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Sample records for pion final states

  1. Incoherent pion photoproduction on the deuteron with polarization observables. II. Influence of final state rescattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fix, A.; Arenhövel, H.

    2005-12-01

    Incoherent pion photoproduction on the deuteron is studied for photon energies from threshold up to 1 GeV, with special emphasis on polarization observables. The elementary γN→πN amplitude is taken from the MAID model. We investigate the influence of final state interactions on total and semi-exclusive cross sections d→(γ→,π)NN by including complete rescattering in the final NN and πN subsystems. For charged-pion production the influence of NN rescattering is moderate whereas πN rescattering is almost negligible. Much stronger influences of NN rescattering are seen in neutral-pion production, which are due to the elimination of a significant spurious coherent contribution in the impulse approximation. Sizable effects are also found in some of the beam, target, and beam-target asymmetries of the differential cross section.

  2. Final state interactions and the transverse structure of the pion using non-perturbative eikonal methods

    SciTech Connect

    Gamberg, Leonard; Schlegel, Marc

    2010-01-18

    In the factorized picture of semi-inclusive hadronic processes the naive time reversal-odd parton distributions exist by virtue of the gauge link which renders it color gauge invariant. The link characterizes the dynamical effect of initial/final-state interactions of the active parton due soft gluon exchanges with the target remnant. Though these interactions are non-perturbative, studies of final-state interaction have been approximated by perturbative one-gluon approximation in Abelian models. We include higher-order contributions by applying non-perturbative eikonal methods incorporating color degrees of freedom in a calculation of the Boer-Mulders function of the pion. Lastly, using this framework we explore under what conditions the Boer Mulders function can be described in terms of factorization of final state interactions and a spatial distribution in impact parameter space.

  3. Final state interactions and the transverse structure of the pion using non-perturbative eikonal methods

    DOE PAGES

    Gamberg, Leonard; Schlegel, Marc

    2010-01-18

    In the factorized picture of semi-inclusive hadronic processes the naive time reversal-odd parton distributions exist by virtue of the gauge link which renders it color gauge invariant. The link characterizes the dynamical effect of initial/final-state interactions of the active parton due soft gluon exchanges with the target remnant. Though these interactions are non-perturbative, studies of final-state interaction have been approximated by perturbative one-gluon approximation in Abelian models. We include higher-order contributions by applying non-perturbative eikonal methods incorporating color degrees of freedom in a calculation of the Boer-Mulders function of the pion. Lastly, using this framework we explore under what conditionsmore » the Boer Mulders function can be described in terms of factorization of final state interactions and a spatial distribution in impact parameter space.« less

  4. Characterization of Final State Interaction Strength in Plastic Scintillator by Muon-Neutrino Charged Current Charged Pion Production

    SciTech Connect

    Eberly, Brandon M.

    2014-01-01

    Precise knowledge of neutrino-nucleus interactions is increasingly important as neutrino oscillation measurements transition into the systematics-limited era. In addition to modifying the initial interaction, the nuclear medium can scatter and absorb the interaction by-products through final state interactions, changing the types and kinematic distributions of particles seen by the detector. Recent neutrino pion production data from MiniBooNE is inconsistent with the final state interaction strength predicted by models and theoretical calculations, and some models fit best to the MiniBooNE data only after removing final state interactions entirely. This thesis presents a measurement of dσ/dTπ and dσ/dθπ for muon-neutrino charged current charged pion production in the MINER A scintillator tracker. MINER A is a neutrino-nucleus scattering experiment installed in the few-GeV NuMI beam line at Fermilab. The analysis is limited to neutrino energies between 1.5-10 GeV. Dependence on invariant hadronic mass W is studied through two versions of the analysis that impose the limits W < 1.4 GeV and W < 1.8 GeV. The lower limit on W increases compatibility with the MiniBooNE pion data. The shapes of the differential cross sections, which depend strongly on the nature of final state interactions, are compared to Monte Carlo and theoretical predictions. It is shown that the measurements presented in this thesis favor models that contain final state interactions. Additionally, a variety of neutrino-nucleus interaction models are shown to successfully reproduce the thesis measurements, while simultaneously failing to describe the shape of the MiniBooNE data.

  5. Diffractive pion production at COMPASS - First results on 3{pi} final states - neutral mode

    SciTech Connect

    Nerling, Frank

    2010-08-05

    The COMPASS experiment at CERN is designed for light hadron spectroscopy with emphasis on the detection of new states, in particular the search for exotic states and glue-balls. After a short pilot run in 2004 (190 GeV/c negative pion beam, lead target) showing significant production strength for an exotic J{sup PC} = 1{sup -+} state at 1.66 GeV/c{sup 2}, we have collected data with a 190 GeV/c negative charged hadron beam on a proton (liquid hydrogen) and nuclear targets in 2008 and 2009. The spectrometer features good coverage by electromagnetic calorimetry, and our data provide excellent opportunity for simultaneous observation of new states in two different decay modes in the same experiment. The diffractively produced (3{pi}){sup -} system for example can be studied in both modes {pi}{sup -}p{yields}{pi}{sup -{pi}+{pi}-}p and {pi}{sup -}p{yields}{pi}{sup -{pi}0{pi}0}p. Charged and neutral mode rely on completely different parts of the spectrometer. Observing a new state in both modes provides important crosscheck. First results of a preliminary PWA performed on the 2008 data are presented.

  6. The interference effects of multi-channel pion-pion scattering contributions to the final states of Ψ- and γ-meson family decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surovtsev, Yu. S.; Bydžovský, P.; Gutsche, T.; Kamiński, R.; Lyubovitskij, V. E.; Nagy, M.

    2016-11-01

    It is shown that the basic shape of dipion mass distributions in the twopion transitions of both charmonia and bottomonia states are explained by an unified mechanism based on the contribution of the ππ, KK¯ and ηη coupled channels including their interference.

  7. Measurement of double-differential muon neutrino charged-current interactions on C8 H8 without pions in the final state using the T2K off-axis beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Andreopoulos, C.; Antonova, M.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Assylbekov, S.; Autiero, D.; Barbi, M.; Barker, G. J.; Barr, G.; Bartet-Friburg, P.; Batkiewicz, M.; Berardi, V.; Berkman, S.; Bhadra, S.; Blondel, A.; Bolognesi, S.; Bordoni, S.; Boyd, S. B.; Brailsford, D.; Bravar, A.; Bronner, C.; Buizza Avanzini, M.; Calland, R. G.; Cao, S.; Caravaca Rodríguez, J.; Cartwright, S. L.; Castillo, R.; Catanesi, M. G.; Cervera, A.; Cherdack, D.; Chikuma, N.; Christodoulou, G.; Clifton, A.; Coleman, J.; Collazuol, G.; Cremonesi, L.; Dabrowska, A.; De Rosa, G.; Dealtry, T.; Denner, P. F.; Dennis, S. R.; Densham, C.; Dewhurst, D.; Di Lodovico, F.; Di Luise, S.; Dolan, S.; Drapier, O.; Duffy, K. E.; Dumarchez, J.; Dytman, S.; Dziewiecki, M.; Emery-Schrenk, S.; Ereditato, A.; Feusels, T.; Finch, A. J.; Fiorentini, G. A.; Friend, M.; Fujii, Y.; Fukuda, D.; Fukuda, Y.; Furmanski, A. P.; Galymov, V.; Garcia, A.; Giffin, S. G.; Giganti, C.; Gizzarelli, F.; Gonin, M.; Grant, N.; Hadley, D. R.; Haegel, L.; Haigh, M. D.; Hamilton, P.; Hansen, D.; Hara, T.; Hartz, M.; Hasegawa, T.; Hastings, N. C.; Hayashino, T.; Hayato, Y.; Helmer, R. L.; Hierholzer, M.; Hillairet, A.; Himmel, A.; Hiraki, T.; Hirota, S.; Hogan, M.; Holeczek, J.; Horikawa, S.; Hosomi, F.; Huang, K.; Ichikawa, A. K.; Ieki, K.; Ikeda, M.; Imber, J.; Insler, J.; Intonti, R. A.; Irvine, T. J.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Iwai, E.; Iwamoto, K.; Izmaylov, A.; Jacob, A.; Jamieson, B.; Jiang, M.; Johnson, S.; Jo, J. H.; Jonsson, P.; Jung, C. K.; Kabirnezhad, M.; Kaboth, A. C.; Kajita, T.; Kakuno, H.; Kameda, J.; Karlen, D.; Karpikov, I.; Katori, T.; Kearns, E.; Khabibullin, M.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kielczewska, D.; Kikawa, T.; Kim, H.; Kim, J.; King, S.; Kisiel, J.; Knight, A.; Knox, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Koch, L.; Koga, T.; Konaka, A.; Kondo, K.; Kopylov, A.; Kormos, L. L.; Korzenev, A.; Koshio, Y.; Kropp, W.; Kudenko, Y.; Kurjata, R.; Kutter, T.; Lagoda, J.; Lamont, I.; Larkin, E.; Lasorak, P.; Laveder, M.; Lawe, M.; Lazos, M.; Lindner, T.; Liptak, Z. J.; Litchfield, R. P.; Li, X.; Longhin, A.; Lopez, J. P.; Ludovici, L.; Lu, X.; Magaletti, L.; Mahn, K.; Malek, M.; Manly, S.; Marino, A. D.; Marteau, J.; Martin, J. F.; Martins, P.; Martynenko, S.; Maruyama, T.; Matveev, V.; Mavrokoridis, K.; Ma, W. Y.; Mazzucato, E.; McCarthy, M.; McCauley, N.; McFarland, K. S.; McGrew, C.; Mefodiev, A.; Mezzetto, M.; Mijakowski, P.; Minamino, A.; Mineev, O.; Mine, S.; Missert, A.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Mueller, Th. A.; Murphy, S.; Myslik, J.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakahata, M.; Nakamura, K. G.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, K. D.; Nakayama, S.; Nakaya, T.; Nakayoshi, K.; Nantais, C.; Nielsen, C.; Nirkko, M.; Nishikawa, K.; Nishimura, Y.; Nowak, J.; O'Keeffe, H. M.; Ohta, R.; Okumura, K.; Okusawa, T.; Oryszczak, W.; Oser, S. M.; Ovsyannikova, T.; Owen, R. A.; Oyama, Y.; Palladino, V.; Palomino, J. L.; Paolone, V.; Patel, N. D.; Pavin, M.; Payne, D.; Perkin, J. D.; Petrov, Y.; Pickard, L.; Pickering, L.; Pinzon Guerra, E. S.; Pistillo, C.; Popov, B.; Posiadala-Zezula, M.; Poutissou, J.-M.; Poutissou, R.; Przewlocki, P.; Quilain, B.; Radicioni, E.; Ratoff, P. N.; Ravonel, M.; Rayner, M. A. M.; Redij, A.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Riccio, C.; Rojas, P.; Rondio, E.; Roth, S.; Rubbia, A.; Rychter, A.; Sacco, R.; Sakashita, K.; Sánchez, F.; Sato, F.; Scantamburlo, E.; Scholberg, K.; Schoppmann, S.; Schwehr, J.; Scott, M.; Seiya, Y.; Sekiguchi, T.; Sekiya, H.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shah, R.; Shaikhiev, A.; Shaker, F.; Shaw, D.; Shiozawa, M.; Shirahige, T.; Short, S.; Smy, M.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Sorel, M.; Southwell, L.; Stamoulis, P.; Steinmann, J.; Stewart, T.; Suda, Y.; Suvorov, S.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, K.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Tacik, R.; Tada, M.; Takahashi, S.; Takeda, A.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, H. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Terhorst, D.; Terri, R.; Thakore, T.; Thompson, L. F.; Tobayama, S.; Toki, W.; Tomura, T.; Touramanis, C.; Tsukamoto, T.; Tzanov, M.; Uchida, Y.; Vacheret, A.; Vagins, M.; Vallari, Z.; Vasseur, G.; Wachala, T.; Wakamatsu, K.; Walter, C. W.; Wark, D.; Warzycha, W.; Wascko, M. O.; Weber, A.; Wendell, R.; Wilkes, R. J.; Wilking, M. J.; Wilkinson, C.; Wilson, J. R.; Wilson, R. J.; Yamada, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yano, T.; Yen, S.; Yershov, N.; Yokoyama, M.; Yoshida, K.; Yuan, T.; Yu, M.; Zalewska, A.; Zalipska, J.; Zambelli, L.; Zaremba, K.; Ziembicki, M.; Zimmerman, E. D.; Zito, M.; Żmuda, J.; T2K Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    We report the measurement of muon neutrino charged-current interactions on carbon without pions in the final state at the T2K beam energy using 5.734 ×1020 protons on target. For the first time the measurement is reported as a flux-integrated, double-differential cross section in muon kinematic variables (cos θμ, pμ), without correcting for events where a pion is produced and then absorbed by final state interactions. Two analyses are performed with different selections, background evaluations and cross-section extraction methods to demonstrate the robustness of the results against biases due to model-dependent assumptions. The measurements compare favorably with recent models which include nucleon-nucleon correlations but, given the present precision, the measurement does not distinguish among the available models. The data also agree with Monte Carlo simulations which use effective parameters that are tuned to external data to describe the nuclear effects. The total cross section in the full phase space is σ =(0.417 ±0.047 (syst ) ±0.005 (stat ) )×10-38 cm2 nucleon-1 and the cross section integrated in the region of phase space with largest efficiency and best signal-over-background ratio (cos θμ>0.6 and pμ>200 MeV ) is σ =(0.202 ±0.036 (syst ) ±0.003 (stat ) )×10-38 cm2 nucleon-1 .

  8. Study of Branching Fractions and CP-Violating Asymmetries in B Meson Decays to Rho And Pion Final State with the BABAR Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jinwei; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2006-03-22

    strong phase shift parameters respectively, we obtain {Delta}C = 0.15 {+-} 0.11 {+-} 0.03 and {Delta}S = 0.22 {+-} 0.15 {+-} 0.03. For the angle {alpha} of the Unitarity Triangle we measure (113{sub -17}{sup +27} {+-} 6){sup o}; only a weak constraint is achieved at the significance level of more than two standard deviations. Finally, for the relative strong phase {delta}{sub +-} between the B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} transitions we find (-67{sub -31}{sup +28} {+-} 7){sup o}, with a similarly weak constraint at two standard deviations and beyond.

  9. Pion exchange at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, L.M.

    1980-07-01

    The state of Regge pion exchange calculations for high-energy reactions is reviewed. Experimental evidence is summarized to show that (i) the pion trajectory has a slope similar to that of other trajectories; (ii) the pion exchange contribution can dominate contributions of higher trajectories up to quite a large energy; (iii) many two-body cross sections with large pion contributions can be fit only by models which allow for kinematical conspiracy at t=0. The theory of kinematic conspiracy is reviewed for two-body amplitudes, and calculations of the conspiring pion--Pomeron cut discussed. The author then summarizes recent work on pion exchange in Reggeized Deck models for multiparticle final states, with emphasis on the predictions of various models (with and without resonances) for phases of the partial wave amplitudes.

  10. Experiments on the nuclear interactions of pion and electrons. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Minehart, R.C.

    1998-05-01

    The work in this report is grouped into four categories. (1) The experiments in pion nucleus physics were primarily studies of pion absorption and scattering in light nuclei, carried out at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). (2) The experiments on fundamental particle properties were carried out at LAMPF and at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland, the pion-beta decay experiment is still under construction and will begin taking data in 1999. (3) The experiments in electro-nuclear physics were performed at the Stanford Linear Electron Accelerator (SLAC), at the Saclay Laboratory in France, at the LEGS facility at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, and at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at the Jefferson Laboratory. These experiments relate mainly to the question of the role of longitudinal and transverse strength for inelastic scattering from nuclei, measurements of fundamental nuclear properties with tagged polarized photons, and to the quark structure of the nucleon and its excited states. (4) Experiments on absorption of antiprotons in heavy nuclei, were carried out by K. Ziock primarily while on a sabbatical leave in Munich, Germany.

  11. Galilean Invariance and Pion Production with Excitation of Giant Dipole States.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Hing Wah

    1982-03-01

    The role of Galilean invariance in a nonrelativistic theory of pion production is examined. A nonrelativistic pion-nuclear interaction H(,(pi)N)('eff) is one which in perturbation theory gives the same matrix element for a physical reaction as the limit of small nuclear velocities of the relativistic matrix element. The latter matric elements are always Galilean invariant, but this does not require that H(,(pi)N)('eff) be Galilean invariant. If a pion is emitted or absorbed by a nucleon moving in a potential, then the Galilean correction term can be shown to be ambiguously of order v/c or of order v('2)/c('2). It is shown that H(,(pi)N)('eff) cannot always reproduce the nonrelativistic limit of a relativistic matrix. It is suggested that pion production by nucleons on nuclei with excitation of giant dipole and quadrapole states may be particularly sensitive to the presence of a Galilean correction term in the production matrix. A DWBA two nucleon mode (TNM) s-wave pion production model is developed to investigate the sensitivity of the Galilean correction term. The TNM pion production process includes pion production by one nucleon, using the Galilean invariant pion production interaction, with the pion rescattered by the second nucleon. The TNM model employs a finite range approximation. The finite range approximation assumes that the contribution to the matrix element is small when the distance between the two involved nucleons is large. The pion production reaction ('12)C(p,(pi)('+))('13C)(,g.d.), with excitation of the giant dipole state, thought to be a good candidate for an experimental investigation of the sensitivity of the Galilean correction term, is investigated. The calculated cross sections are 0.4 nb/sr and 0.13 nb/sr, respectively, at the forward angle with and without the contribution from the Galilean correction term. The smallness of these values is primarily due to the vanishing of the contribution from a diagram having a large coupling

  12. Cross-Section Parameterizations for Pion and Nucleon Production From Negative Pion-Proton Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Norman, Ryan; Tripathi, R. K.

    2002-01-01

    Ranft has provided parameterizations of Lorentz invariant differential cross sections for pion and nucleon production in pion-proton collisions that are compared to some recent data. The Ranft parameterizations are then numerically integrated to form spectral and total cross sections. These numerical integrations are further parameterized to provide formula for spectral and total cross sections suitable for use in radiation transport codes. The reactions analyzed are for charged pions in the initial state and both charged and neutral pions in the final state.

  13. Pion interference correlations in pion-nucleus collisions at 10. 5 GeV/c

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, R.

    1983-01-01

    Inclusive reactions of pion, Ne collisions at 10.5 GeV/c have been studied. The pion intensity interference effect has been observed in identical pion (..pi../sup +/, ..pi../sup -/, and ..pi../sup -/, ..pi../sup -/) as well as non-identical (..pi../sup +/, ..pi../sup -/) pion pair correlations. A momentum dependence is observed in the interference correlation function at small momentum differences. Previously only the identical pion interference correlations have been reported. In this thesis, the non-identical pion pair correlation is also studied. The momentum dependence is also new. For (..pi../sup -/,..pi../sup +/) and (..pi../sup -/,..pi../sup -/) pairs, the enhancement is due mostly to pions with mom/sup */>600 MeV/c. However for (..pi../sup +/, ..pi../sup +/) pairs, the peak is due primarily to pions with mom<200 MeV/c. Using the method of Kopylov and Podgoretsky the identical pion source region is determined to be 4.1 +/- 2.3 fermis. Also the influence on the final state correlations by the Bose statistics, Coulomb, and nuclear forces is observed. The possibility of using the (..pi../sup +/,..pi../sup -/) pion pair correlations to examine the pions produced in the quark-gluon perturbative vacuum of high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions is suggested.

  14. Charged pion production in $\

    SciTech Connect

    Eberly, B.; et al.

    2015-11-23

    Charged pion production via charged-current νμ interactions on plastic scintillator (CH) is studied using the MINERvA detector exposed to the NuMI wideband neutrino beam at Fermilab. Events with hadronic invariant mass W < 1.4 GeV and W < 1.8 GeV are selected in separate analyses: the lower W cut isolates single pion production, which is expected to occur primarily through the Δ(1232) resonance, while results from the higher cut include the effects of higher resonances. Cross sections as functions of pion angle and kinetic energy are compared to predictions from theoretical calculations and generator-based models for neutrinos ranging in energy from 1.5–10 GeV. The data are best described by calculations which include significant contributions from pion intranuclear rescattering. As a result, these measurements constrain the primary interaction rate and the role of final state interactions in pion production, both of which need to be well understood by neutrino oscillation experiments.

  15. Charged pion production in $$\

    DOE PAGES

    Eberly, B.; et al.

    2015-11-23

    Charged pion production via charged-current νμ interactions on plastic scintillator (CH) is studied using the MINERvA detector exposed to the NuMI wideband neutrino beam at Fermilab. Events with hadronic invariant mass W < 1.4 GeV and W < 1.8 GeV are selected in separate analyses: the lower W cut isolates single pion production, which is expected to occur primarily through the Δ(1232) resonance, while results from the higher cut include the effects of higher resonances. Cross sections as functions of pion angle and kinetic energy are compared to predictions from theoretical calculations and generator-based models for neutrinos ranging in energymore » from 1.5–10 GeV. The data are best described by calculations which include significant contributions from pion intranuclear rescattering. As a result, these measurements constrain the primary interaction rate and the role of final state interactions in pion production, both of which need to be well understood by neutrino oscillation experiments.« less

  16. Search for deeply bound pionic states in 208Pb via radiative atomic capture of negative pions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raywood, K. J.; Lange, J. B.; Jones, G.; Pavan, M.; Sevior, M. E.; Hutcheon, D. A.; Olin, A.; Ottewell, D.; Yen, S.; Lee, S. J.; Sim, K. S.; Altman, A.; Friedman, E.; Trudel, A.

    1997-05-01

    A search for narrow, deeply bound pionic atom states via atomic radiative capture of negative pions in a target of 208Pb was carried out for pion kinetic energies of 20 and 25 MeV. Although no clear signature of any such gamma ray emission could be observed in the data, fits of the gamma ray spectra between the energies of 12 and 42 MeV involving a quadratic background together with a pair of peaks (1s, 2p) whose relative intensity was taken from theory yielded an overall strength for the peaks which are consistent (to a 67% confidence level) with radiative capture whose integrated cross section is 20.0 +/- 10.0 μb/sr at 90° for 20 MeV incident pions. A lower probability (40% confidence level) result was obtained when the fit was carried out without the peaks included, just the continuum background.

  17. Inelastic pion scattering to 2 1+ states of pre12C and 28Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amos, K.; Berge, L.

    1983-08-01

    Large basis, microscopic models of nuclear structure have been used to specify the “collective” form factors for inelastic scattering to the 2 1+ states in 12C and 28Si. They have been used in a Distorted Wave Impulse Approximation, with π-nucleon t-matrices fixed by elastic scattering analyses, to fit inelastic pion scattering data.

  18. Pion scattering to 8/sup -/ stretched states in /sup 60/Ni

    SciTech Connect

    Clausen, B.L.

    1988-03-01

    Using the Energetic Pion Channel and Spectrometer at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility, differential cross sections for pion scattering were measured for ten previously known J/sup ..pi../ = 8/sup /minus// stretched states in /sup 60/Ni. A possible new pure isoscalar stretched state was also found. The data were taken near the /DELTA//sub 3,3/-resonance using 162 MeV incident pions and scattering angles of 65/degree/, 80/degree/, and 90/degree/ for ..pi../sup +/ and 65/degree/ and 80/degree/ for ..pi../sup /minus//. The analysis of the /sup 60/Ni data found that the use of Woods-Saxon wave functions in the theoretical calculations gave much better agreement with data than the use of the usual harmonic oscillator wave functions. The WS theory gave better predictions of: the angle at which the ..pi../sup /minus// and ..pi../sup +/ angular distributions are maximum, the ratios of ..pi../sup /minus// to ..pi../sup +/ cross sections for pure isovector states (which were much larger than unity), and the absolute size of the cross sections for all states (so that the normalization factor necessary to arrive at agreement of theory with data was closer to unity). The theoretical calculations used the distorted wave impulse approximation, including new methods for unbound states. The sensitivities of the calculations to input parameters were investigated. This analysis using WS wave functions was extended to five other nuclei (/sup 12/C, /sup 14/C, /sup 16/O, /sup 28/Si, and /sup 54/Fe) on which both pion scattering and electron scattering have been done. A significant improvement in arriving at a normalization factor close to unity was found when WS wave functions were consistently used for analyzing both pion and electron inelastic scattering data. 101 refs., 26 figs., 13 tabs.

  19. Antiproton-proton annihilation into collinear charged pions and kaons

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, S.; Amsler, C.; Armenteros, R.; Auld, E.; Axen, D.; Bailey, D.; Barlag, S.; Beer, G.; Bizot, J.h.; Botlo, M.; and others

    1986-10-15

    AN analysis is presented of two body final states of collinear charged pions or kaons from antiproton-proton annihilation at rest in the ASTERIX spectrometer at LEAR. The relative branching ratio of kaons to pions, which is sensitive to the dynamics of quark-antiquark annihilation and rearrangement, is shown to differ for P and S wave initial states.

  20. Matrix elements of the electromagnetic operator between kaon and pion states

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, I.; Lubicz, V.; Martinelli, G.; Orifici, L.; Simula, S.

    2011-10-01

    We compute the matrix elements of the electromagnetic operator sF{sub {mu}{nu}}{sigma}{sup {mu}{nu}}d between kaon and pion states, using lattice QCD with maximally twisted-mass fermions and two flavors of dynamical quarks (N{sub f}=2). The operator is renormalized nonperturbatively in the RI'/MOM scheme and our simulations cover pion masses as light as 270 MeV and three values of the lattice spacing from {approx_equal}0.07 up to {approx_equal}0.1 fm. At the physical point our result for the corresponding tensor form factor at zero-momentum transfer is f{sub T}{sup K{pi}}(0)=0.417(14{sub stat})(5{sub syst}), where the systematic error does not include the effect of quenching the strange and charm quarks. Our result differs significantly from the old quenched result f{sub T}{sup K{pi}}(0)=0.78(6) obtained by the SPQ{sub cd}R Collaboration with pion masses above 500 MeV. We investigate the source of this difference and conclude that it is mainly related to the chiral extrapolation. We also study the tensor charge of the pion and obtain the value f{sub T}{sup {pi}{pi}}(0)=0.195(8{sub stat})(6{sub syst}) in good agreement with, but more accurate than the result f{sub T}{sup {pi}{pi}}(0)=0.216(34) obtained by the QCDSF Collaboration using higher pion masses.

  1. GENIE final state interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Dytman, Steven

    2015-10-15

    Final state interactions are an important component of any neutrino-nucleus Monte Carlo program. GENIE has 2 FSI programs which serve different purposes. Each has fair-good agreement with a wide range of hadron-nucleus data. Recent improvements and planned advancements are described.

  2. Pions in and out of equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Gavin, S.

    1991-12-01

    Can final state scattering wrestle the secondaries in nucleus-nucleus collisions into a fluid state near local thermal equilibrium What do the pion p{sub T} spectra measured in pp, pA and SPS light ion experiments already tell us about the approach to equilibrium To begin to address these questions, we must face the nonequilibrium nature of hadronic evolution in the late stages of these collisions. I will outline efforts to apply transport theory to the nonequilibrium pion fluid at midrapidity focusing on two phenomena: partial thermalization and pion conservation.

  3. Pions in and out of equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Gavin, S.

    1991-12-01

    Can final state scattering wrestle the secondaries in nucleus-nucleus collisions into a fluid state near local thermal equilibrium? What do the pion p{sub T} spectra measured in pp, pA and SPS light ion experiments already tell us about the approach to equilibrium? To begin to address these questions, we must face the nonequilibrium nature of hadronic evolution in the late stages of these collisions. I will outline efforts to apply transport theory to the nonequilibrium pion fluid at midrapidity focusing on two phenomena: partial thermalization and pion conservation.

  4. Single Pion production from Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S. K.; Athar, M. Sajjad; Ahmed, S.

    2007-12-21

    We have studied charged current one pion production induced by {nu}{sub {mu}}({nu}-bar{sub {mu}}) from some nuclei. The calculations have been done for the incoherent pion production processes from these nuclear targets in the {delta} dominance model and take into account the effect of Pauli blocking, Fermi motion and renormalization of {delta} properties in the nuclear medium. The effect of final state interactions of pions has also been taken into account. The numerical results have been compared with the recent results from the MiniBooNE experiment for the charged current 1{pi} production, and also with some of the older experiments in Freon and Freon-Propane from CERN.

  5. Pion Inelastic Scattering to the First Three Excited States of Lithium-6.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    extremely useful hadronic probe due to resulting theoretical simplifications in the analysis of pion- nucleus scattering data, and the ability to perform... hadronic probe such as the proton. (2) The pion possesses spin zero. As a boson, it can be absorbed by clusters of nucleons in the nucleus , and pion...treatment of pion- nucleus scattering as is the case for other hadronic probes such as protons and alpha particles. (4) Lastly, the total w+p and r-p cross

  6. Limiting temperature of pion gas with the van der Waals equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poberezhnyuk, R. V.; Vovchenko, V.; Anchishkin, D. V.; Gorenstein, M. I.

    2016-09-01

    The grand canonical ensemble formulation of the van der Waals equation of state that includes the effects of Bose statistics is applied to the equilibrium system of interacting pions. If the attractive interaction between pions is large enough, a limiting temperature T 0 emerges, i.e., no thermodynamical equilibrium is possible at T\\gt {T}0. The system pressure p, particle number density n, and energy density ε remain finite at T={T}0, whereas for T near T 0 both the specific heat C={{d}}\\varepsilon /{{d}}T and the scaled variance of particle number fluctuations ω [N] are proportional to {({T}0-T)}-1/2 and, thus, go to infinity at T\\to {T}0. The limiting temperature also corresponds to the softest point of the equation of state, i.e., the speed of sound squared {c}s2={{d}}p/{{d}}\\varepsilon goes to zero as {({T}0-T)}1/2. Very similar thermodynamical behavior takes place in the Hagedorn model for the special choice of a power, namely {m}-4, in the pre-exponential factor of the mass spectrum ρ (m).

  7. Scrutinizing the pion condensed phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carignano, Stefano; Lepori, Luca; Mammarella, Andrea; Mannarelli, Massimo; Pagliaroli, Giulia

    2017-02-01

    When the isospin chemical potential exceeds the pion mass, charged pions condense in the zero-momentum state forming a superfluid. Chiral perturbation theory provides a very powerful tool for studying this phase. However, the formalism that is usually employed in this context does not clarify various aspects of the condensation mechanism and makes the identification of the soft modes problematic. We re-examine the pion condensed phase using different approaches within the chiral perturbation theory framework. As a first step, we perform a low-density expansion of the chiral Lagrangian valid close to the onset of the Bose-Einstein condensation. We obtain an effective theory that can be mapped to a Gross-Pitaevskii Lagrangian in which, remarkably, all the coefficients depend on the isospin chemical potential. The low-density expansion becomes unreliable deep in the pion condensed phase. For this reason, we develop an alternative field expansion deriving a low-energy Lagrangian analog to that of quantum magnets. By integrating out the "radial" fluctuations we obtain a soft Lagrangian in terms of the Nambu-Goldstone bosons arising from the breaking of the pion number symmetry. Finally, we test the robustness of the second-order transition between the normal and the pion condensed phase when next-to-leading-order chiral corrections are included. We determine the range of parameters for turning the second-order phase transition into a first-order one, finding that the currently accepted values of these corrections are unlikely to change the order of the phase transition.

  8. Pion-photon reactions and chiral dynamics in Primakoff processes at COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, Jan Michael

    2016-01-22

    With the COMPASS experiment at CERN, pion-photon reactions are investigated via the Primakoff effect, implying that high-energetic pions react with the quasi-real photon field surrounding the target nuclei. The production of a single hard photon in such a pion scattering at lowest momentum transfer to the nucleus is related to pion Compton scattering. From the measured cross-section shape, the pion polarisability is determined. The COMPASS measurement is in contradiction to the earlier dedicated measurements, and rather in agreement with the theoretical expectation from chiral perturbation theory. In the same data taking, reactions with neutral and charged pions in the final state are measured and analyzed. At low energy in the pion-photon centre-of-momentum system, these reactions are governed by chiral dynamics and contain information relevant for chiral perturbation theory. At higher energies, resonances are produced and their radiative coupling is investigated.

  9. Effect of three-pion unitarity on resonance poles from heavy meson decays

    SciTech Connect

    Satoshi X. Nakamura

    2011-10-01

    We study the final state interaction in 3-pion decay of meson resonances at the Excited Baryon Analysis Center (EBAC) of JLab. We apply the dynamical coupled-channels formulation which has been extensively used by EBAC to extract N* information. The formulation satisfies the 3-pion unitarity condition which has been missed in the existing works with the isobar models. We report the effect of the 3-pion unitarity on the meson resonance pole positions and Dalitz plot.

  10. Final State Interactions Effects in Neutrino-Nucleus Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Golan, Tomasz; Juszczak, Cezary; Sobczyk, Jan T.

    2012-07-01

    Final State Interactions effects are discussed in the context of Monte Carlo simulations of neutrino-nucleus interactions. A role of Formation Time is explained and several models describing this effect are compared. Various observables which are sensitive to FSI effects are reviewed including pion-nucleus interaction and hadron yields in backward hemisphere. NuWro Monte Carlo neutrino event generator is described and its ability to understand neutral current $\\pi^0$ production data in $\\sim 1$ GeV neutrino flux experiments is demonstrated.

  11. Pion production in high-energy neutrino reactions with nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosel, U.

    2015-06-01

    Background: A quantitative understanding of neutrino interactions with nuclei is needed for precision era neutrino long baseline experiments (MINOS, NOvA, DUNE) which all use nuclear targets. Pion production is the dominant reaction channel at the energies of these experiments. Purpose: Investigate the influence of nuclear effects on neutrino-induced pion production cross sections and compare predictions for pion-production with available data. Method: The Giessen Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (GiBUU) model is used for the description of all incoherent channels in neutrino-nucleus reactions. Results: Differential cross sections for charged and neutral pion production for the MINER ν A neutrino and antineutrino flux are calculated. An estimate for the coherent cross section is obtained from a comparison of data with theoretical results for incoherent cross sections. The invariant mass (W ) distribution of the Δ resonances produced is analyzed. Conclusions: Final state interactions affect the pion kinetic energy spectra significantly. The data for charged pion production at MINER ν A are compatible with the results of calculations using elementary data taken from an old Argonne National Laboratory experiment. Remaining differences for charged pion production can be attributed to coherent production; the data for antineutrino induced neutral pion production, where no coherent contribution is present, are reproduced quite well. The analysis of W distributions shows that sharp cuts on experimentally reconstructed invariant masses lead to shape distortions of the true W distributions for nuclear targets.

  12. Search for an admixture of heavy neutrino states in pion decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abela, R.; Daum, M.; Eaton, G. H.; Frosch, R.; Jost, B.; Kettle, P.-R.; Steiner, E.

    1981-10-01

    We have measured the muon energy spectrum in pion decay at rest, in order to search for a small fraction η of pion decays in which a heavy neutrino νH would be emitted. The upper limit of η has been lowered considerably in the range 5 MeV/ c2 ⩽ mνH ⩽ 30 MeV/ c2.

  13. Research program in nuclear and solid state physics. [including pion absorption spectra and muon spin precession

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The survey of negative pion absorption reactions on light and medium nuclei was continued. Muon spin precession was studied using an iron target. An impulse approximation model of the pion absorption process implied that the ion will absorb almost exclusively on nucleon pairs, single nucleon absorption being suppressed by energy and momentum conservation requirements. For measurements on both paramagnetic and ferromagnetic iron, the external magnetic field was supplied by a large C-type electromagnet carrying a current of about 100 amperes.

  14. Pion yields and the nature of kaon-pion ratios in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisons: models versus measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; De, B.; Guptaroy, P.

    2001-08-01

    The pion densities and the nature of kaon-pion ratios offer two very prominent and crucial physical observables on which sufficient data for heavy nucleus collisions, to date, are available. In the light of two models - one purely phenomenological and the other with a sound dynamical basis - we would try to examine here the state of agreement between calculations and experimental results obtainable from the past and the latest measurements. Impact and implications of all these would also finally be spelt out.

  15. Auxiliary field GFMC calculation on the possibility of a pion condensate state of neutron matter at high densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouadani, Mohamed

    2007-10-01

    For a long time, theory has speculated on the possibility of a pion condensate phase for highly dense nuclear matter, in particular for neutron matter. Almost all calculations have been based on a mean field approach. The first known calculation using a realistic hamiltonian is the FHNC/SOC of Akmal-Pandharipande. There, the computation was only indirect in showing that at enough density and wavelength there seem to be a favorable high dense phase of matter inferred by the linear response study showing a pion excess which was ``reasonably'' attributed to the pion condensate state. The aim of the present work is to calculate the energy expectation for a liquid phase boxed-plane-wave function and a varied field-modulated wave function in the longitudinal direction of the box with plane wave orbitals in the transverse plane as suggested by the tensor interaction. The calculation is based on the fixed phase constrained auxiliary field GFMC method with potential the Argonne v^8' and the urbana UIX three body interaction. The energy calculations and distribution statistics show that the potential gain overwhelms reasonably the kinetic increase for the one dimensional laminated structured wave-function reaching a maximum at 3.5 fm for ρ/ρo 5. More importantly, our results show continuous variations with the defining parameters. The phase transition seems of the second order kind.

  16. Inelastic final-state interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Mahiko

    2008-03-01

    The final-state interaction in multichannel decay processes is systematically studied in the hadronic picture with application to B decay in mind. Since the final-state interaction is intrinsically interwoven with the decay interaction in this case, no simple phase theorem like ''Watson's theorem'' holds for experimentally observed final states. We first solve exactly the two-channel problem as a toy model in order to clarify the issues. The constraints of the two-channel approximation turns out to be too stringent for most B decay modes, but realistic multichannel problems are too complex for useful quantitative analysis at present. To alleviate the stringent constraints of the two-body problem and to cope with complexity beyond it, we introduce a method of approximation that is applicable to the case where one prominent inelastic channel dominates over all others. We illustrate this approximation method with the amplitude of the decay B{yields}K{pi} fed by the intermediate states of a charmed-meson pair. Even with our approximation we need more accurate information of strong interactions than we have now. Nonetheless we are able to obtain some insight in the issue and draw useful conclusions on general features on the strong phases.

  17. Inelastic final-state interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Mahiko

    2008-03-01

    The final-state interaction in multichannel decay processes is systematically studied in the hadronic picture with application to B decay in mind. Since the final-state interaction is intrinsically interwoven with the decay interaction in this case, no simple phase theorem like “Watson’s theorem” holds for experimentally observed final states. We first solve exactly the two-channel problem as a toy model in order to clarify the issues. The constraints of the two-channel approximation turns out to be too stringent for most B decay modes, but realistic multichannel problems are too complex for useful quantitative analysis at present. To alleviate the stringent constraints of the two-body problem and to cope with complexity beyond it, we introduce a method of approximation that is applicable to the case where one prominent inelastic channel dominates over all others. We illustrate this approximation method with the amplitude of the decay B→Kπ fed by the intermediate states of a charmed-meson pair. Even with our approximation we need more accurate information of strong interactions than we have now. Nonetheless we are able to obtain some insight in the issue and draw useful conclusions on general features on the strong phases.

  18. Inelastic final-state interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Mahiko; Suzuki, Mahiko

    2007-10-29

    The final-state interaction in multichannel decay processes is systematically studied with application to B decay in mind. Since the final-state interaction is intrinsically interwoven with the decay interaction in this case, no simple phase theorem like"Watson's theorem" holds for experimentally observed final states. We first examine in detail the two-channel problem as a toy-model to clarify the issues and to remedy common mistakes made in earlier literature. Realistic multichannel problems are too challenging for quantitative analysis. To cope with mathematical complexity, we introduce a method of approximation that is applicable to the case where one prominent inelastic channel dominates over all others. We illustrate this approximation method in the amplitude of the decay B to pi K fed by the intermediate states of a charmed meson pair. Even with our approximation we need more accurate information of strong interactions than we have now. Nonetheless we are able to obtain some insight in the issue and draw useful conclusions on general features on the strong phases.

  19. Amplitude analysis of resonant production in three pions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackura, Andrew; Mikhasenko, Mikhail; Szczepaniak, Adam

    2016-11-01

    We present some results on the analysis of three pion resonances. The analyses are motivated by the recent release of the largest data set on diffractively produced three pions by the COMPASS collaboration. We construct reaction amplitudes that satisfy fundamental S -matrix principles, which allows the use of models that have physical constraints to be used in fitting data. The models are motivated by the isobar model that satisfy unitarity constraints. The model consist of a Deck production amplitude with which final state interactions are constrained by unitarity. We employ the isobar model where two of the pions form a quasi-stable particle. The analysis is performed in the high-energy, single Regge limit. We specifically discuss the examples of the three pion JPC = 2-+ resonance in the ρπ and f2π channels.

  20. Amplitude analysis of resonant production in three pions

    SciTech Connect

    Jackura, Andrew; Mikhasenko, Mikhail; Szczepaniak, Adam

    2016-11-29

    We present some results on the analysis of three pion resonances. The analyses are motivated by the recent release of the largest data set on diffractively produced three pions by the COMPASS collaboration. We construct reaction amplitudes that satisfy fundamental $S$-matrix principles, which allows the use of models that have physical constraints to be used in fitting data. The models are motivated by the isobar model that satisfy unitarity constraints. The model consist of a Deck production amplitude with which final state interactions are constrained by unitarity. We employ the isobar model where two of the pions form a quasi-stable particle. The analysis is performed in the high-energy, single Regge limit. We specifically discuss the examples of the three pion $J^{PC}=2^{-+}$ resonance in the $\\rho\\pi$ and $f_2\\pi$ channels.

  1. Elliptic flow and fixed p{sub T} suppression in a final state interaction model

    SciTech Connect

    Capella, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.

    2007-02-15

    It has been shown that a final state interaction model, used to describe J/{psi} suppression, can also describe the fixed p{sub T} suppression of the {pi}{sup 0} (and charged pion) yield at all values of p{sub T}, with a final state interaction cross section {sigma} close to one milibarn. We propose an extension of the model to the pion motion in the transverse plane, which introduces a dependence of the suppression on the azimuthal angle {theta}{sub R}. Using the same value of {sigma}, we obtain values of the elliptic flow v{sub 2} close to the experimental ones, for all values of p{sub T}, including the soft-p{sub T} region.

  2. Using a New Smearing Technique to Find Moments of the Quark Distribution Amplitude of the Pion

    SciTech Connect

    H. L. L. Roberts, David Richards, Christopher Thomas

    2011-09-01

    We study the distribution of momentum between valence quarks of the ground state and the first excited state of the pion using Lattice QCD on the anisotropic lattice. Our final goal is to extract the second moment of distribution amplitudes of the ground state and first excited state of the pion for exclusive processes at high momentum transfer. At this stage of the project, we can compute the ground state pion decay constant in a lattice renormalization scheme up to an overall normalization constant.We employ a variational technique that will allow us to determine the decay constant and second moment of the distribution amplitude of the first excited state of the pion also. We use a new smearing technique in order to minimize pollution of the data from higher-lying excited states. The anisotropy of the lattice is a novel feature of our approach, and strongly increases sensitivity to excited states through a better temporal resolution.

  3. Using a New Smearing Technique to Find Moments of the Quark Distribution Amplitude of the Pion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, H. L. L.; Richards, David; Thomas, Christopher

    2011-09-01

    We study the distribution of momentum between valence quarks of the ground state and the first excited state of the pion using Lattice QCD on the anisotropic lattice. Our final goal is to extract the second moment of distribution amplitudes of the ground state and first excited state of the pion for exclusive processes at high momentum transfer. At this stage of the project, we can compute the ground state pion decay constant in a lattice renormalization scheme up to an overall normalization constant. We employ a variational technique that will allow us to determine the decay constant and second moment of the distribution amplitude of the first excited state of the pion also. We use a new smearing technique in order to minimize pollution of the data from higher-lying excited states. The anisotropy of the lattice is a novel feature of our approach, and strongly increases sensitivity to excited states through a better temporal resolution.

  4. Pion distribution amplitude and quasidistributions

    DOE PAGES

    Radyushkin, Anatoly V.

    2017-03-27

    We extend our analysis of quasidistributions onto the pion distribution amplitude. Using the formalism of parton virtuality distribution amplitudes, we establish a connection between the pion transverse momentum dependent distribution amplitude Ψ(x,k2⊥) and the pion quasidistribution amplitude (QDA) Qπ(y,p3). We build models for the QDAs from the virtuality-distribution-amplitude-based models for soft transverse momentum dependent distribution amplitudes, and analyze the p3 dependence of the resulting QDAs. As there are many models claimed to describe the primordial shape of the pion distribution amplitude, we present the p3-evolution patterns for models producing some popular proposals: Chernyak-Zhitnitsky, flat, and asymptotic distribution amplitude. Finally, ourmore » results may be used as a guide for future studies of the pion distribution amplitude on the lattice using the quasidistribution approach.« less

  5. Study of di-pion Bottomonium Transitions and Search for the h_b(1P) State

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-12-09

    We study inclusive di-pion decays using a sample of 108 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(3S) events recorded with the BABAR detector. We search for the decay mode {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}h{sub b} (1P) and find no evidence for the bottomonium spin-singlet state h{sub b}(1P) in the invariant mass distribution recoiling against the {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} system. Assuming the h{sub b}(1P) mass to be 9.900 GeV/c{sup 2}, we measure the upper limit on the branching fraction {Beta}[{Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}h{sub b}(1P)] < 1.2 x 10{sup -4}, at 90% confidence level. We also investigate the {chi}{sub bJ}(2P) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {chi}{sub bJ}(1P), {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{Upsilon}(2S), and {Upsilon}(2S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{Upsilon}(1S) di-pion transitions and present an improved measurement of the branching fraction of the {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{Upsilon}(2S) decay and of the {Upsilon}(3S) - {Upsilon}(2S) mass difference.

  6. Pion production: A probe for coherence in medium-energy heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stachel, J.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Freifelder, R. H.; Paul, P.; Sen, S.; Deyoung, P.; Zhang, P. H.; Awes, T. C.; Obenshain, F. E.; Plasil, F.; Young, G. R.; Fox, R.; Ronningen, R.

    1986-04-01

    The production of neutral pions has been studied in reactions of 35 MeV/nucleon 14N+ 27Al,Ni,W and 25 MeV/nucleon 16O+ 27Al,Ni. Inclusive pion differential distributions dσ/dTπ, dσ/dΩ, dσ/dy, dσ/dp⊥, and d2σ/dy dp⊥ have been measured by detecting the two pion-decay γ rays in a setup of 20 lead glass Cˇerenkov detector telescopes. Special care was taken to understand and suppress background events. Effects of pion reabsorption are discussed and it is found that the cross sections presented here are substantially affected by such final state interactions. The comparatively large experimental cross sections and the shape of the spectral distributions cannot be accounted for in single nucleon-nucleon collision or statistical models; they rather call for a coherent pion production mechanism.

  7. Production and decay of baryonic resonances in pion induced reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przygoda, Witold

    2016-11-01

    Pion induced reactions give unique opportunities for an unambiguous description of baryonic resonances and their coupling channels. A systematic energy scan and high precision data, in conjunction with a partial wave analysis, allow for the study of the excitation function of the various contributions. A review of available world data unravels strong need for modern facilities delivering measurements with a pion beam. Recently, HADES collaboration collected data in pion-induced reactions on light (12C) and heavy (74W) nuclei at a beam momentum of 1.7 GeV/c dedicated to strangeness production. It was followed by a systematic scan at four different pion beam momenta (0.656, 0.69, 0.748 and 0.8 GeV/c) in π- - p reaction in order to tackle the role of N(1520) resonance in conjunction with the intermediate ρ production. First results on exclusive channels with one pion (π- p) and two pions (nπ+π-, pπ-π0) in the final state are discussed.

  8. Neutron star cooling and pion condensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Umeda, Hideyuki; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Tsuruta, Sachiko; Muto, Takumi; Tatsumi, Toshitaka

    1994-01-01

    The nonstandard cooling of a neutron star with the central pion core is explored. By adopting the latest results from the pion condensation theory, neutrino emissivity is calulated for both pure charged pions and a mixture of charged and neutral pions, and the equations of state are constructed for the pion condensate. The effect of superfluidity on cooling is investigated, adopting methods more realistic than in previous studies. Our theoretical models are compared with the currently updated observational data, and possible implications are explored.

  9. Polarized 3He target and Final State Interactions in SiDIS

    DOE PAGES

    Del Dotto, Alessio; Kaptari, Leonid; Pace, Emanuele; ...

    2017-01-03

    Jefferson Lab is starting a wide experimental program aimed at studying the neutron’s structure, with a great emphasis on the extraction of the parton transverse-momentum distributions (TMDs). To this end, Semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (SiDIS) experiments on polarized $^3$He will be carried out, providing, together with proton and deuteron data, a sound flavor decomposition of the TMDs. Here, given the expected high statistical accuracy, it is crucial to disentangle nuclear and partonic degrees of freedom to get an accurate theoretical description of both initial and final states. In this contribution, a preliminary study of the Final State Interaction (FSI) in themore » standard SiDIS, where a pion (or a Kaon) is detected in the final state is presented, in view of constructing a realistic description of the nuclear initial and final states.« less

  10. Polarized ^{\\varvec{3}}He Target and Final State Interactions in SiDIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Dotto, Alessio; Kaptari, Leonid; Pace, Emanuele; Salmè, Giovanni; Scopetta, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    Jefferson Lab is starting a wide experimental program aimed at studying the neutron's structure, with a great emphasis on the extraction of the parton transverse-momentum distributions (TMDs). To this end, Semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (SiDIS) experiments on polarized ^3He will be carried out, providing, together with proton and deuteron data, a sound flavor decomposition of the TMDs. Given the expected high statistical accuracy, it is crucial to disentangle nuclear and partonic degrees of freedom to get an accurate theoretical description of both initial and final states. In this contribution, a preliminary study of the Final State Interaction (FSI) in the standard SiDIS, where a pion (or a Kaon) is detected in the final state is presented, in view of constructing a realistic description of the nuclear initial and final states.

  11. Neutrino induced coherent pion production

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, E.; Nieves, J.; Valverde, M.; Vicente-Vacas, M. J.

    2010-03-30

    We discuss different parameterizations of the C{sub 5}{sup A}(q{sup 2}) NDELTA form factor, fitted to the old Argonne bubble chamber data for pion production by neutrinos, and we use coherent pion production to test their low q{sup 2} behavior. We find moderate effects that will be difficult to observe with the accuracy of present experiments. We also discuss the use of the Rein-Sehgal model for low energy coherent pion production. By comparison to a microscopic calculation, we show the weaknesses some of the approximations in that model that lead to very large cross sections as well as to the wrong shapes for differential ones. Finally we show that models based on the partial conservation of the axial current hypothesis are not fully reliable for differential cross sections that depend on the angle formed by the pion and the incident neutrino.

  12. Entanglement of Quasielastic Scattering and Pion Production

    SciTech Connect

    Mosel, Ulrich; Lalakulich, Olga; Leitner, Tina

    2011-11-23

    The extraction of neutrino oscillation parameters requires the determination of the neutrino energy from observations of the hadronic final state. Here we discuss the difficulties connected with this energy reconstruction for the ongoing experiments MiniBooNE and T2K. We point out that a lower limit to the uncertainty in the reconstructed energy from Fermi motion alone amounts to about 15%. The entanglement of very different elementary processes, in this case quasielastic scattering and pion production, in the actual observables leads to considerably larger errors. We discuss the sensitivity of the energy reconstruction to detection techniques and experimental acceptances. We also calculate the misidentification cross section for electron appearance in the T2K experiment due to neutral pion production.

  13. Comparison of GiBUU calculations with MiniBooNE pion production data

    SciTech Connect

    Lalakulich, O.; Mosel, U.

    2015-05-15

    Background: Neutrino-induced pion production can give important informationon the axial coupling to nucleon resonances. Furthermore, pion production represents a major background to quasielastic-like events. one pion production data from the MiniBooNE in charged current neutrino scattering in mineral oil appeared higher than expected within conventional theoretical approaches. Purpose: We aim to investigate which model parameters affect the calculated cross section and how they do this. Method: The Giessen Boltzmann–Uehling–Uhlenbeck (GiBUU) model is used for an investigation of neutrino-nucleus reactions. Results: Presented are integrated and differential cross sections for 1π{sup +} and 1π{sup 0} production before and after final state interactions in comparison with the MiniBooNE data. Conclusions: For the MiniBooNE flux all processes (QE, 1π-background, Δ, higher resonance production, DIS) contribute to the observed final state with one pion of a given charge. The uncertainty in elementary pion production cross sections leads to a corresponding uncertainty in the nuclear cross sections. Final state interactions change the shape of the muon-related observables only slightly, but they significantly change the shape of pion distributions.

  14. Resonance production and decay in pion induced collisions with HADES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scozzi, Federico

    2017-03-01

    The main goal of the High Acceptance Di-Electron experiment (HADES) at GSI is the study of hadronic matter in the 1-3.5 GeV/nucleon incident energy range. HADES results on e+ e- production in proton-nucleus reactions and in nucleus-nucleus collisions demonstrate a strong enhancement of the dilepton yield relative to a reference spectrum obtained from elementary nucleon-nucleon reactions. These observations point to a strong modification of the in-medium ρ spectral function driven by the coupling of the ρ to baryon-resonance hole states. However, to scrutinize this conjecture, a precise study of the role of the ρ meson in electromagnetic baryon-resonance transitions in the time-like region is mandatory. In order to perform this study, HADES has started a dedicated pion-nucleon programme. For the first time a combined measurement of hadronic and dielectron final states have been performed in π--N reactions at four different pion beam momenta (0.656, 0.69, 0.748 and 0.8 GeV/c). First results on exclusive channels with one pion π--p and two pions (nπ+π-, pπ-π0) in the final state, which are currently analysed within the partial wave analysis (PWA) framework of the Bonn-Gatchina group, are discussed. Finally first results for the dielectron analysis will be shown.

  15. One-pion production in neutrino-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Hernández, E.; Nieves, J.; Vicente-Vacas, J. M.

    2015-05-15

    We use our model for neutrino pion production on the nucleon to study pion production on a nucleus. The model is conveniently modified to include in-medium corrections and its validity is extended up to 2 GeV neutrino energies by the inclusion of new resonant contributions in the production process. Our results are compared with recent MiniBooNE data measured in mineral oil. Our total cross sections are below data for neutrino energies above ≈ 1 GeV. As with other theoretical calculations, the agreement with data improves if we neglect pion final state interaction. This is also the case for differential cross sections convoluted over the neutrino flux.

