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Sample records for pion-nucleon dynamics revisited

  1. Three pion nucleon coupling constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Arriola, E.; Amaro, J. E.; Navarro Pérez, R.

    2016-08-01

    There exist four pion nucleon coupling constants, fπ0pp, - fπ0nn, fπ+pn/2 and fπ-np/2 which coincide when up and down quark masses are identical and the electron charge is zero. While there is no reason why the pion-nucleon-nucleon coupling constants should be identical in the real world, one expects that the small differences might be pinned down from a sufficiently large number of independent and mutually consistent data. Our discussion provides a rationale for our recent determination fp2 = 0.0759(4),f 02 = 0.079(1),f c2 = 0.0763(6), based on a partial wave analysis of the 3σ self-consistent nucleon-nucleon Granada-2013 database comprising 6713 published data in the period 1950-2013.

  2. Three pion nucleon coupling constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Arriola, E.; Amaro, J. E.; Navarro Pérez, R.

    2016-08-01

    There exist four pion nucleon coupling constants, fπ0pp, ‑ fπ0nn, fπ+pn/2 and fπ‑np/2 which coincide when up and down quark masses are identical and the electron charge is zero. While there is no reason why the pion-nucleon-nucleon coupling constants should be identical in the real world, one expects that the small differences might be pinned down from a sufficiently large number of independent and mutually consistent data. Our discussion provides a rationale for our recent determination fp2 = 0.0759(4),f 02 = 0.079(1),f c2 = 0.0763(6), based on a partial wave analysis of the 3σ self-consistent nucleon-nucleon Granada-2013 database comprising 6713 published data in the period 1950-2013.

  3. Backward pion-nucleon scattering

    SciTech Connect

    F. Huang; Sibirtsev, Alex; Haidenbauer, Johann; Meissner, Ulf-G.

    2010-02-01

    A global analysis of the world data on differential cross sections and polarization asymmetries of backward pion-nucleon scattering for invariant collision energies above 3 GeV is performed in a Regge model. Including the $N_\\alpha$, $N_\\gamma$, $\\Delta_\\delta$ and $\\Delta_\\beta$ trajectories, we reproduce both angular distributions and polarization data for small values of the Mandelstam variable $u$, in contrast to previous analyses. The model amplitude is used to obtain evidence for baryon resonances with mass below 3 GeV. Our analysis suggests a $G_{39}$ resonance with a mass of 2.83 GeV as member of the $\\Delta_{\\beta}$ trajectory from the corresponding Chew-Frautschi plot.

  4. Invited Parallel Talk: Forward pion-nucleon charge exchange reaction and Regge constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Fei; Sibirtsev, A.; Krewald, S.; Hanhart, C.; Haidenbauer, J.; Meißner, U.-G.

    2009-12-01

    We present our recent study of pion-nucleon charge exchange amplitudes above 2 GeV. We analyze the forward pion-nucleon charge exchange reaction data in a Regge model and compare the resulting amplitudes with those from the Karlsruhe-Helsinki and George-Washington-University partial-wave analyses. We explore possible high-energy constraints for theoretical baryon resonance analyses in the energy region above 2 GeV. Our results show that for the pion-nucleon charge exchange reaction, the appropriate energy region for matching meson-nucleon dynamics to diffractive scattering should be around 3 GeV for the helicity flip amplitude.

  5. Low-energy pion-nucleon scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, W.R.; Ai, L.; Kaufmann, W.B.

    1998-02-01

    An analysis of low-energy charged pion-nucleon data from recent {pi}{sup {plus_minus}}p experiments is presented. From the scattering lengths and the Goldberger-Miyazawa-Oehme (GMO) sum rule we find a value of the pion-nucleon coupling constant of f{sup 2}=0.0756{plus_minus}0.0007. We also find, contrary to most previous analyses, that the scattering volumes for the P{sub 31} and P{sub 13} partial waves are equal, within errors, corresponding to a symmetry found in the Hamiltonian of many theories. For the potential models used, the amplitudes are extrapolated into the subthreshold region to estimate the value of the {Sigma} term. Off-shell amplitudes are also provided. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. Low-energy pion-nucleon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, W. R.; Ai, Li; Kaufmann, W. B.

    1998-02-01

    An analysis of low-energy charged pion-nucleon data from recent π+/-p experiments is presented. From the scattering lengths and the Goldberger-Miyazawa-Oehme (GMO) sum rule we find a value of the pion-nucleon coupling constant of f2=0.0756+/-0.0007. We also find, contrary to most previous analyses, that the scattering volumes for the P31 and P13 partial waves are equal, within errors, corresponding to a symmetry found in the Hamiltonian of many theories. For the potential models used, the amplitudes are extrapolated into the subthreshold region to estimate the value of the Σ term. Off-shell amplitudes are also provided.

  7. Remarks on the pion-nucleon σ-term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoferichter, Martin; Ruiz de Elvira, Jacobo; Kubis, Bastian; Meißner, Ulf-G.

    2016-09-01

    The pion-nucleon σ-term can be stringently constrained by the combination of analyticity, unitarity, and crossing symmetry with phenomenological information on the pion-nucleon scattering lengths. Recently, lattice calculations at the physical point have been reported that find lower values by about 3σ with respect to the phenomenological determination. We point out that a lattice measurement of the pion-nucleon scattering lengths could help resolve the situation by testing the values extracted from spectroscopy measurements in pionic atoms.

  8. Pion-nucleon partial wave analysis and study of baryon structure. Progress report, June 1, 1979-May 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrick, R.E.

    1981-01-10

    This report details progress toward completion of a long-term pion-nucleon partial wave analysis, summarizing results and conclusions to date. The report also discussed progress in using partial wave and resonance parameter results to test dynamical models of the baryon and in better understanding interquark forces within baryons.

  9. Pion-nucleon charge exchange amplitudes above 2 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, F.; Sibirtsev, A.; Krewald, S.; Hanhart, C.; Haidenbauer, J.; Meißner, U.-G.

    2009-04-01

    The amplitudes for the pion-nucleon charge exchange reaction of the Karlsruhe-Helsinki and the George-Washington-University partial-wave analyses are compared with those of a Regge-cut model with the aim to explore the possibility to provide high-energy constraints for theoretical baryon resonance analyses in the energy region above 2GeV.

  10. Evidence for a Second F35 Pion-Nucleon Resonance near 2000 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manley, D. Mark

    1984-06-01

    A recent isobar-model, partial-wave analysis of πN-->ππN finds strong indications of the F35 pion-nucleon resonance belonging to the (70,L=2+) baryon multiplet. This conclusion is drawn from recent predictions of baryon decays obtained with baryon compositions determined by the Isgur-Karl quark model. The highly inelastic F35 resonance is observed through its dominant p-wave decay to ρN.

  11. Pion-nucleon scattering in covariant baryon chiral perturbation theory with explicit Delta resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, De-Liang; Siemens, D.; Bernard, V.; Epelbaum, E.; Gasparyan, A. M.; Gegelia, J.; Krebs, H.; Meißner, Ulf-G.

    2016-05-01

    We present the results of a third order calculation of the pion-nucleon scattering amplitude in a chiral effective field theory with pions, nucleons and delta resonances as explicit degrees of freedom. We work in a manifestly Lorentz invariant formulation of baryon chiral perturbation theory using dimensional regularization and the extended on-mass-shell renormalization scheme. In the delta resonance sector, the on mass-shell renormalization is realized as a complex-mass scheme. By fitting the low-energy constants of the effective Lagrangian to the S- and P -partial waves a satisfactory description of the phase shifts from the analysis of the Roy-Steiner equations is obtained. We predict the phase shifts for the D and F waves and compare them with the results of the analysis of the George Washington University group. The threshold parameters are calculated both in the delta-less and delta-full cases. Based on the determined low-energy constants, we discuss the pion-nucleon sigma term. Additionally, in order to determine the strangeness content of the nucleon, we calculate the octet baryon masses in the presence of decuplet resonances up to next-to-next-to-leading order in SU(3) baryon chiral perturbation theory. The octet baryon sigma terms are predicted as a byproduct of this calculation.

  12. a Phenomenological Determination of the Pion-Nucleon Scattering Lengths from Pionic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ericson, T. E. O.; Loiseau, B.; Wycech, S.

    A model independent expression for the electromagnetic corrections to a phenomenological hadronic pion-nucleon (πN) scattering length ah, extracted from pionic hydrogen, is obtained. In a non-relativistic approach and using an extended charge distribution, these corrections are derived up to terms of order α2 log α in the limit of a short-range hadronic interaction. We infer ahπ ^-p=0.0870(5)m-1π which gives for the πNN coupling through the GMO relation g2π ^± pn/(4π )=14.04(17).

  13. Double-doorway model for pion-nucleon elastic scattering in the [ital S][sub 11] channel

    SciTech Connect

    McLeod, R.J. ); Ernst, D.J. )

    1994-02-01

    Resonance energy pion-nucleon elastic scattering in the [ital S][sub 11] channel is modeled by assuming that the pion plus nucleon couple to two resonances, the resonances couple to inleastic channels, but there is no direct coupling of the pion-nucleon channel to the inelastic channels. The model is solved by matrix [ital N]/[ital D] methods. The coupling of the inelastic channels to the elastic channel is taken directly from data. Using form factors from the constituent quark model, we find the model is able to reproduce the experimentally determined pion-nucleon phases in the [ital S][sub 11] channel over the resonance region and that the resonance part of the amplitude is negligible at low energies.

  14. Elastic pion-nucleon scattering in chiral perturbation theory: A fresh look

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemens, D.; Bernard, V.; Epelbaum, E.; Gasparyan, A.; Krebs, H.; Meißner, Ulf-G.

    2016-07-01

    Elastic pion-nucleon scattering is analyzed in the framework of chiral perturbation theory up to fourth order within the heavy-baryon expansion and a covariant approach based on an extended on-mass-shell renormalization scheme. We discuss in detail the renormalization of the various low-energy constants and provide explicit expressions for the relevant β functions and the finite subtractions of the power-counting breaking terms within the covariant formulation. To estimate the theoretical uncertainty from the truncation of the chiral expansion, we employ an approach which has been successfully applied in the most recent analysis of the nuclear forces. This allows us to reliably extract the relevant low-energy constants from the available scattering data at low energy. The obtained results provide clear evidence that the breakdown scale of the chiral expansion for this reaction is related to the Δ resonance. The explicit inclusion of the leading contributions of the Δ isobar is demonstrated to substantially increase the range of applicability of the effective field theory. The resulting predictions for the phase shifts are in an excellent agreement with the predictions from the recent Roy-Steiner-equation analysis of pion-nucleon scattering.

  15. A relativistic meson-exchange model of pion-nucleon scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.S.H.; Hung, C.T.; Yang, S.N.

    1995-08-01

    Pion-nucleon scattering is investigated using the Kadshevsky three-dimensional reduction of the Bethe-Salpeter equation. The resulting potential includes the direct and crossed N and {Delta} terms, and the t-channel {sigma}- and {rho}-exchange terms. The nucleon-pole condition is imposed to define the renormalization of the nucleon mass and the {pi}NN coupling constant. A mixture of the scalar and vector {sigma}{pi}{pi} couplings is introduced to simulate the broad width of the s-wave correlated two-pion exchange mechanism. Good descriptions of the {pi}N phase shifts up to 400 MeV have been obtained in all S- and P-waves. The off-shell behavior for our model differs significantly from that obtained using different reductions. A paper describing our results was published.

  16. Matching Pion-Nucleon Roy-Steiner Equations to Chiral Perturbation Theory.

    PubMed

    Hoferichter, Martin; Ruiz de Elvira, Jacobo; Kubis, Bastian; Meissner, Ulf-G

    2015-11-01

    We match the results for the subthreshold parameters of pion-nucleon scattering obtained from a solution of Roy-Steiner equations to chiral perturbation theory up to next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order, to extract the pertinent low-energy constants including a comprehensive analysis of systematic uncertainties and correlations. We study the convergence of the chiral series by investigating the chiral expansion of threshold parameters up to the same order and discuss the role of the Δ(1232) resonance in this context. Results for the low-energy constants are also presented in the counting scheme usually applied in chiral nuclear effective field theory, where they serve as crucial input to determine the long-range part of the nucleon-nucleon potential as well as three-nucleon forces. PMID:26588373

  17. Dynamic Topography Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moresi, Louis

    2015-04-01

    Dynamic Topography Revisited Dynamic topography is usually considered to be one of the trinity of contributing causes to the Earth's non-hydrostatic topography along with the long-term elastic strength of the lithosphere and isostatic responses to density anomalies within the lithosphere. Dynamic topography, thought of this way, is what is left over when other sources of support have been eliminated. An alternate and explicit definition of dynamic topography is that deflection of the surface which is attributable to creeping viscous flow. The problem with the first definition of dynamic topography is 1) that the lithosphere is almost certainly a visco-elastic / brittle layer with no absolute boundary between flowing and static regions, and 2) the lithosphere is, a thermal / compositional boundary layer in which some buoyancy is attributable to immutable, intrinsic density variations and some is due to thermal anomalies which are coupled to the flow. In each case, it is difficult to draw a sharp line between each contribution to the overall topography. The second definition of dynamic topography does seem cleaner / more precise but it suffers from the problem that it is not measurable in practice. On the other hand, this approach has resulted in a rich literature concerning the analysis of large scale geoid and topography and the relation to buoyancy and mechanical properties of the Earth [e.g. refs 1,2,3] In convection models with viscous, elastic, brittle rheology and compositional buoyancy, however, it is possible to examine how the surface topography (and geoid) are supported and how different ways of interpreting the "observable" fields introduce different biases. This is what we will do. References (a.k.a. homework) [1] Hager, B. H., R. W. Clayton, M. A. Richards, R. P. Comer, and A. M. Dziewonski (1985), Lower mantle heterogeneity, dynamic topography and the geoid, Nature, 313(6003), 541-545, doi:10.1038/313541a0. [2] Parsons, B., and S. Daly (1983), The

  18. Chiral representation of the πN scattering amplitude and the pion-nucleon sigma term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alarcón, J. M.; Camalich, J. Martin; Oller, J. A.

    2012-03-01

    We present a novel analysis of the πN scattering amplitude in Lorentz covariant baryon chiral perturbation theory renormalized in the extended-on-mass-shell scheme. This amplitude, valid up to O(p3) in the chiral expansion, systematically includes the effects of the Δ(1232) in the δ-counting, has the right analytic properties, and is renormalization-scale independent. This approach overcomes the limitations that previous chiral analyses of the πN scattering amplitude had, providing an accurate description of the partial wave phase shifts of the Karlsruhe-Helsinki and George-Washington groups up to energies just below the resonance region. We also study the solution of the Matsinos group which focuses on the parameterization of the data at low energies. Once the values of the low-energy constants are determined by adjusting the center-of-mass energy dependence of the amplitude to the scattering data, we obtain predictions on different observables. In particular, we extract an accurate value for the pion-nucleon sigma term, σπN. This allows us to avoid the usual method of extrapolation to the unphysical region of the amplitude. Our study indicates that the inclusion of modern meson-factory and pionic-atom data favors relatively large values of the sigma term. We report the value σπN=59(7)MeV and comment on implications that this result may have.

  19. Pion-Nucleon Scattering and Analysis from threshold to the N*(1440) Resonance Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, Michael; Watson, Shon; Stahov, Jugoslav

    2008-10-01

    Many measurements for pion-nucleon scattering from threshold to the N*(1440) resonance region have been made since 1980, when the landmark Karlsruhe-Helsinki (KH) and Carnegie Mellon-Berkeley (CMB) partial wave analyses (PWA) were completed. These measurements consist of differential cross sections and analyzing powers for elastic scattering and charge exchange. Spin rotation parameters for elastic scattering in the momentum interval 0.4 -- 0.7 GeV/c have also been obtained. The program culminated with measurements of π-p -> Neutrals (charge exchange, multiple pi-zero final states, eta production, and inverse photoproduction) using the Crystal Ball at BNL. Resonance parameters for the N*(1440) in the Review of Particle Physics by the Particle Data Group have been obtained from the KH and CMB analyses. The 2006 edition also includes the analysis by George Washington University (GWU) ``for averages, fits, limits, etc.'', but the parameters were unchanged. An overview of the data will be presented along with comparisons to PWA.

  20. Determination of the pion-nucleon coupling constant and scattering lengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ericson, T. E.; Loiseau, B.; Thomas, A. W.

    2002-07-01

    We critically evaluate the isovector Goldberger-Miyazawa-Oehme (GMO) sum rule for forward πN scattering using the recent precision measurements of π-p and π-d scattering lengths from pionic atoms. We deduce the charged-pion-nucleon coupling constant, with careful attention to systematic and statistical uncertainties. This determination gives, directly from data, g2c(GMO)/ 4π=14.11+/-0.05(statistical)+/-0.19(systematic) or f2c/4π=0.0783(11). This value is intermediate between that of indirect methods and the direct determination from backward np differential scattering cross sections. We also use the pionic atom data to deduce the coherent symmetric and antisymmetric sums of the pion-proton and pion-neutron scattering lengths with high precision, namely, (aπ-p+aπ-n)/2=[- 12+/-2(statistical)+/-8(systematic)]×10-4 m-1π and (aπ-p-aπ- n)/2=[895+/-3(statistical)+/-13 (systematic)]×10-4 m-1π. For the need of the present analysis, we improve the theoretical description of the pion-deuteron scattering length.

  1. High-Precision Determination of the Pion-Nucleon σ Term from Roy-Steiner Equations.

    PubMed

    Hoferichter, Martin; Ruiz de Elvira, Jacobo; Kubis, Bastian; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2015-08-28

    We present a determination of the pion-nucleon (πN) σ term σ_{πN} based on the Cheng-Dashen low-energy theorem (LET), taking advantage of the recent high-precision data from pionic atoms to pin down the πN scattering lengths as well as of constraints from analyticity, unitarity, and crossing symmetry in the form of Roy-Steiner equations to perform the extrapolation to the Cheng-Dashen point in a reliable manner. With isospin-violating corrections included both in the scattering lengths and the LET, we obtain σ_{πN}=(59.1±1.9±3.0)  MeV=(59.1±3.5)  MeV, where the first error refers to uncertainties in the πN amplitude and the second to the LET. Consequences for the scalar nucleon couplings relevant for the direct detection of dark matter are discussed. PMID:26371645

  2. Cortical dynamics revisited.

    PubMed

    Singer, Wolf

    2013-12-01

    Recent discoveries on the organisation of the cortical connectome together with novel data on the dynamics of neuronal interactions require an extension of classical concepts on information processing in the cerebral cortex. These new insights justify considering the brain as a complex, self-organised system with nonlinear dynamics in which principles of distributed, parallel processing coexist with serial operations within highly interconnected networks. The observed dynamics suggest that cortical networks are capable of providing an extremely high-dimensional state space in which a large amount of evolutionary and ontogenetically acquired information can coexist and be accessible to rapid parallel search.

  3. Measurements of observables in the pion-nucleon system, nuclear a- dependence of heavy quark production and rare decays of D and B mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Sadler, M.E.; Isenhower, L.D.

    1992-02-15

    This report discusses research on the following topics: pion-nucleon interactions; detector tomography facility; nuclear dependence of charm and beauty quark production and a study of two-prong decays of neutral D and B mesons; N* collaboration at CEBAF; and pilac experiments. (LSP)

  4. Axial, induced pseudoscalar, and pion-nucleon form factors in manifestly Lorentz-invariant chiral perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Schindler, M. R.; Fuchs, T.; Scherer, S.; Gegelia, J.

    2007-02-15

    We calculate the nucleon form factors G{sub A} and G{sub P} of the isovector axial-vector current and the pion-nucleon form factor G{sub {pi}}{sub N} in manifestly Lorentz-invariant baryon chiral perturbation theory up to and including order O(p{sup 4}). In addition to the standard treatment including the nucleon and pions, we also consider the axial-vector meson a{sub 1} as an explicit degree of freedom. This is achieved by using the reformulated infrared renormalization scheme. We find that the inclusion of the axial-vector meson effectively results in one additional low-energy coupling constant that we determine by a fit to the data for G{sub A}. The inclusion of the axial-vector meson results in an improved description of the experimental data for G{sub A}, while the contribution to G{sub P} is small.

  5. Nucleon resonances and pion-nucleon interaction in nuclear matter above the [Delta] resonance energy

    SciTech Connect

    Arima, M. ); Masutani, K. ); Seki, R. Department of Physics, California State University, Northridge, California 91330 )

    1995-01-01

    We investigate the [pi]-nucleon interaction in nuclear matter around [radical][ital s] =1.5 GeV by examining dynamical modifications of [ital N][sup *] resonances microscopically. The pion production through the [pi][Delta] channel is suppressed appreciably in nuclear matter because the pion produced is strongly distorted through a [Delta] formation with a neighboring nucleon. This effect makes the width of [ital N](1520) smaller and the mass larger in nuclear medium than in free space, and the [pi][ital N] [ital D][sub 13]-wave amplitude loses much of its inelasticity. A similar situation arises with [ital N](1535) and the [pi][ital N] [ital S][sub 11]-wave amplitude because the [eta][ital N] channel is suppressed by Pauli blocking of the nucleus that accompanies [eta]. The total widths of [ital N][sup *] in nuclear medium, however, could be larger than in free space because of their spreading potentials.

  6. Measurements of observables in the pion-nucleon system, nuclear a- dependence of heavy quark production and rare decays of D and B mesons. Progress report, 1 December, 1990--15 February, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Sadler, M.E.; Isenhower, L.D.

    1992-02-15

    This report discusses research on the following topics: pion-nucleon interactions; detector tomography facility; nuclear dependence of charm and beauty quark production and a study of two-prong decays of neutral D and B mesons; N* collaboration at CEBAF; and pilac experiments. (LSP)

  7. Baryon fields with UL(3 ) ×UR(3 ) chiral symmetry. V. Pion-nucleon and kaon-nucleon Σ terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrašinović, V.; Chen, Hua-Xing; Hosaka, Atsushi

    2016-06-01

    We have previously calculated the pion-nucleon Σπ N term in the chiral mixing approach with u ,d flavors only, and found the lower bound Σπ N≥(" close=")mu0+md0)">1 +16/3 sin2θ 3/2 (gA(0 )+gA(3 )) , where gA(0 ),gA(3 ) , are the flavor-singlet and the isovector axial couplings. With presently accepted values of current quark masses, this leads to Σπ N≥58.0 ±4.5 -6.5+11.4 MeV, which is in agreement with the values extracted from experiments, and substantially higher than most previous two-flavor calculations. The causes of this enhancement are: (1) the large, (16/3 ≃5.3 ), purely SUL(2 ) ×SUR(2 ) algebraic factor; (2) the admixture of the [(1 ,1/2 ) ⊕(1/2 ,1 ) ] chiral multiplet component in the nucleon, whose presence has been known for some time, but that had not been properly taken into account, yet. We have now extended these calculations of Σπ N to three light flavors, i.e., to SUL(3 ) ×SUR(3 ) multiplet mixing. Phenomenology of chiral SUL(3 ) ×SUR(3 ) multiplet mixing demands the presence of three chiral SUL(3 ) ×SUR(3 ) multiplets, viz. [(6 ,3 )⊕(3 ,6 )],[(3 ,3 ¯) ⊕(3 ¯,3 ) ] , and [(3 ¯,3 ) ⊕(3 ,3 ¯) ] , in order to successfully reproduce the baryons' flavor-octet and flavor-singlet axial current coupling constants, as well as the baryon anomalous magnetic moments. Here we use these previously obtained results, together with known constraints on the explicit chiral symmetry breaking in baryons to calculate the Σπ N term, but find no change of Σπ N from the above successful two-flavor result. The physical significance of these results lies in the fact that they show no need for q4q ¯ components, and in particular, no need for an s s ¯ component in the nucleon, in order to explain the large "observed" Σπ N value. We also predict the kaon-nucleon σ term ΣK N that is experimentally unknown, but may be calculable in lattice QCD.

  8. Exclusive measurements of pion nucleon going to pion pion nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kermani, Mohammad Arjomand

    The pion induced pion production reactions π±p/toπ±π+n were studied at projectile incident energies of 223, 243, 264, 284, and 305 MeV. The Canadian High Acceptance Orbit Spectrometer (CHAOS) was used to detected the charged particles, which originated from the interaction of the incident pion beam with a cryogenic liquid hydrogen target. The experimental results are presented in the form of single, double and triple differential cross sections. Total cross sections obtained by integrating the differential quantities are also reported. The experimental data, namely the π-p/toπ-π+n double differential cross sections, were used as input to the Chew-Low extrapolation procedure which was utilized to determine on-shell π+π- elastic scattering cross sections in the near threshold region. The Chew-Low results (the extrapolated πpi cross sections) were then used in a dispersion analysis (Roy equations) to obtain the πpi isospin zero S-wave scattering length. We find a00=0.209/pm 0.011μ-1. In addition, the invariant mass distributions from the (π+π-) channel were fitted to determine the model parameters for the extended model of Oset and Vicente-Vacas. We find that the model parameters obtained from fitting the (π+π-) data do not describe the invariant mass distributions in the (π+π+) channel.

  9. Toward complete pion nucleon amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Mathieu, Vincent; Danilkin, Igor V.; Fernández-Ramírez, Cesar; Pennington, Michael R.; Schott, Diane M.; Szczepaniak, Adam P.; Fox, G.

    2015-10-05

    We compare the low-energy partial wave analyses πN scattering with a high-energy data via finite energy sum rules. We also construct a new set of amplitudes by matching the imaginary part from the low-energy analysis with the high-energy, Regge parametrization and then reconstruct the real parts using dispersion relations.

  10. Fast dynamics in glass-forming polymers revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Colmenero, J.; Arbe, A.; Mijangos, C.; Reinecke, H.

    1997-12-31

    The so called fast-dynamics of glass-forming systems as observed by time of flight (TOF) neutron scattering techniques is revisited. TOF-results corresponding to several glass-forming polymers with different chemical microstructure and glass-transition temperature are presented together with the theoretical framework proposed by the authors to interpret these results. The main conclusion is that the TOF-data can be explained in terms of quasiharmonic vibrations and the particular short time behavior of the segmental dynamics. The segmental dynamics display in the very short time range (t {approx} 2 ps) a crossover from a simple exponential behavior towards a non-exponential regime. The first exponential decay, which is controlled by C-C rotational barriers, can be understood as a trace of the behavior of the system in absence of the effects (correlations, cooperativity, memory effects {hor_ellipsis}) which characterize the dense supercooled liquid like state against the normal liquid state. The non-exponential regime at t > 2 ps corresponds to what is usually understood as {alpha} and {beta} relaxations. Some implications of these results are also discussed.

  11. Determination of partial-wave inelasticities for elastic pion-nucleon scattering with the aid of experimental data on π N → ππ N processes in the beam-momentum range 300 < P beam < 500 MeV/ c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozhevnikov, V. A.; Sherman, S. G.

    2008-11-01

    The partial-wave inelasticity parameters of the amplitude for elastic pion-nucleon scattering are determined with the aid of the phenomenological amplitude for inelastic π N → ππ N processes in the energy range extending to the threshold for the production of two pions. The resulting inelasticity parameters are compared with their counterparts derived from modern partial-wave analyses. The largest inelastic-scattering cross section in the P11 wave is in excellent agreement with the analogous value from the analysis performed at the George Washington University in 2006. For other waves, however, the present results differ in the majority of cases from respective values given by partial-wave analyses (the distinctions are especially large for the isospin-3/2 amplitudes).

  12. Autonomic neural control of heart rate during dynamic exercise: revisited

    PubMed Central

    White, Daniel W; Raven, Peter B

    2014-01-01

    The accepted model of autonomic control of heart rate (HR) during dynamic exercise indicates that the initial increase is entirely attributable to the withdrawal of parasympathetic nervous system (PSNS) activity and that subsequent increases in HR are entirely attributable to increases in cardiac sympathetic activity. In the present review, we sought to re-evaluate the model of autonomic neural control of HR in humans during progressive increases in dynamic exercise workload. We analysed data from both new and previously published studies involving baroreflex stimulation and pharmacological blockade of the autonomic nervous system. Results indicate that the PSNS remains functionally active throughout exercise and that increases in HR from rest to maximal exercise result from an increasing workload-related transition from a 4 : 1 vagal–sympathetic balance to a 4 : 1 sympatho–vagal balance. Furthermore, the beat-to-beat autonomic reflex control of HR was found to be dependent on the ability of the PSNS to modulate the HR as it was progressively restrained by increasing workload-related sympathetic nerve activity. In conclusion: (i) increases in exercise workload-related HR are not caused by a total withdrawal of the PSNS followed by an increase in sympathetic tone; (ii) reciprocal antagonism is key to the transition from vagal to sympathetic dominance, and (iii) resetting of the arterial baroreflex causes immediate exercise-onset reflexive increases in HR, which are parasympathetically mediated, followed by slower increases in sympathetic tone as workloads are increased. PMID:24756637

  13. Revisiting the photodissociation dynamics of the phenyl radical

    SciTech Connect

    Cole-Filipiak, Neil C.; Shapero, Mark; Negru, Bogdan; Neumark, Daniel M.

    2014-09-14

    We have reinvestigated the photodissociation dynamics of the phenyl radical at 248 nm and 193 nm via photofragment translational spectroscopy under a variety of experimental conditions aimed at reducing the nascent internal energy of the phenyl radical and eliminating signal from contaminants. Under these optimized conditions, slower translational energy (P(E{sub T})) distributions for H-atom loss were seen at both wavelengths than in previously reported work. At 193 nm, the branching ratio for C{sub 2}H{sub 2} loss vs. H-atom loss was found to be 0.2 ± 0.1, a significantly lower value than was obtained previously in our laboratory. The new branching ratio agrees with calculated Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus rate constants, suggesting that the photodissociation of the phenyl radical at 193 nm can be treated using statistical models. The effects of experimental conditions on the P(E{sub T}) distributions and product branching ratios are discussed.

  14. Benzophenone Ultrafast Triplet Population: Revisiting the Kinetic Model by Surface-Hopping Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The photochemistry of benzophenone, a paradigmatic organic molecule for photosensitization, was investigated by means of surface-hopping ab initio molecular dynamics. Different mechanisms were found to be relevant within the first 600 fs after excitation; the long-debated direct (S1 → T1) and indirect (S1 → T2 → T1) mechanisms for population of the low-lying triplet state are both possible, with the latter being prevalent. Moreover, we established the existence of a kinetic equilibrium between the two triplet states, never observed before. This fact implies that a significant fraction of the overall population resides in T2, eventually allowing one to revisit the usual spectroscopic assignment proposed by transient absorption spectroscopy. This finding is of particular interest for photocatalysis as well as for DNA damages studies because both T1 and T2 channels are, in principle, available for benzophenone-mediated photoinduced energy transfer toward DNA. PMID:26821061

  15. A dynamical model for pion electroproduction on the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    George L. Caia; Louis E. Wright; Vladimir Pascalutsa

    2005-06-01

    We develop a Lorenz- and gauge-invariant dynamical model for pion electroproduction in the resonance region. The model is based on solving of the Salpeter (instantaneous) equation for the pion-nucleon interaction with a hadron-exchange potential. We find that the one-particle-exchange kernel of the Salpeter equation for pion electroproduction develops an unphysical singularity for a finite value of Q{sup 2}. We analyze two methods of dealing with this problem. Results of our model are compared with recent single-polarization data for pion electroproduction.

  16. Quantum-mechanical picture of peripheral chiral dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Granados, Carlos; Weiss, Christian

    2015-08-28

    The nucleon's peripheral transverse charge and magnetization densities are computed in chiral effective field theory. The densities are represented in first-quantized form, as overlap integrals of chiral light-front wave functions describing the transition of the nucleon to soft pion-nucleon intermediate states. The orbital motion of the pion causes a large left-right asymmetry in a transversely polarized nucleon. As a result, the effect attests to the relativistic nature of chiral dynamics [pion momenta k = O(Mπ)] and could be observed in form factor measurements at low momentum transfer.

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance signal dynamics of liquids in the presence of distant dipolar fields, revisited.

    PubMed

    Barros, Wilson; Gochberg, Daniel F; Gore, John C

    2009-05-01

    The description of the nuclear magnetic resonance magnetization dynamics in the presence of long-range dipolar interactions, which is based upon approximate solutions of Bloch-Torrey equations including the effect of a distant dipolar field, has been revisited. New experiments show that approximate analytic solutions have a broader regime of validity as well as dependencies on pulse-sequence parameters that seem to have been overlooked. In order to explain these experimental results, we developed a new method consisting of calculating the magnetization via an iterative formalism where both diffusion and distant dipolar field contributions are treated as integral operators incorporated into the Bloch-Torrey equations. The solution can be organized as a perturbative series, whereby access to higher order terms allows one to set better boundaries on validity regimes for analytic first-order approximations. Finally, the method legitimizes the use of simple analytic first-order approximations under less demanding experimental conditions, it predicts new pulse-sequence parameter dependencies for the range of validity, and clarifies weak points in previous calculations.

  18. Structure and Dynamics of the Instantaneous Water/Vapor Interface Revisited by Path-Integral and Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Jan; Elgabarty, Hossam; Spura, Thomas; Karhan, Kristof; Partovi-Azar, Pouya; Hassanali, Ali A; Kühne, Thomas D

    2015-08-01

    The structure and dynamics of the water/vapor interface is revisited by means of path-integral and second-generation Car-Parrinello ab initio molecular dynamics simulations in conjunction with an instantaneous surface definition [Willard, A. P.; Chandler, D. J. Phys. Chem. B 2010, 114, 1954]. In agreement with previous studies, we find that one of the OH bonds of the water molecules in the topmost layer is pointing out of the water into the vapor phase, while the orientation of the underlying layer is reversed. Therebetween, an additional water layer is detected, where the molecules are aligned parallel to the instantaneous water surface.

  19. Delta: the First Pion Nucleon Resonance - Its Discovery and Applications

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Nagle, D. E.

    1984-07-01

    It is attempted to recapture some of the fun and excitement of the pion-scattering work that led to the discovery of what is now called the delta particle. How significant this discovery was became apparent only gradually. That the delta is alive today and thriving at Los Alamos (as well as other places) is described.

  20. Delta: the first pion nucleon resonance - its discovery and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Nagle, D.E.

    1984-07-01

    It is attempted to recapture some of the fun and excitement of the pion-scattering work that led to the discovery of what is now called the delta particle. How significant this discovery was became apparent only gradually. That the delta is alive today and thriving at Los Alamos (as well as other places) is described.

  1. The pion nucleon scattering lengths from pionic hydrogen and deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, H.-Ch.; Badertscher, A.; Goudsmit, P. F. A.; Janousch, M.; Leisi, H. J.; Matsinos, E.; Sigg, D.; Zhao, Z. G.; Chatellard, D.; Egger, J.-P.; Gabathuler, K.; Hauser, P.; Simons, L. M.; Rusi El Hassani, A. J.

    2001-07-01

    This is the final publication of the ETH Zurich Neuchâtel PSI collaboration on the pionic hydrogen and deuterium precision X-ray experiments. We describe the recent hydrogen 3 p 1 s measurement, report on the determination of the Doppler effect correction to the transition line width, analyze the deuterium shift measurement and discuss implications of the combined hydrogen and deuterium results. From the pionic hydrogen 3 p 1 s transition experiments we obtain the strong-interaction energy level shift \\varepsilon_{1s} = -7.108±0.013 (stat.)±0.034 (syst.) eV and the total decay width Γ_{1s} = 0.868±0.040 (stat.)±0.038 (syst.) eV of the 1s state. Taking into account the electromagnetic corrections we find the hadronic π N s-wave scattering amplitude a_{π-prightarrowπ-p} = 0.0883±0.0008 m_{π}^{-1} for elastic scattering and a_{π-prightarrowπ0n} = -0.128±0.006 m_{π} ^{-1} for single charge exchange, respectively. We then combine the pionic hydrogen results with the 1 s level shift measurement on pionic deuterium and test isospin symmetry of the strong interaction: our data are still compatible with isospin symmetry. The isoscalar and isovector π N scattering lengths (within the framework of isospin symmetry) are found to be b_0 = -0.0001^{+0.0009}_{-0.0021} m_{π}^{-1} and b1 = -0.0885^{+0.0010}_{-0.0021} m_{π} ^{-1}, respectively. Using the GMO sum rule, we obtain from b_1 a new value of the π N coupling constant (g_{π N} = 13.21_{-0.05}^{+0.11}) from which follows the Goldberger Treiman discrepancy Δ_{{GT}} =0.027_{-0.008}^{+0.012}. The new values of b_0 and g_{π N} imply an increase of the nucleon sigma term by at least 9 MeV.

  2. Delta-nucleus dynamics: proceedings of symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.S.H.; Geesaman, D.F.; Schiffer, J.P.

    1983-10-01

    The appreciation of the role in nuclear physics of the first excited state of the nucleon, the delta ..delta..(1232), has grown rapidly in the past decade. The delta resonance dominates nuclear reactions induced by intermediate energy pions, nucleons, and electromagnetic probes. It is also the most important non-nucleonic degree of freedom needed to resolve many fundamental problems encountered in the study of low-energy nuclear phenomena. Clearly, a new phase of nuclear physics has emerged and conventional thinking must be extended to account for this new dimension of nuclear dynamics. The most challenging problem we are facing is how a unified theory can be developed to describe ..delta..-nucleus dynamics at all energies. In exploring this new direction, it is important to have direct discussions among researchers with different viewpoints. Separate entries were prepared for the 49 papers presented. (WHK)

  3. Revisiting the Body-Schema Concept in the Context of Whole-Body Postural-Focal Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Morasso, Pietro; Casadio, Maura; Mohan, Vishwanathan; Rea, Francesco; Zenzeri, Jacopo

    2015-01-01

    The body-schema concept is revisited in the context of embodied cognition, further developing the theory formulated by Marc Jeannerod that the motor system is part of a simulation network related to action, whose function is not only to shape the motor system for preparing an action (either overt or covert) but also to provide the self with information on the feasibility and the meaning of potential actions. The proposed computational formulation is based on a dynamical system approach, which is linked to an extension of the equilibrium-point hypothesis, called Passive Motor Paradigm: this dynamical system generates goal-oriented, spatio-temporal, sensorimotor patterns, integrating a direct and inverse internal model in a multi-referential framework. The purpose of such computational model is to operate at the same time as a general synergy formation machinery for planning whole-body actions in humanoid robots and/or for predicting coordinated sensory–motor patterns in human movements. In order to illustrate the computational approach, the integration of simultaneous, even partially conflicting tasks will be analyzed in some detail with regard to postural-focal dynamics, which can be defined as the fusion of a focal task, namely reaching a target with the whole-body, and a postural task, namely maintaining overall stability. PMID:25741274

  4. Revisiting the body-schema concept in the context of whole-body postural-focal dynamics.

    PubMed

    Morasso, Pietro; Casadio, Maura; Mohan, Vishwanathan; Rea, Francesco; Zenzeri, Jacopo

    2015-01-01

    The body-schema concept is revisited in the context of embodied cognition, further developing the theory formulated by Marc Jeannerod that the motor system is part of a simulation network related to action, whose function is not only to shape the motor system for preparing an action (either overt or covert) but also to provide the self with information on the feasibility and the meaning of potential actions. The proposed computational formulation is based on a dynamical system approach, which is linked to an extension of the equilibrium-point hypothesis, called Passive Motor Paradigm: this dynamical system generates goal-oriented, spatio-temporal, sensorimotor patterns, integrating a direct and inverse internal model in a multi-referential framework. The purpose of such computational model is to operate at the same time as a general synergy formation machinery for planning whole-body actions in humanoid robots and/or for predicting coordinated sensory-motor patterns in human movements. In order to illustrate the computational approach, the integration of simultaneous, even partially conflicting tasks will be analyzed in some detail with regard to postural-focal dynamics, which can be defined as the fusion of a focal task, namely reaching a target with the whole-body, and a postural task, namely maintaining overall stability. PMID:25741274

  5. Revisiting the body-schema concept in the context of whole-body postural-focal dynamics.

    PubMed

    Morasso, Pietro; Casadio, Maura; Mohan, Vishwanathan; Rea, Francesco; Zenzeri, Jacopo

    2015-01-01

    The body-schema concept is revisited in the context of embodied cognition, further developing the theory formulated by Marc Jeannerod that the motor system is part of a simulation network related to action, whose function is not only to shape the motor system for preparing an action (either overt or covert) but also to provide the self with information on the feasibility and the meaning of potential actions. The proposed computational formulation is based on a dynamical system approach, which is linked to an extension of the equilibrium-point hypothesis, called Passive Motor Paradigm: this dynamical system generates goal-oriented, spatio-temporal, sensorimotor patterns, integrating a direct and inverse internal model in a multi-referential framework. The purpose of such computational model is to operate at the same time as a general synergy formation machinery for planning whole-body actions in humanoid robots and/or for predicting coordinated sensory-motor patterns in human movements. In order to illustrate the computational approach, the integration of simultaneous, even partially conflicting tasks will be analyzed in some detail with regard to postural-focal dynamics, which can be defined as the fusion of a focal task, namely reaching a target with the whole-body, and a postural task, namely maintaining overall stability.

  6. Chemical Kinetics, Heat Transfer, and Sensor Dynamics Revisited in a Simple Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sad, Maria E.; Sad, Mario R.; Castro, Alberto A.; Garetto, Teresita F.

    2008-01-01

    A simple experiment about thermal effects in chemical reactors is described, which can be used to illustrate chemical reactor models, the determination and validation of their parameters, and some simple principles of heat transfer and sensor dynamics. It is based in the exothermic reaction between aqueous solutions of sodium thiosulfate and…

  7. Revisiting linear dynamics of non-axisymmetric perturbations in weakly magnetized accretion discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamatsashvili, G. R.; Chagelishvili, G. D.; Bodo, G.; Rossi, P.

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the linear dynamics of non-axisymmetric perturbations in incompressible, vertically stratified Keplerian discs threaded by a weak non-zero net vertical magnetic field in the local shearing box approximation. Perturbations are decomposed into shearing waves or spatial harmonics whose temporal evolution is then followed via numerical integration of the linearized ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations of the shearing box. There are two basic modes in the system - inertia-gravity waves and magnetic mode, which displays the magnetorotational instability (MRI). Distinct from previous related studies, we introduce `eigen-variables' characterizing each (counter-propagating) component of the inertia-gravity and magnetic modes, which are governed by a set of four first-order coupled ordinary differential equations. This allows us to identify a new process of linear coupling of the two above non-axisymmetric modes due to the disc's differential rotation. We also carry out a comparative analysis of the dynamics of non-axisymmetric and axisymmetric magnetic mode perturbations. It is demonstrated that the growth of `optimal' and close-to-optimal non-axisymmetric harmonics of this mode, having transient nature, can prevail over the exponential growth of axisymmetric ones (i.e. over the axisymmetric MRI) during dynamical time. A possible implication of this result for axisymmetric channel solutions emerging in numerical simulations is discussed. In particular, the formation of the (axisymmetric) channel may be affected/impeded by non-axisymmetric modes already at the early linear stage leading to its untimely disruption - the outcome strongly depends on the amplitude and spectrum of initial perturbation. Thus, this competition may result in an uncertainty in the magnetic mode's non-linear dynamics. Even so, we consider that incompressible perturbations, in the final part, speculate on the dynamics in the compressible case. It is shown that a maximum growth of non

  8. The Adaptively Biased Molecular Dynamics method revisited: New capabilities and an application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Mahmoud; Babin, Volodymyr; Roland, Christopher; Sagui, Celeste

    2015-09-01

    The free energy is perhaps one of the most important quantity required for describing biomolecular systems at equilibrium. Unfortunately, accurate and reliable free energies are notoriously difficult to calculate. To address this issue, we previously developed the Adaptively Biased Molecular Dynamics (ABMD) method for accurate calculation of rugged free energy surfaces (FES). Here, we briefly review the workings of the ABMD method with an emphasis on recent software additions, along with a short summary of a selected ABMD application based on the B-to-Z DNA transition. The ABMD method, along with current extensions, is currently implemented in the AMBER (ver.10-14) software package.

  9. Ab initio molecular-dynamics simulation of aqueous proton solvation and transport revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izvekov, Sergei; Voth, Gregory A.

    2005-07-01

    The solvation and transport of the hydrated excess proton is studied using the Car-Parrinello molecular-dynamics (CPMD) simulation method. The simulations were performed using BLYP and HCTH gradient-corrected exchange-correlation energy functionals. The fictitious electronic mass was chosen to be small enough so that the underlying water structural and dynamical properties were converged with respect to this important CPMD simulation parameter. An unphysical overstructuring of liquid water in the CPMD simulations using the BLYP functional resulted in the formation of long-lived hydrogen-bonding structures involving the excess proton and a particular (special) water oxygen. The excess proton was observed to be attracted to the special oxygen through the entire length of the BLYP CPMD simulations. Consequently, the excess proton diffusion was limited by the mobility of the special oxygen in the slowly diffusing water network and, in turn, the excess proton self-diffusion coefficient was found to be significantly below the experimental value. On the other hand, the structural properties of liquid water in the HCTH CPMD simulation were seen to be in better agreement with experiment, although the water and excess proton diffusions were still well below the experimental value.

  10. Dispositional envy revisited: unraveling the motivational dynamics of benign and malicious envy.

    PubMed

    Lange, Jens; Crusius, Jan

    2015-02-01

    Previous research has conceptualized dispositional envy as a unitary construct. Recently however, episodic envy has been shown to emerge in two qualitatively different forms. Benign envy is related to the motivation to move upward, whereas malicious envy is related to pulling superior others down. In four studies (N = 1,094)--using the newly developed Benign and Malicious Envy Scale (BeMaS)--we show that dispositional envy is also characterized by two independent dimensions related to distinct motivational dynamics and behavioral consequences. Dispositional benign and malicious envy uniquely predict envious responding following upward social comparisons. Furthermore, they are differentially connected to hope for success and fear of failure. Corresponding to these links, dispositional benign envy predicted faster race performance of marathon runners mediated via higher goal setting. In contrast, dispositional malicious envy predicted race goal disengagement. The findings highlight that disentangling the two sides of envy opens up numerous research avenues.

  11. Synthetic-dynamic theory of drug abuse: a revisit with empirical data.

    PubMed

    Kim, S; Newman, S H

    1982-07-01

    A revised version of the synthetic-dynamic theory of drug abuse is presented. A partial test of the validity of the theory is implemented through a drug survey taken in November 1979 involving 14,594 students in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina. Utilizing multiple regression analysis, 50.08% (R = .708) of the total variation in student drug involvement is explained by four components operating jointly. An examination of individual standardized regression coefficients indicates that the drug attitude component accounts for the largest change in the dependent variable, followed by the environmental, the socialization, and (responsible for the least change) the personal discontent components. On the basis of these findings, the implications for future drug education models and prevention policies are examined.

  12. Concreteness effects revisited: the influence of dynamic visual noise on memory for concrete and abstract words.

    PubMed

    Parker, Andrew; Dagnall, Neil

    2009-05-01

    Two experiments are presented that investigate the effects of dynamic visual noise (DVN) on memory for concrete and abstract words. Memory for concrete words is typically superior to that of abstract words and is referred to as the concreteness effect. DVN is a procedure that has been demonstrated to interfere selectively with visual working memory and the generation of images from long-term memory. It was reasoned that if concreteness effects arise because of the ability of the latter to activate visual representations, then DVN should selectively impair memory for concrete words. Experiment 1 found DVN to selectively reduce free recall of concrete words. Experiment 2 investigated recognition memory and found DVN to reduce memory accuracy and remember responses, while increasing know responses to concrete words.

  13. Revisiting Molecular Dynamics on a CPU/GPU system: Water Kernel and SHAKE Parallelization.

    PubMed

    Ruymgaart, A Peter; Elber, Ron

    2012-11-13

    We report Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) and Open-MP parallel implementations of water-specific force calculations and of bond constraints for use in Molecular Dynamics simulations. We focus on a typical laboratory computing-environment in which a CPU with a few cores is attached to a GPU. We discuss in detail the design of the code and we illustrate performance comparable to highly optimized codes such as GROMACS. Beside speed our code shows excellent energy conservation. Utilization of water-specific lists allows the efficient calculations of non-bonded interactions that include water molecules and results in a speed-up factor of more than 40 on the GPU compared to code optimized on a single CPU core for systems larger than 20,000 atoms. This is up four-fold from a factor of 10 reported in our initial GPU implementation that did not include a water-specific code. Another optimization is the implementation of constrained dynamics entirely on the GPU. The routine, which enforces constraints of all bonds, runs in parallel on multiple Open-MP cores or entirely on the GPU. It is based on Conjugate Gradient solution of the Lagrange multipliers (CG SHAKE). The GPU implementation is partially in double precision and requires no communication with the CPU during the execution of the SHAKE algorithm. The (parallel) implementation of SHAKE allows an increase of the time step to 2.0fs while maintaining excellent energy conservation. Interestingly, CG SHAKE is faster than the usual bond relaxation algorithm even on a single core if high accuracy is expected. The significant speedup of the optimized components transfers the computational bottleneck of the MD calculation to the reciprocal part of Particle Mesh Ewald (PME). PMID:23264758

  14. Revisiting Molecular Dynamics on a CPU/GPU system: Water Kernel and SHAKE Parallelization.

    PubMed

    Ruymgaart, A Peter; Elber, Ron

    2012-11-13

    We report Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) and Open-MP parallel implementations of water-specific force calculations and of bond constraints for use in Molecular Dynamics simulations. We focus on a typical laboratory computing-environment in which a CPU with a few cores is attached to a GPU. We discuss in detail the design of the code and we illustrate performance comparable to highly optimized codes such as GROMACS. Beside speed our code shows excellent energy conservation. Utilization of water-specific lists allows the efficient calculations of non-bonded interactions that include water molecules and results in a speed-up factor of more than 40 on the GPU compared to code optimized on a single CPU core for systems larger than 20,000 atoms. This is up four-fold from a factor of 10 reported in our initial GPU implementation that did not include a water-specific code. Another optimization is the implementation of constrained dynamics entirely on the GPU. The routine, which enforces constraints of all bonds, runs in parallel on multiple Open-MP cores or entirely on the GPU. It is based on Conjugate Gradient solution of the Lagrange multipliers (CG SHAKE). The GPU implementation is partially in double precision and requires no communication with the CPU during the execution of the SHAKE algorithm. The (parallel) implementation of SHAKE allows an increase of the time step to 2.0fs while maintaining excellent energy conservation. Interestingly, CG SHAKE is faster than the usual bond relaxation algorithm even on a single core if high accuracy is expected. The significant speedup of the optimized components transfers the computational bottleneck of the MD calculation to the reciprocal part of Particle Mesh Ewald (PME).

  15. Lakatos Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Court, Deborah

    1999-01-01

    Revisits and reviews Imre Lakatos' ideas on "Falsification and the Methodology of Scientific Research Programmes." Suggests that Lakatos' framework offers an insightful way of looking at the relationship between theory and research that is relevant not only for evaluating research programs in theoretical physics, but in the social sciences as…

  16. On the Characterization of Revisitation Patterns in Complex Human Dynamics - A Data Science Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa Filho, Hugo Serrano

    When it comes to visitation patterns, humans beings are extremely regular and predictable, with recurrent activities responsible for most of our movements. In recent years, we have seen scientists attempt to model and explain human dynamics and in particular human movement. Akin to other human behaviors, traveling patterns evolve from the convolution between internal and external factors. A better understanding on the mechanisms responsible for transforming and incorporating individual events into regular patterns is of fundamental importance. Many aspects of our complex lives are affected by human movements such as disease spread and epidemics modeling, city planning, wireless network development, and disaster relief, to name a few. Given the myriad of applications, it is clear that a complete understanding of how people move in space can lead to considerable benefits to our society. In most of the recent works, scientists have focused on the idea that people movements are biased towards frequently-visited locations. According to them, human movement is based on a exploration/exploitation dichotomy in which individuals choose new locations (exploration) or return to frequently-visited locations (exploitation). In this dissertation we present some of our contributions to the field, such as the presence of a recency effect in human mobility and Web browsing behaviors as well as the Returner vs. Explorers dichotomy in Web browsing trajectories.

  17. Energy corrugation in atomic-scale friction on graphite revisited by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiao-Yu; Qi, Yi-Zhou; Ouyang, Wengen; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Li, Qunyang

    2016-08-01

    Although atomic stick-slip friction has been extensively studied since its first demonstration on graphite, the physical understanding of this dissipation-dominated phenomenon is still very limited. In this work, we perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the frictional behavior of a diamond tip sliding over a graphite surface. In contrast to the common wisdom, our MD results suggest that the energy barrier associated lateral sliding (known as energy corrugation) comes not only from interaction between the tip and the top layer of graphite but also from interactions among the deformed atomic layers of graphite. Due to the competition of these two subentries, friction on graphite can be tuned by controlling the relative adhesion of different interfaces. For relatively low tip-graphite adhesion, friction behaves normally and increases with increasing normal load. However, for relatively high tip-graphite adhesion, friction increases unusually with decreasing normal load leading to an effectively negative coefficient of friction, which is consistent with the recent experimental observations on chemically modified graphite. Our results provide a new insight into the physical origins of energy corrugation in atomic scale friction.

  18. Revisit of Rotational Dynamics of Asteroid 4179 Toutatis from Chang'e-2's flyby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuhui; Hu, Shoucun; Ji, Jianghui

    2015-08-01

    In this work we investigate the rotational dynamics of Toutatis based on the derived results from Chang'e-2's close flyby to the asteroid (Huang et al. 2013). Toutatis' non-principal axis rotation (NPA) was revealed by radar observations captured from its Earth approaches in the past two decades. Matrix of inertia calculated from radar derived shape model are inconsistent with observations, which may indicate an uneven density distribution of the asteroid. We perform numerical simulations of rotational evolution of Toutatis and figure out the relative rotational parameters of Euler angles, rotational velocities and matrix of inertia. According to the major morphological feature of the ginger-shaped asteroid, we suggest a density ratio of the two lobes. On the basis of these results, we will evaluate the magnitude of the bias of mass center and figure center, which may have slight effects in the momentum variation calculation. These results are in good agreements with the previous radar observation derived results (Takahashi et al. 2013).

  19. Infrared Spectroscopy of N-Methylacetamide Revisited by ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Gaigeot, M P; Vuilleumier, R; Sprik, M; Borgis, D

    2005-09-01

    The density functional theory based molecular dynamics simulation method ("Car-Parrinello") was applied in a numerical study of the electronic properties, hydrogen bonding, and infrared spectroscopy of the trans and cis isomer of N-methylacetamide in aqueous solution. A detailed analysis of the electronic structure of the solvated molecules, in terms of localized Wannier functions and Born atomic charges, is presented. Two schemes for the computation of the solute infrared absorption spectrum are investigated:  In the first method the spectrum is determined by Fourier transforming the time correlation function of the solute dipole as determined from the Wannier function analysis. The second method uses instead the molecular current-current correlation function computed from the Born charges and atomic velocities. The resulting spectral properties of trans- and cis-NMA are carefully compared to each other and to experimental results. We find that the two solvated isomers can be clearly distinguished by their infrared spectral profile in the 1000-2000 cm(-)(1) range. PMID:26641894

  20. REVISITING THE ROLE OF M31 IN THE DYNAMICAL HISTORY OF THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Kallivayalil, Nitya; Sanderson, Robyn; Besla, Gurtina; Alcock, Charles

    2009-08-01

    We study the dynamics of the Magellanic Clouds in a model for the Local Group whose mass is constrained using the timing argument/two-body limit of the action principle. The goal is to evaluate the role of M31 in generating the high angular momentum orbit of the Clouds, a puzzle that has only been exacerbated by the latest Hubble Space Telescope proper motion measurements. We study the effects of varying the total Local Group mass, the relative mass of the Milky Way (MW) and M31, the proper motion of M31, and the proper motion of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) on this problem. Over a large part of this parameter space, we find that tides from M31 are insignificant. For a range of LMC proper motions approximately 3{sigma} higher than the mean and total Local Group mass >3.5 x 10{sup 12} M{sub sun}, M31 can provide a significant torque to the LMC orbit. However, if the LMC is bound to the MW, then M31 is found to have negligible effect on its motion, and the origin of the high angular momentum of the system remains a puzzle. Finally, we use the timing argument to calculate the total mass of the MW-LMC system based on the assumption that they are encountering each other for the first time, their previous perigalacticon being a Hubble time ago, obtaining M{sub MW} + M{sub LMC} = (8.7 {+-} 0.8) x 10{sup 11} M{sub sun}.

  1. Multicomponent diffusion revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, S. H.

    2006-07-01

    The derivation of the multicomponent diffusion law is revisited. Following Furry [Am. J. Phys. 16, 63 (1948)], Williams [Am. J. Phys. 26, 467 (1958); Combustion Theory, 2nd ed. (Benjamin/Cummings , Menlo Park, CA,1985)] heuristically rederived the classical kinetic theory results using macroscopic equations, and pointed out that the dynamics of the mixture fluid had been assumed inviscid. This paper generalizes the derivation, shows that the inviscid assumption can easily be relaxed to add a new term to the classical diffusion law, and the thermal diffusion term can also be easily recovered. The nonuniqueness of the multicomponent diffusion coefficient matrix is emphasized and discussed.

