Science.gov

Sample records for pitting temperature measurement

  1. Pitting resistance of Alloy 800 as a function of temperature and prefilming in high temperature water

    SciTech Connect

    Stellwag, B.

    1995-12-31

    The pitting behavior of Alloy 800 was investigated as a function of temperature and prefilming in high temperature water. The pitting behavior was characterized in terms of the pitting potential and the pit density. The pitting potential decreases with increasing temperature and chloride activity. Prefilming of test coupons over a time period between 100 and 5,000 hours in ammoniated water at 300 C has no apparent influence on the pitting potential at room temperature, 180 C and 300 C. However, the number of pits in prefilmed coupons is much higher than in coupons covered with an air passive layer. The effect of prefilming on pit nucleation was investigated in more detail with regard to a model and test methods developed by Bianchi and co-workers. Density of pits in prefilmed coupons is at least one order of magnitude higher than in air passive coupons. Maximum pit density was measured after a prefilming period of 1 00 hours. The effect is discussed in terms of Bianchi`s model and in terms of features of passive films. It is outlined that the initially amorphous metastable passive film on Alloy 800 becomes crystalline at increased temperatures. Crystallization induces lattice defects, such as dislocations and grain boundaries, in the passive film. The film grows and slowly transforms into a thick oxide layer. The transformation process is associated with enhanced susceptibility to pit nucleation.

  2. Coordinate Measuring Machine Pit Artifact Inspection Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Montano, Joshua D.

    2012-07-31

    The goal of this document is to outline a procedure for dimensional measurement of Los Alamos National Laboratory's CMM Pit Artifact. This procedure will be used by the Manufacturing Practice's Inspection Technology Subgroup of the Interagency Manufacturing Operations Group and Joint Operations Weapon Operations Group (IMOG/JOWOG 39) round robin participants. The intent is to assess the state of industry within the Nuclear Weapons Complex for measurements made on this type of part and find which current measurement strategies and techniques produce the best results.

  3. Effect of annealing temperature on the pitting corrosion resistance of super duplex stainless steel UNS S32750

    SciTech Connect

    Tan Hua; Jiang Yiming; Deng Bo; Sun Tao; Xu Juliang; Li Jin

    2009-09-15

    The pitting corrosion resistance of commercial super duplex stainless steels SAF2507 (UNS S32750) annealed at seven different temperatures ranging from 1030 deg. C to 1200 deg. C for 2 h has been investigated by means of potentiostatic critical pitting temperature. The microstructural evolution and pit morphologies of the specimens were studied through optical/scanning electron microscope. Increasing annealing temperature from 1030 deg. C to 1080 deg. C elevates the critical pitting temperature, whereas continuing to increase the annealing temperature to 1200 deg. C decreases the critical pitting temperature. The specimens annealed at 1080 deg. C for 2 h exhibit the best pitting corrosion resistance with the highest critical pitting temperature. The pit morphologies show that the pit initiation sites transfer from austenite phase to ferrite phase as the annealing temperature increases. The aforementioned results can be explained by the variation of pitting resistance equivalent number of ferrite and austenite phase as the annealing temperature changes.

  4. Temperature measurement

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003400.htm Temperature measurement To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The measurement of body temperature can help detect illness. It can also monitor ...

  5. Changes in energy metabolism accompanying pitting in blueberries stored at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qian; Zhang, Chunlei; Cheng, Shunchang; Wei, Baodong; Liu, Xiuying; Ji, Shujuan

    2014-12-01

    Low-temperature storage and transport of blueberries is widely practiced in commercial blueberry production. In this research, the storage life of blueberries was extended at low temperature, but fruit stored for 30 d at 0°C pitted after 2d at room-temperature. Fruit cellular structure and physiological parameters accompanying pitting in blueberries were changed. The objective of this research was to characterise properties of energy metabolism accompanying pitting in blueberries during storage, including adenosine phosphates and mitochondrial enzymes involved in stress responses. Physiological and metabolic disorders, changes in cell ultrastructure, energy content and ATPase enzyme activity were observed in pitting blueberries. Energy shortages and increased activity of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and lipoxygenase (LOX) were observed in fruit kept at shelf life. The results suggested that sufficient available energy status and a stable enzymatic system in blueberries collectively contribute to improve chilling tolerance, thereby alleviating pitting and maintaining quality of blueberry fruit in long-term cold storage.

  6. Micro-PIT/V --- Simultaneous temperature and velocity fields in microfluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pottebaum, Tait

    2008-11-01

    The use of encapsulated thermochromic liquid crystals (TLC) for the simultaneous measurement of temperature and velocity fields in microfluidic devices has been demonstrated. Implementation of TLC thermometry at the micro-scale is significantly different than at the macro-scale due to the constraints on imaging and illumination configurations and the proximity of the measurements to interfaces and surfaces from which light will scatter. Unlike in micro-PIV, wavelength filtering (such as with fluorescent particles) cannot be used to remove undesired reflections, because the temperature information is carried by the particle color. Therefore, circular polarization filtering is used, exploiting the circular dichroism of TLC. Micro-PIT/V will enable new investigations into the physics of microfluidic devices involving temperature gradients, such as thermocapillary actuated devices and many ``lab-on-a-chip'' applications involving temperature sensitive chemical and biological processes. In addition, the design of operational devices can be improved by applying micro-PIT/V to the characterization of prototypes.

  7. Measurement research for pitting potential of aluminium alloy with chromate passivation layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Z. H.; Dai, Y.; Ma, Q. Y.; Wang, J. N.; Zheng, C. Q.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes common technology for measuring corrosion resistant properties of aluminium alloy with chromate passivation layers. It gives a resolution to characterize corrosion resistant properties of pitting potential. The method, including sample preparation, measuring polarization and the determining of pitting corrosion potential, was proposed. Tests of repeatability and reproducibility can meet the demand of measurement precision. In addition, comparison of the positional relationships between polarization curves and nominal pitting corrosion potential was provided to judge products.

  8. Modeling spatial and temporal variations in temperature and salinity during stratification and overturn in Dexter Pit Lake, Tuscarora, Nevada, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balistrieri, L.S.; Tempel, R.N.; Stillings, L.L.; Shevenell, L.A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the seasonal cycling of temperature and salinity in Dexter pit lake in arid northern Nevada, and describes an approach for modeling the physical processes that operate in such systems. The pit lake contains about 596,200 m3 of dilute, near neutral (pHs 6.7-9) water. Profiles of temperature, conductivity, and selected element concentrations were measured almost monthly during 1999 and 2000. In winter (January-March), the pit lake was covered with ice and bottom water was warmer (5.3 ??C) with higher total dissolved solids (0.298 g/L) than overlying water (3.96 ??C and 0.241 g/L), suggesting inflow of warm (11.7 ??C) groundwater with a higher conductivity than the lake (657 versus 126-383 ??S/cm). Seasonal surface inflow due to spring snowmelt resulted in lower conductivity in the surface water (232-247 ??S/cm) relative to deeper water (315-318 ??S/cm). The pit lake was thermally stratified from late spring through early fall, and the water column turned over in late November (2000) or early December (1999). The pit lake is a mixture of inflowing surface water and groundwater that has subsequently been evapoconcentrated in the arid environment. Linear relationships between conductivity and major and some minor (B, Li, Sr, and U) ions indicate conservative mixing for these elements. Similar changes in the elevations of the pit lake surface and nearby groundwater wells during the year suggest that the pit lake is a flow-through system. This observation and geochemical information were used to configure an one-dimensional hydrodynamics model (Dynamic Reservoir Simulation Model or DYRESM) that predicts seasonal changes in temperature and salinity based on the interplay of physical processes, including heating and cooling (solar insolation, long and short wave radiation, latent, and sensible heat), hydrologic flow (inflow and outflow by surface and ground water, pumping, evaporation, and precipitation), and transfers of momentum (wind stirring

  9. High temperature behavior of pressureless-sintered SiC in a steel soaking pit environment

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, G.C.; White, C.L.

    1984-07-01

    Sintered-..cap alpha.. SiC was exposed for about 800 h at about 1250/sup 0/C to a steel soaking pit environment. A slag layer consisting of hematite and low cristobalite in an Fe-K-Ca silicate glass matrix was formed on the external surface of sintered-..cap alpha.. SiC. No measurable corrosion or loss of material was observed. Large angular pores and depletion of graphite sintering aid, observed in the surface region of the as-received material, resulted in a lower-than-usual fracture strength. The fracture strength increased slightly following the exposure. Auger electron spectroscopic analysis identified oxygen penetration in the near-surface region of the exposed material. The results suggested that sintered-..cap alpha.. SiC would be suitable for use as a heat exchanger material in steel soaking pits. 8 references, 8 figures, 1 table.

  10. Ultrasonic scattering from a hemispherical pit theory and experimental measurement precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eason, Thomas J.; Bond, Leonard J.; Lozev, Mark G.

    2017-02-01

    The accuracy and precision of pulse-echo ultrasonic thickness measurement systems are influenced by systematic and environmental factors including the topographic profile of the back-wall surface. For the case of thickness measurement from the outside surface of a pipe, the back-wall surface can vary in roughness as a result of internal corrosion. A single corrosive pit can be geometrically represented by a hemisphere in a half-space to model the initiation point of rough surface corrosion, or to model isolated pitting degradation as is possible with naphthenic acid corrosion in oil refineries. The elastic wave scattering from a single hemispherical pit has been studied in the Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) community, as well as scattering from a hemispherical canyon in the seismology community for various incident and reflected wave angles, modes, and frequency ranges with both analytical and discretized numerical methods. This paper looks to first review recent scattering theory (developed in the seismology community) on a full frequency range analytical solution for a normal incident longitudinal wave at a normal reflection angle from a hemispherical canyon, and then extend this theory to NDE applications with the introduction of a new far-field scattering amplitude term. Next, a selection of new theoretical scattering amplitude solutions are presented along with semi-analytical simulation and experimental measurement results. Finally, a statistical methodology to determine thickness measurement accuracy and precision taking into consideration asymmetric measurement uncertainty is referenced.

  11. An AFM-based pit-measuring method for indirect measurements of cell-surface membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaojun; Chen, Yuan; Chen, Yong

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Air drying induced the transformation of cell-surface membrane vesicles into pits. • An AFM-based pit-measuring method was developed to measure cell-surface vesicles. • Our method detected at least two populations of cell-surface membrane vesicles. - Abstract: Circulating membrane vesicles, which are shed from many cell types, have multiple functions and have been correlated with many diseases. Although circulating membrane vesicles have been extensively characterized, the status of cell-surface membrane vesicles prior to their release is less understood due to the lack of effective measurement methods. Recently, as a powerful, micro- or nano-scale imaging tool, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been applied in measuring circulating membrane vesicles. However, it seems very difficult for AFM to directly image/identify and measure cell-bound membrane vesicles due to the similarity of surface morphology between membrane vesicles and cell surfaces. Therefore, until now no AFM studies on cell-surface membrane vesicles have been reported. In this study, we found that air drying can induce the transformation of most cell-surface membrane vesicles into pits that are more readily detectable by AFM. Based on this, we developed an AFM-based pit-measuring method and, for the first time, used AFM to indirectly measure cell-surface membrane vesicles on cultured endothelial cells. Using this approach, we observed and quantitatively measured at least two populations of cell-surface membrane vesicles, a nanoscale population (<500 nm in diameter peaking at ∼250 nm) and a microscale population (from 500 nm to ∼2 μm peaking at ∼0.8 μm), whereas confocal microscopy only detected the microscale population. The AFM-based pit-measuring method is potentially useful for studying cell-surface membrane vesicles and for investigating the mechanisms of membrane vesicle formation/release.

  12. Volume Measurements of Laser-generated Pits for In Situ Geochronology using KArLE (Potassium-Argon Laser Experiment)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, R. A.; Cohen, B. A.; Miller, J. S.

    2014-01-01

    The Potassium-Argon Laser Experiment( KArLE), is composed of two main instruments: a spectrometer as part of the Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) method and a Mass Spectrometer (MS). The LIBS laser ablates a sample and creates a plasma cloud, generating a pit in the sample. The LIBS plasma is measured for K abundance in weight percent and the released gas is measured using the MS, which calculates Ar abundance in mols. To relate the K and Ar measurements, total mass of the ablated sample is needed but can be difficult to directly measure. Instead, density and volume are used to calculate mass, where density is calculated based on the elemental composition of the rock (from the emission spectrum) and volume is determined by pit morphology. This study aims to reduce the uncertainty for KArLE by analyzing pit volume relationships in several analog materials and comparing methods of pit volume measurements and their associated uncertainties.

  13. FOVEA: a new program to standardize the measurement of foveal pit morphology

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Bret A.; Yoo, Innfarn; Tyrrell, Luke P.; Benes, Bedrich

    2016-01-01

    The fovea is one of the most studied retinal specializations in vertebrates, which consists of an invagination of the retinal tissue with high packing of cone photoreceptors, leading to high visual resolution. Between species, foveae differ morphologically in the depth and width of the foveal pit and the steepness of the foveal walls, which could influence visual perception. However, there is no standardized methodology to measure the contour of the foveal pit across species. We present here FOVEA, a program for the quantification of foveal parameters (width, depth, slope of foveal pit) using images from histological cross-sections or optical coherence tomography (OCT). FOVEA is based on a new algorithm to detect the inner retina contour based on the color variation of the image. We evaluated FOVEA by comparing the fovea morphology of two Passerine birds based on histological cross-sections and its performance with data from previously published OCT images. FOVEA detected differences between species and its output was not significantly different from previous estimates using OCT software. FOVEA can be used for comparative studies to better understand the evolution of the fovea morphology in vertebrates as well as for diagnostic purposes in veterinary pathology. FOVEA is freely available for academic use and can be downloaded at: http://estebanfj.bio.purdue.edu/fovea. PMID:27076997

  14. High temperature measuring device

    DOEpatents

    Tokarz, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    A temperature measuring device for very high design temperatures (to 2,000.degree. C.). The device comprises a homogenous base structure preferably in the form of a sphere or cylinder. The base structure contains a large number of individual walled cells. The base structure has a decreasing coefficient of elasticity within the temperature range being monitored. A predetermined quantity of inert gas is confined within each cell. The cells are dimensionally stable at the normal working temperature of the device. Increases in gaseous pressure within the cells will permanently deform the cell walls at temperatures within the high temperature range to be measured. Such deformation can be correlated to temperature by calibrating similarly constructed devices under known time and temperature conditions.

  15. Acoustical measurements of sound fields between the stage and the orchestra pit inside an historical opera house

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Shin-Ichi; Prodi, Nicola; Sakai, Hiroyuki

    2004-05-01

    To clarify the relationship of the sound fields between the stage and the orchestra pit, we conducted acoustical measurements in a typical historical opera house, the Teatro Comunale of Ferrara, Italy. Orthogonal factors based on the theory of subjective preference and other related factors were analyzed. First, the sound fields for a singer on the stage in relation to the musicians in the pit were analyzed. And then, the sound fields for performers in the pit in relation to the singers on the stage were considered. Because physical factors vary depending on the location of the sound source, performers can move on the stage or in the pit to find the preferred sound field.

  16. Measuring Temperature Reading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    There are two requirements for taking a measurement of something. The first is a tool for taking a measurement. The second is scale for making sense of the numbers of the measurement. For example, a ruler is often used to measure short lengths. It is the tool for measurement. On the ruler are one or more number scales with equally spaced numbers. These numbers can be compared with numbers from any other ruler that is accurately set to the same scale. Measuring length is far simpler than measuring temperature. While there is evidence of tools for measuring length at various times in human history, tools and scales for measuring temperature do not appear until more recent human history. Early thermometers, called thermoscopes, first appear in the 1500's. They were crude instruments that were not at all accurate. Most did not even have a number scale associated with them. This made them useless for most practical purposes. Gabriel Fahrenheit created the first accurate thermometer in 1714, and the Fahrenheit temperature scale followed it in 1724. The thermometer s accuracy was based on its use of mercury, a silver colored substance that remains liquid over a wide range of temperatures but expands or contracts in a standard, predictable way with changes in temperature. To set the scale, Fahrenheit created the coldest temperature that he could. He mixed equal parts of ice, water, and salt, and then used this as the zero point, 0 degrees, of his scale. He intended to make 30 degrees the freezing point of water and 90 degrees the temperature of the human body, but he had to later revise these temperatures to be 32 degrees and 96 degrees. In the final version of the scale, the temperature of the human body became 98.6 degrees. 19th century thermoscope

  17. Noncontact Temperature Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Mark C. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Noncontact temperature measurement has been identified as one of the eight advanced technology development (ATD) areas to support the effort of the Microgravity Science and Applications Division in developing six Space Station flight experiment facilities. This two-day workshop was an opportunity for all six disciplines to present their requirements on noncontact temperature measurement and to discuss state-of-the-art developments. Multi-color pyrometry, laser pyrometry and radiometric imaging techniques are addressed.

  18. Temperature measuring device

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J.; Bible, Don W.; Sohns, Carl W.

    1999-01-01

    Systems and methods are described for a wireless instrumented silicon wafer that can measure temperatures at various points and transmit those temperature readings to an external receiver. The device has particular utility in the processing of semiconductor wafers, where it can be used to map thermal uniformity on hot plates, cold plates, spin bowl chucks, etc. without the inconvenience of wires or the inevitable thermal perturbations attendant with them.

  19. Temperature measuring device

    SciTech Connect

    Lauf, R.J.; Bible, D.W.; Sohns, C.W.

    1999-10-19

    Systems and methods are described for a wireless instrumented silicon wafer that can measure temperatures at various points and transmit those temperature readings to an external receiver. The device has particular utility in the processing of semiconductor wafers, where it can be used to map thermal uniformity on hot plates, cold plates, spin bowl chucks, etc. without the inconvenience of wires or the inevitable thermal perturbations attendant with them.

  20. The Effects of Hot Corrosion Pits on the Fatigue Resistance of a Disk Superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Telesman, Jack; Hazel, Brian; Mourer, David P.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of hot corrosion pits on low cycle fatigue life and failure modes of the disk superalloy ME3 were investigated. Low cycle fatigue specimens were subjected to hot corrosion exposures producing pits, then tested at low and high temperatures. Fatigue lives and failure initiation points were compared to those of specimens without corrosion pits. Several tests were interrupted to estimate the fraction of fatigue life that fatigue cracks initiated at pits. Corrosion pits significantly reduced fatigue life by 60 to 98 percent. Fatigue cracks initiated at a very small fraction of life for high temperature tests, but initiated at higher fractions in tests at low temperature. Critical pit sizes required to promote fatigue cracking were estimated, based on measurements of pits initiating cracks on fracture surfaces.

  1. Measurement of optical scattered power from laser-induced shallow pits on silica

    SciTech Connect

    Feigenbaum, Eyal; Nielsen, Norman; Matthews, Manyalibo J.

    2015-10-01

    We describe a model for far-field scattered power and irradiance by a silica glass slab with a shallow-pitted exit surface and is experimentally validated. The comparison to the model is performed using a precisely micromachined ensemble of ~11 μm wide laser ablated shallow pits producing 1% of the incident beam scatter in a 10 mrad angle. This series of samples with damage initiations and laser-induced shallow pits resulting from 351 nm, 5 ns pulsed laser cleaning of metal microparticles at different fluences between 2 J/cm2 and 11 J/cm2 are characterized as well and found in good agreement with model predictions.

  2. Measurement of optical scattered power from laser-induced shallow pits on silica

    DOE PAGES

    Feigenbaum, Eyal; Nielsen, Norman; Matthews, Manyalibo J.

    2015-10-01

    We describe a model for far-field scattered power and irradiance by a silica glass slab with a shallow-pitted exit surface and is experimentally validated. The comparison to the model is performed using a precisely micromachined ensemble of ~11 μm wide laser ablated shallow pits producing 1% of the incident beam scatter in a 10 mrad angle. This series of samples with damage initiations and laser-induced shallow pits resulting from 351 nm, 5 ns pulsed laser cleaning of metal microparticles at different fluences between 2 J/cm2 and 11 J/cm2 are characterized as well and found in good agreement with model predictions.

  3. Field temperature measurements at Erta'Ale Lava Lake, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgi, Pierre-Yves; Caillet, Marc; Haefeli, Steven

    2002-06-01

    The shield volcano Erta'Ale, situated in the Danakil Depression, Ethiopia, is known for its active lava lake. In February 2001, our team visited this lake, located inside an 80-m-deep pit, to perform field temperature measurements. The distribution and variation of temperature inside the lake were obtained on the basis of infrared radiation measurements performed from the rim of the pit and from the lake shores. The crust temperature was also determined from the lake shores with a thermocouple to calibrate the pyrometer. We estimated an emissivity of the basalt of 0.74 from this experiment. Through the application of the Stefan-Boltzmann law, we then obtained an estimate of the total radiative heat flux, constrained by pyrometer measurements of the pit, and visual observations of the lake activity. Taking into account the atmospheric convective heat flux, the convected magma mass flux needed to balance the energy budget was subsequently derived and found to represent between 510 and 580 kg s-1. The surface circulation of this mass flux was also analyzed through motion processing techniques applied to video images of the lake. Electronic supplementary material to this paper can be obtained by using the Springer LINK server located at http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00445-002-0224-3.

  4. Arne - Exploring the Mare Tranquillitatis Pit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, M. S.; Thangavelautham, J.; Wagner, R.; Hernandez, V. A.; Finch, J.

    2014-12-01

    Lunar mare "pits" are key science and exploration targets. The first three pits were discovered within Selene observations [1,2] and were proposed to represent collapses into lava tubes. Subsequent LROC images revealed 5 new mare pits and showed that the Mare Tranquillitatis pit (MTP; 8.335°N, 33.222°E) opens into a sublunarean void at least 20-meters in extent [3,4]. A key remaining task is determining pit subsurface extents, and thus fully understanding their exploration and scientific value. We propose a simple and cost effective reconnaissance of the MTP using a small lander (<130 kg) named Arne, that carries three flying microbots (or pit-bots) [5,6,7]. Key measurement objectives include decimeter scale characterization of the pit walls, 5-cm scale imaging of the eastern floor, determination of the extent of sublunarean void(s), and measurement of the magnetic and thermal environment. After landing and initial surface systems check Arne will transmit full resolution descent and surface images. Within two hours the first pit-bot will launch and fly into the eastern void. Depending on results from the first pit-bot the second and third will launch and perform follow-up observations. The primary mission is expected to last 48-hours; before the Sun sets on the lander there should be enough time to execute ten flights with each pit-bot. The pit-bots are 30-cm diameter spherical flying robots [5,6,7] equipped with stereo cameras, temperature sensors, sensors for obstacle avoidance and a laser rangefinder. Lithium hydride [5,6] and water/hydrogen peroxide power three micro-thrusters and achieve a specific impulse of 350-400 s. Each pit-bot can fly for 2 min at 2 m/s for more than 100 cycles; recharge time is 20 min. Arne will carry a magnetometer, thermometer, 2 high resolution cameras, and 6 wide angle cameras and obstacle avoidance infrared sensors enabling detailed characterization of extant sublunarean voids. [1] Haruyama et al. (2010) 41st LPSC, #1285. [2

  5. Measuring Soil Temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil temperature is a critical factor in the germination and early growth of many crops including corn, cotton, small grains, and vegetable crops. Soil temperature strongly influences the rate of critical biological reactions in the soil such as the rates of nitrification and microbial respiration. ...

  6. A Model for High-Temperature Pitting Corrosion in Nickel-Based Alloys Involving Internal Precipitation of Carbides, Oxides, and Graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albertsen, J. Z.; Grong, Ø.; Walmsley, J. C.; Mathiesen, R. H.; van Beek, W.

    2008-06-01

    The present investigation is concerned with fundamental studies of the mechanisms of pitting corrosion in the Ni-based alloys 602 and 693, following long-term exposure to syngas at 540 °C and a 35-bar total pressure. The 4-years’ plant-exposed alloys were examined using synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) in combination with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It is concluded that the pitting corrosion attacks start when carbon diffuses into the bulk of the alloys following the breakdown of the protective Cr2O3-Al2O3 surface oxide layer. During the incubation period, this oxide layer provides an effective barrier against carbon intrusion by virtue of its ability to restore cracks and flaws through diffusion. The corrosion pits then grow by a process of internal carburization and oxidation, in which carbides, oxides, and graphite form separately within an approximately 30- μm-thick belt in front of the pits (referred to as the white zone). In particular, the oxidation of the internal Cr3C2 carbides occurring close to the white zone/pit interface is associated with large volume changes. This volume expansion results in the buildup of high mechanical stresses within the white zone and, eventually, to the complete disintegration of the original alloy matrices into a layered pit microstructure consisting of Ni + Fe and Cr2O3 + Al2O3 + graphite. The observed microstructural changes have been rationalized through detailed modeling of the physical reactions involved, leading to the development of new and comprehensive models for high-temperature pitting corrosion in Ni-based alloys.

  7. The Pits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    8 March 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a portion of a pit chain on the lower, northern flank of the giant martian volcano, Arsia Mons. Pits such as these commonly form as a result of collapse of surface materials into a subsurface void, possibly along a fault or into an old lava tube. The layered material, exposed near the top of several of the pits, is shedding house-sized boulders which can be seen resting on the sloping sidewalls and floors of many of the pits.

    Location near: 6.7oS, 120.1oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Southern Summer

  8. Note on the relationship between porosity data and intervessel pit dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Murphey, W.K.; Elder, T.J.; Blankenhorn, P.R.

    1980-01-01

    Data on porosity, charring temperature, mercury intrusion, pit dimensions, and density of black cherry char are summarized and examined statistically in an attempt to elucidate relationships between measured parameters. Pit dimensions were not related to porosity, but were related to real density. Porosity is found to be related to mercury intrusion, real density and temperature. 1 figure, 2 tables.

  9. High temperature adsorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bertani, R.; Parisi, L.; Perini, R.; Tarquini, B.

    1996-12-31

    Adsorption phenomena are a rich and rather new field of study in geothermal research, in particular at very high temperature. ENEL is interested in the exploitation of geothermal regions with super-heated steam, and it is important to understand the behavior of water-rock interaction. We have analyzed in the 170-200{degrees}C temperature range four samples of Monteverdi cuttings; the next experimental effort will be at 220{degrees}C and over in 1996. The first results of the 1995 runs are collected in this paper. We can highlight four main items: (1) At relative pressures over 0.6 the capillarity forces are very important. (2) There is no significant temperature effect. (3) Adsorbed water can be present, and it is able to multiply by a factor of 15 the estimated reserve of super-heated steam only. (4) Pores smaller than 15 {Angstrom} do not contribute to the adsorbed mass.

  10. High temperature adsorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bertani, R.; Parisi, L.; Perini, R.; Tarquini, B.

    1996-01-24

    Adsorption phenomena are a rich and rather new field of study in geothermal research, in particular at very high temperature. ENEL is interested in the exploitation of geothermal regions with superheated steam, and it is important to understand the behavior of water-rock interaction. We have analyzed in the 170-200 °C temperature range four samples of Monteverdi cuttings; the next experimental effort will be at 220 °C and over in 1996. The first results of the 1995 runs are collected in this paper. We can highlight four main items: 1. At relative pressures over 0.6 the capillarity forces are very important. 2. There is no significant temperature effect. 3. Adsorbed water can be present, and it is able to multiply by a factor of 15 the estimated reserve of super-heated steam only. 4. Pores smaller than 15 Å do not contribute to the adsorbed mass.

  11. Volume Computation of a Stockpile - a Study Case Comparing GPS and Uav Measurements in AN Open Pit Quarry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeva, P. L.; Filipova, S. L.; Filipov, D. G.

    2016-06-01

    The following paper aims to test and evaluate the accuracy of UAV data for volumetric measurements to the conventional GNSS techniques. For this purpose, an appropriate open pit quarry has been chosen. Two sets of measurements were performed. Firstly, a stockpile was measured by GNSS technologies and later other terrestrial GNSS measurements for modelling the berms of the quarry were taken. Secondly, the area of the whole quarry including the stockpile site was mapped by a UAV flight. Having considered how dynamic our world is, new techniques and methods should be presented in numerous fields. For instance, the management of an open pit quarry requires gaining, processing and storing a large amount of information which is constantly changing with time. Fast and precise acquisition of measurements regarding the process taking place in a quarry is the key to an effective and stable maintenance. In other words, this means getting an objective evaluations of the processes, using up-to-date technologies and reliable accuracy of the results. Often legislations concerning mine engineering state that the volumetric calculations are to present ±3% accuracy of the whole amount. On one hand, extremely precise measurements could be performed by GNSS technologies, however, it could be really time consuming. On the other hand, UAV photogrammetry presents a fast, accurate method for mapping large areas and calculating stockpiles volumes. The study case was performed as a part of a master thesis.

  12. Measuring Temperature: The Thermometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamoun, Mirvette

    2005-01-01

    The author discusses the historical development of the thermometer with the view of helping children understand the role that mathematics plays in society. A model thermometer that is divided into three sections, each displaying one of the three temperature scales used today (Fahrenheit, Celsius and Kelvin) is highlighted as a project to allow…

  13. Surface temperature measurement errors

    SciTech Connect

    Keltner, N.R.; Beck, J.V.

    1983-05-01

    Mathematical models are developed for the response of surface mounted thermocouples on a thick wall. These models account for the significant causes of errors in both the transient and steady-state response to changes in the wall temperature. In many cases, closed form analytical expressions are given for the response. The cases for which analytical expressions are not obtained can be easily evaluated on a programmable calculator or a small computer.

  14. Volume Measurements of Laser-generated Pits for in Situ Geochronology Using KArLE (Potassium-Argon Laser Experiment)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, R. A.; Cohen, B. A.; Miller, J. S.

    2014-01-01

    KArLE (Potassium-­-Argon Laser Experiment) has been developed for in situ planetary geochronology using the K - Ar (potassium-­-argon) isotope system, where material ablated by LIBS (Laser-­-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy) is used to calculate isotope abundances. We are determining the accuracy and precision of volume measurements of these pits using stereo and laser microscope data to better understand the ablation process for isotope abundance calculations. If a characteristic volume can be determined with sufficient accuracy and precision for specific rock types, KArLE will prove to be a useful instrument for future planetary rover missions.

  15. Temperature Measurements in the Magnetic Measurement Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zachary

    2010-12-13

    Several key LCLS undulator parameter values depend strongly on temperature primarily because of the permanent magnet material the undulators are constructed with. The undulators will be tuned to have specific parameter values in the Magnetic Measurement Facility (MMF). Consequently, it is necessary for the temperature of the MMF to remain fairly constant. Requirements on undulator temperature have been established. When in use, the undulator temperature will be in the range 20.0 {+-} 0.2 C. In the MMF, the undulator tuning will be done at 20.0 {+-} 0.1 C. For special studies, the MMF temperature set point can be changed to a value between 18 C and 23 C with stability of {+-}0.1 C. In order to ensure that the MMF temperature requirements are met, the MMF must have a system to measure temperatures. The accuracy of the MMF temperature measurement system must be better than the {+-}0.1 C undulator tuning temperature tolerance, and is taken to be {+-}0.01 C. The temperature measurement system for the MMF is under construction. It is similar to a prototype system we built two years ago in the Sector 10 alignment lab at SLAC. At that time, our goal was to measure the lab temperature to {+-}0.1 C. The system has worked well for two years and has maintained its accuracy. For the MMF system, we propose better sensors and a more extensive calibration program to achieve the factor of 10 increase in accuracy. In this note we describe the measurement system under construction. We motivate our choice of system components and give an overview of the system. Most of the software for the system has been written and will be discussed. We discuss error sources in temperature measurements and show how these errors have been dealt with. The calibration system is described in detail. All the LCLS undulators must be tuned in the Magnetic Measurement Facility at the same temperature to within {+-}0.1 C. In order to ensure this, we are building a system to measure the temperature of the

  16. High-Sensitivity Temperature Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leadstone, G. S.

    1978-01-01

    Describes a method of measuring small temperature differences that amount to a .01K, using an arrangement of a copper-constantan thermocouple, a microamplifier and a galvanometer, as an indirect way of measuring heat energy. (GA)

  17. Acoustical Measurement Of Furnace Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parthasarathy, Shakkottai; Venkateshan, Shakkottai P.

    1989-01-01

    Simple probes withstand severe conditions, yet give spatially-resolved temperature readings. Prototype acoustical system developed to measure temperatures from ambient to 1,800 degree F in such structures as large industrial lime kilns and recovery-boiler furnaces. Pulses of sound reflected from obstructions in sensing tube. Speed of sound and temperature in each segment deduced from travel times of pulses.

  18. High-temperature-measuring device

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1981-01-27

    A temperature measuring device for very high design temperatures (to 2000/sup 0/C) is described. The device comprises a homogenous base structure preferably in the form of a sphere or cylinder. The base structure contains a large number of individual walled cells. The base structure has a decreasing coefficient of elasticity within the temperature range being monitored. A predetermined quantity of inert gas is confined within each cell. The cells are dimensonally stable at the normal working temperature of the device. Increases in gaseous pressure within the cells will permanently deform the cell walls at temperatures within the high temperature range to be measured. Such deformation can be correlated to temperature by calibrating similarly constructed devices under known time and temperature conditions.

  19. Noncontact temperature pattern measuring device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elleman, D. D. (Inventor); Allen, J. L. (Inventor); Lee, M. C. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    This invention relates to a noncontact imagine pyrometer system for obtaining the true temperature image of a given substance in a contactless fashion without making assumptions about localized emissivity of the substance or the uniformity of the temperature distribution. Such a contactless temperature imaging system has particular application in the study and production of many materials where the physical contact required to make a conventional temperature measurement drastically effects or contaminates the physical process being observed. Two examples where accurate temperature profiles are of critical interest are: (1) the solid-liquid phase change interface in the production of electronic materials and (2) metastable materials in the undercooling region. The apparent novelty resides in the recognition that an active pyrometer system may be advantageously adapted to perform contactless temperature imaging so that an accurate temperature profile can be obtained.

  20. High-temperature rapid pyrometamorphism induced by a charcoal pit burning: The case of Ricetto, central Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capitanio, Flavio; Larocca, Francesco; Improta, Salvatore

    Bulk chemistry and mineralogy of the peculiar rock of Ricetto (Carseolani Mts., Central Apennines, Italy) was studied to resolve its controversial origin: igneous dyke or anthropic product. This hybrid rock consists of a colorless, felsic component made up of glass plus quartz, and a brown, femic component made up of fans and spherulites of diopside, calcic plagioclase, wollastonite, and melilite. Textural relationships indicate very rapid cooling and immiscibility phenomena. The bulk chemistry of the rock is the same as that of the surrounding siliciclastic sandstone. The 14C analysis of a coal fragment from bottom of the body yields the conventional age of 227(+/-50) years. The Ricetto occurrence is an example of pyrometamorphism of a siliceous limestone induced by a charcoal pit burning. The small size of the heat source at Ricetto caused an intense but short-lived melting of the country rock. Prograde metamorphism caused a temperature increase up to 1,000-1,100 °C when melilite crystallization conditions were reached at appreciable P(CO2) and high f(O2). Melting occurred in a close system represented by the simplified equation: 3Cal+16.5Qtz+Ms+Bt-->Mel+Melt+2H2O+3CO2+0.5O2. Diopside+calcic plagioclase+wollastonite formed by melilite breakdown during rapid cooling, through the reaction: 6Mel+6Qtz+0.5O2-->3Di+2An+7Wo. Liquid immiscibility caused the separation between the felsic melt component and the femic melilite-bearing component. Immiscibility was characterized by different fractionation of alumina and alkalies between these two phases. Differences in bulk, glass, and mineral chemistry between the Ricetto and other melilite-bearing pyrometamorphic rocks can be attributed mainly to different protoliths.

  1. Integrated Emissivity And Temperature Measurement

    DOEpatents

    Poulsen, Peter

    2005-11-08

    A multi-channel spectrometer and a light source are used to measure both the emitted and the reflected light from a surface which is at an elevated temperature relative to its environment. In a first method, the temperature of the surface and emissivity in each wavelength is calculated from a knowledge of the spectrum and the measurement of the incident and reflected light. In the second method, the reflected light is measured from a reference surface having a known reflectivity and the same geometry as the surface of interest and the emitted and the reflected light are measured for the surface of interest. These measurements permit the computation of the emissivity in each channel of the spectrometer and the temperature of the surface of interest.

  2. Non-contact temperature measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordine, Paul C.; Krishnan, Shankar; Weber, J. K. R.; Schiffman, Robert A.

    Three methods for noncontact temperature measurement are presented. Ideal gas thermometry is realized by using laser-induced fluorescence to measure the concentration of mercury atoms in a Hg-Ar mixture in the vicinity of hot specimens. Emission polarimetry is investigated by measuring the spatially resolved intensities of polarized light from a hot tungsten sphere. Laser polarimetry is used to measure the optical properties, emissivity, and, in combination with optical pyrometry, the temperature of electromagnetically levitated liquid aluminum. The precision of temperature measurements based on the ideal gas law is + or - 2.6 percent at 1500-2000 K. The polarized emission technique is found to have the capability to determine optical properties and/or spectral emissivities of specimens over a wide range of wavelengths with quite simple instruments.

  3. Containerless high temperature property measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordine, Paul C.; Weber, J. K. Richard; Krishnan, Shankar; Anderson, Collin D.

    1991-01-01

    Containerless processing in the low gravity environment of space provides the opportunity to increase the temperature at which well controlled processing of and property measurements on materials is possible. This project was directed towards advancing containerless processing and property measurement techniques for application to materials research at high temperatures in space. Containerless high temperature material property studies include measurements of the vapor pressure, melting temperature, optical properties, and spectral emissivities of solid boron. The reaction of boron with nitrogen was also studied by laser polarimetric measurement of boron nitride film growth. The optical properties and spectral emissivities were measured for solid and liquid silicon, niobium, and zirconium; liquid aluminum and titanium; and liquid Ti-Al alloys of 5 to 60 atomic pct. titanium. Alternative means for noncontact temperature measurement in the absence of material emissivity data were evaluated. Also, the application of laser induced fluorescence for component activity measurements in electromagnetic levitated liquids was studied, along with the feasibility of a hybrid aerodynamic electromagnetic levitation technique.

  4. Measurement of facial skin temperature.

    PubMed

    Ariyaratnam, S; Rood, J P

    1990-10-01

    It is essential to know the pattern of facial skin temperatures in normal subjects to be able to objectively assess differences in cases of nerve injury. Thirty healthy adults were selected at random to investigate the pattern of facial temperature using liquid crystal thermography and an electronic thermocouple system. The highest temperature of the face was in the forehead area (c, 34 degrees C) and the lowest (c. 32 degrees C) in the cheek area. If ambient temperature and humidity are controlled in a draught-free environment, symmetry of the facial skin temperature can be maintained. It is concluded that measurements of facial skin temperature may be used to investigate and assess lesions of peripheral branches of cranial nerves supplying the face.

  5. The Kelvin and Temperature Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Mangum, B. W.; Furukawa, G. T.; Kreider, K. G.; Meyer, C. W.; Ripple, D. C.; Strouse, G. F.; Tew, W. L.; Moldover, M. R.; Johnson, B. Carol; Yoon, H. W.; Gibson, C. E.; Saunders, R. D.

