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Sample records for pistacia atlantica seedlings

  1. Morphological leaf variability in natural populations of Pistacia atlantica Desf. subsp. atlantica along climatic gradient: new features to update Pistacia atlantica subsp. atlantica key.

    PubMed

    El Zerey-Belaskri, Asma; Benhassaini, Hachemi

    2016-04-01

    The effect of bioclimate range on the variation in Pistacia atlantica Desf. subsp. atlantica leaf morphology was studied on 16 sites in Northwest Algeria. The study examined biometrically mature leaves totaling 3520 compound leaves. Fifteen characters (10 quantitative and 5 qualitative) were assessed on each leaf. For each quantitative character, the nested analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to examine relative magnitude of variation at each level of the nested hierarchy. The correlation between the climatic parameters and the leaf morphology was examined. The statistical analysis applied on the quantitative leaf characters showed highly significant variation at the within-site level and between-site variation. The correlation coefficient (r) showed also an important correlation between climatic parameters and leaf morphology. The results of this study exhibited several values reported for the first time on the species, such as the length and the width of the leaf (reaching up to 24.5 cm/21.9 cm), the number of leaflets (up to 18 leaflets/leaf), and the petiole length of the terminal leaflet (reaching up to 3.4 cm). The original findings of this study are used to update the P. atlantica subsp. atlantica identification key.

  2. Distinct antimicrobial activities in aphid galls on Pistacia atlantica

    PubMed Central

    Yoram, Gerchman; Inbar, Moseh

    2011-01-01

    Gall-formers are parasitic organisms that manipulate plant traits for their own benefit. Galls have been shown to protect their inhabitants from natural enemies such as predators and parasitoids by various chemical and mechanical means. Much less attention, however, has been given to the possibility of defense against microbial pathogens in the humid and nutrient-rich gall environment. We found that the large, cauliflower-shaped, galls induced by the aphid Slavum wertheimae on buds of Pistacia atlantica trees express antibacterial and antifungal activities distinct from those found in leaves. Antibacterial activity was especially profound against Bacillus spp (a genus of many known insect pathogen) and against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (a known plant pathogen). Antifungal activity was also demonstrated against multiple filamentous fungi. Our results provide evidence for the protective antimicrobial role of galls. This remarkable antibacterial and antifungal activity in the galls of S. wertheimae may be of agricultural and pharmaceutical value. PMID:22105034

  3. Antioxidant activity and phenolic profile of different organs of Pistacia atlantica Desf. subsp. atlantica from Algeria.

    PubMed

    Toul, Fethi; Belyagoubi-Benhammou, Nabila; Zitouni, Amel; Atik-Bekkara, Fawzia

    2017-03-01

    The present study evaluated the antioxidant activity of 21 extracts prepared from seven parts of Pistacia atlantica Desf. subsp. atlantica. (Fruits, leaves, buds, stems, roots, internal and external trunk barks) collected from Tlemcen, Algeria. Total phenolic, flavonoid and flavonol contents were determined and the antioxidant properties were measured using different assays: 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH), ferric antioxidant reducing power and β-carotene bleaching assay. BHA (butylated hydroxyanisole) was used for comparison purposes. The results showed that the extracts of leaves and buds had the highest phenolic contents with 255.789 ± 4.733 and 233.946 ± 6.205 mg GAE/g DM, respectively. For the antioxidant activity, values of EC50 concentrations ranged from 0.059 to 5.712 mg/mL for DPPH, 0.015 to 3.141 mg/mL for reducing power and 0.068 to 5.021 mg/mL for β-carotene method, for all studied extracts. Analysing the phenolic composition, 10 components were identified in different parts of the plant.

  4. In vitro antifungal properties of Pistacia atlantica and olive extracts on different fungal species

    PubMed Central

    Shialy, Z; Zarrin, M; Sadeghi Nejad, B; Yusef Naanaie, S

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Pistacia atlantica, which belongs to the Anacardiaceae family, grows in the Zagrossian region of Iran. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antifungal properties of Pistacia atlantica and olive leaf extracts against different fungal species. Materials and Methods: In this study, we assessed the activities of olive leaf extracts and Pistacia atlantica leaf and fruit extracts against Candida species, including C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, and C. krusei. In addition, antifungal activities against three filamentous species, i.e., Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, and Aspergillus fumigates, were assessed, using the agar-well diffusion method. Results: The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) values of fruit and leaf extracts from Pistacia atlantica ranged 6.25-12.5 mg ml-1 and 6.25-25 mg ml-1 against the tested Candida and Aspergillus species, respectively. The olive leaf extracts showed no activity against Candida species or Aspergillus flavus, while they exhibited antifungal potency against Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus fumigatus (MIC: 12.5-25 mg/ml). The MICs of the mixture of selected extracts ranged from 6.25 to 25 mg/ml. Conclusion: Based on the results, the ethanolic extracts of the selected plants exhibited antifungal potency against the tested fungi and could be used as natural antifungal agents. PMID:28681004

  5. In vitro antifungal properties of Pistacia atlantica and olive extracts on different fungal species.

    PubMed

    Shialy, Z; Zarrin, M; Sadeghi Nejad, B; Yusef Naanaie, S

    2015-12-01

    Pistacia atlantica, which belongs to the Anacardiaceae family, grows in the Zagrossian region of Iran. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antifungal properties of Pistacia atlantica and olive leaf extracts against different fungal species. In this study, we assessed the activities of olive leaf extracts and Pistacia atlantica leaf and fruit extracts against Candida species, including C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, and C. krusei. In addition, antifungal activities against three filamentous species, i.e., Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, and Aspergillus fumigates, were assessed, using the agar-well diffusion method. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) values of fruit and leaf extracts from Pistacia atlantica ranged 6.25-12.5 mg ml(-1) and 6.25-25 mg ml(-1) against the tested Candida and Aspergillus species, respectively. The olive leaf extracts showed no activity against Candida species or Aspergillus flavus, while they exhibited antifungal potency against Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus fumigatus (MIC: 12.5-25 mg/ml). The MICs of the mixture of selected extracts ranged from 6.25 to 25 mg/ml. Based on the results, the ethanolic extracts of the selected plants exhibited antifungal potency against the tested fungi and could be used as natural antifungal agents.

  6. Sustainability of wild pistachio (Pistacia atlantica Desf.) in Zagros forests, Iran

    Treesearch

    Morteza Pourreza; John D. Shaw; Hoshang Zangeneh

    2008-01-01

    Wild pistachio (Pistacia atlantica Desf.) is the most economically important tree species in many rural areas in the west of Iran. The species produces resin used for a wide variety of traditional uses. Because the resin can be harvested non-destructively, the trees are maintained until mortality occurs from natural causes. The result is that natural...

  7. Healing Effect of Pistacia Atlantica Fruit Oil Extract in Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tanideh, Nader; Masoumi, Samira; Hosseinzadeh, Massood; Safarpour, Ali Reza; Erjaee, Hoda; Koohi-Hosseinabadi, Omid; Rahimikazerooni, Salar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Considering the anti-oxidant properties of Pistacia atlantica and lack of data regarding its efficacy in the treatment of ulcerative colitis, this study aims at investigating the effect of the Pistacia atlantica fruit extract in treating experimentally induced colitis in a rat model. Methods: Seventy male Sprague-Dawley rats (weighing 220±20 g) were used. All rats fasted 24 hours before the experimental procedure. The rats were randomly divided into 7 groups, each containing 10 induced colitis with 2ml acetic acid (3%). Group 1 (Asacol), group 2 (base gel) and group 7 (without treatment) were assigned as control groups. Group 3 (300 mg/ml) and group 4 (600 mg/ml) received Pistacia atlantica fruit orally. Group 5 (10% gel) and group 6 (20% gel) received Pistacia atlantica in the form of gel as enema. Macroscopic, histopathological examination and MDA measurement were carried out. Results: All groups revealed significant macroscopic healing in comparison with group 7 (P<0.001). Regarding microscopic findings in the treatment groups compared with group 7, the latter group differed significantly with groups 1, 2, 4 and 6 (P<0.001). There was a significant statistical difference in MDA scores of the seven treatment groups (F(5,54)=76.61, P<0.001). Post-hoc comparisons indicated that the mean±SD score of Asacol treated group (1.57±0.045) was not significantly different from groups 4 (1.62±0.024) and 6 (1.58±0.028). Conclusion: Our study showed that a high dose of Pistacia atlantica fruit oil extract, administered orally and rectally can improve colitis physiologically and pathologically in a rat model, and may be efficient for ulcerative colitis. PMID:25429174

  8. Effects of Pistacia atlantica subsp. kurdica on Growth and Aflatoxin Production by Aspergillus parasiticus

    PubMed Central

    Khodavaisy, Sadegh; Rezaie, Sassan; Noorbakhsh, Fatemeh; Baghdadi, Elham; Sharifynia, Somayeh; Aala, Farzad

    2016-01-01

    Background Aflatoxins are highly toxic secondary metabolites mainly produced by Aspergillus parasiticus. This species can contaminate a wide range of agricultural commodities, including cereals, peanuts, and crops in the field. In recent years, research on medicinal herbs, such as Pistacia atlantica subsp. kurdica, have led to reduced microbial growth, and these herbs also have a particular effect on the production of aflatoxins as carcinogenic compounds. Objectives In this study, we to examine P. atlantica subsp. kurdica as a natural compound used to inhibit the growth of A. parasiticus and to act as an anti-mycotoxin. Materials and Methods In vitro antifungal susceptibility testing of P. atlantica subsp. kurdica for A. parasiticus was performed according to CLSI document M38-A2. The rate of aflatoxin production was determined using the HPLC technique after exposure to different concentrations (62.5 - 125 mg/mL) of the gum. The changes in expression levels of the aflR gene were analyzed with a quantitative real-time PCR assay. Results The results showed that P. atlantica subsp. kurdica can inhibit A. parasiticus growth at a concentration of 125 mg/mL. HPLC results revealed a significant decrease in aflatoxin production with 125 mg/mL of P. atlantica subsp. kurdica, and AFL-B1 production was entirely inhibited. Based on quantitative real-time PCR results, the rate of aflR gene expression was significantly decreased after treatment with P. atlantica subsp. kurdica. Conclusions Pistacia atlantica subsp. kurdica has anti-toxic properties in addition to an inhibitory effect on A. parasiticus growth, and is able to decrease aflatoxin production effectively in a dose-dependent manner. Therefore, this herbal extract maybe considered a potential anti-mycotoxin agent in medicine or industrial agriculture. PMID:27800127

  9. Oxidant-induced damage to equine erythrocytes from exposure to Pistacia atlantica, Pistacia terebinthus, and Pistacia chinensis

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Kyla M.; Moore, Caroline E.; Bozorgmanesh, Rana; Magdesian, K. Gary; Woods, Leslie W.; Puschner, Birgit

    2017-01-01

    Two horses were referred for methemoglobinemia and hemolytic anemia following 5 acute deaths in their herd from an unidentified toxin source. Horses have a greater risk than other mammalian species of developing methemoglobinemia and hemolytic anemia following ingestion of oxidizing toxins, due to deficiencies in the mechanisms that protect against oxidative damage in erythrocytes. Their susceptibility to oxidative erythrocyte damage is evident in the numerous cases of red maple (Acer rubrum) toxicosis. The suspected toxins causing A. rubrum toxicosis are tannic acid, gallic acid, and a metabolite of gallic acid, pyrogallol. These compounds can be found in a variety of plants, posing a risk to equine health. In order to quickly identify toxin sources, 2 rapid in vitro assays were developed to screen plant extracts for the ability to induce methemoglobin formation or cause hemolysis in healthy equine donor erythrocytes. The plant extract screening focused on 3 species of the genus Pistacia: P. atlantica, P. terebinthus, and P. chinensis, which were located in the horse pasture. Extracts of the seeds and leaves of each species induced methemoglobin formation and resulted in hemolysis, with seed extracts having greater potency. The in vitro assays used in the current study provide a useful diagnostic method for the rapid identification of oxidizing agents from unidentified sources. There is no effective treatment for oxidative erythrocyte damage in horses, making rapid identification and removal of the source essential for the prevention of poisoning. PMID:25227420

  10. Oxidant-induced damage to equine erythrocytes from exposure to Pistacia atlantica, Pistacia terebinthus, and Pistacia chinensis.

    PubMed

    Walter, Kyla M; Moore, Caroline E; Bozorgmanesh, Rana; Magdesian, K Gary; Woods, Leslie W; Puschner, Birgit

    2014-11-01

    Two horses were referred for methemoglobinemia and hemolytic anemia following 5 acute deaths in their herd from an unidentified toxin source. Horses have a greater risk than other mammalian species of developing methemoglobinemia and hemolytic anemia following ingestion of oxidizing toxins, due to deficiencies in the mechanisms that protect against oxidative damage in erythrocytes. Their susceptibility to oxidative erythrocyte damage is evident in the numerous cases of red maple (Acer rubrum) toxicosis. The suspected toxins causing A. rubrum toxicosis are tannic acid, gallic acid, and a metabolite of gallic acid, pyrogallol. These compounds can be found in a variety of plants, posing a risk to equine health. In order to quickly identify toxin sources, 2 rapid in vitro assays were developed to screen plant extracts for the ability to induce methemoglobin formation or cause hemolysis in healthy equine donor erythrocytes. The plant extract screening focused on 3 species of the genus Pistacia: P. atlantica, P. terebinthus, and P. chinensis, which were located in the horse pasture. Extracts of the seeds and leaves of each species induced methemoglobin formation and resulted in hemolysis, with seed extracts having greater potency. The in vitro assays used in the current study provide a useful diagnostic method for the rapid identification of oxidizing agents from unidentified sources. There is no effective treatment for oxidative erythrocyte damage in horses, making rapid identification and removal of the source essential for the prevention of poisoning.

  11. Evaluation of the antifungal activities of various extracts from Pistacia atlantica Desf

    PubMed Central

    Falahati, M; Sepahvand, A; Mahmoudvand, H; Baharvand, P; Jabbarnia, S; Ghojoghi, A; Yarahmadi, M

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Despite the availability of various treatments for fungal diseases, there are some limitations in the management of these conditions due to multiple treatment-related side-effects. The present study was designed to investigate the antifungal properties of different extracts from Pistacia atlantica Desf. Materials and Methods: Different parts of P. atlantica (i.e., dried fruit, fresh fruit and dried leaf) were separately extracted via percolation method with 80% methanol and water. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis was performed to determine the main constituents of leaf and fruit extracts from P. atlantica. In vitro anti-Candida activities of the extracts against Candida albicans, Candida glabrata and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were studied. For this purpose, the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimum fungicidal concentrations (MFCs) were determined, using broth microdilution method, according to the modified M27-A3 protocol on yeasts, proposed by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). Results: Based on GC/MS analysis, the main constituents of P. atlantica fruit extracts were β-myrcene (41.4%), α-pinene (32.48%) and limonene (4.66%), respectively, whereas the major constituents of P. atlantica leaf extracts were trans-caryophyllene (15.18%), α-amorphene (8.1%) and neo-allo-ocimene (6.21%), respectively. As the findings indicated, all the constituents exhibited both fungistatic and fungicidal activities, with MICs ranging from 6.66 to 26.66 mg/mL and MFCs ranging from 13.3 to 37.3 mg/mL, respectively. Among the evaluated extracts, the methanolic fresh fruit extract of P. atlantica was significantly more effective than other extracts (P<0.05). Conclusion: Based on the findings of the present study, novel antifungal agents need to be developed, and use of P. atlantica should be promoted in the traditional treatment of Candida infections. PMID:28680993

  12. Comparative morphology of leaf epidermis in eight populations of Atlas Pistachio (Pistacia atlantica Desf., Anacardiaceae).

    PubMed

    Belhadj, Safia; Derridj, Arezki; Aigouy, Thierry; Gers, Charles; Gauquelin, Thierry; Mevy, Jean-Philippe

    2007-10-01

    A comparative analysis was undertaken to conduct a micromorphological study of Pistacia atlantica leaves by comparing different populations grown under different climatic conditions. Leaf epidermis of eight wild populations was investigated under scanning electron microscope. Micromorphological characteristics (epidermis ornament, stomata type, waxes as well as trichomes) of the adaxial and abaxial leaf surfaces were examined. The epidermis ornament varied among populations and leaf surface, the abaxial leaf surface is reticulate with a striate surface. Messaad site shows a smooth uneven surface. The adaxial leaf surface is smooth but several ornamentations can be seen. The leaflet is amphistomatic; the stomata appeared to be slightly sunken. A variety of stomatal types were recorded; actinocytic and anomocytic types are the most frequent. The indumentum consisted of glandular and nonglandular trichomes. Unicellular glandular trichomes are recorded for P. atlantica leaves in this study. Their density is higher in Oued safene site, located at the highest altitude in comparison with the other populations. The wax occurred in all the sites and its pattern varied according to the populations studied, particularly between Berriane and Messaad. The morphological variability exhibited by the eight populations of P. atlantica may be interpreted as relevant to the ecological plasticity and the physiological mechanisms involved are discussed in this report.

  13. Effects of Pistacia Atlantica Extract on Erythrocyte Membrane Rigidity, Oxidative Stress, and Hepatotoxicity Induced by CCl4 in Rats.

    PubMed

    Tolooei, Mohsen; Mirzaei, Ali

    2015-03-26

    Previous findings have suggested that antioxidants may reduce the levels of free radicals, which induce oxidative damage and play a key role in various diseases. Thus, we evaluated the protective activity of a Pistacia atlantica extract on erythrocyte membrane rigidity, oxidative stress, and hepatotoxicity induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) in rats. Fresh leaves of P.atlantica were collected from the mountains in Yasuj, Iran. Acute oral toxicity (LD50) was evaluated in Wistar rats (200-230 g). Animals were randomly divided into 4 groups, out of which the negative and plant control groups received distilled water and P. atlantica extracts (500 mg/kg), respectively. The toxic rat group received CCl4, while the treatment group received CCl4+P. atlantica extract. Blood plasma was utilized for the estimation of enzyme markers and lipid peroxidation, whereas hemolysate was applied for the determination of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activities. The levels of cholesterol and phospholipids in erythrocyte membranes were also determined. Rats were killed under anesthesia by cervical dislocation; liver was isolated from each rat and tissues homogenization was prepared for biochemical parameters such as malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels. LD50 values were determined for doses>3000 mg/kg (p.o.). The activities of glutamic pyruvate transaminase (GPT), glutamic oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and GSH in the protected group were significantly (p<0.001) reduced compared with those of toxic rats. In addition, we observed a decrease in the cholesterol level and an increase in red blood cell membrane phospholipids, SOD, and catalase activities (p<0.001) in the protected group, as compared with toxic rats. Administration of Pistacia atlantica extract normalized liver tissue MDA level (p<0.01) when compared to CCl4 treated group. The P. atlantica extract was able to normalize the levels of biochemical markers, including

  14. Effects of Pistacia Atlantica Extract on Erythrocyte Membrane Rigidity, Oxidative Stress, and Hepatotoxicity Induced by CCl4 in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tolooei, Mohsen; Mirzaei, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Previous findings have suggested that antioxidants may reduce the levels of free radicals, which induce oxidative damage and play a key role in various diseases. Thus, we evaluated the protective activity of a Pistacia atlantica extract on erythrocyte membrane rigidity, oxidative stress, and hepatotoxicity induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) in rats. Materials and Methods: Fresh leaves of P. atlantica were collected from the mountains in Yasuj, Iran. Acute oral toxicity (LD50) was evaluated in Wistar rats (200–230 g). Animals were randomly divided into 4 groups, out of which the negative and plant control groups received distilled water and P. atlantica extracts (500 mg/kg), respectively. The toxic rat group received CCl4, while the treatment group received CCl4 + P. atlantica extract. Blood plasma was utilized for the estimation of enzyme markers and lipid peroxidation, whereas hemolysate was applied for the determination of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activities. The levels of cholesterol and phospholipids in erythrocyte membranes were also determined. Rats were killed under anesthesia by cervical dislocation; liver was isolated from each rat and tissues homogenization was prepared for biochemical parameters such as malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels. Results: LD50 values were determined for doses >3000 mg/kg (p.o.). The activities of glutamic pyruvate transaminase (GPT), glutamic oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and GSH in the protected group were significantly (p < 0.001) reduced compared with those of toxic rats. In addition, we observed a decrease in the cholesterol level and an increase in red blood cell membrane phospholipids, SOD, and catalase activities (p < 0.001) in the protected group, as compared with toxic rats. Administration of Pistacia atlantica extract normalized liver tissue MDA level (p < 0. 01) when compared to CCl4 treated group. Conclusion: The P. atlantica

  15. Chemical composition, antioxidant and antibacterial properties of Bene (Pistacia atlantica subsp. mutica) hull essential oil.

    PubMed

    Rezaie, Mitra; Farhoosh, Reza; Sharif, Ali; Asili, Javad; Iranshahi, Mehrdad

    2015-10-01

    The tree Pistacia atlantica subsp. mutica, namely Bene, is widely distributed in Iranian mountains. Recent studies revealed that the oil of Bene was stable, even more stable than sesame oil, with antioxidant properties. This can give versatile applications for the oil. The volatile composition of this oil has not chemically been investigated so far. In this study, sixty three compounds were identified in the essential oil (EO) of Bene hull. The major components were determined to be α-pinene (20.8 %), camphene (8.4 %), β-myrcene (8.2 %) and limonene (8 %). Antioxidant activities of the essential oil from Bene hull were evaluated by using 2,2'- diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical-scavenging, ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), β-carotene bleaching test, thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS) and Rancimat assays. The Bene essential oil exhibited significant antioxidant activities in FRAP and TBARS assays as compared with positive controls. In addition, the oil was evaluated for its antimicrobial activity against both Gram positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria. It showed significant antibacterial activities against S. aureus and E. coli with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of 6 and 12.5 μg/mL, respectively.

  16. Experimental and Pathalogical study of Pistacia atlantica, butyrate, Lactobacillus casei and their combination on rat ulcerative colitis model.

    PubMed

    Gholami, Mahdi; Ghasemi-Niri, Seyedeh Farnaz; Maqbool, Faheem; Baeeri, Maryam; Memariani, Zahra; Pousti, Iraj; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2016-06-01

    This study evaluated the effects of Pistacia atlantica (P. atlantica), butyrate, Lactobacillus casei (L. casei) and especially their combination therapy on 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS)-induced rat colitis model. Rats were divided into seven groups. Four groups received oral P. atlantica, butyrate, L. casei and the combination of three agents for 10 consecutive days. The remaining groups were negative and positive controls and a sham group. Macroscopic and histopathological examinations were carried out along with determination of the specific biomarker of colonic oxidative stress, the myeloperoxidase (MPO). Compared with controls, the combination therapy exhibited a significant alleviation of colitis in terms of pathological scores and reduction of MPO activity (55%, p=0.0009). Meanwhile, the macroscopic appearance such as stool consistency, tissue and histopathological scores (edema, necrosis and neutrophil infiltration) were improved. Although single therapy by each P. atlantica, butyrate, and L. casei was partially beneficial in reduction of colon oxidative stress markers, the combination therapy was much more effective. In conclusion, the combination therapy was able to reduce the severity of colitis that is clear from biochemical markers. Future studies have to focus on clinical effects of this combination in management of human ulcerative colitis. Further molecular and signaling pathway studies will help to understand the mechanisms involved in the treatment of colitis and inflammatory diseases.

  17. Hydroethanolic Pistacia atlantica hulls extract improved wound healing process; evidence for mast cells infiltration, angiogenesis and RNA stability.

    PubMed

    Farahpour, Mohammad Reza; Mirzakhani, Navideh; Doostmohammadi, Jamal; Ebrahimzadeh, Mahmood

    2015-05-01

    In Iranian traditional therapy folk, the Pistacia is used for treatment of wound inflammation. Here in the present study, the In vivo effect of Pistacia atlantica hulls ointment (PAO) on the wound healing process was assessed. Excision and incision wounds were induced in rats. Three different doses of PAO were administrated. Following 3, 7, 14 and 21 days, the tissue samples were obtained and skin irritation ratio, hydroxyproline content, as well as immune cells, fibroblasts, fibrocytes distribution and collagen density were analyzed. Moreover, the cellular RNA damage examined using epi-fluorescent microscope. Hydroethanolic extract of PAO significantly (P < 0.05) increased wound contraction percentage and up-regulated hydroxyproline content. The animals in medium and high dose PAO-treated groups exhibited remarkably (P < 0.05) higher fibroblast distribution and significantly (P < 0.05) lower immune cells infiltration. PAO up-regulated mast cells distribution on day 7 and elevated neovascularization in a dose dependent manner. Significantly lower RNA damage was revealed in PAO-treated animals. Our data showed that, PAO shortened the inflammation phase by provoking the fibroblast proliferation. Moreover, PAO enhanced mast cells distribution and infiltration, which in turn promoted the neovascularization. Ultimately, promoted angiogenesis increased RNA stability in different cell types. Thus, Hydroethanolic extract of PAO can be considered as an appropriate compound for wound healing medicine.

  18. Five Pistacia species (P. vera, P. atlantica, P. terebinthus, P. khinjuk, and P. lentiscus): A Review of Their Traditional Uses, Phytochemistry, and Pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Bozorgi, Mahbubeh; Memariani, Zahra; Mobli, Masumeh; Shams-Ardekani, Mohammad Reza

    2013-01-01

    Pistacia, a genus of flowering plants from the family Anacardiaceae, contains about twenty species, among them five are more popular including P. vera, P. atlantica, P. terebinthus, P. khinjuk, and P. lentiscus. Different parts of these species have been used in traditional medicine for various purposes like tonic, aphrodisiac, antiseptic, antihypertensive and management of dental, gastrointestinal, liver, urinary tract, and respiratory tract disorders. Scientific findings also revealed the wide pharmacological activities from various parts of these species, such as antioxidant, antimicrobial, antiviral, anticholinesterase, anti-inflammatory, antinociceptive, antidiabetic, antitumor, antihyperlipidemic, antiatherosclerotic, and hepatoprotective activities and also their beneficial effects in gastrointestinal disorders. Various types of phytochemical constituents like terpenoids, phenolic compounds, fatty acids, and sterols have also been isolated and identified from different parts of Pistacia species. The present review summarizes comprehensive information concerning ethnomedicinal uses, phytochemistry, and pharmacological activities of the five mentioned Pistacia species. PMID:24453812

  19. Five Pistacia species (P. vera, P. atlantica, P. terebinthus, P. khinjuk, and P. lentiscus): a review of their traditional uses, phytochemistry, and pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Bozorgi, Mahbubeh; Memariani, Zahra; Mobli, Masumeh; Salehi Surmaghi, Mohammad Hossein; Shams-Ardekani, Mohammad Reza; Rahimi, Roja

    2013-01-01

    Pistacia, a genus of flowering plants from the family Anacardiaceae, contains about twenty species, among them five are more popular including P. vera, P. atlantica, P. terebinthus, P. khinjuk, and P. lentiscus. Different parts of these species have been used in traditional medicine for various purposes like tonic, aphrodisiac, antiseptic, antihypertensive and management of dental, gastrointestinal, liver, urinary tract, and respiratory tract disorders. Scientific findings also revealed the wide pharmacological activities from various parts of these species, such as antioxidant, antimicrobial, antiviral, anticholinesterase, anti-inflammatory, antinociceptive, antidiabetic, antitumor, antihyperlipidemic, antiatherosclerotic, and hepatoprotective activities and also their beneficial effects in gastrointestinal disorders. Various types of phytochemical constituents like terpenoids, phenolic compounds, fatty acids, and sterols have also been isolated and identified from different parts of Pistacia species. The present review summarizes comprehensive information concerning ethnomedicinal uses, phytochemistry, and pharmacological activities of the five mentioned Pistacia species.

  20. Effects of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi on the seedling growth of three Pistacia species.

    PubMed

    Caglar, S; Akgun, A

    2006-07-01

    The experiment was undertaken to test the efficiency of inoculation of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi on the seedling growth of three Pistacia species used as rootstocks. The stratified Pistacia seeds were inoculated with VAM fungi. The highest rate of inoculated roots was 96.7% in P. khinjuck seedlings with G. clarum and G. etunicatum, 83.3% in P. vera seedlings with G. caledonium and 73.3% in P. terebinthus seedlings with G. caledonium. Mycorrhizal inoculations improved seedling height only in P. terebinthus. Certain mycorrhizal inoculations increased the leaf N, but not P and K contents. Seedlings inoculated with G. caledonium had higher reducing sugar contents. It was concluded that pre-inoculated Pistacia seedlings could have a better growth in the harsh field conditions.

  1. The Effect of Pistacia atlantica Var. mutica Mouthwash on Dental Plaque Bacteria and Subgingival Microorganisms: a Randomized and Controlled Triple-blind Study.

    PubMed

    Arami, S; Mojaddadi, M A; Pourabbas, R; Chitsaz, M T; Delazar, A; Mobayen, H

    2015-09-01

    Dental plaque is a well-documented etiologic factor for periodontal diseases. While chlorhexidine (CHX) is the gold-standard agent for treating dental plaques, undesirable side effects are often found after continuous use of the mouthwash. Therefore, this single-center, randomized, triple-blinded and clinical trial was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of Pistacia atlantica Var. mutica extract mouthwash on de novo dental plaque bacteria and subgingival microorganisms compared to CHX on a total of 28 patients. The mean aerobic plaque bacterial count of patients at baseline was 2.17 × 10(6). After 4 days of treatment, there were statistically significant decreases in the mean aerobic bacteria in the patients who received P. atlantica and/or CHX (7.25 × 10(4), p = 0.006) and (9.91 × 10(3), p = 0.002), respectively, compared to the patients who received the placebo (6.26 × 10(5)). This study showed that P. atlantica mouthwash is effective against gingival microorganisms. Because of its reduced side effects, P. atlantica mouthwash may be a good alternative choice for patients. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Facile green synthesis of silver nanoparticles using seed aqueous extract of Pistacia atlantica and its antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Babak; Rostami, Amir; Momeni, S S

    2015-01-05

    In the present work, we describe the synthesis of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) using seed aqueous extract of Pistacia atlantica (PA) and its antibacterial activity. UV-visible spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray energy dispersive spectrophotometer (EDAX) were performed to ascertain the formation of Ag-NPs. It was observed that the growths of Ag-NPs are stopped within 35 min of reaction time. The synthesized Ag-NPs were characterized by a peak at 446 nm in the UV-visible spectrum. XRD confirmed the crystalline nature of the nanoparticles of 27 nm size. The XRD peaks at 38°, 44°, 64° and 77° can be indexed to the (111), (200), (220) and (311) Bragg's reflections of cubic structure of metallic silver, respectively. The FTIR result clearly showed that the extracts containing OH as a functional group act in capping the nanoparticles synthesis. Antibacterial activities of Ag-NPs were tested against the growth of Gram-positive (S. aureus) using SEM. The inhibition was observed in the Ag-NPs against S. aureus. The results suggest that the synthesized Ag-NPs act as an effective antibacterial agent. It is confirmed that Ag-NPs are capable of rendering high antibacterial efficacy and hence has a great potential in the preparation of used drugs against bacterial diseases. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM), indicated that, the most strains of S. aureus was damaged and extensively disappeared by addition of Ag-NPs. The results confirmed that the (PA) is a very good eco friendly and nontoxic source for the synthesis of Ag-NPs as compared to the conventional chemical/physical methods.

  3. Facile green synthesis of silver nanoparticles using seed aqueous extract of Pistacia atlantica and its antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, Babak; Rostami, Amir; Momeni, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, we describe the synthesis of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) using seed aqueous extract of Pistacia atlantica (PA) and its antibacterial activity. UV-visible spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray energy dispersive spectrophotometer (EDAX) were performed to ascertain the formation of Ag-NPs. It was observed that the growths of Ag-NPs are stopped within 35 min of reaction time. The synthesized Ag-NPs were characterized by a peak at 446 nm in the UV-visible spectrum. XRD confirmed the crystalline nature of the nanoparticles of 27 nm size. The XRD peaks at 38°, 44°, 64° and 77° can be indexed to the (1 1 1), (2 0 0), (2 2 0) and (3 1 1) Bragg's reflections of cubic structure of metallic silver, respectively. The FTIR result clearly showed that the extracts containing OH as a functional group act in capping the nanoparticles synthesis. Antibacterial activities of Ag-NPs were tested against the growth of Gram-positive (S. aureus) using SEM. The inhibition was observed in the Ag-NPs against S. aureus. The results suggest that the synthesized Ag-NPs act as an effective antibacterial agent. It is confirmed that Ag-NPs are capable of rendering high antibacterial efficacy and hence has a great potential in the preparation of used drugs against bacterial diseases. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM), indicated that, the most strains of S. aureus was damaged and extensively disappeared by addition of Ag-NPs. The results confirmed that the (PA) is a very good eco friendly and nontoxic source for the synthesis of Ag-NPs as compared to the conventional chemical/physical methods.

  4. Characterization and quantitation of the polyphenolic compounds detected in methanol extracts of Pistacia atlantica Desf. fruits from the Guelmim region of Morocco.

    PubMed

    Khallouki, Farid; Breuer, Andrea; Merieme, Elzemzoumi; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Owen, Robert W

    2017-02-05

    High performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS) was used for the identification of the major phenolic compounds in mature P. atlantica fruits from the Guelmim region (southeast of Morocco). In this study twenty seven polyphenolic compounds are identified and quantitated. To date, this is the most comprehensive report on the polyphenolic content of Pistacia fruits. The profiles comprise, three major polyphenolic classes, namely gallates (18.76g/kg; 63.92%), flavonoids (10.12g/kg; 34.48%) and ellagic acid derivatives (0.47g/kg; 1.60%) with a total of 29.35g/kg detected. The major gallate was pentagalloyl glucoside (5.0g/kg; 17.04% of total polyphenolics), the major flavonoid luteolin (3.18g/kg; 10.83% of total polyphenolics) and the major ellagic acid derivative ellagic acid (0.25g/kg; 0.85% of total polyphenolics). Identification of galloyl quinate, digalloyl quinates (x 2), galloyl glucoside, digalloyl glucosides (x 2), trigalloyl glucoside, tetragalloyl glucosides (x 2), pentagalloyl glucoside, 2″-O-galloyl-quercetin-3-O-galactoside, quercetin-3-O-rhamnogalactoside, quercetin-3-O-galactoside, ellagic acid diglucoside, luteolin-4'-O-glucoside, 2″-O-galloyl-luteolin-4'-O-glucoside, quercetin-3-O-glucuronide, kaempferol-3-O-glucoside, eriodictyol, apigenin, ellagic acid diglucoside, ellagic acid glucoside, methyl ellagic acid glucoside, and ellagic acid are described as phytochemical components of Pistacia fruits for the first time.

  5. Physical and chemical properties of soils under some wild Pistachio (Pistacia atlantica Desf) canopies in a semi-arid ecosystem, southwestern Iran.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owliaie, Hamidreza

    2010-05-01

    Pistacia atlantica Desf. is one of the most important wild species in Zagros forests which is of high economical and environmental value. Sustainability of these forests primarily depends on soil quality and water availability. Study the relationships between trees and soil is one of the basic factors in management and planning of forests. Hence, this study was undertaken with the objective of assessing the effect of tree species on soil physical and chemical properties in a semi-arid region (Kohgilouye Province) in the southwestern part of Iran. The experimental design was a factorial 4×2 (4 depths and 2 distances) in a randomized complete block design with six replications. Soil samples (0-20, 20-40, 40-60 and 60-80 cm depth) were taken from beneath the tree crowns and adjacent open areas. Soil samples were analyzed for physical and chemical properties. The results showed that wild pistachio canopy increased mostly organic carbon, hydraulic conductivity, total N, SP, available K+, P (olsen), EC, EDTA extractable Fe2+ and Mn2+, while bulk density, CCE and DTPA extractable Cu2+ were decreased. Pistachio canopy had no significant effect on soil texture, Zn2+ and pH.

  6. Dereplication of antioxidant compounds in Bene (Pistacia atlantica subsp. mutica) hull using a multiplex approach of HPLC-DAD, LC-MS and (1)H NMR techniques.

    PubMed

    Rezaie, Mitra; Farhoosh, Reza; Pham, Ngoc; Quinn, Ronald J; Iranshahi, Mehrdad

    2016-01-05

    Bene is an edible fruit from the tree Pistacia atlantica subsp. mutica, and is of steadily growing interest in recent years due to its significant antioxidant properties and potential health benefits. An antioxidant activity-guided fractionation of the methanol extract from Bene hull together with an integrated approach of HPLC-DAD, LC-MS and (1)H NMR techniques led to the identification of main antioxidant phenolic compounds for the first time. Radical scavenging activity of each fraction/compound was tested using DPPH and FRAP assays. The phenolic content of the fractions was also determined by Folin-Ciocalteu's method. The main identified antioxidant compounds were luteolin (46.53% w/w of total extract), gallic acid (9.84% w/w), 2″-O-galloylisoquercitrin (0.53% w/w), quercetin 3-rutinoside (0.34% w/w) and 2″-O-cis-caffeoylquercitrin (0.26% w/w). The minor antioxidant compounds were also identified by liquid chromatography-positive/negative electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. The structure-antioxidant activity relationship of identified phenolics are also discussed in this paper.

  7. Pistacia in Afghanistan

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Four species of Pistacia have been reported within Afghanistan: Pistacia vera L., P. Khinjuk Stocks, P.atlantica subsp. cabulica (Stocks) Rech. f., and P. integerrima (=P. chinensis subsp. integerrima (J.L. Stewart) Rech. f.). Information on their identification is provided based on recent literat...

  8. Effects of a fixed-intensity of endurance training and pistacia atlantica supplementation on ATP-binding cassette G4 expression

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Adenosine triphosphate-cassette binding protein (ABC) type G is considered as a part of reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) process in modification and metabolism of plasma and tissue cholesterol. This study aims to evaluate the effect of endurance training with or without Pistacia atlantica (Baneh) supplementation on the female rat tissues ABC type G expression and its correlation with plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentration. Methods Twenty Wistar rats (six to eight weeks old, 125–135 g weight) were arbitrarily allocated into training (n = 10) and control (n = 10) groups and further divided into saline-control (n = 5), saline-training (n = 5), Baneh-control (n = 5), and Baneh-training (n = 5). The training groups were given exercise on a motor-driven treadmill at 25 m/min (0% grade) for 60 min/day, 5 days/week for eight weeks. The rats were fed orally with Baneh extract and saline for six weeks. Seventy-two hours after the last training session, the rats were sacrificed and their tissues were excised for tissues ABCG4 expression which was detected by Real-time PCR method. Results The ABCG4 gene expressions were significantly higher in liver (P = 02), small intestine (P = 06), and visceral fat tissues (P = 04) of the trained rats compared to the tissues of the control rats, but were lower in Baneh treated rats (liver P = 045, small intestine P = 06 and visceral fat P = 004) with lower HDL-C concentrations (P = 008). Conclusions The Baneh administration lowered tissues ABCG4 expression and plasma HDL-C concentrations while endurance training increased the expression in female rat tissues. PMID:24267473

  9. Root architecture and hydraulic conductance in nutrient deprived Pistacia lentiscus L. seedlings.

    PubMed

    Trubat, Roman; Cortina, Jordi; Vilagrosa, Alberto

    2012-12-01

    Plants respond to low nutrient availability by modifying root morphology and root system topology. Root responses to nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) limitation may affect plant capacity to withstand water stress. But studies on the effect of nutrient availability on plant ability to uptake and transport water are scarce. In this study, we assess the effect of nitrogen and phosphorus limitation on root morphology and root system topology in Pistacia lentiscus L seedlings, a common Mediterranean shrub, and relate these changes to hydraulic conductivity of the whole root system. Nitrogen and phosphorus deprivation had no effect on root biomass, but root systems were more branched in nutrient limited seedlings. Total root length was higher in seedlings subjected to phosphorus deprivation. Root hydraulic conductance decreased in nutrient-deprived seedlings, and was related to the number of root junctions but not to other architectural traits. Our study shows that changes in nutrient availability affect seedling water use by modifying root architecture. Changes in nutrient availability should be taken into account when evaluating seedling response to drought.

  10. Tolerance of Mycorrhiza infected pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) seedling to drought stress under glasshouse conditions.

    PubMed

    Abbaspour, H; Saeidi-Sar, S; Afshari, H; Abdel-Wahhab, M A

    2012-05-01

    The influence of Glomus etunicatum colonization on plant growth and drought tolerance of 3-month-old Pistacia vera seedlings in potted culture was studied in two different water treatments. The arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) inoculation and plant growth (including plant shoot and root weight, leaf area, and total chlorophyll) were higher for well-watered than for water-stressed plants. The growth of AM-treated seedlings was higher than non-AM-treatment regardless of water status. P, K, Zn and Cu contents in AM-treated shoots were greater than those in non-AM shoots under well-watered conditions and drought stress. N and Ca content were higher under drought stress, while AM symbiosis did not affect the Mg content. The contents of soluble sugars, proteins, flavonoid and proline were higher in mycorrhizal than non-mycorrhizal-treated plants under the whole water regime. AM colonization increased the activities of peroxidase enzyme in treatments, but did not affect the catalase activity in shoots and roots under well-watered conditions and drought stress. We conclude that AM colonization improved the drought tolerance of P. vera seedlings by increasing the accumulation of osmotic adjustment compounds, nutritional and antioxidant enzyme activity. It appears that AM formation enhanced the drought tolerance of pistachio plants, which increased host biomass and plant growth. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. A cheap, simple high throughput method for screening native Helicobacter pylori urease inhibitors using a recombinant Escherichia coli, its validation and demonstration of Pistacia atlantica methanolic extract effectivity and specificity.

    PubMed

    Amar, Natalie; Peretz, Avi; Gerchman, Yoram

    2017-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the most frequent and persistent bacterial infection worldwide, and a risk factor for active gastritis, peptic ulcers, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, and gastric cancer. Although combined antibiotics treatment is effective cases of antibiotic resistance are reported at an alarming rate. The H. pylori urease enzyme is essential for the bacteria establishment in the gastric mucosa, resulting urease inhibitors being sought after as effective and specific anti- H. pylori treatment. To-date, screening assays are based mostly on the analog plant urease enzyme but difference in properties of the plant and bacterial enzymes hamper these efforts. We have developed a screening assay based on recombinant Escherichia coli expressing native H. pylori urease, and validated this assay using thiourea and a methanolic extract of Pistacia atlantica. The assay demonstrated the thiourea and the extract to be potent urease inhibitors, with the extract having strong bacteriostatic activity against clinical isolates of H. pylori, including such with antibiotic resistance. The extract was also found to be neutral toward common probiotic bacteria, supporting its specificity and compatibility with digestive system desired microflora and suggesting it could be a good source for anti-H. pylori compounds. The assay has proven to be cheap, simple and native alternative to the plant enzyme based assay and could allow for high throughput screening for new urease inhibitors and could expedite screening and development of novel, better H. pylori remedies helping us to combat this infection.

  12. Application of least squares support vector regression and linear multiple regression for modeling removal of methyl orange onto tin oxide nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon and activated carbon prepared from Pistacia atlantica wood.

    PubMed

    Ghaedi, M; Rahimi, Mahmoud Reza; Ghaedi, A M; Tyagi, Inderjeet; Agarwal, Shilpi; Gupta, Vinod Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Two novel and eco friendly adsorbents namely tin oxide nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon (SnO2-NP-AC) and activated carbon prepared from wood tree Pistacia atlantica (AC-PAW) were used for the rapid removal and fast adsorption of methyl orange (MO) from the aqueous phase. The dependency of MO removal with various adsorption influential parameters was well modeled and optimized using multiple linear regressions (MLR) and least squares support vector regression (LSSVR). The optimal parameters for the LSSVR model were found based on γ value of 0.76 and σ(2) of 0.15. For testing the data set, the mean square error (MSE) values of 0.0010 and the coefficient of determination (R(2)) values of 0.976 were obtained for LSSVR model, and the MSE value of 0.0037 and the R(2) value of 0.897 were obtained for the MLR model. The adsorption equilibrium and kinetic data was found to be well fitted and in good agreement with Langmuir isotherm model and second-order equation and intra-particle diffusion models respectively. The small amount of the proposed SnO2-NP-AC and AC-PAW (0.015 g and 0.08 g) is applicable for successful rapid removal of methyl orange (>95%). The maximum adsorption capacity for SnO2-NP-AC and AC-PAW was 250 mg g(-1) and 125 mg g(-1) respectively.

  13. Phenotypic variation among trees in a population of a Pistacia atlantica X P. integerrima cross sold as UCB-1 rootstock for grafting P. vera (pistachio) cultivars

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    UCB-1 is widely used in California as a pistachio rootstock because of its Verticillium resistance, salt and cold tolerance, and vigor. It can grow in most locations in California. However, significant variation exists in the phenotypic performance of trees grafted to seedling UCB-1 rootstocks. In J...

  14. Response of Holm oak (Quercus ilex subsp. ballota) and mastic shrub (Pistacia lentiscus L.) seedlings to high concentrations of Cd and Tl in the rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, María T; Marañón, Teodoro; Murillo, José Manuel; Redondo-Gómez, Susana

    2011-05-01

    The impairment of root growth and photosynthetical functioning are the main impacts of trace elements on woody plant seedlings. In this work, we assessed the response of Holm oak (Quercusilex subsp. ballota) and mastic shrub (Pistacia lentiscus) seedlings to high concentrations of Cd and Tl in the rhizosphere. These are non-essential trace elements, with a potential high mobility in the soil-plant system. Seedlings of these species are frequently used in the afforestation of degraded soils in mining areas. Plants were exposed to different levels of Cd (20, 80 and 200 mg L(-1)) and Tl (2, 10 and 20 mg L(-1)) in a sand culture. Biomass allocation, growth rates, chlorophyll fluorescence and gas exchange were studied. Both metals affected root biomass. Cadmium produced an increase in the root mass ratio and a decrease in the specific leaf area of the plants in oak seedlings, while Tl did not provoke such response. Mastic plants were more sensitive to Tl and Cd than oak plants. Between elements, Tl provoked more severe toxic effects in the plants, affecting the antennae complexes and reaction centers of the photosystem II. Both elements decreased net assimilation rates (down to a 20% of the control plants) and stomatal conductance (5-10% of the values for the control plants). Cadmium was highly retained in the roots of both species, while Tl was highly translocated into the leaves. In general, Holm oak showed a higher tolerance for Cd than for Tl, and a higher resistance to both metals than mastic shrub, due to a high capacity for Cd retention at the root level. However, such accumulation in roots may induce water stress in the seedling exposed to Cd.

  15. Improvement of Cupressus atlantica Gaussen growth by inoculation with native arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    PubMed

    Ouahmane, L; Hafidi, M; Thioulouse, J; Ducousso, M; Kisa, M; Prin, Y; Galiana, A; Boumezzough, A; Duponnois, R

    2007-09-01

    The study aimed to determine whether inoculation with native arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi could improve survival and growth of seedlings in degraded soils of Morocco. Soil samples were collected from the rhizosphere of Cupressus atlantica trees in the N'Fis valley (Haut Atlas, Morocco). AM spores were extracted from the soil, identified and this mixture of native AM fungi was propagated on maize for 12 weeks on a sterilized soil to enrich the fungal inoculum. Then C. atlantica seedlings were inoculated with and without (control) mycorrhizal maize roots, cultured in glasshouse conditions and further, transplanted into the field. The experiment was a randomized block design with one factor and three replication blocks. The results showed that a high AM fungal diversity was associated with C. atlantica; native AM fungi inoculation was very effective on the growth of C. atlantica seedlings in glasshouse conditions and this plant growth stimulation was maintained for 1 year after outplanting. Inoculation of C. atlantica with AM fungi increased growth and survival in greenhouse and field. The data indicate that use of native species of AM fungi may accelerate reforestation of degraded soils. Further studies have to be performed to determine the persistence of these mycorrhizae for a longer period of plantation and to measure the effects of this microbial inoculation on soil biofunctioning.

  16. Use of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi to improve the drought tolerance of Cupressus atlantica G.

    PubMed

    Zarik, Lamia; Meddich, Abdelilah; Hijri, Mohamed; Hafidi, Mohamed; Ouhammou, Ahmed; Ouahmane, Lahcen; Duponnois, Robin; Boumezzough, Ali

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated whether indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi could improve the tolerance of Cupressus atlantica against water deficit. We tested a gradient of watering regime spanning from 90% to 25% of soil retention capacity of water on mycorhized and non-mycorhized seedlings in pot cultures with sterilized and non-sterilized soils. Our result showed a positive impact of AM fungi on shoot height, stem diameter and biomass as well as on the growth rate. We also observed that inoculation with AM fungi significantly improved uptake of minerals by C. atlantica in both sterilized and non-sterilized soils independently of water regimes. We found that mycorhized plants maintained higher relative water content (RWC) and water potential compared with non-mycorhized plants that were subjected to drought-stress regimes (50% and 25% of soil retention capacity). The contents of proline and of soluble sugars showed that their concentrations decreased in non-mycorhized plants subjected to DS. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities also decreased in non-mycorhized plants submitted to DS compared to mycorhized plants. The same pattern was observed by measuring peroxidase (POD) enzyme activity. The results demonstrated that AM fungal inoculation promoted the growth and tolerance of C. atlantica against DS in pot cultures. Therefore, mycorrhizal inoculation could be a potential solution for the conservation and reestablishment of C. atlantica in its natural ecosystem.

  17. Quantitative determination of alpha-tocopherol in Pistacia lentiscus, Pistacia lentiscus var. chia, and Pistacia terebinthus by TLC-densitometry and colorimetry.

    PubMed

    Kivçak, B; Akay, S

    2005-01-01

    A quantitative determination of alpha-tocopherol in Pistacia lentiscus, Pistacia lentiscus var. chia, and Pistacia terebinthus, leaves was established by TLC-densitometry and colorimetry. The highest amount of alpha-tocopherol was found in P. lentiscus var. chia.

  18. Bio-Activity of Natural Polymers from the Genus Pistacia: A Validated Model for Their Antimicrobial Action

    PubMed Central

    Sharifi, Mohammad Sharif; Ebrahimi, Diako; Hibbert, David Brynn; Hook, James; Hazell, Stuart Loyd

    2012-01-01

    The polymers from mastic gum of Pistacia lentiscose and subspecies of Pistacia atlantica, (sp. kurdica, mutica and cabolica) have been isolated and characterised by gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and 13C NMR spectroscopy as cis-1,4-poly-β-myrcenes. They were screened against Helicobacter pylori and other Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria to evaluate their antimicrobial action. In order to further test their hypothesised mode of action, two polymer types were synthesized: one from myrcene, and four from polyvinyl alcohols of different molecular weights, derivatised with p-hydroxybenzoate. The anti-microbial activity of these polymers, evaluated through their ‘kill’ kinetics, was found to be related to their functional groups, their molecular weight and their solubility. PMID:22980106

  19. Phylogenetics and reticulate evolution in Pistacia (Anacardiaceae).

    PubMed

    Yi, Tingshuang; Wen, Jun; Golan-Goldhirsh, Avi; Parfitt, Dan E

    2008-02-01

    The systematic position and intrageneric relationships of the economically important Pistacia species (Anacardiaceae) are controversial. The phylogeny of Pistacia was assessed using five data sets: sequences of nuclear ribosomal ITS, the third intron of the nuclear nitrate reductase gene (NIA-i3), and the plastid ndhF, trnL-F and trnC-trnD. Significant discordance was detected among ITS, NIA-i3, and the combined plastid DNA data sets. ITS, NIA-i3, and the combined plastid data sets were analyzed separately using Bayesian and parsimony methods. Both the ITS and the NIA-i3 data sets resolved the relationships among Pistacia species well; however, these two data sets had significant discordance. The ITS phylogeny best reflects the evolutionary relationships among Pistacia species. Lineage sorting of the NIA-i3 alleles may explain the conflicts between the NIA-i3 and the ITS data sets. The combined analysis of three plastid DNA data sets resolved Pistacia species into three major clades, within which only a few subclades were supported. Pistacia was shown to be monophyletic in all three analyses. The previous intrageneric classification was largely inconsistent with the molecular data. Some Pistacia species appear not to be genealogical species, and evidence for reticulate evolution is presented. Pistacia saportae was shown to be a hybrid with P. lentiscus (maternal) and P. terebinthus (paternal) as the parental taxa.

  20. Prediction of some physical and drying properties of terebinth fruit (Pistacia atlantica L.) using Artificial Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Kaveh, Mohammad; Chayjan, Reza Amiri

    2014-01-01

    Drying of terebinth fruit was conducted to provide microbiological stability, reduce product deterioration due to chemical reactions, facilitate storage and lower transportation costs. Because terebinth fruit is susceptible to heat, the selection of a suitable drying technology is a challenging task. Artificial neural networks (ANNs) are used as a nonlinear mapping structures for modelling and prediction of some physical and drying properties of terebinth fruit. Drying characteristics of terebinth fruit with an initial moisture content of 1.16 (d.b.) was studied in an infrared fluidized bed dryer. Different levels of air temperatures (40, 55 and 70°C), air velocities (0.93, 1.76 and 2.6 m/s) and infrared (IR) radiation powers (500, 1000 and 1500 W) were applied. In the present study, the application of Artificial Neural Network (ANN) for predicting the drying moisture diffusivity, energy consumption, shrinkage, drying rate and moisture ratio (output parameter for ANN modelling) was investigated. Air temperature, air velocity, IR radiation and drying time were considered as input parameters. The results revealed that to predict drying rate and moisture ratio a network with the TANSIG-LOGSIG-TANSIG transfer function and Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) training algorithm made the most accurate predictions for the terebinth fruit drying. The best results for ANN at predications were R2 = 0.9678 for drying rate, R2 = 0.9945 for moisture ratio, R2 = 0.9857 for moisture diffusivity and R2 = 0.9893 for energy consumption. Results indicated that artificial neural network can be used as an alternative approach for modelling and predicting of terebinth fruit drying parameters with high correlation. Also ANN can be used in optimization of the process.

  1. Economic injury level of the psyllid, Agonoscena pistaciae, on Pistachio, Pistacia vera cv. Ohadi.

    PubMed

    Reza Hassani, Mohammad; Nouri-Ganbalani, Gadir; Izadi, Hamzeh; Shojai, Mahmoud; Basirat, Mehdi

    2009-01-01

    The pistachio psylla, Agonoscena pistaciae Burckhardt and Lauterer (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) is a major pest of pistachio trees, Pistacia vera L. (Sapindalis: Anacardiaceae) throughout pistachio-producing regions in Iran. Different density levels of A. pistaciae nymphs were maintained on pistachio trees by different insecticide dosages to evaluate the relationship between nymph density and yield loss (weight of 1000 nuts). Psylla nymph densities were monitored weekly by counting nymphs on pistachio terminal leaflets. There was a significant reduction in weight of 1000 nuts as seasonal averages of nymphs increased. Regression analysis was used to determine the relationship between nymph density and weight of 1000 nuts. The economic injury levels varied as a function of market values, management costs, insecticide efficiency and yield loss rate and ranged from 7.7 to 30.7 nymphal days per terminal leaflet, based on weight of 1000 nuts.

  2. Economic Injury Level of the Psyllid, Agonoscena pistaciae, on Pistachio, Pistacia vera cv. Ohadi

    PubMed Central

    Reza Hassani, Mohammad; Nouri-Ganbalani, Gadir; Izadi, Hamzeh; Basirat, Mehdi

    2009-01-01

    The pistachio psylla, Agonoscena pistaciae Burckhardt and Lauterer (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) is a major pest of pistachio trees, Pistacia vera L. (Sapindalis: Anacardiaceae) throughout pistachio-producing regions in Iran. Different density levels of A. pistaciae nymphs were maintained on pistachio trees by different insecticide dosages to evaluate the relationship between nymph density and yield loss (weight of 1000 nuts). Psylla nymph densities were monitored weekly by counting nymphs on pistachio terminal leaflets. There was a significant reduction in weight of 1000 nuts as seasonal averages of nymphs increased. Regression analysis was used to determine the relationship between nymph density and weight of 1000 nuts. The economic injury levels varied as a function of market values, management costs, insecticide efficiency and yield loss rate and ranged from 7.7 to 30.7 nymphal days per terminal leaflet, based on weight of 1000 nuts. PMID:19619034

  3. SCAR marker for sex identification of Pistacia chinensis Bunge (Anacardiaceae).

    PubMed

    Sun, Q; Yang, X; Li, R

    2014-02-28

    Pistacia chinensis Bunge is a dioecious plant that originated in China, and its sex cannot be identified at the early stage of cultivation by only its appearance. Recent studies show that the seed of P. chinensis is an ideal feedstock for biofuel production. To guide the cultivation of this energy plant scientifically, a new method is urgently needed to identify the sex of P. chinensis seedlings. In this paper, from 21 random-amplified polymorphic DNA primers and 20 inter-simple sequence repeat primers, 2 sex-specific primers (S1 and S281) were identified that can amplify female-specific fragments of 473 and 1242 bp, respectively. However, only 1 fragment (FS281) was converted successfully into a sequence-characterized amplified region marker using S281-1 and S281-2 primers. When the annealing temperature was 64°C, a 636-bp specific sequence appeared in all female specimens but was absent in all the male samples tested. This study will offer some clues to sex selection in P. chinensis plantations.

  4. Soil seed bank, factors controlling germination and establishment of a Mediterranean shrub: Pistacia lentiscus L.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Fayos, Patricio; Verdú, Miguel

    1998-08-01

    The recruitment strategy of Pistacia lentiscus, an evergreen sclerophyllous shrub inhabiting the Mediterranean region, was studied in order to identify the key factors controlling seedling establishment and survival. The capacity to develop a seed bank, the loss of seed viability with time, the presence of dormancy mechanisms, the conditions to promote seed germination and the seedling dynamics were investigated. The results show that P. lentiscus has a transient seed bank with rapid seed germination occurring within the year. Dormancy was not present as seeds germinated successfully without light or temperature pretreatments. Only pulp removal and a long and abundant rain event (≥ 7 days; ≥ 100 L·m -2) appeared to be necessary for germination. Seed viability decreased drastically after 1 year. More seedlings emerged under shrub canopy than in open sites, as expected by the seed dispersal pattern and canopy effects on plant establishment. The high mortality observed in the few weeks after establishment indicates that seedling survival is a bottleneck in the recruitment process of P. lentiscus in dense shrublands. Some seedlings survived in a latent mode for at least 4 years.

  5. Plant regeneration from encapsulated embryoids and an embryogenic mass of pistachio, Pistacia vera L.

    PubMed

    Onay, A; Jeffree, C E; Yeoman, M M

    1996-05-01

    Pieces of an embryogenic mass (EMS) induced in culture from immature fruits of pistachio, Pistacia vera L., were encapsulated into calcium alginate beads. Somatic embryos were also encapsulated individually into calcium alginate beads to produce synthetic seeds. The viability of the encapsulated EMS and somatic embryos was investigated immediately following encapsulation, and after storage for 60 days at 4°C. The encapsulated-stored EMS fragments recovered their original proliferative capacity after two months storage following two sub-cultures, but non-encapsulated-stored EMS failed to recover. The conversion frequency of synthetic seeds to seedling plants was 14% after storage for 60 days at 4°C, from which it may be concluded that encapsulation is a practical procedure for short-term storage of embryogenic pistachio tissue, and may be applicable to the preservation of desirable elite genotypes.

  6. In vitro biological activities and fatty acid profiles of Pistacia terebinthus fruits and Pistacia khinjuk seeds.

    PubMed

    Hacıbekiroğlu, Işil; Yılmaz, Pelin Köseoğlu; Haşimi, Nesrin; Kılınç, Ersin; Tolan, Veysel; Kolak, Ufuk

    2015-01-01

    This study reports in vitro anticholinesterase, antioxidant and antimicrobial effects of the n-hexane, dichloromethane, ethanol and ethanol-water extracts prepared from Pistacia terebinthus L. fruits and Pistacia khinjuk Stocks seeds as well as their total phenolic and flavonoid contents, and fatty acid compositions. Ethanol and ethanol-water extracts of both species exhibited higher anticholinesterase activity than galanthamine. Among ABTS, DPPH and CUPRAC assays, the highest antioxidant capacity of the extracts was found in the last one. P. terebinthus ethanol extract being rich in flavonoid content showed the best cupric reducing effect. All extracts possessed no antimicrobial activity. The main fatty acid in P. terebinthus fruits (52.52%) and P. khinjuk seeds (59.44%) was found to be oleic acid. Our results indicate that P. terebinthus fruits and P. khinjuk seeds could be a good source of anticholinesterase compounds, and could be phytochemically investigated.

  7. Antifungal activities of the leaves of three Pistacia species grown in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kordali, S; Cakir, A; Zengin, H; Duru, M E

    2003-02-01

    The crude extracts obtained from the leaves of Pistacia vera, Pistacia terebinthus and Pistacia lentiscus were tested for antifungal activities against three pathogenic agricultural fungi, Phythium ultimum, Rhizoctania solani and Fusarium sambucinum. The extracts significantly inhibited the growth of P. ultimum and R. solani. However, the antifungal activity was not observed against F. sambucinum.

  8. Distribution and reproductive biology of the little cuttlefish Sepiola atlantica (Cephalopoda: Sepiolidae) around Anglesey, North Wales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, N. J. E.; Richardson, C. A.

    2012-06-01

    Sepiola atlantica were captured in seine nets at twelve locations around the coast of Anglesey, UK. Animals were most abundant on the very sheltered shore of Y Foryd Bay and the wave-exposed shore of Traeth Penrhos, and these two locations were further sampled seasonally to examine the seasonal occurrence, population structure and reproductive biology of S. atlantica. Sepiola atlantica (5-28 mm dorsal mantle length (DML)) migrated inshore seasonally and first appeared in July where they attained peak abundances between July and August at seawater temperatures of 17°C. Numbers declined between September and October as temperatures fell below 15-16°C, and in late October, they migrated offshore. Male S. atlantica was significantly smaller and matured at a smaller DML than females. The number of spermatangia on the bursa copulatrix of female S. atlantica varied seasonally attaining maximum numbers in October with a mean of 22 spermatangia on the bursa copulatrix of Y Foryd Bay females. At Y Foryd Bay and Traeth Penrhos, the number of spermatophores in male and potential fecundity in female S. atlantica ranged between 1 and 147 and 25 and 141, respectively. The spermatophoric complex and gonadosomatic index showed a high degree of variability in individuals of similar wet body weight with the female gonad constituting a far greater percentage of the total wet body weight than the male gonad. It is concluded that S. atlantica of all sizes and maturity stages congregate in the shallow waters around Anglesey between July and October when environmental conditions are favourable for enhanced growth and maturation and where the high numbers of animals enhance opportunities for mating.

  9. Effect of Pistacia lentiscus oil on experimental pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Abidi, Anouar; Serairi Beji, Raja; Kourda, Nadia; Ennigrou, Samir; Ksouri, Riadh; Jameleddine, Saloua

    2016-07-01

    Background - Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic disease characterized by histopathological lesions in lung tissue. This is the most common and most severe idiopathic interstitial pneumonias. Current treatments are based on the combination of corticosteroids and immunosuppressants, but their effectiveness is still debated. Purpose of work - Testing the preventive effect of Pistacia Lentiscus oil, known for its antioxidant, anti-mutagenic and anti-proliferative effects, on a model of experimental lung fibrosis. Methods - Two groups of rats received an intratracheal injection of bleomycin (4.5 mg / kg). The first group, control (n = 20 rats), has received no treatment. The second group was treated with Pistacia Lentiscus oil (n = 20 rats) for 30 days before fibrosis induction, by daily gavage oil Pistacia Lentiscus oil (3,33ml / kg). This treatment was continued for 10 days. At the end of the experimental period, all rats were sacrificed and the lung tissue was examined histopathologically and immunostained for TGFβ. Results - The chromatographic profile oil Pistacia Lentiscus oil shows the dominance of two fatty acids that are linoleic acid and palmitic acid representing respectively 70.57 and 24.67%. Our results also show a decrease in the distribution of TGFβ both at the level of the inflammatory infiltrate and at the level of the pulmonary parenchyma histiocytes of rats treated with Pistacia Lentiscus oil compared with control rats. However, these changes are not accompanied by statistically significant changes of fibrosis score and inflammatory index. Conclusion - Our results are interesting to consider. Further studies using higher doses of Pistacia Lentiscus oil are important to conduct.

