Science.gov

Sample records for pipe energy transport

  1. Heat-Pipe Development for Advanced Energy Transport Concepts Final Report Covering the Period January 1999 through September 2001

    SciTech Connect

    R.S.Reid; J.F.Sena; A.L.Martinez

    2002-10-01

    This report summarizes work in the Heat-pipe Technology Development for the Advanced Energy Transport Concepts program for the period January 1999 through September 2001. A gas-loaded molybdenum-sodium heat pipe was built to demonstrate the active pressure-control principle applied to a refractory metal heat pipe. Other work during the period included the development of processing procedures for and fabrication and testing of three types of sodium heat pipes using Haynes 230, MA 754, and MA 956 wall materials to assess the compatibility of these materials with sodium. Also during this period, tests were executed to measure the response of a sodium heat pipe to the penetration of water.

  2. Experimental simulation of latent heat thermal energy storage and heat pipe thermal transport for dish concentrator solar receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, R.; Zimmerman, W. F.; Poon, P. T. Y.

    1981-01-01

    Test results on a modular simulation of the thermal transport and heat storage characteristics of a heat pipe solar receiver (HPSR) with thermal energy storage (TES) are presented. The HPSR features a 15-25 kWe Stirling engine power conversion system at the focal point of a parabolic dish concentrator operating at 827 C. The system collects and retrieves solar heat with sodium pipes and stores the heat in NaF-MgF2 latent heat storage material. The trials were run with a single full scale heat pipe, three full scale TES containers, and an air-cooled heat extraction coil to replace the Stirling engine heat exchanger. Charging and discharging, constant temperature operation, mixed mode operation, thermal inertial, etc. were studied. The heat pipe performance was verified, as were the thermal energy storage and discharge rates and isothermal discharges.

  3. Alpha characterization inside pipes using ion-transport technology

    SciTech Connect

    Rojas, S.P.; Rawool-Sullivan, M.W.; Williams, K.G.; Vaccarella, J.A.

    1995-03-01

    Many DOE facilities have several miles of waste pipe systems that are internally contaminated with various and often undetermined radio nuclides. Unfortunately, currently acceptable alpha detection technologies are inefficient, time consuming, and do not address the problems presented by small diameter or curved pipes. In general, the problem of detecting alpha contamination on the inside surface of pipes is complicated by the fact that alphas do not penetrate the pipe walls. Unlike their conventional counterparts, alpha detectors based on ion transport technology sense alpha particles by collecting the ions created in ambient air as the particle loses its kinetic energy. The ions inside the pipe are transported by a fan-generated air current to an electrode inside the detector, which is attached to one end of the pipe. The collected charge at the electrode is proportional to the number of ions created inside the pipe, which in turn is proportional to the number of alphas emitted. Typically, monitoring for alpha contamination inside pipes or ductwork involves disrupting the operation to access as much surface area as possible for standard alpha monitoring. The detector based on ion transport technology effectively minimizes such disruption and in many circumstances will allow for in situ monitoring of a system that might otherwise not be practically accessible to standard methods.

  4. A bimodal power and propulsion system based on cermet fuel and heat pipe energy transport

    SciTech Connect

    Polansky, G.F.; Gunther, N.A.; Rochow, R.F.; Bixler, C.H.

    1995-05-01

    Bimodal space reactor systems provide both thermal propulsion for the spacecraft orbital transfer and electrical power to the spacecraft bus once it is on station. These systems have the potential to increase both the available payload in high energy orbits and the available power to that payload. These increased mass and power capabilities can be used to either reduce mission cost by permitting the use of smaller launch vehicles or to provide increased mission performance from the current launch vehicle. A major barrier to the deployment of these bimodal systems has been the cost associated with their development. This paper describes a bimodal reactor system with performance potential to permit more than 70% of the instrumented payload of the Titan IV/Centaur to be launched from the Atlas IIAS. The development cost is minimized by basing the design on existing component technologies.

  5. 49 CFR 192.65 - Transportation of pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS... pipe having an outer diameter to wall thickness ratio of 70 to 1, or more, that is transported by... (incorporated by reference, see § 192.7). (2) In the case of pipe transported before November 12, 1970, the...

  6. 49 CFR 195.207 - Transportation of pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Transportation of pipe. 195.207 Section 195.207 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS...

  7. 49 CFR 195.207 - Transportation of pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Transportation of pipe. 195.207 Section 195.207 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS...

  8. 49 CFR 192.65 - Transportation of pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Transportation of pipe. 192.65 Section 192.65 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER...

  9. 49 CFR 195.207 - Transportation of pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Transportation of pipe. 195.207 Section 195.207 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS...

  10. 49 CFR 192.65 - Transportation of pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Transportation of pipe. 192.65 Section 192.65 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER...

  11. 49 CFR 192.65 - Transportation of pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Transportation of pipe. 192.65 Section 192.65 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER...

  12. Heat pipe solar receiver with thermal energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, W. F.

    1981-01-01

    An HPSR Stirling engine generator system featuring latent heat thermal energy storge, excellent thermal stability and self regulating, effective thermal transport at low system delta T is described. The system was supported by component technology testing of heat pipes and of thermal storage and energy transport models which define the expected performance of the system. Preliminary and detailed design efforts were completed and manufacturing of HPSR components has begun.

  13. A Novel MagPipe Pipeline transportation system using linear motor drives

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, J.R.; Montgomery, D.B.; Roderick, L.

    2009-11-15

    A novel capsule pipeline transportation system using linear motor drives, called Magplane MagPipe, is under development with the intention to replace trucks and railways for hauling materials from the mine to the rail head, power plant, or processing plant with reduced operating cost and energy consumption. The initial demonstration of a MagPipe line in Inner Mongolia will be a 500-m-long double-pipe coal transport system with the design transportation capacity of 3 Mega-Mg per year. The pipeline consists of 6-m-long plastic pipe modules with an I-beam suspension system inside the pipe to carry sets of five coupled capsules. The pipe will also contain noncontinuous motor winding modules spaced at 50-m intervals. A set of Halbach-arrayed permanent magnets on the bottom of the capsules interact with the linear motor windings to provide propulsion. The motor is driven by variable frequency drives outside the pipe to control the speed. This paper briefly describes the overall MagPipe pipeline transportation system, including the preliminary conclusions of the linear synchronous motor analysis.

  14. Thermodynamic analysis of alternate energy carriers, hydrogen and chemical heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, K. E.; Carty, R. H.; Conger, W. L.; Soliman, M. A.; Funk, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    Hydrogen and chemical heat pipes were proposed as methods of transporting energy from a primary energy source (nuclear, solar) to the user. In the chemical heat pipe system, primary energy is transformed into the energy of a reversible chemical reaction; the chemical species are then transmitted or stored until the energy is required. Analysis of thermochemical hydrogen schemes and chemical heat pipe systems on a second law efficiency or available work basis show that hydrogen is superior especially if the end use of the chemical heat pipe is electrical power.

  15. High thermal-transport capacity heat pipes for space radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Albert W.; Gustafson, Eric; Roukis, Susan L.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents the results of performance tests of several dual-slot heat pipe test articles. The dual-slot configuration has a very high thermal transport capability and has been identified as a very promising candidate for the radiator system for the NASA Space Station solar dynamic power modules. Two six-foot long aluminum heat pipes were built and tested with ammonia and acetone. A 20-ft long heat pipe was also built and tested with ammonia. The test results have been compared with performance predictions. A thermal transport capacity of 2000 W at an adverse tilt of 1 in. and a 1000 W capacity at an adverse tilt of 2 in. were achieved on the 20-ft long heat pipe. These values are in close agreement with the predicted performance limits.

  16. 18. VIEW OF THE CEILING, THE PIPING TRANSPORTED CHEMICALS FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. VIEW OF THE CEILING, THE PIPING TRANSPORTED CHEMICALS FROM A CHEMICAL PREPARATION ROOM ON THE SECOND FLOOR TO THE FIRST FLOOR PROCESS AREAS. (6/12/73) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Recovery & Fabrication Facility, North-central section of plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  17. Natural gas transport by plastic pipes. (Latest citations from the Compendex database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of plastic piping to transport natural gas or liquid propane gas. The interaction between gas odorants and plastic pipe, the effects of aging on plastic pipe used to transport gas, and pipe failure analyses are examined. Bending, joining, and repair methods are discussed. Composite reinforced plastic pipes and plastic coated pipes are considered. Polyethylene and epoxy composites are among the materials discussed. Gas main upgrading projects that replaced old pipes with plastic ones are briefly cited. (Contains a minimum of 88 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  18. Random walk approach for dispersive transport in pipe networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sämann, Robert; Graf, Thomas; Neuweiler, Insa

    2016-04-01

    Keywords: particle transport, random walk, pipe, network, HYSTEM-EXTAN, OpenGeoSys After heavy pluvial events in urban areas the available drainage system may be undersized at peak flows (Fuchs, 2013). Consequently, rainwater in the pipe network is likely to spill out through manholes. The presence of hazardous contaminants in the pipe drainage system represents a potential risk to humans especially when the contaminated drainage water reaches the land surface. Real-time forecasting of contaminants in the drainage system needs a quick calculation. Numerical models to predict the fate of contaminants are usually based on finite volume methods. Those are not applicable here because of their volume averaging elements. Thus, a more efficient method is preferable, which is independent from spatial discretization. In the present study, a particle-based method is chosen to calculate transport paths and spatial distribution of contaminants within a pipe network. A random walk method for particles in turbulent flow in partially filled pipes has been developed. Different approaches for in-pipe-mixing and node-mixing with respect to the geometry in a drainage network are shown. A comparison of dispersive behavior and calculation time is given to find the fastest model. The HYSTEM-EXTRAN (itwh, 2002) model is used to provide hydrodynamic conditions in the pipe network according to surface runoff scenarios in order to real-time predict contaminant transport in an urban pipe network system. The newly developed particle-based model will later be coupled to the subsurface flow model OpenGeoSys (Kolditz et al., 2012). References: Fuchs, L. (2013). Gefährdungsanalyse zur Überflutungsvorsorge kommunaler Entwässerungssysteme. Sanierung und Anpassung von Entwässerungssystemen-Alternde Infrastruktur und Klimawandel, Österreichischer Wasser-und Abfallwirtschaftsverband, Wien, ISBN, 978-3. itwh (2002). Modellbeschreibung, Institut für technisch-wissenschaftliche Hydrologie Gmb

  19. Preventing oil adhesion to pipe walls in heavy crude transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Rivero, M.; Guevara, E.; Joseph, D.

    1995-12-31

    During the transportation of heavy, extra heavy, and bitumen with water in carbon steel pipelines, the crude sticks to the internal pipe wall, reducing the flow area and as a consequence increasing the pressure drop in time. The situation may become worse if an unplanned shut down occurs, due to the phase separation by gravity. The problem. is resolved using a cement lined pipeline, with a cement composition that creates a permanent oleophobic and hydrophilic surface. These surfaces repel oil when they are hydrated in water, avoiding the occurrence of fouling at stationary and restart conditions.

  20. 78 FR 62614 - Guttman Energy, Inc., PBF Holding Company LLC v. Buckeye Pipe Line Company, L.P., Laurel Pipe...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Guttman Energy, Inc., PBF Holding Company LLC v. Buckeye Pipe Line Company, L.P., Laurel Pipe Line Company, L.P.; Notice of Complaint Take notice that on October 15, 2013... Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission) a complaint against Buckeye Pipe Line Company L.P. and...

  1. Granular Matter Transport in Vertical Pipes: The Influence of Pipe Outlet Conditions on Gravity-driven Granular Flow.

    PubMed

    Jaklič, Miha; Kočevar, Klemen; Srčič, Stanko; Dreu, Rok

    2016-01-01

    Gravity transport of granular materials in vertical pipes is one of the most fundamental steps in bulk powder handling and processing. Presented study investigates powder flow characteristics in vertical pipes with open and closed outlets and condition of free powder fall. Powder flow of pharmaceutical grade powders was observed in transparent, vertical pipe model. Description of flow structures was performed. Powder volume flow rate, acceleration, and dilatation were quantified and correlated with powder properties. The results show that in pipes with a closed outlet the escaping air slows down the powder flow, resulting in a much slower flow than in pipes with an open outlet. A dense granular flow was detected in an open outlet condition, whereas in a closed outlet condition two concurrent flow regimes were observed: a slow moving, dense powder bed, and a fast dilute powder flow. Differences in flow regimes may promote segregation, with important implications to industrial processes.

  2. Numerical Modeling of Mantle Convection with Heat-pipe Melt Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prinz, Sebastian; Plesa, Ana-Catalina; Tosi, Nicola; Breuer, Doris

    2015-04-01

    During the early evolution of terrestrial bodies, a large amount of mantle melting is expected to affect significantly the energy budget of the interior through heat transport by volcanism. Partial melt, generated when the mantle temperature exceeds the solidus, can propagate to the surface through dikes, thereby advecting upwards a large amount of heat. This so-called heat-pipe mechanism is an effective way to transport thermal energy from the meltregion to the planetary surface. Indeed, recent studies suggest that this mechanism may have shaped the Earth's earliest evolution by controlling interior heat loss until the onset of plate tectonics [1]. Furthermore, heat-piping is likely the primary mechanism through which Jupiter's moon Io loses its tidally generated heat, leading to massive volcanism able to cause a present-day heat-flux about 40 times higher than the Earth's average heat-flux [2]. However, despite its obvious importance, heat-piping is often neglected in mantle convection models of terrestrial planets because of its additional complexity and vaguely defined parameterization. In this study, adopting the approach of [1] we model mantle convection in a generic stagnant lid planet and study heat-piping effects in a systematic way. Assuming that melt is instantaneously extracted to the surface and melting regions are refilled by downward advection of cold mantle material in order to ensure mass conservation, we investigate the influence of heat-pipes on the mantle temperature and stagnant lid thickness using the numerical code Gaia [3]. To this end, we run a large set of simulations in 2D Cartesian geometry spanning a wide parameter space. Our results are consistent with [1] and show that in systems with strongly temperature-dependent viscosity the heat-pipe mechanism sets in at a Rayleigh number Ra ~ 2 × 107. Upon increasing Ra up to ~ 6 × 107

  3. Natural gas transport by plastic pipes. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of plastic piping to transport natural gas or liquid propane gas. The interaction between gas odorants and plastic pipe, the effects of aging on plastic pipe used to transport gas, and pipe failure analyses are examined. Bending, joining, and repair methods are discussed. Composite reinforced plastic pipes and plastic coated pipes are considered. Polyethylene and epoxy composites are among the materials discussed. Gas main upgrading projects that replaced old pipes with plastic ones are briefly cited. (Contains a minimum of 91 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  4. Natural gas transport by plastic pipes. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of plastic piping to transport natural gas or liquid propane gas. The interaction between gas odorants and plastic pipe, the effects of aging on plastic pipe used to transport gas, and pipe failure analyses are examined. Bending, joining, and repair methods are discussed. Composite reinforced plastic pipes and plastic coated pipes are considered. Polyethylene and epoxy composites are among the materials discussed. Gas main upgrading projects that replaced old pipes with plastic ones are briefly cited. (Contains a minimum of 89 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  5. Air transportation energy efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, L. J.

    1977-01-01

    The energy efficiency of air transportation, results of the recently completed RECAT studies on improvement alternatives, and the NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency Research Program to develop the technology for significant improvements in future aircraft were reviewed.

  6. 49 CFR 195.207 - Transportation of pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... stress of 20 percent or more of SMYS, an operator may not use pipe having an outer diameter to wall... barge. In a pipeline operated at a hoop stress of 20 percent or more of SMYS, an operator may not...

  7. Heat pipe heat transport system for the Stirling Space Power Converter (SSPC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alger, Donald L.

    1992-01-01

    Life issues relating to a sodium heat pipe heat transport system are described. The heat pipe system provides heat, at a temperature of 1050 K, to a 50 kWe Stirling engine/linear alternator power converter called the Stirling Space Power Converter (SSPC). The converter is being developed under a National Aeronautics and Space Administration program. Since corrosion of heat pipe materials in contact with sodium can impact the life of the heat pipe, a literature review of sodium corrosion processes was performed. It was found that the impurity reactions, primarily oxygen, and dissolution of alloy elements were the two corrosion process likely to be operative in the heat pipe. Approaches that are being taken to minimize these corrosion processes are discussed.

  8. Transportation energy conservation fairs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    An energy conservation fair sponsored by the Department of Transportation was described. It demonstrated how average drivers can save transportation dollars by changing driving habits at little or no cost. Exhibitors are listed. Methods for disseminating information and recommendations on how to set up such fairs are discussed. (MCW)

  9. Thermodynamic analysis of alternate energy carriers, hydrogen and chemical heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, K. E.; Carty, R. H.; Conger, W. L.; Soliman, M. A.; Funk, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    The paper discusses the production concept and efficiency of two new energy transmission and storage media intended to overcome the disadvantages of electricity as an overall energy carrier. These media are hydrogen produced by water-splitting and the chemical heat pipe. Hydrogen can be transported or stored, and burned as energy is needed, forming only water and thus obviating pollution problems. The chemical heat pipe envisions a system in which heat is stored as the heat of reaction in chemical species. The thermodynamic analysis of these two methods is discussed in terms of first-law and second-law efficiency. It is concluded that chemical heat pipes offer large advantages over thermochemical hydrogen generation schemes on a first-law efficiency basis except for the degradation of thermal energy in temperature thus providing a source of low-temperature (800 K) heat for process heat applications. On a second-law efficiency basis, hydrogen schemes are superior in that the amount of available work is greater as compared to chemical heat pipes.

  10. An approach for measuring the thermal conductivity of in situ foamed insulated pipe transporting liquid nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dong; Wu, Heng; Liu, Huiming; Gong, Linghui; Xu, Xiangdong; Li, L. F.

    2012-06-01

    The thermal conductivity of three foamed pipes has been tested for the development of liquid nitrogen transmission pipelines. By establishing a function between evaporation rate and thermal conductivity, we obtain effective thermal conductivity without destroying pipes. The comparison between our test and test coupons shows that this test device is reliable and could be a standard test for checking insulation properties of in situ foamed pipes transporting liquid nitrogen. The scientific principles, system design, experimental results and effect factors of the test are presented in this paper.

  11. Storing and transporting energy

    DOEpatents

    McClaine, Andrew W.; Brown, Kenneth

    2010-09-07

    Among other things, hydrogen is released from water at a first location using energy from a first energy source; the released hydrogen is stored in a metal hydride slurry; and the metal hydride slurry is transported to a second location remote from the first location.

  12. Fully localised nonlinear energy growth optimals in pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pringle, Chris C. T.; Willis, Ashley P.; Kerswell, Rich R.

    2015-06-01

    A new, fully localised, energy growth optimal is found over large times and in long pipe domains at a given mass flow rate. This optimal emerges at a threshold disturbance energy below which a nonlinear version of the known (streamwise-independent) linear optimal [P. J. Schmid and D. S. Henningson, "Optimal energy density growth in Hagen-Poiseuille flow," J. Fluid Mech. 277, 192-225 (1994)] is selected and appears to remain the optimal up until the critical energy at which transition is triggered. The form of this optimal is similar to that found in short pipes [Pringle et al., "Minimal seeds for shear flow turbulence: Using nonlinear transient growth to touch the edge of chaos," J. Fluid Mech. 702, 415-443 (2012)], but now with full localisation in the streamwise direction. This fully localised optimal perturbation represents the best approximation yet of the minimal seed (the smallest perturbation which is arbitrarily close to states capable of triggering a turbulent episode) for "real" (laboratory) pipe flows. Dependence of the optimal with respect to several parameters has been computed and establishes that the structure is robust.

  13. Fully localised nonlinear energy growth optimals in pipe flow

    SciTech Connect

    Pringle, Chris C. T.; Willis, Ashley P.; Kerswell, Rich R.

    2015-06-15

    A new, fully localised, energy growth optimal is found over large times and in long pipe domains at a given mass flow rate. This optimal emerges at a threshold disturbance energy below which a nonlinear version of the known (streamwise-independent) linear optimal [P. J. Schmid and D. S. Henningson, “Optimal energy density growth in Hagen-Poiseuille flow,” J. Fluid Mech. 277, 192–225 (1994)] is selected and appears to remain the optimal up until the critical energy at which transition is triggered. The form of this optimal is similar to that found in short pipes [Pringle et al., “Minimal seeds for shear flow turbulence: Using nonlinear transient growth to touch the edge of chaos,” J. Fluid Mech. 702, 415–443 (2012)], but now with full localisation in the streamwise direction. This fully localised optimal perturbation represents the best approximation yet of the minimal seed (the smallest perturbation which is arbitrarily close to states capable of triggering a turbulent episode) for “real” (laboratory) pipe flows. Dependence of the optimal with respect to several parameters has been computed and establishes that the structure is robust.

  14. Numerical investigation of high temperature heat pipe incorporated in thermal energy storage systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdavi, Mahboobe; Qiu, Songgang; Tiari, Saeed

    2014-11-01

    In the present work, a new type of high temperature heat pipe is investigated which can be incorporated in the thermal energy storage for concentrated solar power systems. A detailed two dimensional axisymmetric numerical procedure is developed to analyze the steady state thermal-hydrodynamic characteristics of the heat pipe. The model accounts for conduction in the wall and wick regions as well as compressible flow in vapor chambers. The geometrical features, working fluid type, wick structure and operational temperature of the heat pipe are adjusted satisfying the heat transport limitations. The proposed numerical model agrees well with available experimental data. The effects of evaporator heat input and vapor core radius on the vapor velocity and pressure fields, vapor and wall temperature distributions as well as heat pipe thermal resistance are studied. The results revealed that the thermal resistance increases with the increase of heat input while decreases with the increase of radius, however, there exists a certain radius which further increase over would not affect the thermal resistance significantly.

  15. 76 FR 14643 - Hazardous Materials: Safety Requirements for External Product Piping on Cargo Tanks Transporting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-17

    ... April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477) or you may visit http://www.regulations.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background On January 27, 2011, PHMSA published a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) (HM-213D; 76 FR 4847...: Safety Requirements for External Product Piping on Cargo Tanks Transporting Flammable Liquids...

  16. Reactive Transport in a Pipe in Soluble Rock: a Theoretical and Experimental Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W.; Opolot, M.; Sousa, R.; Einstein, H. H.

    2015-12-01

    Reactive transport processes within the dominant underground flow pathways such as fractures can lead to the widening or narrowing of rock fractures, potentially altering the flow and transport processes in the fractures. A flow-through experiment was designed to study the reactive transport process in a pipe in soluble rock to serve as a simplified representation of a fracture in soluble rock. Assumptions were made to formulate the problem as three coupled, one-dimensional partial differential equations: one for the flow, one for the transport and one for the radius change due to dissolution. Analytical and numerical solutions were developed to predict the effluent concentration and the change in pipe radius. The positive feedback of the radius increase is captured by the experiment and the numerical model. A comparison between the experiment and the simulation results demonstrates the validity of the analytical and numerical models.

  17. Mass transport, corrosion, plugging, and their reduction in solar dish/Stirling heat pipe receivers

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, D.R.; Andraka, C.E.; Bradshaw, R.W.; Goods, S.H.; Moreno, J.B.; Moss, T.A.

    1996-07-01

    Solar dish/Stirling systems using sodium heat pipe receivers are being developed by industry and government laboratories here and abroad. The unique demands of this application lead to heat pipe wicks with very large surface areas and complex three-dimensional flow patterns. These characteristics can enhance the mass transport and concentration of constituents of the wick material, resulting in wick corrosion and plugging. As the test times for heat pipe receivers lengthen, we are beginning to see these effects both indirectly, as they affect performance, and directly in post-test examinations. We are also beginning to develop corrective measures. In this paper, we report on our test experiences, our post-test examinations, and on our initial effort to ameliorate various problems.

  18. Heat-pipe effect on the transport of gaseous radionuclides released from a nuclear waste container

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, W.; Chambre, P.L.; Pigford, T.H.; Lee, W.W.L.

    1990-11-01

    When an unsaturated porous medium is subjected to a temperature gradient and the temperature is sufficiently high, vadose water is heated and vaporizes. Vapor flows under its pressure gradient towards colder regions where it condenses. Vaporization and condensation produce a liquid saturation gradient, creating a capillary pressure gradient inside the porous medium. Condensate flows towards the hot end under the influence of a capillary pressure gradient. This is a heat pipe in an unsaturated porous medium. We study analytically the transport of gaseous species released from a spent-fuel waste package, as affected by a time-dependent heat pipe in an unsaturated rock. For parameter values typical of a potential repository in partially saturated fractured tuff at Yucca Mountain, we found that a heat pipe develops shortly after waste is buried, and the heat-pipe`s spatial extent is time-dependent. Water vapor movements produced by the heat pipe can significantly affect the migration of gaseous radionuclides. 12 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Possibilities of using carbon dioxide as fillers for heat pipe to obtain low-potential geothermal energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasanický, M.; Gavlas, S.; Vantúch, M.; Malcho, M.

    2013-04-01

    The use of low-potential heat is now possible especially in systems using heat pumps. There is a presumption that the trend will continue. Therefore, there is a need to find ways to be systems with a heat pump efficiencies. The usage of heat pipes seems to be an appropriate alternative to the establishedtechnology of obtaining heat through in-debt probes. This article describes a series of experiments on simulator for obtaining low-potential geothermal energy, in order to find the optimal amount of carbon dioxide per meter length of the heat pipe. For orientation and understanding of the conclusions of theexperiment, the article has also a detailed description of the device which simulates the transport of heat through geothermal heat pipes.

  20. A lead-before-break strategy for primary heat transport piping of 500 MWe Indian PHWR

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, J.; Dutta, B.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.

    1997-04-01

    Leak-Before-Break (LBB) is being used to design the primary heat transport piping system of 500 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (IPHWR). The work is categorized in three directions to demonstrate three levels of safety against sudden catastrophic break. Level 1 is inherent in the design procedure of piping system as per ASME Sec.III with a well defined factor of safety. Level 2 consists of fatigue crack growth study of a postulated part-through flaw at the inside surface of pipes. Level 3 is stability analysis of a postulated leakage size flaw under the maximum credible loading condition. Developmental work related to demonstration of level 2 and level 3 confidence is described in this paper. In a case study on fatigue crack growth on PHT straight pipes for level 2, negligible crack growth is predicted for the life of the reactor. For level 3 analysis, the R6 method has been adopted. A database to evaluate SIF of elbows with throughwall flaws under combined internal pressure and bending moment has been generated to provide one of the inputs for R6 method. The methodology of safety assessment of elbow using R6 method has been demonstrated for a typical pump discharge elbow. In this analysis, limit load of the cracked elbow has been determined by carrying out elasto-plastic finite element analysis. The limit load results compared well with those given by Miller. However, it requires further study to give a general form of limit load solution. On the experimental front, a set of small diameter pipe fracture experiments have been carried out at room temperature and 300{degrees}C. Two important observations of the experiments are - appreciable drop in maximum load at 300{degrees}C in case of SS pipes and out-of-plane crack growth in case of CS pipes. Experimental load deflection curves are finally compared with five J-estimation schemes predictions. A material database of PHT piping materials is also being generated for use in LBB analysis.

  1. Transportation energy use in Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Sheinbaum, C.; Meyers, S.; Sathaye, J.

    1994-07-01

    This report presents data on passenger travel and freight transport and analysis of the consequent energy use in Mexico during the 1970--1971 period. We describe changes in modal shares for passenger travel and freight transport, and analyze trends in the energy intensity of different modes. We look in more detail at transportation patterns, energy use, and the related environmental problems in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area, and also discuss policies that have been implemented there to reduce emissions from vehicles.

  2. Basic problems and new potentials in monitoring sediment transport using Japanese pipe type geophone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakajo, Saiichi

    2016-04-01

    The authors have conducted a lot of series of monitoring of sediment transport by pipe type geophone in a model hydrological channel with various gradients and water discharge, using the various size of particles from 2 to 21 mm in the diameter. In the case of casting soils particle by particle into the water channel, 1,000 test cases were conducted. In the case of casting all soils at a breath into the water channel, 100 test cases were conducted. The all test results were totally analyzed by the conventional method, with visible judgement by video pictures. Then several important basic problems were found in estimating the volume and particle distributions by the conventional method, which was not found in the past similar studies. It was because the past studies did not consider the types of collisions between sediment particle and pipe. Based on these experiments, the authors have firstly implemented this idea into the old formula to estimate the amount of sediment transport. In the formula, two factors of 1) the rate of sensing in a single collision and 2) the rate of collided particles to a cast all soil particles were concretely considered. The parameters of these factors could be determined from the experimental results and it was found that the obtained formula could estimate grain size distribution. In this paper, they explain the prototype formula to estimate a set of volume and distribution of sediment transport. Another finding in this study is to propose a single collision as a river index to recognize its characteristics of sediment transport. This result could characterize the risk ranking of sediment transport in the rivers and mudflow in the mountainous rivers. Furthermore, in this paper the authors explain how the preciseness of the pipe geophone to sense the smaller sediment particles shall be improved, which has never been able to be sensed.

  3. Experimental investigation of transport of discrete solids with surge flows in a 10.0 cm diameter partially filled pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, B. M.

    1982-01-01

    The transport of discrete solids with surge flows in a partially filled slightly pitched horizontal pipe was investigated. The experimental apparatus, instrumentation, and procedures are described. The experiments were conducted using a cylindrical solid in a 10.0 cm (4 in) diameter pipe. The water surge flows were obtained by discharging different volumes of water into the pipe from a falling head open container which simulated a water closet. Flow induced solid velocities and stream depth histories at various locations along the length of the pipe were measured. The effects of water volume used, pipe slope, and size of the solid on the solid velocities were examined. Solid velocities were compared with the maximum water velocities estimated from the stream depth histories. Also, the distance traversed by the solids in the pipe were measured for those cases in which the solids did not clear the pipe. The solid velocity increased with an increase in water volume used, a decrease in the size of the solid, and an increase in the pipe slope. The solid velocity in the initial reach of the pipe was less than the maximum water velocity; and the solid velocity approaches the maximum water velocity as the solid traveled downstream, except for some experiments with small water volumes.

  4. Comparison of bedload transport measurements at the Suggadinbach stream with geophones and modified pipe hydrophones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiari, Michael; Berktold, Maximilian; Jäger, Gerald; Hübl, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    A new bedload transport monitoring station has been designed by the Institute of Mountain Risk engineering at the Suggadinbach in Austria (Vorarlberg). In cooperation with the Austrian Service for Torrent and Avalanche Control the station has been installed in June 2013 in a check dam. Two different types of measuring systems are installed: 13 Swiss type geophone sensors record the vibrations of the transported sediment. Additionally 3 modified Japanese pipe hydrophones are mounted under steel plates in order to record the acoustic signal produced by the sediment transport. Both systems can be compared directly because they are arranged consecutively in flow direction. For calibration of the sensors a series of systematic tests have been carried out during low water conditions. Sediment has been fed by a crane with a concrete container. A flume has been installed in order to obtain controlled flow and transport over the measuring system. Four different grain classes up to 64 mm and a mixture of all classes were tested. A total amount of 4 tons were fed during the experiments. The signal was recorded with 9.6 kHz. Frequency analyses were performed for different grain-classes in order to investigate the influence of the grain-size distribution on the shape of the signal and the influence of neighbouring sensors. The standard evaluation and storage procedure for 1 minute aggregated data show that the modified pipe hydrophone is able to detect finer grain-sizes than the geophone sensor.

  5. Heat transport in the Hadean mantle: From heat pipes to plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kankanamge, Duminda G. J.; Moore, William B.

    2016-04-01

    Plate tectonics is a unique feature of Earth, and it plays a dominant role in transporting Earth's internally generated heat. It also governs the nature, shape, and the motion of the surface of Earth. The initiation of plate tectonics on Earth has been difficult to establish observationally, and modeling of the plate breaking process has not consistently accounted for the nature of the preplate tectonic Earth. We have performed numerical simulations of heat transport in the preplate tectonic Earth to understand the transition to plate tectonic behavior. This period of time is dominated by volcanic heat transport called the heat pipe mode of planetary cooling. These simulations of Earth's mantle include heat transport by melting and melt segregation (volcanism), Newtonian temperature-dependent viscosity, and internal heating. We show that when heat pipes are active, the lithosphere thickens and lithospheric isotherms are kept flat by the solidus. Both of these effects act to suppress plate tectonics. As volcanism wanes, conduction begins to control lithospheric thickness, and large slopes arise at the base of the lithosphere. This produces large lithospheric stress and focuses it on the thinner regions of the lithosphere resulting in plate breaking events.

  6. Application of LBB to high energy piping systems in operating PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Swamy, S.A.; Bhowmick, D.C.

    1997-04-01

    The amendment to General Design Criterion 4 allows exclusion, from the design basis, of dynamic effects associated with high energy pipe rupture by application of leak-before-break (LBB) technology. This new approach has resulted in substantial financial savings to utilities when applied to the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) primary loop piping and auxiliary piping systems made of stainless steel material. To date majority of applications pertain to piping systems in operating plants. Various steps of evaluation associated with the LBB application to an operating plant are described in this paper.

  7. Buried pipe design

    SciTech Connect

    Mosler, A.P.

    1990-01-01

    This book covers basic information on proper, cost-effective design of buried-pipe systems for underground fluid transportation. Examines various pipe products available. Discusses soil engineering and piping mechanics. Specific topics include pipe-wall stresses and strains; design bases; rigid- and flexible-pipe analysis; soil pressure; and longitudinal, wheel, expansive-soil, and frost loading.

  8. Simulation and analysis of solute transport in 2D fracture/pipe networks: the SOLFRAC program.

    PubMed

    Bodin, Jacques; Porel, Gilles; Delay, Fred; Ubertosi, Fabrice; Bernard, Stéphane; de Dreuzy, Jean-Raynald

    2007-01-01

    The Time Domain Random Walk (TDRW) method has been recently developed by Delay and Bodin [Delay, F. and Bodin, J., 2001. Time domain random walk method to simulate transport by advection-dispersion and matrix diffusion in fracture networks. Geophys. Res. Lett., 28(21): 4051-4054.] and Bodin et al. [Bodin, J., Porel, G. and Delay, F., 2003c. Simulation of solute transport in discrete fracture networks using the time domain random walk method. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 6566: 1-8.] for simulating solute transport in discrete fracture networks. It is assumed that the fracture network can reasonably be represented by a network of interconnected one-dimensional pipes (i.e. flow channels). Processes accounted for are: (1) advection and hydrodynamic dispersion in the channels, (2) matrix diffusion, (3) diffusion into stagnant zones within the fracture planes, (4) sorption reactions onto the fracture walls and in the matrix, (5) linear decay, and (6) mass sharing at fracture intersections. The TDRW method is handy and very efficient in terms of computation costs since it allows for the one-step calculation of the particle residence time in each bond of the network. This method has been programmed in C++, and efforts have been made to develop an efficient and user-friendly software, called SOLFRAC. This program is freely downloadable at the URL (labo.univ-poitiers.fr/hydrasa/intranet/telechargement.htm). It calculates solute transport into 2D pipe networks, while considering different types of injections and different concepts of local dispersion within each flow channel. Post-simulation analyses are also available, such as the mean velocity or the macroscopic dispersion at the scale of the entire network. The program may be used to evaluate how a given transport mechanism influences the macroscopic transport behaviour of fracture networks. It may also be used, as is the case, e.g., with analytical solutions, to interpret laboratory or field tracer test experiments performed

  9. Ballistic Energy Transport in Oligomers.

    PubMed

    Rubtsova, Natalia I; Qasim, Layla N; Kurnosov, Arkady A; Burin, Alexander L; Rubtsov, Igor V

    2015-09-15

    The development of nanocomposite materials with desired heat management properties, including nanowires, layered semiconductor structures, and self-assembled monolayer (SAM) junctions, attracts broad interest. Such materials often involve polymeric/oligomeric components and can feature high or low thermal conductivity, depending on their design. For example, in SAM junctions made of alkane chains sandwiched between metal layers, the thermal conductivity can be very low, whereas the fibers of ordered polyethylene chains feature high thermal conductivity, exceeding that of many pure metals. The thermal conductivity of nanostructured materials is determined by the energy transport between and within each component of the material, which all need to be understood for optimizing the properties. For example, in the SAM junctions, the energy transport across the metal-chain interface as well as the transport through the chains both determine the overall heat conductivity, however, to separate these contributions is difficult. Recently developed relaxation-assisted two-dimensional infrared (RA 2DIR) spectroscopy is capable of studying energy transport in individual molecules in the time domain. The transport in a molecule is initiated by exciting an IR-active group (a tag); the method records the influence of the excess energy on another mode in the molecule (a reporter). The energy transport time can be measured for different reporters, and the transport speed through the molecule is evaluated. Various molecules were interrogated by RA 2DIR: in molecules without repeating units (disordered), the transport mechanism was expected and found to be diffusive. The transport via an oligomer backbone can potentially be ballistic, as the chain offers delocalized vibrational states. Indeed, the transport regime via three tested types of oligomers, alkanes, polyethyleneglycols, and perfluoroalkanes was found to be ballistic, whereas the transport within the end groups was diffusive

  10. Energy conservation and air transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Air transportation demand and passenger energy demand are discussed, in relation to energy conservation. Alternatives to air travel are reviewed, along with airline advertising and ticket pricing. Cargo energy demand and airline systems efficiency are also examined, as well as fuel conservation techniques. Maximum efficiency of passenger aircraft, from B-747 to V/STOL to British Concorde, is compared.

  11. OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion) Cold Water Pipe At-Sea Test Program. Phase 2: Suspended pipe test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHale, F. A.

    1984-08-01

    An important step in the development of technology for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) cold water pipes (CWP) is the at-sea testing and subsequent evaluation of a large diameter fiberglass reinforced plastic (FRP) pipe. Focus was on the CWP since it is the most critical element in any OTEC design. The results of the second phase of the CWP At-Sea Test Program are given. During this phase an 8 foot diameter, 400 foot long sandwich wall FRP syntactic foam configuration CWP test article was developed, constructed, deployed and used for data acquisition in the open ocean near Honolulu, Hawaii. This instrumented CWP as suspended from a moored platform for a three week experiment in April-May, 1983. The CWP represented a scaled version of a 40 megawatt size structure, nominally 30 feet in diameter and 3000 feet long.

  12. Testing in support of transportation of residues in the pipe overpack container

    SciTech Connect

    Ammerman, D.J.; Bobbe, J.G.; Arviso, M.; Bronowski, D.R.

    1997-04-01

    The disposition of the large back-log of plutonium residues at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats) will require interim storage and subsequent shipment to a waste repository. Current plants call for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and the transportation to WIPP in the TRUPACT-II. The transportation phase will require the residues to be packaged in a container that is more robust than a standard 55-gallon waste drum. Rocky Flats has designed the Pipe Overpack Container to meet this need. The tests described here were performed to qualify the Pipe Overpack Container as a waste container for shipment in the TRUPACT-II. Using a more robust container will assure the fissile materials in each container can not be mixed with the fissile material from the other containers and will provide criticality control. This will allow an increase in the payload of the TRUPACT-II from 325 fissile gram equivalents to 2,800 fissile gram equivalents.

  13. MR Imaging of Apparent 3He Gas Transport in Narrow Pipes and Rodent Airways

    PubMed Central

    Minard, Kevin R.; Jacob, Richard E.; Laicher, Gernot; Einstein, Daniel R.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Corley, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    High sensitivity makes hyperpolarized 3He an attractive signal source for visualizing gas flow with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Its rapid Brownian motion, however, can blur observed flow lamina and alter measured diffusion rates when excited nuclei traverse shear-induced velocity gradients during data acquisition. Here, both effects are described analytically, and predicted values for measured transport during laminar flow through a straight, 3.2-mm-diameter pipe are validated using two-dimensional (2D) constant-time images of different binary gas mixtures. Results show explicitly how measured transport in narrow conduits is characterized by apparent values that depend on underlying gas dynamics and imaging time. In ventilated rats, this is found to obscure acquired airflow images. Nevertheless, flow splitting at airway branches is still evident and use of 3D vector flow mapping is shown to reveal surprising detail that highlights the correlation between gas dynamics and lung structure. PMID:18667344

  14. MR Imaging of Apparent 3He Gas Transport in Narrow Pipes and Rodent Airways

    SciTech Connect

    Minard, Kevin R.; Jacob, Rick E.; Laicher, Gernot; Einstein, Daniel R.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Corley, Richard A.

    2008-10-01

    High sensitivity makes hyperpolarized 3He an attractive signal source for visualizing gas flow with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Its rapid Brownian motion, however, can blur observed flow lamina and alter measured diffusion rates when excited nuclei traverse shear-induced velocity gradients during data acquisition. Here, both effects are described analytically, and predicted values for measured transport during laminar flow through a straight, 3.2-mm-diameter pipe are validated using two-dimensional (2D) constant-time images of different binary gas mixtures. Results show explicitly how measured transport in narrow conduits is characterized by apparent values that depend on underlying gas dynamics and imaging time. In ventilated rats, this is found to obscure acquired airflow images. Flow splitting at airway branches is still evident, however, and use of 3D vector flow mapping is shown to provide a quantitative view of pulmonary gas supply that highlights the correlation of airflow dynamics with lung structure.

  15. Measurement of the Critical Deposition Velocity in Slurry Transport through a Horizontal Pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Erian, Fadel F.; Furfari, Daniel J.; Kellogg, Michael I.; Park, Walter R.

    2001-03-01

    Critical Deposition Velocity (CDV) is an important design and operational parameter in slurry transport. Almost all existing correlations that are used to predict this parameter have been obtained experimentally from slurry transport tests featuring single solid species in the slurry mixture. No correlations have been obtained to describe this parameter when the slurry mixture contains more than one solid species having a wide range of specific gravities, particle size distributions, and volume concentrations within the overall slurry mixture. There are no physical or empirical bases that can justify the extrapolation or modification of the existing single species correlations to include all these effects. New experiments must be carried out to obtain new correlations that would be suited for these types of slurries, and that would clarify the mechanics of solids deposition as a function of the properties of the various solid species. Our goal in this paper is to describe a robust experimental technique for the accurate determination of the critical deposition velocity associated with the transport of slurries in horizontal or slightly inclined pipes. Because of the relative difficulty encountered during the precise determination of this useful operational parameter, it has been the practice to connect it with some transitional behavior of more easily measurable flow parameters such as the pressure drop along the slurry pipeline. In doing so, the critical deposition velocity loses its unique and precise definition due to the multitude of factors that influence such transitional behaviors. Here, data has been obtained for single species slurries made up of washed garnet and water and flowing through a 1- inch clear pipe. The selected garnet had a narrow particle size distribution with a mean diameter of 100 mm, approximately. The critical deposition velocity was measured for garnet/water slurries of 10, 20, and 30 percent solids concentration by volume.

  16. Thermal energy storage and transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hausz, W.

    1980-01-01

    The extraction of thermal energy from large LWR and coal fired plants for long distance transport to industrial and residential/commercial users is analyzed. Transport of thermal energy as high temperature water is shown to be considerably cheaper than transport as steam, hot oil, or molten salt over a wide temperature range. The delivered heat is competitive with user-generated heat from oil, coal, or electrode boilers at distances well over 50 km when the pipeline operates at high capacity factor. Results indicate that thermal energy storage makes meeting of even very low capacity factor heat demands economic and feasible and gives the utility flexibility to meet coincident electricity and heat demands effectively.

  17. On the calculation of turbulent heat transport downstream from an abrupt pipe expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chieng, C. C.; Launder, B. E.

    1980-01-01

    A numerical study is reported of flow and heat transfer in the separated flow region created by an abrupt pipe expansion. Computations employed an adaptation of the TEACH-2E computer program with the standard model of turbulence. Emphasis is given to the simulation, from both a physical and numerical viewpoint, of the region in the immediate vicinity of the wall where turbulent transport gives way to molecular conduction and diffusion. Wall resistance laws or wall functions used to bridge this near-wall region are based on the idea that, beyond the viscous sublayer, the turbulent length scale is universal, increasing linearly with distance from the wall. Predictions of expermental data for a diameter ratio of 0.54 show generally encouraging agreement with experiment. At a diameter of 0.43 different trends are discernible between measurement and calculation though this appears to be due to effects unconnected with the wall region studied.