  16. Pion Pion Correlations at Low Relative Momentum Produced in the Reactions Proton-Proton Going to Proton-Proton Pion, Negative Pion)(n) with N = 2,3,4,5,6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uribe Duque, Jorge

    We have measured low relative momentum correlations between like sign pions produced in the reactions pp to pp(pi^+,pi^ {-})^{n} with n ranging from 2 to 6. The data sample consisted of 0.93 times10^6 fully reconstructed exclusive interactions, with incident proton momentum of 27.5 GeV/c, recorded by experiment E766 at the AGS in Brookhaven National Laboratory. By parametrizing the correlation with a function of Q^2 representing the dynamics of the reaction and the correlation itself, it was shown that the Q^2 scale does not depend on the final state multiplicity and has a value of 1.08 fermi. The "strength" of the correlation does depend on multiplicity. For negative pions the "strength" is 26% larger than for positive pions.

  17. Incoherent single pion electroproduction on the deuteron with polarization effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tammam, M.; Fix, A.; Arenhövel, H.

    2006-10-01

    Incoherent pion electroproduction on the deuteron is studied from threshold up to the second resonance region with special emphasis on the influence of the final-state interaction, in particular on polarization observables. The elementary γN→πN amplitude is taken from the MAID-2003 model. The final-state interaction is included by considering complete rescattering in the final NN and πN subsystems. Investigated in detail is their influence on the structure functions governing the semi-exclusive differential cross section, where besides the scattered electron only the produced pion is detected. For charged pion-production the effect of NN rescattering is moderate whereas πN rescattering is almost negligible, except very close to threshold. NN rescattering appears much stronger in neutral pion production for which the primary mechanism is the elimination of a significant spurious coherent contribution in the impulse approximation. Sizeable effects are also found in some of the polarization structure functions for beam and/or target polarizations.

  18. Final state interactions and CP violation in B decays to three pseudoscalars

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, Robert; Lesniak, L.; Bennich, B. El; Furman, A.; Moussallam, B.

    2010-08-05

    We study CP violation and final state interactions between pions and kaons in B{sup +}, B{sup -}, -B{sup 0} and B-bar{sup 0} decays into K{pi}{pi}. The weak transition amplitudes consist of two terms: the first part is derived in QCD factorization approach and the second one is a phenomenological long-distance charming penguin contribution. The final state K{pi} interactions in S- and P-waves are described by strange scalar and vector form factors, respectively. These are determined using a unitary coupled channel model together with chiral symmetry and asymptotic QCD constraints. The final state interactions are dominated by presence of the scalar K{sub 0}*(1430) and the vector K*(892) resonances. We show that additional charming penguin amplitudes are needed to reproduce the latest experimental K{pi} effective mass and helicity angle distributions, branching fractions and asymmetries obtained by Belle and BaBar collaborations.

  19. Experimental studies of pion-nucleus interactions at intermediate energies. [New Mexico State Univ. , Las Cruces, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    This report summarizes investigations of various pion-nucleus interactions and nucleon-nucleus charge-exchange reactions. The work was carried out with the LAMPF accelerator at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the cyclotrons at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) near Zurich, Switzerland, and at Indiana University (IUCF), as a collaborative effort among several laboratories and universities. The experimental activity at LAMPF involved measurements of new data on pion double-charge-exchange scattering, some initial work on a new Neutral Meson Spectrometer system, a search for deeply-bound pionic atoms, measurements of elastic scattering, and studies of the (n,p) reaction on various nuclei. At PSI measurements of pion quasielastic scattering were carried out, with detection of the recoil proton. Work on the analysis of data from a previous experiment at PSI on pion absorption in nuclei was continued. This experiment involved using a detector system that covered nearly the full solid angle.

  20. Neutron-proton final-state interaction in. pi. d breakup: Vector analyzing power

    SciTech Connect

    List, W.; Boschitz, E.T.; Garcilazo, H.; Gyles, W.; Ottermann, C.R.; Tacik, R.; Mango, S.; Konter, J.A.; van den Brandt, B.; Smith, G.R.; and others

    1988-04-01

    The vector analyzing power iT/sub 11/ has been measured for the ..pi..d breakup reaction in a kinematically complete experiment. The dependence of iT/sub 11/ on the momentum of the proton has been obtained for 36 pion-proton angle pairs at T/sub ..pi../ = 134 and 228 MeV. The data are compared with predictions from the new relativistic Faddeev theory of Garcilazo. The sensitivity of the observable iT/sub 11/, in particular in the np final-state interaction region, to details of the theory is investigated.

  1. Black hole final state conspiracies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInnes, Brett

    2009-01-01

    The principle that unitarity must be preserved in all processes, no matter how exotic, has led to deep insights into boundary conditions in cosmology and black hole theory. In the case of black hole evaporation, Horowitz and Maldacena were led to propose that unitarity preservation can be understood in terms of a restriction imposed on the wave function at the singularity. Gottesman and Preskill showed that this natural idea only works if one postulates the presence of “conspiracies” between systems just inside the event horizon and states at much later times, near the singularity. We argue that some AdS black holes have unusual internal thermodynamics, and that this may permit the required “conspiracies” if real black holes are described by some kind of sum over all AdS black holes having the same entropy.

  2. Exclusive final states from photon-photon collisions at SPEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, D.L.

    1981-05-01

    Studies of exclusive final states produced by the two-photon process have been made at SPEAR by the Mark II and by the Crystal Ball Collaborations. Measurements of ..pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/ and ..pi../sup 0/..pi../sup 0/ production in the mass region 500 MeV/c/sup 2/ < m/sub ..pi pi../ < 2000 MeV/c/sup 2/ are presented. These data include strong signals from the well-known f(1270) meson. The A/sub 2/(1310) has been observed via its ..pi../sup 0/ eta decay mode and its partial width to ..gamma gamma.. has been determined. A measurement of the cross section for the reaction ..gamma gamma.. ..-->.. ..pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/..pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/ is reported. This channel is found to be small just above the four pion threshold, but exhibits a large enhancement near the rho/sup 0/rho/sup 0/ threshold.

  3. Resonance Production and Decay in Proton and Pion Induced Collisions with HADES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przygoda, Witold

    Resonance production and decay in proton-proton collisions at kinetic beam energies of 1.25 and 3.5 GeV as well as π- - p reactions at four different pion beam momenta (0.656, 0.69, 0.748, and 0.8 GeV/c) are investigated. Exclusive channels with one pion in the final state (npπ+ and ppπ0) in the pp collisions were put to extended studies based on various observables in the framework of a one-pion exchange model and with solutions obtained within the framework of a partial wave analysis (PWA) of the Bonn-Gatchina group. In the case of the 3.5 GeV data, the study of the ppe+e- channel gave insight on the dielectron production from N* and Δ in the second and third resonance regions. We show that the measured dielectron invariant mass distribution cannot be explained by a point-like resonance-γ* coupling. Comparison with various transport models unravels the ambiguities of the descriptions and the important role of the intermediate ρ production. To tackle this problem a systematic investigation focused on the role of N(1520) production and decay in pion induced reactions on polyethylene and carbon targets. First results on exclusive channels with one pion (π-p), two pions (nπ+π-) and dileptons (ne+e-) in the final state are presented.

  4. Solid State Reactor Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mays, G.T.

    2004-03-10

    The Solid State Reactor (SSR) is an advanced reactor concept designed to take advantage of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) recently developed graphite foam that has enhanced heat transfer characteristics and excellent high-temperature mechanical properties, to provide an inherently safe, self-regulated, source of heat for power and other potential applications. This work was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) program (Project No. 99-064) from August 1999 through September 30, 2002. The initial concept of utilizing the graphite foam as a basis for developing an advanced reactor concept envisioned that a suite of reactor configurations and power levels could be developed for several different applications. The initial focus was looking at the reactor as a heat source that was scalable, independent of any heat removal/power conversion process. These applications might include conventional power generation, isotope production and destruction (actinides), and hydrogen production. Having conducted the initial research on the graphite foam and having performed the scoping parametric analyses from neutronics and thermal-hydraulic perspectives, it was necessary to focus on a particular application that would (1) demonstrate the viability of the overall concept and (2) require a reasonably structured design analysis process that would synthesize those important parameters that influence the concept the most as part of a feasible, working reactor system. Thus, the application targeted for this concept was supplying power for remote/harsh environments and a design that was easily deployable, simplistic from an operational standpoint, and utilized the new graphite foam. Specifically, a 500-kW(t) reactor concept was pursued that is naturally load following, inherently safe, optimized via neutronic studies to achieve near-zero reactivity change with burnup, and proliferation resistant. These four major areas of research

  5. Nuclear transparencies from photoinduced pion production

    SciTech Connect

    W. Cosyn; M.C. Martinez; J. Ryckebusch; B. Van Overmeire

    2006-12-01

    We present a relativistic and cross-section factorized framework for computing nuclear transparencies extracted from A({gamma}, {pi} N) reactions at intermediate energies. The proposed quantum mechanical model adopts a relativistic extension to the multiple-scattering Glauber approximation to account for the final state interactions of the ejected nucleon and pion. The theoretical predictions are compared against the experimental {sup 4}He({gamma},p {pi}{sup -}) data from Jefferson Lab. For those data, our results show no conclusive evidence for the onset of mechanisms related to color transparency.

  6. Diffractive Pion Dissociation into {pi}{sup -{pi}+{pi}-{pi}+{pi}-} at COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Neubert, S.

    2010-08-05

    At the COMPASS experiment a sample of {approx}380000 exclusive events of diffractive pion dissociation on a lead target into a {pi}{sup -{pi}+{pi}-{pi}+{pi}-} final state has been recorded in 2004. The 5{pi} invariant mass spectrum shows a momentum transfer dependent structure peaking around 1.8 GeV/c{sup 2}. In the (4{pi}){sup 0} subsystem there is a clear signal for the f{sub 1}(1285) resonance decaying into 4 pions. In this note we describe the data sample and explore the physics potential of this final state.

  7. Exclusive B Decays to Charmonium Final States

    SciTech Connect

    Barrera, Barbara

    2000-10-13

    We report on exclusive decays of B mesons into final states containing charmonium using data collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage rings. The charmonium states considered here are J/{psi}, {psi}(2S), and {chi}{sub c1}. Branching fractions for several exclusive final states, a measurement of the decay amplitudes for the B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi} K* decay, and measurements of the B{sup 0} and B{sup +} masses are presented. All of the results we present here are preliminary.

  8. {delta}-mediated pion production in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Praet, C.; Lalakulich, O.; Jachowicz, N.; Ryckebusch, J.

    2009-04-15

    We present a fully relativistic formalism for describing neutrino-induced {delta}-mediated single-pion production in nuclei. We assess the ambiguities stemming from the {delta} interactions and quantify the uncertainties in the axial form-factor parameters by comparing with the available bubble-chamber neutrino-scattering data. To include nuclear effects, we turn to a relativistic plane-wave impulse approximation (RPWIA) using realistic bound-state wave functions derived in the Hartree approximation to the {sigma}-{omega} Walecka model. For neutrino energies larger than 1 GeV, we show that a relativistic Fermi-gas model with appropriate binding-energy correction produces results that are comparable to the RPWIA that naturally includes Fermi motion, nuclear-binding effects, and the Pauli exclusion principle. Including {delta} medium modifications roughly halves the RPWIA cross section. Calculations for primary (prior to undergoing final-state interactions) pion production are presented for both electron- and neutrino-induced processes, and a comparison with electron-scattering data and other theoretical approaches is included. We infer that the total {delta}-production strength is underestimated by about 20 to 25%, a fraction that is due to the pionless decay modes of the {delta} in a medium. The model presented in this work can be naturally extended to include the effect of final-state interactions in a relativistic and quantum-mechanical way.

  9. Current status of final-state interaction models and their impact on neutrino-nucleus interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, W. Y.; Pinzon Guerra, E. S.; Yu, M.; Fiorentini, A.; Feusels, T.; T2K collaboration

    2017-09-01

    Hadrons produced in neutrino-nucleus interactions may re-scatter while propagating through the nuclear medium. Such re-scatters, often called Final State Interactions (FSI), can change the charge and multiplicity of the outgoing hadrons, as well as altering their final state kinematics. A good description of these processes is crucial for accurate measurements of the neutrino energy spectra – a key part of neutrino oscillation analyses. We present the comparison of predictions from various neutrino interaction event generators (NEUT, GENIE, Geant4, NuWro and FLUKA) with thin-target pion/nucleon scattering data. The FSI model used in NEUT is a microscopic cascade where the hadrons are propagated semiclassically through a nuclear medium in finite steps. A new tune of the cascade model has been performed for improvements from the current NEUT parameters using external data, and is presented.

  10. Equation of state in the pion condensation phase in asymmetric nuclear matter using a holographic QCD model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishihara, Hiroki; Harada, Masayasu

    2014-12-01

    We study the asymmetric nuclear matter using a holographic QCD model by introducing a baryonic charge in the infrared boundary. We first show that, in the normal hadron phase, the predicted values of the symmetry energy and its slope parameter are comparable with the empirical values. We find that the phase transition from the normal phase to the pion condensation phase is delayed compared with the pure mesonic matter: the critical chemical potential is larger than the pion mass which is obtained for the pure mesonic matter. We also show that, in the pion condensation phase, the pion contribution to the isospin number density increases with the chemical potential, while the baryonic contribution is almost constant. Furthermore, the value of chiral condensation implies that the enhancement of the chiral symmetry breaking occurs in the asymmetric nuclear matter as in the pure mesonic matter. We also give a discussion on how to understand the delay in terms of the four-dimensional chiral Lagrangian including the rho and omega mesons based on the hidden local symmetry.

  11. Diffractive Dissociation into {pi}{sup -{pi}-{pi}+} Final States at COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, Florian

    2011-10-24

    QCD predicts gluonic excitations like hybrids to contribute to the meson spectrum in addition to qq-bar pair configurations. The most promising way to identify such states is the search for J{sup PC} quantum number combinations which are forbidden in the constituent quark model. The fixed target COMPASS experiment at CERN offers the opportunity to search for such states in the light quark sector with an unprecedented statistics.Diffractive reactions of 190 GeV/c pions on a lead target were studied by COMPASS during a pilot run in 2004. A Partial Wave Analysis (PWA) of the {pi}{sup -{pi}-{pi}+} final state with 42 waves including acceptance corrections through a phase-space Monte Carlo simulation of the spectrometer was performed. The exotic {pi}{sup 1}(1600) meson with quantum numbers J{sup PC} = 1{sup -+} has been clearly established in the rho-pi decay channel with a mass of 1660{+-}10(stat) MeV/c{sup 2} and a width of 269{+-}21(stat) MeV/c{sup 2}. The improved detector performance in 2008 allows us to study this channel with significantly higher statistics. First results of the ongoing analysis of the 2008 data taking period, using a 190 GeV/c pion beam on a liquid hydrogen target are presented in this paper.

  12. Diffractive Dissociation into {pi}{sup -{pi}-{pi}+} Final States at COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, Florian

    2010-08-05

    QCD predicts gluonic excitations like hybrids to contribute to the meson spectrum in addition to qq-bar pair configurations. The most promising way to identify such states is the search for J{sup PC} quantum number combinations which are forbidden in the constituent quark model. The fixed target COMPASS experiment at CERN offers the opportunity to search for such states in the light quark sector with an unprecedented statistics.Diffractive reactions of 190 GeV/c pions on a lead target were studied by COMPASS during a pilot run in 2004. A Partial Wave Analysis (PWA) of the {pi}{sup -{pi}-{pi}+} final state with 42 waves including acceptance corrections through a phase-space Monte Carlo simulation of the spectrometer was performed. The exotic {pi}{sub 1}(1600) meson with quantum numbers J{sup PC} = 1{sup -+} has been clearly established in the rho-pi decay channel with a mass of 1660{+-}10(stat) MeV/c{sup 2} and a width of 269{+-}21(stat) MeV/c{sup 2}. The improved detector performance in 2008 allows us to study this channel with significantly higher statistics. First results of the ongoing analysis of the 2008 data taking period, using a 190 GeV/c pion beam on a liquid hydrogen target are presented in this paper.

  13. Measurement of muon plus proton final states in muon neutrinos interactions on CH at 4.2 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakotondravohitra, Laza; Minerva Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    MINERvA (Main INjector Experiment for v-A) is a neutrino scattering experiment in Fermilab's NuMI high-intensity neutrino beam. MINERvA was designed to make precision measurements of neutrino and antineutrino cross sections on a variety of materials including plastic scintillator(CH), C, Fe, Pb, He and water. We present a result of charged-current muon neutrino scattering on hydrocarbon (CH) at an average neutrino energy of 4.2 GeV in which the final state includes a muon, at least one proton, and no pions exiting the nucleus . Although this signature has the topology of neutrino quasielastic scattering from neutrons, the event sample contains contributions from both quasielastic and inelastic processes where pions are absorbed in the nucleus.

  14. Study of the Two-pion Photoproduction on the Deuteron

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Lewis P.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the structure of baryons in terms of the fundamental interaction of the constituent quarks and gluons is one of the primary challenges in strong interaction physics. This interaction is governed by Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), which is a theory for understanding the dynamics of strong. QCD displays the asymptotic freedom of hadrons at very short distances and also the confinement of quarks and gluons inside hadrons. However, solutions of this QCD theory in the non-perturbative domain of the interaction are extremely difficult to achieve, mainly because confinement happens on the hadronic scale on which the coupling constant is large and prevents any perturbative approach. Thus leaving us with strategies such as lattice QCD or formulating QCD sum rules to get around this problem. In exclusive hadron production the yN interaction is recognized for being a powerful method for investigating hadrons and the mysteries that still exist within the strong interaction. From reactions with the nucleon, the strong interaction can be investigated through the transition amplitudes to the N and Delta resonances. More specifically, if an electromagnetic interaction is well known then the intermediate resonance states may be evaluated through meson photoproduction. To gain more detailed insight into this interaction, we look to probe the baryon structure of the nucleon and the photo-excited resonance decays through photon scattering off a deuteron producing two pions in the final state. This photoproduction process off the deuteron will be used to investigate known baryon resonances in the two pion channel. The two pion final state will be investigated for unraveling new information into the photo-coupling strengths. We want to explore final state interactions, search for properties of known resonances, and to explore the possibility of seeing missing states that are predicted by quark models but have not yet been found experimentally. Using the CEBAF Large

  15. Soft Pion Processes

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Nambu, Y.

    1968-01-01

    My talk is concerned with a review, not necessarily of the latest theoretical developments, but rather of an old idea which has contributed to recent theoretical activities. By soft pion processes I mean processes in which low energy pions are emitted or absorbed or scattered, just as we use the word soft photon in a similar context. Speaking more quantitatively, we may call a pion soft if its energy is small compared to a natural scale in the reaction. This scale is determined by the particular dynamics of pion interaction, and one may roughly say that a pion is soft if its energy is small compared to the energies of the other individual particles that participate in the reaction. It is important to note at this point that pion is by far the lightest member of all the hadrons, and much of the success of the soft pion formulas depends on this fact.

  16. Photon final states at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Campanelli, Mario; /University Coll. London

    2008-04-01

    The authors present here several recent measurements involving associate production of photons and jets at the Tevatron. In particular, inclusive photon + met from D0, and photon + b-jets and photon + b-jet + leptons + MET from CDF are described in some detail. These measurements offer a good test of QCD predictions in rather complex final states.

  17. Final state interactions and inclusive nuclear collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Dubey, Rajendra R.

    1993-01-01

    A scattering formalism is developed in a multiple scattering model to describe inclusive momentum distributions for high-energy projectiles. The effects of final state interactions on response functions and momentum distributions are investigated. Calculations for high-energy protons that include shell model response functions are compared with experiments.

  18. Anomalous electrodynamics of neutral pion matter in strong magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauner, Tomáš; Kadam, Saurabh V.

    2017-03-01

    The ground state of quantum chromodynamics in sufficiently strong external magnetic fields and at moderate baryon chemical potential is a chiral soliton lattice (CSL) of neutral pions [1]. We investigate the interplay between the CSL structure and dynamical electromagnetic fields. Our main result is that in presence of the CSL background, the two physical photon polarizations and the neutral pion mix, giving rise to two gapped excitations and one gapless mode with a nonrelativistic dispersion relation. The nature of this mode depends on the direction of its propagation, interpolating between a circularly polarized electromagnetic wave [2] and a neutral pion surface wave, which in turn arises from the spontaneously broken translation invariance. Quite remarkably, there is a neutral-pion-like mode that remains gapped even in the chiral limit, in seeming contradiction to the Goldstone theorem. Finally, we have a first look at the effect of thermal fluctuations of the CSL, showing that even the soft nonrelativistic excitation does not lead to the Landau-Peierls instability. However, it leads to an anomalous contribution to pressure that scales with temperature and magnetic field as T 5/2( B/f π )3/2.

  19. Relativistic Treatment of Pion Photoproduction on Nuclei.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Jon Ingvar

    1993-01-01

    A relativistic one-nucleon model for the charged pion photoproduction reaction on a nucleus is discussed. The specific reactions considered are (gamma, pi^{-} p) and the related process (pi^{+}, gamma p). The incident particle reacts with a single nucleon, while the rest of the nucleus acts as a spectator. The interaction of the projectile with the target nucleon is comprised of the gauge invariant set of Born terms, arising from the pseudovector form of the pion-nucleon interaction lagrangian, as well as s- and u-channel diagrams involving delta propagation. The latter are each separately gauge invariant. The calculations are done in coordinate space and require the solution of eight-dimensional space-time integrals, which are simplified by making the following approximations for diagrams that involve intermediate state propagation: (i) the intermediate particle propagates without interaction with the nuclear medium, and (ii) the outer legs of one vertex are plane waves. The propagator for each diagram is then the freemomentum -space propagator for the particle times a coordinate-space delta-function (a local operator), and the integration at one vertex is done trivially. The remaining calculations of the amplitude are then carried out in the distorted wave framework. Both the bound and continuum state nucleons are described by solutions of the Dirac equation with appropriate vector and scalar potentials. The pion wave function is a solution of the Klein-Gordon equation; the interaction of the pion with the residual nucleus is taken into account by including an optical potential. The contribution of each of the diagrams to the differential cross section and the final proton's polarization, under different kinematic conditions, are explored. In particular we study the role of the Delta resonance in the reaction. We find the contribution of the delta to be important in the resonance region, but for the (gamma, pi^{-} p) reaction there was no case found in which that

  20. Glauber gluons in pion-induced Drell-Yan processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chun-peng; Li, Hsiang-nan

    2013-10-01

    We point out that the existence of Glauber gluons in the kT factorization theorem can account for the violation of the Lam-Tung relation, namely, the anomalous lepton angular distribution observed in pion-induced Drell-Yan processes. The emission of a final-state parton, that balances the lepton-pair transverse momentum, causes the responsible spin-transverse-momentum correlation in the Glauber-gluon background. It is argued that the Glauber effect is significant in the pion due to its unique role of being a Nambu-Goldstone boson and a qqbar bound state simultaneously. This mechanism is compared to other resolutions in the literature by means of vacuum effects and Boer-Mulders functions. We propose to discriminate the above resolutions by measuring the ppbar Drell-Yan process at GSI and J-PARC.

  1. Lattice calculation of Delta isospin = 3/2 kaon decays to pion pion decay amplitude with interacting two pions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Changhoan

    We report the results of a calculation of the K → pipi matrix elements of the DeltaI = 3/2 operators. Relying on the 3-flavor effective Hamiltonian, we calculate the low energy contribution to the matrix elements in quenched lattice QCD with the DBW2 action using domain wall fermions, while the high energy contribution is included in the Wilson coefficients. In order to generate interacting pipi states with non-zero relative momentum in lattice, we apply anti-periodic boundary conditions on pions. Since only the magnitude of the overlap of our interpolating operators with the initial and final state is determined, we can calculate only the magnitude of the matrix elements. From the comparison with the experimental result, however, we find some degree of discrepancy. This discrepancy might be ascribed to the unphysical kinematics we choose in this report.

  2. Charged hadron composition of the final state in e + e - annihilation at high energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Althoff, M.; Brandelik, R.; Braunschweig, W.; Gather, K.; Kirschfink, F. J.; Lübelsmeyer, K.; Martyn, H.-U.; Peise, G.; Rimkus, J.; Sander, H. G.; Schmitz, D.; Siebke, H.; Trines, D.; Wallraff, W.; Boerner, H.; Fischer, H. M.; Hartmann, H.; Hilger, E.; Hillen, W.; Knop, G.; Köpke, L.; Kolanoski, H.; Kück, H.; Wedemeyer, R.; Wermes, N.; Wollstadt, M.; Burkhardt, H.; Cooper, S.; Franzke, J.; Hultschig, H.; Joos, P.; Koch, W.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Ladage, A.; Löhr, B.; Lüke, D.; Mättig, P.; Mess, K. H.; Notz, D.; Pyrlik, J.; Quarrie, D. R.; Riethmüller, R.; Schütte, W.; Söding, P.; Wolf, G.; Yekutieli, G.; Fohrmann, R.; Krasemann, H. L.; Leu, P.; Lohrmann, E.; Pandoulas, D.; Poelz, G.; Römer, O.; Schmüser, P.; Wiik, B. H.; Al-Agil, I.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Campbell, A. J.; Dornan, P. J.; Garbutt, D. A.; Jones, T. D.; Jones, W. G.; Lloyd, S. L.; McCardle, J.; Sedgebeer, J. K.; Bell, K. W.; Bowler, M. G.; Brock, I. C.; Cashmore, R. J.; Carnegie, R.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Devenish, R.; Grossmann, P.; Illingworth, J.; Salmon, G. L.; Thomas, J.; Wyatt, T. R.; Youngman, C.; Foster, B.; Hart, J. C.; Harvey, J.; Proudfoot, J.; Saxon, D. H.; Woodworth, P. L.; Heyland, D.; Holder, M.; Duchovni, E.; Eisenberg, Y.; Karshon, U.; Mikenberg, G.; Revel, D.; Ronat, E.; Shapira, A.; Barklow, T.; Freeman, J.; Lecomte, P.; Meyer, T.; Rudolph, G.; Venkataramania, H.; Wicklund, E.; Wu, Sau Lan; Zobernig, G.

    1983-03-01

    The inclusive production of π± and K ± mesons and of protons and antiprotons in e + e - annihilation has been measured at c.m. energies of W=14, 22 and 34GeV. Using time of flight measurements and Cerenkov counters the full momentum range has been covered. Differential cross sections and total particle yields are given. At particle momenta of 0.4 GeV/c more than 90% of the charged hadrons are pions. With increasing momentum the fraction of pions among the charged hadrons decreases. At W=34 GeV and a momentum of 5 GeV/c the particle fractions are approximately π±: K ±: p,bar p = 0.55:0.3:0.15. On average an event at W=34 GeV contains 10.3±0.4π±, 2.0±0.2 K ± and 0.8±0.1 p,bar p. In addition, we present results on baryon correlations using a sample of events where two or more protons and/or antiprotons are observed in the final state.

  3. Pion and kaon interferometry of nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gyulassy, M.; Padula, S.S.

    1989-08-04

    In the study complex reactions, the simple space-time interpretation of pion interferometry often breaks down due to strong correlations between spatial and momentum coordinates. In those cases, pion interferometry is still useful as a complementary test of specific dynamic models, but a refined formalism must be used, as discussed in the introduction. With this formalism, we show that recent NA35 data on O + Au {yields} {pi}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup {minus}} + X at 200 AGeV are consistent with both hadronic resonance and quark-gluon plasma models for this reaction. The sensitivity of the outward and sideward transverse projected correlation function for pions is investigated. Finally, we compare pion and kaon interferometry predictions of these two models. 31 refs., 3 figs.

  4. The hadronic final state at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Paul R.; Wing, Matthew

    2014-07-01

    The hadronic final state in electron-proton collisions at HERA has provided a rich testing ground for development of the theory of the strong force, QCD. In this review, over 200 publications from the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations are summarized. Short distance physics, the measurement of processes at high-energy scales, has provided rigorous tests of perturbative QCD and constrained the structure of the proton as well as allowing precise determinations of the strong coupling constant to be made. Nonperturbative or low-energy processes have also been investigated and results on hadronization interpreted together with those from other experiments. Searches for exotic QCD objects, such as pentaquarks, glueballs, and instantons, have been performed. The subject of diffraction has been reinvigorated through its precise measurement, such that it can now be described by perturbative QCD. After discussion of HERA, the H1 and ZEUS detectors, and the techniques used to reconstruct differing hadronic final states, the above subject areas are elaborated on. The major achievements are then condensed further in a final section summarizing what has been learned.

  5. Pion form factor

    SciTech Connect

    Ryong Ji, C.; Pang, A.; Szczepaniak, A.

    1994-04-01

    It is pointed out that the correct criterion to define the legal PQCD contribution to the exclusive processes in the lightcone perturbative expansion should be based on the large off-shellness of the lightcone energy in the intermediate states. In the lightcone perturbative QCD calculation of the pion form factor, the authors find that the legal PQCD contribution defined by the lightcone energy cut saturates in the smaller Q{sup 2} region compared to that defined by the gluon four-momentum square cut. This is due to the contribution by the highly off-energy-shell gluons in the end point regions of the phase space, indicating that the gluon four-momentum-square cut may have cut too much to define the legal PQCD.

  6. Partial wave analysis of 3 π with pion and photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackura, Andrew; Mikhasenko, Mikhail; Szczepaniak, Adam; Ketzer, Bernhard; Joint Physics Analysis Center Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    We present some results on the analysis of 3 π resonances from peripheral scattering of pions off of nuclear targets. The analysis is motivated by the recent release of the largest data set on diffractively produced three pions by the COMPASS collaboration. The model emphasizes the 3 π production process and their final state interactions which satisfy S-matrix principles. We apply our model to fit partial wave intensities and relative phases from COMPASS in the JPC =2-+ sector and search for resonances. We then discuss the extension of our formalism to photon beams to be used in the GlueX experiment.

  7. Multiple pion and kaon production in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions: measurements versus specific models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guptaroy, P.; de, Bh.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Bhattacharyya, D. P.

    The pion and kaon rapidity densities and the nature of kaon-pion ratios offer two very prominent and crucial physical observables on which modestly sufficient data for heavy nucleus collisions are available to date. In the light of two sets of models - one purely phenomenological and the other with a modest degree of a dynamical basis - we try to examine the state of agreement between calculations and experimental results obtainable from the past and the latest measurements. Impact and implications of all these would also finally be spelt out.

  8. Pion Asymmetries due to Hyperon Decays in the Qweak Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elledge, Jacob

    2015-10-01

    The Qweak experiment took place at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility between 2010 and 2012. In the experiment an electron beam was directed onto a liquid hydrogen target. The purpose of the Qweak experiment is to investigate the weak interaction between the proton and the electron. The experiment determined the proton's weak charge by measuring the asymmetry in elastic scattering when changing the helicity of the incoming electron beam 960 times per second. Under different kinematic conditions the experiment investigated inelastic scattering with pions in the final state, a background for the elastic scattering measurement. In this inelastic measurement, a false asymmetry due to parity-violating hyperon decays must be determined. Using the results of a simulation written in Geant4, I have been able to isolate the cross sections for samples of opposite helicities. By combining this cross section with the signal of detected pions from hyperon decay, I was able to isolate the expected false asymmetry.

  9. Searches in dilepton final states at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Andrew; /UC, Davis

    2010-01-01

    Event signatures with two oppositely or same-sign charged leptons are predicted in many new physics scenarios. Such events could arise from chargino-neutralino production, in decays of pair produced supersymmetric top quarks, additional massive vector bosons or exotic heavy quarks. We present the most recent results from the CDF experiment on searches for physics beyond the Standard Model in events with two leptons in the final state produced in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at Fermilab Tevatron.

  10. The pion: an enigma within the Standard Model

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, Tanja; Roberts, Craig D.

    2016-05-27

    Almost 50 years after the discovery of gluons & quarks, we are only just beginning to understand how QCD builds the basic bricks for nuclei: neutrons, protons, and the pions that bind them. QCD is characterised by two emergent phenomena: confinement & dynamical chiral symmetry breaking (DCSB). They are expressed with great force in the character of the pion. In turn, pion properties suggest that confinement & DCSB are closely connected. As both a Nambu-Goldstone boson and a quark-antiquark bound-state, the pion is unique in Nature. Developing an understanding of its properties is thus critical to revealing basic features of the Standard Model. We describe experimental progress in this direction, made using electromagnetic probes, highlighting both improvements in the precision of charged-pion form factor data, achieved in the past decade, and new results on the neutral-pion transition form factor. Both challenge existing notions of pion structure. We also provide a theoretical context for these empirical advances, first explaining how DCSB works to guarantee that the pion is unnaturally light; but also, nevertheless, ensures the pion is key to revealing the mechanisms that generate nearly all the mass of hadrons. Our discussion unifies the charged-pion elastic and neutral-pion transition form factors, and the pion's twist-2 parton distribution amplitude. It also indicates how studies of the charged-kaon form factor can provide significant contributions. Importantly, recent predictions for the large-$Q^2$ behaviour of the pion form factor can be tested by experiments planned at JLab 12. Those experiments will extend precise charged-pion form factor data to momenta that can potentially serve in validating factorisation theorems in QCD, exposing the transition between the nonperturbative and perturbative domains, and thereby reaching a goal that has long driven hadro-particle physics.

  11. Final state interactions in hadronic B decays

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, H.-Y.; Chua, C.-K.; Soni, Amarjit

    2005-01-01

    There exist many experimental indications that final-state interactions (FSIs) may play a prominent role not only in charmful B decays but also in charmless B ones. We examine the final-state rescattering effects on the hadronic B decay rates and their impact on direct CP violation. The color-suppressed neutral modes such as B{sup 0}{yields}D{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0},{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0},{rho}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0},K{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} can be substantially enhanced by long-distance rescattering effects. The direct CP-violating partial rate asymmetries in charmless B decays to {pi}{pi}/{pi}K and {rho}{pi} are significantly affected by final-state rescattering, and their signs are generally different from that predicted by the short-distance (SD) approach. For example, direct CP asymmetry in B{sup 0}{yields}{rho}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} is increased to around 60% due to final-state rescattering effects whereas the short-distance picture gives about 1%. Evidence of direct CP violation in the decay B{sup 0}{yields}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +} is now established, while the combined BABAR and Belle measurements of B{sup 0}{yields}{rho}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}} imply a 3.6{sigma} direct CP asymmetry in the {rho}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} mode. Our predictions for CP violation agree with experiment in both magnitude and sign, whereas the QCD factorization predictions (especially for {rho}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) seem to have some difficulty with the data. Direct CP violation in the decay B{sup -}{yields}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} is very small ((less-or-similar sign)1%) in the standard model even after the inclusion of FSIs. Its measurement will provide a nice way to search for new physics as in the standard model QCD penguins cannot contribute (except by isospin violation). Current data on {pi}K modes seem to violate the isospin sum-rule relation, suggesting the presence of electroweak penguin contributions. We have also investigated whether a large transverse polarization in B{yields}{phi}K* can arise from the

  12. Two-pion correlations in heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Zajc, W.A.

    1982-08-01

    An application of intensity interferometry to relativistic heavy ion collisions is reported. Specifically, the correlation between two like-charged pions is used to study the reactions Ar+KCl..-->..2..pi../sup +-/+X and Ne+NaF..-->..2..pi../sup -/+X. Source sizes are obtained that are consistent with a simple geometric interpretation. Lifetimes are less well determined but are indicative of a faster pion production process than predicted by Monte Carlo cascade calculations. There appears to be a substantial coherent component of the pion source, although measurement is complicated by the presence of final state interactions. Additionally, the generation of spectra of uncorrelated events is discussed. In particular, the influence of the correlation function on the background spectrum is analyzed, and a prescription for removal of this influence is given. A formulation to describe the statistical errors in the background is also presented. Finally, drawing from the available literature, a self-contained introduction to Bose-Einstein correlations and the Hanbury-Brown - Twiss effect is provided, with an emphasis on points of contact between classical and quantum mechanical descriptions.

  13. Dispersion relation for hadronic light-by-light scattering: two-pion contributions

    DOE PAGES

    Colangelo, Gilberto; Hoferichter, Martin; Procura, Massimiliano; ...

    2017-04-27

    In our third paper of a series dedicated to a dispersive treatment of the hadronic light-by-light (HLbL) tensor, we derive a partial-wave formulation for two-pion intermediate states in the HLbL contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon (g - 2)μ, including a detailed discussion of the unitarity relation for arbitrary partial waves. We show that obtaining a final expression free from unphysical helicity partial waves is a subtle issue, which we thoroughly clarify. As a by-product, we obtain a set of sum rules that could be used to constrain future calculations of γ*γ* → ππ. We validate the formalism extensively using the pion-box contribution, defined by two-pion intermediate states with a pion-pole left-hand cut, and demonstrate how the full known result is reproduced when resumming the partial waves. Using dispersive fits to high-statistics data for the pion vector form factor, we provide an evaluation of the full pion box, amore » $$π-box\\atop{μ}$$ =-15.9(2) × 10-11. As an application of the partial-wave formalism, we present a first calculation of ππ-rescattering effects in HLbL scattering, with γ*γ* → ππ helicity partial waves constructed dispersively using ππ phase shifts derived from the inverse-amplitude method. In this way, the isospin-0 part of our calculation can be interpreted as the contribution of the f0(500) to HLbL scattering in (g - 2)μ. We also argue that the contribution due to charged-pion rescattering implements corrections related to the corresponding pion polarizability and show that these are moderate. Our final result for the sum of pion-box contribution and its S-wave rescattering corrections reads a$$π-box\\atop{μ}$$ + a$$ππ, π-pole LHC\\atop{μ, J=0}$$ = -24(1) × 10-11.« less

  14. Pion production via isobar giant resonance formation and decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Deutchman, P. A.; Madigan, R. L.; Norbury, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    A spin, isotopic-spin formalism for the production of pions due to decays of isobar giant resonances formed in peripheral heavy-ion collisions is presented. The projectile nucleus isobar giant resonance state is assumed to coherently form and then incoherently decay to produce the pions. Total spin and isotopic spin for the system are conserved through the concomitant excitation of the target nucleus to an isobaric analog giant resonance state. Comparisons of the predicted total pion cross sections, over a range of energies, are made with heavy-ion pion data.

  15. Study of event mixing for Bose-Einstein correlations in reactions with ππ X final states around 1 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Q. H.

    2017-07-01

    We present a new event mixing cut condition, named energy sum (ES) cut, aiming to investigate two-pion Bose-Einstein correlations (BEC) in reaction with only two identical pions among three final state particles. Unlike the previous proposed pion energy cut, which rejects original events with either pion’s energy beyond a given level, this cut does not eliminate any original events and hence improves the statistics of both original events and mixed events. It selects mixed events in terms of a weight proportional to the two-pion energy sum distribution of original events. Numerical tests using the γp → π0π0p events are carried out to verify the validity of the energy sum cut. Simulation results show this cut is able to reproduce the relative momentum distribution of the original events in the absence of BEC effects. Its ability to observe BEC effects and to extract correct BEC parameters is verified using event sample in the presence of BEC effects. It is found that the BEC effects can be obviously observed as an enhancement in the correlation function and the BEC parameters extracted by this event mixing cut are in good agreement with input values.

  16. Muon-neutrino-induced charged-current pion production on nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosel, U.; Gallmeister, K.

    2017-07-01

    Background: Long-baseline experiments such as T2K, NOvA, or the planned Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment require theoretical descriptions of the complete event in a neutrino-nucleus reaction. Since nuclear targets are used this requires a good understanding of neutrino-nucleus interactions. Purpose: One of the dominant reaction channels in neutrino-nucleus interactions is pion production. This paper aims for a theoretically consistent treatment of all charged current charged pion production data that are available from the experiments MiniBooNE, the near detector experiment at T2K, and MINERvA. Method: Pion production is treated through excitations of nucleon resonances, including background terms, and deep inelastic scattering. The final state interactions of the produced pions are described within the Giessen-Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck implementation of quantum-kinetic transport theory. Results: Results are given for MiniBooNE, the near detector experiment at T2K and for MINERvA. While the theoretical results for MiniBooNE differ from the data both in shape and magnitude, their agreement both with the T2K and the MINERvA data is good for all pion and lepton observables. Predictions for pion spectra are shown for MicroBooNE and NOvA. Conclusions: Based on the GiBUU model of lepton-nucleus interactions a consistent, good theoretical description of CC charged pion production data from the T2K ND and the MINERvA experiments is possible, without any parameter tunes.

  17. Final-State Interactions and Single-Spin Asymmetries in Semi-inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Hwang, Dae Sung; Schmidt, Ivan; /Santa Maria U., Valparaiso

    2007-11-14

    Recent measurements from the HERMES and SMC collaborations show a remarkably large azimuthal single-spin asymmetries A{sub UL} and A{sub UT} of the proton in semi-inclusive pion leptoproduction {gamma}*(q)p {yields} {pi}X. We show that final-state interactions from gluon exchange between the outgoing quark and the target spectator system leads to single-spin asymmetries in deep inelastic lepton-proton scattering at leading twist in perturbative QCD; i.e., the rescattering corrections are not power-law suppressed at large photon virtuality q{sup 2} at fixed x{sub bj}. The existence of such single-spin asymmetries requires a phase difference between two amplitudes coupling the proton target with J{sup z}{sub p} = {+-}1/2 to the same final-state, the same amplitudes which are necessary to produce a nonzero proton anomalous magnetic moment. We show that the exchange of gauge particles between the outgoing quark and the proton spectators produces a Coulomb-like complex phase which depends on the angular momentum L{sup z} of the proton's constituents and thus is distinct for different proton spin amplitudes. The single-spin asymmetry which arises from such final-state interactions does not factorize into a product of structure function and fragmentation function, and it is not related to the transversity distribution {delta}q(x;Q) which correlates transversely polarized quarks with the spin of the transversely polarized target nucleon.

  18. Exclusive measurements of pion nucleon going to pion pion nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kermani, Mohammad Arjomand

    The pion induced pion production reactions π±p/toπ±π+n were studied at projectile incident energies of 223, 243, 264, 284, and 305 MeV. The Canadian High Acceptance Orbit Spectrometer (CHAOS) was used to detected the charged particles, which originated from the interaction of the incident pion beam with a cryogenic liquid hydrogen target. The experimental results are presented in the form of single, double and triple differential cross sections. Total cross sections obtained by integrating the differential quantities are also reported. The experimental data, namely the π-p/toπ-π+n double differential cross sections, were used as input to the Chew-Low extrapolation procedure which was utilized to determine on-shell π+π- elastic scattering cross sections in the near threshold region. The Chew-Low results (the extrapolated πpi cross sections) were then used in a dispersion analysis (Roy equations) to obtain the πpi isospin zero S-wave scattering length. We find a00=0.209/pm 0.011μ-1. In addition, the invariant mass distributions from the (π+π-) channel were fitted to determine the model parameters for the extended model of Oset and Vicente-Vacas. We find that the model parameters obtained from fitting the (π+π-) data do not describe the invariant mass distributions in the (π+π+) channel.

  19. The 3 Final States of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia, A. C. M.; Laskar, J.

    2000-10-01

    In 1962, using radar measurements, the slow retrograde rotation of Venus was discovered (see Carpenter, 1970). Since, the understanding of this particular state becomes a challenge as many uncertainties remain in the dissipative models of Venus' rotation. Various hypothesis were proposed for its evolution, aiming to search wether Venus was born with a direct or retrograde rotation. The most favored scenario assumes that its axis was actually tilted down during its past evolution as a result of core mantle friction and atmospheric tides (Lago and Cazenave, 1979, Dobrovolski, 1980, Shen and Zhang, 1989, McCue and Dormand, 1993, Yoder, 1995, 1997). Nevertheless, this requires high values of the initial obliquity, and it was proposed that Venus was strongly hit by massive bodies which would have tilted it significantly or started its rotation backward (Dones and Tremaine, 1993). Even while considering the chaotic evolution of Venus's obliquity (Laskar and Robutel, 1993), the published scenarios still have some difficulties to tilt Venus axis towards its present position (Yoder,1997). In the present work we show that due to the dissipative effects, there are only 4 possible final states for Venus' rotation, and only 3 of them are really reachable. When the planetary perturbations are added, most of the initial conditions lead to the two states corresponding to the present configuration of Venus, one with period -243.02 days and nearly 0o obliquity, and the other with opposite period and nearly 180o obliquity.We thus demonstrate that a large impact is not necessary to have a satisfying scenario for the reverse rotation of Venus.

  20. Evaluation on Geant4 Hadronic Models for Pion Minus, Pion Plus and Neutron Particles as Major Antiproton Annihilation Products

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli, Mohammad Bagher; Mohammadi, Mohammad Mehdi; Reiazi, Reza; Jabbari, Keyvan

    2015-01-01

    Geant4 is an open source simulation toolkit based on C++, which its advantages progressively lead to applications in research domains especially modeling the biological effects of ionizing radiation at the sub-cellular scale. However, it was shown that Geant4 does not give a reasonable result in the prediction of antiproton dose especially in Bragg peak. One of the reasons could be lack of reliable physic model to predict the final states of annihilation products like pions. Considering the fact that most of the antiproton deposited dose is resulted from high-LET nuclear fragments following pion interaction in surrounding nucleons, we reproduced depth dose curves of most probable energy range of pions and neutron particle using Geant4. We consider this work one of the steps to understand the origin of the error and finally verification of Geant4 for antiproton tracking. Geant4 toolkit version 9.4.6.p01 and Fluka version 2006.3 were used to reproduce the depth dose curves of 220 MeV pions (both negative and positive) and 70 MeV neutrons. The geometry applied in the simulations consist a 20 × 20 × 20 cm3 water tank, similar to that used in CERN for antiproton relative dose measurements. Different physic lists including Quark-Gluon String Precompound (QGSP)_Binary Cascade (BIC)_HP, the recommended setting for hadron therapy, were used. In the case of pions, Geant4 resulted in at least 5% dose discrepancy between different physic lists at depth close to the entrance point. Even up to 15% discrepancy was found in some cases like QBBC compared to QGSP_BIC_HP. A significant difference was observed in dose profiles of different Geant4 physic list at small depths for a beam of pions. In the case of neutrons, large dose discrepancy was observed when LHEP or LHEP_EMV lists were applied. The magnitude of this dose discrepancy could be even 50% greater than the dose calculated by LHEP (or LHEP_EMV) at larger depths. We found that effect different Geant4 physic list in

  1. Pion scattering and nuclear dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.B.

    1988-01-01

    A phenomenological optical-model analysis of pion elastic scattering and single- and double-charge-exchange scattering to isobaric-analog states is reviewed. Interpretation of the optical-model parameters is briefly discussed, and several applications and extensions are considered. The applications include the study of various nuclear properties, including neutron deformation and surface-fluctuation contributions to the density. One promising extension for the near future would be to develop a microscopic approach based on powerful momentum-space methods brought to existence over the last decade. In this, the lowest-order optical potential as well as specific higher-order pieces would be worked out in terms of microscopic pion-nucleon and delta-nucleon interactions that can be determined within modern meson-theoretical frameworks. A second extension, of a more phenomenological nature, would use coupled-channel methods and shell-model wave functions to study dynamical nuclear correlations in pion double charge exchange. 35 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Experiments on the Nuclear Interactions of Pions and Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ralph C. Minehart

    2005-04-15

    This is the final technical report. Yearly Progress Reports were submitted throughout the duration of the project. Along with our publications, these reports provide a detailed record of our accomplishments. This report largely consists of a summary of the technical activities carried out during last 2-1/2 years of the project, along with a list of papers published in the period from 2002-2005. Our work during this period involved the following: 1. Electro-production of excited states of the nucleon through the analysis of exclusive single pion production reactions induced by polarized electrons incident on both polarized and unpolarized nucleon targets. (JLab) 2. Measurement of proton and deuteron spin structure functions in and above the nucleon resonance region at low and moderate $Q^2$, using inclusive electron-proton and electron deuteron scattering (JLAB). 3. Contributions to the PRIMEX experiment (JLab). 4. A precise measurement of the branching ratio for pion beta decay was carried out along with other members of the PIBETA collaboration (PSI). The first three, labeled JLab, were experiments made with the CLAS detector at the Thomas Jefferson Laboratory in Newport News, VA. The PIBETA experiment was carried out using a low energy pion beam at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Villigen, Switzerland.

  3. Electromagnetic pion form factor

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, C.D.

    1995-08-01

    A phenomenological Dyson-Schwinger/Bethe-Salpeter equation approach to QCD, formalized in terms of a QCD-based model field theory, the Global Color-symmetry Model (GCM), was used to calculate the generalized impulse approximation contribution to the electromagnetic pion form factor at space-like q{sup 2} on the domain [0,10] GeV{sup 2}. In effective field theories this form factor is sometimes understood as simply being due to Vector Meson Dominance (VMD) but this does not allow for a simple connection with QCD where the VMD contribution is of higher order than that of the quark core. In the GCM the pion is treated as a composite bound state of a confined quark and antiquark interacting via the exchange of colored vector-bosons. A direct study of the quark core contribution is made, using a quark propagator that manifests the large space-like-q{sup 2} properties of QCD, parameterizes the infrared behavior and incorporates confinement. It is shown that the few parameters which characterize the infrared form of the quark propagator may be chosen so as to yield excellent agreement with the available data. In doing this one directly relates experimental observables to properties of QCD at small space-like-q{sup 2}. The incorporation of confinement eliminates endpoint and pinch singularities in the calculation of F{sub {pi}}(q{sup 2}). With asymptotic freedom manifest in the dressed quark propagator the calculation yields q{sup 4}F{sub {pi}}(q{sup 2}) = constant, up to [q{sup 2}]- corrections, for space-like-q{sup 2} {approx_gt} 35 GeV{sup 2}, which indicates that soft, nonperturbative contributions dominate the form factor at presently accessible q{sup 2}. This means that the often-used factorization Ansatz fails in this exclusive process. A paper describing this work was submitted for publication. In addition, these results formed the basis for an invited presentation at a workshop on chiral dynamics and will be published in the proceedings.

  4. JLAB CLAS Results on Pion Production from Nuclear Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyupwoo; Manly, Steven

    Preliminary results on single charged pion production in eA collisions at Ebeam = 5 GeV/c2 are presented. The data were collected using the CLAS detector, which is a multipurpose, large acceptance, magnetic spectrometer located in Hall B at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. Distributions in W, Q2, pπ, and θπ are shown for data produced using deuterium, carbon, iron, and lead targets. The motivation for this work is to provide distributions useful for tuning the hadronic final state interaction models used in extracting results from current and next generation neutrino oscillation experiments.

  5. Pion Absorption in HELIUM-4 at 114 Mev

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adimi, Farida

    The exact mechanism which leads to pion absorption is not well known. Particularly, the breakdown of the cross section for pion absorption as a function of the number of nucleons involved is poorly understood. Although about 50-70% of absorption occurs on a nucleon pair (2NA) inside a more complex nucleus, the participation of greater than two nucleons is not negligible. In this experiment, we hope to better understand pion absorption which is fundamental to our knowledge of inter-nucleon forces. For such a measurement, it is necessary to capture as many of the emitted particles as possible; therefore, use of large solid angle detectors is essential. Pion absorption cross sections were measured using a large solid angle detector array to observe multi-particle coincidences. The detector consisted of an array of 16 DeltaE-E plastic scintillation detectors arranged in a cylindrical geometry surrounding a liquid ^4He target. Because of the complicated and large detector system (~ 2pi ), we used a Monte Carlo simulation of this experiment based on the CERN code GEANT to reproduce the geometry and the detection properties of our instrument, such as the efficiencies, energy losses, particle decays, and reaction losses. Some known processes like two-nucleon absorption, quasi-free absorption and multi-step processes were then modeled into the event generator. The ultimate goal of this experiment is to separate the contribution to the pion absorption cross section from two, three, and four nucleons participating in the absorption, in addition to signatures of multi-step processes. It was found that the undisturbed 2NA mechanism represents 56% of the observed total absorption cross section, and only 6% can be attributed to 3NA with a spectator neutron. The yield leading to four nucleons in the final state appears to be modified by Soft FSI between two of the emitted nucleons and leads to 10% of the total absorption cross section. Other 4NA leading to ppd final states

  6. Pion dissociation and Levinson's theorem in hot PNJL quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wergieluk, A.; Blaschke, D.; Kalinovsky, Yu. L.; Friesen, A. V.

    2013-12-01

    Pion dissociation by the Mott effect of quark plasma is described within the generalized Beth-Uhlenbeck approach on the basis of the PNJL model which allows for a unified description of bound, resonant and scattering states. As a first approximation, we utilize the Breit-Wigner ansatz for the spectral function and clarify its relation to the complex mass pole solution of the pion Bethe-Salpeter equation. Application of the Levinson theorem proves that describing the pion Mott dissociation solely by means of spectral broadening of the pion bound state beyond T Mott leaves out a significant aspect. Thus we acknowledge the importance of the continuum of scattering states and show its role for the thermodynamics of pion dissociation.

  7. Alabama Consolidated State Application Accountability Workbook. Final

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This workbook, submitted by the State of Alabama to the U.S. Department of Education, is for State Grants under Title IX, Part C, Section 9302 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (Public Law 107-110). By January 31, 2003, States must complete and submit to the Department this Consolidated State Application Accountability Workbook. The…

  8. Final-state interaction as origin of single-spin asymmetry in semi-inclusive DIS

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, D.S.

    2005-05-06

    Recent measurements from the HERMES, SMC, CLAS and COMPASS collaborations show a remarkably large azimuthal single-spin asymmetries of the proton in semi-inclusive pion leptoproduction {gamma}*(q)p{up_arrow} {yields} {pi}X. The existence of such single-spin asymmetries requires a phase difference between two amplitudes coupling the proton target with J{sub p}{sup z} = {+-}(1/2) to the same final-state, the same amplitudes which are necessary to produce a nonzero proton anomalous magnetic moment. We show that the exchange of gauge particles between the outgoing quark and the proton spectators produces a Coulomb-like complex phase which depends on the angular momentum Lz of the proton's constituents and is thus distinct for different proton spin amplitudes. We then find that final-state interactions from gluon exchange between the outgoing quark and the target spectator system lead to single-spin asymmetries at leading twist in perturbative QCD; i.e., the rescattering corrections are not power-law suppressed at large photon virtuality Q2 at fixed xbj.

