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Sample records for pinch theory design

  1. Self-Pinched Transport Theory for the SABRE Ion Diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Dale R.; Olson, Craig L.; Hanson, David L.

    1997-05-01

    In anticipation of a 90 kA 4 MV SABRE ion diode experiment, we have been examining self-pinch transport of ions for application to ion-driven inertial confinement fusion. The Li^+3 beam will exit the diode with a 30-40 mradian divergence and a shallow focusing angle of 75 mradians. The beam is annular with an 4.6-cm inner radius and a 6.8-cm outer radius. Self-pinch theory and simulation predict that large residual currents are possible in 2-20 mtorr argon gas. The simulations suggest that ≈ 50 kA of Li particle current is necessary to contain the beam's transverse momentum. Some non-ideal effects include large beam divergence, large focusing angle and beam annularity. To address these problems, we have been studying the benefits of beam conditioning in the focus region between the diode and the self pinch region after the beam has reached a small radius. We have found some benefit from including a passive conical structure and a low-pressure gas. A significant lens effect can be attained using only the beam fields in vacuum or a low pressure gas. In this configuration, a large focusing force, that keeps the ions off an inner cone and outer wall as the beam converges, has been calculated using the numerical simulation code uc(iprop.) Results from integrated simulation of the condition cell and self-pinch region look encouraging.

  2. Conceptual Design of a Z-Pinch Fusion Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Robert; Polsgrove, Tara; Fincher, Sharon; Fabinski, Leo; Maples, Charlotte; Miernik, Janie; Stratham, Geoffrey; Cassibry, Jason; Cortez, Ross; Turner, Matthew; hide

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews a project that aims to develop a conceptual design for a Z-pinch thruster, that could be applied to develop advanced thruster designs which promise high thrust/high specific impulse propulsion. Overviews shows the concept of the design, which use annular nozzles with deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel and a Lithium mixture as a cathode, Charts show the engine performance as a function of linear mass, nozzle performance (i.e., plasma segment trajectories), and mission analysis for possible Mars and Jupiter missions using this concept for propulsion. Slides show views of the concepts for the vehicle configuration, thrust coil configuration, the power management system, the structural analysis of the magnetic nozzle, the thermal management system, and the avionics suite,

  3. A plasma model for reversed field pinch circuit design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, J. W.

    1981-03-01

    A plasma model has been developed for use in the design of circuits for reversed field pinch experiments. The magnetic field is assumed to evolve through a given series of relaxed states with the plasma resistivity specified as a function of time. At any instant the magnetic field configuration is determined by the field energy and the toroidal flux. If the Bessel function model is chosen as the relaxed state then the magnetic helicity can be used as an alternative to the magnetic energy without altering the results. Simulations of discharges on ZETA and ETA BETA II are presented. By suitable choices of the relaxed field configuration and plasma resistivity it is possible to obtain close agreement with the experimental waveforms. Application to the proposed RFX device is discussed.

  4. Anomalous transport theory for the reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, P.W.; Hegna, C.C; Sovinec, C.R.

    1996-09-01

    Physically motivated transport models with predictive capabilities and significance beyond the reversed field pinch (RFP) are presented. It is shown that the ambipolar constrained electron heat loss observed in MST can be quantitatively modeled by taking account of the clumping in parallel streaming electrons and the resultant self-consistent interaction with collective modes; that the discrete dynamo process is a relaxation oscillation whose dependence on the tearing instability and profile relaxation physics leads to amplitude and period scaling predictions consistent with experiment; that the Lundquist number scaling in relaxed plasmas driven by magnetic turbulence has a weak S{sup {minus}1/4} scaling; andmore » that radial E{times}B shear flow can lead to large reductions in the edge particle flux with little change in the heat flux, as observed in the RFP and tokamak. 24 refs.« less

  5. The design and implementation of a windowing interface pinch force measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Tze-Yee; Chen, Yuanu-Joan; Chung, Chin-Teng; Hsiao, Ming-Heng

    2010-02-01

    This paper presents a novel windowing interface pinch force measurement system that is basically based on an USB (Universal Series Bus) microcontroller which mainly processes the sensing data from the force sensing resistance sensors mounted on five digits. It possesses several friendly functions, such as the value and curve trace of the applied force by a hand injured patient displayed in real time on a monitoring screen, consequently, not only the physician can easily evaluate the effect of hand injury rehabilitation, but also the patients get more progressive during the hand physical therapy by interacting with the screen of pinch force measurement. In order to facilitate the pinch force measurement system and make it friendly, the detail hardware design and software programming flowchart are described in this paper. Through a series of carefully and detailed experimental tests, first of all, the relationship between the applying force and the FSR sensors are measured and verified. Later, the different type of pinch force measurements are verified by the oscilloscope and compared with the corresponding values and waveform traces in the window interface display panel to obtain the consistency. Finally, a windowing interface pinch force measurement system based on the USB microcontroller is implemented and demonstrated. The experimental results show the verification and feasibility of the designed system.

  6. Design and experimental research on a self-magnetic pinch diode under MV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pengfei, ZHANG; Yang, HU; Jiang, SUN; Yan, SONG; Jianfeng, SUN; Zhiming, YAO; Peitian, CONG; Mengtong, QIU; Aici, QIU

    2018-01-01

    A self-magnetic pinch diode (SMPD) integrating an anode foil-reinforced electron beam pinch focus and a small high-dose x-ray spot output was designed and optimized. An x-ray focal spot measuring system was developed in accordance with the principle of pinhole imaging. The designed SMPD and the corresponding measuring system were tested under ∼MV, with 1.75 × 2 mm2 oval x-ray spots (AWE defined) and forward directed dose 1.6 rad at 1 m. Results confirmed that the anode foil can significantly strengthen the electron beam pinch focus, and the focal spot measuring system can collect clear focal spot images. This finding indicated that the principle and method are feasible.

  7. Designs and Plans for MAIZE: a 1 MA LTD-Driven Z-Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilgenbach, R. M.; Gomez, M. R.; Zier, J.; Tang, W.; French, D. M.; Hoff, B. W.; Jordan, N.; Cruz, E.; Lau, Y. Y.; Fowler-Guzzardo, T.; Meisel, J.; Mazarakis, M. G.; Cuneo, M. E.; Johnston, M. D.; Mehlhorn, T. A.; Kim, A. A.; Sinebryukhov, V. A.

    2007-11-01

    We present designs and experimental plans of the first 1 MA z-pinch in the USA to be driven by a Linear Transformer Driver (LTD). The Michigan Accelerator for Inductive Z-pinch Experiments, (MAIZE), is based on the LTD developed at the Institute for High Current Electronics, utilizing 80 capacitors and 40 spark gap switches to deliver a 1 MA, 100 kV pulse with <100 ns risetime. Designs will be presented of a low-inductance MITL terminated in a wire-array z-pinch. Initial, planned experiments will evaluate the LTD driving time-changing inductance of imploding 4-16 wire-array z-pinches. Wire ablation dynamics, axial-correlations and instability development will be explored. *This work was supported by U. S. DoE through Sandia National Laboratories award number 240985 to the University of Michigan. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  8. Recent developments in linear theta-pinch research: experiment and theory

    SciTech Connect

    McKenna, K.F.; Bartsch, R.R.; Commisso, R.J.

    1978-01-01

    High energy plasmas offusion interest can be generated in linear theta pinches. However, end losses present a fundamental limitation on the plasma containment time. This paper discusses recent progress in end-loss and end-stoppering experiments and in the theoretical understanding of linear theta-pinch physics.

  9. Design of Z-Pinch and Dense Plasma Focus Powered Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polsgrove, Tara; Fincher, Sharon; Adams, Robert B.; Cassibry, Jason; Cortez, Ross; Turner, Matthew; Maples, C. Daphne; Miermik, Janie N.; Statham, Geoffrey N.; Fabisinski, Leo; hide

    2011-01-01

    Z-pinch and Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) are two promising techniques for bringing fusion power to the field of in-space propulsion. A design team comprising of engineers and scientists from UAHuntsville, NASA's George C. Marshall Space Flight Center and the University of Wisconsin developed concept vehicles for a crewed round trip mission to Mars and an interstellar precursor mission. Outlined in this paper are vehicle concepts, complete with conceptual analysis of the mission profile, operations, structural and thermal analysis and power/avionics design. Additionally engineering design of the thruster itself is included. The design efforts adds greatly to the fidelity of estimates for power density (alpha) and overall performance for these thruster concepts

  10. Z-Pinch Magneto-Inertial Fusion Propulsion Engine Design Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miernik, Janie H.; Statham, Geoffrey; Adams, Robert B.; Polsgrove, Tara; Fincher, Sharon; Fabisinski, Leo; Maples, C. Dauphne; Percy, Thomas K.; Cortez, Ross J.; Cassibry, Jason

    2011-01-01

    , configuration, and materials of the nozzle must meet many severe requirements. The configuration would focus, in a conical manner, the Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) fuel and Lithium-6/7 liner fluid to meet at a specific point that acts as a cathode so the Li-6 can serve as a current return path to complete the circuit. In addition to serving as a current return path, the Li liner also serves as a radiation shield. The advantage to this configuration is the reaction between neutrons and Li-6 results in the production of additional Tritium, thus adding further fuel to the fusion reaction and boosting the energy output. To understand the applicability of Z-Pinch propulsion to interplanetary travel, it is necessary to design a concept vehicle that uses it. The propulsion system significantly impacts the design of the electrical, thermal control, avionics, radiation shielding, and structural subsystems of a vehicle. The design reference mission is the transport of crew and cargo to Mars and back, with the intention that the vehicle be reused for other missions. Several aspects of this vehicle are based on a previous crewed fusion vehicle study called Human Outer Planet Exploration (HOPE), which employed a Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) propulsion concept. Analysis of this propulsion system concludes that a 40-fold increase of Isp over chemical propulsion is predicted. This along with a greater than 30% predicted payload mass fraction certainly warrants further development of enabling technologies. The vehicle is designed for multiple interplanetary missions and conceivably may be suited for an automated one-way interstellar voyage.

  11. Management Design Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pries-Heje, Jan; Baskerville, Richard L.

    This paper elaborates a design science approach for management planning anchored to the concept of a management design theory. Unlike the notions of design theories arising from information systems, management design theories can appear as a system of technological rules, much as a system of hypotheses or propositions can embody scientific theories. The paper illus trates this form of management design theories with three grounded cases. These grounded cases include a software process improvement study, a user involvement study, and an organizational change study. Collectively these studies demonstrate how design theories founded on technological rules can not only improve the design of information systems, but that these concepts have great practical value for improving the framing of strategic organi zational design decisions about such systems. Each case is either grounded in an empirical sense, that is to say, actual practice, or it is grounded to practices described extensively in the practical literature. Such design theories will help managers more easily approach complex, strategic decisions.

  12. Information Design Theories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettersson, Rune

    2014-01-01

    Information design has practical and theoretical components. As an academic discipline we may view information design as a combined discipline, a practical theory, or as a theoretical practice. So far information design has incorporated facts, influences, methods, practices, principles, processes, strategies, and tools from a large number of…

  13. Comment on ``Turbulent equipartition theory of toroidal momentum pinch'' [Phys. Plasmas 15, 055902 (2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peeters, A. G.; Angioni, C.; Strintzi, D.

    2009-03-01

    The comment addresses questions raised on the derivation of the momentum pinch velocity due to the Coriolis drift effect [A. G. Peeters et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 265003 (2007)]. These concern the definition of the gradient, and the scaling with the density gradient length. It will be shown that the turbulent equipartition mechanism is included within the derivation using the Coriolis drift, with the density gradient scaling being the consequence of drift terms not considered in [T. S. Hahm et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 055902 (2008)]. Finally the accuracy of the analytic models is assessed through a comparison with the full gyrokinetic solution.

  14. Two Theories of Design and Instructional Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tripp, Steven D.

    This paper address three questions: (1) What is the nature of design? (2) How do skilled designers function? and (3) Can a theory of design be constructed which will allow novice and expert instructional designers to perform their tasks more efficiently and effectively? It begins by presenting two general theories of design: Simon's conception of…

  15. Optimization of K-shell emission in aluminum z-pinch implosions: Theory versus experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, K. G.; Thornhill, J. W.; Giuliani, J. L.; Davis, J.; Miles, L. A.; Nolting, E. E.; Kenyon, V. L.; Speicer, W. A.; Draper, J. A.; Parsons, C. R.; Dang, P.; Spielman, R. B.; Nash, T. J.; McGurn, J. S.; Ruggles, L. E.; Deeney, C.; Prasad, R. R.; Warren, L.

    1994-09-01

    Two sets of z-pinch experiments were recently completed at the Saturn and Phoenix facilities of Sandia National Laboratories and the Naval Surface Warfare Center, respectively, using aluminum wire arrays of different wire and array diameters. Measurements of the total x-ray yield from the K shell of aluminum were made. In this paper, a comparison of these measurements is made to both theoretical predictions and to a similar set of earlier measurements that were made at the Double Eagle facility of Physics International Company. These three sets of yield measurements have points of agreement with predicted yields and with each other, but they also show points of mutual disagreement, whose significance is discussed. The data are analyzed using a slightly revised version of a previously published K-shell yield scaling law, and they support the existence of a reasonably well defined region in (load mass)-(implosion velocity) space in which plasma kinetic energy is efficiently converted into K-shell x rays. Furthermore, a correlation is observed between the inferred conversion efficiencies and the times in which the implosions occur relative to the times when each generator's short-circuit current reaches its peak value. Finally, unlike the Double Eagle experiments, the largest measured yields in the new experiments were observed to occur at the upper velocity boundary of the efficient emission region. Moreover, the observed yields are in fairly good quantitative agreement with an earlier scaling law prediction of the maximum K-shell x-ray yield from aluminum as a function of load mass assuming kinetic energy conversion alone.

  16. CUSP-PINCH DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.; Watteau, J.P.H.

    1962-06-01

    An ion-electron plasma heating device of the pinch tube class is designed with novel means for counteracting the instabilities of an ordinary linear pinch discharge. A plasma-forming discharge is created between two spacedapart coaxial electiodes through a gas such as deuterium. A pair of spaced coaxial magnetic field coils encircle the discharge and carry opposing currents so that a magnetic field having a cuspate configuration is created around the plasma, the field being formed after the plasma has been established but before significant instability arises. Thus, containment time is increased and intensified heating is obtained. In addition to the pinch compression heating additional heating is obtained by high-frequency magnetic field modulation. (AEC)

  17. Theory of formation of helical structures in a perfectly conducting, premagnetized Z-pinch liner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Edmund; Velikovich, Alexander; Peterson, Kyle

    2014-10-01

    The magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) concept uses an azimuthal magnetic field to collapse a thick metallic liner containing preheated fusion fuel. A critical component of the concept is an axial magnetic field, permeating both the fuel and surrounding liner, which reduces the compression necessary to achieve fusion conditions. Recent experiments demonstrate that a liner premagnetized with a 10 T axial field develops helical structures with a pitch significantly larger than an estimate of Bz /Bθ would suggest. The cause of the helical perturbations is still not understood. In this work, we present an analytic, linear theory in which we model the liner as a perfectly conducting metal, and study how bumps and divots on its surface redirect current flow, resulting in perturbations to B as well as j × B . We show that in the presence of axial and azimuthal magnetic field, the theory predicts divots will grow and deform at an angle determined by the magnetic field. We compare theoretical results with three dimensional, resistive MHD simulations. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the National Nuclear Security Administration under DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  18. The Physics of the Dense Z-Pinch in Theory and in Experiment With Application to Fusion Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, M. G.

    1982-01-01

    A new generation of Z-pinches employing high voltage, high current pulsed lines as power sources produce dense hot plasmas with enhanced stability properties. Three methods of Z-pinch formation are currently in use: (1) cylindrical collapse and compression of a pre-ionised gas; (2) laser initiation and Joule heating of a gas embedded pinch, and (3) hollow gas puff and subsequent collapse to the axis. The first method shows no dynamic bounce and no instability over about ten radial Alfvén transit times. The laser initiated Z-pinch shows benign helical structures, whilst the gas puff experiments are known for their high X-ray energy conversion associated with m = 0 instabilities. The first two experimental conditions are relevant for fusion. A calculation of energy balance for satisfying Lawson conditions with axial and radial energy losses and radiation loss shows that a current I of ~ 106 A and a line density N of 6 × 1018m-1 are required. This leads to two coincidences of physical quantities that are very favourable for controlled fusion. The first is that at this line density and under pressure balance the ratio of the ion Larmor radius to pinch radius is of order 1 so that a marked stabilisation of the configuration is expected. The second coincidence is that the current is only just below the Pease-Braginskii limit; this will permit the possibility of radiative collapse to attain the high density (~ 4 × 1027 m-3) and small radius (~ 20 μm) required for a compact (0.1 m long) discharge. The confining self-magnetic field is 104 T, the confinement time ~ 100 ns, and a matrix of pulsed discharges is envisaged in a moderator and breeding medium which does not have the wall-loading limitations of tokamaks.

  19. Pinch current limitation effect in plasma focus

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; Saw, S. H.; INTI International University College, 71800 Nilai

    The Lee model couples the electrical circuit with plasma focus dynamics, thermodynamics, and radiation. It is used to design and simulate experiments. A beam-target mechanism is incorporated, resulting in realistic neutron yield scaling with pinch current and increasing its versatility for investigating all Mather-type machines. Recent runs indicate a previously unsuspected 'pinch current limitation' effect. The pinch current does not increase beyond a certain value however low the static inductance is reduced to. The results indicate that decreasing the present static inductance of the PF1000 machine will neither increase the pinch current nor the neutron yield, contrary to expectations.

  20. Aerodynamic design via control theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, Antony

    1988-01-01

    The question of how to modify aerodynamic design in order to improve performance is addressed. Representative examples are given to demonstrate the computational feasibility of using control theory for such a purpose. An introduction and historical survey of the subject is included.

  1. Gestalt Theory and Instructional Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Patrick; Fitz, Chad

    1993-01-01

    Offers a brief overview of Gestalt theory. Shows how six Gestalt principles (proximity, closure, symmetry, figure-ground segregation, good continuation, and similarity) can be applied to improve a reader's comprehension of a badly designed instruction module that uses several graphics. (SR)

  2. STABILIZED PINCH MACHINE

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, O.A.

    1962-04-24

    A device for heating and confining a high temperature gas or plasma utilizing the linear pinch effect is described. The pinch discharge produced is the form of an elongated cylinder. The electrical discharge current is returned in parallel along an axial and a concentric conductor whereby the magnetic field of the conductors compresses and stabilizes the pinch discharge against lateral instability. (AEC)

  3. Antenna theory: Analysis and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balanis, C. A.

    The book's main objective is to introduce the fundamental principles of antenna theory and to apply them to the analysis, design, and measurements of antennas. In a description of antennas, the radiation mechanism is discussed along with the current distribution on a thin wire. Fundamental parameters of antennas are examined, taking into account the radiation pattern, radiation power density, radiation intensity, directivity, numerical techniques, gain, antenna efficiency, half-power beamwidth, beam efficiency, bandwidth, polarization, input impedance, and antenna temperature. Attention is given to radiation integrals and auxiliary potential functions, linear wire antennas, loop antennas, linear and circular arrays, self- and mutual impedances of linear elements and arrays, broadband dipoles and matching techniques, traveling wave and broadband antennas, frequency independent antennas and antenna miniaturization, the geometrical theory of diffraction, horns, reflectors and lens antennas, antenna synthesis and continuous sources, and antenna measurements.

  4. Characterization of laser-cut copper foil X-pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, G. W.; Valenzuela, J. C.; Hansen, S. B.; Wei, M. S.; Reed, C. T.; Forsman, A. C.; Beg, F. N.

    2016-10-01

    Quantitative data analyses of laser-cut Cu foil X-pinch experiments on the 150 ns quarter-period, ˜250 kA GenASIS driver are presented. Three different foil designs are tested to determine the effects of initial structure on pinch outcome. Foil X-pinch data are also presented alongside the results from wire X-pinches with comparable mass. The X-ray flux and temporal profile of the emission from foil X-pinches differed significantly from that of wire X-pinches, with all emission from the foil X-pinches confined to a ˜3 ns period as opposed to the delayed, long-lasting electron beam emission common in wire X-pinches. Spectroscopic data show K-shell as well as significant L-shell emission from both foil and wire X-pinches. Fits to synthetic spectra using the SCRAM code suggest that pinching foil X's produced a ˜1 keV, ne ≥ 1023 cm-3 plasma. The spectral data combined with the improved reliability of the source timing, flux, and location indicate that foil X-pinches generate a reproducible, K-shell point-projection radiography source that can be easily modified and tailored to suit backlighting needs across a variety of applications.

  5. Applying circuit theory for corridor expansion and management at regional scales: tiling, pinch points, and omnidirectional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, David; Clark, Melissa; Anderson, Mark G; Rayfield, Bronwyn; Wulder, Michael A; Cardille, Jeffrey A

    2014-01-01

    Connectivity models are useful tools that improve the ability of researchers and managers to plan land use for conservation and preservation. Most connectivity models function in a point-to-point or patch-to-patch fashion, limiting their use for assessing connectivity over very large areas. In large or highly fragmented systems, there may be so many habitat patches of interest that assessing connectivity among all possible combinations is prohibitive. To overcome these conceptual and practical limitations, we hypothesized that minor adaptation of the Circuitscape model can allow the creation of omnidirectional connectivity maps illustrating flow paths and variations in the ease of travel across a large study area. We tested this hypothesis in a 24,300 km(2) study area centered on the Montérégie region near Montréal, Québec. We executed the circuit model in overlapping tiles covering the study region. Current was passed across the surface of each tile in orthogonal directions, and then the tiles were reassembled to create directional and omnidirectional maps of connectivity. The resulting mosaics provide a continuous view of connectivity in the entire study area at the full original resolution. We quantified differences between mosaics created using different tile and buffer sizes and developed a measure of the prominence of seams in mosaics formed with this approach. The mosaics clearly show variations in current flow driven by subtle aspects of landscape composition and configuration. Shown prominently in mosaics are pinch points, narrow corridors where organisms appear to be required to traverse when moving through the landscape. Using modest computational resources, these continuous, fine-scale maps of nearly unlimited size allow the identification of movement paths and barriers that affect connectivity. This effort develops a powerful new application of circuit models by pinpointing areas of importance for conservation, broadening the potential for

  6. "Marginal pinching" in soap films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aradian, A.; Raphaël, E.; de Gennes, P.-G.

    2001-09-01

    We discuss the behaviour of a thin soap film facing a frame element: the pressure in the Plateau border around the frame is lower than the film pressure, and the film thins out over a certain distance λ(t), due to the formation of a well-localized pinched region of thickness h(t) and extension w(t). We construct a hydrodynamic theory for this thinning process, assuming a constant surface tension: Marangoni effects are probably important only at late stages, where instabilities set in. We find λ(t) ~ t1/4, and for the pinch dimensions, h(t) ~ t-1/2 and w(t) ~ t-1/4. These results may play a useful role for the discussion of later instabilities leading to a global film thinning and drainage, as first discussed by K. Mysels under the name "marginal regeneration".

  7. 2D Kinetic Particle in Cell Simulations of a Shear-Flow Stabilized Z-Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tummel, Kurt; Higginson, Drew; Schmidt, Andrea; Link, Anthony; McLean, Harry; Shumlak, Uri; Nelson, Brian; Golingo, Raymond; Claveau, Elliot; Lawrence Livermore National Lab Team; University of Washington Team

    2016-10-01

    The Z-pinch is a relatively simple and attractive potential fusion reactor design, but attempts to develop such a reactor have consistently struggled to overcome Z-pinch instabilities. The ``sausage'' and ``kink'' modes are among the most robust and prevalent Z-pinch instabilities, but theory and simulations suggest that axial flow-shear, dvz / dr ≠ 0 , can suppress these modes. Experiments have confirmed that Z-pinch plasmas with embedded axial flow-shear display a significantly enhanced resilience to the sausage and kink modes at a demonstration current of 50kAmps. A new experiment is under way to test the concept at higher current, and efforts to model these plasmas are being expanded. The performance and stability of these devices will depend on features like the plasma viscosity, anomalous resistivity, and finite Larmor radius effects, which are most accurately characterized in kinetic models. To predict these features, kinetic simulations using the particle in cell code LSP are now in development, and initial benchmarking and 2D stability analyses of the sausage mode are presented here. These results represent the first kinetic modeling of the flow-shear stabilized Z-pinch. This work is funded by the USDOE/ARPAe Alpha Program. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  8. Polytropic scaling of a flow Z-pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, M. C.; Shumlak, U.; Nelson, B. A.; Golingo, R. P.; Claveau, E. L.; Doty, S. A.; Forbes, E. G.; Kim, B.; Ross, M. P.; Weed, J. R.

    2015-11-01

    The ZaP Flow Z-Pinch project investigates the use of velocity shear to mitigate MHD instabilities. The ZaP-HD experiment produces 50 cm long pinches of varying radii. The power to the experiment is split between the plasma formation and acceleration process and the pinch assembly and compression process. Once the pinch is formed, low magnetic fluctuations indicate a quiescent, long-lived pinch. The split power supply allows more control of the pinch current than previous machine iterations, with a designed range from 50 to 150 kA. Radial force balance leads to the Bennett relation which indicates that as the pinch compresses due to increasing currents, the plasma pressure and/or linear density must change. Through ion spectroscopy and digital holographic interferometry coupled with magnetic measurements of the pinch current, the components of the Bennett relation can be fully measured. A scaling relation is then assumed to follow a polytrope as the pinch pressure, initially approximately 250 kPa, increases from an initially formed state to much higher values, approaching 100 MPa. A preliminary analysis of pinch scaling is shown corroborating with other diagnostics on the machine along with extrapolations to required currents for an HEDLP machine. This work is supported by grants from the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration.

  9. Design 2000: Theory-Based Design Models of the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richey, Rita C.

    The influence of theory on instructional-design models of the future is explored on the basis of the theoretical developments of today. Anticipated model changes are expected to result from disparate theoretical thinking in areas such as chaos theory, constructivism, situated learning, cognitive-learning theory, and general systems theory.…

  10. Using 1D theory to understand 3D stagnation of a wire-array Z pinch in the absence of radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Edmund

    2015-11-01

    Many high-energy-density systems implode towards the axis of symmetry, where it collides on itself, forming a hot plasma. However, experiments show these imploding plasmas develop three-dimensional (3D) structures. As a result, the plasma cannot completely dissipate its kinetic energy at stagnation, instead retaining significant 3D flow. A useful tool for understanding the effects of this residual flow is 3D simulation, but the amount and complexity of information can be daunting. To address this problem, we explore the connection between 3D simulation and one-dimensional (1D) theory. Such a connection, if it exists, is mutually beneficial: 1D theory can provide a clear picture of the underlying dynamics of 3D stagnation. On the other hand, deviations between theory and simulation suggest how 1D theory must be modified to account for 3D effects. In this work, we focus on a 3D, magnetohydrodynamic simulation of a compact wire-array Z pinch. To provide a simpler background against which to test our ideas, we artificially turn off radiation during the stagnation phase. Examination of the initial accumulation of mass on axis reveals oblique collision between jets, shock accretion, and vortex formation. Despite evidence for shock-dominated stagnation, a 1D shockless stagnation solution is more appropriate for describing the global dynamics, in that it reproduces the increase of on-axis density with time. However, the 1D solution must be modified to account for 3D effects: the flows suggest enhanced thermal transport as well as centrifugal force. Upon reaching peak compression, the stagnation transitions to a second phase, in which the high-pressure core on axis expands outward into the remaining imploding plasma. During this phase, a 1D shock solution describes the growth of the shock accretion region, as well as the decrease of on-axis density with time. However, the effect of 3D flows is still present: the on-axis temperature does not cool during expansion, which

  11. Self-pinched transport for ion-driven inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, D.R.; Olson, C.L.

    Efficient transport of intense ion beams is necessary for ion-driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The self-pinched transport scheme involves the focusing of an ion beam to a radius of about 1 cm or less. At this radius, using the beam`s self-magnetic field for confinement, the ion beam propagates through the reactor chamber to an ICF target. A promising regime for self-pinched transport involves the injection of a high current beam into an initially neutral gas at about 200 mTorr less. A simple equilibrium theory of a beam with a temporally pinching radial envelope predicts that large confining magnetic fields aremore » possible with net currents of more than 50% of the beam current. The magnitude of these fields is strongly dependent on the rate of ionization of the given ion species. The authors have simulated ion-beam propagation, using the hybrid code IPROP, which self-consistently calculates the gas breakdown and electromagnetic fields. In agreement, with the theory, a propagation window of 20-200 mTorr of argon is calculated for a 50 kA, 5 MeV proton beam similar to the parameters of the SABRE accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories. The authors present simulations of the focusing and propagation of the SABRE beam, with the purpose of designing a self-pinch experiment.« less

  12. General Systems Theory and Instructional Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salisbury, David F.

    The use of general systems theory in the field of instructional systems design (ISD) is explored in this paper. Drawing on work by Young, the writings of 12 representative ISD writers and researchers were surveyed to determine the use of 60 general systems theory concepts by the individual authors. The average number of concepts used by these…

  13. Organization Theory: Implications for Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, David A.

    1979-01-01

    This paper outlines the possibilities for scientific inquiry into the design of the university organization structure. In a theoretical context, bureaucratic management techniques were not refined enough to apply to university structures until the mid-twentieth century. Universities today are bureaucracies in that they have a formal division of…

  14. Self-pinched lithium beam transport experiments on SABRE

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, D.L.; Olson, C.L.; Poukey, J.W.

    Self-pinched transport of ion beams has many advantages for ion-driven ICF applications involving high yield and energy production. The authors are currently preparing for a self-pinched lithium beam transport experiment on the SABRE accelerator. There are three transport elements that must eventually be demonstrated: (1) efficient lithium beam generation and ballistic transport to a focus at the self-pinched transport channel entrance; (2) self-pinched transport in the channel, requiring optimized injection conditions and gas breakdown; and (3) self-pinched transport of the equilibrated beam from the channel into free space, with associated aiming and stability considerations. In the present experiment, a hollowmore » annular lithium beam from an applied-B extraction ion diode will be focused to small radius (r {le} 2 cm) in a 60 cm long ballistic focus section containing argon gas at a pressure of a few Torr. The self-pinched transport channel will contain a low pressure background gas of 10--40 mTorr argon to allow sufficient net current to confine the beam for long distance transport. IPROP simulations are in progress to optimize the design of the ballistic and self-pinched transport sections. Progress on preparation of this lithium self-pinched transport experiment, including a discussion of transport system design, important gas breakdown issues, and diagnostics, will be presented.« less

  15. Pin-Ching Maness | NREL

    Science.gov Websites

    Pin-Ching Maness Photo of Pin-Ching Maness Pin-Ching Maness Group Research Manager III-Molecular University, 1974 Professional Experience Principal Group Manager, Photobiology Group, National Renewable in Rubrivivax gelatinosus," PLOS ONE (2014) Illustration of a model of carbon monoxide and

  16. Depletion zones and crystallography on pinched spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jingyuan; Xing, Xiangjun; Yao, Zhenwei

    2018-03-01

    Understanding the interplay between ordered structures and substrate curvature is an interesting problem with versatile applications, including functionalization of charged supramolecular surfaces and modern microfluidic technologies. In this work, we investigate the two-dimensional packing structures of charged particles confined on a pinched sphere. By continuously pinching the sphere, we observe cleavage of elongated scars into pleats, proliferation of disclinations, and subsequently, emergence of a depletion zone at the negatively curved waist that is completely void of particles. We systematically study the geometrics and energetics of the depletion zone, and reveal its physical origin as a finite size effect, due to the interplay between Coulomb repulsion and concave geometry of the pinched sphere. These results further our understanding of crystallography on curved surfaces, and have implications in design and manipulation of charged, deformable interfaces in various applications.

  17. Application of theory to propeller design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, G. G.; Morgan, W. B.

    1974-01-01

    The various theories concerning propeller design are discussed. The use of digital computers to obtain specific blade shapes to meet appropriate flow conditions is emphasized. The development of lifting-line and lifting surface configurations is analyzed. Ship propulsive performance and basic propeller design considerations are investigated. The characteristics of supercavitating propellers are compared with those of subcavitating propellers.

  18. General process improvements through pinch technology

    SciTech Connect

    Linnhoff, B.; Polley, G.T.; Sahdev, V.

    1988-06-01

    Over the last ten years pinch technology has emerged as somewhat of a ''maverick'' development in the process design and energy conservation scene. Running contrary to general trends by taking the computer out of the loop and putting the engineer back in control, it has been questioned by some and welcomed by others. Regardless of persuasion, however, critics and advocates alike have largely failed to notice that pinch technology is more than an energy conservation tool. This is probably because soon after the advent of pinch technology in the 1970s, the process design scene became dominated by the oil crisis.more » Energy savings became the primary task of process designers and, therefore, the primary focus of the technology. Application during this period typically demonstrated energy cost savings in the range of 20 to 50 percent and payback periods of one year or less. Only recently have the other benefits of the technology reemerged. While it is true that pinch technology is essentially a heat-flow-based technique it is also true that it can be used to address a very diverse range of objectives.« less

  19. Toward a Theory of Representation Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-01

    understanding. This report describes research done at the Artificial Inteligence Laboratory of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Support for this...AD-A210 885 Technical Report 1128 Toward a Theory of Representation Design Jeffrey Van Baale MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory DTIC ELECTE A... Artificial Intelligence Laboratory 545 Technology Square Cambridge, MA 02139 11. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 11. REPORT DATE Advanced Research

  20. General Systems Theory and Instructional Systems Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salisbury, David F.

    1990-01-01

    Describes basic concepts in the field of general systems theory (GST) and identifies commonalities that exist between GST and instructional systems design (ISD). Models and diagrams that depict system elements in ISD are presented, and two matrices that show how GST has been used in ISD literature are included. (11 references) (LRW)

  1. Deconstruction and Graphic Design: History Meets Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lupton, Ellen; Miller, J. Abbott

    1994-01-01

    Considers the reception and use of deconstruction in the recent history of graphic design. Considers the place of graphics within the theory of deconstruction in the work of philosopher Jacques Derrida. Argues that deconstruction is not a style but a mode of questioning through and about the technologies, formal devices, social institutions and…

  2. Fusion in a staged Z-pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessel, F. J.; Rahman, H. U.; Ney, P.; Valenzuela, J.; Beg, F.; McKee, E.; Darling, T.

    2016-03-01

    This paper is dedicated to Norman Rostoker, our (FJW and HUR) mentor and long-term collaborator, who will always be remembered for the incredible inspiration that he has provided us. Norman's illustrious career dealt with a broad range of fundamental-physics problems and we were fortunate to have worked with him on many important topics: intense-charged-particle beams, field-reversed configurations, and Z-pinches. Rostoker 's group at the University of CA, Irvine was well known for having implemented many refinements to the Z-pinch, that make it more stable, scalable, and efficient, including the development of: the gas-puff Z-pinch [1], which provides for the use of an expanded range of pinch-load materials; the gas-mixture Z-pinch [2], which enhances the pinch stability and increases its radiation efficiency; e-beam pre-ionization [3], which enhances the uniformity of the initial-breakdown process in a gas pinch; magnetic-flux-compression [4, 5], which allows for the amplification of an axial-magnetic field Bz; the Z-θ pinch [6], which predicts fusion in a pinch-on-fiber configuration; the Staged Z-pinch (SZP) [7], which allows for the amplification of the pinch self-magnetic field, Bθ , in addition to a Bz, and leads to a stable implosion and high-gain fusion [8, 9, 10]. This paper describes the physical basis for a magneto-inertial compression in a liner-on-target SZP [11]. Initially a high-atomic-number liner implodes under the action of the J →×B → , Lorentz Force. As the implosion becomes super Alfvénic, magnetosonic waves form, transporting current and magnetic field through the liner toward the interface of the low-atomic-number target. The target implosion remains subsonic with its surface bounded by a stable-shock front. Shock waves that pass into the target provide a source of target plasma pre-heat. At peak compression the assembly is compressed by liner inertia, with flux compression producing an intense-magnetic field near the target

  3. Application of Theodorsen's Theory to Propeller Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crigler, John L

    1948-01-01

    A theoretical analysis is presented for obtaining by use of Theodorsen's propeller theory the load distribution along a propeller radius to give the optimum propeller efficiency for any design condition.The efficiencies realized by designing for the optimum load distribution are given in graphs, and the optimum efficiency for any design condition may be read directly from the graph without any laborious calculations. Examples are included to illustrate the method of obtaining the optimum load distributions for both single-rotating and dual-rotating propellers.

  4. Application of Theodorsen's theory to propeller design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crigler, John L

    1949-01-01

    A theoretical analysis is presented for obtaining, by use of Theodorsen's propeller theory, the load distribution along a propeller radius to give the optimum propeller efficiency for any design condition. The efficiencies realized by designing for the optimum load distribution are given in graphs, and the optimum efficiency for any design condition may be read directly from the graph without any laborious calculations. Examples are included to illustrate the method of obtaining the optimum load distributions for both single-rotating and dual-rotating propellers.

  5. Pulsed Flow Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, Charles

    2005-10-01

    Formation of a Pulsed Flow Pinch is discussed, based on 2-D, MHD numerical calculations. The PFP utilizes the observed stable, Btheta magnetic ``bubble'' which propagates from breach to muzzle during the run-down phase of the coaxial Marshall gun. We consider two ways of launching a PFP onto a fiber or cylindrical gas cloud: 1) by propagating the bubble to small radius along an exponentially-decreasing-radius center conductor and, 2) by a radial launch to form reflex PFP's propagating in opposite directions along a fiber. We show that the bubble velocity increases to high values as the radius is decreased making the rise time of Btheta at an axial point very short. A bubble, launched into uniform gas is found to undergo unstable pinching of the front. Results will be presented of calculations of a PFP driven, neutron-producing, snow-plow pinch. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  6. Z-Pinch Fusion Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miernik, Janie

    2011-01-01

    Fusion-based nuclear propulsion has the potential to enable fast interplanetary transportation. Shorter trips are better for humans in the harmful radiation environment of deep space. Nuclear propulsion and power plants can enable high Ispand payload mass fractions because they require less fuel mass. Fusion energy research has characterized the Z-Pinch dense plasma focus method. (1) Lightning is form of pinched plasma electrical discharge phenomena. (2) Wire array Z-Pinch experiments are commonly studied and nuclear power plant configurations have been proposed. (3) Used in the field of Nuclear Weapons Effects (NWE) testing in the defense industry, nuclear weapon x-rays are simulated through Z-Pinch phenomena.

  7. Theory and design of electrical rotating machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, W. J., Jr.

    1980-04-01

    The objective of this program was to contribute toward new and improved rotating machines for Naval applications, with emphasis on superconducting machinery. Work has been performed on the theory of ac losses in multifilament superconductors and experiments were made to check the theory. A list of publications and abstracts of scientific papers published under the contract is given, and a review is given of the theory of losses. A macroscopic theory for superconductivity in multifilament superconductors was developed, and the theory was used to calculate the hysteresis and eddy current losses which occur in the presence of changing magnetic fields. Both the transverse field and the longitudinal field cases were considered, and also the self-field loss of an alternating transport current, along with some examples of the combined loss due to alternating applied field and transport current. The results are useful for the design of superconducting devices, such as superconducting motors and generators. A small amount of additional work was done on studies of novel homo- and heteropolar motors.

  8. Z-Pinch Pulsed Plasma Propulsion Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polsgrove, Tara; Adams, Robert B.; Fabisinski, Leo; Fincher, Sharon; Maples, C. Dauphne; Miernik, Janie; Percy, Tom; Statham, Geoff; Turner, Matt; Cassibry, Jason; hide

    2010-01-01

    Fusion-based propulsion can enable fast interplanetary transportation. Magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) is an approach which has been shown to potentially lead to a low cost, small reactor for fusion break even. The Z-Pinch/dense plasma focus method is an MIF concept in which a column of gas is compressed to thermonuclear conditions by an axial current (I approximates 100 MA). Recent advancements in experiments and the theoretical understanding of this concept suggest favorable scaling of fusion power output yield as I(sup 4). This document presents a conceptual design of a Z-Pinch fusion propulsion system and a vehicle for human exploration. The purpose of this study is to apply Z-Pinch fusion principles to the design of a propulsion system for an interplanetary spacecraft. This study took four steps in service of that objective; these steps are identified below. 1. Z-Pinch Modeling and Analysis: There is a wealth of literature characterizing Z-Pinch physics and existing Z-Pinch physics models. In order to be useful in engineering analysis, simplified Z-Pinch fusion thermodynamic models are required to give propulsion engineers the quantity of plasma, plasma temperature, rate of expansion, etc. The study team developed these models in this study. 2. Propulsion Modeling and Analysis: While the Z-Pinch models characterize the fusion process itself, propulsion models calculate the parameters that characterize the propulsion system (thrust, specific impulse, etc.) The study team developed a Z-Pinch propulsion model and used it to determine the best values for pulse rate, amount of propellant per pulse, and mixture ratio of the D-T and liner materials as well as the resulting thrust and specific impulse of the system. 3. Mission Analysis: Several potential missions were studied. Trajectory analysis using data from the propulsion model was used to determine the duration of the propulsion burns, the amount of propellant expended to complete each mission considered. 4

  9. PINCHED PLASMA REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, J.A.; Suydam, R.; Tuck, J.L.

    1961-07-01

    BS>A plasma confining and heating reactor is described which has the form of a torus with a B/sub 2/ producing winding on the outside of the torus and a helical winding of insulated overlapping tunns on the inside of the torus. The inner helical winding performs the double function of shielding the plasma from the vitreous container and generating a second B/sub z/ field in the opposite direction to the first B/sub z/ field after the pinch is established.

  10. Theoretical z -pinch scaling relations for thermonuclear-fusion experiments.

    PubMed

    Stygar, W A; Cuneo, M E; Vesey, R A; Ives, H C; Mazarakis, M G; Chandler, G A; Fehl, D L; Leeper, R J; Matzen, M K; McDaniel, D H; McGurn, J S; McKenney, J L; Muron, D J; Olson, C L; Porter, J L; Ramirez, J J; Seamen, J F; Speas, C S; Spielman, R B; Struve, K W; Torres, J A; Waisman, E M; Wagoner, T C; Gilliland, T L

    2005-08-01

    We have developed wire-array z -pinch scaling relations for plasma-physics and inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) experiments. The relations can be applied to the design of z -pinch accelerators for high-fusion-yield (approximately 0.4 GJ/shot) and inertial-fusion-energy (approximately 3 GJ/shot) research. We find that (delta(a)/delta(RT)) proportional (m/l)1/4 (Rgamma)(-1/2), where delta(a) is the imploding-sheath thickness of a wire-ablation-dominated pinch, delta(RT) is the sheath thickness of a Rayleigh-Taylor-dominated pinch, m is the total wire-array mass, l is the axial length of the array, R is the initial array radius, and gamma is a dimensionless functional of the shape of the current pulse that drives the pinch implosion. When the product Rgamma is held constant the sheath thickness is, at sufficiently large values of m/l, determined primarily by wire ablation. For an ablation-dominated pinch, we estimate that the peak radiated x-ray power P(r) proportional (I/tau(i))(3/2)Rlphigamma, where I is the peak pinch current, tau(i) is the pinch implosion time, and phi is a dimensionless functional of the current-pulse shape. This scaling relation is consistent with experiment when 13 MA < or = I < or = 20 MA, 93 ns < or = tau(i) < or = 169 ns, 10 mm < or = R < or = 20 mm, 10 mm < or = l < or = 20 mm, and 2.0 mg/cm < or = m/l < or = 7.3 mg/cm. Assuming an ablation-dominated pinch and that Rlphigamma is held constant, we find that the x-ray-power efficiency eta(x) congruent to P(r)/P(a) of a coupled pinch-accelerator system is proportional to (tau(i)P(r)(7/9 ))(-1), where P(a) is the peak accelerator power. The pinch current and accelerator power required to achieve a given value of P(r) are proportional to tau(i), and the requisite accelerator energy E(a) is proportional to tau2(i). These results suggest that the performance of an ablation-dominated pinch, and the efficiency of a coupled pinch-accelerator system, can be improved substantially by decreasing the

  11. A Reactor Development Scenario for the FuZE Sheared-Flow Stabilized Z-pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, Harry S.; Higginson, D. P.; Schmidt, A.; Tummel, K. K.; Shumlak, U.; Nelson, B. A.; Claveau, E. L.; Forbes, E. G.; Golingo, R. P.; Stepanov, A. D.; Weber, T. R.; Zhang, Y.

    2017-10-01

    We present a conceptual design, scaling calculations, and development path for a pulsed fusion reactor based on a flow-stabilized Z-pinch. Experiments performed on the ZaP and ZaP-HD devices have largely demonstrated the basic physics of sheared-flow stabilization at pinch currents up to 100 kA. Initial experiments on the FuZE device, a high-power upgrade of ZaP, have achieved 20 usec of stability at pinch current 100-200 kA and pinch diameter few mm for a pinch length of 50 cm. Scaling calculations based on a quasi-steady-state power balance show that extending stable duration to 100 usec at a pinch current of 1.5 MA and pinch length of 50 cm, results in a reactor plant Q 5. Future performance milestones are proposed for pinch currents of: 300 kA, where Te and Ti are calculated to exceed 1-2 keV; 700 kA, where DT fusion power would be expected to exceed pinch input power; and 1 MA, where fusion energy per pulse exceeds input energy per pulse. This work funded by USDOE ARPA-E and performed under the auspices of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-734770.

  12. Functional sensibility assessment. Part II: Effects of sensory improvement on precise pinch force modulation after transverse carpal tunnel release.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsiu-Yun; Kuo, Li-Chieh; Chiu, Haw-Yen; Jou, I-Ming; Su, Fong-Chin

    2009-11-01

    Patients with median nerve compression at the carpal tunnel often have poor sensory afferents. Without adequate sensory modulation control, these patients frequently exhibit clumsy performance and excessive force output in the affected hand. We analyzed precision grip function after the sensory recovery of patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) who underwent carpal tunnel release (CTR). Thirteen CTS patients were evaluated using a custom-designed pinch device and conventional sensory tools before and after CTR to measure sensibility, maximum pinch strength, and anticipated pinch force adjustments to movement-induced load fluctuations in a pinch-holding-up activity. Based on these tests, five force-related parameters and sensory measurements were used to determine improvements in pinch performance after sensory recovery. The force ratio between the exerted pinch force and maximum load force of the lifting object was used to determine pinch force coordination and to prove that CTR enabled precision motor output. The magnitude of peak pinch force indicated an economic force output during manipulations following CTR. The peak pinch force, force ratio, and percentage of maximum pinch force also demonstrated a moderate correlation with the Semmes-Weinstein test. Analysis of these tests revealed that improved sensory function helped restore patients' performance in precise pinch force control evaluations. These results suggest that sensory information plays an important role in adjusting balanced force output in dexterous manipulation. (c) 2009 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Scaling of X pinches from 1 MA to 6 MA.

    SciTech Connect

    Bland, Simon Nicholas; McBride, Ryan D.; Wenger, David Franklin

    This final report for Project 117863 summarizes progress made toward understanding how X-pinch load designs scale to high currents. The X-pinch load geometry was conceived in 1982 as a method to study the formation and properties of bright x-ray spots in z-pinch plasmas. X-pinch plasmas driven by 0.2 MA currents were found to have source sizes of 1 micron, temperatures >1 keV, lifetimes of 10-100 ps, and densities >0.1 times solid density. These conditions are believed to result from the direct magnetic compression of matter. Physical models that capture the behavior of 0.2 MA X pinches predict more extreme parametersmore » at currents >1 MA. This project developed load designs for up to 6 MA on the SATURN facility and attempted to measure the resulting plasma parameters. Source sizes of 5-8 microns were observed in some cases along with evidence for high temperatures (several keV) and short time durations (<500 ps).« less

  14. Combined linear theory/impact theory method for analysis and design of high speed configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooke, D.; Vondrasek, D. V.

    1980-01-01

    Pressure distributions on a wing body at Mach 4.63 are calculated. The combined theory is shown to give improved predictions over either linear theory or impact theory alone. The combined theory is also applied in the inverse design mode to calculate optimum camber slopes at Mach 4.63. Comparisons with optimum camber slopes obtained from unmodified linear theory show large differences. Analysis of the results indicate that the combined theory correctly predicts the effect of thickness on the loading distributions at high Mach numbers, and that finite thickness wings optimized at high Mach numbers using unmodified linear theory will not achieve the minimum drag characteristics for which they are designed.

  15. Overview of the Fusion Z-Pinch Experiment FuZE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, T. R.; Shumlak, U.; Nelson, B. A.; Golingo, R. P.; Claveau, E. L.; McLean, H. S.; Tummel, K. K.; Higginson, D. P.; Schmidt, A. E.; UW/LLNL Team

    2016-10-01

    Previously, the ZaP device, at the University of Washington, demonstrated sheared flow stabilized (SFS) Z-pinch plasmas. Instabilities that have historically plagued Z-pinch plasma confinement were mitigated using sheared flows generated from a coaxial plasma gun of the Marshall type. Based on these results, a new SFS Z-pinch experiment, the Fusion Z-pinch Experiment (FuZE), has been constructed. FuZE is designed to investigate the scaling of SFS Z-pinch plasmas towards fusion conditions. The experiment will be supported by high fidelity physics modeling using kinetic and fluid simulations. Initial plans are in place for a pulsed fusion reactor following the results of FuZE. Notably, the design relies on proven commercial technologies, including a modest discharge current (1.5 MA) and voltage (40 kV), and liquid metal electrodes. Supported by DoE FES, NNSA, and ARPA-E ALPHA.

  16. The Application of Layer Theory to Design: The Control Layer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbons, Andrew S.; Langton, Matthew B.

    2016-01-01

    A theory of design layers proposed by Gibbons ("An Architectural Approach to Instructional Design." Routledge, New York, 2014) asserts that each layer of an instructional design is related to a body of theory closely associated with the concerns of that particular layer. This study focuses on one layer, the control layer, examining…

  17. Theory and design of nonlinear metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Alec Daniel

    If electronics are ever to be completely replaced by optics, a significant possibility in the wake of the fiber revolution, it is likely that nonlinear materials will play a central and enabling role. Indeed, nonlinear optics is the study of the mechanisms through which light can change the nature and properties of matter and, as a corollary, how one beam or color of light can manipulate another or even itself within such a material. However, of the many barriers preventing such a lofty goal, the narrow and limited range of properties supported by nonlinear materials, and natural materials in general, stands at the forefront. Many industries have turned instead to artificial and composite materials, with homogenizable metamaterials representing a recent extension of such composites into the electromagnetic domain. In particular, the inclusion of nonlinear elements has caused metamaterials research to spill over into the field of nonlinear optics. Through careful design of their constituent elements, nonlinear metamaterials are capable of supporting an unprecedented range of interactions, promising nonlinear devices of novel design and scale. In this context, I cast the basic properties of nonlinear metamaterials in the conventional formalism of nonlinear optics. Using alternately transfer matrices and coupled mode theory, I develop two complementary methods for characterizing and designing metamaterials with arbitrary nonlinear properties. Subsequently, I apply these methods in numerical studies of several canonical metamaterials, demonstrating enhanced electric and magnetic nonlinearities, as well as predicting the existence of nonlinear magnetoelectric and off-diagonal nonlinear tensors. I then introduce simultaneous design of the linear and nonlinear properties in the context of phase matching, outlining five different metamaterial phase matching methods, with special emphasis on the phase matching of counter propagating waves in mirrorless parametric amplifiers

  18. Designing a grounded theory study: some practicalities.

    PubMed

    McCallin, Antoinette M

    2003-01-01

    Grounded theory is an interpretative research methodology frequently used by social science researchers seeking to discover the underlying social processes shaping interaction. The methodology is useful to create knowledge about the behavioural patterns of a group. The aim of this paper was to discuss some practical issues that the prospective grounded theory researcher planning a small-scale project may consider. Discussion focuses on the basic premises, choosing a version of grounded theory, the research problem, the purpose of study, the research question and the place of the literature in a study. The specific skills required of the grounded theory researcher are considered and some cautions are exercised. The paper may assist student researchers in a critical care setting and may be of interest to their supervisors and experienced. grounded theory researchers.

  19. Measurement of Radiation Symmetry in Z-Pinch Driven Hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, David L.

    2001-10-01

    The z-pinch driven hohlraum (ZPDH) is a promising approach to high yield inertial confinement fusion currently being characterized in experiments on the Sandia Z accelerator [1]. In this concept [2], x rays are produced by an axial z-pinch in a primary hohlraum at each end of a secondary hohlraum. A fusion capsule in the secondary is imploded by a symmetric x-ray flux distribution, effectively smoothed by wall reemission during transport to the capsule position. Capsule radiation symmetry, a critical issue in the design of such a system, is influenced by hohlraum geometry, wall motion and time-dependent albedo, as well as power balance and pinch timing between the two z-pinch x-ray sources. In initial symmetry studies on Z, we used solid low density burnthrough spheres to diagnose highly asymmetric, single-sided-drive hohlraum geometries. We then applied this technique to the more symmetric double z-pinch geometry [3]. As a result of design improvements, radiation flux symmetry in Z double-pinch wire array experiments now exceeds the measurement sensitivity of this self-backlit foam ball symmetry diagnostic (15% max-min flux asymmetry). To diagnose radiation symmetry at the 2 - 5% level attainable with our present ZPDH designs, we are using high-energy x rays produced by the recently-completed Z-Beamlet laser backlighter for point-projection imaging of thin-wall implosion and symmetry capsules. We will present the results of polar flux symmetry measuremets on Z for several ZPDH capsule geometries together with radiosity and radiation-hydrodynamics simulations for comparison. [1] M. E. Cuneo et al., Phys. Plasmas 8,2257(2001); [2] J. H. Hammer et al., Phys. Plasmas 6,2129(1999); [3] D. L. Hanson et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 45,360(2000).

  20. Pinching parameters for open (super) strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Playle, Sam; Sciuto, Stefano

    2018-02-01

    We present an approach to the parametrization of (super) Schottky space obtained by sewing together three-punctured discs with strips. Different cubic ribbon graphs classify distinct sets of pinching parameters; we show how they are mapped onto each other. The parametrization is particularly well-suited to describing the region within (super) moduli space where open bosonic or Neveu-Schwarz string propagators become very long and thin, which dominates the IR behaviour of string theories. We show how worldsheet objects such as the Green's function converge to graph theoretic objects such as the Symanzik polynomials in the α ' → 0 limit, allowing us to see how string theory reproduces the sum over Feynman graphs. The (super) string measure takes on a simple and elegant form when expressed in terms of these parameters.

  1. Some Implications of Cognitive Theory for Instructional Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winn, William

    1990-01-01

    Examines some of the recent developments in cognitive theory and explores their implications for instructional design. Topics discussed include a shift from emphasis on behavioral theory to cognitive theory; task analysis; instructional objectives; learner characteristics; instructional strategies; metacognition; and the dynamic nature of…

  2. Better Instructional Design Theory: Process Improvement or Reengineering?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dick, Walter

    1997-01-01

    Discusses three ways that instructional design theories can change over time: (1) revision via evolution of models to reflect the outcomes that are being achieved with its current use; (2) revision to reflect current understanding of technology; and (3) complete replacement of present theory with another more powerful theory. Describes the…

  3. Moderately reverberant learning ultrasonic pinch panel.

    PubMed

    Nikolovski, Jean-Pierre

    2013-10-01

    Tactile sensing is widely used in human-computer interfaces. However, mechanical integration of touch technologies is often perceived as difficult by engineers because it often limits the freedom of style or form factor requested by designers. Recent work in active ultrasonic touch technologies has made it possible to transform thin glass plates, metallic sheets, or plastic shells into interactive surfaces. The method is based on a learning process of touch-induced, amplitude-disturbed diffraction patterns. This paper proposes, first, an evolution in the design with multiple dipole transducers that improves touch sensitivity or maximum panel size by a factor of ten, and improves robustness and usability in moderately reverberant panels, and second, defines a set of acoustic variables in the signal processing for the evaluation of sensitivity and radiating features. For proof of concept purposes, the design and process are applied to 3.2- and 6-mm-thick glass plates with variable damping conditions. Transducers are bonded to only one short side of the rectangular substrates. Measurements show that the highly sensitive free lateral sides are perfectly adapted for pinch-touch and pinch-slide interactions. The advantage of relative versus absolute touch disturbance measurement is discussed, together with tolerance to abutting contaminants.

  4. Analysis of pinching in deterministic particle separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risbud, Sumedh; Luo, Mingxiang; Frechette, Joelle; Drazer, German

    2011-11-01

    We investigate the problem of spherical particles vertically settling parallel to Y-axis (under gravity), through a pinching gap created by an obstacle (spherical or cylindrical, center at the origin) and a wall (normal to X axis), to uncover the physics governing microfluidic separation techniques such as deterministic lateral displacement and pinched flow fractionation: (1) theoretically, by linearly superimposing the resistances offered by the wall and the obstacle separately, (2) computationally, using the lattice Boltzmann method for particulate systems and (3) experimentally, by conducting macroscopic experiments. Both, theory and simulations, show that for a given initial separation between the particle centre and the Y-axis, presence of a wall pushes the particles closer to the obstacle, than its absence. Experimentally, this is expected to result in an early onset of the short-range repulsive forces caused by solid-solid contact. We indeed observe such an early onset, which we quantify by measuring the asymmetry in the trajectories of the spherical particles around the obstacle. This work is partially supported by the National Science Foundation Grant Nos. CBET- 0731032, CMMI-0748094, and CBET-0954840.

  5. Using Gestalt Theory to Teach Document Design and Graphics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Patrick; Fitz, Chad

    1993-01-01

    Presents a brief overview of Gestalt theory. Discusses and illustrates six key principles of Gestalt psychology as they apply to document design and graphics. Presents exercise that students may use to improve their understanding of the principles and develop their document design skills. Distinguishes between Gestalt theory and rhetoric. (RS)

  6. ARTEMIS: Reinvigorating History and Theory in Art and Design Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janet, Jeff; Miles, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    ARTEMIS (Art Educational Multiplayer Interactive Space) is an online multi-user virtual environment that is designed around the objects, artefacts, philosophies, personalities and critical discourses of the histories and theories of art and design. Conceived as a means of reinvigorating art history and theory education in the digital age, ARTEMIS…

  7. Approximations for Quantitative Feedback Theory Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, D. K.; Hess, R. A.