  10. Phytochemical, ethnomedicinal uses and pharmacological profile of genus Pistacia.

    PubMed

    Rauf, Abdur; Patel, Seema; Uddin, Ghias; Siddiqui, Bina S; Ahmad, Bashir; Muhammad, Naveed; Mabkhot, Yahia N; Hadda, Taibi Ben

    2017-02-01

    Pistacia genus belong to family Anacardiaceae and it is versatile in that its member species have food (P. vera), medicinal (P. lentiscus) and ornamental (P. chinensis) values. Various species of this genus have folkloric uses with credible mention in diverse pharmacopeia. As a trove of phenolic compounds, terpenoids, monoterpenes, flavonoids, alkaloids, saponins, fatty acids, and sterols, this genus has garnered pharmaceutical attention in recent times. With adequate clinical studies, this genus might be exploited for therapy of a multitude of inflammatory diseases, as promised by preliminary studies. In this regard, the ethnomedicinal, phytochemistry, biological potencies, risks, and scopes of Pistacia genus have been reviewed here.

  11. Development of Pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) spread.

    PubMed

    Shakerardekani, Ahmad; Karim, Roselina; Ghazali, Hasanah Mohd; Chin, Nyuk Ling

    2013-03-01

    Pistachio nut (Pistacia vera L.) is one of the most delicious and nutritious nuts in the world. Pistachio spreads were developed using pistachio paste as the main component, icing sugar, soy protein isolate (SPI), and red palm oil (RPO), at different ratios. The highest mean scores of all the sensory attributes were depicted by spreads that were made without addition of SPI. It was found that the work of shear was 0 to 11.0 kg s for an acceptable spread. Sensory spreadability, overall texture, spreadability, and overall acceptability were negatively correlated (R > 0.83) with the work of shear of spreads. The findings indicated that the presence of RPO had a direct effect on the viscoelastic behavior of the pistachio spreads. The a values, which are related to the green color of the pistachio product ranged from 1.7 to 3.9 for spread without addition of RPO, and 4.0 to 5.3 in the presence of RPO. The development of pistachio spread would potentially increase the food uses of pistachio and introduce consumers with a healthier snack food. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  12. Cytotoxicity and antiangiogenic effects of Rhus coriaria, Pistacia vera and Pistacia khinjuk oleoresin methanol extracts

    PubMed Central

    Mirian, M.; Behrooeian, M.; Ghanadian, M.; Dana, N.; Sadeghi-Aliabadi, H.

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis, formation of new blood vessels, play an important role in some diseases such as cancer and its metastasis. Using angiogenesis inhibitors, therefore, is one of the ways for cancer treatment and prevention of metastasis. Medicinal plants have been shown to play a major role in the treatment of a variety of cancers. In this direction, cytotoxic and angiogenic effects of oleo gum resin extracts of Rhus coriaria, Pistacia vera and Pistacia khinjuk from Anacardiaceae family were studied. For IC50 values, cytotoxic effects of the plant extracts were evaluated at different concentrations (1, 10, 20, 40, 80,100 μg/ml) against human umbilical vein endothelial normal cell (HUVEC) and Y79 cell lines using 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. In vitro tube formation on matrigel base was used to evaluate angiogenic effects in the presence of increasing concentrations (50, 100, 250 μg/ml) of the extracts. Vascular endothelium growth factor was used as angiogenesis stimulator. Gas chromatography results showed that α-pinene and β-pinene were the major essential oils constituents of all plant extracts. According to the MTT assay results, the R. coriaria resin extract was more cytotoxic than those of P. vera and P. khinjuk extracts (IC50, 9.1 ± 1.6 vs 9.8 ± 2.1 and 12.0 ± 1.9, respectively; P<0.05). Cytotoxic effects of all extracts against Y79 cell line was significantly higher than those of HUVEC used as a normal cell line (P<0.05). Tube formation assay also showed that extract of R. coriaria resin inhibited angiogenesis more significantly than other tested extracts (P<0.05). It could be concluded that R. coriaria resin extract possess cytotoxic effect and antiangiogenesis against cancer cells and as an anticancer natural product has a good potential for future studies. PMID:26600850

  13. The Power To Change: The Experience of the Costa Atlantica Project in Colombia (1977-1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chetley, Andrew

    In 1977, the Bernard van Leer Foundation began supporting a project in Colombia that had the objective of improving the quality of early childhood care and education in a small village. The Costa Atlantica project offered an approach to development that was based on community organization, social management, participation, cooperation, popular…

  14. The Power To Change: The Experience of the Costa Atlantica Project in Colombia (1977-1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chetley, Andrew

    In 1977, the Bernard van Leer Foundation began supporting a project in Colombia that had the objective of improving the quality of early childhood care and education in a small village. The Costa Atlantica project offered an approach to development that was based on community organization, social management, participation, cooperation, popular…

  15. Diversity of Sterol Composition in Tunisian Pistacia lentiscus Seed Oil.

    PubMed

    Mezni, Faten; Labidi, Arbia; Khouja, Mohamed Larbi; Martine, Lucy; Berdeaux, Olivier; Khaldi, Abdelhamid

    2016-05-01

    Pistacia lentiscus L. seed oil is used in some Mediterranean forest area for culinary and medicinal purposes. In this study, we aim to examine, for the first time, the effect of growing area on sterol content of Pistacia lentiscus seed oil. Fruits were harvested from 13 different sites located in northern and central Tunisia. Gas chromatography-flame-ionization detection (GC-FID) was used to quantify sterols and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was used to identify them. The major sterol identified was β-sitosterol with a value ranging from 854.12 to 1224.09 mg/kg of oil, thus making up more than 54% of the total sterols. The other two main sterols were cycloartenol (11%) and 24-methylene-cycloartenol (5%). Statistical results revealed that growing location significantly (P < 0.001) affected phytosterol levels in these oils.

  16. Proposal of Xanthomonas translucens pv. pistaciae pv. nov., pathogenic to pistachio (Pistacia vera).

    PubMed

    Giblot-Ducray, Danièle; Marefat, Alireza; Gillings, Michael R; Parkinson, Neil M; Bowman, John P; Ophel-Keller, Kathy; Taylor, Cathy; Facelli, Evelina; Scott, Eileen S

    2009-12-01

    Strains of Xanthomonas translucens have caused dieback in the Australian pistachio industry for the last 15 years. Such pathogenicity to a dicotyledonous woody host contrasts with that of other pathovars of X. translucens, which are characterized by their pathogenicity to monocotyledonous plant families. Further investigations, using DNA-DNA hybridization, gyrB gene sequencing and integron screening, were conducted to confirm the taxonomic status of the X. translucens pathogenic to pistachio. DNA-DNA hybridization provided a clear classification, at the species level, of the pistachio pathogen as a X. translucens. In the gyrB-based phylogeny, strains of the pistachio pathogen clustered among the X. translucens pathovars as two distinct lineages. Integron screening revealed that the cassette arrays of strains of the pistachio pathogen were different from those of other Xanthomonas species, and again distinguished two groups. Together with previously reported pathogenicity data, these results confirm that the pistachio pathogen is a new pathovar of X. translucens and allow hypotheses about its origin. The proposed name is Xanthomonas translucens pv. pistaciae pv. nov.

  17. Seminavis atlantica Garcia, a new psammic diatom (Bacillariophyceae) from southern Brazilian sandy beaches.

    PubMed

    Garcia, M

    2007-11-01

    The paper presents the description of Seminavis atlantica Garcia, a psammic marine diatom from dissipative sandy beaches from southern Brazil. It is characterized by its convex linear dorsal margin (37 to 50% of its length is in a straight line), linear ventral margin and raphe located very close to the ventral margin. Its morphology is compared to similar species such as Amphora clevei Grunow, Amphora angusta (Greg.) Cleve var. orientalis Allem, Amphora ventricosa Gregory and Amphora eulesteinii Grunow.

  18. Bactericidal activity of Pistacia lentiscus mastic gum against Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Marone, P; Bono, L; Leone, E; Bona, S; Carretto, E; Perversi, L

    2001-12-01

    In this study we evaluated the antibacterial activity of mastic gum, a resin obtained from the Pistacia lentiscus tree, against clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori. The minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) were obtained by a microdilution assay. Mastic gum killed 50% of the strains tested at a concentration of 125 microg/ml and 90% at a concentration of 500 microg/ml. The influence of sub-MBCs of mastic gum on the morphologies of H. pylori was evaluated by transmission electron microscopy. The lentiscus resin induced blebbing, morphological abnormalities and cellular fragmentation in H. pylori cells.

  19. Chemical composition and antifungal properties of essential oils of three Pistacia species.

    PubMed

    Duru, M E; Cakir, A; Kordali, S; Zengin, H; Harmandar, M; Izumi, S; Hirata, T

    2003-02-01

    The chemical composition of essential oils obtained from the leaves of Pistacia vera, Pistacia terebinthus, Pistacia lentiscus and the resin of Pistacia lentiscus were analyzed by GC and GC-MS. alpha-Pinene, beta-pinene, limonene, terpinen-4-ol and alpha-terpineol were found to be the major components. The antifungal activities of the above oils and P. lentiscus resin (total, acidic and neutral fractions) against the growth of three agricultural pathogens, Pythium ultimum, Rhizoctonia solani and Fusarium sambucinum were evaluated. Some doses of P. terebinthus, P. vera and P. lentiscus leaf oils and total and neutral fraction of P. lentiscus resin significantly inhibited the growth of R. solani. However, all samples did not show antifungal activity against P. ultimum and F. sambucinum, but increased the growth of F. sambucinum.

  20. Aliterella atlantica gen. nov., sp. nov., and Aliterella antarctica sp. nov., novel members of coccoid Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Rigonato, Janaina; Gama, Watson Arantes; Alvarenga, Danillo Oliveira; Branco, Luis Henrique Zanini; Brandini, Frederico Pereira; Genuário, Diego Bonaldo; Fiore, Marli Fatima

    2016-09-01

    Two Cyanobacteria isolated from South Atlantic Ocean continental shelf deep water and from a marine green algae inhabiting the Admiralty Bay, King George Island, Antarctica were investigated based on morphological and ultrastructural traits, phylogeny of 16S rRNA gene sequences, secondary structure of the 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer regions and phylogenomic analyses. The majority of these evaluations demonstrated that both strains differ from the genera of cyanobacteria with validly published names and, therefore, supported the description of the novel genus as Aliterella gen. nov. The identity and phylogeny of 16S rRNA gene sequences, together with the secondary structure of D1D1' and BoxB intergenic regions, further supported the two strains representing distinct species: Aliterella atlantica gen. nov., sp. nov. (type SP469036, strain CENA595T) and Aliterella antarctica sp. nov. (type SP469035, strain CENA408T). The phylogenomic analysis of A. atlantica sp. nov. CENA595T, based on 21 protein sequences, revealed that this genus belongs to the cyanobacterial order Chroococcidiopsidales. The isolation and cultivation of two geographically distant unicellular members of a novel cyanobacterial genus and the sequenced genome of the type strain bring new insights into the current classification of the coccoid group, and into the reconstruction of their evolutionary history.

  1. Occurrence of the siphonophore Muggiaea atlantica in Scottish coastal waters: source or sink?

    PubMed Central

    Blackett, Michael; Lucas, Cathy H.; Cook, Katherine; Licandro, Priscilla

    2017-01-01

    We applied the concept of source–sink dynamics to investigate a recent (1999–2013) increase in the occurrence of the siphonophore Muggiaea atlantica in Scottish coastal waters. Our aim was to determine whether this change represented the establishment of resident populations (i.e. “sources”), or transient populations reliant on immigration (i.e. “sinks”). First, we show that local production was not always sufficient to account for recruitment (a “source” prerequisite), suggesting reliance on immigration (a “sink” prerequisite). Using variation partitioning, we then discriminated between the exclusive effects of immigration [indexed by the European Slope Current (ESC)] and local production (indexed by local sea temperature and food availability). On the west coast (Loch Ewe), interannual variability in the species’ abundance was determined by, in order of increasing importance: (i) suitable local environmental conditions (13%); (ii) the role of the ESC in modulating these conditions (20%); and (iii) immigration via the ESC (29%). These results provided a strong indication that Loch Ewe represents a sink habitat for M. atlantica. However, on the east coast (Stonehaven) our results were less conclusive, probably due to the less direct influence of the ESC. For both locations, we suggest that low winter temperatures prevented overwintering, necessitating annual re-colonization via immigration. PMID:28566798

  2. Identification and quantitative determination of lignans in Cedrus atlantica resins using 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nam, Anne-Marie; Paoli, Mathieu; Castola, Vincent; Casanova, Joseph; Bighelli, Ange

    2011-03-01

    Identification and quantitative determination of individual components of resin collected on the trunk of 28 Cedrus atlantica trees, grown in Corsica, has been carried out using 13C NMR spectroscopy. Eight resin acids bearing either the pimarane or abietane skeleton, two monoterpene hydrocarbons and four oxygenated neutral diterpenes have been identified, as well as three lignans, scarcely found in resins. Three groups could be distinguished within the 28 resin samples. The nine samples of Group I had their composition dominated by diterpene acids (33.7-45.8%), with abietic acid (6.2-18.7%) and isopimaric acid (5.1-12.6%) being the major components. The four samples of Group II contained resin acids (main components) and lignans in moderate amounts (up to 10.3%). Conversely, lignans (38.8-63.8%) were by far the major components of the 15 samples of Group III. Depending on the sample, the major component was pinoresinol (18.1-38.9%), lariciresinol (17.2-33.7%) or lariciresinol 9'-acetate (16.9-29.1%). Finally, due to the high biological interest in lignans, a rapid procedure, based on 1H NMR spectroscopy, was developed for quantification of lignans in resins of C. atlantica.

  3. Anti-inflammatory triterpenes from Pistacia terebinthus galls.

    PubMed

    Giner-Larza, Eva M; Máñez, Salvador; Giner, Rosa M; Recio, M Carmen; Prieto, José M; Cerdá-Nicolás, Miguel; Ríos, José Luis

    2002-04-01

    From the galls of Pistacia terebinthus we obtained an extract that proved to be effective against chronic and acute inflammation. Now we report on the isolation and identification of three triterpenes: two tirucallane-type lanostanoids and one oleanane, which we have identified as masticadienonic acid (1), masticadienolic acid (2), and morolic acid (3), respectively. All of them showed effectiveness on the mouse ear inflammation induced by repeated applications of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate and on the phospholipase A2-induced foot paw edema. The pharmacological activity of the compounds was ratified by a histological study of the ear samples. In addition, they inhibited leukotriene B4 production in rat polymorphonuclear leukocytes stimulated with calcium ionophore A 23187.

  4. [Effects of NaCl stress on photosynthesis characteristics and fast chlorophyll fluorescence induction dynamics of Pistacia chinensis leaves].

    PubMed

    Li, Xu-Xin; Liu, Bing-Xiang; Guo, Zhi-Tao; Chang, Yue-Xia; He, Lei; Chen, Fang; Lu, Bing-She

    2013-09-01

    By using fast chlorophyll fluorescence induction dynamics analysis technique (JIP-test), this paper studied the photosynthesis characteristics and fast chlorophyll fluorescence induction dynamics of 1-year old Pistacia chinensis seedlings under the stress of NaCl at the concentrations 0% (CK), 0.15%, 0.3%, 0.45%, and 0.6%. With the increasing concentration of NaCl, the contents of Chl a, Chl b, and Chl (a+b) in the seedlings leaves decreased, the Chl a/b ratio decreased after an initial increase, and the carotenoid content increased. The net photosynthetic rate (P(n)) and stomatal conductance (g(s)) decreased gradually with increasing NaCl concentration. The decrease of P(n) was mainly attributed to the stomatal limitation when the NaCl concentration was lower than 0.3%, and to the non-stomatal limitation when the NaCl concentration was higher than 0.3%. The trapped energy flux per RC (TR0/CS0), electron transport flux per RC (ET0/CS0), density of RCs (RC/CS0), and yield or flux ratio (psi(0) or phi(E0)) decreased, but the absorption flux per CS (ABS/CS0) and the K phase (W(k)) and J phase (V) in the O-J-I-P chlorophyll fluorescence induction curves increased distinctly, indicating that NaCl stress damaged the leaf oxygen-evolving complex (OEC), donor sides, and PS II reaction centers. When the NaCl concentration reached 0.3%, the maximum photochemical efficiency (F(v)/F(m)) and performance index (PI(ABS)) decreased 17.7% and 36.6%, respectively, as compared with the control.

  5. Processing of a novel powdered herbal coffee (Pistacia Terebinthus L. Fruits Coffee) and its sensorial properties.

    PubMed

    Secilmis, S S; Yanık, D Kocak; Gogus, F

    2015-07-01

    In this study, the effects of roasting method, grinding and reduction in oil content on the characteristics of Pistacia terebinthus fruit coffee were investigated. Pistacia terebinthus fruit was roasted by microwave, pan and combined (microwave and convection) methods. The degree of roasting was determined by L*, a*, b* color values. The roasting times were 1,500, 1,900 and 1,620 s for microwave, pan and combined roasting methods, respectively. Cold press was used to reduce the oil content both prior to roasting and after the roasting. The oil content was reduced to around 21.5 % in all roasting methods to approach to that of coffee beans. Powdered Pistacia terebinthus fruit coffee brews were compared with each other and Turkish coffee in terms of aroma, flavor, acidity aftertaste, and overall acceptability. Sensorial analysis results showed that coffee brews prepared by pressing after the roasting process were better than those pressing prior to roasting.

  6. Aerobiological and phenological study of Pistacia in Córdoba city (Spain).

    PubMed

    Velasco-Jiménez, María José; Arenas, Manuel; Alcázar, Purificación; Galán, Carmen; Domínguez-Vilches, Eugenio

    2015-02-01

    Pistacia species grow in temperate regions, and are widespread in the Mediterranean area. Two species can be found in the Iberian Peninsula: Pistacia lentiscus L. and Pistacia terebinthus L. Airborne pollen from these species, recorded in some Spanish provinces, is regarded by some authors as potentially allergenic, and therefore should be of particular interest, given that these species are actually being introduced as ornamentals in parks and gardens. This paper deals with a study of daily and seasonal Pistacia airborne pollen counts in Córdoba city, analysed in parallel with field flowering phenology data. The study was carried out in Córdoba, using a volumetric Hirst-type sampler in accordance with Spanish Aerobiology Network guidelines. Phenological monitoring was performed weekly from January to May at 7 sites in the mountain areas north of Córdoba city. The Pistacia pollen season lasted an average of 41 days, from mid-March to end of April. Higher pollen counts were recorded in evening hours. The pollen index increased over the study period, and the pollen season coincided with phenological observations. Some airborne pollen grains were recorded once flowering had finished, due to re-suspension or transport from other locations. Pistacia pollen counts in Córdoba were low, but sufficient to identify seasonal and daily patterns. This pollen type should be taken into account in pollen calendars, in order to fully inform potential allergy-sufferers. The number of trees introduced as ornamentals should be carefully controlled, since widespread planting could increase airborne pollen levels.

  7. Pistagremic acid, a glucosidase inhibitor from Pistacia integerrima.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Ghias; Rauf, Abdur; Al-Othman, Abdulaziz M; Collina, Simona; Arfan, Muhammad; Ali, Gowhar; Khan, Inamullah

    2012-12-01

    Pistacia integerrima Stewart in traditionally used as folk remedy for various pathological conditions including diabetes. In order to identify the bioactive compound responsible for its folk use in diabetes, a phytochemical and biological study was conducted. Pistagremic acid (PA) was isolated from the dried galls extract of P. integerrima. Strong α-glucosidase inhibitory potential of PA was predicted using its molecular docking simulations against yeast α-glucosidase as a therapeutic target. Significant experimental α-glucosidase inhibitory activity of PA confirmed the computational predictions. PA showed potent enzyme inhibitory activity both against yeast (IC(50): 89.12±0.12μM) and rat intestinal (IC(50): 62.47±0.09μM) α-glucosidases. Interestingly, acarbose was found to be more than 12 times more potent an inhibitor against mammalian (rat intestinal) enzyme (having IC(50) value 62.47±0.09μM), as compared to the microbial (yeast) enzyme (with IC(50) value 780.21μM). Molecular binding mode was explored via molecular docking simulations, which revealed hydrogen bonding interactions between PA and important amino acid residues (Asp60, Arg69 and Asp 70 (3.11Å)), surrounding the catalytic site of the α-glucosidase. These interactions could be mainly responsible for their role in potent inhibitory activity of PA. PA has a strong potential to be further investigated as a new lead compound for better management of diabetes.

  8. Phylogeny of the genus Pistacia as determined from analysis of the chloroplast genome

    PubMed Central

    Parfitt, Dan E.; Badenes, Maria L.

    1997-01-01

    Classification within the genus Pistacia has been based on leaf morphology and geographical distribution. Molecular genetic tools (PCR amplification followed by restriction analysis of a 3.2-kb region of variable chloroplast DNA, and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the Pistacia cpDNA with tobacco chloroplast DNA probes) provided a new set of variables to study the phylogenetic relationships of 10 Pistacia species. Both parsimony and cluster analyses were used to divide the genus into two major groups. P. vera was determined to be the least derived species. P. weinmannifolia, an Asian species, is most closely related to P. texana and P. mexicana, New World species. These three species share a common origin, suggesting that a common ancestor of P. texana and P. mexicana originated in Asia. P. integerrima and P. chinensis were shown to be distinct whereas the pairs of species were monophyletic within each of two tertiary groups, P. vera:P. khinjuk and P. mexicana:P. texana. An evolutionary trend from large to small nuts and leaves with few, large leaflets to many, small leaflets was supported. The genus Pistacia was shown to have a low chloroplast DNA mutation rate: 0.05–0.16 times that expected of annual plants. PMID:9223300

  9. Phylogeny of Pistacia (Ancardiaceae) based on chloroplast DNA non-coding spacer sequences

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pistacia is a member of the Anacardiaceae family that includes at least eleven extant dioecious tree species grouped into four sections with both Old and New World distributions. P. vera was cultivated in prehistoric Iran and was an early introduction into Mediterranean Europe at the Christian Era....

  10. Acute toxicity of Opuntia ficus indica and Pistacia lentiscus seed oils in mice.

    PubMed

    Boukeloua, A; Belkhiri, A; Djerrou, Z; Bahri, L; Boulebda, N; Hamdi Pacha, Y

    2012-01-01

    Opuntia ficus indica and Pistacia lentiscus L. seeds are used in traditional medicine. The objective of this study was to investigate the toxicity of the fixed oil of Opuntia ficus indica and Pistacia lentiscus L. seeds in mice through determination of LD₅₀ values, and also the physicochemical characteristics of the fixed oil of these oils. The acute toxicity of their fixed oil were also investigated in mice using the method of Kabba and Berhens. The fixed oil of Pistacia lentiscus and Opuntia ficus indica seeds were extracted and analyzed for its chemical and physical properties such as acid value, free fatty acid percentage (% FFA), iodine index, and saponification value as well as refractive index and density. LD₅₀ values obtained by single doses, orally and intraperitoneally administered in mice, were respectively 43 ± 0,8 ;[40.7- 45.4 ] ml/kg body wt. p.o. and 2.72 ± 0,1 ;[2.52-2.92] ml/kg body wt. i.p. for Opuntia ficus indica ; and 37 ± 1 ;[34.4 - 39.8 ] ml/kg body wt. p.o. and 2.52 ± 0,2 ;[2.22 - 2.81 ] ml/kg body wt. i.p. for Pistacia lentiscus respectively. The yields of seed oil were respectively calculated as 20.25% and 10.41%. The acid and free fatty acid values indicated that the oil has a low acidity.

  11. Chemical variability of the wood essential oil of Cedrus atlantica Manetti from Corsica.

    PubMed

    Paoli, Mathieu; Nam, Anne-Marie; Castola, Vincent; Casanova, Joseph; Bighelli, Ange

    2011-02-01

    The composition of 48 samples of essential oil isolated from the wood of Cedrus atlantica growing in Corsica was investigated by GC (in combination with retention indices), GC/MS, and (13) C-NMR. Twenty-three compounds accounting for 73.9-96.0% of the oil composition were identified. The oils consisted mainly of monoterpene hydrocarbons and sesquiterpenes, in particular α-pinene (5; up to 79.4%), himachalol (4; up to 66.2%), β-pinene (up to 21.4%), β-himachalene (2; up to 19.3%), γ-himachalene (3; up to 11.0%), and α-himachalene (1; up to 10.9%). The 48 oil compositions were submitted to k-means partitioning and principal-component analysis, which allowed the distinction of two groups within the oil samples. The composition of Group I (44% of the samples) was dominated by 5, while the samples of Group II (56% of the samples) contained mainly 4.

  12. Genetic diversity and population structure in natural populations of Moroccan Atlas cedar (Cedrus atlantica; Pinaceae) determined with cpSSR markers.

    PubMed

    Terrab, Anass; Paun, Ovidiu; Talavera, Salvador; Tremetsberger, Karin; Arista, Montserrat; Stuessy, Tod F

    2006-09-01

    Atlas cedar (Cedrus atlantica) is an ecologically and economically important forest tree species of northern Africa and is considered one of the endangered conifer species in the region. Chloroplast microsatellites (cpSSR) were used to study genetic variation within and among populations and geographical structure in natural populations of C. atlantica throughout its entire distribution range in Morocco. A total of 25 chloroplast haplotypes and 66 cpSSR alleles were found among 162 individuals. The cpSSRs indicate that C. atlantica appears to maintain a high level of genetic diversity (mean H(e) = 0.95), as observed in most coniferous species. Values of mean pairwise distance within a population (D(2)(SH)) were related to the size and location of the populations. AMOVA analysis showed that most of the variation in C. atlantica occurs within populations and confirmed the general tendency of gymnosperms to display lower values of population differentiation than angiosperms. The distance-based clustering method (PCoA and neighbor-joining analysis) and the geographical structure revealed a poor structure among the six populations of Cedrus atlantica. Also, a Mantel test indicated a weak correlation between geographic and genetic distances (P = 0.106, r = 0.363). These results are also interpreted in the context of postglacial history of the region plus human impacts.

  13. Evaluation of Three Neonicotinoid Insecticides Against the Common Pistachio Psylla, Agonoscena pistaciae, and Its Natural Enemies

    PubMed Central

    Amirzade, Najmeh; Izadi, Hamzeh; Jalali, Mohammad Amin; Zohdi, Hadi

    2014-01-01

    The common pistachio psylla, Agonoscena pistaciae Burckhardt and Lauterer (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), is a key pest in pistachio orchards in Iran. Chemical control is a common method to manage this pest. Compatibility between natural enemies and pesticides is a primary concern in programs of integrated pest management of the psyllid pest. In this research, susceptibility of fifth instar nymphs of Ag. pistaciae and fourth instar larvae of the two most common predators of this pest, Adalia bipunctata L. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) and Coccinella undecimpunctata aegyptiaca Reiche, to acetamiprid, thiamethoxam, and imidacloprid was investigated. Probit analysis of concentration-mortality data was conducted to estimate the LC50 value. The results showed that thiamethoxam with an LC50 value of 56.35 mg a.i./L was more toxic to fifth instar nymphs of Ag. pistaciae in comparison to acetamiprid (60.75 mg a.i/L) and imidacloprid (138.21 mg a.i/L). Imidacloprid with an LC50 value of 218.89 mg a.i/L compared to acetamiprid (222.65 mg a.i/L) and thiamethoxam (232.37 mg a.i/L) had more lethal effects on fourth instar larvae of Ad. bipunctata. However, on the fourth instar larvae of C. undecimpunctata aegyptica, acetamiprid with an LC50 value of 263.44 mg a.i/L was more toxic than thiamethoxam (296.62 mg a.i/L) and imidacloprid (447.82 mg a.i/L). The laboratory findings showed that the three tested insecticides were more toxic to the common pistachio psylla than to its natural predators. Thiamethoxam was the most toxic against Ag. pistaciae. However, its toxicity to the predators was lower than imidacloprid and acetamiprid. This result suggests that thiamethoxam is the best insecticide for control of Ag. pistaciae in combination with predatory lady beetles. PMID:25373182

  14. Evaluation of three neonicotinoid insecticides against the common pistachio psylla, Agonoscena pistaciae, and its natural enemies.

    PubMed

    Amirzade, Najmeh; Izadi, Hamzeh; Jalali, Mohammad Amin; Zohdi, Hadi

    2014-03-06

    The common pistachio psylla, Agonoscena pistaciae Burckhardt and Lauterer (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), is a key pest in pistachio orchards in Iran. Chemical control is a common method to manage this pest. Compatibility between natural enemies and pesticides is a primary concern in programs of integrated pest management of the psyllid pest. In this research, susceptibility of fifth instar nymphs of Ag. pistaciae and fourth instar larvae of the two most common predators of this pest, Adalia bipunctata L. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) and Coccinella undecimpunctata aegyptiaca Reiche, to acetamiprid, thiamethoxam, and imidacloprid was investigated. Probit analysis of concentration-mortality data was conducted to estimate the LC50 value. The results showed that thiamethoxam with an LC50 value of 56.35 mg a.i./L was more toxic to fifth instar nymphs of Ag. pistaciae in comparison to acetamiprid (60.75 mg a.i/L) and imidacloprid (138.21 mg a.i/L) . Imidacloprid with an LC50 value of 218.89 mg a.i/L compared to acetamiprid (222.65 mg a.i/L) and thiamethoxam (232.37 mg a.i/L) had more lethal effects on fourth instar larvae of Ad. bipunctata. However, on the fourth instar larvae of C. undecimpunctata aegyptica, acetamiprid with an LC50 value of 263.44 mg a.i/L was more toxic than thiamethoxam (296.62 mg a.i/L) and imidacloprid (447.82 mg a.i/L). The laboratory findings showed that the three tested insecticides were more toxic to the common pistachio psylla than to its natural predators. Thiamethoxam was the most toxic against Ag. pistaciae. However, its toxicity to the predators was lower than imidacloprid and acetamiprid. This result suggests that thiamethoxam is the best insecticide for control of Ag. pistaciae in combination with predatory lady beetles.

  15. Seedling root targets

    Treesearch

    Diane L. Haase

    2011-01-01

    Roots are critical to seedling performance after outplanting. Although root quality is not as quick and simple to measure as shoot quality, target root characteristics should be included in any seedling quality assessment program. This paper provides a brief review of root characteristics most commonly targeted for operational seedling production. These are: root mass...

  16. Longleaf Seedling Trends

    Treesearch

    Mark J. Hainds

    2002-01-01

    Demand for longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) seedlings continues to increase throughout the Southeast. Overall production of longleaf pine seedlings has increased annually for at least the last 3 years (51 percent increase over the past 3 years), while demand for seedlings has continued to exceed the supply. There are several reasons for the...

  17. Consumption of Pistacia lentiscus foliage alleviates coccidiosis in young goats.

    PubMed

    Markovics, A; Cohen, I; Muklada, H; Glasser, T A; Dvash, L; Ungar, E D; Azaizeh, H; Landau, S Y

    2012-05-25

    Coccidiosis near weaning is a major cause of diarrhea, ill-thrift, and impaired performance in small ruminants. A recent survey showed that in villages of the Samaria Hills, Israel, shepherds treat young, weaned goat kids afflicted with diarrhea by cutting and feeding them the foliage of Pistacia lentiscus L. (lentisk) or by tethering them close to lentisk bushes which they browse. The aim of the present study was to assess whether lentisk leaves do indeed have anti-coccidial value, and, if positive, to ascertain the role of tannins in this effect. We monitored for 24 (Experiment 1) and 30 (Experiment 2) days the effect of lentisk feeding on the development of naturally occurring coccidiosis in weaned kids artificially infected with parasitic nematodes. In Experiment 1, kids were infected with nematodes and fed lentisk foliage (PIS) or cereal hay (HAY). Coccidiosis developed at the early stage of the nematode infection, when dietary treatments were initiated. Kids in the PIS group had a lower (P<0.02) concentration of oocysts per gram feces (opg). In Experiment 2, aimed at verifying if tannins are the active component in lentisk foliage, coccidiosis occurred at the peak of the nematode infection, before experimental diets were initiated. Dietary treatments were: cereal hay (HAY), or lentisk foliage consumed without (PIS) or with (PISPEG) a 20-g daily supplement of polyethylene glycol (PEG; MW 4000), a molecule that impairs tannin-bonding with proteins. Goats fed the PIS diet had lower fecal opg counts than counterparts of the HAY (P<0.001) and PISPEG (P<0.002) treatments. Fecal opg counts for the HAY and PISPEG treatments did not differ, suggesting that the anti-coccidial moiety in lentisk was indeed tannins. Our results strongly suggest that: (i) in agreement with the ethno-veterinary anecdotal evidence, exposure of young, weaned goat kids to lentisk foliage alleviates coccidiosis; and (ii) this positive effect is associated with tannins. As coccidiosis is a major

  18. Maricoccus atlantica gen. nov. sp. nov., isolated from deep sea sediment of the Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Li, Guizhen; Lai, Qiliang; Liu, Xiupian; Sun, Fengqin; Du, Yaping; Li, Guangyu; Shao, Zongze

    2013-12-01

    A taxonomic study was carried out on strain 22II-S10r2(T), which was isolated from the deep sea sediment of the Atlantic Ocean using oil-degrading enrichment. The bacterium was Gram-negative, oxidase positive and catalase negative, spherical in shape, and motile by polar flagella. Growth was observed at salinities of 0.5-7 % and at temperatures of 10-41 °C. The isolate was capable of aesculin hydrolysis, but unable to reduce nitrate to nitrite or degrade Tween 80 or gelatine. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain 22II-S10r2(T) belonged to the family Ectothiorhodospiraceae, with highest sequence similarity to Thioalkalivibrio sulfidiphilus HL-EbGR7(T) (90.9 % similarity). The principal fatty acids were Sum In Feature 8 (C18:1 ω7c/ω6c (29.9 %), C18:1 ω9c (13.5 %), C16:1 ω5c (12.3 %), C12:03OH (6.8 %), C18:1 ω5c (5.7 %) and C16:0 (5.3 %). The G+C content of the chromosomal DNA was 60.7 mol%. The respiratory quinone was determined to be Q-7 (25 %) and Q-8 (75 %). Phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, aminophospholipid, glycolipid, three phospholipids and lipid were present. The strain was aerobic, non-phototrophic and non-chemolithoautotrophic. The combined genotypic and phenotypic data show that strain 22II-S10r2(T) represents a novel species within a novel genus, for which the name Maricoccus atlantica gen. nov. sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain 22II-S10r2(T) (=CGMCC NO.1.12317(T) = LMG 27155(T) = MCCC 1A09384(T)).

  19. Pastoral and woodcutting activities drive Cedrus atlantica Mediterranean forest structure in the Moroccan Middle Atlas.

    PubMed

    Coudel, Marc; Aubert, Pierre-Marie; Aderghal, Mohammed; Hély, Christelle

    2016-03-01

    Human activities are historical ecological drivers, and we need to better understand their effects on ecosystems. In particular, they have been very important in the shaping of the Mediterranean biodiversity hotspot. Researchers and managers nonetheless lack knowledge concerning the impacts of their combinations and their current intensity on the structure of forest ecosystems of the southern part of the Mediterranean basin. In this study, we have develped a new methodology in order to understand the impacts of combined pastoral and woodcutting activities on the forest structure of the still ill-described but ecologically and economically important Moroccan Middle Atlas cedar forests. In a 40 000 ha forest, we chose 103 sites and sampled human activities through proxies and forest structures through circumference and vertical structures. A typology of sites yielded four human activity types: dominant pastoral activities, dominant oak cutting or cedar cutting activities, and an intermediate mid-disturbance type. This typology did not depend on altitude or substrate, confirming that the ecosystem structures linked to the different types depend more on human activities than on main environmental parameters. Pastoral activities modified forests the most, converting them to parklands with reduced canopies and low dynamics but high tree maturation. Woodcutting activities induced gap dynamics, favoring Cedrus atlantica in favorable environmental conditions and Quercus ilex otherwise, while they affected vertical structure depending on the local environment and competition for light and soil resources. Moderately disturbed stands showed forest maturation with low competition for light. Unlike previous studies, we found no evidence of a general degradation of cedar forests due to local human activities. However, cedar logging has reduced standing basal area regionally and one third of the sites may have vulnerable cedar populations due to pastoral activities and to

  20. Growth, water relations and photosynthesis of seedlings and resprouts after fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemente, Adelaide S.; Rego, Francisco C.; Correia, Otília A.

    2005-05-01

    Seasonal patterns of growth, water relations, photosynthesis and leaf characteristics were compared between obligate seeders ( Cistus monspeliensis and Cistus ladanifer) and resprouters ( Arbutus unedo and Pistacia lentiscus) from the first to the second year after fire. We hypothesized that seedlings would be more water-limited than resprouts due to their shallower root systems. Regarding water use strategies, Cistus species are drought semi-deciduous and A. unedo and P. lentiscus are evergreen sclerophylls, therefore, comparisons were based on the relative deviation from mature conspecific plants. Seedlings and resprouts had higher shoot elongation and leaf production than mature plants, and over an extended period. Differences from mature plants were larger in resprouts, with two-fold transpiration, leaf conductance and photosynthesis in late spring/early summer. Seedlings of C. monspeliensis exhibited higher transpiration and leaf conductance than mature plants, while those of C. ladanifer only exhibited higher water potential. Growth increments and ameliorated water relations and photosynthesis after fire were attributed to an increase in water and nutrient availability. The small differences in water relations and photosynthesis between seedlings and mature conspecifics are in accordance with the prediction of seedlings experiencing higher water limitation than resprouts. We attribute these results to differences in root systems: resprouters benefited from an increase in root/shoot ratios and the presence of deep roots whereas Cistus seedlings relied on very shallow roots, which cannot provide assess to deep water during summer. Nevertheless, seedlings did not show evidence of experiencing a more severe water limitation than mature conspecifics, which we attributed to the presence of efficient mechanisms of avoiding and tolerating water stress. The results are discussed in relation to post-fire demography of seeders and resprouters in Mediterranean

  1. GC-MS analysis of penta- and tetra-cyclic triterpenes from resins of Pistacia species. Part II. Pistacia terebinthus var. Chia.

    PubMed

    Assimopoulou, A N; Papageorgiou, V P

    2005-10-01

    Pistacia species contain oleoresins with bioactive triterpenes. In this study triterpenes, including minor components, were identified and quantified in both neutral and acidic fractions of Pistacia terebinthus var. Chia resin, grown exclusively in Chios island (Greece), collected traditionally, as well as using stimulating agents (liquid collection). It was proved that these two resin samples were composed of several different minor triterpenes, while major constituents were similar but in different proportions. Compounds that differentiated two resin samples of P. lentiscus and P. terebinthus var. Chia, both traditionally collected, were detected, in order to identify the nature of resins present in archaeological materials. In the traditionally collected resin, 37 triterpenes were identified, 12 in the acidic and 25 in the neutral fraction. In the liquid collection resin 10 compounds were identified in the acidic and 23 in the neutral fraction, while 16 compounds were not contained in the traditionally collected resin. The main triterpenes in both resin samples collected traditionally and using stimulating agents were: isomasticadienonic acid (23.6 and 26.3% w[sol ]w of the triterpenic fraction, respectively), 28-norolean-17-en-3-one (16.3 and 17.5% w[sol ]w of the triterpenic fraction, respectively) and masticadienonic acid (5.8 and 6.0% w[sol ]w of the triterpenic fraction). In this study the qualitative and quantitative composition of triterpenes was compared in the Pistacia lentiscus and P. terebinthus var. Chia resin samples collected with the traditional and new liquid techniques, and also triterpenes in resins of P. terebinthus obtained by the traditional technique and using stimulating agents. The aim of the study was also to examine whether the collection technique influenced the triterpenes contained in P. terebinthus var. Chia resin samples.

  2. Review-An overview of Pistacia integerrima a medicinal plant species: Ethnobotany, biological activities and phytochemistry.

    PubMed

    Bibi, Yamin; Zia, Muhammad; Qayyum, Abdul

    2015-05-01

    Pistacia integerrima with a common name crab's claw is an ethnobotanically important tree native to Asia. Traditionally plant parts particularly its galls have been utilized for treatment of cough, asthma, dysentery, liver disorders and for snake bite. Plant mainly contains alkaloids, flavonoids, tannins, saponins and sterols in different parts including leaf, stem, bark, galls and fruit. A number of terpenoids, sterols and phenolic compounds have been isolated from Pistacia integerrima extracts. Plant has many biological activities including anti-microbial, antioxidant, analgesic, cytotoxicity and phytotoxicity due to its chemical constituents. This review covers its traditional ethnomedicinal uses along with progresses in biological and phytochemical evaluation of this medicinally important plant species and aims to serve as foundation for further exploration and utilization.

  3. Biogeographic history of Pistacia (Anacardiaceae), emphasizing the evolution of the Madrean-Tethyan and the eastern Asian-Tethyan disjunctions.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lei; Yang, Zhi-Yun; Wen, Jun; Li, De-Zhu; Yi, Ting-Shuang

    2014-08-01

    Pistacia L. exhibits a disjunct distribution in Mediterranean Eurasia and adjacent North Africa, eastern Asia, and North to Central America. The spatio-temporal diversification history of Pistacia was assessed to test hypotheses on the Madrean-Tethyan and the Eurasian Tethyan disjunctions through phylogenetic and biogeographic analyses. Maximum parsimony and Bayesian methods were employed to analyze sequences of multiple nuclear and plastid loci of Pistacia species. Bayesian dating analysis was conducted to estimate the divergence times of clades. The likelihood method LAGRANGE was used to infer ancestral areas. The New World species of Pistacia formed a clade sister to the Old World clade in all phylogenetic analyses. The eastern Asian Pistacia weinmannifolia-P. cucphuongensis clade was sister to a clade of the remaining Old World species, which were further resolved into three subclades. Pistacia was estimated to have originated at 37.60 mya (with 95% highest posterior density interval (HPD): 25.42-48.51 mya). A vicariance event in the early Miocene (19.79 mya with 95% HPD: 10.88-30.36 mya) was inferred to account for the intercontinental disjunction between the New World and the Old World species, which is consistent with the Madrean-Tethyan hypothesis. The two Old World eastern Asian-Tethyan disjunctions are best explained by one vicariance event in the early Miocene (15.87 mya with 95% HPD: 8.36-24.36 mya) and one dispersal event in late Miocene (5.89 mya with 95% HPD: 2.68-9.16 mya). The diversification of the Old World Pistacia species was significantly affected by extensive geological and climatic changes in the Qinghai-Tibetan plateau (QTP) and in the Mediterranean region.

  4. Phylogeography of North African Atlas cedar (Cedrus atlantica, Pinaceae): Combined molecular and fossil data reveal a complex Quaternary history.

    PubMed

    Terrab, Anass; Hampe, Arndt; Lepais, Olivier; Talavera, Salvador; Vela, Errol; Stuessy, Tod F

    2008-10-01

    Northwest Africa is a major hotspot of plant biodiversity, but very little is known about the Quaternary range dynamics of plant species in this region. Here we investigate the range-wide population structure and phylogeography of Atlas cedar (Cedrus atlantica), an emblematic forest tree endemic to Morocco and Algeria. We genotyped 261 individuals from 11 populations using AFLP markers. Data were analyzed using both conventional F(ST)-based techniques and Bayesian clustering. Overall population differentiation was high (F(ST) = 0.25). Two major groups of populations were identified, one distributed through the Rif and Middle Atlas mountains in Morocco and the other through the Algerian Tell Atlas and Aurès mountains as well as the Middle Atlas. Combined molecular and fossil data indicate that C. atlantica survived the Last Glacial Maximum in at least three disjunct refugia along the coast of the Mediterranean Sea, whereas the Middle Atlas, today the core of the species range, has been colonized relatively recently (<10000 yr BP). The colonization history of individual populations has left clear imprints in their present-day diversity, which may vary greatly even between nearby stands. Our study illustrates how integrating different data sources and analytical approaches can help elucidate complex range dynamics that would otherwise remain undeciphered.

  5. [Analgesic activity of different nonvolatile extracts of Nepeta atlantica Ball and Nepeta Tuberosa L. ssp. reticulata (Desf.) Maire].

    PubMed

    Bouidida, El Houcine; Alaoui, Katim; Cherrah, Yahia; Chammache, Malika; Il Idrissi, Abdelkader

    2008-01-01

    Different extracts of Nepeta atlantica Ball and Nepeta tuberosa L. ssp. reticulata (Desf.) Maire contain mainly secondary metabolites with iridoïd lactonic and glucosidic type, also with triterpine lupan type.The aerial part of each species is crushed, then extracted in methanol by cold maceration, called global extracts. The global extracts will be extracted through various solvents: initially by hexane, then by dichloromethane, after that by ethyl acetate and at the end by buthanol. Each one of the obtained extracts will be used for the following trials: i) Tail flick trial on the rat for central morphine-like analgesic activity; ii) Koster trial on the mouse for peripheral analgesic activity. The evaluation of the central and peripheral analgesic activities for the pre-cited extracts was realized after optimal doses determination of the global extracts activities for both species.The peripheral analgesic activity test on the mouse showed that, for 60 mg/kg intra peritoneum (IP), the hexanic, dichloromethanic, ethyl acetate and butanic extracts have a protection power against abdominal cramp respectively around 89.78%, 81.73%, 70.9% et 69.05% for Nepeta atlantica Ball, and around 89.16%, 82.98%, 71.52% et 70.27% for Nepeta tuberosa L. ssp. reticulata.Central morphine-like analgesic activity on the rat showed that, for both spices under 60 mg/kg IP, the central analgesic activity effect is significantly for two extracts only: dichloromethane and ethyl acetate.

  6. The embryonic phase and its implication in the hatchling size and condition of Atlantic bobtail squid Sepiola atlantica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Marcelo; Guerra, Ángel; Troncoso, Jesús S.

    2011-06-01

    Early life stages of cephalopods are somewhat complex due to the life history strategy or species specificity of generalized ontogenetic patterns and processes. This work aimed to determine the time length of embryonic development at different temperatures, and if the egg size is a determinant of hatchling size in Sepiola atlantica d'Orbigny, 1839-1842. Successful hatching occurred in 98.5-100% of the eggs for each female. As seen in other coleoid cephalopods, temperature determines the amount of time for embryonic development in S. atlantica, and the obtained data were very similar to other coleoid cephalopods. Developmental times for temperatures at 13 ± 0.4°C, 18 ± 0.3°C and 16.4 ± 1.1°C were 61.8 ± 3.8, 22.6 ± 1.7 and 40.1 ± 4.8 days. The duration of embryonic development and hatchling mantle length was not strictly related. The egg volume was positively related to hatchling mantle length. Our results provide new records on the duration of embryogenesis and other information on reproductive patterns in this species. Some hatching and post-hatching behaviour are shown and discussed.

  7. The historical roots of popular practices in oral health: Pistacia lentiscus in Cartagena, Murcia (Spain).

    PubMed

    Sáez, José Miguel; López, José; Romero, Martín

    2005-11-01

    All over the world, different cultures have made use of the plants that nature has provided for their oral care and hygiene. Many of these popular uses were integrated into scientific medicine during ancient times, but have once again returned to occupy a place in popular medical practice. This article will trace the historical route of the popular uses of Pistacia lentiscus (the mastic tree, or evergreen pistache) in the province of Murcia in the south of Spain.

  8. Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of the essential oils of Pistacia lentiscus var. chia.

    PubMed

    Magiatis, P; Melliou, E; Skaltsounis, A L; Chinou, I B; Mitaku, S

    1999-12-01

    The chemical composition of the three essential oils obtained by steam distillation of the mastic gum, leaves and twigs of Pistacia lentiscus var. chia, was studied by GC/MS. Sixty nine constituents were identified from the oils. alpha-Pinene, myrcene, trans-caryophyllene and germacrene D were found to be the major components. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of the three essential oils and of the resin (total, acid and neutral fraction) against six bacteria and three fungi is reported.

  9. The Study of Anticancer and Antifungal Activities of Pistacia integerrima Extract in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bibi, Y.; Nisa, S.; Zia, M.; Waheed, A.; Ahmed, S.; Chaudhary, M. F.

    2012-01-01

    Pistacia integerrima Stew. ex Brand (Anacardiaceae) is an ethanobotanically important plant species traditionally used in the treatment of chronic wounds, jaundice, dysentery, etc. The crude extract from Pistacia integerrima and its fractions were tested for cytotoxic activity against Michigan Cancer Foundation-7 human breast cancer cell line. We have also investigated that crude stem extract of this plant also exhibits the antitumour as well as antifungal potential activities. Moreover, we have also studied that the crude extract inhibited Michigan Cancer Foundation-7 cell viability in a dose-dependent manner; the poor toxicity (1.6%) at 10 μg/ml to moderate toxicity (55.4%) at 100 μg/ml. The IC50 values calculated were 90.9 μg/ml. The ethyl acetate and chloroform fractions at a concentration of 200 μg/ml showed ~100 and 97.4% inhibition against Michigan Cancer Foundation-7 cell line, respectively. The crude methanol extract also showed good antitumour (IC50 125 ppm) activity, but weak antifungal activity. These findings reveal that the ethyl acetate and chloroform fractions of Pistacia integerrima are potent cytotoxic fractions, and could be an alternate candidate for the development of novel biologically active compounds. PMID:23626397

  10. The efficacy of Pistacia Terebinthus soap in the treatment of cetuximab-induced skin toxicity.

    PubMed

    Tastekin, Didem; Tambas, Makbule; Kilic, Kemal; Erturk, Kayhan; Arslan, Deniz

    2014-12-01

    This open-labeled phase II, efficacy-finding study evaluated the efficiency and safety of Pistacia terebinthus soap in metastatic colorectal cancer patients who developed cetuximab induced skin toxicity. Patients who received cetuximab plus chemotherapy and developed Grade 2 or 3 skin toxicity were treated twice daily with a soap made of oil extracted from Pistacia terebinthus. During treatment, no topical or oral antibiotics, corticosteroids or other moisturizers were used. Patients were examined 1 week later and their photographs were taken. Fifteen mCRC patients who developed skin toxicity while receiving first-line CTX in combination with chemotherapy were included into the study. Eight patients were male and the median age was 58 (25-70). Sixty percent of the patients (n:9) had Grade 3 skin toxicity. Complete response rates in patients with Grade 2 and Grade 3 skin toxicities were 100 and 33%, respectively. In the remaining patients with Grade 3 toxicity the skin toxicity regressed to Grade 1. The objective response rate was 100%, and no delay, dose reduction or discontinuation of CTX treatment due to skin toxicity was necessary. Skin toxicity reoccurred in all patients when patients stopped administering the soap and therefore they used it throughout the cetuximab treatment. Pistacia terebinthus soap seemed to be used safely and effectively in the treatment of skin toxicity induced by Cetuximab.

  11. The effects of aqueous extracts prepared from the leaves of Pistacia lentiscus in experimental liver disease.

    PubMed

    Ljubuncic, Predrag; Song, Hui; Cogan, Uri; Azaizeh, Hassan; Bomzon, Arieh

    2005-08-22

    In a previous study, we identified Pistacia lentiscus was worthy for further laboratory evaluation because an aqueous extract of the plant suppressed iron-induced lipid peroxidation in rat liver homogenates without affecting mitochondrial respiration in cultured HepG2 and PC12 cells. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of an aqueous extract prepared from the dried leaves of Pistacia lentiscus in a rat model of hepatic injury caused by the hepatotoxin, thioacetamide. We assessed the impact of daily dosing on biochemical and morphological indices and the extent of oxidative stress in the livers of healthy and thioacetamide-treated rats. In healthy rats, long-term administration of the extract induced hepatic fibrosis and an inflammatory response, mild cholestasis and depletion of reduced glutathione associated with an increase in its oxidized form. In thioacetamide-treated rats, long-term administration of extract aggravated the inflammatory and fibrotic and glutathione depleting responses without affecting the extent of lipid peroxidation. Although our previous in vitro study established that extracts prepared from the leaves of Pistacia lentiscus had antioxidant activity, this in vivo study establishes these extracts also contains hepatotoxins whose identity may be quite different from those compounds with antioxidant properties. The results of this study suggest complementing in vitro experiments with those involving animals are essential steps in establishing the safety of medicinal plants. Furthermore, these data confirm that complete reliance on data obtained using in vitro methodologies may lead to erroneous conclusions pertaining to the safety of phytopharmaceuticals.

  12. Thioclava atlantica sp. nov., isolated from deep sea sediment of the Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Lai, Qiliang; Li, Shaoneng; Xu, Hongxiu; Jiang, Lijiang; Zhang, Rongqiu; Shao, Zongze

    2014-11-01

    A taxonomic study was carried out on strain 13D2W-2(T), which was isolated from a sulphur-oxidizing bacterial consortium, enriched by the deep-sea sediment of the Atlantic Ocean. The isolate was observed to be Gram-negative, oxidase- and catalase-positive, short rod-shaped and motile by means of a flagellum. Growth was observed at salinities from 0.5 to 12 % and at temperatures from 4 to 41 °C, and the strain found to be able to reduce nitrate but not degrade gelatin. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain 13D2W-2(T) belongs to the genus Thioclava, with highest sequence similarity of 97.8 % to Thioclava dalianensis DLFJ1-1(T), followed by Thioclava pacifica TL 2(T) (97.7 %), while the sequence similarities to other members of the genus were all below 97.0 %. The digital DNA:DNA hybridization estimated values between strain 13D2W-2(T) and, respectively, T. dalianensis DLFJ1-1(T) and T. pacifica TL 2(T) were 22.6 ± 2.4 and 25.6 ± 2.4 %. The ANI values between strain 13D2W-2(T) and T. dalianensis DLFJ1-1(T) and T. pacifica TL 2(T) were 78.49 and 81.91 % respectively. The principal fatty acid identified was Summed Feature 8 (C18:1 ω7c/ω6c) (74.38 %). The isoprenoid quinone of strain 13D2W-2(T) was identified as Q10 (100 %). The major polar lipids of strain 13D2W-2(T) were found to be comprised of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, an aminophospholipid, a glycolipid and three unknown phospholipids. The G+C content of the chromosomal DNA was determined to be 65.3 mol%. The combined genotypic and phenotypic data show that strain 13D2W-2(T) represents a novel species of the genus Thioclava, for which the name Thioclava atlantica sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain 13D2W-2(T) ( = MCCC 1A02612(T) = LMG 27145(T)).

  13. Aquimarina atlantica sp. nov., isolated from surface seawater of the Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Li, Guizhen; Lai, Qiliang; Sun, Fengqin; Liu, Xiupian; Xie, Yunbiao; Du, Yaping; Li, Guangyu; Shao, Zongze

    2014-08-01

    A taxonomic study was carried out on strain 22II-S11-z7(T), which was isolated from the surface seawater of the Atlantic Ocean. The bacterium was found to be Gram-negative, oxidase negative and catalase positive, long-rod shaped, and gliding. Growth was observed at salinities of 1-5 % and at temperatures of 10-41 °C. The isolate was capable of hydrolysing gelatin and Tween 80 and able to reduce nitrate to nitrite, but unable to degrade aesculin. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain 22II-S11-z7(T) belongs to the genus Aquimarina, with highest sequence similarity to Aquimarina megaterium XH134(T) (98.31 %), followed by Aquimarina macrocephali JAMB N27(T) (96.59 %); other species of the genus Aquimarina shared 93.63-96.08 % sequence similarity. The ANI value between strain 22II-S11-z7(T) and A. megaterium XH134(T) was found to be 91.86-91.81 %. The DNA-DNA hybridization estimated value between strain 22II-S11-z7(T) and A. megaterium XH134(T) was 47.7 ± 2.6 %. The principal fatty acids were identified as Summed Feature 3 (C16:1 ω7c/ω6c, as defined by the MIDI system; 8.1 %), SummedFeature 9 (iso-C17:1 ω7c/C16:110-methyl; 6.8 %), iso-C15:0 G (11.3 %), iso-C15:0 (24.9 %), iso-C16:0 (5.7 %), C16:0 (5.2 %), iso-C15:0 3OH (6.4 %) and iso-C17:0 3OH (21.5 %). The G+C content of the chromosomal DNA was determined to be 32.99 mol %. The respiratory quinone was determined to be MK-6 (100 %). Phosphatidylethanolamine, two unidentified aminolipids, five unidentified phospholipids and two unidentified lipids were found to be present. The combined genotypic and phenotypic data show that strain 22II-S11-z7(T) represents a novel species within the genus Aquimarina, for which the name Aquimarina atlantica sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain 22II-S11-z7(T) (=MCCC 1A09239(T) = KCTC 42003(T)).

  14. Recent volcanism and mitochondrial DNA structuring in the lizard Gallotia atlantica from the island of Lanzarote.

    PubMed

    Bloor, P; Kemp, S J; Brown, R P

    2008-02-01

    The phylogeography of the lacertid lizard Gallotia atlantica from the small volcanic island of Lanzarote (Canary Islands) was analysed based on 1075 bp of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence (partial cytochrome b and ND2) for 157 individuals from 27 sites (including three sites from neighbouring islets). Levels of sequence divergence were generally low, with the most distant haplotypes separated by only 14 mutational steps. MtDNA divergence appears to coincide with formation of the middle Pleistocene lowland that united formerly separate ancient islands to form the current island of Lanzarote, allowing rejection of a two-island model of phylogeographical structure. There was evidence of large-scale population expansion after island unification, consistent with the colonization of new areas. A nested clade phylogeographical analysis (NCPA) revealed significant phylogeographical structuring. Two-step and higher-level clades each had disjunct distributions, being found to the east and west of a common area with a north-south orientation that extends between coasts in the centre-east of the island (El Jable). Other clades were almost entirely restricted to the El Jable region alone. Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo analyses were used to separate ongoing gene flow from historical associations. These supported the NCPA by indicating recent (75,000-150,000 years ago) east-west vicariance across the El Jable region. Lava flows covered El Jable and other parts of the central lowland at this time and likely led to population extinctions and temporary dispersal barriers, although present-day evidence suggests some populations would have survived in small refugia. Expansion of the latter appears to explain the presence of a clade located between the eastern and western components of the disjunct clades. Direct relationships between mtDNA lineages and morphology were not found, although one of two morphological forms on the island has a disjunct distribution that is broadly

  15. El Poder de Cambiar: La Experiencia del Proyecto Costa Atlantica de Colombia (The Power To Change: The Experience of the Atlantic Coast Project in Columbia, 1977-1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chetley, Andrew

    In 1977, the Bernard van Leer Foundation began supporting a project in Colombia that had the objective of improving the quality of early childhood care and education in a small village. The Costa Atlantica project offered an approach to development that was based on community organization, social management, participation, cooperation, popular…

  16. Seedling disease in Michigan

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sugar beet seedlings (24 entries of a larger genetic population constructed to dissect Rhizoctonia disease reaction in sugar beet) were screened for their response to a highly virulent isolate of Rhizoctonia solani AG 2-2. Seedlings were grown to the two-leaf stage in the greenhouse, thinned to 15 p...

  17. Hardwood Seedling Nutrition

    Treesearch

    C. B. Davey

    2005-01-01

    Hardwood seedling production presents several challenges that differ considerably from pine seedling production. Because of a nearly double water requirement, hardwoods need to be planted where they can be irrigated separately from pines. Nutrient requirements are generally higher for hardwoods, including especially nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), calcium (Ca), and...

  18. Container hardwood seedling production

    Treesearch

    John McRae

    2005-01-01

    Container production of hardwood seedlings requires larger cavities, more space, and the ability to easily sort seedlings (as compared to conifers) very early during the germination phase of production. This presentation demonstrates the most productive system, based upon past experience, to commercially produce container hardwoods. The container system of choice is...

  19. Lifting Pine Seedlings

    Treesearch

    C. B. Briscoe

    1960-01-01

    One of the factors preventing more widespread planting of the true pines (Pinus spp.) in the tropics is the present necessity of using potted stock instead of barerooted seedlings, such as are used throughout the temperate regions. Potted seedlings require more space, more equipment, more labor, and more money, both to produce in the nursery and to plant in the field...

  20. Flavonoid content in leaf extracts of the fig (Ficus carica L.), carob (Ceratonia siliqua L.) and pistachio (Pistacia lentiscus L.).

    PubMed

    Vaya, Jacob; Mahmood, Saeed

    2006-01-01

    The total flavonoid content of leaf extracts (70% ethanol) from fig (Ficus carica L.), carob (Ceratonia siliqua L.) and pistachio (Pistacia lentiscus L.) plants were determined by using reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-and analyzed by UV/VIS array and electrospray ionization (ESI)-mass spectrometry (MS) detectors. As a base for comparison, flavonoid type and level were also determined in extracts from soybeans and grape seeds. It was found that the major flavonoids in Ficus are quercetin and luteolin, with a total of 631 and 681 mg/kg extract, respectively. In Ceratonia leaves, nine different flavonoids were detected. The major one was myricetin (1486 mg/kg extract), with a similar level in Pistacia (1331 mg/kg extract, myricetin). The present study is the first to report the presence of the isoflavone genistein in the Pistacia leaf, which was discovered to consist of about a third of the genistein level detected in soybean.

  1. Intraspecific chemical variability of essential oil from leaves of Cupressus atlantica Gaussen, an endemic and endangered coniferous species in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Abbad, Abdelaziz; Sfairi, Youssef; Lahcen, Hassani; Bekkouche, Khalid; Markouk, Mohammed; Wohlmuth, Hans; Leach, David

    2013-01-01

    The composition of essential oils isolated from leaves of 11 natural populations of Cupressus atlantica, an endemic and endangered coniferous species from Morocco, was investigated by GC-MS. In total, 42 essential oil components were identified, accounting for 73.1-97.7% of the total oil. Monoterpene (25.2-84.9%) and sesquiterpene hydrocarbons (12.2-46.8%) were the principal subclasses of compounds, with α-pinene (15-65.4%), germacrene D (5.9-30.5%), δ-3-carene (2-16.6%) and γ-cadinene (1.3-9.8%) as the main constituents. The results of the oil composition were analysed by hierarchical cluster and principal component analysis that established three main groups of essential oils. These oils were differentiated by the content of the major constituents (α-pinene, germacrene D, δ-3-carene and γ-cadinene), geographical location and climatic characteristics.

  2. Anti-inflammatory activity of Pistacia lentiscus essential oil: involvement of IL-6 and TNF-alpha.

    PubMed

    Maxia, Andrea; Sanna, Cinzia; Frau, Maria Assunta; Piras, Alessandra; Karchuli, Manvendra Singh; Kasture, Veena

    2011-10-01

    The topical anti-inflammatory activity of essential oil of Pistacia lentiscus L. was studied using carrageenan induced rat paw edema and cotton pellet induced granuloma. The effect on serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in rats inserted with cotton pellet was also investigated. On topical application, the oil exhibited a significant decrease in paw edema. The oil also inhibited cotton pellet-induced granuloma, and reduced serum TNF-alpha and IL-6. It can be concluded that the essential oil of Pistacia lentiscus reduces leukocyte migration to the damaged tissue and exhibits anti-inflammatory activity.

  3. GC-MS analysis of penta- and tetra-cyclic triterpenes from resins of Pistacia species. Part I. Pistacia lentiscus var. Chia.

