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Sample records for pion-nucleon dynamics revisited

  1. Three pion nucleon coupling constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Arriola, E.; Amaro, J. E.; Navarro Pérez, R.

    2016-08-01

    There exist four pion nucleon coupling constants, fπ0pp, - fπ0nn, fπ+pn/2 and fπ-np/2 which coincide when up and down quark masses are identical and the electron charge is zero. While there is no reason why the pion-nucleon-nucleon coupling constants should be identical in the real world, one expects that the small differences might be pinned down from a sufficiently large number of independent and mutually consistent data. Our discussion provides a rationale for our recent determination fp2 = 0.0759(4),f 02 = 0.079(1),f c2 = 0.0763(6), based on a partial wave analysis of the 3σ self-consistent nucleon-nucleon Granada-2013 database comprising 6713 published data in the period 1950-2013.

  2. Pion-nucleon scattering: from chiral perturbation theory to Roy-Steiner equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubis, Bastian; Hoferichter, Martin; de Elvira, Jacobo Ruiz; Meißner, Ulf-G.

    2016-11-01

    Ever since Weinberg's seminal predictions of the pion-nucleon scattering amplitudes at threshold, this process has been of central interest for the study of chiral dynamics involving nucleons. The scattering lengths or the pion-nucleon σ-term are fundamental quantities characterizing the explicit breaking of chiral symmetry by means of the light quark masses. On the other hand, pion-nucleon dynamics also strongly affects the long-range part of nucleon-nucleon potentials, and hence has a far-reaching impact on nuclear physics. We discuss the fruitful combination of dispersion-theoretical methods, in the form of Roy-Steiner equations, with chiral dynamics to determine pion-nucleon scattering amplitudes at low energies with high precision.*

  3. Low-energy pion-nucleon scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, W.R.; Ai, L.; Kaufmann, W.B.

    1998-02-01

    An analysis of low-energy charged pion-nucleon data from recent {pi}{sup {plus_minus}}p experiments is presented. From the scattering lengths and the Goldberger-Miyazawa-Oehme (GMO) sum rule we find a value of the pion-nucleon coupling constant of f{sup 2}=0.0756{plus_minus}0.0007. We also find, contrary to most previous analyses, that the scattering volumes for the P{sub 31} and P{sub 13} partial waves are equal, within errors, corresponding to a symmetry found in the Hamiltonian of many theories. For the potential models used, the amplitudes are extrapolated into the subthreshold region to estimate the value of the {Sigma} term. Off-shell amplitudes are also provided. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Low-energy pion-nucleon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, W. R.; Ai, Li; Kaufmann, W. B.

    1998-02-01

    An analysis of low-energy charged pion-nucleon data from recent π+/-p experiments is presented. From the scattering lengths and the Goldberger-Miyazawa-Oehme (GMO) sum rule we find a value of the pion-nucleon coupling constant of f2=0.0756+/-0.0007. We also find, contrary to most previous analyses, that the scattering volumes for the P31 and P13 partial waves are equal, within errors, corresponding to a symmetry found in the Hamiltonian of many theories. For the potential models used, the amplitudes are extrapolated into the subthreshold region to estimate the value of the Σ term. Off-shell amplitudes are also provided.

  5. Roy-Steiner-equation analysis of pion-nucleon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meißner, U.-G.; Ruiz de Elvira, J.; Hoferichter, M.; Kubis, B.

    2017-03-01

    Low-energy pion-nucleon scattering is relevant for many areas in nuclear and hadronic physics, ranging from the scalar couplings of the nucleon to the long-range part of two-pion-exchange potentials and three-nucleon forces in Chiral Effective Field Theory. In this talk, we show how the fruitful combination of dispersion-theoretical methods, in particular in the form of Roy-Steiner equations, with modern high-precision data on hadronic atoms allows one to determine the pion-nucleon scattering amplitudes at low energies with unprecedented accuracy. Special attention will be paid to the extraction of the pion-nucleon σ-term, and we discuss in detail the current tension with recent lattice results, as well as the determination of the low-energy constants of chiral perturbation theory.c

  6. Quark dynamics and pion-nucleon coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weise, W.; Werner, E.

    1981-05-01

    In the framework of nonperturbative QCD phenomenology we discuss: (1) The elementary process for the creation of color-singlet qq-pairs inside a hadron. (2) The interaction of the qq-pair with the surrounding quark-gluon medium. An important consequence of these discussions is that meson emission takes place preferentially, if the primary qq-pair is created in the surface region of the hadron. For the case of pseudoscalar coupling we employ PCAC to obtain the coupling of the qq-pair to the pion. The resulting form and coupling strength of the πNN vertex is consistent with the phenomenological OPEP.

  7. Roy-Steiner-equation analysis of pion-nucleon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoferichter, Martin; Ruiz de Elvira, Jacobo; Kubis, Bastian; Meißner, Ulf-G.

    2016-04-01

    We review the structure of Roy-Steiner equations for pion-nucleon scattering, the solution for the partial waves of the t-channel process ππ → N ¯ N, as well as the high-accuracy extraction of the pion-nucleon S-wave scattering lengths from data on pionic hydrogen and deuterium. We then proceed to construct solutions for the lowest partial waves of the s-channel process πN → πN and demonstrate that accurate solutions can be found if the scattering lengths are imposed as constraints. Detailed error estimates of all input quantities in the solution procedure are performed and explicit parameterizations for the resulting low-energy phase shifts as well as results for subthreshold parameters and higher threshold parameters are presented. Furthermore, we discuss the extraction of the pion-nucleon σ-term via the Cheng-Dashen low-energy theorem, including the role of isospin-breaking corrections, to obtain a precision determination consistent with all constraints from analyticity, unitarity, crossing symmetry, and pionic-atom data. We perform the matching to chiral perturbation theory in the subthreshold region and detail the consequences for the chiral convergence of the threshold parameters and the nucleon mass.

  8. Roy-Steiner equations for pion-nucleon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditsche, C.; Hoferichter, M.; Kubis, B.; Meissner, U. G.

    Starting from hyperbolic dispersion relations for the invariant amplitudes of pion-nucleon scattering together with crossing symmetry and unitarity, one can derive a closed system of integral equations for the partial waves of both the s-channel (pi N --> pi N) and the t-channel (pi pi --> Nbar N) reaction, called Roy-Steiner equations. After giving a brief overview of the Roy-Steiner system for pi N scattering, we demonstrate that the solution of the t-channel subsystem, which represents the first step in solving the full system, can be achieved by means of Muskhelishvili-Omn\\`es techniques. In particular, we present results for the P-waves featuring in the dispersive analysis of the electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon.

  9. Roy-Steiner equations for pion-nucleon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditsche, C.; Hoferichter, M.; Kubis, B.; Meißner, U.-G.

    2012-06-01

    Starting from hyperbolic dispersion relations, we derive a closed system of Roy-Steiner equations for pion-nucleon scattering that respects analyticity, unitarity, and crossing symmetry. We work out analytically all kernel functions and unitarity relations required for the lowest partial waves. In order to suppress the dependence on the high energy regime we also consider once- and twice-subtracted versions of the equations, where we identify the subtraction constants with subthreshold parameters. Assuming Mandelstam analyticity we determine the maximal range of validity of these equations. As a first step towards the solution of the full system we cast the equations for the π π to overline N N partial waves into the form of a Muskhelishvili-Omnès problem with finite matching point, which we solve numerically in the single-channel approximation. We investigate in detail the role of individual contributions to our solutions and discuss some consequences for the spectral functions of the nucleon electromagnetic form factors.

  10. Pion-nucleon scattering in covariant baryon chiral perturbation theory with explicit Delta resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, De-Liang; Siemens, D.; Bernard, V.; Epelbaum, E.; Gasparyan, A. M.; Gegelia, J.; Krebs, H.; Meißner, Ulf-G.

    2016-05-01

    We present the results of a third order calculation of the pion-nucleon scattering amplitude in a chiral effective field theory with pions, nucleons and delta resonances as explicit degrees of freedom. We work in a manifestly Lorentz invariant formulation of baryon chiral perturbation theory using dimensional regularization and the extended on-mass-shell renormalization scheme. In the delta resonance sector, the on mass-shell renormalization is realized as a complex-mass scheme. By fitting the low-energy constants of the effective Lagrangian to the S- and P -partial waves a satisfactory description of the phase shifts from the analysis of the Roy-Steiner equations is obtained. We predict the phase shifts for the D and F waves and compare them with the results of the analysis of the George Washington University group. The threshold parameters are calculated both in the delta-less and delta-full cases. Based on the determined low-energy constants, we discuss the pion-nucleon sigma term. Additionally, in order to determine the strangeness content of the nucleon, we calculate the octet baryon masses in the presence of decuplet resonances up to next-to-next-to-leading order in SU(3) baryon chiral perturbation theory. The octet baryon sigma terms are predicted as a byproduct of this calculation.

  11. a Phenomenological Determination of the Pion-Nucleon Scattering Lengths from Pionic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ericson, T. E. O.; Loiseau, B.; Wycech, S.

    A model independent expression for the electromagnetic corrections to a phenomenological hadronic pion-nucleon (πN) scattering length ah, extracted from pionic hydrogen, is obtained. In a non-relativistic approach and using an extended charge distribution, these corrections are derived up to terms of order α2 log α in the limit of a short-range hadronic interaction. We infer ahπ ^-p=0.0870(5)m-1π which gives for the πNN coupling through the GMO relation g2π ^± pn/(4π )=14.04(17).

  12. Elastic pion-nucleon scattering in chiral perturbation theory: A fresh look

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemens, D.; Bernard, V.; Epelbaum, E.; Gasparyan, A.; Krebs, H.; Meißner, Ulf-G.

    2016-07-01

    Elastic pion-nucleon scattering is analyzed in the framework of chiral perturbation theory up to fourth order within the heavy-baryon expansion and a covariant approach based on an extended on-mass-shell renormalization scheme. We discuss in detail the renormalization of the various low-energy constants and provide explicit expressions for the relevant β functions and the finite subtractions of the power-counting breaking terms within the covariant formulation. To estimate the theoretical uncertainty from the truncation of the chiral expansion, we employ an approach which has been successfully applied in the most recent analysis of the nuclear forces. This allows us to reliably extract the relevant low-energy constants from the available scattering data at low energy. The obtained results provide clear evidence that the breakdown scale of the chiral expansion for this reaction is related to the Δ resonance. The explicit inclusion of the leading contributions of the Δ isobar is demonstrated to substantially increase the range of applicability of the effective field theory. The resulting predictions for the phase shifts are in an excellent agreement with the predictions from the recent Roy-Steiner-equation analysis of pion-nucleon scattering.

  13. Matching Pion-Nucleon Roy-Steiner Equations to Chiral Perturbation Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoferichter, Martin; Ruiz de Elvira, Jacobo; Kubis, Bastian; Meißner, Ulf-G.

    2015-11-01

    We match the results for the subthreshold parameters of pion-nucleon scattering obtained from a solution of Roy-Steiner equations to chiral perturbation theory up to next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order, to extract the pertinent low-energy constants including a comprehensive analysis of systematic uncertainties and correlations. We study the convergence of the chiral series by investigating the chiral expansion of threshold parameters up to the same order and discuss the role of the Δ (1232 ) resonance in this context. Results for the low-energy constants are also presented in the counting scheme usually applied in chiral nuclear effective field theory, where they serve as crucial input to determine the long-range part of the nucleon-nucleon potential as well as three-nucleon forces.

  14. High-Precision Determination of the Pion-Nucleon σ Term from Roy-Steiner Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoferichter, Martin; Ruiz de Elvira, Jacobo; Kubis, Bastian; Meißner, Ulf-G.

    2015-08-01

    We present a determination of the pion-nucleon (π N ) σ term σπ N based on the Cheng-Dashen low-energy theorem (LET), taking advantage of the recent high-precision data from pionic atoms to pin down the π N scattering lengths as well as of constraints from analyticity, unitarity, and crossing symmetry in the form of Roy-Steiner equations to perform the extrapolation to the Cheng-Dashen point in a reliable manner. With isospin-violating corrections included both in the scattering lengths and the LET, we obtain σπ N=(59.1 ±1.9 ±3.0 ) MeV =(59.1 ±3.5 ) MeV , where the first error refers to uncertainties in the π N amplitude and the second to the LET. Consequences for the scalar nucleon couplings relevant for the direct detection of dark matter are discussed.

  15. A relativistic meson-exchange model of pion-nucleon scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.S.H.; Hung, C.T.; Yang, S.N.

    1995-08-01

    Pion-nucleon scattering is investigated using the Kadshevsky three-dimensional reduction of the Bethe-Salpeter equation. The resulting potential includes the direct and crossed N and {Delta} terms, and the t-channel {sigma}- and {rho}-exchange terms. The nucleon-pole condition is imposed to define the renormalization of the nucleon mass and the {pi}NN coupling constant. A mixture of the scalar and vector {sigma}{pi}{pi} couplings is introduced to simulate the broad width of the s-wave correlated two-pion exchange mechanism. Good descriptions of the {pi}N phase shifts up to 400 MeV have been obtained in all S- and P-waves. The off-shell behavior for our model differs significantly from that obtained using different reductions. A paper describing our results was published.

  16. Determination of the pion-nucleon coupling constant and scattering lengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ericson, T. E.; Loiseau, B.; Thomas, A. W.

    2002-07-01

    We critically evaluate the isovector Goldberger-Miyazawa-Oehme (GMO) sum rule for forward πN scattering using the recent precision measurements of π-p and π-d scattering lengths from pionic atoms. We deduce the charged-pion-nucleon coupling constant, with careful attention to systematic and statistical uncertainties. This determination gives, directly from data, g2c(GMO)/ 4π=14.11+/-0.05(statistical)+/-0.19(systematic) or f2c/4π=0.0783(11). This value is intermediate between that of indirect methods and the direct determination from backward np differential scattering cross sections. We also use the pionic atom data to deduce the coherent symmetric and antisymmetric sums of the pion-proton and pion-neutron scattering lengths with high precision, namely, (aπ-p+aπ-n)/2=[- 12+/-2(statistical)+/-8(systematic)]×10-4 m-1π and (aπ-p-aπ- n)/2=[895+/-3(statistical)+/-13 (systematic)]×10-4 m-1π. For the need of the present analysis, we improve the theoretical description of the pion-deuteron scattering length.

  17. Dynamic causal modelling revisited.

    PubMed

    Friston, K J; Preller, Katrin H; Mathys, Chris; Cagnan, Hayriye; Heinzle, Jakob; Razi, Adeel; Zeidman, Peter

    2017-02-17

    This paper revisits the dynamic causal modelling of fMRI timeseries by replacing the usual (Taylor) approximation to neuronal dynamics with a neural mass model of the canonical microcircuit. This provides a generative or dynamic causal model of laminar specific responses that can generate haemodynamic and electrophysiological measurements. In principle, this allows the fusion of haemodynamic and (event related or induced) electrophysiological responses. Furthermore, it enables Bayesian model comparison of competing hypotheses about physiologically plausible synaptic effects; for example, does attentional modulation act on superficial or deep pyramidal cells - or both? In this technical note, we describe the resulting dynamic causal model and provide an illustrative application to the attention to visual motion dataset used in previous papers. Our focus here is on how to answer long-standing questions in fMRI; for example, do haemodynamic responses reflect extrinsic (afferent) input from distant cortical regions, or do they reflect intrinsic (recurrent) neuronal activity? To what extent do inhibitory interneurons contribute to neurovascular coupling? What is the relationship between haemodynamic responses and the frequency of induced neuronal activity? This paper does not pretend to answer these questions; rather it shows how they can be addressed using neural mass models of fMRI timeseries.

  18. Dynamic Topography Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moresi, Louis

    2015-04-01

    Dynamic Topography Revisited Dynamic topography is usually considered to be one of the trinity of contributing causes to the Earth's non-hydrostatic topography along with the long-term elastic strength of the lithosphere and isostatic responses to density anomalies within the lithosphere. Dynamic topography, thought of this way, is what is left over when other sources of support have been eliminated. An alternate and explicit definition of dynamic topography is that deflection of the surface which is attributable to creeping viscous flow. The problem with the first definition of dynamic topography is 1) that the lithosphere is almost certainly a visco-elastic / brittle layer with no absolute boundary between flowing and static regions, and 2) the lithosphere is, a thermal / compositional boundary layer in which some buoyancy is attributable to immutable, intrinsic density variations and some is due to thermal anomalies which are coupled to the flow. In each case, it is difficult to draw a sharp line between each contribution to the overall topography. The second definition of dynamic topography does seem cleaner / more precise but it suffers from the problem that it is not measurable in practice. On the other hand, this approach has resulted in a rich literature concerning the analysis of large scale geoid and topography and the relation to buoyancy and mechanical properties of the Earth [e.g. refs 1,2,3] In convection models with viscous, elastic, brittle rheology and compositional buoyancy, however, it is possible to examine how the surface topography (and geoid) are supported and how different ways of interpreting the "observable" fields introduce different biases. This is what we will do. References (a.k.a. homework) [1] Hager, B. H., R. W. Clayton, M. A. Richards, R. P. Comer, and A. M. Dziewonski (1985), Lower mantle heterogeneity, dynamic topography and the geoid, Nature, 313(6003), 541-545, doi:10.1038/313541a0. [2] Parsons, B., and S. Daly (1983), The

  19. Measurements of observables in the pion-nucleon system, nuclear a- dependence of heavy quark production and rare decays of D and B mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Sadler, M.E.; Isenhower, L.D.

    1992-02-15

    This report discusses research on the following topics: pion-nucleon interactions; detector tomography facility; nuclear dependence of charm and beauty quark production and a study of two-prong decays of neutral D and B mesons; N* collaboration at CEBAF; and pilac experiments. (LSP)

  20. Pion-nucleon scattering in the Roper channel from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, C. B.; Leskovec, L.; Padmanath, M.; Prelovsek, S.

    2017-01-01

    We present a lattice QCD study of N π scattering in the positive-parity nucleon channel, where the puzzling Roper resonance N*(1440 ) resides in experiment. The study is based on the PACS-CS ensemble of gauge configurations with Nf=2 +1 Wilson-clover dynamical fermions, mπ≃156 MeV and L ≃2.9 fm . In addition to a number of q q q interpolating fields, we implement operators for N π in p -wave and N σ in s -wave. In the center-of-momentum frame we find three eigenstates below 1.65 GeV. They are dominated by N (0 ), N (0 )π (0 )π (0 ) [mixed with N (0 )σ (0 )] and N (p )π (-p ) with p ≃2 π /L , where momenta are given in parentheses. This is the first simulation where the expected multi-hadron states are found in this channel. The experimental N π phase shift would—in the approximation of purely elastic N π scattering—imply an additional eigenstate near the Roper mass mR≃1.43 GeV for our lattice size. We do not observe any such additional eigenstate, which indicates that N π elastic scattering alone does not render a low-lying Roper. Coupling with other channels, most notably with N π π , seems to be important for generating the Roper resonance, reinforcing the notion that this state could be a dynamically generated resonance. Our results are in line with most of the previous lattice studies based just on q q q interpolators, which did not find a Roper eigenstate below 1.65 GeV. The study of the coupled-channel scattering including a three-particle decay N π π remains a challenge.

  1. Application of a folding-model optical potential to analyzing inelastic pion-nucleus scattering and the in-medium effect on a pion-nucleon amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukyanov, V. K.; Zemlyanaya, E. V.; Lukyanov, K. V.; Abdul-Magead, I. A. M.

    2016-11-01

    The folding-model optical potential is generalized in such a way as to apply it to calculating the cross sections for inelastic scattering of π ±-mesons on 28Si, 40Ca, 58Ni, and 208Pb nuclei at the energies of 162, 180, 226, and 291 MeV leading to the excitation of the 2+ and 3- collective states. In doing this, use is made of known nucleon-density distributions in nuclei and the pion-nucleon scattering amplitude whose parameters were obtained previously by fitting the elastic scattering cross sections for the same nuclei. Thus, the values of quadrupole ( β 2) and octupole ( β 3) deformations of nuclei appear here as the only adjustable parameters. The scattering cross section is calculated by solving the relativistic wave equation, whereby effects of relativization and distortion in the entrance and exit scattering channels are taken exactly into account. The cross sections calculated in this way for inelastic scattering are in good agreement with respective experimental data. The importance of the inclusion of in-medium effects in choosing parameters of the pion-nucleon amplitude is emphasized.

  2. Measurements of observables in the pion-nucleon system, nuclear a- dependence of heavy quark production and rare decays of D and B mesons. Progress report, 1 December, 1990--15 February, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Sadler, M.E.; Isenhower, L.D.

    1992-02-15

    This report discusses research on the following topics: pion-nucleon interactions; detector tomography facility; nuclear dependence of charm and beauty quark production and a study of two-prong decays of neutral D and B mesons; N* collaboration at CEBAF; and pilac experiments. (LSP)

  3. Spin effects in pion-nucleon and nucleon-nucleon scattering at high energies and fixed angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavleishvili, M. P.

    1989-05-01

    Based on the study of the general structure of helicity amplitudes, obligatory kinematic factors are separated and the so-called dynamic amplitudes are introduced. These factors make conservation laws fulfill and contain all the kinematic singularities of helicity amplitudes. Via the dynamic amplitudes, the observable quantities are expressed in a simple form. Kinematic factors play the role of weighting functions. At high energies and fixed angles these factors turn into small parameters which suppress contributions of some helicity amplitudes, and enhance contributions of others. So we get the kinematic hierarchy for binary processes. As an example we consider πN- and NN-scattering. Predictions are given for some asymmetry parameters which do not coincide with the helicity conservation rules, predicted by QCD.

  4. Exclusive measurements of pion nucleon going to pion pion nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kermani, Mohammad Arjomand

    The pion induced pion production reactions π±p/toπ±π+n were studied at projectile incident energies of 223, 243, 264, 284, and 305 MeV. The Canadian High Acceptance Orbit Spectrometer (CHAOS) was used to detected the charged particles, which originated from the interaction of the incident pion beam with a cryogenic liquid hydrogen target. The experimental results are presented in the form of single, double and triple differential cross sections. Total cross sections obtained by integrating the differential quantities are also reported. The experimental data, namely the π-p/toπ-π+n double differential cross sections, were used as input to the Chew-Low extrapolation procedure which was utilized to determine on-shell π+π- elastic scattering cross sections in the near threshold region. The Chew-Low results (the extrapolated πpi cross sections) were then used in a dispersion analysis (Roy equations) to obtain the πpi isospin zero S-wave scattering length. We find a00=0.209/pm 0.011μ-1. In addition, the invariant mass distributions from the (π+π-) channel were fitted to determine the model parameters for the extended model of Oset and Vicente-Vacas. We find that the model parameters obtained from fitting the (π+π-) data do not describe the invariant mass distributions in the (π+π+) channel.

  5. Toward complete pion nucleon amplitudes

    DOE PAGES

    Mathieu, Vincent; Danilkin, Igor V.; Fernández-Ramírez, Cesar; ...

    2015-10-05

    We compare the low-energy partial wave analyses πN scattering with a high-energy data via finite energy sum rules. We also construct a new set of amplitudes by matching the imaginary part from the low-energy analysis with the high-energy, Regge parametrization and then reconstruct the real parts using dispersion relations.

  6. Revisiting approximate dynamic programming and its convergence.

    PubMed

    Heydari, Ali

    2014-12-01

    Value iteration-based approximate/adaptive dynamic programming (ADP) as an approximate solution to infinite-horizon optimal control problems with deterministic dynamics and continuous state and action spaces is investigated. The learning iterations are decomposed into an outer loop and an inner loop. A relatively simple proof for the convergence of the outer-loop iterations to the optimal solution is provided using a novel idea with some new features. It presents an analogy between the value function during the iterations and the value function of a fixed-final-time optimal control problem. The inner loop is utilized to avoid the need for solving a set of nonlinear equations or a nonlinear optimization problem numerically, at each iteration of ADP for the policy update. Sufficient conditions for the uniqueness of the solution to the policy update equation and for the convergence of the inner-loop iterations to the solution are obtained. Afterwards, the results are formed as a learning algorithm for training a neurocontroller or creating a look-up table to be used for optimal control of nonlinear systems with different initial conditions. Finally, some of the features of the investigated method are numerically analyzed.

  7. Chiral dynamics with (non)strange quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubis, Bastian; Meißner, Ulf-G.

    2017-01-01

    We review the results and achievements of the project B.3. Topics addressed include pion photoproduction off the proton and off deuterium, three-flavor chiral perturbation theory studies, chiral symmetry tests in Goldstone boson decays, the development of unitarized chiral perturbation theory to next-to-leading order, the two-pole structure of the Λ(1405), the dynamical generation of the lowest S11 resonances, the theory of hadronic atoms and its application to various systems, precision studies in light-meson decays based on dispersion theory, the Roy-Steiner analysis of pion-nucleon scattering, a high-precision extraction of the elusive pion-nucleon σ-term, and aspects of chiral dynamics in few-nucleon systems.

  8. The dynamics of three vortices revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavantzis, John; Ting, LU

    1988-01-01

    The dynamics of three vortices was studied by Synge (1949) using the length of the sides of the triangle formed by the vortices as prime variables. The critical states at which the lengths of the sides remain fixed throughout the motion were found to be either equilateral triangles or collinear configurations. The equilateral configurations were either stable or unstable depending on whether the sum of the products of strengths K was greater or less than zero, respectively. In the case of K = 0, a one-parameter family of solutions of contracting and another of expanding similar triangles were found. It is shown here that, for this special case, the family of contracting similar solutions is always unstable while the family of expanding ones is stable. The critical states for collinear configurations in the general case are studied where K is greater than or less than zero. It is shown that there are either six or four critical states depending on the strengths of the vortices. The properties of these states are discussed.

  9. Dynamics of personality test responses: the empiricist's manifesto revisited.

    PubMed

    Butcher, J N

    2000-03-01

    This article revisits the classic empirical manifesto written by Meehl in 1945, and examines subsequent developments in structured personality assessment. The current status of personality assessment from an empirical-scale-development perspective is presented, with examples drawn from recent work on the MMPI-2. Meehl's heuristic defense of empirically based personality-scale construction was reexamined and the lasting influences of these views were highlighted. Meehl's early conceptualization of the relative unimportance of item content in personality-test construction and several alternative views were summarized, and Meehl's modified position was described. The role that test-taking attitudes can play in personality assessment was discussed in the 1945 article, and Meehl's views on the need for appraisal of invalidating conditions have been reaffirmed in contemporary test development. Finally, the so-called "dynamics" of a structured personality item response were discussed from a contemporary perspective, and some recent research was included to illustrate the continued importance of anchoring test interpretation in empirical correlates.

  10. Richards model revisited: validation by and application to infection dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang-Sheng; Wu, Jianhong; Yang, Yong

    2012-11-21

    Ever since Richards proposed his flexible growth function more than half a century ago, it has been a mystery that this empirical function has made many incredible coincidences with real ecological or epidemic data even though one of its parameters (i.e., the exponential term) does not seem to have clear biological meaning. It is therefore a natural challenge to mathematical biologists to provide an explanation of the interesting coincidences and a biological interpretation of the parameter. Here we start from a simple epidemic SIR model to revisit Richards model via an intrinsic relation between both models. Especially, we prove that the exponential term in the Richards model has a one-to-one nonlinear correspondence to the basic reproduction number of the SIR model. This one-to-one relation provides us an explicit formula in calculating the basic reproduction number. Another biological significance of our study is the observation that the peak time is approximately just a serial interval after the turning point. Moreover, we provide an explicit relation between final outbreak size, basic reproduction number and the peak epidemic size which means that we can predict the final outbreak size shortly after the peak time. Finally, we introduce a constraint in Richards model to address over fitting problem observed in the existing studies and then apply our method with constraint to conduct some validation analysis using the data of recent outbreaks of prototype infectious diseases such as Canada 2009 H1N1 outbreak, GTA 2003 SARS outbreak, Singapore 2005 dengue outbreak, and Taiwan 2003 SARS outbreak. Our new formula gives much more stable and precise estimate of model parameters and key epidemic characteristics such as the final outbreak size, the basic reproduction number, and the turning point, compared with earlier simulations without constraints.

  11. System identification based approach to dynamic weighing revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedźwiecki, Maciej; Meller, Michał; Pietrzak, Przemysław

    2016-12-01

    Dynamic weighing, i.e., weighing of objects in motion, without stopping them on the weighing platform, allows one to increase the rate of operation of automatic weighing systems, used in industrial production processes, without compromising their accuracy. Since the classical identification-based approach to dynamic weighing, based on the second-order mass-spring-damper model of the weighing system, does not yield satisfactory results when applied to conveyor belt type checkweighers, several extensions of this technique are examined. Experiments confirm that when appropriately modified the identification-based approach becomes a reliable tool for dynamic mass measurement in checkweighers.

  12. Subpicosecond measurements of polar solvation dynamics: Coumarin 153 revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Horng, M.L.; Gardecki, J.A.; Papazyan, A.; Maroncelli, M.

    1995-11-30

    Time-resolved emission measurements of the solute coumarin 153 (C153) are used to probe the time dependence of solvation in 24 common solvents at room temperature. Significant improvements in experimental time resolution ({approx}100 fs instrument response) as well as corresponding improvements in analysis methods provide confidence that all of the spectral evolution (including both the inertial and the diffusive parts of the response) are observed in these measurements. Extensive data concerning the steady-state solvatochromism of C153, coupled to an examination of the effects of vibrational relaxation, further demonstrate that the spectral dynamics being observed accurately monitor the dynamics of nonspecific solvation. Comparisons to theoretical predictions show that models based on the dielectric response of the pure solvent provide a semiquantitative understanding of the dynamics observed. 156 refs., 26 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Quantum-mechanical picture of peripheral chiral dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Granados, Carlos; Weiss, Christian

    2015-08-28

    The nucleon's peripheral transverse charge and magnetization densities are computed in chiral effective field theory. The densities are represented in first-quantized form, as overlap integrals of chiral light-front wave functions describing the transition of the nucleon to soft pion-nucleon intermediate states. The orbital motion of the pion causes a large left-right asymmetry in a transversely polarized nucleon. As a result, the effect attests to the relativistic nature of chiral dynamics [pion momenta k = O(Mπ)] and could be observed in form factor measurements at low momentum transfer.

  14. Quantum-mechanical picture of peripheral chiral dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granados, C.; Weiss, C.

    2015-08-01

    The nucleon's peripheral transverse charge and magnetization densities are computed in chiral effective field theory. The densities are represented in first-quantized form, as overlap integrals of chiral light-front wave functions describing the transition of the nucleon to soft pion-nucleon intermediate states. The orbital motion of the pion causes a large left-right asymmetry in a transversely polarized nucleon. The effect attests to the relativistic nature of chiral dynamics [pion momenta k =O (Mπ) ] and could be observed in form factor measurements at low momentum transfer.

  15. Revisiting r > g-The asymptotic dynamics of wealth inequality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, Yonatan; Shapira, Yoash

    2017-02-01

    Studying the underlying mechanisms of wealth inequality dynamics is essential for its understanding and for policy aiming to regulate its level. We apply a heterogeneous non-interacting agent-based modeling approach, solved using iterated maps to model the dynamics of wealth inequality based on 3 parameters-the economic output growth rate g, the capital value change rate a and the personal savings rate s and show that for a < g the wealth distribution reaches an asymptotic shape and becomes close to the income distribution. If a > g, the wealth distribution constantly becomes more and more inegalitarian. We also show that when a < g, wealth is asymptotically accumulated at the same rate as the economic output, which also implies that the wealth-disposable income ratio asymptotically converges to s /(g - a) .

  16. Revisiting the S-Au(111) interaction: Static or Dynamic?

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, M M; Biener, J; Friend, C M

    2004-08-17

    The chemical inertness typically observed for Au does not imply a general inability to form stable bonds with non-metals but is rather a consequence of high reaction barriers. The Au-S interaction is probably the most intensively studied interaction of Au surfaces with non-metals as, for example, it plays an important role in Au ore formation, and controls the structure and dynamics of thiol-based self-assembled-monolayers (SAMs). In recent years a quite complex picture of the interaction of sulfur with Au(111) surfaces emerged, and a variety of S-induced surface structures was reported under different conditions. The majority of these structures were interpreted in terms of a static Au surface, where the positions of the Au atoms remain essentially unperturbed. Here we demonstrate that the Au(111) surface exhibits a very dynamic character upon interaction with adsorbed sulfur: low sulfur coverages modify the surface stress of the Au surface leading to lateral expansion of the surface layer; large-scale surface restructuring and incorporation of Au atoms into a growing two-dimensional AuS phase were observed with increasing sulfur coverage. These results provide new insight into the Au-S surface chemistry, and reveal the dynamic character of the Au(111) surface.

  17. The dorsal visual stream revisited: Stable circuits or dynamic pathways?

    PubMed

    Galletti, Claudio; Fattori, Patrizia

    2017-01-23

    In both macaque and human brain, information regarding visual motion flows from the extrastriate area V6 along two different paths: a dorsolateral one towards areas MT/V5, MST, V3A, and a dorsomedial one towards the visuomotor areas of the superior parietal lobule (V6A, MIP, VIP). The dorsolateral visual stream is involved in many aspects of visual motion analysis, including the recognition of object motion and self motion. The dorsomedial stream uses visual motion information to continuously monitor the spatial location of objects while we are looking and/or moving around, to allow skilled reaching for and grasping of the objects in structured, dynamically changing environments. Grasping activity is present in two areas of the dorsal stream, AIP and V6A. Area AIP is more involved than V6A in object recognition, V6A in encoding vision for action. We suggest that V6A is involved in the fast control of prehension and plays a critical role in biomechanically selecting appropriate postures during reach to grasp behaviors. In everyday life, numerous functional networks, often involving the same cortical areas, are continuously in action in the dorsal visual stream, with each network dynamically activated or inhibited according to the context. The dorsolateral and dorsomedial streams represent only two examples of these networks. Many others streams have been described in the literature, but it is worthwhile noting that the same cortical area, and even the same neurons within an area, are not specific for just one functional property, being part of networks that encode multiple functional aspects. Our proposal is to conceive the cortical streams not as fixed series of interconnected cortical areas in which each area belongs univocally to one stream and is strictly involved in only one function, but as interconnected neuronal networks, often involving the same neurons, that are involved in a number of functional processes and whose activation changes dynamically according

  18. Diagnosing erectile dysfunction: the penile dynamic colour duplex ultrasound revisited.

    PubMed

    Aversa, A; Bruzziches, R; Spera, G

    2005-12-01

    A number of disease processes of the penis including Peyronie's disease, priapism, penile fractures and tumors are clearly visualized with ultrasound. Diagnostic evaluation of erectile dysfunction (ED) by penile dynamic colour-duplex Doppler ultrasonography (D-CDDU) is actually considered a second level approach to ED patients because of the fact that intracavernous injections test IV with prostaglandin-E(1) may provide important information about the patients' erectile capacity. However, no direct vascular imaging and a high percentage of false negative diagnoses of vasculogenic ED are its major pitfalls and subsequent treatment decisions remain quite limited. The occurrence of ED and its sentinel relationship to cardiovascular disease has prompted more accurate vascular screening in all patients even in the absence of cardiovascular risk factors. The sonographic evaluation of the intima-media thickness of the carotid arteries may sometimes represent an early manifestation of diffuse atherosclerotic disease and endothelial damage. This latter finding is often the cause of failure to oral agents, i.e. phosphodiesterase inhibitors, because of inability of the dysfunctional endothelium to release nitric oxide. D-CDDU represents an accurate tool to investigate cavernous artery inflow and venous leakage when compared with more invasive diagnostic techniques i.e. selective arteriography and dynamic infusion cavernosometry along with cavernosography.

  19. Benzophenone Ultrafast Triplet Population: Revisiting the Kinetic Model by Surface-Hopping Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The photochemistry of benzophenone, a paradigmatic organic molecule for photosensitization, was investigated by means of surface-hopping ab initio molecular dynamics. Different mechanisms were found to be relevant within the first 600 fs after excitation; the long-debated direct (S1 → T1) and indirect (S1 → T2 → T1) mechanisms for population of the low-lying triplet state are both possible, with the latter being prevalent. Moreover, we established the existence of a kinetic equilibrium between the two triplet states, never observed before. This fact implies that a significant fraction of the overall population resides in T2, eventually allowing one to revisit the usual spectroscopic assignment proposed by transient absorption spectroscopy. This finding is of particular interest for photocatalysis as well as for DNA damages studies because both T1 and T2 channels are, in principle, available for benzophenone-mediated photoinduced energy transfer toward DNA. PMID:26821061

  20. Geostationary secular dynamics revisited: application to high area-to-mass ratio objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gachet, Fabien; Celletti, Alessandra; Pucacco, Giuseppe; Efthymiopoulos, Christos

    2016-12-01

    The long-term dynamics of the geostationary Earth orbits (GEO) is revisited through the application of canonical perturbation theory. We consider a Hamiltonian model accounting for all major perturbations: geopotential at order and degree two, lunisolar perturbations with a realistic model for the Sun and Moon orbits, and solar radiation pressure. The long-term dynamics of the GEO region has been studied both numerically and analytically, in view of the relevance of such studies to the issue of space debris or to the disposal of GEO satellites. Past studies focused on the orbital evolution of objects around a nominal solution, hereafter called the forced equilibrium solution, which shows a particularly strong dependence on the area-to-mass ratio. Here, we (i) give theoretical estimates for the long-term behavior of such orbits, and (ii) we examine the nature of the forced equilibrium itself. In the lowest approximation, the forced equilibrium implies motion with a constant non-zero average `forced eccentricity', as well as a constant non-zero average inclination, otherwise known in satellite dynamics as the inclination of the invariant `Laplace plane'. Using a higher order normal form, we demonstrate that this equilibrium actually represents not a point in phase space, but a trajectory taking place on a lower-dimensional torus. We give analytical expressions for this special trajectory, and we compare our results to those found by numerical orbit propagation. We finally discuss the use of proper elements, i.e., approximate integrals of motion for the GEO orbits.

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance signal dynamics of liquids in the presence of distant dipolar fields, revisited.

    PubMed

    Barros, Wilson; Gochberg, Daniel F; Gore, John C

    2009-05-07

    The description of the nuclear magnetic resonance magnetization dynamics in the presence of long-range dipolar interactions, which is based upon approximate solutions of Bloch-Torrey equations including the effect of a distant dipolar field, has been revisited. New experiments show that approximate analytic solutions have a broader regime of validity as well as dependencies on pulse-sequence parameters that seem to have been overlooked. In order to explain these experimental results, we developed a new method consisting of calculating the magnetization via an iterative formalism where both diffusion and distant dipolar field contributions are treated as integral operators incorporated into the Bloch-Torrey equations. The solution can be organized as a perturbative series, whereby access to higher order terms allows one to set better boundaries on validity regimes for analytic first-order approximations. Finally, the method legitimizes the use of simple analytic first-order approximations under less demanding experimental conditions, it predicts new pulse-sequence parameter dependencies for the range of validity, and clarifies weak points in previous calculations.

  2. Adaptive Control for Linear Uncertain Systems with Unmodeled Dynamics Revisited via Optimal Control Modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the optimal control modification for linear uncertain plants. The Lyapunov analysis shows that the modification parameter has a limiting value depending on the nature of the uncertainty. The optimal control modification exhibits a linear asymptotic property that enables it to be analyzed in a linear time invariant framework for linear uncertain plants. The linear asymptotic property shows that the closed-loop plants in the limit possess a scaled input-output mapping. Using this property, we can derive an analytical closed-loop transfer function in the limit as the adaptive gain tends to infinity. The paper revisits the Rohrs counterexample problem that illustrates the nature of non-robustness of model-reference adaptive control in the presence of unmodeled dynamics. An analytical approach is developed to compute exactly the modification parameter for the optimal control modification that stabilizes the plant in the Rohrs counterexample. The linear asymptotic property is also used to address output feedback adaptive control for non-minimum phase plants with a relative degree 1.

  3. The pion nucleon scattering lengths from pionic hydrogen and deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, H.-Ch.; Badertscher, A.; Goudsmit, P. F. A.; Janousch, M.; Leisi, H. J.; Matsinos, E.; Sigg, D.; Zhao, Z. G.; Chatellard, D.; Egger, J.-P.; Gabathuler, K.; Hauser, P.; Simons, L. M.; Rusi El Hassani, A. J.

    2001-07-01

    This is the final publication of the ETH Zurich Neuchâtel PSI collaboration on the pionic hydrogen and deuterium precision X-ray experiments. We describe the recent hydrogen 3 p 1 s measurement, report on the determination of the Doppler effect correction to the transition line width, analyze the deuterium shift measurement and discuss implications of the combined hydrogen and deuterium results. From the pionic hydrogen 3 p 1 s transition experiments we obtain the strong-interaction energy level shift \\varepsilon_{1s} = -7.108±0.013 (stat.)±0.034 (syst.) eV and the total decay width Γ_{1s} = 0.868±0.040 (stat.)±0.038 (syst.) eV of the 1s state. Taking into account the electromagnetic corrections we find the hadronic π N s-wave scattering amplitude a_{π-prightarrowπ-p} = 0.0883±0.0008 m_{π}^{-1} for elastic scattering and a_{π-prightarrowπ0n} = -0.128±0.006 m_{π} ^{-1} for single charge exchange, respectively. We then combine the pionic hydrogen results with the 1 s level shift measurement on pionic deuterium and test isospin symmetry of the strong interaction: our data are still compatible with isospin symmetry. The isoscalar and isovector π N scattering lengths (within the framework of isospin symmetry) are found to be b_0 = -0.0001^{+0.0009}_{-0.0021} m_{π}^{-1} and b1 = -0.0885^{+0.0010}_{-0.0021} m_{π} ^{-1}, respectively. Using the GMO sum rule, we obtain from b_1 a new value of the π N coupling constant (g_{π N} = 13.21_{-0.05}^{+0.11}) from which follows the Goldberger Treiman discrepancy Δ_{{GT}} =0.027_{-0.008}^{+0.012}. The new values of b_0 and g_{π N} imply an increase of the nucleon sigma term by at least 9 MeV.

  4. Pion-Nucleon Scattering Experiments at Low Energies:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitschopf, J.; Bauer, M.; Clement, H.; Cröni, M.; Denz, H.; Meier, R.; Wagner, G. J.; Friedman, E.; Gibson, E.

    Total cross sections of the single charge exchange reaction π-p→π0n have been measured at PSI from about 40 to 250 MeV using a transmission technique. Preliminary results show an excellent agreement with predictions from the SAID FA02 phase shift analysis for energies above 70 MeV.

  5. Polarization and dilepton anisotropy in pion-nucleon collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speranza, Enrico; Zétényi, Miklós; Friman, Bengt

    2017-01-01

    Hadronic polarization and the related anisotropy of the dilepton angular distribution are studied for the reaction πN → Ne+e-. We employ consistent effective interactions for baryon resonances up to spin-5/2, where non-physical degrees of freedom are eliminated, to compute the anisotropy coefficients for isolated intermediate baryon resonances. It is shown that the spin and parity of the intermediate baryon resonance is reflected in the angular dependence of the anisotropy coefficient. We then compute the anisotropy coefficient including the N (1520) and N (1440) resonances, which are essential at the collision energy of the recent data obtained by the HADES Collaboration on this reaction. We conclude that the anisotropy coefficient provides useful constraints for unraveling the resonance contributions to this process.

  6. Pion-nucleon {sigma} term in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Fukugita, M.; Kuramashi, Y.; Okawa, M.; Ukawa, A.

    1995-05-01

    We calculate both the connected and disconnected contributions to the {pi}-{ital N} {sigma} term in quenched lattice QCD with the Wilson quark action on a 12{sup 3}{times}20 lattice at {beta}=5.7 with the lattice spacing {ital a}{approx}0.14 fm. The latter is evaluated with the variant wall source method, previously applied successfully for {pi}-{pi} scattering lengths and the {eta}{prime} meson mass. We found the disconnected contribution to be about twice as large as the connected one. The value for the full {pi}-{ital N} {sigma} term {sigma}=40--60 MeV is consistent with the experimental estimates. The nucleon matrix element of the strange quark density {ital {bar s}s} is fairly large in our result.

  7. Delta: the first pion nucleon resonance - its discovery and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Nagle, D.E.

    1984-07-01

    It is attempted to recapture some of the fun and excitement of the pion-scattering work that led to the discovery of what is now called the delta particle. How significant this discovery was became apparent only gradually. That the delta is alive today and thriving at Los Alamos (as well as other places) is described.

  8. Delta: the First Pion Nucleon Resonance - Its Discovery and Applications

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Nagle, D. E.

    1984-07-01

    It is attempted to recapture some of the fun and excitement of the pion-scattering work that led to the discovery of what is now called the delta particle. How significant this discovery was became apparent only gradually. That the delta is alive today and thriving at Los Alamos (as well as other places) is described.

  9. Structure and Dynamics of the Instantaneous Water/Vapor Interface Revisited by Path-Integral and Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Jan; Elgabarty, Hossam; Spura, Thomas; Karhan, Kristof; Partovi-Azar, Pouya; Hassanali, Ali A; Kühne, Thomas D

    2015-08-06

    The structure and dynamics of the water/vapor interface is revisited by means of path-integral and second-generation Car-Parrinello ab initio molecular dynamics simulations in conjunction with an instantaneous surface definition [Willard, A. P.; Chandler, D. J. Phys. Chem. B 2010, 114, 1954]. In agreement with previous studies, we find that one of the OH bonds of the water molecules in the topmost layer is pointing out of the water into the vapor phase, while the orientation of the underlying layer is reversed. Therebetween, an additional water layer is detected, where the molecules are aligned parallel to the instantaneous water surface.

  10. Delta-nucleus dynamics: proceedings of symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.S.H.; Geesaman, D.F.; Schiffer, J.P.

    1983-10-01

    The appreciation of the role in nuclear physics of the first excited state of the nucleon, the delta ..delta..(1232), has grown rapidly in the past decade. The delta resonance dominates nuclear reactions induced by intermediate energy pions, nucleons, and electromagnetic probes. It is also the most important non-nucleonic degree of freedom needed to resolve many fundamental problems encountered in the study of low-energy nuclear phenomena. Clearly, a new phase of nuclear physics has emerged and conventional thinking must be extended to account for this new dimension of nuclear dynamics. The most challenging problem we are facing is how a unified theory can be developed to describe ..delta..-nucleus dynamics at all energies. In exploring this new direction, it is important to have direct discussions among researchers with different viewpoints. Separate entries were prepared for the 49 papers presented. (WHK)

  11. Revisiting the Body-Schema Concept in the Context of Whole-Body Postural-Focal Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Morasso, Pietro; Casadio, Maura; Mohan, Vishwanathan; Rea, Francesco; Zenzeri, Jacopo

    2015-01-01

    The body-schema concept is revisited in the context of embodied cognition, further developing the theory formulated by Marc Jeannerod that the motor system is part of a simulation network related to action, whose function is not only to shape the motor system for preparing an action (either overt or covert) but also to provide the self with information on the feasibility and the meaning of potential actions. The proposed computational formulation is based on a dynamical system approach, which is linked to an extension of the equilibrium-point hypothesis, called Passive Motor Paradigm: this dynamical system generates goal-oriented, spatio-temporal, sensorimotor patterns, integrating a direct and inverse internal model in a multi-referential framework. The purpose of such computational model is to operate at the same time as a general synergy formation machinery for planning whole-body actions in humanoid robots and/or for predicting coordinated sensory–motor patterns in human movements. In order to illustrate the computational approach, the integration of simultaneous, even partially conflicting tasks will be analyzed in some detail with regard to postural-focal dynamics, which can be defined as the fusion of a focal task, namely reaching a target with the whole-body, and a postural task, namely maintaining overall stability. PMID:25741274

  12. Revisiting the body-schema concept in the context of whole-body postural-focal dynamics.

    PubMed

    Morasso, Pietro; Casadio, Maura; Mohan, Vishwanathan; Rea, Francesco; Zenzeri, Jacopo

    2015-01-01

    The body-schema concept is revisited in the context of embodied cognition, further developing the theory formulated by Marc Jeannerod that the motor system is part of a simulation network related to action, whose function is not only to shape the motor system for preparing an action (either overt or covert) but also to provide the self with information on the feasibility and the meaning of potential actions. The proposed computational formulation is based on a dynamical system approach, which is linked to an extension of the equilibrium-point hypothesis, called Passive Motor Paradigm: this dynamical system generates goal-oriented, spatio-temporal, sensorimotor patterns, integrating a direct and inverse internal model in a multi-referential framework. The purpose of such computational model is to operate at the same time as a general synergy formation machinery for planning whole-body actions in humanoid robots and/or for predicting coordinated sensory-motor patterns in human movements. In order to illustrate the computational approach, the integration of simultaneous, even partially conflicting tasks will be analyzed in some detail with regard to postural-focal dynamics, which can be defined as the fusion of a focal task, namely reaching a target with the whole-body, and a postural task, namely maintaining overall stability.

  13. Density fluctuation dynamics in a dissipative self-gravitating dilute gas revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez, A. R.; García-Perciante, A. L.

    2016-11-01

    The analysis of the behavior of density fluctuations in a dissipative self gravitating gas in the linear regime is revisited. A factorization for the dispersion relation given by approximate roots is proposed, which is analogous to the one introduced in the case without gravitational field. The threshold for the onset of a gravitational instability, namely Jeans wavenumber, is found to be unaltered by the presence of thermal and viscous dissipation. However, the behavior of damped modes does not correspond to the usual Rayleigh-Brillouin spectrum when the gravitational field is taken into account. Additional to the usual central Rayleigh peak and Brillouin doublet, both corrected due to the presence of the field, non-Lorentizan terms are included in the structure factor. These terms are larger in the presence of the gravitational field and may lead in principle to relevant differences in the general properties of the spectrum. The possible mathematical origin of these modifications is briefly discussed.

  14. Chemical Kinetics, Heat Transfer, and Sensor Dynamics Revisited in a Simple Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sad, Maria E.; Sad, Mario R.; Castro, Alberto A.; Garetto, Teresita F.

    2008-01-01

    A simple experiment about thermal effects in chemical reactors is described, which can be used to illustrate chemical reactor models, the determination and validation of their parameters, and some simple principles of heat transfer and sensor dynamics. It is based in the exothermic reaction between aqueous solutions of sodium thiosulfate and…

  15. The auditory dynamic attending theory revisited: A closer look at the pitch comparison task.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Anna-Katharina R; Jaeger, Manuela; Thorne, Jeremy D; Bendixen, Alexandra; Debener, Stefan

    2015-11-11

    The dynamic attending theory as originally proposed by Jones, 1976. Psychol. Rev. 83(5), 323-355 posits that tone sequences presented at a regular rhythm entrain attentional oscillations and thereby facilitate the processing of sounds presented in phase with this rhythm. The increased interest in neural correlates of dynamic attending requires robust behavioral indicators of the phenomenon. Here we aimed to replicate and complement the most prominent experimental implementation of dynamic attending (Jones et al., 2002. Psychol. Sci. 13(4), 313-319). The paradigm uses a pitch comparison task in which two tones, the initial and the last of a longer series, have to be compared. In-between the two, distractor tones with variable pitch are presented, at a regular pace. A comparison tone presented in phase with the entrained rhythm is hypothesized to lead to better behavioral performance. Aiming for a conceptual replication, four different variations of the original paradigm were created which were followed by an exact replication attempt. Across all five experiments, only 40 of the 140 tested participants showed the hypothesized pattern of an inverted U-shaped profile in task accuracy, and the group average effects did not replicate the pattern reported by Jones et al., 2002. Psychol. Sci. 13(4), 313-319 in any of the five experiments. However, clear evidence for a relationship between musicality and overall behavioral performance was found. This study casts doubt on the suitability of the pitch comparison task for demonstrating auditory dynamic attending. We discuss alternative tasks that have been shown to support dynamic attending theory, thus lending themselves more readily to studying its neural correlates. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Prediction and Attention.

  16. Critical Dynamics of the Dirty Boson Problem: Revisiting the Equality z=d

    SciTech Connect

    Weichman, Peter B.; Mukhopadhyay, Ranjan

    2007-06-15

    It is shown that previous arguments, leading to the equality z=d for the dynamical exponent describing the Bose glass to superfluid transition in d dimensions, may break down, as apparently seen in recent simulations. The key observation is that the major contribution to the compressibility, which remains finite through the transition and was predicted to scale as {kappa}{approx} vertical bar {delta} vertical bar{sup (d-z){nu}} (where {delta} is the deviation from criticality and {nu} is the correlation length exponent) comes from the analytic, not the singular part of the free energy, and is not restricted by any conventional scaling hypothesis.

  17. Revisiting nonlinearity in meandering river planform dynamics using Gradual Wavelet Reconstruc­­tion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenk, J.; Foufoula-Georgiou, E.; Lanzoni, S.

    2014-12-01

    Characterizing the intrinsic nonlinearity in meandering river dynamics is important because it dictates river evolution response to perturbations such as bank armoring or channel straightening. Meandering river dynamics have been described in terms of chaos or self-organized criticality—characterizations predicated on the presence of nonlinearity—yet recent studies have found only limited evidence for its existence. Standard nonlinearity tests are performed by generating a number of linearized surrogate series from a signal of interest. Inherent nonlinearities in the original signal are destroyed in the surrogates via phase randomization in the Fourier domain. Nonlinearity is inferred if a significant difference exists between the original and the surrogates in an appropriately determined phase space. These tests detect the presence or absence of nonlinearity but cannot identify which scales and locations are contributing most to the signal's nonlinearity. A new surrogate generation method called Gradual Wavelet Reconstruction (GWR) has two key advantages over the standard methodology. First, GWR quantifies the degree of nonlinearity rather than simply detecting its presence or absence, providing a basis for comparisons between river planforms and models of meander migration. Second, because the GWR methodology relies on localized transformations, it can determine the scales and locations primarily contributing to the observed complexity. As a result of those advantages too, GWR has been shown to detect the presence of nonlinearity in signals where standard tests have failed. We apply GWR methodology to time series of channel sinuosity predicted by two established models of long-time meander migration: a HIPS-type model and that of Zolezzi and Seminara (2001). Although the former model has been shown to capture first-order meander dynamics, it fails to fully couple sediment and flow dynamics; nor does it account for the resonance phenomenon. Using GWR, we show

  18. The structure and dynamics of the AC114 galaxy cluster revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proust, Dominique; Yegorova, Irina; Saviane, Ivo; Ivanov, Valentin D.; Bresolin, Fabio; Salzer, John J.; Capelato, Hugo V.

    2015-10-01

    We present a dynamical analysis of the galaxy cluster AC114 based on a catalogue of 524 velocities. Of these, 169 (32 per cent) are newly obtained at European Southern Observatory (Chile) with the Very Large Telescope and the VIsible MultiObject spectrograph. Data on individual galaxies are presented and the accuracy of the measured velocities is discussed. Dynamical properties of the cluster are derived. We obtain an improved mean redshift value z = 0.31665 ± 0.0008 and velocity dispersion σ = 1893^{+73}_{-82} km s^{-1}. A large velocity dispersion within the core radius and the shape of the infall pattern suggests that this part of the cluster is in a radial phase of relaxation with a very elongated radial filament spanning 12 000 km s-1. A radial foreground structure is detected within the central 0.5 h-1 Mpc radius, recognizable as a redshift group at the same central redshift value. We analyse the colour distribution for this archetype Butcher-Oemler galaxy cluster and identify the separate red and blue galaxy sequences. The latter subset contains 44 per cent of confirmed members of the cluster, reaching magnitudes as faint as Rf= 21.1 (1.0 mag fainter than previous studies). We derive a mass M200 = (4.3 ± 0.7) × 1015 M⊙ h-1. In a subsequent paper, we will utilize the spectral data presented here to explore the mass-metallicity relation for this intermediate redshift cluster.

  19. Dispositional envy revisited: unraveling the motivational dynamics of benign and malicious envy.

    PubMed

    Lange, Jens; Crusius, Jan

    2015-02-01

    Previous research has conceptualized dispositional envy as a unitary construct. Recently however, episodic envy has been shown to emerge in two qualitatively different forms. Benign envy is related to the motivation to move upward, whereas malicious envy is related to pulling superior others down. In four studies (N = 1,094)--using the newly developed Benign and Malicious Envy Scale (BeMaS)--we show that dispositional envy is also characterized by two independent dimensions related to distinct motivational dynamics and behavioral consequences. Dispositional benign and malicious envy uniquely predict envious responding following upward social comparisons. Furthermore, they are differentially connected to hope for success and fear of failure. Corresponding to these links, dispositional benign envy predicted faster race performance of marathon runners mediated via higher goal setting. In contrast, dispositional malicious envy predicted race goal disengagement. The findings highlight that disentangling the two sides of envy opens up numerous research avenues.