    1997-01-01

    The computational requirements for obtaining the results summarized in the preceding section were very modest and were easily accomplished using computer-aided control system design software. Of special significance is the ability of the PDT to indicate a loop closure sequence for MIMO QFT designs that employ sequential loop closure. Although discussed as part of a 2 x 2 design, the PDT is obviously applicable to designs with a greater number of inputs and system responses.

  8. Applying learning theories and instructional design models for effective instruction.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Mohammed K; Elkhider, Ihsan A

    2016-06-01

    Faculty members in higher education are involved in many instructional design activities without formal training in learning theories and the science of instruction. Learning theories provide the foundation for the selection of instructional strategies and allow for reliable prediction of their effectiveness. To achieve effective learning outcomes, the science of instruction and instructional design models are used to guide the development of instructional design strategies that elicit appropriate cognitive processes. Here, the major learning theories are discussed and selected examples of instructional design models are explained. The main objective of this article is to present the science of learning and instruction as theoretical evidence for the design and delivery of instructional materials. In addition, this article provides a practical framework for implementing those theories in the classroom and laboratory. Copyright © 2016 The American Physiological Society.

  9. Linear Transformer Drivers for Z-pinch Based Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Robert; Seidler, William; Giddens, Patrick; Fabisinski, Leo; Cassibry, Jason

    2017-01-01

    The MSFC/UAH team has been developing of a novel power management and distribution system called a Linear Transformer Driver (LTD). LTD's hold the promise of dramatically reducing the required mass to drive a z-pinch by replacing the capacitor banks which constitute half the mass of the entire system. The MSFC?UAH tea, is developing this technology in hope of integrating it with the Pulsed Fission Fusion (PuFF) propulsion concept. High-Voltage pulsed power systems used for Z-Pinch experimentation have in the past largely been based on Marx Generators. Marx generators deliver the voltage and current required for the Z-Pinch, but suffer from two significant drawbacks when applied to a flight system: they are very massive, consisting of high-voltage capacitor banks insulated in oil-filled tanks and they do not lend themselves to rapid pulsing. The overall goal of Phase 2 is to demonstrate the construction of a higher voltage stack from a number of cavities each of the design proven in Phase 1 and to characterize and understand the techniques for designing the stack. The overall goal of Phase 3 is to demonstrate the feasibility of constructing a higher energy cavity from a number of smaller LTD stacks, to characterize and understand the way in which the constituent stacks combine, and to extend this demonstration LTD to serve as the basis for a 64 kJ pulse generator for Z-Pinch experiments.

  10. Fusion Propulsion Z-Pinch Engine Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miernik, J.; Statham, G.; Fabisinski, L.; Maples, C. D.; Adams, R.; Polsgrove, T.; Fincher, S.; Cassibry, J.; Cortez, R.; Turner, M.; hide

    2011-01-01

    Fusion-based nuclear propulsion has the potential to enable fast interplanetary transportation. Due to the great distances between the planets of our solar system and the harmful radiation environment of interplanetary space, high specific impulse (Isp) propulsion in vehicles with high payload mass fractions must be developed to provide practical and safe vehicles for human spaceflight missions. The Z-Pinch dense plasma focus method is a Magneto-Inertial Fusion (MIF) approach that may potentially lead to a small, low cost fusion reactor/engine assembly1. Recent advancements in experimental and theoretical understanding of this concept suggest favorable scaling of fusion power output yield 2. The magnetic field resulting from the large current compresses the plasma to fusion conditions, and this process can be pulsed over short timescales (10(exp -6 sec). This type of plasma formation is widely used in the field of Nuclear Weapons Effects testing in the defense industry, as well as in fusion energy research. A Decade Module 2 (DM2), approx.500 KJ pulsed-power is coming to the RSA Aerophysics Lab managed by UAHuntsville in January, 2012. A Z-Pinch propulsion concept was designed for a vehicle based on a previous fusion vehicle study called "Human Outer Planet Exploration" (HOPE), which used Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) 3 propulsion. The reference mission is the transport of crew and cargo to Mars and back, with a reusable vehicle.

  11. ATLAS, an integrated structural analysis and design system. Volume 6: Design module theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backman, B. F.

    1979-01-01

    The automated design theory underlying the operation of the ATLAS Design Module is decribed. The methods, applications and limitations associated with the fully stressed design, the thermal fully stressed design and a regional optimization algorithm are presented. A discussion of the convergence characteristics of the fully stressed design is also included. Derivations and concepts specific to the ATLAS design theory are shown, while conventional terminology and established methods are identified by references.

  12. Information Architecture without Internal Theory: An Inductive Design Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haverty, Marsha

    2002-01-01

    Suggests that information architecture design is primarily an inductive process, partly because it lacks internal theory and partly because it is an activity that supports emergent phenomena (user experiences) from basic design components. Suggests a resemblance to Constructive Induction, a design process that locates the best representational…

  13. Mathematical theory of a relaxed design problem in structural optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kikuchi, Noboru; Suzuki, Katsuyuki

    1990-01-01

    Various attempts have been made to construct a rigorous mathematical theory of optimization for size, shape, and topology (i.e. layout) of an elastic structure. If these are represented by a finite number of parametric functions, as Armand described, it is possible to construct an existence theory of the optimum design using compactness argument in a finite dimensional design space or a closed admissible set of a finite dimensional design space. However, if the admissible design set is a subset of non-reflexive Banach space such as L(sup infinity)(Omega), construction of the existence theory of the optimum design becomes suddenly difficult and requires to extend (i.e. generalize) the design problem to much more wider class of design that is compatible to mechanics of structures in the sense of variational principle. Starting from the study by Cheng and Olhoff, Lurie, Cherkaev, and Fedorov introduced a new concept of convergence of design variables in a generalized sense and construct the 'G-Closure' theory of an extended (relaxed) optimum design problem. A similar attempt, but independent in large extent, can also be found in Kohn and Strang in which the shape and topology optimization problem is relaxed to allow to use of perforated composites rather than restricting it to usual solid structures. An identical idea is also stated in Murat and Tartar using the notion of the homogenization theory. That is, introducing possibility of micro-scale perforation together with the theory of homogenization, the optimum design problem is relaxed to construct its mathematical theory. It is also noted that this type of relaxed design problem is perfectly matched to the variational principle in structural mechanics.

  14. Applying Learning Theories and Instructional Design Models for Effective Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khalil, Mohammed K.; Elkhider, Ihsan A.

    2016-01-01

    Faculty members in higher education are involved in many instructional design activities without formal training in learning theories and the science of instruction. Learning theories provide the foundation for the selection of instructional strategies and allow for reliable prediction of their effectiveness. To achieve effective learning…

  15. Schema Theory and Signaling: Implications for Text Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Stephen R.

    This discussion of the implications of schema theory and signaling theory for the design of both paper- and computer-based text describes the macro and micro levels of text structure and their interaction, provides a definition of signaling, and identifies four types of signals: (1) pointer words informing the reader of the author's perspective on…

  16. Designing Instructional Visuals; Theory, Composition, Implementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linker, Jerry Mac

    The use of visual media in the classroom contributes to the improvement of teaching and learning. The purpose of this handbook is to present a practical discussion of the principles involved in designing visuals that teach. The author first describes the essentials of communication applied to instructional visuals. He then analyzes the physical…

  17. A spin-liquid with pinch-line singularities on the pyrochlore lattice.

    PubMed

    Benton, Owen; Jaubert, L D C; Yan, Han; Shannon, Nic

    2016-05-26

    The mathematics of gauge theories lies behind many of the most profound advances in physics in the past 200 years, from Maxwell's theory of electromagnetism to Einstein's theory of general relativity. More recently it has become clear that gauge theories also emerge in condensed matter, a prime example being the spin-ice materials which host an emergent electromagnetic gauge field. In spin-ice, the underlying gauge structure is revealed by the presence of pinch-point singularities in neutron-scattering measurements. Here we report the discovery of a spin-liquid where the low-temperature physics is naturally described by the fluctuations of a tensor field with a continuous gauge freedom. This gauge structure underpins an unusual form of spin correlations, giving rise to pinch-line singularities: line-like analogues of the pinch points observed in spin-ice. Remarkably, these features may already have been observed in the pyrochlore material Tb2Ti2O7.

  18. Z-Pinch Fusion for Energy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    SPIELMAN,RICK B.

    2000-01-01

    Z pinches, the oldest fusion concept, have recently been revisited in light of significant advances in the fields of plasma physics and pulsed power engineering. The possibility exists for z-pinch fusion to play a role in commercial energy applications. We report on work to develop z-pinch fusion concepts, the result of an extensive literature search, and the output for a congressionally-mandated workshop on fusion energy held in Snowmass, Co July 11-23,1999.

  19. Theory and Design of Electrical Rotating Machinery.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    6.17 Magnetic Circuit Design for a Homopolar Motor .. ..... 12 6.18 AC Losses in Superconducting Solenoids .. ........ . 12 6.19 AC Loss from the...have contributed to this program are as follows: W. J. Carr, Jr. - Consultant in Magnetics and * Superconductivity J. H. Murphy - Engineer, Cryogenics...Abstract: In some applications of multifilament superconduct - ing wire an appreciable component of a time dependent magnetic field exists along the

  20. A Reactor Development Scenario for the FUZE Shear-flow Stabilized Z-pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, H. S.; Higginson, D. P.; Schmidt, A.; Tummel, K. K.; Shumlak, U.; Nelson, B. A.; Claveau, E. L.; Golingo, R. P.; Weber, T. R.

    2016-10-01

    We present a conceptual design, scaling calculations, and a development path for a pulsed fusion reactor based on the shear-flow-stabilized Z-pinch device. Experiments performed on the ZaP device have demonstrated stable operation for 40 us at 150 kA total discharge current (with 100 kA in the pinch) for pinches that are 1cm in diameter and 100 cm long. Scaling calculations show that achieving stabilization for a pulse of 100 usec, for discharge current 1.5 MA, in a shortened pinch 50 cm, results in a pinch diameter of 200 um and a reactor plant Q 5 for reasonable assumptions of the various system efficiencies. We propose several key intermediate performance levels in order to justify further development. These include achieving operation at pinch currents of 300 kA, where Te and Ti are calculated to exceed 1 keV, 700 kA where fusion power exceeds pinch input power, and 1 MA where fusion energy per pulse exceeds input energy per pulse. This work funded by USDOE ARPAe ALPHA Program and performed under the auspices of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-697801.

  1. Coherent optical OFDM: theory and design.

    PubMed

    Shieh, W; Bao, H; Tang, Y

    2008-01-21

    Coherent optical OFDM (CO-OFDM) has recently been proposed and the proof-of-concept transmission experiments have shown its extreme robustness against chromatic dispersion and polarization mode dispersion. In this paper, we first review the theoretical fundamentals for CO-OFDM and its channel model in a 2x2 MIMO-OFDM representation. We then present various design choices for CO-OFDM systems and perform the nonlinearity analysis for RF-to-optical up-converter. We also show the receiver-based digital signal processing to mitigate self-phase-modulation (SPM) and Gordon-Mollenauer phase noise, which is equivalent to the midspan phase conjugation.

  2. Gestalt-A Learning Theory for Graphic Design Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Ian

    2008-01-01

    This article will begin by seeking to define the notion of learning "by, through" and "from" experience. A linkage will then be established between these notions of experiences and gestalt theory. This will be explored within a subject specific context of graphic design. Links will be highlighted between the inherent nature of graphic design and…

  3. A New Theory of Trajectory Design and NASA's Vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folta, David

    2006-01-01

    This new theory is defined as the use of chaos to design trajectories and orbits that can be used to meet complex mission goals. The benefits are; a) minimizes fuel costs; b) optimizes trajectory profiles; c) provides non-standard and new orbit designs; and d) mitigates operational risks. Other synonymous terms include dynamical systems, invariant manifolds, capture orbits and ballistic orbits.

  4. Neutron generation from Z-pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vikhrev, V. V.; Korolev, V. D.

    2007-05-01

    Recent advances in both experimental and theoretical studies on neutron generation in various Z-pinch facilities are reviewed. The main methods for enhancing neutron emission from the Z-pinch plasma are described, and the problems of igniting a thermonuclear burn wave in this plasma are discussed.

  5. Applying Semiotic Theories to Graphic Design Education: An Empirical Study on Poster Design Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Chao-Ming; Hsu, Tzu-Fan

    2015-01-01

    The rationales behind design are dissimilar to those behind art. Establishing an adequate theoretical foundation for conducting design education can facilitate scientising design methods. Thus, from the perspectives of the semiotic theories proposed by Saussure and Peirce, we investigated graphic design curricula by performing teaching…

  6. Design of transonic airfoil sections using a similarity theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, D.

    1978-01-01

    A study of the available methods for transonic airfoil and wing design indicates that the most powerful technique is the numerical optimization procedure. However, the computer time for this method is relatively large because of the amount of computation required in the searches during optimization. The optimization method requires that base and calibration solutions be computed to determine a minimum drag direction. The design space is then computationally searched in this direction; it is these searches that dominate the computation time. A recent similarity theory allows certain transonic flows to be calculated rapidly from the base and calibration solutions. In this paper the application of the similarity theory to design problems is examined with the object of at least partially eliminating the costly searches of the design optimization method. An example of an airfoil design is presented.

  7. Design of crusher liner based on time - varying uncertainty theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, J. C.; Shi, B. Q.; Yu, H. J.; Wang, R. J.; Zhang, W. Y.

    2017-09-01

    This article puts forward the time-dependent design method considering the load fluctuation factors for the liner based on the time-varying uncertainty theory. In this method, the time-varying uncertainty design model of liner is constructed by introducing the parameters that affect the wear rate, the volatility and the drift rate. Based on the design example, the timevarying design outline of the moving cone liner is obtained. Based on the theory of minimum wear, the gap curve of wear resistant cavity is designed, and the optimized cavity is obtained by the combination of the thickness of the cone and the cavity gap. Taking the PYGB1821 multi cylinder hydraulic cone crusher as an example, it is proved that the service life of the new liner is improved by more than 14.3%.

  8. Design theory and performance of cryogenic molecular adsorption refrigeration systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartwig, W. H.; Woltman, A. W.; Masson, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    Closed-cycle operation of molecular adsorption refrigeration systems (MARS) has been demonstrated by using thermally cycled zeolites to adsorb and desorb various gases under pressures of 20-60 atm. This paper develops three aspects of the design theory: the physical theory of molecular adsorption of small molecules such as A, N2, N2O and NH3, the design relations for closed-cycle flow for three or more compressors, and the coefficient of performance. This work is intended to demonstrate nonmechanical gas compression for various cryogenic gases than can compete with mechanical systems with a different mix of advantages and disadvantages.

  9. Quantification of hand function by power grip and pinch strength force measurements in ulnar nerve lesion simulated by ulnar nerve block.

    PubMed

    Wachter, Nikolaus Johannes; Mentzel, Martin; Krischak, Gert D; Gülke, Joachim

    2017-06-24

    In the assessment of hand and upper limb function, grip strength is of the major importance. The measurement by dynamometers has been established. In this study, the effect of a simulated ulnar nerve lesion on different grip force measurements was evaluated. In 25 healthy volunteers, grip force measurement was done by the JAMAR dynamometer (Fabrication Enterprises Inc, Irvington, NY) for power grip and by a pinch strength dynamometer for tip pinch strength, tripod grip, and key pinch strength. A within-subject research design was used in this prospective study. Each subject served as the control by preinjection measurements of grip and pinch strength. Subsequent measurements after ulnar nerve block were used to examine within-subject change. In power grip, there was a significant reduction of maximum grip force of 26.9% with ulnar nerve block compared with grip force without block (P < .0001). Larger reductions in pinch strength were observed with block: 57.5% in tip pinch strength (P < .0001), 61.0% in tripod grip (P < .0001), and 58.3% in key pinch strength (P < .0001). The effect of the distal ulnar nerve block on grip and pinch force could be confirmed. However, the assessment of other dimensions of hand strength as tip pinch, tripod pinch and key pinch had more relevance in demonstrating hand strength changes resulting from an distal ulnar nerve lesion. The measurement of tip pinch, tripod grip and key pinch can improve the follow-up in hand rehabilitation. II. Copyright © 2017 Hanley & Belfus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Cognitive theories and the design of e-learning environments.

    PubMed

    Gillani, Bijan; O'Guinn, Christina

    2004-01-01

    Cognitive development refers to a mental process by which knowledge is acquired, stored, and retrieved to solve problems. Therefore, cognitive developmental theories attempt to explain cognitive activities that contribute to students' intellectual development and their capacity to learn and solve problems. Cognitive developmental research has had a great impact on the constructivism movement in education and educational technology. In order to appreciate how cognitive developmental theories have contributed to the design, process and development of constructive e-learning environments, we shall first present Piaget's cognitive theory and derive an inquiry training model from it that will support a constructivism approach to teaching and learning. Second, we will discuss an example developed by NASA that used the Web as an appropriate instructional delivery medium to apply Piaget's cognitive theory to create e-learning environments.

  11. Instructional Design Theory: Advancements from Cognitive Science and Instructional Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennyson, Robert D.

    Scientific advancements in cognitive science and instructional technology extend the behaviorally-oriented learning paradigm of instructional design and management in three major areas: (1) analysis of information-to-be-learned; (2) means of evaluating learners; and (3) linkage of learning theory to instructional prescriptions. The two basic types…

  12. What Should Instructional Designers Know about General Systems Theory?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salisbury, David F.

    1989-01-01

    Describes basic concepts in the field of general systems theory (GST) and explains the relationship between instructional systems design (ISD) and GST. Benefits of integrating GST into the curriculum of ISD graduate programs are discussed, and a short bibliography on GST is included. (LRW)

  13. Designing Opportunities to Learn Mathematics Theory-Building Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bass, Hyman

    2017-01-01

    Mathematicians commonly distinguish two modes of work in the discipline: "Problem solving," and "theory building." Mathematics education offers many opportunities to learn problem solving. This paper explores the possibility, and value, of designing instructional activities that provide supported opportunities for students to…

  14. Designing for Instrumentalisation: Constructionist Perspectives on Instrumental Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kynigos, Chronis; Psycharis, Giorgos

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we aim to contribute to the process of networking between theoretical frames in mathematics education by means of forging connections between Constructionism and Instrumental Theory to discuss a design for instrumentalisation. We specifically focus on instrumentalisation, i.e. the ways in which students make changes to digital…

  15. Comparative study of millennials' (age 20-34 years) grip and lateral pinch with the norms.

    PubMed

    Fain, Elizabeth; Weatherford, Cara

    Cross-sectional research design. Clinical practice continues to use normative data for grip and pinch measurements that were established in 1985. There is no updated norms despite different hand usage patterns in today's society. Measuring and comparing grip and pinch strengths with normative data is a valid method to determine hand function. This research was implemented to compare the grip and pinch measurements obtained from healthy millennials to the established norms and to describe hand usage patterns for millennials. Grip and lateral pinch measurements were obtained from a sample of 237 healthy millennials (ages 20-34 years). Strength scores were statistically lower that older normative data in all millennial grip strengths, with the exception of the women in the age group of 30-34 years. Specifically, this statistically significant trend was observed in all male grip strengths, as well as in women in the age group of 20-24 years (bilateral grip) and 25-29 years (right grip). However, the lateral pinch data reflected was similar to the older norms with variances of 0.5-1 kg. Current data reflect statistically significant differences from the norms for all male grip measurements, as well as for women in the age group of 20-24 years (bilateral grip) and 25-29 years (right grip). No statistical significance was observed in the independent-sample t tests for the lateral pinch in men of all age groups. Statistical significance was noted for lateral pinch for female age groups for the left hand (20-24 years) and for bilateral lateral pinches (30-34 years). IV. Copyright © 2016 Hanley & Belfus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Scaling the Shear-flow Stabilized Z-pinch to Reactor Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, H. S.; Schmidt, A.; Shumlak, U.; Nelson, B. A.; Golingo, R. P.; Cleveau, E.

    2015-11-01

    We present a conceptual design along with scaling calculations for a pulsed fusion reactor based on the shear-flow-stabilized Z-pinch device. Experiments performed on the ZaP device, at the University of Washington, have demonstrated stable operation for durations of 20 usec at ~100kA discharge current for pinches that are ~1 cm in diameter and 100 cm long. The inverse of the pinch diameter and plasma energy density scale strongly with pinch current and calculations show that maintaining stabilization durations of ~7 usec for increased discharge current (~15x) in a shortened pinch (10 cm) results in a pinch diameter of ~200 um and plasma conditions that approach those needed to support significant fusion burn and energy gain (Ti ~ 30keV, density ~ 3e26/m3, ntau ~1.4e20 sec/m3). Compelling features of the concept include operation at modest discharge current (1.5 MA) and voltage (40kV) along with direct adoption of liquid metals for at least one electrode--technological capabilities that have been proven in existing, commercial, pulse power devices such as large ignitrons. LLNL-ABS-674920. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy ARPAe ALPHA Program by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  17. Effect of driver impedance on dense plasma focus Z-pinch neutron yield

    SciTech Connect

    Sears, Jason, E-mail: sears8@llnl.gov, E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; Link, Anthony, E-mail: sears8@llnl.gov, E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; Schmidt, Andrea, E-mail: sears8@llnl.gov, E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov

    2014-12-15

    The Z-pinch phase of a dense plasma focus (DPF) heats the plasma by rapid compression and accelerates ions across its intense electric fields, producing neutrons through both thermonuclear and beam-target fusion. Driver characteristics have empirically been shown to affect performance, as measured by neutron yield per unit of stored energy. We are exploring the effect of driver characteristics on DPF performance using particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of a kJ scale DPF. In this work, our PIC simulations are fluid for the run-down phase and transition to fully kinetic for the pinch phase, capturing kinetic instabilities, anomalous resistivity, and beam formation duringmore » the pinch. The anode-cathode boundary is driven by a circuit model of the capacitive driver, including system inductance, the load of the railgap switches, the guard resistors, and the coaxial transmission line parameters. It is known that the driver impedance plays an important role in the neutron yield: first, it sets the peak current achieved at pinch time; and second, it affects how much current continues to flow through the pinch when the pinch inductance and resistance suddenly increase. Here we show from fully kinetic simulations how total neutron yield depends on the impedance of the driver and the distributed parameters of the transmission circuit. Direct comparisons between the experiment and simulations enhance our understanding of these plasmas and provide predictive design capability for neutron source applications.« less

  18. Designing the Electronic Classroom: Applying Learning Theory and Ergonomic Design Principles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emmons, Mark; Wilkinson, Frances C.

    2001-01-01

    Applies learning theory and ergonomic principles to the design of effective learning environments for library instruction. Discusses features of electronic classroom ergonomics, including the ergonomics of physical space, environmental factors, and workstations; and includes classroom layouts. (Author/LRW)

  19. Pinched-flow hydrodynamic stretching of single-cells.

    PubMed

    Dudani, Jaideep S; Gossett, Daniel R; Tse, Henry T K; Di Carlo, Dino

    2013-09-21

    Reorganization of cytoskeletal networks, condensation and decondensation of chromatin, and other whole cell structural changes often accompany changes in cell state and can reflect underlying disease processes. As such, the observable mechanical properties, or mechanophenotype, which is closely linked to intracellular architecture, can be a useful label-free biomarker of disease. In order to make use of this biomarker, a tool to measure cell mechanical properties should accurately characterize clinical specimens that consist of heterogeneous cell populations or contain small diseased subpopulations. Because of the heterogeneity and potential for rare populations in clinical samples, single-cell, high-throughput assays are ideally suited. Hydrodynamic stretching has recently emerged as a powerful method for carrying out mechanical phenotyping. Importantly, this method operates independently of molecular probes, reducing cost and sample preparation time, and yields information-rich signatures of cell populations through significant image analysis automation, promoting more widespread adoption. In this work, we present an alternative mode of hydrodynamic stretching where inertially-focused cells are squeezed in flow by perpendicular high-speed pinch flows that are extracted from the single inputted cell suspension. The pinched-flow stretching method reveals expected differences in cell deformability in two model systems. Furthermore, hydraulic circuit design is used to tune stretching forces and carry out multiple stretching modes (pinched-flow and extensional) in the same microfluidic channel with a single fluid input. The ability to create a self-sheathing flow from a single input solution should have general utility for other cytometry systems and the pinched-flow design enables an order of magnitude higher throughput (65,000 cells s(-1)) compared to our previously reported deformability cytometry method, which will be especially useful for identification of rare

  20. Integrated control-system design via generalized LQG (GLQG) theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, Dennis S.; Hyland, David C.; Richter, Stephen; Haddad, Wassim M.

    1989-01-01

    Thirty years of control systems research has produced an enormous body of theoretical results in feedback synthesis. Yet such results see relatively little practical application, and there remains an unsettling gap between classical single-loop techniques (Nyquist, Bode, root locus, pole placement) and modern multivariable approaches (LQG and H infinity theory). Large scale, complex systems, such as high performance aircraft and flexible space structures, now demand efficient, reliable design of multivariable feedback controllers which optimally tradeoff performance against modeling accuracy, bandwidth, sensor noise, actuator power, and control law complexity. A methodology is described which encompasses numerous practical design constraints within a single unified formulation. The approach, which is based upon coupled systems or modified Riccati and Lyapunov equations, encompasses time-domain linear-quadratic-Gaussian theory and frequency-domain H theory, as well as classical objectives such as gain and phase margin via the Nyquist circle criterion. In addition, this approach encompasses the optimal projection approach to reduced-order controller design. The current status of the overall theory will be reviewed including both continuous-time and discrete-time (sampled-data) formulations.

  1. The mathematical theory of signal processing and compression-designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feria, Erlan H.

    2006-05-01

    The mathematical theory of signal processing, named processor coding, will be shown to inherently arise as the computational time dual of Shannon's mathematical theory of communication which is also known as source coding. Source coding is concerned with signal source memory space compression while processor coding deals with signal processor computational time compression. Their combination is named compression-designs and referred as Conde in short. A compelling and pedagogically appealing diagram will be discussed highlighting Conde's remarkable successful application to real-world knowledge-aided (KA) airborne moving target indicator (AMTI) radar.

  2. Integrating Health Behavior Theory and Design Elements in Serious Games.

    PubMed

    Cheek, Colleen; Fleming, Theresa; Lucassen, Mathijs Fg; Bridgman, Heather; Stasiak, Karolina; Shepherd, Matthew; Orpin, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Internet interventions for improving health and well-being have the potential to reach many people and fill gaps in service provision. Serious gaming interfaces provide opportunities to optimize user adherence and impact. Health interventions based in theory and evidence and tailored to psychological constructs have been found to be more effective to promote behavior change. Defining the design elements which engage users and help them to meet their goals can contribute to better informed serious games. To elucidate design elements important in SPARX, a serious game for adolescents with depression, from a user-centered perspective. We proposed a model based on an established theory of health behavior change and practical features of serious game design to organize ideas and rationale. We analyzed data from 5 studies comprising a total of 22 focus groups and 66 semistructured interviews conducted with youth and families in New Zealand and Australia who had viewed or used SPARX. User perceptions of the game were applied to this framework. A coherent framework was established using the three constructs of self-determination theory (SDT), autonomy, competence, and relatedness, to organize user perceptions and design elements within four areas important in design: computer game, accessibility, working alliance, and learning in immersion. User perceptions mapped well to the framework, which may assist developers in understanding the context of user needs. By mapping these elements against the constructs of SDT, we were able to propose a sound theoretical base for the model. This study's method allowed for the articulation of design elements in a serious game from a user-centered perspective within a coherent overarching framework. The framework can be used to deliberately incorporate serious game design elements that support a user's sense of autonomy, competence, and relatedness, key constructs which have been found to mediate motivation at all stages of the change

  3. Quasi-linear gyrokinetic predictions of the Coriolis momentum pinch in NSTX

    DOE Data Explorer

    Guttenfelder, W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Kaye, S. M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Ren, Y. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Solomon, W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Bell, R. E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Candy, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Gerhardt, S. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); LeBlanc, B. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Yuh, H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents quasi-linear gyrokinetic predictions of the Coriolis momentum pinch for low aspect-ratio NSTX H-modes where previous experimental measurements were focused. Local, linear calculations predict that in the region of interest (just outside the mid-radius) of these relatively high-beta plasmas, profiles are most unstable to microtearing modes that are only effective in transporting electron energy. However, sub-dominant electromagnetic and electrostatic ballooning modes are also unstable, which are effective at transporting energy, particles and momentum. The quasi-linear prediction of transport from these weaker ballooning modes, assuming they contribute transport in addition to that from microtearing modes in a nonlinear turbulent state, leads to a very small or outward convection of momentum, inconsistent with the experimentally measured inward pinch, and opposite to predictions in conventional aspect ratio tokamaks. Additional predictions of a low beta L-mode plasma, unstable to more traditional electrostatic ion temperature gradient-trapped electron mode instability, show that the Coriolis pinch is inward but remains relatively weak and insensitive to many parameter variations. The weak or outward pinch predicted in NSTX plasmas appears to be at least partially correlated to changes in the parallel mode structure that occur at finite beta and low aspect ratio, as discussed in previous theories. The only conditions identified where a stronger inward pinch is predicted occur either in the purely electrostatic limit or if the aspect ratio is increased. As the Coriolis pinch cannot explain the measured momentum pinch, additional theoretical momentum transport mechanisms are discussed that may be potentially important.

  4. Quasi-linear gyrokinetic predictions of the Coriolis momentum pinch in National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Guttenfelder, W.; Kaye, S. M.; Ren, Y.

    This paper presents quasi-linear gyrokinetic predictions of the Coriolis momentum pinch for low aspect-ratio National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) H-modes where previous experimental measurements were focused. Local, linear calculations predict that in the region of interest (just outside the mid-radius) of these relatively high-beta plasmas, profiles are most unstable to microtearing modes that are only effective in transporting electron energy. However, sub-dominant electromagnetic and electrostaticballooning modes are also unstable, which are effective at transporting energy, particles, and momentum. The quasi-linear prediction of transport from these weaker ballooning modes, assuming they contribute transport in addition to that from microtearing modes inmore » a nonlinear turbulent state, leads to a very small or outward convection of momentum, inconsistent with the experimentally measured inward pinch, and opposite to predictions in conventional aspect ratio tokamaks. Additional predictions of a low beta L-mode plasma, unstable to more traditional electrostatic ion temperature gradient-trapped electron mode instability, show that the Coriolis pinch is inward but remains relatively weak and insensitive to many parameter variations. The weak or outward pinch predicted in NSTX plasmas appears to be at least partially correlated to changes in the parallel mode structure that occur at a finite beta and low aspect ratio, as discussed in previous theories. The only conditions identified where a stronger inward pinch is predicted occur either in the purely electrostatic limit or if the aspect ratio is increased. Lastly, as the Coriolis pinch cannot explain the measured momentum pinch, additional theoretical momentum transport mechanisms are discussed that may be potentially important.« less

  5. Quasi-linear gyrokinetic predictions of the Coriolis momentum pinch in National Spherical Torus Experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Guttenfelder, W.; Kaye, S. M.; Ren, Y.; ...

    2016-05-11

    This paper presents quasi-linear gyrokinetic predictions of the Coriolis momentum pinch for low aspect-ratio National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) H-modes where previous experimental measurements were focused. Local, linear calculations predict that in the region of interest (just outside the mid-radius) of these relatively high-beta plasmas, profiles are most unstable to microtearing modes that are only effective in transporting electron energy. However, sub-dominant electromagnetic and electrostaticballooning modes are also unstable, which are effective at transporting energy, particles, and momentum. The quasi-linear prediction of transport from these weaker ballooning modes, assuming they contribute transport in addition to that from microtearing modes inmore » a nonlinear turbulent state, leads to a very small or outward convection of momentum, inconsistent with the experimentally measured inward pinch, and opposite to predictions in conventional aspect ratio tokamaks. Additional predictions of a low beta L-mode plasma, unstable to more traditional electrostatic ion temperature gradient-trapped electron mode instability, show that the Coriolis pinch is inward but remains relatively weak and insensitive to many parameter variations. The weak or outward pinch predicted in NSTX plasmas appears to be at least partially correlated to changes in the parallel mode structure that occur at a finite beta and low aspect ratio, as discussed in previous theories. The only conditions identified where a stronger inward pinch is predicted occur either in the purely electrostatic limit or if the aspect ratio is increased. Lastly, as the Coriolis pinch cannot explain the measured momentum pinch, additional theoretical momentum transport mechanisms are discussed that may be potentially important.« less

  6. Study of a non-equilibrium plasma pinch with application for microwave generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Agry, Ahmad Farouk

    The Non-Equilibrium Plasma Pinch (NEPP), also known as the Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) is well known as a source of energetic ions, relativistic electrons and neutrons as well as electromagnetic radiation extending from the infrared to X-ray. In this dissertation, the operation of a 15 kJ, Mather type, NEPP machine is studied in detail. A large number of experiments are carried out to tune the machine parameters for best performance using helium and hydrogen as filling gases. The NEPP machine is modified to be able to extract the copious number of electrons generated at the pinch. A hollow anode with small hole at the flat end, and a mock magnetron without biasing magnetic field are built. The electrons generated at the pinch are very difficult to capture, therefore a novel device is built to capture and transport the electrons from the pinch to the magnetron. The novel cup-rod-needle device successfully serves the purpose to capture and transport electrons to monitor the pinch current. Further, the device has the potential to field emit charges from its needle end acting as a pulsed electron source for other devices such as the magnetron. Diagnostics tools are designed, modeled, built, calibrated, and implemented in the machine to measure the pinch dynamics. A novel, UNLV patented electromagnetic dot sensors are successfully calibrated, and implemented in the machine. A new calibration technique is developed and test stands designed and built to measure the dot's ability to track the impetus signal over its dynamic range starting and ending in the noise region. The patented EM-dot sensor shows superior performance over traditional electromagnetic sensors, such as Rogowski coils. On the other hand, the cup-rod structure, when grounded on the rod side, serves as a diagnostic tool to monitor the pinch current by sampling the actual current, a quantity that has been always very challenging to measure without perturbing the pinch. To the best of our knowledge, this method

  7. Homogenization theory for designing graded viscoelastic sonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Zhao-Liang; Ren, Chun-Yu; Pei, Yong-Mao; Fang, Dai-Ning

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a homogenization theory for designing graded viscoelastic sonic crystals (VSCs) which consist of periodic arrays of elastic scatterers embedded in a viscoelastic host material. We extend an elastic homogenization theory to VSC by using the elastic-viscoelastic correspondence principle and propose an analytical effective loss factor of VSC. The results of VSC and the equivalent structure calculated by using the finite element method are in good agreement. According to the relation of the effective loss factor to the filling fraction, a graded VSC plate is easily and quickly designed. Then, the graded VSC may have potential applications in the vibration absorption and noise reduction fields. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB610301).

  8. Control theory based airfoil design using the Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, Antony; Reuther, James

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of optimization techniques based on control theory for airfoil design. In our previous work it was shown that control theory could be employed to devise effective optimization procedures for two-dimensional profiles by using the potential flow equation with either a conformal mapping or a general coordinate system. The goal of our present work is to extend the development to treat the Euler equations in two-dimensions by procedures that can readily be generalized to treat complex shapes in three-dimensions. Therefore, we have developed methods which can address airfoil design through either an analytic mapping or an arbitrary grid perturbation method applied to a finite volume discretization of the Euler equations. Here the control law serves to provide computationally inexpensive gradient information to a standard numerical optimization method. Results are presented for both the inverse problem and drag minimization problem.

  9. A novel method for multifactorial bio-chemical experiments design based on combinational design theory.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xun; Sun, Beibei; Liu, Boyang; Fu, Yaping; Zheng, Pan

    2017-01-01

    Experimental design focuses on describing or explaining the multifactorial interactions that are hypothesized to reflect the variation. The design introduces conditions that may directly affect the variation, where particular conditions are purposely selected for observation. Combinatorial design theory deals with the existence, construction and properties of systems of finite sets whose arrangements satisfy generalized concepts of balance and/or symmetry. In this work, borrowing the concept of "balance" in combinatorial design theory, a novel method for multifactorial bio-chemical experiments design is proposed, where balanced templates in combinational design are used to select the conditions for observation. Balanced experimental data that covers all the influencing factors of experiments can be obtianed for further processing, such as training set for machine learning models. Finally, a software based on the proposed method is developed for designing experiments with covering influencing factors a certain number of times.

  10. Pinch aperture proprioception: reliability and feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Yahya, Abdalghani; von Behren, Timothy; Levine, Shira; dos Santos, Marcio

    2018-01-01

    [Purpose] To establish the reliability and feasibility of a novel pinch aperture device to measure proprioceptive joint position sense. [Subjects and Methods] Reliability of the pinch aperture device was assessed in 21 healthy subjects. Following familiarization with a 15° target position of the index finger and thumb, subjects performed 5 trials in which they attempted to actively reproduce the target position without visual feedback. This procedure was repeated at a testing session on a separate date, and the between-session intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated. In addition, extensor tendon vibration was applied to 19 healthy subjects, and paired t-tests were conducted to compare performance under vibration and no-vibration conditions. Pinch aperture proprioception was also assessed in two individuals with known diabetic neuropathy. [Results] The pinch aperture device demonstrated excellent reliability in healthy subjects (ICC 0.88, 95% confidence interval 0.70–0.95). Tendon vibration disrupted pinch aperture proprioception, causing subjects to undershoot the target position (18.1 ± 2.6° vs. 14.8° ± 0.76, p<0.001). This tendency to undershoot the target position was also noted in individuals with diabetic neuropathy. [Conclusion] This study describes a reliable, feasible, and functional means of measuring finger proprioception. Further research should investigate the assessment and implications of pinch aperture proprioception in neurological and orthopedic populations. PMID:29765192

  11. R A Fisher, design theory, and the Indian connection.

    PubMed

    Rau, A R P

    2009-09-01

    Design Theory, a branch of mathematics, was born out of the experimental statistics research of the population geneticist R A Fisher and of Indian mathematical statisticians in the 1930s. The field combines elements of combinatorics, finite projective geometries, Latin squares, and a variety of further mathematical structures, brought together in surprising ways. This essay will present these structures and ideas as well as how the field came together, in itself an interesting story.

  12. Particle pinch with fully noninductive lower hybrid current drive in Tore Supra.

    PubMed

    Hoang, G T; Bourdelle, C; Pégourié, B; Schunke, B; Artaud, J F; Bucalossi, J; Clairet, F; Fenzi-Bonizec, C; Garbet, X; Gil, C; Guirlet, R; Imbeaux, F; Lasalle, J; Loarer, T; Lowry, C; Travère, J M; Tsitrone, E

    2003-04-18

    Recently, plasmas exceeding 4 min have been obtained with lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) in Tore Supra. These LHCD plasmas extend for over 80 times the resistive current diffusion time with zero loop voltage. Under such unique conditions the neoclassical particle pinch driven by the toroidal electric field vanishes. Nevertheless, the density profile remains peaked for more than 4 min. For the first time, the existence of an inward particle pinch in steady-state plasma without toroidal electric field, much larger than the value predicted by the collisional neoclassical theory, is experimentally demonstrated.

  13. Motivating the Notion of Generic Design within Information Processing Theory: The Design Problem Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goel, Vinod; Pirolli, Peter

    The notion of generic design, while it has been around for 25 years, is not often articulated, especially within Newell and Simon's (1972) Information Processing Theory framework. Design is merely lumped in with other forms of problem solving activity. Intuitively it is felt that there should be a level of description of the phenomenon which…

  14. Theory and design of variable conductance heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcus, B. D.

    1972-01-01

    A comprehensive review and analysis of all aspects of heat pipe technology pertinent to the design of self-controlled, variable conductance devices for spacecraft thermal control is presented. Subjects considered include hydrostatics, hydrodynamics, heat transfer into and out of the pipe, fluid selection, materials compatibility and variable conductance control techniques. The report includes a selected bibliography of pertinent literature, analytical formulations of various models and theories describing variable conductance heat pipe behavior, and the results of numerous experiments on the steady state and transient performance of gas controlled variable conductance heat pipes. Also included is a discussion of VCHP design techniques.

  15. Conformity of modified O-ring test and maximal pinch strength for cross tape application direction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Hoon; Choi, Hyun-Su

    2018-06-01

    Although cross tape has recently been used by clinicians for various musculoskeletal conditions, scientific studies on the direction of cross tape application are lacking. The present study aimed to investigate whether the direction of cross tape application affected the outcomes of the modified O-ring test and maximal pinch strength using a pinch gauge and the conformity between these 2 tests when cross tape was applied to the forearm muscles of individuals with no upper extremity pain and no restriction of joint range of motion.This study used a single-blinding crossover design. The subjects comprised 39 adults (16 men and 23 women). Cross tape was applied to the dominant hand so that the 4 rows were at an angle of 45° to the right or left of the direction of the flexor digitorum superficialis muscle fibers, and then the subjects underwent a modified O-ring test and a test of maximal pinch strength using a pinch gauge. Both tests were performed in both directions, and the order of the directions and tests was randomized. SPSS 18.0 was used for statistical analysis. Cohen's kappa coefficient was used to analyze the conformity of the results from the 2 tests. The statistical significance level was P < .05. A positive response in the modified O-ring test and maximal pinch strength were both affected by cross tape direction. The modified O-ring test and maximal pinch strength using pinch gauge results were in agreement (P < .00), and the kappa coefficient was significant at 1.00. The direction of cross tape application that produced a positive response in the modified O-ring test also produced greater maximal pinch strength. Thus, we propose that when applying cross tape to muscles, the direction of the 4 lines of the cross tape should be 45° relative to the direction of the muscle fibers, toward the side that produces a positive response in the modified O-ring test or produces the greatest maximal pinch strength using a pinch gauge.

  16. Game Theory and Risk-Based Levee System Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, R.; Lund, J. R.; Madani, K.

    2014-12-01

    Risk-based analysis has been developed for optimal levee design for economic efficiency. Along many rivers, two levees on opposite riverbanks act as a simple levee system. Being rational and self-interested, land owners on each river bank would tend to independently optimize their levees with risk-based analysis, resulting in a Pareto-inefficient levee system design from the social planner's perspective. Game theory is applied in this study to analyze decision making process in a simple levee system in which the land owners on each river bank develop their design strategies using risk-based economic optimization. For each land owner, the annual expected total cost includes expected annual damage cost and annualized construction cost. The non-cooperative Nash equilibrium is identified and compared to the social planner's optimal distribution of flood risk and damage cost throughout the system which results in the minimum total flood cost for the system. The social planner's optimal solution is not feasible without appropriate level of compensation for the transferred flood risk to guarantee and improve conditions for all parties. Therefore, cooperative game theory is then employed to develop an economically optimal design that can be implemented in practice. By examining the game in the reversible and irreversible decision making modes, the cost of decision making myopia is calculated to underline the significance of considering the externalities and evolution path of dynamic water resource problems for optimal decision making.

  17. Integrating Health Behavior Theory and Design Elements in Serious Games

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Theresa; Lucassen, Mathijs FG; Bridgman, Heather; Stasiak, Karolina; Shepherd, Matthew; Orpin, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Internet interventions for improving health and well-being have the potential to reach many people and fill gaps in service provision. Serious gaming interfaces provide opportunities to optimize user adherence and impact. Health interventions based in theory and evidence and tailored to psychological constructs have been found to be more effective to promote behavior change. Defining the design elements which engage users and help them to meet their goals can contribute to better informed serious games. Objective To elucidate design elements important in SPARX, a serious game for adolescents with depression, from a user-centered perspective. Methods We proposed a model based on an established theory of health behavior change and practical features of serious game design to organize ideas and rationale. We analyzed data from 5 studies comprising a total of 22 focus groups and 66 semistructured interviews conducted with youth and families in New Zealand and Australia who had viewed or used SPARX. User perceptions of the game were applied to this framework. Results A coherent framework was established using the three constructs of self-determination theory (SDT), autonomy, competence, and relatedness, to organize user perceptions and design elements within four areas important in design: computer game, accessibility, working alliance, and learning in immersion. User perceptions mapped well to the framework, which may assist developers in understanding the context of user needs. By mapping these elements against the constructs of SDT, we were able to propose a sound theoretical base for the model. Conclusions This study’s method allowed for the articulation of design elements in a serious game from a user-centered perspective within a coherent overarching framework. The framework can be used to deliberately incorporate serious game design elements that support a user’s sense of autonomy, competence, and relatedness, key constructs which have been found

  18. Applying Instructional Design Theories to Bioinformatics Education in Microarray Analysis and Primer Design Workshops

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The need to support bioinformatics training has been widely recognized by scientists, industry, and government institutions. However, the discussion of instructional methods for teaching bioinformatics is only beginning. Here we report on a systematic attempt to design two bioinformatics workshops for graduate biology students on the basis of Gagne's Conditions of Learning instructional design theory. This theory, although first published in the early 1970s, is still fundamental in instructional design and instructional technology. First, top-level as well as prerequisite learning objectives for a microarray analysis workshop and a primer design workshop were defined. Then a hierarchy of objectives for each workshop was created. Hands-on tutorials were designed to meet these objectives. Finally, events of learning proposed by Gagne's theory were incorporated into the hands-on tutorials. The resultant manuals were tested on a small number of trainees, revised, and applied in 1-day bioinformatics workshops. Based on this experience and on observations made during the workshops, we conclude that Gagne's Conditions of Learning instructional design theory provides a useful framework for developing bioinformatics training, but may not be optimal as a method for teaching it. PMID:16220141

  19. Effect of Initial Conditions on Gas-Puff Z-Pinch Dynamics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Gus Gordon

    This dissertation concerns the effects initial conditions have on the dynamics of an imploded, annular gas-puff z-pinch. The influence of axial magnetic fields, nozzle size and composition, different gases, pre-ionization, and electrode design on pinch quality and x-ray yield is investigated. The experiment uses a 5-kJ capacitor bank to deliver 0.35 MA to the pinch load in 1.4 mu rm s. This research establishes parameters important to increasing the x-ray yield of dense z-pinches. The initial stage of the implosion is diagnosed with a framing camera that photographs visible light emitted from z-pinch gas breakdown. Data from subsequent stages of the pinch is recorded with a B-dot probe, filtered x-ray diodes, an x-ray filtered pinhole camera, and a nitrogen laser interferometer. Applied axial magnetic fields of ~100 gauss increase average x-ray yield by more than 20%. A substantial increase of K-shell x -ray yield of more than 200% was obtained by increasing the energy delivered to the plasma by enlarging the nozzle diameter from 4 to 5 cm. The use of a Teflon outer-mantle for the nozzle resulted in less uniform gas breakdown as compared to graphite and copper outer-mantles, but x-ray yield and final state uniformity were not reduced. Lower Z gases showed poorer breakdown uniformity. Pre-ionization improved the uniformity of helium and neon breakdown but did not appear to affect subsequent dynamics. X-ray yield was significantly higher using a knife-edge annular anode, as opposed to a flat stainless steel honeycomb anode. Annular anodes with diameters more than a few millimeters different than the nozzle diameter produced low quality pinches with substantially lower x-ray yield.

  20. Normative Measurements of Grip and Pinch Strengths of 21st Century Korean Population

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Jin Hee; Kim, Jin Soo; Lee, Dong Chul; Ki, Sae Hwi; Yang, Jae Won; Jeon, Man Kyung; Lee, Sang Myung

    2013-01-01

    Background Measuring grip and pinch strength is an important part of hand injury evaluation. Currently, there are no standardized values of normal grip and pinch strength among the Korean population, and lack of such data prevents objective evaluation of post-surgical recovery in strength. This study was designed to establish the normal values of grip and pinch strength among the healthy Korean population and to identify any dependent variables affecting grip and pinch strength. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out. The inclusion criterion was being a healthy Korean person without a previous history of hand trauma. The grip strength was measured using a Jamar dynamometer. Pulp and key pinch strength were measured with a hydraulic pinch gauge. Intra-individual and inter-individual variations in these variables were analyzed in a standardized statistical manner. Results There were a total of 336 healthy participants between 13 and 77 years of age. As would be expected in any given population, the mean grip and pinch strength was greater in the right hand than the left. Male participants (137) showed mean strengths greater than female participants (199) when adjusted for age. Among the male participants, anthropometric variables correlated positively with grip strength, but no such correlations were identifiable in female participants in a statistically significant way. Conclusions Objective measurements of hand strength are an important component of hand injury evaluation, and population-specific normative data are essential for clinical and research purposes. This study reports updated normative hand strengths of the South Korean population in the 21st century. PMID:23362480

  1. Design with constructal theory: Steam generators, turbines and heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong Sung

    This dissertation shows that the architecture of steam generators, steam turbines and heat exchangers for power plants can be predicted on the basis of the constructal law. According to constructal theory, the flow architecture emerges such that it provides progressively greater access to its currents. Each chapter shows how constructal theory guides the generation of designs in pursuit of higher performance. Chapter two shows the tube diameters, the number of riser tubes, the water circulation rate and the rate of steam production are determined by maximizing the heat transfer rate from hot gases to riser tubes and minimizing the global flow resistance under the fixed volume constraint. Chapter three shows how the optimal spacing between adjacent tubes, the number of tubes for the downcomer and the riser and the location of the flow reversal for the continuous steam generator are determined by the intersection of asymptotes method, and by minimizing the flow resistance under the fixed volume constraints. Chapter four shows that the mass inventory for steam turbines can be distributed between high pressure and low pressure turbines such that the global performance of the power plant is maximal under the total mass constraint. Chapter five presents the more general configuration of a two-stream heat exchanger with forced convection of the hot side and natural circulation on the cold side. Chapter six demonstrates that segmenting a tube with condensation on the outer surface leads to a smaller thermal resistance, and generates design criteria for the performance of multi-tube designs.

  2. Pinch-force-magnification mechanism of low degree of freedom EMG prosthetic hand for children.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hesong; Sakoda, Shintaro; Jiang, Yinlai; Morishita, Soichiro; Yokoi, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    EMG prosthetic hands are being extensively studied for the disabled who need them not only for cosmesis but also for the functions to help them with basic daily activities. However, most EMG prosthetic hands are developed for adults. Since the early use of prosthetic hands is important for the children to accept and adapt to them, we are developing low degrees of freedom (DoF) prosthetic hand that is suitable for children. Due to the limited size of a child's hand, the servo motor which drives the MP joint are small-sized and low-power. Hence, a pinch-force-magnification mechanism is required to improve the pinch force of the EMG prosthetic hand. In this paper we designed a wire-driven mechanism which can magnify pinch force by increasing the length of the MP joint's moment arm. Pinch force measurement experiment validated that the pinch force of the prosthetic hand with the mechanism is more than twice of that of the hand with direct drive.

  3. Measurements of high-current electron beams from X pinches and wire array Z pinches.

    PubMed

    Shelkovenko, T A; Pikuz, S A; Blesener, I C; McBride, R D; Bell, K S; Hammer, D A; Agafonov, A V; Romanova, V M; Mingaleev, A R

    2008-10-01

    Some issues concerning high-current electron beam transport from the X pinch cross point to the diagnostic system and measurements of the beam current by Faraday cups are discussed. Results of computer simulation of electron beam propagation from the pinch to the Faraday cup give limits for the measured current for beams having different energy spreads. The beam is partially neutralized as it propagates from the X pinch to a diagnostic system, but within a Faraday cup diagnostic, space charge effects can be very important. Experimental results show evidence of such effects.

  4. Interpretive Research Aiming at Theory Building: Adopting and Adapting the Case Study Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz Andrade, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Although the advantages of case study design are widely recognised, its original positivist underlying assumptions may mislead interpretive researchers aiming at theory building. The paper discusses the limitations of the case study design for theory building and explains how grounded theory systemic process adds to the case study design. The…

  5. What learning theories can teach us in designing neurofeedback treatments

    PubMed Central

    Strehl, Ute

    2014-01-01

    Popular definitions of neurofeedback point out that neurofeedback is a process of operant conditioning which leads to self-regulation of brain activity. Self-regulation of brain activity is considered to be a skill. The aim of this paper is to clarify that not only operant conditioning plays a role in the acquisition of this skill. In order to design the learning process additional references have to be derived from classical conditioning, two-process-theory and in particular from skill learning and research into motivational aspects. The impact of learning by trial and error, cueing of behavior, feedback, reinforcement, and knowledge of results as well as transfer of self-regulation skills into everyday life will be analyzed in this paper. In addition to these learning theory basics this paper tries to summarize the knowledge about acquisition of self-regulation from neurofeedback studies with a main emphasis on clinical populations. As a conclusion it is hypothesized that learning to self-regulate has to be offered in a psychotherapeutic, i.e., behavior therapy framework. PMID:25414659

  6. What learning theories can teach us in designing neurofeedback treatments.

    PubMed

    Strehl, Ute

    2014-01-01

    Popular definitions of neurofeedback point out that neurofeedback is a process of operant conditioning which leads to self-regulation of brain activity. Self-regulation of brain activity is considered to be a skill. The aim of this paper is to clarify that not only operant conditioning plays a role in the acquisition of this skill. In order to design the learning process additional references have to be derived from classical conditioning, two-process-theory and in particular from skill learning and research into motivational aspects. The impact of learning by trial and error, cueing of behavior, feedback, reinforcement, and knowledge of results as well as transfer of self-regulation skills into everyday life will be analyzed in this paper. In addition to these learning theory basics this paper tries to summarize the knowledge about acquisition of self-regulation from neurofeedback studies with a main emphasis on clinical populations. As a conclusion it is hypothesized that learning to self-regulate has to be offered in a psychotherapeutic, i.e., behavior therapy framework.

  7. Combining theory and experiment in electrocatalysis: Insights into materials design

    DOE PAGES

    Seh, Zhi Wei; Kibsgaard, Jakob; Dickens, Colin F.; ...

    2017-01-12

    Electrocatalysis plays a central role in clean energy conversion, enabling a number of sustainable processes for future technologies. This review discusses design strategies for state-of-the-art heterogeneous electrocatalysts and associated materials for several different electrochemical transformations involving water, hydrogen, and oxygen, using theory as a means to rationalize catalyst performance. By examining the common principles that govern catalysis for different electrochemical reactions, we describe a systematic framework that clarifies trends in catalyzing these reactions, serving as a guide to new catalyst development while highlighting key gaps that need to be addressed. Here, we conclude by extending this framework to emerging cleanmore » energy reactions such as hydrogen peroxide production, carbon dioxide reduction, and nitrogen reduction, where the development of improved catalysts could allow for the sustainable production of a broad range of fuels and chemicals.« less

  8. Market Mechanism Design for Renewable Energy based on Risk Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wu; Bo, Wang; Jichun, Liu; Wenjiao, Zai; Pingliang, Zeng; Haobo, Shi

    2018-02-01

    Generation trading between renewable energy and thermal power is an efficient market means for transforming supply structure of electric power into sustainable development pattern. But the trading is hampered by the output fluctuations of renewable energy and the cost differences between renewable energy and thermal power at present. In this paper, the external environmental cost (EEC) is defined and the EEC is introduced into the generation cost. At same time, the incentive functions of renewable energy and low-emission thermal power are designed, which are decreasing functions of EEC. On these bases, for the market risks caused by the random variability of EEC, the decision-making model of generation trading between renewable energy and thermal power is constructed according to the risk theory. The feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed model are verified by simulation results.

  9. Z-Pinch fusion-based nuclear propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miernik, J.; Statham, G.; Fabisinski, L.; Maples, C. D.; Adams, R.; Polsgrove, T.; Fincher, S.; Cassibry, J.; Cortez, R.; Turner, M.; Percy, T.

    2013-02-01

    Fusion-based nuclear propulsion has the potential to enable fast interplanetary transportation. Due to the great distances between the planets of our solar system and the harmful radiation environment of interplanetary space, high specific impulse (Isp) propulsion in vehicles with high payload mass fractions must be developed to provide practical and safe vehicles for human space flight missions. The Z-Pinch dense plasma focus method is a Magneto-Inertial Fusion (MIF) approach that may potentially lead to a small, low cost fusion reactor/engine assembly [1]. Recent advancements in experimental and theoretical understanding of this concept suggest favorable scaling of fusion power output yield [2]. The magnetic field resulting from the large current compresses the plasma to fusion conditions, and this process can be pulsed over short timescales (10-6 s). This type of plasma formation is widely used in the field of Nuclear Weapons Effects testing in the defense industry, as well as in fusion energy research. A Z-Pinch propulsion concept was designed for a vehicle based on a previous fusion vehicle study called "Human Outer Planet Exploration" (HOPE), which used Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) [3] propulsion. The reference mission is the transport of crew and cargo to Mars and back, with a reusable vehicle. The analysis of the Z-Pinch MIF propulsion system concludes that a 40-fold increase of Isp over chemical propulsion is predicted. An Isp of 19,436 s and thrust of 3812 N s/pulse, along with nearly doubling the predicted payload mass fraction, warrants further development of enabling technologies.

  10. The Pinch Pot Technique and Raku.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demery, Marie

    Since the 16th century, the small Japanese raku tea bowl has reflected the merged cultural influences of art, religion, and other countries on the art of Japanese pottery. Artistically, the bowl is a combination of ceramics (pinching) and sculpture (carving). The dictates of the Zen Buddhist tea masters determine its sculptural process and steps,…

  11. Magnetic pinch compression of silica glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bless, S. J.

    1974-01-01

    SiO2 glass has been irreversibly densified by pressures up to 250 kbar produced in a magnetic pinch apparatus. The threshold for significant densification was about 60 kbar. The recovered densities agree better with published shock wave results than with static results.

  12. Construction and Initial Tests of MAIZE: 1 MA LTD-Driven Z-Pinch *

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilgenbach, R. M.; Gomez, M. R.; Zier, J. C.; Tang, W.; French, D. M.; Lau, Y. Y.; Mazarakis, M. G.; Cuneo, M. E.; Johnston, M. D.; Oliver, B. V.; Mehlhorn, T. A.; Kim, A. A.; Sinebryukhov, V. A.