    2001-01-01

    The International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90) is defined from 0.65 K upwards to the highest temperature measurable by spectral radiation thermometry, the radiation thermometry being based on the Planck radiation law. When it was developed, the ITS-90 represented thermodynamic temperatures as closely as possible. Part I of this paper describes the realization of contact thermometry up to 1234.93 K, the temperature range in which the ITS-90 is defined in terms of calibration of thermometers at 15 fixed points and vapor pressure/temperature relations which are phase equilibrium states of pure substances. The realization is accomplished by using fixed-point devices, containing samples of the highest available purity, and suitable temperature-controlled environments. All components are constructed to achieve the defining equilibrium states of the samples for the calibration of thermometers. The high quality of the temperature realization and measurements is well documented. Various research efforts are described, including research to improve the uncertainty in thermodynamic temperatures by measuring the velocity of sound in gas up to 800 K, research in applying noise thermometry techniques, and research on thermocouples. Thermometer calibration services and high-purity samples and devices suitable for “on-site” thermometer calibration that are available to the thermometry community are described. Part II of the paper describes the realization of temperature above 1234.93 K for which the ITS-90 is defined in terms of the calibration of spectroradiometers using reference blackbody sources that are at the temperature of the equilibrium liquid-solid phase transition of pure silver, gold, or copper. The realization of temperature from absolute spectral or total radiometry over the temperature range from about 60 K to 3000 K is also described. The dissemination of the temperature scale using radiation thermometry from NIST to the customer is achieved by

  6. Method for measuring surface temperature

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Gary A.; Baker, Sheila N.; McCleskey, T. Mark

    2009-07-28

    The present invention relates to a method for measuring a surface temperature using is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methyl pyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

  7. Pit Formation during the Self-Assembly of Dithiol Monolayers on Au(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macdairmid, A. R.; Cappello, M. L.; Keeler, W. J.; Banks, J. T.; Gallagher, M. C.

    2000-03-01

    The formation of pits one gold atom deep during the growth of alkanethiol monolayers on Au(111), has been observed previously by others. Explanations for pit formation include etching of the substrate, or mass transport of gold atom + thiol molecule on the surface, due to changes in surface energy^1. We have investigated the structure of dithiothreitol (DTT) SAMs on Au(111). Ex situ STM measurements indicate similar pitting occurs during formation of the dithiol monolayer. The degree of pitting depends on exposure time, sample temperature during formation, and subsequent annealing of the sample. Pitting is enhanced considerasbly when DTT is coordinated with Ti, in fact DTT/Ti films exhibit considerable pit motion during STM imaging. ^1 F. Teran et al. Electrochimica Acta 44, 1053 (1998).

  8. Pitted keratolysis*

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida Jr, Hiram Larangeira; Siqueira, Rodrigo Nunes; Meireles, Renan da Silva; Rampon, Greice; de Castro, Luis Antonio Suita; Silva, Ricardo Marques e

    2016-01-01

    Pitted keratolysis is a skin disorder that affects the stratum corneum of the plantar surface and is caused by Gram-positive bacteria. A 30-year-old male presented with small punched-out lesions on the plantar surface. A superficial shaving was carried out for scanning electron microscopy. Hypokeratosis was noted on the plantar skin and in the acrosyringium, where the normal elimination of corneocytes was not seen. At higher magnification (x 3,500) bacteria were easily found on the surface and the described transversal bacterial septation was observed. PMID:26982791

  9. Temperature measurement during microwave processing

    SciTech Connect

    Darby, G.; Clark, D.E.; DiFiore, R.; Foltz, D.

    1995-12-31

    Many ceramic materials have been fabricated using sol-gel processing where the starting materials consist of a liquid organic precursor mixed with water and alcohol. The initial stages in sol-gel reactions require temperatures in the range of 100{degrees}C or less, and therefore appear ideally suited for processing in a conventional microwave oven. In this paper we evaluate the use of several types of thermocouple geometries for measuring the temperature of liquids, including tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) during microwave heating. The boiling point of water is used as a reference on which to base the accuracy of our measurements.

  10. Optic Nerve Pit

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Optic Nerve Pit What is optic nerve pit? An optic nerve pit is a ... may be seen in both eyes. How is optic pit diagnosed? If the pit is not affecting ...

  11. [Effects of scale-like pit and mulching measures on soil moisture of dryland jujube orchard in North Shaanxi Province, China].

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Chen; Zhao, Xi-Ning; Gao, Xiao-Ding; Wang, Jia-Wen; Shi, Yin-Guang

    2014-08-01

    Soil moisture is a key factor affecting jujube growth in the semiarid Northern Shaanxi Province. The impacts of different engineering and mulching measures on soil moisture were investigated via in situ measurements in a typical dryland jujube orchard. The results showed that the mean soil moistures (0-180 cm) of scale-like pit + branch mulching, scale-like scale + straw mulching, and soil moisture of scale-like pit with no mulching were increased by 14.2%, 9.4%, and 4.8% than control, respectively. Different measures, especially for the scale-like pit + branch mulching, significantly increased the soil moisture in the soil surface (0-20 cm) and the main root zone layer (20-100 cm) during the jujube growth stage. Individual precipitation events had great impacts on soil moisture in the 0-100 cm, while its effect on soil moisture in deep layers was not apparent. There was no significant difference among the soil moistures in different soil depths of scale-like pit with no mulching when compared with the control under high, medium, and low soil humidity conditions. This study indicated that using the clipped jujube branches as mulching could both save materials cost and achieve the goal of reserving more water in dryland jujube orchard in north Shaanxi Province.

  12. Noncontact temperature pattern measuring device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elleman, Daniel D. (Inventor); Allen, James L. (Inventor); Lee, Mark C. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Laser pyrometer techniques are utilized to accurately image a true temperature distribution on a given target without touching the target and without knowing the localized emissivity of the target. The pyrometer utilizes a very high definition laser beam and photodetector, both having a very narrow focus. The pyrometer is mounted in a mechanism designed to permit the pyrometer to be aimed and focused at precise localized points on the target surface. The pyrometer is swept over the surface area to be imaged, temperature measurements being taken at each point of focus.

  13. Snake bite: pit vipers.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Michael E

    2006-11-01

    Pit vipers are the largest group of venomous snakes in the United States and are involved in an estimated 150,000 bites annually of dogs and cats. The severity of any pit viper bite is related to the volume and toxicity of the venom injected as well as the location of the bite, which may influence the rate of venom uptake. The toxicity of rattlesnake venom varies widely. It is possible for pit vipers' venom to be strictly neurotoxic with virtually no local signs of envenomation. Venom consists of 90% water and has a minimum of 10 enzymes and 3 to 12 nonenzymatic proteins and peptides in any individual snake. The onset of clinical signs after envenomation may be delayed for several hours. The presence of fang marks does not indicate that envenomation has occurred, only that a bite has taken place. Systemic clinical manifestations encompass a wide variety of problems including pain, weakness, dizziness, nausea, severe hypotension, and thrombocytopenia. The victim's clotting abnormalities largely depend upon the species of snake involved. Venom induced thrombocytopenia occurs in approximately 30% of envenomations. Many first aid measures have been advocated for pit viper bite victims, none has been shown to prevent morbidity or mortality. Current recommendations for first aid in the field are to keep the victim calm, keep the bite site below heart level if possible, and transport the victim to a veterinary medical facility for primary medical intervention. The patient should be hospitalized and monitored closely for a minimum of 8 hours for the onset of signs of envenomation. The only proven specific therapy against pit viper envenomation is the administration of antivenin. The dosage of antivenin needed is calculated relative to the amount of venom injected, the body mass of the victim, and the bite site. The average dosage in dogs and cats is 1 to 2 vials of antivenin.

  14. Environmental tests of thermographic phosphors for turbine-engine temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noel, B. W.; Bibby, M. C.; Borella, H. M.; Woodruff, S. E.; Hudson, C. L.

    1989-07-01

    A method that uses thermographic phosphors (TPs) for remote temperature measurements in hostile environments was developed. Based on the results of environmental tests, the potential for applying the TP method to measuring blade and vane temperatures in operating turbine engines was evaluated. Heat/water-quench tests, burner-rig tests, and a test in an experimental-engine hot section demonstrated that the TPs can be durably bonded to blade and vane surfaces, yet still exhibit usable luminescence after the test. A spin-pit test showed that it was possible to measure the temperature reliably on a heated rotating turbine disk. These tests and their results are described.

  15. Evaluating and testing thermographic phosphors for turbine-engine temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noel, B. W.; Allison, S. W.; Beshears, D. L.; Cates, M. R.; Borella, H. M.; Franks, L. A.; Iverson, C. E.; Lutz, S. S.; Marshall, B. R.; Thomas, M. B.

    A technique developed earlier for measuring the temperature of inaccessible surfaces in low-temperature rotating machines is being adapted to measure the temperature of surfaces at the higher temperatures and in the erosive environment inside operating turbine engines. The method uses the temperature dependence of the characteristic decay time of the laser-induced-fluorescence of thermographic phosphors to measure the temperature. This paper summarizes recent work in four areas: phosphor characterization and calibration, instrumentation development, bonding, and field tests. By using improved instrumentation and data-analysis techniques, calibration curves for several phosphors are measured with greater accuracy and extended to higher temperatures than before. Phosphors are evaluated that were attached to sample surfaces by high-temperature bonding materials, electron-beam deposition, flame spraying, and plasma spraying. A burner rig test was performed on some phosphor-coated samples and the instrumentation required for an upcoming spin-pit test was designed, built, and calibrated.

  16. High temperature skin friction measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Holmes, Harlan K.; Supplee, Frank H., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Skin friction measurement in the NASA Langley hypersonic propulsion facility is described. The sensor configuration utilized an existing balance, modified to provide thermal isolation and an increased standoff distance. For test run times of about 20 sec and ambient-air cooling of the test section and balance, the modified balance performed satisfactorily, even when it was subjected to acoustic and structural vibration. The balance is an inertially balanced closed-loop servo system where the current to a moving-coil motor needed to restore or null the output from the position sensor is a measure of the force or skin friction tending to displace the moving element. The accuracy of the sensor is directly affected by the position sensor in the feedback loop, in this case a linear-variable differential transformer which has proven to be influenced by temperature gradients.

  17. Ground-based multispectral measurements for airborne data verification in non-operating open pit mine "Kremikovtsi"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Denitsa; Nikolov, Hristo; Petkov, Doyno

    2013-10-01

    The impact of mining industry and metal production on the environment is presented all over the world. In our research we set focus on the impact of already non-operating ferrous "Kremikovtsi"open pit mine and related waste dumps and tailings which we consider to be the major factor responsible for pollution of one densely populated region in Bulgaria. The approach adopted is based on correct estimation of the distribution of the iron oxides inside open pit mines and the neighboring regions those considered in this case to be the key issue for the ecological state assessment of soils, vegetation and water. For this study the foremost source of data are those of airborne origin and those combined with ground-based in-situ and laboratory acquired data were used for verification of the environmental variables and thus in process of assessment of the present environmental status influenced by previous mining activities. The percentage of iron content was selected as main indicator for presence of metal pollution since it could be reliably identified by multispectral data used in this study and also because the iron compounds are widely spread in the most of the minerals, rocks and soils. In our research the number of samples from every source (air, field, lab) was taken in the way to be statistically sound and confident. In order to establish relationship between the degree of pollution of the soil and mulspectral data 40 soil samples were collected during a field campaign in the study area together with GPS measurements for two types of laboratory measurements: the first one, chemical and mineralogical analysis and the second one, non-destructive spectroscopy. In this work for environmental variables verification over large areas mulspectral satellite data from Landsat instruments TM/ETM+ and from ALI/OLI (Operational Land Imager) were used. Ground-based (laboratory and in-situ) spectrometric measurements were performed using the designed and constructed in Remote

  18. Simultaneous measurement of temperature and velocity fields in convective air flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeling, Daniel; Bosbach, Johannes; Wagner, Claus

    2014-03-01

    Thermal convective air flows are of great relevance in fundamental studies and technical applications such as heat exchangers or indoor ventilation. Since these kinds of flow are driven by temperature gradients, simultaneous measurements of instantaneous velocity and temperature fields are highly desirable. A possible solution is the combination of particle image velocimetry (PIV) and particle image thermography (PIT) using thermochromic liquid crystals (TLCs) as tracer particles. While combined PIV and PIT is already state of the art for measurements in liquids, this is not yet the case for gas flows. In this study we address the adaptation of the measuring technique to gaseous fluids with respect to the generation of the tracer particles, the particle illumination and the image filtering process. Results of the simultaneous PIV/PIT stemming from application to a fluid system with continuous air exchange are presented. The measurements were conducted in a cuboidal convection sample with air in- and outlet at a Rayleigh number Ra ≈ 9.0 × 107. They prove the feasibility of the method by providing absolute and relative temperature accuracies of σT = 0.19 K and σΔT = 0.06 K, respectively. Further open issues that have to be addressed in order to mature the technique are identified.

  19. The application of PIT tags to measure transport of detrital coral fragments on a fringing reef: Majuro Atoll, Marshall Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Murray R.

    2014-06-01

    Passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags are a radio-frequency identification device widely used as a machine-readable identification tool in fisheries research. PIT tags have also been employed, to a lesser extent, to track the movement of gravel-sized clasts within fluvial and coastal systems. In this study, PIT tags were inserted into detrital coral fragments and used to establish source-sink transport pathways on a fringing reef on Majuro Atoll in the Marshall Islands. Results suggest the transport of gravel-sized material on the inter-tidal reef flat is exclusively across-reef towards the lagoon. Considerable variation in the distance travelled by fragments was observed. Fragments were largely intact and visually recognisable after almost 5 months on the reef flat. However, the branches of some recovered fragments had broken off and corallite abrasion was observed in recovered fragments. This study indicates that PIT tags are an inexpensive and powerful new addition to the suite of sediment transport and taphonomic tools for researchers working within coral reef systems.

  20. Measurements of the dynamics of thermal plumes in turbulent mixed convection based on combined PIT and PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeling, Daniel; Bosbach, Johannes; Wagner, Claus

    2015-06-01

    The dynamics of thermal plumes and their abundance is investigated in mixed convection in a cuboidal sample with respect to the characteristic numbers. The parameter range spans , and . Combined particle image thermography and particle image velocimetry is conducted in a horizontal layer close above the bottom thermal boundary layer. This combination of measurement techniques, using thermochromic liquid crystals as tracer particles, which is novel for air flows, allows for simultaneous measurement of temperature and velocity fields. Details of the measurement technique are published in Schmeling et al. (Meas Sci Technol 25:035302, 2014). The fingerprints of sheet-like plumes and those of the stems of mushroom-like plumes are visible in the instantaneous temperature fields. A study of temperature PDFs reveals that the distributions can be well described by a sum of two Gaussian distributions. Analysing the ratio of the probabilities reveals a sudden change at a critical Ra c ≈ 2.3 × 108. Here, denotes the abundance of fluid temperatures imprinted by the bulk flow, while represses the abundance of temperatures ascribed to warm thermal plumes. Accordingly, is a measure for the plume fraction in the measurement plane. The change occurs in the regime , in which the interaction of buoyancy-induced large-scale circulations with the wall jet of the incoming air results in an instability reported already by Schmeling et al. (Exp Fluids 54:1517, 2013). A combined evaluation of the temperature and velocity fields reveals a change in the horizontal heat fluxes at . Furthermore, the total amount of heat transported in x direction within the measurement layer increases with in bulk-dominated regions, while it stays almost constant for plume-dominated ones.

  1. 121. Man with temperature probe aimed at armature measuring temperature ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    121. Man with temperature probe aimed at armature measuring temperature as armature heats up between the two electrodes. March 27, 1985 - Statue of Liberty, Liberty Island, Manhattan, New York County, NY

  2. An evaluation of body temperature measurement.

    PubMed

    Ilsley, A H; Rutten, A J; Runciman, W B

    1983-02-01

    The accuracy of routine body temperature measurements, the suitability of various sites for such measurements, and the performance and practicality of various temperature measuring devices were studied. Oral and axillary temperature measurements made by the nursing staff were within 1 degree C of a reference value (within 0.5 degree C in 67%). Both sites were suitable for routine ward temperature measurement. Mercury-in-glass thermometers are recommended for routine ward use. Electronic and disposable chemical thermometers cost more but the latter are suitable in uncooperative patients and children. Forehead skin temperature measurements using liquid crystal plastic discs were unreliable. Pulmonary artery and rectal temperature measurements were satisfactory in operating theatre and intensive care unit; however, electronic thermometers should be subjected to routine checks. The bladder temperature measuring device proved unsuitable for clinical use. When oesophagus, nasopharynx and tympanum sites are used careful placement is necessary to minimise trauma and obtain reliable measurements.

  3. Comet 67P's Pitted Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-11-01

    High-resolution imagery of comet 67P ChuryumovGerasimenko has revealed that its surface is covered in active pits some measuring hundreds of meters both wide and deep! But what processes caused these pits to form?Pitted LandscapeESAs Rosetta mission arrived at comet 67P in August 2014. As the comet continued its journey around the Sun, Rosetta extensively documented 67Ps surface through high-resolution images taken with the on-board instrument NavCam. These images have revealed that active, circular depressions are a common feature on the comets surface.In an attempt to determine how these pits formed, an international team of scientists led by Olivier Mousis (Laboratory of Astrophysics of Marseille) has run a series of simulations of a region of the comet the Seth region that contains a 200-meter-deep pit. These simulations include the effects of various phase transitions, heat transfer through the matrix of ices and dust, and gas diffusion throughout the porous material.Escaping VolatilesAdditional examples of pitted areas on 67Ps northern-hemisphere surface include the Ash region and the Maat region (both imaged September 2014 by NavCam) [Mousis et al. 2015]Previous studies have already eliminated two potential formation mechanisms for the pits: impacts (the sizes of the pits werent right) and erosion due to sunlight (the pits dont have the right shape). Mousis and collaborators assume that the pits are instead caused by the depletion of volatile materials chemical compounds with low boiling points either via explosive outbursts at the comets surface, or via sinkholes opening from below the surface. But what process causes the volatiles to deplete when the comet heats?The authors simulations demonstrate that volatiles trapped beneath the comets surface either in icy structures called clathrates or within amorphous ice can be suddenly released as the comet warms up. The team shows that the release of volatiles from these two structures can create 200-meter

  4. Measuring Specific Heats at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandersande, Jan W.; Zoltan, Andrew; Wood, Charles

    1987-01-01

    Flash apparatus for measuring thermal diffusivities at temperatures from 300 to 1,000 degrees C modified; measures specific heats of samples to accuracy of 4 to 5 percent. Specific heat and thermal diffusivity of sample measured. Xenon flash emits pulse of radiation, absorbed by sputtered graphite coating on sample. Sample temperature measured with thermocouple, and temperature rise due to pulse measured by InSb detector.

  5. [Measurement and management of body temperature].

    PubMed

    Iwashita, Hironobu; Matsukawa, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Body temperature regulation is at the basis of life maintenance and for humans to maintain the central body temperature within the range of 37 +/- 0.2 degrees Celsius. In the case of anesthesia, a patient would have a high possibility of lower body temperature and also could have more complications with low body temperature. In addition, it would generate more complications and extend a period of hospitalization. For that reason, anesthetists must pay full attention to body temperature management during surgery. Measurement for central body temperature is necessary as a monitor for body temperature measurement and the measurement for nasopharyngeal temperature, tympanic temperature, and lung artery temperature is effective for this purpose. Therapeutic hypothermia for brain injury is receiving attention recently as a preventive method for brain disorder and the method is utilized in hospital facilities. In future, it is expected to attain the most suitable treatment method by clinical studies on low body temperature.

  6. Apparatus Would Measure Temperatures Of Ball Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, John C.; Fredricks, Thomas H.

    1995-01-01

    Rig for testing ball bearings under radial and axial loads and measuring surface temperatures undergoing development. Includes extensible thermocouples: by means of bellows as longitudinal positioners, thermocouples driven into contact with bearing balls to sense temperatures immediately after test run. Not necessary to disassemble rig or to section balls to obtain indirect indications of maximum temperatures reached. Thermocouple measurements indicate temperatures better than temperature-sensitive paints.

  7. The relationship between induction time for pitting and pitting potential for high purity aluminum.

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Frederick Douglas; Vandenavyle, Justin J.; Martinez, Michael A.

    2003-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if a distribution of pit induction times (from potentiostatic experiments) could be used to predict a distribution of pitting potentials (from potentiodynamic experiments) for high-purity aluminum. Pit induction times were measured for 99.99 Al in 50 mM NaCl at potentials of -0.35, -0.3, -0.25, and -0.2 V vs. saturated calomel electrode. Analysis of the data showed that the pit germination rate generally was an exponential function of the applied potential; however, a subset of the germination rate data appeared to be mostly potential insensitive. The germination rate behavior was used as an input into a mathematical relationship that provided a prediction of pitting potential distribution. Good general agreement was found between the predicted distribution and an experimentally determined pitting potential distribution, suggesting that the relationships presented here provide a suitable means for quantitatively describing pit germination rate.

  8. Measurement of turbine blade temperature using pyrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, H.; Du, C.

    1985-09-01

    This paper presents the study of application of a self-made turbine blade pyrometer to measuring rotating turbine blade temperatures in a bed testing aeroengine. The study includes the temperature measuring principle and the pyrometer system; installation and adjustment of the double ball-floating type configuration optical head which goes through four different high temperatures bulkheads; and measurement of three kinds of temperature (the average blade temperature Ta, the average peak blade temperature Tap, and the maximum peak blade temperature Tmp) for all rotor blades of the turbine first stage. The experimental data analysis reveals that the first attempt of application of this pyrometer is successful. The measurement errors in the temperature range of 550-1200 C are within + or - 1 percent of calculated blade temperatures.

  9. Measurement of small temperature fluctuations at high average temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholl, James W.; Scholl, Marija S.

    1988-01-01

    Both absolute and differential temperature measurements were simultaneously performed as a function of time for a pixel on a high-temperature, multi-spectral, spatially and temporally varying infrared target simulator. A scanning laser beam was used to maintain a pixel at an on-the-average constant temperature of 520 K. The laser refresh rate of up to 1 kHz resulted in small-amplitude temperature fluctuations with a peak-to-peak amplitude of less than 1 K. The experimental setup to accurately measure the differential and the absolute temperature as a function of time is described.

  10. Measurement of thermodynamic temperature of high temperature fixed points

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrilov, V. R.; Khlevnoy, B. B.; Otryaskin, D. A.; Grigorieva, I. A.; Samoylov, M. L.; Sapritsky, V. I.

    2013-09-11

    The paper is devoted to VNIIOFI's measurements of thermodynamic temperature of the high temperature fixed points Co-C, Pt-C and Re-C within the scope of the international project coordinated by the Consultative Committee for Thermometry working group 5 'Radiation Thermometry'. The melting temperatures of the fixed points were measured by a radiance mode radiation thermometer calibrated against a filter radiometer with known irradiance spectral responsivity via a high temperature black body. This paper describes the facility used for the measurements, the results and estimated uncertainties.

  11. Surface Temperature Measurement Using Hematite Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bencic, Timothy J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Systems and methods that are capable of measuring temperature via spectrophotometry principles are discussed herein. These systems and methods are based on the temperature dependence of the reflection spectrum of hematite. Light reflected from these sensors can be measured to determine a temperature, based on changes in the reflection spectrum discussed herein.

  12. Measuring Poisson Ratios at Low Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boozon, R. S.; Shepic, J. A.

    1987-01-01

    Simple extensometer ring measures bulges of specimens in compression. New method of measuring Poisson's ratio used on brittle ceramic materials at cryogenic temperatures. Extensometer ring encircles cylindrical specimen. Four strain gauges connected in fully active Wheatstone bridge self-temperature-compensating. Used at temperatures as low as liquid helium.

  13. Non-destructive measurement of demineralization and remineralization in the occlusal pits and fissures of extracted 3rd molars with PS-OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chulsung; Hsu, Dennis J.; Le, Michael H.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2009-02-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that Polarization Sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography (PS-OCT) can be used to image the remineralization of early artificial caries lesion on smooth enamel surfaces of human and bovine teeth. However, most new dental decay is found in the pits and fissures of the occlusal surfaces of posterior dentition and it is in these high risk areas where the performance of new caries imaging devices need to be investigated. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that PS-OCT can be used to measure the subsequent remineralization of artificial lesions produced in the pits and fissures of extracted 3rd molars. A PS-OCT system operating at 1310-nm was used to acquire polarization resolved images of occlusal surfaces exposed to a demineralizing solution at pH-4.5 followed by a fluoride containing remineralizing solution at pH-7.0 containing 2-ppm fluoride. The integrated reflectivity was calculated to a depth of 200-µm in the entire lesion area using an automated image processing algorithm. Although a well-defined surface zone was clearly resolved in only a few of the samples that underwent remineralization, the PS-OCT measurements indicated a significant (p<0.05) reduction in the integrated reflectivity between the severity of the lesions that were exposed to the remineralization solution and those that were not. The lesion depth and mineral loss were also measured with polarized light microscopy and transverse microradiography after sectioning the teeth. These results show that PS-OCT can be used to non-destructively monitor the remineralization potential of anti-caries agents in the important pits and fissures of the occlusal surface.

  14. Temperature measurement inside metallic cables using distributed temperature system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaros, Jakub; Papes, Martin; Liner, Andrej; Vasinek, Vladimir; Mach, Veleslav; Hruby, David; Kajnar, Tomas; Perecar, Frantisek

    2015-07-01

    Nowadays, metallic cables are produced so as to avoid the maximum allowable temperature of the cable by the normal operation and the maximum allowable temperature for short-circuit the exceeding the maximum allowable internal temperature. The temperature increase is an unwanted phenomena causing losses in the cable and its abrasion. Longterm overload can lead to damaging of the cable or to the risk of fire in extreme cases. In our work, we present the temperature distribution measurement inside the metallic cables using distributed temperature system. Within the cooperation with manufacturer of the metallic cables, optical fibers were implemented into these cables. The cables are double coated and the fibers are allocated between these coatings and also in the centre of the cable. Thus we are able to measure the temperature inside the cable and also on the surface temperature along the whole cable length with spatial resolution 1 m during the cable heating. This measurement method can be also used for short-circuit prediction and detection, because this phenomena is always accompanied with temperature increase. Distributed temperature systems are already successfully implemented in temperature measurements in industry environment, such as construction, sewer systems, caliducts etc. The main advantage of these systems is electromagnetic resistance, low application price and the possibility of monitoring several kilometers long distances.

  15. Measuring the performance of two stationary interrogation systems for detecting downstream and upstream movement of PIT-tagged salmonids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Connolly, P.J.; Jezorek, I.G.; Martens, K.D.; Prentice, E.F.

    2008-01-01

    We tested the performance of two stationary interrogation systems designed for detecting the movement of fish with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags. These systems allowed us to determine the direction of fish movement with high detection efficiency and high precision in a dynamic stream environment. We describe an indirect method for deriving an estimate for detection efficiency and the associated variance that does not rely on a known number of fish passing the system. By using six antennas arranged in a longitudinal series of three arrays, we attained detection efficiencies for downstream- and upstream-moving fish exceeding 96% during high-flow periods and approached 100% during low-flow periods for the two interrogation systems we tested. Because these systems did not rely on structural components, such as bridges or culverts, they were readily adaptable to remote, natural stream sites. Because of built-in redundancy, these systems were able to perform even with a loss of one or more antennas owing to dislodgement or electrical failure. However, the reduction in redundancy resulted in decreased efficiency and precision and the potential loss of ability to determine the direction of fish movement. What we learned about these systems should be applicable to a wide variety of other antenna configurations and to other types of PIT tags and transceivers.

  16. Temperature measurements in cavitation bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutier-Delgosha, Olivier

    2016-11-01

    Cavitation is usually a nearly isothermal process in the liquid phase, but in some specific flow conditions like hot water or cryogenic fluids, significant temperature variations are detected. In addition, a large temperature increase happens inside the cavitation bubbles at the very end of their collapse, due to the fast compression of the gas at the bubble core, which is almost adiabatic. This process is of primary interest in various biomedical and pharmaceutical applications, where the mechanisms of bubble collapse plays a major role. To investigate the amplitude and the spatial distribution of these temperature variations inside and outside the cavitation bubbles, a system based on cold wires has been developed. They have been tested in a configuration of a single bubble obtained by submitting a small air bubble to a large amplitude pressure wave. Some promising results have been obtained after the initial validation tests. This work is funded by the Office of Naval Research Global under Grant N62909-16-1-2116, Dr. Salahuddin Ahmed & Ki-Han Kim program managers.

  17. Method and apparatus for optical temperature measurements

    DOEpatents

    Angel, S.M.; Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1986-04-22

    A method and apparatus are provided for remotely monitoring temperature. Both method and apparatus employ a temperature probe material having an excitation-dependent emission line whose fluorescence intensity varies directly with temperature whenever excited by light having a first wavelength and whose fluorescence intensity varies inversely with temperature whenever excited by light having a second wavelength. Temperature is measured by alternatively illiminating the temperature probe material with light having the first wavelength and light having the second wavelength, monitoring the intensity of the successive emissions of the excitation-dependent emission line, and relating the intensity ratio of successive emissions to temperature. 3 figs.

  18. Method and apparatus for optical temperature measurements

    DOEpatents

    Angel, S. Michael; Hirschfeld, Tomas B.

    1988-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for remotely monitoring temperature. Both method and apparatus employ a temperature probe material having an excitation-dependent emission line whose fluorescence intensity varies directly with temperature whenever excited by light having a first wavelength and whose fluorescence intensity varies inversely with temperature whenever excited by light having a second wavelength. Temperature is measured by alternatively illuminating the temperature probe material with light having the first wavelength and light having the second wavelength, monitoring the intensity of the successive emissions of the excitation-dependent emission line, and relating the intensity ratio of successive emissions to temperature.

  19. Method and apparatus for optical temperature measurement

    DOEpatents

    O'Rourke, Patrick E.; Livingston, Ronald R.; Prather, William S.

    1994-01-01

    A temperature probe and a method for using said probe for temperature measurements based on changes in light absorption by the probe. The probe comprises a first and a second optical fiber that carry light to and from the probe, and a temperature sensor material, the absorbance of which changes with temperature, through which the light is directed. Light is directed through the first optical fiber, passes through the temperature sensor material, and is transmitted by a second optical fiber from the material to a detector. Temperature-dependent and temperature-independent factors are derived from measurements of the transmitted light intensity. For each sensor material, the temperature T is a function of the ratio, R, of these factors. The temperature function f(R) is found by applying standard data analysis techniques to plots of T versus R at a series of known temperatures. For a sensor having a known temperature function f(R) and known characteristic and temperature-dependent factors, the temperature can be computed from a measurement of R. Suitable sensor materials include neodymium-doped boresilicate glass, accurate to .+-.0.5.degree. C. over an operating temperature range of about -196.degree. C. to 400.degree. C.; and a mixture of D.sub.2 O and H.sub.2 O, accurate to .+-.0.1.degree. C. over an operating range of about 5.degree. C. to 90.degree. C.

  20. Method and apparatus for optical temperature measurement

    DOEpatents

    O'Rourke, P.E.; Livingston, R.R.; Prather, W.S.

    1994-09-20

    A temperature probe and a method for using said probe for temperature measurements based on changes in light absorption by the probe are disclosed. The probe comprises a first and a second optical fiber that carry light to and from the probe, and a temperature sensor material, the absorbance of which changes with temperature, through which the light is directed. Light is directed through the first optical fiber, passes through the temperature sensor material, and is transmitted by a second optical fiber from the material to a detector. Temperature-dependent and temperature-independent factors are derived from measurements of the transmitted light intensity. For each sensor material, the temperature T is a function of the ratio, R, of these factors. The temperature function f(R) is found by applying standard data analysis techniques to plots of T versus R at a series of known temperatures. For a sensor having a known temperature function f(R) and known characteristic and temperature-dependent factors, the temperature can be computed from a measurement of R. Suitable sensor materials include neodymium-doped borosilicate glass, accurate to [+-]0.5 C over an operating temperature range of about [minus]196 C to 400 C; and a mixture of D[sub 2]O and H[sub 2]O, accurate to [+-]0.1 C over an operating range of about 5 C to 90 C. 13 figs.

  1. Measuring Moduli Of Elasticity At High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfenden, Alan

    1993-01-01

    Shorter, squatter specimens and higher frequencies used in ultrasonic measurement technique. Improved version of piezo-electric ultrasonic composite oscillator technique used to measure moduli of elasticity of solid materials at high temperatures.

  2. Temperature Measurements Taken by Phoenix Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This chart plots the minimum daily atmospheric temperature measured by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander spacecraft since landing on Mars. As the temperature increased through the summer season, the atmospheric humidity also increased. Clouds, ground fog, and frost were observed each night after the temperature started dropping.

  3. Remote temperature-measurement instrumentation for a heated rotating turbine disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, S. S.; Turley, W. D.; Borella, H. M.; Noel, B. W.; Cates, M. R.; Probert, M. R.

    Thermographic-Phosphor (TP) remote temperature sensors were installed on a turbine disk and subjected to thermal and centrifugal stresses in a spin-pit test. The sensors were placed at three different radii on the disk, which was run at 6600, 9330, 11400, and 13200 rpm at nominal temperatures of ambient, 300 F, 600 F, 900 F, and 1250 F. The paper gives details of the TP temperature-measurement method, phosphor bonding to the disk, calibration, optical-system design, and electronics instrumentation. The temperatures measured by the TP sensors were compared with those measured by thermocouples mounted on the disk. A number of the thermocouples behaved erratically after we operated the disk at 677 C for an extended period. Nevertheless, for those cases where they could be compared with confidence, the agreement between the TP sensors and the thermocouples was good.

  4. Temperature standards, what and where: resources for effective temperature measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, W.W. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Many standards have been published to describe devices, methods, and other topics. How they are developed and by whom are briefly described, and an attempt is made to extract most of those relating to temperature measurements. A directory of temperature standards and their sources is provided.

  5. Temperature measurement systems in wearable electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, S.; Gołebiowski, J.

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the concept of temperature measurement system, adapted to wearable electronics applications. Temperature is one of the most commonly monitored factor in smart textiles, especially in sportswear, medical and rescue products. Depending on the application, measured temperature could be used as an initial value of alert, heating, lifesaving or analysis system. The concept of the temperature measurement multi-point system, which consists of flexible screen-printed resistive sensors, placed on the T-shirt connected with the central unit and the power supply is elaborated in the paper.

  6. Liquid crystal quantitative temperature measurement technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wei; Wu, Zongshan

    2001-10-01

    Quantitative temperature measurement using wide band thermochromic liquid crystals is an “area” thermal measurement technique. This technique utilizes the feature that liquid crystal changes its reflex light color with variation of temperature and applies an image capturing and processing system to calibrate the characteristic curve of liquid crystal’s color-temperature. Afterwards, the technique uses this curve to measure the distribution of temperature on experimental model. In this paper, firstly, each part of quantitative temperature measurement system using liquid crystal is illustrated and discussed. Then the technique is employed in a long duration hypersonic wind tunnel, and the quantitative result of the heat transfer coefficient along laminar plate is obtained. Additionally, some qualitative results are also given. In the end, comparing the experimental results with reference enthalpy theoretical results, a conclusion of thermal measurement accuracy is drawn.

  7. Temperature Sensitive Particle for Velocity and Temperature Measurement.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Someya, Satoshi; Okamoto, Koji; Iida, Masao

    2007-11-01

    Phosphorescence and fluorescence are often applied to measure the temperature and the concentration of oxygen. The intensity and the lifetime of phosphor depend on the temperature and the oxygen concentration, due to the quenching effect of the phosphor. The present study clarified the effects of temperature on the lifetime of phosphorescence of Porphyrins, Ru(bpy)3^2+ and the europium complex. The phosphorescence lifetime of oil solution / water solution / painted wall were measured with changing temperature and oxygen concentration. In addition, the optical property of the small particles incorporated with the europium complex was investigated in the oil/water. The lifetime was strongly affected by temperature. Then, the temperature sensitive particle (TSParticle) with metal complex was applied to measure temperature in Silicone oil (10cSt) two-dimensionally. Present study is the result of ?High speed three-dimensional direct measurement technology development for the evaluation of heat flux and flow of liquid metal? entrusted to the University of Tokyo by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan(MEXT).

  8. High temperature heat treatment on boron precursor and PIT process optimization to improve the Jc performance of MgB2-based conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignolo, M.; Bovone, G.; Bernini, C.; Palenzona, A.; Kawale, S.; Romano, G.; Siri, A. S.

    2013-10-01

    The promising results reported in our previous works led us to think that the production process of boron plays a crucial role in MgB2 synthesis. A new method for boron preparation has been developed in our laboratory. This particular process is based on magnesiothermic reaction (Moissan’s process) with the addition of an initial step that gives boron powder with nano-metric grain size. In this paper we report our efforts regarding optimization of the powder-in-tube (PIT) method for these nano-metric powders, and the resolution of problems previously highlighted such as the difficulty in powder packaging and the high friction phenomena occurring during cold working. This increases cracking during the tape and wire manufacture, leading to failure. Packaging problems are related to the amorphous nature of boron synthesized in our laboratory, so a crystallization treatment was applied to improve the crystallinity of the boron. To prevent excessive friction phenomena we synthesized non-stoichiometric MgB2 and used magnesium as lubricant. Our goal is the Jc improvement, but a global physical-chemical characterization was also made to analyse the improvement given by our treatments: this characterization includes x-ray diffraction, ρ(T) measurement, and SEM imaging, besides magnetic and transport Jc measurements.

  9. Temperature measurements of high power LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badalan (Draghici), Niculina; Svasta, Paul; Drumea, Andrei

    2016-12-01

    Measurement of a LED junction temperature is very important in designing a LED lighting system. Depending on the junction temperature we will be able to determine the type of cooling system and the size of the lighting system. There are several indirect methods for junction temperature measurement. The method used in this paper is based on the thermal resistance model. The aim of this study is to identify the best device that would allow measuring the solder point temperature and the temperature on the lens of power LEDs. For this purpose four devices for measuring temperature on a high-power LED are presented and compared according to the acquired measurements: an infrared thermal camera from FLIR Systems, a multimeter with K type thermocouple (Velleman DVM4200), an infrared-spot based noncontact thermometer (Raynger ST) and a measurement system based on a digital temperature sensor (DS1821 type) connected to a PC. The measurements were conducted on an 18W COB (chip-on-board) LED. The measurement points are the supply terminals and the lens of the LED.

  10. CHerenkov detectors In mine PitS (CHIPS) Letter of Intent to FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, P.; Austin, J.; Cao, S. V.; Coelho, J. A. B.; Davies, G. S.; Evans, J. J.; Guzowski, P.; Habig, A.; Holin, A.; Huang, J.; Johnson, R.; St. John, J.; Kreymer, A.; Kordosky, M.; Lang, K.; Marshak, M. L.; Mehdiyev, R.; Meier, J.; Miller, W.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Nichol, R. J.; Patterson, R. B.; Paolone, V.; Pawloski, G.; Perch, A.; Pfutzner, M.; Proga, M.; Qian, X.; Radovic, A.; Sanchez, M. C.; Schreiner, S.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Sousa, A.; Thomas, J.; Vahle, P.; Wendt, C.; Whitehead, L. H.; Wojcicki, S.