  2. Dynamic reciprocity revisited.

    PubMed

    Kaul, Himanshu; Ventikos, Yiannis

    2015-04-01

    The cellular microenvironment - which includes the cells, extracellular matrix (ECM), and local transport processes - affects the cell which in turn responds by synthetic or degradative processes causing the composition and the structure of ECM, and the local transport processes, to change which in a coupled manner influence the cell, and so forth. PMID:25636494

  3. Pion scattering and nuclear dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.B.

    1988-01-01

    A phenomenological optical-model analysis of pion elastic scattering and single- and double-charge-exchange scattering to isobaric-analog states is reviewed. Interpretation of the optical-model parameters is briefly discussed, and several applications and extensions are considered. The applications include the study of various nuclear properties, including neutron deformation and surface-fluctuation contributions to the density. One promising extension for the near future would be to develop a microscopic approach based on powerful momentum-space methods brought to existence over the last decade. In this, the lowest-order optical potential as well as specific higher-order pieces would be worked out in terms of microscopic pion-nucleon and delta-nucleon interactions that can be determined within modern meson-theoretical frameworks. A second extension, of a more phenomenological nature, would use coupled-channel methods and shell-model wave functions to study dynamical nuclear correlations in pion double charge exchange. 35 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  4. New Aspects of Experimental Study of the Pion-Nucleon Interaction in the Resonance Region

    SciTech Connect

    Sumachev, V.V.

    2005-06-01

    New experimental data that were obtained by the PNPI-ITEP Collaboration have resolved some discrete ambiguities in the partial-wave analysis (PWA). These results were used in the new FA02 PWA performed at George Washington University. At the same time, the FA02 PWA has revealed considerable fewer N* and {delta} resonances than those listed in the RPP tables. This circumstance aggravated the known problem of so-called missing resonances. The program for further measurements of the spin rotation parameters in elastic {pi}N scattering that are required to eliminate the remaining discrete PWA ambiguities is discussed.

  5. Cats protecting birds revisited.

    PubMed

    Fan, Meng; Kuang, Yang; Feng, Zhilan

    2005-09-01

    In this paper, we revisit the dynamical interaction among prey (bird), mesopredator (rat), and superpredator (cat) discussed in [Courchamp, F., Langlais, M., Sugihara, G., 1999. Cats protecting birds: modelling the mesopredator release effect. Journal of Animal Ecology 68, 282-292]. First, we develop a prey-mesopredator-superpredator (i.e., bird-rat-cat, briefly, BRC) model, where the predator's functional responses are derived based on the classical Holling's time budget arguments. Our BRC model overcomes several model construction problems in Courchamp et al. (1999), and admits richer, reasonable and realistic dynamics. We explore the possible control strategies to save or restore the bird by controlling or eliminating the rat or the cat when the bird is endangered. We establish the existence of two types of mesopredator release phenomena: severe mesopredator release, where once superpredators are suppressed, a burst of mesopredators follows which leads their shared prey to extinction; and mild mesopredator release, where the mesopredator release could assert more negative impact on the endemic prey but does not lead the endemic prey to extinction. A sharp sufficient criterion is established for the occurrence of severe mesopredator release. We also show that, in a prey-mesopredator-superpredator trophic food web, eradication of introduced superpredators such as feral domestic cats in the BRC model, is not always the best solution to protect endemic insular prey. The presence of a superpredator may have a beneficial effect in such systems. PMID:15998496

  6. Revisiting structure and dynamics of Ag+ in 18.6% aqueous ammonia: An ab initio quantum mechanical charge field simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasetyo, Niko; Armunanto, Ria

    2016-05-01

    Structures and dynamics of Ag+ in 18.6% aqueous ammonia have been studied using Quantum Mechanical Charge Field Molecular Dynamics (QMCF-MD) simulation at the Hartree-Fock (HF) level theory employing LANL2DZ ECP basis set for Ag+ and Dunning DZP for solvent molecules. Structural properties are in excellent agreement with previous QM/MM and experiments studies. [Ag(NH3)2(H2O)3]+ was found as dominant species during simulation time. For 20 ps of simulation time, a labile first solvation shell was observed with both fast ammonia and water ligands exchanges. QMCF-MD framework describes first solvation shell more labile than conventional QM/MM MD simulation.

  7. A 3D hp-Discontinuous Galerkin Method: Revisiting the M7.3 Landers Earthquake Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tago, J.; Cruz-Atienza, V. M.; Virieux, J.; Etienne, V.; Sanchez-Sesma, F. J.

    2011-12-01

    Reliable dynamic source models should account of both fault geometry and heterogeneities in the surrounding medium. In this work we introduce a novel numerical method for modeling the dynamic rupture based on a 3D hp-Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) scheme. Our method is derived from the scheme proposed by Benjemaa et al. (2009), which is based on a Finite Volume (FV) approach. Migrating from such approach to the hp-Discontinuous Galerkin philosophy is somehow straightforward since the FV method can be seen as the DG method with its lowest order or approximation (i.e. P0 element). We present a novel approach for treating dynamic rupture boundary conditions using an hp-Discontinuous Galerkin method for unstructured tetrahedral meshes. Although the theory we have developed holds for fault elements with arbitrary order, we show that second order (P2) elements yield a very good convergence. Since the DG method does not impose continuity between elements, our strategy consists in the way we compute the fluxes across the fault elements. During rupture propagation, the fluxes in the elements where the shear traction overcomes the fault strength are such that continuity of every wavefield is imposed except for the tangential fault velocities, while in the unbroken elements tangential continuity is also imposed. Because the fault nodes of a given element are coupled through the Mass and Flux matrices, when a fault node breaks we impose the shear traction on that node and need to recompute the values throughout the rest, to avoid any violation of the friction law throughout the element. This procedure repeats itself iteratively following a predictor-corrector scheme for a given time step until the element solutions stabilize. We point out that our scheme for the fault fluxes in the case of P0 elements is exactly the same as the one proposed by Benjemaa et al. who compute them through energy balance considerations. To verify our mathematical and computational model we have solved

  8. Revisiting a population-dynamic model of air pollution and daily mortality of the elderly in Philadelphia.

    PubMed

    Murray, Christian J; Lipfert, Frederick W

    2010-05-01

    Epidemiological studies find that elderly, susceptible, and previously impaired individuals are more sensitive to transient air pollution exposures than healthy persons. However, any associated changes in life expectancy remain largely unresolved. Murray and Nelson published a model of daily mortality and air pollution that addresses mortality displacement or harvesting by directly considering population dynamics on the basis of the assumption that a period of illness or frailty precedes most elderly deaths. The underlying concept is that a person's response to an environmental exposure also depends on his/her physiological ability to withstand stress at that time. They used Kalman filtering to estimate an unobservable quantity--the size of the frail subpopulation from which elderly (ages > or = 65 yr) nontraumatic deaths are assumed to derive. They found a small subpopulation, relatively robust to environmental variations over 14 yr, with remaining life expectancies of 8-31 days in this frail status. Here, this model and dataset are expanded to examine the ramifications in more detail (including seasonality), to consider peak ozone as an additional pollutant, and to consider remaining life expectancies of the this frail subpopulation on a daily basis. Previous studies of mortality displacement and of Philadelphia mortality-air-pollution associations are also summarized in general, and agreement with the Murray-Nelson model was found, thus supporting its validity. The estimated additional mortality associated with a given environmental exposure persists for a few days at most but is not always compensated by subsequent mortality deficits. It is concluded that the pollution-associated mortality increases of a few percent in this dataset are consistent with losses of remaining life expectancy of up to a few days. It is also recommended that a more complex population-dynamic model be implemented to examine the extent to which previous short-term environmental

  9. Stretching of single poly-ubiquitin molecules revisited: Dynamic disorder in the non-exponential unfolding kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yue; Bian, Yukun; Zhao, Nanrong; Hou, Zhonghuai

    2014-03-01

    A theoretical framework based on a generalized Langevin equation (GLE) with fractional Gaussian noise (fGn) and a power-law memory kernel is presented to describe the non-exponential kinetics of the unfolding of a single poly-ubiquitin molecule under a constant force [T.-L. Kuo, S. Garcia-Manyes, J. Li, I. Barel, H. Lu, B. J. Berne, M. Urbakh, J. Klafter, and J. M. Fernández, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 107, 11336 (2010)]. Such a GLE-fGn strategy is made on the basis that the pulling coordinate variable x undergoes subdiffusion, usually resulting from conformational fluctuations, over a one-dimensional force-modified free-energy surface U(x, F). By using the Kramers' rate theory, we have obtained analytical formulae for the time-dependent rate coefficient k(t, F), the survival probability S(t, F) as well as the waiting time distribution function f(t, F) as functions of time t and force F. We find that our results can fit the experimental data of f(t, F) perfectly in the whole time range with a power-law exponent γ = 1/2, the characteristic of typical anomalous subdiffusion. In addition, the fitting of the survival probabilities for different forces facilitates us to reach rather reasonable estimations for intrinsic properties of the system, such as the free-energy barrier and the distance between the native conformation and the transition state conformation along the reaction coordinate, which are in good agreements with molecular dynamics simulations in the literatures. Although static disorder has been implicated in the original work of Kuo et al., our work suggests a sound and plausible alternative interpretation for the non-exponential kinetics in the stretching of poly-ubiquitin molecules, associated with dynamic disorder.

  10. Stretching of single poly-ubiquitin molecules revisited: dynamic disorder in the non-exponential unfolding kinetics.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yue; Bian, Yukun; Zhao, Nanrong; Hou, Zhonghuai

    2014-03-28

    A theoretical framework based on a generalized Langevin equation (GLE) with fractional Gaussian noise (fGn) and a power-law memory kernel is presented to describe the non-exponential kinetics of the unfolding of a single poly-ubiquitin molecule under a constant force [T.-L. Kuo, S. Garcia-Manyes, J. Li, I. Barel, H. Lu, B. J. Berne, M. Urbakh, J. Klafter, and J. M. Fernández, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 107, 11336 (2010)]. Such a GLE-fGn strategy is made on the basis that the pulling coordinate variable x undergoes subdiffusion, usually resulting from conformational fluctuations, over a one-dimensional force-modified free-energy surface U(x, F). By using the Kramers' rate theory, we have obtained analytical formulae for the time-dependent rate coefficient k(t, F), the survival probability S(t, F) as well as the waiting time distribution function f(t, F) as functions of time t and force F. We find that our results can fit the experimental data of f(t, F) perfectly in the whole time range with a power-law exponent γ = 1/2, the characteristic of typical anomalous subdiffusion. In addition, the fitting of the survival probabilities for different forces facilitates us to reach rather reasonable estimations for intrinsic properties of the system, such as the free-energy barrier and the distance between the native conformation and the transition state conformation along the reaction coordinate, which are in good agreements with molecular dynamics simulations in the literatures. Although static disorder has been implicated in the original work of Kuo et al., our work suggests a sound and plausible alternative interpretation for the non-exponential kinetics in the stretching of poly-ubiquitin molecules, associated with dynamic disorder. PMID:24697481

  11. Stochastic dynamics and non-equilibrium thermodynamics of a bistable chemical system: the Schlögl model revisited.

    PubMed

    Vellela, Melissa; Qian, Hong

    2009-10-01

    Schlögl's model is the canonical example of a chemical reaction system that exhibits bistability. Because the biological examples of bistability and switching behaviour are increasingly numerous, this paper presents an integrated deterministic, stochastic and thermodynamic analysis of the model. After a brief review of the deterministic and stochastic modelling frameworks, the concepts of chemical and mathematical detailed balances are discussed and non-equilibrium conditions are shown to be necessary for bistability. Thermodynamic quantities such as the flux, chemical potential and entropy production rate are defined and compared across the two models. In the bistable region, the stochastic model exhibits an exchange of the global stability between the two stable states under changes in the pump parameters and volume size. The stochastic entropy production rate shows a sharp transition that mirrors this exchange. A new hybrid model that includes continuous diffusion and discrete jumps is suggested to deal with the multiscale dynamics of the bistable system. Accurate approximations of the exponentially small eigenvalue associated with the time scale of this switching and the full time-dependent solution are calculated using Matlab. A breakdown of previously known asymptotic approximations on small volume scales is observed through comparison with these and Monte Carlo results. Finally, in the appendix section is an illustration of how the diffusion approximation of the chemical master equation can fail to represent correctly the mesoscopically interesting steady-state behaviour of the system.

  12. Dissociation of strong acid revisited: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations of HNO3 in water

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Tanza; Winter, Berndt; Stern, Abraham C.; Baer, Marcel D.; Mundy, Christopher J.; Tobias, Douglas J.; Hemminger, J. C.

    2011-08-04

    Molecular-level insight into the dissociation of nitric acid in water is obtained from photoelectron X-ray spectroscopy and first-principles molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Our combined studies reveal surprisingly abrupt changes in solvation configurations of undissociated nitric acid at approximately 4 M concentration. Experimentally, this is inferred from N1s binding energy shifts of HNO3(aq) as a function of concentration, and is associated with variations in the local electronic structure of the nitrogen atom. It also shows up as a discontinuity in the degree of dissociation as a function of concentration, determined here from the N1s photoelectron signal intensity, which can be separately quantified for undissociated HNO3(aq) and dissociated NO3-(aq). Intermolecular interactions within the nitric acid solution are discussed on the basis of MD simulations, which reveal that molecular HNO3 interacts remarkably weakly with solvating water molecules at low concentration; around 4 M there is a turnover to a more structured solvation shell, accompanied by an increase in hydrogen bonding between HNO3 and water. We suggest that the driving force behind the more structured solvent configuration of HNO3 is the overlap of nitric acid solvent shells that sets in around 4 M concentration. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  13. Revisiting kinetic boundary conditions at the surface of fuel droplet hydrocarbons: An atomistic computational fluid dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Nasiri, Rasoul

    2016-01-01

    The role of boundary conditions at the interface for both Boltzmann equation and the set of Navier-Stokes equations have been suggested to be important for studying of multiphase flows such as evaporation/condensation process which doesn't always obey the equilibrium conditions. Here we present aspects of transition-state theory (TST) alongside with kinetic gas theory (KGT) relevant to the study of quasi-equilibrium interfacial phenomena and the equilibrium gas phase processes, respectively. A two-state mathematical model for long-chain hydrocarbons which have multi-structural specifications is introduced to clarify how kinetics and thermodynamics affect evaporation/condensation process at the surface of fuel droplet, liquid and gas phases and then show how experimental observations for a number of n-alkane may be reproduced using a hybrid framework TST and KGT with physically reasonable parameters controlling the interface, gas and liquid phases. The importance of internal activation dynamics at the surface of n-alkane droplets is established during the evaporation/condensation process. PMID:27215897

  14. Revisiting kinetic boundary conditions at the surface of fuel droplet hydrocarbons: An atomistic computational fluid dynamics simulation

    PubMed Central

    Nasiri, Rasoul

    2016-01-01

    The role of boundary conditions at the interface for both Boltzmann equation and the set of Navier-Stokes equations have been suggested to be important for studying of multiphase flows such as evaporation/condensation process which doesn’t always obey the equilibrium conditions. Here we present aspects of transition-state theory (TST) alongside with kinetic gas theory (KGT) relevant to the study of quasi-equilibrium interfacial phenomena and the equilibrium gas phase processes, respectively. A two-state mathematical model for long-chain hydrocarbons which have multi-structural specifications is introduced to clarify how kinetics and thermodynamics affect evaporation/condensation process at the surface of fuel droplet, liquid and gas phases and then show how experimental observations for a number of n-alkane may be reproduced using a hybrid framework TST and KGT with physically reasonable parameters controlling the interface, gas and liquid phases. The importance of internal activation dynamics at the surface of n-alkane droplets is established during the evaporation/condensation process. PMID:27215897

  15. Revisiting kinetic boundary conditions at the surface of fuel droplet hydrocarbons: An atomistic computational fluid dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasiri, Rasoul

    2016-05-01

    The role of boundary conditions at the interface for both Boltzmann equation and the set of Navier-Stokes equations have been suggested to be important for studying of multiphase flows such as evaporation/condensation process which doesn’t always obey the equilibrium conditions. Here we present aspects of transition-state theory (TST) alongside with kinetic gas theory (KGT) relevant to the study of quasi-equilibrium interfacial phenomena and the equilibrium gas phase processes, respectively. A two-state mathematical model for long-chain hydrocarbons which have multi-structural specifications is introduced to clarify how kinetics and thermodynamics affect evaporation/condensation process at the surface of fuel droplet, liquid and gas phases and then show how experimental observations for a number of n-alkane may be reproduced using a hybrid framework TST and KGT with physically reasonable parameters controlling the interface, gas and liquid phases. The importance of internal activation dynamics at the surface of n-alkane droplets is established during the evaporation/condensation process.

  16. Ethylene glycol revisited: Molecular dynamics simulations and visualization of the liquid and its hydrogen-bond network.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Alexander; Ismailova, Oksana; Koskela, Antti; Huber, Stefan E; Ritter, Marcel; Cosenza, Biagio; Benger, Werner; Nazmutdinov, Renat; Probst, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of liquid ethylene glycol described by the OPLS-AA force field were performed to gain insight into its hydrogen-bond structure. We use the population correlation function as a statistical measure for the hydrogen-bond lifetime. In an attempt to understand the complicated hydrogen-bonding, we developed new molecular visualization tools within the Vish Visualization shell and used it to visualize the life of each individual hydrogen-bond. With this tool hydrogen-bond formation and breaking as well as clustering and chain formation in hydrogen-bonded liquids can be observed directly. Liquid ethylene glycol at room temperature does not show significant clustering or chain building. The hydrogen-bonds break often due to the rotational and vibrational motions of the molecules leading to an H-bond half-life time of approximately 1.5 ps. However, most of the H-bonds are reformed again so that after 50 ps only 40% of these H-bonds are irreversibly broken due to diffusional motion. This hydrogen-bond half-life time due to diffusional motion is 80.3 ps. The work was preceded by a careful check of various OPLS-based force fields used in the literature. It was found that they lead to quite different angular and H-bond distributions.

  17. Light-front representation of chiral dynamics in peripheral transverse densities

    SciTech Connect

    Granados, Carlos G.; Weiss, Christian

    2015-07-31

    The nucleon's electromagnetic form factors are expressed in terms of the transverse densities of charge and magnetization at fixed light-front time. At peripheral transverse distances b = O(M_pi^{-1}) the densities are governed by chiral dynamics and can be calculated model-independently using chiral effective field theory (EFT). We represent the leading-order chiral EFT results for the peripheral transverse densities as overlap integrals of chiral light-front wave functions, describing the transition of the initial nucleon to soft pion-nucleon intermediate states and back. The new representation (a) explains the parametric order of the peripheral transverse densities; (b) establishes an inequality between the spin-independent and -dependent densities; (c) exposes the role of pion orbital angular momentum in chiral dynamics; (d) reveals a large left-right asymmetry of the current in a transversely polarized nucleon and suggests a simple interpretation. The light-front representation enables a first-quantized, quantum-mechanical view of chiral dynamics that is fully relativistic and exactly equivalent to the second-quantized, field-theoretical formulation. It relates the charge and magnetization densities measured in low-energy elastic scattering to the generalized parton distributions probed in peripheral high-energy scattering processes. The method can be applied to nucleon form factors of other operators, e.g. the energy-momentum tensor.

  18. Light-front representation of chiral dynamics in peripheral transverse densities

    DOE PAGES

    Granados, Carlos G.; Weiss, Christian

    2015-07-31

    The nucleon's electromagnetic form factors are expressed in terms of the transverse densities of charge and magnetization at fixed light-front time. At peripheral transverse distances b = O(M_pi^{-1}) the densities are governed by chiral dynamics and can be calculated model-independently using chiral effective field theory (EFT). We represent the leading-order chiral EFT results for the peripheral transverse densities as overlap integrals of chiral light-front wave functions, describing the transition of the initial nucleon to soft pion-nucleon intermediate states and back. The new representation (a) explains the parametric order of the peripheral transverse densities; (b) establishes an inequality between the spin-independentmore » and -dependent densities; (c) exposes the role of pion orbital angular momentum in chiral dynamics; (d) reveals a large left-right asymmetry of the current in a transversely polarized nucleon and suggests a simple interpretation. The light-front representation enables a first-quantized, quantum-mechanical view of chiral dynamics that is fully relativistic and exactly equivalent to the second-quantized, field-theoretical formulation. It relates the charge and magnetization densities measured in low-energy elastic scattering to the generalized parton distributions probed in peripheral high-energy scattering processes. The method can be applied to nucleon form factors of other operators, e.g. the energy-momentum tensor.« less

  19. Nuclear chiral dynamics and thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Jeremy W.; Kaiser, Norbert; Weise, Wolfram

    2013-11-01

    This presentation reviews an approach to nuclear many-body systems based on the spontaneously broken chiral symmetry of low-energy QCD. In the low-energy limit, for energies and momenta small compared to a characteristic symmetry breaking scale of order 1 GeV, QCD is realized as an effective field theory of Goldstone bosons (pions) coupled to heavy fermionic sources (nucleons). Nuclear forces at long and intermediate distance scales result from a systematic hierarchy of one- and two-pion exchange processes in combination with Pauli blocking effects in the nuclear medium. Short distance dynamics, not resolved at the wavelengths corresponding to typical nuclear Fermi momenta, are introduced as contact interactions between nucleons. Apart from a set of low-energy constants associated with these contact terms, the parameters of this theory are entirely determined by pion properties and low-energy pion-nucleon scattering observables. This framework (in-medium chiral perturbation theory) can provide a realistic description of both isospin-symmetric nuclear matter and neutron matter, with emphasis on the isospin-dependence determined by the underlying chiral NN interaction. The importance of three-body forces is emphasized, and the role of explicit Δ(1232)-isobar degrees of freedom is investigated in detail. Nuclear chiral thermodynamics is developed and a calculation of the nuclear phase diagram is performed. This includes a successful description of the first-order phase transition from a nuclear Fermi liquid to an interacting Fermi gas and the coexistence of these phases below a critical temperature Tc. Density functional methods for finite nuclei based on this approach are also discussed. Effective interactions, their density dependence and connections to Landau Fermi liquid theory are outlined. Finally, the density and temperature dependences of the chiral (quark) condensate are investigated.

  20. Palatogram revisited

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Ashish R.; Venkat Prasad, M. K.; Ariga, Padma

    2014-01-01

    It is the responsibility of the dentist to fabricate a denture that is fully functional and perfectly esthetic. One prime oral function that has always been overlooked in this regard is speech. It has been thought that speech will follow mere replacement of teeth and that it is the patient's duty to fine tune this function with practice. Phonetics, esthetics, function and comfort form the foundation of a successful prosthodontic treatment. Accurate approximation of palatal contours of a maxillary complete denture to a patient's tongue can improve speech intelligibility, if other factors such as tooth position, occlusal plane and occlusal vertical dimension are satisfactory. Customizing palatal contours of a maxillary complete denture can be accomplished by using tissue-conditioning material, which provides sufficient working time for a patient to pronounce a series of sibilant sounds while recording dynamic impression of the tongue. This article describes a technique of obtaining palatogram and customizing palatal contours of a maxillary complete denture with autopolymerizing acrylic resin to improve the intelligibility of speech. PMID:24808716

  1. Nutational Damping Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, J. A.; Sharma, I.

    2000-10-01

    Motivated by the recent detection of complex rotational states for several asteroids and comets, as well as by the ongoing and planned spacecraft missions to such bodies, which should allow their rotational states to be accurately determined, we revisit the problem of the nutational damping of small solar system bodies. The nutational damping of asteroids has been approximately analyzed by Prendergast (1958), Burns and Safronov (1973), and Efroimsky and Lazarian (2000). Many other similar dynamical studies concern planetary wobble decay (e.g., Peale 1973; Yoder and Ward 1979), interstellar dust grain alignment (e.g., Purcell 1979; Lazarian and Efroimsky 1999) and damping of Earth's Chandler wobble (Lambeck 1980). Recall that rotational energy loss for an isolated body aligns the body's angular momentum vector with its axis of maximum inertia. Assuming anelastic dissipation, simple dimensional analysis determines a functional form of the damping timescale, on which all the above authors agree. However, the numerical coefficients of published results are claimed to differ by orders of magnitude. Differences have been ascribed to absent physics, to solutions that fail to satisfy boundary conditions perfectly, and to unphysical choices for the Q parameter. The true reasons for the discrepancy are unclear since, despite contrary claims, the full 3D problem (nutational damping of an anelastic ellipsoid) is analytically intractable so far. To move the debate forward, we compare the solution of a related 2D problem to the expressions found previously, and we present results from a finite element model. On this basis, we feel that previous rates for the decay of asteroidal tumbling (Harris 1994), derived from Burns and Safronov (1973), are likely to be accurate, at least to a factor of a few. Funded by NASA.

  2. The Linguistic Repertoire Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busch, Brigitta

    2012-01-01

    This article argues for the relevance of poststructuralist approaches to the notion of a linguistic repertoire and introduces the notion of language portraits as a basis for empirical study of the way in which speakers conceive and represent their heteroglossic repertoires. The first part of the article revisits Gumperz's notion of a linguistic…

  3. A Hydrostatic Paradox Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganci, Salvatore

    2012-01-01

    This paper revisits a well-known hydrostatic paradox, observed when turning upside down a glass partially filled with water and covered with a sheet of light material. The phenomenon is studied in its most general form by including the mass of the cover. A historical survey of this experiment shows that a common misunderstanding of the phenomenon…

  4. Colloquial Hebrew Imperatives Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolozky, Shmuel

    2009-01-01

    In revisiting Bolozky's [Bolozky, Shmuel, 1979. "On the new imperative in colloquial Hebrew." "Hebrew Annual Review" 3, 17-24] and Bat-El's [Bat-El, Outi, 2002. "True truncation in colloquial Hebrew imperatives." "Language" 78(4), 651-683] analyses of colloquial Hebrew imperatives, the article argues for restricting Imperative Truncation to the…

  5. Revisiting Bioaccumulation Criteria

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of workgroup 5 was to revisit the B(ioaccumulation) criteria that are currently being used to identify POPs under the Stockholm Convention and PBTs under CEPA, TSCA, REACh and other programs. Despite the lack of a recognized definition for a B substance, we defined ...

  6. Revisiting Curriculum Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deng, Zongyi

    2011-01-01

    This article analyzes the notion of curriculum potential by revisiting the ideas of Miriam Ben-Peretz and Joseph Schwab. Invoking the German "Didaktik" tradition and by way of a curriculum-making framework, the paper argues that interpreting curriculum materials for curriculum potential requires a careful analysis and unpacking of the meanings and…

  7. Anodic Polarization Curves Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yue; Drew, Michael G. B.; Liu, Ying; Liu, Lin

    2013-01-01

    An experiment published in this "Journal" has been revisited and it is found that the curve pattern of the anodic polarization curve for iron repeats itself successively when the potential scan is repeated. It is surprising that this observation has not been reported previously in the literature because it immediately brings into…

  8. A Multi-Level Model of Moral Functioning Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Don Collins

    2009-01-01

    The model of moral functioning scaffolded in the 2008 "JME" Special Issue is here revisited in response to three papers criticising that volume. As guest editor of that Special Issue I have formulated the main body of this response, concerning the dynamic systems approach to moral development, the problem of moral relativism and the role of…

  9. Revisiting Dialogues and Monologues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kvernbekk, Tone

    2012-01-01

    In educational discourse dialogue tends to be viewed as being (morally) superior to monologue. When we look at them as basic forms of communication, we find that dialogue is a two-way, one-to-one form and monologue is a one-way, one-to-many form. In this paper I revisit the alleged (moral) superiority of dialogue. First, I problematize certain…

  10. Time functions revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathi, Albert

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we revisit our joint work with Antonio Siconolfi on time functions. We will give a brief introduction to the subject. We will then show how to construct a Lipschitz time function in a simplified setting. We will end with a new result showing that the Aubry set is not an artifact of our proof of existence of time functions for stably causal manifolds.

  11. Clinical ethics revisited

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Peter A; Pellegrino, Edmund D; Siegler, Mark

    2001-01-01

    A decade ago, we reviewed the field of clinical ethics; assessed its progress in research, education, and ethics committees and consultation; and made predictions about the future of the field. In this article, we revisit clinical ethics to examine our earlier observations, highlight key developments, and discuss remaining challenges for clinical ethics, including the need to develop a global perspective on clinical ethics problems. PMID:11346456

  12. 42 CFR 488.30 - Revisit user fee for revisit surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... surveys conducted during the time period for which authority to levy a revisit user fee exists. (e... of the revisit user fee, such as clerical errors, billing for a fee already paid, or assessment of a... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Revisit user fee for revisit surveys....

  13. s-wave repulsion in the pion-nucleus optical potential and the subthreshold pion-nucleon T matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalerao, R. S.; Shakin, C. M.

    1981-05-01

    A covariant theory of the pion-nucleus interaction has been used to calculate off-shell matrix elements of the first-order pion-nucleus optical potential in momentum space. The matrix elements are calculated for 16O and 40Ca, as a function of k, the momentum in the π-nucleus center-of-mass system, for W=mπ+MN. (As in our previous studies we have carried out a full integration over the Fermi motion of the target nucleons. Off-shell effects related to nuclear binding are treated carefully.) As this calculation is sensitively dependent upon the subthreshold πN T matrix, two different models for the T matrix are studied. One is the well known separable model of Londergan, McVoy, and Moniz. The second model includes terms describing the direct and crossed Born terms and therefore has the appropriate s- and u-channel nucleon poles. (In the calculations using this model both the pion and the nucleon are allowed to go off the mass shell.) The remaining part of the amplitude in the second model is represented by a separable form. For small k, the matrix elements of the optical potential calculated with these two models are significantly larger than those obtained when use is made of the fixed-scatterer approximation. Phenomenological optical potentials which describe low-energy pion-nucleus scattering data or pionic-atom data exhibit s-wave repulsion which is about 2-8 times that obtained from calculations made in the fixed-scatterer approximation. (The uncertainty in this enhancement factor reflects the uncertainty in the free-space values of the πN scattering lengths). We conclude that the explanation of a significant fraction of the s-wave repulsion in the low energy pion-nucleus interaction may lie in a careful treatment of off-shell effects using a good model for the subthreshold πN T matrix. NUCLEAR REACTIONS Pion-nucleus interactions, off-shell effects in the pion-nucleus interaction at low energy; pionic atoms.

  14. Reframing in dentistry: revisited.

    PubMed

    Nuvvula, Sivakumar; Kamatham, Rekalakshmi; Challa, Ramasubbareddy; Asokan, Sharath

    2013-01-01

    The successful practice of dentistry involves a good combination of technical skills and soft skills. Soft skills or communication skills are not taught extensively in dental schools and it can be challenging to learn and at times in treating dental patients. Guiding the child's behavior in the dental operatory is one of the preliminary steps to be taken by the pediatric dentist and one who can successfully modify the behavior can definitely pave the way for a life time comprehensive oral care. This article is an attempt to revisit a simple behavior guidance technique, reframing and explain the possible psychological perspectives behind it for better use in the clinical practice. PMID:24021326

  15. The generalized Langevin equation revisited: Analytical expressions for the persistence dynamics of a viscous fluid under a time dependent external force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivares-Rivas, Wilmer; Colmenares, Pedro J.

    2016-09-01

    The non-static generalized Langevin equation and its corresponding Fokker-Planck equation for the position of a viscous fluid particle were solved in closed form for a time dependent external force. Its solution for a constant external force was obtained analytically. The non-Markovian stochastic differential equation, associated to the dynamics of the position under a colored noise, was then applied to the description of the dynamics and persistence time of particles constrained within absorbing barriers. Comparisons with molecular dynamics were very satisfactory.

  16. The formulation of dynamical contact problems with friction in the case of systems of rigid bodies and general discrete mechanical systems—Painlevé and Kane paradoxes revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, Alexandre; Ballard, Patrick

    2016-08-01

    The dynamics of mechanical systems with a finite number of degrees of freedom (discrete mechanical systems) is governed by the Lagrange equation which is a second-order differential equation on a Riemannian manifold (the configuration manifold). The handling of perfect (frictionless) unilateral constraints in this framework (that of Lagrange's analytical dynamics) was undertaken by Schatzman and Moreau at the beginning of the 1980s. A mathematically sound and consistent evolution problem was obtained, paving the road for many subsequent theoretical investigations. In this general evolution problem, the only reaction force which is involved is a generalized reaction force, consistently with the virtual power philosophy of Lagrange. Surprisingly, such a general formulation was never derived in the case of frictional unilateral multibody dynamics. Instead, the paradigm of the Coulomb law applying to reaction forces in the real world is generally invoked. So far, this paradigm has only enabled to obtain a consistent evolution problem in only some very few specific examples and to suggest numerical algorithms to produce computational examples (numerical modeling). In particular, it is not clear what is the evolution problem underlying the computational examples. Moreover, some of the few specific cases in which this paradigm enables to write down a precise evolution problem are known to show paradoxes: the Painlevé paradox (indeterminacy) and the Kane paradox (increase in kinetic energy due to friction). In this paper, we follow Lagrange's philosophy and formulate the frictional unilateral multibody dynamics in terms of the generalized reaction force and not in terms of the real-world reaction force. A general evolution problem that governs the dynamics is obtained for the first time. We prove that all the solutions are dissipative; that is, this new formulation is free of Kane paradox. We also prove that some indeterminacy of the Painlevé paradox is fixed in this

  17. Satellite failures revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2012-12-01

    In January 1994, the two geostationary satellites known as Anik-E1 and Anik-E2, operated by Telesat Canada, failed one after the other within 9 hours, leaving many northern Canadian communities without television and data services. The outage, which shut down much of the country's broadcast television for hours and cost Telesat Canada more than $15 million, generated significant media attention. Lam et al. used publicly available records to revisit the event; they looked at failure details, media coverage, recovery effort, and cost. They also used satellite and ground data to determine the precise causes of those satellite failures. The researchers traced the entire space weather event from conditions on the Sun through the interplanetary medium to the particle environment in geostationary orbit.

  18. Quantum duel revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Alexandre G. M.; Paiva, Milena M.

    2012-03-01

    We revisit the quantum two-person duel. In this problem, both Alice and Bob each possess a spin-1/2 particle which models dead and alive states for each player. We review the Abbott and Flitney result—now considering non-zero α1 and α2 in order to decide if it is better for Alice to shoot or not the second time—and we also consider a duel where players do not necessarily start alive. This simple assumption allows us to explore several interesting special cases, namely how a dead player can win the duel shooting just once, or how can Bob revive Alice after one shot, and the better strategy for Alice—being either alive or in a superposition of alive and dead states—fighting a dead opponent.

  19. Revisiting Lambert's problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzo, Dario

    2015-01-01

    The orbital boundary value problem, also known as Lambert problem, is revisited. Building upon Lancaster and Blanchard approach, new relations are revealed and a new variable representing all problem classes, under L-similarity, is used to express the time of flight equation. In the new variable, the time of flight curves have two oblique asymptotes and they mostly appear to be conveniently approximated by piecewise continuous lines. We use and invert such a simple approximation to provide an efficient initial guess to an Householder iterative method that is then able to converge, for the single revolution case, in only two iterations. The resulting algorithm is compared, for single and multiple revolutions, to Gooding's procedure revealing to be numerically as accurate, while having a significantly smaller computational complexity.

  20. Flow-Induced New Channels of Energy Exchange in Multi-Scale Plasma Dynamics - Revisiting Perturbative Hybrid Kinetic-MHD Theory.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Junya; Miyato, Naoaki; Matsunaga, Go

    2016-05-10

    It is found that new channels of energy exchange between macro- and microscopic dynamics exist in plasmas. They are induced by macroscopic plasma flow. This finding is based on the kinetic-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory, which analyses interaction between macroscopic (MHD-scale) motion and microscopic (particle-scale) dynamics. The kinetic-MHD theory is extended to include effects of macroscopic plasma flow self-consistently. The extension is realised by generalising an energy exchange term due to wave-particle resonance, denoted by δ WK. The first extension is generalisation of the particle's Lagrangian, and the second one stems from modification to the particle distribution function due to flow. These extensions lead to a generalised expression of δ WK, which affects the MHD stability of plasmas.

  1. Flow-Induced New Channels of Energy Exchange in Multi-Scale Plasma DynamicsRevisiting Perturbative Hybrid Kinetic-MHD Theory

    PubMed Central

    Shiraishi, Junya; Miyato, Naoaki; Matsunaga, Go

    2016-01-01

    It is found that new channels of energy exchange between macro- and microscopic dynamics exist in plasmas. They are induced by macroscopic plasma flow. This finding is based on the kinetic-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory, which analyses interaction between macroscopic (MHD-scale) motion and microscopic (particle-scale) dynamics. The kinetic-MHD theory is extended to include effects of macroscopic plasma flow self-consistently. The extension is realised by generalising an energy exchange term due to wave-particle resonance, denoted by δ WK. The first extension is generalisation of the particle’s Lagrangian, and the second one stems from modification to the particle distribution function due to flow. These extensions lead to a generalised expression of δ WK, which affects the MHD stability of plasmas. PMID:27160346

  2. Visser's massive graviton bimetric theory revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Roany, Alain de; Chauvineau, Bertrand; Freitas Pacheco, Jose A. de

    2011-10-15

    A massive gravity theory was proposed by Visser in the late 1990s. This theory, based on a background metric b{sub {alpha}{beta}} and on an usual dynamical metric g{sub {alpha}{beta}} has the advantage of being free of ghosts as well as discontinuities present in other massive theories proposed in the past. In the present investigation, the equations of Visser's theory are revisited with particular care on the related conservation laws. It will be shown that a multiplicative factor is missing in the graviton tensor originally derived by Visser, which has no incidence on the weak field approach but becomes important in the strong field regime when, for instance, cosmological applications are considered. In this case, contrary to some previous claims found in the literature, we conclude that a nonstatic background metric is required in order to obtain a solution able to mimic the {Lambda}CDM cosmology.

  3. Light-front representation of chiral dynamics with Δ isobar and large- N c relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granados, C.; Weiss, C.

    2016-06-01

    Transverse densities describe the spatial distribution of electromagnetic current in the nucleon at fixed light-front time. At peripheral distances b = O( M π - 1 ) the densities are governed by chiral dynamics and can be calculated model-independently using chiral effective field theory (EFT). Recent work has shown that the EFT results can be represented in first-quantized form, as overlap integrals of chiral light-front wave functions describing the transition of the nucleon to soft-pion-nucleon intermediate states, resulting in a quantum-mechanical picture of the peripheral transverse densities. We now extend this representation to include intermediate states with Δ isobars and implement relations based on the large- N c limit of QCD. We derive the wave function overlap formulas for the Δ contributions to the peripheral transverse densities by way of a three-dimensional reduction of relativistic chiral EFT expressions. Our procedure effectively maintains rotational invariance and avoids the ambiguities with higher-spin particles in the light-front time-ordered approach. We study the interplay of π N and πΔ intermediate states in the quantum-mechanical picture of the densities in a transversely polarized nucleon. We show that the correct N c -scaling of the charge and magnetization densities emerges as the result of the particular combination of currents generated by intermediate states with degenerate N and Δ. The off-shell behavior of the chiral EFT is summarized in contact terms and can be studied easily. The methods developed here can be applied to other peripheral densities and to moments of the nucleon's generalized parton distributions.

  4. Light-front representation of chiral dynamics with Δ isobar and large-Nc relations

    DOE PAGES

    Granados, C.; Weiss, C.

    2016-06-13

    Transverse densities describe the spatial distribution of electromagnetic current in the nucleon at fixed light-front time. At peripheral distances b = O(Mπ–1) the densities are governed by chiral dynamics and can be calculated model-independently using chiral effective field theory (EFT). Recent work has shown that the EFT results can be represented in first-quantized form, as overlap integrals of chiral light-front wave functions describing the transition of the nucleon to soft-pion-nucleon intermediate states, resulting in a quantum-mechanical picture of the peripheral transverse densities. We now extend this representation to include intermediate states with Δ isobars and implement relations based on themore » large-Nc limit of QCD. We derive the wave function overlap formulas for the Δ contributions to the peripheral transverse densities by way of a three-dimensional reduction of relativistic chiral EFT expressions. Our procedure effectively maintains rotational invariance and avoids the ambiguities with higher-spin particles in the light-front time-ordered approach. We study the interplay of πN and πΔ intermediate states in the quantum-mechanical picture of the densities in a transversely polarized nucleon. We show that the correct Nc-scaling of the charge and magnetization densities emerges as the result of the particular combination of currents generated by intermediate states with degenerate N and Δ. The off-shell behavior of the chiral EFT is summarized in contact terms and can be studied easily. As a result, the methods developed here can be applied to other peripheral densities and to moments of the nucleon's generalized parton distributions.« less

  5. Ring flips revisited: (13)C relaxation dispersion measurements of aromatic side chain dynamics and activation barriers in basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Weininger, Ulrich; Modig, Kristofer; Akke, Mikael

    2014-07-22

    Intramolecular motions of proteins are critical for biological function. Transient structural fluctuations underlie a wide range of processes, including enzyme catalysis, ligand binding to buried sites, and generic protein motions, such as 180° rotation of aromatic side chains in the protein interior, but remain poorly understood. Understanding the dynamics and molecular nature of concerted motions requires characterization of their rates and energy barriers. Here we use recently developed (13)C transverse relaxation dispersion methods to improve our current understanding of aromatic ring flips in basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI). We validate these methods by benchmarking ring-flip rates against the three previously characterized cases in BPTI, namely, Y23, Y35, and F45. Further, we measure conformational exchange for one additional aromatic ring, F22, which can be interpreted in terms of a flip rate of 666 s(-1) at 5 °C. Upon inclusion of our previously reported result that Y21 also flips slowly [Weininger, U., et al. (2013) J. Phys. Chem. B 117, 9241-9247], the (13)C relaxation dispersion experiments thus reveal relatively slow ring-flip rates for five of eight aromatic residues in BPTI. These results are in contrast with previous reports, which have estimated that all rings, except Y23, Y35, and F45, flip with a high rate at ambient temperature. The (13)C relaxation dispersion data result in an updated rank order of ring-flip rates in BPTI, which agrees considerably better with that estimated from a recent 1 ms molecular dynamics trajectory than do previously published NMR data. However, significant quantitative differences remain between experiment and simulation, in that the latter yields flip rates that are in many cases too fast by 1-2 orders of magnitude. By measuring flip rates across a temperature range of 5-65 °C, we determined the activation barriers of ring flips for Y23, Y35, and F45. Y23 and F45 have identical activation parameters

  6. Revisiting caspases in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Aziz, M; Jacob, A; Wang, P

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is a life-threatening illness that occurs due to an abnormal host immune network which extends through the initial widespread and overwhelming inflammation, and culminates at the late stage of immunosupression. Recently, interest has been shifted toward therapies aimed at reversing the accompanying periods of immune suppression. Studies in experimental animals and critically ill patients have demonstrated that increased apoptosis of lymphoid organs and some parenchymal tissues contributes to this immune suppression, anergy and organ dysfunction. Immediate to the discoveries of the intracellular proteases, caspases for the induction of apoptosis and inflammation, and their striking roles in sepsis have been focused elaborately in a number of original and review articles. Here we revisited the different aspects of caspases in terms of apoptosis, pyroptosis, necroptosis and inflammation and focused their links in sepsis by reviewing several recent findings. In addition, we have documented striking perspectives which not only rewrite the pathophysiology, but also modernize our understanding for developing novel therapeutics against sepsis. PMID:25412304

  7. Searle's"Dualism Revisited"

    SciTech Connect

    P., Henry

    2008-11-20

    A recent article in which John Searle claims to refute dualism is examined from a scientific perspective. John Searle begins his recent article 'Dualism Revisited' by stating his belief that the philosophical problem of consciousness has a scientific solution. He then claims to refute dualism. It is therefore appropriate to examine his arguments against dualism from a scientific perspective. Scientific physical theories contain two kinds of descriptions: (1) Descriptions of our empirical findings, expressed in an every-day language that allows us communicate to each other our sensory experiences pertaining to what we have done and what we have learned; and (2) Descriptions of a theoretical model, expressed in a mathematical language that allows us to communicate to each other certain ideas that exist in our mathematical imaginations, and that are believed to represent, within our streams of consciousness, certain aspects of reality that we deem to exist independently of their being perceived by any human observer. These two parts of our scientific description correspond to the two aspects of our general contemporary dualistic understanding of the total reality in which we are imbedded, namely the empirical-mental aspect and the theoretical-physical aspect. The duality question is whether this general dualistic understanding of ourselves should be regarded as false in some important philosophical or scientific sense.

  8. Revisiting caspases in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, M; Jacob, A; Wang, P

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is a life-threatening illness that occurs due to an abnormal host immune network which extends through the initial widespread and overwhelming inflammation, and culminates at the late stage of immunosupression. Recently, interest has been shifted toward therapies aimed at reversing the accompanying periods of immune suppression. Studies in experimental animals and critically ill patients have demonstrated that increased apoptosis of lymphoid organs and some parenchymal tissues contributes to this immune suppression, anergy and organ dysfunction. Immediate to the discoveries of the intracellular proteases, caspases for the induction of apoptosis and inflammation, and their striking roles in sepsis have been focused elaborately in a number of original and review articles. Here we revisited the different aspects of caspases in terms of apoptosis, pyroptosis, necroptosis and inflammation and focused their links in sepsis by reviewing several recent findings. In addition, we have documented striking perspectives which not only rewrite the pathophysiology, but also modernize our understanding for developing novel therapeutics against sepsis. PMID:25412304

  9. Lorentz violation naturalness revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belenchia, Alessio; Gambassi, Andrea; Liberati, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    We revisit here the naturalness problem of Lorentz invariance violations on a simple toy model of a scalar field coupled to a fermion field via a Yukawa interaction. We first review some well-known results concerning the low-energy percolation of Lorentz violation from high energies, presenting some details of the analysis not explicitly discussed in the literature and discussing some previously unnoticed subtleties. We then show how a separation between the scale of validity of the effective field theory and that one of Lorentz invariance violations can hinder this low-energy percolation. While such protection mechanism was previously considered in the literature, we provide here a simple illustration of how it works and of its general features. Finally, we consider a case in which dissipation is present, showing that the dissipative behaviour does not percolate generically to lower mass dimension operators albeit dispersion does. Moreover, we show that a scale separation can protect from unsuppressed low-energy percolation also in this case.

  10. Multinomial pattern matching revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, Matthew S.; Rigling, Brian D.

    2015-05-01

    Multinomial pattern matching (MPM) is an automatic target recognition algorithm developed for specifically radar data at Sandia National Laboratories. The algorithm is in a family of algorithms that first quantizes pixel value into Nq bins based on pixel amplitude before training and classification. This quantization step reduces the sensitivity of algorithm performance to absolute intensity variation in the data, typical of radar data where signatures exhibit high variation for even small changes in aspect angle. Our previous work has focused on performance analysis of peaky template matching, a special case of MPM where binary quantization is used (Nq = 2). Unfortunately references on these algorithms are generally difficult to locate and here we revisit the MPM algorithm and illustrate the underlying statistical model and decision rules for two algorithm interpretations: the 1-of-K vector form and the scalar. MPM can also be used as a detector and specific attention is given to algorithm tuning where "peak pixels" are chosen based on their underlying empirical probabilities according to a reward minimization strategy aimed at reducing false alarms in the detection scenario and false positives in a classification capacity. The algorithms are demonstrated using Monte Carlo simulations on the AFRL civilian vehicle dataset for variety of choices of Nq.

  11. CGL description revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunana, P.; Zank, G. P.; Goldstein, M. L.; Webb, G. M.; Adhikari, L.

    2016-03-01

    Solar wind observational studies have emphasized that the solar wind plasma data is bounded by the mirror and firehose instabilities, and it is often believed that these instabilities are of a purely kinetic nature. The simplest fluid model that generalizes magnetohydrodynamics with anisotropic temperatures is the Chew-Goldberger-Low model (CGL). Here we briefly revisit the CGL description and discuss its (otherwise well-documented) linear firehose and mirror instability thresholds; namely that the firehose instability threshold is identical to the one found from linear kinetic theory and that the mirror threshold contains a factor of 6 error. We consider a simple higher-order fluid model with time dependent heat flux equations and show that the mirror instability threshold is correctly reproduced. We also present fully nonlinear three-dimensional simulations of freely decaying turbulence for the Hall-CGL model with isothermal electrons. The spatial resolution of these simulations is 5123 and the formation of a spectral break in magnetic and velocity field spectra around the proton inertial length is found.

  12. Erratum: Interstellar Abundance Standards Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofia, U. J.; Meyer, D. M.

    2001-09-01

    In the Letter ``Interstellar Abundance Standards Revisited'' by U. J. Sofia and D. M. Meyer (ApJ, 554, L221 [2001]), Table 2 and its footnotes contain several typographical errors. The corrected table is shown below. We note that the solar reference standard now implies a positive abundance of nitrogen in halo dust.

  13. The "Mushroom Cloud" Demonstration Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panzarasa, Guido; Sparnacci, Katia

    2013-01-01

    A revisitation of the classical "mushroom cloud" demonstration is described. Instead of aniline and benzoyl peroxide, the proposed reaction involves household chemicals such as alpha-pinene (turpentine oil) and trichloroisocyanuric acid ("Trichlor") giving an impressive demonstration of oxidation and combustion reactions that…

  14. Benjamin Franklin and Mesmerism, revisited.

    PubMed

    McConkey, Kevin M; Perry, Campbell

    2002-10-01

    The authors revisit and update their previous historiographical note (McConkey & Perry, 1985) on Benjamin Franklin's involvement with and investigation of animal magnetism or mesmerism. They incorporate more recent literature and offer additional comment about Franklin's role in and views about mesmerism. Franklin had a higher degree of personal involvement with and a more detailed opinion of mesmerism than has been previously appreciated.

  15. Oxidative phosphorylation revisited.

    PubMed

    Nath, Sunil; Villadsen, John

    2015-03-01

    The fundamentals of oxidative phosphorylation and photophosphorylation are revisited. New experimental data on the involvement of succinate and malate anions respectively in oxidative phosphorylation and photophosphorylation are presented. These new data offer a novel molecular mechanistic explanation for the energy coupling and ATP synthesis carried out in mitochondria and chloroplast thylakoids. The mechanism does not suffer from the flaws in Mitchell's chemiosmotic theory that have been pointed out in many studies since its first appearance 50 years ago, when it was hailed as a ground-breaking mechanistic explanation of what is perhaps the most important process in cellular energetics. The new findings fit very well with the predictions of Nath's torsional mechanism of energy transduction and ATP synthesis. It is argued that this mechanism, based on at least 15 years of experimental and theoretical work by Sunil Nath, constitutes a fundamentally different theory of the energy conversion process that eliminates all the inconsistencies in Mitchell's chemiosmotic theory pointed out by other authors. It is concluded that the energy-transducing complexes in oxidative phosphorylation and photosynthesis are proton-dicarboxylic acid anion cotransporters and not simply electrogenic proton translocators. These results necessitate revision of previous theories of biological energy transduction, coupling, and ATP synthesis. The novel molecular mechanism is extended to cover ATP synthesis in prokaryotes, in particular to alkaliphilic and haloalkaliphilic bacteria, essentially making it a complete theory addressing mechanistic, kinetic, and thermodynamic details. Finally, based on the new interpretation of oxidative phosphorylation, quantitative values for the P/O ratio, the amount of ATP generated per redox package of the reduced substrates, are calculated and compared with experimental values for fermentation on different substrates. It is our hope that the presentation of

  16. BHQ revisited (2): Texture development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilian, Rüdiger; Heilbronner, Renée

    2016-04-01

    appears that grains can be unfavourably oriented for glide despite their c-axis direction falling in those positions which were used in the "classical" interpretation. Additionally, it turns out that grain-scale dispersion axes can be used to describe the kinematic behaviour in a more consistent way compared to the rotations axes obtained from intragranular misorientations in the range of 2-10°. The implications derived from the experimental data set will be compared to data obtained from natural quartz mylonites which formed in a comparable recrystallization regime. This is the companion poster to "BHQ revisited (I) looking at grain size" where the development of the dynamically recrystallized grain size is addressed. Reference cited: Heilbronner, R., and J. Tullis (2006), Evolution of c axis pole figures and grain size during dynamic recrystallization: Results from experimentally sheared quartzite, J. Geophys. Res., 111, B10202, doi:10.1029/2005JB004194.

  17. Enceladus' tidal dissipation revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobie, Gabriel; Behounkova, Marie; Choblet, Gael; Cadek, Ondrej; Soucek, Ondrej

    2016-10-01

    A series of chemical and physical evidence indicates that the intense activity at Enceladus' South Pole is related to a subsurface salty water reservoir underneath the tectonically active ice shell. The detection of a significant libration implies that this water reservoir is global and that the average ice shell thickness is about 20-25km (Thomas et al. 2016). The interpretation of gravity and topography data further predicts large variations in ice shell thickness, resulting in a shell potentially thinner than 5 km in the South Polar Terrain (SPT) (Cadek et al. 2016). Such an ice shell structure requires a very strong heat source in the interior, with a focusing mechanism at the SPT. Thermal diffusion through the ice shell implies that at least 25-30 GW is lost into space by passive diffusion, implying a very efficient dissipation mechanism in Enceladus' interior to maintain such an ocean/ice configuration thermally stable.In order to determine in which conditions such a large dissipation power may be generated, we model the tidal response of Enceladus including variable ice shell thickness. For the rock core, we consider a wide range of rheological parameters representative of water-saturated porous rock materials. We demonstrate that the thinning toward the South Pole leads to a strong increase in heat production in the ice shell, with a optimal thickness obtained between 1.5 and 3 km, depending on the assumed ice viscosity. Our results imply that the heat production in the ice shell within the SPT may be sufficient to counterbalance the heat loss by diffusion and to power eruption activity. However, outside the SPT, a strong dissipation in the porous core is required to counterbalance the diffusive heat loss. We show that about 20 GW can be generated in the core, for an effective viscosity of 1012 Pa.s, which is comparable to the effective viscosity estimated in water-saturated glacial tills on Earth. We will discuss the implications of this revisited tidal

  18. Radiolytic Cryovolcanism Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, J. F.; Cooper, P. D.; Sittler, E. C.; Wesenberg, R. P.

    2013-12-01

    Active geysers of water vapor and ice grains from the south pole of Enceladus are not yet definitively explained in terms of energy sources and processes. Other instances of hot (Io) and cold (Mars, Triton) volcanism beyond Earth are known if not fully understood. We revisit, in comparison to other models, the 'Old Faithful' theory of radiolytic gas-driven cryovolcanism first proposed by Cooper et al. [Plan. Sp. Sci. 2009]. In the energetic electron irradiation environment of Enceladus within Saturn's magnetosphere, a 10-percent duty cycle could be maintained for current geyser activity driven by gases from oxidation of ammonia to N2 and methane to CO2 in the thermal margins of a south polar sea. Much shorter duty cycles down to 0.01 percent would be required to account for thermal power output up to 16 GW, Steady accumulation of oxidant energy over four billion years could have powered all Enceladus emissions over the past four hundred thousand to four hundred million years. There could be separate energy sources driving mass flow and thermal emission over vastly different time scales. Since episodic tidal dissipation on 10 Myr time scales at 0.1 - 1 Gyr intervals [O'Neill and Nimmo, Nature 2010], and thus duty cycles 1 - 10 percent, could heat the polar sea to the current level, the radiolytic energy source could easily power and modulate the geyser mass flow on million-year time scales. Maximum thermal emission temperature 223 K [Abramov and Spencer, Icarus 2009] hints at thermal buffering in the basal and vent wall layers by a 1:1 H2O:H2O2 radiolytic eutectic, assuming deep ice crust saturation with H2O2 from long cumulative surface irradiation and downward ice convection. Due to density stratification the peroxide eutectic and salt water layers could separate, so that the denser peroxide layer (1.2 g/cc) descends to the polar sea while the lighter salt water (1.05 g/cc) rises along separate channels. Methane reservoirs could be found dissolved into the polar

  19. Granger causality revisited

    PubMed Central

    Friston, Karl J.; Bastos, André M.; Oswal, Ashwini; van Wijk, Bernadette; Richter, Craig; Litvak, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    This technical paper offers a critical re-evaluation of (spectral) Granger causality measures in the analysis of biological timeseries. Using realistic (neural mass) models of coupled neuronal dynamics, we evaluate the robustness of parametric and nonparametric Granger causality. Starting from a broad class of generative (state-space) models of neuronal dynamics, we show how their Volterra kernels prescribe the second-order statistics of their response to random fluctuations; characterised in terms of cross-spectral density, cross-covariance, autoregressive coefficients and directed transfer functions. These quantities in turn specify Granger causality — providing a direct (analytic) link between the parameters of a generative model and the expected Granger causality. We use this link to show that Granger causality measures based upon autoregressive models can become unreliable when the underlying dynamics is dominated by slow (unstable) modes — as quantified by the principal Lyapunov exponent. However, nonparametric measures based on causal spectral factors are robust to dynamical instability. We then demonstrate how both parametric and nonparametric spectral causality measures can become unreliable in the presence of measurement noise. Finally, we show that this problem can be finessed by deriving spectral causality measures from Volterra kernels, estimated using dynamic causal modelling. PMID:25003817

  20. Granger causality revisited.

    PubMed

    Friston, Karl J; Bastos, André M; Oswal, Ashwini; van Wijk, Bernadette; Richter, Craig; Litvak, Vladimir

    2014-11-01

    This technical paper offers a critical re-evaluation of (spectral) Granger causality measures in the analysis of biological timeseries. Using realistic (neural mass) models of coupled neuronal dynamics, we evaluate the robustness of parametric and nonparametric Granger causality. Starting from a broad class of generative (state-space) models of neuronal dynamics, we show how their Volterra kernels prescribe the second-order statistics of their response to random fluctuations; characterised in terms of cross-spectral density, cross-covariance, autoregressive coefficients and directed transfer functions. These quantities in turn specify Granger causality - providing a direct (analytic) link between the parameters of a generative model and the expected Granger causality. We use this link to show that Granger causality measures based upon autoregressive models can become unreliable when the underlying dynamics is dominated by slow (unstable) modes - as quantified by the principal Lyapunov exponent. However, nonparametric measures based on causal spectral factors are robust to dynamical instability. We then demonstrate how both parametric and nonparametric spectral causality measures can become unreliable in the presence of measurement noise. Finally, we show that this problem can be finessed by deriving spectral causality measures from Volterra kernels, estimated using dynamic causal modelling.