  20. Revisiting Molecular Dynamics on a CPU/GPU system: Water Kernel and SHAKE Parallelization.

    PubMed

    Ruymgaart, A Peter; Elber, Ron

    2012-11-13

    We report Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) and Open-MP parallel implementations of water-specific force calculations and of bond constraints for use in Molecular Dynamics simulations. We focus on a typical laboratory computing-environment in which a CPU with a few cores is attached to a GPU. We discuss in detail the design of the code and we illustrate performance comparable to highly optimized codes such as GROMACS. Beside speed our code shows excellent energy conservation. Utilization of water-specific lists allows the efficient calculations of non-bonded interactions that include water molecules and results in a speed-up factor of more than 40 on the GPU compared to code optimized on a single CPU core for systems larger than 20,000 atoms. This is up four-fold from a factor of 10 reported in our initial GPU implementation that did not include a water-specific code. Another optimization is the implementation of constrained dynamics entirely on the GPU. The routine, which enforces constraints of all bonds, runs in parallel on multiple Open-MP cores or entirely on the GPU. It is based on Conjugate Gradient solution of the Lagrange multipliers (CG SHAKE). The GPU implementation is partially in double precision and requires no communication with the CPU during the execution of the SHAKE algorithm. The (parallel) implementation of SHAKE allows an increase of the time step to 2.0fs while maintaining excellent energy conservation. Interestingly, CG SHAKE is faster than the usual bond relaxation algorithm even on a single core if high accuracy is expected. The significant speedup of the optimized components transfers the computational bottleneck of the MD calculation to the reciprocal part of Particle Mesh Ewald (PME).

  1. Dworkin’s argument revisited: Point processes, dynamics, diffraction, and correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xinghua; Moody, Robert V.

    2008-04-01

    The setting is an ergodic dynamical system (X,μ) whose points are themselves uniformly discrete point sets Λ in some space Rd and whose group action is that of translation of these point sets by the vectors of Rd. Steven Dworkin's argument relates the diffraction of the typical point sets comprising X to the dynamical spectrum of X. In this paper we look more deeply at this relationship, particularly in the context of point processes. We show that there is an Rd-equivariant, isometric embedding, depending on the scattering strengths (weights) that are assigned to the points of Λ∈X, that takes the L2-space of Rd under the diffraction measure into L2(X,μ). We examine the image of this embedding and give a number of examples that show how it fails to be surjective. We show that full information on the measure μ is available from the weights and set of all the correlations (that is, the two-point, three-point, …, correlations) of the typical point set Λ∈X. We develop a formalism in the setting of random point measures that includes multi-colour point sets, and arbitrary real-valued weightings for the scattering from the different colour types of points, in the context of Palm measures and weighted versions of them. As an application we give a simple proof of a square-mean version of the Bombieri-Taylor conjecture, and from that we obtain an inequality that gives a quantitative relationship between the autocorrelation, the diffraction, and the ɛ-dual characters of typical element of X. The paper ends with a discussion of the Palm measure in the context of defining pattern frequencies.

  2. Lakatos Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Court, Deborah

    1999-01-01

    Revisits and reviews Imre Lakatos' ideas on "Falsification and the Methodology of Scientific Research Programmes." Suggests that Lakatos' framework offers an insightful way of looking at the relationship between theory and research that is relevant not only for evaluating research programs in theoretical physics, but in the social…

  3. The concept of field capacity revisited: Defining intrinsic static and dynamic criteria for soil internal drainage dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assouline, Shmuel; Or, Dani

    2014-06-01

    Across many soil types and conditions, post wetting soil internal drainage exhibits predictable dynamics that lead to a stable and repeatable hydration state termed "field capacity" (FC). Soil regulation of internal drainage toward FC has long been recognized as producing a useful hydrologic benchmark for modeling and for estimation of plant available soil water. To overcome ambiguities and inconsistencies in various ad hoc definitions of FC, we propose using a soil intrinsic characteristic length (a matric potential value derived from drainable soil pore size distribution) to characterize the loss of hydraulic continuity associated with the attainment of FC. The resulting static criterion for FC was extended to formulate a self-consistent dynamic criterion based on soil internal drainage dynamics. A systematic evaluation of the proposed definitions of FC using numerical simulations and experimental data reveals remarkable consistency and predictability across a wide range of soil types. The new metrics add definitiveness and robustness of this widely used concept with potential expansion to additional agronomic, hydrologic, ecological, and climatic applications.

  4. Revisit of Rotational Dynamics of Asteroid 4179 Toutatis from Chang'e-2's flyby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuhui; Hu, Shoucun; Ji, Jianghui

    2015-08-01

    In this work we investigate the rotational dynamics of Toutatis based on the derived results from Chang'e-2's close flyby to the asteroid (Huang et al. 2013). Toutatis' non-principal axis rotation (NPA) was revealed by radar observations captured from its Earth approaches in the past two decades. Matrix of inertia calculated from radar derived shape model are inconsistent with observations, which may indicate an uneven density distribution of the asteroid. We perform numerical simulations of rotational evolution of Toutatis and figure out the relative rotational parameters of Euler angles, rotational velocities and matrix of inertia. According to the major morphological feature of the ginger-shaped asteroid, we suggest a density ratio of the two lobes. On the basis of these results, we will evaluate the magnitude of the bias of mass center and figure center, which may have slight effects in the momentum variation calculation. These results are in good agreements with the previous radar observation derived results (Takahashi et al. 2013).

  5. Molecular dynamics of polymer crystallization revisited: Crystallization from the melt and the glass in longer polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Takashi

    2013-08-01

    Molecular mechanisms of the steady-state growth of the chain folded lamella and the cold crystallization across the glass transition temperature Tg are investigated by molecular dynamics simulation for a system of long polyethylene (PE)-like polymers made of 512 united atoms C512. The present paper aims to reconsider results of our previous simulations for short PE-like polymers C100 by carrying out very long simulations up to 1 μs for more realistic systems of much longer chains, thereby to establish the firm molecular image of chain-folded crystallization and clarify the specific molecular process of cold crystallization. We observe that the chain-folded lamella shows fast thickening-growth keeping marked tapered growth front. Despite the fast growth in much longer chains, the fold-surface is found to be predominantly of adjacent-reentry. Detailed inspections of the molecular pathway give an insightful image that can explain the apparently contradicting results. In addition, the fold-structure with specific spatial heterogeneity is found to give rise to heterogeneous mobility within the crystalline region. On the other hand, investigations of the cold crystallization during slow heating of the glassy film across Tg is found to give a granular texture made of small crystallites. The crystallites are found to nucleate preferentially near the free surfaces having lower Tg, and to be dominantly edge-on showing a definite tendency to orient their chain axes parallel to the free surface.

  6. On the Characterization of Revisitation Patterns in Complex Human Dynamics - A Data Science Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa Filho, Hugo Serrano

    When it comes to visitation patterns, humans beings are extremely regular and predictable, with recurrent activities responsible for most of our movements. In recent years, we have seen scientists attempt to model and explain human dynamics and in particular human movement. Akin to other human behaviors, traveling patterns evolve from the convolution between internal and external factors. A better understanding on the mechanisms responsible for transforming and incorporating individual events into regular patterns is of fundamental importance. Many aspects of our complex lives are affected by human movements such as disease spread and epidemics modeling, city planning, wireless network development, and disaster relief, to name a few. Given the myriad of applications, it is clear that a complete understanding of how people move in space can lead to considerable benefits to our society. In most of the recent works, scientists have focused on the idea that people movements are biased towards frequently-visited locations. According to them, human movement is based on a exploration/exploitation dichotomy in which individuals choose new locations (exploration) or return to frequently-visited locations (exploitation). In this dissertation we present some of our contributions to the field, such as the presence of a recency effect in human mobility and Web browsing behaviors as well as the Returner vs. Explorers dichotomy in Web browsing trajectories.

  7. Energy corrugation in atomic-scale friction on graphite revisited by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiao-Yu; Qi, Yi-Zhou; Ouyang, Wengen; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Li, Qunyang

    2016-08-01

    Although atomic stick-slip friction has been extensively studied since its first demonstration on graphite, the physical understanding of this dissipation-dominated phenomenon is still very limited. In this work, we perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the frictional behavior of a diamond tip sliding over a graphite surface. In contrast to the common wisdom, our MD results suggest that the energy barrier associated lateral sliding (known as energy corrugation) comes not only from interaction between the tip and the top layer of graphite but also from interactions among the deformed atomic layers of graphite. Due to the competition of these two subentries, friction on graphite can be tuned by controlling the relative adhesion of different interfaces. For relatively low tip-graphite adhesion, friction behaves normally and increases with increasing normal load. However, for relatively high tip-graphite adhesion, friction increases unusually with decreasing normal load leading to an effectively negative coefficient of friction, which is consistent with the recent experimental observations on chemically modified graphite. Our results provide a new insight into the physical origins of energy corrugation in atomic scale friction.

  8. Pion scattering and nuclear dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.B.

    1988-01-01

    A phenomenological optical-model analysis of pion elastic scattering and single- and double-charge-exchange scattering to isobaric-analog states is reviewed. Interpretation of the optical-model parameters is briefly discussed, and several applications and extensions are considered. The applications include the study of various nuclear properties, including neutron deformation and surface-fluctuation contributions to the density. One promising extension for the near future would be to develop a microscopic approach based on powerful momentum-space methods brought to existence over the last decade. In this, the lowest-order optical potential as well as specific higher-order pieces would be worked out in terms of microscopic pion-nucleon and delta-nucleon interactions that can be determined within modern meson-theoretical frameworks. A second extension, of a more phenomenological nature, would use coupled-channel methods and shell-model wave functions to study dynamical nuclear correlations in pion double charge exchange. 35 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  9. New Aspects of Experimental Study of the Pion-Nucleon Interaction in the Resonance Region

    SciTech Connect

    Sumachev, V.V.

    2005-06-01

    New experimental data that were obtained by the PNPI-ITEP Collaboration have resolved some discrete ambiguities in the partial-wave analysis (PWA). These results were used in the new FA02 PWA performed at George Washington University. At the same time, the FA02 PWA has revealed considerable fewer N* and {delta} resonances than those listed in the RPP tables. This circumstance aggravated the known problem of so-called missing resonances. The program for further measurements of the spin rotation parameters in elastic {pi}N scattering that are required to eliminate the remaining discrete PWA ambiguities is discussed.

  10. Improved input for multi-reaction hadronic analyses from elastic pion-nucleon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revier, Joseph; Roenchen, Deborah; Doering, Michael; Workman`, Ronald

    2017-01-01

    In the search for missing baryonic resonances, many analyses include data from a variety of pion and photon induced reactions. For elastic πN scattering, however, usually the partial waves of the SAID or other groups are fitted, instead of data. We provide the partial-wave covariance matrices needed to perform correlated χ2 fits, in which the obtained χ2 equals the actual χ2 up to non-linear and normalization corrections. For any analysis relying on partial waves extracted from elastic pion scattering, this is a prerequisite to assess the significance of resonance signals and to assign any uncertainty on results. The compilation of the necessary data to improve hadronic analyses is presented in detail. Supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Grant DE-SC0014133, contract DE-AC05-06OR23177, and by the National Science Foundation (CAREER grant No. 1452055, PIF Grant No. 1415459).

  11. Renormdynamics, discrete dynamics and quanputers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhaldiani, Nugzar

    2017-03-01

    In the Standard Model of Particle Physics (SM), the values of the coupling constants and masses of particles evolve according to the Renormdynamic motion equations. In SM, minimal supersymmetric extension of the SM, standard pion-nucleon field theory and other models is shown how to define the values of coupling constants and masses. Why supersymmetry is So universal?

  12. Influence of velocity effects on the shape of N2 (and air) broadened H2O lines revisited with classical molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, N. H.; Tran, H.; Gamache, R. R.; Bermejo, D.; Domenech, J.-L.

    2012-08-01

    The modeling of the shape of H2O lines perturbed by N2 (and air) using the Keilson-Storer (KS) kernel for collision-induced velocity changes is revisited with classical molecular dynamics simulations (CMDS). The latter have been performed for a large number of molecules starting from intermolecular-potential surfaces. Contrary to the assumption made in a previous study [H. Tran, D. Bermejo, J.-L. Domenech, P. Joubert, R. R. Gamache, and J.-M. Hartmann, J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transf. 108, 126 (2007)], 10.1016/j.jqsrt.2007.03.009, the results of these CMDS show that the velocity-orientation and -modulus changes statistically occur at the same time scale. This validates the use of a single memory parameter in the Keilson-Storer kernel to describe both the velocity-orientation and -modulus changes. The CMDS results also show that velocity- and rotational state-changing collisions are statistically partially correlated. A partially correlated speed-dependent Keilson-Storer model has thus been used to describe the line-shape. For this, the velocity changes KS kernel parameters have been directly determined from CMDS, while the speed-dependent broadening and shifting coefficients have been calculated with a semi-classical approach. Comparisons between calculated spectra and measurements of several lines of H2O broadened by N2 (and air) in the ν3 and 2ν1 + ν2 + ν3 bands for a wide range of pressure show very satisfactory agreement. The evolution of non-Voigt effects from Doppler to collisional regimes is also presented and discussed.

  13. Influence of velocity effects on the shape of N2 (and air) broadened H2O lines revisited with classical molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Ngo, N H; Tran, H; Gamache, R R; Bermejo, D; Domenech, J-L

    2012-08-14

    The modeling of the shape of H(2)O lines perturbed by N(2) (and air) using the Keilson-Storer (KS) kernel for collision-induced velocity changes is revisited with classical molecular dynamics simulations (CMDS). The latter have been performed for a large number of molecules starting from intermolecular-potential surfaces. Contrary to the assumption made in a previous study [H. Tran, D. Bermejo, J.-L. Domenech, P. Joubert, R. R. Gamache, and J.-M. Hartmann, J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transf. 108, 126 (2007)], the results of these CMDS show that the velocity-orientation and -modulus changes statistically occur at the same time scale. This validates the use of a single memory parameter in the Keilson-Storer kernel to describe both the velocity-orientation and -modulus changes. The CMDS results also show that velocity- and rotational state-changing collisions are statistically partially correlated. A partially correlated speed-dependent Keilson-Storer model has thus been used to describe the line-shape. For this, the velocity changes KS kernel parameters have been directly determined from CMDS, while the speed-dependent broadening and shifting coefficients have been calculated with a semi-classical approach. Comparisons between calculated spectra and measurements of several lines of H(2)O broadened by N(2) (and air) in the ν(3) and 2ν(1) + ν(2) + ν(3) bands for a wide range of pressure show very satisfactory agreement. The evolution of non-Voigt effects from Doppler to collisional regimes is also presented and discussed.

  14. Light-front representation of chiral dynamics in peripheral transverse densities

    SciTech Connect

    Granados, Carlos G.; Weiss, Christian

    2015-07-31

    The nucleon's electromagnetic form factors are expressed in terms of the transverse densities of charge and magnetization at fixed light-front time. At peripheral transverse distances b = O(M_pi^{-1}) the densities are governed by chiral dynamics and can be calculated model-independently using chiral effective field theory (EFT). We represent the leading-order chiral EFT results for the peripheral transverse densities as overlap integrals of chiral light-front wave functions, describing the transition of the initial nucleon to soft pion-nucleon intermediate states and back. The new representation (a) explains the parametric order of the peripheral transverse densities; (b) establishes an inequality between the spin-independent and -dependent densities; (c) exposes the role of pion orbital angular momentum in chiral dynamics; (d) reveals a large left-right asymmetry of the current in a transversely polarized nucleon and suggests a simple interpretation. The light-front representation enables a first-quantized, quantum-mechanical view of chiral dynamics that is fully relativistic and exactly equivalent to the second-quantized, field-theoretical formulation. It relates the charge and magnetization densities measured in low-energy elastic scattering to the generalized parton distributions probed in peripheral high-energy scattering processes. The method can be applied to nucleon form factors of other operators, e.g. the energy-momentum tensor.

  15. Light-front representation of chiral dynamics in peripheral transverse densities

    DOE PAGES

    Granados, Carlos G.; Weiss, Christian

    2015-07-31

    The nucleon's electromagnetic form factors are expressed in terms of the transverse densities of charge and magnetization at fixed light-front time. At peripheral transverse distances b = O(M_pi^{-1}) the densities are governed by chiral dynamics and can be calculated model-independently using chiral effective field theory (EFT). We represent the leading-order chiral EFT results for the peripheral transverse densities as overlap integrals of chiral light-front wave functions, describing the transition of the initial nucleon to soft pion-nucleon intermediate states and back. The new representation (a) explains the parametric order of the peripheral transverse densities; (b) establishes an inequality between the spin-independentmore » and -dependent densities; (c) exposes the role of pion orbital angular momentum in chiral dynamics; (d) reveals a large left-right asymmetry of the current in a transversely polarized nucleon and suggests a simple interpretation. The light-front representation enables a first-quantized, quantum-mechanical view of chiral dynamics that is fully relativistic and exactly equivalent to the second-quantized, field-theoretical formulation. It relates the charge and magnetization densities measured in low-energy elastic scattering to the generalized parton distributions probed in peripheral high-energy scattering processes. The method can be applied to nucleon form factors of other operators, e.g. the energy-momentum tensor.« less

  16. Cats protecting birds revisited.

    PubMed

    Fan, Meng; Kuang, Yang; Feng, Zhilan

    2005-09-01

    In this paper, we revisit the dynamical interaction among prey (bird), mesopredator (rat), and superpredator (cat) discussed in [Courchamp, F., Langlais, M., Sugihara, G., 1999. Cats protecting birds: modelling the mesopredator release effect. Journal of Animal Ecology 68, 282-292]. First, we develop a prey-mesopredator-superpredator (i.e., bird-rat-cat, briefly, BRC) model, where the predator's functional responses are derived based on the classical Holling's time budget arguments. Our BRC model overcomes several model construction problems in Courchamp et al. (1999), and admits richer, reasonable and realistic dynamics. We explore the possible control strategies to save or restore the bird by controlling or eliminating the rat or the cat when the bird is endangered. We establish the existence of two types of mesopredator release phenomena: severe mesopredator release, where once superpredators are suppressed, a burst of mesopredators follows which leads their shared prey to extinction; and mild mesopredator release, where the mesopredator release could assert more negative impact on the endemic prey but does not lead the endemic prey to extinction. A sharp sufficient criterion is established for the occurrence of severe mesopredator release. We also show that, in a prey-mesopredator-superpredator trophic food web, eradication of introduced superpredators such as feral domestic cats in the BRC model, is not always the best solution to protect endemic insular prey. The presence of a superpredator may have a beneficial effect in such systems.

  17. H-infinity optimization of a variant design of the dynamic vibration absorber—Revisited and new results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Y. L.; Wong, W. O.

    2011-08-01

    The H∞ optimum parameters of a dynamic vibration absorber (DVA) with ground-support are derived to minimize the resonant vibration amplitude of a single degree-of-freedom (sdof) system under harmonic force excitation. The optimum parameters which are derived based on the classical fixed-points theory and reported in literature for this non-traditional DVA are shown to be not leading to the minimum resonant vibration amplitude of the controlled mass. A new procedure is proposed for the H∞ optimization of such a dynamic vibration absorber. A new set of optimum tuning frequency and damping of the absorber is derived, thereby resulting in lower maximum amplitude responses than those reported in the literature. The proposed optimized variant DVA is also compared to a ground-hooked damper of the same damping capacity of the damper in the DVA. It is proved that the proposed optimized DVA has better suppression of the resonant vibration amplitude of the controlled system than both the traditional DVA and also the ground-hooked damper if the proposed design procedure of the variant DVA is followed.

  18. Sensory neural pathways revisited to unravel the temporal dynamics of the Simon effect: A model-based cognitive neuroscience approach.

    PubMed

    Salzer, Yael; de Hollander, Gilles; Forstmann, Birte U

    2017-02-24

    The Simon task is one of the most prominent interference tasks and has been extensively studied in experimental psychology and cognitive neuroscience. Despite years of research, the underlying mechanism driving the phenomenon and its temporal dynamics are still disputed. Within the framework of the review, we adopt a model-based cognitive neuroscience approach. We first go over key findings in the literature of the Simon task, discuss competing qualitative cognitive theories and the difficulty of testing them empirically. We then introduce sequential sampling models, a particular class of mathematical cognitive process models. Finally, we argue that the brain architecture accountable for the processing of spatial ('where') and non-spatial ('what') information, could constrain these models. We conclude that there is a clear need to bridge neural and behavioral measures, and that mathematical cognitive models may facilitate the construction of this bridge and work towards revealing the underlying mechanisms of the Simon effect.

  19. Stretching of single poly-ubiquitin molecules revisited: Dynamic disorder in the non-exponential unfolding kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yue; Bian, Yukun; Zhao, Nanrong; Hou, Zhonghuai

    2014-03-01

    A theoretical framework based on a generalized Langevin equation (GLE) with fractional Gaussian noise (fGn) and a power-law memory kernel is presented to describe the non-exponential kinetics of the unfolding of a single poly-ubiquitin molecule under a constant force [T.-L. Kuo, S. Garcia-Manyes, J. Li, I. Barel, H. Lu, B. J. Berne, M. Urbakh, J. Klafter, and J. M. Fernández, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 107, 11336 (2010)]. Such a GLE-fGn strategy is made on the basis that the pulling coordinate variable x undergoes subdiffusion, usually resulting from conformational fluctuations, over a one-dimensional force-modified free-energy surface U(x, F). By using the Kramers' rate theory, we have obtained analytical formulae for the time-dependent rate coefficient k(t, F), the survival probability S(t, F) as well as the waiting time distribution function f(t, F) as functions of time t and force F. We find that our results can fit the experimental data of f(t, F) perfectly in the whole time range with a power-law exponent γ = 1/2, the characteristic of typical anomalous subdiffusion. In addition, the fitting of the survival probabilities for different forces facilitates us to reach rather reasonable estimations for intrinsic properties of the system, such as the free-energy barrier and the distance between the native conformation and the transition state conformation along the reaction coordinate, which are in good agreements with molecular dynamics simulations in the literatures. Although static disorder has been implicated in the original work of Kuo et al., our work suggests a sound and plausible alternative interpretation for the non-exponential kinetics in the stretching of poly-ubiquitin molecules, associated with dynamic disorder.

  20. The Fefferman-Stein decomposition for the Constantin-Lax-Majda equation: Regularity criteria for inviscid fluid dynamics revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkitani, Koji

    2012-11-01

    The celebrated Beale-Kato-Majda (BKM) criterion for the 3D Euler equations has been updated by Kozono and Taniuchi by replacing the supremum with the bounded mean oscillation norm. We consider this generalized criterion in an attempt to understand it more intuitively by giving an alternative explanation. For simplicity, we first treat the Constantin-Lax-Majda (CLM) equation dfrac{partial ω }{partial t}=H(ω )ω for the vorticity ω in one-dimension and identify a mechanism underlying the update of such an estimate. We consider a Fefferman-Stein (FS) decomposition for the initial vorticity ω = ω0 + H[ω1] and how it propagates under the dynamics of the CLM equation. In particular, we obtain a set of dynamical equations for it, which reads in its simplest case dfrac{partial ω _0}{partial t} =ω _0 H[ω _0]-{ω _1} H[{ω _1}] and dfrac{partial {ω _1}}{partial t} =ω _0 H[{ω _1}]+{ω _1} H[ω _0]. The equation for the second component ω1, responsible for a possible logarithmic blow-up, is linear and homogeneous; hence it remains zero if it is so initially until a stronger blow-up takes place. This rules out a logarithmic blow-up on its own and underlies the generalized BKM criterion. Numerical results are also presented to illustrate how each component of the FS decomposition evolves in time. Higher dimensional cases are also discussed. Without knowing fully explicit FS decompositions for the 3D Euler equations, we show that the second component of the FS decomposition will not appear if it is zero initially, thereby precluding a logarithmic blow-up.

  1. Revisiting kinetic boundary conditions at the surface of fuel droplet hydrocarbons: An atomistic computational fluid dynamics simulation

    PubMed Central

    Nasiri, Rasoul

    2016-01-01

    The role of boundary conditions at the interface for both Boltzmann equation and the set of Navier-Stokes equations have been suggested to be important for studying of multiphase flows such as evaporation/condensation process which doesn’t always obey the equilibrium conditions. Here we present aspects of transition-state theory (TST) alongside with kinetic gas theory (KGT) relevant to the study of quasi-equilibrium interfacial phenomena and the equilibrium gas phase processes, respectively. A two-state mathematical model for long-chain hydrocarbons which have multi-structural specifications is introduced to clarify how kinetics and thermodynamics affect evaporation/condensation process at the surface of fuel droplet, liquid and gas phases and then show how experimental observations for a number of n-alkane may be reproduced using a hybrid framework TST and KGT with physically reasonable parameters controlling the interface, gas and liquid phases. The importance of internal activation dynamics at the surface of n-alkane droplets is established during the evaporation/condensation process. PMID:27215897

  2. Revisiting kinetic boundary conditions at the surface of fuel droplet hydrocarbons: An atomistic computational fluid dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Nasiri, Rasoul

    2016-05-24

    The role of boundary conditions at the interface for both Boltzmann equation and the set of Navier-Stokes equations have been suggested to be important for studying of multiphase flows such as evaporation/condensation process which doesn't always obey the equilibrium conditions. Here we present aspects of transition-state theory (TST) alongside with kinetic gas theory (KGT) relevant to the study of quasi-equilibrium interfacial phenomena and the equilibrium gas phase processes, respectively. A two-state mathematical model for long-chain hydrocarbons which have multi-structural specifications is introduced to clarify how kinetics and thermodynamics affect evaporation/condensation process at the surface of fuel droplet, liquid and gas phases and then show how experimental observations for a number of n-alkane may be reproduced using a hybrid framework TST and KGT with physically reasonable parameters controlling the interface, gas and liquid phases. The importance of internal activation dynamics at the surface of n-alkane droplets is established during the evaporation/condensation process.

  3. Ethylene glycol revisited: Molecular dynamics simulations and visualization of the liquid and its hydrogen-bond network☆

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Alexander; Ismailova, Oksana; Koskela, Antti; Huber, Stefan E.; Ritter, Marcel; Cosenza, Biagio; Benger, Werner; Nazmutdinov, Renat; Probst, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of liquid ethylene glycol described by the OPLS-AA force field were performed to gain insight into its hydrogen-bond structure. We use the population correlation function as a statistical measure for the hydrogen-bond lifetime. In an attempt to understand the complicated hydrogen-bonding, we developed new molecular visualization tools within the Vish Visualization shell and used it to visualize the life of each individual hydrogen-bond. With this tool hydrogen-bond formation and breaking as well as clustering and chain formation in hydrogen-bonded liquids can be observed directly. Liquid ethylene glycol at room temperature does not show significant clustering or chain building. The hydrogen-bonds break often due to the rotational and vibrational motions of the molecules leading to an H-bond half-life time of approximately 1.5 ps. However, most of the H-bonds are reformed again so that after 50 ps only 40% of these H-bonds are irreversibly broken due to diffusional motion. This hydrogen-bond half-life time due to diffusional motion is 80.3 ps. The work was preceded by a careful check of various OPLS-based force fields used in the literature. It was found that they lead to quite different angular and H-bond distributions. PMID:24748697

  4. Stochastic dynamics and non-equilibrium thermodynamics of a bistable chemical system: the Schlögl model revisited.

    PubMed

    Vellela, Melissa; Qian, Hong

    2009-10-06

    Schlögl's model is the canonical example of a chemical reaction system that exhibits bistability. Because the biological examples of bistability and switching behaviour are increasingly numerous, this paper presents an integrated deterministic, stochastic and thermodynamic analysis of the model. After a brief review of the deterministic and stochastic modelling frameworks, the concepts of chemical and mathematical detailed balances are discussed and non-equilibrium conditions are shown to be necessary for bistability. Thermodynamic quantities such as the flux, chemical potential and entropy production rate are defined and compared across the two models. In the bistable region, the stochastic model exhibits an exchange of the global stability between the two stable states under changes in the pump parameters and volume size. The stochastic entropy production rate shows a sharp transition that mirrors this exchange. A new hybrid model that includes continuous diffusion and discrete jumps is suggested to deal with the multiscale dynamics of the bistable system. Accurate approximations of the exponentially small eigenvalue associated with the time scale of this switching and the full time-dependent solution are calculated using Matlab. A breakdown of previously known asymptotic approximations on small volume scales is observed through comparison with these and Monte Carlo results. Finally, in the appendix section is an illustration of how the diffusion approximation of the chemical master equation can fail to represent correctly the mesoscopically interesting steady-state behaviour of the system.

  5. Revisiting kinetic boundary conditions at the surface of fuel droplet hydrocarbons: An atomistic computational fluid dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasiri, Rasoul

    2016-05-01

    The role of boundary conditions at the interface for both Boltzmann equation and the set of Navier-Stokes equations have been suggested to be important for studying of multiphase flows such as evaporation/condensation process which doesn’t always obey the equilibrium conditions. Here we present aspects of transition-state theory (TST) alongside with kinetic gas theory (KGT) relevant to the study of quasi-equilibrium interfacial phenomena and the equilibrium gas phase processes, respectively. A two-state mathematical model for long-chain hydrocarbons which have multi-structural specifications is introduced to clarify how kinetics and thermodynamics affect evaporation/condensation process at the surface of fuel droplet, liquid and gas phases and then show how experimental observations for a number of n-alkane may be reproduced using a hybrid framework TST and KGT with physically reasonable parameters controlling the interface, gas and liquid phases. The importance of internal activation dynamics at the surface of n-alkane droplets is established during the evaporation/condensation process.

  6. Dissociation of strong acid revisited: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations of HNO3 in water

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Tanza; Winter, Berndt; Stern, Abraham C.; Baer, Marcel D.; Mundy, Christopher J.; Tobias, Douglas J.; Hemminger, J. C.

    2011-08-04

    Molecular-level insight into the dissociation of nitric acid in water is obtained from photoelectron X-ray spectroscopy and first-principles molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Our combined studies reveal surprisingly abrupt changes in solvation configurations of undissociated nitric acid at approximately 4 M concentration. Experimentally, this is inferred from N1s binding energy shifts of HNO3(aq) as a function of concentration, and is associated with variations in the local electronic structure of the nitrogen atom. It also shows up as a discontinuity in the degree of dissociation as a function of concentration, determined here from the N1s photoelectron signal intensity, which can be separately quantified for undissociated HNO3(aq) and dissociated NO3-(aq). Intermolecular interactions within the nitric acid solution are discussed on the basis of MD simulations, which reveal that molecular HNO3 interacts remarkably weakly with solvating water molecules at low concentration; around 4 M there is a turnover to a more structured solvation shell, accompanied by an increase in hydrogen bonding between HNO3 and water. We suggest that the driving force behind the more structured solvent configuration of HNO3 is the overlap of nitric acid solvent shells that sets in around 4 M concentration. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  7. Dissociation of strong acid revisited: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations of HNO3 in water.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Tanza; Winter, Bernd; Stern, Abraham C; Baer, Marcel D; Mundy, Christopher J; Tobias, Douglas J; Hemminger, John C

    2011-08-04

    Molecular-level insight into the dissociation of nitric acid in water is obtained from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and first-principles molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Our combined studies reveal surprisingly abrupt changes in solvation configurations of undissociated nitric acid at approximately 4 M concentration. Experimentally, this is inferred from shifts of the N1s binding energy of HNO(3)(aq) as a function of concentration and is associated with variations in the local electronic structure of the nitrogen atom. It also shows up as a discontinuity in the degree of dissociation as a function of concentration, determined here from the N1s photoelectron signal intensity, which can be separately quantified for undissociated HNO(3)(aq) and dissociated NO(3)(-)(aq). Intermolecular interactions within the nitric acid solution are discussed on the basis of MD simulations, which reveal that molecular HNO(3) interacts remarkably weakly with solvating water molecules at low concentration; around 4 M there is a turnover to a more structured solvation shell, accompanied by an increase in hydrogen bonding between HNO(3) and water. We suggest that the driving force behind the more structured solvent configuration of HNO(3) is the overlap of nitric acid solvent shells that sets in around 4 M concentration.

  8. Palatogram revisited

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Ashish R.; Venkat Prasad, M. K.; Ariga, Padma

    2014-01-01

    It is the responsibility of the dentist to fabricate a denture that is fully functional and perfectly esthetic. One prime oral function that has always been overlooked in this regard is speech. It has been thought that speech will follow mere replacement of teeth and that it is the patient's duty to fine tune this function with practice. Phonetics, esthetics, function and comfort form the foundation of a successful prosthodontic treatment. Accurate approximation of palatal contours of a maxillary complete denture to a patient's tongue can improve speech intelligibility, if other factors such as tooth position, occlusal plane and occlusal vertical dimension are satisfactory. Customizing palatal contours of a maxillary complete denture can be accomplished by using tissue-conditioning material, which provides sufficient working time for a patient to pronounce a series of sibilant sounds while recording dynamic impression of the tongue. This article describes a technique of obtaining palatogram and customizing palatal contours of a maxillary complete denture with autopolymerizing acrylic resin to improve the intelligibility of speech. PMID:24808716

  9. Nutational Damping Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, J. A.; Sharma, I.

    2000-10-01

    Motivated by the recent detection of complex rotational states for several asteroids and comets, as well as by the ongoing and planned spacecraft missions to such bodies, which should allow their rotational states to be accurately determined, we revisit the problem of the nutational damping of small solar system bodies. The nutational damping of asteroids has been approximately analyzed by Prendergast (1958), Burns and Safronov (1973), and Efroimsky and Lazarian (2000). Many other similar dynamical studies concern planetary wobble decay (e.g., Peale 1973; Yoder and Ward 1979), interstellar dust grain alignment (e.g., Purcell 1979; Lazarian and Efroimsky 1999) and damping of Earth's Chandler wobble (Lambeck 1980). Recall that rotational energy loss for an isolated body aligns the body's angular momentum vector with its axis of maximum inertia. Assuming anelastic dissipation, simple dimensional analysis determines a functional form of the damping timescale, on which all the above authors agree. However, the numerical coefficients of published results are claimed to differ by orders of magnitude. Differences have been ascribed to absent physics, to solutions that fail to satisfy boundary conditions perfectly, and to unphysical choices for the Q parameter. The true reasons for the discrepancy are unclear since, despite contrary claims, the full 3D problem (nutational damping of an anelastic ellipsoid) is analytically intractable so far. To move the debate forward, we compare the solution of a related 2D problem to the expressions found previously, and we present results from a finite element model. On this basis, we feel that previous rates for the decay of asteroidal tumbling (Harris 1994), derived from Burns and Safronov (1973), are likely to be accurate, at least to a factor of a few. Funded by NASA.

  10. Saturn's rings revisited by the images of the CASSINI spacecraft: Dynamical evolution of the F ring and photometric study of the main rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deau, E.

    2007-12-01

    In the Solar system, the planetary rings represent a fantastic opportunity of studying a majority of phenomena taking place in the thin discs. One can find discs at all redshifts and on all scales of the Universe. Planetary discs are very different~: among the jovian rings, one finds a halo of fine and diffuse dust; the rings of Uranus are very compact, like radially confined strings and the system of rings of Neptune consists of azimuthally stable arcs. However our interest goes on Saturn which has the most complex and widest system of rings known to date~: 484.000 km and a vertical extension which increases with the distance to Saturn (typically less than 1km to 10.000 km). The interest of such a matter organization around Saturn plus its many moons (more than one forty including 8 of a size of several hundreds kilometers) gave birth to the exploration mission CASSINI, supposed to allow the development and the refinement of models set up at the flybies of the two interplanetary probes VOYAGER. The CASSINI Mission began its nominal tour on january, 15th 2005 after the orbital insertion the 1st july 2004 and the dropping of HUYGENS probe on january, 14th 2005 on Titan's surface. The purpose of this thesis consists to revisite two subjects unsolved of long date in the photometric and dynamic behaviours of the Saturn's rings. In a first part, we try to solve the problem of accretion of matter within the Roche limit by studying the F ring. This ring, since its discovery in 1979 by Pioneer 11, is involved in a most various dynamic theories to explain its complex multi-radial structure and its variable azimuthal structure. We showed that the multi-radial structure of this ring can be understood by the existence of a spiral which is rolled up around a central area, bright, eccentric and inclined~: the core. The lifespan of this spiral is not the same one as the core, suggesting that the processes which create the spiral are periodic. Moreover, we showed that the

  11. Anodic Polarization Curves Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yue; Drew, Michael G. B.; Liu, Ying; Liu, Lin

    2013-01-01

    An experiment published in this "Journal" has been revisited and it is found that the curve pattern of the anodic polarization curve for iron repeats itself successively when the potential scan is repeated. It is surprising that this observation has not been reported previously in the literature because it immediately brings into…

  12. A Hydrostatic Paradox Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganci, Salvatore

    2012-01-01

    This paper revisits a well-known hydrostatic paradox, observed when turning upside down a glass partially filled with water and covered with a sheet of light material. The phenomenon is studied in its most general form by including the mass of the cover. A historical survey of this experiment shows that a common misunderstanding of the phenomenon…

  13. Parametric Resonance Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Broeck, C.; Bena, I.

    The phenomenon of parametric resonance is revisited. Several physical examples are reviewed and an exactly solvable model is discussed. A mean field theory is presented for globally coupled parametric oscillators with randomly distributed phases. A new type of collective instability appears, which is similar in nature to that of noise induced phase transitions.

  14. Concept Image Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bingolbali, Erhan; Monaghan, John

    2008-01-01

    Concept image and concept definition is an important construct in mathematics education. Its use, however, has been limited to cognitive studies. This article revisits concept image in the context of research on undergraduate students' understanding of the derivative which regards the context of learning as paramount. The literature, mainly on…

  15. Revisiting Bioaccumulation Criteria

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of workgroup 5 was to revisit the B(ioaccumulation) criteria that are currently being used to identify POPs under the Stockholm Convention and PBTs under CEPA, TSCA, REACh and other programs. Despite the lack of a recognized definition for a B substance, we defined ...

  16. The Linguistic Repertoire Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busch, Brigitta

    2012-01-01

    This article argues for the relevance of poststructuralist approaches to the notion of a linguistic repertoire and introduces the notion of language portraits as a basis for empirical study of the way in which speakers conceive and represent their heteroglossic repertoires. The first part of the article revisits Gumperz's notion of a linguistic…

  17. Colloquial Hebrew Imperatives Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolozky, Shmuel

    2009-01-01

    In revisiting Bolozky's [Bolozky, Shmuel, 1979. "On the new imperative in colloquial Hebrew." "Hebrew Annual Review" 3, 17-24] and Bat-El's [Bat-El, Outi, 2002. "True truncation in colloquial Hebrew imperatives." "Language" 78(4), 651-683] analyses of colloquial Hebrew imperatives, the article argues for restricting Imperative Truncation to the…

  18. Revisiting Dialogues and Monologues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kvernbekk, Tone

    2012-01-01

    In educational discourse dialogue tends to be viewed as being (morally) superior to monologue. When we look at them as basic forms of communication, we find that dialogue is a two-way, one-to-one form and monologue is a one-way, one-to-many form. In this paper I revisit the alleged (moral) superiority of dialogue. First, I problematize certain…

  19. Clinical ethics revisited

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Peter A; Pellegrino, Edmund D; Siegler, Mark

    2001-01-01

    A decade ago, we reviewed the field of clinical ethics; assessed its progress in research, education, and ethics committees and consultation; and made predictions about the future of the field. In this article, we revisit clinical ethics to examine our earlier observations, highlight key developments, and discuss remaining challenges for clinical ethics, including the need to develop a global perspective on clinical ethics problems. PMID:11346456

  20. Mountain Rivers Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2011-12-01

    Published in 2000, the original Mountain Rivers was written to provide a concise summary of the scientific understanding of the distinct subset of rivers that gave the book its name. Spurred by developments in the field in the past decade, the book's author, Ellen Wohl, produced Mountain Rivers Revisited, an updated edition aimed at graduate students and professional researchers. In this interview, Eos talks to Wohl about steep channels, climate change, and opportunities for future research.

  1. The generalized Langevin equation revisited: Analytical expressions for the persistence dynamics of a viscous fluid under a time dependent external force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivares-Rivas, Wilmer; Colmenares, Pedro J.

    2016-09-01

    The non-static generalized Langevin equation and its corresponding Fokker-Planck equation for the position of a viscous fluid particle were solved in closed form for a time dependent external force. Its solution for a constant external force was obtained analytically. The non-Markovian stochastic differential equation, associated to the dynamics of the position under a colored noise, was then applied to the description of the dynamics and persistence time of particles constrained within absorbing barriers. Comparisons with molecular dynamics were very satisfactory.

  2. Revisiting the tubulin cofactors and Arl2 in the regulation of soluble αβ-tubulin pools and their effect on microtubule dynamics.

    PubMed

    Al-Bassam, Jawdat

    2017-02-01

    Soluble αβ-tubulin heterodimers are maintained at high concentration inside eukaryotic cells, forming pools that fundamentally drive microtubule dynamics. Five conserved tubulin cofactors and ADP ribosylation factor-like 2 regulate the biogenesis and degradation of αβ-tubulins to maintain concentrated soluble pools. Here I describe a revised model for the function of three tubulin cofactors and Arl2 as a multisubunit GTP-hydrolyzing catalytic chaperone that cycles to promote αβ-tubulin biogenesis and degradation. This model helps explain old and new data indicating these activities enhance microtubule dynamics in vivo via repair or removal of αβ-tubulins from the soluble pools.

  3. Light-front representation of chiral dynamics with Δ isobar and large-Nc relations

    DOE PAGES

    Granados, C.; Weiss, C.

    2016-06-13

    Transverse densities describe the spatial distribution of electromagnetic current in the nucleon at fixed light-front time. At peripheral distances b = O(Mπ–1) the densities are governed by chiral dynamics and can be calculated model-independently using chiral effective field theory (EFT). Recent work has shown that the EFT results can be represented in first-quantized form, as overlap integrals of chiral light-front wave functions describing the transition of the nucleon to soft-pion-nucleon intermediate states, resulting in a quantum-mechanical picture of the peripheral transverse densities. We now extend this representation to include intermediate states with Δ isobars and implement relations based on themore » large-Nc limit of QCD. We derive the wave function overlap formulas for the Δ contributions to the peripheral transverse densities by way of a three-dimensional reduction of relativistic chiral EFT expressions. Our procedure effectively maintains rotational invariance and avoids the ambiguities with higher-spin particles in the light-front time-ordered approach. We study the interplay of πN and πΔ intermediate states in the quantum-mechanical picture of the densities in a transversely polarized nucleon. We show that the correct Nc-scaling of the charge and magnetization densities emerges as the result of the particular combination of currents generated by intermediate states with degenerate N and Δ. The off-shell behavior of the chiral EFT is summarized in contact terms and can be studied easily. As a result, the methods developed here can be applied to other peripheral densities and to moments of the nucleon's generalized parton distributions.« less

  4. Light-front representation of chiral dynamics with Δ isobar and large- N c relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granados, C.; Weiss, C.

    2016-06-01

    Transverse densities describe the spatial distribution of electromagnetic current in the nucleon at fixed light-front time. At peripheral distances b = O( M π - 1 ) the densities are governed by chiral dynamics and can be calculated model-independently using chiral effective field theory (EFT). Recent work has shown that the EFT results can be represented in first-quantized form, as overlap integrals of chiral light-front wave functions describing the transition of the nucleon to soft-pion-nucleon intermediate states, resulting in a quantum-mechanical picture of the peripheral transverse densities. We now extend this representation to include intermediate states with Δ isobars and implement relations based on the large- N c limit of QCD. We derive the wave function overlap formulas for the Δ contributions to the peripheral transverse densities by way of a three-dimensional reduction of relativistic chiral EFT expressions. Our procedure effectively maintains rotational invariance and avoids the ambiguities with higher-spin particles in the light-front time-ordered approach. We study the interplay of π N and πΔ intermediate states in the quantum-mechanical picture of the densities in a transversely polarized nucleon. We show that the correct N c -scaling of the charge and magnetization densities emerges as the result of the particular combination of currents generated by intermediate states with degenerate N and Δ. The off-shell behavior of the chiral EFT is summarized in contact terms and can be studied easily. The methods developed here can be applied to other peripheral densities and to moments of the nucleon's generalized parton distributions.

  5. Revisiting the logistic map: A closer look at the dynamics of a classic chaotic population model with ecologically realistic spatial structure and dispersal.

    PubMed

    Storch, Laura S; Pringle, James M; Alexander, Karen E; Jones, David O

    2017-04-01

    There is an ongoing debate about the applicability of chaotic and nonlinear models to ecological systems. Initial introduction of chaotic population models to the ecological literature was largely theoretical in nature and difficult to apply to real-world systems. Here, we build upon and expand prior work by performing an in-depth examination of the dynamical complexities of a spatially explicit chaotic population, within an ecologically applicable modeling framework. We pair a classic chaotic growth model (the logistic map) with explicit dispersal length scale and shape via a Gaussian dispersal kernel. Spatio-temporal heterogeneity is incorporated by applying stochastic perturbations throughout the spatial domain. We witness a variety of population dynamics dependent on the growth rate, dispersal distance, and domain size. Dispersal serves to eliminate chaotic population behavior for many of the parameter combinations tested. The model displays extreme sensitivity to changes in growth rate, dispersal distance, or domain size, but is robust to low-level stochastic population perturbations. Large and temporally consistent perturbations can lead to a change in population dynamics. Frequent switching occurs between chaotic/non-chaotic behaviors as dispersal distance, domain size, or growth rate increases. Small changes in these parameters are easy to imagine in real populations, and understanding or anticipating the abrupt resulting shifts in population dynamics is important for population management and conservation.

  6. The formulation of dynamical contact problems with friction in the case of systems of rigid bodies and general discrete mechanical systems—Painlevé and Kane paradoxes revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, Alexandre; Ballard, Patrick

    2016-08-01

    The dynamics of mechanical systems with a finite number of degrees of freedom (discrete mechanical systems) is governed by the Lagrange equation which is a second-order differential equation on a Riemannian manifold (the configuration manifold). The handling of perfect (frictionless) unilateral constraints in this framework (that of Lagrange's analytical dynamics) was undertaken by Schatzman and Moreau at the beginning of the 1980s. A mathematically sound and consistent evolution problem was obtained, paving the road for many subsequent theoretical investigations. In this general evolution problem, the only reaction force which is involved is a generalized reaction force, consistently with the virtual power philosophy of Lagrange. Surprisingly, such a general formulation was never derived in the case of frictional unilateral multibody dynamics. Instead, the paradigm of the Coulomb law applying to reaction forces in the real world is generally invoked. So far, this paradigm has only enabled to obtain a consistent evolution problem in only some very few specific examples and to suggest numerical algorithms to produce computational examples (numerical modeling). In particular, it is not clear what is the evolution problem underlying the computational examples. Moreover, some of the few specific cases in which this paradigm enables to write down a precise evolution problem are known to show paradoxes: the Painlevé paradox (indeterminacy) and the Kane paradox (increase in kinetic energy due to friction). In this paper, we follow Lagrange's philosophy and formulate the frictional unilateral multibody dynamics in terms of the generalized reaction force and not in terms of the real-world reaction force. A general evolution problem that governs the dynamics is obtained for the first time. We prove that all the solutions are dissipative; that is, this new formulation is free of Kane paradox. We also prove that some indeterminacy of the Painlevé paradox is fixed in this

  7. Quantum duel revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Alexandre G. M.; Paiva, Milena M.

    2012-03-01

    We revisit the quantum two-person duel. In this problem, both Alice and Bob each possess a spin-1/2 particle which models dead and alive states for each player. We review the Abbott and Flitney result—now considering non-zero α1 and α2 in order to decide if it is better for Alice to shoot or not the second time—and we also consider a duel where players do not necessarily start alive. This simple assumption allows us to explore several interesting special cases, namely how a dead player can win the duel shooting just once, or how can Bob revive Alice after one shot, and the better strategy for Alice—being either alive or in a superposition of alive and dead states—fighting a dead opponent.

  8. ``Robinson's sum rule'' revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, Yuri F.

    2010-02-01

    This discussion revisits two articles on synchrotron radiation damping published in 1958, one by this author and Evgeny K. Tarasov [Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz. 34, 651 (1958)ZETFA70044-4510; Sov. Phys. JETP 34, 449 (1958)SPHJAR0038-5646], and one by Kenneth W. Robinson [Phys. Rev. 111, 373 (1958)PHRVAO0031-899X10.1103/PhysRev.111.373]. The latter is the source of what is known as “Robinson’s sum rule.” Both present the familiar rule, but with very different proofs and calculations of concrete damping decrements. Comparative analysis of these differences reveals serious flaws in Robinson’s proof and calculations.

  9. Polite Theories Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanović, Dejan; Barrett, Clark

    The classic method of Nelson and Oppen for combining decision procedures requires the theories to be stably-infinite. Unfortunately, some important theories do not fall into this category (e.g. the theory of bit-vectors). To remedy this problem, previous work introduced the notion of polite theories. Polite theories can be combined with any other theory using an extension of the Nelson-Oppen approach. In this paper we revisit the notion of polite theories, fixing a subtle flaw in the original definition. We give a new combination theorem which specifies the degree to which politeness is preserved when combining polite theories. We also give conditions under which politeness is preserved when instantiating theories by identifying two sorts. These results lead to a more general variant of the theorem for combining multiple polite theories.

  10. Effective string theory revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovsky, Sergei; Flauger, Raphael; Gorbenko, Victor

    2012-09-01

    We revisit the effective field theory of long relativistic strings such as confining flux tubes in QCD. We derive the Polchinski-Strominger interaction by a calculation in static gauge. This interaction implies that a non-critical string which initially oscillates in one direction gets excited in orthogonal directions as well. In static gauge no additional term in the effective action is needed to obtain this effect. It results from a one-loop calculation using the Nambu-Goto action. Non-linearly realized Lorentz symmetry is manifest at all stages in dimensional regularization. We also explain that independent of the number of dimensions non-covariant counterterms have to be added to the action in the commonly used zeta-function regularization.

  11. Flow-Induced New Channels of Energy Exchange in Multi-Scale Plasma DynamicsRevisiting Perturbative Hybrid Kinetic-MHD Theory

    PubMed Central

    Shiraishi, Junya; Miyato, Naoaki; Matsunaga, Go

    2016-01-01

    It is found that new channels of energy exchange between macro- and microscopic dynamics exist in plasmas. They are induced by macroscopic plasma flow. This finding is based on the kinetic-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory, which analyses interaction between macroscopic (MHD-scale) motion and microscopic (particle-scale) dynamics. The kinetic-MHD theory is extended to include effects of macroscopic plasma flow self-consistently. The extension is realised by generalising an energy exchange term due to wave-particle resonance, denoted by δ WK. The first extension is generalisation of the particle’s Lagrangian, and the second one stems from modification to the particle distribution function due to flow. These extensions lead to a generalised expression of δ WK, which affects the MHD stability of plasmas. PMID:27160346

  12. Flow-Induced New Channels of Energy Exchange in Multi-Scale Plasma Dynamics - Revisiting Perturbative Hybrid Kinetic-MHD Theory.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Junya; Miyato, Naoaki; Matsunaga, Go

    2016-05-10

    It is found that new channels of energy exchange between macro- and microscopic dynamics exist in plasmas. They are induced by macroscopic plasma flow. This finding is based on the kinetic-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory, which analyses interaction between macroscopic (MHD-scale) motion and microscopic (particle-scale) dynamics. The kinetic-MHD theory is extended to include effects of macroscopic plasma flow self-consistently. The extension is realised by generalising an energy exchange term due to wave-particle resonance, denoted by δ WK. The first extension is generalisation of the particle's Lagrangian, and the second one stems from modification to the particle distribution function due to flow. These extensions lead to a generalised expression of δ WK, which affects the MHD stability of plasmas.

  13. Cyclohexane revisited: High pressure nuclear magnetic resonance rotating frame relaxation study of the dynamical solvent effects on the conformational isomerization of cyclohexane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, D. M.; Mackowiak, M.; Jonas, J.

    1992-02-01

    The main goal of this study is to extend the dynamic range of isomerization rates for cyclohexane in order to determine with high accuracy whether the barrier height to isomerization is pressure dependent. Therefore, the effect of pressure and temperature on the conformational isomerization of cyclohexane in carbon disulfide solvent has been investigated using the NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) rotating frame relaxation technique. This technique, used for the first time in pressure studies of chemical exchange, allows the measurement of isomerization dynamics over a wide range of pressures and temperatures. By combining the rotating frame and NMR line shape techniques and generating the isoviscosity plots, it is shown that the barrier height to isomerization is independent of pressure. Since the experimental isomerization rate is accelerated by pressure, the viscosity dependence of the reduced transmission coefficient shows that the isomerization falls into the energy controlled (inertial) regime of the Kramers model in agreement with our earlier experimental findings. These experimental results, as interpreted in terms of stochastic models of isomerization reactions, indicate a strong collisional coupling and the presence of dynamical solvent effects.

  14. Visser's massive graviton bimetric theory revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Roany, Alain de; Chauvineau, Bertrand; Freitas Pacheco, Jose A. de

    2011-10-15

    A massive gravity theory was proposed by Visser in the late 1990s. This theory, based on a background metric b{sub {alpha}{beta}} and on an usual dynamical metric g{sub {alpha}{beta}} has the advantage of being free of ghosts as well as discontinuities present in other massive theories proposed in the past. In the present investigation, the equations of Visser's theory are revisited with particular care on the related conservation laws. It will be shown that a multiplicative factor is missing in the graviton tensor originally derived by Visser, which has no incidence on the weak field approach but becomes important in the strong field regime when, for instance, cosmological applications are considered. In this case, contrary to some previous claims found in the literature, we conclude that a nonstatic background metric is required in order to obtain a solution able to mimic the {Lambda}CDM cosmology.

  15. Light-front representation of chiral dynamics with Δ isobar and large-Nc relations

    SciTech Connect

    Granados, C.; Weiss, C.

    2016-06-13

    Transverse densities describe the spatial distribution of electromagnetic current in the nucleon at fixed light-front time. At peripheral distances b = O(Mπ–1) the densities are governed by chiral dynamics and can be calculated model-independently using chiral effective field theory (EFT). Recent work has shown that the EFT results can be represented in first-quantized form, as overlap integrals of chiral light-front wave functions describing the transition of the nucleon to soft-pion-nucleon intermediate states, resulting in a quantum-mechanical picture of the peripheral transverse densities. We now extend this representation to include intermediate states with Δ isobars and implement relations based on the large-Nc limit of QCD. We derive the wave function overlap formulas for the Δ contributions to the peripheral transverse densities by way of a three-dimensional reduction of relativistic chiral EFT expressions. Our procedure effectively maintains rotational invariance and avoids the ambiguities with higher-spin particles in the light-front time-ordered approach. We study the interplay of πN and πΔ intermediate states in the quantum-mechanical picture of the densities in a transversely polarized nucleon. We show that the correct Nc-scaling of the charge and magnetization densities emerges as the result of the particular combination of currents generated by intermediate states with degenerate N and Δ. The off-shell behavior of the chiral EFT is summarized in contact terms and can be studied easily. As a result, the methods developed here can be applied to other peripheral densities and to moments of the nucleon's generalized parton distributions.

  16. Revisiting caspases in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, M; Jacob, A; Wang, P

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is a life-threatening illness that occurs due to an abnormal host immune network which extends through the initial widespread and overwhelming inflammation, and culminates at the late stage of immunosupression. Recently, interest has been shifted toward therapies aimed at reversing the accompanying periods of immune suppression. Studies in experimental animals and critically ill patients have demonstrated that increased apoptosis of lymphoid organs and some parenchymal tissues contributes to this immune suppression, anergy and organ dysfunction. Immediate to the discoveries of the intracellular proteases, caspases for the induction of apoptosis and inflammation, and their striking roles in sepsis have been focused elaborately in a number of original and review articles. Here we revisited the different aspects of caspases in terms of apoptosis, pyroptosis, necroptosis and inflammation and focused their links in sepsis by reviewing several recent findings. In addition, we have documented striking perspectives which not only rewrite the pathophysiology, but also modernize our understanding for developing novel therapeutics against sepsis. PMID:25412304

  17. Searle's"Dualism Revisited"

    SciTech Connect

    P., Henry

    2008-11-20

    A recent article in which John Searle claims to refute dualism is examined from a scientific perspective. John Searle begins his recent article 'Dualism Revisited' by stating his belief that the philosophical problem of consciousness has a scientific solution. He then claims to refute dualism. It is therefore appropriate to examine his arguments against dualism from a scientific perspective. Scientific physical theories contain two kinds of descriptions: (1) Descriptions of our empirical findings, expressed in an every-day language that allows us communicate to each other our sensory experiences pertaining to what we have done and what we have learned; and (2) Descriptions of a theoretical model, expressed in a mathematical language that allows us to communicate to each other certain ideas that exist in our mathematical imaginations, and that are believed to represent, within our streams of consciousness, certain aspects of reality that we deem to exist independently of their being perceived by any human observer. These two parts of our scientific description correspond to the two aspects of our general contemporary dualistic understanding of the total reality in which we are imbedded, namely the empirical-mental aspect and the theoretical-physical aspect. The duality question is whether this general dualistic understanding of ourselves should be regarded as false in some important philosophical or scientific sense.