    2013-12-30

    This Letter of Intent outlines a proposal to build a large, yet cost-effective, 100 kton fiducial mass water Cherenkov detector that will initially run in the NuMI beam line. The CHIPS detector (CHerenkov detector In Mine PitS) will be deployed in a flooded mine pit, removing the necessity and expense of a substantial external structure capable of supporting a large detector mass. There are a number of mine pits in northern Minnesota along the NuMI beam that could be used to deploy such a detector. In particular, the Wentworth Pit 2W is at the ideal off-axis angle to contribute to the measurement of the CP violating phase. The detector is designed so that it can be moved to a mine pit in the LBNE beam line once that becomes operational.

  11. KINETICS OF PITTING CORROSION IN GELS.

    SciTech Connect

    ISAACS, H.S.; ADZIC, G.

    2000-10-22

    An investigation has been carried out on stainless steel to determine the important parameters that related the changes in pH around pits to the current coming from the pits. Potentiodynamic measurements at 1 mV/s were made on Type 302 stainless steel in agar containing 1M NaCl and a wide range pH indicator. Many pits suddenly appeared at the pitting potential, as indicated by the red, low pH region around the pits. Simulations of the changes in pH were based on diffusion from a point current source. The results also were considered in terms of the effects of a minimum detectable thickness of pH change within the gel.

  12. Nulling Infrared Radiometer for Measuring Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert

    2003-01-01

    A nulling, self-calibrating infrared radiometer is being developed for use in noncontact measurement of temperature in any of a variety of industrial and scientific applications. This instrument is expected to be especially well-suited to measurement of ambient or near-ambient temperature and, even more specifically, for measuring the surface temperature of a natural body of water. Although this radiometer would utilize the long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) portion of the spectrum (wavelengths of 8 to 12 m), its basic principle of operation could also be applied to other spectral bands (corresponding to other temperature ranges) in which the atmosphere is transparent and in which design requirements for sensitivity and temperature-measurement accuracy could be satisfied.

  13. Nonintrusive temperature measurements on advanced turbomachinery components

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, B.W.; Turley, W.D.; Lewis, W.

    1992-12-31

    A nonintrusive, noncontacting method we developed for temperature measurements in hostile environments is well-suited for measurements on advanced turbine components. The method is not only superior to thermocouples in sufficiently difficult environments, but also is the only known method for making measurements in situations where no form of pyrometry works. We demonstrated the method, which uses laser-induced fluorescence of thermographic phosphors bonded to the component surfaces, on turbine blades and vanes in developmental turbine engines. The method is extendable to the much-higher temperatures expected inside advanced turbomachinery. Of particular note is the adaptability of the method to surface-temperature measurements on ceramics operating at high temperatures. In this temperature range, the ceramics become translucent, and surface emissivity becomes meaningless. We shall discuss the method, its advantages and limitations, recent test results on operating turbine engines, and the extension to ceramic components.

  14. Accurate measurement of unsteady state fluid temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaremkiewicz, Magdalena

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, two accurate methods for determining the transient fluid temperature were presented. Measurements were conducted for boiling water since its temperature is known. At the beginning the thermometers are at the ambient temperature and next they are immediately immersed into saturated water. The measurements were carried out with two thermometers of different construction but with the same housing outer diameter equal to 15 mm. One of them is a K-type industrial thermometer widely available commercially. The temperature indicated by the thermometer was corrected considering the thermometers as the first or second order inertia devices. The new design of a thermometer was proposed and also used to measure the temperature of boiling water. Its characteristic feature is a cylinder-shaped housing with the sheath thermocouple located in its center. The temperature of the fluid was determined based on measurements taken in the axis of the solid cylindrical element (housing) using the inverse space marching method. Measurements of the transient temperature of the air flowing through the wind tunnel using the same thermometers were also carried out. The proposed measurement technique provides more accurate results compared with measurements using industrial thermometers in conjunction with simple temperature correction using the inertial thermometer model of the first or second order. By comparing the results, it was demonstrated that the new thermometer allows obtaining the fluid temperature much faster and with higher accuracy in comparison to the industrial thermometer. Accurate measurements of the fast changing fluid temperature are possible due to the low inertia thermometer and fast space marching method applied for solving the inverse heat conduction problem.

  15. [Temperature Measurement with Bluetooth under Android Platform].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Shen, Hao; Luo, Changze

    2015-03-01

    To realize the real-time transmission of temperature data and display using the platform of intelligent mobile phone and bluetooth. Application of Arduino Uno R3 in temperature data acquisition of digital temperature sensor DS18B20 acquisition, through the HC-05 bluetooth transmits the data to the intelligent smart phone Android system, realizes transmission of temperature data. Using Java language to write applications program under Android development environment, can achieve real-time temperature data display, storage and drawing temperature fluctuations drawn graphics. Temperature sensor is experimentally tested to meet the body temperature measurement precision and accuracy. This paper can provide a reference for other smart phone mobile medical product development.

  16. [Body temperature measurement in daily practice].

    PubMed

    Sermet-Gaudelus, I; Chadelat, I; Lenoir, G

    2005-08-01

    The use of rectal mercury thermometer has long been the standard method for measurement of body temperature. The restriction of mercury use since 1996 has led to development of other devices. The liquid crystal strip thermometer held against the forehead has a low sensitivity. The single-use chemical thermometer measures oral temperature. Its accuracy must be evaluated. Infrared ear thermometers are routinely used because it is convenient and fast to use. However, numerous studies have shown that it does not show sufficient correlation with rectal temperature, leading to the risk to miss cases of true fever. Rectal temperature remains the gold standard in case of fever. Rectal temperature measurement with an electronic device is well correlated with the glass mercury standard. Galistan thermometer accuracy must be evaluated because of sterilization of the whole device, which is not the case for the electronic thermometer. A pediatric study is necessary to evaluate the performance of this device in comparison with the electronic thermometer.

  17. Dynamic temperature measurements with embedded optical sensors.

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, Daniel H.,; Seagle, Christopher T; Ao, Tommy

    2013-10-01

    This report summarizes LDRD project number 151365, \\Dynamic Temperature Measurements with Embedded Optical Sensors". The purpose of this project was to develop an optical sensor capable of detecting modest temperature states (<1000 K) with nanosecond time resolution, a recurring diagnostic need in dynamic compression experiments at the Sandia Z machine. Gold sensors were selected because the visible re ectance spectrum of gold varies strongly with temperature. A variety of static and dynamic measurements were performed to assess re ectance changes at di erent temperatures and pressures. Using a minimal optical model for gold, a plausible connection between static calibrations and dynamic measurements was found. With re nements to the model and diagnostic upgrades, embedded gold sensors seem capable of detecting minor (<50 K) temperature changes under dynamic compression.

  18. [Microsite characteristics of pit and mound and their effects on the vegetation regeneration in Pinus koraiensis-dominated broadleaved mixed forest].

    PubMed

    Du, Shan; Duan, Wen-Biao; Wang, Li-Xia; Chen, Li-Xin; Wei, Quan-Shuai; Li, Meng; Wang, Li-dong

    2013-03-01

    Abstract: An investigation was conducted in a 2.55 hm2 plot of Pinus koraiensis-dominated broad-leaved mixed forest to study the microsite characteristics of pit and mound formed by 42 treefalls and the status of vegetation regeneration on the microsites. The soil water content, soil temperature, relative air humidity, and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) on five microsites (mound top, mound face, pit wall, pit bottom, and intact forest floor) were measured. Among the five mirosites, mound top had the highest PAR (527.9 micromol.m-2.s-1 ) while intact forest floor had the lowest one (58.7 micromol.m-2.s-), mound top had the highest soil temperature (16.0 degrees C) but pit bottom had the lowest one (13.3 degrees C), pit bottom had the highest soil water content (34.6%) but mound face had the lowest one (0.5%), and intact forest floor had the highest relative air humidity (75.9%) but mound top had the lowest one (68.0%). The frequency of forming pit/ mound complex by the tree species was decreased in the order of Pinus koraiensis (42. 9%) >Picea asperata (31.0%) > Betula platyphylla (16.7%) > Abies fabri (7. 1%) > Prunus padus (2.4%). Among the 42 treefalls, two-thirds of them were in northwest direction. The treefalls volume had significant positive correlations with pit depth, pit length, mound height, and mound width, but negative correlation with mound thickness. The treefall mean diameter at breast height had significant positive correlations with pit width (r=0.328, P=0.017) and pit length (r=0.527, P= 0). The tree species richness at the microsites decreased in the order of intact forest floor > pit > mound, and the tree species coverage was in the sequence of intact forest floor > pit > mound.

  19. Microwave radiometry for cement kiln temperature measurements.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Karl D; Wang, Lingyun; Ryza, Eric

    2007-01-01

    The maximum temperature inside a cement kiln is a critical operating parameter, but is often difficult or impossible to measure. We present here the first data that show a correlation between cement kiln temperature measured using a microwave radiometer and product chemistry over an eight-hour period. The microwave radiometer senses radiation in the 12-13 GHz range and has been described previously [Stephan and Pearce (2002), JMPEE 37: 112-124].

  20. Wideband filter radiometers for blackbody temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boivin, L. P.; Bamber, C.; Gaertner, A. A.; Gerson, R. K.; Woods, D. J.; Woolliams, E. R.

    2010-10-01

    The use of high-temperature blackbody (HTBB) radiators to realize primary spectral irradiance scales requires that the operating temperature of the HTBB be accurately determined. We have developed five filter radiometers (FRs) to measure the temperature of the National Research Council of Canada's HTBB. The FRs are designed to minimize sensitivity to ambient temperature fluctuations. They incorporate air-spaced colored glass filters and a Si photodiode detector that are housed in a cell whose temperature is controlled to ±0.1°C by means of annular thermoelectric elements at the front and rear of the cell. These wideband filter radiometers operate in four different wavelength bands. The spectral responsivity measurements were performed in an underfill geometry for a power-mode calibration that is traceable to NRC's cryogenic radiometer. The spectral temperature sensitivity of each of these FRs has been measured. The apertures for these FRs were cold-formed by swaging machine-cut apertures onto precision dowel pins. A description of the filter radiometer design, fabrication and testing, together with a detailed uncertainty analysis, is presented. We derive the equations that relate the spectral irradiance measured by the FRs to the spectral radiance and temperature of the HTBB, and deal specifically with the change of index of refraction over the path of the radiation from the interior of the HTBB to the FRs. We believe these equations are more accurate than recently published derivations. Our measurements of the operating temperature of our HTBB working at temperatures near 2500 K, 2700 K and 2900 K, together with measurements using a pyrometer, show agreement between the five filter radiometers and with the pyrometer to within the estimated uncertainties.

  1. Surface aspects of pitting and stress corrosion cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truhan, J. S., Jr.; Hehemann, R. F.

    1977-01-01

    The pitting and stress corrosion cracking of a stable austenitic stainless steel in aqueous chloride environments were investigated using a secondary ion mass spectrometer as the primary experimental technique. The surface concentration of hydrogen, oxygen, the hydroxide, and chloride ion, magnesium or sodium, chromium and nickel were measured as a function of potential in both aqueous sodium chloride and magnesium chloride environments at room temperature and boiling temperatures. It was found that, under anodic conditions, a sharp increase in the chloride concentration was observed to occur for all environmental conditions. The increase may be associated with the formation of an iron chloride complex. Higher localized chloride concentrations at pits and cracks were also detected with an electron microprobe.

  2. MISSE 1 and 2 Tray Temperature Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, Gale A.; Kinard, William H.

    2006-01-01

    The Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE 1 & 2) was deployed August 10,2001 and retrieved July 30,2005. This experiment is a co-operative endeavor by NASA-LaRC. NASA-GRC, NASA-MSFC, NASA-JSC, the Materials Laboratory at the Air Force Research Laboratory, and the Boeing Phantom Works. The objective of the experiment is to evaluate performance, stability, and long term survivability of materials and components planned for use by NASA and DOD on future LEO, synchronous orbit, and interplanetary space missions. Temperature is an important parameter in the evaluation of space environmental effects on materials. The MISSE 1 & 2 had autonomous temperature data loggers to measure the temperature of each of the four experiment trays. The MISSE tray-temperature data loggers have one external thermistor data channel, and a 12 bit digital converter. The MISSE experiment trays were exposed to the ISS space environment for nearly four times the nominal design lifetime for this experiment. Nevertheless, all of the data loggers provided useful temperature measurements of MISSE. The temperature measurement system has been discussed in a previous paper. This paper presents temperature measurements of MISSE payload experiment carriers (PECs) 1 and 2 experiment trays.

  3. Factors influencing habitat selection by arboreal pit vipers.

    PubMed

    Sawant, Nitin S; Jadhav, Trupti D

    2013-01-01

    We studied factors influencing habitat selection by two arboreal species of pit viper, namely Trimeresurus malabaricus (Malabar pit viper) and T. gramineus (Bamboo pit viper). The macrohabitat of these species was classified as forest, forest edge, or open habitat. To determine microhabitat selection, a variety of features at every other snake location were measured. Whether or not the animal was found in a tree, the tree species, its height of perch, position on the branch (distal/ apical/middle), diameter of the branch, the tree canopy (thick/sparse) and vegetation of the area (thick/sparse) were recorded. Assessment of habitat was done to determine how patterns of habitat use vary seasonally. Shaded ambient (air) temperatures and humidity were recorded. Data pertaining to 90 individuals of T. malabaricus and 100 individuals of T. gramineus were recorded. Trimeresurus malabaricus selected home ranges that included areas with thick vegetation and were encountered at regions of higher altitude. Neither of the species was found in open habitats. Both of the species preferred diverse habitats and were spread over the entire available space during the monsoon; they did not show any preference for the perch height during different seasons. Males had a positive correlation between body mass and preferred perch diameter. The present study suggests that several factors play an important role in habitat selection by these arboreal pit vipers, thus making them highly habitat-specific.

  4. Bionic research of pit vipers on infrared imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhigang; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Qingchuan; Cheng, Teng; Wu, Xiaoping

    2015-07-27

    The members of viperidae crotalinae (pit viper) family have special pit organs to detect infrared radiation in normal room conditions, whereas most artificial uncooled infrared focal plane arrays (FPAs) operate only in a vacuum chamber. Dissection shows that the pit membrane is a unique substrate-free structure. The temperature rise advantage of this pit organ was verified in comparison with an assumed substrate pit organ (as an artificial FPA structure). Inspired by the pit viper, we introduced this structure to infrared FPA, replacing the conventional substrate FPA. The substrate-free FPA was fabricated by micro-elctromechanical systems (MEMS) process and placed into an infrared imaging system to obtain thermal images of the human body in atmosphere and vacuum working conditions. We show that the infrared capability of the substrate-free pit organ was achieved.

  5. Pitted terrains on Vesta: Thermophysical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capria, M.; Tosi, F.; De Sanctis, M.; Turrini, D.; Ammannito, E.; Capaccioni, F.; Fonte, S.; Frigeri, A.; Longobardo, A.; Palomba, E.; Zambon, F.; Schroeder, S.; Denevi, B.; Williams, D.; Scully, J.; Russell, C.; Raymond, C.

    2014-07-01

    Launched in 2007, the Dawn spacecraft, after one year spent orbiting Vesta, is now on its way to Ceres. In the science payload, the Visible and Infrared mapping spectrometer (VIR) is devoted to the study of the mineralogical composition and thermophysical properties of Vesta's surface [1]. Disk-resolved surface temperatures of Vesta have been determined from the infrared spectra measured by VIR [2]. The observed temperatures, together with a thermophysical model, have been used to constrain the thermal properties of a large part of the surface of the asteroid [3]. The average thermal inertia of the surface is quite low, consistent with a widespread presence of a dust layer. While the global thermal inertia is low, the characterization of its surface in terms of regions showing peculiar thermophysical properties gives us the possibility to identify specific areas with different thermal and structural characteristics. These variations can be linked to strong albedo variations that have been observed, or to other physical and structural characteristics of the first few centimeters of the soil. The highest values of thermal inertia have been determined on areas coinciding with locations where pitted terrains have been found [4]. Pitted terrains, first identified on Mars, have been found in association with 4 craters on Vesta: Marcia, Cornelia, Licinia, and Numisia. The Marcia area is characterized by high hydrogen and OH content [5]. By analogy with Mars, the formation of these terrains is thought to be due to the rapid release of volatiles, triggered by heating from an impact event. A question arises on the origin of volatiles: hydrated minerals, or ground, buried ice? In order to discuss the second hypothesis, we have to assume that a comet impact delivers ice that gets buried under a layer of regolith. Successively, another impact on the same area would give origin to the pitted terrain. The buried ice has obviously to survive for the time between the two impacts

  6. Whistle Gauge Measures Flow And Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shakkottai, Parthasarathy; Kwack, Eug Y.

    1989-01-01

    Simple, rugged gauge used to measure speed of flow and temperature of steam or other gas flowing through pipes of arbitrary diameter, from 1 to 28 in. or larger. Specially designed, instrumented whistle - has no moving parts, small, nonobstruction, operates at high temperature and pressure, and cleans itself. Does not operate at zero flow, but at moderate flows (tens of meters per second) generates intense sound for use in measurements. Consists of slanted ring groove of depth D and pressure taps in wall of pipe carrying flow to be measured. Resonant wavelength of sound generated by ring groove depends primarily on size and shape of groove and approximately equal to 4D.

  7. Assessment of body temperature measurement options.

    PubMed

    Sund-Levander, Märtha; Grodzinsky, Ewa

    Assessment of body temperature is important for decisions in nursing care, medical diagnosis, treatment and the need of laboratory tests. The definition of normal body temperature as 37°C was established in the middle of the 19th century. Since then the technical design and the accuracy of thermometers has been much improved. Knowledge of physical influence on the individual body temperature, such as thermoregulation and hormones, are still not taken into consideration in body temperature assessment. It is time for a change; the unadjusted mode should be used, without adjusting to another site and the same site of measurement should be used as far as possible. Peripheral sites, such as the axillary and the forehead site, are not recommended as an assessment of core body temperature in adults. Frail elderly individuals might have a low normal body temperature and therefore be at risk of being assessed as non-febrile. As the ear site is close to the hypothalamus and quickly responds to changes in the set point temperature, it is a preferable and recommendable site for measurement of body temperature.

  8. Turbine gas temperature measurement and control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, W. L.

    1973-01-01

    A fluidic Turbine Inlet Gas Temperature (TIGIT) Measurement and Control System was developed for use on a Pratt and Whitney Aircraft J58 engine. Based on engine operating requirements, criteria for high temperature materials selection, system design, and system performance were established. To minimize development and operational risk, the TIGT control system was designed to interface with an existing Exhaust Gas Temperature (EGT) Trim System and thereby modulate steady-state fuel flow to maintain a desired TIGT level. Extensive component and system testing was conducted including heated (2300F) vibration tests for the fluidic sensor and gas sampling probe, temperature and vibration tests on the system electronics, burner rig testing of the TIGT measurement system, and in excess of 100 hours of system testing on a J58 engine. (Modified author abstract)

  9. Laser weld penetration estimation using temperature measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Lankalapalli, K.N.; Tu, J.F.; Leong, K.H.; Gartner, M.

    1997-10-01

    Penetration depth is an important factor critical to the quality of a laser weld. This paper examines the feasibility of using temperature measurements on the bottom surface of the work-piece to estimate weld penetration. A three-dimensional analytical model relating penetration depth, weld bead width and welding speed to temperature distribution at the bottom surface of the workpiece is developed. Temperatures on the bottom surface of the workpiece are measured using infrared thermocouples located behind the laser beam. Experimental results from bead-on-plate welds on low carbon steel plates of varying thickness at different levels of laser power and speeds validate the model and show that the temperature on the bottom surface is a sensitive indicator of penetration depth. The proposed model is computationally efficient and is suitable for on-line process monitoring application.

  10. Apparatus and method for high temperature viscosity and temperature measurements

    DOEpatents

    Balasubramaniam, Krishnan; Shah, Vimal; Costley, R. Daniel; Singh, Jagdish P.

    2001-01-01

    A probe for measuring the viscosity and/or temperature of high temperature liquids, such as molten metals, glass and similar materials comprises a rod which is an acoustical waveguide through which a transducer emits an ultrasonic signal through one end of the probe, and which is reflected from (a) a notch or slit or an interface between two materials of the probe and (b) from the other end of the probe which is in contact with the hot liquid or hot melt, and is detected by the same transducer at the signal emission end. To avoid the harmful effects of introducing a thermally conductive heat sink into the melt, the probe is made of relatively thermally insulative (non-heat-conductive) refractory material. The time between signal emission and reflection, and the amplitude of reflections, are compared against calibration curves to obtain temperature and viscosity values.

  11. Dual neutron flux/temperature measurement sensor

    DOEpatents

    Mihalczo, John T.; Simpson, Marc L.; McElhaney, Stephanie A.

    1994-01-01

    Simultaneous measurement of neutron flux and temperature is provided by a single sensor which includes a phosphor mixture having two principal constituents. The first constituent is a neutron sensitive 6LiF and the second is a rare-earth activated Y203 thermophosphor. The mixture is coated on the end of a fiber optic, while the opposite end of the fiber optic is coupled to a light detector. The detected light scintillations are quantified for neutron flux determination, and the decay is measured for temperature determination.

  12. Two-temperature method for measuring emissivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watson, K.

    1992-01-01

    Spectral emissivity can be uniquely determined from radiance measurements if the object can be observed at two different temperatures. The advantage of this approach is that the spectral emissivity is determined without a priori assumptions about spectral shape. Because the different temperatures are obtained by observing the scene at two times in the diurnal cycle (optimally after midday and midnight), the method assumes that emissivity is temporally invariant. This is valid for rocks and dry soils, not well established for vegetation, and not true when changes in soil moisture occur between the measurements. Accurate image registration and satisfactory signal:noise are critical factors that limit extensive use of this method. ?? 1992.

  13. A Method of Measuring Piston Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinkel, Benjamin; Mangniello, Eugene J

    1940-01-01

    A method that makes use of thermocouples has been developed to measure the temperature of engine pistons operating at high speeds. The thermocouples installed on the moving piston are connected with a potentiometer outside the engine by means of pneumatically operated plungers, which make contact with the piston thermocouples for about 10 crankshaft degrees at the bottom of the piston stroke. The equipment is operated satisfactory at engine speeds of 2,400 r.p.m. and shows promise of successful operation at higher engine speeds. Measurements of piston temperatures in a liquid-cooled compression-ignition engine and in an air-cooled spark-ignition are presented.

  14. Ion temperature measurements in the Maryland Spheromak

    SciTech Connect

    Gauvreau, J.L.

    1992-12-31

    Initial spectroscopic data from MS showed evidence of ion heating as deduced from the line widths of different ion species. Detailed measurements of OIV spectral emission line profiles in space and time revealed that heating takes place at early time, before spheromak formation and is occurring within the current discharge. The measured ion temperature is several times the electron temperature and cannot be explained by classical (Spitzer) resistivity. Classically, ions are expected to have lower temperatures than the electrons and therefore, lower temperatures than observed. High ion temperatures have been observed in different RFP`s and Spheromaks but are usually associated with relaxation to the Taylor state and occur in the sustainment phase. During formation, the current delivered to start the discharge is not axisymmetric and as a consequence, X-points appear in the magnetic flux. A two dimensional analysis predicts that magnetic reconnection occurring at an X-point can give rise to high ion heating rates. A simple 0-dimensional calculation showed that within the first 20 {mu}s, a conversion of mass flow kinetic energy into ion temperature could take place due to viscosity.

  15. Neutral thermospheric temperature from ion concentration measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breig, E. L.; Donaldson, J. S.; Hanson, W. B.; Hoffman, J. H.; Power, R. A.; Kayser, D. C.; Spencer, N. W.; Wharton, L. E.

    1981-01-01

    A technique for extracting information on neutral temperature from in situ F region measurements of O(+) and H(+) ion concentrations is analyzed and evaluated. Advantage is taken of the condition of charge-exchange equilibrium of these species in the neighborhood of 320 km to infer the associated relative abundances of neutral oxygen and hydrogen. Results are shown to be generally consistent with other concurrent in situ measurements.

  16. Dynamic gas temperature measurement system, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmore, D. L.; Robinson, W. W.; Watkins, W. B.

    1983-01-01

    A gas temperature measurement system with compensated frequency response of 1 kHz and capability to operate in the exhaust of a gas turbine engine combustor was developed. A review of available technologies which could attain this objective was done. The most promising method was identified as a two wire thermocouple, with a compensation method based on the responses of the two different diameter thermocouples to the fluctuating gas temperature field. In a detailed design of the probe, transient conduction effects were identified as significant. A compensation scheme was derived to include the effects of gas convection and wire conduction. The two wire thermocouple concept was tested in a laboratory burner exhaust to temperatures of about 3000 F and in a gas turbine engine to combustor exhaust temperatures of about 2400 F. Uncompensated and compensated waveforms and compensation spectra are presented.

  17. Global trends of measured surface air temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, James; Lebedeff, Sergej

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents the results of surface air temperature measurements from available meteorological stations for the period of 1880-1985. It is shown that the network of meteorological stations is sufficient to yield reliable long-term, decadal, and interannual temperature changes for both the Northern Hemisphere and the Southern Hemisphere, despite the fact that most stations are located on the continents. The results indicate a global warming of about 0.5-0.7 C in the past century, with warming of similar magnitude in both hemispheres. A strong warming trend between 1965 and 1980 raised the global mean temperature in 1980 and 1981 to the highest level in the period of instrumental records. Selected graphs of the temperature change in each of the eight latitude zones are included.

  18. Core temperature measurement: methods and current insights.

    PubMed

    Moran, Daniel S; Mendal, Liran

    2002-01-01

    Climatic injuries, including hypothermia, hyperthermia and heat stroke, are common in many sports activities. Body core temperature (T(c)) measurement for the sportsperson can influence individual performance and may help to prevent injuries. Monitoring internal body T(c) accurately requires invasive methods of measurement. The mercury thermometer, most commonly used to measure oral temperature (T(oral)), has been almost exclusively the only instrument for measuring T(c) since the 18th century. Rectal (T(re)) and oesophageal temperatures (T(oes)) have been the most preferred measurement sites employed in thermoregulatory investigations. However, these measurement sites (T(re), T(oes), T(oral)), and the methods used to measure T(c) at these sites, are not convenient. T(oral) measurements are not always possible or accurate. T(oes) is undesirable because of the difficulty of inserting the thermistor, irritation to nasal passages and general subject discomfort. T(re) is not suitable under many circumstances as it is labour intensive and has a prolonged response time. However, T(re) remains the most accurately available method for monitoring T(c) in thermal illness that occurs during sports activities. In addition, T(re) and T(oes) require wire connections between the thermistor and the monitoring device. The purpose of this paper is to review the various existing methods of T(c) measurements in order to focus on the breakthrough needed for a simple, noninvasive, universally used device for T(c) measurement which is essential for preventing climatic injuries during sports events.

  19. Measuring electron temperature in the extended corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassler, Donald M.; Gardner, L. D.; Kohl, John L.

    1992-01-01

    A technique for measuring electron temperature in the extended corona from the line profile of the electron scattered component of coronal H I Ly alpha produced by Thomson scattering of chromospheric Ly alpha emission is discussed. Because of the high thermal velocity of electrons at coronal temperatures (approximately 6800 km/s at T(sub e) = 1,500,000 K) the effect of nonthermal velocities and solar wind flows on the electron velocity distribution are negligible. However, the low electron mass which is responsible for the high thermal velocity also results in a very wide profile (approximately equal to 50 A). This wide profile, together with an intensity that is three orders of magnitude weaker than the resonantly scattered component of Ly alpha makes the direct measurement of T(sub e) a challenging observational problem. An evaluation of this technique based on simulated measurements is presented and the subsequent instrumental requirements necessary to make a meaningful determination of the electron temperature are discussed. Estimates of uncertainties in the measured electron temperature are related to critical instrument parameters such as grating stray light suppression.

  20. Temperature measurements of shocked silica aerogel foam

    DOE PAGES

    Falk, K.; McCoy, C. A.; Fryer, C. L.; ...

    2014-09-12

    We present recent results of equation-of-state (EOS) measurements of shocked silica (SiO2) aerogel foam at the OMEGA laser facility. Silica aerogel is an important low-density pressure standard used in many high energy density experiments, including the novel technique of shock and release. Due to its many applications, it has been a heavily studied material and has a well-known Hugoniot curve. This work then complements the velocity and pressure measurements with additional temperature data providing the full EOS information within the warm dense matter regime for the temperature interval of 1–15 eV and shock velocities between 10 and 40 km/s correspondingmore » to shock pressures of 0.3–2 Mbar. The experimental results were compared with hydrodynamic simulations and EOS models. We found that the measured temperature was systematically lower than suggested by theoretical calculations. As a result, simulations provide a possible explanation that the emission measured by optical pyrometry comes from a radiative precursor rather than from the shock front, which could have important implications for such measurements.« less

  1. Temperature measurements of shocked silica aerogel foam

    SciTech Connect

    Falk, K.; McCoy, C. A.; Fryer, C. L.; Greeff, C. W.; Hungerford, A. L.; Montgomery, D. S.; Schmidt, D. W.; Sheppard, D. G.; Williams, J. R.; Boehly, T. R.; Benage, J. F.

    2014-09-12

    We present recent results of equation-of-state (EOS) measurements of shocked silica (SiO2) aerogel foam at the OMEGA laser facility. Silica aerogel is an important low-density pressure standard used in many high energy density experiments, including the novel technique of shock and release. Due to its many applications, it has been a heavily studied material and has a well-known Hugoniot curve. This work then complements the velocity and pressure measurements with additional temperature data providing the full EOS information within the warm dense matter regime for the temperature interval of 1–15 eV and shock velocities between 10 and 40 km/s corresponding to shock pressures of 0.3–2 Mbar. The experimental results were compared with hydrodynamic simulations and EOS models. We found that the measured temperature was systematically lower than suggested by theoretical calculations. As a result, simulations provide a possible explanation that the emission measured by optical pyrometry comes from a radiative precursor rather than from the shock front, which could have important implications for such measurements.

  2. Temperature measurements of shocked silica aerogel foam.

    PubMed

    Falk, K; McCoy, C A; Fryer, C L; Greeff, C W; Hungerford, A L; Montgomery, D S; Schmidt, D W; Sheppard, D G; Williams, J R; Boehly, T R; Benage, J F

    2014-09-01

    We present recent results of equation-of-state (EOS) measurements of shocked silica (SiO_{2}) aerogel foam at the OMEGA laser facility. Silica aerogel is an important low-density pressure standard used in many high energy density experiments, including the novel technique of shock and release. Due to its many applications, it has been a heavily studied material and has a well-known Hugoniot curve. This work then complements the velocity and pressure measurements with additional temperature data providing the full EOS information within the warm dense matter regime for the temperature interval of 1-15 eV and shock velocities between 10 and 40 km/s corresponding to shock pressures of 0.3-2 Mbar. The experimental results were compared with hydrodynamic simulations and EOS models. We found that the measured temperature was systematically lower than suggested by theoretical calculations. Simulations provide a possible explanation that the emission measured by optical pyrometry comes from a radiative precursor rather than from the shock front, which could have important implications for such measurements.

  3. Noncontact infrared temperature measurement using machine vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Fei; Shi, Tielin; He, Tao; Zhong, Yuning

    2006-11-01

    Temperature monitoring is a common requirement; the thermocouples can accurately control the temperature of rotating and moving heated object, without touching it. Uncoated metal heaters are difficult for infrared sensors to measure reliably, the reflected infrared signals can change after a heated object surface is clean, the smog is rareness after the clean heated object has been burnt, when the surface is dirty and smeary, the smog is so dense that the measurement result would be influenced. In order to measuring the metal heater accurately, the measurement noise can be reduced by the machine vision. The Self-Organizing Maps (SOM) is an efficient tool for image processing. It projects input space on prototypes of a low-dimensional regular grid. In this paper a new image process technique has been validated against U-matrix method based on Euclidean distances between input vectors and neurons weights combined with the distribution of the fixed lattices in the network. SOM, as an unsupervised neural networks, is applied to pattern recognition and image processing. By analyzing and processing of the noise signals of the image, the characteristic parameters which represent operating state of the heated object are extracted to construct characteristic vector and used to train SOM. The trained results can be used to modify the sensor testing value. A new image processing scheme based on the use of the organization property of Kohonen maps are presented in this paper, the image processing result can be correct the non-contact infrared temperature measurement.

  4. Variable-Temperature Critical-Current Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    L. F. Goodrich; T. C. Stauffer

    2009-05-19

    This is the final report of a three year contract that covered 09/19/2005 to 07/14/2008. We requested and received a no cost time extension for the third year, 07/15/2007 to 07/14/2008, to allow DoE to send us funds if they became available during that year. It turned out that we did not receive any funding for the third year. The following paper covers our variable-temperature critical-current measurements. We made transport critical-current (Ic) measurements on commercial multifilamentary Nb3Sn strands at temperatures (T) from 4 to 17 K and magnetic fields (H) from 0 to 14 T. One of the unique features of our measurements is that we can cover a wide range of critical currents from less than 0.1 A to over 700 A.

  5. Lava Tube Collapse Pits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    We will be looking at collapse pits for the next two weeks. Collapse pits on Mars are formed in several ways. In volcanic areas, channelized lava flows can form roofs which insulate the flowing lava. These features are termed lava tubes on Earth and are common features in basaltic flows. After the lava has drained, parts of the roof of the tube will collapse under its own weight. These collapse pits will only be as deep as the bottom of the original lava tube. Another type of collapse feature associated with volcanic areas arises when very large eruptions completely evacuate the magma chamber beneath the volcano. The weight of the volcano will cause the entire edifice to subside into the void space below it. Structural features including fractures and graben will form during the subsidence. Many times collapse pits will form within the graben. In addition to volcanic collapse pits, Mars has many collapse pits formed when volatiles (such as subsurface ice) are released from the surface layers. As the volatiles leave, the weight of the surrounding rock causes collapse pits to form.

    These collapse pits are found in the southern hemisphere of Mars. They are likely lava tube collapse pits related to flows from Hadriaca Patera.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -36.8, Longitude 89.6 East (270.4 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space

  6. Ascraeus Mons Collapse Pits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    We will be looking at collapse pits for the next two weeks. Collapse pits on Mars are formed in several ways. In volcanic areas, channelized lava flows can form roofs which insulate the flowing lava. These features are termed lava tubes on Earth and are common features in basaltic flows. After the lava has drained, parts of the roof of the tube will collapse under its own weight. These collapse pits will only be as deep as the bottom of the original lava tube. Another type of collapse feature associated with volcanic areas arises when very large eruptions completely evacuate the magma chamber beneath the volcano. The weight of the volcano will cause the entire edifice to subside into the void space below it. Structural features including fractures and graben will form during the subsidence. Many times collapse pits will form within the graben. In addition to volcanic collapse pits, Mars has many collapse pits formed when volatiles (such as subsurface ice) are released from the surface layers. As the volatiles leave, the weight of the surrounding rock causes collapse pits to form.

    These collapse pits are found on the flank of Ascraeus Mons. The pits and channels are all related to lava tube formation and emptying.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude 8, Longitude 253.9 East (106.1 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science

  7. Temperature measurement on and inside lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallin, Bo

    1994-03-01

    The use of thermography within the lamp manufacturing industry can improve the quality of many types of lamps ranging from normal incandescent lamps to highly specialized lamps for sports arenas, airports or small lamps for cars. There is a strong demand for more light for the same energy input. Specialized lamps for all possible purposes are developed. But it also forces the lamp manufacturers to utilize the available materials to their extremes. The exact control of the temperatures inside or on the lamp shell has therefore become increasingly necessary as temperatures in lamps can be rather extreme. In plasma lamps for example, the plasma can have a temperature of 6000 C, the bulb around 700 C and the electrodes inside the bulb can have temperatures in excess of 2000 C. Thermographic methods have shown their applicability for a large number of measurement cases. Some of these methods and measurement cases are described. As these applications put very special demands on the measurement equipment, these demands are explained in more detail.

  8. High temperature measurement of water vapor absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keefer, Dennis; Lewis, J. W. L.; Eskridge, Richard

    1985-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to measure the absorption coefficient, at a wavelength of 10.6 microns, for mixtures of water vapor and a diluent gas at high temperature and pressure. The experimental concept was to create the desired conditions of temperature and pressure in a laser absorption wave, similar to that which would be created in a laser propulsion system. A simplified numerical model was developed to predict the characteristics of the absorption wave and to estimate the laser intensity threshold for initiation. A non-intrusive method for temperature measurement utilizing optical laser-beam deflection (OLD) and optical spark breakdown produced by an excimer laser, was thoroughly investigated and found suitable for the non-equilibrium conditions expected in the wave. Experiments were performed to verify the temperature measurement technique, to screen possible materials for surface initiation of the laser absorption wave and to attempt to initiate an absorption wave using the 1.5 kW carbon dioxide laser. The OLD technique was proven for air and for argon, but spark breakdown could not be produced in helium. It was not possible to initiate a laser absorption wave in mixtures of water and helium or water and argon using the 1.5 kW laser, a result which was consistent with the model prediction.

  9. Measuring Thermal Conductivity at LH2 Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selvidge, Shawn; Watwood, Michael C.

    2004-01-01

    For many years, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) produced reference materials for materials testing. One such reference material was intended for use with a guarded hot plate apparatus designed to meet the requirements of ASTM C177-97, "Standard Test Method for Steady-State Heat Flux Measurements and Thermal Transmission Properties by Means of the Guarded-Hot-Plate Apparatus." This apparatus can be used to test materials in various gaseous environments from atmospheric pressure to a vacuum. It allows the thermal transmission properties of insulating materials to be measured from just above ambient temperature down to temperatures below liquid hydrogen. However, NIST did not generate data below 77 K temperature for the reference material in question. This paper describes a test method used at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to optimize thermal conductivity measurements during the development of thermal protection systems. The test method extends the usability range of this reference material by generating data at temperatures lower than 77 K. Information provided by this test is discussed, as are the capabilities of the MSFC Hydrogen Test Facility, where advanced methods for materials testing are routinely developed and optimized in support of aerospace applications.

  10. Time-resolved Temperature Measurements in SSPX

    SciTech Connect

    Ludington, A R; Hill, D N; McLean, H S; Moller, J; Wood, R D

    2006-08-14

    We seek to measure time-resolved electron temperatures in the SSPX plasma using soft X-rays from free-free Bremsstrahlung radiation. To increase sensitivity to changes in temperature over the range 100-300 eV, we use two photodiode detectors sensitive to different soft X-ray energies. The detectors, one with a Zr/C coating and the other with a Ti/Pd coating, view the plasma along a common line of sight tangential to the magnetic axis of the spheromak, where the electron temperature is a maximum. The comparison of the signals, over a similar volume of plasma, should be a stronger function of temperature than a single detector in the range of Te< 300 eV. The success of using photodiodes to detect changing temperatures along a chord will make the case for designing an array of the detectors, which could provide a time changing temperature profile over a larger portion of the plasma.