  1. Baby universes revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambjørn, J.; Barkley, J.; Budd, T.; Loll, R.

    2011-11-01

    The behavior of baby universes has been an important ingredient in understanding and quantifying non-critical string theory or, equivalently, models of two-dimensional Euclidean quantum gravity coupled to matter. Within a regularized description based on dynamical triangulations, we amend an earlier conjecture by Jain and Mathur on the scaling behavior of genus-g surfaces containing particular baby universe 'necks', and perform a non-trivial numerical check on our improved conjecture.

  2. Revisiting the microtrabecular lattice.

    PubMed

    Clegg, James S

    2010-11-01

    The 'microtrabecular lattice' (MTL) that Keith Porter described in the 1970s and 1980s is reconsidered as a proposed fundamental cytoplasmic structure of eukaryotic cells. Although considered to be an artefact by most cell biologists of his time (and probably ours), the case is made that something like the MTL may well exist, but in a much more dynamic form than images from electron microscopy imply and convey.

  3. Lithium in the Pleiades Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, J. R.; Hobbs, L. M.; Schuler, S. C.; Pinsonneault, M. H.

    2003-12-01

    New Li abundances have been derived for some 15-20 Pleiades dwarfs using new high-resolution and high S/N spectroscopy from HET/HRS. Previous studies suggested that our objects, all modest (projected) rotators, evinced considerable scatter in their Li abundances. We revisit the question of this scatter and its origin. This work has been supported by NSF grants AST 00-86576 and 02-39518, a South Carolina Space Grant Scholarship award, a generous donation from the Curry Foundation of Seneca, SC, and the NOAO Public Access Program.

  4. SLIM--An Early Work Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Alex; /SLAC

    2008-07-25

    An early, but at the time illuminating, piece of work on how to deal with a general, linearly coupled accelerator lattice is revisited. This work is based on the SLIM formalism developed in 1979-1981.

  5. Chain inflation revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Chialva, Diego; Danielsson, Ulf H E-mail: ulf.danielsson@fysast.uu.se

    2008-10-15

    This paper represents an in-depth treatment of the chain inflation scenario. We fully determine the evolution of the universe in the model, the conditions necessary in order to have a successful inflationary period, and the matching with the observational results regarding the cosmological perturbations. We study in great detail, and in general, the dynamics of the background, as well as the mechanism of generation of the perturbations. We also find an explicit formula for the spectrum of adiabatic perturbations. Our results prove that chain inflation is a viable model for solving the horizon, entropy and flatness problems of standard cosmology and for generating the right amount of adiabatic cosmological perturbations. The results are radically different from those found in previous works on the subject. Finally, we argue that there is a natural way to embed chain inflation into flux compactified string theory. We discuss the details of the implementation and how to fit observations.

  6. The Phantom brane revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahni, Varun

    2016-07-01

    The Phantom brane is based on the normal branch of the DGP braneworld. It possesses a phantom-like equation of state at late times, but no big-rip future singularity. In this braneworld, the cosmological constant is dynamically screened at late times. Consequently it provides a good fit to SDSS DR11 measurements of H(z) at high redshifts. We obtain a closed system of equations for scalar perturbations on the brane. Perturbations of radiation, matter and the Weyl fluid are self-consistently evolved until the present epoch. We find that the late time growth of density perturbations on the brane proceeds at a faster rate than in ΛCDM. Additionally, the gravitational potentials φ, Ψ evolve differently on the brane than in ΛCDM, for which φ = Ψ. On the Brane, by contrast, the ratio φ/Ψ exceeds unity during the late matter dominated epoch (z ≤ 50). These features emerge as smoking gun tests of phantom brane cosmology and allow predictions of this scenario to be tested against observations of galaxy clustering and large scale structure. The phantom brane also displays a pole in its equation of state, which provides a key test of this dark energy model.

  7. DROMO propagator revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutxua, Hodei; Sanjurjo-Rivo, Manuel; Peláez, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    In the year 2000 an in-house orbital propagator called DROMO (Peláez et al. in Celest Mech Dyn Astron 97:131-150, 2007. doi: 10.1007/s10569-006-9056-3) was developed by the Space Dynamics Group of the Technical University of Madrid, based in a set of redundant variables including Euler-Rodrigues parameters. An original deduction of the DROMO propagator is carried out, underlining its close relation with the ideal frame concept introduced by Hansen (Abh der Math-Phys Cl der Kon Sachs Ges der Wissensch 5:41-218, 1857). Based on the very same concept, Deprit (J Res Natl Bur Stand Sect B Math Sci 79B(1-2):1-15, 1975) proposed a formulation for orbit propagation. In this paper, similarities and differences with the theory carried out by Deprit are analyzed. Simultaneously, some improvements are introduced in the formulation, that lead to a more synthetic and better performing propagator. Also, the long-term effect of the oblateness of the primary is studied in terms of DROMO variables, and new numerical results are presented to evaluate the performance of the method.

  8. Origin of Sex Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Mauro; Zintzaras, Elias; Szathmáry, Eörs

    2003-10-01

    Why did sex ever arise in the first place? Why it does not disappear in view of the greater efficiency of asexuals? These are clearly two different questions, and we suggest here that the solution for the origin of sex does not necessarily come from theoretical considerations based on currently existing genetic systems. Thus, while we agree with a number of authors in that the emergence of sex (understood as the exchange of genetic material between genomes) is deeply rooted in the origin of life and happened during the very early stages in the transition from individual genes (`replicators') to bacteria-like cells (`reproducers'), we challenge the idea that recombinational repair was the major selective force for the emergence of sex. Taking the stochastic corrector model as a starting point, we provide arguments that question the putative costs of redundancy in primitive protocells. In addition, if genes that cause intragenomic conflict (i.e., parasites) are taken into account, it is certainly wrong to suggest that cellular fusion would be beneficial at the population level (although this strong claim needs some qualifications). However, when a continuous input of deleterious mutations that impair the fitness of the protocell as a whole is considered in the model (in the realistic range in which stable mutant distributions of quasi-species within compartments are established), there are circumstances when sex could be beneficial as a side effect of the dynamic equilibrium between cellular fusion-mutation-selection. The scenario we have explored numerically is fully consistent with the idea that the universal ancestor was not a discrete entity but an ensemble of proto-organisms that exchanged much genetic information.

  9. The climate continuum revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emile-Geay, J.; Wang, J.; Partin, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    A grand challenge of climate science is to quantify the extent of natural variability on adaptation-relevant timescales (10-100y). Since the instrumental record is too short to adequately estimate the spectra of climate measures, this information must be derived from paleoclimate proxies, which may harbor a many-to-one, non-linear (e.g. thresholded) and non-stationary relationship to climate. In this talk, I will touch upon the estimation of climate scaling behavior from climate proxies. Two case studies will be presented: an investigation of scaling behavior in a reconstruction of global surface temperature using state-of- the-art data [PAGES2K Consortium, in prep] and methods [Guillot et al., 2015]. Estimating the scaling exponent β in spectra derived from this reconstruction, we find that 0 < β < 1 in most regions, suggesting long-term memory. Overall, the reconstruction-based spectra are steeper than the ones based on an instrumental dataset [HadCRUT4.2, Morice et al., 2012], and those estimated from PMIP3/CMIP5 models, suggesting the climate system is more energetic at multidecadal to centennial timescales than can be inferred from the short instrumental record or from the models developed to reproduce it [Laepple and Huybers, 2014]. an investigation of scaling behavior in speleothems records of tropical hydroclimate. We will make use of recent advances in proxy system modeling [Dee et al., 2015] and investigate how various aspects of the speleothem system (karst dynamics, age uncertainties) may conspire to bias the estimate of scaling behavior from speleothem timeseries. The results suggest that ignoring such complications leads to erroneous inferences about hydroclimate scaling. References Dee, S. G., J. Emile-Geay, M. N. Evans, Allam, A., D. M. Thompson, and E. J. Steig (2015), J. Adv. Mod. Earth Sys., 07, doi:10.1002/2015MS000447. Guillot, D., B. Rajaratnam, and J. Emile-Geay (2015), Ann. Applied. Statist., pp. 324-352, doi:10.1214/14-AOAS794. Laepple, T

  10. Acute Kidney Injury: Controversies Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Kenneth; Dogra, Gursharan; Boudville, Neil; Pinder, Mary; Lim, Wai

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses the epidemiology of AKI specifically in relation to recent changes in AKI classification and revisits the controversies regarding the timing of initiation of dialysis and the use of peritoneal dialysis as a renal replacement therapy for AKI. In summary, the new RIFLE/AKIN classifications of AKI have facilitated more uniform diagnosis of AKI and clinically significant risk stratification. Regardless, the issue of timing of dialysis initiation still remains unanswered and warrants further examination. Furthermore, peritoneal dialysis as a treatment modality for AKI remains underutilised in spite of potential beneficial effects. Future research should be directed at identifying early reliable biomarkers of AKI, which in conjunction with RIFLE/AKIN classifications of AKI could facilitate well-designed large randomised controlled trials of early versus late initiation of dialysis in AKI. In addition, further studies of peritoneal dialysis in AKI addressing dialysis dose and associated complications are required for this therapy to be accepted more widely by clinicians. PMID:21660314

  11. Orthopaedic service lines-revisited.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Cheryl

    2008-01-01

    This article revisits the application of orthopaedic service lines from early introduction and growth of this organizational approach in the 1980s, through the 1990s, and into the current decade. The author has experienced and worked in various service-line structures through these three decades, as well as the preservice-line era of 1970s orthopaedics. Past lessons learned during earlier phases and then current trends and analysis by industry experts are summarized briefly, with indication given of the future for service lines. Variation versus consistency of certain elements in service-line definitions and in operational models is discussed. Main components of service-line structures and typical processes are described briefly, along with a more detailed section on the service-line director/manager role. Current knowledge contained here will help guide the reader to more "out-of-the-box" thinking toward comprehensive orthopaedic centers of excellence.

  12. Cretaceous eustasy revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haq, Bilal U.

    2014-02-01

    Eustatic sea-level changes of the Cretaceous are reevaluated based on a synthesis of global stratigraphic data. A new terminology for local/regional or relative sea-level changes (eurybatic shifts) is proposed to distinguish them from global (eustatic) sea-level changes, with the observation that all measures of sea-level change in any given location are eurybatic, even when they include a strong global signal. Solid-earth factors that influence inherited regional topography and thus modify physical measures of amplitude of the sea-level rises and falls locally are reviewed. One of these factors, dynamic topography (surface expression of mass flow in the upper mantle on land- and seascapes), is considered most pertinent in altering local measures of amplitude of sea-level events on third-order time scales (0.5-3.0 Myr). Insights gained from these models have led to the reconciliation of variance between amplitude estimates of eurybatic shifts in any given region and global measures of eustatic changes. Global estimates of third-order events can only be guesstimated at best by averaging the eurybatic data from widely distributed time-synchronous events. Revised curves for both long-term and short-term sea-level variations are presented for the Cretaceous Period. The curve representing the long-term envelope shows that average sea levels throughout the Cretaceous remained higher than the present day mean sea level (75-250 m above PDMSL). Sea level reached a trough in mid Valanginian (~ 75 m above PDMSL), followed by two high points, the first in early Barremian (~ 160-170 m above PDMSL) and the second, the highest peak of the Cretaceous, in earliest Turonian (~ 240-250 m above PDMSL). The curve also displays two ~ 20 Myr-long periods of relatively high and stable sea levels (Aptian through early Albian and Coniacian through Campanian). The short-term curve identifies 58 third-order eustatic events in the Cretaceous, most have been documented in several basins, while

  13. Atomic mass dependence of Xi- baryon and anti-Xi+ baryon production in central 250 GeV/c pion-nucleon interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagenhart, William David

    2000-06-01

    We present the first measurement of the atomic mass dependence of central Ξ - and X+ production. It is measured using a sample of 22,459 Ξ- 's and X+ 's produced in collisions between a 250 GeV/c π- beam and targets of beryllium, aluminum, copper, and tungsten. The relative cross sections are fit to the two parameter function σ0 Aα, where A is the atomic mass. We measure α = 0.924 +/- 0.020 +/- 0.025, for Feynman- x in the range -0.09 < xF < 0.15.

  14. Shuttle entry guidance revisited using nonlinear geometric methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mease, Kenneth D.; Kremer, Jean-Paul

    1994-11-01

    The entry guidance law for the space shuttle orbiter is revisited using nonlinear geometric methods. The shuttle guidance concept is to track a reference drag trajectory that has been designed to lead a specified range and velocity. It is shown that the approach taken in the original derivation of the shuttle entry guidance has much in common with the more recently developed feedback linearization method of differential geometric control. Using the feedback linearization method, however, an alternative, potentially superior, guidance law was formulated. Comparing the two guidance laws based performance domains in state space, taking into account the nonlinear dynamics, the alternative guidance law achieves the desired performance over larger domains in state space; the stability domain of the laws are similar. With larger operating domain for the shuttle or some other entry vehicle, the alternative guidance law should be considered.

  15. Revisiting Bohr's semiclassical quantum theory.

    PubMed

    Ben-Amotz, Dor

    2006-10-12

    Bohr's atomic theory is widely viewed as remarkable, both for its accuracy in predicting the observed optical transitions of one-electron atoms and for its failure to fully correspond with current electronic structure theory. What is not generally appreciated is that Bohr's original semiclassical conception differed significantly from the Bohr-Sommerfeld theory and offers an alternative semiclassical approximation scheme with remarkable attributes. More specifically, Bohr's original method did not impose action quantization constraints but rather obtained these as predictions by simply matching photon and classical orbital frequencies. In other words, the hydrogen atom was treated entirely classically and orbital quantized emerged directly from the Planck-Einstein photon quantization condition, E = h nu. Here, we revisit this early history of quantum theory and demonstrate the application of Bohr's original strategy to the three quintessential quantum systems: an electron in a box, an electron in a ring, and a dipolar harmonic oscillator. The usual energy-level spectra, and optical selection rules, emerge by solving an algebraic (quadratic) equation, rather than a Bohr-Sommerfeld integral (or Schroedinger) equation. However, the new predictions include a frozen (zero-kinetic-energy) state which in some (but not all) cases lies below the usual zero-point energy. In addition to raising provocative questions concerning the origin of quantum-chemical phenomena, the results may prove to be of pedagogical value in introducing students to quantum mechanics.

  16. Revisiting the sadomasochistic marriage: the paranoid-masochistic relationship.

    PubMed

    Mendelsohn, Robert

    2014-10-01

    The sadomasochistic marriage is thought to be very resistant to change because of the object relations of each member of a couple as well as the sadomasochistic dynamics within the couple. However, the picture may be even more complex because there are times when a psychoanalytic therapist may mistakenly believe he or she is treating a sadomasochistic couple when the couple actually is functioning in a paranoid-masochistic relationship. The present paper reexamines the sadomasochistic marriage by revisiting the work of Nydes, who formulated the concept of paranoid-masochism in individuals and contrasted it to the more commonly understood sadomasochist dynamic. This paper applies his concepts to couples: Just as we understand some couples to be sadomasochistic, other couples may have paranoid-masochistic dynamics, which may require a somewhat different kind of understanding and technical approach than the dynamics of a sadomasochistic couple at the same level of object relations. This may be the reason why some marriages, misdiagnosed as sadomasochistic, are even more difficult to treat than others, because they might be more accurately treated as paranoid-masochistic.

  17. Topological string theory revisited I: The stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Bei

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we reformulate topological string theory using supermanifolds and supermoduli spaces, following the approach worked out by Witten (Superstring perturbation theory revisited, arXiv:1209.5461). We intend to make the construction geometrical in nature, by using supergeometry techniques extensively. The goal is to establish the foundation of studying topological string amplitudes in terms of integration over appropriate supermoduli spaces.

  18. Revisiting the Regenerative Possibilities of Ortiz

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duques, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    The author of this article revisits Simon Ortiz's poem, "From Sand Creek," in which the latter can in so few words convey both the horrific tragedy of conquest and colonization, while at the same time find a space for possibility, a means for recovery that is never about forgetting but always occurs as a kind of recuperative remembering. Ortiz…

  19. The Future of Engineering Education--Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wankat, Phillip C.; Bullard, Lisa G.

    2016-01-01

    This paper revisits the landmark CEE series, "The Future of Engineering Education," published in 2000 (available free in the CEE archives on the internet) to examine the predictions made in the original paper as well as the tools and approaches documented. Most of the advice offered in the original series remains current. Despite new…

  20. Revisiting separation properties of convex fuzzy sets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Separation of convex sets by hyperplanes has been extensively studied on crisp sets. In a seminal paper separability and convexity are investigated, however there is a flaw on the definition of degree of separation. We revisited separation on convex fuzzy sets that have level-wise (crisp) disjointne...

  1. Revisiting Basic Counseling Skills with Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Velsor, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    Counseling with children can be challenging for counselors whose training focused on adult clients. The purpose of this article is to offer information to counselors seeking to improve their skills with children, revisiting a topic discussed in an earlier Journal of Counseling & Development article by P. Erdman and R. Lampe (1996). Examples of…

  2. The Rotating Morse-Pekeris Oscillator Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuniga, Jose; Bastida, Adolfo; Requena, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    The Morse-Pekeris oscillator model for the calculation of the vibration-rotation energy levels of diatomic molecules is revisited. This model is based on the realization of a second-order exponential expansion of the centrifugal term about the minimum of the vibrational Morse oscillator and the subsequent analytical resolution of the resulting…

  3. Phenomenology of n - n ¯ oscillations revisited

    DOE PAGES

    Gardner, S.; Jafari, E.

    2015-05-22

    We revisit the phenomenology of n-n¯ oscillations in the presence of external magnetic fields, highlighting the role of spin. We show, contrary to long-held belief, that the n-n¯ transition rate need not be suppressed, opening new opportunities for its empirical study.

  4. Revisiting the 1761 Transatlantic Tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baptista, Maria Ana; Wronna, Martin; Miranda, Jorge Miguel

    2016-04-01

    The tsunami catalogs of the Atlantic include two transatlantic tsunamis in the 18th century the well known 1st November 1755 and the 31st March 1761. The 31st March 1761 earthquake struck Portugal, Spain, and Morocco. The earthquake occurred around noontime in Lisbon alarming the inhabitants and throwing down ruins of the past 1st November 1755 earthquake. According to several sources, the earthquake was followed by a tsunami observed as far as Cornwall (United Kingdom), Cork (Ireland) and Barbados (Caribbean). The analysis of macroseismic information and its compatibility with tsunami travel time information led to a source area close to the Ampere Seamount with an estimated epicenter circa 34.5°N 13°W. The estimated magnitude of the earthquake was 8.5. In this study, we revisit the tsunami observations, and we include a report from Cadiz not used before. We use the results of the compilation of the multi-beam bathymetric data, that covers the area between 34°N - 38°N and 12.5°W - 5.5°W and use the recent tectonic map published for the Southwest Iberian Margin to select among possible source scenarios. Finally, we use a non-linear shallow water model that includes the discretization and explicit leap-frog finite difference scheme to solve the shallow water equations in the spherical or Cartesian coordinate to compute tsunami waveforms and tsunami inundation and check the results against the historical descriptions to infer the source of the event. This study received funding from project ASTARTE- Assessment Strategy and Risk Reduction for Tsunamis in Europe a collaborative project Grant 603839, FP7-ENV2013 6.4-3

  5. The flow along an external corner revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denier, Jim; Jewell, Nathaniel

    2013-11-01

    We revisit the problem of the flow of an almost inviscid fluid along an external corner made from the junction of two quarter infinite plates joined at an angle 0 < α < π / 2 . The structure of the boundary layer which develops along the corner is explored using a computational approach based upon a spectral element discretisation of the steady two-dimensional boundary-layer equations. We pay particular attention to the case when the angle α is small, thus approximating the semi-infinte quarter plate problem considered by Stewartson (1961) and recently revisited by Duck & Hewitt (2012). Our results, which demonstrate a thickening of the boundary-layer near the sharp corner, will be discussed in the context of the asymptotic theory developed in the aforementioned papers.

  6. The Actinide Transition Revisited by Gutzwiller Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenhu; Lanata, Nicola; Yao, Yongxin; Kotliar, Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    We revisit the problem of the actinide transition using the Gutzwiller approximation (GA) in combination with the local density approximation (LDA). In particular, we compute the equilibrium volumes of the actinide series and reproduce the abrupt change of density found experimentally near plutonium as a function of the atomic number. We discuss how this behavior relates with the electron correlations in the 5 f states, the lattice structure, and the spin-orbit interaction. Our results are in good agreement with the experiments.

  7. How to infer gene networks from expression profiles, revisited.

    PubMed

    Penfold, Christopher A; Wild, David L

    2011-12-01

    Inferring the topology of a gene-regulatory network (GRN) from genome-scale time-series measurements of transcriptional change has proved useful for disentangling complex biological processes. To address the challenges associated with this inference, a number of competing approaches have previously been used, including examples from information theory, Bayesian and dynamic Bayesian networks (DBNs), and ordinary differential equation (ODE) or stochastic differential equation. The performance of these competing approaches have previously been assessed using a variety of in silico and in vivo datasets. Here, we revisit this work by assessing the performance of more recent network inference algorithms, including a novel non-parametric learning approach based upon nonlinear dynamical systems. For larger GRNs, containing hundreds of genes, these non-parametric approaches more accurately infer network structures than do traditional approaches, but at significant computational cost. For smaller systems, DBNs are competitive with the non-parametric approaches with respect to computational time and accuracy, and both of these approaches appear to be more accurate than Granger causality-based methods and those using simple ODEs models.

  8. Sloan Digital Sky Survey Photometric Calibration Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marriner, J.

    2016-05-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey calibration is revisited to obtain the most accurate photometric calibration. A small but significant error is found in the flat-fielding of the Photometric telescope used for calibration. Two SDSS star catalogs are compared and the average difference in magnitude as a function of right ascension and declination exhibits small systematic errors in relative calibration. The photometric transformation from the SDSS Photometric Telescope to the 2.5 m telescope is recomputed and compared to synthetic magnitudes computed from measured filter bandpasses.

  9. Consistency of the triplet seesaw model revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonilla, Cesar; Fonseca, Renato M.; Valle, J. W. F.

    2015-10-01

    Adding a scalar triplet to the Standard Model is one of the simplest ways of giving mass to neutrinos, providing at the same time a mechanism to stabilize the theory's vacuum. In this paper, we revisit these aspects of the type-II seesaw model pointing out that the bounded-from-below conditions for the scalar potential in use in the literature are not correct. We discuss some scenarios where the correction can be significant and sketch the typical scalar boson profile expected by consistency.

  10. Revisiting the bell-jar demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caleon, Imelda; Subramaniam, R.; Regaya, Ma Hershey P.

    2013-03-01

    The familiar bell-jar demonstration, commonly used to show that sound cannot travel in a vacuum, is revisited in this study. It is suggested that by emphasizing the different media present in this set-up, sound propagation in near-vacuum conditions can be made possible. In this way, the concept of sound propagation in this set-up can be examined in a nuanced manner. In a study involving upper-secondary students, the set-up has also been found to be helpful in addressing a few alternative conceptions related to sound propagation.

  11. Sloan Digital Sky Survey Photometric Calibration Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Marriner, John; /Fermilab

    2012-06-29

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey calibration is revisited to obtain the most accurate photometric calibration. A small but significant error is found in the flat-fielding of the Photometric telescope used for calibration. Two SDSS star catalogs are compared and the average difference in magnitude as a function of right ascension and declination exhibits small systematic errors in relative calibration. The photometric transformation from the SDSS Photometric Telescope to the 2.5 m telescope is recomputed and compared to synthetic magnitudes computed from measured filter bandpasses.

  12. Revisiting the Master-Signifier, or, Mandela and Repression.

    PubMed

    Hook, Derek; Vanheule, Stijn

    2015-01-01

    The concept of the master-signifier has been subject to a variety of applications in Lacanian forms of political discourse theory and ideology critique. While there is much to be commended in literature of this sort, it often neglects salient issues pertaining to the role of master signifiers in the clinical domain of (individual) psychical economy. The popularity of the concept of the master (or "empty") signifier in political discourse analysis has thus proved a double-edged sword. On the one hand it demonstrates how crucial psychical processes are performed via the operations of the signifier, extending thus the Lacanian thesis that identification is the outcome of linguistic and symbolic as opposed to merely psychological processes. On the other, the use of the master signifier concept within the political realm to track discursive formations tends to distance the term from the dynamics of the unconscious and operation of repression. Accordingly, this paper revisits the master signifier concept, and does so within the socio-political domain, yet while paying particular attention to the functioning of unconscious processes of fantasy and repression. More specifically, it investigates how Nelson Mandela operates as a master signifier in contemporary South Africa, as a vital means of knitting together diverse elements of post-apartheid society, enabling the fantasy of the post-apartheid nation, and holding at bay a whole series of repressed and negated undercurrents. PMID:26834664

  13. Revisiting the Master-Signifier, or, Mandela and Repression

    PubMed Central

    Hook, Derek; Vanheule, Stijn

    2016-01-01

    The concept of the master-signifier has been subject to a variety of applications in Lacanian forms of political discourse theory and ideology critique. While there is much to be commended in literature of this sort, it often neglects salient issues pertaining to the role of master signifiers in the clinical domain of (individual) psychical economy. The popularity of the concept of the master (or “empty”) signifier in political discourse analysis has thus proved a double-edged sword. On the one hand it demonstrates how crucial psychical processes are performed via the operations of the signifier, extending thus the Lacanian thesis that identification is the outcome of linguistic and symbolic as opposed to merely psychological processes. On the other, the use of the master signifier concept within the political realm to track discursive formations tends to distance the term from the dynamics of the unconscious and operation of repression. Accordingly, this paper revisits the master signifier concept, and does so within the socio-political domain, yet while paying particular attention to the functioning of unconscious processes of fantasy and repression. More specifically, it investigates how Nelson Mandela operates as a master signifier in contemporary South Africa, as a vital means of knitting together diverse elements of post-apartheid society, enabling the fantasy of the post-apartheid nation, and holding at bay a whole series of repressed and negated undercurrents. PMID:26834664

  14. Revisit an old problem -- Complexation between DNA and PEI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chi

    2009-03-01

    After revisiting the captioned problem by using a combination of chemical synthesis and physical methods, we studied the dynamics of the complexation between branched polyethyleneimine (bPEI) and plasmid DNA (pDNA) and characterized the structure, size and surface charge of the resultant DNA/PEI complexes (polyplexes). As expected, in order to reach a high efficiency in gene transfection into cells it is necessary to use a higher N:P ratio and make the polyplexes positively charged. Our results reveal that it is those uncomplexed bPEI chains free in the solution mixture that plays a vitally important role in enhancing the transfection efficiency, inspiring new thinking of how to correlate in vitro and in vivo studies so that we can improve the in vivo transfection efficiency. Increasing the N:P ratio normally results in a higher cytotoxicity, which is a catch-22 problem. Recently, we found that a proper modification of bPEI can greatly reduce its cytotoxicity without any suffering in the transfection efficiency. In this lecture, we will show that our properly modified bPEI is even much more effective and less cytotoxic in the gene transfection than those commercially available lipoflexes. Our recent breakthrough leads to a complete new direction in the development of non-viral vectors for molecular medicines, including gene transfection.

  15. Transonic Flow Around Swept Wings: Revisiting Von Karman's Similarity Rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkman, Jeffrey J.

    Modern aircraft are expected to fly faster and more efficiently than their predecessors. To improve aerodynamic efficiency, designers must carefully consider and handle shock wave formation. Presently, many designers utilize computationally heavy optimization methods to design wings. While these methods may work, they do not provide insight. This thesis aims to better understand fundamental methods that govern wing design. In order to further understand the flow in the transonic regime, this work revisits the Transonic Similarity Rule. This rule postulates an equivalent incompressible geometry to any high speed geometry in flight and postulates a "stretching" analogy. This thesis utilizes panel methods and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to show that the "stretching" analogy is incorrect, but instead the flow is transformed by a nonlinear "scaling" of the flow velocity. This work also presents data to show the discrepancies between many famous authors in deriving the accurate Critical Pressure Coefficient (Cp*) equation for both swept and unswept wing sections. The final work of the thesis aims to identify the correct predictive methods for the Critical Pressure Coefficient.

  16. The pollen tube paradigm revisited.

    PubMed

    Kroeger, Jens; Geitmann, Anja

    2012-12-01

    The polar growth process characterizing pollen tube elongation has attracted numerous modeling attempts over the past years. While initial models focused on recreating the correct cellular geometry, recent models are increasingly based on experimentally assessed cellular parameters such as the dynamics of signaling processes and the mechanical properties of the cell wall. Recent modeling attempts have therefore substantially gained in biological relevance and predictive power. Different modeling methods are explained and the power and limitations of individual models are compared. Focus is on several recent models that use closed feedback loops in order to generate limit cycles representing the oscillatory behavior observed in growing tubes. PMID:23000432

  17. Planets of β Pictoris revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freistetter, F.; Krivov, A. V.; Löhne, T.

    2007-04-01

    Observations have revealed a large variety of structures (global asymmetries, warps, belts, rings) and dynamical phenomena ("falling-evaporating bodies" or FEBs, the "β Pic dust stream") in the disk of β Pictoris, most of which may indicate the presence of one or more planets orbiting the star. Because planets of β Pic have not been detected by observations yet, we use dynamical simulations to find "numerical evidence" for a planetary system. We show that one planet at 12 AU with a mass of 2 to 5 MJ and an eccentricity ⪉ 0.1 can probably already account for three major features (main warp, two inner belts, FEBs) observed in the β Pic disk. The existence of at least two additional planets at about 25 AU and 45 AU from the star seems likely. We find rather strong upper limits of 0.6 MJ and 0.2 MJ on the masses of those planets. The same planets could, in principle, also account for the outer rings observed at 500-800 AU.

  18. Fluidmechanics of semicircular canals revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obrist, Dominik

    2008-05-01

    In this work we find the exact solution for the flow field in a semicircular canal which is the main sensor for angular motion in the human body. When the head is rotated the inertia of the fluid in the semicircular canal leads to a deflection of sensory hair cells which are part of a gelatinous structure called cupula. A modal expansion of the governing equation shows that the semicircular organ can be understood as a dynamic system governed by duct modes and a single cupular mode. We use this result to derive an explicit expression for the displacement of the cupula as a function of the angular motion of the head. This result shows in a mathematically and physically clean way that the semicircular canal is a transducer for angular velocity.

  19. The Mathematics of Dispatchability, Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Dispatchability is an important property for the efficient execution of temporal plans where the temporal constraints are represented as a Simple Temporal Network (STN). It has been shown that every STN may be reformulated as a dispatchable STN, and dispatchability ensures that the temporal constraints need only be satisfied locally during execution. Recently, it has also been shown that Simple Temporal Networks with Uncertainty, augmented with wait edges, are Dynamically Controllable provided every projection is dispatchable. Thus, dispatchability has considerable theoretical as well as practical significance. One thing that hampers further work in this area is the underdeveloped theory. Moreover, the existing foundation is inadequate in certain respects. In this paper, we develop a new mathematical theory of dispatchability and its relationship to execution. We also provide several characterizations of dispatchability, including characterizations in terms of the structural properties of the STN graph. This facilitates the potential application of the theory to other areas.

  20. The Mathematics of Dispatchability Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Dispatchability is an important property for the efficient execution of temporal plans where the temporal constraints are represented as a Simple Temporal Network (STN). It has been shown that every STN may be reformulated as a dispatchable STN, and dispatchability ensures that the temporal constraints need only be satisfied locally during execution. Recently it has also been shown that Simple Temporal Networks with Uncertainty, augmented with wait edges, are Dynamically Controllable provided every projection is dispatchable. Thus, the dispatchability property has both theoretical and practical interest. One thing that hampers further work in this area is the underdeveloped theory. The existing definitions are expressed in terms of algorithms, and are less suitable for mathematical proofs. In this paper, we develop a new formal theory of dispatchability in terms of execution sequences. We exploit this to prove a characterization of dispatchability involving the structural properties of the STN graph. This facilitates the potential application of the theory to uncertainty reasoning.

  1. Lower hybrid wavepacket stochasticity revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, V.; Krlín, L.; Pánek, R.; Preinhaelter, J.; Seidl, J.; Urban, J.

    2014-02-12

    Analysis is presented in support of the explanation in Ref. [1] for the observation of relativistic electrons during Lower Hybrid (LH) operation in EC pre-heated plasma at the WEGA stellarator [1,2]. LH power from the WEGA TE11 circular waveguide, 9 cm diameter, un-phased, 2.45 GHz antenna, is radiated into a B≅0.5 T, Ðœ„n{sub e}≅5×10{sup 17} 1/m{sup 3} plasma at T{sub e}≅10 eV bulk temperature with an EC generated 50 keV component [1]. The fast electrons cycle around flux or drift surfaces with few collisions, sufficient for randomizing phases but insufficient for slowing fast electrons down, and thus repeatedly interact with the rf field close to the antenna mouth, gaining energy in the process. Our antenna calculations reveal a standing electric field pattern at the antenna mouth, with which we formulate the electron dynamics via a relativistic Hamiltonian. A simple approximation of the equations of motion leads to a relativistic generalization of the area-preserving Fermi-Ulam (F-U) map [3], allowing phase-space global stochasticity analysis. At typical WEGA plasma and antenna conditions, the F-U map predicts an LH driven current of about 230 A, at about 225 W of dissipated power, in good agreement with the measurements and analysis reported in [1].

  2. Origins of Hot Jupiters, Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batygin, Konstantin; Bodenheimer, Peter; Laughlin, Greg

    2015-12-01

    Hot Jupiters, giant extrasolar planets with orbital periods less than ~10 days, have long been thought to form at large radial distances (a > 2AU) in protostellar disks, only to subsequently experience large-scale inward migration to the small orbital radii at which they are observed. Here, we propose that a substantial fraction of the hot Jupiter population forms in situ, with the Galactically prevalent short-period super-Earths acting as the source population. Our calculations suggest that under conditions appropriate to the inner regions of protostellar disks, rapid gas accretion can be initiated for solid cores of 10-20 Earth masses, in line with the conventional picture of core-nucleated accretion. This formation scenario leads to testable consequences, including the expectation that hot Jupiters should frequently be accompanied by additional planets, reminiscent of those observed in large numbers by NASA’s Kepler Mission and Doppler velocity surveys. However, dynamical interactions during the early stages of planetary systems' evolutionary lifetimes tend to increase the mutual inclinations of exterior, low-mass companions to hot Jupiters, making transits rare. High-precision radial velocity monitoring provides the best prospect for their detection.

  3. Astrosociological Implications of Astrobiology (Revisited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pass, Jim

    2010-01-01

    Supporters of astrobiology continue to organize the field around formalized associations and organizations under the guise of the so-called ``hard'' sciences (e.g., biology and the related physical/natural sciences). The so-called ``soft'' sciences-including sociology and the other social sciences, the behavioral sciences, and the humanities-remain largely separated from this dynamically growing field. However, as argued in this paper, space exploration involving the search for extraterrestrial life should be viewed as consisting of two interrelated parts (i.e., two sides of the same coin): astrobiology and astrosociology. Together, these two fields broadly combine the two major branches of science as they relate to the relationship between human life and alien life, as appropriate. Moreover, with a formalized system of collaboration, these two complimentary fields would also focus on the implications of their research to human beings as well as their cultures and social structures. By placing the astrosociological implications of astrobiology at a high enough priority, scientists interested in the search for alien life can augment their focus to include the social, cultural, and behavioral implications that were always associated with their work (yet previously overlooked or understated, and too often misunderstood). Recognition of the astrosociological implications expands our perception about alien life by creating a new emphasis on their ramifications to human life on Earth.

  4. Friction and anchorage loading revisited.

    PubMed

    Dholakia, Kartik D

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary concepts of sliding mechanics explain that friction is inevitable. To overcome this frictional resistance, excess force is required to retract the tooth along the archwire (ie, individual retraction of canines, en masse retraction of anterior teeth), in addition to the amount of force required for tooth movement. The anterior tooth retraction force, in addition to excess force (to overcome friction), produces reciprocal protraction force on molars, thereby leading to increased anchorage loading. However, this traditional concept was challenged in recent literature, which was based on the finite element model, but did not bear correlation to the clinical scenario. This article will reinforce the fact that clinically, friction increases anchorage loading in all three planes of space, considering the fact that tooth movement is a quasistatic process rather than a purely continuous or static one, and that conventional ways of determining the effects of static or dynamic friction on anchorage load cannot be applied to clinical situations (which consist of anatomical resistance units and a complex muscular force system). The article does not aim to quantify friction and its effect on the amount of anchorage load. Rather, a new perspective regarding the role of various additional factors (which is not explained by contemporary concept) that may influence friction and anchorage loading is provided..

  5. Dynamics of the Zeraoulia-Sprott Map Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guanrong; Kudryashova, Elena V.; Kuznetsov, Nikolay V.; Leonov, Gennady A.

    2016-06-01

    In the paper “Some Open Problems in Chaos Theory and Dynamics” by Zeraoulia and Sprott, the two-dimensional map (x,y)↦(‑ax(1 + y2)‑1,x + by) was considered and the problem on the analytical study of the boundedness of its attractors was formulated. In the present paper, the boundedness of its attractors is studied, the corresponding analytical estimation of absorbing set is obtained, and thus an answer to the problem is given.

  6. Radical Change Revisited: Dynamic Digital Age Books for Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dresang, Eliza T.

    2008-01-01

    Radical change, a theory described in Eliza Dresang's 1999 book, "Radical Change: Books for Youth in a Digital Age," was developed in the mid-1990s. It serves as a lens through which to examine, explain, and ultimately, use contemporary literature for youth growing up in the Digital Age. It identifies changes in forms and formats,…

  7. Oscillatory dynamics of Gestalt perception in schizophrenia revisited

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Kevin M.; Ghorashi, Shahab

    2014-01-01

    Background: Abnormalities in γ oscillations (30–100 Hz) in the scalp-recorded electroencephalogram (EEG) have been proposed to reflect neural circuitry abnormalities in schizophrenia. Oscillations in the γ band are thought to play an important role in visual perception, mediating the binding of visual features into coherent objects. However, there is relatively little evidence to date of deficits in γ-mediated processes associated with Gestalt perception in schizophrenia. Methods: Fourteen healthy control subjects (HC) and 17 chronic schizophrenia patients (SZ) discriminated between illusory Kanisza Squares and No-Square control stimuli, indicating their judgment with a manual button press. Time-frequency decomposition of the EEG was computed with the Morlet wavelet transform. Time-frequency maps of phase locking factor (PLF) values were calculated for stimulus- and response-locked oscillations. Results: HC and SZ did not differ in reaction time, error rate, an early ERP effect associated with Gestalt processing, nor an early visual-evoked γ oscillation. Two response-locked high γ effects had greater PLF for Square than No-Square stimuli in HC, and the reverse pattern in SZ. One of these effects was correlated with thought disorder symptom ratings in SZ. Conclusions: SZ demonstrated abnormalities in γ oscillations associated with the perception of Gestalt objects, while their early visual-evoked γ activity was mostly normal, contrary to previous results. This study supports the hypothesis that high-frequency oscillations are sensitive to aspects of psychosis. PMID:24550878

  8. Revisits within 48 Hours to a Thai Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Nithimathachoke, Adisak; Tirrell, Gregory Philip; Surawongwattana, Sataporn; Liu, Shan Woo

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Emergency department (ED) revisits are a common ED quality measure. This study was undertaken to ascertain the contributing factors of revisits within 48 hours to a Thai ED and to explore physician-related, illness-related, and patient-related factors behind those revisits. Methods. This study was a chart review from one tertiary care, urban Thai hospital from October 1, 2009, to September 31, 2010. We identified patients who returned to the ED within 48 hours for the same or related complaints after their initial discharge. Three physicians classified revisit as physician-related, illness-related, and patient-related factors. Results. Our study included 172 ED patients' charts. 86/172 (50%) were male and the mean age was 38 ± 5.6 (SD) years. The ED revisits contributing factors were physician-related factors [86/172 (50.0%)], illness-related factors [61/172 (35.5%)], and patient-related factor [25/172 (14.5%)], respectively. Among revisits classified as physician-related factors, 40/86 (46.5%) revisits were due to misdiagnosis and 36/86 (41.9%) were due to suboptimal management. Abdominal pain [27/86 (31.4%)] was the majority of physician-related chief complaints, followed by fever [16/86 (18.6%)] and dyspnea [15/86 (17.4%)]. Conclusion. Misdiagnosis and suboptimal management contributed to half of the 48-hour repeat ED visits in this Thai hospital. PMID:27478642

  9. Ebola revisited: lessons in managing global epidemics.

    PubMed

    Boulton, Jacqueline

    The latest statistics for the number of new cases of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in West Africa point to the near containment of the virus. While the current threat will not be deemed over until 42 days after the last case to be diagnosed has twice tested negative, there is now a shift in focus from an emphasis on containment to that of policy review and capacity building in light of lessons learned. This article primarily focuses on Sierra Leone. It revisits the issues surrounding the epidemic, seeking to summarise both the negative and positive aspects of the response at local and global levels, as well as highlights fresh perspectives from healthcare workers in the field for the management of similar epidemics.

  10. Electron heating in capacitively coupled plasmas revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafleur, T.; Chabert, P.; Booth, J. P.

    2014-06-01

    We revisit the problem of electron heating in capacitively coupled plasmas (CCPs), and propose a method for quantifying the level of collisionless and collisional heating in plasma simulations. The proposed procedure, based on the electron mechanical energy conservation equation, is demonstrated with particle-in-cell simulations of a number of single and multi-frequency CCPs operated in regimes of research and industrial interest. In almost all cases tested, the total electron heating is comprised of collisional (ohmic) and pressure heating parts. This latter collisionless component is in qualitative agreement with the mechanism of electron heating predicted from the recent re-evaluation of theoretical models. Finally, in very electrically asymmetric plasmas produced in multi-frequency discharges, we observe an additional collisionless heating mechanism associated with electron inertia.

  11. Revisiting weighted stego-image steganalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ker, Andrew D.; Böhme, Rainer

    2008-02-01

    This paper revisits the steganalysis method involving a Weighted Stego-Image (WS) for estimating LSB replacement payload sizes in digital images. It suggests new WS estimators, upgrading the method's three components: cover pixel prediction, least-squares weighting, and bias correction. Wide-ranging experimental results (over two million total attacks) based on images from multiple sources and pre-processing histories show that the new methods produce greatly improved accuracy, to the extent that they outperform even the best of the structural detectors, while avoiding their high complexity. Furthermore, specialised WS estimators can be derived for detection of sequentially-placed payload: they offer levels of accuracy orders of magnitude better than their competitors.

  12. Thermocapillary instabilities in liquid bridges revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhkov, Ilya I.

    2011-08-01

    The study of convective thermocapillary instabilities in liquid bridges [J. J. Xu and S. H. Davis, Phys. Fluids 27(5), 1102 (1984)] is revisited. A new branch of neutral mode m = 1 is found. The previously reported results are confirmed in the range of low Prandtl numbers. It is shown that for large Prandtl numbers, the flow becomes unstable at much smaller values of the Marangoni number than it was reported previously. The calculations are performed for adiabatic and heat conductive free surface. In both cases, the critical mode is m = 1. The previously reported change of critical mode from m = 1 to m = 0 with increasing the Prandtl number is not confirmed. The corrected results provide a better agreement with the experimental data.

  13. Revisiting R-invariant direct gauge mediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Cheng-Wei; Harigaya, Keisuke; Ibe, Masahiro; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.

    2016-03-01

    We revisit a special model of gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking, the " R-invariant direct gauge mediation." We pay particular attention to whether the model is consistent with the minimal model of the μ-term, i.e., a simple mass term of the Higgs doublets in the superpotential. Although the incompatibility is highlighted in view of the current experimental constraints on the superparticle masses and the observed Higgs boson mass, the minimal μ-term can be consistent with the R-invariant gauge mediation model via a careful choice of model parameters. We derive an upper limit on the gluino mass from the observed Higgs boson mass. We also discuss whether the model can explain the 3 σ excess of the Z + jets + E T miss events reported by the ATLAS collaboration.

  14. Revisiting the R νMDM models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yi; Schmidt, Michael A.

    2016-05-01

    Combining neutrino mass generation and a dark matter candidate in a unified model has always been intriguing. We revisit the class of R νMDM models, which incorporate minimal dark matter in radiative neutrino mass models based on the one-loop ultraviolet completions of the Weinberg operator. The possibility of an exact accidental Z 2 is completely ruled out in this scenario. We study the phenomenology of one of the models with an approximate Z 2 symmetry. In addition to the Standard Model particles, it contains two real scalar quintuplets, one vector-like quadruplet fermion and a fermionic quintuplet. The neutral component of the fermionic quintuplet serves as a good dark matter candidate which can be tested by the future direct and indirect detection experiments. The constraints from flavor physics and electroweak-scale naturalness are also discussed.

  15. Seasonal dating of Sappho's 'Midnight Poem' revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuntz, Manfred; Gurdemir, Levent; George, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Sappho was a Greek lyric poet who composed a significant array of pristine poetry. Although much of it has been lost, her reputation has endured thanks to numerous surviving fragments. One of her contributions includes the so-called 'Midnight Poem', which contains a line about the Pleiades, setting sometime before midnight, and supposedly observed from the island of Lesbos. This poem also refers to the setting of the Moon. Sappho's Midnight Poem thus represents a prime example of where ancient poetry and astronomy merge, and it also offers the possibility of seasonal dating. Previously, Herschberg and Mebius (1990) estimated that the poem was composed in late winter/early spring, a time frame that is not unusual for lyrics of an amorous nature. The aim of our paper is to revisit this earlier finding by using modern-day software. Our study confirms Herschberg and Mebius' result, but also conveys further information.

  16. Seeing the unseen: Charles Bonnet syndrome revisited.

    PubMed

    Nair, Aditya Gopinathan; Nair, Akshay Gopinathan; Shah, Bharat R; Gandhi, Rashmin Anilkumar

    2015-09-01

    Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS) is a rare condition that encompasses three clinical features: complex visual hallucinations, ocular pathology causing visual deterioration, and preserved cognitive status. Common associated ocular pathologies include age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, and cataracts. Several theories have been proposed to try to explain the visual hallucinations. However, the pathophysiology remains poorly understood, and treatment is largely based on anecdotal data. The lack of awareness of CBS among medical professionals often leads to inappropriate diagnosis and medication. In a country like India, where awareness of mental health is not widespread, cultural myths and stigma prevent patients from seeking professional help. Here we describe two cases of CBS and revisit different ocular morbidities that have been reported to occur in conjunction with CBS. Psychiatrists and ophthalmologists alike must be sensitive to this clinical condition to ensure prompt diagnosis and treatment.

  17. Re-visiting the electrophysiology of language.

    PubMed

    Obleser, Jonas

    2015-09-01

    This editorial accompanies a special issue of Brain and Language re-visiting old themes and new leads in the electrophysiology of language. The event-related potential (ERP) as a series of characteristic deflections ("components") over time and their distribution on the scalp has been exploited by speech and language researchers over decades to find support for diverse psycholinguistic models. Fortunately, methodological and statistical advances have allowed human neuroscience to move beyond some of the limitations imposed when looking at the ERP only. Most importantly, we currently witness a refined and refreshed look at "event-related" (in the literal sense) brain activity that relates itself more closely to the actual neurobiology of speech and language processes. It is this imminent change in handling and interpreting electrophysiological data of speech and language experiments that this special issue intends to capture.

  18. The Species Problem in Myxomycetes Revisited.

    PubMed

    Walker, Laura M; Stephenson, Steven L

    2016-08-01

    Species identification in the myxomycetes (plasmodial slime molds or myxogastrids) poses particular challenges to researchers as a result of their morphological plasticity and frequent alteration between sexual and asexual life strategies. Traditionally, myxomycete morphology has been used as the primary method of species delimitation. However, with the increasing availability of genetic information, traditional myxomycete taxonomy is being increasingly challenged, and new hypotheses continue to emerge. Due to conflicts that sometimes occur between traditional and more modern species concepts that are based largely on molecular data, there is a pressing need to revisit the discussion surrounding the species concept used for myxomycetes. Biological diversity is being increasingly studied with molecular methods and data accumulates at ever-faster rates, making resolution of this matter urgent. In this review, currently used and potentially useful species concepts (biological, morphological, phylogenetic and ecological) are reviewed, and an integrated approach to resolve the myxomycete species problem is discussed. PMID:27351595

  19. Quantization of the nonlinear sigma model revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Timothy

    2016-08-01

    We revisit the subject of perturbatively quantizing the nonlinear sigma model in two dimensions from a rigorous, mathematical point of view. Our main contribution is to make precise the cohomological problem of eliminating potential anomalies that may arise when trying to preserve symmetries under quantization. The symmetries we consider are twofold: (i) diffeomorphism covariance for a general target manifold; (ii) a transitive group of isometries when the target manifold is a homogeneous space. We show that there are no anomalies in case (i) and that (ii) is also anomaly-free under additional assumptions on the target homogeneous space, in agreement with the work of Friedan. We carry out some explicit computations for the O(N)-model. Finally, we show how a suitable notion of the renormalization group establishes the Ricci flow as the one loop renormalization group flow of the nonlinear sigma model.

  20. Predator-prey interactions, resource depression and patch revisitation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erwin, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    Generalist predators may be confronted by different types of prey in different patches: sedentary and conspicuous, cryptic (with or without refugia), conspicuous and nonsocial, or conspicuous and social. I argue that, where encounter rates with prey are of most importance, patch revisitation should be a profitable tactic where prey have short 'recovery' times (conspicuous, nonsocial prey), or where anti-predator response (e.g. shoaling) may increase conspicuousness. Predictions are made for how temporal changes in prey encounter rates should affect revisit schedules and feeding rates for the 4 different prey types.

  1. Revisiting the phase diagram of hard ellipsoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odriozola, Gerardo

    2012-04-01

    In this work, the well-known Frenkel-Mulder phase diagram of hard ellipsoids of revolution [D. Frenkel and B. M. Mulder, Mol. Phys. 55, 1171 (1985), 10.1080/00268978500101971] is revisited by means of replica exchange Monte Carlo simulations. The method provides good sampling of dense systems and so, solid phases can be accessed without the need of imposing a given structure. At high densities, we found plastic solids and fcc-like crystals for semi-spherical ellipsoids (prolates and oblates), and SM2 structures [P. Pfleiderer and T. Schilling, Phys. Rev. E 75, 020402 (2007)] for x : 1-prolates and 1 : x-oblates with x ≥ 3. The revised fluid-crystal and isotropic-nematic transitions reasonably agree with those presented in the Frenkel-Mulder diagram. An interesting result is that, for small system sizes (100 particles), we obtained 2:1- and 1.5:1-prolate equations of state without transitions, while some order is developed at large densities. Furthermore, the symmetric oblate cases are also reluctant to form ordered phases.

  2. Structural sensitivity of biological models revisited.

    PubMed

    Cordoleani, Flora; Flora, Cordoleani; Nerini, David; David, Nerini; Gauduchon, Mathias; Mathias, Gauduchon; Morozov, Andrew; Andrew, Morozov; Poggiale, Jean-Christophe; Jean-Christophe, Poggiale

    2011-08-21

    Enhancing the predictive power of models in biology is a challenging issue. Among the major difficulties impeding model development and implementation are the sensitivity of outcomes to variations in model parameters, the problem of choosing of particular expressions for the parametrization of functional relations, and difficulties in validating models using laboratory data and/or field observations. In this paper, we revisit the phenomenon which is referred to as structural sensitivity of a model. Structural sensitivity arises as a result of the interplay between sensitivity of model outcomes to variations in parameters and sensitivity to the choice of model functions, and this can be somewhat of a bottleneck in improving the models predictive power. We provide a rigorous definition of structural sensitivity and we show how we can quantify the degree of sensitivity of a model based on the Hausdorff distance concept. We propose a simple semi-analytical test of structural sensitivity in an ODE modeling framework. Furthermore, we emphasize the importance of directly linking the variability of field/experimental data and model predictions, and we demonstrate a way of assessing the robustness of modeling predictions with respect to data sampling variability. As an insightful illustrative example, we test our sensitivity analysis methods on a chemostat predator-prey model, where we use laboratory data on the feeding of protozoa to parameterize the predator functional response.

  3. [What mirror neurons have revealed: revisited].

    PubMed

    Murata, Akira; Maeda, Kazutaka

    2014-06-01

    The first paper on mirror neurons was published in 1992. In the span of over two decades since then, much knowledge about the relationship between social cognitive function and the motor control system has been accumulated. Direct matching of visual actions and their corresponding motor representations is the most important functional property of mirror neuron. Many studies have emphasized intrinsic simulation as a core concept for mirror neurons. Mirror neurons are thought to play a role in social cognitive function. However, the function of mirror neurons in the macaque remains unclear, because such cognitive functions are limited or lacking in macaque monkeys. It is therefore important to discuss these neurons in the context of motor function. Rizzolatti and colleagues have stressed that the most important function of mirror neurons in macaques is recognition of actions performed by other individuals. I suggest that mirror neurons in the Macaque inferior pariental lobule might be correlated with body schema. In the parieto-premotor network, matching of corollary discharge and actual sensory feedback is an essential neuronal operation. Recently, neurons showing mirror properties were found in some cortical areas outside the mirror neuron system. The current work would revisit the outcomes of mirror neuron studies to discuss the function of mirror neurons in the monkey.

  4. Revisiting the Anatomy of the Living Heart.

    PubMed

    Mori, Shumpei; Spicer, Diane E; Anderson, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of the complexity of cardiac anatomy is required by all who seek, in the setting of cardiac disease, to interpret the images confronting them. Although the mysteries of cardiac structure have been extensively addressed, significant gaps continue to exist between the descriptions provided by morphologists and by those working in the clinical setting. In part, this reflects the limitations in providing 3D visualization of such a complicated organ. Current 3D imaging technology now permits visualization of the cardiac components using datasets obtained in the living individual. These advances, furthermore, demonstrate the anatomy in the setting of the heart as imaged within the thorax. It has been failure to describe the heart as it lies within the thorax that remains a major deficiency of many morphologists relying on the dissecting room to provide the gold standard. Describing the heart in attitudinally appropriate fashion, a basic rule of clinical anatomy, creates the necessary bridges between anatomists and clinicians. The rapid progression of cardiac interventional techniques, furthermore, emphasizes the need to revisit cardiac anatomy using a multidisciplinary approach. In this review, therefore, we illustrate the advantages of an attitudinally correct approach to cardiac anatomy. We then focus on the morphology of the arterial roots, revealing the accuracy that can now be achieved by clinicians using datasets obtained during life.

  5. Carbon emission from global hydroelectric reservoirs revisited.

    PubMed

    Li, Siyue; Zhang, Quanfa

    2014-12-01

    Substantial greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from hydropower reservoirs have been of great concerns recently, yet the significant carbon emitters of drawdown area and reservoir downstream (including spillways and turbines as well as river reaches below dams) have not been included in global carbon budget. Here, we revisit GHG emission from hydropower reservoirs by considering reservoir surface area, drawdown zone and reservoir downstream. Our estimates demonstrate around 301.3 Tg carbon dioxide (CO2)/year and 18.7 Tg methane (CH4)/year from global hydroelectric reservoirs, which are much higher than recent observations. The sum of drawdown and downstream emission, which is generally overlooked, represents 42 % CO2 and 67 % CH4 of the total emissions from hydropower reservoirs. Accordingly, the global average emissions from hydropower are estimated to be 92 g CO2/kWh and 5.7 g CH4/kWh. Nonetheless, global hydroelectricity could currently reduce approximate 2,351 Tg CO2eq/year with respect to fuel fossil plant alternative. The new findings show a substantial revision of carbon emission from the global hydropower reservoirs.

  6. Carbon emission from global hydroelectric reservoirs revisited.

    PubMed

    Li, Siyue; Zhang, Quanfa

    2014-12-01

    Substantial greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from hydropower reservoirs have been of great concerns recently, yet the significant carbon emitters of drawdown area and reservoir downstream (including spillways and turbines as well as river reaches below dams) have not been included in global carbon budget. Here, we revisit GHG emission from hydropower reservoirs by considering reservoir surface area, drawdown zone and reservoir downstream. Our estimates demonstrate around 301.3 Tg carbon dioxide (CO2)/year and 18.7 Tg methane (CH4)/year from global hydroelectric reservoirs, which are much higher than recent observations. The sum of drawdown and downstream emission, which is generally overlooked, represents 42 % CO2 and 67 % CH4 of the total emissions from hydropower reservoirs. Accordingly, the global average emissions from hydropower are estimated to be 92 g CO2/kWh and 5.7 g CH4/kWh. Nonetheless, global hydroelectricity could currently reduce approximate 2,351 Tg CO2eq/year with respect to fuel fossil plant alternative. The new findings show a substantial revision of carbon emission from the global hydropower reservoirs. PMID:24943886

  7. The Sakharov Experiment Revisited for Granular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogler, Tracy

    2013-06-01

    Sakharov and co-workers in 1965 proposed an experiment in which a sinusoidal perturbation in a planar wave evolves as it travels through a material. More recent, Liu and co-workers utilized gas gun techniques rather than explosives to drive the shock wave, resulting in a better defined input. The technique has been applied to liquids such as water and mercury as well as solids such as aluminum. All analyses of the experiments conducted to date have utilized a viscous fluid approach, even for the solids. Here, the concept of the decay of a perturbation in a shock wave is revisited and applied to granular materials. Simulations utilizing continuum models for the granular materials as well as mesoscale models in which individual particles are resolved are utilized. It is found that the perturbation decay is influenced by the strength (deviatoric behavior) used in the continuum model. In the mesocale calculations, the simulation parameters as well as the computational approach influence the results. Finally, initial experimental results for the technique using granular tungsten carbide are presented. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin company, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  8. Revisiting the survival mnemonic effect in children.