  18. On the calculation of turbulent heat transport downstream from an abrupt pipe expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chieng, C. C.; Launder, B. E.

    1980-01-01

    A numerical study of flow and heat transfer in the separated flow region produced by an abrupt pipe explosion is reported, with emphasis on the region in the immediate vicinity of the wall where turbulent transport gives way to molecular conduction and diffusion. The analysis is based on a modified TEACH-2E program with the standard k-epsilon model of turbulence. Predictions of the experimental data of Zemanick and Dougall (1970) for a diameter ratio of 0.54 show generally encouraging agreement with experiment. At a diameter ratio of 0.43 different trends are discernable between measurement and calculation, though this appears to be due to effects unconnected with the wall region studied here.

  19. Transportation economics and energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltani Sobh, Ali

    The overall objective of this research is to study the impacts of technology improvement including fuel efficiency increment, extending the use of natural gas vehicle and electric vehicles on key parameters of transportation. In the first chapter, a simple economic analysis is used in order to demonstrate the adoption rate of natural gas vehicles as an alternative fuel vehicle. The effect of different factors on adoption rate of commuters is calculated in sensitivity analysis. In second chapter the VMT is modeled and forecasted under influence of CNG vehicles in different scenarios. The VMT modeling is based on the time series data for Washington State. In order to investigate the effect of population growth on VMT, the per capita model is also developed. In third chapter the effect of fuel efficiency improvement on fuel tax revenue and greenhouse emission is examined. The model is developed based on time series data of Washington State. The rebound effect resulted from fuel efficiency improvement is estimated and is considered in fuel consumption forecasting. The reduction in fuel tax revenue and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions as two outcomes of lower fuel consumption are computed. In addition, the proper fuel tax rate to restitute the revenue is suggested. In the fourth chapter effective factors on electric vehicles (EV) adoption is discussed. The constructed model is aggregated binomial logit share model that estimates the modal split between EV and conventional vehicles for different states over time. Various factors are incorporated in the utility function as explanatory variables in order to quantify their effect on EV adoption choices. The explanatory variables include income, VMT, electricity price, gasoline price, urban area and number of EV stations.

  20. Pipe/tube conveyors a modern method of coal and ash transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Loeffler, F.J.; Gulledge, J.D. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    For more than 100 years the troughed belt conveyor has been used to transport bulk materials. Its success has been attributed to its relatively low capital cost, high degree of reliability and availability, and low operating and maintenance costs. The only significant problems with conventional conveyors have occurred at transfer points when the transported materials were sticky, dusty or there was a need to provide a totally enclosed system to protect the product from the environment or contain dribble from the return belt. The pipe or tube conveyor solves these problems by transporting the product in a circular cross section formed by overlapping the belt edges and using idlers arranged in a hexagonal pattern to form a tubular shape. The belt encloses the product being conveyed and protects the product from the elements and the environment from the product. The return belt is also formed into a circular cross section, rolled with the carrying side of the belt inward to prevent material clinging to the belt from dislodging at the return idlers.

  1. Interfacial Area Transport of Bubbly Flow in a Small Diameter Pipe Under Microgravity Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Tatsuya Hazuku; Tomoji Takamasa; Takashi Hibiki; Mamoru Ishii

    2002-07-01

    Axial developments of one-dimensional void fraction, bubble number density, interfacial area concentration, and Sauter mean diameter of adiabatic nitrogen-water bubbly flows in a 9-mm-diameter pipe were measured under a microgravity environment using an image-processing method. The interfacial area transport mechanism was determined based on visual observation. Marked bubble coalescence occurred when fast-moving bubbles near the channel center overtook and swept up slower-moving bubbles in the vicinity of the channel wall (velocity profile entrainment). Negligible bubble breakup was observed because of weak turbulence under tested flow conditions. Axial changes of measured interfacial area concentrations were compared with the interfacial area transport equation considering the bubble expansion and wake entrainment as observed under a normal gravity environment. The velocity profile entrainment effect under microgravity was likely to be comparable to the wake entrainment effect under normal gravity in the tested flow conditions. This apparently led to insignificant differences between measured interfacial area concentrations and those predicted by the interfacial area transport equation with the wake entrainment model under normal gravity. Possible bubble coalescence mechanisms would differ, however, between normal gravity and microgravity conditions. (authors)

  2. Electrofuels: Versatile Transportation Energy Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-01

    Electrofuels Project: ARPA-E’s Electrofuels Project is using microorganisms to create liquid transportation fuels in a new and different way that could be up to 10 times more energy efficient than current biofuel production methods. ARPA-E is the only U.S. government agency currently funding research on Electrofuels.

  3. Pipe inspection using the pipe crawler. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) continually seeks safer and more cost-effective remediation technologies for use in the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of nuclear facilities. In several of the buildings at the Fernald Site, there is piping that was used to transport process materials. As the demolition of these buildings occur, disposal of this piping has become a costly issue. Currently, all process piping is cut into ten-foot or less sections, the ends of the piping are wrapped and taped to prevent the release of any potential contaminants into the air, and the piping is placed in roll off boxes for eventual repackaging and shipment to the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for disposal. Alternatives that allow for the onsite disposal of process piping are greatly desired due to the potential for dramatic savings in current offsite disposal costs. No means is currently employed to allow for the adequate inspection of the interior of piping, and consequently, process piping has been assumed to be internally contaminated and thus routinely disposed of at NTS. The BTX-II system incorporates a high-resolution micro color camera with lightheads, cabling, a monitor, and a video recorder. The complete probe is capable of inspecting pipes with an internal diameter (ID) as small as 1.4 inches. By using readily interchangeable lightheads, the same system is capable of inspecting piping up to 24 inches in ID. The original development of the BTX system was for inspection of boiler tubes and small diameter pipes for build-up, pitting, and corrosion. However, the system is well suited for inspecting the interior of most types of piping and other small, confined areas. The report describes the technology, its performance, uses, cost, regulatory and policy issues, and lessons learned.

  4. Transportation Energy Pathways LDRD.

    SciTech Connect

    Barter, Garrett.; Reichmuth, David.; Westbrook, Jessica; Malczynski, Leonard A.; Yoshimura, Ann S.; Peterson, Meghan B.; West, Todd H.; Manley, Dawn Kataoka; Guzman, Katherine Dunphy; Edwards, Donna M.; Hines, Valerie Ann-Peters

    2012-09-01

    This report presents a system dynamics based model of the supply-demand interactions between the USlight-duty vehicle (LDV) fleet, its fuels, and the corresponding primary energy sources through the year2050. An important capability of our model is the ability to conduct parametric analyses. Others have reliedupon scenario-based analysis, where one discrete set of values is assigned to the input variables and used togenerate one possible realization of the future. While these scenarios can be illustrative of dominant trendsand tradeoffs under certain circumstances, changes in input values or assumptions can have a significantimpact on results, especially when output metrics are associated with projections far into the future. Thistype of uncertainty can be addressed by using a parametric study to examine a range of values for the inputvariables, offering a richer source of data to an analyst.The parametric analysis featured here focuses on a trade space exploration, with emphasis on factors thatinfluence the adoption rates of electric vehicles (EVs), the reduction of GHG emissions, and the reduction ofpetroleum consumption within the US LDV fleet. The underlying model emphasizes competition between13 different types of powertrains, including conventional internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles, flex-fuel vehicles (FFVs), conventional hybrids(HEVs), plug-in hybrids (PHEVs), and battery electric vehicles(BEVs).We find that many factors contribute to the adoption rates of EVs. These include the pace of technologicaldevelopment for the electric powertrain, battery performance, as well as the efficiency improvements inconventional vehicles. Policy initiatives can also have a dramatic impact on the degree of EV adoption. Theconsumer effective payback period, in particular, can significantly increase the market penetration rates ifextended towards the vehicle lifetime.Widespread EV adoption can have noticeable impact on petroleum consumption and greenhouse gas

  5. Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Phoenix Refrigeration Systems, Inc.'s heat pipe addition to the Phoenix 2000, a supermarket rooftop refrigeration/air conditioning system, resulted from the company's participation in a field test of heat pipes. Originally developed by NASA to control temperatures in space electronic systems, the heat pipe is a simple, effective, heat transfer system. It has been used successfully in candy storage facilities where it has provided significant energy savings. Additional data is expected to fully quantify the impact of the heat pipes on supermarket air conditioning systems.

  6. World transport of energy: prospects to 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Hawdon, D.

    1985-01-01

    A new edition of a report, first published in 1980, provides a detailed analysis of energy transport, the demand for energy transport services, the supply of transport capacity, freight market and reconciliation of supply and demand, and policy options and their consequences. The report covers oil, coal, natural gas and liquefied petroleum in international trade, the costs of energy transport, and an assessment of seaborne energy transport prospects to 1995.

  7. Characterization of radioactive contamination inside pipes with the Pipe Explorer{sup trademark} system

    SciTech Connect

    Cremer, C.D.; Lowry, W.; Cramer, E.

    1995-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy`s nuclear facility decommissioning program needs to characterize radiological contamination inside piping systems before the pipe can be recycled, remediated, or disposed. Historically, this has been attempted using hand held survey instrumentation, surveying only the accessible exterior portions of pipe systems. Difficulty, or inability of measuring threshold surface contamination values, worker exposure, and physical access constraints have limited the effectiveness of this approach. Science and Engineering associates, Inc. under contract with the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center has developed and demonstrated the Pipe Explorer{trademark} system, which uses an inverting membrane to transport various characterization sensors into pipes. The basic process involves inverting (turning inside out) a tubular impermeable membrane under air pressure. A characterization sensor is towed down the interior of the pipe by the membrane.

  8. Analysis of the energy transmission in spatial piping systems with heavy internal fluid loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, S. V.; Olhoff, N.; Ershova, O. A.

    2008-03-01

    The energy transmission in spatial elastic water-filled pipes is considered. A solution of the wave propagation problem in the framework of the general theory of elastic cylindrical shells with internal fluid loading is used as a reference. It is shown that energy transmission phenomena may be adequately described by means of the reduced theory in the frequency range of practical interest. The boundary integral equations method is specialised for this reduced theory and two generic problems of the energy transmission in piping systems are solved. The first one is concerned with analysis of the distribution of the transmitted energy between two branches in a pipeline with a single joint and between alternative transmission paths in each branch. Besides the frequency and the type of excitation, the influence of an angle between connected pipes is studied. The second problem is related to analysis of the energy transmission in a pipe with multiple regularly spaced junctions and attention is focused at formation of frequency band gaps due to periodicity of location of branches.

  9. Economic optimization of the energy transport component of a large distributed solar power plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. H.

    1976-01-01

    A solar thermal power plant with a field of collectors, each locally heating some transport fluid, requires a pipe network system for eventual delivery of energy power generation equipment. For a given collector distribution and pipe network geometry, a technique is herein developed which manipulates basic cost information and physical data in order to design an energy transport system consistent with minimized cost constrained by a calculated technical performance. For a given transport fluid and collector conditions, the method determines the network pipe diameter and pipe thickness distribution and also insulation thickness distribution associated with minimum system cost; these relative distributions are unique. Transport losses, including pump work and heat leak, are calculated operating expenses and impact the total system cost. The minimum cost system is readily selected. The technique is demonstrated on six candidate transport fluids to emphasize which parameters dominate the system cost and to provide basic decision data. Three different power plant output sizes are evaluated in each case to determine severity of diseconomy of scale.

  10. Transport Energy Impact Analysis; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    Gonder, J.

    2015-05-13

    Presented at the Sustainable Transportation Energy Pathways Spring 2015 Symposium on May 13, 2015, this presentation by Jeff Gonder of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provides information about NREL's transportation energy impact analysis of connected and automated vehicles.

  11. Parametric study on maximum transportable distance and cost for thermal energy transportation using various coolants

    SciTech Connect

    Su-Jong Yoon; Piyush Sabharwall

    2014-07-01

    The operation temperature of advanced nuclear reactors is generally higher than commercial light water reactors and thermal energy from advanced nuclear reactor can be used for various purposes such as district heating, desalination, hydrogen production and other process heat applications, etc. The process heat industry/facilities will be located outside the nuclear island due to safety measures. This thermal energy from the reactor has to be transported a fair distance. In this study, analytical analysis was conducted to identify the maximum distance that thermal energy could be transported using various coolants such as molten-salts, helium and water by varying the pipe diameter and mass flow rate. The cost required to transport each coolant was also analyzed. The coolants analyzed are molten salts (such as: KClMgCl2, LiF-NaF-KF (FLiNaK) and KF-ZrF4), helium and water. Fluoride salts are superior because of better heat transport characteristics but chloride salts are most economical for higher temperature transportation purposes. For lower temperature water is a possible alternative when compared with He, because low pressure He requires higher pumping power which makes the process very inefficient and economically not viable for both low and high temperature application.

  12. An estimation method for echo signal energy of pipe inner surface longitudinal crack detection by 2-D energy coefficients integration

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Shiyuan Sun, Haoyu Xu, Chunguang Cao, Xiandong Cui, Liming Xiao, Dingguo

    2015-03-31

    The echo signal energy is directly affected by the incident sound beam eccentricity or angle for thick-walled pipes inner longitudinal cracks detection. A method for analyzing the relationship between echo signal energy between the values of incident eccentricity is brought forward, which can be used to estimate echo signal energy when testing inside wall longitudinal crack of pipe, using mode-transformed compression wave adaptation of shear wave with water-immersion method, by making a two-dimension integration of “energy coefficient” in both circumferential and axial directions. The calculation model is founded for cylinder sound beam case, in which the refraction and reflection energy coefficients of different rays in the whole sound beam are considered different. The echo signal energy is calculated for a particular cylinder sound beam testing different pipes: a beam with a diameter of 0.5 inch (12.7mm) testing a φ279.4mm pipe and a φ79.4mm one. As a comparison, both the results of two-dimension integration and one-dimension (circumferential direction) integration are listed, and only the former agrees well with experimental results. The estimation method proves to be valid and shows that the usual method of simplifying the sound beam as a single ray for estimating echo signal energy and choosing optimal incident eccentricity is not so appropriate.

  13. Transportation Energy Efficiency Trends, 1972--1992

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, D.L.; Fan, Y.

    1994-12-01

    The US transportation sector, which remains 97% dependent on petroleum, used a record 22.8 quads of energy in 1993. Though growing much more slowly than the economy from 1975 to 1985, energy use for transportation is now growing at nearly the same rate as GDP. This report describes the analysis of trends in energy use and energy intensity in transportation into components due to, (1) growth in transportation activity, (2) changes in energy intensity, and (3) changes in the modal structure of transportation activities.

  14. Beam Fields and Energy Dissipation Inside the the BE Beam Pipe of the Super-B Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Novokhatski, Alexander; Sullivan, Michael; /SLAC

    2010-09-10

    We study the bunch field diffusion and energy dissipation in the beam pipe of the Super-B detector, which consists of two coaxial Be thin pipes (half a millimeter). Cooling water will run between these two pipes. Gold and nickel will be sputtered (several microns) onto the beryllium pipe at different sides. The Maxwell equations for the beam fields in these thin layers are solved numerically for the case of infinite pipes. We also calculate the amplitude of the electromagnetic fields outside the beam pipe, which may be noticeable as the beam current can reach 4 A in each beam. Results of simulations are used for the design of this central part of the Super-B detector.

  15. Modeling energy transport in nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattamatta, Arvind

    Heat transfer in nanostructures differ significantly from that in the bulk materials since the characteristic length scales associated with heat carriers, i.e., the mean free path and the wavelength, are comparable to the characteristic length of the nanostructures. Nanostructure materials hold the promise of novel phenomena, properties, and functions in the areas of thermal management and energy conversion. Example of thermal management in micro/nano electronic devices is the use of efficient nanostructured materials to alleviate 'hot spots' in integrated circuits. Examples in the manipulation of heat flow and energy conversion include nanostructures for thermoelectric energy conversion, thermophotovoltaic power generation, and data storage. One of the major challenges in Metal-Oxide Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) devices is to study the 'hot spot' generation by accurately modeling the carrier-optical phonon-acoustic phonon interactions. Prediction of hotspot temperature and position in MOSFET devices is necessary for improving thermal design and reliability of micro/nano electronic devices. Thermoelectric properties are among the properties that may drastically change at nanoscale. The efficiency of thermoelectric energy conversion in a material is measured by a non-dimensional figure of merit (ZT) defined as, ZT = sigmaS2T/k where sigma is the electrical conductivity, S is the Seebeck coefficient, T is the temperature, and k is the thermal conductivity. During the last decade, advances have been made in increasing ZT using nanostructures. Three important topics are studied with respect to energy transport in nanostructure materials for micro/nano electronic and thermoelectric applications; (1) the role of nanocomposites in improving the thermal efficiency of thermoelectric devices, (2) the interfacial thermal resistance for the semiconductor/metal contacts in thermoelectric devices and for metallic interconnects in micro/nano electronic devices, (3) the

  16. Energy Transport in Organic Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergemann, Kevin J.

    Organic photovoltaics (OPV) have the potential to be a flexible and low-cost form of carbon-neutral energy production. However, many of the underlying physical mechanisms that dictate the behavior of OPVs remain frustratingly obscure in comparison to the well-understood physics of inorganic semiconductors. This dissertation centers around the development of new techniques to characterize the behavior of excitons in organic semiconductors, both in the bulk and at interfaces. We first examine the method of spectrally-resolved photoluminescence quenching (SR-PLQ), the most convenient and powerful current technique for measuring the exciton diffusion length (LD) of organic semiconductors, and extend it to work with optically thin films. This allows for its application to a much wider range of materials and physical systems. The second part of the dissertation presents a further extension of the method of PL quenching to characterize non-ideal interfaces, those which block or quench only a fraction of incident excitons. This is used to understand the operation of a novel fullerene:wide energy gap material buffer in OPVs. In combination with charge transport and morphological studies, it is shown that the mixed buffer shows disproportionate benefits from the two materials; blocking excitons superlinearly with wide energy gap material concentration and still conducting charges efficiently even at very small (10%) fullerene concentration. Finally, we extend the principles of PL quenching to characterize arbitrary interfaces, including those between materials with identical energy levels but different LD and exciton lifetime, and those between materials with small (˜20 meV) energy offsets. These techniques allow us to finally resolve the ambiguity in the spin state of the exciton which serves as the primary source of photocurrent in C60, one of the most important materials in current efficient OPVs.

  17. Coupled Fluid Energy Solute Transport

    1992-02-13

    CFEST is a Coupled Fluid, Energy, and Solute Transport code for the study of a multilayered, nonisothermal ground-water system. It can model discontinuous as well as continuous layers, time-dependent and constant source/sinks, and transient as well as steady-state flow. The finite element method is used for analyzing isothermal and nonisothermal events in a confined aquifer system. Only single-phase Darcian flow is considered. In the Cartesian coordinate system, flow in a horizontal plane, in a verticalmore » plane, or in a fully three-dimensional region can be simulated. An option also exists for the axisymmetric analysis of a vertical cross section. The code employs bilinear quadrilateral elements in all two dimensional analyses and trilinear quadrilateral solid elements in three dimensional simulations. The CFEST finite element formulation can approximate discontinuities, major breaks in slope or thickness, and fault zones in individual hydrogeologic units. The code accounts for heterogeneity in aquifer permeability and porosity and accommodates anisotropy (collinear with the Cartesian coordinates). The variation in the hydraulic properties is described on a layer-by-layer basis for the different hydrogeologic units. Initial conditions can be prescribed hydraulic head or pressure, temperature, or concentration. CFEST can be used to support site, repository, and waste package subsystem assessments. Some specific applications are regional hydrologic characterization; simulation of coupled transport of fluid, heat, and salinity in the repository region; consequence assessment due to natural disruption or human intrusion scenarios in the repository region; flow paths and travel-time estimates for transport of radionuclides; and interpretation of well and tracer tests.« less

  18. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion moored pipe/mobile platform design study

    SciTech Connect

    Bullock, H.O.; McNatt, T.R.; Ross, J.M.; Stambaugh, K.A.; Watts, J.L.

    1982-07-30

    The Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Moored Pipe/Mobile Platform (MP-Squared) Design Study was carried out to investigate an innovative approach to the moored floating OTEC plant. In the past, a number of concepts have been examined by NOAA for floating OTEC plants. These concepts have considered various configurations for platforms, cold water pipes and mooring systems. In most cases the cold water pipe (CWP) was permanently attached to the platform and the platform was permanently moored on station. Even though CWP concepts incorporating articulated joints or flexible pipes were used, the CWP stresses induced by platform motion were frequently excessive and beyond the design limits of the CWP. This was especially true in the survival (100-year storm) case. It may be feasible that the concept of a permanently moored CWP attached through a flexible transition CWP to the platform could reduce the degree of technical risk by de-coupling the CWP from the motions of the platform. In addition, if the platform is capable of disconnecting from the CWP during survival conditions, even less technical risk may be inherent in the OTEC system. The MP-Squared Design Study was an engineering evaluation of the concepts described above. The effort has been carried through to the conceptual design level, and culminated in model tests in an experimental wave basin.

  19. Estimated United States Transportation Energy Use 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C A; Simon, A J; Belles, R D

    2011-11-09

    A flow chart depicting energy flow in the transportation sector of the United States economy in 2005 has been constructed from publicly available data and estimates of national energy use patterns. Approximately 31,000 trillion British Thermal Units (trBTUs) of energy were used throughout the United States in transportation activities. Vehicles used in these activities include automobiles, motorcycles, trucks, buses, airplanes, rail, and ships. The transportation sector is powered primarily by petroleum-derived fuels (gasoline, diesel and jet fuel). Biomass-derived fuels, electricity and natural gas-derived fuels are also used. The flow patterns represent a comprehensive systems view of energy used within the transportation sector.

  20. Using probabilistic modeling to evaluate human exposure to organotin in drinking water transported by polyvinyl chloride pipe.

    PubMed

    Fristachi, Anthony; Xu, Ying; Rice, Glenn; Impellitteri, Christopher A; Carlson-Lynch, Heather; Little, John C

    2009-11-01

    The leaching of organotin (OT) heat stabilizers from polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipes used in residential drinking water systems may affect the quality of drinking water. These OTs, principally mono- and di-substituted species of butyltins and methyltins, are a potential health concern because they belong to a broad class of compounds that may be immune, nervous, and reproductive system toxicants. In this article, we develop probability distributions of U.S. population exposures to mixtures of OTs encountered in drinking water transported by PVC pipes. We employed a family of mathematical models to estimate OT leaching rates from PVC pipe as a function of both surface area and time. We then integrated the distribution of estimated leaching rates into an exposure model that estimated the probability distribution of OT concentrations in tap waters and the resulting potential human OT exposures via tap water consumption. Our study results suggest that human OT exposures through tap water consumption are likely to be considerably lower than the World Health Organization (WHO) "safe" long-term concentration in drinking water (150 microg/L) for dibutyltin (DBT)--the most toxic of the OT considered in this article. The 90th percentile average daily dose (ADD) estimate of 0.034 +/- 2.92 x 10(-4)microg/kg day is approximately 120 times lower than the WHO-based ADD for DBT (4.2 microg/kg day).

  1. Three-dimensional shape measurement system applied to superficial inspection of non-metallic pipes for the hydrocarbons transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arciniegas, Javier R.; González, Andrés. L.; Quintero, L. A.; Contreras, Carlos R.; Meneses, Jaime E.

    2014-05-01

    Three-dimensional shape measurement is a subject that consistently produces high scientific interest and provides information for medical, industrial and investigative applications, among others. In this paper, it is proposed to implement a three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction system for applications in superficial inspection of non-metallic pipes for the hydrocarbons transport. The system is formed by a CCD camera, a video-projector and a laptop and it is based on fringe projection technique. System functionality is evidenced by evaluating the quality of three-dimensional reconstructions obtained, which allow observing the failures and defects on the study object surface.

  2. Numerical study of finned heat pipe-assisted latent heat thermal energy storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiari, Saeed; Qiu, Songgang; Mahdavi, Mahboobe

    2014-11-01

    In the present study the thermal characteristics of a finned heat pipe-assisted latent heat thermal energy storage system are investigated numerically. A transient two dimensional finite volume based model employing enthalpy-porosity technique is implemented to analyze the performance of a thermal energy storage unit with square container and high melting temperature phase change material. The effects of heat pipe spacing, fin length and numbers as well as the influence of natural convection on the thermal response of the thermal energy storage unit have been studied. The obtained results reveal that the natural convection has considerable effect on the melting process of the phase change material. Increasing the number of heat pipes leads to the increase of melting rate and the decrease of base wall temperature. Also, the increase of fin length results in the decrease of temperature difference within the phase change material in the container, providing more uniform temperature distribution. Furthermore, it is showed that the number of fins does not affect the performance of the system considerably.

  3. The air transportation/energy system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The changing pattern of transportation is discussed, and the energy intensiveness of various modes of transportation is also analyzed. Sociopsychological data affecting why people travel by air are presented, along with governmental regulation and air transportation economics. The aviation user tax structure is shown in tabular form.

  4. Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Bobs Candies, Inc. produces some 24 million pounds of candy a year, much of it 'Christmas candy.' To meet Christmas demand, it must produce year-round. Thousands of cases of candy must be stored a good part of the year in two huge warehouses. The candy is very sensitive to temperature. The warehouses must be maintained at temperatures of 78-80 degrees Fahrenheit with relative humidities of 38- 42 percent. Such precise climate control of enormous buildings can be very expensive. In 1985, energy costs for the single warehouse ran to more than $57,000 for the year. NASA and the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) were adapting heat pipe technology to control humidity in building environments. The heat pipes handle the jobs of precooling and reheating without using energy. The company contacted a FSEC systems engineer and from that contact eventually emerged a cooperative test project to install a heat pipe system at Bobs' warehouses, operate it for a period of time to determine accurately the cost benefits, and gather data applicable to development of future heat pipe systems. Installation was completed in mid-1987 and data collection is still in progress. In 1989, total energy cost for two warehouses, with the heat pipes complementing the air conditioning system was $28,706, and that figures out to a cost reduction.

  5. Transportation Energy Data Book, Edition 18

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Stacy C.

    1998-09-01

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 18 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Transportation Technologies in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. This edition of the Data Book has 11 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2 - energy Chapter 3 - emissions; Chapter 4 - transportation and the economy; Chapter 5 - highway vehicles; Chapter 6 - Light vehicles; Chapter 7 - heavy vehicles; Chapter 8 - alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 9 - fleet vehicles; Chapter 10 - household vehicles; and Chapter 11 - nonhighway modes. The sources used represent the latest available data.

  6. Transportation Energy Data Book, Edition 19

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, S.C.

    1999-09-01

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 19 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Transportation Technologies in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. The latest editions of the Data Book are available to a larger audience via the Internet (http://www-cta.ornl.gov/data/tedb.htm).

  7. Transportation energy conservation data book: Edition 4

    SciTech Connect

    Kulp, G.; Shonka, D.B.; Collins, M.J.; Murphy, B.J.; Reed, K.J.

    1980-09-01

    This is the fourth edition of the Transportation Energy Conservation Data Book, a statistical compendium compiled and published by ORNL for DOE. Secondary data on transportation characteristics by mode, on transportation energy use, and on other related variables are presented in tabular and/or graphic form. All major modes of transportation are represented: highway, air, rail, marine, and pipeline. The six main chapters focus on various characteristics of the transportation sector including (1) modal characteristics, (2) current energy use, efficiency and conservation, (3) projections of modal energy use, (4) impact of government activities, (5) supply and cost of energy, and (6) general demographic and economic characteristics. Included in the tables and figures are the following transportation stock and use statistics: number of vehicles, vehicle-miles traveled, passenger-miles and freight ton-miles, fleet characteristics, household automobile ownership, size mix of automobiles, vehicle travel characteristics, and commuting patterns. Energy characteristics presented include energy use by fuel source and transportation mode, energy intensity figures by mode, indirect energy use, production as a percent of consumption, imports as a percent of domestic production, energy prices from the wellhead to the retail outlet, and alternative fuels.

  8. 49 CFR 192.279 - Copper pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Copper pipe. 192.279 Section 192.279 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Copper pipe. Copper pipe may not be threaded except that copper pipe used for joining screw fittings...

  9. 49 CFR 192.279 - Copper pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Copper pipe. 192.279 Section 192.279 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Copper pipe. Copper pipe may not be threaded except that copper pipe used for joining screw fittings...

  10. 49 CFR 192.279 - Copper pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Copper pipe. 192.279 Section 192.279 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Copper pipe. Copper pipe may not be threaded except that copper pipe used for joining screw fittings...

  11. 49 CFR 192.279 - Copper pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Copper pipe. 192.279 Section 192.279 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Copper pipe. Copper pipe may not be threaded except that copper pipe used for joining screw fittings...

  12. 49 CFR 192.279 - Copper pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Copper pipe. 192.279 Section 192.279 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Copper pipe. Copper pipe may not be threaded except that copper pipe used for joining screw fittings...

  13. Transportation Energy Use and Conservation Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirst, Eric

    1973-01-01

    Analyzes transportation energy consumption and energy intensiveness for inter-city freight and passenger traffic and urban passenger traffic with the definition of energy intensiveness as Btu per ton-mile or per passenger-mile. Indicates that public education is one of three ways to achieve the goals of energy conservation. (CC)

  14. Transportation energy data book: edition 16

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, S.C.; McFarlin, D.N.

    1996-07-01

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 16 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Transportation Technologies in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. Each of the major transportation modes is treated in separate chapters or sections. Chapter 1 compares U.S. transportation data with data from other countries. Aggregate energy use and energy supply data for all modes are presented in Chapter 2. The highway mode, which accounts for over three-fourths of total transportation energy consumption, is dealt with in Chapter 3. Topics in this chapter include automobiles, trucks, buses, fleet vehicles, federal standards, fuel economies, and high- occupancy vehicle lane data. Household travel behavior characteristics are displayed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 contains information on alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles. Chapter 6 covers the major nonhighway modes: air, water, and rail. The last chapter, Chapter 7, presents data on environmental issues relating to transportation.

  15. Squaring the Circle: Geometric Skewness and Symmetry Breaking for Passive Scalar Transport in Ducts and Pipes.

    PubMed

    Aminian, Manuchehr; Bernardi, Francesca; Camassa, Roberto; McLaughlin, Richard M

    2015-10-01

    We study the role geometry plays in the emergence of asymmetries in diffusing passive scalars advected by pressure-driven flows in ducts and pipes of different aspect ratios. We uncover nonintuitive, multi-time-scale behavior gauged by a new statistic, which we term "geometric skewness" S^{G}, which measures instantaneously forming asymmetries at short times due to flow geometry. This signature distinguishes elliptical pipes of any aspect ratio, for which S^{G}=0, from rectangular ducts whose S^{G} is generically nonzero, and, interestingly, shows that a special duct of aspect ratio ≈0.53335 behaves like a circular pipe as its geometric skewness vanishes. Using a combination of exact solutions, novel short-time asymptotics, and Monte Carlo simulations, we establish the relevant time scales for plateaus and extrema in the evolution of the skewness and kurtosis for our class of geometries. For ducts limiting to channel geometries, we present new exact, single-series formulas for the first four moments on slices used to benchmark Monte Carlo simulations. PMID:26550727

  16. Flexible ocean upwelling pipe

    DOEpatents

    Person, Abraham

    1980-01-01

    In an ocean thermal energy conversion facility, a cold water riser pipe is releasably supported at its upper end by the hull of the floating facility. The pipe is substantially vertical and has its lower end far below the hull above the ocean floor. The pipe is defined essentially entirely of a material which has a modulus of elasticity substantially less than that of steel, e.g., high density polyethylene, so that the pipe is flexible and compliant to rather than resistant to applied bending moments. The position of the lower end of the pipe relative to the hull is stabilized by a weight suspended below the lower end of the pipe on a flexible line. The pipe, apart from the weight, is positively buoyant. If support of the upper end of the pipe is released, the pipe sinks to the ocean floor, but is not damaged as the length of the line between the pipe and the weight is sufficient to allow the buoyant pipe to come to a stop within the line length after the weight contacts the ocean floor, and thereafter to float submerged above the ocean floor while moored to the ocean floor by the weight. The upper end of the pipe, while supported by the hull, communicates to a sump in the hull in which the water level is maintained below the ambient water level. The sump volume is sufficient to keep the pipe full during heaving of the hull, thereby preventing collapse of the pipe.

  17. Pipe Explorer{trademark} surveying system. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-06-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Chicago Operations Office and the DOE`s Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) developed a Large Scale Demonstration Project (LSDP) at the Chicago Pile-5 Research Reactor (CP-5) at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL). The objective of the LSDP is to demonstrate potentially beneficial decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) technologies in comparison with current baseline technologies. The Pipe Explorer{trademark} system was developed by Science and Engineering Associates, Inc. (SEA), Albuquerque, NM as a deployment method for transporting a variety of survey tools into pipes and ducts. Tools available for use with the system include alpha, beta and gamma radiation detectors; video cameras; and pipe locator beacons. Different versions of this technology have been demonstrated at three other sites; results of these demonstrations are provided in an earlier Innovative Technology Summary Report. As part of a D and D project, characterization radiological contamination inside piping systems is necessary before pipes can be recycled, remediated or disposed. This is usually done manually by surveying over the outside of the piping only, with limited effectiveness and risk of worker exposure. The pipe must be accessible to workers, and embedded pipes in concrete or in the ground would have to be excavated at high cost and risk of exposure to workers. The advantage of the Pipe Explorer is its ability to perform in-situ characterization of pipe internals.

  18. ERTS-C (Landsat 3) cryogenic heat pipe experiment definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennan, P. J.; Kroliczek, E. J.

    1975-01-01

    A flight experiment designed to demonstrate current cryogenic heat pipe technology was defined and evaluated. The experiment package developed is specifically configured for flight aboard an ERTS type spacecraft. Two types of heat pipes were included as part of the experiment package: a transporter heat pipe and a thermal diode heat pipe. Each was tested in various operating modes. Performance data obtained from the experiment are applicable to the design of cryogenic systems for detector cooling, including applications where periodic high cooler temperatures are experienced as a result of cyclic energy inputs.

  19. Moving around efficiently: Energy and transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermans, L. J. F.

    2013-06-01

    Worldwide, transportation takes almost 20% of the total energy use, and more than half of the oil consumption. By far the largest part is used by cars powered by internal combustion engines. The reason is simple: oil and gasoline are ideal energy carriers for transportation, since their energy density is extremely high. However, in terms of energy efficiency the internal combustion engine has a poor performance: about 25% only. How does this compare with electric cars? What are the alternative transportation systems and their efficiencies anyway? In this lecture we will analyse the efficiency of various transport systems, using elementary physics principles. We will look at cars, buses, trains and TGVs, ships, aircraft and zeppelins. Also the efficiency of human powered vehicles will be considered. Special attention is given to future mobile energy carriers like hydrogen, batteries and super capacitors.

  20. Transportation energy: data, forecasting, policy, and models

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, M.; Talvitie, A.; Hartgen, D.T.; Erlbaum, N.S.; Lee, M.E.H.

    1980-01-01

    The 16 papers in this report deal with the following areas: assessment of energy and petroleum consumption of different transportation modes in the Buffalo area; long-range forecasts of transportation energy consumption in New York state; use of disaggregate data to evaluate gasoline conservation policies: smaller cars and carpooling; how much fuel does vanpooling really save; evaluating the costs and benefits of plans to reduce gasoline queues; queuing and search delays due to gasoline station closings: simple equilibrium framework; demand for travel and the gasoline crisis; simple analytical model for understanding gasoline station lines; review of analytical models of gasoline demand during an energy emergency; direct energy accounts for urban transportation planning; transportation energy effects on urban growth: results of simulations; effect of urban development patterns on transportation energy use; travel demand and estimation of energy consumption by a constrained model; assessment of the Wharton EFA automobile demand model; forecasting equilibrium motor vehicle holdings by means of disaggregate models; and transportation system management actions - a study of the energy costs.

  1. Analyzing stability of compressible, swirling pipe flows using disturbance energy mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Arnab

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the spatial stability of compressible, viscous pipe flows with radius-dependent mean density profiles, subjected to solid body rotations. Holding the flow Reynolds number fixed, as the Rossby number is lowered (increased swirl), flow usually transitions from being stable to convectively unstable, finally leading to absolute instability. In this work, the role of compressibility on flow stability is characterized via specifying stratified mean densities where for certain choices the flow appears to be unconditionally stable while for others the situation is more complex with an initially convectively unstable state becoming stable as rotational speeds are progressively raised. A disturbance energy-based method is used to obtain physical understanding of the instability mechanisms in such flows with special emphasis on the role of compressibility. We observe that mechanisms due to pressure energy redistribution and entropy perturbations dominate as primary instability mechanisms instead of the energy due to shear in axial velocity, the primary source of instability in incompressible flows. With reference to pipe flows, we quantify the complex interplay between the various energy mechanisms to provide physical insight into the stability of compressible swirling flows.

  2. A Numerical Study of a Double Pipe Latent Heat Thermal Energy Storage System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabassum, Tonny

    Solar energy is an intermittent supply source of energy. To efficiently utilize this free renewable energy source some form of thermal energy storage devices are necessary. Phase change materials (PCMs), because of their high energy density storage capacity and near isothermal phase change characteristics, have proven to be promising candidates for latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) devices. Among the various LHTES devices for low temperature residential heating and cooling applications, the shell-and-tube type heat exchanging devices are the most simple to operate and can be easily fabricated. This work numerically investigates the buoyancy driven heat transfer process during melting (charging) of a commercial paraffin wax as PCM filling the annulus of a horizontal double pipe heat exchanger. The heated working fluid (water) is passing through the central tube of the annulus at a sufficiently high flow-rate and thereby maintaining an almost isothermal wall temperature at the inner pipe which is higher than the melting temperature of the PCM. The transient, two-dimensional coupled laminar momentum and energy equations for the model are suitably non-dimensionalized and are solved numerically using the enthalpy-porosity approach. Time-wise evolutions of the flow patterns and temperature distributions are presented through velocity vector fields and isotherm plots. In this study, two types of PCM filled annuli, a plain annulus and a strategically placed longitudinal finned annulus, are studied. The total energy stored, the total liquid fraction and the energy efficiency at different melting times are evaluated for three different operating conditions and the results are compared between the plain and finned annuli. The present study will provide guidelines for system thermal performance and design optimization of the shell-and-tube LHTES devices. .

  3. Transportation energy data book: Edition 13

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, S.C.; Strang, S.G.

    1993-03-01

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 13 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Transportation Technologies in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. Each of the major transportation modes -- highway, air, water, rail, pipeline -- is treated in separate chapters or sections. Chapter 1 compares US transportation data with data from seven other countries. Aggregate energy use and energy supply data for all modes are presented in Chapter 2. The highway mode, which accounts for over three-fourths of total transportation energy consumption, is dealt with in Chapter 3. Topics in this chapter include automobiles, trucks, buses, fleet automobiles, federal standards, fuel economies, and vehicle emission data. Household travel behavior characteristics are displayed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 contains information on alternative fuels and alternatively-fueled vehicles. The last chapter, Chapter 6, covers each of the nonhighway modes: air, water, pipeline, and rail, respectively.

  4. Transportation energy data book: Edition 13

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, S.C.; Strang, S.G.

    1993-03-01

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 13 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Transportation Technologies in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. Each of the major transportation modes - highway, air, water, rail, pipeline - is treated in separate chapters or sections. Chapter 1 compares US transportation data with data from seven other countries. Aggregate energy use and energy supply data for all modes are presented in Chapter 2. The highway mode, which accounts for over three-fourths of total transportation energy consumption, is dealt with in Chapter 3. Topics in this chapter include automobiles, trucks, buses, fleet automobiles, federal standards, fuel economies, and vehicle emission data. Household travel behavior characteristics are displayed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 contains information on alternative fuels and alternatively-fueled vehicles. The last chapter, Chapter 6, covers each of the nonhighway modes: air, water, pipeline, and rail, respectively.

  5. Transportation energy data book: Edition 12

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, S.C.; Morris, M.D.

    1992-03-01

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 12 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory under contract with the Office of Transportation Technologies in the Department of Energy. Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. Each of the major transportation modes--highway, air, water, rail, pipeline--is treated in separate chapters or sections. Chapter 1 compares US transportation data with data from seven other countries. Aggregate energy use and energy supply data for all modes are presented in Chapter 2. The highway mode, which accounts for over three-fourths of total transportation energy consumption, is dealt with in Chapter 3. Topics in this chapter include automobiles, trucks, buses, fleet automobiles, federal standards, fuel economies, and vehicle emission data. Household travel behavior characteristics are displayed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 contains information on alternative fuels and alternatively-fueled vehicles. The last chapter, Chapter 6, covers each of the nonhighway modes: air, water, pipeline, and rail, respectively.

  6. 78 FR 58383 - Renewal of Rail Energy Transportation Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-23

    ... TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Renewal of Rail Energy Transportation Advisory Committee AGENCY: Surface Transportation Board, DOT. ACTION: Notice of intent to renew charter. SUMMARY: In accordance with... the Surface Transportation Board (Board) intends to renew the charter of the Rail...

  7. Characterization of radioactive contamination inside pipes with the Pipe Explorer{trademark} system

    SciTech Connect

    Kendrick, D.T.; Cremer, C.D.; Lowry, W.; Cramer, E.

    1995-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy`s nuclear facility decommissioning program needs to characterize radiological contamination inside piping systems before the pipe can be recycled, remediated, or disposed. Science and Engineering associates, Inc. under contract with the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center has developed and demonstrated the Pipe Explorer{trademark} system, which uses an inverting membrane to transport various characterization sensors into pipes. The basic process involves inverting (turning inside out) a tubular impermeable membrane under air pressure. A characterization sensor is towed down the interior of the pipe by the membrane. Advantages of this approach include the capability of deploying through constrictions in the pipe, around 90{degrees} bends, vertically up and down, and in slippery conditions. Because the detector is transported inside the membrane (which is inexpensive and disposable), it is protected from contamination, which eliminates cross-contamination. Characterization sensors that have been demonstrated with the system thus far include: gamma detectors, beta detectors, video cameras, and pipe locators. Alpha measurement capability is currently under development. A remotely operable Pipe Explorer{trademark} system has been developed and demonstrated for use in DOE facilities in the decommissioning stage. The system is capable of deployment in pipes as small as 2-inch-diameter and up to 250 feet long. This paper describes the technology and presents measurement results of a field demonstration conducted with the Pipe Explorer{trademark} system at a DOE site. These measurements identify surface activity levels of U-238 contamination as a function of location in drain lines. Cost savings to the DOE of approximately $1.5 million dollars were realized from this one demonstration.

  8. On the calculation of turbulent heat and mass transport downstream from an abrupt pipe expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amano, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    A numerical study is reported of heat/mass transfer in the separated flow region created by an abrupt pipe expansion. Computations have employed a hybrid method of central and upwind finite differencing to solve the full Navier-Stokes equations with turbulent model (k approximately equal to epsilon). The study has given its main attention to the simulation of the region in the immediate vicinity of the wall, by formulating near-wall model for the evaluation of the mean generation and destruction rate of the epsilon equation. The computed results were compared with the experimental data and they showed generally encouraging agreement with the measurements.

  9. Transportation energy data book: Edition 15

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, S.C.

    1995-05-01

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 15 is a statistical compendium. Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. Purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. Each of the major transportation modes is treated in separate chapters or sections. Chapter I compares US transportation data with data from other countries. Aggregate energy use and energy supply data for all modes are presented in Chapter 2. The highway mode, which accounts for over three-fourths of total transportation energy consumption, is dealt with in Chapter 3. Topics in this chapter include automobiles, trucks, buses, fleet vehicles, federal standards, fuel economies, and high-occupancy vehicle lane data. Household travel behavior characteristics are displayed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 contains information on alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles. Chapter 6 covers the major nonhighway modes: air, water, and rail. The last chapter, Chapter 7, presents data environmental issues relating to transportation.