    2008-11-01

    We report construction and initial testing of a 1-MA Linear Transformer Driver (LTD), The Michigan Accelerator for Inductive Z-pinch Experiments, (MAIZE). This machine, the first of its type to reach the USA, is based on the joint HCEI, Sandia Laboratories, and UM development effort. The compact LTD uses 80 capacitors and 40 spark gap switches, in 40 ``bricks'', to deliver 1 MA, 100 kV pulses with 70 ns risetime into a matched resistive load. Test results will be presented for a single brick and the full LTD. Design and construction will be presented of a low-inductance MITL. Experimental research programs under design and construction at UM include: a) Studies of Magneto-Raleigh-Taylor Instability of planar foils, and b) Vacuum convolute studies including cathode and anode plasma. Theory and simulation results will be presented for these planned experiments. Initial experimental designs and moderate-current feasibility experiments will be discussed. *Research supported by U. S. DoE through Sandia National Laboratories award document numbers 240985, 768225, 790791 and 805234 to the UM. MRG supported by NNSA Fellowship and JCZ supported by NPSC Fellowship / Sandia National Labs.

  13. Development and simulation study of a new inverse-pinch high Coulomb transfer switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang H.

    1989-01-01

    The inverse-pinch plasma switch was studied using a computer simulation code. The code was based on a 2-D, 2-temperature magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model. The application of this code was limited to the disk-type inverse-pinch plasma switch. The results of the computer analysis appear to be in agreement with the experimental results when the same parameters are used. An inverse-pinch plasma switch for closing has been designed and tested for high-power switching requirements. An azimuthally uniform initiation of breakdown is a key factor in achieving an inverse-pinch current path in the switch. Thus, various types of triggers, such as trigger pins, wire-brush, ring trigger, and hypocycloidal-pinch (HCP) devices have been tested for uniform breakdown. Recently, triggering was achieved by injection of a plasma-ring (plasma puff) that is produced separately with hypocycloidal-pinch electrodes placed under the cathode of the main gap. The current paths at switch closing, initiated by the injection of a plasma-ring from the HCP trigger are azimuthally uniform, and the local current density is significantly reduced, so that damage to the electrodes and the insulator surfaces is minimized. The test results indicate that electron bombardment on the electrodes and the insulator surfaces is minimized. The test results indicate that electron bombardment on the electrodes is four orders of magnitude less than that of a spark-gap switch for the same switching power. Indeed, a few thousand shots with peak current exceeding a mega-ampere and with hold-off voltage up to 20 kV have been conducted without showing measurable damage to the electrodes and insulators.

  14. Design of Digital Learning Material on Social-Psychological Theories for Nutrition Behavior Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busstra, Maria C.; De Graaf, Cees; Hartog, Rob

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the design, implementation and evaluation of digital learning material on the social--psychological Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) and its use in nutrition behavior research. The design is based on guidelines derived from theories on instructional design. The major component of the design challenge is to implement three…

  15. Theory and optical design of x-ray echo spectrometers

    DOE PAGES

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2017-08-02

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a space-domain counterpart of neutron spin echo, is a recently proposed inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) technique. X-ray echo spectroscopy relies on imaging IXS spectra and does not require x-ray monochromatization. Due to this, the echo-type IXS spectrometers are broadband, and thus have a potential to simultaneously provide dramatically increased signal strength, reduced measurement times, and higher resolution compared to the traditional narrow-band scanning-type IXS spectrometers. The theory of x-ray echo spectrometers presented earlier [Yu. Shvyd'ko, Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 080801 (2016)] is developed here further with a focus on questions of practical importance, which could facilitate opticalmore » design and assessment of the feasibility and performance of the echo spectrometers. Among others, the following questions are addressed: spectral resolution, refocusing condition, echo spectrometer tolerances, refocusing condition adjustment, effective beam size on the sample, spectral window of imaging and scanning range, impact of the secondary source size on the spectral resolution, angular dispersive optics, focusing and collimating optics, and detector's spatial resolution. In conclusion, examples of optical designs and characteristics of echo spectrometers with 1-meV and 0.1-meV resolutions are presented.« less

  16. Theory and optical design of x-ray echo spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    X-ray echo spectroscopy, a space-domain counterpart of neutron spin echo, is a recently proposed inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) technique. X-ray echo spectroscopy relies on imaging IXS spectra and does not require x-ray monochromatization. Due to this, the echo-type IXS spectrometers are broadband, and thus have a potential to simultaneously provide dramatically increased signal strength, reduced measurement times, and higher resolution compared to the traditional narrow-band scanning-type IXS spectrometers. The theory of x-ray echo spectrometers presented earlier [Yu. Shvyd'ko, Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 080801 (2016)] is developed here further with a focus on questions of practical importance, which could facilitate opticalmore » design and assessment of the feasibility and performance of the echo spectrometers. Among others, the following questions are addressed: spectral resolution, refocusing condition, echo spectrometer tolerances, refocusing condition adjustment, effective beam size on the sample, spectral window of imaging and scanning range, impact of the secondary source size on the spectral resolution, angular dispersive optics, focusing and collimating optics, and detector's spatial resolution. In conclusion, examples of optical designs and characteristics of echo spectrometers with 1-meV and 0.1-meV resolutions are presented.« less

  17. Multiple scattering theory for total skin electron beam design.

    PubMed

    Antolak, J A; Hogstrom, K R

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to describe a method for designing a broad beam of electrons suitable for total skin electron irradiation (TSEI). A theoretical model of a TSEI beam from a linear accelerator with a dual scattering system has been developed. The model uses Fermi-Eyges theory to predict the planar fluence of the electron beam after it has passed through various materials between the source and the treatment plane, which includes scattering foils, monitor chamber, air, and a plastic diffusing plate. Unique to this model is its accounting for removal of the tails of the electron beam profile as it passes through the primary x-ray jaws. A method for calculating the planar fluence profile for an obliquely incident beam is also described. Off-axis beam profiles and percentage depth doses are measured with ion chambers, film, and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The measured data show that the theoretical model can accurately predict beam energy and planar fluence of the electron beam at normal and oblique incidence. The agreement at oblique angles is not quite as good but is sufficiently accurate to be of predictive value when deciding on the optimal angles for the clinical TSEI beams. The advantage of our calculational approach for designing a TSEI beam is that many different beam configurations can be tested without having to perform time-consuming measurements. Suboptimal configurations can be quickly dismissed, and the predicted optimal solution should be very close to satisfying the clinical specifications.

  18. Design and control of the precise tracking bed based on complex electromechanical design theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Changzhi; Liu, Zhao; Wu, Liao; Chen, Ken

    2010-05-01

    The precise tracking technology is wide used in astronomical instruments, satellite tracking and aeronautic test bed. However, the precise ultra low speed tracking drive system is one high integrated electromechanical system, which one complexly electromechanical design method is adopted to improve the efficiency, reliability and quality of the system during the design and manufacture circle. The precise Tracking Bed is one ultra-exact, ultra-low speed, high precision and huge inertial instrument, which some kind of mechanism and environment of the ultra low speed is different from general technology. This paper explores the design process based on complex electromechanical optimizing design theory, one non-PID with a CMAC forward feedback control method is used in the servo system of the precise tracking bed and some simulation results are discussed.

  19. Study of the internal structure, instabilities, and magnetic fields in the dense Z-pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Vladimir V.

    stagnated plasma will be studied to estimate its contribution to the Doppler broadening of x-ray lines. Development of “necks” and “hot spots” will be studied with high-resolution UV diagnostics, an x-ray streak camera, and x-ray spectroscopy. Laser initiation of hot spots in Z pinches will be tested. A Faraday rotation diagnostic at 266 nm will be applied to 1-10 MG magnetic fields. For magnetic fields B>20 MG, suggested in micropinches, Cotton-Mouton and cutoff diagnostics will be applied. A picosecond optical Kerr shutter will be tested to increase a sensitivity of UV methods for application at multi-MA Z pinches. The proposal is based on the experimental capability of NTF. The Zebra generator produces 1-1.7 MA Z-pinches with electron plasma density of 10 20-10 21cm -3, electron temperature of 0.5-1 keV, and magnetic fields >10 MG. The Leopard laser was upgraded to energy of 90-J at 0.8 ns. This regime will be used for laser initiation of hot spots. A further upgrade to energy of 250-J is suggested for laser-Z-pinch interaction. A picosecond regime will be used for optical gating. A 10-TW Tomcat laser at NTF is available for the high energy UV laser probing of the Z-pinch. Two graduate students will develop new optical and x-ray diagnostics, carry out experiments, and process experimental data. Other students will be involved in the design and fabrication of loads, supporting regular optical and x-ray diagnostics, and data processing. The new plasma diagnostics may be applied to HEDP experiments at NTF and other multi-MA generators. The feasibility of the research plan is based on the experience of the scientific team in Z-pinch plasma physics, laser physics, development of new plasma diagnostics, and the experimental capability of NTF. The experimental group of Dr. V. V. Ivanov (UNR) collaborates with a group for Z pinch MHD modeling of Dr. J. P. Chittenden (Imperial College, London), and theoretical group of Dr. D. D. Ryutov (LLNL). The suggested research ideas

  20. Work Design Theory: A Review and Critique with Implications for Human Resource Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torraco, Richard J.

    2005-01-01

    Six theoretical perspectives on work design are examined for their contributions to our understanding of how work is organized and designed in organizations: sociotechnical systems theory, process improvement, adaptive structuration theory, the job characteristics model, technostructural change models, and activity theory. A critique of these…

  1. A spin-liquid with pinch-line singularities on the pyrochlore lattice

    PubMed Central

    Benton, Owen; Jaubert, L.D.C.; Yan, Han; Shannon, Nic

    2016-01-01

    The mathematics of gauge theories lies behind many of the most profound advances in physics in the past 200 years, from Maxwell's theory of electromagnetism to Einstein's theory of general relativity. More recently it has become clear that gauge theories also emerge in condensed matter, a prime example being the spin-ice materials which host an emergent electromagnetic gauge field. In spin-ice, the underlying gauge structure is revealed by the presence of pinch-point singularities in neutron-scattering measurements. Here we report the discovery of a spin-liquid where the low-temperature physics is naturally described by the fluctuations of a tensor field with a continuous gauge freedom. This gauge structure underpins an unusual form of spin correlations, giving rise to pinch-line singularities: line-like analogues of the pinch points observed in spin-ice. Remarkably, these features may already have been observed in the pyrochlore material Tb2Ti2O7. PMID:27225400

  2. General Systems Theory: Application To The Design Of Speech Communication Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Raymond K.

    1971-01-01

    General systems theory can be applied to problems in the teaching of speech communication courses. The author describes general systems theory as it is applied to the designing, conducting and evaluation of speech communication courses. (Author/MS)

  3. Operationalising elaboration theory for simulation instruction design: a Delphi study.

    PubMed

    Haji, Faizal A; Khan, Rabia; Regehr, Glenn; Ng, Gary; de Ribaupierre, Sandrine; Dubrowski, Adam

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of incorporating the Delphi process within the simplifying conditions method (SCM) described in elaboration theory (ET) to identify conditions impacting the complexity of procedural skills for novice learners. We generated an initial list of conditions impacting the complexity of lumbar puncture (LP) from key informant interviews (n = 5) and a literature review. Eighteen clinician-educators from six different medical specialties were subsequently recruited as expert panellists. Over three Delphi rounds, these panellists rated: (i) their agreement with the inclusion of the simple version of the conditions in a representative ('epitome') training scenario, and (ii) how much the inverse (complex) version increases LP complexity for a novice. Cronbach's α-values were used to assess inter-rater agreement. All panellists completed Rounds 1 and 2 of the survey and 17 completed Round 3. In Round 1, Cronbach's α-values were 0.89 and 0.94 for conditions that simplify and increase LP complexity, respectively; both values increased to 0.98 in Rounds 2 and 3. With the exception of 'high CSF (cerebral spinal fluid) pressure', panellists agreed with the inclusion of all conditions in the simplest (epitome) training scenario. Panellists rated patient movement, spinal anatomy, patient cooperativeness, body habitus, and the presence or absence of an experienced assistant as having the greatest impact on the complexity of LP. This study demonstrated the feasibility of using expert consensus to establish conditions impacting the complexity of procedural skills, and the benefits of incorporating the Delphi method into the SCM. These data can be used to develop and sequence simulation scenarios in a progressively challenging manner. If the theorised learning gains associated with ET are realised, the methods described in this study may be applied to the design of simulation training for other procedural and non-procedural skills

  4. New Perspective on Visual Communication Design Education: An Empirical Study of Applying Narrative Theory to Graphic Design Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Chao-Ming; Hsu, Tzu-Fan

    2017-01-01

    Visual communication design (VCD) is a form of nonverbal communication. The application of relevant linguistic or semiotic theories to VCD education renders graphic design an innovative and scientific discipline. In this study, actual teaching activities were examined to verify the feasibility of applying narrative theory to graphic design…

  5. Augmenting Conceptual Design Trajectory Tradespace Exploration with Graph Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dees, Patrick D.; Zwack, Mathew R.; Steffens, Michael; Edwards, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Within conceptual design changes occur rapidly due to a combination of uncertainty and shifting requirements. To stay relevant in this fluid time, trade studies must also be performed rapidly. In order to drive down analysis time while improving the information gained by these studies, surrogate models can be created to represent the complex output of a tool or tools within a specified tradespace. In order to create this model however, a large amount of data must be collected in a short amount of time. By this method, the historical approach of relying on subject matter experts to generate the data required is schedule infeasible. However, by implementing automation and distributed analysis the required data can be generated in a fraction of the time. Previous work focused on setting up a tool called multiPOST capable of orchestrating many simultaneous runs of an analysis tool assessing these automated analyses utilizing heuristics gleaned from the best practices of current subject matter experts. In this update to the previous work, elements of graph theory are included to further drive down analysis time by leveraging data previously gathered. It is shown to outperform the previous method in both time required, and the quantity and quality of data produced.

  6. Feasibility of combining linear theory and impact theory methods for the analysis and design of high speed configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooke, D.; Vondrasek, D. V.

    1978-01-01

    The aerodynamic influence coefficients calculated using an existing linear theory program were used to modify the pressures calculated using impact theory. Application of the combined approach to several wing-alone configurations shows that the combined approach gives improved predictions of the local pressure and loadings over either linear theory alone or impact theory alone. The approach not only removes most of the short-comings of the individual methods, as applied in the Mach 4 to 8 range, but also provides the basis for an inverse design procedure applicable to high speed configurations.

  7. The Modified Delphi Method to Analyze the Application of Instructional Design Theory to Online Graduate Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeedick, Danielle Marie

    2010-01-01

    During the past several decades, the field of instructional design theory has experienced changes in what is mostly applied to traditional, on-ground education. While instructional design theory has been (and still is being) discussed, constructed, and deconstructed, there has been no agreement among prominent instructional design theory…

  8. Toggle mechanism for pinching metal tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengard, E. O. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A toggle mechanism pinches a metal tube and maintains the tube in a pinched condition, without fracturing. The toggle mechanism includes a plunger translatable along a longitudinal axis, as well as a pair of links pivoted about a common axis extending through an end of the plunger. One of the links also pivots about a fixed axis. A free end of the other link carries a push link which the other link translates at right angles to the plunger longitudinal axis. First and second sides of the tube bear against a first stop block and are engaged by the push link when a compression spring, attached to the plunger, is suddenly released to irreversibly drive the plunger along its longitudinal axis so the pivot point of the two links is driven to an over travel position.

  9. Pinching Solutions of Slender Cylindrical Jets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA 23681.2This research was supported in part by Fondo Nacional de Desarrollo Cientifico y Tecnologico (FONDE...concentrate on inviscid irrotational flows of liquid jets. A review article has been written by Bogy [2]. Of relevance is also the work of Chandrasekhar...equations become elliptic and allow the possibility of admissible pinching solutions described in this article . It is interesting to find that for jets

  10. Compression mechanisms in the plasma focus pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Saw, S. H.; Ali, Jalil

    2017-03-01

    The compression of the plasma focus pinch is a dynamic process, governed by the electrodynamics of pinch elongation and opposed by the negative rate of change of current dI/dt associated with the current dip. The compressibility of the plasma is influenced by the thermodynamics primarily the specific heat ratio; with greater compressibility as the specific heat ratio γ reduces with increasing degree of freedom f of the plasma ensemble due to ionization energy for the higher Z (atomic number) gases. The most drastic compression occurs when the emitted radiation of a high-Z plasma dominates the dynamics leading in extreme cases to radiative collapse which is terminated only when the compressed density is sufficiently high for the inevitable self-absorption of radiation to occur. We discuss the central pinch equation which contains the basic electrodynamic terms with built-in thermodynamic factors and a dQ/dt term; with Q made up of a Joule heat component and absorption-corrected radiative terms. Deuterium is considered as a thermodynamic reference (fully ionized perfect gas with f = 3) as well as a zero-radiation reference (bremsstrahlung only; with radiation power negligible compared with electrodynamic power). Higher Z gases are then considered and regimes of thermodynamic enhancement of compression are systematically identified as are regimes of radiation-enhancement. The code which incorporates all these effects is used to compute pinch radius ratios in various gases as a measure of compression. Systematic numerical experiments reveal increasing severity in radiation-enhancement of compressions as atomic number increases. The work progresses towards a scaling law for radiative collapse and a generalized specific heat ratio incorporating radiation.

  11. Z-Pinch Plasma Neutron Sources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-24

    deuterium into 9 to 14 keV (around 10 keV), which is well in the fusion energy range we are interested in. To make plasma radiation sources work, we...showing the 1-D dynamics of the pinch plasma implosion, temperature, fusion energy production and deposition for the conditions of shot Z1422. The minimum...histories of ion and electron temperatures, fusion energy production and energy deposition in ID RMHD run modeling deuterium shot Z1422. In our simulations

  12. A Complete Multimode Equivalent-Circuit Theory for Electrical Design

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Dylan F.; Hayden, Leonard A.; Marks, Roger B.

    1997-01-01

    This work presents a complete equivalent-circuit theory for lossy multimode transmission lines. Its voltages and currents are based on general linear combinations of standard normalized modal voltages and currents. The theory includes new expressions for transmission line impedance matrices, symmetry and lossless conditions, source representations, and the thermal noise of passive multiports. PMID:27805153

  13. The Need for a Contemporary Theory of Job Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martelli, Joseph T.

    1982-01-01

    Presents a critique of Taylor's scientific management theory and the negative consequences of work simplification. Compares this method with Maslow's, Herzberg's, and Thorsrud's theories of motivation, and contrasts the experiences of General Motors' application of Taylor's model and General Foods' application of Thorsrud's. (SK)

  14. Theory and practice in the design and conduct of graduate medical education.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Brian David; Kuper, Ayelet

    2012-01-01

    Medical education practice is more often the result of tradition, ritual, culture, and history than of any easily expressed theoretical or conceptual framework. The authors explain the importance and nature of the role of theory in the design and conduct of graduate medical education. They outline three groups of theories relevant to graduate medical education: bioscience theories, learning theories, and sociocultural theories. Bioscience theories are familiar to many medical educators but are often misperceived as truths rather than theories. Theories from such disciplines as neuroscience, kinesiology, and cognitive psychology offer insights into areas such as memory formation, motor skills acquisition, diagnostic decision making, and instructional design. Learning theories, primarily emerging from psychology and education, are also popular within medical education. Although widely employed, not all learning theories have robust evidence bases. Nonetheless, many important notions within medical education are derived from learning theories, including self-monitoring, legitimate peripheral participation, and simulation design enabling sustained deliberate practice. Sociocultural theories, which are common in the wider education literature but have been largely overlooked within medical education, are inherently concerned with contexts and systems and provide lenses that selectively highlight different aspects of medical education. They challenge educators to reconceptualize the goals of medical education, to illuminate maladaptive processes, and to untangle problems such as career choice, interprofessional communication, and the hidden curriculum.Theories make visible existing problems and enable educators to ask new and important questions. The authors encourage medical educators to gain greater understanding of theories that guide their educational practices.

  15. Controlled injection using a channel pinch in a plasma-channel-guided laser wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiaqi; Zhang, Zhijun; Liu, Jiansheng; Li, Wentao; Wang, Wentao; Yu, Changhai; Qi, Rong; Qin, Zhiyong; Fang, Ming; Wu, Ying; Feng, Ke; Ke, Lintong; Wang, Cheng; Li, Ruxin

    2018-06-01

    Plasma-channel-guided laser plasma accelerators make it possible to drive high-brilliance compact radiation sources and have high-energy physics applications. Achieving tunable internal injection of the electron beam (e beam) inside the plasma channel, which realizes a tunable radiation source, is a challenging method to extend such applications. In this paper, we propose the use of a channel pinch, which is designed as an initial reduction followed by an expansion of the channel radius along the plasma channel, to achieve internal controlled off-axis e beam injection in a channel-guided laser plasma accelerator. The off-axis injection is triggered by bubble deformation in the expansion region. The dynamics of the plasma wake is explored, and the trapping threshold is found to be reduced radially in the channel pinch. Simulation results show that the channel pinch not only triggers injection process localized at the pinch but also modulates the parameters of the e beam by adjusting its density profile, which can additionally accommodate a tunable radiation source via betatron oscillation.

  16. On the Heating of Ions in Noncylindrical Z-Pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svirsky, E. B.

    2018-01-01

    The method proposed here for analyzing processes in a hot plasma of noncylindrical Z-pinches is based on separation of the group of high-energy ions into a special fraction. Such ions constitute an insignificant fraction ( 10%) of the total volume of the Z-pinch plasma, but these ions contribute the most to the formation of conditions in which the pinch becomes a source of nuclear fusion products and X-ray radiation. The method allows a quite correct approach to obtaining quantitative estimates of the plasma parameters, the nuclear fusion energy yield, and the features of neutron fluxes in experiments with Z-pinches.

  17. Rational evolutionary design: the theory of in vitro protein evolution.

    PubMed

    Voigt, C A; Kauffman, S; Wang, Z G

    2000-01-01

    Directed evolution uses a combination of powerful search techniques to generate proteins with improved properties. Part of the success is due to the stochastic element of random mutagenesis; improvements can be made without a detailed description of the complex interactions that constitute function or stability. However, optimization is not a conglomeration of random processes. Rather, it requires both knowledge of the system that is being optimized and a logical series of techniques that best explores the pathways of evolution (Eigen et al., 1988). The weighing of parameters associated with mutation, recombination, and screening to achieve the maximum fitness improvement is the beginning of rational evolutionary design. The optimal mutation rate is strongly influenced by the finite number of mutants that can be screened. A smooth fitness landscape implies that many mutations can be accumulated without disrupting the fitness. This has the effect of lowering the required library size to sample a higher mutation rate. As the sequence ascends the fitness landscape, the optimal mutation rate decreases as the probability of discovering improved mutations also decreases. Highly coupled regions require that many mutations be simultaneously made to generate a positive mutant. Therefore, positive mutations are discovered at uncoupled positions as the fitness of the parent increases. The benefit of recombination is twofold: it combines good mutations and searches more sequence space in a meaningful way. Recombination is most beneficial when the number of mutants that can be screened is limited and the landscape is of an intermediate ruggedness. The structure of schema in proteins leads to the conclusion that many cut points are required. The number of parents and their sequence identity are determined by the balance between exploration and exploitation. Many disparate parents can explore more space, but at the risk of losing information. The required screening effort is

  18. Analysis and design of nonlinear resonances via singularity theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirillo, G. I.; Habib, G.; Kerschen, G.; Sepulchre, R.

    2017-03-01

    Bifurcation theory and continuation methods are well-established tools for the analysis of nonlinear mechanical systems subject to periodic forcing. We illustrate the added value and the complementary information provided by singularity theory with one distinguished parameter. While tracking bifurcations reveals the qualitative changes in the behaviour, tracking singularities reveals how structural changes are themselves organised in parameter space. The complementarity of that information is demonstrated in the analysis of detached resonance curves in a two-degree-of-freedom system.

  19. The Effect of Tool Handle Shape on Hand Muscle Load and Pinch Force in a Simulated Dental Scaling Task

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hui; Loomer, Peter; Barr, Alan; LaRoche, Charles; Young, Ed; Rempel, David

    2007-01-01

    Work-related upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders, including carpal tunnel syndrome, are prevalent among dentists and dental hygienists. An important risk factor for developing these disorders is forceful pinching which occurs during periodontal work such as dental scaling. Ergonomically designed dental scaling instruments may help reduce the prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome among dental practitioners. In this study, 8 custom-designed dental scaling instruments with different handle shapes were used by 24 dentists and dental hygienists to perform a simulated tooth scaling task. The muscle activity of two extensors and two flexors in the forearm was recorded with electromyography while thumb pinch force was measured by pressure sensors. The results demonstrated that the instrument handle with a tapered, round shape and a 10 mm diameter required the least muscle load and pinch force when performing simulated periodontal work. The results from this study can guide dentists and dental hygienists in selection of dental scaling instruments. PMID:17156742

  20. Relaxation models for single helical reversed field pinch plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paccagnella, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a relaxation theory for plasmas where a single dominant mode is present [Bhattacharjee et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 45, 347 (1980)], is revisited. The solutions of a related eigenvalue problem are numerically calculated and discussed. Although these solutions can reproduce well, the magnetic fields measured in experiments, there is no way within the theory to determine the dominant mode, whose pitch is a free parameter in the model. To find the preferred helical perturbation, a procedure is proposed that minimizes the "distance" of the relaxed state from a state which is constructed as a two region generalization of the Taylor's relaxation model [Taylor, Phys. Rev. Lett. 33, 1139 (1974); Rev. Mod. Phys. 58, 751 (1986)] and that allows current discontinuities. It is found that this comparison is able to predict the observed scaling with the aspect ratio and reversal parameter for the dominant mode in the Single Helical states. The aspect ratio scaling alone is discussed in a previous paper [Paccagnella, Nucl. Fusion 56, 046010 (2016)] in terms of the efficient response of a toroidal shell to specific modes (leaving a sign undetermined), showing that the ideal wall boundary condition, a key ingredient in relaxation theories, is particularly well matched for them. Therefore, the present paper altogether [Paccagnella, Nucl. Fusion 56, 046010 (2016)] can give a new and satisfactory explanation of some robust and reproducible experimental facts observed in the Single Helical Reversed Field Pinch plasmas and never explained before.

  1. The design of patient decision support interventions: addressing the theory-practice gap.

    PubMed

    Elwyn, Glyn; Stiel, Mareike; Durand, Marie-Anne; Boivin, Jacky

    2011-08-01

    Although an increasing number of decision support interventions for patients (including decision aids) are produced, few make explicit use of theory. We argue the importance of using theory to guide design. The aim of this work was to address this theory-practice gap and to examine how a range of selected decision-making theories could inform the design and evaluation of decision support interventions. We reviewed the decision-making literature and selected relevant theories. We assessed their key principles, theoretical pathways and predictions in order to determine how they could inform the design of two core components of decision support interventions, namely, information and deliberation components and to specify theory-based outcome measures. Eight theories were selected: (1) the expected utility theory; (2) the conflict model of decision making; (3) prospect theory; (4) fuzzy-trace theory; (5) the differentiation and consolidation theory; (6) the ecological rationality theory; (7) the rational-emotional model of decision avoidance; and finally, (8) the Attend, React, Explain, Adapt model of affective forecasting. Some theories have strong relevance to the information design (e.g. prospect theory); some are more relevant to deliberation processes (conflict theory, differentiation theory and ecological validity). None of the theories in isolation was sufficient to inform the design of all the necessary components of decision support interventions. It was also clear that most work in theory-building has focused on explaining or describing how humans think rather than on how tools could be designed to help humans make good decisions. It is not surprising therefore that a large theory-practice gap exists as we consider decision support for patients. There was no relevant theory that integrated all the necessary contributions to the task of making good decisions in collaborative interactions. Initiatives such as the International Patient Decision Aids Standards

  2. Towards Cognitive Load Theory as Guideline for Instructional Design in Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meissner, Barbara; Bogner, Franz X.

    2013-01-01

    We applied cognitive load theory in an heuristic out-of-school science lesson. The lesson comprises experiments concerning major attributes of NaCl and was designed for 5th to 8th grade students. Our interest focused on whether cognitive load theory provides sufficient guidelines for instructional design in the field of heuristic science…

  3. Teaching Reform of Course Group Regarding Theory and Design of Mechanisms Based on MATLAB Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Yi; Yuan, Mingxin; Wang, Mingqiang

    2013-01-01

    Considering that the course group regarding theory and design of mechanisms is characterized by strong engineering application background and the students generally feel very boring and tedious during the learning process, some teaching reforms for the theory and design of mechanisms are carried out to improve the teaching effectiveness in this…

  4. Investigation on the pinch point position in heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Lisheng; Shi, Weixiu

    2016-06-01

    The pinch point is important for analyzing heat transfer in thermodynamic cycles. With the aim to reveal the importance of determining the accurate pinch point, the research on the pinch point position is carried out by theoretical method. The results show that the pinch point position depends on the parameters of the heat transfer fluids and the major fluid properties. In most cases, the pinch point locates at the bubble point for the evaporator and the dew point for the condenser. However, the pinch point shifts to the supercooled liquid state in the near critical conditions for the evaporator. Similarly, it shifts to the superheated vapor state with the condensing temperature approaching the critical temperature for the condenser. It even can shift to the working fluid entrance of the evaporator or the supercritical heater when the heat source fluid temperature is very high compared with the absorbing heat temperature. A wrong position for the pinch point may generate serious mistake. In brief, the pinch point should be founded by the iterative method in all conditions rather than taking for granted.

  5. Networking for Teacher Learning: Toward a Theory of Effective Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Joseph P.; Klein, Emily J.

    2003-01-01

    Examines how teacher networks design for teacher learning, describing several dynamic tensions inherent in the designs of a sample of teacher networks and assessing the relationships of these tensions to teacher learning. The paper illustrates these design concepts with reference to the work of seven networks that aim to revamp teacher' knowledge…

  6. Designing IS Curricula for Practical Relevance: Applying Baseball's "Moneyball" Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Surendra, Nanda C.; Denton, James W.

    2009-01-01

    Baseball's "Moneyball" theory states that the baseball market undervalues some attributes (and players with these attributes) that are key contributors to wins while overvaluing other attributes. Teams who correctly evaluate attributes that contribute to wins have higher winning percentages with relatively low payrolls. We applied the Moneyball…

  7. Theory and Practice Meets in Industrial Process Design -Educational Perspective-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aramo-Immonen, Heli; Toikka, Tarja

    Software engineer should see himself as a business process designer in enterprise resource planning system (ERP) re-engineering project. Software engineers and managers should have design dialogue. The objective of this paper is to discuss the motives to study the design research in connection of management education in order to envision and understand the soft human issues in the management context. Second goal is to develop means of practicing social skills between designers and managers. This article explores the affective components of design thinking in industrial management domain. In the conceptual part of this paper are discussed concepts of network and project economy, creativity, communication, use of metaphors, and design thinking. Finally is introduced empirical research plan and first empirical results from design method experiments among the multi-disciplined groups of the master-level students of industrial engineering and management and software engineering.

  8. Influence of pinches on magnetic reconnection in turbulent space plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olshevsky, Vyacheslav; Lapenta, Giovanni; Markidis, Stefano; Divin, Andrey

    A generally accepted scenario of magnetic reconnection in space plasmas is the breakage of magnetic field lines in X-points. In laboratory, reconnection is widely studied in pinches, current channels embedded into twisted magnetic fields. No model of magnetic reconnection in space plasmas considers both null-points and pinches as peers. We have performed a particle-in-cell simulation of magnetic reconnection in a three-dimensional configuration where null-points are present nitially, and Z-pinches are formed during the simulation. The X-points are relatively stable, and no substantial energy dissipation is associated with them. On contrary, turbulent magnetic reconnection in the pinches causes the magnetic energy to decay at a rate of approximately 1.5 percent per ion gyro period. Current channels and twisted magnetic fields are ubiquitous in turbulent space plasmas, so pinches can be responsible for the observed high magnetic reconnection rates.

  9. Effect of transcranial magnetic stimulation on force of finger pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odagaki, Masato; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Hiwaki, Osamu

    2009-04-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is used to explore many aspects of brain function, and to treat neurological disorders. Cortical motor neuronal activation by TMS over the primary motor cortex (M1) produces efferent signals that pass through the corticospinal tracts. Motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) are observed in muscles innervated by the stimulated motor cortex. TMS can cause a silent period (SP) following MEP in voluntary electromyography (EMG). The present study examined the effects of TMS eliciting MEP and SP on the force of pinching using two fingers. Subjects pinched a wooden block with the thumb and index finger. TMS was applied to M1 during the pinch task. EMG of first dorsal interosseous muscles and pinch forces were measured. Force output increased after the TMS, and then oscillated. The results indicated that the motor control system to keep isotonic forces of the muscles participated in the finger pinch was disrupted by the TMS.

  10. 250 kA compact linear transformer driver for wire array z-pinch loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bott, S. C.; Haas, D. M.; Madden, R. E.; Ueda, U.; Eshaq, Y.; Collins, G., IV; Gunasekera, K.; Mariscal, D.; Peebles, J.; Beg, F. N.; Mazarakis, M.; Struve, K.; Sharpe, R.

    2011-05-01

    We present the application of a short rise (˜150ns) 250 kA linear transformer driver (LTD) to wire array z-pinch loads for the first time. The generator is a modification of a previous driver in which a new conical power feed provides a low inductance coupling to wire loads. Performance of the new design using both short circuit and plasma loads is presented and discussed. The final design delivers ˜200kA to a wire array load which is in good agreement with SCREAMER calculations using a simplified representative circuit. Example results demonstrate successful experiments using cylindrical, conical, and inverse wire arrays as well as previously published work on x-pinch loads.

  11. Radiant coolers - Theory, flight histories, design comparisons and future applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donohoe, M. J.; Sherman, A.; Hickman, D. E.

    1975-01-01

    Radiant coolers have been developed for application to the cooling of infrared detectors aboard NASA earth observation systems and as part of the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program. The prime design constraints for these coolers are the location of the cooler aboard the satellite and the satellite orbit. Flight data from several coolers indicates that, in general, design temperatures are achieved. However, potential problems relative to the contamination of cold surfaces are also revealed by the data. A comparison among the various cooler designs and flight performances indicates design improvements that can minimize the contamination problem in the future.

  12. Harnessing International Relations Theory to Security Cooperation Program Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-22

    behavior. One of the most famous Liberal theorists is the philosopher Immanuel Kant , whose theory of “Perpetual Peace” centered on a vision where “free...democratic states would retain their sovereignty while working together to avoid war.”17 Kant ‟s vision has repeatedly been channeled into a desire...Interdependence and Liberal Institutionalist thinkers share roots with Grotius and Kant , and believe that there is a larger civil society where interstate

  13. A z-pinch photo-pumped pulsed atomic iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, D. H.; Saunders, D. P.; Clark, M. C.

    1984-03-01

    A pulsed atomic iodine laser (CF3I) was designed and constructed using a coaxial xenon flash lamp as a pump source. The flash lamp was operated at low pressure to obtain pulse compression via xenon self-pinch. Electrical and optical diagnostics were performed for various xenon and CF3I pressures. Calorimeter data and burn patterns were obtained for the laser. Time-resolved spectroscopic data were taken throughout the CF3I pump band.

  14. Yokoi's Theory of Lateral Innovation: Applications for Learning Game Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Scott J.; Jones, Greg

    2008-01-01

    There are several major challenges for instructional designers seeking to design learning games. These include the lack of access, the cost of rapidly advancing/expensive technology tools that make developing games uneconomical, the institutional time constraints limiting game use, and the concerns that schools lack sufficiently robust computer…

  15. Developing Learning Theory by Refining Conjectures Embodied in Educational Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandoval, William A.

    2004-01-01

    Designed learning environments embody conjectures about learning and instruction, and the empirical study of learning environments allows such conjectures to be refined over time. The construct of embodied conjecture is introduced as a way to demonstrate the theoretical nature of learning environment design and to frame methodological issues in…

  16. Age-Related and Sex-Related Differences in Hand and Pinch Grip Strength in Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puh, Urska

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to quantify age-related changes in hand grip strength and three types of pinch grip strength (key pinch, tip pinch, and palmar pinch) among male and female participants. The study included 199 healthy participants (100 females, 99 males) aged 20-79 years, who were divided into four age groups. The Baseline Hydraulic…

  17. Robust synthetic biology design: stochastic game theory approach.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bor-Sen; Chang, Chia-Hung; Lee, Hsiao-Ching

    2009-07-15

    Synthetic biology is to engineer artificial biological systems to investigate natural biological phenomena and for a variety of applications. However, the development of synthetic gene networks is still difficult and most newly created gene networks are non-functioning due to uncertain initial conditions and disturbances of extra-cellular environments on the host cell. At present, how to design a robust synthetic gene network to work properly under these uncertain factors is the most important topic of synthetic biology. A robust regulation design is proposed for a stochastic synthetic gene network to achieve the prescribed steady states under these uncertain factors from the minimax regulation perspective. This minimax regulation design problem can be transformed to an equivalent stochastic game problem. Since it is not easy to solve the robust regulation design problem of synthetic gene networks by non-linear stochastic game method directly, the Takagi-Sugeno (T-S) fuzzy model is proposed to approximate the non-linear synthetic gene network via the linear matrix inequality (LMI) technique through the Robust Control Toolbox in Matlab. Finally, an in silico example is given to illustrate the design procedure and to confirm the efficiency and efficacy of the proposed robust gene design method. http://www.ee.nthu.edu.tw/bschen/SyntheticBioDesign_supplement.pdf.

  18. The CAL: cognitive, apperceptive and representative aspects of fashion design - Side note to neuroaesthetic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csanák, Edit

    2017-10-01

    This article deals with the creative and cognitive process of the creative work from the aspect of fashion design. It is examined through the Cognitive-Apperceptive-Limn process (The CAL), analysing the stages of design work referring to prominent literature, and discussing exciting theories, such the FLOW and the AHA effects are, and the neuro aesthetic theory. Setting them into a new context, the article offers a fresh approach of a designer, rather than a scientific statement based on pragmatic findings. Since theories on artistic performance and creativity can never be enough ‘empirical’, and the process can be never understood enough well…

  19. NDARC NASA Design and Analysis of Rotorcraft. Appendix 5; Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wayne

    2017-01-01

    The NASA Design and Analysis of Rotorcraft (NDARC) software is an aircraft system analysis tool that supports both conceptual design efforts and technology impact assessments. The principal tasks are to design (or size) a rotorcraft to meet specified requirements, including vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) operation, and then analyze the performance of the aircraft for a set of conditions. For broad and lasting utility, it is important that the code have the capability to model general rotorcraft configurations, and estimate the performance and weights of advanced rotor concepts. The architecture of the NDARC code accommodates configuration flexibility, a hierarchy of models, and ultimately multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization. Initially the software is implemented with low-fidelity models, typically appropriate for the conceptual design environment. An NDARC job consists of one or more cases, each case optionally performing design and analysis tasks. The design task involves sizing the rotorcraft to satisfy specified design conditions and missions. The analysis tasks can include off-design mission performance calculation, flight performance calculation for point operating conditions, and generation of subsystem or component performance maps. For analysis tasks, the aircraft description can come from the sizing task, from a previous case or a previous NDARC job, or be independently generated (typically the description of an existing aircraft). The aircraft consists of a set of components, including fuselage, rotors, wings, tails, and propulsion. For each component, attributes such as performance, drag, and weight can be calculated; and the aircraft attributes are obtained from the sum of the component attributes. Description and analysis of conventional rotorcraft configurations is facilitated, while retaining the capability to model novel and advanced concepts. Specific rotorcraft configurations considered are single-main-rotor and tail

  20. NDARC: NASA Design and Analysis of Rotorcraft. Appendix 3; Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wayne

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Design and Analysis of Rotorcraft (NDARC) software is an aircraft system analysis tool that supports both conceptual design efforts and technology impact assessments. The principal tasks are to design (or size) a rotorcraft to meet speci?ed requirements, including vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) operation, and then analyze the performance of the aircraft for a set of conditions. For broad and lasting utility, it is important that the code have the capability to model general rotorcraft con?gurations, and estimate the performance and weights of advanced rotor concepts. The architecture of the NDARC code accommodates con?guration ?exibility, a hierarchy of models, and ultimately multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization. Initially the software is implemented with low-?delity models, typically appropriate for the conceptual design environment. An NDARC job consists of one or more cases, each case optionally performing design and analysis tasks. The design task involves sizing the rotorcraft to satisfy speci?ed design conditions and missions. The analysis tasks can include off-design mission performance calculation, ?ight performance calculation for point operating conditions, and generation of subsystem or component performance maps. For analysis tasks, the aircraft description can come from the sizing task, from a previous case or a previous NDARC job, or be independently generated (typically the description of an existing aircraft). The aircraft consists of a set of components, including fuselage, rotors, wings, tails, and propulsion. For each component, attributes such as performance, drag, and weight can be calculated; and the aircraft attributes are obtained from the sum of the component attributes. Description and analysis of conventional rotorcraft con?gurations is facilitated, while retaining the capability to model novel and advanced concepts. Speci?c rotorcraft con?gurations considered are single-main-rotor and tail-rotor helicopter

  1. NDARC NASA Design and Analysis of Rotorcraft Theory Appendix 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wayne

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Design and Analysis of Rotorcraft (NDARC) software is an aircraft system analysis tool that supports both conceptual design efforts and technology impact assessments. The principal tasks are to design (or size) a rotorcraft to meet specified requirements, including vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) operation, and then analyze the performance of the aircraft for a set of conditions. For broad and lasting utility, it is important that the code have the capability to model general rotorcraft configurations, and estimate the performance and weights of advanced rotor concepts. The architecture of the NDARC code accommodates configuration flexibility, a hierarchy of models, and ultimately multidisciplinary design, analysis, and optimization. Initially the software is implemented with low-fidelity models, typically appropriate for the conceptual design environment. An NDARC job consists of one or more cases, each case optionally performing design and analysis tasks. The design task involves sizing the rotorcraft to satisfy specified design conditions and missions. The analysis tasks can include off-design mission performance calculation, flight performance calculation for point operating conditions, and generation of subsystem or component performance maps. For analysis tasks, the aircraft description can come from the sizing task, from a previous case or a previous NDARC job, or be independently generated (typically the description of an existing aircraft). The aircraft consists of a set of components, including fuselage, rotors, wings, tails, and propulsion. For each component, attributes such as performance, drag, and weight can be calculated; and the aircraft attributes are obtained from the sum of the component attributes. Description and analysis of conventional rotorcraft configurations is facilitated, while retaining the capability to model novel and advanced concepts. Specific rotorcraft configurations considered are single-main-rotor and tail

  2. Resistive wall modes in the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunsell, P. R.; Malmberg, J.-A.; Yadikin, D.; Cecconello, M.

    2003-10-01

    Resistive wall modes (RWM) in the reversed field pinch are studied and a detailed comparison of experimental growth rates and linear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory is made. RWM growth rates are experimentally measured in the thin shell device EXTRAP T2R [P. R. Brunsell et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 43, 1 (2001)]. Linear MHD calculations of RWM growth rates are based on experimental equilibria. Experimental and linear MHD RWM growth rate dependency on the equilibrium profiles is investigated experimentally by varying the pinch parameter Θ=Bθ(a)/ in the range Θ=1.5-1.8. Quantitative agreement between experimental and linear MHD growth rates is seen. The dominating RWMs are the internal on-axis modes (having the same helicity as the central equilibrium field). At high Θ, external nonresonant modes are also observed. For internal modes experimental growth rates decrease with Θ while for external modes, growth rates increase with Θ. The effect of RWMs on the reversed-field pinch plasma performance is discussed.

  3. Theory and Design of Flight-Vehicle Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhdanov, V. T. (Editor); Kurziner, R. I. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    Papers are presented on such topics as the testing of aircraft engines, errors in the experimental determination of the parameters of scramjet engines, the effect of the nonuniformity of supersonic flow with shocks on friction and heat transfer in the channel of a hypersonic ramjet engine, and the selection of the basic parameters of cooled GTE turbines. Consideration is also given to the choice of optimal total wedge angle for the acceleration of aerospace vehicles, the theory of an electromagnetic-resonator engine, the dynamic characteristics of the pumps and turbines of liquid propellant rocket engines in transition regimes, and a hierarchy of mathematical models for spacecraft control engines.

  4. Theory of Aircraft Collision-Avoidance System Design and Evaluation

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1971-05-01

    The problem of aircraft anti-collision system design and evaluation is discussed in this work. Two evaluation criteria, conflict ratio and probability of missed critical alarm are formulated and are found to be independent of both traffic density and...

  5. The quantum pinch effect in semiconducting quantum wires: A bird’s-eye view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, Manvir S.

    2016-01-01

    Those who measure success with culmination do not seem to be aware that life is a journey not a destination. This spirit is best reflected in the unceasing failures in efforts for solving the problem of controlled thermonuclear fusion for even the simplest pinches for over decades; and the nature keeps us challenging with examples. However, these efforts have permitted researchers the obtention of a dense plasma with a lifetime that, albeit short, is sufficient to study the physics of the pinch effect, to create methods of plasma diagnostics, and to develop a modern theory of plasma processes. Most importantly, they have impregnated the solid state plasmas, particularly the electron-hole plasmas in semiconductors, which do not suffer from the issues related with the confinement and which have demonstrated their potential not only for the fundamental physics but also for the device physics. Here, we report on a two-component, cylindrical, quasi-one-dimensional quantum plasma subjected to a radial confining harmonic potential and an applied magnetic field in the symmetric gauge. It is demonstrated that such a system, as can be realized in semiconducting quantum wires, offers an excellent medium for observing the quantum pinch effect at low temperatures. An exact analytical solution of the problem allows us to make significant observations: Surprisingly, in contrast to the classical pinch effect, the particle density as well as the current density display a determinable maximum before attaining a minimum at the surface of the quantum wire. The effect will persist as long as the equilibrium pair density is sustained. Therefore, the technological promise that emerges is the route to the precise electronic devices that will control the particle beams at the nanoscale.

  6. Parametric effects on pinch-off modes in liquid/liquid jet systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milosevic, Ilija N.

    Many industries rely on liquid/liquid extraction systems, where jet pinch off occurs on a regular basis. Inherent short time and length scales make analytical and numerical simulation of the process very challenging. A main objective of this work was to document the details of various pinch-off modes at different length scales using Laser Induced Fluorescence and Particle Image Velocimetry. A water glycerine mixture was injected into ambient either silicone oil or 1-octanol. The resultant viscosity ratios, inner to outer fluid, were 1.6 and 2.8, respectively. Ohnesorge numbers were 0.013 for ambient silicone oil and 0.08 for ambient 1-octanol. Reynolds and Strouhal numbers ranged from 30 to 100 and 0.5 to 3.5, respectively. Decreasing the Strouhal number increased the number of drops formed per forcing. Increasing the Reynolds number suppressed satellite formation, and in some cases the number of drops decreased from two to one per cycle. Increasing the Ohnesorge number to 0.08 suppressed the pinch off yielding a longer jet with three-dimensional threads. At Ohnesorge number 0.013, increasing the forcing amplitude shortened the jet, and eventually led to a dripping mode. High-resolution measurements of pinch-off angles were compared to results from similarity theory. Two modes were investigated: drops breaking from the jet (jet/drop) and, one drop splitting into two (splitting drop). The jet/drop mode angle measurements agreed with similarity predictions. The splitting drop mode converged towards smaller angles. Scaling analysis showed that a Stokesian similarity regime applied for a neck radius of 6 microns or less. The smallest radius observed in experiments was 15 microns. Therefore, it is not known whether splitting drop mode might still converge to same behavior.

  7. From theory to experimental design-Quantifying a trait-based theory of predator-prey dynamics.

    PubMed

    Laubmeier, A N; Wootton, Kate; Banks, J E; Bommarco, Riccardo; Curtsdotter, Alva; Jonsson, Tomas; Roslin, Tomas; Banks, H T

    2018-01-01

    Successfully applying theoretical models to natural communities and predicting ecosystem behavior under changing conditions is the backbone of predictive ecology. However, the experiments required to test these models are dictated by practical constraints, and models are often opportunistically validated against data for which they were never intended. Alternatively, we can inform and improve experimental design by an in-depth pre-experimental analysis of the model, generating experiments better targeted at testing the validity of a theory. Here, we describe this process for a specific experiment. Starting from food web ecological theory, we formulate a model and design an experiment to optimally test the validity of the theory, supplementing traditional design considerations with model analysis. The experiment itself will be run and described in a separate paper. The theory we test is that trophic population dynamics are dictated by species traits, and we study this in a community of terrestrial arthropods. We depart from the Allometric Trophic Network (ATN) model and hypothesize that including habitat use, in addition to body mass, is necessary to better model trophic interactions. We therefore formulate new terms which account for micro-habitat use as well as intra- and interspecific interference in the ATN model. We design an experiment and an effective sampling regime to test this model and the underlying assumptions about the traits dominating trophic interactions. We arrive at a detailed sampling protocol to maximize information content in the empirical data obtained from the experiment and, relying on theoretical analysis of the proposed model, explore potential shortcomings of our design. Consequently, since this is a "pre-experimental" exercise aimed at improving the links between hypothesis formulation, model construction, experimental design and data collection, we hasten to publish our findings before analyzing data from the actual experiment, thus

  8. Users/consumers differences regarding ergonomics and design theory and practice.

    PubMed

    Dejean, Pierre-Henri; Wagstaff, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the concept of direct and indirect users, a key issue to cooperation between ergonomists, designers and managers involved in a sustainable approach to design. What issues for Ergonomics and Design are launched by this concept? User/consumer differences should be approached taking into account Ergonomics and Design theory and practice. What dialogue and tools could help the ergonomist/designer/manager to respond to all the requirements of the future clients of the product?

  9. Computer-based teaching module design: principles derived from learning theories.

    PubMed

    Lau, K H Vincent

    2014-03-01

    The computer-based teaching module (CBTM), which has recently gained prominence in medical education, is a teaching format in which a multimedia program serves as a single source for knowledge acquisition rather than playing an adjunctive role as it does in computer-assisted learning (CAL). Despite empirical validation in the past decade, there is limited research into the optimisation of CBTM design. This review aims to summarise research in classic and modern multimedia-specific learning theories applied to computer learning, and to collapse the findings into a set of design principles to guide the development of CBTMs. Scopus was searched for: (i) studies of classic cognitivism, constructivism and behaviourism theories (search terms: 'cognitive theory' OR 'constructivism theory' OR 'behaviourism theory' AND 'e-learning' OR 'web-based learning') and their sub-theories applied to computer learning, and (ii) recent studies of modern learning theories applied to computer learning (search terms: 'learning theory' AND 'e-learning' OR 'web-based learning') for articles published between 1990 and 2012. The first search identified 29 studies, dominated in topic by the cognitive load, elaboration and scaffolding theories. The second search identified 139 studies, with diverse topics in connectivism, discovery and technical scaffolding. Based on their relative representation in the literature, the applications of these theories were collapsed into a list of CBTM design principles. Ten principles were identified and categorised into three levels of design: the global level (managing objectives, framing, minimising technical load); the rhetoric level (optimising modality, making modality explicit, scaffolding, elaboration, spaced repeating), and the detail level (managing text, managing devices). This review examined the literature in the application of learning theories to CAL to develop a set of principles that guide CBTM design. Further research will enable educators to

  10. Artificial Instruction. A Method for Relating Learning Theory to Instructional Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohlsson, Stellan

    Prior research on learning has been linked to instruction by the derivation of general principles of instructional design from learning theories. However, such design principles are often difficult to apply to particular instructional issues. A new method for relating research on learning to instructional design is proposed: Different ways of…

  11. Design for human factors (DfHF): a grounded theory for integrating human factors into production design processes.

    PubMed

    Village, Judy; Searcy, Cory; Salustri, Filipo; Patrick Neumann, W

    2015-01-01

    The 'design for human factors' grounded theory explains 'how' human factors (HF) went from a reactive, after-injury programme in safety, to being proactively integrated into each step of the production design process. In this longitudinal case study collaboration with engineers and HF Specialists in a large electronics manufacturer, qualitative data (e.g. meetings, interviews, observations and reflections) were analysed using a grounded theory methodology. The central tenet in the theory is that when HF Specialists acclimated to the engineering process, language and tools, and strategically aligned HF to the design and business goals of the organisation, HF became a means to improve business performance. This led to engineers 'pulling' HF Specialists onto their team. HF targets were adopted into engineering tools to communicate HF concerns quantitatively, drive continuous improvement, visibly demonstrate change and lead to benchmarking. Senior management held engineers accountable for HF as a key performance indicator, thus integrating HF into the production design process. Practitioner Summary: Research and practice lack explanations about how HF can be integrated early in design of production systems. This three-year case study and the theory derived demonstrate how ergonomists changed their focus to align with design and business goals to integrate HF into the design process.

  12. IB-LBM study on cell sorting by pinched flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jingtao; Xu, Yuanqing; Tian, Fangbao; Tang, Xiaoying

    2014-01-01

    Separation of two categories of cells in pinched flow fractionation(PFF) device is simulated by employing IB-LBM. The separation performances at low Reynolds number (about 1) under different pinched segment widths, flow ratios, cell features, and distances between neighboring cells are studied and the results are compared with those predicted by the empirical formula. The simulation indicates that the diluent flow rate should approximate to or more than the flow rate of particle solution in order to get a relatively ideal separation performance. The discrepancy of outflow position between numerical simulation and the empirical prediction enlarges, when the cells become more flexible. Too short distance between two neighboring cells could lead to cell banding which would result in incomplete separation, and the relative position of two neighboring cells influences the banding of cells. The present study will probably provide some new applications of PFF, and make some suggestions on the design of PFF devices.

  13. The Role of Modern Control Theory in the Design of Controls for Aircraft Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeller, J.; Lehtinen, B.; Merrill, W.

    1982-01-01

    Accomplishments in applying Modern Control Theory to the design of controls for advanced aircraft turbine engines were reviewed. The results of successful research programs are discussed. Ongoing programs as well as planned or recommended future thrusts are also discussed.

  14. Parallel Operation of Multiple Closely Spaced Small Aspect Ratio Rod Pinches

    DOE PAGES

    Harper-Slaboszewicz, Victor J.; Leckbee, Joshua; Bennett, Nichelle; ...

    2014-12-10

    A series of simulations and experiments to resolve questions about the operation of arrays of closely spaced small aspect ratio rod pinches has been performed. Design and post-shot analysis of the experimental results are supported by 3D particle-in-cell simulations. Both simulations and experiments support these conclusions. Penetration of current to the interior of the array appears to be efficient, as the current on the center rods is essentially equal to the current on the outer rods. Current loss in the feed due to the formation of magnetic nulls was avoided in these experiments by design of the feed surface ofmore » the cathode and control of the gap to keep the electric fields on the cathode below the emission threshold. Some asymmetry in the electron flow to the rod was observed, but the flow appeared to symmetrize as it reached the end of the rod. Interaction between the rod pinches can be controlled to allow the stable and consistent operation of arrays of rod pinches.« less

  15. Studies of the Plasma Triggering Mechanism of Inverse Pinch Switch

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-11-10

    plasma - focus driven plasma-puff was also discussed in comparison with the hypocycloidal pinch plasma-puff triggering. The main discharge of inverse pinch switch with plasma - focus driven plasma-puff trigger is found to be more azimuthally uniform than that with hypocycloidal pinch plasma-puff trigger in a gas pressure region between 80 mTorr and 1 Torr. A comparative study of the INPIStron and a spark gap also reveals that the INPIStron with a low impedance Z = 9 ohms can transfer a high voltage pulse with a superior pulse-shape fidelity over that with

  16. Designing Innovative Counseling Courses: Combining Technology, Theory, and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cicco, Gina

    2012-01-01

    This article will discuss the development of an innovative instructional design for teaching graduate courses in counselor education programs. The teaching strategies that will be highlighted evolved during a collaborative team-teaching project conducted by two counselor educators. These two faculty members worked together to redesign a course in…

  17. Examining Student-Designed Games through Suits' Theory of Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Ashley; Hastie, Peter; Jump, Steve

    2016-01-01

    This paper documents how a unit of student-designed games can create a more meaningful version of physical education (PE) for disengaged students, a version that enhances the educational legitimacy of the subject matter by affording it worth in and of itself rather than being justified for other, extrinsic or instrumental reasons. Furthermore, it…

  18. Large-Scale Linear Optimization through Machine Learning: From Theory to Practical System Design and Implementation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-10

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2016-0073 Large-scale Linear Optimization through Machine Learning: From Theory to Practical System Design and Implementation ...2016 4.  TITLE AND SUBTITLE Large-scale Linear Optimization through Machine Learning: From Theory to Practical System Design and Implementation 5a...performances on various machine learning tasks and it naturally lends itself to fast parallel implementations . Despite this, very little work has been

  19. Using Theory and Simulation to Design Self-Healing Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-16

    blends, microcapsules Anna C. Balazs University of Pittsburgh Office of Sponsored Programs 3700 O’Hara St Pittsburgh, PA 15260 - REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE...novel computational approach (P5) to simulate the rolling motion of fluid-driven, particle-filled microcapsules along heterogeneous, adhesive substrates...established guidelines for designing particle-filled microcapsules that perform a “repair and go” function and could ultimately be used to restore

  20. Development of a Dependency Theory Toolbox for Database Design.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    published algorithms and theorems , and hand simulating these algorithms can be a tedious and error prone chore. Additionally, since the process of...to design and study relational databases exists in the form of published algorithms and theorems . However, hand simulating these algorithms can be a...published algorithms and theorems . Hand simulating these algorithms can be a tedious and error prone chore. Therefore, a toolbox of algorithms and

  1. Theory of reliable systems. [systems analysis and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    The analysis and design of reliable systems are discussed. The attributes of system reliability studied are fault tolerance, diagnosability, and reconfigurability. Objectives of the study include: to determine properties of system structure that are conducive to a particular attribute; to determine methods for obtaining reliable realizations of a given system; and to determine how properties of system behavior relate to the complexity of fault tolerant realizations. A list of 34 references is included.