    PubMed

    Pand eirada, Josefa N S; Pires, Luísa; Soares, Sandra C

    2014-01-01

    The survival processing paradigm is designed to explore the adaptive nature of memory functioning. The mnemonic advantage of processing information in fitness-relevant contexts, as has been demonstrated using this paradigm, is now well established, particularly in young adults; this phenomenon is often referred to as the "survival processing effect." In the current experiment, we revisited the investigation of this effect in children and tested it in a new cultural group, using a procedure that differs from the existing studies with children. A group of 40 Portuguese children rated the relevance of unrelated words to a survival and a new moving scenario. This encoding task was followed by a surprise free-recall task. Akin to what is typically found, survival processing produced better memory performance than the control condition (moving). These data put on firmer ground the idea that a mnemonic tuning to fitness-relevant encodings is present early in development. The theoretical importance of this result to the adaptive memory literature is discussed, as well as potential practical implications of this kind of approach to the study of memory in children.

  9. Role of iron in synthetic tetrahedrites revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasonova, Daria I.; Presniakov, Igor A.; Sobolev, Alexei V.; Verchenko, Valeriy Yu.; Tsirlin, Alexander A.; Wei, Zheng; Dikarev, Evgeny V.; Shevelkov, Andrei V.

    2016-10-01

    The valence state of iron in Cu12-xFexSb4S13 tetrahedrites have been revisited by the combination of the crystallographic results, Mössbauer spectroscopy, and magnetization measurements. The crystal structure solution for Cu11.0Fe1.0Sb4S13 (space group I 4 bar 3m, a=10.3253(12), z=2, R=0.011) proved that iron substitutes for copper only in the Cu1 position. At the iron content of x=0.8, 1.0, and 1.2, the presence of two nonequivalent and non-interacting Fe3+ cations was inferred from Mössbauer spectra. At higher levels of substitution (x=1.5 and 2.0), room-temperature Mössbauer spectra indicate the electron hopping between part of Fe3+ and Fe2+ centers, whereas the rest of iron atoms exists as valence-localized Fe3+ and Fe2+ cations. Electron transfer is frozen out at 77 K, where a combination of two Fe3+ sites and one high-spin Fe2+ site is observed. Paramagnetic effective moments extracted from the magnetic susceptibility data point at the Fe3+ state of iron at x=0.8, while a mixture of Fe2+ and Fe3+ is presumed in the samples with higher Fe content.

  10. Scaling Relationships for Spherical Polymer Brushes Revisited.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guang; Li, Hao; Das, Siddhartha

    2016-06-16

    In this short paper, we revisit the scaling relationships for spherical polymer brushes (SPBs), i.e., polymer brushes grafted to rigid, spherical particles. Considering that the brushes can be described to be encased in a series of hypothetical spherical blobs, we identify significant physical discrepancies in the model of Daoud and Cotton (Journal of Physics, 1982), which is considered to be the state of the art in scaling modeling of SPBs. We establish that the "brush" configuration of the polymer molecules forming the SPBs is possible only if the swelling ratio (which is the ratio of the end-to-end length of the blob-encased polymer segment to the corresponding coil-like polymer segment) is always less than unity-a notion that has been erroneously overlooked in the model of Daoud and Cotton. We also provide new scaling arguments that (a) establish this swelling (or more appropriately shrinking) ratio as a constant (less than unity) for the case of "good" solvent, (b) recover the scaling predictions for blob dimension and monomer number and monomer concentration distributions within the blob, and

  11. High- Tc superconductivity via superpropagators revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, G. P.

    2008-07-01

    We revisit our earlier paper because it was perceived in some quarters to be based on a formulation that took into account the electron-pairs (e-pairs), but not the hole-pairs (h-pairs). Through a more comprehensive study of the basic equation on which our earlier work was based, we present here temperature-generalized equations for the Bethe-Salpeter amplitudes for Cooper pairs (CPs) of the (e-e), (h-h), and (e-h/h-e) varieties (our earlier paper seemed to deal with only the first category of pairs). We then show that solution of the (e-e) or the (h-h) equation, at T = 0, yields a pair of pure imaginary binding energies (W); this result is in agreement with the one obtained long ago by Thouless, by Abrikosov et al., by Schrieffer, and others, and signifies that both the e-pairs and the h-pairs have been taken into account in our work. A salient feature of our approach is that it determines the all-important Tc and Hc in the limit of vanishing W whereas, in the BCS theory, Tc is obtained in the limit gap → 0, and Hc is determined via the condensation energy of the CPs.

  12. No-scale ripple inflation revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tianjun; Li, Zhijin; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V. E-mail: lizhijin@physics.tamu.edu

    2014-04-01

    We revisit the no-scale ripple inflation model, where no-scale supergravity is modified by an additional term for the inflaton field in the Kähler potential. This term not only breaks one SU(N,1) symmetry explicitly, but also plays an important role for inflation. We generalize the superpotential in the no-scale ripple inflation model slightly. There exists a discrete Z{sub 2} symmetry/parity in the scalar potential in general, which can be preserved or violated by the non-canonical nomalized inflaton kinetic term. Thus, there are three inflation paths: one parity invariant path, and the left and right paths for parity violating scenario. We show that the inflations along the parity invariant path and right path are consistent with the Planck results. However, the gavitino mass for the parity invariant path is so large that the inflation results will be invalid if we consider the inflaton supersymmetry breaking soft mass term. Thus, only the inflation along the right path gives the correct and consistent results. Notably, the tensor-to-scalar ratio in such case can be large, with a value around 0.05, which may be probed by the future Planck experiment.

  13. Revisiting the argument from fetal potential.

    PubMed

    Manninen, Bertha Alvarez

    2007-01-01

    One of the most famous, and most derided, arguments against the morality of abortion is the argument from potential, which maintains that the fetus' potential to become a person and enjoy the valuable life common to persons, entails that its destruction is prima facie morally impermissible. In this paper, I will revisit and offer a defense of the argument from potential.First, I will criticize the classical arguments proffered against the importance of fetal potential, specifically the arguments put forth by philosophers Peter Singer and David Boonin, by carefully unpacking the claims made in these arguments and illustrating why they are flawed.Secondly, I will maintain that fetal potential is morally relevant when it comes to the morality of abortion, but that it must be accorded a proper place in the argument. This proper place, however, cannot be found until we first answer a very important and complex question: we must first address the issue of personal identity, and when the fetus becomes the type of being who is relevantly identical to a future person. I will illustrate why the question of fetal potential can only be meaningfully addressed after we have first answered the question of personal identity and how it relates to the human fetus. PMID:17509146

  14. Targeting Cancer Metabolism - Revisiting the Warburg Effects

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Quangdon; Lee, Hyunji; Park, Jisoo; Kim, Seon-Hwan; Park, Jongsun

    2016-01-01

    After more than half of century since the Warburg effect was described, this atypical metabolism has been standing true for almost every type of cancer, exhibiting higher glycolysis and lactate metabolism and defective mitochondrial ATP production. This phenomenon had attracted many scientists to the problem of elucidating the mechanism of, and reason for, this effect. Several models based on oncogenic studies have been proposed, such as the accumulation of mitochondrial gene mutations, the switch from oxidative phosphorylation respiration to glycolysis, the enhancement of lactate metabolism, and the alteration of glycolytic genes. Whether the Warburg phenomenon is the consequence of genetic dysregulation in cancer or the cause of cancer remains unknown. Moreover, the exact reasons and physiological values of this peculiar metabolism in cancer remain unclear. Although there are some pharmacological compounds, such as 2-deoxy-D-glucose, dichloroacetic acid, and 3-bromopyruvate, therapeutic strategies, including diet, have been developed based on targeting the Warburg effect. In this review, we will revisit the Warburg effect to determine how much scientists currently understand about this phenomenon and how we can treat the cancer based on targeting metabolism. PMID:27437085

  15. The drive revisited: Mastery and satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Denis, Paul

    2016-06-01

    Starting from the theory of the libido and the notions of the experience of satisfaction and the drive for mastery introduced by Freud, the author revisits the notion of the drive by proposing the following model: the drive takes shape in the combination of two currents of libidinal cathexis, one which takes the paths of the 'apparatus for obtaining mastery' (the sense-organs, motricity, etc.) and strives to appropriate the object, and the other which cathects the erotogenic zones and the experience of satisfaction that is experienced through stimulation in contact with the object. The result of this combination of cathexes constitutes a 'representation', the subsequent evocation of which makes it possible to tolerate for a certain period of time the absence of a satisfying object. On the basis of this conception, the author distinguishes the representations proper, vehicles of satisfaction, from imagos and traumatic images which give rise to excitation that does not link up with the paths taken by the drives. This model makes it possible to conciliate the points of view of the advocates of 'object-seeking' and of those who give precedence to the search for pleasure, and, further, to renew our understanding of object-relations, which can then be approached from the angle of their relations to infantile sexuality. Destructiveness is considered in terms of "mastery madness" and not in terms of the late Freudian hypothesis of the death drive.

  16. Pair Production Constraints on Superluminal Neutrinos Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Gardner, Susan; /Kentucky U.

    2012-02-16

    We revisit the pair creation constraint on superluminal neutrinos considered by Cohen and Glashow in order to clarify which types of superluminal models are constrained. We show that a model in which the superluminal neutrino is effectively light-like can evade the Cohen-Glashow constraint. In summary, any model for which the CG pair production process operates is excluded because such timelike neutrinos would not be detected by OPERA or other experiments. However, a superluminal neutrino which is effectively lightlike with fixed p{sup 2} can evade the Cohen-Glashow constraint because of energy-momentum conservation. The coincidence involved in explaining the SN1987A constraint certainly makes such a picture improbable - but it is still intrinsically possible. The lightlike model is appealing in that it does not violate Lorentz symmetry in particle interactions, although one would expect Hughes-Drever tests to turn up a violation eventually. Other evasions of the CG constraints are also possible; perhaps, e.g., the neutrino takes a 'short cut' through extra dimensions or suffers anomalous acceleration in matter. Irrespective of the OPERA result, Lorentz-violating interactions remain possible, and ongoing experimental investigation of such possibilities should continue.

  17. Revisiting the phase diagram of hard ellipsoids.

    PubMed

    Odriozola, Gerardo

    2012-04-01

    In this work, the well-known Frenkel-Mulder phase diagram of hard ellipsoids of revolution [D. Frenkel and B. M. Mulder, Mol. Phys. 55, 1171 (1985)] is revisited by means of replica exchange Monte Carlo simulations. The method provides good sampling of dense systems and so, solid phases can be accessed without the need of imposing a given structure. At high densities, we found plastic solids and fcc-like crystals for semi-spherical ellipsoids (prolates and oblates), and SM2 structures [P. Pfleiderer and T. Schilling, Phys. Rev. E 75, 020402 (2007)] for x : 1-prolates and 1 : x-oblates with x ≥ 3. The revised fluid-crystal and isotropic-nematic transitions reasonably agree with those presented in the Frenkel-Mulder diagram. An interesting result is that, for small system sizes (100 particles), we obtained 2:1- and 1.5:1-prolate equations of state without transitions, while some order is developed at large densities. Furthermore, the symmetric oblate cases are also reluctant to form ordered phases.

  18. Revisiting the Trust Effect in Urban Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Curt M.; Forsyth, Patrick B.

    2013-01-01

    More than a decade after Goddard, Tschannen-Moran, and Hoy (2001) found that collective faculty trust in clients predicts student achievement in urban elementary schools, we sought to identify a plausible link for this relationship. Our purpose in revisiting the trust effect was twofold: (1) to test the main effect of collective faculty trust on…

  19. The Importance of Being a Complement: CED Effects Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurka, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation revisits subject island effects (Ross 1967, Chomsky 1973) cross-linguistically. Controlled acceptability judgment studies in German, English, Japanese and Serbian show that extraction out of specifiers is consistently degraded compared to extraction out of complements, indicating that the Condition on Extraction domains (CED,…

  20. Environmental Education and Politics: Snakes and Ladders Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, David

    2004-01-01

    This paper revisits the history of environmental education in Australia in the 1970s and 1980s and draws parallels between these and current events in four countries, including Australia. It is argued that little has changed and that few environmental educators confront the inherently political nature of their work. It is concluded that…

  1. Revisiting Constructivist Teaching Methods in Ontario Colleges Preparing for Accreditation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Rachel A.

    2015-01-01

    At the time of writing, the first community colleges in Ontario were preparing for transition to an accreditation model from an audit system. This paper revisits constructivist literature, arguing that a more pragmatic definition of constructivism effectively blends positivist and interactionist philosophies to achieve both student centred…

  2. Bohr’s ‘Light and Life’ revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussenzveig, H. M.

    2015-11-01

    I revisit Niels Bohr’s famous 1932 ‘Light and Life’ lecture, confronting it with current knowledge. Topics covered include: life origin and evolution, quantum mechanics and life, brain and mind, consciousness and free will, and light as a tool for biology, with special emphasis on optical tweezers and their contributions to biophysics. Specialized knowledge of biology is not assumed.

  3. Threshold Concepts and Student Engagement: Revisiting Pedagogical Content Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zepke, Nick

    2013-01-01

    This article revisits the notion that to facilitate quality learning requires teachers in higher education to have pedagogical content knowledge. It constructs pedagogical content knowledge as a teaching and learning space that brings content and pedagogy together. On the content knowledge side, it suggests that threshold concepts, akin to a…

  4. Moral Judgment Development across Cultures: Revisiting Kohlberg's Universality Claims

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, John C.; Basinger, Karen S.; Grime, Rebecca L.; Snarey, John R.

    2007-01-01

    This article revisits Kohlberg's cognitive developmental claims that stages of moral judgment, facilitative processes of social perspective-taking, and moral values are commonly identifiable across cultures. Snarey [Snarey, J. (1985). "The cross-cultural universality of social-moral development: A critical review of Kohlbergian research."…

  5. Literary Origins of the Term "School Psychologist" Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagan, Thomas K.

    2005-01-01

    Previous research on the literary origins of the term "school psychologist" is revisited, and conclusions are revised in light of new evidence. It appears that the origin of the term in the American literature occurred as early as 1898 in an article by Hugo Munsterberg, predating the usage by Wilhelm Stern in 1911. The early references to the…

  6. Revisiting Jack Goody to Rethink Determinisms in Literacy Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collin, Ross

    2013-01-01

    This article revisits Goody's arguments about literacy's influence on social arrangements, culture, cognition, economics, and other domains of existence. Whereas some of his arguments tend toward technological determinism (i.e., literacy causes change in the world), other of his arguments construe literacy as a force that shapes and is shaped by…

  7. Antidote for Zero Tolerance: Revisiting a "Reclaiming" School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farner, Conrad D.

    2002-01-01

    Reports on a revisit to the Frank Lloyd Wright Middle School, which implemented strategies to deal with disciplinary problems. The school continues to progress towards creating the type of reclaiming environment necessary to ensure the needs of all students. Strategies used include alternatives to zero tolerance policy; smaller teams of students;…

  8. Revisiting Feminist Identity Development Theory, Research, and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moradi, Bonnie; Subich, Linda Mezydlo; Phillips, Julia C.

    2002-01-01

    The model of feminist identity development proposed by Downing and Roush in 1985 is revisited as a potentially useful framework in counseling psychology theory, research, and practice. An examination of the historical context from which the model arose illustrates how it advanced theory in the psychology of women. A critical review of the extant…

  9. WAC Revisited: You Get What You Pay for

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perelman, Les

    2011-01-01

    In 1982, the author wrote an essay for the second issue of "The Writing Instructor," "Approaches to Comprehensive Writing: Integrating Writing into the College Curriculum," reviewing the early stages of the modern Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC)/Writing in the Disciplines (WID) movement. In this article, the author revisits his essay and…

  10. Facilitating Grade Acceleration: Revisiting the Wisdom of John Feldhusen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culross, Rita R.; Jolly, Jennifer L.; Winkler, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    This article revisits the 1986 Feldhusen, Proctor, and Black recommendations on grade skipping. These recommendations originally appeared as 12 guidelines. In this article, the guidelines are grouped into three general categories: how to screen accelerant candidates, how to engage with the adults in the acceleration process (e.g., teachers,…

  11. Educational Administration and the Management of Knowledge: 1980 Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Richard

    2013-01-01

    This paper revisits the thesis of a 1980 paper that suggested a new approach to educational administration based upon the New Sociology of Education. In particular it updates answers to the six key questions asked by that paper: what counts as knowledge; how is what counts as knowledge organised; how is what counts as knowledge transmitted; how is…

  12. Magnetic Braking Revisited: Activities for the Undergraduate Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ireson, Gren; Twidle, John

    2008-01-01

    This paper revisits the demonstration of Lenz by dropping magnets down a non-magnetic tube. Recent publications are reviewed and ideas for undergraduate laboratory investigations are suggested. Finally, an example of matching theory to observation is presented. (Contains 4 tables, 5 figures and 3 footnotes.)

  13. Revisiting the Continua of Biliteracy: International and Critical Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornberger, Nancy H.; Skilton-Sylvester, Ellen

    2000-01-01

    The continua model of biliteracy offers a framework to situate research, teaching, and language planning in linguistically diverse settings. The continua model is revisited from the perspective of international cases of educational policy and practice in linguistically diverse settings, and from a critical perspective that seeks to make explicit…

  14. Pockets of Participation: Revisiting Child-Centred Participation Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franks, Myfanwy

    2011-01-01

    This article revisits the theme of the clash of interests and power relations at work in participatory research which is prescribed from above. It offers a possible route toward solving conflict between adult-led research carried out by young researchers, funding requirements and organisational constraints. The article explores issues of…

  15. Active Nuclear Import of Membrane Proteins Revisited.

    PubMed

    Laba, Justyna K; Steen, Anton; Popken, Petra; Chernova, Alina; Poolman, Bert; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M

    2015-01-01

    It is poorly understood how membrane proteins destined for the inner nuclear membrane pass the crowded environment of the Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC). For the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins Src1/Heh1 and Heh2, a transport mechanism was proposed where the transmembrane domains diffuse through the membrane while the extralumenal domains encoding a nuclear localization signal (NLS) and intrinsically disordered linker (L) are accompanied by transport factors and travel through the NPC. Here, we validate the proposed mechanism and explore and discuss alternative interpretations of the data. First, to disprove an interpretation where the membrane proteins become membrane embedded only after nuclear import, we present biochemical and localization data to support that the previously used, as well as newly designed reporter proteins are membrane-embedded irrespective of the presence of the sorting signals, the specific transmembrane domain (multipass or tail anchored), independent of GET, and also under conditions that the proteins are trapped in the NPC. Second, using the recently established size limit for passive diffusion of membrane proteins in yeast, and using an improved assay, we confirm active import of polytopic membrane protein with extralumenal soluble domains larger than those that can pass by diffusion on similar timescales. This reinforces that NLS-L dependent active transport is distinct from passive diffusion. Thirdly, we revisit the proposed route through the center of the NPC and conclude that the previously used trapping assay is, unfortunately, poorly suited to address the route through the NPC, and the route thus remains unresolved. Apart from the uncertainty about the route through the NPC, the data confirm active, transport factor dependent, nuclear transport of membrane-embedded mono- and polytopic membrane proteins in baker's yeast. PMID:26473931

  16. Active Nuclear Import of Membrane Proteins Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Laba, Justyna K.; Steen, Anton; Popken, Petra; Chernova, Alina; Poolman, Bert; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M.

    2015-01-01

    It is poorly understood how membrane proteins destined for the inner nuclear membrane pass the crowded environment of the Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC). For the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins Src1/Heh1 and Heh2, a transport mechanism was proposed where the transmembrane domains diffuse through the membrane while the extralumenal domains encoding a nuclear localization signal (NLS) and intrinsically disordered linker (L) are accompanied by transport factors and travel through the NPC. Here, we validate the proposed mechanism and explore and discuss alternative interpretations of the data. First, to disprove an interpretation where the membrane proteins become membrane embedded only after nuclear import, we present biochemical and localization data to support that the previously used, as well as newly designed reporter proteins are membrane-embedded irrespective of the presence of the sorting signals, the specific transmembrane domain (multipass or tail anchored), independent of GET, and also under conditions that the proteins are trapped in the NPC. Second, using the recently established size limit for passive diffusion of membrane proteins in yeast, and using an improved assay, we confirm active import of polytopic membrane protein with extralumenal soluble domains larger than those that can pass by diffusion on similar timescales. This reinforces that NLS-L dependent active transport is distinct from passive diffusion. Thirdly, we revisit the proposed route through the center of the NPC and conclude that the previously used trapping assay is, unfortunately, poorly suited to address the route through the NPC, and the route thus remains unresolved. Apart from the uncertainty about the route through the NPC, the data confirm active, transport factor dependent, nuclear transport of membrane-embedded mono- and polytopic membrane proteins in baker’s yeast. PMID:26473931

  17. Revisiting Scaling Relations for Giant Radio Halos in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassano, R.; Ettori, S.; Brunetti, G.; Giacintucci, S.; Pratt, G. W.; Venturi, T.; Kale, R.; Dolag, K.; Markevitch, Maxim L.

    2013-01-01

    Many galaxy clusters host megaparsec-scale radio halos, generated by ultrarelativistic electrons in the magnetized intracluster medium. Correlations between the synchrotron power of radio halos and the thermal properties of the hosting clusters were established in the last decade, including the connection between the presence of a halo and cluster mergers. The X-ray luminosity and redshift-limited Extended GMRT Radio Halo Survey provides a rich and unique dataset for statistical studies of the halos. We uniformly analyze the radio and X-ray data for the GMRT cluster sample, and use the new Planck Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) catalog to revisit the correlations between the power of radio halos and the thermal properties of galaxy clusters. We find that the radio power at 1.4 GHz scales with the cluster X-ray (0.1-2.4 keV) luminosity computed within R(sub 500) as P(sub 1.4) approx. L(2.1+/-0.2) - 500). Our bigger and more homogenous sample confirms that the X-ray luminous (L(sub 500) > 5 × 10(exp 44) erg/s)) clusters branch into two populations-radio halos lie on the correlation, while clusters without radio halos have their radio upper limits well below that correlation. This bimodality remains if we excise cool cores from the X-ray luminosities. We also find that P(sub 1.4) scales with the cluster integrated SZ signal within R(sub 500), measured by Planck, as P(sub 1.4) approx. Y(2.05+/-0.28) - 500), in line with previous findings. However, contrary to previous studies that were limited by incompleteness and small sample size, we find that "SZ-luminous" Y(sub 500) > 6×10(exp -5) Mpc(exp 2) clusters show a bimodal behavior for the presence of radio halos, similar to that in the radio-X-ray diagram. Bimodality of both correlations can be traced to clusters dynamics, with radio halos found exclusively in merging clusters. These results confirm the key role of mergers for the origin of giant radio halos, suggesting that they trigger the relativistic particle acceleration.

  18. REVISITING SCALING RELATIONS FOR GIANT RADIO HALOS IN GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Cassano, R.; Brunetti, G.; Venturi, T.; Kale, R.; Pratt, G. W.; Markevitch, M.

    2013-11-10

    Many galaxy clusters host megaparsec-scale radio halos, generated by ultrarelativistic electrons in the magnetized intracluster medium. Correlations between the synchrotron power of radio halos and the thermal properties of the hosting clusters were established in the last decade, including the connection between the presence of a halo and cluster mergers. The X-ray luminosity and redshift-limited Extended GMRT Radio Halo Survey provides a rich and unique dataset for statistical studies of the halos. We uniformly analyze the radio and X-ray data for the GMRT cluster sample, and use the new Planck Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) catalog to revisit the correlations between the power of radio halos and the thermal properties of galaxy clusters. We find that the radio power at 1.4 GHz scales with the cluster X-ray (0.1-2.4 keV) luminosity computed within R{sub 500} as P{sub 1.4}∼L{sup 2.1±0.2}{sub 500}. Our bigger and more homogenous sample confirms that the X-ray luminous (L{sub 500} > 5 × 10{sup 44} erg s{sup –1}) clusters branch into two populations—radio halos lie on the correlation, while clusters without radio halos have their radio upper limits well below that correlation. This bimodality remains if we excise cool cores from the X-ray luminosities. We also find that P{sub 1.4} scales with the cluster integrated SZ signal within R{sub 500}, measured by Planck, as P{sub 1.4}∼Y{sup 2.05±0.28}{sub 500}, in line with previous findings. However, contrary to previous studies that were limited by incompleteness and small sample size, we find that 'SZ-luminous' Y{sub 500} > 6 × 10{sup –5} Mpc{sup 2} clusters show a bimodal behavior for the presence of radio halos, similar to that in the radio-X-ray diagram. Bimodality of both correlations can be traced to clusters dynamics, with radio halos found exclusively in merging clusters. These results confirm the key role of mergers for the origin of giant radio halos, suggesting that they trigger the relativistic particle

  19. Consensus Paper: Revisiting the Symptoms and Signs of Cerebellar Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bodranghien, Florian; Bastian, Amy; Casali, Carlo; Hallett, Mark; Louis, Elan D; Manto, Mario; Mariën, Peter; Nowak, Dennis A; Schmahmann, Jeremy D; Serrao, Mariano; Steiner, Katharina Marie; Strupp, Michael; Tilikete, Caroline; Timmann, Dagmar; van Dun, Kim

    2016-06-01

    The cerebellum is involved in sensorimotor operations, cognitive tasks and affective processes. Here, we revisit the concept of the cerebellar syndrome in the light of recent advances in our understanding of cerebellar operations. The key symptoms and signs of cerebellar dysfunction, often grouped under the generic term of ataxia, are discussed. Vertigo, dizziness, and imbalance are associated with lesions of the vestibulo-cerebellar, vestibulo-spinal, or cerebellar ocular motor systems. The cerebellum plays a major role in the online to long-term control of eye movements (control of calibration, reduction of eye instability, maintenance of ocular alignment). Ocular instability, nystagmus, saccadic intrusions, impaired smooth pursuit, impaired vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), and ocular misalignment are at the core of oculomotor cerebellar deficits. As a motor speech disorder, ataxic dysarthria is highly suggestive of cerebellar pathology. Regarding motor control of limbs, hypotonia, a- or dysdiadochokinesia, dysmetria, grasping deficits and various tremor phenomenologies are observed in cerebellar disorders to varying degrees. There is clear evidence that the cerebellum participates in force perception and proprioceptive sense during active movements. Gait is staggering with a wide base, and tandem gait is very often impaired in cerebellar disorders. In terms of cognitive and affective operations, impairments are found in executive functions, visual-spatial processing, linguistic function, and affective regulation (Schmahmann's syndrome). Nonmotor linguistic deficits including disruption of articulatory and graphomotor planning, language dynamics, verbal fluency, phonological, and semantic word retrieval, expressive and receptive syntax, and various aspects of reading and writing may be impaired after cerebellar damage. The cerebellum is organized into (a) a primary sensorimotor region in the anterior lobe and adjacent part of lobule VI, (b) a second sensorimotor

  20. Hadronic event generation for hadron cascade calculations and detector simulation, Part IV: The application of the intranuclear cascade model to reactions of pions, nucleons, kaons, and their antiparticles with nuclei below 6 GeV/c

    SciTech Connect

    Haenbssgen, K.

    1987-02-01

    An extension of the intranuclear cascade model is described. The primary hadrons may be pions, kaons, nucleons, and their antiparticles. Secondary particles produced include hyperons or antihyperons. A large amount of experimental data is described by the model. The model is constructed via the Monte Carlo generation of complete events, based on a model of the nucleus structure and the hadron/nucleon interaction inside the nucleus. Calculated average multiplicities and single and double differential cross sections are compared with experimental data.

  1. Five years on: Revisiting GSN data quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gee, L. S.; Nettles, M.; Ekstrom, G.; Davis, J. P.; Ringler, A. T.; Storm, T. L.; Wilson, D.; Anderson, K. R.

    2014-12-01

    In 2010, the Lamont Waveform Quality Center (WQC) conducted an in-depth review of ten stations in the Global Seismographic Network (GSN). IU stations (CASY, DAV, KIP, KONO, WCI), IC stations (SSE, XAN), and II stations (ALE, DGAR, RPN) were analyzed using a scaling analysis based on data-synthetic comparisons, evaluation of noise levels, assessment of inter-sensor coherence, and polarization analysis. These reports (available from http://www.ldeo.columbia.edu/~ekstrom/Projects/WQC.html) highlighted a number of significant problems in GSN data quality, including the frequency-dependent loss of gain in the STS-1 seismometer (Ekström et al., 2006) that has been attributed to the presence of humidity in the electronics, cables, and connectors (Yuki and Ishihara, 2002; Hutt and Ringler, 2011). The reports from the WQC spurred a number of changes in the operation of the GSN, including the adoption of the policy of annual calibrations and the development of new tools and metrics to monitor, evaluate, and communicate data quality. In parallel, the USGS' Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory (ASL) and UCSD's Project IDA worked with the IRIS Consortium to upgrade GSN stations with new data acquisition systems, to refurbish the STS-1 seismometers with new electronics, and to expand the deployment of secondary broadband sensors. We revisit the 2010 reports, using the tools of the WQC as well as a number of newly developed tools such as the USGS' Data Quality Analyzer and IRIS' MUSTANG, and provide an update on GSN data quality. Our initial focus is on CASY and KIP, the first two stations reviewed by the WQC. Our goal is to evaluate progress in the last five years and assess our ability to quantify data quality as well as to identify potential problems that could compromise data quality in the future. Ekström, G., C. A. Dalton, and M. Nettles (2006). Observations of time-dependent errors in long-period instrument gain at global seismic stations. Seismological Research Letters

  2. Finite frequency tomography: the checkerboard test revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercerat, E. D.; Zaroli, C.; Nolet, G.

    2011-12-01

    We address some consequences of the application of finite frequency theory for seismic tomography by revisiting the classical checkerboard test. We use a simple borehole-to-borehole experiment set-up in order to have complete control of the situation and to avoid complicating factors such as crustal corrections that still hamper global tomography. We are particularly interested in the feasibility of using ray-based finite frequency kernels in the inversion of travel time perturbations measured by crosscorrelation, in the cross-dependence between S wave velocity perturbations and the measured P travel times, and in the benefits of using finite-frequency theory on one or multiple frequency bands. We have done a 3D checkerboard test to assess the influence of these issues. Full-waveform synthetic seismograms are calculated using the spectral elements method up to 2 kHz maximum frequency. The computational domain extends 200 m x 120 m x 120 m and the target velocity model is a checkerboard with 12 m x 12 m x 12 m blocks of velocities 5% slower and faster than the background (homogeneous, Vp=6 km/s) model. First, we make a comparison between finite-frequency kernels calculated by ray theory with those based on the spectral elements method (adjoint technique), in terms of resolution, accuracy, but also computational cost. From synthetic seismograms calculated for the 3D checkerboard model as well as for the homogeneous model, we measure crosscorrelation travel times at different frequency bands and invert them with classical ray theory as well as with finite frequency theory. Several interesting features are highlighted in our multi-band data set, such as the wavefront healing effect. For instance, we observe that the delay times, in absolute value, are usually larger at short (0.5 ms) than long (4 ms) periods. This can be explained by the presence of the "doughnut hole" along the geometrical ray path in the sensitivity kernels, whose diameter is proportional to the

  3. 14 CFR 1214.205 - Revisit and/or retrieval services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Revisit and/or retrieval services. 1214.205 Section 1214.205 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT..., time on orbit, and other extra costs incurred by the revisit....

  4. Unwarranted Return: A Response to McVee, Dunsmore, and Gavelek's (2005) "Schema Theory Revisited"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krasny, Karen A.; Sadoski, Mark; Paivio, Allan

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the authors' response to McVee, Dunsmore, and Gavelek's "Schema Theory Revisited." In "Schema Theory Revisited," McVee, Dunsmore, and Gavelek (2005) proposed a rearticulation of schema theory intended to encompass the ideas that schemata and other cognitive processes are embodied, that knowledge is situated in the transaction…

  5. Enthalpy-Entropy Compensation (EEC) Effect: A Revisit.

    PubMed

    Pan, Animesh; Biswas, Tapas; Rakshit, Animesh K; Moulik, Satya P

    2015-12-31

    A short account of the developments and perspectives of IKR (iso-kinetic relation) and EEC (enthalpy (H) - entropy (S) compensation) has been presented. The IKR and EEC are known to be extra thermodynamic or empirical correlations though linear H-S correlation can be thermodynamically deduced. Attempt has also been made to explain the phenomena in terms of statistical thermodynamics. In this study, we have briefly revisited the fundamentals of both IKR and EEC from kinetic and thermodynamic grounds. A detailed revisit of the EEC phenomenon on varied kinetic and equilibrium processes has been also presented. Possible correlations among the free energy (ΔG), enthalpy (ΔH), and entropy (ΔS) changes of different similar and nonsimilar chemical processes under varied conditions have been discussed with possible future projections. PMID:26641279

  6. Should the recommended number of IUD revisits be reduced?

    PubMed

    Janowitz, B; Hubacher, D; Petrick, T; Dighe, N

    1994-01-01

    This study uses data from clinical trials of intrauterine devices to examine the effect of reducing the recommended number of IUD follow-up visits. Over 11,000 follow-up forms were analyzed to estimate the number of health problems that would have escaped detection if women with no or mild symptoms had not made recommended revisits. Less than one percent of woman-visits with no or only mild symptoms had an underlying health risk that could have gone undetected if the follow-up visits that were made in the clinic trial setting had not been made. The results from this analysis suggest that a reduction in the number of recommended follow-up visits is safe, when measured according to selected conditions. Additional research is necessary to determine whether any revisits should be recommended in the absence of signs or symptoms.

  7. Enthalpy-Entropy Compensation (EEC) Effect: A Revisit.

    PubMed

    Pan, Animesh; Biswas, Tapas; Rakshit, Animesh K; Moulik, Satya P

    2015-12-31

    A short account of the developments and perspectives of IKR (iso-kinetic relation) and EEC (enthalpy (H) - entropy (S) compensation) has been presented. The IKR and EEC are known to be extra thermodynamic or empirical correlations though linear H-S correlation can be thermodynamically deduced. Attempt has also been made to explain the phenomena in terms of statistical thermodynamics. In this study, we have briefly revisited the fundamentals of both IKR and EEC from kinetic and thermodynamic grounds. A detailed revisit of the EEC phenomenon on varied kinetic and equilibrium processes has been also presented. Possible correlations among the free energy (ΔG), enthalpy (ΔH), and entropy (ΔS) changes of different similar and nonsimilar chemical processes under varied conditions have been discussed with possible future projections.

  8. Indoor air and human health revisited: A recent IAQ symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Gammage, R.B.

    1994-12-31

    Indoor Air and Human Health Revisited was a speciality symposium examining the scientific underpinnings of sensory and sensitivity effects, allergy and respiratory disease, neurotoxicity and cancer. An organizing committee selected four persons to chain the sessions and invite experts to give state-of-the-art presentations that will be published as a book. A summary of the presentations is made and some critical issues identified.

  9. Discussion of "Computational Electrocardiography: Revisiting Holter ECG Monitoring".

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Christian; Caiani, Enrico G; Dickhaus, Hartmut; Kulikowski, Casimir A; Schiecke, Karin; van Bemmel, Jan H; Witte, Herbert

    2016-08-01

    This article is part of a For-Discussion-Section of Methods of Information in Medicine about the paper "Computational Electrocardiography: Revisiting Holter ECG Monitoring" written by Thomas M. Deserno and Nikolaus Marx. It is introduced by an editorial. This article contains the combined commentaries invited to independently comment on the paper of Deserno and Marx. In subsequent issues the discussion can continue through letters to the editor.

  10. Mindless reading revisited: an analysis based on the SWIFT model of eye-movement control.

    PubMed

    Nuthmann, Antje; Engbert, Ralf

    2009-02-01

    In this article, we revisit the mindless reading paradigm from the perspective of computational modeling. In the standard version of the paradigm, participants read sentences in both their normal version as well as the transformed (or mindless) version where each letter is replaced with a z. z-String scanning shares the oculomotor requirements with reading but none of the higher-level lexical and semantic processes. Here we use the z-string scanning task to validate the SWIFT model of saccade generation [Engbert, R., Nuthmann, A., Richter, E., & Kliegl, R. (2005). SWIFT: A dynamical model of saccade generation during reading. Psychological Review, 112(4), 777-813] as an example for an advanced theory of eye-movement control in reading. We test the central assumption of spatially distributed processing across an attentional gradient proposed by the SWIFT model. Key experimental results like prolonged average fixation durations in z-string scanning compared to normal reading and the existence of a string-length effect on fixation durations and probabilities were reproduced by the model, which lends support to the model's assumptions on visual processing. Moreover, simulation results for patterns of regressive saccades in z-string scanning confirm SWIFT's concept of activation field dynamics for the selection of saccade targets.

  11. Charitable Giving by Married Couples Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoruk, Baris K.

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of gender differences and household bargaining on charitable giving. I replicate the study of Andreoni, Brown, and Rischall (2003) using a different data set--the recently available Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) supplement on charitable giving--and test the sensitivity of their results to inclusion of…

  12. The effect of time ordering revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Rosato, J.; Boland, D.; Capes, H.; Marandet, Y.; Stamm, R.

    2008-10-22

    The effects of time ordering on line shapes are investigated for the dynamic ionic broadening of the Lyman alpha line in hydrogen plasmas. The difference between calculations with and without time ordering is calculated for an electric field created by a single particle, and for a thermal average over plasma configurations with moderate temperature and density.

  13. Revisiting a Problem of Two Freezers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Easton, Don

    2014-01-01

    The January 2013 Physics Challenge for Teachers and Students has some features that are surprising and worth a closer look. The problem concerns a Carnot-cycle refrigeration unit operating inside a tent. It achieves dynamic equilibrium with a freezer ("cold") compartment temperature of T[subscript C] = 13°C, tent temperature of…

  14. Topological entropy of catalytic sets: Hypercycles revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardanyés, Josep; Duarte, Jorge; Januário, Cristina; Martins, Nuno

    2012-02-01

    The dynamics of catalytic networks have been widely studied over the last decades because of their implications in several fields like prebiotic evolution, virology, neural networks, immunology or ecology. One of the most studied mathematical bodies for catalytic networks was initially formulated in the context of prebiotic evolution, by means of the hypercycle theory. The hypercycle is a set of self-replicating species able to catalyze other replicator species within a cyclic architecture. Hypercyclic organization might arise from a quasispecies as a way to increase the informational containt surpassing the so-called error threshold. The catalytic coupling between replicators makes all the species to behave like a single and coherent evolutionary multimolecular unit. The inherent nonlinearities of catalytic interactions are responsible for the emergence of several types of dynamics, among them, chaos. In this article we begin with a brief review of the hypercycle theory focusing on its evolutionary implications as well as on different dynamics associated to different types of small catalytic networks. Then we study the properties of chaotic hypercycles with error-prone replication with symbolic dynamics theory, characterizing, by means of the theory of topological Markov chains, the topological entropy and the periods of the orbits of unimodal-like iterated maps obtained from the strange attractor. We will focus our study on some key parameters responsible for the structure of the catalytic network: mutation rates, autocatalytic and cross-catalytic interactions.

  15. Liberal Arts Catch-Up Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goyder, John

    2014-01-01

    This paper replicates the work of Giles and Drewes from the 1990s. They showed a catch-up effect whereby graduates of liberal arts undergraduate programs, although at an early-career disadvantage compared with graduates of applied programs, had higher incomes by mid-career. Working with the Panel 5 Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (2005-2010),…

  16. Revisiting the Gulf Coast after Katrina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Principal, 2009

    2009-01-01

    In August 2005, the world witnessed one of the most destructive natural disasters on America's mainland. Hurricane Katrina, followed a month later by Hurricane Rita, brought more than broken levees, flooded streets and homes, and destroyed businesses. It caused changes in the dynamics and the demographic and cultural makeup of the region. One of…

  17. Mathematical analysis of a multiple strain, multi-locus-allele system for antigenically variable infectious diseases revisited.

    PubMed

    Cherif, Alhaji

    2015-09-01

    Many important pathogens such as HIV/AIDS, influenza, malaria, dengue and meningitis generally exist in phenotypically distinct serotypes that compete for hosts. Models used to study these diseases appear as meta-population systems. Herein, we revisit one of the multiple strain models that have been used to investigate the dynamics of infectious diseases with co-circulating serotypes or strains, and provide analytical results underlying the numerical investigations. In particular, we establish the necessary conditions for the local asymptotic stability of the steady states and for the existence of oscillatory behaviors via Hopf bifurcation. In addition, we show that the existence of discrete antigenic forms among pathogens can either fully or partially self-organize, where (i) strains exhibit no strain structures and coexist or (ii) antigenic variants sort into non-overlapping or minimally overlapping clusters that either undergo the principle of competitive exclusion exhibiting discrete strain structures, or co-exist cyclically.

  18. Circular revisit orbits design for responsive mission over a single target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Taibo; Xiang, Junhua; Wang, Zhaokui; Zhang, Yulin

    2016-10-01

    The responsive orbits play a key role in addressing the mission of Operationally Responsive Space (ORS) because of their capabilities. These capabilities are usually focused on supporting specific targets as opposed to providing global coverage. One subtype of responsive orbits is repeat coverage orbit which is nearly circular in most remote sensing applications. This paper deals with a special kind of repeating ground track orbit, referred to as circular revisit orbit. Different from traditional repeat coverage orbits, a satellite on circular revisit orbit can visit a target site at both the ascending and descending stages in one revisit cycle. This typology of trajectory allows a halving of the traditional revisit time and does a favor to get useful information for responsive applications. However the previous reported numerical methods in some references often cost lots of computation or fail to obtain such orbits. To overcome this difficulty, an analytical method to determine the existence conditions of the solutions to revisit orbits is presented in this paper. To this end, the mathematical model of circular revisit orbit is established under the central gravity model and the J2 perturbation. A constraint function of the circular revisit orbit is introduced, and the monotonicity of that function has been studied. The existent conditions and the number of such orbits are naturally worked out. Taking the launch cost into consideration, optimal design model of circular revisit orbit is established to achieve a best orbit which visits a target twice a day in the morning and in the afternoon respectively for several days. The result shows that it is effective to apply circular revisit orbits in responsive application such as reconnoiter of natural disaster.

  19. A practical method of predicting client revisit intention in a hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyun Jick

    2005-01-01

    Data mining (DM) models are an alternative to traditional statistical methods for examining whether higher customer satisfaction leads to higher revisit intention. This study used a total of 906 outpatients' satisfaction data collected from a nationwide survey interviews conducted by professional interviewers on a face-to-face basis in South Korea, 1998. Analyses showed that the relationship between overall satisfaction with hospital services and outpatients' revisit intention, along with word-of-mouth recommendation as intermediate variables, developed into a nonlinear relationship. The five strongest predictors of revisit intention were overall satisfaction, intention to recommend to others, awareness of hospital promotion, satisfaction with physician's kindness, and satisfaction with treatment level.

  20. A practical method of predicting client revisit intention in a hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyun Jick

    2005-01-01

    Data mining (DM) models are an alternative to traditional statistical methods for examining whether higher customer satisfaction leads to higher revisit intention. This study used a total of 906 outpatients' satisfaction data collected from a nationwide survey interviews conducted by professional interviewers on a face-to-face basis in South Korea, 1998. Analyses showed that the relationship between overall satisfaction with hospital services and outpatients' revisit intention, along with word-of-mouth recommendation as intermediate variables, developed into a nonlinear relationship. The five strongest predictors of revisit intention were overall satisfaction, intention to recommend to others, awareness of hospital promotion, satisfaction with physician's kindness, and satisfaction with treatment level. PMID:15923917

  1. Nonlinear time-series analysis revisited.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Elizabeth; Kantz, Holger

    2015-09-01

    In 1980 and 1981, two pioneering papers laid the foundation for what became known as nonlinear time-series analysis: the analysis of observed data-typically univariate-via dynamical systems theory. Based on the concept of state-space reconstruction, this set of methods allows us to compute characteristic quantities such as Lyapunov exponents and fractal dimensions, to predict the future course of the time series, and even to reconstruct the equations of motion in some cases. In practice, however, there are a number of issues that restrict the power of this approach: whether the signal accurately and thoroughly samples the dynamics, for instance, and whether it contains noise. Moreover, the numerical algorithms that we use to instantiate these ideas are not perfect; they involve approximations, scale parameters, and finite-precision arithmetic, among other things. Even so, nonlinear time-series analysis has been used to great advantage on thousands of real and synthetic data sets from a wide variety of systems ranging from roulette wheels to lasers to the human heart. Even in cases where the data do not meet the mathematical or algorithmic requirements to assure full topological conjugacy, the results of nonlinear time-series analysis can be helpful in understanding, characterizing, and predicting dynamical systems. PMID:26428563

  2. Nonlinear time-series analysis revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Elizabeth; Kantz, Holger

    2015-09-01

    In 1980 and 1981, two pioneering papers laid the foundation for what became known as nonlinear time-series analysis: the analysis of observed data—typically univariate—via dynamical systems theory. Based on the concept of state-space reconstruction, this set of methods allows us to compute characteristic quantities such as Lyapunov exponents and fractal dimensions, to predict the future course of the time series, and even to reconstruct the equations of motion in some cases. In practice, however, there are a number of issues that restrict the power of this approach: whether the signal accurately and thoroughly samples the dynamics, for instance, and whether it contains noise. Moreover, the numerical algorithms that we use to instantiate these ideas are not perfect; they involve approximations, scale parameters, and finite-precision arithmetic, among other things. Even so, nonlinear time-series analysis has been used to great advantage on thousands of real and synthetic data sets from a wide variety of systems ranging from roulette wheels to lasers to the human heart. Even in cases where the data do not meet the mathematical or algorithmic requirements to assure full topological conjugacy, the results of nonlinear time-series analysis can be helpful in understanding, characterizing, and predicting dynamical systems.

  3. Space-independent xenon oscillations revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Rizwan-uddin )

    1989-01-01

    Recently, various branches of engineering and science have seen a rapid increase in the number of dynamical analyses undertaken. This modern phenomenon often obscures the fact that such analyses were sometimes carried out even before the current trend began. Moreover, these earlier analyses, which even now seem very ingenuous, were carried out at a time when the available information about dynamical systems was not as well disseminated as it is today. One such analysis, carried out in the early 1960s, showed the existence of stable limit cycles in a simple model for space-independent xenon dynamics in nuclear reactors. The authors, apparently unaware of the now well-known bifurcation theorem by Hopf, could not numerically discover unstable limit cycles, though they did find regions in parameter space where the fixed points are stable for small perturbations but unstable for very large perturbations. The analysis was carried out both analytically and numerically. As a tribute to these early nonlinear dynamicists in the field of nuclear engineering, in this paper, the Hopf theorem and its conclusions are briefly described, and then the solution of the space-independent xenon oscillation problem is presented, which was obtained using the bifurcation analysis BIFDD code. These solutions are presented along with a discussion of the earlier results.

  4. Dynamic noise, chaos and parameter estimation in population biology.

    PubMed

    Stollenwerk, N; Aguiar, M; Ballesteros, S; Boto, J; Kooi, B; Mateus, L

    2012-04-01

    We revisit the parameter estimation framework for population biological dynamical systems, and apply it to calibrate various models in epidemiology with empirical time series, namely influenza and dengue fever. When it comes to more complex models such as multi-strain dynamics to describe the virus-host interaction in dengue fever, even the most recently developed parameter estimation techniques, such as maximum likelihood iterated filtering, reach their computational limits. However, the first results of parameter estimation with data on dengue fever from Thailand indicate a subtle interplay between stochasticity and the deterministic skeleton. The deterministic system on its own already displays complex dynamics up to deterministic chaos and coexistence of multiple attractors.

  5. Parameter Estimation in Epidemiology: from Simple to Complex Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, Maíra; Ballesteros, Sebastién; Boto, João Pedro; Kooi, Bob W.; Mateus, Luís; Stollenwerk, Nico

    2011-09-01

    We revisit the parameter estimation framework for population biological dynamical systems, and apply it to calibrate various models in epidemiology with empirical time series, namely influenza and dengue fever. When it comes to more complex models like multi-strain dynamics to describe the virus-host interaction in dengue fever, even most recently developed parameter estimation techniques, like maximum likelihood iterated filtering, come to their computational limits. However, the first results of parameter estimation with data on dengue fever from Thailand indicate a subtle interplay between stochasticity and deterministic skeleton. The deterministic system on its own already displays complex dynamics up to deterministic chaos and coexistence of multiple attractors.

  6. What to Do When the Inhaler Fails: Revisiting the Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Shams, Alexandra A; Leggit, Jeffrey C

    2015-10-01

    Paradoxical vocal fold movement is important to consider in the differential for dyspnea on exertion or shortness of breath. It is often confused with asthma and remains undiagnosed because of a paucity of pathognomonic examination and imaging findings. This case serves as a reminder of the specific clinical picture, diagnosis, and treatment of paradoxical vocal fold movement. It also highlights the broader importance of continuity of care and the clinician's ability to revisit the differential diagnosis if an initial workup is unrevealing or the patient is not responding to treatment.

  7. Hyperbranched polymer stars with Gaussian chain statistics revisited.

    PubMed

    Polińska, P; Gillig, C; Wittmer, J P; Baschnagel, J

    2014-02-01

    Conformational properties of regular dendrimers and more general hyperbranched polymer stars with Gaussian statistics for the spacer chains between branching points are revisited numerically. We investigate the scaling for asymptotically long chains especially for fractal dimensions df = 3 (marginally compact) and df = 2.5 (diffusion limited aggregation). Power-law stars obtained by imposing the number of additional arms per generation are compared to truly self-similar stars. We discuss effects of weak excluded-volume interactions and sketch the regime where the Gaussian approximation should hold in dense solutions and melts for sufficiently large spacer chains. PMID:24574057

  8. Revisiting the deific-decree doctrine in Washington state.

    PubMed

    Leong, Gregory B

    2008-01-01

    The deific-decree exception to Washington's M'Naughten insanity standard first appeared in case law a quarter century ago in State v. Crenshaw. A few subsequent cases have attempted to refine the contours of the deific decree; however, the deific-decree doctrine has had only limited utility as a basis for the insanity defense. After about a decade of no activity in this area, the Washington courts have recently revisited the deific-decree doctrine in a case involving two defendants.

  9. Revisiting a Constructive Classic: Wright's Physical Disability: A Psychosocial Approach

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Dana S.; Elliott, Timothy R.

    2008-01-01

    Beatrice A. Wright's (1960) classic book, Physical Disability: A Psychological Approach is a landmark publication in rehabilitation psychology. The authors believe that Division 22's forthcoming 50th anniversary, the results of a recent survey on essential readings in rehabilitation psychology, and a public critique concerning the relevance of individuating language in psychology are compelling reasons for revisiting the influence of Physical Disability. After discussing these catalysts, the authors review the book's history, scholarly impact, and link to positive disciplinary directions. The authors conclude by encouraging rehabilitation psychologists and other members of the discipline to (re)acquaint themselves with this important book and the timeless concepts it espouses. PMID:19079791

  10. Noise processing by microRNA-mediated circuits: The Incoherent Feed-Forward Loop, revisited.

    PubMed

    Grigolon, Silvia; Di Patti, Francesca; De Martino, Andrea; Marinari, Enzo

    2016-04-01

    The intrinsic stochasticity of gene expression is usually mitigated in higher eukaryotes by post-transcriptional regulation channels that stabilise the output layer, most notably protein levels. The discovery of small non-coding RNAs (miRNAs) in specific motifs of the genetic regulatory network has led to identifying noise buffering as the possible key function they exert in regulation. Recent in vitro and in silico studies have corroborated this hypothesis. It is however also known that miRNA-mediated noise reduction is hampered by transcriptional bursting in simple topologies. Here, using stochastic simulations validated by analytical calculations based on van Kampen's expansion, we revisit the noise-buffering capacity of the miRNA-mediated Incoherent Feed Forward Loop (IFFL), a small module that is widespread in the gene regulatory networks of higher eukaryotes, in order to account for the effects of intermittency in the transcriptional activity of the modulator gene. We show that bursting considerably alters the circuit's ability to control static protein noise. By comparing with other regulatory architectures, we find that direct transcriptional regulation significantly outperforms the IFFL in a broad range of kinetic parameters. This suggests that, under pulsatile inputs, static noise reduction may be less important than dynamical aspects of noise and information processing in characterising the performance of regulatory elements.

  11. How to Measure Recovery? Revisiting Concepts and Methods for Stroke Studies.

    PubMed

    Hommel, Marc; Detante, Olivier; Favre, Isabelle; Touzé, Emmanuel; Jaillard, Assia

    2016-10-01

    In clinical trials, assessing efficacy is based on validated scales, and the primary endpoint is usually based on a single scale. The aim of the review is to revisit the concepts and methods to design and analyze studies focused on restoration, recovery and or compensation. These studies are becoming more frequent with the development of restorative medicine. After discussing the definitions of recovery, we address the concept of recovery as the regain of lost capabilities, when the patient reaches a new equilibrium. Recovery is a dynamic process which assessment includes information from initial and final status, their difference, the difference between the final status of the patient and normality, and the speed of restoration. Finally, recovery can be assessed either for a specific function (focal restoration) or for a more global restoration. A single scale is not able to assess all the facets of a skill or a function, therefore complementary information should be collected and analyzed simultaneously to be tested in a single analysis. We are suggesting that recovery should be considered as a latent variable and therefore cannot be measured in pure form. We are also suggesting to customize the data collection and analysis according to the characteristics of the subjects, the mechanisms of action and consequences of the intervention. Moreover, recovery trials should benefit from latent variable analysis methods. Structural equation modeling is likely the best candidate for this approach applicable in pre-clinical and clinical studies. PMID:27498680

  12. Revisiting the First Galaxies: The Effects of Population III Stars on their Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muratov, Alexander L.; Gnedin, Oleg Y.; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.; Zemp, Marcel

    2013-08-01

    We revisit the formation and evolution of the first galaxies using new hydrodynamic cosmological simulations with the adaptive refinement tree code. Our simulations feature a recently developed model for H2 formation and dissociation, and a star formation recipe that is based on molecular rather than atomic gas. Here, we develop and implement a recipe for the formation of metal-free Population III (Pop III) stars in galaxy-scale simulations that resolve primordial clouds with sufficiently high density. We base our recipe on the results of prior zoom-in simulations that resolved the protostellar collapse in pre-galactic objects. We find the epoch during which Pop III stars dominated the energy and metal budget of the first galaxies to be short-lived. Galaxies that host Pop III stars do not retain dynamical signatures of their thermal and radiative feedback for more than 108 years after the lives of the stars end in pair-instability supernovae, even when we consider the maximum reasonable efficiency of the feedback. Though metals ejected by the supernovae can travel well beyond the virial radius of the host galaxy, they typically begin to fall back quickly, and do not enrich a large fraction of the intergalactic medium. Galaxies with a total mass in excess of 3 × 106 M ⊙ re-accrete most of their baryons and transition to metal-enriched Pop II star formation.

  13. Noise processing by microRNA-mediated circuits: The Incoherent Feed-Forward Loop, revisited.

    PubMed

    Grigolon, Silvia; Di Patti, Francesca; De Martino, Andrea; Marinari, Enzo

    2016-04-01

    The intrinsic stochasticity of gene expression is usually mitigated in higher eukaryotes by post-transcriptional regulation channels that stabilise the output layer, most notably protein levels. The discovery of small non-coding RNAs (miRNAs) in specific motifs of the genetic regulatory network has led to identifying noise buffering as the possible key function they exert in regulation. Recent in vitro and in silico studies have corroborated this hypothesis. It is however also known that miRNA-mediated noise reduction is hampered by transcriptional bursting in simple topologies. Here, using stochastic simulations validated by analytical calculations based on van Kampen's expansion, we revisit the noise-buffering capacity of the miRNA-mediated Incoherent Feed Forward Loop (IFFL), a small module that is widespread in the gene regulatory networks of higher eukaryotes, in order to account for the effects of intermittency in the transcriptional activity of the modulator gene. We show that bursting considerably alters the circuit's ability to control static protein noise. By comparing with other regulatory architectures, we find that direct transcriptional regulation significantly outperforms the IFFL in a broad range of kinetic parameters. This suggests that, under pulsatile inputs, static noise reduction may be less important than dynamical aspects of noise and information processing in characterising the performance of regulatory elements. PMID:27441269

  14. REVISITING THE FIRST GALAXIES: THE EFFECTS OF POPULATION III STARS ON THEIR HOST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Muratov, Alexander L.; Gnedin, Oleg Y.; Zemp, Marcel; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2013-08-01

    We revisit the formation and evolution of the first galaxies using new hydrodynamic cosmological simulations with the adaptive refinement tree code. Our simulations feature a recently developed model for H{sub 2} formation and dissociation, and a star formation recipe that is based on molecular rather than atomic gas. Here, we develop and implement a recipe for the formation of metal-free Population III (Pop III) stars in galaxy-scale simulations that resolve primordial clouds with sufficiently high density. We base our recipe on the results of prior zoom-in simulations that resolved the protostellar collapse in pre-galactic objects. We find the epoch during which Pop III stars dominated the energy and metal budget of the first galaxies to be short-lived. Galaxies that host Pop III stars do not retain dynamical signatures of their thermal and radiative feedback for more than 10{sup 8} years after the lives of the stars end in pair-instability supernovae, even when we consider the maximum reasonable efficiency of the feedback. Though metals ejected by the supernovae can travel well beyond the virial radius of the host galaxy, they typically begin to fall back quickly, and do not enrich a large fraction of the intergalactic medium. Galaxies with a total mass in excess of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} M{sub Sun} re-accrete most of their baryons and transition to metal-enriched Pop II star formation.