  18. Twin Signature Schemes, Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäge, Sven

    In this paper, we revisit the twin signature scheme by Naccache, Pointcheval and Stern from CCS 2001 that is secure under the Strong RSA (SRSA) assumption and improve its efficiency in several ways. First, we present a new twin signature scheme that is based on the Strong Diffie-Hellman (SDH) assumption in bilinear groups and allows for very short signatures and key material. A big advantage of this scheme is that, in contrast to the original scheme, it does not require a computationally expensive function for mapping messages to primes. We prove this new scheme secure under adaptive chosen message attacks. Second, we present a modification that allows to significantly increase efficiency when signing long messages. This construction uses collision-resistant hash functions as its basis. As a result, our improvements make the signature length independent of the message size. Our construction deviates from the standard hash-and-sign approach in which the hash value of the message is signed in place of the message itself. We show that in the case of twin signatures, one can exploit the properties of the hash function as an integral part of the signature scheme. This improvement can be applied to both the SRSA based and SDH based twin signature scheme.

  19. AC-Susceptibility and Ultrasonic Attenuation Measurements of Vortex Dynamics in the Vicinity of the Peak Effect in V-Ti Alloys - Multicriticality Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrov, I. K.

    2005-03-01

    In-situ SANS and ac-susceptibility measurements have provided evidence for a first-order Bragg glass transition into a disordered vortex state in a Nb single crystal. This transition manifests itself in the peak effect (PE) in the critical current density, widely believed to be associated with the sudden softening of the vortex lattice. Subsequent studies mapping the full phase diagram in the same sample have suggested the existence of four distinct phase boundaries meeting at a single multicritical point (MCP). The natures of the transition lines combined with simple thermodynamic requirements suggest that the MCP is a bicritical point. This would rule out either the bulk transition line Tc2(T) or the surface superconducting transition Hc3(T) as being related to the MCP. Mutual inductance magnetic ac-susceptibility and ultrasonic attenuation measurements in V-21at.%Ti have unequivocally established the presence of a PE in this alloy. The H-T phase diagram for this sample will be presented and vortex dynamics in the vicinity of the PE will be discussed. We are indebted to Prof. Shapira of Tufts University for providing us with the sample. This work was supported by the NSF under Grant No. DMR-0406626.

  20. Benjamin Franklin and Mesmerism, revisited.

    PubMed

    McConkey, Kevin M; Perry, Campbell

    2002-10-01

    The authors revisit and update their previous historiographical note (McConkey & Perry, 1985) on Benjamin Franklin's involvement with and investigation of animal magnetism or mesmerism. They incorporate more recent literature and offer additional comment about Franklin's role in and views about mesmerism. Franklin had a higher degree of personal involvement with and a more detailed opinion of mesmerism than has been previously appreciated.

  1. Cultural Warping of Childbirth, Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Budin, Wendy C.

    2007-01-01

    In this column, the editor of The Journal of Perinatal Education revisits Doris Haire's classic 1972 article, “The Cultural Warping of Childbirth,” and describes the birth culture of today. The editor also describes the contents of this issue, which offer a broad range of resources, research, and inspiration for childbirth educators in their efforts to promote normal birth.

  2. The "Mushroom Cloud" Demonstration Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panzarasa, Guido; Sparnacci, Katia

    2013-01-01

    A revisitation of the classical "mushroom cloud" demonstration is described. Instead of aniline and benzoyl peroxide, the proposed reaction involves household chemicals such as alpha-pinene (turpentine oil) and trichloroisocyanuric acid ("Trichlor") giving an impressive demonstration of oxidation and combustion reactions that…

  3. Revisiting the Schoolwide Enrichment Model--An Approach to Gifted Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Sherry; Efinger, Joan

    2001-01-01

    This article provides a consistent framework through which educators may better identify and serve gifted and talented students by revisiting the dynamics of the Schoolwide Enrichment Model (SEM) in relation to student achievement. Delivery and structural and organizational components of SEM are discussed, along with research supporting the model.…

  4. BHQ revisited (2): Texture development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilian, Rüdiger; Heilbronner, Renée

    2016-04-01

    appears that grains can be unfavourably oriented for glide despite their c-axis direction falling in those positions which were used in the "classical" interpretation. Additionally, it turns out that grain-scale dispersion axes can be used to describe the kinematic behaviour in a more consistent way compared to the rotations axes obtained from intragranular misorientations in the range of 2-10°. The implications derived from the experimental data set will be compared to data obtained from natural quartz mylonites which formed in a comparable recrystallization regime. This is the companion poster to "BHQ revisited (I) looking at grain size" where the development of the dynamically recrystallized grain size is addressed. Reference cited: Heilbronner, R., and J. Tullis (2006), Evolution of c axis pole figures and grain size during dynamic recrystallization: Results from experimentally sheared quartzite, J. Geophys. Res., 111, B10202, doi:10.1029/2005JB004194.

  5. Enceladus' tidal dissipation revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobie, Gabriel; Behounkova, Marie; Choblet, Gael; Cadek, Ondrej; Soucek, Ondrej

    2016-10-01

    A series of chemical and physical evidence indicates that the intense activity at Enceladus' South Pole is related to a subsurface salty water reservoir underneath the tectonically active ice shell. The detection of a significant libration implies that this water reservoir is global and that the average ice shell thickness is about 20-25km (Thomas et al. 2016). The interpretation of gravity and topography data further predicts large variations in ice shell thickness, resulting in a shell potentially thinner than 5 km in the South Polar Terrain (SPT) (Cadek et al. 2016). Such an ice shell structure requires a very strong heat source in the interior, with a focusing mechanism at the SPT. Thermal diffusion through the ice shell implies that at least 25-30 GW is lost into space by passive diffusion, implying a very efficient dissipation mechanism in Enceladus' interior to maintain such an ocean/ice configuration thermally stable.In order to determine in which conditions such a large dissipation power may be generated, we model the tidal response of Enceladus including variable ice shell thickness. For the rock core, we consider a wide range of rheological parameters representative of water-saturated porous rock materials. We demonstrate that the thinning toward the South Pole leads to a strong increase in heat production in the ice shell, with a optimal thickness obtained between 1.5 and 3 km, depending on the assumed ice viscosity. Our results imply that the heat production in the ice shell within the SPT may be sufficient to counterbalance the heat loss by diffusion and to power eruption activity. However, outside the SPT, a strong dissipation in the porous core is required to counterbalance the diffusive heat loss. We show that about 20 GW can be generated in the core, for an effective viscosity of 1012 Pa.s, which is comparable to the effective viscosity estimated in water-saturated glacial tills on Earth. We will discuss the implications of this revisited tidal

  6. Parallel Dynamics of Continuous Hopfield Model Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimura, Kazushi

    2009-03-01

    We have applied the generating functional analysis (GFA) to the continuous Hopfield model. We have also confirmed that the GFA predictions in some typical cases exhibit good consistency with computer simulation results. When a retarded self-interaction term is omitted, the GFA result becomes identical to that obtained using the statistical neurodynamics as well as the case of the sequential binary Hopfield model.

  7. First Grade Writers Revisit Their Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Jane A.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author focuses on first grade readers and writers who revisit their work and describes what first-graders do when they revisit their writing about science and literature and review collections of their work. The first-graders discussed here are in Elaine O'Connor's classroom at Clark Elementary School in Charlottesville. In a…

  8. Asymptotic structure of electrodynamics revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herdegen, Andrzej

    2017-03-01

    We point out that recently published analyses of null and timelike infinity and long-range structures in electrodynamics to large extent rediscover results present in the literature. At the same time, some of the conclusions these recent works put forward may prove controversial. In view of these facts, we find it desirable to revisit the analysis taken up more than two decades ago, starting from earlier works on null infinity by other authors.

  9. Radiolytic Cryovolcanism Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, J. F.; Cooper, P. D.; Sittler, E. C.; Wesenberg, R. P.

    2013-12-01

    Active geysers of water vapor and ice grains from the south pole of Enceladus are not yet definitively explained in terms of energy sources and processes. Other instances of hot (Io) and cold (Mars, Triton) volcanism beyond Earth are known if not fully understood. We revisit, in comparison to other models, the 'Old Faithful' theory of radiolytic gas-driven cryovolcanism first proposed by Cooper et al. [Plan. Sp. Sci. 2009]. In the energetic electron irradiation environment of Enceladus within Saturn's magnetosphere, a 10-percent duty cycle could be maintained for current geyser activity driven by gases from oxidation of ammonia to N2 and methane to CO2 in the thermal margins of a south polar sea. Much shorter duty cycles down to 0.01 percent would be required to account for thermal power output up to 16 GW, Steady accumulation of oxidant energy over four billion years could have powered all Enceladus emissions over the past four hundred thousand to four hundred million years. There could be separate energy sources driving mass flow and thermal emission over vastly different time scales. Since episodic tidal dissipation on 10 Myr time scales at 0.1 - 1 Gyr intervals [O'Neill and Nimmo, Nature 2010], and thus duty cycles 1 - 10 percent, could heat the polar sea to the current level, the radiolytic energy source could easily power and modulate the geyser mass flow on million-year time scales. Maximum thermal emission temperature 223 K [Abramov and Spencer, Icarus 2009] hints at thermal buffering in the basal and vent wall layers by a 1:1 H2O:H2O2 radiolytic eutectic, assuming deep ice crust saturation with H2O2 from long cumulative surface irradiation and downward ice convection. Due to density stratification the peroxide eutectic and salt water layers could separate, so that the denser peroxide layer (1.2 g/cc) descends to the polar sea while the lighter salt water (1.05 g/cc) rises along separate channels. Methane reservoirs could be found dissolved into the polar

  10. Granger causality revisited.

    PubMed

    Friston, Karl J; Bastos, André M; Oswal, Ashwini; van Wijk, Bernadette; Richter, Craig; Litvak, Vladimir

    2014-11-01

    This technical paper offers a critical re-evaluation of (spectral) Granger causality measures in the analysis of biological timeseries. Using realistic (neural mass) models of coupled neuronal dynamics, we evaluate the robustness of parametric and nonparametric Granger causality. Starting from a broad class of generative (state-space) models of neuronal dynamics, we show how their Volterra kernels prescribe the second-order statistics of their response to random fluctuations; characterised in terms of cross-spectral density, cross-covariance, autoregressive coefficients and directed transfer functions. These quantities in turn specify Granger causality - providing a direct (analytic) link between the parameters of a generative model and the expected Granger causality. We use this link to show that Granger causality measures based upon autoregressive models can become unreliable when the underlying dynamics is dominated by slow (unstable) modes - as quantified by the principal Lyapunov exponent. However, nonparametric measures based on causal spectral factors are robust to dynamical instability. We then demonstrate how both parametric and nonparametric spectral causality measures can become unreliable in the presence of measurement noise. Finally, we show that this problem can be finessed by deriving spectral causality measures from Volterra kernels, estimated using dynamic causal modelling.

  11. Weyl gravity revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez, Enrique; González-Martín, Sergio

    2017-02-01

    The on shell equivalence of first order and second order formalisms for the Einstein-Hilbert action does not hold for those actions quadratic in curvature. It would seem that by considering the connection and the metric as independent dynamical variables, there are no quartic propagators for any dynamical variable. This suggests that it is possible to get both renormalizability and unitarity along these lines. We have studied a particular instance of those theories, namely Weyl gravity. In this first paper we show that it is not possible to implement this program with the Weyl connection alone.

  12. Sea quark matrix elements and flavor singlet spectroscopy on the lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Lagae, J.F.

    1996-12-31

    I summarize the results of three recent lattice studies which use stochastic estimator techniques in order to investigate the flavor singlet dynamics in QCD. These include a measurement of the pion-nucleon {sigma}-term, the computation of the flavor singlet axial coupling constant of the nucleon and a determination of flavor singlet meson screening lengths in finite temperature QCD.

  13. Recurrence plots revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casdagli, M. C.

    1997-09-01

    We show that recurrence plots (RPs) give detailed characterizations of time series generated by dynamical systems driven by slowly varying external forces. For deterministic systems we show that RPs of the time series can be used to reconstruct the RP of the driving force if it varies sufficiently slowly. If the driving force is one-dimensional, its functional form can then be inferred up to an invertible coordinate transformation. The same results hold for stochastic systems if the RP of the time series is suitably averaged and transformed. These results are used to investigate the nonlinear prediction of time series generated by dynamical systems driven by slowly varying external forces. We also consider the problem of detecting a small change in the driving force, and propose a surrogate data technique for assessing statistical significance. Numerically simulated time series and a time series of respiration rates recorded from a subject with sleep apnea are used as illustrative examples.

  14. Revisiting and parallelizing SHAKE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinbach, Yael; Elber, Ron

    2005-10-01

    An algorithm is presented for running SHAKE in parallel. SHAKE is a widely used approach to compute molecular dynamics trajectories with constraints. An essential step in SHAKE is the solution of a sparse linear problem of the type Ax = b, where x is a vector of unknowns. Conjugate gradient minimization (that can be done in parallel) replaces the widely used iteration process that is inherently serial. Numerical examples present good load balancing and are limited only by communication time.

  15. Lithium in the Pleiades Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, J. R.; Hobbs, L. M.; Schuler, S. C.; Pinsonneault, M. H.

    2003-12-01

    New Li abundances have been derived for some 15-20 Pleiades dwarfs using new high-resolution and high S/N spectroscopy from HET/HRS. Previous studies suggested that our objects, all modest (projected) rotators, evinced considerable scatter in their Li abundances. We revisit the question of this scatter and its origin. This work has been supported by NSF grants AST 00-86576 and 02-39518, a South Carolina Space Grant Scholarship award, a generous donation from the Curry Foundation of Seneca, SC, and the NOAO Public Access Program.

  16. SLIM--An Early Work Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Alex; /SLAC

    2008-07-25

    An early, but at the time illuminating, piece of work on how to deal with a general, linearly coupled accelerator lattice is revisited. This work is based on the SLIM formalism developed in 1979-1981.

  17. McLean's second variation formula revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lê, Hông Vân; Vanžura, Jiří

    2017-03-01

    We revisit McLean's second variation formulas for calibrated submanifolds in exceptional geometries, and correct his formulas concerning associative submanifolds and Cayley submanifolds, using a unified treatment based on the (relative) calibration method and Harvey-Lawson's identities.

  18. Rabbits killing birds revisited.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jimin; Fan, Meng; Kuang, Yang

    2006-09-01

    We formulate and study a three-species population model consisting of an endemic prey (bird), an alien prey (rabbit) and an alien predator (cat). Our model overcomes several model construction problems in existing models. Moreover, our model generates richer, more reasonable and realistic dynamics. We explore the possible control strategies to save or restore the bird by controlling or eliminating the rabbit or the cat when the bird is endangered. We confirm the existence of the hyperpredation phenomenon, which is a big potential threat to most endemic prey. Specifically, we show that, in an endemic prey-alien prey-alien predator system, eradication of introduced predators such as the cat alone is not always the best solution to protect endemic insular prey since predator control may fail to protect the indigenous prey when the control of the introduced prey is not carried out simultaneously.

  19. PITCHING MECHANICS, REVISITED

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The overhead pitching motion is described as a coordinated sequence of body movements and muscular forces that have an ultimate goal of achieving high ball velocity and target accuracy. An understanding of the dynamic overhead throwing motion outlined in this clinical commentary can assist the clinician in addressing the unique injuries experienced by the pitcher. The potential biomechanical sources for injury have been studied utilizing videography and electromyographic techniques due to the rapid pace with which the pitching motion occurs. This clinical comentary will describe what is widely accepted as the six phases of the pitching motion and the relationship to the kinetic chain theory as well as outline the common mechanical faults that can lead to increased tissue stress and potential injury. Level of Evidence: 5 PMID:24175144

  20. Revisiting the conundrum of trehalose stabilization.

    PubMed

    Katyal, Nidhi; Deep, Shashank

    2014-12-28

    Protein aggregation and loss of protein's biological functionality are manifestations of protein instability. Cosolvents, in particular trehalose, are widely accepted antidotes against such destabilization. Although numerous theories have been promulgated in the literature with regard to its mechanism of stabilization, the present scenario is still elusive in view of the discrepancies existing in them. To this end, we have revisited the conundrum and attempted to rationalize the mechanism by conducting thorough investigation of the effect of trehalose on the native, partially unfolded and denatured states of protein "Lysozyme" by means of molecular dynamic (MD) simulations under different temperature and concentration regimes. Two-dimensional contour plots along with principal component analysis suggest that trehalose molecules offer on-pathway stabilization unaltering the principal direction of protein's motion, although it slows down protein dynamics so that the protein gets trapped in the homogeneous ensemble of conformations closer to the native state. Free energy landscape reveals higher population of native compared to intermediate and denatured states. Delphi results and calculation of the preferential interaction parameter demonstrate that this relative stabilization of the native state can be ascribed to be the consequence of favourable interactions of trehalose with side chains of certain loci on the protein surface encompassing polar flexible residues. Stability of protein results from the observed difference in binding affinity of trehalose for native and denatured states of protein. Our findings are at variance with the common conception of relative destabilization of the denatured state. Rather, we provide evidence for relative stabilization of the native state. This stabilization is due to interplay of protein-trehalose, water-trehalose, water-water, protein-water and trehalose-trehalose interactions.

  1. Revisiting the destiny compulsion.

    PubMed

    Potamianou, Anna

    2017-02-01

    This paper is an attempt to deal with some questions raised by the so-called 'compulsion of destiny' constellation. In presenting the standpoints of Freud and of psychoanalysts who after him were concerned with this problematic, the author takes the view that several aspects of the configuration merit further discussion. Accordingly, the dynamics of repetition compulsion, the complexity of the projective strategy, the coexistence of passive and omnipotent trends are considered. Concerning compulsive repetitions the dimension of drive intrication is underlined, thus moderating the understanding of this clinical entity as mainly related to death drive trends. Projection is understood as serving complex psychic demands. The coexistence of passive and omnipotent trends is envisaged, as manifested in phantasies of submission / participation of patients to a force that exceeds human limitations. For certain cases the consonance of somatic and psychic experiences is noted. Finally, elements from the material of two cases are presented which pertain to the problematic of the compulsion of destiny in which random events are submitted to heavy psychic necessities.

  2. DROMO propagator revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutxua, Hodei; Sanjurjo-Rivo, Manuel; Peláez, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    In the year 2000 an in-house orbital propagator called DROMO (Peláez et al. in Celest Mech Dyn Astron 97:131-150, 2007. doi: 10.1007/s10569-006-9056-3) was developed by the Space Dynamics Group of the Technical University of Madrid, based in a set of redundant variables including Euler-Rodrigues parameters. An original deduction of the DROMO propagator is carried out, underlining its close relation with the ideal frame concept introduced by Hansen (Abh der Math-Phys Cl der Kon Sachs Ges der Wissensch 5:41-218, 1857). Based on the very same concept, Deprit (J Res Natl Bur Stand Sect B Math Sci 79B(1-2):1-15, 1975) proposed a formulation for orbit propagation. In this paper, similarities and differences with the theory carried out by Deprit are analyzed. Simultaneously, some improvements are introduced in the formulation, that lead to a more synthetic and better performing propagator. Also, the long-term effect of the oblateness of the primary is studied in terms of DROMO variables, and new numerical results are presented to evaluate the performance of the method.

  3. Multiscale Fluctuation Analysis Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struzik, Zbigniew R.; Kiyono, Ken; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2007-07-01

    Ubiquitous non-Gaussianity of the probability density of (time-series) fluctuations in many real world phenomena has been known and modelled extensively in recent years. Similarly, the analysis of (multi)scaling properties of (fluctuations in) complex systems has become a standard way of addressing unknown complexity. Yet the combined analysis and modelling of multiscale behaviour of probability density — multiscale PDF analysis — has only recently been proposed for the analysis of time series arising in complex systems, such as the cardiac neuro-regulatory system, financial markets or hydrodynamic turbulence. This relatively new technique has helped significantly to expand the previously obtained insights into the phenomena addressed. In particular, it has helped to identify a novel class of scale invariant behaviour of the multiscale PDF in healthy heart rate regulation during daily activity and in a market system undergoing crash dynamics. This kind of invariance reflects invariance of the system under renormalisation and resembles behaviour at criticality of a system undergoing continuous phase transition — indeed in both phenomena, such phase transition behaviour has been revealed. While the precise mechanism underlying invariance of the PDF under system renormalisation of both systems discussed is not to date understood, there is an intimate link between the non-Gaussian PDF characteristics and the persistent invariant correlation structure emerging between fluctuations across scale and time.

  4. The bacterial nucleoid revisited.

    PubMed Central

    Robinow, C; Kellenberger, E

    1994-01-01

    This review compares the results of different methods of investigating the morphology of nucleoids of bacteria grown under conditions favoring short generation times. We consider the evidence from fixed and stained specimens, from phase-contrast and fluorescence microscopy of growing bacteria, and from electron microscopy of whole as well as thinly sectioned ones. It is concluded that the nucleoid of growing cells is in a dynamic state: part of the chromatin is "pulled out" of the bulk of the nucleoid in order to be transcribed. This activity is performed by excrescences which extend far into the cytoplasm so as to reach the maximum of available ribosomes. Different means of fixation provide markedly different views of the texture of the DNA-containing plasm of the bulk of the nucleoid. Conventional chemical fixatives stabilize the cytoplasm of bacteria but not their protein-low chromatin. Uranyl acetate does cross-link the latter well but only if the cytoplasm has first been fixed conventionally. In the interval between the two fixations, the DNA arranges itself in liquid-crystalline form, supposedly because of loss of supercoiling. In stark contrast, cryofixation preserves bacterial chromatin in a finely granular form, believed to reflect its native strongly negatively supercoiled state. In dinoflagellates the DNA of their permanently visible chromosomes (also low in histone-like protein) is natively present as a liquid crystal. The arrangement of chromatin in Epulocystis fishelsoni, one of the largest known prokaryotes, is briefly described. Images PMID:7521510

  5. The Phantom brane revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahni, Varun

    2016-07-01

    The Phantom brane is based on the normal branch of the DGP braneworld. It possesses a phantom-like equation of state at late times, but no big-rip future singularity. In this braneworld, the cosmological constant is dynamically screened at late times. Consequently it provides a good fit to SDSS DR11 measurements of H(z) at high redshifts. We obtain a closed system of equations for scalar perturbations on the brane. Perturbations of radiation, matter and the Weyl fluid are self-consistently evolved until the present epoch. We find that the late time growth of density perturbations on the brane proceeds at a faster rate than in ΛCDM. Additionally, the gravitational potentials φ, Ψ evolve differently on the brane than in ΛCDM, for which φ = Ψ. On the Brane, by contrast, the ratio φ/Ψ exceeds unity during the late matter dominated epoch (z ≤ 50). These features emerge as smoking gun tests of phantom brane cosmology and allow predictions of this scenario to be tested against observations of galaxy clustering and large scale structure. The phantom brane also displays a pole in its equation of state, which provides a key test of this dark energy model.

  6. The Cosmic Battery Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Contopoulos, Ioannis; Kazanas, Demosthenes; Christodoulos, Dimistris M.

    2007-01-01

    We reinvestigate the generation and accumulation of magnetic flux in optically thin accretion flows around active gravitating objects. The source of the magnetic field is the azimuthal electric current associated with the Poynting-Robertson drag on the electrons of the accreting plasma. This current generates magnetic field loops which open up because of the differential rotation of the flow. We show through simple numerical simulations that what regulates the generation and accumulation of magnetic flux near the center is the value of the plasma conductivity. Although the conductivity is usually considered to be effectively infinite for the fully ionized plasmas expected near the inner edge of accretion disks, the turbulence of those plasmas may actually render them much less conducting due to the presence of anomalous resistivity. We have discovered that if the resistivity is sufficiently high throughout the turbulent disk while it is suppressed interior to its inner edge, an interesting steady-state process is established: accretion carries and accumulates magnetic flux of one polarity inside the inner edge of the disk, whereas magnetic diffusion releases magnetic flux of the opposite polarity to large distances. In this scenario, magnetic flux of one polarity grows and accumulates at a steady rate in the region inside the inner edge and up to the point of equipartition when it becomes dynamically important. We argue that this inward growth and outward expulsion of oppositely-directed magnetic fields that we propose may account for the approx. 30 min cyclic variability observed in the galactic microquasar GRS1915+105.

  7. The climate continuum revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emile-Geay, J.; Wang, J.; Partin, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    A grand challenge of climate science is to quantify the extent of natural variability on adaptation-relevant timescales (10-100y). Since the instrumental record is too short to adequately estimate the spectra of climate measures, this information must be derived from paleoclimate proxies, which may harbor a many-to-one, non-linear (e.g. thresholded) and non-stationary relationship to climate. In this talk, I will touch upon the estimation of climate scaling behavior from climate proxies. Two case studies will be presented: an investigation of scaling behavior in a reconstruction of global surface temperature using state-of- the-art data [PAGES2K Consortium, in prep] and methods [Guillot et al., 2015]. Estimating the scaling exponent β in spectra derived from this reconstruction, we find that 0 < β < 1 in most regions, suggesting long-term memory. Overall, the reconstruction-based spectra are steeper than the ones based on an instrumental dataset [HadCRUT4.2, Morice et al., 2012], and those estimated from PMIP3/CMIP5 models, suggesting the climate system is more energetic at multidecadal to centennial timescales than can be inferred from the short instrumental record or from the models developed to reproduce it [Laepple and Huybers, 2014]. an investigation of scaling behavior in speleothems records of tropical hydroclimate. We will make use of recent advances in proxy system modeling [Dee et al., 2015] and investigate how various aspects of the speleothem system (karst dynamics, age uncertainties) may conspire to bias the estimate of scaling behavior from speleothem timeseries. The results suggest that ignoring such complications leads to erroneous inferences about hydroclimate scaling. References Dee, S. G., J. Emile-Geay, M. N. Evans, Allam, A., D. M. Thompson, and E. J. Steig (2015), J. Adv. Mod. Earth Sys., 07, doi:10.1002/2015MS000447. Guillot, D., B. Rajaratnam, and J. Emile-Geay (2015), Ann. Applied. Statist., pp. 324-352, doi:10.1214/14-AOAS794. Laepple, T

  8. Shuttle entry guidance revisited using nonlinear geometric methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mease, Kenneth D.; Kremer, Jean-Paul

    1994-11-01

    The entry guidance law for the space shuttle orbiter is revisited using nonlinear geometric methods. The shuttle guidance concept is to track a reference drag trajectory that has been designed to lead a specified range and velocity. It is shown that the approach taken in the original derivation of the shuttle entry guidance has much in common with the more recently developed feedback linearization method of differential geometric control. Using the feedback linearization method, however, an alternative, potentially superior, guidance law was formulated. Comparing the two guidance laws based performance domains in state space, taking into account the nonlinear dynamics, the alternative guidance law achieves the desired performance over larger domains in state space; the stability domain of the laws are similar. With larger operating domain for the shuttle or some other entry vehicle, the alternative guidance law should be considered.

  9. Revisiting the method of characteristics via a convex hull algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeFloch, Philippe G.; Mercier, Jean-Marc

    2015-10-01

    We revisit the method of characteristics for shock wave solutions to nonlinear hyperbolic problems and we propose a novel numerical algorithm-the convex hull algorithm (CHA)-which allows us to compute both entropy dissipative solutions (satisfying all entropy inequalities) and entropy conservative (or multi-valued) solutions. From the multi-valued solutions determined by the method of characteristics, our algorithm "extracts" the entropy dissipative solutions, even after the formation of shocks. It applies to both convex and non-convex flux/Hamiltonians. We demonstrate the relevance of the proposed method with a variety of numerical tests, including conservation laws in one or two spatial dimensions and problem arising in fluid dynamics.

  10. Recollision revisited: How far can we push the classical picture?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staudte, André

    2007-06-01

    The double ionization probability of nobel gases in strong laser fields at intermediate intensities exceeds the probability that can be expected on grounds of an independent electron picture by several orders of magnitude. Electron-electron correlation is the well-known origin for this dramatic effect. We have revisited this so called nonsequential double ionization in the simplest 2-electron system, the Helium atom, and, using very high resolution coincidence techniques, we observe a surprising structure in the correlated electron momentum distribution. The structure can be interpreted as a signature of the microscopic dynamics in the recollision process, taking the analogy to the classical (e,2e) processes one step further. This interpretation is supported by inspecting the solution of the 2-body 3-dimensional time-dependent Schr"odinger equation.

  11. Gravity current jump conditions, revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungarish, Marius; Hogg, Andrew J.

    2016-11-01

    Consider the flow of a high-Reynolds-number gravity current of density ρc in an ambient fluid of density ρa in a horizontal channel z ∈ [ 0 , H ] , with gravity in - z direction. The motion is often modeled by a two-layer formulation which displays jumps (shocks) in the height of the interface, in particular at the leading front of the dense layer. Various theoretical models have been advanced to predict the dimensionless speed of the jump, Fr = U /√{g' h } ; g' , h are reduced gravity and jump height. We revisit this problem and using the Navier-Stokes equations, integrated over a control volume embedding the jump, derive balances of mass and momentum fluxes. We focus on understanding the closures needed to complete this model and we show the vital need to understand the pressure head losses over the jump, which we show can be related to the vorticity fluxes at the boundaries of the control volume. Our formulation leads to two governing equations for three dimensionless quantities. Closure requires one further assumption, depending on which we demonstrate that previous models for gravity current fronts and internal bores can be recovered. This analysis yield new insights into existing results, and also provides constraints for potential new formulae.

  12. Revisiting intracellular calcium signaling semantics.

    PubMed

    Haiech, Jacques; Audran, Emilie; Fève, Marie; Ranjeva, Raoul; Kilhoffer, Marie-Claude

    2011-12-01

    Cells use intracellular free calcium concentration changes for signaling. Signal encoding occurs through both spatial and temporal modulation of the free calcium concentration. The encoded message is detected by an ensemble of intracellular sensors forming the family of calcium-binding proteins (CaBPs) which must faithfully translate the message using a new syntax that is recognized by the cell. The cell is home to a significant although limited number of genes coding for proteins involved in the signal encoding and decoding processes. In a cell, only a subset of this ensemble of genes is expressed, leading to a genetic regulation of the calcium signal pathways. Calmodulin (CaM), the most ubiquitous expressed intracellular calcium-binding protein, plays a major role in calcium signal translation. Similar to a hub, it is central to a large and finely tuned network, receiving information, integrating it and dispatching the cognate response. In this review, we examine the different steps starting with an external stimulus up to a cellular response, with special emphasis on CaM and the mechanism by which it decodes calcium signals and translates it into exquisitely coordinated cellular events. By this means, we will revisit the calcium signaling semantics, hoping that we will ease communication between scientists dealing with calcium signals in different biological systems and different domains.

  13. Revisiting Bohr's semiclassical quantum theory.

    PubMed

    Ben-Amotz, Dor

    2006-10-12

    Bohr's atomic theory is widely viewed as remarkable, both for its accuracy in predicting the observed optical transitions of one-electron atoms and for its failure to fully correspond with current electronic structure theory. What is not generally appreciated is that Bohr's original semiclassical conception differed significantly from the Bohr-Sommerfeld theory and offers an alternative semiclassical approximation scheme with remarkable attributes. More specifically, Bohr's original method did not impose action quantization constraints but rather obtained these as predictions by simply matching photon and classical orbital frequencies. In other words, the hydrogen atom was treated entirely classically and orbital quantized emerged directly from the Planck-Einstein photon quantization condition, E = h nu. Here, we revisit this early history of quantum theory and demonstrate the application of Bohr's original strategy to the three quintessential quantum systems: an electron in a box, an electron in a ring, and a dipolar harmonic oscillator. The usual energy-level spectra, and optical selection rules, emerge by solving an algebraic (quadratic) equation, rather than a Bohr-Sommerfeld integral (or Schroedinger) equation. However, the new predictions include a frozen (zero-kinetic-energy) state which in some (but not all) cases lies below the usual zero-point energy. In addition to raising provocative questions concerning the origin of quantum-chemical phenomena, the results may prove to be of pedagogical value in introducing students to quantum mechanics.

  14. The Future of Engineering Education--Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wankat, Phillip C.; Bullard, Lisa G.

    2016-01-01

    This paper revisits the landmark CEE series, "The Future of Engineering Education," published in 2000 (available free in the CEE archives on the internet) to examine the predictions made in the original paper as well as the tools and approaches documented. Most of the advice offered in the original series remains current. Despite new…

  15. Phenomenology of n - n ¯ oscillations revisited

    DOE PAGES

    Gardner, S.; Jafari, E.

    2015-05-22

    We revisit the phenomenology of n-n¯ oscillations in the presence of external magnetic fields, highlighting the role of spin. We show, contrary to long-held belief, that the n-n¯ transition rate need not be suppressed, opening new opportunities for its empirical study.

  16. Revisiting separation properties of convex fuzzy sets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Separation of convex sets by hyperplanes has been extensively studied on crisp sets. In a seminal paper separability and convexity are investigated, however there is a flaw on the definition of degree of separation. We revisited separation on convex fuzzy sets that have level-wise (crisp) disjointne...

  17. The Rotating Morse-Pekeris Oscillator Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuniga, Jose; Bastida, Adolfo; Requena, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    The Morse-Pekeris oscillator model for the calculation of the vibration-rotation energy levels of diatomic molecules is revisited. This model is based on the realization of a second-order exponential expansion of the centrifugal term about the minimum of the vibrational Morse oscillator and the subsequent analytical resolution of the resulting…

  18. Topological string theory revisited I: The stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Bei

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we reformulate topological string theory using supermanifolds and supermoduli spaces, following the approach worked out by Witten (Superstring perturbation theory revisited, arXiv:1209.5461). We intend to make the construction geometrical in nature, by using supergeometry techniques extensively. The goal is to establish the foundation of studying topological string amplitudes in terms of integration over appropriate supermoduli spaces.

  19. Revisiting the Regenerative Possibilities of Ortiz

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duques, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    The author of this article revisits Simon Ortiz's poem, "From Sand Creek," in which the latter can in so few words convey both the horrific tragedy of conquest and colonization, while at the same time find a space for possibility, a means for recovery that is never about forgetting but always occurs as a kind of recuperative remembering. Ortiz…

  20. Revisiting Basic Counseling Skills with Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Velsor, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    Counseling with children can be challenging for counselors whose training focused on adult clients. The purpose of this article is to offer information to counselors seeking to improve their skills with children, revisiting a topic discussed in an earlier Journal of Counseling & Development article by P. Erdman and R. Lampe (1996). Examples of…

  1. Revisiting the 1761 Transatlantic Tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baptista, Maria Ana; Wronna, Martin; Miranda, Jorge Miguel

    2016-04-01

    The tsunami catalogs of the Atlantic include two transatlantic tsunamis in the 18th century the well known 1st November 1755 and the 31st March 1761. The 31st March 1761 earthquake struck Portugal, Spain, and Morocco. The earthquake occurred around noontime in Lisbon alarming the inhabitants and throwing down ruins of the past 1st November 1755 earthquake. According to several sources, the earthquake was followed by a tsunami observed as far as Cornwall (United Kingdom), Cork (Ireland) and Barbados (Caribbean). The analysis of macroseismic information and its compatibility with tsunami travel time information led to a source area close to the Ampere Seamount with an estimated epicenter circa 34.5°N 13°W. The estimated magnitude of the earthquake was 8.5. In this study, we revisit the tsunami observations, and we include a report from Cadiz not used before. We use the results of the compilation of the multi-beam bathymetric data, that covers the area between 34°N - 38°N and 12.5°W - 5.5°W and use the recent tectonic map published for the Southwest Iberian Margin to select among possible source scenarios. Finally, we use a non-linear shallow water model that includes the discretization and explicit leap-frog finite difference scheme to solve the shallow water equations in the spherical or Cartesian coordinate to compute tsunami waveforms and tsunami inundation and check the results against the historical descriptions to infer the source of the event. This study received funding from project ASTARTE- Assessment Strategy and Risk Reduction for Tsunamis in Europe a collaborative project Grant 603839, FP7-ENV2013 6.4-3

  2. The flow along an external corner revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denier, Jim; Jewell, Nathaniel

    2013-11-01

    We revisit the problem of the flow of an almost inviscid fluid along an external corner made from the junction of two quarter infinite plates joined at an angle 0 < α < π / 2 . The structure of the boundary layer which develops along the corner is explored using a computational approach based upon a spectral element discretisation of the steady two-dimensional boundary-layer equations. We pay particular attention to the case when the angle α is small, thus approximating the semi-infinte quarter plate problem considered by Stewartson (1961) and recently revisited by Duck & Hewitt (2012). Our results, which demonstrate a thickening of the boundary-layer near the sharp corner, will be discussed in the context of the asymptotic theory developed in the aforementioned papers.

  3. Revisiting Cementoblastoma with a Rare Case Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Narasimhan, Malathi; Ramalingam, Suganya; Anandan, Soumya; Ranganathan, Subhashini

    2017-01-01

    Cementoblastoma is a rare benign odontogenic neoplasm which is characterized by the proliferation of cellular cementum. Diagnosis of cementoblastoma is challenging because of its protracted clinical, radiographic features, and bland histological appearance; most often cementoblastoma is often confused with other cementum and bone originated lesions. The aim of this article is to overview/revisit, approach the diagnosis of cementoblastoma, and also present a unique radiographic appearance of a cementoblastoma lesion associated with an impacted tooth. PMID:28337352

  4. Nuclear fragmentation and charge-exchange reactions induced by pions in the Δ -resonance region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhao-Qing

    2016-11-01

    The dynamics of the nuclear fragmentations and the charge exchange reactions in pion-nucleus collisions near the Δ (1232) resonance energies has been investigated within the Lanzhou quantum molecular dynamics transport model. An isospin-, momentum-, and density-dependent pion-nucleon potential is implemented in the model, which influences the pion dynamics, in particular the kinetic energy spectra, but weakly impacts the fragmentation mechanism. The absorption process in pion-nucleon collisions to form the Δ (1232) resonance dominates the heating mechanism of the target nucleus. The excitation energy transferred to the target nucleus increases with the pion kinetic energy and is similar for both π-- and π+-induced reactions. The magnitude of fragmentation of the target nucleus weakly depends on the pion energy. The isospin ratio in the pion double-charge exchange is influenced by the isospin ingredient of target nucleus.

  5. Revisiting the observed surface climate response to large volcanic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunderlich, Fabian; Mitchell, Daniel M.

    2017-01-01

    In light of the range in presently available observational, reanalysis and model data, we revisit the surface climate response to large tropical volcanic eruptions from the end of the 19th century until present. We focus on the dynamically driven response of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and the radiative-driven tropical temperature response. Using 10 different reanalysis products and the Hadley Centre Sea Level Pressure observational dataset (HadSLP2) we confirm a positive tendency in the phase of the NAO during boreal winters following large volcanic eruptions, although we conclude that it is not as clear cut as the current literature suggests. While different reanalyses agree well on the sign of the surface volcanic NAO response for individual volcanoes, the spread in the response is often large (˜ 1/2 standard deviation). This inter-reanalysis spread is actually larger for the more recent volcanic eruptions, and in one case does not encompass observations (El Chichón). These are all in the satellite era and therefore assimilate more atmospheric data that may lead to a more complex interaction for the surface response. The phase of the NAO leads to a dynamically driven warm anomaly over northern Europe in winter, which is present in all datasets considered. The general cooling of the surface temperature due to reduced incoming shortwave radiation is therefore disturbed by dynamical impacts. In the tropics, where less dynamically driven influences are present, we confirm a predominant cooling after most but not all eruptions. All datasets agree well on the strength of the tropical response, with the observed and reanalysis response being statistically significant but the modelled response not being significant due to the high variability across models.

  6. Sloan Digital Sky Survey Photometric Calibration Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Marriner, John; /Fermilab

    2012-06-29

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey calibration is revisited to obtain the most accurate photometric calibration. A small but significant error is found in the flat-fielding of the Photometric telescope used for calibration. Two SDSS star catalogs are compared and the average difference in magnitude as a function of right ascension and declination exhibits small systematic errors in relative calibration. The photometric transformation from the SDSS Photometric Telescope to the 2.5 m telescope is recomputed and compared to synthetic magnitudes computed from measured filter bandpasses.

  7. Revisiting the texture zero neutrino mass matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Madan; Ahuja, Gulsheen; Gupta, Manmohan

    2016-12-01

    In the light of refined and large measurements of the reactor mixing angle θ, we have revisited the texture three- and two-zero neutrino mass matrices in the flavor basis. For Majorana neutrinos, it has been explicitly shown that all the texture three-zero mass matrices remain ruled out. Further, for both normal and inverted mass ordering, for the texture two-zero neutrino mass matrices one finds interesting constraints on the Dirac-like CP-violating phase δ and Majorana phases ρ and σ.

  8. Liquid drop spreading on surfaces: Initial regimes revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Surjyasish; Mitra, Sushanta

    2016-11-01

    Liquid drop spreading on a given surface is fundamental towards technological processes like coating and paints, inkjet printing, surface characterization, etc. Though, the underlying dynamics is well understood, we have revisited this problem through experiments conducted on surfaces kept in air as well as immersed in water. It was found that the two key parameters that dictated the spreading process were drop-surrounding medium viscosity ratio and the characteristic viscous length scale. It was observed that irrespective of the drop liquid and surrounding liquid medium (air and water in this case), spreading always began in a regime dominated by drop viscosity, where the spreading radius scales as r t . However, the prefactor of the scaling observed was different for air (of the order of unity) and under-water (much less than unity). Following this initial regime, a second intermediate regime dominated by drop inertia (typically found for water drops spreading in air) was observed only when the characteristic viscous length scale favored such a transition. In this regime as well, a non-universal prefactor was noted for the scaling law, i.e., r t1/2. In all cases considered, the spreading process terminated in the Tanner's regime where the spreading radius scaled as r t1/10.

  9. The flux qubit revisited to enhance coherence and reproducibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Fei; Gustavsson, Simon; Kamal, Archana; Birenbaum, Jeffrey; Sears, Adam P.; Hover, David; Gudmundsen, Ted J.; Rosenberg, Danna; Samach, Gabriel; Weber, S.; Yoder, Jonilyn L.; Orlando, Terry P.; Clarke, John; Kerman, Andrew J.; Oliver, William D.

    2016-11-01

    The scalable application of quantum information science will stand on reproducible and controllable high-coherence quantum bits (qubits). Here, we revisit the design and fabrication of the superconducting flux qubit, achieving a planar device with broad-frequency tunability, strong anharmonicity, high reproducibility and relaxation times in excess of 40 μs at its flux-insensitive point. Qubit relaxation times T1 across 22 qubits are consistently matched with a single model involving resonator loss, ohmic charge noise and 1/f-flux noise, a noise source previously considered primarily in the context of dephasing. We furthermore demonstrate that qubit dephasing at the flux-insensitive point is dominated by residual thermal-photons in the readout resonator. The resulting photon shot noise is mitigated using a dynamical decoupling protocol, resulting in T2~85 μs, approximately the 2T1 limit. In addition to realizing an improved flux qubit, our results uniquely identify photon shot noise as limiting T2 in contemporary qubits based on transverse qubit-resonator interaction.

  10. The flux qubit revisited to enhance coherence and reproducibility

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Fei; Gustavsson, Simon; Kamal, Archana; Birenbaum, Jeffrey; Sears, Adam P; Hover, David; Gudmundsen, Ted J.; Rosenberg, Danna; Samach, Gabriel; Weber, S; Yoder, Jonilyn L.; Orlando, Terry P.; Clarke, John; Kerman, Andrew J.; Oliver, William D.

    2016-01-01

    The scalable application of quantum information science will stand on reproducible and controllable high-coherence quantum bits (qubits). Here, we revisit the design and fabrication of the superconducting flux qubit, achieving a planar device with broad-frequency tunability, strong anharmonicity, high reproducibility and relaxation times in excess of 40 μs at its flux-insensitive point. Qubit relaxation times T1 across 22 qubits are consistently matched with a single model involving resonator loss, ohmic charge noise and 1/f-flux noise, a noise source previously considered primarily in the context of dephasing. We furthermore demonstrate that qubit dephasing at the flux-insensitive point is dominated by residual thermal-photons in the readout resonator. The resulting photon shot noise is mitigated using a dynamical decoupling protocol, resulting in T2≈85 μs, approximately the 2T1 limit. In addition to realizing an improved flux qubit, our results uniquely identify photon shot noise as limiting T2 in contemporary qubits based on transverse qubit–resonator interaction. PMID:27808092

  11. Revisiting the Master-Signifier, or, Mandela and Repression.

    PubMed

    Hook, Derek; Vanheule, Stijn

    2015-01-01

    The concept of the master-signifier has been subject to a variety of applications in Lacanian forms of political discourse theory and ideology critique. While there is much to be commended in literature of this sort, it often neglects salient issues pertaining to the role of master signifiers in the clinical domain of (individual) psychical economy. The popularity of the concept of the master (or "empty") signifier in political discourse analysis has thus proved a double-edged sword. On the one hand it demonstrates how crucial psychical processes are performed via the operations of the signifier, extending thus the Lacanian thesis that identification is the outcome of linguistic and symbolic as opposed to merely psychological processes. On the other, the use of the master signifier concept within the political realm to track discursive formations tends to distance the term from the dynamics of the unconscious and operation of repression. Accordingly, this paper revisits the master signifier concept, and does so within the socio-political domain, yet while paying particular attention to the functioning of unconscious processes of fantasy and repression. More specifically, it investigates how Nelson Mandela operates as a master signifier in contemporary South Africa, as a vital means of knitting together diverse elements of post-apartheid society, enabling the fantasy of the post-apartheid nation, and holding at bay a whole series of repressed and negated undercurrents.

  12. Revisiting the Master-Signifier, or, Mandela and Repression

    PubMed Central

    Hook, Derek; Vanheule, Stijn

    2016-01-01

    The concept of the master-signifier has been subject to a variety of applications in Lacanian forms of political discourse theory and ideology critique. While there is much to be commended in literature of this sort, it often neglects salient issues pertaining to the role of master signifiers in the clinical domain of (individual) psychical economy. The popularity of the concept of the master (or “empty”) signifier in political discourse analysis has thus proved a double-edged sword. On the one hand it demonstrates how crucial psychical processes are performed via the operations of the signifier, extending thus the Lacanian thesis that identification is the outcome of linguistic and symbolic as opposed to merely psychological processes. On the other, the use of the master signifier concept within the political realm to track discursive formations tends to distance the term from the dynamics of the unconscious and operation of repression. Accordingly, this paper revisits the master signifier concept, and does so within the socio-political domain, yet while paying particular attention to the functioning of unconscious processes of fantasy and repression. More specifically, it investigates how Nelson Mandela operates as a master signifier in contemporary South Africa, as a vital means of knitting together diverse elements of post-apartheid society, enabling the fantasy of the post-apartheid nation, and holding at bay a whole series of repressed and negated undercurrents. PMID:26834664

  13. Hershfield factor revisited: Correcting annual maximum precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papalexiou, Simon Michael; Dialynas, Yannis G.; Grimaldi, Salvatore

    2016-11-01

    The Hershfield factor (H) is a multiplier aiming to correct the error between fixed time interval maxima (F-maxima) and sliding maxima (S-maxima) as a direct consequence of temporal discretization of hydrometeorological time series. Rainfall is typically recorded over discrete intervals, e.g., over fixed 24-h intervals, and the historical series express average values over these intervals. This temporal discretization introduces an important systematic error on rainfall characteristics such as the annual maxima. Research to date suggests that our understanding of this error across different time scales is limited. In this study we revisit the probabilistic nature of the H-factor in an unprecedentedly large analysis comprising thousands of up-to-date hourly records across the US. We study the probabilistic behavior of F- and S-maxima of the historical records. We quantify the discretization error of the rainfall maxima and its statistical properties at different time scales. We revisit the classical definitions of the H-factor and we investigate the exact probability distribution of H-factor. We introduce a bounded exponential distribution with an atom at one, which closely depicts the empirical distribution of the H-factor. Notable is the result that the proposed mixed-type distribution is invariant across a range of time scales. This work clarifies the probabilistic nature of the rainfall maxima correction. The results may have wide use across a range of hydrological applications.

  14. The Mathematics of Dispatchability, Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Dispatchability is an important property for the efficient execution of temporal plans where the temporal constraints are represented as a Simple Temporal Network (STN). It has been shown that every STN may be reformulated as a dispatchable STN, and dispatchability ensures that the temporal constraints need only be satisfied locally during execution. Recently, it has also been shown that Simple Temporal Networks with Uncertainty, augmented with wait edges, are Dynamically Controllable provided every projection is dispatchable. Thus, dispatchability has considerable theoretical as well as practical significance. One thing that hampers further work in this area is the underdeveloped theory. Moreover, the existing foundation is inadequate in certain respects. In this paper, we develop a new mathematical theory of dispatchability and its relationship to execution. We also provide several characterizations of dispatchability, including characterizations in terms of the structural properties of the STN graph. This facilitates the potential application of the theory to other areas.

  15. The Mathematics of Dispatchability Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Dispatchability is an important property for the efficient execution of temporal plans where the temporal constraints are represented as a Simple Temporal Network (STN). It has been shown that every STN may be reformulated as a dispatchable STN, and dispatchability ensures that the temporal constraints need only be satisfied locally during execution. Recently it has also been shown that Simple Temporal Networks with Uncertainty, augmented with wait edges, are Dynamically Controllable provided every projection is dispatchable. Thus, the dispatchability property has both theoretical and practical interest. One thing that hampers further work in this area is the underdeveloped theory. The existing definitions are expressed in terms of algorithms, and are less suitable for mathematical proofs. In this paper, we develop a new formal theory of dispatchability in terms of execution sequences. We exploit this to prove a characterization of dispatchability involving the structural properties of the STN graph. This facilitates the potential application of the theory to uncertainty reasoning.

  16. Astrosociological Implications of Astrobiology (Revisited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pass, Jim

    2010-01-01

    Supporters of astrobiology continue to organize the field around formalized associations and organizations under the guise of the so-called ``hard'' sciences (e.g., biology and the related physical/natural sciences). The so-called ``soft'' sciences-including sociology and the other social sciences, the behavioral sciences, and the humanities-remain largely separated from this dynamically growing field. However, as argued in this paper, space exploration involving the search for extraterrestrial life should be viewed as consisting of two interrelated parts (i.e., two sides of the same coin): astrobiology and astrosociology. Together, these two fields broadly combine the two major branches of science as they relate to the relationship between human life and alien life, as appropriate. Moreover, with a formalized system of collaboration, these two complimentary fields would also focus on the implications of their research to human beings as well as their cultures and social structures. By placing the astrosociological implications of astrobiology at a high enough priority, scientists interested in the search for alien life can augment their focus to include the social, cultural, and behavioral implications that were always associated with their work (yet previously overlooked or understated, and too often misunderstood). Recognition of the astrosociological implications expands our perception about alien life by creating a new emphasis on their ramifications to human life on Earth.

  17. Lower hybrid wavepacket stochasticity revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, V.; Krlín, L.; Pánek, R.; Preinhaelter, J.; Seidl, J.; Urban, J.

    2014-02-12

    Analysis is presented in support of the explanation in Ref. [1] for the observation of relativistic electrons during Lower Hybrid (LH) operation in EC pre-heated plasma at the WEGA stellarator [1,2]. LH power from the WEGA TE11 circular waveguide, 9 cm diameter, un-phased, 2.45 GHz antenna, is radiated into a B≅0.5 T, Ðœ„n{sub e}≅5×10{sup 17} 1/m{sup 3} plasma at T{sub e}≅10 eV bulk temperature with an EC generated 50 keV component [1]. The fast electrons cycle around flux or drift surfaces with few collisions, sufficient for randomizing phases but insufficient for slowing fast electrons down, and thus repeatedly interact with the rf field close to the antenna mouth, gaining energy in the process. Our antenna calculations reveal a standing electric field pattern at the antenna mouth, with which we formulate the electron dynamics via a relativistic Hamiltonian. A simple approximation of the equations of motion leads to a relativistic generalization of the area-preserving Fermi-Ulam (F-U) map [3], allowing phase-space global stochasticity analysis. At typical WEGA plasma and antenna conditions, the F-U map predicts an LH driven current of about 230 A, at about 225 W of dissipated power, in good agreement with the measurements and analysis reported in [1].

  18. NetDyn Revisited: A Replicated Study of Network Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-10-01

    experiment were in one location (UC-Berkeley).Our experiments di er from these studies in that we wanted to observe user level performance ofend -to-end...and B. Jain. Experimental assessment ofend -to-end behavior on Internet. Technical Report CS-TR-2909, University of Maryland,Computer Science Department

  19. Revisiting Lepton Flavor Universality in B Decays.

    PubMed

    Feruglio, Ferruccio; Paradisi, Paride; Pattori, Andrea

    2017-01-06

    Lepton flavor universality (LFU) in B decays is revisited by considering a class of semileptonic operators defined at a scale Λ above the electroweak scale v. The importance of quantum effects, so far neglected in the literature, is emphasized. We construct the low-energy effective Lagrangian taking into account the running effects from Λ down to v through the one-loop renormalization group equations (RGEs) in the limit of exact electroweak symmetry and QED RGEs from v down to the 1 GeV scale. The most important quantum effects turn out to be the modification of the leptonic couplings of the vector boson Z and the generation of a purely leptonic effective Lagrangian. Large LFU breaking effects in Z and τ decays and visible lepton flavor violating effects in the processes τ→μℓℓ, τ→μρ, τ→μπ, and τ→μη^{(')} are induced.

  20. Revisiting instanton corrections to the Konishi multiplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alday, Luis F.; Korchemsky, Gregory P.

    2016-12-01

    We revisit the calculation of instanton effects in correlation functions in N=4 SYM involving the Konishi operator and operators of twist two. Previous studies revealed that the scaling dimensions and the OPE coefficients of these operators do not receive instanton corrections in the semiclassical approximation. We go beyond this approximation and demonstrate that, while operators belonging to the same N=4 supermultiplet ought to have the same conformal data, the evaluation of quantum instanton corrections for one operator can be mapped into a semiclassical computation for another operator in the same supermultiplet. This observation allows us to compute explicitly the leading instanton correction to the scaling dimension of operators in the Konishi supermultiplet as well as to their structure constants in the OPE of two half-BPS scalar operators. We then use these results, together with crossing symmetry, to determine instanton corrections to scaling dimensions of twist-four operators with large spin.

  1. Revisiting Lepton Flavor Universality in B Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feruglio, Ferruccio; Paradisi, Paride; Pattori, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Lepton flavor universality (LFU) in B decays is revisited by considering a class of semileptonic operators defined at a scale Λ above the electroweak scale v . The importance of quantum effects, so far neglected in the literature, is emphasized. We construct the low-energy effective Lagrangian taking into account the running effects from Λ down to v through the one-loop renormalization group equations (RGEs) in the limit of exact electroweak symmetry and QED RGEs from v down to the 1 GeV scale. The most important quantum effects turn out to be the modification of the leptonic couplings of the vector boson Z and the generation of a purely leptonic effective Lagrangian. Large LFU breaking effects in Z and τ decays and visible lepton flavor violating effects in the processes τ →μ ℓℓ, τ →μ ρ , τ →μ π , and τ →μ η(') are induced.

  2. Re-visiting the electrophysiology of language.

    PubMed

    Obleser, Jonas

    2015-09-01

    This editorial accompanies a special issue of Brain and Language re-visiting old themes and new leads in the electrophysiology of language. The event-related potential (ERP) as a series of characteristic deflections ("components") over time and their distribution on the scalp has been exploited by speech and language researchers over decades to find support for diverse psycholinguistic models. Fortunately, methodological and statistical advances have allowed human neuroscience to move beyond some of the limitations imposed when looking at the ERP only. Most importantly, we currently witness a refined and refreshed look at "event-related" (in the literal sense) brain activity that relates itself more closely to the actual neurobiology of speech and language processes. It is this imminent change in handling and interpreting electrophysiological data of speech and language experiments that this special issue intends to capture.

  3. Revisiting gravitino dark matter in thermal leptogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibe, Masahiro; Suzuki, Motoo; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we revisit the gravitino dark matter scenario in the presence of the bilinear R-parity violating interaction. In particular, we discuss a consistency with the thermal leptogenesis. For a high reheating temperature required for the thermal leptogenesis, the gravitino dark matter tends to be overproduced, which puts a severe upper limit on the gluino mass. As we will show, a large portion of parameter space of the gravitino dark matter scenario has been excluded by combining the constraints from the gravitino abundance and the null results of the searches for the superparticles at the LHC experiments. In particular, the models with the stau (and other charged slepton) NLSP has been almost excluded by the searches for the long-lived charged particles at the LHC unless the required reheating temperature is somewhat lowered by assuming, for example, a degenerated right-handed neutrino mass spectrum.