    PubMed

    Assimopoulou, A N; Papageorgiou, V P

    2005-05-01

    Pistacia species contain oleoresins with bioactive triterpenes. In this study triterpenes, including minor components, were identified and quantified in both neutral and acidic fraction of Pistacia lentiscus var. Chia resin, grown exclusively in Chios island (Greece), collected traditionally, as well as by the use of stimulating agents (liquid collection). It was proved that these two resin samples were composed of several different minor triterpenes. In the traditional collection of the resin, 36 triterpenes were identified, 23 of which are new minor compounds (five in the acidic and eighteen in the neutral fraction). In the liquid collection resin eight compounds were identified in the acidic and 11 in the neutral fraction, while seven compounds were not contained in resin traditionally collected. The main triterpenes in both resin samples collected traditionally and by use of stimulating agents were in the following order: isomasticadienonic acid (24 and 22.5% w/w of triterpenic fraction respectively), masticadienonic acid (9.3 and 14.7% w/w of triterpenic fraction) and 28-norolean-17-en-3-one (19 and 36% w/w of triterpenic fraction respectively). The aim of this study was to compare the qualitative and quantitative composition of triterpenes in the resin samples collected using the traditional and new liquid techniques, and examine whether the collection technique influences the contained triterpenes in P. lentiscus var. Chia resin samples. Finally, since there is confusion on interpreting mass spectra of triterpenes we present an analytical review on the base peaks, main fragments and fragmentation mechanism/pattern of several skeleton penta- and tetra- cyclic triterpenes reported in P. lentiscus resin. Also, a biosynthetic route for triterpene skeletons contained in P. lentiscus resin was approached.

  4. Study of genotoxic, antigenotoxic and antioxidant activities of the digallic acid isolated from Pistacia lentiscus fruits.

    PubMed

    Bhouri, Wissem; Derbel, Safa; Skandrani, Ines; Boubaker, Jihed; Bouhlel, Ines; Sghaier, Mohamed B; Kilani, Soumaya; Mariotte, Anne M; Dijoux-Franca, Marie G; Ghedira, Kamel; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2010-03-01

    The digallic acid obtained from the fruit Pistacia lentiscus exhibits an inhibitory activity against nitrofurantoine and B[a]P induced genotoxicity when tested by the SOS chromotest bacterial assay system in the presence of Escherichia coli PQ37 strain. The antioxidant activity of the tested compound was determined by its ability to scavenge the free radical ABTS(+), to inhibit the xanthine oxidase, involved in the generation of free radicals, and to inhibit the lipid peroxidation induced by H(2)O(2) in the K562 cell line. Our results revealed that digallic acid shows an important free radical scavenging activity towards the ABTS(+) radical (99%) and protection against lipid peroxidation (68%).

  5. Antibacterial activity of the essential oils of Pistacia lentiscus used in Moroccan folkloric medicine.

    PubMed

    Mharti, Fatima Zohra; Lyoussi, Badiaa; Abdellaoui, Abdelfattah

    2011-10-01

    The essential oil of the leaves of Pistacia lentiscus, collected from the middle Atlas in Morocco, was analyzed by GC and GC-MS. Altogether 43 components in concentrations of more than 0.2% were identified representing 97.4% of the oil composition. The main constituents were germanicol (12.8%), thunbergol (8.8%), himachalene (7.4%), trans-squalene (6.7%), terpinyl propionate (6.7%), 3,3-dimenthol (6.2%) and cadina-1.4-diene (5.1%). The oils showed strong activity against Klebsiella pneumonia, but no activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  6. Development and characterization of eight polymorphic microsatellite loci from Pistacia lentiscus L. (Anacardiaceae).

    PubMed

    Albaladejo, Rafael G; Sebastiani, F; Aparicio, A; Buonamici, A; González-Martínez, S C; Vendramin, G G

    2008-07-01

    We have developed a set of eight polymorphic nuclear microsatellite markers for the Mediterranean shrub Pistacia lentiscus by means of an enriched library method. Characterization for the eight loci was carried out on 42 individuals from two populations sampled in southern Spain. The overall number of alleles detected was 59, ranging from three to 13 per locus. Expected heterozygosity per locus and population ranged from 0.139 to 0.895. Two loci albeit only in one population (Seville) departed significantly from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium expectations and no linkage disequilibrium between pairs of loci was detected. These markers will be used in studies of gene flow across a fragmented landscape.

  7. Auger electron spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the biocorrosion of copper by Gum Arabic, BCS and Pseudomonas atlantica exopolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Jolley, J.G.; Geesey, G.G.; Hankins, M.R.; Wright, R.B.; Wichlacz, P.L.

    1987-01-01

    Thin films (3.4 nm) of copper on germanium substrates were exposed to 10% Gum Arabic aqueous solution, 1% BCS (aqueous and simulated sea water solutions) and 0.5% Pseudomonas atlantica exopolymer (aqueous and simulated sea water solutions). Pre- and post-exposure characterization were done by Auger electron spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Ancillary graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy was used to monitor the removal process of the copper thin film from the germanium substrate. Results indicate that the copper was oxidized by the Gum Arabic and BCS, and some was removed from the Cu/Ge interface by all three polymers and incorporated into the polymer matrix. Thus biocorrosion of copper was exhibited by the Gum Arabic, BCS and Pseudomonas atlantica exopolymer. 14 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Composition of the essential oil of leaves, galls, and ripe and unripe fruits of Jordanian Pistacia palaestina Boiss.

    PubMed

    Flamini, Guido; Bader, Ammar; Cioni, Pier Luigi; Katbeh-Bader, Ahmad; Morelli, Ivano

    2004-02-11

    Pistacia palaestina Boiss. (Pistacia terebinthus L. var. palaestina (Boiss.) Engl.) is a medicinal and foodstuff plant. The ripe fruits are used largely in the Middle East as a component of the so-called Zaatar, a mix of aromatic and food plants. Results of GC and GC-MS analyses of the essential oils of leaves, galls produced by Baizongia pistaciae (L.), and ripe and unripe fruits of Pistacia palaestinaBoiss. collected in Jordan are reported. Both qualitative and quantitative differences between different parts of the plant were observed. The oil was rich in monoterpenes, and the main constituents were alpha-pinene (63.1%) and myrcene (13.3%) in the leaves and alpha-pinene (49.4%), sabinene (22.8%), and limonene (8.1%) in the galls. (E)-Ocimene (33.8-41.3%), sabinene (20.3-24.1%), and (Z)-ocimene (3.8-13.0%) were the main ones in both unripe and ripe fruits. Sesquiterpenes have been detected in small quantities in leaves and fruits and in trace amounts in galls.

  9. Anti-Melanogenic Activity and Cytotoxicity of Pistacia vera Hull on Human Melanoma SKMEL-3 Cells.

    PubMed

    Sarkhail, Parisa; Salimi, Mona; Sarkheil, Pantea; Mostafapour Kandelous, Hirsa

    2017-07-01

    Pistacia vera seed is a common food and medicinal seed in Iran. It's hull (outer skin) as a significant byproduct of pistachio, is traditionally used as tonic, sedative and antidiarrheal and has been shown to be a rich source of antioxidants. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the anti-melanogenic activity of the pistachio hulls in order to discover a new alternative herbal agent to treat skin hyperpigmentation disorders. In this work, antioxidant and anti-tyrosinase activity of MeOH extract from Pistacia vera hull (MPH) were evaluated in vitro, respectively, by DPPH radical scavenging and mushroom tyrosinase activity assays. Then the effect of MPH on the melanin content, cellular tyrosinase activity and cytotoxicity (MTT assay) on human melanoma SKMEL-3 cell were determined followed by 72 h incubation. The results indicated that MPH had valuable DPPH radical scavenging effect and weak anti-tyrosinase activity when compared to the well-known antioxidant (BHT) and tyrosinase inhibitor (kojic acid), respectively. MPH, at a high dose (0.5 mg/mL), showed significant cytotoxic activity (~63%) and strong anti-melanogenic effect (~57%) on SKMEL-3 cells. The effect of MPH in the reduction of melanin content may be related to its cytotoxicity. The results obtained suggest that MPH can be used as an effective agent in the treatment of some skin hyperpigmentation disorders such as melanoma.

  10. Acclimation of Pistacia integerrima trees to frost in semi-arid environments depends on autumn's drought.

    PubMed

    Sperling, Or; Secchi, Francesca; Godfrey, Jessie; Zwieniecki, Maciej A

    2017-03-01

    Main conclusion Cold acclimation is revealed through induced stem respiration during pre-winter frost of native Pistacia integerrima trees in continental semi-arid environments. Semi-arid environments challenge vegetation by simultaneous abiotic stresses. In this study, we examine the combined effects of water stress and frost on the physiology of Pistacia integerrima stems. This species is native to semi-arid environments where drought and frost frequently co-occur. We quantified carbohydrates and proline in P. integerrima stems responding to frost and experiencing water potentials between -0.2 and -1.8 MPa. We report that dehydrated trees (i.e., Ψstem <=-1 MPa) had more soluble sugars and proline than the well-watered trees (-0.2 MPa). The dehydrated trees also froze at lower temperatures and were less damaged by freezing. Interestingly, we observed a significant increase in stem CO2 efflux at near-freezing temperatures that could be linked to frost protection. This novel finding challenges current paradigm of plant respiration-kinetics which predicts, according to Arrhenius equation, lower respiration rates during frost. Our results support the notion that drought and frost are analogous stresses that can independently activate corresponding physiological processes in trees and amplify protection. This inevitable stress response 'collaboration' may be the key to understanding how non-dormant perennial plants survive the highly variable weather patterns of early winters in semi-arid environments.

  11. Bioassay-guided evaluation of anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities of pistachio, Pistacia vera L.

    PubMed

    Orhan, I; Küpeli, E; Aslan, M; Kartal, M; Yesilada, E

    2006-04-21

    The ethanolic and aqueous extracts prepared from different parts of Pistacia vera L. (Anacardiaceae) as well as its oleoresin were evaluated for their in vivo anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities. Among the extracts screened, only the oleoresin was shown to possess a marked anti-inflammatory activity against carrageenan-induced hind paw edema model in mice without inducing any gastric damage at both 250 and 500 mg/kg doses whereas the rest of the extracts were totally inactive. While the oleoresin was found to display significant antinociceptive activity at 500 mg/kg dose, the ethanolic and aqueous extracts belonging to fruit, leaf, branch and peduncle of Pistacia vera did not exhibit any noticeable antinociception in p-benzoquinone-induced abdominal contractions in mice. Fractionation of the oleoresin indicated the n-hexane fraction to be active, which further led to recognition of some monoterpenes, mainly alpha-pinene (77.5%) by capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) as well as the oleoresin itself. alpha-Pinene was also assessed for its antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities in the same manner and exerted a moderate anti-inflammatory effect at 500 mg/kg dose.

  12. Comparison of Mediterranean Pistacia lentiscus genotypes by random amplified polymorphic DNA, chemical, and morphological analyses.

    PubMed

    Barazani, Oz; Dudai, Nativ; Golan-Goldhirsh, Avi

    2003-08-01

    Characterization of the genetic variability of Mediterranean Pistacia lentiscus genotypes by RAPD, composition of essential oils, and morphology is presented. High polymorphism in morphological parameters was found among accessions, with no significant differences in relation to geographical origin, or to gender. GC-MS analysis of leaves extracted by t-butyl methyl ether, showed 12 monoterpenes, seven sesquiterpenes, and one linear nonterpenic compound. Cluster analysis divided the accessions into two main groups according to the relative content of the major compounds, with no relation to their geographical origin. In contrast, a dendrogram based on RAPD analysis gave two main clusters according to their geographical origins. Low correlation was found between genetic and essential oil content matrices. High morphological and chemical variability on one hand, and genotypic polymorphism on the other, provide ecological advantages that might explain the distribution of Pistacia lentiscus over a wide range of habitats. The plants under study were grown together in the same climatic and environmental conditions, thus pointing to the plausible genetic basis of the observed phenotypic differences.

  13. Effect of virgin fatty oil of Pistacia lentiscus on experimental burn wound's healing in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Djerrou, Zouhir; Maameri, Z; Hamdi-Pacha, Y; Serakta, M; Riachi, F; Djaalab, H; Boukeloua, A

    2010-04-03

    This study aimed to assess the efficiency of the virgin fatty oil of Pistacia lentiscus (PLVFO) for burn wounds healing. It was carried out on 6 adult male New Zealand rabbits. Four burn wounds of deep third degree were made on the back of each animal. The first was not treated and served as control (CRL group); the others were covered immediately after burning procedure by 0.5g of one of the following products: Vaseline gel (VAS group), Madecassol(®) cream 1% (MAD group) or 1ml of PLVFO (PLVFO group). The treatments were repeated once daily until complete healing. For four days post burns, the percentage of wound contraction was assessed. Also, the different healing times were noted. The results showed that both PLVFO and Madecassol(®) significantly accelerated wound healing activity compared to wounds dressed with Vaseline and the untreated wounds. However, the level of wound contraction was significantly higher and the healing time was faster in PLVFO group than those of the MAD group, VAS group and CRL group. The different epithelization periods obtained in days were respectively: 30±3.94 (PLVFO group), 33.5±3.78 (MAD group), 34.66±3.88 (VAS group) and 37.16±3.54 (CRL group). We conclude that Pistacia lentiscus virgin fatty oil promotes significantly (p< 0.05) wound contraction and reduces epithelization period in rabbit model.

  14. Phosphodiesterase-1 Inhibitory Activity of Two Flavonoids Isolated from Pistacia integerrima J. L. Stewart Galls

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Muhammad; Uddin, Ghias; Siddiqui, Bina S.; Khan, Haroon; Raza, Muslim; Hamid, Syeda Zehra; Khan, Ajmal; Maione, Francesco; Mascolo, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Pistacia integerrima is one of twenty species among the genus Pistacia. Long horn-shaped galls that develop on this plant are harvested and used in Ayurveda and Indian traditional medicine to make “karkatshringi”, a herbal medicine used for the treatment of asthma and different disorders of respiratory tract. However, until now, the molecular mechanisms of action of “karkatshringi” and its chemical characterization are partially known. This study deals with the isolation and characterization of the active constituents from the methanolic extract of P. integerrima galls and it was also oriented to evaluate in vitro and in silico their potential enzymatic inhibitory activity against phosphodiesterase-1 (PDE1), a well-known enzyme involved in airway smooth muscle activity and airway inflammation. Our results showed that the methanolic extract of P. integerrima galls and some of its active constituents [naringenin (1) and 3,5,7,4′-tetrahydroxy-flavanone (2)] are able in vitro to inhibit PDE1 activity (59.20 ± 4.95%, 75.90 ± 5.90%, and 65.25 ± 5.25%, resp.) and demonstrate in silico an interesting interaction with this enzymatic site. Taken together, our results add new knowledge of chemical constituents responsible for the biological activity of P. integerrima and contextually legitimate the use of this plant in folk medicine. PMID:25945110

  15. Contribution of gall microscopic structure to taxonomy of gallicolous aphids on Pistacia.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, R; Martinez, J-J I; Muñoz-Viveros, A L; Molist, P; Abad-González, J; Nieto Nafría, J M

    2016-09-01

    Aphids inducing galls on Pistacia plants belong to the tribe Fordini. According to the Heie & Wegierek classification, the genera are grouped into three subtribes. Previous microscopic studies showed that this taxonomy is not consistent with the histological characteristics of the galls. In this paper, galls induced by Aplonerura lentisci, Asiphonella cynodonti, Forda riccobonii, Slavun wertheimae and Smynthurodes betae were analyzed for the first time, as well as nine other galls previously described. Based on histological features three groups of galls can be establish: the first group comprises closed galls, induced by Baizongia pistaciae, Geoica utricularia, Rectinasus buxtoni and Slavun wertheimae; the second group includes two species of Geopemphigus (G. blackmani and G. torsus), and the third one is divided into two subgroups, the first comprises Aplonerura lentisci, Asiphonella cynodonti and Geopemphigus morral, and the second that includes Forda formicaria, F. marginata, F. riccobonii, Paracletus cimiciformis and Smynthurodes betae. An identification key of species based on microscopic features of galls is presented. © 2016 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  16. Marketing and Seedling Distribution of Longleaf Pine Seedlings

    Treesearch

    Mark J. Hainds

    2002-01-01

    The Longleaf Alliance, a partnership of people and organizations interested in longleaf pine, started tracking longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) seedling production in 1996. Total Longleaf seedling production has increased annually from 1996 to 2000. Bareroot seedling production decreased from 1996 to 1997, and decreased again from 1997 to 1998....

  17. Short-term effects of oral administration of Pistacia lentiscus oil on tissue-specific toxicity and drug metabolizing enzymes in mice.

    PubMed

    Attoub, Samir; Karam, Sherif M; Nemmar, Abderrahim; Arafat, Kholoud; John, Annie; Al-Dhaheri, Wafa; Al Sultan, Mahmood Ahmed; Raza, Haider

    2014-01-01

    Pistacia lentiscus (Anacardiaceae) is a flowering plant traditionally used in the treatment of various skin, respiratory, and gastrointestinal disorders. The aim of this study was to assess whether Pistacia lentiscus oil has any short term toxic effects in vivo and in vitro. Pistacia lentiscus oil (100µl) was administered orally into mice for 5 days. Measurements of body weight did not show any weight loss. Serum concentration of LDH did not show any significant statistical difference when compared to control mice. Similarly, blood, kidney or liver function tests showed no toxicity with Pistacia lentiscus oil when compared to the control group. Examination of gastrointestinal tissues sections revealed similar structural features with no difference in cell proliferation. In this context, pharmacological dilutions of Pistacia lentiscus oil (10(-6) - 10(-3)) did not affect the viability (cell death and proliferation) of mouse gastric stem cells, human colorectal cancer cells HT29, human hepatoma cells HepG2. However, it appears that at the dose and time point studied, Pistacia lentiscus oil treatment has targeted various cytochrome P450s and has specifically inhibited the activities and the expression of CYP2E1, CYP3A4, CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 differentially in different tissues. Our results also demonstrate that there is no appreciable effect of Pistacia lentiscus oil on the GSH-dependent redox homoeostasis and detoxification mechanism in the tissues. These data suggest a good safety profile of short term oral use of Pistacia lentiscus oil as a monotherapy in the treatment of various skin, respiratory, and gastrointestinal disorders. However, due to its inhibitory effect of various cytochrome P450s and mainly CYP3A4, this might have implications on the bioavailability and metabolism of drugs taken in combination with Pistacia lentiscus oil. More attention is needed when Pistacia lentiscus oil is intended to be uses in combination with other pharmacological agents in order

  18. Bacterial endosymbionts in the gills of the deep-sea wood-boring bivalves Xylophaga atlantica and Xylophaga washingtona.

    PubMed

    Distel, D L; Roberts, S J

    1997-04-01

    Bacterial endosymbionts found in gill tissues in several bivalve families convert otherwise unavailable energy sources (sulfide, methane, or cellulose) to forms readily metabolized by their hosts. We investigated the existence of such a symbiosis in two species of Xylophaga (family Pholadidae). The genus Xylophaga includes opportunistic species that are the predominant colonizers of wood at depths greater than 150 m. It has been hypothesized that, like their shallow-water counterparts the shipworms (family Teredinidae), species of Xylophaga utilize wood for nutrition. Results from transmission and scanning electron microscopy of X. atlantica and X. washingtona clearly demonstrate the presence of endosymbionts that resemble the shipworm endosymbionts both morphologically and in their anatomical location within the gills. Xylophaga and the teredinids both have a caecum packed with wood chips but lack the dense populations of microorganisms associated with cellulose digestion in termites or ruminants. These observations suggest that Xylophaga has evolved a symbiotic solution to wood digestion similar to that seen in shipworms. Hence, the Xylophaga symbiosis suggests a mechanism for the conversion of terrestrially derived cellulosic carbon from wood into animal biomass in the deep sea.

  19. Changes in oxidative stability, antioxidant capacity and phytochemical composition of Pistacia terebinthus oil with roasting.

    PubMed

    Durmaz, Gökhan; Gökmen, Vural

    2011-09-15

    The effect of roasting on oxidative stability, antioxidant capacity and the content of antioxidant phytochemicals in Pistacia terebinthus oil was investigated. Oils were extracted from P. terebinthus fruits roasted at 180°C for 0-40min. Roasting was found to cause an increase in the passage of phenolic compounds to the oil whereas the level of tocopherols, lutein and β-carotene was decreased. Antioxidant capacity and oxidative stability of P. terebinthus oil increased with roasting. As an indicator of the presence of Maillard reaction products in oil, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) level and colour intensity was measured and found to increase with increasing roasting time. Fatty acid composition was not affected significantly by roasting.

  20. Effects of ozone on the foliar histology of the mastic plant (Pistacia lentiscus L.).

    PubMed

    Reig-Armiñana, J; Calatayud, V; Cerveró, J; García-Breijo, F J; Ibars, A; Sanz, M J

    2004-11-01

    An open-top chamber study was conducted to investigate the tissue and cellular-level foliar effects of ozone (O3) on a Mediterranean evergreen species, the mastic plant (Pistacia lentiscus L.). Plants were exposed at three different O3 levels, and leaf samples were collected periodically from the beginning of the exposure. Although no visible foliar injury was evident, alterations of the plastids and vacuoles in the mesophyll were observed. Senescence processes were accelerated with an anomalous stacking of tannin vacuoles, and a reduction in the size and number of the chloroplasts. Overall, most of the modifications induced by O3 were consistent with previously reported observations on deciduous broadleaf species, with the exception of alterations in the cells covering the secretory channels, reported here as a new finding. Comments on the feasibility of using microscopy to validate O3 related field observations and subtle foliar injury are also given. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Ltd.

  1. [Effects of salt stress on germination and in vitro growth of pistachio (Pistacia vera L.)].

    PubMed

    Benmahioul, Benamar; Daguin, Florence; Kaid-Harche, Meriem

    2009-08-01

    In order to study the salinity tolerance of pistachio (Pistacia vera L.), embryos developed from mature seeds were isolated and cultured in vitro and subjected to different NaCl concentrations (0, 42.8, 85.5, 171.1 and 256.6 mM) for 30 days. The results showed that in vitro germination of embryonic axes was not affected by the salt concentration. However, the germinated embryo survival rates decreased from 100% for the control to 62.9% for the highest salt concentration (256.6 mM). In addition, the plantlet growth (length of aerial and root parts, number of leaf produced per embryo, as well as the production of total fresh and dry matter for both aerial parts and roots) showed significant differences according the various salt concentrations.

  2. Enlightening the past: analytical proof for the use of Pistacia exudates in ancient Egyptian embalming resins.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Tim M; Gradl, Manuela; Welte, Beatrix; Metzger, Michael; Pusch, Carsten M; Albert, Klaus

    2011-12-01

    Mastic, the resinous exudate of the evergreen shrub Pistacia lentiscus, is frequently discussed as one of the ingredients used for embalming in ancient Egypt. We show the identification of mastic in ancient Egyptian embalming resins by an unambiguous assignment of the mastic triterpenoid fingerprint consisting of moronic acid, oleanonic acid, isomasticadienonic and masticadienonic acid through the consolidation of NMR and GC/MS analysis. Differences in the observed triterpenoid fingerprints between mummy specimens suggest that more than one plant species served as the triterpenoid resin source. Analysis of the triterpenoid acids of ancient embalming resin samples in the form of their methyl- and trimethylsilyl esters is compared. In addition we show a simple way to differentiate between residues of mastic from its use as incense during embalming or from direct mastic application in the embalming resin. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Monitoring of pistachio (Pistacia Vera) ripening by high field nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sciubba, Fabio; Avanzato, Damiano; Vaccaro, Angela; Capuani, Giorgio; Spagnoli, Mariangela; Di Cocco, Maria Enrica; Tzareva, Irina Nikolova; Delfini, Maurizio

    2017-04-01

    The metabolic profiling of pistachio (Pistacia vera) aqueous extracts from two different cultivars, namely 'Bianca' and 'Gloria', was monitored over the months from May to September employing high field NMR spectroscopy. A large number of water-soluble metabolites were assigned by means of 1D and 2D NMR experiments. The change in the metabolic profiles monitored over time allowed the pistachio development to be investigated. Specific temporal trends of amino acids, sugars, organic acids and other metabolites were observed and analysed by multivariate Partial Least Squares (PLS) analysis. Statistical analysis showed that while in the period from May to September there were few differences between the two cultivars, the ripening rate was different.

  4. Choice of solvent extraction technique affects fatty acid composition of pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) oil.

    PubMed

    Abdolshahi, Anna; Majd, Mojtaba Heydari; Rad, Javad Sharifi; Taheri, Mehrdad; Shabani, Aliakbar; Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A

    2015-04-01

    Pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) oil has important nutritional and therapeutic properties because of its high concentration of essential fatty acids. The extraction method used to obtain natural compounds from raw material is critical for product quality, in particular to protect nutritional value. This study compared the fatty acid composition of pistachio oil extracted by two conventional procedures, Soxhlet extraction and maceration, analyzed by a gas chromatography-flame ionization detector (GC-FID). Four solvents with different polarities were tested: n-hexane (Hx), dichloromethane (DCM), ethyl acetate (EtAc) and ethanol (EtOH). The highest unsaturated fatty acid content (88.493 %) was obtained by Soxhlet extraction with EtAc. The Soxhlet method extracted the most oleic and linolenic acids (51.99 % and 0.385 %, respectively) although a higher concentration (36.32 %) of linoleic acid was extracted by maceration.

  5. In vitro antimicrobial activity of Pistacia lentiscus L. edible oil and phenolic extract.

    PubMed

    Mezni, F; Aouadhi, C; Khouja, M L; Khaldi, A; Maaroufi, A

    2015-01-01

    Pistacia lentiscus L. is known in some Tunisian forest area by its fixed oil used in traditional medicine as an antiseptic product. This investigation is the first to study the antimicrobial activity of P.lentiscus edible oil and its phenolic extract. Oil was extracted from fruits harvested from six provenances located in Tunisia. The antimicrobial activity was tested using disc diffusion assay and the broth dilution method. Kbouch and Sidi Zid oils were most efficient (p < 0.003) against, respectively, Staphylococcus aureus and Aspergillus niger with an inhibition zone of 9.33 mm. The phenolic extract had the largest spectrum of sensitive microorganisms. The minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration results showed that all strains were inhibited by both oil and extract.

  6. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis induced by the essential oil of Pistacia lentiscus.

    PubMed

    Zaraa, I; Ben Taazayet, S; Trojjet, S; El Euch, D; Chelly, I; Haouet, S; Mokni, M; Ben Osman, A

    2012-06-01

    Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) is an uncommon pustular eruption characterized by small nonfollicular pustules on an erythematous background, sometimes associated with fever and neutrophilia. Over 90% of cases are drug-induced; however, it can be caused in rare cases by other agents. We report two cases of AGEP secondary to ingestion of Pistacia lentiscus essential oil, the first two such cases to our knowledge. The cutaneous morphology, disease course and histological findings were consistent with a definite diagnosis of AGEP, based on the criteria of the EuroSCAR study group. These two cases highlight the need to consider herbal extracts as a potential rare cause of AGEP and to ensure the safety of herbal medicines.

  7. Antioxidant activity of Sicilian pistachio (Pistacia vera L. var. Bronte) nut extract and its bioactive components.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Carla; Tesoriere, Luisa; Butera, Daniela; Fazzari, Marco; Monastero, Massimo; Allegra, Mario; Livrea, Maria A

    2007-02-07

    Pistacia vera L. is the only species of Pistacia genus producing edible nuts. This paper investigates the antioxidant potential of a Sicilian variety of pistachio nut by chemical as well as biological assays and measured antioxidant vitamins and a number of antioxidant polyphenols in either the hydrophilic and/or the lipophilic nut extract. In accordance with the majority of foods, the total antioxidant activity, measured as a TAA test, was much higher (50-fold) in the hydrophilic than in the lipophilic extract. Substantial amounts of total phenols were measured. The hydrophilic extract inhibited dose-dependently both the metal-dependent and -independent lipid oxidation of bovine liver microsomes, and the Cu+2-induced oxidation of human low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Peroxyl radical-scavenging as well as chelating activity of nut components may be suggested to explain the observed inhibition patterns. Among tocopherols, gamma-tocopherol was the only vitamin E isomer found in the lipophilic extract that did not contain any carotenoid. Vitamin C was found only in a modest amount. The hydrophilic extract was a source of polyphenol compounds among which trans-resveratrol, proanthocyanidins, and a remarkable amount of the isoflavones daidzein and genistein, 3.68 and 3.40 mg per 100 g of edible nut, respectively, were evaluated. With the exception of isoflavones that appeared unmodified, the amounts of other bioactive molecules were remarkably reduced in the pistachio nut after roasting, and the total antioxidant activity decreased by about 60%. Collectively, our findings provide evidence that the Sicilian pistachio nut may be considered for its bioactive components and can effectively contribute to a healthy status.

  8. Oxidative stress-related liver dysfunction by sodium arsenite: Alleviation by Pistacia lentiscus oil.

    PubMed

    Klibet, Fahima; Boumendjel, Amel; Khiari, Mohamed; El Feki, Abdelfattah; Abdennour, Cherif; Messarah, Mahfoud

    2016-01-01

    Pistacia lentiscus L. (Anacardiaceae) is an evergreen shrub widely distributed throughout the Mediterranean region. Pistacia lentiscus oil (PLo) was particularly known in North African traditional medicine. Thus, people of these regions have used it externally to treat sore throats, burns and wounds, as well as they employed it internally for respiratory allergies. PLo is rich in essential fatty acids, vitamin E and polyphenols. As a very active site of metabolism, liver is reported to be susceptible to arsenic (As) intoxication. The present study evaluates the protective effect of PLo against sodium arsenite-induced hepatic dysfunction and oxidative stress in experimental Wistar rats. Twenty-eight rats were equally divided into four groups; the first served as a control, the remaining groups were respectively treated with PLo (3.3 mL/kg body weight), sodium arsenite (5.55 mg/kg body weight) and a combination of sodium arsenite and PLo. After 21 consecutive days, cellular functions were evaluated by hematological, biochemical and oxidative stress markers. A significant decrease in the levels of red blood cells, haemoglobin (p ≤ 0.001), hematocrit (p ≤ 0.001), reduced glutathione and metallothionein (p ≤ 0.05) associated with a significant increase of malondialdehyde (p ≤ 0.001) were noticed in the arsenic-exposed group when compared to the control. The As-treated group also exhibited an increase in hepatic antioxidant enzymes namely superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase (p ≤ 0.01) and catalase (p ≤ 0.05). However, the co-administration of PLo has relatively reduced arsenic effect. The results showed that arsenic intoxication disturbed the liver pro-oxidant/antioxidant status. PLo co-administration mitigates arsenic-induced oxidative damage in rat.

  9. Protective Effects of Pistacia lentiscus L. fruit extract against calcium oxalate monohydrate induced proximal tubular injury.

    PubMed

    Cheraft-Bahloul, Nassima; Husson, Cécile; Ourtioualous, Meriam; Sinaeve, Sébastien; Atmani, Djebbar; Stévigny, Caroline; Nortier, Joëlle L; Antoine, Marie-Hélène

    2017-09-14

    The world prevalence of kidney stones is increasing and plants are frequently used to treat urolithiasis. Pistacia lentiscus L, a plant which freely grows around the Mediterranean basin areas, is widely used for various pathologies. P. lentiscus has an important impact as it has economical value on top of its pharmacological interest. Decoctions of its aerial parts and/or resin are used to treat kidney stones. To in vitro assess the potential nephroprotective effect of Pistacia lentiscus ethanolic fruit extract (PLEF) on proximal tubular cells in response to the adhesion of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals. Human Kidney [HK]-2 cells were incubated with and without COM in the presence or absence of PLEF. Cell viability was measured by the resazurin assay. The expression of E-cadherin was analyzed by PCR. The extracellular production of H2O2 was measured by Amplex® Red H2O2 Assay. The numbers of detached or non-adherent COM crystals in the presence of PLEF were microscopically captured and counted using ImageJ software. The interaction of PLEF with COM and the effect of PLEF on crystal size were analyzed by flow cytometry. The spectrophotometric measurement of turbidity was performed for assessing the COM concentration. PLEF incubated with COM was able to increase the cell viability. The decrease of E-cadherin expression after incubation with COM was counteracted by PLEF. Overproduction of H2O2 induced by COM was also inhibited by PLEF. Observations using flow cytometry showed that interactions between PLEF and the COM crystals occurred. PLEF was also effective in reducing the particles size and in lowering COM concentration. Our data show that COM tubulotoxicity can be significantly reversed by PLEF -at least in part- via an inhibition of COM crystals adhesion onto the apical membrane. This early beneficial effect of PLEF needs to be further investigated as a useful strategy in nephrolithiasis prevention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights

  10. Helminths from an introduced species (Tupinambis merianae), and two endemic species (Trachylepis atlantica and Amphisbaena ridley) from Fernando de Noronha Archipelago, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ramalho, A C O; da Silva, R J; Schwartz, H O; Péres, A K

    2009-08-01

    The present study reports the occurrence of helminths in the introduced species Tupinambis merianae (tegu lizard), and in two endemic species Trachylepis atlantica (small lizard) and Amphisbaena ridleyi (two-head-snake lizard ), from Fernando de Noronha Archipelago, State of Pernambuco, Brazil. Nine species of helminths were found, mainly in the digestive tract and accessory organs, with the following prevalence (P) and mean infection intensity (MII). Tupinambis merianae: Diaphanocephalus galeatus (P = 96%, MII = 20.5), Spinicauda spinicauda (P = 100%, MII = 197.8), and Oochoristica sp.l (P = 20%, MII = 4.4). Trachylepis atlantica: Moaciria alvarengai (P = 20%, MII = 1.4), S. spinicauda (P = 92%, MII = 22.1), Mesocoelium monas (P = 4%, MII = 3.0), Platynosomum sp. (P = 8%, MII = 7.0), and Oochoristica sp.2 (P = 16%, MII = 1.25). Amphisbaena ridleyi: Aplectana albae (P = 96%, MII = 143.4), Thelandros alvarengai (P = 4%, MII = 1.0), Me. monas (P = 44%, MII = 2.8), Platynosomum sp. (P = 36%; MII = 13.8), and Oochoristica sp.2 (P = 48%; MII = 2.17). More than 80% of T. merianae were infected with 2, or more, helminth species. In Tr. atlantica, single-species infections were present in 50% of the specimens, but co-occurrence of 2 parasites was also high (41.7%). In A. ridleyi, multiple infections were more common, with up to 5 parasite species present. The helminth fauna observed allowed us to conclude that helminths can be carried together with their host when they colonize new geographic localities and that these introduced helminths can, in turn, colonize endemic, or native, hosts.

  11. [Acute toxicity and analgesic activity of the global extracts of Nepeta atlantica Ball and Nepeta tuberosa L. ssp. reticulata (Desf.) Maire].

    PubMed

    Bouidida, El Houcine; Alaoui, Katim; Cherrah, Yahia; Fkih-Tetouani, Souad; Idrissi, Abdelkader Il

    2006-01-01

    The global extracts of Nepeta atlantica Ball and Nepeta tuberosa L. ssp. reticulata (Desf.) Maire are especially rich in secondary metabolites of the type iridoid lactonique and glucosidique and of type lupane triterpine. The aerial part of each species is crushed, and then extracted by cold maceration in methanol. These total extracts are in the form of suspension in Arabic gum with 5%, they are tested on the mice for the tests of acute toxicity like for the peripheral analgesic activity according to the test of Koster; and also on the rats for the central analgesic activity of the morphine type based on the test "Tail Flick". The acute toxicity evaluation of these extracts follows upon the determination of the lethal amounts 50% of essential oils from these two species, already given it is specified here by the lethal dose 50% (DL50) of 1672 +/- 232 mg/kg with confidence limits [1030 - 2320] mg/kg for Nepeta atlantica and 1401 +/- 97.29 mg/kg with confidence limits [1130 - 1670] mg/kg for Nepeta tuberosa L. ssp. reticulata. The tests of Koster in the mouse and the "Tail Flik" in the rat showed that the global extracts of the studied species have all two greatly peripheral analgesic activity with an important protection against abdominal cramp 67.91% and 75.53% for 60 mg/kg IP respectively for Nepeta atlantica and Nepeta tuberosa L. ssp. Reticulata, which rise up to 90.10% and 92.89% for 120 mg/kg IP. A central morphine like analgesic activity is record with 120 mg/kg IP for the two species.

  12. Description of Two Species of Early Branching Dinoflagellates, Psammosa pacifica n. g., n. sp. and P. atlantica n. sp

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Noriko; Horák, Aleš; Keeling, Patrick J.

    2012-01-01

    In alveolate evolution, dinoflagellates have developed many unique features, including the cell that has epicone and hypocone, the undulating transverse flagellum. However, it remains unclear how these features evolved. The early branching dinoflagellates so far investigated such as Hematodinium, Amoebophrya and Oxyrrhis marina differ in many ways from of core dinoflagellates, or dinokaryotes. Except those handful of well studied taxa, the vast majority of early branching dinoflagellates are known only by environmental sequences, and remain enigmatic. In this study we describe two new species of the early branching dinoflagellates, Psammosa pacifica n. g., n. sp. and P. atlantica n. sp. from marine intertidal sandy beach. Molecular phylogeny of the small subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA and Hsp90 gene places Psammosa spp. as an early branch among the dinoflagellates. Morphologically (1) they lack the typical dinoflagellate epicone–hypocone structure, and (2) undulation in either flagella. Instead they display a mosaïc of dinokaryotes traits, i.e. (3) presence of bi-partite trychocysts; Oxyrrhis marina–like traits, i.e. (4) presence of flagellar hairs, (5) presence of two-dimensional cobweb scales ornamenting both flagella (6) transversal cell division; a trait shared with some syndineansand Parvilucifera spp. i.e. (7) a nucleus with a conspicuous nucleolus and condensed chromatin distributed beneath the nuclear envelope; as well as Perkinsus marinus -like features i.e. (8) separate ventral grooves where flagella emerge and (9) lacking dinoflagellate-type undulating flagellum. Notably Psammosa retains an apical complex structure, which is shared between perkinsids, colpodellids, chromerids and apicomplexans, but is not found in dinokaryotic dinoflagellates. PMID:22719825

  13. Description of two species of early branching dinoflagellates, Psammosa pacifica n. g., n. sp. and P. atlantica n. sp.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Noriko; Horák, Aleš; Keeling, Patrick J

    2012-01-01

    In alveolate evolution, dinoflagellates have developed many unique features, including the cell that has epicone and hypocone, the undulating transverse flagellum. However, it remains unclear how these features evolved. The early branching dinoflagellates so far investigated such as Hematodinium, Amoebophrya and Oxyrrhis marina differ in many ways from of core dinoflagellates, or dinokaryotes. Except those handful of well studied taxa, the vast majority of early branching dinoflagellates are known only by environmental sequences, and remain enigmatic. In this study we describe two new species of the early branching dinoflagellates, Psammosa pacifica n. g., n. sp. and P. atlantica n. sp. from marine intertidal sandy beach. Molecular phylogeny of the small subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA and Hsp90 gene places Psammosa spp. as an early branch among the dinoflagellates. Morphologically (1) they lack the typical dinoflagellate epicone-hypocone structure, and (2) undulation in either flagella. Instead they display a mosaïc of dinokaryotes traits, i.e. (3) presence of bi-partite trychocysts; Oxyrrhis marina-like traits, i.e. (4) presence of flagellar hairs, (5) presence of two-dimensional cobweb scales ornamenting both flagella (6) transversal cell division; a trait shared with some syndineansand Parvilucifera spp. i.e. (7) a nucleus with a conspicuous nucleolus and condensed chromatin distributed beneath the nuclear envelope; as well as Perkinsus marinus -like features i.e. (8) separate ventral grooves where flagella emerge and (9) lacking dinoflagellate-type undulating flagellum. Notably Psammosa retains an apical complex structure, which is shared between perkinsids, colpodellids, chromerids and apicomplexans, but is not found in dinokaryotic dinoflagellates.

  14. Cytoprotective Effects of Hydrophilic and Lipophilic Extracts of Pistacia vera against Oxidative Versus Carbonyl Stress in Rat Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shahraki, Jafar; Zareh, Mona; Kamalinejad, Mohammad; Pourahmad, Jalal

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the cytoprotection of various extracts and bioactive compounds found in Pistacia vera againts cytotoxicity, ROS formation, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation, mitochondrial and lysosomal membrane damages in cell toxicity models of diabetes related carbonyl (glyoxal) and oxidative stress (hydroperoxide). Methanol, water and ethyl acetate were used to prepare crude pistachios extracts, which were then used to screen for in-vitro cytoprotection of freshly isolated rat hepatocytes against these toxins. The order of protection by Pistacia vera extracts against both hydroperoxide induced oxidative stress (ROS formation) and glyoxal induced protein carbonylation was: pistachio methanolic extract >pistachio water extract, gallic acid, catechin> α-tochoferol and pistachio ethyl acetate extract. Finally due to higher protection achieved by methanolic extract even compared to sole pretreatment of gallic acid, catechin or α-tochoferol, we suggest that cytoprotection depends on the variety of polar and non-polar compounds found in methanolic extract, it is likely that multiple cytoprotective mechanisms are acting against oxidative and carbonyl induced cytotoxicity. To our knowledge, we are the first to report the cytoprotective activity of Pistacia vera extracts against oxidative and carbonyl stress seen in type 2 diabetes hepatocytes model. PMID:25587316

  15. Sensitivity of Mediterranean woody seedlings to copper, nickel and zinc.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, David; Disante, Karen B; Valdecantos, Alejandro; Cortina, Jordi; Vallejo, V Ramón

    2007-01-01

    The restoration of heavy metal contaminated areas requires information on the response of native plant species to these contaminants. The sensitivity of most Mediterranean woody species to heavy metals has not been established, and little is known about phytotoxic thresholds and environmental risks. We have evaluated the response of four plant species commonly used in ecological restoration, Pinus halepensis, Pistacia lentiscus, Juniperus oxycedrus, and Rhamnus alaternus, grown in nutrient solutions containing a range of copper, nickel and zinc concentrations. Seedlings of these species were exposed to 0.048, 1 and 4 microM of Cu; 0, 25 and 50 microM of Ni; and 0.073, 25 and 100 microM of Zn in a hydroponic silica sand culture for 12 weeks. For all four species, the heavy metal concentration increased in plants as the solution concentration increased and was always higher in roots than in shoots. Pinus halepensis and P. lentiscus showed a higher capacity to accumulate metals in roots than J. oxycedrus and R. alaternus, while the allocation to shoots was considerably higher in the latter two. Intermediate heavy-metal doses enhanced biomass accumulation, whereas the highest doses resulted in reductions in biomass. Decreases in shoot biomass occurred at internal concentrations ranging from 25 to 128 microg g-1 of Zn, and 1.7 to 4.1 microg g( -1) of Cu. Nickel phytoxicity could not be established within the range of doses used. Rhamnus alaternus and J. oxycedrus showed higher sensitivity to Cu and Zn than P. halepensis and, especially, P. lentiscus. Contrasted responses to heavy metals must be taken into account when using Mediterranean woody species for the restoration of heavy metal contaminated sites.

  16. Reducing Seed and Seedlings Pathogens Improves Longleaf Pine Seedlings Production

    Treesearch

    James P. Barnett; John M. McGilvray

    2002-01-01

    The demand for container longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) planting stock is increasing across the Lower Gulf Coastal Plain. Poor-quality seeds and seedling losses during nursery culture further constrain a limited seed supply. Improved seed efficiency will be necessary to meet the need for increased seedling production. We evaluated seed...

  17. Forest seedling production in Israel

    Treesearch

    Nir Atzmon; David Brand

    2002-01-01

    Afforestation and reforestation in Israel are done on marginal lands, which consist of poor and shallow soils, with precipitation ranging from 650 mm in the north down to 200 mm in the south. Therefore, seedling quality is of great concern. All forest seedlings planted in Israel are produced by three forest nurseries which belong to the Forest Authority of Israel....

  18. Antinociceptive and Anti-inflammatory Effects of Pistacia vera LeafExtract in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinzadeh, Hossein; Behravan, Effat; M Soleimani, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Pistacia vera L., a member of Anacardiaceae family, has been used for sedation and analgesia in traditional medicine. In this study, the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects as well as acute toxicity of the aqueous and ethanolic extracts of P. vera leaves were investigated in mice. The antinociceptive activity was studied using hot plate and writhing tests. The effect of the extracts against acute inflammation was determined using xylene-induced ear edema and the activity of the extracts, against chronic inflammation, was assessed using the cotton pellet test. The LD50 values of the infusion and maceration extracts were 0.8 g/Kg and 0.79 g/Kg, respectively. The aqueous and ethanolic maceration extracts of the P. vera leaves at the doses of 0.4 g/Kg and 0.5 g/Kg (IP), respectively, showed antinociceptive effects. The pretreatment of naloxone (2 mg/Kg, SC) inhibited the activities of extracts in hot plate test, but naloxone at the same dose could not inhibit the antinociceptive activity in writhing test. The extracts also showed anti-inflammatory effects in acute and chronic anti-inflammatory tests. The ethanolic extract was as effective as diclofenac in both inflammatory tests. The aqueous and ethanolic extracts of P. vera leaves demonstrated central and peripheral antinociceptive activities dose-dependently and the central effect may be mediated by opioid system. The extracts also demonstrated anti-inflammatory effects against acute and chronic inflammation. PMID:24250418

  19. Oleanonic acid, a 3-oxotriterpene from Pistacia, inhibits leukotriene synthesis and has anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Giner-Larza, E M; Máñez, S; Recio, M C; Giner, R M; Prieto, J M; Cerdá-Nicolás, M; Ríos, J L

    2001-09-28

    One of the best known bioactive triterpenoids is oleanolic acid, a widespread 3-hydroxy-17-carboxy oleanane-type compound. In order to determine whether further oxidation of carbon 3 affects anti-inflammatory activity in mice, different tests were carried out on oleanolic acid and its 3-oxo-analogue oleanonic acid, which was obtained from Pistacia terebinthus galls. The last one showed activity on the ear oedema induced by 12-deoxyphorbol-13-phenylacetate (DPP), the dermatitis induced by multiple applications of 12-O-tetradecanoyl-13-acetate (TPA) and the paw oedemas induced by bradykinin and phospholipase A2. The production of leukotriene B4 from rat peritoneal leukocytes was reduced by oleanonic acid with an IC50 of 17 microM. Negligible differences were observed in the response of both triterpenes to DPP, bradykinin, and phospholipase A2, while oleanonic acid was more active on the dermatitis by TPA and on the in vitro leukotriene formation. In conclusion, the presence of a ketone at C-3 implies an increase in the inhibitory effects on models related to 5-lipoxygenase activity and on associated in vivo inflammatory processes.

  20. Quantitation of fatty acids, sterols, and tocopherols in turpentine (Pistacia terebinthus Chia) growing wild in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Matthäus, Bertrand; Ozcan, Mehmet Musa

    2006-10-04

    The chemical composition (fatty acids, tocopherols, and sterols) of the oil from 14 samples of turpentine (Pistacia terebinthus L.) fruits is presented in this study. The oil content of the samples varied in a relatively small range between 38.4 g/100 g and 45.1 g/100 g. The dominating fatty acid of the oil is oleic acid, which accounted for 43.0 to 51.3% of the total fatty acids. The total content of vitamin E active compounds in the oils ranged between 396.8 and 517.7 mg/kg. The predominant isomers were alpha- and gamma-tocopherol, with approximate equal amounts between about 110 and 150 mg/kg. The seed oil of P. terebinthus also contained different tocotrienols, with gamma-tocotrienol as the dominate compound of this group, which amounted to between 79 and 114 mg/kg. The total content of sterols of the oils was determined to be between 1341.3 and 1802.5 mg/kg, with beta-sitosterol as the predominent sterol that accounted for more than 80% of the total amount of sterols. Other sterols in noteworthy amounts were campesterol, Delta5-avenasterol, and stigmasterol, which came to about 3-5% of the total sterols.

  1. Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Effects of Pistacia lentiscus L. Extracts in Pork Sausages

    PubMed Central

    Botsaris, George; Orphanides, Antia; Yiannakou, Evgenia; Gekas, Vassilis

    2015-01-01

    Summary Pistacia lentiscus fruits are ingredients of traditional Cypriot sausages. The objective of this study is to evaluate P. lentiscus extracts as natural additives to the sausages. First, the phenolic content and antioxidant activity of fruit and leaf extracts were determined. Results revealed that leaves are richer source of polyphenolic antioxidants than fruits, with methanol being the better extraction solvent. In the next step, the antioxidant and antimicrobial effects of methanolic extracts (300 mg/kg) in the pork sausage formulation were investigated. Peroxide, acid and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance values demonstrated that both fruit and leaf extracts reduced the rate of lipid oxidation of sausages at 4 °C. Total viable count revealed significant differences on the fifth day of storage, with better microbial inhibition by leaf extract. No significant differences between the extracts were observed after the tenth day of storage. Overall, the extracts can be used to prevent lipid oxidation and reduce microbial spoilage during the first days of storage of fresh traditional pork sausages. PMID:27904382

  2. In Vitro and In Vivo Antileishmanial Effects of Pistacia khinjuk against Leishmania tropica and Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Ezatpour, Behrouz; Saedi Dezaki, Ebrahim; Mahmoudvand, Hossein; Azadpour, Mojgan; Ezzatkhah, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo antileishmanial activities of Pistacia khinjuk Stocks (Anacardiaceae) alcoholic extract and to compare its efficacy with a reference drug, meglumine antimoniate (MA, Glucantime), against Leishmania tropica and Leishmania major. This extract (0-100 µg/mL) was evaluated in vitro against promastigote and intracellular amastigote forms of L. tropica (MRHO/IR/75/ER) and then tested on cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) in male BALB/c mice with L. major to reproduce the antileishmanial activity topically. In vitro, P. khinjuk extract significantly (P < 0.05) inhibited the growth rate of promastigote (IC50 58.6 ± 3.2 µg/mL) and intramacrophage amastigotes (37.3 ± 2.5 µg/mL) of L. tropica as a dose-dependent response. In the in vivo assay, after 30 days of treatment, 75% recovery was observed in the infected mice treated with 30% extract. After treatment of the subgroups with the concentration of 20 and 30% of P. khinjuk extract, mean diameter of lesions was significantly (P < 0.05) reduced. To conclude, the present investigation demonstrated that P. vera extract had in vitro and in vivo effectiveness against L. major. Obtained findings also provide the scientific evidences that natural plants could be used in the traditional medicine for the prevention and treatment of CL.

  3. Pistacia lentiscus fruit oil reduces oxidative stress in human skin explants caused by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Ben Khedir, S; Moalla, D; Jardak, N; Mzid, M; Sahnoun, Z; Rebai, T

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the efficacy of Pistacia lentiscus fruit oil (PLFO) for protecting human skin from damage due to oxidative stress. PLFO contains natural antioxidants including polyphenols, sterols and tocopherols. We compared the antioxidant potential of PLFO with extra virgin olive oil (EVOO). Explants of healthy adult human skin were grown in culture with either PLFO or EVOO before adding hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). We also used cultured skin explants to investigate the effects of PLFO on lipid oxidation and depletion of endogenous antioxidant defense enzymes including glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) one day after 2 h exposure to H2O2. We found that PLFO scavenged radicals and protected skin against oxidative injury. PLFO exhibited greater antioxidant and free radical scavenging activity than EVOO. Skin explants treated with PLFO inhibited H2O2 induced MDA formation by inhibition of lipid oxidation. In addition, the oil inhibited H2O2 induced depletion of antioxidant defense enzymes including GPx, SOD and CAT. We found that treatment with PLFO repaired skin damage owing to its antioxidant properties.

  4. Seasonal carbohydrate storage and mobilization in bearing and non-bearing pistachio (Pistacia vera) trees.

    PubMed

    Spann, Timothy M; Beede, Robert H; Dejong, Theodore M

    2008-02-01

    We analyzed annual carbohydrate storage and mobilization of bearing ("on") and non-bearing ("off") 'Kerman' pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) trees growing on three different rootstocks. On all rootstocks, carbohydrate storage in shoots and branches of "on" and "off" trees was lowest following the spring growth flush. In "off" trees, stored carbohydrates increased and remained high after the initial growth flush. In "on" trees, stem carbohydrates increased temporarily in early summer, but were mobilized in mid-season during kernel fill, and then increased again after nut harvest. During the dormant season, the only substantial differences in carbohydrate storage between previously "on" and "off" trees were found in the roots of the weakest rootstock. The annual carbohydrate storage and mobilization pattern in canopy branches of heavily cropped pistachio trees appeared to be driven by carbohydrate demands related to nut development and untempered by tree vigor. Mobilization of carbohydrates from current-season and 1- and 2-year-old stem wood of "on" trees during the primary period of kernel fill corresponded with the period of inflorescence bud abscission. Thus, the alternate bearing pattern associated with inflorescence bud abscission in 'Kerman' pistachio may be a function of mid-season mobilization of stored carbohydrates in current-season stems resulting in stimulation of inflorescence bud abscission.

  5. Pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) is a new natural host of Hop stunt viroid.

    PubMed

    Elleuch, Amine; Hamdi, Imen; Ellouze, Olfa; Ghrab, Mohamed; Fkahfakh, Hatem; Drira, Noureddine

    2013-10-01

    Besides hop, Hop stunt viroid (HpSVd) infects many woody species including grapevine, citrus, peach, plum, apricot, almond, pomegranate, mulberry and jujube. Here, we report the first detection of HpSVd in pistachio (Pistacia vera L.). Samples corresponding to 16 pistachio cultivars were obtained from a nearby almond collection. From these samples, low molecular weight RNAs were extracted for double polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, northern-blot analysis and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays. HpSVd was detected in 4 of the 16 pistachio cultivars in the first year and in 6 in the second, being also detected in the almond collection. Examination of the nucleotide sequences of pistachio and almond isolates revealed 13 new sequence variants. Sequences from pistachio shared 92-96 % similarity with the first reported HpSVd sequence (GenBank X00009), and multiple alignment and phylogenetic analyses showed that one pistachio isolate (HpSVdPis67Jabari) clustered with the plum group, whereas all the others clustered with the hop, and the recombinants plum-citrus and plum-Hop/cit3 groups. By identifying pistachio as a new natural host, we confirm that HpSVd is an ubiquitous and genetically variable viroid that infects many different fruit trees cultivated worldwide.

  6. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of flavonoids isolated from Pistacia integerrima galls.

    PubMed

    Rauf, Abdur; Uddin, Ghias; Siddiqui, Bina S; Khan, Haroon; Shah, Syed Uzair Ali; Ben Hadda, Taibi; Mabkhot, Yahia Nasser; Farooq, Umar; Khan, Ajmal

    2016-04-01

    The present study deals with the anti-hyperalgesic and anti-inflammtory effects of flavonoids (1-4) isolated from the chloroform fraction of Pistacia integerrima galls. The structure of isolated compounds was elucidated by using advance spectroscopy analysis and comparing their physical spectral data with reported one. The pretreatment of compounds (1-4) caused significant anti-hyperalgesic effects in acetic acid induced writhing test in a dose dependent manner. The compounds strongly complimented the effects in both phases of formalin test. However, the administration of naloxone did not abolish the induced antinociceptive effects and therefore suggested the absence of opioid receptor involvement. The pretreatment of flavonoids (1-4) elicited marked anti-inflammtory effects in carrageenan induced paw edema test in mice during various assessment times (1-5 h). The effects were dose dependent and maximum results were observed after 3rd h of treatments which remained significant up to 5th hour. It is concluded that the isolated flavonoids (1-4) possessed strong anti-hyperalgesic and anti-inflammtory activity and thus are strong candidates for further detail studies.

  7. Triacylglycerols and aliphatic alcohols from fruits of three Tunisian Pistacia lentiscus populations.

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, Hajer; Renaud, Justin; Herchi, Wahid; Boukhchina, Sadok; Mayer, Paul

    2015-08-15

    The search for other sources of vegetable oils by the exploitation and the enhancement of other oil plants will be needed to meet the demands of the international market. This study aims to determine the triacylglycerol (TAG) molecular species and aliphatic alcohol compositions of unexploited fruits of three Tunisian Pistacia lentiscus (lentisc) populations from the Korbous, Tebaba and Rimel areas of Tunisia. Results show that the content of total TAG varies from 738.32 mg g(-1) of total lipid in the Tebaba population to 981.15 mg g(-1) of total lipid in the Korbous population. Furthermore, 14 species of TAG were detected in the three studied populations. In addition, 13 aliphatic compounds were identified and classified into two groups: (1) aliphatic alcohols with fewer than 20 carbon atoms (hexadecanol, heptadecanol, (Z)-octadec-9-en-1-ol, octadecanol and nonadécanol); and (2) the policosanol group (eicosenol, docosenol, docosanol tetracosanol, hexacosanol octacosanol and triacontanol). The Tebaba population showed a distinct composition compared to Korbous and Rimel where heptadecanol is the major compound. Quantitatively, the most abundant TAG species are those constituted by palmitic, oleic and/or linoleic acid. Furthermore, the significant difference observed at the oil composition is associated with a remarkable station effect. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. In Vitro and In Vivo Antileishmanial Effects of Pistacia khinjuk against Leishmania tropica and Leishmania major

    PubMed Central

    Saedi Dezaki, Ebrahim; Mahmoudvand, Hossein; Azadpour, Mojgan; Ezzatkhah, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo antileishmanial activities of Pistacia khinjuk Stocks (Anacardiaceae) alcoholic extract and to compare its efficacy with a reference drug, meglumine antimoniate (MA, Glucantime), against Leishmania tropica and Leishmania major. This extract (0–100 µg/mL) was evaluated in vitro against promastigote and intracellular amastigote forms of L. tropica (MRHO/IR/75/ER) and then tested on cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) in male BALB/c mice with L. major to reproduce the antileishmanial activity topically. In vitro, P. khinjuk extract significantly (P < 0.05) inhibited the growth rate of promastigote (IC50 58.6 ± 3.2 µg/mL) and intramacrophage amastigotes (37.3 ± 2.5 µg/mL) of L. tropica as a dose-dependent response. In the in vivo assay, after 30 days of treatment, 75% recovery was observed in the infected mice treated with 30% extract. After treatment of the subgroups with the concentration of 20 and 30% of P. khinjuk extract, mean diameter of lesions was significantly (P < 0.05) reduced. To conclude, the present investigation demonstrated that P. vera extract had in vitro and in vivo effectiveness against L. major. Obtained findings also provide the scientific evidences that natural plants could be used in the traditional medicine for the prevention and treatment of CL. PMID:25815025

  9. Sex-related differences in lipid peroxidation and photoprotection in Pistacia lentiscus.

    PubMed

    Juvany, Marta; Müller, Maren; Pintó-Marijuan, Marta; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2014-03-01

    Sex-related differences in the response of dioecious plants to abiotic stress have been poorly studied to date. This work explored to what extent sex may affect plant stress responses in Pistacia lentiscus L. (Anacardiaceae), a tree well adapted to Mediterranean climatic conditions. It was hypothesized that a greater reproductive effort in females may increase oxidative stress in leaves, particularly when plants are exposed to abiotic stress. Measurements of oxidative stress markers throughout the year revealed increased lipid peroxidation in females, but only during the winter. Enhanced lipid peroxidation in females was associated with reduced photoprotection, as indicated by reduced tocopherol levels and nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) of chlorophyll fluorescence. Enhanced lipid peroxidation in females was also observed at predawn, which was associated with increased lipoxygenase activity and reduced cytokinin levels. An analysis of the differences between reproductive (R) and nonreproductive (NR) shoots showed an enhanced photoprotective capacity in R shoots compared to NR shoots in females. This capacity was characterized by an increased NPQ and a better antioxidant protection (increased carotenoid and tocopherol levels per unit of chlorophyll) in R compared to NR shoots. It is concluded that (i) females exhibit higher lipid peroxidation in leaves than males, but only during the winter (when sex-related differences in reproductive effort are the highest), (ii) this is associated with a lower photoprotective capacity at midday, as well as enhanced lipoxygenase activity and reduced cytokinin levels at predawn, and (iii) photoprotection capacity is higher in R relative to NR shoots in females.

  10. Sex-related differences in lipid peroxidation and photoprotection in Pistacia lentiscus

    PubMed Central

    Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2014-01-01

    Sex-related differences in the response of dioecious plants to abiotic stress have been poorly studied to date. This work explored to what extent sex may affect plant stress responses in Pistacia lentiscus L. (Anacardiaceae), a tree well adapted to Mediterranean climatic conditions. It was hypothesized that a greater reproductive effort in females may increase oxidative stress in leaves, particularly when plants are exposed to abiotic stress. Measurements of oxidative stress markers throughout the year revealed increased lipid peroxidation in females, but only during the winter. Enhanced lipid peroxidation in females was associated with reduced photoprotection, as indicated by reduced tocopherol levels and nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) of chlorophyll fluorescence. Enhanced lipid peroxidation in females was also observed at predawn, which was associated with increased lipoxygenase activity and reduced cytokinin levels. An analysis of the differences between reproductive (R) and nonreproductive (NR) shoots showed an enhanced photoprotective capacity in R shoots compared to NR shoots in females. This capacity was characterized by an increased NPQ and a better antioxidant protection (increased carotenoid and tocopherol levels per unit of chlorophyll) in R compared to NR shoots. It is concluded that (i) females exhibit higher lipid peroxidation in leaves than males, but only during the winter (when sex-related differences in reproductive effort are the highest), (ii) this is associated with a lower photoprotective capacity at midday, as well as enhanced lipoxygenase activity and reduced cytokinin levels at predawn, and (iii) photoprotection capacity is higher in R relative to NR shoots in females. PMID:24378602

  11. Effect of growing area on tocopherols, carotenoids and fatty acid composition of Pistacia lentiscus edible oil.

    PubMed

    Mezni, F; Khouja, M L; Gregoire, S; Martine, L; Khaldi, A; Berdeaux, O

    2014-01-01

    In this investigation, we aim to study, for the first time, the effect of the growing area on tocopherols, carotenoids and fatty acid content of Pistacia lentiscus fixed oil. Fruits were harvested from eight different sites located in the north and the centre of Tunisia. Tocopherols, carotenoids and fatty acid content of the fixed oils were determined. The highest carotenoid content was exhibited by Feija oil (10.57 mg/kg of oil). Oueslatia and Tabarka oils displayed the highest α-tocopherol content (96.79 and 92.79 mg/kg of oil, respectively). Three major fatty acids were determined: oleic, palmitic and linoleic acids. Oleic acid was the main fatty acid presenting more than 50% of the total fatty acid content. Kebouche oil presented the highest oleic acid content (55.66%). All these results highlight the richness of carotenoids, tocopherols and unsaturated fatty acids in P. lentiscus seed oil and underscore the nutritional value of this natural product.

  12. A metabolite-profiling approach allows the identification of new compounds from Pistacia lentiscus leaves.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Pérez, C; Quirantes-Piné, R; Amessis-Ouchemoukh, N; Madani, K; Segura-Carretero, A; Fernández-Gutierrez, A

    2013-04-15

    Pistacia lentiscus L., commonly known as Mastic tree or lentisk, is a Mediterranean evergreen shrub widely used in traditional medicine to treat such diseases as eczema, diarrhoea, and throat infections. Furthermore, other properties are currently attributed to P. lentiscus, such as antioxidant capacity, hepatoprotective action, and anti-inflammatory effects. High-performance liquid chromatography with diode array coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS) was used for the comprehensive characterization of methanol extract from P. lentiscus leaves. After the optimisation of the HPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS method and the use of the negative ionization mode, 46 different compounds were identified, 20 of which were tentatively characterized for the first time in P. Lentiscus leaves. The majority of the compounds were quantified. Flavonoids, phenolic acids and their derivatives were the most abundant compounds, those with the highest concentrations being myricetin glycoside (6216.13 mg/kg of plant), catechin (3354.78 mg/kg of plant), β-glucogallin (2214.461 mg/kg of plant), and quercitrin gallate (1160 mg/kg of plant). The importance of the knowledge of plants is increasing and our study may help in the future to formulate nutraceutical preparations and will provide the basis for new investigation into activities of the various compounds found in P. lentiscus.