  11. Permeameter for high-temperature magnetic measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barranger, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    A permeameter is described that measures the magnetizing force and the corresponding magnetic induction up to 1000 C. The two symmetrical yokes are made of an alloy of 9 percent iron, 91 percent cobalt. A coil surrounding the specimen supplies a magnetizing force of up to 100 oersteds. The instrument uses the magnetic potentiometer principle to cancel the effects of the reluctance of the yoke and the joint gaps. Very close agreement was obtained at room temperature when compared to an MH type permeameter. The effect of temperature on the normal induction curves for the yoke material is also presented.

  12. Microwave radiometer for subsurface temperature measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, R. A.; Bechis, K. P.

    1976-01-01

    A UHF radiometer, operating at a frequency of 800 MHz, was modified to provide an integral, three frequency voltage standing wave ratio (VSWR) circuit in the radio frequency (RF) head. The VSWR circuit provides readings of power transmission at the antenna-material interface with an accuracy of plus or minus 5 percent. The power transmission readings are numerically equal to the emissivity of the material under observation. Knowledge of material emissivity is useful in the interpretation of subsurface apparent temperatures obtained on phantom models of biological tissue. The emissivities of phantom models consisting of lean beefsteak were found to lie in the range 0.623 to 0.779, depending on moisture content. Radiometric measurements performed on instrumented phantoms showed that the radiometer was capable of sensing small temperature changes occurring at depths of at least 19 to 30 mm. This is consistent with previously generated data which showed that the radiometer could sense temperatures at a depth of 38 mm.

  13. Thermoluminescence measurement technique using millisecond temperature pulses.

    PubMed

    Manfred, Michael E; Gabriel, Nicholas T; Yukihara, Eduardo G; Talghader, Joseph J

    2010-06-01

    A measurement technique, pulsed thermoluminescence, is described which uses short thermal pulses to excite trapped carriers leading to radiative recombination. The pulses are obtained using microstructures with approximately 500 micros thermal time constants. The technique has many of the advantages of pulsed optically stimulated luminescence without the need for optical sources and filters to isolate the luminescent signal. Charge carrier traps in alpha-Al(2)O(3):C particles on microheaters were filled using 205 nm light. Temperature pulses of 10 and 50 ms were applied to the heaters and compared with a standard thermoluminescence curve taken at a ramp rate of 5 K s(-1). This produced curves of intensity verses temperature similar to standard thermoluminescence except shifted to higher temperatures. The luminescence of single particles was read multiple times with negligible loss of population. The lower limit of the duration of useful pulses appears to be limited by particle size and thermal contact between the particle and heater.

  14. A new technique for measuring ionospheric temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, William Edward

    The lower ionosphere is a region of immense electrical energy inflow from space, yet to date there are no direct (in-situ) measurements of the consequent Joule (frictional) heating, partly because of the lack of appropriate instrumentation. This thesis presents a new technique for measuring ion temperature from a sub-orbital sounding rocket using a new type of ion detector, the suprathermal ion imager (SII). Simulations of the SII instrument show that 2-dimensional count-rate distributions binned according to detector azimuth are sensitive to the ratio of ram speed to thermal speed, or Mach number. Analysis of data from the JOULE-II rocket mission show a significant increase in thermal speed at the peak of the Joule heating region as expected, and even higher but unexplained temperatures at lower altitudes.

  15. Wireless sensor for temperature and humidity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drumea, Andrei; Svasta, Paul

    2010-11-01

    Temperature and humidity sensors have a broad range of applications, from heating and ventilation of houses to controlled drying of fruits, vegetables or meat in food industry. Modern sensors are integrated devices, usually MEMS, factory-calibrated and with digital output of measured parameters. They can have power down modes for reduced energy consumption. Such an integrated device allows the implementation of a battery powered wireless sensor when coupled with a low power microcontroller and a radio subsystem. A radio sensor can work independently or together with others in a radio network. Presented paper focuses mainly on measurement and construction aspects of sensors for temperature and humidity designed and implemented by authors; network aspects (communication between two or more sensors) are not analyzed.

  16. Alba Patera Collapse Pits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    We will be looking at collapse pits for the next two weeks. Collapse pits on Mars are formed in several ways. In volcanic areas, channelized lava flows can form roofs which insulate the flowing lava. These features are termed lava tubes on Earth and are common features in basaltic flows. After the lava has drained, parts of the roof of the tube will collapse under its own weight. These collapse pits will only be as deep as the bottom of the original lava tube. Another type of collapse feature associated with volcanic areas arises when very large eruptions completely evacuate the magma chamber beneath the volcano. The weight of the volcano will cause the entire edifice to subside into the void space below it. Structural features including fractures and graben will form during the subsidence. Many times collapse pits will form within the graben. In addition to volcanic collapse pits, Mars has many collapse pits formed when volatiles (such as subsurface ice) are released from the surface layers. As the volatiles leave, the weight of the surrounding rock causes collapse pits to form.

    These collapse pits are found within graben surrounding Alba Patera. Alba Patera is an old volcano that has subsided after it's magma chamber was evacuated.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 43.1, Longitude 259.4 East (100.6 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA

  17. Tractus Catena Collapse Pits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    We will be looking at collapse pits for the next two weeks. Collapse pits on Mars are formed in several ways. In volcanic areas, channelized lava flows can form roofs which insulate the flowing lava. These features are termed lava tubes on Earth and are common features in basaltic flows. After the lava has drained, parts of the roof of the tube will collapse under its own weight. These collapse pits will only be as deep as the bottom of the original lava tube. Another type of collapse feature associated with volcanic areas arises when very large eruptions completely evacuate the magma chamber beneath the volcano. The weight of the volcano will cause the entire edifice to subside into the void space below it. Structural features including fractures and graben will form during the subsidence. Many times collapse pits will form within the graben. In addition to volcanic collapse pits, Mars has many collapse pits formed when volatiles (such as subsurface ice) are released from the surface layers. As the volatiles leave, the weight of the surrounding rock causes collapse pits to form.

    These collapse pits are found in graben located in Tractus Catena. These features are related to subsidence after magma chamber evacuation of Alba Patera.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 35.8, Longitude 241.7 East (118.3 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA

  18. Tharsis Collapse Pits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    We will be looking at collapse pits for the next two weeks. Collapse pits on Mars are formed in several ways. In volcanic areas, channelized lava flows can form roofs which insulate the flowing lava. These features are termed lava tubes on Earth and are common features in basaltic flows. After the lava has drained, parts of the roof of the tube will collapse under its own weight. These collapse pits will only be as deep as the bottom of the original lava tube. Another type of collapse feature associated with volcanic areas arises when very large eruptions completely evacuate the magma chamber beneath the volcano. The weight of the volcano will cause the entire edifice to subside into the void space below it. Structural features including fractures and graben will form during the subsidence. Many times collapse pits will form within the graben. In addition to volcanic collapse pits, Mars has many collapse pits formed when volatiles (such as subsurface ice) are released from the surface layers. As the volatiles leave, the weight of the surrounding rock causes collapse pits to form.

    These collapse pits are found within the extensive lava flows of the Tharsis region. They are related to lava tubes, likely coming from Ascraeus Mons.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 22.8, Longitude 266.8 East (93.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office

  19. Alba Patera Collapse Pits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    We will be looking at collapse pits for the next two weeks. Collapse pits on Mars are formed in several ways. In volcanic areas, channelized lava flows can form roofs which insulate the flowing lava. These features are termed lava tubes on Earth and are common features in basaltic flows. After the lava has drained, parts of the roof of the tube will collapse under its own weight. These collapse pits will only be as deep as the bottom of the original lava tube. Another type of collapse feature associated with volcanic areas arises when very large eruptions completely evacuate the magma chamber beneath the volcano. The weight of the volcano will cause the entire edifice to subside into the void space below it. Structural features including fractures and graben will form during the subsidence. Many times collapse pits will form within the graben. In addition to volcanic collapse pits, Mars has many collapse pits formed when volatiles (such as subsurface ice) are released from the surface layers. As the volatiles leave, the weight of the surrounding rock causes collapse pits to form.

    This image of the Alba Patera region has both lava tube collapse pits (running generally east/west) and subsidence related collapse within structural grabens.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude 26.9, Longitude 256.5 East (103.5 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA

  20. Sulci Collapse Pits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    We will be looking at collapse pits for the next two weeks. Collapse pits on Mars are formed in several ways. In volcanic areas, channelized lava flows can form roofs which insulate the flowing lava. These features are termed lava tubes on Earth and are common features in basaltic flows. After the lava has drained, parts of the roof of the tube will collapse under its own weight. These collapse pits will only be as deep as the bottom of the original lava tube. Another type of collapse feature associated with volcanic areas arises when very large eruptions completely evacuate the magma chamber beneath the volcano. The weight of the volcano will cause the entire edifice to subside into the void space below it. Structural features including fractures and graben will form during the subsidence. Many times collapse pits will form within the graben. In addition to volcanic collapse pits, Mars has many collapse pits formed when volatiles (such as subsurface ice) are released from the surface layers. As the volatiles leave, the weight of the surrounding rock causes collapse pits to form.

    This is the Noctis Labyrinthus region of Mars. These collapse pits are forming along structural fractures that are allowing the release of volatiles from the subsurface. This is believed to be the way that chaos terrain forms on Mars. This area represents the early stage of chaos formation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -12.6, Longitude 264 East (96 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in

  1. Improved Refractometer for Measuring Temperatures of Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naqwi, Amir A.

    2004-01-01

    The Dual Rainbow refractometer is an enhanced version of the Rainbow refractometer, which is added to, and extends the capabilities of, a phase Doppler particle analyzer (PDPA). A PDPA utilizes pairs of laser beams to measure individual components of velocity and sizes of drops in a spray. The Rainbow-refractometer addition measures the temperatures of individual drops. The designs of prior versions of the Rainbow refractometer have required substantial modifications of PDPA transmitting optics, plus dedicated lasers as sources of illumination separate from, and in addition to, those needed for PDPA measurements. The enhancement embodied in the Dual Rainbow refractometer eliminates the need for a dedicated laser and confers other advantages as described below. A dedicated laser is no longer needed because the Dual Rainbow refractometer utilizes one of the pairs of laser beams already present in a PDPA. Hence, the design of the Dual Rainbow refractometer simplifies the task of upgrading PDPA hardware to enable measurement of temperature. Furthermore, in a PDPA/Dual Rainbow refractometer system, a single argon-ion laser with three main wavelengths can be used to measure the temperatures, sizes, and all three components of velocity (in contradistinction to only two components of velocity in a prior PDPA/Rainbow refractometer system). In order to enable the Dual Rainbow refractometer to utilize a pair of PDPA laser beams, it was necessary to (1) find a location for the refractometer receiver, such that the combined rainbow patterns of two laser beams amount to a pattern identical to that of a single beam, (2) adjust the polarization of the two beams to obtain the strongest rainbow pattern, and (3) find a location for the PDPA receiver to obtain a linear relationship between the measured phase shift and drop size.

  2. Thermoreflectance temperature measurement with millimeter wave.

    PubMed

    Pradere, C; Caumes, J-P; BenKhemis, S; Pernot, G; Palomo, E; Dilhaire, S; Batsale, J-C

    2014-06-01

    GigaHertz (GHz) thermoreflectance technique is developed to measure the transient temperature of metal and semiconductor materials located behind an opaque surface. The principle is based on the synchronous detection, using a commercial THz pyrometer, of a modulated millimeter wave (at 110 GHz) reflected by the sample hidden behind a shield layer. Measurements were performed on aluminum, copper, and silicon bulks hidden by a 5 cm thick Teflon plate. We report the first measurement of the thermoreflectance coefficient which exhibits a value 100 times higher at 2.8 mm radiation than those measured at visible wavelengths for both metallic and semiconductor materials. This giant thermoreflectance coefficient κ, close to 10(-3) K(-1) versus 10(-5) K(-1) for the visible domain, is very promising for future thermoreflectance applications.

  3. Thermoreflectance temperature measurement with millimeter wave

    SciTech Connect

    Pradere, C. Caumes, J.-P.; BenKhemis, S.; Palomo, E.; Batsale, J.-C.; Pernot, G.; Dilhaire, S.

    2014-06-15

    GigaHertz (GHz) thermoreflectance technique is developed to measure the transient temperature of metal and semiconductor materials located behind an opaque surface. The principle is based on the synchronous detection, using a commercial THz pyrometer, of a modulated millimeter wave (at 110 GHz) reflected by the sample hidden behind a shield layer. Measurements were performed on aluminum, copper, and silicon bulks hidden by a 5 cm thick Teflon plate. We report the first measurement of the thermoreflectance coefficient which exhibits a value 100 times higher at 2.8 mm radiation than those measured at visible wavelengths for both metallic and semiconductor materials. This giant thermoreflectance coefficient κ, close to 10{sup −3} K{sup −1} versus 10{sup −5} K{sup −1} for the visible domain, is very promising for future thermoreflectance applications.

  4. PIT Coating Requirements Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    MINTEER, D.J.

    2000-10-20

    This study identifies the applicable requirements for procurement and installation of a coating intended for tank farm valve and pump pit interior surfaces. These requirements are intended to be incorporated into project specification documents and design media. This study also evaluates previously recommended coatings and identifies requirement-compliant coating products.

  5. Pitting of 3003 aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.

    1996-12-31

    The Advanced Photon Source is a state-of-the-art synchrotron light source. The storage ring vacuum chamber is fabricated from 6061 extruded Al. Water connections to the vacuum chambers that were fabricated from 3003 Al had developed water leaks, which were subsequently remedied after considerable investigations. Materials subjected to the pitting analysis in this study are 3003, 6061, and 6063 Al.

  6. Drainage pits in cohesionless materials: implications for surface of Phobos.

    PubMed

    Horstman, K C; Melosh, H J

    1989-09-10

    Viking orbiter images show grooves and chains of pits crossing the surface of Phobos, many of which converge toward the large crater Stickney or its antipode. Although it has been proposed that the pits and grooves are chains of secondary craters, their morphology and geometric relations suggest that they are the surface traces of fractures in the underlying solid body of Phobos. Several models have been proposed to explain the pits, of which the most plausible are gas venting and drainage of regolith into open fractures. the latter mechanism is best supported by the image data and is the mechanism studied in this investigation. Drainage pits and fissures are modeled experimentally by using two rigid substrate plates placed edge to edge and covered by uniform thicknesses of dry fragmental debris (simulated regolith). Fracture extension is simulated by drawing the plates apart, allowing drainage of regolith into the newly created void. A typical drainage experiment begins with a shallow depression on the surface of the regolith, above the open fissure. Increased drainage causes local drainage pits to form; continued drainage causes the pits to coalesce, forming a cuspate groove. The resulting experimental patterns of pits and grooves have pronounced similarities to those observed on Phobos. Characteristics such as lack of raised rims, linearity of grooves and chains of pits, uniform spacing of pits, and progression from discrete pits to cuspate grooves are the same in the experiments and on Phobos. In contrast, gas-venting pits occur in irregular chains and have raised rims. These experiments thus indicate that the Phobos grooves and pits formed as drainage structures. The pit spacing in an experiment is measured at the time that the maximum number of pits forms, prior to groove development. The average pit spacing is compared to the regolith thickness for each material. Regression line fits indicate that the average spacing of drainage pits in unconsolidated

  7. Detecting Cavitation Pitting Without Disassembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkhoudarian, S.

    1986-01-01

    Technique for detecting cavitation pitting in pumps, turbines, and other machinery uses low-level nuclear irradiation. Isotopes concentrated below surface emit gamma radiation, a portion of which is attenuated by overlying material. Where there are cavitation pits, output of gamma-ray detector fluctuates as detector is scanned near pits. Important to detect cavitation pits because nozzle, turbine blade, or other pump component weakened by cavitation could fail catastrophically and cause machine to explode.

  8. Infrared radiometric technique in temperature measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazer, S.; Madding, R.

    1988-01-01

    One class of commercially available imaging infrared radiometers using cooled detectors is sensitive to radiation over the 3 to 12 micron wavelength band. Spectral filters can tailor instrument sensitivity to specific regions where the target exhibits optimum radiance. The broadband spectral response coupled with real time two-dimensional imaging and emittance/background temperature corrections make the instruments useful for remote measurement of surface temperatures from -20 C to +1500 C. Commonly used radiometric techniques and assumptions are discussed, and performance specifications for a typical modern commercial instrument are presented. The potential usefulness of an imaging infrared radiometer in space laboratories is highlighted through examples of research, nondestructive evaluation, safety, and routine maintenance applications. Future improvements in instrument design and application of the radiometric technique are discussed.

  9. Measurement Techniques for Data Recording and High Temperature Measurement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    location. These fiber optic cables convey the infrared data produced by the fireball or other thermal event to a separate array of physically...for Data Recording and High Temperature Measurement 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT ... infrared data produced by the fireball or other thermal event to a separate array of physically protected NIR photo detectors whose data signals are

  10. [Temperature measurements during abrasive water jet osteotomy].

    PubMed

    Schmolke, S; Pude, F; Kirsch, L; Honl, M; Schwieger, K; Krömer, S

    2004-01-01

    Working on bone is a major aspect of orthopaedic surgery. Despite its well-known appreciable thermal effects on the edges of the bone cut, the oscillating bone saw blade the oscillating saw remains the standard instrument both for cutting long bones and creating a bed for an endoprosthesis. The application of abrasive water jets offers the possibility of achieving an extremely precise curved cut in bone with no accompanying thermal effect. The thermographically measured absolute temperature increase at the cut edges seen with the water jet was 13 K maximum. The small process forces permit the application in automated handling systems.

  11. Electrochemical Studies of Nitrate-Induced Pitting in Carbon Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Zapp, P.E.

    1998-12-07

    The phenomenon of pitting in carbon steel exposed to alkaline solutions of nitrate and chloride was studied with the cyclic potentiodynamic polarization technique. Open-circuit and pitting potentials were measured on specimens of ASTM A537 carbon steel in pH 9.73 salt solutions at 40 degrees Celsius, with and without the inhibiting nitrite ion present. Nitrate is not so aggressive a pitting agent as is chloride. Both nitrate and chloride did induce passive breakdown and pitting in nitrite-free solutions, but the carbon steel retained passivity in solutions with 0.11-M nitrite even at a nitrate concentration of 2.2 M.

  12. Apparatus for accurately measuring high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Smith, D.D.

    The present invention is a thermometer used for measuring furnace temperatures in the range of about 1800/sup 0/ to 2700/sup 0/C. The thermometer comprises a broadband multicolor thermal radiation sensor positioned to be in optical alignment with the end of a blackbody sight tube extending into the furnace. A valve-shutter arrangement is positioned between the radiation sensor and the sight tube and a chamber for containing a charge of high pressure gas is positioned between the valve-shutter arrangement and the radiation sensor. A momentary opening of the valve shutter arrangement allows a pulse of the high gas to purge the sight tube of air-borne thermal radiation contaminants which permits the radiation sensor to accurately measure the thermal radiation emanating from the end of the sight tube.

  13. Central pit craters on Ganymede

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alzate, Nathalia; Barlow, Nadine G.

    2011-02-01

    Central pit craters are common on Mars, Ganymede and Callisto, and thus are generally believed to require target volatiles in their formation. The purpose of this study is to identify the environmental conditions under which central pit craters form on Ganymede. We have conducted a study of 471 central pit craters with diameters between 5 and 150 km on Ganymede and compared the results to 1604 central pit craters on Mars (diameter range 5-160 km). Both floor and summit pits occur on Mars whereas floor pits dominate on Ganymede. Central peak craters are found in similar locations and diameter ranges as central pit craters on Mars and overlap in location and at diameters <60 km on Ganymede. Central pit craters show no regional variations on either Ganymede or Mars and are not concentrated on specific geologic units. Central pit craters show a range of preservation states, indicating that conditions favoring central pit formation have existed since crater-retaining surfaces have existed on Ganymede and Mars. Central pit craters on Ganymede are generally about three times larger than those on Mars, probably due to gravity scaling although target characteristics and resolution also may play a role. Central pits tend to be larger relative to their parent crater on Ganymede than on Mars, probably because of Ganymede's purer ice crust. A transition to different characteristics occurs in Ganymede's icy crust at depths of 4-7 km based on the larger pit-to-crater-diameter relationship for craters in the 70-130-km-diameter range and lack of central peaks in craters larger than 60-km-diameter. We use our results to constrain the proposed formation models for central pits on these two bodies. Our results are most consistent with the melt-drainage model for central pit formation.

  14. Optical techniques for measurement of high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Veligdan, J.T.

    1991-10-25

    The availability of instrumentation to measure the high outlet gas temperature of a particle bed reactor is a topic of some concern. There are a number of possible techniques with advantages and disadvantages. In order to provide some baseline choice of instrumentation, a review has been conducted of these various technologies. This report summarizes the results of this review for a group of technologies loosely defined as optical techniques (excluding optical pyrometry). The review has concentrated on a number of questions for each technology investigated. These are: (1) Description of the technology, (2) Anticipated sensitivity and accuracy, (3) Requirements for implementation, (4) Necessary development time and costs, (5) Advantages and disadvantages of the technology. Each of these areas was considered for a technology and a large number of technologies were considered in a review of the literature. Based upon this review it was found that a large number of methods exist to measure temperatures in excess of 2000 K. None of the methods found were ideal. Four methods, however, appeared to warrant further consideration: opto-mechanical expansion thermometry, surface Raman spectroscopy, gas-phase Raman spectroscopy and coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS). These techniques will be discussed further in this document.

  15. Temperature measurement of particles in fluidized bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kueh, Kimberley; Lau, Timothy; Nathan, Graham; Alwahabi, Zeyad

    2016-11-01

    In order to improve process efficiencies in particle-laden flow applications, it is necessary to have a more comprehensive understanding of the heat transfer between particles and the flow in a turbulent environment. The presentation will detail the planar thermometry of radiatively heated particles in an optically-accessible fluidized bed. This is done by investigating the interaction between particles and the flow where a 3kW laser was used as the well-defined heat source. Laser-induced phosphorescence (LIP) technique was used for non-intrusive, planar, in-situ measurements that is temporally and spatially resolved. The thermometry was conducted in the fluidized bed where the air mass flow rate was kept constant at 15 L/min, and particles were subjected to varying radiative heat flux up to 32 MW/m2. It was found that the particle temperature measurement uncertainty was about 2K at room temperature, and 5K at 600K. Australian Research Council (ARC): ARC Discovery Grant DP130100198.

  16. Complementary Use of Information from Space-Based Dinsar and Field Measuring Systems for Operational Monitoring Purposes in Open Pit Iron Mines of Carajas Mining Complex (brazilian Amazon Region)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradella, W. R.; Mura, J. C.; Gama, F. F.; Santos, A. R.; Silva, G. G.; Galo, M.; Camargo, P. O.; Silva, A. Q.

    2015-04-01

    Now spanning five simultaneous open-pit operations with exploration carried out through open pit benching, Carajas complex encompasses the world's largest iron reserves. Open pit mining operations in the area can lead to slope instabilities with risks to personnel, equipment and production due to intense excavations in rock products of low geomechanical quality, blasting practices and heavy precipitation. Thus, an effective prediction and management of surface deformations should be a key concern for the mining operations. The ground displacement monitoring techniques in Carajas include surface measurement techniques at discrete points (total station/reflective prisms) and over area using SSR (Slope Stability Radar, a ground based radar). On the other hand, DInSAR techniques are receiving relevance in the mining industry for reasons such a synoptic and continuous coverage without the need for ground instrumentation and a point-to-point good accuracy of measuring displacements (millimeter to centimeter scale) over a dense grid. Using a stack of 33 StripMap TerraSAR-X images acquired over Carajas covering the time span from March 2012 to April 2013, a monitoring approach is discussed based on the complementary use of information provided by DInSAR (DInSAR Time-Series and Persistent Scatterer Interferometry) and surface measuring techniques (total station/prisms, ground-based radar).

  17. Temperature buffer test design, instrumentation and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandén, Torbjörn; Goudarzi, Reza; de Combarieu, Michel; Åkesson, Mattias; Hökmark, Harald

    The Temperature Buffer Test, TBT, is a heated full-scale field experiment carried out jointly by ANDRA and SKB at the SKB Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory in Southeast Sweden. An existing 8 m deep, 1.8 m diameter KBS-3-type deposition hole located at -420 m level has been selected for the test. The objectives are to improve the general understanding of Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical, THM, behavior of buffer materials submitted to severe thermal conditions with temperatures well over 100 °C during water uptake of partly saturated bentonite-based buffer materials, and to check, in due time, their properties after water saturation. The test includes two carbon steel heating canisters each 3 m high and 0.6 m diameter, surrounded by 0.6 m of buffer material. There is a 0.2 m thick sand shield between the upper heater and the surrounding bentonite, while the lower heater is surrounded by bentonite only. On top of the stack of bentonite blocks is a confining plug anchored to the rock. In the slot between buffer and rock wall is a sand filter equipped with pipes to control the water pressure at the boundary, which is seldom done with an EBS in situ experiment. Both heater mid-height planes are densely instrumented in order to follow, with direct or indirect methods, buffer THM evolution. Temperature, relative humidity, stress and pore pressure have been monitored since the test start in March 2003. Total water inflow is also monitored. Firstly, the present paper describes the test design, the instrumentation, the plug anchoring system and the system for water boundary pressure control. Second, having described the test, the paper shows different measurements that illustrate evolution of temperature, saturation, suction and swelling pressure in the upper and the lower buffer.

  18. Polar Cap Pits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    17 August 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows kidney bean-shaped pits, and other pits, formed by erosion in a landscape of frozen carbon dioxide. This images shows one of about a dozen different patterns that are common in various locations across the martian south polar residual cap, an area that has been receiving intense scrutiny by the MGS MOC this year, because it is visible on every orbit and in daylight for most of 2005.

    Location near: 86.9oS, 6.9oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  19. Cracked and Pitted Plain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-536, 6 November 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a typical view--at 1.5 meters (5 feet) per pixel--of surfaces in far western Utopia Planitia. In this region, the plains have developed cracks and pit chains arranged in a polygonal pattern. The pits form by collapse along the trend of a previously-formed crack. This picture is located near 45.0oN, 275.4oW. This April 2003 image covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  20. Pit disassembly motion control

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, L.; Pittman, P. C.

    2001-01-01

    A Department of Energy (DOE) Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) is being designed for the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. The facility will recover plutonium from excess nuclear weapon pits defined in START II and START III treaties. The plutonium will be stored and used to produce mixed oxide reactor fuel at another new DOE facility. Because of radiation dose issues, much of the pit disassembly work and material transfer will be automated. Automated material handling systems will interface with disassembly lathes, conversion reactors that produce oxide for storage, robotic container welding stations, vault retrieval systems, and nondestructive assay (NDA) instrumentation. The goal is to use common motion control hardware for material transfer and possibly common motion controllers for the unique PDCF systems. The latter is complicated by the different directions manufactures are considering for distributed control, such as Firewire, SERCOS, etc., and by the unique control requirements of machines such as lathes compared to controls for an integrated NDA system. The current design approach is to standardize where possible, use network cables to replace wire bundles where possible, but to first select hardware and motion controllers that meet specific machine or process requirements.

  1. Ariel's Densely Pitted Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This mosaic of the four highest-resolution images of Ariel represents the most detailed Voyager 2 picture of this satellite of Uranus. The images were taken through the clear filter of Voyager's narrow-angle camera on Jan. 24, 1986, at a distance of about 130,000 kilometers (80,000 miles). Ariel is about 1,200 km (750 mi) in diameter; the resolution here is 2.4 km (1.5 mi). Much of Ariel's surface is densely pitted with craters 5 to 10 km (3 to 6 mi) across. These craters are close to the threshold of detection in this picture. Numerous valleys and fault scarps crisscross the highly pitted terrain. Voyager scientists believe the valleys have formed over down-dropped fault blocks (graben); apparently, extensive faulting has occurred as a result of expansion and stretching of Ariel's crust. The largest fault valleys, near the terminator at right, as well as a smooth region near the center of this image, have been partly filled with deposits that are younger and less heavily cratered than the pitted terrain. Narrow, somewhat sinuous scarps and valleys have been formed, in turn, in these young deposits. It is not yet clear whether these sinuous features have been formed by faulting or by the flow of fluids.

    JPL manages the Voyager project for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  2. Remote temperature-measurement instrumentation for a heated rotating turbine disk

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, S.S.; Turley, W.D.; Borella, H.M.; Noel, B.W.; Cates, M.R.; Probert, M.R.

    1988-01-01

    Thermographic-phosphor (TP) remote temperature sensors were installed on a turbine disk and subjected to thermal and centrifugal stresses in a spin-pit test. The sensors were placed at three different radii on the disk, which was run at 6600, 9330, 11400, and 13200 rpm at nominal temperatures of ambient, 300) degree)F, 600)degree)F, 900)degree)F, and 1250)degree)F (149)degree)C, 316)degree)C, 482)degree)C, and 677)degree)C, respectively). The paper gives details of the TP temperature-measurement method, phosphor bonding to the disk, calibration, optical-system design, and electronics instrumentation. The temperatures measured by the TP sensors were compared with those measured by thermocouples mounted on the disk. A number of the thermocouples behaved erratically after we operated the disk at 677)degree)C for an extended period. Nevertheless, for those cases where they could be compared with confidence, the agreement between the TP sensors and the thermocouples was good. 6 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Instrument for Measuring Temperature of Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert; Nixon, Thomas; Pagnutti, Mary; Zanoni, Vicki

    2003-01-01

    A pseudo-Brewster-angle infrared radiometer has been proposed for use in noncontact measurement of the surface temperature of a large body of water (e.g., a lake or ocean). This radiometer could be situated on a waterborne, airborne, or spaceborne platform. The design of the pseudo-Brewster-angle radiometer would exploit the spectral-emissivity and polarization characteristics of water to minimize errors attributable to the emissivity of water and to the reflection of downwelling (e.g., Solar and cloud-reflected) infrared radiation. The relevant emissivity and polarization characteristics are the following: . The Brewster angle is the angle at which light polarized parallel to the plane of incidence on a purely dielectric material is not reflected. The pseudo-Brewster angle, defined for a lossy dielectric (somewhat electrically conductive) material, is the angle for which the reflectivity for parallel-polarized light is minimized. For pure water, the reflectivity for parallel-polarized light is only 2.2 x 10(exp -4) at its pseudo- Brewster angle of 51deg. The reflectivity remains near zero, several degrees off from the 51deg optimum, allowing this angle of incidence requirement to be easily achieved. . The wavelength range of interest for measuring water temperatures is 8 to 12 microns. The emissivity of water for parallel- polarized light at the pseudo-Brewster angle is greater than 0.999 in this wavelength range. The radiometer would be sensitive in the wavelength range of 8 to 12 microns, would be equipped with a polarizer to discriminate against infrared light polarized perpendicular to the plane of incidence, and would be aimed toward a body of water at the pseudo- Brewster angle (see figure). Because the infrared radiation entering the radiometer would be polarized parallel to the plane of incidence and because very little downwelling parallel-polarized radiation would be reflected into the radiometer on account of the pseudo-Brewster arrangement, the

  4. 40 CFR 91.309 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Engine intake air temperature... Provisions § 91.309 Engine intake air temperature measurement. (a) Engine intake air temperature measurement... the supply system or in the air stream entering the engine. (b) The temperature measurements must...

  5. 40 CFR 91.309 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Engine intake air temperature... Provisions § 91.309 Engine intake air temperature measurement. (a) Engine intake air temperature measurement... the supply system or in the air stream entering the engine. (b) The temperature measurements must...

  6. 40 CFR 91.309 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Engine intake air temperature... Provisions § 91.309 Engine intake air temperature measurement. (a) Engine intake air temperature measurement... the supply system or in the air stream entering the engine. (b) The temperature measurements must...

  7. High temperature hall effect measurement system design, measurement and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkun, Isil

    A reliable knowledge of the transport properties of semiconductor materials is essential for the development and understanding of a number of electronic devices. In this thesis, the work on developing a Hall Effect measurement system with software based data acqui- sition and control for a temperature range of 300K-700K will be described. A system was developed for high temperature measurements of materials including single crystal diamond, poly-crystalline diamond, and thermoelectric compounds. An added capability for monitor- ing the current versus voltage behavior of the contacts was used for studying the influence of ohmic and non-ohmic contacts on Hall Effect measurements. The system has been primar- ily used for testing the transport properties of boron-doped single crystal diamond (SCD) deposited in a microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) reactor [1]. Diamond has several outstanding properties that are of high interest for its development as an electronic material. These include a relatively wide band gap of 5.5 (eV), high thermal conductivity, high mobility, high saturation velocity, and a high breakdown voltage. For a temperature range of 300K-700K, IV curves, Hall mobilities and carrier concentrations are shown. Temperature dependent Hall effect measurements have shown carrier concentrations from below 1017cm --3 to approximately 1021 cm--3 with mobilities ranging from 763( cm2/V s) to 0.15(cm 2/V s) respectively. Simulation results have shown the effects of single and mixed carrier models, activation energies, effective mass and doping concentrations. These studies have been helpful in the development of single crystal diamond for diode applications. Reference materials of Ge and GaAs were used to test the Hall Effect system. The system was also used to characterize polycrystalline diamond deposited on glass for electrochemical applications, and Mg2(Si,Sn) compounds which are promising candidates of low-cost, light weight and non

  8. The Measurement of Temperature; Part i: Temperature Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forrest, A. M.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the inter-relationships between some important temperature scales such as the Celsius scale, the Kelvin Thermodynamic scale, and the International Practical Temperature Scale (IPTS). Included is a description of the 1968 IPTS with emphasis on innovations introduced in the range below 273.15 k. (CC)

  9. Nonintrusive Measurement Of Temperature Of LED Junction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leidecker, Henning; Powers, Charles

    1991-01-01

    Temperature inferred from spectrum of emitted light. Method of determining temperature of junction based on two relevant characteristics of LED. Gap between valence and conduction electron-energy bands in LED material decreases with increasing temperature, causing wavelength of emitted photon to increase with temperature. Other, as temperature increases, non-radiative processes dissipate more of input electrical energy as heat and less as photons in band-gap wavelenth region; optical and quantum efficiencies decrease with increasing temperature. In principal, either characteristic alone used to determine temperature. However, desirable to use both to obtain indication of uncertainty.

  10. High Temperature Strain Measurements Using Digital Optics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    Eae Melting and Boiling Temperatures for Several Metals ................ 3 2 Comparison of Micrometer and Camera Readings at Room Temperature...over-all accuracy. For materials at or near melting or ablation temperatures any contact with the test sample is an undesirable and often unacceptable... melting and boiling temperatures for several metals 3. In addition to high metals, carbon in the form of graphite sublimes at temperatures near 7000’F in

  11. Accuracy of temperature measurement in the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit.

    PubMed

    Newland, Richard F; Sanderson, Andrew J; Baker, Robert A

    2005-03-01

    Oxygenator arterial outlet blood temperature is routinely measured in the cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) circuit as a surrogate for the temperature of the arterial blood delivered to sensitive organs such as the brain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of the temperature thermistors used in the Terumo Capiox SX25 oxygenator and to compare the temperature measured at the outlet of the oxygenator using the Capiox CX*TL Luer Thermistor with temperatures measured at distal sites. Five experimental stages were performed in vitro to achieve this aim. Under our experimental conditions, the luer thermistors accurately measured the temperature as referenced by a precision thermometer. In the CPB circuit, the difference between arterial outlet and reference thermometer temperature varied with outlet temperature over-reading at low temperatures and under reading at high temperatures. There was negligible heat loss (-0.4+/-0.1degrees C) measured at 4.5 m from the arterial outlet. The Terumo Capiox CX*TL Luer Thermistor is an accurate and reliable instrument for measuring temperature when incorporated into the Capiox Oxygenator. The accuracy in the measurement of temperature using these thermistors is affected by the thermistor immersion depth. Under reading of the arterial blood temperature by approximately 0.5 degrees C should be considered at normothermic temperatures, to avoid exceeding the maximum arterial blood temperature as described by institutional protocols. The accuracy of blood temperature measurements should be considered for all oxygenator arterial outlet temperature probes.

  12. Improvement of the operation rate of medical temperature measuring devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotra, O.; Boyko, O.; Zyska, T.

    2014-08-01

    A method of reducing measuring time of temperature measurements of biological objects based on preheating the resistance temperature detector (RTD) up to the temperature close to the temperature to be measured, is proposed. It has been found that at the same measuring time, the preheating allows to decrease the measurement error by a factor of 5 to 45 over the temperature range of 35-41°С. The measurement time is reduced by 1.6-4 times over this range, keeping the same value of the measurement error.

  13. Measurement Corner: Volume, Temperature and Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teates, Thomas G.

    1977-01-01

    Boyle's Law and basic relationships between volume and pressure of a gas at constant temperature are presented. Suggests two laboratory activities for demonstrating the effect of temperature on the volume of a gas or liquid. (CS)

  14. Device for self-verifying temperature measurement and control

    DOEpatents

    Watkins, Arthur D.; Cannon, Collins P.; Tolle, Charles R.

    2004-08-03

    A measuring instrument includes a first temperature sensor, a second temperature sensor and circuitry. The first and second temperature sensors each generate a signal indicative of the temperature of a medium being detected. The circuitry is configured to activate verification of temperature being sensed with the first sensor. According to one construction, the first temperature sensor comprises at least one thermocouple temperature sensor and the second temperature sensor comprises an optical temperature sensor, each sensor measuring temperature over the same range of temperature, but using a different physical phenomena. Also according to one construction, the circuitry comprises a computer configured to detect failure of one of the thermocouples by comparing temperature of the optical temperature sensor with each of the thermocouple temperature sensors. Even further, an output control signal is generated via a fuzzy inference machine and control apparatus.

  15. 46 CFR 154.1340 - Temperature measuring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Temperature measuring devices. 154.1340 Section 154.1340... Instrumentation § 154.1340 Temperature measuring devices. (a) Each cargo tank must have devices that measure the temperature: (1) At the bottom of the tank; and (2) Near the top of the tank and below the maximum...

  16. 40 CFR 90.309 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Engine intake air temperature... Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 90.309 Engine intake air temperature measurement. (a) The measurement...) The temperature measurements must be accurate to within ±2 °C....

  17. 46 CFR 154.1340 - Temperature measuring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Temperature measuring devices. 154.1340 Section 154.1340... Instrumentation § 154.1340 Temperature measuring devices. (a) Each cargo tank must have devices that measure the temperature: (1) At the bottom of the tank; and (2) Near the top of the tank and below the maximum...

  18. 46 CFR 154.1340 - Temperature measuring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Temperature measuring devices. 154.1340 Section 154.1340... Instrumentation § 154.1340 Temperature measuring devices. (a) Each cargo tank must have devices that measure the temperature: (1) At the bottom of the tank; and (2) Near the top of the tank and below the maximum...