  9. Final-state interaction as origin of single-spin asymmetry in semi-inclusive DIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, D. S.

    2005-05-01

    Recent measurements from the HERMES, SMC, CLAS and COMPASS collaborations show a remarkably large azimuthal single-spin asymmetries of the proton in semi-inclusive pion leptoproduction γ*(q)p↑ → πX. The existence of such single-spin asymmetries requires a phase difference between two amplitudes coupling the proton target with Jpz = ±1/2 to the same final-state, the same amplitudes which are necessary to produce a nonzero proton anomalous magnetic moment. We show that the exchange of gauge particles between the outgoing quark and the proton spectators produces a Coulomb-like complex phase which depends on the angular momentum Lz of the proton's constituents and is thus distinct for different proton spin amplitudes. We then find that final-state interactions from gluon exchange between the outgoing quark and the target spectator system lead to single-spin asymmetries at leading twist in perturbative QCD; i.e., the rescattering corrections are not power-law suppressed at large photon virtuality Q2 at fixed xbj.

  10. Pion Induced Pion Production on Deuterium.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sossi, Vesna

    This thesis describes measurements of the pion induced pion production reaction pi^+ d to pi^{+} pi^{-}p p performed with a 280 MeV incident pi^{+} beam at TRIUMF. The data are compared with an improved version of the Oset and Vicente-Vacas theoretical model (12). The goal of the experiment and of the analysis was to provide a larger body of data for the free reaction and to test the validity of theoretical models. In the process, the ability to determine the values of the coupling constants C, f_Delta, g _{N*Delta_tau} within such a model framework would be explored. The knowledge of the precise value of these coupling constants would constrain N^* decay branching ratios and other pion induced reaction mechanisms like Double Charge Exchange. A previous experiment (23) had indicated that the pion induced pion production on deuterium is essentially a quasifree process with the reaction occurring on the neutron leaving the proton merely a spectator. The main difference with respect to the free reaction is the effect of Fermi motion of the neutron. Although we were interested in studying the free reaction (pi^ {-}p to pi^ {+}pi^{-}n), we chose a deuterium target so that the experiment could be run with a pi^+beam, since the pi^- beam flux is about 6 times lower than the flux of the positive pion beam at 280 MeV, the energy at which our experiment was performed. Such a flux would have required a much longer running time for the experiment in order to achieve the same statistical accuracy. The quasifree nature of the process was also confirmed in our experiment. This experiment involved a coincidence measurement of the quasifree process and as such provided four-fold differential cross section spectra of the reaction thus allowing for a microscopic comparison between data and theoretical models. In the theoretical description we incorporated additional amplitudes for the N^* to N(pipi)_{p-wave} diagrams required to describe the reaction cross section at T_pi = 280 Me

  11. Analytic pion form factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomon, Earle L.; Pacetti, Simone

    2016-09-01

    The pion electromagnetic form factor and two-pion production in electron-positron collisions are simultaneously fitted by a vector dominance model evolving to perturbative QCD at large momentum transfer. This model was previously successful in simultaneously fitting the nucleon electromagnetic form factors (spacelike region) and the electromagnetic production of nucleon-antinucleon pairs (timelike region). For this pion case dispersion relations are used to produce the analytic connection of the spacelike and timelike regions. The fit to all the data is good, especially for the newer sets of timelike data. The description of high-q2 data, in the timelike region, requires one more meson with ρ quantum numbers than listed in the 2014 Particle Data Group review.

  12. Pion Electromagnetic Form Factor in Virtuality Distribution Formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Radyushkin, Anatoly V.

    2016-01-01

    We discuss two applications of the {\\it Virtuality Distribution Amplitudes} (VDA) formalism developed in our recent papers. We start with an overview of the main properties of the pion distribution amplitude emphasizing the quantitative measures of its width, and possibility to access them through the pion transition form factor studies. We formulate the basic concepts of the VDA approach and introduce the pion {\\it transverse momentum distribution amplitude} (TMDA) which plays, in a covariant Lagrangian formulation, a role similar to that of the pion wave function in the 3-dimensional Hamiltonian light-front approach. We propose simple factorized models for soft TMDAs, and use them to describe existing data on the pion transition form factor, thus fixing the scale determining the size of the transverse-momentum effects. Finally, we apply the VDA approach to the one-gluon exchange contribution for the pion electromagnetic form factor. We observe a very late $Q^2 \\gtrsim 20$ GeV$^2$ onset of transition to the asymptotic pQCD predictions and show that in the $Q^2 \\lesssim 10$ GeV$^2$ region there is essentially no sensitivity to the shape of the pion distribution amplitude. Furthermore, the magnitude of the one-gluon exchange contribution in this region is estimated to be an order of magnitude below the Jefferson Lab data, thus leaving the Feynman mechanism as the only one relevant to the pion electromagnetic form factor behavior for accessible $Q^2$.

  13. Measurement of Neutrino-Induced Coherent Pion Production and the Diffractive Background in MINERvA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Alicia; Minerva Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Neutrino-induced coherent charged pion production is a unique neutrino-nucleus scattering process in which a muon and pion are produced while the nucleus is left in its ground state. The MINERvA experiment has made a model-independent differential cross section measurement of this process on carbon by selecting events with a muon and a pion, no evidence of nuclear break-up, and small momentum transfer to the nucleus | t | . A similar process which is a background to the measurement on carbon is diffractive pion production off the free protons in MINERvA's scintillator. This process is not modeled in the neutrino event generator GENIE. At low | t | these events have a similar final state to the aforementioned process. A study to quantify this diffractive event contribution to the background is done by emulating these diffractive events by reweighting all other GENIE-generated background events to the predicted | t | distribution of diffractive events, and then scaling to the diffractive cross section.

  14. Final Report: Multi-State Sharing Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Begoli, Edmon; Boehmann, Brant; DeNap, Frank A

    2012-04-01

    In 2003 a joint effort between the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the U.S. Department of Justice created state and metropolitan intelligence fusion centers. These fusion centers were an effort to share law enforcement, disaster, and terrorism related information and intelligence between state and local jurisdictions and to share terrorism related intelligence between state and local law enforcement agencies and various federal entities. In 2006, DHS commissioned the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to establish and manage a groundbreaking program to assist local, state, and tribal leaders in developing the tools and methods required to anticipate and forestall terrorist events and to enhance disaster response. This program, called the Southeast Region Research Initiative (SERRI), combines science and technology with validated operational approaches to address regionally unique requirements and suggest regional solutions with the potential for national application. In 2009, SERRI sponsored the Multistate Sharing Initiative (MSSI) to assist state and metropolitan intelligence fusion centers with sharing information related to a wider variety of state interests than just terrorism. While these fusion centers have been effective at sharing data across organizations within their respective jurisdictions, their organizational structure makes bilateral communication with federal entities convenient and also allows information to be further disbursed to other local entities when appropriate. The MSSI-developed Suspicious Activity Report (SAR) sharing system allows state-to-state sharing of non-terrorism-related law enforcement and disaster information. Currently, the MSSI SAR system is deployed in Alabama, Kentucky, Tennessee, and South Carolina. About 1 year after implementation, cognizant fusion center personnel from each state were contacted to ascertain the status of their MSSI SAR systems. The overwhelming response from these individuals was that the MSSI

  15. Utah's Pilot State Dissemination Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Kenneth P.

    The final report of the Utah project documents the completion of activities directed at filling the objectives listed in the continuation proposal for the 1972-73 year submitted to the National Institute of Education. (The interim report covering the period from July 1970 to June 1972 is ED 069 327.) Objective one was the establishment of an…

  16. Heavy pentaquark states Pc(4380) and Pc(4450) in the J/ψ production induced by pion beams off the nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Ho; Kim, Hyun-Chul; Hosaka, Atsushi

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we investigate the J / ψ production induced by pion beams off the nucleon, particularly the heavy pentaquarks Pc (4380) and Pc (4450) in intermediate states, based on a hybridized Regge model. The process involving ρ and π meson exchange in the t channel is considered as background, and the heavy pentaquark exchange is included in the s channel. The coupling constants such as the ρNN and πNN vertices are taken from the NN potentials, whereas those for the J / ψρπ and J / ψππ vertices are determined by using experimental data based on the branching ratios. In order to estimate the Pc (4380) and Pc (4450) coupling constants, we use the experimental upper limit on the total cross section as a guide for the πN → J / ψN reaction. The background total cross section is the order of 10-4-10-3 nb. In the vicinity of the heavy pentaquark masses, the total cross section reaches about 1 nb.

  17. The pion: an enigma within the Standard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Tanja; Roberts, Craig D.

    2016-07-01

    Quantum chromodynamics (QCDs) is the strongly interacting part of the Standard Model. It is supposed to describe all of nuclear physics; and yet, almost 50 years after the discovery of gluons and quarks, we are only just beginning to understand how QCD builds the basic bricks for nuclei: neutrons and protons, and the pions that bind them together. QCD is characterised by two emergent phenomena: confinement and dynamical chiral symmetry breaking (DCSB). They have far-reaching consequences, expressed with great force in the character of the pion; and pion properties, in turn, suggest that confinement and DCSB are intimately connected. Indeed, since the pion is both a Nambu-Goldstone boson and a quark-antiquark bound-state, it holds a unique position in nature and, consequently, developing an understanding of its properties is critical to revealing some very basic features of the Standard Model. We describe experimental progress toward meeting this challenge that has been made using electromagnetic probes, highlighting both dramatic improvements in the precision of charged-pion form factor data that have been achieved in the past decade and new results on the neutral-pion transition form factor, both of which challenge existing notions of pion structure. We also provide a theoretical context for these empirical advances, which begins with an explanation of how DCSB works to guarantee that the pion is un-naturally light; but also, nevertheless, ensures that the pion is the best object to study in order to reveal the mechanisms that generate nearly all the mass of hadrons. In canvassing advances in these areas, our discussion unifies many aspects of pion structure and interactions, connecting the charged-pion elastic form factor, the neutral-pion transition form factor and the pion's leading-twist parton distribution amplitude. It also sketches novel ways in which experimental and theoretical studies of the charged-kaon electromagnetic form factor can provide

  18. The pion: an enigma within the Standard Model

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, Tanja; Roberts, Craig D.

    2016-05-27

    Quantum chromodynamics (QCDs) is the strongly interacting part of the Standard Model. It is supposed to describe all of nuclear physics; and yet, almost 50 years after the discovery of gluons and quarks, we are only just beginning to understand how QCD builds the basic bricks for nuclei: neutrons and protons, and the pions that bind them together. QCD is characterised by two emergent phenomena: confinement and dynamical chiral symmetry breaking (DCSB). They have far-reaching consequences, expressed with great force in the character of the pion; and pion properties, in turn, suggest that confinement and DCSB are intimately connected. Indeed, since the pion is both a Nambu–Goldstone boson and a quark–antiquark bound-state, it holds a unique position in nature and, consequently, developing an understanding of its properties is critical to revealing some very basic features of the Standard Model. We describe experimental progress toward meeting this challenge that has been made using electromagnetic probes, highlighting both dramatic improvements in the precision of charged-pion form factor data that have been achieved in the past decade and new results on the neutral-pion transition form factor, both of which challenge existing notions of pion structure. We also provide a theoretical context for these empirical advances, which begins with an explanation of how DCSB works to guarantee that the pion is un-naturally light; but also, nevertheless, ensures that the pion is the best object to study in order to reveal the mechanisms that generate nearly all the mass of hadrons. In canvassing advances in these areas, our discussion unifies many aspects of pion structure and interactions, connecting the charged-pion elastic form factor, the neutral-pion transition form factor and the pion's leading-twist parton distribution amplitude. It also sketches novel ways in which experimental and theoretical studies of the charged-kaon electromagnetic form factor can provide

  19. Dominance of Pion Exchange in {ital {ital R}}-Parity-Violating Supersymmetric Contributions to Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Faessler, A.; Kovalenko, S.; Simkovic, F.; Schwieger, J.; Kovalenko, S.; Simkovic, F.; Simkovic, F.

    1997-01-01

    We present a new contribution of the R-parity-violating (R/{sub p}) supersymmetry (SUSY) to neutrinoless double beta decay (0{nu}{beta}{beta}) via the pion exchange between decaying neutrons. The pion coupling to the final state electrons is induced by the R/{sub p} SUSY interactions. We have found this pion-exchange mechanism to dominate over the conventional two-nucleon one. The latter corresponds to direct interaction between quarks from two decaying neutrons without any light hadronic mediator like {pi} meson. The constraints on the certain R/{sub p} SUSY parameters are extracted from the current experimental 0{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay half-life limit. These constraints are significantly stronger than those previously known or expected from the ongoing accelerator experiments. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. Neutral Pion Double Helicity Asymmetry in Polarized Proton-Proton Collisions at √s=200 GeV at STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leight, William

    2012-03-01

    One of the primary goals of the spin physics program at the STAR experiment is to constrain the polarized gluon distribution function δ(g)(x,Q^2) by measuring the double helicity asymmetry, ALL, of various final-state channels. Neutral pions are a potentially powerful final state because they are copiously produced in p+p collisions and have few backgrounds. STAR can identify neutral pions using its large-acceptance electromagnetic calorimeter, combined with a track veto from the STAR Time Projection Chamber. I will present progress towards measuring an ALL for neutral pions using ˜14 pb-1 of integrated luminosity taken during the 2009 200 GeV p+p run.

  1. Pion absorption on 3He at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, H.; Altman, A.; Ashery, D.; Gefen, G.; Gill, D. R.; Johnson, R. R.; Levy-Nathansohn, R.; Moinester, M. A.; Sevior, M.; Trelle, R. P.

    1996-03-01

    The reactions 3He(π+,pp)p and 3He(π-,pn)n were studied at 37.0 MeV by coincidence detection of two nucleons. The differential cross sections were separated to two-nucleon (σ2N), three-nucleon (σ3N), and final-state interaction (σFSI) components. For π+, the σ2N angular distribution is symmetric about 90°, and the total cross section is 1.5 times the cross section measured for d(π+,pp). For π-, the angular distribution is asymmetric (backward peaked). The asymmetry increases with decreasing energy, indicating increasing pion s-wave contribution at lower energies. The fraction of the cross section induced by s-wave pions as calculated by a partial wave amplitude analysis is 13%. The measured total cross sections are σ2N(π-)=0.85+/-0.08 mb and σ2N(π+)=7.9+/-0.5 mb; σ3N(π-)=1.6+/-0.7 mb and σ3N(π+)=1.3+/-0.3 mb. A new evaluation of σ3N at Tπ=62.5 and 82.8 MeV is given, using data from an earlier experiment. The cross sections leading to the two-nucleon final-state interaction at Tπ=37.0 MeV are also estimated.

  2. Experimental studies of pion-nucleus interactions at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    This report summarizes the work on experimental research in intermediate energy nuclear physics carried out at New Mexico State University in 1991 under a great from the US Department of Energy. Most of these studies have involved investigations of various pion-nucleus interactions. The work has been carried out both with the LAMPF accelerator at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and with the cyclotron at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) near Zurich, Switzerland. Part of the experimental work involves measurements of new data on double-charge-exchange scattering, using facilities at LAMPF which we helped modify, and on pion absorption, using a new detector system at PSI that covers nearly the full solid-angle region which we helped construct. Other work involved preparation for future experiments using polarized nuclear targets and a new high-resolution spectrometer system for detecting {pi}{sup 0} mesons. We also presented several proposals for works to be done in future years, involving studies related to pi-mesonic atoms, fundamental pion-nucleon interactions, studies of the difference between charged and neutral pion interactions with the nucleon, studies of the isospin structure of pion-nucleus interactions, and pion scattering from polarized {sup 3}He targets. This work is aimed at improving our understanding of the pion-nucleon interaction, of the pion-nucleus interaction mechanism, and of nuclear structure.

  3. Pion polarizabilities measurement at COMPASS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guskov, A.

    2008-05-01

    The electromagnetic structure of pions is probed in π- + (A, Z) π- + (A, Z) + γ Compton scattering in inverse kinematics (Primakoff reaction) and described by the electric (απ) and the magnetic (βπ) polarizabilities that depend on the rigidity of pion's internal structure as a composite particle. Values for pion polarizabilities can be extracted from the comparison of the differential cross section for scattering of point like pions with the measured cross section. The pion polarizability measurement was performed with a π- beam of 190 GeV. The high beam intensity, the good spectrometer resolution, the high rate capability, the high acceptance and the possibility to use pion and muon beams, unique to the COMPASS experiment, provide the tools to measure precisely the pion polarizabilities in the Primakoff reaction.

  4. State program advisory number 11. Directive (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-23

    The report updates and revises the State Authorization Manual with RCRA program changes for the period January 1, 1991 through June 30, 1991. It provides nine new checklists: corrections to the land disposal restrictions, suspension of the toxicity characteristic for certain used chlorofluorocarbon refrigerants, correction to the boilers and industrial furnaces requirements, removal of strontium sulfide from the list of hazardous waste, corrections to the organic air emission standards for process vents and equipment leaks, administrative stay for the K069 listing, revision to the petroleum refining primary and secondary oil/water/solids separation sludge listings. The State Program Advisory (SPA) includes a consolidated land disposal checklist, updated through June 30, 1991. This SPA also provides updated tables G-1 and G-2, a model revision attorney general's statement, and a chekclist linkage table to insert into the State Authorization Manual.

  5. Pion absorption in nuclei: The (. pi. /sup + -/,p) reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, C.S.

    1987-05-01

    Reported here is the first experiment to measure the excitation of discrete final states following the (..pi../sup -/,p) reaction. The Energetic Pion Channel and Spectrometer (EPICS) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the High Resolution Pion Channel and Spectrometer (..pi..M1-SUSI) at the Swiss Institute for Nuclear Physics were used for this high resolution study of (..pi../sup + -/,p) reactions. An average energy resolution of 500 KeV and 700 KeV was achieved at EPICS and ..pi..M1-SUSI respectively. At EPICS these reactions were measured at T/sub ..pi../ = 120 MeV and theta/sub lab/ = 25/sup 0/ on /sup 24/Mg, /sup 27/Al, /sup 40/Ca and /sup 58/Ni; /sup 12/C(..pi../sup -/,p) was measured at T/sub ..pi../ = 145 MeV. At ..pi..M1-SUSI these reactions were measured at T/sub ..pi../ = 90 MeV and at theta/sub lab/ = 20/sup 0/ on /sup 23/Na and /sup 24/Mg. The measurement includes both the differential cross sections and continuum up to an excitation energy of 40 MeV. In /sup 23/Na, /sup 24/Mg, and /sup 27/Al there are peaks in the low excitation region. The shape of the continuum in an excitation energy range of 10 to 40 MeV was found to be independent of pion charge and target mass. The magnitude of proton yield from all the targets at T/sub ..pi../ = 120 MeV is more than twenty four times larger for ..pi../sup +/ than for ..pi../sup -/. Also, the cross sections for both reactions on /sup 24/Mg is slightly enhanced compared to other nuclei. At T/sub ..pi../ = 90 MeV the ratio of the proton yield for ..pi../sup +/ to ..pi../sup -/ absorption drops down to fourteen. This high ratio and its energy dependence supports the idea of a two nucleon pion absorption model. Pion absorption in the context of both the reaction mechanism and nuclear structure is discussed. 99 refs., 64 figs., 11 tabs.

  6. Pion loop contribution to the electromagnetic pion charge radius

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, C.D.; Bender, A.; Alkofer, R.

    1995-08-01

    There is a widely held misconception, based on a misrepresentation of the application of chiral perturbation theory, that the electromagnetic structure of the pion is dominated by the pion`s own pion-cloud. To clarify this the Global Color-symmetry Model (GCM), was used to calculate the electromagnetic charge radius of the pion. In this calculation the contributions from the quark core and pion loop were identified and compared. It was shown explicitly that the divergence of the charge radius in the chiral limit is due solely to the pion loop and that, at the physical value of the pion mass, this loop contributes less than 15% {l_angle}r{sub {pi}}{sup 2}{r_angle}; i.e. the quark core is the dominant determining characteristic for the pion. This suggests that quark-based models that fail to reproduce the m{sub {pi}} divergence of {l_angle}{sub {pi}}{sup 2}{r_angle} nevertheless incorporate the dominant characteristic of the pion: its quark core. The result`s studylend further support to the contention that, away from resonances, the dominant determining characteristic of kinematic and dynamical properties of hadrons is their quark core. A paper describing this work was submitted for publication.

  7. Single-pion production in proton-proton collisions at 1.25 GeV: measurements by HADES and a PWA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przygoda, Witold

    2014-11-01

    We report on the single-pion production in proton-proton collisions at a kinetic energy of 1.25 GeV based on data measured with HADES. Exclusive channels npπ+ and ppπ0 were studied simultaneously. The parametrization of production cross sections of the one-pion final states by means of the resonance model has been obtained. Independently, the extraction of the leading partial waves in the data were analyzed within the framework of the partial wave analysis (PWA). Contributions for the production of ∆(1232) and N(1440) intermediate states have been deduced.

  8. Modeling pions on the lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecile, D. J.

    In Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), the pions are the lightest bound states. Current lattice QCD calculations are not able to study pions at realistic masses due to algorithmic difficulties. Instead, lattice studies are limited to unphysically large pion masses, and Chiral Perturbation Theory (ChPT) is often relied upon to extrapolate lattice results to the phenomenological regime and to the chiral limit, where quarks are massless. One of the outstanding problems in the field is to determine the range of quark masses where ChPT is valid and to understand the nonperturbative physics that may cause ChPT to break down. Given the difficulty of studying QCD, it is interesting and useful to construct a lattice field theory model of pions, which would allow a direct lattice calculation without the need for chiral extrapolations. This model can be used to evaluate the reliability of chiral extrapolations as applied to lattice data in the context of a lattice field theory that is exactly solvable numerically even at small quark masses and in the chiral limit. In this light, to create a model of pions of two-flavor Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), a lattice field theory involving two flavors of staggered quarks interacting strongly with Abelian gauge fields is constructed. In the chiral limit, this theory exhibits a SUL(2) x SU R(2) x UA(1) symmetry. The UA(1) symmetry can be broken by introducing a four-fermion term into the action, thereby incorporating the physics of the QCD anomaly. To qualify as a meaningful model of QCD, this lattice model must exhibit spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking and confinement and must have a continuum limit. An interesting mechanism is introduced to address the continuum limit. In particular, an extra dimension allows one to tune a fictitious temperature in order to access a phase of broken symmetry and to find a range where the pion decay constant is much smaller than the lattice cutoff, i.e. Fpi ≪1a . Unlike lattice QCD, a major advantage of

  9. Abelian anomaly and neutral pion production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, H. L. L.; Roberts, C. D.; Bashir, A.; Gutiérrez-Guerrero, L. X.; Tandy, P. C.

    2010-12-01

    We show that in fully self-consistent treatments of the pion, namely, its static properties and elastic and transition form factors, the asymptotic limit of the product Q2Gγ*γπ0(Q2), determined a priori by the interaction employed, is not exceeded at any finite value of spacelike momentum transfer. Furthermore, in such a treatment of a vector-vector contact-interaction one obtains a γ*γ→π0 transition form factor that disagrees markedly with all available data. We explain that the contact interaction produces a pion distribution amplitude that is flat and nonvanishing at the endpoints. This amplitude characterizes a pointlike pion bound state. Such a state has the hardest possible form factors (i.e., form factors that become constant at large momentum transfers and hence are in striking disagreement with completed experiments). However, interactions with QCD-like behavior produce soft pions, a valence-quark distribution amplitude that vanishes as ~(1-x)2 for x~1, and results that agree with the bulk of existing data. Our analysis supports a view that the large-Q2 data obtained by the BaBar Collaboration is not an accurate measure of the γ*γ→π0 form factor.

  10. Decay constants of the pion and its excitations on the lattice.

    SciTech Connect

    Mastropas, Ekaterina V.; Richards, David G.

    2014-07-01

    We present a calculation using lattice QCD of the ratios of decay constants of the excited states of the pion, to that of the pion ground state, at three values of the pion mass between 400 and 700 MeV, using an anisotropic clover fermion action with three flavors of quarks. We find that the decay constant of the first excitation, and more notably of the second, is suppressed with respect to that of the ground-state pion, but that the suppression shows little dependence on the quark mass. The strong suppression of the decay constant of the second excited state is consistent with its interpretation as a predominantly hybrid state.

  11. Pion probes of heavy ion collision dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, J.O.

    1985-03-01

    Pion interferometry data (2-pion correlation) are examined for information on size and lifetime of the pion-emitting matter. The temperatures inferred from pion, proton and kaon spectra are considered. An explanation consistent with the above size and temperature data is proposed. New theoretical Monte Carlo results on spectator effects on heavy-ion pion spectra are presented. 23 refs., 9 figs.

  12. A Study of Charged Current Single Charged Pion Productions on Carbon in a Few-GeV Neutrino Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Hiraide, Katsuki

    2009-01-01

    Understanding single charged pion production via neutrino-nucleus charged current interaction in the neutrino energy region of a few GeV is essential for future neutrino oscillation experiments since this process is a dominant background for vμ → vx oscillation measurements. There are two contributions to this process: single pion production via baryonic resonance (vμN → μ-+) and coherent pion production interacting with the entire nucleus (vμA → μ-+), where N is nucleon in the nucleus and A is the nucleus. The purpose of the study presented in this thesis is a precise measurement of charged current single charged pion productions, resonant and coherent pion productions, with a good final state separation in the neutrino energy region of a few GeV. In this thesis, we focus on the study of charged current coherent pion production from muon neutrinos scattering on carbon, vμ 12C → μ-12+, in the SciBooNE experiment. This is motivated by the fact that without measuring this component first, the precise determination of resonant pion production cross section can not be achieved since the contribution of coherent pion production in the region of small muon scattering angle is not small. Furthermore, the coherent process is particularly interesting because it is deeply rooted in fundamental physics via Adler's partially conserved axial-vector current theorem. We took data from June 2007 until August 2008, in both the neutrino and antineutrino beam. In total, 2.52 x 1020 protons on target were collected. We have performed a search for charged current coherent pion production by using SciBooNE's full neutrino data set, corresponding to 0.99 x 1020 protons on target. No evidence for coherent pion production is observed. We set 90% confidence level upper limits on the cross section ratio of charged

  13. Pion radiotherapy at LAMPF

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, S.E.; Smith, A.R.; Zink, S.

    1982-12-01

    Clinical investigations of pi meson radiotherapy were conducted by the Cancer Research and Treatment Center of the University of New Mexico and the Los Alamos National Laboratory from 1974 until 1982. Two hundred and thirty patients have been treated for a variety of locally advanced primary and metastatic neoplasms. One hundred and ninety-six patients have been followed for a minimum of 18 months. Crude survival data range from 11% for unresectable pancreatic carcinoma to 82% for Stages C and D1 adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Acute tolerance of normal tissues is approximately 4500 pion rad in 36 fractions over 7 weeks. Severe chronic reactions have appeared with increasing frequency after doses in excess of 4000 pion rad.

  14. The four final rotation states of Venus.

    PubMed

    Correia, A C; Laskar, J

    2001-06-14

    Venus rotates very slowly on its axis in a retrograde direction, opposite to that of most other bodies in the Solar System. To explain this peculiar observation, it has been generally believed that in the past its rotational axis was itself rotated to 180 degrees as a result of core-mantle friction inside the planet, together with atmospheric tides. But such a change has to assume a high initial obliquity (the angle between the planet's equator and the plane of the orbital motion). Chaotic evolution, however, allows the spin axis to flip for a large set of initial conditions. Here we show that independent of uncertainties in the models, terrestrial planets with dense atmosphere like Venus can evolve into one of only four possible rotation states. Moreover, we find that most initial conditions will drive the planet towards the configuration at present seen at Venus, albeit through two very different evolutionary paths. The first is the generally accepted view whereby the spin axis flips direction. But we have also found that it is possible for Venus to begin with prograde rotation (the same direction as the other planets) yet then develop retrograde rotation while the obliquity goes towards zero: a rotation of the spin axis is not necessary in this case.

  15. Twist and teleportation analogy of the black hole final state

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Doyeol; Kim, M. S.

    2008-09-15

    Mathematical connection between the quantum teleportation, the most unique feature of quantum information processing, and the black hole final state is studied taking into account the nontrivial spacetime geometry. We use the twist operation for the generalized entanglement measurement and the final-state boundary conditions to obtain transfer theorems for the black hole evaporation. This would enable us to put together the universal quantum teleportation and the black hole evaporation in the unified mathematical footing. For a renormalized post selected final state of outgoing Hawking radiation, we found that the information content, quantified by the mixedness of the state, is preserved only in the special case of the final-state boundary condition in the microcanonical form, which resembles a perfect teleportation channel.

  16. Kaon, pion, and proton associated photofission of Bi nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Y.; Margaryan, A.; Acha, A.; Ahmidouch, A.; Androic, D.; Asaturyan, A.; Asaturyan, R.; Baker, O. K.; Baturin, P.; Benmokhtar, F.; Carlini, R.; Chen, X.; Christy, M.; Cole, L.; Danagoulian, S.; Daniel, A.; Dharmawardane, V.; Egiyan, K.; Elaasar, M.; Ent, R.

    2010-10-15

    The first measurement of proton, pion, and kaon associated fission of Bi nuclei has been performed in a photon energy range 1. 45 < E{sub {gamma}}< 1. 55 GeV. The fission probabilities are compared with an inclusive fission probabilities obtained with photons, protons and pions. The fission probability of Bi nuclei in coincidence with kaons is 0. 18 {+-} 0. 06 which is {approx}3 times larger than the proton and pion associated fission probabilities and {approx}2 times larger than inclusive ones. The kaon associated excess fission events are explained in terms of bound {Lambda} residual states and their weak nonmesonic decays.

  17. Invariant amplitudes for pion electroproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquini, B.; Drechsel, D.; Tiator, L.

    2007-12-01

    The invariant amplitudes for pion electroproduction on the nucleon are evaluated by dispersion relations at constant t with MAID as input for the imaginary parts of these amplitudes. In the threshold region these amplitudes are confronted with the predictions of several low-energy theorems derived in the soft-pion limit. In general agreement with chiral perturbation theory, the dispersive approach yields large corrections to these theorems because of the finite pion mass.

  18. Exclusive electroproduction of two pions at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Ashery, D.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bołd, T.; Bondarenko, K.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Brümmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Dal Corso, F.; del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, S.; Fang, S.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Forrest, M.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bołd, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Gurvich, E.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Horton, K.; Hüttmann, A.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jakob, H.-P.; Januschek, F.; Jones, T. W.; Jüngst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Koffeman, E.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Noor, U.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Oliver, K.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlański, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Pluciński, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycień, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Salii, A.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schönberg, V.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomalak, O.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vázquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Volynets, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Whitmore, J. J.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zhou, C.; Zichichi, A.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zolko, M.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2012-01-01

    The exclusive electroproduction of two pions in the mass range 0.4< M ππ <2.5 GeV has been studied with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 82 pb-1. The analysis was carried out in the kinematic range of 2< Q 2<80 GeV2, 32< W<180 GeV and | t|<0.6 GeV2, where Q 2 is the photon virtuality, W is the photon-proton centre-of-mass energy and t is the squared four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex. The two-pion invariant-mass distribution is interpreted in terms of the pion electromagnetic form factor, | F( M ππ )|, assuming that the studied mass range includes the contributions of the ρ, ρ' and ρ'' vector-meson states. The masses and widths of the resonances were obtained and the Q 2 dependence of the cross-section ratios σ( ρ'→ ππ)/ σ( ρ) and σ( ρ''→ ππ)/ σ( ρ) was extracted. The pion form factor obtained in the present analysis is compared to that obtained in e + e -→ π + π -.

  19. Soft color exchanges and the hadronic final state

    SciTech Connect

    Rathsman, J.

    2000-01-20

    The models for soft color interactions and color string re-interactions, implemented in the Monte Carlo program LEPTO, are investigated regarding hadronic final states in inclusive and diffractive deep inelastic scattering. The hadronic final state in inclusive and diffractive deep inelastic scattering (DIS) can give a better understanding of the interplay between soft and hard processes in QCD. Whereas hard interactions are well described by perturbative QCD, soft interactions are not calculable within perturbation theory. Instead more phenomenological models are used to transform the perturbative partonic final state into an observable hadronic final state. It is normally assumed that the color topology of an event is given by the planar approximation in perturbation theory, so that terms of order 1/N{sub c}{sup 2} are neglected, and that this topology is not altered by soft interactions.

  20. Pion-pair formation and the pion dispersion relation in a hot pion gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alm, T.; Chanfray, G.; Schuck, P.; Welke, G.

    1997-02-01

    The possibility of pion-pair formation in a hot pion gas, based on the bosonic gap equation, is pointed out and discussed in detail. The critical temperature for condensation of pion pairs (Evans-Rashid transition) is determined as a function of the pion density. As for fermions, this phase transition is signated by the appearance of a pole in the two-particle propagator. In Bose systems there exists a second, lower critical temperature, associated with the appearance of the single-particle condensate. Between the two critical temperatures the pion dispersion relation changes from the usual quasiparticle dispersion to a Bogoliubov-like dispersion relation at low momenta. This generalizes the non-relativistic result for an attractive Bose gas by Evans et al. Possible consequences for the inclusive pion spectra measured in heavy-ion collisions at ultra-relativistic energies are discussed.

  1. X(1576) and the final state interaction effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiang; Zhang, Bo; Shen, Lei-Lei; Zhu, Shi-Lin

    2007-04-01

    We study whether the broad peak X(1576) observed by BES Collaboration arises from the final state interaction effect of ρ(14501700) decays. The interference effect could produce an enhancement around 1540 MeV in the K+K- spectrum with typical interference phases. However, the branching ratio B[J/ψ→π0ρ(14501700)]·B[ρ(14501700)→K+K-] from the final state interaction effect is far less than the experimental data.

  2. Measurements of CP-Violating Asymmetries and Branching Fractions in the Decays of B Mesons to Charged Pions and Kaons at the Babar Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Danielson, Morris Nicholas; /Princeton U.

    2006-04-10

    This dissertation describes the measurement of branching fractions and CP asymmetries in neutral B meson decays to charmless two-body final states of charged pions and kaons. CP violation is a poorly-constrained phenomenon in the Standard model (SM) of particle physics and had been studied only in the kaon system before the Babar and Belle experiments. The decay of the neutral B meson to charged pions and kaons is particularly useful for the study of CP violation because they can be related to the Unitarity Triangle angle {alpha}.

  3. Charged-Current Neutral Pion production at SciBooNE

    SciTech Connect

    Catala-Perez, J.; /Valencia U., IFIC

    2009-10-01

    SciBooNE, located in the Booster Neutrino Beam at Fermilab, collected data from June 2007 to August 2008 to accurately measure muon neutrino and anti-neutrino cross sections on carbon below 1 GeV neutrino energy. SciBooNE is studying charged current interactions. Among them, neutral pion production interactions will be the focus of this poster. The experimental signature of neutrino-induced neutral pion production is constituted by two electromagnetic cascades initiated by the conversion of the {pi}{sup 0} decay photons, with an additional muon in the final state for CC processes. In this poster, I will present how we reconstruct and select charged-current muon neutrino interactions producing {pi}{sup 0}'s in SciBooNE.

  4. Sivers asymmetries for inclusive pion and kaon production in deep-inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, John; Hwang, Dae Sung; Kotzinian, Aram

    2009-10-01

    We calculate the Sivers distribution functions induced by the final-state interaction due to one-gluon exchange in diquark models of a nucleon structure, treating the cases of scalar and axial-vector diquarks with both dipole and Gaussian form factors. We use these distribution functions to calculate the Sivers single-spin asymmetries for inclusive pion and kaon production in deep-inelastic scattering. We compare our calculations with the results of HERMES and COMPASS, finding good agreement for {pi}{sup +} production at HERMES, and qualitative agreement for {pi}{sup 0} and K{sup +} production. Our predictions for pion and kaon production at COMPASS could be probed with increased statistics. The successful comparison of our calculations with the HERMES data constitutes prima facie evidence that the quarks in the nucleon have some orbital angular momentum in the infinite-momentum frame.

  5. On-shell interference effects in Higgs boson final states

    DOE PAGES

    Englert, Christoph; Low, Ian; Spannowsky, Michael

    2015-04-29

    Top quark loops in Higgs production via gluon fusion at large invariant final state masses can induce important interference effects in searches for additional Higgs bosons as predicted in, e.g., Higgs portal scenarios and the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model when the heavy scalar is broad or the final state resolution is poor. Currently, the limit setting as performed by both ATLAS and CMS is based on injecting a heavy Higgs-like signal neglecting interference effects. In this study, we perform a study of such “on-shell” interference effects in pp → ZZ and find that they lead to a ≲O(30%) width scheme-dependentmore » modification of the signal strength. Finally, including the continuum contributions to obtain, e.g., the full pp → ZZ → 4l final state, this modification is reduced to the 10% level in the considered intermediate mass range.« less

  6. On-shell interference effects in Higgs boson final states

    SciTech Connect

    Englert, Christoph; Low, Ian; Spannowsky, Michael

    2015-04-29

    Top quark loops in Higgs production via gluon fusion at large invariant final state masses can induce important interference effects in searches for additional Higgs bosons as predicted in, e.g., Higgs portal scenarios and the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model when the heavy scalar is broad or the final state resolution is poor. Currently, the limit setting as performed by both ATLAS and CMS is based on injecting a heavy Higgs-like signal neglecting interference effects. In this study, we perform a study of such “on-shell” interference effects in pp → ZZ and find that they lead to a ≲O(30%) width scheme-dependent modification of the signal strength. Finally, including the continuum contributions to obtain, e.g., the full pp → ZZ → 4l final state, this modification is reduced to the 10% level in the considered intermediate mass range.

  7. Final Department of Defense - State Memorandum of Agreement (DSMOA)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page contains the final version of the model Department of Defense - State Memorandum of Agreement (DSMOA), developed by the Association of State and Territorial Solid Waste Management Officials (ASTSWMO) and the Department of Defense (DoD) with assistance from representatives of the National Association of Attorneys General (NAAG) and the National Governors' Association (NGA).

  8. Elastic pion Compton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalewski, R.V.; Berg, D.; Chandlee, C.; Cihangir, S.; Ferbel, T.; Huston, J.; Jensen, T.; Kornberg, R.; Lobkowicz, F.; Ohshima, T.

    1984-03-01

    We present evidence for elastic pion Compton scattering as observed via the Primakoff process on nulcear targets. We find production cross sections for ..pi../sup -/A..--> pi../sup -/..gamma..A on lead and copper of 0.249 +- 0.027 and 0.029 +- 0.006 mb, respectively, in agreement with the values expected from the one-photon-exchange mechanism of 0.268 +- 0.018 and 0.035 +- 0.004 mb in the region of our experimental acceptance. This reaction provides a clean test of the Primakoff formalism.

  9. Azimuthally Differential Pion Femtoscopy in Pb-Pb Collisions at √{sN N }=2.76 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, S.; Ahn, S. U.; Aiola, S.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Albuquerque, D. S. D.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; An, M.; Andrei, C.; Andrews, H. A.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anson, C.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Anwar, R.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Arnaldi, R.; Arnold, O. W.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Audurier, B.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Ball, M.; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barioglio, L.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Barth, K.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bello Martinez, H.; Bellwied, R.; Beltran, L. G. E.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biro, G.; Biswas, R.; Biswas, S.; Blair, J. T.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Boca, G.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Bonomi, G.; Bonora, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Botta, E.; Bourjau, C.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buhler, P.; Buitron, S. A. I.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Butt, J. B.; Buxton, J. T.; Cabala, J.; Caffarri, D.; Caines, H.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Capon, A. A.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carnesecchi, F.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chauvin, A.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Cho, S.; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa Del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Costanza, S.; Crkovská, J.; Crochet, P.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danisch, M. C.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; de, S.; de Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Conti, C.; de Cuveland, J.; de Falco, A.; de Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; de Pasquale, S.; de Souza, R. D.; Degenhardt, H. F.; Deisting, A.; Deloff, A.; Deplano, C.; Dhankher, P.; di Bari, D.; di Mauro, A.; di Nezza, P.; di Ruzza, B.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Drozhzhova, T.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Duggal, A. K.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Endress, E.; Engel, H.; Epple, E.; Erazmus, B.; Erhardt, F.; Espagnon, B.; Esumi, S.; Eulisse, G.; Eum, J.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Fabbietti, L.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Feuillard, V. J. G.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Francisco, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fronze, G. G.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gajdosova, K.; Gallio, M.; Galvan, C. D.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Garg, K.; Garg, P.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Gauger, E. F.; Gay Ducati, M. B.; Germain, M.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Goméz Coral, D. M.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; Gonzalez, A. S.; Gonzalez, V.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Graham, K. L.; Gramling, J. L.; Greiner, L.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grion, N.; Gronefeld, J. M.; Grosa, F.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grosso, R.; Gruber, L.; Grull, F. R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Guzman, I. B.; Haake, R.; Hadjidakis, C.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hamon, J. C.; Harris, J. W.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Hellbär, E.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Herrmann, F.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hillemanns, H.; Hippolyte, B.; Hladky, J.; Horak, D.; Hosokawa, R.; Hristov, P.; Hughes, C.; Humanic, T. J.; Hussain, N.; Hussain, T.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Inaba, M.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Isakov, V.; Islam, M. S.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Izucheev, V.; Jacak, B.; Jacazio, N.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jadhav, M. B.; Jadlovska, S.; Jadlovsky, J.; Jahnke, C.; Jakubowska, M. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Jercic, M.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jusko, A.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karayan, L.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keijdener, D. L. D.; Keil, M.; Ketzer, B.; Mohisin Khan, M.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Khatun, A.; Khuntia, A.; Kielbowicz, M. M.; Kileng, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, D.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, J.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, C.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Klewin, S.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Kondratyuk, E.; Konevskikh, A.; Kopcik, M.; Kour, M.; Kouzinopoulos, C.; Kovalenko, O.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Králik, I.; Kravčáková, A.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kubera, A. M.; Kučera, V.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, J.; Kumar, L.; Kumar, S.; Kundu, S.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; La Pointe, S. L.; La Rocca, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lapidus, K.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; Laudi, E.; Lavicka, R.; Lazaridis, L.; Lea, R.; Leardini, L.; Lee, S.; Lehas, F.; Lehner, S.; Lehrbach, J.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; León Monzón, I.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Litichevskyi, V.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Llope, W. J.; Lodato, D. F.; Loggins, V. R.; Loenne, P. I.; Loginov, V.; Loizides, C.; Loncar, P.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Lowe, A.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Lupi, M.; Lutz, T. H.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahajan, S.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Mao, Y.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Margutti, J.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martin, N. A.; Martinengo, P.; Martinez, J. A. L.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez García, G.; Martinez Pedreira, M.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Mastroserio, A.; Mathis, A. M.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzilli, M.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Melikyan, Y.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meninno, E.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Mhlanga, S.; Miake, Y.; Mieskolainen, M. M.; Mihaylov, D.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mohammadi, N.; Mohanty, B.; Montes, E.; Moreira de Godoy, D. A.; Moreno, L. A. P.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Mühlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Mulligan, J. D.; Munhoz, M. G.; Münning, K.; Munzer, R. H.; Murakami, H.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Myers, C. J.; Naik, B.; Nair, R.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Naru, M. U.; Natal da Luz, H.; Nattrass, C.; Navarro, S. R.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, R.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Negrao de Oliveira, R. A.; Nellen, L.; Nesbo, S. V.; Ng, F.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Niedziela, J.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Noris, J. C. C.; Norman, J.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Ohlson, A.; Okubo, T.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira da Silva, A. C.; Oliver, M. H.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Orava, R.; Oravec, M.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozdemir, M.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pacik, V.; Pagano, D.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Pal, S. K.; Palni, P.; Pan, J.; Pandey, A. K.; Panebianco, S.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, J.; Park, W. 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C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zardoshti, N.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinovjev, G.; Zmeskal, J.; Alice Collaboration

    2017-06-01

    We present the first azimuthally differential measurements of the pion source size relative to the second harmonic event plane in Pb-Pb collisions at a center-of-mass energy per nucleon-nucleon pair of √{sN N }=2.76 TeV . The measurements have been performed in the centrality range 0%-50% and for pion pair transverse momenta 0.2 pion source size in the directions perpendicular and parallel to the pion transverse momentum, oscillate out of phase, similar to what was observed at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The final-state source eccentricity, estimated via Rside oscillations, is found to be significantly smaller than the initial-state source eccentricity, but remains positive—indicating that even after a stronger expansion in the in-plane direction, the pion source at the freeze-out is still elongated in the out-of-plane direction. The 3 +1 D hydrodynamic calculations are in qualitative agreement with observed centrality and transverse momentum Rside oscillations, but systematically underestimate the oscillation magnitude.

  10. Azimuthally Differential Pion Femtoscopy in Pb-Pb Collisions at sqrt[s_{NN}]=2.76  TeV.

    PubMed

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Poljak, N; Poonsawat, W; Pop, A; Poppenborg, H; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S; Porter, J; Pospisil, J; Pozdniakov, V; Prasad, S K; Preghenella, R; Prino, F; Pruneau, C A; Pshenichnov, I; Puccio, M; Puddu, G; Pujahari, P; Punin, V; Putschke, J; Qvigstad, H; Rachevski, A; Raha, S; Rajput, S; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ramello, L; Rami, F; Rana, D B; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Räsänen, S S; Rascanu, B T; Rathee, D; Ratza, V; Ravasenga, I; Read, K F; Redlich, K; Rehman, A; Reichelt, P; Reidt, F; Ren, X; Renfordt, R; Reolon, A R; Reshetin, A; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Ricci, R A; Richert, T; Richter, M; Riedler, P; Riegler, W; Riggi, F; Ristea, C; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M; Røed, K; Rogochaya, E; Rohr, D; Röhrich, D; Rokita, P S; Ronchetti, F; Ronflette, L; Rosnet, P; Rossi, A; Rotondi, A; Roukoutakis, F; Roy, A; Roy, C; Roy, P; Rubio Montero, A J; Rui, R; Russo, R; Rustamov, A; Ryabinkin, E; Ryabov, Y; Rybicki, A; Saarinen, S; Sadhu, S; Sadovsky, S; Šafařík, K; Saha, S K; Sahlmuller, B; Sahoo, B; Sahoo, P; Sahoo, R; Sahoo, S; Sahu, P K; Saini, J; Sakai, S; Saleh, M A; Salzwedel, J; Sambyal, S; Samsonov, V; Sandoval, A; Sarkar, D; Sarkar, N; Sarma, P; Sas, M H P; Scapparone, E; Scarlassara, F; Scharenberg, R P; Scheid, H S; Schiaua, C; Schicker, R; Schmidt, C; Schmidt, H R; Schmidt, M O; Schmidt, M; Schukraft, J; Schutz, Y; Schwarz, K; Schweda, K; Scioli, G; Scomparin, E; Scott, R; Šefčík, M; Seger, J E; Sekiguchi, Y; Sekihata, D; Selyuzhenkov, I; Senosi, K; Senyukov, S; Serradilla, E; Sett, P; Sevcenco, A; Shabanov, A; Shabetai, A; Shadura, O; Shahoyan, R; Shangaraev, A; Sharma, A; Sharma, A; Sharma, M; Sharma, M; Sharma, N; Sheikh, A I; Shigaki, K; Shou, Q; Shtejer, K; Sibiriak, Y; Siddhanta, S; Sielewicz, K M; Siemiarczuk, T; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Simatovic, G; Simonetti, G; Singaraju, R; Singh, R; Singhal, V; Sinha, T; Sitar, B; Sitta, M; Skaali, T B; Slupecki, M; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R J M; Snellman, T W; Song, J; Song, M; Soramel, F; Sorensen, S; Sozzi, F; Spiriti, E; Sputowska, I; Srivastava, B K; Stachel, J; Stan, I; Stankus, P; Stenlund, E; Stiller, J H; Stocco, D; Strmen, P; Suaide, A A P; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Suleymanov, M; Suljic, M; Sultanov, R; Šumbera, M; Sumowidagdo, S; Suzuki, K; Swain, S; Szabo, A; Szarka, I; Szczepankiewicz, A; Szymanski, M; Tabassam, U; Takahashi, J; Tambave, G J; Tanaka, N; Tarhini, M; Tariq, M; Tarzila, M G; Tauro, A; Tejeda Muñoz, G; Telesca, A; Terasaki, K; Terrevoli, C; Teyssier, B; Thakur, D; Thakur, S; Thomas, D; Tieulent, R; Tikhonov, A; Timmins, A R; Toia, A; Tripathy, S; Trogolo, S; Trombetta, G; Trubnikov, V; Trzaska, W H; Trzeciak, B A; Tsuji, T; Tumkin, A; Turrisi, R; Tveter, T S; Ullaland, K; Umaka, E N; Uras, A; Usai, G L; Utrobicic, A; Vala, M; Van Der Maarel, J; Van Hoorne, J W; van Leeuwen, M; Vanat, T; Vande Vyvre, P; Varga, D; Vargas, A; Vargyas, M; Varma, R; Vasileiou, M; Vasiliev, A; Vauthier, A; Vázquez Doce, O; Vechernin, V; Veen, A M; Velure, A; Vercellin, E; Vergara Limón, S; Vernet, R; Vértesi, R; Vickovic, L; Vigolo, S; Viinikainen, J; Vilakazi, Z; Villalobos Baillie, O; Villatoro Tello, A; Vinogradov, A; Vinogradov, L; Virgili, T; Vislavicius, V; Vodopyanov, A; Völkl, M A; Voloshin, K; Voloshin, S A; Volpe, G; von Haller, B; Vorobyev, I; Voscek, D; Vranic, D; Vrláková, J; Wagner, B; Wagner, J; Wang, H; Wang, M; Watanabe, D; Watanabe, Y; Weber, M; Weber, S G; Weiser, D F; Wessels, J P; Westerhoff, U; Whitehead, A M; Wiechula, J; Wikne, J; Wilk, G; Wilkinson, J; Willems, G A; Williams, M C S; Windelband, B; Witt, W E; Yalcin, S; Yang, P; Yano, S; Yin, Z; Yokoyama, H; Yoo, I-K; Yoon, J H; Yurchenko, V; Zaccolo, V; Zaman, A; Zampolli, C; Zanoli, H J C; Zaporozhets, S; Zardoshti, N; Zarochentsev, A; Závada, P; Zaviyalov, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zhalov, M; Zhang, H; Zhang, X; Zhang, Y; Zhang, C; Zhang, Z; Zhao, C; Zhigareva, N; Zhou, D; Zhou, Y; Zhou, Z; Zhu, H; Zhu, J; Zhu, X; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, A; Zimmermann, M B; Zimmermann, S; Zinovjev, G; Zmeskal, J

    2017-06-02

    We present the first azimuthally differential measurements of the pion source size relative to the second harmonic event plane in Pb-Pb collisions at a center-of-mass energy per nucleon-nucleon pair of sqrt[s_{NN}]=2.76  TeV. The measurements have been performed in the centrality range 0%-50% and for pion pair transverse momenta 0.2pion source size in the directions perpendicular and parallel to the pion transverse momentum, oscillate out of phase, similar to what was observed at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The final-state source eccentricity, estimated via R_{side} oscillations, is found to be significantly smaller than the initial-state source eccentricity, but remains positive-indicating that even after a stronger expansion in the in-plane direction, the pion source at the freeze-out is still elongated in the out-of-plane direction. The 3+1D hydrodynamic calculations are in qualitative agreement with observed centrality and transverse momentum R_{side} oscillations, but systematically underestimate the oscillation magnitude.

  11. Pion Polarizabilities Measurement at Compass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guskov, Alexey; Compass Collaboration

    The electromagnetic structure of pions is probed in p-+(A,Z) p-+(A,Z)+g Compton scattering in inverse kinematics (Primakoff reaction) and described by the electric ([`(ap)]) and the magnetic ([`(bp)]) polarizabilities that depend on the rigidity of pion's internal structure as a composite particle. Values for pion polarizabilities can be extracted from the comparison of the differential cross section for scattering of pointlike pions with the measured cross section. The pion polarizability measurement was performed with a p- beam of 190GeV. The high beam intensity, the good spectrometer resolution, the high rate capability, the high acceptance and the possibility to use pion and muon beams, unique to the COMPASS experiment, provide the tools to measure precisely the pion polarizabilities in the Primakoff reaction. The preliminary result for pion polarizabilities under the assumption of [`(ap)]+[`(bp)]=0 is [`(ap)]=-[`(bp)] = (2.5±1.7stat±0.6syst)x10-4fm3.

  12. Pion contamination in the MICE muon beam

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Barber, G.; Barclay, P.; de Bari, A.; Bayes, R.; Bayliss, V.; Bertoni, R.; Blackmore, V. J.; Blondel, A.; Blot, S.; Bogomilov, M.; Bonesini, M.; Booth, C. N.; Bowring, D.; Boyd, S.; Brashaw, T. W.; Bravar, U.; Bross, A. D.; Capponi, M.; Carlisle, T.; Cecchet, G.; Charnley, C.; Chignoli, F.; Cline, D.; Cobb, J. H.; Colling, G.; Collomb, N.; Coney, L.; Cooke, P.; Courthold, M.; Cremaldi, L. M.; DeMello, A.; Dick, A.; Dobbs, A.; Dornan, P.; Drews, M.; Drielsma, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Franchini, P.; Francis, V.; Fry, L.; Gallagher, A.; Gamet, R.; Gardener, R.; Gourlay, S.; Grant, A.; Greis, J. R.; Griffiths, S.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, O. M.; Hanson, G. G.; Hart, T. L.; Hartnett, T.; Hayler, T.; Heidt, C.; Hills, M.; Hodgson, P.; Hunt, C.; Iaciofano, A.; Ishimoto, S.; Kafka, G.; Kaplan, D. M.; Karadzhov, Y.; Kim, Y. K.; Kuno, Y.; Kyberd, P.; Lagrange, J. -B.; Langlands, J.; Lau, W.; Leonova, M.; Li, D.; Lintern, A.; Littlefield, M.; Long, K.; Luo, T.; Macwaters, C.; Martlew, B.; Martyniak, J.; Mazza, R.; Middleton, S.; Moretti, A.; Moss, A.; Muir, A.; Mullacrane, I.; Nebrensky, J. J.; Neuffer, D.; Nichols, A.; Nicholson, R.; Nugent, J. C.; Oates, A.; Onel, Y.; Orestano, D.; Overton, E.; Owens, P.; Palladino, V.; Pasternak, J.; Pastore, F.; Pidcott, C.; Popovic, M.; Preece, R.; Prestemon, S.; Rajaram, D.; Ramberger, S.; Rayner, M. A.; Ricciardi, S.; Roberts, T. J.; Robinson, M.; Rogers, C.; Ronald, K.; Rubinov, P.; Rucinski, P.; Sakamato, H.; Sanders, D. A.; Santos, E.; Savidge, T.; Smith, P. J.; Snopok, P.; Soler, F. J. P.; Speirs, D.; Stanley, T.; Stokes, G.; Summers, D. J.; Tarrant, J.; Taylor, I.; Tortora, L.; Torun, Y.; Tsenov, R.; Tunnell, C. D.; Uchida, M. A.; Vankova-Kirilova, G.; Virostek, S.; Vretenar, M.; Warburton, P.; Watson, S.; White, C.; Whyte, C. G.; Wilson, A.; Winter, M.; Yang, X.; Young, A.; Zisman, M.