  13. Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Effects of Pistacia lentiscus L. Extracts in Pork Sausages.

    PubMed

    Botsaris, George; Orphanides, Antia; Yiannakou, Evgenia; Gekas, Vassilis; Goulas, Vlasios

    2015-12-01

    Pistacia lentiscus fruits are ingredients of traditional Cypriot sausages. The objective of this study is to evaluate P. lentiscus extracts as natural additives to the sausages. First, the phenolic content and antioxidant activity of fruit and leaf extracts were determined. Results revealed that leaves are richer source of polyphenolic antioxidants than fruits, with methanol being the better extraction solvent. In the next step, the antioxidant and antimicrobial effects of methanolic extracts (300 mg/kg) in the pork sausage formulation were investigated. Peroxide, acid and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance values demonstrated that both fruit and leaf extracts reduced the rate of lipid oxidation of sausages at 4 °C. Total viable count revealed significant differences on the fifth day of storage, with better microbial inhibition by leaf extract. No significant differences between the extracts were observed after the tenth day of storage. Overall, the extracts can be used to prevent lipid oxidation and reduce microbial spoilage during the first days of storage of fresh traditional pork sausages.

  14. Identification and quantification of galloyl derivatives, flavonoid glycosides and anthocyanins in leaves of Pistacia lentiscus L.

    PubMed

    Romani, A; Pinelli, P; Galardi, C; Mulinacci, N; Tattini, M

    2002-01-01

    Separation, identification and quantification of polyphenols was carried out on leaves of Pistacia lentiscus L., an evergreen member of the family Anacardiaceae, using semi-preparative HPLC, HPLC-photodiode array detection and HPLC-MS analysis, together with 1H- and 13C NMR. Three major classes of secondary metabolites were detected: (i) gallic acid and galloyl derivatives of both glucose and quinic acid; (ii) flavonol glycosides, i.e. myricetin and quercetin glycosides; and (iii) anthocyanins, namely delphinidin 3-O-glucoside and cyanidin 3-O-glucoside. Low amounts of catechin were also detected. The concentration of galloyl derivatives was extremely high, representing 5.3% of the leaf dry weight, and appreciable amounts of myricetin derivatives were also detected (1.5% on a dry weight basis). These findings may be useful in establishing a relationship between the chemical composition of the leaf extract and the previously reported biological activity of P. lentiscus, and may also assign a new potential role of P. lentiscus tissue extracts in human health care.

  15. Cryopreservation of Pistacia spp. seeds by dehydration and one-step freezing.

    PubMed

    Ozden-Tokatli, Y; Ozudogru, E A; Gumusel, F; Lambardi, M

    2007-01-01

    Cryopreservation protocols by dehydration and one-step freezing were developed for seeds from three Pistacia species, i.e., P. vera, P. terebinthus and P. lentiscus, which were characterised by different initial germination percentages (100%, 17% and 81%, respectively). In P. vera, a maximum of 90% germination was obtained following 8 hours drying in silica gel (corresponding to 11.7% moisture content on a FW basis) and direct immersion in LN. In P. terebinthus and P. lentiscus, shorter periods of dehydration (1 hour and 15 min, respectively) were sufficient to reduce their moisture content to about 20%, which resulted in peak seed germination percentages from cryostorage of 16% and 47%, respectively. Following cryopreservation, the seeds germinated better on semi-solid MS medium, than on cotton wool wetted with dH(2)O or liquid MS medium. Finally, in P. vera and P. lentiscus, high and significant correlation coefficients were obtained between the TTC viability test and seed germinability after recovery from LN, provided that seeds which were considered positive in the test showed completely or partially red embryonic axes coupled to completely red cotyledons.

  16. Molecular Evaluation of Genetic Diversity in Wild-Type Mastic Tree (Pistacia lentiscus L.).

    PubMed

    Abuduli, Alimu; Aydin, Yıldız; Sakiroglu, Muhammet; Onay, Ahmet; Ercisli, Sezai; Uncuoglu, Ahu Altinkut

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the patterns of genetic variation and phylogenetic relationships of mastic tree (Pistacia lentiscus L.) genotypes including 12 males and 12 females were evaluated using SSR, RAPD, ISSR, and ITS markers yielding 40, 703, 929 alleles, and 260-292 base pairs for ITS1 region, respectively. The average number of alleles produced from SSR, RAPD, and ISSR primers were 5.7, 14, and 18, respectively. The grouping pattern obtained from Bayesian clustering method based on each marker dataset was produced. Principal component analyses (PCA) of molecular data was investigated and neighbor joining dendrograms were subsequently created. Overall, the results indicated that ISSR and RAPD markers were the most powerful to differentiate the genotypes in comparison with other types of molecular markers used in this study. The ISSR results indicated that male and female genotypes were distinctly separated from each other. In this frame, M9 (Alaçatı) and M10 (Mesta Sakız Adası-Chios) were the closest genotypes and while F11 (Seferihisar) and F12 (Bornova/Gökdere) genotypes fall into same cluster and showing closer genetic relation. The RAPD pattern indicated that M8 (Urla) and M10 (Mesta Sakız Adası-Chios), and F10 (Mesta Sakız Adası-Chios) and F11 (Seferihisar) genotypes were the closest male and female genotypes, respectively.

  17. Evaluation of hepatoprotective effect of Pistacia lentiscus, Phillyrea latifolia and Nicotiana glauca.

    PubMed

    Janakat, Sana; Al-Merie, Hela

    2002-11-01

    The hepatoprotective effect of the boiled and non-boiled aqueous extracts of Pistacia lentiscus, Phillyrea latifolia, and Nicotiana glauca, that are alleged to be effective in the treatment of jaundice in Jordanian folk medicine, was evaluated in vivo using carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4)) intoxicated rats as an experimental model. Plant extracts were administrated orally at a dose of 4 ml/kg body weight, containing various amounts of solid matter. Only total serum bilirubin level was reduced by treatment with non-boiled aqueous extract of N. glauca leaves, while the boiled and non-boiled aqueous extracts of the N. glauca flowers were non effective. Bilirubin level and the activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were both reduced upon treatment with boiled aqueous extract of P. latifolia without reducing the activity of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST). Aqueous extract of P. lentiscus (both boiled and non-boiled) showed marked antihepatotoxic activity against CCl(4) by reducing the activity of the three enzymes and the level of bilirubin. The effect of the non-boiled aqueous extract was more pronounced than that of the boiled extract.

  18. Microscopic biomineralization processes and Zn bioavailability: a synchrotron-based investigation of Pistacia lentiscus L. roots.

    PubMed

    De Giudici, G; Medas, D; Meneghini, C; Casu, M A; Gianoncelli, A; Iadecola, A; Podda, S; Lattanzi, P

    2015-12-01

    Plants growing on polluted soils need to control the bioavailability of pollutants to reduce their toxicity. This study aims to reveal processes occurring at the soil-root interface of Pistacia lentiscus L. growing on the highly Zn-contaminated tailings of Campo Pisano mine (SW Sardinia, Italy), in order to shed light on possible mechanisms allowing for plant adaptation. The study combines conventional X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with advanced synchrotron-based techniques, micro-X-ray fluorescence mapping (μ-XRF) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Data analysis elucidates a mechanism used by P. lentiscus L. as response to high Zn concentration in soil. In particular, P. lentiscus roots take up Al, Si and Zn from the rhizosphere minerals in order to build biomineralizations that are part of survival strategy of the species, leading to formation of a Si-Al biomineralization coating the root epidermis. XAS analysis rules out Zn binding to organic molecules and indicates that Zn coordinates Si atoms stored in root epidermis leading to the precipitation of an amorphous Zn-silicate. These findings represent a step forward in understanding biological mechanisms and the resulting behaviour of minor and trace elements during plant-soil interaction and will have significant implications for development of phytoremediation techniques.

  19. Cavitation, stomatal conductance, and leaf dieback in seedlings of two co-occurring Mediterranean shrubs during an intense drought.

    PubMed

    Vilagrosa, A; Bellot, J; Vallejo, V R; Gil-Pelegrin, E

    2003-09-01

    Seedling shrubs in the Mediterranean semi-arid climate are subjected to intense droughts during summer. Thus, seedlings often surpass their limits of tolerance to water stress, resulting in the loss of hydraulic conductivity due to xylem cavitation. The response in terms of stomatal conductance, vulnerability to cavitation, leaf dieback, and survival were analysed in two co-occurring seedlings of mastic tree (Pistacia lentiscus L.) and kermes oak (Quercus coccifera L.) during an intense drought period. Both species reacted to drought with steep decreases in stomatal conductance before the critical water potential brought about the onset of cavitation events. Q. coccifera showed wider safety margins for avoiding runaway embolism than P. lentiscus and these differences could be related to the particular drought strategy displayed by each species: water saver or water spender. The limits for survival, resprout capacity and leaf dieback were also analysed in terms of loss of conductivity. By contrast with previous studies, the species showing higher seedling survival in the presence of drought also showed higher susceptibility to cavitation and operated with a lower safety margin for cavitation. Both species showed a leaf specific conductivity (LSC) threshold below which leaf biomass had to be regulated to avoid runaway embolism. However, each species displayed a different type of response: P. lentiscus conserved total leaf area up to 100% loss of LSC, whereas Q. coccifera continuously adjusted leaf biomass throughout the drought period in order to maintain the LSC very close to the maximum values recorded without loss of conductivity. Both species maintained the capacity for survival until the loss of conductivity was very nearly 100%.

  20. Morphological and physiological evaluations of seedling quality

    Treesearch

    Diane L. Haase

    2007-01-01

    Seedling quality and subsequent field performance can be influenced by various stress factors. Measuring seedling quality can help to identify possible crop problems in order to make informed decisions for culturing, lifting, storing, and planting. In addition, seedling quality data can help seedling growers and users to better understand annual patterns among species...

  1. Space Station Live: Seedling Growth

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Public Affairs Officer Lori Meggs talks with Carol Jacobs, payload operations director at the Marshall Space Flight Center's POIC, about the Seedling Growth experiment talking place aboard the Inte...

  2. Seedling quality tests: chlorophyll fluoresence

    Treesearch

    Gary Ritchie; Thomas D. Landis

    2005-01-01

    So far in this series we have discussed the most commonly -used seedling quality tests: root growth potential, cold hardiness, and stress resistance. In this issue, we're going to talk about one of the newest test-chlorophyll fluorescence (CF). The technology for measuring CF has been in place for over 50 years but has been applied to tr?e seedling physiology only...

  3. In vitro anti-Trichomonas vaginalis activity of Pistacia lentiscus mastic and Ocimum basilicum essential oil.

    PubMed

    Ezz Eldin, Hayam Mohamed; Badawy, Abeer Fathy

    2015-09-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a protozoan parasite that causes trichomoniasis; a cosmopolitan sexually transmitted disease. Metronidazole is the drug of choice for T. vaginalis infections. The increase in metronidazole resistant parasites and undesirable side effects of this drug makes the search for an alternative a priority for the management of trichomoniasis. Pistacia lentiscus mastic and Ocimum basilicum oil are known for their antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral and antiprotozoal effects. The present study was carried out to investigate the in vitro effects of P. lentiscus mastic and O. basilicum oil on T. vaginalis trophozoites. The effects of different concentrations of P. lentiscus mastic (15, 10 and 5 mg/ml) and different concentrations of O. basilicum oil (30, 20 and 10 μg/ml) on multiplication of trophozoites at different time points (after 24, 48, 72 and 96 h) were determined, also morphological changes were reported by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results showed that both plants caused an inhibition of growth of T. vaginalis trophozoites. The minimal lethal concentration of P. lentiscus mastic was 15 mg/ml after 24 h incubation, 10 mg/ml after 48 h and 5 mg/ml after 96 h. The minimal lethal concentration of O. basilicum oil was 30 μg/ml after 24 h incubation, 20 μg/ml after 48 h and 10 μg/ml after 96 h. TEM study of trophozoites treated by P. lentiscus mastic or by O. basilicum oil showed considerable damage of the membrane system of the trophozoites, and extensive vacuolization of the cytoplasm. These results highly suggest that P. lentiscus mastic and O. basilicum oil may be promising phytotherapeutic agents for trichomoniasis treatment.

  4. The healing effect of Pistacia lentiscus fruit oil on laser burn.

    PubMed

    Khedir, Sameh Ben; Bardaa, Sana; Chabchoub, Naourez; Moalla, Dorsaf; Sahnoun, Zouheir; Rebai, Tarek

    2017-12-01

    Since antiquity, Pistacia lentiscus L. (Anacardiaceae) fruit oil (PLFO) has been used as a remedy for primary health care such as burn treatment. This study assesses the healing effect of PLFO on CO2 laser fractional burn in a rat model. The study was carried out on 18 adult male Wistar rats. A second-degree laser burn (wound area = 2.2 cm(2)) was inflicted in the dorsal region by the application of CO2 fractional laser within the following parameters; Energy level: 25 MJ and Depth level: 4. After applying laser, the rats were divided into three groups: the first was treated with saline solution, the second with a reference cream 'CYTOL BASIC(®)' (0.13 μg/mm(2)) and the third with PLFO (0.52 μL/mm(2)). All treatments were topically administered for eight days. The healing effect was assessed using macroscopic, histological and biochemical parameters. After eight days, the higher percentage of wound healing contraction was observed among the PLFO-treated group (100%) followed by the 'CYTOL BASIC(®)' treated group (61.36%) and untreated group (32.27%). During the treatment, the PLFO-treated group showed less erythema, less crusting/scabbing, higher general wound appearance scores and a high content of collagen (220.67 ± 7.48 mg/g of tissue) than the other groups. The current study has shown, for the first time, the healing effect of PLFO on CO2 laser fractional burn. Their wound healing effect could be attributed to their antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects.

  5. Preventive and curative effect of Pistacia lentiscus oil in experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Naouar, Mustafa S; Mekki, Lilia Zouiten; Charfi, Lamia; Boubaker, Jalel; Filali, Azza

    2016-10-01

    to investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of the Pistacia lentiscus oil in experimental colitis model. Colitis was induced in male rats by instillation of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) in all groups. The experimental groups consisted of: 5 rats received Lentisc oil 2months before colitis induction (preventive group), 5 rats received the oil on the day of colitis induction (curative group) and 5 control rats. Lentisc oil was extracted from the ripe fruit of the plant by the cold press method and was analyzed by spectro-chromatography. Lentisc oil has been inserted with a standard diet at the dose of 30mg oil/100g of food/rat. The lentisc oil sample is composed mainly by Oleic acid (47.96%), Palmitic acid (27.94%) and Linoleic acid (20.22%).There was a significant difference between control rats and treated rats with lentisc oil concerned body mass (p=0.009), bleeding index (p=0.005 and p=0.018) and diarrhea (p=0.012). Histological examination revealed a clear difference between the control and preventive groups with disappearance of erosion, decreased of cryptitis, irregular crypts and crypt loss in the preventive group. Curative group showed a significant decrease of ulceration, hyperplasia, cryptitis, irregular crypts and crypt loss compared to the control group. There was an attenuation of inflammation in the preventive group compared to the curative group without statistically significant. Lentisc oil administration could provide a protective effect on intestinal inflammation in colitis rats induced by TNBS mainly when it is administered at a young age in preventive mode. This beneficial effect would involve a modification of arachidonic acid metabolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Polyphenols from Pistacia lentiscus and Phillyrea latifolia impair the exsheathment of gastro-intestinal nematode larvae.

    PubMed

    Azaizeh, H; Halahleh, F; Abbas, N; Markovics, A; Muklada, H; Ungar, E D; Landau, S Y

    2013-01-16

    The infection of grazing ruminants with gastro-intestinal nematodes (GINs) is a severe problem in the Middle East. However, goats that graze the south-western slopes of the Carmel Heights in Israel have very low faecal egg counts, despite high grazing density. We hypothesized that polyphenols from Pistacia lentiscus L. and/or Phillyrea latifolia L. - both prevalent woody species of the region that are consumed by goats - have anthelmintic bioactivity. We tested this hypothesis by using the larval exsheathment inhibition assay (LEIA). Extracts were prepared from leaves of either plant species using 70% ethanol (E70), 100% ethanol (E100), or boiling water (W). Larvae were incubated in a phosphate-buffered saline solution with or without plant extract (1200μg/ml) and then exposed to an exsheathment solution expected to elicit 100% exsheathment after one hour. All extraction methods of P. lentiscus were highly effective at inhibiting larval exsheathment, but higher potency was found for the E70 than for E100 extraction method, while W was intermediate. Only the E70 extract of P. latifolia was highly effective relative to the control. The E70 extract of P. lentiscus had more than 7 times the potency of the E70 extract of P. latifolia. Irrespective of solvent and tannin-equivalent used, P. lentiscus contained more than double the quantity of total polyphenols than P. latifolia. The polyphenols of P. lentiscus consisted mainly of galloyl derivatives (63.6%), flavonol glucosides (28.6%), and catechin (7.8%). In P. latifolia, oleuropein and its derivative tyrosol accounted for 49.3 and 23.1% of phenolics, respectively, the remainder being flavones (luteolin and quercetin) and their glucoside derivatives. Results of the LEIA test suggest that extracts of tannin-rich plants interfere with the very early stage of host invasion and that high concentration of galloylated derivatives may explain anthelmintic activity.

  7. Pistacia lentiscus resin regulates intestinal damage and inflammation in trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis.

    PubMed

    Gioxari, Aristea; Kaliora, Andriana C; Papalois, Apostolos; Agrogiannis, George; Triantafillidis, John K; Andrikopoulos, Nikolaos K

    2011-11-01

    Mastic (Pistacia lentiscus) of the Anacardiaceae family has exhibited anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties in patients with Crohn's disease. This study was based on the hypothesis that mastic inhibits intestinal damage in inflammatory bowel disease, regulating inflammation and oxidative stress in intestinal epithelium. Four different dosages of P. lentiscus powder in the form of powder were administered orally to trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitic rats. Eighty-four male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to seven groups: A, control; B, colitic; C-F, colitic rats daily supplemented with P. lentiscus powder at (C) 50 mg/kg, (D) 100 mg/kg, (E) 200 mg/kg, and (F) 300 mg/kg of body weight; and G, colitic rats treated daily with cortisone (25 μg/kg of body weight). Colonic damage was assessed microscopically. The cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and IL-10 and malonaldehyde were measured in colonic specimens. Results were expressed as mean ± SE values. Histological amelioration of colitis (P≤.001) and significant differences in colonic indices occurred after 3 days of treatment. Daily administration of 100 mg of P. lentiscus powder/kg of body weight decreased all inflammatory cytokines (P≤.05), whereas 50 mg of P. lentiscus powder/kg of body weight and cortisone treatment reduced only ICAM-1 (P≤.05 and P≤.01, respectively). Malonaldehyde was significantly suppressed in all treated groups (P≤.01). IL-10 remained unchanged. Cytokines and malonaldehyde remained unaltered after 6 days of treatment. Thus P. lentiscus powder could possibly have a therapeutic role in Crohn's disease, regulating oxidant/antioxidant balance and modulating inflammation.

  8. Use of Pistacia terebinthus resin as immobilization support for Lactobacillus casei cells and application in selected dairy products.

    PubMed

    Schoina, Vasiliki; Terpou, Antonia; Angelika-Ioanna, Gialleli; Koutinas, Athanasios; Kanellaki, Maria; Bosnea, Loulouda

    2015-09-01

    Resin from Pistacia terebinthus tree was used for the immobilization of L. casei ATCC 393 cells. The encapsulated L. casei cells biocatalysts were added as adjuncts during yogurt production at 45 °C and probiotic viability was assessed during storage at 4 °C. For comparison reasons yogurt with free L. casei cells were prepared. The effect of encapsulated bacteria as adjuncts in yogurt on pH, lactic acid, lactose and other physicochemical parameters were studied for 60 storage days at 4 °C. Samples were also tested for the microbiological and organoleptic characteristics during storage at 4 °C. Encapsulation matrix seems to sustain the viability of embedded L. casei cells at levels more than 7 logcfug(-1) after 60 days of storage at 4 °C. Furthermore, the absence of pathogens such as Salmonella, Staphylococci, Enterobacteriaceae and coliforms in the produced yogurts is noteworthy where spoilage microorganisms such as yeasts and molds seem to affect yogurt quality only in absence of Pistacia terebinthus resin. The effect of the resin on production of aroma-related compounds responsible for yogurt flavor was also studied using the solid phase microextraction gas chromatography/mass spectrometry technique. Alpha and beta- pinene were the major aroma compounds detected in produced yogurts (over 60 % of total aromatic compounds detected). Yogurts with immobilized cells on P.terebintus resin had a fine aroma and taste characteristic of the resin.

  9. Anti-inflammatory activity of Pistacia khinjuk in different experimental models: isolation and characterization of its flavonoids and galloylated sugars.

    PubMed

    Esmat, Ahmed; Al-Abbasi, Fahad A; Algandaby, Mardi M; Moussa, Ashaimaa Y; Labib, Rola M; Ayoub, Nahla A; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B

    2012-03-01

    The present study aimed at isolating and elucidating the structure of the main components of Pistacia khinjuk L. and exploring its potential anti-inflammatory effect in different experimental models. The extract was evaluated for anti-inflammatory activity by measuring paw volume in three experimental models. Then, prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) level, ear edema, tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, histopathology, nitric oxide (NO) level, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) level were assessed. Seven phenolic compounds, mainly flavonoids and galloylated compounds, were isolated from the aqueous methanol extract: gallic acid (1), methyl gallate (2), quercetin-3-O-β-D-⁴C₁-galactopyranoside (hyperin) (3), myricetin-3-O-α-L-¹C₄-rhamnopyranoside (myricitrin) (4), 1,6-digalloyl-β-D-glucose (5), 1,4-digalloyl-β-D-glucopyranoside (6), and 2,3-di-O-galloyl-(α/β)-⁴C₁-glucopyranose (nilocitin) (7). The anti-inflammatory activity was evidenced by decreased carrageenan-induced rat paw edema and PGE₂ elevation. In the croton oil-induced ear edema model, MPO activity was significantly inhibited, and inflammatory histopathological changes were ameliorated. In the rat air pouch model, NO generation and TNF-α release were significantly inhibited. The isolation and nuclear magnetic resonance spectral data of compound 6 from the genus Pistacia are revealed for the first time. Also, P. khinjuk L. aqueous methanol extract possesses anti-inflammatory activity in several experimental models.

  10. Genetic variation and structure in the Mediterranean shrubs Myrtus communis and Pistacia lentiscus in different landscape contexts.

    PubMed

    Nora, S; Albaladejo, R G; Aparicio, A

    2015-03-01

    Studies concerning different habitat configurations can provide insights into the complex interactions between species' life-history traits and the environment and can help to predict patterns in population genetics. In this study, we compared patterns of genetic variation in two Mediterranean shrub species (Myrtus communis and Pistacia lentiscus) that co-occur in populations within three contrasting landscape contexts: continuous, fragmented-connected and fragmented-isolated populations. Analysing variation at microsatellites loci, our results revealed weak responses to the landscape contexts. We rather found a population-specific response in both study species. However, despite both study species sharing similar levels of genetic diversity, Myrtus displayed higher levels of homozygosity and genetic differentiation among populations, stronger patterns of within-population spatial genetic structure, lower values of mutation-scaled effective population size and stronger evidence for recent genetic bottlenecks than Pistacia. This result highlights the influence of past events (e.g. historical connectivity, fluctuations in population size) and local factors (e.g. microhabitat availability for recruitment, habitat quality, plant density, native fauna) and that the landscape configuration per se (i.e. fragment size and/or isolation) might not completely determine the species' genetic patterns.

  11. In Vitro and In Vivo Antileishmanial Activities of Pistacia vera Essential Oil.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudvand, Hossein; Saedi Dezaki, Ebrahim; Ezatpour, Behrouz; Sharifi, Iraj; Kheirandish, Farnaz; Rashidipour, Marzieh

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo antileishmanial activities of Pistacia vera essential oil and compare their efficacy with a reference drug, meglumine antimoniate (Glucantime®). This essential oil (0-100 µg/mL) was evaluated in vitro against the intracellular amastigote forms of Leishmania tropica (MHOM/IR/2002/Mash2) and then tested on cutaneous leishmaniasis of male BALB/c mice by Leishmania major (MRHO/IR/75/ER). In the in vitro assay, it could be observed that P. vera essential oil significantly (p < 0.05) inhibited the growth rate of amastigote forms (IC50 of 21.3 ± 2.1 µg/mL) in a dose-dependent response compared with the control drug. Meglumine antimoniate also demonstrated antileishmanial effects with an IC50 value of 44.6 ± 2.5 µg/mL for this clinical stage. In the in vivo assay, the results indicated that 30 mg/mL of the essential oil had potent suppression effects on cutaneous leishmaniasis in BALB/c mice (87.5% recovery), while 10 and 20 mg/mL of the essential oil represented the suppression effects as weak to intermediate. The mean diameter of the lesions decreased about 0.11 and 0.27 cm after the treatment of the subgroups with the essential oil concentrations of 10 and 20 mg/mL, respectively. In contrast, in the subgroup treated with the essential oil concentration of 30 mg/mL, the mean diameter of the lesions decreased about 0.56 cm. In the control subgroups, the mean diameter of the lesions increased to 1.01 cm. The main components of P. vera essential oil were limonene (26.21%), α-pinene (18.07%), and α-thujene (9.31%). It was also found that P. vera essential oil had no significant cytotoxic effect on J774 cells. The present study found that P. vera essential oil showed considerable in vitro and in vivo effectiveness against L. tropica and L. major compared to the reference drug. These findings also provided the scientific evidence that natural plants could be used in traditional medicine for the prevention and

  12. Antioxidant activity and phenolic profile of pistachio (Pistacia vera L., variety Bronte) seeds and skins.

    PubMed

    Tomaino, Antonio; Martorana, Maria; Arcoraci, Teresita; Monteleone, Domenico; Giovinazzo, Corrado; Saija, Antonella

    2010-09-01

    Pistachio (Pistacia vera L.; Anacardiaceae) is native of aride zones of Central and West Asia and distributed throughout the Mediterranean basin. In Italy, a pistachio cultivar of high quality is typical of Bronte (Sicily), an area around the Etna volcano, where the lava land and climate allow the production of a nut with intense green colour and aromatic taste, very appreciated in international markets. Pistachio nuts are a rich source of phenolic compounds, and have recently been ranked among the first 50 food products highest in antioxidant potential. Pistachio nuts are often used after removing the skin, which thus represents a significant by-product of pistachio industrial processing. The present study was carried out to better characterize the phenolic composition and the antioxidant activity of Bronte pistachios, with the particular aim to evaluate the differences between pistachio seeds and skins. The total content of phenolic compounds in pistachios was shown to be significantly higher in skins than in seeds. By HPLC analysis, gallic acid, catechin, eriodictyol-7-O-glucoside, naringenin-7-O-neohesperidoside, quercetin-3-O-rutinoside and eriodictyol were found both in pistachio seeds than in skins; furthermore, genistein-7-O-glucoside, genistein, daidzein and apigenin appeared to be present only in pistachio seeds, while epicatechin, quercetin, naringenin, luteolin, kaempferol, cyanidin-3-O-galactoside and cyanidin-3-O-glucoside are contained only in pistachio skins. The antioxidant activity of pistachio seeds and skins were determined by means of four different assays (DPPH assay, Folin-Ciocalteau colorimetric method and TEAC assay, SOD-mimetic assay). As expected on the basis of the chemical analyses, pistachio skins have shown to possess a better activity with respect to seeds in all tests. The excellent antioxidant activity of pistachio skins can be explained by its higher content of antioxidant phenolic compounds. By HPLC-TLC analysis, gallic acid

  13. Grass seedling demography and sagebrush steppe restoration

    Treesearch

    J. J. James; M. J. Rinella; T. Svejcar

    2012-01-01

    Seeding is a key management tool for arid rangeland. In these systems, however, seeded species often fail to establish. A recent study inWyoming big sagebrush steppe suggested that over 90% of seeded native grass individuals die before seedlings emerged. This current study examines the timing and rate of seed germination, seedling emergence, and seedling death related...

  14. Fertilization Tests With Potted Red Oak Seedlings

    Treesearch

    Robert E. Phares

    1971-01-01

    Soil-pot tests with red oak seedlings indicated that forest soils supplied more N and P and produced better seedling growth than old-field soils. Growth was closely correlated with content of N and P in the foliage. K fertilization did not improve seedling growth on any of the soils studied.

  15. Growing Longleaf Pine Seedlings in Containers

    Treesearch

    James P. Barnett; John M. McGilvray

    2000-01-01

    We provide basic guidelines for nursery production of longleaf pine ( Pinus palustris P. Mill. [Pinaceae]) seedlings in containers. The best seedlings are spring sown, grown outdoors in full sun in cavities with a 100-ml (6 in3) volume, 11-cm (4.5 in) depth, and a density around 535 seedlings per m2 (...

  16. Tolerance of loblolly pine seedlings to glyphosate

    Treesearch

    James D. Haywood; Thomas W. Melder

    1990-01-01

    Broadcasting glyphosate herbicide over loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) may provide enough early-season weed control to allow seedlings to establish themselves more rapidly, but glyphosate can, injure young trees. To examine the question of seedling injury, four rates of glyphosate were broadcast evenly over planted loblolly pine seedlings, competing...

  17. Growth Reduction of Apple Seedlings by Pratylenchus penetrans as Influenced by Seedling Age at Inoculation

    PubMed Central

    Jaffee, B. A.; Mai, W. F.

    1979-01-01

    Apple seedlings of different ages (1, 3, and 5 weeks) were inoculated with 6,900 Pratylenchus penetrans per seedling in 10-cm-diam pots in a growth chamber. Rate of growth suppression and total growth suppression of seedlings by P. penetrans were inversely proportional to seedling age at time of nematode inoculation. Younger seedlings were found to contain a higher number of nematodes per gram root. PMID:19305551

  18. Arsenic- and mercury-induced phytotoxicity in the Mediterranean shrubs Pistacia lentiscus and Tamarix gallica grown in hydroponic culture.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Jiménez, E; Esteban, E; Carpena-Ruiz, R O; Peñalosa, J M

    2009-09-01

    Hg and As resistance and bioaccumulation were studied in hydroponically grown Pistacia lentiscus and Tamarix gallica plants. Both elements caused growth inhibition in roots and shoots, with mercury showing greater phytotoxicity than arsenic. Accumulation of both elements by plants increased in response to element supply, with the greatest uptake found in T. gallica. Both elements affected P and Mn status in plants, reduced chlorophyll a concentration and increased MDA and thiol levels. These stress indices showed good correlations with As and Hg concentration in plant tissues, especially in the roots. Toxic responses to mercury were more evident than for arsenic, especially in shoot tissues. T. gallica showed higher resistance to both Hg and As than P. lentiscus, as well accumulating more As and Hg.

  19. Growing container seedlings: Three considerations

    Treesearch

    Kas Dumroese; Thomas D. Landis

    2015-01-01

    The science of growing reforestation and conservation plants in containers has continually evolved, and three simple observations may greatly improve seedling quality. First, retaining stock in its original container for more than one growing season should be avoided. Second, strongly taprooted species now being grown as bareroot stock may be good candidates...

  20. Seedling-Size Fumigation Chambers

    Treesearch

    Keith F. Jensen; Frederick W. Bender

    1977-01-01

    The design of fumigation chambers is described. Each chamber has individual temperature, humidity, light, and pollutant control. Temperature is variable from 15 to 35ºC and controlled within ± 1ºC. Humidity is variable from 25 to 95 percent and controlled within ± 3 percent. Seedlings have been successfully grown in these chambers...

  1. Beet Rust and Seedling Rust

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Beet rust, caused by Uromyces betae, can cause pustules on most beet types, and can be a problem in various beet growing areas. Seedling rust, caused by Puccinia subnitens can cause lesions on young beets, primarily on cotyledons, and does not cause economic damage. This chapter describes the dise...

  2. Seven new species within western Atlantic Starksia atlantica, S. lepicoelia, and S. sluiteri (Teleostei, Labrisomidae), with comments on congruence of DNA barcodes and species

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Carole C.; Castillo, Cristina I.; Weigt, Lee A.; Benjamin C., Victor

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Specimens of Starksia were collected throughout the western Atlantic, and a 650-bp portion of the mitochondrial gene cytochrome oxidase-c subunit I (COl) was sequenced as part of a re-analysis of species diversity of western Central Atlantic shorefishes. A neighbor-joining tree constructed from the sequence data suggests the existence of several cryptic species. Voucher specimens from each genetically distinct lineage and color photographs of vouchers taken prior to dissection and preservation were examined for diagnostic morphological characters. The results suggest that Starksia atlantica, Starksia lepicoelia, and Starksia sluiteri are species complexes, and each comprises three or more species. Seven new species are described. DNA data usually support morphological features, but some incongruence between genetic and morphological data exists. Genetic lineages are only recognized as species if supported by morphology. Genetic lineages within western Atlantic Starksia generally correspond to geography, such that members of each species complex have a very restricted geographical distribution. Increasing geographical coverage of sampling locations will almost certainly increase the number of Starksia species and species complexes recognized in the western Atlantic. Combining molecular and morphological investigations is bringing clarity to the taxonomy of many genera of morphologically similar fishes and increasing the number of currently recognized species. Future phylogenetic studies should help resolve species relationships and shed light on patterns of speciation in western Atlantic Starksia. PMID:21594143

  3. Developmental Stages of Cucumber Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Rami; Vernon, Leo P.; Porath, Dan; Arzee, Tova

    1990-01-01

    The changes in morphology during dark germination and subsequent growth of cucumber (Cucumis sativus) seedlings in the light go through three different phases described as latent, active, and steady-state. This pattern is consistently observed for several related developmental processes. The latent period lasts about 2 days following water imbibition after which the following capabilities appear in concert: (a) root and stem elongation, (b) pigment synthesis including protochlorophyll, chlorophyll, carotenoid, and phytochrome, (c) synthesis of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, and (d) enhancement of greening by excision. Following the active phase, which lasts for another 2 to 3 days, these processes slow to a steady-state. Inhibition of chlorphyll accumulation by SO2 was only observed for seedlings in the steady-state phase. PMID:16667373

  4. [Quality classification standard of Scrophularia ningpoensis seedlings].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue; Chen, Da-xia; Tan, Jun; Li, Long-yun

    2015-03-01

    The morphological indexes of the Scuophularia ningpoensis seedlings including the longth, diameter and weight were measured, clustering analysis was used to set up the standard quality grading of seedlings of S. Ningpoensis by SPSS. Field experiment was carried out to measure the indicators of plants growth and development, the yield and the quality. The results showed that the growth and yield of class I seedlings were better than those of class II and III. The content of main active ingredients was affected barely by seedlings classification. To ensure the quality, class II seedlings or above should be used for plantation. The established quality classification standard of S. ningpoensis seedlings was scientific and feasible, and provides the basis for the standardized cultivation of S. ningpoensis.

  5. Interaction of Soil Moisture and Seedling Shelters on Water Relations of Baldcypress Seedlings

    Treesearch

    Ty Swirin; Hans Williams; Bob Keeland

    1999-01-01

    Stomata1 conductance, transpiration, and leaf water potential were measured during the 1996 growing season on baldcypress (Taxodium disfichum (L.) Rich.) seedlings. Seedlings were hand-planted from 1-O bareroot stock in mesic and permanently Rooded soil conditions. One-half of all seedlings were fitted with 122-cm tall polyethylene tree...

  6. Interactive effects of UV radiation and water availability on seedlings of six woody Mediterranean species.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Meritxell; Llorens, Laura; Badosa, Jordi; Verdaguer, Dolors

    2013-02-01

    To assess the effects of UV radiation and its interaction with water availability on Mediterranean plants, we performed an experiment with seedlings of six Mediterranean species (three mesophytes vs three xerophytes) grown in a glasshouse from May to October under three UV conditions (without UV, with UVA and with UVA+UVB) and two irrigation levels (watered to saturation and low watered). Morphological, physiological and biochemical measures were taken. Exposure to UVA+UVB increased the overall leaf mass per area (LMA) and the leaf carotenoids/chlorophyll a + b ratio of plants in relation to plants grown without UV or with UVA, respectively. In contrast, we did not find a general effect of UV on the leaf content of phenols or UVB-absorbing compounds of the studied species. Regarding plant growth, UV inhibited the above-ground biomass production of well-watered plants of Pistacia lentiscus. Conversely, under low irrigation, UVA tended to abolish the reduction in growth experienced by P. lentiscus plants growing in a UV-free environment, in accordance with UVA-enhanced apparent electron transport rate (ETR) values under drought in this species. UVA also induced an overall increase in root biomass when plants of the studied species were grown under a low water supply. In conclusion, while plant exposition to UVA favored root growth under water shortage, UVB addition only gave rise to photoprotective responses, such as the increase in LMA or in the leaf carotenoids/chlorophyll a + b ratio of plants. Species-specific responses to UV were not related with the xerophytic or mesophytic character of the studied species. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2012.

  7. Abundance and activity of soil microorganisms in Cedrus atlantica forests are more related to land use than to altitude or latitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez Rojas, Irene; Perez Fernandez, María; Moreno Gallardo, Laura; Lechuga Ordoñez, Victor; Linares, Juan Carlos

    2016-04-01

    Several environmental traits might change the abundance and the function of soil microorganisms in forest soils by plant-mediated reactions. Few studies have related the landscape-scale forest structural diversity with the micro-scale distribution of microorganism and their activities. High mountain environments harbor ecosystems that are very sensitive to global change and hence highly vulnerable, as those of Atlantic cedar. Altitudinal gradients in mountains are orrelated with changes in vegetation. We propose that altitudinal gradients drive shifts in microbial communities and are correlated with land uses. Thus, the latitudinal and longitudinal pattern of abundance and activity of soil micro-organisms was studied in an intercontinental comparison. We investigate soil extractable organic carbon (EOC) and nitrogen and carbon, microbial biomass and microbial metabolic activities at eight different sites along the latitudinal range of Cedrus atlantica, covering different altitudes and soils characteristics both in Southern Spain and Northern Morocco. Analyses of the abundances of total bacteria, (16S rRNA gene), was conducted using the Ilumina metagenomics technique. Results show that the stands at the highest altitudes had distinct microbial and biochemical characteristics compared with other areas. Overall, microbial activity, as measured by soil respiration, is higher in forests subjected to lower human pressure than in stands highly degraded, probably reflecting the quality of litter input that results of the influence of local assemblage of different tree, shrub and annual species, though changes in the soil N and C contents. Indeed, total soil C and N contents explained the microbial properties at every scale. Our results suggest that in contrast to the observed pronounced altitudinal changes, the kind of human-mediate land management has a stronger role in defining changes in microbial composition and activities in the investigated forest systems.

  8. Chemical composition and in vitro antibacterial activity of Pistacia terebinthus essential oils derived from wild populations in Kosovo.

    PubMed

    Pulaj, Bledar; Mustafa, Behxhet; Nelson, Kate; Quave, Cassandra L; Hajdari, Avni

    2016-05-26

    Plant material from different organs of Pistacia terebinthus L., (Anacardiaceae) were collected in Kosovo with aim to analyze the chemical variability of the essential oils among native populations and to test them for potential antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus. Essential oils obtained from leaves, pedicels, fruits and galls were analyzed by GC-FID and GC/MS. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against three clinically relevant strains of S. aureus (NRS385, LAC and UAMS-1) were used to evaluate the antibacterial activity of essential oils. In total, 33 different compounds were identified. The main constituents were α-pinene (12.58-66.29 %), D-limonene (13.95-46.29 %), β-ocimene (0.03-40.49 %), β-pinene (2.63-20.47 %), sabinene (0.00-5.61 %) and (Z)-β-ocimene (0.00-44.85 %). Antibacterial testing of the essential oils against three clinical isolates of S. aureus revealed that seven of the eight samples had some activity at the concentration range tested (0.04-0.512 % v/v). The gall tissues from both sites produced the highest yield of essential oil (3.24 and 6 %), and both exhibited growth inhibitory activity against S. aureus. The most bioactive essential oils, which exhibited MIC90 values ranging from 0.032-0.128 % v/v, obtained from the fruits of the Ura e Shejtë collection site. Likewise, the leaf and pedicel essential oil from the same site was highly active with MIC90 values of 0.064-0.128 and 0.032-0.256 % v/v, respectively. Principle Component Analyses demonstrated that there is a variation in the chemical composition of essential oil depending on the plant organs from which essential oil are obtained and the geographical origin of the plant populations. The highest variability regarding the chemical composition of essential oil was found between oils obtained from different organs originating from the Prizren site. The MIC90 activity of Pistacia terebinthus was on par or superior compared with Tea Tree Oil control (0

  9. Field measurement of cotton seedling evapotranspiration

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Information on cotton evapotranspiration (ET) during the seedling growth stage and under field conditions is scarce because ET is a difficult parameter to measure. Our objective was to use weighable lysimeters to measure daily values of cotton seedling ET. We designed and built plastic weighable mic...

  10. Innovative cold tolerance test for conifer seedlings

    Treesearch

    Peter A. Balk; Peter Bronnum; Mike Perks; Eva Stattin; Lonneke H. M. van der Geest; Monique F. van Wordragen

    2007-01-01

    Forest tree nurseries rely on tight scheduling of operations to deliver vital seedlings to the planting site. Cold storage is required to: (1) prevent winter damage, especially in container seedlings; (2) to maintain planting stock in an inactive condition; and (3) to ensure plant supply for geographically distinct planting sites, a definite requirement for large-scale...

  11. Container-Grown Longleaf Pine Seedling Quality

    Treesearch

    Mark J. Hainds; James P. Barnett

    2004-01-01

    This study examines the comparative hardiness of various classes or grades of container-grown longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) seedlings. Most container longleaf seedlings are grown in small ribbed containers averaging 5 to 7 cubic inches in volume and 3 to 6 inches in depth. Great variability is often exhibited in typical lots of container-...

  12. Insights into big sagebrush seedling storage practices

    Treesearch

    Emily C. Overton; Jeremiah R. Pinto; Anthony S. Davis

    2013-01-01

    Big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt. [Asteraceae]) is an essential component of shrub-steppe ecosystems in the Great Basin of the US, where degradation due to altered fire regimes, invasive species, and land use changes have led to increased interest in the production of high-quality big sagebrush seedlings for conservation and restoration projects. Seedling...

  13. Seedling quality tests: plant moisture stress

    Treesearch

    Gary Ritchie; Thomas D. Landis

    2005-01-01

    This is the fifth installment in our review of seedling quality tests. Here we focus on what is commonly known as "plant moisture stress" or PMS. Although PMS is not routinely used for seedling quality testing per se, it is nevertheless the most common physiological measurement made on reforestation stock. This is because the measurement itself is simple and...

  14. Efficacy of Pistacia khinjuk Fruits on Viability of Hydatid Cyst Protoscoleces and Its Acute Toxicity in Mice Model

    PubMed Central

    MAHMOUDVAND, Hossein; MIRBADIE, Seyed Reza; GHASEMI KIA, Mehdi; BADPARVA, Ebrahim; SHAMSADINI LORI, Saeedeh; FASIHI HARANDI, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Background: This investigation aimed to evaluate the in vitro scolicidal effects of Pistacia khinjuk methanolic extract against protoscoleces of hydatid cysts and its acute toxicity in mice NMRI model. Methods: Protoscoleces were aseptically extracted from sheep livers having hydatid cysts. Various concentrations of the essential oil (12.5–100 mg/mL) were used for 10 to 60 min. Viability of protoscoleces was confirmed using eosin exclusion test (0.1% eosin staining). Twenty-four male NMRI mice were used to assess the acute toxicity of P. khinjuk. Results: P. khinjuk extract at the concentrations of 100 mg/mL after 10 min of exposure killed 100% of protoscoleces. Similarly, the mean of mortality rate of protoscoleces after 20 min of exposure to the concentration of 50 mg/mL was 100%. The LD50 of the intraperitoneal injection of the P. khinjuk methanolic extract was 2.8 g/kg and the maximum non-fatal dose was 1.7 g/kg. Conclusion: The findings demonstrated effective scolicidal effects of P. khinjuk extract with no considerable toxicity that might be a natural source for the producing of new scolicidal agent. PMID:28127345

  15. Oxidative stress and apoptosis induction in human thyroid carcinoma cells exposed to the essential oil from Pistacia lentiscus aerial parts

    PubMed Central

    Catalani, Simona; Palma, Francesco; Battistelli, Serafina; Benedetti, Serena

    2017-01-01

    Background Essential oils from the aerial parts (leaves, twigs and berries) of Pistacia lentiscus (PLEO) have been well characterized for their antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties; however, poor information exists on their potential anticancer activity. Methods Increasing concentrations of PLEO (0.01–0.1% v/v, 80–800 μg/ml) were administered to a wide variety of cultured cancer cells from breast, cervix, colon, liver, lung, prostate, and thyroid carcinomas. Fibroblasts were also included as healthy control cells. Cell viability was monitored by WST-8 assay up to 72 hours after PLEO administration. The intracellular formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the induction of apoptosis, and the enhancement of chemotherapeutic drug cytotoxicity by PLEO were further investigated in the most responsive cancer cell line. Results A dose-dependent reduction of tumor cell viability was observed upon PLEO exposure; while no cytotoxic effect was revealed in healthy fibroblasts. FTC-133 thyroid cancer cells were found to be the most sensitive cells to PLEO treatment; accordingly, an intracellular accumulation of ROS and an activation of both the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways were evidenced in FTC-133 cells after PLEO administration. Furthermore, the cytotoxic effect of the antineoplastic drugs cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil and etoposide was enhanced in PLEO-exposed FTC-133 cells. Conclusion Taking into account its mode of action, PLEO might be considered as a promising source of natural antitumor agents which might have therapeutic potential in integrated oncology. PMID:28196126

  16. Testing the reliability of δ13C of tree rings as climate tool in Pistacia khinjuk of Syrian desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caracuta, Valentina; Fiorentino, Girolamo

    2010-05-01

    High-resolution measures of past climate variations have been found to be of a critical importance for understanding anthropic resilience in drought-sensitive areas. The hills (Jebels) Abu-Rujmain and Abd al Aziz, with their 350 millimetre of rain and their steppe-forest spreading in the middle of the flat syrian desert, represent an unicum where analysing the effect of short term climate changes on pastoral communities. Thanks to a cooperation project in Syrian Arab republic with CIHEAM-Mediterranean Agronomic Institute of Bari -Italy (Rationalization of Ras El Ain Irrigation systems), we were allowed to carry out dendroclimate and carbon isotope analyses on tree-rings of local Pistacia khinjuk, a long-lived wood taxon, in order to test their reliability as tool for determining annual and seasonal rainfall/temperature variations. Comparison between the last 25 year rainfall and temperature values of the nearby meteorological stations and dendro-isotopes values have been carried out to point out which factor mostly affect the growth pattern of the trees in that particular area.

  17. Association between radionuclides ((210)Po and (210)Pb) and antioxidant enzymes in oak (Quercus coccifera) and mastic tree (Pistacia lentiscus).

    PubMed

    Uğur Görgün, A; Aslan, E; Kül, M; İlhan, S; Dimlioğlu, G; Bor, M; Özdemir, F

    2017-08-01

    The activity levels of naturally occurring radionuclides Polonium-210 and lead-210 in different subjects including plant species have direct or indirect impact on human beings. High levels of ionising radiation cause oxidative stress and the interaction between antioxidative defense and radionuclides is not well established in plant systems. In this study, we aimed to understand the impact of oxidative stress caused by (210)Po and (210)Pb in two Mediterranean plants; Quercus coccifera and Pistacia lentiscus. We analysed the constitutive and seasonal levels of (210)Po, (210)Pb, lipid peroxidation levels, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activities in the field-collected samples. The highest activity concentrations of (210)Po and (210)Pb were detected in both plants in summer and Q. coccifera had higher levels than that of P. lentiscus. SOD and APX activity trends were different between oak and mastic; as compared to P. lentiscus, Q. coccifera efficiently used the two major components of antioxidative defense. Lipid peroxidation levels were low in both plants in all seasons except that of spring which were in good agreement with high antioxidant enzyme activities. In conclusion, we found that high (210)Po and (210)Pb activity concentrations in oak and mastic did not interfere with their growth and life cycles. The ability of both plants for survival and adaptation to Mediterranean environmental constraints provided an additional advantage for coping radionuclide induced oxidative stress as well. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of unsaponifiable matter extracted from Pistacia khinjuk fruit oil on the oxidative stability of olive oil.

    PubMed

    Tavakoli, Javad; Estakhr, Parviz; Jelyani, Aniseh Zarei

    2017-08-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the improvement of oxidative stability of refined olive oil using various concentrations of unsaponifiable matters extracted from Pistacia khinjuk fruit oil (UFO). For further elucidation of UFO antioxidative power, tertbutylhydroquinone (TBHQ) was used in an olive oil sample, too. Oxidative stability of olive oil samples without and with different levels of UFO (50, 100, 250, 500, 750 and 1000 ppm) and TBHQ (100 ppm) were studied via evaluation of conjugated diene value, carbonyl value, oil/oxidative stability index, acid value and total tocopherol (TT) contents through 8 h thermal process at 170 °C. Results obtained by oxidative stability assays revealed that the highest antioxidative activity of olive oil was obtained by 100 ppm of UFO, followed using 100, 250, 500, 750, and 1000 ppm of UFO and 100 ppm TBHQ, respectively. Evaluation of the relationship between oxidative stability indexes and TT changes indicated a strong correlation (R(2) = 0.9718) between mean relative resistance to oxidation and relative resistance to TT reduction during thermal process. By promotion of relative resistance to TT reduction, olive oil samples' relative resistance to oxidation was enhanced exponentially; implying importance of TT in promotion of oxidative stability of edible oils. The results obtained in this study showed that UFO has higher antioxidative activity compared to TBHQ; thus UFO can be considered as a natural antioxidant with ideal antioxidative activity.

  19. Preformation in vegetative buds of pistachio (Pistacia vera): relationship to shoot morphology, crown structure and rootstock vigor.

    PubMed

    Spann, Timothy M; Beede, Robert H; Dejong, Theodore M

    2007-08-01

    Effects of rootstock, shoot carbohydrate status, crop load and crown position on the number of preformed leaf primordia in the dormant terminal and lateral buds of mature and immature 'Kerman' pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) trees were investigated to determine if rootstock vigor is associated with greater shoot preformation. There was no significant variation in preformation related to the factors studied, suggesting strong genetic control of preformation in 'Kerman' pistachio. The growth differences observed among trees on different rootstocks were associated with greater stimulation of neoformed growth in trees on the more vigorous rootstocks. However, most annual extension growth in mature tree crowns was preformed, contrasting with the relatively high rate of neoformation found in young tree crowns. Large amounts of neoformed growth in young trees may allow the trees to become established quickly and secure resources, whereas predominantly preformed growth in mature trees may allow for continued crown expansion without outgrowing available resources. We hypothesized that the stimulation of neoformed growth by the more vigorous rootstocks is associated with greater resource uptake or transport, or both. Understanding the source of variation in shoot extension growth on different rootstocks has important implications for orchard management practices.

  20. Seasonal variation and gender pattern of phenolic and flavonoid contents in Pistacia chinensis Bunge inflorescences and leaves.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lele; Yang, Minglei; Gao, Junlan; Jin, Shan; Wu, Zhengyan; Wu, Lifang; Zhang, Xin

    2016-02-01

    Pistacia chinensis Bunge (P. chinensis) is a deciduous and dioecious perennial arbor of the family Anacardiaceae that flowers from March to April and bears fruit from September to October. There are three rapidly growing stages in the annual growth process of P. chinensis. However, the knowledge of the secondary metabolites related to P. chinensis gender and growth season remains scant. In this study, HPLC was used to qualitatively and quantitatively determine the content of the catechin hydrate, rutin, quercetin, and kaempferol contents in male and female tree inflorescences and leaves. Total phenolics and flavonoids were also detected using a spectrophotometer. The results indicated that the contents of these compounds fluctuated with seasons and they reached the highest levels in nascent leaves. The fluctuations of these compounds followed different pathways of evolution, by increasing or decreasing in male and female trees throughout the whole growth process because they had their own biological functions. Moreover, the extracts exhibited DPPH radical scavenging bioactivity and showed no significant cytotoxicity towards 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Together, these results demonstrated that P. chinensis has great potential as an antioxidant medicine, and the best harvest time is in the spring.

  1. Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of the essential oils from the gum of Turkish pistachio (Pistacia vera L.).

    PubMed

    Alma, Mehmet Hakki; Nitz, Siegfried; Kollmannsberger, Hubert; Digrak, Metin; Efe, Fatih Tuncay; Yilmaz, Necmettin

    2004-06-16

    The essential oil from the gum of Pistachio (Pistacia vera L. (Anacardiaceae)) grown in Turkey was obtained by the hydro-distillation method, and its chemical composition was analyzed by GC and GC-MS. Moreover, the antimicrobial activities of the oil against the growth of 13 bacteria and 3 pathogenic yeasts were evaluated using the agar-disk diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) methods. The results showed that the essential oil contained about 89.67% monoterpenes, 8.1% oxygenated monoterpenes and 1.2% diterpenes. alpha-Pinene (75.6%), beta-pinene (9.5%), trans-verbenol (3.0%), camphene (1.4%), trans-pinocarveol (about 1.20%), and limonene (1.0%) were the major components. The antimicrobial results showed that the oil inhibited nine bacteria and all the yeasts studied, and the activities were considerably dependent upon concentration and its bioactive compounds such as carvacrol, camphene, and limonene. Moreover, the essential oil of the gum was found to be more effective yeastcide than Nystatin, synthetic yeastcide. Furthermore, the antibacterial activities of the oil were lower than those of standard antibiotics, ampicillin sodium, and streptomycine sulfate under the conditions studied.

  2. In vitro antioxidant and in vivo photoprotective effect of pistachio (Pistacia vera L., variety Bronte) seed and skin extracts.

    PubMed

    Martorana, Maria; Arcoraci, Teresita; Rizza, Luisa; Cristani, Mariateresa; Bonina, Francesco Paolo; Saija, Antonina; Trombetta, Domenico; Tomaino, Antonio

    2013-03-01

    Pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) nuts are a rich source of phenolic compounds, known for their high antioxidant activity, and contained not only in the seeds but also in the skin. A pistachio cultivar of high quality is typical of Bronte, Sicily, Italy. The purpose of our study was to investigate the chemical composition and antioxidant properties of two polyphenol-rich extracts from skins (TP) and decorticated seeds (SP) of Bronte pistachios, and to verify the potential use of these extracts for topical photoprotective products. Chemical analysis showed that the TP and SP extracts contain high levels of phenolic compounds, but the TP extract is about ten times richer in phenols than the SP extract, being anthocyanins the most abundant compounds found in the TP extract. Both these extracts, and especially the TP extract, possess good radical scavenger/antioxidant properties, as shown in a series of in vitro assays carried out using homogenous and non-homogenous chemical environment. Furthermore both the TP extract and, although at a lower degree, the SP extract reduce, when topically applied, UV-B-induced skin erythema in human volunteers. These findings suggest that extracts from Bronte TP and SP could be successfully employed as photoprotective ingredients in topical cosmetic and pharmaceutical formulations.

  3. Isolation of high quality RNA from pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) and other woody plants high in secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Moazzam Jazi, Maryam; Rajaei, Saideh; Seyedi, Seyed Mahdi

    2015-10-01

    The quality and quantity of RNA are critical for successful downstream transcriptome-based studies such as microarrays and RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). RNA isolation from woody plants, such as Pistacia vera, with very high amounts of polyphenols and polysaccharides is an enormous challenge. Here, we describe a highly efficient protocol that overcomes the limitations posed by poor quality and low yield of isolated RNA from pistachio and various recalcitrant woody plants. The key factors that resulted in a yield of 150 μg of high quality RNA per 200 mg of plant tissue include the elimination of phenol from the extraction buffer, raising the concentration of β-mercaptoethanol, long time incubation at 65 °C, and nucleic acid precipitation with optimized volume of NaCl and isopropyl alcohol. Also, the A260/A280 and A260/A230 of extracted RNA were about 1.9-2.1and 2.2-2.3, respectively, revealing the high purity. Since the isolated RNA passed highly stringent quality control standards for sensitive reactions, including RNA sequencing and real-time PCR, it can be considered as a reliable and cost-effective method for RNA extraction from woody plants.

  4. Energy allocation changes in overwintering adults of the common pistachio Psylla, Agonoscena pistaciae Burckhardt & Lauterer (Hemiptera: Psyllidae).

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, R; Izadi, H; Mahdian, K

    2012-12-01

    The common pistachio psylla, Agonoscena pistaciae Burckhardt & Lauterer (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), is known as the key pest of pistachio orchards in Iran. This pest passes the winter as adults. In this study, energy allocation changes in relation to ambient temperature were investigated in field-collected adults by measuring total body sugar, trehalose, glucose, sorbitol, myoinositol, glycogen, lipid, and protein contents. Glycogen content decreased with decrease in ambient temperature. The decrease in glycogen content was proportional to the increase in total body sugar, trehalose, myoinositol, and sorbitol contents. In January, with mean ambient temperature of 5.4°C, glycogen content was at the lowest level, whereas total body sugar, trehalose, glucose, and sorbitol were at the highest level. Total body sugar, trehalose, myoinositol, and sorbitol contents increased as temperature decreased from 22.7°C in October to 5.4°C in January. In conclusion, low molecular weight carbohydrates and polyols may play a role in winter survival and adaptation to cold of the common pistachio psylla by providing the required cryoprotection. Also, overwintering adults of the common pistachio psylla may store energy in the form of lipid for later utilization during the overwintering.

  5. Analysis of genetic diversity of Tunisian pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) using sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) markers.

    PubMed

    Guenni, K; Aouadi, M; Chatti, K; Salhi-Hannachi, A

    2016-10-17

    Sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) markers preferentially amplify open reading frames and were used to study the genetic diversity of Tunisian pistachio. In the present study, 43 Pistacia vera accessions were screened using seven SRAP primer pairs. A total of 78 markers was revealed (95.12%) with an average polymorphic information content of 0.850. The results suggest that there is strong genetic differentiation, which characterizes the local resources (GST = 0.307). High gene flow (Nm = 1.127) among groups was explained by the exchange of plant material among regions. Analysis of molecular variance revealed significant differences within groups and showed that 73.88% of the total genetic diversity occurred within groups, whereas the remaining 26.12% occurred among groups. Bayesian clustering and principal component analysis identified three pools, El Guettar, Pollenizers, and the rest of the pistachios belonging to the Gabès, Kasserine, and Sfax localities. Bayesian analysis revealed that El Guettar and male genotypes were assigned with more than 80% probability. The BayeScan method proposed that locus 59 (F13-R9) could be used in the development of sex-linked SCAR markers from SRAP since it is a commonly detected locus in comparisons involving the Pollenizers group. This is the first application of SRAP markers for the assessment of genetic diversity in Tunisian germplasm of P. vera. Such information will be useful to define conservation strategies and improvement programs for this species.

  6. Oxidative stress and apoptosis induction in human thyroid carcinoma cells exposed to the essential oil from Pistacia lentiscus aerial parts.

    PubMed

    Catalani, Simona; Palma, Francesco; Battistelli, Serafina; Benedetti, Serena

    2017-01-01

    Essential oils from the aerial parts (leaves, twigs and berries) of Pistacia lentiscus (PLEO) have been well characterized for their antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties; however, poor information exists on their potential anticancer activity. Increasing concentrations of PLEO (0.01-0.1% v/v, 80-800 μg/ml) were administered to a wide variety of cultured cancer cells from breast, cervix, colon, liver, lung, prostate, and thyroid carcinomas. Fibroblasts were also included as healthy control cells. Cell viability was monitored by WST-8 assay up to 72 hours after PLEO administration. The intracellular formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the induction of apoptosis, and the enhancement of chemotherapeutic drug cytotoxicity by PLEO were further investigated in the most responsive cancer cell line. A dose-dependent reduction of tumor cell viability was observed upon PLEO exposure; while no cytotoxic effect was revealed in healthy fibroblasts. FTC-133 thyroid cancer cells were found to be the most sensitive cells to PLEO treatment; accordingly, an intracellular accumulation of ROS and an activation of both the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways were evidenced in FTC-133 cells after PLEO administration. Furthermore, the cytotoxic effect of the antineoplastic drugs cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil and etoposide was enhanced in PLEO-exposed FTC-133 cells. Taking into account its mode of action, PLEO might be considered as a promising source of natural antitumor agents which might have therapeutic potential in integrated oncology.

  7. Evaluation of Pistacia lentiscus fatty oil effects on glycemic index, liver functions and kidney functions of New Zealand rabbits.

    PubMed

    Djerrou, Zouhir; Hamdi-Pacha, Y; Belkhiri, A M; Djaalab, H; Riachi, F; Serakta, M; Boukeloua, A; Maameri, Z

    2011-01-01

    Pistacia lentiscus fatty oil (PLFO) is a well known natural remedy in eastern Algeria folk medicine. It is widely used in the treatment of respiratory disorders and dermal burns. The present study has been carried out to investigate effects of this oil on fasting glucose and some functional parameters of the liver and kidney in white male New Zealand rabbits (Initial mean weight 1.95 Kg). PLFO was applied to tested rabbits (PLFO group) via rectal route, once daily 5-day per week, for six consecutive weeks at the dose of 1 ml/Kg body weight. The same number of animals (n=6) was not treated and served as control (CRL group). The results showed that PLFO was tolerated by rectal route. No significant differences were observed in body weights of the two groups. Biochemical analysis showed that aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT) were significantly decreased in blood plasma at (P< 0.05) and (P< 0.01) respectively in PLFO group (Mann-Whitney test). On the other hand, the fasting glucose level (GLU) was significantly increased (Mann-Whitney test, P< 0.05), while the rest of the tested parameters (Albumin, total proteins, creatinine, urea) was not significantly affected. However, these variations have not biologic signification toxicity. The study concludes that PLFO is tolerable via rectal route; it is safe with no adverse effect on liver functions and renal functions with possible anti-glycogenesis activity.

  8. In Vivo Evaluation of the Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Pistacia lentiscus Fruit Oil and Its Effects on Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Bardaa, Sana; Sahnoun, Zouheir; Rebai, Tarek

    2016-01-01

    In order to find new topical anti-inflammatory agents, we had recourse to a medicinal plant. This work was designed to determine the topical anti-inflammatory effect of Pistacia lentiscus fruit oil (PLFO), using carrageenan-induced paw edema rat model, and to evaluate its effects on oxidative stress. The topical anti-inflammatory activity of PLFO was compared to Inflocine® and estimated by measuring the diameter of paw edema, for 5 hours at a 1-hour interval. After that the rats were scarified and the inflamed paw tissue was removed for the exploration of some parameters of oxidative stress and histopathology. PLFO showed a significant anti-inflammatory activity in comparison with the Inflocine. The percentages of edema inhibition were 70% and % 51.5% (p < 0.01), respectively, after five hours. The treatment with PLFO and Inflocine led to significant increases (p ≤ 0.05) in the activities of CAT, SOD, and GPX and significant decreases in the MDA level and AOPP activity in the paw tissue after Carr injection, in comparison with the Carr group. Therefore, our findings demonstrate that PLFO might accelerate the development of new drugs which could be used scientifically as a source for natural health products in the treatment of topical inflammation. PMID:28070202

  9. In Vivo Evaluation of the Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Pistacia lentiscus Fruit Oil and Its Effects on Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Ben Khedir, Sameh; Mzid, Masarra; Bardaa, Sana; Moalla, Dorsaf; Sahnoun, Zouheir; Rebai, Tarek

    2016-01-01

    In order to find new topical anti-inflammatory agents, we had recourse to a medicinal plant. This work was designed to determine the topical anti-inflammatory effect of Pistacia lentiscus fruit oil (PLFO), using carrageenan-induced paw edema rat model, and to evaluate its effects on oxidative stress. The topical anti-inflammatory activity of PLFO was compared to Inflocine® and estimated by measuring the diameter of paw edema, for 5 hours at a 1-hour interval. After that the rats were scarified and the inflamed paw tissue was removed for the exploration of some parameters of oxidative stress and histopathology. PLFO showed a significant anti-inflammatory activity in comparison with the Inflocine. The percentages of edema inhibition were 70% and % 51.5% (p < 0.01), respectively, after five hours. The treatment with PLFO and Inflocine led to significant increases (p ≤ 0.05) in the activities of CAT, SOD, and GPX and significant decreases in the MDA level and AOPP activity in the paw tissue after Carr injection, in comparison with the Carr group. Therefore, our findings demonstrate that PLFO might accelerate the development of new drugs which could be used scientifically as a source for natural health products in the treatment of topical inflammation.