  10. Transportation energy trends and issues through 2030

    SciTech Connect

    DeCicco, J.M.

    1996-12-31

    Controlling transportation energy use looms as a serious challenge for the United States in the 21st century. Demand for transportation services is steadily growing, driven by increasing population, economic activity, and incomes. Few forces presently constrain growth in travel by the energy-intensive modes of automobile, truck, and air transportation. In contrast to other sectors of the economy, transportation energy efficiency improvements are nearly stagnant. Efficiency increases are now absent in highway modes; aircraft efficiency is improving, but not enough to offset rising air travel. Transportation is also the most oil-dependent sector of the economy as well as the country`s most rapidly growing source of greenhouse gas emissions. A conservative forecast indicates US transportation energy consumption rising from 23 Quads in 1990 to roughly 36 Quads by 2030; less conservative assumptions push the total to 43 Quads by 2030. Yet opportunities exist for efficiency improvements to counter a substantial portion of this growth. The most promising options are technological, with potential long-term efficiency improvements of threefold for light vehicles, twofold for aircraft, and 65 percent for heavy trucks. Combined with system efficiency changes to help limit growth of the energy-intensive modes, transportation energy use might be cut to 19 Quads by 2030. Pursuing cost-effective strategies to move the system toward such reduced energy intensiveness would be clearly valuable for the economy and environment. This paper examines these trends and options, and offers suggestions for policies that could lead to reductions in transportation energy use and its associated problems such as greenhouse gas emissions and oil dependence risks. 24 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Energy transport using natural convection boundary layers

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R

    1986-04-01

    Natural convection is one of the major modes of energy transport in passive solar buildings. There are two primary mechanisms for natural convection heat transport through an aperture between building zones: (1) bulk density differences created by temperature differences between zones; and (2) thermosyphon pumping created by natural convection boundary layers. The primary objective of the present study is to compare the characteristics of bulk density driven and boundary layer driven flow, and discuss some of the advantages associated with the use of natural convection boundary layers to transport energy in solar building applications.

  12. Transportation: Environment, energy and the economy

    SciTech Connect

    Petrakis, L.

    1993-01-11

    In the US, the transportation sector consumes over one quarter of the entire energy used, almost in its entirety as petroleum products, and in quantities greater than the total US domestic oil production. The transportation sector is responsible for a significant fraction of all emissions that either prevent US cities from achieving compliance with EPA air quality standards or have serious global change implications. Finally, the GDP (Gross Domestic Product) and employment due to the sector are low and incommensurate with the high fraction of energy that the transportation sector consumes. We examine below this situation in some detail and make recommendations for improvements.

  13. Energy pumping analysis of skating motion in a half pipe and on a level surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Z. C.; Xin, Ming

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, an energy pumping mechanism for locomotion is analysed. The pumping is accomplished by exerting forces perpendicular to the direction of motion. The paper attempts to demonstrate an interesting application of the classical mechanics to two sporting events: a person skating in a half pipe and a person travelling on a level surface on a skateboard. The equations of motion based on simplified mechanical models are derived using the Lagrange mechanics. The energy-pumping phenomenon is revealed through numerical simulations with simple pumping actions. The result presented in this paper can be used as an interesting class project in undergraduate mechanics or physics courses. It also motivates potential new applications of energy pumping in many engineering fields.

  14. Kinetic Relaxation Models for Energy Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Kazuo; Markowich, Peter; Takata, Shigeru

    2007-04-01

    Kinetic equations with relaxation collision kernels are considered under the basic assumption of two collision invariants, namely mass and energy. The collision kernels are of BGK-type with a general local Gibbs state, which may be quite different from the Gaussian. By the use of the diffusive length/time scales, energy transport systems consisting of two parabolic equations with the position density and the energy density as unknowns are derived on a formal level. The H theorem for the kinetic model is presented, and the entropy for the energy transport systems, which is inherited from the kinetic model, is derived. The energy transport systems for specific examples of the global Gibbs state, such as a power law with negative exponent, a cut-off power law with positive exponent, the Maxwellian, Bose-Einstein, and Fermi-Dirac distributions, arepresented.

  15. 49 CFR 195.114 - Used pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Used pipe. 195.114 Section 195.114 Transportation... PIPELINE Design Requirements § 195.114 Used pipe. Any used pipe installed in a pipeline system must comply with § 195.112 (a) and (b) and the following: (a) The pipe must be of a known specification and...

  16. Improving energy efficiency in the transportation sector

    SciTech Connect

    Plotkin, S.E.

    1994-12-31

    A primary characteristic of transportation in the United States is its high per capita energy consumption. The average US citizen consumes nearly five times as much energy for transportation as the average Japanese and nearly three times as much as the average citizen of France, Britain, or West Germany. The energy efficiency of US transportation has improved substantially over the past two decades (both absolutely and in comparison to Europe), and US travel volume has grown more slowly than in most of the developed world. However, the United States still consumes more than one-third of the world`s transport energy. Also, 96 percent of US transport energy is in the form of oil products. This is more oil than the United States produces, despite its position as one of the world`s largest oil producers. With current problems and expectation of continued growth in travel and energy use, Congress has increasingly turned to transportation energy conservation - in the form of improvements in the technical efficiency of travel, increases in load factors, reductions in travel demand, shifting to alternative fuels, and shifts to more efficient travel modes - as an important policy goal. For example, the Clean Air Amendments of 1990 incorporate transportation demand management as a critical tool in reducing urban air pollution. Legislation proposed in the 102d Congress sought rigorous new automobile and light truck fuel economy standards. With continued increases in U.S. oil imports, urban traffic congestion, and greenhouse gas emissions, and the failure of many urban areas to meet air quality standards, strong congressional interest in new energy conservation initiates is likely to continue.

  17. M"ossbauer study of corrosion and abrasion products in oil transporting pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Raul W.; Perez Mazariego, Jose Luis; Marquina, Vivianne; Marquina, Ma. Luisa; Ridaura, Rosalia; Martinez, Lorenzo

    2012-02-01

    It is known that one of the main technological problems in carbon steel oleoducts is the corrosion produced by different substances, such as water, carbon dioxide, sulfur, and microorganisms. In addition, if in such mixture there is sand, aggressive sludge can be form that abrasions material from the oleoduct. A room temperature M"ossbauer study of corroded material taken from different sites of oleoducts is presented. Most of the M"ossbauer spectra reveal the presence of nanoparticles, indicating that in these pipes the abrasion problem is severe. A preliminary identification of the oxidized samples suggests the presence of magnetite, and some Iron hydroxides. Further studies are in course in order to identify unambiguously the products present in the corroded materials.

  18. Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 31

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Stacy Cagle; Diegel, Susan W; Boundy, Robert Gary

    2012-08-01

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 31 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Program. Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the Data Book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. The latest edition of the Data Book is available to a larger audience via the Internet (cta.ornl.gov/data). This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2 energy; Chapter 3 highway vehicles; Chapter 4 light vehicles; Chapter 5 heavy vehicles; Chapter 6 alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 7 fleet vehicles; Chapter 8 household vehicles; Chapter 9 nonhighway modes; Chapter 10 transportation and the economy; Chapter 11 greenhouse gas emissions; and Chapter 12 criteria pollutant emissions. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include detailed source information for some tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions. A glossary of terms and a title index are also included for the reader s convenience.

  19. Transportation Energy Data Book. Edition 33

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Stacy Cagle; Williams, Susan E.; Boundy, Robert Gary

    2014-07-01

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 33 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Office. Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the Data Book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. The latest edition of the Data Book is available to a larger audience via the Internet (cta.ornl.gov/data). This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2 energy; Chapter 3 highway vehicles; Chapter 4 light vehicles; Chapter 5 heavy vehicles; Chapter 6 alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 7 fleet vehicles; Chapter 8 household vehicles; Chapter 9 nonhighway modes; Chapter 10 transportation and the economy; Chapter 11 greenhouse gas emissions; and Chapter 12 criteria pollutant emissions. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include detailed source information for some tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions. A glossary of terms and a title index are also included for the reader s convenience.

  20. Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 34

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Stacy Cagle; Williams, Susan E; Boundy, Robert Gary

    2015-08-01

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 34 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Office. Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the Data Book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. The latest edition of the Data Book is available to a larger audience via the Internet (cta.ornl.gov/data). This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2 energy; Chapter 3 highway vehicles; Chapter 4 light vehicles; Chapter 5 heavy vehicles; Chapter 6 alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 7 fleet vehicles; Chapter 8 household vehicles; Chapter 9 nonhighway modes; Chapter 10 transportation and the economy; Chapter 11 greenhouse gas emissions; and Chapter 12 criteria pollutant emissions. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include detailed source information for some tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions. A glossary of terms and a title index are also included for the reader s convenience.

  1. Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 32

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Stacy Cagle; Diegel, Susan W; Boundy, Robert Gary

    2013-08-01

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 32 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Office. Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the Data Book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. The latest edition of the Data Book is available to a larger audience via the Internet (cta.ornl.gov/data). This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2 energy; Chapter 3 highway vehicles; Chapter 4 light vehicles; Chapter 5 heavy vehicles; Chapter 6 alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 7 fleet vehicles; Chapter 8 household vehicles; Chapter 9 nonhighway modes; Chapter 10 transportation and the economy; Chapter 11 greenhouse gas emissions; and Chapter 12 criteria pollutant emissions. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include detailed source information for some tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions. A glossary of terms and a title index are also included for the reader s convenience.

  2. Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 27

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Stacy Cagle; Diegel, Susan W; Boundy, Robert Gary

    2008-06-01

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 27 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Planning, Budget Formulation, and Analysis, under the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) program in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. The latest editions of the Data Book are available to a larger audience via the Internet (cta.ornl.gov/data). This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2 energy; Chapter 3 highway vehicles; Chapter 4 light vehicles; Chapter 5 heavy vehicles; Chapter 6 alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 7 fleet vehicles; Chapter 8 household vehicles; and Chapter 9 nonhighway modes; Chapter 10 transportation and the economy; Chapter 11 greenhouse gas emissions; and Chapter 12 criteria pollutant emissions. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include detailed source information for some tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions. A glossary of terms and a title index are also included for the readers convenience.

  3. Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 25

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Stacy Cagle; Diegel, Susan W

    2006-06-01

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 25 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Planning, Budget Formulation, and Analysis, under the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) program in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. The latest editions of the Data Book are available to a larger audience via the Internet (cta.ornl.gov/data). This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2 - energy; Chapter 3 - highway vehicles; Chapter 4 - light vehicles; Chapter 5 - heavy vehicles; Chapter 6 - alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 7 - fleet vehicles; Chapter 8 - household vehicles; and Chapter 9- nonhighway modes; Chapter 10 - transportation and the economy; Chapter 11 - greenhouse gas emissions; and Chapter 12 - criteria pollutant emissions. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include detailed source information for some tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions. A glossary of terms and a title index are also included for the readers convenience.

  4. Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 26

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Stacy Cagle; Diegel, Susan W

    2007-07-01

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 26 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Planning, Budget Formulation, and Analysis, under the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) program in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. The latest editions of the Data Book are available to a larger audience via the Internet (cta.ornl.gov/data). This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2 - energy; Chapter 3 - highway vehicles; Chapter 4 - light vehicles; Chapter 5 - heavy vehicles; Chapter 6 - alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 7 - fleet vehicles; Chapter 8 - household vehicles; and Chapter 9- nonhighway modes; Chapter 10 - transportation and the economy; Chapter 11 - greenhouse gas emissions; and Chapter 12 - criteria pollutant emissions. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include detailed source information for some tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions. A glossary of terms and a title index are also included for the readers convenience.

  5. Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 24

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, S.C.

    2005-03-08

    The ''Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 24'' is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Planning, Budget Formulation, and Analysis, under the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) program in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. The latest editions of the Data Book are available to a larger audience via the Internet (cta.ornl.gov/data). This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2--energy; Chapter 3--highway vehicles; Chapter 4--light vehicles; Chapter 5--heavy vehicles; Chapter 6--alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 7--fleet vehicles; Chapter 8--household vehicles; and Chapter 9--nonhighway modes; Chapter 10--transportation and the economy; Chapter 11--greenhouse gas emissions; and Chapter 12--criteria pollutant emissions. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include detailed source information for some tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions. A glossary of terms and a title index are also included for the readers convenience.

  6. Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 23

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, S.C.

    2003-10-24

    The ''Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 23'' is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Planning, Budget Formulation, and Analysis, under the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) program in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. The latest editions of the Data Book are available to a larger audience via the Internet (www-cta.ornl.gov/data). This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2--energy; Chapter 3--highway vehicles; Chapter 4--light vehicles; Chapter 5--heavy vehicles; Chapter 6--alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 7--fleet vehicles; Chapter 8--household vehicles; and Chapter 9--nonhighway modes; Chapter 10--transportation and the economy; Chapter 11--greenhouse gas emissions; and Chapter 12--criteria pollutant emissions. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include detailed source information for some tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions. A glossary of terms and a title index are also included for the readers convenience.

  7. Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 28

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Stacy Cagle; Diegel, Susan W; Boundy, Robert Gary

    2009-06-01

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 28 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with U.S Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Program and the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. The latest edition of the Data Book are available to a larger audience via the Internet (cta.ornl.gov/data). This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2 energy; Chapter 3 highway vehicles; Chapter 4 light vehicles; Chapter 5 heavy vehicles; Chapter 6 alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 7 fleet vehicles; Chapter 8 household vehicles; and Chapter 9 nonhighway modes; Chapter 10 transportation and the economy; Chapter 11 greenhouse gas emissions; and Chapter 12 criteria pollutant emissions. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include detailed source information for some tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions. A glossary of terms and a title index are also included for the readers convenience.

  8. Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 30

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Stacy Cagle; Diegel, Susan W; Boundy, Robert Gary

    2011-07-01

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 30 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Program. Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the Data Book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. The latest edition of the Data Book is available to a larger audience via the Internet (cta.ornl.gov/data). This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2 energy; Chapter 3 highway vehicles; Chapter 4 light vehicles; Chapter 5 heavy vehicles; Chapter 6 alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 7 fleet vehicles; Chapter 8 household vehicles; Chapter 9 nonhighway modes; Chapter 10 transportation and the economy; Chapter 11 greenhouse gas emissions; and Chapter 12 criteria pollutant emissions. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include detailed source information for some tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions. A glossary of terms and a title index are also included for the reader s convenience.

  9. Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 29

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Stacy Cagle; Diegel, Susan W; Boundy, Robert Gary

    2010-07-01

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 29 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Program. Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the Data Book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. The latest edition of the Data Book is available to a larger audience via the Internet (cta.ornl.gov/data). This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2 energy; Chapter 3 highway vehicles; Chapter 4 light vehicles; Chapter 5 heavy vehicles; Chapter 6 alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 7 fleet vehicles; Chapter 8 household vehicles; Chapter 9 nonhighway modes; Chapter 10 transportation and the economy; Chapter 11 greenhouse gas emissions; and Chapter 12 criteria pollutant emissions. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include detailed source information for some tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions. A glossary of terms and a title index are also included for the reader s convenience.

  10. Two-Pipe Heat-Transfer Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Device like heat pipe transports heat over long distance with negligible loss in temperature, though with considerably smaller total weight. Uses no pumps or other mechanical means to move working fluid: Instead converts part of available thermal energy to kinetic energy upon vaporization. Vapor carries thermal energy in form of latent heat of vaporization. Delivers thermal energy with drop in temperature of only fraction of degree from source sink.

  11. Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 21

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, S.C.

    2001-09-13

    The ''Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 21'' is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Transportation Technologies in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. The latest editions of the Data Book are available to a larger audience via the Internet (www-cta.ornl.gov/data/tedb.htm). This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2--energy; Chapter 3--greenhouse gas emissions; Chapter 4--criteria pollutant emissions; Chapter 5--transportation and the economy; Chapter 6--highway vehicles; Chapter 7--light vehicles; Chapter 8--heavy vehicles; Chapter 9--alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 10--fleet vehicles; Chapter 11--household vehicles; and Chapter 12--nonhighway modes. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include detailed source information for some tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions. A glossary of terms and a title index are also included for the readers convenience.

  12. Transportation Energy Data Book (Edition 20)

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, S.C.

    2000-10-09

    The ''Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 20'' is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Transportation Technologies in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. The latest editions of the Data Book are available to a larger audience via the Internet (www-cta.ornl.gov/data/tedb.htm). This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2--energy; Chapter 3--greenhouse gas emissions; Chapter 4--criteria pollutant emissions; Chapter 5--transportation and the economy; Chapter 6--highway vehicles; Chapter 7--light vehicles; Chapter 8--heavy vehicles; Chapter 9--alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 10--fleet vehicles; Chapter 11--household vehicles; and Chapter 12--nonhighway modes. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include detailed source information for some tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions. A glossary of terms and a title index are also included for the readers convenience.

  13. Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 14

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, S.C.

    1994-05-01

    Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. Each of the major transportation modes is treated in separate chapters or sections. Chapter 1 compares US transportation data with data from other countries. Aggregate energy use and energy supply data for all modes are presented in Chapter 2. The highway mode, which accounts for over three-fourths of total transportation energy consumption, is dealt with in Chapter 3. Topics in this chapter include automobiles, trucks, buses, fleet vehicles, federal standards, fuel economies, and high-occupancy vehicle lane data. Household travel behavior characteristics are displayed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 contains information on alternative fuels and alternatively-fueled vehicles. Chapter 6 covers the major nonhighway modes: air, water, and rail. The last chapter, Chapter 7, presents data environmental issues relating to transportation.

  14. Conservation and renewable energy technologies for transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    The Office of Transportation Technologies (OTT) is charged with long-term, high-risk, and potentially high-payoff research and development of promising transportation technologies that are unlikely to be undertaken by the private sector alone. OTT activities are designed to develop an advanced technology base within the US transportation industry for future manufacture of more energy-efficient, fuel-flexible, and environmentally sound transportation systems. OTT operations are focused on three areas: advanced automotive propulsion systems including gas turbines, low heat rejection diesel, and electric vehicle technologies; advanced materials development and tribology research; and research, development, demonstration, test, and evaluation (including field testing in fleet operations) of alternative fuels. Five papers describing the transportation technologies program have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  15. Conservation and renewable energy technologies for transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-11-01

    The Office of Transportation Technologies (OTT) is charged with long-term, high-risk, and potentially high-payoff research and development of promising transportation technologies that are unlikely to be undertaken by the private sector alone. OTT activities are designed to develop an advanced technology base within the U.S. transportation industry for future manufacture of more energy-efficient, fuel-flexible, and environmentally sound transportation systems. OTT operations are focused on three areas: advanced automotive propulsion systems including gas turbines, low heat rejection diesel, and electric vehicle technologies; advanced materials development and tribology research; and research, development, demonstration, test, and evaluation (including field testing in fleet operations) of alternative fuels. Five papers describing the transportation technologies program have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  16. Energy transport in crystalline DNA composites

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zaoli; Xu, Shen; Tang, Xiaoduan; Wang, Xinwei

    2014-01-15

    This work reports on the synthesis of crystalline DNA-composited films and microfibers, and details the study of thermal energy transport in them. The transient electro-thermal technique is used to characterize the thermal transport in DNA composite microfibers, and the photothermal technique is used to explore the thermal transport in the thickness direction of DNA films. Compared with microfibers, the DNA films are found to have a higher thermal transport capacity, largely due to the carefully controlled crystallization process in film synthesis. In high NaCl concentration solutions, the bond of the Na{sup +} ion and phosphate group aligns the DNA molecules with the NaCl crystal structure during crystallization. This results in significant enhancement of thermal transport in the DNA films with aligned structure.

  17. Interstate waste transport -- Emotions, energy, and environment

    SciTech Connect

    Elcock, D.

    1993-12-31

    This report applies quantitative analysis to the debate of waste transport and disposal. Moving from emotions and politics back to numbers, this report estimates potential energy, employment and environmental impacts associated with disposing a ton of municipal solid waste under three different disposal scenarios that reflect interstate and intrastate options. The results help provide a less emotional, more quantitative look at interstate waste transport restrictions.

  18. Interstate waste transport -- Emotions, energy, and environment

    SciTech Connect

    Elcock, D.

    1993-01-01

    This report applies quantitative analysis to the debate of waste transport and disposal. Moving from emotions and politics back to numbers, this report estimates potential energy, employment and environmental impacts associated with disposing a ton of municipal solid waste under three different disposal scenarios that reflect interstate and intrastate options. The results help provide a less emotional, more quantitative look at interstate waste transport restrictions.

  19. Energy transport in condensed phase

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.H.; West, M.L.; Wilson, W.E.

    1982-04-01

    The influence of track structure on chemical yields was studied for high LET radiation in nonpolar materials. The time-resolved fluorescence of benzene in cyclohexane irradiated by pulsed proton beams (0.85 to 13 MeV) show that the fluorescence decay becomes more nearly exponential with proton energy. Benzene fluorescence excited by pulsed alpha particles is quenched significantly less than that excited by pulsed protons; the difference in the radial distribution of absorbed energy is one possible explanation. The stochastic model of track structure can be used to explain the difference in the yield of hydrated electrons produced in aqueous solutions by pulsed alpha particles and deuterons of the same stopping power. 3 figures. (DLC)

  20. External artery heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernert, Nelson J. (Inventor); Ernst, Donald M. (Inventor); Shaubach, Robert M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An improved heat pipe with an external artery. The longitudinal slot in the heat pipe wall which interconnects the heat pipe vapor space with the external artery is completely filled with sintered wick material and the wall of the external artery is also covered with sintered wick material. This added wick structure assures that the external artery will continue to feed liquid to the heat pipe evaporator even if a vapor bubble forms within and would otherwise block the liquid transport function of the external artery.

  1. Heat pipe investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshburn, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    The OAO-C spacecraft has three circular heat pipes, each of a different internal design, located in the space between the spacecraft structural tube and the experiment tube, which are designed to isothermalize the structure. Two of the pipes are used to transport high heat loads, and the third is for low heat loads. The test problems deal with the charging of the pipes, modifications, the mobile tilt table, the position indicator, and the heat input mechanisms. The final results showed that the techniques used were adequate for thermal-vacuum testing of heat pipes.

  2. Heat Pipe Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, William B.; Simon, Justin I.; Webb, A. Alexander G.

    2014-01-01

    When volcanism dominates heat transport, a terrestrial body enters a heat-pipe mode, in which hot magma moves through the lithosphere in narrow channels. Even at high heat flow, a heat-pipe planet develops a thick, cold, downwards-advecting lithosphere dominated by (ultra-)mafic flows and contractional deformation at the surface. Heat-pipes are an important feature of terrestrial planets at high heat flow, as illustrated by Io. Evidence for their operation early in Earth's history suggests that all terrestrial bodies should experience an episode of heat-pipe cooling early in their histories.

  3. Mitigating Climate Change with Ocean Pipes: Influencing Land Temperature and Hydrology and Termination Overshoot Risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatkowski, L.; Caldeira, K.; Ricke, K.

    2014-12-01

    With increasing risk of dangerous climate change geoengineering solutions to Earth's climate problems have attracted much attention. One proposed geoengineering approach considers the use of ocean pipes as a means to increase ocean carbon uptake and the storage of thermal energy in the deep ocean. We use a latest generation Earth System Model (ESM) to perform simulations of idealised extreme implementations of ocean pipes. In our simulations, downward transport of thermal energy by ocean pipes strongly cools the near surface atmosphere - by up to 11°C on a global mean. The ocean pipes cause net thermal energy to be transported from the terrestrial environment to the deep ocean while increasing the global net transport of water to land. By cooling the ocean surface more than the land, ocean pipes tend to promote a monsoonal-type circulation, resulting in increased water vapour transport to land. Throughout their implementation, ocean pipes prevent energy from escaping to space, increasing the amount of energy stored in Earth's climate system despite reductions in surface temperature. As a consequence, our results indicate that an abrupt termination of ocean pipes could cause dramatic increases in surface temperatures beyond that which would have been obtained had ocean pipes not been implemented.

  4. High energy H- ion transport and stripping

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    During the Proton Driver design study based on an 8 GeV superconducting RF H{sup -} linac, a major concern is the feasibility of transport and injection of high energy H{sup -} ions because the energy of H{sup -} beam would be an order of magnitude higher than the existing ones. This paper will focus on two key technical issues: (1) stripping losses during transport (including stripping by blackbody radiation, magnetic field and residual gases); (2) stripping efficiency of carbon foil during injection.

  5. Performance of a heat pipe solar collector

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, K.A.R.; Abogderah, M.M.

    1998-02-01

    This paper presents a comparative study between theoretical predictions and experimental results of a flat-plate solar collector with heat pipes. The theoretical model for the heat pipe solar collector is based upon the method by Duffie and Beckman (1980), modified to use heat pipes for energy transport. The methanol filled heat pipes are self-contained devices whose evaporators are inserted under pressure in the flat plate of the solar collector and the heat exchange is carried out at their condensers. The evaporators contain a wick of one mesh layer to ensure a better distribution of the working fluid. The condensers are wickless and inclined 15 deg more than the inclination of the evaporators to facilitate the return of the condensate to the evaporators. The time constant of the heat pipe solar collector was calculated and found to be about 23 minutes. Also presented in this paper are comparative experimental results of the proposed solar collector and a conventional commercial solar collector. The two collectors were tested simultaneously. The instantaneous efficiencies of the heat pipe solar collector are lower than the conventional collector in the morning and higher when the heat pipes reach their operating temperatures.

  6. Anomalous dissipation and kinetic-energy distribution in pipes at very high Reynolds numbers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Wei, Bo-Bo; Hussain, Fazle; She, Zhen-Su

    2016-01-01

    A symmetry-based theory is developed for the description of (streamwise) kinetic energy K in turbulent pipes at extremely high Reynolds numbers (Re's). The theory assumes a mesolayer with continual deformation of wall-attached eddies which introduce an anomalous dissipation, breaking the exact balance between production and dissipation. An outer peak of K is predicted above a critical Re of 10^{4}, in good agreement with experimental data. The theory offers an alternative explanation for the recently discovered logarithmic distribution of K. The concept of anomalous dissipation is further supported by a significant modification of the k-ω equation, yielding an accurate prediction of the entire K profile. PMID:26871016

  7. Energy conservation and the transportation sector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The present status of the energy implications of the transportation systems in the United States was illustrated, with primary emphasis on the technologies and methods for achieving a substantial reduction in the associated energy price (approximately 25% of the nation's energy is consumed directly in the operation of these systems). These technologies may be classified as follows: (1) improvement of system efficiency (system operations or technological), (2) substitution for scarce energy resources (electrification, alternate fuels, use of man power, recycling), (3) curtailment of end use (managed population growth rate, education of citizenry, alternatives to personal transportation, improved urban planning, reduced travel incentives). Examples and illustrations were given. Thirty-four actions were chosen on the basis of a preliminary filtering process with the objective of: (1) demonstrating a methodological approach to arrive at logical and consistent conservation action packages, (2) recommending a viable and supportable specific set of actions.

  8. 49 CFR 195.112 - New pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false New pipe. 195.112 Section 195.112 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Design Requirements § 195.112 New pipe. Any new pipe installed in a pipeline system must...

  9. 49 CFR 195.112 - New pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false New pipe. 195.112 Section 195.112 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Design Requirements § 195.112 New pipe. Any new pipe installed in a pipeline system must...

  10. 49 CFR 195.424 - Pipe movement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pipe movement. 195.424 Section 195.424 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Operation and Maintenance § 195.424 Pipe movement. (a) No operator may move any line pipe,...

  11. 78 FR 33403 - Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Company, LLC; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-04

    ... provide an additional 525,000 dekatherms per day of natural gas transportation capacity from receipt... Energy Regulatory Commission Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Company, LLC; Notice of Intent To Prepare an... facilities by Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Company, LLC (Transco) in Pennsylvania, New Jersey,...

  12. Energy Conservation Guidelines - 4: Energy Conservation in School Transportation Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giesguth, John, Ed.; Scheingold, Edward, Ed.

    Recommended are practices for reducing energy consumed in the process of transporting school pupils. Among the areas in which energy conservation measures may be instituted are preventive bus maintenance, field trip coordination, bus driving practices, modified scheduling policies, and training of bus drivers. (WB)

  13. Energy Conservation in School Transportation Systems. Energy Conservation Guidelines 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giesguth, John, Ed.; Scheingold, Edward, Ed.

    Fourth in a series of four publications on energy conservation, this booklet offers basic guidelines for sound fuel reduction in school transportation. The pamphlet suggests ways to implement energy-saving practices, guidelines for preventive maintenance of school vehicles, a definition of the drivers' and superintendents' roles, school policies…

  14. Application of 3-dimensional radiation transport codes to the analysis of the CRBR prototypic coolant pipe chaseway neutron streaming experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Chatani, K. )

    1992-08-01

    This report summarizes the calculational results from analyses of a Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) prototypic coolant pipe chaseway neutron streaming experiment Comparisons of calculated and measured results are presented, major emphasis being placed on results at bends in the chaseway. Calculations were performed with three three-dimensional radiation transport codes: the discrete ordinates code TORT and the Monte Carlo code MORSE, both developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the discrete ordinates code ENSEMBLE, developed by Japan. The calculated results from the three codes are compared (1) with previously-calculated DOT3.5 two-dimensional results, (2) among themselves, and (3) with measured results. Calculations with TORT used both the weighted-difference and nodal methods. Only the weighted-difference method was used in ENSEMBLE. When the calculated results were compared to measured results, it was found that calculation-to-experiment (C/E) ratios were good in the regions of the chaseway where two-dimensional modeling might be difficult and where there were no significant discrete ordinates ray effects. Excellent agreement was observed for responses dominated by thermal neutron contributions. MORSE-calculated results and comparisons are described also, and detailed results are presented in an appendix.

  15. Low energy beam transport system developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudnikov, V.; Han, B.; Stockli, M.; Welton, R.; Dudnikova, G.

    2015-04-01

    For high brightness beam production it is important to preserve the brightness in the low energy beam transport system (LEBT) used to transport and match the ion beams to the next stage of acceleration, usually an RFQ. While electrostatic focusing can be problematic for high current beam transport, reliable electrostatic LEBT operation has been demonstrated with H- beams up to 60 mA. Now, however, it is commonly accepted that an optimal LEBT for high current accelerator applications consists of focusing solenoids with space charge compensation. Two-solenoid LEBTs are successfully used for high current (>100 mA) proton beam transport. Preservation of low emittances (~0.15 π mm-mrad) requires the addition of a heavy gas (Xe, Kr), which causes ~5% of proton loss in a 1 m long LEBT. Similar Xe densities would be required to preserve low emittances of H- beams, but such gas densities cause unacceptably high H- beam losses. A short LEBT with only one short solenoid, movable for RFQ matching, can be used for reduced negative ion stripping. A strong electrostatic-focusing LEBT has been successfully adopted for transport of high current H- beams in the SNS Front End. Some modifications of such electrostatic LEBTs are expected to improve the reliable transport of intense positive and negative ion beams without greatly degrading their low emittances. We concentrate on processes that determine the beam brightness degradation and on their prevention. Proposed improvements to the SNS electrostatic LEBT are discussed.

  16. High Energy Particle Transport Code System.

    2003-12-17

    Version 00 NMTC/JAM is an upgraded version of the code CCC-694/NMTC-JAERI97, which was developed in 1982 at JAERI and is based on the CCC-161/NMTC code system. NMTC/JAM simulates high energy nuclear reactions and nuclear meson transport processes. The applicable energy range of NMTC/JAM was extended in principle up to 200 GeV for nucleons and mesons by introducing the high energy nuclear reaction code Jet-Aa Microscopic (JAM) for the intra-nuclear cascade part. For the evaporation andmore » fission process, a new model, GEM, can be used to describe the light nucleus production from the excited residual nucleus. According to the extension of the applicable energy, the nucleon-nucleus non-elastic, elastic and differential elastic cross section data were upgraded. In addition, the particle transport in a magnetic field was implemented for beam transport calculations. Some new tally functions were added, and the format of input and output of data is more user friendly. These new calculation functions and utilities provide a tool to carry out reliable neutronics study of a large scale target system with complex geometry more accurately and easily than with the previous model. It implements an intranuclear cascade model taking account of the in-medium nuclear effects and the preequilibrium calculation model based on the exciton one. For treating the nucleon transport process, the nucleon-nucleus cross sections are revised to those derived by the systematics of Pearlstein. Moreover, the level density parameter derived by Ignatyuk is included as a new option for particle evaporation calculation. A geometry package based on the Combinatorial Geometry with multi-array system and the importance sampling technique is implemented in the code. Tally function is also employed for obtaining such physical quantities as neutron energy spectra, heat deposition and nuclide yield without editing a history file. The code can simulate both the primary spallation reaction and the

  17. 49 CFR 192.281 - Plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Plastic pipe. 192.281 Section 192.281... Plastic pipe. (a) General. A plastic pipe joint that is joined by solvent cement, adhesive, or heat fusion may not be disturbed until it has properly set. Plastic pipe may not be joined by a threaded joint...

  18. 49 CFR 192.281 - Plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Plastic pipe. 192.281 Section 192.281... Plastic pipe. (a) General. A plastic pipe joint that is joined by solvent cement, adhesive, or heat fusion may not be disturbed until it has properly set. Plastic pipe may not be joined by a threaded joint...

  19. 49 CFR 192.281 - Plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Plastic pipe. 192.281 Section 192.281... Plastic pipe. (a) General. A plastic pipe joint that is joined by solvent cement, adhesive, or heat fusion may not be disturbed until it has properly set. Plastic pipe may not be joined by a threaded joint...

  20. 49 CFR 192.281 - Plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Plastic pipe. 192.281 Section 192.281... Plastic pipe. (a) General. A plastic pipe joint that is joined by solvent cement, adhesive, or heat fusion may not be disturbed until it has properly set. Plastic pipe may not be joined by a threaded joint...

  1. 49 CFR 192.281 - Plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Plastic pipe. 192.281 Section 192.281... Plastic pipe. (a) General. A plastic pipe joint that is joined by solvent cement, adhesive, or heat fusion may not be disturbed until it has properly set. Plastic pipe may not be joined by a threaded joint...

  2. Pipe-to-pipe impact program

    SciTech Connect

    Alzheimer, J.M.; Bampton, M.C.C.; Friley, J.R.; Simonen, F.A.

    1984-06-01

    This report documents the tests and analyses performed as part of the Pipe-to-Pipe Impact (PTPI) Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. This work was performed to assist the NRC in making licensing decisions regarding pipe-to-pipe impact events following postulated breaks in high energy fluid system piping. The report scope encompasses work conducted from the program's start through the completion of the initial hot oil tests. The test equipment, procedures, and results are described, as are analytic studies of failure potential and data correlation. Because the PTPI Program is only partially completed, the total significance of the current test results cannot yet be accurately assessed. Therefore, although trends in the data are discussed, final conclusions and recommendations will be possible only after the completion of the program, which is scheduled to end in FY 1984.

  3. Energy dissipation and pressure decay during transients in viscoelastic pipes with an in-line valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meniconi, S.; Brunone, B.; Ferrante, M.; Massari, C.

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, the effect of a partially closed in-line valve, viscoelasticity, and unsteady friction on the transient behavior of a pressurized pipe is examined. Such an analysis is executed by considering global energy quantities evaluated by means of a one-dimensional numerical model calibrated on the basis of a huge amount of laboratory tests. In the numerical experiments, the effect of the initial conditions and in-line valve characteristics has been analyzed by considering different values of the initial Reynolds number, N0, in-line valve head loss coefficient, χ, and location, δ. By introducing dimensionless quantities, exponential laws are shown to interpolate the time-history of maxima of both pressure and global energy quantities reliably with the related coefficients being a function of N0, χ, and δ. Thus, the links between the decay of pressure peaks at single sections and the dissipation of the global kinetic and internal energy are established. Moreover, it is shown that a given decay of pressure peaks may derive from very different transients. This result has crucial implications to inverse transient analysis based on the evaluation of the pressure decay at a given section with particular attention to the uniqueness of the solution.

  4. Helicity fluctuations and turbulent energy production in rotating and non-rotating pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlandi, P.

    1995-01-01

    Finite-difference second-order accurate direct simulation of a turbulent pipe has been used to investigate how the turbulence production and dissipation change when a solid body rotation is applied. It is shown that when the helicity increases, the dissipation is reduced. It is asserted that to have a drag reduction the external action should be such as to disrupt the symmetry of right- and left-handed helical structures. In this study the Navier-Stokes equations in rotational form permit the turbulent energy production to be split into a part related to the energy cascade from large to small scales and into a part related to the convection by large scales. The full simulation data have shown the latter is greater than the former in the wall region and that, on the contrary, these two terms balance each other in the central region. From the pdf of the former, it has been shown how the vortical structures are changed in the wall region by the background radiation and how they are related to the changes in the energy production.

  5. An energy signature scheme for steam trap assessment and flow rate estimation using pipe-induced acoustic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olama, Mohammed M.; Allgood, Glenn O.; Kuruganti, Teja P.; Lake, Joe E.

    2012-06-01

    The US Congress has passed legislation dictating that all government agencies establish a plan and process for improving energy efficiencies at their sites. In response to this legislation, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has recently conducted a pilot study to explore the deployment of a wireless sensor system for a real-time measurement-based energy efficiency optimization framework within the steam distribution system within the ORNL campus. We make assessments on the real-time status of the distribution system by observing the state measurements of acoustic sensors mounted on the steam pipes/traps/valves. In this paper, we describe a spectral-based energy signature scheme that interprets acoustic vibration sensor data to estimate steam flow rates and assess steam traps health status. Experimental results show that the energy signature scheme has the potential to identify different steam trap health status and it has sufficient sensitivity to estimate steam flow rate. Moreover, results indicate a nearly quadratic relationship over the test region between the overall energy signature factor and flow rate in the pipe. The analysis based on estimated steam flow and steam trap status helps generate alerts that enable operators and maintenance personnel to take remedial action. The goal is to achieve significant energy-saving in steam lines by monitoring and acting on leaking steam pipes/traps/valves.

  6. An Energy Signature Scheme for Steam Trap Assessment and Flow Rate Estimation Using Pipe-Induced Acoustic Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Olama, Mohammed M; Allgood, Glenn O; Kuruganti, Phani Teja; Lake, Joe E

    2012-01-01

    The US Congress has passed legislation dictating that all government agencies establish a plan and process for improving energy efficiencies at their sites. In response to this legislation, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has recently conducted a pilot study to explore the deployment of a wireless sensor system for a real-time measurement-based energy efficiency optimization framework within the steam distribution system within the ORNL campus. We make assessments on the real-time status of the distribution system by observing the state measurements of acoustic sensors mounted on the steam pipes/traps/valves. In this paper, we describe a spectral-based energy signature scheme that interprets acoustic vibration sensor data to estimate steam flow rates and assess steam traps health status. Experimental results show that the energy signature scheme has the potential to identify different steam trap health status and it has sufficient sensitivity to estimate steam flow rate. Moreover, results indicate a nearly quadratic relationship over the test region between the overall energy signature factor and flow rate in the pipe. The analysis based on estimated steam flow and steam trap status helps generate alerts that enable operators and maintenance personnel to take remedial action. The goal is to achieve significant energy-saving in steam lines by monitoring and acting on leaking steam pipes/traps/valves.

  7. Energy efficiency in buildings, industry and transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovanovic, Dobrica; Babic, Milun; Jovicic, Nebojsa; Gordic, Dusan

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature concerning the energy saving and outlines the importance of energy efficiency, particularly in three the most important areas: buildings, industry and transportation. Improving energy efficiency plays a crucial role in minimizing the societal and environmental impacts of economic growth and offers a powerful tool for achieving sustainable development by reducing the need for investment in new infrastructure, by cutting fuel costs, and by increasing competitiveness for businesses and welfare for consumers. It creates environmental benefits through reduced emissions of greenhouse gases and local air pollutants. It can offer social benefits in the form of increased energy security (through reduced dependence on fossil fuels, particularly when imported) and better energy services.

  8. Energy efficiency in buildings, industry and transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovanovic, Dobrica; Babic, Milun; Jovicic, Nebojsa; Gordic, Dusan

    2012-11-01

    This paper reviews the literature concerning the energy saving and outlines the importance of energy efficiency, particularly in three the most important areas: buildings, industry and transportation. Improving energy efficiency plays a crucial role in minimizing the societal and environmental impacts of economic growth and offers a powerful tool for achieving sustainable development by reducing the need for investment in new infrastructure, by cutting fuel costs, and by increasing competitiveness for businesses and welfare for consumers. It creates environmental benefits through reduced emissions of greenhouse gases and local air pollutants. It can offer social benefits in the form of increased energy security (through reduced dependence on fossil fuels, particularly when imported) and better energy services.

  9. Introduction to Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung

    2015-01-01

    This is the presentation file for the short course Introduction to Heat Pipes, to be conducted at the 2015 Thermal Fluids and Analysis Workshop, August 3-7, 2015, Silver Spring, Maryland. NCTS 21070-15. Course Description: This course will present operating principles of the heat pipe with emphases on the underlying physical processes and requirements of pressure and energy balance. Performance characterizations and design considerations of the heat pipe will be highlighted. Guidelines for thermal engineers in the selection of heat pipes as part of the spacecraft thermal control system, testing methodology, and analytical modeling will also be discussed.

  10. 49 CFR 192.277 - Ductile iron pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ductile iron pipe. 192.277 Section 192.277 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Ductile iron pipe. (a) Ductile iron pipe may not be joined by threaded joints. (b) Ductile iron pipe...

  11. 49 CFR 192.277 - Ductile iron pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ductile iron pipe. 192.277 Section 192.277 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Ductile iron pipe. (a) Ductile iron pipe may not be joined by threaded joints. (b) Ductile iron pipe...

  12. 49 CFR 192.277 - Ductile iron pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ductile iron pipe. 192.277 Section 192.277 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Ductile iron pipe. (a) Ductile iron pipe may not be joined by threaded joints. (b) Ductile iron pipe...

  13. 49 CFR 192.277 - Ductile iron pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ductile iron pipe. 192.277 Section 192.277 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Ductile iron pipe. (a) Ductile iron pipe may not be joined by threaded joints. (b) Ductile iron pipe...

  14. 49 CFR 192.277 - Ductile iron pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ductile iron pipe. 192.277 Section 192.277 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Ductile iron pipe. (a) Ductile iron pipe may not be joined by threaded joints. (b) Ductile iron pipe...

  15. Carbonless Transportation and Energy Storage in Future Energy Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, G. D.; Lamont, A. D.

    2001-01-01

    Electricity is the highest quality energy carrier, increasingly dominant throughout the world's energy infrastructure. Ultimately electricity use can expand to efficiently meet virtually all stationary energy applications, eliminating stationary end-use carbon emissions. This approach is unlikely to work in transportation, however, due to the high cost and low energy density of electricity storage. Chemical energy carriers, such as hydrogen, can more effectively serve transportation fuel and energy storage applications, offering much higher energy density at lower cost. Electrolytic hydrogen, extracted from steam with renewable energy, stored as a high pressure gas or cryogenic liquid, and reconverted to electricity in fuel cells and or used to power hydrogen vehicles, will reduce emissions from both transportation and electric generation. Renewable resources and modular electrolytic technology also permit decentralized hydrogen production, circumventing distribution issues and barriers to market entry. In contrast, sequestration-based fossil-fueled systems must achieve economies of scale by relying on centralized production and hierarchical transmission and distribution of electricity, hydrogen fuel, and carbon (dioxide).