  4. Olfactory pathogenesis of idiopathic Parkinson disease revisited.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Alicja; Bagic, Anto

    2008-06-15

    Idiopathic Parkinson disease (PD) is traditionally considered a movement disorder with hallmark lesions located in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). However, recent histopathological studies of some PD cases suggest the possibility of a multisystem disorder which progresses in a predictable sequence as described in Braak's staging criteria. The disease process starts in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (dmX) and anterior olfactory nucleus and bulb, and from there, spreads through the brainstem nuclei to ultimately reach the SNpc, which then presents as symptomatic PD. In this article, we would like to revisit the olfactory pathogenesis of PD based on Braak's staging system and review anatomical pathways supporting such a possibility. We also suggest some biomarkers for early stages of PD. Additionally, we present and discuss the possibility that a prion-like process underlies the neurodegenerative changes in PD.

  5. Seasonal dating of Sappho's 'Midnight Poem' revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuntz, Manfred; Gurdemir, Levent; George, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Sappho was a Greek lyric poet who composed a significant array of pristine poetry. Although much of it has been lost, her reputation has endured thanks to numerous surviving fragments. One of her contributions includes the so-called 'Midnight Poem', which contains a line about the Pleiades, setting sometime before midnight, and supposedly observed from the island of Lesbos. This poem also refers to the setting of the Moon. Sappho's Midnight Poem thus represents a prime example of where ancient poetry and astronomy merge, and it also offers the possibility of seasonal dating. Previously, Herschberg and Mebius (1990) estimated that the poem was composed in late winter/early spring, a time frame that is not unusual for lyrics of an amorous nature. The aim of our paper is to revisit this earlier finding by using modern-day software. Our study confirms Herschberg and Mebius' result, but also conveys further information.

  6. Revisiting the R νMDM models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yi; Schmidt, Michael A.

    2016-05-01

    Combining neutrino mass generation and a dark matter candidate in a unified model has always been intriguing. We revisit the class of R νMDM models, which incorporate minimal dark matter in radiative neutrino mass models based on the one-loop ultraviolet completions of the Weinberg operator. The possibility of an exact accidental Z 2 is completely ruled out in this scenario. We study the phenomenology of one of the models with an approximate Z 2 symmetry. In addition to the Standard Model particles, it contains two real scalar quintuplets, one vector-like quadruplet fermion and a fermionic quintuplet. The neutral component of the fermionic quintuplet serves as a good dark matter candidate which can be tested by the future direct and indirect detection experiments. The constraints from flavor physics and electroweak-scale naturalness are also discussed.

  7. Soft two-pion-exchange nucleon-nucleon potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Rijken, Th.A. )

    1991-06-01

    Two-pion-exchange nucleon-nucleon potentials are derived for the pseudo-vector pion-nucleon interaction, assuming strong dynamical pair-suppression. At the pion-nucleon vertices the authors include Gaussian form factors, which are incorporated into the relativistic two-body framework by using a dispersion representation for the one-pion-exchange amplitude. The Fourier transformations are performed using a factorization technique for the energy denominators. This leads to analytic expressions for the TPE-potentials containing at most one-dimensional integrals. The TPE-potentials are calculated up to orders {line integral}{sup 4} and (m/M){line integral}{sup 4}. The terms of order {line integral}{sup 4} come from the adiabatic contributions of the parallel and crossed three-dimensional momentum-space TPE-diagrams, and from the non-adiabatic contributions of the OPE-iteration. The (m/M)-corrections are due to the 1/M-terms in the non-adiabatic expansion of the nucleon energies in the intermediate states, and the 1/M-terms in the pion-nucleon vertices. The latter are typical for the PV-coupling and would be absent for the PS-coupling. The Gaussian form factors lead to soft TPE-potentials. These potentials can readily be exploited in NN-calculations in combination with, e.g., the Nijmegen soft-core OBE-model, and in nuclear (matter) calculations.

  8. Revisiting the classics: considering nonconsumptive effects in textbook examples of predator-prey interactions.

    PubMed

    Peckarsky, Barbara L; Abrams, Peter A; Bolnick, Daniel I; Dill, Lawrence M; Grabowski, Jonathan H; Luttbeg, Barney; Orrock, John L; Peacor, Scott D; Preisser, Evan L; Schmitz, Oswald J; Trussell, Geoffrey C

    2008-09-01

    Predator effects on prey dynamics are conventionally studied by measuring changes in prey abundance attributed to consumption by predators. We revisit four classic examples of predator-prey systems often cited in textbooks and incorporate subsequent studies of nonconsumptive effects of predators (NCE), defined as changes in prey traits (e.g., behavior, growth, development) measured on an ecological time scale. Our review revealed that NCE were integral to explaining lynx-hare population dynamics in boreal forests, cascading effects of top predators in Wisconsin lakes, and cascading effects of killer whales and sea otters on kelp forests in nearshore marine habitats. The relative roles of consumption and NCE of wolves on moose and consequent indirect effects on plant communities of Isle Royale depended on climate oscillations. Nonconsumptive effects have not been explicitly tested to explain the link between planktonic alewives and the size structure of the zooplankton, nor have they been invoked to attribute keystone predator status in intertidal communities or elsewhere. We argue that both consumption and intimidation contribute to the total effects of keystone predators, and that characteristics of keystone consumers may differ from those of predators having predominantly NCE. Nonconsumptive effects are often considered as an afterthought to explain observations inconsistent with consumption-based theory. Consequently, NCE with the same sign as consumptive effects may be overlooked, even though they can affect the magnitude, rate, or scale of a prey response to predation and can have important management or conservation implications. Nonconsumptive effects may underlie other classic paradigms in ecology, such as delayed density dependence and predator-mediated prey coexistence. Revisiting classic studies enriches our understanding of predator-prey dynamics and provides compelling rationale for ramping up efforts to consider how NCE affect traditional predator

  9. The "frontal syndrome" revisited: lessons from electrostimulation mapping studies.

    PubMed

    Duffau, Hugues

    2012-01-01

    For a long time, in a localizationist view of brain functioning, a combination of symptoms called "frontal syndrome" has been interpreted as the direct result of damages involving the frontal lobe(s). The goal of this review is to challenge this view, that is, to move to a hodotopical approach to lesion mapping, on the basis of new insights provided by intraoperative electrostimulation mapping investigations in patients who underwent awake surgery for cerebral tumors. These original data reported in the last decade break with the traditional dogma of a modular and fixed organization of the central nervous system, by switching to the concepts of cerebral connectivity and plasticity - i.e., a brain organization based on dynamic interrelationships between parallel distributed networks. According to this revisited model, "frontal symptoms" can be generated by tumor or electrostimulation not only of the frontal lobes, but also of cortical and subcortical (white matter pathways/deep gray nuclei) structures outside the frontal lobes: especially, stimulation of the superior longitudinal fascicle may elicit speech production disorders, syntactic disturbances, involuntary language switching or phonemic paraphasia (arcuate fascicle), stimulation of the inferior fronto-occipital fascicle can generate semantic paraphasia or deficit of cross-modal judgment, stimulation of the subcallosal fasciculus may elicit transcortical motor aphasia, while stimulation of the striatum induces preservations. On the other hand, it is also possible to perform extensive right or left frontal lobectomy in patients who continue to have a normal familial, social and professional life, without "frontal syndrome". Therefore, this provocative approach may open the door to a renewal in the modeling of brain processing as well as in its clinical applications, especially in the fields of cerebral surgery and functional rehabilitation. These findings illustrate well the need to reinforce links between

  10. 'The Ethiopian famine' revisited: band aid and the antipolitics of celebrity humanitarian action.

    PubMed

    Müller, Tanja R

    2013-01-01

    In many ways the Ethiopian famine of 1983-85 has served as a watershed with respect to humanitarian action. One of its lasting legacies has been the emergence of Band Aid and the subsequent increase in celebrity humanitarianism. A revisiting of the events of 1983-85 occurred in 2010 during a dispute in which it was alleged that a portion of the donations of Band Aid were spent on arms purchases. This paper takes this controversy as its starting point. It goes on to use the theoretical reflections of Giorgio Agamben to consider the dynamics that unfolded during the Ethiopian famine of 1983-85 and to analyse the underlying conceptualisation behind the emergence of Band Aid-type celebrity humanitarianism. The paper concludes with some wider thoughts on how the in essence antipolitical agenda of celebrity humanitarian action is transported into the everyday understanding of 'African disaster', resulting ultimately in the perpetuation of hegemonic control by the global North.

  11. Predator-prey interactions, resource depression and patch revisitation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erwin, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    Generalist predators may be confronted by different types of prey in different patches: sedentary and conspicuous, cryptic (with or without refugia), conspicuous and nonsocial, or conspicuous and social. I argue that, where encounter rates with prey are of most importance, patch revisitation should be a profitable tactic where prey have short 'recovery' times (conspicuous, nonsocial prey), or where anti-predator response (e.g. shoaling) may increase conspicuousness. Predictions are made for how temporal changes in prey encounter rates should affect revisit schedules and feeding rates for the 4 different prey types.

  12. Revisiting the phase diagram of hard ellipsoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odriozola, Gerardo

    2012-04-01

    In this work, the well-known Frenkel-Mulder phase diagram of hard ellipsoids of revolution [D. Frenkel and B. M. Mulder, Mol. Phys. 55, 1171 (1985), 10.1080/00268978500101971] is revisited by means of replica exchange Monte Carlo simulations. The method provides good sampling of dense systems and so, solid phases can be accessed without the need of imposing a given structure. At high densities, we found plastic solids and fcc-like crystals for semi-spherical ellipsoids (prolates and oblates), and SM2 structures [P. Pfleiderer and T. Schilling, Phys. Rev. E 75, 020402 (2007)] for x : 1-prolates and 1 : x-oblates with x ≥ 3. The revised fluid-crystal and isotropic-nematic transitions reasonably agree with those presented in the Frenkel-Mulder diagram. An interesting result is that, for small system sizes (100 particles), we obtained 2:1- and 1.5:1-prolate equations of state without transitions, while some order is developed at large densities. Furthermore, the symmetric oblate cases are also reluctant to form ordered phases.

  13. Targeting Cancer Metabolism - Revisiting the Warburg Effects

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Quangdon; Lee, Hyunji; Park, Jisoo; Kim, Seon-Hwan; Park, Jongsun

    2016-01-01

    After more than half of century since the Warburg effect was described, this atypical metabolism has been standing true for almost every type of cancer, exhibiting higher glycolysis and lactate metabolism and defective mitochondrial ATP production. This phenomenon had attracted many scientists to the problem of elucidating the mechanism of, and reason for, this effect. Several models based on oncogenic studies have been proposed, such as the accumulation of mitochondrial gene mutations, the switch from oxidative phosphorylation respiration to glycolysis, the enhancement of lactate metabolism, and the alteration of glycolytic genes. Whether the Warburg phenomenon is the consequence of genetic dysregulation in cancer or the cause of cancer remains unknown. Moreover, the exact reasons and physiological values of this peculiar metabolism in cancer remain unclear. Although there are some pharmacological compounds, such as 2-deoxy-D-glucose, dichloroacetic acid, and 3-bromopyruvate, therapeutic strategies, including diet, have been developed based on targeting the Warburg effect. In this review, we will revisit the Warburg effect to determine how much scientists currently understand about this phenomenon and how we can treat the cancer based on targeting metabolism. PMID:27437085

  14. Revisiting the argument from fetal potential.

    PubMed

    Manninen, Bertha Alvarez

    2007-05-17

    One of the most famous, and most derided, arguments against the morality of abortion is the argument from potential, which maintains that the fetus' potential to become a person and enjoy the valuable life common to persons, entails that its destruction is prima facie morally impermissible. In this paper, I will revisit and offer a defense of the argument from potential.First, I will criticize the classical arguments proffered against the importance of fetal potential, specifically the arguments put forth by philosophers Peter Singer and David Boonin, by carefully unpacking the claims made in these arguments and illustrating why they are flawed.Secondly, I will maintain that fetal potential is morally relevant when it comes to the morality of abortion, but that it must be accorded a proper place in the argument. This proper place, however, cannot be found until we first answer a very important and complex question: we must first address the issue of personal identity, and when the fetus becomes the type of being who is relevantly identical to a future person. I will illustrate why the question of fetal potential can only be meaningfully addressed after we have first answered the question of personal identity and how it relates to the human fetus.

  15. Carbon emission from global hydroelectric reservoirs revisited.

    PubMed

    Li, Siyue; Zhang, Quanfa

    2014-12-01

    Substantial greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from hydropower reservoirs have been of great concerns recently, yet the significant carbon emitters of drawdown area and reservoir downstream (including spillways and turbines as well as river reaches below dams) have not been included in global carbon budget. Here, we revisit GHG emission from hydropower reservoirs by considering reservoir surface area, drawdown zone and reservoir downstream. Our estimates demonstrate around 301.3 Tg carbon dioxide (CO2)/year and 18.7 Tg methane (CH4)/year from global hydroelectric reservoirs, which are much higher than recent observations. The sum of drawdown and downstream emission, which is generally overlooked, represents 42 % CO2 and 67 % CH4 of the total emissions from hydropower reservoirs. Accordingly, the global average emissions from hydropower are estimated to be 92 g CO2/kWh and 5.7 g CH4/kWh. Nonetheless, global hydroelectricity could currently reduce approximate 2,351 Tg CO2eq/year with respect to fuel fossil plant alternative. The new findings show a substantial revision of carbon emission from the global hydropower reservoirs.

  16. Hyperinflation in Brazil, Israel, and Nicaragua revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szybisz, Martín A.; Szybisz, Leszek

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to address the description of hyperinflation regimens in economy. The spirals of hyperinflation developed in Brazil, Israel, and Nicaragua are revisited. This new analysis of data indicates that the episodes occurred in Brazil and Nicaragua can be understood within the frame of the model available in the literature, which is based on a nonlinear feedback (NLF) characterized by an exponent β > 0. In the NLF model the accumulated consumer price index carries a finite time singularity of the type 1 /(tc - t) (1 - β) / β determining a critical time tc at which the economy would crash. It is shown that in the case of Brazil the entire episode cannot be described with a unique set of parameters because the time series was strongly affected by a change of policy. This fact gives support to the "so called" Lucas critique, who stated that model's parameters usually change once policy changes. On the other hand, such a model is not able to provide any tc in the case of the weaker hyperinflation occurred in Israel. It is shown that in this case the fit of data yields β → 0. This limit leads to the linear feedback formulation which does not predict any tc. An extension for the NLF model is suggested.

  17. [What mirror neurons have revealed: revisited].

    PubMed

    Murata, Akira; Maeda, Kazutaka

    2014-06-01

    The first paper on mirror neurons was published in 1992. In the span of over two decades since then, much knowledge about the relationship between social cognitive function and the motor control system has been accumulated. Direct matching of visual actions and their corresponding motor representations is the most important functional property of mirror neuron. Many studies have emphasized intrinsic simulation as a core concept for mirror neurons. Mirror neurons are thought to play a role in social cognitive function. However, the function of mirror neurons in the macaque remains unclear, because such cognitive functions are limited or lacking in macaque monkeys. It is therefore important to discuss these neurons in the context of motor function. Rizzolatti and colleagues have stressed that the most important function of mirror neurons in macaques is recognition of actions performed by other individuals. I suggest that mirror neurons in the Macaque inferior pariental lobule might be correlated with body schema. In the parieto-premotor network, matching of corollary discharge and actual sensory feedback is an essential neuronal operation. Recently, neurons showing mirror properties were found in some cortical areas outside the mirror neuron system. The current work would revisit the outcomes of mirror neuron studies to discuss the function of mirror neurons in the monkey.

  18. No-scale ripple inflation revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tianjun; Li, Zhijin; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V. E-mail: lizhijin@physics.tamu.edu

    2014-04-01

    We revisit the no-scale ripple inflation model, where no-scale supergravity is modified by an additional term for the inflaton field in the Kähler potential. This term not only breaks one SU(N,1) symmetry explicitly, but also plays an important role for inflation. We generalize the superpotential in the no-scale ripple inflation model slightly. There exists a discrete Z{sub 2} symmetry/parity in the scalar potential in general, which can be preserved or violated by the non-canonical nomalized inflaton kinetic term. Thus, there are three inflation paths: one parity invariant path, and the left and right paths for parity violating scenario. We show that the inflations along the parity invariant path and right path are consistent with the Planck results. However, the gavitino mass for the parity invariant path is so large that the inflation results will be invalid if we consider the inflaton supersymmetry breaking soft mass term. Thus, only the inflation along the right path gives the correct and consistent results. Notably, the tensor-to-scalar ratio in such case can be large, with a value around 0.05, which may be probed by the future Planck experiment.

  19. The super-GUT CMSSM revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, John; Evans, Jason L.; Mustafayev, Azar; Nagata, Natsumi; Olive, Keith A.

    2016-11-01

    We revisit minimal supersymmetric SU(5) grand unification (GUT) models in which the soft supersymmetry-breaking parameters of the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) are universal at some input scale, M_in, above the supersymmetric gauge-coupling unification scale, M_GUT. As in the constrained MSSM (CMSSM), we assume that the scalar masses and gaugino masses have common values, m_0 and m_{1/2}, respectively, at M_in, as do the trilinear soft supersymmetry-breaking parameters A_0. Going beyond previous studies of such a super-GUT CMSSM scenario, we explore the constraints imposed by the lower limit on the proton lifetime and the LHC measurement of the Higgs mass, m_h. We find regions of m_0, m_{1/2}, A_0 and the parameters of the SU(5) superpotential that are compatible with these and other phenomenological constraints such as the density of cold dark matter, which we assume to be provided by the lightest neutralino. Typically, these allowed regions appear for m_0 and m_{1/2} in the multi-TeV region, for suitable values of the unknown SU(5) GUT-scale phases and superpotential couplings, and with the ratio of supersymmetric Higgs vacuum expectation values tan β ≲ 6.

  20. Post-inflationary gravitino production revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, John; Garcia, Marcos A.G.; Olive, Keith A.; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V.; Peloso, Marco E-mail: garciagarcia@physics.umn.edu E-mail: olive@physics.umn.edu

    2016-03-01

    We revisit gravitino production following inflation. As a first step, we review the standard calculation of gravitino production in the thermal plasma formed at the end of post-inflationary reheating when the inflaton has completely decayed. Next we consider gravitino production prior to the completion of reheating, assuming that the inflaton decay products thermalize instantaneously while they are still dilute. We then argue that instantaneous thermalization is in general a good approximation, and also show that the contribution of non-thermal gravitino production via the collisions of inflaton decay products prior to thermalization is relatively small. Our final estimate of the gravitino-to-entropy ratio is approximated well by a standard calculation of gravitino production in the post-inflationary thermal plasma assuming total instantaneous decay and thermalization at a time t ≅ 1.2/Γ{sub φ}. Finally, in light of our calculations, we consider potential implications of upper limits on the gravitino abundance for models of inflation, with particular attention to scenarios for inflaton decays in supersymmetric Starobinsky-like models.

  1. Revisiting the phase diagram of hard ellipsoids.

    PubMed

    Odriozola, Gerardo

    2012-04-07

    In this work, the well-known Frenkel-Mulder phase diagram of hard ellipsoids of revolution [D. Frenkel and B. M. Mulder, Mol. Phys. 55, 1171 (1985)] is revisited by means of replica exchange Monte Carlo simulations. The method provides good sampling of dense systems and so, solid phases can be accessed without the need of imposing a given structure. At high densities, we found plastic solids and fcc-like crystals for semi-spherical ellipsoids (prolates and oblates), and SM2 structures [P. Pfleiderer and T. Schilling, Phys. Rev. E 75, 020402 (2007)] for x : 1-prolates and 1 : x-oblates with x ≥ 3. The revised fluid-crystal and isotropic-nematic transitions reasonably agree with those presented in the Frenkel-Mulder diagram. An interesting result is that, for small system sizes (100 particles), we obtained 2:1- and 1.5:1-prolate equations of state without transitions, while some order is developed at large densities. Furthermore, the symmetric oblate cases are also reluctant to form ordered phases.

  2. Binocularity and visual search-Revisited.

    PubMed

    Zou, Bochao; Utochkin, Igor S; Liu, Yue; Wolfe, Jeremy M

    2017-02-01

    Binocular rivalry is a phenomenon of visual competition in which perception alternates between two monocular images. When two eye's images only differ in luminance, observers may perceive shininess, a form of rivalry called binocular luster. Does dichoptic information guide attention in visual search? Wolfe and Franzel (Perception & Psychophysics, 44(1), 81-93, 1988) reported that rivalry could guide attention only weakly, but that luster (shininess) "popped out," producing very shallow Reaction Time (RT) × Set Size functions. In this study, we have revisited the topic with new and improved stimuli. By using a checkerboard pattern in rivalry experiments, we found that search for rivalry can be more efficient (16 ms/item) than standard, rivalrous grating (30 ms/item). The checkerboard may reduce distracting orientation signals that masked the salience of rivalry between simple orthogonal gratings. Lustrous stimuli did not pop out when potential contrast and luminance artifacts were reduced. However, search efficiency was substantially improved when luster was added to the search target. Both rivalry and luster tasks can produce search asymmetries, as is characteristic of guiding features in search. These results suggest that interocular differences that produce rivalry or luster can guide attention, but these effects are relatively weak and can be hidden by other features like luminance and orientation in visual search tasks.

  3. Revisiting scalar quark hidden sector in light of 750-GeV diphoton resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Cheng-Wei; Ibe, Masahiro; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.

    2016-05-01

    We revisit the model of a CP -even singlet scalar resonance proposed in arXiv:1507.02483 , where the resonance appears as the lightest composite state made of scalar quarks participating in hidden strong dynamics. We show that the model can consistently explain the excess of diphoton events with an invariant mass around 750 GeV reported by both the ATLAS and CMS experiments. We also discuss the nature of the charged composite states in the TeV range which accompany to the neutral scalar. Due to inseparability of the dynamical scale and the mass of the resonance, the model also predicts signatures associated with the hidden dynamics such as leptons, jets along with multiple photons at future collider experiments. We also associate the TeV-scale dynamics behind the resonance with an explanation of dark matter.

  4. Threshold Concepts and Student Engagement: Revisiting Pedagogical Content Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zepke, Nick

    2013-01-01

    This article revisits the notion that to facilitate quality learning requires teachers in higher education to have pedagogical content knowledge. It constructs pedagogical content knowledge as a teaching and learning space that brings content and pedagogy together. On the content knowledge side, it suggests that threshold concepts, akin to a…

  5. Magnetic Braking Revisited: Activities for the Undergraduate Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ireson, Gren; Twidle, John

    2008-01-01

    This paper revisits the demonstration of Lenz by dropping magnets down a non-magnetic tube. Recent publications are reviewed and ideas for undergraduate laboratory investigations are suggested. Finally, an example of matching theory to observation is presented. (Contains 4 tables, 5 figures and 3 footnotes.)

  6. Revisiting Jack Goody to Rethink Determinisms in Literacy Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collin, Ross

    2013-01-01

    This article revisits Goody's arguments about literacy's influence on social arrangements, culture, cognition, economics, and other domains of existence. Whereas some of his arguments tend toward technological determinism (i.e., literacy causes change in the world), other of his arguments construe literacy as a force that shapes and is shaped by…

  7. Revisiting the Role of Communication in Adolescent Intimate Partner Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messinger, Adam M.; Rickert, Vaughn I.; Fry, Deborah A.; Lessel, Harriet; Davidson, Leslie L.

    2012-01-01

    A growing literature suggests that communication strategies can promote or inhibit intimate partner violence (IPV). Research on communication is still needed on a group ripe for early IPV intervention: high school-aged adolescents. This article revisits our previous analyses of young female reproductive clinic patients (Messinger, Davidson, &…

  8. College-Level Sheltered Instruction: Revisiting the Issue of Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knoblock, Natalia; Youngquist, Judy

    2016-01-01

    Finding an effective instruction mode for ESL students in the US educational system has not been an easy task. The country's secondary and tertiary institutions continue to struggle to meet the needs of their large non-native student populations. The article revisits the debate whether sheltered instruction is an effective model to follow. In our…

  9. Revisiting Constructivist Teaching Methods in Ontario Colleges Preparing for Accreditation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Rachel A.

    2015-01-01

    At the time of writing, the first community colleges in Ontario were preparing for transition to an accreditation model from an audit system. This paper revisits constructivist literature, arguing that a more pragmatic definition of constructivism effectively blends positivist and interactionist philosophies to achieve both student centred…

  10. Educational Administration and the Management of Knowledge: 1980 Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Richard

    2013-01-01

    This paper revisits the thesis of a 1980 paper that suggested a new approach to educational administration based upon the New Sociology of Education. In particular it updates answers to the six key questions asked by that paper: what counts as knowledge; how is what counts as knowledge organised; how is what counts as knowledge transmitted; how is…

  11. Closing Achievement Gaps: Revisiting Benjamin S. Bloom's "Learning for Mastery"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guskey, Thomas R.

    2007-01-01

    The problem of achievement gaps among different subgroups of students has been evident in education for many years. This manuscript revisits the work of renowned educator Benjamin S. Bloom, who saw reducing gaps in the achievement of various groups of students as a simple problem of reducing variation in student learning outcomes. Bloom observed…

  12. Moral Judgment Development across Cultures: Revisiting Kohlberg's Universality Claims

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, John C.; Basinger, Karen S.; Grime, Rebecca L.; Snarey, John R.

    2007-01-01

    This article revisits Kohlberg's cognitive developmental claims that stages of moral judgment, facilitative processes of social perspective-taking, and moral values are commonly identifiable across cultures. Snarey [Snarey, J. (1985). "The cross-cultural universality of social-moral development: A critical review of Kohlbergian research."…

  13. Literary Origins of the Term "School Psychologist" Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagan, Thomas K.

    2005-01-01

    Previous research on the literary origins of the term "school psychologist" is revisited, and conclusions are revised in light of new evidence. It appears that the origin of the term in the American literature occurred as early as 1898 in an article by Hugo Munsterberg, predating the usage by Wilhelm Stern in 1911. The early references to the…

  14. Girl Number 20 Revisited: Feminist Literacies in New Hard Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonick, Marnina

    2007-01-01

    This paper revisits the question of "voice" in the context of neo-liberal social and educational reform. "Voice" has been one of the key concepts of feminist and critical pedagogies in the theory and practice of producing social transformation. I argue in this paper, that the political effectiveness of this concept needs to be…

  15. Facilitating Grade Acceleration: Revisiting the Wisdom of John Feldhusen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culross, Rita R.; Jolly, Jennifer L.; Winkler, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    This article revisits the 1986 Feldhusen, Proctor, and Black recommendations on grade skipping. These recommendations originally appeared as 12 guidelines. In this article, the guidelines are grouped into three general categories: how to screen accelerant candidates, how to engage with the adults in the acceleration process (e.g., teachers,…

  16. Bohr’s ‘Light and Life’ revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussenzveig, H. M.

    2015-11-01

    I revisit Niels Bohr’s famous 1932 ‘Light and Life’ lecture, confronting it with current knowledge. Topics covered include: life origin and evolution, quantum mechanics and life, brain and mind, consciousness and free will, and light as a tool for biology, with special emphasis on optical tweezers and their contributions to biophysics. Specialized knowledge of biology is not assumed.

  17. Antidote for Zero Tolerance: Revisiting a "Reclaiming" School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farner, Conrad D.

    2002-01-01

    Reports on a revisit to the Frank Lloyd Wright Middle School, which implemented strategies to deal with disciplinary problems. The school continues to progress towards creating the type of reclaiming environment necessary to ensure the needs of all students. Strategies used include alternatives to zero tolerance policy; smaller teams of students;…

  18. The Importance of Being a Complement: CED Effects Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurka, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation revisits subject island effects (Ross 1967, Chomsky 1973) cross-linguistically. Controlled acceptability judgment studies in German, English, Japanese and Serbian show that extraction out of specifiers is consistently degraded compared to extraction out of complements, indicating that the Condition on Extraction domains (CED,…

  19. Revisiting the Trust Effect in Urban Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Curt M.; Forsyth, Patrick B.

    2013-01-01

    More than a decade after Goddard, Tschannen-Moran, and Hoy (2001) found that collective faculty trust in clients predicts student achievement in urban elementary schools, we sought to identify a plausible link for this relationship. Our purpose in revisiting the trust effect was twofold: (1) to test the main effect of collective faculty trust on…

  20. High Resolution Rapid Revisits Insar Monitoring of Surface Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singhroy, V.; Li, J.; Charbonneau, F.

    2014-12-01

    Monitoring surface deformation on strategic energy and transportation corridors requires high resolution spatial and temporal InSAR images for mitigation and safety purposes. High resolution air photos, lidar and other satellite images are very useful in areas where the landslides can be fatal. Recently, radar interferometry (InSAR) techniques using more rapid revisit images from several radar satellites are increasingly being used in active deformation monitoring. The Canadian RADARSAT Constellation (RCM) is a three-satellite mission that will provide rapid revisits of four days interferometric (InSAR) capabilities that will be very useful for complex deformation monitoring. For instance, the monitoring of surface deformation due to permafrost activity, complex rock slide motion and steam assisted oil extraction will benefit from this new rapid revisit capability. This paper provide examples of how the high resolution (1-3 m) rapid revisit InSAR capabilities will improve our monitoring of surface deformation and provide insights in understanding triggering mechanisms. We analysed over a hundred high resolution InSAR images over a two year period on three geologically different sites with various configurations of topography, geomorphology, and geology conditions. We show from our analysis that the more frequent InSAR acquisitions are providing more information in understanding the rates of movement and failure process of permafrost triggered retrogressive thaw flows; the complex motion of an asymmetrical wedge failure of an active rock slide and the identification of over pressure zones related to oil extraction using steam injection. Keywords: High resolution, InSAR, rapid revisits, triggering mechanisms, oil extraction.

  1. The coordinate coherent states approach revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Yan-Gang Zhang, Shao-Jun

    2013-02-15

    We revisit the coordinate coherent states approach through two different quantization procedures in the quantum field theory on the noncommutative Minkowski plane. The first procedure, which is based on the normal commutation relation between an annihilation and creation operators, deduces that a point mass can be described by a Gaussian function instead of the usual Dirac delta function. However, we argue this specific quantization by adopting the canonical one (based on the canonical commutation relation between a field and its conjugate momentum) and show that a point mass should still be described by the Dirac delta function, which implies that the concept of point particles is still valid when we deal with the noncommutativity by following the coordinate coherent states approach. In order to investigate the dependence on quantization procedures, we apply the two quantization procedures to the Unruh effect and Hawking radiation and find that they give rise to significantly different results. Under the first quantization procedure, the Unruh temperature and Unruh spectrum are not deformed by noncommutativity, but the Hawking temperature is deformed by noncommutativity while the radiation specturm is untack. However, under the second quantization procedure, the Unruh temperature and Hawking temperature are untack but the both spectra are modified by an effective greybody (deformed) factor. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Suggest a canonical quantization in the coordinate coherent states approach. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prove the validity of the concept of point particles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Apply the canonical quantization to the Unruh effect and Hawking radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Find no deformations in the Unruh temperature and Hawking temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Provide the modified spectra of the Unruh effect and Hawking radiation.

  2. Machining as a mechanical property test revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David L.

    There is much need for data on mechanical behavior of metals at high strains and strain rates. This need is dictated by modeling of processes like forming and machining, wherein the material in the deformation zone is subjected to severe deformation conditions atypical of conventional material property tests such as tension and torsion. Accurate flow stress data is an essential input for robust prediction of process outputs. Similar requirements arise from applications in high speed ballistic penetration and design of materials for armor. Since the deformation zone in cutting of metals is characterized by unique and extreme combinations of strain, strain rate and temperature, an opportunity exists for using plane-strain cutting as a mechanical property test for measuring flow properties of metals. The feasibility of using plane-strain cutting to measure flow properties of metals is revisited in the light of recent data showing controllability of the deformation conditions in chip formation by systematic variation of process input parameters. A method is outlined as to how the deformation conditions can be varied by changing the process parameters. The method is applied to cutting of commercially pure copper (FCC), iron (BCC) and zinc (HCP). Forces and chip geometries are measured, in conjunction with particle image velocimetry characterization of the deformation using high speed image sequences. The flow stresses are estimated from these measurements. The measured flow stress and its dependence on strain are shown to agree well with prior measurements of these parameters using conventional tests, and flow stress inferred from hardness characterization. The method is also demonstrated to be able to measure properties of metals that recrystallize at room temperature (zinc), wherein quasi-static tests predict much lower strength. Sources of variability and uncertainty in the application of this measurement technique are discussed. Future work in the context of further

  3. Revisiting mu suppression in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Guillaume; Soussignan, Robert; Hugueville, Laurent; Martinerie, Jacques; Nadel, Jacqueline

    2014-10-17

    Two aspects of the EEG literature lead us to revisit mu suppression in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). First and despite the fact that the mu rhythm can be functionally segregated in two discrete sub-bands, 8-10 Hz and 10-12/13 Hz, mu-suppression in ASD has been analyzed as a homogeneous phenomenon covering the 8-13 Hz frequency. Second and although alpha-like activity is usually found across the entire scalp, ASD studies of action observation have focused on the central electrodes (C3/C4). The present study was aimed at testing on the whole brain the hypothesis of a functional dissociation of mu and alpha responses to the observation of human actions in ASD according to bandwidths. Electroencephalographic (EEG) mu and alpha responses to execution and observation of hand gestures were recorded on the whole scalp in high functioning subjects with ASD and typical subjects. When two bandwidths of the alpha-mu 8-13 Hz were distinguished, a different mu response to observation appeared for subjects with ASD in the upper sub-band over the sensorimotor cortex, whilst the lower sub-band responded similarly in the two groups. Source reconstructions demonstrated that this effect was related to a joint mu-suppression deficit over the occipito-parietal regions and an increase over the frontal regions. These findings suggest peculiarities in top-down response modulation in ASD and question the claim of a global dysfunction of the MNS in autism. This research also advocates for the use of finer grained analyses at both spatial and spectral levels for future directions in neurophysiological accounts of autism.

  4. Distant future of the Sun and Earth revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, K.-P.; Connon Smith, Robert

    2008-05-01

    We revisit the distant future of the Sun and the Solar system, based on stellar models computed with a thoroughly tested evolution code. For the solar giant stages, mass loss by the cool (but not dust-driven) wind is considered in detail. Using the new and well-calibrated mass-loss formula of Schröder & Cuntz, we find that the mass lost by the Sun as a red giant branch (RGB) giant (0.332Msolar, 7.59 Gyr from now) potentially gives planet Earth a significant orbital expansion, inversely proportional to the remaining solar mass. According to these solar evolution models, the closest encounter of planet Earth with the solar cool giant photosphere will occur during the tip-RGB phase. During this critical episode, for each time-step of the evolution model, we consider the loss of orbital angular momentum suffered by planet Earth from tidal interaction with the giant Sun, as well as dynamical drag in the lower chromosphere. As a result of this, we find that planet Earth will not be able to escape engulfment, despite the positive effect of solar mass loss. In order to survive the solar tip-RGB phase, any hypothetical planet would require a present-day minimum orbital radius of about 1.15 au. The latter result may help to estimate the chances of finding planets around white dwarfs. Furthermore, our solar evolution models with detailed mass-loss description predict that the resulting tip-AGB (asymptotic giant branch) giant will not reach its tip-RGB size. Compared to other solar evolution models, the main reason is the more significant amount of mass lost already in the RGB phase of the Sun. Hence, the tip-AGB luminosity will come short of driving a final, dust-driven superwind, and there will be no regular solar planetary nebula (PN). The tip-AGB is marked by a last thermal pulse, and the final mass loss of the giant may produce a circumstellar (CS) shell similar to, but rather smaller than, that of the peculiar PN IC 2149 with an estimated total CS shell mass of just a

  5. REVISITING SCALING RELATIONS FOR GIANT RADIO HALOS IN GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Cassano, R.; Brunetti, G.; Venturi, T.; Kale, R.; Pratt, G. W.; Markevitch, M.

    2013-11-10

    Many galaxy clusters host megaparsec-scale radio halos, generated by ultrarelativistic electrons in the magnetized intracluster medium. Correlations between the synchrotron power of radio halos and the thermal properties of the hosting clusters were established in the last decade, including the connection between the presence of a halo and cluster mergers. The X-ray luminosity and redshift-limited Extended GMRT Radio Halo Survey provides a rich and unique dataset for statistical studies of the halos. We uniformly analyze the radio and X-ray data for the GMRT cluster sample, and use the new Planck Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) catalog to revisit the correlations between the power of radio halos and the thermal properties of galaxy clusters. We find that the radio power at 1.4 GHz scales with the cluster X-ray (0.1-2.4 keV) luminosity computed within R{sub 500} as P{sub 1.4}∼L{sup 2.1±0.2}{sub 500}. Our bigger and more homogenous sample confirms that the X-ray luminous (L{sub 500} > 5 × 10{sup 44} erg s{sup –1}) clusters branch into two populations—radio halos lie on the correlation, while clusters without radio halos have their radio upper limits well below that correlation. This bimodality remains if we excise cool cores from the X-ray luminosities. We also find that P{sub 1.4} scales with the cluster integrated SZ signal within R{sub 500}, measured by Planck, as P{sub 1.4}∼Y{sup 2.05±0.28}{sub 500}, in line with previous findings. However, contrary to previous studies that were limited by incompleteness and small sample size, we find that 'SZ-luminous' Y{sub 500} > 6 × 10{sup –5} Mpc{sup 2} clusters show a bimodal behavior for the presence of radio halos, similar to that in the radio-X-ray diagram. Bimodality of both correlations can be traced to clusters dynamics, with radio halos found exclusively in merging clusters. These results confirm the key role of mergers for the origin of giant radio halos, suggesting that they trigger the relativistic particle

  6. Revisiting Scaling Relations for Giant Radio Halos in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassano, R.; Ettori, S.; Brunetti, G.; Giacintucci, S.; Pratt, G. W.; Venturi, T.; Kale, R.; Dolag, K.; Markevitch, Maxim L.

    2013-01-01

    Many galaxy clusters host megaparsec-scale radio halos, generated by ultrarelativistic electrons in the magnetized intracluster medium. Correlations between the synchrotron power of radio halos and the thermal properties of the hosting clusters were established in the last decade, including the connection between the presence of a halo and cluster mergers. The X-ray luminosity and redshift-limited Extended GMRT Radio Halo Survey provides a rich and unique dataset for statistical studies of the halos. We uniformly analyze the radio and X-ray data for the GMRT cluster sample, and use the new Planck Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) catalog to revisit the correlations between the power of radio halos and the thermal properties of galaxy clusters. We find that the radio power at 1.4 GHz scales with the cluster X-ray (0.1-2.4 keV) luminosity computed within R(sub 500) as P(sub 1.4) approx. L(2.1+/-0.2) - 500). Our bigger and more homogenous sample confirms that the X-ray luminous (L(sub 500) > 5 × 10(exp 44) erg/s)) clusters branch into two populations-radio halos lie on the correlation, while clusters without radio halos have their radio upper limits well below that correlation. This bimodality remains if we excise cool cores from the X-ray luminosities. We also find that P(sub 1.4) scales with the cluster integrated SZ signal within R(sub 500), measured by Planck, as P(sub 1.4) approx. Y(2.05+/-0.28) - 500), in line with previous findings. However, contrary to previous studies that were limited by incompleteness and small sample size, we find that "SZ-luminous" Y(sub 500) > 6×10(exp -5) Mpc(exp 2) clusters show a bimodal behavior for the presence of radio halos, similar to that in the radio-X-ray diagram. Bimodality of both correlations can be traced to clusters dynamics, with radio halos found exclusively in merging clusters. These results confirm the key role of mergers for the origin of giant radio halos, suggesting that they trigger the relativistic particle acceleration.

  7. The Stern-Gerlach experiment revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt-Böcking, Horst; Schmidt, Lothar; Lüdde, Hans Jürgen; Trageser, Wolfgang; Templeton, Alan; Sauer, Tilman

    2016-12-01

    experimental example for such directional quantization in scattering processes is shown. Last not least, the early history of the "almost" discovery of the electron spin in the SGE is revisited.

  8. Alkaline phosphatase revisited: hydrolysis of alkyl phosphates.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Patrick J; Herschlag, Daniel

    2002-03-05

    Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase (AP) is the prototypical two metal ion catalyst with two divalent zinc ions bound approximately 4 A apart in the active site. Studies spanning half a century have elucidated many structural and mechanistic features of this enzyme, rendering it an attractive model for investigating the potent catalytic power of bimetallic centers. Unfortunately, fundamental mechanistic features have been obscured by limitations with the standard assays. These assays generate concentrations of inorganic phosphate (P(i)) in excess of its inhibition constant (K(i) approximately 1 muM). This tight binding by P(i) has affected the majority of published kinetic constants. Furthermore, binding limits k(cat)/K(m) for reaction of p-nitrophenyl phosphate, the most commonly employed substrate. We describe a sensitive (32)P-based assay for hydrolysis of alkyl phosphates that avoids the complication of product inhibition. We have revisited basic mechanistic features of AP with these alkyl phosphate substrates. The results suggest that the chemical step for phosphorylation of the enzyme limits k(cat)/K(m). The pH-rate profile and additional results suggest that the serine nucleophile is active in its anionic form and has a pK(a) of < or = 5.5 in the free enzyme. An inactivating pK(a) of 8.0 is observed for binding of both substrates and inhibitors, and we suggest that this corresponds to ionization of a zinc-coordinated water molecule. Counter to previous suggestions, inorganic phosphate dianion appears to bind to the highly charged AP active site at least as strongly as the trianion. The dependence of k(cat)/K(m) on the pK(a) of the leaving group follows a Brønsted correlation with a slope of beta(lg) = -0.85 +/- 0.1, differing substantially from the previously reported value of -0.2 obtained from data with a less sensitive assay. This steep leaving group dependence is consistent with a largely dissociative transition state for AP-catalyzed hydrolysis of

  9. Revisiting the CALIOP Mineral Dust Optical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winker, D. M.; Omar, A. H.; Liu, Z.

    2013-12-01

    The standard aerosol extinction retrieval applied to CALIOP observations relies heavily on a priori values of the lidar ratio (the ratio of extinction to 180-degree backscatter) for each of several aerosol types. The original CALIOP aerosol models were developed over 10 years ago, based on a combination of Aeronet retrievals, measurements from ground-based lidars, and theoretical scattering calculations. Both prior to and since the launch of CALIPSO, a number of studies using a variety of approaches have shown lidar ratios of around 40 sr for mineral dust. Ground-based Raman lidar measurements in Europe and Morroco, on the other hand, have consistently shown higher values of 50 to 60 sr. Reasons for this inconsistency have not been clearly identified, but may be due to geographical variability, mixtures of dust with fine-mode aerosol, multiple scattering effects on the CALIOP retrieval, other retrieval artifacts, or a combination of these. The simplest explanation for the difference between ground-based Raman and space-based retrievals of dust lidar ratio would be multiple scattering effects on the CALIOP signals. We have taken advantage of improvements in scattering codes and of recent field campaigns to re-evaluate the CALIOP optical model for mineral dust and to revisit multiple scattering effects. The original scattering phase functions used to predict multiple scattering were based on Dipole-Dipole Approximation (DDA) calculations of size-shape mixtures of irregular dust particles. At the time, the DDA calculations were limited to particles of less than 2 um diameter. Using current T-matrix codes, we are now able to compute scattering from particles as large as 10 um diameter. Applying T-matrix scattering calculations to spheroidal particles with size distributions consistent with those measured during the SAMUM campaign in Morroco, we find multiple scattering effects are similar to those predicted from the original DDA calculations. Thus multiple scattering

  10. Five years on: Revisiting GSN data quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gee, L. S.; Nettles, M.; Ekstrom, G.; Davis, J. P.; Ringler, A. T.; Storm, T. L.; Wilson, D.; Anderson, K. R.

    2014-12-01

    In 2010, the Lamont Waveform Quality Center (WQC) conducted an in-depth review of ten stations in the Global Seismographic Network (GSN). IU stations (CASY, DAV, KIP, KONO, WCI), IC stations (SSE, XAN), and II stations (ALE, DGAR, RPN) were analyzed using a scaling analysis based on data-synthetic comparisons, evaluation of noise levels, assessment of inter-sensor coherence, and polarization analysis. These reports (available from http://www.ldeo.columbia.edu/~ekstrom/Projects/WQC.html) highlighted a number of significant problems in GSN data quality, including the frequency-dependent loss of gain in the STS-1 seismometer (Ekström et al., 2006) that has been attributed to the presence of humidity in the electronics, cables, and connectors (Yuki and Ishihara, 2002; Hutt and Ringler, 2011). The reports from the WQC spurred a number of changes in the operation of the GSN, including the adoption of the policy of annual calibrations and the development of new tools and metrics to monitor, evaluate, and communicate data quality. In parallel, the USGS' Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory (ASL) and UCSD's Project IDA worked with the IRIS Consortium to upgrade GSN stations with new data acquisition systems, to refurbish the STS-1 seismometers with new electronics, and to expand the deployment of secondary broadband sensors. We revisit the 2010 reports, using the tools of the WQC as well as a number of newly developed tools such as the USGS' Data Quality Analyzer and IRIS' MUSTANG, and provide an update on GSN data quality. Our initial focus is on CASY and KIP, the first two stations reviewed by the WQC. Our goal is to evaluate progress in the last five years and assess our ability to quantify data quality as well as to identify potential problems that could compromise data quality in the future. Ekström, G., C. A. Dalton, and M. Nettles (2006). Observations of time-dependent errors in long-period instrument gain at global seismic stations. Seismological Research Letters

  11. 14 CFR 1214.205 - Revisit and/or retrieval services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Revisit and/or retrieval services. 1214.205... Substantial Investment in the STS Program § 1214.205 Revisit and/or retrieval services. These services will be... dedicated price will be charged. If the user's retrieval requirement is such that it can be accomplished...

  12. 14 CFR 1214.205 - Revisit and/or retrieval services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Revisit and/or retrieval services. 1214.205... Substantial Investment in the STS Program § 1214.205 Revisit and/or retrieval services. These services will be... dedicated price will be charged. If the user's retrieval requirement is such that it can be accomplished...

  13. 14 CFR 1214.205 - Revisit and/or retrieval services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Revisit and/or retrieval services. 1214.205... Substantial Investment in the STS Program § 1214.205 Revisit and/or retrieval services. These services will be... dedicated price will be charged. If the user's retrieval requirement is such that it can be accomplished...

  14. 14 CFR § 1214.205 - Revisit and/or retrieval services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Revisit and/or retrieval services. § 1214... Have Made Substantial Investment in the STS Program § 1214.205 Revisit and/or retrieval services. These..., the full dedicated price will be charged. If the user's retrieval requirement is such that it can...

  15. 14 CFR 1214.205 - Revisit and/or retrieval services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Revisit and/or retrieval services. 1214.205... Substantial Investment in the STS Program § 1214.205 Revisit and/or retrieval services. These services will be... dedicated price will be charged. If the user's retrieval requirement is such that it can be accomplished...

  16. Enthalpy-Entropy Compensation (EEC) Effect: A Revisit.

    PubMed

    Pan, Animesh; Biswas, Tapas; Rakshit, Animesh K; Moulik, Satya P

    2015-12-31

    A short account of the developments and perspectives of IKR (iso-kinetic relation) and EEC (enthalpy (H) - entropy (S) compensation) has been presented. The IKR and EEC are known to be extra thermodynamic or empirical correlations though linear H-S correlation can be thermodynamically deduced. Attempt has also been made to explain the phenomena in terms of statistical thermodynamics. In this study, we have briefly revisited the fundamentals of both IKR and EEC from kinetic and thermodynamic grounds. A detailed revisit of the EEC phenomenon on varied kinetic and equilibrium processes has been also presented. Possible correlations among the free energy (ΔG), enthalpy (ΔH), and entropy (ΔS) changes of different similar and nonsimilar chemical processes under varied conditions have been discussed with possible future projections.

  17. What Is Inflammatory Breast Cancer? Revisiting the Case Definition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-03

    Cancer? Revisiting the Case Definition Paul H. Levine 1 ,*, Ladan Zolfaghari 1 , Heather Young 1 , Muhannad Hafi 1 , Timothy Cannon 1 , Chitra Ganesan 1 ...Carmela Veneroso 1 , Rachel Brem 2 and Mark Sherman 3 1 The Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, George Washington University School of...gwumc.edu; Tel.: + 1 -202-994-4582; Fax: + 1 -202-994-0082. Received: 14 December 2009; in revised form: 10 February 2010 / Accepted: 1 March 2010

  18. Non linear evolution: revisiting the solution in the saturation region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, Carlos; Levin, Eugene; Meneses, Rodrigo

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we revisit the problem of the solution to Balitsky-Kovchegov equation deeply in the saturation domain. We find that solution has the form given in ref. [23] but it depends on variable and the value of Const is calculated in this paper. We propose the solution for full BFKL kernel at large in the entire kinematic region that satisfies the McLerran-Venugopalan-type [3-7] initial condition.

  19. Discussion of "Computational Electrocardiography: Revisiting Holter ECG Monitoring".

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Christian; Caiani, Enrico G; Dickhaus, Hartmut; Kulikowski, Casimir A; Schiecke, Karin; van Bemmel, Jan H; Witte, Herbert

    2016-08-05

    This article is part of a For-Discussion-Section of Methods of Information in Medicine about the paper "Computational Electrocardiography: Revisiting Holter ECG Monitoring" written by Thomas M. Deserno and Nikolaus Marx. It is introduced by an editorial. This article contains the combined commentaries invited to independently comment on the paper of Deserno and Marx. In subsequent issues the discussion can continue through letters to the editor.

  20. Indoor air and human health revisited: A recent IAQ symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Gammage, R.B.

    1994-12-31

    Indoor Air and Human Health Revisited was a speciality symposium examining the scientific underpinnings of sensory and sensitivity effects, allergy and respiratory disease, neurotoxicity and cancer. An organizing committee selected four persons to chain the sessions and invite experts to give state-of-the-art presentations that will be published as a book. A summary of the presentations is made and some critical issues identified.

  1. Partial Dynamical Symmetry in Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Jia-Lun; Chen, Jin-Quan

    1997-03-01

    It is shown that any Hamiltonian involving only one- and two-bond interactions for a molecule withnbonds and having a point groupPas its symmetry group may have theSn⊃Ppartial dynamical symmetry, i.e., the Hamiltonian can be solved analytically for a part of the states, called the unique states. For example, theXY6molecule has theS6⊃Ohpartial dynamical symmetry. The model of Iachello and Oss forncoupled anharmonic oscillators is revisited in terms of the partial dynamical symmetry. The energies are obtained analytically for the nine unique levels of theXY6molecule and the structures of the eigenstates are disclosed for the first time, while for non-unique states they are obtained by diagonalizing the Hamiltonian in theS6⊃Ohsymmetry adapted basis with greatly reduced dimension.

  2. Revisiting the revisit: added evidence for a social chemosignal in human emotional tears.

    PubMed

    Sobel, Noam

    2017-01-01

    In a study by Gelstein et al., we found that human emotional tears act as a social chemosignal. In the first of three different experiments in that study we observed that sniffing women's emotional tears reduced the sexual attractiveness attributed by men to pictures of women's faces. In a study partly titled "Chemosignaling effects of human tears revisited", Gračanin et al. claim failed replication of this effect in a series of experiments, one they described as "exactly the same procedure" as Gelstein. Given that Gračanin et al. refused our extended offer to jointly replicate the experiment at our expense, we can merely comment on their effort. We find that Gračanin, who are not a chemosignaling laboratory, used methodology that falls short of standards typically applied in chemosignaling research. Thus, their experiments were profoundly different from Gelstein. Finally, we found that in reanalysing their raw data we could in fact replicate the effect from Gelstein. Thus, we conclude that the failed replication in Gračanin is neither a replication nor failed.

  3. Behavioral Objectives and Standards Movement Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakouri, Nima; Mirzaee, Sepideh

    2014-01-01

    The present paper sparks a complementary argument that the development of standards movement must not be at the expense of sacrificing the achievement of behavioral objectives. Furthermore, due to the systemic and dynamic nature of standards, standards need to be revised off and on. Besides, the present writers taking a more or less relativist…

  4. Topological entropy of catalytic sets: Hypercycles revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardanyés, Josep; Duarte, Jorge; Januário, Cristina; Martins, Nuno

    2012-02-01

    The dynamics of catalytic networks have been widely studied over the last decades because of their implications in several fields like prebiotic evolution, virology, neural networks, immunology or ecology. One of the most studied mathematical bodies for catalytic networks was initially formulated in the context of prebiotic evolution, by means of the hypercycle theory. The hypercycle is a set of self-replicating species able to catalyze other replicator species within a cyclic architecture. Hypercyclic organization might arise from a quasispecies as a way to increase the informational containt surpassing the so-called error threshold. The catalytic coupling between replicators makes all the species to behave like a single and coherent evolutionary multimolecular unit. The inherent nonlinearities of catalytic interactions are responsible for the emergence of several types of dynamics, among them, chaos. In this article we begin with a brief review of the hypercycle theory focusing on its evolutionary implications as well as on different dynamics associated to different types of small catalytic networks. Then we study the properties of chaotic hypercycles with error-prone replication with symbolic dynamics theory, characterizing, by means of the theory of topological Markov chains, the topological entropy and the periods of the orbits of unimodal-like iterated maps obtained from the strange attractor. We will focus our study on some key parameters responsible for the structure of the catalytic network: mutation rates, autocatalytic and cross-catalytic interactions.

  5. Revisiting the Gulf Coast after Katrina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Principal, 2009

    2009-01-01

    In August 2005, the world witnessed one of the most destructive natural disasters on America's mainland. Hurricane Katrina, followed a month later by Hurricane Rita, brought more than broken levees, flooded streets and homes, and destroyed businesses. It caused changes in the dynamics and the demographic and cultural makeup of the region. One of…

  6. The effect of time ordering revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Rosato, J.; Boland, D.; Capes, H.; Marandet, Y.; Stamm, R.

    2008-10-22

    The effects of time ordering on line shapes are investigated for the dynamic ionic broadening of the Lyman alpha line in hydrogen plasmas. The difference between calculations with and without time ordering is calculated for an electric field created by a single particle, and for a thermal average over plasma configurations with moderate temperature and density.

  7. Liberal Arts Catch-Up Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goyder, John

    2014-01-01

    This paper replicates the work of Giles and Drewes from the 1990s. They showed a catch-up effect whereby graduates of liberal arts undergraduate programs, although at an early-career disadvantage compared with graduates of applied programs, had higher incomes by mid-career. Working with the Panel 5 Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (2005-2010),…

  8. Revisiting a Problem of Two Freezers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Easton, Don

    2014-01-01

    The January 2013 Physics Challenge for Teachers and Students has some features that are surprising and worth a closer look. The problem concerns a Carnot-cycle refrigeration unit operating inside a tent. It achieves dynamic equilibrium with a freezer ("cold") compartment temperature of T[subscript C] = 13°C, tent temperature of…

  9. Circular revisit orbits design for responsive mission over a single target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Taibo; Xiang, Junhua; Wang, Zhaokui; Zhang, Yulin

    2016-10-01

    The responsive orbits play a key role in addressing the mission of Operationally Responsive Space (ORS) because of their capabilities. These capabilities are usually focused on supporting specific targets as opposed to providing global coverage. One subtype of responsive orbits is repeat coverage orbit which is nearly circular in most remote sensing applications. This paper deals with a special kind of repeating ground track orbit, referred to as circular revisit orbit. Different from traditional repeat coverage orbits, a satellite on circular revisit orbit can visit a target site at both the ascending and descending stages in one revisit cycle. This typology of trajectory allows a halving of the traditional revisit time and does a favor to get useful information for responsive applications. However the previous reported numerical methods in some references often cost lots of computation or fail to obtain such orbits. To overcome this difficulty, an analytical method to determine the existence conditions of the solutions to revisit orbits is presented in this paper. To this end, the mathematical model of circular revisit orbit is established under the central gravity model and the J2 perturbation. A constraint function of the circular revisit orbit is introduced, and the monotonicity of that function has been studied. The existent conditions and the number of such orbits are naturally worked out. Taking the launch cost into consideration, optimal design model of circular revisit orbit is established to achieve a best orbit which visits a target twice a day in the morning and in the afternoon respectively for several days. The result shows that it is effective to apply circular revisit orbits in responsive application such as reconnoiter of natural disaster.

  10. A practical method of predicting client revisit intention in a hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyun Jick

    2005-01-01

    Data mining (DM) models are an alternative to traditional statistical methods for examining whether higher customer satisfaction leads to higher revisit intention. This study used a total of 906 outpatients' satisfaction data collected from a nationwide survey interviews conducted by professional interviewers on a face-to-face basis in South Korea, 1998. Analyses showed that the relationship between overall satisfaction with hospital services and outpatients' revisit intention, along with word-of-mouth recommendation as intermediate variables, developed into a nonlinear relationship. The five strongest predictors of revisit intention were overall satisfaction, intention to recommend to others, awareness of hospital promotion, satisfaction with physician's kindness, and satisfaction with treatment level.