  10. Chemical composition and antibacterial activity of the essential oil and the gum of Pistacia lentiscus Var. chia.

    PubMed

    Koutsoudaki, Christina; Krsek, Martin; Rodger, Alison

    2005-10-05

    The essential oil and gum of Pistacia lentiscus var. chia, commonly known as the mastic tree, are natural antimicrobial agents that have found extensive uses in medicine in recent years. In this work, the chemical composition of mastic oil and gum was studied by GC-MS, and the majority of their components was identified. alpha-Pinene, beta-myrcene, beta-pinene, limonene, and beta-caryophyllene were found to be the major components. The antibacterial activity of 12 components of mastic oil and the oil itself was evaluated using the disk diffusion method. Furthermore, attempts were made to separate the essential oil into different fractions in order to have a better picture of the components responsible for its antibacterial activity. Several trace components that appear to contribute significantly to the antibacterial activity of mastic oil have been identified: verbenone, alpha-terpineol, and linalool. The sensitivity to these compounds was different for different bacteria tested (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus subtilis), which suggests that the antibacterial efficacy of mastic oil is due to a number of its components working synergistically. The establishment of a correlation between the antibacterial activity of mastic oil and its components was the main purpose of this research. Mastic gum was also examined, but it proved to be more difficult to handle compared to the essential oil.

  11. Protective Effect of Pistacia lentiscus Oil Against Bleomycin-Induced Lung Fibrosis and Oxidative Stress in Rat.

    PubMed

    Abidi, Anouar; Aissani, Nadhem; Sebai, Hichem; Serairi, Raja; Kourda, Nadia; Ben Khamsa, Saloua

    2017-04-01

    We aimed in the present study to investigate the protective effect of Pistacia lentiscus oil against bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis as well as the involvement of oxidative stress in such protection. In this respect, adult male Wistar rats were used and divided into three groups of twenty each: control (NaCl, 0.9%), bleomycin, and bleomycin (4 mg/kg b.w.) + P. lentiscus oil (3 g/kg, b.w.). Animals were pretreated for 30 days before the induction of fibrosis by bleomycin and 1 wk after the induction of fibrosis. The oil principal compounds detected by gas chromatography analysis are: Linoleic and palmitic acids (70.6 and 24.7%, respectively). Our data demonstrated that P. lentiscus oil protected against bleomycin-induced fibrosis as evidenced by TGFβ immunostaining increase in lungs fibrocytes as well as inflammatory infiltrate. We also showed that acute bleomycin-induced fibrosis was accompanied by an oxidative stress in lung tissue as assessed by an increase of lipid peroxidation as well as antioxidant enzyme activities depletion such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT). More importantly, P. lentiscus oil treatment reversed all bleomycin-induced oxidative stress parameters disturbances. In conclusion, we suggest that P. lentiscus oil had potent protective effects against bleomycin-induced fibrosis due in part to its antioxidant properties.

  12. Inter-population variability of terpenoid composition in leaves of Pistacia lentiscus L. from Algeria: a chemoecological approach.

    PubMed

    Said, Samir Ait; Fernandez, Catherine; Greff, Stéphane; Torre, Franck; Derridj, Arezki; Gauquelin, Thierry; Mevy, Jean-Philippe

    2011-03-22

    Three different altitudes were selected to study the variability of terpenoid composition from leaves of female plants of Pistacia lentiscus L. throughout the elevation gradient. GC-MS analyses showed that terpenoid contents change with altitude. Forty nine compounds were identified with a high interpopulation variability for low- and midaltitude sites that also exhibited the same major components when data were expressed on dry weight basis. However, Two-Way-ANOVA followed by Tukey's post hoc test showed that monoterpene hydrocarbons increased with elevation, giving values of 21.7, 37.5 and 221.5 µg g⁻¹ dw for low- mid- and highlands, respectively. On the other hand, applying P.C.A. with data expressed in percentage of the chromatogram of the volatile extract led to the identification of three chemotypes associated with altitudinal levels. In highlands (Group I), the major compounds were β-caryophyllene (12%), δ-cadinene (9.3%) and a-pinene (6.3%) while in midlands (Group II), β-caryophyllene (11.5%), δ-cadinene (8.6%) and caryophyllene oxide (6.8%) were the main components. In lowlands (Group III) δ-cadinene (10.9%), cubebol (10.5%) and β-bisabolene (7.7%) were chiefly present. Hence, the involvement of genetic factors, temperature and drought in the chemical polymorphism of P. lentiscus associated with elevation is discussed in this report.

  13. Protective effects of mastic oil from Pistacia lentiscus variation chia against experimental growth of lewis lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Magkouta, Sophia; Stathopoulos, Georgios T; Psallidas, Ioannis; Papapetropoulos, Andreas; Kolisis, Fragiskos N; Roussos, Charis; Loutrari, Heleni

    2009-01-01

    Mastic oil from Pistacia lentiscus variation chia, a traditionally used dietary flavoring agent with medicinal properties, has been shown to exert in vitro antitumor activities, but no study has addressed in vivo efficacy and mechanisms of action. Presently, we demonstrated that treatment of immunocompetent mice with mastic oil (45 mg/kg body weight, intraperitoneally, 3 times a wk for approximately 3 wk) significantly inhibited tumor growth (56.4% +/- 5.7 maximum reduction in tumor volumes) without toxicity. Analysis of tumors by immunohistochemistry and ELISA indicated that this effect is associated with increased apoptosis, reduced neovascularization, and inhibition of chemokine expression. Likewise mastic oil reduced vascular endothelial growth factor and chemokine release by Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells. Furthermore, mastic oil administration decreased small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) Ras, RhoA and nuclear factor-kappa-B-dependent reporter gene expression in vivo and in vitro, indicating a mechanistic link between mastic oil activities and blocking of relevant signaling and transcription pathways. A dose-response comparison with perillyl alcohol and alpha-pinene, two of its components, revealed a higher efficacy of mastic oil, pointing to a beneficial collective interaction among its ingredients. Conclusively, our results provide novel in vivo evidence of mastic oil inhibitory effects on tumor growth and set a rational basis for its future application in cancer prevention.

  14. Mastic oil from Pistacia lentiscus var. chia inhibits growth and survival of human K562 leukemia cells and attenuates angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Loutrari, Heleni; Magkouta, Sophia; Pyriochou, Anastasia; Koika, Vasiliki; Kolisis, Fragiskos N; Papapetropoulos, Andreas; Roussos, Charis

    2006-01-01

    Mastic oil from Pistacia lentiscus var. chia, a natural plant extract traditionally used as a food additive, has been extensively studied for its antimicrobial activity attributed to the combination of its bioactive components. One of them, perillyl alcohol (POH), displays tumor chemopreventive, chemotherapeutic, and antiangiogenic properties. We investigated whether mastic oil would also suppress tumor cell growth and angiogenesis. We observed that mastic oil concentration and time dependently exerted an antiproliferative and proapoptotic effect on K562 human leukemia cells and inhibited the release of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) from K562 and B16 mouse melanoma cells. Moreover, mastic oil caused a concentration-dependent inhibition of endothelial cell (EC) proliferation without affecting cell survival and a significant decrease of microvessel formation both in vitro and in vivo. Investigation of underlying mechanism(s) demonstrated that mastic oil reduced 1) in K562 cells the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (Erk1/2) known to control leukemia cell proliferation, survival, and VEGF secretion and 2) in EC the activation of RhoA, an essential regulator of neovessel organization. Overall, our results underscore that mastic oil, through its multiple effects on malignant cells and ECs, may be a useful natural dietary supplement for cancer prevention.

  15. Mycorrhizas on nursery and field seedlings of Quercus garryana.

    PubMed

    Southworth, Darlene; Carrington, Elizabeth M; Frank, Jonathan L; Gould, Peter; Harrington, Connie A; Devine, Warren D

    2009-03-01

    Oak woodland regeneration and restoration requires that seedlings develop mycorrhizas, yet the need for this mutualistic association is often overlooked. In this study, we asked whether Quercus garryana seedlings in nursery beds acquire mycorrhizas without artificial inoculation or access to a mycorrhizal network of other ectomycorrhizal hosts. We also assessed the relationship between mycorrhizal infection and seedling growth in a nursery. Further, we compared the mycorrhizal assemblage of oak nursery seedlings to that of conifer seedlings in the nursery and to that of oak seedlings in nearby oak woodlands. Seedlings were excavated and the roots washed and examined microscopically. Mycorrhizas were identified by DNA sequences of the internal transcribed spacer region and by morphotype. On oak nursery seedlings, predominant mycorrhizas were species of Laccaria and Tuber with single occurrences of Entoloma and Peziza. In adjacent beds, seedlings of Pseudotsuga menziesii were mycorrhizal with Hysterangium and a different species of Laccaria; seedlings of Pinus monticola were mycorrhizal with Geneabea, Tarzetta, and Thelephora. Height of Q. garryana seedlings correlated with root biomass and mycorrhizal abundance. Total mycorrhizal abundance and abundance of Laccaria mycorrhizas significantly predicted seedling height in the nursery. Native oak seedlings from nearby Q. garryana woodlands were mycorrhizal with 13 fungal symbionts, none of which occurred on the nursery seedlings. These results demonstrate the value of mycorrhizas to the growth of oak seedlings. Although seedlings in nursery beds developed mycorrhizas without intentional inoculation, their mycorrhizas differed from and were less species rich than those on native seedlings.

  16. Toxicological and Biochemical Characterizations of AChE in Phosalone-Susceptible and Resistant Populations of the Common Pistachio Psyllid, Agonoscena pistaciae

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Ali; Talebi-Jahromi, Khalil; Hosseininaveh, Vahid; Ghadamyari, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    The toxicological and biochemical characteristics of acetylcholinesterases (AChE) in nine populations of the common pistachio psyllid, Agonoscena pistaciae Burckhardt and Lauterer (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), were investigated in Kerman Province, Iran. Nine A. pistaciae populations were collected from pistachio orchards, Pistacia vera L. (Sapindales: Anacardiaceae), located in Rafsanjan, Anar, Bam, Kerman, Shahrbabak, Herat, Sirjan, Pariz, and Paghaleh regions of Kerman province. The previous bioassay results showed these populations were susceptible or resistant to phosalone, and the Rafsanjan population was most resistant, with a resistance ratio of 11.3. The specific activity of AChE in the Rafsanjan population was significantly higher than in the susceptible population (Bam). The affinity (KM) and hydrolyzing efficiency (Vmax) of AChE on acetylthiocholine iodide, butyrylthiocholine iodide, and propionylthiocholine odide as artificial substrates were clearly lower in the Bam population than that in the Rafsanjan population. These results indicated that the AChE of the Rafsanjan population had lower affinity to these substrates than that of the susceptible population. The higher Vmax value in the Rafsanjan population compared to the susceptible population suggests a possible over expression of AChE in the Rafsanjan population. The in vitro inhibitory effect of several organophosphates and carbamates on AChE of the Rafsanjan and Bam populations was determined. Based on I50, the results showed that the ratios of AChE insensitivity of the resistant to susceptible populations were 23 and 21.7-fold to monocrotophos and phosphamidon, respectively. Whereas, the insensitivity ratios for Rafsanjan population were 0.86, 0.8, 0.78, 0.46, and 0.43 for carbaryl, eserine, propoxur, m-tolyl methyl carbamate, and carbofuran, respectively, suggesting negatively correlated sensitivity to organophosphate-insensitive AChE. Therefore, AChE from the Rafsanjan population showed negatively

  17. Spring Burn Aids Longleaf Pine Seedling Height Growth

    Treesearch

    William R. Maple

    1977-01-01

    Prescribed burning in midspring may stimulate height growth of longleaf pine seedlings. Seedlings were planted on sandy and clayey sites that were prescribed burned 2 years later. Treatments were cool, moderate, and hot burns and an unburned control. The hot, May burn significantly increased height growth of seedlings on the sandy site. The number of seedlings with 50...

  18. Controlled release fertilizer improves quality of container longleaf pine seedlings

    Treesearch

    R. Kasten Dumroese; Jeff Parkhurst; James P. Barnett

    2005-01-01

    In an operational trial, increasing the amount of nitrogen (N) applied to container longleaf pine seedlings by incorporating controlled release fertilizer (CRF) into the media improved seedling growth and quality. Compared with control seedlings that received 40 mg N, seedlings receiving 66 mg N through CRF supplemented with liquid fertilizer had needles that were 4 in...

  19. Synthesis of Pisolithus Ectomycorrhizae on Pecan Seedlings in Fumigated Soil

    Treesearch

    Donald H. Marx

    1979-01-01

    Curtis variety of pecan (Carya illinoensis) seedlings were grown for 8 months in fumigated soil infested at sowing with mycelial inoculum of Pisolithus tinctorius. Pisolithus ectomycorrhizae were formed on all inoculated seedlings and significantly improved their growth over control seedlings. Inoculated and control seedlings also formed ectomycorrhizae with naturally...

  20. Protecting red oak seedlings with tree shelters in northwestern Pennsylvania

    Treesearch

    Russell S. Walters; Russell S. Walters

    1993-01-01

    Examines the growth and survival of planted and natural red oak seedlings and seedlings from planted acorns within translucent tan tree shelters, fences, and unprotected controls under a shelterwood seed-cut stand. Seedlings planted within tree shelters and fences were inside tree shelters. Natural seedlings grew very little and their height inside and outside of tree...

  1. Seedling Diversity and the Homologies of Seedling Organs in the Order Poales (Monocotyledons)

    PubMed Central

    Tillich, Hans-Jürgen

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Seedlings of monocots are much more diverse than those of other angiosperms, often with very derived character states. This makes morphological interpretation difficult. The morphology of seedlings of most of the 16 families of the Poales alliance are only incompletely known. The present study aims first to develop an unambiguous terminology for the description of monocotyledonous seedlings. This makes possible clear morphological comparisons and the use of homologous terms for organs. Finally, plotting of well defined characters onto a molecular tree allows the polarization of character states. Method Seedlings were grown in Petri dishes on moist filter paper under permanent light conditions and analysed using light and scanning electron microscopy. Only seeds collected at natural habitats or from plants with a well documented source were used. Seedling vouchers are deposited in the alcohol collection of Monocot seedlings in the Botanische Staatssammlung München (M). Key Results Based on an unambiguous terminology, seedlings of a great number of genera are described and presented as figures, representing all families of Poales except Ecdeiocoleaceae. Seedlings of Rapateaceae, Joinvilleaceae and Mayacaceae are described for the first time. Morphological comparisons reveal a plausible interpretation of even very modified organ structures, including those of the grass seedling. Conclusions This study demonstrates that detailed studies of seedling morphology can provide interesting morphological insights and also new facts for phylogenetic analyses. However, the morphological diversity of seedlings in the monocots is as yet incompletely known, and in some, e.g. Alismatales or Zingiberales, the seedling structure is particularly poorly understood in terms of comparative morphology. PMID:17933843

  2. Ostryopsis davidiana seedlings inoculated with ectomycorrhizal fungi facilitate formation of mycorrhizae on Pinus tabulaeformis seedlings.

    PubMed

    Bai, Shu-Lan; Li, Guo-Lei; Liu, Yong; Kasten Dumroese, R; Lv, Rui-Heng

    2009-08-01

    Reforestation in China is important for reversing anthropogenic activities that degrade the environment. Pinus tabulaeformis is desired for these activities, but survival and growth of seedlings can be hampered by lack of ectomycorrhizae. When outplanted in association with Ostryopsis davidiana plants on reforestation sites, P. tabulaeformis seedlings become mycorrhizal and survival and growth are enhanced; without O. davidiana, pines often remain without mycorrhizae and performance is poorer. To better understand this relationship, we initiated an experiment using rhizoboxes that restricted root and tested the hypothesis that O. davidiana seedlings facilitated ectomycorrhizae formation on P. tabulaeformis seedlings through hyphal contact. We found that without O. davidiana seedlings, inocula of five indigenous ectomycorrhizal fungi were unable to grow and associate with P. tabulaeformis seedlings. Inocula placed alongside O. davidiana seedlings, however, resulted in enhanced growth and nutritional status of O. davidiana and P. tabulaeformis seedlings, and also altered rhizosphere pH and phosphatase activity. We speculate that these species form a common mycorrhizal network and this association enhances outplanting performance of P. tabulaeformis seedlings used for forest restoration.

  3. Differential effect of Pistacia vera extracts on experimental atherosclerosis in the rabbit animal model: an experimental study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Lipid-enriched diets and oxidative stress are risk factors for the development of atherosclerosis. The effects of the methanolic (ME) and cyclohexane (CHE) extracts of the Pistacia vera nut, often included in the Mediterranean diet, were studied in the rabbit model of atherosclerosis. Methods and results Twenty-four New Zealand White rabbits received atherogenic diet (Control Group), supplemented with ME (Group ME) or CHE (Group CHE) for 3 months. Previously, a GC-MS and a UHPLC LC-DAD-ESI(-)-HRMS/MS method were developed to investigate the extracts' chemical profiles. Blood samples at baseline and monthly determined lipid profile, lipid peroxidation and liver function. The aorta, myocardium and liver were examined histologically at 3 months. Groups ME and CHE had significantly higher HDL- and non-significantly lower LDL-cholesterol median % changes from baseline than the Control Group. Triacylglycerol was significantly higher in Group CHE vs. Control. MDA values were significantly lower in Group ME vs. Control and CHE. ALT and AST were significantly higher in Group CHE vs. Control. γ-GT was lower in Group ME vs. Control. Aortic intimal thickness was significantly less in Groups ME and CHE vs. Control; Group ME atherosclerotic lesions were significantly less extensive vs. Groups Control and CHE. Only Group CHE had significant liver fatty infiltration. Conclusions During short-term administration concomitantly with atherogenic diet, both P. vera extracts were beneficial on HDL-, LDL-cholesterol and aortic intimal thickness. The ME additionally presented an antioxidant effect and significant decrease of aortic surface lesions. These results indicate that P. vera dietary inclusion, in particular its ME, is potentially beneficial in atherosclerosis management. PMID:20633299

  4. Analysis of roasted and unroasted Pistacia terebinthus volatiles using direct thermal desorption-GCxGC-TOF/MS.

    PubMed

    Gogus, F; Ozel, M Z; Kocak, D; Hamilton, J F; Lewis, A C

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of roasting time on volatile components of Pistacia terebinthus L., a fruit growing wild in Turkey. The whole fruit samples were pan roasted for 0, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25min at 200°C. Volatile compounds were isolated and identified using the direct thermal desorption (DTD) method coupled with comprehensive gas chromatography - time of flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC-TOF/MS). The major components of the fresh hull of P. terebinthus were α-pinene (10.37%), limonene (8.93%), β-pinene (5.53%), 2-carene (4.47%) and γ-muurolene (4.29%). Eighty-three constituents were characterised from the volatiles of fresh whole P. terebinthus fruits obtained by direct thermal desorption with α-pinene (9.62%), limonene (5.54%), γ-cadinane (5.48%), β-pinene (5.46%), β-caryophyllene (5.24%) being the major constituents. The type and the number of constituents characterised were observed to change with differing roasting times. Limonene (5.56%), α-pinene (4.84%), 5-methylfurfural (4.78%), 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF, 3.89%), dimethylmetoxyfuranone (3.67%) and 3-methyl-2(5H)furanone (3.12%) were identified as the major components among the 104 compounds characterised in the volatiles of P. terebinthus, roasted for 25min. In addition, volatiles of fully roasted P. terebinthus fruits contained furans and furanones (15.42%), pyridines (4.45%) and benzene derivatives (3.81%) as the major groups.

  5. Identification of Reference Genes for Quantitative Gene Expression Studies in a Non-Model Tree Pistachio (Pistacia vera L.)

    PubMed Central

    Moazzam Jazi, Maryam; Ghadirzadeh Khorzoghi, Effat; Botanga, Christopher; Seyedi, Seyed Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    The tree species, Pistacia vera (P. vera) is an important commercial product that is salt-tolerant and long-lived, with a possible lifespan of over one thousand years. Gene expression analysis is an efficient method to explore the possible regulatory mechanisms underlying these characteristics. Therefore, having the most suitable set of reference genes is required for transcript level normalization under different conditions in P. vera. In the present study, we selected eight widely used reference genes, ACT, EF1α, α-TUB, β-TUB, GAPDH, CYP2, UBQ10, and 18S rRNA. Using qRT-PCR their expression was assessed in 54 different samples of three cultivars of P. vera. The samples were collected from different organs under various abiotic treatments (cold, drought, and salt) across three time points. Several statistical programs (geNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper) were applied to estimate the expression stability of candidate reference genes. Results obtained from the statistical analysis were then exposed to Rank aggregation package to generate a consensus gene rank. Based on our results, EF1α was found to be the superior reference gene in all samples under all abiotic treatments. In addition to EF1α, ACT and β-TUB were the second best reference genes for gene expression analysis in leaf and root. We recommended β-TUB as the second most stable gene for samples under the cold and drought treatments, while ACT holds the same position in samples analyzed under salt treatment. This report will benefit future research on the expression profiling of P. vera and other members of the Anacardiaceae family. PMID:27308855

  6. Identification of Reference Genes for Quantitative Gene Expression Studies in a Non-Model Tree Pistachio (Pistacia vera L.).

    PubMed

    Moazzam Jazi, Maryam; Ghadirzadeh Khorzoghi, Effat; Botanga, Christopher; Seyedi, Seyed Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    The tree species, Pistacia vera (P. vera) is an important commercial product that is salt-tolerant and long-lived, with a possible lifespan of over one thousand years. Gene expression analysis is an efficient method to explore the possible regulatory mechanisms underlying these characteristics. Therefore, having the most suitable set of reference genes is required for transcript level normalization under different conditions in P. vera. In the present study, we selected eight widely used reference genes, ACT, EF1α, α-TUB, β-TUB, GAPDH, CYP2, UBQ10, and 18S rRNA. Using qRT-PCR their expression was assessed in 54 different samples of three cultivars of P. vera. The samples were collected from different organs under various abiotic treatments (cold, drought, and salt) across three time points. Several statistical programs (geNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper) were applied to estimate the expression stability of candidate reference genes. Results obtained from the statistical analysis were then exposed to Rank aggregation package to generate a consensus gene rank. Based on our results, EF1α was found to be the superior reference gene in all samples under all abiotic treatments. In addition to EF1α, ACT and β-TUB were the second best reference genes for gene expression analysis in leaf and root. We recommended β-TUB as the second most stable gene for samples under the cold and drought treatments, while ACT holds the same position in samples analyzed under salt treatment. This report will benefit future research on the expression profiling of P. vera and other members of the Anacardiaceae family.

  7. Spectrofluorimetric determination of melatonin in kernels of four different Pistacia varieties after ultrasound-assisted solid-liquid extraction.

    PubMed

    Oladi, Elham; Mohamadi, Maryam; Shamspur, Tayebeh; Mostafavi, Ali

    2014-11-11

    Melatonin is normally consumed to regulate the body's biological cycle. However it also has therapeutic properties, such as anti-tumor, anti-aging and protects the immune system. There are some reports on the presence of melatonin in edible kernels such as walnuts, but the extraction of melatonin from pistachio kernels is reported here for the first time. For this, the methanolic extract of pistachio kernels was exposed to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis which confirmed the presence of melatonin. A fluorescence-based method was applied for the determination of melatonin in different extracts. When excited at λ=275 nm, the fluorescence emission intensity of melatonin was measured at λ=366 nm. Ultrasound-assisted solid-liquid extraction was used for the extraction of melatonin from pistachio kernels prior to fluorimetric determination. To achieve the highest extraction recovery, the main parameters affecting the extraction efficiency such as extracting solvent type and volume, temperature, sonication time and pH were evaluated. Under the optimized conditions, a linear dependence of fluorescence intensity on melatonin concentration was observed in the range of 0.0040-0.160 μg mL(-1), with a detection limit of 0.0036 μg mL(-1). This method was applied successfully for measuring and comparing the melatonin content in the kernels of four different varieties of Pistacia including Ahmad Aghaei, Akbari, Kalle Qouchi and Fandoghi. In addition, the results obtained were compared with those obtained using GC/MS. A good agreement was observed indicating the reliability of the proposed method.

  8. Toxicity and Safety Profiles of Methanolic Extract of Pistacia integerrima J. L. Stewart ex Brandis (PI) for Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sharwan, Gotmi; Jain, Parag; Pandey, Ravindra; Shukla, Shiv Shankar

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The goals of this research were to evaluate acute (single-dose) and sub-acute (repeated-dose) toxicity profiles of methanolic extract of Pistacia integerrima J. L. Stewart ex Brandis (PI) for Wistar rats and to assess the safety profile of PI by observing physiological changes, mortality, changes in body weight, the histopathology of body organs, the hematology and the biochemistry of the animals. Methods: The toxicity profile of PI was evaluated using Wistar rats of both sexes. Animals were divided into four groups: Group 1; control group (normal saline), Group 2; PI-1 (250 mg/kg), Group 3; PI-2 (500 mg/kg), Group 4; PL-3 (1,000 mg/kg). An acute-toxicity study in which animals received a single dose of PI extract (2,000 mg/ kg) and were then observed for 14 days for changes in skin, fur, eye color, mucous membrane secretions and excretions, gait, posture, and tonic or clonic movements was performed according to guideline 425 of the Organization of Economic and Corporation Development (OECD). In the repeated-dose toxicity study (OECD – 407) animals received a daily dose of PI extract for 28 days (4 weeks). The parameters observed in this study include body weight, hematology and biochemistry of the animals. Results: In the acute toxicity study, no mortalities or changes in behavior were noted in the animals. The repeated-dose toxicity study was also devoid of any toxicity in the animals during the 28 days of testing with PI extract. The extract did not alter- the body weight, hematology or biochemistry of the animals. The methanolic extract of PI was to be found safe to the no-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL) for the single- dose and repeated-dose toxicity tests in rats. Conclusion: The methanolic extract of PI was devoid of toxicity; hence, it can be used for various ayurvedic preparations and treatments of diseases. PMID:27695635

  9. Spectrofluorimetric determination of melatonin in kernels of four different Pistacia varieties after ultrasound-assisted solid-liquid extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oladi, Elham; Mohamadi, Maryam; Shamspur, Tayebeh; Mostafavi, Ali

    2014-11-01

    Melatonin is normally consumed to regulate the body's biological cycle. However it also has therapeutic properties, such as anti-tumor, anti-aging and protects the immune system. There are some reports on the presence of melatonin in edible kernels such as walnuts, but the extraction of melatonin from pistachio kernels is reported here for the first time. For this, the methanolic extract of pistachio kernels was exposed to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis which confirmed the presence of melatonin. A fluorescence-based method was applied for the determination of melatonin in different extracts. When excited at λ = 275 nm, the fluorescence emission intensity of melatonin was measured at λ = 366 nm. Ultrasound-assisted solid-liquid extraction was used for the extraction of melatonin from pistachio kernels prior to fluorimetric determination. To achieve the highest extraction recovery, the main parameters affecting the extraction efficiency such as extracting solvent type and volume, temperature, sonication time and pH were evaluated. Under the optimized conditions, a linear dependence of fluorescence intensity on melatonin concentration was observed in the range of 0.0040-0.160 μg mL-1, with a detection limit of 0.0036 μg mL-1. This method was applied successfully for measuring and comparing the melatonin content in the kernels of four different varieties of Pistacia including Ahmad Aghaei, Akbari, Kalle Qouchi and Fandoghi. In addition, the results obtained were compared with those obtained using GC/MS. A good agreement was observed indicating the reliability of the proposed method.

  10. Response surface modeling of Pb(II) removal from aqueous solution by Pistacia vera L.: Box-Behnken experimental design.

    PubMed

    Yetilmezsoy, Kaan; Demirel, Sevgi; Vanderbei, Robert J

    2009-11-15

    A three factor, three-level Box-Behnken experimental design combining with response surface modeling (RSM) and quadratic programming (QP) was employed for maximizing Pb(II) removal from aqueous solution by Antep pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) shells based on 17 different experimental data obtained in a lab-scale batch study. Three independent variables (initial pH of solution (pH(0)) ranging from 2.0 to 5.5, initial concentration of Pb(II) ions (C(0)) ranging from 5 to 50 ppm, and contact time (t(C)) ranging from 5 to 120 min) were consecutively coded as x(1), x(2) and x(3) at three levels (-1, 0 and 1), and a second-order polynomial regression equation was then derived to predict responses. The significance of independent variables and their interactions were tested by means of the analysis of variance (ANOVA) with 95% confidence limits (alpha=0.05). The standardized effects of the independent variables and their interactions on the dependent variable were also investigated by preparing a Pareto chart. The optimum values of the selected variables were obtained by solving the quadratic regression model, as well as by analysing the response surface contour plots. The optimum coded values of three test variables were computed as x(1)=0.125, x(2)=0.707, and x(3)=0.107 by using a LOQO/AMPL optimization algorithm. The experimental conditions at this global point were determined to be pH(0)=3.97, C(0)=43.4 ppm, and t(C)=68.7 min, and the corresponding Pb(II) removal efficiency was found to be about 100%.

  11. Photo- and antioxidative protection during summer leaf senescence in Pistacia lentiscus L. grown under Mediterranean field conditions.

    PubMed

    Munné-Bosch, S; Peñuelas, J

    2003-09-01

    Summer leaf senescence in Pistacia lentiscus L. plants serves to remobilize nutrients from the oldest leaves to the youngest ones, and therefore contributes to plant survival during the adverse climatic conditions typical of Mediterranean summers, i.e. water deficit superimposed on high solar radiation and high temperatures. To evaluate the extent of photo- and antioxidative protection during leaf senescence of this species, changes in carotenoids, including xanthophyll cycle pigments, and in the levels of ascorbate and alpha-tocopherol were measured prior to and during summer leaf senescence in 3-year-old plants grown under Mediterranean field conditions. Although a chlorophyll loss of approx. 20% was observed during the first stages of leaf senescence, no damage to the photosynthetic apparatus occurred as indicated by constant maximum efficiencies of photosystem II photochemistry. During this period the de-epoxidation state of the xanthophyll cycle, and lutein, neoxanthin and ascorbate levels were kept constant. At the same time beta-carotene and alpha-tocopherol levels increased by approx. 9 and 70%, respectively, presumably conferring photo- and antioxidative protection to the photosynthetic apparatus. By contrast, during the later stages of leaf senescence, characterized by severe chlorophyll loss, carotenoids were moderately degraded (neoxanthin by approx. 20%, and both lutein and beta-carotene by approx. 35%), ascorbate decreased by approx. 80% and alpha-tocopherol was not detected in senescing leaves. This study demonstrates that mechanisms of photo- and antioxidative protection may play a major role in maintaining chloroplast function during the first stages of leaf senescence, while antioxidant defences are lost during the latest stages of senescence.

  12. Irritantcy potential and sub acute dermal toxicity study of Pistacia lentiscus fatty oil as a topical traditional remedy.

    PubMed

    Djerrou, Zouhir; Djaalab, Hdria; Riachi, Foulla; Serakta, Mennouba; Chettoum, Aziez; Maameri, Zineb; Boutobza, Badaoui; Hamdi-Pacha, Youcef

    2013-01-01

    The current study was undertaken to assess safety of Pistacia lentiscus fruits fatty oil (PLFO) as a topical traditional remedy. A primary skin and eye irritation tests were conducted with New Zealand white rabbits to determine the potential for PLFO to produce irritation from a single application. In addition, a sub acute dermal toxicity study was performed on 18 NZW rabbits to evaluate possible adverse effect following application of PLFO for 28 days. Based on the results of the current study, PLFO is classified as slightly irritating to the skin and the eye of rabbits (Primary Irritation Index (P.I.I.) = 1.037; Ocular Irritation Index (O.I.I.) = 5.33 at 1 h). In the sub-acute toxicity test, PLFO produced neither mortality nor significant differences in the body and organ weights between control group and treated rabbits. However, a reversible irritant contact dermatitis was observed in the treated areas from the end of the second week of application until the end of experiment. This local phenomenon was accompanied by a significant skin thickening (P≤0.01) since the 12(th) day (ANOVA, F = 11, 07143, P = 0, 00765) which is confirmed with an inflammatory granuloma in histological study. Haematological analysis and blood chemistry values of the 2 groups showed no significant differences in any of the parameters examined. In summary, PLFO is minimally irritating to the eye and skin after a single exposure, but it may cause irritant contact dermatitis and a reversible thickening of skin after prolonged use.

  13. Antiatherogenic effect of Pistacia lentiscus via GSH restoration and downregulation of CD36 mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Dedoussis, George V Z; Kaliora, Andriana C; Psarras, Stellios; Chiou, Antonia; Mylona, Anastasia; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G; Andrikopoulos, Nikolaos K

    2004-06-01

    Pistacia lentiscus var. Chia (Anacardiaceae) grows almost exclusively on Chios Island, Greece, and gives a resinous exudate resin used for culinary purposes by Mediterranean people. We investigated the molecular mechanisms through which total polar extract of the resin inhibits oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) cytotoxic effect on peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC). Cells exposed to oxLDL underwent apoptosis and necrosis, dependent on the duration of exposure. When culturing cells with oxLDL and the polar extract concurrently, we observed inhibition of both the phenomena. Because under oxidative stress the pro-oxidant systems outbalance the antioxidant, potentially producing oxidative damage and ultimately leading to cell death, we measured the levels of intracellular antioxidant glutathione (GSH). Additionally, we measured CD36 expression, a class B scavenger receptor, on CD14-positive cells, as CD36 has been identified as the oxLDL receptor in macrophages and may play a pivotal role in atherosclerotic foam cell formation. oxLDL decreased GSH levels and upregulated CD36 expression. P. lentiscus extract restored GSH levels and downregulated CD36 expression, even at the mRNA level. In order to find out the biologically drastic constituents of the resin's polar extract, fractions derived from RP-HPLC analysis were examined for their antioxidant effect on oxidatively stressed PBMC. The triterpenoid fraction revealed remarkable increase in intracellular GSH. We suggest GSH restoration and downregulation of CD36 mRNA expression as the pathways via which P. lentiscus triterpenes exert antioxidant/antiatherogenic effect. Additionally, our results provide strong evidence of the resin's antiatherogenic effect; therefore it is credited with beneficial health aspects.

  14. Seasonal patterns and control of gas exchange in local populations of the Mediterranean evergreen shrub Pistacia lentiscus L.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flexas, Jaume; Gulías, Javier; Jonasson, Sven; Medrano, Hipólito; Mus, Mauricio

    2001-02-01

    We examined temporal and spatial variations in net photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, intrinsic water-use efficiency, sub-stomatal CO 2 concentration, apparent carboxylation efficiency and chlorophyll fluorescence in the Mediterranean shrub Pistacia lentiscus. The study was done at the extremes of a precipitation and temperature gradient on the coast and in the mountains of Mallorca, Spain, with gas exchange measurements at different times of the year, and combined measurements of gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence in a controlled experiment. The objectives were to relate annual variation in photosynthetic functions to environmentally induced constraints and to quantify to which extent local differences in climate can affect photosynthesis in shrub populations. In the mountain population, net photosynthesis peaked in spring and autumn, when water was abundant and temperature was moderately high. It was reduced in winter paralleling reduced carboxylation efficiency. Photosynthesis was at the annual minimum in summer at both sites due to drought-induced stomata closure combined with impaired function of the Calvin cycle. The coastal population maintained high photosynthesis in mid winter but had a pronounced decline in spring, and the summer decline lasted longer than in the mountains. Integrated over the seasons, net photosynthesis was about 25 % lower in the coastal than in the mountain population, in spite of maintained high mid winter photosynthesis. Hence, the reduction at the coast was mainly due to early onset of drought in spring and a long period of summer drought, showing that local climatic differences can cause pronounced spatial differences in plant carbon balance. As a consequence, similar differences probably also occur as a function of year-to-year variability of precipitation patterns and temperatures.

  15. Potential Start Codon Targeted (SCoT) and Inter-retrotransposon Amplified Polymorphism (IRAP) Markers for Evaluation of Genetic Diversity and Conservation of Wild Pistacia Species Population.

    PubMed

    Sorkheh, Karim; Amirbakhtiar, Nazanin; Ercisli, Sezai

    2016-08-01

    Wild pistachio species is important species in forests regions Iran and provide protection wind and soil erosion. Even though cultivation and utilization of Pistacia are fully exploited, the evolutionary history of the Pistacia genus and the relationships among the species and accessions is still not well understood. Two molecular marker strategies, SCoT and IRAP markers were analyzed for assessment of 50 accessions of this species accumulated from diverse geographical areas of Iran. A thorough of 115 bands were amplified using eight IRAP primers, of which 104 (90.4 %) have been polymorphic, and 246 polymorphic bands (68.7 %) had been located in 358 bands amplified by way of forty-four SCoT primers. Average PIC for IRAP and SCoT markers became 0.32 and 0.48, respectively. This is exposed that SCoT markers have been extra informative than IRAP for the assessment of variety among pistachio accessions. Primarily based on the two extraordinary molecular markers, cluster evaluation revealed that the 50 accessions taken for the evaluation may be divided into three distinct clusters. Those results recommend that the performance of SCoT and IRAP markers was highly the equal in fingerprinting of accessions. The results affirmed a low genetic differentiation among populations, indicating the opportunity of gene drift most of the studied populations. These findings might render striking information in breeding management strategies for genetic conservation and cultivar improvement.

  16. The mono - and sesquiterpene content of aphid-induced galls on Pistacia palaestina is not a simple reflection of their composition in intact leaves.

    PubMed

    Rand, Karin; Bar, Einat; Ben-Ari, Matan; Lewinsohn, Efraim; Inbar, Moshe

    2014-06-01

    Pistacia palaestina Boiss. (Anacardiaceae), a sibling species of P. terebinthus also known as turpentine tree or terebinth tree, is common in the Levant region. The aphid Baizongia pistaciae L. manipulates the leaves of the plant to form large galls, which provide both food and protection for its developing offspring. We analyzed the levels and composition of mono-and sesquiterpenes in both leaves and galls of ten naturally growing trees. Our results show that monoterpene hydrocarbons are the main constituents of P. palaestina leaves and galls, but terpene levels and composition vary among trees. Despite this inter-tree variation, terpene levels and compositions in galls from different trees resemble each other more than the patterns displayed by leaves from the same trees. Generally, galls contain 10 to 60 fold higher total terpene amounts than leaves, especially of the monoterpenes α-pinene and limonene. Conversely, the leaves generally accumulate more sesquiterpenes, in particular E-caryophyllene, germacrene D and δ-cadinene, in comparison to galls. Our results clearly show that the terpene pattern in the galls is not a simple reflection of that of the leaves and suggest that aphids have a strong impact on the metabolism of their host plant, possibly for their own defense.

  17. Characterization of the volatile constituents in the essential oil of Pistacia lentiscus L. from different origins and its antifungal and antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Barra, Andrea; Coroneo, Valentina; Dessi, Sandro; Cabras, Paolo; Angioni, Alberto

    2007-08-22

    Essential oil (EO) from aerial parts (leaves, juvenile branches, and flowers when present) of Pistacia lentiscus L. growing wild in five localities of Sardinia (Italy) was extracted by steam-distillation (SD) and analyzed by gas chromatography (GC), FID, and GC-ion trap mass spectrometry (ITMS). Samples of P. lentiscus L. were harvested between April and October to study the seasonal chemical variability of the EO. A total of 45 compounds accounting for 97.5-98.4% of the total EO were identified, and the major compounds were alpha-pinene (14.8-22.6%), beta-myrcene (1-19.4%), p-cymene (1.6-16.2%), and terpinen-4-ol (14.2-28.3%). The yields of EO (v/dry w) ranged between 0.09 and 0.32%. Similar content of the major compounds was found in samples from different origins and seasonal variability was also observed. The EOs were tested for their antifungal activity against Aspergillus flavus, Rhizoctonia solani, Penicillium commune, Fusarium oxysporum. Two samples were weakly effective against Aspergillus flavus. Furthermore, terpinenol and alpha-terpineol, two of the major components of EO of Pistacia lentiscus L., totally inhibited the mycelian growth of A. flavus. Quite good antioxidant activity of the EO was also found.

  18. Pistacia lentiscus Oleoresin: Virtual Screening and Identification of Masticadienonic and Isomasticadienonic Acids as Inhibitors of 11β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase 1.

    PubMed

    Vuorinen, Anna; Seibert, Julia; Papageorgiou, Vassilios P; Rollinger, Judith M; Odermatt, Alex; Schuster, Daniela; Assimopoulou, Andreana N

    2015-04-01

    In traditional medicine, the oleoresinous gum of Pistacia lentiscus var. chia, so-called mastic gum, has been used to treat multiple conditions such as coughs, sore throats, eczema, dyslipidemia, and diabetes. Mastic gum is rich in triterpenes, which have been postulated to exert antidiabetic effects and improve lipid metabolism. In fact, there is evidence of oleanonic acid, a constituent of mastic gum, acting as a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ agonist, and mastic gum being antidiabetic in mice in vivo. Despite these findings, the exact antidiabetic mechanism of mastic gum remains unknown. Glucocorticoids play a key role in regulating glucose and fatty acid metabolism, and inhibition of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 that converts inactive cortisone to active cortisol has been proposed as a promising approach to combat metabolic disturbances including diabetes. In this study, a pharmacophore-based virtual screening was applied to filter a natural product database for possible 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 inhibitors. The hit list analysis was especially focused on the triterpenoids present in Pistacia species. Multiple triterpenoids, such as masticadienonic acid and isomasticadienonic acid, main constituents of mastic gum, were identified. Indeed, masticadienonic acid and isomasticadienonic acid selectively inhibited 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 over 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 at low micromolar concentrations. These findings suggest that inhibition of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 contributes to the antidiabetic activity of mastic gum.

  19. Improving Longleaf Pine Seedling Production By Controlling Seed and Seedling Pathogens

    Treesearch

    James P. Barnett; John M. McGilvray

    2002-01-01

    The demand for container longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) planting stock is increasing across the Lower Gulf Coastal Plain. Poor-quality seeds and seedling losses during nursery culture further constrain a limited seed supply. Improved seed efficiency will be necessary to meet the need for increased seedling production. Seed presowing treatments...

  20. The effects of pruning treatments and initial seedling morphology on northern red oak seedling growth

    Treesearch

    Donald J. Kaczmarek; Phillip E. Pope

    1993-01-01

    Northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) seedlings exhibit relatively high survival rates following planting, but their growth rates are often slow and extensive stem dieback can occur. This study was designed to investigate the growth responses of northern red oak seedlings planted with or without root-pruning or shoot-pruning. One-year-old (1-0) northern red oak nursery...

  1. Ostryopsis davidiana seedlings inoculated with ectomycorrhizal fungi facilitate formation of mycorrhizae on Pinus tabulaeformis seedlings

    Treesearch

    Shu-Lan Bai; Guo-Lei Li; Yong Liu; R. Kasten Dumroese; Rui-Heng Lv

    2009-01-01

    Reforestation in China is important for reversing anthropogenic activities that degrade the environment. Pinus tabulaeformis is desired for these activities, but survival and growth of seedlings can be hampered by lack of ectomycorrhizae. When outplanted in association with Ostryopsis davidiana plants on reforestation sites, P. tabulaeformis seedlings become...

  2. Clinorotation affects soybean seedling morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilaire, Emmanuel; Guikema, James A.; Brown, Christopher S.

    1995-01-01

    Although spaceflight does not appear to significantly affect seed germination, it can influence subsequent plant growth. On STS-3 and SL-2, decreased growth (measured as plant length, fresh weight, and dry weight) was noted for pine, oat, and mung bean. In the CHROMEX-01 and 02 experiments with Haplopappus and in the CHROMEX-03 experiment with Arabidopsis, enhanced root growth was noted in the space-grown plants. In the CHROMEX-04 experiments with wheat, both leaf fresh weight and leaf area were diminished in the space-grown plants but there was no difference in total plant height (CS Brown, HG Levine, and AD Krikorian, unpublished data). These data suggest that microgravity impacts growth by whole plant partitioning of the assimilates. The objective of the present study was to determine the influence of clinorotation on the growth and the morphology of soybean seedlings grown in the Biological Research In Canister (BRIC) flight hardware. This experiment provided baseline data for a spaceflight experiment (BRIC-3) flown on STS-63 (February 3-11, 1995).

  3. Clinorotation affects soybean seedling morphology.

    PubMed

    Hilaire, E; Guikema, J A; Brown, C S

    1995-01-01

    Although spaceflight does not appear to significantly affect seed germination, it can influence subsequent plant growth. On STS-3 and SL-2, decreased growth (measured as plant length, fresh weight and dry weight) was noted for pine, oat and mung bean. In the CHROMEX-01 and -02 experiments with Haplopappus and in the CHROMEX-03 experiment with Arabidopsis, enhanced root growth was noted in the space-grown plants. In the CHROMEX-04 experiment with wheat, both leaf fresh weight and leaf area were diminished in the space-grown plants but there was no difference in total plant height (CS Brown, HG Levine, and AD Krikorian, unpublished data). These data suggest that microgravity impacts growth by whole plant partitioning of assimilates. The objective of the present study was to determine the influence of clinorotation on the growth and morphology of soybean seedlings grown in the BRIC (Biological Research In Canister) flight hardware. This experiment provided baseline data for a spaceflight experiment (BRIC-03) flown on STS-63 (Feb. 3-11, 1995).

  4. Clinorotation affects soybean seedling morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilaire, Emmanuel; Guikema, James A.; Brown, Christopher S.

    1995-01-01

    Although spaceflight does not appear to significantly affect seed germination, it can influence subsequent plant growth. On STS-3 and SL-2, decreased growth (measured as plant length, fresh weight, and dry weight) was noted for pine, oat, and mung bean. In the CHROMEX-01 and 02 experiments with Haplopappus and in the CHROMEX-03 experiment with Arabidopsis, enhanced root growth was noted in the space-grown plants. In the CHROMEX-04 experiments with wheat, both leaf fresh weight and leaf area were diminished in the space-grown plants but there was no difference in total plant height (CS Brown, HG Levine, and AD Krikorian, unpublished data). These data suggest that microgravity impacts growth by whole plant partitioning of the assimilates. The objective of the present study was to determine the influence of clinorotation on the growth and the morphology of soybean seedlings grown in the Biological Research In Canister (BRIC) flight hardware. This experiment provided baseline data for a spaceflight experiment (BRIC-3) flown on STS-63 (February 3-11, 1995).

  5. Evaluation of monoterpenic biogenic volatile organic compounds in ambient air around Eucalyptus globulus, Pinus halepensis and Cedrus atlantica trees growing in Algiers city area by chiral and achiral capillary gas chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yassaa, Noureddine; Youcef Meklati, Brahim; Cecinato, Angelo

    The monoterpenic biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) in ambient air around either Eucalyptus globulus, Cedrus atlantica and Pinus halepensis trees from El- Hamma Botanical Garden (Algiers) or from Pinus halepensis trees field located in Bab-Ezzouar (suburb of Algiers) was qualitatively and semi-quantitatively evaluated. The sampling was carried out in ambient air by adsorption through an activated charcoal cartridge followed by the carbon disulfide extraction. The solution was subjected to high-resolution gas chromatography (HRGC) analysis in programmed temperature. The identification of the components was established by the means of retention Kovàts indexes. The use of a β-cyclodextrin chiral capillary column allowed a good separation of monoterpenic enantiomers released in the atmosphere. The enantiomeric ratio provided a good insight into the enantiomeric compound preferentially emitted by plants.

  6. Genetically improved ponderosa pine seedlings outgrow nursery-run seedlings with and without competition -- Early findings

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, P.M.; Fiddler, G.O. ); Kitzmiller, J.H. . Chico Tree Improvement Center)

    1994-04-01

    Three classes of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) seedlings (nursery-run, wind-pollinated, control-pollinated) were evaluated for stem height and diameter at the USDA Forest Service's Placerville Nursery and the Georgetown Range District in northern California. Pines in all three classes were grown with competing vegetation or maintained in a free-to-grow condition. Control-pollinated seedlings were statistically taller than nursery-run counterparts when outplanted, and after 1 and 2 growing seasons in the field with and without competition. They also had significantly larger diameters when outplanted and after 2 growing seasons in the field when free to grow. Wind-pollinated seedlings grew taller than nursery-run seedlings when free to grow. A large amount of competing vegetation [bearclover (Chamaebatia foliolosa)--29,490 plants per acre; herbaceous vegetation--11,500; hardwood sprouts--233; and whiteleaf manzanita (Arctostaphylos viscida) seedlings--100] ensure that future pine development will be tested rigorously.

  7. Influence of Plant-Parasitic Nematodes on Longleaf Pine Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Ruehle, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    Seedlings of longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) were grown in 20-cm pots for 5 to 7 months in the greenhouse following inoculation with a high or low level of one of seven species of plant-parasitic nematodes. Belonolaimus longicaudatus and Helicotylenchus dihystera had no effect on seedling growth. High inoculum densities of Hoplolaimus galeatus and Tylenchorhynchus claytoni caused a significant reduction of fresh weight of seedling roots. Root and top weights of seedlings grown in soil infested with Meloidodera floridensis or Pratylenchus brachyurus were significantly less than those of seedlings in noninfested soil. Root growth of seedlings was stimulated by the higher inoculum density of Scutellonema brachyurum. PMID:19319287

  8. Influence of plant-parasitic nematodes on longleaf pine seedlings.

    PubMed

    Ruehle, J L

    1973-01-01

    Seedlings of longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) were grown in 20-cm pots for 5 to 7 months in the greenhouse following inoculation with a high or low level of one of seven species of plant-parasitic nematodes. Belonolaimus longicaudatus and Helicotylenchus dihystera had no effect on seedling growth. High inoculum densities of Hoplolaimus galeatus and Tylenchorhynchus claytoni caused a significant reduction of fresh weight of seedling roots. Root and top weights of seedlings grown in soil infested with Meloidodera floridensis or Pratylenchus brachyurus were significantly less than those of seedlings in noninfested soil. Root growth of seedlings was stimulated by the higher inoculum density of Scutellonema brachyurum.

  9. Gibberellin Biosynthesis in Developing Pumpkin Seedlings12

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Theo; Kappler, Jeannette; Fischer, Andreas; Frisse, Andrea; Padeffke, Tania; Schmidtke, Sabine; Lange, Maria João Pimenta

    2005-01-01

    A gibberellin (GA) biosynthetic pathway was discovered operating in root tips of 7-d-old pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima) seedlings. Stepwise analysis of GA metabolism in cell-free systems revealed the conversion of GA12-aldehyde to bioactive GA4 and inactive GA34. Highest levels of endogenous GA4 and GA34 were found in hypocotyls and root tips of 3-d-old seedlings. cDNA molecules encoding two GA oxidases, CmGA20ox3 and CmGA3ox3, were isolated from root tips of 7-d-old LAB150978-treated seedlings. Recombinant CmGA20ox3 fusion protein converted GA12 to GA9, GA24 to GA9, GA14 to GA4, and, less efficiently, GA53 to GA20, and recombinant CmGA3ox3 protein oxidized GA9 to GA4. Transcript profiles were determined for four GA oxidase genes from pumpkin revealing relatively high transcript levels for CmGA7ox in shoot tips and cotyledons, for CmGA20ox3 in shoot tips and hypocotyls, and for CmGA3ox3 in hypocotyls and roots of 3-d-old seedlings. Transcripts of CmGA2ox1 were mainly found in roots of 7-d-old seedlings. In roots of 7-d-old seedlings, transcripts of CmGA7ox, CmGA20ox3, and CmGA3ox3 were localized in the cap and the rhizodermis by in situ hybridization. We conclude that hypocotyls and root tips are important sites of GA biosynthesis in the developing pumpkin seedling. PMID:16126862

  10. Chemical composition, efficacy and safety of Pistacia vera (var. Fandoghi) to inactivate protoscoleces during hydatid cyst surgery.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudvand, Hossein; Kheirandish, Farnaz; Dezaki, Ebrahim Saedi; Shamsaddini, Saeedeh; Harandi, Majid Fasihi

    2016-08-01

    At present, various scolicidal agents have been used for inactivation of protoscoleces during hydatid cyst surgery, however, they are associated with serious adverse side effects including sclerosing colangititis (biliary tract fibrosis), liver necrosis and methaemoglobinaemia. This investigation was designed to evaluate the chemical composition and in vitro scolicidal effects of Pistacia vera (var. Fandoghi) essential oil against protoscoleces of hydatid cysts and also its toxicity in mice model. The components of the P. vera essential oil were identified by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) analysis. Protoscoleces were aseptically aspirated from sheep livers having hydatid cysts. Various concentrations of the essential oil (25-200μl/mL) were used for 5-30min. Viability of protoscoleces was confirmed using eosin exclusion test (0.1% eosin staining). In addition, forty male NIH mice were used to determine the acute and sub-acute toxicity of P. vera essential oil for 2 and 14 days, respectively. The main components of P. vera essential oil were limonene (26.21%), α-pinene (18.07%), α-thujene (9.31%) and α-terpinolene (9.28%). Findings of the present study demonstrated that the P. vera essential oil at the concentrations of 100 and 200μl/mL killed 100% protoscoleces after 10 and 5min of exposure, respectively. The LD50 values of intraperitoneal injection of the P. vera essential oil was 2.69ml/kg body weight, and the maximum nonfatal doses were 1.94ml/kg body weight. No significant difference (P>0.05) was observed in the clinical chemistry and hematological parameters following oral administrations of P. vera essential oil at the doses 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4ml/kg for 14 days. The obtained findings demonstrated new chemical composition and promising scolicidal activity of the P. vera with no significant toxicity which might be used as a natural scolicidal agent in hydatid cyst surgery.

  11. Seedling growth and development on space shuttle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowles, J.; Lemay, R.; Jahns, G.

    1994-11-01

    Young pine seedlings, and mung bean and oat seeds were flown on shuttle flights, STS-3 and STS-51F, in March, 1982 and July/August, 1985, respectively. The plant growth units built to support the two experiments functioned mechanically as anticipated and provided the necessary support data. Pine seedlings exposed to the microgravity environment of the space shuttle for 8 days continued to grow at a rate similar to ground controls. Pine stems in flight seedlings, however, averaged 10 to 12% less lignin than controls. Flight mung beans grew slower than control beans and their stems contained about 25% less lignin than control seedlings. Reduced mung bean growth in microgravity was partly due to slower germination rate. Lignin also was reduced in flight oats as compared to controls. Oats and mung beans exhibited upward growing roots which were not observed in control seedlings. Chlorophll A/B ratios were lower in flight tissues than controls. The sealed PGCs exhibited large variations in atmospheric gas composition but the changes were similar between flight and ground controls. Ethylene was present in low concentrations in all chambers.

  12. Seedling growth and development on space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowles, J.; Lemay, R.; Jahns, G.

    1994-01-01

    Young pine seedlings, and mung bean and oat seeds were flown on shuttle flights, STS-3 and STS-51F, in March, 1982 and July/August, 1985, respectively. The plant growth units built to support the two experiments functioned mechanically as anticipated and provided the necessary support data. Pine seedlings exposed to the microgravity environment of the space shuttle for 8 days continued to grow at a rate similar to ground controls. Pine stems in flight seedlings, however, averaged 10 to 12% less lignin than controls. Flight mung beans grew slower than control beans and their stems contained about 25% less lignin than control seedlings. Reduced mung bean growth in microgravity was partly due to slower germination rate. Lignin also was reduced in flight oats as compared to controls. Oats and mung beans exhibited upward growing roots which were not observed in control seedlings. Chlorophyll A/B ratios were lower in flight tissues than controls. The sealed PGCs exhibited large variations in atmospheric gas composition but the changes were similar between flight and ground controls. Ethylene was present in low concentrations in all chambers.

  13. Seedling growth and development on space shuttle.

    PubMed

    Cowles, J; LeMay, R; Jahns, G

    1994-11-01

    Young pine seedlings, and mung bean and oat seeds were flown on shuttle flights, STS-3 and STS-51F, in March, 1982 and July/August, 1985, respectively. The plant growth units built to support the two experiments functioned mechanically as anticipated and provided the necessary support data. Pine seedlings exposed to the microgravity environment of the space shuttle for 8 days continued to grow at a rate similar to ground controls. Pine stems in flight seedlings, however, averaged 10 to 12% less lignin than controls. Flight mung beans grew slower than control beans and their stems contained about 25% less lignin than control seedlings. Reduced mung bean growth in microgravity was partly due to slower germination rate. Lignin also was reduced in flight oats as compared to controls. Oats and mung beans exhibited upward growing roots which were not observed in control seedlings. Chlorophyll A/B ratios were lower in flight tissues than controls. The sealed PGCs exhibited large variations in atmospheric gas composition but the changes were similar between flight and ground controls. Ethylene was present in low concentrations in all chambers.

  14. Seedling growth and development on space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowles, J.; Lemay, R.; Jahns, G.

    1994-01-01

    Young pine seedlings, and mung bean and oat seeds were flown on shuttle flights, STS-3 and STS-51F, in March, 1982 and July/August, 1985, respectively. The plant growth units built to support the two experiments functioned mechanically as anticipated and provided the necessary support data. Pine seedlings exposed to the microgravity environment of the space shuttle for 8 days continued to grow at a rate similar to ground controls. Pine stems in flight seedlings, however, averaged 10 to 12% less lignin than controls. Flight mung beans grew slower than control beans and their stems contained about 25% less lignin than control seedlings. Reduced mung bean growth in microgravity was partly due to slower germination rate. Lignin also was reduced in flight oats as compared to controls. Oats and mung beans exhibited upward growing roots which were not observed in control seedlings. Chlorophyll A/B ratios were lower in flight tissues than controls. The sealed PGCs exhibited large variations in atmospheric gas composition but the changes were similar between flight and ground controls. Ethylene was present in low concentrations in all chambers.

  15. Anaerobic metabolism in Brassica seedlings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Myoung-Ryoul; Hasenstein, Karl H.

    Germination typically depends on oxidative respiration. The lack of convection under space conditions may create hypoxic or conditions during seed germination. We investigated the effect of reduced oxygen on seed germination and metabolism to understand how metabolic constraints affect seed growth and responsiveness to reorientation. Germination was completely inhibited when seeds were imbibed in the absence of oxygen; germination occurred at 5% oxygen and higher levels. Adding oxygen after 72 h resulted in immediate germination (protrusion of the radicle). Hypoxia typically activates alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH, EC 1.1.1.1) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, EC 1.1.1.27) which produce ethanol and/or L-lactate, respectively. We report on the expression of ADH1 and LDH1, and changes in total soluble sugars, starch, pH, and L-lactate in seedlings grown at 28°C in 0, 2.5, 5, 10% and ambient (21%) oxygen conditions as controls. The highest consumption (lowest level) of sugars was seen at 0% oxygen but the lowest level of starch occurred 24 h after imbibition under ambient condition. Expression levels of ADH1 in ambient oxygen condition increased within 24 h but increased threefold under hypoxic conditions; LDH1 increased up to 8-fold under hypoxia compared to controls but ADH1 and LDH1 were less expressed as the oxygen levels increased. The intracellular pH of seeds decreased as the content of L-lactate increased for all oxygen concentrations. These results indicate that germination of Brassica is sensitive to oxygen levels and that oxygen availability during germination is an important factor for metabolic activities. (Supported by NASA grant NNX10AP91G)

  16. Growth of Douglas-fir seedlings after slash burning.

    Treesearch

    Robert F. Tarrant; Ernest. Wright

    1955-01-01

    An understanding of the ways slash burning may affect seedling growth is important in evaluating present slash-disposal practices. Some observations of early seedling development after slash burning are now available from a recent exploratory study.

  17. Virulence of Three Cylindrocladium Species to Yellow-Poplar Seedlings

    Treesearch

    T. H. Filer

    1970-01-01

    Cylindrocladium crotalariae and C. scoparium caused severe root rot on potted yellow-poplar seedlings. They appeared to be equally virulent. C. floridanum caused necrosis only on feeder roots of the seedlings.

  18. Changes of nucleic acids of wheat seedlings under spaceflight conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sytnyk, K. M.; Musatenko, L. I.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of space flight on the growth of wheat seedlings and their nucleic acid content were studied. It was shown that both space and ground seedlings have almost the same appearance, dry weight and nucleic acid content in the root, coleoptile and leaves. The only difference found is in the RNA and DNA content, which is twice as much in the ground seedling apices as in the space-grown seedlings.

  19. The effect of terebinth (Pistacia terebinthus L.) coffee addition on the chemical and physical characteristics, colour values, organic acid profiles, mineral compositions and sensory properties of ice creams.

    PubMed

    Yüksel, Arzu Kavaz; Şat, Ihsan Güngör; Yüksel, Mehmet

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the effect of terebinth (Pistacia terebinthus L.) coffee addition (0.5, 1 and 2 %) on the chemical and physical properties, colour values, organic acid profiles, mineral contents and sensory characteristics of ice creams. The total solids, fat, titratable acidity, viscosity, first dripping time and complete melting time values, a (*) and b (*) colour properties, citric, lactic, acetic and butyric acid levels and Ca, Cu, Mg, Fe, K, Zn and Na concentrations of ice creams showed an increase with the increment of terebinth coffee amount, while protein, pH, L (*), propionic acid and orotic acid values decreased. However, Al and malic acid were not detected in any of the samples. The overall acceptability scores of the sensory properties showed that the addition of 1 % terebinth coffee to the ice cream was more appreciated by the panellists.

  20. Characterization of the Aroma-Active, Phenolic, and Lipid Profiles of the Pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) Nut as Affected by the Single and Double Roasting Process.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Bencomo, Juan José; Kelebek, Hasim; Sonmezdag, Ahmet Salih; Rodríguez-Alcalá, Luis Miguel; Fontecha, Javier; Selli, Serkan

    2015-09-09

    The pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) nut is one of the most widely consumed edible nuts in the world. However, it is the roasting process that makes the pistachio commercially viable and valuable as it serves as the key step to improving the nut's hallmark sensory characteristics including flavor, color, and texture. Consequently, the present study explores the effects of the single-roasting and double-roasting process on the pistachio's chemical composition, specifically aroma-active compounds, polyphenols, and lipids. Results showed the total polyphenol content of increased with the roasting treatment; however, not all phenolic compounds demonstrated this behavior. With regard to the aroma and aroma-active compounds, the results indicated that roasting process results in the development of characteristics and pleasant aroma of pistachio samples due to the Maillard reaction. With regard to lipids, the pistachio roasting treatment reduced the concentration of CN38 diacylglycerides while increasing the amount of elaidic acid.

  1. Identification of archaeological triterpenic resins by the non-separative techniques FTIR and 13C NMR: the case of Pistacia resin (mastic) in comparison with frankincense.

    PubMed

    Bruni, Silvia; Guglielmi, Vittoria

    2014-01-01

    The use of spectroscopic techniques such as Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and carbon 13 nuclear magnetic resonance ((13)C NMR) using the J-mod experiment is proposed as an effective alternative to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for the analysis and identification of natural resin samples found in archaeological environments. The spectral features of the most common diterpenic and triterpenic resins and also two gum-resins are reported and discussed for both techniques. The analytical procedure based on the combined use of FTIR and (13)C NMR is then applied to two archaeological samples from the Milano of the Roman age allowing their identification as Pistacia resin, or mastic, as confirmed by the traditional GC-MS method, and also elucidating some effects of aging on such material. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of manganese on endomycorrhizal sugar maple seedlings

    Treesearch

    George A. Schier; Carolyn J. McQuattie

    2002-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) toxicity may play an important role in the poor survival of seedlings in declining sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) stands in northern Pennsylvania. To determine the effect of Mn on the growth of sugar maple seedlings, 1-year-old seedlings inoculated with vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi and growing in sand-vermiculite-...