    2016-03-01

    Here, the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a systematic investigation of ionization cooling with muon beams of momentum between 140 and 240\\,MeV/c at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory ISIS facility. The measurement of ionization cooling in MICE relies on the selection of a pure sample of muons that traverse the experiment. To make this selection, the MICE Muon Beam is designed to deliver a beam of muons with less than $\\sim$1% contamination. To make the final muon selection, MICE employs a particle-identification (PID) system upstream and downstream of the cooling cell. The PID system includes time-of-flight hodoscopes, threshold-Cherenkov counters and calorimetry. The upper limit for the pion contamination measured in this paper is $f_\\pi < 1.4\\%$ at 90% C.L., including systematic uncertainties. Therefore, the MICE Muon Beam is able to meet the stringent pion-contamination requirements of the study of ionization cooling.

  13. Skyrmion recoil in pion-nucleon scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, J. Physics Department, University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 ); Mathews, G.J. )

    1992-08-01

    We calculate the lowest-order recoil corrections to the pion-nucleon scattering matrix in the SU(2) Skyrme model. The corrections result from a direct semiclassical evaluation of path-integral expressions for relevant finite-time transition amplitudes. The {ital S} matrix for pion-nucleon scattering is extracted from these amplitudes by using a configuration-space representation for the asymptotic nucleons; the quanta are treated just as in the vacuum sector. The recoil corrections result from the Skyrmion freely translating between initial and final positions, and are relevant to a kinematical regime opposite to that where the impulse approximation is valid. The form of the corrections is model independent, unchanged for any chiral model with hedgehog solitary wave solutions. Remarkably, new lowest-lying resonances emerge in the {ital p} channels, whereas the {ital s} and {ital d} waves are not noticeably improved.

  14. Pion contamination in the MICE muon beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, D.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Barber, G.; Barclay, P.; de Bari, A.; Bayes, R.; Bayliss, V.; Bertoni, R.; Blackmore, V. J.; Blondel, A.; Blot, S.; Bogomilov, M.; Bonesini, M.; Booth, C. N.; Bowring, D.; Boyd, S.; Brashaw, T. W.; Bravar, U.; Bross, A. D.; Capponi, M.; Carlisle, T.; Cecchet, G.; Charnley, C.; Chignoli, F.; Cline, D.; Cobb, J. H.; Colling, G.; Collomb, N.; Coney, L.; Cooke, P.; Courthold, M.; Cremaldi, L. M.; DeMello, A.; Dick, A.; Dobbs, A.; Dornan, P.; Drews, M.; Drielsma, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Franchini, P.; Francis, V.; Fry, L.; Gallagher, A.; Gamet, R.; Gardener, R.; Gourlay, S.; Grant, A.; Greis, J. R.; Griffiths, S.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, O. M.; Hanson, G. G.; Hart, T. L.; Hartnett, T.; Hayler, T.; Heidt, C.; Hills, M.; Hodgson, P.; Hunt, C.; Iaciofano, A.; Ishimoto, S.; Kafka, G.; Kaplan, D. M.; Karadzhov, Y.; Kim, Y. K.; Kuno, Y.; Kyberd, P.; Lagrange, J.-B.; Langlands, J.; Lau, W.; Leonova, M.; Li, D.; Lintern, A.; Littlefield, M.; Long, K.; Luo, T.; Macwaters, C.; Martlew, B.; Martyniak, J.; Mazza, R.; Middleton, S.; Moretti, A.; Moss, A.; Muir, A.; Mullacrane, I.; Nebrensky, J. J.; Neuffer, D.; Nichols, A.; Nicholson, R.; Nugent, J. C.; Oates, A.; Onel, Y.; Orestano, D.; Overton, E.; Owens, P.; Palladino, V.; Pasternak, J.; Pastore, F.; Pidcott, C.; Popovic, M.; Preece, R.; Prestemon, S.; Rajaram, D.; Ramberger, S.; Rayner, M. A.; Ricciardi, S.; Roberts, T. J.; Robinson, M.; Rogers, C.; Ronald, K.; Rubinov, P.; Rucinski, P.; Sakamato, H.; Sanders, D. A.; Santos, E.; Savidge, T.; Smith, P. J.; Snopok, P.; Soler, F. J. P.; Speirs, D.; Stanley, T.; Stokes, G.; Summers, D. J.; Tarrant, J.; Taylor, I.; Tortora, L.; Torun, Y.; Tsenov, R.; Tunnell, C. D.; Uchida, M. A.; Vankova-Kirilova, G.; Virostek, S.; Vretenar, M.; Warburton, P.; Watson, S.; White, C.; Whyte, C. G.; Wilson, A.; Winter, M.; Yang, X.; Young, A.; Zisman, M.

    2016-03-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a systematic investigation of ionization cooling with muon beams of momentum between 140 and 240 MeV/c at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory ISIS facility. The measurement of ionization cooling in MICE relies on the selection of a pure sample of muons that traverse the experiment. To make this selection, the MICE Muon Beam is designed to deliver a beam of muons with less than ~1% contamination. To make the final muon selection, MICE employs a particle-identification (PID) system upstream and downstream of the cooling cell. The PID system includes time-of-flight hodoscopes, threshold-Cherenkov counters and calorimetry. The upper limit for the pion contamination measured in this paper is fπ < 1.4% at 90% C.L., including systematic uncertainties. Therefore, the MICE Muon Beam is able to meet the stringent pion-contamination requirements of the study of ionization cooling.

  15. Pion and kaon freezeout in NA44

    SciTech Connect

    NA44 Collaboration

    1994-12-01

    The NA44 spectrometer is optimized for the study of single and two-particle particle spectra near mid-rapidity for transverse momenta below {approx} 1 GeV/c. A large fraction of all pairs in the spectrometer`s acceptance are at low relative momenta, resulting in small statistical uncertainties on the extracted size parameters. In addition, the spectrometer`s clean particle identification allows the authors to measure correlation functions for pions, kaons, and protons. This contribution will concentrate on the source size parameters determined from pion and kaon correlation functions. These size parameters will be compared to calculations from the RQMD event generator and also interpreted in the context of a hydrodynamic model. Finally, the measured single particle spectra will be examined from the viewpoint of hydrodynamics.

  16. Decays of J/psi (3100) to baryon final states

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, M.W.

    1982-05-01

    We present results for the decays of psi(3100) into baryon and hyperon final states. The sample studied here consists of 1.3 million produced psi decays. The decays into nonstrange baryons agree well with currently established results, but with better statistics. In addition, significant resonance formation in multibody final states is observed. The decay psi ..-->.. anti pp..gamma.., the first direct photon decay of the psi involving baryons in the final state, is presented and the theoretical implications of the decays are briefly explored. Several new decays of the psi involving strange baryons are explored, including the first observations of three body final states involving hyperons. The I-spin symmetry of the strong decay psi ..-->.. baryons has clearly been observed. The reduced matrix elements for psi ..-->.. B anti B are presented for final states of different SU(3) content. The B/sub 8/ anti B/sub 8/ results are in excellent agreement with the psi being an SU(3) singlet as are the results for psi ..-->.. B/sub 10/ anti B/sub 10/. We present the first evidence for the SU(3) violating decays of the type psi ..-->.. B/sub 8/ anti B/sub 10/ + c.c.. Angular distributions for psi ..-->.. B/sub 8/ anti B/sub 8/ are presented and compared with theoretical predictions. Statistics are limited, but the data tends to prefer other than a 1 + Cos/sup 2/theta distribution.

  17. X(1576) and the final state interaction effect

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Xiang; Zhang Bo; Shen Leilei; Zhu Shilin

    2007-04-01

    We study whether the broad peak X(1576) observed by BES Collaboration arises from the final state interaction effect of {rho}(1450 1700) decays. The interference effect could produce an enhancement around 1540 MeV in the K{sup +}K{sup -} spectrum with typical interference phases. However, the branching ratio B[J/{psi}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{rho}(1450 1700)]{center_dot}B[{rho}(1450 1700){yields}K{sup +}K{sup -}] from the final state interaction effect is far less than the experimental data.

  18. Measurements without probabilities in the final state proposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousso, Raphael; Stanford, Douglas

    2014-02-01

    The black hole final state proposal reconciles the infalling vacuum with the unitarity of the Hawking radiation, but only for some experiments. We study experiments that first verify the exterior, then the interior purification of the same Hawking particle. (This is the same protocol that renders the firewall paradox operationally meaningful in standard quantum mechanics.) We show that the decoherence functional fails to be diagonal, even upon inclusion of external "pointer" systems. Hence, probabilities for outcomes of these measurements are not defined. We conclude that the final state proposal does not offer a consistent alternative to the firewall hypothesis.

  19. Pions from and about heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, J.O.

    1982-09-01

    A review is presented of the possibilities of pion production with heavy ion reactions. Major headings include: pion thermometry; hills and valleys in pion spectra; pionic orbits of nuclear size; pion confinement in the fireball; anomalons; and Schroedinger equation solutions for pionic atoms. 47 references, 9 figures. (GHT)

  20. Dynamical spin effects in the pion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmady, Mohammad; Sandapen, Ruben; Chishtie, Farrukh

    2017-03-01

    We take into account dynamical spin effects in the holographic light-front pion wavefunction in order to predict the pion radius, decay constant, the pion electromagnetic and photon-to-pion transition form factors. We report a striking improvement in the description of all data.

  1. Charged- and neutral-pion production in the S-matrix approach

    SciTech Connect

    Malafaia, V.; Pena, M. T.; Elster, Ch.; Adam, J. Jr.

    2006-10-15

    The S-matrix approach is used to calculate both charged- and neutral-pion production in nucleon-nucleon (NN) scattering near threshold. The irreducible pion-rescattering diagram, direct production mechanism, {delta} isobars in intermediate states, and Z diagrams mediated by heavy isoscalar mesons are included in the calculation. For the NN distortions, we considered a realistic interaction, within the Bonn family of potentials, which describes the nucleonic inelasticities above the pion production energy threshold.

  2. Unitary, gauge invariant, relativistic resonance model for pion photoproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Surya; F. Gross

    2000-07-01

    Pion photoproduction up to 770 MeV photon laboratory energy is described by a manifestly covariant wave equation, which includes a treatment of the final state {pi}N interactions consistent with the covariant, unitary, resonance model of pi-N scattering previously developed. The kernel of the equation includes nucleon (N), Roper (N*), Delta, and D{sub 13} poles and their crossed poles, as well as {pi}, {mu}, and w exchange terms. The Kroll-Ruderman term and other interaction currents insure that the model is exactly gauge invariant to all orders in the strong coupling, g{sub {pi}NN}, and that the low energy theorem is satisfied. Unitarity is maintained up to first order in the charge e (Watson theorem). The complete development of this model, which gives a good fit to all the data up to 770 MeV, is presented.

  3. Internal conversion to bound final states in 125Te

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harston, M. R.; Carreyre, T.; Chemin, J. F.; Karpeshin, F.; Trzhaskovskaya, M. B.

    2000-08-01

    Theoretical results are presented for rate of decay of the 3/2+ isomeric nuclear state of 125Te by excitation of atomic electrons to bound states in the ions Te 45+ and Te 46+. In these ions the nuclear transition energy lies just below the threshold for emission of a K-shell electron to the continuum with the result that normal K-shell internal conversion is energetically forbidden. However recent experimental results indicate that excitation of K-shell electrons is still significant in these ions. The theoretical results presented here for internal conversion to bound final states are in quantitative agreement with experiment and thereby confirm the contribution of near-resonant electron-nucleus transitions involving a bound final state.

  4. Charged pion production in νμ interactions on hydrocarbon at ⟨Eν⟩=4.0 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberly, B.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Barrios Sazo, M. G.; Bellantoni, L.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Bustamante, M. J.; Butkevich, A.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; Carneiro, M. F.; Christy, M. E.; Chvojka, J.; da Motta, H.; Datta, M.; Devan, J.; Díaz, G. A.; Dytman, S. A.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fine, R.; Fiorentini, G. A.; Gago, A. M.; Galindo, R.; Gallagher, H.; Golan, T.; Gran, R.; Harris, D. A.; Higuera, A.; Hurtado, K.; Kafka, T.; Kleykamp, J.; Kordosky, M.; Le, T.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshall, C. M.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McGowan, A. M.; Messerly, B.; Miller, J.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J. G.; Mousseau, J.; Muhlbeier, T.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Norrick, A.; Osta, J.; Palomino, J. L.; Paolone, V.; Park, J.; Patrick, C. E.; Perdue, G. N.; Rakotondravohitra, L.; Ramirez, M. A.; Ransome, R. D.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Ruterbories, D.; Salazar, G.; Schellman, H.; Schmitz, D. W.; Simon, C.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Tagg, N.; Tice, B. G.; Valencia, E.; Walton, T.; Wolcott, J.; Wospakrik, M.; Zavala, G.; Zegarra, A.; Zhang, D.; Ziemer, B. P.; Minerva Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Charged pion production via charged-current νμ interactions on plastic scintillator (CH) is studied using the MINERvA detector exposed to the NuMI wideband neutrino beam at Fermilab. Events with hadronic invariant mass W <1.4 GeV and W <1.8 GeV are selected in separate analyses: the lower W cut isolates single pion production, which is expected to occur primarily through the Δ (1232 ) resonance, while results from the higher cut include the effects of higher resonances. Cross sections as functions of pion angle and kinetic energy are compared to predictions from theoretical calculations and generator-based models for neutrinos ranging in energy from 1.5-10 GeV. The data are best described by calculations which include significant contributions from pion intranuclear rescattering. These measurements constrain the primary interaction rate and the role of final state interactions in pion production, both of which need to be well understood by neutrino oscillation experiments.

  5. Search for Tau-Lepton Decays to Seven Or More Pions With BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Kass, R.; Ter-Antonian, R.; Hast, C.; /SLAC

    2007-11-02

    We report the results of searches for several decay modes of the {tau}-lepton with {ge} 7 pions in the final state using 207 x 10{sup 6} {tau}-pairs collected with the BaBar detector. For the decays with 7 charged pions in the final state we find the following 90% CL upper limits: B({tau}{sup -} {yields} 4{pi}{sup -}3{pi}{sup +}({pi}{sup 0}){nu}{sub {tau}}) < 3.0 x 10{sup -7}, B({tau}{sup -} {yields} 4{pi}{sup -}3{pi}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) < 4.3 x 10{sup -7} and B({tau}{sup -} {yields}) B({tau}{sup -} {yields} 4{pi}{sup -}3{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}}) < 2.5 x 10{sup -7}. We also search for the decay {tau}{sup -} {yields} 3{pi}{sup -}2{pi}{sup +}2{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} and report a 90% CL upper limit of < 3.4 x 10{sup -6} for its branching fraction. Finally, we search for the exclusive final state {tau}{sup -} {yields} 2{sigma}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} and find a 90% CL upper limit for its branching fraction of < 5.4 x 10{sup -7}.

  6. Hawaii State Plan for Occupational Safety and Health. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2012-09-21

    This document announces the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) decision to modify the Hawaii State Plan's ``final approval'' determination under Section 18(e) of the Occupational Safety and Health Act (the Act) and to transition to ``initial approval'' status. OSHA is reinstating concurrent federal enforcement authority over occupational safety and health issues in the private sector, which have been solely covered by the Hawaii State Plan since 1984.

  7. Charged Pion Photoproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Haiyan Gao, Wei Chen

    2009-12-01

    We extracted the differential cross section for the gn --> pi-p process from a deuterium target using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab in Hall B for photon energies between 1.0 and 3.5 GeV and pion center-of-mass (c.m.) angles (theta c.m.) between 50 deg. and 115 deg. We confirm a previous indication of a broad enhancement around a c.m. energy (sqrt s) of 2.1 GeV at theta c.m. =90 deg. in the scaled differential cross section, s^7 ds/dt and a rapid fall-off in a center-of-mass energy region of about 400 MeV following the enhancement. Our data show an angular dependence of this enhancement as the suggested scaling region is approached for theta c.m. from 70 deg. to 10 deg.

  8. Classical static final state of collapse with supertranslation memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compère, Geoffrey; Long, Jiang

    2016-10-01

    The Kerr metric models the final classical black hole state after gravitational collapse of matter and radiation. Any stationary metric which is close to the Kerr metric has been proven to be diffeomorphic to it. Now, finite supertranslation diffeomorphisms are symmetries which map solutions to inequivalent solutions as such diffeomorphisms generate conserved superrotation charges. The final state of gravitational collapse is therefore parameterized by its mass, angular momentum and supertranslation field, signaled by its conserved superrotation charges. In this paper, we first derive the angle-dependent energy conservation law relating the asymptotic value of the supertranslation field of the final state to the details of the collapse and subsequent evolution of the system. We then generate the static solution with an asymptotic supertranslation field and we study some of its properties. Up to a caveat, the deviation from the Schwarzschild metric could therefore be predicted on a case-by-case basis from accurate modeling of the angular dependence of the ingoing and outgoing energy fluxes leading to the final state.

  9. New Physics in final states with leptons or photons (EXO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radogna, R.; CMS Collaboration

    2017-07-01

    A survey is presented of results from some recent searches for exotic physics in final states with leptons or photons such as dilepton and diphoton massive resonances or vector-like quarks searches. The results are based on 13TeV proton-proton collisions data collected by the CMS detector at the LHC.

  10. Final-state interactions in {sup 3}Hep collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Dirner, A.; Martinska, G.; Urban, J.

    1995-11-01

    Data on the deuteron momentum, the Wilkin angle, and the 4-momentum transfer squared in the reactions {sup 3}Hep {yields} dpp and {sup 3}Hep {yields} pppn are obtained under experimental conditions permitting complete kinematic reconstruction. Final-state interactions leading to deuteron formation are shown to play a significant role. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Entrepreneurship Education in the Arab States. Final Evaluation Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamloumi, Jilani

    2013-01-01

    The report involves the findings of the final evaluation of the regional entrepreneurship education project in Arab States component II (2011-2012) (see ED560497), which is a joint activity between UNESCO and StratREAL Foundation. It aims to help the development of educational policies enabling the integration of entrepreneurship education within…

  12. Final Scientific Report - Wind Powering America State Outreach Project

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Mark; Margolis, Anne

    2012-02-01

    The goal of the Wind Powering America State Outreach Project was to facilitate the adoption of effective state legislation, policy, finance programs, and siting best practices to accelerate public acceptance and development of wind energy. This was accomplished by Clean Energy States Alliance (CESA) through provision of informational tools including reports and webinars as well as the provision of technical assistance to state leaders on wind siting, policy, and finance best practices, identification of strategic federal-state partnership activities for both onshore and offshore wind, and participation in regional wind development collaboratives. The Final Scientific Report - Wind Powering America State Outreach Project provides a summary of the objectives, activities, and outcomes of this project as accomplished by CESA over the period 12/1/2009 - 11/30/2011.

  13. Decay constants of the pion and its excitations on the lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Mastropas, Ekaterina V.; Richards, David G.

    2014-06-23

    We present a lattice QCD calculation of the ratios of decay constants of the excited states of the pion, to that of the pion ground state. We use an anisotropic clover fermion action with three flavors of quarks, and study the pion decay constants at three values of the light-quark masses, corresponding to pion masses of 391, 524 and 702 MeV. We find that the decay constant of the first excitation, and more notably of the second, is suppressed with respect to that of the ground-state pion, but that the suppression shows little dependence on the quark mass. The strong suppression of the decay constant of the second excited state is consistent with its interpretation as a predominantly hybrid state.

  14. Observation of the ABC effect and final-state isospin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doroshkevich, E. A.; Bashkanov, M. A.; Clement, H.; Perez del Rio, E.; Pricking, A.; Skorodko, T. Yu.; Wagner, G. J.

    2014-07-01

    Despite the number of inclusive measurements of the pionic fusion reactions, the nature of the ABC effect discovered in 1960 was not completely established. Exclusive measurements of the doublepion-production reactions leading to either fused d, 3He and 4He nuclear final states or pp pairs are analyzed. A significant ABC effect—enhancement in the region of low ππ mass—is found only in the isoscalar ππ channel while in the isovector channels it is small or absent. For the reaction with isovector pp final state an ABC effect was not observed even at the special kinematic conditions to reproduce a quasi-bound two-proton state. The total cross sections for the d and 4He fusion reactions show similar resonance-like energy dependence.

  15. Pion condensation in holographic QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Albrecht, Dylan; Erlich, Joshua

    2010-11-01

    We study pion condensation at zero temperature in a hard-wall holographic model of hadrons with isospin chemical potential. We find that the transition from the hadronic phase to the pion condensate phase is first order except in a certain limit of model parameters. Our analysis suggests that immediately across the phase boundary the condensate acts as a stiff medium approaching the Zel'dovich limit of equal energy density and pressure.

  16. Closed universe - Their future evolution and final state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrow, J. D.; Tipler, F. J.

    1985-09-01

    The authors summarize what is currently known about the future evolution and final state of closed universes: in mathematical language, those which have a compact Cauchy surface. It is shown that the existence of a maximal hypersurface (a time of maximum expansion) is a necessary and sufficient condition for the existence of an all-encompassing final singularity in a universe with a compact Cauchy surface. The only topologies which can admit maximal hypersurfaces are S3 and S2×S1, together with more complicated topologies formed from these two types of 3-manifold by connected summation and certain identifications. The relevance of these results to inflation is also discussed.

  17. Consistent model for πN transition distribution amplitudes and backward pion electroproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lansberg, J. P.; Pire, B.; Semenov-Tian-Shansky, K.; Szymanowski, L.

    2012-03-01

    The extension of the concept of generalized parton distributions leads to the introduction of baryon to meson transition distribution amplitudes (TDAs), nondiagonal matrix elements of the nonlocal three quark operator between a nucleon and a meson state. We present a general framework for modeling nucleon to pion (πN) TDAs. Our main tool is the spectral representation for πN TDAs in terms of quadruple distributions. We propose a factorized Ansatz for quadruple distributions with input from the soft-pion theorem for πN TDAs. The spectral representation is complemented with a D-term like contribution from the nucleon exchange in the cross channel. We then study backward pion electroproduction in the QCD collinear factorization approach in which the nonperturbative part of the amplitude involves πN TDAs. Within our two component model for πN TDAs, we update previous leading-twist estimates of the unpolarized cross section. Finally, we compute the transverse target single spin asymmetry as a function of skewness. We find it to be sizable in the valence region and sensitive to the phenomenological input of our πN TDA model.

  18. A New Pion-Nucleon Partial Wave Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, Michael; Watson, Shon; Stahov, Jugoslav

    2006-10-01

    Existing determinations of the masses, widths and decay modes of low-lying excited states of the nucleon, as compiled in the Review of Particle Physics, are determined from energy-independent partial wave analyses of pion-nucleon scattering data. For the N*(1440) and most other resonances under 2 GeV, the analyses cited are the Karlsruhe-Helsinki, Carnegie Mellon-Berkeley and Kent State analyses, the latter of which used the elastic amplitudes from the other two. The data included in these analyses were published before 1980. Other analyses, notably the recent ones from George Washington University and the Pittsburgh-Argonne group, are ``not used for averages, fits, limits, etc.'' Complete sets of measurements (differential cross sections, analyzing powers and spin rotation parameters) have been measured in the N*(1440) resonance region since 1980, culminating in the Crystal Ball program at BNL to measure all-neutral final states (charge exchange, multiple pi-zero final states, and inverse photoproduction). A new partial wave analysis of the Karlsruhe-Helsinki type has been started by Abilene Christian University, University of Tuzla, and Rudjer Boskovic Institute. The analysis is constrained by fixed-t and interior hyperbolic dispersion relations. Comparisons of the new analysis to modern experimental data and to previous analyses will be presented.

  19. Isospin Dependence of Pion Absorption on Nucleon Pairs at Tπ=65 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moinester, M. A.; Gill, D. R.; Vincent, J.; Ashery, D.; Levenson, S.; Alster, J.; Altman, A.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Piasetzky, E.; Aniol, K. A.; Johnson, R. R.; Roser, H. W.; Tacik, R.; Gyles, W.; Barnett, B.; Sobie, R. J.; Gubler, H. P.

    1984-04-01

    Angular distributions of differential cross sections were measured for the first time for pion absorption on a T=1, S=0 nucleon pair and for absorption on a T=0, S=1 pair in the 3He nucleus. A large isospin dependence is observed in the differential cross sections. The ratio of cross sections σ(3He(π+,2p))σ(3He(π-,pn)) is 15.2+/-1.2. The results show evidence of an isoscalar component of the final state in the reaction 3He(π-,pn)n, which cannot be mediated by Δ resonance formation.

  20. On the Partial-Wave Analysis of Mesonic Resonances Decaying to Multiparticle Final States Produced by Polarized Photons

    SciTech Connect

    Salgado, Carlos W.; Weygand, Dennis P.

    2014-04-01

    Meson spectroscopy is going through a revival with the advent of high statistics experiments and new advances in the theoretical predictions. The Constituent Quark Model (CQM) is finally being expanded considering more basic principles of field theory and using discrete calculations of Quantum Chromodynamics (lattice QCD). These new calculations are approaching predictive power for the spectrum of hadronic resonances and decay modes. It will be the task of the new experiments to extract the meson spectrum from the data and compare with those predictions. The goal of this report is to describe one particular technique for extracting resonance information from multiparticle final states. The technique described here, partial wave analysis based on the helicity formalism, has been used at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) using pion beams, and Jefferson Laboratory (Jlab) using photon beams. In particular this report broaden this technique to include production experiments using linearly polarized real photons or quasi-real photons. This article is of a didactical nature. We describe the process of analysis, detailing assumptions and formalisms, and is directed towards people interested in starting partial wave analysis.

  1. Dispersive approaches for three-particle final state interaction

    DOE PAGES

    Guo, Peng; Danilkin, Igor V.; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2015-10-30

    In this work, we presented different representations of Khuri-Treiman equation, the advantage and disadvantage of each representations are discussed. With a scattering amplitude toy model, we also studied the sensitivity of solution of KT equation to left-hand cut of toy model and to the different approximate methods. At last, we give a brief discussion of Watson's theorem when three particles in final states are involved.

  2. Dispersive approaches for three-particle final state interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Peng; Danilkin, Igor V.; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2015-10-30

    In this work, we presented different representations of Khuri-Treiman equation, the advantage and disadvantage of each representations are discussed. With a scattering amplitude toy model, we also studied the sensitivity of solution of KT equation to left-hand cut of toy model and to the different approximate methods. At last, we give a brief discussion of Watson's theorem when three particles in final states are involved.

  3. Three-nucleon force the {Delta}-mechanism for pion production and pion absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Pena, M.T. |; Sauer, P.U.; Stadler, A. |; Kortemeyer, G.

    1993-05-18

    The description of the three-nucleon system in terms of nucleon and {Delta} degrees of freedom is extended to allow for explicit pion production (absorption) from single dynamic {Delta} de-excitation (excitation) processes. This mechanism yields an energy dependent effective three-body hamiltonean. The Faddeev equations for the trinucleon bound state are solved with a force model that has already been tested in the two-nucleon system above pion-production threshold. The binding energy and other bound state properties are calculated. The contribution to the effective three-nucleon force arising from the pionic degrees of freedom is evaluated. The validity of previous coupled-channel calculations with explicit but stable A isobar components in the wavefunction is studied.

  4. Studies of $\\Lambda n$ interaction through polarization observables for final-state interactions in exclusive $\\Lambda$ photoproduction off the deuteron

    SciTech Connect

    Ilieva, Yordanka; Cao, Tongtong; Zachariou, Nicholas

    2016-06-01

    Theoretical studies suggest that experimental observables for hyperon production reactions can place stringent constraints on the free parameters of hyperon-nucleon potentials, which are critical for the understanding of hypernuclear matter and neutron stars. Here we present preliminary experimental results for the polarization observables S, Py, Ox, Oz, Cx, and Cz for final-state interactions (FSI) in exclusive L photoproduction off the deuteron. The observables were obtained from data collected during the E06-103 (g13) experiment with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. The g13 experiment ran with unpolarized deuteron target and circularly- and linearly-polarized photon beams with energies between 0.5 GeV and 2.5 GeV and collected about 51010 events with multiple charged particles in the final state. To select the reaction of interest, the K+ and the L decay products, a proton and a negative pion, were detected in the CLAS. The missing-mass technique was used to identify exclusive hyperon photoproduction events. Final-state interaction events were selected by requesting that the reconstructed neutron has a momentum larger than 200 MeV/c. The large statistics of E06-103 provided statistically meaningful FSI event samples, which allow for the extraction of one- and two-fold differential single- and double-polarization observables. Here we present preliminary results for a set of six observables for photon energies between 0.9 GeV and 2.3 GeV and for several kinematic variables in the Ln center-of-mass frame. Our results are the very first estimates of polarization observables for FSI in hyperon photoproduction and will be used to constrain the free parameters of hyperon-nucleon potentials.

  5. Gluon condensate in a pion superfluid beyond the mean-field approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Yin; Zhuang Pengfei

    2011-03-15

    We study gluon condensate in a pion superfluid by calculating the equation of state of the system in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. While in mean-field approximation the growing pion condensate leads to an increasing gluon condensate, meson fluctuations reduce the gluon condensate, and the broken scalar symmetry can be smoothly restored at finite isospin density.

  6. Measurement of muon plus proton final states in νμ interactions on hydrocarbon at < Eν > = 4.2 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, T.

    2015-04-01

    A study of charged-current muon neutrino scattering on hydrocarbon in which the final state includes a muon, at least one proton, and no pions is presented. Although this signature has the topology of neutrino quasielastic scattering from neutrons, the event sample contains contributions from quasielastic and inelastic processes where pions are absorbed in the nucleus. The analysis accepts events with muon production angles up to 70° and proton kinetic energies greater than 110 MeV. The cross section, when based completely on hadronic kinematics, is well described by a relativistic Fermi gas nuclear model including the neutrino event generator modeling for inelastic processes and particle transportation through the nucleus. This is in contrast to the quasielastic cross section based on muon kinematics, which is best described by an extended model that incorporates multinucleon correlations. As a result, this measurement guides the formulation of a complete description of neutrino-nucleus interactions that encompasses the hadronic as well as the leptonic aspects of this process.

  7. Measurement of muon plus proton final states in νμ interactions on hydrocarbon at < Eν > = 4.2 GeV

    DOE PAGES

    Walton, T.

    2015-04-01

    A study of charged-current muon neutrino scattering on hydrocarbon in which the final state includes a muon, at least one proton, and no pions is presented. Although this signature has the topology of neutrino quasielastic scattering from neutrons, the event sample contains contributions from quasielastic and inelastic processes where pions are absorbed in the nucleus. The analysis accepts events with muon production angles up to 70° and proton kinetic energies greater than 110 MeV. The cross section, when based completely on hadronic kinematics, is well described by a relativistic Fermi gas nuclear model including the neutrino event generator modeling formore » inelastic processes and particle transportation through the nucleus. This is in contrast to the quasielastic cross section based on muon kinematics, which is best described by an extended model that incorporates multinucleon correlations. As a result, this measurement guides the formulation of a complete description of neutrino-nucleus interactions that encompasses the hadronic as well as the leptonic aspects of this process.« less

  8. Four-nucleon potential due to exchange of pions

    SciTech Connect

    Robilotta, M.R.

    1985-03-01

    A four-body force due to the exchange of pions has been derived by means of It includes effects corresponding to pion-pion scattering, pion production, and pion-nucleon rescattering. The strength parameters of this four-body potential are typically one order of magnitude smaller than those of the two-pion-exchange three-body force.

  9. Pions to Quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Laurie Mark; Dresden, Max; Hoddeson, Lillian

    2009-01-01

    Part I. Introduction; 1. Pions to quarks: particle physics in the 1950s Laurie M Brown, Max Dresden and Lillian Hoddeson; 2. Particle physics in the early 1950s Chen Ning Yang; 3. An historian's interest in particle physics J. L. Heilbron; Part II. Particle discoveries in cosmic rays; 4. Cosmic-ray cloud-chamber contributions to the discovery of the strange particles in the decade 1947-1957 George D. Rochester; 5. Cosmic-ray work with emulsions in the 1940s and 1950s Donald H. Perkins; Part III. High-energy nuclear physics; Learning about nucleon resonances with pion photoproduction Robert L. Walker; 7. A personal view of nucleon structure as revealed by electron scattering Robert Hofstadter; 8. Comments on electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon Robert G. Sachs and Kameshwar C. Wali; Part IV. The new laboratory; 9. The making of an accelerator physicist Matthew Sands; 10. Accelerator design and construction in the 1950s John P. Blewett; 11. Early history of the Cosmotron and AGS Ernest D. Courant; 12. Panel on accelerators and detectors in the 1950s Lawrence W. Jones, Luis W. Alvarez, Ugo Amaldi, Robert Hofstadter, Donald W. Kerst, Robert R. Wilson; 13. Accelerators and the Midwestern Universities Research Association in the 1950s Donald W. Kerst; 14. Bubbles, sparks and the postwar laboratory Peter Galison; 15. Development of the discharge (spark) chamber in Japan in the 1950s Shuji Fukui; 16. Early work at the Bevatron: a personal account Gerson Goldhaber; 17. The discovery of the antiproton Owen Chamberlain; 18. On the antiproton discovery Oreste Piccioni; Part V. The Strange Particles; 19. The hydrogen bubble chamber and the strange resonances Luis W. Alvarez; 20. A particular view of particle physics in the fifties Jack Steinberger; 21. Strange particles William Chinowsky; 22. Strange particles: production by Cosmotron beams as observed in diffusion cloud chambers William B. Fowler; 23. From the 1940s into the 1950s Abraham Pais; Part VI. Detection of the

  10. Analysis of pion production data measured by HADES in proton-proton collisions at 1.25 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agakishiev, G.; Balanda, A.; Belver, D.; Belyaev, A.; Berger-Chen, J. C.; Blanco, A.; Böhmer, M.; Boyard, J. L.; Cabanelas, P.; Chernenko, S.; Dybczak, A.; Epple, E.; Fabbietti, L.; Fateev, O.; Finocchiaro, P.; Fonte, P.; Friese, J.; Fröhlich, I.; Galatyuk, T.; Garzón, J. A.; Gernhäuser, R.; Göbel, K.; Golubeva, M.; D.; Guber, F.; Gumberidze, M.; Heinz, T.; Hennino, T.; Holzmann, R.; Ierusalimov, A.; Iori, I.; Ivashkin, A.; Jurkovic, M.; Kämpfer, B.; Karavicheva, T.; Koenig, I.; Koenig, W.; Kolb, B. W.; Kornakov, G.; Kotte, R.; Krása, A.; Krizek, F.; Krücken, R.; Kuc, H.; Kühn, W.; Kugler, A.; Kurepin, A.; Ladygin, V.; Lalik, R.; Lang, S.; Lapidus, K.; Lebedev, A.; Liu, T.; Lopes, L.; Lorenz, M.; Maier, L.; Mangiarotti, A.; Markert, J.; Metag, V.; Michalska, B.; Michel, J.; Müntz, C.; Münzer, R.; Naumann, L.; Pachmayer, Y. C.; Palka, M.; Parpottas, Y.; Pechenov, V.; Pechenova, O.; Pietraszko, J.; Przygoda, W.; Ramstein, B.; Reshetin, A.; Rustamov, A.; Sadovsky, A.; Salabura, P.; Schmah, A.; Schwab, E.; Siebenson, J.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Ströbele, H.; Stroth, J.; Sturm, C.; Tarantola, A.; Teilab, K.; Tlusty, P.; Traxler, M.; Trebacz, R.; Tsertos, H.; Vasiliev, T.; Wagner, V.; Weber, M.; Wendisch, C.; Wüstenfeld, J.; Yurevich, S.; Zanevsky, Y.; Sarantsev, A. V.; Nikonov, V. A.

    2015-10-01

    Baryon resonance production in proton-proton collisions at a kinetic beam energy of 1.25GeV is investigated. The multi-differential data were measured by the HADES Collaboration. Exclusive channels with one pion in the final state ( npπ + and ppπ 0 were put to extended studies based on various observables in the framework of a one-pion exchange model and with solutions obtained within the framework of a partial wave analysis (PWA) of the Bonn-Gatchina group. The results of the PWA confirm the dominant contribution of the Δ(1232), yet with a sizable impact of the N (1440) and non-resonant partial waves.

  11. Cross section calculations for subthreshold pion production in peripheral heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Deutchman, P. A.; Townsend, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    Total cross sections angular distributions, and spectral distributions for the exclusive production of charged and neutral subthreshold pions produced in peripheral nucleus-nucleus collisions are calculated by using a particle-hole formalism. The pions result from the formation and decay of an isobar giant resonance state formed in a C-12 nucleus. From considerations of angular momentum conservation and for the sake of providing a unique experimental signature, the other nucleus, chosen for this work to be C-12 also, is assumed to be excited to one of its isovector (1+) giant resonance states. The effects of nucleon recoil by the pion emission are included, and Pauli blocking and pion absorption effects are studied by varying the isobar width. Detailed comparisons with experimental subthreshold pion data for incident energies between 35 and 86 MeV/nucleon are made.

  12. Abelian anomaly and neutral pion production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Craig

    2011-04-01

    The process γ* γ -->π0 is fascinating because in order to explain the associated transition form factor within the Standard Model on the full domain of momentum transfer, one must combine, using a single internally-consistent framework, an explanation of the essentially nonperturbative Abelian anomaly with the features of perturbative QCD. The case for attempting this has received a significant boost with the publication of data from the BaBar Collaboration [Phys. Rev. D 80, 052002 (2009)] because, while they agree with earlier experiments on their common domain of squared-momentum-transfer [CELLO - Z. Phys. C 49, 401 (1991); CLEO - Phys. Rev. D 57, 33 (1998)], the BaBar data are unexpectedly far above the prediction of perturbative QCD at larger values of Q2. I will elucidate the sensitivity of the γ* γ -->π0 transition form factor, Gγ* γπ(Q2) , to the pointwise behaviour of the interaction between quarks; and use existing Dyson-Schwinger equation calculations of this and the kindred γ*γ* -->π0 form factor to characterize the Q2-dependence of Gγ* γπ(Q2) . It will become apparent that in fully-self-consistent treatments of pion: static properties; and elastic and transition form factors, the asymptotic limit of the product Q2Gγ* γπ0(Q2) , which is determined a priori by the interaction employed, is not exceeded at any finite value of spacelike momentum transfer: the product is a monotonically-increasing concave function. Studies exist which interpret the BaBar data as an indication that the pion's distribution amplitude, φπ(x) , deviates dramatically from its QCD asymptotic form, indeed, that φπ(x) = constant, or is at least flat and nonvanishing at x = 0 , 1 . I will explain that such a distribution amplitude characterises an essentially-pointlike pion; and show that, when used in a fully-consistent treatment, it produces results for pion elastic and transition form factors that are in striking disagreement with experiment. A bound-state pion

  13. Pion inelastic scattering from sup 20 Ne

    SciTech Connect

    Burlein, M. . Dept. of Physics)

    1989-12-01

    Angular distributions for {sup 20}Ne({pi}{sup {plus minus}}, {pi}{sup {plus minus}}{prime}) were measured on the Energetic Pion Channel and Spectrometer (EPICS) at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). Data were taken with both {pi}{sup {plus}} and {pi}{sup {minus}} over an angular range of 12{degree} to 90{degree} for T{sub {pi}}=180 MeV and with {pi}{sup +} from 15{degree} to 90{degree} for T{sub {pi}}=120 MeV. The data were analyzed using both the distorted-wave impulse approximation (DWIA) and the coupled-channels impulse approximation (CCIA) with collective transition densities. In addition, microscopic transition densities were used in the DWIA analysis for states in the lowest rotational bands. The transitions to the 6.73-MeV 0{sup +} and several 1{sup {minus}} states, including the states at 5.79 MeV and 8.71 MeV, were studied using several models for the transition density. Strong evidence for the importance of two-step routes in pion inelastic scattering was seen in several angular distributions, including the 5.79-MeV 1{sup {minus}}, the first three 4{sup +} states, and the 8.78-MeV 6{sup +}. 100 refs., 81 figs., 33 tabs.

  14. Chiral baryon with quantized pions

    SciTech Connect

    McNeil, J.A.; Price, J.A.

    1993-04-01

    The authors consider a hybrid chiral baryon model starting from the Gell-Mann-Levy linear sigma model with the sigma and pion fields coupled to quarks. Instead of employing the standard hedgehog ansatz, the authors solve the model using a Fock-space configuration consisting of a component with three quarks plus a component with three quarks and an explicit pion. In each component, the quarks (and pion) are directly coupled to the spin and isospin appropriate to a nucleon and the coupling is preserved throughout the calculation. The authors minimizes the groundstate expectation value of the Gell-Mann-Levy Hamiltonian to obtain the equations of motion which are solved self-consistently. They calculatess the canonical set of nucleon observables and compare them with previous work.

  15. Soft two-pion-exchange nucleon-nucleon potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Rijken, Th.A. )

    1991-06-01

    Two-pion-exchange nucleon-nucleon potentials are derived for the pseudo-vector pion-nucleon interaction, assuming strong dynamical pair-suppression. At the pion-nucleon vertices the authors include Gaussian form factors, which are incorporated into the relativistic two-body framework by using a dispersion representation for the one-pion-exchange amplitude. The Fourier transformations are performed using a factorization technique for the energy denominators. This leads to analytic expressions for the TPE-potentials containing at most one-dimensional integrals. The TPE-potentials are calculated up to orders {line integral}{sup 4} and (m/M){line integral}{sup 4}. The terms of order {line integral}{sup 4} come from the adiabatic contributions of the parallel and crossed three-dimensional momentum-space TPE-diagrams, and from the non-adiabatic contributions of the OPE-iteration. The (m/M)-corrections are due to the 1/M-terms in the non-adiabatic expansion of the nucleon energies in the intermediate states, and the 1/M-terms in the pion-nucleon vertices. The latter are typical for the PV-coupling and would be absent for the PS-coupling. The Gaussian form factors lead to soft TPE-potentials. These potentials can readily be exploited in NN-calculations in combination with, e.g., the Nijmegen soft-core OBE-model, and in nuclear (matter) calculations.

  16. HERA results on jets and hadronic final states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbytskyi, Andrii; H1 Collaboration; ZEUS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We discuss the recent results on the measurements of jets and hadronic final states in e± p collisions at HERA by the ZEUS and H1 experiments. The studies of jet production are presented with the measurements of multijets in low-Q2 region. Results of further measurements of isolated photons in different kinematic regions are provided as well as multiple results on exclusive meson production. The recently performed searches are presented with the searches of strange pentaquarks and QCD instanton induced processes.

  17. Rare Bs decays to η and η' final states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlucci, M. V.; Colangelo, P.; de Fazio, F.

    2009-09-01

    We study exclusive Bs decays to final states with η and η', induced by the rare b→sℓ+ℓ- and b→sνν¯ transitions. Differential decay rates and total branching fractions are predicted in the standard model, adopting the flavor scheme for the description of the η-η' mixing. We discuss the theoretical uncertainty related to the hadronic matrix elements. We also consider these decay modes in a new physics scenario with a single universal extra dimension, studying the dependence of branching ratios and decay distributions on the compactification scale R-1 of the extra dimension.

  18. Final State Interactions, T-odd PDFs & the Lensing Function

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard Gamberg, Marc Schlegel

    2009-12-01

    It has been suggested that under certain approximations the Sivers effect can be described in terms of factorization of final state interactions and a spatial distortion of impact parameter space parton distribution; that is a convolution of the so-called lensing function and the impact parameter GPD E. In this approach the lensing function is calculated in a non-perturbative eikonal model. This enables a comparison between the a priori distinct Sivers function and the GPD E which goes beyond the discussion of overall signs.

  19. Dispersive approaches for three-particle final state interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Peng; Danilkin, I. V.; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we present different representations of the Khuri-Treiman equation and discuss advantages and disadvantages of each representation. In particular we focus on the inversion technique proposed by Pasquier, which, even though developed a long time ago, has not been used in modern analyses of data on three particle decays. We apply the method to a toy model and compare the sensitivity of this and alternative solution methods to the left-hand cut contribution. We also discuss the meaning and applicability of Watson's theorem when three particles in final states are involved.

  20. Systematics of pion double charge exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, R.A.

    1985-10-01

    Differential cross sections have been measured for pion-induced double-charge-exchange (DCX) reactions leading to double-isobaric-analog states (DIAS) and low-lying nonanalog states in the residual nuclei. A description of the experimental details and data analysis is presented. The experimentally observed systematics of reactions leading to DIAS, to nonanalog ground states, and to low-lying 2 states are described. Lowest-order optical-model calculations of DIAS DCX are compared to the data. Efforts to understand the anomalies by invoking additional reaction-mechanism amplitudes and a higher-order optical potential are described. Calculations of nonanalog DCX reactions leading to J/sup / = 0 states were performed within a distorted-wave impulse-approximation framework. The sensitivities of these calculations to input parameters are discussed. 58 refs., 41 figs., 16 tabs.

  1. Spin Structure of the Pion

    SciTech Connect

    Broemmel, D.; Diehl, M.; Goeckeler, M.; Schaefer, A.; Haegler, Ph.; Horsley, R.; Zanotti, J. M.; Nakamura, Y.; Pleiter, D.; Schierholz, G.

    2008-09-19

    We present the first calculation of the transverse spin structure of the pion in lattice QCD. Our simulations are based on two flavors of nonperturbatively improved Wilson fermions, with pion masses as low as 400 MeV in volumes up to (2.1 fm){sup 3} and lattice spacings below 0.1 fm. We find a characteristic asymmetry in the spatial distribution of transversely polarized quarks. This asymmetry is very similar in magnitude to the analogous asymmetry we previously obtained for quarks in the nucleon. Our results support the hypothesis that all Boer-Mulders functions are alike.

  2. Collectivity in small systems: Initial correlations or final state flow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenke, Björn

    2017-01-01

    I review recent progress in understanding correlation measurements in small collision systems, such as proton+lead and proton+proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and proton+gold, deuteron+gold, and 3He+gold collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). I discuss two distinct theoretical approaches to describing the experimental data on multi-particle correlations. The first attributes the origin of the measured correlations to strong final state interactions, often described by hydrodynamics, the second employs the color glass condensate effective theory and is able to reproduce many features of the data from initial state effects only. I discuss how to distinguish which of the two sources of correlations dominates the experimental observables, and give an outlook on how to make progress on the theory side.

  3. Pion-induced pion production on deuterium: a quasifree process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sossi, V.; Iqbal, M. J.; Johnson, R. R.; Jones, G.; Pavan, M.; Rozon, F. M.; Sevior, M.; Vetterli, D.; Weber, P.; Sheffer, G.; Smith, G. R.; Camerini, P.; Grion, N.; Rui, R.; Stevenson, N. R.; Vicente-Vacas, M. J.

    1992-10-01

    A detailed experimental analysis of the π+d → π+π-pp in-plane coincidence data first presented by Rui et al. is compared to an expanded version of the Oset and Vicente-Vacas model for pion-induced pion production on a free nucleon. This extended model averages over Fermi motion to describe the assumed quasifree nature of the process occurring on the deuteron and includes nine additional diagrams to account for the N∗ → N(ππ) p-wave reaction channels. Experimental effects such as pion energy loss in the target and in the detectors, pion decay and muon detection are investigated and incorporated into the comparison of experimental data and theory. Inclusion of Fermi motion was found to be essential to provide good agreement between data and model confirming the quasifree nature of the reaction. When compared to the total-cross-section measurements of Manley et al., the free-reaction model yields a model-dependent estimate of the overall strength of the diagram containing the N∗ → N(ππ) s-wave vertex.

  4. New physics in multi-Higgs boson final states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilian, Wolfgang; Sun, Sichun; Yan, Qi-Shu; Zhao, Xiaoran; Zhao, Zhijie

    2017-06-01

    We explore the potential for the discovery of the triple-Higgs signal in the [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] decay channel at a 100 TeV hadron collider. We consider both the Standard Model and generic new-physics contributions, described by an effective Lagrangian that includes higher-dimensional operators. The selected subset of operators is motivated by composite-Higgs and Higgs-inflation models. In the Standard Model, we perform both a parton-level and a detector-level analysis. Although the parton-level results are encouraging, the detector-level results demonstrate that this mode is really challenging. However, sizable contributions from new effective operators can largely increase the cross section and/or modify the kinematics of the Higgs bosons in the final state. Taking into account the projected constraints from single and double Higgs-boson production, we propose benchmark points in the new physics models for the measurement of the triple-Higgs boson final state for future collider projects.

  5. PIGMI: a design report for Pion Generator for Medical Irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    Hansborough, L.D.

    1981-09-01

    PIGMI (Pion Generator for Medical Irradiations) is an integrated linear accelerator (linac) system developed under the auspices of the National Cancer Institute for specific application to cancer treatment in a hospital environment. In its full configuration, PIGMI is a proton linac that is far smaller, less expensive, and more reliable than previous machines that produce pions. Subsets of PIGMI technology can be used with equal advantage to generate beams of other particles (such as neutrons, protons, or heavy ions) that may be of interest for radiotherapy, radioisotope production, or other applications. The dramatic performance and cost advantages of this new breed of acceleraor result from a number of improvements. In the low-energy portion of the machine, a new type of low-energy linac (the radio-frequency quadrupole(RFQ)) produces an exceptionally good quality beam, and uses a very simple 30-kV injector. In the second part of the machine (the drift-tube linac (DTL)), high accelerating gradients are now achievable with consequent reductions in machine length. Another new structure (the disk and washer (DAW)) will be used in the third and final section of the accelerator; this portion will also be relatively short and require few power amplifiers. The entire machine is designed for ease of operation and high reliability. The pion-production machine, discussed in this report, accelerates a 100-..mu..A average proton-beam current to 650 MeV; use of an efficient pion-collection channel would result in an average pion flux of over 100 rad/min in a volume of about 1 l. Pion-channel design is not treated in this report. Accelerator construction cost is estimated at $10 million (1980 dollars); site preparation and treatment facility costs would bring the cost of a complete facility to an estimated $25 million.

  6. In-Medium Pion Valence Distribution Amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsushima, K.; de Melo, J. P. B. C.

    2017-03-01

    After a brief review of the quark-based model for nuclear matter, and some pion properties in medium presented in our previous works, we report new results for the pion valence wave function as well as the valence distribution amplitude in medium, which are presented in our recent article. We find that both the in-medium pion valence distribution and the in-medium pion valence wave function, are substantially modified at normal nuclear matter density, due to the reduction in the pion decay constant.

  7. I=2 pion scattering length from two-pion wave functions

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, S.; Iwasaki, Y.; Kanaya, K.; Yamazaki, T.; Fukugita, M.; Ishikawa, K-I.; Okawa, M.; Ishizuka, N.; Kuramashi, Y.; Ukawa, A.; Yoshie, T.; Kaneko, T.

    2005-05-01

    We calculate the two-pion wave function in the ground state of the I=2 S-wave system and find the interaction range between two pions, which allows us to examine the validity of the necessary condition for the finite-volume method for the scattering length proposed by Luescher. We work in the quenched approximation employing a renormalization group improved gauge action for gluons and an improved Wilson action for quarks at 1/a=1.207(12) GeV on 16{sup 3}x80, 20{sup 3}x80, and 24{sup 3}x80 lattices. We conclude that the necessary condition is satisfied within the statistical errors for the lattice sizes L{>=}24 (3.92 fm) when the quark mass is in the range that corresponds to m{sub {pi}}{sup 2}=0.273-0.736 GeV{sup 2}. We obtain the scattering length with a smaller statistical error from the wave function than from the two-pion time correlator.

  8. Pion Electroproduction and Siegert's Theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiator, Lothar

    2016-11-01

    Nucleon to Resonance transition form factors are discussed within the MAID model for pion electroproduction on the nucleon. For low Q^2 the consequences of Siegert's theorem are presented and medium to large violations of the Long Wavelength Limit at the pseudo-threshold are observed for the phenomenological parametrizations of the longitudinal transition form factors of different nucleon resonances.

  9. Pauli Principle and Pion Scattering

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Bethe, H. A.

    1972-10-01

    It is pointed out that if the Pauli principle is taken into account in the discussion of pion scattering by complex nuclei (as it ought, of course, to be) some rather implausible consequences of some earlier treatments of this problem can be avoided. (auth)

  10. Dipole polarizabilities of charged pions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fil'kov, L. V.; Kashevarov, V. L.

    2017-01-01

    We discuss main experimental works, where dipole polarizabilities of charged pions have been determined. Possible reasons for the differences between the experimental data are discussed. In particular, it is shown that the account of the -meson gives a significant correction to the value of the polarizability obtained in the latest experiment of the COMPASS collaboration.

  11. Final state interaction in D + → K - π + π + with Kπ I = 1/2 and 3/2 channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimarães, K. S. F. F.; Lourenço, O.; de Paula, W.; Frederico, T.; dos Reis, A. C.