  11. Rural-Nonrural Disparities in Postsecondary Educational Attainment Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Soo-yong; Meece, Judith L.; Irvin, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    Using data from the National Educational Longitudinal Study, this study revisited rural-nonrural disparities in educational attainment by considering a comprehensive set of factors that constrain and support youth's college enrollment and degree completion. Results showed that rural students were more advantaged in community social resources compared to nonrural students, and these resources were associated with a significant increase in the likelihood of bachelor's degree attainment. Yet results confirmed that rural students lagged behind nonrural students in attaining a bachelor's degree largely due to their lower socioeconomic background. The findings present a more comprehensive picture of the complexity of geographic residence in shaping college enrollment and degree attainment. PMID:24285873

  12. Nonlinear realization of spontaneously broken N = 1 supersymmetry revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Hui; Luo, Mingxing; Wang, Liucheng

    2010-02-01

    This paper revisits the nonlinear realization of spontaneously broken N = 1 supersymmetry. It is shown that the constrained superfield formalism as proposed in [6] can be reinterpreted in the language of standard realization of nonlinear supersymmetry via a new and simpler route. Explicit formulas of actions are presented for general renormalizable theories with or without gauge interactions. The nonlinearWess-Zumino gauge is discussed and relations are pointed out for different definitions of gauge fields. In addition, a general procedure is provided to deal with theories of arbitrary Kahler potentials.

  13. Revisiting a Constructive Classic: Wright's Physical Disability: A Psychosocial Approach

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Dana S.; Elliott, Timothy R.

    2008-01-01

    Beatrice A. Wright's (1960) classic book, Physical Disability: A Psychological Approach is a landmark publication in rehabilitation psychology. The authors believe that Division 22's forthcoming 50th anniversary, the results of a recent survey on essential readings in rehabilitation psychology, and a public critique concerning the relevance of individuating language in psychology are compelling reasons for revisiting the influence of Physical Disability. After discussing these catalysts, the authors review the book's history, scholarly impact, and link to positive disciplinary directions. The authors conclude by encouraging rehabilitation psychologists and other members of the discipline to (re)acquaint themselves with this important book and the timeless concepts it espouses. PMID:19079791

  14. The Floor in the Solar Wind Magnetic Field Revisited

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-07

    Paper 3 . DATES COVERED (From - To) 1 Oct 2007 – 10 Nov 2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Floor in the Solar Wind Magnetic Field Revisited...magnitude [B] had a floor of ≈ 4.6 nT in yearly averages, a value which the interplanetary magnetic - field [IMF] strength returned to, or approached, at...is implicit in the work of Owens and Crooker (2006, 2007) who simulated the interplanetary magnetic - field strength in terms of a constant open-flux

  15. Revisiting the deific-decree doctrine in Washington state.

    PubMed

    Leong, Gregory B

    2008-01-01

    The deific-decree exception to Washington's M'Naughten insanity standard first appeared in case law a quarter century ago in State v. Crenshaw. A few subsequent cases have attempted to refine the contours of the deific decree; however, the deific-decree doctrine has had only limited utility as a basis for the insanity defense. After about a decade of no activity in this area, the Washington courts have recently revisited the deific-decree doctrine in a case involving two defendants.

  16. Parameter Estimation in Epidemiology: from Simple to Complex Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, Maíra; Ballesteros, Sebastién; Boto, João Pedro; Kooi, Bob W.; Mateus, Luís; Stollenwerk, Nico

    2011-09-01

    We revisit the parameter estimation framework for population biological dynamical systems, and apply it to calibrate various models in epidemiology with empirical time series, namely influenza and dengue fever. When it comes to more complex models like multi-strain dynamics to describe the virus-host interaction in dengue fever, even most recently developed parameter estimation techniques, like maximum likelihood iterated filtering, come to their computational limits. However, the first results of parameter estimation with data on dengue fever from Thailand indicate a subtle interplay between stochasticity and deterministic skeleton. The deterministic system on its own already displays complex dynamics up to deterministic chaos and coexistence of multiple attractors.

  17. Reforestation in southern China: revisiting soil N mineralization and nitrification after 8 years restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Qifeng; Li, Zhi’An; Zhu, Weixing; Zou, Bi; Li, Yingwen; Yu, Shiqin; Ding, Yongzhen; Chen, Yao; Li, Xiaobo; Wang, Faming

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen availability and tree species selection play important roles in reforestation. However, long-term field studies on the effects and mechanisms of tree species composition on N transformation are very limited. Eight years after tree seedlings were planted in a field experiment, we revisited the site and tested how tree species composition affects the dynamics of N mineralization and nitrification. Both tree species composition and season significantly influenced the soil dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen (DON). N-fixing Acacia crassicarpa monoculture had the highest DON, and 10-mixed species plantation had the highest DOC. The lowest DOC and DON concentrations were both observed in Eucalyptus urophylla monoculture. The tree species composition also significantly affected net N mineralization rates. The highest rate of net N mineralization was found in A. crassicarpa monoculture, which was over twice than that in Castanopsis hystrix monoculture. The annual net N mineralization rates of 10-mixed and 30-mixed plantations were similar as that of N-fixing monoculture. Since mixed plantations have good performance in increasing soil DOC, DON, N mineralization and plant biodiversity, we recommend that mixed species plantations should be used as a sustainable approach for the restoration of degraded land in southern China.

  18. "Perception of the speech code" revisited: Speech is alphabetic after all.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Carol A; Shankweiler, Donald; Studdert-Kennedy, Michael

    2016-03-01

    We revisit an article, "Perception of the Speech Code" (PSC), published in this journal 50 years ago (Liberman, Cooper, Shankweiler, & Studdert-Kennedy, 1967) and address one of its legacies concerning the status of phonetic segments, which persists in theories of speech today. In the perspective of PSC, segments both exist (in language as known) and do not exist (in articulation or the acoustic speech signal). Findings interpreted as showing that speech is not a sound alphabet, but, rather, phonemes are encoded in the signal, coupled with findings that listeners perceive articulation, led to the motor theory of speech perception, a highly controversial legacy of PSC. However, a second legacy, the paradoxical perspective on segments has been mostly unquestioned. We remove the paradox by offering an alternative supported by converging evidence that segments exist in language both as known and as used. We support the existence of segments in both language knowledge and in production by showing that phonetic segments are articulatory and dynamic and that coarticulation does not eliminate them. We show that segments leave an acoustic signature that listeners can track. This suggests that speech is well-adapted to public communication in facilitating, not creating a barrier to, exchange of language forms.

  19. Snow-(N)AO relationship revisited over the whole twentieth century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douville, H.; Peings, Y.; Saint-Martin, D.

    2017-01-01

    Several studies suggest that the Siberian snow cover in fall is a source of predictability of the Arctic Oscillation (AO) in winter. Although a plausible dynamical mechanism was proposed, the robustness of this relationship was recently challenged. Here we use two atmospheric reanalyses to revisit the snow-AO relationship and its modulation across the whole twentieth century. While our results support a stratospheric pathway mechanism, they show that the snow-AO relationship has only emerged in the 1970s and should be rather analyzed as a contrasted multidecadal behavior of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and Pacific North America pattern. They confirm that the quasi-biennial oscillation is a plausible candidate for the modulation of the snow-(N)AO relationship across the twentieth century, but they further show that this modulation might be a purely stochastic effect. Therefore, they emphasize the limitations of any empirical prediction of the (N)AO only based on snow and/or sea ice predictors.

  20. Reforestation in southern China: revisiting soil N mineralization and nitrification after 8 years restoration.

    PubMed

    Mo, Qifeng; Li, Zhi'an; Zhu, Weixing; Zou, Bi; Li, Yingwen; Yu, Shiqin; Ding, Yongzhen; Chen, Yao; Li, Xiaobo; Wang, Faming

    2016-01-22

    Nitrogen availability and tree species selection play important roles in reforestation. However, long-term field studies on the effects and mechanisms of tree species composition on N transformation are very limited. Eight years after tree seedlings were planted in a field experiment, we revisited the site and tested how tree species composition affects the dynamics of N mineralization and nitrification. Both tree species composition and season significantly influenced the soil dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen (DON). N-fixing Acacia crassicarpa monoculture had the highest DON, and 10-mixed species plantation had the highest DOC. The lowest DOC and DON concentrations were both observed in Eucalyptus urophylla monoculture. The tree species composition also significantly affected net N mineralization rates. The highest rate of net N mineralization was found in A. crassicarpa monoculture, which was over twice than that in Castanopsis hystrix monoculture. The annual net N mineralization rates of 10-mixed and 30-mixed plantations were similar as that of N-fixing monoculture. Since mixed plantations have good performance in increasing soil DOC, DON, N mineralization and plant biodiversity, we recommend that mixed species plantations should be used as a sustainable approach for the restoration of degraded land in southern China.

  1. Reaction Hg+I/sub 2/. -->. HgI+I revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Oprysko, M.M.; Aoiz, F.J.; McMahan, M.A.; Bernstein, R.B.

    1983-03-15

    The crossed molecular beam study of Mayer et al. (1977) on the subject reaction is revisited. The present work employs a different beam configuration and thus kinematic framework, and a larger range of relative translational energies is covered (i.e., from the threshold of 1.15 to 3.75 eV). Measurements include in-plane angular distributions and relative values of integral reaction cross sections as a function of energy. At low energies, the results of the present experiments are in good agreement with the previous work. Starting at the threshold, the reaction proceeds through the formation of a long-lived complex, presumed to be IHgI. At higher energies, the c.m. angular distributions show a gradual increase of the so-called ''backscattered component.'' This is interpreted as the opening of a new reaction path: the direct-mode abstraction of I via collinear approach of the Hg atom to the I/sub 2/ molecule. The overall dynamics of this reaction are interpreted in the context of the semiempirical potential energy surfaces and electronic state correlation diagrams of Muckerman et al. (1977). From the present experimental results, the height of the barrier in the exit channel for the collinear configuration can be estimated to be in the range 2.0--2.3 eV. The excitation function rises from threshold and reaches a maximum at collision energy of 2.6 eV, falling off monotonically thereafter.

  2. Reforestation in southern China: revisiting soil N mineralization and nitrification after 8 years restoration

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Qifeng; Li, Zhi’an; Zhu, Weixing; Zou, Bi; Li, Yingwen; Yu, Shiqin; Ding, Yongzhen; Chen, Yao; Li, Xiaobo; Wang, Faming

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen availability and tree species selection play important roles in reforestation. However, long-term field studies on the effects and mechanisms of tree species composition on N transformation are very limited. Eight years after tree seedlings were planted in a field experiment, we revisited the site and tested how tree species composition affects the dynamics of N mineralization and nitrification. Both tree species composition and season significantly influenced the soil dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen (DON). N-fixing Acacia crassicarpa monoculture had the highest DON, and 10-mixed species plantation had the highest DOC. The lowest DOC and DON concentrations were both observed in Eucalyptus urophylla monoculture. The tree species composition also significantly affected net N mineralization rates. The highest rate of net N mineralization was found in A. crassicarpa monoculture, which was over twice than that in Castanopsis hystrix monoculture. The annual net N mineralization rates of 10-mixed and 30-mixed plantations were similar as that of N-fixing monoculture. Since mixed plantations have good performance in increasing soil DOC, DON, N mineralization and plant biodiversity, we recommend that mixed species plantations should be used as a sustainable approach for the restoration of degraded land in southern China. PMID:26794649

  3. REVISITING THE FIRST GALAXIES: THE EFFECTS OF POPULATION III STARS ON THEIR HOST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Muratov, Alexander L.; Gnedin, Oleg Y.; Zemp, Marcel; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2013-08-01

    We revisit the formation and evolution of the first galaxies using new hydrodynamic cosmological simulations with the adaptive refinement tree code. Our simulations feature a recently developed model for H{sub 2} formation and dissociation, and a star formation recipe that is based on molecular rather than atomic gas. Here, we develop and implement a recipe for the formation of metal-free Population III (Pop III) stars in galaxy-scale simulations that resolve primordial clouds with sufficiently high density. We base our recipe on the results of prior zoom-in simulations that resolved the protostellar collapse in pre-galactic objects. We find the epoch during which Pop III stars dominated the energy and metal budget of the first galaxies to be short-lived. Galaxies that host Pop III stars do not retain dynamical signatures of their thermal and radiative feedback for more than 10{sup 8} years after the lives of the stars end in pair-instability supernovae, even when we consider the maximum reasonable efficiency of the feedback. Though metals ejected by the supernovae can travel well beyond the virial radius of the host galaxy, they typically begin to fall back quickly, and do not enrich a large fraction of the intergalactic medium. Galaxies with a total mass in excess of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} M{sub Sun} re-accrete most of their baryons and transition to metal-enriched Pop II star formation.

  4. Revisiting with Chandra the X-ray Scaling Relations of Early-Type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong-Woo

    2011-09-01

    The scaling relations of early-type galaxies are key observables which can be directly compared with theoretical models to better understand the evolution of the galaxies and their hot ISM. We revisit the scaling relations, using high spatial resolution Chandra observations of optical and X-ray selected early type galaxies, including a large fraction of gas-poor galaxies. We have accurately measured the X-ray properties of hot ISM, after carefully removing other individual emission components. In particular, we find a positive correlation between the luminosity and temperature of the hot ISM, significantly tighter than reported by earlier studies. This relation is particularly well defined in the subsample with σ>240 km/s, where it may be related to the analogous correlation found in cD galaxies and groups/clusters. However, the gas-poor galaxies with the shallowest potentials (σ < 200 km/s) also follow this relation, contrary to the expected anti-correlation in a simple outflow/wind scenario. Galaxies with intermediate values of σ instead tend to have the same kT, while Lx(gas) spans a factor of 20. We address the implications of our results in terms of theoretical predictions of the dynamical states of hot halos.

  5. Revisiting the vanishing refuge model of diversification.

    PubMed

    Damasceno, Roberta; Strangas, Maria L; Carnaval, Ana C; Rodrigues, Miguel T; Moritz, Craig

    2014-01-01

    Much of the debate around speciation and historical biogeography has focused on the role of stabilizing selection on the physiological (abiotic) niche, emphasizing how isolation and vicariance, when associated with niche conservatism, may drive tropical speciation. Yet, recent re-emphasis on the ecological dimensions of speciation points to a more prominent role of divergent selection in driving genetic, phenotypic, and niche divergence. The vanishing refuge model (VRM), first described by Vanzolini and Williams (1981), describes a process of diversification through climate-driven habitat fragmentation and exposure to new environments, integrating both vicariance and divergent selection. This model suggests that dynamic climates and peripheral isolates can lead to genetic and functional (i.e., ecological and phenotypic) diversity, resulting in sister taxa that occupy contrasting habitats with abutting distributions. Here, we provide predictions for populations undergoing divergence according to the VRM that encompass habitat dynamics, phylogeography, and phenotypic differentiation across populations. Such integrative analyses can, in principle, differentiate the operation of the VRM from other speciation models. We applied these principles to a lizard species, Coleodactylus meridionalis, which was used to illustrate the model in the original paper. We incorporate data on inferred historic habitat dynamics, phylogeography and thermal physiology to test for divergence between coastal and inland populations in the Atlantic Forest of Brazil. Environmental and genetic analyses are concordant with divergence through the VRM, yet physiological data are not. We emphasize the importance of multidisciplinary approaches to test this and alternative speciation models while seeking to explain the extraordinarily high genetic and phenotypic diversity of tropical biomes.

  6. Revisiting the vanishing refuge model of diversification

    PubMed Central

    Damasceno, Roberta; Strangas, Maria L.; Carnaval, Ana C.; Rodrigues, Miguel T.; Moritz, Craig

    2014-01-01

    Much of the debate around speciation and historical biogeography has focused on the role of stabilizing selection on the physiological (abiotic) niche, emphasizing how isolation and vicariance, when associated with niche conservatism, may drive tropical speciation. Yet, recent re-emphasis on the ecological dimensions of speciation points to a more prominent role of divergent selection in driving genetic, phenotypic, and niche divergence. The vanishing refuge model (VRM), first described by Vanzolini and Williams (1981), describes a process of diversification through climate-driven habitat fragmentation and exposure to new environments, integrating both vicariance and divergent selection. This model suggests that dynamic climates and peripheral isolates can lead to genetic and functional (i.e., ecological and phenotypic) diversity, resulting in sister taxa that occupy contrasting habitats with abutting distributions. Here, we provide predictions for populations undergoing divergence according to the VRM that encompass habitat dynamics, phylogeography, and phenotypic differentiation across populations. Such integrative analyses can, in principle, differentiate the operation of the VRM from other speciation models. We applied these principles to a lizard species, Coleodactylus meridionalis, which was used to illustrate the model in the original paper. We incorporate data on inferred historic habitat dynamics, phylogeography and thermal physiology to test for divergence between coastal and inland populations in the Atlantic Forest of Brazil. Environmental and genetic analyses are concordant with divergence through the VRM, yet physiological data are not. We emphasize the importance of multidisciplinary approaches to test this and alternative speciation models while seeking to explain the extraordinarily high genetic and phenotypic diversity of tropical biomes. PMID:25374581

  7. Revisiting a Problem of Two Freezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Easton, Don

    2014-02-01

    The January 2013 Physics Challenge for Teachers and Students has some features that are surprising and worth a closer look. The problem concerns a Carnot-cycle refrigeration unit operating inside a tent. It achieves dynamic equilibrium with a freezer ("cold") compartment temperature of TC=13°C, tent temperature of TH=1°C (the "hot" waste side of the freezer), and temperature "outside" the tent of TO=0°C. The problem is to find the equilibrium temperature inside the tent if an identical freezer is brought in and run simultaneously. As explained here, what constitutes an identical freezer is open to interpretation.

  8. Revisiting the social cost of carbon

    PubMed Central

    Nordhaus, William D.

    2017-01-01

    The social cost of carbon (SCC) is a central concept for understanding and implementing climate change policies. This term represents the economic cost caused by an additional ton of carbon dioxide emissions or its equivalent. The present study presents updated estimates based on a revised DICE model (Dynamic Integrated model of Climate and the Economy). The study estimates that the SCC is $31 per ton of CO2 in 2010 US$ for the current period (2015). For the central case, the real SCC grows at 3% per year over the period to 2050. The paper also compares the estimates with those from other sources. PMID:28143934

  9. Revisiting the social cost of carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordhaus, William D.

    2017-02-01

    The social cost of carbon (SCC) is a central concept for understanding and implementing climate change policies. This term represents the economic cost caused by an additional ton of carbon dioxide emissions or its equivalent. The present study presents updated estimates based on a revised DICE model (Dynamic Integrated model of Climate and the Economy). The study estimates that the SCC is 31 per ton of CO2 in 2010 US for the current period (2015). For the central case, the real SCC grows at 3% per year over the period to 2050. The paper also compares the estimates with those from other sources.

  10. Vaporisation of a dicationic ionic liquid revisited.

    PubMed

    Vitorino, Joana; Leal, João P; Licence, Peter; Lovelock, Kevin R J; Gooden, Peter N; Minas da Piedade, Manuel E; Shimizu, Karina; Rebelo, Luís P N; Canongia Lopes, José N

    2010-12-03

    The vaporization of a dicationic ionic liquid at moderate temperatures and under reduced pressures--recently studied by line-of-sight mass spectrometry--was further analyzed using an ion-cyclotron resonance mass spectroscopy technique that allows the monitoring of the different species present in the gas phase through the implementation of controlled ion-molecule reactions. The results support the view that the vapour phase of an aprotic dicationic ionic liquid is composed of neutral ion triplets (one dication attached to two anions). Molecular dynamics simulations were also performed in order to explain the magnitude of the vaporization enthalpies of dicationic ionic liquids vis-à-vis their monocationic counterparts.

  11. Nonclassical 21-Homododecahedryl Cation Rearrangement Revisited.

    PubMed

    Jalife, Said; Mondal, Sukanta; Osorio, Edison; Cabellos, José Luis; Martínez-Guajardo, Gerardo; Fernández-Herrera, María A; Merino, Gabriel

    2016-03-04

    The degenerate rearrangement in the 21-homododecahedryl cation (1) has been studied via density functional theory computations and Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics simulations. Compound 1 can be described as a highly fluxional hyperconjugated carbocation. Complete scrambling of 1 can be achieved by the combination of two unveiled barrierless processes. The first one is a "rotation" of one of the six-membered rings via a 0.8 kcal·mol(-1) barrier, and the second one is a slower interconvertion between two hyperconjomers via an out-of-plane methine bending (ΔG(⧧) = 4.0 kcal·mol(-1)).

  12. Revisiting the social cost of carbon.

    PubMed

    Nordhaus, William D

    2017-02-14

    The social cost of carbon (SCC) is a central concept for understanding and implementing climate change policies. This term represents the economic cost caused by an additional ton of carbon dioxide emissions or its equivalent. The present study presents updated estimates based on a revised DICE model (Dynamic Integrated model of Climate and the Economy). The study estimates that the SCC is $31 per ton of CO2 in 2010 US$ for the current period (2015). For the central case, the real SCC grows at 3% per year over the period to 2050. The paper also compares the estimates with those from other sources.

  13. Molecular ring rotation in solid ferrocene revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, Markus; Frick, Bernhard; Spehr, Tinka Luise; Stühn, Bernd

    2015-03-21

    We report on quasielastic neutron spectroscopy experiments on ferrocene (bis(η{sup 5}-cyclopentadienyl)iron) in its three different crystalline phases: the disordered monoclinic crystalline phase (T > 164 K), the metastable triclinic phase (T < 164 K), and the stable orthorhombic phase (T < 250 K). The cyclopentadienyl rings in ferrocene are known to undergo rotational reorientations for which the analysis of our large data set suggests partially a revision of the known picture of the dynamics and allows for an extension and completion of previous studies. In the monoclinic phase, guided by structural information, we propose a model for rotational jumps among non-equivalent sites in contrast to the established 5-fold jump rotation model. The new model takes the dynamical disorder into account and allows the cyclopentadienyl rings to reside in two different configurations which are found to be twisted by an angle of approximately 30°. In the triclinic phase, our analysis demands the use of a 2-ring model accounting for crystallographically independent sites with different barriers to rotation. For the orthorhombic phase of ferrocene, we confirm a significantly increased barrier of rotation using neutron backscattering spectroscopy. Our data analysis includes multiple scattering corrections and presents a novel approach of simultaneous analysis of different neutron scattering data by combining elastic and inelastic fixed window temperature scans with energy spectra, providing a very robust and reliable mean of extracting the individual activation energies of overlapping processes.

  14. Revisiting the block method for evaluating thermal conductivities of clay and granite

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determination of thermal conductivities of porous media using the contact method is revisited and revalidated with consideration of thermal contact resistance. Problems that limit the accuracy of determination of thermal conductivities of porous media are discussed. Thermal conductivities of granite...

  15. Revisiting the Capture of Mercury into Its 3:2 Spin-orbit Resonance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    well before differentiation. Keywords. celestial mechanics, planets and satellites: individual ( Mercury ) 1. Previous studies In the literature hitherto...2014 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Revisiting the capture of Mercury into its 3:2 spin-orbit...Astronomical Union 2014 doi:10.1017/S1743921314007765 Revisiting the capture of Mercury into its 3:2 spin-orbit resonance Benôıt Noyelles1, Julien

  16. Revisiting the Decision of Death in Hurst v. Florida.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Brian K; Ginory, Almari; Zedalis, Jennifer

    2016-12-01

    The United States Supreme Court has considered the question of whether a judge or a jury must make the findings necessary to support imposition of the death penalty in several notable cases, including Spaziano v. Florida (1984), Hildwin v. Florida (1989), and Ring v. Arizona (2002). In 2016, the U.S. Supreme Court revisited the subject in Hurst v. Florida Florida Statute § 921.141 allows the judge, after weighing aggravating and mitigating circumstances, to enter a sentence of life imprisonment or death. Before Hurst, Florida's bifurcated sentencing proceedings included an advisory sentence from jurors and a separate judicial hearing without juror involvement. In Hurst, the Court revisited the question of whether Florida's capital sentencing scheme violates the Sixth Amendment, which requires a jury, not a judge, to find each fact necessary to impose a sentence of death in light of Ring In an eight-to-one decision, the Court reversed the judgment of the Florida Supreme Court, holding that the Sixth Amendment requires a jury to find the aggravating factors necessary for imposing the death penalty. The role of Florida juries in capital sentencing proceedings was thereby elevated from advisory to determinative. We examine the Court's decision and offer commentary regarding this shift from judge to jury in the final imposition of the death penalty and the overall effect of this landmark case.

  17. Engineered nanoparticles: Revisiting safety concerns in light of ethno medicine.

    PubMed

    Palkhiwala, Suhani; Bakshi, Sonal R

    2014-01-01

    The nanoparticles are a miracle invention of the century that has opened novel avenues of applications in various fields. The safety aspect of exposure to nanoparticles for humans, plants, animals, soil micro-flora, and ecosystem at large has been questioned. The safety concern can be addressed by laboratory studies to assess the actual risk and recommend exposure limits and related regulation. There is also a suggestion for considering the nanoparticle form of conventional compounds as a new chemical and subject it to safety assessment in line with the chemical regulatory agencies. In the light of the current scenario of popularity and safety concerns regarding nanoparticles, the use of ancient metal based forms like, Bhasma is revisited in the present article. The current approach of green synthesis of nanoparticles is compared with the Ayurveda Rasayana Shastra guidelines of Bhasma preparation and modern preparation of engineered nanoparticles. Since the benefits of nanotechnology are undeniable, and safety concerns are also not ungrounded, there is a pressing need to revisit the ways nanoparticles are manufactured, and to carry out safety assessment by the techniques specially adapted for this novel compound.

  18. Revisiting Parametric Types and Virtual Classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Anders Bach; Ernst, Erik

    This paper presents a conceptually oriented updated view on the relationship between parametric types and virtual classes. The traditional view is that parametric types excel at structurally oriented composition and decomposition, and virtual classes excel at specifying mutually recursive families of classes whose relationships are preserved in derived families. Conversely, while class families can be specified using a large number of F-bounded type parameters, this approach is complex and fragile; and it is difficult to use traditional virtual classes to specify object composition in a structural manner, because virtual classes are closely tied to nominal typing. This paper adds new insight about the dichotomy between these two approaches; it illustrates how virtual constraints and type refinements, as recently introduced in gbeta and Scala, enable structural treatment of virtual types; finally, it shows how a novel kind of dynamic type check can detect compatibility among entire families of classes.

  19. Revisiting perturbations in extended quasidilaton massive gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Heisenberg, Lavinia

    2015-04-01

    In this work we study the theory of extended quasidilaton massive gravity together with the presence of matter fields. After discussing the homogeneous and isotropic fully dynamical background equations, which governs the exact expansion history of the universe, we consider small cosmological perturbations around these general FLRW solutions. The stability of tensor, vector and scalar perturbations on top of these general background solutions give rise to slightly different constraints on the parameters of the theory than those obtained in the approximative assumption of the late-time asymptotic form of the expansion history, which does not correspond to our current epoch. This opens up the possibility of stable FLRW solutions to be compared with current data on cosmic expansion with the restricted parameter space based on theoretical ground.

  20. H-bonding in protein hydration revisited

    PubMed Central

    Petukhov, Michael; Rychkov, Georgy; Firsov, Leonid; Serrano, Luis

    2004-01-01

    H-bonding between protein surface polar/charged groups and water is one of the key factors of protein hydration. Here, we introduce an Accessible Surface Area (ASA) model for computationally efficient estimation of a free energy of water–protein H-bonding at any given protein conformation. The free energy of water–protein H-bonds is estimated using empirical formulas describing probabilities of hydrogen bond formation that were derived from molecular dynamics simulations of water molecules at the surface of a small protein, Crambin, from the Abyssinian cabbage (Crambe abyssinica) seed. The results suggest that atomic solvation parameters (ASP) widely used in continuum hydration models might be dependent on ASA for polar/charged atoms under consideration. The predictions of the model are found to be in qualitative agreement with the available experimental data on model compounds. This model combines the computational speed of ASA potential, with the high resolution of more sophisticated solvation methods. PMID:15238635

  1. H-bonding in protein hydration revisited.

    PubMed

    Petukhov, Michael; Rychkov, Georgy; Firsov, Leonid; Serrano, Luis

    2004-08-01

    H-bonding between protein surface polar/charged groups and water is one of the key factors of protein hydration. Here, we introduce an Accessible Surface Area (ASA) model for computationally efficient estimation of a free energy of water-protein H-bonding at any given protein conformation. The free energy of water-protein H-bonds is estimated using empirical formulas describing probabilities of hydrogen bond formation that were derived from molecular dynamics simulations of water molecules at the surface of a small protein, Crambin, from the Abyssinian cabbage (Crambe abyssinica) seed. The results suggest that atomic solvation parameters (ASP) widely used in continuum hydration models might be dependent on ASA for polar/charged atoms under consideration. The predictions of the model are found to be in qualitative agreement with the available experimental data on model compounds. This model combines the computational speed of ASA potential, with the high resolution of more sophisticated solvation methods.

  2. Loop quantization of Schwarzschild interior revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Parampreet; Corichi, Alejandro

    2016-03-01

    Several studies of different inequivalent loop quantizations have shown, that there exists no fully satisfactory quantum theory for the Schwarzschild interior. Existing quantizations fail either on dependence on the fiducial structure or on the lack of the classical limit. Here we put forward a novel viewpoint to construct the quantum theory that overcomes all of the known problems of the existing quantizations. It is shown that the quantum gravitational constraint is well defined past the singularity and that its effective dynamics possesses a bounce into an expanding regime. The classical singularity is avoided, and a semiclassical spacetime satisfying vacuum Einstein's equations is recovered on the ``other side'' of the bounce. We argue that such metric represents the interior region of a white-hole spacetime, but for which the corresponding ``white-hole mass'' differs from the original black hole mass. We compare the differences in physical implications with other quantizations.

  3. Revisiting anomalous structures in liquid Ga.

    PubMed

    Tsai, K H; Wu, Ten-Ming; Tsay, Shiow-Fon

    2010-01-21

    In terms of an interatomic pair potential, which well characterizes the dynamic properties of liquid Ga, we investigate again the origin of the well known high-q shoulder in the static structure factor of the liquid. Similar to the results of Gong's simulation at high temperature, dimers with extremely short bond lengths are indeed found in our model just above the melting point, but our results indicate that it is unlikely for the high-q shoulder to be produced by these dimers. Instead, based on our model, the high-q shoulder is resulted from some medium-range order, which is related to the structures beyond the first shell of the radial distribution function, caused by Friedel oscillations within a nanoscale range.

  4. Cell repair: Revisiting the patch hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Nicholas R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Plasma membrane damage elicits a complex and dynamic cellular response. A vital component of this response, membrane resealing, is thought to arise from fusion of intracellular membranous compartments to form a temporary, impermeant patch at the site of damage; however, this hypothesis has been difficult to confirm visually. By utilizing advanced microscopy technologies with high spatiotemporal resolution in wounded Xenopus laevis oocytes, we provide the first direct visualization of the membrane fusion events predicted by the patch hypothesis; we show the barrier formed by patching is capable of abating exchange of material across the plasma membrane within seconds. Profound changes also occur to the plasma membrane surrounding wounds; lipid remodeling is accompanied by membrane fusion events, both conventional (e.g., exocytosis) and novel (e.g., “explodosis”). Further, we reveal additional complexity in wound-induced subcellular patterning, supporting existing evidence that extensive interactions between lipid, protein, and ionic signaling pathways shape the cellular wound response. PMID:28042380

  5. Minimal Model of Plankton Systems Revisited with Spatial Diffusion and Maturation Delay.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiantao; Tian, Jianjun Paul; Wei, Junjie

    2016-03-01

    This study revisits the minimal model for a plankton ecosystem proposed by Scheffer with spatial diffusion of plankton and the delay of the maturation period of herbivorous zooplankton. It deepens our understanding of effects of the nutrients and the predation of fish upon zooplankton on the dynamical patterns of the plankton system and also presents new phenomena induced by the delay with spatial diffusion. When the nutrient level is sufficient low, the zooplankton population collapses and the phytoplankton population reaches its carrying capacity. Mathematically, the global stability of the boundary equilibrium is proved. As the nutrient level increases, the system switches to coexistent equilibria or oscillations depending on the maturation period of zooplankton and the predation rate of fish on herbivorous zooplankton. Under an eutrophic condition, there is a unique coexistent homogeneous equilibrium, and the equilibrium density of phytoplankton increases, while the equilibrium density of herbivorous zooplankton decreases as the fish predation rate on herbivorous zooplankton is increasing. The study shows that the system will never collapses under the eutrophic condition unless the fish predation rate approaches infinite. The study also finds a functional bifurcation relation between the delay parameter of the maturation period of herbivorous zooplankton and the fish predation rate on herbivorous zooplankton that, above a critical value of the fish predation rate, the system stays at the coexistent equilibrium, and below that value, the system switches its dynamical patterns among stable and unstable equilibria and oscillations. The oscillations emerge from Hopf bifurcations, and a detailed mathematical analysis about the Hopf bifurcations is carried out to give relevant ecological predications.

  6. Revisiting sea level changes in the North Sea during the Anthropocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Jürgen; Dangendorf, Sönke; Wahl, Thomas; Niehüser, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    The North Sea is one of the best instrumented ocean basins in the world. Here we revisit sea level changes in the North Sea region from tide gauges, satellite altimetry, hydrographic profiles and ocean reanalysis data from the beginning of the 19th century to present. This includes an overview of the sea level chapter of the North Sea Climate Change Assessment (NOSCCA) complemented by results from more recent investigations. The estimates of long-term changes from tide gauge records are significantly affected by vertical land motion (VLM), which is related to both the large-scale viscoelastic response of the solid earth to ice melting since the last deglaciation and local effects. Removing VLM (estimated from various data sources such as GPS, tide gauge minus altimetry and GIA) significantly reduces the spatial variability of long-term trends in the basin. VLM corrected tide gauge records suggest a transition from relatively moderate changes in the 19th century towards modern trends of roughly 1.5 mm/yr during the 20th century. Superimposed on the long-term changes there is a considerable inter-annual to multi-decadal variability. On inter-annual timescales this variability mainly reflects the barotropic response of the ocean to atmospheric forcing with the inverted barometer effect dominating along the UK and Norwegian coastlines and wind forcing controlling the southeastern part of the basin. The decadal variability is mostly remotely forced and dynamically linked to the North Atlantic via boundary waves in response to long-shore winds along the continental slope. These findings give valuable information about the required horizontal resolution of ocean models and the necessary boundary conditions and are therefore important for the dynamical downscaling of sea level projections for the North Sea coastlines.

  7. Regular Language Constrained Sequence Alignment Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucherov, Gregory; Pinhas, Tamar; Ziv-Ukelson, Michal

    Imposing constraints in the form of a finite automaton or a regular expression is an effective way to incorporate additional a priori knowledge into sequence alignment procedures. With this motivation, Arslan [1] introduced the Regular Language Constrained Sequence Alignment Problem and proposed an O(n 2 t 4) time and O(n 2 t 2) space algorithm for solving it, where n is the length of the input strings and t is the number of states in the non-deterministic automaton, which is given as input. Chung et al. [2] proposed a faster O(n 2 t 3) time algorithm for the same problem. In this paper, we further speed up the algorithms for Regular Language Constrained Sequence Alignment by reducing their worst case time complexity bound to O(n 2 t 3/logt). This is done by establishing an optimal bound on the size of Straight-Line Programs solving the maxima computation subproblem of the basic dynamic programming algorithm. We also study another solution based on a Steiner Tree computation. While it does not improve the run time complexity in the worst case, our simulations show that both approaches are efficient in practice, especially when the input automata are dense.

  8. Revisiting tolerance from the endogenous morphine perspective.

    PubMed

    Stefano, George B; Kream, Richard M; Esch, Tobias

    2009-09-01

    Tolerance represents a dynamic mechanism that can be used to temper various regulatory processes regardless of whether they mediate excitation or inhibition. Tolerance operationally directs state-dependent attenuation of the action of endogenous and exogenous morphine. For example, tolerance ensures that immuno-inhibition induced by morphine does not compromise a requisite functional system over an extended period of time. In the nervous system, tolerance to inhibitory action insures that excitatory tone is resumed. Thus, desensitization sets in and allows various essential processes to be operational once again. Clearly, the temporal rebound of diverse immune and nervous processes involved with opiate actions provides a self-contained operational mechanism to ensure survival of the organism. Furthermore, love and/or pleasure, and satiety, are complex neurobiological phenomena linked to limbic brain reward circuitry. These processes are critically dependent on oxytocin, vasopressin, dopamine, endogenous morphine and serotoninergic signaling. Naturally rewarding and/or pleasurable activities are usually governed by beneficial biological behaviors like eating, sex, and reproduction. It is our contention that critically important tolerance mechanisms extend to behaviors mediated by CNS reward systems. In other words, we become satisfied with sex, food, pleasure for the moment and disinterest creeps in until the "urges" return.

  9. Loop quantization of the Schwarzschild interior revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corichi, Alejandro; Singh, Parampreet

    2016-03-01

    The loop quantization of the Schwarzschild interior region, as described by a homogeneous anisotropic Kantowski-Sachs model, is re-examined. As several studies of different—inequivalent—loop quantizations have shown, to date there exists no fully satisfactory quantum theory for this model. This fact poses challenges to the validity of some scenarios to address the black hole information problem. Here we put forward a novel viewpoint to construct the quantum theory that builds from some of the models available in the literature. The final picture is a quantum theory that is both independent of any auxiliary structure and possesses a correct low curvature limit. It represents a subtle but non-trivial modification of the original prescription given by Ashtekar and Bojowald. It is shown that the quantum gravitational constraint is well defined past the singularity and that its effective dynamics possesses a bounce into an expanding regime. The classical singularity is avoided, and a semiclassical spacetime satisfying vacuum Einstein’s equations is recovered on the ‘other side’ of the bounce. We argue that such a metric represents the interior region of a white-hole spacetime, but for which the corresponding ‘white hole mass’ differs from the original black hole mass. Furthermore, we find that the value of the white hole mass is proportional to the third power of the starting black hole mass.

  10. Wheeler & Feynman's Response of the Universe, revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Milo

    2003-04-01

    In a famous 1945 paper Wheeler and Feynman (1) sought the cause of radiation from an accelerated electron. They assumed that acceleration produced an electromagnetic wave pulse from the electron that caused responding waves from static point-particle absorbers in the universe. Problems arose with possible violation of causality by waves that begin before their cause. This paper points out that a rigorous logical solution is obtained (2) when the electron is a dynamic structure of two scalar quantum waves. The scalar wave equation produces two such inward and outward spherical waves. The two waves combined have complete properties of positrons and electrons and the natural laws. Thus the problem is resolved by replacing the point particle with a scalar quantum wave structure (3). ... The conclusion: The universe and the laws of nature are inter-connected by co-mingled matter waves. Thus if the stars did not exist, it would be meaningless to think that we could exist. 1) Wheeler & Feynman, RMP, 17, 157 (1945). 2) Wolff, Gravition and Cosmology, Kluwer Acad. Publ. (2002). 3) www.QuantumMatter.com

  11. NEC violation in mimetic cosmology revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ijjas, Anna; Ripley, Justin; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2016-09-01

    In the context of Einstein gravity, if the null energy condition (NEC) is satisfied, the energy density in expanding space-times always decreases while in contracting space-times the energy density grows and the universe eventually collapses into a singularity. In particular, no non-singular bounce is possible. It is, though, an open question if this energy condition can be violated in a controlled way, i.e., without introducing pathologies, such as unstable negative-energy states or an imaginary speed of sound. In this letter, we will re-examine the claim that the recently proposed mimetic scenario can violate the NEC without pathologies. We show that mimetic cosmology is prone to gradient instabilities even in cases when the NEC is satisfied (except for trivial examples). Most interestingly, the source of the instability is always the Einstein-Hilbert term in the action. The matter stress-energy component does not contribute spatial gradient terms but instead makes the problematic curvature modes dynamical. We also show that mimetic cosmology can be understood as a singular limit of known, well-behaved theories involving higher-derivative kinetic terms and discuss ways of removing the instability.

  12. Time Variability of Titan's Ionosphere Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Jen-Kai; Ip, Wing-Huen; Perryman, Rebecca; Waite, Hunter

    2015-04-01

    Since the Saturn Orbital Insertion in 2004, the Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) experiment aboard the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft has acquired an extensive data set. The decadal coverage of the measurements during numerous close encounters with Titan allows the study of spatial and temporal variations of Titan's nitrogen-rich atmosphere above 1000-km altitude. Titan's ionosphere is quite different to that of Earth's ionosphere. Due to Titan's thick (hundreds of kilometers) and dense atmosphere, the measurable ion density of Titan's nightside ionosphere extends well beyond the terminator. The diurnal variation of the ion density profiles and compositional changes are the result of photoionization and magnetospheric electron ionization (important at the night side). The different time evolutions of the light and heavy species from day to night could be indicative of the effects of flow dynamics and ion-molecule chemistry. From the observations, we can determine the ion content in Titan's night-side and the asymmetry between the dawn and dusk ion density profiles. We have also found in the long term data base the signature of the equatorial expansion of Titan's atmosphere during solar maximum. In addition the global distributions of the major compound N2 and minor species like CH4 and H2 all exhibit significant changes over a solar cycle as the closest approach points of Cassini moved from the northern hemisphere to the southern hemisphere. In this work, we will first compare the diurnal variations between different ion species and simulate the ion densities to study the possible contributing factors. Then we will compare the results of our analysis to those reported by other groups to construct a comprehensive model of Titan's neutral atmosphere and ionosphere under different solar conditions.

  13. Revisiting Feynman's ratchet with thermoelectric transport theory.

    PubMed

    Apertet, Y; Ouerdane, H; Goupil, C; Lecoeur, Ph

    2014-07-01

    We show how the formalism used for thermoelectric transport may be adapted to Smoluchowski's seminal thought experiment, also known as Feynman's ratchet and pawl system. Our analysis rests on the notion of useful flux, which for a thermoelectric system is the electrical current and for Feynman's ratchet is the effective jump frequency. Our approach yields original insight into the derivation and analysis of the system's properties. In particular we define an entropy per tooth in analogy with the entropy per carrier or Seebeck coefficient, and we derive the analog to Kelvin's second relation for Feynman's ratchet. Owing to the formal similarity between the heat fluxes balance equations for a thermoelectric generator (TEG) and those for Feynman's ratchet, we introduce a distribution parameter γ that quantifies the amount of heat that flows through the cold and hot sides of both heat engines. While it is well established that γ = 1/2 for a TEG, it is equal to 1 for Feynman's ratchet. This implies that no heat may be rejected in the cold reservoir for the latter case. Further, the analysis of the efficiency at maximum power shows that the so-called Feynman efficiency corresponds to that of an exoreversible engine, with γ = 1. Then, turning to the nonlinear regime, we generalize the approach based on the convection picture and introduce two different types of resistance to distinguish the dynamical behavior of the considered system from its ability to dissipate energy. We finally put forth the strong similarity between the original Feynman ratchet and a mesoscopic thermoelectric generator with a single conducting channel.

  14. Orbital anisotropy in cosmological haloes revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojtak, Radosław; Gottlöber, Stefan; Klypin, Anatoly

    2013-09-01

    The velocity anisotropy of particles inside dark matter (DM) haloes is an important physical quantity, which is required for the accurate modelling of mass profiles of galaxies and clusters of galaxies. It is typically measured using the ratio of the radial to tangential velocity dispersions at a given distance from the halo centre. However, this measure is insufficient to describe the dynamics of realistic haloes, which are not spherical and are typically quite elongated. Studying the velocity distribution in massive DM haloes in cosmological simulations, we find that in the inner parts of the haloes, the local velocity ellipsoids are strongly aligned with the major axis of the halo, the alignment being stronger for more relaxed haloes. In the outer regions of the haloes, the alignment becomes gradually weaker and the orientation is more random. These two distinct regions of different degree of the alignment coincide with two characteristic regimes of the DM density profile: a shallow inner cusp and a steep outer profile that are separated by a characteristic radius at which the density declines as ρ ∝ r-2. This alignment of the local velocity ellipsoids requires reinterpretation of features found in measurements based on the spherically averaged ratio of the radial to tangential velocity dispersions. In particular, we show that the velocity distribution in the central halo regions is highly anisotropic. For cluster-size haloes with mass 1014-1015 h-1 M⊙, the velocity anisotropy along the major axis is nearly independent of radius and is equal to β = 1 - σ ^2_perp/σ ^2_radial≈ 0.4, which is significantly larger than the previously estimated spherically averaged velocity anisotropy. The alignment of density and velocity anisotropies and the radial trends may also have some implications for the mass modelling based on kinematical data of objects such as galaxy clusters or dwarf spheroidals, where the orbital anisotropy is a key element in an unbiased mass

  15. Revisiting static modulation in pyramid wavefront sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marafatto, L.; Ragazzoni, R.; Vassallo, D.; Bergomi, M.; Biondi, F.; Farinato, J.; Greggio, D.; Magrin, D.; Viotto, V.

    2016-07-01

    The Pyramid Sensor (PS) is based on the Focault knife-edge test, yielding then, in geometrical approximation, only the sign of the wavefront slope. To provide linear measurements of the wavefront slopes the PS relies on a technique known as modulation, which also plays a central role to improve the linear range of the pyramid WFS, very small in the nonmodulated case. In the main PS using modulation so far, this task is achieved by moving optical components in the WFS, increasing the complexity of the system. An attractive idea to simplify the optical and mechanical design of a pyramid WFS is to work without any dynamic modulation. This concept was only merely described and functionally tested in the framework of MAD, and subsequently, with a holographic diffuser. The latter produce a sort of random distribution of the light coming out from the pupil plane, leading to sort of inefficient modulation, as most of the rays are focused in the central region of the light diffused by such device. The bi-dimensional original grating is, in contrast, producing a well defined deterministic distribution of the light onto a specifically shaped pattern. A crude option has been already discussed as a possibility, and it is here generalized to holographic plates leading to various distribution of lights, including a circle whose diameter would match the required modulation pattern, or more cost effective approaches like the one of a square pattern. These holographic diffusers would exhibit also zero-th and high order patterns and the actual size of the equivalent modulation would be linearly wavelength dependent, leading to colour effects that requires a careful handling in order to properly choose the right amount of equivalent modulation.

  16. The spectroscopic orbit of Capella revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, M.; Strassmeier, K. G.

    2011-07-01

    Context. Capella is among the few binary stars with two evolved giant components. The hotter component is a chromospherically active star within the Hertzsprung gap, while the cooler star is possibly helium-core burning. Aims: The known inclination of the orbital plane from astrometry in combination with precise radial velocities will allow very accurate masses to be determined for the individual Capella stars. This will constrain their evolutionary stage and possibly the role of the active star's magnetic field on the dynamical evolution of the binary system. Methods: We obtained a total of 438 high-resolution échelle spectra during the years 2007-2010 and used the measured velocities to recompute the orbital elements. Our double-lined orbital solution yields average residuals of 64 m s-1 for the cool component and 297 m s-1 for the more rapidly rotating hotter component. Results: The semi-amplitude of the cool component is smaller by 0.045 km s-1 than the orbit determination of Torres et al. from data taken during 1996-1999 but more precise by a factor of 5.5, while for the hotter component it is larger by 0.580 km s-1 and more precise by a factor of 3.6. This corresponds to masses of 2.573 ± 0.009 M⊙ and 2.488 ± 0.008 M⊙ for the cool and hot component, respectively. Their relative errors of 0.34% and 0.30% are about half of the values given in Torres et al. for a combined literature-data solution but with absolute values different by 4% and 2% for the two components, respectively. The mass ratio of the system is therefore q = MA/MB = 0.9673 ± 0.0020. Conclusions: Our orbit is the most precise and also likely to be the most accurate ever obtained for Capella. Based on data obtained with the STELLA robotic telescope in Tenerife, an AIP facility jointly operated by AIP and IAC.Full Table 1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/531/A89

  17. Revisiting a Classic Study of the Molecular Clock.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Lauren M; Boland, Joseph R; Braverman, John M

    2016-03-01

    A constant rate of molecular evolution among homologous proteins and across lineages is known as the molecular clock. This concept has been useful for estimating divergence times. Here, we revisit a study by Richard Dickerson (J Mol Evol 1:26-45, 1971), wherein he provided striking visual evidence for a constant rate of amino acid changes among various evolutionary branch points. Dickerson's study is commonly cited as support of the molecular clock and a figure from it is often reproduced in textbooks. Since its publication, however, there have been updates made to dates of common ancestors based on the fossil record that should be considered. Additionally, collecting the accession numbers and carefully outlining Dickerson's methods serves as a resource to students of the molecular clock hypothesis.

  18. Revisiting the thermodynamic relations in AdS /CMT models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, Seungjoon; Park, Sang-A.; Yi, Sang-Heon

    2017-03-01

    Motivated by the recent unified approach to the Smarr-like relation of anti-de Sitter (AdS) planar black holes in conjunction with the quasilocal formalism on conserved charges, we revisit the quantum statistical and thermodynamic relations of hairy AdS planar black holes. By extending the previous results, we identify the hairy contribution in the bulk and show that the holographic computation can be improved so that it is consistent with the bulk computation. We argue that the first law can be retained in its universal form and that the relation between the on-shell renormalized Euclidean action and its free energy interpretation in gravity may also be undeformed even with the hairy contribution in hairy AdS black holes.

  19. The roles of kisspeptin revisited: inside and outside the hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    UENOYAMA, Yoshihisa; PHENG, Vutha; TSUKAMURA, Hiroko; MAEDA, Kei-ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Kisspeptin, encoded by KISS1/Kiss1 gene, is now considered a master regulator of reproductive functions in mammals owing to its involvement in the direct activation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons after binding to its cognate receptor, GPR54. Ever since the discovery of kisspeptin, intensive studies on hypothalamic expression of KISS1/Kiss1 and on physiological roles of hypothalamic kisspeptin neurons have provided clues as to how the brain controls sexual maturation at the onset of puberty and subsequent reproductive performance in mammals. Additionally, emerging evidence indicates the potential involvement of extra-hypothalamic kisspeptin in reproductive functions. Here, we summarize data regarding kisspeptin inside and outside the hypothalamus and revisit the physiological roles of central and peripheral kisspeptins in the reproductive functions of mammals. PMID:27478063

  20. A short revisit to Kuo-Brown effective interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, XiaoBao; Dong, GuoXiang

    2015-10-01

    This paper is a short revisit to Kuo-Brown effective interaction derived from the Hamada-Johnston nucleon-nucleon potential, done by Gerry Brown and Tom Kuo. This effective interaction, derived in year 1966, is the first attempt to describe nuclear structure properties from the free nucleon-nucleon potential. Nowadays much progress has been achieved for the effective interactions in shell model. We would compare the effective interactions obtained in the 1966 paper with up-to-date shell-model interactions in sd-shell and pf-shell model space. Recent knowledge of effective interactions on nuclear structure, can also be traced in the Kuo- Brown effective interaction, i.e., the universal roles of central and tensor forces, which reminds us that such discovery should be noticed much earlier.

  1. Dark matter relic density in scalar-tensor gravity revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Meehan, Michael T.; Whittingham, Ian B. E-mail: Ian.Whittingham@jcu.edu.au

    2015-12-01

    We revisit the calculation of dark matter relic abundances in scalar-tensor gravity using a generic form A(φ{sub *}) = e{sup βφ{sub *}{sup 2/2}} for the coupling between the scalar field φ{sub *} and the metric, for which detailed Big Bang Nucleosynthesis constraints are available. We find that BBN constraints restrict the modified expansion rate in these models to be almost degenerate with the standard expansion history at the time of dark matter decoupling. In this case the maximum level of enhancement of the dark matter relic density was found to be a factor of ∼ 3, several orders of magnitude below that found in previous investigations.

  2. Axial Electron Heat Loss From Mirror Devices Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D

    2004-08-16

    An issue of the axial electron heat loss is of a significant importance for mirror-based fusion devices. This problem has been considered in a number of publications but it is still shrouded in misconceptions. In this paper we revisit it once again. We discuss the following issues: (1) Formation of the electron distribution function in the end tank at large expansion ratios; (2) The secondary emission from the end plates and the ways of suppressing it (if needed); (3) Ionization and charge exchange in the presence of neutrals in the end tanks; (4) Instabilities caused by the peculiar shape of the electron distribution function and their possible impact on the electron heat losses; (5) Electron heat losses in the pulsed mode of operation of mirror devices.

  3. Revisiting Public Health Challenges in the New Millennium

    PubMed Central

    Anish, TS; Sreelakshmi, PR

    2013-01-01

    Positive Health of the communities could only be brought out through the interrelationship between conventional health sector and other development sectors. It was a dream that came true when World Health Organization (WHO) accepted Primary Health Care (PHC) as the major tool to achieve its proposed goal of Health For All (HFA) by 2000 A.D., but we could not succeed as expected. Now we have the Millennium Development Goals (MDG), which place health at the heart of development but the achievements in health is still challenging. The literature search in this article has been conducted in Pub Med and Google scholar, with the aim to draw references to discuss the major health issues and ways to tackle them. The current article briefly narrates the burden and complexities of challenges faced by the present global health. Revisiting the concept of PHC and reaffirming our solidarity to this philosophy is the need of this hour. PMID:24116303

  4. Energy in synthetic fertilizers and pesticides: Revisited. Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, M.G.; English, B.C.; Turhollow, A.F.; Nyangito, H.O.

    1994-01-01

    Agricultural chemicals that are derived from fossil-fuels are the major energy intensive inputs in agriculture. Growing scarcity of the world`s fossil resources stimulated research and development of energy-efficient technology for manufacturing these chemicals in the last decade. The purpose of this study is to revisit the energy requirements of major plant nutrients and pesticides. The data from manufacturers energy survey conducted by The Fertilizer Institute are used to estimate energy requirements of fertilizers. Energy estimates for pesticides are developed from consulting previously published literature. The impact of technical innovation in the fertilizer industry to US corn, cotton, soybean and wheat producers is estimated in terms of energy-saving.

  5. Neuroticism and vigilance revisited: A transcranial doppler investigation.

    PubMed

    Mandell, Arielle R; Becker, Alexandra; VanAndel, Aaron; Nelson, Andrew; Shaw, Tyler H

    2015-11-01

    Selecting for vigilance assignments remains an important factor in human performance research. The current study revisits the potential relationship between vigilance performance and trait neuroticism, in light of two possible theories. The first theory suggests that neuroticism impairs vigilance performance by competing for available resources. The second theory, attentional control theory, posits that high neuroticism can result in similar or superior performance levels due to the allocation of compensatory effort. In the present study, Transcranial Doppler Sonography was used to investigate the neurophysiological underpinnings of neuroticism during a 12-min abbreviated vigilance task. Performance results were not modified by level of neuroticism, but high neuroticism was associated with higher initial CBFV levels and a greater CBFV decrement over time. These findings indicate that participants higher in neuroticism recruited additional cognitive resources in order to achieve similar performance, suggesting that there is more of an effect on processing efficiency than effectiveness.

  6. Reduplication revisited: functions, constraints, repairs, and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Klein, Harriet B

    2005-02-01

    This case study considers the phonological forms of early lexical items produced by 1 normally developing boy, from 19 to 22 months of age, who began to produce all monosyllabic words as bisyllabic. In order to link this empirical data (the apparent creation of increased complexity) with universal tendencies (motivated by the reduction of complexity), the functions of reduplication were revisited. Phonological processes (i.e., reduplication and final consonant deletion) are viewed as repairs motivated by 2 interacting constraints (i.e., constraints on monosyllabic words and on word-final consonants). These longitudinal case study data provide further evidence for a relationship between final consonant deletion and reduplication. A possible treatment approach for similar patterns demonstrated clinically is recommended.

  7. Willis elastodynamic homogenization theory revisited for periodic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassar, H.; He, Q.-C.; Auffray, N.

    2015-04-01

    The theory of elastodynamic homogenization initiated by J.R. Willis is revisited for periodically inhomogeneous media through a careful scrutiny of the main aspects of that theory in the 3D continuum context and by applying it to the thorough treatment of a simple 1D discrete periodic system. The Bloch theorem appears to be central to appropriately defining and interpreting effective fields. Based on some physical arguments, three necessary conditions are derived for the transition from the microscopic description to the macroscopic description of periodic media. The parameters involved in the Willis effective constitutive relation are expressed in terms of two localization tensors and specified with the help of the corresponding Green function in the spirit of micromechanics. These results are illustrated and discussed for the 1D discrete periodic system considered. In particular, inspired by Brillouin's study, the dependency of the effective constitutive parameters on the frequency is physically interpreted in terms of oscillation modes of the underlying microstructure.