  16. Energy and mass transport in the thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Harris, I.; Spencer, N. W.

    1979-01-01

    Examples illustrating the effects of large scale energy and mass transport in the thermosphere discussed include: (1) The seasonal variations reveal temperature, composition, and ionospheric anomalies involving energy exchange between the thermosphere and mesosphere. (2) The midnight temperature maximum in the thermosphere is interpreted as a signature of tidal waves emanating from the mesosphere and momentum coupling associated with ion drag. (3) The ionospheric storm in the F region illustrates the intricate effects of large scale atmospheric winds driven by magnetospheric energization processes. (4) Atmospheric signatures of Joule heating and electric field momentum coupling are markedly different.

  17. Energy transport between two integrable spin chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biella, Alberto; De Luca, Andrea; Viti, Jacopo; Rossini, Davide; Mazza, Leonardo; Fazio, Rosario

    2016-05-01

    We study the energy transport in a system of two half-infinite XXZ chains initially kept separated at different temperatures, and later connected and let free to evolve unitarily. By changing independently the parameters of the two halves, we highlight, through bosonization and time-dependent matrix-product-state simulations, the different contributions of low-lying bosonic modes and of fermionic quasiparticles to the energy transport. In the simulations we also observe that the energy current reaches a finite value which only slowly decays to zero. The general picture that emerges is the following. Since integrability is only locally broken in this model, a preequilibration behavior may appear. In particular, when the sound velocities of the bosonic modes of the two halves match, the low-temperature energy current is almost stationary and described by a formula with a nonuniversal prefactor interpreted as a transmission coefficient. Thermalization, characterized by the absence of any energy flow, occurs only on longer time scales which are not accessible with our numerics.

  18. Air transportation energy efficiency - Alternatives and implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, L. J.

    1976-01-01

    Results from recent studies of air transportation energy efficiency alternatives are discussed, along with some of the implications of these alternatives. The fuel-saving alternatives considered include aircraft operation, aircraft modification, derivative aircraft, and new aircraft. In the near-term, energy efficiency improvements should be possible through small improvements in fuel-saving flight procedures, higher density seating, and higher load factors. Additional small near-term improvements could be obtained through aircraft modifications, such as the relatively inexpensive drag reduction modifications. Derivatives of existing aircraft could meet the requirements for new aircraft and provide energy improvements until advanced technology is available to justify the cost of a completely new design. In order to obtain significant improvements in energy efficiency, new aircraft must truly exploit advanced technology in such areas as aerodynamics, composite structures, active controls, and advanced propulsion.

  19. Consumer Views on Transportation and Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, E.

    2003-08-01

    This report has been assembled to provide the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) with an idea of how the American public views various transportation, energy, and environmental issues. An issue that still needs attention from EERE is the finding that the public tends to lack information about hybrid vehicles, hydrogen, and alternative fuels for passenger vehicles. Also, the public seems to want fuel-efficiency improvements and cleaner fuels, but is not very willing to pay for these benefits. The public also says that it supports initiatives to promote energy conservation over increased production and that it is willing to make changes such as driving less in an effort to reduce oil consumption.

  20. Energy Conversion Advanced Heat Transport Loop and Power Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, C. H.

    2006-08-01

    The Department of Energy and the Idaho National Laboratory are developing a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) to serve as a demonstration of state-of-the-art nuclear technology. The purpose of the demonstration is two fold 1) efficient low cost energy generation and 2) hydrogen production. Although a next generation plant could be developed as a single-purpose facility, early designs are expected to be dual-purpose. While hydrogen production and advanced energy cycles are still in its early stages of development, research towards coupling a high temperature reactor, electrical generation and hydrogen production is under way. Many aspects of the NGNP must be researched and developed in order to make recommendations on the final design of the plant. Parameters such as working conditions, cycle components, working fluids, and power conversion unit configurations must be understood. Three configurations of the power conversion unit were demonstrated in this study. A three-shaft design with 3 turbines and 4 compressors, a combined cycle with a Brayton top cycle and a Rankine bottoming cycle, and a reheated cycle with 3 stages of reheat were investigated. An intermediate heat transport loop for transporting process heat to a High Temperature Steam Electrolysis (HTSE) hydrogen production plant was used. Helium, CO2, and an 80% nitrogen, 20% helium mixture (by weight) were studied to determine the best working fluid in terms cycle efficiency and development cost. In each of these configurations the relative component size were estimated for the different working fluids. The relative size of the turbomachinery was measured by comparing the power input/output of the component. For heat exchangers the volume was computed and compared. Parametric studies away from the baseline values of the three-shaft and combined cycles were performed to determine the effect of varying conditions in the cycle. This gives some insight into the sensitivity of these cycles to various

  1. Low energy beam transport system developments

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, V.; Han, B.; Stockli, M.; Welton, R.; Dudnikova, G.

    2015-04-08

    For high brightness beam production it is important to preserve the brightness in the low energy beam transport system (LEBT) used to transport and match the ion beams to the next stage of acceleration, usually an RFQ. While electrostatic focusing can be problematic for high current beam transport, reliable electrostatic LEBT operation has been demonstrated with H{sup −} beams up to 60 mA. Now, however, it is commonly accepted that an optimal LEBT for high current accelerator applications consists of focusing solenoids with space charge compensation. Two-solenoid LEBTs are successfully used for high current (>100 mA) proton beam transport. Preservation of low emittances (~0.15 π mm-mrad) requires the addition of a heavy gas (Xe, Kr), which causes ~5% of proton loss in a 1 m long LEBT. Similar Xe densities would be required to preserve low emittances of H{sup −} beams, but such gas densities cause unacceptably high H{sup −} beam losses. A short LEBT with only one short solenoid, movable for RFQ matching, can be used for reduced negative ion stripping. A strong electrostatic-focusing LEBT has been successfully adopted for transport of high current H{sup −} beams in the SNS Front End. Some modifications of such electrostatic LEBTs are expected to improve the reliable transport of intense positive and negative ion beams without greatly degrading their low emittances. We concentrate on processes that determine the beam brightness degradation and on their prevention. Proposed improvements to the SNS electrostatic LEBT are discussed.

  2. Startup analysis for a high temperature gas loaded heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sockol, P. M.

    1973-01-01

    A model for the rapid startup of a high-temperature gas-loaded heat pipe is presented. A two-dimensional diffusion analysis is used to determine the rate of energy transport by the vapor between the hot and cold zones of the pipe. The vapor transport rate is then incorporated in a simple thermal model of the startup of a radiation-cooled heat pipe. Numerical results for an argon-lithium system show that radial diffusion to the cold wall can produce large vapor flow rates during a rapid startup. The results also show that startup is not initiated until the vapor pressure p sub v in the hot zone reaches a precise value proportional to the initial gas pressure p sub i. Through proper choice of p sub i, startup can be delayed until p sub v is large enough to support a heat-transfer rate sufficient to overcome a thermal load on the heat pipe.

  3. 49 CFR 192.59 - Plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Plastic pipe. 192.59 Section 192.59 Transportation... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Materials § 192.59 Plastic pipe. (a) New plastic pipe... specification; and (2) It is resistant to chemicals with which contact may be anticipated. (b) Used plastic...

  4. 49 CFR 192.59 - Plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Plastic pipe. 192.59 Section 192.59 Transportation... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Materials § 192.59 Plastic pipe. (a) New plastic pipe... specification; and (2) It is resistant to chemicals with which contact may be anticipated. (b) Used plastic...

  5. 49 CFR 192.59 - Plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Plastic pipe. 192.59 Section 192.59 Transportation... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Materials § 192.59 Plastic pipe. (a) New plastic pipe... specification; and (2) It is resistant to chemicals with which contact may be anticipated. (b) Used plastic...

  6. 49 CFR 192.59 - Plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Plastic pipe. 192.59 Section 192.59 Transportation... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Materials § 192.59 Plastic pipe. (a) New plastic pipe... specification; and (2) It is resistant to chemicals with which contact may be anticipated. (b) Used plastic...

  7. 49 CFR 192.59 - Plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Plastic pipe. 192.59 Section 192.59 Transportation... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Materials § 192.59 Plastic pipe. (a) New plastic pipe... specification; and (2) It is resistant to chemicals with which contact may be anticipated. (b) Used plastic...

  8. 49 CFR 236.712 - Brake pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Brake pipe. 236.712 Section 236.712 Transportation... OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.712 Brake pipe. A pipe running from the engineman's brake valve through the train, used for the transmission of air...

  9. 49 CFR 236.712 - Brake pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Brake pipe. 236.712 Section 236.712 Transportation... OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.712 Brake pipe. A pipe running from the engineman's brake valve through the train, used for the transmission of air...

  10. 49 CFR 236.712 - Brake pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Brake pipe. 236.712 Section 236.712 Transportation... OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.712 Brake pipe. A pipe running from the engineman's brake valve through the train, used for the transmission of air...

  11. 49 CFR 236.712 - Brake pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Brake pipe. 236.712 Section 236.712 Transportation... OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.712 Brake pipe. A pipe running from the engineman's brake valve through the train, used for the transmission of air...

  12. 49 CFR 236.712 - Brake pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Brake pipe. 236.712 Section 236.712 Transportation... OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.712 Brake pipe. A pipe running from the engineman's brake valve through the train, used for the transmission of air...

  13. Technology development plan: Geotechnical survey systems for OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion) cold water pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valent, Philip J.; Riggins, Michael

    1989-04-01

    An overview is given of current and developing technologies and techniques for performing geotechnical investigations for siting and designing Cold Water Pipes (CWP) for shelf-resting Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power plants. The geotechnical in situ tools used to measure the required parameters and the equipment/systems used to deploy these tools are identified. The capabilities of these geotechnical tools and deployment systems are compared to the data requirements for the CWP foundation/anchor design, and shortfalls are identified. For the last phase of geotechnical data gathering for design, a drillship will be required to perform soil boring work, to obtain required high quality sediment samples for laboratory dynamic testing, and to perform deep penetration in situ tests. To remedy shortfalls and to reduce the future OTEC CWP geotechnical survey costs, it is recommended that a seafloor resting machine be developed to advance the friction cone penetrometer, and also probably a pressuremeter, to provide geotechnical parameters to shallow subseafloor penetrations on slopes of 35 deg and in water depths to 1300 m.

  14. Energy transport in the Anderson insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutman, D. B.; Protopopov, I. V.; Burin, A. L.; Gornyi, I. V.; Santos, R. A.; Mirlin, A. D.

    2016-06-01

    We study the heat conductivity in Anderson insulators in the presence of a power-law interaction. Particle-hole excitations built on localized electron states are viewed as two-level systems randomly distributed in space and energy and coupled due to electron-electron interaction. A small fraction of these states form resonant pairs that in turn build a complex network allowing for energy propagation. We identify the character of energy transport through this network and evaluate the thermal conductivity. For physically relevant cases of two-dimensional and three-dimensional spin systems with 1 /r3 dipole-dipole interaction (originating from the conventional 1 /r Coulomb interaction between electrons), the found thermal conductivity κ scales with temperature as κ ∝T3 and κ ∝T4 /3 , respectively. Our results may be of relevance also to other realizations of random spin Hamiltonians with long-range interactions.

  15. Electrohydrodynamic heat pipes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. B.

    1973-01-01

    An electrohydrodynamic heat pipe of radical design is proposed which substitutes polarization electrohydrodynamic force effects for capillarity in collecting, guiding, and pumping a condensate liquid phase. The discussed device is restricted to the use of dielectric liquids as working fluids. Because of the relatively poor thermal transport properties of these liquids, capillary heat pipes using these liquids have not been high performance devices. The employment of the electrohydrodynamic concept should enhance this performance and help fill the performance gap that exists in the temperature range from 250 F to 750 F for 'conventional' capillary heat pipes.

  16. Solar energy conversion using surface plasmons for broadband energy transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, L. M.

    1982-01-01

    A new strategy for efficient solar energy conversion based on parallel processing with surface plasmons is introduced. The approach is unique in identifying: (1) a broadband carrier with suitable range for energy transport, and (2) a technique to extract more energy from the more energetic photons, without sequential losses or unique materials for each frequency band. The aim is to overcome the fundamental losses associated with the broad solar spectrum and to achieve a higher level of spectrum splitting than has been possible in semiconductor systems.

  17. Pipe support

    DOEpatents

    Pollono, Louis P.

    1979-01-01

    A pipe support for high temperature, thin-walled piping runs such as those used in nuclear systems. A section of the pipe to be supported is encircled by a tubular inner member comprised of two walls with an annular space therebetween. Compacted load-bearing thermal insulation is encapsulated within the annular space, and the inner member is clamped to the pipe by a constant clamping force split-ring clamp. The clamp may be connected to pipe hangers which provide desired support for the pipe.

  18. Consistent energy treatment for radiation transport methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglass, Steven James

    The approximations used in the standard multigroup method and cross section condensation procedure introduce several known errors, such those caused by spectral core environment effects and the neglect of the energy and angular coupling of the flux when condensing the total cross section. In this dissertation, a multigroup formulation is developed which maintains direct consistency with the continuous energy or fine-group structure, exhibiting the accuracy of the detailed energy spectrum within the coarse-group calculation. Two methods are then developed which seek to invert the condensation process -- turning the standard one-way condensation (from fine-group to coarse-group) into the first step of a two-way iterative process. The first method is based on the previously published Generalized Energy Condensation, which established a framework for obtaining the finegroup flux by preserving the flux energy spectrum in orthogonal energy expansion functions, but did not maintain a consistent coarse-group formulation. It is demonstrated that with a consistent extension of the GEC, a cross section recondensation scheme can be used to correct for the spectral core environment error. This is then verified numerically in a 1D VHTR core. In addition, a more practical and efficient new method, termed the "Subgroup Decomposition (SGD) Method," is developed which eliminates the need for expansion functions altogether, and allows the fine-group flux to be decomposed from a consistent coarse-group flux with minimal additional computation or memory requirements. This method, as a special case of a more general spline-approximation for radiation transport, is shown to be highly effective in a cross section recondensation scheme, providing fine-group results in a fraction of the time generally necessary to obtain a fine-group solution. In addition, a whole-core BWR benchmark problem is generated based on operating reactor parameters, in 2D and 3D. This contributes to the furthering

  19. Development of cryogenic thermal control heat pipes. [of stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The development of thermal control heat pipes that are applicable to the low temperature to cryogenic range was investigated. A previous effort demonstrated that stainless steel axially grooved tubing which met performance requirements could be fabricated. Three heat pipe designs utilizing stainless steel axially grooved tubing were fabricated and tested. One is a liquid trap diode heat pipe which conforms to the configuration and performance requirements of the Heat Pipe Experiment Package (HEPP). The HEPP is scheduled for flight aboard the Long Duration Flight Exposure Facility (LDEF). Another is a thermal switch heat pipe which is designed to permit energy transfer at the cooler of the two identical legs. The third thermal component is a hybrid variable conductance heat pipe (VCHP). The design incorporates both a conventional VCHP system and a liquid trap diode. The design, fabrication and thermal testing of these heat pipes is described. The demonstrated heat pipe behavior including start-up, forward mode transport, recovery after evaporator dry-out, diode performance and variable conductance control are discussed.

  20. Pipe Dreams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milshtein, Amy

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the importance of attention to plumbing in college facilities, offering examples from various campuses. Addresses preventive maintenance, technology, and piping materials, including the debate between cast iron and PVC for drain pipes. (EV)

  1. Energy-pointwise discrete ordinates transport methods

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.L.; Asgari, M.; Tashakorri, R.

    1997-06-01

    A very brief description is given of a one-dimensional code, CENTRM, which computes a detailed, space-dependent flux spectrum in a pointwise-energy representation within the resolved resonance range. The code will become a component in the SCALE system to improve computation of self-shielded cross sections, thereby enhancing the accuracy of codes such as KENO. CENTRM uses discrete-ordinates transport theory with an arbitrary angular quadrature order and a Legendre expansion of scattering anisotropy for moderator materials and heavy nuclides. The CENTRM program provides capability to deterministically compute full energy range, space-dependent angular flux spectra, rigorously accounting for resonance fine-structure and scattering anisotropy effects.

  2. Energy transport in the marginal ice zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Tony W.; Squire, Vernon A.

    2001-09-01

    A novel approach to modeling ocean wave scattering in the marginal ice zone that uses the coherent potential approximation to compute the energy transport velocity is reported. The necessary theory is developed by considering sea ice floes to be thin elastic beams governed by the Euler-Bernoulli equation, with the open water surrounding each floe subject to the same equation with its material coefficients set to be very small quantities. This mathematical stratagem facilitates the solution of the problem and yields interesting results about the speed at which wave energy propagates through a marginal ice zone, the dispersion relation for a random mixture of ice floes and water, and the mean free path or attenuation coefficient. Results from the model are compared with data reported by Wadhams et al. [1988].

  3. 49 CFR 230.62 - Dry pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Dry pipe. 230.62 Section 230.62 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Pipes §...

  4. 49 CFR 230.62 - Dry pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dry pipe. 230.62 Section 230.62 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Pipes §...

  5. 49 CFR 230.62 - Dry pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Dry pipe. 230.62 Section 230.62 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Pipes §...

  6. 49 CFR 230.62 - Dry pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Dry pipe. 230.62 Section 230.62 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Pipes §...

  7. 49 CFR 230.62 - Dry pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Dry pipe. 230.62 Section 230.62 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Pipes §...

  8. High power densities from high-temperature material interactions. [in thermionic energy conversion and metallic fluid heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    Thermionic energy conversion (TEC) and metallic-fluid heat pipes (MFHPs), offering unique advantages in terrestrial and space energy processing by virtue of operating on working-fluid vaporization/condensation cycles that accept great thermal power densities at high temperatures, share complex materials problems. Simplified equations are presented that verify and solve such problems, suggesting the possibility of cost-effective applications in the near term for TEC and MFHP devices. Among the problems discussed are: the limitation of alkali-metal corrosion, protection against hot external gases, external and internal vaporization, interfacial reactions and diffusion, expansion coefficient matching, and creep deformation.

  9. An Overview of Long Duration Sodium Heat Pipe Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfeld, John H.; Ernst, Donald M.; Lindemuth, James E.; Sanzi, James L.; Geng, Steven M.; Zuo, Jon

    2004-01-01

    High temperature heat pipes are being evaluated for use in energy conversion applications such as fuel cells, gas turbine re-combustors, and Stirling cycle heat sources; with the resurgence of space nuclear power, additional applications include reactor heat removal elements and radiator elements. Long operating life and reliable performance are critical requirements for these applications. Accordingly long-term materials compatibility is being evaluated through the use of high temperature life test heat pipes. Thermacore International, Inc., has carried out several sodium heat pipe life tests to establish long term operating reliability. Four sodium heat pipes have recently demonstrated favorable materials compatibility and heat transport characteristics at high operating temperatures in air over long time periods. A 3l6L stainless steel heat pipe with a sintered porous nickel wick structure and an integral brazed cartridge heater has successfully operated at 650 to 700 C for over 115,000 hours without signs of failure. A second 3l6L stainless steel heat pipe with a specially-designed Inconel 60 I rupture disk and a sintered nickel powder wick has demonstrated over 83,000 hours at 600 to 650 C with similar success. A representative one-tenth segment Stirling Space Power Converter heat pipe with an Inconel 718 envelope and a stainless steel screen wick has operated for over 41 ,000 hours at nearly 700 0c. A hybrid (i.e. gas-fired and solar) heat pipe with a Haynes 230 envelope and a sintered porous nickel wick structure was operated for about 20,000 hours at nearly 700 C without signs of degradation. These life test results collectively have demonstrated the potential for high temperature heat pipes to serve as reliable energy conversion system components for power applications that require long operating lifetime with high reliability, Detailed design specifications, operating hi story, and test results are described for each of these sodium heat pipes. Lessons

  10. An Overview of Long Duration Sodium Heat Pipe Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfeld, John H.; Ernst, Donald M.; Lindemuth, James E.; Sanzi, James L.; Geng, Steven M.; Zuo, Jon

    2004-02-01

    High temperature heat pipes are being evaluated for use in energy conversion applications such as fuel cells, gas turbine re-combustors, and Stirling cycle heat sources; with the resurgence of space nuclear power, additional applications include reactor heat removal elements and radiator elements. Long operating life and reliable performance are critical requirements for these applications. Accordingly long-term materials compatibility is being evaluated through the use of high temperature life test heat pipes. Thermacore, Inc. has carried out several sodium heat pipe life tests to establish long term operating reliability. Four sodium heat pipes have recently demonstrated favorable materials compatibility and heat transport characteristics at high operating temperatures in air over long time periods. A 316L stainless steel heat pipe with a sintered porous nickel wick structure and an integral brazed cartridge heater has successfully operated at 650C to 700C for over 115,000 hours without signs of failure. A second 316L stainless steel heat pipe with a specially-designed Inconel 601 rupture disk and a sintered nickel powder wick has demonstrated over 83,000 hours at 600C to 650C with similar success. A representative one-tenth segment Stirling Space Power Converter heat pipe with an Inconel 718 envelope and a stainless steel screen wick has operated for over 41,000 hours at nearly 700C. A hybrid (i.e. gas-fired and solar) heat pipe with a Haynes 230 envelope and a sintered porous nickel wick structure was operated for about 20,000 hours at nearly 700C without signs of degradation. These life test results collectively have demonstrated the potential for high temperature heat pipes to serve as reliable energy conversion system components for power applications that require long operating lifetime with high reliability. Detailed design specifications, operating history, and test results are described for each of these sodium heat pipes. Lessons learned and future life

  11. Integrated energy management study. Energy efficient transport program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The Integrated Energy Management (IEM) Study investigated the practicality and feasibility of a closed-loop energy management system for transport aircraft. The study involved: (1) instrumentation and collection of in-flight data for a United Airlines 727-200 flying 80 revenue flights throughout the United Airlines network,(2) analysis of the in-flight data to select representative city pairs and establish operational procedures employed in flying a reference flight profile, (3) simulation of the reference profile in a fast-time model to verify the model and establish performance values against which to measure IEM benefits, (4) development of IEM algorithms, and (5) assessment of the IEM concept.

  12. Advanced thermal energy management: A thermal test bed and heat pipe simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barile, Ronald G.

    1986-01-01

    Work initiated on a common-module thermal test simulation was continued, and a second project on heat pipe simulation was begun. The test bed, constructed from surplus Skylab equipment, was modeled and solved for various thermal load and flow conditions. Low thermal load caused the radiator fluid, Coolanol 25, to thicken due to its temperature avoided by using a regenerator-heat-exchanger. Other possible solutions modeled include a radiator heater and shunting heat from the central thermal bus to the radiator. Also, module air temperature can become excessive with high avionics load. A second preoject concerning advanced heat pipe concepts was initiated. A program was written which calculates fluid physical properties, liquid and vapor pressure in the evaporator and condenser, fluid flow rates, and thermal flux. The program is directed to evaluating newer heat pipe wicks and geometries, especially water in an artery surrounded by six vapor channels. Effects of temperature, groove and slot dimensions, and wick properties are reported.

  13. Pressure drop of slush nitrogen flow in converging-diverging pipes and corrugated pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, Katsuhide; Okuyama, Jun; Nakagomi, Kei; Takahashi, Koichi

    2012-12-01

    Cryogenic slush fluids such as slush hydrogen and slush nitrogen are solid-liquid, two-phase fluids. As a functional thermal fluid, there are high expectations for use of slush fluids in various applications such as fuels for spacecraft engines, clean-energy fuels to improve the efficiency of transportation and storage, and as refrigerants for high-temperature superconducting equipment. Experimental flow tests were performed using slush nitrogen to elucidate pressure-drop characteristics of converging-diverging (C-D) pipes and corrugated pipes. In experimental results regarding pressure drop in two different types of C-D Pipes, i.e., a long-throated pipe and a short-throated pipe, each having an inner diameter of 15 mm, pressure drop for slush nitrogen in the long-throated pipe at a flow velocity of over 1.3 m/s increased by a maximum of 50-60% as compared to that for liquid nitrogen, while the increase was about 4 times as compared to slush nitrogen in the short-throated pipe. At a flow velocity of over 1.5 m/s in the short-throated pipe, pressure drop reduction became apparent, and it was confirmed that the decrease in pressure drop compared to liquid nitrogen was a maximum of 40-50%. In the case of two different types of corrugated pipes with an inner diameter of either 12 mm or 15 mm, a pressure-drop reduction was confirmed at a flow velocity of over 2 m/s, and reached a maximum value of 37% at 30 wt.% compared to liquid nitrogen. The greater the solid fractions, the smaller the pipe friction factor became, and the pipe friction factor at the same solid fraction showed a constant value regardless of the Reynolds number. From the observation of the solid particles' behavior using a high-speed video camera and the PIV method, the pressure-drop reduction mechanisms for both C-D and corrugated pipes were demonstrated.

  14. The development of mathematical model for cool down technique in the LNG pipe-line system

    SciTech Connect

    Hamaogi, Kenji; Takatani, Kouji; Kosugi, Sanai; Fukunaga, Takeshi

    1999-07-01

    An increase in demand for LNG as energy source can be expected since LNG is clean, in stable supply and produces low levels of carbon dioxide. Expansion of various LNG plants is planned. However, the optimal design of the LNG pipe-line systems has not yet been determined since the LNG transport phenomenon is not yet fully understood clearly. For example, in the LNG pipe-line system, large temperature gradients occur when the LNG transport starts. Therefore, although the necessity to cool down the pipe in order to minimize serious deformation is clear, the studies to understand it quantitatively have not been carried out. In this study, experiments on a commercial plant scale and a computer simulation, made up of structural analysis and two phase flow simulation were carried out to establish a prediction model of pipe deformation and to understand the phenomenon in the pipe.

  15. Carbonless Transportation and Energy Storage in Future Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lamont, A.D.; Berry, G.D.

    2001-01-17

    By 2050 world population is projected to stabilize near 10 billion. Global economic development will outpace this growth, achieving present European per capita living standards by quintupling the size of the global economy--and increasing energy use, especially electricity, substantially. Even with aggressive efficiency improvements, global electricity use will at least triple to 30 trillion kWh/yr in 2050. Direct use of fuels, with greater potential for efficiency improvement, may be held to 80 trillion kWh (289 EJ) annually, 50% above present levels (IPCC, 1996). Sustaining energy use at these or higher rates, while simultaneously stabilizing atmospheric greenhouse gas levels, will require massive deployment of carbon-conscious energy systems for electricity generation and transportation by the mid 21st Century. These systems will either involve a shift to non-fossil primary energy sources (such as solar, wind, biomass, nuclear, and hydroelectric) or continue to rely on fossil primary energy sources and sequester carbon emissions (Halmann, 1999). Both approaches share the need to convert, transmit, store and deliver energy to end-users through carbonless energy carriers.

  16. The NSNS High Energy Beam Transport Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raparia, D.; Alessi, J.; Lee, Y. Y.; Ruggiero, A. G.; Weng, W. T.

    1997-05-01

    In the NSNS design, a 160 meter long transport line connects the 1 GeV linac to an accumulator ring and provides the desired foot-print. The linac beam has a current of 56 mA and pulse length of about 1 ms. This line consists of forteen 90^circ FODO cells, and accommodates a 60^circ achromatic bend, an energy compressor, part of the injection system, and enough diagnostic devices to measure the beam quality before injection. To reduce the uncontrolled beam losses this line has four beam halo scrapers and very tight tolerances of both transverse and longitudinal beam dynamics under space charge conditions. The design of this line will be presented together with input beam parameters and acceptance criteria of the beam at the accumulator.

  17. Numerical Investigation of the effect of adiabatic section location on thermal performance of a heat pipe network with the application in thermal energy storage systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdavi, Mahboobe; Tiari, Saeed; Qiu, Songgang

    2015-11-01

    Latent heat thermal energy storage systems benefits from high energy density and isothermal storing process. However, the low thermal conductivity of the phase change material leads to prolong the melting or solidification time. Using a passive device such as heat pipes is required to enhance the heat transfer and to improve the efficiency of the system. In the present work, the performance of a heat pipe network specifically designed for a thermal energy storage system is studied numerically. The network includes a primary heat pipe, which transfers heat received from solar receiver to the heat engine. The excess heat is simultaneously delivered to charge the phase change material via secondary heat pipes. The primary heat pipe composed of a disk shape evaporator, an adiabatic section and a disk shape condenser. The adiabatic section can be either located at the center or positioned outward to the surrounding of the container. Here, the effect of adiabatic section position on thermal performance of the system is investigated. It was concluded that displacing the adiabatic section outwards dramatically increases the average temperatures of the condensers and reduces the thermal resistance of heat pipes.

  18. INL Site Executable Plan for Energy and Transportation Fuels Management

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest L. Fossum

    2008-11-01

    It is the policy of the Department of Energy (DOE) that sustainable energy and transportation fuels management will be integrated into DOE operations to meet obligations under Executive Order (EO) 13423 "Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management," the Instructions for Implementation of EO 13423, as well as Guidance Documents issued in accordance thereto and any modifcations or amendments that may be issued from time to time. In furtherance of this obligation, DOE established strategic performance-based energy and transportation fuels goals and strategies through the Transformational Energy Action Management (TEAM) Initiative, which were incorporated into DOE Order 430.2B "Departmental Energy, Renewable energy, and Transportation Management" and were also identified in DOE Order 450.1A, "Environmental Protection Program." These goals and accompanying strategies are to be implemented by DOE sites through the integration of energy and transportation fuels management into site Environmental Management Systems (EMS).

  19. Energy savings in one-pipe steam heating systems fitted with high-capacity air vents. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    Multifamily buildings heated by one-pipe steam systems experience significant temperature gradients from apartment to apartment, often reaching 15{degrees}F. As a result, many tenants are to cold, or if the heating system output is increased so as to heat the coldest apartment adequately, too hot. While both are undesirable, the second is particularly so because it wastes energy. It was thought that insufficient air venting of the steam pipes contributed to the gradient. Theoretically, if steam mains and risers are quickly vented, steam will reach each radiator at approximately the same time and balance apartment temperatures. The project`s objective was to determine if the installation of large-capacity air vents at the ends of steam mains and risers would economically reduce the temperature gradient between apartments and reduce the amount of space heating energy required. The test was conducted by enabling and disabling air vents biweekly in 10 multifamily buildings in New York City between December 1992 to May 1993. The temperatures of selected apartments and total space heating energy were compared during each venting regime. There was no difference in energy consumption between ``vents on`` and ``vents off`` periods (see Tables 2 and 5); however, there was a reduction in the maximum spread of apartment temperatures.

  20. Transportation Deployment; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-01

    Automakers, commercial fleet operators, component manufacturers, and government agencies all turn to the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to help put more green vehicles on the road. The lab’s independent analysis and evaluation pinpoint fuel-efficient and low-emission strategies to support economic and operational goals, while breaking down barriers to widespread adoption. Customized assessment of existing equipment and practices, energy-saving alternatives, operational considerations, and marketplace realities factor in the multitude of variables needed to ensure meaningful performance, financial, and environmental benefits. NREL provides integrated, unbiased, 360-degree sustainable transportation deployment expertise encompassing alternative fuels, advanced vehicles, and related infrastructure. Hands-on support comes from technical experts experienced in advanced vehicle technologies, fleet operations, and field data collection coupled with extensive modeling and analysis capabilities. The lab’s research team works closely with automakers and vehicle equipment manufacturers to test, analyze, develop, and evaluate high-performance fuel-efficient technologies that meet marketplace needs.

  1. High power densities from high-temperature materials interactions. [thermionic energy conversion and metallic fluid heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    Thermionic energy converters and metallic-fluid heat pipes are well suited to serve together synergistically. The two operating cycles appear as simple and isolated as their material problems seem forebodingly deceptive and complicated. Simplified equations verify material properties and interactions as primary influences on the operational effectiveness of both. Each experiences flow limitations in thermal emission and vaporization because of temperature restrictions redounding from thermophysicochemical stability considerations. Topics discussed include: (1) successful limitation of alkali-metal corrosion; (2) protection against external hot corrosive gases; (3) coping with external and internal vaporization; (4) controlling interfacial reactions and diffusion; and (5) meeting other thermophysical challenges; expansion matches and creep.

  2. Cryogenic Heat Pipe Experiment (CRYOHP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Roy

    The objective of the CRYOHP experiment is to conduct a shuttle experiment that demonstrates the reliable operation of two oxygen heat pipes in microgravity. The experiment will perform the following tasks: (1) demonstrate startup of the pipes from the supercritical state; (2) measure the heat transport capacity of the pipes; (3) measure evaporator and condenser film coefficients; and (4) work shuttle safety issues. The approach for the experiment is as follows: (1) fly two axially grooved oxygen heat pipes attached to mechanical stirling cycle tactical coolers; (2) integrate experiment in hitch-hiker canister; and (3) fly on shuttle and control from ground.

  3. Cryogenic Heat Pipe Experiment (CRYOHP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintosh, Roy

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the CRYOHP experiment is to conduct a shuttle experiment that demonstrates the reliable operation of two oxygen heat pipes in microgravity. The experiment will perform the following tasks: (1) demonstrate startup of the pipes from the supercritical state; (2) measure the heat transport capacity of the pipes; (3) measure evaporator and condenser film coefficients; and (4) work shuttle safety issues. The approach for the experiment is as follows: (1) fly two axially grooved oxygen heat pipes attached to mechanical stirling cycle tactical coolers; (2) integrate experiment in hitch-hiker canister; and (3) fly on shuttle and control from ground.

  4. Thermodynamic aspects of heat pipe operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, Robert; Gottschlich, Joseph

    1990-01-01

    An expanded heat pipe operating model is described which includes thermodynamic and heat transfer considerations to reconcile disparities between actual and theoretical heat pipe performances. The analysis shows that thermodynamic considerations can explain the observed heat pipe performance limitations. A full understanding of thermodynamic processes could lead to advanced concepts for thermal transport devices.

  5. Heat-pipe Earth.

    PubMed

    Moore, William B; Webb, A Alexander G

    2013-09-26

    The heat transport and lithospheric dynamics of early Earth are currently explained by plate tectonic and vertical tectonic models, but these do not offer a global synthesis consistent with the geologic record. Here we use numerical simulations and comparison with the geologic record to explore a heat-pipe model in which volcanism dominates surface heat transport. These simulations indicate that a cold and thick lithosphere developed as a result of frequent volcanic eruptions that advected surface materials downwards. Declining heat sources over time led to an abrupt transition to plate tectonics. Consistent with model predictions, the geologic record shows rapid volcanic resurfacing, contractional deformation, a low geothermal gradient across the bulk of the lithosphere and a rapid decrease in heat-pipe volcanism after initiation of plate tectonics. The heat-pipe Earth model therefore offers a coherent geodynamic framework in which to explore the evolution of our planet before the onset of plate tectonics. PMID:24067709

  6. Heat-pipe Earth.

    PubMed

    Moore, William B; Webb, A Alexander G

    2013-09-26

    The heat transport and lithospheric dynamics of early Earth are currently explained by plate tectonic and vertical tectonic models, but these do not offer a global synthesis consistent with the geologic record. Here we use numerical simulations and comparison with the geologic record to explore a heat-pipe model in which volcanism dominates surface heat transport. These simulations indicate that a cold and thick lithosphere developed as a result of frequent volcanic eruptions that advected surface materials downwards. Declining heat sources over time led to an abrupt transition to plate tectonics. Consistent with model predictions, the geologic record shows rapid volcanic resurfacing, contractional deformation, a low geothermal gradient across the bulk of the lithosphere and a rapid decrease in heat-pipe volcanism after initiation of plate tectonics. The heat-pipe Earth model therefore offers a coherent geodynamic framework in which to explore the evolution of our planet before the onset of plate tectonics.

  7. Transportation Energy Futures: Project Overview and Findings (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy-sponsored Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project examines how combining multiple strategies could reduce both GHG emissions and petroleum use by 80%. The project's primary objective was to help inform domestic decisions about transportation energy strategies, priorities, and investments, with an emphasis on previously underexplored opportunities related to energy efficiency and renewable energy in light-duty vehicles, non-light-duty vehicles, fuels, and transportation demand. This PowerPoint provides an overview of the project and its findings.

  8. 49 CFR 192.125 - Design of copper pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Design of copper pipe. 192.125 Section 192.125 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Pipe Design § 192.125 Design of copper pipe. (a)...

  9. Energy transports by ocean and atmosphere based on an entropy extremum principle. I - Zonal averaged transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohn, Byung-Ju; Smith, Eric A.

    1993-01-01

    The maximum entropy production principle suggested by Paltridge (1975) is applied to separating the satellite-determined required total transports into atmospheric and oceanic components. Instead of using the excessively restrictive equal energy dissipation hypothesis as a deterministic tool for separating transports between the atmosphere and ocean fluids, the satellite-inferred required 2D energy transports are imposed on Paltridge's energy balance model, which is then solved as a variational problem using the equal energy dissipation hypothesis only to provide an initial guess field. It is suggested that Southern Ocean transports are weaker than previously reported. It is argued that a maximum entropy production principle can serve as a governing rule on macroscale global climate, and, in conjunction with conventional satellite measurements of the net radiation balance, provides a means to decompose atmosphere and ocean transports from the total transport field.

  10. Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crank, Ron

    This instructional unit is one of 10 developed by students on various energy-related areas that deals specifically with transportation and energy use. Its objective is for the student to be able to discuss the implication of energy usage as it applies to the area of transportation. Some topics covered are efficiencies of various transportation…

  11. Silicon Heat Pipe Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, Karl Y.; Ganapathi, Gani B.; Sunada, Eric T.; Bae, Youngsam; Miller, Jennifer R.; Beinsford, Daniel F.

    2013-01-01

    Improved methods of heat dissipation are required for modern, high-power density electronic systems. As increased functionality is progressively compacted into decreasing volumes, this need will be exacerbated. High-performance chip power is predicted to increase monotonically and rapidly with time. Systems utilizing these chips are currently reliant upon decades of old cooling technology. Heat pipes offer a solution to this problem. Heat pipes are passive, self-contained, two-phase heat dissipation devices. Heat conducted into the device through a wick structure converts the working fluid into a vapor, which then releases the heat via condensation after being transported away from the heat source. Heat pipes have high thermal conductivities, are inexpensive, and have been utilized in previous space missions. However, the cylindrical geometry of commercial heat pipes is a poor fit to the planar geometries of microelectronic assemblies, the copper that commercial heat pipes are typically constructed of is a poor CTE (coefficient of thermal expansion) match to the semiconductor die utilized in these assemblies, and the functionality and reliability of heat pipes in general is strongly dependent on the orientation of the assembly with respect to the gravity vector. What is needed is a planar, semiconductor-based heat pipe array that can be used for cooling of generic MCM (multichip module) assemblies that can also function in all orientations. Such a structure would not only have applications in the cooling of space electronics, but would have commercial applications as well (e.g. cooling of microprocessors and high-power laser diodes). This technology is an improvement over existing heat pipe designs due to the finer porosity of the wick, which enhances capillary pumping pressure, resulting in greater effective thermal conductivity and performance in any orientation with respect to the gravity vector. In addition, it is constructed of silicon, and thus is better

  12. Energy Policy Act Transportation Rate Study: Final Report on Coal Transportation

    EIA Publications

    2000-01-01

    This is the final in a series of reports prepared for the U.S. Congress by the Secretary of Energy on coal distribution and transportation rates as mandated by Title XIII, Section 1340, Establishment of Data Base and Study of Transportation Rates, of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-486).

  13. Nuclear Energy and Synthetic Liquid Transportation Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Richard

    2012-10-01

    This talk will propose a plan to combine nuclear reactors with the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) process to produce synthetic carbon-neutral liquid transportation fuels from sea water. These fuels can be formed from the hydrogen and carbon dioxide in sea water and will burn to water and carbon dioxide in a cycle powered by nuclear reactors. The F-T process was developed nearly 100 years ago as a method of synthesizing liquid fuels from coal. This process presently provides commercial liquid fuels in South Africa, Malaysia, and Qatar, mainly using natural gas as a feedstock. Nuclear energy can be used to separate water into hydrogen and oxygen as well as to extract carbon dioxide from sea water using ion exchange technology. The carbon dioxide and hydrogen react to form synthesis gas, the mixture needed at the beginning of the F-T process. Following further refining, the products, typically diesel and Jet-A, can use existing infrastructure and can power conventional engines with little or no modification. We can then use these carbon-neutral liquid fuels conveniently long into the future with few adverse environmental impacts.

  14. Radiation energy transport through hydrodynamically evolving slits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, J. M.; Graham, P.; Taylor, M.; Moore, A.; Sorce, C.; Reighard, A.; MacLaren, S.; Young, P.; Glendinning, G.; Blue, B.; Back, C.; Hund, J.

    2008-11-01

    Radiation transport through enclosed spaces with inwardly moving walls is a key component of the physics of laser-heated hohlraums. It arises in the cavity itself (where inward motion of the wall results in late-time stagnation of dense plasma on the hohlraum axis), and also in the laser-entry and diagnostic holes (where an understanding of hole-closure is important to hohlraum design and the interpretation of diagnostic data). To understand these phenomena better, we have carried out a series of experiments at the Omega laser facility. A laser-heated hohlraum is used to illuminate linear and annular slits machined in samples of solid-density tantalum and low-density, tantalum-oxide foam. Measurements of the transmitted energy are made indirectly (by measuring the temperature rise of a ``calorimeter'' hohlraum) and directly (by measuring the emission from the slit component, using a target in which the calorimeter hohlraum was omitted). The hydrodynamics is investigated by self-emission and absorption (backlighting) x-ray imaging of the closing slits. Simulations (using a 2-D Eulerian hydrocode) reproduce the overall energetics, the detail of the deceleration shock and axial stagnation region at the centre of the slit, and the complex shock interactions that occur at corners of the slits.

  15. OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion) Cold Water Pipe At-Sea Test Program Data Analysis Project: Pipe, platform and environmental parameters data reduction and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega, L. A.; Nilhous, G. C.

    1985-08-01

    An assessment of computer models developed to analyze the structural response of cold water pipes (CWPs) is discussed. The principal aim of the data interpretation phase of the study was to determine the causal relationship between the environment and the barge/CWP response to provide the information required to assess the CWP computer models.

  16. Heat Pipe Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The heat pipe was developed to alternately cool and heat without using energy or any moving parts. It enables non-rotating spacecraft to maintain a constant temperature when the surface exposed to the Sun is excessively hot and the non Sun-facing side is very cold. Several organizations, such as Tropic-Kool Engineering Corporation, joined NASA in a subsequent program to refine and commercialize the technology. Heat pipes have been installed in fast food restaurants in areas where humid conditions cause materials to deteriorate quickly. Moisture removal was increased by 30 percent in a Clearwater, FL Burger King after heat pipes were installed. Relative humidity and power consumption were also reduced significantly. Similar results were recorded by Taco Bell, which now specifies heat pipe systems in new restaurants in the Southeast.

  17. Heat pipes and their use in technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasilyev, L.

    1977-01-01

    Heat pipes may be employed as temperature regulators, heat diodes, transformers, storage batteries, or utilized for transforming thermal energy into mechanical, electric, or other forms of energy. General concepts were established for the analysis of the transfer process in heat pipes. A system of equations was developed to describe the thermodynamics of steam passage through a cross section of a heat pipe.

  18. Investigations on the heat transport capability of a cryogenic oscillating heat pipe and its application in achieving ultra-fast cooling rates for cell vitrification cryopreservation☆

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xu; Ma, Hongbin; Jiao, Anjun; Critser, John K.