  3. "Super" Spruce Seedlings Continue Superior Growth for 18 Years

    Treesearch

    Hans Nienstaedt

    1981-01-01

    White spruce seedlings--20, 19, 18, and 17 inches tall--were selected among 2-2 transplants; controls from the same beds averaged 7.7 inches tall. After 18 years in the field, the selected seedlings continued to have a 30 percent height growth advantage over the controls. This note discusses how to incorporate super spruce seedlings into a tree breeding program....

  4. The impact of strip clearcutting on red oak seedling development

    Treesearch

    Jamie L. Schuler; Michael Boyce; Gary W. Miller

    2017-01-01

    A mature upland yellow-poplar/red oak stand was harvested using an alternating strip clearcut method. Red oak seedlings were planted across a light gradient between the cut and residual strips to assess the potential ability of the residual strips to foster the development of competitive oak seedlings over time. After one growing season, no differences in seedling...

  5. Impact of silvicultural treatment on chestnut seedling growth and survival

    Treesearch

    C.C. Pinchot; S.E. Schlarbaum; S.L. Clark; C.J. Schweitzer; A.M. Saxton; F. V. Hebard

    2014-01-01

    Putatively blight-resistant advanced backcross chestnut seedlings will soon be available for outplanting on a regional scale. Few studies have examined the importance of silvicultural treatment or seedling quality to chestnut reintroduction in the U.S. This paper examines results from a silvicultural study of high-quality chestnut seedlings on the Cumberland Plateau of...

  6. Management of seedling damping-off of alfalfa

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A vigorous and productive alfalfa stand starts with strong and uniform seedling establishment. Seed rot and seedling damping-off are a significant cause of poor stand establishment in wet soils. A number of organisms cause seed rot and seedling damping-off including several species of Pythium. As a ...

  7. Seedling production and pest problems at a South Georgia nursery

    Treesearch

    Stephen W. Fraedrich; L. David Dwinell; Michelle M. Cram

    2002-01-01

    Pine seedling production and pest problems were evaluated in methyl bromide-fumigated and nonfumigated plots in two fields at a South Georgia nursery. In one field, fumigation increased loblolly pine seedling bed density in only 1 of 4 years. Seedlings were often significantly larger in fumigated than nonfumigated plots. In the other field, no differences were observed...

  8. Implications of large oak seedlings on problematic deer herbivory

    Treesearch

    Christopher M. Oswalt; Wayne K. Clatterbuck; Allan E. Houston; Scott E. Schlarbaum

    2006-01-01

    Seedling herbivory by whitetail deer [Odocoileus virginianus (Boddaert)] can be a significant problem where artificial regeneration is attempted. We examined the relationship between deer herbivory and morphological traits of northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) seedlings for two growing seasons for both browsed and non-browsed seedlings. Logistic...

  9. Propagation and planting of containerized Eucalyptus seedlings in Hawaii

    Treesearch

    Gerald A. Walters

    1983-01-01

    A container reforestation system has been researched and developed in Hawaii which results in consistently high survival and growth rates for eucalyptus seedlings. Mean survival of containerized saligna eucalyptus (Eucalyptus saligna Smith) seedlings is 90 percent with a standard deviation of 4. Because transplant shock is minimal, seedlings begin to...

  10. Measuring the response of conifer seedlings to soil compaction stress

    Treesearch

    Howard G. Halverson; Robert P. Zisa

    1982-01-01

    A test of seedling growth response to several levels of soil compaction showed that root penetration depth was best correlated with soil compaction. Shoot biomass, root biomass, root elongation, and seedling height were not well correlated with compaction. The results reveal that most measurements of growth do not give a good indication of seedling response to stresses...

  11. Density and Age Affect Performance of Containerized Loblolly Pine Seedlings

    Treesearch

    James P. Barnett

    1980-01-01

    Loblolly pine seedlings were grown in 1 x 5 inch biodegradable plastic tubes for 10, 12, and 14 weeks at densities of 42, 84, 126, and 168 per square foot. Seedling density and age significantly affected seedling development at time of outplanting, and density became more important as greenhouse growing times increased. All morphological characteristics measured when...

  12. Lime-amended growing medium causes seedling growth distortions

    Treesearch

    R. Kasten Dumroese; Gale Thompson; David L. Wenny

    1990-01-01

    Although a commercial growing medium with incorporated agricultural lime had been successfully used for years, it caused growth distortion of coniferous and deciduous seedlings during 1988. Seedlings grown in the amended medium were stunted and chlorotic, often with disfigured needles and multiple tops. Seedlings grown in the same medium without incorporated lime grew...

  13. Grazing on Regeneration Sites Encourages Pine Seedling Growth

    Treesearch

    Raymond D. Ratliff; Renee G. Denton

    1995-01-01

    Effects of season-long, deferred-rotation, and rest-rotation grazing, on ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) seedling growth and herbaceous vegetation control were studied in regeneration sites at Boyd Hill, Modoc National Forest, California. Seedlings were planted in 1989. Pine seedling survival and damage did not differ, but the...

  14. Interim Guidelines for Growing Longleaf Seedlings in Containers

    Treesearch

    James P. Barnett; Mark J. Hainds; George A. Hernandez

    2002-01-01

    The demand for container longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) planting stock continues to increase each year. A problem facing both producers and users of container seedlings is the lack of target seedling specifications. Outplanting and evaluating performance of seedlings with a range of physiological and morphological characteristics, over a...

  15. Growing media trials at the Montana Conservation Seedling Nursery

    Treesearch

    John Justin

    2009-01-01

    The Montana Conservation Seedling Nursery (MCSN) in Missoula produces 750,000 container seedlings annually in containers ranging in size from 66 cm3 (4 in3) up to 61 L (16 gal) pots. The MCSN is a production facility with no research funding. When we encounter a promising idea for improving our seedlings or the efficiency of nursery operations, we rarely perform...

  16. Rhizoctonia seedling damping-off in sugar beet in Michigan

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rhizoctonia solani is an important seedling pathogen of sugar beet, causing damping-off following seedling emergence. Anastomosis group (AG)-4 has been the primary seedling pathogen reported on sugar beet, however, recent screening has found high incidence of infection by AG-2-2. Isolations of R. so...

  17. Analysis for an environmental friendly seedling breeding system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Y. H.; Wei, X. M.; Hou, Y. F.; Chen, B.; Chen, G. Q.; Lin, C.

    2009-04-01

    Most seedlings of crops are produced in solar greenhouse or nursery, from which some problems about energy waste and environment pollution arise. This study aims at investigating the characteristics and effect of an environmental friendly type seedling breeding system. The results demonstrate that crops can grow with a short period and little pollution in the new seedling breeding system with total manpower controllable environment that is not influenced by geography, climate and other natural conditions. By multilayer, nonplanar seedling breeding and annual batches arrangement, utilization ratio of unit area land and seedlings yield can be improved for several times and even more than 10 times. Conclusions can be obtained from the tomato seedling breeding experiments: (1) each growth index of tomato seedlings that are under the conditions of 291 μmol/m2 s artificial illumination intensity is remarkably better than those produced in greenhouse with natural lights. (2) The environment of the seedling breeding system can be accurately controlled. The segmented temperature changed management can be applied according to the photosynthetic characteristics of plants, and not affected by the outside environment, which makes each growth index of tomato seedling constant in different seasons. The seedlings thus grow strong and can achieve the level of commodity seedlings after 20-30 days. (3) The temperature and humidity environment of the seedling breeding system can be accurately controlled according to plants growth demands.

  18. Proceedings of the Southern Containerized Forest Tree Seedling Conference

    Treesearch

    Richard W. Guldin; James P. Barnett; [Editors

    1982-01-01

    Research findings provide benefits to society when they are communicated to and implemented by users. This principle was the rationale for the Southern Containerized Forest Tree Seedling Conference. In the 8 years since the North American Containerized Forest Tree Seedling Symposium in August 1974, southern foresters have developed container seedling nurseries and...

  19. Hardening fertilization and nutrient loading of conifer seedlings

    Treesearch

    R. Kasten Dumroese

    2003-01-01

    Continuing to fertilize bareroot and container seedlings during the hardening process (from cessation of height growth until lifting) can improve seedling viability. The process of fertilizing during hardening has many names, but in the last decade a new term, nutrient loading, has come into use. The process of nutrient loading seedlings leads to luxury consumption...

  20. Response of paper birch seedlings to nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium

    Treesearch

    John C. Bjorkbom

    1973-01-01

    The effects of N, P, and K on the growth of paper birch seedlings were tested in sand culture tests. Each element was tested singly at different supplies while holding constant the supply of all other elements. Seedling growth increased with increasing amounts of nitrogen. Three to 4 percent in the foliage indicated an adequate supply. Seedlings were relatively...

  1. Seed Mucilage Improves Seedling Emergence of a Sand Desert Shrub

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xuejun; Baskin, Carol C.; Baskin, Jerry M.; Liu, Guangzheng; Huang, Zhenying

    2012-01-01

    The success of seedling establishment of desert plants is determined by seedling emergence response to an unpredictable precipitation regime. Sand burial is a crucial and frequent environmental stress that impacts seedling establishment on sand dunes. However, little is known about the ecological role of seed mucilage in seedling emergence in arid sandy environments. We hypothesized that seed mucilage enhances seedling emergence in a low precipitation regime and under conditions of sand burial. In a greenhouse experiment, two types of Artemisia sphaerocephala achenes (intact and demucilaged) were exposed to different combinations of burial depth (0, 5, 10, 20, 40 and 60 mm) and irrigation regimes (low, medium and high, which simulated the precipitation amount and frequency in May, June and July in the natural habitat, respectively). Seedling emergence increased with increasing irrigation. It was highest at 5 mm sand burial depth and ceased at burial depths greater than 20 mm in all irrigation regimes. Mucilage significantly enhanced seedling emergence at 0, 5 and 10 mm burial depths in low irrigation, at 0 and 5 mm burial depths in medium irrigation and at 0 and 10 mm burial depths in high irrigation. Seed mucilage also reduced seedling mortality at the shallow sand burial depths. Moreover, mucilage significantly affected seedling emergence time and quiescence and dormancy percentages. Our findings suggest that seed mucilage plays an ecologically important role in successful seedling establishment of A. sphaerocephala by improving seedling emergence and reducing seedling mortality in stressful habitats of the sandy desert environment. PMID:22511952

  2. Effects of Lifting Method, Seedling Size, and Herbaceous Weed Control on First-Year Growth of Loblolly Pine Seedlings

    Treesearch

    Jason P. Reynolds; Thomas A. Greene; John R. Britt

    2002-01-01

    In fall, 1999, an experiment was installed to measure the effects and interactions of lifting method, seedling size, and weed competition on growth of loblolly pine (P. teada) seedlings during the first two growing seasons. Loblolly pine seedlings grown at two bed densities and lifted either by hand or machine were planted in southwestern Georgia...

  3. Fall versus spring transplanting of container seedlings: A comparison of seedling morphology

    Treesearch

    David Steinfeld; David Davis; Steve Feigner; Karen House

    2002-01-01

    Containerized seedlings of Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii), sugar pine (Pinus lambertiana), Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), western redcedar (Thuja plicata), and western hemlock (Tsuga heterphylla) transplanted in the early fall and later in the early spring were...

  4. Genotype X Fertility Interactions in Seedling Sweetgum

    Treesearch

    Scott X. Chang; Daniel J. Robison

    2002-01-01

    Genotype x fertility interactions may affect the suitability of sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) for specific sites or the efficiency of nutrient use. To gain a better understanding of these interactions, 2-year-old sweetgum seedlings from two half-sib families were tested for growth response to N (0 and 100 kg/ha equivalent) and P (0 and 50 kg...

  5. Direct-seedling pines in the south

    Treesearch

    Harold J. Derr; William F. Mann

    1971-01-01

    Direct seeding of the southern pines is a versatile reforestation technique that is being widely accepted by land managers. On many sites it is more economical than planting nursery-grown seedlings or waiting for natural reproduction. It is applicable on some sites where access, terrain, or drainage conditions make planting difficult. Commercial trials have proved it...

  6. Container-grown longleaf pine seedling quality

    Treesearch

    Mark J. Hainds; James P. Barnett

    2006-01-01

    The Longleaf Alliance, in cooperation with the USDA Forest Service, the Georgia Forestry Commission, and the Clemson Extension Service, has installed numerous longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) seedling quality studies across the Southeastern United States. This paper reviews survival and growth for different classes of container-grown longleaf...

  7. Characterization of rhizobacteria associated with weed seedlings.

    PubMed

    Kremer, R J; Begonia, M F; Stanley, L; Lanham, E T

    1990-06-01

    Rhizobacteria were isolated from seedlings of seven economically important weeds and characterized for potential phytopathogenicity, effects on seedling growth, and antibiosis to assess the possibility of developing deleterious rhizobacteria as biological control agents. The abundance and composition of rhizobacteria varied among the different weed species. For example, fluorescent pseudomonads represented from 11 to 42% of the total rhizobacterial populations from jimsonweed and lambsquarters, respectively. Other bacteria frequently isolated were nonfluorescent pseudomonads, Erwinia herbicola, Alcaligenes spp., and Flavobacterium spp. Only 18% of all isolates were potentially phytopathogenic, based on an Escherichia coli indicator bioassay. However, the proportion of isolates that inhibited growth in seedling assays ranged from 35 to 65% depending on the weed host. Antibiosis was most prevalent among isolates of fluorescent Pseudomonas spp., the activity of which was due to siderophore production in over 75% of these isolates. Overall, rhizobacterial isolates exhibited a complex array of properties that were inconsistent with accepted definitions for plant growth-promoting and deleterious rhizobacteria. It is suggested that for development of effective biological control agents for weed control, deleterious rhizobacteria must be screened directly on host seedlings and must possess several properties including high colonizing ability, specific phytotoxin production, and resistance or tolerance to antibiotics produced by other rhizosphere microorganisms, and they must either synthesize or utilize other bacterial siderophores.

  8. Design issues for evaluating seedling exposure studies.

    Treesearch

    E. Charles Peterson; A. Robert. Mickler

    1993-01-01

    Tree seedling studies, covering a wide range of experimental conditions in pollutant treatment, species, facilities, and exposure regimes, have become commonplace in forestry research for assessing the actual and potential environmental effects of air pollutants on forest ecosystems. While assuring a wide breadth of scientific information, sufficient consideration has...

  9. Interim Guidelines Growing Longleaf Seedlings in Containers

    Treesearch

    James P. Barnett; Mark J. Hainds; George A. Hernandez

    2002-01-01

    These interim guidelines are designed for producers and users of longleaf pine container stock. They are not meant to exclude any container product. The seedling specifications listed in the preferred category are attainable by the grower and will result in excellent field sur vival and early height growth.

  10. Rhizoctonia seedling disease on sugar beet

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rhizoctonia seedling damping-off can cause losses in sugar beet as well as providing inoculum for later root rot. The disease is caused by Rhizoctonia solani. The pathogen has several subgroups, anastomosis groups (AG), of which AG-4 has historically been associated with damping-off, while AG-2-2 is...

  11. [Hydraulic characters of Acer truncatum seedlings].

    PubMed

    Zhai, Hongbo; Li, Jiyue

    2003-09-01

    The hydraulic parameters of 4 years old Acer truncatum seedlings were measured by improved flushing method under the condition of controlled drought gradients in the greenhouse. It's indicated that the changes of hydraulic parameters with stem segment functional xylem diameter could be modeled by different equations. The hydraulic conductivity was influenced by the area that stem segment located. It was higher in non-constriction area than in constriction area. The existence of constriction area was in favor of the competition between individual seedlings. Hydraulic conductivity, specific conductivity and leaf specific conductivity were proportional with functional xylem diameter and twig water potential. The leaf specific conductivity of thicker branches was far higher than that of distal twigs, which was in favor of seedlings in saving those organs with more photosynthesis devotion during drought stress. The change of Huber value of same diameter branches with twig water potential was very small before defoliation, and hence, the main source of seedling's water stress came from xylem cavitation and embolism.

  12. Treating seedling and sapling stands for wildlife

    Treesearch

    Edwin D. Michael

    1989-01-01

    What you want to focus on during the seedling-sapling stage is understory development and species selection. By thinning newly regenerated stands you increase sunlight and therefore the abundance and nutritional value of herbaceous vegetation. Thinning allows you to favor understory species that provide browse, forage, and seeds for wildlife. Precommercial thinning in...

  13. Postfire seedling dynamics and performance in Pinus halepensis Mill. populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daskalakou, Evangelia N.; Thanos, Costas A.

    2010-09-01

    Postfire dynamics of Aleppo pine seedling density, survival and growth were assessed in five burned forests of Attica, Greece (Stamata, Villia, Avlona, Kapandriti and Agios Stefanos) through the establishment of permanent experimental plots. All emerging seedlings were tagged and their survival and growth monitored at regular intervals. Seedling density dynamics show an initial, steep increase (to maximum values 2.9-4.6 seedlings m -2) followed by a gradual decrease that levels off at the second and third postfire year (1.3-3.0 seedlings m -2); similarly, postfire seedling survival more or less stabilised at 30-50%, 2-3 years after fire. On the basis of density and mortality trends as well as relevant bibliographic data, it is predicted that very dense, mature forests (10.000 trees ha -1 or more) will be reinstated within 15-20 years. During the first 5-7 postfire years, seedling/sapling annual height followed linear trends with various yearly rates, ranging mostly between 8 and 15 cm (and 27-30 cm in two exceptional, fast growing cases). Within an individual growth season, seedling height dynamics were found to follow sigmoid curves with growth increment peaks in mid-spring. The time (on a monthly basis) of seedling emergence did not affect seedling growth or survival. On the other hand, for the first time under natural conditions, it has been shown that cotyledon number per seedling, an indirect measure of both seed size and initial photosynthetic capacity, significantly affected seedling survival but not growth. Seedlings bearing a higher number of cotyledons, presumably derived from larger seeds, showed greater survival at the end of the first postfire year than seedlings with fewer cotyledons. A postfire selective pressure, favouring large seed size, is postulated to counteract with a contrasting one, which favours small seed size, expressed during fire-free conditions.

  14. On the biomechanics of seedling anchorage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouzy, Benoît; Edmaier, Katharina; Perona, Paolo

    2014-05-01

    We propose a minimal model for the response of vegetation to pullout constraints at early development stage. We try to capture both the average mechanical properties of the root system and the stochastic component of the uprooting process of seedlings. We identify a minimal set of relevant physical components in the purpose of quantifying the uprooting process: length of the root fibres, elastic response of the fibres and adhesion between the roots and the soil matrix. We present for validation a dataset extracted from Edmaier et al. (under revision), accounting for 98 uprooting experiments using Avena sativa L. seedlings (common oat), growing in non-cohesive sediment under controlled conditions. The corresponding root system has a very simple architecture, with three root fibres of different lengths. The response of the system to the constraint is however complex: the stress-strain signal presents sudden jumps followed by partial elastic recoveries. The analysis of the jumps and partial recoveries gives an insight into the resilience of the system. The anchorage of less mature seedlings rapidly collapses after the peak force has been reached, while more mature seedlings usually recover from partial failures. We explore this crossover with our validation dataset. The type of seedlings we study has been used in flume experiments investigating the feedbacks between the vegetation and the river morphodynamics (see for example Perona et al. (2012)). An understanding of the characteristics of the uprooting curve (maximal uprooting force and total uprooting work) of such vegetation reveals the ability of seedlings to withstand environmental constraints in terms of duration or intensity (see Edmaier et al., under revision), and is therefore helpful for planning future experiments. REFERENCES - P. Perona, P. Molnar, B. Crouzy, E. Perucca, Z. Jiang, S. McLelland, D. Wüthrich, K. Edmaier, R. Francis, C. Camporeale, et al., Biomass selection by floods and related timescales

  15. Seedling functional types in a lowland rain forest in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ibarra-Manríquez, G; Martínez Ramos, M; Oyama, K

    2001-10-01

    Seedling morphology of 210 species (173 trees and 37 lianas) was studied from a community perspective to identify major patterns of seedling functional types in a Mexican rain forest. Five types of seedlings were distinguished: cryptocotylar with reserve storage or absorption cotyledons (epigeal [CER] and hypogeal [CHR]), phanerocotylar epigeal, either with photosynthetic cotyledons (PEF) or with reserve storage or absorption cotyledons (PER), and phanerocotylar hypogeal with reserve cotyledons (PHR). The most common seedling type was PEF (49.5%), followed by CHR (31.4%), PER (9.5%), PHR (7.2%), and CER (2.4%). Excepting the CER type, seedling type frequencies did not differ between trees and lianas. The PEF seedlings had the lightest seeds, whereas CHR seedlings had the heaviest ones. Pioneer trees showed lighter seeds than persistent trees or lianas in species with PEF but not in species with PER. Pioneer trees (38 species) showed three seedling types and the most common was PEF (82%). Persistent trees (135 species) showed the five seedling types but PEF (43%) and CHR (37%) were the most frequent. Seedling type frequencies differed among dispersal syndrome groups. The animal dispersal syndrome was significantly more frequent in species with CHR. Our results show an evolutionary convergence of seedling types at the community level worldwide and the existence of a phylogenetic inertia in the evolution of initial seedling morphology. A comparison among eight tropical communities indicated on average that PEF is the most frequent type and CER the least common, although the relative frequency of each seedling type differs among communities, particularly between Neotropical and Paleotropical sites.

  16. Seedling emergence on Sonoran desert dunes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowers, Janice E.

    1996-01-01

    Seedling emergence of psammophiles (plants restricted to active dunes) was examined with germination experiments and with field observations at the Algodones Dunes, California, U.S.A., and the Sierra del Rosario Dunes, Sonora, Mexico. In the field, perennial psammophiles germinated in response to smaller rainfall triggers (??? 10mm) than other woody desert plants (??? 16mm). In germination experiments, seedlings of three perennial psammophiles, Astragalus magdalenae var. peirsonii, Helianthus niveus subsp. tephrodes, and Palafoxia arida var. gigantea, emerged in larger numbers from greater soil depths than those of three nonpsammophiles, Cercidium microphyllum, Fouquieria splendens, and Palafoxia arida var. arida. Seed size for these six species did not correlate in any consistent fashion with emergence depth, suggesting that food reserves are not the only variable that ensures emergence of deeply buried psammophile seeds.

  17. Early events in geotropism of seedling shoots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickard, B. G.

    1985-01-01

    Developments during the first ten minutes of geotropic stimulation in plant seedling shoots are reviewed. Topics include induction and curvature; early processes; the relationship between auxin, electric field, calcium, and differential growth; gravity reception leading to Went-Cholodny transport; and comparison of root and shoot. Early processes reviewed are sedimentation of amyloplasts, release of ethylene, rise of electrical and auxin asymmetry, redistribution of calcium, asymmetric vascular transport, increase in tendency to deposit callose, and simulation of putative exocytotic voltage transients.

  18. Early events in geotropism of seedling shoots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickard, B. G.

    1985-01-01

    Developments during the first ten minutes of geotropic stimulation in plant seedling shoots are reviewed. Topics include induction and curvature; early processes; the relationship between auxin, electric field, calcium, and differential growth; gravity reception leading to Went-Cholodny transport; and comparison of root and shoot. Early processes reviewed are sedimentation of amyloplasts, release of ethylene, rise of electrical and auxin asymmetry, redistribution of calcium, asymmetric vascular transport, increase in tendency to deposit callose, and simulation of putative exocytotic voltage transients.

  19. Devices to protect seedlings from deer browsing

    Treesearch

    David A. Marquis

    1977-01-01

    Studies on the Allegheny Plateau of Pennsylvania have shown that several types of wire or plastic tubes can be erected around tree seedlings to protect them from deer browsing. The two most promising devices are a 4- to 6-inch diameter plastic tube with small mesh and a 12-inch diameter tube constructed of chicken wire. Both types need to be at least 5 feet tall to...

  20. Freeze injury to southern pine seedlings

    Treesearch

    David B. South

    2006-01-01

    Freeze injury to roots and shoots of pines is affected by genotype and nursery practices. Local sources of shortleaf pine and Virginia pine that are grown in nurseries in USDA hardiness Zones 6 and 7a are relatively freeze tolerant. However, loblolly pine, slash pine, and longleaf pine seedlings have been injured by a number of freeze events (0 to 24 °F) in hardiness...

  1. [Effect of ectomycorrhizae on the growth of Picea koraiensis seedlings].

    PubMed

    Song, Rui-Qing; Wu, Ke

    2005-12-01

    Basidioscarps of Agaricales in different Picea koraiensis forest plantations were collected during August-October, 2000. 36 isolaters of species of Agaricales were obtained by isolating and culturing to the basidioscarps. Through indoor inoculation test on seedlings of Picea koraiensis, 6 ectomycorrhizae fungi cultures were obtained from 36 isolaters. The inoculation results show that the period for ectomycorrhizae inoculation to 1-year seedlings of Picea koraiensis should be about 30 days after seedlings emerging, the suitable temperature for ectomycorrhizae forming is about 20 degrees C. 6 ectomycorrhizae strains all have growth-promoting effect to the seedlings of Picea koraiensis. The contents of chlorophyll a of the seedlings inoculated strains of Agaricus silvaticus, 031 and L15 were significantly higher than other strains and control. The contents of chlorophyll b in the seedlings inoculated strains 009, 004, Agaricus silvaticus and L15 were significantly higher than other strains and control. The weights of seedlings which inoculated strains 009, 025, 031, Agaricus silvaticus and L15 were significantly different to control, the weight of seedlings inoculated strains of Agaricus silvaticus and L15 are 19.23% and 23.08% more than control; The heights of the seedlings inoculated 6 strains all have significant difference to control, the weight of seedlings inoculated strains of Agaricus silvaticus and L15 are 17.83% and 16.37% more than control. The results of outdoor inoculation show that the seedlings inoculated Agaricus silvaticus grow best on height, 9.25% more than control after inoculated 70 days; the seedlings inoculated strain L15 grow best on collar diameter, 9.92% more than control after inoculated 70 days; the lateral root numbers of seedlings inoculated strain 009 is largest, 51.91% more than control after inoculated 70 days; the main roots of seedlings inoculated strain 009 are longest, 3.36% more than control after inoculated 70 days; the

  2. Enhancement of American chestnut somatic seedling production.

    PubMed

    Andrade, G M; Merkle, S A

    2005-08-01

    Somatic embryogenesis holds promise for mass propagation of American chestnut trees bred or genetically engineered for resistance to chestnut blight. However, low germination frequency of chestnut somatic embryos has limited somatic seedling production for this forest tree. We tested the effects of culture regime (semi-solid versus liquid), cold treatment, AC and somatic embryo morphology (i.e., cotyledon number) on germination and conversion of the somatic embryos. Cold treatment for 12 weeks was critical for conversion of chestnut somatic embryos to somatic seedlings, raising conversion frequencies for one line to 47%, compared to 7% with no cold treatment. AC improved germination and conversion frequency for one line to 77% and 59%, respectively, and kept roots from darkening. For two lines that produced embryos with one, two or three-plus cotyledons, cotyledon number did not affect germination or conversion frequency. We also established embryogenic American chestnut suspension cultures and adapted a fractionation/plating system that allowed us to produce populations of relatively synchronous somatic embryos for multiple lines. Embryos derived from suspension cultures of two lines tested had higher conversion frequencies (46% and 48%) than those from cultures maintained on semi-solid medium (7% and 30%). The improvements in manipulation of American chestnut embryogenic cultures described in this study have allowed over a 100-fold increase in somatic seedling production efficiency over what we reported previously and thus constitute a substantial advance toward the application of somatic embryogenesis for mass clonal propagation of the tree.

  3. Kinetics for phototropic curvature by etiolated seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orbovic, V.; Poff, K. L.

    1991-01-01

    An infrared-imaging system has been used to study the influence of gravity on the kinetics of first positive phototropism. The development of phototropic curvature of etiolated seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana was measured in the absence of visible radiation. Following a pulse of blue light, stationary seedlings curved to a maximum of approximately 16 degrees about 80 minutes after stimulation. The seedlings then curved upward again or straightened by about 6 degrees during the subsequent 100 minutes. Seedlings rotated on a clinostat reached a similar maximum curvature following photostimulation. These seedlings maintained that curvature for 30 to 40 minutes before subsequently straightening to the same extent as the stationary seedlings. It is concluded that straightening is not a consequence of gravitropism, although gravity has some effect on the phototropism kinetics.

  4. [Adaptability of mangrove Kandelia obovata seedlings to salinity-waterlogging].

    PubMed

    You, Hui-ming

    2015-03-01

    A laboratory test on the effects of 12 salinity-waterlogging stresses on the growth of Kandelia obovata seedlings was conducted. Nine growth indexes including seedling height, stem height, basal diameter, node number, leaf number, root biomass, stem biomass, leaf biomass and total biomass were measured. The results showed that salinity and salinity-waterlogging stresses had significant effects on the growth of K. obovata seedlings, while waterlogging stress had no significant effects on the seedling height, stem height, basal diameter, node number and leaf number, but had significant effects on root biomass, stem biomass, leaf biomass and total biomass. The growth and biomass of K. obovata seedlings decreased with increasing the salinity and waterlogging time. The principal components analysis showed that K. obovata seedlings would grow best under the 7 per thousand salinity+2 h waterlogging stress, while the 21per thousand+8 h combination was a critical stress.

  5. Nutrient partitioning and seedling development in the genus Leucaena

    SciTech Connect

    Dovel, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    Slow establishment of the genus Leucaena from seed has been attributed to law seedling vigor and late nodulation. Observation of early seedling growth indicated that partitioning of a large proportion of resources to the root of young Leucaena seedlings could account, in part, for the slow initial shoot growth observed in this genus. Therefore, a series of experiments were conducted to examine the partitioning of stored seed reserves, photosynthate, and nitrogen in developing Leucaena seedlings. The effects of nodulation and nitrogen fertilization on partitioning of nutrients in the seedling were also examined. Seed reserves were initially used for radicle growth in dark grown seedlings; however, partitioning soon shifted to the hypocotyl. By four days after imbibition, hypocotyl weight exceeded radicle weight in both species tested (L. leucocephala and L. retusa), at all temperatures above 20/sup 0/C. Two experiments were conducted examining the carbon partitioning of L. leucocephala cultivar K-8 using /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ pulse labeling techniques.

  6. Container Oak Seedlings for Bottomland Hardwood (BLH) Restoration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-01

    artificial stratification, necessary to break seed dormancy . Following the stratification period, seeds should be sown directly into containers filled...when flooding extends into the growing season. Traditionally, restoration has been accomplished with bare-root seedlings or direct seeding with acorns...operators must harvest seedlings before preparation of the seed bed for next year’s crop. If planting occurs prior to flooding, seedlings must tolerate

  7. Longleaf pine bud development: influence of seedling nutrition

    Treesearch

    J. P. Barnett; D. P. Jackson; R. K. Dumroese

    2010-01-01

    A subset of seedlings from a larger study (Jackson and others 2006, 2007) were selected and evaluated for two growing seasons to relate bud development, and root-collar diameter (RCD), and height growth with three nursery fertilization rates. We chose seedlings in the 0.5 (lowest), 2.0 (mid-range), and 4.0 (highest) mg of nitrogen per seedling treatments. Buds moved...

  8. Sod cutting and soil biota effects on seedling performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weijtmans, Kim; Jongejans, Eelke; van Ruijven, Jasper

    2009-09-01

    Sod cutting (i.e. top soil removal) is a restoration management option for enhancing seedling establishment and for lowering the nutrient concentration in eutrophicated soils of nutrient-poor species-rich grasslands. Removal of the upper soil changes not only abiotic soil properties but may also affect the resident soil community. We investigated the effects of sod cutting on the establishment and performance of two endangered plant species ( Cirsium dissectum and Succisa pratensis) while simultaneously manipulating the interaction between seedlings and soil biota. In intact grassland and sod-cut areas at two localities, seedlings were grown in plastic tubes. Half of the tubes had a filter that excluded roots but allowed entry of fungal hyphae and soil microorganisms. The other tubes were closed (i.e. no contact with the surrounding soil). In a greenhouse experiment we studied the effect of soil solutions (with or without fungal tissue) from three grasslands and three sod-cut areas on seedling growth. Sod cutting had a positive net effect on seedling growth for S. pratensis. Access to (mycorrhizal) fungi and other soil biota resulted in a negative impact on seedling growth of both plant species, both in grassland and sod-cut areas. The greenhouse experiment confirmed that the soil biota in these meadows reduced seedling growth. Although sod cutting did not mitigate negative plant-soil feedback, it enhanced seedling growth, presumably by decreasing competition for light. Sod cutting is therefore very useful when seedling establishment needs to be stimulated.

  9. Microelement contents and fatty acid compositions of Rhus coriaria L. and Pistacia terebinthus L. fruits spread commonly in the south eastern Anatolia region of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kizil, Suleyman; Turk, Murat

    2010-01-01

    Sumac (Rhus coriaria L.) and terebinth (Pistacia terebinthus L.) are two important spice plants of south eastern Anatolia, Turkey. Nutrients, physical properties including moisture, ash, dry matter, protein, fatty oil and essential oil content, along with Al, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Na, Ni, Pb, Zn and characteristics of fruit sizes and fatty acid compositions of both plants were determined from ripe fruits. The free fatty acid content was determined in the fruit oil, and the main fatty acids of sumac and terebinth were identified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. They included oleic, linoleic, palmitic and stearic acids in a ratio of 37.7% and 34.8%, 27.4% and 17.3%, 21.1% and 21.7% and, 4.7% and 2.5%, respectively. The fruits of both plants were rich in oil, fatty acids and minerals, suggesting that they are valuable for using in food. The data may also be useful for the evaluation of nutritional information.

  10. Induction of apoptosis by pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) hull extract and its molecular mechanisms of action in human hepatoma cell line HepG2.

    PubMed

    Fathalizadeh, J; Bagheri, V; Khorramdelazad, H; Kazemi Arababadi, M; Jafarzadeh, A; Mirzaei, M R; Shamsizadeh, A; Hajizadeh, M R

    2015-11-30

    Several important Pistacia species such as P. vera have been traditionally used for treating a wide range of diseases (for instance, liver-related disorders). There is a relative lack of research into pharmacological aspects of pistachio hull. Hence, this study was aimed at investigating whether pistachio rosy hull (PRH) extract exerts apoptotic impacts on HepG2 liver cancer cell line. In order to evaluate cell viability and apoptosis in response to treatment with the extract, MTT assay and Annexin-V-fluorescein/propidium iodide (PI) double staining were performed, respectively. Moreover, molecular mechanism of apoptosis induced by the extract was determined using human apoptosis PCR array. Our findings showed that PRH extract treatment reduced cell viability (IC50 ~ 0.3 mg/ml) in a dose-dependent manner. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that the extract significantly induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells. In addition, quantitative PCR array results demonstrated the regulation of a considerable number of apoptosis-related genes belonging to the TNF, BCL2, IAP, TRAF, and caspase families. We observed altered expression of both pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic genes associated with the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptosis signaling pathways. These results suggest that the aqueous extract of PRH possesses apoptotic activity through cytotoxic and apoptosis-inducing effects on HepG2 cells.

  11. The Molecular Cytogenetic Characterization of Pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) Suggests the Arrest of Recombination in the Largest Heteropycnotic Pair HC1

    PubMed Central

    Sola-Campoy, Pedro J.; Robles, Francisca; Schwarzacher, Trude; Ruiz Rejón, Carmelo; de la Herrán, Roberto; Navajas-Pérez, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    This paper represents the first molecular cytogenetic characterization of the strictly dioecious pistachio tree (Pistacia vera L.). The karyotype was characterized by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with probes for 5S and 45S rDNAs, and the pistachio specific satellite DNAs PIVE-40, and PIVE-180, together with DAPI-staining. PIVE-180 has a monomeric unit of 176–178 bp and high sequence homology between family members; PIVE-40 has a 43 bp consensus monomeric unit, and is most likely arranged in higher order repeats (HORs) of two units. The P. vera genome is highly heterochromatic, and prominent DAPI positive blocks are detected in most chromosomes. Despite the difficulty in classifying chromosomes according to morphology, 10 out of 15 pairs (2n = 30) could be distinguished by their unique banding patterns using a combination of FISH probes. Significantly, the largest pair, designated HC1, is strongly heteropycnotic, shows differential condensation, and has massive enrichment in PIVE-40 repeats. There are two types of HC1 chromosomes (type-I and type-II) with differing PIVE-40 hybridization signal. Only type-I/II heterozygotes and type-I homozygotes individuals were found. We speculate that the differentiation between the two HC1 chromosomes is due to suppression of homologous recombination at meiosis, reinforced by the presence of PIVE-40 HORs and differences in PIVE-40 abundance. This would be compatible with a ZW sex-determination system in the pistachio tree. PMID:26633808

  12. Artificial neural network (ANN) approach for modeling of Pb(II) adsorption from aqueous solution by Antep pistachio (Pistacia Vera L.) shells.

    PubMed

    Yetilmezsoy, Kaan; Demirel, Sevgi

    2008-05-30

    A three-layer artificial neural network (ANN) model was developed to predict the efficiency of Pb(II) ions removal from aqueous solution by Antep pistachio (Pistacia Vera L.) shells based on 66 experimental sets obtained in a laboratory batch study. The effect of operational parameters such as adsorbent dosage, initial concentration of Pb(II) ions, initial pH, operating temperature, and contact time were studied to optimise the conditions for maximum removal of Pb(II) ions. On the basis of batch test results, optimal operating conditions were determined to be an initial pH of 5.5, an adsorbent dosage of 1.0 g, an initial Pb(II) concentration of 30 ppm, and a temperature of 30 degrees C. Experimental results showed that a contact time of 45 min was generally sufficient to achieve equilibrium. After backpropagation (BP) training combined with principal component analysis (PCA), the ANN model was able to predict adsorption efficiency with a tangent sigmoid transfer function (tansig) at hidden layer with 11 neurons and a linear transfer function (purelin) at output layer. The Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA) was found as the best of 11 BP algorithms with a minimum mean squared error (MSE) of 0.000227875. The linear regression between the network outputs and the corresponding targets were proven to be satisfactory with a correlation coefficient of about 0.936 for five model variables used in this study.

  13. The Molecular Cytogenetic Characterization of Pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) Suggests the Arrest of Recombination in the Largest Heteropycnotic Pair HC1.

    PubMed

    Sola-Campoy, Pedro J; Robles, Francisca; Schwarzacher, Trude; Ruiz Rejón, Carmelo; de la Herrán, Roberto; Navajas-Pérez, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    This paper represents the first molecular cytogenetic characterization of the strictly dioecious pistachio tree (Pistacia vera L.). The karyotype was characterized by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with probes for 5S and 45S rDNAs, and the pistachio specific satellite DNAs PIVE-40, and PIVE-180, together with DAPI-staining. PIVE-180 has a monomeric unit of 176-178 bp and high sequence homology between family members; PIVE-40 has a 43 bp consensus monomeric unit, and is most likely arranged in higher order repeats (HORs) of two units. The P. vera genome is highly heterochromatic, and prominent DAPI positive blocks are detected in most chromosomes. Despite the difficulty in classifying chromosomes according to morphology, 10 out of 15 pairs (2n = 30) could be distinguished by their unique banding patterns using a combination of FISH probes. Significantly, the largest pair, designated HC1, is strongly heteropycnotic, shows differential condensation, and has massive enrichment in PIVE-40 repeats. There are two types of HC1 chromosomes (type-I and type-II) with differing PIVE-40 hybridization signal. Only type-I/II heterozygotes and type-I homozygotes individuals were found. We speculate that the differentiation between the two HC1 chromosomes is due to suppression of homologous recombination at meiosis, reinforced by the presence of PIVE-40 HORs and differences in PIVE-40 abundance. This would be compatible with a ZW sex-determination system in the pistachio tree.

  14. Toward the definition of a carbon budget model: seasonal variation and temperature effect on respiration rate of vegetative and reproductive organs of pistachio trees (Pistacia vera).

    PubMed

    Marra, Francesco P; Barone, Ettore; La Mantia, Michele; Caruso, Tiziano

    2009-09-01

    This study, as a preliminary step toward the definition of a carbon budget model for pistachio trees (Pistacia vera L.), aimed at estimating and evaluating the dynamics of respiration of vegetative and reproductive organs of pistachio tree. Trials were performed in 2005 in a commercial orchard located in Sicily (370 m a.s.l.) on five bearing 20-year-old pistachio trees of cv. Bianca grafted onto Pistachio terebinthus L. Growth analyses and respiration measurements were done on vegetative (leaf) and reproductive (infructescence) organs during the entire growing season (April-September) at biweekly intervals. Results suggested that the respiration rates of pistachio reproductive and vegetative organs were related to their developmental stage. Both for leaf and for infructescence, the highest values were observed during the earlier stages of growth corresponding to the phases of most intense organ growth. The sensitivity of respiration activity to temperature changes, measured by Q(10), showed an increase throughout the transition from immature to mature leaves, as well as during fruit development. The data collected were also used to estimate the seasonal carbon loss by respiration activity for a single leaf and a single infructescence. The amount of carbon lost by respiration was affected by short-term temperature patterns, organ developmental stage and tissue function.

  15. The winter-red-leaf syndrome in Pistacia lentiscus: evidence that the anthocyanic phenotype suffers from nitrogen deficiency, low carboxylation efficiency and high risk of photoinhibition.

    PubMed

    Nikiforou, Constantinos; Nikolopoulos, Dimosthenis; Manetas, Yiannis

    2011-12-15

    Recent evidence indicates that winter-red leaf phenotypes in the mastic tree (Pistacia lentiscus) are more vulnerable to chronic photoinhibition during the cold season relative to winter-green phenotypes occurring in the same high light environment. This was judged by limitations in the maximum quantum yield of photosystem II (PSII), found in previous studies. In this investigation, we asked whether corresponding limitations in leaf gas exchange and carboxylation reactions could also be manifested. During the cold ("red") season, net CO₂ assimilation rates (A) and stomatal conductances (g(s)) in the red phenotype were considerably lower than in the green phenotype, while leaf internal CO₂ concentration (Ci) was higher. The differences were abolished in the "green" period of the year, the dry summer included. Analysis of A versus Ci curves indicated that CO₂ assimilation during winter in the red phenotype was limited by Rubisco content and/or activity rather than stomatal conductance. Leaf nitrogen levels in the red phenotype were considerably lower during the red-leaf period. Consequently, we suggest that the inherently low leaf nitrogen levels are linked to the low net photosynthetic rates of the red plants through a decrease in Rubisco content. Accordingly, the reduced capacity of the carboxylation reactions to act as photosynthetic electron sinks may explain the corresponding loss of PSII photon trapping efficiency, which cannot be fully alleviated by the screening effect of the accumulated anthocyanins.

  16. Morpho-anatomical, physiological and biochemical adjustments in response to root zone salinity stress and high solar radiation in two Mediterranean evergreen shrubs, Myrtus communis and Pistacia lentiscus.

    PubMed

    Tattini, Massimiliano; Remorini, Damiano; Pinelli, Patrizia; Agati, Giovanni; Saracini, Erica; Traversi, Maria Laura; Massai, Rossano

    2006-01-01

    Salt- and light-induced changes in morpho-anatomical, physiological and biochemical traits were analysed in Myrtus communis and Pistacia lentiscus with a view to explaining their ecological distribution in the Mediterranean basin. In plants exposed to 20 or 100% solar radiation and supplied with 0 or 200 mm NaCl, measurements were conducted for ionic and water relations and photosynthetic performance, leaf morpho-anatomical and optical properties and tissue-specific accumulation of tannins and flavonoids. Net carbon gain and photosystem II (PSII) efficiency decreased less in P. lentiscus than in M. communis when exposed to salinity stress, the former having a superior ability to use Na(+) and Cl(-) for osmotic adjustment. Morpho-anatomical traits also allowed P. lentiscus to protect sensitive targets in the leaf from the combined action of salinity stress and high solar radiation to a greater degree than M. communis. Salt and light-induced increases in carbon allocated to polyphenols, particularly to flavonoids, were greater in M. communis than in P. lentiscus, and appeared to be related to leaf oxidative damage. Our data may conclusively explain the negligible distribution of M. communis in open Mediterranean areas suffering from salinity stress, and suggest a key antioxidant function of flavonoids in response to different stressful conditions.

  17. Ecophysiological responses of some maquis (Ceratonia siliqua L., Olea oleaster Hoffm. & Link, Pistacia lentiscus and Quercus coccifera L.) plant species to drought in the east Mediterranean ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Munir; Dogan, Yunus; Sakcali, M Serdal; Doulis, Andreas; Karam, Fadi

    2010-01-01

    The objective was to examine the adaptation strategies of four maquis species to drought prone environments; typical of the east Mediterranean area in degraded and healthy sites in Turkey. A comparison made between sites for Pistacia lentiscus and Quercus coccifera shows higher net daily photosynthesis in the degraded site, when compared with the healthy site; but Ceratonia siliqua and Olea oleaster exhibited no difference in their photosynthetic activity in environmentally contrasting conditions. The pattern of daily transpiration shows higher values in the degraded site in the case of P. lentiscus and Q. coccifera, while no site effect was observed for C. siliqua and O. oleaster. In the case of Q. coccifera, a behavior similar to C. siliqua was observed. A comparison made between C. siliqua and O. oleaster to observe seasonal differences in daily patterns of net photosynthesis and transpiration reveals that Q. coccifera had the highest water use efficiency (slope= 2.88; r2 = 0.61), followed by C. siliqua (slope = 2.74; r2 = 0.7), P. lentiscus (slope = 2.56; r2 = 0.52) and O. oleaster (slope = 2.40; r2 = 0.78). Olea oleaster and P. lentiscus performed as a drought tolerant species, being more resistant to aridity and thus indicative of the degradation state of the site. Ceratonia siliqua and Q. coccifera were found avoiding drought by adopting first a water-spending strategy, and then a water-saving strategy.

  18. Principal component analysis- adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system modeling and genetic algorithm optimization of adsorption of methylene blue by activated carbon derived from Pistacia khinjuk.

    PubMed

    Ghaedi, M; Ghaedi, A M; Abdi, F; Roosta, M; Vafaei, A; Asghari, A

    2013-10-01

    In the present study, activated carbon (AC) simply derived from Pistacia khinjuk and characterized using different techniques such as SEM and BET analysis. This new adsorbent was used for methylene blue (MB) adsorption. Fitting the experimental equilibrium data to various isotherm models shows the suitability and applicability of the Langmuir model. The adsorption mechanism and rate of processes was investigated by analyzing time dependency data to conventional kinetic models and it was found that adsorption follow the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Principle component analysis (PCA) has been used for preprocessing of input data and genetic algorithm optimization have been used for prediction of adsorption of methylene blue using activated carbon derived from P. khinjuk. In our laboratory various activated carbon as sole adsorbent or loaded with various nanoparticles was used for removal of many pollutants (Ghaedi et al., 2012). These results indicate that the small amount of proposed adsorbent (1.0g) is applicable for successful removal of MB (RE>98%) in short time (45min) with high adsorption capacity (48-185mgg(-1)).

  19. Habitat-related variation in seedling recruitment of Gentiana pannonica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekrtová, Ester; Košnar, Jan

    2012-11-01

    Differences in seedling recruitment of Gentiana pannonica were investigated between the primary (relict) and the secondary (semi-natural) forest-free habitats of the Bohemian Forest (870-1200 m a.s.l.) and of the Alps (1045-1935 m a.s.l.) to understand the factors promoting the seedling recruitment of G. pannonica and their importance for species distribution, population structure, and conservation. In the communities with adult plants of G. pannonica, we recorded environmental variables (the slope, the altitude, and the covers of bare ground, litter, and rocks), estimated parameters of the vegetation (the covers of herbs, bryophytes, and dwarf shrubs), and counted the seedlings of G. pannonica. In a field experiment, we investigated seedling survival under different soil moisture regimes. We also observed seasonal dynamics of seedling recruitment in permanent plots over the course of three years. In the primary habitats of both regions, G. pannonica grew in a relatively wide range of communities, and its seedlings occurred in each area. In the secondary habitats of the Bohemian Forest, a very low frequency of the seedlings was recorded. The number of seedlings increased with the covers of the moss layer and of bare soil and decreased with the cover of the herb layer, especially of graminoids. The seedling mortality was significantly lower in the plots with higher soil moistures, and the emergence of new-born seedlings was concentrated in the spring season, when the soil received a high water supply due to melting of snow. For the successful generative reproduction of G. pannonica, our findings highlight the critical importance of the microsites with low levels of competition and of sufficient soil moisture G. pannonica. It seems that because of the long-term lack of grazing disturbances, the structures of the secondary habitats of G. pannonica in the Bohemian Forest have become unfavourable for seedling establishment and generative reproduction of this threatened

  20. Seed-vectored endophytic bacteria modulate development of rice seedlings.

    PubMed

    Verma, S K; Kingsley, K; Irizarry, I; Bergen, M; Kharwar, R N; White, J F

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of the removal of indigenous bacteria from rice seeds on seedling growth and development. Here we report the presence of three indigenous endophytic bacteria in rice seeds that play important roles in modulating seedling development (shoot and root lengths, and formation of root hairs and secondary roots) and defence against pathogens. Seed-associated bacteria were removed using surface sterilization with NaOCl (bleach) followed by antibiotic treatment. When bacteria were absent, growth of seedlings in terms of root hair development and overall seedling size was less than that of seedlings that contained bacteria. Reactive oxygen staining of seedlings showed that endophytic bacteria became intracellular in root parenchyma cells and root hairs. Roots containing endophytic bacteria were seen to stain densely for reactive oxygen, while roots free of bacteria stained lightly for reactive oxygen. Bacteria were isolated and identified as Enterobacter asburiae (VWB1), Pantoea dispersa (VWB2) and Pseudomonas putida (VWB3) by 16S rDNA sequencing. Bacteria were found to produce indole acetic acid (auxins), inhibited the pathogen Fusarium oxysporum and solubilized phosphate. Reinoculation of bacteria onto seedlings derived from surface-disinfected rice and Bermuda grass seeds significantly restored seedling growth and development. Rice seeds harbour indigenous bacterial endophytes that greatly influence seedling growth and development, including root and shoot lengths, root hair formation and disease susceptibility of rice seedlings. This study shows that seeds of rice naturally harbour bacterial endophytes that play key roles in modulation of seedling development. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  1. Planting and care of fine hardwood seedlings: Nursery production of hardwood seedlings

    Treesearch

    Douglass F. Jacobs

    2003-01-01

    Access to quality tree seedlings is an essential component of a successful hardwood reforestation project. Hardwood plantations may be established by sowing seed directly to a field site, but the success of direct seeding operations has been inconsistent for many species, which indicates that more research is needed before this practice can be recommended. For...

  2. Factors affecting acorn production and germination and early growth of seedlings and seedling sprouts

    Treesearch

    David F. Olson; Stephen G. Boyce

    1971-01-01

    Acorn production is extremely variable and unpredictable. Flowering is copious, but many climatic factors influence acorn development from initiation of flowers to acorn maturity. Acorns are consumed by birds, animals, insects, and microorganisms. The establishment of seedlings is more closely related to favorable site factors than to size of crops. A majority of oaks...

  3. Seedlings Finally Get Their Due: Book Review of Seedling Ecology and Evolution

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Book Review of: Seedling Ecology and Evolution. Ed. Leck, Mary Allessio, Parker, V. Thomas and Simpson, Robert L. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK. 2008. Many plant demographers find themselves, at some point, staring at a dataset full of detailed information on juvenile and adult plants,...

  4. Radiation effects on Brassica seeds and seedlings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deoli, Naresh; Hasenstein, Karl H.

    2016-07-01

    Space radiation consists of high energy charged particles and affects biological systems, but because of its stochastic, non-directional nature is difficult to replicate on Earth. Radiation damages biological systems acutely at high doses or cumulatively at low doses through progressive changes in DNA organization. These damages lead to death or cause of mutations. While radiation biology typically focuses on mammalian or human systems, little is known as to how radiation affects plants. In addition, energetic ion beams are widely used to generate new mutants in plants considering their high-LET (Linear Energy Transfer) as compared to gamma rays and X-rays. Understanding the effect of ionizing radiation on plant provides a basis for studying effects of radiation on biological systems and will help mitigate (space) radiation damage in plants. We exposed dry and imbibed Brassica rapa seeds and seedling roots to proton beams of varying qualities and compared the theoretical penetration range of different energy levels with observable growth response. We used 1, 2 and 3 MeV protons in air at the varying fluences to investigate the effect of direct irradiation on the seeds (1012 - 1015 ions/cm2) and seedlings (1013 ions/cm2). The range of protons in the tissue was calculated using Monte-Carlo based SRIM (Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter) software. The simulation and biological results indicate that ions did not penetrate the tissue of dry or hydrated seeds at all used ion energies. Therefore the entire energy was transferred to the treated tissue. Irradiated seeds were germinated vertically under dim light and roots growth was observed for two days after imbibition. The LD50 of the germination was about 2×1014 ions/cm2 and about 5×1014 ions/cm2 for imbibed and dry seeds, respectively. Since seedlings are most sensitive to gravity, the change in gravitropic behavior is a convenient means to assess radiation damage on physiological responses other than direct tissue

  5. Stevioside prevents oxidative stress in wheat seedlings.

    PubMed

    Timofeeva, O A; Nevmerzhitskaya, Yu Yu; Mikhaylov, A L; Schaimullina, G Kh; Mironov, V F

    2015-11-01

    This is the first study on the effect of stevioside, a diterpene glycoside that is a new promising plant growth regulator, on the antioxidant and photosynthetic systems of seedlings of the winter wheat cultivar Kazanskaya 560. Stevioside has been demonstrated to cause a decrease in the malondialdehyde formation rate, an increase in the activities of antioxidant enzymes (peroxidase and ascorbate peroxidase), and the accumulation of proline and carotenoids. Apparently, this integrated effect of stevioside can prevent oxidative stress caused by adverse environmental factors in plants.

  6. Irrigating and fertilizing to grow better nursery seedlings

    Treesearch

    Paul P. Kormanik; Shi-Jean S. Sung; T.L. Kormanik

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we describe a system for producing excellent loblolly pine seedling for planting in southern forests. The system, which has taken years to develop, appears to be working well. Proof of that will depend upon results of outplanting tests, but there are strong indications that the seedlings we are producing will be better than those coming from most...

  7. Seedling diseases of sugar beet – diversity and host interactions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Seedling diseases cause loss of plant stand due to pre- and post-emergence damping-off and weakened plants due to root or hypocotyl infection. Several pathogens cause seedling disease of sugar beet, including Rhizoctonia solani, Aphanomyces cochlioides, Pythium species, and Fusarium species. Differe...

  8. Competitive suppression of Quercus douglasii (Fagaceae) seedling emergence and growth.

    PubMed

    Gordon, D R; Rice, K J

    2000-07-01

    Reduced recruitment of blue oak (Quercus douglasii) seedlings in California grasslands and woodlands may result from shifts in seasonal soil water availability coincident with replacement of the native perennial herbaceous community by Mediterranean annuals. We used a combination of container and field experiments to examine the interrelationships between soil water potential, herbaceous neighborhood composition, and blue oak seedling shoot emergence and growth. Neighborhoods of exotic annuals depleted soil moisture more rapidly than neighborhoods of a perennial grass or "no-neighbor" controls. Although effects of neighborhood composition on oak seedling root elongation were not statistically significant, seedling shoot emergence was significantly inhibited in the annual neighborhoods where soil water was rapidly depleted. Seedling water status directly reflected soil water potential, which also determined the extent and duration of oak seedling growth during the first year. End-of-season seedling height significantly influenced survival and growth in subsequent years. While growth and survival of blue oak seedlings may be initially constrained by competition with herbaceous species, subsequent competition with adult blue oak trees may further contribute to reduced sapling recruitment.

  9. Using a steamroom to sterilize pallets of Styroblock seedling containers

    Treesearch

    Andy Trent; Robert L. James; Clarke Fleege; Gary Hileman

    2007-01-01

    Styrofoam container blocks (for example, Styroblock, fig. 1), hereafter "blocks," are a popular system for growing seedlings in greenhouse nurseries. They come in a variety of sizes and can be reused several times. They must be sterilized before reuse because they may harbor pathogens that can cause diseases to seedlings. Potential pathogens, such as

  10. Mycorrhizas on nursery and field seedlings of Quercus garryana

    Treesearch

    Dariene Southworth; Elizabeth M. Carrington; Jonathan L. Frank; Peter Gould; Connie A. Harrington; Warren D. Devine

    2009-01-01

    Oak woodland regeneration and restoration requires that seedlings develop mycorrhizas, yet the need for this mutualistic association is often overlooked. In this study, we asked whether Quercus garryana seedlings in nursery beds acquire mycorrhizas without artificial inoculation or access to a mycorrhizal network of other ectomycorrhizal hosts. We...

  11. Herbaceous Weed Control Improves Survival of Planted Shumard Oak Seedlings

    Treesearch

    A.W. Ezell; J.D. Hodges

    2002-01-01

    Shumard oak seedlings were planted on a cutoversite in the Mississippi River floodplain, which had received both chemical and mechanical site preparation treatments. Soil at the site was a commerce silt loam and the elevation was such that the area does not flood. Planting stock was 1-0, bareroot seedlings. A total of seven active herbicide treatments were applied at a...

  12. Shortleaf pine seedling production and seeding trends in Missouri

    Treesearch

    David Gwaze; Greg Hoss; Dena Biram

    2007-01-01

    The Missouri Department of Conservation operates the only nursery that supplies bare-root shortleaf pine seedlings in Missouri. Seedlings and seed have been sold to landowners since 1935. Prior to 1981 most seed was locally collected wild seed, some was purchased from neighboring states. After 1981, most of the seed for artificial regeneration was improved orchard seed...

  13. Photosynthate distribution patterns in cherrybark oak seedling sprouts

    Treesearch

    Brian Roy Lockhart; John D. Hodges; Emile S. Gardiner; Andrew W. Ezell

    2003-01-01

    Summary We used 14C tracers to determine photosynthate distribution in cherrybark oak (Quercus pagoda Raf.) seedling sprouts following release from competing mid-story vegetation. Fall acquisition of labeled photosynthates by seedlings followed expected source--sink patterns, with root and basal stem tissues...

  14. Chemical root pruning of conifer seedlings in Mexico

    Treesearch

    Arnulfo Aldrete; John G. Mexal

    2002-01-01

    Many countries grow seedlings for reforestation in polybags where root spiraling and root egression can decrease seedling survival and growth following outplanting. The overall objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of chemical root pruning on root spiraling, root egression, and nursery performance of Pinus pseudostrobus, P...

  15. Seedling mineral nutrition, the root of the matter

    Treesearch

    Barbara J. Hawkins

    2011-01-01

    Plants have the marvelous ability to take up inorganic mineral nutrients as atoms or simple molecules and process them into proteins, enzymes, and other organic forms. This paper reviews the 14 essential mineral nutrients, their roles within the plant, their target concentrations in tree seedling nursery culture, and their effects on seedling growth and performance...

  16. Survey of Root and Shoot Cultural Practices for Hardwood Seedlings

    Treesearch

    Harry L. Vanderveer

    2005-01-01

    A telephone survey of selected forest seedling nursery managers was conducted in early 2004. About 2 dozen managers were contacted and asked to respond during a brief (15 to 30 minute) conversation about the current practices they employ to manage root and shoot growth of hardwood seedlings. The participants involved were evenly split between public agencies (...

  17. Uptake of Seeds Secondary Metabolites by Virola surinamensis Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Massuo Jorge; Yoshida, Massayoshi; Lopes, Norberto Peporine; da Silva, Denise Brentan; Cavalheiro, Alberto José

    2012-01-01

    The major secondary metabolites and fatty acids occurring in the seeds of Virola surinamensis were monitored by GC-MS during germination and seedling development. The role as carbon source for seedling development was indicated considering that both classes of compounds were similarly consumed in the seeds and that no selective consumption of compounds could be detected. PMID:22505921

  18. A comparison of bareroot and containerized seedling production

    Treesearch

    John McRae; Tom Starkey

    2002-01-01

    Most nursery managers and culturists are comfortable growing bareroot seedlings. A few have become comfortable growing containerized seedlings. This discussion will compare the two systems, with a focus on SYP production, and will include a discussion on capital, equipment, space, and personnel requirements.

  19. Heights of selected ponderosa pine seedlings during 20 years

    Treesearch

    R. Z. Callaham; J. W. Duffield

    1963-01-01

    Many silviculturists and geneticists, concerned with the problem of increasing the rate of production of forest plantations, advocate or practice the selection of the larger seedlings in the nursery bed. Such selection implies a hypothesis that size of seedlings is positively correlated with size of the same plants at some more advanced age. Two tests were established...

  20. Sucrose metabolism and growth in transplanted loblolly pine seedlings

    Treesearch

    Shi-Jean S. Sung; C.C. Black; Paul P. Kormanik

    1993-01-01

    Loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) seedling height, root collar diameter, and the specific activities of three sucrose metabolizing enzymes, namely, sucrose synthase (SS), acid invertase, and neutral invertase, were measured to assess seedling responses to transplant stress. It was concluded that i) SS was the dominant enzyme for sucrose metabolism in...

  1. Auger planting of oak seedlings in northern Arkansas

    Treesearch

    Eric Heitzman; Adrian Grell

    2003-01-01

    Planting oak seedlings to regenerate upland oak forests is a promising but untested silvicultural practice in the Ozark Mountains of northern Arkansas. The stony (cherty) soils of the region make it difficult to dig deep planting holes using conventional hand planting tools. In 2001, we planted 1-0 northern red oak and white oak seedlings in 0.5 to 1 acre group...

  2. Evaluation of Promalin to promote growth of young mangosteen seedlings

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A major impediment to the development of a mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana L.) industry is the long pre-bearing stage that seedlings take to produce fruits. A field study was conducted to determine the effect of Promalin on the growth of mangosteen seedlings. Promalin was applied as a foliar spray...

  3. Naturally developed seedling roots of five western conifers.

    Treesearch

    William I. Stein

    1978-01-01

    Two-year-old seedlings grown from seed outdoors in three southwestern Oregon soils were excavated to determine their root development. Roots of Douglas-fir, ponderosa pine, sugar pine, grand fir, and incense-cedar seedlings differed substantially in total extent, form, and balance in relation to tops. Information on the natural development of roots provides a benchmark...

  4. Response of Citrus Seedlings to Radopholus similis in Two Soils.

    PubMed

    O'Bannon, J H; Tomerlin, A T

    1971-07-01

    Radopholus similis was less pathogenic to greenhouse-grown citrus seedlings in Leon loamy sand than in Lakeland fine sand. This was not affected by different watering regimes. Seedling growth reduction by the burrowing nematode in either soil, compared with noninfected controls, was significant at the 1% level.

  5. Seedling Albinism Induced by an Extract of Alternaria tenuis.

    PubMed

    Ryan, G F; Greenblatt, G; Al-Delaimy, K A

    1961-09-22

    The chlorophyll deficiency in citrus seedlings known as albinism was induced by inoculating seed with certain clones of Alternaria tenuis, or by germination of the seed in contact with extracts from the fungus. The active material in the extracts apparently has a rather specific inhibiting effect on chlorophyll formation in seedlings of various species.

  6. Valley Oak Seedling Growth Associated with Selected Grass Species

    Treesearch

    Karen C. Danielsen; William L. Halvorson

    1991-01-01

    Valley oak (Quercus lobata Née) has exhibited inadequate regeneration since the last century. Seedlings become established, but few develop into saplings. We hypothesized that the invasion of alien annual grasses into native perennial grasslands has increased oak seedling mortality by decreasing soil moisture availability. We conducted greenhouse...