    2014-08-01

    The final state interaction contribution to D + decays is computed for the K - π + π + channel within a light-front relativistic three-body model for the final state interaction. The rescattering process between the kaon and two pions in the decay channel is considered. The off-shell decay amplitude is a solution of a four-dimensional Bethe-Salpeter equation, which is decomposed in a Faddeev form. The projection onto the light-front of the coupled set of integral equations is performed via a quasi-potential approach. The S-wave Kπ interaction is introduced in the resonant isospin 1/2 and the non-resonant isospin 3/2 channels. The numerical solution of the light-front tridimensional inhomogeneous integral equations for the Faddeev components of the decay amplitude is performed perturbatively. The loop-expansion converges fast, and the three-loop contribution can be neglected in respect to the two-loop results for the practical application. The dependence on the model parameters in respect to the input amplitude at the partonic level is exploited and the phase found in the experimental analysis, is fitted with an appropriate choice of the real weights of the isospin components of the partonic amplitude. The data suggests a small mixture of total isospin 5/2 to the dominant 3/2 one. The modulus of the unsymmetrized decay amplitude, which presents a deep valley and a following increase for Kπ masses above 1.5 GeV, is fairly reproduced. This suggests the assignment of the quantum numbers 0+ to the isospin 1/2 K *(1630) resonance.

  12. Experimental studies of pion-nucleus interactions at intermediate energies. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    This report summarizes the work on experimental research in intermediate energy nuclear physics carried out at New Mexico State University in 1991 under a great from the US Department of Energy. Most of these studies have involved investigations of various pion-nucleus interactions. The work has been carried out both with the LAMPF accelerator at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and with the cyclotron at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) near Zurich, Switzerland. Part of the experimental work involves measurements of new data on double-charge-exchange scattering, using facilities at LAMPF which we helped modify, and on pion absorption, using a new detector system at PSI that covers nearly the full solid-angle region which we helped construct. Other work involved preparation for future experiments using polarized nuclear targets and a new high-resolution spectrometer system for detecting {pi}{sup 0} mesons. We also presented several proposals for works to be done in future years, involving studies related to pi-mesonic atoms, fundamental pion-nucleon interactions, studies of the difference between charged and neutral pion interactions with the nucleon, studies of the isospin structure of pion-nucleus interactions, and pion scattering from polarized {sup 3}He targets. This work is aimed at improving our understanding of the pion-nucleon interaction, of the pion-nucleus interaction mechanism, and of nuclear structure.

  13. Pion contamination in the MICE muon beam

    DOE PAGES

    Adams, D.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; ...

    2016-03-01

    Here, the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a systematic investigation of ionization cooling with muon beams of momentum between 140 and 240\\,MeV/c at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory ISIS facility. The measurement of ionization cooling in MICE relies on the selection of a pure sample of muons that traverse the experiment. To make this selection, the MICE Muon Beam is designed to deliver a beam of muons with less thanmore » $$\\sim$$1% contamination. To make the final muon selection, MICE employs a particle-identification (PID) system upstream and downstream of the cooling cell. The PID system includes time-of-flight hodoscopes, threshold-Cherenkov counters and calorimetry. The upper limit for the pion contamination measured in this paper is $$f_\\pi < 1.4\\%$$ at 90% C.L., including systematic uncertainties. Therefore, the MICE Muon Beam is able to meet the stringent pion-contamination requirements of the study of ionization cooling.« less

  14. The one-pion-exchange potential in the three-body model of nucleon-nucleon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcilazo, Humberto

    1981-02-01

    We derive the one-pion-exchange potential in the three-body model of nucleon-nucleon scattering in which the nucleon is treated as a bound state of a pion and a nucleon, and show that it has the same form as the usual Yukawa OPEP derived from field theory, except that its range is energy dependent and it becomes complex above the pion-production threshold.

  15. Effect of the ηη channel and interference phenomena in the two-pion transitions of charmonia and bottomonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surovtsev, Yu. S.; Bydžovský, P.; Gutsche, T.; Kamiński, R.; Lyubovitskij, V. E.; Nagy, M.

    2017-03-01

    The basic shape of di-pion mass spectra in the two-pion transitions of both charmonia and bottomonia states is explained by a unified mechanism based on contributions of the ππ, KK̅, and ηη coupled channels including their interference. The role of the individual f0 resonances in shaping the di-pion mass distributions in the charmonia and bottomonia decays is considered.

  16. Beam Spin Asymmetry Measurements for Two Pion Photoproduction at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Mark D.

    2015-09-01

    The overarching goal of this analysis, and many like it, is to develop our understanding of the strong force interactions within the nucleon by examining the nature of their excitation spectra. As the resonances of these spectra have very short lifetimes (tau = 1x10-23 s) and often have very similar masses, it is often impossible to directly observe resonances in the excitation spectra of nucleons. Polarization observables allow us to study the resonances by looking at how they affect the spin state of final state particles. The beam asymmetry is a polarization observable that allows us to detect the sensitivity of these resonances, and other transition mechanisms, to the electric vector orientation of incident photons. Presented in this thesis are first measurements of the beam asymmetries in the resonant region for the reaction channel pgamma p --> p π+ π-focusing on the intermediate mesonic states rho^0 and f^0, and the final state pions. The analysis used data from the g8b experiment undertaken at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab), the first experiment at JLab to use a linearly polarized photon beam. Using the coherent Bremsstrahlung facility and the CLAS detector of Hall B at JLab allowed for many multi-channel reactions to be detected and the first measurements of many polarization observables including those presented here. A brief overview of the theoretical framework used to undertake this analysis is given, followed by a description of the experimental details of the facilities used, then a description of the calibration of the Bremsstrahlung tagging facility which the author undertook, and finally the analysis is presented and the resulting measurements.

  17. Studies of final state interactions via femtoscopy in ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamil Graczykowski, Lukasz; ALICE Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Femtoscopy is a technique enabling measurements of the space-time characteristics of particle-emitting sources. However, the femtoscopic analysis is also sensitive to the interaction cross-section. In this paper we show the first preliminary measurements of correlation functions in Pb–Pb collisions at . These correlations originate from the final-state interactions which proceed through the a 0(980) resonance only and can be employed to constrain its parameters. A similar approach can be applied to baryon pairs to extract the unknown interaction cross-sections for some (anti-)baryon–(anti-)baryon pairs. We show baryon–baryon and baryon–anti-baryon correlation functions of protons and lambdas, as well as discuss briefly the fitting method.

  18. Inelastic Final-State Interactions in B Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenczykowski, P.

    2003-09-01

    We present the results of an effective approach to rescattering in B decays to two pseudoscalar mesons, where all inelastic Zweig-rule-satisfying SU(3)-symmetric final-state interactions are taken into account. It is shown how such rescattering corrections lead to a simple redefinition of the amplitudes, permitting the use of a simple diagram-based description, in which, however, weak phases may enter in a modified way. An estimate of how these modifications might affect the extracted value of unitarity triangle angle γ is given. It is pointed out that substantial shifts in the value of γ cannot be excluded on the basis of the low experimental bound on the B0d → K+K- branching ratio alone.

  19. Lattice study of the leptonic decay constant of the pion and its excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Mastropas, Ekaterina; Richard, David

    2014-11-01

    We present a calculation of the decay constant of the pion, and its lowest-lying three excitations, at three values of the pion mass between around 400 and 700 MeV, using anisotropic clover lattices. We use the variational method to determine an optimal interpolating operator for each of the states. We find that the decay constant of the first excitation, and more notably of the second, is suppressed with respect to that of the ground-state pion, but that the suppression shows little dependence on the quark mass.

  20. Theoretical spectral distributions and total cross sections for neutral subthreshold pion production in carbon-carbon collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Deutchman, P. A.; Townsend, L. W.

    1985-01-01

    A coherent isobar formalism is employed to model subthreshold production of neutral pions in carbon-carbon collisions at energies below 100 MeV/nucleon. No arbitrary scale factors or adjustable free parameters are used in calculation of the Lorentz-invariant cross sections for pion production in the projectile, which produces an excited state that goes to M1 resonance in the target by conservation of spin and isospin. Pion production is also modeled for the projectile, which also reaches M1 resonance. The overall pion spectral distribution in the center of mass system is then integrated over the energy range 35-84 MeV/nucleon. The results expose an energy loss in the incident ions, as observed experimentally, and indicate that an isobar mechanism is responsible for higher energy pion production. Lower energy pions are a result of thermal processes.

  1. Study of B Meson Decays to ppbarh Final States

    SciTech Connect

    Hryn'ova, Tetiana B.; /SLAC

    2006-03-22

    B mesons are unique among well-established non-quarkonium mesons in their ability to decay into baryons. Baryonic B decays offer a wide range of interesting areas of study: they can be used to test our theoretical understanding of rare decay processes involving baryons, search for direct CP violation and study low-energy QCD. This thesis presents measurements of branching fractions and a study of the decay dynamics of the charmless three-body decays of B meson into p{bar p}h final states, where h = {pi}{sup +}, K{sup +}, K{sub S}{sup 0}, K*{sup 0} or K*{sup +}. With a sample of 232 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} events collected with the BaBar detector, we report the first observation of the B {yields} p{bar p}K*{sup 0} decay, and provide improved measurements of branching fractions of the other modes. The distribution of the three final-state particles is of particular interest since it provides dynamical information on the possible presence of exotic intermediate states such as the hypothetical pentaquark states {Theta}*{sup ++} and {Theta}{sup +}in the m{sub pK{sup +}} and m{sub pK{sub S}{sup 0}} spectra, respectively, or glueball states (such as the tensor glueball f{sub J}(2220)) in the m{sub p{bar p}} spectrum. No evidence for exotic states is found and upper limits on the branching fractions are set. An enhancement at low p{bar p} mass is observed in all the B {yields} p{bar p}h modes, and its shape is compared between the decay modes and with the shape of the time-like proton form factor. A Dalitz plot asymmetry in B {yields} p{bar p}K{sup +} mode suggests dominance of the penguin amplitude in this decay and disfavors the possibility that the low mass p{bar p} enhancement originates from the presence of a resonance below threshold (such as the recently seen baryonium candidate at 1835 MeV/c{sup 2}). We also identify decays of the type B {yields} X{sub c{bar c}}h {yields} p{bar p}h, where h = K{sup +}, K{sub S}{sup 0}, K*{sup 0} or K*{sup +}, and X

  2. Measuring pion beta decay with high-energy pion beams

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, W.K. Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA ); Hoffman, C.M. )

    1993-01-01

    Improved measurements of the pion beta decay rate are possible with an intense high-energy pion beam. The rate for the decay [pi][sup +] [yields] [pi][sup 0]e[sup +]v[epsilon] is predicted by the Standard Model (SM) to be R([pi][sup +] [yields] [pi][sup 0]e[sup +]v[epsilon]) = 0.3999[plus minus]0.0005 s[sup [minus]1]. The best experimental number, obtained using in-flight decays, is R([pi][sup +] [yields] [pi][sup 0]e[sup +]v[epsilon]) = 0.394 [plus minus] 0.015 s[sup [minus]1]. A precise measurement would test the SM by testing the unitarity of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix for which one analysis of the nuclear beta decay data has shown a 0.4% discrepancy. Several nuclear correction factors, needed for nuclear decay, are not present for pion beta decay, so that an experiment at the 0.2% level would be a significant one. Detailed study of possible designs will be needed, as well as extensive testing of components. The reduction of systematic errors to the 0.1% level can only be done over a period of years with a highly stable apparatus and beam. At a minimum, three years of occupancy of a beam line, with 800 hours per year, would be required.

  3. Measuring pion beta decay with high-energy pion beams

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, W.K. |; Hoffman, C.M.

    1993-02-01

    Improved measurements of the pion beta decay rate are possible with an intense high-energy pion beam. The rate for the decay {pi}{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}e{sup +}v{epsilon} is predicted by the Standard Model (SM) to be R({pi}{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}e{sup +}v{epsilon}) = 0.3999{plus_minus}0.0005 s{sup {minus}1}. The best experimental number, obtained using in-flight decays, is R({pi}{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}e{sup +}v{epsilon}) = 0.394 {plus_minus} 0.015 s{sup {minus}1}. A precise measurement would test the SM by testing the unitarity of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix for which one analysis of the nuclear beta decay data has shown a 0.4% discrepancy. Several nuclear correction factors, needed for nuclear decay, are not present for pion beta decay, so that an experiment at the 0.2% level would be a significant one. Detailed study of possible designs will be needed, as well as extensive testing of components. The reduction of systematic errors to the 0.1% level can only be done over a period of years with a highly stable apparatus and beam. At a minimum, three years of occupancy of a beam line, with 800 hours per year, would be required.

  4. Total pion-proton cross section from the new LHCf data on leading neutrons spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryutin, R. A.

    2017-02-01

    In the light of the latest data by the LHCf collaboration of the LHC on leading neutrons spectra it is possible to obtain total pion-proton cross sections in the TeV energy region. In this work the exact extraction procedure is shown. Final results for the pion-proton cross section are collected at several different values of the colliding energy and compared with some popular theoretical predictions. The errors of the results are estimated.

  5. Azimuthally differential pion femtoscopy relative to the second and third harmonic event planes in Pb-Pb 2.76 TeV collisions from ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, Mohammad; Alice Collaboration Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Azimuthally differential femtoscopic measurements, being sensitive to spatio-temporal characteristics of the source as well as to the collective velocity fields at freeze-out, provide very important information on the nature and dynamics of the system evolution. While the HBT radii modulations with respect to the second harmonic event plane reflect mostly the spatial geometry of the source, the third harmonic results are mostly defined by the system dynamics. In this talk, we present azimuthally differential pion femtoscopy with respect to second and third harmonic event planes as a function of the pion transverse momentum for different collision centralities. Our results on the dependence of the side-, out-, and long-radii on the pion emission angle with respect to the second harmonic event plane qualitatively agree with theoretical calculations, but the details show significant deviations. The final-state source eccentricity is found to be significantly smaller than the initial state source eccentricity. While the final-state source eccentricity for the second harmonic event plane remains positive in all centralities, the third harmonic event plane eccentricity becomes negative. All these results are compared to existing models.

  6. Status of Pion Decay Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Numao, T.

    2016-11-01

    The branching ratio of pion decays, {Re/}_μ = Γ ({{{π }}^ + } \\to {e^ + }ν + {e^ + }{{ν γ }})/Γ ({{{π }}^ + } \\to {{{μ }}^ + }ν + {{{μ }}^ + }ν {{γ }}), has provided a sensitive test of electron-muon universality in weak interactions. The uncertainty of the Standard Model prediction is at a 0.01% level. Although a recent measurement, Re /μ = (1.2344 ± 0.0023(stat) ± 0.0019(syst)) × 10-4, reduced the experimental uncertainty by a factor of two, there is room for improvement by more than an order of magnitude. The status of two {{{π }}^ + } \\to {e^ + }ν experiments at TRIUMF and PSI as well as related pion decay experiments is presented.

  7. Pion Production off the Nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafi Alam, M.; Athar, M. Sajjad; Chauhan, Shikha; Singh, S. K.

    We have studied charged current neutrino/antineutrino induced weak pion production from nucleon. For the present study, contributions from Δ(1232)-resonant term, non-resonant background terms as well as contribution from higher resonances viz. P11(1440), D13(1520), S11(1535), S11(1650), and P13(1720) are taken. To write the hadronic current for the non-resonant background terms, a microscopic approach based on SU(2) non-linear sigma model has been used. The vector form factors for the resonances are obtained from the helicity amplitudes provided by MAID. Axial coupling in the case of Δ(1232) resonance is obtained by fitting the ANL and BNL ν-deuteron reanalyzed scattering data. The results of the cross sections are presented and discussed for all the possible channels of single pion production induced by charged current interaction.

  8. Relativistic Calculation on Pion Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Masahiro; Tatsumi, Toshitaka; Liu, Liang-Gang; Matsuura, Hiroyuki; Iwasaki, Yoshitaka; Sakamoto, Katsuaki; Kouno, Hiroaki; Hasegawa, Akira

    2001-04-01

    The critical density of neutral pion condensation is investigated by using a new set of Landau-Migdal parameters, which are derived from a recent experimental data on the quenching factor of Gamow-Teller giant resonance. The particle-hole and delta-hole polarizations of the pion selfenergy are calculated based on the relativistic framework and compared with several nonrelativistic formulae. It is shown that the relativistic calculation gives higher critical densities than those of the nonrelativistic calculations. It is confirmed in the relativistic calculation that "universality assumption" leads to so-called "wall" in the critical density and the wall disappears in the present calculation based on the findings of the experiment of Wakasa et al. on the quenching of the Gamow Teller strength.

  9. Three pion nucleon coupling constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Arriola, E.; Amaro, J. E.; Navarro Pérez, R.

    2016-08-01

    There exist four pion nucleon coupling constants, fπ0pp, - fπ0nn, fπ+pn/2 and fπ-np/2 which coincide when up and down quark masses are identical and the electron charge is zero. While there is no reason why the pion-nucleon-nucleon coupling constants should be identical in the real world, one expects that the small differences might be pinned down from a sufficiently large number of independent and mutually consistent data. Our discussion provides a rationale for our recent determination fp2 = 0.0759(4),f 02 = 0.079(1),f c2 = 0.0763(6), based on a partial wave analysis of the 3σ self-consistent nucleon-nucleon Granada-2013 database comprising 6713 published data in the period 1950-2013.

  10. 76 FR 57659 - Oregon: Final Approval of State Underground Storage Tank Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-16

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 281 Oregon: Final Approval of State Underground Storage Tank Program AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final determination. SUMMARY: The State of Oregon has applied for... Agency (EPA) has reviewed the State of Oregon's application and has made a final determination that...

  11. How strange is pion electroproduction?

    DOE PAGES

    Gorchtein, Mikhail; Spiesberger, Hubert; Zhang, Xilin

    2015-11-18

    We consider pion production in parity-violating electron scattering (PVES) in the presence of nucleon strangeness in the framework of partial wave analysis with unitarity. Using the experimental bounds on the strange form factors obtained in elastic PVES, we study the sensitivity of the parity-violating asymmetry to strange nucleon form factors. For forward kinematics and electron energies above 1 GeV, we observe that this sensitivity may reach about 20% in the threshold region. With parity-violating asymmetries being as large as tens p.p.m., this study suggests that threshold pion production in PVES can be used as a promising way to better constrainmore » strangeness contributions. Using this model for the neutral current pion production, we update the estimate for the dispersive γZ-box correction to the weak charge of the proton. In the kinematics of the Qweak experiment, our new prediction reads ReVγZ(E = 1.165 GeV) = (5.58 ±1.41) ×10–3, an improvement over the previous uncertainty estimate of ±2.0 ×10–3. Our new prediction in the kinematics of the upcoming MESA/P2 experiment reads ReVγZ(E = 0.155 GeV) = (1.1 ±0.2) ×10–3.« less

  12. Studies of Λn Interaction Through Polarization Observables for Final-State Interactions in the γ d \\to K + Λ n Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilieva, Yordanka; Cao, Tongtong; Zachariou, Nicholas

    We present preliminary experimental estimates of the polarization observables Σ, Ox, Oz, Cx, and Cz for final-state interactions (FSI) in exclusive Λ photoproduction off the deuteron. The observables are predicted to be sensitive to the parameters of hyperon-nucleon potentials, which are important for the understanding of hypernuclear matter and neutron stars. The observables were obtained from data collected during the E06-103 (g13) experiment with the CEBAF LargeAcceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. The experiment ran with unpolarized deuteron target and both, circularly- and linearly-polarized photon beams with energies between 0.5 and 2.5 GeV. The events of interest were selected by requiring that the kaon and the Λ decay products, a proton and a negative pion, were detected in CLAS and that the mass of the missing state was consistent with the neutron mass. Final-state-interaction events were selected by requesting that the reconstructed neutron had a momentum larger than 200 MeV/c. The large statistics of E06-103 provided statistically meaningful FSI event samples, which allow for the extraction of one- to four-fold differential single- and double-polarization observables. Our results are the very first estimates of polarization observables for FSI in hyperon photoproduction and will be used to constrain the free parameters of hyperon-nucleon potentials. This work is supported in part by the U.S. National Science Foundation under grant PHY-125782.

  13. Radiation quality of beams of negative pions

    SciTech Connect

    Dicello, J.F.; Brenner, D.J.

    1981-01-01

    As a negative pion stops in tissue, it attaches itself to an adjacent atom to form a mesonic atom. Subsequently, the wave function of the pion interacts with that of the nucleus and the pion is absorbed. Because the energy associated with the rest mass of the pion is greater than the separation energy of the nuclear particles, the nucleus disintegrates (pion star). In tissue, approximately 40 MeV goes into overcoming the binding energies; 20 MeV goes into kinetic energy of charged particles; 80 MeV goes into kinetic energy of neutrons. In cases where biological studies are performed with beams of negative pions, as much as 20% of the total absorbed dose in the treatment volume and about 50% of the high-LET dose (> 100 keV/..mu..m) can result from neutrons. The degree of biological response and the variation of that response throughout the treatment volume can be altered by the neutron dose.

  14. Pion-photon transition distribution amplitudes in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model

    SciTech Connect

    Courtoy, A.; Noguera, S.

    2007-11-01

    We define the pion-photon transition distribution amplitudes (TDA) in a field theoretic formalism from a covariant Bethe-Salpeter approach for the determination of the bound state. We apply our formalism to the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model, as a realistic theory of the pion. The obtained vector and axial TDAs satisfy all features required by general considerations. In particular, sum rules and the polynomiality condition are explicitly verified. We have numerically proved that the odd coefficients in the polynomiality expansion of the vector TDA vanish in the chiral limit. The role of PCAC and the presence of a pion pole are explicitly shown.

  15. Geothermal Energy Development in the Eastern United States. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    1981-10-01

    This document represents the final report from the Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) of The Johns Hopkins University on its efforts on behalf of the Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE) of the Department of Energy (DOE). For the past four years, the Laboratory has been fostering development of geothermal energy in the Eastern United States. While the definition of ''Eastern'' has changed somewhat from time to time, basically it means the area of the continental United States east of the Rocky Mountains, plus Puerto Rico but excluding the geopressured regions of Texas and Louisiana. During these years, the Laboratory developed a background in geology, hydrology, and reservoir analysis to aid it in establishing the marketability of geothermal energy in the east. Contrary to the situation in the western states, the geothermal resource in the east was clearly understood to be inferior in accessible temperature. On the other hand, there were known to be copious quantities of water in various aquifers to carry the heat energy to the surface. More important still, the east possesses a relatively dense population and numerous commercial and industrial enterprises, so that thermal energy, almost wherever found, would have a market. Thus, very early on it was clear that the primary use for geothermal energy in the east would be for process heat and space conditioning--heating and cool electrical production was out of the question. The task then shifted to finding users colocated with resources. This task met with modest success on the Atlantic Coastal Plain. A great deal of economic and demographic analysis pinpointed the prospective beneficiaries, and an intensive ''outreach'' campaign was mounted to persuade the potential users to invest in geothermal energy. The major handicaps were: (1) The lack of demonstrated hydrothermal resources with known temperatures and expected longevity; and (2) The lack of a ''bellwether'' installation for entrepreneurs to see, touch, and

  16. 77 FR 4663 - Final Revisions to Certain Data Collection and Reporting Requirements, Final Priority; State...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-31

    ... out-of-state IHEs, a ] State could, among other things, enter into data reciprocity agreements with contiguous States or States with which it has tuition reciprocity agreements. Changes: None. Comment: One... out-of-state public IHEs through such activities as: (1) Entering into data reciprocity...

  17. Questions in a microscopic theory of pion production/absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, M.K.

    1982-03-10

    In this talk we show that in the treatment of nuclear processes involving pions, such as pion production/absorption or exchange currents, one should use for the ..pi..NN vertex function g..pi..(q/sup 2/)..gamma../sub 5/tau/sub ..cap alpha../, where q is the pion four-momentum and g/sub ..pi../(m/sup 2//sub ..pi../)approx. =13.4 is the pion-nucleon couping constant. The result is independent of the form and details of any interaction Lagrangian. We show that the difference between g/sub ..pi../(q/sup 2/)..gamma../sub 5/tau/sub ..cap alpha../ and the fully dressed ..pi..NN vertex function contributes to amplitudes involving more bosons, e.g., scattering amplitudes (..pi..N..--> pi..N), production amplitudes (..pi..N..--> pi pi..N), etc. Such contributions are mediated through either seagull terms or P11 intermediate states. We point out that it is neither necessary nor practical to calculate these partial contributions to scattering and production amplitudes. One can always exploit other approaches, theoretical and phenomenological, to make reasonably good models for the full amplitudes.

  18. Goldstone pion and other mesons using a scalar confining interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, F. |; Milana, J.

    1994-04-01

    A covariant wave equation for q{bar q} interactions with an interaction kernel composed of the sum of constant vector and linear scalar confining interactions is solved for states with two quarks with identical mass. The model includes an NJL-like mechanism which links the dynamical breaking of chiral symmetry to the spontaneous generation of quark mass and the appearance of a low mass Goldstone pion. A novel feature of this approach is that it automatically explains the small mass of the pion even though the linear potential is a scalar interaction in Dirac space, and hence breaks chiral symmetry. Solutions for mesons composed of light quarks ({pi},{rho}, and low lying excited states) and heavy quarks ({rho}{sub c}, J/{Psi}, and low lying excited states) are presented and discussed.

  19. Studying ρ-N couplings with HADES in pion-induced reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scozzi, Federico

    2016-11-01

    The High-Acceptance Di-Electron Spectrometer (HADES) operates at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt with pion, proton and heavyion beams provided by the synchrotron SIS18. In summer 2014, HADES took data using a pion beam on carbon and polyethylene targets. A large part of the data was taken at a pion beam momentum of 0.69 GeV/c in order to explore di-pion and di-electron production in the second resonance region and the sub-threshold coupling of the ρ to baryonic resonances. In this contribution lepton identification will be discussed as well the purity of reconstructed e+e-. Finally we will show the preliminary di-electon raw spectra.

  20. Branching ratio for the rare pion decay into positron and neutrino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czapek, G.; Federspiel, A.; Flükiger, A.; Frei, D.; Hahn, B.; Hug, C.; Hugentobler, E.; Krebs, W.; Moser, U.; Muster, D.; Ramseyer, E.; Scheidiger, H.; Schlatter, P.; Stucki, G.; Abela, R.; Renker, D.; Steiner, E.

    1993-01-01

    A new precision measurement of the branching ratio of the rare pion decay into a positron and a neutrino (π-->eν) has been completed. A beam of positive pions was stopped in an active target of plastic scintillator surrounded by a 4π BGO calorimeter. 3×105 rare decays and 1.2×106 normal pion decays (π-->μν) were recorded. The branching ratio was finally calculated from 1.2×105 rare decays after various cuts in the time window from 7.5 to 200 ns after pion stop. The errors of the result (1.235+/-0.005)×10-4 are 0.28% statistical and 0.29% systematical.

  1. Charged-pion spectrometer for the BNL gamma-ray-beam facility

    SciTech Connect

    LeVine, M.J.; Thorn, C.E.; Sandorfi, A.M.

    1982-01-01

    The (..gamma..,..pi../sup +-/) studies planned for the BNL Gamma Ray Beam Facility necessitate the detection of charged pions in the energy range 25 < T/sub pi/ < 150 MeV with a modest resolving power to match the photon beam energy resolution (27 MeV). The solid angle must be as large as possible, and the total path length must be as short as possible to minimize the losses due to pion decay. (The mean lifetime corresponds to L = 4.87 m for T/sub pi/ = 25 MeV). Finally, a means must be provided to reject pion decay products reaching the focal plane. A design for such a charged-pion spectrometer is presented. This design utilizes existing large aperture magnetic elements, and provides a momentum resolution of 0.68% at a solid angle of 50 msr, over a momentum range of 10%.

  2. Incoherent neutral pion photoproduction on 12C.

    PubMed

    Tarbert, C M; Watts, D P; Aguar, P; Ahrens, J; Annand, J R M; Arends, H J; Beck, R; Bekrenev, V; Boillat, B; Braghieri, A; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brudvik, J; Cherepnya, S; Codling, R; Downie, E J; Föhl, K; Glazier, D I; Grabmayr, P; Gregor, R; Heid, E; Hornidge, D; Jahn, O; Kashevarov, V L; Knezevic, A; Kondratiev, R; Korolija, M; Kotulla, M; Krambrich, D; Krusche, B; Lang, M; Lisin, V; Livingston, K; Lugert, S; Macgregor, I J D; Manley, D M; Martinez, M; McGeorge, J C; Mekterovic, D; Metag, V; Nefkens, B M K; Nikolaev, A; Novotny, R; Owens, R O; Pedroni, P; Polonski, A; Prakhov, S N; Price, J W; Rosner, G; Rost, M; Rostomyan, T; Schadmand, S; Schumann, S; Sober, D; Starostin, A; Supek, I; Thomas, A; Unverzagt, M; Walcher, Th; Zehr, F

    2008-04-04

    We present the first detailed measurement of incoherent photoproduction of neutral pions to a discrete state of a residual nucleus. The 12C(gamma,pi(0))(12)C*(4.4 MeV) reaction has been studied with the Glasgow photon tagger at MAMI employing a new technique which uses the large solid angle Crystal Ball detector both as a pi(0) spectrometer and to detect decay photons from the excited residual nucleus. The technique has potential applications to a broad range of future nuclear measurements with the Crystal Ball and similar detector systems elsewhere. Such data are sensitive to the propagation of the Delta in the nuclear medium and will give the first information on matter transition form factors from measurements with an electromagnetic probe. The incoherent cross sections are compared to two theoretical predictions including a Delta-hole model.

  3. HBT Pion Interferometry with Phenomenological Mean Field Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, K.

    2010-11-01

    To extract information on hadron production dynamics in the ultrarelativistic heavy ion collision, the space-time structure of the hadron source has been measured using Hanbury Brown and Twiss interferometry. We study the distortion of the source images due to the effect of a final state interaction. We describe the interaction, taking place during penetrating through a cloud formed by evaporating particles, in terms of a one-body mean field potential localized in the vicinity of the source region. By adopting the semiclassical method, the modification of the propagation of an emitted particle is examined. In analogy to the optical model applied to nuclear reactions, our phenomenological model has an imaginary part of the potential, which describes the absorption in the cloud. In this work, we focus on the pion interferometry and mean field interaction obtained using a phenomenological pipi forward scattering amplitude in the elastic channels. The p-wave scattering wit h rho meson resonance leads to an attractive mean field interaction, and the presence of the absorptive part is mainly attributed to the formation of this resonance. We also incorporate a simple time dependence of the potential reflecting the dynamics of the evaporating source. Using the obtained potential, we examine how and to what extent the so-called HBT Gaussian radius is varied by the modification of the propagation.

  4. 77 FR 13248 - Texas: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-06

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Texas: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions... applied to EPA for Final authorization of the changes to its hazardous waste program under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). EPA proposes to grant Final authorization to the State of Texas. In the...

  5. 77 FR 15343 - Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-15

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... Oklahoma has applied to EPA for Final authorization of the changes to its hazardous waste program under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). EPA proposes to grant Final authorization to the State of...

  6. 78 FR 32223 - Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... Oklahoma has applied to EPA for Final authorization of the changes to its hazardous waste program under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). EPA proposes to grant Final authorization to the State of...

  7. Final-state interactions in two-nucleon knockout reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colle, Camille; Cosyn, Wim; Ryckebusch, Jan

    2016-03-01

    Background: Exclusive two-nucleon knockout after electroexcitation of nuclei [A (e ,e'N N ) in brief] is considered to be a primary source of information about short-range correlations (SRCs) in nuclei. For a proper interpretation of the data, final-state interactions (FSIs) need to be theoretically controlled. Purpose: Our goal is to quantify the role of FSI effects in exclusive A (e ,e'p N ) reactions for four target nuclei representative of the whole mass region. Our focus is on processes that are SRC driven. We investigate the role of FSIs for two characteristic detector setups corresponding to "small" and "large" coverage of the available phase space. Method: Use is made of a factorized expression for the A (e ,e'p N ) cross section that is proportional to the two-body center-of-mass (c.m.) momentum distribution of close-proximity pairs. The A (e ,e'p p ) and A (e ,e'p n ) reactions for the target nuclei 12C,27Al,56Fe, and 208Pb are investigated. The elastic attenuation mechanisms in the FSIs are included using the relativistic multiple-scattering Glauber approximation (RMSGA). Single-charge exchange (SCX) reactions are also included. We introduce the nuclear transparency TAp N, defined as the ratio of exclusive (e ,e'p N ) cross sections on nuclei to those on "free" nucleon pairs, as a measure for the aggregated effect of FSIs in p N knockout reactions from nucleus A . A toy model is introduced in order to gain a better understanding of the A dependence of TAp N. Results: The transparency TAp N drops from 0.2 -0.3 for 12C to 0.04 -0.07 for 208Pb. For all considered kinematics, the mass dependence of TAp N can be captured by the power law TAp N∝A-λ with 0.4 ≲λ ≲0.5 . Apart from an overall reduction factor, we find that FSIs only modestly affect the distinct features of SRC-driven A (e ,e'p N ) which are dictated by the c.m. distribution of close-proximity pairs. Conclusion: The SCX mechanisms represent a relatively small (order of a few percent

  8. Gauged linear sigma model and pion-pion scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Fariborz, Amir H.; Schechter, Joseph; Shahid, M. Naeem

    2009-12-01

    A simple gauged linear sigma model with several parameters to take the symmetry breaking and the mass differences between the vector meson and the axial vector meson into account is considered here as a possibly useful 'template' for the role of a light scalar in QCD as well as for (at a different scale) an effective Higgs sector for some recently proposed walking technicolor models. An analytic procedure is first developed for relating the Lagrangian parameters to four well established (in the QCD application) experimental inputs. One simple equation distinguishes three different cases: i. QCD with axial vector particle heavier than vector particle, ii. possible technicolor model with vector particle heavier than the axial vector one, iii. the unphysical QCD case where both the Kawarabayashi-Suzuki-Riazuddin-Fayazuddin and Weinberg relations hold. The model is applied to the s-wave pion-pion scattering in QCD. Both the near threshold region and (with an assumed unitarization) the 'global' region up to about 800 MeV are considered. It is noted that there is a little tension between the choice of 'bare' sigma mass parameter for describing these two regions. If a reasonable 'global' fit is made, there is some loss of precision in the near threshold region.

  9. Pion in deep inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Povh, B.

    2008-10-13

    The forward neutron production in the ep collisions at 300 GeV measured by the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations at DESY has been used to estimate the total probability for the proton fluctuation into n{pi}{sup +} and p{pi}{sup 0}. The probability found is on the order of the 30%. This number is compared with the numbers of obtained for the probability of quark fluctuation into {pi}{sup +} from several alternative DIS processes (Gottfried sum rule, polarized structure function) and the axial-vector coupling constant, where the pion fluctuation is believed to play an important role.

  10. Measurement of the Pion Polarizabilities at Compass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guskov, A. V.

    2007-11-01

    The electromagnetic structure of pions is probed in πγ Compton scattering in inverse kinematics (Primakoff effect) and described by the electric (απ) and magnetic (βπ) polarizabilities, that depend on the rigidity of pion's internal structure as a composite particle. Values for pion polarizabilities can be extracted from the comparison of the theoretically predicted (under approximation of unstructured pion) cross section of Primakoff scattering and the measured cross section. The high beam intensity, good spectrometer resolution, the high rate capability, the high acceptance and possibility to use pion and muon beams, that are unique to the COMPASS experiment provide the tools to measure precisely the pion polarizabilities in the π- + (A, Z) → π- + (A, Z) + γ Primakoff reaction. This cross section is related to the cross section of Compton scattering on pion. A precise tracking system, electromagnetic and hadron calorimeters provide good conditions for Primakoff events selection and background suppression. The pion polarizability measurement was performed with a π- beam of 190 GeV . Most of the statistics was collected with a 3 mm thick lead target, along with smaller samples using carbon, copper, 1.6 mm lead and empty target. Total statistics collected with lead target is about 60 000 events.

  11. Covariant formulation of pion-nucleon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiff, A. D.; Afnan, I. R.

    A covariant model of elastic pion-nucleon scattering based on the Bethe-Salpeter equation is presented. The kernel consists of s- and u-channel nucleon and delta poles, along with rho and sigma exchange in the t-channel. A good fit is obtained to the s- and p-wave phase shifts up to the two-pion production threshold.

  12. The classical pion field in a nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripka, Georges

    2008-12-01

    A self-consistent symmetry arises when the nucleon angular momentum j and the isospin t are coupled to a grand spin G. Closed G shells become sources of a classical pion field with a hedgehog shape. Although the amplitude of the pion field, as measured by the chiral angle, is small, it is found to perturb significantly the energies of the nucleon orbits.

  13. Pion masses in quasiconformal gauge field theories

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, Dennis D.; Jaervinen, Matti

    2009-03-01

    We study modifications to Weinberg-like sum rules in quasiconformal gauge field theories. Beyond the two Weinberg sum rules and the oblique S parameter, we study the pion mass and the X parameter. Especially, we evaluate the pion mass for walking technicolor theories, in particular, minimal walking technicolor, and find contributions of the order of up to several hundred GeV.

  14. Summary of the pion production sessions

    SciTech Connect

    Dytman, S. A.

    2015-05-15

    This is a short summary of the 10 talks given in the Pion Production Sessions at NUINT12. There were 2 very interesting themes that spanned talks - problems with data for single nucleons and pion absorption in the nuclear medium. In addition, a number of interesting new efforts were described.

  15. Strangeness production with protons and pions

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.

    1993-04-01

    We discuss the spectrum of physics questions related to strangeness which could be addressed with intense beams of protons and pions in the few GeV region. We focus on various aspects of strangeness production, including hyperon production in pp collisions, studies of hyperon-nucleon scattering, production of hypernuclei in proton and pion-nucleus collisions, and spin phenomena in hypernuclei.

  16. Incoherent pion photoproduction on the deuteron in the first resonance region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levchuk, M. I.; Loginov, A. Yu.; Sidorov, A. A.; Stibunov, V. N.; Schumacher, M.

    2006-07-01

    Incoherent pion photoproduction on the deuteron is studied in the first resonance region. The unpolarized cross section, the beam asymmetry, and the vector and tensor target asymmetries are calculated in the framework of a diagrammatic approach. Pole diagrams and one-loop diagrams with NN scattering in the final state are taken into account. An elementary operator for pion photoproduction on the nucleon is taken in various on-shell forms and calculated using the SAID and MAID multipole analyses. Model dependence of the obtained results is discussed in some detail. A comparison with predictions of other works is given. Although a reasonable description of many available experimental data on the unpolarized total and differential cross sections and photon asymmetry has been achieved, in some cases a significant disagreement between the theory and experiment has been found. Invoking known information on the reactions γd→π0d and γd→np we predict the total photoabsorption cross section for deuterium. We find that our values strongly overestimate experimental data in the vicinity of the Δ peak.

  17. New York State Adult Functional Literacy Models. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heller, Barbara R.

    This report discusses a nationwide study of Adult Performance Level (APL) which involved sixteen projects in seven states and was conducted to (1) examine the University of Texas at Austin's APL study and describe the results and recommendations in terms of the adult needs in New York State; (2) examine several New York State Adult Basic Education…

  18. Final Scientifc Report - Hydrogen Education State Partnership Project

    SciTech Connect

    Leon, Warren

    2012-02-03

    Under the leadership of the Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells program, Clean Energy States Alliance (CESA) educated and worked with state leaders to encourage wider deployment of fuel cell and hydrogen technologies. Through outreach to state policymakers, legislative leaders, clean energy funds, energy agencies, and public utility commissions, CESA worked to accomplish the following objectives of this project: 1. Provide information and technical assistance to state policy leaders and state renewable energy programs in the development of effective hydrogen fuel cell programs. 2. Identify and foster hydrogen program best practices. 3. Identify and promote strategic opportunities for states and the Department of Energy (DOE) to advance hydrogen technology deployment through partnerships, collaboration, and targeted activities. Over the three years of this project, CESA, with our partner National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL), was able to provide credible information on fuel cell policies, finance, and technical assistance to hundreds of state officials and other stakeholders. CESA worked with its membership network to effectively educate state clean energy policymakers, program managers, and decision makers about fuel cell and hydrogen technologies and the efforts by states to advance those technologies. With the assistance of NCSL, CESA gained access to an effective forum for outreach and communication with state legislators from all 50 states on hydrogen issues and policies. This project worked to educate policymakers and stakeholders with the potential to develop and deploy stationary and portable fuel cell technologies.

  19. Unitary theory of pion photoproduction in the chiral bag model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, M.; Afnan, I. R.

    1987-07-01

    We present a multichannel unitary theory of single pion photoproduction from a baryon B. Here, B is the nucleon or Δ(1232), with possible extension to include the Roper resonance and strange baryons. We treat the baryon as a three-quark state within the framework of the gauge and chiral Lagrangian, derived from the Lagrangian for the chiral bag model. By first exposing two-body, and then three-body unitarity, taking into consideration the ππB and γπB intermediate states, we derive a set of equations for the amplitudes both on and off the energy shell. The Born term in the expansion of the amplitude has the new feature that the vertices in the pole diagram are undressed, while those in the crossed, contact, and pion pole diagrams are dressed.

  20. EOC requirements at state and local levels. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Paxton, K.F.; Goshe, F.; Rainey, C.T.

    1980-08-01

    Part One of this report analyzes Emergency Operating Center functions and requirements at local, area, and sub-State or State levels. EOC roles in times of normalcy, in natural disasters with and without warning, and in the crisis, in-shelter, and postattack phases of nuclear war are examined and compared. In Part Two, three approaches to a backbone nationwide direction and control network are reviewed. A sub-State system based on existing State highway department districts, facilities, and equipment is proposed and correlations with two other sub-State concepts (MIDAS and RAOC) are evaluated.

  1. 77 FR 61326 - Indiana: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-09

    ...; Administrative Practice and Procedure; Confidential business information; Hazardous materials transportation... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Indiana: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision... for Final Authorization of the changes to its hazardous waste program under the Resource Conservation...

  2. 78 FR 54178 - Virginia: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-03

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Virginia: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program..., Virginia received final authorization to implement its hazardous waste management program effective... the analogous Federal requirements. The Virginia Waste Management Act (VWMA), enacted by the...

  3. 45 CFR 1386.36 - Final disapproval of the State plan or plan amendments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Final disapproval of the State plan or plan amendments. 1386.36 Section 1386.36 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE... State Developmental Disabilities Councils § 1386.36 Final disapproval of the State plan or...

  4. Grants to states for construction or acquisition of state home facilities--update of authorized beds. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2010-04-08

    This document adopts as a final rule the proposed rule to amend Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) regulations regarding grants to States for construction or acquisition of State homes. This final rule updates the maximum number of nursing home and domiciliary beds designated for each State and amends the definition of "State" for purposes of these grants to include Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, and American Samoa.

  5. Washington State Nursing Home Administrator Model Curriculum. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, Florence Kelly

    The course outlines presented in this final report comprise a proposed Fort Steilacoom Community College curriculum to be used as a statewide model two-year associate degree curriculum for nursing home administrators. The eight courses described are introduction to nursing, home administration, financial management of nursing homes, nursing home…

  6. Photoproduction of Rho' Mesons in Reactions Photon -p --> (P2((+)PION))(2(-)PION) and Photon-P --> P((+)PION)(( -)PION)2((0)PION) at 20 GEV.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingus, Peter John

    From over 300,000 hadronic events gathered by the BC72/73 collaboration, which directed a 20GeV photon beam onto a liquid hydrogen target, the reaction gamma p to pp ^' was isolated in the channels gamma p to p2pi^+2pi^- and gamma p to ppi^+pi^-2pi^0 . Subsequently various Monte Carlo models of the rho^' decaying into four pions in the charge states 2pi^+2 pi^- and pi^+ pi^-2pi^0 were fit to the data in all pertinent kinematic variables along with the decay angular distributions and various assumed backgrounds that had not been disentangled. The results of this analysis are: (1) The Photoproduced rho^' conserves S channel helicity, this is shown by an analysis of the angle Phi, as described in the text, and by the Density Matrix Elements, (DME), of the rho^' in the channel gamma p to p2pi^+2pi^-. The DMEs, through the Parity Asymmetry, also show the rho^' production to be mostly due to natural parity exchange in the t channel. (2) The dominant decay mode of the rho^' is via rho^' to pi A_1, this is shown by the absence of a rho^0 signal in the channel gamma p to ppi^+pi ^-2pi^0 and by the approximate equality of the rho^' cross sections in the two channels. The rho ^' cross section in the channel gamma p to p2pi^+2pi^- is measured to be 0.944 +/- 0.05 mu b and the rho^' cross section in the channel gamma p to ppi^+ pi^-2pi^0 is measured to be 1.19 +/- 0.089mu b. (3) The rho^' mass and width in the channel gamma p to p2pi^+2 pi^- are determined to be 1.20 +/- 0.05GeV and 0.535 +/- 0.04GeV respectively. In the channel gamma p to ppi^+ pi^-2pi^0 the rho^' mass and width are determined to be 1.25 +/- 0.1GeV and 0.53 +/- 0.06GeV respectively.

  7. The Manpower Development Council, State of Iowa. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa State Manpower Development Council, Des Moines.

    The Iowa State Manpower Development Council was established as an experiment in local coordination of federal, state and community manpower programs. Shifts in the occupational and industrial attachment of workers and heavy out-migrations of workers from rural to urban areas underscored the importance of human resource development. The major goal…

  8. Massachusetts State Educational Information Center (SEIC). Final Report. Volume One.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts State Dept. of Education, Boston. Bureau of Educational Information Services.

    Project SEIC (State Educational Information Center) was funded to increase the demand for and use of educational information, especially ERIC (Educational Resources Information Center) information, and to make more cost effective delivery of information services. To accomplish these goals Project SEIC first assessed the state-of-the-art of…

  9. Massachusetts State Educational Information Center (SEIC). Final Report. Volume 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts State Dept. of Education, Boston. Bureau of Educational Information Services.

    Project SEIC (State Educational Information Center) was funded to increase the demand for and use of educational information, especially ERIC (Educational Resources Information Center) information, and to make more cost effective the delivery of information services. To accomplish these goals, Project SEIC first assessed the state-of-the-art of…

  10. 76 FR 13209 - United States and State of Texas v. United Regional Health Care System; Proposed Final Judgment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-10

    ... Antitrust Division United States and State of Texas v. United Regional Health Care System; Proposed Final... Falls Division, in United States of America and State of Texas v. United Regional Health Care System... that United Regional Health Care System has entered, maintained, and enforced exclusionary contracts...

  11. Inventory of state natural resources information systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Martinko, E.A.; Caron, L.M.; Stewart, D.S.

    1984-01-01

    Data bases and information systems developed and maintained by state agencies to support planning and management of environmental and natural resources were inventoried for all 50 states, Puerto Rico, and U.S. Virgin Islands. The information obtained is assembled into a computerized data base catalog which is throughly cross-referecence. Retrieval is possible by code, state, data base name, data base acronym, agency, computer, GIS capability, language, specialized software, data category name, geograhic reference, data sources, and level of reliability. The 324 automated data bases identified are described.

  12. Two-photon decay of the neutral pion in lattice QCD.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xu; Aoki, Sinya; Fukaya, Hidenori; Hashimoto, Shoji; Kaneko, Takashi; Noaki, Jun-Ichi; Shintani, Eigo

    2012-11-02

    We perform a nonperturbative calculation of the π(0) → γγ transition form factor and the associated decay width using lattice QCD. The amplitude for a two-photon final state, which is not an eigenstate of QCD, is extracted through a Euclidean time integral of the relevant three-point function. We utilize the all-to-all quark propagator technique to carry out this integration as well as to include the disconnected quark diagram contributions. The overlap fermion formulation is employed on the lattice to ensure exact chiral symmetry on the lattice. After examining various sources of systematic effects, except for a possible discretization effect, we obtain Γπ(0) → γγ = 7.83(31)(49) eV for the pion decay width, where the first error is statistical and the second is our estimate of the systematic error.

  13. Two-Photon Decay of the Neutral Pion in Lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xu; Aoki, Sinya; Fukaya, Hidenori; Hashimoto, Shoji; Kaneko, Takashi; Noaki, Jun-ichi; Shintani, Eigo

    2012-11-01

    We perform a nonperturbative calculation of the π0→γγ transition form factor and the associated decay width using lattice QCD. The amplitude for a two-photon final state, which is not an eigenstate of QCD, is extracted through a Euclidean time integral of the relevant three-point function. We utilize the all-to-all quark propagator technique to carry out this integration as well as to include the disconnected quark diagram contributions. The overlap fermion formulation is employed on the lattice to ensure exact chiral symmetry on the lattice. After examining various sources of systematic effects, except for a possible discretization effect, we obtain Γπ0→γγ=7.83(31)(49)eV for the pion decay width, where the first error is statistical and the second is our estimate of the systematic error.

  14. Measurements of pion production in eA with the CLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manly, S.; Lee, H.

    2015-05-01

    Preliminary results on semi-inclusive charged pion production in eA collisions at Ebeam=5 GeV/c2 are presented. The data were collected using the CLAS detector, which is a multipurpose, large acceptance, magnetic spectrometer located in Hall B at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. Selected distributions in W, Q2, pπ, and θπ are shown for data produced using deuterium, carbon, iron and lead targets. Preliminary comparisons with data simulated using the GENIE generator are made. The motivation for this work is to provide distributions useful for tuning the hadronic final state interaction models in order to reduce uncertainties in the results extracted from current and next-generation neutrino oscillation experiments.

  15. Beam-helicity asymmetries in double-charged-pion photoproduction on the proton.

    PubMed

    Strauch, S; Berman, B L; Adams, G; Ambrozewicz, P; Anghinolfi, M; Asavapibhop, B; Asryan, G; Audit, G; Avakian, H; Bagdasaryan, H; Baillie, N; Ball, J P; Baltzell, N A; Barrow, S; Batourine, V; Battaglieri, M; Beard, K; Bedlinskiy, I; Bektasoglu, M; Bellis, M; Benmouna, N; Bennhold, C; Biselli, A S; Boiarinov, S; Bouchigny, S; Bradford, R; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Bültmann, S; Burkert, V D; Butuceanu, C; Calarco, J R; Careccia, S L; Carman, D S; Carnahan, B; Chen, S; Cole, P L; Coleman, A; Coltharp, P; Cords, D; Corvisiero, P; Crabb, D; Crannell, H; Cummings, J P; Degtyarenko, P V; Denizli, H; Dennis, L; De Sanctis, E; Deur, A; Devita, R; Dharmawardane, K V; Dhuga, K S; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Donnelly, J; Doughty, D; Dragovitsch, P; Dugger, M; Dytman, S; Dzyubak, O P; Egiyan, H; Egiyan, K S; Elouadrhiri, L; Empl, A; Eugenio, P; Fatemi, R; Fedotov, G; Feldman, G; Feuerbach, R J; Fix, A; Forest, T A; Funsten, H; Gavalian, G; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girod, F X; Goetz, J T; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Guler, N; Guo, L; Gyurjyan, V; Hadjidakis, C; Hakobyan, R S; Hardie, J; Heddle, D; Hersman, F W; Hicks, K; Hleiqawi, I; Holtrop, M; Hu, J; Huertas, M; Hyde-Wright, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Ito, M M; Jenkins, D; Jo, H S; Joo, K; Juengst, H G; Kellie, J D; Khandaker, M; Kim, K Y; Kim, K; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Klimenko, A V; Klusman, M; Kossov, M; Kramer, L H; Kubarovsky, V; Kuhn, J; Kuhn, S E; Lachniet, J; Laget, J M; Langheinrich, J; Lawrence, D; Lee, T; Lima, A C S; Livingston, K; Lukashin, K; Manak, J J; Marchand, C; McAleer, S; McKinnon, B; McNabb, J W C; Mecking, B A; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Mibe, T; Mikhailov, K; Minehart, R; Mirazita, M; Miskimen, R; Mokeev, V; Morrow, S A; Muccifora, V; Mueller, J; Mutchler, G S; Nadel-Turonski, P; Napolitano, J; Nasseripour, R; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Niczyporuk, B B; Niyazov, R A; Nozar, M; O'rielly, G V; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Park, K; Pasyuk, E; Paterson, C; Philips, S A; Pierce, J; Pivnyuk, N; Pocanic, D; Pogorelko, O; Polli, E; Pozdniakov, S; Preedom, B M; Price, J W; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Riccardi, G; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Roberts, W; Ronchetti, F; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Rowntree, D; Rubin, P D; Sabatié, F; Salgado, C; Santoro, J P; Sapunenko, V; Schumacher, R A; Serov, V S; Shafi, A; Sharabian, Y G; Shaw, J; Skabelin, A V; Smith, E S; Smith, L C; Sober, D I; Stavinsky, A; Stepanyan, S S; Stepanyan, S; Stokes, B E; Stoler, P; Strakovsky, I I; Suleiman, R; Taiuti, M; Taylor, S; Tedeschi, D J; Thoma, U; Thompson, R; Tkabladze, A; Tkachenko, S; Todor, L; Tur, C; Ungaro, M; Vineyard, M F; Vlassov, A V; Wang, K; Weinstein, L B; Weygand, D P; Williams, M; Wolin, E; Wood, M H; Yegneswaran, A; Yun, J; Zana, L; Zhang, J

    2005-10-14

    Beam-helicity asymmetries for the two-pion-photoproduction reaction gammap-->ppi(+)pi(-) have been studied for the first time in the resonance region for center-of-mass energies between 1.35 and 2.30 GeV. The experiment was performed at Jefferson Lab with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer using circularly polarized tagged photons incident on an unpolarized hydrogen target. Beam-helicity-dependent angular distributions of the final-state particles were measured. The large cross-section asymmetries exhibit strong sensitivity to the kinematics and dynamics of the reaction. The data are compared with the results of various phenomenological model calculations, and show that these models currently do not provide an adequate description for the behavior of this new observable.

  16. Measurements of pion production in eA with the CLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Manly, S.; Lee, H.

    2015-05-15

    Preliminary results on semi-inclusive charged pion production in eA collisions at E{sub beam}=5 GeV/c{sup 2} are presented. The data were collected using the CLAS detector, which is a multipurpose, large acceptance, magnetic spectrometer located in Hall B at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. Selected distributions in W, Q{sup 2}, p{sub π}, and θ{sub π} are shown for data produced using deuterium, carbon, iron and lead targets. Preliminary comparisons with data simulated using the GENIE generator are made. The motivation for this work is to provide distributions useful for tuning the hadronic final state interaction models in order to reduce uncertainties in the results extracted from current and next-generation neutrino oscillation experiments.

  17. EOC requirements at state and local levels. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Paxton, K.F.; Goshe, F.; Rainey, C.T.