    2010-01-01

    Theoretically, direct vitrification of cell suspensions with relatively low concentrations (~1 M) of permeating cryoprotective agents (CPA) is suitable for cryopreservation of almost all cell types and can be accomplished by ultra-fast cooling rates that are on the order of 106–7 K/min. However, the methods and devices currently available for cell cryopreservation cannot achieve such high cooling rates. In this study, we constructed a novel cryogenic oscillating heat pipe (COHP) using liquid nitrogen as its working fluid and investigated its heat transport capability to assess its application for achieving ultra-fast cooling rates for cell cryopreservation. The experimental results showed that the apparent heat transfer coefficient of the COHP can reach 2 × 105 W/m2·K, which is two orders of the magnitude higher than traditional heat pipes. Theoretical analyzes showed that the average local heat transfer coefficient in the thin film evaporation region of the COHP can reach 1.2 × 106 W/m2·K, which is approximately 103 times higher than that achievable with standard pool-boiling approaches. Based on these results, a novel device design applying the COHP and microfabrication techniques is proposed and its efficiency for cell vitrification is demonstrated through numerical simulation. The estimated average cooling rates achieved through this approach is 106–7 K/min, which is much faster than the currently available methods and sufficient for achieving vitrification with relatively low concentrations of CPA. PMID:18430413

  19. Flat heat pipe design, construction, and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Voegler, G.; Boughey, B.; Cerza, M.; Lindler, K.W.

    1999-08-02

    This paper details the design, construction and partial analysis of a low temperature flat heat pipe in order to determine the feasibility of implementing flat heat pipes into thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion systems.

  20. Pipe connector

    DOEpatents

    Sullivan, Thomas E.; Pardini, John A.

    1978-01-01

    A safety test facility for testing sodium-cooled nuclear reactor components includes a reactor vessel and a heat exchanger submerged in sodium in the tank. The reactor vessel and heat exchanger are connected by an expansion/deflection pipe coupling comprising a pair of coaxially and slidably engaged tubular elements having radially enlarged opposed end portions of which at least a part is of spherical contour adapted to engage conical sockets in the ends of pipes leading out of the reactor vessel and in to the heat exchanger. A spring surrounding the pipe coupling urges the end portions apart and into engagement with the spherical sockets. Since the pipe coupling is submerged in liquid a limited amount of leakage of sodium from the pipe can be tolerated.

  1. Energy and Transportation Lessons for the Senior High Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Francis; Yoho, Devon

    This guide presents five lessons designed to: create an awareness of the present energy situation and its relation to various aspects of transportation systems; provide knowledge of energy resources, choices, and alternative actions; develop critical thinking skills about energy and individual roles in the energy management process; encourage…

  2. Energy and Transportation Lessons for the Elementary Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballou, Mildred; Lane, Martha

    The 10 lessons presented in this guide are designed to: create an awareness of the present energy situation and its relation to various aspects of transportation systems; provide knowledge of energy resources, choices, and alternative actions; develop critical thinking skills about energy and individual roles in the energy management process;…

  3. Energy and Transportation Lessons for the Middle Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Francis; Yoho, Devon

    The five lessons presented in this guide are designed to: create an awareness of the present energy situation and its relation to various aspects of transportation systems; provide knowledge of energy resources, choices, and alternative actions; develop critical thinking skills about energy and individual roles in the energy management process;…

  4. 49 CFR 192.121 - Design of plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Design of plastic pipe. 192.121 Section 192.121... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Pipe Design § 192.121 Design of plastic pipe. Subject to the limitations of § 192.123, the design pressure for plastic pipe is determined by either of...

  5. 49 CFR 192.121 - Design of plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Design of plastic pipe. 192.121 Section 192.121... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Pipe Design § 192.121 Design of plastic pipe. Subject to the limitations of § 192.123, the design pressure for plastic pipe is determined by either of...

  6. 49 CFR 192.321 - Installation of plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Installation of plastic pipe. 192.321 Section 192... Transmission Lines and Mains § 192.321 Installation of plastic pipe. (a) Plastic pipe must be installed below ground level except as provided by paragraphs (g) and (h) of this section. (b) Plastic pipe that...

  7. 49 CFR 192.121 - Design of plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Design of plastic pipe. 192.121 Section 192.121... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Pipe Design § 192.121 Design of plastic pipe. Subject to the limitations of § 192.123, the design pressure for plastic pipe is determined by either of...

  8. 49 CFR 192.121 - Design of plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Design of plastic pipe. 192.121 Section 192.121... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Pipe Design § 192.121 Design of plastic pipe. Subject to the limitations of § 192.123, the design pressure for plastic pipe is determined by either of...

  9. 49 CFR 192.121 - Design of plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Design of plastic pipe. 192.121 Section 192.121... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Pipe Design § 192.121 Design of plastic pipe. Subject to the limitations of § 192.123, the design pressure for plastic pipe is determined by either of...

  10. 49 CFR 192.321 - Installation of plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Installation of plastic pipe. 192.321 Section 192... Transmission Lines and Mains § 192.321 Installation of plastic pipe. (a) Plastic pipe must be installed below ground level except as provided by paragraphs (g) and (h) of this section. (b) Plastic pipe that...

  11. 49 CFR 192.321 - Installation of plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Installation of plastic pipe. 192.321 Section 192... Transmission Lines and Mains § 192.321 Installation of plastic pipe. (a) Plastic pipe must be installed below ground level except as provided by paragraphs (g) and (h) of this section. (b) Plastic pipe that...

  12. 49 CFR 192.275 - Cast iron pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cast iron pipe. 192.275 Section 192.275... Cast iron pipe. (a) Each caulked bell and spigot joint in cast iron pipe must be sealed with mechanical leak clamps. (b) Each mechanical joint in cast iron pipe must have a gasket made of a...

  13. 49 CFR 192.275 - Cast iron pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cast iron pipe. 192.275 Section 192.275... Cast iron pipe. (a) Each caulked bell and spigot joint in cast iron pipe must be sealed with mechanical leak clamps. (b) Each mechanical joint in cast iron pipe must have a gasket made of a...

  14. 49 CFR 192.275 - Cast iron pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cast iron pipe. 192.275 Section 192.275... Cast iron pipe. (a) Each caulked bell and spigot joint in cast iron pipe must be sealed with mechanical leak clamps. (b) Each mechanical joint in cast iron pipe must have a gasket made of a...

  15. 49 CFR 192.275 - Cast iron pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cast iron pipe. 192.275 Section 192.275... Cast iron pipe. (a) Each caulked bell and spigot joint in cast iron pipe must be sealed with mechanical leak clamps. (b) Each mechanical joint in cast iron pipe must have a gasket made of a...

  16. 49 CFR 192.125 - Design of copper pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Design of copper pipe. 192.125 Section 192.125... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Pipe Design § 192.125 Design of copper pipe. (a) Copper... hard drawn. (b) Copper pipe used in service lines must have wall thickness not less than that...

  17. 49 CFR 192.125 - Design of copper pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Design of copper pipe. 192.125 Section 192.125... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Pipe Design § 192.125 Design of copper pipe. (a) Copper... hard drawn. (b) Copper pipe used in service lines must have wall thickness not less than that...

  18. 49 CFR 192.125 - Design of copper pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Design of copper pipe. 192.125 Section 192.125... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Pipe Design § 192.125 Design of copper pipe. (a) Copper... hard drawn. (b) Copper pipe used in service lines must have wall thickness not less than that...

  19. 49 CFR 192.125 - Design of copper pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Design of copper pipe. 192.125 Section 192.125... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Pipe Design § 192.125 Design of copper pipe. (a) Copper... hard drawn. (b) Copper pipe used in service lines must have wall thickness not less than that...

  20. 49 CFR 192.275 - Cast iron pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cast iron pipe. 192.275 Section 192.275... Cast iron pipe. (a) Each caulked bell and spigot joint in cast iron pipe must be sealed with mechanical leak clamps. (b) Each mechanical joint in cast iron pipe must have a gasket made of a...

  1. 49 CFR 192.105 - Design formula for steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Design formula for steel pipe. 192.105 Section 192... for steel pipe. (a) The design pressure for steel pipe is determined in accordance with the following... § 192.113. T=Temperature derating factor determined in accordance with § 192.115. (b) If steel pipe...

  2. 49 CFR 192.105 - Design formula for steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Design formula for steel pipe. 192.105 Section 192... for steel pipe. (a) The design pressure for steel pipe is determined in accordance with the following... § 192.113. T=Temperature derating factor determined in accordance with § 192.115. (b) If steel pipe...

  3. 49 CFR 192.105 - Design formula for steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Design formula for steel pipe. 192.105 Section 192... for steel pipe. (a) The design pressure for steel pipe is determined in accordance with the following... § 192.113. T=Temperature derating factor determined in accordance with § 192.115. (b) If steel pipe...

  4. 49 CFR 192.105 - Design formula for steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Design formula for steel pipe. 192.105 Section 192... for steel pipe. (a) The design pressure for steel pipe is determined in accordance with the following... § 192.113. T=Temperature derating factor determined in accordance with § 192.115. (b) If steel pipe...

  5. 49 CFR 192.105 - Design formula for steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Design formula for steel pipe. 192.105 Section 192... for steel pipe. (a) The design pressure for steel pipe is determined in accordance with the following... § 192.113. T=Temperature derating factor determined in accordance with § 192.115. (b) If steel pipe...

  6. 49 CFR 192.321 - Installation of plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Transmission Lines and Mains § 192.321 Installation of plastic pipe. (a) Plastic pipe must be installed below ground level except as provided by paragraphs (g) and (h) of this section. (b) Plastic pipe that is... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Installation of plastic pipe. 192.321 Section...

  7. 49 CFR 192.321 - Installation of plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Transmission Lines and Mains § 192.321 Installation of plastic pipe. (a) Plastic pipe must be installed below ground level except as provided by paragraphs (g) and (h) of this section. (b) Plastic pipe that is... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Installation of plastic pipe. 192.321 Section...

  8. 49 CFR 195.212 - Bending of pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bending of pipe. 195.212 Section 195.212... PIPELINE Construction § 195.212 Bending of pipe. (a) Pipe must not have a wrinkle bend. (b) Each field bend must comply with the following: (1) A bend must not impair the serviceability of the pipe. (2)...

  9. OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion) CWP (Cold Water Pipe) Laboratory Test Program. Materials Project Test Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    Fiberglass sandwich wall structures emerged as leading candidates for the OTEC cold water pipe because of their high strength to weight ratio, their flexibility in selecting directional properties, their resistance to electrochemical interaction, their ease of deployment and their relative low cost. A review of the literature established reasonable confidence that FRP laminates could meet the OTEC requirements; however, little information was available on the performance of core materials suitable for OTEC applications. Syntactic foam cores of various composition and density were developed and tested for mechanical properties and seawater absorption.

  10. ECUT energy data reference series: lightweight materials for ground transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Abarcar, R.B.; Hane, G.J.; Johnson, D.R.

    1984-07-01

    This report summarizes information that describes the use of lightweight materials in automobiles. The information on this mode of transportation represents the largest potential energy savings for substitution of lightweight materials in the transportation sector. Included are data on energy conversion efficiency of the engine and its relationship to vehicle weight, the capital stock, the amount of energy used, and the service activity level as measured in ton-miles.

  11. Energy demand analysis and alternative fuels. Transportation research record

    SciTech Connect

    Dingemans, D.; Sperling, D.; Greene, D.L.; Hu, P.S.; Hallet, P.

    1986-01-01

    Contents include: Mental maps and the refueling behavior of vehicle drivers; A functional form analysis of the short-run demand for travel and gasoline by one-vehicle households; An assessment methodology for alternative fuels technologies; Drive-up windows, energy, and air quality; Travel characteristics and transportation energy consumption patterns of minority and poor households; An investigation into the use of market segmentation analysis for transportation energy planning.

  12. Anisotropy Enhancement of Thermal Energy Transport in Supported Black Phosphorene.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jige; Chen, Shunda; Gao, Yi

    2016-07-01

    Thermal anisotropy along the basal plane of materials possesses both theoretical importance and application value in thermal transport and thermoelectricity. Though common two-dimensional materials may exhibit in-plane thermal anisotropy when suspended, thermal anisotropy would often disappear when supported on a substrate. In this Letter, we find a strong anisotropy enhancement of thermal energy transport in supported black phosphorene. The chiral preference of energy transport in the zigzag rather than the armchair direction is greatly enhanced by coupling to the substrate, up to a factor of approximately 2-fold compared to the suspended one. The enhancement originates from its puckered lattice structure, where the nonplanar armchair energy transport relies on the out-of-plane corrugation and thus would be hindered by the flexural suppression due to the substrate, while the planar zigzag energy transport is not. As a result, thermal conductivity of supported black phosphorene shows a consistent anisotropy enhancement under different temperatures and substrate coupling strengths. PMID:27320775

  13. Anisotropy Enhancement of Thermal Energy Transport in Supported Black Phosphorene.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jige; Chen, Shunda; Gao, Yi

    2016-07-01

    Thermal anisotropy along the basal plane of materials possesses both theoretical importance and application value in thermal transport and thermoelectricity. Though common two-dimensional materials may exhibit in-plane thermal anisotropy when suspended, thermal anisotropy would often disappear when supported on a substrate. In this Letter, we find a strong anisotropy enhancement of thermal energy transport in supported black phosphorene. The chiral preference of energy transport in the zigzag rather than the armchair direction is greatly enhanced by coupling to the substrate, up to a factor of approximately 2-fold compared to the suspended one. The enhancement originates from its puckered lattice structure, where the nonplanar armchair energy transport relies on the out-of-plane corrugation and thus would be hindered by the flexural suppression due to the substrate, while the planar zigzag energy transport is not. As a result, thermal conductivity of supported black phosphorene shows a consistent anisotropy enhancement under different temperatures and substrate coupling strengths.

  14. Pipe and bend erosion by pneumatic transport of solids at high temperature: Quarterly report, October-December 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Klinzing, G.E.

    1987-01-01

    In this report the analysis of erosion data by coal slag is presented and compared with the results of sand erosion. While effects of gas velocity and solids concentration are similar in both cases, the effect of temperature on the erosion rate was radically different for each material. The experimental efforts during this period focused on the effect of roughness and temperature on the pressure drop in the vertical test section. The pressure drop data show that temperature effects are minimum while pipe roughness plays a more significant role. The effect of temperature and roughness on the pressure drop of air alone is well predicted by the correlations available in literature. But when soilds are circulating, the agreement between existing correlations and experimental data is poor, becoming worse as the roughness increases. 5 refs., 10 figs. 2 tabs.

  15. Transportation energy strategy: Project {number_sign}5 of the Hawaii Energy Strategy Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This study was prepared for the State Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism (DBEDT) as part of the Hawaii Energy Strategy program. Authority and responsibility for energy planning activities, such as the Hawaii Energy Strategy, rests with the State Energy Resources Coordinator, who is the Director of DBEDT. Hawaii Energy Strategy Study No. 5, Transportation Energy Strategy Development, was prepared to: collect and synthesize information on the present and future use of energy in Hawaii`s transportation sector, examine the potential of energy conservation to affect future energy demand; analyze the possibility of satisfying a portion of the state`s future transportation energy demand through alternative fuels; and recommend a program targeting energy use in the state`s transportation sector to help achieve state goals. The analyses and conclusions of this report should be assessed in relation to the other Hawaii Energy Strategy Studies in developing a comprehensive state energy program. 56 figs., 87 tabs.

  16. Superfluid Helium Heat Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gully, P.

    This paper reports on the development and the thermal tests of three superfluid helium heat pipes. Two of them are designed to provide a large transport capacity (4 mW at 1.7 K). They feature a copper braid located inside a 6 mm outer diameter stainless tube fitted with copper ends for mechanical anchoring. The other heat pipe has no copper braid and is designed to get much smaller heat transport capacity (0.5 mW) and to explore lower temperature (0.7 - 1 K). The copper braid and the tube wall is the support of the Rollin superfluid helium film in which the heat is transferred. The low filling pressure makes the technology very simple with the possibility to easily bend the tube. We present the design and discuss the thermal performance of the heat pipes tested in the 0.7 to 2.0 K temperature range. The long heat pipe (1.2 m with copper braid) and the short one (0.25 m with copper braid) have similar thermal performance in the range 0.7 - 2.0 K. At 1.7 K the long heat pipe, 120 g in weight, reaches a heat transfer capacity of 6.2 mW and a thermal conductance of 600 mW/K for 4 mW transferred power. Due to the pressure drop of the vapor flow and Kapitza thermal resistance, the conductance of the third heat pipe dramatically decreases when the temperature decreases. A 3.8 mW/K is obtained at 0.7 K for 0.5 mW transferred power.

  17. Pipe inspection using the BTX-II. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) continually seeks safer and more cost-effective remediation technologies for use in the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of nuclear facilities. In several of the buildings at the Fernald Site, there is piping that was used to transport process materials. As the demolition of these buildings occur, disposal of this piping has become a costly issue. Currently, all process piping is cut into ten-foot or less sections, the ends of the piping are wrapped and taped to prevent the release of any potential contaminants into the air, and the piping is placed in roll off boxes for eventual repackaging and shipment to the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for disposal. Alternatives that allow for the onsite disposal of process piping are greatly desired due to the potential for dramatic savings in current offsite disposal costs. No means is currently employed to allow for the adequate inspection of the interior of piping, and consequently, process piping has been assumed to be internally contaminated and thus routinely disposed of at NTS. The BTX-II system incorporates a high-resolution micro color camera with lightheads, cabling, a monitor, and a video recorder. The complete probe is capable of inspecting pipes with an internal diameter (ID) as small as 1.4 inches. By using readily interchangeable lightheads, the same system is capable of inspecting piping up to 24 inches in ID. The original development of the BTX system was for inspection of boiler tubes and small diameter pipes for build-up, pitting, and corrosion. However, the system is well suited for inspecting the interior of most types of piping and other small, confined areas. The report describes the technology, its performance, uses, cost, regulatory and policy issues, and lessons learned.

  18. 75 FR 39680 - Houston Pipe Line Company LP, Worsham-Steed Gas Storage, L.P., Energy Transfer Fuel, LP, Mid...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. PR10-44-000; Docket No. PR10-46-000; Docket No. PR10-48- 000; Docket No. PR10-49-000; Docket No. PR10-50-000] Houston Pipe Line Company LP, Worsham-Steed Gas Storage, L.P., Energy Transfer Fuel, LP,...

  19. Bulk flow scaling for turbulent channel and pipe flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Hussain, Fazle; She, Zhen-Su

    2016-08-01

    We report a theory deriving bulk flow scaling for canonical wall-bounded flows. The theory accounts for the symmetries of boundary geometry (flat plate channel vs. circular pipe) by a variational calculation for a large-scale energy length, which characterizes its bulk flow scaling by a simple exponent, i.e., m = 4 for the channel and 5 for the pipe. The predicted mean velocity shows excellent agreement with several dozen sets of quality empirical data for a wide range of the Reynolds number (Re), with a universal bulk flow constant κ≈0.45 . Predictions for dissipation and turbulent transport in the bulk flow are also given, awaiting data verification.

  20. Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 32, from the Center for Transportation Analysis (CTA)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Davis, Stacy C.; Diegel, Susan W.; Boundy, Robert G. [Roltek, Inc.

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 32 is a statistical compendium designed for use as a reference. The data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2 on energy; Chapter 3 0n highway vehicles; Chapter 4 on light vehicles; Chapter 5 on heavy vehicles; Chapter 6 on alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 7on fleet vehicles; Chapter 8 on household vehicles; and Chapter 9 on nonhighway modes; Chapter 10 on transportation and the economy; Chapter 11 on greenhouse gas emissions; and Chapter 12 on criteria pollutant emissions. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also appendices which include detailed source information for various tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions.

  1. Design and fabrication of polymer-concrete-lined pipe for testing in geothermal-energy processes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kaeding, A.O.

    1981-12-01

    A specific polymer-concrete formulation was applied as a steel pipe liner in response to a need for durable, economical materials for use in contact with high temperature geothermal brine. Processes are described for centrifugally applying the liner to straight pipe, for casting the liner in pipe fittings, and for closure of field joints. Physical properties of the liner materials were measured. Compressive strengths of up to 165.8 MPa (24,045 psi) and splitting tensile strengths of 23.5 MPa (3408 psi) were measured at ambient temperature. Compressive strengths of 24 MPa (3490 psi) and splitting tensile strengths of 2.5 MPa (366 psi) were measured at about 150/sup 0/C (302/sup 0/F). A full-scale production plant is described which would be capable of producing about 950 m (3120 ft) of lined 305-mm-diam (12 in.) pipe per day. Capital cost of the plant is estimated to be about $8.6 million with a calculated return on investment of 15.4%. Cost of piping a geothermal plant with PC and PC-lined steel pipe is calculated to be $1.21 million, which compares favorably with a similar plant piped with alloy steel piping at a cost of $1.33 million. Life-cycle cost analysis indicates that the cost of PC-lined steel pipe would be 82% of that of carbon steel pipe over a 20-year plant operating life.

  2. Environmental impacts of energy transportation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Price, J.P.; Limaye, D.R.; Ciliano, R.

    1981-09-01

    This report presents the results of a review and synthesis of existing knowledge about the environmental impacts of fuel transportation for the electric utility industry. Emphasis is placed on the transportation of coal, but oil, natural gas liquified natural gas methanol, and hydrogen are also covered. The major identified impacts associated with coal unit trains are the physical barriers they create, potential accidents, and noise. The former two impacts are regarded as solvable, but the noise problem is far more intractable. Other modes of coal transport generate other types of environmental concerns. Coal slurry pipeline problems are related to water requirements and disposal. Truck transportation of coal leads to increased road and bridge deterioration and needs for repair. The approach in this study was to utilize a consistent and systematic framework to assess existing studies comparatively and to identify research gaps. The results of the study indicate that, except for a number of spectacular projects which have aroused considerable concern, little effort has been dedicated to the evaluation of the environmental socio-economic impacts of fuel transportation. While much of the existing work is useful, there are significant requirements for further research.

  3. World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Transportation Model

    EIA Publications

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ) International Transportation model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

  4. [Ontario Transportation Technology and Energy Branch]. Publications catalogue

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    The Ontario Transportation Technology and Energy Branch was established as the provincial government`s focus for research and development in transportation technology and energy areas that will lead to new and improved products and services. This catalogue lists reports published by the Branch up to February 1993, excluding reports that are extremely outdated, reports superseded by later ones, and reports intended for internal use only. Videos produced by the Branch are also included. Information provided for each report includes title, report number, authors, summary of contents, participating agencies in the research, and publisher. Entries are arranged under such headings as alternative fuels, automotive technology/emissions, commercial vehicles, ride sharing, municipal energy, rail technology, traffic and decisions systems, transportation control technology, and transportation energy management.

  5. Forecast of transportation energy demand through the year 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Mintz, M.M.; Vyas, A.D.

    1991-04-01

    Since 1979, the Center for Transportation Research (CTR) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has produced baseline projections of US transportation activity and energy demand. These projections and the methodologies used to compute them are documented in a series of reports and research papers. As the lastest in this series of projections, this report documents the assumptions, methodologies, and results of the most recent projection -- termed ANL-90N -- and compares those results with other forecasts from the current literature, as well as with the selection of earlier Argonne forecasts. This current forecast may be used as a baseline against which to analyze trends and evaluate existing and proposed energy conservation programs and as an illustration of how the Transportation Energy and Emission Modeling System (TEEMS) works. (TEEMS links disaggregate models to produce an aggregate forecast of transportation activity, energy use, and emissions). This report and the projections it contains were developed for the US Department of Energy's Office of Transportation Technologies (OTT). The projections are not completely comprehensive. Time and modeling effort have been focused on the major energy consumers -- automobiles, trucks, commercial aircraft, rail and waterborne freight carriers, and pipelines. Because buses, rail passengers services, and general aviation consume relatively little energy, they are projected in the aggregate, as other'' modes, and used primarily as scaling factors. These projections are also limited to direct energy consumption. Projections of indirect energy consumption, such as energy consumed in vehicle and equipment manufacturing, infrastructure, fuel refining, etc., were judged outside the scope of this effort. The document is organized into two complementary sections -- one discussing passenger transportation modes, and the other discussing freight transportation modes. 99 refs., 10 figs., 43 tabs.

  6. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Effects of the Built Environment on Transportation: Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Other Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, C. D.; Brown, A.; Dunphy, R. T.; Vimmerstedt, L.

    2013-03-01

    Planning initiatives in many regions and communities aim to reduce transportation energy use, decrease emissions, and achieve related environmental benefits by changing land use. This report reviews and summarizes findings from existing literature on the relationship between the built environment and transportation energy use and greenhouse gas emissions, identifying results trends as well as potential future actions. The indirect influence of federal transportation and housing policies, as well as the direct impact of municipal regulation on land use are examined for their effect on transportation patterns and energy use. Special attention is given to the 'four D' factors of density, diversity, design and accessibility. The report concludes that policy-driven changes to the built environment could reduce transportation energy and GHG emissions from less than 1% to as much as 10% by 2050, the equivalent of 16%-18% of present-day urban light-duty-vehicle travel. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  7. Transportation Energy Futures Series. Effects of the Built Environment on Transportation. Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Other Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, C. D.; Brown, A.; Dunphy, R. T.; Vimmerstedt, L.

    2013-03-15

    Planning initiatives in many regions and communities aim to reduce transportation energy use, decrease emissions, and achieve related environmental benefits by changing land use. This report reviews and summarizes findings from existing literature on the relationship between the built environment and transportation energy use and greenhouse gas emissions, identifying results trends as well as potential future actions. The indirect influence of federal transportation and housing policies, as well as the direct impact of municipal regulation on land use are examined for their effect on transportation patterns and energy use. Special attention is given to the 'four D' factors of density, diversity, design and accessibility. The report concludes that policy-driven changes to the built environment could reduce transportation energy and GHG emissions from less than 1% to as much as 10% by 2050, the equivalent of 16%-18% of present-day urban light-duty-vehicle travel. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  8. Energy efficiency in passenger transportation: What the future may hold

    SciTech Connect

    Plotkin, S.

    1996-12-31

    This presentation very briefly projects future impacts of energy efficiency in passenger transportation. Continuing expansion of the U.S. transportation sector, with a corresponding increased dependency on imported oil, is noted. Freight trucks and air fleets are targeted as having the greatest potential for increased energy efficiency. The light duty vehicle is identified as the only technology option for major efficiency increases. 4 figs., 11 tabs.

  9. Theory of photoelectron production, transport and energy loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagy, A. F.

    1974-01-01

    Current understanding of the theory of ionospheric photoelectron production, transport and energy loss is summarized. The various approaches used in the theoretical calculations of photoelectron fluxes appear to be self consistent and sound; improved values for a number of input parameters are needed now in order to achieve significant improvements and more confidence in the results. The major remaining problem in the present day theory of photoelectron transport and energy loss is centered around the calculations of photoelectron transit through the protonosphere.

  10. Macroscopic magnetic islands and plasma energy transport

    SciTech Connect

    Cima, G; Porcelli, F; Rossi, E; Wootton, A J

    1998-12-03

    A model is presented, based on the combined effects of m=n=l magnetic island dynamics, localized heat sources, large heat diffusivity along magnetic field lines and plasma rotation, which may explain the multipeaked temperature profiles and transport barriers observed in tokamak plasmas heated by electron cyclotron resonant waves.

  11. Alternate high capacity heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voss, F. E.

    1986-01-01

    The performance predictions for a fifty foot heat pipe (4 foot evaporator - 46 foot condensor) are discussed. These performance predictions are supported by experimental data for a four foot heat pipe. Both heat pipes have evaporators with axial groove wick structures and condensers with powder metal external artery wick structures. The predicted performance of a rectangular axial groove/external artery heat pipe operating in space is given. Heat transport versus groove width is plotted for 100, 200 and 300 grooves in the evaporator. The curves show that maximum power is achieved for groove widths from 0.040 to 0.053 as the number of grooves varies from 300 to 100. The corresponding range of maximum power is 3150 to 2400 watts. The relationships between groove width and heat pipe evaporate diameter for 100, 200 and 300 grooves in the evaporator are given. A four foot heat pipe having a three foot condenser and one foot evaporator was built and tested. The evaporator wick structure used axial grooves with rectangular cross sections, and the condenser wick structure used powder metal with an external artery configuration. Fabrication drawings are enclosed. The predicted and measured performance for this heat pipe is shown. The agreement between predicted and measured performance is good and therefore substantiates the predicted performance for a fifty foot heat pipe.

  12. Consumer Views on Transportation and Energy (Second Edition)

    SciTech Connect

    Kubik, M.

    2005-04-01

    This report has been assembled to provide the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) with an idea of how the American public views various transportation, energy, and environmental issues. The data presented in this report have been drawn from multiple sources: surveys conducted by the Opinion Research Corporation (ORC) for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that are commissioned and funded by EERE, Gallup polls, and other sources.

  13. ECUT energy data reference series: Otto cycle engines in transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Hane, G.J.; Johnson, D.R.

    1984-07-01

    Information that describes the use of the Otto cycle engines in transportation is summarized. The transportation modes discussed in this report include the following: automobiles, light trucks, heavy trucks, marine, recreational vehicles, motorcycles, buses, aircraft, and snowmobiles. These modes account for nearly 100% of the gasoline and LPG consumed in transportation engines. The information provided on each of these modes includes descriptions of the average energy conversion efficiency of the engine, the capital stock, the amount of energy used, and the activity level as measured in ton-miles. Estimates are provided for the years 1980 and 2000.

  14. Enhanced energy transport in genetically engineered excitonic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Heechul; Heldman, Nimrod; Rebentrost, Patrick; Abbondanza, Luigi; Iagatti, Alessandro; Alessi, Andrea; Patrizi, Barbara; Salvalaggio, Mario; Bussotti, Laura; Mohseni, Masoud; Caruso, Filippo; Johnsen, Hannah C.; Fusco, Roberto; Foggi, Paolo; Scudo, Petra F.; Lloyd, Seth; Belcher, Angela M.

    2016-02-01

    One of the challenges for achieving efficient exciton transport in solar energy conversion systems is precise structural control of the light-harvesting building blocks. Here, we create a tunable material consisting of a connected chromophore network on an ordered biological virus template. Using genetic engineering, we establish a link between the inter-chromophoric distances and emerging transport properties. The combination of spectroscopy measurements and dynamic modelling enables us to elucidate quantum coherent and classical incoherent energy transport at room temperature. Through genetic modifications, we obtain a significant enhancement of exciton diffusion length of about 68% in an intermediate quantum-classical regime.

  15. Design of Refractory Metal Life Test Heat Pipe and Calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, J. J.; Reid, R. S.; Bragg-Sitton, S. M.

    2010-01-01

    Heat pipe life tests have seldom been conducted on a systematic basis. Typically, one or more heat pipes are built and tested for an extended period at a single temperature with simple condenser loading. Results are often reported describing the wall material, working fluid, test temperature, test duration, and occasionally the nature of any failure. Important information such as design details, processing procedures, material assay, power throughput, and radial power density are usually not mentioned. We propose to develop methods to generate carefully controlled data that conclusively establish heat pipe operating life with material-fluid combinations capable of extended operation. The test approach detailed in this Technical Publication will use 16 Mo-44.5%Re alloy/sodium heat pipe units that have an approximate12-in length and 5/8-in diameter. Two specific test series have been identified: (1) Long-term corrosion rates based on ASTM-G-68-80 (G-series) and (2) corrosion trends in a cross-correlation sequence at various temperatures and mass fluences based on a Fisher multifactor design (F-series). Evaluation of the heat pipe hardware will be performed in test chambers purged with an inert purified gas (helium or helium/argon mixture) at low pressure (10-100 torr) to provide thermal coupling between the heat pipe condenser and calorimeter. The final pressure will be selected to minimize the potential for voltage breakdown between the heat pipe and radio frequency (RF) induction coil (RF heating is currently the planned method of powering the heat pipes). The proposed calorimeter is constructed from a copper alloy and relies on a laminar flow water-coolant channel design to absorb and transport energy

  16. GPM Avionics Module Heat Pipes Design and Performance Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ottenstein, Laura; DeChristopher, Mike

    2011-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is an international network of satellites that provide the next-generation global observations of rain and snow. The GPM core satellite carries an advanced radar / radiometer system to measure precipitation from space and serve as a reference standard to unify precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational satellites. Through improved measurements of precipitation globally, the GPM mission will help to advance our understanding of Earth's water and energy cycle, improve forecasting of extreme events that cause natural hazards and disasters, and extend current capabilities in using accurate and timely information of precipitation to directly benefit society. The avionics module on the core satellite contains a number of electronics boxes which are cooled by a network of aluminum/ammonia heat pipes and a honeycomb radiator which contains thirteen embedded aluminum/ammonia heat pipes. All heat pipes were individually tested by the vendor (Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc.) prior to delivery. Following delivery to NASA, the flight avionics radiator and the flight spare transport heat pipes were mounted to flight-like test structure and a system level thermal vacuum test was performed. This test, which used simulators in place of all electronics boxes, was done to verify the operation of the thermal control system as a whole. This presentation will discuss the design of the avionics module heat pipes, and then discuss performance tests results for the individual heat pipes prior to delivery and for the system level thermal vacuum test. All heat pipes met their performance requirements. However, it was found that the power was too low in some instances to start all of the smaller radiator spreader heat pipes when they were tested in a reflux configuration (which is the nominal test configuration). Although this lowered the efficiency of the radiator somewhat, it did not impact the operating

  17. Anomalous Transport of High Energy Cosmic Rays in Galactic Superbubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barghouty, Nasser F.

    2014-01-01

    High-energy cosmic rays may exhibit anomalous transport as they traverse and are accelerated by a collection of supernovae explosions in a galactic superbubble. Signatures of this anomalous transport can show up in the particles' evolution and their spectra. In a continuous-time-random- walk (CTRW) model assuming standard diffusive shock acceleration theory (DSA) for each shock encounter, and where the superbubble (an OB stars association) is idealized as a heterogeneous region of particle sources and sinks, acceleration and transport in the superbubble can be shown to be sub-diffusive. While the sub-diffusive transport can be attributed to the stochastic nature of the acceleration time according to DSA theory, the spectral break appears to be an artifact of transport in a finite medium. These CTRW simulations point to a new and intriguing phenomenon associated with the statistical nature of collective acceleration of high energy cosmic rays in galactic superbubbles.

  18. Exploring Energy, Power, and Transportation Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowers, Donovan; Kellum, Mary

    These teacher's materials for a seven-unit course were developed to help students develop technological literacy, career exploration, and problem-solving skills relative to the communication industries. The seven units include an overview of energy and power, principles of energy and power, power production and conversion, power transmission and…

  19. Quantum transport of energy in controlled synthetic quantum magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermudez, Alejandro; Schaetz, Tobias

    2016-08-01

    We introduce a theoretical scheme that exploits laser cooling and phonon-mediated spin–spin interactions in crystals of trapped atomic ions to explore the transport of energy through a quantum magnet. We show how to implement an effective transport window to control the flow of energy through the magnet even in the absence of fermionic statistics for the carriers. This is achieved by shaping the density of states of the effective thermal reservoirs that arise from the interaction with the external bath of the modes of the electromagnetic field, and can be experimentally controlled by tuning the laser frequencies and intensities appropriately. The interplay of this transport window with the spin–spin interactions is exploited to build an analogue of the Coulomb-blockade effect in nano-scale electronic devices, and opens new possibilities to study quantum effects in energy transport.

  20. The efficiency of convective energy transport in the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, Kenneth H.

    1988-01-01

    Mixing length theory (MLT) utilizes adiabatic expansion (as well as radiative transport) to diminish the energy content of rising convective elements. Thus in MLT, the rising elements lose their energy to the environment most efficiently and consequently transport heat with the least efficiency. On the other hand Malkus proposed that convection would maximize the efficiency of energy transport. A new stellar envelope code is developed to first examine this other extreme, wherein rising turbulent elements transport heat with the greatest possible efficiency. This other extreme model differs from MLT by providing a small reduction in the upper convection zone temperatures but greatly diminished turbulent velocities below the top few hundred kilometers. Using the findings of deep atmospheric models with the Navier-Stokes equation allows the calculation of an intermediate solar envelope model. Consideration is given to solar observations, including recent helioseismology, to examine the position of the solar envelope compared with the envelope models.

  1. A method for evaluating transport energy consumption in suburban areas

    SciTech Connect

    Marique, Anne-Francoise Reiter, Sigrid

    2012-02-15

    Urban sprawl is a major issue for sustainable development. It represents a significant contribution to energy consumption of a territory especially due to transportation requirements. However, transport energy consumption is rarely taken into account when the sustainability of suburban structures is studied. In this context, the paper presents a method to estimate transport energy consumption in residential suburban areas. The study aimed, on this basis, at highlighting the most efficient strategies needed to promote awareness and to give practical hints on how to reduce transport energy consumption linked to urban sprawl in existing and future suburban neighborhoods. The method uses data collected by using empirical surveys and GIS. An application of this method is presented concerning the comparison of four suburban districts located in Belgium to demonstrate the advantages of the approach. The influence of several parameters, such as distance to work places and services, use of public transport and performance of the vehicles, are then discussed to allow a range of different development situations to be explored. The results of the case studies highlight that traveled distances, and thus a good mix between activities at the living area scale, are of primordial importance for the energy performance, whereas means of transport used is only of little impact. Improving the performance of the vehicles and favoring home-work give also significant energy savings. The method can be used when planning new areas or retrofitting existing ones, as well as promoting more sustainable lifestyles regarding transport habits. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method allows to assess transport energy consumption in suburban areas and highlight the best strategies to reduce it. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Home-to-work travels represent the most important part of calculated transport energy consumption. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Energy savings can be achieved by

  2. Energy and Momentum Transport in String Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juenker, D. W.

    1976-01-01

    Formulas are derived for the energy, momentum, and angular momentum transmitted by waves of arbitrary shape in an inextensible string by pure transverse waves in a string using Tait's procedure. (Author/CP)

  3. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Freight Transportation Demand: Energy-Efficient Scenarios for a Low-Carbon Future

    SciTech Connect

    Grenzeback, L. R.; Brown, A.; Fischer, M. J.; Hutson, N.; Lamm, C. R.; Pei, Y. L.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Vyas, A. D.; Winebrake, J. J.

    2013-03-01

    Freight transportation demand is projected to grow to 27.5 billion tons in 2040, and to nearly 30.2 billion tons in 2050. This report describes the current and future demand for freight transportation in terms of tons and ton-miles of commodities moved by truck, rail, water, pipeline, and air freight carriers. It outlines the economic, logistics, transportation, and policy and regulatory factors that shape freight demand, the trends and 2050 outlook for these factors, and their anticipated effect on freight demand. After describing federal policy actions that could influence future freight demand, the report then summarizes the capabilities of available analytical models for forecasting freight demand. This is one in a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for reducing GHGs and petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  4. Transportation and operations aspects of space energy systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodcock, Gordon R.

    1989-01-01

    A brief comparative analysis was made for three concepts of supplying large-scale electrical energy to Earth from space. The concepts were: (1) mining helium-3 on the Moon and returning it to Earth; (2) constructing solar power satellites in geosynchronous orbit from lunar materials (the energy is beamed by microwave to receivers on Earth); and (3) constructing power collection and beaming systems on the Moon itself and transmitting the energy to Earth by microwave. This analysis concerned mainly space transportation and operations, but each of the systems is briefly characterized to provide a basis for space transportation and operations analysis.

  5. Transportation Energy Futures: Combining Strategies for Deep Reductions in Energy Consumption and GHG Emissions (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-03-01

    This fact sheet summarizes actions in the areas of light-duty vehicle, non-light-duty vehicle, fuel, and transportation demand that show promise for deep reductions in energy use. Energy efficient transportation strategies have the potential to simultaneously reduce oil consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project examined how the combination of multiple strategies could achieve deep reductions in GHG emissions and petroleum use on the order of 80%. Led by NREL, in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory, the project's primary goal was to help inform domestic decisions about transportation energy strategies, priorities, and investments, with an emphasis on underexplored opportunities. TEF findings reveal three strategies with the potential to displace most transportation-related petroleum use and GHG emissions: 1) Stabilizing energy use in the transportation sector through efficiency and demand-side approaches. 2) Using additional advanced biofuels. 3) Expanding electric drivetrain technologies.

  6. Piping Connector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A complex of high pressure piping at Stennis Space Center carries rocket propellants and other fluids/gases through the Center's Component Test Facility. Conventional clamped connectors tend to leak when propellant lines are chilled to extremely low temperatures. Reflange, Inc. customized an existing piping connector to include a secondary seal more tolerant of severe thermal gradients for Stennis. The T-Con connector solved the problem, and the company is now marketing a commercial version that permits testing, monitoring or collecting any emissions that may escape the primary seal during severe thermal transition.

  7. Pipe gripper

    DOEpatents

    Moyers, S.M.

    1975-12-16

    A device for gripping the exterior surface of a pipe or rod is described which has a plurality of wedges, each having a concave face which engages the outer surface of the pipe and each having a smooth face opposing the concave face. The wedges are seated on and their grooved concave faces are maintained in circular alignment by tapered axial segments of an opening extending through a wedge-seating member. The wedges are allowed to slide across the tapered axial segments so that such a sliding movement acts to vary the diameter of the circular alignment.

  8. Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Heat Pipes were originally developed by NASA and the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory during the 1960s to dissipate excessive heat build- up in critical areas of spacecraft and maintain even temperatures of satellites. Heat pipes are tubular devices where a working fluid alternately evaporates and condenses, transferring heat from one region of the tube to another. KONA Corporation refined and applied the same technology to solve complex heating requirements of hot runner systems in injection molds. KONA Hot Runner Systems are used throughout the plastics industry for products ranging in size from tiny medical devices to large single cavity automobile bumpers and instrument panels.

  9. Large-bore pipe decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Ebadian, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    The decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of 1200 buildings within the US Department of Energy-Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Complex will require the disposition of miles of pipe. The disposition of large-bore pipe, in particular, presents difficulties in the area of decontamination and characterization. The pipe is potentially contaminated internally as well as externally. This situation requires a system capable of decontaminating and characterizing both the inside and outside of the pipe. Current decontamination and characterization systems are not designed for application to this geometry, making the direct disposal of piping systems necessary in many cases. The pipe often creates voids in the disposal cell, which requires the pipe to be cut in half or filled with a grout material. These methods are labor intensive and costly to perform on large volumes of pipe. Direct disposal does not take advantage of recycling, which could provide monetary dividends. To facilitate the decontamination and characterization of large-bore piping and thereby reduce the volume of piping required for disposal, a detailed analysis will be conducted to document the pipe remediation problem set; determine potential technologies to solve this remediation problem set; design and laboratory test potential decontamination and characterization technologies; fabricate a prototype system; provide a cost-benefit analysis of the proposed system; and transfer the technology to industry. This report summarizes the activities performed during fiscal year 1997 and describes the planned activities for fiscal year 1998. Accomplishments for FY97 include the development of the applicable and relevant and appropriate regulations, the screening of decontamination and characterization technologies, and the selection and initial design of the decontamination system.

  10. H- beam transport experiments in a solenoid low energy beam transport.

    PubMed

    Gabor, C; Back, J J; Faircloth, D C; Izaola, Z; Lawrie, S R; Letchford, A P

    2012-02-01

    The Front End Test Stand (FETS) is located at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and aims for a high current, fast chopped 3 MeV H(-) ion beam suitable for future high power proton accelerators like ISIS upgrade. The main components of the front end are the Penning ion source, a low energy beam transport line, an radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) and a medium energy beam transport (MEBT) providing also a chopper section and rebuncher. FETS is in the stage of commissioning its low energy beam transport (LEBT) line consisting of three solenoids. The LEBT has to transport an H(-) high current beam (up to 60 mA) at 65 keV. This is the injection energy of the beam into the RFQ. The main diagnostics are slit-slit emittance scanners for each transversal plane. For optimizing the matching to the RFQ, experiments have been performed with a variety of solenoid settings to better understand the actual beam transport. Occasionally, source parameters such as extractor slit width and beam energy were varied as well. The paper also discusses simulations based on these measurements.

  11. H{sup -} beam transport experiments in a solenoid low energy beam transport

    SciTech Connect

    Gabor, C.; Back, J. J.; Faircloth, D. C.; Lawrie, S. R.; Letchford, A. P.; Izaola, Z.