  7. Quercus lobata seedlings and conspecific neighbors: Competitors or allies?

    Treesearch

    Claudia Tyler; Shelly Cole Moritz

    2015-01-01

    In conducting oak restoration, it is common to plant at least two acorns per location to increase the probability that at least one will germinate and produce a seedling. If both seedlings successfully establish, one is generally removed to reduce possible competition. To test the assumption that the near neighbors are competing, we examined several cohorts of valley...

  8. Development of Longleaf Pine Seedlings Under Parent Trees

    Treesearch

    William D. Boyer

    1963-01-01

    In southwest Alabama, unburned seedlings under overstories ranging up to 90 square feet of basal area per acre survived as well as those with no tree competition. After 7 years, milacre stocking averaged 99 percent and survival 72 percent. Growth, but not survival, improved with distance from parent trees. Seedlings under tree crowns had less brown spot than those in...

  9. Temporal patterns in seedling establishment on pocket gopher disturbances.

    PubMed

    Forbis, Tara A; Larmore, Jason; Addis, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    Disturbances often facilitate seedling establishment, and can change the species composition of a community by increasing recruitment of disturbance-adapted species. To understand the effects of pocket gopher disturbances on alpine seedling dynamics, we examined the gopher disturbances' effects on seedling emergence and survival on gopher disturbances 0 to 5 years old. In contrast to results from most other ecosystems, these recently created gopher mounds had lower seedling emergence and survival rates than undisturbed areas. A lack of correlation between species' abundances on gopher mounds and undisturbed sites in one of the two communities studied suggested that a suite of disturbance-adapted species recruited onto the mounds. To explain low seedling emergence on recent gopher mounds, we quantified gopher mound seed banks and studied recruitment in a site with mounds that ranged from 0 to >20 years old. Seed numbers in first-year gopher mound soils were extremely low relative to undisturbed soils, and this pattern was mirrored in seedling establishment patterns over the long term. Gopher disturbance depressed seedling emergence density for the first 5 years. Subsequently, emergence density increased until at least 20 years following the disturbance. Emergence on disturbances more than 20 years old was higher than on undisturbed sites. Therefore, gopher disturbances probably facilitate seedling establishment in alpine dry and moist meadow; however, this process takes place over decades.

  10. Controlling Herbaceous Competition in Pasture Planted with Loblolly Pine Seedlings

    Treesearch

    James D. Haywood

    1995-01-01

    Three treatments designed to control herbaceous vegetation competing with loblolly pine(Pinus taeda L.) seedlings planted in grazed and ungrazed pasture were tested. Effects of the treatments on seedling survival and growth during the first 3 years after planting were determined. The treatments were directed application of herbicides (glyphosate in...

  11. Container Seedling Handling and Storage in the Southeastern States

    Treesearch

    Kasten R. Dumroese; James P. Barnett

    2004-01-01

    Most container seedlings grown in the southeastern US are outplanted during winter, although 10 to 20% are outplanted during summer. Longleaf pine accounts for more than 80% of all container seedlings produced. Very little information is published on cold hardiness and storage effects on container-grown southern pines and hardwoods. In general, growers attempt to...

  12. Adequacy of Advance Tree-Seedling Regeneration in Pennsylvania's Forests

    Treesearch

    William H. McWilliams; Susan L. Stout; Todd W. Bowersox; Larry H. McCormick

    1995-01-01

    Measurement of tree seedlings and herbaceous vegetation from 499 sample locations across Pennsylvania revealed that advance tree-seedling regeneration is inadequate for new stand establishment across most of the State. The samples were located in stands from 40% to 75% stocked to focus on stands with ample light and growing space for establishment of abundant advance...

  13. A hydrothermal seedling emergence model for giant ragweed (Ambrosia trifida)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Late-season seedling emergence of giant ragweed in Ohio crop fields complicates efforts for predicting the optimum time to implement control measures for minimizing crop-yield losses. Our objectives were to develop a hydrothermal seedling emergence model for a late-emerging biotype in Ohio and valid...

  14. Establishing Longleaf Pine Seedlings on Agricultural Fields and Pastures

    Treesearch

    Mark J. Hainds

    2004-01-01

    Acres planted to longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) increased annually through the 1990s until 2000 with peak plantings exceeding 110 million seedlings annually. Many of these longleaf seedlings were planted on agricultural crop fields and pastures. Agricultural areas have unique characteristics that can make them more challenging to successfully plant...

  15. Establishment of Swamp Tupelo Seedlings After Regeneration Cuts

    Treesearch

    Dean S. DeBell; J. Dennis Auld

    1971-01-01

    Environmental factors influencing natural regeneration of swamp tupelo were examined in a study involving five harvest treatments replicated in 3 successive years. Initial seedling establishment was related to seed production, but other factors probably are more limiting in most years. Abundance of established seedlings differed significantly with harvest cuttings,...

  16. Agglomerating seeds to enhance native seedling emergence and growth

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    1. Restoration in rangelands is constrained by low establishment of seeded species. Non-biotic soil-surface crust is one of the major factors limiting reseeding success by acting as a barrier to seedling emergence. 2. The objective of this study was to determine if seedling emergence of Pseudoroegn...

  17. Coumarin pretreatment alleviates salinity stress in wheat seedlings.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Ahmed Mahmoud; Madany, M M Y

    2015-03-01

    The potentiality of COU to improve plant tolerance to salinity was investigated. Wheat grains were primed with COU (50 ppm) and then grown under different levels of NaCl (50, 100, 150 mM) for two weeks. COU pretreatment improved the growth of wheat seedling under salinity, relative to COU-untreated seedlings, due to the accumulation of osmolytes such as soluble sugars and proline. Moreover, COU treatment significantly improved K(+)/Na(+) ratio in the shoots of both salt stressed and un-stressed seedlings. However, in the roots, this ratio increased only under non-salinity. In consistent with phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), phenolics and flavonoids were accumulated in COU-pretreated seedlings under the higher doses of salinity, relative to COU-untreated seedlings. COU primed seedlings showed higher content of the coumarin derivative, scopoletin, and salicylic, chlorogenic, syringic, vanillic, gallic and ferulic acids, under both salinity and non-salinity conditions. Salinity stress significantly improved the activity of peroxidase (POD) in COU-pretreated seedlings. However, the effect of COU on the total antioxidant capacity (TAC) was only obtained at the highest dose of NaCl (150 mM). The present results suggest that COU pretreatment could alleviate the adverse effect of salinity on the growth of wheat seedlings through enhancing, at least partly, the osmoregulation process and antioxidant defense system.

  18. Sugar maple and yellow birch seedling growth after simulated browsing.

    Treesearch

    Frederick T. Metzger

    1977-01-01

    Simulating natural damage to leaders of forest-grown seedlings of yellow birch and sugar maple resulted in no loss of vigor but a loss in net height growth. Leader elongation depended upon seedling, shoot, and bud characteristics rather than on the extent of damage.

  19. Evolutionary history and distance dependence control survival of dipterocarp seedlings.

    PubMed

    Bagchi, Robert; Press, Malcolm C; Scholes, Julie D

    2010-01-01

    One important hypothesis to explain tree-species coexistence in tropical forests suggests that increased attack by natural enemies near conspecific trees gives locally rare species a competitive advantage. Host ranges of natural enemies generally encompass several closely related plant taxa suggesting that seedlings should also do poorly around adults of closely related species. We investigated the effects of adult Parashorea malaanonan on seedling survival in a Bornean rain forest. Survival of P. malaanonan seedlings was highest at intermediate distances from parent trees while heterospecific seedlings were unaffected by distance. Leaf herbivores did not drive this relationship. Survival of seedlings was lowest for P. malaanonan, and increased with phylogenetic dissimilarity from this species, suggesting that survival of close relatives of common species is reduced. This study suggests that distance dependence contributes to species coexistence and highlights the need for further investigation into the role of shared plant enemies in community dynamics.

  20. Effects of graphene on seed germination and seedling growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ming; Gao, Bin; Chen, Jianjun; Li, Yuncong

    2015-02-01

    The environmental impact of graphene has recently attracted great attention. In this work, we show that graphene at a low concentration affected tomato seed germination and seedling growth. Graphene-treated seeds germinated much faster than control seeds. Analytical results indicated that graphene penetrated seed husks. The penetration might break the husks to facilitate water uptake, resulting in faster germination and higher germination rates. At the stage of seedling growth, graphene was also able to penetrate root tip cells. Seedlings germinated from graphene-treated seeds had slightly lower biomass accumulation than the control, but exhibited significantly longer stems and roots than the control, which suggests that graphene, in contrast with other nanoparticles, had different effects on seedling growth. Taken together, our results imply that graphene played complicated roles in affecting the initial stage of seed germination and subsequent seedling growth.

  1. The Response of Citrus limon Seedlings to a Symbiont, Glomus etunicatus, and a Pathogen, Radopholus similis.

    PubMed

    O'Bannon, J H; Nemec, S

    1979-07-01

    The influences of a vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza (Glomus etunicatus) and burrowing nematode (Radophohts similis), alone and in combination, on the growth of rough lemon (Citrus limon) seedlings were studied in the greenhouse. Growth of mycorrhizal seedlings was significantly greater than that of nonmycorrhizal seedlings or seedlings inoculated with R. sindlis. Mycorrhizal stimulation of seedling growth was inhibited by nematode infection. When seedlings were inoculated with G. etunicatus arid R. similis, suppression of seedling growth by R. similis was less on VAM seedlings than on nonmycorrhizal seedlings, Nonmycorrhizal seedlings infected with R. similis were significantly smaller than nonmycorrhizal seedlings free of R. similis. Vesicle formation and mycelia growth were less in nematode-infected roots.

  2. The Response of Citrus limon Seedlings to a Symbiont, Glomus etunicatus, and a Pathogen, Radopholus similis

    PubMed Central

    O'Bannon, J. H.; Nemec, S.

    1979-01-01

    The influences of a vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza (Glomus etunicatus) and burrowing nematode (Radophohts similis), alone and in combination, on the growth of rough lemon (Citrus limon) seedlings were studied in the greenhouse. Growth of mycorrhizal seedlings was significantly greater than that of nonmycorrhizal seedlings or seedlings inoculated with R. sindlis. Mycorrhizal stimulation of seedling growth was inhibited by nematode infection. When seedlings were inoculated with G. etunicatus arid R. similis, suppression of seedling growth by R. similis was less on VAM seedlings than on nonmycorrhizal seedlings, Nonmycorrhizal seedlings infected with R. similis were significantly smaller than nonmycorrhizal seedlings free of R. similis. Vesicle formation and mycelia growth were less in nematode-infected roots. PMID:19300646

  3. Chemiluminescence of adzuki bean and soybean seedlings.

    PubMed

    Iida, T; Kawane, M; Ashikaga, K; Yoshiki, Y; Okubo, K

    2000-01-01

    The chemiluminescence of extracts from leguminous seedlings (adzuki bean and soybean) was investigated. In an H(2)O(2)/gallic acid/water extract system, the photon intensities of adzuki bean seedlings were increased after germination and in the hypocotyls it reached a maximum level during the first 4 days of germination. On day 4 after germination, chemiluminescence in the primary leaf part exhibited the strongest intensity. Emission spectra showed a main peak at 510 nm, with shoulders at 660 nm. Mechanical injuries to the stems and cotyledons resulted in about a 1.5- and 6.8-fold increase of chemiluminescence, respectively. In an H(2)O(2)/70% EtOH extract/HRP system, photon intensities increased after germination and reached a maximum level during the first 2 days of germination. On day 4 after germination, chemiluminescence in the root and leaf area was stronger than in any other area. Emission spectra showed a main peak at around 570 nm, with shoulders at around 660 nm. The photon intensities of stems and cotyledons after mechanical injuries resulted in about an 0.72-fold decrease and an 8.8-fold increase in the presence of H(2)O(2) and acetaldehyde (MeCHO), respectively.

  4. Process-based modeling of temperature and water profiles in the seedling recruitment zone: Part II. Seedling emergence timing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Predictions of seedling emergence timing for spring wheat are facilitated by process-based modeling of the microsite environment in the shallow seedling recruitment zone. Hourly temperature and water profiles within the recruitment zone for 60 days after planting were simulated from the process-base...

  5. Effect of seedling stock on the early stand development and physiology of improved loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) seedlings

    Treesearch

    Shakuntala Sharma; Joshua P. Adams; Jamie L. Schuler; Robert L. Ficklin; Don C. Bragg

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the effects of spacing and genotype on the growth and physiology of improved loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) seedlings from three distinct genotypes planted in Drew County, Arkansas (USA). Genotype had a significant effect on survival and height. Clone CF Var 1 showed greater height and survival compared to other seedlings....

  6. Effects of flooding regime and seedling treatment on early survival and growth of nuttall oak

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burkett, V.R.; Draugelis-Dale, R.O.; Williams, H.M.; Schoenholtz, S.H.

    2005-01-01

    Effects of flooding on survival and growth of three different types of Nuttall oak (Quercus texana Buckl.) seedlings were observed at the end of third and fifth growing seasons at Yazoo National Wildlife Refuge, Mississippi, U.S.A. Three types of seedlings were planted in January 1995 in a split-plot design, with four replications at each of two elevations on floodprone, former cropland in Sharkey clay soil. The lower of the two planting elevations was inundated for 21 days during the first growing season, whereas the higher elevation did not flood during the 5-year period of this study. The three types of 1-0 seedlings were bareroot seedlings, seedlings grown in containers (3.8 ?? 21a??cm plastic seedling cones), and container-grown seedlings inoculated with vegetative mycelia of Pisolithus tinctorius (Pers.) Coker. Survival of all the three seedling types was greatest at the lower, intermittently flooded elevation, indicating that drought and related effects on plant competition were more limiting to seedling survival than flooding. At the lower elevation, survival of mycorrhizal-inoculated container seedlings was greater than that of noninoculated container seedlings. Survival among bareroot seedlings and inoculated container seedlings was not significantly different at either elevation. At the higher, nonflooded elevation, however, bareroot seedling survival was greater than the survival of container seedlings without inoculation. Differences were significant among the inoculated and the noninoculated container seedlings, with higher survival of inoculated seedlings at both elevations, though differences were only significant in year 3. At the end of the fifth year, height of bareroot seedlings was significantly greater than the heights of both types of container-grown seedlings at both planting elevations. Because seedlings grown in the plastic seedlings cones did not survive better than the bareroot seedlings at either planting elevation, the bareroot stock

  7. Temperature Requirements for Seed Germination and Seedling Development Determine Timing of Seedling Emergence of Three Monocotyledonous Temperate Forest Spring Geophytes

    PubMed Central

    Vandelook, Filip; Van Assche, Jozef A.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims The optimal period for seedling emergence depends on factors such as habitat preference, life cycle and geographical distribution. This research was performed to clarify the role of temperature in regulating processes leading to seedling emergence of the European continental Scilla bifolia and the Atlantic Narcissus pseudonarcissus and Hyacinthoides non-scripta. Methods Experiments in natural conditions were performed to examine the phenology of embryo growth, seed germination in the soil and seedling emergence. Effects of temperature conditions on embryo growth, seed germination, seedling growth and leaf formation were studied in temperature-controlled incubators. Key Results In nature, embryo growth of all three species was initiated from the moment the seeds were dispersed in spring and continued during summer. A sequence of high temperature followed by a lower temperature was required to complete embryo growth and initiate germination. Seeds of H. non-scripta and N. pseudonarcissus germinated in autumn once they attained the critical E:S ratio, while seeds of S. bifolia started germinating when temperatures were low in winter. Seedlings developed normally, but slowly, only when placed in low temperature conditions (5 or 10 °C), resulting in a time lag between the moment of radicle protrusion and seedling emergence in the field. Conclusions A continuous development of the embryo and seedlings of the three species was observed from the moment the seeds were dispersed until seedlings emerged. A sequence of high summer temperatures followed by decreasing autumn and winter temperatures was required for all developmental processes to be completed. Although a time lag occurs between radicle protrusion and seedling emergence, the term ‘epicotyl dormancy’ does not apply here, due to the absence of a period of developmental arrest. Timing of first seedling emergence differed between the three species and could be related to differences in

  8. Flow and scour constraints on uprooting of pioneer woody seedlings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bywater-Reyes, Sharon; Wilcox, Andrew C.; Stella, John C.; Lightbody, Anne F.

    2015-11-01

    Scour and uprooting during flood events is a major disturbance agent that affects plant mortality rates and subsequent vegetation composition and density, setting the trajectory of physical-biological interactions in rivers. During flood events, riparian plants may be uprooted if they are subjected to hydraulic drag forces greater than their resisting force. We measured the resisting force of woody seedlings established on river bars with in situ lateral pull tests that simulated flood flows with and without substrate scour. We quantified the influence of seedling size, species (Populus and Tamarix), water-table depth, and scour depth on resisting force. Seedling size and resisting force were positively related with scour depth and water-table depth—a proxy for root length—exerting strong and opposing controls on resisting force. Populus required less force to uproot than Tamarix, but displayed a greater increase in uprooting force with seedling size. Further, we found that calculated mean velocities required to uproot seedlings were greater than modeled flood velocities under most conditions. Only when plants were either shallowly rooted or subjected to substrate scour (≥0.3 m) did the calculated velocities required for uprooting decrease to within the range of modeled flood velocities, indicating that drag forces alone are unlikely to uproot seedlings in the absence of extreme events or bar-scale sediment transport. Seedlings on river bars are most resilient to uprooting when they are large, deeply rooted, and unlikely to experience substrate scour, which has implications for ecogeomorphic evolution and river management.

  9. Genetic diversity of seagrass seeds influences seedling morphology and biomass.

    PubMed

    Randall Hughes, A; Hanley, Torrance C; Schenck, Forest R; Hays, Cynthia G

    2016-12-01

    Genetic diversity can influence ecological processes throughout ontogeny, yet whether diversity at early life history stages is important in long-lived taxa with overlapping generations is unclear. Seagrass systems provide some of the best evidence for the ecological effects of genetic diversity among adult shoots, but we do not know if the genetic diversity of seeds and seedlings also influences seagrass ecology. We tested the effects of seagrass (Zostera marina) seed diversity and relatedness on germination success, seedling morphology, and seedling production by comparing experimental assemblages of seeds collected from single reproductive shoots ("monocultures") to assemblages of seeds collected from multiple reproductive shoots ("polycultures"). There was no difference in seedling emergence, yet seedlings from polycultures had larger shoots above and below ground than seedlings from monocultures at the end of the 1-yr experiment. Genetic relatedness of the seedlings predicted some aspects of shoot morphology, with more leaves and longer roots and shoots at intermediate levels of relatedness, regardless of seed diversity. Our results suggest that studies of only adult stages may underestimate the importance of genetic diversity if the benefits at early life history stages continue to accrue throughout the life cycle.

  10. Cellular changes in wheat seedlings during orbital flight.

    PubMed

    Edwards, B F; Gray, S W

    1971-01-01

    Wheat seedlings in weightlessness aboard NASA Biosatellite 2 differ from ground control seedlings in mitotic count, cell length and nuclear volume as well as in orientation, starch grain distribution, organ length and malformations previously reported to COSPAR. Dividing cells are fewer in roots of orbited seedlings than in erect or clinostat ground controls. The greatest difference is among cells in early prophase. Root cells, proximal to the zone of cell division are longer in flight seedlings than erect or clinostat ground controls. As the roots are the same length, greater elongation compensates for the reduced rate of cell division. Volume of interphase nuclei in all seedling organs is increased by orbital flight. In clinostat controls, only nuclei of primary roots increase in size. Between 58 and 65 hours of age, nuclear volume in erect 1 g coleoptiles decreases; in flight seedlings it increases. Simulated launch vibration, alone or followed by growth on the clinostat, increases nuclear volume in some roots, but coleoptile nuclei do not respond as in flight seedlings. Thus, at the cellular level, orbital flight cannot be exactly duplicated by the clinostat whether preceded by vibration or not.

  11. Early field performance of Acacia koa seedlings grown under subirrigation and overhead irrigation

    Treesearch

    Anthony S. Davis; Jeremiah R. Pinto; Douglass F. Jacobs

    2011-01-01

    Koa (Acacia koa A. Gray [Fabaceae]) seedlings were grown with subirrigation and overhead irrigation systems in an effort to characterize post-nursery field performance. One year following outplanting, we found no differences in seedling height or survival, but root-collar diameter was significantly larger for subirrigated seedlings. This indicates that koa seedlings,...

  12. Historical forest seedling production in the southern United States: 2008 to 2009 planting season

    Treesearch

    Scott A. Enebak

    2011-01-01

    Seedling production across the southern US for the 2008 to 2009 planting season was 1.05 billion seedlings, a decrease of 53.6 million (5%) from the 2007 to 2008 planting season. The vast majority (90%) of reduction in conifer seedling production from 2008 was bareroot loblolly (Pinus taeda) and slash (P. elliottii) pine. Hardwoods were about 1% of regional seedling...

  13. Winter injury among white fir seedlings...unusual pattern in seed source study

    Treesearch

    M. Thompson Conkle; W. J. Libby; J. L. Hamrick

    1967-01-01

    White fir seeds collected from 43 sources were sown at the Institute of Forest Genetics, Placerville, Calif. in 1963. Observations made 3 years later showed that seedlings from northern sources sustained more winter injury than did southern origin seedlings. Seedlings from low elevations were less severely damaged than seedlings from higher elevations in the same...

  14. A comparison of tree shelters installed on green ash and cherrybark oak seedlings in Arkansas

    Treesearch

    H. Christoph Stuhlinger

    2013-01-01

    Tree shelters can aid hardwood seedling establishment by improving early seedling survival and growth. This study was established in Arkansas to compare three types of tree shelters installed on green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh.) and cherrybark oak (Quercus pagoda Raf.) seedlings. Seedlings planted in 4 feet tall Blue-X®,...

  15. Study of antimutagenic and antioxidant activities of gallic acid and 1,2,3,4,6-pentagalloylglucose from Pistacia lentiscus. Confirmation by microarray expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Abdelwahed, Afef; Bouhlel, Ines; Skandrani, Ines; Valenti, Kita; Kadri, Malika; Guiraud, Pascal; Steiman, Régine; Mariotte, Anne-Marie; Ghedira, Kamel; Laporte, François; Dijoux-Franca, Marie-Geneviève; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2007-01-05

    In vitro antioxidant and antimutagenic activities of two polyphenols isolated from the fruits of Pistacia lentiscus was assessed. Antioxidant activity was determined by the ability of each compound to scavenge the free radical 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH*), to inhibit xanthine oxidase and to inhibit the lipid peroxidation induced by H(2)O(2) in K562 cell line. Antimutagenic activity was assayed with SOS chromotest using Escherichia coli PQ37 as tester strain and Comet assay using K562 cell line. 1,2,3,4,6-Pentagalloylglucose was found to be more effective to scavenge DPPH* radical and protect against lipid peroxidation. Moreover, these two compounds induced an inhibitory activity against nifuroxazide and aflatoxin B1 mutagenicity. The protective effect exhibited by these molecules was also determined by analysis of gene expression as response to an oxidative stress. For this purpose, we used a cDNA-microarray containing 82 genes related to cell defense, essentially represented by antioxidant and DNA repair proteins. We found that 1,2,3,4,6-pentagalloylglucose induced a decrease in the expression of 11 transcripts related to antioxidant enzymes family (GPX1, TXN, AOE372, SHC1 and SEPW1) and DNA repair (POLD1, APEX, POLD2, MPG, PARP and XRCC5). The use of Gallic acid, induced expression of TXN, TXNRD1, AOE372, GSS (antioxidant enzymes) and LIG4, POLD2, MPG, GADD45A, PCNA, RPA2, DDIT3, HMOX2, XPA, TDG, ERCC1 and GTF2H1 (DNA repair) as well as the repression of GPX1, SEPW1, POLD1 and SHC1 gene expression.

  16. Does Landscape Fragmentation Influence Sex Ratio of Dioecious Plants? A Case Study of Pistacia chinensis in the Thousand-Island Lake Region of China

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lin; Lu, Jianbo

    2011-01-01

    The Thousand-Island Lake region in Zhejiang Province, China is a highly fragmented landscape with a clear point-in-time of fragmentation as a result of flooding to form the reservoir. Islands in the artificial lake were surveyed to examine how population sex ratio of a dioecious plant specie Pistacia chinensis B. was affected by landscape fragmentation. A natural population on the mainland near the lake was also surveyed for comparison. Population size, sex ratio and diameter at breast height (DBH) of individuals were measured over 2 years. More than 1,500 individuals, distributed in 31 populations, were studied. Soil nitrogen in the different populations was measured to identify the relationship between sex ratio and micro-environmental conditions. In accordance with the results of many other reports on biased sex ratio in relation to environmental gradient, we found that poor soil nitrogen areas fostered male-biased populations. In addition, the degree of sex ratio bias increased with decreasing population size and population connectivity. The biased sex ratios were only found in younger individuals (less than 50 years old) in small populations, while a stable 1∶1 sex ratio was found in the large population on the mainland. We concluded that the effects of landscape fragmentation on the dioecious population sex ratio were mainly achieved in relation to changing soil nitrogen conditions in patches and pollen limitation within and among populations. Large populations could maintain a more suitable environment in terms of nutrient conditions and pollen flow, subsequently maintaining a stable sex ratio in dioecious plant populations. Both micro-environmental factors and spatial structure should be considered in fragmented landscape for the conservation of dioecious plant species. PMID:21829667

  17. Boron nutrition affects the carbon metabolism of silver birch seedlings.

    PubMed

    Ruuhola, Teija; Keinänen, Markku; Keski-Saari, Sarita; Lehto, Tarja

    2011-11-01

    Boron (B) is an essential micronutrient whose deficiency is common both in agriculture and in silviculture. Boron deficiency impairs the growth of plants and affects many metabolic processes like carbohydrate metabolism. Boron deficiency and also excess B may decrease the sink demand by decreasing the growth and sugar transport which may lead to the accumulation of carbohydrates and down-regulation of photosynthesis. In this study, we investigated the effects of B nutrition on the soluble and storage carbohydrate concentrations of summer leaves and autumn buds in a deciduous tree species, Betula pendula Roth. In addition, we investigated the changes in the pools of condensed tannins between summer and autumn harvests. One-year-old birch seedlings were fertilized with a complete nutrient solution containing three different levels of B: 0, 30 and 100% of the standard level for complete nutrient solution. Half of the seedlings were harvested after summer period and another half when leaves abscised. The highest B fertilization level (B100) caused an accumulation of starch and a decrease in the concentrations of hexoses (glucose and fructose) in summer leaves, whereas in the B0 seedlings, hexoses (mainly glucose) accumulated and starch decreased. These changes in carbohydrate concentrations might be related to the changes in the sink demand since the autumn growth was the smallest for the B100 seedlings and largest for the B30 seedlings that did not accumulate carbohydrates. The autumn buds of B30 seedlings contained the lowest levels of glucose, glycerol, raffinose and total polyols, which was probably due to the dilution effect of the deposition of other substances like phenols. Condensed tannins accumulated in high amounts in the birch stems during the hardening of seedlings and the largest accumulation was detected in the B30 treatment. Our results suggest that B nutrition of birch seedlings affects the carbohydrate and phenol metabolism and may play an important

  18. Growth of ponderosa pine seedlings as affected by air pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momen, B.; Anderson, P. D.; Houpis, J. L. J.; Helms, J. A.

    The effect of air pollution on seedling survival and competitive ability is important to natural and artificial regeneration of forest trees. Although biochemical and physiological processes are sensitive indicators of pollution stress, the cumulative effects of air pollutants on seedling vigor and competitive ability may be assessed directly from whole-plant growth characteristics such as diameter, height, and photosynthetic area. A few studies that have examined intraspecific variation in seedling response to air pollution indicate that genotypic differences are important in assessing potential effects of air pollution on forest regeneration. Here, we studied the effects of acid rain (no-rain, pH 5.1 rain, pH 3.0 rain) and ozone (filtered, ambient, twice-ambient) in the field on height, diameter, volume, the height:diameter ratio, maximum needle length, and time to reach maximum needle length in seedlings of three families of ponderosa pine ( Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws). Seedling diameter, height, volume, and height:diameter ratio related significantly to their pre-treatment values. Twice-ambient ozone decreased seedling diameter compared with ozone-filtered air. A significant family-by-ozone interaction was detected for seedling height, as the height of only one of the three families was decreased by twice-ambient ozone compared with the ambient level. Seedling diameter was larger and the height:diameter ratio was smaller under pH 3.0 rain compared to either the no-rain or the pH 5.1-rain treatment. This suggests greater seedling vigor, perhaps due to a foliar fertilization effect of the pH 3.0 rain.

  19. Photomodulation of strigolactone biosynthesis and accumulation during sunflower seedling growth.

    PubMed

    Bharti, Niharika; Tripathi, Smita; Bhatla, Satish Chander

    2015-01-01

    Present investigations report the presence of strigolactones (SLs) and photomodulation of their biosynthesis in sunflower seedlings (roots, cotyledons and first pair of leaves) during early phase of seedling development. Qualitative analyses and characterization by HPLC, ESI-MS and FT-IR revealed the presence of more than one type of SLs. Orobanchyl acetate was detected both in roots and leaves. Five-deoxystrigol, sorgolactone and orobanchol were exclusively detected in seedling roots. Sorgomol was detectable only in leaves. HPLC eluted fraction from seedling roots and leaves co-chromatographing with GR24 (a synthetic SL) could also bring about germination in Orobanche cernua (a weed) seeds, which are established to exhibit SL - mediated germination, thereby indicating the SL identity of the eluates using this bioassay. SLs accumulation was always more in the roots of light-grown seedlings, it being maximum at 4 d stage. Although significant activity of carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase (CCD, the enzyme critical for SL biosynthesis) was detected in 2 d old seedling roots, SLs remained undetectable in cotyledons at all stages of development and also in the roots of 2 d old light and dark-grown seedlings. Roots of light-grown seedlings showed maximum CCD activity during early (2 d) stage of development, thereby confirming photomodulation of enzyme activity. These observations indicate the migration of a probable light-sensitized signaling molecule (yet to be identified) or a SL precursor from light exposed aerial parts to the seedling roots maintained in dark. Thus, a photomodulation and migration of SL precursor/s is evident from the present work.

  20. BIM LAU-PE: Seedlings in Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gass, S.; Pennese, R.; Chapuis, D.; Dainesi, P.; Nebuloni, S.; Garcia, M.; Oriol, A.

    2015-09-01

    The effect of gravity on plant roots is an intensive subject of research. Sounding rockets represent a costeffective platform to study this effect under microgravity conditions. As part of the upcoming MASER 13 sounding rocket campaign, two experiments on Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings have been devised: GRAMAT and SPARC. These experiments are aimed at studying (1) the genes that are specifically switched on or off during microgravity, and (2) the position of auxin-transporting proteins during microgravity. To perform these experiments, RUAG Space Switzerland site of Nyon, in collaboration with the Swedish Space Corporation (SSC) and the University of Freiburg, has developed the BIM LAU-PE (Biolology In Microgravity Late Access Unit Plant Experiment). In the following an overview of the BIM LAU-PE design is presented, highlighting specific module design features and verifications performed. A particular emphasis is placed on the parabolic flight experiments, including results of the micro-g injection system validation.

  1. Arborescent palm seed morphology and seedling distribution.

    PubMed

    Salm, Rodolfo

    2005-11-01

    This study examines how the seed morphology of two large arborescent palms, Attalea maripa (Aubl.) Mart. and Astrocaryum aculeatum G. Mey, may affect their seed shadow in a seasonally dry Amazonian forest. In addition to being smaller and produced in larger numbers than those of A. aculeatum, A. maripa seeds also presented a substantially lower amount of nutritional reserves available for the embryo. However, A. maripa seedlings were found in much higher numbers than those of A. aculeatum. The results suggest that, within the spatial scale considered, the seed rain of A. maripa is more restricted to the area surrounding around reproductive conspecifics than that of A. aculeatum. Furthermore, in comparison with those of A. aculeatum, the smaller seeds of A. maripa might be less attractive to scatterhoarding rodents (e.g. Dasyprocta aguti). The pattern observed emphasizes the importance of scatterhoarding rodents as dispersers of large-seeded plant species in Neotropical forests.

  2. Arthropod invasion disrupts Cycas micronesica seedling recruitment.

    PubMed

    Marler, Thomas E; Terry, L Irene

    2011-11-01

    We recently described characteristics of reproductive effort for the cycad Cycas micronesica on the island of Guam. The data were serendipitously recorded just prior to the devastating invasion of the armored scale Aulacaspis yasumatsui. This invasion decimated the cycad population and after six years of infestation no recruitment is occurring among the survivors. We describe various underlying mechanisms that may explain how this homopteran insect has eliminated host recruitment among categories including plant-pollinator mutualism disruptions, direct damage to reproductive structures, population level responses to declining plant health, and failures of seedlings to establish. Our pre-invasion data on reproductive effort will serve as the benchmark for quantifying how this alien pest is endangering the endemic cycad.

  3. Storage oil hydrolysis during early seedling growth.

    PubMed

    Quettier, Anne-Laure; Eastmond, Peter J

    2009-06-01

    Storage oil breakdown plays an important role in the life cycle of many plants by providing the carbon skeletons that support seedling growth immediately following germination. This metabolic process is initiated by lipases (EC: 3.1.1.3), which catalyze the hydrolysis of triacylglycerols (TAGs) to release free fatty acids and glycerol. A number of lipases have been purified to near homogeneity from seed tissues and analysed for their in vitro activities. Furthermore, several genes encoding lipases have been cloned and characterised from plants. However, only recently has data been presented to establish the molecular identity of a lipase that has been shown to be required for TAG breakdown in seeds. In this review we briefly outline the processes of TAG synthesis and breakdown. We then discuss some of the biochemical literature on seed lipases and describe the cloning and characterisation of a lipase called SUGAR-DEPENDENT1, which is required for TAG breakdown in Arabidopsis thaliana seeds.

  4. Endophytic Chaetomium globosum enhances maize seedling copper stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Abou Alhamed, M F; Shebany, Y M

    2012-09-01

    This study aims at characterisation of the impact of Chaetomium globosum on copper stress resistance of maize seedlings. Higher levels of copper treatment decreased maize dry weight and induced a marked increase in osmotic solutes, antioxidant enzyme activity and the level of lipid peroxidation. On the other hand, addition of the endophytic C. globosum alleviated the toxic effect of copper on maize growth. The combination of copper sulphate and Chaetomium increased seedling dry weight, osmotic solute content and antioxidant enzyme activity compared to copper sulphate alone, while lipid peroxidation levels were also decreased. The fungal scavenger system might be important for supporting the ability of maize seedlings to resist copper toxicity.

  5. Long-suppressed ponderosa pine seedlings respond to release.

    Treesearch

    Walter G. Dahms

    1960-01-01

    Long-suppressed ponderosa pine seedlings and saplings have a remarkable ability to recover and resume normal growth when released. This fact is strikingly demonstrated by a study begun in 1934 on the Pringle Falls Experimental Forest, near Bend, Oregon.

  6. Pulsed induction of circadian clock genes in Arabidopsis seedlings.

    PubMed

    Knowles, Stephen M; Lu, Sheen X; Tobin, Elaine M

    2014-01-01

    The Alc-inducible system is a simple, yet effective, "gene switch" that can be used to transiently induce gene expression in Arabidopsis. Here we provide a protocol for using the Alc-inducible system to give a pulse in expression of a circadian clock gene in transgenic seedlings. The line we use as an example harbors an Alc-inducible copy of the CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED 1 (CCA1) gene (Alc∷CCA1). Alc∷CCA1 seedlings are grown on solid MS medium and subsequently treated with ethanol vapor. Because the ethanol is quickly absorbed into the medium upon exposure, the seedlings are moved to fresh plates following treatment to avoid continuous induction. After the induction, the seedlings are harvested over a time-course for future total RNA and/or protein extraction that can be used for subsequent gene expression analyses.

  7. ARC EMCS Experiments (Seedling Growth-2) Experiment Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heathcote, David; Steele, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Presentation of the status of the ARC ISS (International Space Station) Experiment, Seedling Growth-2 to the Payload Operations Investigator Working Group meeting at MSFC, Huntsville AL. The experiment employs the European Modular Cultivation System (ECMS).

  8. A leaf phosphorus assay for seedlings of Acacia mangium.

    PubMed

    Sun, J S; Simpson, R J; Sands, R

    1992-10-01

    Concentrations of extractable and total phosphorus in leaves, stem, root and nodules of 12-week-old seedlings of two provenances of Acacia mangium Willd. were analyzed to identify the fraction of phosphorus and the plant part most suitable for predicting the phosphorus nutritional status of the seedlings.For both provenances, concentrations of extractable phosphorus were more sensitive to changes in soil phosphorus status and varied less among different plant parts than concentrations of total phosphorus. Concentrations of extractable phosphorus in the youngest fully expanded leaf (Leaf 3 from the apex) and the next two older leaves correlated closely with seedling dry mass and may be used to assess the phosphorus nutritional status of Acacia mangium seedlings.

  9. Effect of ponderosa pine needle litter on grass seedling survival.

    Treesearch

    Burt R. McConnell; Justin G. Smith

    1971-01-01

    Hard fescue survival rates were followed for 6 years on four different pine needle treatment plots. Needle litter had a significant effect on initial survival of fescue seedlings, but subsequent losses undoubtedly resulted from the interaction of many factors.

  10. Stimulatory effects of aluminum on growth of sugar maple seedlings

    Treesearch

    George A. Schier; Carolyn J. McQuattie

    2002-01-01

    To determine the effect of aluminum (Al) on sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.), seedlings were grown in sand irrigated with nutrient solution (pH 3.8) containing 0, 2.5, 5, 10, 20, or 40 mg L-1 Al. Seedling growth was enhanced at 2.5 and 5mgL-1 Al. Although higher levels of Al reduced calcium (Ca) and...

  11. Photosynthesis and Biomass Allocation in Oak Seedlings Grown Under Shade

    Treesearch

    Shi-Jean S. Sung; Paul P. Kormanik; Stanley J. Zarnoch

    1998-01-01

    Abstract-Northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) (NRO) and white oak (Q. alba L.) (WO) acorns were sown into wooden plots and grown under 30 percent shade screen (30 percent S) or 70 percent shade screen (70 percent S). Seedlings grown under full sun were the controls (C). At the end of the first year, the 30 percent S NRO had 30 percent greater seedling dry weight (DW...

  12. Limitations to seedling establishment in a mesic Hawaiian forest.

    PubMed

    Denslow, Julie S; Uowolo, Amanda L; Hughes, R Flint

    2006-05-01

    While invasive species may be visible indicators of plant community degradation, they may not constitute the only, or even the primary, limitation to stand regeneration. We used seed-augmentation and grass-removal experiments under different canopy conditions to assess the relative importance of dispersal limitation, resource availability, and competition on seedling establishment in the understory shrubs Sophora chrysophilla, Dodonea viscosa, and Pipturus albidus in a montane mesic forest in Hawaii. The study location was an Acacia koa-Metrosideros polymorpha forest at 1000-1500 m elevation on the leeward side of Hawaii Island; it is a closed-canopy forest historically subject to logging and grazing by cattle and sheep and currently dominated by the exotic grass, Ehrharta stipoides, in the herb layer. Seedling establishment after 1 and 2 years was strongly dispersal limited in Sophora and Dodonea, but not in Acacia, a non-augmented species in which abundant seedlings established, nor in Pipterus, in which only one seedling established in 2 years. Grass cover reduced seedling establishment in Acacia, Sophora, and Dodonea and, for the latter two species, seedling establishment was substantially greater in the warmer, more moist forest at the lowest elevation. Light, moisture, and resin-captured N and P were more strongly affected by elevation and canopy composition than by grass cover, but in most cases seedling establishment was not positively correlated with resource availability. Limitations to the establishment of woody seedlings in this forest-grassland mixture vary among species; however, both dispersal limitation and competition from a shade-tolerant grass are important deterrents to regeneration in these forests.

  13. Inhibiting effect of ponderosa pine seed trees on seedling growth

    Treesearch

    Philip M. McDonald

    1976-01-01

    Ponderosa pine seed trees, numbering 4, 8, and 12 per acre, were left standing for 9 years after harvest cutting on the Challenge Experimental Forest, Calif. Seedling heights were measured at ages 5, 9, and 14, and for all ages were poorest if within 20 feet of a seed tree. Seedlings 20 feet or less from a seed tree at the ages given lost the equivalent in years of...

  14. Translocation of 14-C in ponderosa pine seedlings

    Treesearch

    Robert R. Ziemer

    1971-01-01

    The movement of 14-C from the old needles to the roots, and later to the new needles, was measured in 2-year-old ponderosa pine seedlings. The seedlings were in one of three growth stages at the time of the feeding of 14-CO-2: 9 days before spring bud break with no root activity; 7 days before spring bud break with high root activity; and 7 days after spring bud break...

  15. Actin of Beta vulgaris seedlings under the clinorotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozeko, L. Ye.

    We study the influence of altered gravity on actin expression in roots of Beta vulguris seedlings grown on the horizontal clinostat (2 rpm) from seed germination for three days. It is shown that the total actin quantity was not influenced. Three actin isoforms are revealed; a relative protein quantity of these isoforms was similar both in clinorotated seedlings and in ones grown in norm. This point to stable expression of actin under the altered gravity conditions.

  16. Translocation of Paclobutrazol, a Gibberellin Biosynthesis Inhibitor, in Apple Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shiow Y.; Sun, Tung; Faust, Miklos

    1986-01-01

    The [(2RS,3RS)-1-(4-chlorophenyl)-4,4-dimethyl-2-(1,2,4-triazol-1- yl)-pentan-3-ol] (paclobutrazol, PP333) measured in apple seedlings (`York Imperial' Malus domestica Borkh) was confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Data showed that paclobutrazol was taken up through roots and transported primarily in the xylem through the stems and accumulated in leaves. No detectable basipetal movement of paclobutrazol in apple seedlings was found. PMID:16664976

  17. Eucalyptus obliqua seedling growth in organic vs. mineral soil horizons.

    PubMed

    Barry, Karen M; Janos, David P; Nichols, Scott; Bowman, David M J S

    2015-01-01

    Eucalyptus obliqua, the most widespread timber tree in Tasmania, is a pioneer after fire which can eliminate the organic layer of forest soil, exposing the underlying mineral soil. We compared seedling growth, mycorrhiza formation, and mineral nutrient limitation in organic layer vs. mineral soil. We grew E. obliqua seedlings separately in pots of organic layer and mineral soil in a glasshouse. Additional treatments of organic soil only, involved fully crossed methyl-bromide fumigation and fertilization. Fertilization comprised chelated iron for 121 days after transplant (DAT) followed by soluble phosphorus. At 357 DAT, whole plant dry weight was three times greater in ambient organic than in mineral soil. In organic soil, fumigation halved ectomycorrhiza abundance and reduced seedling growth at 149 DAT, but by 357 DAT when negative effects of fumigation on seedling growth had disappeared, neither fumigation nor fertilization affected mycorrhiza abundance. Iron fertilization diminished seedling growth, but subsequent phosphorus fertilization improved it. E. obliqua seedlings grow much better in organic layer soil than in mineral soil, although phosphorus remains limiting. The prevalent forestry practice of burning to mineral soil after timber harvest exposes a poor growth medium likely only partially compensated by fire-induced mineral soil alterations.

  18. Wood formation in Abies balsamea seedlings subjected to artificial defoliation.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Sergio; Simard, Sonia; Deslauriers, Annie; Morin, Hubert

    2009-04-01

    We determined the cambial sensitivity and quantified the anatomical differences in xylem of Abies balsamea (L.) Mill. seedlings subjected to artificial defoliation to simulate spruce budworm feeding. Defoliation was performed by removing two-thirds of needles of all current-year shoots for up to four consecutive growth cycles to account for inter- and intra-annual xylem formation. In Experiment 1, xylem development was studied from May to October 2005 in seedlings defoliated at the end of June. In Experiment 2, anatomical features of the xylem were measured along the tree rings formed in 2005 and 2006 during the four cycles of growth and defoliation. Control and defoliated seedlings showed similar patterns of cambial activity and timing of xylem differentiation, although fewer enlarging cells were observed in August to September in defoliated seedlings. Tree-ring widths were similar in control and defoliated seedlings, with thinner rings produced in the greenhouse in winter. No effect of defoliation on cell lumen area was observed, and effects on radial cell diameter and wall thickness were found only occasionally. The results indicate that the A. balsamea seedlings produced all the resources required to maintain stem growth during the four cycles of defoliation.

  19. Alcohol dehydrogenase and an inactivator from rice seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Shimomura, S.; Beevers, H.

    1983-01-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) was measured in the various organs of rice seedlings (Oryza sativa) growing in air. In extracts from ungerminated seeds, the ADH is stable, but in extracts from seedlings more than 2 days old the enzyme initially present loses activity in a time- and temperature-dependent fashion, due to the presence of an inactivating component which increases with age in roots and shoots. The inactivation can be prevented completely by dithiothreitol, and when this is included in the extraction medium the apparent loss of total ADH in roots and shoots with age is not observed. In seedlings grown in N/sub 2/, ADA levels in coleoptile extracts are higher than those in air, the enzyme is stable, and no inactivator can be detected. When seedlings grown for 5 days in air were transferred to N/sub 2/ for 3 days, ADA levels increased and there was a decline in inactivator activity. Transfer back to air after 1 day in N/sub 2/ led to loss of the accumulated ADH and increase in inactivator. These reciprocal changes and the fact that the inactivator is absent from coleoptiles of seedlings grown in N/sub 2/ appear to suggest a regulator role for the inactivator in vivo. However, it is clear that high levels of inactivator and ADH can exist in cells of seedlings grown in air for long periods without loss of enzyme activity, and it is argued that they must normally be separately compartmented.

  20. Eucalyptus obliqua seedling growth in organic vs. mineral soil horizons

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Karen M.; Janos, David P.; Nichols, Scott; Bowman, David M. J. S.

    2015-01-01

    Eucalyptus obliqua, the most widespread timber tree in Tasmania, is a pioneer after fire which can eliminate the organic layer of forest soil, exposing the underlying mineral soil. We compared seedling growth, mycorrhiza formation, and mineral nutrient limitation in organic layer vs. mineral soil. We grew E. obliqua seedlings separately in pots of organic layer and mineral soil in a glasshouse. Additional treatments of organic soil only, involved fully crossed methyl-bromide fumigation and fertilization. Fertilization comprised chelated iron for 121 days after transplant (DAT) followed by soluble phosphorus. At 357 DAT, whole plant dry weight was three times greater in ambient organic than in mineral soil. In organic soil, fumigation halved ectomycorrhiza abundance and reduced seedling growth at 149 DAT, but by 357 DAT when negative effects of fumigation on seedling growth had disappeared, neither fumigation nor fertilization affected mycorrhiza abundance. Iron fertilization diminished seedling growth, but subsequent phosphorus fertilization improved it. E. obliqua seedlings grow much better in organic layer soil than in mineral soil, although phosphorus remains limiting. The prevalent forestry practice of burning to mineral soil after timber harvest exposes a poor growth medium likely only partially compensated by fire-induced mineral soil alterations. PMID:25750650

  1. Molecular biology of Ganoderma pathogenicity and diagnosis in coconut seedlings.

    PubMed

    Kandan, A; Radjacommare, R; Ramanathan, A; Raguchander, T; Balasubramanian, P; Samiyappan, R

    2009-01-01

    The pathogenicity of Ganoderma boninense was tested on coconut seedlings under greenhouse conditions and infection confirmed by using immunological and molecular diagnostic tools. Desiccation of older leaves and the emergence of sporophores were observed from pathogen-inoculated seedlings, whereas a control seedling does not show any pathogenic symptoms. Mature sporophores were formed within 10-13 weeks after inoculation. Polyclonal antibodies raised against mycelial proteins of Ganoderma were used for detection of Ganoderma in infected field palm and seedlings through indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay technique. We adopted dot-immunobinding assay for the detection of Ganoderma from greenhouse and field samples. Under nucleic-acid-based diagnosis, G. boninense (167 bp) was detected from artificially inoculated seedlings and infected field palms by polymerase chain reaction. Apart from these, histopathological studies also support the Ganoderma pathogenicity in coconut seedlings. The pathogenicity test and combination of all the three diagnostic methods for Ganoderma could be highly reliable, rapid, sensitive and effective screening of resistance in planting material in the future.

  2. Considerations for evaluating controlled exposure studies of tree seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, C.E. Jr.; Mickler, R.A.

    1994-03-01

    Tree seedling exposure studies, covering a wide range of experimental conditions in pollutant treatments, species, facilities, and exposure regimes, have been conducted during the past several years to determine acute effects and relative sensitivity of tree species in response to simulated acid precipitation and gaseous pollutants. Because of the difficulties inherent in conducting controlled exposures with mature trees (e.g., size, variability among experimental units, and costs associated with replication of treatments), seedling exposure studies have been initiated as the quickest way to address these issues. However, sufficient consideration has not been given to either the comparability of seedling studies or to their appropriate inference. The statistical power of any given analysis is rarely discussed when the outcomes are published. Appropriate and documented statistics of experimenter bias are often not reported, and variability in the exposure regime (ie., treatment target levels) and the measurement of experimental variables is assumed to be zero, rather than quantified. FInally, the populations of seedlings for which seedling experiments have inferences the extent to which seedling responses are applicable to mature trees and forest condition, and the limitations in national or regional generalizations are crucial issues often left to an individual reader`s interpretation without the benefit of adequate quantitative information presented by the authors. 31 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Effects of selenium on wheat seedlings under drought stress.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xiaoqin; Chu, Jianzhou; Wang, Guangyin

    2009-09-01

    The paper reports the effects of selenium (Se) supply on growth and some physiological traits of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv Shijiazhuang NO. 8) seedlings exposed to drought stress. The growth and physiological responses of seedlings were different depending on the Se concentration. The higher (3.0 mg Se kg(-1)) and lower amount used (0.5 mg Se kg(-1)) did not significantly affect on biomass accumulation. Treatments with 1.0 and 2.0 mg Se kg(-1) promoted biomass accumulation of wheat seedlings. Treatments at 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 mg Se kg(-1) significantly increased root activity, proline content, peroxidase (POD), and catalase (CAT) activities, carotenoids (Car) content, chlorophyll content, and reduced malondialdehyde (MDA) content of wheat seedlings. Lower Se treatment did not significantly effect on chlorophyll content and MDA content, although it also increased some antioxidant index (proline and Car content, POD and CAT activities) in wheat seedlings. These results suggest that optimal Se supply is favorable for growth of wheat seedlings during drought condition.

  4. Lignification in young plant seedlings grown on earth and aboard the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowles, Joe R.; Lemay, R.; Jahns, G.; Scheld, W. H.; Peterson, C.

    1989-01-01

    The Space Shuttle era has provided an opportunity for investigators to conduct experiments in a microgravity environment. Two Shuttle flights, STS-3 and STS-51F, each contained an experiment designed principally to determine whether young plant seedlings exposed to microgravity had reduced lignin content in comparison to seedlings grown at one gravity. Three different plant species, pine, oats, and mung beans, were exposed for eight days to the microgravity environment of the Shuttle. The lignin content of in-flight seedlings was less than the control seedlings in all seven sets of seedlings included in these two experiments. In five sets of seedlings, the reduction in lignin content in flight seedlings ranged from 6 to 24 percent and was statistically significant. In addition, the activity of two enzymes involved in lignin synthesis, phenylalanine ammonia lyase and peroxidase, were significantly reduced in pine seedlings. It was therefore concluded that microgravity, as perceived by young plant seedlings, results in reduced lignin synthesis.

  5. Lignification in young plant seedlings grown on earth and aboard the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowles, Joe R.; Lemay, R.; Jahns, G.; Scheld, W. H.; Peterson, C.

    1989-01-01

    The Space Shuttle era has provided an opportunity for investigators to conduct experiments in a microgravity environment. Two Shuttle flights, STS-3 and STS-51F, each contained an experiment designed principally to determine whether young plant seedlings exposed to microgravity had reduced lignin content in comparison to seedlings grown at one gravity. Three different plant species, pine, oats, and mung beans, were exposed for eight days to the microgravity environment of the Shuttle. The lignin content of in-flight seedlings was less than the control seedlings in all seven sets of seedlings included in these two experiments. In five sets of seedlings, the reduction in lignin content in flight seedlings ranged from 6 to 24 percent and was statistically significant. In addition, the activity of two enzymes involved in lignin synthesis, phenylalanine ammonia lyase and peroxidase, were significantly reduced in pine seedlings. It was therefore concluded that microgravity, as perceived by young plant seedlings, results in reduced lignin synthesis.

  6. The Vibration Ring. Phase 1; [Seedling Fund

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asnani, Vivake M.; Krantz, Timothy L.; Delap, Damon C.; Stringer, David B.

    2014-01-01

    The vibration ring was conceived as a driveline damping device to prevent structure-borne noise in machines. It has the appearance of a metal ring, and can be installed between any two driveline components like an ordinary mechanical spacer. Damping is achieved using a ring-shaped piezoelectric stack that is poled in the axial direction and connected to an electrical shunt circuit. Surrounding the stack is a metal structure, called the compression cage, which squeezes the stack along its poled axis when excited by radial driveline forces. The stack in turn generates electrical energy, which is either dissipated or harvested using the shunt circuit. Removing energy from the system creates a net damping effect. The vibration ring is much stiffer than traditional damping devices, which allows it to be used in a driveline without disrupting normal operation. In phase 1 of this NASA Seedling Fund project, a combination of design and analysis was used to examine the feasibility of this concept. Several designs were evaluated using solid modeling, finite element analysis, and by creating prototype hardware. Then an analytical model representing the coupled electromechanical response was formulated in closed form. The model was exercised parametrically to examine the stiffness and loss factor spectra of the vibration ring, as well as simulate its damping effect in the context of a simplified driveline model. The results of this work showed that this is a viable mechanism for driveline damping, and provided several lessons for continued development.

  7. Photomorphogenic responses in maize seedling development.

    PubMed

    Markelz, Nicole H; Costich, Denise E; Brutnell, Thomas P

    2003-12-01

    As an emerging maize (Zea mays) seedling senses light, there is a decrease in the rate of mesocotyl elongation, an induction of root growth, and an expansion of leaves. In leaf tissues, mesophyll and bundle sheath cell fate is determined, and the proplastids of each differentiate into the dimorphic chloroplasts typical of each cell type. Although it has been inferred from recent studies in several model plant species that multiple photoreceptor systems mediate this process, surprisingly little is known of light signal transduction in maize. Here, we examine two photomorphogenic responses in maize: inhibition of mesocotyl elongation and C4 photosynthetic differentiation. Through an extensive survey of white, red, far-red, and blue light responses among a diverse collection of germplasm, including a phytochrome-deficient mutant elm1, we show that light response is a highly variable trait in maize. Although all inbreds examined appear to have a functional phytochrome signal transduction pathway, several lines showed reduced sensitivity to blue light. A significant correlation was observed between light response and subpopulation, suggesting that light responsiveness may be a target of artificial selection. An examination of C4 gene expression patterns under various light regimes in the standard W22 inbred and elm1 indicate that cell-specific patterns of C4 gene expression are maintained in fully differentiated tissues independent of light quality. To our knowledge, these findings represent the first comprehensive survey of light response in maize and are discussed in relation to maize breeding strategies.

  8. Salinity and temperature significantly influence seed germination, seedling establishment, and seedling growth of eelgrass Zostera marina L.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shaochun; Wang, Pengmei; Wang, Feng; Zhang, Xiaomei; Gu, Ruiting

    2016-01-01

    Globally, seagrass beds have been recognized as critical yet declining coastal habitats. To mitigate seagrass losses, seagrass restorations have been conducted in worldwide over the past two decades. Seed utilization is considered to be an important approach in seagrass restoration efforts. In this study, we investigated the effects of salinity and temperature on seed germination, seedling establishment, and seedling growth of eelgrass Zostera marina L. (Swan Lake, northern China). We initially tested the effects of salinity (0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, and 40 ppt) and water temperature (5, 10, 15, and 20 °C) on seed germination to identify optimal levels. To identify levels of salinity that could potentially limit survival and growth, and, consequently, the spatial distribution of seedlings in temperate estuaries, we then examined the effect of freshwater and other salinity levels (10, 20, and 30 ppt) on seedling growth and establishment to confirm suitable conditions for seedling development. Finally, we examined the effect of transferring germinated seeds from freshwater or low salinity levels (1, 5, and 15 ppt) to natural seawater (32 ppt) on seedling establishment rate (SER) at 15 °C. In our research, we found that: (1) Mature seeds had a considerably lower moisture content than immature seeds; therefore, moisture content may be a potential indicator of Z. marina seed maturity; (2) Seed germination significantly increased at low salinity (p < 0.001) and high temperature (p < 0.001). Salinity had a much stronger influence on seed germination than temperature. Maximum seed germination (88.67 ± 5.77%) was recorded in freshwater at 15 °C; (3) Freshwater and low salinity levels (< 20 ppt) increased germination but had a strong negative effect on seedling morphology (number of leaves per seedling reduced from 2 to 0, and maximum seedling leaf length reduced from 4.48 to 0 cm) and growth (seedling biomass reduced by 46.15–66.67% and maximum seedling length

  9. A genome-wide transcriptome map of pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) provides novel insights into salinity-related genes and marker discovery.

    PubMed

    Moazzzam Jazi, Maryam; Seyedi, Seyed Mahdi; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil; Ebrahimi, Mansour; De Moro, Gianluca; Botanga, Christopher

    2017-08-17

    Pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) is one of the most important commercial nut crops worldwide. It is a salt-tolerant and long-lived tree, with the largest cultivation area in Iran. Climate change and subsequent increased soil salt content have adversely affected the pistachio yield in recent years. However, the lack of genomic/global transcriptomic sequences on P. vera impedes comprehensive researches at the molecular level. Hence, whole transcriptome sequencing is required to gain insight into functional genes and pathways in response to salt stress. RNA sequencing of a pooled sample representing 24 different tissues of two pistachio cultivars with contrasting salinity tolerance under control and salt treatment by Illumina Hiseq 2000 platform resulted in 368,953,262 clean 100 bp paired-ends reads (90 Gb). Following creating several assemblies and assessing their quality from multiple perspectives, we found that using the annotation-based metrics together with the length-based parameters allows an improved assessment of the transcriptome assembly quality, compared to the solely use of the length-based parameters. The generated assembly by Trinity was adopted for functional annotation and subsequent analyses. In total, 29,119 contigs annotated against all of five public databases, including NR, UniProt, TAIR10, KOG and InterProScan. Among 279 KEGG pathways supported by our assembly, we further examined the pathways involved in the plant hormone biosynthesis and signaling as well as those to be contributed to secondary metabolite biosynthesis due to their importance under salinity stress. In total, 11,337 SSRs were also identified, which the most abundant being dinucleotide repeats. Besides, 13,097 transcripts as candidate stress-responsive genes were identified. Expression of some of these genes experimentally validated through quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) that further confirmed the accuracy of the assembly. From this analysis, the contrasting expression pattern

  10. Anthelmintic activity of Pistacia lentiscus foliage in two Middle Eastern breeds of goats differing in their propensity to consume tannin-rich browse.

    PubMed

    Landau, S; Azaizeh, H; Muklada, H; Glasser, T; Ungar, E D; Baram, H; Abbas, N; Markovics, A

    2010-10-29

    The Damascus and Mamber breeds of goats thrive in Middle Eastern Mediterranean regions where the tannin-rich (20% of polyethylene glycol-binding tannins) brush species Pistacia lentiscus L. (lentisk) is ubiquitous. In light of the increasing recognition of the anthelmintic activity of plant tannins, we examined the effect of offering lentisk foliage for 24 days on fecal egg excretion in 5.5-month-old Damascus and Mamber kid goats (n=28) following infection with 10,000 L3 larvae of mixed gastro-intestinal nematodes (GIN). Lentisk foliage was consumed with or without a daily supplement of 20 g polyethylene glycol (PEG; MW 4000). Lentisk tannins showed a strong protein-depletive effect that was totally reversed by the addition of PEG. At the peak of infection, kids of the two breeds lost weight unless they were fed with lentisk without PEG. Fecal egg counts (FEC) were lowest - and did not differ from 0 - in kids fed lentisk without PEG, highest in the controls fed hay as roughage, and intermediate in kids fed lentisk and PEG (241, 1293, and 705 eggs per gram, respectively, SEM 180; P<0.001); therefore, the anthelmintic activity of lentisk was only partly attributable to tannins. The suppressive effect of lentisk on FEC ceased when feeding was discontinued, suggesting that female parasites were not killed but their fertility was reversibly impaired. Damascus kids showed lower FEC than their Mamber counterparts, inferring that the effect of foraging on tannin-rich species is only additive to genetic differences between goat breeds in their sensitivity to GIN infection. On the basis of our results we would expect yearlong lentisk grazing to result in no or very low GIN infection, and Damascus goats to have some advantage over Mamber goats where chemical control of GIN is unfeasible. There appears to be a trade-off between the benefits of lentisk tannin as drug and its side-effects (protein depletion) when given at high level; how goats balance this trade-off requires

  11. Forest tree seedlings may suffer from predicted future winters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domisch, Timo; Repo, Tapani; Martz, Françoise; Rautio, Pasi

    2016-04-01

    Future climate scenarios predict increased precipitation and air temperatures, particularly at high latitudes, and especially so during winter, spring and autumn. However, soil temperatures are more difficult to predict, since they depend strongly on the insulating snow cover. Warm periods during winter can lead to thaw-freeze cycles and flooding, which again can result in the formation of ice layers, affecting soil properties, soil gas concentrations and the survival of tree seedlings. We conducted two laboratory experiments of 20 weeks duration each, simulating winter, spring and early summer, and imposed Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) or downy birch (Betula pubescens Ehrh.) seedlings to four different winter scenarios: (1) ambient snow cover, (2) compressed snow and ice encasement, (3) frozen flood and (4) no snow. We estimated the stress that the seedlings experienced by means of gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence and determining above- and belowground biomass and carbohydrate contents, as well as measuring soil oxygen and carbon dioxide concentrations. The seedlings in the snow and compressed snow treatments survived until the end of the experiments, although only those covered with an ambient snow cover showed normal height growth and typical carbohydrate contents. The seedlings in the other treatments showed symptoms of dieback already during early spring and had almost completely died at the end of the experiment. Our results suggest the crucial significance of the protective snow cover, and that a missing soil cover or soil hypoxia and anoxia during winter can be lethal for seedlings, and that respiratory losses and winter desiccation of aboveground organs can further lead to the death of tree seedlings.