  8. How clonal are Neisseria species? The epidemic clonality model revisited.

    PubMed

    Tibayrenc, Michel; Ayala, Francisco J

    2015-07-21

    The three species Neisseria meningitidis, Neisseria gonorrheae, and Neisseria lactamica are often regarded as highly recombining bacteria. N. meningitidis has been considered a paradigmatic case of the "semiclonal model" or of "epidemic clonality," demonstrating occasional bouts of clonal propagation in an otherwise recombining species. In this model, occasional clonality generates linkage disequilibrium in the short term. In the long run, however, the effects of clonality are countered by recombination. We show that many data are at odds with this proposal and that N. meningitidis fits the criteria that we have proposed for predominant clonal evolution (PCE). We point out that (i) the proposed way to distinguish epidemic clonality from PCE may be faulty and (ii) the evidence of deep phylogenies by microarrays and whole-genome sequencing is at odds with the predictions of the semiclonal model. Last, we revisit the species status of N. meningitidis, N. gonorrheae, and N. lactamica in the light of the PCE model.

  9. Kinetic theory of turbulence for parallel propagation revisited: Formal results

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Peter H.

    2015-08-15

    In a recent paper, Gaelzer et al. [Phys. Plasmas 22, 032310 (2015)] revisited the second-order nonlinear kinetic theory for turbulence propagating in directions parallel/anti-parallel to the ambient magnetic field. The original work was according to Yoon and Fang [Phys. Plasmas 15, 122312 (2008)], but Gaelzer et al. noted that the terms pertaining to discrete-particle effects in Yoon and Fang's theory did not enjoy proper dimensionality. The purpose of Gaelzer et al. was to restore the dimensional consistency associated with such terms. However, Gaelzer et al. was concerned only with linear wave-particle interaction terms. The present paper completes the analysis by considering the dimensional correction to nonlinear wave-particle interaction terms in the wave kinetic equation.

  10. Revisiting Johnson and Jackson boundary conditions for granular flows

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tingwen; Benyahia, Sofiane

    2012-07-01

    In this article, we revisit Johnson and Jackson boundary conditions for granular flows. The oblique collision between a particle and a flat wall is analyzed by adopting the classic rigid-body theory and a more realistic semianalytical model. Based on the kinetic granular theory, the input parameter for the partial-slip boundary conditions, specularity coefficient, which is not measurable in experiments, is then interpreted as a function of the particle-wall restitution coefficient, the frictional coefficient, and the normalized slip velocity at the wall. An analytical expression for the specularity coefficient is suggested for a flat, frictional surface with a low frictional coefficient. The procedure for determining the specularity coefficient for a more general problem is outlined, and a working approximation is provided.

  11. Feedback instability in the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling system: Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, T.-H.

    2010-02-15

    A coupled set of the reduced magnetohydrodynamic and the two-fluid equations is applied to the magnetosphere-ionosphere (M-I) feedback interactions in relation to growth of quite auroral arcs. A theoretical analysis revisiting the linear feedback instability reveals asymptotic behaviors of the dispersion relation and a non-Hermite property in the M-I coupling. A nonlinear simulation of the feedback instability in the M-I coupling system manifests growth of the Kelvin-Helmholtz-like mode in the magnetosphere as the secondary instability. The distorted vortex and field-aligned current profiles propagating as the shear Alfven waves lead to spontaneous deformation of ionospheric density and current structures associated with auroral arcs.

  12. Feedback instability in the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling system: Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, T.-H.

    2010-02-01

    A coupled set of the reduced magnetohydrodynamic and the two-fluid equations is applied to the magnetosphere-ionosphere (M-I) feedback interactions in relation to growth of quite auroral arcs. A theoretical analysis revisiting the linear feedback instability reveals asymptotic behaviors of the dispersion relation and a non-Hermite property in the M-I coupling. A nonlinear simulation of the feedback instability in the M-I coupling system manifests growth of the Kelvin-Helmholtz-like mode in the magnetosphere as the secondary instability. The distorted vortex and field-aligned current profiles propagating as the shear Alfvén waves lead to spontaneous deformation of ionospheric density and current structures associated with auroral arcs.

  13. Revisiting the Interaction between the Chaperone Skp and Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Burmann, Björn M.; Holdbrook, Daniel A.; Callon, Morgane; Bond, Peter J.; Hiller, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial outer membrane comprises two main classes of components, lipids and membrane proteins. These nonsoluble compounds are conveyed across the aqueous periplasm along specific molecular transport routes: the lipid lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is shuttled by the Lpt system, whereas outer membrane proteins (Omps) are transported by chaperones, including the periplasmic Skp. In this study, we revisit the specificity of the chaperone-lipid interaction of Skp and LPS. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy measurements indicate that LPS interacts with Skp nonspecifically, accompanied by destabilization of the Skp trimer and similar to denaturation by the nonnatural detergent lauryldimethylamine-N-oxide (LDAO). Bioinformatic analysis of amino acid conservation, structural analysis of LPS-binding proteins, and MD simulations further confirm the absence of a specific LPS binding site on Skp, making a biological relevance of the interaction unlikely. Instead, our analysis reveals a highly conserved salt-bridge network, which likely has a role for Skp function. PMID:25809264

  14. Response variance in functional maps: neural darwinism revisited.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hirokazu; Yokota, Ryo; Kanzaki, Ryohei

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms by which functional maps and map plasticity contribute to cortical computation remain controversial. Recent studies have revisited the theory of neural Darwinism to interpret the learning-induced map plasticity and neuronal heterogeneity observed in the cortex. Here, we hypothesize that the Darwinian principle provides a substrate to explain the relationship between neuron heterogeneity and cortical functional maps. We demonstrate in the rat auditory cortex that the degree of response variance is closely correlated with the size of its representational area. Further, we show that the response variance within a given population is altered through training. These results suggest that larger representational areas may help to accommodate heterogeneous populations of neurons. Thus, functional maps and map plasticity are likely to play essential roles in Darwinian computation, serving as effective, but not absolutely necessary, structures to generate diverse response properties within a neural population.

  15. Global Instability on Laminar Separation Bubbles-Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theofilis, Vassilis; Rodriquez, Daniel; Smith, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    In the last 3 years, global linear instability of LSB has been revisited, using state-of-the-art hardware and algorithms. Eigenspectra of LSB flows have been understood and classified in branches of known and newly-discovered eigenmodes. Major achievements: World-largest numerical solutions of global eigenvalue problems are routinely performed. Key aerodynamic phenomena have been explained via critical point theory, applied to our global mode results. Theoretical foundation for control of LSB flows has been laid. Global mode of LSB at the origin of observable phenomena. U-separation on semi-infinite plate. Stall cells on (stalled) airfoil. Receptivity/Sensitivity/AFC feasible (practical?) via: Adjoint EVP solution. Direct/adjoint coupling (the Crete connection). Minor effect of compressibility on global instability in the subsonic compressible regime. Global instability analysis of LSB in realistic supersonic flows apparently quite some way down the horizon.

  16. Revisiting the Scattering Greenhouse Effect of CO2 Ice Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitzmann, D.

    2016-02-01

    Carbon dioxide ice clouds are thought to play an important role for cold terrestrial planets with thick CO2 dominated atmospheres. Various previous studies showed that a scattering greenhouse effect by carbon dioxide ice clouds could result in a massive warming of the planetary surface. However, all of these studies only employed simplified two-stream radiative transfer schemes to describe the anisotropic scattering. Using accurate radiative transfer models with a general discrete ordinate method, this study revisits this important effect and shows that the positive climatic impact of carbon dioxide clouds was strongly overestimated in the past. The revised scattering greenhouse effect can have important implications for the early Mars, but also for planets like the early Earth or the position of the outer boundary of the habitable zone.

  17. The Safety of Adjuvanted Vaccines Revisited: Vaccine-Induced Narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, S Sohail; Montomoli, Emanuele; Pasini, Franco Laghi; Steinman, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Despite the very high benefit-to-risk ratio of vaccines, the fear of negative side effects has discouraged many people from getting vaccinated, resulting in the reemergence of previously controlled diseases such as measles, pertussis and diphtheria. This fear has been amplified more recently by multiple epidemiologic studies that confirmed the link of an AS03-adjuvanted pandemic influenza vaccine (Pandemrix, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, Germany) used in Europe during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic [A(H1N1) pdm09] with the development of narcolepsy, a chronic sleep disorder, in children and adolescents. However, public misperceptions of what adjuvants are and why they are used in vaccines has created in some individuals a closed "black box" attitude towards all vaccines. The focus of this review article is to revisit this "black box" using the example of narcolepsy associated with the European AS03-adjuvanted pandemic influenza vaccine.

  18. BHQ revisited (1) - Looking at grain size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilbronner, Renée; Kilian, Rüdiger; Tullis, Jan

    2016-04-01

    microstructure and texture analysis of Heilbronner & Tullis (2006). Here, in poster (1), we focus on the recrystallized grain size with the aim of (a) comparing CIP- and EBSD derived grain size measurements, (b) of comparing the recrystallized grain size of coaxially deformed and sheared BHQ and (c) in order to confirm that the quartz piezometer indeed depends on texture, and (d) to test if it also depends on the type of deformation (irrotational versus rotational deformation). References cited: Heilbronner, R., and S.D. Barrett (2014) Image Analysis in Earth Sciences, Springer. Heilbronner, R., and J. Tullis (2002), The effect of static annealing on micro- structure and crystallographic preferred orientations of quartzites experimentally deformed in axial compression and shear, Geol. Soc. Spec. Publ., 200, 191 - 218. Heilbronner, R., and J. Tullis (2006), Evolution of c axis pole figures and grain size during dynamic recrystallization: Results from experimentally sheared quartzite. JGR, 111, B10202, doi:10.1029/2005JB004194, 2006 Hirth, G., and J. Tullis (1992), Dislocation creep regimes in quartz aggregates, JSG, 14, 145-159. Stipp, M., and J. Tullis (2003), The recrystallized grain size piezometer for quartz, Geophys. Res. Lett., 30(21), 2088, doi:10.1029/2003GL018444.

  19. Revisiting Black Holes as Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-02-01

    Could dark matter be made of intermediate-mass black holes formed in the beginning of the universe? A recent study takes a renewed look at this question.Galactic LurkersThe nature of dark matter has long been questioned, but the recent discovery of gravitational waves by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) has renewed interest in the possibility that dark matter could consist of primordial black holes in the mass range of 101000 solar masses.The relative amounts of the different constituents of the universe. Dark matter makes up roughly 27%. [ESA/Planck]According to this model, the extreme density of matter present during the universes early expansion led to the formation of a large number of intermediate-mass black holes. These black holes now hide in the halos of galaxies, constituting the mass that weve measured dynamically but remains unseen.LIGOs first gravitational-wave detection revealed the merger of two black holes that were both tens of solar masses in size. If primordial black holes are indeed a major constituent of dark matter, then LIGOs detection is consistent with what we would expect to find: occasional mergers of the intermediate-mass black holes that formed in the early universe and now lurk in galactic halos.Quasar MicrolensingTheres a catch, however. If there truly were a large number of intermediate-mass primordial black holes hiding in galactic halos, they wouldnt go completely unnoticed: we would see signs of their presence in the gravitational microlensing of background quasars. Unseen primordial black holes in a foreground galaxy could cause an image of a background quasar to briefly brighten which would provide us with clear evidence of such black holes despite our not being able to detect them directly.A depiction of quasar microlensing (click for a closer look!). The microlensing object in the foreground galaxy could be a star (as depicted), a primordial black hole, or any other compact object. [NASA

  20. Modeling Lag-2 Revisits to Understand Trade-Offs in Mixed Control of Fixation Termination During Visual Search.

    PubMed

    Godwin, Hayward J; Reichle, Erik D; Menneer, Tamaryn

    2016-06-20

    An important question about eye-movement behavior is when the decision is made to terminate a fixation and program the following saccade. Different approaches have found converging evidence in favor of a mixed-control account, in which there is some overlap between processing information at fixation and planning the following saccade. We examined one interesting instance of mixed control in visual search: lag-2 revisits, during which observers fixate a stimulus, move to a different stimulus, and then revisit the first stimulus on the next fixation. Results show that the probability of lag-2 revisits occurring increased with the number of target-similar stimuli, and revisits were preceded by a brief fixation on the intervening distractor stimulus. We developed the Efficient Visual Sampling (EVS) computational model to simulate our findings (fixation durations and fixation locations) and to provide insight into mixed control of fixations and the perceptual, cognitive, and motor processes that produce lag-2 revisits.

  1. Dynamical modelling of meteoroid streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. L.; Wiegert, P. A.

    2014-07-01

    Accurate simulations of meteoroid streams permit the prediction of stream interaction with Earth, and provide a measure of risk to Earth satellites and interplanetary spacecraft. Current cometary ejecta and meteoroid stream models have been somewhat successful in predicting some stream observations, but have required significant assumptions and simplifications. Extending on the approach of Vaubaillon et al. 2005, we model dust ejection from the cometary nucleus, and generate sample particles representing bins of distinct dynamical evolution-regulating characteristics (size, density, direction, albedo). Ephemerides of the sample particles are integrated and recorded for later assignment of weights based on model parameter changes. To assist in model analysis we are developing interactive software to permit the "turning of knobs" of model parameters, allowing for near-real-time 3D visualization of resulting stream structure. Using the tool, we will revisit prior assumptions made, and will observe the impact of introducing non-uniform and time-variant cometary surface attributes and processes.

  2. A two-level atom and the problem of the radiation reaction in the semiclassical theory: optical Bloch equations revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surdutovich, G. I.; Ghiner, A. V.

    2000-08-01

    A famous model of a two-level atom interacting with the classical electromagnetic field is used to illustrate the fundamental problem of the relationship between the dynamical and relaxation processes under the interaction of radiation with a quantum-mechanical system and, as a result, to derive nonlinear Bloch-like equations. The presented considerations are based on the analysis of the balance of the fluxes of energy between atomic and field subsystems. It is shown that the generally accepted model of the exponential relaxation deduced for an isolated excited atom and inserted customarily into optical Bloch equations (OBE) describing atom in an external field always leads to a very strange result: spontaneous emission of an atom should be accompanied by the radiation of the coherent field into the external field's mode. Making use of only the energetic considerations, we found the relaxation mechanism (in the form of additional terms in the OBE) which, on the one hand, guarantees the fulfillment of the energetic balance and, on the other hand, allows to introduce arbitrary additional collision-like relaxation mechanism without violation of this balance. Note that these additional terms introduced into OBE from the energetic considerations in a remarkable manner exactly correspond to the renormalization of the external field with the allowance of the classical radiation damping (RD) effect. The revisited OBE may be used as the starting point for considering the dynamics of an atom by making allowance for the quantum properties of an external field.

  3. Curvature perturbation and domain wall formation with pseudo scaling scalar dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ema, Yohei; Nakayama, Kazunori; Takimoto, Masahiro E-mail: kazunori@hep-th.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2016-02-01

    Cosmological dynamics of scalar field with a monomial potential φ{sup n} with a general background equation of state is revisited. It is known that if n is smaller than a critical value, the scalar field exhibits a coherent oscillation and if n is larger it obeys a scaling solution without oscillation. We study in detail the case where n is equal to the critical value, and find a peculiar scalar dynamics which is neither oscillating nor scaling solution, and we call it a pseudo scaling solution. We also discuss cosmological implications of a pseudo scaling scalar dynamics, such as the curvature perturbation and the domain wall problem.

  4. Revisiting human nose anatomy: phylogenic and ontogenic perspectives.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, Roger

    2011-11-01

    This review suggests revisiting nose anatomy by considering the ethmoidal labyrinths as part of the olfactory nose and not as paranasal sinuses. Phylogenetically, the olfactory and respiratory organs of the most primitive vertebrates are separated. Exaptation, a mechanism of evolution, may explain the fusion of the olfactory and respiratory organs in dipnoi. The respiratory and olfactory noses remain anatomically separated by the transverse lamina in most mammals, whose olfactory labyrinth is a blind recess housing the ethmoturbinates. In humans, the partitioning between the olfactory cleft and the ethmoid labyrinth seems to be a consequence of ethmoid bone remodeling induced by the acquisition of an upright posture. The ethmoid bone is derived from the cartilaginous nasal capsule of primitive vertebrates and considered to be a highly conserved region among the bony elements of the skull base. It appears to be involved only in housing and protecting the olfactory function. During the early stages of human fetal development, rupture of the oronasal membrane leads to the integration of the primary olfactory sac in the future respiratory organ. The cartilaginous nasal capsule appears in the tissue under the brain and around the olfactory channels. Its early fetal development is classically regarded as the beginning of paranasal sinus formation. From phylogenic and ontogenic perspectives, it may be regarded as the development of the olfactory labyrinth as modified by the remodeling process of the human face and skull base. The endochondral bony origin of the ethmoid labyrinths makes them substantially different from the other paranasal sinuses.

  5. Finite size effect on classical ideal gas revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S.; Mitra, J.; Bera, N.

    2015-09-01

    Finite size effects on classical ideal gas are revisited. The micro-canonical partition function for a collection of ideal particles confined in a box is evaluated using Euler-Maclaurin’s as well as Poisson's summation formula. In Poisson's summation formula there are some exponential terms which are absent in Euler-Maclaurin’s formula. In the thermodynamic limit the exponential correction is negligibly small but in the macro/nano dimensions and at low temperatures they may have a great significance. The consequences of finite size effects have been illustrated by redoing the calculations in one and three dimensions keeping the exponential corrections. Global and local thermodynamic properties, diffusion driven by the finite size effect, and effect on speed of sound have been discussed. Thermo-size effects, similar to thermoelectric effects, have been described in detail and may be a theoretical basis with which to design nano-scaled devices. This paper can also be very helpful for undergraduate and graduate students in physics and chemistry as an instructive exercise for a good course in statistical mechanics.

  6. Revisiting reflexology: Concept, evidence, current practice, and practitioner training.

    PubMed

    Embong, Nurul Haswani; Soh, Yee Chang; Ming, Long Chiau; Wong, Tin Wui

    2015-10-01

    Reflexology is basically a study of how one part of the human body relates to another part of the body. Reflexology practitioners rely on the reflexes map of the feet and hands to all the internal organs and other human body parts. They believe that by applying the appropriate pressure and massage certain spots on the feet and hands, all other body parts could be energized and rejuvenated. This review aimed to revisit the concept of reflexology and examine its effectiveness, practices, and the training for reflexology practitioners. PubMed, SCOPUS, Google Scholar, and SpringerLink databases were utilized to search the following medical subject headings or keywords: foot massage, reflexology, foot reflexotherapy, reflexological treatment, and zone therapy. The articles published for the last 10 years were included. Previous systematic reviews failed to show concrete evidence for any specific effect of reflexology in any conditions. Due to its non-invasive, non-pharmacological complementary nature, reflexology is widely accepted and anecdotal evidence of positive effect reflexology in a variety of health conditions are available. Adequate training for practitioners is necessary to ensure the consistency of service provided.

  7. Biogas from Macroalgae: is it time to revisit the idea?

    PubMed

    Hughes, Adam D; Kelly, Maeve S; Black, Kenneth D; Stanley, Michele S

    2012-11-27

    The economic and environmental viability of dedicated terrestrial energy crops is in doubt. The production of large scale biomass (macroalgae) for biofuels in the marine environment was first tested in the late 1960's. The culture attempts failed due to the engineering challenges of farming offshore. However the energy conversion via anaerobic digestion was successful as the biochemical composition of macroalgae makes it an ideal feedstock. The technology for the mass production of macroalgae has developed principally in China and Asia over the last 50 years to such a degree that it is now the single largest product of aquaculture. There has also been significant technology transfer and macroalgal cultivation is now well tried and tested in Europe and America. The inherent advantage of production of biofuel feedstock in the marine environment is that it does not compete with food production for land or fresh water. Here we revisit the idea of the large scale cultivation of macroalgae at sea for subsequent anaerobic digestion to produce biogas as a source of renewable energy, using a European case study as an example.

  8. IMPULSIVE SPOT HEATING AND THERMAL EXPLOSION OF INTERSTELLAR GRAINS REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Ivlev, A. V.; Röcker, T. B.; Vasyunin, A.; Caselli, P.

    2015-05-20

    The problem of the impulsive heating of dust grains in cold, dense interstellar clouds is revisited theoretically with the aim of better understanding the leading mechanisms of the explosive desorption of icy mantles. We rigorously show that if the heating of a reactive medium occurs within a sufficiently localized spot (e.g., the heating of mantles by cosmic rays (CRs)), then the subsequent thermal evolution is characterized by a single dimensionless number λ. This number identifies a bifurcation between two distinct regimes: when λ exceeds a critical value (threshold), the heat equation exhibits the explosive solution, i.e., the thermal (chemical) explosion is triggered. Otherwise, thermal diffusion causes the deposited heat to spread over the entire grain—this regime is commonly known as whole-grain heating. The theory allows us to find a critical combination of physical parameters that govern the explosion of icy mantles due to impulsive spot heating. In particular, our calculations suggest that heavy CR species (e.g., iron ions) colliding with dust are able to trigger the explosion. Based on recently calculated local CR spectra, we estimate the expected rate of explosive desorption. The efficiency of the desorption, which in principle affects all solid species independent of their binding energy, is shown to be comparable to other CR desorption mechanisms typically considered in the literature. Also, the theory allows us to estimate the maximum abundances of reactive species that may be stored in the mantles, which provides important constraints on the available astrochemical models.

  9. Fever tree revisited: From malaria to autoinflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Pastore, Serena; Vuch, Josef; Bianco, Anna Monica; Taddio, Andrea; Tommasini, Alberto

    2015-11-08

    Over the centuries the idea of recurrent fevers has mainly been associated with malaria, but many other fevers, such as typhoid and diphtheria were cause for concern. It is only in recent times, with the more severe forms of fever from infectious origin becoming less frequent or a cause for worry that we started noticing recurrent fevers without any clear infectious cause, being described as having a pathogenesis of autoinflammatory nature. The use of molecular examinations in many cases can allow a diagnosis where the cause is monogenic. In other cases, however the pathogenesis is likely to be multifactorial and the diagnostic-therapeutic approach is strictly clinical. The old fever tree paradigm developed to describe fevers caused by malaria has been revisited here to describe today's periodic fevers from the periodic fever adenitis pharyngitis aphthae syndrome to the more rare autoinflammatory diseases. This model may allow us to place cases that are yet to be identified which are likely to be of multifactorial origin.

  10. Groundwater and river water interaction on Cikapundung River: Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darul, A.; Irawan, D. E.; Trilaksono, N. J.

    2015-09-01

    The interaction between groundwater and Cikapundung river water has not changed significantly in 16 years of period. This paper revisit the similar research based on 43 measurement points: 13 dug wells, 2 springs, and 24 river, distributed along the riverbank at Curug Dago to Batununggal segment. The field measurements were taken in rainy season of April to May 2014 using portable instruments. Six parameters were measured: water level, temperature, total dissolved solids (TDS), dissolved-oxygen (DO), and pH. The new model is unable to detect significant change in water flow, however it finds two local anomalies in Dago Pojok and Cikapayang area. Both locations show local drawdown circle which can induce influent stream in overal effluent environment. Moreover, water quality parameters indicate mixing processes between groundwater and river water, with erratic pattern both in effluent and influent stream. Also some DO and TDS readings exceed the permissible limit. These values suggest a lifted groundwater mineralization from organic and non-organic sources and change of chemical stability. The source of contamination is still under further examination.

  11. Revisiting the quantum Szilard engine with fully quantum considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hai; Zou, Jian; Li, Jun-Gang; Shao, Bin; Wu, Lian-Ao

    2012-12-15

    By considering level shifting during the insertion process we revisit the quantum Szilard engine (QSZE) with fully quantum consideration. We derive the general expressions of the heat absorbed from thermal bath and the total work done to the environment by the system in a cycle with two different cyclic strategies. We find that only the quantum information contributes to the absorbed heat, and the classical information acts like a feedback controller and has no direct effect on the absorbed heat. This is the first demonstration of the different effects of quantum information and classical information for extracting heat from the bath in the QSZE. Moreover, when the well width L{yields}{infinity} or the temperature of the bath T{yields}{infinity} the QSZE reduces to the classical Szilard engine (CSZE), and the total work satisfies the relation W{sub tot}=k{sub B}Tln2 as obtained by Sang Wook Kim et al. [S.W. Kim, T. Sagawa, S. De Liberato, M. Ueda, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106 (2011) 070401] for one particle case. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For the first time analyze the QSZE by considering energy level shifts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Find different roles played by classical and quantum information in the QSZE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The amount of work extracted depends on the cyclic strategies of the QSZE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Verify that the QSZE will reduce to the CSZE in the classical limits.

  12. Revisiting Supernova 1987A constraints on dark photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jae Hyeok; Essig, Rouven; McDermott, Samuel D.

    2017-01-01

    We revisit constraints on dark photons with masses below ˜ 100 MeV from the observations of Supernova 1987A. If dark photons are produced in sufficient quantity, they reduce the amount of energy emitted in the form of neutrinos, in conflict with observations. For the first time, we include the effects of finite temperature and density on the kinetic-mixing parameter, ɛ, in this environment. This causes the constraints on ɛ to weaken with the dark-photon mass below ˜ 15 MeV. For large-enough values of ɛ, it is well known that dark photons can be reabsorbed within the supernova. Since the rates of reabsorption processes decrease as the dark-photon energy increases, we point out that dark photons with energies above the Wien peak can escape without scattering, contributing more to energy loss than is possible assuming a blackbody spectrum. Furthermore, we estimate the systematic uncertainties on the cooling bounds by deriving constraints assuming one analytic and four different simulated temperature and density profiles of the proto-neutron star. Finally, we estimate also the systematic uncertainty on the bound by varying the distance across which dark photons must propagate from their point of production to be able to affect the star. This work clarifies the bounds from SN1987A on the dark-photon parameter space.

  13. Revisiting reflexology: Concept, evidence, current practice, and practitioner training

    PubMed Central

    Embong, Nurul Haswani; Soh, Yee Chang; Ming, Long Chiau; Wong, Tin Wui

    2015-01-01

    Reflexology is basically a study of how one part of the human body relates to another part of the body. Reflexology practitioners rely on the reflexes map of the feet and hands to all the internal organs and other human body parts. They believe that by applying the appropriate pressure and massage certain spots on the feet and hands, all other body parts could be energized and rejuvenated. This review aimed to revisit the concept of reflexology and examine its effectiveness, practices, and the training for reflexology practitioners. PubMed, SCOPUS, Google Scholar, and SpringerLink databases were utilized to search the following medical subject headings or keywords: foot massage, reflexology, foot reflexotherapy, reflexological treatment, and zone therapy. The articles published for the last 10 years were included. Previous systematic reviews failed to show concrete evidence for any specific effect of reflexology in any conditions. Due to its non-invasive, non-pharmacological complementary nature, reflexology is widely accepted and anecdotal evidence of positive effect reflexology in a variety of health conditions are available. Adequate training for practitioners is necessary to ensure the consistency of service provided. PMID:26587391

  14. Revisiting the Monoamine Hypothesis of Depression: A New Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Joel S; Bell, Clifton E; Pollard, David A

    2014-01-01

    As the incidence of depression increases, depression continues to inflict additional suffering to individuals and societies and better therapies are needed. Based on magnetic resonance spectroscopy and laboratory findings, gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) may be intimately involved in the pathophysiology of depression. The isoelectric point of GABA (pI = 7.3) closely approximates the pH of cerebral spinal fluid (CSF). This may not be a trivial observation as it may explain preliminary spectrophotometric, enzymatic, and HPLC data that monoamine oxidase (MAO) deaminates GABA. Although MAO is known to deaminate substrates such as catecholamines, indoleamines, and long chain aliphatic amines all of which contain a lipophilic moiety, there is very good evidence to predict that a low concentration of a very lipophilic microspecies of GABA is present when GABA pI = pH as in the CSF. Inhibiting deamination of this microspecies of GABA could explain the well-established successful treatment of refractory depression with MAO inhibitors (MAOI) when other antidepressants that target exclusively levels of monoamines fail. If further experimental work can confirm these preliminary findings, physicians may consider revisiting the use of MAOI for the treatment of non-intractable depression because the potential benefits of increasing GABA as well as the monoamines may outweigh the risks associated with MAOI therapy. PMID:24737931

  15. The evolution of the mitochondrial genetic code in arthropods revisited.

    PubMed

    Abascal, Federico; Posada, David; Zardoya, Rafael

    2012-04-01

    A variant of the invertebrate mitochondrial genetic code was previously identified in arthropods (Abascal et al. 2006a, PLoS Biol 4:e127) in which, instead of translating the AGG codon as serine, as in other invertebrates, some arthropods translate AGG as lysine. Here, we revisit the evolution of the genetic code in arthropods taking into account that (1) the number of arthropod mitochondrial genomes sequenced has triplicated since the original findings were published; (2) the phylogeny of arthropods has been recently resolved with confidence for many groups; and (3) sophisticated probabilistic methods can be applied to analyze the evolution of the genetic code in arthropod mitochondria. According to our analyses, evolutionary shifts in the genetic code have been more common than previously inferred, with many taxonomic groups displaying two alternative codes. Ancestral character-state reconstruction using probabilistic methods confirmed that the arthropod ancestor most likely translated AGG as lysine. Point mutations at tRNA-Lys and tRNA-Ser correlated with the meaning of the AGG codon. In addition, we identified three variables (GC content, number of AGG codons, and taxonomic information) that best explain the use of each of the two alternative genetic codes.

  16. Revisiting the first fluid interface experiment in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yongkang; Weislogel, Mark; Masica, William; Kohl, Fred; Green, Robert

    2016-11-01

    This year marks the 54th anniversary of the first fluid physics experiment performed aboard a spacecraft during the Mercury-Atlas 7 mission (MA7). The MA7 experiment test cell served as an early model for a spacecraft liquid fuel tank consisting of a circular standpipe mounted within a spherical container. The low-g free surface configuration was dependent on contact angle, fluid fill fraction, standpipe dimensions, and initial conditions. Well-behaved symmetric equilibrium interfaces in the symmetric tank were expected and observed during the historic flight. We revisit the problem here employing a modern numerical tool and discover a rich variety of asymmetric fluid interface configurations that were not observed during the experiment. Interestingly, experimental support for these newly-computed outcomes may be found in 54 year old drop tower data collected by the original NASA investigator team. In short, rotationally symmetric nodoidal surfaces are unstable in a certain domain giving rise to highly asymmetric surfaces with significant shifts in the mass center of the liquid. The NASA team selected a fluid fill level for MA7 that 'fortunately' fell outside this domain. NASA NNX12A047A.

  17. Advanced Single-Aisle Transport Propulsion Design Options Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guynn, Mark D.; Berton, Jeffrey J.; Tong, Michael T.; Haller, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Future propulsion options for advanced single-aisle transports have been investigated in a number of previous studies by the authors. These studies have examined the system level characteristics of aircraft incorporating ultra-high bypass ratio (UHB) turbofans (direct drive and geared) and open rotor engines. During the course of these prior studies, a number of potential refinements and enhancements to the analysis methodology and assumptions were identified. This paper revisits a previously conducted UHB turbofan fan pressure ratio trade study using updated analysis methodology and assumptions. The changes incorporated have decreased the optimum fan pressure ratio for minimum fuel consumption and reduced the engine design trade-offs between minimizing noise and minimizing fuel consumption. Nacelle drag and engine weight are found to be key drivers in determining the optimum fan pressure ratio from a fuel efficiency perspective. The revised noise analysis results in the study aircraft being 2 to 4 EPNdB (cumulative) quieter due to a variety of reasons explained in the paper. With equal core technology assumed, the geared engine architecture is found to be as good as or better than the direct drive architecture for most parameters investigated. However, the engine ultimately selected for a future advanced single-aisle aircraft will depend on factors beyond those considered here.

  18. Cation dyshomeostasis and cardiomyocyte necrosis: the Fleckenstein hypothesis revisited

    PubMed Central

    Borkowski, Brian J.; Cheema, Yaser; Shahbaz, Atta U.; Bhattacharya, Syamal K.; Weber, Karl T.

    2011-01-01

    An ongoing loss of cardiomyocytes to apoptotic and necrotic cell death pathways contributes to the progressive nature of heart failure. The pathophysiological origins of necrotic cell loss relate to the neurohormonal activation that accompanies acute and chronic stressor states and which includes effector hormones of the adrenergic nervous system. Fifty years ago, Albrecht Fleckenstein and coworkers hypothesized the hyperadrenergic state, which accompanies such stressors, causes cardiomyocyte necrosis based on catecholamine-initiated excessive intracellular Ca2+ accumulation (EICA), and mitochondrial Ca2+ overloading in particular, in which the ensuing dysfunction and structural degeneration of these organelles leads to necrosis. In recent years, two downstream factors have been identified which, together with EICA, constitute a signal–transducer–effector pathway: (i) mitochondria-based induction of oxidative stress, in which the rate of reactive oxygen metabolite generation exceeds their rate of detoxification by endogenous antioxidant defences; and (ii) the opening of the mitochondrial inner membrane permeability transition pore (mPTP) followed by organellar swelling and degeneration. The pathogenesis of stress-related cardiomyopathy syndromes is likely related to this pathway. Other factors which can account for cytotoxicity in stressor states include: hypokalaemia; ionized hypocalcaemia and hypomagnesaemia with resultant elevations in parathyroid hormone serving as a potent mediator of EICA; and hypozincaemia with hyposelenaemia, which compromise antioxidant defences. Herein, we revisit the Fleckenstein hypothesis of EICA in leading to cardiomyocyte necrosis and the central role played by mitochondria. PMID:21398641

  19. Large-scale Filamentary Structures around the Virgo Cluster Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Suk; Rey, Soo-Chang; Bureau, Martin; Yoon, Hyein; Chung, Aeree; Jerjen, Helmut; Lisker, Thorsten; Jeong, Hyunjin; Sung, Eon-Chang; Lee, Youngdae; Lee, Woong; Chung, Jiwon

    2016-12-01

    We revisit the filamentary structures of galaxies around the Virgo cluster, exploiting a larger data set, based on the HyperLeda database, than previous studies. In particular, this includes a large number of low-luminosity galaxies, resulting in better sampled individual structures. We confirm seven known structures in the distance range 4 h -1 Mpc < SGY < 16 h -1 Mpc, now identified as filaments, where SGY is the axis of the supergalactic coordinate system roughly along the line of sight. The Hubble diagram of the filament galaxies suggests they are infalling toward the main body of the Virgo cluster. We propose that the collinear distribution of giant elliptical galaxies along the fundamental axis of the Virgo cluster is smoothly connected to two of these filaments (Leo II A and B). Behind the Virgo cluster (16 h -1 Mpc < SGY < 27 h -1 Mpc), we also identify a new filament elongated toward the NGC 5353/4 group (“NGC 5353/4 filament”) and confirm a sheet that includes galaxies from the W and M clouds of the Virgo cluster (“W-M sheet”). In the Hubble diagram, the NGC 5353/4 filament galaxies show infall toward the NGC 5353/4 group, whereas the W-M sheet galaxies do not show hints of gravitational influence from the Virgo cluster. The filamentary structures identified can now be used to better understand the generic role of filaments in the build-up of galaxy clusters at z ≈ 0.

  20. Biogas from Macroalgae: is it time to revisit the idea?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The economic and environmental viability of dedicated terrestrial energy crops is in doubt. The production of large scale biomass (macroalgae) for biofuels in the marine environment was first tested in the late 1960’s. The culture attempts failed due to the engineering challenges of farming offshore. However the energy conversion via anaerobic digestion was successful as the biochemical composition of macroalgae makes it an ideal feedstock. The technology for the mass production of macroalgae has developed principally in China and Asia over the last 50 years to such a degree that it is now the single largest product of aquaculture. There has also been significant technology transfer and macroalgal cultivation is now well tried and tested in Europe and America. The inherent advantage of production of biofuel feedstock in the marine environment is that it does not compete with food production for land or fresh water. Here we revisit the idea of the large scale cultivation of macroalgae at sea for subsequent anaerobic digestion to produce biogas as a source of renewable energy, using a European case study as an example. PMID:23186536

  1. Interplant volatile signaling in willows: revisiting the original talking trees.

    PubMed

    Pearse, Ian S; Hughes, Kathy; Shiojiri, Kaori; Ishizaki, Satomi; Karban, Richard

    2013-07-01

    The importance of interplant volatile signaling in plant-herbivore interactions has been a contentious issue for the past 30 years. We revisit willows as the system in which evidence for interplant signaling was originally found, but then questioned. We established three well-replicated experiments with two willow species (Salix exigua and Salix lemmonii) to address whether the receipt of an interplant signal from a neighboring willow reduces herbivore damage. Additionally we tested whether this signal is volatile in nature, and whether plants signal better to themselves than they do to other individuals. In all three experiments, we found evidence that cues from a damaged neighbor reduce subsequent herbivory experienced by willows. In one experiment, we showed that bagging of clipped tissue, which prevents the exchange of volatile signals, removed the effect of neighbor wounding. This was consistent with results from the other two experiments, in which clipping potted neighbors connected only through airborne volatile cues reduced damage of receivers. In one year, we found evidence that the perception of volatile signals from genetically identical clones was more effective at reducing foliar damage to a neighbor than signals from a genetically different individual. However, this trend was not significant in the following year. In three well-replicated experiments, we found strong evidence for the importance of interplant volatile cues in mediating herbivore interactions with willows.

  2. How clonal are Neisseria species? The epidemic clonality model revisited

    PubMed Central

    Tibayrenc, Michel; Ayala, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    The three species Neisseria meningitidis, Neisseria gonorrheae, and Neisseria lactamica are often regarded as highly recombining bacteria. N. meningitidis has been considered a paradigmatic case of the “semiclonal model” or of “epidemic clonality,” demonstrating occasional bouts of clonal propagation in an otherwise recombining species. In this model, occasional clonality generates linkage disequilibrium in the short term. In the long run, however, the effects of clonality are countered by recombination. We show that many data are at odds with this proposal and that N. meningitidis fits the criteria that we have proposed for predominant clonal evolution (PCE). We point out that (i) the proposed way to distinguish epidemic clonality from PCE may be faulty and (ii) the evidence of deep phylogenies by microarrays and whole-genome sequencing is at odds with the predictions of the semiclonal model. Last, we revisit the species status of N. meningitidis, N. gonorrheae, and N. lactamica in the light of the PCE model. PMID:26195766

  3. Solid-solid transitions induced by repulsive interactions revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navascués, G.; Velasco, E.; Mederos, L.

    2016-10-01

    We revisit a problem already studied 15 years ago by us in collaboration with Stell and Hemmer: the isostructural solid-solid transitions induced by repulsive particle interactions exhibited by classical systems interacting via the Stell-Hemmer potentials. The full phase diagram in the crystal region is obtained by applying a perturbation theory for classical solids used during our collaboration with Stell. Also, the performance of such a theory is now tested by comparing the perturbative phase diagram with that obtained from computer simulations. The latter was calculated using a recently refined method to obtain the free-energy of crystals by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The perturbation theory captures the correct topology and correctly identifies the stable, fcc and bcc, phases. In addition, the theory predicts the occurrence of special points: a point where the two stable structures coexist at the same density, and two critical points terminating the corresponding isostructural phase transitions for fcc and bcc phases. The location of some of these features in the phase diagram is predicted almost quantitatively. However, phase boundaries involving the non-compact bcc phase are much less accurate, a problem that can be traced to the poor representation used for the bcc phase of the reference, hard-sphere, system.

  4. Psychological Well-Being Revisited: Advances in Science and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Ryff, Carol D.

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the research and interventions that have grown up around a model of psychological well-being (Ryff, 1989) generated more than two decades ago to address neglected aspects of positive functioning, such as purposeful engagement in life, realization of personal talents and capacities, and enlightened self-knowledge. The conceptual origins of this formulation are revisited and scientific products emerging from six thematic areas are examined: (1) how well-being changes across adult development and later life, (2) what are the personality correlates of well-being, (3) how well-being is linked with experiences in family life, (4) how well-being relates to work and other community activities, (5) what are the connections between well-being and health, including biological risk factors, (6) and via clinical and intervention studies, how psychological well-being can be promoted for ever greater segments of society. Together, these topics illustrate flourishing interest across diverse scientific disciplines in understanding adults as striving, meaning-making, proactive organisms who are actively negotiating the challenges of life. A take-home message is that increasing evidence supports the health protective features of psychological well-being in reducing risk for disease and promoting length of life. A recurrent and increasingly important theme is resilience – the capacity to maintain or regain well-being in the face of adversity. Implications for future research and practice are considered. PMID:24281296

  5. Automated Guidance for Thermodynamics Essays: Critiquing Versus Revisiting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Dermot F.; Vitale, Jonathan M.; Linn, Marcia C.

    2015-12-01

    Middle school students struggle to explain thermodynamics concepts. In this study, to help students succeed, we use a natural language processing program to analyze their essays explaining the aspects of thermodynamics and provide guidance based on the automated score. The 346 sixth-grade students were assigned to either the critique condition where they criticized an explanation or the revisit condition where they reviewed visualizations. Within each condition, the student was assigned one of two types of tailored guidance based on the sophistication of their original essay. Both forms of guidance led to significant improvement in student understanding on the posttest. Guidance was more effective for students with low prior knowledge than for those with high prior knowledge (consistent with regression toward the mean). However, analysis of student responses to the guidance illustrates the value of aligning guidance with prior knowledge. All students were required to revise their essay as an embedded assessment. While effective, teachers involved in this study reported that revising is resisted by students and does not align with typical, vocabulary-focused classroom writing activities.

  6. Fever tree revisited: From malaria to autoinflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pastore, Serena; Vuch, Josef; Bianco, Anna Monica; Taddio, Andrea; Tommasini, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Over the centuries the idea of recurrent fevers has mainly been associated with malaria, but many other fevers, such as typhoid and diphtheria were cause for concern. It is only in recent times, with the more severe forms of fever from infectious origin becoming less frequent or a cause for worry that we started noticing recurrent fevers without any clear infectious cause, being described as having a pathogenesis of autoinflammatory nature. The use of molecular examinations in many cases can allow a diagnosis where the cause is monogenic. In other cases, however the pathogenesis is likely to be multifactorial and the diagnostic-therapeutic approach is strictly clinical. The old fever tree paradigm developed to describe fevers caused by malaria has been revisited here to describe today’s periodic fevers from the periodic fever adenitis pharyngitis aphthae syndrome to the more rare autoinflammatory diseases. This model may allow us to place cases that are yet to be identified which are likely to be of multifactorial origin. PMID:26566482

  7. Entropy is conserved in Hawking radiation as tunneling: A revisit of the black hole information loss paradox

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Baocheng; Cai Qingyu; Zhan Mingsheng; You Li

    2011-02-15

    Research Highlights: > Information is found to be encoded and carried away by Hawking radiations. > Entropy is conserved in Hawking radiation. > We thus conclude no information is lost. > The dynamics of black hole may be unitary. - Abstract: We revisit in detail the paradox of black hole information loss due to Hawking radiation as tunneling. We compute the amount of information encoded in correlations among Hawking radiations for a variety of black holes, including the Schwarzchild black hole, the Reissner-Nordstroem black hole, the Kerr black hole, and the Kerr-Newman black hole. The special case of tunneling through a quantum horizon is also considered. Within a phenomenological treatment based on the accepted emission probability spectrum from a black hole, we find that information is leaked out hidden in the correlations of Hawking radiation. The recovery of this previously unaccounted for information helps to conserve the total entropy of a system composed of a black hole plus its radiations. We thus conclude, irrespective of the microscopic picture for black hole collapsing, the associated radiation process: Hawking radiation as tunneling, is consistent with unitarity as required by quantum mechanics.

  8. Revisiting metallization boundary of warm dense helium in a wide ρ-T regime from ab initio study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Li, Zhiguo; Fu, Zhijian; Dai, Jiayu; Chen, Qifeng; Cai, Lingcang

    2017-01-01

    The knowledge of the metallization of warm dense helium has important implications for understanding the thermal histories, stellar structure and magnetic field environment of giant planets. However, it is also a pendent scientific topic. For a revisiting into the properties of warm dense helium, we performed extensive quantum Langevin molecular dynamic simulations and electronic structure calculations to study helium over a very wide range of density (ρ = 1~24 g/cm3) and temperature (T = 10~160 kK). The dependencies of helium band gap on ρ and T were presented and a metallization boundary of helium was thus determined by gap closure. Such a boundary is further identified by the calculated electrical conductivity and optical reflectivity based on Kubo-Greenwood formula: along the boundary, the electrical conductivities are found to be 7.0 × 105~1.3 × 106 Ω−1 m−1 and the optical reflectivity value at 532 nm is about 0.55, which are typical values for true metal. PMID:28157200

  9. Revisiting metallization boundary of warm dense helium in a wide ρ-T regime from ab initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Li, Zhiguo; Fu, Zhijian; Dai, Jiayu; Chen, Qifeng; Cai, Lingcang

    2017-02-01

    The knowledge of the metallization of warm dense helium has important implications for understanding the thermal histories, stellar structure and magnetic field environment of giant planets. However, it is also a pendent scientific topic. For a revisiting into the properties of warm dense helium, we performed extensive quantum Langevin molecular dynamic simulations and electronic structure calculations to study helium over a very wide range of density (ρ = 1~24 g/cm3) and temperature (T = 10~160 kK). The dependencies of helium band gap on ρ and T were presented and a metallization boundary of helium was thus determined by gap closure. Such a boundary is further identified by the calculated electrical conductivity and optical reflectivity based on Kubo-Greenwood formula: along the boundary, the electrical conductivities are found to be 7.0 × 105~1.3 × 106 Ω‑1 m‑1 and the optical reflectivity value at 532 nm is about 0.55, which are typical values for true metal.

  10. Revisiting metallization boundary of warm dense helium in a wide ρ-T regime from ab initio study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Li, Zhiguo; Fu, Zhijian; Dai, Jiayu; Chen, Qifeng; Cai, Lingcang

    2017-02-03

    The knowledge of the metallization of warm dense helium has important implications for understanding the thermal histories, stellar structure and magnetic field environment of giant planets. However, it is also a pendent scientific topic. For a revisiting into the properties of warm dense helium, we performed extensive quantum Langevin molecular dynamic simulations and electronic structure calculations to study helium over a very wide range of density (ρ = 1~24 g/cm(3)) and temperature (T = 10~160 kK). The dependencies of helium band gap on ρ and T were presented and a metallization boundary of helium was thus determined by gap closure. Such a boundary is further identified by the calculated electrical conductivity and optical reflectivity based on Kubo-Greenwood formula: along the boundary, the electrical conductivities are found to be 7.0 × 10(5)~1.3 × 10(6) Ω(-1) m(-1) and the optical reflectivity value at 532 nm is about 0.55, which are typical values for true metal.

  11. Theoretical and revisited experimentally retrieved He-broadened line parameters of carbon monoxide in the fundamental band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Predoi-Cross, A.; Esteki, K.; Rozario, H.; Naseri, H.; Latif, S.; Thibault, F.; Malathy Devi, V.; Smith, M. A. H.; Mantz, A. W.

    2016-11-01

    We report revisited experimentally retrieved and theoretically calculated He-broadened Lorentz half-width coefficients and He- pressure-shift coefficients of 45 carbon monoxide transitions in the 1←0 band. The spectra analyzed in this study were recorded over a range of temperatures between 79 and 296 K. The He-broadened line parameters and their temperature dependences were retrieved using a multispectrum nonlinear least squares analysis program. The line shape models used in this study include Voigt, speed dependent Voigt, Rautian (to take into account confinement narrowing) and Rautian with speed dependence, all with an asymmetric component added to account for weak line mixing effects. We were unable to retrieve the temperature dependence of line mixing coefficients. A classical method was used to determine the He-narrowing parameters while quantum dynamical calculations were performed to determine He-broadening and He-pressure shifts coefficients at different temperatures. The line mixing coefficients were also derived from the exponential power gap law and the energy corrected sudden approximation. The current measurements and theoretical results are compared with other published results, where appropriate.

  12. Resampling Methods Revisited: Advancing the Understanding and Applications in Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bai, Haiyan; Pan, Wei

    2008-01-01

    Resampling methods including randomization test, cross-validation, the jackknife and the bootstrap are widely employed in the research areas of natural science, engineering and medicine, but they lack appreciation in educational research. The purpose of the present review is to revisit and highlight the key principles and developments of…

  13. Asian Lifelong Learning in the Context of a Global Knowledge Economy: A Task Re-Visited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Soonghee

    2007-01-01

    This article revisits and reinterprets my previous paper. It is a snapshot of the lifelong learning system building in selected Asian countries, reflected in the mirror of the Asian Financial Crisis in the 1997s and the aftermath of that event. I reconsidered the arguments (1) the economic recession had delivered a global dimension of lifelong…

  14. Revisiting the Age-Old Question: Does Money Matter in Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Bruce D.

    2012-01-01

    This policy brief revisits the long and storied literature on whether money matters in providing a quality education. Increasingly, political rhetoric adheres to the unfounded certainty that money doesn't make a difference in education, and that reduced funding is unlikely to harm educational quality. Such proclamations have even been used to…

  15. The Postgraduate Premium: Revisiting Trends in Social Mobility and Educational Inequalities in Britain and America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindley, Joanne; Machin, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    This report revisits the debate about why social mobility levels are relatively low in Great Britain and the United States of America compared to other countries. It focuses on three main areas within this debate: (1) the changing role of educational inequalities; (2) the expectation of ever higher levels of education as revealed in increasing…

  16. Revisiting Feminism and Australian Education: Who Speaks? What Questions? What Contexts? What Impact?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yates, Lyn

    2008-01-01

    This article revisits the development of feminist research and policy in education in Australia in the mid-1970s to mid-1980s from the perspective of the present decade. The purpose is to give one insider's account of the specificities of that initial period, and to use that analysis to draw attention to changes evident in the context and agendas…

  17. Revisiting Interpretation of Canonical Correlation Analysis: A Tutorial and Demonstration of Canonical Commonality Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nimon, Kim; Henson, Robin K.; Gates, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    In the face of multicollinearity, researchers face challenges interpreting canonical correlation analysis (CCA) results. Although standardized function and structure coefficients provide insight into the canonical variates produced, they fall short when researchers want to fully report canonical effects. This article revisits the interpretation of…

  18. Ambiguity Advantage Revisited: Two Meanings Are Better than One when Accessing Chinese Nouns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Chien-Jer Charles; Ahrens, Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    This paper revisits the effect of lexical ambiguity in word recognition, which has been controversial as previous research reported advantage, disadvantage, and null effects. We discuss factors that were not consistently treated in previous research (e.g., the level of lexical ambiguity investigated, parts of speech of the experimental stimuli,…

  19. Sunday School Revisited: An Alternative to Christian Education of the Church Today?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Nam Soon

    2013-01-01

    This article attempts to demonstrate similarities between the socioeconomic, cultural, and religious contexts of 18th-century England and 21st-century Canada. Revisiting the Sunday School movement in 18th-century England provides insights for the development of renewed Sunday School models in the current Canadian context of transnational…

  20. DNA as Genetic Material: Revisiting Classic Experiments through a Simple, Practical Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malago, Wilson, Jr.; Soares-Costa, Andrea; Henrique-Silva, Flavio

    2009-01-01

    In 1928, Frederick Griffith demonstrated a transmission process of genetic information by transforming "Pneumococcus". In 1944, Avery et al. demonstrated that Griffith's transforming principle was DNA. We revisited these classic experiments in a practical class for undergraduate students. Both experiments were reproduced in simple, adapted forms.…

  1. Revisiting the Metaphor of the Island: Challenging "World Culture" from an Island Misunderstood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rappleye, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    This article revisits the newly "discovered" island that world culture theorists have repeatedly utilised to explain their theoretical stance, conceptual preferences and methodological approach. Yet, it seeks to (re)connect world culture with the real world by replacing their imagined atoll with a real one--the island-nation of Japan. In…

  2. Increasing the Degrees of Freedom in Future Group Randomized Trials: The "df*" Method Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, David M.; Blitstein, Jonathan L.; Hannan, Peter J.; Shadish, William R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: This article revisits an article published in Evaluation Review in 2005 on sample size estimation and power analysis for group-randomized trials. With help from a careful reader, we learned of an important error in the spreadsheet used to perform the calculations and generate the results presented in that article. As we studied the…

  3. Transformation of Learning in Education and Training: Key Qualifications Revisited. CEDEFOP Reference Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamarainen, Pekka, Ed.; Attwell, Graham, Ed.; Brown, Alan, Ed.

    This book contains 15 papers examining European approaches to the theme of key qualifications. The following papers are included: "Key Qualifications Revisited: An Introduction" (Pekka Kamarainen); "Exploring Key Qualifications: Context, Theory, and Practice in Europe" (Pekka Kamarainen); "Rethinking Key Qualifications:…

  4. The Myth of Meeting Needs Revisited: The Case of Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawy, Robert; Armstrong, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Our primary objective in this paper is revisit a debate that was articulated 25 years ago in this journal in which it was argued that the idea of meeting needs in adult and continuing education is a myth. We extend the original analysis of need and apply it to the case of educational research. We look at the policy context, which has, in the…

  5. The Relationship between Undergraduate Attendance and Performance Revisited: Alignment of Student and Instructor Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westerman, James W.; Perez-Batres, Luis A.; Coffey, Betty S.; Pouder, Richard W.

    2011-01-01

    We revisit the relationship between attendance and performance in the undergraduate university setting and apply agency theory in the instructor-student context. Building on agency theory propositions in the educational setting advanced by Smith, Zsidisin, and Adams (2005), we propose that the student and instructor must align goals to promote the…

  6. Considerations of the Social, Individual, and Embodied: A Response to Comments on "Schema Theory Revisited"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McVee, Mary B.; Gavelek, James R.; Dunsmore, Kailonnie L.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the authors' response and clarifications to the comments of Margaret E. Gredler and of Karen A. Krasny, Mark Sadoski, and Allan Paivio on their article "Schema Theory Revisited." The authors first respond to Gredler's criticism contending that they "transmogrified" Harre's (1984) "ignominiously named...Vygotsky space" in…

  7. Commentary: Revisiting "Guidelines for Using Technology to Prepare Social Studies Teachers"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartshorne, Richard; Waring, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    In Hicks, Lee, Berson, Bolick, and Diem (2014), the authors revisited and revised a series of principles focusing on the preparation of social studies teachers for using digital technologies in the classroom, originally presented in the inaugural issue of "Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education" (Mason et al., 2000).…

  8. A Re-Visitation of Two Communities Represented in the Linguistic Atlas of New England.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, David R.

    A study was undertaken "to determine the extent and nature of change, if any, in the speech of two New England communities" since the fieldwork for the "Linguistic Atlas of New England" (LANE) was completed in 1932. Two rural communities, Granby and Deerfield, Massachusetts, were re-visited in order to interview the same three…

  9. Commentary on "Distributed Revisiting: An Analytic for Retention of Coherent Science Learning"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt, Jim

    2015-01-01

    The article, "Distributed Revisiting: An Analytic for Retention of Coherent Science Learning" is an interesting study that operates at the intersection of learning theory and learning analytics. The authors observe that the relationship between learning theory and research in the learning analytics field is constrained by several…

  10. Making Productive Use of Four Models of School English: A Case Study Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macken-Horarik, Mary

    2014-01-01

    At a time when political leaders and media pundits seek to narrow the English curriculum and reduce its knowledge structure to the "basics," it is helpful to revisit the potential of different approaches to learning in English that have evolved over time. In this paper I reflect on the semantic features of personal growth, cultural…

  11. Kensington Revisited: Two Key Years of Context from the Milford Chronicle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Louis M.; And Others

    In introducing a symposium on Kensington School (Missouri), an innovative elementary school in Milford School District, this paper discusses the origins of the restudy of Kensington 15 years after its creation and narrates the story of 2 key years in the district's history. The authors describe how a revisit to the district uncovered new…

  12. The Best and the Rest: Revisiting the Norm of Normality of Individual Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Boyle, Ernest, Jr.; Aguinis, Herman

    2012-01-01

    We revisit a long-held assumption in human resource management, organizational behavior, and industrial and organizational psychology that individual performance follows a Gaussian (normal) distribution. We conducted 5 studies involving 198 samples including 633,263 researchers, entertainers, politicians, and amateur and professional athletes.…

  13. New Orleans Revisited and Revised: Recommendations for the Field of Speech Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roever, James E.; And Others

    This collection of four papers is the result of an action caucus held in association with the Speech Communication Association's 1972 convention, focusing on developments in the speech communication field since the 1968 USOE/SAA New Orleans conference (ED 028 164). In the first paper, "New Orleans Revisited but Briefly," James E. Roever summarizes…

  14. The intensities of methane in the 3-5 mu m region revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fejard, L.; Champion, J.; Jouvard, J.; Brown, L.; Pine, A.

    2000-01-01

    The analysis of the linestrengths of the infrared spectrum of methane (12 and 13) in the 3-5 mu m region has been revisited onthe basis of new measurements from Fourier transform spectra recorded at Kitt Peak under various optical densities.

  15. Revisiting the Challenges Linked to Parenting and Home-School Relationships at the High School Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deslandes, Rollande; Barma, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    The article revisits data from a 2005 study on the parental involvement process. The purpose of this study was to analyze parents' written statements regarding two processes: parenting and home-school relationships associated with school success at the high school level. The objectives are mainly to describe parents' understanding of their role in…

  16. Atmospheric Entry Heating of Micrometeorites Revisited: Higher Temperatures and Potential Biases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, S.; Alexander, C. M. OD.