  15. How to Measure Recovery? Revisiting Concepts and Methods for Stroke Studies.

    PubMed

    Hommel, Marc; Detante, Olivier; Favre, Isabelle; Touzé, Emmanuel; Jaillard, Assia

    2016-10-01

    In clinical trials, assessing efficacy is based on validated scales, and the primary endpoint is usually based on a single scale. The aim of the review is to revisit the concepts and methods to design and analyze studies focused on restoration, recovery and or compensation. These studies are becoming more frequent with the development of restorative medicine. After discussing the definitions of recovery, we address the concept of recovery as the regain of lost capabilities, when the patient reaches a new equilibrium. Recovery is a dynamic process which assessment includes information from initial and final status, their difference, the difference between the final status of the patient and normality, and the speed of restoration. Finally, recovery can be assessed either for a specific function (focal restoration) or for a more global restoration. A single scale is not able to assess all the facets of a skill or a function, therefore complementary information should be collected and analyzed simultaneously to be tested in a single analysis. We are suggesting that recovery should be considered as a latent variable and therefore cannot be measured in pure form. We are also suggesting to customize the data collection and analysis according to the characteristics of the subjects, the mechanisms of action and consequences of the intervention. Moreover, recovery trials should benefit from latent variable analysis methods. Structural equation modeling is likely the best candidate for this approach applicable in pre-clinical and clinical studies.

  16. Reforestation in southern China: revisiting soil N mineralization and nitrification after 8 years restoration

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Qifeng; Li, Zhi’an; Zhu, Weixing; Zou, Bi; Li, Yingwen; Yu, Shiqin; Ding, Yongzhen; Chen, Yao; Li, Xiaobo; Wang, Faming

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen availability and tree species selection play important roles in reforestation. However, long-term field studies on the effects and mechanisms of tree species composition on N transformation are very limited. Eight years after tree seedlings were planted in a field experiment, we revisited the site and tested how tree species composition affects the dynamics of N mineralization and nitrification. Both tree species composition and season significantly influenced the soil dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen (DON). N-fixing Acacia crassicarpa monoculture had the highest DON, and 10-mixed species plantation had the highest DOC. The lowest DOC and DON concentrations were both observed in Eucalyptus urophylla monoculture. The tree species composition also significantly affected net N mineralization rates. The highest rate of net N mineralization was found in A. crassicarpa monoculture, which was over twice than that in Castanopsis hystrix monoculture. The annual net N mineralization rates of 10-mixed and 30-mixed plantations were similar as that of N-fixing monoculture. Since mixed plantations have good performance in increasing soil DOC, DON, N mineralization and plant biodiversity, we recommend that mixed species plantations should be used as a sustainable approach for the restoration of degraded land in southern China. PMID:26794649

  17. Reforestation in southern China: revisiting soil N mineralization and nitrification after 8 years restoration.

    PubMed

    Mo, Qifeng; Li, Zhi'an; Zhu, Weixing; Zou, Bi; Li, Yingwen; Yu, Shiqin; Ding, Yongzhen; Chen, Yao; Li, Xiaobo; Wang, Faming

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen availability and tree species selection play important roles in reforestation. However, long-term field studies on the effects and mechanisms of tree species composition on N transformation are very limited. Eight years after tree seedlings were planted in a field experiment, we revisited the site and tested how tree species composition affects the dynamics of N mineralization and nitrification. Both tree species composition and season significantly influenced the soil dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen (DON). N-fixing Acacia crassicarpa monoculture had the highest DON, and 10-mixed species plantation had the highest DOC. The lowest DOC and DON concentrations were both observed in Eucalyptus urophylla monoculture. The tree species composition also significantly affected net N mineralization rates. The highest rate of net N mineralization was found in A. crassicarpa monoculture, which was over twice than that in Castanopsis hystrix monoculture. The annual net N mineralization rates of 10-mixed and 30-mixed plantations were similar as that of N-fixing monoculture. Since mixed plantations have good performance in increasing soil DOC, DON, N mineralization and plant biodiversity, we recommend that mixed species plantations should be used as a sustainable approach for the restoration of degraded land in southern China. PMID:26794649

  18. Exact solutions for steady reconnective annihilation revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Vyacheslav S.; Tassi, Emanuele; Hornig, Gunnar

    2004-10-01

    This work complements the previous studies on steady reconnective magnetic annihilation in three different geometries: the two-dimensional Cartesian and polar ones and the three-dimensional (3D) cylindrical one. A special class of diffusive solutions is found analytically in explicit form for all of the three geometries. In the 3D case it is extended to a much wider class of exact solutions describing reconnective magnetic annihilation at the separatrix spine line of a magnetic null point. One of the obtained solutions provides an explicit expression for the Craig-Fabling solution. It is also identified which of the steady flow regimes found are dynamically accessible.

  19. Revisiting the block method for evaluating thermal conductivities of clay and granite

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determination of thermal conductivities of porous media using the contact method is revisited and revalidated with consideration of thermal contact resistance. Problems that limit the accuracy of determination of thermal conductivities of porous media are discussed. Thermal conductivities of granite...

  20. Molecular ring rotation in solid ferrocene revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appel, Markus; Frick, Bernhard; Spehr, Tinka Luise; Stühn, Bernd

    2015-03-01

    We report on quasielastic neutron spectroscopy experiments on ferrocene (bis(η5-cyclopentadienyl)iron) in its three different crystalline phases: the disordered monoclinic crystalline phase (T > 164 K), the metastable triclinic phase (T < 164 K), and the stable orthorhombic phase (T < 250 K). The cyclopentadienyl rings in ferrocene are known to undergo rotational reorientations for which the analysis of our large data set suggests partially a revision of the known picture of the dynamics and allows for an extension and completion of previous studies. In the monoclinic phase, guided by structural information, we propose a model for rotational jumps among non-equivalent sites in contrast to the established 5-fold jump rotation model. The new model takes the dynamical disorder into account and allows the cyclopentadienyl rings to reside in two different configurations which are found to be twisted by an angle of approximately 30°. In the triclinic phase, our analysis demands the use of a 2-ring model accounting for crystallographically independent sites with different barriers to rotation. For the orthorhombic phase of ferrocene, we confirm a significantly increased barrier of rotation using neutron backscattering spectroscopy. Our data analysis includes multiple scattering corrections and presents a novel approach of simultaneous analysis of different neutron scattering data by combining elastic and inelastic fixed window temperature scans with energy spectra, providing a very robust and reliable mean of extracting the individual activation energies of overlapping processes.

  1. Molecular ring rotation in solid ferrocene revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, Markus; Frick, Bernhard; Spehr, Tinka Luise; Stühn, Bernd

    2015-03-21

    We report on quasielastic neutron spectroscopy experiments on ferrocene (bis(η{sup 5}-cyclopentadienyl)iron) in its three different crystalline phases: the disordered monoclinic crystalline phase (T > 164 K), the metastable triclinic phase (T < 164 K), and the stable orthorhombic phase (T < 250 K). The cyclopentadienyl rings in ferrocene are known to undergo rotational reorientations for which the analysis of our large data set suggests partially a revision of the known picture of the dynamics and allows for an extension and completion of previous studies. In the monoclinic phase, guided by structural information, we propose a model for rotational jumps among non-equivalent sites in contrast to the established 5-fold jump rotation model. The new model takes the dynamical disorder into account and allows the cyclopentadienyl rings to reside in two different configurations which are found to be twisted by an angle of approximately 30°. In the triclinic phase, our analysis demands the use of a 2-ring model accounting for crystallographically independent sites with different barriers to rotation. For the orthorhombic phase of ferrocene, we confirm a significantly increased barrier of rotation using neutron backscattering spectroscopy. Our data analysis includes multiple scattering corrections and presents a novel approach of simultaneous analysis of different neutron scattering data by combining elastic and inelastic fixed window temperature scans with energy spectra, providing a very robust and reliable mean of extracting the individual activation energies of overlapping processes.

  2. Dynamics of elliptical galaxies with planetary nebulae in modified Newtonian dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yong; Ko, Chung-Ming

    2016-10-01

    The dynamics of an elliptical galaxy within a couple of effective radii can be probed effectively by stars. However, at larger distances planetary nebulae (PNe) replace stars as the tracer of the dynamics. Making use of the motion of PNe, Romanowsky et al. measured the dynamics of three luminous elliptical galaxies (NGC821, NGC3379 and NGC4494) at large distances from the galactic centre. They found that little dark matter is needed up to six effective radii. Milgrom & Sanders showed that this result can be understood in the framework of MOdified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND). As more data are available in the past decade, we revisit this problem. We combine PNe data (up to six to eight effective radii) and stellar data from SAURON of seven elliptical galaxies, including those three galaxies in Romanowsky et al. with updated data and four other galaxies which have not been analysed before. We conclude that the dynamics of these galaxies can be well explained by MOND.

  3. Engineered nanoparticles: Revisiting safety concerns in light of ethno medicine

    PubMed Central

    Palkhiwala, Suhani; Bakshi, Sonal R.

    2014-01-01

    The nanoparticles are a miracle invention of the century that has opened novel avenues of applications in various fields. The safety aspect of exposure to nanoparticles for humans, plants, animals, soil micro-flora, and ecosystem at large has been questioned. The safety concern can be addressed by laboratory studies to assess the actual risk and recommend exposure limits and related regulation. There is also a suggestion for considering the nanoparticle form of conventional compounds as a new chemical and subject it to safety assessment in line with the chemical regulatory agencies. In the light of the current scenario of popularity and safety concerns regarding nanoparticles, the use of ancient metal based forms like, Bhasma is revisited in the present article. The current approach of green synthesis of nanoparticles is compared with the Ayurveda Rasayana Shastra guidelines of Bhasma preparation and modern preparation of engineered nanoparticles. Since the benefits of nanotechnology are undeniable, and safety concerns are also not ungrounded, there is a pressing need to revisit the ways nanoparticles are manufactured, and to carry out safety assessment by the techniques specially adapted for this novel compound. PMID:26664232

  4. H-bonding in protein hydration revisited.

    PubMed

    Petukhov, Michael; Rychkov, Georgy; Firsov, Leonid; Serrano, Luis

    2004-08-01

    H-bonding between protein surface polar/charged groups and water is one of the key factors of protein hydration. Here, we introduce an Accessible Surface Area (ASA) model for computationally efficient estimation of a free energy of water-protein H-bonding at any given protein conformation. The free energy of water-protein H-bonds is estimated using empirical formulas describing probabilities of hydrogen bond formation that were derived from molecular dynamics simulations of water molecules at the surface of a small protein, Crambin, from the Abyssinian cabbage (Crambe abyssinica) seed. The results suggest that atomic solvation parameters (ASP) widely used in continuum hydration models might be dependent on ASA for polar/charged atoms under consideration. The predictions of the model are found to be in qualitative agreement with the available experimental data on model compounds. This model combines the computational speed of ASA potential, with the high resolution of more sophisticated solvation methods.

  5. Loop quantization of Schwarzschild interior revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Parampreet; Corichi, Alejandro

    2016-03-01

    Several studies of different inequivalent loop quantizations have shown, that there exists no fully satisfactory quantum theory for the Schwarzschild interior. Existing quantizations fail either on dependence on the fiducial structure or on the lack of the classical limit. Here we put forward a novel viewpoint to construct the quantum theory that overcomes all of the known problems of the existing quantizations. It is shown that the quantum gravitational constraint is well defined past the singularity and that its effective dynamics possesses a bounce into an expanding regime. The classical singularity is avoided, and a semiclassical spacetime satisfying vacuum Einstein's equations is recovered on the ``other side'' of the bounce. We argue that such metric represents the interior region of a white-hole spacetime, but for which the corresponding ``white-hole mass'' differs from the original black hole mass. We compare the differences in physical implications with other quantizations.

  6. Revisiting Numerical Errors in Direct and Large Eddy Simulations of Turbulence: Physical and Spectral Spaces Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedioun, Ivan; Lardjane, Nicolas; Gökalp, Iskender

    2001-12-01

    Some recent studies on the effects of truncation and aliasing errors on the large eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent flows via the concept of modified wave number are revisited. It is shown that all the results obtained for nonlinear partial differential equations projected and advanced in time in spectral space are not straightforwardly applicable to physical space calculations due to the nonequivalence by Fourier transform of spectral aliasing errors and numerical errors on a set of grid points in physical space. The consequences of spectral static aliasing errors on a set of grid points are analyzed in one dimension of space for quadratic products and their derivatives. The dynamical process that results through time stepping is illustrated on the Burgers equation. A method based on midpoint interpolation is proposed to remove in physical space the static grid point errors involved in divergence forms. It is compared to the sharp filtering technique on finer grids suggested by previous authors. Global performances resulting from combination of static aliasing errors and truncation errors are then discussed for all classical forms of the convective terms in Navier-Stokes equations. Some analytical results previously obtained on the relative magnitude of subgrid scale terms and numerical errors are confirmed with 3D realistic random fields. The physical space dynamical behavior and the stability of typical associations of numerical schemes and forms of nonlinear terms are finally evaluated on the LES of self-decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence. It is shown that the convective form (if conservative properties are not strictly required) associated with highly resolving compact finite difference schemes provides the best compromise, which is nearly equivalent to dealiased pseudo-spectral calculations.

  7. Revisiting sea level changes in the North Sea during the Anthropocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Jürgen; Dangendorf, Sönke; Wahl, Thomas; Niehüser, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    The North Sea is one of the best instrumented ocean basins in the world. Here we revisit sea level changes in the North Sea region from tide gauges, satellite altimetry, hydrographic profiles and ocean reanalysis data from the beginning of the 19th century to present. This includes an overview of the sea level chapter of the North Sea Climate Change Assessment (NOSCCA) complemented by results from more recent investigations. The estimates of long-term changes from tide gauge records are significantly affected by vertical land motion (VLM), which is related to both the large-scale viscoelastic response of the solid earth to ice melting since the last deglaciation and local effects. Removing VLM (estimated from various data sources such as GPS, tide gauge minus altimetry and GIA) significantly reduces the spatial variability of long-term trends in the basin. VLM corrected tide gauge records suggest a transition from relatively moderate changes in the 19th century towards modern trends of roughly 1.5 mm/yr during the 20th century. Superimposed on the long-term changes there is a considerable inter-annual to multi-decadal variability. On inter-annual timescales this variability mainly reflects the barotropic response of the ocean to atmospheric forcing with the inverted barometer effect dominating along the UK and Norwegian coastlines and wind forcing controlling the southeastern part of the basin. The decadal variability is mostly remotely forced and dynamically linked to the North Atlantic via boundary waves in response to long-shore winds along the continental slope. These findings give valuable information about the required horizontal resolution of ocean models and the necessary boundary conditions and are therefore important for the dynamical downscaling of sea level projections for the North Sea coastlines.

  8. Maneuver Warfare revisited: a plea for balance

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, M,R.

    1986-04-01

    This paper is a plea for balance in the current pursuit of understanding of the concept and the teaching of Maneuver Warfare. It specifically addresses the need for a more-complete analysis of some of the more-common historical examples commonly offered as examples of the supremecy of Maneuver Warfare. The paper in no way disagrees with the desirability of conducting the kinds of operations associated with the ill-defined concepts offered by advocates of Maneuver Warfare but suggests that the desirable results of historical battles may be too readily ascribed to the dynamic, offensive actions of the victorious side. Secondly, the paper points out the lack of utility and applicability of some common buzzwords being used in today's Army. Specifically assailed is the concept of turning within a decision cycle. The paper describes the reasons that this commonly used phrase has little applicability to ground warfare. Finally, the paper mentions the tendency for the Maneuver Warfare camp to cloud discussion of doctrine in a kind of intellectualism and elitism that has no use in forming the necessary consensus demanded by doctrine.

  9. Combustion chemistry via metadynamics: benzyl decomposition revisited.

    PubMed

    Polino, Daniela; Parrinello, Michele

    2015-02-12

    Large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are thought to be responsible for the formation of soot particles in combustion processes. However, there are still uncertainties on the course that leads small molecules to form PAHs. This is largely due to the high number of reactions and intermediates involved. Metadynamics combined with ab initio molecular dynamics can provide a very precious contribution because offers the possibility to explore new possible pathways and suggest new mechanisms. Here, we adopt this method to investigate the chemical evolution of the benzyl radical, whose role is very important in PAHs growth. This species has been intensely studied, and though most of its chemistry is known, there are still open questions regarding its decomposition. The simulation reproduces the most commonly accepted decomposition pathway and it suggests also a new one which can explain recent experimental data that are in contradiction with the old mechanism. In addition, quantitative free energy evaluation of some key reaction steps sheds light on the role of entropy.

  10. NEC violation in mimetic cosmology revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ijjas, Anna; Ripley, Justin; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2016-09-01

    In the context of Einstein gravity, if the null energy condition (NEC) is satisfied, the energy density in expanding space-times always decreases while in contracting space-times the energy density grows and the universe eventually collapses into a singularity. In particular, no non-singular bounce is possible. It is, though, an open question if this energy condition can be violated in a controlled way, i.e., without introducing pathologies, such as unstable negative-energy states or an imaginary speed of sound. In this letter, we will re-examine the claim that the recently proposed mimetic scenario can violate the NEC without pathologies. We show that mimetic cosmology is prone to gradient instabilities even in cases when the NEC is satisfied (except for trivial examples). Most interestingly, the source of the instability is always the Einstein-Hilbert term in the action. The matter stress-energy component does not contribute spatial gradient terms but instead makes the problematic curvature modes dynamical. We also show that mimetic cosmology can be understood as a singular limit of known, well-behaved theories involving higher-derivative kinetic terms and discuss ways of removing the instability.

  11. Loop quantization of the Schwarzschild interior revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corichi, Alejandro; Singh, Parampreet

    2016-03-01

    The loop quantization of the Schwarzschild interior region, as described by a homogeneous anisotropic Kantowski-Sachs model, is re-examined. As several studies of different—inequivalent—loop quantizations have shown, to date there exists no fully satisfactory quantum theory for this model. This fact poses challenges to the validity of some scenarios to address the black hole information problem. Here we put forward a novel viewpoint to construct the quantum theory that builds from some of the models available in the literature. The final picture is a quantum theory that is both independent of any auxiliary structure and possesses a correct low curvature limit. It represents a subtle but non-trivial modification of the original prescription given by Ashtekar and Bojowald. It is shown that the quantum gravitational constraint is well defined past the singularity and that its effective dynamics possesses a bounce into an expanding regime. The classical singularity is avoided, and a semiclassical spacetime satisfying vacuum Einstein’s equations is recovered on the ‘other side’ of the bounce. We argue that such a metric represents the interior region of a white-hole spacetime, but for which the corresponding ‘white hole mass’ differs from the original black hole mass. Furthermore, we find that the value of the white hole mass is proportional to the third power of the starting black hole mass.

  12. Fingering convection in red giants revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachlin, F. C.; Vauclair, S.; Althaus, L. G.

    2014-10-01

    Context. Fingering (thermohaline) convection has been invoked for several years as a possible extra-mixing which could occur in red giant stars; it is due to the modification of the chemical composition induced by nuclear reactions in the hydrogen burning zone. Recent studies show, however, that this mixing is not sufficient to account for the needed surface abundances. Aims: A new prescription for fingering convection, based on 3D numerical simulations has recently been proposed. The resulting mixing coefficient is larger than those previously given in the literature. We compute models using this new coefficient and compare them to previous studies. Methods: We used the LPCODE stellar evolution code with a generalized version of the mixing length theory to compute red giant models and we introduce fingering convection using the BGS prescription. Results: The results show that, although the fingering zone now reaches the outer dynamical convective zone, the efficiency of the mixing is not enough to account for the observations. The fingering mixing coefficient should be increased by two orders of magnitude for the needed surface abundances to be reached. Conclusions: We confirm that fingering convection cannot be the mixing process needed to account for surface abundances in red giant branch stars.

  13. Markers and mapping revisited: finding your gene.

    PubMed

    Jones, Neil; Ougham, Helen; Thomas, Howard; Pasakinskiene, Izolda

    2009-01-01

    this highly dynamic arena of plant science.

  14. Topological analysis of chaotic orbits: Revisiting Hyperion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Patricia T.; Mindlin, Gabriel B.; Gilmore, Robert; Solari, Hernan G.

    1994-01-01

    There is emerging interest in the possibility of chaotic evolution in astrophysical systems. To mention just one example, recent well-sampled ground-based observations of the Saturian satellite Hyperion strongly suggest that it is exhibiting chaotic behavior. We present a general technique, the method of close returns, for the analysis of data from astronomical objects believed to be exhibiting chaotic motion. The method is based on the extraction of pieces of the evolution that exhibit nearly periodic behavior-episodes during which the object stays near in phase space to some unstable periodic orbit. Such orbits generally act as skeletal features, tracing the topological organization of the manifold on which the chaotic dynamics takes place. This method does not require data sets as lengthy as other nonlinear analysis techniques do and is therefore well suited to many astronomical observing programs. Well sampled data covering between twenty and forty characteristic periods of the system have been found to be sufficient for the application of this technique. Additional strengths of this method are its robustness in the presence of noise and the ability for a user to clearly distinguish between periodic, random, and chaotic behavior by inspection of the resulting two-dimensional image. As an example of its power, we analyze close returns in a numerically generated data set, based on a model for Hyperion extensively studied in the literature, corresponding to nightly observations of the satellite. We show that with a small data set, embedded unstable periodic orbits can be extracted and that these orbits can be responsible for nearly periodic behavior lasting a substantial fraction of the observing run.

  15. Revisiting Feynman's ratchet with thermoelectric transport theory.

    PubMed

    Apertet, Y; Ouerdane, H; Goupil, C; Lecoeur, Ph

    2014-07-01

    We show how the formalism used for thermoelectric transport may be adapted to Smoluchowski's seminal thought experiment, also known as Feynman's ratchet and pawl system. Our analysis rests on the notion of useful flux, which for a thermoelectric system is the electrical current and for Feynman's ratchet is the effective jump frequency. Our approach yields original insight into the derivation and analysis of the system's properties. In particular we define an entropy per tooth in analogy with the entropy per carrier or Seebeck coefficient, and we derive the analog to Kelvin's second relation for Feynman's ratchet. Owing to the formal similarity between the heat fluxes balance equations for a thermoelectric generator (TEG) and those for Feynman's ratchet, we introduce a distribution parameter γ that quantifies the amount of heat that flows through the cold and hot sides of both heat engines. While it is well established that γ = 1/2 for a TEG, it is equal to 1 for Feynman's ratchet. This implies that no heat may be rejected in the cold reservoir for the latter case. Further, the analysis of the efficiency at maximum power shows that the so-called Feynman efficiency corresponds to that of an exoreversible engine, with γ = 1. Then, turning to the nonlinear regime, we generalize the approach based on the convection picture and introduce two different types of resistance to distinguish the dynamical behavior of the considered system from its ability to dissipate energy. We finally put forth the strong similarity between the original Feynman ratchet and a mesoscopic thermoelectric generator with a single conducting channel.

  16. Revisiting Feynman's ratchet with thermoelectric transport theory.

    PubMed

    Apertet, Y; Ouerdane, H; Goupil, C; Lecoeur, Ph

    2014-07-01

    We show how the formalism used for thermoelectric transport may be adapted to Smoluchowski's seminal thought experiment, also known as Feynman's ratchet and pawl system. Our analysis rests on the notion of useful flux, which for a thermoelectric system is the electrical current and for Feynman's ratchet is the effective jump frequency. Our approach yields original insight into the derivation and analysis of the system's properties. In particular we define an entropy per tooth in analogy with the entropy per carrier or Seebeck coefficient, and we derive the analog to Kelvin's second relation for Feynman's ratchet. Owing to the formal similarity between the heat fluxes balance equations for a thermoelectric generator (TEG) and those for Feynman's ratchet, we introduce a distribution parameter γ that quantifies the amount of heat that flows through the cold and hot sides of both heat engines. While it is well established that γ = 1/2 for a TEG, it is equal to 1 for Feynman's ratchet. This implies that no heat may be rejected in the cold reservoir for the latter case. Further, the analysis of the efficiency at maximum power shows that the so-called Feynman efficiency corresponds to that of an exoreversible engine, with γ = 1. Then, turning to the nonlinear regime, we generalize the approach based on the convection picture and introduce two different types of resistance to distinguish the dynamical behavior of the considered system from its ability to dissipate energy. We finally put forth the strong similarity between the original Feynman ratchet and a mesoscopic thermoelectric generator with a single conducting channel. PMID:25122257

  17. Biologically inspired dynamic material systems.

    PubMed

    Studart, André R

    2015-03-01

    Numerous examples of material systems that dynamically interact with and adapt to the surrounding environment are found in nature, from hair-based mechanoreceptors in animals to self-shaping seed dispersal units in plants to remodeling bone in vertebrates. Inspired by such fascinating biological structures, a wide range of synthetic material systems have been created to replicate the design concepts of dynamic natural architectures. Examples of biological structures and their man-made counterparts are herein revisited to illustrate how dynamic and adaptive responses emerge from the intimate microscale combination of building blocks with intrinsic nanoscale properties. By using top-down photolithographic methods and bottom-up assembly approaches, biologically inspired dynamic material systems have been created 1) to sense liquid flow with hair-inspired microelectromechanical systems, 2) to autonomously change shape by utilizing plantlike heterogeneous architectures, 3) to homeostatically influence the surrounding environment through self-regulating adaptive surfaces, and 4) to spatially concentrate chemical species by using synthetic microcompartments. The ever-increasing complexity and remarkable functionalities of such synthetic systems offer an encouraging perspective to the rich set of dynamic and adaptive properties that can potentially be implemented in future man-made material systems.

  18. Conductivity Cell Thermal Inertia Correction Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksen, C. C.

    2012-12-01

    Salinity measurements made with a CTD (conductivity-temperature-depth instrument) rely on accurate estimation of water temperature within their conductivity cell. Lueck (1990) developed a theoretical framework for heat transfer between the cell body and water passing through it. Based on this model, Lueck and Picklo (1990) introduced the practice of correcting for cell thermal inertia by filtering a temperature time series using two parameters, an amplitude α and a decay time constant τ, a practice now widely used. Typically these two parameters are chosen for a given cell configuration and internal flushing speed by a statistical method applied to a particular data set. Here, thermal inertia correction theory has been extended to apply to flow speeds spanning well over an order of magnitude, both within and outside a conductivity cell, to provide predictions of α and τ from cell geometry and composition. The extended model enables thermal inertia correction for the variable flows encountered by conductivity cells on autonomous gliders and floats, as well as tethered platforms. The length scale formed as the product of cell encounter speed of isotherms, α, and τ can be used to gauge the size of the temperature correction for a given thermal stratification. For cells flushed by dynamic pressure variation induced by platform motion, this length varies by less than a factor of 2 over more than a decade of speed variation. The magnitude of correction for free-flow flushed sensors is comparable to that of pumped cells, but at an order of magnitude in energy savings. Flow conditions around a cell's exterior are found to be of comparable importance to thermal inertia response as flushing speed. Simplification of cell thermal response to a single normal mode is most valid at slow speed. Error in thermal inertia estimation arises from both neglect of higher modes and numerical discretization of the correction scheme, both of which can be easily quantified

  19. The chromospherically active binary CFTuc revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doǧru, D.; Erdem, A.; Doǧru, S. S.; Zola, S.

    2009-08-01

    This paper presents results derived from analysis of new spectroscopic and photometric observations of the chromospherically active binary system CFTuc. New high-resolution spectra, taken at the Mt. John University Observatory in 2007, were analysed using two methods: cross-correlation and Fourier-based disentangling. As a result, new radial velocity curves of both components were obtained. The resulting orbital elements of CFTuc are a1 sini = 0.0254 +/- 0.0001au, a2sini = 0.0228 +/- 0.0001au, M1sini = 0.902 +/- 0.005Msolar and M2sini = 1.008 +/- 0.006Msolar. The cooler component of the system shows Hα and CaII H&K emissions. Using simultaneous spectroscopic and photometric observations, an anticorrelation between the Hα emission and the BV light curve maculation effects was found. This behaviour indicates a close spatial association between photospheric and chromospheric active regions. Our spectroscopic data and recent BV light curves were solved simultaneously using the Wilson-Devinney code. A dark spot on the surface of the cooler component was assumed to explain large asymmetries observed in the light curves. The following absolute parameters of the components were determined: M1 = 1.11 +/- 0.01Msolar, M2 = 1.23 +/- 0.01Msolar, R1 = 1.63 +/- 0.02Rsolar, R2 = 3.60 +/- 0.02Rsolar, L1 = 3.32 +/- 0.51Lsolar and L2 = 3.91 +/- 0.84Lsolar. The primary component has an age of about 5Gyr and is approaching its main-sequence terminal age. The distance to CFTuc was calculated to be 89 +/- 6pc from the dynamic parallax, neglecting interstellar absorption, in agreement with the Hipparcos value. The orbital period of the system was studied using the O-C analysis. The O-C diagram could be interpreted in terms of either two abrupt changes or a quasi-sinusoidal form superimposed on a downward parabola. These variations are discussed by reference to the combined effect of mass transfer and mass loss, the Applegate mechanism and also a light-time effect due to the existence of

  20. The health risks of saccharin revisited.

    PubMed

    Ellwein, L B; Cohen, S M

    1990-01-01

    Almost from its discovery in 1879, the use of saccharin as an artificial, non-nutritive sweetener has been the center of several controversies regarding potential toxic effects, most recently focusing on the urinary bladder carcinogenicity of sodium saccharin in rats when fed at high doses in two-generation studies. No carcinogenic effect has been observed in mice, hamsters, or monkeys, and numerous epidemiological studies provide no clear or consistent evidence to support the assertion that sodium saccharin increases the risk of bladder cancer in the human population. Mechanism of action studies in the one susceptible species, the rat, continue to provide information useful in assessing potential risk to the human from saccharin consumption. Unlike typical carcinogens which interact with DNA, sodium saccharin is not genotoxic, but leads to an increase in cell proliferation of the urothelium, the only target tissue. It also appears that the effect of saccharin is modified by the salt form in which it is administered, despite equivalent concentrations of saccharin in the urine. The chemical form of saccharin in the urine is unaffected, and there is no evidence for a specific cell receptor for the saccharin molecule. Changes in several urinary parameters, such as pH, sodium, protein, silicates, volume, and others, appear to influence the reaction of the urothelium to sodium saccharin administration. Silicon-containing precipitate and/or crystals appear to be generated in the urine under specific circumstances, acting as microabrasive, cytotoxic material. Using a mathematical model of carcinogenesis, which encompasses the temporal dynamics and complexity of the process at a cellular level, including spontaneous genetic transitions, it has been shown that the effects of sodium saccharin can be explained entirely in terms of its non-genotoxic influence on cell proliferation. In interpreting these analytical studies in the human context, particularly as they pertain to

  1. The spectroscopic orbit of Capella revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, M.; Strassmeier, K. G.

    2011-07-01

    Context. Capella is among the few binary stars with two evolved giant components. The hotter component is a chromospherically active star within the Hertzsprung gap, while the cooler star is possibly helium-core burning. Aims: The known inclination of the orbital plane from astrometry in combination with precise radial velocities will allow very accurate masses to be determined for the individual Capella stars. This will constrain their evolutionary stage and possibly the role of the active star's magnetic field on the dynamical evolution of the binary system. Methods: We obtained a total of 438 high-resolution échelle spectra during the years 2007-2010 and used the measured velocities to recompute the orbital elements. Our double-lined orbital solution yields average residuals of 64 m s-1 for the cool component and 297 m s-1 for the more rapidly rotating hotter component. Results: The semi-amplitude of the cool component is smaller by 0.045 km s-1 than the orbit determination of Torres et al. from data taken during 1996-1999 but more precise by a factor of 5.5, while for the hotter component it is larger by 0.580 km s-1 and more precise by a factor of 3.6. This corresponds to masses of 2.573 ± 0.009 M⊙ and 2.488 ± 0.008 M⊙ for the cool and hot component, respectively. Their relative errors of 0.34% and 0.30% are about half of the values given in Torres et al. for a combined literature-data solution but with absolute values different by 4% and 2% for the two components, respectively. The mass ratio of the system is therefore q = MA/MB = 0.9673 ± 0.0020. Conclusions: Our orbit is the most precise and also likely to be the most accurate ever obtained for Capella. Based on data obtained with the STELLA robotic telescope in Tenerife, an AIP facility jointly operated by AIP and IAC.Full Table 1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/531/A89

  2. Kinetic theory of turbulence for parallel propagation revisited: Formal results

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Peter H.

    2015-08-15

    In a recent paper, Gaelzer et al. [Phys. Plasmas 22, 032310 (2015)] revisited the second-order nonlinear kinetic theory for turbulence propagating in directions parallel/anti-parallel to the ambient magnetic field. The original work was according to Yoon and Fang [Phys. Plasmas 15, 122312 (2008)], but Gaelzer et al. noted that the terms pertaining to discrete-particle effects in Yoon and Fang's theory did not enjoy proper dimensionality. The purpose of Gaelzer et al. was to restore the dimensional consistency associated with such terms. However, Gaelzer et al. was concerned only with linear wave-particle interaction terms. The present paper completes the analysis by considering the dimensional correction to nonlinear wave-particle interaction terms in the wave kinetic equation.

  3. Revisiting the interaction between the chaperone Skp and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Burmann, Björn M; Holdbrook, Daniel A; Callon, Morgane; Bond, Peter J; Hiller, Sebastian

    2015-03-24

    The bacterial outer membrane comprises two main classes of components, lipids and membrane proteins. These nonsoluble compounds are conveyed across the aqueous periplasm along specific molecular transport routes: the lipid lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is shuttled by the Lpt system, whereas outer membrane proteins (Omps) are transported by chaperones, including the periplasmic Skp. In this study, we revisit the specificity of the chaperone-lipid interaction of Skp and LPS. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy measurements indicate that LPS interacts with Skp nonspecifically, accompanied by destabilization of the Skp trimer and similar to denaturation by the nonnatural detergent lauryldimethylamine-N-oxide (LDAO). Bioinformatic analysis of amino acid conservation, structural analysis of LPS-binding proteins, and MD simulations further confirm the absence of a specific LPS binding site on Skp, making a biological relevance of the interaction unlikely. Instead, our analysis reveals a highly conserved salt-bridge network, which likely has a role for Skp function.

  4. Online haemodiafiltration: definition, dose quantification and safety revisited.

    PubMed

    Tattersall, James E; Ward, Richard A

    2013-03-01

    The general objective assigned to the EUropean DIALlysis (EUDIAL) Working Group by the European Renal Association-European Dialysis and Transplant Association (ERA-EDTA) was to enhance the quality of dialysis therapies in Europe in the broadest possible sense. Given the increasing interest in convective therapies, the Working Group has started by focusing on haemodiafiltration (HDF) therapies. Several reports suggest that those therapies potentially improve the outcomes for end-stage renal disease patients. Europe is the leader in the field, having introduced the concept of ultra-purity for water and dialysis fluids and with notified bodies of the European Community having certified water treatment systems and online HDF machines. The prevalence of online HDF-treated patients is steadily increasing in Europe, averaging 15%. A EUDIAL consensus conference was held in Paris on 13 October 2011 to revisit terminology, safety and efficacy of online HDF. This is the first report of the expert group arising from that conference.

  5. Dark matter relic density in scalar-tensor gravity revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Meehan, Michael T.; Whittingham, Ian B. E-mail: Ian.Whittingham@jcu.edu.au

    2015-12-01

    We revisit the calculation of dark matter relic abundances in scalar-tensor gravity using a generic form A(φ{sub *}) = e{sup βφ{sub *}{sup 2/2}} for the coupling between the scalar field φ{sub *} and the metric, for which detailed Big Bang Nucleosynthesis constraints are available. We find that BBN constraints restrict the modified expansion rate in these models to be almost degenerate with the standard expansion history at the time of dark matter decoupling. In this case the maximum level of enhancement of the dark matter relic density was found to be a factor of ∼ 3, several orders of magnitude below that found in previous investigations.

  6. Global Instability on Laminar Separation Bubbles-Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theofilis, Vassilis; Rodriquez, Daniel; Smith, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    In the last 3 years, global linear instability of LSB has been revisited, using state-of-the-art hardware and algorithms. Eigenspectra of LSB flows have been understood and classified in branches of known and newly-discovered eigenmodes. Major achievements: World-largest numerical solutions of global eigenvalue problems are routinely performed. Key aerodynamic phenomena have been explained via critical point theory, applied to our global mode results. Theoretical foundation for control of LSB flows has been laid. Global mode of LSB at the origin of observable phenomena. U-separation on semi-infinite plate. Stall cells on (stalled) airfoil. Receptivity/Sensitivity/AFC feasible (practical?) via: Adjoint EVP solution. Direct/adjoint coupling (the Crete connection). Minor effect of compressibility on global instability in the subsonic compressible regime. Global instability analysis of LSB in realistic supersonic flows apparently quite some way down the horizon.

  7. Bond energy analysis revisited and designed toward a rigorous methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, Hiromi; Ohashi, Hideaki; Imamura, Yutaka; Kikuchi, Yasuaki

    2011-09-01

    The present study theoretically revisits and numerically assesses two-body energy decomposition schemes including a newly proposed one. The new decomposition scheme is designed to make the equilibrium bond distance equivalent with the minimum point of bond energies. Although the other decomposition schemes generally predict the wrong order of the C-C bond strengths of C2H2, C2H4, and C2H6, the new decomposition scheme is capable of reproducing the C-C bond strengths. Numerical assessment on a training set of molecules demonstrates that the present scheme exhibits a stronger correlation with bond dissociation energies than the other decomposition schemes do, which suggests that the new decomposition scheme is a reliable and powerful analysis methodology.

  8. Axial Electron Heat Loss From Mirror Devices Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D

    2004-08-16

    An issue of the axial electron heat loss is of a significant importance for mirror-based fusion devices. This problem has been considered in a number of publications but it is still shrouded in misconceptions. In this paper we revisit it once again. We discuss the following issues: (1) Formation of the electron distribution function in the end tank at large expansion ratios; (2) The secondary emission from the end plates and the ways of suppressing it (if needed); (3) Ionization and charge exchange in the presence of neutrals in the end tanks; (4) Instabilities caused by the peculiar shape of the electron distribution function and their possible impact on the electron heat losses; (5) Electron heat losses in the pulsed mode of operation of mirror devices.

  9. Energy in synthetic fertilizers and pesticides: Revisited. Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, M.G.; English, B.C.; Turhollow, A.F.; Nyangito, H.O.

    1994-01-01

    Agricultural chemicals that are derived from fossil-fuels are the major energy intensive inputs in agriculture. Growing scarcity of the world`s fossil resources stimulated research and development of energy-efficient technology for manufacturing these chemicals in the last decade. The purpose of this study is to revisit the energy requirements of major plant nutrients and pesticides. The data from manufacturers energy survey conducted by The Fertilizer Institute are used to estimate energy requirements of fertilizers. Energy estimates for pesticides are developed from consulting previously published literature. The impact of technical innovation in the fertilizer industry to US corn, cotton, soybean and wheat producers is estimated in terms of energy-saving.

  10. The Safety of Adjuvanted Vaccines Revisited: Vaccine-Induced Narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, S Sohail; Montomoli, Emanuele; Pasini, Franco Laghi; Steinman, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Despite the very high benefit-to-risk ratio of vaccines, the fear of negative side effects has discouraged many people from getting vaccinated, resulting in the reemergence of previously controlled diseases such as measles, pertussis and diphtheria. This fear has been amplified more recently by multiple epidemiologic studies that confirmed the link of an AS03-adjuvanted pandemic influenza vaccine (Pandemrix, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, Germany) used in Europe during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic [A(H1N1) pdm09] with the development of narcolepsy, a chronic sleep disorder, in children and adolescents. However, public misperceptions of what adjuvants are and why they are used in vaccines has created in some individuals a closed "black box" attitude towards all vaccines. The focus of this review article is to revisit this "black box" using the example of narcolepsy associated with the European AS03-adjuvanted pandemic influenza vaccine. PMID:27228647

  11. Semiclassical approach for the evaporating black hole revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gim, Yongwan; Kim, Wontae

    2016-01-01

    A recent calculation shows that the observed energy density in the Unruh state at the future event horizon as seen by a freely falling observer is finite if the observer is released from rest at any positive distance outside the horizon; however, it is getting larger and larger so that it is negatively divergent at the horizon in the limit that the observer starts falling from rest at the horizon, which corresponds to the infinite boost with respect to the freely falling observer at a finite distance from the horizon. In order to resolve some conflicts between the recent calculation and the conventional ones in the well-known literatures, the calculation of the free-fall energy density is revisited and some differences are pointed out.

  12. Neuroticism and vigilance revisited: A transcranial doppler investigation.

    PubMed

    Mandell, Arielle R; Becker, Alexandra; VanAndel, Aaron; Nelson, Andrew; Shaw, Tyler H

    2015-11-01

    Selecting for vigilance assignments remains an important factor in human performance research. The current study revisits the potential relationship between vigilance performance and trait neuroticism, in light of two possible theories. The first theory suggests that neuroticism impairs vigilance performance by competing for available resources. The second theory, attentional control theory, posits that high neuroticism can result in similar or superior performance levels due to the allocation of compensatory effort. In the present study, Transcranial Doppler Sonography was used to investigate the neurophysiological underpinnings of neuroticism during a 12-min abbreviated vigilance task. Performance results were not modified by level of neuroticism, but high neuroticism was associated with higher initial CBFV levels and a greater CBFV decrement over time. These findings indicate that participants higher in neuroticism recruited additional cognitive resources in order to achieve similar performance, suggesting that there is more of an effect on processing efficiency than effectiveness.

  13. Revisiting the Scattering Greenhouse Effect of CO2 Ice Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitzmann, D.

    2016-02-01

    Carbon dioxide ice clouds are thought to play an important role for cold terrestrial planets with thick CO2 dominated atmospheres. Various previous studies showed that a scattering greenhouse effect by carbon dioxide ice clouds could result in a massive warming of the planetary surface. However, all of these studies only employed simplified two-stream radiative transfer schemes to describe the anisotropic scattering. Using accurate radiative transfer models with a general discrete ordinate method, this study revisits this important effect and shows that the positive climatic impact of carbon dioxide clouds was strongly overestimated in the past. The revised scattering greenhouse effect can have important implications for the early Mars, but also for planets like the early Earth or the position of the outer boundary of the habitable zone.

  14. Seismic demand of plan-asymmetric structures: a revisit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Rana; Chakroborty, Suvonkar

    2013-03-01

    In view of the recognition of the importance of the interdependent behavior of strength and stiffness of walltype structural elements, the seismic demand of plan-asymmetric systems is revisited. Useful strength distribution strategies, i.e., `Center of Strength-Center of Mass (CV-CM) coinciding' and `Balanced Center of Strength-Center of Resistance (CVCR)' are adopted. Design charts for the seismic demand of classical uni-directionally and bi-directionally asymmetric systems are developed in a simple unified format. A conceptual framework is also outlined to conveniently apply the design charts. Illustrations are included to explain the use of the current recommendations in practical design. The study also highlights the relative performance of `CV-CM coinciding' and `Balanced CV-CR' criteria.

  15. Revisiting Johnson and Jackson boundary conditions for granular flows

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tingwen; Benyahia, Sofiane

    2012-07-01

    In this article, we revisit Johnson and Jackson boundary conditions for granular flows. The oblique collision between a particle and a flat wall is analyzed by adopting the classic rigid-body theory and a more realistic semianalytical model. Based on the kinetic granular theory, the input parameter for the partial-slip boundary conditions, specularity coefficient, which is not measurable in experiments, is then interpreted as a function of the particle-wall restitution coefficient, the frictional coefficient, and the normalized slip velocity at the wall. An analytical expression for the specularity coefficient is suggested for a flat, frictional surface with a low frictional coefficient. The procedure for determining the specularity coefficient for a more general problem is outlined, and a working approximation is provided.

  16. Revisiting the 100 Year Old Radioactivity Lectures of Frederick Soddy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampton, Christine

    2008-04-01

    Between 1908 and 1922, Frederick Soddy, MA., FRS (Dr. Lee`s Professor of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Univ. of Oxford) published four editions of a compendium of his experimental lectures delivered at the University of Glasgow, under the title ``The Interpretation of Radium, and the Structure of the Atom''. Professor Soddy taught his students about `radium writing' and the emanation of radium. He presented a radium clock designed by Professor Strutt; showed students `Pleochroic Halos'; and described the separation of `ionium' from its isotope, thorium. The process of constructing a cohesive logic to empirical observations of this newly discovered phenomenon of radioactivity was a challenging one. Some aspects did not stand the test of time. However, revisiting these lectures after 100 years gives us fascinating insight into the mental processes of the early pioneers in radioactivity.

  17. Revisiting a Classic Study of the Molecular Clock.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Lauren M; Boland, Joseph R; Braverman, John M

    2016-03-01

    A constant rate of molecular evolution among homologous proteins and across lineages is known as the molecular clock. This concept has been useful for estimating divergence times. Here, we revisit a study by Richard Dickerson (J Mol Evol 1:26-45, 1971), wherein he provided striking visual evidence for a constant rate of amino acid changes among various evolutionary branch points. Dickerson's study is commonly cited as support of the molecular clock and a figure from it is often reproduced in textbooks. Since its publication, however, there have been updates made to dates of common ancestors based on the fossil record that should be considered. Additionally, collecting the accession numbers and carefully outlining Dickerson's methods serves as a resource to students of the molecular clock hypothesis.

  18. Revisiting the Interaction between the Chaperone Skp and Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Burmann, Björn M.; Holdbrook, Daniel A.; Callon, Morgane; Bond, Peter J.; Hiller, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial outer membrane comprises two main classes of components, lipids and membrane proteins. These nonsoluble compounds are conveyed across the aqueous periplasm along specific molecular transport routes: the lipid lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is shuttled by the Lpt system, whereas outer membrane proteins (Omps) are transported by chaperones, including the periplasmic Skp. In this study, we revisit the specificity of the chaperone-lipid interaction of Skp and LPS. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy measurements indicate that LPS interacts with Skp nonspecifically, accompanied by destabilization of the Skp trimer and similar to denaturation by the nonnatural detergent lauryldimethylamine-N-oxide (LDAO). Bioinformatic analysis of amino acid conservation, structural analysis of LPS-binding proteins, and MD simulations further confirm the absence of a specific LPS binding site on Skp, making a biological relevance of the interaction unlikely. Instead, our analysis reveals a highly conserved salt-bridge network, which likely has a role for Skp function. PMID:25809264

  19. Response variance in functional maps: neural darwinism revisited.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hirokazu; Yokota, Ryo; Kanzaki, Ryohei

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms by which functional maps and map plasticity contribute to cortical computation remain controversial. Recent studies have revisited the theory of neural Darwinism to interpret the learning-induced map plasticity and neuronal heterogeneity observed in the cortex. Here, we hypothesize that the Darwinian principle provides a substrate to explain the relationship between neuron heterogeneity and cortical functional maps. We demonstrate in the rat auditory cortex that the degree of response variance is closely correlated with the size of its representational area. Further, we show that the response variance within a given population is altered through training. These results suggest that larger representational areas may help to accommodate heterogeneous populations of neurons. Thus, functional maps and map plasticity are likely to play essential roles in Darwinian computation, serving as effective, but not absolutely necessary, structures to generate diverse response properties within a neural population.

  20. Revisiting NMR composite pulses for broadband 2H excitation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Ming; Roopchand, Rabia; Mananga, Eugene S.; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Chen, Qun; Boutis, Gregory S.; Hu, Bingwen

    2014-01-01

    Quadrupolar echo NMR spectroscopy of static solids often requires RF excitation that covers spectral widths exceeding 100 kHz, which is difficult to obtain due to instrumental limitations. In this work we revisit four well-known composite pulses (COM-I, II, III and IV) for broadband excitation in deuterium quadrupolar echo spectroscopy. These composite pulses are combined with several phase cycling schemes that were previously shown to decrease finite pulse width distortions in deuterium solid-echo experiments performed with two single pulses. The simulations and experiments show that COM-II and IV composite pulses combined with an 8-step phase cycling aid in achieving broadband excitation with limited pulse width distortions. PMID:25583576

  1. Feedback instability in the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling system: Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, T.-H.

    2010-02-15

    A coupled set of the reduced magnetohydrodynamic and the two-fluid equations is applied to the magnetosphere-ionosphere (M-I) feedback interactions in relation to growth of quite auroral arcs. A theoretical analysis revisiting the linear feedback instability reveals asymptotic behaviors of the dispersion relation and a non-Hermite property in the M-I coupling. A nonlinear simulation of the feedback instability in the M-I coupling system manifests growth of the Kelvin-Helmholtz-like mode in the magnetosphere as the secondary instability. The distorted vortex and field-aligned current profiles propagating as the shear Alfven waves lead to spontaneous deformation of ionospheric density and current structures associated with auroral arcs.

  2. Revisiting Public Health Challenges in the New Millennium

    PubMed Central

    Anish, TS; Sreelakshmi, PR

    2013-01-01

    Positive Health of the communities could only be brought out through the interrelationship between conventional health sector and other development sectors. It was a dream that came true when World Health Organization (WHO) accepted Primary Health Care (PHC) as the major tool to achieve its proposed goal of Health For All (HFA) by 2000 A.D., but we could not succeed as expected. Now we have the Millennium Development Goals (MDG), which place health at the heart of development but the achievements in health is still challenging. The literature search in this article has been conducted in Pub Med and Google scholar, with the aim to draw references to discuss the major health issues and ways to tackle them. The current article briefly narrates the burden and complexities of challenges faced by the present global health. Revisiting the concept of PHC and reaffirming our solidarity to this philosophy is the need of this hour. PMID:24116303

  3. Axial Electron Heat Loss from Mirror Devices Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D.D.

    2005-01-15

    An issue of the axial electron heat loss is of a significant importance for mirror-based fusion devices. This problem has been considered in a number of publications but it is still shrouded in misconceptions. In this paper we revisit it once again. We discuss the following issues: 1) Formation of the electron distribution function in the end tank at large expansion ratios; 2) The secondary emission from the end plates and the ways of suppressing it (if needed); 3) Ionization and charge exchange in the presence of neutrals in the end tanks; 4) Instabilities caused by the peculiar shape of the electron distribution function and their possible impact on the electron heat losses; 5) Electron heat losses in the pulsed mode of operation of mirror devices.

  4. How clonal are Neisseria species? The epidemic clonality model revisited.

    PubMed

    Tibayrenc, Michel; Ayala, Francisco J

    2015-07-21

    The three species Neisseria meningitidis, Neisseria gonorrheae, and Neisseria lactamica are often regarded as highly recombining bacteria. N. meningitidis has been considered a paradigmatic case of the "semiclonal model" or of "epidemic clonality," demonstrating occasional bouts of clonal propagation in an otherwise recombining species. In this model, occasional clonality generates linkage disequilibrium in the short term. In the long run, however, the effects of clonality are countered by recombination. We show that many data are at odds with this proposal and that N. meningitidis fits the criteria that we have proposed for predominant clonal evolution (PCE). We point out that (i) the proposed way to distinguish epidemic clonality from PCE may be faulty and (ii) the evidence of deep phylogenies by microarrays and whole-genome sequencing is at odds with the predictions of the semiclonal model. Last, we revisit the species status of N. meningitidis, N. gonorrheae, and N. lactamica in the light of the PCE model.

  5. The Safety of Adjuvanted Vaccines Revisited: Vaccine-Induced Narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, S Sohail; Montomoli, Emanuele; Pasini, Franco Laghi; Steinman, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Despite the very high benefit-to-risk ratio of vaccines, the fear of negative side effects has discouraged many people from getting vaccinated, resulting in the reemergence of previously controlled diseases such as measles, pertussis and diphtheria. This fear has been amplified more recently by multiple epidemiologic studies that confirmed the link of an AS03-adjuvanted pandemic influenza vaccine (Pandemrix, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, Germany) used in Europe during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic [A(H1N1) pdm09] with the development of narcolepsy, a chronic sleep disorder, in children and adolescents. However, public misperceptions of what adjuvants are and why they are used in vaccines has created in some individuals a closed "black box" attitude towards all vaccines. The focus of this review article is to revisit this "black box" using the example of narcolepsy associated with the European AS03-adjuvanted pandemic influenza vaccine.

  6. Dynamical modelling of meteoroid streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. L.; Wiegert, P. A.

    2014-07-01

    Accurate simulations of meteoroid streams permit the prediction of stream interaction with Earth, and provide a measure of risk to Earth satellites and interplanetary spacecraft. Current cometary ejecta and meteoroid stream models have been somewhat successful in predicting some stream observations, but have required significant assumptions and simplifications. Extending on the approach of Vaubaillon et al. 2005, we model dust ejection from the cometary nucleus, and generate sample particles representing bins of distinct dynamical evolution-regulating characteristics (size, density, direction, albedo). Ephemerides of the sample particles are integrated and recorded for later assignment of weights based on model parameter changes. To assist in model analysis we are developing interactive software to permit the "turning of knobs" of model parameters, allowing for near-real-time 3D visualization of resulting stream structure. Using the tool, we will revisit prior assumptions made, and will observe the impact of introducing non-uniform and time-variant cometary surface attributes and processes.

  7. The width of the Roper resonance in baryon chiral perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gegelia, Jambul; Meißner, Ulf-G.; Yao, De-Liang

    2016-09-01

    We calculate the width of the Roper resonance at next-to-leading order in a systematic expansion of baryon chiral perturbation theory with pions, nucleons, and the delta and Roper resonances as dynamical degrees of freedom. Three unknown low-energy constants contribute up to the given order. One of them can be fixed by reproducing the empirical value for the width of the Roper decay into a pion and a nucleon. Assuming that the remaining two couplings of the Roper interaction take values equal to those of the nucleon, the result for the width of the Roper decaying into a nucleon and two pions is consistent with the experimental value.

  8. BHQ revisited (1) - Looking at grain size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilbronner, Renée; Kilian, Rüdiger; Tullis, Jan

    2016-04-01

    microstructure and texture analysis of Heilbronner & Tullis (2006). Here, in poster (1), we focus on the recrystallized grain size with the aim of (a) comparing CIP- and EBSD derived grain size measurements, (b) of comparing the recrystallized grain size of coaxially deformed and sheared BHQ and (c) in order to confirm that the quartz piezometer indeed depends on texture, and (d) to test if it also depends on the type of deformation (irrotational versus rotational deformation). References cited: Heilbronner, R., and S.D. Barrett (2014) Image Analysis in Earth Sciences, Springer. Heilbronner, R., and J. Tullis (2002), The effect of static annealing on micro- structure and crystallographic preferred orientations of quartzites experimentally deformed in axial compression and shear, Geol. Soc. Spec. Publ., 200, 191 - 218. Heilbronner, R., and J. Tullis (2006), Evolution of c axis pole figures and grain size during dynamic recrystallization: Results from experimentally sheared quartzite. JGR, 111, B10202, doi:10.1029/2005JB004194, 2006 Hirth, G., and J. Tullis (1992), Dislocation creep regimes in quartz aggregates, JSG, 14, 145-159. Stipp, M., and J. Tullis (2003), The recrystallized grain size piezometer for quartz, Geophys. Res. Lett., 30(21), 2088, doi:10.1029/2003GL018444.

  9. Franklin Delano Roosevelt: The Diagnosis of Poliomyelitis Revisited.

    PubMed

    Ditunno, John F; Becker, Bruce E; Herbison, Gerald J

    2016-09-01

    Revisiting the ailments of famous historical persons in light of contemporary medical understanding has become a common academic hobby. Public discussion of Franklin Delano Roosevelt's (FDR) diagnosis of poliomyelitis after his sudden onset of paralysis in 1921 has received just such a revisitation. Recently, this 2003 historical analysis has been referenced widely on the Internet and in biographies, raising speculation that his actual diagnosis should have been Guillain-Barré Syndrome, a noncontagious disease of the peripheral nervous system rather than poliomyelitis. The authors of that 2003 analysis used a statistical analysis of his case by selectively choosing some of his reported symptoms. FDR's diagnosis of poliomyelitis, however, was fully supported by the findings of leading expert physicians of that time, who were very knowledgeable in the then-common disease and who periodically examined him during the period of 1921-1924. The most significant diagnostic features of polio are the absence of objective sensory findings in the presence of flaccid motor paralysis. These features are consistent with diagnostic criteria extant during the periods of major poliomyelitis epidemics as well as those of the Center for Disease Control 90 years later. Additional findings of fever, prodromal hyperesthesia, more severe residual proximal muscle weakness, and extensive lower extremity impairment requiring mobility with long leg braces or a wheelchair give further evidence for the diagnosis in FDR's case. Nonbulbar Guillain-Barré Syndrome, which shares the features of a flaccid paralysis and thus mimicking the initial presentation of poliomyelitis, has more than an 80% complete recovery with no reported cases of eventual wheelchair use. The most severe cases of Guillain-Barré Syndrome often have persistent objective sensory loss, associated with greater weakness in the feet and hands, which show no resemblance to FDR's impairment and disability. In light of the expert

  10. V838 Monocerotis revisited: Space phenomenon imitates art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-03-01

    V838 Monocerotis revisited: Space phenomenon imitates art hi-res Size hi-res: 558 Kb Credits: NASA, the Hubble Heritage Team (AURA/STScI) and ESA V838 Monocerotis revisited: Space phenomenon imitates art "Starry Night", Vincent van Gogh's famous painting, is renowned for its bold whorls of light sweeping across a raging night sky. Although this image of the heavens came only from the artist's restless imagination, a new picture from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope bears remarkable similarities to the van Gogh work, complete with never-before-seen spirals of dust swirling across trillions of kilometres of interstellar space. This image, obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on February 8, 2004, is Hubble's latest view of an expanding halo of light around a distant star, named V838 Monocerotis (V838 Mon). The illumination of interstellar dust comes from the red supergiant star at the middle of the image, which gave off a flashbulb-like pulse of light two years ago. V838 Mon is located about 20,000 light-years away from Earth in the direction of the constellation Monoceros, placing the star at the outer edge of our Milky Way galaxy V838 Monocerotis revisited: Space phenomenon imitates art hi-res Size hi-res: 1989 kb Credits: NASA, the Hubble Heritage Team (AURA/STScI) and ESA V838 Monocerotis revisited: Space phenomenon imitates art "Starry Night", Vincent van Gogh's famous painting, is renowned for its bold whorls of light sweeping across a raging night sky. Although this image of the heavens came only from the artist's restless imagination, a new picture from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope bears remarkable similarities to the van Gogh work, complete with never-before-seen spirals of dust swirling across trillions of kilometres of interstellar space. This image, obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on February 8, 2004, is Hubble's latest view of an expanding halo of light around a distant star, named V838 Monocerotis (V838 Mon). The

  11. Revisiting reflexology: Concept, evidence, current practice, and practitioner training

    PubMed Central

    Embong, Nurul Haswani; Soh, Yee Chang; Ming, Long Chiau; Wong, Tin Wui

    2015-01-01

    Reflexology is basically a study of how one part of the human body relates to another part of the body. Reflexology practitioners rely on the reflexes map of the feet and hands to all the internal organs and other human body parts. They believe that by applying the appropriate pressure and massage certain spots on the feet and hands, all other body parts could be energized and rejuvenated. This review aimed to revisit the concept of reflexology and examine its effectiveness, practices, and the training for reflexology practitioners. PubMed, SCOPUS, Google Scholar, and SpringerLink databases were utilized to search the following medical subject headings or keywords: foot massage, reflexology, foot reflexotherapy, reflexological treatment, and zone therapy. The articles published for the last 10 years were included. Previous systematic reviews failed to show concrete evidence for any specific effect of reflexology in any conditions. Due to its non-invasive, non-pharmacological complementary nature, reflexology is widely accepted and anecdotal evidence of positive effect reflexology in a variety of health conditions are available. Adequate training for practitioners is necessary to ensure the consistency of service provided. PMID:26587391

  12. The hateful patient revisited: Relevance for 21st century medicine.

    PubMed

    Strous, Rael D; Ulman, Anne-Marie; Kotler, Moshe

    2006-10-01

    While the practice of medicine has changed over the years, including technological advances, access to medical information, and the narrowing of socio-economic and educational gaps between the clinician and his/her patients, the importance of the doctor-patient relationship has not diminished over time. This can be a very rewarding interaction. However, many physicians experience a great deal of anger, inadequacy and frustration, and much of the actual practice of medicine may become a burden rather than a source of satisfaction. Physicians may encounter a subset of patients who engender strong negative feelings, despair and even downright malice. An understanding of the "hateful patient" can therefore be very informative to the physician. Several categories of such patients may be described, and sensitivity to the phenomenon will lead to improved physician well-being, less self-destructive patient behavior and a lower risk of litigation. Several factors may assist the 21st century physician in managing the "hateful patient" in an empathic manner and in making some sense of why the patient has resorted to negative response patterns. Ultimately, a failure to consider these issues will result in poorer medical care and, no less important, reduced satisfaction of both patients and doctors. The intention of this article is to revisit the concept and to place it in the context of contemporary medical practice.