  2. Aberration Theory and Design Techniques for Refracting Prism Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Bizri, N.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. The general case of image formation by optical systems consisting of combinations of ordinary lens components and refracting prisms is studied in detail. Formulae for the sagittal and tangential magnifications, the pupil scale ratios, the image tilt, the positions of (newly defined) principal planes and the equivalent focal lengths have been derived. Formulae for the axial astigmatism, axial transverse chromatic aberration and the focal shift measure of the aberration due to the tilt of the image plane have also been obtained. All of these formulae are equally valid for any optical system which has a single plane of symmetry. The calculation of the wavefront aberration coefficients and of the variance of the aberration for such systems has been treated using the pre-inverted matrix method. In addition formulae for the numerical evaluation of the optical transfer function, the point spread function, the line spread function and the edge response function, have been obtained and programmed. First-order formulae, and a refinement technique, for the design of cemented refracting doublet prisms have been obtained, which ensure that the desired prismatic deviation of the axis is obtained, and that the axial astigmatism and the axial transverse chromatic aberration have stipulated target values. All of the above formulae have been carefully tested by numerical examples, and the design technique has been used to design endoscope objectives which provide small deviations (<10^circ ) of the optical axis.

  3. Theory-driven design of hole-conducting transparent oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimarchi, G.; Peng, H.; Im, J.; Freeman, A. J.; Cloet, V.; Raw, A.; Poeppelmeier, K. R.; Biswas, K.; Lany, S.; Zunger, A.

    2012-02-01

    The design of p-type transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) aims at simultaneously achieving transparency and high hole concentration and hole conductivity in one compound. Such design principles (DPs) define a multi-objective optimization problem that is to be solved by searching a large set of compounds for optimum ones. Here, we screen a large set of ternary compounds, including Ag and Cu oxides and chalcogenides, by calculating via first-principles methods the design properties of each compound, in order to search for optimum p-type TCOs. We first select Ag3VO4 as a case study of the application of ab-initio methods to assess a compound as a candidate p-type TCO. We predict Ag3VO4 (i) to have a hole concentration of 10^14 cm-3 at room temperature, (ii) to be at the verge of transparency, and (iii) to have lower hole effective mass than the prototype p-type TCO CuAlO2. We then map the hole effective mass vs. the band gap in the selected compounds and determine those that best meet the DPs by having simultaneously minimum effective mass and a band gap large enough for transparency.

  4. Unique sodium phosphosilicate glasses designed through extended topological constraint theory.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Huidan; Jiang, Qi; Liu, Zhao; Li, Xiang; Ren, Jing; Chen, Guorong; Liu, Fude; Peng, Shou

    2014-05-15

    Sodium phosphosilicate glasses exhibit unique properties with mixed network formers, and have various potential applications. However, proper understanding on the network structures and property-oriented methodology based on compositional changes are lacking. In this study, we have developed an extended topological constraint theory and applied it successfully to analyze the composition dependence of glass transition temperature (Tg) and hardness of sodium phosphosilicate glasses. It was found that the hardness and Tg of glasses do not always increase with the content of SiO2, and there exist maximum hardness and Tg at a certain content of SiO2. In particular, a unique glass (20Na2O-17SiO2-63P2O5) exhibits a low glass transition temperature (589 K) but still has relatively high hardness (4.42 GPa) mainly due to the high fraction of highly coordinated network former Si((6)). Because of its convenient forming and manufacturing, such kind of phosphosilicate glasses has a lot of valuable applications in optical fibers, optical amplifiers, biomaterials, and fuel cells. Also, such methodology can be applied to other types of phosphosilicate glasses with similar structures.

  5. Theory and Practice in the Design of Physician Payment Incentives

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, James C.

    2001-01-01

    Combining the economic literature on principal-agent relationships with examples of marketplace innovations allows analysis of the evolution of methods for paying physicians. Agency theory and the economic principles of performance-based compensation are applied in the context of imperfect information, risk aversion, multiple interrelated tasks, and team production efficiencies. Fee-for-service and capitation are flawed methods of motivating physicians to achieve specific goals. Payment innovations that blend elements of fee-for-service, capitation, and case rates can preserve the advantages and attenuate the disadvantages of each. These innovations include capitation with fee-for-service carve-outs, department budgets with individual fee-for-service or “contact” capitation, and case rates for defined episodes of illness. The context within which payment incentives are embedded, includes such nonprice mechanisms as screening and monitoring and such organizational relationships as employment and ownership. The analysis has implications for health services research and public policy with respect to physician payment incentives. PMID:11439463

  6. Energy required to pinch a DNA plectoneme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barde, Céline; Destainville, Nicolas; Manghi, Manoel

    2018-03-01

    DNA supercoiling plays an important role from a biological point of view. One of its consequences at the supramolecular level is the formation of DNA superhelices named plectonemes. Normally separated by a distance on the order of 10 nm, the two opposite double strands of a DNA plectoneme must be brought closer if a protein or protein complex implicated in genetic regulation is to be bound simultaneously to both strands, as if the plectoneme was locally pinched. We propose an analytic calculation of the energetic barrier, of elastic nature, required to bring closer the two loci situated on the opposed double strands. We examine how this energy barrier scales with the DNA supercoiling. For physically relevant values of elastic parameters and of supercoiling density, we show that the energy barrier is in the kBT range under physiological conditions, thus demonstrating that the limiting step to loci encounter is more likely the preceding plectoneme slithering bringing the two loci side by side.

  7. Pinching solutions of slender cylindrical jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papageorgiou, Demetrios T.; Orellana, Oscar

    1993-01-01

    Simplified equations for slender jets are derived for a circular jet of one fluid flowing into an ambient second fluid, the flow being confined in a circular tank. Inviscid flows are studied which include both surface tension effects and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. For slender jets a coupled nonlinear system of equations is found for the jet shape and the axial velocity jump across it. The equations can break down after a finite time and similarity solutions are constructed, and studied analytically and numerically. The break-ups found pertain to the jet pinching after a finite time, without violation of the slender jet ansatz. The system is conservative and admissible singular solutions are those which conserve the total energy, mass, and momentum. Such solutions are constructed analytically and numerically, and in the case of vortex sheets with no surface tension certain solutions are given in closed form.

  8. Five roles for using theory and evidence in the design and testing of behavior change interventions.

    PubMed

    Bartholomew, L Kay; Mullen, Patricia Dolan

    2011-01-01

    The prevailing wisdom in the field of health-related behavior change is that well-designed and effective interventions are guided by theory. Using the framework of intervention mapping, we describe and provide examples of how investigators can effectively select and use theory to design, test, and report interventions. We propose five roles for theory and evidence about theories: a) identification of behavior and determinants of behavior related to a specified health problem (i.e., the logic model of the problem); b) explication of a causal model that includes theoretical constructs for producing change in the behavior of interest (i.e., the logic model of change); c) selection of intervention methods and delivery of practical applications to achieve changes in health behavior; d) evaluation of the resulting intervention including theoretical mediating variables; and e) reporting of the active ingredients of the intervention together with the evaluation results. In problem-driven applied behavioral or social science, researchers use one or multiple theories, empiric evidence, and new research, both to assess a problem and to solve or prevent a problem. Furthermore, the theories for description of the problem may differ from the theories for its solution. In an applied approach, the main focus is on solving problems regarding health behavior change and improvement of health outcomes, and the criteria for success are formulated in terms of the problem rather than the theory. Resulting contributions to theory development may be quite useful, but they are peripheral to the problem-solving process.

  9. A comparison of design variables for control theory based airfoil optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuther, James; Jameson, Antony

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of optimization techniques based on control theory for airfoil design. In our previous work in the area it was shown that control theory could be employed to devise effective optimization procedures for two-dimensional profiles by using either the potential flow or the Euler equations with either a conformal mapping or a general coordinate system. We have also explored three-dimensional extensions of these formulations recently. The goal of our present work is to demonstrate the versatility of the control theory approach by designing airfoils using both Hicks-Henne functions and B-spline control points as design variables. The research also demonstrates that the parameterization of the design space is an open question in aerodynamic design.

  10. A theory of requirements definition in engineering design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eodice, Michael Thomas

    2000-10-01

    Traditional requirements-definition activities begin with the engineer or design team performing a needs-analysis to identify user requirements. Needs-analysis is generally subjective, and varies according to the composition and experience of the design team. Systematic procedures for defining and ranking requirements are necessary to consolidate the foundation on which the design process is predicated, and to enhance its outcome by providing the designer with a consistent, reliable approach to product development. As a first step towards developing such procedures, research was conducted at Stanford University using empirical data from a NASA spaceflight experiment that flew aboard Space Shuttle mission STS-90 (April 1998). This research was accomplished using ex post facto data analysis. This researcher served in the central role of Experiment Manager for the spaceflight experiment, and acted as a participant-observer while conducting formal research. To better understand requirement structure and evolution, individual requirements were decomposed using AND/OR graphs. The AND/OR graph data structure illustrates requirements evolution, and reveals that the original requirement is often met by fulfilling a series of sub-requirements that are easier to implement. Early in the product life cycle, many hundreds of potential needs were identified; however, it was a smaller subset of these initial needs that were realized in the final product. Based on analysis of a large group of requirements, it was observed that two critical components for any individual requirement were: (1) a stated need, and (2) an advocate to implement the need. Identification of need, or needs-analysis, although a necessary condition, is insufficient to ensure that a stated need evolves into a formal requirement. Equally important to the concept of requirements-definition is the notion of advocacy. Early in the product development cycle of the of the NASA experiment, many potential needs were

  11. Metal Cutting Theory and Friction Stir Welding Tool Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payton, Lewis N.

    2003-01-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a relatively new industrial process that was invented at The Weld Institute (TWI, United Kingdom) and patented in 1992 under research funded by in part by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Often quoted advantages of the process include good strength and ductility along with minimization of residual stress and distortion. Less well advertised are the beneficial effects of this solid state welding process in the field of occupational and environmental safety. It produces superior weld products in difficult to weld materials without producing any toxic fumes or solid waste that must be controlled as hazardous waste. In fact, it reduces noise pollution in the workspace as well. In the early days of FSW, most welding was performed on modified machine tools, in particular on milling machines with modified milling cutters. In spite of the obvious milling heritage of the process, the techniques and lessons learned from almost 250 years of successful metalworking with milling machines have not been applied in the field of modern Friction Stir Welding. The goal of the current research was to study currently successful FSW tools and parameterize the process in such a way that the design of new tools for new materials could be accelerated. Along the way, several successful new tooling designs were developed for current issues at the Marshall Space Flight Center with accompanying patent disclosures

  12. Turbulent equipartition pinch of toroidal momentum in spherical torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahm, T. S.; Lee, J.; Wang, W. X.; Diamond, P. H.; Choi, G. J.; Na, D. H.; Na, Y. S.; Chung, K. J.; Hwang, Y. S.

    2014-12-01

    We present a new analytic expression for turbulent equipartition (TEP) pinch of toroidal angular momentum originating from magnetic field inhomogeneity of spherical torus (ST) plasmas. Starting from a conservative modern nonlinear gyrokinetic equation (Hahm et al 1988 Phys. Fluids 31 2670), we derive an expression for pinch to momentum diffusivity ratio without using a usual tokamak approximation of B ∝ 1/R which has been previously employed for TEP momentum pinch derivation in tokamaks (Hahm et al 2007 Phys. Plasmas 14 072302). Our new formula is evaluated for model equilibria of National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) (Ono et al 2001 Nucl. Fusion 41 1435) and Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus (VEST) (Chung et al 2013 Plasma Sci. Technol. 15 244) plasmas. Our result predicts stronger inward pinch for both cases, as compared to the prediction based on the tokamak formula.

  13. Long implosion time (240 ns) Z-pinch experiments with a large diameter (12 cm) double-shell nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, J. S.; Banister, J. W.; Failor, B. H.; Qi, N.; Song, Y.; Sze, H. M.; Fisher, A.

    2004-05-01

    Recently, an 8 cm diameter double-shell nozzle has produced argon Z pinches with high K-shell yields with implosion time of 210 ns. To produce even longer implosion time Z pinches for facilities such as Decade Quad [D. Price, et al., "Electrical and Mechanical Design of the Decade Quad in PRS Mode," in Proceedings of the 12th IEEE Pulsed Power Conference, Monterey, CA, edited by C. Stallings and H. Kirbie (IEEE, New York, 1999), p. 489] (9 MA short circuit current at 300 ns), a larger nozzle (12 cm outer diameter) was designed and fabricated. During initial testing on Double-EAGLE [P. Sincerny et al., Proceedings of the 5th IEEE Pulsed Power Conference, Arlington, VA, edited by M. F. Rose and P. J. Turchi (IEEE, New York, 1985), p. 151], 9 kJ of argon K-shell radiation in a 6 ns full width at half maximum pulse was produced with a 240 ns implosion. The initial gas distributions produced by various nozzle configurations have been measured and their impact on the final radiative characteristics of the pinch are presented. The addition of a central jet to increase the initial gas density near the axis is observed to enhance the pinch quality, increasing K-shell yield by 17% and power by 40% in the best configuration tested.

  14. Theory and design of interferometric synthetic aperture radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, E.; Martin, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    A derivation of the signal statistics, an optimal estimator of the interferometric phase, and the expression necessary to calculate the height-error budget are presented. These expressions are used to derive methods of optimizing the parameters of the interferometric synthetic aperture radar system (InSAR), and are then employed in a specific design example for a system to perform high-resolution global topographic mapping with a one-year mission lifetime, subject to current technological constraints. A Monte Carlo simulation of this InSAR system is performed to evaluate its performance for realistic topography. The results indicate that this system has the potential to satisfy the stringent accuracy and resolution requirements for geophysical use of global topographic data.

  15. Measurements of high energy photons in Z-pinch experiments on primary test stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Fenni; Zhang, Chuanfei; Xu, Rongkun; Yuan, Xi; Huang, Zhanchang; Xu, Zeping; Ye, Fan; Yang, Jianlun; Ning, Jiamin; Hu, Qingyuan; Zhu, Xuebin

    2015-08-01

    High energy photons are measured for the first time in wire-array Z-pinch experiments on the Primary Test Stand (PTS) which delivers a current up to 8 MA with a rise time of 70 ns. A special designed detecting system composed of three types of detectors is used to measure the average energy, intensity, and pulse waveform of high energy photons. Results from Pb-TLD (thermoluminescence dosimeter) detector indicate that the average energy is 480 keV (±15%). Pulse shape of high energy photons is measured by the photodiode detector consisted of scintillator coupled with a photodiode, and it is correlated with soft x-ray power by the same timing signal. Intensity is measured by both TLD and the photodiode detector, showing good accordance with each other, and it is 1010 cm-2 (±20%) at 2 m in the horizontal direction. Measurement results show that high energy photons are mainly produced in pinch regions due to accelerated electrons. PTS itself also produces high energy photons due to power flow electrons, which is one order smaller in amplitude than those from pinch region.

  16. Measurements of high energy photons in Z-pinch experiments on primary test stand.

    PubMed

    Si, Fenni; Zhang, Chuanfei; Xu, Rongkun; Yuan, Xi; Huang, Zhanchang; Xu, Zeping; Ye, Fan; Yang, Jianlun; Ning, Jiamin; Hu, Qingyuan; Zhu, Xuebin

    2015-08-01

    High energy photons are measured for the first time in wire-array Z-pinch experiments on the Primary Test Stand (PTS) which delivers a current up to 8 MA with a rise time of 70 ns. A special designed detecting system composed of three types of detectors is used to measure the average energy, intensity, and pulse waveform of high energy photons. Results from Pb-TLD (thermoluminescence dosimeter) detector indicate that the average energy is 480 keV (±15%). Pulse shape of high energy photons is measured by the photodiode detector consisted of scintillator coupled with a photodiode, and it is correlated with soft x-ray power by the same timing signal. Intensity is measured by both TLD and the photodiode detector, showing good accordance with each other, and it is 10(10) cm(-2) (±20%) at 2 m in the horizontal direction. Measurement results show that high energy photons are mainly produced in pinch regions due to accelerated electrons. PTS itself also produces high energy photons due to power flow electrons, which is one order smaller in amplitude than those from pinch region.

  17. Crabs grab strongly depending on mechanical advantages of pinching and disarticulation of chela.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Shin-Ichi; Kawai, Hiroki

    2016-10-01

    A small morphological variation of an organ may cause a major change of its function in animal evolution. The function of decapod chela varies considerably among taxa, between sex, and even within an individual, but also retains a simple mechanism of motion. Therefore, the decapod chela is a suitable structure to study the evolutionary process of functional diversifications, although the relationship of form and function is inadequately understood, yet. We estimated the mechanical advantages of pinching and passive disarticulation resistance, and chela size relative to the carapace in 317 chelae of 168 decapod specimens, and compared these indices with the functions of each chela. Our study revealed that mechanical advantages of pinching efficiency and passive disarticulation resistance were greatest in shell-crushing chelae, followed by gripping and pinching chelae, whereas the chela size relative to the carapace was not related to differences among these functions. We also found that the chelae are designed to retain the ratio between depth and width of the proximal dactylus. In the evolutionary process of decapods, the diversifications of chela functions were accompanied by the diversifications of the mechanical advantages, and played an essential role in their ecological diversification. J. Morphol. 277:1259-1272, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Increasing Plasma Parameters using Sheared Flow Stabilization of a Z-Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumlak, Uri

    2016-10-01

    Recent experiments on the ZaP Flow Z-Pinch at the University of Washington have been successful in compressing the plasma column to smaller radii, producing the predicted increases in plasma density (1018 cm-3), temperature (200 eV), and magnetic fields (4 T), while maintaining plasma stability for many Alfven times (over 40 μs) using sheared plasma flows. These results indicate the suitability of the device as a discovery science platform for astrophysical and high energy density plasma research, and keeps open a possible path to achieving burning plasma conditions in a compact fusion device. Long-lived Z-pinch plasmas have been produced with dimensions of 1 cm radius and 100 cm long that are stabilized by sheared axial flows for over 1000 Alfven radial transit times. The observed plasma stability is coincident with the presence of a sheared flow as measured by time-resolved multi-chord ion Doppler spectroscopy applied to impurity ion radiation. These measurements yield insights into the evolution of the velocity profile and show that the stabilizing behavior of flow shear agrees with theoretical calculations and 2-D MHD computational simulations. The flow shear value, extent, and duration are shown to be consistent with theoretical models of the plasma viscosity, which places a design constraint on the maximum axial length of a sheared flow stabilized Z-pinch. Measurements of the magnetic field topology indicate simultaneous azimuthal symmetry and axial uniformity along the entire 100 cm length of the Z-pinch plasma. Separate control of plasma acceleration and compression have increased the accessible plasma parameters and have generated stable plasmas with radii below 0.5 cm, as measured with a high resolution digital holographic interferometer. This work was supported by Grants from U.S. DOE, NNSA, and ARPA-E.

  19. A Discussion of Change Theory, System Theory, and State Designed Standards and Accountability Initiatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeal, Larry; Christy, W. Keith

    This brief paper is a presentation that preceeded another case of considering the ongoing dialogue on the advantages and disadvantages of centralized and decentralized school-improvement processes. It attempts to raise a number of questions about the relationship between state-designed standards and accountability initiatives and change and…

  20. About plasma points' generation in Z-pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afonin, V. I.; Potapov, A. V.; Lazarchuk, V. P.; Murugov, V. M.; Senik, A. V.

    1997-05-01

    The streak tube study results (at visible and x-ray ranges) of dynamics of fast Z-pinch formed at explosion of metal wire in diode of high current generator are presented. Amplitude of current in the load reached ˜180 kA at increase time ˜50 ns. The results' analysis points to capability of controlling hot plasma points generation process in Z-pinch.

  1. De/signing Research in Education: Patchwork(ing) Methodologies with Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Marc; Madden, Brooke; Berard, Marie-France; Lenz Kothe, Elsa; Nordstrom, Susan

    2017-01-01

    Four education scholars extend the methodological space inspired by Jackson and Mazzei's "Thinking with Theory" through focusing on research design. The notion of de/sign is presented and employed to counter prescriptive method/ology that often sutures over pedagogical possibilities in research and educational settings. Key…

  2. Learning Theory Expertise in the Design of Learning Spaces: Who Needs a Seat at the Table?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rook, Michael M.; Choi, Koun; McDonald, Scott P.

    2015-01-01

    This study highlights the impact of including stakeholders with expertise in learning theory in a learning space design process. We present the decision-making process during the design of the Krause Innovation Studio on the campus of the Pennsylvania State University to draw a distinction between the architect and faculty member's decision-making…

  3. Creativity and Conflict: How Theory and Practice Shape Student Identities in Design Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tynan, Jane; New, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    By exploring the role of student identities in shaping attitudes to learning, this study asks how design students draw on experience to work across theory and practice. It explores how a specific group of design undergraduate students in a UK university perform on two distinct learning experiences on their course: work placement and dissertation.…

  4. Pinch-off Scaling Law of Soap Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, John; Ryu, Sangjin

    2014-11-01

    Three common interfacial phenomena that occur daily are liquid drops in gas, gas bubbles in liquid and thin-film bubbles. One aspect that has been studied for these phenomena is the formation or pinch-off of the drop/bubble from the liquid/gas threads. In contrast to the formation of liquid drops in gas and gas bubbles in liquid, thin-film bubble pinch-off has not been well documented. Having thin-film interfaces may alter the pinch-off process due to the limiting factor of the film thickness. We observed the pinch-off of one common thin-film bubble, soap bubbles, in order to characterize its pinch-off behavior. We achieved this by constructing an experimental model replicating the process of a human producing soap bubbles. Using high-speed videography and image processing, we determined that the minimal neck radius scaled with the time left till pinch-off, and that the scaling law exponent was 2/3, similar to that of liquid drops in gas.

  5. The effectiveness of orthoses in the conservative management of thumb CMC joint osteoarthritis: An analysis of functional pinch strength.

    PubMed

    Grenier, Marie-Lyne; Mendonca, Rochelle; Dalley, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The study was a retrospective cohort analysis for a 19-month period from May 2013 to December 2014. Although the use of orthoses has long been a staple of conservative treatment measures for individuals with osteoarthritis of the thumb carpometacarpal (CMC) joint, there remains little evidence exploring its effectiveness in improving functional outcomes for this client population. The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of 3 frequently used orthoses in improving the functional pinch strength of adults with a diagnosis of thumb CMC joint osteoarthritis. A retrospective cohort analysis was conducted to determine whether pinch strength improved after orthotic fabrication, and fitting in patients referred to a hand therapy clinic. Patients who received a Colditz design orthosis had a mean increase of 2.64 lb with regard to functional pinch strength after orthotic fabrication and fitting. Patients who received a Comfort Cool orthosis (North Coast Medical, Morgan Hill, CA) had a mean increase of 2.47 lb, whereas patients who received a Thumb Spica orthosis had a mean increase of 3.25 lb. There was no evidence of any statistically significant difference in the average improvements in pinch strength between the Colditz design orthosis and the Comfort Cool orthosis. Results from this study demonstrate that orthosis wear consistently increases the functional pinch strength of individuals with thumb CMC joint osteoarthritis. Large-scale multisite research studies comparing various orthotic designs are necessary to help therapists determine best practice interventions for the conservative management of thumb CMC joint osteoarthritis. 2(c). Copyright © 2016 Hanley & Belfus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Aircraft ride quality controller design using new robust root clustering theory for linear uncertain systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yedavalli, R. K.

    1992-01-01

    The aspect of controller design for improving the ride quality of aircraft in terms of damping ratio and natural frequency specifications on the short period dynamics is addressed. The controller is designed to be robust with respect to uncertainties in the real parameters of the control design model such as uncertainties in the dimensional stability derivatives, imperfections in actuator/sensor locations and possibly variations in flight conditions, etc. The design is based on a new robust root clustering theory developed by the author by extending the nominal root clustering theory of Gutman and Jury to perturbed matrices. The proposed methodology allows to get an explicit relationship between the parameters of the root clustering region and the uncertainty radius of the parameter space. The current literature available for robust stability becomes a special case of this unified theory. The bounds derived on the parameter perturbation for robust root clustering are then used in selecting the robust controller.

  7. History of HERMES III diode to z-pinch breakthrough and beyond :

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, Thomas Williamlou.

    HERMES III and Z are two flagship accelerators of Sandias pulsed-power program developed to generate intense -ray fields for the study of nuclear radiation effects, and to explore high energy-density physics (including the production of intense x-ray fields for Inertia Confinement Fusion [ICF]), respectively. A diode at the exit of HERMES III converts its 20-MeV electron beam into -rays. In contrast, at the center of Z, a z-pinch is used to convert its 20-MA current into an intense burst of x-rays. Here the history of how the HERMES III diode emerged from theoretical considerations to actual hardware is discussed. Next,more » the reverse process of how the experimental discovery of wire-array stabilization in a z-pinch, led to a better theory of wirearray implosions and its application to one of the ICF concepts on Z--the DH (Dynamic Hohlraum) is reviewed. Lastly, the report concludes with how the unexpected axial radiation asymmetry measured in the DH is understood. The first discussion illustrates the evolution of physics from theory-to-observationto- refinement. The second two illustrate the reverse process of observationto- theory-to refinement. The histories are discussed through the vehicle of my research at Sandia, illustrating the unique environment Sandia provides for personal growth and development into a scientific leader.« less

  8. Building inhabitant feedback: Creating a reflective practice for environmental design using activity theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Dara Suzanne

    The way buildings are designed now, there is little feedback from use involved in the design process. Attempts to correct this problem have been made in the form of Post Occupancy Evaluations (POEs) for 50-years but have largely failed. POEs are the accepted method for environmental designers to collect feedback about buildings in use. They are infrequently conducted, after the building is built, in a one-time only evaluation, and not funded as part of the build process. Other products receive feedback about the design in use from online critiques. Online critiques could provide a platform for feedback from actors engaged with buildings in use for environmental designers to utilize in developing reflective design rationale to avoid adverse consequences in future designs or correct consequences in past and current designs. Since buildings constitute such a large part of the human environment, it's important to research the effects of buildings on their inhabitants. In order for environmental designers to act on feedback from situated use, designers need to have access to that feedback and all actors interacting with the building design need to have an easy, inexpensive, and accessible method to submit feedback. These needs can be addressed by utilizing modern networked and mobile computing to collect and access building feedback. The analysis presented in this dissertation is informed by a thorough evaluation of the theory of reflective practice, activity theory, environmental design, and cognitive science research. From this analysis, I developed the following contributions. First, I expanded Schon's reflective practice by combining his theory with a modified version of activity theory, using activity theory to enrich reflective practice and create Reflective Activity Systems Theory (RAST), which provides a new framework to develop design rationale based on feedback from use and a focus on the activity. Second, I suggest the design of an activity information system

  9. A Method for Co-Designing Theory-Based Behaviour Change Systems for Health Promotion.

    PubMed

    Janols, Rebecka; Lindgren, Helena

    2017-01-01

    A methodology was defined and developed for designing theory-based behaviour change systems for health promotion that can be tailored to the individual. Theories from two research fields were combined with a participatory action research methodology. Two case studies applying the methodology were conducted. During and between group sessions the participants created material and designs following the behaviour change strategy themes, which were discussed, analysed and transformed into a design of a behaviour change system. Theories in behavioural change and persuasive technology guided the data collection, data analyses, and the design of a behaviour change system. The methodology has strong emphasis on the target group's participation in the design process. The different aspects brought forward related to behaviour change strategies defined in literature on persuasive technology, and the dynamics of these are associated to needs and motivation defined in literature on behaviour change. It was concluded that the methodology aids the integration of theories into a participatory action research design process, and aids the analyses and motivations of design choices.

  10. Predictor - Predictive Reaction Design via Informatics, Computation and Theories of Reactivity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-10-10

    into more complex and valuable molecules, but are limited by: 1. The extensive time it takes to design and optimize a synthesis 2. Multi-step...system. As it is fully compatible to the industry standard SQL, designing a server- based system at a later time will be trivial. Producing a JAVA front...Report: PREDICTOR - Predictive REaction Design via Informatics, Computation and Theories of Reactivity The goal of this program was to create a cyber

  11. Influence of Burke and Lessing on the Semiotic Theory of Document Design: Ideologies and Good Visual Images of Documents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, Daniel D.

    2000-01-01

    Presents historical roots of page design principles, arguing that current theories and practices of document design have their roots in gender-related theories of images. Claims visual design should be evaluated regarding the rhetorical situation in which the design is used. Focuses on visual images of documents in professional communication,…

  12. Instructional Design and Intelligent Tutoring: Theory and the Precision of Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capell, Peter; Dannenberg, Roger B.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses instructional design methods used in intelligent tutoring systems (ITS) and describes the application of instructional systems design to the creation of an ITS called Piano Tutor, a multimedia workstation that is designed to provide first-year piano lessons. The ITS curriculum is analyzed, including critical lessons and skill groups.…

  13. Particle drift model for Z-pinch-driven magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, Jia Kun; Xu, Qiang; Wang, Kun Lun; Ren, Xiao Dong; Huang, Xian Bin

    2016-09-01

    A theoretical model of Z-pinch driven magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability is proposed based on the particle drift point of view, which can explain the helical instability structure observed in premagnetized imploding liner experiments. It is demonstrated that all possible drift motions, including polarization drift, gradient drift, and curvature drift, which can lead to charge separations, each will attribute to an effective gravity acceleration. Theoretical predictions given by this model are dramatically different from those given by previous theories which have been readily recovered in the theory presented here as a limiting case. The theory shows qualitative agreement with available experimental data of the pitch angle and provides certain predictions to be verified.

  14. Finite-Larmor-radius effects on z-pinch stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheffel, Jan; Faghihi, Mostafa

    1989-06-01

    The effect of finite Larmor radius (FLR) on the stability of m = 1 small-axial-wavelength kinks in a z-pinch with purely poloidal magnetic field is investigated. We use the incompressible FLR MHD model; a collisionless fluid model that consistently includes the relevant FLR terms due to ion gyroviscosity, Hall effect and electron diamagnetism. With FLR terms absent, the Kadomtsev criterion of ideal MHD, 2r dp/dr + m2B2/μ0 ≥ 0 predicts instability for internal modes unless the current density is singular at the centre of the pinch. The same result is obtained in the present model, with FLR terms absent. When the FLR terms are included, a normal-mode analysis of the linearized equations yields the following results. Marginally unstable (ideal) modes are stabilized by gyroviscosity. The Hall term has a damping (but not absolutely stabilizing) effect - in agreement with earlier work. On specifying a constant current and particle density equilibrium, the effect of electron diamagnetism vanishes. For a z-pinch with parameters relevant to the EXTRAP experiment, the m = 1 modes are then fully stabilized over the crosssection for wavelengths λ/a ≤ 1, where a denotes the pinch radius. As a general z-pinch result a critical line-density limit Nmax = 5 × 1018 m-1 is found, above which gyroviscous stabilization near the plasma boundary becomes insufficient. This limit corresponds to about five Larmor radii along the pinch radius. The result holds for wavelengths close to, or smaller than, the pinch radius and for realistic equilibrium profiles. This limit is far below the required limit for a reactor with contained alpha particles, which is in excess of 1020 m-1.

  15. Two-fluid and finite Larmor radius effects on helicity evolution in a plasma pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Sauppe, J. P., E-mail: jpsauppe@gmail.com; Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53706; Sovinec, C. R., E-mail: csovinec@wisc.edu

    2016-03-15

    The evolution of magnetic energy, helicity, and hybrid helicity during nonlinear relaxation of a driven-damped plasma pinch is compared in visco-resistive magnetohydrodynamics and two-fluid models with and without the ion gyroviscous stress tensor. Magnetic energy and helicity are supplied via a boundary electric field which initially balances the resistive dissipation, and the plasma undergoes multiple relaxation events during the nonlinear evolution. The magnetic helicity is well conserved relative to the magnetic energy over each event, which is short compared with the global resistive diffusion time. The magnetic energy decreases by roughly 1.5% of its initial value over a relaxation event,more » while the magnetic helicity changes by at most 0.2% of the initial value. The hybrid helicity is dominated by magnetic helicity in low-β pinch conditions and is also well conserved. Differences of less than 1% between magnetic helicity and hybrid helicity are observed with two-fluid modeling and result from cross helicity evolution. The cross helicity is found to change appreciably due to the first-order finite Larmor radius effects which have not been included in contemporary relaxation theories. The plasma current evolves towards the flat parallel current state predicted by Taylor relaxation theory but does not achieve it. Plasma flow develops significant structure for two-fluid models, and the flow perpendicular to the magnetic field is much more substantial than the flow along it.« less

  16. Practising what we preach: using cognitive load theory for workshop design and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Naismith, Laura M; Haji, Faizal A; Sibbald, Matthew; Cheung, Jeffrey J H; Tavares, Walter; Cavalcanti, Rodrigo B

    2015-12-01

    Theory-based instructional design is a top priority in medical education. The goal of this Show and Tell article is to present our theory-driven approach to the design of instruction for clinical educators. We adopted cognitive load theory as a framework to design and evaluate a series of professional development workshops that were delivered at local, national and international academic conferences in 2014. We used two rating scales to measure participants' cognitive load. Participants also provided narrative comments as to how the workshops could be improved. Cognitive load ratings from 59 participants suggested that the workshop design optimized learning by managing complexity for different levels of learners (intrinsic load), stimulating cognitive processing for long-term memory storage (germane load), and minimizing irrelevant distracters (extraneous load). Narrative comments could also be classified as representing intrinsic, extraneous, or germane load, which provided specific directions for ongoing quality improvement. These results demonstrate that a cognitive load theory approach to workshop design and evaluation is feasible and useful in the context of medical education.

  17. Design Exemplars for Synchronous e-Learning: A Design Theory Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hrastinski, Stefan; Keller, Christina; Carlsson, Sven A.

    2010-01-01

    Synchronous e-learning has received much less research attention, as compared with asynchronous e-learning. Practitioners that consider using and designing synchronous e-learning are in urgent need of guidance. In order to address this need, we propose design exemplars for synchronous e-learning. They are directed towards a primary constituent…

  18. Electron density and plasma dynamics of a spherical theta pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teske, C.; Liu, Y.; Blaes, S.; Jacoby, J.

    2012-03-01

    A spherical theta pinch for plasma stripper applications has been developed and investigated regarding the electron density and the plasma confinement during the pinching sequence. The setup consists of a 6 μH induction coil surrounding a 4000 ml spherical discharge vessel and a capacitor bank with interchangeable capacitors leading to an overall capacitance of 34 μF and 50 μF, respectively. A thyristor switch is used for driving the resonant circuit. Pulsed coil currents reached values of up to 26 kA with maximum induction of 500 mT. Typical gas pressures were 0.7 Pa up to 120 Pa with ArH2 (2.8% H2)-gas as a discharge medium. Stark broadening measurements of the Hβ emission line were carried out in order to evaluate the electron density of the discharge. In accordance with the density measurements, the transfer efficiency was estimated and a scaling law between electron density and discharge energy was established for the current setup. The densities reached values of up to 8 × 1022 m-3 for an energy of 1.6 kJ transferred into the plasma. Further, the pinching of the discharge plasma was documented and the different stages of the pinching process were analyzed. The experimental evidence suggests that concerning the recent setup of the spherical theta pinch, a linear scaling law between the transferred energy and the achievable plasma density can be applied for various applications like plasma strippers and pulsed ion sources.

  19. Integrating PCR Theory and Bioinformatics into a Research-oriented Primer Design Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Amber L.; Phillips, Allison R.

    2008-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a conceptually difficult technique that embodies many fundamental biological processes. Traditionally, students have struggled to analyze PCR results due to an incomplete understanding of the biological concepts (theory) of DNA replication and strand complementarity. Here we describe the design of a novel…

  20. Lessons Learned from Instructional Design Theory: An Application in Management Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Lisa A.

    2007-01-01

    Given that many doctoral programs do not provide extensive training on how to present course information in the classroom, the current paper looks to educational psychology theory and research for guidance. Richard Mayer and others' copious empirical work on effective and ineffective instructional design, along with relevant research findings in…

  1. Applying Program Theory-Driven Approach to Design and Evaluate a Teacher Professional Development Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Su-ching; Wu, Ming-sui

    2016-01-01

    This study was the first year of a two-year project which applied a program theory-driven approach to evaluating the impact of teachers' professional development interventions on students' learning by using a mix of methods, qualitative inquiry, and quasi-experimental design. The current study was to show the results of using the method of…

  2. Towards a Theory-Based Design Framework for an Effective E-Learning Computer Programming Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGowan, Ian S.

    2016-01-01

    Built on Dabbagh (2005), this paper presents a four component theory-based design framework for an e-learning session in introductory computer programming. The framework, driven by a body of exemplars component, emphasizes the transformative interaction between the knowledge building community (KBC) pedagogical model, a mixed instructional…

  3. Applying Item Response Theory Methods to Design a Learning Progression-Based Science Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Learning progressions are used to describe how students' understanding of a topic progresses over time and to classify the progress of students into steps or levels. This study applies Item Response Theory (IRT) based methods to investigate how to design learning progression-based science assessments. The research questions of this study are: (1)…

  4. Using Diffusion of Innovation Theory to Promote Universally Designed College Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Sally; McGuire, Joan

    2017-01-01

    Universal Design applied to college instruction has evolved and rapidly spread on an international scale. Diffusion of Innovation theory is described and used to identify patterns of change in this trend. Implications and strategies are discussed for promoting this inclusive approach to teaching in higher education.

  5. Theories and Applications of Massive Online Open Courses (MOOCs): The Case for Hybrid Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anders, Abram

    2015-01-01

    Initial studies of learning in massive open online courses (MOOCs) primarily focused on participation patterns and participant experiences. More recently, research has addressed learning theories and offered case studies of different pedagogical designs for MOOCs. Based on a meta-analysis and synthesis of the research literature, this study…

  6. The Interaction between Multimedia Data Analysis and Theory Development in Design Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Nes, Fenna; Doorman, Michiel

    2010-01-01

    Mathematics education researchers conducting instruction experiments using a design research methodology are challenged with the analysis of often complex and large amounts of qualitative data. In this paper, we present two case studies that show how multimedia analysis software can greatly support video data analysis and theory development in…

  7. Preparing Students for Education, Work, and Community: Activity Theory in Task-Based Curriculum Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Chris; MacPherson, Seonaigh; Sawkins, Tanis

    2014-01-01

    This case study describes how sociocultural and activity theory were applied in the design of a publicly funded, Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB)-based English as a Second Language (ESL) credential program and curriculum for immigrant and international students in postsecondary institutions in British Columbia, Canada. The ESL Pathways Project…

  8. Cognitive Load Theory, Educational Research, and Instructional Design: Some Food for Thought

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Jong, Ton

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive load is a theoretical notion with an increasingly central role in the educational research literature. The basic idea of cognitive load theory is that cognitive capacity in working memory is limited, so that if a learning task requires too much capacity, learning will be hampered. The recommended remedy is to design instructional systems…

  9. Applying Theory of Mind Concepts When Designing Interventions Targeting Social Cognition among Youth Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noel, Kristine K.; Westby, Carol

    2014-01-01

    This study employed a multiple baseline, across-participants, single-subject design to investigate the feasibility of an individual, narrative-based, social problem-solving intervention on the social problem-solving, narrative, and theory of mind (ToM) abilities of 3 incarcerated adolescent youth offenders identified as having emotional…

  10. Computer Game Theories for Designing Motivating Educational Software: A Survey Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ang, Chee Siang; Rao, G. S. V. Radha Krishna

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate computer game theories for educational software. We propose a framework for designing engaging educational games based on contemporary game studies which includes ludology and narratology. Ludology focuses on the study of computer games as play and game activities, while narratology revolves around the…

  11. Laser dynamics: The system dynamics and network theory of optoelectronic integrated circuit design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarng, Tom Shinming-T. K.

    Laser dynamics is the system dynamics, communication and network theory for the design of opto-electronic integrated circuit (OEIC). Combining the optical network theory and optical communication theory, the system analysis and design for the OEIC fundamental building blocks is considered. These building blocks include the direct current modulation, inject light modulation, wideband filter, super-gain optical amplifier, E/O and O/O optical bistability and current-controlled optical oscillator. Based on the rate equations, the phase diagram and phase portrait analysis is applied to the theoretical studies and numerical simulation. The OEIC system design methodologies are developed for the OEIC design. Stimulating-field-dependent rate equations are used to model the line-width narrowing/broadening mechanism for the CW mode and frequency chirp of semiconductor lasers. The momentary spectra are carrier-density-dependent. Furthermore, the phase portrait analysis and the nonlinear refractive index is used to simulate the single mode frequency chirp. The average spectra of chaos, period doubling, period pulsing, multi-loops and analog modulation are generated and analyzed. The bifurcation-chirp design chart with modulation depth and modulation frequency as parameters is provided for design purpose.

  12. Design of Mobile Augmented Reality in Health Care Education: A Theory-Driven Framework.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Egui; Lilienthal, Anneliese; Shluzas, Lauren Aquino; Masiello, Italo; Zary, Nabil

    2015-09-18

    Augmented reality (AR) is increasingly used across a range of subject areas in health care education as health care settings partner to bridge the gap between knowledge and practice. As the first contact with patients, general practitioners (GPs) are important in the battle against a global health threat, the spread of antibiotic resistance. AR has potential as a practical tool for GPs to combine learning and practice in the rational use of antibiotics. This paper was driven by learning theory to develop a mobile augmented reality education (MARE) design framework. The primary goal of the framework is to guide the development of AR educational apps. This study focuses on (1) identifying suitable learning theories for guiding the design of AR education apps, (2) integrating learning outcomes and learning theories to support health care education through AR, and (3) applying the design framework in the context of improving GPs' rational use of antibiotics. The design framework was first constructed with the conceptual framework analysis method. Data were collected from multidisciplinary publications and reference materials and were analyzed with directed content analysis to identify key concepts and their relationships. Then the design framework was applied to a health care educational challenge. The proposed MARE framework consists of three hierarchical layers: the foundation, function, and outcome layers. Three learning theories-situated, experiential, and transformative learning-provide foundational support based on differing views of the relationships among learning, practice, and the environment. The function layer depends upon the learners' personal paradigms and indicates how health care learning could be achieved with MARE. The outcome layer analyzes different learning abilities, from knowledge to the practice level, to clarify learning objectives and expectations and to avoid teaching pitched at the wrong level. Suggestions for learning activities and the

  13. Contribution of flexor pollicis longus to pinch strength: an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Goetz, Thomas J; Costa, Joseph A; Slobogean, Gerard; Patel, Satyam; Mulpuri, Kishore; Travlos, Andrew

    2012-11-01

    To estimate the contribution of the flexor pollicis longus (FPL) to key pinch strength. Secondary outcomes include tip pinch, 3-point chuck pinch, and grip strength. Eleven healthy volunteers consented to participate in the study. We recorded baseline measures for key, 3-point chuck, and tip pinch and for grip strength. In order to control for instability of the interphalangeal (IP) joint after FPL paralysis, pinch measurements were repeated after immobilizing the thumb IP joint. Measures were repeated after subjects underwent electromyography-guided lidocaine blockade of the FPL muscle. Nerve conduction studies and clinical examinations were used to confirm FPL blockade and to rule out median nerve blockade. Paired t-tests were used to compare pre- and postblock means for both unsplinted and splinted measures. The difference in means was used to estimate the contribution of FPL to pinch strength. All 3 types of pinch strength showed a significant decrease between pre- and postblock measurements. The relative contribution of FPL for each pinch type was 56%, 44%, and 43% for key, chuck, and tip pinch, respectively. Mean grip strength did not decrease significantly. Splinting of the IP joint had no significant effect on pinch measurements. FPL paralysis resulted in a statistically significant decrease in pinch strength. IP joint immobilization to simulate IP joint fusion did not affect results. Reconstruction after acute or chronic loss of FPL function should be considered when restoration of pinch strength is important. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Starting buoyant plumes and vortex ring pinch-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pottebaum, Tait; Gharib, Mory

    2003-11-01

    The vortex ring formation process of a starting buoyant plume was studied experimentally. Buoyant plumes were produced using a heating element at the base of a water tank. The velocity and temperature fields in the flow were measured using digital particle image thermometry and velocimetry (DPITV), allowing the density and vorticity fields to be determined. The vortex ring initially grew, with additional circulation being supplied by the trailing plume. At later times, the vortex ring became disconnected from the trailing plume. This is analogous to the pinch-off of a vortex ring produced by a piston-cylinder apparatus reported by Gharib et al (1998 JFM 360: 121-140). The existence of a pinch-off process for starting buoyant plumes has many implications for environmental flows. Of particular interest is the effect of vortex ring pinch-off on the dispersal of particulates and contaminants in intermittent or sudden convection events.

  15. X-pinch dynamics: Neck formation and implosion

    SciTech Connect

    Oreshkin, V. I.; National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Ave., Tomsk 634050; Chaikovsky, S. A.

    2014-10-15

    We propose a model that describes the neck formation and implosion in an X-pinch. The process is simulated to go in two stages. The first stage is neck formation. This stage begins with an electrical explosion of the wires forming the X-pinch, and at the end of the stage, a micropinch (neck) is formed in the region where the wires are crossed. The second stage is neck implosion. The implosion is accompanied by outflow of matter from the neck region, resulting in the formation of a “hot spot”. Analytical estimates obtained in the study under consideration indicate that these stagesmore » are approximately equal in duration. Having analyzed the neck implosion dynamics, we have verified a scaling which makes it possible to explain the observed dependences of the time of occurrence of an x-ray pulse on the X-pinch current and mass.« less

  16. Aerodynamic design for improved manueverability by use of three-dimensional transonic theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, M. J.; Campbell, R. L.; Ferris, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    Improvements in transonic maneuver performance by the use of three-dimensional transonic theory and a transonic design procedure were examined. The FLO-27 code of Jameson and Caughey was used to design a new wing for a fighter configuration with lower drag at transonic maneuver conditions. The wing airfoil sections were altered to reduce the upper-surface shock strength by means of a design procedure which is based on the iterative application of the FLO-27 code. The plan form of the fighter configuration was fixed and had a leading edge sweep of 45 deg and an aspect ratio of 3.28. Wind-tunnel tests were conducted on this configuration at Mach numbers from 0.60 to 0.95 and angles of attack from -2 deg to 17 deg. The transonic maneuver performance of this configuration was evaluated by comparison with a wing designed by empirical methods and a wing designed primarily by two-dimensional transonic theory. The configuration designed by the use of FLO-27 had the same or lower drag than the empirical wing and, for some conditions, lower drag than the two-dimensional design. From some maneuver conditions, the drag of the two-dimensional design was somewhat lower.

  17. Theory of acoustic design of opera house and a design proposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Yoichi

    2004-05-01

    First of all, the theory of subjective preference for sound fields based on the model of auditory-brain system is briefly mentioned. It consists of the temporal factors and spatial factors associated with the left and right cerebral hemispheres, respectively. The temporal criteria are the initial time delay gap between the direct sound and the first Reflection (Dt1) and the subsequent reverberation time (Tsub). These preferred conditions are related to the minimum value of effective duration of the running autocorrelation function of source signals (te)min. The spatial criteria are binaural listening level (LL) and the IACC, which may be extracted from the interaural crosscorrelation function. In the opera house, there are two different kind of sound sources, i.e., the vocal source of relatively short values of (te)min in the stage and the orchestra music of long values of (te)min in the pit. For these sources, a proposal is made here.

  18. Rotorcraft control system design for uncertain vehicle dynamics using quantitative feedback theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    Quantitative Feedback Theory describes a frequency-domain technique for the design of multi-input, multi-output control systems which must meet time or frequency domain performance criteria when specified uncertainty exists in the linear description of the vehicle dynamics. This theory is applied to the design of the longitudinal flight control system for a linear model of the BO-105C rotorcraft. Uncertainty in the vehicle model is due to the variation in the vehicle dynamics over a range of airspeeds from 0-100 kts. For purposes of exposition, the vehicle description contains no rotor or actuator dynamics. The design example indicates the manner in which significant uncertainty exists in the vehicle model. The advantage of using a sequential loop closure technique to reduce the cost of feedback is demonstrated by example.

  19. The application of probabilistic design theory to high temperature low cycle fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirsching, P. H.

    1981-01-01

    Metal fatigue under stress and thermal cycling is a principal mode of failure in gas turbine engine hot section components such as turbine blades and disks and combustor liners. Designing for fatigue is subject to considerable uncertainty, e.g., scatter in cycles to failure, available fatigue test data and operating environment data, uncertainties in the models used to predict stresses, etc. Methods of analyzing fatigue test data for probabilistic design purposes are summarized. The general strain life as well as homo- and hetero-scedastic models are considered. Modern probabilistic design theory is reviewed and examples are presented which illustrate application to reliability analysis of gas turbine engine components.

  20. A generalized concept for cost-effective structural design. [Statistical Decision Theory applied to aerospace systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. M.; Hawk, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    A generalized concept for cost-effective structural design is introduced. It is assumed that decisions affecting the cost effectiveness of aerospace structures fall into three basic categories: design, verification, and operation. Within these basic categories, certain decisions concerning items such as design configuration, safety factors, testing methods, and operational constraints are to be made. All or some of the variables affecting these decisions may be treated probabilistically. Bayesian statistical decision theory is used as the tool for determining the cost optimum decisions. A special case of the general problem is derived herein, and some very useful parametric curves are developed and applied to several sample structures.

  1. The Experimental Research on E-Learning Instructional Design Model Based on Cognitive Flexibility Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xianzhong; Wang, Feng; Zheng, Zhongmei

    The paper reports an educational experiment on the e-Learning instructional design model based on Cognitive Flexibility Theory, the experiment were made to explore the feasibility and effectiveness of the model in promoting the learning quality in ill-structured domain. The study performed the experiment on two groups of students: one group learned through the system designed by the model and the other learned by the traditional method. The results of the experiment indicate that the e-Learning designed through the model is helpful to promote the intrinsic motivation, learning quality in ill-structured domains, ability to resolve ill-structured problem and creative thinking ability of the students.

  2. α Heating in a Stagnated Z-pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbe, Brian; Chittenden, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    A computational investigation of a scheme for magneto-inertial confinement fusion in a Z-pinch is carried out. In the scheme implosion of a deuterium-tritium fuel mass is preceded by formation of a hotspot containing warm, dense plasma on axis. The presence of the hotspot increases energy yield. Compression of the hotspot by the main fuel mass initiates thermonuclear burn. There is significant heating of the plasma by thermonuclear α particles which are confined by the strong magnetic field of the Z-pinch.

  3. Message Design for Mobile Learning: Learning Theories, Human Cognition and Design Principles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Minjuan; Shen, Ruimin

    2012-01-01

    The demands of an increasingly knowledge-based society and the dramatic advances in mobile phone technology are combining to spur the growth of mobile learning (mLearning). However, for mLearning to attain its full potential, it is essential to develop pedagogy and instructional design tailored to the needs of this new learning environment. At…

  4. Applying Instructional Design Theories to Bioinformatics Education in Microarray Analysis and Primer Design Workshops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shachak, Aviv; Ophir, Ron; Rubin, Eitan

    2005-01-01

    The need to support bioinformatics training has been widely recognized by scientists, industry, and government institutions. However, the discussion of instructional methods for teaching bioinformatics is only beginning. Here we report on a systematic attempt to design two bioinformatics workshops for graduate biology students on the basis of…

  5. A theory-based curriculum design for remediation of residents' communication skills.

    PubMed

    Leung, Fok-Han; Martin, Dawn; Batty, Helen

    2009-12-01

    Residents requiring remediation are often deficient in communication skills, namely clinical interviewing skills. Residents have to digest large amounts of knowledge, and then apply it in a clinical interview. The patient-centered approach, as demonstrated in the Calgary-Cambridge model and Martin's Map, can be difficult to teach. Before implementing a remediation curriculum, the theoretical educational underpinnings must be sound; curriculum evaluation is often expensive. Before establishing metrics for curriculum evaluation, a starting point is to perform a mental experiment to test theoretical adherence. This article describes an experiential remedial curriculum for communication skills. Educational theories of Kolb, Knowles, Bandura, and Bloom are used to design the curriculum into theory-based design components. Kolb's experiential cycle models the natural sequence of experiencing, teaching, and learning interviewing skills. A curriculum structured around this cycle has multiple intercalations with the above educational theories. The design is strengthened by appropriately timed use of education strategies such as learning contracts, taped interviews, simulations, structured reflection, and teacher role modeling. Importantly, it also models the form of the clinical interview format desired. Through understanding and application of contemporary educational theories, a program to remediate interviewing skills can increase its potential for success.

  6. Boundary layers in centrifugal compressors. [application of boundary layer theory to compressor design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, R. C., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The utility of boundary-layer theory in the design of centrifugal compressors is demonstrated. Boundary-layer development in the diffuser entry region is shown to be important to stage efficiency. The result of an earnest attempt to analyze this boundary layer with the best tools available is displayed. Acceptable prediction accuracy was not achieved. The inaccuracy of boundary-layer analysis in this case would result in stage efficiency prediction as much as four points low. Fluid dynamic reasons for analysis failure are discussed with support from flow data. Empirical correlations used today to circumnavigate the weakness of the theory are illustrated.

  7. Learning control system design based on 2-D theory - An application to parallel link manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geng, Z.; Carroll, R. L.; Lee, J. D.; Haynes, L. H.

    1990-01-01

    An approach to iterative learning control system design based on two-dimensional system theory is presented. A two-dimensional model for the iterative learning control system which reveals the connections between learning control systems and two-dimensional system theory is established. A learning control algorithm is proposed, and the convergence of learning using this algorithm is guaranteed by two-dimensional stability. The learning algorithm is applied successfully to the trajectory tracking control problem for a parallel link robot manipulator. The excellent performance of this learning algorithm is demonstrated by the computer simulation results.

  8. Design of Mobile Augmented Reality in Health Care Education: A Theory-Driven Framework

    PubMed Central

    Lilienthal, Anneliese; Shluzas, Lauren Aquino; Masiello, Italo; Zary, Nabil

    2015-01-01

    Background Augmented reality (AR) is increasingly used across a range of subject areas in health care education as health care settings partner to bridge the gap between knowledge and practice. As the first contact with patients, general practitioners (GPs) are important in the battle against a global health threat, the spread of antibiotic resistance. AR has potential as a practical tool for GPs to combine learning and practice in the rational use of antibiotics. Objective This paper was driven by learning theory to develop a mobile augmented reality education (MARE) design framework. The primary goal of the framework is to guide the development of AR educational apps. This study focuses on (1) identifying suitable learning theories for guiding the design of AR education apps, (2) integrating learning outcomes and learning theories to support health care education through AR, and (3) applying the design framework in the context of improving GPs’ rational use of antibiotics. Methods The design framework was first constructed with the conceptual framework analysis method. Data were collected from multidisciplinary publications and reference materials and were analyzed with directed content analysis to identify key concepts and their relationships. Then the design framework was applied to a health care educational challenge. Results The proposed MARE framework consists of three hierarchical layers: the foundation, function, and outcome layers. Three learning theories—situated, experiential, and transformative learning—provide foundational support based on differing views of the relationships among learning, practice, and the environment. The function layer depends upon the learners’ personal paradigms and indicates how health care learning could be achieved with MARE. The outcome layer analyzes different learning abilities, from knowledge to the practice level, to clarify learning objectives and expectations and to avoid teaching pitched at the wrong level

  9. Linking natural microstructures with numerical modeling of pinch-and-swell structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Max; Berger, Alfons; Herwegh, Marco; Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    dominated deformation at relatively high extensional strains in the pinches. The numerical simulations indicate that viscosity weakening due to dissipated heat from grain size reduction marks the onset of localization, resulting in continuous necking of the layer. Interestingly, there exist multiple steady states, i.e. a first homogeneous state out of which localization arises, steady states of the stable end-member structure, expressed by homogeneous conditions in both pinches and swells, and in the surrounding matrix, the latter obeying a linear rheology. Based on our microstructural and numerical results, we suggest that the onset of localization represents a fundamental material bifurcation. This implies that the studied structures can be described as ductile instabilities. Finally, we discuss the profound role of the energy theory of localization described here, which allows deriving the paleo-deformation conditions, as well as fundamental material properties in a self-consistent manner. REFERENCES Herwegh, M., Poulet, T., Karrech, A. and Regenauer-Lieb, K. (2014): Journal of Geophysical Research 119, doi:10.1002/2013JB010701 Peters, M., Veveakis, M., Poulet, T., Karrech, A., Herwegh, M. and Regenauer-Lieb, K. (2015): Journal of Structural Geology 78, doi:10.1016/j.jsg.2015.06.005

  10. The Cultures of Contemporary Instructional Design Scholarship, Part Two: Developments Based on Constructivist and Critical Theory Foundations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    This article is the second in a series (see Willis, 2011) that looks at the current status of instructional design scholarship and theory. In this concluding article, the focus is on two cultures of ID work, one based on constructivist and interpretivist theory and the other based on critical theory and critical pedagogy. There are distinct…

  11. Performance of a Liner-on-Target Injector for Staged Z-Pinch Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, F.; Valenzuela, J. C.; Narkis, J.; Krasheninnikov, I.; Beg, F.; Wessel, F. J.; Ruskov, E.; Rahman, H. U.; McGee, E.

    2016-10-01

    We present the design and characterization of a compact liner-on-target injector, used in the Staged Z-pinch experiments conducted on the UNR-NTF Zebra Facility. Previous experiments and analysis indicate that high-Z gas liners produce a uniform and efficient implosion on a low-Z target plasma. The liner gas shell is produced by an annular solenoid valve and a converging-diverging nozzle designed to achieve a collimated, supersonic, Mach-5 flow. The on-axis target is produced by a coaxial plasma gun, where a high voltage pulse is applied to ionize neutral gas and accelerate the plasma by the J-> × B-> force. Measurements of the liner and target dynamics, resolved by interferometry in space and time, fast imaging, and collection of the emitted light, are presented. The results are compared to the predictions from Computational Fluid Dynamics and MHD simulations that model the injector. Optimization of the design parameters, for upcoming Staged Z-pinch experiments, will be discussed. Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy, DE-AR0000569.