    2001-01-01

    The atmospheric entry heating model of Love and Brownlee appears to have overestimated evaporation rates by as much as two orders of magnitude. Here we revisit the issue of atmospheric entry heating, using a revised prescription for evaporation rates. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  17. My First CMC Article Revisited: A Window on Spanish L2 Interlanguage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blake, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The computer-assisted language learning (CALL) field seems to change overnight with new technological affordances. Blake revisits his 2000 "LLT" article on computer-mediation communication (CMC) in order to reflect on how the field has examined this topic over the past decade or so. While the Interaction Hypothesis continues to guide…

  18. Revisiting First-Year College Students' Mattering: Social Support, Academic Stress, and the Mattering Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayle, Andrea Dixon; Chung, Kuo-Yi

    2008-01-01

    In this study, Nancy Schlossberg's (1989) theory of college students' mattering to others was revisited. Mattering is the experience of others depending on us, being interested in us, and being concerned with our fate. The relationships of gender, mattering to college friends and the college environment, and friend and family social support with…

  19. Re-Visit to the School Nurse and Adolescents' Medicine Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borup, Ina K.; Andersen, Anette; Holstein, Bjorn E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine if students who re-visit the school nurse use medicines differently than other students when exposed to aches and psychological problems. Methods: The study includes all 11-, 13- and 15-year-old students from a random sample of schools in Denmark, response rate 87 per cent, n = 5,205. The data collection followed the…

  20. Understanding Emergency Department 72-Hour Revisits Among Medicaid Patients Using Electronic Healthcare Records.

    PubMed

    Ryan, James; Hendler, James; Bennett, Kristin P

    2015-12-01

    Electronic Healthcare Records (EHRs) have the potential to improve healthcare quality and to decrease costs by providing quality metrics, discovering actionable insights, and supporting decision-making to improve future outcomes. Within the United States Medicaid Program, rates of recidivism among emergency department (ED) patients serve as metrics of hospital performance that help ensure efficient and effective treatment within the ED. We analyze ED Medicaid patient data from 1,149,738 EHRs provided by a hospital over a 2-year period to understand the characteristics of the ED return visits within a 72-hour time frame. Frequent flyer patients with multiple revisits account for 47% of Medicaid patient revisits over this period. ED encounters by frequent flyer patients with prior 72-hour revisits in the last 6 months are thrice more likely to result in a readmit than those of infrequent patients. Statistical L1-logistic regression and random forest analyses reveal distinct patterns of ED usage and patient diagnoses between frequent and infrequent patient encounters, suggesting distinct opportunities for interventions to improve efficacy of care and streamline ED workflow. This work forms a foundation for future development of predictive models, which could flag patients at high risk of revisiting.

  1. Critical Language Awareness in the United States: Revisiting Issues and Revising Pedagogies in a Resegregated Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alim, H. Samy

    2005-01-01

    As scholars examine the successes and failures of more than 50 years of court-ordered desegregation since "Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas," and 25 years of language education of Black youth since "Martin Luther King Elementary School Children v. Ann Arbor School District Board," this article revisits the key…

  2. Reflecting Back and Looking Forward: Revisiting "Teaching about Writing, Righting Misconceptions" Five Years on

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wardle, Elizabeth; Downs, Doug

    2013-01-01

    In this Retrospective, we revisit our 2007 "College Composition and Communication" article in order to clarify our primary argument, address some questions and critiques that have arisen, and consider anew the value of composition courses that study writing. We review our core argument that engaging students with the research and ideas of writing…

  3. Where Are They Now? LJ Revisits a Decade's Worth of Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuzyk, Raya

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author revisits 11 graduates who were profiled as part of LJ's annual Placements & Salaries issue. Armed with a library science degree from various institutions, they had just secured jobs in librarianship and were off to a good start forging their careers. Since then, they have worked at elementary school, college, and…

  4. Revisiting coupled Shukla-Varma and convective cell mode in classical and quantum dusty magnetoplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masood, W.; Mirza, Arshad M.; Nargis, Shahida

    2010-08-01

    The coupled Shukla-Varma (SV) and convective cell mode is revisited in classical and quantum dusty magnetoplasmas. It is shown that the inclusion of electron thermal effects modifies the original coupled SV and convective cell mode. It is also discussed how the quantum effects can be incorporated in the coupled SV and convective cell mode.

  5. Reading Researchers in Search of Common Ground: The Expert Study Revisited. 2nd Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flippo, Rona F., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    In "Reading Researchers in Search of Common Ground, Second Edition", Rona F. Flippo revisits her study, in which she set out to find common ground among experts in the much-fragmented field of reading research. The original edition, featuring contributions from participants in the study, commentary from additional distinguished literacy scholars…

  6. Teacher Communication Concerns Revisited: Calling into Question the Gnawing Pull towards Equilibrium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dannels, Deanna P.

    2015-01-01

    This study revisits the long-standing teacher communication concerns framework originating over three decades ago. Analysis of 10 years of contemporary GTA teacher communication concerns reveals a typology of 10 concerns, which taken together construct teaching as a process of negotiating relationships, managing identities, and focusing attention.…

  7. Framing the Future: Revisiting the Place of Educational Expectations in Status Attainment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozick, Robert; Alexander, Karl; Entwisle, Doris; Dauber, Susan; Kerr, Kerri

    2010-01-01

    This study revisits the Wisconsin model of status attainment from a life course developmental perspective. Fixed-effects regression analyses lend strong support to the Wisconsin framework's core proposition that academic performance and significant others' influence shape educational expectations. However, investigating the process of expectation…

  8. Revisiting Evidence for Modularity and Functional Equivalence across Verbal and Spatial Domains in Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerard, Katherine; Tremblay, Sebastien

    2008-01-01

    The authors revisited evidence in favor of modularity and of functional equivalence between the processing of verbal and spatial information in short-term memory. This was done by investigating the patterns of intrusions, omissions, transpositions, and fill-ins in verbal and spatial serial recall and order reconstruction tasks under control,…

  9. Revisiting "Grutter" and "Gratz" in the Wake of "Fisher": Looking Back to Move Forward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ledesma, Maria C.

    2013-01-01

    This article revisits the University of Michigan's 2003 affirmative action cases, "Grutter v. Bollinger" and "Gratz v. Bollinger." Through the aid of critical textual analysis and critical race theory, the author looks back at the predominant narratives that framed the challenge to, and defense of, race-conscious affirmative…

  10. Parentocracy Revisited: Still a Relevant Concept for Understanding Middle Class Educational Advantage?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett DeWiele, Corinne E.; Edgerton, Jason D.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we revisit Brown's ("Br J Soc Educ" 14: 65-85, 1990) concept of "parentocracy" which has been informatively applied in educational research in a number of studies in various countries internationally--but almost none in North America. We provide an expanded conceptualization of parentocracy and suggest that it…

  11. Revisiting Individual Creativity Assessment: Triangulation in Subjective and Objective Assessment Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Namgyoo K.; Chun, Monica Youngshin; Lee, Jinju

    2016-01-01

    Compared to the significant development of creativity studies, individual creativity research has not reached a meaningful consensus regarding the most valid and reliable method for assessing individual creativity. This study revisited 2 of the most popular methods for assessing individual creativity: subjective and objective methods. This study…

  12. Mental health and poverty in developing countries: revisiting the relationship.

    PubMed

    Das, Jishnu; Do, Quy-Toan; Friedman, Jed; McKenzie, David; Scott, Kinnon

    2007-08-01

    The relationship between poverty and mental health has received considerable attention in the recent literature. However, the associations presented in existing studies typically rely on limited samples of individuals and on proxy indicators for poverty such as education, the lack of tap water, or being unemployed. We revisit the relationship between poverty and mental health using data from nationally representative household surveys in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Indonesia and Mexico, along with special surveys from India and Tonga. As in previous studies, we find that individuals who are older, female, widowed, and in poor health are more likely to report worse mental health outcomes. Individuals living with others with poor mental health are significantly more likely to report worse mental health themselves. The size of the coefficients and their significance are comparable across the five countries. In contrast to previous studies, the relationship between higher education and better mental health is weak or non-existent. Furthermore, there is no consistent association between consumption poverty and mental health - in two countries mental health measures are marginally worse for the poor; in two countries there is no association; and in one country mental health measures are better for the poor compared to the non-poor. Moreover, the sizes of the coefficients for both education and consumption poverty are small compared to other factors considered here. While the lack of an association between consumption poverty and mental health implies that poor mental health is not a "disease of affluence", neither is it a disease of poverty. Changes in life circumstances brought on, for instance, by illness may have a greater impact on mental health than levels of poverty. Effective public health policy for mental health should focus on protecting individuals and households from adverse events and on targeted interventions following such adverse changes.

  13. The residence time of water in the atmosphere revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Ent, Ruud J.; Tuinenburg, Obbe A.

    2017-02-01

    This paper revisits the knowledge on the residence time of water in the atmosphere. Based on state-of-the-art data of the hydrological cycle we derive a global average residence time of 8.9 ± 0.4 days (uncertainty given as 1 standard deviation). We use two different atmospheric moisture tracking models (WAM-2layers and 3D-T) to obtain atmospheric residence time characteristics in time and space. The tracking models estimate the global average residence time to be around 8.5 days based on ERA-Interim data. We conclude that the statement of a recent study that the global average residence time of water in the atmosphere is 4-5 days, is not correct. We derive spatial maps of residence time, attributed to evaporation and precipitation, and age of atmospheric water, showing that there are different ways of looking at temporal characteristics of atmospheric water. Longer evaporation residence times often indicate larger distances towards areas of high precipitation. From our analysis we find that the residence time over the ocean is about 2 days less than over land. It can be seen that in winter, the age of atmospheric moisture tends to be much lower than in summer. In the Northern Hemisphere, due to the contrast in ocean-to-land temperature and associated evaporation rates, the age of atmospheric moisture increases following atmospheric moisture flow inland in winter, and decreases in summer. Looking at the probability density functions of atmospheric residence time for precipitation and evaporation, we find long-tailed distributions with the median around 5 days. Overall, our research confirms the 8-10-day traditional estimate for the global mean residence time of atmospheric water, and our research contributes to a more complete view of the characteristics of the turnover of water in the atmosphere in time and space.

  14. Photoevaporation of Circumstellar Disks Revisited: The Dust-free Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kei E. I.; Nakamoto, Taishi; Omukai, Kazuyuki

    2013-08-01

    Photoevaporation by stellar ionizing radiation is believed to play an important role in the dispersal of disks around young stars. The mass-loss model for dust-free disks developed by Hollenbach et al. is currently regarded as the conventional one and has been used in a wide variety of studies. However, the rate in this model was derived using the crude so-called 1+1D approximation of ionizing radiation transfer, which assumes that diffuse radiation propagates in a direction vertical to the disk. In this study, we revisit the photoevaporation of dust-free disks by solving the two-dimensional axisymmetric radiative transfer for steady-state disks. Unlike that solved by the conventional model, we determine that direct stellar radiation is more important than the diffuse field at the disk surface. The radial density distribution at the ionization boundary is represented by a single power law with index -3/2 in contrast to the conventional double power law. For this distribution, the photoevaporation rate from the entire disk can be written as a function of the ionizing photon emissivity ΦEUV from the central star and the disk outer radius r d as follows: \\dot{M}_PE = 5.4 \\times 10^{-5} (\\Phi _EUV/10^{49}\\ s^{-1})^{1/2} (r_d/1000\\ AU)^{1/2} \\ M_\\odot \\ yr^{-1}. This new rate depends on the outer disk radius rather than on the gravitational radius as in the conventional model, because of the enhanced contribution to the mass loss from the outer disk annuli. In addition, we discuss its applications to present-day as well as primordial star formation.

  15. Revisiting the sequencing of the first tree genome: Populus trichocarpa.

    PubMed

    Wullschleger, Stan D; Weston, D J; DiFazio, S P; Tuskan, G A

    2013-04-01

    Ten years ago, it was announced that the Joint Genome Institute with funds provided by the Department of Energy, Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research would sequence the black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa Torr. & Gray) genome. This landmark decision was the culmination of work by the forest science community to develop Populus as a model system. Since its public release in late 2006, the availability of the Populus genome has spawned research in plant biology, morphology, genetics and ecology. Here we address how the tree physiologist has used this resource. More specifically, we revisit our earlier contention that the rewards of sequencing the Populus genome would depend on how quickly scientists working with woody perennials could adopt molecular approaches to investigate the mechanistic underpinnings of basic physiological processes. Several examples illustrate the integration of functional and comparative genomics into the forest sciences, especially in areas that target improved understanding of the developmental differences between woody perennials and herbaceous annuals (e.g., phase transitions). Sequencing the Populus genome and the availability of genetic and genomic resources has also been instrumental in identifying candidate genes that underlie physiological and morphological traits of interest. Genome-enabled research has advanced our understanding of how phenotype and genotype are related and provided insights into the genetic mechanisms whereby woody perennials adapt to environmental stress. In the future, we anticipate that low-cost, high-throughput sequencing will continue to facilitate research in tree physiology and enhance our understanding at scales of individual organisms and populations. A challenge remains, however, as to how genomic resources, including the Populus genome, can be used to understand ecosystem function. Although examples are limited, progress in this area is encouraging and will undoubtedly improve as

  16. Ecological caring-Revisiting the original ideas of caring science.

    PubMed

    Dahlberg, Helena; Ranheim, Albertine; Dahlberg, Karin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this empirically grounded philosophical paper is to explore the notion of holistic care with the intention to expand it into a notion of ecological care and in such a way revisit the original ideas of caring science. The philosophical analysis, driven by lifeworld theory and especially Merleau-Ponty's philosophy, is firmly rooted in contemporary clinical care. We used interview data from patients in a study at an anthroposophic clinic in Sweden, which forms part of an ecological community with, for example, ecological agriculture. The empirical study is analysed according to reflective lifeworld research. Starting from the fact that illness can be defined as a loss of homelikeness in the body and in the familiar world, our findings illustrate how ecological care helps the patient to once again find one's place in a world that is characterized by interconnectedness. The task of ecological care is thus not only to see the patient within a world of relationships but to help the patient find his/her place again, to understand himself/herself and the world anew. Ecological care is not only about fighting an illness, but also recognizes a patient from inside a world that s/he is affected by and affects, that s/he is understood and understands from. Such care tries to restore this connection by making possible the rhythmical movement as well as the space in-between activity and rest, between being cared for and actively involving oneself in one's recovery and between closing oneself off from the world and once again going out into it.

  17. PHOTOEVAPORATION OF CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS REVISITED: THE DUST-FREE CASE

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Kei E. I.; Omukai, Kazuyuki; Nakamoto, Taishi

    2013-08-20

    Photoevaporation by stellar ionizing radiation is believed to play an important role in the dispersal of disks around young stars. The mass-loss model for dust-free disks developed by Hollenbach et al. is currently regarded as the conventional one and has been used in a wide variety of studies. However, the rate in this model was derived using the crude so-called 1+1D approximation of ionizing radiation transfer, which assumes that diffuse radiation propagates in a direction vertical to the disk. In this study, we revisit the photoevaporation of dust-free disks by solving the two-dimensional axisymmetric radiative transfer for steady-state disks. Unlike that solved by the conventional model, we determine that direct stellar radiation is more important than the diffuse field at the disk surface. The radial density distribution at the ionization boundary is represented by a single power law with index -3/2 in contrast to the conventional double power law. For this distribution, the photoevaporation rate from the entire disk can be written as a function of the ionizing photon emissivity {Phi}{sub EUV} from the central star and the disk outer radius r{sub d} as follows: M-dot{sub PE} = 5.4 x 10{sup -5} ({Phi}{sub EUV}/10{sup 49} s{sup -1}){sup 1/2} (r{sub d}/1000 AU){sup 1/2} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. This new rate depends on the outer disk radius rather than on the gravitational radius as in the conventional model, because of the enhanced contribution to the mass loss from the outer disk annuli. In addition, we discuss its applications to present-day as well as primordial star formation.

  18. Ecological caring—Revisiting the original ideas of caring science

    PubMed Central

    Dahlberg, Helena; Ranheim, Albertine; Dahlberg, Karin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this empirically grounded philosophical paper is to explore the notion of holistic care with the intention to expand it into a notion of ecological care and in such a way revisit the original ideas of caring science. The philosophical analysis, driven by lifeworld theory and especially Merleau-Ponty's philosophy, is firmly rooted in contemporary clinical care. We used interview data from patients in a study at an anthroposophic clinic in Sweden, which forms part of an ecological community with, for example, ecological agriculture. The empirical study is analysed according to reflective lifeworld research. Starting from the fact that illness can be defined as a loss of homelikeness in the body and in the familiar world, our findings illustrate how ecological care helps the patient to once again find one's place in a world that is characterized by interconnectedness. The task of ecological care is thus not only to see the patient within a world of relationships but to help the patient find his/her place again, to understand himself/herself and the world anew. Ecological care is not only about fighting an illness, but also recognizes a patient from inside a world that s/he is affected by and affects, that s/he is understood and understands from. Such care tries to restore this connection by making possible the rhythmical movement as well as the space in-between activity and rest, between being cared for and actively involving oneself in one's recovery and between closing oneself off from the world and once again going out into it. PMID:27914196

  19. Revisiting evidence for sustainability of bushmeat hunting in West Africa.

    PubMed

    Waite, T A

    2007-09-01

    Bushmeat hunting, a key source of dietary protein, has been implicated as a major extinction threat to tropical vertebrate species in West Africa. Ideally, any such hunting of wild species should be done sustainably, with off-take levels low enough to ensure viability of harvested species. Recent work purports to show that a mature bushmeat market in a major city in Ghana operates sustainably after depletion of vulnerable, slow-reproducing species (Cowlishaw and others 2005). I revisit two aspects of this work. First, I retest the prediction that larger species are transported to the market from greater distances, as expected if overexploitation depletes large species close to the city. Cowlishaw and others failed to find a significantly positive relationship between species-specific body mass and distance between capture site and the market. However, my reanalysis provides evidence for a positive relationship after all, consistent with unsustainable harvesting. In particular, ungulate species were harvested significantly farther from the market than smaller-bodied rodent species. Second, I caution that just because species "persist" in the marketplace in no way implies that they can withstand hunting pressure elsewhere and so should be of little concern to conservationists. I reveal that such species, despite their high intrinsic rates of population growth, are not robust elsewhere. Several of them have disappeared from a network of protected areas in Ghana (Brashares and others 2001). I show that faster-reproducing species are not necessarily more likely to persist in protected areas. The mere presence of fast-reproducing species in a mature bushmeat market should not be construed as generalizable robustness; criteria for ecological sustainability should ensure viability; and harvested species should be robust, not highly prone to extinction, in protected areas.

  20. Revisiting the OH-CH correlation in diffuse clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mookerjea, Bhaswati

    2016-07-01

    Based on the analysis of available published data and archival data along 24 sightlines (5 of which are new) we derive more accurate estimates of the column densities of OH and CH towards diffuse/translucent clouds and revisit the typically observed correlation between the abundances of these species. The increase in the sample size was possible because of the equivalence of the column densities of CH derived from a combination of the transitions at 3137 and 3143 Å, and a combination of transitions at 3886 and 3890 Å, which we have demonstrated here. We find that with the exception of four diffuse clouds, the entire source sample shows a clear correlation between the column densities of OH and CH similar to previous observations. The analysis presented also verifies the theoretically predicted oscillator strengths of the OH A-X (3078 and 3082 Å), CH B-X (3886 and 3890 Å) and C-X (3137 and 3143 Å) transitions. We estimate N(H) and N(H2) from the observed E(B - V) and N(CH) respectively. The N(OH)/N(CH) ratio is not correlated with the molecular fraction of hydrogen in the diffuse/translucent clouds. We show that with the exception of HD 34078 for all the clouds the observed column density ratios of CH and OH can be reproduced by simple chemical models which include gas-grain interaction and gas-phase chemistry. The enhanced N(OH)/N(CH) ratio seen towards the three new sightlines can be reproduced primarily by considering different cosmic ray ionization rates.

  1. Revisiting the Interpretation of Thorium Abundances at Hansteen Alpha

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, D. J.; Hawke, B. R.; Elphic, R. C.; Feldman, W. C.; Prettyman, T. H.; Vaniman, D. T.

    2004-01-01

    Hansteen Alpha is one of the few remaining locations on the Moon thought to be formed by highlands volcanism. Hansteen Alpha is a triangular shaped feature located in the southern portion of Oceanus Procellarum (12 degrees W, 50 degrees S) and its size is approximately 25 km on each side. As described by Hawke et al., there is clear evidence that: 1) Hansteen Alpha was emplaced by extrusive volcanic processes; and 2) it was formed by a viscous lava that should be enriched in Th. However, in the study of Hawke et al. using available Lunar Prospector (LP) Th data, it was concluded that the Hansteen Alpha region was not greatly enriched in Th as would be expected for a highly evolved, viscous lava. It was further concluded based on other compositional data that the magma that formed Hansteen Alpha did not correspond to any known rock type. Here we revisit the interpretation of Th abundances at Hansteen Alpha for a couple of reasons. First, the size of Hansteen Alpha is smaller than the spatial resolution of the LP Gamma-ray Spectrometer (LP-GRS) from which the Th abundances were derived. Therefore, the LP-GRS pixels covering Hansteen Alpha may not truly represent the Th abundance of the Hansteen Alpha feature. Second, recent work has led to a much greater understanding of the Th spatial distribution for small-area features on the lunar surface. In particular, using forward modeling techniques, we have developed the ability to obtain information about Th abundances for features that are at or smaller than the FWHM spatial resolution (approximately [80 square kilometers]) of the LP-GRS data.

  2. Revisiting noninteracting string partition functions in Rindler space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertens, Thomas G.; Verschelde, Henri; Zakharov, Valentin I.

    2016-05-01

    We revisit noninteracting string partition functions in Rindler space by summing over fields in the spectrum. In field theory, the total partition function splits in a natural way into a piece that does not contain surface terms and a piece consisting of solely the so-called edge states. For open strings, we illustrate that surface contributions to the higher-spin fields correspond to open strings piercing the Rindler origin, unifying the higher-spin surface contributions in string language. For closed strings, we demonstrate that the string partition function is not quite the same as the sum over the partition functions of the fields in the spectrum: an infinite overcounting is present for the latter. Next we study the partition functions obtained by excluding the surface terms. Using recent results of He et al. [J. High Energy Phys. 05 (2015) 106], this construction, first done by Emparan [arXiv:hep-th/9412003], can be put on much firmer ground. We generalize to type II and heterotic superstrings and demonstrate modular invariance. All of these exhibit an IR divergence that can be interpreted as a maximal acceleration close to the black hole horizon. Ultimately, since these partition functions are only part of the full story, divergences here should not be viewed as a failure of string theory: maximal acceleration is a feature of a faulty treatment of the higher-spin fields in the string spectrum. We comment on the relevance of this to Solodukhin's recent proposal [Phys. Rev. D 91, 084028 (2015)]. A possible link with the firewall paradox is apparent.

  3. Revisiting impacts of nuclear burning for reviving weak shocks in neutrino-driven supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Ko; Kotake, Kei; Takiwaki, Tomoya; Nishimura, Nobuya

    2014-02-20

    We revisit potential impacts of nuclear burning on the onset of the neutrino-driven explosions of core-collapse supernovae. By changing the neutrino luminosity and its decay time to obtain parametric explosions in one- and two-dimensional (1D and 2D, respectively) models with or without a 13 isotope α network, we study how the inclusion of nuclear burning could affect the postbounce dynamics for 4 progenitor models; 3 for 15.0 M {sub ☉} stars and 1 for an 11.2 M {sub ☉} star. We find that the energy supply due to the nuclear burning of infalling material behind the shock can energize the shock expansion, especially for models that produce only marginal explosions in the absence of nuclear burning. These models are energized by nuclear energy deposition when the shock front passes through the silicon-rich layer and/or later as it touches the oxygen-rich layer. Depending on the neutrino luminosity and its decay time, the diagnostic energy of the explosion increases up to a few times 10{sup 50} erg for models with nuclear burning compared to the corresponding models without. We point out that these features are most remarkable for the Limongi-Chieffi progenitor in both 1D and 2D because the progenitor model possesses a massive oxygen layer, with an inner-edge radius that is smallest among the employed progenitors, which means that the shock can touch the rich fuel on a shorter timescale after bounce. The energy difference is generally smaller (∼0.1-0.2 × 10{sup 51} erg) in 2D than in 1D (at most ∼0.6 × 10{sup 51} erg). This is because neutrino-driven convection and the shock instability in 2D models enhance the neutrino heating efficiency, which makes the contribution of nuclear burning relatively smaller compared to 1D models. Considering uncertainties in progenitor models, our results indicate that nuclear burning should remain one of the important ingredients to foster the onset of neutrino-driven explosions.

  4. Electrical lysis: dynamics revisited and advances in On-chip operation.

    PubMed

    Morshed, Bashir; Shams, Maitham; Mussivand, Tofy

    2013-01-01

    Electrical lysis (EL) is the process of breaking the cell membrane to expose the internal contents under an applied high electric field. Lysis is an important phenomenon for cellular analysis, medical treatment, and biofouling control. This paper aims to review, summarize, and analyze recent advancements on EL. Major databases including PubMed, Ei Engineering Village, IEEE Xplore, and Scholars Portal were searched using relevant keywords. More than 50 articles published in English since 1997 are cited in this article. EL has several key advantages compared to other lysis techniques such as chemical, mechanical, sonication, or laser, including rapid speed of operation, ability to control, miniaturization, low cost, and low power requirement. A variety of cell types have been investigated for including protoplasts, E. coli, yeasts, blood cells, and cancer cells. EL has been developed and applied for decontamination, cytology, genetics, single-cell analysis, cancer treatment, and other applications. On-chip EL is a promising technology for multiplexed automated implementation of cell-sample preparation and processing with micro- or nanoliter reagents.

  5. Spreading Activation in an Attractor Network with Latching Dynamics: Automatic Semantic Priming Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerner, Itamar; Bentin, Shlomo; Shriki, Oren

    2012-01-01

    Localist models of spreading activation (SA) and models assuming distributed representations offer very different takes on semantic priming, a widely investigated paradigm in word recognition and semantic memory research. In this study, we implemented SA in an attractor neural network model with distributed representations and created a unified…

  6. Revisiting the dynamical case for a massive black hole in IC10 X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laycock, Silas G. T.; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Christodoulou, Dimitris M.

    2015-09-01

    The relative phasing of the X-ray eclipse ephemeris and optical radial velocity (RV) curve for the X-ray binary IC10 X-1 suggests that the He [λ4686] emission line originates in a shadowed sector of the stellar wind that avoids ionization by X-rays from the compact object. The line attains maximum blueshift when the wind is directly towards us at mid X-ray eclipse, as is also seen in Cygnus X-3. If the RV curve is unrelated to stellar motion, evidence for a massive black hole (BH) evaporates because the mass function of the binary is unknown. The reported X-ray luminosity, spectrum, slow QPO and broad eclipses caused by absorption/scattering in the Wolf-Rayet (WR) wind are all consistent with either a low-stellar-mass BH or a neutron star (NS). For an NS, the centre of mass lies inside the WR envelope whose motion is then far below the observed 370 km s-1 RV amplitude, while the velocity of the compact object is as high as 600 km s-1. The resulting 0.4 per cent Doppler variation of X-ray spectral lines could be confirmed by missions in development. These arguments also apply to other putative BH binaries whose RV and eclipse curves are not yet phase-connected. Theories of BH formation and predicted rates of gravitational wave sources may need revision.

  7. Forward flight of birds revisited. Part 2: short-term dynamic stability and trim

    PubMed Central

    Iosilevskii, G.

    2014-01-01

    Thrust generation by flapping is accompanied by alternating pitching moment. On the down-stroke, it pitches the bird down when the wings are above its centre of gravity and up when they are below; on the up-stroke, the directions reverse. Because the thrust depends not only on the flapping characteristics but also on the angle of attack of the bird's body, interaction between the flapping and body motions may incite a resonance that is similar to the one that causes the swinging of a swing. In fact, it is shown that the equation governing the motion of the bird's body in flapping flight resembles the equation governing the motion of a pendulum with periodically changing length. Large flapping amplitude, low flapping frequency, and excessive tilt of the flapping plane may incite the resonance; coordinated fore–aft motion, that uses the lift to cancel out the moment generated by the thrust, suppresses it. It is probably incited by the tumbler pigeon in its remarkable display of aerobatics. The fore–aft motion that cancels the pitching moment makes the wing tip draw a figure of eight relative to the bird's body when the wings are un-swept, and a ring when the wings are swept back and fold during the upstroke. PMID:26064549

  8. Gas dynamics of heat-release-induced waves in supercritical fluids: revisiting the Piston Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliorino, Mario Tindaro; Scalo, Carlo

    2016-11-01

    We investigate a gasdynamic approach to the modeling of heat-release-induced compression waves in supercritical fluids. We rely on highly resolved one-dimensional fully compressible Navier-Stokes simulations of CO2 at pseudo-boiling conditions in a closed duct inspired by the experiments of Miura et al.. Near-critical fluids exhibit anomalous variations of thermodynamic variables taken into account by adopting the Peng-Robinson equation of state and Chung's Method. An idealized heat source is applied, away from the boundaries, resulting in the generation of compression waves followed by contact discontinuities bounding a region of hot expanding fluid. For higher heat-release rates such compressions are coalescent with distinct shock-like features (i.e. non-isentropicity and propagation Mach numbers measurably greater than unity) and a non-uniform post-shock state, not present in ideal gas simulations, caused by the highly nonlinear equation of state. Thermoacoustic effects are limited to: (1) a one-way/one-time thermal-to-acoustic energy conversion, and (2) cumulative non-isentropic bulk heating due to the resonating compression waves, resulting in what is commonly referred to as the Piston Effect.

  9. Dynamics of a Two-Link Vehicle in an L-Shaped Corridor Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonyuk, E. Ya.; Zabuga, A. T.

    2014-03-01

    The kinematics of a two-link mobile robot with three steerable wheels moving in an L-shaped corridor is analyzed. A smooth (with continuous first derivative) path is designed maintaining the optimal maneuverability of the vehicle. The motion of the vehicle along this path is planned. Analytical expressions for the reactions at the contact of the wheels with the ground are given in the general case of motion. The radius of curvature of the programmed path is shown to have a strong influence on the reactions.

  10. Revisiting the Nucleolus: From Marker to Dynamic Integrator of Cancer Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ruggero, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Key signaling pathways (such as phosphoinositide 3-kinase, Myc, and RAS) act as sensors of energy, stress, and nutrient availability and integrate these inputs to directly control ribosomeproduction and gene expression at the translational level. This activity is normally directly coupled to cell growth, division, and survival. However, it remains poorly understood the extent to which changes in ribosome number and nucleolar integrity downstream of these key signaling pathways contribute to their oncogenic activity. Emerging studies provide interesting insight into how deregulations in RNA polymerase I activity may lead to tumorigenesis and suggest that new drugs targeting ribosomal DNA transcription may hold great promise for the treatment of cancer. PMID:22969157

  11. Revisit of rotational dynamics of Asteroid 4179 Toutatis from Chang'e-2's flyby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuhui; Hu, Shoucun; Ji, Jianghui

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents analysis of the rotational parameters of Toutatis based on the observational results from Chang'e-2's close flyby. The 3-D shape model derived from ground-based radar observation is used to calculate the 3-1-3 Euler angles at the flyby epoch, which are evaluated to be -20.1° +/- 1°, 27.6° +/- 1° and 42.2° +/- 1°. The large amplitude of Toutatis' tumbling attitude is demonstrated to be the result of the large deviation of the angular momentum axis and the rotational axis. Two rotational periods are evaluated to be 5.38+/-0.03 days for rotation about the long axis and 7.40+/-0.03 days for precession of the long axis about the angular momentum vector based on Fourier analysis. These results provide a further understanding of rotational state of Toutatis.

  12. Dynamic microtubules and the texture of plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Clive

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between microtubules and cell-wall texture has had a fitful history in which progress in one area has not been matched by progress in the other. For example, the idea that wall texture arises entirely from self-assembly, independently of microtubules, originated with electron microscopic analyses of fixed cells that gave no clue to the ability of microtubules to reorganize. Since then, live-cell studies have established the surprising dynamicity of plant microtubules involving collisions, changes in angle, parallelization, and rotation of microtubule tracks. Combined with proof that cellulose synthases do track along shifting microtubules, this offers more realistic models for the dynamic influence of microtubules on wall texture than could have been imagined in the electron microscopic era-the era from which most ideas on wall texture originate. This review revisits the classical literature on wall organization from the vantage point of current knowledge of microtubule dynamics.

  13. The Angular Momentum of Baryons and Dark Matter Halos Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimm, Taysun; Devriendt, Julien; Slyz, Adrianne; Pichon, Christophe; Kassin, Susan A.; Dubois, Yohan

    2011-01-01

    Recent theoretical studies have shown that galaxies at high redshift are fed by cold, dense gas filaments, suggesting angular momentum transport by gas differs from that by dark matter. Revisiting this issue using high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamics simulations with adaptive-mesh refinement (AMR), we find that at the time of accretion, gas and dark matter do carry a similar amount of specific angular momentum, but that it is systematically higher than that of the dark matter halo as a whole. At high redshift, freshly accreted gas rapidly streams into the central region of the halo, directly depositing this large amount of angular momentum within a sphere of radius r = 0.1R(sub vir). In contrast, dark matter particles pass through the central region unscathed, and a fraction of them ends up populating the outer regions of the halo (r/R(sub vir) > 0.1), redistributing angular momentum in the process. As a result, large-scale motions of the cosmic web have to be considered as the origin of gas angular momentum rather than its virialised dark matter halo host. This generic result holds for halos of all masses at all redshifts, as radiative cooling ensures that a significant fraction of baryons remain trapped at the centre of the halos. Despite this injection of angular momentum enriched gas, we predict an amount for stellar discs which is in fair agreement with observations at z=0. This arises because the total specific angular momentum of the baryons (gas and stars) remains close to that of dark matter halos. Indeed, our simulations indicate that any differential loss of angular momentum amplitude between the two components is minor even though dark matter halos continuously lose between half and two-thirds of their specific angular momentum modulus as they evolve. In light of our results, a substantial revision of the standard theory of disc formation seems to be required. We propose a new scenario where gas efficiently carries the angular momentum generated

  14. Diffusion Monte Carlo Study of Para-Diiodobenzene Polymorphism Revisited.

    PubMed

    Hongo, Kenta; Watson, Mark A; Iitaka, Toshiaki; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Maezono, Ryo

    2015-03-10

    We revisit our investigation of the diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) simulation of para-diiodobenzene (p-DIB) molecular crystal polymorphism. [See J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2010, 1, 1789-1794.] We perform, for the first time, a rigorous study of finite-size effects and choice of nodal surface on the prediction of polymorph stability in molecular crystals using fixed-node DMC. Our calculations are the largest that are currently feasible using the resources of the K-computer and provide insights into the formidable challenge of predicting such properties from first principles. In particular, we show that finite-size effects can influence the trial nodal surface of a small (1 × 1 × 1) simulation cell considerably. Therefore, we repeated our DMC simulations with a 1 × 3 × 3 simulation cell, which is the largest such calculation to date. We used a density functional theory (DFT) nodal surface generated with the PBE functional, and we accumulated statistical samples with ∼6.4 × 10(5) core hours for each polymorph. Our final results predict a polymorph stability that is consistent with experiment, but they also indicate that the results in our previous paper were somewhat fortuitous. We analyze the finite-size errors using model periodic Coulomb (MPC) interactions and kinetic energy corrections, according to the CCMH scheme of Chiesa, Ceperley, Martin, and Holzmann. We investigate the dependence of the finite-size errors on different aspect ratios of the simulation cell (k-mesh convergence) in order to understand how to choose an appropriate ratio for the DMC calculations. Even in the most expensive simulations currently possible, we show that the finite size errors in the DMC total energies are much larger than the energy difference between the two polymorphs, although error cancellation means that the polymorph prediction is accurate. Finally, we found that the T-move scheme is essential for these massive DMC simulations in order to circumvent population explosions and

  15. Effective-Medium Models for Marine Gas Hydrates, Mallik Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, D. A.; Knapp, C. C.; Knapp, J. H.

    2011-12-01

    Hertz-Mindlin type effective-medium dry-rock elastic models have been commonly used for more than three decades in rock physics analysis, and recently have been applied to assessment of marine gas hydrate resources. Comparisons of several effective-medium models with derivative well-log data from the Mackenzie River Valley, Northwest Territories, Canada (i.e. Mallik 2L-38 and 5L-38) were made several years ago as part of a marine gas hydrate joint industry project in the Gulf of Mexico. The matrix/grain supporting model (one of the five models compared) was clearly a better representation of the Mallik data than the other four models (2 cemented sand models; a pore-filling model; and an inclusion model). Even though the matrix/grain supporting model was clearly better, reservations were noted that the compressional velocity of the model was higher than the compressional velocity measured via the sonic logs, and that the shear velocities showed an even greater discrepancy. Over more than thirty years, variations of Hertz-Mindlin type effective medium models have evolved for unconsolidated sediments and here, we briefly review their development. In the past few years, the perfectly smooth grain version of the Hertz-Mindlin type effective-medium model has been favored over the infinitely rough grain version compared in the Gulf of Mexico study. We revisit the data from the Mallik wells to review assertions that effective-medium models with perfectly smooth grains are a better predictor than models with infinitely rough grains. We briefly review three Hertz-Mindlin type effective-medium models, and standardize nomenclature and notation. To calibrate the extended effective-medium model in gas hydrates, we use a well accepted framework for unconsolidated sediments through Hashin-Shtrikman bounds. We implement the previously discussed effective-medium models for saturated sediments with gas hydrates and compute theoretical curves of seismic velocities versus gas hydrate

  16. Alkaline Phosphatase Revisited:  Hydrolysis of Alkyl Phosphates (†).

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Patrick J; Herschlag, Daniel

    2002-03-05

    Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase (AP) is the prototypical two metal ion catalyst with two divalent zinc ions bound ∼4 Å apart in the active site. Studies spanning half a century have elucidated many structural and mechanistic features of this enzyme, rendering it an attractive model for investigating the potent catalytic power of bimetallic centers. Unfortunately, fundamental mechanistic features have been obscured by limitations with the standard assays. These assays generate concentrations of inorganic phosphate (Pi) in excess of its inhibition constant (K i ≈ 1 μM). This tight binding by Pi has affected the majority of published kinetic constants. Furthermore, binding limits k cat/K m for reaction of p-nitrophenyl phosphate, the most commonly employed substrate. We describe a sensitive (32)P-based assay for hydrolysis of alkyl phosphates that avoids the complication of product inhibition. We have revisited basic mechanistic features of AP with these alkyl phosphate substrates. The results suggest that the chemical step for phosphorylation of the enzyme limits k cat/K m. The pH-rate profile and additional results suggest that the serine nucleophile is active in its anionic form and has a pK a of ≤5.5 in the free enzyme. An inactivating pK a of 8.0 is observed for binding of both substrates and inhibitors, and we suggest that this corresponds to ionization of a zinc-coordinated water molecule. Counter to previous suggestions, inorganic phosphate dianion appears to bind to the highly charged AP active site at least as strongly as the trianion. The dependence of k cat/K m on the pK a of the leaving group follows a Brønsted correlation with a slope of βlg = -0.85 ± 0.1, differing substantially from the previously reported value of -0.2 obtained from data with a less sensitive assay. This steep leaving group dependence is consistent with a largely dissociative transition state for AP-catalyzed hydrolysis of phosphate monoesters. The new (32)P

  17. Revisited Inventory of Glaciers on Axel Heiberg Island, Nunavut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, L.; Osinski, G.

    2009-05-01

    As documented in the IPCC's Climate Change 2007 report, the high latitude regions of the Northern Hemisphere are experiencing the highest rates of warming. Given that 35% of the global glacial ice exists within the Arctic Archipelago, this region provides an excellent laboratory for monitoring the anticipated degree of glacial recession [1]. Evidence of arctic warming through negative mass balance trends has been detected in several studies already [e.g., 2]. Here, we show the importance and value of historical records in the task of monitoring glacial retreat. A highly detailed inventory developed by S. Ommanney in 1969 [3], has been revisited and transformed into digital format for the purposes of integration with modern inventories. The Ommanney inventory covers the entirety of Axel Heiberg Island , NU, and includes details often lacking in present day inventories, including orientations (accumulation and ablation zones), elevations (highest, lowest, elevation of the snowline, and the mean elevations of both the accumulation and ablation areas), length (of the ablation area, exposed ice, and of the total glacier including debris cover), area (of the ablation area, exposed ice, and of the total glacier), accumulation area ratio (AAR), depth, volume, and a six digit code which gives qualitative details on glacier attributes. This report is one of the most thorough and comprehensive glacier inventory report ever published in Canada. More recent inventories used for comparison include the glacier extents created by the National Topographic System based on photography from 1980-1987, as well as extents developed by Dr. Luke Copland for the Global Land Ice Measurements from Space (GLIMS) database using 1999-2000 satellite imagery. Our preliminary results show that approximately 90% of ice bodies under 0.2km on Axel Heiberg Island have disappeared entirely in the 40 year period of interest. The issue of glacier definition will be discussed as a possible cause of these

  18. Hydrodynamic limit of Wigner-Poisson kinetic theory: Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we revisit the hydrodynamic limit of the Langmuir wave dispersion relation based on the Wigner-Poisson model in connection with that obtained directly from the original Lindhard dielectric function based on the random-phase-approximation. It is observed that the (fourth-order) expansion of the exact Lindhard dielectric constant correctly reduces to the hydrodynamic dispersion relation with an additional term of fourth-order, beside that caused by the quantum diffraction effect. It is also revealed that the generalized Lindhard dielectric theory accounts for the recently discovered Shukla-Eliasson attractive potential (SEAP). However, the expansion of the exact Lindhard static dielectric function leads to a k4 term of different magnitude than that obtained from the linearized quantum hydrodynamics model. It is shown that a correction factor of 1/9 should be included in the term arising from the quantum Bohm potential of the momentum balance equation in fluid model in order for a correct plasma dielectric response treatment. Finally, it is observed that the long-range oscillatory screening potential (Friedel oscillations) of type cos ( 2 k F r ) / r 3 , which is a consequence of the divergence of the dielectric function at point k = 2kF in a quantum plasma, arises due to the finiteness of the Fermi-wavenumber and is smeared out in the limit of very high electron number-densities, typical of white dwarfs and neutron stars. In the very low electron number-density regime, typical of semiconductors and metals, where the Friedel oscillation wavelength becomes much larger compared to the interparticle distances, the SEAP appears with a much deeper potential valley. It is remarked that the fourth-order approximate Lindhard dielectric constant approaches that of the linearized quantum hydrodynamic in the limit if very high electron number-density. By evaluation of the imaginary part of the Lindhard dielectric function, it is shown that the Landau

  19. SU-E-I-43: Photoelectric Cross Section Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Haga, A; Nakagawa, K; Kotoku, J; Horikawa, Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The importance of the precision in photoelectric cross-section value increases for recent developed technology such as dual energy computed tomography, in which some reconstruction algorithms require the energy dependence of the photo-absorption in each material composition of human being. In this study, we revisited the photoelectric cross-section calculation by self-consistent relativistic Hartree-Fock (HF) atomic model and compared with that widely distributed as “XCOM database” in National Institute of Standards and Technology, which was evaluated with localdensity approximation for electron-exchange (Fock)z potential. Methods: The photoelectric cross section can be calculated with the electron wave functions in initial atomic state (bound electron) and final continuum state (photoelectron). These electron states were constructed based on the selfconsistent HF calculation, where the repulsive Coulomb potential from the electron charge distribution (Hartree term) and the electron exchange potential with full electromagnetic interaction (Fock term) were included for the electron-electron interaction. The photoelectric cross sections were evaluated for He (Z=2), Be (Z=4), C (Z=6), O (Z=8), and Ne (Z=10) in energy range of 10keV to 1MeV. The Result was compared with XCOM database. Results: The difference of the photoelectric cross section between the present calculation and XCOM database was 8% at a maximum (in 10keV for Be). The agreement tends to be better as the atomic number increases. The contribution from each atomic shell has a considerable discrepancy with XCOM database except for K-shell. However, because the photoelectric cross section arising from K-shell is dominant, the net photoelectric cross section was almost insensitive to the different handling in Fock potential. Conclusion: The photoelectric cross-section program has been developed based on the fully self-consistent relativistic HF atomic model. Due to small effect on the Fock

  20. Dynamic thermodiffusion theory for ternary liquid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslamian, Morteza; Ziad Saghir, M.

    2010-04-01

    Following the non-equilibrium thermodynamics approach, we develop expressions for the calculation of the thermal diffusion coefficients in a ternary system. On the basis of some physical justifications, we approximate the net heat of transport with the activation energy of viscous flow. In parallel, we revisit the Kempers model and propose new expressions for the estimation of the thermal diffusion factors in a ternary mixture. The proposed expressions are based on a dynamic modeling approach, as they incorporate the activation energy of viscous flow, which is a fluid flow property and contains the effects of some of the parameters that govern thermodiffusion. The proposed expressions, the Kempers and Ghorayeb-Firoozabadi-Shukla models are evaluated against the experimental data. Our expression which was developed on the basis of the Kempers approach has the best performance.

  1. Turkey Revisited: Reflections on Turkish Society and Culture after 20 Years of Absence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    0 o TURKEY REVISITED: REFLECTIONS ON TURKISH SOCIETY AND CULTURE AFTER 20 YEARS OF ABSENCE Graham E, Fuller December 1988 14 LECTEIff P-7513 mens... culture . He read dozens of Turkish novels of the time and became acquainted with many of their authors. As a result, he wrote a book- length analysis of the...SOCIETY AND CULTURE AFTER 20 YEARS OF ABSENCE Graham E. Fuller There is much merit in abandoning an intellectual discipline for lengthy periods of

  2. Revisiting "Who gets care?": health equity as an arena for nursing action.

    PubMed

    Pauly, Bernadette M; MacKinnon, Karen; Varcoe, Colleen

    2009-01-01

    This article revisits and reaffirms Patricia Steven's earlier work on access to healthcare as an important arena for nursing action. Many of the conditions that affect access to healthcare, such as racism and oppression, also shape inequities in health outcomes. We propose a conceptualization of social justice that is consistent with addressing the conditions that influence health inequities. We also discuss the implications of a critical and feminist conception of social justice for nursing action, education, practice, research, and policy.

  3. Revisit boundary conditions for the self-adjoint angular flux formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yaqi; Gleicher, Frederick N.

    2015-03-01

    We revisit the boundary conditions for SAAF. We derived the equivalent parity variational form ready for coding up. The more rigorous approach of evaluating odd parity should be solving the odd parity equation coupled with the even parity. We proposed a symmetric reflecting boundary condition although neither positive definiteness nor even-odd decoupling is achieved. A simple numerical test verifies the validity of these boundary conditions.

  4. Obstetric triage revisited: update on non-obstetric surgical conditions in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Angelini, Diane J

    2003-01-01

    New findings and diagnostic advances warrant revisiting key features of acute non-obstetric abdominal pain in pregnancy. Four of the most frequently seen conditions warranting surgical intervention are: appendicitis, cholecystitis, pancreatitis, and bowel obstruction. Because pregnancy often masks abdominal complaints, effectively assessing and triaging abdominal pain in pregnant women can be difficult. Working in obstetric triage settings and triaging obstetric phone calls demand continual updating of abdominal assessment knowledge and clinical skills.

  5. Revisiting the fundamental physical chemistry in heterogeneous photocatalysis: its thermodynamics and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Bunsho

    2014-02-07

    Although the history of photocatalysis research is not so long, many researchers have studied photocatalysis and a large number of papers on photocatalysis have been published. The objectives of this review paper are to revisit the fundamentals of photocatalysis, especially its thermodynamics and kinetics, which have not been reexamined in recent studies, to clarify the problems, if any, that prevent developments in the field of photocatalysis, and to present insights for future progress.

  6. Stochastic resonance in neuron models: Endogenous stimulation revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesser, Hans E.; Geisel, Theo

    2001-03-01

    The paradigm of stochastic resonance (SR)-the idea that signal detection and transmission may benefit from noise-has met with great interest in both physics and the neurosciences. We investigate here the consequences of reducing the dynamics of a periodically driven neuron to a renewal process (stimulation with reset or endogenous stimulation). This greatly simplifies the mathematical analysis, but we show that stochastic resonance as reported earlier occurs in this model only as a consequence of the reduced dynamics.

  7. Taï chimpanzees anticipate revisiting high-valued fruit trees from further distances.

    PubMed

    Ban, Simone D; Boesch, Christophe; Janmaat, Karline R L

    2014-11-01

    The use of spatio-temporal memory has been argued to increase food-finding efficiency in rainforest primates. However, the exact content of this memory is poorly known to date. This study investigated what specific information from previous feeding visits chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus), in Taï National Park, Côte d'Ivoire, take into account when they revisit the same feeding trees. By following five adult females for many consecutive days, we tested from what distance the females directed their travels towards previously visited feeding trees and how previous feeding experiences and fruit tree properties influenced this distance. To exclude the influence of sensory cues, the females' approach distance was measured from their last significant change in travel direction until the moment they entered the tree's maximum detection field. We found that chimpanzees travelled longer distances to trees at which they had previously made food grunts and had rejected fewer fruits compared to other trees. In addition, the results suggest that the chimpanzees were able to anticipate the amount of fruit that they would find in the trees. Overall, our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that chimpanzees act upon a retrieved memory of their last feeding experiences long before they revisit feeding trees, which would indicate a daily use of long-term prospective memory. Further, the results are consistent with the possibility that positive emotional experiences help to trigger prospective memory retrieval in forest areas that are further away and have fewer cues associated with revisited feeding trees.

  8. Revisiting spin-lattice relaxation time measurements for dilute spins in high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fu, Riqiang; Li, Jun; Cui, Jingyu; Peng, Xinhua

    2016-07-01

    Numerous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of spin-lattice relaxation times (T1S) for dilute spins such as (13)C have led to investigations of the motional dynamics of individual functional groups in solid materials. In this work, we revisit the Solomon equations and analyze how the heteronuclear cross relaxation between the dilute S (e.g. (13)C) and abundant I (e.g. (1)H) spins affects the measured T1S values in solid-state NMR in the absence of (1)H saturation during the recovery time. It is found theoretically that at the beginning of the S spin magnetization recovery, the existence of non-equilibrium I magnetization introduces the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect onto the recovery of the S spin magnetization and confirmed experimentally that such a heteronuclear cross relaxation effect results in the recovery overshoot phenomena for the dilute spins when T1S is on the same order of T1H, leading to inaccurate measurements of the T1S values. Even when T1S is ten times larger than T1H, the heteronuclear cross relaxation effect on the measured T1S values is still noticeable. Furthermore, this cross relaxation effect on recovery trajectory of the S spins can be manipulated and even suppressed by preparing the initial I and S magnetization, so as to obtain the accurate T1S values. A sample of natural abundance l-isoleucine powder has been used to demonstrate the T1S measurements and their corresponding measured T1C values under various experimental conditions.

  9. Revisiting the physical characterisitics of the subduction interplate seismogenic zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuret, Arnauld; Lallemand, Serge; Funiciello, Francesca; Piromallo, Claudia

    2010-05-01

    Based on the Centennial earthquake catalog, the revised 1964-2007 EHB hypocenters catalog and the 1976-2007 CMT Harvard catalog, we have extracted the hypocenters, nodal planes and seismic moments of worldwide subduction earthquakes for the 1900-2007 period. For the 1976-2007 period, we combine the focal solutions provided by Harvard and the revised hypocenters from Engdahl et al. (1998). Older events are extracted from the Centennial catalogue (Engdahl and Villasenor, 2002) and they are used to estimate the cumulated seismic moment only. The selection criteria for the subduction earthquakes are similar to those used by Mc Caffrey (1994), i.e., we test if the focal mechanisms are consistent with 1/ shallow thrust events (depth > 70 km, positive slips, and at least one nodal plane gets dip < 45°), and, 2/ the plate interface local geometry and orientation (one nodal plane is oriented toward the volcanic arc, the azimuth of this nodal plane ranges between ± 45° with respect to the trench one, its dip ranges between ± 20° with respect to the slab one and the epicentre is located seaward of the volcanic arc). Our study concerns segments of subduction zones that fit with estimated paleoruptures associated with major events (M > 8). We assume that the seismogenic zone coincides with the distribution of 5.5 < M < 7 subduction earthquakes. We provide a map of the interplate seismogenic zones for 80% of the trench systems including dip, length, downdip and updip limits, we revisit the statistical study done by Pacheco et al. (1993) and test some empirical laws obtained for example by Ruff and Kanamori (1980) in light of a more complete, detailed, accurate and uniform description of the subduction interplate seismogenic zone. Since subduction earthquakes result from stress accumulation along the interplate and stress depends on plates kinematics, subduction zone geometry, thermal state and seismic coupling, we aim to isolate some correlations between parameters. The

  10. Tales of sociology and the nursing curriculum: revisiting the debates.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Kay; Law, Kate

    2007-08-01

    . Sociology and the nursing curriculum; editorial. Nurse Education in Practice 4, 81-82; Mowforth, G., Harrison, J., Morris, M., 2005. An investigation into adult nursing students' experience of the relevance and application of behavioural sciences (biology, psychology and sociology) across two different curricula. Nurse Education Today 25, 41-48]. Much attention has been given to the role, utility and value of sociology mostly within pre-registration but also post-registration nursing curricula. Through an initial analysis of a series of letters appearing in The Nursing Times over a 12 week period in 2004, and using an analytical framework of four tales (realist, critical, deconstructive and reflexive) we revisit this relationship. Unlike previous debates our argument is that this relationship is more usefully viewed as emblematic of the legitimation crisis inherent in all modern projects. We argue that in order to move beyond the 'utility' discussion, an interrogation of the knowledge claims of both nursing and sociology is required.

  11. Pair dynamics in the formation of molecules in a Bose-Einstein condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Naidon, Pascal; Masnou-Seeuws, Francoise

    2003-09-01

    We revisit the mean-field treatment of photoassociation and Feshbach resonances in a Bose-Einstein condensate previously used by various authors. Generalizing the Cherny and Shanenko approach [Phys. Rev. E 62, 1646 (2000)] where the finite size of the potentials is explicitly introduced, we develop a two-channel model for a mixed atomic-molecular condensate. Besides the individual dynamics of the condensed and noncondensed atoms, the model also takes into account their pair dynamics by means of pair wave functions. We show that the resulting set of coupled equations can be reduced to the usual coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations when the time scale of the pair dynamics is short compared to that of the individual dynamics. Such time scales are discussed in the case of typical photoassociation experiments with cw lasers. We show that the individual dynamics plays a minor role, demonstrating the validity of the rates predicted by the usual models describing photoassociation in a nondegenerate gas.

  12. NMR and computational methods in the structural and dynamic characterization of ligand-receptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Ghitti, Michela; Musco, Giovanna; Spitaleri, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The recurrent failures in drug discovery campaigns, the asymmetry between the enormous financial investments and the relatively scarce results have fostered the development of strategies based on complementary methods. In this context in recent years the rigid lock-and-key binding concept had to be revisited in favour of a dynamic model of molecular recognition accounting for conformational changes of both the ligand and the receptor. The high level of complexity required by a dynamic description of the processes underlying molecular recognition requires a multidisciplinary investigation approach. In this perspective, the combination of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy with molecular docking, conformational searches along with molecular dynamics simulations has given new insights into the dynamic mechanisms governing ligand receptor interactions, thus giving an enormous contribution to the identification and design of new and effective drugs. Herein a succinct overview on the applications of both NMR and computational methods to the structural and dynamic characterization of ligand-receptor interactions will be presented.

  13. Quasispecies dynamics with network constraints.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Valmir C; Donangelo, Raul; Souza, Sergio R

    2012-11-07

    A quasispecies is a set of interrelated genotypes that have reached a stationary state while evolving according to the usual Darwinian principles of selection and mutation. Quasispecies studies invariably assume that it is possible for any genotype to mutate into any other, but recent finds indicate that this assumption is not necessarily true. Here we revisit the traditional quasispecies theory by adopting a network structure to constrain the occurrence of mutations. Such structure is governed by a random-graph model, whose single parameter (a probability p) controls both the graph's density and the dynamics of mutation. We contribute two further modifications to the theory, one to account for the fact that different loci in a genotype may be differently susceptible to the occurrence of mutations, the other to allow for a more plausible description of the transition from adaptation to degeneracy of the quasispecies as p is increased. We give analytical and simulation results for the usual case of binary genotypes, assuming the fitness landscape in which a genotype's fitness decays exponentially with its Hamming distance to the wild type. These results support the theory's assertions regarding the adaptation of the quasispecies to the fitness landscape and also its possible demise as a function of p.