  19. 40 CFR 89.325 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Engine intake air temperature... Test Equipment Provisions § 89.325 Engine intake air temperature measurement. (a) Engine intake air temperature measurement must be made within 122 cm of the engine. The measurement location must be made...

  20. 46 CFR 154.1340 - Temperature measuring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Temperature measuring devices. 154.1340 Section 154.1340... Instrumentation § 154.1340 Temperature measuring devices. (a) Each cargo tank must have devices that measure the temperature: (1) At the bottom of the tank; and (2) Near the top of the tank and below the maximum...

  1. 40 CFR 89.325 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Engine intake air temperature... Test Equipment Provisions § 89.325 Engine intake air temperature measurement. (a) Engine intake air temperature measurement must be made within 122 cm of the engine. The measurement location must be made...

  2. 46 CFR 154.1340 - Temperature measuring devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Temperature measuring devices. 154.1340 Section 154.1340... Instrumentation § 154.1340 Temperature measuring devices. (a) Each cargo tank must have devices that measure the temperature: (1) At the bottom of the tank; and (2) Near the top of the tank and below the maximum...

  3. 40 CFR 90.309 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Engine intake air temperature... Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 90.309 Engine intake air temperature measurement. (a) The measurement...) The temperature measurements must be accurate to within ±2 °C....

  4. 40 CFR 89.325 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Engine intake air temperature... Test Equipment Provisions § 89.325 Engine intake air temperature measurement. (a) Engine intake air temperature measurement must be made within 122 cm of the engine. The measurement location must be made...

  5. 40 CFR 90.309 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Engine intake air temperature... Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 90.309 Engine intake air temperature measurement. (a) The measurement...) The temperature measurements must be accurate to within ±2 °C....

  6. 40 CFR 90.309 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Engine intake air temperature... Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 90.309 Engine intake air temperature measurement. (a) The measurement...) The temperature measurements must be accurate to within ±2 °C....

  7. 40 CFR 89.325 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Engine intake air temperature... Test Equipment Provisions § 89.325 Engine intake air temperature measurement. (a) Engine intake air temperature measurement must be made within 122 cm of the engine. The measurement location must be made...

  8. Soil moisture inferences from thermal infrared measurements of vegetation temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, R. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    Thermal infrared measurements of wheat (Triticum durum) canopy temperatures were used in a crop water stress index to infer root zone soil moisture. Results indicated that one time plant temperature measurement cannot produce precise estimates of root zone soil moisture due to complicating plant factors. Plant temperature measurements do yield useful qualitative information concerning soil moisture and plant condition.

  9. 13. DETAIL WEST OF TURBINE PIT SHOWING PIT DRAINED AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. DETAIL WEST OF TURBINE PIT SHOWING PIT DRAINED AND TURBINE EXPOSED. ORIGINAL WATER LEVEL SHOWN BY LINE JUST ABOVE ARCHED OPENING TO LEFT. WATER LINE AFTER 1982 INSTALLATION OF FLASH BOARDS REVEALED BY DARK STAIN. - Middle Creek Hydroelectric Dam, On Middle Creek, West of U.S. Route 15, 3 miles South of Selinsgrove, Selinsgrove, Snyder County, PA

  10. Crevice and pitting corrosion behavior of stainless steels in seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Zaragoza-Ayala, A.E.; Orozco-Cruz, R.

    1999-11-01

    Pitting and crevice corrosion tests in natural seawater were performed on a series of stainless steels (i.e., S31603, N08904, S32304, S31803, S32520, N08925 and S31266) in order to determine their resistance to these types of localized corrosion. Open circuit potential (OCP) measurements for these alloys show for short exposure times an ennoblement in the OCP. After a certain time, occasional fall and rise in the OCP values was observed, which can be related to nucleation and repassivation of pits and/or crevices on the metal surface. Analysis of the electrochemical behavior and microscopic observations shows that only S31603 and S32304 alloys were susceptible to crevice and pitting corrosion, whereas the remaining alloys exhibited good resistance. Pitting potentials determined by the potentiodynamic technique also show S3 1603 and S32304 are susceptible to pitting corrosion under the experimental conditions used in this work.

  11. Low temperature fiber optic pyrometer for fast time resolved temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willsch, M.; Bosselmann, T.; Gaenshirt, D.; Kaiser, J.; Villnow, M.; Banda, M.

    2016-05-01

    Low temperature Pyrometry at temperatures beyond 150°C is limited in the measurement speed due to slow pyroelectric detectors. To detect the circumferential temperature distribution of fast rotating machines a novel Fiber Optical Pyrometer Type is presented here.

  12. Bulk temperature measurement in thermally striped pipe flows

    SciTech Connect

    Lemure, N.; Olvera, J.R.; Ruggles, A.E.

    1995-12-01

    The hot leg flows in some Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) designs have a temperature distribution across the pipe cross-section. This condition is often referred to as a thermally striped flow. Here, the bulk temperature measurement of pipe flows with thermal striping is explored. An experiment is conducted to examine the feasibility of using temperature measurements on the external surface of the pipe to estimate the bulk temperature of the flow. Simple mixing models are used to characterize the development of the temperature profile in the flow. Simple averaging techniques and Backward Propagating Neural Net are used to predict bulk temperature from the external temperature measurements. Accurate bulk temperatures can be predicted. However, some temperature distributions in the flow effectively mask the bulk temperature from the wall and cause significant error in the bulk temperature predicted using this technique.

  13. Controlling potential barrier height by changing V-shaped pit size and the effect on optical and electrical properties for InGaN/GaN based light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Narihito Kashihara, Hiroyuki; Sugimoto, Kohei; Yamada, Yoichi; Tadatomo, Kazuyuki

    2015-01-14

    The internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) with blue light emission was improved by inserting an InGaN/GaN superlattice (SL) beneath the MQWs. While the SL technique is useful for improving the light-emitting diode (LED) performance, its effectiveness from a multilateral point of view requires investigation. V-shaped pits (V-pits), which generate a potential barrier and screen the effect of the threading dislocation, are one of the candidates for increasing the light emission efficiency of LEDs exceptionally. In this research, we investigated the relationship between the V-pit and SL and revealed that the V-pit diameter is strongly correlated with the IQE by changing the number of SL periods. Using scanning near-field optical microscopy and photoluminescence measurements, we demonstrated the distinct presence of the potential barrier formed by the V-pits around the dislocations. The relationship between the V-pit and the number of SL periods resulted in changing the potential barrier height, which is related to the V-pit diameter determined by the number of SL periods. In addition, we made an attempt to insert pit expansion layers (PELs) composed of combination of SL and middle temperature grown GaN layer instead of only SL structure. As a result of the evaluation of LEDs using SL or PEL, the EL intensity was strongly related to pit diameter regardless of the structures to form the V-pits. In addition, it was clear that larger V-pits reduce the efficiency droop, which is considered to be suppression of the carrier loss at high injection current.

  14. Refractory thermowell for continuous high temperature measurement of molten metal

    DOEpatents

    Thiesen, Todd J.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus for the continuous high temperature measurement of materials in vessels lined with rammed or cast refractory materials. A refractory housing member is integral with the refractory lining of the vessel and contains a plurality of high temperature sensing means, such as thermocouples. A face of the housing is flush with the refractory lining and contacts the high temperature material contained in the vessel. Continuous temperature measurement is achieved by a means which is coupled to the thermocouples for indicating the temperature.

  15. Nervous control of blood flow microkinetics in the infrared organs of pit vipers.

    PubMed

    Goris, R; Nakano, M; Atobe, Y; Kadota, T; Funakoshi, K; Hisajima, T; Kishida, R

    2000-10-30

    The pit organ of pit vipers contains a membrane which serves as an infrared retina, processing infrared information by the degree to which the temperature of trigeminal nerve receptors (terminal nerve masses) is raised. The receptors are arranged in a monolayer array within the pit membrane and irrigated by a capillary network which both supplies energy to the terminal nerve masses and serves as a heat exchange mechanism. This mechanism maintains the receptors at a stable temperature level to increase or decrease their sensitivity and to reduce to a minimum the afterimage effect of a moving stimulus. We used a Doppler laser blood flow meter to measure the local changes in blood flow in response to a point heat source (a small soldering iron) and to direct stimuli (red and infrared lasers). Resection of any one of the trigeminal A-delta fiber trunks innervating the pit membrane abolished blood flow response in the area innervated, but resection of the main trunk between the primary neurons and the medulla left the response intact. In addition to the A-delta fibers the pit membrane contains autonomic and sensory C-fiber innervation, but preganglionic resection of parasympathetic neurons, and chemical blocking of postganglionic fibers with atropine and capsaicin had no influence on the blood flow changes. Therefore, on the basis of the rapid response time and the similarity of the blood flow curves to electrophysiological recordings from the receptors, we surmised that all blood flow changes were due to a vasomotor reaction, modulated by the terminal nerve masses directly, resulting in a change in local heat capacity that cools the stimulated receptors back to a basal temperature.

  16. Titan's Surface Temperatures Measured by Cassini CIRS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Donald E.; Flasar, F. M.; Kundle, V. G.; Samuelson, R. E.; Pearl, J. C.; Nixon, C. A.; Carlson, R. C.; Mamoutkine, A. A.; Brasunas, J. C.; Guandique, E.; Arhterberg, R. K.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Romani, P. N.; Segura, M. E.; Albright, S. A.; Elliott, M. H.; Tingley, J. S.; Calcutt, S.; Coustenis, A.; Bezard, B.; Courtin, R.

    2008-01-01

    A large fraction of 19-micron thermal radiation from the surface of Titan reaches space through a spectral window of low atmospheric opacity. The emergent radiance, after removing the effect of the atmosphere, gives the brightness temperature of the surface. This atmospheric window is covered by the far-infrared channel of the Composite Infrared spectrometer1 (CIRS) on Cassini. In mapping Titan surface temperatures, CIRS is able to improve upon results of Voyager IRIS, by taking advantage of improved latitude coverage and a much larger dataset. Observations are from a wide range of emission angles and thereby provide constraints on the atmospheric opacity and radiance that are used to derive the surface temperature. CIRS finds an average equatorial surface brightness temperature of 93.7+/-0.6 K, virtually identical to the HASI temperature at the Huygens landing site. Mapping in latitude shows that the surface temperature decreases toward the poles by about 2 K in the south and 3 K in the north. This surface temperature distribution is consistent with the formation of lakes seen at high latitudes on Titan.

  17. Turbine Blade Temperature Measurements Using Thin Film Temperature Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, H. P.; Przybyszewski, J. S.; Claing, R. G.

    1981-01-01

    The development of thin film temperature sensors is discussed. The technology for sputtering 2 micron thin film platinum versus platinum 10 percent rhodium thermocouples on alumina forming coatings was improved and extended to applications on actual turbine blades. Good adherence was found to depend upon achieving a proper morphology of the alumina surface. Problems of adapting fabrication procedures to turbine blades were uncovered, and improvements were recommended. Testing at 1250 K at one atmosphere pressure was then extended to a higher Mach No. (0.5) in combustor flow for 60 hours and 71 thermal cycles. The mean time to failure was 47 hours accumulated during 1 hour exposures in the combustor. Calibration drift was about 0.1 percent per hour, attributable to oxidation of the rhodium in the thin films. An increase in film thickness and application of a protective overcoat are recommended to reduce drift in actual engine testing.

  18. PIT Tagging Anurans

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCreary, Brome

    2008-01-01

    The following video demonstrates a procedure to insert a passive integrated transponder (PIT) tag under the skin of an anuran (frog or toad) for research and monitoring purposes. Typically, a 12.5 mm tag (0.5 in.) is used to uniquely identify individual anurans as smal as 40 mm (1.6 in.) in length from snout to vent. Smaller tags are also available and allow smaller anurans to be tagged. The procedure does not differ for other sizes of tages or other sizes of anurans. Anyone using this procedure should ensure that the tag is small enough to fit easily behind the sacral hump of the anuran, as shown in this video.

  19. Floating Probe Assembly for Measuring Temperature of Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Randy; Ruffin, Clyde

    2003-01-01

    A floating apparatus denoted a temperature probe aquatic suspension system (TPASS) has been developed for measuring the temperature of an ocean, lake, or other natural body of water at predetermined depths. These types of measurements are used in computer models to relate remotely sensed water-surface temperature to bulkwater temperature. Prior instruments built for the same purpose were found to give inaccurate readings because the apparatuses themselves significantly affected the temperatures of the water in their vicinities. The design of the TPASS is intended to satisfy a requirement to minimize the perturbation of the temperatures to be measured.

  20. Temperature measurement of contact resistance based on infrared detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    En, De; Feng, Jieyu

    2010-11-01

    For science and technology, the level of science and technology is determined by the measurement accuracy and efficiency to some extent. Contact resistance can not be ignored in precise measurement. Because the measured object is not directly contacted with infrared measurement device, there is no friction. Infrared measurement has the advantage of high sensitivity, fast response and so on. In this paper, the reasons for the temperature rising of the contact resistance and its harm and the importance of measuring the temperature of the contact resistance in precise measurement are analyzed firstly; then some theories of the infrared detection technology are introduced; finally, an infrared temperature measurement system based on SCM is designed.

  1. Junction Temperature Measurement of IGBTs Using Short Circuit Current

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Fei; Xu, Zhuxian; Ning, Puqi

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a method is proposed to measure the junction temperatures of IGBT discrete devices and modules using short circuit current. Experimental results show that the short circuit current has good sensitivity, linearity and selectivity, which is suitable to be used as temperature sensitive electrical parameters (TSEP). Test circuit and hardware design are proposed for junction temperature measurement in single phase and three phase convertes. By connecting a temperature measurement unit to the converter and giving a short circuit pulse, the IGBT junction temperature can be measured.

  2. 7 CFR 28.301 - Measurement: humidity; temperature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Measurement: humidity; temperature. 28.301 Section 28... for Length of Staple § 28.301 Measurement: humidity; temperature. The length of staple of any cotton... its fibers under a relative humidity of the atmosphere of 65 percent and a temperature of 70 °F....

  3. 7 CFR 28.301 - Measurement: humidity; temperature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Measurement: humidity; temperature. 28.301 Section 28... for Length of Staple § 28.301 Measurement: humidity; temperature. The length of staple of any cotton... its fibers under a relative humidity of the atmosphere of 65 percent and a temperature of 70 °F....

  4. 7 CFR 28.301 - Measurement: humidity; temperature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Measurement: humidity; temperature. 28.301 Section 28... for Length of Staple § 28.301 Measurement: humidity; temperature. The length of staple of any cotton... its fibers under a relative humidity of the atmosphere of 65 percent and a temperature of 70° F....

  5. 7 CFR 28.301 - Measurement: humidity; temperature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Measurement: humidity; temperature. 28.301 Section 28... for Length of Staple § 28.301 Measurement: humidity; temperature. The length of staple of any cotton... its fibers under a relative humidity of the atmosphere of 65 percent and a temperature of 70 °F....

  6. 7 CFR 28.301 - Measurement: humidity; temperature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Measurement: humidity; temperature. 28.301 Section 28... for Length of Staple § 28.301 Measurement: humidity; temperature. The length of staple of any cotton... its fibers under a relative humidity of the atmosphere of 65 percent and a temperature of 70 °F....

  7. A noncontact temperature measurement method in polymerase chain reaction reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sochivko, D. G.; Varlamov, D. A.; Fedorov, A. A.; Kurochkin, V. E.

    2016-04-01

    A new noncontact method for measuring temperatures of liquids, which is based on the fluorescent probes, is proposed. The method is intended for measuring temperatures of reaction media in reactors of devices for polymerase chain reactions in real time and can be used for determining dynamic temperature parameters.

  8. Measuring Method for Lightning Channel Temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Zhang, J; Chen, L; Xue, Q; Zhu, R

    2016-09-26

    In this paper, we demonstrate the temperature of lightning channel utilizing the theory of lightning spectra and the model of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). The impulse current generator platform (ICGS) was used to simulate the lightning discharge channel, and the spectral energy of infrared spectroscopy (930 nm) and the visible spectroscopy (648.2 nm) of the simulated lightning has been calculated. Results indicate that the peaks of luminous intensity of both infrared and visible spectra increase with the lightning current intensity in range of 5-50 kA. Based on the results, the temperature of the lightning channel is derived to be 6140.8-10424 K. Moreover, the temperature of the channel is approximately exponential to the lightning current intensity, which shows good agreement with that of the natural lightning cases.

  9. Measuring Method for Lightning Channel Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Li, X.; Zhang, J.; Chen, L.; Xue, Q.; Zhu, R.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the temperature of lightning channel utilizing the theory of lightning spectra and the model of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). The impulse current generator platform (ICGS) was used to simulate the lightning discharge channel, and the spectral energy of infrared spectroscopy (930 nm) and the visible spectroscopy (648.2 nm) of the simulated lightning has been calculated. Results indicate that the peaks of luminous intensity of both infrared and visible spectra increase with the lightning current intensity in range of 5–50 kA. Based on the results, the temperature of the lightning channel is derived to be 6140.8–10424 K. Moreover, the temperature of the channel is approximately exponential to the lightning current intensity, which shows good agreement with that of the natural lightning cases. PMID:27665937

  10. Nanosecond-resolved temperature measurements using magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenbiao; Liu, Wenzhong; Zhang, Pu

    2016-05-01

    Instantaneous and noninvasive temperature measurements are important when laser thermotherapy or welding is performed. A noninvasive nanosecond-resolved magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) temperature measurement system is described in which a transient change in temperature causes an instantaneous change in the magnetic susceptibilities of the MNPs. These transient changes in the magnetic susceptibilities are rapidly recorded using a wideband magnetic measurement system with an upper frequency limit of 0.5 GHz. The Langevin function (the thermodynamic model characterizing the MNP magnetization process) is used to obtain the temperature information. Experiments showed that the MNP DC magnetization temperature-measurement system can detect a 14.4 ns laser pulse at least. This method of measuring temperature is likely to be useful for acquiring the internal temperatures of materials irradiated with lasers, as well as in other areas of research.

  11. Measuring the Electron Temperature in the Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, Joseph; SaintCyr, Orville C.; Reginald, Nelson

    2008-01-01

    We report on an experiment to demonstrate the feasibility of a new method to obtain the electron temperature and flow speed in the solar corona by observing the visible Kcoronal spectrum during the total solar eclipse on 29 March 2006 in Libya. Results show that this new method is indeed feasible, giving electron temperatures and speeds of 1.10 $\\pm$ 0.05 MK, 103.0 $\\pm$ 92.0 $kmsA{-l}$; 0.98 $\\pm$ 0.12 MK, 0.0 + 10.0 $kmsA{-1)s; 0.70 $\\pm$ 0.08 MK, 0.0 + 10.0 $kmsA{-l)$ at l.l{\\it R)$ {\\odot}$ in the solar north, east and west, respectively, and 0.93 $\\pm$ 0.12 MK, 0.0 + 10.0 $kmsA{-l}$ at 1.2{\\it R}$ {\\odot}$ in the solar east. This new technique could be easily used from a space-based platform in a coronagraph to produce two dimensional maps of the electron temperature and bulk flow speed at the base of the solar wind useful for the study of heliospheric structure and space weather.

  12. [Problems in the measurement of human body temperature].

    PubMed

    Shakhov, E K; Mel'nikov, A A; Dolgova, I A

    2008-01-01

    The problems arising in the measurement of human body temperature are discussed. The results of the experimental research are described. The effect of the initial sensor temperature on the results of measurement is explained. It is shown that the thermal or cold irritation of skin when brought in contact with the sensor also has an effect on the measurement results. Recommendations for optimizing the temperature sensor size are given.

  13. Temperature Measurement of a Glass Material Using a Multiwavelength Pyrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Daniel

    1997-01-01

    Temperature measurement of a substance that is transparent using the traditional 1-color, 2-color and other pyrometers has been difficult. The radiation detected by pyrometers do not come from a well defined location in the transparent body. The multiwavelength pyrometer developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center can measure the surface temperature of many materials. We show in this paper that it also measures the surface and a bulk subsurface temperature of transparent materials like glass.

  14. Acoustic temperature measurement in a rocket noise field.

    PubMed

    Giraud, Jarom H; Gee, Kent L; Ellsworth, John E

    2010-05-01

    A 1 μm diameter platinum wire resistance thermometer has been used to measure temperature fluctuations generated during a static GEM-60 rocket motor test. Exact and small-signal relationships between acoustic pressure and acoustic temperature are derived in order to compare the temperature probe output with that of a 3.18 mm diameter condenser microphone. After preliminary plane wave tests yielded good agreement between the transducers within the temperature probe's ∼2 kHz bandwidth, comparison between the temperature probe and microphone data during the motor firing show that the ±∼3 K acoustic temperature fluctuations are a significant contributor to the total temperature variations.

  15. Active radiometer for self-calibrated furnace temperature measurements

    DOEpatents

    Woskov, Paul P.; Cohn, Daniel R.; Titus, Charles H.; Wittle, J. Kenneth; Surma, Jeffrey E.

    1996-01-01

    Radiometer with a probe beam superimposed on its field-of-view for furnace temperature measurements. The radiometer includes a heterodyne millimeter/submillimeter-wave receiver including a millimeter/submillimeter-wave source for probing. The receiver is adapted to receive radiation from a surface whose temperature is to be measured. The radiation includes a surface emission portion and a surface reflection portion which includes the probe beam energy reflected from the surface. The surface emission portion is related to the surface temperature and the surface reflection portion is related to the emissivity of the surface. The simultaneous measurement of surface emissivity serves as a real time calibration of the temperature measurement.

  16. Measurement and correlation of jet fuel viscosities at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schruben, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    Apparatus and procedures were developed to measure jet fuel viscosity for eight current and future jet fuels at temperatures from ambient to near -60 C by shear viscometry. Viscosity data showed good reproducibility even at temperatures a few degrees below the measured freezing point. The viscosity-temperature relationship could be correlated by two linear segments when plotted as a standard log-log type representation (ASTM D 341). At high temperatures, the viscosity-temperature slope is low. At low temperatures, where wax precipitation is significant, the slope is higher. The breakpoint between temperature regions is the filter flow temperature, a fuel characteristic approximated by the freezing point. A generalization of the representation for the eight experimental fuels provided a predictive correlation for low-temperature viscosity, considered sufficiently accurate for many design or performance calculations.

  17. Solar energy control system. [temperature measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie, J. R. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A solar energy control system for a hot air type solar energy heating system wherein thermocouples are arranged to sense the temperature of a solar collector, a space to be heated, and a top and bottom of a heat storage unit is disclosed. Pertinent thermocouples are differentially connected together, and these are employed to effect the operation of dampers, a fan, and an auxiliary heat source. In accomplishing this, the differential outputs from the thermocouples are amplified by a single amplifier by multiplexing techniques. Additionally, the amplifier is corrected as to offset by including as one multiplex channel a common reference signal.

  18. What measure of temperature is the best predictor of mortality?

    PubMed

    Barnett, A G; Tong, S; Clements, A C A

    2010-08-01

    Hot and cold temperatures significantly increase mortality rates around the world, but which measure of temperature is the best predictor of mortality is not known. We used mortality data from 107 US cities for the years 1987-2000 and examined the association between temperature and mortality using Poisson regression and modelled a non-linear temperature effect and a non-linear lag structure. We examined mean, minimum and maximum temperature with and without humidity, and apparent temperature and the Humidex. The best measure was defined as that with the minimum cross-validated residual. We found large differences in the best temperature measure between age groups, seasons and cities, and there was no one temperature measure that was superior to the others. The strong correlation between different measures of temperature means that, on average, they have the same predictive ability. The best temperature measure for new studies can be chosen based on practical concerns, such as choosing the measure with the least amount of missing data.

  19. MRI Based Diagnostics for Temperature Measurements in Turbulent Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Lauren Sascha; Elkins, Christopher J.; Eaton, John K.

    2014-11-01

    Accurate modeling of the thermal diffusion in the complex turbulent flows related to cooling high temperature gas turbine blades is critical to optimize the performance and predict the lifetime of the blades. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) techniques for temperature measurement in simple but related flows are being developed in an effort to obtain full field thermal measurements to better understand diffusion processes and support the development of more accurate computational models in these flows. Magnetic Resonance Thermometry (MRT) utilizes the temperature dependence of the hydrogen proton resonant frequency (PRF) in water. MRT is now routinely used to measure tissue temperatures during medical procedures, and a few previous studies have made velocity and temperature measurements in turbulent pipe flows. In this study, MRT is applied to the flow of a heated single hole film cooling jet (Reynolds number 3000) inclined at 30 degrees injected into a cold developing turbulent channel flow (Reynolds number 25,000 based on bulk velocity and channel height.) The jet fluid temperature is 30 degrees Celsius above the temperature in the channel. The temperature measurements compare well to previously published results for measured passive scalar concentration in the same flow although the temperature measurements show higher uncertainties of 5--10 % of the temperature difference. Techniques for reducing this uncertainty will be presented as well as procedures for applying MRT to quantify the turbulent heat transfer coefficient in turbulent internal flows.

  20. Multi-spectral pyrometer for gas turbine blade temperature measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shan; Wang, Lixin; Feng, Chi

    2014-09-01

    To achieve the highest possible turbine inlet temperature requires to accurately measuring the turbine blade temperature. If the temperature of blade frequent beyond the design limits, it will seriously reduce the service life. The problem for the accuracy of the temperature measurement includes the value of the target surface emissivity is unknown and the emissivity model is variability and the thermal radiation of the high temperature environment. In this paper, the multi-spectral pyrometer is designed provided mainly for range 500-1000°, and present a model corrected in terms of the error due to the reflected radiation only base on the turbine geometry and the physical properties of the material. Under different working conditions, the method can reduce the measurement error from the reflect radiation of vanes, make measurement closer to the actual temperature of the blade and calculating the corresponding model through genetic algorithm. The experiment shows that this method has higher accuracy measurements.

  1. Temperature Measurement of Ceramic Materials Using a Multiwavelength Pyrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Daniel; Fralick, Gustave

    1999-01-01

    The surface temperatures of several pure ceramic materials (alumina, beryllia, magnesia, yittria and spinel) in the shape of pellets were measured using a multiwavelength pyrometer. In one of the measurements, radiation signal collection is provided simply by an optical fiber. In the other experiments, a 4.75 inch (12 cm) parabolic mirror collects the signal for the spectrometer. Temperature measurement using the traditional one- and two-color pyrometer for these ceramic materials is difficult because of their complex optical properties, such as low emissivity which varies with both temperature and wavelength. In at least one of the materials, yittria, the detected optical emission increased as the temperature was decreased due to such emissivity variation. The reasons for such changes are not known. The multiwavelength pyrometer has demonstrated its ability to measure surface temperatures under such conditions. Platinum electrodes were embedded in the ceramic pellets for resistance measurements as the temperature changed.

  2. Measuring Contact Thermal Conductances at Low Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salerno, Louis J.; Kittel, Peter; Brooks, Walter; Spivak, Alan L.; Marks, William G., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Instrument measures thermal conductance of pressed contacts in liquid helium. Makes measurements automatically as function of force on pairs of brass samples having various surface finishes. Developed as part of effort to determine heat-transfer characteristics of bolted joints on cryogenically cooled focal planes in infrared equipment. Cylindrical chamber hangs from cover plate in bath of liquid helium. Inside chamber rocker arm applies controlled force to samples. Upper sample made slightly wider than lower one so two samples remain in complete contact even under slight lateral misalignment.

  3. An Integrated-Circuit Temperature Sensor for Calorimetry and Differential Temperature Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muyskens, Mark A.

    1997-01-01

    Describes the application of an integrated-circuit (IC) chip which provides an easy-to-use, inexpensive, rugged, computer-interfaceable temperature sensor for calorimetry and differential temperature measurement. Discusses its design and advantages. (JRH)

  4. Thermistor holder for skin-temperature measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Williams, B. A.

    1974-01-01

    Sensing head of thermistor probe is supported in center area of plastic ring which has tabs so that it can be anchored in place by rubber bands or adhesive tapes. Device attaches probes to human subjects practically, reliably, and without affecting characteristics of skin segment being measured.

  5. Finger temperature controller for non-invasive blood glucose measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiqin; Ting, Choon Meng; Yeo, Joon Hock

    2010-11-01

    Blood glucose level is an important parameter for doctors to diagnose and treat diabetes. The Near-Infra-Red (NIR) spectroscopy method is the most promising approach and this involves measurement on the body skin. However it is noted that the skin temperature does fluctuate with the environmental and physiological conditions and we found that temperature has important influences on the glucose measurement. In-vitro and in-vivo investigations on the temperature influence on blood glucose measurement have been carried out. The in-vitro results show that water temperature has significant influence on water absorption. Since 90% of blood components are water, skin temperature of measurement site has significant influence on blood glucose measurement. Also the skin temperature is related to the blood volume, blood volume inside capillary vessels changes with skin temperature. In this paper the relationship of skin temperature and signal from the skin and inside tissue was studied at different finger temperatures. Our OGTT (oral glucose tolerance test) trials results show the laser signals follow the skin temperature trend and the correlation of signal and skin temperature is much stronger than the correlation of signal and glucose concentration. A finger heater device is designed to heat and maintain the skin temperature of measurement site. The heater is controlled by an electronic circuit according to the skin temperature sensed by a thermocouple that is put close to the measurement site. In vivo trials were carried out and the results show that the skin temperature significantly influences the signal fluctuations caused by pulsate blood and the average signal value.

  6. Pitted keratolysis, erythromycin, and hyperhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Pranteda, Guglielmo; Carlesimo, Marta; Pranteda, Giulia; Abruzzese, Claudia; Grimaldi, Miriam; De Micco, Sabrina; Muscianese, Marta; Bottoni, Ugo

    2014-01-01

    Pitted keratolysis (PK) is a plantar skin disorder mainly caused by coryneform bacteria. A common treatment consists of the topical use of erythromycin. Hyperhidrosis is considered a predisposing factor for bacterial proliferation and, consequently, for the onset of PK. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between PK erythromycin and hyperhidrosis. All patients with PK seen in Sant'Andrea Hospital, between January 2009 and December 2011, were collected. PK was clinically and microscopically diagnosed. All patients underwent only topical treatment with erythromycin 3% gel twice daily. At the beginning of the study and after 5 and 10 days of treatment, a clinical evaluation and a gravimetric measurement of plantar sweating were assessed. A total of 97 patients were diagnosed as PK and were included in the study. Gravimetric measurements showed that in 94 of 97 examined patients (96.90%) at the time of the diagnosis, there was a bilateral excessive sweating occurring specifically in the areas affected by PK. After 10 days of antibiotic therapy, hyperhidrosis regressed together with the clinical manifestations. According to these data, we hypothesize that hyperhidrosis is due to an eccrine sweat gland hyperfunction, probably secondary to bacterial infection.

  7. Further development of the dynamic gas temperature measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmore, D. L.; Robinson, W. W.; Watkins, W. B.

    1985-01-01

    Two experiments for verifying the frequency response of a previously-developed dynamic gas temperature measurement system were performed. In both experiments, fine-wire resistance temperature sensors were used as standards. The compensated dynamic temperature sensor data will be compared with the standards to verify the compensation method. The experiments are described in detail.

  8. Portable optical fiber probe for in vivo brain temperature measurements.

    PubMed

    Musolino, Stefan; Schartner, Erik P; Tsiminis, Georgios; Salem, Abdallah; Monro, Tanya M; Hutchinson, Mark R

    2016-08-01

    This work reports on the development of an optical fiber based probe for in vivo measurements of brain temperature. By utilizing a thin layer of rare-earth doped tellurite glass on the tip of a conventional silica optical fiber a robust probe, suitable for long-term in vivo measurements of temperature can be fabricated. This probe can be interrogated using a portable optical measurement setup, allowing for measurements to be performed outside of standard optical laboratories.

  9. Portable optical fiber probe for in vivo brain temperature measurements

    PubMed Central

    Musolino, Stefan; Schartner, Erik P.; Tsiminis, Georgios; Salem, Abdallah; Monro, Tanya M.; Hutchinson, Mark R.

    2016-01-01

    This work reports on the development of an optical fiber based probe for in vivo measurements of brain temperature. By utilizing a thin layer of rare-earth doped tellurite glass on the tip of a conventional silica optical fiber a robust probe, suitable for long-term in vivo measurements of temperature can be fabricated. This probe can be interrogated using a portable optical measurement setup, allowing for measurements to be performed outside of standard optical laboratories. PMID:27570698

  10. Global exospheric temperatures from ESRO 4 scale height measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keating, G. M.; Prior, E. J.; Lake, L. R.; Nicholson, J. Y., III; Fricke, K.

    1977-01-01

    The scale height temperatures considered are based on molecular nitrogen measurements by the gas analyzer aboard the ESRO 4 in the altitude range from 280 to 310 km during the interval from December 1972 to April 1974, a period of low solar activity. At the altitude of measurement during the considered period, the scale height temperature is essentially the exospheric temperature. The mean scale height temperature derived from 1833 independent N2 scale heights is 708 K. It is concluded that the ESRO 4 data provides evidence of mean global temperatures of less than 800 K.

  11. CARS Temperature Measurements in Turbulent and Supersonic Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarrett, O., Jr.; Antcliff, R. R.; Smith, M. W.; Cutler, A. D.; Diskin, G. S.; Northam, G. B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper documents the development of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s (NASA) Langley Research Center ( LaRC) Coherent Antistokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) systems for measurements of temperature in a turbulent subsonic or supersonic reacting hydrogen-air environment. Spectra data provides temperature data when compared to a precalculated library of nitrogen CARS spectra. Library validity was confirmed by comparing CARS temperatures derived through the library with three different techniques for determination of the temperature in hydrogen-air combustion and an electrically heated furnace. The CARS system has been used to survey temperature profiles in the simulated flow of a supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) model. Measurement results will be discussed.

  12. Prediction of parturition in bitches utilizing continuous vaginal temperature measurement.

    PubMed

    Geiser, B; Burfeind, O; Heuwieser, W; Arlt, S

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine sensitivity and specificity of a body temperature decline in bitches to predict parturition. Temperature loggers were placed into the vaginal cavity of 16 pregnant bitches on day 56-61 after estimated ovulation or first mating. This measurement technique has been validated previously and enabled continuous sampling of body temperature. The temperature loggers were expelled from the vagina before delivery of the first pup. The computed values for specificity (77-92%) were higher than sensitivity (53-69%), indicating a more precise prognosis of parturition not occurring. In conclusion, our findings may assist interpreting vaginal temperature measurements in order to predict parturition in bitches.

  13. Influence of Resistance Method on Motor Winding Temperature Rise Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beges, G.

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this article is presentation of influences when measuring the motor winding temperature rise in the scope of safety testing of electrical appliances, with respect to conformity assessment. The temperature measurement in testing is one of the most defined fields of measurement, but it is very important how the measurement is performed. Standards only describe that the resistance method shall be used for determination of the temperature rise (heating) of the winding. The temperature rise is defined as the average temperature rise of the windings above the ambient (surrounding) temperature, at the specified load of the unit under test. It is not explicitly defined how to approach this measurement when using cooling characteristics of the winding for determination of the temperature rise. Since the extrapolation curve is used, the procedure is also very important to obtain a result as accurate as possible. It is important that measurement results and their associated uncertainties are correctly evaluated, and on that basis, appropriate conclusions of conformity of the product with specifications are made. The resistance method influence on the motor winding temperature rise measurement is a case study in this article. The article focuses on the measurement of the temperature rise of electrical motors used in electrical appliances according to the standard EN 60335-1, clause 11 (2002) (identical as standard IEC 60335-1, 2001). In this article, the influencing parameters are analyzed when measuring the temperature rise of electromotor winding. As a case study, concrete measurements are presented. The optimal time after which the performer has to start measurement of the cooling characteristics is analyzed, since the motors are typically mounted deep into appliances. Especially for a collector motor winding, it takes some time for a performer to be able to connect the measuring instrument to collector's lamellas because this contact has an important

  14. Temperature measurement error simulation of the pure rotational Raman lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Jingyu; Huang, Yong; Wang, Zhirui; Yi, Fan; Shen, Jianglin; Jia, Xiaoxing; Chen, Huabin; Yang, Chuan; Zhang, Mingyang

    2015-11-01

    Temperature represents the atmospheric thermodynamic state. Measure the atmospheric temperature accurately and precisely is very important to understand the physics of the atmospheric process. Lidar has some advantages in the atmospheric temperature measurement. Based on the lidar equation and the theory of pure rotational Raman (PRR), we've simulated the temperature measurement errors of the double-grating-polychromator (DGP) based PRR lidar. First of all, without considering the attenuation terms of the atmospheric transmittance and the range in the lidar equation, we've simulated the temperature measurement errors which are influenced by the beam splitting system parameters, such as the center wavelength, the receiving bandwidth and the atmospheric temperature. We analyzed three types of the temperature measurement errors in theory. We've proposed several design methods for the beam splitting system to reduce the temperature measurement errors. Secondly, we simulated the temperature measurement error profiles by the lidar equation. As the lidar power-aperture product is determined, the main target of our lidar system is to reduce the statistical and the leakage errors.

  15. Apparatus for accurately measuring high temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Douglas D.

    1985-01-01

    The present invention is a thermometer used for measuring furnace temperaes in the range of about 1800.degree. to 2700.degree. C. The thermometer comprises a broadband multicolor thermal radiation sensor positioned to be in optical alignment with the end of a blackbody sight tube extending into the furnace. A valve-shutter arrangement is positioned between the radiation sensor and the sight tube and a chamber for containing a charge of high pressure gas is positioned between the valve-shutter arrangement and the radiation sensor. A momentary opening of the valve shutter arrangement allows a pulse of the high gas to purge the sight tube of air-borne thermal radiation contaminants which permits the radiation sensor to accurately measure the thermal radiation emanating from the end of the sight tube.

  16. A high temperature apparatus for measurement of the Seebeck coefficient

    SciTech Connect

    Iwanaga, Shiho; Toberer, Eric S.; LaLonde, Aaron; Snyder, G. Jeffrey

    2011-06-15

    A high temperature Seebeck coefficient measurement apparatus with various features to minimize typical sources of error is designed and built. Common sources of temperature and voltage measurement error are described and principles to overcome these are proposed. With these guiding principles, a high temperature Seebeck measurement apparatus with a uniaxial 4-point contact geometry is designed to operate from room temperature to over 1200 K. This instrument design is simple to operate, and suitable for bulk samples with a broad range of physical types and shapes.

  17. Proximity effect thermometer for local temperature measurements on mesoscopic samples.

    SciTech Connect

    Aumentado, J.; Eom, J.; Chandrasekhar, V.; Baldo, P. M.; Rehn, L. E.; Materials Science Division; Northwestern Univ; Univ. of Chicago

    1999-11-29

    Using the strong temperature-dependent resistance of a normal metal wire in proximity to a superconductor, we have been able to measure the local temperature of electrons heated by flowing a direct-current (dc) in a metallic wire to within a few tens of millikelvin at low temperatures. By placing two such thermometers at different parts of a sample, we have been able to measure the temperature difference induced by a dc flowing in the samples. This technique may provide a flexible means of making quantitative thermal and thermoelectric measurements on mesoscopic metallic samples.