    1980-08-01

    Emergency Operating Center functions and requirements at local, area, sub-State, and State levels are analyzed. EOC roles in times of normalcy, in natural disasters with and without warning, and in the crisis, in-shelter, and postattack phases of nuclear war are examined and compared. Three approaches to a backbone nationwide direction and control network are reviewed. A sub-State system based on existing State Highway department districts is proposed and correlations with other backbone concepts evaluated. In a companion manual, a guide to developing an EOC standard operating procedure is presented, based on the foregoing EOC requirements analysis. The manual includes a sample EOC Standard Operating Procedure for a county.

  18. Final Scientific and Technical Report State and Regional Biomass Partnerships

    SciTech Connect

    Handley, Rick; Stubbs, Anne D.

    2008-12-29

    The Northeast Regional Biomass Program successfully employed a three pronged approach to build the regional capacity, networks, and reliable information needed to advance biomass and bioenergy technologies and markets. The approach included support for state-based, multi-agency biomass working groups; direct technical assistance to states and private developers; and extensive networking and partnership-building activities to share objective information and best practices.

  19. Limit states and reliability-based pipeline design. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, T.J.E.; Chen, Q.; Pandey, M.D.

    1997-06-01

    This report provides the results of a study to develop limit states design (LSD) procedures for pipelines. Limit states design, also known as load and resistance factor design (LRFD), provides a unified approach to dealing with all relevant failure modes combinations of concern. It explicitly accounts for the uncertainties that naturally occur in the determination of the loads which act on a pipeline and in the resistance of the pipe to failure. The load and resistance factors used are based on reliability considerations; however, the designer is not faced with carrying out probabilistic calculations. This work is done during development and periodic updating of the LSD document. This report provides background information concerning limits states and reliability-based design (Section 2), gives the limit states design procedures that were developed (Section 3) and provides results of the reliability analyses that were undertaken in order to partially calibrate the LSD method (Section 4). An appendix contains LSD design examples in order to demonstrate use of the method. Section 3, Limit States Design has been written in the format of a recommended practice. It has been structured so that, in future, it can easily be converted to a limit states design code format. Throughout the report, figures and tables are given at the end of each section, with the exception of Section 3, where to facilitate understanding of the LSD method, they have been included with the text.

  20. Axial transition form factors and pion decay of baryon resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Julia-Diaz, B.; Riska, D.O.; Coester, F.

    2004-10-01

    The pion decay constants of the lowest orbitally excited states of the nucleon and the {delta}(1232) along with the corresponding axial transition form factors are calculated with Poincare covariant constituent-quark models with instant, point, and front forms of relativistic kinematics. The model wave functions are chosen such that the calculated electromagnetic and axial form factors of the nucleon represent the empirical values in all three forms of kinematics, when calculated with single-constituent currents. The pion decay widths calculated with the three forms of kinematics are smaller than the empirical values. Front and instant form kinematics provide a similar description, with a slight preference for front form, while the point form values are significantly smaller in the case of the lowest positive parity resonances.

  1. 40 CFR 272.1601 - New Mexico State-Administered Program: Final Authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., 42 U.S.C. 6926(b), the EPA granted New Mexico final authorization for the following elements as...) Unauthorized State Amendments. (i) The State's adoption of the Federal rules listed in the following table...

  2. Pion masses in two-flavor QCD with η condensation.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Sinya; Creutz, Michael

    2014-04-11

    We investigate some aspects of two-flavor QCD with mu≠md at low energy, using the leading order chiral perturbation theory including anomaly effects. While nothing special happens at mu=0 for the fixed md≠0, the neutral pion mass becomes zero at two critical values of mu, between which the neutral pion field condenses, leading to a spontaneously CP broken phase, the so-called Dashen phase. We also show that the "topological susceptibility" in the chiral perturbation theory diverges at these two critical points. We briefly discuss a possibility that mu=0 can be defined by the vanishing the "topological susceptibility. We finally analyze the case of mu=md=m with θ=π, which is equivalent to mu=-md=-m with θ=0 by the chiral rotation. In this case, the η condensation occurs at small m, violating the CP symmetry spontaneously. Deep in the η condensation phase, three pions become Nambu-Goldstone bosons, but they show unorthodox behavior at small m that mπ2=O(m2), which, however, is shown to be consistent with the chiral Ward-Takahashi identities.

  3. Lattice QCD study of mixed systems of pions and kaons

    SciTech Connect

    William Detmold, Brian Smigielski

    2011-07-01

    The O(100) different ground state energies of N-pion and M-kaon systems for N+M <= 12 are studied in lattice QCD. These energies are then used to extract the various two- and three- body interactions that occur in these systems. These calculations are performed using one ensemble of 2+1 flavor anisotropic lattices with a spatial lattice spacing $a_s$ ~ 0.125 fm, an anisotropy factor $\\xi=a_s/a_t=3.5$, and a spatial volume $L^3\\sim (2.5\\ {\\rm fm})^3$. Particular attention is paid to additional thermal states present in the spectrum because of the finite temporal extent. The quark masses used correspond to pion and kaon masses of $m_\\pi$ ~ 383 MeV and $m_K$ ~ 537 MeV, respectively. The isospin and strangeness chemical potentials of these systems are found to be in the region where chiral perturbation theory and hadronic models predict a phase transition between a pion condensed phase and a kaon condensed phase.

  4. Inelastic pion scattering by /sup 13/C at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J.H.

    1987-03-01

    Angular distributions for inelastically scattered pions were obtained for several states in /sup 13/C at an incident energy of 65 MeV. The data include results from both ..pi../sup +/ and ..pi../sup -/ measurements. In addition, ..pi../sup -/ measurements were made at T/sub ..pi../ = 50 MeV at one angle to give a two point fixed-q excitation function. The data are compared to theory and the data of others. As might be expected, medium corrections are shown to be considerably more important at low energies than at resonance. This is true for inelastic transitions of multipolarity 0,2 and 3. Parameters derived from an analysis of elastic pion scattering and SCX data also provide an adequate description of the inelastic transitions. The charge asymmetry in the cross sections for the 9/2/sup +/ state that was seen at resonance persists at these energies. This result is consistent with an impulse approximation treatment of the spin-flip amplitude. This is true even though the incoming energy of the pions is far below the range where the validity of an impulse treatment is expected. 65 refs., 45 figs.

  5. Final priority; Technical Assistance on State Data Collection--IDEA Data Management Center. Final priority.

    PubMed

    2014-08-05

    The Assistant Secretary for the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS) announces a priority under the Technical Assistance on State Data Collection program. The Assistant Secretary may use this priority for competitions in fiscal year (FY) 2014 and later years. We take this action to fund a cooperative agreement to establish and operate an IDEA Data Management Center (Center) that will provide technical assistance (TA) to improve the capacity of States to meet the data collection requirements of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).

  6. Fate of pion condensation in quark matter: From the chiral limit to the physical pion mass

    SciTech Connect

    Abuki, H.; Anglani, R.; Pellicoro, M.; Ruggieri, M.; Gatto, R.

    2009-02-01

    We study aspects of the pion condensation in two-flavor neutral quark matter using the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model of QCD at finite density. We investigate the role of electric charge neutrality, and explicit symmetry breaking via quark mass, both of which control the onset of the charged pion ({pi}{sup c}) condensation. We show that the equality between the electric chemical potential and the in-medium pion mass, {mu}{sub e}=M{sub {pi}{sup -}}, as a threshold, persists even for a composite pion system in the medium, provided the transition to the pion condensed phase is of the second order. Moreover, we find that the pion condensate in neutral quark matter is extremely fragile with respect to the symmetry breaking effect via a current quark mass m, and is ruled out for m larger than the order of 10 keV.

  7. Radiative pion capture by C12.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, W. C.; Gotow, K.; Macdonald, B.; Trower, W. P.; Anderson, D. K.

    1972-01-01

    The energy spectrum of neutrons from radiative pion capture by carbon is investigated. Radiative pion capture is identified by coincidence of a stop signal and a signal from one of six lead-glass gamma detectors when negative pions traverse a beam telescope and are stopped in a carbon target. The energy of the neutrons is measured using the time interval between a stop signal coincident with a gamma-counter signal and a signal from a liquid-oscillator neutron counter. Asymmetry in the neutron-photon angular correlation increases with neutron energy and is accounted for by direct neutron emission.

  8. Radiative pion capture by C12.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, W. C.; Gotow, K.; Macdonald, B.; Trower, W. P.; Anderson, D. K.

    1972-01-01

    The energy spectrum of neutrons from radiative pion capture by carbon is investigated. Radiative pion capture is identified by coincidence of a stop signal and a signal from one of six lead-glass gamma detectors when negative pions traverse a beam telescope and are stopped in a carbon target. The energy of the neutrons is measured using the time interval between a stop signal coincident with a gamma-counter signal and a signal from a liquid-oscillator neutron counter. Asymmetry in the neutron-photon angular correlation increases with neutron energy and is accounted for by direct neutron emission.

  9. Pion-like dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Subhaditya; Melić, Blaženka; Wudka, Jose

    2016-04-01

    We introduce the model of the light dark matter particles emerging as the pseudo-Goldstone bosons of spontaneously broken GDM = SU (N) ⊗ SU (N) to the unbroken HDM = SU (N) group. The associated fields transform linearly under HDM, but non-linearly under GDM /HDM and their number is equal to the number of broken generators of G/H group according to the Coleman-Wess-Zumino theorem. Those massless fields which acquire HDM breaking degenerate masses we call ;dark mater pions; (DMP). We investigate the thermal history of DMP and solve the Boltzmann equations. We compare the results with the WMAP and PLANCK data as well as with the direct detection experiment results and constrain the model parameters.

  10. Backward pion-nucleon scattering

    SciTech Connect

    F. Huang; Sibirtsev, Alex; Haidenbauer, Johann; Meissner, Ulf-G.

    2010-02-01

    A global analysis of the world data on differential cross sections and polarization asymmetries of backward pion-nucleon scattering for invariant collision energies above 3 GeV is performed in a Regge model. Including the $N_\\alpha$, $N_\\gamma$, $\\Delta_\\delta$ and $\\Delta_\\beta$ trajectories, we reproduce both angular distributions and polarization data for small values of the Mandelstam variable $u$, in contrast to previous analyses. The model amplitude is used to obtain evidence for baryon resonances with mass below 3 GeV. Our analysis suggests a $G_{39}$ resonance with a mass of 2.83 GeV as member of the $\\Delta_{\\beta}$ trajectory from the corresponding Chew-Frautschi plot.

  11. Enhanced Internet firewall design using stateful filters final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchins, J.A.; Simons, R.W.

    1997-08-01

    The current state-of-the-art in firewall design provides a lot of security for company networks, but normally at the expense of performance and/or functionality. Sandia researched a new approach to firewall design which incorporates a highly stateful approach, allowing much more flexibility for protocol checking and manipulation while retaining performance. A prototype system was built and multiple protocol policy modules implemented to test the concept. The resulting system, though implemented on a low-power workstation, performed almost at the same performance as Sandia`s current firewall.

  12. RTG resource book for western states and provinces: Final proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    The Western Interstate Energy Board held a workshop and liaison activities among western states, provinces, and utilities on the formation of Regional Transmission Groups (RTGs). Purpose of the activities was to examine the policy implications for western states and provinces in the formation of RTGs in the West, the implications for western ratepayers and utilities of the RTG formation and potential impacts of RTGs on the western electricity system. The workshop contributed to fulfilling the transmission access and competition objectives of Title VII of the Energy Policy Act of 1992.

  13. Measurement of Charged Current Coherent Pion Production by Neutrinos on Carbon at MINER$\

    SciTech Connect

    Mislivec, Aaron Robert

    2017-01-01

    Neutrino-nucleus coherent pion production is a rare neutrino scattering process where the squared four-momentum transferred to the nucleus is small, a lepton and pion are produced in the forward direction, and the nucleus remains in its initial state. This process is an important background in neutrino oscillation experiments. Measurements of coherent pion production are needed to constrain models which are used to predict coherent pion production in oscillation experiments. This thesis reports measurements of νµ and νµ charged current coherent pion production on carbon for neutrino energies in the range 2 < Eν < 20 GeV. The measurements were made using data from MINERνA, which is a dedicated neutrino-nucleus scattering experiment that uses a fi scintillator tracking detector in the high-intensity NuMI neutrino beam at Fermilab. Coherent interactions were isolated from the data using only model-independent signatures of the reaction, which are a forward muon and pion, no evidence of nuclear breakup, and small four-momentum transfer to the nucleus. The measurements were compared to the coherent pion production model used by oscillation experiments. The data and model agree in the total interaction rate and are similar in the dependence of the interaction rate on the squared four- momentum transferred from the neutrino. The data and model disagree significantly in the pion kinematics. The measured νµ and νµ interaction rates are consistent, which supports model predictions that the neutrino and antineutrino interaction rates are equal.

  14. 75 FR 35720 - Massachusetts: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-23

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Massachusetts: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... Massachusetts has applied to EPA for final authorization of changes to its hazardous waste program under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). EPA proposes to grant final authorization to Massachusetts...

  15. 78 FR 54200 - Virginia: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-03

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Virginia: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... applied to EPA for final authorization of revisions to its hazardous waste program under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). EPA proposes to grant final authorization to Virginia. In the ``Rules and...

  16. 76 FR 62303 - California: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 California: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... has applied for final authorization of certain revisions to its hazardous waste program under the... waste program satisfy all of the requirements necessary to qualify for final authorization. Thus, with...

  17. 77 FR 69788 - Colorado: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-21

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Colorado: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... applied to the EPA for final authorization of changes to its hazardous waste program under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The EPA proposes to grant final authorization to the hazardous waste...

  18. A Precision Measurement of the Neutral Pion Lifetime via the Primakoff Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Clinton, Eric

    2007-09-01

    The neutral pion radiative width has been measured to 8.411 eV ± 1.8% + 1.13% - 1.70% (lifetime = 7.826 ± 0.14 + 0.088 - 0.133 x 10-17 s) utilizing the Primakoff effect and roughly 4.9 to 5.5 GeV photons at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News, VA. The Hall B Photon Tagger, the Hall B Pair Spectrometer, a state of the art Hybrid Calorimter enabled precision incident photon energy measurement, photon flux measurement, and neutral pion identification, respectively. With these and other hardware and software tools, elastic neutral pion yields were extracted from the data. A well developed and understood simulation calculated geometric and software cut efficiency curves. The simulation also provided photo-pion production response functions to fit the experimental cross sections and extract the Primakoff cross section and thus the neutral pion radiative width and lifetime. Future work includes improving understanding of the nuclear incoherent process and any other background sources of elastic neutral pions in this data.

  19. The SPICE Center at Bluefield State College. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, David Harrill

    The writing center at Bluefield State College (West Virginia) is called the SPICE Center, SPICE being an acronym for Self Paced Instruction for Competency in English. In addition to emphasizing skill acquisition and flexibility, it stresses face-to-face evaluation of written work, and places heavy emphasis on writing as process instead of writing…

  20. Western European Studies in the United States. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blank, Stephen

    The task of this survey was to measure the relative scale of interest in Western European Studies in the United States. Doctoral dissertations and mainstream academic journals in political science, economics, anthropology, geography, sociology, and history were examined for topics dealing with Western Europe. In addition, programs and…

  1. Description of Community Theatres in the United States. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havens, John F.

    This directory presents the findings of a national survey of community theatres. The following information is provided for each responding community theatre, listed alphabetically by State: (1) Name and address of theatre, (2) year activated, (3) name and address of contact individual, (4) affiliations with theatre organizations, (5) type of…

  2. United States Participation in the Pacific Circle Consortium. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    The goal of the Pacific Circle Project is to improve international and intercultural understanding among the people and nations of the Pacific. Consortium member countries are Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the United States. Within the countries are chosen member institutions. Two major types of activities of the consortium are the exchange…

  3. Washington State Student Achievement Initiative Policy Study: Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Davis; Wachen, John; Moore, Colleen; Shulock, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    In 2007, the Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges launched a performance funding policy called the Student Achievement Initiative (SAI) both to improve public accountability by more accurately describing what students achieve from enrolling in community colleges and to provide incentives to colleges through financial rewards…

  4. Theoretical Calculation of the Particle Spectrum Following Absorption of Stopped Negative Pion by Helium -3.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roginsky, Jacob

    1987-09-01

    In 1982 Gotta et al^1, experimentally observed the branching ratios for n + D, n + D^', where D ^' represents the virtual S _{0} np state, and the probability density for three-body (n + n + p) events following absorption of stopped (pi) ^{-} in ^3He. The purpose of the thesis was to calculate theoretically the particle spectrum following the absorption, using the two-nucleon model of pion absorption ^2 and to compare it to the results obtained in the Gotta experiment. The ^3 He pionic atom is unique in that it is the simplest nucleus which provides an opportunity for the verification of the two-nucleon absorption model. For this calculation the effective two-nucleon Hamiltonian^{3,4,5} was chosen as the T-matrix for low energy pion scattering from one nucleon followed by absorption on the second nucleon. The constants g_{0} and g _1 are obtained from the corresponding two-nucleon interaction processes resulting in the pion production with the first one corresponding to the spin triplet and the second to the spin singlet nucleon interactions. The initial bound-state momentum-space wave function was chosen ^6 to be consistent with the charge radius of the ^3He nucleus and to have the correct singularities generated by the asymptotic two- and three-body channels. The final-state wave functions are characterized by non-interacting n + D, non-interacting n + D^', and a non-interacting n + n + p states (when the energy is roughly equally shared between the nucleons). The results of the calculation turned out to be in a fairly good agreement with those obtained in ^1. The branching ratio of singlet deuteron rate of transition to the corresponding rate into deuteron differed from the result in the former by less than one percent. As a check some of the results obtained in ^6 were reproduced, giving a very good agreement with it as well. The calculation indicates that the two-nucleon absorption model gives a good result when used for a simple system like ^3He. Those

  5. 40 CFR 272.1751 - North Dakota State-administered program: Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false North Dakota State-administered... Dakota § 272.1751 North Dakota State-administered program: Final authorization. (a) Pursuant to section 3006(b) of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6926(b), North Dakota has final authorization for the following elements as...

  6. 40 CFR 272.1751 - North Dakota State-administered program: Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false North Dakota State-administered... Dakota § 272.1751 North Dakota State-administered program: Final authorization. (a) Pursuant to section 3006(b) of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6926(b), North Dakota has final authorization for the following elements as...

  7. 40 CFR 272.1751 - North Dakota State-administered program: Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false North Dakota State-administered... Dakota § 272.1751 North Dakota State-administered program: Final authorization. (a) Pursuant to section 3006(b) of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6926(b), North Dakota has final authorization for the following elements as...

  8. 77 FR 60963 - Tennessee: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-05

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Tennessee: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... applied to EPA for final authorization of the changes to its hazardous waste program under the Resource... Otis Johnson, Permits and State Programs Section, RCRA Programs and Materials Management Branch,...

  9. 76 FR 6594 - North Carolina: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-07

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 North Carolina: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... applied to EPA for Final authorization of the changes to its hazardous waste program under the Resource... Johnson, Permits and State Programs Section, RCRA Programs and Materials Management Branch, RCRA...

  10. 40 CFR 272.1801 - State-administered program: Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Ohio § 272.1801 State-administered program: Final authorization. Pursuant to section 3006(b) of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6926(b): Ohio has final authorization for the following elements submitted to EPA in Ohio's program application for...

  11. Pion-nucleon scattering and pion production in nucleon-nucleon and nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.

    1982-01-01

    Lecture notes are presented on the following: (1) basic aspects of ..pi..N interactions (properties of pions and nucleons, SU(3) and SU(6) classification phenomenology of ..pi..N scattering ((3.3) resonance; phase shift analysis, and bag model approach to ..pi..N); (2) pion production and absorption in the two nucleon system (NN ..-->.. NN..pi.. (isobar model) and ..pi..d reversible NN (existence of dibaryon resonances)); (3) pion absorption in complex nuclei (multiparticle aspects and cascade calculations); and (4) pion production with nuclear targets including (a) nucleon-nucleus, (b) nucleus-nucleus (Fermi-averaged 2-body vs thermodynamic models), and (c) ..pi pi.. interoferometry.

  12. 40 CFR 272.1151 - State-administered program: Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Michigan § 272.1151 State... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false State-administered program: Final... (see 56 FR 18517). (a) State Statutes and Regulations. (1) The requirements in the Michigan statutes...

  13. Initial state fluctuations and final state correlations in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luzum, Matthew; Petersen, Hannah

    2014-06-01

    We review the phenomenology and theory of bulk observables in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions, focusing on recent developments involving event-by-event fluctuations in the initial stages of a heavy-ion collision, and how they manifest in observed correlations. We first define the relevant observables and show how each measurement is related to underlying theoretical quantities. Then we review the prevailing picture of the various stages of a collision, including the state-of-the-art modeling of the initial stages of a collision and subsequent hydrodynamic evolution, as well as hadronic scattering and freeze-out in the later stages. We then discuss the recent results that have shaped our current understanding and identify the challenges that remain. Finally, we point out open issues and the potential for progress in the field.

  14. United States Coast Guard portable salvage computer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, S.J.

    1986-07-01

    The US Coast Guard's interest in marine salvage arises from its responsibility under the Federal Water Pollution Control Act and other laws dealing with oil spills. At vessel stranding situations, which could result in significant environmental damage through the release of oil or hazardous chemicals, the Coast Guard is represented by an On-Scene Coordinator (OSC), who must evaluate whether or not appropriate salvage techniques are applied to the stranded vessel by commercial salvors. To assist the OSC, who may not be trained in marine salvage, and other Coast Guard personnel assigned to such salvage operations, a portable salvage computer has been programmed to accomplish salvage calculations in a user-friendly manner. In this final report, the development of the salvage program and selection of a portable computer are described along with results of field testing with actual stranding situations.

  15. United States Coast Guard recycling guide. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    In accordance with the Pollution Prevention Act of 1990, the United States Coast Guard (CG) is committed to a pollution prevention program that will improve the quality of the environment. A key element of this program is the minimization of municipal, industrial, and hazardous waste being generated at CG facilities nationwide. Recycling of wastes serves to reduce disposal costs and minimize adverse effects on the environment. This document gives guidance to personnel responsible for establishing CG recycling programs.

  16. Single stage anaerobic digester at Tarleton State University. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The design and operation of the demonstration plant facilities at Tarleton State University to produce methane in a single stage anaerobic digester are described. A combination of manures from hogs and poultry are used as feedstock. Uses for the methane, cost of the digester, and value of the energy produced are discussed. During the 21 months of operation, 310 people have visited the project. (DMC)

  17. Low energy theorems in pion production

    SciTech Connect

    Holstein, B.R. |

    1992-09-01

    Considerable activity-both theoretical and experimental-has recently taken place involving the threshold and near threshold of pion photo- and electroproduction. This activity is herein summarized and a program for future work is outlined.

  18. Low energy theorems in pion production

    SciTech Connect

    Holstein, B.R. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy Washington Univ., Seattle, WA . Inst. for Nuclear Theory)

    1992-01-01

    Considerable activity-both theoretical and experimental-has recently taken place involving the threshold and near threshold of pion photo- and electroproduction. This activity is herein summarized and a program for future work is outlined.

  19. Chiral pions in a magnetic background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colucci, G.; Fraga, E. S.; Sedrakian, A.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the modification of the pion self-energy at finite temperature due to its interaction with a low-density, isospin-symmetric nuclear medium embedded in a constant magnetic background. To one loop, for fixed temperature and density, we find that the pion effective mass increases with the magnetic field. For the π-, interestingly, this happens solely due to the trivial Landau quantization shift ∼|eB|, since the real part of the self-energy is negative in this case. In a scenario in which other charged particle species are present and undergo an analogous trivial shift, the relevant behavior of the effective mass might be determined essentially by the real part of the self-energy. In this case, we find that the pion mass decreases by ∼10% for a magnetic field |eB|∼mπ2, which favors pion condensation at high density and low temperatures.

  20. Valence-quark distributions in the pion

    SciTech Connect

    Hecht, M. B.; Roberts, C. D.; Schmidt, S. M.

    2001-02-01

    We calculate the pion's valence-quark momentum-fraction probability distribution using a Dyson-Schwinger equation model. Valence quarks with an active mass of 0.30 GeV carry 71% of the pion's momentum at a resolving scale q{sub 0}=0.54 GeV=1/(0.37 fm). The shape of the calculated distribution is characteristic of a strongly bound system and, evolved from q{sub 0} to q=2 GeV, it yields first, second, and third moments in agreement with lattice and phenomenological estimates, and valence-quarks carrying 49% of the pion's momentum. However, pointwise there is a discrepancy between our calculated distribution and that hitherto inferred from parametrizations of extant pion-nucleon Drell-Yan data.

  1. Pion distribution amplitude from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian-Hui; Chen, Jiunn-Wei; Ji, Xiangdong; Jin, Luchang; Lin, Huey-Wen

    2017-05-01

    We present the first lattice-QCD calculation of the pion distribution amplitude using the large-momentum effective field theory (LaMET) approach, which allows us to extract light cone parton observables from a Euclidean lattice. The mass corrections needed to extract the pion distribution amplitude from this approach are calculated to all orders in mπ2/Pz2 . We also implement the Wilson-line renormalization which is crucial to remove the power divergences in this approach, and find that it reduces the oscillation at the end points of the distribution amplitude. Our exploratory result at 310-MeV pion mass favors a single-hump form broader than the asymptotic form of the pion distribution amplitude.

  2. 75 FR 47256 - Louisiana: Final Authorization of State-Initiated Changes and Incorporation by Reference of State...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-05

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 271 and 272 Louisiana: Final Authorization of State-Initiated Changes and Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... variety of State-initiated changes to Louisiana's hazardous waste program under the Resource...

  3. 77 FR 71395 - Texas: Final Authorization of State-initiated Changes and Incorporation by Reference of State...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-30

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 271 and 272 Texas: Final Authorization of State-initiated Changes and Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... State-initiated changes to Texas' hazardous waste program under the Resource Conservation and...

  4. 75 FR 36609 - Arkansas: Final Authorization of State-Initiated Changes and Incorporation by Reference of State...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-28

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 271 and 272 Arkansas: Final Authorization of State-Initiated Changes and Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... variety of State-initiated changes to Arkansas' hazardous waste program under the Resource...

  5. 76 FR 12307 - Texas: Final Authorization of State-initiated Changes and Incorporation by Reference of State...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-07

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 271 and 272 Texas: Final Authorization of State-initiated Changes and Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... State-initiated changes to Texas' hazardous waste program under the Resource Conservation and...

  6. 77 FR 41348 - Louisiana: Final Authorization of State-Initiated Changes and Incorporation by Reference of State...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-13

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 271 and 272 Louisiana: Final Authorization of State-Initiated Changes and Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... variety of State-initiated changes to Louisiana's hazardous waste program ] under the...

  7. 78 FR 58988 - Louisiana: Final Authorization of State-initiated Changes and Incorporation by Reference of State...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 271 and 272 Louisiana: Final Authorization of State-initiated Changes and Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... variety of State-initiated changes to Louisiana's hazardous waste program under the Resource...

  8. Geothermal well log interpretation state of the art. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sanyal, S.K.; Wells, L.E.; Bickham, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    An in-depth study of the state of the art in Geothermal Well Log Interpretation has been made encompassing case histories, technical papers, computerized literature searches, and actual processing of geothermal wells from New Mexico, Idaho, and California. A classification scheme of geothermal reservoir types was defined which distinguishes fluid phase and temperature, lithology, geologic province, pore geometry, salinity, and fluid chemistry. Major deficiencies of Geothermal Well Log Interpretation are defined and discussed with recommendations of possible solutions or research for solutions. The Geothermal Well Log Interpretation study and report has concentrated primarily on Western US reservoirs. Geopressured geothermal reservoirs are not considered.

  9. Duality in Semi-Inclusive Pion Electroproduction

    SciTech Connect

    F E Close, W Melnitchouk

    2009-05-01

    We explore quark-hadron duality in semi-inclusive pion electroproduction on proton and neutron targets. Using the spin-flavor symmetric quark model, we compute ratios of $\\pi^+$ and $\\pi^-$ cross sections for both unpolarized and polarized scattering, and discuss realizations of duality in several symmetry breaking scenarios. The model calculations allow one to understand some of the key features of recent data on semi-inclusive pion production at low energies.

  10. Neutral Pion Production in MINERvA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palomino, Jose

    2012-03-01

    MINERνA is a neutrino-nucleus scattering experiment employing multiple nuclear targets. The experiment is searching for neutral pion production, both in charged current and neutral current, from coherent, resonant and deep-inelastic processes off these targets. Neutral pions are detected through the 2 photon decay that then produce electromagnetic showers. We will describe how we isolate and reconstruct the electromagnetic showers to calculate the invariant mass of the photon pair.

  11. Exclusive Reactions Involving Pions and Nucleons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Tripathi, R. K.

    2002-01-01

    The HZETRN code requires inclusive cross sections as input. One of the methods used to calculate these cross sections requires knowledge of all exclusive processes contributing to the inclusive reaction. Conservation laws are used to determine all possible exclusive reactions involving strong interactions between pions and nucleons. Inclusive particle masses are subsequently determined and are needed in cross-section calculations for inclusive pion production.

  12. Two-pion exchange currents in photodisintegration of the deuteron

    SciTech Connect

    Rozp edzik, D.; Golak, J.; Koelling, S.; Epelbaum, E.

    2011-10-24

    Chiral effective field theory (ChEFT) is a modern framework to analyze the properties of few-nucleon systems at low energies. It is based on the most general effective Lagrangian for pions and nucleons consistent with the chiral symmetry of QCD. For energies below the pion-production threshold it is possible to eliminate the pionic degrees of freedom and derive nuclear potentials and nuclear current operators solely in terms of the nucleonic degrees of freedom. This is very important because, despite a lot of experience gained in the past, the consistency between two-nucleon forces, many-nucleon forces and the corresponding current operators has not been achieved yet. In this presentation we consider the recently derived long-range two-pion exchange (TPE) contributions to the nuclear current operator which appear at next-to leading order of the chiral expansion. These operators do not contain any free parameters. We study their role in the deuteron photodisintegration reaction and compare our predictions with experimental data from Refs [3]. The bound and scattering states are calculated using five different chiral N2LO nucleon-nucleon (NN) potentials which allows to estimate the theoretical uncertainty at a given order in the chiral expansion. For some observables the results are very close to the reference predictions based on the AV18 NN potential and the current operator (partly) consistent with this force.

  13. Transportation control measure: State Implementation Plan guidance (revised final report)

    SciTech Connect

    Eisinger, D.S.; Deakin, E.A.; Mahoney, L.A.; Morris, R.E.; Ireson, R.G.

    1990-09-01

    The document has been developed for the United States Environmental Protection Agency to summarize current knowledge about transportation control measures (TCMs). The target audience includes transportation and air quality management staff at all government levels. The guidance development effort is motivated by the need to provide post-1987 guidance to attain National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). The document provides descriptions and examples of the most frequently implemented TCMs; institutional guidance such as assessing feasibility, agency responsibilities, and funding; and techniques for monitoring and enforcing TCMs. In addition, the document describes the tools available for evaluating TCM impacts on hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, and carbon monoxide emissions. Appendices present approaches to estimate TCM effects on PM-10 emissions; important sources of additional information; implementation experiences in various cities; and rules of thumb to quantitatively evaluate TCM transportation system effects. The information presented demonstrates that there have been significant advances in TCM development over the past decade, and that TCMs are appropriate control options for state implementation plans.

  14. Battery charger and state of charge indicator. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Latos, T.S.

    1984-04-15

    The battery charger has a full-wave rectifier in series with a transformer isolated 20 kHz dc-dc converter with high frequency switches which are programmed to actively shape the input ac line current to be a mirror image of the ac line voltage. The power circuit is capable of operating at 2 kW peak and 1 kW average power. The BC/SCI has two major subsystems: (1) the battery charger power electronics with its controls; and (2) a microcomputer subsystem which is used to acquire battery terminal data and exercise the state-of-charge software programs. The state-of-charge definition employed is the energy remaining in the battery when extracted at a 10 kW rate divided by the energy capacity of a fully charged new battery. The battery charger circuit is an isolated boost converter operating at an internal frequency of 20 kHz. The switches selected for the battery charger are the single most important item in determining its efficiency. The combination of voltage and current requirements dictated the use of high power NPN Darlington switching transistors. The power circuit topology developed is a three switch design utilizing a power FET on the center tap of the isolation transformer and the power Darlingtons on each of the two ends. An analog control system is employed to accomplish active input current waveshaping as well as the necessary regulation.

  15. Pion production cross sections and associated parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradbury, J. N.

    Negative pions have been used for radiotherapy at the meson factories LAMPF (USA), SIN (Switzerland), and TRIUMF (Canada) and have been planned for use at new meson facilities under construction (USSR) and at proposed dedicated medical facilities. Providing therapeutically useful dose rates of pions requires a knowledge of the pion production cross sections as a function of primary proton energy (500 to 1000 MeV), pion energy (less than or equal to100 MeV), production angle, and target material. The current status of the data base in this area is presented including theoretical guidelines for extrapolation purposes. The target material and geometry, as well as the proton and pion beam parameters, will affect the electron (and muon) contamination in the beam which may have an important effect on both the LET characteristics of the dose and the dose distribution. In addition to cross-section data, channel characteristics such as length of pion trajectory, solid-angle acceptance, and momentum analysis will affect dose rate, distribution, and quality. Such considerations are briefly addressed in terms of existing facilities and proposed systems.

  16. Pion Production Data Needed for Space Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    2010-01-01

    A recent discovery concerning the importance of hadron production in space radiation is that pions can contribute up to twenty percent of the dose from galactic cosmic ray interactions (S. Aghara, S. Blattnig, J. Norbury, R. Singleterry, Nuclear Instruments and Methods, Vol. 267, 2009, p. 1115). Although the contribution for dose equivalent will be smaller, the dose contribution could be important for fluence based radiation models. Pion production cross sections will be an essential ingredient to such models, and it is of interest to investigate the adequacy of the pion production experimental data base for energies relevant to space radiation. The pion production threshold in nucleon - nucleon reactions is at 280 MeV and, in an interesting accident of nature, this lies near the peak of the galactic cosmic ray proton spectrum. Therefore, pion production data are needed from threshold up to energies around 50 GeV/nucleon, where the galactic cosmic ray fluence is of decreasing importance. Total and differential cross section data for pion production in this energy range will be reviewed. The availability and accuracy of theoretical models will also be discussed. It will be shown that there are a significant lack of data in this important energy range and that theoretical models still need improvement.

  17. Cross sections for νμ and ν¯μ induced pion production on hydrocarbon in the few-GeV region using MINERvA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGivern, C. L.; Le, T.; Eberly, B.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Bellantoni, L.; Bercellie, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Cai, T.; Carneiro, M. F.; Christy, M. E.; da Motta, H.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Endress, E.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fine, R.; Galindo, R.; Gallagher, H.; Golan, T.; Gran, R.; Harris, D. A.; Higuera, A.; Hurtado, K.; Kiveni, M.; Kleykamp, J.; Kordosky, M.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshall, C. M.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; McFarland, K. S.; McGowan, A. M.; Messerly, B.; Miller, J.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J. G.; Mousseau, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Norrick, A.; Nuruzzaman; Paolone, V.; Park, J.; Patrick, C. E.; Perdue, G. N.; Rakotondravohitra, L.; Ramirez, M. A.; Ransome, R. D.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rimal, D.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Ruterbories, D.; Schellman, H.; Schmitz, D. W.; Simon, C.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Sánchez Falero, S.; Tice, B. G.; Valencia, E.; Walton, T.; Wolcott, J.; Wospakrik, M.; Zhang, D.; Minerva Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Separate samples of charged-current pion production events representing two semi-inclusive channels νμ-CC (π+) and ν¯ μ-CC (π0) have been obtained using neutrino and antineutrino exposures of the MINERvA detector. Distributions in kinematic variables based upon μ±-track reconstructions are analyzed and compared for the two samples. The differential cross sections for muon production angle, muon momentum, and four-momentum transfer Q2 are reported, and cross sections versus neutrino energy are obtained. Comparisons with predictions of current neutrino event generators are used to clarify the role of the Δ (1232 ) and higher-mass baryon resonances in CC pion production and to show the importance of pion final-state interactions. For the νμ-CC (π+) [ν¯ μ-CC (π0) ] sample, the absolute data rate is observed to lie below (above) the predictions of some of the event generators by amounts that are typically 1-to- 2 σ . However the generators are able to reproduce the shapes of the differential cross sections for all kinematic variables of either data set.

  18. Cross sections for νμ and ν¯μ induced pion production on hydrocarbon in the few-GeV region using MINERvA

    DOE PAGES

    McGivern, C. L.; Le, T.; Eberly, B.; ...

    2016-09-06

    Separate samples of charged-current pion production events representing two semi-inclusive channels νμ–CC(π+) and ν¯μ–CC(π0) have been obtained using neutrino and antineutrino exposures of the MINERvA detector. Distributions in kinematic variables based upon μ±-track reconstructions are analyzed and compared for the two samples. The differential cross sections for muon production angle, muon momentum, and four-momentum transfer Q2 are reported, and cross sections versus neutrino energy are obtained. Comparisons with predictions of current neutrino event generators are used to clarify the role of the Δ(1232) and higher-mass baryon resonances in CC pion production and to show the importance of pion final-state interactions.more » For the νμ–CC(π+) [ν¯μ–CC(π0)] sample, the absolute data rate is observed to lie below (above) the predictions of some of the event generators by amounts that are typically 1-to- 2σ. Furthermore, the generators are able to reproduce the shapes of the differential cross sections for all kinematic variables of either data set.« less

  19. Effects of pion-fold-pion diagrams in the energy-independent nucleon-nucleon potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Guzman, G.; Kuo, T. T. S.; Holinde, K.; Machleidt, R.; Faessler, A.; Müther, H.

    1985-10-01

    Based on a T-matrix equivalence theory, an energy-independent or locally energy-dependent nucléon-nucléon potential VNN derived from meson exchanges is studied. The potential, given as a series expansion of folded diagrams, is independent of the asymptotic energy of the scattering nucleons. It is, however, locally energy dependent in the sense that its matrix elements < a| VNN| b> depend on the energies associated with its bra and ket states a and b. Our formulation makes use of right-hand-side on-shell T-matrix equivalence of the field-theoretical and potential descriptions when limited to the space of neutrons and protons only. This preserves not only scattering (e.g. phase shifts, projections of wave functions) but also bound-state properties. The matrix elements of V were calculated for two potential models, one based on one-pion exchange (OPEP) and the other on one-boson exchange (OBEP) using {π, ρ, σ, ω, δ, η }. Three types of phase-shift calculations have been carried out to study the viability of constructing an energy-independent potential using the folded-diagram expansion: (A) NN phase shifts for an energy-dependent OPEP and OBEP. For the OBEP we used parameters adjusted to fit experimental data. (B) The same phase shifts for the energy-independent case for both OPEP and OBEP. (C) Repetition of (B) with effects of the two-pion folded diagrams included. Our results show two important points: (i) folded diagrams are of essential importance, and (ii) the first-order folded diagrams contain the dominant effect and the neglect of terms with more than two folds can be regarded as a good approximation. The effects of folded diagrams are large especially for low partial waves and high energies. For high partial waves ( J greater than 2) the folded terms are negligible, and the phase shifts given by (A), (B) and (C) practically coincide.

  20. Hard QCD and hadronic final state at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valkárová, Alice

    2017-03-01

    The production of inclusive jets, dijets and trijets was investigated with the high statistics HERA II DIS data. The H1 experiment has determined the corresponding cross sections with improved experimental precision and sophisticated method of unfolding, compared to previous measurements. The results were compared with NLO QCD and NNLO QCD calculations for the first time. Signals of QCD instanton-induced processes were searched for in neutral current deep-inelastic scattering with high momentum transfer Q2 by H1 collaboration. Compared to earlier publications, the limits were improved by an order of magnitude. A search for a narrow baryonic state in the p KS0 and p ¯KS0 system has been performed with the ZEUS detector. Measurements with the ZEUS data in DIS of isolated photons were reported, including studies of kinematic variables sensitive to the event dynamics. The measurements were compared to MC models and to theoretical calculations based on kt factorisation QCD approach.

  1. Final report for Utah State's SciDAC CEMM contribution

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Eric Held

    2008-05-13

    This document represents a summary of work carried out at Utah State University in conjunction with the Center for Extended Magnetohyrodynamic Modeling (CEMM). The principal investigator, Dr. Eric Held, was aided in this work by two former graduate students, Drs. John James and Michael Addae-Kagyah, who completed their PhD's while being partially funded by CEMM monies. In addtion, Dr. Jeong-Young Ji, a postdoctoral researcher and Mukta Sharma, a graduate student were supported. The work associated with this grant focused on developing an efficient, hybrid fluid/kinetic model for fusion plasmas. Specifically, expressions for the parallel heat fluxes and stresses in magnetized plasmas were implemented and exercised in the NIMROD plasma fluid code.

  2. Spontaneous pion emission as a new natural radioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ion, D. B.; Ivascu, M.; Ion-Mihai, R.

    1986-10-01

    In this paper the pionic nuclear radioactivity or spontaneous poin emission by a nucleus from its ground state is investigated. The Qπ-values as well as the statistical factors are calculated using the experimental masses tabulated by Wapstra and Audi. Then it was shown that the pionic radioactivity of the nuclear ground state is energetically possible via three-body channels for all nuclides with Z > 80. This new type of natural radioactivity is statistically favored especially for Z = 92 - 106 for which F π/F SF = 40 - 200 [ MeV] 2. Experimental detection of the neutral pion and also some possible emission mechanisms are discussed.

  3. Penguins, trees and final state interactions in B decays in broken SU3.

    SciTech Connect

    Lipkin, H. J.; High Energy Physics; Weizmann Inst. of Science

    1997-12-01

    The availability of data on B{sub s} decays to strange quasi-two-body final states, either with or without charmonium opens new possibilities for understanding different contributions of weak diagrams and in particular the relative contributions of tree and penguin diagrams. Corresponding B{sub d} and B{sub s} decays to charge conjugate final states are equal in the SU(3) symmetry limit and the dominant SU(3) breaking mechanism is given by ratios of CKM matrix elements. Final State Interactions effects should be small, because strong interactions conserve C and should tend to cancel in ratios between charge conjugate states. Particularly interesting implications of decays into final states containing {eta} and {eta}{prime} are discussed.

  4. 40 CFR 272.2201 - Texas State-Administered Program: Final Authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Texas State-Administered Program... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Texas § 272.2201 Texas State-Administered Program: Final Authorization. (a) Pursuant to section 3006(b) of RCRA, 42 U.S.C...

  5. 40 CFR 272.151 - Arizona State-administered program: Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Arizona State-administered program... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Arizona § 272.151 Arizona State-administered program: Final authorization. (a) Pursuant to section 3006(b) of RCRA, 42 U.S.C...

  6. 40 CFR 272.151 - Arizona State-administered program: Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Arizona State-administered program... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Arizona § 272.151 Arizona State-administered program: Final authorization. (a) Pursuant to section 3006(b) of RCRA, 42 U.S.C...

  7. 40 CFR 272.151 - Arizona State-administered program: Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Arizona State-administered program... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Arizona § 272.151 Arizona State-administered program: Final authorization. (a) Pursuant to section 3006(b) of RCRA, 42 U.S.C...

  8. 40 CFR 272.151 - Arizona State-administered program: Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Arizona State-administered program... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Arizona § 272.151 Arizona State-administered program: Final authorization. (a) Pursuant to section 3006(b) of RCRA, 42 U.S.C...

  9. 40 CFR 272.501 - Florida State-administered program: Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Florida State-administered program... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Florida § 272.501 Florida State-administered program: Final authorization. (a) Pursuant to section 3006(b) of RCRA, 42 U.S.C...

  10. 40 CFR 272.501 - Florida State-administered program: Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Florida State-administered program... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Florida § 272.501 Florida State-administered program: Final authorization. (a) Pursuant to section 3006(b) of RCRA, 42 U.S.C...

  11. 40 CFR 272.501 - Florida State-administered program: Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Florida State-administered program... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Florida § 272.501 Florida State-administered program: Final authorization. (a) Pursuant to section 3006(b) of RCRA, 42 U.S.C...

  12. 40 CFR 272.501 - Florida State-administered program: Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Florida State-administered program... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Florida § 272.501 Florida State-administered program: Final authorization. (a) Pursuant to section 3006(b) of RCRA, 42 U.S.C...

  13. 40 CFR 272.1601 - New Mexico State-Administered Program: Final Authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false New Mexico State-Administered Program... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS New Mexico § 272.1601 New Mexico State-Administered Program: Final Authorization. (a) Pursuant to section 3006(b) of RCRA...

  14. 40 CFR 272.1601 - New Mexico State-Administered Program: Final Authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false New Mexico State-Administered Program... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS New Mexico § 272.1601 New Mexico State-Administered Program: Final Authorization. (a) Pursuant to section 3006(b) of RCRA...

  15. 40 CFR 272.1601 - New Mexico State-Administered Program: Final Authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false New Mexico State-Administered Program... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS New Mexico § 272.1601 New Mexico State-Administered Program: Final Authorization. (a) Pursuant to section 3006(b) of RCRA...

  16. 40 CFR 272.1601 - New Mexico State-Administered Program: Final Authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false New Mexico State-Administered Program... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS New Mexico § 272.1601 New Mexico State-Administered Program: Final Authorization. (a) Pursuant to section 3006(b) of RCRA...

  17. 77 FR 47302 - South Dakota: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-08

    ... Revisions AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The EPA is granting... comment from the South Dakota State Deputy Attorney General regarding Indian country language. No further... Indian country, where the state is not authorized to administer its program. Specifically, the state...

  18. 78 FR 58890 - Louisiana: Final Authorization of State-Initiated Changes and Incorporation by Reference of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 271 and 272 Louisiana: Final Authorization of State-Initiated Changes and Incorporation by Reference of Approved State Hazardous Waste Management Program AGENCY: Environmental Protection... identified a variety of State-initiated changes to its hazardous waste program under the...

  19. 75 FR 47223 - Louisiana: Final Authorization of State-Initiated Changes and Incorporation by Reference of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-05

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 271 and 272 Louisiana: Final Authorization of State-Initiated Changes and Incorporation by Reference of Approved State Hazardous Waste Management Program AGENCY: Environmental Protection... identified a variety of State-initiated changes to its hazardous waste program under the...

  20. 78 FR 29239 - Final Priority; Technical Assistance To Improve State Data Capacity-National Technical Assistance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-20

    ... CFR Chapter III Final Priority; Technical Assistance To Improve State Data Capacity--National Technical Assistance Center To Improve State Capacity To Accurately Collect and Report IDEA Data AGENCY... under the Technical Assistance to Improve State Data Capacity program. The Assistant Secretary may...

  1. 40 CFR 272.1851 - Oklahoma State-administered program: Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Oklahoma State-administered program... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Oklahoma § 272.1851 Oklahoma State-administered program: Final authorization. (a) Pursuant to section 3006(b) of RCRA, 42 U.S.C...

  2. 40 CFR 272.1851 - Oklahoma State-administered program: Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oklahoma State-administered program... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Oklahoma § 272.1851 Oklahoma State-administered program: Final authorization. (a) Pursuant to section 3006(b) of RCRA, 42 U.S.C...

  3. 40 CFR 272.1851 - Oklahoma State-administered program: Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Oklahoma State-administered program... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Oklahoma § 272.1851 Oklahoma State-administered program: Final authorization. (a) Pursuant to section 3006(b) of RCRA, 42 U.S.C...

  4. Ξ-d-->nΛΛ and the ΛΛ final state interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, S. B.; Afnan, I. R.; Gibson, B. F.

    1998-06-01

    The reaction Ξ-d-->nΛΛ is studied within the framework of the Faddeev equations as a possible tool to gain insight into the final state ΛΛ interaction. The neutron differential energy spectrum gives a final state interaction that is sensitive to both the ΛΛ amplitude at threshold and the coupling between the ΛΛ and ΞN channels. The latter is a result of interference between two mechanisms for the production of the final state, which suggests that this reaction could give a measure of flavor SU(3) violation in the two-baryon system.

  5. Pion scattering poles and chiral symmetry restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Fraile, D.; Nicola, A. Gomez; Herruzo, E. T.

    2007-10-15

    Using unitarized chiral perturbation theory methods, we perform a detailed analysis of the {pi}{pi} scattering poles f{sub 0}(600) and {rho}(770) behavior when medium effects such as temperature or density drive the system towards chiral symmetry restoration. In the analysis of real poles below threshold, we show that it is crucial to extend properly the unitarized amplitudes so that they match the perturbative Adler zeros. Our results do not show threshold enhancement effects at finite temperature in the f{sub 0}(600) channel, which remains as a pole of broad nature. We also implement T=0 finite-density effects related to chiral symmetry restoration, by varying the pole position with the pion decay constant. Although this approach takes into account only a limited class of contributions, we reproduce the expected finite-density restoration behavior, which drives the poles towards the real axis, producing threshold enhancement and {pi}{pi} bound states. We compare our results with several model approaches and discuss the experimental consequences, both in relativistic heavy ion collisions and in {pi}{yields}{pi}{pi} and {gamma}{yields}{pi}{pi} reactions in nuclei.

  6. Model selection for pion photoproduction

    DOE PAGES

    Landay, J.; Doring, M.; Fernandez-Ramirez, C.; ...

    2017-01-12

    Partial-wave analysis of meson and photon-induced reactions is needed to enable the comparison of many theoretical approaches to data. In both energy-dependent and independent parametrizations of partial waves, the selection of the model amplitude is crucial. Principles of the S matrix are implemented to a different degree in different approaches; but a many times overlooked aspect concerns the selection of undetermined coefficients and functional forms for fitting, leading to a minimal yet sufficient parametrization. We present an analysis of low-energy neutral pion photoproduction using the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) in combination with criteria from information theory andmore » K-fold cross validation. These methods are not yet widely known in the analysis of excited hadrons but will become relevant in the era of precision spectroscopy. As a result, the principle is first illustrated with synthetic data; then, its feasibility for real data is demonstrated by analyzing the latest available measurements of differential cross sections (dσ/dΩ), photon-beam asymmetries (Σ), and target asymmetry differential cross sections (dσT/d≡Tdσ/dΩ) in the low-energy regime.« less

  7. Model selection for pion photoproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landay, J.; Döring, M.; Fernández-Ramírez, C.; Hu, B.; Molina, R.

    2017-01-01

    Partial-wave analysis of meson and photon-induced reactions is needed to enable the comparison of many theoretical approaches to data. In both energy-dependent and independent parametrizations of partial waves, the selection of the model amplitude is crucial. Principles of the S matrix are implemented to a different degree in different approaches; but a many times overlooked aspect concerns the selection of undetermined coefficients and functional forms for fitting, leading to a minimal yet sufficient parametrization. We present an analysis of low-energy neutral pion photoproduction using the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) in combination with criteria from information theory and K -fold cross validation. These methods are not yet widely known in the analysis of excited hadrons but will become relevant in the era of precision spectroscopy. The principle is first illustrated with synthetic data; then, its feasibility for real data is demonstrated by analyzing the latest available measurements of differential cross sections (d σ /d Ω ), photon-beam asymmetries (Σ ), and target asymmetry differential cross sections (d σT/d ≡T d σ /d Ω ) in the low-energy regime.

  8. PLIAC: A Pion Linac facility for 1-GEV pion physics at LAMPF

    SciTech Connect

    Spalek, G.; Thiessen, H.A.

    1991-12-31

    A design study for a Pion Linac (PILAC) at LAMPF is underway at Los Alamos. We present here a reference design for a system of pion source, linac, and high-resolution beam line and spectrometer that will provide 10{sup 9} pions per second on target and 200-keV resolution for the ({pi}{sup +}, K{sup +}) reaction at 0.92 GeV. A general-purpose beam line that delivers both positive and negative pions in the energy range 0.4--1.1 GeV is included, thus opening up the possibility of a broad experimental program as is discussed in this report. A kicker-based beam sharing system allows delivery of beam to both beamlines simultaneously with independent sign and energy control. Because the pion linac acts like an rf particle separator, all beams produced by PILAC will be free of electron (or positron) and proton contamination.

  9. PLIAC: A Pion Linac facility for 1-GEV pion physics at LAMPF

    SciTech Connect

    Spalek, G.; Thiessen, H.A.

    1991-01-01

    A design study for a Pion Linac (PILAC) at LAMPF is underway at Los Alamos. We present here a reference design for a system of pion source, linac, and high-resolution beam line and spectrometer that will provide 10{sup 9} pions per second on target and 200-keV resolution for the ({pi}{sup +}, K{sup +}) reaction at 0.92 GeV. A general-purpose beam line that delivers both positive and negative pions in the energy range 0.4--1.1 GeV is included, thus opening up the possibility of a broad experimental program as is discussed in this report. A kicker-based beam sharing system allows delivery of beam to both beamlines simultaneously with independent sign and energy control. Because the pion linac acts like an rf particle separator, all beams produced by PILAC will be free of electron (or positron) and proton contamination.

  10. Extraction of Resonance Parameters and Role of the Final State Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strakovsky, Igor I.; Briscoe, William J.; Kudryavtsev, Alexander E.; Tarasov, Vladimir E.

    2014-01-01

    We present an overview of the SAID group effort to analyze new γn → π-p cross sections vs. the world database to get new multipoles and determine neutron electromagnetic couplings. The differential cross section for the processes γn → π-p was extracted from new measurements at CLAS and MAMI-B accounting for Fermi motion effects in the impulse approximation (IA) as well as NN- and πN-FSI effects beyond the IA. We evaluated results of several pion photoproduction analyses and compared πN PWA results as a constraint for analyses of pion photoproduction data (Watson's theorem).

  11. Anatomy of relativistic pion loop corrections to the electromagnetic nucleon coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Chueng-Ryong; Melnitchouk, Wally; Thomas, Anthony W.

    2013-10-01

    We present a relativistic formulation of pion loop corrections to the coupling of photons with nucleons on the light-front. Vertex and wave function renormalization constants are computed to lowest order in the pion field, including their nonanalytic behavior in the chiral limit, and studied numerically as a function of the ultraviolet cutoff. Particular care is taken to explicitly verify gauge invariance and Ward-Takahashi identity constraints to all orders in the m_\\pi expansion. The results are used to compute the chiral corrections to matrix elements of local operators, related to moments of deep-inelastic structure functions. Finally, comparisons of results for pseudovector and pseudoscalar coupling allows the resolution of a long-standing puzzle in the computation of pion cloud corrections to structure function moments.