  12. High brightness electrodeless Z-Pinch EUV source for mask inspection tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, Stephen F.; Partlow, Matthew J.; Gustafson, Deborah S.; Besen, Matthew M.; Smith, Donald K.; Blackborow, Paul A.

    2012-03-01

    Energetiq Technology has been shipping the EQ-10 Electrodeless Z-pinchTM light source since 1995. The source is currently being used for metrology, mask inspection, and resist development. Energetiq's higher brightness source has been selected as the source for pre-production actinic mask inspection tools. This improved source enables the mask inspection tool suppliers to build prototype tools with capabilities of defect detection and review down to 16nm design rules. In this presentation we will present new source technology being developed at Energetiq to address the critical source brightness issue. The new technology will be shown to be capable of delivering brightness levels sufficient to meet the HVM requirements of AIMS and ABI and potentially API tools. The basis of the source technology is to use the stable pinch of the electrodeless light source and have a brightness of up to 100W/mm(carat)2-sr. We will explain the source design concepts, discuss the expected performance and present the modeling results for the new design.

  13. The impact of plasma dynamics on the self-magnetic-pinch diode impedance

    DOE PAGES

    Bennett, Nichelle; Crain, M. Dale; Droemer, Darryl W.; ...

    2015-03-20

    In this study, the self-magnetic-pinch diode is being developed as an intense electron beam source for pulsed-power-driven x-ray radiography. The basic operation of this diode has long been understood in the context of pinched diodes, including the dynamic effect that the diode impedance decreases during the pulse due to electrode plasma formation and expansion. Experiments being conducted at Sandia National Laboratories' RITS-6 accelerator are helping to characterize these plasmas using time-resolved and time-integrated camera systems in the x-ray and visible. These diagnostics are analyzed in conjunction with particle-in-cell simulations of anode plasma formation and evolution. The results confirm the long-standingmore » theory of critical-current operation with the addition of a time-dependent anode-cathode gap length. Finally, the results may suggest that anomalous impedance collapse is driven by increased plasma radial drift, leading to larger-than-average ion v r × B θ acceleration into the gap.« less

  14. Integrating psychological theory into the design of an online intervention for sexual health: the sexunzipped website.

    PubMed

    Carswell, Kenneth; McCarthy, Ona; Murray, Elizabeth; Bailey, Julia V

    2012-11-19

    The Internet can provide a confidential and convenient medium for sexual health promotion for young people. This paper describes the development of an interactive, theory-based website (Sexunzipped) aimed at increasing safe sexual behavior of young people, as well as an outline of the evaluation protocol. The website focuses on safer sex, relationships, and sexual pleasure. An overview of the site is provided, including a description of the theoretical constructs which form the basis of the site development. An integrated behavioral model was chosen as the guiding theory for the Sexunzipped intervention. A randomized trial design will be used to evaluate the site quantitatively. The content of the site is described in detail with examples of the main content types: information pages, quizzes, and decision-making activities. We describe the protocol for quantitative evaluation of the website using a randomized trial design and discuss the principal challenges involved in developing the site, including the challenge of balancing the requirements of theory with young people's views on website content and design. Considerations for future interventions are discussed. Developing an online behavior-change intervention is costly and time consuming. Given the large public health potential, the cost involved in developing online interventions, and the need for attractive design, future interventions may benefit from collaborating with established sites that already have a user base, a brand, and a strong Internet presence. It is vital to involve users in decisions about intervention content, design, and features, paying attention to aspects that will attract and retain users' interest. A central challenge in developing effective Internet-based interventions for young people is to find effective ways to operationalize theory in ways that address the views and perspectives of young people.

  15. Integrating Psychological Theory Into the Design of an Online Intervention for Sexual Health: The Sexunzipped Website

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Internet can provide a confidential and convenient medium for sexual health promotion for young people. Objective This paper describes the development of an interactive, theory-based website (Sexunzipped) aimed at increasing safe sexual behavior of young people, as well as an outline of the evaluation protocol. Methods The website focuses on safer sex, relationships, and sexual pleasure. An overview of the site is provided, including a description of the theoretical constructs which form the basis of the site development. An integrated behavioral model was chosen as the guiding theory for the Sexunzipped intervention. A randomized trial design will be used to evaluate the site quantitatively. Results The content of the site is described in detail with examples of the main content types: information pages, quizzes, and decision-making activities. We describe the protocol for quantitative evaluation of the website using a randomized trial design and discuss the principal challenges involved in developing the site, including the challenge of balancing the requirements of theory with young people’s views on website content and design. Conclusions Considerations for future interventions are discussed. Developing an online behavior-change intervention is costly and time consuming. Given the large public health potential, the cost involved in developing online interventions, and the need for attractive design, future interventions may benefit from collaborating with established sites that already have a user base, a brand, and a strong Internet presence. It is vital to involve users in decisions about intervention content, design, and features, paying attention to aspects that will attract and retain users’ interest. A central challenge in developing effective Internet-based interventions for young people is to find effective ways to operationalize theory in ways that address the views and perspectives of young people. PMID:23612122

  16. Adopting a constructivist approach to grounded theory: implications for research design.

    PubMed

    Mills, Jane; Bonner, Ann; Francis, Karen

    2006-02-01

    Grounded theory is a popular research methodology that is evolving to account for a range of ontological and epistemological underpinnings. Constructivist grounded theory has its foundations in relativism and an appreciation of the multiple truths and realities of subjectivism. Undertaking a constructivist enquiry requires the adoption of a position of mutuality between researcher and participant in the research process, which necessitates a rethinking of the grounded theorist's traditional role of objective observer. Key issues for constructivist grounded theorists to consider in designing their research studies are discussed in relation to developing a partnership with participants that enables a mutual construction of meaning during interviews and a meaningful reconstruction of their stories into a grounded theory model.

  17. Virtual patient design: exploring what works and why. A grounded theory study

    PubMed Central

    Bateman, James; Allen, Maggie; Samani, Dipti; Kidd, Jane; Davies, David

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Virtual patients (VPs) are online representations of clinical cases used in medical education. Widely adopted, they are well placed to teach clinical reasoning skills. International technology standards mean VPs can be created, shared and repurposed between institutions. A systematic review has highlighted the lack of evidence to support which of the numerous VP designs may be effective, and why. We set out to research the influence of VP design on medical undergraduates. Methods This is a grounded theory study into the influence of VP design on undergraduate medical students. Following a review of the literature and publicly available VP cases, we identified important design properties. We integrated them into two substantial VPs produced for this research. Using purposeful iterative sampling, 46 medical undergraduates were recruited to participate in six focus groups. Participants completed both VPs, an evaluation and a 1-hour focus group discussion. These were digitally recorded, transcribed and analysed using grounded theory, supported by computer-assisted analysis. Following open, axial and selective coding, we produced a theoretical model describing how students learn from VPs. Results We identified a central core phenomenon designated ‘learning from the VP’. This had four categories: VP Construction; External Preconditions; Student–VP Interaction, and Consequences. From these, we constructed a three-layer model describing the interactions of students with VPs. The inner layer consists of the student's cognitive and behavioural preconditions prior to sitting a case. The middle layer considers the VP as an ‘encoded object’, an e-learning artefact and as a ‘constructed activity’, with associated pedagogic and organisational elements. The outer layer describes cognitive and behavioural change. Conclusions This is the first grounded theory study to explore VP design. This original research has produced a model which enhances understanding

  18. Virtual patient design: exploring what works and why. A grounded theory study.

    PubMed

    Bateman, James; Allen, Maggie; Samani, Dipti; Kidd, Jane; Davies, David

    2013-06-01

    Virtual patients (VPs) are online representations of clinical cases used in medical education. Widely adopted, they are well placed to teach clinical reasoning skills. International technology standards mean VPs can be created, shared and repurposed between institutions. A systematic review has highlighted the lack of evidence to support which of the numerous VP designs may be effective, and why. We set out to research the influence of VP design on medical undergraduates. This is a grounded theory study into the influence of VP design on undergraduate medical students. Following a review of the literature and publicly available VP cases, we identified important design properties. We integrated them into two substantial VPs produced for this research. Using purposeful iterative sampling, 46 medical undergraduates were recruited to participate in six focus groups. Participants completed both VPs, an evaluation and a 1-hour focus group discussion. These were digitally recorded, transcribed and analysed using grounded theory, supported by computer-assisted analysis. Following open, axial and selective coding, we produced a theoretical model describing how students learn from VPs. We identified a central core phenomenon designated 'learning from the VP'. This had four categories: VP Construction; External Preconditions; Student-VP Interaction, and Consequences. From these, we constructed a three-layer model describing the interactions of students with VPs. The inner layer consists of the student's cognitive and behavioural preconditions prior to sitting a case. The middle layer considers the VP as an 'encoded object', an e-learning artefact and as a 'constructed activity', with associated pedagogic and organisational elements. The outer layer describes cognitive and behavioural change. This is the first grounded theory study to explore VP design. This original research has produced a model which enhances understanding of how and why the delivery and design of VPs

  19. Algorithms and theory for the design and programming of industrial control systems materialized with PLC's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya Villena, Rafael

    According to its title, the general objective of the Thesis consists in developing a clear, simple and systematic methodology for programming type PLC devices. With this aim in mind, we will use the following elements: Codification of all variables types. This section is very important since it allows us working with little information. The necessary rules are given to codify all type of phrases produced in industrial processes. An algorithm that describes process evolution and that has been called process D.F. This is one of the most important contributions, since it will allow us, together with information codification, representing the process evolution in a graphic way and with any design theory used. Theory selection. Evidently, the use of some kind of design method is necessary to obtain logic equations. For this particular case, we will use binodal theory, an ideal theory for wired technologies, since it can obtain highly reduced schemas for relatively simple automatisms, which means a minimum number of components used. User program outline algorithm (D.F.P.). This is another necessary contribution and perhaps the most important one, since logic equations resulting from binodal theory are compatible with process evolution if wired technology is used, whether it is electric, electronic, pneumatic, etc. On the other hand, PLC devices performance characteristics force the program instructions order to validate or not the automatism, as we have proven in different articles and lectures at congresses both national and international. Therefore, we will codify any information concerning the automating process, graphically represent its temporal evolution and, applying binodal theory and D.F.P (previously adapted), succeed in making logic equations compatible with the process to be automated and the device in which they will be implemented (PLC in our case)

  20. Implications of complex adaptive systems theory for the design of research on health care organizations.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, Reuben R; Lanham, Holly Jordan; Anderson, Ruth A

    2009-01-01

    Because health care organizations (HCOs) are complex adaptive systems (CASs), phenomena of interest often are dynamic and unfold in unpredictable ways, and unfolding events are often unique. Researchers of HCOs may recognize that the subject of their research is dynamic; however, their research designs may not take this into account. Researchers may also know that unfolding events are often unique, but their design may not have the capacity to obtain information from meager evidence. These two concerns led us to examine two ideas from organizational theory: (a) the ideas of K. E. Weick (1993) on organizational design as a verb and (b) the ideas of J. G. March, L. S. Sproull, and M. Tamuz (1991) on learning from samples of one or fewer. In this article, we applied these ideas to develop an enriched perspective of research design for studying CASs. We conducted a theoretical analysis of organizations as CASs, identifying relevant characteristics for research designs. We then explored two ideas from organizational theory and discussed the implications for research designs. Weick's idea of "design as a verb" helps in understanding dynamic and process-oriented research design. The idea of "learning from samples of one or fewer" of March, Sproull, and Tamuz provides strategies for research design that enables learning from meager evidence. When studying HCOs, research designs are likely to be more effective when they (a) anticipate change, (b) include tension, (c) capitalize on serendipity, and (d) use an "act-then-look" mind set. Implications for practice are discussed. Practitioners who understand HCOs as CASs will be cautious in accepting findings from studies that treat HCOs mechanistically. They will consider the characteristics of CAS when evaluating the evidence base for practice. Practitioners can use the strategies proposed in this article to stimulate discussion with researchers seeking to conduct research in their HCO.

  1. Implications of complex adaptive systems theory for the design of research on health care organizations

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, Reuben R.; Lanham, Holly Jordan; Anderson, Ruth A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Because health care organizations (HCOs) are complex adaptive systems (CASs), phenomena of interest often are dynamic and unfold in unpredictable ways, and unfolding events are often unique. Researchers of HCOs may recognize that the subject of their research is dynamic; however, their research designs may not take this into account. Researchers may also know that unfolding events are often unique, but their design may not have the capacity to obtain information from meager evidence. Purpose These two concerns led us to examine two ideas from organizational theory: (a) the ideas of K. E. Weick (1993) on organizational design as a verb and (b) the ideas of J. G. March, L. S. Sproull, and M. Tamuz (1991) on learning from samples of one or fewer. In this article, we applied these ideas to develop an enriched perspective of research design for studying CASs. Methodology/Approach We conducted a theoretical analysis of organizations as CASs, identifying relevant characteristics for research designs. We then explored two ideas from organizational theory and discussed the implications for research designs. Findings Weick's idea of “design as a verb” helps in understanding dynamic and process-oriented research design. The idea of “learning from samples of one or fewer” of March, Sproull, and Tamuz provides strategies for research design that enables learning from meager evidence. When studying HCOs, research designs are likely to be more effective when they (a) anticipate change, (b) include tension, (c) capitalize on serendipity, and (d) use an “act-then-look” mind set. Implications for practice are discussed. Practice Implications Practitioners who understand HCOs as CASs will be cautious in accepting findings from studies that treat HCOs mechanistically. They will consider the characteristics of CAS when evaluating the evidence base for practice. Practitioners can use the strategies proposed in this article to stimulate discussion with researchers

  2. Robust control design with real parameter uncertainty using absolute stability theory. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    How, Jonathan P.; Hall, Steven R.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to investigate an extension of mu theory for robust control design by considering systems with linear and nonlinear real parameter uncertainties. In the process, explicit connections are made between mixed mu and absolute stability theory. In particular, it is shown that the upper bounds for mixed mu are a generalization of results from absolute stability theory. Both state space and frequency domain criteria are developed for several nonlinearities and stability multipliers using the wealth of literature on absolute stability theory and the concepts of supply rates and storage functions. The state space conditions are expressed in terms of Riccati equations and parameter-dependent Lyapunov functions. For controller synthesis, these stability conditions are used to form an overbound of the H2 performance objective. A geometric interpretation of the equivalent frequency domain criteria in terms of off-axis circles clarifies the important role of the multiplier and shows that both the magnitude and phase of the uncertainty are considered. A numerical algorithm is developed to design robust controllers that minimize the bound on an H2 cost functional and satisfy an analysis test based on the Popov stability multiplier. The controller and multiplier coefficients are optimized simultaneously, which avoids the iteration and curve-fitting procedures required by the D-K procedure of mu synthesis. Several benchmark problems and experiments on the Middeck Active Control Experiment at M.I.T. demonstrate that these controllers achieve good robust performance and guaranteed stability bounds.

  3. Theory driven research designs for explaining behavioural health risk transitions: the case of smoking.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Jane; Banwell, Cathy

    2009-06-01

    Recent social network analyses have suggested that common chronic disease risk factors are more mutable than expected; raising practical considerations for public health interventions. Within this context, it is timely to assess the alternative social science reasoning being offered to explain behavioural health risk transitions. This paper takes up this challenge by critically reviewing the major theories applied to the temporal trends and sub-population variations in affluent country smoking behaviour. Three explanations dominate: a materialist approach; Bourdieu's distinctive class-based cultures; and, the spread of norms and emotions within social networks. We note conceptual tension when integrated theories are adopted. We also report on the relative absence of theoretical interrogation for the persistent adoption of smoking behaviours among present and successive lower socio-economic status (SES) cohorts. While unequal rates of persistence within cohorts has received some attention, the ongoing adoption of a non-innovative and health damaging behaviour is not well understood. To this end, we suggest the incorporation of several underused concepts: namely Bourdieu's 'rules of the game' and 'symbolic violence' and 'mimesis', an aspect of social contagion. We conclude by describing the implications for social action of the alternative theories, and argue that theory driven research designs could deliver more efficacious evidence for interventions than the post hoc application of theories to existing data sets.

  4. Current redistribution and generation of kinetic energy in the stagnated Z pinch.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, V V; Anderson, A A; Papp, D; Astanovitskiy, A L; Talbot, B R; Chittenden, J P; Niasse, N

    2013-07-01

    The structure of magnetic fields was investigated in stagnated wire-array Z pinches using a Faraday rotation diagnostic at the wavelength of 266 nm. The distribution of current in the pinch and trailing material was reconstructed. A significant part of current can switch from the main pinch to the trailing plasma preheated by x-ray radiation of the pinch. Secondary implosions of trailing plasma generate kinetic energy and provide enhanced heating and radiation of plasma at stagnation. Hot spots in wire-array Z pinches also provide enhanced radiation of the Z pinch. A collapse of a single hot spot radiates 1%-3% of x-ray energy of the Z pinch with a total contribution of hot spots of 10%-30%.

  5. On the relationship between matched filter theory as applied to gust loads and phased design loads analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeiler, Thomas A.; Pototzky, Anthony S.

    1989-01-01

    A theoretical basis and example calculations are given that demonstrate the relationship between the Matched Filter Theory approach to the calculation of time-correlated gust loads and Phased Design Load Analysis in common use in the aerospace industry. The relationship depends upon the duality between Matched Filter Theory and Random Process Theory and upon the fact that Random Process Theory is used in Phased Design Loads Analysis in determining an equiprobable loads design ellipse. Extensive background information describing the relevant points of Phased Design Loads Analysis, calculating time-correlated gust loads with Matched Filter Theory, and the duality between Matched Filter Theory and Random Process Theory is given. It is then shown that the time histories of two time-correlated gust load responses, determined using the Matched Filter Theory approach, can be plotted as parametric functions of time and that the resulting plot, when superposed upon the design ellipse corresponding to the two loads, is tangent to the ellipse. The question is raised of whether or not it is possible for a parametric load plot to extend outside the associated design ellipse. If it is possible, then the use of the equiprobable loads design ellipse will not be a conservative design practice in some circumstances.

  6. Grazing incidence extreme ultraviolet spectrometer fielded with time resolution in a hostile z-pinch environment.

    PubMed

    Williamson, K M; Kantsyrev, V L; Safronova, A S; Wilcox, P G; Cline, W; Batie, S; LeGalloudec, B; Nalajala, V; Astanovitsky, A

    2011-09-01

    This recently developed diagnostic was designed to allow for time-gated spectroscopic study of the EUV radiation (4 nm < λ < 15 nm) present during harsh wire array z-pinch implosions. The spectrometer utilizes a 25 μm slit, an array of 3 spherical blazed gratings at grazing incidence, and a microchannel plate (MCP) detector placed in an off-Rowland position. Each grating is positioned such that its diffracted radiation is cast over two of the six total independently timed frames of the MCP. The off-Rowland configuration allows for a much greater spectral density on the imaging plate but only focuses at one wavelength per grating. The focal wavelengths are chosen for their diagnostic significance. Testing was conducted at the Zebra pulsed-power generator (1 MA, 100 ns risetime) at the University of Nevada, Reno on a series of wire array z-pinch loads. Within this harsh z-pinch environment, radiation yields routinely exceed 20 kJ in the EUV and soft x-ray. There are also strong mechanical shocks, high velocity debris, sudden vacuum changes during operation, energic ion beams, and hard x-ray radiation in excess of 50 keV. The spectra obtained from the precursor plasma of an Al double planar wire array contained lines of Al IX and AlX ions indicating a temperature near 60 eV during precursor formation. Detailed results will be presented showing the fielding specifications and the techniques used to extract important plasma parameters using this spectrometer. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  7. The use of network theory to model disparate ship design information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigterink, Douglas; Piks, Rebecca; Singer, David J.

    2014-06-01

    This paper introduces the use of network theory to model and analyze disparate ship design information. This work will focus on a ship's distributed systems and their intra- and intersystem structures and interactions. The three system to be analyzed are: a passageway system, an electrical system, and a fire fighting system. These systems will be analyzed individually using common network metrics to glean information regarding their structures and attributes. The systems will also be subjected to community detection algorithms both separately and as a multiplex network to compare their similarities, differences, and interactions. Network theory will be shown to be useful in the early design stage due to its simplicity and ability to model any shipboard system.

  8. Pinch technique and the Batalin-Vilkovisky formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binosi, Daniele; Papavassiliou, Joannis

    2002-07-01

    In this paper we take the first step towards a nondiagrammatic formulation of the pinch technique. In particular we proceed into a systematic identification of the parts of the one-loop and two-loop Feynman diagrams that are exchanged during the pinching process in terms of unphysical ghost Green's functions; the latter appear in the standard Slavnov-Taylor identity satisfied by the tree-level and one-loop three-gluon vertex. This identification allows for the consistent generalization of the intrinsic pinch technique to two loops, through the collective treatment of entire sets of diagrams, instead of the laborious algebraic manipulation of individual graphs, and sets up the stage for the generalization of the method to all orders. We show that the task of comparing the effective Green's functions obtained by the pinch technique with those computed in the background field method Feynman gauge is significantly facilitated when employing the powerful quantization framework of Batalin and Vilkovisky. This formalism allows for the derivation of a set of useful nonlinear identities, which express the background field method Green's functions in terms of the conventional (quantum) ones and auxiliary Green's functions involving the background source and the gluonic antifield; these latter Green's functions are subsequently related by means of a Schwinger-Dyson type of equation to the ghost Green's functions appearing in the aforementioned Slavnov-Taylor identity.

  9. Scaling in two-fluid pinch-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommer, Chris; Suryo, Ronald; Subramani, Hariprasad; Harris, Michael; Basaran, Osman

    2009-11-01

    Two-fluid pinch-off is encountered when drops or bubbles of one fluid are ejected from a nozzle into another fluid or when a compound jet breaks. While the breakup of a drop in a passive environment and that of a passive bubble in a liquid are well understood, the physics of pinch-off when both the inner and outer fluids are dynamically active is inadequately understood. In this talk, the breakup of a compound jet whose core and shell are both incompressible Newtonian fluids is analyzed computationally by a method of lines ALE algorithm which uses finite elements with elliptic mesh generation for spatial discretization and adaptive finite differences for time integration. Pinch-off dynamics are investigated well beyond the limit of experiments set by the wavelength of visible light and that of various algorithms used in the literature. Simulations show that the minimum neck radius r initially scales with time τ before breakup as &αcirc; where α varies over a certain range. However, depending on the values of the governing dimensionless groups, this initial scaling regime may be transitory and, closer to pinch-off, the dynamics may transition to a final asymptotic regime for which r ˜&βcirc;, where β!=α.

  10. Hydrodynamic mode associated with the pinch flow in RFP simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delzanno, Gian Luca; Chacon, Luis; Finn, John

    2007-11-01

    We present a systematic study of single helicity (SH) states and quasi-single helicity (QSH) states in RFPs. We begin with cylindrical paramagnetic pinch equilibria with uniform resistivity, characterized by a single dimensionless parameter proportional to the toroidal electric field, or the RFP toroidal current parameter θ. For sufficiently high θ, there are several unstable m=1 ideal MHD instabilities, typically one of which is nonresonant, with 1/n just above q(r=0). We evolve these modes nonlinearly to saturation for low Hartmann number H. We show the existence of a new class of unstable modes [1], besides the electromagnetic kink modes typically responsible for the reversal of the axial magnetic field at the edge in RFPs. This new instability is hydrodynamic in nature and is due to the inward equilibrium pinch flow and suitable boundary conditions. In these circumstances, the total angular momentum of the system must grow in response to the flux of particles coming from the boundary. The hydrodynamic mode dominates the nonlinear phase of the velocity field but has little effect on the dynamics of the magnetic field. [1] G.L. Delzanno, L. Chac'on, J.M. Finn, Hydrodynamic mode associated with the pinch flow in Reversed Field Pinch simulations, submitted (2007).

  11. A linearized theory method of constrained optimization for supersonic cruise wing design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, D. S.; Carlson, H. W.; Middleton, W. D.

    1976-01-01

    A linearized theory wing design and optimization procedure which allows physical realism and practical considerations to be imposed as constraints on the optimum (least drag due to lift) solution is discussed and examples of application are presented. In addition to the usual constraints on lift and pitching moment, constraints are imposed on wing surface ordinates and wing upper surface pressure levels and gradients. The design procedure also provides the capability of including directly in the optimization process the effects of other aircraft components such as a fuselage, canards, and nacelles.

  12. Evaluating the Usability of Pinchigator, a system for Navigating Virtual Worlds using Pinch Gloves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, George S.; Brookman, Stephen; Dumas, Joseph D. II; Tilghman, Neal

    2003-01-01

    Appropriate design of two dimensional user interfaces (2D U/I) utilizing the well known WIMP (Window, Icon, Menu, Pointing device) environment for computer software is well studied and guidance can be found in several standards. Three-dimensional U/I design is not nearly so mature as 2D U/I, and standards bodies have not reached consensus on what makes a usable interface. This is especially true when the tools for interacting with the virtual environment may include stereo viewing, real time trackers and pinch gloves instead of just a mouse & keyboard. Over the last several years the authors have created a 3D U/I system dubbed Pinchigator for navigating virtual worlds based on the dVise dV/Mockup visualization software, Fakespace Pinch Gloves and Pohlemus trackers. The current work is to test the usability of the system on several virtual worlds, suggest improvements to increase Pinchigator s usability, and then to generalize about what was learned and how those lessons might be applied to improve other 3D U/I systems.

  13. Co-twin control designs for testing behavioral economic theories of child nutrition: methodological note.

    PubMed

    Faith, M S; Rose, E; Matz, P E; Pietrobelli, A; Epstein, L H

    2006-10-01

    To illustrate the use and potential efficiency of the co-twin control design for testing behavioral economic theories of child nutrition. Co-twin control design, in which participating twins ate an ad libitum lunch on two laboratory visits. At visit 1, child food choices were not reinforced. On visit 2, twins were randomized to conditions such that one twin was reinforced for each fruit and vegetable serving consumed during lunch ('contingent') while his co-twin was reinforced irrespective of food intake ('non-contingent'). Six male twins, 5 years old, from three monozygotic twin pairs. Ad libitum intake of total energy (kcals), fat (kcals), and fruits and vegetables (servings) from the protocol test meals on the two visits. Compared to twins receiving non-contingent reinforcement, twins receiving contingent reinforcement increased fruit and vegetable intake by 2.0 servings, reduced fat intake 106.3 kcals, and reduced total energy intake by 112.7 kcals. The relative efficiency of the co-twin control design compared to a conventional between-groups design of unrelated children was most powerful for detecting 'substitution effects' (i.e., reduced total energy and fat intake) more so than for detecting increased fruit and vegetable intake. Genetically informative studies, including the co-twin control design, can provide conceptually elegant and efficient strategies for testing environmental theories of child nutrition and obesity.

  14. Integrating PCR theory and bioinformatics into a research-oriented primer design exercise.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Amber L; Phillips, Allison R

    2008-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a conceptually difficult technique that embodies many fundamental biological processes. Traditionally, students have struggled to analyze PCR results due to an incomplete understanding of the biological concepts (theory) of DNA replication and strand complementarity. Here we describe the design of a novel research-oriented exercise that prepares students to design DNA primers for PCR. Our exercise design includes broad and specific learning goals and assessments of student performance and perceptions. We developed this interactive Primer Design Exercise using the principles of scientific teaching to enhance student understanding of the theory behind PCR and provide practice in designing PCR primers to amplify DNA. In the end, the students were more poised to troubleshoot problems that arose in real experiments using PCR. In addition, students had the opportunity to utilize several bioinformatics tools to gain an increased understanding of primer quality, directionality, and specificity. In the course of this study many misconceptions about DNA replication during PCR and the need for primer specificity were identified and addressed. Students were receptive to the new materials and the majority achieved the learning goals.

  15. Integrating design science theory and methods to improve the development and evaluation of health communication programs.

    PubMed

    Neuhauser, Linda; Kreps, Gary L

    2014-12-01

    Traditional communication theory and research methods provide valuable guidance about designing and evaluating health communication programs. However, efforts to use health communication programs to educate, motivate, and support people to adopt healthy behaviors often fail to meet the desired goals. One reason for this failure is that health promotion issues are complex, changeable, and highly related to the specific needs and contexts of the intended audiences. It is a daunting challenge to effectively influence health behaviors, particularly culturally learned and reinforced behaviors concerning lifestyle factors related to diet, exercise, and substance (such as alcohol and tobacco) use. Too often, program development and evaluation are not adequately linked to provide rapid feedback to health communication program developers so that important revisions can be made to design the most relevant and personally motivating health communication programs for specific audiences. Design science theory and methods commonly used in engineering, computer science, and other fields can address such program and evaluation weaknesses. Design science researchers study human-created programs using tightly connected build-and-evaluate loops in which they use intensive participatory methods to understand problems and develop solutions concurrently and throughout the duration of the program. Such thinking and strategies are especially relevant to address complex health communication issues. In this article, the authors explore the history, scientific foundation, methods, and applications of design science and its potential to enhance health communication programs and their evaluation.

  16. Study and optimization of negative polarity rod pinch diode as flash radiography source at 4.5 MV

    SciTech Connect

    Etchessahar, Bertrand; Bicrel, Beatrice; Cassany, Bruno

    2012-09-15

    The negative polarity rod pinch diode (NPRPD) is a potential millimeter spot size radiography source for high voltage generators (4 to 8 MV) [Cooperstein et al., 'Considerations of rod-pinch diode operation in negative polarity for radiography,' in Proceedings of the 14th IEEE Pulsed Power Conference, 2003, pp. 975-978]. The NPRPD consists of a small diameter (few mm) cylindrical anode extending from the front end of the vacuum cell through a thin annular cathode, held by a central conductor. The polarity has been inverted when compared to the original rod pinch diode [Cooperstein et al., 'Theoretical modeling and experimental characterization ofmore » a rod-pinch diode,' Phys. Plasmas 8(10), 4618-4636 (2001)] in order to take advantage from the maximal x-ray emission toward the anode holder at such a voltage [Swanekamp et al., 'Evaluation of self-magnetically pinched diodes up to 10 MV as high resolution flash X-ray sources,' IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 32(5), 2004-2016 (2004). We have studied this diode at 4.5 MV, driven by the ASTERIX generator [Raboisson et al., 'ASTERIX, a high intensity X-ray generator,' in Proceedings of the 7th IEEE Pulsed Power Conference, 1989, pp. 567-570.]. This generator, made up of a capacitor bank and a Blumlein line, was initially designed to test the behavior of electronic devices under irradiation. In our experiments, the vacuum diode has been modified in order to set up flash a radiographic diode [Etchessahar et al., 'Negative polarity rod pinch diode experiments on the ASTERIX generator,' in Conference Records-Abstracts, 37th IEEE International Conference on Plasma Science, 2010]. The experiments and numerical simulations presented here allowed the observation and analysis of various physical phenomena associated with the diode operation. Also, the influence of several experimental parameters, such as cathode and anode diameters, materials and surface states, was examined. In order to achieve the most comprehensive

  17. The role of modern control theory in the design of controls for aircraft turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeller, J.; Lehtinen, B.; Merrill, W.

    1982-01-01

    The development, applications, and current research in modern control theory (MCT) are reviewed, noting the importance for fuel-efficient operation of turbines with variable inlet guide vanes, compressor stators, and exhaust nozzle area. The evolution of multivariable propulsion control design is examined, noting a basis in a matrix formulation of the differential equations defining the process, leading to state space formulations. Reports and papers which appeared from 1970-1982 which dealt with problems in MCT applications to turbine engine control design are outlined, including works on linear quadratic regulator methods, frequency domain methods, identification, estimation, and model reduction, detection, isolation, and accommodation, and state space control, adaptive control, and optimization approaches. Finally, NASA programs in frequency domain design, sensor failure detection, computer-aided control design, and plant modeling are explored

  18. Data Sufficiency Assessment and Pumping Test Design for Groundwater Prediction Using Decision Theory and Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhee, J.; William, Y. W.

    2005-12-01

    This work presents a methodology for pumping test design based on the reliability requirements of a groundwater model. Reliability requirements take into consideration the application of the model results in groundwater management, expressed in this case as a multiobjective management model. The pumping test design is formulated as a mixed-integer nonlinear programming (MINLP) problem and solved using a combination of genetic algorithm (GA) and gradient-based optimization. Bayesian decision theory provides a formal framework for assessing the influence of parameter uncertainty over the reliability of the proposed pumping test. The proposed methodology is useful for selecting a robust design that will outperform all other candidate designs under most potential 'true' states of the system

  19. Capsule symmetry sensitivity and hohlraum symmetry calculations for the z-pinch driven hohlraum high-yield concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesey, Roger; Cuneo, M. E.; Hanson Porter, D. L., Jr.; Mehlhorn, T. A.; Ruggles, L. E.; Simpson, W. W.; Hammer, J. H.; Landen, O.

    2000-10-01

    Capsule radiation symmetry is a crucial issue in the design of the z-pinch driven hohlraum approach to high-yield inertial confinement fusion [1]. Capsule symmetry may be influenced by power imbalance of the two z-pinch x-ray sources, and by hohlraum effects (geometry, time-dependent albedo, wall motion). We have conducted two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics calculations to estimate the symmetry sensitivity of the 220 eV beryllium ablator capsule that nominally yields 400 MJ in this concept. These estimates then determine the symmetry requirements to be met by the hohlraum design (for even Legendre modes) and by the top-bottom pinch imbalance and mistiming (for odd Legendre modes). We have used a combination of 2- and 3-D radiosity ("viewfactor"), and 2-D radiation-hydrodynamics calculations to identify hohlraum geometries that meet these symmetry requirements for high-yield, and are testing these models against ongoing Z foam ball symmetry experiments. 1. J. H. Hammer et al., Phys. Plas. 6, 2129 (1999).

  20. A robust rotorcraft flight control system design methodology utilizing quantitative feedback theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorder, Peter James

    1993-01-01

    Rotorcraft flight control systems present design challenges which often exceed those associated with fixed-wing aircraft. First, large variations in the response characteristics of the rotorcraft result from the wide range of airspeeds of typical operation (hover to over 100 kts). Second, the assumption of vehicle rigidity often employed in the design of fixed-wing flight control systems is rarely justified in rotorcraft where rotor degrees of freedom can have a significant impact on the system performance and stability. This research was intended to develop a methodology for the design of robust rotorcraft flight control systems. Quantitative Feedback Theory (QFT) was chosen as the basis for the investigation. Quantitative Feedback Theory is a technique which accounts for variability in the dynamic response of the controlled element in the design robust control systems. It was developed to address a Multiple-Input Single-Output (MISO) design problem, and utilizes two degrees of freedom to satisfy the design criteria. Two techniques were examined for extending the QFT MISO technique to the design of a Multiple-Input-Multiple-Output (MIMO) flight control system (FCS) for a UH-60 Black Hawk Helicopter. In the first, a set of MISO systems, mathematically equivalent to the MIMO system, was determined. QFT was applied to each member of the set simultaneously. In the second, the same set of equivalent MISO systems were analyzed sequentially, with closed loop response information from each loop utilized in subsequent MISO designs. The results of each technique were compared, and the advantages of the second, termed Sequential Loop Closure, were clearly evident.

  1. BPF Theory-Based Design Method for Wireless Power Transfer System by Use of Magnetically Coupled Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awai, Ikuo

    A wireless power transfer system based on two coupled resonators is analyzed by the filter design theory. Many useful relations between the equivalent circuit components are derived to comply with the change of power transfer condition along with the basic design of the system. Some design examples are given to deepen understanding of the theory and thus to stimulate using it for the system design. The effect of the resonator losses is also addressed to show the robustness of the theory, indicating the circuit loss of almost 10 dB does not deteriorate the matching condition too much.

  2. Applying Constructivist and Objectivist Learning Theories in the Design of a Web-based Course: Implications for Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moallem, Mahnaz

    2001-01-01

    Provides an overview of the process of designing and developing a Web-based course using instructional design principles and models, including constructivist and objectivist theories. Explains the process of implementing an instructional design model in designing a Web-based undergraduate course and evaluates the model based on course evaluations.…

  3. Experimental study of self magnetic pinch diode as flash radiography source at 4 megavolt

    SciTech Connect

    Etchessahar, Bertrand; Bicrel, Béatrice; Cassany, Bruno

    2013-10-15

    The Self Magnetic Pinch (SMP) diode is a potential high-brightness X-ray source for high voltage generators (2–10 MV) that has shown good reliability for flash radiography applications [D. D. Hinchelwood et al., “High power self-pinch diode experiments for radiographic applications” IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 35(3), 565–572 (2007)]. We have studied this diode at about 4 MV, driven by the ASTERIX generator operated at the CEA/GRAMAT [G. Raboisson et al., “ASTERIX, a high intensity X-ray generator,” in Proceedings of the 7th IEEE Pulsed Power Conference (1989), pp. 567–570]. This generator, made up of a capacitor bank and a Blumlein line, wasmore » initially designed to test the behavior of electronic devices under irradiation. In our experiments, the vacuum diode is modified in order to set up flash radiographic diodes. A previous set of radiographic experiments was carried out on ASTERIX with a Negative Polarity Rod Pinch (NPRP) diode [B. Etchessahar et al., “Study and optimization of negative polarity rod pinch diode as flash radiography source at 4.5 MV,” Phys. Plasmas 19(9), 093104 (2012)]. The SMP diode which is examined in the present study provides an alternative operating point on the same generator and a different radiographic performance: 142 ± 11 rad at 1 m dose (Al) for a 3.46 ± 0.42 mm spot size (1.4× FWHM of the LSF). This performance is obtained in a reproducible and robust nominal configuration. However, several parametric variations were also tested, such as cathode diameter and anode/cathode gap. They showed that an even better performance is accessible after optimization, in particular, a smaller spot size (<3 mm). Numbers of electrical, optical, and X-ray diagnostics have been implemented in order to gain more insight in the diode physics and to optimize it further. For the first time in France, visible and laser imaging of the SMP diode has been realized, from a radial point of view, thus, providing key information on the

  4. Formation of a pinched electron beam and an intense x-ray source in radial foil rod-pinch diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Sorokin, S. A.

    2016-04-15

    Low-impedance rod-pinch diode experiments were performed on the MIG generator at Institute of High Current Electronics using an aluminum foil placed between concentric electrodes of a rod-pinch diode. The J × B force accelerates the foil plasma in the axial and radial directions. After the foil plasma is pushed beyond the tip of the rod, a vacuum gap and a pinched electron beam form. The anode and cathode plasmas expansion and the following plasmas sweeping up by the J × B force can result in repetitive gap formations and closures, which are evident in the several successive intense x-ray pulses. A 0.7-mm-size point-like x-raymore » source was realized using a 1-mm-diameter tungsten rod, tapered to a point over the last 10 mm. The results of experiments show that the foil-shorted rod-pinch diode configuration has the potential to form low-impedance diodes, to shorten x-ray pulse duration and to realize submillimeter spot-size x-ray sources.« less

  5. Information theory-based decision support system for integrated design of multivariable hydrometric networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keum, Jongho; Coulibaly, Paulin

    2017-07-01

    Adequate and accurate hydrologic information from optimal hydrometric networks is an essential part of effective water resources management. Although the key hydrologic processes in the water cycle are interconnected, hydrometric networks (e.g., streamflow, precipitation, groundwater level) have been routinely designed individually. A decision support framework is proposed for integrated design of multivariable hydrometric networks. The proposed method is applied to design optimal precipitation and streamflow networks simultaneously. The epsilon-dominance hierarchical Bayesian optimization algorithm was combined with Shannon entropy of information theory to design and evaluate hydrometric networks. Specifically, the joint entropy from the combined networks was maximized to provide the most information, and the total correlation was minimized to reduce redundant information. To further optimize the efficiency between the networks, they were designed by maximizing the conditional entropy of the streamflow network given the information of the precipitation network. Compared to the traditional individual variable design approach, the integrated multivariable design method was able to determine more efficient optimal networks by avoiding the redundant stations. Additionally, four quantization cases were compared to evaluate their effects on the entropy calculations and the determination of the optimal networks. The evaluation results indicate that the quantization methods should be selected after careful consideration for each design problem since the station rankings and the optimal networks can change accordingly.

  6. Optimal design of earth-moving machine elements with cusp catastrophe theory application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitukhin, A. V.; Skobtsov, I. G.

    2017-10-01

    This paper deals with the optimal design problem solution for the operator of an earth-moving machine with a roll-over protective structure (ROPS) in terms of the catastrophe theory. A brief description of the catastrophe theory is presented, the cusp catastrophe is considered, control parameters are viewed as Gaussian stochastic quantities in the first part of the paper. The statement of optimal design problem is given in the second part of the paper. It includes the choice of the objective function and independent design variables, establishment of system limits. The objective function is determined as mean total cost that includes initial cost and cost of failure according to the cusp catastrophe probability. Algorithm of random search method with an interval reduction subject to side and functional constraints is given in the last part of the paper. The way of optimal design problem solution can be applied to choose rational ROPS parameters, which will increase safety and reduce production and exploitation expenses.

  7. Neonatal Imitation: Theory, Experimental Design, and Significance for the Field of Social Cognition.

    PubMed

    Vincini, Stefano; Jhang, Yuna; Buder, Eugene H; Gallagher, Shaun

    2017-01-01

    Neonatal imitation has rich implications for neuroscience, developmental psychology, and social cognition, but there is little consensus about this phenomenon. The primary empirical question, whether or not neonatal imitation exists, is not settled. Is it possible to give a balanced evaluation of the theories and methodologies at stake so as to facilitate real progress with respect to the primary empirical question? In this paper, we address this question. We present the operational definition of differential imitation and discuss why it is important to keep it in mind. The operational definition indicates that neonatal imitation may not look like prototypical imitation and sets non-obvious requirements on what can count as evidence for imitation. We also examine the principal explanations for the extant findings and argue that two theories, the arousal hypothesis and the Association by Similarity Theory, which interprets neonatal imitation as differential induction of spontaneous behavior through similarity, offer better explanations than the others. With respect to methodology, we investigate what experimental design can best provide evidence for imitation, focusing on how differential induction may be maximized and detected. Finally, we discuss the significance of neonatal imitation for the field of social cognition. Specifically, we propose links with theories of social interaction and direct social perception. Overall, our goals are to help clarify the complex theoretical issues at stake and suggest fruitful guidelines for empirical research.

  8. Neonatal Imitation: Theory, Experimental Design, and Significance for the Field of Social Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Vincini, Stefano; Jhang, Yuna; Buder, Eugene H.; Gallagher, Shaun

    2017-01-01

    Neonatal imitation has rich implications for neuroscience, developmental psychology, and social cognition, but there is little consensus about this phenomenon. The primary empirical question, whether or not neonatal imitation exists, is not settled. Is it possible to give a balanced evaluation of the theories and methodologies at stake so as to facilitate real progress with respect to the primary empirical question? In this paper, we address this question. We present the operational definition of differential imitation and discuss why it is important to keep it in mind. The operational definition indicates that neonatal imitation may not look like prototypical imitation and sets non-obvious requirements on what can count as evidence for imitation. We also examine the principal explanations for the extant findings and argue that two theories, the arousal hypothesis and the Association by Similarity Theory, which interprets neonatal imitation as differential induction of spontaneous behavior through similarity, offer better explanations than the others. With respect to methodology, we investigate what experimental design can best provide evidence for imitation, focusing on how differential induction may be maximized and detected. Finally, we discuss the significance of neonatal imitation for the field of social cognition. Specifically, we propose links with theories of social interaction and direct social perception. Overall, our goals are to help clarify the complex theoretical issues at stake and suggest fruitful guidelines for empirical research. PMID:28824502

  9. Advancing the literature on designing audit and feedback interventions: identifying theory-informed hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Colquhoun, Heather L; Carroll, Kelly; Eva, Kevin W; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Ivers, Noah; Michie, Susan; Sales, Anne; Brehaut, Jamie C

    2017-09-29

    Audit and feedback (A&F) is a common strategy for helping health providers to implement evidence into practice. Despite being extensively studied, health care A&F interventions remain variably effective, with overall effect sizes that have not improved since 2003. Contributing to this stagnation is the fact that most health care A&F interventions have largely been designed without being informed by theoretical understanding from the behavioral and social sciences. To determine if the trend can be improved, the objective of this study was to develop a list of testable, theory-informed hypotheses about how to design more effective A&F interventions. Using purposive sampling, semi-structured 60-90-min telephone interviews were conducted with experts in theories related to A&F from a range of fields (e.g., cognitive, health and organizational psychology, medical decision-making, economics). Guided by detailed descriptions of A&F interventions from the health care literature, interviewees described how they would approach the problem of designing improved A&F interventions. Specific, theory-informed hypotheses about the conditions for effective design and delivery of A&F interventions were elicited from the interviews. The resulting hypotheses were assigned by three coders working independently into themes, and categories of themes, in an iterative process. We conducted 28 interviews and identified 313 theory-informed hypotheses, which were placed into 30 themes. The 30 themes included hypotheses related to the following five categories: A&F recipient (seven themes), content of the A&F (ten themes), process of delivery of the A&F (six themes), behavior that was the focus of the A&F (three themes), and other (four themes). We have identified a set of testable, theory-informed hypotheses from a broad range of behavioral and social science that suggest conditions for more effective A&F interventions. This work demonstrates the breadth of perspectives about A&F from non

  10. Rotorcraft flight control design using quantitative feedback theory and dynamic crossfeeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Rendy P.

    1995-01-01

    A multi-input, multi-output controls design with robust crossfeeds is presented for a rotorcraft in near-hovering flight using quantitative feedback theory (QFT). Decoupling criteria are developed for dynamic crossfeed design and implementation. Frequency dependent performance metrics focusing on piloted flight are developed and tested on 23 flight configurations. The metrics show that the resulting design is superior to alternative control system designs using conventional fixed-gain crossfeeds and to feedback-only designs which rely on high gains to suppress undesired off-axis responses. The use of dynamic, robust crossfeeds prior to the QFT design reduces the magnitude of required feedback gain and results in performance that meets current handling qualities specifications relative to the decoupling of off-axis responses. The combined effect of the QFT feedback design following the implementation of low-order, dynamic crossfeed compensator successfully decouples ten of twelve off-axis channels. For the other two channels it was not possible to find a single, low-order crossfeed that was effective.

  11. God, the Devil, and Darwin - A Critique of Intelligent Design Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanks, Niall

    2007-03-01

    In the last fifteen years a controversial new theory of the origins of biological complexity and the nature of the universe has been fomenting bitter debates in education and science policy across North America, Europe, and Australia. Backed by intellectuals at respectable universities, Intelligent Design theory (ID) proposes an alternative to accepted accounts of evolutionary theory: that life is so complex, and that the universe is so fine-tuned for the appearance of life, that the only plausible explanation is the existence of an intelligent designer. For many ID theorists, the designer is taken to be the god of Christianity. Niall Shanks has written the first accessible introduction to, and critique of, this controversial new intellectual movement. Shanks locates the growth of ID in the last two decades of the twentieth century in the growing influence of the American religious right. But as he shows, its roots go back beyond Aquinas to Ancient Greece. After looking at the historical roots of ID, Shanks takes a hard look at its intellectual underpinnings, discussing modern understandings of thermodynamics, and how self-organizing processes lead to complex physical, chemical, and biological systems. He considers cosmological arguments for ID rooted in so-called "anthropic coincidences" and also tackles new biochemical arguments for ID based on "irreducible biological complexity." Throughout he shows how arguments for ID lack cohesion, rest on errors and unfounded suppositions, and generally are grossly inferior to evolutionary explanations. While ID has been proposed as a scientific alternative to evolutionary biology, Shanks argues that ID is in fact "old creationist wine in new designer label bottles" and moreover is a serious threat to the scientific and democratic values that are our cultural and intellectual inheritance from the Enlightenment.

  12. Acute and repeated activation of male sexual behavior by tail pinch: opioid and dopaminergic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Leyton, M; Stewart, J

    1996-07-01

    We studied the effect of tail pinch on male sexual behavior and its neurochemical basis. Male rats were gonadectomized and maintained on low doses of testosterone propionate (20.0 micrograms/day). Tail pinch significantly increased the percentage of males that mounted, intromitted, and ejaculated within a 30-min test, and these increases were attenuated by both pimozide (1.0 mg/kg, i.p.) and by naloxone (0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mg/kg, s.c.). Moreover, tail pinch in the presence of an estrous female led to significantly increased female-directed behavior 48 h later during a test without tail pinch. Repeated tail pinch tests led to progressively more sexual activity, and the development of this behavioral sensitization was prevented by naloxone. These findings suggest that tail pinch increases the salience of the incentive characteristics of the female. Furthermore, during subsequent tests, with or without tail pinch, the increased salience of the female remains, as measured by the continued increases in sexual activity. These acute and sensitized behavioral increases might result from tail pinch-induced activation of the midbrain dopamine system via an opioid mechanism; either preventing tail pinch-induced dopamine activation (by an opioid antagonist) or blocking the effects of dopamine activation (by a dopamine antagonist) attenuated the long-term facilitation of sexual behavior seen after pairing the female with tail pinch.

  13. Control Theory based Shape Design for the Incompressible Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowles, G.; Martinelli, L.

    2003-12-01

    A design method for shape optimization in incompressible turbulent viscous flow has been developed and validated for inverse design. The gradient information is determined using a control theory based algorithm. With such an approach, the cost of computing the gradient is negligible. An additional adjoint system must be solved which requires the cost of a single steady state flow solution. Thus, this method has an enormous advantage over traditional finite-difference based algorithms. The method of artificial compressibility is utilized to solve both the flow and adjoint systems. An algebraic turbulence model is used to compute the eddy viscosity. The method is validated using several inverse wing design test cases. In each case, the program must modify the shape of the initial wing such that its pressure distribution matches that of the target wing. Results are shown for the inversion of both finite thickness wings as well as zero thickness wings which can be considered a model of yacht sails.

  14. The Design of Power System Stability Controller Based on the PCH Theory and Improved Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhijian; Yin, Donghui; Yan, Jun

    2017-05-01

    Low frequency oscillation is still frequently happened in the power system and it affects the safety and stability of power system directly. With the continuously expending of the interconnection scale of power grid, the risk of low frequency oscillation becomes more and more noticeable. Firstly, the basic theory of port-controlled Hamilton (PCH) and its application is analyzed. Secondly, based on the PCH theory and the dynamic model of system, from the viewpoint of energy, the nonlinear stability controller of power system is designed. By the improved genetic algorithm, the parameters of the PCH model are optimized. Finally, a simulation model with PCH is built to vary the effectiveness of the method proposed in this paper.

  15. Design of ultra-broadband terahertz polymer waveguide emitters for telecom wavelengths using coupled mode theory.

    PubMed

    Vallejo, Felipe A; Hayden, L Michael

    2013-03-11

    We use coupled mode theory, adequately incorporating optical losses, to model ultra-broadband terahertz (THz) waveguide emitters (0.1-20 THz) based on difference frequency generation of femtosecond infrared (IR) optical pulses. We apply the model to a generic, symmetric, five-layer, metal/cladding/core waveguide structure using transfer matrix theory. We provide a design strategy for an efficient ultra-broadband THz emitter and apply it to polymer waveguides with a nonlinear core composed of a poled guest-host electro-optic polymer composite and pumped by a pulsed fiber laser system operating at 1567 nm. The predicted bandwidths are greater than 15 THz and we find a high conversion efficiency of 1.2 × 10(-4) W(-1) by balancing both the modal phase-matching and effective mode attenuation.

  16. Control theory based airfoil design for potential flow and a finite volume discretization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuther, J.; Jameson, A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of optimization techniques based on control theory for airfoil design. In previous studies it was shown that control theory could be used to devise an effective optimization procedure for two-dimensional profiles in which the shape is determined by a conformal transformation from a unit circle, and the control is the mapping function. The goal of our present work is to develop a method which does not depend on conformal mapping, so that it can be extended to treat three-dimensional problems. Therefore, we have developed a method which can address arbitrary geometric shapes through the use of a finite volume method to discretize the potential flow equation. Here the control law serves to provide computationally inexpensive gradient information to a standard numerical optimization method. Results are presented, where both target speed distributions and minimum drag are used as objective functions.

  17. Optimal design of a beam-based dynamic vibration absorber using fixed-points theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Yingyu; Wong, Waion; Cheng, Li

    2018-05-01

    The addition of a dynamic vibration absorber (DVA) to a vibrating structure could provide an economic solution for vibration suppressions if the absorber is properly designed and located onto the structure. A common design of the DVA is a sprung mass because of its simple structure and low cost. However, the vibration suppression performance of this kind of DVA is limited by the ratio between the absorber mass and the mass of the primary structure. In this paper, a beam-based DVA (beam DVA) is proposed and optimized for minimizing the resonant vibration of a general structure. The vibration suppression performance of the proposed beam DVA depends on the mass ratio, the flexural rigidity and length of the beam. In comparison with the traditional sprung mass DVA, the proposed beam DVA shows more flexibility in vibration control design because it has more design parameters. With proper design, the beam DVA's vibration suppression capability can outperform that of the traditional DVA under the same mass constraint. The general approach is illustrated using a benchmark cantilever beam as an example. The receptance theory is introduced to model the compound system consisting of the host beam and the attached beam-based DVA. The model is validated through comparisons with the results from Abaqus as well as the Transfer Matrix method (TMM) method. Fixed-points theory is then employed to derive the analytical expressions for the optimum tuning ratio and damping ratio of the proposed beam absorber. A design guideline is then presented to choose the parameters of the beam absorber. Comparisons are finally presented between the beam absorber and the traditional DVA in terms of the vibration suppression effect. It is shown that the proposed beam absorber can outperform the traditional DVA by following this proposed guideline.

  18. PINCH WELD TESTING TO SUPPORT CHANGE IN MANUFACTURING OIL AT THE KCP

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P; David Maxwell, D

    2008-02-28

    This task supports the change from an oil mixture termed 50:50 oil (an equal parts mixture of Milpro 634 and Pennex N47) to a new oil mixture (Castrol Illocut 334). This change was necessitated by a KCP vendor no longer supplying the Pennex N47 component of the 50-50. In order to continue production of machined parts, a detailed process was followed to ensure that high quality parts could be manufactured and that the cutting oil selected would provide acceptable human performance characteristics, e.g., skin irritability, smell, etc. A prime consideration in changing the oil was that no apparent change inmore » the pinch weldability of the fill stems fabricated using the new oil and process parameters, if any, be observed. A two part approach, as detailed in the plan shown in Appendix B, was used to qualify the effect of the process on pinch weld characteristics. In the first phase, ref. 1., the weld parameter window was defined using fill stems made from 304L, 21-6-9, and 316 stainless steel. These weld conditions were then subsequently used for the Castrol Illocut 334 machined fill stems. The results of this activity are reported in this document. A follow-on task of welding in the facility was requested by one of the design agencies and this will be completed and reported separately.« less

  19. Quorum-Sensing Synchronization of Synthetic Toggle Switches: A Design Based on Monotone Dynamical Systems Theory

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaev, Evgeni V.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic constructs in biotechnology, biocomputing, and modern gene therapy interventions are often based on plasmids or transfected circuits which implement some form of “on-off” switch. For example, the expression of a protein used for therapeutic purposes might be triggered by the recognition of a specific combination of inducers (e.g., antigens), and memory of this event should be maintained across a cell population until a specific stimulus commands a coordinated shut-off. The robustness of such a design is hampered by molecular (“intrinsic”) or environmental (“extrinsic”) noise, which may lead to spontaneous changes of state in a subset of the population and is reflected in the bimodality of protein expression, as measured for example using flow cytometry. In this context, a “majority-vote” correction circuit, which brings deviant cells back into the required state, is highly desirable, and quorum-sensing has been suggested as a way for cells to broadcast their states to the population as a whole so as to facilitate consensus. In this paper, we propose what we believe is the first such a design that has mathematically guaranteed properties of stability and auto-correction under certain conditions. Our approach is guided by concepts and theory from the field of “monotone” dynamical systems developed by M. Hirsch, H. Smith, and others. We benchmark our design by comparing it to an existing design which has been the subject of experimental and theoretical studies, illustrating its superiority in stability and self-correction of synchronization errors. Our stability analysis, based on dynamical systems theory, guarantees global convergence to steady states, ruling out unpredictable (“chaotic”) behaviors and even sustained oscillations in the limit of convergence. These results are valid no matter what are the values of parameters, and are based only on the wiring diagram. The theory is complemented by extensive computational bifurcation

  20. Intermediate Scale Experimental Design to Validate a Subsurface Inverse Theory Applicable to Date-sparse Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, J.; Trautz, A.; Zhang, Y.; Illangasekera, T.

    2017-12-01

    Subsurface flow and transport characterization under data-sparse condition is addressed by a new and computationally efficient inverse theory that simultaneously estimates parameters, state variables, and boundary conditions. Uncertainty in static data can be accounted for while parameter structure can be complex due to process uncertainty. The approach has been successfully extended to inverting transient and unsaturated flows as well as contaminant source identification under unknown initial and boundary conditions. In one example, by sampling numerical experiments simulating two-dimensional steady-state flow in which tracer migrates, a sequential inversion scheme first estimates the flow field and permeability structure before the evolution of tracer plume and dispersivities are jointly estimated. Compared to traditional inversion techniques, the theory does not use forward simulations to assess model-data misfits, thus the knowledge of the difficult-to-determine site boundary condition is not required. To test the general applicability of the theory, data generated during high-precision intermediate-scale experiments (i.e., a scale intermediary to the field and column scales) in large synthetic aquifers can be used. The design of such experiments is not trivial as laboratory conditions have to be selected to mimic natural systems in order to provide useful data, thus requiring a variety of sensors and data collection strategies. This paper presents the design of such an experiment in a synthetic, multi-layered aquifer with dimensions of 242.7 x 119.3 x 7.7 cm3. Different experimental scenarios that will generate data to validate the theory are presented.