  18. Remote measurement of atmospheric temperatures by Raman lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coney, T. A.; Salzman, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    The Raman shifted return of a lidar system has been utilized to make atmospheric temperature measurements. The measurements were made along a horizontal path at temperatures ranging from -30 C to +30 C and at ranges of about 100 meters. The temperature data were acquired by recording the intensity ratio of two portions of the rotational Raman spectrum which were simultaneously sampled from a preset range. A temperature measurement accuracy of plus or minus 4 C and a temporal resolution of one minute were realized with this system. The combined results of the theoretical analysis and the experimentation indicate that system improvements will significantly increase both accuracy and range.

  19. 40 CFR 89.325 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... temperature measurement must be made within 122 cm of the engine. The measurement location must be made either... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine intake air temperature... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES...

  20. Measuring transient high temperature thermal phenomena in hostile environment

    SciTech Connect

    Brenden, B.B.; Hartman, J.S.; Reich, F.R.

    1980-01-01

    The design of equipment for measuring temperature and strain in a rapidly heated and pressurized cylinder of stainless steel is discussed. Simultaneous cinematography of the full circumference of the cylinder without interference with temperature and strain measurements is also illustrated. The integrated system uses a reflective chamber for the sample and requires careful consideration of the spectral energy distribution utilized by each instrument.

  1. Non-contact temperature measurement requirements for electronic materials processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehoczky, S. L.; Szofran, F. R.

    1988-01-01

    The requirements for non-contact temperature measurement capabilities for electronic materials processing in space are assessed. Non-contact methods are probably incapable of sufficient accuracy for the actual absolute measurement of temperatures in most such applications but would be useful for imaging in some applications.

  2. Measuring High Temperatures In Ceramic-Fiber Blankets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A.

    1996-01-01

    Thermocouple assemblies devised specifically for measuring temperatures at fixed locations within insulating blankets made of such ceramic fibers as alumina, silicon carbide, and/or aluminoborosilicate. Thermocouples measure temperatures from 100 to 3,200 degrees F in oxidizing atmospheres. Wires enclosed in alumina sheath for protection against hot oxidation and mechanical damage.

  3. Skin Temperature Measurements on Small Bodies of Water

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzeja, R.

    2002-11-26

    The temperature of the top millimeter of a water surface is generally a few tenths of a degree Celsius cooler than the 'bulk' temperature, i.e., the temperature approximately 1 meter deep, which is routinely measured by buoys and ships. This is because of a daytime temperature gradient between the bulk location and the surface, and because of the thin skin at the surface. This difference is important for climate and weather forecasting because of the atmospheric forcing by the oceans.

  4. Separation of temperature and emittance in remotely sensed radiance measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahle, Anne B.; Alley, Ronald E.

    1992-01-01

    The remote determination of surface temperature and surface spectral emittance by use of airborne or satellite-borne thermal infrared instruments is not straightforward. The radiance measured is a function of surface temperature, the unknown surface spectral emittance, and absorption and emission in the intervening atmosphere. With a single measurement, the solution for temperature and spectral emittance is undedetermined. This article reviews two of the early approximate methods which have been fairly widely used to approach this problem.

  5. Measurement of temperature and emissivity of specularly reflecting glowing bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, G. P.; Hauge, R. H.; Margrave, J. L.; Krishnan, S.

    1988-01-01

    A new method of measuring the thermodynamic temperature of an object as well as the surface emissivity based on laser reflectivity has been developed. By using rotator analyzer ellipsometry, the light reflected from the sample at a specific angle of incidence can be analyzed for its ellipticity. The normal incidence reflectivity and emissivity are then extracted using standard relations. The thermodynamic temperature of the body is obtained simultaneously by measuring the intensity of emitted light at the same angle of incidence. Room temperature measurements are carried out on selected metals to test the system. Elevated temperature measurements on platinum foils show that this technique is reliable and accurate for monitoring and measuring the temperature and emissivity of specularly reflecting, glowing bodies.

  6. Non-invasive body temperature measurement of wild chimpanzees using fecal temperature decline.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Siv Aina; Mundry, Roger; Nunn, Charles L; Boesch, Christophe; Leendertz, Fabian H

    2009-04-01

    New methods are required to increase our understanding of pathologic processes in wild mammals. We developed a noninvasive field method to estimate the body temperature of wild living chimpanzees habituated to humans, based on statistically fitting temperature decline of feces after defecation. The method was established with the use of control measures of human rectal temperature and subsequent changes in fecal temperature over time. The method was then applied to temperature data collected from wild chimpanzee feces. In humans, we found good correspondence between the temperature estimated by the method and the actual rectal temperature that was measured (maximum deviation 0.22 C). The method was successfully applied and the average estimated temperature of the chimpanzees was 37.2 C. This simple-to-use field method reliably estimates the body temperature of wild chimpanzees and probably also other large mammals.

  7. Further development of the dynamic gas temperature measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmore, D. L.; Robinson, W. W.; Watkins, W. B.

    1986-01-01

    A compensated thermocouple measurement method was experimentally verified. Dynamic signal content from an atmospheric pressure laboratory burner was measured by the dynamic temperature sensor and a relatively delicate fine-wire resistance thermometer. Compensated data from the two dynamic temperature sensor thermoelements were compared with the compensated fine-wire data in the frequency domain. Absolute differences between spectral line amplitudes measured with different sensors are small relative to the mean temperature and verify the compenation method. Increases in precision of the measurement method require optimization of several factors, and directions for further work are identified.

  8. Sensitivity to thermal stimulation in prairie rattlesnakes (Crotalus viridis) after bilateral anesthetization of the facial pits

    SciTech Connect

    Chiszar, D.; Dickman, D.; Colton, J.

    1986-01-01

    Six yearling prairie rattlesnakes (Crotalus viridis) were exposed to thermal stimuli prior to and after bilateral anesthetization of their facial pits with 2% xylocaine solution. This treatment eliminates trigeminally mediated electrophysiological responses of the pits to thermal stimulation. Nevertheless, the rattlesnakes continued to exhibit behavioral responses to thermal cues after anesthetization of the pits. An auxiliary infrared-sensitive system, nociceptors, or the common temperature sense could be responsible for these findings.

  9. Noncontact Measurement of Humidity and Temperature Using Airborne Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akihiko Kon,; Koichi Mizutani,; Naoto Wakatsuki,

    2010-04-01

    We describe a noncontact method for measuring humidity and dry-bulb temperature. Conventional humidity sensors are single-point measurement devices, so that a noncontact method for measuring the relative humidity is required. Ultrasonic temperature sensors are noncontact measurement sensors. Because water vapor in the air increases sound velocity, conventional ultrasonic temperature sensors measure virtual temperature, which is higher than dry-bulb temperature. We performed experiments using an ultrasonic delay line, an atmospheric pressure sensor, and either a thermometer or a relative humidity sensor to confirm the validity of our measurement method at relative humidities of 30, 50, 75, and 100% and at temperatures of 283.15, 293.15, 308.15, and 323.15 K. The results show that the proposed method measures relative humidity with an error rate of less than 16.4% and dry-bulb temperature with an error of less than 0.7 K. Adaptations of the measurement method for use in air-conditioning control systems are discussed.

  10. Thermo-voltage measurements of atomic contacts at low temperature

    PubMed Central

    Ofarim, Ayelet; Kopp, Bastian; Möller, Thomas; Martin, León; Boneberg, Johannes; Leiderer, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Summary We report the development of a novel method to determine the thermopower of atomic-sized gold contacts at low temperature. For these measurements a mechanically controllable break junction (MCBJ) system is used and a laser source generates a temperature difference of a few kelvins across the junction to create a thermo-voltage. Since the temperature difference enters directly into the Seebeck coefficient S = −ΔV/ΔT, the determination of the temperature plays an important role. We present a method for the determination of the temperature difference using a combination of a finite element simulation, which reveals the temperature distribution of the sample, and the measurement of the resistance change due to laser heating of sensor leads on both sides next to the junction. Our results for the measured thermopower are in agreement with recent reports in the literature. PMID:27335765

  11. Thermo-voltage measurements of atomic contacts at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Ofarim, Ayelet; Kopp, Bastian; Möller, Thomas; Martin, León; Boneberg, Johannes; Leiderer, Paul; Scheer, Elke

    2016-01-01

    We report the development of a novel method to determine the thermopower of atomic-sized gold contacts at low temperature. For these measurements a mechanically controllable break junction (MCBJ) system is used and a laser source generates a temperature difference of a few kelvins across the junction to create a thermo-voltage. Since the temperature difference enters directly into the Seebeck coefficient S = -ΔV/ΔT, the determination of the temperature plays an important role. We present a method for the determination of the temperature difference using a combination of a finite element simulation, which reveals the temperature distribution of the sample, and the measurement of the resistance change due to laser heating of sensor leads on both sides next to the junction. Our results for the measured thermopower are in agreement with recent reports in the literature.

  12. Optimizing the temperature compensation of an electronic pressure measurement system

    SciTech Connect

    Maxey, L.C.; Blalock, T.V.

    1990-08-01

    In an effort to minimize temperature sensitivity, the pressure measurement channels in the sensor/electronics modules of a high-resolution multiplexed pressure measurement system were analyzed. The pressure sensor (a silicon diaphragm strain gage) was known to have two temperature-dependent parameters. Component testing revealed that the current source driving the pressure sensor was also temperature sensitive. Although the transducer manufacturer supplies empirically selected temperature compensation resistors with each transducer, it was determined that the temperature sensitivity compensation could be optimized for this application by changing one of these resistors. By modifying the value of the sensitivity compensation resistor to optimize performance in this application, the temperature sensitivity of the pressure measurement channels was reduced by more than 60%.

  13. Fast Response Temperature Measurements in Stirling Cycle Cryocooler Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, K.; Dadd, M. W.; Bailey, P. B.; Stone, C. R.

    2008-03-01

    One reason that heat transfer processes are not well understood is the difficulty of obtaining reliable temperature measurements when gas temperatures vary rapidly. In the work described here gas temperatures have been measured using a fine wire resistance thermometer with a 3.8 micron active sensor. The equipment represented the basic elements of a cryocooler: a clearance seal linear compressor and a wire mesh regenerator. Both were operated close to ambient temperature, with gas temperatures being measured close to the regenerator. The test rig was run at different volume ratios, frequencies (8-50 Hz), gases and filling pressures (1-26 bar). The waveforms of the gas temperature were found to vary dramatically for differing flow regimes. The results suggested that the thermometer was measuring the temperatures of two distinct volumes of gas, and that the gas must remain stratified in the compression space. A flow transition was identified from the cycle-by-cycle variations in temperature. The critical Reynolds number was determined to be 9.6-11. At the critical condition, the temperature was so unstable that fluctuations up to 250 Hz were observed. A series of validation tests have confirmed that the observed temperatures were not artifacts.

  14. Pyrometric temperature measurement method and apparatus for measuring particle temperatures in hot furnaces: Application to reacting black liquor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenberg, J.; Frederick, W. J.; Boström, S.; Hernberg, R.; Hupa, M.

    1996-05-01

    A specialized two-color pyrometric method has been developed for the measurement of particle surface temperatures in hot, radiating environments. In this work, the method has been applied to the measurement of surface temperatures of single reacting black liquor char particles in an electrically heated muffle furnace. Black liquor was introduced into the hot furnace as wet droplets. After drying, the resulted particles were processed in different atmospheres corresponding to combustion, pyrolysis, and gasification at furnace temperatures of 700-900 °C. The pyrometric measurement is performed using two silicon photodiode detectors and 10 nm bandpass filters centered at 650 and 1050 nm. Thermal radiation is transferred using an uncooled fiberoptic probe brought into the vicinity of the char particle. The key features of the pyrometric apparatus and analysis method are: (1) Single particle temperature is resolved temporally at high speed. (2) The thermal radiation originating from the furnace and reflected by the particle is accounted for in the measurement of the surface temperature. (3) Particle temperatures above or below the furnace temperature can be measured without the need of a cooled background assisting the measurement in the hot furnace. To accomplish this, a minimum particle size is needed that is a function of the temperature difference between the particle and furnace. Particles cooler than the furnace can be measured if their diameter is more than 0.7 mm. Surface temperatures of 300-400 °C above the furnace temperature were measured during combustion of black liquor char particles in air. In atmospheres corresponding to gasification, endothermic reactions occurred, and char temperature remained typically 40° below the furnace temperature.

  15. Temperature Distribution Measurement of The Wing Surface under Icing Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isokawa, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Takeshi; Kimura, Shigeo; Sakaue, Hirotaka; Morita, Katsuaki; Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency Collaboration; Univ of Notre Dame Collaboration; Kanagawa Institute of Technology Collaboration; Univ of Electro-(UEC) Team, Comm

    2016-11-01

    De- or anti-icing system of an aircraft is necessary for a safe flight operation. Icing is a phenomenon which is caused by a collision of supercooled water frozen to an object. For the in-flight icing, it may cause a change in the wing cross section that causes stall, and in the worst case, the aircraft would fall. Therefore it is important to know the surface temperature of the wing for de- or anti-icing system. In aerospace field, temperature-sensitive paint (TSP) has been widely used for obtaining the surface temperature distribution on a testing article. The luminescent image from the TSP can be related to the temperature distribution. (TSP measurement system) In icing wind tunnel, we measured the surface temperature distribution of the wing model using the TSP measurement system. The effect of icing conditions on the TSP measurement system is discussed.

  16. Oxidative pit formation in pristine, hydrogenated and dehydrogenated graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, J. D.; Morris, C. F.; Verbeck, G. F.; Perez, J. M.

    2013-01-01

    We study oxidative pit formation in pristine, hydrogenated, and dehydrogenated monolayer graphene (MLG), bilayer graphene (BLG) and trilayer graphene (TLG). Graphene samples are produced by mechanical exfoliation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) onto SiO2 substrates. Etching is carried out by exposing samples to O2 gas at 450-700 °C. Using atomic force microscopy, we observe that pre-heating pristine MLG in vacuum at 590 °C increases the onset temperature for pit formation to values comparable to those in HOPG. We attribute this decrease in reactivity to an increase in adhesion between the MLG and substrate. In hydrogenated MLG and BLG, we observe a significant decrease in the onset temperature for pit formation. Dehydrogenation of these materials results in a decrease in the density of pits. We attribute the decrease in onset temperature to H-related defects in their sp3-bonded structure. In contrast, hydrogenated TLG and thicker-layer samples show no significant change in pit formation. We propose that this is because they are not transformed into an sp3-bonded structure by hydrogenation.

  17. Novel method of optical fiber temperature measurement: measuring the inner temperature of the cage motor in starting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Danping; Lin, Wei; Lin, YinWen

    2000-10-01

    Although the development of fluorescent fiber optic temperature measurement technology have overcome the difficulty of the surface temperature distribution measurement of a rotor of electric machine. The temperature of the conductor (or magnetic) strips which are buried under the surface of the rotor yet not be resolved. A new measuring scheme of fluorescent optical fiber is presented in this paper. It is fully suitable for the above measuring demands. Several fiber probes are assembled with the rotor. The sensor heads are buried under the rotor surface to touch the measuring points. The other ends of the fiber probes are terminated on an optical rotational coupling disc. The induced temperature signals then are sequentially transmitted out to the external of the rotor by another fix fiber. Finally the temperature of the strips is obtained. In this paper we will discuss the selection of light source, the design of light path and derive the theory analysis of dynamic coupling.

  18. Temperature measurement method using temperature coefficient timing for resistive or capacitive sensors

    DOEpatents

    Britton, C.L. Jr.; Ericson, M.N.

    1999-01-19

    A method and apparatus for temperature measurement especially suited for low cost, low power, moderate accuracy implementation. It uses a sensor whose resistance varies in a known manner, either linearly or nonlinearly, with temperature, and produces a digital output which is proportional to the temperature of the sensor. The method is based on performing a zero-crossing time measurement of a step input signal that is double differentiated using two differentiators functioning as respective first and second time constants; one temperature stable, and the other varying with the sensor temperature. 5 figs.

  19. Temperature measurement method using temperature coefficient timing for resistive or capacitive sensors

    DOEpatents

    Britton, Jr., Charles L.; Ericson, M. Nance

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for temperature measurement especially suited for low cost, low power, moderate accuracy implementation. It uses a sensor whose resistance varies in a known manner, either linearly or nonlinearly, with temperature, and produces a digital output which is proportional to the temperature of the sensor. The method is based on performing a zero-crossing time measurement of a step input signal that is double differentiated using two differentiators functioning as respective first and second time constants; one temperature stable, and the other varying with the sensor temperature.

  20. Fabrication and superconducting properties of MgB2 composite wiresby the PIT method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Y.; Zhao, Y.; Pradhan, A. K.; Zhou, L.; Zhang, P. X.; Liu, X. H.; Ji, P.; Du, S. J.; Liu, C. F.; Wu, Y.; Koshizuka, N.

    2002-01-01

    Dense MgB2/Cu wires with Ta as a buffer layer were successfully fabricated by the powder-in-tube (PIT) method. The microstructure was investigated by optical microscopy. Magnetization measurements were carried out by using a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer at magnetic fields up to 7 T from 5 K to 35 K. The transition temperature of the MgB2 wire is around 38.4 K and the irreversibility field is 6.6 T at 5 K. The critical current density as high as 105 A cm-2 (5 K, self-field) and 104 A cm-2 (20 K, 1 T) has been obtained. The results suggest that the powder-in-tube (PIT) process is promising in preparing high-quality MgB2 wires.

  1. Application of Phosphor Thermometry to a Galvanneal Temperature Measurement System

    SciTech Connect

    Beshears, D.L.; Allison, S.W.; Andrews, W.H.; Cates, M.R.; Grann, E.B.; Manges, W.W.; McIntyre, T.J.; Scudiere, M.B.; Simpson, M.L.; Childs, R.M.; Vehec, J.; Zhang, L.

    1999-06-01

    The Galvanneal Temperature Measurement System (GTMS) was developed for the American Iron and Steel Institute by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory through a partnership with the National Steel Midwest Division in Portage, Indiana. The GTMS provides crucial on-line thermal process control information during the manufacturing of galvanneal steel. The system has been used with the induction furnaces to measure temperatures ranging from 840 to 1292 F with an accuracy of better than {+-}9 F. The GTMS provides accurate, reliable temperature information thus ensuring a high quality product, reducing waste, and saving energy. The production of uniform, high-quality galvanneal steel is only possible through strict temperature control.

  2. Measurements of temperature profiles at the exit of small rockets.

    PubMed

    Griggs, M; Harshbarger, F C

    1966-02-01

    The sodium line reversal technique was used to determine the reversal temperature profile across the exit of small rockets. Measurements were made on one 73-kg thrust rocket, and two 23-kg thrust rockets with different injectors. The large rocket showed little variation of reversal temperature across the plume. However, the 23-kg rockets both showed a large decrease of reversal temperature from the axis to the edge of the plume. In addition, the sodium line reversal technique of temperature measurement was compared with an infrared technique developed in these laboratories.

  3. Analysis and improvement of gas turbine blade temperature measurement error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shan; Wang, Lixin; Feng, Chi; Daniel, Ketui

    2015-10-01

    Gas turbine blade components are easily damaged; they also operate in harsh high-temperature, high-pressure environments over extended durations. Therefore, ensuring that the blade temperature remains within the design limits is very important. In this study, measurement errors in turbine blade temperatures were analyzed, taking into account detector lens contamination, the reflection of environmental energy from the target surface, the effects of the combustion gas, and the emissivity of the blade surface. In this paper, each of the above sources of measurement error is discussed, and an iterative computing method for calculating blade temperature is proposed.

  4. Acoustic force measurement in a dual-temperature resonant chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robey, Judith L.; Trinh, Eugene H.; Wang, Taylor G.

    1987-01-01

    The acoustic radiation force was measured for a dual-temperature resonant chamber. This rectangular chamber has its long dimension approximately 8.5 times the square cross-sectional dimension, and the opposite ends are at widely different temperatures. Force profiles were obtained for two hot end temperatures of 520 C and 760 C, while the cool end remained at approximately room temperature. Force magnitudes as high as 17 dyn for a sample 1.2 cm in diameter at 760 C and at 162-dB input level were measured.

  5. Tissue temperature distribution measurement and laser immunotherapy for cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yichao; Gyanwalib, Surya; Bjorlie, Jeremy; Andrienko, Kirill; Liu, Hong; Tesiram, Yasvir A.; Abbott, Andrew; Towner, Rheal A.; Chen, Wei R.

    2006-02-01

    Temperature distribution in tissue can be a crucial factor in laser treatment for inducing immunization responses. In this study, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) was used to measure thermal temperature distribution in target tissue in laser treatment of metastatic tumors. It is the only feasible method for in vivo, non-invasive temperature distribution measurement. The measurement was conducted using phantom gel and tumor-bearing rats. The thermal couple measurement of target temperature was also was used to calibrate the relative temperature increase. The phantom system was constructed with a dye-enhanced spherical gel embedded in uniform gel phantom, simulating a tumor within normal tissue. Irradiation by an 805-nm laser increased the system temperature. Using an MRI system and proper algorithm processing for small animal studies, a clear temperature distribution matrix was obtained. The temperature profiles of rat tumors, irradiated by the laser with a power in the range of 2-3.5W and injected with a light-absorbing dye, ICG, and an immunoadjuvant, GC, were obtained. The temperature distribution provided in vivo thermal information and future reference for optimizing dye concentration and irradiation parameters to reach the optimum tumor destruction and immunization effects.

  6. An anatomically realistic temperature phantom for radiofrequency heating measurements

    PubMed Central

    Graedel, Nadine N.; Polimeni, Jonathan R.; Guerin, Bastien; Gagoski, Borjan; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose An anthropomorphic phantom with realistic electrical properties allows for a more accurate reproduction of tissue current patterns during excitation. A temperature map can then probe the worst-case heating expected in the un-perfused case. We describe an anatomically realistic human head phantom that allows rapid 3D temperature mapping at 7 T. Methods The phantom was based on hand-labeled anatomical imaging data and consists of four compartments matching the corresponding human tissues in geometry and electrical properties. The increases in temperature resulting from radiofrequency excitation were measured with MR thermometry using a temperature sensitive contrast agent (TmDOTMA−) validated by direct fiber optic temperature measurements. Results Acquisition of 3D temperature maps of the full phantom with a temperature accuracy better than 0.1°C was achieved with an isotropic resolution of 5 mm and acquisition times of 2–4 minutes. Conclusion Our results demonstrate the feasibility of constructing anatomically realistic phantoms with complex geometries incorporating the ability to measure accurate temperature maps in the phantom. The anthropomorphic temperature phantom is expected to provide a useful tool for the evaluation of the heating effects of both conventional and parallel transmit pulses and help validate electromagnetic and temperature simulations. PMID:24549755

  7. A Precise Calibration Technique for Measuring High Gas Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Schultz, Donald F.

    2000-01-01

    A technique was developed for direct measurement of gas temperatures in the range of 2050 K 2700 K with improved accuracy and reproducibility. The technique utilized the low-emittance of certain fibrous materials, and the uncertainty of the technique was United by the uncertainty in the melting points of the materials, i.e., +/-15 K. The materials were pure, thin, metal-oxide fibers whose diameters varied from 60 microns to 400 microns in the experiments. The sharp increase in the emittance of the fibers upon melting was utilized as indication of reaching a known gas temperature. The accuracy of the technique was confirmed by both calculated low emittance values of transparent fibers, of order 0.01, up to a few degrees below their melting point and by the fiber-diameter independence of the results. This melting-point temperature was approached by increments not larger than 4 K, which was accomplished by controlled increases of reactant flow rates in hydrogen-air and/or hydrogen-oxygen flames. As examples of the applications of the technique, the gas-temperature measurements were used: (a) for assessing the uncertainty in inferring gas temperatures from thermocouple measurements, and (b) for calibrating an IR camera to measure gas temperatures. The technique offers an excellent calibration reference for other gas-temperature measurement methods to improve their accuracy and reliably extending their temperature range of applicability.

  8. A Precise Calibration Technique for Measuring High Gas Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Schultz, Donald F.

    1999-01-01

    A technique was developed for direct measurement of gas temperatures in the range of 2050 K - 2700 K with improved accuracy and reproducibility. The technique utilized the low-emittance of certain fibrous Materials, and the uncertainty of the technique was limited by the uncertainty in the melting points of the materials, i.e., +/- 15 K. The materials were pure, thin, metal-oxide fibers whose diameters varied from 60 mm to 400 mm in the experiments. The sharp increase in the emittance of the fibers upon melting was utilized as indication of reaching a known gas temperature. The accuracy of the technique was confirmed by both calculated low emittance values of transparent fibers, of order 0.01, up to a few degrees below their melting point and by the fiber-diameter independence of the results. This melting-point temperature was approached by increments not larger than 4 K, which was accomplished by controlled increases of reactant flow rates in hydrogen-air and/or hydrogen- oxygen flames. As examples of the applications of the technique, the gas-temperature measurements were used (a) for assessing the uncertainty in infering gas temperatures from thermocouple measurements, and (b) for calibrating an IR camera to measure gas temperatures. The technique offers an excellent calibration reference for other gas-temperature measurement methods to improve their accuracy and reliably extending their temperature range of applicability.

  9. Radon and aerosol release from open-pit uranium mining

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, V.W.; Nielson, K.K.; Mauch, M.L.

    1982-08-01

    The quantity of /sup 222/Rn (hereafter called radon) released per unit of uranium produced from open pit mining has been determined. A secondary objective was to determine the nature and quantity of airborne particles resulting from mine operations. To accomplish these objectives, a comprehensive study of the release rates of radon and aerosol material to the atmosphere was made over a one-year period from April 1979 to May 1980 at the Morton Ranch Mine which was operated by United Nuclear Corporation (UNC) in partnership with Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). The mine is now operated for TVA by Silver King Mines. Morton Ranch Mine was one of five open pit uranium mines studied in central Wyoming. Corroborative measurements were made of radon flux and /sup 226/Ra (hereafter called radium) concentrations of various surfaces at three of the other mines in October 1980 and again at these three mines plus a fourth in April of 1981. Three of these mines are located in the Powder River Basin, about 80 kilometers east by northeast of Casper. One is located in the Shirley Basin, about 60 km south of Casper, and the remaining one is located in the Gas Hills, approximately 100 km west of Casper. The one-year intensive study included simultaneous measurement of several parameters: continuous measurement of atmospheric radon concentration near the ground at three locations, monthly 24-hour radon flux measurements from various surfaces, radium analyses of soil samples collected under each of the flux monitoring devices, monthly integrations of aerosols on dichotomous aerosol samplers, analysis of aerosol samplers for total dust loading, aerosol elemental and radiochemical composition, aerosol elemental composition by particle size, wind speed, wind direction, temperature, barometric pressure, and rainfall.

  10. Temperature measurement within myocardium during in vitro RF catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Cao, H; Vorperian, V R; Tsai, J Z; Tungjitkusolmun, S; Woo, E J; Webster, J G

    2000-11-01

    While most commercial ablation units and research systems can provide catheter tip temperature during ablation, they do not provide information about the temperature change inside the myocardium, which determines the lesion size. We present the details of a flow simulation and temperature measurement system, which allows the monitoring of the temperature change inside the myocardium during in vitro radio frequency (RF) cardiac catheter ablation at different blood flow rates to which the catheter site may be exposed. We set up a circulation system that simulated different blood flow rates of 0 to 5 L/min at 37 degrees C. We continuously measured the temperature at the catheter tip using the built-in thermistor and inside the myocardium using a three-thermocouple probe. The system provides a means for further study of the temperature inside myocardium during RF catheter ablation under different flow conditions and at different penetration depths.

  11. Calorimetric Measurements at Low Temperatures in Toluene Glass and Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Ney, C.; Labarga, J.; Moratalla, M.; Castilla, J. M.; Ramos, M. A.

    2017-04-01

    The specific heat of toluene in glass and crystal states has been measured both at low temperatures down to 1.8 K (using the thermal relaxation method) and in a wide temperature range up to the liquid state (using a quasiadiabatic continuous method). Our measurements therefore extend earlier published data to much lower temperatures, thereby allowing to explore the low-temperature "glassy anomalies" in the case of toluene. Surprisingly, no indication of the existence of tunneling states is found, at least within the temperature range studied. At moderate temperatures, our data either for the glass or for the crystal show good agreement with those found in the literature. Also, we have been able to prepare bulk samples of toluene glass by only doping with 2% mol ethanol instead of with higher impurity doses used by other authors.

  12. Surface temperature measurements of heterogeneous explosives by IR emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henson, B. F.; Funk, D. J.; Dickson, P. M.; Fugard, C. S.; Asay, B. W.

    1998-07-01

    We present measurements of the integrated IR emission (1-5 μm) from both the heterogeneous explosive PBX 9501 and pure HMX at calibrated temperatures from 30 °C to 250 °C. The IR power emitted as a function of temperature is that expected of a black body, attenuated by a unique temperature independent constant which we report as the thermal emissivity. We have utilized this calibration of IR emission in measurements of the surface temperature from PBX 9501 subject to 1 GPa, two dimensional impact, and spontaneous ignition in unconfined cookoff. We demonstrate that the measurement of IR emission in this spectral region provides a temperature probe of sufficient sensitivity to resolve the thermal response from the solid explosive throughout the range of weak mechanical perturbation, prolonged heating to ignition, and combustion.

  13. Electron Temperature Measurement by Floating Probe Method Using AC Voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoshi, Nodomi; Shuichi, Sato; Mikio, Ohuchi

    2016-11-01

    This study presents a novel floating probe method to measure electron temperatures using a hollow cathode-type discharge tube. The proposed method detects a shift in the floating potential when an AC voltage is applied to a probe through an intermediary blocking capacitor. The shift in the floating potential is described as a function of the electron temperature and the applied AC voltage. The floating probe method is simpler than the Langmuir probe method because it does not require the measurement of volt-ampere characteristics. As the input AC voltage increases, the electron temperature converges. The electron temperature measured using the floating probe method with an applied sinusoidal voltage shows a value close to the first (tail) electron temperature in the range of the floating potential.

  14. Ambient Temperature Changes and the Impact to Time Measurement Error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogrizovic, V.; Gucevic, J.; Delcev, S.

    2012-12-01

    Measurements in Geodetic Astronomy are mainly outdoors and performed during a night, when the temperature often decreases very quickly. The time-keeping during a measuring session is provided by collecting UTC time ticks from a GPS receiver and transferring them to a laptop computer. An interrupt handler routine processes received UTC impulses in real-time and calculates the clock parameters. The characteristics of the computer quartz clock are influenced by temperature changes of the environment. We exposed the laptop to different environmental temperature conditions, and calculate the clock parameters for each environmental model. The results show that the laptop used for time-keeping in outdoor measurements should be kept in a stable temperature environment, at temperatures near 20° C.

  15. Surface temperature measurements of heterogeneous explosives by IR emission

    SciTech Connect

    Henson, B.F.; Funk, D.J.; Dickson, P.M.; Fugard, C.S.; Asay, B.W.

    1998-03-01

    The authors present measurements of the integrated IR emission (1--5 {micro}m) from both the heterogeneous explosive PBX 9501 and pure HMX at calibrated temperatures from 300 C to 2,500 C. The IR power emitted as a function of temperature is that expected of a black body, attenuated by a unique temperature independent constant which the authors report as the thermal emissivity. The authors have utilized this calibration of IR emission in measurements of the surface temperature from PBX 9501 subject to 1 GPa, two dimensional impact, and spontaneous ignition in unconfined cookoff. They demonstrate that the measurement of IR emission in this spectral region provides a temperature probe of sufficient sensitivity to resolve the thermal response from the solid explosive throughout the range of weak mechanical perturbation, prolonged heating to ignition, and combustion.

  16. Low temperature measurements on UBe/sub 13/

    SciTech Connect

    Brison, J.P.; Lasjaunias, J.C.; Ravex, A.; Flouquet, J.; Jaccard, D.; Fisk, Z.; Smith, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    Transport and specific heat measurements are reported on a new sample of UBe/sub 13/. Special focuses are given on the zero field specific heat : at low temperature (T < 150 mK) where the impurity scattering dominates, at intermediate temperature where a quani T/sub 3/ law characteristic of an axial state is obeyed and near the critical temperature where critical fluctuations are observed. Correlations are made with magnetoresistivity and thermal conductivity experiments. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Acoustic temperature profile measurement technique for large combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateshan, S. P.; Shakkottai, P.; Kwack, E. Y.; Back, L. H.

    1989-01-01

    Measurement of times of flight of sound waves can be used to determine temperatures in a gas. This paper describes a system, based on this principle, that is capable of giving the temperature profile in a nonisothermal gas volume, for example, prevalent in a large furnace. The apparatus is simple, rugged, accurate, and capable of being automated for process control applications. It is basically an acoustic waveguide where the outside temperature profile is transferred to a chosen gas contained inside the guide.

  18. Rocket measurements of electron temperature in the E region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, R. K., Jr.; Smith, L. G.

    1980-01-01

    The rocket borne equipment, experimental method, and data reduction techniques used in the measurement of electron temperature in the E region are fully described. Electron temperature profiles from one daytime equatorial flight and two nighttime midlatitude flights are discussed. The last of these three flights, Nike Apache 14.533, showed elevated E region temperatures which are interpreted as the heating effect of a stable auroral red arc.

  19. What about temperature? Measuring permeability at magmatic conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushnir, Alexandra R. L.; Martel, Caroline; Champallier, Rémi; Reuschlé, Thierry

    2015-04-01

    The explosive potential of volcanoes is intimately linked to permeability, which is governed by the connectivity of the porous structure of the magma and surrounding edifice. As magma ascends, volatiles exsolve from the melt and expand, creating a gas phase within the conduit. In the absence of a permeable structure capable of dissipating these gases, the propulsive force of an explosive eruption arises from the gas expansion and the build up of subsurface overpressures. Thus, characterizing the permeability of volcanic rocks under in-situ conditions (high temperature and pressure) allows us to better understand the outgassing potential and explosivity of volcanic systems. Current studies of the permeabilities of volcanic rocks generally measure permeability at room temperature using gas permeameters or model permeability using analytic imaging. Our goal is to perform and assess permeability measurements made at high temperature and high pressure in the interest of approaching the permeability of the samples at magmatic conditions. We measure the permeability of andesitic samples expelled during the 2010 Mt. Merapi eruption. We employ and compare two protocols for measuring permeability at high temperature and under high pressure using argon gas in an internally heated Paterson apparatus with an isolated pore fluid system. We first use the pulse decay method to measure the permeability of our samples, then compare these values to permeability measurements performed under steady state flow. We consider the steady state flow method the more rigorous of the two protocols, as we are more capable of accounting for the temperature gradient within the entire pore fluid system. At temperatures in excess of 700°C and pressures of 100 MPa, permeability values plummet by several orders of magnitude. These values are significantly lower than those commonly reported for room temperature permeameter measurements. The reduction in permeability at high temperature is a

  20. Measuring Rocket Engine Temperatures with Hydrogen Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wehrmeyer, Joseph A.

    2002-01-01

    Laser-based combustion diagnostics, such as single-pulse UV Raman spectroscopy and visible Raman spectroscopy, have been successfully applied to optically-accessible rocket-like test articles. If an independent pressure measurement is available, Raman major species concentration measurements can also provide a temperature measurement. However it is desirable to obtain a Raman-derived temperature measurement without the need for simultaneous pressure measurement, especially when chamber pressure may vary spatially. This report describes Raman temperature measurements obtained by exploiting the variation in shape of the H2 Raman spectrum. Hydrogen is advantageous since it is ubiquitous in H2-O2 systems and its Raman spectrum is simpler than for other diatomics. However the influence of high pressure on the H2 Raman spectrum must be investigated. At moderate pressures, well below those of rocket engines, the Raman spectra of O2 and N2 are known to become featureless due to collisional broadening.

  1. Surface Temperature Measurements of Heterogeneous Explosives by IR Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henson, B. F.; Funk, D. J.; Laabs, G. W.; Asay, B. W.

    1997-07-01

    Solid phase temperature is a key observable for understanding chemical and physical properties of energetic materials. Material decomposition during prolonged heating and the rate and mechanism of energy release during explosive ignition are both strongly coupled to the temperature field in the solid. Toward the end of addressing these issues we are pursuing the remote measurement of temperature by the quantitative collection of IR emission from the material surface. We present measurements of the integrated IR emission (1-5 mm) from both the heterogeneous explosive PBX 9501 and pure components at calibrated temperatures from 100C to 250C. The IR power emitted as a function of temperature is that expected of a black body, attenuated by a unique temperature-independent constant for each component which we report as the thermal emissivity of that component in this spectral region. In addition, we report preliminary measurements of the thermal transients from the unconfined surface of both PBX9501 and pressed HMX during ignition after periods of prolonged heating. We demonstrate that the measurement of IR emission in this spectral region provides both a reliable probe of static surface temperature and a unique observable of dynamic temperature change during ignition.

  2. Survey of Temperature Measurement Techniques For Studying Underwater Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Alderfer, David W.

    2004-01-01

    Several optical methods for measuring temperature near underwater shock waves are reviewed and compared. The relative merits of the different techniques are compared, considering accuracy, precision, ease of use, applicable temperature range, maturity, spatial resolution, and whether or not special additives are required.

  3. Miniature ingestible telemeter devices to measure deep-body temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, J. M.; Fryer, T. B. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A telemetry device comprised of a pill-size ingestible transmitter developed to obtain deep body temperature measurements of a human is described. The device has particular utility in the medical field where deep body temperatures provide an indication of general health.

  4. Low Temperature Hall Measurements of Neutron Irradiated Silicon Carbide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-03-01

    general programming interface bus (GPIB). Table 3: Equipment List for Keithley System 110 Make Model Name Keithley 617 Electrometer Keithley 196 Voltmeter...concentration with temperature as measured by the S110 system . Theory models the temperature dependence of carrier concentration as an exponential. 44 y = 8E+16x...Penney Model of Conduction ........................................................................ 7 Silicon Carbide

  5. The measurement of droplet temperature using thermochromic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, D.; Hu, S.H.; Richards, C.D.; Richards, R.F.

    1995-12-31

    A noninvasive technique to determine the temperature of droplets in flight is under development. The technique involves atomizing droplets of neat thermochromic liquid crystals and then inferring the droplet temperatures form the liquid crystals` color-play. Previous work has shown the feasibility of atomizing the neat liquid crystal. The present work reports results of a calibration of the temperature response of 200 to 300 micron droplets of neat liquid crystal. The calibration is accomplished by suspending droplets of the neat liquid crystal on a microthermocouple within a controlled temperature environment. The droplet is imaged using a long-distance microscope, an RGB video camera, and a frame grabber. Images of the droplet are acquired and digitized to quantify changes in RGB values (color) with temperature. The RGB information is transformed into hue, saturation, intensity (HSI) space to relate hue, H, to temperature. The temperature of the droplet is measured directly with the micro-thermocouple.