    2012-02-15

    The Front End Test Stand (FETS) is located at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and aims for a high current, fast chopped 3 MeV H{sup -} ion beam suitable for future high power proton accelerators like ISIS upgrade. The main components of the front end are the Penning ion source, a low energy beam transport line, an radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) and a medium energy beam transport (MEBT) providing also a chopper section and rebuncher. FETS is in the stage of commissioning its low energy beam transport (LEBT) line consisting of three solenoids. The LEBT has to transport an H{sup -} high current beam (up to 60 mA) at 65 keV. This is the injection energy of the beam into the RFQ. The main diagnostics are slit-slit emittance scanners for each transversal plane. For optimizing the matching to the RFQ, experiments have been performed with a variety of solenoid settings to better understand the actual beam transport. Occasionally, source parameters such as extractor slit width and beam energy were varied as well. The paper also discusses simulations based on these measurements.

  12. Prometheus Hot Leg Piping Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Gribik, Anastasia M.; DiLorenzo, Peter A.

    2007-01-30

    The Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommended the development of a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton energy conversion system as the Space Nuclear Power Plant (SNPP) for NASA's Project Prometheus. The section of piping between the reactor outlet and turbine inlet, designated as the hot leg piping, required unique design features to allow the use of a nickel superalloy rather than a refractory metal as the pressure boundary. The NRPCT evaluated a variety of hot leg piping concepts for performance relative to SNPP system parameters, manufacturability, material considerations, and comparison to past high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) practice. Manufacturability challenges and the impact of pressure drop and turbine entrance temperature reduction on cycle efficiency were discriminators between the piping concepts. This paper summarizes the NRPCT hot leg piping evaluation, presents the concept recommended, and summarizes developmental issues for the recommended concept.

  13. Promethus Hot Leg Piping Concept

    SciTech Connect

    AM Girbik; PA Dilorenzo

    2006-01-24

    The Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommended the development of a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton energy conversion system as the Space Nuclear Power Plant (SNPP) for NASA's Project Prometheus. The section of piping between the reactor outlet and turbine inlet, designated as the hot leg piping, required unique design features to allow the use of a nickel superalloy rather than a refractory metal as the pressure boundary. The NRPCT evaluated a variety of hot leg piping concepts for performance relative to SNPP system parameters, manufacturability, material considerations, and comparison to past high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) practice. Manufacturability challenges and the impact of pressure drop and turbine entrance temperature reduction on cycle efficiency were discriminators between the piping concepts. This paper summarizes the NRPCT hot leg piping evaluation, presents the concept recommended, and summarizes developmental issues for the recommended concept.

  14. 49 CFR 230.63 - Smoke box, steam pipes and pressure parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Pipes § 230.63 Smoke box, steam pipes and pressure parts. The smoke box, steam pipes and... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Smoke box, steam pipes and pressure parts....

  15. 49 CFR 230.63 - Smoke box, steam pipes and pressure parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Pipes § 230.63 Smoke box, steam pipes and pressure parts. The smoke box, steam pipes and... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Smoke box, steam pipes and pressure parts....

  16. 49 CFR 230.63 - Smoke box, steam pipes and pressure parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Pipes § 230.63 Smoke box, steam pipes and pressure parts. The smoke box, steam pipes and... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Smoke box, steam pipes and pressure parts....

  17. 49 CFR 230.63 - Smoke box, steam pipes and pressure parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Pipes § 230.63 Smoke box, steam pipes and pressure parts. The smoke box, steam pipes and... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Smoke box, steam pipes and pressure parts....

  18. 49 CFR 230.63 - Smoke box, steam pipes and pressure parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Pipes § 230.63 Smoke box, steam pipes and pressure parts. The smoke box, steam pipes and... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Smoke box, steam pipes and pressure parts....

  19. How to Conserve Energy in School Transportation Systems. Energy Conservation Materials Package 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Education, Denver.

    Energy conservation in school transportation is a major area of concern to the educational community. School buses travel in excess of four billion miles annually consuming 900 million gallons of fuel, transporting 55 percent of the school enrollment (grades K-12). Since the fuel allocation emergency, school transportation managers have begun…

  20. Abrasion resistance of linings in filament wound composite pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, S.C.

    1999-07-01

    Fiberglass filament wound composite pipe has numerous industrial applications including transportation of petroleum and natural gas. Its corrosion resistance is well known but it can be susceptible to abrasion and erosion when it is used to transport slurries or dry gas containing sand particles. However, composite pipe can be manufactured integrally with abrasion resistant linings which protect the pipe from abrasion and erosion and increase its life. Laboratory investigations were performed to determine the effect of abrasive flows through polyurea-lined and unlined glass-reinforced epoxy (GRE) pipe, ultra-high molecular weight (UHMW) polyethylene (PE) pipe, and unlined steel pipe. Results are provided for the abrasion resistance, chemical resistance, adhesion strength, elongation, tensile strength, impact resistance and hardness of selected linings. The abrasion resistance of polyurea-lined composite pipe proved to be almost as resistant to abrasion and erosion as unlined steel pipe without the electrochemical corrosion associated with steel pipe.

  1. Triplet Energy Transport in Platinum-Acetylide Light Harvesting Arrays.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhuo; Hsu, Hsien-Yi; Arca, Mert; Schanze, Kirk S

    2015-06-18

    Light harvesting and triplet energy transport is investigated in chromophore-functionalized polystyrene polymers featuring light harvesting and energy acceptor chromophores (traps) at varying loading. The series of precision polymers was constructed via reversible addition-fragmentation transfer polymerization and functionalized with platinum acetylide triplet chromophores by using an azide-alkyne "click" reaction. The polymers have narrow polydispersity and degree of polymerization ∼60. The chromophores have the general structure, trans-[-R-C6H4-C≡C-Pt(PBu3)2-C≡C-Ar], where R is the attachment point to the polystyrene backbone and Ar is either -C6H4-C≡C-Ph or -pyrenyl (PE2-Pt and Py-Pt, respectively, with triplet energies of 2.35 and 1.88 eV). The polychromophores contain mainly the high-energy PE2-Pt units (light absorber and energy donor), with randomly distributed Py-Pt units (3-20% loading, energy acceptor). Photophysical methods are used to study the dynamics and efficiency of energy transport from the PE2-Pt to Py-Pt units in the polychromophores. The energy transfer efficiency is >90% for copolymers that contain 5% of the Py-Pt acceptor units. Time-resolved phosphorescence measurements combined with Monte Carlo exciton dynamics simulations suggest that the mechanism of exciton transport is exchange energy transfer hopping between PE2-Pt units.

  2. Alpha detection in pipes using an inverting membrane scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Kendrick, D.T.; Cremer, C.D.; Lowry, W.

    1995-10-01

    Characterization of surface alpha emitting contamination inside enclosed spaces such as piping systems presents an interesting radiological measurement challenge. Detection of these alpha particles from the exterior of the pipe is impossible since the alpha particles are completely absorbed by the pipe wall. Traditional survey techniques, using hand-held instruments, simply can not be used effectively inside pipes. Science and Engineering Associates, Inc. is currently developing an enhancement to its Pipe Explorer{trademark} system that will address this challenge. The Pipe Explorer{trademark} uses a unique sensor deployment method where an inverted tubular membrane is propagated through complex pipe runs via air pressure. The inversion process causes the membrane to fold out against the pipe wall, such that no part of the membrane drags along the pipe wall. This deployment methodology has been successfully demonstrated at several DOE sites to transport specially designed beta and gamma, scintillation detectors into pipes ranging in length up to 250 ft.

  3. Consumer Views on Transportation and Energy (Third Edition)

    SciTech Connect

    Kubik, M.

    2006-01-01

    This report has been assembled to provide the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) with an idea of how the American public views various transportation, energy, and environmental issues. The data presented in this report have been drawn from multiple sources: surveys conducted by the Opinion Research Corporation (ORC) for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that are commissioned and funded by EERE, Gallup polls, news organization polls, surveys conducted by independent groups and academic institutions, and other sources.

  4. Transport of energy by disturbances in arbitrary steady flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, M. K.

    1991-01-01

    An exact equation governing the transport of energy associated with disturbances in an arbitrary steady flow is derived. The result is a generalization of the familiar concept of acoustic energy and is suggested by a perturbation expansion of the general energy equation of fluid mechanics. A disturbance energy density and flux are defined and identified as exact fluid dynamic quantities whose leading-order regular perturbation representations reduce in various special cases to previously known results. The exact equation on disturbance energy is applied to a simple example of nonlinear wave propagation as an illustration of its general utility in situations where a linear description of the disturbance is inadequate.

  5. Post-Test Analysis of a 10-Year Sodium Heat Pipe Life Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfeld, John H.; Locci, Ivan E.; Sanzi, James L.; Hull, David R.; Geng, Steven M.

    2011-01-01

    High-temperature heat pipes are being evaluated for use in energy conversion applications such as fuel cells, gas turbine re-combustors, Stirling cycle heat sources; and with the resurgence of space nuclear power both as reactor heat removal elements and as radiator elements. Long operating life and reliable performance are critical requirements for these applications. Accordingly, long-term materials compatibility is being evaluated through the use of high-temperature life test heat pipes. Thermacore, Inc., has carried out a sodium heat pipe 10-year life test to establish long-term operating reliability. Sodium heat pipes have demonstrated favorable materials compatibility and heat transport characteristics at high operating temperatures in air over long time periods. A representative one-tenth segment Stirling Space Power Converter heat pipe with an Inconel 718 envelope and a stainless steel screen wick has operated for over 87,000 hr (10 years) at nearly 700 C. These life test results have demonstrated the potential for high-temperature heat pipes to serve as reliable energy conversion system components for power applications that require long operating lifetime with high reliability. Detailed design specifications, operating history, and post-test analysis of the heat pipe and sodium working fluid are described. Lessons learned and future life test plans are also discussed.

  6. Transition from IVR limited vibrational energy transport to bulk heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schade, Marco; Hamm, Peter

    2012-01-01

    In a previous paper [M. Schade, P. Hamm, Vibrational energy transport in the presence of intrasite vibrational energy redistribution, J. Chem. Phys. 131 (2009) 044511], it has been shown that on ultrashort length and time scales, the speed of vibrational energy transport along a molecular chain is limited by intrasite vibrational relaxation rather than the actual intersite propagation. However, since intrasite vibrational relaxation is length independent, the intersite propagation rate is expected to become rate-limiting at some length scale, where propagation approaches the bulk limit. In the present paper, we investigate the transition between both regimes. The response of different types of modes may be very different at early times, depending on how much they contribute directly to energy transport. Surprisingly though, when averaging the energy content over all vibrational modes of the various chain sites, the complexity of the intrasite vibrational relaxation process is completely hidden so that energy transport on the nanoscale can be described by an effective propagation rate, that equals the bulk value, even at short times.

  7. A quantum energy transport model for semiconductor device simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Sho, Shohiro; Odanaka, Shinji

    2013-02-15

    This paper describes numerical methods for a quantum energy transport (QET) model in semiconductors, which is derived by using a diffusion scaling in the quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) model. We newly drive a four-moments QET model similar with a classical ET model. Space discretization is performed by a new set of unknown variables. Numerical stability and convergence are obtained by developing numerical schemes and an iterative solution method with a relaxation method. Numerical simulations of electron transport in a scaled MOSFET device are discussed. The QET model allows simulations of quantum confinement transport, and nonlocal and hot-carrier effects in scaled MOSFETs.

  8. Transportation and energy efficiency: Promised potentials, serious roadblocks

    SciTech Connect

    Kraft-Oliver, T.V.

    1995-12-31

    Transportation is both a critical element of achieving national economic development goals and a major consumer of scarce and expensive energy resources. Improvements in access and mobility from reduced congestion, higher speeds, additional non motorized and pedestrian options, and better mass transit will result in reductions in energy use in most cases. Additional improvements in vehicle efficiency are possible but will not meet the needs of the region for transportation and energy efficiency improvements in the absence of these other improvements. The barriers to success in the transport sector are obvious on a superficial level. They include lack of road space, inadequate or incomplete road networks, insufficient mass transit capacity, predation of pedestrian and nonmotorized vehicle space by motor vehicles, and financing. The lack of progress in solving many of these problems over the past ten to twenty years indicates that there are underlying issues not yet addressed. Perceptions of these problems have changed since the middle 1970s and early 1980s as international lending and technical assistance began to focus on transportation. In those early years the problems were described as financial, and `meeting demand` challenges. The World Bank is now conducting a review of their Transport Sector Policy. While the review has not progressed to a final document and certainly not to articulation or transformation of Bank policy, early drafts reflect a view that past failures to improve transportation circumstances are human resource and institutional problems.

  9. Analysis of the theory of high energy ion transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    Procedures for the approximation of the transport of high-energy ions are discussed on the basis of available data on ion nuclear reactions. A straightahead approximation appears appropriate for space applications. The assumption that the secondary-ion-fragment velocity is equal to that of the fragmenting nucleus is inferior to straightahead theory but is of sufficient accuracy if the primary ions display a broad energy spectrum. An iterative scheme for the solution of the inhomogenous integral transport equations holds promise for practical calculation. A model calculation shows that multiple charged ion fragments penetrate to greater depths in comparison with the free path of a primary heavy ion.

  10. LDRD project 151362 : low energy electron-photon transport.

    SciTech Connect

    Kensek, Ronald Patrick; Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Magyar, Rudolph J.; Bondi, Robert James; Crawford, Martin James

    2013-09-01

    At sufficiently high energies, the wavelengths of electrons and photons are short enough to only interact with one atom at time, leading to the popular %E2%80%9Cindependent-atom approximation%E2%80%9D. We attempted to incorporate atomic structure in the generation of cross sections (which embody the modeled physics) to improve transport at lower energies. We document our successes and failures. This was a three-year LDRD project. The core team consisted of a radiation-transport expert, a solid-state physicist, and two DFT experts.

  11. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Freight Transportation Modal Shares: Scenarios for a Low-Carbon Future

    SciTech Connect

    Brogan, J. J.; Aeppli, A. E.; Beagan, D. F.; Brown, A.; Fischer, M. J.; Grenzeback, L. R.; McKenzie, E.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Vyas, A. D.; Witzke, E.

    2013-03-01

    Truck, rail, water, air, and pipeline modes each serve a distinct share of the freight transportation market. The current allocation of freight by mode is the product of technologic, economic, and regulatory frameworks, and a variety of factors -- price, speed, reliability, accessibility, visibility, security, and safety -- influence mode. Based on a comprehensive literature review, this report considers how analytical methods can be used to project future modal shares and offers insights on federal policy decisions with the potential to prompt shifts to energy-efficient, low-emission modes. There are substantial opportunities to reduce the energy used for freight transportation, but it will be difficult to shift large volumes from one mode to another without imposing considerable additional costs on businesses and consumers. This report explores federal government actions that could help trigger the shifts in modal shares needed to reduce energy consumption and emissions. This is one in a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency effort to pinpoint underexplored strategies for reducing GHGs and petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  12. Technology Development Plan: Geotechnical survey systems for OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion) cold water pipes: Final subcontract report

    SciTech Connect

    Valent, P.J.; Riggins, M.

    1989-04-01

    This report provides an overview of current and developing technologies and techniques for performing geotechnical investigations for siting and designing Cold Water Pipes (CWP) for shelf-resting Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power plants. The geotechnical in situ tools used to measure the required parameters and the equipment/systems used to deploy these tools are identified. The capabilities of these geotechnical tools and deployment systems are compared to the data requirements for the CWP foundation/anchor design, and shortfalls are identified. For the last phase of geotechnical data gathering for design, a drillship will be required to perform soil boring work, to obtain required high-quality sediment samples for laboratory dynamic testing, and to perform deep-penetration in situ tests. To remedy shortfalls and to reduce the future OTEC CWP geotechnical survey costs, it is recommended that a seafloor-resting machine be developed to advance the friction cone penetrometer, and also probably a pressuremeter, to provide geotechnical parameters to shallow subseafloor penetrations on slopes of 35/degree/ and in water depths to 1300 m. 74 refs., 19 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Neutral dynamics and ion energy transport in MST plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Zichuan; Nornberg, Mark; den Hartog, Daniel; Kumar, Santosh; Anderson, Jay

    2015-11-01

    Neutral dynamics can have a significant effect on ion energy transport through charge exchange collisions. Whereas previously charge exchange was considered a direct loss mechanism in MST plasmas, new analysis indicates that significant thermal charge exchange neutrals are reionized. Further, the temperatures of the neutral species in the core of the plasma are suspected to be much higher than room temperature, which has a large effect on ion energy losses due to charge exchange. The DEGAS2 Monte Carlo simulation code is applied to the MST reversed field pinch experiment to estimate the density and temperature profile of the neutral species. The result is then used to further examine the effect of the neutral species on ion energy transport in improved confinement plasmas. This enables the development of a model that accounts for collisional equilibration between species, classical convective and conductive energy transport, and energy loss due to charge exchange collisions. The goal is to quantify classical, stochastic, and anomalous ion heating and transport in RFP plasmas. Work supported by the US DOE. DEGAS2 is provided by PPPL and STRAHL is provided by Ralph Dux of the Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasmaphysik.

  14. Energy and transportation systems. Final report 1980-1983

    SciTech Connect

    Talaga, D.; Palen, J.; Hatano, M.; Shirley, E.C.

    1983-07-01

    The objective of the study was to upgrade the publication titled, Energy and Transportation Systems. The most recent data for establishing factors for calculating direct and indirect energy usage on a highway improvement project were incorporated into a new report. Energy analysis and updated factors are discussed separately for recycling asphalt-concrete pavements and for light-rail systems. A new criterion for impact was developed and life-cycle costing is discussed. The computer program for performing an energy analysis on a highway project has been expanded and improved.

  15. Air transportation energy consumption - Yesterday, today, and tomorrow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mascy, A. C.; Williams, L. J.

    1975-01-01

    The energy consumption by aviation is reviewed and projections of its growth are discussed. Forecasts of domestic passenger demand are presented, and the effect of restricted fuel supply and increased fuel prices is considered. The most promising sources for aircraft fuels, their availability and cost, and possible alternative fuels are reviewed. The energy consumption by various air and surface transportation modes is identified and compared on typical portal-to-portal trips. A measure of the indirect energy consumed by ground and air modes is defined. Historical trends in aircraft energy intensities are presented and the potential fuel savings with new technologies are discussed.

  16. End use energy consumption data base: transportation sector

    SciTech Connect

    Hooker, J.N.; Rose, A.B.; Greene, D.L.

    1980-02-01

    The transportation fuel and energy use estimates developed a Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the End Use Energy Consumption Data Base are documented. The total data base contains estimates of energy use in the United States broken down into many categories within all sectors of the economy: agriculture, mining, construction, manufacturing, commerce, the household, electric utilities, and transportation. The transportation data provided by ORNL generally cover each of the 10 years from 1967 through 1976 (occasionally 1977 and 1978), with omissions in some models. The estimtes are broken down by mode of transport, fuel, region and State, sector of the economy providing transportation, and by the use to which it is put, and, in the case of automobile and bus travel, by the income of the traveler. Fuel types include natural gas, motor and aviation gasoline, residual and diesel oil, liuqefied propane, liquefied butane, and naphtha- and kerosene-type jet engine fuels. Electricity use is also estimated. The mode, fuel, sector, and use categories themselves subsume one, two, or three levels of subcategories, resulting in a very detailed categorization and definitive accounting.

  17. Center for Renewable Energy and Alternative Transportation Technologies (CREATT)

    SciTech Connect

    Mackin, Thomas

    2012-06-30

    The Center for Renewable Energy and Alternative Transportation Technologies (CREATT) was established to advance the state of the art in knowledge and education on critical technologies that support a renewable energy future. Our research and education efforts have focused on alternative energy systems, energy storage systems, and research on battery and hybrid energy storage systems.This report details the Center's progress in the following specific areas: Development of a battery laboratory; Development of a demonstration system for compressed air energy storage; Development of electric propulsion test systems; Battery storage systems; Thermal management of battery packs; and Construction of a micro-grid to support real-world performance monitoring of a renewable energy system.

  18. Electric Transport Traction Power Supply System With Distributed Energy Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, E. Y.; Schurov, N. I.; Rozhkova, M. V.

    2016-04-01

    The paper states the problem of traction substation (TSS) leveling of daily-load curve for urban electric transport. The circuit of traction power supply system (TPSS) with distributed autonomous energy source (AES) based on photovoltaic (PV) and energy storage (ES) units is submitted here. The distribution algorithm of power flow for the daily traction load curve leveling is also introduced in this paper. In addition, it illustrates the implemented experiment model of power supply system.

  19. A Numerical Analysis on Freezing Behavior of Flowing Water inside a Pipe Cooled from Surroundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Ryoichi; Izumi, Masaaki

    A freezing phenomenon in forced convectional flow inside a pipe is investigated numerically in this paper .The numerical analysis is carried out to assess the transient freezing behavior of flowing water inside a pipe cooled from surroundings in consideration of pressure drop caused by the freezing. The finite element technique is applied to solve the equations of motion and energy transport for laminar flow. The numerical model attempts to capture the solid-fluid interface on a fixed computational grid. The correlations among cooling conditions of pipe, velocity and temperature of water at the inlet, and location at which the freezing starts are examined to show the critical velocity to avoid freezing. In addition, under the condition that pressure remains constant at the inlet, the period in which the pipe is not blockaded by ice is calculated. The period is illustrated with some dimensionless parameters to predict the conditions under which blockage occurs within a given time.

  20. Origin and transport of high energy particles in the galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wefel, John P.

    1987-01-01

    The origin, confinement, and transport of cosmic ray nuclei in the galaxy was studied. The work involves interpretations of the existing cosmic ray physics database derived from both balloon and satellite measurements, combined with an effort directed towards defining the next generation of instruments for the study of cosmic radiation. The shape and the energy dependence of the cosmic ray pathlength distribution in the galaxy was studied, demonstrating that the leaky box model is not a good representation of the detailed particle transport over the energy range covered by the database. Alternative confinement methods were investigated, analyzing the confinement lifetime in these models based upon the available data for radioactive secondary isotopes. The source abundances of several isotopes were studied using compiled nuclear physics data and the detailed transport calculations. The effects of distributed particle acceleration on the secondary to primary ratios were investigated.

  1. The High-Energy Transport Code HETC88

    SciTech Connect

    Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Alsmiller, F.S.; Gabriel, T.A.; Hermann, O.W.; Barnes, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    An upgraded version, HETC88, of the previously available High-Energy Transport Code HETC is briefly described. In the upgraded code, the particle production model from hadron-nucleus nonelastic collisions at energies greater than 5 GeV has been revised. At nucleon and ion energies below 5 GeV, HETC88 is not different from the code previously available. In particular, provision is still made to allow neutrons with energies less than or equal to20 MeV to be transported by none of the available codes designed for low-energy neutron transport. Calculated results for the longitudinal distribution of the flux of neutrons with energy greater than or equal to40 KeV in the Tevatron tunnel when 900 GeV protons interact with N/sub 2/ in a warm section are presented and compared with experimental data. Some disagreements between the calculated and measured neutron flux are found. For 20 TeV protons incident on a large cylindrical iron target, calculated ''star'' density results from HETC88, FLUKA87, CASIM, and MARS10 are also compared. 22 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Supersonic transport vis-a-vis energy savings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cormery, G.

    1979-01-01

    The energy and economic saving modifications in supersonic transportation are studied. Modifications in the propulsion systems and in the aerodynamic configurations of the Concorde aircraft to reduce noise generation and increase fuel efficiency are discussed. The conversion of supersonic aircraft from fuel oils to synthetic fuels is examined.

  3. 78 FR 13156 - Notice of Rail Energy Transportation Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-26

    ... Surface Transportation Board Notice of Rail Energy Transportation Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: Surface Transportation Board, Transportation. ACTION: Notice of Rail Energy Transportation Advisory... communications about this meeting may be announced through the Board's Web site at WWW.STB.DOT.GOV. This...

  4. 49 CFR 192.287 - Plastic pipe: Inspection of joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Plastic pipe: Inspection of joints. 192.287... Than by Welding § 192.287 Plastic pipe: Inspection of joints. No person may carry out the inspection of joints in plastic pipes required by §§ 192.273(c) and 192.285(b) unless that person has been qualified...

  5. 49 CFR 192.283 - Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures. 192... Materials Other Than by Welding § 192.283 Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures. (a) Heat fusion... for making plastic pipe joints by a heat fusion, solvent cement, or adhesive method, the...

  6. 49 CFR 192.123 - Design limitations for plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Design limitations for plastic pipe. 192.123... Design limitations for plastic pipe. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (e) and paragraph (f) of this section, the design pressure may not exceed a gauge pressure of 100 psig (689 kPa) for plastic pipe...

  7. 49 CFR 192.123 - Design limitations for plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Design limitations for plastic pipe. 192.123... Design limitations for plastic pipe. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (e) and paragraph (f) of this section, the design pressure may not exceed a gauge pressure of 100 psig (689 kPa) for plastic pipe...

  8. 49 CFR 192.311 - Repair of plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Repair of plastic pipe. 192.311 Section 192.311... Lines and Mains § 192.311 Repair of plastic pipe. Each imperfection or damage that would impair the serviceability of plastic pipe must be repaired or removed....

  9. 49 CFR 192.311 - Repair of plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Repair of plastic pipe. 192.311 Section 192.311... Lines and Mains § 192.311 Repair of plastic pipe. Each imperfection or damage that would impair the serviceability of plastic pipe must be repaired or removed....

  10. 49 CFR 192.311 - Repair of plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Repair of plastic pipe. 192.311 Section 192.311... Lines and Mains § 192.311 Repair of plastic pipe. Each imperfection or damage that would impair the serviceability of plastic pipe must be repaired or removed....

  11. 49 CFR 192.283 - Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures. 192... Materials Other Than by Welding § 192.283 Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures. (a) Heat fusion... for making plastic pipe joints by a heat fusion, solvent cement, or adhesive method, the...

  12. 49 CFR 192.287 - Plastic pipe: Inspection of joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Plastic pipe: Inspection of joints. 192.287... Than by Welding § 192.287 Plastic pipe: Inspection of joints. No person may carry out the inspection of joints in plastic pipes required by §§ 192.273(c) and 192.285(b) unless that person has been qualified...

  13. 49 CFR 192.287 - Plastic pipe: Inspection of joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Plastic pipe: Inspection of joints. 192.287... Than by Welding § 192.287 Plastic pipe: Inspection of joints. No person may carry out the inspection of joints in plastic pipes required by §§ 192.273(c) and 192.285(b) unless that person has been qualified...

  14. 49 CFR 192.311 - Repair of plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Repair of plastic pipe. 192.311 Section 192.311... Lines and Mains § 192.311 Repair of plastic pipe. Each imperfection or damage that would impair the serviceability of plastic pipe must be repaired or removed....

  15. 49 CFR 192.193 - Valve installation in plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Valve installation in plastic pipe. 192.193... Components § 192.193 Valve installation in plastic pipe. Each valve installed in plastic pipe must be designed so as to protect the plastic material against excessive torsional or shearing loads when the...

  16. 49 CFR 192.193 - Valve installation in plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Valve installation in plastic pipe. 192.193... Components § 192.193 Valve installation in plastic pipe. Each valve installed in plastic pipe must be designed so as to protect the plastic material against excessive torsional or shearing loads when the...

  17. 49 CFR 192.123 - Design limitations for plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Design limitations for plastic pipe. 192.123... Design limitations for plastic pipe. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (e) and paragraph (f) of this section, the design pressure may not exceed a gauge pressure of 100 psig (689 kPa) for plastic pipe...

  18. 49 CFR 192.287 - Plastic pipe: Inspection of joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Plastic pipe: Inspection of joints. 192.287... Than by Welding § 192.287 Plastic pipe: Inspection of joints. No person may carry out the inspection of joints in plastic pipes required by §§ 192.273(c) and 192.285(b) unless that person has been qualified...

  19. 49 CFR 192.283 - Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures. 192... Materials Other Than by Welding § 192.283 Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures. (a) Heat fusion... for making plastic pipe joints by a heat fusion, solvent cement, or adhesive method, the...

  20. 49 CFR 192.123 - Design limitations for plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Design limitations for plastic pipe. 192.123... Design limitations for plastic pipe. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (e) and paragraph (f) of this section, the design pressure may not exceed a gauge pressure of 100 psig (689 kPa) for plastic pipe...

  1. 49 CFR 192.123 - Design limitations for plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Design limitations for plastic pipe. 192.123... Design limitations for plastic pipe. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (e) and paragraph (f) of this section, the design pressure may not exceed a gauge pressure of 100 psig (689 kPa) for plastic pipe...

  2. 49 CFR 192.193 - Valve installation in plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Valve installation in plastic pipe. 192.193... Components § 192.193 Valve installation in plastic pipe. Each valve installed in plastic pipe must be designed so as to protect the plastic material against excessive torsional or shearing loads when the...

  3. 49 CFR 192.311 - Repair of plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Repair of plastic pipe. 192.311 Section 192.311... Lines and Mains § 192.311 Repair of plastic pipe. Each imperfection or damage that would impair the serviceability of plastic pipe must be repaired or removed....

  4. 49 CFR 192.283 - Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures. 192... Materials Other Than by Welding § 192.283 Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures. (a) Heat fusion... for making plastic pipe joints by a heat fusion, solvent cement, or adhesive method, the...

  5. 49 CFR 192.283 - Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures. 192... Materials Other Than by Welding § 192.283 Plastic pipe: Qualifying joining procedures. (a) Heat fusion... for making plastic pipe joints by a heat fusion, solvent cement, or adhesive method, the...

  6. 49 CFR 192.287 - Plastic pipe: Inspection of joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Plastic pipe: Inspection of joints. 192.287... Than by Welding § 192.287 Plastic pipe: Inspection of joints. No person may carry out the inspection of joints in plastic pipes required by §§ 192.273(c) and 192.285(b) unless that person has been qualified...

  7. 49 CFR 192.193 - Valve installation in plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Valve installation in plastic pipe. 192.193... Components § 192.193 Valve installation in plastic pipe. Each valve installed in plastic pipe must be designed so as to protect the plastic material against excessive torsional or shearing loads when the...

  8. 49 CFR 192.193 - Valve installation in plastic pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Valve installation in plastic pipe. 192.193... Components § 192.193 Valve installation in plastic pipe. Each valve installed in plastic pipe must be designed so as to protect the plastic material against excessive torsional or shearing loads when the...

  9. 49 CFR 192.315 - Wrinkle bends in steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Wrinkle bends in steel pipe. 192.315 Section 192... Transmission Lines and Mains § 192.315 Wrinkle bends in steel pipe. (a) A wrinkle bend may not be made on steel... wrinkle bend on steel pipe must comply with the following: (1) The bend must not have any sharp kinks....

  10. 49 CFR 192.309 - Repair of steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Repair of steel pipe. 192.309 Section 192.309... Lines and Mains § 192.309 Repair of steel pipe. (a) Each imperfection or damage that impairs the serviceability of a length of steel pipe must be repaired or removed. If a repair is made by grinding,...

  11. 49 CFR 192.315 - Wrinkle bends in steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Wrinkle bends in steel pipe. 192.315 Section 192... Transmission Lines and Mains § 192.315 Wrinkle bends in steel pipe. (a) A wrinkle bend may not be made on steel... wrinkle bend on steel pipe must comply with the following: (1) The bend must not have any sharp kinks....

  12. 49 CFR 192.309 - Repair of steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Repair of steel pipe. 192.309 Section 192.309... Lines and Mains § 192.309 Repair of steel pipe. (a) Each imperfection or damage that impairs the serviceability of a length of steel pipe must be repaired or removed. If a repair is made by grinding,...

  13. 49 CFR 192.309 - Repair of steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Repair of steel pipe. 192.309 Section 192.309... Lines and Mains § 192.309 Repair of steel pipe. (a) Each imperfection or damage that impairs the serviceability of a length of steel pipe must be repaired or removed. If a repair is made by grinding,...

  14. 49 CFR 192.315 - Wrinkle bends in steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Wrinkle bends in steel pipe. 192.315 Section 192... Transmission Lines and Mains § 192.315 Wrinkle bends in steel pipe. (a) A wrinkle bend may not be made on steel... wrinkle bend on steel pipe must comply with the following: (1) The bend must not have any sharp kinks....

  15. 49 CFR 192.309 - Repair of steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Repair of steel pipe. 192.309 Section 192.309... Lines and Mains § 192.309 Repair of steel pipe. (a) Each imperfection or damage that impairs the serviceability of a length of steel pipe must be repaired or removed. If a repair is made by grinding,...

  16. 49 CFR 192.315 - Wrinkle bends in steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Wrinkle bends in steel pipe. 192.315 Section 192... Transmission Lines and Mains § 192.315 Wrinkle bends in steel pipe. (a) A wrinkle bend may not be made on steel... wrinkle bend on steel pipe must comply with the following: (1) The bend must not have any sharp kinks....

  17. 49 CFR 192.309 - Repair of steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Repair of steel pipe. 192.309 Section 192.309... Lines and Mains § 192.309 Repair of steel pipe. (a) Each imperfection or damage that impairs the serviceability of a length of steel pipe must be repaired or removed. If a repair is made by grinding,...

  18. 49 CFR 192.315 - Wrinkle bends in steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Wrinkle bends in steel pipe. 192.315 Section 192... Transmission Lines and Mains § 192.315 Wrinkle bends in steel pipe. (a) A wrinkle bend may not be made on steel... wrinkle bend on steel pipe must comply with the following: (1) The bend must not have any sharp kinks....

  19. Analysis of heat pipe receivers for point-focus solar concentrators

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, D.R.

    1988-01-01

    Heat-pipe solar receivers are used to transfer concentrated solar energy from the focal point of a parabolic dish concentrator to the working fluid of a heat engine (or in some instances a chemical reactor). Concentrated solar energy that is collected on the front (absorber) surface of a heat pipe receiver is removed by the evaporation of an intermediate working fluid on the back side of the absorber surface. The vaporized fluid flows to the heater tubes of an engine where it condenses and transfers energy to the heat engine's working fluid. The condensed vapor then returns to the absorber surface where it is redistributed across the surface by a wick. Heat pipes are an attractive option for coupling solar concentrators to heat engines because of their near isothermal operating characteristics and their ability to transfer large amounts of heat from relatively small surface areas. This paper investigates design factors that must be considered in constructing a solar heat pipe receiver. Particular emphasis is placed on designing a wick structure to transport the working fluid across the solar absorber surface, but general issues concerning fluid flow in heat pipe receivers are also presented. Analytical tools for the design of heat-pipe solar receivers are also provided. 18 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Macomb College Transportation and Energy Technology 126.09

    SciTech Connect

    2010-12-31

    The objectives for this project were to create the laboratory facilities to deliver recently created and amended curriculum in the areas of energy creation, storage, and delivery in the transportation and stationary power sectors. The project scope was to define the modules, courses and programs in the emerging energy sectors of the stationary power and transportation industries, and then to determine the best equipment to support instruction, and procure it and install it in the laboratories where courses will be taught. Macomb Community College had a curriculum development grant through the Department of Education that ran parallel to this one where the energy curriculum at the school was revised to better permit students to gain comprehensive education in a targeted area of the renewable energy realm, as well as enhance the breadth of jobs addressed by curriculum in the transportation sector. The curriculum development and experiment and equipment definition ran in parallel, and resulted in what we believe to be a cogent and comprehensive curriculum supported with great hands-on experiments in modern labs. The project has been completed, and this report will show how the equipment purchases under the Department of Energy Grant support the courses and programs developed and amended under the Department of Education Grant. Also completed is the tagging documentation and audit tracking process required by the DOE. All materials are tagged, and the documentation is complete as required.

  1. Paracellular epithelial sodium transport maximizes energy efficiency in the kidney.

    PubMed

    Pei, Lei; Solis, Glenn; Nguyen, Mien T X; Kamat, Nikhil; Magenheimer, Lynn; Zhuo, Min; Li, Jiahua; Curry, Joshua; McDonough, Alicia A; Fields, Timothy A; Welch, William J; Yu, Alan S L

    2016-07-01

    Efficient oxygen utilization in the kidney may be supported by paracellular epithelial transport, a form of passive diffusion that is driven by preexisting transepithelial electrochemical gradients. Claudins are tight-junction transmembrane proteins that act as paracellular ion channels in epithelial cells. In the proximal tubule (PT) of the kidney, claudin-2 mediates paracellular sodium reabsorption. Here, we used murine models to investigate the role of claudin-2 in maintaining energy efficiency in the kidney. We found that claudin-2-null mice conserve sodium to the same extent as WT mice, even during profound dietary sodium depletion, as a result of the upregulation of transcellular Na-K-2Cl transport activity in the thick ascending limb of Henle. We hypothesized that shifting sodium transport to transcellular pathways would lead to increased whole-kidney oxygen consumption. Indeed, compared with control animals, oxygen consumption in the kidneys of claudin-2-null mice was markedly increased, resulting in medullary hypoxia. Furthermore, tubular injury in kidneys subjected to bilateral renal ischemia-reperfusion injury was more severe in the absence of claudin-2. Our results indicate that paracellular transport in the PT is required for efficient utilization of oxygen in the service of sodium transport. We speculate that paracellular permeability may have evolved as a general strategy in epithelial tissues to maximize energy efficiency.

  2. Paracellular epithelial sodium transport maximizes energy efficiency in the kidney

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Lei; Nguyen, Mien T.X.; Kamat, Nikhil; Magenheimer, Lynn; Zhuo, Min; Li, Jiahua; McDonough, Alicia A.; Fields, Timothy A.; Welch, William J.; Yu, Alan S.L.

    2016-01-01

    Efficient oxygen utilization in the kidney may be supported by paracellular epithelial transport, a form of passive diffusion that is driven by preexisting transepithelial electrochemical gradients. Claudins are tight-junction transmembrane proteins that act as paracellular ion channels in epithelial cells. In the proximal tubule (PT) of the kidney, claudin-2 mediates paracellular sodium reabsorption. Here, we used murine models to investigate the role of claudin-2 in maintaining energy efficiency in the kidney. We found that claudin-2–null mice conserve sodium to the same extent as WT mice, even during profound dietary sodium depletion, as a result of the upregulation of transcellular Na-K-2Cl transport activity in the thick ascending limb of Henle. We hypothesized that shifting sodium transport to transcellular pathways would lead to increased whole-kidney oxygen consumption. Indeed, compared with control animals, oxygen consumption in the kidneys of claudin-2–null mice was markedly increased, resulting in medullary hypoxia. Furthermore, tubular injury in kidneys subjected to bilateral renal ischemia-reperfusion injury was more severe in the absence of claudin-2. Our results indicate that paracellular transport in the PT is required for efficient utilization of oxygen in the service of sodium transport. We speculate that paracellular permeability may have evolved as a general strategy in epithelial tissues to maximize energy efficiency. PMID:27214555

  3. Electromagnetic energy transport in nanoparticle chains via dark plasmon modes.

    PubMed

    Solis, David; Willingham, Britain; Nauert, Scott L; Slaughter, Liane S; Olson, Jana; Swanglap, Pattanawit; Paul, Aniruddha; Chang, Wei-Shun; Link, Stephan

    2012-03-14

    Using light to exchange information offers large bandwidths and high speeds, but the miniaturization of optical components is limited by diffraction. Converting light into electron waves in metals allows one to overcome this problem. However, metals are lossy at optical frequencies and large-area fabrication of nanometer-sized structures by conventional top-down methods can be cost-prohibitive. We show electromagnetic energy transport with gold nanoparticles that were assembled into close-packed linear chains. The small interparticle distances enabled strong electromagnetic coupling causing the formation of low-loss subradiant plasmons, which facilitated energy propagation over many micrometers. Electrodynamic calculations confirmed the dark nature of the propagating mode and showed that disorder in the nanoparticle arrangement enhances energy transport, demonstrating the viability of using bottom-up nanoparticle assemblies for ultracompact opto-electronic devices. PMID:22292470

  4. Engineering Synergy: Energy and Mass Transport in Hybrid Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eun Seon; Coates, Nelson E; Forster, Jason D; Ruminski, Anne M; Russ, Boris; Sahu, Ayaskanta; Su, Norman C; Yang, Fan; Urban, Jeffrey J

    2015-10-14

    An emerging class of materials that are hybrid in nature is propelling a technological revolution in energy, touching many fundamental aspects of energy-generation, storage, and conservation. Hybrid materials combine classical inorganic and organic components to yield materials that manifest new functionalities unattainable in traditional composites or other related multicomponent materials, which have additive function only. This Research News article highlights the exciting materials design innovations that hybrid materials enable, with an eye toward energy-relevant applications involving charge, heat, and mass transport. PMID:25754355

  5. Helical inner-wall texture prevents jamming in granular pipe flows.

    PubMed

    Verbücheln, Felix; Parteli, Eric J R; Pöschel, Thorsten

    2015-06-01

    Granular pipe flows are characterized by intermittent behavior and large, potentially destructive solid fraction variations in the transport direction. By means of particle-based numerical simulations of gravity-driven flows in vertical pipes, we show that it is possible to obtain steady material transport by adding a helical texture to the inner-wall of the pipe. The helical texture leads to a more homogeneous mass flux along the pipe, prevents the emergence of large density waves and substantially reduces the probability of plug formation thus avoiding jamming of the particulate flow. We show that the granular mass flux Q through a pipe of diameter D with a helical texture of wavelength λ follows the equation Q = Q0·{1 - B sin[arctan(2πD/λ)]}, where Q0 is the flow without helix, predicted from the well-known Beverloo equation. Our new expression yields, thus, a modification of the Beverloo equation with only one additional fit parameter, B, and describes the particle mass flux with the helical texture with excellent quantitative agreement with simulation results. Future application of the method proposed here has the potential to improve granular pipe flows in a broad range of processes without the need for energy input from any external source. PMID:25914100

  6. Building, Testing, and Post Test Analysis of Durability Heat Pipe No.6

    SciTech Connect

    MOSS, TIMOTHY A.

    2002-03-01

    The Solar Thermal Program at Sandia supports work developing dish/Stirling systems to convert solar energy into electricity. Heat pipe technology is ideal for transferring the energy of concentrated sunlight from the parabolic dish concentrators to the Stirling engine heat tubes. Heat pipes can absorb the solar energy at non-uniform flux distributions and release this energy to the Stirling engine heater tubes at a very uniform flux distribution thus decoupling the design of the engine heater head from the solar absorber. The most important part of a heat pipe is the wick, which transports the sodium over the heated surface area. Bench scale heat pipes were designed and built to more economically, both in time and money, test different wicks and cleaning procedures. This report covers the building, testing, and post-test analysis of the sixth in a series of bench scale heat pipes. Durability heat pipe No.6 was built and tested to determine the effects of a high temperature bakeout, 950 C, on wick corrosion during long-term operation. Previous tests showed high levels of corrosion with low temperature bakeouts (650-700 C). Durability heat pipe No.5 had a high temperature bakeout and reflux cleaning and showed low levels of wick corrosion after long-term operation. After testing durability heat pipe No.6 for 5,003 hours at an operating temperature of 750 C, it showed low levels of wick corrosion. This test shows a high temperature bakeout alone will significantly reduce wick corrosion without the need for costly and time consuming reflux cleaning.