  13. IMPULSIVE SPOT HEATING AND THERMAL EXPLOSION OF INTERSTELLAR GRAINS REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Ivlev, A. V.; Röcker, T. B.; Vasyunin, A.; Caselli, P.

    2015-05-20

    The problem of the impulsive heating of dust grains in cold, dense interstellar clouds is revisited theoretically with the aim of better understanding the leading mechanisms of the explosive desorption of icy mantles. We rigorously show that if the heating of a reactive medium occurs within a sufficiently localized spot (e.g., the heating of mantles by cosmic rays (CRs)), then the subsequent thermal evolution is characterized by a single dimensionless number λ. This number identifies a bifurcation between two distinct regimes: when λ exceeds a critical value (threshold), the heat equation exhibits the explosive solution, i.e., the thermal (chemical) explosion is triggered. Otherwise, thermal diffusion causes the deposited heat to spread over the entire grain—this regime is commonly known as whole-grain heating. The theory allows us to find a critical combination of physical parameters that govern the explosion of icy mantles due to impulsive spot heating. In particular, our calculations suggest that heavy CR species (e.g., iron ions) colliding with dust are able to trigger the explosion. Based on recently calculated local CR spectra, we estimate the expected rate of explosive desorption. The efficiency of the desorption, which in principle affects all solid species independent of their binding energy, is shown to be comparable to other CR desorption mechanisms typically considered in the literature. Also, the theory allows us to estimate the maximum abundances of reactive species that may be stored in the mantles, which provides important constraints on the available astrochemical models.

  14. SUSY effects in Rb: Revisited under current experimental constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Wei; Yang, Jin Min

    2016-06-01

    In this note we revisit the SUSY effects in Rb under current experimental constraints including the LHC Higgs data, the B-physics measurements, the dark matter relic density and direct detection limits, as well as the precision electroweak data. We first perform a scan to figure out the currently allowed parameter space and then display the SUSY effects in Rb. We find that although the SUSY parameter space has been severely restrained by current experimental data, both the general MSSM and the natural-SUSY scenario can still alter Rb with a magnitude sizable enough to be observed at future Z-factories (ILC, CEPC, FCC-ee, Super Z-factory) which produce 109-1012Z-bosons. To be specific, assuming a precise measurement δRb = 2.0 ×10-5 at FCC-ee, we can probe a right-handed stop up to 530 GeV through chargino-stop loops, probe a sbottom to 850 GeV through neutralino-sbottom loops and a charged Higgs to 770 GeV through the Higgs-top quark loops for a large tan ⁡ β. The full one-loop SUSY correction to Rb can reach 1 ×10-4 in natural SUSY and 2 ×10-4 in the general MSSM.

  15. Grid Based Nonlinear Filtering Revisited: Recursive Estimation & Asymptotic Optimality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalogerias, Dionysios S.; Petropulu, Athina P.

    2016-08-01

    We revisit the development of grid based recursive approximate filtering of general Markov processes in discrete time, partially observed in conditionally Gaussian noise. The grid based filters considered rely on two types of state quantization: The \\textit{Markovian} type and the \\textit{marginal} type. We propose a set of novel, relaxed sufficient conditions, ensuring strong and fully characterized pathwise convergence of these filters to the respective MMSE state estimator. In particular, for marginal state quantizations, we introduce the notion of \\textit{conditional regularity of stochastic kernels}, which, to the best of our knowledge, constitutes the most relaxed condition proposed, under which asymptotic optimality of the respective grid based filters is guaranteed. Further, we extend our convergence results, including filtering of bounded and continuous functionals of the state, as well as recursive approximate state prediction. For both Markovian and marginal quantizations, the whole development of the respective grid based filters relies more on linear-algebraic techniques and less on measure theoretic arguments, making the presentation considerably shorter and technically simpler.

  16. Revisiting the Mode-Beating Model of AC Helicity Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauppe, J. P.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2010-11-01

    Oscillating field current drive (OFCD), or AC helicity injection, is an important candidate for current sustainment in reversed-field pinch devices. Bellan examined AC helicity injection in a slab geometry and described it as a beating between two plasma modes that produces a mean current parallel to the equilibrium magnetic field [P. M. Bellan. Phys. Rev. Lett. 54, 1381 (1985)]. This mean current is confined to within a classical resistive skin depth of the plasma surface, and plasma relaxation is responsible for transporting this current to the core. We revisit this analytical work and examine how this wave-beating effect is represented in zero-beta MHD simulations, including consideration of the choice of boundary conditions. In addition to the expected parallel current, numerical simulations show a pinch effect from a cycle-averaged current that is perpendicular to the mean magnetic field, which is not described in Bellan's original work. Our results are discussed with respect to Boozer's general anti-dynamo theorem [A. H. Boozer. Phys. Fluids B Vol. 5, 2271 (1993)].

  17. Fever tree revisited: From malaria to autoinflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Pastore, Serena; Vuch, Josef; Bianco, Anna Monica; Taddio, Andrea; Tommasini, Alberto

    2015-11-01

    Over the centuries the idea of recurrent fevers has mainly been associated with malaria, but many other fevers, such as typhoid and diphtheria were cause for concern. It is only in recent times, with the more severe forms of fever from infectious origin becoming less frequent or a cause for worry that we started noticing recurrent fevers without any clear infectious cause, being described as having a pathogenesis of autoinflammatory nature. The use of molecular examinations in many cases can allow a diagnosis where the cause is monogenic. In other cases, however the pathogenesis is likely to be multifactorial and the diagnostic-therapeutic approach is strictly clinical. The old fever tree paradigm developed to describe fevers caused by malaria has been revisited here to describe today's periodic fevers from the periodic fever adenitis pharyngitis aphthae syndrome to the more rare autoinflammatory diseases. This model may allow us to place cases that are yet to be identified which are likely to be of multifactorial origin. PMID:26566482

  18. Historical volcanoes of Armenia and adjacent areas: What is revisited?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakhanian, A.; Jrbashyan, R.; Trifonov, V.; Philip, H.; Arakelian, S.; Avagyan, A.; Baghdassaryan, H.; Davtian, V.

    2006-07-01

    The validity of some data in Karakhanian et al. [Karakhanian, A., Djrbashian, R., Trifonov V., Philip H., Arakelian S., Avagian, A., 2002. Holocene-historical volcanism and active faults as natural risk factor for Armenia and adjacent countries. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 113, 1, 319-344; Karakhanian, A., Jrbashyan, R., Trifonov, V., Philip, H., Arakelian, S., Avagyan, A., Baghdassaryan, H., Davtian, V., Ghoukassyan, Yu., 2003. Volcanic hazards in the region of the Armenian nuclear power plant. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 126/1-2, 31-62] that are revisited by R. Haroutiunian is considered. A conclusion is made that the revisions suggested by Haroutiunian concern unessential parts of the content of work by Karakhanian et al. [Karakhanian, A., Djrbashian, R., Trifonov V., Philip H., Arakelian S., Avagian, A., 2002. Holocene-historical volcanism and active faults as natural risk factor for Armenia and adjacent countries. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 113, 1, 319-344; Karakhanian, A., Jrbashyan, R., Trifonov, V., Philip, H., Arakelian, S., Avagyan, A., Baghdassaryan, H., Davtian, V., Ghoukassyan, Yu., 2003. Volcanic hazards in the region of the Armenian nuclear power plant. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 126/1-2, 31-62]. This article presents new evidence and re-proves the earlier conclusions that are disputed or revised by R. Haroutiunian.

  19. Automated Guidance for Thermodynamics Essays: Critiquing Versus Revisiting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Dermot F.; Vitale, Jonathan M.; Linn, Marcia C.

    2015-12-01

    Middle school students struggle to explain thermodynamics concepts. In this study, to help students succeed, we use a natural language processing program to analyze their essays explaining the aspects of thermodynamics and provide guidance based on the automated score. The 346 sixth-grade students were assigned to either the critique condition where they criticized an explanation or the revisit condition where they reviewed visualizations. Within each condition, the student was assigned one of two types of tailored guidance based on the sophistication of their original essay. Both forms of guidance led to significant improvement in student understanding on the posttest. Guidance was more effective for students with low prior knowledge than for those with high prior knowledge (consistent with regression toward the mean). However, analysis of student responses to the guidance illustrates the value of aligning guidance with prior knowledge. All students were required to revise their essay as an embedded assessment. While effective, teachers involved in this study reported that revising is resisted by students and does not align with typical, vocabulary-focused classroom writing activities.

  20. Fever tree revisited: From malaria to autoinflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pastore, Serena; Vuch, Josef; Bianco, Anna Monica; Taddio, Andrea; Tommasini, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Over the centuries the idea of recurrent fevers has mainly been associated with malaria, but many other fevers, such as typhoid and diphtheria were cause for concern. It is only in recent times, with the more severe forms of fever from infectious origin becoming less frequent or a cause for worry that we started noticing recurrent fevers without any clear infectious cause, being described as having a pathogenesis of autoinflammatory nature. The use of molecular examinations in many cases can allow a diagnosis where the cause is monogenic. In other cases, however the pathogenesis is likely to be multifactorial and the diagnostic-therapeutic approach is strictly clinical. The old fever tree paradigm developed to describe fevers caused by malaria has been revisited here to describe today’s periodic fevers from the periodic fever adenitis pharyngitis aphthae syndrome to the more rare autoinflammatory diseases. This model may allow us to place cases that are yet to be identified which are likely to be of multifactorial origin. PMID:26566482

  1. Interplant volatile signaling in willows: revisiting the original talking trees.

    PubMed

    Pearse, Ian S; Hughes, Kathy; Shiojiri, Kaori; Ishizaki, Satomi; Karban, Richard

    2013-07-01

    The importance of interplant volatile signaling in plant-herbivore interactions has been a contentious issue for the past 30 years. We revisit willows as the system in which evidence for interplant signaling was originally found, but then questioned. We established three well-replicated experiments with two willow species (Salix exigua and Salix lemmonii) to address whether the receipt of an interplant signal from a neighboring willow reduces herbivore damage. Additionally we tested whether this signal is volatile in nature, and whether plants signal better to themselves than they do to other individuals. In all three experiments, we found evidence that cues from a damaged neighbor reduce subsequent herbivory experienced by willows. In one experiment, we showed that bagging of clipped tissue, which prevents the exchange of volatile signals, removed the effect of neighbor wounding. This was consistent with results from the other two experiments, in which clipping potted neighbors connected only through airborne volatile cues reduced damage of receivers. In one year, we found evidence that the perception of volatile signals from genetically identical clones was more effective at reducing foliar damage to a neighbor than signals from a genetically different individual. However, this trend was not significant in the following year. In three well-replicated experiments, we found strong evidence for the importance of interplant volatile cues in mediating herbivore interactions with willows. PMID:23576105

  2. Solid-solid transitions induced by repulsive interactions revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navascués, G.; Velasco, E.; Mederos, L.

    2016-10-01

    We revisit a problem already studied 15 years ago by us in collaboration with Stell and Hemmer: the isostructural solid-solid transitions induced by repulsive particle interactions exhibited by classical systems interacting via the Stell-Hemmer potentials. The full phase diagram in the crystal region is obtained by applying a perturbation theory for classical solids used during our collaboration with Stell. Also, the performance of such a theory is now tested by comparing the perturbative phase diagram with that obtained from computer simulations. The latter was calculated using a recently refined method to obtain the free-energy of crystals by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The perturbation theory captures the correct topology and correctly identifies the stable, fcc and bcc, phases. In addition, the theory predicts the occurrence of special points: a point where the two stable structures coexist at the same density, and two critical points terminating the corresponding isostructural phase transitions for fcc and bcc phases. The location of some of these features in the phase diagram is predicted almost quantitatively. However, phase boundaries involving the non-compact bcc phase are much less accurate, a problem that can be traced to the poor representation used for the bcc phase of the reference, hard-sphere, system.

  3. Psychological Well-Being Revisited: Advances in Science and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Ryff, Carol D.

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the research and interventions that have grown up around a model of psychological well-being (Ryff, 1989) generated more than two decades ago to address neglected aspects of positive functioning, such as purposeful engagement in life, realization of personal talents and capacities, and enlightened self-knowledge. The conceptual origins of this formulation are revisited and scientific products emerging from six thematic areas are examined: (1) how well-being changes across adult development and later life, (2) what are the personality correlates of well-being, (3) how well-being is linked with experiences in family life, (4) how well-being relates to work and other community activities, (5) what are the connections between well-being and health, including biological risk factors, (6) and via clinical and intervention studies, how psychological well-being can be promoted for ever greater segments of society. Together, these topics illustrate flourishing interest across diverse scientific disciplines in understanding adults as striving, meaning-making, proactive organisms who are actively negotiating the challenges of life. A take-home message is that increasing evidence supports the health protective features of psychological well-being in reducing risk for disease and promoting length of life. A recurrent and increasingly important theme is resilience – the capacity to maintain or regain well-being in the face of adversity. Implications for future research and practice are considered. PMID:24281296

  4. Revisiting the quantum Szilard engine with fully quantum considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hai; Zou, Jian; Li, Jun-Gang; Shao, Bin; Wu, Lian-Ao

    2012-12-01

    By considering level shifting during the insertion process we revisit the quantum Szilard engine (QSZE) with fully quantum consideration. We derive the general expressions of the heat absorbed from thermal bath and the total work done to the environment by the system in a cycle with two different cyclic strategies. We find that only the quantum information contributes to the absorbed heat, and the classical information acts like a feedback controller and has no direct effect on the absorbed heat. This is the first demonstration of the different effects of quantum information and classical information for extracting heat from the bath in the QSZE. Moreover, when the well width L→∞ or the temperature of the bath T→∞ the QSZE reduces to the classical Szilard engine (CSZE), and the total work satisfies the relation W=kBTln2 as obtained by Sang Wook Kim et al. [S.W. Kim, T. Sagawa, S. De Liberato, M. Ueda, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106 (2011) 070401] for one particle case.

  5. Advanced Single-Aisle Transport Propulsion Design Options Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guynn, Mark D.; Berton, Jeffrey J.; Tong, Michael T.; Haller, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Future propulsion options for advanced single-aisle transports have been investigated in a number of previous studies by the authors. These studies have examined the system level characteristics of aircraft incorporating ultra-high bypass ratio (UHB) turbofans (direct drive and geared) and open rotor engines. During the course of these prior studies, a number of potential refinements and enhancements to the analysis methodology and assumptions were identified. This paper revisits a previously conducted UHB turbofan fan pressure ratio trade study using updated analysis methodology and assumptions. The changes incorporated have decreased the optimum fan pressure ratio for minimum fuel consumption and reduced the engine design trade-offs between minimizing noise and minimizing fuel consumption. Nacelle drag and engine weight are found to be key drivers in determining the optimum fan pressure ratio from a fuel efficiency perspective. The revised noise analysis results in the study aircraft being 2 to 4 EPNdB (cumulative) quieter due to a variety of reasons explained in the paper. With equal core technology assumed, the geared engine architecture is found to be as good as or better than the direct drive architecture for most parameters investigated. However, the engine ultimately selected for a future advanced single-aisle aircraft will depend on factors beyond those considered here.

  6. Revisiting heritability accounting for shared environmental effects and maternal inheritance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunyu; Dupuis, Josée; Larson, Martin G; Cupples, L Adrienne; Ordovas, Jose M; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Meigs, James B; Jacques, Paul F; Levy, Daniel

    2015-02-01

    Heritability measures the proportion of phenotypic variation attributable to genetic factors. In addition to a shared nuclear genetic component, a number of additional variance components, such as spousal correlation, sibship, household and maternal effects, may have strong contributions to inter-individual phenotype variation. In humans, the confounding effects of these components on heritability have not been studied thoroughly. We sought to obtain unbiased heritability estimates for complex traits in the presence of multiple variance components and also to estimate the contributions of these variance components to complex traits. We compared regression and variance component methods to estimate heritability in simulations when additional variance components existed. We then revisited heritability for several traits in Framingham Heart Study (FHS) participants. Using simulations, we found that failure to account for or misclassification of necessary variance components yielded biased heritability estimates. The direction and magnitude of the bias varied depending on a variance structure and an estimation method. Using the best fitted models to account for necessary variance components, we found that heritability estimates for most FHS traits were overestimated, ranging from 4 to 47 %, when we compared models that considered necessary variance components to models that only considered familial relationships. Spousal correlation explained 14-36 % of phenotypic variation in several anthropometric and lifestyle traits. Maternal and sibling effects also contributed to phenotypic variation, ranging from 3 to 5 % and 4 to 7 %, respectively, in several anthropometric and metabolic traits. Our findings may explain, in part, the missing heritability for some traits.

  7. The evolution of the mitochondrial genetic code in arthropods revisited.

    PubMed

    Abascal, Federico; Posada, David; Zardoya, Rafael

    2012-04-01

    A variant of the invertebrate mitochondrial genetic code was previously identified in arthropods (Abascal et al. 2006a, PLoS Biol 4:e127) in which, instead of translating the AGG codon as serine, as in other invertebrates, some arthropods translate AGG as lysine. Here, we revisit the evolution of the genetic code in arthropods taking into account that (1) the number of arthropod mitochondrial genomes sequenced has triplicated since the original findings were published; (2) the phylogeny of arthropods has been recently resolved with confidence for many groups; and (3) sophisticated probabilistic methods can be applied to analyze the evolution of the genetic code in arthropod mitochondria. According to our analyses, evolutionary shifts in the genetic code have been more common than previously inferred, with many taxonomic groups displaying two alternative codes. Ancestral character-state reconstruction using probabilistic methods confirmed that the arthropod ancestor most likely translated AGG as lysine. Point mutations at tRNA-Lys and tRNA-Ser correlated with the meaning of the AGG codon. In addition, we identified three variables (GC content, number of AGG codons, and taxonomic information) that best explain the use of each of the two alternative genetic codes.

  8. Cation dyshomeostasis and cardiomyocyte necrosis: the Fleckenstein hypothesis revisited

    PubMed Central

    Borkowski, Brian J.; Cheema, Yaser; Shahbaz, Atta U.; Bhattacharya, Syamal K.; Weber, Karl T.

    2011-01-01

    An ongoing loss of cardiomyocytes to apoptotic and necrotic cell death pathways contributes to the progressive nature of heart failure. The pathophysiological origins of necrotic cell loss relate to the neurohormonal activation that accompanies acute and chronic stressor states and which includes effector hormones of the adrenergic nervous system. Fifty years ago, Albrecht Fleckenstein and coworkers hypothesized the hyperadrenergic state, which accompanies such stressors, causes cardiomyocyte necrosis based on catecholamine-initiated excessive intracellular Ca2+ accumulation (EICA), and mitochondrial Ca2+ overloading in particular, in which the ensuing dysfunction and structural degeneration of these organelles leads to necrosis. In recent years, two downstream factors have been identified which, together with EICA, constitute a signal–transducer–effector pathway: (i) mitochondria-based induction of oxidative stress, in which the rate of reactive oxygen metabolite generation exceeds their rate of detoxification by endogenous antioxidant defences; and (ii) the opening of the mitochondrial inner membrane permeability transition pore (mPTP) followed by organellar swelling and degeneration. The pathogenesis of stress-related cardiomyopathy syndromes is likely related to this pathway. Other factors which can account for cytotoxicity in stressor states include: hypokalaemia; ionized hypocalcaemia and hypomagnesaemia with resultant elevations in parathyroid hormone serving as a potent mediator of EICA; and hypozincaemia with hyposelenaemia, which compromise antioxidant defences. Herein, we revisit the Fleckenstein hypothesis of EICA in leading to cardiomyocyte necrosis and the central role played by mitochondria. PMID:21398641

  9. Revisiting the naturalness problem: Who is afraid of quadratic divergences?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Hajime; Iso, Satoshi

    2012-07-01

    It is widely believed that quadratic divergences severely restrict natural constructions of particle physics models beyond the standard model (SM). Supersymmetry provides a beautiful solution, but the recent LHC experiments have excluded large parameter regions of supersymmetric extensions of the SM. It will now be important to reconsider whether we have been misinterpreting the quadratic divergences in field theories. In this paper, we revisit the problem from the viewpoint of the Wilsonian renormalization group and argue that quadratic divergences—which can always be absorbed into a position of the critical surface—should be simply subtracted in model constructions. Such a picture gives another justification to the argument [W. A. Bardeen, Report No. FERMILAB-CONF-95-391-T] that the scale invariance of the SM, except for the soft-breaking terms, is an alternative solution to the naturalness problem. It also largely broadens possibilities of model constructions beyond the SM since we just need to take care of logarithmic divergences, which cause mixings of various physical scales and runnings of couplings.

  10. Finite size effect on classical ideal gas revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S.; Mitra, J.; Bera, N.

    2015-09-01

    Finite size effects on classical ideal gas are revisited. The micro-canonical partition function for a collection of ideal particles confined in a box is evaluated using Euler-Maclaurin’s as well as Poisson's summation formula. In Poisson's summation formula there are some exponential terms which are absent in Euler-Maclaurin’s formula. In the thermodynamic limit the exponential correction is negligibly small but in the macro/nano dimensions and at low temperatures they may have a great significance. The consequences of finite size effects have been illustrated by redoing the calculations in one and three dimensions keeping the exponential corrections. Global and local thermodynamic properties, diffusion driven by the finite size effect, and effect on speed of sound have been discussed. Thermo-size effects, similar to thermoelectric effects, have been described in detail and may be a theoretical basis with which to design nano-scaled devices. This paper can also be very helpful for undergraduate and graduate students in physics and chemistry as an instructive exercise for a good course in statistical mechanics.

  11. Revisiting the Source Process of the 2007 Tocopilla, Chile Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, M.; Minson, S. E.; Jolivet, R.; Jiang, J.; Beck, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    We revisit the 2007 Mw 7.7 Tocopilla, Chile earthquake to create a finite fault kinematic source model based on the current best practices in data analysis and inversion methods. The data used to constrain the source model include both static GPS offsets and 1 Hz kinematic GPS time series, as well as interferograms which have been reanalyzed to remove tropospheric effects which can be quite significant in this region. Our inversion methodology is a Bayesian approach that uses only physics-based constraints on the rupture evolution, and which utilizes models of both the observational noise and the errors in our forward model to obtain the ensemble of all plausible rupture models which satisfy both the data and our a priori assumptions. This approach allows us to better understand which parts of the rupture process are well-constrained and which are not, and thus to better understand how the 2007 Tocopilla, Chile earthquake rupture fits into the sequence of large earthquakes which have been mosaicking the northern Chile subduction zone.

  12. Hediger revisited: how do zoo animals see us?

    PubMed

    Hosey, Geoff

    2013-01-01

    Contact with people, both familiar (e.g., caretakers) and unfamiliar (e.g., members of the public), is a significant part of the lives of nonhuman animals in zoos. The available empirical evidence shows that in many cases this contact represents a source of stress to the animals, although there is sufficient overall ambiguity in these studies to suggest that the effect of people on the animals is much more complex than this. A possible way to try to understand human-animal relationships in the zoo is to ask how the animals might perceive the humans with whom they have contact, and here this question is explored further, using a framework first published by Hediger as a starting point. Hediger suggested that zoo animals might perceive people as an enemy, as part of the inanimate environment, or as a member of the same species. He supported these categories with anecdotal evidence, which was all that was available at the time, but more empirical evidence is available now, so it is appropriate to revisit these categories. The evidence suggests that animals discriminate both conspecific and heterospecific others, rather than just viewing familiar people as members of their own species, and that additional categories (stimulating part of the environment and friendship) may be warranted. These categories are then placed in a general model that suggests how relationships of different qualities, and hence different perceptions of each other, might develop between animals and the people they are in contact with in zoos.

  13. Biogas from Macroalgae: is it time to revisit the idea?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The economic and environmental viability of dedicated terrestrial energy crops is in doubt. The production of large scale biomass (macroalgae) for biofuels in the marine environment was first tested in the late 1960’s. The culture attempts failed due to the engineering challenges of farming offshore. However the energy conversion via anaerobic digestion was successful as the biochemical composition of macroalgae makes it an ideal feedstock. The technology for the mass production of macroalgae has developed principally in China and Asia over the last 50 years to such a degree that it is now the single largest product of aquaculture. There has also been significant technology transfer and macroalgal cultivation is now well tried and tested in Europe and America. The inherent advantage of production of biofuel feedstock in the marine environment is that it does not compete with food production for land or fresh water. Here we revisit the idea of the large scale cultivation of macroalgae at sea for subsequent anaerobic digestion to produce biogas as a source of renewable energy, using a European case study as an example. PMID:23186536

  14. Changes in Sea Levels around the British Isles Revisited (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teferle, F. N.; Hansen, D. N.; Bingley, R. M.; Williams, S. D.; Woodworth, P. L.; Gehrels, W. R.; Bradley, S. L.; Stocchi, P.

    2009-12-01

    Recently a number of new and/or updated sources for estimates of vertical land movements for the British Isles have become available allowing the relative and average changes in sea levels for this region to be revisited. The geodetic data set stems from a combination of re-processed continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements from stations in the British Isles and from a global reference frame network, and absolute gravity (AG) measurements from two stations in the British Isles. The geologic data set of late Holocene sea level indicators has recently been updated, now applying corrections for the 20th century sea level rise, syphoning effect and late Holocene global ice melt, and expanded to Northern Ireland and Ireland. Several new model predictions of the glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) process active in this region form the modelling data set of vertical land movements for the British Isles. Correcting the updated revised local reference (RLR) trends from the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL) with these vertical land movement data sets, regional and averaged changes in sea levels around the British Isles have been investigated. Special focus is thereby also given to the coastal areas that have recently been identified within the UK Climate Projections 2009.

  15. Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy: The Mitochondrial Connection Revisited.

    PubMed

    Abu-Amero, Khaled K

    2011-01-01

    Our current understanding of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON)-mitochondrial connection falls short of comprehensive. Twenty years of intensive investigation have yielded a wealth of information about mitochondria, the mitochondrial genome, the metabolism of the optic nerve and other structures, and the phenotypic variability of classic LHON. However, we still cannot completely explain how primary LHON mutations injure the optic nerve or why the optic nerve is particularly at risk. We cannot explain the incomplete penetrance or the male predominance of LHON, the typical onset in young adult life without warning, or the synchronicity of visual loss. Moreover, primary LHON mutations clearly are not present in every family with the LHON phenotype (including multigenerational maternal inheritance), and they are present in only a minority of individuals who have the LHON optic neuropathy phenotype without a family history. All lines of evidence point to abnormalities of the mitochondria as the direct or indirect cause of LHON. Therefore, the mitochondria-LHON connection needs to be revisited and examined closely. This review will attempt to do that and provide an update on various aspects of LHON.

  16. Solid-solid transitions induced by repulsive interactions revisited.

    PubMed

    Navascués, G; Velasco, E; Mederos, L

    2016-10-19

    We revisit a problem already studied 15 years ago by us in collaboration with Stell and Hemmer: the isostructural solid-solid transitions induced by repulsive particle interactions exhibited by classical systems interacting via the Stell-Hemmer potentials. The full phase diagram in the crystal region is obtained by applying a perturbation theory for classical solids used during our collaboration with Stell. Also, the performance of such a theory is now tested by comparing the perturbative phase diagram with that obtained from computer simulations. The latter was calculated using a recently refined method to obtain the free-energy of crystals by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The perturbation theory captures the correct topology and correctly identifies the stable, fcc and bcc, phases. In addition, the theory predicts the occurrence of special points: a point where the two stable structures coexist at the same density, and two critical points terminating the corresponding isostructural phase transitions for fcc and bcc phases. The location of some of these features in the phase diagram is predicted almost quantitatively. However, phase boundaries involving the non-compact bcc phase are much less accurate, a problem that can be traced to the poor representation used for the bcc phase of the reference, hard-sphere, system. PMID:27546295

  17. NLTE in a Hot Hydrogen Star: Auer & Mihalas Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiersma, J.; Rutten, R. J.; Lanz, T.

    2003-01-01

    We pay tribute to two landmark papers published by Auer & Mihalas in 1969. They modeled hot-star NLTE-RE hydrogen-only atmospheres, using two simplified hydrogen atoms: ApJ 156, 157: H I levels 1, 2 and c, Lyman α the only line ApJ 156, 681: H I levels 1, 2, 3 and c, Balmer α the only line and computed LTE and NLTE models with the single line turned on and off. The results were extensively analyzed in the two papers. Any student of stellar line formation should take these beautiful papers to heart. The final exercise in Rutten's lecture notes ``Radiative Transfer in Stellar Atmospheres'' asks the student to work through five pages of questions concerning diagrams from the first paper alone! That exercise led to the present work in which we recompute the Auer-Mihalas hot-hydrogen-star models with TLUSTY, adding results from a complete hydrogen atom for comparison. Our motivation for this Auer-Mihalas re-visitation is twofold: 1. to add diagnostic diagrams to the ones published by Auer & Mihalas, in particular Bν, Jν, Sν graphs to illustrate the role of the radiation field, and radiative heating & cooling graphs to illustrate the radiative energy budget, 2. to see the effect of adding the rest of the hydrogen atom.

  18. Theoretical and revisited experimentally retrieved He-broadened line parameters of carbon monoxide in the fundamental band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Predoi-Cross, A.; Esteki, K.; Rozario, H.; Naseri, H.; Latif, S.; Thibault, F.; Malathy Devi, V.; Smith, M. A. H.; Mantz, A. W.

    2016-11-01

    We report revisited experimentally retrieved and theoretically calculated He-broadened Lorentz half-width coefficients and He- pressure-shift coefficients of 45 carbon monoxide transitions in the 1←0 band. The spectra analyzed in this study were recorded over a range of temperatures between 79 and 296 K. The He-broadened line parameters and their temperature dependences were retrieved using a multispectrum nonlinear least squares analysis program. The line shape models used in this study include Voigt, speed dependent Voigt, Rautian (to take into account confinement narrowing) and Rautian with speed dependence, all with an asymmetric component added to account for weak line mixing effects. We were unable to retrieve the temperature dependence of line mixing coefficients. A classical method was used to determine the He-narrowing parameters while quantum dynamical calculations were performed to determine He-broadening and He-pressure shifts coefficients at different temperatures. The line mixing coefficients were also derived from the exponential power gap law and the energy corrected sudden approximation. The current measurements and theoretical results are compared with other published results, where appropriate.

  19. Entropy is conserved in Hawking radiation as tunneling: A revisit of the black hole information loss paradox

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Baocheng; Cai Qingyu; Zhan Mingsheng; You Li

    2011-02-15

    Research Highlights: > Information is found to be encoded and carried away by Hawking radiations. > Entropy is conserved in Hawking radiation. > We thus conclude no information is lost. > The dynamics of black hole may be unitary. - Abstract: We revisit in detail the paradox of black hole information loss due to Hawking radiation as tunneling. We compute the amount of information encoded in correlations among Hawking radiations for a variety of black holes, including the Schwarzchild black hole, the Reissner-Nordstroem black hole, the Kerr black hole, and the Kerr-Newman black hole. The special case of tunneling through a quantum horizon is also considered. Within a phenomenological treatment based on the accepted emission probability spectrum from a black hole, we find that information is leaked out hidden in the correlations of Hawking radiation. The recovery of this previously unaccounted for information helps to conserve the total entropy of a system composed of a black hole plus its radiations. We thus conclude, irrespective of the microscopic picture for black hole collapsing, the associated radiation process: Hawking radiation as tunneling, is consistent with unitarity as required by quantum mechanics.

  20. The Relationship between Undergraduate Attendance and Performance Revisited: Alignment of Student and Instructor Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westerman, James W.; Perez-Batres, Luis A.; Coffey, Betty S.; Pouder, Richard W.

    2011-01-01

    We revisit the relationship between attendance and performance in the undergraduate university setting and apply agency theory in the instructor-student context. Building on agency theory propositions in the educational setting advanced by Smith, Zsidisin, and Adams (2005), we propose that the student and instructor must align goals to promote the…

  1. Understanding Emergency Department 72-Hour Revisits Among Medicaid Patients Using Electronic Healthcare Records.

    PubMed

    Ryan, James; Hendler, James; Bennett, Kristin P

    2015-12-01

    Electronic Healthcare Records (EHRs) have the potential to improve healthcare quality and to decrease costs by providing quality metrics, discovering actionable insights, and supporting decision-making to improve future outcomes. Within the United States Medicaid Program, rates of recidivism among emergency department (ED) patients serve as metrics of hospital performance that help ensure efficient and effective treatment within the ED. We analyze ED Medicaid patient data from 1,149,738 EHRs provided by a hospital over a 2-year period to understand the characteristics of the ED return visits within a 72-hour time frame. Frequent flyer patients with multiple revisits account for 47% of Medicaid patient revisits over this period. ED encounters by frequent flyer patients with prior 72-hour revisits in the last 6 months are thrice more likely to result in a readmit than those of infrequent patients. Statistical L1-logistic regression and random forest analyses reveal distinct patterns of ED usage and patient diagnoses between frequent and infrequent patient encounters, suggesting distinct opportunities for interventions to improve efficacy of care and streamline ED workflow. This work forms a foundation for future development of predictive models, which could flag patients at high risk of revisiting.

  2. Preschool in Three Cultures Revisited: China, Japan, and the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobin, Joseph; Hsueh, Yeh; Karasawa, Mayumi

    2009-01-01

    Published twenty years ago, the original "Preschool in Three Cultures" was a landmark in the study of education: a profoundly enlightening exploration of the different ways preschoolers are taught in China, Japan, and the United States. Here, lead author Joseph Tobin--along with new collaborators Yeh Hsueh and Mayumi Karasawa--revisits his…

  3. My First CMC Article Revisited: A Window on Spanish L2 Interlanguage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blake, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The computer-assisted language learning (CALL) field seems to change overnight with new technological affordances. Blake revisits his 2000 "LLT" article on computer-mediation communication (CMC) in order to reflect on how the field has examined this topic over the past decade or so. While the Interaction Hypothesis continues to guide…

  4. Transformation of Learning in Education and Training: Key Qualifications Revisited. CEDEFOP Reference Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamarainen, Pekka, Ed.; Attwell, Graham, Ed.; Brown, Alan, Ed.

    This book contains 15 papers examining European approaches to the theme of key qualifications. The following papers are included: "Key Qualifications Revisited: An Introduction" (Pekka Kamarainen); "Exploring Key Qualifications: Context, Theory, and Practice in Europe" (Pekka Kamarainen); "Rethinking Key Qualifications: Towards a New Framework"…

  5. The Peter Effect Revisited: Reading Habits and Attitudes of College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Applegate, Anthony J.; Applegate, Mary DeKonty; Mercantini, Martha A.; McGeehan, Catherine M.; Cobb, Jeanne B.; DeBoy, Joanne R.; Modla, Virginia B.; Lewinski, Kimberly E.

    2014-01-01

    Certainly a primary goal of literacy education is the creation of avid, enthusiastic, and highly motivated readers. However, in this article revisiting the Peter Effect (Applegate & Applegate, 2004), researchers surveyed more than 1,000 college sophomores and found strikingly low levels of enthusiasm for reading. Only 46.6% of surveyed…

  6. DNA as Genetic Material: Revisiting Classic Experiments through a Simple, Practical Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malago, Wilson, Jr.; Soares-Costa, Andrea; Henrique-Silva, Flavio

    2009-01-01

    In 1928, Frederick Griffith demonstrated a transmission process of genetic information by transforming "Pneumococcus". In 1944, Avery et al. demonstrated that Griffith's transforming principle was DNA. We revisited these classic experiments in a practical class for undergraduate students. Both experiments were reproduced in simple, adapted forms.…

  7. 14 CFR 1214.205 - Revisit and/or retrieval services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Revisit and/or retrieval services. 1214.205 Section 1214.205 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT Reimbursement for Shuttle Services Provided to Civil U.S. Government Users and Foreign Users Who Have...

  8. 14 CFR § 1214.205 - Revisit and/or retrieval services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Revisit and/or retrieval services. § 1214.205 Section § 1214.205 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT Reimbursement for Shuttle Services Provided to Civil U.S. Government Users and Foreign Users...

  9. 14 CFR 1214.205 - Revisit and/or retrieval services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Revisit and/or retrieval services. 1214.205 Section 1214.205 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT Reimbursement for Shuttle Services Provided to Civil U.S. Government Users and Foreign Users Who Have...

  10. 14 CFR 1214.205 - Revisit and/or retrieval services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Revisit and/or retrieval services. 1214.205 Section 1214.205 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT Reimbursement for Shuttle Services Provided to Civil U.S. Government Users and Foreign Users Who Have...

  11. Sunday School Revisited: An Alternative to Christian Education of the Church Today?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Nam Soon

    2013-01-01

    This article attempts to demonstrate similarities between the socioeconomic, cultural, and religious contexts of 18th-century England and 21st-century Canada. Revisiting the Sunday School movement in 18th-century England provides insights for the development of renewed Sunday School models in the current Canadian context of transnational…

  12. Missing Data and Mixed Results: The Effects of Teach For America on Student Achievement Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penner, Emily K.

    2013-01-01

    This paper revisits existing experimental work on Teach For America (TFA) and extends it by examining treatment effects across the distribution of student achievement. TFA is a rapidly expanding teacher preparation program that currently serves over half a million students in low-income districts across the country. Previous research results did…

  13. Revisiting Pedagogical Content Knowledge: The Pedagogy of Content/The Content of Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segall, Avner

    2004-01-01

    This paper revisits the prevalent concept of pedagogical content knowledge and examines how (and when) each of its components works with/on/against the other in the production of meaning and experience in the educative process. Its purpose is not simply to suggest that content and pedagogy need to come together to provide for powerful…

  14. Commentary: Revisiting "Guidelines for Using Technology to Prepare Social Studies Teachers"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartshorne, Richard; Waring, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    In Hicks, Lee, Berson, Bolick, and Diem (2014), the authors revisited and revised a series of principles focusing on the preparation of social studies teachers for using digital technologies in the classroom, originally presented in the inaugural issue of "Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education" (Mason et al., 2000).…

  15. Globalisation, the Singapore Developmental State and Education Policy: A Thesis Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gopinathan, S.

    2007-01-01

    In this article I revisit and extend arguments made in 1996 and 1997 about the relationship between globalisation, the state and education policy. I was particularly concerned then to see how a small but strong state, Singapore, was responding in the education arena to globalisation. I also wished to draw attention to the literature on the high…

  16. Reflecting Back and Looking Forward: Revisiting "Teaching about Writing, Righting Misconceptions" Five Years on

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wardle, Elizabeth; Downs, Doug

    2013-01-01

    In this Retrospective, we revisit our 2007 "College Composition and Communication" article in order to clarify our primary argument, address some questions and critiques that have arisen, and consider anew the value of composition courses that study writing. We review our core argument that engaging students with the research and ideas of writing…

  17. Revisiting the Metaphor of the Island: Challenging "World Culture" from an Island Misunderstood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rappleye, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    This article revisits the newly "discovered" island that world culture theorists have repeatedly utilised to explain their theoretical stance, conceptual preferences and methodological approach. Yet, it seeks to (re)connect world culture with the real world by replacing their imagined atoll with a real one--the island-nation of Japan. In…

  18. Revisiting First-Year College Students' Mattering: Social Support, Academic Stress, and the Mattering Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayle, Andrea Dixon; Chung, Kuo-Yi

    2008-01-01

    In this study, Nancy Schlossberg's (1989) theory of college students' mattering to others was revisited. Mattering is the experience of others depending on us, being interested in us, and being concerned with our fate. The relationships of gender, mattering to college friends and the college environment, and friend and family social support with…

  19. Teacher Communication Concerns Revisited: Calling into Question the Gnawing Pull towards Equilibrium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dannels, Deanna P.

    2015-01-01

    This study revisits the long-standing teacher communication concerns framework originating over three decades ago. Analysis of 10 years of contemporary GTA teacher communication concerns reveals a typology of 10 concerns, which taken together construct teaching as a process of negotiating relationships, managing identities, and focusing attention.…

  20. Revisiting "Grutter" and "Gratz" in the Wake of "Fisher": Looking Back to Move Forward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ledesma, Maria C.

    2013-01-01

    This article revisits the University of Michigan's 2003 affirmative action cases, "Grutter v. Bollinger" and "Gratz v. Bollinger." Through the aid of critical textual analysis and critical race theory, the author looks back at the predominant narratives that framed the challenge to, and defense of, race-conscious affirmative action policy in the…

  1. Re-Visit to the School Nurse and Adolescents' Medicine Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borup, Ina K.; Andersen, Anette; Holstein, Bjorn E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine if students who re-visit the school nurse use medicines differently than other students when exposed to aches and psychological problems. Methods: The study includes all 11-, 13- and 15-year-old students from a random sample of schools in Denmark, response rate 87 per cent, n = 5,205. The data collection followed the…

  2. Resampling Methods Revisited: Advancing the Understanding and Applications in Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bai, Haiyan; Pan, Wei

    2008-01-01

    Resampling methods including randomization test, cross-validation, the jackknife and the bootstrap are widely employed in the research areas of natural science, engineering and medicine, but they lack appreciation in educational research. The purpose of the present review is to revisit and highlight the key principles and developments of…

  3. Parentocracy Revisited: Still a Relevant Concept for Understanding Middle Class Educational Advantage?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett DeWiele, Corinne E.; Edgerton, Jason D.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we revisit Brown's ("Br J Soc Educ" 14: 65-85, 1990) concept of "parentocracy" which has been informatively applied in educational research in a number of studies in various countries internationally--but almost none in North America. We provide an expanded conceptualization of parentocracy and suggest that it…

  4. Revisiting Individual Creativity Assessment: Triangulation in Subjective and Objective Assessment Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Namgyoo K.; Chun, Monica Youngshin; Lee, Jinju

    2016-01-01

    Compared to the significant development of creativity studies, individual creativity research has not reached a meaningful consensus regarding the most valid and reliable method for assessing individual creativity. This study revisited 2 of the most popular methods for assessing individual creativity: subjective and objective methods. This study…

  5. A Gender Lens on Pedagogical Choice in Academia: Revisiting Hartlaub and Lancaster's Study on Teaching Methodologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wigfall, Patricia Moss; Hall, Paula Quick

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on the role of gender in faculty choice of teaching methodologies at colleges and universities in North Carolina. We replicate research conducted by Hartlaub and Lancaster who examined pedagogical preference among a national sample of political science instructors. In revisiting that inquiry, published in 2008, we have explored…

  6. Critical Language Awareness in the United States: Revisiting Issues and Revising Pedagogies in a Resegregated Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alim, H. Samy

    2005-01-01

    As scholars examine the successes and failures of more than 50 years of court-ordered desegregation since "Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas," and 25 years of language education of Black youth since "Martin Luther King Elementary School Children v. Ann Arbor School District Board," this article revisits the key issues involved in those…

  7. Revisiting the Age-Old Question: Does Money Matter in Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Bruce D.

    2012-01-01

    This policy brief revisits the long and storied literature on whether money matters in providing a quality education. Increasingly, political rhetoric adheres to the unfounded certainty that money doesn't make a difference in education, and that reduced funding is unlikely to harm educational quality. Such proclamations have even been used to…

  8. The Myth of Meeting Needs Revisited: The Case of Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawy, Robert; Armstrong, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Our primary objective in this paper is revisit a debate that was articulated 25 years ago in this journal in which it was argued that the idea of meeting needs in adult and continuing education is a myth. We extend the original analysis of need and apply it to the case of educational research. We look at the policy context, which has, in the…

  9. The solution of an open XXZ chain with arbitrary spin revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murgan, Rajan; Silverthorn, Chris

    2015-02-01

    The Bethe ansatz solutions for an open XXZ spin chain with arbitrary spin with N sites and nondiagonal boundary terms are revisited. The anisotropy parameter, for cases considered here, has values η = iπ \\frac{r}{q} , where r and q are positive integers with q restricted to odd integers. Numerical results are presented to support the solutions.

  10. Atmospheric Entry Heating of Micrometeorites Revisited: Higher Temperatures and Potential Biases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, S.; Alexander, C. M. OD.

    2001-01-01

    The atmospheric entry heating model of Love and Brownlee appears to have overestimated evaporation rates by as much as two orders of magnitude. Here we revisit the issue of atmospheric entry heating, using a revised prescription for evaporation rates. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  11. Asian Lifelong Learning in the Context of a Global Knowledge Economy: A Task Re-Visited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Soonghee

    2007-01-01

    This article revisits and reinterprets my previous paper. It is a snapshot of the lifelong learning system building in selected Asian countries, reflected in the mirror of the Asian Financial Crisis in the 1997s and the aftermath of that event. I reconsidered the arguments (1) the economic recession had delivered a global dimension of lifelong…

  12. Revisiting Interpretation of Canonical Correlation Analysis: A Tutorial and Demonstration of Canonical Commonality Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nimon, Kim; Henson, Robin K.; Gates, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    In the face of multicollinearity, researchers face challenges interpreting canonical correlation analysis (CCA) results. Although standardized function and structure coefficients provide insight into the canonical variates produced, they fall short when researchers want to fully report canonical effects. This article revisits the interpretation of…

  13. Making Productive Use of Four Models of School English: A Case Study Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macken-Horarik, Mary

    2014-01-01

    At a time when political leaders and media pundits seek to narrow the English curriculum and reduce its knowledge structure to the "basics," it is helpful to revisit the potential of different approaches to learning in English that have evolved over time. In this paper I reflect on the semantic features of personal growth, cultural…

  14. Framing the Future: Revisiting the Place of Educational Expectations in Status Attainment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozick, Robert; Alexander, Karl; Entwisle, Doris; Dauber, Susan; Kerr, Kerri

    2010-01-01

    This study revisits the Wisconsin model of status attainment from a life course developmental perspective. Fixed-effects regression analyses lend strong support to the Wisconsin framework's core proposition that academic performance and significant others' influence shape educational expectations. However, investigating the process of expectation…

  15. The Best and the Rest: Revisiting the Norm of Normality of Individual Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Boyle, Ernest, Jr.; Aguinis, Herman

    2012-01-01

    We revisit a long-held assumption in human resource management, organizational behavior, and industrial and organizational psychology that individual performance follows a Gaussian (normal) distribution. We conducted 5 studies involving 198 samples including 633,263 researchers, entertainers, politicians, and amateur and professional athletes.…

  16. Service-Learning in Crisis Communication Education: Revisiting Coombs' Objectives for the Crisis Communication Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maresh-Fuehrer, Michelle M.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to revisit Coombs' suggestions for teaching the crisis communication course using service-learning as a framework. The author sought to assess the effectiveness of using this method in terms of the benefits to both students and the partnering organization and students' perceptions of whether they met the learning…

  17. Revisiting Feminism and Australian Education: Who Speaks? What Questions? What Contexts? What Impact?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yates, Lyn

    2008-01-01

    This article revisits the development of feminist research and policy in education in Australia in the mid-1970s to mid-1980s from the perspective of the present decade. The purpose is to give one insider's account of the specificities of that initial period, and to use that analysis to draw attention to changes evident in the context and agendas…

  18. Where Are They Now? LJ Revisits a Decade's Worth of Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuzyk, Raya

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author revisits 11 graduates who were profiled as part of LJ's annual Placements & Salaries issue. Armed with a library science degree from various institutions, they had just secured jobs in librarianship and were off to a good start forging their careers. Since then, they have worked at elementary school, college, and…

  19. The Postgraduate Premium: Revisiting Trends in Social Mobility and Educational Inequalities in Britain and America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindley, Joanne; Machin, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    This report revisits the debate about why social mobility levels are relatively low in Great Britain and the United States of America compared to other countries. It focuses on three main areas within this debate: (1) the changing role of educational inequalities; (2) the expectation of ever higher levels of education as revealed in increasing…

  20. The Concept of Experience by John Dewey Revisited: Conceiving, Feeling and "Enliving"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohr, Hansjorg

    2013-01-01

    "The concept of experience by John Dewey revisited: conceiving, feeling and 'enliving'." Dewey takes a few steps towards a differentiation of the concept of experience, such as the distinction between primary and secondary experience, or between ordinary (partial, raw, primitive) experience and complete, aesthetic experience. However, he does not…

  1. Increasing the Degrees of Freedom in Future Group Randomized Trials: The "df*" Method Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, David M.; Blitstein, Jonathan L.; Hannan, Peter J.; Shadish, William R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: This article revisits an article published in Evaluation Review in 2005 on sample size estimation and power analysis for group-randomized trials. With help from a careful reader, we learned of an important error in the spreadsheet used to perform the calculations and generate the results presented in that article. As we studied the…

  2. Structuralism's Relevance in a Post-Structural Era: Re-Visiting Research on Multicultural Curricular Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shim, Jenna Min

    2011-01-01

    At the current historical juncture in which differences and inequalities are surfacing greater than ever in the world, societies, and schools, the main goal of this essay is to revisit the aspects of structuralism that can potentially contribute productively to understanding the invisible structures and forces that everyone carries (mostly…

  3. Revisiting evidence for sustainability of bushmeat hunting in West Africa.

    PubMed

    Waite, T A

    2007-09-01

    Bushmeat hunting, a key source of dietary protein, has been implicated as a major extinction threat to tropical vertebrate species in West Africa. Ideally, any such hunting of wild species should be done sustainably, with off-take levels low enough to ensure viability of harvested species. Recent work purports to show that a mature bushmeat market in a major city in Ghana operates sustainably after depletion of vulnerable, slow-reproducing species (Cowlishaw and others 2005). I revisit two aspects of this work. First, I retest the prediction that larger species are transported to the market from greater distances, as expected if overexploitation depletes large species close to the city. Cowlishaw and others failed to find a significantly positive relationship between species-specific body mass and distance between capture site and the market. However, my reanalysis provides evidence for a positive relationship after all, consistent with unsustainable harvesting. In particular, ungulate species were harvested significantly farther from the market than smaller-bodied rodent species. Second, I caution that just because species "persist" in the marketplace in no way implies that they can withstand hunting pressure elsewhere and so should be of little concern to conservationists. I reveal that such species, despite their high intrinsic rates of population growth, are not robust elsewhere. Several of them have disappeared from a network of protected areas in Ghana (Brashares and others 2001). I show that faster-reproducing species are not necessarily more likely to persist in protected areas. The mere presence of fast-reproducing species in a mature bushmeat market should not be construed as generalizable robustness; criteria for ecological sustainability should ensure viability; and harvested species should be robust, not highly prone to extinction, in protected areas.

  4. The Coral Data Time Series Need To Be Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juillet-Leclerc, A.

    2004-12-01

    Coral skeleton is formed under organism control and its geochemical properties are strongly influenced by biological effects embedding environmental signal. Geochemists have been puzzled by the diversity of geochemical responses showed by colonies grown in a same area. By revisiting the Weber and Woodhead data series (1972), gathering data from enough colonies developed in similar conditions to provide a statistical isotopic value representative of one site, we demonstrate that for Porites and Acropora, the expected isotopic thermometer is revealed when the "vital effect" is removed. On the other hand, by using Acropora cultured in controlled condition, with changing temperature on a range comprised between 23 and 29°C, the comparison of oxygen and carbon isotopic values revealed the role played by kinetic fractionation. This apparent paradox of two co-existing fractionations is explained by the isotopic analyzes of wild and cultured corals operated at micrometer size scale taking into account of microstructures of the skeleton. Two different crystals appear to be the growth units of the skeleton, each crystal corresponding to a specific deposition mechanism. Thus, the measurement performed with a conventional method is a "bulk" measurement, which depends upon two isotopic fractionations. Some investigations underlined the discrepancy of the meaning of the inter-annual and seasonal isotopic records, which could be illustrated by different isotopic calibrations assessed from seasonal or annual data. It has been also explained by micrometer analyses of Porites aragonite. A smoothing at around 400microns of isotopic measurements as well as Sr/Ca indicates that at seasonal time scale the growth unit is the month. This is in agreement with extensive studies conducted by biologists describing the mechanism governing the formation of Porites skeleton: every month is deposited a framework which is progressively filled in. By combining biologists and geochemists knowledge

  5. Revisiting noninteracting string partition functions in Rindler space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertens, Thomas G.; Verschelde, Henri; Zakharov, Valentin I.

    2016-05-01

    We revisit noninteracting string partition functions in Rindler space by summing over fields in the spectrum. In field theory, the total partition function splits in a natural way into a piece that does not contain surface terms and a piece consisting of solely the so-called edge states. For open strings, we illustrate that surface contributions to the higher-spin fields correspond to open strings piercing the Rindler origin, unifying the higher-spin surface contributions in string language. For closed strings, we demonstrate that the string partition function is not quite the same as the sum over the partition functions of the fields in the spectrum: an infinite overcounting is present for the latter. Next we study the partition functions obtained by excluding the surface terms. Using recent results of He et al. [J. High Energy Phys. 05 (2015) 106], this construction, first done by Emparan [arXiv:hep-th/9412003], can be put on much firmer ground. We generalize to type II and heterotic superstrings and demonstrate modular invariance. All of these exhibit an IR divergence that can be interpreted as a maximal acceleration close to the black hole horizon. Ultimately, since these partition functions are only part of the full story, divergences here should not be viewed as a failure of string theory: maximal acceleration is a feature of a faulty treatment of the higher-spin fields in the string spectrum. We comment on the relevance of this to Solodukhin's recent proposal [Phys. Rev. D 91, 084028 (2015)]. A possible link with the firewall paradox is apparent.

  6. Revisiting the OH-CH correlation in diffuse clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mookerjea, Bhaswati

    2016-07-01

    Based on the analysis of available published data and archival data along 24 sightlines (5 of which are new) we derive more accurate estimates of the column densities of OH and CH towards diffuse/translucent clouds and revisit the typically observed correlation between the abundances of these species. The increase in the sample size was possible because of the equivalence of the column densities of CH derived from a combination of the transitions at 3137 and 3143 Å, and a combination of transitions at 3886 and 3890 Å, which we have demonstrated here. We find that with the exception of four diffuse clouds, the entire source sample shows a clear correlation between the column densities of OH and CH similar to previous observations. The analysis presented also verifies the theoretically predicted oscillator strengths of the OH A-X (3078 and 3082 Å), CH B-X (3886 and 3890 Å) and C-X (3137 and 3143 Å) transitions. We estimate N(H) and N(H2) from the observed E(B - V) and N(CH) respectively. The N(OH)/N(CH) ratio is not correlated with the molecular fraction of hydrogen in the diffuse/translucent clouds. We show that with the exception of HD 34078 for all the clouds the observed column density ratios of CH and OH can be reproduced by simple chemical models which include gas-grain interaction and gas-phase chemistry. The enhanced N(OH)/N(CH) ratio seen towards the three new sightlines can be reproduced primarily by considering different cosmic ray ionization rates.

  7. Revisiting the Interpretation of Thorium Abundances at Hansteen Alpha

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, D. J.; Hawke, B. R.; Elphic, R. C.; Feldman, W. C.; Prettyman, T. H.; Vaniman, D. T.