  1. Multidisciplinary design optimisation of a recurve bow based on applications of the autogenetic design theory and distributed computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzsche, Matthias; Kittel, Konstantin; Blankenburg, Alexander; Vajna, Sándor

    2012-08-01

    The focus of this paper is to present a method of multidisciplinary design optimisation based on the autogenetic design theory (ADT) that provides methods, which are partially implemented in the optimisation software described here. The main thesis of the ADT is that biological evolution and the process of developing products are mainly similar, i.e. procedures from biological evolution can be transferred into product development. In order to fulfil requirements and boundary conditions of any kind (that may change at any time), both biological evolution and product development look for appropriate solution possibilities in a certain area, and try to optimise those that are actually promising by varying parameters and combinations of these solutions. As the time necessary for multidisciplinary design optimisations is a critical aspect in product development, ways to distribute the optimisation process with the effective use of unused calculating capacity, can reduce the optimisation time drastically. Finally, a practical example shows how ADT methods and distributed optimising are applied to improve a product.

  2. Design of space-borne imager with wide field of view based on freeform aberration theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Haodong; Zhang, Jizhen; Wang, Lingjie; Zhang, Xin; Jiang, Huilin

    2016-10-01

    Freeform surfaces have advantages on balancing asymmetric aberration of the unobscured push-broom imager. However, since the conventional paraxial aberration theory is no longer appropriate for the freeform system design, designers are lack of insights on the imaging quality from the freeform aberration distribution. In order to design the freeform optical system efficiently, the contribution and nodal behavior of coma and astigmatism introduced by Standard Zernike polynomial surface are discussed in detail. An unobscured three-mirror optical system with 850 mm effective focal length, 20°× 2° field of view (FOV) is designed. The coma and astigmatism nodal positions are moved into the real-FOV by selecting and optimizing the Zernike terms pointedly, which has balanced the off-axis asymmetric aberration. The results show that the modulation transfer function (MTF) is close to diffraction limit, and the distortion throughout full-FOV is less than 0.25%. At last, a computer-generated hologram (CGH) for freeform surface testing is designed. The CGH design error RMS is lower than λ/1000 at 632.8 nm, which meets the requirements for measurement.

  3. Theory and simulation of DNA-coated colloids: a guide for rational design.

    PubMed

    Angioletti-Uberti, Stefano; Mognetti, Bortolo M; Frenkel, Daan

    2016-03-07

    By exploiting the exquisite selectivity of DNA hybridization, DNA-coated colloids (DNACCs) can be made to self-assemble in a wide variety of structures. The beauty of this system stems largely from its exceptional versatility and from the fact that a proper choice of the grafted DNA sequences yields fine control over the colloidal interactions. Theory and simulations have an important role to play in the optimal design of self assembling DNACCs. At present, the powerful model-based design tools are not widely used, because the theoretical literature is fragmented and the connection between different theories is often not evident. In this Perspective, we aim to discuss the similarities and differences between the different models that have been described in the literature, their underlying assumptions, their strengths and their weaknesses. Using the tools described in the present Review, it should be possible to move towards a more rational design of novel self-assembling structures of DNACCs and, more generally, of systems where ligand-receptor are used to control interactions.

  4. Design optimization of a viscoelastic dynamic vibration absorber using a modified fixed-points theory.

    PubMed

    Wong, W O; Fan, R P; Cheng, F

    2018-02-01

    A viscoelastic dynamic vibration absorber (VDVA) is proposed for suppressing infrasonic vibrations of heavy structures because the traditional dynamic vibration absorber equipped with a viscous damper is not effective in suppressing low frequency vibrations. The proposed VDVA has an elastic spring and a viscoelastic damper with frequency dependent modulus and damping properties. The standard fixed-points theory cannot be applied to derive the optimum design parameters of the VDVA because both its stiffness and damping are frequency dependent. A modified fixed-points theory is therefore proposed to solve this problem. H ∞ design optimization of the proposed VDVA have been derived for the minimization of resonant vibration amplitude of a single degree-of-freedom system excited by harmonic forces or due to ground motions. The stiffness and damping of the proposed VDVA can be decoupled such that both of these two properties of the absorber can be tuned independently to their optimal values by following a specified procedure. The proposed VDVA with optimized design is tested numerically using two real commercial viscoelastic damping materials. It is found that the proposed viscoelastic absorber can provide much stronger vibration reduction effect than the conventional VDVA without the elastic spring.

  5. Mixing methodology, nursing theory and research design for a practice model of district nursing advocacy.

    PubMed

    Reed, Frances M; Fitzgerald, Les; Rae, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    To highlight philosophical and theoretical considerations for planning a mixed methods research design that can inform a practice model to guide rural district nursing end of life care. Conceptual models of nursing in the community are general and lack guidance for rural district nursing care. A combination of pragmatism and nurse agency theory can provide a framework for ethical considerations in mixed methods research in the private world of rural district end of life care. Reflection on experience gathered in a two-stage qualitative research phase, involving rural district nurses who use advocacy successfully, can inform a quantitative phase for testing and complementing the data. Ongoing data analysis and integration result in generalisable inferences to achieve the research objective. Mixed methods research that creatively combines philosophical and theoretical elements to guide design in the particular ethical situation of community end of life care can be used to explore an emerging field of interest and test the findings for evidence to guide quality nursing practice. Combining philosophy and nursing theory to guide mixed methods research design increases the opportunity for sound research outcomes that can inform a nursing model of care.

  6. Performance of NACA Eight-Stage Axial-Flow Compressor Designed on the Basis of Airfoil Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1944-08-01

    TEE BASIS OF AIRFOIL THEORY By John T. Slnnette, Jr., Oscar W. Schey, and J. Austin King Aircraft Engine Research Laboratory Cleveland, Ohio FILE...efficiency can he designed by the proper application of airfoil theory. Aircraft Engine Research laboratory, Hational Advisory Committee for Aeronautlos...Basis of Airfoil Theory AUTHORS): Sinnette, John T.; Schey, Oscar W.; and others ORIGINATING AGENCY: Aircraft Engine Research Laboratory, Cleveland

  7. Introduction to boundary-layer theory. [viscous friction loss calculation for turbine blade design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnally, W. D.

    1973-01-01

    The pressure ratio across a turbine provides a certain amount of ideal energy that is available to the turbine for producing work. The portion of the ideal energy that is not converted to work is considered to be a loss. One of the more important and difficult aspects of turbine design is the prediction of the losses. The primary cause of losses is the boundary layer that develops on the blade and end wall surfaces. Boundary-layer theory is used to calculate the parameters needed to estimate viscous (friction) losses.

  8. The theory, design, and operation of the suppressed carrier data-aided tracking receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, M. K.; Springett, J. C.

    1973-01-01

    A viable, efficient, and easily mechanized carrier regenerating receiver for use in suppressed carrier-tracking system is described. The receiver referred to as a data-aided receiver (DAR) incorporates a data-aided loop (DAL) which provides the required carrier reference signal. The DAL employs the principle of decision feedback and as such is more efficient than other forms of suppressed carrier-tracking loops. The analysis, design, and implementation of the DAR are covered in detail. Performance comparisons and mechanization tradeoffs are made, wherever possible, with discrete carrier systems and other suppressed carrier systems presently in use. Experimental performance verification is given throughout in support of the theory presented.

  9. Theory-informed design of values clarification methods: a cognitive psychological perspective on patient health-related decision making.

    PubMed

    Pieterse, Arwen H; de Vries, Marieke; Kunneman, Marleen; Stiggelbout, Anne M; Feldman-Stewart, Deb

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare decisions, particularly those involving weighing benefits and harms that may significantly affect quality and/or length of life, should reflect patients' preferences. To support patients in making choices, patient decision aids and values clarification methods (VCM) in particular have been developed. VCM intend to help patients to determine the aspects of the choices that are important to their selection of a preferred option. Several types of VCM exist. However, they are often designed without clear reference to theory, which makes it difficult for their development to be systematic and internally coherent. Our goal was to provide theory-informed recommendations for the design of VCM. Process theories of decision making specify components of decision processes, thus, identify particular processes that VCM could aim to facilitate. We conducted a review of the MEDLINE and PsycINFO databases and of references to theories included in retrieved papers, to identify process theories of decision making. We selected a theory if (a) it fulfilled criteria for a process theory; (b) provided a coherent description of the whole process of decision making; and (c) empirical evidence supports at least some of its postulates. Four theories met our criteria: Image Theory, Differentiation and Consolidation theory, Parallel Constraint Satisfaction theory, and Fuzzy-trace Theory. Based on these, we propose that VCM should: help optimize mental representations; encourage considering all potentially appropriate options; delay selection of an initially favoured option; facilitate the retrieval of relevant values from memory; facilitate the comparison of options and their attributes; and offer time to decide. In conclusion, our theory-based design recommendations are explicit and transparent, providing an opportunity to test each in a systematic manner. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Strengthening the Link between Theory and Practice in Teaching Design Engineering: An Empirical Study on a New Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tempelman, E.; Pilot, A.

    2011-01-01

    In 2007, the Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering of the Delft University of Technology introduced a new bachelor program. Based on theories of learning and instruction three design principles were used to develop an approach that aims to make it easier for students to bridge the gap between theoretical design engineering courses and practical…

  11. Optimization of Capsule Symmetry in Z-Pinch Driven Hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesey, R. A.; Cuneo, M.; Hanson, D.; Porter, J.; Mehlhorn, T.; Ruggles, L.; Simpson, W.; Vargas, M.; Hammer, J.; Landen, O.

    1999-11-01

    The uniformity of the radiation flux incident on the capsule is a critical issue for indirect drive fusion using the z-pinch driven hohlraum high-yield concept(J.H. Hammer et al., Phys. Plas. 6), 2129 (1999).. Experiments on the Z accelerator at Sandia have demonstrated the ability to diagnose the uniformity of the flux striking a foam ball (surrogate capsule)(P.A. Amendt et al., Phys. Plas. 4), 1862 (1997); S.G. Glendinning et al. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 70, 536 (1999).. These single-sided drive experiments have been modeled using radiosity and radiation-hydrodynamics codes, yielding agreement with the measured ablation rate vs. angle on the foam ball. Flux uniformity at the 1-2% level needed for high-convergence capsule implosions requires a 2-sided drive (top and bottom z-pinch) configuration. Constrained optimization methods have identified hohlraum geometries with improved symmetry.

  12. Characterisation of Plasma Filled Rod Pinch electron beam diode operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, James; Bland, Simon; Chittenden, Jeremy

    2016-10-01

    The plasma filled rod pinch diode (aka PFRP) offers a small radiographic spot size and a high brightness source. It operates in a very similar to plasma opening switches and dense plasma focus devices - with a plasma prefill, supplied via a number of simple coaxial plasma guns, being snowploughed along a thin rod cathode, before detaching at the end. The aim of this study is to model the PFRP and understand the factors that affect its performance, potentially improving future output. Given the dependence on the PFRP on the prefill, we are making detailed measurements of the density (1015-1018 cm-3), velocity, ionisation and temperature of the plasma emitted from a plasma gun/set of plasma guns. This will then be used to provide initial conditions to the Gorgon 3D MHD code, and the dynamics of the entire rod pinch process studied.

  13. Constructing Knowledge via a Peer Interaction in a CAS Environment with Tasks Designed from a Task-Technique-Theory Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hitt, Fernando; Kieran, Carolyn

    2009-01-01

    Our research project aimed at understanding the complexity of the construction of knowledge in a CAS environment. Basing our work on the French instrumental approach, in particular the Task-Technique-Theory (T-T-T) theoretical frame as adapted from Chevallard's Anthropological Theory of Didactics, we were mindful that a careful task design process…

  14. Design, Implementation, and Lessons Learned from a Digital Storytelling Project in an Undergraduate Health Promotion Theory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rimando, Marylen; Smalley, K. Bryant; Warren, Jacob C.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the design, implementation and lessons learned from a digital storytelling project in a health promotion theory course. From 2011-2012, 195 health promotion majors completed a digital storytelling project at a Midwestern university. The instructor observed students' understanding of theories and models. This article adds to…

  15. Simulation study of a new inverse-pinch high Coulomb transfer switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, S. H.

    1984-01-01

    A simulation study of a simplified model of a high coulomb transfer switch is performed. The switch operates in an inverse pinch geometry formed by an all metal chamber, which greatly reduces hot spot formations on the electrode surfaces. Advantages of the switch over the conventional switches are longer useful life, higher current capability and lower inductance, which improves the characteristics required for a high repetition rate switch. The simulation determines the design parameters by analytical computations and comparison with the experimentally measured risetime, current handling capability, electrode damage, and hold-off voltages. The parameters of initial switch design can be determined for the anticipated switch performance. Results are in agreement with the experiment results. Although the model is simplified, the switch characteristics such as risetime, current handling capability, electrode damages, and hold-off voltages are accurately determined.

  16. Comparison study of toroidal-field divertors for a compact reversed-field pinch reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bathke, C. G.; Krakowski, R. A.; Miller, R. L.

    Two divertor configurations for the Compact Reversed-Field Pinch Reactor (CRFPR) based on diverting the minority (toroidal) field have been reported. A critical factor in evaluating the performance of both poloidally symmetric and bundle divertor configurations is the accurate determination of the divertor connection length and the monitoring of magnetic islands introduced by the divertors, the latter being a three-dimensional effect. To this end the poloidal-field, toroidal-field, and divertor coils and the plasma currents are simulated in three dimensions for field-line trackings in both the divertor channel and the plasma-edge regions. The results of this analysis indicate a clear preference for the poloidally symmetric toroidal-field divertor. Design modifications to the limiter-based CRFPR design that accommodate this divertor are presented.

  17. Industrial wastewater minimization using water pinch analysis: a case study on an old textile plant.

    PubMed

    Ujang, Z; Wong, C L; Manan, Z A

    2002-01-01

    Industrial wastewater minimization can be conducted using four main strategies: (i) reuse; (ii) regeneration-reuse; (iii) regeneration-recycling; and (iv) process changes. This study is concerned with (i) and (ii) to investigate the most suitable approach to wastewater minimization for an old textile industry plant. A systematic water networks design using water pinch analysis (WPA) was developed to minimize the water usage and wastewater generation for the textile plant. COD was chosen as the main parameter. An integrated design method has been applied, which brings the engineering insight using WPA that can determine the minimum flowrate of the water usage and then minimize the water consumption and wastewater generation as well. The overall result of this study shows that WPA has been effectively applied using both reuse and regeneration-reuse strategies for the old textile industry plant, and reduced the operating cost by 16% and 50% respectively.

  18. Characteristics of switching plasma in an inverse-pinch switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ja H.; Choi, Sang H.; Venable, Demetrius D.; Han, Kwang S.; Nam, Sang H.

    1993-01-01

    Characteristics of the plasma that switches on tens of giga volt-ampere in an inverse-pinch plasma switch (INPIStron) have been made. Through optical and spectroscopic diagnostics of the current carrying plasma, the current density, the motion of current paths, dominant ionic species have been determined in order to access their effects on circuit parameters and material erosion. Also the optimum operational condition of the plasma-puff triggering method required for azimuthally uniform conduction in the INPIStron has been determined.

  19. Dynamics of conical wire array Z-pinch implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Ampleford, D. J.; Lebedev, S. V.; Bland, S. N.

    2007-10-15

    A modification of the wire array Z pinch, the conical wire array, has applications to the understanding of wire array implosions and potentially to pulse shaping relevant to inertial confinement fusion. Results are presented from imploding conical wire array experiments performed on university scale 1 MA generators--the MAGPIE generator (1 MA, 240 ns) at Imperial College London [I. H. Mitchell et al., Rev. Sci Instrum. 67, 1533 (1996)] and the Nevada Terawatt Facility's Zebra generator (1 MA, 100 ns) at the University of Nevada, Reno [B. Bauer et al., in Dense Z-Pinches, edited by N. Pereira, J. Davis, and P.more » Pulsifer (AIP, New York, 1997), Vol. 409, p. 153]. This paper will discuss the implosion dynamics of conical wire arrays. Data indicate that mass ablation from the wires in this complex system can be reproduced with a rocket model with fixed ablation velocity. Modulations in the ablated plasma are present, the wavelength of which is invariant to a threefold variation in magnetic field strength. The axial variation in the array leads to a zippered precursor column formation. An initial implosion of a magnetic bubble near the cathode is followed by the implosion zippering upwards. Spectroscopic data demonstrating a variation of plasma parameters (e.g., electron temperature) along the Z-pinch axis is discussed, and experimental data are compared to magnetohydrodynamic simulations.« less

  20. Resolving microstructures in Z pinches with intensity interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Apruzese, J. P.; Kroupp, E.; Maron, Y.

    2014-03-15

    Nearly 60 years ago, Hanbury Brown and Twiss [R. Hanbury Brown and R. Q. Twiss, Nature 178, 1046 (1956)] succeeded in measuring the 30 nrad angular diameter of Sirius using a new type of interferometry that exploited the interference of photons independently emitted from different regions of the stellar disk. Its basis was the measurement of intensity correlations as a function of detector spacing, with no beam splitting or preservation of phase information needed. Applied to Z pinches, X pinches, or laser-produced plasmas, this method could potentially provide spatial resolution under one micron. A quantitative analysis based on the workmore » of Purcell [E. M. Purcell, Nature 178, 1449 (1956)] reveals that obtaining adequate statistics from x-ray interferometry of a Z-pinch microstructure would require using the highest-current generators available. However, using visible light interferometry would reduce the needed photon count and could enable its use on sub-MA machines.« less

  1. Diagnostics for Z-pinch implosion experiments on PTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, X. D.; Huang, X. B.; Zhou, S. T.; Zhang, S. Q.; Dan, J. K.; Li, J.; Cai, H. C.; Wang, K. L.; Ouyang, K.; Xu, Q.; Duan, S. C.; Chen, G. H.; Wang, M.; Feng, S. P.; Yang, L. B.; Xie, W. P.; Deng, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    The preliminary experiments of wire array implosion were performed on PTS, a 10 MA z-pinch driver with a 70 ns rise time. A set of diagnostics have been developed and fielded on PTS to study pinch physics and implosion dynamics of wire array. Radiated power measurement for soft x-rays was performed by multichannel filtered x-ray diode array, and flat spectral responses x-ray diode detector. Total x-ray yield was measured by a calibrated, unfiltered nickel bolometer which was also used to obtain pinch power. Multiple time-gated pinhole cameras were used to produce spatial-resolved images of x-ray self-emission from plasmas. Two time-integrated pinhole cameras were used respectively with 20-μm Be filter and with multilayer mirrors to record images produced by >1-keV and 277±5 eV self-emission. An optical streak camera was used to produce radial implosion trajectories, and an x-ray streak camera paired with a horizontal slit was used to record a continuous time-history of emission with one-dimensional spatial resolution. A frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser (532 nm) was used to produce four frame laser shadowgraph images with 6 ns time interval. We will briefly describe each of these diagnostics and present some typical results from them.

  2. Associations of work activities requiring pinch or hand grip or exposure to hand-arm vibration with finger and wrist osteoarthritis: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Paula E C; Shiri, Rahman; Kryger, Ann I; Kirkeskov, Lilli; Bonde, Jens Peter

    2014-03-01

    We systematically reviewed the epidemiologic evidence linking finger and wrist osteoarthritis (OA) with work activities requiring pinch or hand grip or exposure to hand-arm vibration (HAV). PubMed and Embase databases were searched up to June 2013. We selected studies assessing the associations of radiographic diagnosed finger and/or wrist joint OA with work activities involving pinch or hand grip or exposure to HAV. We used specific criteria to evaluate completeness of reporting, potential confounding, and bias. Pooled odds ratios (OR) were computed using random-effects meta-analyses. Of the 19 studies included, 17 were cross-sectional, 1 was a prospective cohort, and 1 a case-control study. The meta-analyses of studies that controlled their estimates for at least age and gender showed the associations of pinch grip work with proximal interphalangeal joint [OR 1.56, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.09-2.23] and the first carpometacarpal joint OA (OR 2.10, 95% CI 1.06-4.17), but not with distal interphalangeal, metacarpalphalangeal, or wrist joints OA. Hand grip work and exposure to HAV were not associated with any finger or wrist OA. Epidemiological studies provide limited evidence that pinch grip may increase the risk of wrist or finger OA, but causal relation cannot be resolved because of cross-sectional designs and inadequate characterization of biomechanical strain to the hand and wrist.

  3. A Compact Soft X-Ray Microscope using an Electrode-less Z-Pinch Source.

    PubMed

    Horne, S F; Silterra, J; Holber, W

    2009-01-01

    Soft X-rays (< 1Kev) are of medical interest both for imaging and microdosimetry applications. X-ray sources at this low energy present a technological challenge. Synchrotrons, while very powerful and flexible, are enormously expensive national research facilities. Conventional X-ray sources based on electron bombardment can be compact and inexpensive, but low x-ray production efficiencies at low electron energies restrict this approach to very low power applications. Laser-based sources tend to be expensive and unreliable. Energetiq Technology, Inc. (Woburn, MA, USA) markets a 92 eV, 10W(2pi sr) electrode-less Z-pinch source developed for advanced semiconductor lithography. A modified version of this commercial product has produced 400 mW at 430 eV (2pi sr), appropriate for water window soft X-ray microscopy. The US NIH has funded Energetiq to design and construct a demonstration microscope using this source, coupled to a condenser optic, as the illumination system. The design of the condenser optic matches the unique characteristics of the source to the illumination requirements of the microscope, which is otherwise a conventional design. A separate program is underway to develop a microbeam system, in conjunction with the RARAF facility at Columbia University, NY, USA. The objective is to develop a focused, sub-micron beam capable of delivering > 1 Gy/second to the nucleus of a living cell. While most facilities of this type are coupled to a large and expensive particle accelerator, the Z-pinch X-ray source enables a compact, stand-alone design suitable to a small laboratory. The major technical issues in this system involve development of suitable focusing X-ray optics. Current status of these programs will be reported.

  4. A Compact Soft X-Ray Microscope using an Electrode-less Z-Pinch Source

    PubMed Central

    Silterra, J; Holber, W

    2009-01-01

    Soft X-rays (< 1Kev) are of medical interest both for imaging and microdosimetry applications. X-ray sources at this low energy present a technological challenge. Synchrotrons, while very powerful and flexible, are enormously expensive national research facilities. Conventional X-ray sources based on electron bombardment can be compact and inexpensive, but low x-ray production efficiencies at low electron energies restrict this approach to very low power applications. Laser-based sources tend to be expensive and unreliable. Energetiq Technology, Inc. (Woburn, MA, USA) markets a 92 eV, 10W(2pi sr) electrode-less Z-pinch source developed for advanced semiconductor lithography. A modified version of this commercial product has produced 400 mW at 430 eV (2pi sr), appropriate for water window soft X-ray microscopy. The US NIH has funded Energetiq to design and construct a demonstration microscope using this source, coupled to a condenser optic, as the illumination system. The design of the condenser optic matches the unique characteristics of the source to the illumination requirements of the microscope, which is otherwise a conventional design. A separate program is underway to develop a microbeam system, in conjunction with the RARAF facility at Columbia University, NY, USA. The objective is to develop a focused, sub-micron beam capable of delivering > 1 Gy/second to the nucleus of a living cell. While most facilities of this type are coupled to a large and expensive particle accelerator, the Z-pinch X-ray source enables a compact, stand-alone design suitable to a small laboratory. The major technical issues in this system involve development of suitable focusing X-ray optics. Current status of these programs will be reported. PMID:20198115

  5. Theory, design, and experimental verification of a reflectionless bianisotropic Huygens' metasurface for wide-angle refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Michael; Abdo-Sánchez, Elena; Epstein, Ariel; Eleftheriades, George V.

    2018-03-01

    Huygens' metasurfaces are electrically thin devices which allow arbitrary field transformations. Beam refraction is among the first demonstrations of realized metasurfaces. As previously shown for extreme-angle refraction, control over only the electric impedance and magnetic admittance of the Huygens' metasurface proved insufficient to produce the desired reflectionless field transformation. To maintain zero reflections for wide refraction angles, magnetoelectric coupling between the electric and magnetic response of the metasurface, leading to bianisotropy, can be introduced. In this paper, we report the theory, design, and experimental characterization of a reflectionless bianisotropic metasurface for extreme-angle refraction of a normally incident plane wave towards 71.8° at 20 GHz. The theory and design of three-layer asymmetric bianisotropic unit cells are discussed. The realized printed circuit board structure was tested via full-wave simulations as well as experimental characterization. To experimentally verify the prototype, two setups were used. A quasi-optical experiment was conducted to assess the specular reflections of the metasurface, while a far-field antenna measurement characterized its refraction nature. The measurements verify that the fabricated metasurface has negligible reflections and the majority of the scattered power is refracted to the desired Floquet mode. This provides an experimental demonstration of a reflectionless wide-angle refracting metasurface using a bianisotropic Huygens' metasurface at microwave frequencies.

  6. [Design of magneto-acoustic-electrical detection system and verification of its linear sweep theory].

    PubMed

    Dai, Ming; Chen, Siping; Li, Fangfang; Chen, Mian; Lin, Haoming; Chen, Xin

    2018-02-01

    Clinical studies had demonstrated that early diagnosis of lesion could significantly reduce the risk of cancer. Magneto-acoustic-electrical tomography (MAET) is expected to become a new detection method due to its advantages of high resolution and high contrast. Based on thinking of modular design, a low-cost, digital magneto-acoustic conductivity detection system was designed and implemented in this study. The theory of MAET using chirp continuous wave excitation was introduced. The results of homogeneous phantom experiment with 0.5% NaCl clearly showed that the conductivity curve of homogeneous phantom was highly consistent with the actual physical size, which indicated that the chirp excitation theory in our proposed system was correct and feasible. Besides, the resolution obtained by 1 000 μs sweep time was better than that obtained by 500 μs and 1 500 μs, which means that sweep time is an important factor affecting the detection resolution of the conductivity. The same result was obtained in the experiments carried out on homogeneous phantoms with different concentrations of NaCl, which demonstrated the repeatability of our proposed MAET system.

  7. The Power of Theory, Research Design, and Transdisciplinary Integration in Moving Psychopathology Forward.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Uma; Vrieze, Scott I; Iacono, William G

    While the past few decades have seen much work in psychopathology research that has yielded provocative insights, relatively little progress has been made in understanding the etiology of mental disorders. We contend that this is due to an overreliance on statistics and technology with insufficient attention to adequacy of experimental design, a lack of integration of data across various domains of research, and testing of theoretical models using relatively weak study designs. We provide a conceptual discussion of these issues and follow with a concrete demonstration of our proposed solution. Using two different disorders - depression and substance use - as examples, we illustrate how we can evaluate competing theories regarding their etiology by integrating information from various domains including latent variable models, neurobiology, and quasi-experimental data such as twin and adoption studies, rather than relying on any single methodology alone. More broadly, we discuss the extent to which such integrative thinking allows for inferences about the etiology of mental disorders, rather than focusing on descriptive correlates alone. Greater scientific insight will require stringent tests of competing theories and a deeper conceptual understanding of the advantages and pitfalls of methodologies and criteria we use in our studies.

  8. Application of fuzzy theories to formulation of multi-objective design problems. [for helicopters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhingra, A. K.; Rao, S. S.; Miura, H.

    1988-01-01

    Much of the decision making in real world takes place in an environment in which the goals, the constraints, and the consequences of possible actions are not known precisely. In order to deal with imprecision quantitatively, the tools of fuzzy set theory can by used. This paper demonstrates the effectiveness of fuzzy theories in the formulation and solution of two types of helicopter design problems involving multiple objectives. The first problem deals with the determination of optimal flight parameters to accomplish a specified mission in the presence of three competing objectives. The second problem addresses the optimal design of the main rotor of a helicopter involving eight objective functions. A method of solving these multi-objective problems using nonlinear programming techniques is presented. Results obtained using fuzzy formulation are compared with those obtained using crisp optimization techniques. The outlined procedures are expected to be useful in situations where doubt arises about the exactness of permissible values, degree of credibility, and correctness of statements and judgements.

  9. Designing molecular complexes using free-energy derivatives from liquid-state integral equation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrugalla, Florian; Kast, Stefan M.

    2016-09-01

    Complex formation between molecules in solution is the key process by which molecular interactions are translated into functional systems. These processes are governed by the binding or free energy of association which depends on both direct molecular interactions and the solvation contribution. A design goal frequently addressed in pharmaceutical sciences is the optimization of chemical properties of the complex partners in the sense of minimizing their binding free energy with respect to a change in chemical structure. Here, we demonstrate that liquid-state theory in the form of the solute-solute equation of the reference interaction site model provides all necessary information for such a task with high efficiency. In particular, computing derivatives of the potential of mean force (PMF), which defines the free-energy surface of complex formation, with respect to potential parameters can be viewed as a means to define a direction in chemical space toward better binders. We illustrate the methodology in the benchmark case of alkali ion binding to the crown ether 18-crown-6 in aqueous solution. In order to examine the validity of the underlying solute-solute theory, we first compare PMFs computed by different approaches, including explicit free-energy molecular dynamics simulations as a reference. Predictions of an optimally binding ion radius based on free-energy derivatives are then shown to yield consistent results for different ion parameter sets and to compare well with earlier, orders-of-magnitude more costly explicit simulation results. This proof-of-principle study, therefore, demonstrates the potential of liquid-state theory for molecular design problems.

  10. Designing molecular complexes using free-energy derivatives from liquid-state integral equation theory.

    PubMed

    Mrugalla, Florian; Kast, Stefan M

    2016-09-01

    Complex formation between molecules in solution is the key process by which molecular interactions are translated into functional systems. These processes are governed by the binding or free energy of association which depends on both direct molecular interactions and the solvation contribution. A design goal frequently addressed in pharmaceutical sciences is the optimization of chemical properties of the complex partners in the sense of minimizing their binding free energy with respect to a change in chemical structure. Here, we demonstrate that liquid-state theory in the form of the solute-solute equation of the reference interaction site model provides all necessary information for such a task with high efficiency. In particular, computing derivatives of the potential of mean force (PMF), which defines the free-energy surface of complex formation, with respect to potential parameters can be viewed as a means to define a direction in chemical space toward better binders. We illustrate the methodology in the benchmark case of alkali ion binding to the crown ether 18-crown-6 in aqueous solution. In order to examine the validity of the underlying solute-solute theory, we first compare PMFs computed by different approaches, including explicit free-energy molecular dynamics simulations as a reference. Predictions of an optimally binding ion radius based on free-energy derivatives are then shown to yield consistent results for different ion parameter sets and to compare well with earlier, orders-of-magnitude more costly explicit simulation results. This proof-of-principle study, therefore, demonstrates the potential of liquid-state theory for molecular design problems.

  11. Energy balance in a Z pinch with suppressed Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksht, R. B.; Oreshkin, V. I.; Rousskikh, A. G.; Zhigalin, A. S.

    2018-03-01

    At present Z-pinch has evolved into a powerful plasma source of soft x-ray. This paper considers the energy balance in a radiating metallic gas-puff Z pinch. In this type of Z pinch, a power-law density distribution is realized, promoting suppression of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities that occur in the pinch plasma during compression. The energy coupled into the pinch plasma, is determined as the difference between the total energy delivered to the load from the generator and the magnetic energy of the load inductance. A calibrated voltage divider and a Rogowski coil were used to determine the coupled energy and the load inductance. Time-gated optical imaging of the pinch plasma showed its stable compression up to the stagnation phase. The pinch implosion was simulated using a 1D two-temperature radiative magnetohydrodynamic code. Comparison of the experimental and simulation results has shown that the simulation adequately describes the pinch dynamics for conditions in which RT instability is suppressed. It has been found that the proportion of the Ohmic heating in the energy balance of a Z pinch with suppressed RT instability is determined by Spitzer resistance and makes no more than ten percent.

  12. What Communication Theories Can Teach the Designer of Computer-Based Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen, Ronald E.

    1985-01-01

    Reviews characteristics of computer-based training (CBT) that make application of communication theories appropriate and presents principles from communication theory (e.g., general systems theory, symbolic interactionism, rule theories, and interpersonal communication theories) to illustrate how CBT developers can profitably apply them to…

  13. High energy density Z-pinch plasmas using flow stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Shumlak, U., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Golingo, R. P., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Nelson, B. A., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu

    The ZaP Flow Z-Pinch research project[1] at the University of Washington investigates the effect of sheared flows on MHD instabilities. Axially flowing Z-pinch plasmas are produced that are 100 cm long with a 1 cm radius. The plasma remains quiescent for many radial Alfvén times and axial flow times. The quiescent periods are characterized by low magnetic mode activity measured at several locations along the plasma column and by stationary visible plasma emission. Plasma evolution is modeled with high-resolution simulation codes – Mach2, WARPX, NIMROD, and HiFi. Plasma flow profiles are experimentally measured with a multi-chord ion Doppler spectrometer. Amore » sheared flow profile is observed to be coincident with the quiescent period, and is consistent with classical plasma viscosity. Equilibrium is determined by diagnostic measurements: interferometry for density; spectroscopy for ion temperature, plasma flow, and density[2]; Thomson scattering for electron temperature; Zeeman splitting for internal magnetic field measurements[3]; and fast framing photography for global structure. Wall stabilization has been investigated computationally and experimentally by removing 70% of the surrounding conducting wall to demonstrate no change in stability behavior.[4] Experimental evidence suggests that the plasma lifetime is only limited by plasma supply and current waveform. The flow Z-pinch concept provides an approach to achieve high energy density plasmas,[5] which are large, easy to diagnose, and persist for extended durations. A new experiment, ZaP-HD, has been built to investigate this approach by separating the flow Z-pinch formation from the radial compression using a triaxial-electrode configuration. This innovation allows more detailed investigations of the sheared flow stabilizing effect, and it allows compression to much higher densities than previously achieved on ZaP by reducing the linear density and increasing the pinch current. Experimental results

  14. Design of a universal two-layered neural network derived from the PLI theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chia-Lun J.

    2004-05-01

    The if-and-only-if (IFF) condition that a set of M analog-to-digital vector-mapping relations can be learned by a one-layered-feed-forward neural network (OLNN) is that all the input analog vectors dichotomized by the i-th output bit must be positively, linearly independent, or PLI. If they are not PLI, then the OLNN just cannot learn no matter what learning rules is employed because the solution of the connection matrix does not exist mathematically. However, in this case, one can still design a parallel-cascaded, two-layered, perceptron (PCTLP) to acheive this general mapping goal. The design principle of this "universal" neural network is derived from the major mathematical properties of the PLI theory - changing the output bits of the dependent relations existing among the dichotomized input vectors to make the PLD relations PLI. Then with a vector concatenation technique, the required mapping can still be learned by this PCTLP system with very high efficiency. This paper will report in detail the mathematical derivation of the general design principle and the design procedures of the PCTLP neural network system. It then will be verified in general by a practical numerical example.

  15. Software design as a problem in learning theory (a research overview)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fass, Leona F.

    1992-01-01

    Our interest in automating software design has come out of our research in automated reasoning, inductive inference, learnability, and algebraic machine theory. We have investigated these areas extensively, in connection with specific problems of language representation, acquisition, processing, and design. In the case of formal context-free (CF) languages we established existence of finite learnable models ('behavioral realizations') and procedures for constructing them effectively. We also determined techniques for automatic construction of the models, inductively inferring them from finite examples of how they should 'behave'. These results were obtainable due to appropriate representation of domain knowledge, and constraints on the domain that the representation defined. It was when we sought to generalize our results, and adapt or apply them, that we began investigating the possibility of determining similar procedures for constructing correct software. Discussions with other researchers led us to examine testing and verification processes, as they are related to inference, and due to their considerable importance in correct software design. Motivating papers by other researchers, led us to examine these processes in some depth. Here we present our approach to those software design issues raised by other researchers, within our own theoretical context. We describe our results, relative to those of the other researchers, and conclude that they do not compare unfavorably.

  16. Integrated design of multivariable hydrometric networks using entropy theory with a multiobjective optimization approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Hwang, T.; Vose, J. M.; Martin, K. L.; Band, L. E.

    2016-12-01

    Obtaining quality hydrologic observations is the first step towards a successful water resources management. While remote sensing techniques have enabled to convert satellite images of the Earth's surface to hydrologic data, the importance of ground-based observations has never been diminished because in-situ data are often highly accurate and can be used to validate remote measurements. The existence of efficient hydrometric networks is becoming more important to obtain as much as information with minimum redundancy. The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) has recommended a guideline for the minimum hydrometric network density based on physiography; however, this guideline is not for the optimum network design but for avoiding serious deficiency from a network. Moreover, all hydrologic variables are interconnected within the hydrologic cycle, while monitoring networks have been designed individually. This study proposes an integrated network design method using entropy theory with a multiobjective optimization approach. In specific, a precipitation and a streamflow networks in a semi-urban watershed in Ontario, Canada were designed simultaneously by maximizing joint entropy, minimizing total correlation, and maximizing conditional entropy of streamflow network given precipitation network. After comparing with the typical individual network designs, the proposed design method would be able to determine more efficient optimal networks by avoiding the redundant stations, in which hydrologic information is transferable. Additionally, four quantization cases were applied in entropy calculations to assess their implications on the station rankings and the optimal networks. The results showed that the selection of quantization method should be considered carefully because the rankings and optimal networks are subject to change accordingly.

  17. Integrated design of multivariable hydrometric networks using entropy theory with a multiobjective optimization approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keum, J.; Coulibaly, P. D.

    2017-12-01

    Obtaining quality hydrologic observations is the first step towards a successful water resources management. While remote sensing techniques have enabled to convert satellite images of the Earth's surface to hydrologic data, the importance of ground-based observations has never been diminished because in-situ data are often highly accurate and can be used to validate remote measurements. The existence of efficient hydrometric networks is becoming more important to obtain as much as information with minimum redundancy. The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) has recommended a guideline for the minimum hydrometric network density based on physiography; however, this guideline is not for the optimum network design but for avoiding serious deficiency from a network. Moreover, all hydrologic variables are interconnected within the hydrologic cycle, while monitoring networks have been designed individually. This study proposes an integrated network design method using entropy theory with a multiobjective optimization approach. In specific, a precipitation and a streamflow networks in a semi-urban watershed in Ontario, Canada were designed simultaneously by maximizing joint entropy, minimizing total correlation, and maximizing conditional entropy of streamflow network given precipitation network. After comparing with the typical individual network designs, the proposed design method would be able to determine more efficient optimal networks by avoiding the redundant stations, in which hydrologic information is transferable. Additionally, four quantization cases were applied in entropy calculations to assess their implications on the station rankings and the optimal networks. The results showed that the selection of quantization method should be considered carefully because the rankings and optimal networks are subject to change accordingly.

  18. Using theory of change to design and evaluate public health interventions: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Breuer, Erica; Lee, Lucy; De Silva, Mary; Lund, Crick

    2016-05-06

    Despite the increasing popularity of the theory of change (ToC) approach, little is known about the extent to which ToC has been used in the design and evaluation of public health interventions. This review aims to determine how ToCs have been developed and used in the development and evaluation of public health interventions globally. We searched for papers reporting the use of "theory of change" in the development or evaluation of public health interventions in databases of peer-reviewed journal articles such as Scopus, Pubmed, PsychInfo, grey literature databases, Google and websites of development funders. We included papers of any date, language or study design. Both abstracts and full text papers were double screened. Data were extracted and narratively and quantitatively summarised. A total of 62 papers were included in the review. Forty-nine (79 %) described the development of ToC, 18 (29 %) described the use of ToC in the development of the intervention and 49 (79 %) described the use of ToC in the evaluation of the intervention. Although a large number of papers were included in the review, their descriptions of the ToC development and use in intervention design and evaluation lacked detail. The use of the ToC approach is widespread in the public health literature. Clear reporting of the ToC process and outputs is important to strengthen the body of literature on practical application of ToC in order to develop our understanding of the benefits and advantages of using ToC. We also propose a checklist for reporting on the use of ToC to ensure transparent reporting and recommend that our checklist is used and refined by authors reporting the ToC approach.

  19. Rule-based graph theory to enable exploration of the space system architecture design space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arney, Dale Curtis

    The primary goal of this research is to improve upon system architecture modeling in order to enable the exploration of design space options. A system architecture is the description of the functional and physical allocation of elements and the relationships, interactions, and interfaces between those elements necessary to satisfy a set of constraints and requirements. The functional allocation defines the functions that each system (element) performs, and the physical allocation defines the systems required to meet those functions. Trading the functionality between systems leads to the architecture-level design space that is available to the system architect. The research presents a methodology that enables the modeling of complex space system architectures using a mathematical framework. To accomplish the goal of improved architecture modeling, the framework meets five goals: technical credibility, adaptability, flexibility, intuitiveness, and exhaustiveness. The framework is technically credible, in that it produces an accurate and complete representation of the system architecture under consideration. The framework is adaptable, in that it provides the ability to create user-specified locations, steady states, and functions. The framework is flexible, in that it allows the user to model system architectures to multiple destinations without changing the underlying framework. The framework is intuitive for user input while still creating a comprehensive mathematical representation that maintains the necessary information to completely model complex system architectures. Finally, the framework is exhaustive, in that it provides the ability to explore the entire system architecture design space. After an extensive search of the literature, graph theory presents a valuable mechanism for representing the flow of information or vehicles within a simple mathematical framework. Graph theory has been used in developing mathematical models of many transportation and

  20. Optimal design of hydrometric monitoring networks with dynamic components based on Information Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfonso, Leonardo; Chacon, Juan; Solomatine, Dimitri

    2016-04-01

    The EC-FP7 WeSenseIt project proposes the development of a Citizen Observatory of Water, aiming at enhancing environmental monitoring and forecasting with the help of citizens equipped with low-cost sensors and personal devices such as smartphones and smart umbrellas. In this regard, Citizen Observatories may complement the limited data availability in terms of spatial and temporal density, which is of interest, among other areas, to improve hydraulic and hydrological models. At this point, the following question arises: how can citizens, who are part of a citizen observatory, be optimally guided so that the data they collect and send is useful to improve modelling and water management? This research proposes a new methodology to identify the optimal location and timing of potential observations coming from moving sensors of hydrological variables. The methodology is based on Information Theory, which has been widely used in hydrometric monitoring design [1-4]. In particular, the concepts of Joint Entropy, as a measure of the amount of information that is contained in a set of random variables, which, in our case, correspond to the time series of hydrological variables captured at given locations in a catchment. The methodology presented is a step forward in the state of the art because it solves the multiobjective optimisation problem of getting simultaneously the minimum number of informative and non-redundant sensors needed for a given time, so that the best configuration of monitoring sites is found at every particular moment in time. To this end, the existing algorithms have been improved to make them efficient. The method is applied to cases in The Netherlands, UK and Italy and proves to have a great potential to complement the existing in-situ monitoring networks. [1] Alfonso, L., A. Lobbrecht, and R. Price (2010a), Information theory-based approach for location of monitoring water level gauges in polders, Water Resour. Res., 46(3), W03528 [2] Alfonso, L., A

  1. Computational material design for Q&P steels with plastic instability theory

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, G.; Choi, K. S.; Hu, X. H.

    In this paper, the deformation limits of Quenching and Partitioning (Q&P) steels are examined with the plastic instability theory. For this purpose, the constituent phase properties of various Q&P steels were first experimentally obtained, and used to estimate the overall tensile stress-strain curves based on the simple rule of mixture (ROM) with the iso-strain and iso-stress assumptions. Plastic instability theory was then applied to the obtained overall stress-strain curves in order to estimate the deformation limits of the Q&P steels. A parametric study was also performed to examine the effects of various material parameters on the deformation limits of Q&Pmore » steels. Computational material design was subsequently carried out based on the information obtained from the parametric study. The results show that the plastic instability theory with iso-stress-based stress-strain curve may be used to provide the lower bound estimate of the uniform elongation (UE) for the various Q&P steels considered. The results also indicate that higher austenite stability/volume fractions, less strength difference between the primary phases, higher hardening exponents of the constituent phases are generally beneficial for the performance improvement of Q&P steels, and that various material parameters may be concurrently adjusted in a cohesive way in order to improve the performance of Q&P steel. The information from this study may be used to devise new heat treatment parameters and alloying elements to produce Q&P steels with the improved performance.« less

  2. Bridging Theory with Practice: An Exploratory Study of Visualization Use and Design for Climate Model Comparison

    DOE PAGES

    Dasgupta, Aritra; Poco, Jorge; Wei, Yaxing; ...

    2015-03-16

    Evaluation methodologies in visualization have mostly focused on how well the tools and techniques cater to the analytical needs of the user. While this is important in determining the effectiveness of the tools and advancing the state-of-the-art in visualization research, a key area that has mostly been overlooked is how well established visualization theories and principles are instantiated in practice. This is especially relevant when domain experts, and not visualization researchers, design visualizations for analysis of their data or for broader dissemination of scientific knowledge. There is very little research on exploring the synergistic capabilities of cross-domain collaboration between domainmore » experts and visualization researchers. To fill this gap, in this paper we describe the results of an exploratory study of climate data visualizations conducted in tight collaboration with a pool of climate scientists. The study analyzes a large set of static climate data visualizations for identifying their shortcomings in terms of visualization design. The outcome of the study is a classification scheme that categorizes the design problems in the form of a descriptive taxonomy. The taxonomy is a first attempt for systematically categorizing the types, causes, and consequences of design problems in visualizations created by domain experts. We demonstrate the use of the taxonomy for a number of purposes, such as, improving the existing climate data visualizations, reflecting on the impact of the problems for enabling domain experts in designing better visualizations, and also learning about the gaps and opportunities for future visualization research. We demonstrate the applicability of our taxonomy through a number of examples and discuss the lessons learnt and implications of our findings.« less

  3. Bridging Theory with Practice: An Exploratory Study of Visualization Use and Design for Climate Model Comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Dasgupta, Aritra; Poco, Jorge; Wei, Yaxing

    Evaluation methodologies in visualization have mostly focused on how well the tools and techniques cater to the analytical needs of the user. While this is important in determining the effectiveness of the tools and advancing the state-of-the-art in visualization research, a key area that has mostly been overlooked is how well established visualization theories and principles are instantiated in practice. This is especially relevant when domain experts, and not visualization researchers, design visualizations for analysis of their data or for broader dissemination of scientific knowledge. There is very little research on exploring the synergistic capabilities of cross-domain collaboration between domainmore » experts and visualization researchers. To fill this gap, in this paper we describe the results of an exploratory study of climate data visualizations conducted in tight collaboration with a pool of climate scientists. The study analyzes a large set of static climate data visualizations for identifying their shortcomings in terms of visualization design. The outcome of the study is a classification scheme that categorizes the design problems in the form of a descriptive taxonomy. The taxonomy is a first attempt for systematically categorizing the types, causes, and consequences of design problems in visualizations created by domain experts. We demonstrate the use of the taxonomy for a number of purposes, such as, improving the existing climate data visualizations, reflecting on the impact of the problems for enabling domain experts in designing better visualizations, and also learning about the gaps and opportunities for future visualization research. We demonstrate the applicability of our taxonomy through a number of examples and discuss the lessons learnt and implications of our findings.« less

  4. Quantitative design of emergency monitoring network for river chemical spills based on discrete entropy theory.

    PubMed

    Shi, Bin; Jiang, Jiping; Sivakumar, Bellie; Zheng, Yi; Wang, Peng

    2018-05-01

    Field monitoring strategy is critical for disaster preparedness and watershed emergency environmental management. However, development of such is also highly challenging. Despite the efforts and progress thus far, no definitive guidelines or solutions are available worldwide for quantitatively designing a monitoring network in response to river chemical spill incidents, except general rules based on administrative divisions or arbitrary interpolation on routine monitoring sections. To address this gap, a novel framework for spatial-temporal network design was proposed in this study. The framework combines contaminant transport modelling with discrete entropy theory and spectral analysis. The water quality model was applied to forecast the spatio-temporal distribution of contaminant after spills and then corresponding information transfer indexes (ITIs) and Fourier approximation periodic functions were estimated as critical measures for setting sampling locations and times. The results indicate that the framework can produce scientific preparedness plans of emergency monitoring based on scenario analysis of spill risks as well as rapid design as soon as the incident happened but not prepared. The framework was applied to a hypothetical spill case based on tracer experiment and a real nitrobenzene spill incident case to demonstrate its suitability and effectiveness. The newly-designed temporal-spatial monitoring network captured major pollution information at relatively low costs. It showed obvious benefits for follow-up early-warning and treatment as well as for aftermath recovery and assessment. The underlying drivers of ITIs as well as the limitations and uncertainty of the approach were analyzed based on the case studies. Comparison with existing monitoring network design approaches, management implications, and generalized applicability were also discussed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Coloring your information: How designers use Theory of Color in creative ways to present infographic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucius, C. R.; Fuad, A.

    2017-12-01

    Various methods of data presentation is now visualized through engaging infographics and perform the presentation techniques a new kind of storytelling. Geometric elements for infographics perform interesting data, which is developed with color harmony. There are categories of colors based on color circle from the theory of color design: primary color, secondary color and tertiary color. This color circle allows a designer to visualize the balance and harmony of colors when they are side by side. These composition of colors can be formed as a harmonious dyad, triad, or tetrads. A harmonious dyad is formed from two diametrically opposed colors on the color circle, which known as contrast complementary and works best in color harmonious if one of the colors is dominant. A harmonious triad is represented by three colors from the color circle which positions with an equilateral triangle. An triangle of yellow-red-blue shows the most powerful of harmonious triad and call as the fundamental triad. A harmonious tetrad is developed from two pairs of complementary colors, which can be formed by rectangle or square on the color circle. It help to figure out how objects are connected on presenting data. To create an efficiency infographic, presenting data has to prepare with some strategic. The color circle has the power to perform the infographic when it is made for a fascinating design.

  6. Reducing alcohol consumption among university students: recruitment and program design strategies based on Social Marketing Theory.

    PubMed

    Black, D R; Smith, M A

    1994-09-01

    Recruitment of program participants and development of appealing comprehensive alcohol abuse prevention programs is an exigent priority for university campuses due to the serious physical and emotional consequences related to alcohol consumption. A sample of 67 students from a large midwestern university completed a survey based on Social Marketing Theory (SMT) which was developed to improve recruitment and enhance the design of comprehensive alcohol abuse prevention programs. The results indicate that recruitment may be optimized by providing a flexible, convenient, low-cost program that encourages friends' participation, communicates alcohol-related risks and offers university credit or refund as participation incentives. The design of alcohol abuse prevention programs may be enhanced by emphasizing the positive outcomes of reducing alcohol consumption, improving the quality and quantity of alternatives to the social atmosphere connected with drinking, and soliciting respected opinion leaders (physicians and parents) to communicate alcohol reduction messages. This project is a first initiative to 'fill the gap' in the social marketing research literature by providing formative information pertinent to recruitment and design of alcohol reduction programs specifically for college students.

  7. Controls design with crossfeeds for hovering rotorcraft using quantitative feedback theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, Mark B.; Biezad, Daniel J.; Cheng, Rendy

    1996-01-01

    A multi-input, multi-output controls design with dynamic crossfeed pre-compensation is presented for rotorcraft in near-hovering flight using Quantitative Feedback Theory (QFT). The resulting closed-loop control system bandwidth allows the rotorcraft to be considered for use as an inflight simulator. The use of dynamic, robust crossfeeds prior to the QFT design reduces the magnitude of required feedback gain and results in performance that meets most handling qualities specifications relative to the decoupling of off-axis responses. Handling qualities are Level 1 for both low-gain tasks and high-gain tasks in the roll, pitch, and yaw axes except for the 10 deg/sec moderate-amplitude yaw command where the rotorcraft exhibits Level 2 handling qualities in the yaw axis caused by phase lag. The combined effect of the QFT feedback design following the implementation of low-order, dynamic crossfeed compensators successfully decouples ten of twelve off-axis channels. For the other two channels it was not possible to find a single, low-order crossfeed that was effective. This is an area to be investigated in future research.

  8. Parametric study of rod-pinch diode using particle-in-cell simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.; Biswas, D., E-mail: raghav@barc.gov.in; Chandra, R.

    2014-07-01

    We perform Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulation of KALI-30 GW pulsed power generator based rod-pinch diode. It is shown that ions emitted from the anode-plasma play a crucial role in diode dynamics. It is found that ions not only help in compensating the space charge due to electron beam, but also lead to enhancement of the local electric field at the side walls of the cathode leading to additional electron emission from the side wall. Electrons emanating from one side wall of the cathode tend to converge at the anode tip. This can be used to design an improved Flash X-ray source.more » (author)« less

  9. Ideal flow theory for the double - shearing model as a basis for metal forming design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, S.; Trung, N. T.

    2018-02-01

    In the case of Tresca’ solids (i.e. solids obeying the Tresca yield criterion and its associated flow rule) ideal flows have been defined elsewhere as solenoidal smooth deformations in which an eigenvector field associated everywhere with the greatest principal stress (and strain rate) is fixed in the material. Under such conditions all material elements undergo paths of minimum plastic work, a condition which is often advantageous for metal forming processes. Therefore, the ideal flow theory is used as the basis of a procedure for the preliminary design of such processes. The present paper extends the theory of stationary planar ideal flow to pressure dependent materials obeying the double shearing model and the double slip and rotation model. It is shown that the original problem of plasticity reduces to a purely geometric problem. The corresponding system of equations is hyperbolic. The characteristic relations are integrated in elementary functions. In regions where one family of characteristics is straight, mapping between the principal lines and Cartesian coordinates is determined by linear ordinary differential equations. An illustrative example is provided.

  10. Comparing the Effectiveness of SPSS and EduG Using Different Designs for Generalizability Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teker, Gulsen Tasdelen; Guler, Nese; Uyanik, Gulden Kaya

    2015-01-01

    Generalizability theory (G theory) provides a broad conceptual framework for social sciences such as psychology and education, and a comprehensive construct for numerous measurement events by using analysis of variance, a strong statistical method. G theory, as an extension of both classical test theory and analysis of variance, is a model which…

  11. A Brush with Research: Teaching Grounded Theory in the Art and Design Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Compton, Mike; Barrett, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Grounded Theory is a systematic approach to social research that allows for new concepts and theories to emerge from gathered data, as opposed to relying on either established theory or personal conjecture to interpret social processes. Although Grounded Theory is a well-known method within social science literature, it is relatively unknown in…

  12. Consensus-Based Course Design and Implementation of Constructive Alignment Theory in a Power System Analysis Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanfretti, Luigi; Farrokhabadi, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the implementation of the constructive alignment theory (CAT) in a power system analysis course through a consensus-based course design process. The consensus-based design process involves both the instructor and graduate-level students and it aims to develop the CAT framework in a holistic manner with the goal of including…

  13. Students' Understanding of the Special Theory of Relativity and Design for a Guided Visit to a Science Museum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guisasola, Jenaro; Solbes, Jordi; Barragues, Jose-Ignacio; Morentin, Maite; Moreno, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    The present paper describes the design of teaching materials that are used as learning tools in school visits to a science museum. An exhibition on "A century of the Special Theory of Relativity", in the Kutxaespacio Science Museum, in San Sebastian, Spain, was used to design a visit for first-year engineering students at the university…

  14. Statistical Theory for the "RCT-YES" Software: Design-Based Causal Inference for RCTs. NCEE 2015-4011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schochet, Peter Z.

    2015-01-01

    This report presents the statistical theory underlying the "RCT-YES" software that estimates and reports impacts for RCTs for a wide range of designs used in social policy research. The report discusses a unified, non-parametric design-based approach for impact estimation using the building blocks of the Neyman-Rubin-Holland causal…

  15. The Study and Design of Adaptive Learning System Based on Fuzzy Set Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Bing; Zhong, Shaochun; Zheng, Tianyang; Liu, Zhiyong

    Adaptive learning is an effective way to improve the learning outcomes, that is, the selection of learning content and presentation should be adapted to each learner's learning context, learning levels and learning ability. Adaptive Learning System (ALS) can provide effective support for adaptive learning. This paper proposes a new ALS based on fuzzy set theory. It can effectively estimate the learner's knowledge level by test according to learner's target. Then take the factors of learner's cognitive ability and preference into consideration to achieve self-organization and push plan of knowledge. This paper focuses on the design and implementation of domain model and user model in ALS. Experiments confirmed that the system providing adaptive content can effectively help learners to memory the content and improve their comprehension.

  16. Aligning Theory and Design: The Development of an Online Learning Intervention to Teach Evidence-based Practice for Maximal Reach.

    PubMed

    Delagran, Louise; Vihstadt, Corrie; Evans, Roni

    2015-09-01

    Online educational interventions to teach evidence-based practice (EBP) are a promising mechanism for overcoming some of the barriers to incorporating research into practice. However, attention must be paid to aligning strategies with adult learning theories to achieve optimal outcomes. We describe the development of a series of short self-study modules, each covering a small set of learning objectives. Our approach, informed by design-based research (DBR), involved 6 phases: analysis, design, design evaluation, redesign, development/implementation, and evaluation. Participants were faculty and students in 3 health programs at a complementary and integrative educational institution. We chose a reusable learning object approach that allowed us to apply 4 main learning theories: events of instruction, cognitive load, dual processing, and ARCS (attention, relevance, confidence, satisfaction). A formative design evaluation suggested that the identified theories and instructional approaches were likely to facilitate learning and motivation. Summative evaluation was based on a student survey (N=116) that addressed how these theories supported learning. Results suggest that, overall, the selected theories helped students learn. The DBR approach allowed us to evaluate the specific intervention and theories for general applicability. This process also helped us define and document the intervention at a level of detail that covers almost all the proposed Guideline for Reporting Evidence-based practice Educational intervention and Teaching (GREET) items. This thorough description will facilitate the interpretation of future research and implementation of the intervention. Our approach can also serve as a model for others considering online EBP intervention development.