  7. Energy Conversion Chain Analysis of Sustainable Energy Systems: A Transportation Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    In general terms there are only three primary energy sources: fossil fuels, renewable energy, and nuclear fission. For fueling road transportation, there has been much speculation about the use of hydrogen as an energy carrier, which would usher in the "hydrogen economy." A parallel situation would use a simple battery to store electricity…

  8. On the energy-dependence of Hoechst 33342 transport by the ABC transporter LmrA.

    PubMed

    Venter, Henrietta; Velamakanni, Saroj; Balakrishnan, Lekshmy; van Veen, Hendrik W

    2008-02-15

    LmrA is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) multidrug transporter from Lactococcus lactis, and is a structural homologue of the human multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein (ABCB1), the overexpression of which is associated with multidrug resistance in tumours. We recently observed that a truncated version of LmrA lacking the nucleotide-binding domain mediates a proton motive force-dependent ethidium transport reaction by catalyzing proton-ethidium symport. This finding raised the question whether proton motive force-dependent transport can also be observed for other drugs, and whether this reaction is also relevant for full-length LmrA. Furthermore, the observations on LmrA-MD raised the question whether ATP-dependent transport by LmrA in intact cells could be due to the activity of independent ABC transporters that might become upregulated in the lactococcal cells due to the overexpression of LmrA; the recently identified ABC multidrug transporter LmrCD was put forward as a possible candidate. Here, we investigated the energy coupling to the transport of the amphiphilic dye Hoechst 33342 in proteoliposomes containing purified LmrA. For this purpose, LmrA was obtained from lactococcal cells lacking the genomic lmrA and lmrCD genes, in which LmrA was expressed from a plasmid. To separate ATP-dependence from proton motive force-dependence, we also used mutant LmrA proteins, which were affected in their ability to hydrolyse ATP. Our studies in proteoliposomes demonstrate that LmrA can catalyze Hoechst 33342 transport independent of auxiliary proteins, in an ATP-dependent fashion and a transmembrane chemical proton gradient (interior acidic)-dependent fashion.

  9. Space resources. Volume 2: Energy, power, and transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, Mary Fae (Editor); Mckay, David S. (Editor); Duke, Michael B. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    This volume of the Space Resources report covers a number of technical and policy issues concerning the energy and power to carry out advanced space missions and the means of transportation to get to the sites of those missions. Discussed in the first half of this volume are the technologies which might be used to provide power and a variety of ways to convert power from one form to another, store it, move it wherever it is needed, and use it. In the second half of this volume, various kinds of transportation, including both interplanetary and surface systems, are discussed.

  10. Straight low energy beam transport for intense uranium beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, C.; Groening, L.; Vormann, H.; Mickat, S.; Hollinger, R.; Adonin, A.; Orzhekhovskaya, A.; Maier, M.; Al-Omari, H.; Barth, W.; Kester, O. K.; Yaramyshev, S.

    2015-07-01

    A new high current uranium ion source and dedicated Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) will be built at the GSI High Current Injector (HSI). This LEBT will be integrated into the existing complex which already comprises two branches. The paper presents the design and dynamics simulation using the TRACE-3D and TRACK code. The simulation results illustrate that this straight LEBT can transport uranium beams over a wide range of space-charge compensation, and can provide 15.4 (14.2) mA U4+ inside of the effective acceptance of the subsequent RFQ assuming the space-charge is compensated to 100% (95%).

  11. RECENT TRENDS IN EMERGING TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND ENERGY CONSUMPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Bunting, Bruce G

    2012-01-01

    Abundance of energy can be improved both by developing new sources of fuel and by improving efficiency of energy utilization, although we really need to pursue both paths to improve energy accessibility in the future. Currently, 2.7 billion people or 38% of the world s population do not have access to modern cooking fuel and depend on wood or dung and 1.4 billion people or 20% do not have access to electricity. It is estimated that correcting these deficiencies will require an investment of $36 billion dollars annually through 2030. In growing economies, energy use and economic growth are strongly linked, but energy use generally grows at a lower rate due to increased access to modern fuels and adaptation of modern, more efficient technology. Reducing environmental impacts of increased energy consumption such as global warming or regional emissions will require improved technology, renewable fuels, and CO2 reuse or sequestration. The increase in energy utilization will probably result in increased transportation fuel diversity as fuels are shaped by availability of local resources, world trade, and governmental, environmental, and economic policies. The purpose of this paper is to outline some of the recently emerging trends, but not to suggest winners. This paper will focus on liquid transportation fuels, which provide the highest energy density and best match with existing vehicles and infrastructure. Data is taken from a variety of US, European, and other sources without an attempt to normalize or combine the various data sources. Liquid transportation fuels can be derived from conventional hydrocarbon resources (crude oil), unconventional hydrocarbon resources (oil sands or oil shale), and biological feedstocks through a variety of biochemical or thermo chemical processes, or by converting natural gas or coal to liquids.

  12. Kinetic energy transport in Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petschel, K.; Stellmach, S.; Wilczek, M.; Lülff, J.; Hansen, U.

    2015-06-01

    The kinetic energy balance in Rayleigh--B\\'{e}nard convection is investigated for the Prandtl number range $0.01\\le Pr \\le 150$ and for fixed Rayleigh number $Ra=5\\cdot10^{6}$. The kinetic energy balance is divided into a dissipation, a production and a flux term. We discuss profiles of all terms and find that the different contributions to the energy balance can be spatially separated into regions where kinetic energy is produced and where kinetic energy is dissipated. Analysing the Prandtl number dependence of the kinetic energy balance, we show that the height-dependence of the mean viscous dissipation is closely related to the flux of kinetic energy. We show that the flux of kinetic energy can be divided into four additive contributions, each representing a different elementary physical process (advection, buoyancy, normal viscous stresses and viscous shear stresses). The behaviour of these individual flux contributions is found to be surprisingly rich and exhibits a pronounced Prandtl number dependence. Different flux contributions dominate the kinetic energy transport at different depth, such that a comprehensive discussion requires a decomposition of the domain into a considerable number of sub-layers. On a less detailed level, our results reveal that advective kinetic energy fluxes play a key role in balancing the near-wall dissipation at low Prandtl number, whereas normal viscous stresses are particularly important at high Prandtl number. Finally, our work reveals that classical velocity boundary layers are deeply connected to the kinetic energy transport, but fail to correctly represent regions of enhanced viscous dissipation.

  13. 49 CFR 192.109 - Nominal wall thickness (t) for steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Nominal wall thickness (t) for steel pipe. 192.109 Section 192.109 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND... Nominal wall thickness (t) for steel pipe. (a) If the nominal wall thickness for steel pipe is not...

  14. 49 CFR 192.109 - Nominal wall thickness (t) for steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nominal wall thickness (t) for steel pipe. 192.109 Section 192.109 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND... Nominal wall thickness (t) for steel pipe. (a) If the nominal wall thickness for steel pipe is not...

  15. 49 CFR 192.109 - Nominal wall thickness (t) for steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Nominal wall thickness (t) for steel pipe. 192.109 Section 192.109 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND... Nominal wall thickness (t) for steel pipe. (a) If the nominal wall thickness for steel pipe is not...

  16. 49 CFR 192.109 - Nominal wall thickness (t) for steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Nominal wall thickness (t) for steel pipe. 192.109 Section 192.109 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND... Nominal wall thickness (t) for steel pipe. (a) If the nominal wall thickness for steel pipe is not...

  17. 49 CFR 192.109 - Nominal wall thickness (t) for steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Nominal wall thickness (t) for steel pipe. 192.109 Section 192.109 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND... Nominal wall thickness (t) for steel pipe. (a) If the nominal wall thickness for steel pipe is not...

  18. 49 CFR 192.107 - Yield strength (S) for steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Yield strength (S) for steel pipe. 192.107 Section 192.107 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS... (S) for steel pipe. (a) For pipe that is manufactured in accordance with a specification listed...

  19. 49 CFR 178.348-3 - Pumps, piping, hoses and connections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pumps, piping, hoses and connections. 178.348-3 Section 178.348-3 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS..., piping, hoses and connections. Each pump and all piping, hoses and connections on each cargo tank...

  20. Heat pipe and thermal energy storage and corrosion studies (1988). Final report, October 1987-September 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamurthy, M.; Dalton, P.; Jacobson, D.

    1989-06-01

    Corrosion-degradation analysis was performed on a set of three Inconel 617 Thermal Energy Storage capsules filled with different eutectic fluoride mixtures of LiF, MgF{sub 2}, NaF and KF which were thermally cycled near 1000 K for 10,000 hours. These capsules were cut out and various sections were metallographically studied by Optical and Scanning Electron microscopy and by elemental X-ray mapping. Chemical analyses on the metallic container were performed using the Electron Probe Micro-analyser and that of the salts by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. It was determined that the container material did not suffer significant microstructural damage except for tiny pits near the edge in contact with the salts and some voids near the surface exposed to vacuum which could not be positively identified as due to corrosion. The region extending to about 50 microns form the inner edge is contact with salt and about 30 microns from the outer edge exposed to vacuum were found to be depleted mainly of aluminum and to a lesser extent chromium.

  1. Greater transportation energy and GHG offsets from bioelectricity than ethanol.

    PubMed

    Campbell, J E; Lobell, D B; Field, C B

    2009-05-22

    The quantity of land available to grow biofuel crops without affecting food prices or greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from land conversion is limited. Therefore, bioenergy should maximize land-use efficiency when addressing transportation and climate change goals. Biomass could power either internal combustion or electric vehicles, but the relative land-use efficiency of these two energy pathways is not well quantified. Here, we show that bioelectricity outperforms ethanol across a range of feedstocks, conversion technologies, and vehicle classes. Bioelectricity produces an average of 81% more transportation kilometers and 108% more emissions offsets per unit area of cropland than does cellulosic ethanol. These results suggest that alternative bioenergy pathways have large differences in how efficiently they use the available land to achieve transportation and climate goals.

  2. Catalog of selected heavy duty transport energy management models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colello, R. G.; Boghani, A. B.; Gardella, N. C.; Gott, P. G.; Lee, W. D.; Pollak, E. C.; Teagan, W. P.; Thomas, R. G.; Snyder, C. M.; Wilson, R. P., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A catalog of energy management models for heavy duty transport systems powered by diesel engines is presented. The catalog results from a literature survey, supplemented by telephone interviews and mailed questionnaires to discover the major computer models currently used in the transportation industry in the following categories: heavy duty transport systems, which consist of highway (vehicle simulation), marine (ship simulation), rail (locomotive simulation), and pipeline (pumping station simulation); and heavy duty diesel engines, which involve models that match the intake/exhaust system to the engine, fuel efficiency, emissions, combustion chamber shape, fuel injection system, heat transfer, intake/exhaust system, operating performance, and waste heat utilization devices, i.e., turbocharger, bottoming cycle.

  3. Transportation Energy Futures Series. Effects of Travel Reduction and Efficient Driving on Transportation. Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, C. D.; Brown, A.; DeFlorio, J.; McKenzie, E.; Tao, W.; Vimmerstedt, L.

    2013-03-01

    Since the 1970s, numerous transportation strategies have been formulated to change the behavior of drivers or travelers by reducing trips, shifting travel to more efficient modes, or improving the efficiency of existing modes. This report summarizes findings documented in existing literature to identify strategies with the greatest potential impact. The estimated effects of implementing the most significant and aggressive individual driver behavior modification strategies range from less than 1% to a few percent reduction in transportation energy use and GHG emissions. Combined strategies result in reductions of 7% to 15% by 2030. Pricing, ridesharing, eco-driving, and speed limit reduction/enforcement strategies are widely judged to have the greatest estimated potential effect, but lack the widespread public acceptance needed to accomplish maximum results. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  4. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Effects of Travel Reduction and Efficient Driving on Transportation: Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, C. D.; Brown, A.; DeFlorio, J.; McKenzie, E.; Tao, W.; Vimmerstedt, L.

    2013-03-01

    Since the 1970s, numerous transportation strategies have been formulated to change the behavior of drivers or travelers by reducing trips, shifting travel to more efficient modes, or improving the efficiency of existing modes. This report summarizes findings documented in existing literature to identify strategies with the greatest potential impact. The estimated effects of implementing the most significant and aggressive individual driver behavior modification strategies range from less than 1% to a few percent reduction in transportation energy use and GHG emissions. Combined strategies result in reductions of 7% to 15% by 2030. Pricing, ridesharing, eco-driving, and speed limit reduction/enforcement strategies are widely judged to have the greatest estimated potential effect, but lack the widespread public acceptance needed to accomplish maximum results. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  5. Neutron Transport Models and Methods for HZETRN and Coupling to Low Energy Light Ion Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blattnig, S.R.; Slaba, T.C.; Heinbockel, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    Exposure estimates inside space vehicles, surface habitats, and high altitude aircraft exposed to space radiation are highly influenced by secondary neutron production. The deterministic transport code HZETRN has been identified as a reliable and efficient tool for such studies, but improvements to the underlying transport models and numerical methods are still necessary. In this paper, the forward-backward (FB) and directionally coupled forward-backward (DC) neutron transport models are derived, numerical methods for the FB model are reviewed, and a computationally efficient numerical solution is presented for the DC model. Both models are compared to the Monte Carlo codes HETCHEDS and FLUKA, and the DC model is shown to agree closely with the Monte Carlo results. Finally, it is found in the development of either model that the decoupling of low energy neutrons from the light ion (A<4) transport procedure adversely affects low energy light ion fluence spectra and exposure quantities. A first order correction is presented to resolve the problem, and it is shown to be both accurate and efficient.

  6. Optimizing the Pipe Diameter of the Pipe Belt Conveyor Based on Discrete Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yong-cun; Wang, Shuang; Hu, Kun; Li, De-yong

    2016-03-01

    In order to increase the transport volume of the pipe belt conveyor and reduce lateral pressure of the supporting roller set, this study aims to optimize the pipe diameter of the pipe belt conveyor. A mechanical model of the pipe belt conveyor with six supporting roller sets in the belt bearing section was built based on the infinitesimal method, and the formula for calculating the lateral pressure of each supporting roller was deduced on the basis of reasonable assumption. Simulated analysis was carried out on the operation process of the pipe belt conveyor by using the discrete element method. The result showed that, when the other conditions were certain, as the pipe diameter increased, the average lateral pressure of the supporting roller set increased, with a gradually decreasing increment, which was consistent with the calculated result of the theoretical formula. An optimized pipe diameter under the current conditions was obtained by fitting the curve of the formula for calculating the transport volume of the pipe belt conveyor and its simulation curve. It provided a certain reference value for improving the transport efficiency and prolonging the service life of the pipe belt conveyor.

  7. OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion) Cold Water Pipe At-Sea Test Program Data Analysis Project: Users guide for the NOAA/ROTECF and NOAA/TRW computer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega, L. A.; Nihous, G. C.

    1985-06-01

    Additional guidelines for the use of the Cold-Water-Pipe computer models NOAA/TRW and NOAA/ROTECF are provided. The primary intent is to correct and upgrade the user manuals with errata sheets and to provide an updated listing of the source codes. It is recommended that users be familiar with the hydrodynamic and structural aspects of floating vessels and the representation of ocean thermal energy conversion pipes as beams of equivalent structural properties.

  8. Drill pipe protector development

    SciTech Connect

    Thomerson, C.; Kenne, R.; Wemple, R.P.

    1996-03-01

    The Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO), formed in the early 1980s by the geothermal industry and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Geothermal Division, sponsors specific development projects to advance the technologies used in geothermal exploration, drilling, and production phases. Individual GDO member companies can choose to participate in specific projects that are most beneficial to their industry segment. Sandia National Laboratories is the technical interface and contracting office for the DOE in these projects. Typical projects sponsored in the past have included a high temperature borehole televiewer, drill bits, muds/polymers, rotary head seals, and this project for drill pipe protectors. This report documents the development work of Regal International for high temperature geothermal pipe protectors.

  9. Alternative energy sources for non-highway transportation. Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    A planning study was made for DOE on alternate fuels for non-highway transportation (aircraft, rail, marine, and pipeline). The study provides DOE with a recommendation of what alternate fuels may be of interest to non-highway transportation users from now through 2025 and recommends R and D needed to allow non-petroleum derived fuels to be used in non-highway transportation. Volume III contains all of the references for the data used in the preliminary screening and is presented in 4 subvolumes. Volume IIIA covers the background information on the various prime movers used in the non-highway transportation area, the physical property data, the fuel-prime mover interaction and a review of some alternate energy forms. Volume IIIB covers the economics of producing, tranporting, and distributing the various fuels. Volume IIIC is concerned with the environment issues in production and use of the fuels, the energy efficiency in use and production, the fuel logistics considerations, and the overall ratings and selection of the fuels and prime movers for the detailed evaluation. Volume IIID covers the demand-related issues.

  10. A coupled energy transport and hydrological model for urban canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Bou-Zeid, E.; Smith, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    Urban land-atmosphere interaction has been attracting more research efforts in order to understand the complex physics of flow and mass and heat transport in urban surfaces and the lower urban atmosphere. In this work, we developed and implemented a new physically-based single-layer urban canopy model, coupling the surface exchange of energy and the subsurface transport of water/soil moisture. The new model incorporates sub-facet heterogeneity for each urban surface (roof, wall or ground). This better simulates the energy transport in urban canopy layers, especially over low-intensity built (suburban type) terrains that include a significant fraction of vegetated surfaces. We implemented detailed urban hydrological models for both natural terrains (bare soil and vegetation) and porous engineered materials with water-holding capacity (concrete, gravel, etc). The skill of the new scheme was tested against experimental data collected through a wireless sensor network deployed over the campus of Princeton University. The model performance was found to be robust and insensitive to changes in weather conditions or seasonal variability. Predictions of the volumetric soil water content were also in good agreement with field measurements, highlighting the model capability of capturing subsurface water transport for urban lawns. The new model was also applied to a case study assessing different strategies, i.e. white versus green roofs, in the mitigation of urban heat island effect.

  11. 49 CFR 195.112 - New pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... with the following: (a) The pipe must be made of steel of the carbon, low alloy-high strength, or alloy... Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS...

  12. US Department of Energy fuel cell program for transportation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Pandit G.

    1992-01-01

    Fuel cells of offer promise as the best future replacement for internal combustion engines in transportation applications. Fuel cells operate more efficiently than internal combustion engines, and are capable of running on non-petroleum fuels such as methanol, ethanol, natural gas or hydrogen. Fuel cells can also have a major impact on improving air quality. They virtually eliminate particulates, NO(x) and sulfur oxide emissions, and significantly reduce hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide. The U.S. Department of Energy program on fuel cells for transportation applications is structured to advance fuel cells technologies from the R&D phase, through engineering design and scale-tip, to demonstration in cars, trucks, buses and locomotives, in order to provide energy savings, fuel flexibility and air quality improvements. This paper describes the present status of the U.S. program.

  13. Nonlinearly-enhanced energy transport in many dimensional quantum chaos

    PubMed Central

    Brambila, D. S.; Fratalocchi, A.

    2013-01-01

    By employing a nonlinear quantum kicked rotor model, we investigate the transport of energy in multidimensional quantum chaos. This problem has profound implications in many fields of science ranging from Anderson localization to time reversal of classical and quantum waves. We begin our analysis with a series of parallel numerical simulations, whose results show an unexpected and anomalous behavior. We tackle the problem by a fully analytical approach characterized by Lie groups and solitons theory, demonstrating the existence of a universal, nonlinearly-enhanced diffusion of the energy in the system, which is entirely sustained by soliton waves. Numerical simulations, performed with different models, show a perfect agreement with universal predictions. A realistic experiment is discussed in two dimensional dipolar Bose-Einstein-Condensates (BEC). Besides the obvious implications at the fundamental level, our results show that solitons can form the building block for the realization of new systems for the enhanced transport of matter. PMID:23912934

  14. Baseline projections of transportation energy consumption by mode: 1981 update

    SciTech Connect

    Millar, M; Bunch, J; Vyas, A; Kaplan, M; Knorr, R; Mendiratta, V; Saricks, C

    1982-04-01

    A comprehensive set of activity and energy-demand projections for each of the major transportation modes and submodes is presented. Projections are developed for a business-as-usual scenario, which provides a benchmark for assessing the effects of potential conservation strategies. This baseline scenario assumes a continuation of present trends, including fuel-efficiency improvements likely to result from current efforts of vehicle manufacturers. Because of anticipated changes in fuel efficiency, fuel price, modal shifts, and a lower-than-historic rate of economic growth, projected growth rates in transportation activity and energy consumption depart from historic patterns. The text discusses the factors responsible for this departure, documents the assumptions and methodologies used to develop the modal projections, and compares the projections with other efforts.

  15. Nonlinearly-enhanced energy transport in many dimensional quantum chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brambila, D. S.; Fratalocchi, A.

    2013-08-01

    By employing a nonlinear quantum kicked rotor model, we investigate the transport of energy in multidimensional quantum chaos. This problem has profound implications in many fields of science ranging from Anderson localization to time reversal of classical and quantum waves. We begin our analysis with a series of parallel numerical simulations, whose results show an unexpected and anomalous behavior. We tackle the problem by a fully analytical approach characterized by Lie groups and solitons theory, demonstrating the existence of a universal, nonlinearly-enhanced diffusion of the energy in the system, which is entirely sustained by soliton waves. Numerical simulations, performed with different models, show a perfect agreement with universal predictions. A realistic experiment is discussed in two dimensional dipolar Bose-Einstein-Condensates (BEC). Besides the obvious implications at the fundamental level, our results show that solitons can form the building block for the realization of new systems for the enhanced transport of matter.

  16. A low energy beam transport system for proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y.; Zhang, Z. M.; Wu, Q.; Zhang, W. H.; Ma, H. Y.; Sun, L. T.; Zhang, X. Z.; Liu, Z. W.; He, Y.; Zhao, H. W.; Xie, D. Z.

    2013-03-15

    A low energy beam transport (LEBT) system has been built for a compact pulsed hadron source (CPHS) at Tsinghua University in China. The LEBT, consisting of two solenoids and three short-drift sections, transports a pulsed proton beam of 60 mA of energy of 50 keV to the entrance of a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ). Measurement has shown a normalized RMS beam emittance less than 0.2 {pi} mm mrad at the end of the LEBT. Beam simulations were carried out to compare with the measurement and are in good agreement. Based on the successful CPHS LEBT development, a new LEBT for a China ADS projector has been designed. The features of the new design, including a beam chopper and beam simulations of the LEBT are presented and discussed along with CPHS LEBT development in this article.

  17. Solar Energy for Transportation Fuel (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Nate

    2008-05-12

    Nate Lewis' talk looks at the challenge of capturing solar energy and storing it as an affordable transportation fuel - all on a scale necessary to reduce global warming. Overcoming this challenge will require developing new materials that can use abundant and inexpensive elements rather than costly and rare materials. He discusses the promise of new materials in the development of carbon-free alternatives to fossil fuel.

  18. Solar Energy for Transportation Fuel (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    ScienceCinema

    Lewis, Nate

    2016-07-12

    Nate Lewis' talk looks at the challenge of capturing solar energy and storing it as an affordable transportation fuel - all on a scale necessary to reduce global warming. Overcoming this challenge will require developing new materials that can use abundant and inexpensive elements rather than costly and rare materials. He discusses the promise of new materials in the development of carbon-free alternatives to fossil fuel.

  19. 49 CFR 192.175 - Pipe-type and bottle-type holders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pipe-type and bottle-type holders. 192.175 Section....175 Pipe-type and bottle-type holders. (a) Each pipe-type and bottle-type holder must be designed so as to prevent the accumulation of liquids in the holder, in connecting pipe, or in...

  20. 49 CFR 195.585 - What must I do to correct corroded pipe?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Corrosion Control § 195.585 What must I do to correct corroded pipe? (a) General corrosion. If you find pipe so generally corroded that the remaining wall thickness... restore the serviceability of the pipe. (b) Localized corrosion pitting. If you find pipe that...

  1. 49 CFR 195.585 - What must I do to correct corroded pipe?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Corrosion Control § 195.585 What must I do to correct corroded pipe? (a) General corrosion. If you find pipe so generally corroded that the remaining wall thickness... restore the serviceability of the pipe. (b) Localized corrosion pitting. If you find pipe that...

  2. 49 CFR 195.585 - What must I do to correct corroded pipe?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Corrosion Control § 195.585 What must I do to correct corroded pipe? (a) General corrosion. If you find pipe so generally corroded that the remaining wall thickness... restore the serviceability of the pipe. (b) Localized corrosion pitting. If you find pipe that...

  3. 49 CFR 195.585 - What must I do to correct corroded pipe?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Corrosion Control § 195.585 What must I do to correct corroded pipe? (a) General corrosion. If you find pipe so generally corroded that the remaining wall thickness... restore the serviceability of the pipe. (b) Localized corrosion pitting. If you find pipe that...

  4. Energy-filtered cold electron transport at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Bhadrachalam, Pradeep; Subramanian, Ramkumar; Ray, Vishva; Ma, Liang-Chieh; Wang, Weichao; Kim, Jiyoung; Cho, Kyeongjae; Koh, Seong Jin

    2014-01-01

    Fermi-Dirac electron thermal excitation is an intrinsic phenomenon that limits functionality of various electron systems. Efforts to manipulate electron thermal excitation have been successful when the entire system is cooled to cryogenic temperatures, typically <1 K. Here we show that electron thermal excitation can be effectively suppressed at room temperature, and energy-suppressed electrons, whose energy distribution corresponds to an effective electron temperature of ~45 K, can be transported throughout device components without external cooling. This is accomplished using a discrete level of a quantum well, which filters out thermally excited electrons and permits only energy-suppressed electrons to participate in electron transport. The quantum well (~2 nm of Cr2O3) is formed between source (Cr) and tunnelling barrier (SiO2) in a double-barrier-tunnelling-junction structure having a quantum dot as the central island. Cold electron transport is detected from extremely narrow differential conductance peaks in electron tunnelling through CdSe quantum dots, with full widths at half maximum of only ~15 mV at room temperature. PMID:25204839

  5. Energy transport in laser-plasma interactions: a UK perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancaster, Kathryn

    2008-11-01

    A range of experimental and theoretical work has been performed recently to gain a greater insight into energy transport in laser plasma interactions. Experiments have been performed on the VULCAN Petawatt facility in the UK and the LULI2000 facility in France to look at energy transport as a function of a number of different parameters. The parameters studied range from the introduction of controlled pre-pulses, material properties / target geometry through to absorption as a function of density scale length. A wide range of diagnostics were used such as transverse shadowgraphy, rear-side optical emission imaging, X-ray imaging and spectroscopy, and streaked harmonic measurements. To support and stimulate this work, computational tools such as Vlasov-Fokker-Planck (LEDA, K2 (K2 constructed by M. Sherlock)) and radiation hydrodynamic codes. One highlight that will be discussed in detail is the observation of changes to the beam divergence pattern with the addition of a cone-guide. Preliminary results from very recent studies conducted at the VULCAN facility to study the characterization and energy transport in warm dense matter in the context of the HiPER project will be presented. A.P.L Robinson et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100 025002 2008 K.L.Lancaster et al, submitted to Phys. Rev. Lett www.hiper-laser.org

  6. Hydrogen Energy Storage: Grid and Transportation Services (Technical Report)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2015-02-01

    Proceedings of an expert workshop convened by the U.S. Department of Energy and Industry Canada, and hosted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the California Air Resources Board, May 14-15, 2014, in Sacramento, California, to address the topic of hydrogen energy storage (HES). HES systems provide multiple opportunities to increase the resilience and improve the economics of energy sup supply systems underlying the electric grid, gas pipeline systems, and transportation fuels. This is especially the case when considering particular social goals and market drivers, such as reducing carbon emissions, increasing reliability of supply, and reducing consumption of conventional petroleum fuels. This report compiles feedback collected during the workshop, which focused on policy and regulatory issues related to HES systems. Report sections include an introduction to HES pathways, market demand, and the "smart gas" concept; an overview of the workshop structure; and summary results from panel presentations and breakout groups.

  7. Optimal numerical flux of power-law fluids in some partially full pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefton, Lew; Wei, Dongming; Liu, Yu

    2014-07-01

    Consider the steady state pressure driven flow of a power-law fluid in a partially filled straight pipe. It is known that an increase in flux can be achieved for a fixed pressure by partially filling the pipe and having the remaining volume either void or filled with a less viscous, lubricating fluid. If the pipe has circular cross section, the fluid level which maximizes flux is the level which avoids contact with exactly 25% of the boundary. This result can be proved analytically for Newtonian fluids and has been verified numerically for certain non-Newtonian models. This paper provides a generalization of this work numerically to pipes with non-circular cross sections which are partially full with a power-law fluid. A simple and physically plausible geometric condition is presented which can be used to approximate the fluid level that maximizes flux in a wide range of pipe geometries. Additional increases in flux for a given pressure can be obtained by changing the shape of the pipe but leaving the perimeter fixed. This computational analysis of flux as a function of both fluid level and pipe geometry has not been considered to our knowledge. Fluxes are computed using a special discretization scheme, designed to uncover general properties which are only dependent on fluid level and/or pipe cross-sectional geometry. Computations use finite elements and take advantage of the variational structure inherent in the power-law model. A minimization technique for approximating the critical points of the associated non-linear energy functional is used. In particular, the numerical scheme for the non-linear partial differential equation has been proved to be convergent with known error estimates. The numerical results obtained in this work can be useful for designing pipes and canals for transportation of non-Newtonian fluids, such as those in chemical engineering and food processing engineering.

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF TECHNOLOGY TO REMOTELY NAVIGATE VERTICAL PIPE ARRAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Krementz, D.; Immel, D.; Vrettos, N.; Nance, T.; Marzolf, A.

    2011-07-01

    Situations exist around the Savannah River Site (SRS) and the Department of Energy (DOE) complex where it is advantageous to remotely navigate vertical pipe arrays. Specific examples are waste tanks in the SRS Tank Farms, which contain horizontal cooling coils at the tank bottom, vertical cooling coils throughout and a limited number of access points or ''risers''. These factors limit accessibility to many parts of these tanks by conventional means. Pipe Traveler technology has been developed to address these issues. The Pipe Traveler addresses these issues by using the vertical cooling coils as its medium of travel. The unit operates by grabbing a pipe using dual grippers located on either side of the equipment. Once securely attached to the pipe a drive wheel is extended to come in contact with the pipe. Rotation of the drive wheel causes the unit to rotate around the pipe. This action is continued until the second set of grippers is aligned with the next pipe. Extension pistons are actuated to extend the second set of grippers in contact with a second pipe. The second set of grippers is then actuated to grasp the pipe. The first set of grippers releases the original pipe and the process is repeated until the unit reaches its desired location. Once at the tool deployment location the desired tool may be used. The current design has proven the concept of pipe-to-pipe navigation. Testing of the Pipe Traveler has proven its ability to transfer itself from one pipe to another.

  9. 75 FR 53374 - Notice of Rail Energy Transportation Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ... Surface Transportation Board Notice of Rail Energy Transportation Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: Surface Transportation Board. ACTION: Notice of Rail Energy Transportation Advisory Committee meeting... this meeting may be announced through the Board's Web site at www.stb.dot.gov . This action will...

  10. 48 CFR 970.5223-6 - Executive Order 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management. 970.5223-6 Section 970.5223-6... FEDERAL ENVIRONMENTAL, ENERGY, AND TRANSPORTATION MANAGEMENT (OCT 2010) Since this contract involves... MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Solicitation Provisions and Contract Clauses for Management and...

  11. Interpreting the implied meridional oceanic energy transport in AMIP

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, D.A.; Gleckler, P.J.

    1993-09-01

    The Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) was outlined in Paper No. CLIM VAR 2.3 (entitled {open_quote}The validation of ocean surface heat fluxes in AMIP`) of these proceedings. Preliminary results of AMIP subproject No. 5 were also summarized. In particular, zonally averaged ocean surface heat fluxes resulting from various AMIP simulations were intercompared, and to the extent possible they were validated with uncertainties in observationally-based estimates of surface heat fluxes. The intercomparison is continued in this paper by examining the Oceanic Meridional Energy Transport (OMET) implied by the net surface heat fluxes of the AMIP simulations. As with the surface heat fluxes of the AMIP simulations. As with the surface heat fluxes, the perspective here will be very cursory. The annual mean implied ocean heat transport can be estimated by integrating the zonally averaged net ocean surface heat flux, N{sub sfc}, from one pole to the other. In AGCM simulations (and perhaps reality), the global mean N{sub sfc} is typically not in exact balance when averaged over one or more years. Because of this, an important assumption must be made about changes in the distribution of energy in the oceans. Otherwise, the integration will yield a non-zero transport at the endpoint of integration (pole) which is not physically realistic. Here the authors will only look at 10-year means of the AMIP runs, and for simplicity they assume that any long term imbalance in the global averaged N{sub sfc} will be sequestered (or released) over the global ocean. Tests have demonstrated that the treatment of how the global average energy imbalance is assumed to be distributed is important, especially when the long term imbalances are in excess of 10 W m{sup {minus}2}. However, this has not had a substantial impact on the qualitative features of the implied heat transport of the AMIP simulations examined thus far.

  12. Compressed Air/Vacuum Transportation Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha, Shyamal

    2011-03-01

    General theory of compressed air/vacuum transportation will be presented. In this transportation, a vehicle (such as an automobile or a rail car) is powered either by compressed air or by air at near vacuum pressure. Four version of such transportation is feasible. In all versions, a ``c-shaped'' plastic or ceramic pipe lies buried a few inches under the ground surface. This pipe carries compressed air or air at near vacuum pressure. In type I transportation, a vehicle draws compressed air (or vacuum) from this buried pipe. Using turbine or reciprocating air cylinder, mechanical power is generated from compressed air (or from vacuum). This mechanical power transferred to the wheels of an automobile (or a rail car) drives the vehicle. In type II-IV transportation techniques, a horizontal force is generated inside the plastic (or ceramic) pipe. A set of vertical and horizontal steel bars is used to transmit this force to the automobile on the road (or to a rail car on rail track). The proposed transportation system has following merits: virtually accident free; highly energy efficient; pollution free and it will not contribute to carbon dioxide emission. Some developmental work on this transportation will be needed before it can be used by the traveling public. The entire transportation system could be computer controlled.

  13. A novel pyroelectric generator utilising naturally driven temperature fluctuations from oscillating heat pipes for waste heat recovery and thermal energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabek, D.; Taylor, J.; Ayel, V.; Bertin, Y.; Romestant, C.; Bowen, C. R.

    2016-07-01

    Low temperature thermal to electrical energy converters have the potential to provide a route for recovering waste energy. In this paper, we propose a new configuration of a thermal harvester that uses a naturally driven thermal oscillator free of mechanical motion and operates between a hot heat source and a cold heat sink. The system exploits a heat induced liquid-vapour transition of a working fluid as a primary driver for a pyroelectric generator. The two-phase instability of a fluid in a closed looped capillary channel of an oscillating heat pipe (OHP) creates pressure differences which lead to local high frequency temperature oscillations in the range of 0.1-5 K. Such temperature changes are suitable for pyroelectric thermal to electrical energy conversion, where the pyroelectric generator is attached to the adiabatic wall of the OHP, thereby absorbing thermal energy from the passing fluid. This new pyroelectric-oscillating heat pipe (POHP) assembly of a low temperature generator continuously operates across a spatial heat source temperature of 55 °C and a heat sink temperature of 25 °C, and enables waste heat recovery and thermal energy harvesting from small temperature gradients at low temperatures. Our electrical measurements with lead zirconate titanate (PZT) show an open circuit voltage of 0.4 V (AC) and with lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) an open circuit voltage of 0.8 V (AC) at a frequency of 0.45 Hz, with an energy density of 95 pJ cm-3 for PMN-PT. Our novel POHP device therefore has the capability to convert small quantities of thermal energy into more desirable electricity in the nW to mW range and provides an alternative to currently used batteries or centralised energy generation.

  14. Ultrasonic pipe assessment

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Graham H.; Morrow, Valerie L.; Levie, Harold; Kane, Ronald J.; Brown, Albert E.

    2003-12-23

    An ultrasonic pipe or other structure assessment system includes an ultrasonic transducer positioned proximate the pipe or other structure. A fluid connection between the ultrasonic transducer and the pipe or other structure is produced. The ultrasonic transducer is moved relative to the pipe or other structure.

  15. Transportation Energy Survey Data Book 1.1

    SciTech Connect

    Gurikova, T

    2002-06-18

    vehicles. There are three ways to achieve this goal: efficiency, substitution, or less travel. A reduction in oil usage will result in a reduction of carbon emissions. Successful transition to alternative types of fuel and advanced technology vehicles may depend on awareness of U.S. dependence on imported oil and the U.S. energy situation. Successful transition may also depend on knowledge of alternative types of fuels and advanced technologies. The ''Transportation Energy Survey Data Book 1.1'' examines the public's knowledge, beliefs and expectations of the energy situation in the United States and transportation energy-related issues. The data presented in the report have been drawn from multiple sources: surveys conducted by the Opinion Research Corporation International (ORCI) for National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that are commissioned and funded by OTT, Gallup polls, ABC News/Washington Post polls, NBC News/Wall Street Journal polls, polls conducted by the Ipsos-Reid Corporation, as well articles from The Washington Post (2001) and other sources. All surveys are telephone interviews conducted with randomly selected national samples of adults 18 years of age and older. Almost all surveys were conducted before the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, with the only exceptions being the November 2001 ORCI survey and the November 2001 survey conducted by the Ipsos-Reid Corporation.

  16. Enhanced energy transport owing to nonlinear interface interaction

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ruixia; Yuan, Zongqiang; Wang, Jun; Zheng, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    It is generally expected that the interface coupling leads to the suppression of thermal transport through coupled nanostructures due to the additional interface phonon-phonon scattering. However, recent experiments demonstrated that the interface van der Waals interactions can significantly enhance the thermal transfer of bonding boron nanoribbons compared to a single freestanding nanoribbon. To obtain a more in-depth understanding on the important role of the nonlinear interface coupling in the heat transports, in the present paper, we explore the effect of nonlinearity in the interface interaction on the phonon transport by studying the coupled one-dimensional (1D) Frenkel-Kontorova lattices. It is found that the thermal conductivity increases with increasing interface nonlinear intensity for weak inter-chain nonlinearity. By developing the effective phonon theory of coupled systems, we calculate the dependence of heat conductivity on interfacial nonlinearity in weak inter-chain couplings regime which is qualitatively in good agreement with the result obtained from molecular dynamics simulations. Moreover, we demonstrate that, with increasing interface nonlinear intensity, the system dimensionless nonlinearity strength is reduced, which in turn gives rise to the enhancement of thermal conductivity. Our results pave the way for manipulating the energy transport through coupled nanostructures for future emerging applications. PMID:26787363

  17. Encouraging School Transportation Effective Energy Management (ESTEEM). Fuel Economy Management Handbook for Directors of Pupil Transportation; School District Administrators; Transportation Department Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BRI Systems, Inc., Phoenix, AZ.

    This handbook offers a practical approach for pupil transportation energy management by suggesting ideas to save fuel in the purchasing, planning, routing, scheduling, driving, and maintenance areas of the pupil transportation operation. The handbook is divided into seven parts. Part 1 and 2 provide insight into energy management in pupil…

  18. Energy transport in ultra-fast eated solid targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Johzaki, Tomoyuki; Kemp, Andreas

    2008-11-01

    We discuss hot electron generation in ultra intense laser interaction with initially non-ionized matter. Hot electron energy and the transport inside the target are strongly affected by collisional effects and ionization processes, especially in high-Z material. We have introduced an ionization model into our collisional particle-in-cell code, PICLS, to study hot electron transport in ultra-fast heated matter. Our description of collisional ionization is based on the Thomas-Fermi model, where a local average charge state is calculated from the bulk electron temperature and density. Field ionization is taken into account for ionization of low density plasmas. We have studied laser matter interaction under an irradiation of a laser with 10^20W/cm^2. A strong heat inhibition within a micron distance was observed in a gold target because of the large number of lower energy hot electrons produced at the steepened interface by the laser photon pressure. We will discuss the generation of hot electrons and their transport in ultra-fast heated solid targets of various materials.

  19. Glass heat pipe evacuated tube solar collector

    DOEpatents

    McConnell, Robert D.; Vansant, James H.

    1984-01-01

    A glass heat pipe is adapted for use as a solar energy absorber in an evacuated tube solar collector and for transferring the absorbed solar energy to a working fluid medium or heat sink for storage or practical use. A capillary wick is formed of granular glass particles fused together by heat on the inside surface of the heat pipe with a water glass binder solution to enhance capillary drive distribution of the thermal transfer fluid in the heat pipe throughout the entire inside surface of the evaporator portion of the heat pipe. Selective coatings are used on the heat pipe surface to maximize solar absorption and minimize energy radiation, and the glass wick can alternatively be fabricated with granular particles of black glass or obsidian.

  20. Glass heat pipe evacuated tube solar collector

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, R.D.; Vansant, J.H.

    1984-10-02

    A glass heat pipe is adapted for use as a solar energy absorber in an evacuated tube solar collector and for transferring the absorbed solar energy to a working fluid medium or heat sink for storage or practical use. A capillary wick is formed of granular glass particles fused together by heat on the inside surface of the heat pipe with a water glass binder solution to enhance capillary drive distribution of the thermal transfer fluid in the heat pipe throughout the entire inside surface of the evaporator portion of the heat pipe. Selective coatings are used on the heat pipe surface to maximize solar absorption and minimize energy radiation, and the glass wick can alternatively be fabricated with granular particles of black glass or obsidian.

  1. Transport of hydrogen in metals with occupancy dependent trap energies

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, K. Toussaint, U. von; Schwarz-Selinger, T.

    2014-10-07

    Common diffusion trapping models for modeling hydrogen transport in metals are limited to traps with single de-trapping energies and a saturation occupancy of one. While they are successful in predicting typical mono isotopic ion implantation and thermal degassing experiments, they fail at describing recent experiments on isotope exchange at low temperatures. This paper presents a new modified diffusion trapping model with fill level dependent de-trapping energies that can also explain these new isotope exchange experiments. Density function theory (DFT) calculations predict that even mono vacancies can store between 6 and 12 H atoms with de-trapping energies that depend on the fill level of the mono vacancy. The new fill level dependent diffusion trapping model allows to test these DFT results by bridging the gap in length and time scale between DFT calculations and experiment.

  2. US Department of Energy Transportation Programs: computerized techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Joy, D.S.; Johnson, P.E.; Fore, C.S.; Peterson, B.E.

    1984-01-01

    The US Department of Energy is currently sponsoring the development of four specialized transportation programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The programs function as research tools that provide unique computerized techniques for planning the safe shipment of radioactive and hazardous materials. Major achievements include the development of rail and highway routing models, an emergency response assistance program, a data base focusing on legislative requirements, and a resource file identifying key state and local contacts. A discussion of each program and data base is presented, and several examples reflecting each project's applications to the overall DOE transportation program are provided. The interface of these programs offers a dynamic resource of data for use during preshipment planning stages. 9 references, 10 figures, 2 tables.

  3. Spheromak Energy Transport Studies via Neutral Beam Injection

    SciTech Connect

    McLean, H S; Hill, D N; Wood, R D; Jayakumar, J; Pearlstein, L D

    2008-02-11

    Results from the SSPX spheromak experiment provide strong motivation to add neutral beam injection (NBI) heating. Such auxiliary heating would significantly advance the capability to study the physics of energy transport and pressure limits for the spheromak. This LDRD project develops the physics basis for using NBI to heat spheromak plasmas in SSPX. The work encompasses three activities: (1) numerical simulation to make quantitative predictions of the effect of adding beams to SSPX, (2) using the SSPX spheromak and theory/modeling to develop potential target plasmas suitable for future application of neutral beam heating, and (3) developing diagnostics to provide the measurements needed for transport calculations. These activities are reported in several publications.