  12. 75 FR 5132 - United States v. Cameron International Corp., et al.; Proposed Final Judgment and Competitive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-01

    ..., Suite 100, Houston, TX 77041, Defendants. Case No.: Case: 1:09-cv-02165. Assigned To: Bates, John D...: November 17, 2009. Judge: Bates, John D. Proposed Final Judgment Whereas, Plaintiff, United States of...

  13. Final June Revisions Rule State Budgets and New Unit Set-Asides TSD

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This technical support document (TSD) for the final revisions to the Transport Rule shows the underlying data and calculations used to quantify the state budget revisions and new unit set-aside revisions.

  14. Cross-State Air Pollution Rule Update Allowance Allocation Final Rule TSD

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Technical Support Document (TSD) provides information that supports EPA’s determination of unit-level allocations for existing and new units under the final Cross-State Air Pollution Rule Update.

  15. Air Quality Modeling Technical Support Document for the Final Cross State Air Pollution Rule Update

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In this technical support document (TSD) we describe the air quality modeling performed to support the final Cross State Air Pollution Rule for the 2008 ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS).

  16. 40 CFR 272.951 - Louisiana state-administered program: Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... addition of Consumer Electronics as a state universal waste. These changes were made as part of the same... for the August 5, 2005 Federal final rule, however, EPA does recognize Consumer Electronics as part...

  17. 40 CFR 272.951 - Louisiana state-administered program: Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... addition of Consumer Electronics as a state universal waste. These changes were made as part of the same... for the August 5, 2005 Federal final rule, however, EPA does recognize Consumer Electronics as part...

  18. Final Revisions Rule State Budgets and New Unit Set-Asides TSD

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This technical support document shows the underlying data and calculations used to quantify the state budget revisions and new unit set-aside revisions made in the final revisions rule, as well as those revisions included in the direct final revisions rule

  19. 75 FR 918 - Oregon: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-07

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Oregon: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: Oregon has applied to EPA for... comment period closed on December 18, 2009. EPA has decided that the revisions to the Oregon...

  20. 76 FR 37048 - Louisiana; Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Louisiana; Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... Louisiana has applied to EPA for Final authorization of the changes to its hazardous waste program under...

  1. 76 FR 37021 - Louisiana: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Louisiana: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program..., (50 FR 3348), to implement its base Hazardous Waste Management Program. We granted authorization for... opportunity to apply for final authorization to operate all aspects of their hazardous waste...

  2. 78 FR 15338 - New York: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 New York: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... applied to EPA for final authorization of changes to its hazardous waste program under the Solid...

  3. 78 FR 70255 - West Virginia: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 West Virginia: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... applied to EPA for final authorization of revisions to its hazardous waste program under the...

  4. 77 FR 65314 - Missouri: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-26

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Missouri: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program..., Missouri received final authorization to implement its hazardous waste management program effective... Hazardous Waste Management Law'' section 260.350 through 260.434. Missouri's authority to incorporate...

  5. 77 FR 47797 - Arkansas: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Arkansas: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... Arkansas has applied to EPA for Final authorization of the changes to its hazardous waste program under...

  6. 78 FR 25579 - Georgia: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-02

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Georgia: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions... to EPA for final authorization of changes to its hazardous waste program under the Resource... authorization during the comment period, the decision to authorize Georgia's changes to its hazardous waste...

  7. 76 FR 6564 - Florida: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-07

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Florida: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions... to EPA for final authorization of the changes to its hazardous waste program under the Resource... changes to its hazardous waste program will take effect. If we receive comments that oppose this action...

  8. 78 FR 33986 - Indiana: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Indiana: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision... Indiana final authorization of the changes to its hazardous waste program under the Resource Conservation... 3006(b), 42 U.S.C. 6926(b), must maintain a hazardous waste program that is equivalent to, consistent...

  9. 76 FR 19004 - Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... Oklahoma has applied to EPA for Final authorization of the changes to its hazardous waste program under the...

  10. 77 FR 38566 - Louisiana: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Louisiana: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... Louisiana has applied to EPA for Final authorization of the changes to its hazardous waste program under the...

  11. 76 FR 6594 - Florida: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Florida: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions... for Final authorization of the changes to its hazardous waste program under the Resource Conservation...

  12. 78 FR 25678 - Georgia: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Georgia: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions... for final authorization of changes to its hazardous waste program under the Resource Conservation and...

  13. 76 FR 18927 - Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-06

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision... applied to the EPA for Final authorization of the changes to its hazardous waste program under the... authorize Oklahoma's changes to its hazardous waste program will take effect. If we receive comments that...

  14. 75 FR 9345 - Michigan: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-02

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Michigan: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision... final authorization of the changes to its hazardous waste program under the Resource Conservation and... Michigan Department of Natural Resources and Environment, Waste and Hazardous Materials Division...

  15. Longitudinal Electroproduction of Charged Pions from

    SciTech Connect

    David Gaskell; Abdellah Ahmidouch; Pawel Ambrozewicz; H. Anklin; John Arrington; K. Assamagan; Steven Avery; Kevin Bailey; Oliver K. Baker; Shelton Beedoe; Elizabeth Beise; Herbert Breuer; D. S. Brown; Roger Carlini; Jinseok Cha; Nicholas Chant; Anthony Cowley; Samuel Danagoulian; D. De Schepper; Jim Dunne; Dipangkar Dutta; Rolf Ent; Liping Gan; Ashot Gasparian; Donald Geesaman; Ron Gilman; Charles Glashausser; Paul Gueye; M. Harvey; O. Hashimoto; Wendy Hinton; G. Hofman; Ceasar Jackson; Hal Jackson; Cynthia Keppel; Ed Kinney; Doug Koltenuk; G. Kyle; Allison Lung; David Mack; D. McKee; Joseph Mitchell; Hamlet Mkrtchyan; B. Mueller; Gabriel Niculescu; Ioana Niculescu; Tom O'Neill; V. Papavassiliou; Dave Potterveld; Juerg Reinhold; Philip Roos; Reyad Sawafta; Ralph Segel; Stepan Stepanyan; Vardan Tadevosyan; T. Takahashi; Liguang Tang; B. Terburg; D. Van Westrum; J. Volmer; T. P. Welch; Stephen Wood; Lulin Yuan; Ben Zeidman; Beni Zihlmann

    2001-11-12

    Separated longitudinal and transverse cross sections for charged pion electroproduction from {sup 1}H, {sup 2}H, and {sup 3}He were measured at Q{sup 2} = 0.4 (GeV/c){sup 2} for two values of the invariant mass, {bar W} = 1.15 GeV and {bar W} = 1.60 GeV, in a search for a mass dependence which would signal the effect of nuclear pions. This is the first such study that includes recoil momenta significantly above the Fermi surface. The longitudinal cross section, if dominated by the pion-pole process, should be sensitive to nuclear pion currents. Comparisons of the longitudinal cross section target ratios to a quasifree calculation reveal a significant suppression in {sup 3>}He at {bar W} = 1.60 GeV. The {bar W} = 1.15 GeV results are consistent with simple estimates of the effect of nuclear pion currents, but are also consistent with pure quasifree production.

  16. Measurement of the Charged-Pion Polarizability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolph, C.; Akhunzyanov, R.; Alexeev, M. G.; Alexeev, G. D.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Anosov, V.; Austregesilo, A.; Badełek, B.; Balestra, F.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Beck, R.; Bedfer, Y.; Berlin, A.; Bernhard, J.; Bicker, K.; Bieling, J.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bodlak, M.; Boer, M.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Burtin, E.; Capozza, L.; Chiosso, M.; Chung, S. U.; Cicuttin, A.; Colantoni, M.; Crespo, M. L.; Curiel, Q.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S. S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O. Yu.; Dinkelbach, A. M.; Donskov, S. V.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dünnweber, W.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Elia, C.; Eversheim, P. D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Filin, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; Du Fresne von Hohenesche, N.; Friedrich, J. M.; Frolov, V.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O. P.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Gnesi, I.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Gorzellik, M.; Grabmüller, S.; Grasso, A.; Grube, B.; Grussenmeyer, T.; Guskov, A.; Guthörl, T.; Haas, F.; von Harrach, D.; Hahne, D.; Hashimoto, R.; Heinsius, F. H.; Herrmann, F.; Hinterberger, F.; Höppner, Ch.; Horikawa, N.; D'Hose, N.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jary, V.; Jasinski, P.; Jörg, P.; Joosten, R.; Kabuß, E.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G. V.; Khokhlov, Yu. A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koivuniemi, J. H.; Kolosov, V. N.; Kondo, K.; Königsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V. F.; Kotzinian, A. M.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krämer, M.; Kroumchtein, Z. V.; Kuchinski, N.; Kuhn, R.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R. P.; Lednev, A. A.; Lehmann, A.; Levillain, M.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G. K.; Marchand, C.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matousek, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Miyachi, Y.; Moinester, M. A.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nagel, T.; Nerling, F.; Neubert, S.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V. I.; Novy, J.; Nowak, W.-D.; Nunes, A. S.; Olshevsky, A. G.; Orlov, I.; Ostrick, M.; Panknin, R.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Peshekhonov, D.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polyakov, V. A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Regali, C.; Reicherz, G.; Rocco, E.; Rossiyskaya, N. S.; Ryabchikov, D. I.; Rychter, A.; Samoylenko, V. D.; Sandacz, A.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I. A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schlüter, T.; Schmidt, K.; Schmieden, H.; Schönning, K.; Schopferer, S.; Schott, M.; Shevchenko, O. Yu.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Slunecka, M.; Sosio, S.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Steiger, L.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Suzuki, H.; Szabelski, A.; Szameitat, T.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; Ter Wolbeek, J.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thibaud, F.; Uhl, S.; Uman, I.; Virius, M.; Wang, L.; Weisrock, T.; Wilfert, M.; Windmolders, R.; Wollny, H.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Ziembicki, M.; Zink, A.; Compass Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    The COMPASS collaboration at CERN has investigated pion Compton scattering, π-γ →π-γ , at center-of-mass energy below 3.5 pion masses. The process is embedded in the reaction π-Ni →π-γ Ni , which is initiated by 190 GeV pions impinging on a nickel target. The exchange of quasireal photons is selected by isolating the sharp Coulomb peak observed at smallest momentum transfers, Q2<0.0015 (GeV /c )2 . From a sample of 63 000 events, the pion electric polarizability is determined to be απ=(2.0 ±0. 6stat±0. 7syst)×1 0-4 fm3 under the assumption απ=-βπ, which relates the electric and magnetic dipole polarizabilities. It is the most precise measurement of this fundamental low-energy parameter of strong interaction that has been addressed since long by various methods with conflicting outcomes. While this result is in tension with previous dedicated measurements, it is found in agreement with the expectation from chiral perturbation theory. An additional measurement replacing pions by muons, for which the cross-section behavior is unambiguously known, was performed for an independent estimate of the systematic uncertainty.

  17. Closing the wedge: Search strategies for extended Higgs sectors with heavy flavor final states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gori, Stefania; Kim, Ian-Woo; Shah, Nausheen R.; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2016-04-01

    We consider search strategies for an extended Higgs sector at the high-luminosity LHC14 utilizing multitop final states. In the framework of a two Higgs doublet model, the purely top final states (t t ¯ , 4 t ) are important channels for heavy Higgs bosons with masses in the wedge above 2 mt and at low values of tan β , while a 2 b 2 t final state is most relevant at moderate values of tan β . We find, in the t t ¯H channel, with H →t t ¯, that both single and three lepton final states can provide statistically significant constraints at low values of tan β for mA as high as ˜750 GeV . When systematics on the t t ¯ background are taken into account, however, the three lepton final state is more powerful, though the precise constraint depends fairly sensitively on lepton fake rates. We also find that neither 2 b 2 t nor t t ¯ final states provide constraints on additional heavy Higgs bosons with couplings to tops smaller than the top Yukawa due to expected systematic uncertainties in the t t ¯ background.

  18. Looking for pions in all the wrong places

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, T.D. )

    1992-12-05

    In this talk, the problem of virtual pion contributions to nucleon properties is discussed. The infrared behavior of the pion propagator can lead to quantities being nonanalytic in [ital m][sup 2][sub [pi

  19. Baryon spectroscopy in a hybrid model with quantized pions

    SciTech Connect

    Price, C.E.; McNeil, J.A.

    1993-04-01

    The authors extend their earlier calculations of baryon properties in a hybrid quark model based on the Gell-Mann-Levy linear sigma model. They have avoided the projection problems associated with the standard hedgehog ansatz by solving the model using a Fock-space configuration which explicitly incorporates the correct isospin and angular momentum couplings in every component. This Fock-space configuration has components involving three quarks and various numbers of quantal pions. They minimize the ground-state expectation value of their Hamiltonian to obtain the equations of motion which they solve self-consistently. They calculate the canonical set of nucleon observables and compare with previous work.

  20. Supporting State attorneys general CERCLA remedial and enforcement activities at NPL sites. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-06-21

    The directive reaffirms role of State-lead agency for award of cooperative agreements, and states that funds can none-the-less be available to State attorneys general via pass through from the lead agency. Describes the three types of cooperative agreements that can be passed through the State-lead agency to the State Attorney General. The guidance supplements directives no. 9831.6a-6d Interim Final Guidance Package on Funding CERCLA State Enforcement Actions at NPL Sites, dated April 7, 1988.

  1. nuSTORM Pion Beamline Design Update

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, A.; Bross, A.; Neuffer, D.; Lee, S. Y.

    2013-09-01

    A facility producing neutrinos from muons that decay in a racetrack ring can provide extremely well understood neutrino beams for oscillation physics and the search for sterile neutrinos. The “neutrinos from STORed Muons” (nuSTORM) facility based on this idea has been introduced by Bross, Neuffer et al. The design of the nuSTORM facility and the particle tracking have been presented in the paper of Liu, et al. This paper demonstrates the recent optimization results of the pion beamline, with G4beamline simulations. The optimum choice of pion beam center momentum, a new algorithm on fitting bivariate Gaussian distribution to the pion phase space data at the downstream side of the horn, and the comparison of the beamline performance with the optics designed based on Graphite and Inconel targets are also described.

  2. Low-energy theorems for pion photoproduction from nuclei and pion-nucleus coupling constants

    SciTech Connect

    Radutskii, G.M.; Serdyutskii, V.A.

    1982-10-01

    New low-energy theorems for pion photoproduction in light nuclei are derived using a model that allows one to extract all the information contained in the current algebra and the CVC and PCAC hypotheses. From the comparison with the experimental total cross sections for threshold photoproduction of charged pions on the nuclei /sup 6/Li, /sup 12/C, and /sup 14/N, the values of the pion-nucleus coupling constants are obtained and the magnitude of the electric quadrupole moment of the /sup 12/N nucleus is predicted.

  3. Application, review, and reporting process for Waivers for State Innovation. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2012-02-27

    This final rule sets forth a procedural framework for submission and review of initial applications for a Waiver for State Innovation described in section 1332 of the Patient Protection and the Affordable Care Act including processes to ensure opportunities for public input in the development of such applications by States and in the Federal review of the applications.

  4. Implications of Climate Change for State Bioassessment Programs and Approaches to Account for Effects (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This final report uses biological data collected by four states in wadeable rivers and streams to examine the components of state and tribal bioassessment and biomonitoring programs that may be vulnerable to climate change. The study investigates the potential to identify biologi...

  5. Implications of Climate Change for State Bioassessment Programs and Approaches to Account for Effects (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA announced the availability of the final report, Implications of Climate Change for State Bioassessment Programs and Approaches to Account for Effects. This report uses biological data collected by four states in wadeable rivers and streams to examine the components ...

  6. Implications of Climate Change for State Bioassessment Programs and Approaches to Account for Effects (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA announced the availability of the final report, Implications of Climate Change for State Bioassessment Programs and Approaches to Account for Effects. This report uses biological data collected by four states in wadeable rivers and streams to examine the components ...

  7. Final state-selected spectra in unimolecular reactions: A transition-state-based random matrix model for overlapping resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Peskin, U.; Miller, W.H.; Reisler, H.

    1995-06-08

    Final state-selected spectra in unimolecular decomposition are obtained by a random matrix version of Feshbach`s optical model. The number of final states which are independently coupled to the molecular quasibound states is identified with the number of states at the dividing surface of transition state theory (TST). The coupling of the transition state to the molecular complex is modeled via a universal random matrix effective Hamiltonian which is characterized by its resonance eigenstates and provides the correct average unimolecular decay rate. The transition from nonoverlapping resonances which are associated with isolated Lorentzian spectral peaks, to overlapping resonances, associated with more complex spectra, is characterized in terms of deviations from a {chi}{sup 2}-like distribution of the resonance widths and the approach to a random phase-distribution of the resonance scattering amplitudes. The evolution of the system from a tight transition state to reaction products is treated explicitly as a scattering process where specific dynamics can be incorporated. Comparisons with recently measured final state-selected spectra and rotational distributions for the unimolecular reaction of NO{sub 2} show that the present model provides a useful new approach for understanding and interpreting experimental results which are dominated by overlapping resonances.

  8. Neutrino induced pion production at MINERvA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Trung

    2012-10-01

    MINERvA part 5. Pion production with neutrinos can proceed through several means, including resonances, deep inelastic scattering, or coherent scattering. Determination of the cross section and understanding of the reaction requires good identification of both charged and neutral pions. Studies of pion production in MINERvA will be presented.

  9. High-energy pion-nucleus scattering at LAMPF

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, C.L.

    1993-02-01

    Recent data obtained for pion-nucleus interactions above the {triangle}(1232) is presented. The expected long mean-free path at pion energies above the [3,3] resonance is demonstrated in elastic scattering. Evidence for unexpected nuclear transparency for outgoing pions at resonance energies is presented. A new technique measuring virtual {triangle} components of the nuclear wave function is suggested.

  10. High-energy pion-nucleus scattering at LAMPF

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, C.L.

    1993-01-01

    Recent data obtained for pion-nucleus interactions above the [triangle](1232) is presented. The expected long mean-free path at pion energies above the [3,3] resonance is demonstrated in elastic scattering. Evidence for unexpected nuclear transparency for outgoing pions at resonance energies is presented. A new technique measuring virtual [triangle] components of the nuclear wave function is suggested.

  11. Properties of hadronic final states in diffractive deep inelastic ep scattering at DESY HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.; Musgrave, B.; Pellegrino, A.; Repond, J.; Yoshida, R.; Mattingly, M. C.; Antonioli, P.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Romeo, G. Cara; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Corradi, M.; de Pasquale, S.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Levi, G.; Margotti, A.; Massam, T.; Nania, R.; Palmonari, F.; Pesci, A.; Sartorelli, G.; Zichichi, A.; Aghuzumtsyan, G.; Brock, I.; Goers, S.; Hartmann, H.; Hilger, E.; Irrgang, P.; Jakob, H.-P.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U. F.; Kerger, R.; Kind, O.; Paul, E.; Rautenberg, J.; Schnurbusch, H.; Stifutkin, A.; Tandler, J.; Voss, K. C.; Weber, A.; Wieber, H.; Bailey, D. S.; Brook, N. H.; Cole, J. E.; Foster, B.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Robins, S.; Rodrigues, E.; Scott, J.; Tapper, R. J.; Wing, M.; Capua, M.; Mastroberardino, A.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Jeoung, H. Y.; Kim, J. Y.; Lee, J. H.; Lim, I. T.; Ma, K. J.; Pac, M. Y.; Caldwell, A.; Helbich, M.; Liu, W.; Liu, X.; Mellado, B.; Paganis, S.; Sampson, S.; Schmidke, W. B.; Sciulli, F.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Klimek, K.; Olkiewicz, K.; Przybycień, M. B.; Stopa, P.; Zawiejski, L.; Bednarek, B.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Jeleń, K.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowal, A. M.; Kowal, M.; Kowalski, T.; Mindur, B.; Przybycień, M.; Rulikowska-Zarȩbska, E.; Suszycki, L.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Kotański, A.; Bauerdick, L. A.; Behrens, U.; Borras, K.; Chiochia, V.; Crittenden, J.; Dannheim, D.; Desler, K.; Drews, G.; Fox-Murphy, A.; Fricke, U.; Geiser, A.; Goebel, F.; Göttlicher, P.; Graciani, R.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hartner, G. F.; Hebbel, K.; Hillert, S.; Koch, W.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Labes, H.; Löhr, B.; Mankel, R.; Martens, J.; Martínez, M.; Milite, M.; Moritz, M.; Notz, D.; Petrucci, M. C.; Polini, A.; Schneekloth, U.; Selonke, F.; Stonjek, S.; Wolf, G.; Wollmer, U.; Whitmore, J. J.; Wichmann, R.; Youngman, C.; Zeuner, W.; Coldewey, C.; Viani, A. Lopez-Duran; Meyer, A.; Schlenstedt, S.; Barbagli, G.; Gallo, E.; Pelfer, P. G.; Bamberger, A.; Benen, A.; Coppola, N.; Markun, P.; Raach, H.; Wölfle, S.; Bell, M.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; Glasman, C.; Lee, S. W.; Lupi, A.; McCance, G. J.; Saxon, D. H.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Bodmann, B.; Gendner, N.; Holm, U.; Salehi, H.; Wick, K.; Yildirim, A.; Ziegler, A.; Carli, T.; Garfagnini, A.; Gialas, I.; Lohrmann, E.; Foudas, C.; Gonçalo, R.; Long, K. R.; Metlica, F.; Miller, D. B.; Tapper, A. D.; Walker, R.; Cloth, P.; Filges, D.; Kuze, M.; Nagano, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Boos, E. G.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Ahn, S. H.; Lee, S. B.; Park, S. K.; Lim, H.; Son, D.; Barreiro, F.; García, G.; González, O.; Labarga, L.; del Peso, J.; Redondo, I.; Terrón, J.; Vázquez, M.; Barbi, M.; Bertolin, A.; Corriveau, F.; Ochs, A.; Padhi, S.; Stairs, D. G.; Tsurugai, T.; Antonov, A.; Bashkirov, V.; Danilov, P.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Gladkov, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Suchkov, S.; Dementiev, R. K.; Ermolov, P. F.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Katkov, I. I.; Khein, L. A.; Korotkova, N. A.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Solomin, A. N.; Vlasov, N. N.; Zotkin, S. A.; Bokel, C.; Engelen, J.; Grijpink, S.; Maddox, E.; Koffeman, E.; Kooijman, P.; Schagen, S.; Tassi, E.; Tiecke, H.; Tuning, N.; Velthuis, J. J.; Wiggers, L.; de Wolf, E.; Brümmer, N.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Gilmore, J.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Kim, C. L.; Ling, T. Y.; Boogert, S.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Devenish, R. C.; Ferrando, J.; Große-Knetter, J.; Matsushita, T.; Rigby, M.; Ruske, O.; Sutton, M. R.; Walczak, R.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; Corso, F. Dal; Dusini, S.; Limentani, S.; Longhin, A.; Parenti, A.; Posocco, M.; Stanco, L.; Turcato, M.; Adamczyk, L.; Iannotti, L.; Oh, B. Y.; Saull, P. R.; Toothacker, W. S.; Iga, Y.; D'Agostini, G.; Marini, G.; Nigro, A.; Cormack, C.; Hart, J. C.; McCubbin, N. A.; Epperson, D.; Heusch, C.; Sadrozinski, H.; Seiden, A.; Williams, D. C.; Park, I. H.; Pavel, N.; Abramowicz, H.; Dagan, S.; Gabareen, A.; Kananov, S.; Kreisel, A.; Levy, A.; Abe, T.; Fusayasu, T.; Kohno, T.; Umemori, K.; Yamashita, T.; Hamatsu, R.; Hirose, T.; Inuzuka, M.; Kitamura, S.; Matsuzawa, K.; Nishimura, T.; Arneodo, M.; Cartiglia, N.; Cirio, R.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M. I.; Maselli, S.; Monaco, V.; Peroni, C.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Bailey, D. C.; Fagerstroem, C.-P.; Galea, R.; Koop, T.; Levman, G. M.; Martin, J. F.; Mirea, A.; Sabetfakhri, A.; Butterworth, J. M.; Gwenlan, C.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Hayes, M. E.; Heaphy, E. A.; Jones, T. W.; Lane, J. B.; Lightwood, M. S.; West, B. J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Grzelak, G.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Smalska, B.; Tymieniecka, T.; Ukleja, A.; Ukleja, J.; Zakrzewski, J. A.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Adamus, M.; Plucinski, P.; Sztuk, J.; Eisenberg, Y.; Gladilin, L. K.; Hochman, D.; Karshon, U.; Breitweg, J.; Chapin, D.; Cross, R.; Kçira, D.; Lammers, S.; Reeder, D. D.; Savin, A. A.; Smith, W. H.; Deshpande, A.; Dhawan, S.; Hughes, V. W.; Straub, P. B.; Bhadra, S.; Catterall, C. D.; Frisken, W. R.; Khakzad, M.; Menary, S.

    2002-03-01

    Characteristics of the hadronic final state of diffractive deep inelastic scattering events ep-->eXp were studied in the kinematic range 4final state X were studied in its center-of-mass frame using thrust, thrust angle, sphericity, energy flow, transverse energy flow, and ``seagull'' distributions. As the invariant mass of the system increases, the final state becomes more collimated, more aligned, and more asymmetric in the average transverse momentum with respect to the direction of the virtual photon. Comparisons of the properties of the hadronic final state with predictions from various Monte Carlo model generators suggest that the final state is dominated by qq&;g states at the parton level.

  12. Medium Effects of Low Energy Pions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, E.

    2004-03-01

    Fits of pion--nucleus potentials to large sets of pionic atom data reveal departures of parameter values from the corresponding free π N parameters. These medium effects can be quantitatively reproduced by a chiral-motivated model where the pion decay constant is modified in the medium or by including the empirical on-shell energy dependence of the amplitudes. No consistency is obtained between pionic atoms and the free π N interaction when an extreme off-shell chiral model is used. The role of the size of data sets is briefly discussed.

  13. Pion form factor from a contact interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez-Guerrero, L. X.; Bashir, A.; Cloeet, I. C.; Roberts, C. D.

    2010-06-15

    In a Poincare-covariant vector-boson-exchange theory, the pion possesses components of pseudovector origin, which materially influence its observable properties. For a range of such quantities, we explore the consequences of a momentum-independent interaction, regularized in a symmetry-preserving manner. The contact interaction, while capable of describing pion static properties, produces a form factor whose evolution for Q{sup 2}>0.17 GeV{sup 2} disagrees markedly with experiment and whose asymptotic power-law behavior conflicts strongly with perturbative QCD.

  14. Final state interaction effects in 3overlineHe( e→, e‧ p)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carasco, C.; Bermuth, J.; Merle, P.; Bartsch, P.; Baumann, D.; Böhm, R.; Bosnar, D.; Ding, M.; Distler, M. O.; Friedrich, J.; Friedrich, J. M.; Golak, J.; Glöckle, W.; Hauger, M.; Heil, W.; Jennewein, P.; Jourdan, J.; Kamada, H.; Klein, A.; Kohl, M.; Krygier, K. W.; Merkel, H.; Müller, U.; Neuhausen, R.; Nogga, A.; Normand, Ch.; Otten, E.; Pospischil, Th.; Potokar, M.; Rohe, D.; Schmieden, H.; Schmiedeskamp, J.; Seimetz, M.; Sick, I.; Širca, S.; Skibiński, R.; Testa, G.; Walcher, Th.; Warren, G.; Weis, M.; Witała, H.; Wöhrle, H.; Zeier, M.

    2003-04-01

    Asymmetries in quasi-elastic 3overlineHe(e→,e‧p) have been measured at a momentum transfer of 0.67 (GeV/c)2 and are compared to a calculation which takes into account relativistic kinematics in the final state and a relativistic one-body current operator. With an exact solution of the Faddeev equation for the 3He-ground state and an approximate treatment of final state interactions in the continuum good agreement is found with the experimental data.

  15. Comprehensive Study of Final State Interactions and Dirac Dynamics in Inclusive Quasielastic Electron Scattering.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinn, Clayton Roy

    The longitudinal and transverse response functions for the inclusive quasielastic (e,e^' ) reaction as well as the Coulomb sum rule are analyzed in detail. A theoretical framework is developed resulting in a one-body Green's function doorway approach, which includes many-body and inelastic final state processes by properly incorporating a nonhermitean optical potential. Final state interactions and Dirac physical degrees of freedom are thoroughly analyzed within this optical model formalism. Explicit momentum space calculations are performed permitting comparisons between relativistic plane wave approximations, nonrelativistic final state interaction and relativistic final state interaction results. Nonrelativistic final state interaction effects are described by a variety of complex optical potentials including phenomenology, local density models and microscopic impulse approximations. Optical potentials used to describe relativistic final state interactions span a similar range of models such as energy dependent global phenomenology and Dirac impulse approximation optical models. Relativistic calculations are performed in Dirac four-component space allowing no nonrelativistic reduction in {|vec p| /m}. Extensive calculations are performed for ^{40 }Ca at 410, 550 and 700 MeV/c momentum transfers, where there are no free adjustable parameters. Physical effects observed include large off-shell effects, significant relativistic suppression of R_{rm L} and large quantitative shape differences between various final state interaction predictions. In no case is simultaneous agreement found with both response functions. The large suppression of R_ {rm L} due to relativistic and Dirac sea effects is reflected in the Coulomb sum rule results providing reasonable predictions of the data, although continuing to overestimate the anomalous ^ {40}Ca data. Implications are that large additional transverse mechanisms are necessary for realistic descriptions of quasielastic

  16. A measurement of neutrino-induced charged-current neutral pion production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Robert H.

    This work presents the first comprehensive measurement of neutrino-induced charged-current neutral pion production (CCpi0) off a nuclear target. The Mini Booster Neutrino Experiment (MiniBooNE) and Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) are discussed in detail. MiniBooNE is a high-statistics (˜1,000,000 interactions) low-energy (Enu ∈ 0.5--2.0 GeV) neutrino experiment located at Fermilab. The method for selecting and reconstructing CCpi0 events is presented. The pi0 and mu - are fully reconstructed in the final state allowing for the measurement of, among other things, the neutrino energy. The total observable CCpi 0 cross-section is presented as a function of neutrino energy, along with five differential cross-sections in terms of the final state kinematics and Q2. The results are combined to yield a flux-averaged total cross-section of phi = (9.2 +/- 0.3stat. +/- 1.5 syst.) x 10--39 cm 2/CH2 at energy 965 MeV. These measurements will aid future neutrino experiments with the prediction of their neutrino interaction rates.

  17. A Measurement of Neutrino-Induced Charged-Current Neutral Pion Production

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Robert H.

    2010-01-01

    This work presents the first comprehensive measurement of neutrino-induced charged-current neutral pion production (CCπ0) off a nuclear target. The Mini Booster Neutrino Experiment (MiniBooNE) and Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) are discussed in detail. MiniBooNE is a high-statistics (~ 1, 000, 000 interactions) low-energy (Evϵ 2 0.5 - 2.0 GeV) neutrino experiment located at Fermilab. The method for selecting and reconstructing CCπ0 events is presented. The π0 and μ- are fully reconstructed in the final state allowing for the measurement of, among other things, the neutrino energy. The total observable CCπ0 cross-section is presented as a function of neutrino energy, along with five differential cross-sections in terms of the final state kinematics and Q2. The results are combined to yield a flux-averaged total cross-section of <σ>Φ = (9.2 ± 0.3stat. ± 1.5syst.) × 10-39 cm2/CH2 at energy 965 MeV. These measurements will aid future neutrino experiments with the prediction of their neutrino interaction rates.

  18. Calculation of molecular final states and their effect on a precision neutrino mass experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Fackler, O.; Mugge, M.; Sticker, H.; Winter, N.; Woerner, R.

    1984-02-01

    An experiment to determine the electron neutrino mass is being performed with the precision of a few electron volts by measuring the tritium beta decay energy distribution near the endpoint. At the few electron volt level, a major consideration in the choice of a tritium source is the effect of excited final atomic or molecular states on the beta decay distribution. It is important to choose a source for which the initial and final states can be accurately calculated. Frozen tritium was chosen as the source since the states of molecular tritium and those of the HeT/sup +/ daughter ion have electronic wavefunctions that can be calculated with high accuracy. The effects of final excited states on the neutrino mass determination and the results of these calculations are described.

  19. On the determination of the pion effective mass in nuclei from pionic atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, E.; Gal, A.

    1998-07-01

    The binding energies of the deeply bound 1s and 2p states in pionic atoms of 207Pb, recently established experimentally in the 208Pb(d,3He) reaction, have been used by several groups to derive the pion effective mass in nuclear matter. We show that these binding energies are fully consistent with `normal' pionic atoms and that the real part of the pion-nucleus potential at the center of 207Pb is 28+/-3 MeV and not 20 MeV as suggested previously.

  20. 40 CFR Appendix D to Part 97 - Final Section 126 Rule: State Compliance supplement pools for the Section 126 Final Rule (Tons)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Final Section 126 Rule: State Compliance supplement pools for the Section 126 Final Rule (Tons) D Appendix D to Part 97 Protection of... PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS Pt. 97, App. D Appendix D to Part 97—Final Section 126...

  1. 40 CFR Appendix D to Part 97 - Final Section 126 Rule: State Compliance supplement pools for the Section 126 Final Rule (Tons)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Final Section 126 Rule: State Compliance supplement pools for the Section 126 Final Rule (Tons) D Appendix D to Part 97 Protection of... PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS Pt. 97, App. D Appendix D to Part 97—Final Section 126...

  2. 40 CFR Appendix D to Part 97 - Final Section 126 Rule: State Compliance supplement pools for the Section 126 Final Rule (Tons)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Final Section 126 Rule: State Compliance supplement pools for the Section 126 Final Rule (Tons) D Appendix D to Part 97 Protection of... PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS Pt. 97, App. D Appendix D to Part 97—Final Section 126...

  3. 40 CFR Appendix D to Part 97 - Final Section 126 Rule: State Compliance supplement pools for the Section 126 Final Rule (Tons)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Final Section 126 Rule: State Compliance supplement pools for the Section 126 Final Rule (Tons) D Appendix D to Part 97 Protection of... PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS Pt. 97, App. D Appendix D to Part 97—Final Section 126...

  4. Final state interactions and relativistic effects in the quasielastic (e,e') reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Chinn, C.R.; Picklesimer, A.; Van Orden, J.W.

    1988-11-01

    The longitudinal and transverse response functions for the inclusive quasielastic (e,e') reaction are analyzed in detail. A microscopic theoretical framework for the many-body reaction provides a clear conceptual (nonrelativistic) basis for treating final state interactions and goes far beyond simple wave or Hermitean potential models. The many-body physics of inelastic final state channels as described by optical and multiple scattering theories included by incorporating a full complex optical potential. Explicit nonrelativistic and relativistic momentum-space calculations quantitatively demonstrate the importance of such a treatment of final state interactions for both the transverse and longitudinal response. Nonrelativistic calculations are performed using final state interactions based on phenomenology, local density models and microscopic multiple scattering theory. Relativistic calculations span a similar range of models and employ Dirac bound state wave functions. The theoretical extension to relativistic dynamics is of course not clear, but is done in obvious parallel to elastic proton scattering. Extensive calculations are performed for UCa at momentum transfers of 410, 550 and 700 MeV/c. A number of interesting physical effects are observed, including significant relativistic suppressions (especially for R/sub L/), large-off-shell and virtual pair effects, enhancement of the tails of the response by the final state interactions, and large qualitative and even shape distinctions between the predictions of the various models of the final state interactions. None of the models is found to be able to simultaneously predict the data for both response functions. This strongly suggests that additional physical mechanisms are of qualitative importance in inclusive quasielastic electron scattering. 48 refs., 16 figs.

  5. Parameterizations of Pion Energy Spectrum in Nucleon-Nucleon Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Franics A.; Wilson, John W.; Norbury, John W.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of pion (PI) production are expected to play an important role in radiation exposures in the upper atmosphere or on the Martian surface. Nuclear databases for describing pion production are developed for radiation transport codes to support these studies. We analyze the secondary energy spectrum of pions produced in nucleon-nucleon (NN) collisions in the relativistic one-pion exchange model. Parametric formulas of the isospin cross sections for one-pion production channels are discussed and are used to renormalize the model spectrum. Energy spectra for the deuteron related channels (NN yields dPi) are also described.

  6. Plans for a measurement of pion polarizabilities at COMPASS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guskov, A.; Compass Collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The pion electromagnetic structure can be probed in π+(A,Z)→π+(A,Z)+γ Compton scattering in inverse kinematics (Primakoff reaction) and described by the electric ( α) and the magnetic ( β) polarizabilities that depend on the rigidity of pion's internal structure as a composite particle. Values for pion polarizabilities can be extracted from the comparison of the differential cross section for scattering of point-like pions with the measured cross section. The opportunity to measure pion polarizability via the Primakoff reaction at the COMPASS experiment was studied with a π beam of 190 GeV. The obtained results are used for preparation of the new measurement.

  7. PHOTOPRODUCTION OF PI O FROM HYDROGEN NEAR THE SECOND PION NUCLEON RESONANCE,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    state interaction between emitted pion and recoil nucleon. There has remained, however, a noticeable lack of data at high momentum transfer in the...positions is not due to the photo-electric term, and also establish the possibility of a high momentum transfer enhancement of pi o photoproduction caused by

  8. Direct time-domain observation of attosecond final-state lifetimes in photoemission from solids

    DOE PAGES

    Tao, Z.; Chen, C.; Szilvasi, T.; ...

    2016-06-01

    Attosecond spectroscopic techniques have made it possible to measure differences in transport times for photoelectrons from localized core levels and delocalized valence bands in solids. Here, we report the application of attosecond pulse trains to directly and unambiguously measure the difference in lifetimes between photoelectrons born into free electron–like states and those excited into unoccupied excited states in the band structure of nickel (111). An enormous increase in lifetime of 212 ± 30 attoseconds occurs when the final state coincides with a short-lived excited state. Moreover, a strong dependence of this lifetime on emission angle is directly related to themore » final-state band dispersion as a function of electron transverse momentum. Our finding underscores the importance of the material band structure in determining photoelectron lifetimes and corresponding electron escape depths.« less

  9. Direct time-domain observation of attosecond final-state lifetimes in photoemission from solids

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Z.; Chen, C.; Szilvasi, T.; Keller, M.; Mavrikakis, M.; Kapteyn, H.; Murnane, M.

    2016-06-01

    Attosecond spectroscopic techniques have made it possible to measure differences in transport times for photoelectrons from localized core levels and delocalized valence bands in solids. Here, we report the application of attosecond pulse trains to directly and unambiguously measure the difference in lifetimes between photoelectrons born into free electron–like states and those excited into unoccupied excited states in the band structure of nickel (111). An enormous increase in lifetime of 212 ± 30 attoseconds occurs when the final state coincides with a short-lived excited state. Moreover, a strong dependence of this lifetime on emission angle is directly related to the final-state band dispersion as a function of electron transverse momentum. Our finding underscores the importance of the material band structure in determining photoelectron lifetimes and corresponding electron escape depths.

  10. Direct time-domain observation of attosecond final-state lifetimes in photoemission from solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Zhensheng; Chen, Cong; Szilvási, Tibor; Keller, Mark; Mavrikakis, Manos; Kapteyn, Henry; Murnane, Margaret

    2016-07-01

    Attosecond spectroscopic techniques have made it possible to measure differences in transport times for photoelectrons from localized core levels and delocalized valence bands in solids. We report the application of attosecond pulse trains to directly and unambiguously measure the difference in lifetimes between photoelectrons born into free electron-like states and those excited into unoccupied excited states in the band structure of nickel (111). An enormous increase in lifetime of 212 ± 30 attoseconds occurs when the final state coincides with a short-lived excited state. Moreover, a strong dependence of this lifetime on emission angle is directly related to the final-state band dispersion as a function of electron transverse momentum. This finding underscores the importance of the material band structure in determining photoelectron lifetimes and corresponding electron escape depths.

  11. Pion double charge exchange and hadron dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper will review theoretical results to show how pion double charge exchange is contributing to our understanding of hadron dynamics in nuclei. The exploitation of the nucleus as a filter is shown to be essential in facilitating the comparison between theory and experiment. 23 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Exclusive single pion electroproduction off the proton: Results from CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Kijun

    2016-08-13

    Exclusive meson electroproduction off protons is a powerful tool to probe the effective degrees of freedom in excited nucleon states at the varying distance scale where the transition from the contributions of both quark core and meson-baryon cloud to the quark core dominance. During the past decade, the CLAS collaboration has executed a broad experimental program to study the excited states of the proton using polarized electron beam and both polarized and unpolarized proton targets. The measurements covered a broad kinematic range in the invariant mass $W$ and photon virtuality $Q^2$ with nearly full coverage in polar and azimuthal angles in the hadronic CM system. As results, several low-lying nucleon resonance states in particular from pion threshold to $W < 1.6$ GeV have been explored. These include $\\Delta$(1232)$\\frac{3}{2}^+$, $N(1440)\\frac{1}{2}^+$, $N(1520)\\frac{3}{2}^-$, and $N(1535)\\frac{1}{2}^-$ states. In addition, we recently published the differential cross sections and helicity amplitudes of the reaction $\\gamma^*p\\to n\\pi^+$ at higher $W$ (1.6 to 2.0 GeV) which are the $N(1675)\\frac{5}{2}^-$, $N(1680)\\frac{5}{2}^+$, and $N(1710)\\frac{1}{2}^+$ states. These excited states with isospin $1/2$ and with masses near 1.7 GeV can be accessed in single $n\\pi^+$ production as there are no isospin $3/2$ states present in this mass range with the same spin-parity assignments. As a result, I will briefly discuss these states from CLAS results of the single charged pion electroproduction data.

  13. Exclusive Single Pion Electroproduction off the Proton: Results from CLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kijun

    2016-11-01

    Exclusive meson electroproduction off protons is a powerful tool to probe the effective degrees of freedom in excited nucleon states at the varying distance scale where the transition from the contributions of both quark core and meson-baryon cloud to the quark core dominance. During the past decade, the CLAS collaboration has executed a broad experimental program to study the excited states of the proton using polarized electron beam and both polarized and unpolarized proton targets. The measurements covered a broad kinematic range in the invariant mass W and photon virtuality Q^2 with nearly full coverage in polar and azimuthal angles in the hadronic CM system. As results, several low-lying nucleon resonance states in particular from pion threshold to W < 1.6 GeV have been explored. These include Δ (1232)3/2^+, N(1440)1/2^+, N(1520)3/2^-, and N(1535)1/2^- states. In addition, we recently published the differential cross sections and helicity amplitudes of the reaction γ ^*p→ nπ ^+ at higher W (1.6-2.0 GeV) which are the N(1675)5/2^-, N(1680)5/2^+, and N(1710)1/2^+ states. These excited states with isospin 1/2 and with masses near 1.7 GeV can be accessed in single nπ ^+ production as there are no isospin 3/2 states present in this mass range with the same spin-parity assignments. I will briefly discuss these states from CLAS results of the single charged pion electroproduction data.

  14. Exclusive single pion electroproduction off the proton: Results from CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Kijun

    2016-08-13

    Exclusive meson electroproduction off protons is a powerful tool to probe the effective degrees of freedom in excited nucleon states at the varying distance scale where the transition from the contributions of both quark core and meson-baryon cloud to the quark core dominance. During the past decade, the CLAS collaboration has executed a broad experimental program to study the excited states of the proton using polarized electron beam and both polarized and unpolarized proton targets. The measurements covered a broad kinematic range in the invariant mass $W$ and photon virtuality $Q^2$ with nearly full coverage in polar and azimuthal angles in the hadronic CM system. As results, several low-lying nucleon resonance states in particular from pion threshold to $W < 1.6$ GeV have been explored. These include $\\Delta$(1232)$\\frac{3}{2}^+$, $N(1440)\\frac{1}{2}^+$, $N(1520)\\frac{3}{2}^-$, and $N(1535)\\frac{1}{2}^-$ states. In addition, we recently published the differential cross sections and helicity amplitudes of the reaction $\\gamma^*p\\to n\\pi^+$ at higher $W$ (1.6 to 2.0 GeV) which are the $N(1675)\\frac{5}{2}^-$, $N(1680)\\frac{5}{2}^+$, and $N(1710)\\frac{1}{2}^+$ states. These excited states with isospin $1/2$ and with masses near 1.7 GeV can be accessed in single $n\\pi^+$ production as there are no isospin $3/2$ states present in this mass range with the same spin-parity assignments. As a result, I will briefly discuss these states from CLAS results of the single charged pion electroproduction data.

  15. Exclusive single pion electroproduction off the proton: Results from CLAS

    DOE PAGES

    Park, Kijun

    2016-08-13

    Exclusive meson electroproduction off protons is a powerful tool to probe the effective degrees of freedom in excited nucleon states at the varying distance scale where the transition from the contributions of both quark core and meson-baryon cloud to the quark core dominance. During the past decade, the CLAS collaboration has executed a broad experimental program to study the excited states of the proton using polarized electron beam and both polarized and unpolarized proton targets. The measurements covered a broad kinematic range in the invariant massmore » $W$ and photon virtuality $Q^2$ with nearly full coverage in polar and azimuthal angles in the hadronic CM system. As results, several low-lying nucleon resonance states in particular from pion threshold to $W < 1.6$ GeV have been explored. These include $$\\Delta$$(1232)$$\\frac{3}{2}^+$$, $$N(1440)\\frac{1}{2}^+$$, $$N(1520)\\frac{3}{2}^-$$, and $$N(1535)\\frac{1}{2}^-$$ states. In addition, we recently published the differential cross sections and helicity amplitudes of the reaction $$\\gamma^*p\\to n\\pi^+$$ at higher $W$ (1.6 to 2.0 GeV) which are the $$N(1675)\\frac{5}{2}^-$$, $$N(1680)\\frac{5}{2}^+$$, and $$N(1710)\\frac{1}{2}^+$$ states. These excited states with isospin $1/2$ and with masses near 1.7 GeV can be accessed in single $$n\\pi^+$$ production as there are no isospin $3/2$ states present in this mass range with the same spin-parity assignments. As a result, I will briefly discuss these states from CLAS results of the single charged pion electroproduction data.« less

  16. Improved Limits on $B^{0}$ Decays to Invisible $(+gamma)$ Final States

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, David Nathan; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; So, R.Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V.E.; /more authors..

    2013-11-01

    We establish improved upper limits on branching fractions for B{sup 0} decays to final states where the decay products are purely invisible (i.e., no observable final state particles) and for final states where the only visible product is a photon. Within the Standard Model, these decays have branching fractions that are below the current experimental sensitivity, but various models of physics beyond the Standard Model predict significant contributions for these channels. Using 471 million B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon} (4S) resonance by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, we establish upper limits at the 90% confidence level of 2.4 x 10{sup -5} for the branching fraction of B{sup 0} {yields} invisible and 1.7 x 10{sup -5} for the branching fraction of B{sup 0} {yields} invisible + {gamma}.

  17. Study of D 0 and D + decays into final states with two or three kaons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, H.; Hamacher, T.; Hofmann, R. P.; Kirchhoff, T.; Mankel, R.; Nau, A.; Nowak, S.; Reßing, D.; Schröder, H.; Schulz, H. D.; Walter, M.; Wurth, R.; Hast, C.; Kapitza, H.; Kolanoski, H.; Kosche, A.; Lange, A.; Lindner, A.; Schieber, M.; Siegmund, T.; Spaan, B.; Thurn, H.; Töpfer, D.; Wegener, D.; Eckstein, P.; Schmidtler, M.; Schramm, M.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Waldi, R.; Reim, K.; Wegener, H.; Eckmann, R.; Kuipers, H.; Mai, O.; Mundt, R.; Oest, T.; Reiner, R.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Stiewe, J.; Werner, S.; Ehret, K.; Hofmann, W.; Hüpper, A.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Spengler, J.; Krieger, P.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Prentice, J. D.; Saull, P. R. B.; Tzamariudaki, K.; van de Water, R. G.; Yoon, T.-S.; Frankl, C.; Schneider, M.; Weseler, S.; Kernel, G.; Križan, P.; Križnič, E.; Podobnik, T.; Živko, T.; Balagura, V.; Barsuk, S.; Belyaev, I.; Chechelnitsky, S.; Chistov, R.; Danilov, M.; Droutskoy, A.; Gershtein, Yu.; Golutvin, A.; Korolko, I.; Kostina, G.; Litvintsev, D.; Lubimov, V.; Pakhlov, P.; Semenov, S.; Snizhko, A.; Tichomirov, I.; Zaitsev, Yu.

    1994-09-01

    Using the ARGUS detector at the e + e - storage ring DORIS II, we have studied Cabibbo-suppressed D 0 decay modes resulting in the K + K - π + π - final state and two-body D 0 decay modes with a ϕ meson in the final state. The BR( D 0→ K {/S 0} K {/S 0}π+π- was measured for the first time. We also present a measurement of the D + →K {/S 0} K {/S 0} K + branching ratio. The values are compared with other experimental results and model predictions.

  18. Seagull and pion-in-flight currents in neutrino-induced 1 N and 2 N knockout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Cuyck, T.; Jachowicz, N.; González-Jiménez, R.; Ryckebusch, J.; Van Dessel, N.

    2017-05-01

    Background: The neutrino-nucleus (ν A ) cross section is a major source of systematic uncertainty in neutrino-oscillation studies. A precise ν A scattering model, in which multinucleon effects are incorporated, is pivotal for an accurate interpretation of the data. Purpose: In ν A interactions, meson-exchange currents (MECs) can induce two-nucleon (2 N ) knockout from the target nucleus, resulting in a two-particle two-hole (2p2h) final state. They also affect single nucleon (1 N ) knockout reactions, yielding a one-particle one-hole (1p1h) final state. Both channels affect the inclusive strength. We present a study of axial and vector, seagull and pion-in-flight currents in muon-neutrino induced 1 N and 2 N knockout reactions on 12C . Method: Bound and emitted nucleons are described as Hartree-Fock wave functions. For the vector MECs, the standard expressions are used. For the axial current, three parametrizations are considered. The framework developed here allows for a treatment of MECs and short-range correlations (SRCs). Results: Results are compared with electron-scattering data and with literature. The strengths of the seagull, pion-in-flight, and axial currents are studied separately and double differential cross sections including MECs are compared with results including SRCs. A comparison with MiniBooNE and T2K data is presented. Conclusions: In the 1p1h channel, the effects of the MECs tend to cancel each other, resulting in a small effect on the double differential cross section. 2 N knockout processes provide a small contribution to the inclusive double differential cross section, ranging from the 2 N knockout threshold into the dip region. A fair agreement with the MiniBooNE and T2K data is reached.

  19. Experimental studies of nucleon-nucleon and pion-nucleus interactions at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-01

    This report summarizes the work on experimental research in intermediate energy nuclear and particle physics carried out by New Mexico State University in 1988--91. Most of these studies have involved investigations of neutron-proton and pion-nucleus interactions. The neutron-proton research is part of a program of studies of interactions between polarized nucleons that we have been involved with for more than ten years. Its purpose has been to help complete the determination of the full set of ten complex nucleon-nucleon amplitudes at energies up to 800 MeV, as well as to continue investigating the possibility of the existence of dibaryon resonances. The give complex isospin-one amplitudes have been fairly well determined, partly as a result of this work. Our work in this period has involved measurements and analysis of data on elastic scattering and total cross sections for polarized neutrons on polarized protons. The pion-nucleus research continues our studies of this interaction in regions where it has not been well explored. One set of experiments includes studies of pion elastic and double-charge-exchange scattering at energies between 300 and 550 MeV, where our data is unique. Another involves elastic and single-charge-exchange scattering of pions from polarized nuclear targets, a new field of research which will give the first extensive set of information on spin-dependent pion-nucleus amplitudes. Still another involves the first set of detailed studies of the kinematic correlations among particles emitted following pion absorption in nuclei.

  20. Study of kaonic final states in {pi}{sup -} p at 190 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Schlueter, Tobias

    2010-08-05

    We discuss the status of analyses of data recorded in the 2008 and 2009 runs of the COMPASS experiment at CERN with sepcific focus on final states with K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0{pi}}- and K{sup +}K{sup -{pi}-} produced in {pi}{sup -}(190 GeV)p scattering. The interest in such final states is motivated by a summary of some of the relevant literature. We also show first results from the analysis of diffractively produced KK-bar{pi} states. Two prominent three-body structures, one around 1.8 GeV, the other at 2.2 GeV decaying via known KK-bar and K{pi} states are seen.

  1. High harmonic generation by anions and atoms: effect of initial/final-state wavefunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrovsky, V. N.

    2005-12-01

    When high harmonic generation (HHG) is considered theoretically within the ideas of the rescattering mechanism, the specifics of initial/final state of an active electron usually attract little attention. We explore such specifics related to initial/final bound p-state of the active electron (existing studies concentrated on s-states). The halogen anions and noble gas atoms (except He) provide important examples of such targets. The present theory with realistic wavefunctions gives HHG rates by 1 or 2 orders of magnitude lower than previous calculations with asymptotic (single-exponential) wavefunctions. This indicates that the HHG process is much more sensitive to the description of the bound-state wavefunctions in the inner domain than the above-threshold ionization where the asymptotic (large-r) approach is sufficient and self-consistent. The rates of HHG processes with and without change of electron magnetic quantum number mell are compared for B(2p) and H(2p) targets.