  12. Mycorrhizal networks affect ectomycorrhizal fungal community similarity between conspecific trees and seedlings.

    PubMed

    Bingham, Marcus A; Simard, Suzanne W

    2012-05-01

    Ectomycorrhizal (EM) networks (MN) are thought to be an important mode of EM fungal colonization of coniferous seedlings. How MNs affect EM communities on seedlings, and how this varies with biotic and abiotic factors, is integral to understanding their importance in seedling establishment. We examined EM fungal community similarity between mature trees and conspecific interior Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca) seedlings in two experiments where seed and nursery-grown seedlings originating from different locations were planted at various distances from trees along a climatic gradient. At harvest, trees shared 60% of their fungal taxa in common with outplanted seedlings and 77% with germinants, indicating potential for seedlings to join the network of residual trees. In both experiments, community similarity between trees and seedlings increased with drought. However, community similarity was lower among nursery seedlings growing at 2.5 m from trees when they were able to form an MN, suggesting MNs reduced seedling EM fungal richness. For field germinants, MNs resulted in lower community similarity in the driest climates. Distance from trees affected community similarity of nursery seedlings to trees, but there was no interaction of provenance with MNs in their effect on similarity in either nursery seedlings or field germinants as hypothesized. We conclude that MNs of trees influence EM colonization patterns of seedlings, and the strength of these effects increases with climatic drought. © Springer-Verlag 2012

  13. Assessing Posidonia oceanica Seedling Substrate Preference: An Experimental Determination of Seedling Anchorage Success in Rocky vs. Sandy Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Alagna, Adriana; Fernández, Tomás Vega; Anna, Giovanni D; Magliola, Carlo; Mazzola, Salvatore; Badalamenti, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    In the last decades the growing awareness of the ecological importance of seagrass meadows has prompted increasing efforts to protect existing beds and restore degraded habitats. An in-depth knowledge of factors acting as major drivers of propagule settlement and recruitment is required in order to understand patterns of seagrass colonization and recovery and to inform appropriate management and conservation strategies. In this work Posidonia oceanica seedlings were reared for five months in a land-based culture facility under simulated natural hydrodynamic conditions to identify suitable substrates for seedling anchorage. Two main substrate features were investigated: firmness (i.e., sand vs. rock) and complexity (i.e., size of interstitial spaces between rocks). Seedlings were successfully grown in culture tanks, obtaining overall seedling survival of 93%. Anchorage was strongly influenced by substrate firmness and took place only on rocks, where it was as high as 89%. Anchorage occurred through adhesion by sticky root hairs. The minimum force required to dislodge plantlets attached to rocky substrates reached 23.830 N (equivalent to 2.43 kg), which would potentially allow many plantlets to overcome winter storms in the field. The ability of rocky substrates to retain seedlings increased with their complexity. The interstitial spaces between rocks provided appropriate microsites for seedling settlement, as seeds were successfully retained, and a suitable substrate for anchorage was available. In conclusion P. oceanica juveniles showed a clear-cut preference for hard substrates over the sandy one, due to the root system adhesive properties. In particular, firm and complex substrates allowed for propagule early and strong anchorage, enhancing persistence and establishment probabilities. Seedling substrate preference documented here leads to expect a more successful sexual recruitment on hard bottoms compared with soft ones. This feature could have influenced P

  14. Mangrove microclimates alter seedling dynamics at the range edge.

    PubMed

    Devaney, John L; Lehmann, Michael; Feller, Ilka C; Parker, John D

    2017-08-05

    Recent climate warming has led to asynchronous species migrations, with major consequences for ecosystems worldwide. In woody communities, localized microclimates have the potential to create feedback mechanisms that can alter the rate of species range shifts attributed to macroclimate drivers alone. Mangrove encroachment into saltmarsh in many areas is driven by a reduction in freeze events, and this encroachment can further modify local climate, but the subsequent impacts on mangrove seedling dynamics are unknown. We monitored microclimate conditions beneath mangrove canopies and adjacent open saltmarsh at a freeze-sensitive mangrove-saltmarsh ecotone and assessed survival of experimentally transplanted mangrove seedlings. Mangrove canopies buffered night time cooling during the winter, leading to interspecific differences in freeze damage on mangrove seedlings. However, mangrove canopies also altered biotic interactions. Herbivore damage was higher under canopies, leading to greater mangrove seedling mortality beneath canopies relative to saltmarsh. While warming-induced expansion of mangroves can lead to positive microclimate feedbacks, simultaneous fluctuations in biotic drivers can also alter seedling dynamics. Thus, climate change can drive divergent feedback mechanisms through both abiotic and biotic channels, highlighting the importance of vegetation-microclimate interactions as important moderators of climate driven range shifts. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Degraded dryland rehabilitation: boosting seedling survival using zeolitic tuff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhamad, Mohammad Noor; Alrbabah, Mohammad; Athamneh, Hana

    2016-04-01

    More than 90% of Jordan is broadly defined as rangelands. Most rangelands are located within the arid zone of the country. Extensive grazing occurs across much of the natural pastures resulting in serious environmental degradation of natural resources in these rangelands. Several programs were carried out for rangeland conservation and rehabilitation in the country. However, these programs face a major challenge of the low survival rate of transplanted shrub seedlings. Seeking innovative approaches to assure healthy establishment of seedling is a big challenge to achieve successful rehabilitation programs. Drought is considered one of the major problems in rehabilitation. Promoting survival and growth, using zeolitic tuff added to planting holes is suggested to be a possible solution. The experiment was conducted on a factorial arrangement within RCBD design. Two shrub species (Atriplex halimus, Atriplex nummularia) were transplanted into holes prepared with three levels of tuff treatments (mulching, mixing and control) under rainfed condition. The result showed insignificant effect of tuff on seedling survival percentage, when mixing tuff with plantation soil or adding tuff as mulch. Also, the two species showed similar survival percentages over two measured dates. However, mixing tuff with soil during hole preparation significantly enhanced seedling heights. Furthers, The Australian atriplex (Atriplex nummularia) species significantly grow higher than Atriplex halimus. The study results suggested that mixing zeoltic tuff with soil during transplantation of seedling is promising in improving the success of rangeland rehabilitation in dry areas in Jordan.

  16. Why are there few seedlings beneath the myrmecophyte Triplaris americana?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larrea-Alcázar, Daniel M.; Simonetti, Javier A.

    2007-07-01

    We compared the relative importance of chemical alellopathy, pruning behaviour of resident ants and other non-related agents to ant-plant mutualism for seedling establishment beneath Triplaris americana L. (Polygonaceae), a myrmecophyte plant. We also included a preliminary analysis of effects of fragmentation on these ecological processes. Seeds and seedlings of Theobroma cacao L. (Sterculiaceae) were used as the target species in all experiments. Leaf-tissue extracts of the myrmecophyte plant did not inhibit germination of cacao seeds. Resident Pseudomyrmex triplarinus Weddell (Pseudomyrmecinae) ants did not remove seeds under the canopy of their host plants. The main seed consumer was the leaf-cutting ant Atta sexdens L. (Myrmicinae). Leaves of cacao seedlings were partially or totally pruned by Pseudomyrmex ants mainly in forest fragments studied. We offer evidence pointing to the possibility that the absence of seedlings beneath Triplaris may result from effects of both ant species. We discuss the benefits of pruning behaviour for the resident ant colony and the effects of ant-ant interactions on seedling establishment beneath this ant-plant system.

  17. Effect of low temperature on ethanolic fermentation in rice seedlings.

    PubMed

    Kato-Noguchi, Hisashi; Yasuda, Yukihiro

    2007-08-01

    Rice seedlings (Oryza sativa L.) were incubated at 5-30 degrees C for 48 h and the effect of temperature on ethanolic fermentation in the seedlings was investigated in terms of low-temperature adaptation. Activities of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH, EC 1.1.1.1) and pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC, EC 4.1.1.1) in roots and shoots of the seedlings were low at temperatures of 20-30 degrees C, whereas temperatures of 5, 7.5 and 10 degrees C significantly increased ADH and PDC activities in the roots and shoots. Temperatures of 5-10 degrees C also increased ethanol concentrations in the roots and shoots. The ethanol concentrations in the roots and shoots at 7.5 degrees C were 16- and 12-times greater than those in the roots and shoots at 25 degrees C, respectively. These results indicate that low temperatures (5-10 degrees C) induced ethanolic fermentation in the roots and shoots of the seedlings. Ethanol is known to prevent lipid degradation in plant membrane, and increased membrane-lipid fluidization. In addition, an ADH inhibitor, 4-methylpyrazole, decreased low-temperature tolerance in roots and shoots of rice seedlings and this reduction in the tolerance was recovered by exogenous applied ethanol. Therefore, production of ethanol by ethanolic fermentation may lead to low-temperature adaptation in rice plants by altering the physical properties of membrane lipids.

  18. Seedling mortality from litterfall increases with decreasing latitude.

    PubMed

    Gillman, Len N

    2016-02-01

    Global patterns in ecology need to be identified and interpreted if macroecological processes are to be fully understood. Facilitating effects on seedlings such as that of nurse plants and competitive effects such as allelopathy have been well recognized but the importance of plants acting as killers through physical damage by the litterfall they produce has received relatively little attention. Here I examine latitudinal patterns of physical disturbance to seedlings (microdisturbance) due to litterfall and discuss the macroecological implications in light of current research. Analyses of results from published studies show that both the risk of litterfall disturbance, as measured using artificial model seedlings, and the proportion of seedling mortalities due to litterfall decrease significantly with increasing latitude. Patterns of microdisturbance appear to be driven by the dynamic interaction between macro-litterfall, safe sites with protective overhead vegetation, topography, and animal activity. However, we are informed on this subject by few studies. There is evidence, again from a limited number of studies, for considerable spatial heterogeneity in microdisturbance intensity and for seedling resilience to litterfall damage to differ substantially among species. Therefore, differential survival among microsites may produce regeneration niche diversity. However, more focused studies are required across a range of forest types and latitudes before these results can be generalized. Therefore, there is fertile ground for researchers to use comparable multifactorial methods to investigate the implications of microdisturbance at macro-ecological scales.

  19. Response of Pinus ponderosa Seedlings to Stylet-Bearing Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Viglierchio, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    Of 12 stylet-bearing nematodes used for inoculations, Pratylenchus penetrans, P. brachyurus, P. vulnus, Ditylenchus destructor, Meloidogyne incognita, M. javanica, and M. hapla reproduced on Pinus ponderosa, while Xiphinema index, Aphelenchus avenae, Paratylenehus neoamblycephalus, Tylenchulus semipenetrans, and Macroposthonia xenoplax did not. P. vulnus, P. brachyurus, P. penetrans, A. avenae, D. destructor, T. semipenetrans, and P. neoamblycephalus significantly suppressed both the shoot and root wet weights of ponderosa pine seedlings obtained from stands in five different locations. X. index significantly suppressed root wet weights, M. xenoplax siguificantly suppressed shoot wet weight, and M. incognita, M. javanica, and M. hapla suppressed neither at the inoculation levels used. Injurious nematodes tended to suppress root growth more than shoot growth. Seedlings from two locations produced greater shoot growth wet weight than did seedlings from the other three locations. The more injurious nematodes tended to cause an increase in the water content of shoots. Frequency analyses of seedling population shoot-root ratios indicated that ponderosa pine seedlings could be selected for better shoot-root ratios as well as for resistance to several pathogenic nematodes. PMID:19300659

  20. Substitution of peat for municipal solid waste- and sewage sludge-based composts in nursery growing media: effects on growth and nutrition of the native shrub Pistacia lentiscus L.

    PubMed

    Ostos, J C; López-Garrido, R; Murillo, J M; López, R

    2008-04-01

    In this study, the effect of a partial substitution of peat for compost on the growth and nutrition of a native shrub (Pistacia lentiscus L.) was tested. Composts were prepared from pruning and municipal solid wastes or pruning waste and sewage sludge. For preparing growing media each compost was added at a rate of 40%, fresh pine bark at 20% or 40% and peat at 20%, 40% or 60%. Aqueous extracts from the substrates did not impair germination of cress (germination bioassay). In relation to plants growing in peat-based substrate (used as a control), plants of the compost-based substrates reached better growth and nutrition, especially when using the sewage sludge-based compost, and the P uptake was notably enhanced. The concentrations of trace elements were far lower than the ranges considered phytotoxic for vascular plants. Detrimental effect derived from using fresh pine bark was not observed.

  1. Survival and Growth of Northern Red Oak Seedlings Following a Prescribed Burn

    Treesearch

    Paul S. Johnson

    1974-01-01

    Mortality of northern red oak seedlings in a spring prescribed burn was related to temperature near the root collar. Most of the 42 percent of seedlings that survived the burn developed new shoots from the root collar.

  2. Active Ground Optical Remote Sensing for Improved Monitoring of Seedling Stress in Nurseries

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Active ground optical remote sensing (AGORS) devices mounted on overhead irrigation booms could help to improve seedling quality by autonomously monitoring seedling stress. In contrast to traditionally used passive optical sensors, AGORS devices operate independently of ambient light conditions and ...

  3. Effects of Simulated Microgravity on Thermotolerance of Pea Seedlings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozeko, L.

    2008-06-01

    A coordinated plant response to simulated microgravity (clinorotation) and heat stress was analyzed. 5-d pea seedlings grown on a horizontal clinostat or in the stationary conditions were exposed to different heat treatments (mild, severe and severe after pretreatment). Temperature-dependent quantitative changes in the heat stress response were revealed in the clinorotated seedlings comparatively to the stationary grown ones: less growth activity, an increase in the production of high levels of heat shock proteins Hsp70 and Hsp90, a higher extent of the membrane damage. Thus, clinorotated seedlings were more sensitive to heat stress. The data suggest that clinorotation may influence distinct functions, including Hsps synthesis and protection of membrane integrity, that affect plant growth activity and thermotolerance as a result.

  4. Ultraweak, spontaneous photon emission in seedlings: toxicological and chronobiological applications.

    PubMed

    de Mello Gallep, Cristiano

    2014-12-01

    The detection of ultraweak light emission in seedlings has been explored in toxicological and chronobiological studies. The main studies in this area are reviewed briefly, including a report on applied tests held in the last 7 years at LaFA--UNICAMP (Brazil). In general, results indicate that a linear relation for total light emission versus germination performance is found if only strong stress situations are considered, when external factors depress a seedling's development, even when considering a sequential series of tests. Light emitted by a single seedling was detected in a compact apparatus, and data are presented here for the first time showing pronounced circadian cycles are evident, with similar time and frequency profiles as those of the local gravimetric tide. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Endophytic fungi reduce leaf-cutting ant damage to seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Bittleston, L. S.; Brockmann, F.; Wcislo, W.; Van Bael, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    Our study examines how the mutualism between Atta colombica leaf-cutting ants and their cultivated fungus is influenced by the presence of diverse foliar endophytic fungi (endophytes) at high densities in tropical leaf tissues. We conducted laboratory choice trials in which ant colonies chose between Cordia alliodora seedlings with high (Ehigh) or low (Elow) densities of endophytes. The Ehigh seedlings contained 5.5 times higher endophyte content and a greater diversity of fungal morphospecies than the Elow treatment, and endophyte content was not correlated with leaf toughness or thickness. Leaf-cutting ants cut over 2.5 times the leaf area from Elow relative to Ehigh seedlings and had a tendency to recruit more ants to Elow plants. Our findings suggest that leaf-cutting ants may incur costs from cutting and processing leaves with high endophyte loads, which could impact Neotropical forests by causing variable damage rates within plant communities. PMID:20610420

  6. Nitrogen ion utilization by tulip poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera L. ) seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, L.K.

    1982-01-01

    Growth responses of one-year-old tulip poplar seedlings were determined for different nitrogen sources (HN/sub 4/NO/sub 3/, NH+/sub 4/, NO-/sub 3/, no nitrogen) at 336 ppm N in nutrient culture. At the end of three months, there were no significant differences in growth observed among treatments in terms of stem elongation, leaf area, and leaf size. After four months, however, seedlings of the NH/sub 4/NO/sub 3/ treatment exhibited significantly (P<0.05) greater growth (final weight gain and stem elongation) than all other nitrogen sorces. Growth was slightly less for the NO-/sub 3/ treatment plants, but compared with NH+/sub 4/ and no nitrogen treatment, both NH/sub 4/NO/sub 3/ and NO-/sub 3/ treatments exhibited significantly greater growth responses. NO-/sub 3/ is recommended as the sole nitrogen source, especially for small seedlings of tulip poplar.

  7. Germination and seedling establishment in orchids: a complex of requirements

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Hanne N.; Dixon, Kingsley W.; Jersáková, Jana; Těšitelová, Tamara

    2015-01-01

    Background Seedling recruitment is essential to the sustainability of any plant population. Due to the minute nature of seeds and early-stage seedlings, orchid germination in situ was for a long time practically impossible to observe, creating an obstacle towards understanding seedling site requirements and fluctuations in orchid populations. The introduction of seed packet techniques for sowing and retrieval in natural sites has brought with it important insights, but many aspects of orchid seed and germination biology remain largely unexplored. Key Considerations The germination niche for orchids is extremely complex, because it is defined by requirements not only for seed lodging and germination, but also for presence of a fungal host and its substrate. A mycobiont that the seedling can parasitize is considered an essential element, and a great diversity of Basidiomycota and Ascomycota have now been identified for their role in orchid seed germination, with fungi identifiable as imperfect Rhizoctonia species predominating. Specificity patterns vary from orchid species employing a single fungal lineage to species associating individually with a limited selection of distantly related fungi. A suitable organic carbon source for the mycobiont constitutes another key requirement. Orchid germination also relies on factors that generally influence the success of plant seeds, both abiotic, such as light/shade, moisture, substrate chemistry and texture, and biotic, such as competitors and antagonists. Complexity is furthermore increased when these factors influence seeds/seedling, fungi and fungal substrate differentially. Conclusions A better understanding of germination and seedling establishment is needed for conservation of orchid populations. Due to the obligate association with a mycobiont, the germination niches in orchid species are extremely complex and varied. Microsites suitable for germination can be small and transient, and direct observation is difficult

  8. Germination and seedling establishment in orchids: a complex of requirements.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Hanne N; Dixon, Kingsley W; Jersáková, Jana; Těšitelová, Tamara

    2015-09-01

    Seedling recruitment is essential to the sustainability of any plant population. Due to the minute nature of seeds and early-stage seedlings, orchid germination in situ was for a long time practically impossible to observe, creating an obstacle towards understanding seedling site requirements and fluctuations in orchid populations. The introduction of seed packet techniques for sowing and retrieval in natural sites has brought with it important insights, but many aspects of orchid seed and germination biology remain largely unexplored. The germination niche for orchids is extremely complex, because it is defined by requirements not only for seed lodging and germination, but also for presence of a fungal host and its substrate. A mycobiont that the seedling can parasitize is considered an essential element, and a great diversity of Basidiomycota and Ascomycota have now been identified for their role in orchid seed germination, with fungi identifiable as imperfect Rhizoctonia species predominating. Specificity patterns vary from orchid species employing a single fungal lineage to species associating individually with a limited selection of distantly related fungi. A suitable organic carbon source for the mycobiont constitutes another key requirement. Orchid germination also relies on factors that generally influence the success of plant seeds, both abiotic, such as light/shade, moisture, substrate chemistry and texture, and biotic, such as competitors and antagonists. Complexity is furthermore increased when these factors influence seeds/seedling, fungi and fungal substrate differentially. A better understanding of germination and seedling establishment is needed for conservation of orchid populations. Due to the obligate association with a mycobiont, the germination niches in orchid species are extremely complex and varied. Microsites suitable for germination can be small and transient, and direct observation is difficult. An experimental approach using several

  9. Release and activity of allelochemicals from allelopathic rice seedlings.

    PubMed

    Kong, Chuihua; Liang, Wenju; Xu, Xiaohua; Hu, Fei; Wang, Peng; Jiang, Yong

    2004-05-19

    3-Isopropyl-5-acetoxycyclohexene-2-one-1 (1), momilactone B (2), and 5,7,4'-trihydroxy-3',5'-dimethoxyflavone (3) were isolated and identified from an allelopathic rice accession PI312777. These three compounds at low concentrations could inhibit the growth of weeds Echinochloa crusgalli and Cyperus difformis associated with rice, especially mixtures of the compounds had stronger inhibitory activity than did individual compounds. Studies with hydroponic culture, continuous root exudates trapping system (CRETS), and direct resin adsorption methods showed that a total of 7.6 n moles 1, 2, and 3 were exuded from living roots of each seedling into the environment at 10 days after seedlings were transplanted. Furthermore, 1, 2, and 3 were found in the soil growing PI312777 seedlings at day 15 after seedlings emergence and reached a total of 39.5 microg/g soil at day 30. The results indicated that PI 312777 seedlings could release sufficient quantities of 1, 2, and 3 into the environment to act as allelochemicals inhibiting the growth of associated weeds. Investigations on the distribution of 1, 2, and 3 in PI 312777 plant, and its root exudates showed that the levels of 1, 2, and 3 were significantly higher in the shoots and root exudates than in the roots, and only trace 1 was observed in the roots. The results suggest that the roots of rice seedlings are not major site of synthesis or accumulation 1, 2, and 3, but a pathway for their release into the environment. The levels of 1, 2, and 3 in the root exudates were over 2-folds higher under direct resin adsorption than under hydroponic culture and CRETS, and hence, it is the preferred method to collect and identify active allelochemicals in rice exudates in future studies on rice allelopathy.

  10. Effect of soil bulk density on forest tree seedlings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kormanek, Mariusz; Banach, Jacek; Sowa, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the results of an analysis of the influence of soil bulk density in a forest nursery plot on the growth and quality parameters of Scots pine and European beech seedlings. Particular density variants were obtained using a tractor device exerting controlled pressure on the soil, while field examinations were performed on an area of `Kłaj' forest nursery in Niepołomice Forest District. Three series of plots were prepared for each species, applying a unit pressure of the values of 50, 100, 150, 200, 250 kPa, corresponding to the dry bulk density in the range of 1.03-1.19 g cm-3, and control plots without the pressure. Seeds of the examined species were sown on the prepared plots, and after 6 months of growth the seedlings were subjected to biometric analysis determining differentiation in root neck diameter, length of the above-ground part and root system, as well as dry mass of particular parts of the plant. The quality of the seedlings was also determined using the method of Schmidt-Vogt. The results obtained show that the change in dry bulk density soil significantly affected most of the growth parameters of the examined seedlings. Especially high negative correlations were obtained for the length and dry mass of the root system. A significant influence of dry bulk density variant on all growth parameters of Scots pine seedlings, and on some parameters of European beech was demonstrated. An increase in soil bulk density clearly caused also a deterioration of European beech seedlings quality

  11. Protecting red oak seedlings with tree shelters in northwestern Pennsylvania. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, R.S.

    1993-10-01

    The report examines the growth and survival of planted and natural red oak seedlings and seedlings from planted acorns within translucent tan tree shelters, fences, and unprotected controls under a shelterwood seed-cut stand. Seedlings planted within tree shelters and fences were inside tree shelters. Natural seedlings grew very little and their height inside and outside of tree shelters did not differ. Recommendations based on these results should improve results from the use of tree shelters.

  12. Genetic analysis for rice seedling vigor and fine mapping of a major QTL qSSL1b for seedling shoot length

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Anpeng; Liu, Chaolei; Chen, Guang; Hong, Kai; Gao, Yang; Tian, Peng; Peng, Youlin; Zhang, Bin; Ruan, Banpu; Jiang, Hongzhen; Guo, Longbiao; Qian, Qian; Gao, Zhenyu

    2017-01-01

    Seedling vigor is an important agricultural trait as direct-seeded rice technology becomes widely applied. In order to investigate the genetic mechanisms underlying seedling vigor in rice, seeds of 132 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from 93-11 and PA64s, harvested from Lingshui and Hangzhou were cultivated in the nutrient solution, and four indices for seedling vigor were measured including seedling shoot length (SSL), seedling root length (SRL), seedling wet weight (SWW) and seedling dry weight (SDW). Significant correlations were observed among the indices, and also between 1000-seed weight (TSW) and SWW or SDW. Combined with a high-resolution genetic map generated from sequencing of the RILs, 65 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were detected on all chromosomes with interval of 1.93 Mb on average. Among 57 QTLs for seedling vigor, 28 were detected from seeds harvested in both sites and 33 were first identified. With BC3F2 derived from 93-11 and a CSSL harboring segments from PA64s in 93-11 background, a major QTL for SSL, qSSL1b was fine mapped within 80.5 kb between two InDel markers. Our study provides a platform for further cloning of the QTL and dissecting the molecular basis for seedling vigor at early seedling stage in rice. PMID:28744184

  13. Genetic analysis for rice seedling vigor and fine mapping of a major QTL qSSL1b for seedling shoot length.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Anpeng; Liu, Chaolei; Chen, Guang; Hong, Kai; Gao, Yang; Tian, Peng; Peng, Youlin; Zhang, Bin; Ruan, Banpu; Jiang, Hongzhen; Guo, Longbiao; Qian, Qian; Gao, Zhenyu

    2017-06-01

    Seedling vigor is an important agricultural trait as direct-seeded rice technology becomes widely applied. In order to investigate the genetic mechanisms underlying seedling vigor in rice, seeds of 132 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from 93-11 and PA64s, harvested from Lingshui and Hangzhou were cultivated in the nutrient solution, and four indices for seedling vigor were measured including seedling shoot length (SSL), seedling root length (SRL), seedling wet weight (SWW) and seedling dry weight (SDW). Significant correlations were observed among the indices, and also between 1000-seed weight (TSW) and SWW or SDW. Combined with a high-resolution genetic map generated from sequencing of the RILs, 65 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were detected on all chromosomes with interval of 1.93 Mb on average. Among 57 QTLs for seedling vigor, 28 were detected from seeds harvested in both sites and 33 were first identified. With BC3F2 derived from 93-11 and a CSSL harboring segments from PA64s in 93-11 background, a major QTL for SSL, qSSL1b was fine mapped within 80.5 kb between two InDel markers. Our study provides a platform for further cloning of the QTL and dissecting the molecular basis for seedling vigor at early seedling stage in rice.

  14. Pathogenicity of seed transmittedFusarium spp. to triticale seedlings.

    PubMed

    Arseniuk, E; Scharen, A L; Czembor, H J

    1991-09-01

    In the conducted studies 13 species ofFusarium were isolated into pure culture from triticale seed. Their pathogenicity was assessed under laboratory and greenhouse conditions. Most of the species studied were highly pathogenic to the first leaf see-dlings of triticale 'Grado' and 'Lasko' under both sets of conditions. It was shown, that seed-transmitted Fusarium spp. considerably reduced the ability of seeds to germinate and incited seedling blight. On average, triticale 'Lasko' was more resistant toFusarium spp. than 'Grado', but in some instances a reverse reaction was observed.

  15. [Physiological responses of mycorrhizal Pinus massoniana seedlings to drought stress and drought resistance evaluation].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Ding, Gui-jie

    2013-03-01

    A greenhouse pot experiment was conducted to study the effects of inoculating Pisolithus tinctorius, Cenococcum geophilum, Cantharellus cibarius, and Suillus luteus on the physiological characteristics of Pinus massoniana seedlings under the conditions of drought stress and re-watering, with the drought resistance of the mycorrhizal seedlings evaluated. Under drought stress, the MDA content and membrane' s relative permeability of P. massoniana seedlings increased, but these two indices in the inoculated (mycorrhizal) seedlings were significantly lower than these in the un-inoculated (control) seedlings. After re-watering, the MDA content and membrane's relative permeability of mycorrhizal seedlings had a rapid decrease, as compared with the control. In the first 21 days of drought stress, the production rate of superoxide radical of the seedlings increased, and the SOD, POD and NR activities of mycorrhizal seedlings increased significantly. With the extending of drought stress, the seedlings after re-watering had different recovery ability. Under the re-watering after 14 days drought stress, the SOD, POD and NR activities recovered. The drought resistance of the mycorrhizal seedlings was in the order of Suillus luteus 1 > Suillus luteus 7 > Cantharellus cibarius > Cenococcum geophilum > Pisolithus tinctorius. The SOD and MDA activities had a greater correlation with the mycorrhizal seedlings drought resistance, being able to be used as the indicators to evaluate the drought resistance of mycorrhizal seedlings.

  16. Antioxidants and anti-stress compounds improve the survival of cryopreserved Arabidopsis seedlings

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cryopreservation is a safe and cost-effective tool for the long-term storage of plant germplasm. Successful cryopreservation depends on suitable cryoprotection protocol. In Arabidopsis seedlings cryopreservation, the growth ability could be partly restored in 60-h seedlings, whereas 72-h seedlings d...

  17. Fusarium species-a British Columbia perspective in forest seedling production

    Treesearch

    Michael Peterson

    2008-01-01

    This review provides a brief biological outline of some species in the genus Fusarium and how these can be implicated as seedborne organisms leading to conifer seed and seedling losses in British Columbia. Fusarium spp. are implicated with pre- and post-emergence damping-off, seedling wilt, late damping-off, root rot, and seedling mortality after outplanting. Current...

  18. Facilitation and interference of seedling establishment by a native legume before and after wildfire

    Treesearch

    Erin Goergen; Jeanne C. Chambers

    2011-01-01

    In semi-arid ecosystems, heterogeneous resources can lead to variable seedling recruitment. Existing vegetation can influence seedling establishment by modifying the resource and physical environment. We asked how a native legume, Lupinus argenteus, modifies microenvironments in unburned and burned sagebrush steppe, and if L. argenteus presence facilitates seedling...

  19. Can auger planting improve survival of Douglas-fir seedlings? Res

    Treesearch

    Richard E. Miller

    1969-01-01

    Survival and apparent vigor of Douglas-fir seedlings were compared after: (1) hoe planting of root-trimmed seedlings; (2) as above plus manual site preparation; (3) auger planting of untrimmed seedlings. After two growing seasons, surviving with method (3) but not (2) was significantly greater than survival with method (1). After the third season, survival...

  20. Effect of advance seedling size and vigor on survival after clearcutting

    Treesearch

    David A. Marquis

    1982-01-01

    In several separate experiments, it was found that survival of advance seedlings after clearcutting in Allegheny hardwood stands is a function of initial seedling size-larger seedlings survive best. Age, number of leaves, and leaf size also were important determinants of survival. In Allegheny hardwood stands, where advance regeneration is typically less than 1 foot in...

  1. Influence of light and moisture on longleaf pine seedling growth in selection silviculture

    Treesearch

    David S. Dyson; Edward F. Loewenstein; Steven B. Jack; Dale G. Brockway

    2012-01-01

    Selection silviculture has become increasingly common for longleaf pine management, yet questions remain regarding residual canopy effects on seedling survival and growth. To determine what levels of residual overstory promote adequate seedling recruitment, 600 containerized longleaf pine seedlings were planted on two sites during the 2007-2008 dormant season. To...

  2. Characterizing Betula litwinowii seedling microsites at the alpine-treeline ecotone, central Greater Caucasus Mountains, Georgia

    Treesearch

    Nicole M Hughes; Daniel M. Johnson; Maia Akhalkatsi; Otar Abdaladze

    2009-01-01

    Seedling establishment is an important factor dictating the altitudinal limits of treeline species. Factors that affect seedling mortality and survival, however, have yet to be fully characterized, especially for deciduous treeline species. Here we describe microsite characteristics of successfully established Betula litwinowii seedlings at the...

  3. Run for cover! What's covering your greenhouse and how is it affecting seedling growth?

    Treesearch

    Jeremy R. Pinto; Kas Dumroese; John D. Marshall

    2006-01-01

    Analysis of seedling growth characteristics between two greenhouse cover types, old fiberglass and new polycarbonate, shows significant differences in height and sturdiness coefficients in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) seedlings. Three rates of nitrogen (N) application (20, 40, and 60 mg) indicate that seedling growth will increase under both cover types, but may...

  4. Economic rationale for planting less trees in the face of seedling mortality

    Treesearch

    Thomas J. Dean; S. Joseph Chang

    2002-01-01

    Simple economic analyses are used to demonstrate that planting extra trees to compensate for initial seedling mortality can actually reduce the profit expected from a pine plantation. At a 6-percent interest rate, the cost of planting 15 or 25 percent additional seedlings compounded to the end of a 30-year rotation exceeds the revenue lost to these rates of seedling...

  5. Sucrose metabolism, growth and transplanting stress in sweetgum seedling taproots and stems

    Treesearch

    Shi-Jean S. Sung; Paul P Kormanik

    2000-01-01

    One-year-old nursery-grown bare-root sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) seedlings were lifted and transplanted into a nearby nursery bed or a cleared forest field in January 1994. Seedlings remaining in the same bed for the second year were the nontransplanted controls. Seedlings growing in beds were watered regularly and those in field received...

  6. Factors Affecting Seedling Survivorship of Blue Oak (Quercus douglasii H. & A.) in Central California

    Treesearch

    Frank W. Davis; Mark Borchert; L. E. Harvey; Joel C. Michaelsen

    1991-01-01

    Blue oak seedling mortality was studied in relation to vertebrate predators, initial acorn planting position, slope and aspect, and oak canopy cover at two sites in the Central Coast Ranges of California. Seedling survival rates (Psd) were related to treatment variables using logistic regression analysis. Analysis of 2842 seedlings for 3 years following establishment...

  7. Naturally seeded versus planted ponderosa pine seedlings in group-selection openings

    Treesearch

    Philip M. McDonald; Gary Fiddler; Martin Ritchie; Paula Anderson

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to determine whether natural regeneration or planted seedlings should be used in group-selection openings. The answer dependson the survival and growth rate of both types of seedlings, and that could depend on the size of the openings and the effect of trees on their edge. In thisside-by-side study, the natural pine seedlings originated...

  8. Monitoring the Temperature of Tree Seedlings With the Thermochron iButton Data Logger

    Treesearch

    David S. Gasvoda; Richard W. Tinus; Karen E. Burr; Andy Trent

    2002-01-01

    Tracking the temperature of tree seedlings from the nursery to the planting site can be the key to evaluating possible physiological causes of morality after seedlings are planted. Seedlings enter and leave nursery storage with easily documented levels of cold hardiness, root growth potential, and general stress tolerance (Burr 1990: Ritchie and Tanaka 1990). The...

  9. Air lateral root pruning affects longleaf pine seedling root system morphology

    Treesearch

    Shi-Jean Susana Sung; Dave Haywood

    2016-01-01

    Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) seedlings were cultured with air lateral root pruning (side-vented containers, VT) or without (solid-walled containers, SW). Seedling root system morphology and growth were assessed before planting and 8 and 14 months after planting. Although VT seedlings had greater root collar diameter than the SW before planting,...

  10. Foliar mineral content of forest and nursery-grown Douglas-fir seedlings.

    Treesearch

    Kenneth W. Krueger

    1967-01-01

    High-vigor seedlings are required for consistently successful reforestation, and mineral nutrition undoubtedly plays a large role in determining seedling vigor. Though no serious mineral deficiencies were known to exist in Northwest forest nurseries, assurance of adequate seedling nutrition would eliminate this factor as a possible cause of plantation failures....

  11. Planting stock type x genotype interactions affect early outplanting performance of black walnut seedlings

    Treesearch

    J.W. Van Sambeek; J.W. Hanover; R.D. Williams

    1991-01-01

    A provenance/progeny test was established in south central Indiana with seedlings from 72 open-pollinated families from across the commercial range of black walnut (Juglans nigra L.). The seedlings were grown in a conventional hardwood nursery and in containers in a greenhouse. Seedlings were outplanted in 1981 on an old-field site in Johnson County...

  12. Identification of seedling vigor-associated quantitative trait loci in temperate japonica rice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis of seedling vigor traits was conducted under dry-seeded conditions using 176 recombinant inbred lines developed from a cross of two California temperate japonica rice varieties M-203 and M-206. Height at early seedling (HES) and late seedling (HLS) stage, gro...

  13. Copper-Treated Containers Influence Root Development of Longleaf Pine Seedlings

    Treesearch

    James P. Barnett; John M. McGilvray

    2002-01-01

    Development of longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) seedlings grown in CopperblockTM containers and BC/ CFC First ChoiceTM Styrofoam blocks, with applications of Spin Out® root growth regulator, were compared to control seedlings. The copper treatments significantly changed seedling morphology; at...

  14. Effects of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae and seed source on nursery-grown black walnut seedlings

    Treesearch

    B. L. Brookshire; H. E. Garrett; T. L. Robison

    2003-01-01

    A nursery study was established in Missouri to evaluate the effects of endomycorrhizal inoculation and seed source on the growth of black walnut seedlings. Inoculation, in general, resulted in seedlings with significantly larger sturdiness quotients. Glomus intraradicies was found to produce larger seedlings than Glomus etunicatus...

  15. Nursery response of container Pinus palustris seedlings to nitrogen supply and subsequent effects on outplanting performance

    Treesearch

    D. Paul Jackson; R. Kasten Dumroese; James P. Barnett

    2012-01-01

    Container longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) seedlings often survive and grow better after outplanting than bareroot seedlings. Because of this, most longleaf pine are now produced in containers. Little is known about nursery fertilization effects on the quality of container longleaf pine seedlings and how that influences outplanting performance. We compared various...

  16. Evaluations of plastic mesh tubes for protecting conifer seedling from pocket gophers in three western states

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engeman, Richard M.; Anthony, Richard M.; Barnes, Victor G.; Krupa, Heather W.; Evans, James

    1999-01-01

    The efficacy of plastic mesh tubes for protecting conifer seedlings from pocket gopher damage was evaluated on three national forest lands in three states. In each area, cohorts of 640 protected seedlings and 640 unprotected seedlings (3,840 total) were individually monitored for damage, survival, and growth twice each summer for 5 yr after planting. Substantial differences were found between protected and unprotected seedlings for time until occurrence of damage, survival time, proportion damaged and proportion surviving, as well as differences in growth. Over the three forest study sites, the proportion of unprotected seedlings damaged ranged from 60-89%, whereas the proportion of protected seedlings damaged after 5 yr ranged from 18-27%. The proportion of unprotected seedlings that died of gopher damage over 5 yr ranged from 46-64%, versus 1-19% for protected seedlings. Height growth was 25% greater for protected seedlings. Even when only undamaged seedlings were considered, protected seedlings exhibited superior height growth, possibly due to a more favorable microclimate provided by the tubes. These results were reflected in the higher and more uniform stocking rates for protected seedlings.

  17. Patterns of element concentrations help explain varietal differences in rice seedling vigor

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Seedling vigor is an important factor in rice production because it minimizes exposure of emerging seedlings to soil-borne diseases and promotes the early development of a uniform stand. Seedling vigor is influenced by both genetics and environment. In this study where plants of varying levels of se...

  18. Photosynthetic light response of flooded cherrybark oak (Quercus pagoda) seedlings grown in two light regimes

    Treesearch

    Emile S. Gardiner; Ken W. Krauss

    2001-01-01

    Two-year-old cherrybark oak (Quercus pagoda Raf.) seedlings raised in full or partial (27 percent) sunlight were flooded for 30 days to study the effects of light availability and root inundation on photosynthetic light response. Compared with seedlings receiving full sunlight, seedlings receiving partial sunlight developed leaves...

  19. Wrenching Douglas-fir seedlings in August: immediate but no lasting effects.

    Treesearch

    William I. Stein

    1984-01-01

    Effects of wrenching Douglas-fir seedlings in August of their second season in the D. L. Phipps State Forest Nursery, Elkton, Oregon, were determined by periodic samplings to learn of changes in phenological, morphological, and growth characteristics. Initial effects of wrenching moderated by January when seedlings were lifted; both wrenched and unwrenched seedlings...

  20. Young Seedling Stripe1 encodes a chloroplast nucleoid-associated protein required for chloroplast development in rice seedlings.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kunneng; Ren, Yulong; Zhou, Feng; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Long; Lyu, Jia; Wang, Yihua; Zhao, Shaolu; Ma, Weiwei; Zhang, Huan; Wang, Liwei; Wang, Chunming; Wu, Fuqing; Zhang, Xin; Guo, Xiupin; Cheng, Zhijun; Wang, Jiulin; Lei, Cailin; Jiang, Ling; Li, Zefu; Wan, Jianmin

    2017-01-01

    Young Seedling Stripe1 (YSS1) was characterized as an important regulator of plastid-encoded plastid RNA polymerase (PEP) activity essential for chloroplast development at rice seedling stage. Chloroplast development is coordinately regulated by plastid- and nuclear-encoding genes. Although a few regulators have been reported to be involved in chloroplast development, new factors remain to be identified, given the complexity of this process. Here, we report the characterization of a temperature-sensitive young seedling stripe1 (yss1) rice mutant, which develops striated leaves at the seedling stage, particularly in leaf 3, but produces wild-type leaves in leaf 5 and onwards. The chlorotic leaves have decreased chlorophyll (Chls) accumulation and impaired chloroplast structure. Positional cloning combined with sequencing demonstrated that aberrant splicing of the 8th intron in YSS1 gene, due to a single nucleotide deletion around splicing donor site, leads to decreased expression of YSS1 and accumulation of an 8th intron-retained yss1 transcript. Furthermore, complementation test revealed that downregulation of YSS1 but not accumulation of yss1 transcript confers yss1 mutant phenotype. YSS1 encodes a chloroplast nucleoid-localized protein belonging to the DUF3727 superfamily. Expression analysis showed that YSS1 gene is more expressed in newly expanded leaves, and distinctly up-regulated as temperatures increase and by light stimulus. PEP- and nuclear-encoded phage-type RNA polymerase (NEP)-dependent genes are separately down-regulated and up-regulated in yss1 mutant, indicating that PEP activity may be impaired. Furthermore, levels of chloroplast proteins are mostly reduced in yss1 seedlings. Together, our findings identify YSS1 as a novel regulator of PEP activity essential for chloroplast development at rice seedling stage.

  1. Food reserves and seasonal growth of Douglas-fir seedlings.

    Treesearch

    Kenneth W. Krueger; James M. Trappe

    1967-01-01

    Seasonal growth of tops and roots and concomitant trends in food reserves were observed biweekly on Peudotsuga menzisii (Mirb.) Franco seedlings of two seed sources growing in a Pacific Northwest forest nursery. A general pattern of alternating root, diameter, and shoot growth was found. Rapid root growth did not coincide with rapid shoot...

  2. Seedling vigor in Beta vulgaris: The artistry of germination

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Emergence and stand establishment through the first 10 weeks after planting continue to be primary concerns of sugar beet growers. Our goal is to understand the genes and genetics of seedling vigor in order to overcome beet’s inherent disadvantages of small seed size and encapsulation in a corky fru...

  3. Height Growth of Mahogany Seedlings, St. Croix, Virgin Islands

    Treesearch

    R. W. Nobles; C. B. Briscoe

    1966-01-01

    Small-leaf mahogany seedlings grew more rapidly than bigleaf and their hybrids grew more rapidly than either for the first two years. However, by age 4 and continuing through age 7, both hybrids and bigleaf were significantly taller than small-leaf. Bigleaf suffered the most mortality, followed by small-leaf, then the two hybrids.

  4. Release of sugar pine seedlings and saplings by harvest cutting.

    Treesearch

    William E. Hallin

    1959-01-01

    Sugar pine, the preferred species to grow on many forest areas in southwestern Oregon, is often seeded or planted on clearcuts there. Advance growth in the form of seedlings, saplings, and poles is common in the mixed- conifer type, and costly planting can be eliminated if this advance growth can be saved during logging and slash disposal. However, if the necessary...

  5. Seed germination and seedling emergence of Scotch broom (Cytisus scoparius)

    Treesearch

    Timothy B. Harrington

    2009-01-01

    Scotch broom is a large, leguminous shrub that has invaded 27 U.S. states. The species produces seeds with a hard coat that remain viable in the soil for years. Growth-chamber studies were conducted to determine effects of temperature regime and cold-stratification period on seed germination. Seedling emergence, mortality, and biomass also were studied in response to...

  6. Identification of seedling cabbages and weeds using hyperspectral imaging

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Target detectionis one of research focues for precision chemical application. This study developed a method to identify seedling cabbages and weeds using hyperspectral spectral imaging. In processing the image data, with ENVI software, after dimension reduction, noise reduction, de-correlation for h...

  7. Proteome Profiling of Paulownia Seedlings Infected with Phytoplasma

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xibing; Fan, Guoqiang; Dong, Yanpeng; Zhao, Zhenli; Deng, Minjie; Wang, Zhe; Liu, Wenshan

    2017-01-01

    Phytoplasma is an insect-transmitted pathogen that causes witches' broom disease in many plants. Paulownia witches' broom is one of the most destructive diseases threatening Paulownia production. The molecular mechanisms associated with this disease have been investigated by transcriptome sequencing, but changes in protein abundance have not been investigated with isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation. Previous results have shown that methyl methane sulfonate (MMS) can help Paulownia seedlings recover from the symptoms of witches' broom and reinstate a healthy morphology. In this study, a transcriptomic-assisted proteomic technique was used to analyze the protein changes in phytoplasma-infected Paulownia tomentosa seedlings, phytoplasma-infected seedlings treated with 20 and 60 mg·L−1 MMS, and healthy seedlings. A total of 2,051 proteins were obtained, 879 of which were found to be differentially abundant in pairwise comparisons between the sample groups. Among the differentially abundant proteins, 43 were related to Paulownia witches' broom disease and many of them were annotated to be involved in photosynthesis, expression of dwarf symptom, energy production, and cell signal pathways. PMID:28344590

  8. Economical and simple production of containerized hardwood seedlings

    Treesearch

    Merrill C. Hoyle

    1982-01-01

    An automatic mat-watering system for growing hardwood seedlings in containers was designed and tested. The system has only one moving part, and no electrical requirements. There is no need to calculate different watering schedules for different growth phases, different hardwood species, or different evapotranspiration conditions. Results were excellent with mat...

  9. Toward a single nursery protocol for oak seedlings

    Treesearch

    Paul P. Kormanik; Shi-Jean S. Sung; T.L. Kormanik

    1994-01-01

    After a soil fertility baseline had been determined for the Georgia Forestry Commission's (GFC) Morgan Nursery, and single nursery protocol consistently produced high quality oak seedlings. The fertility baseline developed at the Institute of Tree Root Biology's Whitehall Experimental Nursery and adjusted for three GFC nurseries has a background target level...

  10. Phosphine-induced physiological and biochemical responses in rice seedlings.

    PubMed

    Mi, Lina; Niu, Xiaojun; Lu, Meiqing; Ma, Jinling; Wu, Jiandong; Zhou, Xingqiu

    2014-04-01

    Paddy fields have been demonstrated to be one of the major resources of atmospheric phosphine and may have both positive and negative effects on rice plants. To elucidate the physiological and biochemical responses of rice plants to phosphine, rice seedlings (30 d old) were selected as a model plant and were treated with different concentrations of phosphine (0, 1.4, 4.2, and 7.0 mg m(-3)). Antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), and catalase (CAT), and lipid peroxidation measured via malondialdehyde (MDA) were determined as indicators of the physiological and biochemical responses of the rice seedlings to phosphine exposure. Increasing concentrations of phosphine treatment enhanced the activity of SOD, POD, and CAT. In addition, the MDA content increased with increasing concentrations of phosphine. These results suggested that antioxidant enzymes played important roles in protecting rice seedlings from ROS damage. Moreover, rice seedlings were able to cope with the oxidative stress induced by low concentrations of phosphine via an increase in antioxidant enzymatic activities. However, oxidative stress may not fully be prevented when the plants were exposed to higher concentrations of phosphine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Characterization of growth-promoting rhizobacteria in Eucalyptus nitens seedlings].

    PubMed

    Angulo, Violeta C; Sanfuentes, Eugenio A; Rodríguez, Francisco; Sossa, Katherine E

    2014-01-01

    Rhizospheric and endophytic bacteria were isolated from the rizosphere and root tissue of Eucalyptus nitens. The objective of this work was to evaluate their capacity to promote growth in seedlings of the same species under greenhouse conditions. The isolates that improved seedling growth were identified and characterized by their capacity to produce indoleacetic acid (IAA), solubilize phosphates and increase 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase activity. One hundred and five morphologically different strains were isolated, 15 of which promoted E. nitens seedling growth, significantly increasing the height (50%), root length (45%) as well as the aerial and root dry weight (142% and 135% respectively) of the plants. Bacteria belonged to the genus Arthrobacter, Lysinibacillus, Rahnella and Bacillus. Isolates A. phenanthrenivorans 21 and B. cereus 113 improved 3.15 times the emergence of E. nitens after 12 days, compared to control samples. Among isolated R. aquatilis, 78 showed the highest production of IAA (97.5±2.87 μg/ml) in the presence of tryptophan and the highest solubilizer index (2.4) for phosphorus, while B. amyloliquefaciens 60 isolate was positive for ACC deaminase activity. Our results reveal the potential of the studied rhizobacteria as promoters of emergence and seedling growth of E. nitens, and their possible use as PGPR inoculants, since they have more than one mechanism associated with plant growth promotion. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  12. Inhibitory effects of monoterpenes on seed germination and seedling growth.

    PubMed

    Kordali, Saban; Cakir, Ahmet; Sutay, Sunay

    2007-01-01

    Monoterpenes, the chemical constituents of essential oils found in plants, are known biologically active compounds. The present study was conducted to investigate the inhibitory effects of 30 monoterpenes including monoterpene hydrocarbons and oxygenated monoterpenes on seed germination and seedling growth of Amaranthus retroflexus, Chenopodium album and Rumex crispus under laboratory conditions. The monoterpenes were applied at contents of 10 and 20 microl for liquid compounds and 10 and 20 microg for solid compounds. The results show that most of the monoterpenes significantly inhibited seed germination and seedling growth of the tested plants. Oxygenated monoterpenes including beta-citronellol, nerol and terpinen-4-ol completely inhibited seed germination and seedling growth of all tested plants. Their inhibitory effects were also stronger than that of the herbicide 2,4-D. In general, monoterpenes were less effective against seed germination and seedling growth of C. album as compared with R. crispus and A. retroflexus. Phytotoxic effects of monoterpene hydrocarbons were found to be lower than those of oxygenated monoterpenes. The alcohol derivatives of oxygenated monoterpenes were also found to be more phytotoxic as compared with their acetate derivatives. Based on the present results, it can be concluded that the oxygenated monoterpenes can be used as potential bio-herbicides.

  13. Flood tolerance of oak seedlings from bottomland and upland sites

    Treesearch

    Michael P. Walsh; Jerry Van Sambeek; Mark Coggeshall; David. Gwaze

    2009-01-01

    Artificial regeneration of oak species in floodplains presents numerous challenges because of the seasonal flooding associated with these areas. Utilizing not only flood-tolerant oak species, but also flood tolerant seed sources of the oak species, may serve to enhance seedling survival and growth rates. Despite the importance of these factors to hardwood forest...

  14. Relation between height growth of larch seedlings and weather conditions

    Treesearch

    D. R. Brewster

    1918-01-01

    It is a common experience in passing through stands of coniferous seedlings ten to thirty feet tall to notice the rapidly growing leaders of the dominant trees. A casual glance will show a surprising variation in the rate of height growth of the same tree in different years. The obvious explanation that occurs to one is that this variation is clue to a corresponding...

  15. Characterization of Rhizobacteria Associated with Weed Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Kremer, Robert J.; Begonia, Maria Fatima T.; Stanley, Lynn; Lanham, Eric T.

    1990-01-01

    Rhizobacteria were isolated from seedlings of seven economically important weeds and characterized for potential phytopathogenicity, effects on seedling growth, and antibiosis to assess the possibility of developing deleterious rhizobacteria as biological control agents. The abundance and composition of rhizobacteria varied among the different weed species. For example, fluorescent pseudomonads represented from 11 to 42% of the total rhizobacterial populations from jimsonweed and lambsquarters, respectively. Other bacteria frequently isolated were nonfluorescent pseudomonads, Erwinia herbicola, Alcaligenes spp., and Flavobacterium spp. Only 18% of all isolates were potentially phytopathogenic, based on an Escherichia coli indicator bioassay. However, the proportion of isolates that inhibited growth in seedling assays ranged from 35 to 65% depending on the weed host. Antibiosis was most prevalent among isolates of fluorescent Pseudomonas spp., the activity of which was due to siderophore production in over 75% of these isolates. Overall, rhizobacterial isolates exhibited a complex array of properties that were inconsistent with accepted definitions for plant growth-promoting and deleterious rhizobacteria. It is suggested that for development of effective biological control agents for weed control, deleterious rhizobacteria must be screened directly on host seedlings and must possess several properties including high colonizing ability, specific phytotoxin production, and resistance or tolerance to antibiotics produced by other rhizosphere microorganisms, and they must either synthesize or utilize other bacterial siderophores. PMID:16348208

  16. Morphology targets: What do seedling morphological attributes tell us?

    Treesearch

    Jeremiah R. Pinto

    2011-01-01

    Morphology is classically defined as the form and structure of individual organisms, as distinct from their anatomy or physiology. We use morphological targets in the nursery because they are easy to measure, and because we can often quantitatively link seedling morphological traits with survival and growth performance in the field. In the 20 years since the Target...

  17. Light-emitting diode lighting for forest nursery seedling production

    Treesearch

    R. Kasten Dumroese; Jeremiah R. Pinto; Anthony S. Davis

    2015-01-01

    Crop lighting is an energy-intensive necessity for nursery production of high-quality native plants and forest tree seedlings. During the winter months (especially in northern USA latitudes) or overcast or cloudy days, the amount of solar radiation reaching greenhouse crops is insufficient resulting in growth cessation, early terminal bud formation, and failure of...

  18. Soil Water Effects on Blue Oak Seedling Establishment

    Treesearch

    Doria R. Gordon; Kevin J. Rice; Jeffrey M. Welker

    1991-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted to examine the effects of soil water availability on blue oak (Quercus douglasii) seedling establishment. Acorns were planted either into cleared plots of 0, 10, 20, or 40 cm diameter. The cleared plots were located in two grazed and one ungrazed site. Half of the plots received drip irrigation in a split plot design...

  19. Regulation of Flavonoid Biosynthetic Genes in Germinating Arabidopsis Seedlings.

    PubMed Central

    Kubasek, WL; Shirley, BW; McKillop, A; Goodman, HM; Briggs, W; Ausubel, FM

    1992-01-01

    Many higher plants, including Arabidopsis, transiently display purple anthocyanin pigments just after seed germination. We observed that steady state levels of mRNAs encoded by four flavonoid biosynthetic genes, PAL1 (encoding phenylalanine ammonia-lyase 1), CHS (encoding chalcone synthase), CHI (encoding chalcone isomerase), and DFR (encoding dihydroflavonol reductase), were temporally regulated, peaking in 3-day-old seedlings grown in continuous white light. Except for the case of PAL1 mRNA, mRNA levels for these flavonoid genes were very low in seedlings grown in darkness. Light induction studies using seedlings grown in darkness showed that PAL1 mRNA began to accumulate before CHS and CHI mRNAs, which, in turn, began to accumulate before DFR mRNA. This order of induction is the same as the order of the biosynthetic steps in flavonoid biosynthesis. Our results suggest that the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway is coordinately regulated by a developmental timing mechanism during germination. Blue light and UVB light induction experiments using red light- and dark-grown seedlings showed that the flavonoid biosynthetic genes are induced most effectively by UVB light and that blue light induction is mediated by a specific blue light receptor. PMID:12297632

  20. Sesinoside, a new iridoid glucoside from sesame (Sesamum indicum) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Takase, Ryo; Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Yamada, Kosumi; Hasegawa, Koji; Shigemori, Hideyuki

    2014-11-01

    A new iridoid glucoside, sesinoside (1), was isolated from the seedlings of Sesamum indicum. The structure of 1 was elucidated by spectroscopic analyses and by methanolysis of 1, which produced the known compounds, phlorigidosides C (2) and (6Z)-foliamenthic acid methyl ester (3). This is the first report of an iridoid glucoside with 3.

  1. Measuring Tree Seedlings and Associated Understory Vegetation in Pennsylvania's Forests

    Treesearch

    William H. McWilliams; Todd W. Bowersox; Patrick H. Brose; Daniel A. Devlin; James C. Finley; Kurt W. Gottschalk; Steve Horsley; Susan L. King; Brian M. LaPoint; Tonya W. Lister; Larry H. McCormick; Gary W. Miller; Charles T. Scott; Harry Steele; Kim C. Steiner; Susan L. Stout; James A. Westfall; Robert L. White

    2005-01-01

    The Northeastern Research Station's Forest Inventory and Analysis (NE-FIA) unit is conducting the Pennsylvania Regeneration Study (PRS) to evaluate composition and abundance of tree seedlings and associated vegetation. Sampling methods for the PRS were tested and developed in a pilot study to determine the appropriate number of 2-m microplots needed to capture...

  2. Insect and Disease Impacts on Blue Oak Acorns and Seedlings

    Treesearch

    Tedmund J. Swiecki; Elizabeth A. Bernhardt; Richard A. Arnold

    1991-01-01

    We studied the impacts of diseases and arthropods on acorns and naturally occurring seedlings of blue oak, Quercus douglasii, in northern California. Damage levels were always significantly higher in acorns collected from the ground than those picked from the tree. Accurate assessments of damage levels could only be made by dissecting acorns, since...

  3. Optimal light for greenhouse culture of American ginseng seedlings.

    PubMed

    Proctor, John T A; Palmer, John W

    2017-07-01

    Three greenhouse experiments with American ginseng seedlings growing under light levels from 4.8% to 68% showed a quadratic response for root dry weight, giving an optimal root dry weight of 239 mg (range 160-415 mg) at an optimal light level of 35.6% (range 30.6-43.2%).

  4. Systemic Activity of Birdrin® in Loblolly Pine Seedlings

    Treesearch

    Richard A. Werner; Danny L. Lyon

    1970-01-01

    Bioassay tests with pales weevils, Hylobius pales (Herbst), indicated that technical Bidrin® had a lox degree of systemic activity when applied as a soil drench around 2-year-old, potted loblolly pine, Pinus taeda L., seedlings. The results of this experiment will probably preclude future testing of Bidrin® in the studies involving...

  5. Locust sprouts reduce growth of yellow-poplar seedlings

    Treesearch

    Donald E. Beck; Charles E. McGee

    1974-01-01

    Dense thickets of black locust which often appear after clearcutting in the Southern Appalachians and Piedmont, can severely reduce growth of other desirable hardwoods. Released yellow-poplar seedlings were 51 percent taller and 79 percent larger in diameter than unreleased ones 6 years after treatment.

  6. Water Quality in the Production of Containerized Longleaf Pine Seedlings

    Treesearch

    David J. Moorhead; John M. Ruter

    2002-01-01

    The consistent production of quality container grown seedlings requires that key production variables be identified and controlled; otherwise, quality and the percentage of marketable plants will be erratic (Garber and Ruter 1993a). Additionally, production times and costs may increase unless production variables are monitored and managed throughout the production...

  7. Sucrose metabolic pathways in sweetgum and pecan seedlings

    Treesearch

    S.S. Sung; P.P. Kormanik; D.P. Xu; C.C. Black

    1989-01-01

    Sucrose metabolism and glycolysis were studied in one- to two-year-old seedlings of sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) and pecan (Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) C. Koch). The sucrose synthase pathway was identified as the dominant sucrose metabolic activity in sucrose sink tissues such as terminal buds and the root cambial...

  8. Air pollutants affect the relative growth rate of hardwood seedlings

    Treesearch

    Keith F. Jensen

    1981-01-01

    One-year-old seedlings of yellow-poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera L.), eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoides Bartr.), and white ash (Fraxinus americana L.) were divided into four groups. One group served as the control, and the other groups were fumigated for 12 hours per day with either 0.1 ppm O3...

  9. Nitrate Reductase of Primary Roots of Red Spruce Seedlings 1

    PubMed Central

    Yandow, Tim S.; Klein, Richard M.

    1986-01-01

    Nitrate reductase activity (NRA) was found in primary roots, but not in foliage of red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) seedlings. Nitrate induced NRA:NH4+ did not induce and slightly depressed NRA in older seedlings. Induction required 8 hours and, once induced, NRA decreased slowly in the absence of exogenous NO3−. Seedlings were grown in perlite with a complete nutrient solution containing NH4+ to limit NR induction. Established seedlings were stressed with nutrient solutions at pH 3, 4, or 5 supplemented with Cl− salts of Al, Cd, Pb, or Zn each at two concentrations. NRA in primary root tips was measured at 2, 14, 28, and 42 days. NRA induction was greatest at pH 3, and remained high during the period of study. NRA induction at pH 4 was lower. Metal ions suppressed NRA at pH 3 and 5, but enhanced NRA at pH 4. It is concluded that acidity and soluble metals in the root environment of red spruce are unlikely to be important factors in nitrogen transformations in red spruce roots. PMID:16664891

  10. Artificial light sources differ in effect on birch seedling growth

    Treesearch

    David A. Marquis

    1965-01-01

    The use of artificial lights to grow tree seedlings for research and even for commercial uses is becoming common. With this has come an increasing awareness that not all types of artificial lights produce the same results (2, 3, 5). The presence or absence of particular wavelengths in the light source may cause large differences in height growth and morphological...

  11. Ethanol accumulation in drought-stressed conifer seedlings

    Treesearch

    Daniel K. Manter; Rick G. Kelsey

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of drought stress on ethanol production and accumulation in tissues from seedlings of three conifers (Douglas-fir, lodgepole pine, and ponderosa pine) with increasing degrees of tolerance to drought stress. Significant ethanol accumulation was only observed in their aerial tissues when severely stressed (water potential

  12. Considerations for evaluating controlled exposure studies of tree seedlings.

    Treesearch

    E. Charles Peterson; A. Robert. Mickler

    1994-01-01

    Tree seedling exposure studies, covering a wide range of experimental conditions in pollutant treatments, species, facilities, and exposure regimes, have been conducted during the past several years to determine acute effects and relative sensitivity of tree species in response to simulated acid precipitation and gaseous pollutants. Because of tile difficulties...

  13. Cutworm damage to seedlings in California pine stands

    Treesearch

    H.A. Fowells

    1940-01-01

    Cutworms, Noctuidae larvae, frequently cause serious damage to natural and planted seedlings in the California pine region. Observations during several years in California and reports from other regions suggest that these insects contribute to frequent failures of plantations and natural reproduction. Careful study of the insects with a view to their control seems...

  14. Examining possible causes of mortality in white pine seedlings

    Treesearch

    Elizabeth Gilles; Ronald Reitz; Greg Hoss; David. Gwaze

    2011-01-01

    White pine (Pinus strobus L.) is one of the most important timber trees in the northeastern United States and eastern Canada (Demeritt and Garrett 1996). White pine is not native to Missouri; it is commonly planted for wind breaks and erosion control and as an ornamental. Unusual mortality of bare-root seedlings of white pine purchased from the...

  15. Burst of ethylene upon horizontal placement of tomato seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, M.; Pickard, B. G.

    1984-01-01

    Seedlings of Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv Rutgers emit a pulse of ethylene during the first 2 to 4 minutes following horizontal placement. Because this burst appears too rapid and brief to be mediated by increase in net activity of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase, it might result form accelerated transformation of vacuolar 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid to ethylene.

  16. Rooting of needle fascicles from western white pine seedlings

    Treesearch

    Ramond J. Hoff; Geral I. McDonald

    1968-01-01

    In one test, 45 out of 318 (14 percent) needle fascicles from 2-year-old seedlings of Pinus monticola Dougl. were rooted. Eight of the needle fascicles produced shoot growth. In another test, 392 out of 742 (53 percent) needle fascicles were rooted, but none of these produced shoot growth.

  17. Symptoms of Nutrient Deficiency in Yellow-Poplar Seedlings

    Treesearch

    Albert F. Ike

    1968-01-01

    Visual symptoms are described for leaves of yellow-poplar seedlings supplied N, P. and K in varying concentrations ranging from minimal to excessive. Probability of growth responses to added N is high when tissue levels are below 2 percent; no response is likely when they exceed 3 percent.

  18. Effects of Irrigating Tree Seedlings with a Nutrient Solution

    Treesearch

    R. P. Belanger; C. B. Briscoe

    1963-01-01

    Subsurface irrigation with nutrient solution was found to be biologically feasible under the conditions tested. Growth of seedlings was satisfactory, but not unusually good. On the bases of total height growth, and growth in fresh weight, the various fertilizers tested produced statistically different results. The species tested, members of three different families and...

  19. Soybean seedlings tolerate abrasion from air-propelled grit

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    New tools for controlling weeds would be useful for soybean production in organic systems. Air-propelled abrasive grit is one such tool that performs well for in-row weed control in corn, but crop safety in soybean is unknown. We examined responses to abrasion by corn-cob grit of soybean seedlings a...

  20. Limitations to seedling establishment in a mesic Hawaiian forest

    Treesearch

    Julie S. Denslow; Amanda L. Uowolo; R. Flint. Hughes

    2006-01-01

    While invasive species may be visible indicators of plant community degradation, they may not constitute the only, or even the primary, limitation to stand regeneration. We used seed-augmentation and grass-removal experiments under different canopy conditions to assess the relative importance of dispersal limitation, resource availability, and competition on seedling...