  4. Solar energy in the context of energy use, energy transportation and energy storage.

    PubMed

    MacKay, David J C

    2013-08-13

    Taking the UK as a case study, this paper describes current energy use and a range of sustainable energy options for the future, including solar power and other renewables. I focus on the area involved in collecting, converting and delivering sustainable energy, looking in particular detail at the potential role of solar power. Britain consumes energy at a rate of about 5000 watts per person, and its population density is about 250 people per square kilometre. If we multiply the per capita energy consumption by the population density, then we obtain the average primary energy consumption per unit area, which for the UK is 1.25 watts per square metre. This areal power density is uncomfortably similar to the average power density that could be supplied by many renewables: the gravitational potential energy of rainfall in the Scottish highlands has a raw power per unit area of roughly 0.24 watts per square metre; energy crops in Europe deliver about 0.5 watts per square metre; wind farms deliver roughly 2.5 watts per square metre; solar photovoltaic farms in Bavaria, Germany, and Vermont, USA, deliver 4 watts per square metre; in sunnier locations, solar photovoltaic farms can deliver 10 watts per square metre; concentrating solar power stations in deserts might deliver 20 watts per square metre. In a decarbonized world that is renewable-powered, the land area required to maintain today's British energy consumption would have to be similar to the area of Britain. Several other high-density, high-consuming countries are in the same boat as Britain, and many other countries are rushing to join us. Decarbonizing such countries will only be possible through some combination of the following options: the embracing of country-sized renewable power-generation facilities; large-scale energy imports from country-sized renewable facilities in other countries; population reduction; radical efficiency improvements and lifestyle changes; and the growth of non-renewable low

  5. Solar energy in the context of energy use, energy transportation and energy storage.

    PubMed

    MacKay, David J C

    2013-08-13

    Taking the UK as a case study, this paper describes current energy use and a range of sustainable energy options for the future, including solar power and other renewables. I focus on the area involved in collecting, converting and delivering sustainable energy, looking in particular detail at the potential role of solar power. Britain consumes energy at a rate of about 5000 watts per person, and its population density is about 250 people per square kilometre. If we multiply the per capita energy consumption by the population density, then we obtain the average primary energy consumption per unit area, which for the UK is 1.25 watts per square metre. This areal power density is uncomfortably similar to the average power density that could be supplied by many renewables: the gravitational potential energy of rainfall in the Scottish highlands has a raw power per unit area of roughly 0.24 watts per square metre; energy crops in Europe deliver about 0.5 watts per square metre; wind farms deliver roughly 2.5 watts per square metre; solar photovoltaic farms in Bavaria, Germany, and Vermont, USA, deliver 4 watts per square metre; in sunnier locations, solar photovoltaic farms can deliver 10 watts per square metre; concentrating solar power stations in deserts might deliver 20 watts per square metre. In a decarbonized world that is renewable-powered, the land area required to maintain today's British energy consumption would have to be similar to the area of Britain. Several other high-density, high-consuming countries are in the same boat as Britain, and many other countries are rushing to join us. Decarbonizing such countries will only be possible through some combination of the following options: the embracing of country-sized renewable power-generation facilities; large-scale energy imports from country-sized renewable facilities in other countries; population reduction; radical efficiency improvements and lifestyle changes; and the growth of non-renewable low

  6. Angular Momentum Transport in Accretion Disks and Relevance of Thermal Energy Content and Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppi, P. S.; Coppi, B.

    2003-04-01

    Considering thin accretion disks where the magnetic energy is comparable to the thermal energy is relevant to theoretical models of magnetized jets originating from disks. In these regimes the only known modes that can induce outward transport of angular momentum, as needed for the accretion process to occur, are tridimensional, locally corotating with the disk, which, if described by the linearized ideal MHD approximation, have radial profiles with two sets of characteristic singularities(B. Coppi and P.S. Coppi, Phys. Rev. Lett.), 87, 051101-1 (2001). The more important of these two sets corresponds to the radius where the relevant Doppler shifted frequency equals that of the slow magnetosonic mode (ω ^2≃ k_allel^2c_s^2v_A^2/(c_s^2+v_A^2)). Thus the finiteness of the plasma temperature is a key factor in the excitation of these modes. Nonlinear effects are shown to be more important than ``dissipative'' processes to describe the transition across the singularities. The connection between transport of angular momentum and that of thermal energy that is central to the explanation of the ``spontaneous rotation'' phenomenon in laboratory plasmas by the relevant accretion theory(B. Coppi, Nucl. Fusion), 42, 1 (2002) is discussed and the difference of the phsyical regimes of these plasmas relative to those characterizing accretion disks is pointed out.

  7. Electrolyte- and Transport-Enhanced Thermogalvanic Energy Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunawan, Andrey

    Waste heat energy conversion remains an inviting subject for research, given the renewed emphasis on energy efficiency and carbon emissions reduction. Solid-state thermoelectric devices have been widely investigated, but their practical application remains challenging because of cost and the inability to fabricate them in geometries that are easily compatible with heat sources. An intriguing alternative to solid-state thermoelectric devices is thermogalvanic cells, which include a generally liquid electrolyte that permits the transport of ions. Thermogalvanic cells have long been known in the electrochemistry community, but have not received much attention from the thermal transport community. This is surprising given that their performance is highly dependent on controlling both thermal and mass (ionic) transport. This research will focus on a research project, which is an interdisciplinary collaboration between mechanical engineering (i.e. thermal transport) and chemistry, and is a largely experimental effort aimed at improving fundamental understanding of thermogalvanic systems. The first part will discuss how a simple utilization of natural convection within the cell doubles the maximum power output of the cell. In the second part of the research, some of the results from the previous part will be applied in a feasibility study of incorporating thermogalvanic waste heat recovery systems into automobiles. Finally, a new approach to enhance Seebeck coefficient by tuning the configurational entropy of a mixed-ligand complex formation of copper sulfate aqueous electrolytes will be presented. Ultimately, a summary of these results as well as possible future work that can be formed from these efforts is discussed.

  8. Prospects for reduced energy transports: A preliminary analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardema, M. D.; Harper, M.; Smith, C. L.; Waters, M. H.; Williams, L. J.

    1974-01-01

    The recent energy crisis and subsequent substantial increase in fuel prices have provided increased incentive to reduce the fuel consumption of civil transport aircraft. At the present time many changes in operational procedures have been introduced to decrease fuel consumption of the existing fleet. In the future, however, it may become desirable or even necessary to introduce new fuel-conservative aircraft designs. This paper reports the results of a preliminary study of new near-term fuel conservative aircraft. A parametric study was made to determine the effects of cruise Mach number and fuel cost on the optimum configuration characteristics and on economic performance. For each design, the wing geometry was optimized to give maximum return on investment at a particular fuel cost. Based on the results of the parametric study, a nominal reduced energy configuration was selected. Compared with existing transport designs, the reduced energy design has a higher aspect ratio wing with lower sweep, and cruises at a lower Mach number. It has about 30% less fuel consumption on a seat-mile basis.

  9. Energy level control: toward an efficient hot electron transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Xiao; Li, Qinghua; Li, Yue; Chen, Zihan; Wei, Tai-Huei; He, Xingdao; Sun, Weifu

    2014-08-01

    Highly efficient hot electron transport represents one of the most important properties required for applications in photovoltaic devices. Whereas the fabrication of efficient hot electron capture and lost-cost devices remains a technological challenge, regulating the energy level of acceptor-donor system through the incorporation of foreign ions using the solution-processed technique is one of the most promising strategies to overcome this obstacle. Here we present a versatile acceptor-donor system by incorporating MoO3:Eu nanophosphors, which reduces both the `excess' energy offset between the conduction band of acceptor and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of donor, and that between the valence band and highest occupied molecular orbital. Strikingly, the hot electron transfer time has been shortened. This work demonstrates that suitable energy level alignment can be tuned to gain the higher hot electron/hole transport efficiency in a simple approach without the need for complicated architectures. This work builds up the foundation of engineering building blocks for third-generation solar cells.

  10. Energy level control: toward an efficient hot electron transport.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiao; Li, Qinghua; Li, Yue; Chen, Zihan; Wei, Tai-Huei; He, Xingdao; Sun, Weifu

    2014-08-07

    Highly efficient hot electron transport represents one of the most important properties required for applications in photovoltaic devices. Whereas the fabrication of efficient hot electron capture and lost-cost devices remains a technological challenge, regulating the energy level of acceptor-donor system through the incorporation of foreign ions using the solution-processed technique is one of the most promising strategies to overcome this obstacle. Here we present a versatile acceptor-donor system by incorporating MoO3:Eu nanophosphors, which reduces both the 'excess' energy offset between the conduction band of acceptor and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of donor, and that between the valence band and highest occupied molecular orbital. Strikingly, the hot electron transfer time has been shortened. This work demonstrates that suitable energy level alignment can be tuned to gain the higher hot electron/hole transport efficiency in a simple approach without the need for complicated architectures. This work builds up the foundation of engineering building blocks for third-generation solar cells.

  11. Energy efficient transport technology: Program summary and bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, D. B.; Bartlett, D. W.; Hood, R. V.

    1985-01-01

    The Energy Efficient Transport (EET) Program began in 1976 as an element of the NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) Program. The EET Program and the results of various applications of advanced aerodynamics and active controls technology (ACT) as applicable to future subsonic transport aircraft are discussed. Advanced aerodynamics research areas included high aspect ratio supercritical wings, winglets, advanced high lift devices, natural laminar flow airfoils, hybrid laminar flow control, nacelle aerodynamic and inertial loads, propulsion/airframe integration (e.g., long duct nacelles) and wing and empennage surface coatings. In depth analytical/trade studies, numerous wind tunnel tests, and several flight tests were conducted. Improved computational methodology was also developed. The active control functions considered were maneuver load control, gust load alleviation, flutter mode control, angle of attack limiting, and pitch augmented stability. Current and advanced active control laws were synthesized and alternative control system architectures were developed and analyzed. Integrated application and fly by wire implementation of the active control functions were design requirements in one major subprogram. Additional EET research included interdisciplinary technology applications, integrated energy management, handling qualities investigations, reliability calculations, and economic evaluations related to fuel savings and cost of ownership of the selected improvements.

  12. Experimental benchmark for piping system dynamic-response analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes the scope and status of a piping system dynamics test program. A 0.20 m(8 in.) nominal diameter test piping specimen is designed to be representative of main heat transport system piping of LMFBR plants. Particular attention is given to representing piping restraints. Applied loadings consider component-induced vibration as well as seismic excitation. The principal objective of the program is to provide a benchmark for verification of piping design methods by correlation of predicted and measured responses. Pre-test analysis results and correlation methods are discussed.

  13. Transport and containment of plasma, particles and energy within flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, L. W.; Brown, W. A.; Bruner, M. E. C.; Haisch, B. M.; Strong, K. T.

    1983-01-01

    Results from the analysis of flares observed by the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) and a recent rocket experiment are discussed. Evidence for primary energy release in the corona through the interaction of magnetic structures, particle and plasma transport into more than a single magnetic structure at the time of a flare and a complex and changing magnetic topology during the course of a flare is found. The rocket data are examined for constraints on flare cooling, within the context of simple loop models. These results form a basis for comments on the limitations of simple loop models for flares.

  14. Efficient Energy Transport in Photosynthesis: Roles of Coherence and Entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Apoorva D.

    2011-09-23

    Recently it has been discovered - contrary to expectations of physicists as well as biologists - that the energy transport during photosynthesis, from the chlorophyll pigment that captures the photon to the reaction centre where glucose is synthesised from carbon dioxide and water, is highly coherent even at ambient temperature and in the cellular environment. This process and the key molecular ingredients that it depends on are described. By looking at the process from the computer science view-point, we can study what has been optimised and how. A spatial search algorithmic model based on robust features of wave dynamics is presented.

  15. Effective Potential Energies and Transport Properties for Nitrogen and Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcop, James R.; Partridge, Harry; Levin, Eugene; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The results of recent theoretical studies for N--N2, O--O2, N2--N2 interactions are applied to the transport properties of nitrogen and oxygen gases. The theoretical results are used to select suitable oxygen interaction energies from previous work for determining the diffusion and viscosity coefficients at high temperatures. A universal formulation is applied to determine the collision integrals for O2--O2 interactions at high temperatures and to calculate certain ratios for determining higher-order collision integrals.

  16. Electron energy transport and magnetic curvature driven modes

    SciTech Connect

    Coppi, B.; Tang, W.M.

    1984-10-01

    A transport coefficient for anomalous electron thermal conduction is constructed on the basis of the so-called Principle of Profile Consistency. It is assumed that the relevant modes in plasma where a substantial fraction of the electron population is magnetically trapped produce magnetic reconnection at a microscopic level and are driven by the combined effects of the plasma pressure gradient and the magnetic field curvature. Consequently, the scaling for the electron energy confinement time exhibits a strongly favorable dependence on the radius of magnetic curvature.

  17. Long-range energy transport in photosystem II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roden, Jan J. J.; Bennett, Doran I. G.; Whaley, K. Birgitta

    2016-06-01

    We simulate the long-range inter-complex electronic energy transfer in photosystem II - from the antenna complex, via a core complex, to the reaction center - using a non-Markovian (ZOFE) quantum master equation description that allows the electronic coherence involved in the energy transfer to be explicitly included at all length scales. This allows us to identify all locations where coherence is manifested and to further identify the pathways of the energy transfer in the full network of coupled chromophores using a description based on excitation probability currents. We investigate how the energy transfer depends on the initial excitation - localized, coherent initial excitation versus delocalized, incoherent initial excitation - and find that the overall energy transfer is remarkably robust with respect to such strong variations of the initial condition. To explore the importance of vibrationally enhanced transfer and to address the question of optimization in the system parameters, we systematically vary the strength of the coupling between the electronic and the vibrational degrees of freedom. We find that the natural parameters lie in a (broad) region that enables optimal transfer efficiency and that the overall long-range energy transfer on a ns time scale appears to be very robust with respect to variations in the vibronic coupling of up to an order of magnitude. Nevertheless, vibrationally enhanced transfer appears to be crucial to obtain a high transfer efficiency, with the latter falling sharply for couplings outside the optimal range. Comparison of our full quantum simulations to results obtained with a "classical" rate equation based on a modified-Redfield/generalized-Förster description previously used to simulate energy transfer dynamics in the entire photosystem II complex shows good agreement for the overall time scales of excitation energy transport.

  18. 49 CFR 393.124 - What are the rules for securing concrete pipe?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What are the rules for securing concrete pipe? 393... Specific Securement Requirements by Commodity Type § 393.124 What are the rules for securing concrete pipe? (a) Applicability. (1) The rules in this section apply to the transportation of concrete pipe...

  19. 49 CFR 393.124 - What are the rules for securing concrete pipe?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What are the rules for securing concrete pipe? 393... Specific Securement Requirements by Commodity Type § 393.124 What are the rules for securing concrete pipe? (a) Applicability. (1) The rules in this section apply to the transportation of concrete pipe...

  20. 49 CFR 393.124 - What are the rules for securing concrete pipe?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false What are the rules for securing concrete pipe? 393... Specific Securement Requirements by Commodity Type § 393.124 What are the rules for securing concrete pipe? (a) Applicability. (1) The rules in this section apply to the transportation of concrete pipe...

  1. 49 CFR 393.124 - What are the rules for securing concrete pipe?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What are the rules for securing concrete pipe? 393... Specific Securement Requirements by Commodity Type § 393.124 What are the rules for securing concrete pipe? (a) Applicability. (1) The rules in this section apply to the transportation of concrete pipe...

  2. 49 CFR 393.124 - What are the rules for securing concrete pipe?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What are the rules for securing concrete pipe? 393... Specific Securement Requirements by Commodity Type § 393.124 What are the rules for securing concrete pipe? (a) Applicability. (1) The rules in this section apply to the transportation of concrete pipe...

  3. 49 CFR 178.348-3 - Pumps, piping, hoses and connections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pumps, piping, hoses and connections. 178.348-3... PACKAGINGS Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.348-3 Pumps, piping, hoses and connections. Each pump and all piping, hoses and connections on each cargo tank motor vehicle...

  4. 49 CFR 178.348-3 - Pumps, piping, hoses and connections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pumps, piping, hoses and connections. 178.348-3... PACKAGINGS Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.348-3 Pumps, piping, hoses and connections. Each pump and all piping, hoses and connections on each cargo tank motor vehicle...

  5. 49 CFR 178.345-9 - Pumps, piping, hoses and connections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pumps, piping, hoses and connections. 178.345-9... PACKAGINGS Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.345-9 Pumps, piping, hoses... that pressure within a cargo tank does not exceed test pressure. (b) Each hose, piping,...

  6. 49 CFR 178.348-3 - Pumps, piping, hoses and connections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pumps, piping, hoses and connections. 178.348-3... PACKAGINGS Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.348-3 Pumps, piping, hoses and connections. Each pump and all piping, hoses and connections on each cargo tank motor vehicle...

  7. 49 CFR 178.345-9 - Pumps, piping, hoses and connections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pumps, piping, hoses and connections. 178.345-9... PACKAGINGS Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.345-9 Pumps, piping, hoses... that pressure within a cargo tank does not exceed test pressure. (b) Each hose, piping,...

  8. 49 CFR 178.348-3 - Pumps, piping, hoses and connections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pumps, piping, hoses and connections. 178.348-3... PACKAGINGS Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.348-3 Pumps, piping, hoses and connections. Each pump and all piping, hoses and connections on each cargo tank motor vehicle...

  9. Interactions between energy supply and transportation-related energy use, volume 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, T. J.; Ison, J. W.; Geinzer, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    The structure of ENTRANS and some of its policy analysis applications are described. ENTRANS is a computer simulator model of the interactions between energy supply and transportation related energy use. It includes a complete representation of the characteristics of transportation supply (public transit, carpooling, highways, and autos) and of households' travel related decisions (car type, travel mode, trip length, and frequency choices). The model is capable of analyzing a wide range of policies designed to change automobile fuel use. The results of several detailed policy analyses are described.

  10. Nanostructured semiconductors for thermoelectric energy conversion: Synthesis and transport properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Pranati

    Increasing energy demands and decreasing natural energy resources have sparked search for alternative clean and renewable energy sources. For instance, currently there is a tremendous interest in thermoelectric and photovoltaic solar energy production technologies. Half-Heusler (HH) alloys are among the most popular material systems presently under widespread investigations for high temperature thermoelectric energy conversion. Approaches to increase the thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT) of HH range from (1) chemical substitution of atoms with different masses within the same atomic position in the crystal structure to optimize carrier concentration and enhance phonon scattering via mass fluctuation and (2) embedding secondary phonon scattering centers in the matrix (nanostructuring) to further reduce thermal conductivity. This work focuses on three material systems. The first part describes the synthesis and properties (thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity, magnetic) of various oxide nanostructures (NiO, Co3O4) which were subsequently used as inclusion phases in a HH matrix to reduce the thermal conductivity. Detailed reviews of the past efforts along with the current effort to optimize synthetic routes are presented. The effects of the synthesis conditions on the thermoelectric properties of compacted pellets of NiO and Co3O4 are also discussed. The second part of the work discusses the development of synthetic strategies for the fabrication of p-type and n-type bulk nanostructured thermoelectric materials made of a half-Heusler matrix based on (Ti,Hf)CoSb, containing nanostructures with full-Heusler (FH) compositions and structures coherently embedded inside the half-Heusler matrix. The role of the nanostructures in the regulation of phonon and charge carrier transports within the half-heusler matrix is extensively discussed by combining transport data and electron microscopy images. It was found that the FH nanoinclusions form staggered

  11. Insulated pipe clamp design

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.J.; Hyde, L.L.; Wagner, S.E.; Severud, L.K.

    1980-01-01

    Thin wall large diameter piping for breeder reactor plants can be subjected to significant thermal shocks during reactor scrams and other upset events. On the Fast Flux Test Facility, the addition of thick clamps directly on the piping was undesired because the differential metal temperatures between the pipe wall and the clamp could have significantly reduced the pipe thermal fatigue life cycle capabilities. Accordingly, an insulated pipe clamp design concept was developed. The design considerations and methods along with the development tests are presented. Special considerations to guard against adverse cracking of the insulation material, to maintain the clamp-pipe stiffness desired during a seismic event, to minimize clamp restraint on the pipe during normal pipe heatup, and to resist clamp rotation or spinning on the pipe are emphasized.

  12. The Suppression of Energy Discretization Errors in Multigroup Transport Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, Edward

    2013-06-17

    The Objective of this project is to develop, implement, and test new deterministric methods to solve, as efficiently as possible, multigroup neutron transport problems having an extremely large number of groups. Our approach was to (i) use the standard CMFD method to "coarsen" the space-angle grid, yielding a multigroup diffusion equation, and (ii) use a new multigrid-in-space-and-energy technique to efficiently solve the multigroup diffusion problem. The overall strategy of (i) how to coarsen the spatial an energy grids, and (ii) how to navigate through the various grids, has the goal of minimizing the overall computational effort. This approach yields not only the fine-grid solution, but also coarse-group flux-weighted cross sections that can be used for other related problems.

  13. A new model for gas/solid pipe flow

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Bangxian; Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Petrick, M.

    1995-12-31

    A new model of particle turbulent dispersion in vertical gas/solid pipe flow is presented in this paper. The essence of the model is to pay more attention to the active and discrete behavior of particles in the dispersion process in non-homogeneous turbulent vertical pipe flows using two-fluid approaches. In the new model, a non-gradient type of diffusion term is included in the expression of radial particle dispersion flux; the transport equation for particle turbulent kinetic energy (PTKE) is developed and solved for its distribution; the effect of intra-particle collision is considered for the generation and dissipation of PTKE; turbulence modulation due to particle presence is taken into account. Preliminary numerical results based on this new model are also presented in this paper.

  14. Heat pipe waste heat recovery boilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Littwin, D. A.; McCurley, J.

    The use of heat pipes as transport devices in waste heat recovery boilers is examined. Test results show that heat pipes can efficiently extract heat from the hot gas stream and transfer it inside the pressure vessel for the steam generation process. The benefits of incorporating heat pipes into the design of waste heat recovery boilers include a highly compact package, a significant reduction in thermally induced stresses, double isolation of the steam from the heat source, an extended surface for improved efficiency in heat extraction, improved circulation and stability in the boiling regime, easy cleaning, individually replaceable tubes, and low flue gas pressure drop.

  15. Arterial gas occlusions in operating heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saaski, E. W.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of noncondensable gases on high performance arterial heat pipes has been investigated both analytically and experimentally. Models have been generated which characterize the dissolution of gases in condensate and the diffusional loss of dissolved gases from condensate in arterial flow. These processes, and others, have been used to postulate stability criteria for arterial heat pipes. Experimental observations of gas occlusions were made using a stainless steel heat pipe equipped with viewing ports, and the working fluids methanol and ammonia with the gas additives helium, argon, and xenon. Observations were related to gas transport models.

  16. Advanced Reactors Thermal Energy Transport for Process Industries

    SciTech Connect

    P. Sabharwall; S.J. Yoon; M.G. McKellar; C. Stoots; George Griffith

    2014-07-01

    The operation temperature of advanced nuclear reactors is generally higher than commercial light water reactors and thermal energy from advanced nuclear reactor can be used for various purposes such as liquid fuel production, district heating, desalination, hydrogen production, and other process heat applications, etc. Some of the major technology challenges that must be overcome before the advanced reactors could be licensed on the reactor side are qualification of next generation of nuclear fuel, materials that can withstand higher temperature, improvement in power cycle thermal efficiency by going to combined cycles, SCO2 cycles, successful demonstration of advanced compact heat exchangers in the prototypical conditions, and from the process side application the challenge is to transport the thermal energy from the reactor to the process plant with maximum efficiency (i.e., with minimum temperature drop). The main focus of this study is on doing a parametric study of efficient heat transport system, with different coolants (mainly, water, He, and molten salts) to determine maximum possible distance that can be achieved.

  17. The US Department of Energy - investing in clean transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalk, Steven G.; Milliken, JoAnn; Miller, James F.; Venkateswaran, S. R.

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), together with six other federal agencies and America's three largest car makers, are jointly investing in the development of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells as a clean and efficient technology for automotive propulsion under the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV). (PEM is sometimes referred to as `proton exchange membrane'. The correctness, or otherwise, of that interpretation will depend on the mechanism of apparent proton transfer in the membrane implied). It is anticipated that the successful development of PEM fuel cells (and other long-term technologies) to meet automotive requirements will extend beyond the PNGV's 2004 timeframe for achieving 80 miles per gallon in production prototypes. Given the extraordinary promise of large energy, environmental and economic benefits to the nation from fuel cells and other long-term technologies, the PNGV partners will continue to invest in these technologies beyond 2004. The DOE's Transportation Fuel Cells Program has recently announced US$50 million of new contract awards for focused R&D to overcome critical technical barriers such as fuel-flexible fuel processing technology. The progress achieved toward automotive goals through these and past investments will also enable nearer-term application of fuel cells (e.g. in buses). This paper describes the status of the PNGV program and the key role and technical accomplishments of the DOE Transportation Fuel Cells Program. The DOE's recent investments in new fuel cell R&D activities will be discussed.

  18. Vapor spill pipe monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchini, G. M.; McRae, T. G.

    1983-06-01

    The invention is a method and apparatus for continually monitoring the composition of liquefied natural gas flowing from a spill pipe during a spill test by continually removing a sample of the LNG by means of a probe, gasifying the LNG in the probe, and sending the vaporized LNG to a remote IR gas detector for analysis. The probe comprises three spaced concentric tubes surrounded by a water jacket which communicates with a flow channel defined between the inner and middle, and middle and outer tubes. The inner tube is connected to a pump for providing suction, and the probe is positioned in the LNG flow below the spill pipe with the tip oriented partly downward so that LNG is continuously drawn into the inner tube through a small orifice. The probe is made of a high thermal conductivity metal. Hot water is flowed through the water jacket and through the flow channel between the three tubes to provide the necessary heat transfer to flash vaporize the LNG passing through the inner channel of the probe. The gasified LNG is transported through a connected hose or tubing extending from the probe to a remote IR sensor which measures the gas composition.

  19. Vapor spill pipe monitor

    DOEpatents

    Bianchini, G.M.; McRae, T.G.

    1983-06-23

    The invention is a method and apparatus for continually monitoring the composition of liquefied natural gas flowing from a spill pipe during a spill test by continually removing a sample of the LNG by means of a probe, gasifying the LNG in the probe, and sending the vaporized LNG to a remote ir gas detector for analysis. The probe comprises three spaced concentric tubes surrounded by a water jacket which communicates with a flow channel defined between the inner and middle, and middle and outer tubes. The inner tube is connected to a pump for providing suction, and the probe is positioned in the LNG flow below the spill pipe with the tip oriented partly downward so that LNG is continuously drawn into the inner tube through a small orifice. The probe is made of a high thermal conductivity metal. Hot water is flowed through the water jacket and through the flow channel between the three tubes to provide the necessary heat transfer to flash vaporize the LNG passing through the inner channel of the probe. The gasified LNG is transported through a connected hose or tubing extending from the probe to a remote ir sensor which measures the gas composition.

  20. OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion) cold water pipe at-sea test program data analysis project. Comparisons between measured and predicted barge and pipe response: Evaluation of the NOAA/ROTECF and NOAA/TRW computer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega, L. A.; Nihous, G. C.

    1985-10-01

    The simulation of the at-sea test conditions with computer models is considered. The NOAA/ROTECF model simulates a coupled barge/pipe system driven by waves and currents in the frequency domain (standard-deviation parameters are considered). The NOAA/TRW model simulates a pipe driven by user-specified barge motions, waves, and currents in the time domain (parameters as a function of time are considered).

  1. Pressure-drop reduction and heat-transfer deterioration of slush nitrogen in horizontal pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, Katsuhide; Nakagomi, Kei; Takahashi, Norifumi

    2011-10-01

    Cryogenic slush fluids such as slush hydrogen and slush nitrogen are two-phase, single-component fluids containing solid particles in a liquid. Since their density and refrigerant capacity are greater than those of liquid-state fluid alone, there are high expectations for the use of slush fluids in various applications such as clean-energy fuels, spacecraft fuels for improved efficiency in transportation and storage, and as refrigerants for high-temperature superconducting equipment. Experimental tests were performed using slush nitrogen to obtain the flow and heat-transfer characteristics in two different types of horizontal circular pipes with inner diameters of 10 and 15 mm. One of the primary objectives for the study was to investigate the effect of pipe diameter on the pressure-drop reduction and heat-transfer deterioration of slush nitrogen according to changes in the pipe flow velocity, solid fraction and heat flux. In the case of an inner diameter of 15 mm, pressure drop was reduced and heat-transfer characteristics deteriorated when the pipe flow velocity was higher than 3.6 m/s. On the other hand, in the case of an inner diameter of 10 mm, pressure drop was reduced and heat-transfer characteristics deteriorated when the pipe flow velocity was higher than 2.0 m/s. From these results, it can be seen that a larger pipe diameter produces a higher onset velocity for reducing pressure drop and deteriorating heat-transfer characteristics. Furthermore, based on observations using a high-speed video camera, it was confirmed that pressure drop was reduced and heat-transfer characteristics deteriorated when the solid particles migrated to the center of the pipe and the flow pattern of the solid particles inside the pipe was pseudo-homogeneous.

  2. Reusable pipe flange covers

    DOEpatents

    Holden, James Elliott; Perez, Julieta

    2001-01-01

    A molded, flexible pipe flange cover for temporarily covering a pipe flange and a pipe opening includes a substantially round center portion having a peripheral skirt portion depending from the center portion, the center portion adapted to engage a front side of the pipe flange and to seal the pipe opening. The peripheral skirt portion is formed to include a plurality of circumferentially spaced tabs, wherein free ends of the flexible tabs are formed with respective through passages adapted to receive a drawstring for pulling the tabs together on a back side of the pipe flange.

  3. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Potential for Energy Efficiency Improvement Beyond the Light-Duty-Vehicle Sector

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, A. D.; Patel, D. M.; Bertram, K. M.

    2013-03-01

    Considerable research has focused on energy efficiency and fuel substitution options for light-duty vehicles, while much less attention has been given to medium- and heavy-duty trucks, buses, aircraft, marine vessels, trains, pipeline, and off-road equipment. This report brings together the salient findings from an extensive review of literature on future energy efficiency options for these non-light-duty modes. Projected activity increases to 2050 are combined with forecasts of overall fuel efficiency improvement potential to estimate the future total petroleum and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions relative to current levels. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  4. Transportation Energy Futures Series. Potential for Energy Efficiency Improvement Beyond the Light-Duty-Vehicle Sector

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, A. D.; Patel, D. M.; Bertram, K. M.

    2013-02-01

    Considerable research has focused on energy efficiency and fuel substitution options for light-duty vehicles, while much less attention has been given to medium- and heavy-duty trucks, buses, aircraft, marine vessels, trains, pipeline, and off-road equipment. This report brings together the salient findings from an extensive review of literature on future energy efficiency options for these non-light-duty modes. Projected activity increases to 2050 are combined with forecasts of overall fuel efficiency improvement potential to estimate the future total petroleum and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions relative to current levels. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  5. Scaling behaviors of weighted food webs as energy transportation networks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiang; Guo, Liangpeng

    2010-06-01

    Food webs can be regarded as energy transporting networks in which the weight of each edge denotes the energy flux between two species. By investigating 21 empirical weighted food webs as energy flow networks, we found several ubiquitous scaling behaviors. Two random variables A(i) and C(i) defined for each vertex i, representing the total flux (also called vertex intensity) and total indirect effect or energy store of i, were found to follow power law distributions with the exponents alpha approximately 1.32 and beta approximately 1.33, respectively. Another scaling behavior is the power law relationship, C(i) approximately A(i)(eta), where eta approximately 1.02. This is known as the allometric scaling power law relationship because A(i) can be treated as metabolism and C(i) as the body mass of the sub-network rooted from the vertex i, according to the algorithm presented in this paper. Finally, a simple relationship among these power law exponents, eta=(alpha-1)/(beta-1), was mathematically derived and tested by the empirical food webs.

  6. High-performance heat pipes for heat recovery applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saaski, E. W.; Hartl, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    Methods to improve the performance of reflux heat pipes for heat recovery applications were examined both analytically and experimentally. Various models for the estimation of reflux heat pipe transport capacity were surveyed in the literature and compared with experimental data. A high transport capacity reflux heat pipe was developed that provides up to a factor of 10 capacity improvement over conventional open tube designs; analytical models were developed for this device and incorporated into a computer program HPIPE. Good agreement of the model predictions with data for R-11 and benzene reflux heat pipes was obtained.

  7. Energy analysis and break-even distance for transportation for biofuels in comparison to fossil fuels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the present analysis various forms fuel from biomass and fossil sources, their mass and energy densities, and their break-even transportation distances to transport them effectively were analyzed. This study gives an insight on how many times more energy spent on transporting the fuels to differe...

  8. 48 CFR 970.5223-6 - Executive Order 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management. 970.5223-6 Section 970.5223-6 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS DOE... Contracts 970.5223-6 Executive Order 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and...

  9. 77 FR 71478 - Notice of Rail Energy Transportation Advisory Committee Vacancies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-30

    ... Agriculture, Energy, and Transportation and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to serve on RETAC in... environment or the conservation of energy resources. Authority: 49 U.S.C. 721, 49 U.S.C. 11101; 49...

  10. Effects of inclination and vorticity on interfacial flow dynamics in horizontal and inclined pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiara, Areti; Hendrickson, Kelli; Liu, Yuming

    2015-11-01

    The transport of oil and gas in long horizontal pipelines can be significantly affected by the development of violent roll waves and slugs, but the mechanics causing such transitions have not been well understood. To enable the improvement of the prediction of flow transition criteria in long pipelines we perform theoretical analysis and direct numerical simulations of multiphase pipe flows to quantify the roles of inclination and vorticity in the flow dynamics. We find that backflow or flooding may occur even in the absence of disturbances due to inclination effects and obtain criteria on the maximum pipe length for steady flows. We identify and compare the effects of inclination and vorticity on the stability of interfacial wave disturbances. We discuss the mechanisms of non-linear energy transfer between stable and unstable wave disturbances and present results from direct numerical simulations for the predictions of spectrum evolutions for broad-banded interfacial disturbances in inclined pipes.

  11. Room-temperature ballistic energy transport in molecules with repeating units

    SciTech Connect

    Rubtsova, Natalia I.; Nyby, Clara M.; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Boyu; Zhou, Xiao; Jayawickramarajah, Janarthanan; Burin, Alexander L.; Rubtsov, Igor V.

    2015-06-07

    In materials, energy can propagate by means of two limiting regimes: diffusive and ballistic. Ballistic energy transport can be fast and efficient and often occurs with a constant speed. Using two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy methods, we discovered ballistic energy transport via individual polyethylene chains with a remarkably high speed of 1440 m/s and the mean free path length of 14.6 Å in solution at room temperature. Whereas the transport via the chains occurs ballistically, the mechanism switches to diffusive with the effective transport speed of 130 m/s at the end-groups attached to the chains. A unifying model of the transport in molecules is presented with clear time separation and additivity among the transport along oligomeric fragments, which occurs ballistically, and the transport within the disordered fragments, occurring diffusively. The results open new avenues for making novel elements for molecular electronics, including ultrafast energy transporters, controlled chemical reactors, and sub-wavelength quantum nanoseparators.

  12. Three essays in transportation energy and environmental policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajiamiri, Sara

    technologies instead of a similar-sized conventional gasoline-powered vehicle (CV). The electric vehicle technologies considered are gasoline-powered hybrid and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and battery electric vehicles. It is found that the private benefits are positive, but smaller than the expected short-term cost premiums on these technologies, which suggest the need for government support if a large-scale adoption of electric vehicles is desired. Also, it is found that the net present values of the societal benefits that are not internalized by the vehicle purchaser are not likely to exceed $1,700. This estimate accounts for changes in GHG emissions, criteria air pollutants, gasoline consumption and the driver's contribution to congestion. The third essay explores the implications of a large-scale adoption of electric vehicles on transportation finance. While fuel efficiency improvements are desirable with respect to goals for achieving energy security and environmental improvement, it has adverse implications for the current system of transportation finance. Reductions in gasoline consumption relative to the amount of driving that takes place would result in a decline in fuel tax revenues that are needed to fund planning, construction, maintenance, and operation of highways and public transit systems. In this paper the forgone fuel tax revenue that results when an electric vehicle replaces a similar-sized CV is estimated. It is found that under several vehicle electrification scenarios, the combined federal and state trust funds could decline by as much as 5 percent by 2020 and as much as 12.5 percent by 2030. Alternative fee systems that tie more directly to transportation system use rather then to fuel consumption could reconcile energy security, environmental, and transportation finance goals.

  13. Energy Models for One-Carrier Transport in Semiconductor Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jerome, Joseph W.; Shu, Chi-Wang

    1991-01-01

    Moment models of carrier transport, derived from the Boltzmann equation, made possible the simulation of certain key effects through such realistic assumptions as energy dependent mobility functions. This type of global dependence permits the observation of velocity overshoot in the vicinity of device junctions, not discerned via classical drift-diffusion models, which are primarily local in nature. It was found that a critical role is played in the hydrodynamic model by the heat conduction term. When ignored, the overshoot is inappropriately damped. When the standard choice of the Wiedemann-Franz law is made for the conductivity, spurious overshoot is observed. Agreement with Monte-Carlo simulation in this regime required empirical modification of this law, or nonstandard choices. Simulations of the hydrodynamic model in one and two dimensions, as well as simulations of a newly developed energy model, the RT model, are presented. The RT model, intermediate between the hydrodynamic and drift-diffusion model, was developed to eliminate the parabolic energy band and Maxwellian distribution assumptions, and to reduce the spurious overshoot with physically consistent assumptions. The algorithms employed for both models are the essentially non-oscillatory shock capturing algorithms. Some mathematical results are presented and contrasted with the highly developed state of the drift-diffusion model.

  14. Transportable high-energy high-power generator.

    PubMed

    Novac, B M; Smith, I R; Senior, P; Parker, M; Louverdis, G

    2010-05-01

    High-power applications sometimes require a transportable, simple, and robust gigawatt pulsed power generator, and an analysis of various possible approaches shows that one based on a twin exploding wire array is extremely advantageous. A generator based on this technology and used with a high-energy capacitor bank has recently been developed at Loughborough University. An H-configuration circuit is used, with one pair of diagonally opposite arms each comprising a high-voltage ballast inductor and the other pair exploding wire arrays capable of generating voltages up to 300 kV. The two center points of the H configuration provide the output to the load, which is coupled through a high-voltage self-breakdown spark gap, with the entire autonomous source being housed in a metallic container. Experimentally, a load resistance of a few tens of Ohms is provided with an impulse of more than 300 kV, having a rise time of about 140 ns and a peak power of over 1.7 GW. Details of the experimental arrangement and typical results are presented and diagnostic measurements of the current and voltage output are shown to compare well with theoretical predictions based on detailed numerical modeling. Finally, the next stage toward developing a more powerful and energetic transportable source is outlined. PMID:20515165

  15. Heat pipes. [technology utilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The development and use of heat pipes are described, including space requirements and contributions. Controllable heat pipes, and designs for automatically maintaining a selected constant temperature, are discussed which would add to the versatility and usefulness of heat pipes in industrial processing, manufacture of integrated circuits, and in temperature stabilization of electronics.

  16. High energy electromagnetic particle transportation on the GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canal, P.; Elvira, D.; Jun, S. Y.; Kowalkowski, J.; Paterno, M.; Apostolakis, J.

    2014-06-01

    We present massively parallel high energy electromagnetic particle transportation through a finely segmented detector on a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). Simulating events of energetic particle decay in a general-purpose high energy physics (HEP) detector requires intensive computing resources, due to the complexity of the geometry as well as physics processes applied to particles copiously produced by primary collisions and secondary interactions. The recent advent of hardware architectures of many-core or accelerated processors provides the variety of concurrent programming models applicable not only for the high performance parallel computing, but also for the conventional computing intensive application such as the HEP detector simulation. The components of our prototype are a transportation process under a non-uniform magnetic field, geometry navigation with a set of solid shapes and materials, electromagnetic physics processes for electrons and photons, and an interface to a framework that dispatches bundles of tracks in a highly vectorized manner optimizing for spatial locality and throughput. Core algorithms and methods are excerpted from the Geant4 toolkit, and are modified and optimized for the GPU application. Program kernels written in C/C++ are designed to be compatible with CUDA and OpenCL and with the aim to be generic enough for easy porting to future programming models and hardware architectures. To improve throughput by overlapping data transfers with kernel execution, multiple CUDA streams are used. Issues with floating point accuracy, random numbers generation, data structure, kernel divergences and register spills are also considered. Performance evaluation for the relative speedup compared to the corresponding sequential execution on CPU is presented as well.

  17. High energy electromagnetic particle transportation on the GPU

    SciTech Connect

    Canal, P.; Elvira, D.; Jun, S. Y.; Kowalkowski, J.; Paterno, M.; Apostolakis, J.

    2014-01-01

    We present massively parallel high energy electromagnetic particle transportation through a finely segmented detector on a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). Simulating events of energetic particle decay in a general-purpose high energy physics (HEP) detector requires intensive computing resources, due to the complexity of the geometry as well as physics processes applied to particles copiously produced by primary collisions and secondary interactions. The recent advent of hardware architectures of many-core or accelerated processors provides the variety of concurrent programming models applicable not only for the high performance parallel computing, but also for the conventional computing intensive application such as the HEP detector simulation. The components of our prototype are a transportation process under a non-uniform magnetic field, geometry navigation with a set of solid shapes and materials, electromagnetic physics processes for electrons and photons, and an interface to a framework that dispatches bundles of tracks in a highly vectorized manner optimizing for spatial locality and throughput. Core algorithms and methods are excerpted from the Geant4 toolkit, and are modified and optimized for the GPU application. Program kernels written in C/C++ are designed to be compatible with CUDA and OpenCL and with the aim to be generic enough for easy porting to future programming models and hardware architectures. To improve throughput by overlapping data transfers with kernel execution, multiple CUDA streams are used. Issues with floating point accuracy, random numbers generation, data structure, kernel divergences and register spills are also considered. Performance evaluation for the relative speedup compared to the corresponding sequential execution on CPU is presented as well.

  18. Design and testing of CRBRP insulated horizontal and vertical pipe clamps

    SciTech Connect

    Pollono, L.P.; Mello, R.M.

    1980-01-01

    The Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) Primary Heat Transport system piping may be characterized as large-diameter, thin-wall piping which transports liquid sodium at high temperatures. The piping is arranged in accord with the elevated loop concept, consisting of large horizontal inplane, expansion loops and long, vertical runs of piping. These characteristics and the postulated thermal transient and seismic loads, which are imposed on the piping, dictate pipe clamp designs that are substantially different from standard off the shelf pipe clamp designs. The design features of the CRBRP horizontal and vertical pipe clamps for the large sodium piping, the various test programs used to verify the clamp designs, and the results of this testing are presented.

  19. Energy loss in a partonic transport model including bremsstrahlung processes

    SciTech Connect

    Fochler, Oliver; Greiner, Carsten; Xu Zhe

    2010-08-15

    A detailed investigation of the energy loss of gluons that traverse a thermal gluonic medium simulated within the perturbative QCD-based transport model BAMPS (a Boltzmann approach to multiparton scatterings) is presented in the first part of this work. For simplicity the medium response is neglected in these calculations. The energy loss from purely elastic interactions is compared with the case where radiative processes are consistently included based on the matrix element by Gunion and Bertsch. From this comparison, gluon multiplication processes gg{yields}ggg are found to be the dominant source of energy loss within the approach employed here. The consequences for the quenching of gluons with high transverse momentum in fully dynamic simulations of Au+Au collisions at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) energy of {radical}(s)=200A GeV are discussed in the second major part of this work. The results for central collisions as discussed in a previous publication are revisited, and first results on the nuclear modification factor R{sub AA} for noncentral Au+Au collisions are presented. They show a decreased quenching compared to central collisions while retaining the same shape. The investigation of the elliptic flow v{sub 2} is extended up to nonthermal transverse momenta of 10 GeV, exhibiting a maximum v{sub 2} at roughly 4 to 5 GeV and a subsequent decrease. Finally the sensitivity of the aforementioned results on the specific implementation of the effective modeling of the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal (LPM) effect via a formation-time-based cutoff is explored.

  20. Evaluation of commercially-available spacecraft-type heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, W. B.; Tower, L. K.

    1978-01-01

    As part of an effort to develop reliable, cost effective spacecraft thermal control heat pipes, life tests on 30 commercially available heat pipes in 10 groups of different design and material combinations were conducted. Results for seven groups were reported herein. Materials are aluminum and stainless steel, and working fluids are methanol and ammonia. The formation of noncondensible gas was observed for times exceeding 11,000 hours. The heat transport capacities of the pipes were also determined.