  17. Theory, Design and Operation of a High-Power Second - Gyro-Twt Amplifier.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qinsong

    1995-01-01

    Based on the cyclotron resonance maser (CRM) instability, the gyrotron traveling wave tube (gyro-TWT) amplifier is an efficient high power microwave and millimeter wave coherent radiation source. As evidenced in previous experiments, gyro-TWTs, however, can be very susceptible to spontaneous oscillations, and their output powers have thus been limited to relatively low levels. In this dissertation work, thorough theoretical and experimental studies have been conducted to demonstrate and confirm a novel "marginal stability design" (MSD) concept that a harmonic gyro-TWT amplifier is more stable to spontaneous oscillation than a fundamental harmonic gyro-TWT amplifier. Since their interactions are, in general, weaker and allow higher levels of electron beam current, harmonic gyro-TWTs can yield, in principle, a significantly higher RF output power than a fundamental gyro-TWT. The study results also show that a magnetron injection gun (MIG) type electron beam is applicable to harmonic gyro-TWTs. A complete analytic linear theory employing Laplace transforms and a three dimensional nonlinear theory using a slow time-scale formalism are developed in Chapt. 2 for the general CRM interaction to address the issue of stability. Two designs were developed to demonstrate the MSD procedure. The design and development of the proof -of-principle experiment are discussed in Chapt. 3. The accompanying cold test results indicate that all the components have met their respective design goals. The RF diagnostic circuit employed to characterize the gyro-TWT amplifier is also described. Chapter 4 presents the hot-test results of the second-harmonic TE_{21} gyro-TWT amplifier experiment in which an 80 kV, 20 A MIG beam with alpha(equivupsilon _|/upsilon_|) = 1 was used to generate a peak RF output power of 207 kW in Ku-band with an efficiency of 12.9%. In addition, the saturated gain is 16 dB, the small signal gain is 22 dB, the measured bandwidth is 2.1%, and the amplifier was zero

  18. A multimedia adult literacy program: Combining NASA technology, instructional design theory, and authentic literacy concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, Jerry W.

    1993-01-01

    be the most effective or most desirable way to use computer technology in literacy programs. This project is developing a series of instructional packages that are based on a different instructional model - authentic instruction. The instructional development model used to create these packages is also different. Instead of using the traditional five stage linear, sequential model based on behavioral learning theory, the project uses the recursive, reflective design and development model (R2D2) that is based on cognitive learning theory, particularly the social constructivism of Vygotsky, and an epistemology based on critical theory. Using alternative instructional and instructional development theories, the result of the summer faculty fellowship is LiteraCity, a multimedia adult literacy instructional package that is a simulation of finding and applying for a job. The program, which is about 120 megabytes, is distributed on CD-ROM.

  19. Wire Array Z-pinches on Sphinx Machine: Experimental Results and Relevant Points of Microsecond Implosion Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calamy, H.; Hamann, F.; Lassalle, F.; Bayol, F.; Mangeant, C.; Morell, A.; Huet, D.; Bedoch, J. P.; Chittenden, J. P.; Lebedev, S. V.; Jennings, C. A.; Bland, S. N.

    2006-01-01

    Centre d'Etudes de Gramat (France) has developed an efficient long implosion time (800 ns) Aluminum plasma radiation source (PRS). Based on the LTD technology, the SPHINX facility is developed as a 1-3MJ, 1μs rise time, 4-10 MA current driver. In this paper, it was used in 1MJ, 4MA configuration to drive Aluminum nested wire arrays Z-pinches with K-shell yield up to 20 kJ and a FWHM of the x-ray pulse of about 50 ns. We present latest SPHINX experiments and some of the main physic issues of the microsecond regime. Experimental setup and results are described with the aim of giving trends that have been obtained. The main features of microsecond implosion of wire arrays can be analyzed thanks to same methods and theories as used for faster Z-pinches. The effect of load polarity was examined. The stability of the implosion , one of the critical point of microsecond wire arrays due to the load dimensions imposed by the time scale, is tackled. A simple scaling from 100 ns Z-pinch results to 800 ns ones gives good results and the use of nested arrays improves dramatically the implosion quality and the Kshell yield of the load. However, additional effects such as the impact of the return current can geometry on the implosion have to be taken into account on our loads. Axial inhomogeneity of the implosion the origin of which is not yet well understood occurs in some shots and impacts the radiation output. The shape of the radiative pulse is discussed and compared with the homogeneity of the implosion. Numerical 2D R-Z and R-θ simulations are used to highlight some experimental results and understand the plasma conditions during these microsecond wire arrays implosions.

  20. Wire Array Z-pinches on Sphinx Machine: Experimental Results and Relevant Points of Microsecond Implosion Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Calamy, H.; Hamann, F.; Lassalle, F.

    Centre d'Etudes de Gramat (France) has developed an efficient long implosion time (800 ns) Aluminum plasma radiation source (PRS). Based on the LTD technology, the SPHINX facility is developed as a 1-3MJ, 1{mu}s rise time, 4-10 MA current driver. In this paper, it was used in 1MJ, 4MA configuration to drive Aluminum nested wire arrays Z-pinches with K-shell yield up to 20 kJ and a FWHM of the x-ray pulse of about 50 ns. We present latest SPHINX experiments and some of the main physic issues of the microsecond regime. Experimental setup and results are described with the aim ofmore » giving trends that have been obtained. The main features of microsecond implosion of wire arrays can be analyzed thanks to same methods and theories as used for faster Z-pinches. The effect of load polarity was examined. The stability of the implosion , one of the critical point of microsecond wire arrays due to the load dimensions imposed by the time scale, is tackled. A simple scaling from 100 ns Z-pinch results to 800 ns ones gives good results and the use of nested arrays improves dramatically the implosion quality and the Kshell yield of the load. However, additional effects such as the impact of the return current can geometry on the implosion have to be taken into account on our loads. Axial inhomogeneity of the implosion the origin of which is not yet well understood occurs in some shots and impacts the radiation output. The shape of the radiative pulse is discussed and compared with the homogeneity of the implosion. Numerical 2D R-Z and R-{theta} simulations are used to highlight some experimental results and understand the plasma conditions during these microsecond wire arrays implosions.« less

  1. What Can "Social Practice" Theory and "Socio-Cultural" Theory Contribute to Our Understanding of the Processes of Module Design?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binns, Carole

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the data obtained from an online survey of academic staff who are involved in module design and who are employed within one university. The survey was used as a baselining tool to explore the nature of current module design practice within the survey sample. Do academics consistently employ the pragmatic approaches…

  2. Role of Theories in the Design of Web-Based Person-Centered Support: A Critical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ranerup, Agneta; Sparud-Lundin, Carina; Koinberg, Ingalill; Skärsäter, Ingela; Jenholt-Nolbris, Margaretha; Berg, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to provide a critical understanding of the role of theories and their compatibility with a person-centered approach in the design and evaluation of web-based support for the management of chronic illness. Methods. Exploration of web-based support research projects focusing on four cases: (1) preschool children aged 4–6 with bladder dysfunction and urogenital malformation; (2) young adults aged 16–25 living with mental illness; (3) women with type 1 diabetes who are pregnant or in early motherhood; and (4) women who have undergone surgery for breast cancer. Data comprised interviews with research leaders and documented plans. Analysis was performed by means of a cross-case methodology. Results. The used theories concerned design, learning, health and well-being, or transition. All web support products had been developed using a participatory design (PD). Fundamental to the technology design and evaluation of outcomes were theories focusing on learning and on health and well-being. All theories were compatible with a person-centered approach. However, a notable exception was the relatively collective character of PD and Communities of Practice. Conclusion. Our results illustrate multifaceted ways for theories to be used in the design and evaluation of web-based support. PMID:26464860

  3. Theta-Pinch Thruster for Piloted Deep Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaPointe, Mike R.; Reddy, Dhanireddy (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A new high-power propulsion concept that combines a rapidly pulsed theta-pinch discharge with upstream particle reflection by a magnetic mirror was evaluated under a Phase 1 grant awarded through the NASA Institute for Advanced Concepts. Analytic and numerical models were developed to predict the performance of a theta-pinch thruster operated over a wide range of initial gas pressures and discharge periods. The models indicate that a 1 m radius, 10 m long thruster operated with hydrogen propellant could provide impulse-bits ranging from 1 N-s to 330 N-s with specific impulse values of 7,500 s to 2,500 s, respectively. A pulsed magnetic field strength of 2 T is required to compress and heat the preionized hydrogen over a 10(exp -3) second discharge period, with about 60% of the heated plasma exiting the chamber each period to produce thrust. The unoptimized thruster efficiency is low, peaking at approximately 16% for an initial hydrogen chamber pressure of 100 Torr. The specific impulse and impulse-bit at this operating condition are 3,500 s and 90 N-s, respectively, and the required discharge energy is approximately 9x10(exp 6) J. For a pulse repetition rate of 10 Hz, the engine would produce an average thrust of 900 N at 3,500 s specific impulse. Combined with the electrodeless nature of the device, these performance parameters indicate that theta-pinch thrusters could provide unique, long-life propulsion systems for piloted deep space mission applications.

  4. Using Theory to Design Evaluations of Communication Campaigns: The Case of the National Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign

    PubMed Central

    Hornik, Robert C.; Yanovitzky, Itzhak

    2014-01-01

    We present a general theory about how campaigns can have effects and suggest that the evaluation of communication campaigns must be driven by a theory of effects. The National Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign illustrates both the theory of campaign effects and implications that theory has for the evaluation design. Often models of effect assume that individual exposure affects cognitions that continue to affect behavior over a short term. Contrarily, effects may operate through social or institutional paths as well as through individual learning, require substantial levels of exposure achieved through multiple channels over time, take time to accumulate detectable change, and affect some members of the audience but not others. Responsive evaluations will choose appropriate units of analysis and comparison groups, data collection schedules sensitive to lagged effects, samples able to detect subgroup effects, and analytic strategies consistent with the theory of effects that guides the campaign. PMID:25525317

  5. Using Theory to Design Evaluations of Communication Campaigns: The Case of the National Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign.

    PubMed

    Hornik, Robert C; Yanovitzky, Itzhak

    2003-05-01

    We present a general theory about how campaigns can have effects and suggest that the evaluation of communication campaigns must be driven by a theory of effects. The National Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign illustrates both the theory of campaign effects and implications that theory has for the evaluation design. Often models of effect assume that individual exposure affects cognitions that continue to affect behavior over a short term. Contrarily, effects may operate through social or institutional paths as well as through individual learning, require substantial levels of exposure achieved through multiple channels over time, take time to accumulate detectable change, and affect some members of the audience but not others. Responsive evaluations will choose appropriate units of analysis and comparison groups, data collection schedules sensitive to lagged effects, samples able to detect subgroup effects, and analytic strategies consistent with the theory of effects that guides the campaign.

  6. Bubble pinch-off and scaling during liquid drop impact on liquid pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Bahni; Biswas, Gautam; Sharma, Ashutosh

    2012-08-01

    Simulations are performed to show entrapment of air bubble accompanied by high speed upward and downward water jets when a water drop impacts a pool of water surface. A new bubble entrapment zone characterised by small bubble pinch-off and long thick jet is found. Depending on the bubble and jet behaviour, the bubble entrapment zone is subdivided into three sub-regimes. The entrapped bubble size and jet height depends on the crater shape and its maximum depth. During the bubble formation, bubble neck develops an almost singular shape as it pinches off. The final pinch-off shape and the power law governing the pinching, rneck ∝ A(t0 - t)αvaries with the Weber number. Weber dependence of the function describing the radius of the bubble during the pinch-off only affects the coefficient A and not the power exponent α.

  7. Axisymmetric bubble pinch-off at high Reynolds numbers.

    PubMed

    Gordillo, J M; Sevilla, A; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, J; Martínez-Bazán, C

    2005-11-04

    Analytical considerations and potential-flow numerical simulations of the pinch-off of bubbles at high Reynolds numbers reveal that the bubble minimum radius, rn, decreases as tau proportional to r2n sqrt[1lnr2n], where tau is the time to break up, when the local shape of the bubble near the singularity is symmetric. However, if the gas convective terms in the momentum equation become of the order of those of the liquid, the bubble shape is no longer symmetric and the evolution of the neck changes to a rn proportional to tau1/3 power law. These findings are verified experimentally.

  8. THE STABILITY OF THE PINCH WITH ANISOTROPIC PRESSURE

    SciTech Connect

    Jaggi, R.K.

    1961-12-01

    A dispersion equation was obtained for the stability of the pinch from the hydromagnetic equations supplemented by an equation for the pressure tensor of the ions. The dispersion equation was obtained for the marginal instability case only. It was observed that this dispersion equation coincides with the dispersion equation obtained from the Chew, Goldberger, and Low equations for the marginal instability case. It was concluded that the region of stability predicted from the equations that were used is slightly more than given by the kinetic equation used by Chandrasekhar, Kaufmann, and Watson. (auth)

  9. Model for the loop voltage of reversed field pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Jarboe, T.R.; Alper, B.

    1987-04-01

    A simple model is presented that uses the concept of helicity balance to predict the toroidal loop voltage of reversed field pinches (RFP's). Data from the RFP's at Culham (Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 27, 1307 (1985)) are used to calibrate and verify the model. The model indicates that most of the helicity dissipation occurs in edge regions that are outside the limiters or in regions where field lines contact the walls. The value of this new interpretation to future RFP and spheromak experiments is discussed.

  10. Stability of a diffuse linear pinch with axial boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Einaudi, G.; Van Hoven, G.

    1981-01-01

    A formulation of the stability behavior of a finite-length pinch is presented. A general initial perturbation is expressed as a uniformly convergent sum over a complete discrete k set. A variational calculation is then performed, based on the energy principle, in which the end-boundary conditions appear as constraints. The requisite Lagrange multipliers mutually couple the elemental periodic excitations. The resulting extended form of delta-W still admits a proper second-variation treatment so that the minimization and stability considerations of Newcomb remain applicable. Comparison theorems are discussed as is the relevance of this end-effect model to the stability of solar coronal loops.

  11. Turbulence, flow and transport: hints from reversed field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vianello, N.; Antoni, V.; Spada, E.; Spolaore, M.; Serianni, G.; Cavazzana, R.; Bergsåker, H.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.

    2006-04-01

    The interplay between sheared E × B flows and turbulence has been experimentally investigated in the edge region of the Extrap-T2R reversed field pinch experiment. Electrostatic fluctuations are found to rule the momentum balance equation representing the main driving term for sheared flows which counterbalances anomalous viscous damping. The driving role of electrostatic fluctuations is proved by the spatial structure of the Reynolds stress and by the time behaviour of the mean energy production term which supports the existence of an energy exchange from the small scales of turbulence to the larger scales of the mean flow.

  12. Design of formative assessment model for professional behavior using stages of change theory

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, Akram; Mirzazadeh, Azim; Shirazi, Mandana; Asghari, Fariba

    2016-01-01

    Background: Professionalism is a core competency of physicians. This study was conducted to design a model for formative assessment of professional commitment in medical students according to stages of change theory. Methods: In this qualitative study, data were collected through literature review & focus group interviews in the Tehran University of Medical Sciences in 2013 and analyzed using content analysis approach. Results: Review of the literature and results of focus group interviews led to design a formative assessment model of professional commitment in three phases, including pre-contemplation, contemplation, and readiness for behavior change that each one has interventional and assessment components. In the second phase of the study, experts’ opinion collected in two main categories: the educational environment (factors related to students, students’ assessment and educational program); and administrative problems (factors related to subcultures, policymakers or managers and budget). Moreover, there was a section of recommendations for each category related to curriculum, professors, students, assessments, making culture, the staff and reinforcing administrative factors. Conclusion: This type of framework analysis made it possible to develop a conceptual model that could be effective on forming the professional commitment and behavioral change in medical students. PMID:28210576

  13. Design of formative assessment model for professional behavior using stages of change theory.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Akram; Mirzazadeh, Azim; Shirazi, Mandana; Asghari, Fariba

    2016-01-01

    Background: Professionalism is a core competency of physicians. This study was conducted to design a model for formative assessment of professional commitment in medical students according to stages of change theory. Methods: In this qualitative study, data were collected through literature review & focus group interviews in the Tehran University of Medical Sciences in 2013 and analyzed using content analysis approach. Results: Review of the literature and results of focus group interviews led to design a formative assessment model of professional commitment in three phases, including pre-contemplation, contemplation, and readiness for behavior change that each one has interventional and assessment components. In the second phase of the study, experts' opinion collected in two main categories: the educational environment (factors related to students, students' assessment and educational program); and administrative problems (factors related to subcultures, policymakers or managers and budget). Moreover, there was a section of recommendations for each category related to curriculum, professors, students, assessments, making culture, the staff and reinforcing administrative factors. Conclusion: This type of framework analysis made it possible to develop a conceptual model that could be effective on forming the professional commitment and behavioral change in medical students.

  14. An educational video game for nutrition of young people: Theory and design

    PubMed Central

    Ledoux, Tracey; Griffith, Melissa; Thompson, Debbe; Nguyen, Nga; Watson, Kathy; Baranowski, Janice; Buday, Richard; Abdelsamad, Dina; Baranowski, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Background Playing Escape from DIAB (DIAB) and Nanoswarm (NANO), epic video game adventures, increased fruit and vegetable consumption among a multi-ethnic sample of 10–12 year old children during pilot testing. Key elements of both games were educational mini-games embedded in the overall game that promoted knowledge acquisition regarding diet, physical activity and energy balance. 95–100% of participants demonstrated mastery of these mini-games suggesting knowledge acquisition. Aim This article describes the process of designing and developing the educational mini-games. A secondary purpose was to explore the experience of children while playing the games. Method The educational games were based on Social Cognitive and Mastery Learning Theories. A multidisciplinary team of behavioral nutrition, PA, and video game experts designed, developed, and tested the mini-games. Results Alpha testing revealed children generally liked the mini-games and found them to be reasonably challenging. Process evaluation data from pilot testing revealed almost all participants completed nearly all educational mini-games in a reasonable amount of time suggesting feasibility of this approach. Conclusions Future research should continue to explore the use of video games in educating children to achieve healthy behavior changes. PMID:27547019

  15. An educational video game for nutrition of young people: Theory and design.

    PubMed

    Ledoux, Tracey; Griffith, Melissa; Thompson, Debbe; Nguyen, Nga; Watson, Kathy; Baranowski, Janice; Buday, Richard; Abdelsamad, Dina; Baranowski, Tom

    2016-08-01

    Playing Escape from DIAB (DIAB) and Nanoswarm (NANO) , epic video game adventures, increased fruit and vegetable consumption among a multi-ethnic sample of 10-12 year old children during pilot testing. Key elements of both games were educational mini-games embedded in the overall game that promoted knowledge acquisition regarding diet, physical activity and energy balance. 95-100% of participants demonstrated mastery of these mini-games suggesting knowledge acquisition. This article describes the process of designing and developing the educational mini-games. A secondary purpose was to explore the experience of children while playing the games. The educational games were based on Social Cognitive and Mastery Learning Theories. A multidisciplinary team of behavioral nutrition, PA, and video game experts designed, developed, and tested the mini-games. Alpha testing revealed children generally liked the mini-games and found them to be reasonably challenging. Process evaluation data from pilot testing revealed almost all participants completed nearly all educational mini-games in a reasonable amount of time suggesting feasibility of this approach. Future research should continue to explore the use of video games in educating children to achieve healthy behavior changes.

  16. Pinched flow coupled shear-modulated inertial microfluidics for high-throughput rare blood cell separation.

    PubMed

    Bhagat, Ali Asgar S; Hou, Han Wei; Li, Leon D; Lim, Chwee Teck; Han, Jongyoon

    2011-06-07

    Blood is a highly complex bio-fluid with cellular components making up >40% of the total volume, thus making its analysis challenging and time-consuming. In this work, we introduce a high-throughput size-based separation method for processing diluted blood using inertial microfluidics. The technique takes advantage of the preferential cell focusing in high aspect-ratio microchannels coupled with pinched flow dynamics for isolating low abundance cells from blood. As an application of the developed technique, we demonstrate the isolation of cancer cells (circulating tumor cells (CTCs)) spiked in blood by exploiting the difference in size between CTCs and hematologic cells. The microchannel dimensions and processing parameters were optimized to enable high throughput and high resolution separation, comparable to existing CTC isolation technologies. Results from experiments conducted with MCF-7 cells spiked into whole blood indicate >80% cell recovery with an impressive 3.25 × 10(5) fold enrichment over red blood cells (RBCs) and 1.2 × 10(4) fold enrichment over peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL). In spite of a 20× sample dilution, the fast operating flow rate allows the processing of ∼10(8) cells min(-1) through a single microfluidic device. The device design can be easily customized for isolating other rare cells from blood including peripheral blood leukocytes and fetal nucleated red blood cells by simply varying the 'pinching' width. The advantage of simple label-free separation, combined with the ability to retrieve viable cells post enrichment and minimal sample pre-processing presents numerous applications for use in clinical diagnosis and conducting fundamental studies.

  17. Investigation of practical applications of H infinity control theory to the design of control systems for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irwin, R. Dennis

    1988-01-01

    The applicability of H infinity control theory to the problems of large space structures (LSS) control was investigated. A complete evaluation to any technique as a candidate for large space structure control involves analytical evaluation, algorithmic evaluation, evaluation via simulation studies, and experimental evaluation. The results of analytical and algorithmic evaluations are documented. The analytical evaluation involves the determination of the appropriateness of the underlying assumptions inherent in the H infinity theory, the determination of the capability of the H infinity theory to achieve the design goals likely to be imposed on an LSS control design, and the identification of any LSS specific simplifications or complications of the theory. The resuls of the analytical evaluation are presented in the form of a tutorial on the subject of H infinity control theory with the LSS control designer in mind. The algorthmic evaluation of H infinity for LSS control pertains to the identification of general, high level algorithms for effecting the application of H infinity to LSS control problems, the identification of specific, numerically reliable algorithms necessary for a computer implementation of the general algorithms, the recommendation of a flexible software system for implementing the H infinity design steps, and ultimately the actual development of the necessary computer codes. Finally, the state of the art in H infinity applications is summarized with a brief outline of the most promising areas of current research.

  18. Numerical characterization of plasma breakdown in reversed field pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yanli; Zhang, Ya; Mao, Wenzhe; Yang, Zhoujun; Hu, Xiwei; Jiang, Wei

    2018-02-01

    In the reversed field pinch, there is considerable interest in investigating the plasma breakdown. Indeed, the plasma formed during the breakdown may have an influence on the confinement and maintenance in the latter process. However, up to now there has been no related work, experimentally or in simulation, regarding plasma breakdown in reversed field pinch (RFP). In order to figure out the physical mechanism behind plasma breakdown, the effects of the toroidal and error magnetic field, as well as the loop voltage have been studied. We find that the error magnetic field cannot be neglected even though it is quite small in the short plasma breakdown phase. As the toroidal magnetic field increases, the averaged electron energy is reduced after plasma breakdown is complete, which is disadvantageous for the latter process. In addition, unlike the voltage limits in the tokamak, loop voltages can be quite high because there are no requirements for superconductivity. Volt-second consumption has a small difference under different loop voltages. The breakdown delay still exists in various loop voltage cases, but it is much shorter compared to that in the tokamak case. In all, successful breakdowns are possible in the RFP under a fairly broad range of parameters.

  19. Scaling in two-fluid pinch-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommer, Chris; Harris, Michael; Basaran, Osman

    2010-11-01

    The physics of two-fluid pinch-off, which arises whenever drops, bubbles, or jets of one fluid are ejected from a nozzle into another fluid, is scientifically important and technologically relevant. While the breakup of a drop in a passive environment is well understood, the physics of pinch-off when both the inner and outer fluids are dynamically active remains inadequately understood. Here, the breakup of a compound jet whose core and shell are incompressible Newtonian fluids is analyzed computationally when the interior is a "bubble" and the exterior is a liquid. The numerical method employed is an implicit method of lines ALE algorithm which uses finite elements with elliptic mesh generation and adaptive finite differences for time integration. Thus, the new approach neither starts with a priori idealizations, as has been the case with previous computations, nor is limited to length scales above that set by the wavelength of visible light as in any experimental study. In particular, three distinct responses are identified as the ratio m of the outer fluid's viscosity to the inner fluid's viscosity is varied. For small m, simulations show that the minimum neck radius r initially scales with time τ before breakup as r ˜0.58° (in accord with previous experiments and inviscid fluid models) but that r ˜τ once r becomes sufficiently small. For intermediate and large values of m, r ˜&αcirc;, where the exponent α may not equal one, once again as r becomes sufficiently small.

  20. To Design or Not to Design (Part Five): Doctrine and Design: How Analogies and Design Theory Resist the Military Ritual of Codification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-15

    discipline and reduce academic discourse. “Rather than getting a continuous and coherent picture, we are getting fragments- remarkably detailed but...Students that merely plagiarize by imitating existing successful designs do not learn, while students that combine novel creativity with

  1. Demonstrating the Value of Education Through Exploration as a Theory of Digital Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anbar, A. D.; Mead, C.; Bratton, D., III; Horodyskyj, L.; Hayes, J.; Schonstein, D.; Watt, S.; Watt, K.; Ben-Naim, D.; Leon, A.

    2017-12-01

    We present results from two online college courses - HabWorlds and BioBeyond - that teach introductory science using astrobiology as motivation, according to a new theory of digital learning design that we call "education through exploration" (ETX). ETX design, building on the research-based practices of active learning and guided inquiry, aims to engage and encourage curiosity and to promote higher order thinking skills, in addition to content mastery. Students solve problems and actively discover relationships, supported by an intelligent tutoring system which provides immediate feedback and scaffolds scientific thinking and methods. Here we report the first comparative evidence of the effectiveness of ETX designs. A historical comparative study of HabWorlds was conducted at a community college where two instructors used it to replace an existing introductory astronomy course. Data from five Habitable Worlds and three BAU sections (300 students) show that course grades shifted significantly towards A and B (p = .009). A similar study at a second community college found comparable results for BioBeyond. Here, a single instructor taught introductory biology with and without BioBeyond, totalling five and two sections, respectively (>200 students). Grades on exams using a consistent question pool showed a significant increase in A's and B's when BioBeyond was used (p < .001). In addition to these single-site studies, multi-site data for BioBeyond show improved student outcomes over business as usual (BAU) equivalents. We compared student grades in introductory biology courses using BioBeyond, either as a complete course replacement or as a course supplement in a hybrid or flipped-classroom model, and BAU courses at each institution. A regression analysis controlled for potentially confounding variables, such as cumulative GPA, part-time/full-time status, gender, or race/ethnicity. BioBeyond was associated with a statistically significant positive predictive effect on

  2. Design and optimization of a Holweck pump via linear kinetic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naris, Steryios; Koutandou, Eirini; Valougeorgis, Dimitris

    2012-05-01

    The Holweck pump is widely used in the vacuum pumping industry. It can be a self standing apparatus or it can be part of a more advanced pumping system. It is composed by an inner rotating cylinder (rotor) and an outer stationary cylinder (stator). One of them, has spiral guided grooves resulting to a gas motion from the high towards the low vacuum port. Vacuum pumps may be simulated by the DSMC method but due to the involved high computational cost in many cases manufactures commonly resort to empirical formulas and experimental data. Recently a computationally efficient simulation of the Holweck pump via linear kinetic theory has been proposed by Sharipov et al [1]. Neglecting curvature and end effects the gas flow configuration through the helicoidal channels is decomposed into four basic flows. They correspond to pressure and boundary driven flows through a grooved channel and through a long channel with a T shape cross section. Although the formulation and the methodology are explained in detail, results are very limited and more important they are presented in a normalized way which does not provide the needed information about the pump performance in terms of the involved geometrical and flow parameters. In the present work the four basic flows are solved numerically based on the linearized BGK model equation subjected to diffuse boundary conditions. The results obtained are combined in order to create a database of the flow characteristics for a large spectrum of the rarefaction parameter and various geometrical configurations. Based on this database the performance characteristics which are critical in the design of the Holweck pump are computed and the design parameters such as the angle of the pump and the rotational speed, are optimized. This modeling may be extended to other vacuum pumps.

  3. Madres para la Salud: Design of a Theory-based Intervention for Postpartum Latinas

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Colleen; Records, Kathie; Ainsworth, Barbara; Belyea, Michael; Permana, Paska; Coonrod, Dean; Vega-López, Sonia; Nagle-Williams, Allison

    2011-01-01

    Background Weight gain in young women suggests that childbearing may be an important contributor to the development of obesity in women. Depressive symptoms can interfere with resumption of normal activity levels following childbirth or with the initiation of or adherence to physical activity programs essential for losing pregnancy weight. Depression symptoms may function directly to promote weight gain through a physiologic mechanism. Obesity and its related insulin resistance may contribute to depressed mood physiologically. Although physical activity has well-established beneficial effects on weight management and depression, women tend to under participate in physical activity during childbearing years. Further, the mechanisms underpinning the interplay of overweight, obesity, physical activity, depression, and inflammatory processes are not clearly explained. Objectives This report describes the theoretical rationale, design considerations, and cultural relevance for “Madres para la Salud” [Mothers for Health]. Design and Methods Madres para la Salud is a 12 month prospective, randomized controlled trial exploring the effectiveness of a culturally specific intervention using “bouts” of physical activity to effect changes in body fat, systemic and fat tissue inflammation, and postpartum depression symptoms in sedentary postpartum Latinas. Summary The significance and innovation of Madres para la Salud includes use of a theory-driven approach to intervention, specification and cultural relevance of a social support intervention, use of a Promotora model to incorporate cultural approaches, use of objective measures of physical activity in post partum Latinas women, and the examination of biomarkers indicative of cardiovascular risk related to physical activity behaviors in postpartum Latinas. PMID:21238614

  4. Advancing density functional theory to finite temperatures: methods and applications in steel design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickel, T.; Grabowski, B.; Körmann, F.; Neugebauer, J.

    2012-02-01

    The performance of materials such as steels, their high strength and formability, is based on an impressive variety of competing mechanisms on the microscopic/atomic scale (e.g. dislocation gliding, solid solution hardening, mechanical twinning or structural phase transformations). Whereas many of the currently available concepts to describe these mechanisms are based on empirical and experimental data, it becomes more and more apparent that further improvement of materials needs to be based on a more fundamental level. Recent progress for methods based on density functional theory (DFT) now makes the exploration of chemical trends, the determination of parameters for phenomenological models and the identification of new routes for the optimization of steel properties feasible. A major challenge in applying these methods to a true materials design is, however, the inclusion of temperature-driven effects on the desired properties. Therefore, a large range of computational tools has been developed in order to improve the capability and accuracy of first-principles methods in determining free energies. These combine electronic, vibrational and magnetic effects as well as structural defects in an integrated approach. Based on these simulation tools, one is now able to successfully predict mechanical and thermodynamic properties of metals with a hitherto not achievable accuracy.

  5. Application of modern control theory to the design of optimum aircraft controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Power, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    The synthesis procedure presented is based on the solution of the output regulator problem of linear optimal control theory for time-invariant systems. By this technique, solution of the matrix Riccati equation leads to a constant linear feedback control law for an output regulator which will maintain a plant in a particular equilibrium condition in the presence of impulse disturbances. Two simple algorithms are presented that can be used in an automatic synthesis procedure for the design of maneuverable output regulators requiring only selected state variables for feedback. The first algorithm is for the construction of optimal feedforward control laws that can be superimposed upon a Kalman output regulator and that will drive the output of a plant to a desired constant value on command. The second algorithm is for the construction of optimal Luenberger observers that can be used to obtain feedback control laws for the output regulator requiring measurement of only part of the state vector. This algorithm constructs observers which have minimum response time under the constraint that the magnitude of the gains in the observer filter be less than some arbitrary limit.

  6. Surface mine planning and design implications and theory of a visual environmental quality predictive model

    SciTech Connect

    Burley, J.B.

    1999-07-01

    Surface mine planners and designers are searching for scientifically based tools to assist in the pre-mine planning and post-mine development or surface mine sites. In this study, the author presents a science based visual and environmental quality predictive model useful in preparing and assessing landscape treatments for surface mine sites. The equation explains 67 percent of respondent preference, with an overall p-value for the equation >0.0001 and a p-value >0.05 for each regressor. Regressors employed in the equation include an environmental quality index, foreground vegetation, distant nonvegetation, people, vehicles, utilities, foreground flowers, foreground erosion, wildlife, landscape openness, landscape mystery, andmore » noosphericness (a measure of human disturbance). The equation can be explained with an Intrusion/Neutral Modifier/Temporal Enhancement Theory which suggests that human intrusions upon other humans results in landscape of low preference and which also suggests that landscape containing natural and special temporal features such as wildlife and flowers can enhance the value of a landscape scene. This research supports the importance of visual barriers such as berms and vegetation screens during mining operations and supports public perceptions concerning many types of industrial activities. In addition, the equation can be applied to study post-mining landscape development plans to maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of landscape treatments.« less

  7. Madres para la Salud: design of a theory-based intervention for postpartum Latinas.

    PubMed

    Keller, Colleen; Records, Kathie; Ainsworth, Barbara; Belyea, Michael; Permana, Paska; Coonrod, Dean; Vega-López, Sonia; Nagle-Williams, Allison

    2011-05-01

    Weight gain in young women suggests that childbearing may be an important contributor to the development of obesity in women. Depressive symptoms can interfere with resumption of normal activity levels following childbirth or with the initiation of or adherence to physical activity programs essential for losing pregnancy weight. Depression symptoms may function directly to promote weight gain through a physiologic mechanism. Obesity and its related insulin resistance may contribute to depressed mood physiologically. Although physical activity has well-established beneficial effects on weight management and depression, women tend to under participate in physical activity during childbearing years. Further, the mechanisms underpinning the interplay of overweight, obesity, physical activity, depression, and inflammatory processes are not clearly explained. This report describes the theoretical rationale, design considerations, and cultural relevance for "Madres para la Salud" [Mothers for Health]. Madres para la Salud is a 12 month prospective, randomized controlled trial exploring the effectiveness of a culturally specific intervention using "bouts" of physical activity to effect changes in body fat, systemic and fat tissue inflammation, and postpartum depression symptoms in sedentary postpartum Latinas. The significance and innovation of Madres para la Salud includes use of a theory-driven approach to intervention, specification and cultural relevance of a social support intervention, use of a Promotora model to incorporate cultural approaches, use of objective measures of physical activity in post partum Latinas women, and the examination of biomarkers indicative of cardiovascular risk related to physical activity behaviors in postpartum Latinas. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Business Model Design from an ANT Perspective: Contributions and Insights of an Open and Living Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Cristina Chuva; da Cunha, Paulo Rupino

    The way the Internet has connected millions of users at negligible costs has changed playing field for companies. Several stakeholders can now come together in virtual networks to create innovative business models that would be unfeasible in the physical world. However, the more radical the departure from the established models of value creation, the bigger the complexity in ensuring the sustained interest of the involved parties and the stability of the bonds. To address this problem, we sought inspiration in the Actor-Network Theory (ANT), which is capable of providing insights into socio-technical settings where human and non-human agents interact. We describe how several of its principles, ideas, and concepts were adapted and embedded in our approach for complex business model design or analysis. A simple illustration is provided. Our iterative approach helps systematically scrutinize and tune the contributions and returns of the various actors, ensuring that all end up with an attractive value proposal, thus promoting the robustness of the network. Guidelines for the services that an underlying information system must provide are also derived from the results.

  9. From grand-canonical density functional theory towards rational compound design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Lilienfeld, Anatole

    2008-03-01

    The fundamental challenge of rational compound design, ie the reverse engineering of chemical compounds with predefined specific properties, originates in the high-dimensional combinatorial nature of chemical space. Chemical space is the hyper-space of a given set of molecular observables that is spanned by the grand-canonical variables (particle densities of electrons and nuclei) which define chemical composition. A brief but rigorous description of chemical space within the molecular grand-canonical ensemble multi-component density functional theory framework will be given [1]. Numerical results will be presented for intermolecular energies as a continuous function of alchemical variations within a neutral and isoelectronic 10 proton system, including CH4, NH3, H2O, and HF, interacting with formic acid [2]. Furthermore, engineering the Fermi level through alchemical generation of boron-nitrogen doped mutants of benzene shall be discussed [3].[1] von Lilienfeld and Tuckerman JCP 125 154104 (2006)[2] von Lilienfeld and Tuckerman JCTC 3 1083 (2007)[3] Marcon et al. JCP 127 064305 (2007)

  10. Designing mixed metal halide ammines for ammonia storage using density functional theory and genetic algorithms.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Peter Bjerre; Lysgaard, Steen; Quaade, Ulrich J; Vegge, Tejs

    2014-09-28

    Metal halide ammines have great potential as a future, high-density energy carrier in vehicles. So far known materials, e.g. Mg(NH3)6Cl2 and Sr(NH3)8Cl2, are not suitable for automotive, fuel cell applications, because the release of ammonia is a multi-step reaction, requiring too much heat to be supplied, making the total efficiency lower. Here, we apply density functional theory (DFT) calculations to predict new mixed metal halide ammines with improved storage capacities and the ability to release the stored ammonia in one step, at temperatures suitable for system integration with polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC). We use genetic algorithms (GAs) to search for materials containing up to three different metals (alkaline-earth, 3d and 4d) and two different halides (Cl, Br and I) - almost 27,000 combinations, and have identified novel mixtures, with significantly improved storage capacities. The size of the search space and the chosen fitness function make it possible to verify that the found candidates are the best possible candidates in the search space, proving that the GA implementation is ideal for this kind of computational materials design, requiring calculations on less than two percent of the candidates to identify the global optimum.

  11. Density functional theory and an experimentally-designed energy functional of electron density.

    PubMed

    Miranda, David A; Bueno, Paulo R

    2016-09-21

    We herein demonstrate that capacitance spectroscopy (CS) experimentally allows access to the energy associated with the quantum mechanical ground state of many-electron systems. Priorly, electrochemical capacitance, C [small mu, Greek, macron] [ρ], was previously understood from conceptual and computational density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Thus, we herein propose a quantum mechanical experiment-based variational method for electron charging processes based on an experimentally-designed functional of the ground state electron density. In this methodology, the electron state density, ρ, and an energy functional of the electron density, E [small mu, Greek, macron] [ρ], can be obtained from CS data. CS allows the derivative of the electrochemical potential with respect to the electron density, (δ[small mu, Greek, macron][ρ]/δρ), to be obtained as a unique functional of the energetically minimised system, i.e., β/C [small mu, Greek, macron] [ρ], where β is a constant (associated with the size of the system) and C [small mu, Greek, macron] [ρ] is an experimentally observable quantity. Thus the ground state energy (at a given fixed external potential) can be obtained simply as E [small mu, Greek, macron] [ρ], from the experimental measurement of C [small mu, Greek, macron] [ρ]. An experimental data-set was interpreted to demonstrate the potential of this quantum mechanical experiment-based variational principle.

  12. Advancing density functional theory to finite temperatures: methods and applications in steel design.

    PubMed

    Hickel, T; Grabowski, B; Körmann, F; Neugebauer, J

    2012-02-08

    The performance of materials such as steels, their high strength and formability, is based on an impressive variety of competing mechanisms on the microscopic/atomic scale (e.g. dislocation gliding, solid solution hardening, mechanical twinning or structural phase transformations). Whereas many of the currently available concepts to describe these mechanisms are based on empirical and experimental data, it becomes more and more apparent that further improvement of materials needs to be based on a more fundamental level. Recent progress for methods based on density functional theory (DFT) now makes the exploration of chemical trends, the determination of parameters for phenomenological models and the identification of new routes for the optimization of steel properties feasible. A major challenge in applying these methods to a true materials design is, however, the inclusion of temperature-driven effects on the desired properties. Therefore, a large range of computational tools has been developed in order to improve the capability and accuracy of first-principles methods in determining free energies. These combine electronic, vibrational and magnetic effects as well as structural defects in an integrated approach. Based on these simulation tools, one is now able to successfully predict mechanical and thermodynamic properties of metals with a hitherto not achievable accuracy.

  13. Pulse Power Compression by Cutting a Dense Z-Pinch with a Laser Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterberg, F.

    1999-07-01

    A thin cut made through a z-pinch by an intense laser beam can become a magnetically insulated diode crossed by an intense ion beam. For larger cuts, the gap is crossed by an intense relativistic electron beam, stopped by magnetic bremsstrahlung resulting in a pointlike intense x-ray source. In either case, the impedance of the pinch discharge is increased, with the power delivered rising in the same pro-portion. A magnetically insulated cut is advantageous for three reasons: First, with the ion current com-parable to the Alfvèn ion current, the pinch instabilities are reduced. Second, with the energy deposit-ed into fast ions, a non-Maxwellian velocity distribution is established increasing<σ ν> value for nuclear fusion reactions taking place in the pinch discharge. Third, in a high density z-pinch plasma, the intense ion beam can launch a thermonuclear detonation wave propagating along the pinch discharge channel. For larger cuts the soft x-rays produced by magnetic bremsstrahlung can be used to drive a thermonuclear hohlraum target. Finally, the proposed pulse power compression scheme permits to use a cheap low power d.c. source charging a magnetic storage coil delivering the magnetically stored energy to the pinch discharge load by an exploding wire opening switch.

  14. Functional sensibility assessment. Part I: develop a reliable apparatus to assess momentary pinch force control.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Haw-Yen; Hsu, Hsiu-Yun; Kuo, Li-Chieh; Chang, Jer-Hao; Su, Fong-Chin

    2009-08-01

    A precise magnitude and timing control of pinch performance is based on accurate feed-forward and feedback control mechanisms. Ratio of peak pinch force and maximum load force during a functional performance is a sensitive parameter to reflect the ability to scale pinch force output according to actual loads. A pinch apparatus was constructed to detect momentary pinch force modulation of 20 subjects with normal hand sensation. The results indicated high intra-class correlation coefficient and small coefficient of variation of the detected force ratio among three repeated tests, which represented that the stability test of the measured response confirmed the feasibility of this apparatus. The force ratio for a 480 g object with a steel surface ranged between 1.77 and 1.98. Normal subjects were able to scale and contribute pinch force precisely to a pinch-holding-up test. This study may provide clinicians a reliable apparatus and method to analyze the recovery of functional sensibility in patients with nerve injuries. Copyright 2009 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Polar Radiation-Flux Symmetry Measurements in Z-Pinch-Driven Hohlraums with Symmetric Double-Pinch Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, D. L.; Vesey, R. A.; Cuneo Porter, M. E., Jr.; Chandler, G. A.; Ruggles, L. E.; Simpson, W. W.; Seamen, H.; Primm, P.; Torres, J.; McGurn, J.; Gilliland, T. L.; Reynolds, P.; Hebron, D. E.; Dropinski, S. C.; Schroen-Carey, D. G.; Hammer, J. H.; Landen, O.; Koch, J.

    2000-10-01

    We are currently exploring symmetry requirements of the z-pinch-driven hohlraum concept [1] for high-yield inertial confinement fusion. In experiments on the Z accelerator, the burnthrough of a low-density self-backlit foam ball has been used to diagnose the large time-dependent flux asymmetry of several single-sided-drive hohlraum geometries [2]. We are currently applying this technique to study polar radiation flux symmetry in a symmetric double z-pinch geometry. Wire arrays on opposite ends of the hohlraum, connected in series to a single current drive of 18 MA, implode and stagnate on axis, efficiently radiating about 100 TW of x rays which heat the secondary to 75 eV. Comparisons with 3-D radiosity and 2-D rad-hydro models of hohlraum symmetry performance will be presented. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. 1 J. H. Hammer et al., Phys. Plasmas 6, 2129 (1999). 2 D. L. Hanson et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 44, 40 (1999).

  16. Applying an Activity Theory Lens to Designing Instruction for Learning about the Structure, Behavior, and Function of a Honeybee System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danish, Joshua A.

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on a study in which activity theory was used to design, implement, and analyze a 10-week curriculum unit about how honeybees collect nectar with a particular focus on complex systems concepts. Students (n = 42) in a multi-year kindergarten and 1st-grade classroom participated in this study as part of their 10 regular classroom…

  17. A Proposed Theory Seeded Methodology for Design Based Research into Effective Use of MUVES in Vocational Education Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochrane, Todd; Davis, Niki; Morrow, Donna

    2013-01-01

    A methodology for design based research (DBR) into effective development and use of Multi-User Virtual Environments (MUVE) in vocational education is proposed. It blends software development with DBR with two theories selected to inform the methodology. Legitimate peripheral participation LPP (Lave & Wenger, 1991) provides a filter when…

  18. Teaching Evolution at A-Level: Is "Intelligent Design" a Scientific Theory That Merits Inclusion in the Biology Syllabus?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeland, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Charles Darwin supposed that evolution involved a process of gradual change, generated randomly, with the selection and retention over many generations of survival-promoting features. Some theists have never accepted this idea. "Intelligent design" is a relatively recent theory, supposedly based on scientific evidence, which attempts to…

  19. Change of Mind: How Organization Theory Led Me to Move from Studying Educational Reform to Pursuing Educational Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogawa, Rodney T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is for the author to recount how his use of organizational theory to understand educational reform in the USA led to a change of mind. Design/methodology/approach: My shift resulted from my conclusion, derived from the new institutionalism, that only marginal changes can be made in schools and, thus, fundamental…

  20. Improving the Quality of Online Discussion: The Effects of Strategies Designed Based on Cognitive Load Theory Principles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darabi, Aubteen; Jin, Li

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on heavy cognitive load as the reason for the lack of quality associated with conventional online discussion. Using the principles of cognitive load theory, four online discussion strategies were designed specifically aiming at reducing the discussants' cognitive load and thus enhancing the quality of their online discussion.…

  1. Building bridges between theory and practice in medical education using a design-based research approach: AMEE Guide No. 60.

    PubMed

    Dolmans, Diana H J M; Tigelaar, D

    2012-01-01

    Medical education research has grown enormously over the past 20 years, but it does not sufficiently make use of theories, according to influential leaders and researchers in this field. In this AMEE Guide, it is argued that design-based research (DBR) studies should be conducted much more in medical education design research because these studies both advance the testing and refinement of theories and advance educational practice. In this Guide, the essential characteristics of DBR as well as how DBR differs from other approach such as formative evaluation are explained. It is also explained what the pitfalls and challenges of DBR are. The main challenges deal with how to insure that DBR studies reveal findings that are of a broader relevance than the local situation and how to insure that DBR contributes toward theory testing and refinement. An example of a series of DBR studies on the design of a teaching portfolio in higher education that is aimed at stimulating a teacher's professional development is described, to illustrate how DBR studies actually work in practice. Finally, it is argued that DBR-studies could play an important role in the advancement of theory and practice in the two broad domains of designing or redesigning work-based learning environments and assessment programs.

  2. Application of optimal control theory to the design of the NASA/JPL 70-meter antenna servos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, L. S.; Nickerson, J.

    1989-01-01

    The application of Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) techniques to the design of the 70-m axis servos is described. Linear quadratic optimal control and Kalman filter theory are reviewed, and model development and verification are discussed. Families of optimal controller and Kalman filter gain vectors were generated by varying weight parameters. Performance specifications were used to select final gain vectors.

  3. Using Web-Based Instruction to Teach Music Theory in the Piano Studio: Defining, Designing, and Implementing an Integrative Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carney, Robert D.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation rationalizes the best use of Web-based instruction (WBI) for teaching music theory to private piano students in the later primary grades. It uses an integrative research methodology for defining, designing, and implementing a curriculum that includes WBI. Research from the fields of music education, educational technology,…

  4. Aligning Theory and Design: The Development of an Online Learning Intervention to Teach Evidence-based Practice for Maximal Reach

    PubMed Central

    Vihstadt, Corrie; Evans, Roni

    2015-01-01

    Background: Online educational interventions to teach evidence-based practice (EBP) are a promising mechanism for overcoming some of the barriers to incorporating research into practice. However, attention must be paid to aligning strategies with adult learning theories to achieve optimal outcomes. Methods: We describe the development of a series of short self-study modules, each covering a small set of learning objectives. Our approach, informed by design-based research (DBR), involved 6 phases: analysis, design, design evaluation, redesign, development/implementation, and evaluation. Participants were faculty and students in 3 health programs at a complementary and integrative educational institution. Results: We chose a reusable learning object approach that allowed us to apply 4 main learning theories: events of instruction, cognitive load, dual processing, and ARCS (attention, relevance, confidence, satisfaction). A formative design evaluation suggested that the identified theories and instructional approaches were likely to facilitate learning and motivation. Summative evaluation was based on a student survey (N=116) that addressed how these theories supported learning. Results suggest that, overall, the selected theories helped students learn. Conclusion: The DBR approach allowed us to evaluate the specific intervention and theories for general applicability. This process also helped us define and document the intervention at a level of detail that covers almost all the proposed Guideline for Reporting Evidence-based practice Educational intervention and Teaching (GREET) items. This thorough description will facilitate the interpretation of future research and implementation of the intervention. Our approach can also serve as a model for others considering online EBP intervention development. PMID:26421233

  5. [Identification of ecological corridors and its importance by integrating circuit theory].

    PubMed

    Song, Li Li; Qin, Ming Zhou

    2016-10-01

    Landscape connectivity is considered as an extraordinarily important factor affecting various ecological processes. The least cost path (LCP) on the basis of minimum cumulative resis-tance model (MCRM) may provide a more efficient approach to identify functional connectivity in heterogeneous landscapes, and is already adopted by the research of landscape functional connecti-vity assessment and ecological corridor simulation. Connectivity model on circuit theory (CMCT) replaced the edges in the graph theory with resistors, cost distance with resistance distance to measure the functional connectivity in heterogeneous landscapes. By means of Linkage Mapper tool and Circuitscape software, the simulated landscape generated from SIMMAP 2.0 software was viewed as the study object in this article, aimed at exploring how to integrate MCRM with CMCT to identify ecological corridors and relative importance of landscape factors. The results showed that two models had their individual advantages and mutual complement. MCRM could effectively identify least cost corridors among habitats. CMCT could effectively identify important landscape factor and pinch point, which had important influence on landscape connectivity. We also found that the position of pinch point was not affected by corridor width, which had obvious advantage in the research of identifying the importance of corridors. The integrated method could provide certain scientific basis for regional ecological protection planning and ecological corridor design.

  6. Applying Item Response Theory methods to design a learning progression-based science assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jing

    Learning progressions are used to describe how students' understanding of a topic progresses over time and to classify the progress of students into steps or levels. This study applies Item Response Theory (IRT) based methods to investigate how to design learning progression-based science assessments. The research questions of this study are: (1) how to use items in different formats to classify students into levels on the learning progression, (2) how to design a test to give good information about students' progress through the learning progression of a particular construct and (3) what characteristics of test items support their use for assessing students' levels. Data used for this study were collected from 1500 elementary and secondary school students during 2009--2010. The written assessment was developed in several formats such as the Constructed Response (CR) items, Ordered Multiple Choice (OMC) and Multiple True or False (MTF) items. The followings are the main findings from this study. The OMC, MTF and CR items might measure different components of the construct. A single construct explained most of the variance in students' performances. However, additional dimensions in terms of item format can explain certain amount of the variance in student performance. So additional dimensions need to be considered when we want to capture the differences in students' performances on different types of items targeting the understanding of the same underlying progression. Items in each item format need to be improved in certain ways to classify students more accurately into the learning progression levels. This study establishes some general steps that can be followed to design other learning progression-based tests as well. For example, first, the boundaries between levels on the IRT scale can be defined by using the means of the item thresholds across a set of good items. Second, items in multiple formats can be selected to achieve the information criterion at all

  7. Multirate Flutter Suppression System Design for the Benchmark Active Controls Technology Wing. Part 1; Theory and Design Procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Gregory S.; Berg, Martin C.; Mukhopadhyay, Vivek

    2002-01-01

    To study the effectiveness of various control system design methodologies, the NASA Langley Research Center initiated the Benchmark Active Controls Project. In this project, the various methodologies were applied to design a flutter suppression system for the Benchmark Active Controls Technology (BACT) Wing. This report describes a project at the University of Washington to design a multirate suppression system for the BACT wing. The objective of the project was two fold. First, to develop a methodology for designing robust multirate compensators, and second, to demonstrate the methodology by applying it to the design of a multirate flutter suppression system for the BACT wing.

  8. Activity Theory as a Framework for Designing the Model of College English Listening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jianfeng

    2014-01-01

    Activity theory signifies that activities are at the centre of human behaviour and it has been used to study cognitive process in many fields. Nowadays, college English listening learning is time-consuming but less effective in China, so enhancing the performance of listening instruction is a very hot topic. Theoretically, activity theory is able…

  9. Theory and (In) Practice: The Problem of Integration in Art and Design Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rintoul, Jenny Ruth

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between art "theory" and art "practice" in British art education at post-compulsory level, with a focus on the ways in which theory is framed and delivered and what this means for its integration. Drawing upon constructions of knowledge and approaches to integration as a technique and…

  10. Design of Learning Model of Logic and Algorithms Based on APOS Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartati, Sulis Janu

    2014-01-01

    This research questions were "how do the characteristics of learning model of logic & algorithm according to APOS theory" and "whether or not these learning model can improve students learning outcomes". This research was conducted by exploration, and quantitative approach. Exploration used in constructing theory about the…

  11. Insights from Skill Acquisition Theory for Grammar Activity Sequencing and Design in Foreign Language Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Criado, Raquel

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a framework for the elaboration of Foreign Language Teaching (FLT) grammar materials for adults based on the application to SLA of Skill Acquisition Theory (SAT). This theory is argued to compensate for the major drawbacks of FLT settings in comparison with second language contexts (lack of classroom learning time and limited…

  12. A look at Behaviourism and Perceptual Control Theory in Interface Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-02-01

    behaviours such as response variability, instinctive drift, autoshaping , etc. Perceptual Control Theory (PCT) postulates that behaviours result from the...internal variables. Behaviourism, on the other hand, can not account for variability in responses, instinctive drift, autoshaping , etc. Researchers... Autoshaping . Animals appear to learn without reinforcement. However, conditioning theory speculates that learning results only when reinforcement

  13. Education for Social Change and Pragmatist Theory: Five Features of Educative Environments Designed for Social Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanWynsberghe, Robert; Herman, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper establishes the basis for a pragmatist-inspired theory of human action to predominant ideas about knowledge, learning and education. As a necessary prelude to an examination of pragmatist theory's position on human action and its specific focus on habits and creativity, pragmatism is defined and then related to inquiry. Next, the fields…

  14. Fast tracking the design of theory-based KT interventions through a consensus process.

    PubMed

    Bussières, André E; Al Zoubi, Fadi; Quon, Jeffrey A; Ahmed, Sara; Thomas, Aliki; Stuber, Kent; Sajko, Sandy; French, Simon

    2015-02-11

    Despite available evidence for optimal management of spinal pain, poor adherence to guidelines and wide variations in healthcare services persist. One of the objectives of the Canadian Chiropractic Guideline Initiative is to develop and evaluate targeted theory- and evidence-informed interventions to improve the management of non-specific neck pain by chiropractors. In order to systematically develop a knowledge translation (KT) intervention underpinned by the Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF), we explored the factors perceived to influence the use of multimodal care to manage non-specific neck pain, and mapped behaviour change techniques to key theoretical domains. Individual telephone interviews exploring beliefs about managing neck pain were conducted with a purposive sample of 13 chiropractors. The interview guide was based upon the TDF. Interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed by two independent assessors using thematic content analysis. A 15-member expert panel formally met to design a KT intervention. Nine TDF domains were identified as likely relevant. Key beliefs (and relevant domains of the TDF) included the following: influence of formal training, colleagues and patients on clinicians (Social Influences); availability of educational material (Environmental Context and Resources); and better clinical outcomes reinforcing the use of multimodal care (Reinforcement). Facilitating factors considered important included better communication (Skills); audits of patients' treatment-related outcomes (Behavioural Regulation); awareness and agreement with guidelines (Knowledge); and tailoring of multimodal care (Memory, Attention and Decision Processes). Clinicians conveyed conflicting beliefs about perceived threats to professional autonomy (Social/Professional Role and Identity) and speed of recovery from either applying or ignoring the practice recommendations (Beliefs about Consequences). The expert panel mapped behaviour change

  15. Lower hybrid accessibility in a large, hot reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Dziubek, R.A.; Harvey, R.W.; Hokin, S.A.

    1995-11-01

    Accessibility and damping of the slow wave in a reversed field pinch (RFP) plasma is investigated theoretically, using projected Reversed Field Experiment (RFX) plasma parameters. By numerically solving the hot plasma dispersion relation, regions of propagation are found and the possibility of mode conversion is analyzed. If the parallel index of refraction of the wave is chosen judiciously at the edge of the plasma, the slow wave is accessible to a target region located just inside the reversal surface without mode conversion. Landau damping is also optimized in this region. A representative fast electron population is then added in ordermore » to determine its effect on accessibility and damping. The presence of these electrons, whose parameters were estimated by extrapolation of Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) data, does not affect the accessibility of the wave. However, the initial phase velocity of the wave needs to be increased somewhat in order to maintain optimal damping in the target zone.« less

  16. Coherent structures and anomalous transport in reversed field pinch plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoni, V.; Drake, J. R.; Spada, E.; Spolaore, M.; Vianello, N.; Bergsåker, H.; Cavazzana, R.; Cecconello, M.; Martines, E.; Serianni, G.

    2006-02-01

    The results leading to the identification of coherent structures emerging from the background turbulence in the edge region of the reversed field pinch experiments EXTRAP-T2R and RFX are reviewed. These structures have traits of vortices in velocity field and blobs in density, and the reconstruction of their spatial structure and of their time evolution is discussed focusing on the analysis tools applied. The role of these structures in the particle anomalous transport is addressed, showing that their collisions can contribute up to 50% the total particle losses.This process is shown to be responsible for bursts in particle flux and it is found to set a characteristic collision time, which is in agreement with the statistical properties of laminar times for particle flux bursts.

  17. A kind of fast shutter for Z pinch diagnosis device.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liangping; Zhang, Xinjun; Sun, Tieping; Mao, Wentin

    2016-09-01

    A kind of fast shutter for protecting the diagnosis devices in Z pinch experiments is introduced in this paper. The shutter is composed of a pulling rod, a magnetic core, and a solenoid. Different from the traditional coils which were used at the voltage of 220 V, the solenoid we used must endure the high voltage of 5-10 kV and the deformation which maybe caused by the 5-10 T intense magnetic field. A creative configuration for the solenoid is developed including the winding guide, insulating sleeve, and stainless-steel sleeve. The experimental results show that the configuration of the solenoid is effective. The velocity of the valve is nearly 19 m/s and the time jitter of the shutdown is within 75 μs.