    2004-01-01

    Hansteen Alpha is one of the few remaining locations on the Moon thought to be formed by highlands volcanism. Hansteen Alpha is a triangular shaped feature located in the southern portion of Oceanus Procellarum (12 degrees W, 50 degrees S) and its size is approximately 25 km on each side. As described by Hawke et al., there is clear evidence that: 1) Hansteen Alpha was emplaced by extrusive volcanic processes; and 2) it was formed by a viscous lava that should be enriched in Th. However, in the study of Hawke et al. using available Lunar Prospector (LP) Th data, it was concluded that the Hansteen Alpha region was not greatly enriched in Th as would be expected for a highly evolved, viscous lava. It was further concluded based on other compositional data that the magma that formed Hansteen Alpha did not correspond to any known rock type. Here we revisit the interpretation of Th abundances at Hansteen Alpha for a couple of reasons. First, the size of Hansteen Alpha is smaller than the spatial resolution of the LP Gamma-ray Spectrometer (LP-GRS) from which the Th abundances were derived. Therefore, the LP-GRS pixels covering Hansteen Alpha may not truly represent the Th abundance of the Hansteen Alpha feature. Second, recent work has led to a much greater understanding of the Th spatial distribution for small-area features on the lunar surface. In particular, using forward modeling techniques, we have developed the ability to obtain information about Th abundances for features that are at or smaller than the FWHM spatial resolution (approximately [80 square kilometers]) of the LP-GRS data.

  8. Revisiting perfect fluid dark matter: Observational constraints from our galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapov, Alexander A.; Garipova, Guzel M.; Nandi, Kamal K.

    2016-02-01

    We revisit certain features of an assumed spherically symmetric perfect fluid dark matter halo in the light of the observed data of our galaxy, the Milky Way (MW). The idea is to apply the Faber-Visser approach of combined observations of rotation curves and lensing to a first post-Newtonian approximation to "measure" the equation of state ω (r) of the perfect fluid galactic halo. However, for the model considered here, no constraints from lensing are used as it will be sufficient to consider only the rotation curve observations. The lensing mass together with other masses will be just computed using recent data. Since the halo has attractive gravity, we shall impose the constraint that ω (r) ≥ 0 for r ≤RMW, where RMW ˜ 200 kpc is the adopted halo radius of our galaxy. The observed circular velocity ℓ (= 2 vc2 / c02) from the flat rotation curve and a crucial adjustable parameter D appearing in the perfect fluid solution then yield different numerical ranges of ω (r). It is demonstrated that the computed observables such as the rotation curve mass, the lens mass, the post-Newtonian mass of our galaxy compare well with the recent mass data. We also calculate the Faber-Visser χ-factor, which is a measure of pressure content in the dark matter. Our analysis indicates that a range 0 ≤ ω (r) ≤ 2.8 ×10-7 for the perfect fluid dark matter can reasonably describe the attractive galactic halo. This is a strong constraint indicating a dust-like CDM halo (ω ˜ 0) supported also by CMB constraints.

  9. Revisit of rotational dynamics of Asteroid 4179 Toutatis from Chang'e-2's flyby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuhui; Hu, Shoucun; Ji, Jianghui

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents analysis of the rotational parameters of Toutatis based on the observational results from Chang'e-2's close flyby. The 3-D shape model derived from ground-based radar observation is used to calculate the 3-1-3 Euler angles at the flyby epoch, which are evaluated to be -20.1° +/- 1°, 27.6° +/- 1° and 42.2° +/- 1°. The large amplitude of Toutatis' tumbling attitude is demonstrated to be the result of the large deviation of the angular momentum axis and the rotational axis. Two rotational periods are evaluated to be 5.38+/-0.03 days for rotation about the long axis and 7.40+/-0.03 days for precession of the long axis about the angular momentum vector based on Fourier analysis. These results provide a further understanding of rotational state of Toutatis.

  10. Electrical lysis: dynamics revisited and advances in On-chip operation.

    PubMed

    Morshed, Bashir; Shams, Maitham; Mussivand, Tofy

    2013-01-01

    Electrical lysis (EL) is the process of breaking the cell membrane to expose the internal contents under an applied high electric field. Lysis is an important phenomenon for cellular analysis, medical treatment, and biofouling control. This paper aims to review, summarize, and analyze recent advancements on EL. Major databases including PubMed, Ei Engineering Village, IEEE Xplore, and Scholars Portal were searched using relevant keywords. More than 50 articles published in English since 1997 are cited in this article. EL has several key advantages compared to other lysis techniques such as chemical, mechanical, sonication, or laser, including rapid speed of operation, ability to control, miniaturization, low cost, and low power requirement. A variety of cell types have been investigated for including protoplasts, E. coli, yeasts, blood cells, and cancer cells. EL has been developed and applied for decontamination, cytology, genetics, single-cell analysis, cancer treatment, and other applications. On-chip EL is a promising technology for multiplexed automated implementation of cell-sample preparation and processing with micro- or nanoliter reagents.

  11. Forward flight of birds revisited. Part 2: short-term dynamic stability and trim.

    PubMed

    Iosilevskii, G

    2014-10-01

    Thrust generation by flapping is accompanied by alternating pitching moment. On the down-stroke, it pitches the bird down when the wings are above its centre of gravity and up when they are below; on the up-stroke, the directions reverse. Because the thrust depends not only on the flapping characteristics but also on the angle of attack of the bird's body, interaction between the flapping and body motions may incite a resonance that is similar to the one that causes the swinging of a swing. In fact, it is shown that the equation governing the motion of the bird's body in flapping flight resembles the equation governing the motion of a pendulum with periodically changing length. Large flapping amplitude, low flapping frequency, and excessive tilt of the flapping plane may incite the resonance; coordinated fore-aft motion, that uses the lift to cancel out the moment generated by the thrust, suppresses it. It is probably incited by the tumbler pigeon in its remarkable display of aerobatics. The fore-aft motion that cancels the pitching moment makes the wing tip draw a figure of eight relative to the bird's body when the wings are un-swept, and a ring when the wings are swept back and fold during the upstroke.

  12. Magma dynamics, crystallization, and chemical differentiation of the 1959 Kilauea Iki lava lake, Hawaii, revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jellinek, A. Mark; Kerr, Ross C.

    2001-10-01

    Using constraints from an extensive database of geological and geochemical observations along with results from fluid mechanical studies of convection in magma chambers, we identify the main physical processes at work during the solidification of the 1959 Kilauea Iki lava lakes. In turn, we investigate their quantitative influence on the crystallization and chemical differentiation of the magma, and on the development of the internal structure of the lava lake. In contrast to previous studies, vigorous stirring in the magma, driven predominately by the descent of dense crystal-laden thermal plumes from the roof solidification front and the ascent of buoyant compositional plumes due to the in situ growth of olivine crystals at the floor, is predicted to have been an inevitable consequence of very strong cooling at the roof and floor. The flow is expected to have caused extensive but imperfect mixing over most of the cooling history of the magma, producing minor compositional stratification at the roof and thermal stratification at the floor. The efficient stirring of the large roof cooling is expected to have resulted in significant internal nucleation of olivine crystals, which ultimately settled to the floor. Additional forcing due to either crystal sedimentation or the ascent of gas bubbles is not expected to have increased significantly the amount of mixing. In addition to convection in the magma, circulation driven by the convection of buoyant interstitial melt in highly permeable crystal-melt mushes forming the roof and the floor of the lava lake is envisaged to have produced a net upward flow of evolved magma from the floor during solidification. In the floor zone, mush convection may have caused the formation of axisymmetric chimneys through which evolved magma drained from deep within the floor into the overlying magma and potentially the roof. We hypothesize that the highly evolved, pipe-like 'vertical olivine-rich bodies' (VORBs) [Bull. Volcanol. 43 (1980) 675] observed in the floor zone, of the lake are fossil chimneys. In the roof zone, buoyant residual liquid both produced at the roof solidification front and gained from the floor as a result of incomplete convective mixing is envisaged to have percolated or 'leaked' into the overlying highly-permeable cumulate, displacing less buoyant interstitial melt downward. The results from Rayleigh fractionation-type models formulated using boundary conditions based on a quantitative understanding of the convection in the magma indicate that most of the incompatible element variation over the height of the lake can be explained as a consequence of a combination of crystal settling and the extensive but imperfect convective mixing of buoyant residual liquid released from the floor solidification front. The remaining chemical variation is understood in terms of the additional influences of mush convection in the roof and floor on the vertical distribution of incompatible elements. Although cooling was concentrated at the roof of the lake, the floor zone is found to be thicker than the roof zone, implying that it grew more quickly. The large growth rate of the floor is explained as a consequence of a combination of the substantial sedimentation of olivine crystals and more rapid in situ crystallization due to both a higher liquidus temperature and enhanced cooling resulting from imperfect thermal and chemical mixing.

  13. Forward flight of birds revisited. Part 2: short-term dynamic stability and trim

    PubMed Central

    Iosilevskii, G.

    2014-01-01

    Thrust generation by flapping is accompanied by alternating pitching moment. On the down-stroke, it pitches the bird down when the wings are above its centre of gravity and up when they are below; on the up-stroke, the directions reverse. Because the thrust depends not only on the flapping characteristics but also on the angle of attack of the bird's body, interaction between the flapping and body motions may incite a resonance that is similar to the one that causes the swinging of a swing. In fact, it is shown that the equation governing the motion of the bird's body in flapping flight resembles the equation governing the motion of a pendulum with periodically changing length. Large flapping amplitude, low flapping frequency, and excessive tilt of the flapping plane may incite the resonance; coordinated fore–aft motion, that uses the lift to cancel out the moment generated by the thrust, suppresses it. It is probably incited by the tumbler pigeon in its remarkable display of aerobatics. The fore–aft motion that cancels the pitching moment makes the wing tip draw a figure of eight relative to the bird's body when the wings are un-swept, and a ring when the wings are swept back and fold during the upstroke. PMID:26064549

  14. Spreading Activation in an Attractor Network with Latching Dynamics: Automatic Semantic Priming Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerner, Itamar; Bentin, Shlomo; Shriki, Oren

    2012-01-01

    Localist models of spreading activation (SA) and models assuming distributed representations offer very different takes on semantic priming, a widely investigated paradigm in word recognition and semantic memory research. In this study, we implemented SA in an attractor neural network model with distributed representations and created a unified…

  15. Ultrafast transient absorption revisited: Phase-flips, spectral fingers, and other dynamical features.

    PubMed

    Cina, Jeffrey A; Kovac, Philip A; Jumper, Chanelle C; Dean, Jacob C; Scholes, Gregory D

    2016-05-01

    We rebuild the theory of ultrafast transient-absorption/transmission spectroscopy starting from the optical response of an individual molecule to incident femtosecond pump and probe pulses. The resulting description makes use of pulse propagators and free molecular evolution operators to arrive at compact expressions for the several contributions to a transient-absorption signal. In this alternative description, which is physically equivalent to the conventional response-function formalism, these signal contributions are conveniently expressed as quantum mechanical overlaps between nuclear wave packets that have undergone different sequences of pulse-driven optical transitions and time-evolution on different electronic potential-energy surfaces. Using this setup in application to a simple, multimode model of the light-harvesting chromophores of PC577, we develop wave-packet pictures of certain generic features of ultrafast transient-absorption signals related to the probed-frequency dependence of vibrational quantum beats. These include a Stokes-shifting node at the time-evolving peak emission frequency, antiphasing between vibrational oscillations on opposite sides (i.e., to the red or blue) of this node, and spectral fingering due to vibrational overtones and combinations. Our calculations make a vibrationally abrupt approximation for the incident pump and probe pulses, but properly account for temporal pulse overlap and signal turn-on, rather than neglecting pulse overlap or assuming delta-function excitations, as are sometimes done. PMID:27155654

  16. Dynamic microtubules and the texture of plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Clive

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between microtubules and cell-wall texture has had a fitful history in which progress in one area has not been matched by progress in the other. For example, the idea that wall texture arises entirely from self-assembly, independently of microtubules, originated with electron microscopic analyses of fixed cells that gave no clue to the ability of microtubules to reorganize. Since then, live-cell studies have established the surprising dynamicity of plant microtubules involving collisions, changes in angle, parallelization, and rotation of microtubule tracks. Combined with proof that cellulose synthases do track along shifting microtubules, this offers more realistic models for the dynamic influence of microtubules on wall texture than could have been imagined in the electron microscopic era-the era from which most ideas on wall texture originate. This review revisits the classical literature on wall organization from the vantage point of current knowledge of microtubule dynamics.

  17. Physical characteristics of subduction-type seismogenic zones revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuret, A.; Lallemand, S.; Piromallo, C.; Funiciello, F.

    2009-12-01

    Based on both the Centennial earthquake catalog, the revised 1964-2007 EHB hypocenters and the 1976-2007 CMT Harvard catalog, we have extracted the hypocenters, nodal planes and seismic moments of worldwide subduction earthquakes for the period 1900-2007. For the period 1976-2007, we use the focal solutions provided by Harvard and the revised hypocenters from Engdahl et al. (1998). Older events are extracted from the Centennial catalogue (Engdahl and Villasenor, 2002) and they are used for the estimate of the cumulated seismic moment only. The criteria used to select the subduction earthquakes are similar to those used by Mc Caffrey (1994), i.e., we test if the focal mechanisms are consistent with 1/ shallow thrust events (positive slips, at least one nodal plane get dip < 45° and depth > 70 km), and, 2/ the plate interface local geometry and orientation (one nodal plane is oriented toward the volcanic arc, the azimut of this nodal plane is ± 45° with respect to the trench one, its dip is ± 20° with respect to the slab one and the epicenter is located seaward of the volcanic arc). Our study concerns segments of subduction zones that fit with estimated paleoruptures associated with major events (M > 8). We assume that the seismogenic zone coincides with the distribution of 5.5 < M < 7 subduction earthquakes. We then provide a map of the seismogenic zone for 36% of the oceanic subduction plates boundaries including dip, length, downdip and updip limits. The remnant 64% correspond to either weakly coupled oceanic subduction zones, slow subduction rates, or long recurrence period between earthquakes. We then revisit the statistical study done by Pacheco et al. (1993) and tested some empirical laws obtained for example by Kanamori (1986) in light of a more complete, more detailed, more accurate and more uniform description of the subduction interplate seismogenic zone. Since the subduction earthquakes result from stress accumulation along the interplate and that

  18. SU-E-I-43: Photoelectric Cross Section Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Haga, A; Nakagawa, K; Kotoku, J; Horikawa, Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The importance of the precision in photoelectric cross-section value increases for recent developed technology such as dual energy computed tomography, in which some reconstruction algorithms require the energy dependence of the photo-absorption in each material composition of human being. In this study, we revisited the photoelectric cross-section calculation by self-consistent relativistic Hartree-Fock (HF) atomic model and compared with that widely distributed as “XCOM database” in National Institute of Standards and Technology, which was evaluated with localdensity approximation for electron-exchange (Fock)z potential. Methods: The photoelectric cross section can be calculated with the electron wave functions in initial atomic state (bound electron) and final continuum state (photoelectron). These electron states were constructed based on the selfconsistent HF calculation, where the repulsive Coulomb potential from the electron charge distribution (Hartree term) and the electron exchange potential with full electromagnetic interaction (Fock term) were included for the electron-electron interaction. The photoelectric cross sections were evaluated for He (Z=2), Be (Z=4), C (Z=6), O (Z=8), and Ne (Z=10) in energy range of 10keV to 1MeV. The Result was compared with XCOM database. Results: The difference of the photoelectric cross section between the present calculation and XCOM database was 8% at a maximum (in 10keV for Be). The agreement tends to be better as the atomic number increases. The contribution from each atomic shell has a considerable discrepancy with XCOM database except for K-shell. However, because the photoelectric cross section arising from K-shell is dominant, the net photoelectric cross section was almost insensitive to the different handling in Fock potential. Conclusion: The photoelectric cross-section program has been developed based on the fully self-consistent relativistic HF atomic model. Due to small effect on the Fock

  19. Facial clefts and facial dysplasia: revisiting the classification.

    PubMed

    Mazzola, Riccardo F; Mazzola, Isabella C

    2014-01-01

    Most craniofacial malformations are identified by their appearance. The majority of the classification systems are mainly clinical or anatomical, not related to the different levels of development of the malformation, and underlying pathology is usually not taken into consideration. In 1976, Tessier first emphasized the relationship between soft tissues and the underlying bone stating that "a fissure of the soft tissue corresponds, as a general rule, with a cleft of the bony structure". He introduced a cleft numbering system around the orbit from 0 to 14 depending on its relationship to the zero line (ie, the vertical midline cleft of the face). The classification, easy to understand, became widely accepted because the recording of the malformations was simple and communication between observers facilitated. It represented a great breakthrough in identifying craniofacial malformations, named clefts by him. In the present paper, the embryological-based classification of craniofacial malformations, proposed in 1983 and in 1990 by us, has been revisited. Its aim was to clarify some unanswered questions regarding apparently atypical or bizarre anomalies and to establish as much as possible the moment when this event occurred. In our opinion, this classification system may well integrate the one proposed by Tessier and tries at the same time to find a correlation between clinical observation and morphogenesis.Terminology is important. The overused term cleft should be reserved to true clefts only, developed from disturbances in the union of the embryonic facial processes, between the lateronasal and maxillary process (or oro-naso-ocular cleft); between the medionasal and maxillary process (or cleft of the lip); between the maxillary processes (or cleft of the palate); and between the maxillary and mandibular process (or macrostomia).For the other types of defects, derived from alteration of bone production centers, the word dysplasia should be used instead. Facial

  20. Curiosity and context revisited: crassulacean acid metabolism in the Anthropocene.

    PubMed

    Osmond, Barry; Neales, Tom; Stange, Gert

    2008-01-01

    Having gained some understanding of the consequences of the CO(2)-concentrating mechanisms in crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) that internalize the photosynthetic environment of the Cretaceous on a daily basis, it may be time to consider potential long-term effects of the planetary CO(2)-concentrating mechanism on growth and ecology of these plants in the Anthropocene. This paper emphasizes our limited understanding of the carbohydrate economy of CAM in relation to growth processes and briefly reviews recent studies of the diel cycles of growth in these plants. An inadvertent long-term, regional-scale experiment from the past is revisited in which an Opuntia monoculture grew to occupy >25 million hectares of farmland in central eastern Australia, producing a total biomass of about 1.5 billion tonnes in about 80 years. Although at the time it does not seem to have been recognized that this invasion involved CAM, a botanist from the University of Melbourne, Jean White-Haney emerges as a heroic pioneer in the control of the invader by poison and pioneered its biological control. The Opuntia population was expanding at 10-100 ha h(-1) when it was brought to a halt within a decade by the voracious appetite of Cactoblastis cactorum larvae. It is now known that the female parent moth of this predator detects CAM in O. stricta prior to oviposition by deploying the most sensitive CO(2) detector system yet found in the Lepidoptera. The O. stricta invasion is a dramatic demonstration of the capacity of CAM plants to attain and sustain high biomass; to sequester and retain atmospheric CO(2). In conclusion, experiments are reviewed that show stimulation of CO(2) assimilation, growth, and biomass of CAM plants by elevated atmospheric [CO(2)], and the proposition that these plants may have a role in atmospheric CO(2) sequestration is re-examined. This role may be compromised by predators such as Cactoblastis. However the moth CO(2) sensors are adapted to pre

  1. Hydrodynamic limit of Wigner-Poisson kinetic theory: Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2015-02-15

    In this paper, we revisit the hydrodynamic limit of the Langmuir wave dispersion relation based on the Wigner-Poisson model in connection with that obtained directly from the original Lindhard dielectric function based on the random-phase-approximation. It is observed that the (fourth-order) expansion of the exact Lindhard dielectric constant correctly reduces to the hydrodynamic dispersion relation with an additional term of fourth-order, beside that caused by the quantum diffraction effect. It is also revealed that the generalized Lindhard dielectric theory accounts for the recently discovered Shukla-Eliasson attractive potential (SEAP). However, the expansion of the exact Lindhard static dielectric function leads to a k{sup 4} term of different magnitude than that obtained from the linearized quantum hydrodynamics model. It is shown that a correction factor of 1/9 should be included in the term arising from the quantum Bohm potential of the momentum balance equation in fluid model in order for a correct plasma dielectric response treatment. Finally, it is observed that the long-range oscillatory screening potential (Friedel oscillations) of type cos(2k{sub F}r)/r{sup 3}, which is a consequence of the divergence of the dielectric function at point k = 2k{sub F} in a quantum plasma, arises due to the finiteness of the Fermi-wavenumber and is smeared out in the limit of very high electron number-densities, typical of white dwarfs and neutron stars. In the very low electron number-density regime, typical of semiconductors and metals, where the Friedel oscillation wavelength becomes much larger compared to the interparticle distances, the SEAP appears with a much deeper potential valley. It is remarked that the fourth-order approximate Lindhard dielectric constant approaches that of the linearized quantum hydrodynamic in the limit if very high electron number-density. By evaluation of the imaginary part of the Lindhard dielectric function, it is shown that the

  2. Bulk flow and diffusion revisited, and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Reulen, Hans-J

    2010-01-01

    and diffusion in the development and resolution of brain edema will be revisited, then some recent examples will be shown as to how this knowledge of diffusion and bulk flow can be transferred into clinical applications.A great part of the work on bulk flow and diffusion was done during a stay in I. Klatzo's laboratory in Bethesda in 1973/1974 (Fig. 1). Since then a long collaboration developed with I. Klatzo and M. Spatz. Due to given limits, I will concentrate on the studies of our group. Unfortunately it will not be possible to mention all the important groups who have contributed by essential studies. PMID:19812913

  3. The Angular Momentum of Baryons and Dark Matter Halos Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimm, Taysun; Devriendt, Julien; Slyz, Adrianne; Pichon, Christophe; Kassin, Susan A.; Dubois, Yohan

    2011-01-01

    Recent theoretical studies have shown that galaxies at high redshift are fed by cold, dense gas filaments, suggesting angular momentum transport by gas differs from that by dark matter. Revisiting this issue using high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamics simulations with adaptive-mesh refinement (AMR), we find that at the time of accretion, gas and dark matter do carry a similar amount of specific angular momentum, but that it is systematically higher than that of the dark matter halo as a whole. At high redshift, freshly accreted gas rapidly streams into the central region of the halo, directly depositing this large amount of angular momentum within a sphere of radius r = 0.1R(sub vir). In contrast, dark matter particles pass through the central region unscathed, and a fraction of them ends up populating the outer regions of the halo (r/R(sub vir) > 0.1), redistributing angular momentum in the process. As a result, large-scale motions of the cosmic web have to be considered as the origin of gas angular momentum rather than its virialised dark matter halo host. This generic result holds for halos of all masses at all redshifts, as radiative cooling ensures that a significant fraction of baryons remain trapped at the centre of the halos. Despite this injection of angular momentum enriched gas, we predict an amount for stellar discs which is in fair agreement with observations at z=0. This arises because the total specific angular momentum of the baryons (gas and stars) remains close to that of dark matter halos. Indeed, our simulations indicate that any differential loss of angular momentum amplitude between the two components is minor even though dark matter halos continuously lose between half and two-thirds of their specific angular momentum modulus as they evolve. In light of our results, a substantial revision of the standard theory of disc formation seems to be required. We propose a new scenario where gas efficiently carries the angular momentum generated

  4. Revisiting "Who gets care?": health equity as an arena for nursing action.

    PubMed

    Pauly, Bernadette M; MacKinnon, Karen; Varcoe, Colleen

    2009-01-01

    This article revisits and reaffirms Patricia Steven's earlier work on access to healthcare as an important arena for nursing action. Many of the conditions that affect access to healthcare, such as racism and oppression, also shape inequities in health outcomes. We propose a conceptualization of social justice that is consistent with addressing the conditions that influence health inequities. We also discuss the implications of a critical and feminist conception of social justice for nursing action, education, practice, research, and policy.

  5. Revisit boundary conditions for the self-adjoint angular flux formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yaqi; Gleicher, Frederick N.

    2015-03-01

    We revisit the boundary conditions for SAAF. We derived the equivalent parity variational form ready for coding up. The more rigorous approach of evaluating odd parity should be solving the odd parity equation coupled with the even parity. We proposed a symmetric reflecting boundary condition although neither positive definiteness nor even-odd decoupling is achieved. A simple numerical test verifies the validity of these boundary conditions.

  6. Revisiting the fundamental physical chemistry in heterogeneous photocatalysis: its thermodynamics and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Bunsho

    2014-02-01

    Although the history of photocatalysis research is not so long, many researchers have studied photocatalysis and a large number of papers on photocatalysis have been published. The objectives of this review paper are to revisit the fundamentals of photocatalysis, especially its thermodynamics and kinetics, which have not been reexamined in recent studies, to clarify the problems, if any, that prevent developments in the field of photocatalysis, and to present insights for future progress.

  7. Revisiting "Who gets care?": health equity as an arena for nursing action.

    PubMed

    Pauly, Bernadette M; MacKinnon, Karen; Varcoe, Colleen

    2009-01-01

    This article revisits and reaffirms Patricia Steven's earlier work on access to healthcare as an important arena for nursing action. Many of the conditions that affect access to healthcare, such as racism and oppression, also shape inequities in health outcomes. We propose a conceptualization of social justice that is consistent with addressing the conditions that influence health inequities. We also discuss the implications of a critical and feminist conception of social justice for nursing action, education, practice, research, and policy. PMID:19461229

  8. Taï chimpanzees anticipate revisiting high-valued fruit trees from further distances.

    PubMed

    Ban, Simone D; Boesch, Christophe; Janmaat, Karline R L

    2014-11-01

    The use of spatio-temporal memory has been argued to increase food-finding efficiency in rainforest primates. However, the exact content of this memory is poorly known to date. This study investigated what specific information from previous feeding visits chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus), in Taï National Park, Côte d'Ivoire, take into account when they revisit the same feeding trees. By following five adult females for many consecutive days, we tested from what distance the females directed their travels towards previously visited feeding trees and how previous feeding experiences and fruit tree properties influenced this distance. To exclude the influence of sensory cues, the females' approach distance was measured from their last significant change in travel direction until the moment they entered the tree's maximum detection field. We found that chimpanzees travelled longer distances to trees at which they had previously made food grunts and had rejected fewer fruits compared to other trees. In addition, the results suggest that the chimpanzees were able to anticipate the amount of fruit that they would find in the trees. Overall, our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that chimpanzees act upon a retrieved memory of their last feeding experiences long before they revisit feeding trees, which would indicate a daily use of long-term prospective memory. Further, the results are consistent with the possibility that positive emotional experiences help to trigger prospective memory retrieval in forest areas that are further away and have fewer cues associated with revisited feeding trees.

  9. Stochastic resonance in neuron models: Endogenous stimulation revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesser, Hans E.; Geisel, Theo

    2001-03-01

    The paradigm of stochastic resonance (SR)-the idea that signal detection and transmission may benefit from noise-has met with great interest in both physics and the neurosciences. We investigate here the consequences of reducing the dynamics of a periodically driven neuron to a renewal process (stimulation with reset or endogenous stimulation). This greatly simplifies the mathematical analysis, but we show that stochastic resonance as reported earlier occurs in this model only as a consequence of the reduced dynamics.

  10. Revisiting spin-lattice relaxation time measurements for dilute spins in high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fu, Riqiang; Li, Jun; Cui, Jingyu; Peng, Xinhua

    2016-07-01

    Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of spin-lattice relaxation times (T1S) for dilute spins such as (13)C have led to investigations of the motional dynamics of individual functional groups in solid materials. In this work, we revisit the Solomon equations and analyze how the heteronuclear cross relaxation between the dilute S (e.g. (13)C) and abundant I (e.g. (1)H) spins affects the measured T1S values in solid-state NMR in the absence of (1)H saturation during the recovery time. It is found theoretically that at the beginning of the S spin magnetization recovery, the existence of non-equilibrium I magnetization introduces the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect onto the recovery of the S spin magnetization and confirmed experimentally that such a heteronuclear cross relaxation effect results in the recovery overshoot phenomena for the dilute spins when T1S is on the same order of T1H, leading to inaccurate measurements of the T1S values. Even when T1S is ten times larger than T1H, the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect on the measured T1S values is still noticeable. Furthermore, this cross relaxation effect on recovery trajectory of the S spins can be manipulated and even suppressed by preparing the initial I and S magnetization, so as to obtain the accurate T1S values. A sample of natural abundance l-isoleucine powder has been used to demonstrate the T1S measurements and their corresponding measured T1C values under various experimental conditions. PMID:27187211

  11. Revisiting spin-lattice relaxation time measurements for dilute spins in high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fu, Riqiang; Li, Jun; Cui, Jingyu; Peng, Xinhua

    2016-07-01

    Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of spin-lattice relaxation times (T1S) for dilute spins such as (13)C have led to investigations of the motional dynamics of individual functional groups in solid materials. In this work, we revisit the Solomon equations and analyze how the heteronuclear cross relaxation between the dilute S (e.g. (13)C) and abundant I (e.g. (1)H) spins affects the measured T1S values in solid-state NMR in the absence of (1)H saturation during the recovery time. It is found theoretically that at the beginning of the S spin magnetization recovery, the existence of non-equilibrium I magnetization introduces the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect onto the recovery of the S spin magnetization and confirmed experimentally that such a heteronuclear cross relaxation effect results in the recovery overshoot phenomena for the dilute spins when T1S is on the same order of T1H, leading to inaccurate measurements of the T1S values. Even when T1S is ten times larger than T1H, the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect on the measured T1S values is still noticeable. Furthermore, this cross relaxation effect on recovery trajectory of the S spins can be manipulated and even suppressed by preparing the initial I and S magnetization, so as to obtain the accurate T1S values. A sample of natural abundance l-isoleucine powder has been used to demonstrate the T1S measurements and their corresponding measured T1C values under various experimental conditions.

  12. Revisiting spin-lattice relaxation time measurements for dilute spins in high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Riqiang; Li, Jun; Cui, Jingyu; Peng, Xinhua

    2016-07-01

    Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of spin-lattice relaxation times (T1S) for dilute spins such as 13C have led to investigations of the motional dynamics of individual functional groups in solid materials. In this work, we revisit the Solomon equations and analyze how the heteronuclear cross relaxation between the dilute S (e.g. 13C) and abundant I (e.g. 1H) spins affects the measured T1S values in solid-state NMR in the absence of 1H saturation during the recovery time. It is found theoretically that at the beginning of the S spin magnetization recovery, the existence of non-equilibrium I magnetization introduces the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect onto the recovery of the S spin magnetization and confirmed experimentally that such a heteronuclear cross relaxation effect results in the recovery overshoot phenomena for the dilute spins when T1S is on the same order of T1H, leading to inaccurate measurements of the T1S values. Even when T1S is ten times larger than T1H, the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect on the measured T1S values is still noticeable. Furthermore, this cross relaxation effect on recovery trajectory of the S spins can be manipulated and even suppressed by preparing the initial I and S magnetization, so as to obtain the accurate T1S values. A sample of natural abundance L-isoleucine powder has been used to demonstrate the T1S measurements and their corresponding measured T1C values under various experimental conditions.

  13. Revisiting the physical characterisitics of the subduction interplate seismogenic zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuret, Arnauld; Lallemand, Serge; Funiciello, Francesca; Piromallo, Claudia

    2010-05-01

    Based on the Centennial earthquake catalog, the revised 1964-2007 EHB hypocenters catalog and the 1976-2007 CMT Harvard catalog, we have extracted the hypocenters, nodal planes and seismic moments of worldwide subduction earthquakes for the 1900-2007 period. For the 1976-2007 period, we combine the focal solutions provided by Harvard and the revised hypocenters from Engdahl et al. (1998). Older events are extracted from the Centennial catalogue (Engdahl and Villasenor, 2002) and they are used to estimate the cumulated seismic moment only. The selection criteria for the subduction earthquakes are similar to those used by Mc Caffrey (1994), i.e., we test if the focal mechanisms are consistent with 1/ shallow thrust events (depth > 70 km, positive slips, and at least one nodal plane gets dip < 45°), and, 2/ the plate interface local geometry and orientation (one nodal plane is oriented toward the volcanic arc, the azimuth of this nodal plane ranges between ± 45° with respect to the trench one, its dip ranges between ± 20° with respect to the slab one and the epicentre is located seaward of the volcanic arc). Our study concerns segments of subduction zones that fit with estimated paleoruptures associated with major events (M > 8). We assume that the seismogenic zone coincides with the distribution of 5.5 < M < 7 subduction earthquakes. We provide a map of the interplate seismogenic zones for 80% of the trench systems including dip, length, downdip and updip limits, we revisit the statistical study done by Pacheco et al. (1993) and test some empirical laws obtained for example by Ruff and Kanamori (1980) in light of a more complete, detailed, accurate and uniform description of the subduction interplate seismogenic zone. Since subduction earthquakes result from stress accumulation along the interplate and stress depends on plates kinematics, subduction zone geometry, thermal state and seismic coupling, we aim to isolate some correlations between parameters. The

  14. Tales of sociology and the nursing curriculum: revisiting the debates.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Kay; Law, Kate

    2007-08-01

    . Sociology and the nursing curriculum; editorial. Nurse Education in Practice 4, 81-82; Mowforth, G., Harrison, J., Morris, M., 2005. An investigation into adult nursing students' experience of the relevance and application of behavioural sciences (biology, psychology and sociology) across two different curricula. Nurse Education Today 25, 41-48]. Much attention has been given to the role, utility and value of sociology mostly within pre-registration but also post-registration nursing curricula. Through an initial analysis of a series of letters appearing in The Nursing Times over a 12 week period in 2004, and using an analytical framework of four tales (realist, critical, deconstructive and reflexive) we revisit this relationship. Unlike previous debates our argument is that this relationship is more usefully viewed as emblematic of the legitimation crisis inherent in all modern projects. We argue that in order to move beyond the 'utility' discussion, an interrogation of the knowledge claims of both nursing and sociology is required.

  15. Increased 30-Day Emergency Department Revisits Among Homeless Patients with Mental Health Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Chun Nok; Arora, Sanjay; Menchine, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Patients with mental health conditions frequently use emergency medical services. Many suffer from substance use and homelessness. If they use the emergency department (ED) as their primary source of care, potentially preventable frequent ED revisits and hospital readmissions can worsen an already crowded healthcare system. However, the magnitude to which homelessness affects health service utilization among patients with mental health conditions remains unclear in the medical community. This study assessed the impact of homelessness on 30-day ED revisits and hospital readmissions among patients presenting with mental health conditions in an urban, safety-net hospital. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of administrative data on all adult ED visits in 2012 in an urban safety-net hospital. Patient demographics, mental health status, homelessness, insurance coverage, level of acuity, and ED disposition per ED visit were analyzed using multilevel modeling to control for multiple visits nested within patients. We performed multivariate logistic regressions to evaluate if homelessness moderated the likelihood of mental health patients’ 30-day ED revisits and hospital readmissions. Results Study included 139,414 adult ED visits from 92,307 unique patients (43.5±15.1 years, 51.3% male, 68.2% Hispanic/Latino). Nearly 8% of patients presented with mental health conditions, while 4.6% were homeless at any time during the study period. Among patients with mental health conditions, being homeless contributed to an additional 28.0% increase in likelihood (4.28 to 5.48 odds) of 30-day ED revisits and 38.2% increase in likelihood (2.04 to 2.82 odds) of hospital readmission, compared to non-homeless, non-mental health (NHNM) patients as the base category. Adjusted predicted probabilities showed that homeless patients presenting with mental health conditions have a 31.1% chance of returning to the ED within 30-day post discharge and a 3.7% chance of hospital

  16. Increased 30-Day Emergency Department Revisits Among Homeless Patients with Mental Health Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Chun Nok; Arora, Sanjay; Menchine, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Patients with mental health conditions frequently use emergency medical services. Many suffer from substance use and homelessness. If they use the emergency department (ED) as their primary source of care, potentially preventable frequent ED revisits and hospital readmissions can worsen an already crowded healthcare system. However, the magnitude to which homelessness affects health service utilization among patients with mental health conditions remains unclear in the medical community. This study assessed the impact of homelessness on 30-day ED revisits and hospital readmissions among patients presenting with mental health conditions in an urban, safety-net hospital. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of administrative data on all adult ED visits in 2012 in an urban safety-net hospital. Patient demographics, mental health status, homelessness, insurance coverage, level of acuity, and ED disposition per ED visit were analyzed using multilevel modeling to control for multiple visits nested within patients. We performed multivariate logistic regressions to evaluate if homelessness moderated the likelihood of mental health patients’ 30-day ED revisits and hospital readmissions. Results Study included 139,414 adult ED visits from 92,307 unique patients (43.5±15.1 years, 51.3% male, 68.2% Hispanic/Latino). Nearly 8% of patients presented with mental health conditions, while 4.6% were homeless at any time during the study period. Among patients with mental health conditions, being homeless contributed to an additional 28.0% increase in likelihood (4.28 to 5.48 odds) of 30-day ED revisits and 38.2% increase in likelihood (2.04 to 2.82 odds) of hospital readmission, compared to non-homeless, non-mental health (NHNM) patients as the base category. Adjusted predicted probabilities showed that homeless patients presenting with mental health conditions have a 31.1% chance of returning to the ED within 30-day post discharge and a 3.7% chance of hospital

  17. High-scale axions without isocurvature from inflationary dynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Kearney, John; Orlofsky, Nicholas; Pierce, Aaron

    2016-05-31

    Observable primordial tensor modes in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) would point to a high scale of inflation HI. If the scale of Peccei-Quinn (PQ) breaking fa is greater than HI/2π, CMB constraints on isocurvature naively rule out QCD axion dark matter. This assumes the potential of the axion is unmodified during inflation. We revisit models where inflationary dynamics modify the axion potential and discuss how isocurvature bounds can be relaxed. We find that models that rely solely on a larger PQ-breaking scale during inflation fI require either late-time dilution of the axion abundance or highly super-Planckian fI that somehowmore » does not dominate the inflationary energy density. Models that have enhanced explicit breaking of the PQ symmetry during inflation may allow fa close to the Planck scale. Lastly, avoiding disruption of inflationary dynamics provides important limits on the parameter space.« less

  18. Saskatchewan Revisited: Growth, Change, and Promise on the Prairies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claypool, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    In honouring the tradition my esteemed colleagues have initiated, the opportunity to contribute to this Special Issue is appreciated. Previous authors, Saklofske and Grainger, had an iconic presence that continues to affect ongoing developments. A solid foundation of professional practice in an ever-changing and dynamic field of applied psychology…

  19. Tail Lobe Revisited: Magnetic Field Modeling Based on Plasma Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlsson, S. B. P.; Tsyganenko, N. A.

    1999-01-01

    Plasma data from the ISEE-1 and -2 spacecraft during 1977-1980 have been used to determine the distribution of data points in the magnetotail in the range of distances -20 < XGSM < --15, i.e. which of the records that were located in the current sheet, in the tail lobe, in the magnetosheath and in the boundary layers respectively. The ISEE-1 and -2 magnetic field data for the records in the tail lobe were then used to model the tail lobe magnetic field dependence on the solar wind dynamic pressure, on the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) and on the Dst index. The tail lobe magnetic field was assumed to be dependent on the square root of the dynamic pressure based on the balance between the total magnetic pressure in the tail lobes and the dynamic pressure of the solar wind. The IMF dependent terms, added to the pressure term, were sought in many different forms while the Dst dependence of the tail lobe magnetic field was assumed to be linear. The field shows a strong dependence on the square root of the dynamic pressure and the different IMF dependent terms all constitute a significant contribution to the total field. However, the dependence on the Dst index turned out to be very weak at those down-tail distances. The results of this study are intended to be used for parameterizing future versions of the data-based models of the global magnetospheric magnetic field.

  20. Dynamic patterns of academic forum activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Gao, Ya-Chun; Cai, Shi-Min; Zhou, Tao

    2016-11-01

    A mass of traces of human activities show rich dynamic patterns. In this article, we comprehensively investigate the dynamic patterns of 50 thousands of researchers' activities in Sciencenet, the largest multi-disciplinary academic community in China. Through statistical analyses, we found that (i) there exists a power-law scaling between the frequency of visits to an academic forum and the number of corresponding visitors, with the exponent being about 1.33; (ii) the expansion process of academic forums obeys the Heaps' law, namely the number of distinct visited forums to the number of visits grows in a power-law form with exponent being about 0.54; (iii) the probability distributions of time intervals and the number of visits taken to revisit the same academic forum both follow power-laws, indicating the existence of memory effect in academic forum activities. On the basis of these empirical results, we propose a dynamic model that incorporates the exploration, preferential return with memory effect, which can well reproduce the observed scaling laws.

  1. Painlevé's paradox and dynamic jamming in simple models of passive dynamic walking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Or, Yizhar

    2014-02-01

    Painlevé's paradox occurs in the rigid-body dynamics of mechanical systems with frictional contacts at configurations where the instantaneous solution is either indeterminate or inconsistent. Dynamic jamming is a scenario where the solution starts with consistent slippage and then converges in finite time to a configuration of inconsistency, while the contact force grows unbounded. The goal of this paper is to demonstrate that these two phenomena are also relevant to the field of robotic walking, and can occur in two classical theoretical models of passive dynamic walking — the rimless wheel and the compass biped. These models typically assume sticking contact and ignore the possibility of foot slippage, an assumption which requires sufficiently large ground friction. Nevertheless, even for large friction, a perturbation that involves foot slippage can be kinematically enforced due to external forces, vibrations, or loose gravel on the surface. In this work, the rimless wheel and compass biped models are revisited, and it is shown that the periodic solutions under sticking contact can suffer from both Painlevé's paradox and dynamic jamming when given a perturbation of foot slippage. Thus, avoidance of these phenomena and analysis of orbital stability with respect to perturbations that include slippage are of crucial importance for robotic legged locomotion.

  2. Rb and Zr abundances in massive Galactic AGB stars revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Mesa, V.; Zamora, O.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Plez, B.; Manchado, A.; Karakas, A. I.; Lugaro, M.

    2016-07-01

    We report new abundances of Rb and Zr in a sample of massive Galactic asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars that were previously studied with hydrostatic models by using more realistic dynamical model atmospheres. We use a modified version of the spectral synthesis code Turbospectrum, and consider the presence of a circumstellar envelope and a radial wind in the modelling of these Galactic AGB stars. The Rb and Zr are determined from the 7800 Å Rb I resonant line and the 6474 Å ZrO bandhead, respectively, and they are compared with the AGB nucleosynthesis theoretical predictions. The derived Rb abundances are much lower (∼⃒1-2 dex) with the new dynamical models, while the Zr abundances, however, are closer to the hydrostatic values. The new model atmospheres can help to resolve the problem of the mismatch between the observations and the nucleosynthesis theoretical predictions of massive AGB stars.

  3. Dynamical Modelling of Meteoroid Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, David; Wiegert, P. A.

    2012-10-01

    Accurate simulations of meteoroid streams permit the prediction of stream interaction with Earth, and provide a measure of risk to Earth satellites and interplanetary spacecraft. Current cometary ejecta and meteoroid stream models have been somewhat successful in predicting some stream observations, but have required questionable assumptions and significant simplifications. Extending on the approach of Vaubaillon et al. (2005)1, we model dust ejection from the cometary nucleus, and generate sample particles representing bins of distinct dynamical evolution-regulating characteristics (size, density, direction, albedo). Ephemerides of the sample particles are integrated and recorded for later assignment of frequency based on model parameter changes. To assist in model analysis we are developing interactive software to permit the “turning of knobs” of model parameters, allowing for near-real-time 3D visualization of resulting stream structure. With this tool, we will revisit prior assumptions made, and will observe the impact of introducing non-uniform cometary surface attributes and temporal activity. The software uses a single model definition and implementation throughout model verification, sample particle bin generation and integration, and analysis. It supports the adjustment with feedback of both independent and independent model values, with the intent of providing an interface supporting multivariate analysis. Propagations of measurement uncertainties and model parameter precisions are tracked rigorously throughout. We maintain a separation of the model itself from the abstract concepts of model definition, parameter manipulation, and real-time analysis and visualization. Therefore we are able to quickly adapt to fundamental model changes. It is hoped the tool will also be of use in other solar system dynamics problems. 1 Vaubaillon, J.; Colas, F.; Jorda, L. (2005) A new method to predict meteor showers. I. Description of the model. Astronomy and

  4. Electromagnetic braking revisited with a magnetic point dipole model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Land, Sara; McGuire, Patrick; Bumb, Nikhil; Mann, Brian P.; Yellen, Benjamin B.

    2016-04-01

    A theoretical model is developed to predict the trajectory of magnetized spheres falling through a copper pipe. The derive magnetic point dipole model agrees well with the experimental trajectories for NdFeB spherical magnets of varying diameter, which are embedded inside 3D printed shells with fixed outer dimensions. This demonstration of electrodynamic phenomena and Lenz's law serves as a good laboratory exercise for physics, electromagnetics, and dynamics classes at the undergraduate level.

  5. Revisiting the plasma sheath—dust in plasma sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, G. C.; Deka, R.; Bora, M. P.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we have considered the formation of warm plasma sheath in the vicinity of a wall in a plasma with considerable presence of dust particles. As an example, we have used the parameters relevant in case of plasma sheath formed around surfaces of various solid bodies in space, though the results obtained in this work can be applied to any other physical situation such as laboratory plasma. In the ion-acoustic time scale, we neglect the dust dynamics. The dust particles affect the sheath dynamics by affecting the Poisson equation which determines the plasma potential in the sheath region. It is important to note that our calculations are valid only when the amount of dust particles is not sufficient so as to affect the plasma dynamics in the dust-acoustic time scale, but enough to affect the plasma sheath. We have assumed the current to a dust particle to be balanced throughout the analysis. This makes the grain potential dependent on plasma potential, which is then incorporated into the Poisson equation. The resultant numerical model becomes an initial value problem, which is described by a 1-D integro-differential equation, which is then solved self-consistently by incorporating the change in plasma potential caused by inclusion of the dust potential in the Poisson equation.

  6. Investigating Predictors of Visiting, Using, and Revisiting an Online Health-Communication Program: A Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Crutzen, Rik; De Vries, Hein

    2010-01-01

    Background Online health communication has the potential to reach large audiences, with the additional advantages that it can be operational at all times and that the costs per visitor are low. Furthermore, research shows that Internet-delivered interventions can be effective in changing health behaviors. However, exposure to Internet-delivered health-communication programs is generally low. Research investigating predictors of exposure is needed to be able to effectively disseminate online interventions. Objective In the present study, the authors used a longitudinal design with the aim of identifying demographic, psychological, and behavioral predictors of visiting, using, and revisiting an online program promoting physical activity in the general population. Methods A webpage was created providing the public with information about health and healthy behavior. The website included a “physical activity check,” which consisted of a physical activity computer-tailoring expert system where visitors could check whether their physical activity levels were in line with recommendations. Visitors who consented to participate in the present study (n = 489) filled in a questionnaire that assessed demographics, mode of recruitment, current physical activity levels, and health motivation. Immediately after, participants received tailored feedback concerning their current physical activity levels and completed a questionnaire assessing affective and cognitive user experience, attitude toward being sufficiently physically active, and intention to be sufficiently physically active. Three months later, participants received an email inviting them once more to check whether their physical activity level had changed. Results Analyses of visiting showed that more women (67.5%) than men (32.5%) visited the program. With regard to continued use, native Dutch participants (odds ratio [OR] = 2.81, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.16-6.81, P = .02) and participants with a strong

  7. The importance of jet bending in gamma-ray AGNs—revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, P. J.; Tingay, S. J.

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the hypothesis that γ-ray-quiet active galactic nuclei (AGNs) have a greater tendency for jet bending than γ-ray-loud AGNs, revisiting the analysis of Tingay et al. We perform a statistical analysis using a large sample of 351 radio-loud AGNs along with γ-ray identifications from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). Our results show no statistically significant differences in jet-bending properties between γ-ray-loud and γ-ray-quiet populations, indicating that jet bending is not a significant factor for γ-ray detection in AGNs.

  8. Marginalization: A Revisitation With Integration of Scholarship on Globalization, Intersectionality, Privilege, Microaggressions, and Implicit Biases.

    PubMed

    Hall, Joanne M; Carlson, Kelly

    2016-01-01

    In 1994, the concept of marginalization was explored in an article in Advances in Nursing Science. This is a revisitation of the concept incorporating new scholarship. This update is founded on feminism, postcolonialism, critical race theory, and discourse deconstruction, all viewpoints that have been explicated in nursing. The purpose of this analysis is to look at new scholarship and concepts useful to applying marginalization in nursing knowledge development from the standpoint of Bourdieu's macro, meso, and micro levels. New scholarship includes globalization, intersectionality, privilege, microaggressions, and implicit bias. Implications for decreasing health disparities through this new scholarship are discussed. PMID:27490876

  9. Habituation Revisited: An Updated and Revised Description of the Behavioral Characteristics of Habituation

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, Catharine H.; Abrams, Thomas; Barry, Robert J.; Bhatnagar, Seema; Clayton, David; Colombo, John; Coppola, Gianluca; Geyer, Mark A.; Glanzman, David L.; Marsland, Stephen; McSweeney, Frances; Wilson, Donald A.; Wu, Chun-Fang; Thompson, Richard F.

    2009-01-01

    The most commonly cited descriptions of the behavioral characteristics of habituation come from two papers published almost 40 years ago (Thompson and Spencer, 1966; Groves and Thompson, 1970). In August 2007, the authors of this review, who study habituation in a wide range of species and paradigms, met to discuss their work on habituation and to revisit and refine the characteristics of habituation. This review offers a re-evaluation of the characteristics of habituation in light of these discussions. We made substantial changes to only a few of the characteristics, usually to add new information and expand upon the description rather than to substantially alter the original point. PMID:18854219

  10. Psychosis as a disorder of reduced cathectic capacity: Freud's analysis of the Schreber case revisited.

    PubMed

    McGlashan, Thomas H

    2009-05-01

    Approximately 100 years ago, a prominent German public figure name Daniel Schreber wrote memoirs of his experiences in asylums. His case was diagnosed Dementia Praecox at times and Paranoia at others by his treaters. Freud analyzed Schreber's memoirs from the perspective of his "libido" theory of developmentally organized mental "cathexes" or ideational/emotional investments in self and others. Revisiting Freud's analysis of the Schreber case suggests that it may represent the first theoretical articulation that the pathophysiologic core of psychosis is one of deficit, i.e., of diminished (organic) cathectic capacity for normal mental and affective investments in life.

  11. Revisiting the Passerini reaction mechanism: existence of the nitrilium, organocatalysis of its formation, and solvent effect.

    PubMed

    Ramozzi, Romain; Morokuma, Keiji

    2015-06-01

    The Passerini reaction mechanism is revisited using high-level DFT calculations. Contrary to the common belief, the nitrilium intermediate is found to be stable in solution and its formation is rate-determining. The present results point out that this step is catalyzed by a second carboxylic acid molecule, as the subsequent Mumm rearrangement is. The solvent effect on the reaction rate was investigated. In a protic solvent like methanol, hydrogen bonds are responsible of the increasing barrier of the rate-determining step, compared to the commonly used solvent, the dichloromethane.

  12. Revisiting Deng et al.'s Multiparty Quantum Secret Sharing Protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Tzonelih; Hwang, Cheng-Chieh; Yang, Chun-Wei; Li, Chuan-Ming

    2011-09-01

    The multiparty quantum secret sharing protocol [Deng et al. in Chin. Phys. Lett. 23: 1084-1087, 2006] is revisited in this study. It is found that the performance of Deng et al.'s protocol can be much improved by using the techniques of block-transmission and decoy single photons. As a result, the qubit efficiency is improved 2.4 times and only one classical communication, a public discussion, and two quantum communications between each agent and the secret holder are needed rather than n classical communications, n public discussions, and 3n/2 quantum communications required in the original scheme.

  13. Marginalization: A Revisitation With Integration of Scholarship on Globalization, Intersectionality, Privilege, Microaggressions, and Implicit Biases.

    PubMed

    Hall, Joanne M; Carlson, Kelly

    2016-01-01

    In 1994, the concept of marginalization was explored in an article in Advances in Nursing Science. This is a revisitation of the concept incorporating new scholarship. This update is founded on feminism, postcolonialism, critical race theory, and discourse deconstruction, all viewpoints that have been explicated in nursing. The purpose of this analysis is to look at new scholarship and concepts useful to applying marginalization in nursing knowledge development from the standpoint of Bourdieu's macro, meso, and micro levels. New scholarship includes globalization, intersectionality, privilege, microaggressions, and implicit bias. Implications for decreasing health disparities through this new scholarship are discussed.

  14. Long, cold, early r process? Neutrino-induced nucleosynthesis in He shells revisited.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Projjwal; Haxton, W C; Qian, Yong-Zhong

    2011-05-20

    We revisit a ν-driven r-process mechanism in the He shell of a core-collapse supernova, finding that it could succeed in early stars of metallicity Z ≲ 10⁻³ Z(⊙), at relatively low temperatures and neutron densities, producing A ~ 130 and 195 abundance peaks over ~10-20 s. The mechanism is sensitive to the ν emission model and to ν oscillations. We discuss the implications of an r process that could alter interpretations of abundance data from metal-poor stars, and point out the need for further calculations that include effects of the supernova shock. PMID:21668217

  15. Revisiting Valley Development on Martian Volcanoes Using MGS and Odyssey Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulick, Virginia C.

    2005-01-01

    The valley networks found on the slopes of Martian volcanoes represent an interesting subset of the Martian valley networks. Not only do the volcanoes constrain the possible geologic settings, they also provide a window into Martian valley development through time, as the volcanoes formed throughout the geologic history of Mars. Here I take another look at this intriguing subset of networks by revisiting conclusions reached in my earlier studies using the Viking imagery and the valleys on Hawaii as an analog. I then examine more recent datasets.

  16. Sample selection versus two-part models revisited: the case of female smoking and drinking.

    PubMed

    Madden, David

    2008-03-01

    There is a well-established debate between Heckman sample selection and two-part models in health econometrics, particularly when no obvious exclusion restrictions are available. Most of this debate has focussed on the application of these models to health care expenditure. This paper revisits the debate in the context of female smoking and drinking, and evaluates the two approaches on three grounds: theoretical, practical and statistical. The two-part model is generally favoured but it is stressed that this comparison should be carried out on a case-by-case basis.

  17. A parable of oil and water: Revisiting Prince William Sound, four years after

    SciTech Connect

    Keeble, J.

    1993-12-31

    On Good Friday, March 24, 1989, the Exxon oil tanker Valdez foundered on Bligh Reef, spilling 11 million gallons of crude oil into Alaska`s Prince William Sound. To Alaskans, especially fishing people, this was a shocking but not entirely unanticipated event, as there had been several near misses in the twelve years since the opening of oil shipping from Valdez, Alaska. This article revisits Prince William sound to evaluate both the lingering environmental effects and the socio-economic effects of the spill and the huge monetary settlement from the spills.

  18. Plasmodium vivax malaria elimination: should innovative ideas from the past be revisited?

    PubMed Central

    Val, Fernando Fonseca; Sampaio, Vanderson Souza; Cassera, Maria Belén; Andrade, Raquel Tapajós; Tauil, Pedro Luiz; Monteiro, Wuelton Marcelo; Lacerda, Marcus Vinícius Guimarães

    2014-01-01

    In the 1950s, the strategy of adding chloroquine to food salt as a prophylaxis against malaria was considered to be a successful tool. However, with the development of Plasmodium resistance in the Brazilian Amazon, this control strategy was abandoned. More than 50 years later, asexual stage resistance can be avoided by screening for antimalarial drugs that have a selective action against gametocytes, thus old prophylactic measures can be revisited. The efficacy of the old methods should be tested as complementary tools for the elimination of malaria. PMID:25184997

  19. Revisited: The South Dakota Board of Nursing theory-based regulatory decisioning model.

    PubMed

    Damgaard, Gloria; Bunkers, Sandra Schmidt

    2012-07-01

    The authors of this column describe the South Dakota Board of Nursing's 11 year journey utilizing a humanbecoming theory-based regulatory decisioning model. The column revisits the model with an emphasis on the cocreation of a strategic plan guiding the work of the South Dakota Board of Nursing through 2014. The strategic plan was influenced by the latest refinements of the humanbecoming postulates and the humanbecoming community change concepts. A graphic picture of the decisioning model is presented along with future plans for the theory-based model.