  14. Saskatchewan Revisited: Growth, Change, and Promise on the Prairies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claypool, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    In honouring the tradition my esteemed colleagues have initiated, the opportunity to contribute to this Special Issue is appreciated. Previous authors, Saklofske and Grainger, had an iconic presence that continues to affect ongoing developments. A solid foundation of professional practice in an ever-changing and dynamic field of applied psychology…

  15. High-scale axions without isocurvature from inflationary dynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Kearney, John; Orlofsky, Nicholas; Pierce, Aaron

    2016-05-31

    Observable primordial tensor modes in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) would point to a high scale of inflation HI. If the scale of Peccei-Quinn (PQ) breaking fa is greater than HI/2π, CMB constraints on isocurvature naively rule out QCD axion dark matter. This assumes the potential of the axion is unmodified during inflation. We revisit models where inflationary dynamics modify the axion potential and discuss how isocurvature bounds can be relaxed. We find that models that rely solely on a larger PQ-breaking scale during inflation fI require either late-time dilution of the axion abundance or highly super-Planckian fI that somehowmore » does not dominate the inflationary energy density. Models that have enhanced explicit breaking of the PQ symmetry during inflation may allow fa close to the Planck scale. Lastly, avoiding disruption of inflationary dynamics provides important limits on the parameter space.« less

  16. High-scale axions without isocurvature from inflationary dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, John; Orlofsky, Nicholas; Pierce, Aaron

    2016-05-01

    Observable primordial tensor modes in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) would point to a high scale of inflation HI . If the scale of Peccei-Quinn (PQ) breaking fa is greater than H/I 2 π , CMB constraints on isocurvature naively rule out QCD axion dark matter. This assumes the potential of the axion is unmodified during inflation. We revisit models where inflationary dynamics modify the axion potential and discuss how isocurvature bounds can be relaxed. We find that models that rely solely on a larger PQ-breaking scale during inflation fI require either late-time dilution of the axion abundance or highly super-Planckian fI that somehow does not dominate the inflationary energy density. Models that have enhanced explicit breaking of the PQ symmetry during inflation may allow fa close to the Planck scale. Avoiding disruption of inflationary dynamics provides important limits on the parameter space.

  17. Associations between in-hospital bed occupancy and unplanned 72-h revisits to the emergency department: a register study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A possible downstream effect of high in-hospital bed occupancy is that patients in the emergency department (ED) who would benefit from in-hospital care are denied admission. The present study aimed at evaluating this hypothesis through investigating associations between in-hospital bed occupancy at the time of presentation in the ED and the probability for unplanned 72-hour (72-h) revisits to the ED among patients discharged at index. A second outcome was unplanned 72-h revisits resulting in admission. Methods All visits to the ED of a 420-bed emergency hospital in southern Sweden between 1 January 2011 and 31 December 2012, which did not result in admission, death, or transfer to another hospital were included. Revisiting fractions were computed for in-hospital occupancy intervals <85%, 85% to 90%, 90% to 95%, 95% to 100%, 100% to 105%, and ≥105%. Multivariate models were constructed in an attempt to take confounding factors from, e.g., presenting complaints, age, referral status, and triage priority into account. Results Included in the study are 81,878 visits. The fraction of unplanned 72-h revisits/unplanned 72-h revisits resulting in admission was 5.8%/1.4% overall, 6.2%/1.4% for occupancy <85%, 6.4%/1.5% for occupancy 85% to 90%, 5.8%/1.4% for occupancy 90% to 95%, 6.0%/1.6% for occupancy 95% to 100%, 5.4%/1.6% for occupancy 100% to 105%, and 4.9%/1.4% for occupancy ≥105%. In the multivariate models, a trend to lower probability of unplanned 72-h revisits was observed at occupancy ≥105% compared to occupancy <95% (OR 0.88, CI 0.76 to 1.01). No significant associations between in-hospital occupancy at index and the probability of making unplanned 72-h revisits resulting in admission were observed. Conclusions The lack of associations between in-hospital occupancy and unplanned 72-h revisits does not support the hypothesis that ED patients are inappropriately discharged when in-hospital beds are scarce. The results are reassuring as they

  18. Revisiting the Galileo Probe results by a stretched atmospheric mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng; Ingersoll, Andrew P.; Janssen, Michael A.

    2015-11-01

    The Juno spacecraft will arrive at Jupiter in the late 2016. One of its major scientific target is to measure the deep water abundance through its Microwave Radiometer (MWR). Prior to the arrival of Juno, the only observation of the weather layer of Jupiter was the Galileo probe (Niemann et al. 1996; Wong et al. 2004), which returned puzzling results. In contrast to the detected 2 - 5 times enrichment of CH4, NH3 and H2S with respect to the solar values, the amount of water was severely subsolar. Three dimensional modeling (Showman & Dowling 2000) shows that dynamic dry downdrafts could create a huge trough in the material surface, such that air flowing through the hot spots undergoes a temporary increase in pressure by a factor of 2, though it is still too small to explain the Galileo probe results. Inspired by the 3D modeling result, we constructed a stretched atmospheric model to parameterize the alteration of the thermodynamic state of air parcel by dynamics. In our model, an air parcel is initially in its equilibrium condensation state and later has been dynamically stretched to higher pressure modeled by a multiplicative factor S. When S=1, the atmosphere is unaltered by dynamics, representing the equilibrium condensation model. We found that, when S=4, the mixing ratios of H2O, NH3 and H2S match all observations coming from the Galileo probe site. Thus, this stretch parameter provides a continuous representation of dynamic processes from the equilibrium condensation model to the Galileo probe results. We also show that the strength of stretch (S) can be retrieved from Juno/MWR limb darkening observations.

  19. Delay driven spatiotemporal chaos in single species population dynamics models.

    PubMed

    Jankovic, Masha; Petrovskii, Sergei; Banerjee, Malay

    2016-08-01

    Questions surrounding the prevalence of complex population dynamics form one of the central themes in ecology. Limit cycles and spatiotemporal chaos are examples that have been widely recognised theoretically, although their importance and applicability to natural populations remains debatable. The ecological processes underlying such dynamics are thought to be numerous, though there seems to be consent as to delayed density dependence being one of the main driving forces. Indeed, time delay is a common feature of many ecological systems and can significantly influence population dynamics. In general, time delays may arise from inter- and intra-specific trophic interactions or population structure, however in the context of single species populations they are linked to more intrinsic biological phenomena such as gestation or resource regeneration. In this paper, we consider theoretically the spatiotemporal dynamics of a single species population using two different mathematical formulations. Firstly, we revisit the diffusive logistic equation in which the per capita growth is a function of some specified delayed argument. We then modify the model by incorporating a spatial convolution which results in a biologically more viable integro-differential model. Using the combination of analytical and numerical techniques, we investigate the effect of time delay on pattern formation. In particular, we show that for sufficiently large values of time delay the system's dynamics are indicative to spatiotemporal chaos. The chaotic dynamics arising in the wake of a travelling population front can be preceded by either a plateau corresponding to dynamical stabilisation of the unstable equilibrium or by periodic oscillations.

  20. Dynamic patterns of academic forum activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Gao, Ya-Chun; Cai, Shi-Min; Zhou, Tao

    2016-11-01

    A mass of traces of human activities show rich dynamic patterns. In this article, we comprehensively investigate the dynamic patterns of 50 thousands of researchers' activities in Sciencenet, the largest multi-disciplinary academic community in China. Through statistical analyses, we found that (i) there exists a power-law scaling between the frequency of visits to an academic forum and the number of corresponding visitors, with the exponent being about 1.33; (ii) the expansion process of academic forums obeys the Heaps' law, namely the number of distinct visited forums to the number of visits grows in a power-law form with exponent being about 0.54; (iii) the probability distributions of time intervals and the number of visits taken to revisit the same academic forum both follow power-laws, indicating the existence of memory effect in academic forum activities. On the basis of these empirical results, we propose a dynamic model that incorporates the exploration, preferential return with memory effect, which can well reproduce the observed scaling laws.

  1. Electromagnetic braking revisited with a magnetic point dipole model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Land, Sara; McGuire, Patrick; Bumb, Nikhil; Mann, Brian P.; Yellen, Benjamin B.

    2016-04-01

    A theoretical model is developed to predict the trajectory of magnetized spheres falling through a copper pipe. The derive magnetic point dipole model agrees well with the experimental trajectories for NdFeB spherical magnets of varying diameter, which are embedded inside 3D printed shells with fixed outer dimensions. This demonstration of electrodynamic phenomena and Lenz's law serves as a good laboratory exercise for physics, electromagnetics, and dynamics classes at the undergraduate level.

  2. Revisiting the optical properties of the FMO protein

    PubMed Central

    Milder, Maaike T. W.; Brüggemann, Ben; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2010-01-01

    We review the optical properties of the FMO complex as found by spectroscopic studies of the Qy band over the last two decades. This article emphasizes the different methods used, both experimental and theoretical, to elucidate the excitonic structure and dynamics of this pigment–protein complex. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11120-010-9540-1) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20229036

  3. Painlevé's paradox and dynamic jamming in simple models of passive dynamic walking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Or, Yizhar

    2014-02-01

    Painlevé's paradox occurs in the rigid-body dynamics of mechanical systems with frictional contacts at configurations where the instantaneous solution is either indeterminate or inconsistent. Dynamic jamming is a scenario where the solution starts with consistent slippage and then converges in finite time to a configuration of inconsistency, while the contact force grows unbounded. The goal of this paper is to demonstrate that these two phenomena are also relevant to the field of robotic walking, and can occur in two classical theoretical models of passive dynamic walking — the rimless wheel and the compass biped. These models typically assume sticking contact and ignore the possibility of foot slippage, an assumption which requires sufficiently large ground friction. Nevertheless, even for large friction, a perturbation that involves foot slippage can be kinematically enforced due to external forces, vibrations, or loose gravel on the surface. In this work, the rimless wheel and compass biped models are revisited, and it is shown that the periodic solutions under sticking contact can suffer from both Painlevé's paradox and dynamic jamming when given a perturbation of foot slippage. Thus, avoidance of these phenomena and analysis of orbital stability with respect to perturbations that include slippage are of crucial importance for robotic legged locomotion.

  4. Revisiting the plasma sheath—dust in plasma sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, G. C.; Deka, R.; Bora, M. P.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we have considered the formation of warm plasma sheath in the vicinity of a wall in a plasma with considerable presence of dust particles. As an example, we have used the parameters relevant in case of plasma sheath formed around surfaces of various solid bodies in space, though the results obtained in this work can be applied to any other physical situation such as laboratory plasma. In the ion-acoustic time scale, we neglect the dust dynamics. The dust particles affect the sheath dynamics by affecting the Poisson equation which determines the plasma potential in the sheath region. It is important to note that our calculations are valid only when the amount of dust particles is not sufficient so as to affect the plasma dynamics in the dust-acoustic time scale, but enough to affect the plasma sheath. We have assumed the current to a dust particle to be balanced throughout the analysis. This makes the grain potential dependent on plasma potential, which is then incorporated into the Poisson equation. The resultant numerical model becomes an initial value problem, which is described by a 1-D integro-differential equation, which is then solved self-consistently by incorporating the change in plasma potential caused by inclusion of the dust potential in the Poisson equation.

  5. Preequilibrium particle emissions and in-medium effects on the pion production in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhao-Qing

    2017-02-01

    Within the framework of the Lanzhou quantum molecular dynamics (LQMD) transport model, pion dynamics in heavy-ion collisions near threshold energies and the emission of preequilibrium particles (nucleons and light complex fragments) have been investigated. A density, momentum and isospin-dependent pion-nucleon potential based on the Δ-hole model is implemented in the transport approach, which slightly leads to the increase of the π-/π+ ratio, but reduces the total pion yields. It is found that a bump structure of the π-/π+ ratio in the kinetic energy spectra appears at the pion energy close to the Δ (1232) resonance region. The yield ratios of neutrons to protons from the squeeze-out particles perpendicular to the reaction plane are sensitive to the stiffness of nuclear symmetry energy, in particular at the high-momentum (kinetic energy) tails.

  6. Dynamical Modelling of Meteoroid Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, David; Wiegert, P. A.

    2012-10-01

    Accurate simulations of meteoroid streams permit the prediction of stream interaction with Earth, and provide a measure of risk to Earth satellites and interplanetary spacecraft. Current cometary ejecta and meteoroid stream models have been somewhat successful in predicting some stream observations, but have required questionable assumptions and significant simplifications. Extending on the approach of Vaubaillon et al. (2005)1, we model dust ejection from the cometary nucleus, and generate sample particles representing bins of distinct dynamical evolution-regulating characteristics (size, density, direction, albedo). Ephemerides of the sample particles are integrated and recorded for later assignment of frequency based on model parameter changes. To assist in model analysis we are developing interactive software to permit the “turning of knobs” of model parameters, allowing for near-real-time 3D visualization of resulting stream structure. With this tool, we will revisit prior assumptions made, and will observe the impact of introducing non-uniform cometary surface attributes and temporal activity. The software uses a single model definition and implementation throughout model verification, sample particle bin generation and integration, and analysis. It supports the adjustment with feedback of both independent and independent model values, with the intent of providing an interface supporting multivariate analysis. Propagations of measurement uncertainties and model parameter precisions are tracked rigorously throughout. We maintain a separation of the model itself from the abstract concepts of model definition, parameter manipulation, and real-time analysis and visualization. Therefore we are able to quickly adapt to fundamental model changes. It is hoped the tool will also be of use in other solar system dynamics problems. 1 Vaubaillon, J.; Colas, F.; Jorda, L. (2005) A new method to predict meteor showers. I. Description of the model. Astronomy and

  7. Stefan-Boltzmann law for the tungsten filament of a light bulb: Revisiting the experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlà, Marcello

    2013-07-01

    A classical laboratory experiment to verify the Stefan-Boltzmann radiation law with the tungsten filaments of commercial incandescent lamps has been fully revisited, collecting a fairly large amount of data with a computer-controlled four-channel power supply. In many cases, the total power dissipated by the lamp is well described by a sum of two power-law terms, with one exponent very close to 4, as predicted by the radiation law, and the other very close to 1, as for simple heat conduction. This result was true even for filament surfaces with a shiny metallic appearance, whose emissivity should vary with temperature.

  8. The Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid with quantum impurity revisited: Critical line and phase diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taejin

    2017-01-01

    We revisit the (1 + 1) dimensional field theoretical model, which describes the Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid (TLL), interacting with a static impurity at the origin of the half line. Applying the Fermi-Bose equivalence and finite conformal transformations only, we map the model onto the Schmid model. Some details of the bosonization procedure have been given. The critical line and the phase diagram of the model follow from the renormalization group analysis of the Schmid model. The obtained critical line of the model is a hyperbola in the parameter space of the two couplings of the TLL.

  9. Long, cold, early r process? Neutrino-induced nucleosynthesis in He shells revisited.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Projjwal; Haxton, W C; Qian, Yong-Zhong

    2011-05-20

    We revisit a ν-driven r-process mechanism in the He shell of a core-collapse supernova, finding that it could succeed in early stars of metallicity Z ≲ 10⁻³ Z(⊙), at relatively low temperatures and neutron densities, producing A ~ 130 and 195 abundance peaks over ~10-20 s. The mechanism is sensitive to the ν emission model and to ν oscillations. We discuss the implications of an r process that could alter interpretations of abundance data from metal-poor stars, and point out the need for further calculations that include effects of the supernova shock.

  10. Vacuum Ultraviolet Photodissociation and Fourier Transform–Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FT-ICR) Mass Spectrometry: Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Jared B.; Robinson, Errol W.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2016-02-16

    We revisited the implementation of UVPD within the ICR cell of a FT-ICR mass spectrometer. UVPD performance characteristics were examined in the context of recent developments in the understanding of UVPD and in-cell tandem mass spectrometry. Efficient UVPD and photo-ECD of a model peptide and small protein within the ICR cell of a FT-ICR mass spectrometer are accomplished through appropriate modulation of laser pulse timing relative to ion magnetron motion and the potential applied to an ion optical element that photons impinge on. It is shown that UVPD yields efficient and extensive fragmentation resulting in excellent sequence coverage for model peptide and protein cations.

  11. The Importance of Jet Bending in Gamma-Ray AGNs—Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, P. J.; Tingay, S. J.

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the hypothesis that γ-ray-quiet active galactic nuclei (AGNs) have a greater tendency for jet bending than γ-ray-loud AGNs, revisiting the analysis of Tingay et al. We perform a statistical analysis using a large sample of 351 radio-loud AGNs along with γ-ray identifications from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). Our results show no statistically significant differences in jet-bending properties between γ-ray-loud and γ-ray-quiet populations, indicating that jet bending is not a significant factor for γ-ray detection in AGNs.

  12. Impact of CP-violation on neutrino lepton number asymmetries revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barenboim, Gabriela; Park, Wan-Il

    2017-02-01

    We revisit the effect of the (Dirac) CP-violating phase on neutrino lepton number asymmetries in both mass- and flavor-basis. We found that, even if there are sizable effects on muon- and tau-neutrino asymmetries, the effect on the asymmetry of electron-neutrinos is at most similar to the upper bound set by BBN for initial neutrino degeneracy parameters smaller than order unity. We also found that, for the asymmetries in mass-basis, the changes caused by CP-violation is of sub-% level which is unlikely to be accessible neither in the current nor in the forthcoming experiments.

  13. The quantum trajectory approach to quantum feedback control of an oscillator revisited.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Andrew C; Szorkovszky, A; Harris, G I; Bowen, W P

    2012-11-28

    We revisit the stochastic master equation approach to feedback cooling of a quantum mechanical oscillator undergoing position measurement. By introducing a rotating wave approximation for the measurement and bath coupling, we can provide a more intuitive analysis of the achievable cooling in various regimes of measurement sensitivity and temperature. We also discuss explicitly the effect of backaction noise on the characteristics of the optimal feedback. The resulting rotating wave master equation has found application in our recent work on squeezing the oscillator motion using parametric driving and may have wider interest.

  14. Revisit on the thermodynamic stability of the noncommutative Schwarzschild black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Meng-Sen; Liu, Yan-Song; Li, Huai-Fan

    In two frameworks, we discuss the thermodynamic stability of noncommutative geometry inspired Schwarzschild black hole (NCSBH). Under the horizon thermodynamics of black holes, we show that the NCSBH cannot be thermodynamically stable if requiring positive temperature. We note the inconsistency in the work of Larrañaga et al. and propose an effective first law of black hole thermodynamics for the NCSBH to eliminate the inconsistency. Based on the effective first law, we recalculate the heat capacity and the thermodynamic curvature by means of geometrothermodynamics (GTD) to revisit the thermodynamic stability.

  15. A parable of oil and water: Revisiting Prince William Sound, four years after

    SciTech Connect

    Keeble, J.

    1993-12-31

    On Good Friday, March 24, 1989, the Exxon oil tanker Valdez foundered on Bligh Reef, spilling 11 million gallons of crude oil into Alaska`s Prince William Sound. To Alaskans, especially fishing people, this was a shocking but not entirely unanticipated event, as there had been several near misses in the twelve years since the opening of oil shipping from Valdez, Alaska. This article revisits Prince William sound to evaluate both the lingering environmental effects and the socio-economic effects of the spill and the huge monetary settlement from the spills.

  16. Psychosis as a disorder of reduced cathectic capacity: Freud's analysis of the Schreber case revisited.

    PubMed

    McGlashan, Thomas H

    2009-05-01

    Approximately 100 years ago, a prominent German public figure name Daniel Schreber wrote memoirs of his experiences in asylums. His case was diagnosed Dementia Praecox at times and Paranoia at others by his treaters. Freud analyzed Schreber's memoirs from the perspective of his "libido" theory of developmentally organized mental "cathexes" or ideational/emotional investments in self and others. Revisiting Freud's analysis of the Schreber case suggests that it may represent the first theoretical articulation that the pathophysiologic core of psychosis is one of deficit, i.e., of diminished (organic) cathectic capacity for normal mental and affective investments in life.

  17. Marginalization: A Revisitation With Integration of Scholarship on Globalization, Intersectionality, Privilege, Microaggressions, and Implicit Biases.

    PubMed

    Hall, Joanne M; Carlson, Kelly

    2016-01-01

    In 1994, the concept of marginalization was explored in an article in Advances in Nursing Science. This is a revisitation of the concept incorporating new scholarship. This update is founded on feminism, postcolonialism, critical race theory, and discourse deconstruction, all viewpoints that have been explicated in nursing. The purpose of this analysis is to look at new scholarship and concepts useful to applying marginalization in nursing knowledge development from the standpoint of Bourdieu's macro, meso, and micro levels. New scholarship includes globalization, intersectionality, privilege, microaggressions, and implicit bias. Implications for decreasing health disparities through this new scholarship are discussed.

  18. The [C II] 158 Micron Line Deficit in Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies Revisited

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-10

    THE [C ii] 158 MICRON LINE DEFICIT IN ULTRALUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES REVISITED1 M. L. Luhman ,2,3 S. Satyapal,4,5,6 J. Fischer,2 M. G.Wolfire,7 E...INTRODUCTION In a previous study ( Luhman et al. 1998, hereafter Paper I), we reported measurements of the 157.74 lm 2P3=2 2P1=2 fine-structure line of C+ in...4945, NGC 1068, and Circinus), in order to compare the ULIRG distribution with that of normal and starburst galaxies only. 762 LUHMAN ET AL. Vol. 594

  19. Revisiting the hopeless ridge: Part II--Inductive orthopedic allograft applied to dental implant regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lupovici, John

    2009-05-01

    Part I of "Revisiting the Hopeless Ridge" highlighted the higher complication rates, greater resorption profile, and lower implant success rates associated with autogenous block grafts. The conclusions described in that article were based on a comprehensive literature review, rather than an individual clinician's experience in clinical practice. Additionally, the idea that such grafts were the gold standard for traditional dental implant-associated bone regeneration was challenged. This article explores the advantageous properties of new commercially available allograft bone in a variety of clinical applications. One such product that combines demineralized bone with lecithin is reviewed, and two case reports using it are presented.

  20. Revisiting Valley Development on Martian Volcanoes Using MGS and Odyssey Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulick, Virginia C.

    2005-01-01

    The valley networks found on the slopes of Martian volcanoes represent an interesting subset of the Martian valley networks. Not only do the volcanoes constrain the possible geologic settings, they also provide a window into Martian valley development through time, as the volcanoes formed throughout the geologic history of Mars. Here I take another look at this intriguing subset of networks by revisiting conclusions reached in my earlier studies using the Viking imagery and the valleys on Hawaii as an analog. I then examine more recent datasets.

  1. Revisiting Deng et al.'s Multiparty Quantum Secret Sharing Protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Tzonelih; Hwang, Cheng-Chieh; Yang, Chun-Wei; Li, Chuan-Ming

    2011-09-01

    The multiparty quantum secret sharing protocol [Deng et al. in Chin. Phys. Lett. 23: 1084-1087, 2006] is revisited in this study. It is found that the performance of Deng et al.'s protocol can be much improved by using the techniques of block-transmission and decoy single photons. As a result, the qubit efficiency is improved 2.4 times and only one classical communication, a public discussion, and two quantum communications between each agent and the secret holder are needed rather than n classical communications, n public discussions, and 3n/2 quantum communications required in the original scheme.

  2. Synthesis of Sulfones and Sulfonamides via Sulfinate Anions: Revisiting the Utility of Thiosulfonates.

    PubMed

    Shyam, Pranab K; Jang, Hye-Young

    2017-02-03

    Simple and high-yielding strategies for the production of a variety of sulfones and sulfonamides, using thiosulfonates synthesized by copper-catalyzed aerobic dimerization, are reported. Although thiosulfonates are an old class of compound, practical methods for their synthesis and utilization have not been rigorously developed. In this study, we revisit the reactions of easily accessible thiosulfonates to form sulfinate anions. Because of the similar reactivity of thiosulfonates and metal sulfinates derived from toxic SO2, thiosulfinates are proposed to be stable, nontoxic alternatives to metal sulfinate salts.

  3. Revisit the spin-FET: Multiple reflection, inelastic scattering, and lateral size effects

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Luting; Li, Xin-Qi; Sun, Qing-feng

    2014-01-01

    We revisit the spin-injected field effect transistor (spin-FET) in a framework of the lattice model by applying the recursive lattice Green's function approach. In the one-dimensional case the results of simulations in coherent regime reveal noticeable differences from the celebrated Datta-Das model, which lead us to an improved treatment with generalized result. The simulations also allow us to address inelastic scattering and lateral confinement effects in the control of spins. These issues are very important in the spin-FET device. PMID:25516433

  4. Revisiting an open access monograph experiment: measuring citations and tweets 5 years later.

    PubMed

    Snijder, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    An experiment run in 2009 could not assess whether making monographs available in open access enhanced scholarly impact. This paper revisits the experiment, drawing on additional citation data and tweets. It attempts to answer the following research question: does open access have a positive influence on the number of citations and tweets a monograph receives, taking into account the influence of scholarly field and language? The correlation between monograph citations and tweets is also investigated. The number of citations and tweets measured in 2014 reveal a slight open access advantage, but the influence of language or subject should also be taken into account. However, Twitter usage and citation behaviour hardly overlap.

  5. Revisiting the Magnetic and Spin Evolution of Two Young X-ray Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferdman, Robert; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Archibald, Robert Frederic

    2014-08-01

    We present results from timing analysis of two young X-ray pulsars found in the large Magellanic Cloud: the Crab-like energetic pulsar PSR B0540-69 and the so-called "big glitcher", PSR J0537-6910. In both cases, we analyze data taken with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. This work extends the published data sets for these pulsars by approximately doubling their respective data spans. We revisit the glitching activity of these neutron stars, particularly that of PSR J0537-6910, determine more precise glitch and spin parameters, and discuss the implications for the spin and magnetospheric evolution of these interesting pulsars.

  6. ULYSSES comes full circle, before revisiting the Sun's poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-04-01

    Ulysses discovered unusually strong magnetic waves in the polar regions. Another surprise concerns unexpected connections between the polar and equatorial regions. Rhythmic variations in the intensity of energetic particles and cosmic rays, recorded by Ulysses at high latitudes, originate in effects of the Sun's rotation much closer to the equator. Scientists are debating how their picture of the magnetic field in the heliosphere must change, to make sense of the Ulysses observations. Without this new knowledge of the solar wind's behaviour, and its widespread effects, shocks felt in the Earth's vicinity would remain incomprehensible. For two centuries, sketchy links between sunspots, auroras and magnetic storms have puzzled scientists. Results from Ulysses and other solar spacecraft, including ESA's SOHO and Cluster II, are expected to transform human understanding of solar-terrestrial events. The task is urgent because astronauts and technological systems are becoming ever more vulnerable to the stormy Sun. After the quiet Sun, a peak of activity When Ulysses conducted the first-ever investigation of the high-latitude heliosphere, the Sun was quiet, being near the minimum of solar activity. As scientists expected, the circumstances were ideal for revealing the underlying structure of the Sun's atmosphere and the solar wind, in their simplest form. With the first phase of the voyage safely and very productively completed, Ulysses faces a new challenge, as it continues along its unique path. Obeying a cycle of roughly eleven years, the Sun is once again becoming restless as sunspot activity builds towards the next peak around 2000. When Ulysses revisits the polar regions at that time it will encounter conditions vastly different from those of 1994-95. The international mission of exploration has already given a new and thought-provoking view of the heliosphere. Its findings at solar maximum are guaranteed to do the same, and to give new insights into the gusts and shocks

  7. A unified approach to computation of solid and liquid free energy to revisit the solid-fluid equilibrium of Lennard-Jones chains.

    PubMed

    Vorselaars, Bart

    2015-03-21

    Liquid free energies are computed by integration along a path from a reference system of known free energy, using a strong localization potential. A particular choice of localization pathway is introduced, convenient for use in molecular dynamics codes, and which achieves accurate results without the need to include the identity-swap or relocation Monte Carlo moves used in previous studies. Moreover, an adaptive timestep is introduced to attain the reference system. Furthermore, a center-of-mass correction that is different from previous studies and phase-independent is incorporated. The resulting scheme allows computation of both solid and liquid free energies with only minor differences in simulation protocol. This is used to re-visit solid-liquid equilibrium in a system of short semi-flexible Lennard-Jones chain molecules. The computed melting curve is demonstrated to be consistent with direct co-existence simulations and computed hysteresis loops, provided that an entropic term arising from unsampled solid states is included.

  8. A unified approach to computation of solid and liquid free energy to revisit the solid-fluid equilibrium of Lennard-Jones chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorselaars, Bart

    2015-03-01

    Liquid free energies are computed by integration along a path from a reference system of known free energy, using a strong localization potential. A particular choice of localization pathway is introduced, convenient for use in molecular dynamics codes, and which achieves accurate results without the need to include the identity-swap or relocation Monte Carlo moves used in previous studies. Moreover, an adaptive timestep is introduced to attain the reference system. Furthermore, a center-of-mass correction that is different from previous studies and phase-independent is incorporated. The resulting scheme allows computation of both solid and liquid free energies with only minor differences in simulation protocol. This is used to re-visit solid-liquid equilibrium in a system of short semi-flexible Lennard-Jones chain molecules. The computed melting curve is demonstrated to be consistent with direct co-existence simulations and computed hysteresis loops, provided that an entropic term arising from unsampled solid states is included.

  9. Role of two-way airflow owing to temperature difference in severe acute respiratory syndrome transmission: revisiting the largest nosocomial severe acute respiratory syndrome outbreak in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun; Zhao, Bin; Yang, Xudong; Li, Yuguo

    2011-01-01

    By revisiting the air distribution and bioaerosol dispersion in Ward 8A where the largest nosocomial severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak occurred in Hong Kong in 2003, we found an interesting phenomenon. Although all the cubicles were in ‘positive pressure’ towards the corridor, the virus-containing bioaerosols generated from the index patient's cubicle were still transmitted to other cubicles, which cannot be explained in a traditional manner. A multi-zone model combining the two-way airflow effect was used to analyse this phenomenon. The multi-zone airflow model was evaluated by our experimental data. Comparing with the previous computational fluid dynamic simulation results, we found that the air exchange owing to the small temperature differences between cubicles played a major role in SARS transmission. Additionally, the validated multi-zone model combining the two-way airflow effect could simulate the pollutant transport with reasonable accuracy but much less computational time. A probable improvement in general ward design was also proposed. PMID:21068029

  10. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) revisited: Covalent modulation of XPO1/CRM1 activities and implication for its mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sijin; Zhang, Keren; Qin, Hongqiang; Niu, Mingshan; Zhao, Weijie; Ye, Mingliang; Zou, Hanfa; Yang, Yongliang

    2016-11-08

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is the bioactive constituent of propolis from honeybee hives and is well known for its anti-inflammatory, anticarcinogenic, antioxidant, and immunomodulatory properties. Herein, we revisited the cellular mechanism underlying the diverse biological effects of CAPE. We demonstrated that XPO1/CRM1, a major nuclear export receptor, is a cellular target of CAPE. Through nuclear export functional assay, we observed a clear shift of XPO1 cargo proteins from a cytoplasmic localization to nucleus when treated with CAPE. In particular, we showed that CAPE could specifically target the non-catalytic and conserved Cys(528) of XPO1 through the means of mass spectrometric analysis. In addition, we demonstrated that the mutation of Cys(528) residue in XPO1 could rescue the nuclear export defects caused by CAPE. Furthermore, we performed position-restraint molecular dynamics simulation to show that the Michael acceptor moiety of CAPE is the warhead to enable covalent binding with Cys(528) residue of XPO1. The covalent modulation of nuclear export by CAPE may explain its diverse biological effects. Our findings may have general implications for further investigation of CAPE and its structural analogs.

  11. Revisiting the Aqueous Solutions of Dimethyl Sulfoxide by Spectroscopy in the Mid- and Near-Infrared: Experiments and Car-Parrinello Simulations.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Victoria M; Dhumal, Nilesh R; Zehentbauer, Florian M; Kim, Hyung J; Kiefer, Johannes

    2015-11-19

    The infrared and near-infrared spectra of the aqueous solutions of dimethyl sulfoxide are revisited. Experimental and computational vibrational spectra are analyzed and compared. The latter are determined as the Fourier transformation of the velocity autocorrelation function of data obtained from Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations. The experimental absorption spectra are deconvolved, and the excess spectra are determined. The two-dimensional excess contour plot provides a means of visualizing and identifying spectral regions and concentration ranges exhibiting nonideal behavior. In the binary mixtures, the analysis of the SO stretching band provides a semiquantitative picture of the formation and dissociation of hydrogen-bonded DMSO-water complexes. A maximum concentration of these clusters is found in the equimolar mixture. At high DMSO concentration, the formation of rather stable 3DMSO:1water complexes is suggested. The formation of 1DMSO:2water clusters, in which the water oxygen atoms interact with the sulfoxide methyl groups, is proposed as a possible reason for the marked depression of the freezing temperature at the eutectic point.

  12. Revisiting TW Hydrae in light of new astrometric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, R.; Ducourant, C.; Galli, P. A. B.; Le Campion, J. F.; Zuckerman, B.; Krone-Martins, A. G. O.; Chauvin, G.; Song, I.

    2014-10-01

    Our efforts in the present work focused mainly on refining and improving the previous description and understanding of the stellar association TW Hydrae (TWA) including a very detailed membership analysis and its dynamical and evolutionary age.To achieve our objectives in a fully reliable way we take advantage of our own astrometric measurements (Ducourant et al. 2013) performed with NTT/EFOSC2 - ESO (La Silla - Chile) spread over three years (2007 - 2010) and of those published in the literature.A very detailed membership analysis based on the convergent point strategy as developed by our team (Galli et al. 2012, 2013) allowed us to define a consistent kinematic group containing 31 stars among the 44 proposed as TWA member in the literature. Assuming that our sample of stars may be contaminated by non-members and to get rid of the particular influence of each star we applied a Jacknife resampling technique generating 2000 random lists of 13 stars taken from our 16 stars and calculated for each the epoch of convergence when the radius is minimum. The mean of the epochs obtained and the dispersion about the mean give a dynamical age of 7.5± 0.7 Myr for the association that is in good agreement with the previous traceback age (De La Reza et al. 2006). We also estimated age for TWA moving group members from pre-main sequence evolutionary models (Siess et al. 2000) and find a mean age of 7.4± 1.2 Myr. These results show that the dynamical age of the association obtained via the traceback technique and the average age derived from theoretical evolutionary models are in good agreement.

  13. Revisiting "Kindergarten as Academic Boot Camp": A Nationwide Study of Ability Grouping and Psycho-Social Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catsambis, Sophia; Buttaro, Anthony, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    We revisit Harry L. Gracey's perspective of kindergarten as academic boot camp where, at school entry, children acquire the student role through a structured program of activities. We provide further insights into the crucial mechanisms of socialization that occur in U.S. kindergartens by examining the relationship between within-class ability…

  14. An analytic algorithm for global coverage of the revisiting orbit and its application to the CFOSAT satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ming; Huang, Li

    2014-08-01

    This paper addresses a new analytic algorithm for global coverage of the revisiting orbit and its application to the mission revisiting the Earth within long periods of time, such as Chinese-French Oceanic Satellite (abbr., CFOSAT). In the first, it is presented that the traditional design methodology of the revisiting orbit for some imaging satellites only on the single (ascending or descending) pass, and the repeating orbit is employed to perform the global coverage within short periods of time. However, the selection of the repeating orbit is essentially to yield the suboptimum from the rare measure of rational numbers of passes per day, which will lose lots of available revisiting orbits. Thus, an innovative design scheme is proposed to check both rational and irrational passes per day to acquire the relationship between the coverage percentage and the altitude. To improve the traditional imaging only on the single pass, the proposed algorithm is mapping every pass into its ascending and descending nodes on the specified latitude circle, and then is accumulating the projected width on the circle by the field of view of the satellite. The ergodic geometry of coverage percentage produced from the algorithm is affecting the final scheme, such as the optimal one owning the largest percentage, and the balance one possessing the less gradient in its vicinity, and is guiding to heuristic design for the station-keeping control strategies. The application of CFOSAT validates the feasibility of the algorithm.

  15. A Fresh Take on Democratic Education: Revisiting Rancière through the Notions of Emergence and Enaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastrup-Birk, Henriette; Wildemeersch, Danny

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims at contributing to new ways of thinking about democratic education. We discuss how revisiting this concept may help raise fresh questions in relation to non-formal fora grappling with intricate sustainability issues that span international borders. Starting from Rancière's ideas on democracy, we first examine a conception of…

  16. Today's Teens, Their Problems, and Their Literature: Revisiting G. Robert Carlsen's "Books and the Teenage Reader" Thirty Years Later.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Pamela Sissi

    1997-01-01

    Revisits G. Robert Carlsen's call for the use of young adult literature in the classroom by looking specifically at the emotional and reading needs of older adolescents, those in the upper grades. Discusses problems associated with adolescence in the late twentieth century and lists recommended young adult books that touch on those issues. (TB)

  17. Revisiting an Old Friend: The Practice and Promise of Cooperative Learning for the Twenty-First Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schul, James E.

    2011-01-01

    Cooperative learning has long been at the disposal of school teachers. However, it is often misunderstood by some teachers as just another form of collaborative group work. This article revisits cooperative learning, including a sampling of its popular variations, with practical approaches toward effectively integrating it into classroom…

  18. Revisiting Risk in the 21st Century. Forum Focus. Volume 3, Issue 1, January-February 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forum for Youth Investment, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Over the past year, dozens of articles have been published about excessive youth borrowing and spending (leading to high amounts of debt), new reactions to negative body image (such as plastic surgery), as well as more familiar risks like premarital sex and smoking. In Forum Focus: Revisiting Risk in the 21st Century, we explore these challenges…

  19. Revisiting Individualism and Collectivism: A Multinational Examination of Pre-Service Teachers' Perceptions on Student Academic Performances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiang, Heng

    2016-01-01

    This study explores how pre-service teachers in Singapore, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and the United States perceive educational diversity in relation to students' academic achievement by means of qualitative content analysis. It takes cultural psychological perspectives to revisit the attribute reasoning embedded in individualist and collectivist…

  20. Revisiting the redistancing problem using the Hopf-Lax formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byungjoon; Darbon, Jérôme; Osher, Stanley; Kang, Myungjoo

    2017-02-01

    This article presents a fast new numerical method for redistancing objective functions based on the Hopf-Lax formula [1]. The algorithm suggested here is a special case of the previous work in [2] and an extension that applies the Hopf-Lax formula for computing the signed distance to the front. We propose the split Bregman approach to solve the minimization problem as a solution of the eikonal equation obtained from Hopf-Lax formula. Our redistancing procedure is expected to be generalized and widely applied to many fields such as computational fluid dynamics, the minimal surface problem, and elsewhere.

  1. Temperature echoes revisited to probe the vibrational behavior of dendrimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulo, Pedro M. R.

    2010-03-01

    Temperature quench echoes were induced in molecular dynamics simulations of dendrimers. This phenomenon was used to probe the vibrational behavior of these molecules by comparing simulation results with harmonic model predictions. The echo depth for short time intervals between temperature quenches is well described by the harmonic approximation and the fluctuations observed are related to the vibrational density of states. The echo depth for long time intervals decays progressively revealing dephasing due to anharmonic interactions. The density of states was calculated from the temperature fluctuations after the first quench and high-frequency modes were assigned by comparison with vibrational spectra of similar dendrimers.

  2. Temperature echoes revisited to probe the vibrational behavior of dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Paulo, Pedro M R

    2010-03-21

    Temperature quench echoes were induced in molecular dynamics simulations of dendrimers. This phenomenon was used to probe the vibrational behavior of these molecules by comparing simulation results with harmonic model predictions. The echo depth for short time intervals between temperature quenches is well described by the harmonic approximation and the fluctuations observed are related to the vibrational density of states. The echo depth for long time intervals decays progressively revealing dephasing due to anharmonic interactions. The density of states was calculated from the temperature fluctuations after the first quench and high-frequency modes were assigned by comparison with vibrational spectra of similar dendrimers.

  3. Cybersecurity Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-20

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: In the course of seeking fundamental concepts that can drive the study of cybersecurity for the many years to come...of Cybersecurity Dynamics emerged. Intuitively, Cybersecurity Dynamics describes the evolution of cybersecurity state as caused by cyber attack...defense interactions. By studying Cybersecurity Dynamics, we can characterize the cybersecurity phenomena exhibited in the evolution of cybersecurity

  4. Stiff Spring Approximation Revisited: Inertial Effects in Nonequilibrium Trajectories.

    PubMed

    Nategholeslam, Mostafa; Gray, C G; Tomberli, Bruno

    2017-01-19

    Use of harmonic guiding potentials is the most commonly adopted method for implementing steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations, performed to obtain potentials of mean force (PMFs) using Jarzynski's equality and other nonequilibrium work (NEW) theorems. The stiff spring approximation (SSA) of Schulten and co-workers enables calculation of the PMF by using the work performed along many SMD trajectories in NEW theorems. We discuss and demonstrate how a high spring constant, k, required for the validity of the SSA can violate another requirement of SSA, the validity of Brownian dynamics in the system under study. These result in skewed work distributions with their width increasing with k. The skew and broadening of work distributions result in biased estimation (through invoking NEW theorems) of the PMF. Remarkably, the skewness and the broadening of work distributions are independent of the average drift velocity and physical asymmetries and can only be attributed to using too-stiff springs. We discuss the proper upper limit for k such that the inertial effects are minimized. In the presence of inertial effects, using the peak value (rather than the statistical mean) of the work distributions vastly reduces the bias in the calculated PMFs and improves the accuracy.

  5. CATASTROPHIC QUENCHING IN {alpha}{Omega} DYNAMOS REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, Alexander; Brandenburg, Axel

    2012-03-20

    At large magnetic Reynolds numbers, magnetic helicity evolution plays an important role in astrophysical large-scale dynamos. The recognition of this fact led to the development of the dynamical {alpha} quenching formalism, which predicts catastrophically low mean fields in open systems. Here, we show that in oscillatory {alpha}{Omega} dynamos this formalism predicts an unphysical magnetic helicity transfer between scales. An alternative technique is proposed where this artifact is removed by using the evolution equation for the magnetic helicity of the total field in the shearing advective gauge. In the traditional dynamical {alpha} quenching formalism, this can be described by an additional magnetic helicity flux of small-scale fields that does not appear in homogeneous {alpha}{sup 2} dynamos. In {alpha}{Omega} dynamos, the alternative formalism is shown to lead to larger saturation fields than what has been obtained in some earlier models with the traditional formalism. We have compared the predictions of the two formalisms to results of direct numerical simulations, finding that the alternative formulation provides a better fit. This suggests that worries about catastrophic dynamo behavior in the limit of large magnetic Reynolds number are unfounded.

  6. Revisiting molecular ionization: Does a molecule like to share?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, C. B.; Esry, B. D.

    2012-06-01

    The ever-increasing detail obtained in strong-field experiments calls for a deeper understanding of the laser-molecule interaction. For instance, recent measurements reported in PRL 107, 143004 (2011) reveal a limitation in understanding strong-field ionization dynamics in terms of the strong-field approximation. We have addressed the question of how the electron and the nuclei share the energy when H2^+ breaks up in the presence of an intense IR field via the process: H2^++nφ->p+p+e^-. Solving the time-dependent Schr"odinger equation and calculating the ionization probability resolved as a function of the asymptotic electron energy and the nuclear kinetic energy release (KER) allow us to give an answer. The energy sharing is non-trivial and plays an important role in the prediction of, for instance, the KER. We also address the limitations of current understanding of molecular ionization by comparing to models like the strong-field approximation and the Floquet picture. Such benchmarking may be facilitated by XUV+IR pump-probe schemes and carrier-envelope-phase control that allow for time-resolved and spatial probing of the dynamics.

  7. Kinetic theory of turbulence for parallel propagation revisited: Low-to-intermediate frequency regime

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Peter H.

    2015-09-15

    A previous paper [P. H. Yoon, “Kinetic theory of turbulence for parallel propagation revisited: Formal results,” Phys. Plasmas 22, 082309 (2015)] revisited the second-order nonlinear kinetic theory for turbulence propagating in directions parallel/anti-parallel to the ambient magnetic field, in which the original work according to Yoon and Fang [Phys. Plasmas 15, 122312 (2008)] was refined, following the paper by Gaelzer et al. [Phys. Plasmas 22, 032310 (2015)]. The main finding involved the dimensional correction pertaining to discrete-particle effects in Yoon and Fang's theory. However, the final result was presented in terms of formal linear and nonlinear susceptibility response functions. In the present paper, the formal equations are explicitly written down for the case of low-to-intermediate frequency regime by making use of approximate forms for the response functions. The resulting equations are sufficiently concrete so that they can readily be solved by numerical means or analyzed by theoretical means. The derived set of equations describe nonlinear interactions of quasi-parallel modes whose frequency range covers the Alfvén wave range to ion-cyclotron mode, but is sufficiently lower than the electron cyclotron mode. The application of the present formalism may range from the nonlinear evolution of whistler anisotropy instability in the high-beta regime, and the nonlinear interaction of electrons with whistler-range turbulence.

  8. A ‘sparkling’ low-cost revisitation of the historical Hertz’s experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozzo, G.; Bonanno, A.; Sapia, P.

    2017-01-01

    Electromagnetic phenomena involve abstract concepts and models that are particularly problematic for students, especially in the field of electromagnetic (EM) waves. In particular, for these abstract topics it is difficult to plan real experiments that offer the possibility to introduce the basic related concepts. A valid support might come from the revisitation of historical experiments, whose value have been demonstrated from an educational point of view. In this frontline we have planned an educational real-time experiment, which allows students to get in touch with the basic phenomenology of EM waves. It is a modern revisitation of the historical Hertz’s experiment that offers the possibility (from a qualitative point of view) to reproduce the Hertz’s ideas using low cost and easy to find materials, showing an easy way to generate and to detect an electromagnetic wave. Moreover, the same kind of low cost setup allows performing quantitative measures if coupled with a digital acquisition module, offering the possibility to characterise the main conceptual aspects of an electromagnetic wave, such as the signal’s dependence on the distance between transmitter and receiver or as the concept (otherwise abstract) of polarisation.

  9. Distractor Dwelling, Skipping, and Revisiting Determine Target Absent Performance in Difficult Visual Search

    PubMed Central

    Horstmann, Gernot; Herwig, Arvid; Becker, Stefanie I.

    2016-01-01

    Some targets in visual search are more difficult to find than others. In particular, a target that is similar to the distractors is more difficult to find than a target that is dissimilar to the distractors. Efficiency differences between easy and difficult searches are manifest not only in target-present trials but also in target-absent trials. In fact, even physically identical displays are searched through with different efficiency depending on the searched-for target. Here, we monitored eye movements in search for a target similar to the distractors (difficult search) versus a target dissimilar to the distractors (easy search). We aimed to examine three hypotheses concerning the causes of differential search efficiencies in target-absent trials: (a) distractor dwelling (b) distractor skipping, and (c) distractor revisiting. Reaction times increased with target similarity which is consistent with existing theories and replicates earlier results. Eye movement data indicated guidance in target trials, even though search was very slow. Dwelling, skipping, and revisiting contributed to low search efficiency in difficult search, with dwelling being the strongest factor. It is argued that differences in dwell time account for a large amount of total search time differences. PMID:27574510

  10. "Frankie" Revisited: Foundational Concepts In Flux--An Introduction to the Section.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    The author offers his own historical review of the celebrated "Frankie" case, contextualizing it within political as well as scientific challenges. In addition, he provides an introductory survey of the three contributions that are to follow in the section. Similarities and differences are underscored, as contemporary child analysts revisit this acknowledged "classic" reported more than sixty years ago. In the revisiting and even in one instance where it is surprisingly a first reading, similarities and differences between there-and-then as contrasted with here-and-now reflections prove quite illuminating. There is considerable lauding of the revolutionary nature of the original case on the one hand, along with some open criticisms on the other. Several of the scholars suggest that the technique and the theories of pathogenesis and therapeutic action might well benefit from some selective updating of cognitive stance to the organization of clinical data. In this regard, adding nonlinear thinking to the original reductionism bias gets a strong boost--although that proposal doesn't quite achieve the decisive definition that permits it to flourish.

  11. Distractor Dwelling, Skipping, and Revisiting Determine Target Absent Performance in Difficult Visual Search.

    PubMed

    Horstmann, Gernot; Herwig, Arvid; Becker, Stefanie I

    2016-01-01

    Some targets in visual search are more difficult to find than others. In particular, a target that is similar to the distractors is more difficult to find than a target that is dissimilar to the distractors. Efficiency differences between easy and difficult searches are manifest not only in target-present trials but also in target-absent trials. In fact, even physically identical displays are searched through with different efficiency depending on the searched-for target. Here, we monitored eye movements in search for a target similar to the distractors (difficult search) versus a target dissimilar to the distractors (easy search). We aimed to examine three hypotheses concerning the causes of differential search efficiencies in target-absent trials: (a) distractor dwelling (b) distractor skipping, and (c) distractor revisiting. Reaction times increased with target similarity which is consistent with existing theories and replicates earlier results. Eye movement data indicated guidance in target trials, even though search was very slow. Dwelling, skipping, and revisiting contributed to low search efficiency in difficult search, with dwelling being the strongest factor. It is argued that differences in dwell time account for a large amount of total search time differences.

  12. Revisiting the Central Dogma One Molecule at a Time

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante, Carlos; Cheng, Wei; Meija, Yara

    2011-01-01

    The faithful relay and timely expression of genetic information depend on specialized molecular machines, many of which function as nucleic acid translocases. The emergence over the last decade of single-molecule fluorescence detection and manipulation techniques with nm and Å resolution, and their application to the study of nucleic acid translocases are painting an increasingly sharp picture of the inner workings of these machines, the dynamics and coordination of their moving parts, their thermodynamic efficiency, and the nature of their transient intermediates. Here we present an overview of the main results arrived at by the application of single-molecule methods to the study of the main machines of the central dogma. PMID:21335233

  13. The Nash Equilibrium Revisited: Chaos and Complexity Hidden in Simplicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellman, Philip V.

    The Nash Equilibrium is a much discussed, deceptively complex, method for the analysis of non-cooperative games (McLennan and Berg, 2005). If one reads many of the commonly available definitions the description of the Nash Equilibrium is deceptively simple in appearance. Modern research has discovered a number of new and important complex properties of the Nash Equilibrium, some of which remain as contemporary conundrums of extraordinary difficulty and complexity (Quint and Shubik, 1997). Among the recently discovered features which the Nash Equilibrium exhibits under various conditions are heteroclinic Hamiltonian dynamics, a very complex asymptotic structure in the context of two-player bi-matrix games and a number of computationally complex or computationally intractable features in other settings (Sato, Akiyama and Farmer, 2002). This paper reviews those findings and then suggests how they may inform various market prediction strategies.

  14. Forward flight of birds revisited. Part 1: aerodynamics and performance.

    PubMed

    Iosilevskii, G

    2014-10-01

    This paper is the first part of the two-part exposition, addressing performance and dynamic stability of birds. The aerodynamic model underlying the entire study is presented in this part. It exploits the simplicity of the lifting line approximation to furnish the forces and moments acting on a single wing in closed analytical forms. The accuracy of the model is corroborated by comparison with numerical simulations based on the vortex lattice method. Performance is studied both in tethered (as on a sting in a wind tunnel) and in free flights. Wing twist is identified as the main parameter affecting the flight performance-at high speeds, it improves efficiency, the rate of climb and the maximal level speed; at low speeds, it allows flying slower. It is demonstrated that, under most circumstances, the difference in performance between tethered and free flights is small.

  15. The SACD method and the XLRS squamometry tests revisited.

    PubMed

    Piérard-Franchimont, C; Henry, F; Piérard, G E

    2000-12-01

    The assessment of many aspects of the structure and biological dynamics of the stratum corneum can be conducted using calibrated stripping with adhesive-coated discs (SACD). Squamometry entails staining SACD samples with a toluidine blue-basic fuschsin ethanol-based solution and reading the colorimetric variable Chroma C* representing the squamometry index. Four main variants of squamometry index have been designed so far. Squamometry X refers to the assessment of xerosis and any scaly condition. Squamometry L explores the intercorneocyte cohesiveness impaired by ultraviolet light. Squamometry R evaluates stratum corneum renewal and squamometry S assesses the effect of surfactants on corneocyte integrity. This latter variant is related to, although not similar to, the ex-vivo corneosurfametry bioassay. All squamometry tests are rapid, reliable, sensitive and cheap.

  16. Forward flight of birds revisited. Part 1: aerodynamics and performance

    PubMed Central

    Iosilevskii, G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper is the first part of the two-part exposition, addressing performance and dynamic stability of birds. The aerodynamic model underlying the entire study is presented in this part. It exploits the simplicity of the lifting line approximation to furnish the forces and moments acting on a single wing in closed analytical forms. The accuracy of the model is corroborated by comparison with numerical simulations based on the vortex lattice method. Performance is studied both in tethered (as on a sting in a wind tunnel) and in free flights. Wing twist is identified as the main parameter affecting the flight performance—at high speeds, it improves efficiency, the rate of climb and the maximal level speed; at low speeds, it allows flying slower. It is demonstrated that, under most circumstances, the difference in performance between tethered and free flights is small. PMID:26064548

  17. Finite size effects on the QCD spectrum revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Gottlieb, S. . Dept. of Physics Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY )

    1992-01-01

    We have continued our study of finite size effects in the QCD spectrum on lattices ranging in size from 8[sup 3][times]24 to 16[sup 3][times]24. We have increased our statistics for quark mass am[sub q]=0.025 for the smallest lattice size. In addition, we have studied quark mass 0.01225 for lattice sizes 12[sup 3][times]24. These lattice sizes correspond to a box 1.8-3.6 fm on a side when the rho mass at zero quark mass is used to set the scale. We discuss the nucleon to rho mass ratio at a smaller value of m[pi]/m[rho] than previously studied with two dynamical flavors.

  18. Finite size effects on the QCD spectrum revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Gottlieb, S. |; MIMD Lattice Calculation Collaboration

    1992-12-31

    We have continued our study of finite size effects in the QCD spectrum on lattices ranging in size from 8{sup 3}{times}24 to 16{sup 3}{times}24. We have increased our statistics for quark mass am{sub q}=0.025 for the smallest lattice size. In addition, we have studied quark mass 0.01225 for lattice sizes 12{sup 3}{times}24. These lattice sizes correspond to a box 1.8-3.6 fm on a side when the rho mass at zero quark mass is used to set the scale. We discuss the nucleon to rho mass ratio at a smaller value of m{pi}/m{rho} than previously studied with two dynamical flavors.

  19. Revisiting The Effect Of Sine Sweep Rate On Modal Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Nicolas; Girard, Alain

    2012-07-01

    Sine-sweep base excitation vibration tests are performed to qualify spacecraft structures in the low-frequency environment where the dynamic behavior can be characterized by a small number of modes. These modes can be extracted from the measured frequency response functions (FRF) by various modal identification methods, and then used for model validation purposes. If the sweep rate is too high, the steady-state response is not reached and the resulting FRF profile will be modified by the presence of transients. This has a direct effect on the modal parameters extracted from the FRF.Several authors have examined the effect of the sweep rate based on the response of a one-degree-of-freedom system. The goal of this paper is to adapt the approach to base-excitation vibration tests. Both increasing and decreasing exponential sweep rates are considered. The effect on the three principal modal parameters (natural frequency, damping and modal effective parameters) is examined.

  20. Two-dimensional numerical simulations of supercritical accretion flows revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiao-Hong; Yuan, Feng; Bu, De-Fu; Ohsuga, Ken E-mail: fyuan@shao.ac.cn

    2014-01-01

    We study the dynamics of super-Eddington accretion flows by performing two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic simulations. Compared with previous works, in this paper we include the T {sub θφ} component of the viscous stress and consider various values of the viscous parameter α. We find that when T {sub θφ} is included, the rotational speed of the high-latitude flow decreases, while the density increases and decreases at the high and low latitudes, respectively. We calculate the radial profiles of inflow and outflow rates. We find that the inflow rate decreases inward, following a power law form of M-dot {sub in}∝r{sup s}. The value of s depends on the magnitude of α and is within the range of ∼0.4-1.0. Correspondingly, the radial profile of density becomes flatter compared with the case of a constant M-dot (r). We find that the density profile can be described by ρ(r)∝r {sup –p} and the value of p is almost same for a wide range of α ranging from α = 0.1 to 0.005. The inward decrease of inflow accretion rate is very similar to hot accretion flows, which is attributed to the mass loss in outflows. To study the origin of outflow, we analyze the convective stability of the slim disk. We find that depending on the value of α, the flow is marginally stable (when α is small) or unstable (when α is large). This is different from the case of hydrodynamical hot accretion flow, where radiation is dynamically unimportant and the flow is always convectively unstable. We speculate that the reason for the difference is because radiation can stabilize convection. The origin of outflow is thus likely because of the joint function of convection and radiation, but further investigation is required.