  6. Soil moisture from temperature measurements at the Earth's surface, update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welker, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    Soil moisture budgets at the Earth's surface were investigated based on soil and atmospheric temperature variations. A number of data sets were plotted and statistically analyzed in order to accentuate the existence and the characteristics of mesoscale soil temperature extrema variations and their relations to other parameters. The correlations between diurnal temperature extrema for air and soil in drought and non-drought periods appear to follow different characteristic patterns, allowing an inference of soil moisture content from temperature data. The recovery of temperature extrema after a precipitation event also follows a characteristic power curve rise between two limiting values which is an indicator of evaporation rates. If these indicators are applied universally to regional temperature data, soil moisture content or drought conditions can be inferred directly from temperature measurements.

  7. Compensation of Verdet Constant Temperature Dependence by Crystal Core Temperature Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Petricevic, Slobodan J.; Mihailovic, Pedja M.

    2016-01-01

    Compensation of the temperature dependence of the Verdet constant in a polarimetric extrinsic Faraday sensor is of major importance for applying the magneto-optical effect to AC current measurements and magnetic field sensing. This paper presents a method for compensating the temperature effect on the Faraday rotation in a Bi12GeO20 crystal by sensing its optical activity effect on the polarization of a light beam. The method measures the temperature of the same volume of crystal that effects the beam polarization in a magnetic field or current sensing process. This eliminates the effect of temperature difference found in other indirect temperature compensation methods, thus allowing more accurate temperature compensation for the temperature dependence of the Verdet constant. The method does not require additional changes to an existing Δ/Σ configuration and is thus applicable for improving the performance of existing sensing devices. PMID:27706043

  8. Development of a multispectral sensor for crop canopy temperature measurement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantifying spatial and temporal variability in plant stress has precision agriculture applications in controlling variable rate irrigation and variable rate nutrient application. One approach to plant stress detection is crop canopy temperature measurement by the use of thermographic or radiometric...

  9. Lower atmospheric temperature profile measurements using a Raman lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melfi, S. H.; Whiteman, D.

    1986-01-01

    A Raman lidar system was used to measure the temperature profile of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. The system consists of a tripled Nd-YAG laser and a 1.5 meter diameter telescope. Two photomultipliers are used at the output of the telescope to allow for measurements at both the laser wavelength and at the Raman shifted wavelength due to atmospheric nitrogen. The signal from the photomultipliers is recorded as photon counts in 1 microsec bins. The results of a number of laser shots are summed together to provide atmospheric returns which have acceptable signal to noise characteristics. Measurements of the Raman nitrogen return were acquired up to an altitude in excess of 20 km. Temperature profiles were retrieved from the attenuation corrected Raman nitrogen return assuming the atmosphere to be in hydrostatic equilibrium and using the ideal gas law. Retrieved temperature profiles are shown compared with independent temperature measurements.

  10. Active radiometer for self-calibrated furnace temperature measurements

    DOEpatents

    Woskov, P.P.; Cohn, D.R.; Titus, C.H.; Wittle, J.K.; Surma, J.E.

    1996-11-12

    A radiometer is described with a probe beam superimposed on its field-of-view for furnace temperature measurements. The radiometer includes a heterodyne millimeter/submillimeter-wave receiver including a millimeter/submillimeter-wave source for probing. The receiver is adapted to receive radiation from a surface whose temperature is to be measured. The radiation includes a surface emission portion and a surface reflection portion which includes the probe beam energy reflected from the surface. The surface emission portion is related to the surface temperature and the surface reflection portion is related to the emissivity of the surface. The simultaneous measurement of surface emissivity serves as a real time calibration of the temperature measurement. 5 figs.

  11. Differential absorption lidar measurements of atmospheric temperature and pressure profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, C. L.

    1981-01-01

    The theory and methodology of using differential absorption lidar techniques for the remote measurement of atmospheric pressure profiles, surface pressure, and temperature profiles from ground, air, and space-based platforms are presented. Pressure measurements are effected by means of high resolution measurement of absorption at the edges of the oxygen A band lines where absorption is pressure dependent due to collisional line broadening. Temperature is assessed using measurements of the absorption at the center of the oxygen A band line originating from a quantum state with high ground state energy. The population of the state is temperature dependent, allowing determination of the temperature through the Boltzmann term. The results of simulations of the techniques using Voigt profile and variational analysis are reported for ground-based, airborne, and Shuttle-based systems. Accuracies in the 0.5-1.0 K and 0.1-0.3% range are projected.

  12. Study of Windows Effects for Shock Wave Temperature Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    W. D. Turley, G. Stevens, L. Veeser, D. Holtkamp, A. Seifter

    2011-05-25

    Temperature measurements of shocked plutonium are needed for improved understanding of its equation of state (EOS) and will enable better understanding and reliability of the U.S. nuclear weapon stockpile.

  13. Measurement of electron density and temperature in plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billman, K. W.; Rowley, P. D.; Presley, L. L.; Stallcop, J.

    1972-01-01

    Application of two laser wavelengths passing through plasma measures electron density and temperature. Function depends on determining absorption of light at two wavelengths. Nature of reaction is explained and schematic diagram of equipment is included.

  14. Applications of Thin Film Thermocouples for Surface Temperature Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Lisa C.; Holanda, Raymond

    1994-01-01

    Thin film thermocouples provide a minimally intrusive means of measuring surface temperature in hostile, high temperature environments. Unlike wire thermocouples, thin films do not necessitate any machining of the surface, therefore leaving intact its structural integrity. Thin films are many orders of magnitude thinner than wire, resulting in less disruption to the gas flow and thermal patterns that exist in the operating environment. Thin film thermocouples have been developed for surface temperature measurement on a variety of engine materials. The sensors are fabricated in the NASA Lewis Research Center's Thin Film Sensor Lab, which is a class 1000 clean room. The thermocouples are platinum-13 percent rhodium versus platinum and are fabricated by the sputtering process. Thin film-to-leadwire connections are made using the parallel-gap welding process. Thermocouples have been developed for use on superalloys, ceramics and ceramic composites, and intermetallics. Some applications of thin film thermocouples are: temperature measurement of space shuttle main engine turbine blade materials, temperature measurement in gas turbine engine testing of advanced materials, and temperature and heat flux measurements in a diesel engine. Fabrication of thin film thermocouples is described. Sensor durability, drift rate, and maximum temperature capabilities are addressed.

  15. Nonequilibrium temperature measurement in a thermal conduction process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Puneet Kumar; Batra, Romesh C.

    2017-01-01

    We identify the temperature being measured by a thermometer in a nonequilibrium scenario by studying heat conduction in a three-dimensional Lennard-Jones (LJ) system whose two ends are kept at different temperatures. It is accomplished by modeling the thermometer particles also with the LJ potential but with added tethers to prevent their rigid body motion. These models of the system and the thermometer mimic a real scenario in which a mechanical thermometer is "inserted" into a system and kept there long enough for the temperature to reach a steady value. The system is divided into five strips, and for each strip the temperature is measured using an embedded thermometer. Unlike previous works, these thermometers are small enough not to alter the steady state of the nonequilibrium system. After showing initial transients, the thermometers eventually show steady-state conditions with the subregions of the system and provide values of the different temperature definitions—kinetic, configurational, dynamical, and higher-order configurational. It is found that their kinetic and the configurational temperatures are close to the system's kinetic temperature except in the two thermostatted regions. In the thermostatted regions, where the system's kinetic and the configurational temperatures are significantly different, the thermometers register a temperature substantially different from either of these two values. With a decrease in the system density and size, these differences between the kinetic and the configurational temperatures of the thermometer become more pronounced.

  16. High temperature thermographic measurements of laser heated silica

    SciTech Connect

    Elhadj, S; Yang, S T; Matthews, M J; Cooke, D J; Bude, J D; Johnson, M; Feit, M; Draggoo, V; Bisson, S E

    2009-11-02

    In situ spatial and temporal surface temperature profiles of CO{sub 2} laser-heated silica were obtained using a long wave infrared (LWIR) HgCdTe camera. Solutions to the linear diffusion equation with volumetric and surface heating are shown to describe the temperature evolution for a range of beam powers, over which the peak surface temperature scales linearly with power. These solutions were used with on-axis steady state and transient experimental temperatures to extract thermal diffusivity and conductivity for a variety of materials, including silica, spinel, sapphire, and lithium fluoride. Experimentally-derived thermal properties agreed well with reported values and, for silica, thermal conductivity and diffusivity are shown to be approximately independent of temperature between 300 and 2800K. While for silica our analysis based on a temperature independent thermal conductivity is shown to be accurate, for other materials studied this treatment yields effective thermal properties that represent reasonable approximations for laser heating. Implementation of a single-wavelength radiation measurement in the semi-transparent regime is generally discussed, and estimates of the apparent temperature deviation from the actual outer surface temperature are also presented. The experimental approach and the simple analysis presented yield surface temperature measurements that can be used to validate more complex physical models, help discriminate dominant heat transport mechanisms, and to predict temperature distribution and evolution during laser-based material processing.

  17. Comparison of digital holographic interferometry and constant temperature anemometry for measurement of temperature field in fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doleček, Roman; Psota, Pavel; Lédl, Vít.; Vít, Tomáś; Dančová, Petra; Kopecký, Václav

    2015-05-01

    The presented paper shows possibility of using digital holographic interferometry (DHI) for temperature field measurement in moving fluids. This method uses a modified Twymann-Green setup having double sensitivity instead of commonly used Mach-Zehnder type of interferometer in order to obtain sufficient phases change of the field. On the other hand this setup is not light efficient as Mach-Zehnder interferometer. For measurement of the fast periodical phenomenon is not necessary to use always the high speed camera. One can consider this field to coherent phenomenon. With employing one digital camera synchronized to periodic field and external triggered one can capture whole period of the phenomenon. However the projections form one viewing direction of asymmetrical temperature field maybe misguided. Hence for sufficient examination of the asymmetrical field one should capture a large number of the phenomenon's projections from different viewing directions. This projections are later used for 3D tomographic reconstruction of the whole temperature field and its time evolution. One of the commonly used method for temperature field measurement in moving fluids is hot wire method - constant temperature anemometry (CTA). In contrast to whole field measurement of DHI it is an invasive point temperature measurement method. One of the limiting factor of using CTA in moving fluids is frequency of temperature changes. This changes should not exceed 1 kHz. This limitation could be overcome by using of optical methods such as DHI. The results of temperature field measurement achieved by both method are compared in the paper.

  18. Turbine engine hot-part temperature measurement techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, A.G.; Prufert, M.B. )

    1992-07-01

    The paper identifies altitude test facility techniques for nonintrusive acquisition of hot-part temperatures using IR radiance measurements. The techniques discussed are applicable for turbojet and low-bypass turbofan engines. Constraints limiting IR measurements in the altitude ground test facility are discussed. Methods for evaluating altitude ground test data are outlined including review of predictive capabilities which enable the determination of the influence of turbine engine hot-part temperatures on IR emissions. 7 refs.

  19. Surface temperature measurements using a thin film thermal array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillon-Townes, L. A.; Johnson, P. B.; Ash, R. L.; Daryabeigi, K.; Whipple, J. C.

    1989-01-01

    A thin film device was designed and fabricated to measure surface temperatures. An array of eight integrated thermal sensors are mounted on a 0.002 inch (0.05 mm) Kapton film and multiplexed to obtain an area thermal measurement. The device was tested on a flat plate airfoil and demonstrated a temperature variation of 0.55 C maximum and 0.05 C minimum compared to embedded thermocouples. Future improvements are also discussed.

  20. Nonintrusive Temperature and Velocity Measurements in a Hypersonic Nozzle Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OByrne, S.; Danehy, P. M.; Houwing, A. F. P.

    2002-01-01

    Distributions of nitric oxide vibrational temperature, rotational temperature and velocity have been measured in the hypersonic freestream at the exit of a conical nozzle, using planar laser-induced fluorescence. Particular attention has been devoted to reducing the major sources of systematic error that can affect fluorescence tempera- ture measurements, including beam attenuation, transition saturation effects, laser mode fluctuations and transition choice. Visualization experiments have been performed to improve the uniformity of the nozzle flow. Comparisons of measured quantities with a simple one-dimensional computation are made, showing good agreement between measurements and theory given the uncertainty of the nozzle reservoir conditions and the vibrational relaxation rate.

  1. The effects of spatial sampling choices on MR temperature measurements.

    PubMed

    Todd, Nick; Vyas, Urvi; de Bever, Josh; Payne, Allison; Parker, Dennis L

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to quantify the effects that spatial sampling parameters have on the accuracy of magnetic resonance temperature measurements during high intensity focused ultrasound treatments. Spatial resolution and position of the sampling grid were considered using experimental and simulated data for two different types of high intensity focused ultrasound heating trajectories (a single point and a 4-mm circle) with maximum measured temperature and thermal dose volume as the metrics. It is demonstrated that measurement accuracy is related to the curvature of the temperature distribution, where regions with larger spatial second derivatives require higher resolution. The location of the sampling grid relative temperature distribution has a significant effect on the measured values. When imaging at 1.0 × 1.0 × 3.0 mm(3) resolution, the measured values for maximum temperature and volume dosed to 240 cumulative equivalent minutes (CEM) or greater varied by 17% and 33%, respectively, for the single-point heating case, and by 5% and 18%, respectively, for the 4-mm circle heating case. Accurate measurement of the maximum temperature required imaging at 1.0 × 1.0 × 3.0 mm(3) resolution for the single-point heating case and 2.0 × 2.0 × 5.0 mm(3) resolution for the 4-mm circle heating case.

  2. Characterization of Permeable Zones by the Measurement of Borehole Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Tung-Lin; Chuang, Po-Yu; Lee, Tsai-Ping; Chia, Yeeping

    2015-04-01

    Subsurface temperature distribution has become an important issue in hydrogeologic studies. The major heat transfer mechanisms in porous medium are conduction and convection. Temperature profile in geological formations with different thermal conductivity would be controlled primarily by heat conduction. The temperature change related to water flows is caused by heat convection. Consequently, temperature profiles are affected by a variety of factors, such as surface temperature change, well diameter, groundwater level change, and water flows inside the borehole. In this study, we use temperature probe as a well logging device to investigate the borehole conditions. There is the depth correction for the time lag problem resulting from the equilibration time of the sensors during the logging process. Then the field measurement was conducted in a 60-m deep well in a gravelly aquifer to characterize the temperature profile of screened zone. In the shallow depth, the change of temperature is primarily influenced by seasonal variation and daily fluctuation. Below the depth of 30-m, the change of temperature was subject to geothermal gradient. However, the slope of temperature profiles changed at approximately 42-m deep, the top of well screen, and it indicated the effects of heat convection in the aquifer. In addition, the measured temperature in the borehole may not represent the actual temperature of aquifer. The measured temperature in the screened section changed continuously in response to pumping, but stabilized an hour data when 2 to 3 times of the borehole water volume is extracted. This phenomenon is related to the temperature mixing with the upper borehole water and aquifer permeability. On the other hand, if the aquifer permeability is high enough, it may influence the temperature profile in borehole through the high flow velocity. The test results indicated that, in order to obtain the actual temperature or chemical constituents, we have to pump 2 to 3 times

  3. 41. 44INCH SOAKING PITS. A MORGAN CRANE LOWERS THE STEEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. 44-INCH SOAKING PITS. A MORGAN CRANE LOWERS THE STEEL INGOT INTO A 'SOAKING PIT,' WHERE IT IS HEATED TO A UNIFORM TEMPERATURE PRIOR TO ROLLING. THE INGOT RECEIVES ITS FIRST ROLLING ON THE 44-INCH BLOOMING MILL. - Corrigan, McKinney Steel Company, 3100 East Forty-fifth Street, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  4. [Microclimate dynamics of pit and mound complex within different sizes of forest gaps in Pinus koraiensis-dominated broadleaved mixed forest].

    PubMed

    Wei, Quan-Shuai; Wang, Jing-Hua; Duan, Wen-Biao; Chen, Li-Xin; Wang, Ting; Han, Dong-Hui; Gu, Wei

    2014-03-01

    An investigation was conducted in a 2.25 hm2 plot of Pinus koraiensis-dominated broad-leaved mixed forest to study basic characteristics of 7 small gaps, 5 middle gaps, 3 large gaps and 7 closed stands within 38 pit and mound complexes caused by treefall in May 2012. From June to September 2012, the soil temperature, soil water content and relative humidity at five microsites (pit bottom, pit wall, mound top, mound face and undisturbed closed stands) were measured in six sunny days each month. The results showed that among the five microsites in every month, the mound top had the highest soil temperature and the lowest water content and relative humidity, and vice versa for the pit bottom. Mostly, the differences in the above indicators among the five microsites were significant. From June to September, the mean soil temperatures for all microsites at pit and mound complex in the various gaps and closed stands were in the order of large gap>middle gap >small gap>closed stand; but the soil water content ranked differently every month. In June, August and September, the mean relative humidities for all microsites in the various gaps and closed stands were in the order of closed stand>small gap>middle gap>large gap. Mostly, the differences in the above indicators between all microsites in the various gaps and closed stand were significant. The mean monthly soil temperature and relative humidity were highest in July, but lowest in September. The maximal mean monthly soil water content occurred in July and the minimal one in September for each microsite except the undisturbed closed stands, where the maximal mean monthly soil water content occurred in July. The variation of the microclimate at the pit and mound complex was mainly influenced by gap size, microsite, and time.

  5. Characterization of physical mass transport through oil sands fluid fine tailings in an end pit lake: a multi-tracer study.

    PubMed

    Dompierre, Kathryn A; Barbour, S Lee

    2016-06-01

    Soft tailings pose substantial challenges for mine reclamation due to their high void ratios and low shear strengths, particularly for conventional terrestrial reclamation practices. Oil sands mine operators have proposed the development of end pit lakes to contain the soft tailings, called fluid fine tailings (FFT), generated when bitumen is removed from oil sands ore. End pit lakes would be constructed within mined-out pits with FFT placed below the lake water. However, the feasibility of isolating the underlying FFT has yet to be fully evaluated. Chemical constituents of interest may move from the FFT into the lake water via two key processes: (1) advective-diffusive mass transport with upward pore water flow caused by settling of the FFT; and (2) mixing created by wind events or unstable density profiles through the lake water and upper portion of the FFT. In 2013 and 2014, temperature and stable isotopes of water profiles were measured through the FFT and lake water in the first end pit lake developed by Syncrude Canada Ltd. Numerical modelling was undertaken to simulate these profiles to identify the key mechanisms controlling conservative mass transport in the FFT. Shallow mixing of the upper 1.1 m of FFT with lake water was required to explain the observed temperature and isotopic profiles. Following mixing, the re-establishment of both the temperature and isotope profiles required an upward advective flux of approximately 1.5 m/year, consistent with average FFT settling rates measured at the study site. These findings provide important insight on the ability to sequester soft tailings in an end pit lake, and offer a foundation for future research on the development of end pit lakes as an oil sands reclamation strategy.

  6. Characterization of physical mass transport through oil sands fluid fine tailings in an end pit lake: a multi-tracer study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dompierre, Kathryn A.; Barbour, S. Lee

    2016-06-01

    Soft tailings pose substantial challenges for mine reclamation due to their high void ratios and low shear strengths, particularly for conventional terrestrial reclamation practices. Oil sands mine operators have proposed the development of end pit lakes to contain the soft tailings, called fluid fine tailings (FFT), generated when bitumen is removed from oil sands ore. End pit lakes would be constructed within mined-out pits with FFT placed below the lake water. However, the feasibility of isolating the underlying FFT has yet to be fully evaluated. Chemical constituents of interest may move from the FFT into the lake water via two key processes: (1) advective-diffusive mass transport with upward pore water flow caused by settling of the FFT; and (2) mixing created by wind events or unstable density profiles through the lake water and upper portion of the FFT. In 2013 and 2014, temperature and stable isotopes of water profiles were measured through the FFT and lake water in the first end pit lake developed by Syncrude Canada Ltd. Numerical modelling was undertaken to simulate these profiles to identify the key mechanisms controlling conservative mass transport in the FFT. Shallow mixing of the upper 1.1 m of FFT with lake water was required to explain the observed temperature and isotopic profiles. Following mixing, the re-establishment of both the temperature and isotope profiles required an upward advective flux of approximately 1.5 m/year, consistent with average FFT settling rates measured at the study site. These findings provide important insight on the ability to sequester soft tailings in an end pit lake, and offer a foundation for future research on the development of end pit lakes as an oil sands reclamation strategy.

  7. ASRDI oxygen technology survey. Volume 4: Low temperature measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, L. L.

    1974-01-01

    Information is presented on temperature measurement between the triple point and critical point of liquid oxygen. The criterion selected is that all transducers which may reasonably be employed in the liquid oxygen (LO2) temperature range are considered. The temperature range for each transducer is the appropriate full range for the particular thermometer. The discussion of each thermometer or type of thermometer includes the following information: (1) useful temperature range, (2) general and particular methods of construction and the advantages of each type, (3) specifications (accuracy, reproducibility, response time, etc.), (4) associated instrumentation, (5) calibrations and procedures, and (6) analytical representations.

  8. Instrumentation requirements for small scale towed temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugan, J. P.; Morris, W. D.

    1984-03-01

    Measurements of horizontal ocean temperature structure are difficult to obtain by towing sensors from research vessels because the tow cable induces sensor platform motions which contaminate the data. In this report, temperature data which previously were acquired in the thermocline with special care are used to specify the acceptable level of motion and to prescribe appropriate sensor noise levels. In the swell-induced ship motion band, for example, the rms vertical displacements of the sensors should be less than several centimeters and temperature sensors should resolve fluctuations of one millidegree Celsius in regions of high (approx 0.1 C/m) temperature gradient.

  9. Simultaneous measurement of temperature and strain using four connecting wires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Allen R., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a new signal-conditioning technique for measuring strain and temperature which uses fewer connecting wires than conventional techniques. Simultaneous measurement of temperature and strain has been achieved by using thermocouple wire to connect strain gages to signal conditioning. This signal conditioning uses a new method for demultiplexing sampled analog signals and the Anderson current loop circuit. Theory is presented along with data to confirm that strain gage resistance change is sensed without appreciable error because of thermoelectric effects. Furthermore, temperature is sensed without appreciable error because of voltage drops caused by strain gage excitation current flowing through the gage resistance.

  10. Based on coherent detection of Rayleigh - Brillouin temperature measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yeliang; Hu, Yihua; Huang, Baokun

    2016-11-01

    The traditional laser temperature measurement usually adopt the direct detection method, while the direct detection method is easily influenced by aerosol scattering and background stray light. In this paper, the DSC710 balanced detector was first applied to the measurement of complete gas Rayleigh - Brillouin scattering spectrum (RBS). By utilizing the difference of RBS spectrum broadening under different temperature to get the temperature information. In this article, a simple theoretical derivation and error analysis has been made. The results show that using this method can effectively inhibit the interference of background stray light and has high precision.

  11. High Accuracy Thermal Expansion Measurement at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Jim; Despit, Gregory; Stallcup, Michael; Presson, Joan; Nein, Max

    2003-01-01

    A new, interferometer-based system for measuring thermal expansion to an absolute accuracy of 20 ppb or better at cryogenic temperatures has been developed. Data from NIST Copper SRM 736 measured from room temperature to 15 K will be presented along with data from many other materials including beryllium, ULE, Zerodur, and composite materials. Particular attention will be given to a study by the Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center (SOMTC) investigating the variability of ULE and beryllium materials used in the AMSD program Approximately 20 samples of each material, tested from room temperature to below 30 K are compared as a function of billet location.

  12. High Accuracy Thermal Expansion Measurement At Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcup, Michael; Presson, Joan; Tucker, James; Daspit, Gregory; Nein, Max

    2003-01-01

    A new, interferometer based system for measuring thermal expansion to an absolute accuracy of 20 ppb or better at cryogenic temperatures has been developed. Data from NIST Copper SRM 736 measured from room temperature to 15 K will be presented along with data from many other materials including beryllium, ULE, Zerodur, and composite materials. Particular attention will be given to a study by the Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center (SOMTC) investigating the variability of ULE and beryllium materials used in the AMSD program. Approximately 20 samples of each material, tested from room temperature to below 30 K are compared as a function of billet location.

  13. Wet method for measuring starch gelatinization temperature using electrical conductivity.

    PubMed

    Morales-Sanchez, E; Figueroa, J D C; Gaytan-Martínez, M

    2009-09-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop a method for obtaining the gelatinization temperature of starches by using electrical conductivity. Native starches from corn, rice, potato, and wheat were prepared with different proportions of water and heated from room temperature to 90 degrees C, in a device especially designed for monitoring the electrical conductivity as a function of temperature. The results showed a linear trend of the electrical conductivity with the temperature until it reaches the onset gelatinization temperature. After that point, the electrical conductivity presented an increment or decrement depending on the water content in the sample and it was related to starch swelling and gelatinization phenomena. At the end gelatinization temperature, the conductivity becomes stable and linear, indicating that there are no more changes of phase. The starch gelatinization parameter, which was evaluated in the 4 types of starches using the electrical conductivity, was compared with those obtained by using differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). The onset temperature at which the electrical conductivity increased or decreased was found to be similar to that obtained by DSC. Also, the final temperature at which the electrical conductivity returned to linearity matched the end gelatinization temperature of the DSC. Further, a wet method for measuring the onset, peak, and end gelatinization temperatures as a function of temperature using the electrical conductivity curves is presented for a starch-water suspension.

  14. Temperature measurement of cryogenic nitrogen jets at supercritical pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, H.; Teramoto, S.; Toki, T.; Yoshida, S.; Yamaguchi, K.; Okamoto, K.

    2016-07-01

    The temperatures of transcritical and supercritical nitrogen jets were measured to explore the influence of "pseudovaporization" upon cryogenic propellant mixing in high-pressure rocket chambers. Pseudovaporization is the large thermodynamic transition near the pseudocritical temperature under transcritical conditions, which can include a drastic density change and large peak of isobaric specific heat. A decline in the rise of temperature along the jet centerline of the transcritical jet was caused at the position where the local temperature reached nearpseudocritical temperature. This can be considered to be due to the large peak of isobaric specific heat. The density jump appeared near the pseudocritical temperature, which can be correlated to the sudden expansion due to pseudovaporization. The axial profiles of the temperature and density of the supercritical jet monotonically increased and decreased, respectively, in the downstream region of the end of the jet potential core. Similar to the axial profiles, the radial profiles of the temperature were influenced by the pseudovaporization - i. e., the temperature rise in the radial direction became very shallow in the region where the local temperature was still lower than the pseudocritical temperature. The full width at half maximum of the density profiles stayed almost constant further downstream of the end of the jet potential core, whereas that of the mass fraction profiles of the incompressible variable-density jet began to increase near the end of the potential core. Hence, the evolutions of jet mixing layers of transcritical jets and variable-density jets can be considered to differ due to pseudovaporization.

  15. Measurement of the temperature distribution inside the power cable using distributed temperature system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaros, Jakub; Liner, Andrej; Papes, Martin; Vasinek, Vladimir; Mach, Veleslav; Hruby, David; Kajnar, Tomas; Perecar, Frantisek

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, the power cables are manufactured to fulfill the following condition - the highest allowable temperature of the cable during normal operation and the maximum allowable temperature at short circuit conditions cannot exceed the condition of the maximum allowable internal temperature. The distribution of the electric current through the conductor leads to the increase of the amplitude of electrons in the crystal lattice of the cables material. The consequence of this phenomenon is the increase of friction and the increase of collisions between particles inside the material, which causes the temperature increase of the carrying elements. The temperature increase is unwanted phenomena, because it is causing losses. In extreme cases, the long-term overload leads to the cable damaging or fire. This paper deals with the temperature distribution measurement inside the power cables using distributed temperature system. With cooperation with Kabex company, the tube containing optical fibers was installed into the center of power cables. These fibers, except telecommunications purposes, can be also used as sensors in measurements carrying out with distributed temperature system. These systems use the optical fiber as a sensor and allow the continual measurement of the temperature along the whole cable in real time with spatial resolution 1 m. DTS systems are successfully deployed in temperature measurement applications in industry areas yet. These areas include construction, drainage, hot water etc. Their advantages are low cost, resistance to electromagnetic radiation and the possibility of real time monitoring at the distance of 8 km. The location of the optical fiber in the center of the power cable allows the measurement of internal distribution of the temperature during overloading the cable. This measurement method can be also used for prediction of short-circuit and its exact location.

  16. Containerless high temperature property measurements by atomic fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordine, Paul C.; Shiffman, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    Containerless high temperature processing and material property measurements are discussed. Researchers developed methods for non-contact suspension, heating, and property measurement for materials at temperatures up to 3,680K, the melting point of tungsten. New, scientifically interesting results were obtained in Earth-based research. These results and the demonstration of new methods and techniques form a basis for further advances under the low gravity environment of space where containerless conditions are more easily achieved. Containerless high temperature material property investigations that have been completed in this and our earlier projects include measurements of fluorine LaB sub 6 reaction kinetics at 1,000 to 1,500K; optical property measurements on sapphire (Al2O3) at temperatures up to the melting point (2,327K); and vapor pressure measurements for LaB sub 6 at 2,000 to 2,500K, for molybdenum up to 2,890K and for tungsten up to 3,680K. Gas jet levitation which is applicable to any solid material, and electromagnetic levitation of electrical conductors were used to suspend the materials of interest. Non-contact heating and property measurements were achieved by optical techniques, i.e., laser heating, laser induced fluorescence measurements of vapor concentrations, and optical pyrometry for specimen temperatures.

  17. Measuring gas temperature during spin-exchange optical pumping process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normand, E.; Jiang, C. Y.; Brown, D. R.; Robertson, L.; Crow, L.; Tong, X.

    2016-04-01

    The gas temperature inside a Spin-Exchange Optical Pumping (SEOP) laser-pumping polarized 3He cell has long been a mystery. Different experimental methods were employed to measure this temperature but all were based on either modelling or indirect measurement. To date there has not been any direct experimental measurement of this quantity. Here we present the first direct measurement using neutron transmission to accurately determine the number density of 3He, the temperature is obtained using the ideal gas law. Our result showed a surprisingly high gas temperature of 380°C, compared to the 245°C of the 3He cell wall temperature and 178°C of the optical pumping oven temperature. This experiment result may be used to further investigate the unsolved puzzle of the "X-factor" in the SEOP process which places an upper bound to the 3He polarization that can be achieved. Additional spin relaxation mechanisms might exist due to the high gas temperature, which could explain the origin of the X-factor.

  18. Sensorless battery temperature measurements based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raijmakers, L. H. J.; Danilov, D. L.; van Lammeren, J. P. M.; Lammers, M. J. G.; Notten, P. H. L.

    2014-02-01

    A new method is proposed to measure the internal temperature of (Li-ion) batteries. Based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements, an intercept frequency (f0) can be determined which is exclusively related to the internal battery temperature. The intercept frequency is defined as the frequency at which the imaginary part of the impedance is zero (Zim = 0), i.e. where the phase shift between the battery current and voltage is absent. The advantage of the proposed method is twofold: (i) no hardware temperature sensors are required anymore to monitor the battery temperature and (ii) the method does not suffer from heat transfer delays. Mathematical analysis of the equivalent electrical-circuit, representing the battery performance, confirms that the intercept frequency decreases with rising temperatures. Impedance measurements on rechargeable Li-ion cells of various chemistries were conducted to verify the proposed method. These experiments reveal that the intercept frequency is clearly dependent on the temperature and does not depend on State-of-Charge (SoC) and aging. These impedance-based sensorless temperature measurements are therefore simple and convenient for application in a wide range of stationary, mobile and high-power devices, such as hybrid- and full electric vehicles.

  19. Modeling the wet bulb globe temperature using standard meteorological measurements.

    PubMed

    Liljegren, James C; Carhart, Richard A; Lawday, Philip; Tschopp, Stephen; Sharp, Robert

    2008-10-01

    The U.S. Army has a need for continuous, accurate estimates of the wet bulb globe temperature to protect soldiers and civilian workers from heat-related injuries, including those involved in the storage and destruction of aging chemical munitions at depots across the United States. At these depots, workers must don protective clothing that increases their risk of heat-related injury. Because of the difficulty in making continuous, accurate measurements of wet bulb globe temperature outdoors, the authors have developed a model of the wet bulb globe temperature that relies only on standard meteorological data available at each storage depot for input. The model is composed of separate submodels of the natural wet bulb and globe temperatures that are based on fundamental principles of heat and mass transfer, has no site-dependent parameters, and achieves an accuracy of better than 1 degree C based on comparisons with wet bulb globe temperature measurements at all depots.

  20. Multi-spectral temperature measurement method for gas turbine blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shan; Feng, Chi; Wang, Lixin; Li, Dong

    2016-02-01

    One of the basic methods to improve both the thermal efficiency and power output of a gas turbine is to increase the firing temperature. However, gas turbine blades are easily damaged in harsh high-temperature and high-pressure environments. Therefore, ensuring that the blade temperature remains within the design limits is very important. There are unsolved problems in blade temperature measurement, relating to the emissivity of the blade surface, influences of the combustion gases, and reflections of radiant energy from the surroundings. In this study, the emissivity of blade surfaces has been measured, with errors reduced by a fitting method, influences of the combustion gases have been calculated for different operational conditions, and a reflection model has been built. An iterative computing method is proposed for calculating blade temperatures, and the experimental results show that this method has high precision.

  1. Modeling the wet bulb globe temperature using standard meteorological measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Liljegren, J. C.; Carhart, R. A.; Lawday, P.; Tschopp, S.; Sharp, R.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2008-10-01

    The U.S. Army has a need for continuous, accurate estimates of the wet bulb globe temperature to protect soldiers and civilian workers from heat-related injuries, including those involved in the storage and destruction of aging chemical munitions at depots across the United States. At these depots, workers must don protective clothing that increases their risk of heat-related injury. Because of the difficulty in making continuous, accurate measurements of wet bulb globe temperature outdoors, the authors have developed a model of the wet bulb globe temperature that relies only on standard meteorological data available at each storage depot for input. The model is composed of separate submodels of the natural wet bulb and globe temperatures that are based on fundamental principles of heat and mass transfer, has no site-dependent parameters, and achieves an accuracy of better than 1 C based on comparisons with wet bulb globe temperature measurements at all depots.

  2. Sub-optimal pit construction in predatory ant lion larvae (Myrmeleon sp.).

    PubMed

    Burgess, Matthew G

    2009-10-07

    The impacts on energy gains of two aspects of ant lion pit architecture were investigated in a natural population of pit-building ant lion larvae (Myrmeleon sp.) in Costa Rica. Field and laboratory settings were used to examine the impacts of circumference and depth of the pit on net energy gain rate. An optimization model predicted a point optimum circumference and angle of depression in an unconstrained system, and positive correlations between body mass, pit circumference, and pit angle of depression in the presence of physiological constraints on both measures. Such a physiological constraint is possible in this system due to a large one-time construction cost. All of these correlations were observed in a lab setting with filtered substrate and no competition; though none were significant in the field. Individuals additionally constructed wider, shallower pits in the field. These results are consistent with an angle of depression that is limited by the angle of repose of the substrate in the field, rather than physiology. These results provided suggestive evidence for sub-optimal pit dimensions in Myrmeleon sp., and for the importance of substrate type in understanding the architecture of natural ant lion pits. The model predicted that the frequency of relocation would not affect the optimal angle of depression, but it would affect the optimal pit circumference to a degree proportional to the square root of the change in the average time an ant lion occupies a single pit. These findings challenge the widely held assumption of adaptive optimality in animal foraging.

  3. Quantitative assessment of impedance tomography for temperature measurements in hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Blad, B; Persson, B; Lindström, K

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this study is a non-invasive assessment of the thermal dose in hyperthermia. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) has previously been given a first trial as a temperature monitoring method together with microwave-induced hyperthermia treatment, but it has not been thoroughly investigated. In the present work we have examined this method in order to investigate the correlation in vitro between the true spatial temperature distribution and the corresponding measured relative resistivity changes. Different hyperthermia techniques, such as interstitial water tubings, microwave-induced, laser-induced and ferromagnetic seeds have been used. The results show that it is possible to find a correlation between the measured temperature values and the tomographically measured relative resistivity changes in tissue-equivalent phantoms. But the uncertainty of the temperature coefficients, which has been observed, shows that the method has to be improved before it can be applied to clinical in vivo applications.

  4. High-Temperature Sprayable Phosphor Coating Developed for Measuring Surface Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bencic, Timothy J.

    2003-01-01

    The use of phosphor thermography for noncontact temperature measurements in harsh environments has been proven over the last decade, but it has suffered from difficult application procedures such as vapor deposition or sputtering techniques. We have developed a high-temperature-sensitive paint that is easily applied with commercially available paint-spraying equipment and have successfully demonstrated it to temperatures up to 1500 C. Selected phosphors have also shown measurable signals to 1700 C, thus allowing a combination of phosphors to be used in high-temperature binders to make surface temperature measurements from ambient to over 1500 C. Phosphor thermography is an optical technique that measures the time response of fluorescence light, which is a function of the phosphor temperature. The phosphors are excited with short wavelength light (ultraviolet or blue), and they emit light at a longer wavelength. This technique has a benefit over other temperature measurements, such as thermocouples and infrared thermography, in difficult environments such as high blackbody backgrounds, vibration, flames, high electromagnetic noise, or where special windows may be needed. In addition, the sprayable phosphor paints easily cover large or complicated structures, providing full-surface information with a single measurement. Oak Ridge National Laboratories developed and tested the high-temperature binders and phosphors under the direction of the NASA Glenn Research Center. Refractory materials doped with rare earth metals were selected for their performance at high temperature. Survivability, adhesion, and material compatibility tests were conducted at high temperatures in a small furnace while the fluorescent response from the phosphors was being measured. A painted sample in a furnace with a clearly visible fluorescing dot excited by a pulsed laser is shown. Measuring the decay time of this fluorescence yields the surface temperature. One new paint was recently tested

  5. Temperature dependence of Brewer UV measurements at Rome station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siani, Anna M.; Benevento, Giuseppe; Casale, Giuseppe R.

    2003-11-01

    Decreasing trends of total ozone affect mainly solar ultraviolet (UV) levels at ground level with adverse effects on the biosphere. Highly accurate measurements of solar UV irradiance have become an important issue to assess UV trends. To detect these trends stations with well calibrated instruments, with long-term stability and Quality Assurance (QA)/ Quality Control (QC) carefully followed procedures, are necessary. The Solar Radiometry Observatory of Rome, University "La Sapienza" (city center) is one of the stations regularly measuring UV irradiance in Italy. Measurements of UV spectral (290-325 nm) irradiance started in 1992, using Brewer MKIV 067. Measurements of total irradiance contained in the 280 - 320 nm waveband begun in 2000 with the YES UVB-1 broad-band radiometer. An investigation of the internal temperature dependence of the spectral responsivity to improve the quality of the Brewer UV data was carried out. The study was based on the analysis of responsivity files recorded during the years 2000-2002. Responsivities are provided by specific tests through a set of five 50 W quartz tungsten-halogen lamps, traceable to the standards of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The lamp tests allow to measure any changes in the instrument response over time. It was observed that a decrease in the instrument's responsivity resulted from an increase of the internal temperature. A methodology based on a family of responsivity files at different temperature intervals is proposed to allow correction of UV irradiances using the responsivity file at the corresponding temperatures. The mean percentage differnce between temperature corrected and non-corrected Brewer data varies from 0.8% to 1.5% over an internal temperature of 8°C-42°C. In addition the results of a field evaluation in Rome between Brewer 067 and two temperature stabilized instruments, a broad-band radiometer (YES UVB-1) and a moderate bandwidth multichannel radiometer

  6. INTERACTIVE PIT LAKES 2004 CONFERENCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This CD and the workshop provide a pit lakes forum for the exchange of scientific information on current domestic and international approaches, including arid and wet regions throughout the world. These approaches include characterization, modeling/monitoring, and treatment and r...