  20. Current perspectives on the dynamics of antibiotic resistance in different reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Caniça, Manuela; Manageiro, Vera; Jones-Dias, Daniela; Clemente, Lurdes; Gomes-Neves, Eduarda; Poeta, Patrícia; Dias, Elsa; Ferreira, Eugénia

    2015-09-01

    Antibiotic resistance consists of a dynamic web. In this review, we describe the path by which different antibiotic residues and antibiotic resistance genes disseminate among relevant reservoirs (human, animal, and environmental settings), evaluating how these events contribute to the current scenario of antibiotic resistance. The relationship between the spread of resistance and the contribution of different genetic elements and events is revisited, exploring examples of the processes by which successful mobile resistance genes spread across different niches. The importance of classic and next generation molecular approaches, as well as action plans and policies which might aid in the fight against antibiotic resistance, are also reviewed. PMID:26247891

  1. ULYSSES comes full circle, before revisiting the Sun's poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-04-01

    Ulysses discovered unusually strong magnetic waves in the polar regions. Another surprise concerns unexpected connections between the polar and equatorial regions. Rhythmic variations in the intensity of energetic particles and cosmic rays, recorded by Ulysses at high latitudes, originate in effects of the Sun's rotation much closer to the equator. Scientists are debating how their picture of the magnetic field in the heliosphere must change, to make sense of the Ulysses observations. Without this new knowledge of the solar wind's behaviour, and its widespread effects, shocks felt in the Earth's vicinity would remain incomprehensible. For two centuries, sketchy links between sunspots, auroras and magnetic storms have puzzled scientists. Results from Ulysses and other solar spacecraft, including ESA's SOHO and Cluster II, are expected to transform human understanding of solar-terrestrial events. The task is urgent because astronauts and technological systems are becoming ever more vulnerable to the stormy Sun. After the quiet Sun, a peak of activity When Ulysses conducted the first-ever investigation of the high-latitude heliosphere, the Sun was quiet, being near the minimum of solar activity. As scientists expected, the circumstances were ideal for revealing the underlying structure of the Sun's atmosphere and the solar wind, in their simplest form. With the first phase of the voyage safely and very productively completed, Ulysses faces a new challenge, as it continues along its unique path. Obeying a cycle of roughly eleven years, the Sun is once again becoming restless as sunspot activity builds towards the next peak around 2000. When Ulysses revisits the polar regions at that time it will encounter conditions vastly different from those of 1994-95. The international mission of exploration has already given a new and thought-provoking view of the heliosphere. Its findings at solar maximum are guaranteed to do the same, and to give new insights into the gusts and shocks

  2. Revisiting the Aqueous Solutions of Dimethyl Sulfoxide by Spectroscopy in the Mid- and Near-Infrared: Experiments and Car-Parrinello Simulations.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Victoria M; Dhumal, Nilesh R; Zehentbauer, Florian M; Kim, Hyung J; Kiefer, Johannes

    2015-11-19

    The infrared and near-infrared spectra of the aqueous solutions of dimethyl sulfoxide are revisited. Experimental and computational vibrational spectra are analyzed and compared. The latter are determined as the Fourier transformation of the velocity autocorrelation function of data obtained from Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations. The experimental absorption spectra are deconvolved, and the excess spectra are determined. The two-dimensional excess contour plot provides a means of visualizing and identifying spectral regions and concentration ranges exhibiting nonideal behavior. In the binary mixtures, the analysis of the SO stretching band provides a semiquantitative picture of the formation and dissociation of hydrogen-bonded DMSO-water complexes. A maximum concentration of these clusters is found in the equimolar mixture. At high DMSO concentration, the formation of rather stable 3DMSO:1water complexes is suggested. The formation of 1DMSO:2water clusters, in which the water oxygen atoms interact with the sulfoxide methyl groups, is proposed as a possible reason for the marked depression of the freezing temperature at the eutectic point. PMID:26509778

  3. Dissociative adsorption of CH{sub 3}X (X = Br and Cl) on a silicon(100) surface revisited by density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chen-Guang; Huang, Kai E-mail: wji@ruc.edu.cn; Ji, Wei E-mail: wji@ruc.edu.cn

    2014-11-07

    During the dissociative adsorption on a solid surface, the substrate usually participates in a passive manner to accommodate fragments produced upon the cleavage of the internal bond(s) of a (transient) molecular adsorbate. This simple picture, however, neglects the flexibility of surface atoms. Here, we report a Density Functional Theory study to revisit our early studies of the dissociative adsorption of CH{sub 3}X (X = Br and Cl) on Si(100). We have identified a new reaction pathway, which involves a flip of a silicon dimer; this new pathway agrees better with experiments. For our main exemplar of CH{sub 3}Br, insights have been gained using a simple model that involves a three-atom reactive center, Br-C-Si. When the silicon dimer flips, the interaction between C and Si in the Br-C-Si center is enhanced, evident in the increased energy-split of the frontier orbitals. We also examine how the dissociation dynamics of CH{sub 3}Br is altered on a heterodimer (Si-Al, Si-P, and Si-Ge) in a Si(100) surface. In each case, we conclude, on the basis of computed reaction pathways, that no heterodimer flipping is involved before the system transverses the transition state to dissociative adsorption.

  4. A unified approach to computation of solid and liquid free energy to revisit the solid-fluid equilibrium of Lennard-Jones chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorselaars, Bart

    2015-03-01

    Liquid free energies are computed by integration along a path from a reference system of known free energy, using a strong localization potential. A particular choice of localization pathway is introduced, convenient for use in molecular dynamics codes, and which achieves accurate results without the need to include the identity-swap or relocation Monte Carlo moves used in previous studies. Moreover, an adaptive timestep is introduced to attain the reference system. Furthermore, a center-of-mass correction that is different from previous studies and phase-independent is incorporated. The resulting scheme allows computation of both solid and liquid free energies with only minor differences in simulation protocol. This is used to re-visit solid-liquid equilibrium in a system of short semi-flexible Lennard-Jones chain molecules. The computed melting curve is demonstrated to be consistent with direct co-existence simulations and computed hysteresis loops, provided that an entropic term arising from unsampled solid states is included.

  5. Revisiting the Aqueous Solutions of Dimethyl Sulfoxide by Spectroscopy in the Mid- and Near-Infrared: Experiments and Car-Parrinello Simulations.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Victoria M; Dhumal, Nilesh R; Zehentbauer, Florian M; Kim, Hyung J; Kiefer, Johannes

    2015-11-19

    The infrared and near-infrared spectra of the aqueous solutions of dimethyl sulfoxide are revisited. Experimental and computational vibrational spectra are analyzed and compared. The latter are determined as the Fourier transformation of the velocity autocorrelation function of data obtained from Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations. The experimental absorption spectra are deconvolved, and the excess spectra are determined. The two-dimensional excess contour plot provides a means of visualizing and identifying spectral regions and concentration ranges exhibiting nonideal behavior. In the binary mixtures, the analysis of the SO stretching band provides a semiquantitative picture of the formation and dissociation of hydrogen-bonded DMSO-water complexes. A maximum concentration of these clusters is found in the equimolar mixture. At high DMSO concentration, the formation of rather stable 3DMSO:1water complexes is suggested. The formation of 1DMSO:2water clusters, in which the water oxygen atoms interact with the sulfoxide methyl groups, is proposed as a possible reason for the marked depression of the freezing temperature at the eutectic point.

  6. Revisiting an Old Friend: The Practice and Promise of Cooperative Learning for the Twenty-First Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schul, James E.

    2011-01-01

    Cooperative learning has long been at the disposal of school teachers. However, it is often misunderstood by some teachers as just another form of collaborative group work. This article revisits cooperative learning, including a sampling of its popular variations, with practical approaches toward effectively integrating it into classroom…

  7. A Material and Practical Account of Education in Digital Times: Neil Postman's Views on Literacy and the Screen Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vlieghe, Joris

    2016-01-01

    In this article I deal with the impact of digitization on education by revisiting the ideas Neil Postman developed in regard with the omnipresence of screens in the American society of the 1980s and their impact on what it means to grow up and to become an educated person. Arguing, on the one hand, that traditionally education is profoundly…

  8. Today's Teens, Their Problems, and Their Literature: Revisiting G. Robert Carlsen's "Books and the Teenage Reader" Thirty Years Later.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Pamela Sissi

    1997-01-01

    Revisits G. Robert Carlsen's call for the use of young adult literature in the classroom by looking specifically at the emotional and reading needs of older adolescents, those in the upper grades. Discusses problems associated with adolescence in the late twentieth century and lists recommended young adult books that touch on those issues. (TB)

  9. Revisiting "Kindergarten as Academic Boot Camp": A Nationwide Study of Ability Grouping and Psycho-Social Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catsambis, Sophia; Buttaro, Anthony, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    We revisit Harry L. Gracey's perspective of kindergarten as academic boot camp where, at school entry, children acquire the student role through a structured program of activities. We provide further insights into the crucial mechanisms of socialization that occur in U.S. kindergartens by examining the relationship between within-class ability…

  10. Revisiting Risk in the 21st Century. Forum Focus. Volume 3, Issue 1, January-February 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forum for Youth Investment, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Over the past year, dozens of articles have been published about excessive youth borrowing and spending (leading to high amounts of debt), new reactions to negative body image (such as plastic surgery), as well as more familiar risks like premarital sex and smoking. In Forum Focus: Revisiting Risk in the 21st Century, we explore these challenges…

  11. Revisiting Individualism and Collectivism: A Multinational Examination of Pre-Service Teachers' Perceptions on Student Academic Performances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiang, Heng

    2016-01-01

    This study explores how pre-service teachers in Singapore, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and the United States perceive educational diversity in relation to students' academic achievement by means of qualitative content analysis. It takes cultural psychological perspectives to revisit the attribute reasoning embedded in individualist and collectivist…

  12. A Fresh Take on Democratic Education: Revisiting Rancière through the Notions of Emergence and Enaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastrup-Birk, Henriette; Wildemeersch, Danny

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims at contributing to new ways of thinking about democratic education. We discuss how revisiting this concept may help raise fresh questions in relation to non-formal fora grappling with intricate sustainability issues that span international borders. Starting from Rancière's ideas on democracy, we first examine a conception of…

  13. Revisiting TW Hydrae in light of new astrometric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, R.; Ducourant, C.; Galli, P. A. B.; Le Campion, J. F.; Zuckerman, B.; Krone-Martins, A. G. O.; Chauvin, G.; Song, I.

    2014-10-01

    Our efforts in the present work focused mainly on refining and improving the previous description and understanding of the stellar association TW Hydrae (TWA) including a very detailed membership analysis and its dynamical and evolutionary age.To achieve our objectives in a fully reliable way we take advantage of our own astrometric measurements (Ducourant et al. 2013) performed with NTT/EFOSC2 - ESO (La Silla - Chile) spread over three years (2007 - 2010) and of those published in the literature.A very detailed membership analysis based on the convergent point strategy as developed by our team (Galli et al. 2012, 2013) allowed us to define a consistent kinematic group containing 31 stars among the 44 proposed as TWA member in the literature. Assuming that our sample of stars may be contaminated by non-members and to get rid of the particular influence of each star we applied a Jacknife resampling technique generating 2000 random lists of 13 stars taken from our 16 stars and calculated for each the epoch of convergence when the radius is minimum. The mean of the epochs obtained and the dispersion about the mean give a dynamical age of 7.5± 0.7 Myr for the association that is in good agreement with the previous traceback age (De La Reza et al. 2006). We also estimated age for TWA moving group members from pre-main sequence evolutionary models (Siess et al. 2000) and find a mean age of 7.4± 1.2 Myr. These results show that the dynamical age of the association obtained via the traceback technique and the average age derived from theoretical evolutionary models are in good agreement.

  14. Chiral symmetry breaking revisited: the gap equation with lattice ingredients

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar, Arlene C.

    2011-05-23

    We study chiral symmetry breaking in QCD, using as ingredients in the quark gap equation recent lattice results for the gluon and ghost propagators. The Ansatz employed for the quark-gluon vertex is purely non-Abelian, introducing a crucial dependence on the ghost dressing function and the quark-ghost scattering amplitude. The numerical impact of these quantities is considerable: the need to invoke confinement explicitly is avoided, and the dynamical quark masses generated are of the order of 300 MeV. In addition, the pion decay constant and the quark condensate are computed, and are found to be in good agreement with phenomenology.

  15. Parker Winds Revisited: An Extension to Disk Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, T. R.; Proga, D.

    2012-08-01

    A simple, one-dimensional dynamical model of thermally driven disk winds, one in the spirit of the original Parker (1958) model, is presented. We consider two different axi-symmetric streamline geometries: geometry (i) is commonly used in kinematic models to compute synthetic spectra, while geometry (ii), which exhibits self-similarity and more closely resembles the geometry found by many numerical simulations of disk winds, is likely unused for this purpose, although it easily could be with existing kinematic models. We make the case that it should be, i.e., that geometry (ii) leads to transonic wind solutions with substantially different properties.

  16. Temperature echoes revisited to probe the vibrational behavior of dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Paulo, Pedro M R

    2010-03-21

    Temperature quench echoes were induced in molecular dynamics simulations of dendrimers. This phenomenon was used to probe the vibrational behavior of these molecules by comparing simulation results with harmonic model predictions. The echo depth for short time intervals between temperature quenches is well described by the harmonic approximation and the fluctuations observed are related to the vibrational density of states. The echo depth for long time intervals decays progressively revealing dephasing due to anharmonic interactions. The density of states was calculated from the temperature fluctuations after the first quench and high-frequency modes were assigned by comparison with vibrational spectra of similar dendrimers.

  17. CATASTROPHIC QUENCHING IN {alpha}{Omega} DYNAMOS REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, Alexander; Brandenburg, Axel

    2012-03-20

    At large magnetic Reynolds numbers, magnetic helicity evolution plays an important role in astrophysical large-scale dynamos. The recognition of this fact led to the development of the dynamical {alpha} quenching formalism, which predicts catastrophically low mean fields in open systems. Here, we show that in oscillatory {alpha}{Omega} dynamos this formalism predicts an unphysical magnetic helicity transfer between scales. An alternative technique is proposed where this artifact is removed by using the evolution equation for the magnetic helicity of the total field in the shearing advective gauge. In the traditional dynamical {alpha} quenching formalism, this can be described by an additional magnetic helicity flux of small-scale fields that does not appear in homogeneous {alpha}{sup 2} dynamos. In {alpha}{Omega} dynamos, the alternative formalism is shown to lead to larger saturation fields than what has been obtained in some earlier models with the traditional formalism. We have compared the predictions of the two formalisms to results of direct numerical simulations, finding that the alternative formulation provides a better fit. This suggests that worries about catastrophic dynamo behavior in the limit of large magnetic Reynolds number are unfounded.

  18. Revisiting the Rossby Haurwitz wave test case with contour advection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Robert K.; Dritschel, David G.

    2006-09-01

    This paper re-examines a basic test case used for spherical shallow-water numerical models, and underscores the need for accurate, high resolution models of atmospheric and ocean dynamics. The Rossby-Haurwitz test case, first proposed by Williamson et al. [D.L. Williamson, J.B. Drake, J.J. Hack, R. Jakob, P.N. Swarztrauber, A standard test set for numerical approximations to the shallow-water equations on the sphere, J. Comput. Phys. (1992) 221-224], has been examined using a wide variety of shallow-water models in previous papers. Here, two contour-advective semi-Lagrangian (CASL) models are considered, and results are compared with previous test results. We go further by modifying this test case in a simple way to initiate a rapid breakdown of the basic wave state. This breakdown is accompanied by the formation of sharp potential vorticity gradients (fronts), placing far greater demands on the numerics than the original test case does. We also go further by examining other dynamical fields besides the height and potential vorticity, to assess how well the models deal with gravity waves. Such waves are sensitive to the presence or not of sharp potential vorticity gradients, as well as to numerical parameter settings. In particular, large time steps (convenient for semi-Lagrangian schemes) can seriously affect gravity waves but can also have an adverse impact on the primary fields of height and velocity. These problems are exacerbated by a poor resolution of potential vorticity gradients.

  19. Suppression of dynamics and frequency synchronization in coupled slow and fast dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Kajari; Ambika, G.

    2016-06-01

    We present our study on the emergent states of two interacting nonlinear systems with differing dynamical time scales. We find that the inability of the interacting systems to fall in step leads to difference in phase as well as change in amplitude. If the mismatch is small, the systems settle to a frequency synchronized state with constant phase difference. But as mismatch in time scale increases, the systems have to compromise to a state of no oscillations. We illustrate this for standard nonlinear systems and identify the regions of quenched dynamics in the parameter plane. The transition curves to this state are studied analytically and confirmed by direct numerical simulations. As an important special case, we revisit the well-known model of coupled ocean-atmosphere system used in climate studies for the interactive dynamics of a fast oscillating atmosphere and slowly changing ocean. Our study in this context indicates occurrence of multi stable periodic states and steady states of convection coexisting in the system, with a complex basin structure.

  20. Distractor Dwelling, Skipping, and Revisiting Determine Target Absent Performance in Difficult Visual Search.

    PubMed

    Horstmann, Gernot; Herwig, Arvid; Becker, Stefanie I

    2016-01-01

    Some targets in visual search are more difficult to find than others. In particular, a target that is similar to the distractors is more difficult to find than a target that is dissimilar to the distractors. Efficiency differences between easy and difficult searches are manifest not only in target-present trials but also in target-absent trials. In fact, even physically identical displays are searched through with different efficiency depending on the searched-for target. Here, we monitored eye movements in search for a target similar to the distractors (difficult search) versus a target dissimilar to the distractors (easy search). We aimed to examine three hypotheses concerning the causes of differential search efficiencies in target-absent trials: (a) distractor dwelling (b) distractor skipping, and (c) distractor revisiting. Reaction times increased with target similarity which is consistent with existing theories and replicates earlier results. Eye movement data indicated guidance in target trials, even though search was very slow. Dwelling, skipping, and revisiting contributed to low search efficiency in difficult search, with dwelling being the strongest factor. It is argued that differences in dwell time account for a large amount of total search time differences. PMID:27574510

  1. Kinetic theory of turbulence for parallel propagation revisited: Low-to-intermediate frequency regime

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Peter H.

    2015-09-15

    A previous paper [P. H. Yoon, “Kinetic theory of turbulence for parallel propagation revisited: Formal results,” Phys. Plasmas 22, 082309 (2015)] revisited the second-order nonlinear kinetic theory for turbulence propagating in directions parallel/anti-parallel to the ambient magnetic field, in which the original work according to Yoon and Fang [Phys. Plasmas 15, 122312 (2008)] was refined, following the paper by Gaelzer et al. [Phys. Plasmas 22, 032310 (2015)]. The main finding involved the dimensional correction pertaining to discrete-particle effects in Yoon and Fang's theory. However, the final result was presented in terms of formal linear and nonlinear susceptibility response functions. In the present paper, the formal equations are explicitly written down for the case of low-to-intermediate frequency regime by making use of approximate forms for the response functions. The resulting equations are sufficiently concrete so that they can readily be solved by numerical means or analyzed by theoretical means. The derived set of equations describe nonlinear interactions of quasi-parallel modes whose frequency range covers the Alfvén wave range to ion-cyclotron mode, but is sufficiently lower than the electron cyclotron mode. The application of the present formalism may range from the nonlinear evolution of whistler anisotropy instability in the high-beta regime, and the nonlinear interaction of electrons with whistler-range turbulence.

  2. Distractor Dwelling, Skipping, and Revisiting Determine Target Absent Performance in Difficult Visual Search.

    PubMed

    Horstmann, Gernot; Herwig, Arvid; Becker, Stefanie I

    2016-01-01

    Some targets in visual search are more difficult to find than others. In particular, a target that is similar to the distractors is more difficult to find than a target that is dissimilar to the distractors. Efficiency differences between easy and difficult searches are manifest not only in target-present trials but also in target-absent trials. In fact, even physically identical displays are searched through with different efficiency depending on the searched-for target. Here, we monitored eye movements in search for a target similar to the distractors (difficult search) versus a target dissimilar to the distractors (easy search). We aimed to examine three hypotheses concerning the causes of differential search efficiencies in target-absent trials: (a) distractor dwelling (b) distractor skipping, and (c) distractor revisiting. Reaction times increased with target similarity which is consistent with existing theories and replicates earlier results. Eye movement data indicated guidance in target trials, even though search was very slow. Dwelling, skipping, and revisiting contributed to low search efficiency in difficult search, with dwelling being the strongest factor. It is argued that differences in dwell time account for a large amount of total search time differences.

  3. Distractor Dwelling, Skipping, and Revisiting Determine Target Absent Performance in Difficult Visual Search

    PubMed Central

    Horstmann, Gernot; Herwig, Arvid; Becker, Stefanie I.

    2016-01-01

    Some targets in visual search are more difficult to find than others. In particular, a target that is similar to the distractors is more difficult to find than a target that is dissimilar to the distractors. Efficiency differences between easy and difficult searches are manifest not only in target-present trials but also in target-absent trials. In fact, even physically identical displays are searched through with different efficiency depending on the searched-for target. Here, we monitored eye movements in search for a target similar to the distractors (difficult search) versus a target dissimilar to the distractors (easy search). We aimed to examine three hypotheses concerning the causes of differential search efficiencies in target-absent trials: (a) distractor dwelling (b) distractor skipping, and (c) distractor revisiting. Reaction times increased with target similarity which is consistent with existing theories and replicates earlier results. Eye movement data indicated guidance in target trials, even though search was very slow. Dwelling, skipping, and revisiting contributed to low search efficiency in difficult search, with dwelling being the strongest factor. It is argued that differences in dwell time account for a large amount of total search time differences. PMID:27574510

  4. Force dynamics in fixed-ratio schedules.

    PubMed

    Pinkston, Jonathan W; McBee, Lindsey N

    2014-03-01

    Fixed-ratio schedules are widely used in behavioral research. Although fixed-ratio schedules often conjure up relationships to work and effort, little is known about effort-related measures in these schedules. Early research had shown that force and effort of operant behavior vary systematically during the execution of ratio schedules, and the goal of the present study was to revisit early research on force dynamics in fixed-ratio schedules. Four rats earned sucrose by pressing an isometric force transducer. Presses produced sucrose after ten or twenty responses. In general, the force of responses increased then decreased systematically across the ratio. The possibility that decreases in force during ratio execution was due to a trade-off with the differential reinforcement of short inter-response times (IRT) was investigated in an additional condition where sucrose was made available according to a tandem fixed-ratio 19 inter-response (IRT)> t schedule. The tandem IRT requirement did not eliminate decreasing trends in force across the ratio; unexpectedly, the tandem requirement did eliminate increases in force early in the ratio, which may reflect sequence-level organization operating in the control of force dynamics. PMID:24315798

  5. Proton and electron mean free paths: The Palmer consensus revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bieber, John W.; Matthaeus, William H.; Smith, Charles W.; Wanner, Wolfgang; Kallenrode, May-Britt; Wibberenz, Gerd

    1994-01-01

    We present experimental and theoretical evidence suggesting that the mean free path of cosmic-ray electrons and protons may be fundamentally different at low to intermediate (less than 50 MV) rigidities. The experimental evidence is from Helios observations of solar energetic particles, which show that the mean free path of 1.4 MV electrons is often similar to that of 187 MV protons, even though proton mean free paths continue to decrease comparatively rapidly with decreasing rigidty down to the lowest channels (about 100 MV) observed. The theoretical evidence is from computations of particle scattering in dynamical magnetic turbulence, which predict that electrons will have a larger mean free path than protons of the same rigidity. In the light of these new results, 'consensus' ideas about cosmic-ray mean free paths may require drastic revision.

  6. Revisiting the Central Dogma One Molecule at a Time

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante, Carlos; Cheng, Wei; Meija, Yara

    2011-01-01

    The faithful relay and timely expression of genetic information depend on specialized molecular machines, many of which function as nucleic acid translocases. The emergence over the last decade of single-molecule fluorescence detection and manipulation techniques with nm and Å resolution, and their application to the study of nucleic acid translocases are painting an increasingly sharp picture of the inner workings of these machines, the dynamics and coordination of their moving parts, their thermodynamic efficiency, and the nature of their transient intermediates. Here we present an overview of the main results arrived at by the application of single-molecule methods to the study of the main machines of the central dogma. PMID:21335233

  7. Quantum-thermodynamic treatment of intrinsic anharmonicity; Wallace's theorem revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Michel H. G.; de Jong, Bernard H. W. S.

    2005-12-01

    Wallace (in Thermodynamics of crystals, 1972) developed a theorem, rooted in rigid lattice dynamics, which incorporates intrinsic anharmonic effects in solids. The practical application of this theorem in mineral physics is computationally involved and this is the main reason for the theorem not getting the attention it deserves. Because intrinsic anharmonicity is an important issue at the extreme conditions in planetary mantles, we derived a method which removes the computational obstacles in applying this theorem. We extended the theorem to incorporate details of the phonon spectrum and tested our algorithm on forsterite (Mg2SiO4). Using a least squares inversion technique applied to all available experimental data, we show that it results in an accurate representation of thermodynamic properties and sound wave velocities of Mg2SiO4 in its complete pressure-temperature stability range. We also show that the accuracy of our results is not significantly affected by the use of a different equation of state.

  8. The Nash Equilibrium Revisited: Chaos and Complexity Hidden in Simplicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellman, Philip V.

    The Nash Equilibrium is a much discussed, deceptively complex, method for the analysis of non-cooperative games (McLennan and Berg, 2005). If one reads many of the commonly available definitions the description of the Nash Equilibrium is deceptively simple in appearance. Modern research has discovered a number of new and important complex properties of the Nash Equilibrium, some of which remain as contemporary conundrums of extraordinary difficulty and complexity (Quint and Shubik, 1997). Among the recently discovered features which the Nash Equilibrium exhibits under various conditions are heteroclinic Hamiltonian dynamics, a very complex asymptotic structure in the context of two-player bi-matrix games and a number of computationally complex or computationally intractable features in other settings (Sato, Akiyama and Farmer, 2002). This paper reviews those findings and then suggests how they may inform various market prediction strategies.

  9. Forward flight of birds revisited. Part 1: aerodynamics and performance.

    PubMed

    Iosilevskii, G

    2014-10-01

    This paper is the first part of the two-part exposition, addressing performance and dynamic stability of birds. The aerodynamic model underlying the entire study is presented in this part. It exploits the simplicity of the lifting line approximation to furnish the forces and moments acting on a single wing in closed analytical forms. The accuracy of the model is corroborated by comparison with numerical simulations based on the vortex lattice method. Performance is studied both in tethered (as on a sting in a wind tunnel) and in free flights. Wing twist is identified as the main parameter affecting the flight performance-at high speeds, it improves efficiency, the rate of climb and the maximal level speed; at low speeds, it allows flying slower. It is demonstrated that, under most circumstances, the difference in performance between tethered and free flights is small. PMID:26064548

  10. The SACD method and the XLRS squamometry tests revisited.

    PubMed

    Piérard-Franchimont, C; Henry, F; Piérard, G E

    2000-12-01

    The assessment of many aspects of the structure and biological dynamics of the stratum corneum can be conducted using calibrated stripping with adhesive-coated discs (SACD). Squamometry entails staining SACD samples with a toluidine blue-basic fuschsin ethanol-based solution and reading the colorimetric variable Chroma C* representing the squamometry index. Four main variants of squamometry index have been designed so far. Squamometry X refers to the assessment of xerosis and any scaly condition. Squamometry L explores the intercorneocyte cohesiveness impaired by ultraviolet light. Squamometry R evaluates stratum corneum renewal and squamometry S assesses the effect of surfactants on corneocyte integrity. This latter variant is related to, although not similar to, the ex-vivo corneosurfametry bioassay. All squamometry tests are rapid, reliable, sensitive and cheap. PMID:18503430

  11. Forward flight of birds revisited. Part 1: aerodynamics and performance

    PubMed Central

    Iosilevskii, G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper is the first part of the two-part exposition, addressing performance and dynamic stability of birds. The aerodynamic model underlying the entire study is presented in this part. It exploits the simplicity of the lifting line approximation to furnish the forces and moments acting on a single wing in closed analytical forms. The accuracy of the model is corroborated by comparison with numerical simulations based on the vortex lattice method. Performance is studied both in tethered (as on a sting in a wind tunnel) and in free flights. Wing twist is identified as the main parameter affecting the flight performance—at high speeds, it improves efficiency, the rate of climb and the maximal level speed; at low speeds, it allows flying slower. It is demonstrated that, under most circumstances, the difference in performance between tethered and free flights is small. PMID:26064548

  12. Acquisition, learning, or development of language? Skinner's "Verbal Behavior" revisited.

    PubMed

    López Ornat, Susana; Gallo, Pilar

    2004-11-01

    In 1957, Skinner, in his "Verbal Behavior", proposed an explanation on how a language is learned. In 1959, Chomsky strongly argued the non-learnability of language, establishing in the field of developmental psycholinguistics the substitution of the term "learning" for that of "acquisition". Currently, the constructivist models describe language acquisition as a process of ontogenetic, gradual, complex, and adaptive change. This new theoretical framework has been especially useful for rereading Verbal Behavior because it facilitates recovering the Skinnerian learning mechanisms. This can be observed in the recent research trends that recapture reinforcement and imitation (echoic responses), although they are now located in the initial phases of the process and are included in a cognitive dynamic that, by gradually increasing its complexity, can achieve grammar. The new constructivist theoretical framework, by retrieving the functional and referential aspects of language, can also take advantage of the classic Skinnerian proposal about the pragmatic types of verbal behavior, providing it with new meaning.

  13. Revisiting blob theory for DNA diffusivity in slitlike confinement

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Liang; Tree, Douglas R.; van der Maarel, Johan R. C.; Dorfman, Kevin D.; Doyle, Patrick S.

    2013-01-01

    Blob theory has been widely applied to describe polymer conformations and dynamics in nanoconfinement. In slit confinement, blob theory predicts a scaling exponent of 2/3 for polymer diffusivity as a function of slit height, yet a large body of experimental studies using DNA produce a scaling exponent significantly less than 2/3. In this work, we develop a theory that predicts that this discrepancy occurs because the segment correlation function for a semiflexible chain such as DNA does not follow the Flory exponent for length scales smaller than the persistence length. We show that these short length scale effects contribute significantly to the scaling for the DNA diffusivity, but do not appreciably affect the scalings for static properties. Our theory is fully supported by Monte Carlo simulations, quantitative agreement with DNA experiments, and the results reconcile this outstanding problem for confined polymers. PMID:23679643

  14. The SACD method and the XLRS squamometry tests revisited.

    PubMed

    Piérard-Franchimont, C; Henry, F; Piérard, G E

    2000-12-01

    The assessment of many aspects of the structure and biological dynamics of the stratum corneum can be conducted using calibrated stripping with adhesive-coated discs (SACD). Squamometry entails staining SACD samples with a toluidine blue-basic fuschsin ethanol-based solution and reading the colorimetric variable Chroma C* representing the squamometry index. Four main variants of squamometry index have been designed so far. Squamometry X refers to the assessment of xerosis and any scaly condition. Squamometry L explores the intercorneocyte cohesiveness impaired by ultraviolet light. Squamometry R evaluates stratum corneum renewal and squamometry S assesses the effect of surfactants on corneocyte integrity. This latter variant is related to, although not similar to, the ex-vivo corneosurfametry bioassay. All squamometry tests are rapid, reliable, sensitive and cheap.

  15. Inner zone and slot electron radial diffusion revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, T. P.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Guild, T. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Turner, D. L.; Blake, J. B.; Clemmons, J. H.; Roeder, J. L.

    2016-07-01

    Using recent data from NASA's Van Allen Probes, we estimate the quiet time radial diffusion coefficients for electrons in the inner radiation belt (L < 3) with energies from ~50 to 750 keV. The observations are consistent with dynamics dominated by pitch angle scattering and radial diffusion. We use a coordinate system in which these two modes of diffusion are separable. Then we integrate phase space density over pitch angle to obtain a "bundle content" that is invariant to pitch angle scattering, except for atmospheric loss. We estimate the effective radial diffusion coefficient from the temporal and radial variation of the bundle content. We show that our diffusion coefficients agree well with previously determined values obtained in the 1960s and 1970s and follow the form one expects for radial diffusion caused by exponentially decaying impulses in the large-scale electrostatic potential.

  16. Forward flight of birds revisited. Part 1: aerodynamics and performance.

    PubMed

    Iosilevskii, G

    2014-10-01

    This paper is the first part of the two-part exposition, addressing performance and dynamic stability of birds. The aerodynamic model underlying the entire study is presented in this part. It exploits the simplicity of the lifting line approximation to furnish the forces and moments acting on a single wing in closed analytical forms. The accuracy of the model is corroborated by comparison with numerical simulations based on the vortex lattice method. Performance is studied both in tethered (as on a sting in a wind tunnel) and in free flights. Wing twist is identified as the main parameter affecting the flight performance-at high speeds, it improves efficiency, the rate of climb and the maximal level speed; at low speeds, it allows flying slower. It is demonstrated that, under most circumstances, the difference in performance between tethered and free flights is small.

  17. Finite size effects on the QCD spectrum revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Gottlieb, S. |; MIMD Lattice Calculation Collaboration

    1992-12-31

    We have continued our study of finite size effects in the QCD spectrum on lattices ranging in size from 8{sup 3}{times}24 to 16{sup 3}{times}24. We have increased our statistics for quark mass am{sub q}=0.025 for the smallest lattice size. In addition, we have studied quark mass 0.01225 for lattice sizes 12{sup 3}{times}24. These lattice sizes correspond to a box 1.8-3.6 fm on a side when the rho mass at zero quark mass is used to set the scale. We discuss the nucleon to rho mass ratio at a smaller value of m{pi}/m{rho} than previously studied with two dynamical flavors.

  18. Finite size effects on the QCD spectrum revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Gottlieb, S. . Dept. of Physics Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY )

    1992-01-01

    We have continued our study of finite size effects in the QCD spectrum on lattices ranging in size from 8[sup 3][times]24 to 16[sup 3][times]24. We have increased our statistics for quark mass am[sub q]=0.025 for the smallest lattice size. In addition, we have studied quark mass 0.01225 for lattice sizes 12[sup 3][times]24. These lattice sizes correspond to a box 1.8-3.6 fm on a side when the rho mass at zero quark mass is used to set the scale. We discuss the nucleon to rho mass ratio at a smaller value of m[pi]/m[rho] than previously studied with two dynamical flavors.

  19. Two-dimensional Numerical Simulations of Supercritical Accretion Flows Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiao-Hong; Yuan, Feng; Ohsuga, Ken; Bu, De-Fu

    2014-01-01

    We study the dynamics of super-Eddington accretion flows by performing two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic simulations. Compared with previous works, in this paper we include the T θphi component of the viscous stress and consider various values of the viscous parameter α. We find that when T θphi is included, the rotational speed of the high-latitude flow decreases, while the density increases and decreases at the high and low latitudes, respectively. We calculate the radial profiles of inflow and outflow rates. We find that the inflow rate decreases inward, following a power law form of \\dot{M}_in\\propto r^s. The value of s depends on the magnitude of α and is within the range of ~0.4-1.0. Correspondingly, the radial profile of density becomes flatter compared with the case of a constant \\dot{M}(r). We find that the density profile can be described by ρ(r)vpropr -p and the value of p is almost same for a wide range of α ranging from α = 0.1 to 0.005. The inward decrease of inflow accretion rate is very similar to hot accretion flows, which is attributed to the mass loss in outflows. To study the origin of outflow, we analyze the convective stability of the slim disk. We find that depending on the value of α, the flow is marginally stable (when α is small) or unstable (when α is large). This is different from the case of hydrodynamical hot accretion flow, where radiation is dynamically unimportant and the flow is always convectively unstable. We speculate that the reason for the difference is because radiation can stabilize convection. The origin of outflow is thus likely because of the joint function of convection and radiation, but further investigation is required.

  20. Revisiting the terrestrial carbon cycle: New insights from isothermal microcalorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Anke M.; Boye, Kristin; Bölscher, Tobias; Nunan, Naoise; Coucheney, Elsa; Schaefer, Michael; Fendorf, Scott

    2014-05-01

    Energy is continuously transformed in environmental systems through the metabolic activities of living organisms. In terrestrial ecosystems, there is a general consensus that the diversity of microbial metabolic processes is poorly related to overall ecosystem function because of the inherent functional redundancy that exists within many microbial communities. Here, we propose a conceptual ecological model of microbial energetics in various terrestrial ecosystems (e.g. Scandinavian arable systems or temporarily flooded systems in South East Asia). Using isothermal microcalorimetry, we show that direct measures of energetics provide a functional link between energy flow and the composition of belowground microbial communities at a high taxonomic level. In contrast, this link is not apparent when carbon dioxide (CO2) was used as an aggregate measure of microbial metabolism. Our results support the notion that systems with higher relative abundances of fungi have more efficient microbial metabolism. Furthermore, we suggest that the microbial energetics approach combined with spectroscopic and aqueous chemical measurements is a viable approach to determine the effect of energy release from organic matter on metal(loid) mobility in soils and sediments under anaerobic conditions. We advocate that the microbial energetics approach provides complementary information to soil respiration for investigating the involvement of microbial communities in belowground carbon dynamics. Our results indicate that microbial metabolic processes are an essential constituent in governing the terrestrial carbon balance and that microbial diversity should not be neglected in ecosystem modeling. Quantification of microbial energetics incorporates thermodynamic principles and our conceptual model provides empirical data that can feed into carbon-climate based ecosystem feedback modeling. Together they disentangle the intrinsically complex yet essential carbon dynamics of soils to address

  1. Revisiting Coupled Instability Theory and the Initiation of ENSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, S.; Kirtman, B. P.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding and predicting the initiation and subsequent growth of ENSO events has proven exceptionally challenging, particularly from the dynamical perspective. Often, the inherent complexities of the coupled system prove a substantial hurdle in determining why, on a mechanistic level, certain ENSO events are initiated and the associated uncertainty can be difficult to quantify. To isolate the initiation process, we present a state-of-the-art coupled climate model framework to isolate the unstable growth of ENSO events via dynamically coupled instabilities. Earlier studies show that sufficiently strong air-sea coupling can destabilize ocean waves and initiate ENSO events. The presented model framework allows for coupled instabilities to grow under a fully coupled climate model configuration, which modernizes earlier approaches implemented with highly simplified models. An ensemble of NCAR-CCSM4 experiments is integrated for various initialization months and results show that the experimental design successfully captures the growth of ENSO events from small, random perturbations that are not prescribed. Additionally, these particular events occur in the absence of a previous ENSO event, without a subsurface heat content precursor in the western Pacific, and without wind stress "trigger patterns" characterized by large deterministic components, all of which tend to bias the coupled state towards a particular ENSO phase. The occurrence and type of event may be sensitive to the initialized state and we demonstrate that the ENSO growth rate displays strong seasonal characteristics as well as dependence on the initialization month. We also quantify the skill saturation and show that there exists a well-defined seasonal limit to growth.

  2. Dynamics systems vs. optimal control--a unifying view.

    PubMed

    Schaal, Stefan; Mohajerian, Peyman; Ijspeert, Auke

    2007-01-01

    In the past, computational motor control has been approached from at least two major frameworks: the dynamic systems approach and the viewpoint of optimal control. The dynamic system approach emphasizes motor control as a process of self-organization between an animal and its environment. Nonlinear differential equations that can model entrainment and synchronization behavior are among the most favorable tools of dynamic systems modelers. In contrast, optimal control approaches view motor control as the evolutionary or development result of a nervous system that tries to optimize rather general organizational principles, e.g., energy consumption or accurate task achievement. Optimal control theory is usually employed to develop appropriate theories. Interestingly, there is rather little interaction between dynamic systems and optimal control modelers as the two approaches follow rather different philosophies and are often viewed as diametrically opposing. In this paper, we develop a computational approach to motor control that offers a unifying modeling framework for both dynamic systems and optimal control approaches. In discussions of several behavioral experiments and some theoretical and robotics studies, we demonstrate how our computational ideas allow both the representation of self-organizing processes and the optimization of movement based on reward criteria. Our modeling framework is rather simple and general, and opens opportunities to revisit many previous modeling results from this novel unifying view.

  3. A network dynamics approach to chemical reaction networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Schaft, A. J.; Rao, S.; Jayawardhana, B.

    2016-04-01

    A treatment of a chemical reaction network theory is given from the perspective of nonlinear network dynamics, in particular of consensus dynamics. By starting from the complex-balanced assumption, the reaction dynamics governed by mass action kinetics can be rewritten into a form which allows for a very simple derivation of a number of key results in the chemical reaction network theory, and which directly relates to the thermodynamics and port-Hamiltonian formulation of the system. Central in this formulation is the definition of a balanced Laplacian matrix on the graph of chemical complexes together with a resulting fundamental inequality. This immediately leads to the characterisation of the set of equilibria and their stability. Furthermore, the assumption of complex balancedness is revisited from the point of view of Kirchhoff's matrix tree theorem. Both the form of the dynamics and the deduced behaviour are very similar to consensus dynamics, and provide additional perspectives to the latter. Finally, using the classical idea of extending the graph of chemical complexes by a 'zero' complex, a complete steady-state stability analysis of mass action kinetics reaction networks with constant inflows and mass action kinetics outflows is given, and a unified framework is provided for structure-preserving model reduction of this important class of open reaction networks.

  4. Molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ladd, A.J.C.

    1988-08-01

    The basic methodology of equilibrium molecular dynamics is described. Examples from the literature are used to illustrate how molecular dynamics has been used to resolve theoretical controversies, provide data to test theories, and occasionally to discover new phenomena. The emphasis is on the application of molecular dynamics to an understanding of the microscopic physics underlying the transport properties of simple fluids. 98 refs., 4 figs.

  5. On the spatio-temporal dynamics of soil moisture at the field scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vereecken, H.; Huisman, J. A.; Pachepsky, Y.; Montzka, C.; van der Kruk, J.; Bogena, H.; Weihermüller, L.; Herbst, M.; Martinez, G.; Vanderborght, J.

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we review the state of the art of characterizing and analyzing spatio-temporal dynamics of soil moisture content at the field scale. We discuss measurement techniques that have become available in recent years and that provide unique opportunities to characterize field scale soil moisture variability with high spatial and/or temporal resolution. These include soil moisture sensor networks, hydrogeophysical measurement techniques, novel remote sensing platforms, and cosmic ray probes. Techniques and methods to analyze soil moisture fields are briefly discussed and include temporal stability analysis, wavelet analysis and empirical orthogonal functions. We revisit local and non-local controls on field scale soil moisture dynamics and discuss approaches to model these dynamics at the field scale. Finally, we address the topic of optimal measurement design and provide an outlook and future research perspectives.

  6. Cosmological Ohm's law and dynamics of non-minimal electromagnetism

    SciTech Connect

    Hollenstein, Lukas; Jain, Rajeev Kumar; Urban, Federico R. E-mail: jain@cp3.dias.sdu.dk

    2013-01-01

    The origin of large-scale magnetic fields in cosmic structures and the intergalactic medium is still poorly understood. We explore the effects of non-minimal couplings of electromagnetism on the cosmological evolution of currents and magnetic fields. In this context, we revisit the mildly non-linear plasma dynamics around recombination that are known to generate weak magnetic fields. We use the covariant approach to obtain a fully general and non-linear evolution equation for the plasma currents and derive a generalised Ohm law valid on large scales as well as in the presence of non-minimal couplings to cosmological (pseudo-)scalar fields. Due to the sizeable conductivity of the plasma and the stringent observational bounds on such couplings, we conclude that modifications of the standard (adiabatic) evolution of magnetic fields are severely limited in these scenarios. Even at scales well beyond a Mpc, any departure from flux freezing behaviour is inhibited.

  7. STEADY-STATE MODEL OF SOLAR WIND ELECTRONS REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Peter H.; Kim, Sunjung; Choe, G. S.

    2015-10-20

    In a recent paper, Kim et al. put forth a steady-state model for the solar wind electrons. The model assumed local equilibrium between the halo electrons, characterized by an intermediate energy range, and the whistler-range fluctuations. The basic wave–particle interaction is assumed to be the cyclotron resonance. Similarly, it was assumed that a dynamical steady state is established between the highly energetic superhalo electrons and high-frequency Langmuir fluctuations. Comparisons with the measured solar wind electron velocity distribution function (VDF) during quiet times were also made, and reasonable agreements were obtained. In such a model, however, only the steady-state solution for the Fokker–Planck type of electron particle kinetic equation was considered. The present paper complements the previous analysis by considering both the steady-state particle and wave kinetic equations. It is shown that the model halo and superhalo electron VDFs, as well as the assumed wave intensity spectra for the whistler and Langmuir fluctuations, approximately satisfy the quasi-linear wave kinetic equations in an approximate sense, thus further validating the local equilibrium model constructed in the paper by Kim et al.

  8. West Nile virus: A re-emerging pathogen revisited

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Acebes, Miguel A; Saiz, Juan-Carlos

    2012-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV), a flavivirus of the Flaviviridae family, is maintained in nature in an enzootic transmission cycle between avian hosts and ornithophilic mosquito vectors, although the virus occasionally infects other vertebrates. WNV causes sporadic disease outbreaks in horses and humans, which may result in febrile illness, meningitis, encephalitis and flaccid paralysis. Until recently, its medical and veterinary health concern was relatively low; however, the number, frequency and severity of outbreaks with neurological consequences in humans and horses have lately increased in Europe and the Mediterranean basin. Since its introduction in the Americas, the virus spread across the continent with worrisome consequences in bird mortality and a considerable number of outbreaks among humans and horses, which have resulted in the largest epidemics of neuroinvasive WNV disease ever documented. Surprisingly, its incidence in human and animal health is very different in Central and South America, and the reasons for it are not yet understood. Even though great advances have been obtained lately regarding WNV infection, and although efficient equine vaccines are available, no specific treatments or vaccines for human use are on the market. This review updates the most recent investigations in different aspects of WNV life cycle: molecular virology, transmission dynamics, host range, clinical presentations, epidemiology, ecology, diagnosis, control, and prevention, and highlights some aspects that certainly require further research. PMID:24175211

  9. Revisiting Street Intersections Using Slot-Based Systems

    PubMed Central

    Tachet, Remi; Santi, Paolo; Sobolevsky, Stanislav; Reyes-Castro, Luis Ignacio; Frazzoli, Emilio; Helbing, Dirk; Ratti, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Since their appearance at the end of the 19th century, traffic lights have been the primary mode of granting access to road intersections. Today, this centuries-old technology is challenged by advances in intelligent transportation, which are opening the way to new solutions built upon slot-based systems similar to those commonly used in aerial traffic: what we call Slot-based Intersections (SIs). Despite simulation-based evidence of the potential benefits of SIs, a comprehensive, analytical framework to compare their relative performance with traffic lights is still lacking. Here, we develop such a framework. We approach the problem in a novel way, by generalizing classical queuing theory. Having defined safety conditions, we characterize capacity and delay of SIs. In the 2-road crossing configuration, we provide a capacity-optimal SI management system. For arbitrary intersection configurations, near-optimal solutions are developed. Results theoretically show that transitioning from a traffic light system to SI has the potential of doubling capacity and significantly reducing delays. This suggests a reduction of non-linear dynamics induced by intersection bottlenecks, with positive impact on the road network. Such findings can provide transportation engineers and planners with crucial insights as they prepare to manage the transition towards a more intelligent transportation infrastructure in cities. PMID:26982532

  10. Revisiting the formation of cyclic clusters in liquid ethanol.

    PubMed

    Balanay, Mannix P; Kim, Dong Hee; Fan, Haiyan

    2016-04-21

    The liquid phase of ethanol in pure and in non-polar solvents was studied at room temperature using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies together with theoretical approach. The FT-IR spectra for pure ethanol and solution in cyclohexane at different dilution stages are consistent with (1)H NMR results. The results from both methods were best explained by the results of the density functional theory based on a multimeric model. It is suggested that cyclic trimers and tetramers are dominated in the solution of cyclohexane/hexane with the concentration greater than 0.5M at room temperature. In liquid ethanol, while the primary components at room temperature are cyclic trimers and tetramers, there is a certain amount (∼14%) of open hydroxide group representing the existence of chain like structures in the equilibria. The cyclic cluster model in the liquid and concentrated solution phase (>0.5M) can be used to explain the anomalously lower freezing point of ethanol (159 K) than that of water (273 K) at ambient conditions. In addition, (1)H NMR at various dilution stages reveals the dynamics for the formation of cyclic clusters. PMID:27389215

  11. Interpersonal trust: An age-period-cohort analysis revisited.

    PubMed

    Clark, April K; Eisenstein, Marie A

    2013-03-01

    Building on the previous work of Robinson and Jackson(1), this study addresses the extent to which interpersonal trust in America is changing due to age, period, or cohort effects (APC). The importance of APC in explaining variations in trust stems from the understanding that the specific source of change can have important - albeit different and possibly, negative - consequences on society. Moreover, 3years after the previous study concluded, the country experienced the largest concerted terrorist attacks on US soil. Little is known about how the attacks affected the dynamics of interpersonal trust relative to the processes of birth, aging, and historical change - such an investigation has important implications for our understanding of the sources and consequences of interpersonal trust. Two analysis techniques for disentangling APC effects are used: constrained generalized linear models and intrinsic estimator models. The results show that while period effects are an important contributor to declining trust, the attacks exert little influence over one's decision to trust others. Also, the investigation provides further confirmation that trust in others has fallen dramatically in the US with the scarcity being led by individuals coming of age in the late 1940s, after which, trust falls with each successive cohort. If this trend continues, through the process of cohort replacement, we will become a society of "distrusters".

  12. The multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree approach revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Manthe, Uwe

    2015-06-28

    The multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree (MCTDH) approach facilitates accurate high-dimensional quantum dynamics simulations. In the approach, the wavefunction is expanded in a direct product of self-adapting time-dependent single-particle functions (SPFs). The equations of motion for the expansion coefficients and the SPFs are obtained via the Dirac-Frenkel variational principle. While this derivation yields well-defined differential equations for the motion of occupied SPFs, singularities in the working equations resulting from unoccupied SPFs have to be removed by a regularization procedure. Here, an alternative derivation of the MCTDH equations of motion is presented. It employs an analysis of the time-dependence of the single-particle density matrices up to second order. While the analysis of the first order terms yields the known equations of motion for the occupied SPFs, the analysis of the second order terms provides new equations which allow one to identify optimal choices for the unoccupied SPFs. The effect of the optimal choice of the unoccupied SPFs on the structure of the MCTDH equations of motion and their regularization is discussed. Generalized equations applicable in the multi-layer MCTDH framework are presented. Finally, the effects resulting from the initial choice of the unoccupied SPFs are illustrated by a simple numerical example.

  13. Revisiting the formation of cyclic clusters in liquid ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balanay, Mannix P.; Kim, Dong Hee; Fan, Haiyan

    2016-04-01

    The liquid phase of ethanol in pure and in non-polar solvents was studied at room temperature using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies together with theoretical approach. The FT-IR spectra for pure ethanol and solution in cyclohexane at different dilution stages are consistent with 1H NMR results. The results from both methods were best explained by the results of the density functional theory based on a multimeric model. It is suggested that cyclic trimers and tetramers are dominated in the solution of cyclohexane/hexane with the concentration greater than 0.5M at room temperature. In liquid ethanol, while the primary components at room temperature are cyclic trimers and tetramers, there is a certain amount (˜14%) of open hydroxide group representing the existence of chain like structures in the equilibria. The cyclic cluster model in the liquid and concentrated solution phase (>0.5M) can be used to explain the anomalously lower freezing point of ethanol (159 K) than that of water (273 K) at ambient conditions. In addition, 1H NMR at various dilution stages reveals the dynamics for the formation of cyclic clusters.

  14. Revisiting the formation of cyclic clusters in liquid ethanol.

    PubMed

    Balanay, Mannix P; Kim, Dong Hee; Fan, Haiyan

    2016-04-21

    The liquid phase of ethanol in pure and in non-polar solvents was studied at room temperature using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies together with theoretical approach. The FT-IR spectra for pure ethanol and solution in cyclohexane at different dilution stages are consistent with (1)H NMR results. The results from both methods were best explained by the results of the density functional theory based on a multimeric model. It is suggested that cyclic trimers and tetramers are dominated in the solution of cyclohexane/hexane with the concentration greater than 0.5M at room temperature. In liquid ethanol, while the primary components at room temperature are cyclic trimers and tetramers, there is a certain amount (∼14%) of open hydroxide group representing the existence of chain like structures in the equilibria. The cyclic cluster model in the liquid and concentrated solution phase (>0.5M) can be used to explain the anomalously lower freezing point of ethanol (159 K) than that of water (273 K) at ambient conditions. In addition, (1)H NMR at various dilution stages reveals the dynamics for the formation of cyclic clusters.

  15. Macronutrients and obesity: revisiting the calories in, calories out framework.

    PubMed

    Riera-Crichton, Daniel; Tefft, Nathan

    2014-07-01

    Recent clinical research has studied weight responses to varying diet composition, but the contribution of changes in macronutrient intake and physical activity to rising population weight remains controversial. Research on the economics of obesity typically assumes a "calories in, calories out" framework, but a weight production model separating caloric intake into carbohydrates, fat, and protein, has not been explored in an economic framework. To estimate the contributions of changes in macronutrient intake and physical activity to changes in population weight, we conducted dynamic time series and structural VAR analyses of U.S. data between 1974 and 2006 and a panel analysis of 164 countries between 2001 and 2010. Findings from all analyses suggest that increases in carbohydrates are most strongly and positively associated with increases in obesity prevalence even when controlling for changes in total caloric intake and occupation-related physical activity. Our structural VAR results suggest that, on the margin, a 1% increase in carbohydrates intake yields a 1.01 point increase in obesity prevalence over 5 years while an equal percent increase in fat intake decreases obesity prevalence by 0.24 points.

  16. Revisiting Street Intersections Using Slot-Based Systems.

    PubMed

    Tachet, Remi; Santi, Paolo; Sobolevsky, Stanislav; Reyes-Castro, Luis Ignacio; Frazzoli, Emilio; Helbing, Dirk; Ratti, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Since their appearance at the end of the 19th century, traffic lights have been the primary mode of granting access to road intersections. Today, this centuries-old technology is challenged by advances in intelligent transportation, which are opening the way to new solutions built upon slot-based systems similar to those commonly used in aerial traffic: what we call Slot-based Intersections (SIs). Despite simulation-based evidence of the potential benefits of SIs, a comprehensive, analytical framework to compare their relative performance with traffic lights is still lacking. Here, we develop such a framework. We approach the problem in a novel way, by generalizing classical queuing theory. Having defined safety conditions, we characterize capacity and delay of SIs. In the 2-road crossing configuration, we provide a capacity-optimal SI management system. For arbitrary intersection configurations, near-optimal solutions are developed. Results theoretically show that transitioning from a traffic light system to SI has the potential of doubling capacity and significantly reducing delays. This suggests a reduction of non-linear dynamics induced by intersection bottlenecks, with positive impact on the road network. Such findings can provide transportation engineers and planners with crucial insights as they prepare to manage the transition towards a more intelligent transportation infrastructure in cities.

  17. Nonlinear system modeling with random matrices: echo state networks revisited.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bai; Miller, David J; Wang, Yue

    2012-01-01

    Echo state networks (ESNs) are a novel form of recurrent neural networks (RNNs) that provide an efficient and powerful computational model approximating nonlinear dynamical systems. A unique feature of an ESN is that a large number of neurons (the "reservoir") are used, whose synaptic connections are generated randomly, with only the connections from the reservoir to the output modified by learning. Why a large randomly generated fixed RNN gives such excellent performance in approximating nonlinear systems is still not well understood. In this brief, we apply random matrix theory to examine the properties of random reservoirs in ESNs under different topologies (sparse or fully connected) and connection weights (Bernoulli or Gaussian). We quantify the asymptotic gap between the scaling factor bounds for the necessary and sufficient conditions previously proposed for the echo state property. We then show that the state transition mapping is contractive with high probability when only the necessary condition is satisfied, which corroborates and thus analytically explains the observation that in practice one obtains echo states when the spectral radius of the reservoir weight matrix is smaller than 1.

  18. de Gennes's theory of polymer drag reduction revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Hyun; Akhavan, Rayhaneh

    2010-11-01

    The original theory of polymer drag reduction proposed by de Gennes [1] and its re-interpretation for wall-bounded flows proposed by Sreenivasan & White [2] give predictions which are orders of magnitude off from both DNS results and available experimental data. A revised version of this theory is developed, in which the effect of the mean shear on polymer stretching is included, and the polymer is assumed to affect the dynamics of a turbulent scale when a small fraction, on the order of ˜3%, of the turbulence kinetic energy at that scale is redirected into the elastic energy of polymer. The revised theory gives predictions in quantitative agreement with DNS and experimental results for a number of polymer drag reduction features, including the criteria for onset of drag reduction, saturation of drag reduction, MDR, and the range of turbulent scales affected by the polymer. A complete theory of polymer drag reduction is proposed to show how this minimal exchange of energy between the polymer and turbulence can lead to the dramatic drag reductions observed with polymers.[4pt] [1] de Gennes, Physica 140A, p.9 (1986).[0pt] [2] Sreenivasan & White, J. Fluid Mech. 409, p.149 (2000)

  19. Revisiting Street Intersections Using Slot-Based Systems.

    PubMed

    Tachet, Remi; Santi, Paolo; Sobolevsky, Stanislav; Reyes-Castro, Luis Ignacio; Frazzoli, Emilio; Helbing, Dirk; Ratti, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Since their appearance at the end of the 19th century, traffic lights have been the primary mode of granting access to road intersections. Today, this centuries-old technology is challenged by advances in intelligent transportation, which are opening the way to new solutions built upon slot-based systems similar to those commonly used in aerial traffic: what we call Slot-based Intersections (SIs). Despite simulation-based evidence of the potential benefits of SIs, a comprehensive, analytical framework to compare their relative performance with traffic lights is still lacking. Here, we develop such a framework. We approach the problem in a novel way, by generalizing classical queuing theory. Having defined safety conditions, we characterize capacity and delay of SIs. In the 2-road crossing configuration, we provide a capacity-optimal SI management system. For arbitrary intersection configurations, near-optimal solutions are developed. Results theoretically show that transitioning from a traffic light system to SI has the potential of doubling capacity and significantly reducing delays. This suggests a reduction of non-linear dynamics induced by intersection bottlenecks, with positive impact on the road network. Such findings can provide transportation engineers and planners with crucial insights as they prepare to manage the transition towards a more intelligent transportation infrastructure in cities. PMID:26982532

  20. Revisiting an old friend: manganese-based MRI contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Dipanjan; Caruthers, Shelton D.; Senpan, Angana; Schmieder, Ann H.; Wickline, Samuel A.; Lanza, Gregory M.

    2011-01-01

    Non-invasive cellular and molecular imaging techniques are emerging as a multidisciplinary field that offers promise in understanding the components, processes, dynamics and therapies of disease at a molecular level. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an attractive technique due to the absence of radiation and high spatial resolution which makes it advantageous over techniques involving radioisotopes. Typically paramagnetic and superparamagnetic metals are used as contrast materials for MR based techniques. Gadolinium has been the predominant paramagnetic contrast metal until the discovery and association of the metal with nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) in some patients with severe renal or kidney disease. Manganese was one of the earliest reported examples of paramagnetic contrast material for MRI because of its efficient positive contrast enhancement. In this review manganese based contrast agent approaches will be presented with a particular emphasis on nanoparticulate agents. We have discussed both classically used small molecule based blood pool contrast agents and recently developed innovative nanoparticle-based strategies highlighting a number of successful molecular imaging examples. PMID:20860051