  2. pK+Λ final state: Towards the extraction of the ppK- contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbietti, L.; Agakishiev, G.; Behnke, C.; Belver, D.; Belyaev, A.; Berger-Chen, J. C.; Blanco, A.; Blume, C.; Böhmer, M.; Cabanelas, P.; Chernenko, S.; Dritsa, C.; Dybczak, A.; Epple, E.; Fateev, O.; Fonte, P.; Friese, J.; Fröhlich, I.; Galatyuk, T.; Garzón, J. A.; Gill, K.; Golubeva, M.; González-Díaz, D.; Guber, F.; Gumberidze, M.; Harabasz, S.; Hennino, T.; Höhne, C.; Holzmann, R.; Huck, P.; Ierusalimov, A.; Ivashkin, A.; Jurkovic, M.; Kämpfer, B.; Karavicheva, T.; Koenig, I.; Koenig, W.; Kolb, B. W.; Korcyl, G.; Kornakov, G.; Kotte, R.; Krása, A.; Krebs, E.; Krizek, F.; Kuc, H.; Kugler, A.; Kurepin, A.; Kurilkin, A.; Kurilkin, P.; Ladygin, V.; Lalik, R.; Lang, S.; Lapidus, K.; Lebedev, A.; Lopes, L.; Lorenz, M.; Maier, L.; Mangiarotti, A.; Markert, J.; Metag, V.; Michel, J.; Müntz, C.; Münzer, R.; Naumann, L.; Palka, M.; Parpottas, Y.; Pechenov, V.; Pechenova, O.; Pietraszko, J.; Przygoda, W.; Ramstein, B.; Rehnisch, L.; Reshetin, A.; Rustamov, A.; Sadovsky, A.; Salabura, P.; Scheib, T.; Schuldes, H.; Siebenson, J.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Spataro, S.; Ströbele, H.; Stroth, J.; Strzempek, P.; Sturm, C.; Svoboda, O.; Tarantola, A.; Teilab, K.; Tlusty, P.; Traxler, M.; Tsertos, H.; Vasiliev, T.; Wagner, V.; Weber, M.; Wendisch, C.; Wüstenfeld, J.; Yurevich, S.; Zanevsky, Y.

    2013-09-01

    The reaction p(@3.5 GeV)+p→p+Λ+K+ can be studied to search for the existence of kaonic bound states like ppK- leading to this final state. This effort has been motivated by the assumption that in p+p collisions the Λ(1405) resonance can act as a doorway to the formation of the kaonic bound states. The status of this analysis within the HADES Collaboration, with particular emphasis on the comparison to simulations, is shown in this work and the deviation method utilized by the DISTO Collaboration in a similar analysis is discussed. The outcome suggests the employment of a partial wave analysis do disentangle the different contributions to the measured pK+Λ final state.

  3. Nevada State plan; final approval determination. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), U.S. Department of Labor. Final State plan approval--Nevada.

    PubMed

    2000-04-18

    This document amends OSHA's regulations to reflect the Assistant Secretary's decision granting final approval to the Nevada State plan. As a result of this affirmative determination under section 18(e) of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, Federal OSHA's standards and enforcement authority no longer apply to occupational safety and health issues covered by the Nevada plan, and authority for Federal concurrent jurisdiction is relinquished. Federal enforcement jurisdiction is retained over any private sector maritime employment, private sector employers on Indian land, and any contractors or subcontractors on any Federal establishment where the land is exclusive Federal jurisdiction. Federal jurisdiction remains in effect with respect to Federal government employers and employees. Federal OSHA will also retain authority for coverage of the United States Postal Service (USPS), including USPS employees, contract employees, and contractor-operated facilities engaged in USPS mail operations.

  4. Branching ratios of B{sub c} meson decays into tensor meson in the final state

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Neelesh

    2010-01-01

    Two-body hadronic weak decays of B{sub c} meson involving tensor meson in the final state are studied by using the Isgur-Scora-Grinstein-Wise II model. Decay amplitudes are obtained using the factorization scheme in the spectator quark model. Branching ratios for the charm changing and bottom changing decay modes are predicted.

  5. 77 FR 45944 - Final Priorities and Definitions; State Personnel Development Grants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-02

    ... Definitions; State Personnel Development Grants CFDA Number: 84.323A. AGENCY: Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, Department of Education. ACTION: Final priorities and definitions. SUMMARY: The... later years. The Assistant Secretary also announces definitions applicable to this program and these...

  6. Extra dimensions in photon-induced two lepton final states at the CERN LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Atag, S.; Inan, S. C.; Sahin, I.

    2009-10-01

    We discuss the potential of the photon-induced two lepton final states at the LHC to explore the phenomenology of the Kaluza-Klein tower of gravitons in the scenarios of the Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, and Dvali model and the Randall-Sundrum model. The sensitivity to model parameters can be improved compared to the present LEP or Tevatron sensitivity.

  7. Where the Brain Appreciates the Final State of an Event: The Neural Correlates of Telicity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romagno, Domenica; Rota, Giuseppina; Ricciardi, Emiliano; Pietrini, Pietro

    2012-01-01

    In this study we investigated whether the human brain distinguishes between telic events that necessarily entail a specified endpoint (e.g., "reaching"), and atelic events with no delimitation or final state (e.g., "chasing"). We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to explore the patterns of neural response associated with verbs denoting…

  8. Where the Brain Appreciates the Final State of an Event: The Neural Correlates of Telicity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romagno, Domenica; Rota, Giuseppina; Ricciardi, Emiliano; Pietrini, Pietro

    2012-01-01

    In this study we investigated whether the human brain distinguishes between telic events that necessarily entail a specified endpoint (e.g., "reaching"), and atelic events with no delimitation or final state (e.g., "chasing"). We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to explore the patterns of neural response associated with verbs denoting…

  9. CP Violation in B0 decays to Charmonium and Charm Final States

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chunhui

    2008-09-24

    We report on measurements of time-dependent CP-violation asymmetries in neutral B meson decays to charmonium and charm final states. The results are obtained from a data sample of (467 {+-} 5) x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory.

  10. 76 FR 6561 - North Carolina: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-07

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 North Carolina: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program..., effective December 31, 1984 (49 FR 48694) to implement its base hazardous waste management program. EPA... XV are from the North Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Rules 15A NCAC 13A, effective April...

  11. 78 FR 32161 - Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision... authorization of its program revision in accordance with 40 CFR 271.21. The Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management... seq. establishes the statutory authority to administer the Hazardous waste management program...

  12. 77 FR 47779 - Arkansas: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-10

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Arkansas: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision..., 1985) to implement its Base Hazardous Waste Management program. Arkansas received authorization for... Ecology Commission Regulation Number 23 (Hazardous Waste Management), adopted on April 25, 2008 and...

  13. Fulfilling Our Promises: The United States and the Helsinki Final Act. A Status Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe, Washington, DC.

    This report examines compliance by the United States with agreements made in the Helsinki Final Act. The Act was signed in 1975 by leaders of 33 East and West European nations, Canada, and the U.S. It contains numerous cooperative measures aimed at improving East-West relations. This report was prepared by the Commission on Security and…

  14. 75 FR 42134 - United States v. Keyspan Corporation; Public Comments and Response on Proposed Final Judgment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-20

    ... United States and KeySpan will submit an amended proposed Final Judgment that takes account of the... contemplating anticompetitive agreements similar to the KeySpan Swap now will have to take into account possible... settlement and accounts for litigation risk and costs. As courts have stressed, it is altogether...

  15. 75 FR 65442 - New Mexico: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-25

    ... effect. We will then respond to public comments in a later final rule based on this proposal. You may not have another opportunity for comment. If you want to comment on this action, you must do so at this... Division, at the address shown below. You can examine copies of the materials submitted by the State of New...

  16. 40 CFR 272.751 - Indiana state-administered program: Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... 6926(b), Indiana has final authorization for the following elements as submitted to EPA in Indiana's... provisions: Although the Federal rules listed in the following table have been adopted by the State and have... listed the following table. EPA will continue to implement the Federal HSWA requirements for...

  17. 75 FR 57188 - Rhode Island: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-20

    ... authorization of the state's requirements regarding EPA's Zinc Fertilizer Rule in a separate final rule... to EPA authorizing Rhode Island for the Zinc Fertilizer Rule. Today's action responds to that comment... EPA's Zinc Fertilizer Rule. In addition, the comment also objected to EPA authorizing Rhode Island...

  18. Quark mean field model with pion and gluon corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Xueyong; Hu, Jinniu; Shen, Hong

    2016-10-01

    The properties of nuclear matter and finite nuclei are studied within the quark mean field (QMF) model by taking the effects of pions and gluons into account at the quark level. The nucleon is described as the combination of three constituent quarks confined by a harmonic oscillator potential. To satisfy the spirit of QCD theory, the contributions of pions and gluons on the nucleon structure are treated in second-order perturbation theory. In a nuclear many-body system, nucleons interact with each other by exchanging mesons between quarks. With different constituent quark mass, mq, we determine three parameter sets for the coupling constants between mesons and quarks, named QMF-NK1, QMF-NK2, and QMF-NK3, by fitting the ground-state properties of several closed-shell nuclei. It is found that all of the three parameter sets can give a satisfactory description of properties of nuclear matter and finite nuclei, moreover they also predict a larger neutron star mass around 2.3 M⊙ without hyperon degrees of freedom.

  19. Eta photoproduction in a combined analysis of pion- and photon-induced reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ronchen, D.; Doring, M.; Haberzettl, H.; Haidenbauer, J.; MeiBner, U. -G.; Nakayama, K.

    2015-06-25

    The $\\eta N$ final state is isospin-selective and thus provides access to the spectrum of excited nucleons without being affected by excited $\\Delta$ states. To this end, the world database on eta photoproduction off the proton up to a center-of-mass energy of $E\\sim 2.3$ GeV is analyzed, including data on differential cross sections, and single and double polarization observables. The resonance spectrum and its properties are determined in a combined analysis of eta and pion photoproduction off the proton together with the reactions $\\pi N\\to \\pi N$, $\\eta N$, $K\\Lambda$ and $K\\Sigma$. For the analysis, the so-called J\\"ulich coupled-channel framework is used, incorporating unitarity, analyticity, and effective three-body channels. Parameters tied to photoproduction and hadronic interactions are varied simultaneously. Furthermore, the influence of recent MAMI $T$ and $F$ asymmetry data on the eta photoproduction amplitude is discussed in detail.

  20. Eta photoproduction in a combined analysis of pion- and photon-induced reactions

    DOE PAGES

    Ronchen, D.; Doring, M.; Haberzettl, H.; ...

    2015-06-25

    Themore » $$\\eta N$$ final state is isospin-selective and thus provides access to the spectrum of excited nucleons without being affected by excited $$\\Delta$$ states. To this end, the world database on eta photoproduction off the proton up to a center-of-mass energy of $$E\\sim 2.3$$ GeV is analyzed, including data on differential cross sections, and single and double polarization observables. resonance spectrum and its properties are determined in a combined analysis of eta and pion photoproduction off the proton together with the reactions $$\\pi N\\to \\pi N$$, $$\\eta N$$, $$K\\Lambda$$ and $$K\\Sigma$$. For the analysis, the so-called J\\"ulich coupled-channel framework is used, incorporating unitarity, analyticity, and effective three-body channels. Parameters tied to photoproduction and hadronic interactions are varied simultaneously. Furthermore, the influence of recent MAMI $T$ and $F$ asymmetry data on the eta photoproduction amplitude is discussed in detail.« less

  1. Transversity from two pion interference fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    She Jun; Huang Yang; Barone, Vincenzo; Ma Boqiang

    2008-01-01

    We present calculation on the azimuthal spin asymmetries for pion pair production in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) process at both HERMES and COMPASS kinematics, with transversely polarized proton, deuteron, and neutron targets. We calculate the asymmetry by adopting a set of parametrization of the interference fragmentation functions and two different models for the transversity. We find that the result for the proton target is insensitive to the approaches of the transversity but more helpful to understand the interference fragmentation functions. However, for the neutron target, which can be obtained through using deuteron and {sup 3}He targets, we find different predictions for different approaches to the transversity. Thus probing the two pion interference fragmentation from the neutron can provide us more interesting information on the transversity.

  2. Vector meson condensation in a pion superfluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauner, Tomáš; Huang, Xu-Guang

    2016-11-01

    We revisit the suggestion that charged ρ -mesons undergo Bose-Einstein condensation in isospin-rich nuclear matter. Using a simple version of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model, we conclude that ρ -meson condensation is either avoided or postponed to isospin chemical potentials much higher than the ρ -meson mass as a consequence of the repulsive interaction with the preformed pion condensate. In order to support our numerical results, we work out a linear sigma model for pions and ρ -mesons, showing that the two models lead to similar patterns of medium dependence of meson masses. As a byproduct, we analyze in detail the mapping between the NJL model and the linear sigma model, focusing on conditions that must be satisfied for a quantitative agreement between the models.

  3. Low-energy pion-nucleon scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, W.R.; Ai, L.; Kaufmann, W.B.

    1998-02-01

    An analysis of low-energy charged pion-nucleon data from recent {pi}{sup {plus_minus}}p experiments is presented. From the scattering lengths and the Goldberger-Miyazawa-Oehme (GMO) sum rule we find a value of the pion-nucleon coupling constant of f{sup 2}=0.0756{plus_minus}0.0007. We also find, contrary to most previous analyses, that the scattering volumes for the P{sub 31} and P{sub 13} partial waves are equal, within errors, corresponding to a symmetry found in the Hamiltonian of many theories. For the potential models used, the amplitudes are extrapolated into the subthreshold region to estimate the value of the {Sigma} term. Off-shell amplitudes are also provided. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Low-energy pion-nucleon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, W. R.; Ai, Li; Kaufmann, W. B.

    1998-02-01

    An analysis of low-energy charged pion-nucleon data from recent π+/-p experiments is presented. From the scattering lengths and the Goldberger-Miyazawa-Oehme (GMO) sum rule we find a value of the pion-nucleon coupling constant of f2=0.0756+/-0.0007. We also find, contrary to most previous analyses, that the scattering volumes for the P31 and P13 partial waves are equal, within errors, corresponding to a symmetry found in the Hamiltonian of many theories. For the potential models used, the amplitudes are extrapolated into the subthreshold region to estimate the value of the Σ term. Off-shell amplitudes are also provided.

  5. Chiral nontopological solitons with perturbative quantum pions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, A. G.; Dodd, L. R.

    1988-04-01

    We investigate chiral extensions of a broad class of nontopological soliton bag models. Chiral symmetry is restored in a nonlinear realization through the introduction of an elementary pion field. We show in particular that it is consistent to treat the pions as a perturbative quantum field, as is done in the cloudy-bag model. The cloudy-bag model is recovered as a limiting case. A careful comparison is made between predictions of chiral extensions of the Friedberg-Lee and the Nielsen-Patkos color-dielectric nontopological soliton models and the cloudy-bag model. Once the overall distance scale is fixed we find relative insensitivity to the detailed choice of nontopological soliton parameters. We investigate two versions of chiral nontopological solitons, analogous to the surface- and volume-coupled cloudy-bag model, and discuss their relation to current algebra.

  6. Two Photon Exchange for Exclusive Pion Electroproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Afanaciev, Andrei V.; Aleksejevs, Aleksandrs G.; Barkanova, Svetlana G.

    2013-09-01

    We perform detailed calculations of two-photon-exchange QED corrections to the cross section of pion electroproduction. The results are obtained with and without the soft-photon approximation; analytic expressions for the radiative corrections are derived. The relative importance of the two-photon correction is analyzed for the kinematics of several experiments at Jefferson Lab. A significant, over 20%, effect due to two-photon exchange is predicted for the backward angles of electron scattering at large transferred momenta.

  7. Kaon to Two Pions decays from Lattice QCD: Delta I = 1/2 rule and CP violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qi

    We report a direct lattice calculation of the K to pipi decay matrix elements for both the DeltaI=1/2 and 3/2 amplitudes A0 and A2 on a 2+1 flavor, domain wall fermion, 163x32x16 lattice ensemble and a 243x64x16 lattice ensemble. This is a complete calculation in which all contractions for the required ten, four-quark operators are evaluated, including the disconnected graphs in which no quark line connects the initial kaon and final two-pion states. These lattice operators are non-perturbatively renormalized using the Rome-Southampton method and the quadratic divergences are studied and removed. This is an important but notoriously difficult calculation, requiring high statistics on a large volume. In this work we take a major step towards the computation of the physicalK→pipi amplitudes by performing a complete calculation at unphysical kinematics with pions of mass 422 MeV and 329 MeV at rest in the kaon rest frame. With this simplification we are able to resolve Re(A0) from zero for the first time, with a 25% statistical error on the 163 lattice and 15% on the 243 lattice. The complex amplitude A2 is calculated with small statistical errors. We obtain the DeltaI=1/2 rule with an enhancement factor of 9.1(21) and 12.0(17) on these two ensembles. From the detailed analysis of the results we gain a deeper understanding of the origin of the DeltaI=1/2 rule. We also calculate the complex amplitude A0, a calculation central to understanding and testing the standard model of CP violation in the kaon system. The final result for the measure of direct CP violation, epsilon', calculated at unphysical kinematics has an order of 100% statistical error, so this only serves as an order of magnitude check.

  8. An Overview of CC Coherent Pion Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Zachary

    2017-01-01

    Neutrino cross-sections are a critical component to any neutrino measurement. With the modern neutrino experiments aiming to measure precision parameters, such as those in long-baseline oscillation experiments, the need for a detailed understanding of neutrino interactions has become even more important. Within this landscape remains a number of experimental challenges in the regime of low energy neutrino cross-sections. This talk will give an overview of recent publications on Charged Current-Coherent Pion Production (CC-Coh Pion) results from a number of experimental collaborations. Specifically, the lack of observation from the SciBooNE and T2K collaborations to observe CC-Coh Pion below one GeV in contrast to the observation of this signature at higher energies by other experiments. The work presented here is a part of the beginning steps to a reanalysis of the SciBooNE data using a modern neutrino generator in order to better understand the previous results. There will be included details of a liquid Argon purification system that is being built at UTA, and of plans for a ``Baby Time Projection Chamber (TPC)'' which will also be built at UTA, and the instrumentation and detector methods used in their construction. The closing is a look to the future for a new analysis at low neutrino energies utilizing Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LArTPCs) based at Fermilab.

  9. Pion momentum distributions in the nucleon in chiral effective theory

    SciTech Connect

    Burkardt, Matthias R.; Hendricks, K. S.; Ji, Cheung Ryong; Melnitchouk, Wally; Thomas, Anthony W.

    2013-03-01

    We compute the light-cone momentum distributions of pions in the nucleon in chiral effective theory using both pseudovector and pseudoscalar pion--nucleon couplings. For the pseudovector coupling we identify $\\delta$-function contributions associated with end-point singularities arising from the pion-nucleon rainbow diagrams, as well as from pion tadpole diagrams which are not present in the pseudoscalar model. Gauge invariance is demonstrated, to all orders in the pion mass, with the inclusion of Weinberg-Tomozawa couplings involving operator insertions at the $\\pi NN$ vertex. The results pave the way for phenomenological applications of pion cloud models that are manifestly consistent with the chiral symmetry properties of QCD.

  10. Covariant density functional theory: The role of the pion

    SciTech Connect

    Lalazissis, G. A.; Karatzikos, S.; Serra, M.; Otsuka, T.; Ring, P.

    2009-10-15

    We investigate the role of the pion in covariant density functional theory. Starting from conventional relativistic mean field (RMF) theory with a nonlinear coupling of the {sigma} meson and without exchange terms we add pions with a pseudovector coupling to the nucleons in relativistic Hartree-Fock approximation. In order to take into account the change of the pion field in the nuclear medium the effective coupling constant of the pion is treated as a free parameter. It is found that the inclusion of the pion to this sort of density functionals does not destroy the overall description of the bulk properties by RMF. On the other hand, the noncentral contribution of the pion (tensor coupling) does have effects on single particle energies and on binding energies of certain nuclei.

  11. Unitarity of black hole evaporation in final-state projection models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Seth; Preskill, John

    2014-08-01

    Almheiri et al. have emphasized that otherwise reasonable beliefs about black hole evaporation are incompatible with the monogamy of quantum entanglement, a general property of quantum mechanics. We investigate the final-state projection model of black hole evaporation proposed by Horowitz and Maldacena, pointing out that this model admits cloning of quantum states and polygamous entanglement, allowing unitarity of the evaporation process to be reconciled with smoothness of the black hole event horizon. Though the model seems to require carefully tuned dynamics to ensure exact unitarity of the black hole S-matrix, for a generic final-state boundary condition the deviations from unitarity are exponentially small in the black hole entropy; furthermore observers inside black holes need not detect any deviations from standard quantum mechanics. Though measurements performed inside old black holes could potentially produce causality-violating phenomena, the computational complexity of decoding the Hawking radiation may render the causality violation unobservable. Final-state projection models illustrate how inviolable principles of standard quantum mechanics might be circumvented in a theory of quantum gravity.

  12. 75 FR 3277 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on State Highway 99 (Segment F-2) in Texas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-20

    ... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on State Highway 99 (Segment F-2) in... actions relate to a proposed highway project, Grand Parkway (State Highway 99) Segment F-2, from State... the following highway project in the State of Texas: Grand Parkway (State Highway 99) Segment F-2...

  13. Pion single- and double-charge-exchange reactions at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, H.W.

    1987-01-01

    The general features of pion charge-exchange reactions at energies of 20 to 80 MeV leading to nuclear isobaric-analog states (IAS) and double-isobaric-analog states (DIAS) are reviewed. The recent progress achieved in understanding the role of short-range N-N correlations in the double-charge-exchange reactions is presented. 36 refs., 21 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Reaction Mechanism for Forward Pion Electroproduction from π^-/π^+ ratios on the Deuteron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assamagan, Ketevi

    1998-04-01

    for the Charged Pion Form Factor (F_π) Collaboration at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (E93-021). During the F_π experiment, forward pion electroproduction data were acquired on the deuteron for Q^2 = 0.6-1.6 at W = 1.95 for both π^+ and π^-. Measurements were made in Hall C with two beam energies at fixed momentum transfer in order to separate the longitudinal and transverse response functions. The ratio of π^-/π^+ production on the deuteron yields an important test of the reaction mechanism, and most systematic errors cancel in this ratio. Previous results using unseparated cross sections were consistent with pion pole dominance at low -t and s-channel quark knockout at higher -t. Ratios for the separated response functions should make more definitive conclusions possible. The F_π experiment will extract F_π(Q^2) from the pion-pole dominated longitudinal response. Reaction mechanism studies will help us to understand any longitudinal non-pole physics backgrounds which may become important at larger -t. The state of the analysis will be summarized as well as our improving knowledge of the reaction mechanism.

  15. Energy dependence of pion and kaon production in central Pb+Pb collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasiev, S. V.; Anticic, T.; Barna, D.; Bartke, J.; Barton, R. A.; Behler, M.; Betev, L.; Białkowska, H.; Billmeier, A.; Blume, C.; Blyth, C. O.; Boimska, B.; Botje, M.; Bracinik, J.; Bramm, R.; Brun, R.; Bunčić, P.; Cerny, V.; Cramer, J. G.; Csató, P.; Dinkelaker, P.; Eckhardt, V.; Filip, P.; Fodor, Z.; Foka, P.; Freund, P.; Friese, V.; Gál, J.; Gaździcki, M.; Georgopoulos, G.; Gładysz, E.; Hegyi, S.; Höhne, C.; Igo, G.; Jones, P. G.; Kadija, K.; Karev, A.; Kolesnikov, V. I.; Kollegger, T.; Kowalski, M.; Kraus, I.; Kreps, M.; van Leeuwen, M.; Lévai, P.; Malakhov, A. I.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Mayes, B. W.; Melkumov, G. L.; Mischke, A.; Molnár, J.; Nelson, J. M.; Pálla, G.; Panagiotou, A. D.; Perl, K.; Petridis, A.; Pikna, M.; Pinsky, L.; Pühlhofer, F.; Reid, J. G.; Renfordt, R.; Retyk, W.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rybicki, A.; Sammer, T.; Sandoval, A.; Sann, H.; Schmitz, N.; Seyboth, P.; Siklér, F.; Sitar, B.; Skrzypczak, E.; Squier, G. T.; Stock, R.; Ströbele, H.; Susa, T.; Szentpétery, I.; Sziklai, J.; Trainor, T. A.; Varga, D.; Vassiliou, M.; Veres, G. I.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vranić, D.; Wetzler, A.; Whitten, C.; Yoo, I. K.; Zaranek, J.; Zimányi, J.

    2002-11-01

    Measurements of charged pion and kaon production in central Pb+Pb collisions at 40, 80, and 158 A GeV are presented. These are compared with data at lower and higher energies as well as with results from p+p interactions. The mean pion multiplicity per wounded nucleon increases approximately linearly with s1/4NN with a change of slope starting in the region 15-40 A GeV. The change from pion suppression with respect to p+p interactions, as observed at low collision energies, to pion enhancement at high energies occurs at about 40A GeV. A nonmonotonic energy dependence of the ratio of K+ to π+ yields is observed, with a maximum close to 40A GeV and an indication of a nearly constant value at higher energies. The measured dependences may be related to an increase of the entropy production and a decrease of the strangeness to entropy ratio in central Pb+Pb collisions in the low SPS energy range, which is consistent with the hypothesis that a transient state of deconfined matter is created above these energies. Other interpretations of the data are also discussed.

  16. Organizational procedure for the study of pion production and absorption processes on nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, M.K.; Walker, G.E.

    1983-02-01

    For nuclear processes involving pions, such as pion production/absorption or exchange currents, it is shown that a natural organization involves adoption of the ..pi..NN vertex function g/sub ..pi../(q/sup 2/)..gamma../sub 5/tau/sub ..cap alpha../, where q is the pion four-momentum and g/sub ..pi../(m/sub ..pi../ /sup 2/)approx. =13.4 is the renormalized pion-nucleon coupling constant. The result is independent of the form and details of any fundamental interaction Lagrangian. The difference between g/sub ..pi../(q/sup 2/)..gamma../sub 5/tau/sub ..cap alpha../ and the fully-dressed ..pi..NN vertex function contributes to amplitudes involving more bosons, e.g., scattering amplitudes (..pi..N..--> pi..N), production amplitudes (..pi..N..--> pi pi..N), etc. Such contributions are mediated through either seagull-like terms or P11 intermediate states. It is pointed out that it is neither necessary nor practical to calculate these partial contributions to scattering and production amplitudes. One can always exploit other approaches, theoretical and phenomenological, to make reasonably good models for the full amplitudes. The usual procedure of including the effects of negative energy parts of the nucleon propagator in interaction potentials, exchange currents, etc., is easily included in the present organization. The result is that from scattering amplitudes, etc; the positive energy nucleon poles are deleted but Z graphs are included.

  17. Next-to-leading-order correction to pion form factor in k{sub T} factorization

    SciTech Connect

    Li Hsiangnan; Shen Yuelong; Wang Yuming; Zou Hao

    2011-03-01

    We calculate the next-to-leading-order (NLO) correction to the pion electromagnetic form factor at leading twist in the k{sub T} factorization theorem. Partons off-shell by k{sub T}{sup 2} are considered in both quark diagrams and effective diagrams for the transverse-momentum-dependent pion wave function. The light-cone singularities in the transverse-momentum-dependent pion wave function are regularized by rotating the Wilson lines away from the light cone. The soft divergences from gluon exchanges among initial- and fal-state partons cancel exactly. We derive the infrared-finite k{sub T}-dependent NLO hard kernel for the pion electromagnetic form factor by taking the difference of the above two sets of diagrams. Varying the renormalization and factorization scales, we find that the NLO correction is smaller, when both the scales are set to the invariant masses of internal particles: it becomes lower than 40% of the leading-order contribution for momentum transfer squared Q{sup 2}>7 GeV{sup 2}. It is observed that the NLO leading-twist correction does not play an essential role in explaining the experimental data, but the leading-order higher-twist contribution does.

  18. Design and Simulation of the nuSTORM Pion Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, A.; Neuffer, D.; Bross, A.

    2015-08-15

    The nuSTORM (neutrinos from STORed Muons) proposal presents a detailed design for a neutrino facility based on a muon storage ring, with muon decay in the production straight section of the ring providing well defined neutrino beams. The facility includes a primary high-energy proton beam line, a target station with pion production and collection, and a pion beamline for pion transportation and injection into a muon decay ring. The nuSTORM design uses “stochastic injection”, in which pions are directed by a chicane, referred to as the Orbit Combination Section (OCS), into the production straight section of the storage ring. Pions that decay within that straight section provide muons within the circulating acceptance of the ring. Furthermore, the design enables injection without kickers or a separate pion decay transport line. The beam line that the pions traverse before being extracted from the decay ring is referred to as the pion beamline. Our paper describes the design and simulation of the pion beamline, and includes full beam dynamics simulations of the system.

  19. Joint Resummation for TMD Wave Function of Pion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu-Ming

    2015-02-01

    QCD corrections to transverse-momentum-dependent pion wave function develop the mixed double logarithm ln x ln(ζ P2/k_T^2), when the gluon emission is collinear to the energetic pion. The fist scheme-independent kT factorization formula for γ*π → γ transition form factor is achieved by resumming all the enhanced logarithms for both pion wave function and short-distance coefficient function. High-order QCD corrections and transfer momentum √ {Q2} dependence of pion form factor are found to be distinct from those predicted by the conventional resummation approach.

  20. NEGATIVE PION PHOTOPRODUCTION FROM BISMUTH ACCOMPANIED BY NEUTRON EMISSION,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    BISMUTH, PIONS, EMISSIVITY, BREMSSTRAHLUNG, NUCLEI, ALPHA PARTICLE DETECTORS, PROTON REACTIONS, RADIOACTIVITY, PHOTONUCLEAR REACTIONS, POLONIUM , NUCLEAR STRUCTURE, MATHEMATICAL MODELS, PROBABILITY, SURFACES, DISTRIBUTION.

  1. Analyzing Powers and Differential Cross Sections for Polarized Proton Neutron Going to Negative Pion Proton Proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Fraser Andrew

    There is considerable interest in the pn to pi^-pp reaction which can proceed by a nonresonant channel from the isospin 0 pn initial state (an NDelta intermediate state cannot be formed). This thesis describes a measurement of analyzing powers and triple differential cross sections for a subset of this reaction, pn to pi^-pp(^1S_0) by isolating the quasifree process in pd to pi^-ppp_{s}. The experimental arrangement selects the relative S-wave component of the outgoing "diproton". The experiment was done on TRIUMF beam line 1B using a LD_2 target; the pion was detected in a magnetic spectrometer, the two outgoing protons in a scintillator bar array. The spectator proton was undetected. Data were taken in August 1989 at 353, 403 and 440 MeV beam energies. Of these the 403 and 440 MeV data are analysed in this thesis and analyzing powers and triple differential cross sections as a function of pion scattering angle extracted at centre of mass kinetic energies, T_{CM}, of 55 and 70 MeV (corresponding to the 403 and 440 MeV beam energies respectively). Partial wave analysis of the data shows that, while the isospin 0 channel dominates the reaction, contributing approximately 75% of the cross section at the energies studied here, there are significant contributions from the s and d-wave pion, isospin 1 channels. Of particular importance is the contribution from the s-wave pion, isospin 1, channel whose interference with the isospin 0 channels produces the characteristic shapes of the cross sections and analyzing powers observed in the data. The d-wave pion, isospin 1 channels, are also required to fully explain the observed analyzing power distributions, and are essential for the T_{CM} = 70MeV data. Comparisons of the pion production data measured in this experiment with pion absorption measurements on ^3He, where the absorption process is pi^-pp(^1S_0) to pn, show a shift in the shape of the differential cross section which can be interpreted as due to differences in

  2. Search for B0 decays to invisible final states and to nunugamma.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Shen, B C; Wang, K; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Smith, J G; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q L; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Cormack, C M; Harrison, P F; Di Lodovico, F; Mohanty, G B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hart, P A; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Allmendinger, T; Brau, B; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Anulli, F; Biasini, M; Peruzzi, I M; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Del Gamba, V; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; De Nardo, G; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Elsen, E E; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Rubin, A E; Sekula, S J; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2004-08-27

    We establish upper limits on branching fractions for B0 decays to final states where the decay products are purely invisible (i.e., no observable final state particles) and for B0 decays to nunugamma. Within the standard model, these decays have branching fractions that are below current experimental sensitivity, but various models of physics beyond the standard model predict significant contributions from these channels. Using 88.5 x 10(6) BB pairs collected at the Upsilon(4S) resonance by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e(+)e- storage ring at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, we establish upper limits at the 90% confidence level of 22 x 10(-5) for the branching fraction of B0-->invisible and 4.7 x 10(-5) for the branching fraction of B0-->nunugamma.

  3. Measurement of the top quark mass using the matrix element technique in dilepton final states

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brochmann, M.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Cuth, J.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Franc, J.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M. -A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Savitskyi, M.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schott, M.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y. -T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J. M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.

    2016-08-18

    Here, we present a measurement of the top quark mass in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The data were collected by the D0 experiment corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.7 fb-1. The matrix element technique is applied to tt events in the final state containing leptons (electrons or muons) with high transverse momenta and at least two jets. The calibration of the jet energy scale determined in the lepton+jets final state of tt decays is applied to jet energies. This correction provides a substantial reduction in systematic uncertainties. We obtain a top quark mass of mt = 173.93±1.84 GeV.

  4. Measurement of the top quark mass using the matrix element technique in dilepton final states

    DOE PAGES

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; ...

    2016-08-18

    Here, we present a measurement of the top quark mass in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The data were collected by the D0 experiment corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.7 fb-1. The matrix element technique is applied to tt events in the final state containing leptons (electrons or muons) with high transverse momenta and at least two jets. The calibration of the jet energy scale determined in the lepton+jets final state of tt decays is applied to jet energies. This correction provides a substantial reduction in systematic uncertainties. We obtain amore » top quark mass of mt = 173.93±1.84 GeV.« less

  5. Measurement of top quark polarization in t t ¯ lepton +jets final states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brochmann, M.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cuth, J.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Franc, J.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Savitskyi, M.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schott, M.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shkola, O.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J. M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.; D0 Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We present a measurement of top quark polarization in t t ¯ pair production in p p ¯ collisions at √{s }=1.96 TeV using data corresponding to 9.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity recorded with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We consider final states containing a lepton and at least three jets. The polarization is measured through the distribution of lepton angles along three axes: the beam axis, the helicity axis, and the transverse axis normal to the t t ¯ production plane. This is the first measurement of top quark polarization at the Tevatron using lepton +jet final states and the first measurement of the transverse polarization in t t ¯ production. The observed distributions are consistent with standard model predictions of nearly no polarization.

  6. Using final state pseudorapidities to improve s-channel resonance observables at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Diener, Ross; Martin, Travis A. W.; Godfrey, Stephen

    2009-10-01

    We study the use of final state particle pseudorapidity for measurements of s-channel resonances at the LHC. Distinguishing the spin of an s-channel resonance can, in principle, be accomplished using angular distributions in the center-of-mass frame, possibly using a center-edge asymmetry measurement, A{sub CE}. In addition, forward-backward asymmetry measurements, A{sub FB}, can be used to distinguish between models of extra neutral gauge bosons. In this article we show how these measurements can be improved by using simple methods based on the pseudorapidity of the final state particles and present the expected results for A{sub FB} and A{sub CE} for several representative models.

  7. Search for D0 decays to invisible final states at Belle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Y.-T.; Wang, M.-Z.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Asner, D. M.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Badhrees, I.; Bakich, A. M.; Bansal, V.; Barberio, E.; Berger, M.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Biswal, J.; Bobrov, A.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Červenkov, D.; Chang, P.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Dash, N.; Di Carlo, S.; Doležal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Ferber, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, A.; Gillard, R.; Goldenzweig, P.; Golob, B.; Hayasaka, K.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsu, C.-L.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Inguglia, G.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jaegle, I.; Jeon, H. B.; Joffe, D.; Joo, K. K.; Julius, T.; Kang, K. H.; Kawasaki, T.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Kodyš, P.; Kotchetkov, D.; Krokovny, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kulasiri, R.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, I. S.; Li, C. H.; Li, L.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liventsev, D.; Masuda, M.; Matsuda, T.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohanty, S.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nakazawa, H.; Nanut, T.; Nath, K. J.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nayak, M.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Pakhlov, P.; Pal, B.; Park, H.; Paul, S.; Pedlar, T. K.; Piilonen, L. E.; Pulvermacher, C.; Rauch, J.; Ritter, M.; Sahoo, H.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, V.; Schlüter, T.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Seino, Y.; Semmler, D.; Senyo, K.; Seong, I. S.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Simon, F.; Solovieva, E.; Starič, M.; Stypula, J.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Takizawa, M.; Tamponi, U.; Tenchini, F.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Usov, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K. E.; Vorobyev, V.; Wang, C. H.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Widmann, E.; Won, E.; Yamashita, Y.; Ye, H.; Yook, Y.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.; Belle Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We report the result from the first search for D0 decays to invisible final states. The analysis is performed on a data sample of 924 fb-1 collected at and near the ϒ (4 S ) and ϒ (5 S ) resonances with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. The absolute branching fraction is determined using an inclusive D0 sample, obtained by fully reconstructing the rest of the particle system including the other charmed particle. No significant signal yield is observed and an upper limit of 9.4 ×10-5 is set on the branching fraction of D0 to invisible final states at 90% confidence level.

  8. Final State Interactions and Polarization Observables in the Reaction pp → pKΛ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röder, Matthias; Ritman, James

    2012-12-01

    Due to the lack of high quality hyperon beams, final state interactions in hyperon production reactions are a compelling tool to study hyperon-nucleon interactions. The COSY-TOF experiment has recently been upgraded in order to reconstruct the pK+Λ final state with sufficient precision to determine the spin triplet pΛ scattering length with a polarized proton beam. We find an unexpected behavior of the K+ analyzing power which prevents the extraction method to be used with the available statistics. A theoretical explanation is pending. Furthermore, the polarized beam together with the self analyzing decay of the Λ allows us to determine the Λ depolarization. This is especially sensitive to K+ and π exchange in the production mechanism. Our finding verifies, to a large extent, the result from DISTO [2] that has so far been the only measurement close to the production threshold.

  9. Measurement of the top quark mass using the matrix element technique in dilepton final states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brochmann, M.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cuth, J.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Franc, J.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Savitskyi, M.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schott, M.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J. M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.; D0 Collaboration

    2016-08-01

    We present a measurement of the top quark mass in p p ¯ collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The data were collected by the D0 experiment corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.7 fb-1 . The matrix element technique is applied to t t ¯ events in the final state containing leptons (electrons or muons) with high transverse momenta and at least two jets. The calibration of the jet energy scale determined in the lepton +jets final state of t t ¯ decays is applied to jet energies. This correction provides a substantial reduction in systematic uncertainties. We obtain a top quark mass of mt=173.93 ±1.84 GeV .

  10. Measurement of the top quark mass using the matrix element technique in dilepton final states

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brochmann, M.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Cuth, J.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Franc, J.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M. -A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Savitskyi, M.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schott, M.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y. -T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J. M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.

    2016-08-18

    Here, we present a measurement of the top quark mass in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The data were collected by the D0 experiment corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.7 fb-1. The matrix element technique is applied to tt events in the final state containing leptons (electrons or muons) with high transverse momenta and at least two jets. The calibration of the jet energy scale determined in the lepton+jets final state of tt decays is applied to jet energies. This correction provides a substantial reduction in systematic uncertainties. We obtain a top quark mass of mt = 173.93±1.84 GeV.

  11. Search for nucleon decay into lepton+K0 final states using Soudan 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, D.; Allison, W. W.; Alner, G. J.; Ayres, D. S.; Barrett, W. L.; Bode, C.; Border, P. M.; Brooks, C. B.; Cobb, J. H.; Cotton, R.; Courant, H.; Demuth, D. M.; Fields, T. H.; Gallagher, H. R.; Garcia-Garcia, C.; Goodman, M. C.; Gran, R.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Kafka, T.; Kasahara, S. M.; Leeson, W.; Litchfield, P. J.; Longley, N. P.; Mann, W. A.; Marshak, M. L.; Milburn, R. H.; Miller, W. H.; Mualem, L.; Napier, A.; Oliver, W. P.; Pearce, G. F.; Peterson, E. A.; Petyt, D. A.; Price, L. E.; Ruddick, K.; Sanchez, M.; Schneps, J.; Schub, M. H.; Seidlein, R.; Stassinakis, A.; Tom, H.; Thron, J. L.; Villaume, G.; Wakely, S. P.; West, N.

    2000-04-01

    A search for nucleon decay into two-body final states containing K0 mesons has been conducted using the 963 metric ton Soudan 2 iron tracking calorimeter. The topologies, ionizations, and kinematics of contained events recorded in a 5.52 kiloton-year total exposure (4.41 kton-year fiducial volume exposure) are examined for compatibility with nucleon decays in an iron medium. For proton decay into the fully visible final states μ+K0S and e+K0S, zero and one event candidates are observed respectively. The lifetime lower limits (τ/B) thus implied are 1.5×1032 yr and 1.2×1032 yr, respectively. Lifetime lower limits are also reported for proton decay into l+K0l, and for neutron decay into νK0S.

  12. Nonthermal p/π ratio at LHC as a consequence of hadronic final state interactions.

    PubMed

    Steinheimer, Jan; Aichelin, Jörg; Bleicher, Marcus

    2013-01-25

    Recent LHC data on Pb+Pb reactions at sqrt[s](NN) = 2.7 TeV suggests that the p/π is incompatible with thermal models. We explore several hadron ratios (K/π, p/π, Λ/π, Ξ/π) within a hydrodynamic model with a hadronic after burner, namely the ultrarelativistic quantum molecular dynamics model 3.3, and show that the deviations can be understood as a final state effect. We propose the p/π as an observable sensitive on whether final state interactions take place or not. The measured values of the hadron ratios do then allow us to gauge the transition energy density from hydrodynamics to the Boltzmann description. We find that the data can be explained with transition energy densities of 840 ± 150 MeV/fm(3).

  13. Search for the standard model Higgs boson in tau final states.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anzelc, M S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; Backusmayes, J; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calfayan, P; Calpas, B; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Carrera, E; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Cheu, E; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cuplov, V; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; DeVaughan, K; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Escalier, M; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Huske, N; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jamin, D; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Khatidze, D; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Mättig, P; Magerkurth, A; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Mitrevski, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Orduna, J; Oshima, N; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero Y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padilla, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Takahashi, M; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Torchiani, I; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vilanova, D; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Voutilainen, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Welty-Rieger, L; Wenger, A; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xu, C; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zeitnitz, C; Zelitch, S; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2009-06-26

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson using hadronically decaying tau leptons, in 1 fb(-1) of data collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron pp collider. We select two final states: tau+/- plus missing transverse energy and b jets, and tau+ tau- plus jets. These final states are sensitive to a combination of associated W/Z boson plus Higgs boson, vector boson fusion, and gluon-gluon fusion production processes. The observed ratio of the combined limit on the Higgs production cross section at the 95% C.L. to the standard model expectation is 29 for a Higgs boson mass of 115 GeV.

  14. Observation of χcJ decaying into the pp¯K+K- final state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Alberto, D.; An, L.; An, Q.; An, Z. H.; Bai, J. Z.; Baldini, R.; Ban, Y.; Becker, J.; Berger, N.; Bertani, M.; Bian, J. M.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Bytev, V.; Cai, X.; Cao, G. F.; Cao, X. X.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, Y. P.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; Ding, Y.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Fan, R. R.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Feng, C. Q.; Fu, C. D.; Fu, J. L.; Gao, Y.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Greco, M.; Grishin, S.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, Y. P.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, M.; He, Z. Y.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Huang, B.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y. P.; Hussain, T.; Ji, C. S.; Ji, Q.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jia, L. K.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Jing, F. F.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kuehn, W.; Lange, J. S.; Leung, J. K. C.; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, Lei; Li, N. B.; Li, Q. J.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, X. R.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Liao, X. T.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. L.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, C. Y.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, G. C.; Liu, H.; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, H. W.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. H.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Y. W.; Liu, Yong; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Z. Q.; Loehner, H.; Lu, G. R.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Q. W.; Lu, X. R.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Ma, C. L.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, T.; Ma, X.; Ma, X. Y.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, H.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Nefedov, Y.; Ning, Z.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Pun, C. S. J.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, X. S.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Schulze, J.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shepherd, M. R.; Song, X. Y.; Sonoda, S.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, D. H.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, X. D.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tang, X. F.; Tian, H. L.; Toth, D.; Varner, G. S.; Wan, X.; Wang, B. Q.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wei, D. H.; Wen, Q. G.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, N.; Wu, W.; Wu, Z.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, G. M.; Xu, H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z. R.; Xu, Z. Z.; Xue, Z.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, M.; Yang, T.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, L.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, T. R.; Zhang, X. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, H. S.; Zhao, Jiawei; Zhao, Jingwei; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, X. H.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhao, Z. L.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zheng, Z. P.; Zhong, B.; Zhong, J.; Zhong, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhu, C.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, X. W.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Zuo, J. X.; Zweber, P.

    2011-06-01

    First measurements of the decays of the three χcJ states to pp¯K+K- final states are presented. Intermediate ϕ→K+K- and Λ(1520)→pK- resonance states are observed, and branching fractions for χcJ→p¯K+Λ(1520), Λ(1520)Λ¯(1520), and ϕpp¯ are reported. We also measure branching fractions for direct χcJ→pp¯K+K- decays. These are first observations of χcJ decays to unstable baryon resonances and provide useful information about the χcJ states. The experiment uses samples of χcJ mesons produced via radiative transitions from 106×106 ψ' mesons collected in the BESIII detector at the BEPCII e+e- collider.

  15. QCD radiation in the production of high s-hat final states

    SciTech Connect

    Skands, Peter; Plehn, Tilman; Rainwater, David; /Rochester U.

    2005-11-01

    In the production of very heavy final states--high Mandelstam {cflx s}--extra QCD radiation can play a significant role. By comparing several different parton shower approximations to results obtained with fixed-order perturbation theory, they quantify the degree to which these approaches agree (or disagree), focusing on initial state radiation above p{perpendicular} = 50 GeV, for top pair production at the Tevatron and at the LHC, and for SUSY pair production at the LHC. Special attention is paid to ambiguities associated with the choice of the maximum value of the ordering variable in parton shower models.

  16. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in Leptons plus Jets Final States

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Huong

    2014-01-01

    Searches for SM Higgs boson production in the leptons plus jets final states with a data set corresponding to 9.7 fb-1 of $\\bar{p}$p collisions at √s = 1.96TeV collected by the DØ Experiment are presented in this thesis. The searches are carried out in two independent analyses, accounting for different signal topologies.

  17. Measurement of top quark polarization in top-antitop lepton+jets final states at DØ

    SciTech Connect

    Augsten, Kamil

    2017-01-01

    This thesis presents a measurement of the top quark polarization in the $t\\overline{t}$ events produced in $p\\overline{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV using data corresponding to 9.7 fb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The final states used in the measurement contain one lepton and at least three jets. The polarization is measured using the angular distribution of leptons along three different axes: the beam axis, the helicity axis, and the transverse axis normal to the $t\\overline{t}$ production plane. This is the first measurement of top quark polarization at the Tevatron Collider in lepton+jets final states, and the first measurement of transverse polarization in $t\\overline{t}$ production. The polarization along the beam axis is combined with the previous result in the dilepton final states by the D0 experiment. The observed distributions are consistent with the Standard Model of nearly no polarization and no indication for beyond Standard Model physics is observed. The measurement offers legacy result from unique Tevatron Collider data and provides more information about the top quark production and decays, about the properties of the heaviest elementary particle.

  18. Absolute Differential Cross-Sections for Elastic PION(+/-)/PROTON Scattering at 30 Less than or Equal to T(pion) Less than or Equal to 140 Mev

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brack, Jeffrey Thomas

    Differential cross sections for elastic pi^{+/-}p scattering have been measured at TRIUMF for 10 incident pion energies in three separate experiments at 66.8 <= T_{pi} <= 138.8 MeV, Tpi = 66.8 MeV (pi^+p only), and 30 <= T_{pi} <= 66.8 MeV, using three independent techniques. Typical statistical accuracies are 1-3% and normalization uncertainties are 1.2-3.0%. Extensive experimental checks were employed to minimize systematic errors. Incident pion beam rates were varied by a factor of 5, target thickness was varied by a factor of 10, different target compositions were used (CH_2 and CH_{1.1 }), and derangements of the detector geometry tested the reproducibility of the cross sections under widely varying conditions. Three separate Monte Carlo routines were used. All measurements used solid targets. Thin scintillators and time-of-flight (TOF) techniques were used to count and identify particles incident on the targets and to detect the scattered pions. Recoil protons were detected in coincidence with the scattered pions in two of the three experiments. At the upper range of incident pion energies (66.8 to 138 MeV), a two-arm coincidence technique was used in which proton detection was similar to pion detection (TOF). At the three lowest incident pion energies, an active target technique was used in which the recoil particles were detected by means of the light generated within the CH_ {1.1} scintillator-target. These are the only elastic pip coincidence measurements by any experimental group below 140 MeV incident pion energy. At 66.8 MeV, a third technique was used in which no recoil particles were detected. At incident pion energies of 100 MeV and above, all pi^{+/-}p results from these three measurements are in good agreement with previous measurements, as are the pi ^-p results at all energies. However, while the pi^{+/-}p results of these three experiments are consistent within experimental error at the overlapping energy of 66.8 MeV, they are 10-25% lower than

  19. On the unique mapping relationship between initial and final quantum states

    SciTech Connect

    Sanz, A.S.; Miret-Artés, S.

    2013-12-15

    In its standard formulation, quantum mechanics presents a very serious inconvenience: given a quantum system, there is no possibility at all to unambiguously (causally) connect a particular feature of its final state with some specific section of its initial state. This constitutes a practical limitation, for example, in numerical analyses of quantum systems, which often make necessary the use of some extra assistance from classical methodologies. Here it is shown how the Bohmian formulation of quantum mechanics removes the ambiguity of quantum mechanics, providing a consistent and clear answer to such a question without abandoning the quantum framework. More specifically, this formulation allows to define probability tubes, along which the enclosed probability keeps constant in time all the way through as the system evolves in configuration space. These tubes have the interesting property that once their boundary is defined at a given time, they are uniquely defined at any time. As a consequence, it is possible to determine final restricted (or partial) probabilities directly from localized sets of (Bohmian) initial conditions on the system initial state. Here, these facts are illustrated by means of two simple yet physically insightful numerical examples: tunneling transmission and grating diffraction. -- Highlights: •The concept of quantum probability tube is introduced. •Quantum tubes result from the evolution of a separatrix set of initial Bohmian conditions. •Probabilities inside these sets remain constant along the corresponding quantum tubes. •Particular features of final states are then uniquely linked to specific regions of initial states. •Tunneling and grating diffraction are analyzed.

  20. A measurement of coherent neutral pion production in neutrino neutral current interactions in the NOMAD experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kullenberg, C. T.; Mishra, S. R.; Seaton, M. B.; Kim, J. J.; Tian, X. C.; Scott, A. M.; Kirsanov, M.; Petti, R.; Alekhin, S.; Astier, P.; Autiero, D.; Baldisseri, A.; Baldo-Ceolin, M.; Banner, M.; Bassompierre, G.; Benslama, K.; Besson, N.; Bird, I.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bobisut, F.; Bouchez, J.; Boyd, S.; Bueno, A.; Bunyatov, S.; Camilleri, L.; Cardini, A.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cavasinni, V.; Cervera-Villanueva, A.; Challis, R.; Chukanov, A.; Collazuol, G.; Conforto, G.; Conta, C.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cousins, R.; Degaudenzi, H.; De Santo, A.; Del Prete, T.; Di Lella, L.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Dumarchez, J.; Ellis, M.; Feldman, G. J.; Ferrari, R.; Ferrère, D.; Flaminio, V.; Fraternali, M.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Gangler, E.; Geiser, A.; Geppert, D.; Gibin, D.; Gninenko, S.; Godley, A.; Gomez-Cadenas, J.-J.; Gosset, J.; Gößling, C.; Gouanère, M.; Grant, A.; Graziani, G.; Guglielmi, A.; Hagner, C.; Hernando, J.; Hurst, P.; Hyett, N.; Iacopini, E.; Joseph, C.; Juget, F.; Kent, N.; Klimov, O.; Kokkonen, J.; Kovzelev, A.; Krasnoperov, A.; Kulagin, S.; Lacaprara, S.; Lachaud, C.; Lakić, B.; Lanza, A.; La Rotonda, L.; Laveder, M.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Levy, J.-M.; Ling, J.; Linssen, L.; Ljubičić, A.; Long, J.; Lupi, A.; Lyubushkin, V.; Marchionni, A.; Martelli, F.; Méchain, X.; Mendiburu, J.-P.; Meyer, J.-P.; Mezzetto, M.; Moorhead, G. F.; Naumov, D.; Nédélec, P.; Nefedov, Yu.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Orestano, D.; Pastore, F.; Peak, L. S.; Pennacchio, E.; Pessard, H.; Placci, A.; Polesello, G.; Pollmann, D.; Polyarush, A.; Poulsen, C.; Popov, B.; Rebuffi, L.; Rico, J.; Riemann, P.; Roda, C.; Rubbia, A.; Salvatore, F.; Samoylov, O.; Schahmaneche, K.; Schmidt, B.; Schmidt, T.; Sconza, A.; Sevior, M.; Sillou, D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Sozzi, G.; Steele, D.; Stiegler, U.; Stipčević, M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Tareb-Reyes, M.; Taylor, G. N.; Tereshchenko, V.; Toropin, A.; Touchard, A.-M.; Tovey, S. N.; Tran, M.-T.; Tsesmelis, E.; Ulrichs, J.; Vacavant, L.; Valdata-Nappi, M.; Valuev, V.; Vannucci, F.; Varvell, K. E.; Veltri, M.; Vercesi, V.; Vidal-Sitjes, G.; Vieira, J.-M.; Vinogradova, T.; Weber, F. V.; Weisse, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Winton, L. J.; Wu, Q.; Yabsley, B. D.; Zaccone, H.; Zuber, K.; Zuccon, P.

    2009-11-01

    We present a study of exclusive neutral pion production in neutrino-nucleus Neutral Current interactions using data from the NOMAD experiment at the CERN SPS. The data correspond to 1.44 ×106 muon-neutrino Charged Current interactions in the energy range 2.5 ⩽Eν ⩽ 300 GeV. Neutrino events with only one visible π0 in the final state are expected to result from two Neutral Current processes: coherent π0 production, ν + A → ν + A +π0 and single π0 production in neutrino-nucleon scattering. The signature of coherent π0 production is an emergent π0 almost collinear with the incident neutrino while π0's produced in neutrino-nucleon deep inelastic scattering have larger transverse momenta. In this analysis all relevant backgrounds to the coherent π0 production signal are measured using data themselves. Having determined the backgrounds, and using the Rein-Sehgal model for the coherent π0 production to compute the detection efficiency, we obtain 4630 ± 522 (stat) ± 426 (syst) corrected coherent-π0 events with Eπ0 ⩾ 0.5 GeV. We measure σ (νA → νAπ0) = [ 72.6 ± 8.1 (stat) ± 6.9 (syst) ] ×10-40 cm2 /nucleus. This is the most precise measurement of the coherent π0 production to date.