  18. A kind of fast shutter for Z pinch diagnosis device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liangping; Zhang, Xinjun; Sun, Tieping; Mao, Wentin

    2016-09-01

    A kind of fast shutter for protecting the diagnosis devices in Z pinch experiments is introduced in this paper. The shutter is composed of a pulling rod, a magnetic core, and a solenoid. Different from the traditional coils which were used at the voltage of 220 V, the solenoid we used must endure the high voltage of 5-10 kV and the deformation which maybe caused by the 5-10 T intense magnetic field. A creative configuration for the solenoid is developed including the winding guide, insulating sleeve, and stainless-steel sleeve. The experimental results show that the configuration of the solenoid is effective. The velocity of the valve is nearly 19 m/s and the time jitter of the shutdown is within 75 μs.

  19. Production of dense plasmas in a hypocycloidal pinch apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.; Mcfarland, D. R.; Hohl, F.

    1977-01-01

    A high-power pinch apparatus consisting of disk electrodes was developed, and diagnostic measurements to study its mechanism of dense plasma production have been made. The collapse fronts of the current sheets are well organized, and dense plasma foci are produced on the axis with radial stability in excess of 5 microsec. A plasma density greater than 10 to the 18th power per cu cm is determined with Stark broadening and CO2 laser absorption. Essentially complete absorption of a high-energy CO2 laser beam has been observed. A plasma temperature of approximately 1 keV is measured with differential transmission of soft X-rays through thin foils. The advantages of this apparatus over the coaxial plasma focus are improvements in (1) plasma volume, (2) stability, (3) containment time, (4) access to additional heating by laser or electron beams, and (5) the possibility of scaling up to a multiple array for high-power operation.

  20. Scaling and Instabilities in Bubble Pinch-Off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, J. C.; Waldrep, R.; Taborek, P.

    2005-05-01

    We have used a 100 000 frame-per-second video to analyze the pinch-off of nitrogen gas bubbles in fluids with a wide range of viscosity. If the external fluid is highly viscous (ηext>100 cP), the bubble neck radius is proportional to the time before break, τ, and decreases smoothly to zero. If the external fluid has low viscosity (ηext<10 cP), the radius scales as τ1/2 until an instability develops in the gas bubble, which causes the neck to rupture and tear apart. Finally, if the viscosity of the external fluid is in an intermediate range, an elongated thread is formed, which breaks apart into micron-sized bubbles.

  1. Gas Bubble Pinch-off in Viscous and Inviscid Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taborek, P.

    2005-11-01

    We have used high-speed video to analyze pinch-off of nitrogen gas bubbles in fluids with a wide range of viscosity. If the external fluid is highly viscous (ηext>100 cP), the radius is proportional to the time before break, τ, and decreases smoothly to zero. If the external fluid has low viscosity (ηext<10 cP), the neck radius scales as &1/2circ; until an instability develops in the gas bubble which causes the neck to rupture and tear apart. Finally, if the viscosity of the external fluid is in an intermediate range, an elongated thread is formed which breaks apart into micron-sized bubbles. 100,000 frame-per-second videos will be presented which illustrate each of these flow regimes.

  2. New compact hohlraum configuration research at the 1.7 MA Z-pinch generator

    SciTech Connect

    Kantsyrev, V. L., E-mail: victor@unr.edu; Shrestha, I. K.; Esaulov, A. A.

    A new compact Z-pinch x-ray hohlraum design with parallel-driven x-ray sources was experimentally demonstrated in a full configuration with a central target and tailored shine shields (to provide a symmetric temperature distribution on the target) at the 1.7 MA Zebra generator. This presentation reports on the joint success of two independent lines of research. One of these was the development of new sources – planar wire arrays (PWAs). PWAs turned out to be a prolific radiator. Another success was the drastic improvement in energy efficiency of pulsed-power systems, such as the Load Current Multiplier (LCM). The Zebra/LCM generator almost doubledmore » the plasma load current to 1.7 MA. The two above-mentioned innovative approaches were used in combination to produce a new compact hohlraum design for ICF, as jointly proposed by SNL and UNR. Good agreement between simulated and measured radiation temperature of the central target is shown. Experimental comparison of PWAs with planar foil liners (PFL) - another viable alternative to wire array loads at multi-MA generators show promising data. Results of research at the University of Nevada Reno allowed for the study of hohlraum coupling physics at University-scale generators. The advantages of new hohlraum design applications for multi-MA facilities with W or Au double PWAs or PFL x-ray sources are discussed.« less

  3. Charger 1: A New Facility for Z-Pinch Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Brian; Cassibry, Jason; Cortez, Ross; Doughty, Glen; Adams, Robert; DeCicco, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Charger 1 is a multipurpose pulsed power laboratory located on Redstone Arsenal, with a focus on fusion propulsion relevant experiments involving testing z-pinch diodes, pulsed magnetic nozzle and other related physics experiments. UAH and its team of pulsed power researchers are investigating ways to increase and optimize fusion production from Charger 1. Currently the team has reached high-power testing. Due to the unique safety issues related to high power operations the UAH/MSFC team has slowed repair efforts to develop safety and operations protocols. The facility is expected to be operational by the time DZP 2017 convenes. Charger 1 began life as the Decade Module 2, an experimental prototype built to prove the Decade Quad pinch configuration. The system was donated to UAH by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DRTA) in 2012. For the past 5 years a UAH/MSFC/Boeing team has worked to refurbish, assemble and test the system. With completion of high power testing in summer 2017 Charger 1 will become operational for experimentation. Charger 1 utilizes a Marx Bank of 72 100-kV capacitors that are charged in parallel and discharged in series. The Marx output is compressed to a pulse width of approximately 200 ns via a pulse forming network of 32 coaxial stainless steel tubes using water as a dielectric. After pulse compression a set of SF6 switches are triggered, allowing the wave front to propagate through the output line to the load. Charger 1 is capable of storing 572-kJ of energy and time compressing discharge to less than 250 ns discharge time producing a discharge of about 1 TW of discharge with 1 MV and 1 MA peak voltage and current, respectively. This capability will be used to study energy yield scaling and physics from solid density target as applied to advanced propulsion research.

  4. On the application of motivation theory to human factors/ergonomics: motivational design principles for human-technology interaction.

    PubMed

    Szalma, James L

    2014-12-01

    Motivation is a driving force in human-technology interaction. This paper represents an effort to (a) describe a theoretical model of motivation in human technology interaction, (b) provide design principles and guidelines based on this theory, and (c) describe a sequence of steps for the. evaluation of motivational factors in human-technology interaction. Motivation theory has been relatively neglected in human factors/ergonomics (HF/E). In both research and practice, the (implicit) assumption has been that the operator is already motivated or that motivation is an organizational concern and beyond the purview of HF/E. However, technology can induce task-related boredom (e.g., automation) that can be stressful and also increase system vulnerability to performance failures. A theoretical model of motivation in human-technology interaction is proposed, based on extension of the self-determination theory of motivation to HF/E. This model provides the basis for both future research and for development of practical recommendations for design. General principles and guidelines for motivational design are described as well as a sequence of steps for the design process. Human motivation is an important concern for HF/E research and practice. Procedures in the design of both simple and complex technologies can, and should, include the evaluation of motivational characteristics of the task, interface, or system. In addition, researchers should investigate these factors in specific human-technology domains. The theory, principles, and guidelines described here can be incorporated into existing techniques for task analysis and for interface and system design.

  5. Ion energy balance in enhanced-confinement reversed-field pinch plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Z. A.; Nornberg, M. D.; Boguski, J.; Craig, D.; den Hartog, D. J.; McCollam, K.

    2017-10-01

    Testing the applicability of collisional ion transport theory using tearing suppressed RFP plasma in MST achieved through Pulsed Poloidal Current Drive (PPCD), we find that the ion temperature dynamics in the core to be well-predicted by classical and collisional terms. Prior work demonstrated that impurity ion particle transport in PPCD plasmas is classical. Neoclassical effects on ions in the RFP are small and the stochastic transport is greatly suppressed during PPCD. Recent neutral modelling with DEGAS2 suggests higher core neutral temperatures than expected due to the preferential penetration of higher temperature neutrals generated by charge exchange. Further, investigations through equilibrium reconstruction point to the existence of an inward pinch flow associated with ExB drift. The heat balance model pulls together a wide range of diagnostic data to forward model Ti evolution in PPCD, which is then compared to charge exchange spectroscopy measurements of Ti. Ion power balance is mostly driven by classical effects including compressional heating, electron collisional heating, and charge exchange transport. This understanding provides a good baseline for investigations of anomalous heating in plasmas with tearing mode activity. This work is supported by US DOE.

  6. Reversed field pinch operation with intelligent shell feedback control in EXTRAP T2R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunsell, P. R.; Kuldkepp, M.; Menmuir, S.; Cecconello, M.; Hedqvist, A.; Yadikin, D.; Drake, J. R.; Rachlew, E.

    2006-11-01

    Discharges in the thin shell reversed field pinch (RFP) device EXTRAP T2R without active feedback control are characterized by growth of non-resonant m = 1 unstable resistive wall modes (RWMs) in agreement with linear MHD theory. Resonant m = 1 tearing modes (TMs) exhibit initially fast rotation and the associated perturbed radial fields at the shell are small, but eventually TMs wall-lock and give rise to a growing radial field. The increase in the radial field at the wall due to growing RWMs and wall-locked TMs is correlated with an increase in the toroidal loop voltage, which leads to discharge termination after 3-4 wall times. An active magnetic feedback control system has been installed in EXTRAP T2R. A two-dimensional array of 128 active saddle coils (pair-connected into 64 independent m = 1 coils) is used with intelligent shell feedback control to suppress the m = 1 radial field at the shell. With feedback control, active stabilization of the full toroidal spectrum of 16 unstable m = 1 non-resonant RWMs is achieved, and TM wall locking is avoided. A three-fold extension of the pulse length, up to the power supply limit, is observed. Intelligent shell feedback control is able to maintain the plasma equilibrium for 10 wall times, with plasma confinement parameters sustained at values comparable to those obtained in thick shell devices of similar size.

  7. Advanced feedback control methods in EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadikin, D.; Brunsell, P. R.; Paccagnella, R.

    2006-07-01

    Previous experiments in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch device have shown the possibility of suppression of multiple resistive wall modes (RWM). A feedback system has been installed in EXTRAP T2R having 100% coverage of the toroidal surface by the active coil array. Predictions based on theory and the previous experimental results show that the number of active coils should be sufficient for independent stabilization of all unstable RWMs in the EXTRAP T2R. Experiments using different feedback schemes are performed, comparing the intelligent shell, the fake rotating shell, and the mode control with complex feedback gains. Stabilization of all unstable RWMs throughout the discharge duration of td≈10τw is seen using the intelligent shell feedback scheme. Mode rotation and the control of selected Fourier harmonics is obtained simultaneously using the mode control scheme with complex gains. Different sensor signals are studied. A feedback system with toroidal magnetic field sensors could have an advantage of lower feedback gain needed for the RWM suppression compared to the system with radial magnetic field sensors. In this study, RWM suppression is demonstrated, using also the toroidal field component as a sensor signal in the feedback system.

  8. Mode- and plasma rotation in a resistive shell reversed-field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malmberg, J.-A.; Brzozowski, J.; Brunsell, P. R.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    Mode rotation studies in a resistive shell reversed-field pinch, EXTRAP T2R [P. R. Brunsell et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43, 1 (2001)] are presented. The phase relations and nonlinear coupling of the resonant modes are characterized and compared with that expected from modeling based on the hypothesis that mode dynamics can be described by a quasi stationary force balance including electromagnetic and viscous forces. Both m=0 and m=1 resonant modes are studied. The m=1 modes have rotation velocities corresponding to the plasma flow velocity (20-60 km/s) in the core region. The rotation velocity decreases towards the end of the discharge, although the plasma flow velocity does not decrease. A rotating phase locked m=1 structure is observed with a velocity of about 60 km/s. The m=0 modes accelerate throughout the discharges and reach velocities as high as 150-250 km/s. The observed m=0 phase locking is consistent with theory for certain conditions, but there are several conditions when the dynamics are not described. This is not unexpected because the assumption of quasi stationarity for the mode spectra is not fulfilled for many conditions. Localized m=0 perturbations are formed in correlation with highly transient discrete dynamo events. These perturbations form at the location of the m=1 phase locked structure, but rotate with a different velocity as they spread out in the toroidal direction.

  9. Design, Analysis and User Acceptance of Architectural Design Education in Learning System Based on Knowledge Management Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Yun-Wu; Lin, Yu-An; Wen, Ming-Hui; Perng, Yeng-Hong; Hsu, I-Ting

    2016-01-01

    The major purpose of this study is to develop an architectural design knowledge management learning system with corresponding learning activities to help the students have meaningful learning and improve their design capability in their learning process. Firstly, the system can help the students to obtain and share useful knowledge. Secondly,…

  10. Beam heated linear theta-pinch device for producing hot plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Bohachevsky, Ihor O.

    1981-01-01

    A device for producing hot plasmas comprising a single turn theta-pinch coil, a fast discharge capacitor bank connected to the coil, a fuel element disposed along the center axis of the coil, a predetermined gas disposed within the theta-pinch coil, and a high power photon, electron or ion beam generator concentrically aligned to the theta-pinch coil. Discharge of the capacitor bank generates a cylindrical plasma sheath within the theta-pinch coil which heats the outer layer of the fuel element to form a fuel element plasma layer. The beam deposits energy in either the cylindrical plasma sheath or the fuel element plasma layer to assist the implosion of the fuel element to produce a hot plasma.

  11. Dynamical analysis of surface-insulated planar wire array Z-pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Sheng, Liang; Hei, Dongwei; Li, Xingwen; Zhang, Jinhai; Li, Mo; Qiu, Aici

    2018-05-01

    The ablation and implosion dynamics of planar wire array Z-pinches with and without surface insulation are compared and discussed in this paper. This paper first presents a phenomenological model named the ablation and cascade snowplow implosion (ACSI) model, which accounts for the ablation and implosion phases of a planar wire array Z-pinch in a single simulation. The comparison between experimental data and simulation results shows that the ACSI model could give a fairly good description about the dynamical characteristics of planar wire array Z-pinches. Surface insulation introduces notable differences in the ablation phase of planar wire array Z-pinches. The ablation phase is divided into two stages: insulation layer ablation and tungsten wire ablation. The two-stage ablation process of insulated wires is simulated in the ACSI model by updating the formulas describing the ablation process.

  12. X-Pinch And Its Applications In X-ray Radiograph

    SciTech Connect

    Zou Xiaobing; Wang Xinxin; Liu Rui

    2009-07-07

    An X-pinch device and the related diagnostics of x-ray emission from X-pinch were briefly described. The time-resolved x-ray measurements with photoconducting diodes show that the x-ray pulse usually consists of two subnanosecond peaks with a time interval of about 0.5 ns. Being consistent with these two peaks of the x-ray pulse, two point x-ray sources of size ranging from 100 mum to 5 mum and depending on cut-off x-ray photon energy were usually observed on the pinhole pictures. The x-pinch was used as x-ray source for backlighting of the electrical explosion of single wire and the evolution of X-pinch, andmore » for phase-contrast imaging of soft biological objects such as a small shrimp and a mosquito.« less

  13. Method for plasma formation for extreme ultraviolet lithography-theta pinch

    DOEpatents

    Hassanein, Ahmed [Naperville, IL; Konkashbaev, Isak [Bolingbrook, IL; Rice, Bryan [Hillsboro, OR

    2007-02-20

    A device and method for generating extremely short-wave ultraviolet electromagnetic wave, utilizing a theta pinch plasma generator to produce electromagnetic radiation in the range of 10 to 20 nm. The device comprises an axially aligned open-ended pinch chamber defining a plasma zone adapted to contain a plasma generating gas within the plasma zone; a means for generating a magnetic field radially outward of the open-ended pinch chamber to produce a discharge plasma from the plasma generating gas, thereby producing a electromagnetic wave in the extreme ultraviolet range; a collecting means in optical communication with the pinch chamber to collect the electromagnetic radiation; and focusing means in optical communication with the collecting means to concentrate the electromagnetic radiation.

  14. Overview of the FuZE Fusion Z-Pinch Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumlak, U.; Nelson, B. A.; Claveau, E. L.; Forbes, E. G.; Golingo, R. P.; Stepanov, A. D.; Weber, T. R.; Zhang, Y.; McLean, H. S.; Higginson, D. P.; Schmidt, A.; Tummel, K. K.

    2017-10-01

    Successful results of the sheared flow stabilized (SFS) Z-pinch from ZaP and ZaP-HD have motivated the new FuZE project to scale the plasma performance to fusion conditions. The SFS Z-pinch is immune to the instabilities that plague the conventional Z-pinch yet maintains the same favorable radial scaling. The plasma density and temperature increase rapidly with decreasing plasma radius, which naturally leads to a compact configuration at fusion conditions. The SFS Z-pinch is being investigated as a novel approach to a compact fusion device in a collaborative ARPA-E ALPHA project with the University of Washington and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The project includes an experimental effort coupled with high-fidelity physics modeling using kinetic and fluid simulations. Along with scaling law analysis, computational and experimental results from the FuZE device are presented. This work is supported by an award from US ARPA-E.

  15. Simulation of the radiation from the hot spot of an X-pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oreshkin, V. I.; Artyomov, A. P.; Chaikovsky, S. A.; Oreshkin, E. V.; Rousskikh, A. G.

    2017-01-01

    The results of X-pinch experiments performed using a small-sized pulse generator are analyzed. The generator, capable of producing a 200-kA, 180-ns current, was loaded with an X-pinch made of four 35-μm-diameter aluminum wires. The analysis consists of a one-dimensional radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the formation of a hot spot in an X-pinch, taking into account the outflow of material from the neck region. The radiation loss and the ion species composition of the pinch plasma are calculated based on a stationary collisional-radiative model, including balance equations for the populations of individual levels. With this model, good agreement between simulation predictions and experimental data has been achieved: the experimental and the calculated radiation power and pulse duration differ by no more than twofold. It has been shown that the x-ray pulse is formed in the radiative collapse region, near its boundary.

  16. Controlling Rayleigh-Taylor Instabilities in Magnetically Driven Solid Metal Shells by Means of a Dynamic Screw Pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Schmit, P. F.; Velikovich, A. L.; McBride, R. D.

    Magnetically driven implosions of solid metal shells are an effective vehicle to compress materials to extreme pressures and densities. Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities (RTI) are ubiquitous, yet typically undesired features in all such experiments where solid materials are rapidly accelerated to high velocities. In cylindrical shells (“liners”), the magnetic field driving the implosion can exacerbate the RTI. Here, we suggest an approach to implode solid metal liners enabling a remarkable reduction in the growth of magnetized RTI (MRTI) by employing a magnetic drive with a tilted, dynamic polarization, forming a dynamic screw pinch. Our calculations, based on a self-consistent analytic framework, demonstratemore » that the cumulative growth of the most deleterious MRTI modes may be reduced by as much as 1 to 2 orders of magnitude. One key application of this technique is to generate increasingly stable, higher-performance implosions of solid metal liners to achieve fusion [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014)]. Finally, we weigh the potentially dramatic benefits of the solid liner dynamic screw pinch against the experimental tradeoffs required to achieve the desired drive field history and identify promising designs for future experimental and computational studies.« less

  17. Controlling Rayleigh-Taylor Instabilities in Magnetically Driven Solid Metal Shells by Means of a Dynamic Screw Pinch

    DOE PAGES

    Schmit, P. F.; Velikovich, A. L.; McBride, R. D.; ...

    2016-11-11

    Magnetically driven implosions of solid metal shells are an effective vehicle to compress materials to extreme pressures and densities. Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities (RTI) are ubiquitous, yet typically undesired features in all such experiments where solid materials are rapidly accelerated to high velocities. In cylindrical shells (“liners”), the magnetic field driving the implosion can exacerbate the RTI. Here, we suggest an approach to implode solid metal liners enabling a remarkable reduction in the growth of magnetized RTI (MRTI) by employing a magnetic drive with a tilted, dynamic polarization, forming a dynamic screw pinch. Our calculations, based on a self-consistent analytic framework, demonstratemore » that the cumulative growth of the most deleterious MRTI modes may be reduced by as much as 1 to 2 orders of magnitude. One key application of this technique is to generate increasingly stable, higher-performance implosions of solid metal liners to achieve fusion [M. R. Gomez et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155003 (2014)]. Finally, we weigh the potentially dramatic benefits of the solid liner dynamic screw pinch against the experimental tradeoffs required to achieve the desired drive field history and identify promising designs for future experimental and computational studies.« less

  18. Games and Diabetes: A Review Investigating Theoretical Frameworks, Evaluation Methodologies, and Opportunities for Design Grounded in Learning Theories.

    PubMed

    Lazem, Shaimaa; Webster, Mary; Holmes, Wayne; Wolf, Motje

    2015-09-02

    Here we review 18 articles that describe the design and evaluation of 1 or more games for diabetes from technical, methodological, and theoretical perspectives. We undertook searches covering the period 2010 to May 2015 in the ACM, IEEE, Journal of Medical Internet Research, Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, and Google Scholar online databases using the keywords "children," "computer games," "diabetes," "games," "type 1," and "type 2" in various Boolean combinations. The review sets out to establish, for future research, an understanding of the current landscape of digital games designed for children with diabetes. We briefly explored the use and impact of well-established learning theories in such games. The most frequently mentioned theoretical frameworks were social cognitive theory and social constructivism. Due to the limitations of the reported evaluation methodologies, little evidence was found to support the strong promise of games for diabetes. Furthermore, we could not establish a relation between design features and the game outcomes. We argue that an in-depth discussion about the extent to which learning theories could and should be manifested in the design decisions is required. © 2015 Diabetes Technology Society.

  19. Impact of grain size evolution on necking and pinch-and-swell formation in calcite layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalholz, Stefan Markus; Duretz, Thibault

    2017-04-01

    The formation of necking zones and the associated formation of pinch-and-swell structure is one form of strain localization in extending, competent layers. Natural pinch-and-swell structure in centimetre-thick calcite layers typically shows a reduction of grain size from swell towards pinch. However, the impact of grain size evolution on necking and pinch-and-swell formation is incompletely understood. We perform zero-dimensional (0D) and 2D thermo-mechanical numerical simulations to quantify the impact of grain size evolution on necking for extension rates between 10-12s^-1and10^-14 s-1 and temperatures around 350°C. For a combination of diffusion and dislocation creep we calculate grain size evolution according to the paleowattmeter (grain size is proportional to mechanical work rate) or the paleopiezometer (grain size is proportional to stress). Numerical results fit two observations: (i) grain size reduction from swells towards pinches, and (ii) dislocation creep dominated deformation in swells and significant contribution of diffusion creep in pinches. Modelled grain size in pinches (10 to 60 μm) and swells (70 to 800 μm) is close to observed grain size in pinches (15 to 27 μm) and in swells (250 to 1500 μm). Grain size evolution has only a minor impact on necking suggesting that grain size evolution is a consequence, and not the cause of necking. Viscous shear heating and grain size evolution had a negligible thermal impact in the simulations.

  20. Magnetoelectric confinement and stabilization of Z pinch in a soft-x-ray Ar(+8) laser.

    PubMed

    Szasz, J; Kiss, M; Santa, I; Szatmari, S; Kukhlevsky, S V

    2013-05-03

    Magnetoelectric confinement and stabilization of the plasma column in a soft-x-ray Ar(+8) laser, which is excited by a capillary Z pinch, via the combined magnetic and electric fields of the gliding surface discharge is experimentally demonstrated. Unlike soft-x-ray lasers excited by the conventional capillary Z pinches, the magnetoelectric confinement and stabilization of plasma do provide the laser operation without using any external preionization circuit.

  1. Using attachment theory to inform the design and delivery of mental health services: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bucci, Sandra; Roberts, Nicola H; Danquah, Adam N; Berry, Katherine

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this review was to propose and describe the design and delivery of an attachment-informed general mental health service. We systematically searched the PsycINFO, MEDLINE, Web of Knowledge, COPAC, CINAHL, and Science Direct databases from 1960 to 2013. We also searched reference lists of relevant papers and directly contacted authors in the field. Literature describing attachment theory and its applicability in designing and delivering general mental health services was synthesized using thematic analysis. Papers published in English, books or chapters in edited books that described applying attachment theory in designing and delivering mental health services for adults and adolescents were included in the review. Of the 1,105 articles identified, 14 met inclusion criteria for the review. Eight key themes, and four subthemes, were extracted and organized to reflect the experience of a service user moving through the mental health system. Key themes extracted were as follows: service policy and evaluation; referrals; assessment and formulation; intervention; support for staff; support for carers; moving on; and potential service benefits. Papers reviewed suggested that service users with severe mental health problems have attachment needs that should be met in general mental health services. Attachment theory provides a useful framework to inform the design and delivery of general mental health services. The resource implications for services are discussed, as are limitations of the review and recommendations for future research. Attachment theory should be used to inform the design and delivery of general mental health services. Mental health services should evaluate the extent to which they meet service users' attachment needs. Attachment-informed mental health services should assess outcomes, including cost-effectiveness over time. Papers included in this review focus on long-stay residential care or secure services and there is a limited experimental

  2. A systematic review of the use of theory in the design of guideline dissemination and implementation strategies and interpretation of the results of rigorous evaluations.

    PubMed

    Davies, Philippa; Walker, Anne E; Grimshaw, Jeremy M

    2010-02-09

    There is growing interest in the use of cognitive, behavioural, and organisational theories in implementation research. However, the extent of use of theory in implementation research is uncertain. We conducted a systematic review of use of theory in 235 rigorous evaluations of guideline dissemination and implementation studies published between 1966 and 1998. Use of theory was classified according to type of use (explicitly theory based, some conceptual basis, and theoretical construct used) and stage of use (choice/design of intervention, process/mediators/moderators, and post hoc/explanation). Fifty-three of 235 studies (22.5%) were judged to have employed theories, including 14 studies that explicitly used theory. The majority of studies (n = 42) used only one theory; the maximum number of theories employed by any study was three. Twenty-five different theories were used. A small number of theories accounted for the majority of theory use including PRECEDE (Predisposing, Reinforcing, and Enabling Constructs in Educational Diagnosis and Evaluation), diffusion of innovations, information overload and social marketing (academic detailing). There was poor justification of choice of intervention and use of theory in implementation research in the identified studies until at least 1998. Future research should explicitly identify the justification for the interventions. Greater use of explicit theory to understand barriers, design interventions, and explore mediating pathways and moderators is needed to advance the science of implementation research.

  3. Biomechanical energy harvesting from human motion: theory, state of the art, design guidelines, and future directions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Biomechanical energy harvesting from human motion presents a promising clean alternative to electrical power supplied by batteries for portable electronic devices and for computerized and motorized prosthetics. We present the theory of energy harvesting from the human body and describe the amount of energy that can be harvested from body heat and from motions of various parts of the body during walking, such as heel strike; ankle, knee, hip, shoulder, and elbow joint motion; and center of mass vertical motion. Methods We evaluated major motions performed during walking and identified the amount of work the body expends and the portion of recoverable energy. During walking, there are phases of the motion at the joints where muscles act as brakes and energy is lost to the surroundings. During those phases of motion, the required braking force or torque can be replaced by an electrical generator, allowing energy to be harvested at the cost of only minimal additional effort. The amount of energy that can be harvested was estimated experimentally and from literature data. Recommendations for future directions are made on the basis of our results in combination with a review of state-of-the-art biomechanical energy harvesting devices and energy conversion methods. Results For a device that uses center of mass motion, the maximum amount of energy that can be harvested is approximately 1 W per kilogram of device weight. For a person weighing 80 kg and walking at approximately 4 km/h, the power generation from the heel strike is approximately 2 W. For a joint-mounted device based on generative braking, the joints generating the most power are the knees (34 W) and the ankles (20 W). Conclusions Our theoretical calculations align well with current device performance data. Our results suggest that the most energy can be harvested from the lower limb joints, but to do so efficiently, an innovative and light-weight mechanical design is needed. We also compared the

  4. Biomechanical energy harvesting from human motion: theory, state of the art, design guidelines, and future directions.

    PubMed

    Riemer, Raziel; Shapiro, Amir

    2011-04-26

    Biomechanical energy harvesting from human motion presents a promising clean alternative to electrical power supplied by batteries for portable electronic devices and for computerized and motorized prosthetics. We present the theory of energy harvesting from the human body and describe the amount of energy that can be harvested from body heat and from motions of various parts of the body during walking, such as heel strike; ankle, knee, hip, shoulder, and elbow joint motion; and center of mass vertical motion. We evaluated major motions performed during walking and identified the amount of work the body expends and the portion of recoverable energy. During walking, there are phases of the motion at the joints where muscles act as brakes and energy is lost to the surroundings. During those phases of motion, the required braking force or torque can be replaced by an electrical generator, allowing energy to be harvested at the cost of only minimal additional effort. The amount of energy that can be harvested was estimated experimentally and from literature data. Recommendations for future directions are made on the basis of our results in combination with a review of state-of-the-art biomechanical energy harvesting devices and energy conversion methods. For a device that uses center of mass motion, the maximum amount of energy that can be harvested is approximately 1 W per kilogram of device weight. For a person weighing 80 kg and walking at approximately 4 km/h, the power generation from the heel strike is approximately 2 W. For a joint-mounted device based on generative braking, the joints generating the most power are the knees (34 W) and the ankles (20 W). Our theoretical calculations align well with current device performance data. Our results suggest that the most energy can be harvested from the lower limb joints, but to do so efficiently, an innovative and light-weight mechanical design is needed. We also compared the option of carrying batteries to the

  5. The demonstration of a theory-based approach to the design of localized patient safety interventions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is evidence of unsafe care in healthcare systems globally. Interventions to implement recommended practice often have modest and variable effects. Ideally, selecting and adapting interventions according to local contexts should enhance effects. However, the means by which this can happen is seldom systematic, based on theory, or made transparent. This work aimed to demonstrate the applicability, feasibility, and acceptability of a theoretical domains framework implementation (TDFI) approach for co-designing patient safety interventions. Methods We worked with three hospitals to support the implementation of evidence-based guidance to reduce the risk of feeding into misplaced nasogastric feeding tubes. Our stepped process, informed by the TDF and key principles from implementation literature, entailed: involving stakeholders; identifying target behaviors; identifying local factors (barriers and levers) affecting behavior change using a TDF-based questionnaire; working with stakeholders to generate specific local strategies to address key barriers; and supporting stakeholders to implement strategies. Exit interviews and audit data collection were undertaken to assess the feasibility and acceptability of this approach. Results Following audit and discussion, implementation teams for each Trust identified the process of checking the positioning of nasogastric tubes prior to feeding as the key behavior to target. Questionnaire results indicated differences in key barriers between organizations. Focus groups generated innovative, generalizable, and adaptable strategies for overcoming barriers, such as awareness events, screensavers, equipment modifications, and interactive learning resources. Exit interviews identified themes relating to the benefits, challenges, and sustainability of this approach. Time trend audit data were collected for 301 patients over an 18-month period for one Trust, suggesting clinically significant improved use of pH and

  6. ZaP-HD: High Energy Density Z-Pinch Plasmas using Sheared Flow Stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golingo, R. P.; Shumlak, U.; Nelson, B. A.; Claveau, E. L.; Doty, S. A.; Forbes, E. G.; Hughes, M. C.; Kim, B.; Ross, M. P.; Weed, J. R.

    2015-11-01

    The ZaP-HD flow Z-pinch project investigates scaling the flow Z-pinch to High Energy Density Plasma, HEDP, conditions by using sheared flow stabilization. ZaP used a single power supply to produce 100 cm long Z-pinches that were quiescent for many radial Alfven times and axial flow-through times. The flow Z-pinch concept provides an approach to achieve HED plasmas, which are dimensionally large and persist for extended durations. The ZaP-HD device replaces the single power supply from ZaP with two separate power supplies to independently control the plasma flow and current in the Z-pinch. Equilibrium is determined by diagnostic measurements of the density with interferometry and digital holography, the plasma flow and temperature with passive spectroscopy, the magnetic field with surface magnetic probes, and plasma emission with optical imaging. The diagnostics fully characterize the plasma from its initiation in the coaxial accelerator, through the pinch, and exhaust from the assembly region. The plasma evolution is modeled with high resolution codes: Mach2, WARPX, and NIMROD. Experimental results and scaling analyses are presented. This work is supported by grants from the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration.

  7. Review of effects of dielectric coatings on electrical exploding wires and Z pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jian; Li, Xingwen; Li, Mo; Li, Yang; Qiu, Aici

    2017-10-01

    As the most powerful x-ray source in the laboratories, the wire array Z pinches have been of great relevance to inertial confinement fusions, laboratory astrophysics, and other high-energy density applications. In order to produce x-ray with greater power and higher efficiency, the dynamics of wire array has been investigated extensively, and various methods have been proposed to improve the implosion quality of the wire array. This review focuses on the experimental and theoretical investigations regarding the effects of the dielectric coatings on electrical exploding wires and Z pinches. Since the early 2000, the electrical wire explosion related to the first stage of the wire array Z pinches has been studied extensively, and the results indicated that the dielectric coatings can significantly increase the joule energy deposition into a wire in the initial stage, and even the corona free explosion of tungsten wires can be achieved. Recently, there is an increasing interest in the dynamics of insulated wire array Z pinches. By applying dielectric coatings, the ablation process is suppressed, the x-ray start time is delayed, and the possibility of multi-peak radiation is decreased. This review is organized by the evolution dynamics of wire array Z pinches, and a broad introduction to relevant scientific concepts and various other applications are presented. According to the current research status, the challenges, opportunities and further developments of Z pinch loads using dielectric coatings are proposed to further promote the researches and their applications.

  8. Current halo structures in high-current plasma experiments: θ-pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matveev, Yu. V.

    2007-03-01

    Experimental data elucidating mechanisms for halo formation in θ-pinch discharges are presented and discussed. The experiments were performed with different gases (H2, D2, He, and Ar) in a theta-pinch device with a porcelain vacuum chamber and an excitation coil 15 cm in diameter and 30 cm in length. The stored energy, the current in the excitation coil, and the current half-period were W = 10 kJ, I = 400 kA, and T/2 = 14 μs, respectively. It is found that the plasma rings (halos) surrounding the pinch core arise as a result of coaxial pinch stratification due to both the excitation of closed currents (inductons) inside the pinch and the radial convergence of the plasma current sheaths produced after the explosion of T-layers formed near the wall in the initial stage of the discharge. It is concluded that halo structures observed in pinches, tokamaks, and other high-current devices used in controlled fusion research have the same nature.

  9. Strength training improves the tri-digit finger-pinch force control of older adults.

    PubMed

    Keogh, Justin W; Morrison, Steve; Barrett, Rod

    2007-08-01

    To investigate the effect of unilateral upper-limb strength training on the finger-pinch force control of older men. Pretest and post-test 6-week intervention study. Exercise science research laboratory. Eleven neurologically fit older men (age range, 70-80y). The strength training group (n=7) trained twice a week for 6 weeks, performing dumbbell bicep curls, wrist flexions, and wrists extensions, while the control group subjects (n=4) maintained their normal activities. Changes in force variability, targeting error, peak power frequency, proportional power, sample entropy, digit force sharing, and coupling relations were assessed during a series of finger-pinch tasks. These tasks involved maintaining a constant or sinusoidal force output at 20% and 40% of each subject's maximum voluntary contraction. All participants performed the finger-pinch tasks with both the preferred and nonpreferred limbs. Analysis of covariance for between-group change scores indicated that the strength training group (trained limb) experienced significantly greater reductions in finger-pinch force variability and targeting error, as well as significantly greater increases in finger-pinch force, sample entropy, bicep curl, and wrist flexion strength than did the control group. A nonspecific upper-limb strength-training program may improve the finger-pinch force control of older men.

  10. Robert M. Gagne's Impact on Instructional Design Theory and Practice of the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richey, Rita C.

    Robert Gagne has been a central figure in the infusion of instructional psychology into the field of instructional technology, and in the creation of the domain of instructional design. Gagne's design principles provide not only a theoretical orientation to an instructional design project, but also have prompted a number of design conventions and…

  11. Small-amplitude magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth in cylindrical liners and Z-pinches imploded in an axial magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velikovich, A. L.; Giuliani, J. L.; Clark, R. W.; Mikitchuk, D.; Kroupp, E.; Maron, Y.; Fisher, A.; Schmit, P. F.

    2014-10-01

    Recent progress in developing the MagLIF approach to pulsed-power driven inertial confinement fusion has stimulated the interest in observation and mitigation of the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability (MRTI) of liners and Z-pinches imploded in an axial magnetic field. Theoretical analysis of these issues is particularly important because direct numerical simulation of the MRTI development is challenging due to intrinsically 3D helical structure of the fastest-growing modes. We review the analytical small-amplitude theory of the MRTI perturbation development and the weakly nonlinear theory of MRTI mode interaction, emphasizing basic physics, opportunity for 3D code verification against exact analytical solutions, and stabilization criteria. The theory is compared to the experimental results obtained at Weizmann Institute with gas-puff Z pinches and on the Z facility at Sandia with solid liners imploded in an axial magnetic field. Work supported by the US DOE/NNSA, and by the US-Israel Binational Science Foundation. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. Development And Characterization Of A Liner-On-Target Injector For Staged Z-Pinch Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenzuela, J. C.; Conti, F.; Krasheninnikov, I.; Narkis, J.; Beg, F.; Wessel, F. J.; Rahman, H. U.

    2016-10-01

    We present the design and optimization of a liner-on-target injector for Staged Z-pinch experiments. The injector is composed of an annular high atomic number (e.g. Ar, Kr) gas-puff and an on-axis plasma gun that delivers the ionized deuterium target. The liner nozzle injector has been carefully studied using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations to produce a highly collimated 1 cm radius gas profile that satisfies the theoretical requirement for best performance on the 1 MA Zebra current driver. The CFD simulations produce density profiles as a function of the nozzle shape and gas. These profiles are initialized in the MHD MACH2 code to find the optimal liner density for a stable, uniform implosion. We use a simple Snowplow model to study the plasma sheath acceleration in a coaxial plasma gun to help us properly design the target injector. We have performed line-integrated density measurements using a CW He-Ne laser to characterize the liner gas and the plasma gun density as a function of time. The measurements are compared with models and calculations and benchmarked accordingly. Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy, DE-AR0000569.

  13. Web 2.0 systems supporting childhood chronic disease management: design guidelines based on information behaviour and social learning theories.

    PubMed

    Ekberg, Joakim; Ericson, Leni; Timpka, Toomas; Eriksson, Henrik; Nordfeldt, Sam; Hanberger, Lena; Ludvigsson, Johnny

    2010-04-01

    Self-directed learning denotes that the individual is in command of what should be learned and why it is important. In this study, guidelines for the design of Web 2.0 systems for supporting diabetic adolescents' every day learning needs are examined in light of theories about information behaviour and social learning. A Web 2.0 system was developed to support a community of practice and social learning structures were created to support building of relations between members on several levels in the community. The features of the system included access to participation in the culture of diabetes management practice, entry to information about the community and about what needs to be learned to be a full practitioner or respected member in the community, and free sharing of information, narratives and experience-based knowledge. After integration with the key elements derived from theories of information behaviour, a preliminary design guideline document was formulated.

  14. Performance of NACA Eight-stage Axial-flow Compressor Designed on the Basis of Airfoil Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinnette, John T; Schey, Oscar W; King, J Austin

    1943-01-01

    The NACA has conducted an investigation to determine the performance that can be obtained from a multistage axial-flow compressor based on airfoil research. A theory was developed; an eight-stage axial-flow compressor was designed, constructed, and tested. The performance of the compressor was determined for speeds from 5000 to 14,000 r.p.m with varying air flow at each speed. Most of the tests were made with air at room temperature. The performance was determined in accordance with the Committee's recommended procedure for testing superchargers. The expected performance was obtained, showing that a multistage compressor of high efficiency can be designed by the application of airfoil theory.

  15. On the use of thick-airfoil theory to design airfoil families in which thickness and lift are varied independently

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barger, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    A method has been developed for designing families of airfoils in which the members of a family have the same basic type of pressure distribution but vary in thickness ratio or lift, or both. Thickness ratio and lift may be prescribed independently. The method which is based on the Theodorsen thick-airfoil theory permits moderate variations from the basic shape on which the family is based.

  16. Conflict Management in Collaborative Engineering Design: Basic Research in Fundamental Theory, Modeling Framework, and Computer Support for Collaborative Engineering Activities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    behaviors are influenced by social interactions, and to how modern IT sys- tems should be designed to support these group technical activities. The...engineering disciplines to behavior, decision, psychology, organization, and the social sciences. “Conflict manage- ment activity in collaborative...Researchers instead began to search for an entirely new paradigm, starting from a theory in social science, to construct a conceptual framework to describe

  17. Lead field theory provides a powerful tool for designing microelectrode array impedance measurements for biological cell detection and observation.

    PubMed

    Böttrich, Marcel; Tanskanen, Jarno M A; Hyttinen, Jari A K

    2017-06-26

    Our aim is to introduce a method to enhance the design process of microelectrode array (MEA) based electric bioimpedance measurement systems for improved detection and viability assessment of living cells and tissues. We propose the application of electromagnetic lead field theory and reciprocity for MEA design and measurement result interpretation. Further, we simulated impedance spectroscopy (IS) with two- and four-electrode setups and a biological cell to illustrate the tool in the assessment of the capabilities of given MEA electrode constellations for detecting cells on or in the vicinity of the microelectrodes. The results show the power of the lead field theory in electromagnetic simulations of cell-microelectrode systems depicting the fundamental differences of two- and four-electrode IS measurement configurations to detect cells. Accordingly, the use in MEA system design is demonstrated by assessing the differences between the two- and four-electrode IS configurations. Further, our results show how cells affect the lead fields in these MEA system, and how we can utilize the differences of the two- and four-electrode setups in cell detection. The COMSOL simulator model is provided freely in public domain as open source. Lead field theory can be successfully applied in MEA design for the IS based assessment of biological cells providing the necessary visualization and insight for MEA design. The proposed method is expected to enhance the design and usability of automated cell and tissue manipulation systems required for bioreactors, which are intended for the automated production of cell and tissue grafts for medical purposes. MEA systems are also intended for toxicology to assess the effects of chemicals on living cells. Our results demonstrate that lead field concept is expected to enhance also the development of such methods and devices.

  18. Negotiating Tensions Between Theory and Design in the Development of Mailings for People Recovering From Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Witteman, Holly O; Presseau, Justin; Nicholas Angl, Emily; Jokhio, Iffat; Schwalm, J D; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Bosiak, Beth; Natarajan, Madhu K; Ivers, Noah M

    2017-03-01

    Taking all recommended secondary prevention cardiac medications and fully participating in a formal cardiac rehabilitation program significantly reduces mortality and morbidity in the year following a heart attack. However, many people who have had a heart attack stop taking some or all of their recommended medications prematurely and many do not complete a formal cardiac rehabilitation program. The objective of our study was to develop a user-centered, theory-based, scalable intervention of printed educational materials to encourage and support people who have had a heart attack to use recommended secondary prevention cardiac treatments. Prior to the design process, we conducted theory-based interviews and surveys with patients who had had a heart attack to identify key determinants of secondary prevention behaviors. Our interdisciplinary research team then partnered with a patient advisor and design firm to undertake an iterative, theory-informed, user-centered design process to operationalize techniques to address these determinants. User-centered design requires considering users' needs, goals, strengths, limitations, context, and intuitive processes; designing prototypes adapted to users accordingly; observing how potential users respond to the prototype; and using those data to refine the design. To accomplish these tasks, we conducted user research to develop personas (archetypes of potential users), developed a preliminary prototype using behavior change theory to map behavior change techniques to identified determinants of medication adherence, and conducted 2 design cycles, testing materials via think-aloud and semistructured interviews with a total of 11 users (10 patients who had experienced a heart attack and 1 caregiver). We recruited participants at a single cardiac clinic using purposive sampling informed by our personas. We recorded sessions with users and extracted key themes from transcripts. We held interdisciplinary team discussions to

  19. Negotiating Tensions Between Theory and Design in the Development of Mailings for People Recovering From Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Presseau, Justin; Nicholas Angl, Emily; Jokhio, Iffat; Schwalm, JD; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Bosiak, Beth; Natarajan, Madhu K; Ivers, Noah M

    2017-01-01

    Background Taking all recommended secondary prevention cardiac medications and fully participating in a formal cardiac rehabilitation program significantly reduces mortality and morbidity in the year following a heart attack. However, many people who have had a heart attack stop taking some or all of their recommended medications prematurely and many do not complete a formal cardiac rehabilitation program. Objective The objective of our study was to develop a user-centered, theory-based, scalable intervention of printed educational materials to encourage and support people who have had a heart attack to use recommended secondary prevention cardiac treatments. Methods Prior to the design process, we conducted theory-based interviews and surveys with patients who had had a heart attack to identify key determinants of secondary prevention behaviors. Our interdisciplinary research team then partnered with a patient advisor and design firm to undertake an iterative, theory-informed, user-centered design process to operationalize techniques to address these determinants. User-centered design requires considering users’ needs, goals, strengths, limitations, context, and intuitive processes; designing prototypes adapted to users accordingly; observing how potential users respond to the prototype; and using those data to refine the design. To accomplish these tasks, we conducted user research to develop personas (archetypes of potential users), developed a preliminary prototype using behavior change theory to map behavior change techniques to identified determinants of medication adherence, and conducted 2 design cycles, testing materials via think-aloud and semistructured interviews with a total of 11 users (10 patients who had experienced a heart attack and 1 caregiver). We recruited participants at a single cardiac clinic using purposive sampling informed by our personas. We recorded sessions with users and extracted key themes from transcripts. We held

  20. When paradigms collide at the road rail interface: evaluation of a sociotechnical systems theory design toolkit for cognitive work analysis.

    PubMed

    Read, Gemma J M; Salmon, Paul M; Lenné, Michael G

    2016-09-01

    The Cognitive Work Analysis Design Toolkit (CWA-DT) is a recently developed approach that provides guidance and tools to assist in applying the outputs of CWA to design processes to incorporate the values and principles of sociotechnical systems theory. In this paper, the CWA-DT is evaluated based on an application to improve safety at rail level crossings. The evaluation considered the extent to which the CWA-DT met pre-defined methodological criteria and aligned with sociotechnical values and principles. Both process and outcome measures were taken based on the ratings of workshop participants and human factors experts. Overall, workshop participants were positive about the process and indicated that it met the methodological criteria and sociotechnical values. However, expert ratings suggested that the CWA-DT achieved only limited success in producing RLX designs that fully aligned with the sociotechnical approach. Discussion about the appropriateness of the sociotechnical approach in a public safety context is provided. Practitioner Summary: Human factors and ergonomics practitioners need evidence of the effectiveness of methods. A design toolkit for cognitive work analysis, incorporating values and principles from sociotechnical systems theory, was applied to create innovative designs for rail level crossings. Evaluation results based on the application are provided and discussed.

  1. The design and analysis of simple low speed flap systems with the aid of linearized theory computer programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Harry W.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose here is to show how two linearized theory computer programs in combination may be used for the design of low speed wing flap systems capable of high levels of aerodynamic efficiency. A fundamental premise of the study is that high levels of aerodynamic performance for flap systems can be achieved only if the flow about the wing remains predominantly attached. Based on this premise, a wing design program is used to provide idealized attached flow camber surfaces from which candidate flap systems may be derived, and, in a following step, a wing evaluation program is used to provide estimates of the aerodynamic performance of the candidate systems. Design strategies and techniques that may be employed are illustrated through a series of examples. Applicability of the numerical methods to the analysis of a representative flap system (although not a system designed by the process described here) is demonstrated in a comparison with experimental data.

  2. Persuasive Design: An Information-Systems Design-Theory Approach to Persuade Employment-Seeking Behavior among People with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Buhairan, Fadi

    2012-01-01

    People with disabilities face a number of societal challenges that influence this vulnerable population to be less interested and motivated to pursue working. According to researchers, persuasive technologies are able to motivate intended users to change a targeted behavior. This study included the design, development, and evaluation of an…

  3. Theories of Learning, Development, and Psychoeducational Design: Origins and Applications in Nonschool Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Henry P.; Lacefield, Warren E.

    1982-01-01

    Psychoeducational design is a powerful technology with roots in experimental psychology and applied learning research in military, industrial, health care, and educational settings. The users of psychoeducational design should understand its historical, social, and philosophical purposes and significance. (FG)

  4. Effective Principles in Designing E-Course in Light of Learning Theories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afifi, Muhammad K.; Alamri, Saad S.

    2014-01-01

    The researchers conducted an exploratory study to determine the design quality of some E-courses delivered via the web to a number of colleagues at the university. Results revealed a number of shortcomings in the design of these courses, mostly due to the absence of effective principles in the design of these E-courses, especially principles of…

  5. The environmental design of children- nature relations: some strands of applicative theory

    Treesearch

    Robin C. Moore

    1977-01-01

    A brief framework for children-environment relations, focused on 8- to 12-year-olds and their natural environment, is based on the principles of maturation and Gestalt therapy. The concepts of "quality" and "place" are discussed. A comprehensive ecological framework is proposed, relating theory to the material resources used in place-making,...

  6. Student Learning in an Electric Circuit Theory Course: Critical Aspects and Task Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carstensen, Anna-Karin; Bernhard, Jonte

    2009-01-01

    Understanding time-dependent responses, such as transients, is important in electric circuit theory and other branches of engineering. However, transient response is considered difficult to learn since familiarity with advanced mathematical tools such as Laplace transforms is required. Here, we analyse and describe a novel learning environment…

  7. Practical Application of Critical Race Theory: A Social Justice Course Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulliam, Rose M.

    2017-01-01

    Social work education aims to prepare students to effectively engage with diverse people and groups. This article presents a practical application of critical race theory (CRT) toward that end. It describes a brief history of curricular approaches to teaching diversity and social justice and examines a few of the challenges with current curricular…

  8. Re-designing Orem's Self-care Theory for Patients with Chronic Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Hasanpour-Dehkordi, Ali; Mohammadi, Nooredin; Nikbakht-Nasrabadi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis is an inflammatory disease which has many adverse effects on patients' life because of its chronic nature. Since Orem's theory of self-care is a grounded theory, the concepts and applications of this theory in patients with chronic hepatitis who have special needs may lead to some challenges. The purpose of this study was to explore self-care in patients with chronic hepatitis. A directed content analysis was used in this qualitative study. Participants were recruited from a metropolitan area. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews. The verbatim transcripts of the participants' interviews were analyzed according to directed content analysis. In this study, four themes, suggested by Orem, were drawn from the data according to directed content analysis. The codes generated from the data were classified into concepts and then the concepts were assigned into these four themes. These themes were needs in the matrix of time and place, self-care agency, need for change in self-care and consequences of hepatitis. The use of Orem's self-care theory cannot meet the need for self-care in hepatitis patients because these patients have vital sexual, respect and belonging, physical, economical, and psychological-behavioral needs, and lack adequate knowledge about self-care. Consequently, the specific self-care model developed in this study helps health professionals identify self-care activities in patients with chronic hepatitis.

  9. Knowledge Management ERP Curriculum Design/Mapping (Theory and Development Tools)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Zane; Hepner, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    This study proposes a knowledge management framework for developing and managing enterprise resource planning (ERP) curriculum within business schools. Both theory and a practical implementation are addressed. The knowledge management (KM) framework has two components which utilize ERP from a big picture curriculum overview and a ground level…

  10. CLASS Challenging Tasks: Using Cognitive Load Theory to Inform the Design of Challenging Mathematical Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, James; Hopkins, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    This paper outlines a seven-step process for developing problem-solving tasks informed by cognitive load theory. Through an example of a task developed for Year 2 students, we show how this approach can be used to produce challenging mathematical tasks that aim to optimise cognitive load for each student.

  11. Designing and Testing a Mathematics Card Game for Teaching and Learning Elementary Group Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galarza, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores the viability and development of the first edition of the researcher's mathematical card game, Groups, as a learning tool for elementary group theory, a topic in abstract algebra. "Groups" was play-tested by six undergraduate students in late 2016 who provided feedback on "Groups" from both utility-centric…

  12. Acquisition Theory and Experimental Design: A Critique of Tomasello and Herron.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Maria-Luise; Eubank, Lynn

    1991-01-01

    Caution should be taken in viewing previous research indicating that negative evidence, a special type of error correction to eliminate overgeneralizations, could be crucial to second-language learning, because the underlying theories adopted for that research possibly could be flawed. (10 references) (CB)

  13. Constructing an Inquiry Orientation from a Learning Theory Perspective: Democratizing Access through Task Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buell, Catherine A.; Greenstein, Steven; Wilstein, Zahava

    2017-01-01

    It is widely accepted in the mathematics education community that pedagogies oriented toward inquiry are aligned with a constructivist theory of learning, and that these pedagogies effectively support students' learning of mathematics. In order to promote such an orientation, we first separate the idea of inquiry from its conception as a…

  14. General Strain Theory as a Basis for the Design of School Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Byongook; Morash, Merry

    2013-01-01

    The research described in this article applies general strain theory to identify possible points of intervention for reducing delinquency of students in two middle schools. Data were collected from 296 youths, and separate negative binomial regression analyses were used to identify predictors of violent, property, and status delinquency. Emotional…

  15. Social Learning Theories--An Important Design Consideration for Geoscience Fieldwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Streule, M. J.; Craig, L. E.

    2016-01-01

    The nature of field trips in geoscience lends them to the application of social learning theories for three key reasons. First, they provide opportunity for meaningful practical experience and promote effective learning afforded by no other educational vehicle in the subject. Second, they are integral for students creating a strong but changing…

  16. Overview of a Linguistic Theory of Design. AI Memo 383A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Mark L.; Goldstein, Ira P.

    The SPADE theory, which uses linguistic formalisms to model the planning and debugging processes of computer programming, was simultaneously developed and tested in three separate contexts--computer uses in education, automatic programming (a traditional artificial intelligence arena), and protocol analysis (the domain of information processing…

  17. The quest for a z-pinch based fusion energy source—a historical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethian, John

    1997-05-01

    Ever since 1958, when Oscar Anderson observed copious neutrons emanating from a "magnetically self-constricted column of deuterium plasma," scientists have attempted to develop the simple linear pinch into a fusion power source. After all, simple calculations show that if one can pass a current of slightly less than 2 million amperes through a stable D-T plasma, then one could achieve not just thermonuclear break-even, but thermonuclear gain. Moreover, several reactor studies have shown that a simple linear pinch could be the basis for a very attractive fusion system. The problem is, of course, that the seemingly simple act of passing 2 MA through a stable pinch has proven to be quite difficult to accomplish. The pinch tends to disrupt due to instabilities, either by the m=0 (sausage) or m=1 (kink) modes. Curtailing the growth of these instabilities has been the primary thrust of z-pinch fusion research, and over the years a wide variety of formation techniques have been tried. The early pinches were driven by relatively slow capacitive discharges and were formed by imploding a plasma column. The advent of fast pulsed power technology brought on a whole new repertoire of formation techniques, including: fast implosions, laser or field-enhanced breakdown in a uniform volume of gas, a discharge inside a small capillary, a frozen deuterium fiber isolated by vacuum, and staged concepts in which one pinch implodes upon another. And although none of these have yet to be successful, some have come tantalizingly close. This paper will review the history of this four-decade long quest for fusion power.

  18. Measurements of hot electrons in the Extrap T1 reversed-field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welander, A.; Bergsåker, H.

    1998-02-01

    The presence of an anisotropic energetic electron population in the edge region is a characteristic feature of reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasmas. In the Extrap T1 RFP, the anisotropic, parallel heat flux in the edge region measured by calorimetry was typically several hundred 0741-3335/40/2/011/img1. To gain more insight into the origin of the hot electron component and to achieve time resolution of the hot electron flow during the discharge, a target probe with a soft x-ray monitor was designed, calibrated and implemented. The x-ray emission from the target was measured with a surface barrier detector covered with a set of different x-ray filters to achieve energy resolution. A calibration in the range 0.5-2 keV electron energy was performed on the same target and detector assembly using a 0741-3335/40/2/011/img2 cathode electron gun. The calibration data are interpolated and extrapolated numerically. A directional asymmetry of more than a factor of 100 for the higher energy electrons is observed. The hot electrons are estimated to constitute 10% of the total electron density at the edge and their energy distribution is approximated by a half-Maxwellian with a temperature slightly higher than the central electron temperature. Scalings with plasma current, as well as correlations with local 0741-3335/40/2/011/img3 measurements and radial dependences, are presented.

  19. Concept design theory and model for multi-use space facilities: Analysis of key system design parameters through variance of mission requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynerson, Charles Martin

    This research has been performed to create concept design and economic feasibility data for space business parks. A space business park is a commercially run multi-use space station facility designed for use by a wide variety of customers. Both space hardware and crew are considered as revenue producing payloads. Examples of commercial markets may include biological and materials research, processing, and production, space tourism habitats, and satellite maintenance and resupply depots. This research develops a design methodology and an analytical tool to create feasible preliminary design information for space business parks. The design tool is validated against a number of real facility designs. Appropriate model variables are adjusted to ensure that statistical approximations are valid for subsequent analyses. The tool is used to analyze the effect of various payload requirements on the size, weight and power of the facility. The approach for the analytical tool was to input potential payloads as simple requirements, such as volume, weight, power, crew size, and endurance. In creating the theory, basic principles are used and combined with parametric estimation of data when necessary. Key system parameters are identified for overall system design. Typical ranges for these key parameters are identified based on real human spaceflight systems. To connect the economics to design, a life-cycle cost model is created based upon facility mass. This rough cost model estimates potential return on investments, initial investment requirements and number of years to return on the initial investment. Example cases are analyzed for both performance and cost driven requirements for space hotels, microgravity processing facilities, and multi-use facilities. In combining both engineering and economic models, a design-to-cost methodology is created for more accurately estimating the commercial viability for multiple space business park markets.

  20. A generalized theory for the design of contraction cones and other low speed ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barger, R. L.; Bowen, J. T.

    1972-01-01

    A generalization of the Tsien method of contraction cone design is described. The design velocity distribution is expressed in such a form that the required high order derivatives can be obtained by recursion rather than by numerical or analytic differentiation. The method is applicable to the design of diffusers and converging-diverging ducts as well as contraction cones. The computer program is described and a FORTRAN listing of the program is provided.