  7. Antiresonant guiding photonic crystal fibers for distributed temperature gradient measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, R.; Zeng, J.; Kandel, M.; Fam, A. T.; Cartwright, A. N.; Litchinitser, N. M.

    2011-11-01

    We propose, design, and experimentally demonstrate a novel, simple, distributed refractometric measurement technique based on unique spectral properties of antiresonant-guiding photonic crystal fibers for measuring temperature gradients. We use a simple and accurate analytical model and numerical simulations to guide our experiments. The proposed technique may find applications for monitoring and control of chemical and biological reactions in microfluidic systems.

  8. HIGH TEMPERATURE HIGH PRESSURE THERMODYNAMIC MEASUREMENTS FOR COAL MODEL COMPOUNDS

    SciTech Connect

    Vinayak N. Kabadi

    2000-05-01

    The flow VLE apparatus designed and built for a previous project was upgraded and recalibrated for data measurements for this project. The modifications include better and more accurate sampling technique, addition of a digital recorder to monitor temperature and pressure inside the VLE cell, and a new technique for remote sensing of the liquid level in the cell. VLE data measurements for three binary systems, tetralin-quinoline, benzene--ethylbenzene and ethylbenzene--quinoline, have been completed. The temperature ranges of data measurements were 325 C to 370 C for the first system, 180 C to 300 C for the second system, and 225 C to 380 C for the third system. The smoothed data were found to be fairly well behaved when subjected to thermodynamic consistency tests. SETARAM C-80 calorimeter was used for incremental enthalpy and heat capacity measurements for benzene--ethylbenzene binary liquid mixtures. Data were measured from 30 C to 285 C for liquid mixtures covering the entire composition range. An apparatus has been designed for simultaneous measurement of excess volume and incremental enthalpy of liquid mixtures at temperatures from 30 C to 300 C. The apparatus has been tested and is ready for data measurements. A flow apparatus for measurement of heat of mixing of liquid mixtures at high temperatures has also been designed, and is currently being tested and calibrated.

  9. Flowmeter measures flow rates of high temperature fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.

    1966-01-01

    Flowmeter in which flow rate is determined by measuring the position and thus the displacement of an internal float acted upon by the flowing fluid determines the flow rates of various liquid metals at elevated temperatures. Viscous forces cause the float to move from its mounted position, affording several means for measuring this motion and the flow rate.

  10. Stagnation temperature measurement using thin-film platinum resistance sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonham, C.; Thorpe, S. J.; Erlund, M. N.; Stevenson, R. D.

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of stagnation temperature in high-speed flows is an important aspect of gas turbine engine testing. The ongoing requirement to improve the accuracy of such measurements has led to the development of probe systems that use a thin-film platinum resistance thermometer (PRT) as the sensing element. For certain aspects of engine testing this type of sensing device potentially offers superior measurement performance to the thermocouple, the temperature sensor of choice in most gas turbine applications. This paper considers the measurement performance of prototype PRT-based stagnation temperature probes, up to high-subsonic flow conditions, using passively aspirated probe heads. The relatively poor temperature recovery performance of a simply constructed probe has led to the development of a new design that is intended to reduce the impact of thermal conduction within the probe assembly. The performance of this so-called dual-skin probe has been measured through a series of tests at a range of Mach numbers, incidence angles and Reynolds numbers. The data reveal that a high probe recovery factor has been achieved with this device, and that the application of this design to engine tests would yield the measurement performance benefits of the PRT whilst requiring small levels of temperature recovery compensation.

  11. Self-calibrated active pyrometer for furnace temperature measurements

    DOEpatents

    Woskov, Paul P.; Cohn, Daniel R.; Titus, Charles H.; Surma, Jeffrey E.

    1998-01-01

    Pyrometer with a probe beam superimposed on its field-of-view for furnace temperature measurements. The pyrometer includes a heterodyne millimeter/sub-millimeter-wave or microwave receiver including a millimeter/sub-millimeter-wave or microwave source for probing. The receiver is adapted to receive radiation from a surface whose temperature is to be measured. The radiation includes a surface emission portion and a surface reflection portion which includes the probe beam energy reflected from the surface. The surface emission portion is related to the surface temperature and the surface reflection portion is related to the emissivity of the surface. The simultaneous measurement of surface emissivity serves as a real time calibration of the temperature measurement. In an alternative embodiment, a translatable base plate and a visible laser beam allow slow mapping out of interference patterns and obtaining peak values therefor. The invention also includes a waveguide having a replaceable end portion, an insulating refractory sleeve and/or a source of inert gas flow. The pyrometer may be used in conjunction with a waveguide to form a system for temperature measurements in a furnace. The system may employ a chopper or alternatively, be constructed without a chopper. The system may also include an auxiliary reflector for surface emissivity measurements.

  12. Pulsed Raman measurements of lattice temperature: Validity tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compaan, A.; Lee, M. C.; Lo, H. W.; Trott, G. J.; Aydinli, A.

    1983-10-01

    We measure the temperature dependence of the Raman correction factors and present data on the spot size and transverse beam quality of lasers used in the pulsed Raman measurements of lattice temperature in Si. Recent criticisms are also evaluated and shown to be inappropriate or in error. Finally we measure the shift of the 520-cm-1 Raman line and find it also to be consistent with the observed Stokes/anti-Stokes ratios indicating optic phonon populations characteristic of ˜450 °C.

  13. The validation of ATSR measurements with in situ sea temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Minnett, P.J.; Stansfield, K.L.

    1993-10-08

    The largest source of uncertainty in the retrieval of SST (sea-surface) temperature from space-borne infrared radiometric measurements is in the correction for the effects of the intervening atmosphere. During a research cruise of the R/V Alliance measurements of sea surface temperature, surface meteorological variables and surface infrared radiances were taken. SST fields were generated from the ATSR data using pre-launch algorithims derived by the ATSR Instrument Team (A.M. Zavody, personal communication), and the initial comparison between ATSR measurements and SST taken along the ship`s track indicate that the dual-angle atmospheric correction is accurate in mid-latitude conditions.

  14. Soil temperature variability in complex terrain measured using fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil temperature (Ts) exerts critical controls on hydrologic and biogeochemical processes but magnitude and nature of Ts variability in a landscape setting are rarely documented. Fiber optic distributed temperature sensing systems (FO-DTS) potentially measure Ts at high density over a large extent. ...

  15. Temperature Grid Sensor for the Measurement of Spatial Temperature Distributions at Object Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, Thomas; Schubert, Markus; Hampel, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents results of the development and application of a new temperature grid sensor based on the wire-mesh sensor principle. The grid sensor consists of a matrix of 256 Pt1000 platinum chip resistors and an associated electronics that measures the grid resistances with a multiplexing scheme at high speed. The individual sensor elements can be spatially distributed on an object surface and measure transient temperature distributions in real time. The advantage compared with other temperature field measurement approaches such as infrared cameras is that the object under investigation can be thermally insulated and the radiation properties of the surface do not affect the measurement accuracy. The sensor principle is therefore suited for various industrial monitoring applications. Its applicability for surface temperature monitoring has been demonstrated through heating and mixing experiments in a vessel. PMID:23353141

  16. Proceedings of the Second Noncontact Temperature Measurement Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, Robert R. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The state of the art in noncontact temperature measurement (NCTM) technology was reviewed and the NCTM requirements of microgravity materials processing community identified. The workshop included technical presentations and discussions which ranged from research on advanced concepts for temperature measurement to laboratory research and development regarding measurement principles and state-of-the-art engineering practices for NCTM methodology in commercial and industrial applications. Technical presentations were made concerning: NCTM needs as perceived by several NASA centers, recent ground-based NCT, research and development of industry, NASA, academia, and selected national laboratories, work-in-progress communication, and technical issues of the implementation of temperature measurement in the space environment to facilitate future U.S. materials science investigations.

  17. CARS Temperature and Species Measurements For Air Vehicle Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Gord, James R.; Grisch, Frederic; Klimenko, Dmitry; Clauss, Walter

    2005-01-01

    The coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) method has recently been used in the United States and Europe to probe several different types of propulsion systems for air vehicles. At NASA Langley Research Center in the United States, CARS has been used to simultaneously measure temperature and the mole fractions of N2, O2 and H2 in a supersonic combustor, representative of a scramjet engine. At Wright- Patterson Air Force Base in the United States, CARS has been used to simultaneously measure temperature and mole fractions of N2, O2 and CO2, in the exhaust stream of a liquid-fueled, gas-turbine combustor. At ONERA in France and the DLR in Germany researchers have used CARS to measure temperature and species concentrations in cryogenic LOX-H2 rocket combustion chambers. The primary aim of these measurements has been to provide detailed flowfield information for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code validation.

  18. Floating Probe Assembly for Measuring Temperature of Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selinsky, T.; Stewart, Randy; Ruffin, Clyde

    2002-01-01

    A floating apparatus denoted a temperature probe aquatic suspension system (TPASS) has been developed for measuring the temperature of an ocean, lake, or other natural body of water at predetermined depths. Prior instruments built for the same purpose were found to give inaccurate readings because the apparatuses themselves significantly affected the temperatures of the water in their vicinities. The design of the TPASS is intended to satisfy a requirement to minimize the perturbation of the temperatures to be measured. The TPASS includes a square-cross-section aluminum rod 28 in. (approx. = 71 cm) long with floats attached at both ends. Each float includes five polystyrene foam disks about 3/4 in. (approx. = 1.9 cm) thick and 2.5 in. (approx. = 6.4 cm) in diameter. The disks are stacked to form cylinders, bolted to the rod, and covered with hollow plastic sleeves. A metal sleeve is clamped to the middle of the aluminum rod, from whence it hangs down into the water. Temperature probes (which can be thermocouples, thermistors, or resistance temperature devices) are placed within the sleeve at the desired measurement depths. Wires from the temperature probes are routed to the input terminals of a data logger. This work was done by Randy

  19. Floating Probe Assembly for Measuring Temperature of Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Randy; Ruffin, Clyde

    2002-01-01

    A floating apparatus denoted a temperature probe aquatic suspension system (TPASS) has been developed for measuring the temperature of an ocean, lake, or other natural body of water at predetermined depths. Prior instruments built for the same purpose were found to give inaccurate readings because the apparatuses themselves significantly affected the temperatures of the water in their vicinities. The design of the TPASS is intended to satisfy a requirement to minimize the perturbation of the temperatures to be measured. The TPASS includes a square-cross-section aluminum rod 28 in. (=71 cm) long with floats attached at both ends. Each float includes five polystyrene foam disks about 3/4 in.(=1.9 cm) thick and 2.5 in. (=6.4 cm) in diameter. The disks are stacked to form cylinders, bolted to the rod, and covered with hollow plastic sleeves. A metal sleeve is clamped to the middle of the aluminum rod, from whence it hangs down into the water. Temperature probes (which can be thermocouples, thermistors, or resistance temperature devices) are placed within the sleeve at the desired measurement depths. Wires from the temperature probes are routed to the input terminals of a data logger.

  20. Comparison of two methods for contactless surface temperature measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piasecka, Magdalena; Michalski, Dariusz; Strąk, Kinga

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the paper is to determine the temperature filed of the heating surface on the basis of temperature measurements taken by liquid crystal thermography and infrared thermography applied in boiling heat transfer research during FC-72 flow in minichannels, and to compare them. The essential part of the experimental stand is the test section with two parallel rectangular minichannels, each 1.7 mm deep, 24 mm wide and 360 mm long. It is possible to observe the channel surfaces through panes: of the first minichannel allows observing foil temperature changes on the plain side due to liquid crystal thermography (LCT), which required treating the foil surface with thermochromic liquid crystals, of the other minichannel enables detecting outer glass or foil surface temperature changes due to infrared thermography (IRT). Comparison of the results of the measurements are presented in graphical form as thermographs and as heating surface temperature vs. minichannel length. The differences between two sets of measurement data concerning the temperature of the heating surface obtained with LCT and IRT, were analyzed using: Pearson linear correlation coefficient, determination coefficient, Experimental Method Error and Method Accuracy. The comparative data analysis shows that similar values and distributions of the surface temperature were obtained from both techniques.

  1. Fiber - Optic Devices as Temperature Sensors for Temperature Measurements in AC Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rablau, Corneliu; Lafrance, Joseph; Sala, Anca

    2007-10-01

    We report on the investigation of several fiber-optic devices as potential sensors for temperature measurements in AC magnetic fields. Common temperature sensors, such as thermocouples, thermistors or diodes, will create random and/or systematic errors when placed in a magnetic field. A DC magnetic field is susceptible to create a systematic offset to the measurement, while in an AC magnetic field of variable frequency random errors which cannot be corrected for can also be introduced. Fiber-Bragg-gratings and thin film filters have an inherent temperature dependence. Detrimental for their primary applications, the same dependence allows one to use such devices as temperature sensors. In an AC magnetic field, they present the advantage of being immune to electromagnetic interference. Moreover, for fiber-Bragg-gratings, the shape factor and small mass of the bare-fiber device make it convenient for temperature measurements on small samples. We studied several thin-film filters and fiber-Bragg-gratings and compared their temperature measurement capabilities in AC magnetic fields of 0 to 150 Gauss, 0 to 20 KHz to the results provided by off-the-shelf thermocouples and thermistor-based temperature measurement systems.

  2. Non-contact infrared temperature measurements in dry permafrost boreholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junker, Ralf; Grigoriev, Mikhail N.; Kaul, Norbert

    2008-04-01

    While planning the COAST Expedition to the Siberian Laptev Sea in 2005, the question of how to make a short equilibrium temperature measurement in a dry borehole arose. As a result, an infrared borehole tool was developed and used in three dry boreholes (up to 60.2 m deep) in the coastal transition zone from terrestrial to sub-sea permafrost near Mamontovy Klyk in the western Laptev Sea. A depth versus temperature profile was acquired with equilibration times of 50 × 10-3 s at each depth interval. Comparison with a common resistor string revealed an offset due to limitations of accuracy of the infrared technique and the influence of the probe's massive steel housing. Therefore it was necessary to calibrate the infrared sensor with a high precision temperature logger in each borehole. The results of the temperature measurements show a highly dynamic transition zone with temperature gradients up to -0.092°C/m and heat flow of -218 mW/m. A period of submergence of only 600 years the drilled sub-sea permafrost is approaching the overlying seawater temperature at -1.61°C with a temperature gradient of 0.021°C/m and heat flow of 49 mW/m. Further offshore, 11 km from the coastline, a temperature gradient of 0.006°C/m and heat flow of 14 mW/m occur. Thus the sub-sea permafrost in the Mamontovy Klyk region has reached a critical temperature for the presence of interstitial ice. The aim of this article is to give a brief feasibility study of infrared downhole temperature measurements and to present experiences and results of its successful application.

  3. A nonintrusive temperature measuring system for estimating deep body temperature in bed.

    PubMed

    Sim, S Y; Lee, W K; Baek, H J; Park, K S

    2012-01-01

    Deep body temperature is an important indicator that reflects human being's overall physiological states. Existing deep body temperature monitoring systems are too invasive to apply to awake patients for a long time. Therefore, we proposed a nonintrusive deep body temperature measuring system. To estimate deep body temperature nonintrusively, a dual-heat-flux probe and double-sensor probes were embedded in a neck pillow. When a patient uses the neck pillow to rest, the deep body temperature can be assessed using one of the thermometer probes embedded in the neck pillow. We could estimate deep body temperature in 3 different sleep positions. Also, to reduce the initial response time of dual-heat-flux thermometer which measures body temperature in supine position, we employed the curve-fitting method to one subject. And thereby, we could obtain the deep body temperature in a minute. This result shows the possibility that the system can be used as practical temperature monitoring system with appropriate curve-fitting model. In the next study, we would try to establish a general fitting model that can be applied to all of the subjects. In addition, we are planning to extract meaningful health information such as sleep structure analysis from deep body temperature data which are acquired from this system.

  4. Non-contact temperature measurement of a falling drop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmeister, William; Bayuzick, R. J.; Robinson, M. B.

    1989-01-01

    The 105 meter drop tube at NASA-Marshall has been used in a number of experiments to determine the effects of containerless, microgravity processing on the undercooling and solidification behavior of metals and alloys. These experiments have been limited, however, because direct temperature measurement of the falling drops has not been available. Undercooling and nucleation temperatures are calculated from thermophysical properties based on droplet cooling models. In most cases these properties are not well known, particularly in the undercooled state. This results in a large amount of uncertainty in the determination of nucleation temperatures. If temperature measurement can be accomplished then the thermal history of the drops could be well documented. This would lead to a better understanding of the thermophysical and thermal radiative properties of undercooled melts. An effort to measure the temperature of a falling drop is under way. The technique uses two color pyrometry and high speed data acquisition. The approach is presented along with some preliminary data from drop tube experiments. The results from droplet cooling models is compared with noncontact temperature measurements.

  5. Hydrothermal Fluxes at the Turtle Pits Vent Site, southern MAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, J.; Walter, M.; Mertens, C.; Sültenfuß, J.; Rhein, M.

    2009-04-01

    The Turtle Pits vent fields are located in a north-south orientated rift valley at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) near 5oS. The site consists of three known hydrothermal fields: Turtle Pits, Comfortless Cove, and Red Lion. Data collected during a Meteor cruise in May 2006 and a L' Atalante cruise in January 2008 are used to calculate the total emission of volume, heat, and helium of the site. The data sets consist of vertical profiles and towed transsects of temperature, salinity, and turbidity, as well as direct velocity measurements with a lowered acoustic Doppler current profiler (LADCP) and water samples for Helium isotope analysis. Vent fluid samples for noble gas analysis where taken with an ROV. The particle plume is confined to the rift valley since the depth of the valley exceeds the rise height of the plume. Therefore the fluxes of heat and volume can be estimated from the helium fluxes at the vent sites in comparison with the horizontal helium transport in the valley. The comparison of the 3He concentration measured south of the hydrothermal vents with the 3He signal north of the hydrothermal vents suggests a rather strong northward flow. This is confirmed by the tide corrected velocities observed with the LADCP during the Meteor cruise. The northward volume transport has been calculated using the local bathymetry and tide corrected velocities from the Meteor cruise. In combination with the 3He concentrations and an average 3He end member concentration a flux of 900 l/s is estimated, which corresponds to a heat flux of 450 MW. The rise height of the particle plume estimated from the turbidity data combined with the known background stratification yields an estimate of the total flux of the hydrothermal vents which is one order of magnitude lower.

  6. NIR detection of pits and pit fragments in fresh cherries (abstract)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The feasibility of using near infrared (NIR) diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for the detection of pits and pit fragments in cherries was demonstrated. For detection of whole pits, 300 cherries were obtained locally and pits were removed from half. NIR reflectance spectra were obtained in triplicate...

  7. Factors affecting rectal temperature measurement using commonly available digital thermometers.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Jonathan M; Streeter, Renee M; Torgerson, Paul

    2012-02-01

    Rectal temperature measurement is an essential part of physical examination of cattle and some physiological experiments. Modern digital thermometers are often used to measure rectal temperatures by students; this study describes their reliability and appropriate use. Students measured rectal temperature on 53 occasions using their personal digital thermometer and techniques gained from previous instruction, rectal temperature was also measured by an experienced person using a Cornell mercury thermometer completely inserted in the rectum. Cornell mercury thermometers values were 38.95±0.05°C (mean±1 SE, n=53). Student rectal temperature measurements using their initial technique were nearly 0.5°C lower, 38.46±0.07°C. After receiving instruction to insert the digital thermometer to the window, student obtained values were 38.77±0.06°C; these are significantly higher than with the student's initial technique and closer to those obtained with a Cornell thermometer. In a series of 53 water bath tests, student owned thermometers recorded similar mean values to those of a traceable (reference) digital thermometer, Cornell mercury thermometer readings were 0.2°C higher. 10 individual digital thermometers were repeatedly tested against a traceable thermometer in a water bath, one was inaccurate. In a separate experiment a trained clinician tested the effect of angle of insertion of a digital thermometer on temperature readings and the affect was <0.1°C. We conclude that accurate temperature measurements using digital thermometers are only likely if the thermometer is inserted to the beginning of the window and the thermometer's accuracy is checked periodically.

  8. Density and Temperature Measurements in a Solar Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Harry P.; Winebarger, Amy R.

    2003-10-01

    We present electron density and temperature measurements from an active region observed above the limb with the Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation spectrometer on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. Density-sensitive line ratios from Si VIII and S X indicate densities greater than 108 cm-3 as high as 200" (or 145 Mm) above the limb. At these heights, static, uniformly heated loop models predict densities close to 107 cm-3. Differential emission measure analysis shows that the observed plasma is nearly isothermal with a mean temperature of about 1.5 MK and a dispersion of about 0.2 MK. Both the differential emission measure and the Si XI/Si VIII line ratios indicate only small variations in the temperature at the heights observed. These measurements confirm recent observations from the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer of ``overdense'' plasma at temperatures near 1 MK in solar active regions. Time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations suggest that impulsive heating models can account for the large densities, but they have a difficult time reproducing the narrow range of observed temperatures. The observations of overdense, nearly isothermal plasma in the solar corona provide a significant challenge to theories of coronal heating.

  9. Dynamic measurement of temperature using neutron resonance spectroscopy (NRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funk, D. J.; Asay, B. W.; Bennett, B. I.; Bowman, J. D.; Boat, R. M.; Dickson, P. M.; Henson, B. F.; Hull, L. M.; Idar, D. J.; Laabs, G. W.; London, R. K.; Mace, J. L.; Morgan, G. L.; Murk, D. M.; Rabie, R. L.; Ragan, C. E.; Stacy, H. L.; Yuan, V. W.

    1998-07-01

    Accurate temperature measurements in dynamic systems have been pursued for decades and have usually relied on optical techniques. These approaches are generally hampered by insufficient information regarding the emissivity of the system under study. We are developing NRS techniques to measure temperature in dynamic systems and overcome these limitations. Many neutron resonances have narrow intrinsic Breit-Wigner widths such that the resonance is substantially broadened by the atomic motion even at room temperature. Thus, accurate measurement of the Doppler contribution allows one to infer the material temperature, and for the conditions achieved using standard high explosives, the probe itself is not perturbed by the high temperature and pressure. Experiments are conducted using a pulsed spallation source at LANSCE with time-of-flight measurement of the neutron spectra. In initial experiments, we have demonstrated that measurements with ten percent accuracy are possible. We have fielded dynamic tests, most of which were neutron-flux limited. An overview of the approach and the status of our experimental campaign are discussed.

  10. Dynamic Measurement of Temperature using Neutron Resonance Spectroscopy (NRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funk, David J.; Asay, B. W.; Bennett, B. I.; Bowman, J. D.; Boat, R. M.; Henson, B. F.; Hixson, R. S.; Hull, L. M.; Laabs, G. W.; London, R. K.; Mace, J. L.; Morgan, G. L.; Murk, D. M.; Rabie, R. L.; Ragan, C. E.; Stacy, H. L.; Yuan, V. W.

    1997-07-01

    Accurate temperature measurements in dynamic systems have been pursued for decades and have usually relied on optical techniques. These approaches are generally hampered by insufficient information regarding the emissivity of the system under study. We are developing NRS techniques to measure temperature in dynamic systems and overcome these limitations. Many neutron resonances have narrow intrinsic Breit-Wigner widths such that the resonance is substantially broadened by the atomic motion even at room temperature. Thus, accurate measurement of the Doppler contribution allows one to infer the material temperature, and for the conditions achieved using standard high explosives, the probe itself is not perturbed by the high temperature and pressure. Experiments are conducted using a pulsed spallation source at LANSCE with time-of-flight measurement of the neutron spectra. In initial experiments, we have demonstrated that measurements with ten percent accuracy are possible. We have fielded dynamic tests, most of which were neutron-flux limited. An overview of the approach and the status of our experimental campaign will be discussed.

  11. Temperature measurements using multicolor pyrometry in thermal radiation heating environments

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Tairan; Liu, Jiangfan; Duan, Minghao; Zong, Anzhou

    2014-04-15

    Temperature measurements are important for thermal-structural experiments in the thermal radiation heating environments such as used for thermal-structural stress analyses. This paper describes the use of multicolor pyrometry for the measurements of diffuse surfaces in thermal radiation environments that eliminates the effects of background radiation reflections and unknown emissivities based on a least-squares algorithm. The near-infrared multicolor pyrometer had a spectral range of 1100–2400 nm, spectrum resolution of 6 nm, maximum sampling frequency of 2 kHz, working distance of 0.6 m to infinity, temperature range of 700–1700 K. The pyrometer wavelength response, nonlinear intensity response, and spectral response were all calibrated. The temperature of a graphite sample irradiated by quartz lamps was then measured during heating and cooling using the least-squares algorithm based on the calibrated irradiation data. The experiments show that higher temperatures and longer wavelengths are more suitable for the thermal measurements in the quartz lamp radiation heating system. This analysis provides a valuable method for temperature measurements of diffuse surfaces in thermal radiation environments.

  12. Measuring Systems for Thermometer Calibration in Low-Temperature Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szmyrka-Grzebyk, A.; Lipiński, L.; Manuszkiewicz, H.; Kowal, A.; Grykałowska, A.; Jancewicz, D.

    2011-12-01

    The national temperature standard for the low-temperature range between 13.8033 K and 273.16 K has been established in Poland at the Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research (INTiBS). The standard consists of sealed cells for realization of six fixed points of the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90) in the low-temperature range, an adiabatic cryostat and Isotech water and mercury triple-point baths, capsule standard resistance thermometers (CSPRT), and AC and DC bridges with standard resistors for thermometers resistance measurements. INTiBS calibrates CSPRTs at the low-temperature fixed points with uncertainties less than 1 mK. In lower temperature range—between 2.5 K and about 25 K — rhodium-iron (RhFe) resistance thermometers are calibrated by comparison with a standard which participated in the EURAMET.T-K1.1 comparison. INTiBS offers a calibration service for industrial platinum resistance thermometers and for digital thermometers between 77 K and 273 K. These types of thermometers may be calibrated at INTiBS also in a higher temperature range up to 550°C. The Laboratory of Temperature Standard at INTiBS acquired an accreditation from the Polish Centre for Accreditation. A management system according to EN ISO/IEC 17025:2005 was established at the Laboratory and presented on EURAMET QSM Forum.

  13. Ultraflexible, large-area, physiological temperature sensors for multipoint measurements

    PubMed Central

    Yokota, Tomoyuki; Inoue, Yusuke; Terakawa, Yuki; Reeder, Jonathan; Kaltenbrunner, Martin; Ware, Taylor; Yang, Kejia; Mabuchi, Kunihiko; Murakawa, Tomohiro; Sekino, Masaki; Voit, Walter; Sekitani, Tsuyoshi; Someya, Takao

    2015-01-01

    We report a fabrication method for flexible and printable thermal sensors based on composites of semicrystalline acrylate polymers and graphite with a high sensitivity of 20 mK and a high-speed response time of less than 100 ms. These devices exhibit large resistance changes near body temperature under physiological conditions with high repeatability (1,800 times). Device performance is largely unaffected by bending to radii below 700 µm, which allows for conformal application to the surface of living tissue. The sensing temperature can be tuned between 25 °C and 50 °C, which covers all relevant physiological temperatures. Furthermore, we demonstrate flexible active-matrix thermal sensors which can resolve spatial temperature gradients over a large area. With this flexible ultrasensitive temperature sensor we succeeded in the in vivo measurement of cyclic temperatures changes of 0.1 °C in a rat lung during breathing, without interference from constant tissue motion. This result conclusively shows that the lung of a warm-blooded animal maintains surprising temperature stability despite the large difference between core temperature and inhaled air temperature. PMID:26554008

  14. Ultraflexible, large-area, physiological temperature sensors for multipoint measurements.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Tomoyuki; Inoue, Yusuke; Terakawa, Yuki; Reeder, Jonathan; Kaltenbrunner, Martin; Ware, Taylor; Yang, Kejia; Mabuchi, Kunihiko; Murakawa, Tomohiro; Sekino, Masaki; Voit, Walter; Sekitani, Tsuyoshi; Someya, Takao

    2015-11-24

    We report a fabrication method for flexible and printable thermal sensors based on composites of semicrystalline acrylate polymers and graphite with a high sensitivity of 20 mK and a high-speed response time of less than 100 ms. These devices exhibit large resistance changes near body temperature under physiological conditions with high repeatability (1,800 times). Device performance is largely unaffected by bending to radii below 700 µm, which allows for conformal application to the surface of living tissue. The sensing temperature can be tuned between 25 °C and 50 °C, which covers all relevant physiological temperatures. Furthermore, we demonstrate flexible active-matrix thermal sensors which can resolve spatial temperature gradients over a large area. With this flexible ultrasensitive temperature sensor we succeeded in the in vivo measurement of cyclic temperatures changes of 0.1 °C in a rat lung during breathing, without interference from constant tissue motion. This result conclusively shows that the lung of a warm-blooded animal maintains surprising temperature stability despite the large difference between core temperature and inhaled air temperature.

  15. Time-resolved aluminium laser-induced plasma temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surmick, D. M.; Parigger, C. G.

    2014-11-01

    We seek to characterize the temperature decay of laser-induced plasma near the surface of an aluminium target from laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements of aluminium alloy sample. Laser-induced plasma are initiated by tightly focussing 1064 nm, nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser radiation. Temperatures are inferred from aluminium monoxide spectra viewed at systematically varied time delays by comparing experimental spectra to theoretical calculations with a Nelder Mead algorithm. The temperatures are found to decay from 5173 ± 270 to 3862 ± 46 Kelvin from 10 to 100 μs time delays following optical breakdown. The temperature profile along the plasma height is also inferred from spatially resolved spectral measurements and the electron number density is inferred from Stark broadened Hβ spectra.

  16. Calibration Method of an Ultrasonic System for Temperature Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chao; Wang, Yueke; Qiao, Chunjie; Dai, Weihua

    2016-01-01

    System calibration is fundamental to the overall accuracy of the ultrasonic temperature measurement, and it is basically involved in accurately measuring the path length and the system latency of the ultrasonic system. This paper proposes a method of high accuracy system calibration. By estimating the time delay between the transmitted signal and the received signal at several different temperatures, the calibration equations are constructed, and the calibrated results are determined with the use of the least squares algorithm. The formulas are deduced for calculating the calibration uncertainties, and the possible influential factors are analyzed. The experimental results in distilled water show that the calibrated path length and system latency can achieve uncertainties of 0.058 mm and 0.038 μs, respectively, and the temperature accuracy is significantly improved by using the calibrated results. The temperature error remains within ±0.04°C consistently, and the percentage error is less than 0.15%. PMID:27788252

  17. Airborne compact rotational Raman lidar for temperature measurement.

    PubMed

    Wu, Decheng; Wang, Zhien; Wechsler, Perry; Mahon, Nick; Deng, Min; Glover, Brent; Burkhart, Matthew; Kuestner, William; Heesen, Ben

    2016-09-05

    We developed an airborne compact rotational Raman lidar (CRL) for use on the University of Wyoming King Air (UWKA) aircraft to obtain two-dimensional (2D) temperature disman tributions. It obtained fine-scale 2D temperature distributions within 3 km below the aircraft for the first time during the PECAN (Plains Elevated Convection At Night) campaign in 2015. The CRL provided nighttime temperature measurements with a random error of <0.5 K within 800 m below aircraft at 45 m vertical and 1000 m horizontal resolution. The temperatures obtained by the CRL and a radiosonde agreed. Along with water vapor and aerosol measurements, the CRL provides critical parameters on the state of the lower atmosphere for a wide range of atmospheric research.

  18. Global surface temperature/heat transfer measurements using infrared imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran

    1992-01-01

    A series of studies were conducted to evaluate the use of scanning radiometric infrared imaging systems for providing global surface temperature/heat transfer measurements in support of hypersonic wind tunnel testing. The in situ precision of the technique with narrow temperature span setting over the temperature range of 20 to 200 C was investigated. The precision of the technique over wider temperature span settings was also determined. The accuracy of technique for providing aerodynamic heating rates was investigated by performing measurements on a 10.2-centimeter hemisphere model in the Langley 31-inch Mach 10 tunnel, and comparing the results with theoretical predictions. Data from tests conducted on a generic orbiter model in this tunnel are also presented.

  19. Development of coherent Raman measurements of temperature in condensed phases

    SciTech Connect

    Mcgrane, Shawn D; Dang, Nhan C; Bolme, Cindy A; Moore, David S

    2010-12-08

    We report theoretical considerations and preliminary data on various forms of coherent Raman spectroscopy that have been considered as candidates for measurement of temperature in condensed phase experiments with picosecond time resolution. Due to the inherent broadness and congestion of vibrational features in condensed phase solids, particularly at high temperatures and pressures, only approaches that rely on the ratio of anti-Stokes to Stokes spectral features are considered. Methods that rely on resolution of vibrational progressions, calibration of frequency shifts with temperature and pressure in reference experiments, or detailed comparison to calculation are inappropriate or impossible for our applications. In particular, we consider femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS), femtosecond/picosecond hybrid coherent Raman spectroscopy (multiplex CARS), and optical heterodyne detected femtosecond Raman induced Kerr Effect spectroscopy (OHD-FRIKES). We show that only FSRS has the ability to measure temperature via an anti-Stokes to Stokes ratio of peaks.

  20. Inverse estimation of near-field temperature and surface heat flux via single point temperature measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chen-Wu; Shu, Yong-Hua; Xie, Ji-Jia; Jiang, Jian-Zheng; Fan, Jing

    2017-02-01

    A concept was developed to inversely estimate the near-field temperature as well as the surface heat flux for the transient heat conduction problem with boundary condition of the unknown heat flux. The mathematical formula was derived for the inverse estimation of the near-field temperature and surface heat flux via a single point temperature measurement. The experiments were carried out in a vacuum chamber and the theoretically predicted temperatures were justified in specific positions. The inverse estimation principle was validated and the estimation deviation was evaluated for the present configuration.

  1. Innovative Instrumentation and Analysis of the Temperature Measurement for High Temperature Gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Seong W. Lee

    2005-10-01

    The objectives of this project during this semi-annual reporting period are to test the effects of coating layer of the thermal couple on the temperature measurement and to screen out the significant factors affecting the temperature reading under different operational conditions. The systematic tests of the gasifier simulator on the high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) spray coated thermal couples were completed in this reporting period. The comparison tests of coated and uncoated thermal couples were conducted under various operational conditions. The temperature changes were recorded and the temperature differences were calculated to describe the thermal spray coating effect on the thermal couples. To record the temperature data accurately, the computerized data acquisition system (DAS) was adopted to the temperature reading. The DAS could record the data with the accuracy of 0.1 C and the recording parameters are configurable. In these experiments, DAS was set as reading one data for every one (1) minute. The operational conditions are the combination of three parameters: air flow rate, water/ammonia flow rate and the amount of fine dust particles. The results from the temperature readings show the temperature of uncoated thermal couple is uniformly higher than that of coated thermal couple for each operational condition. Analysis of Variances (ANOVA) was computed based on the results from systematic tests to screen out the significant factors and/or interactions. The temperature difference was used as dependent variable and three operational parameters (i.e. air flow rate, water/ammonia flow rate and amount of fine dust particle) were used as independent factors. The ANOVA results show that the operational parameters are not the statistically significant factors affecting the temperature readings which indicate that the coated thermal couple could be applied to temperature measurement in gasifier. The actual temperature reading with the coated thermal couple in

  2. Silicon Carbide Temperature Monitor Measurements at the High Temperature Test Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    J. L. Rempe; K. G. Condie; D. L. Knudson; L. L. Snead

    2010-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) temperature monitors are now available for use as temperature sensors in Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) irradiation test capsules. Melt wires or paint spots, which are typically used as temperature sensors in ATR static capsules, are limited in that they can only detect whether a single temperature is or is not exceeded. SiC monitors are advantageous because a single monitor can be used to detect for a range of temperatures that may have occurred during irradiation. As part of the efforts initiated by the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to make SiC temperature monitors available, a capability was developed to complete post-irradiation evaluations of these monitors. As discussed in this report, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) selected the resistance measurement approach for detecting peak irradiation temperature from SiC temperature monitors. This document describes the INL efforts to develop the capability to complete these resistance measurements. In addition, the procedure is reported that was developed to assure that high quality measurements are made in a consistent fashion.

  3. Furthur development of the dynamic gas temperature measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmore, D. L.; Robinson, W. W.; Watkins, W. B.

    1984-01-01

    Candidate concepts capable of generating dynamic temperatures were identified and analyzed for use in verifying experimentally the frequency response of the dynamic gas temperature measurement system. A rotating wheel concept and one other concept will be selected for this purpose. Modifications to the data reduction code algorithms developed were identified and evaluated to reduce substantially the data reduction execution time. These modifications will be incorporated in a new data reduction program to be written in FORTRAN IV.

  4. The role of fiberoptics in remote temperature measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzetti, Riccardo

    1988-01-01

    The use of optical fibers in conjunction with infrared detectors and signal processing electronics represents the latest advance in the field of non-contact temperature measurement and control. The operating principles and design of fiber-optic radiometric systems are discussed and the advantages and disadvantages of using optical fibers are addressed. Signal processing requirements and various infrared detector types are also described. Several areas in which infrared fiber-optic instrumentation is used for temperature monitoring and control are discussed.

  5. Temperature and Density Measurements in a Quiet Coronal Streamer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Harry P.; Warshall, Andrew D.

    2002-06-01

    Many previous studies have used emission line or broadband filter ratios to infer the presence of temperature gradients in the quiet solar corona. Recently it has been suggested that these temperature gradients are not real, but result from the superposition of isothermal loops with different temperatures and density scale heights along the line of sight. A model describing this hydrostatic weighting bias has been developed by Aschwanden & Acton. In this paper we present the application of the Aschwanden & Acton differential emission measure model to Solar and Heliospheric Observatory Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) observations of a quiet coronal streamer. Simultaneous Yohkoh soft X-ray telescope (SXT) observations show increases in the filter ratios with height above the limb, indicating an increase in temperature. The application of the Aschwanden & Acton model to these SUMER data, however, show that the temperature is constant with height and that the distribution of temperatures in the corona is much too narrow for the hydrostatic weighting bias to have any effect on the SXT filter ratios. We consider the possibility that there is a tenuous hot component (~3 MK) that accounts for the SXT observations. We find that a hot plasma with an emission measure sufficient to reproduce the observed SXT fluxes would also produce significant count rates in the high-temperature emission lines in the SUMER wavelength range. These lines are not observed, and we conclude that the SUMER spectra are not consistent with the SXT filter ratio temperatures. Calculations from a hydrodynamic loop model suggest that nonuniform footpoint heating may be consistent with the temperatures and densities observed at most heights, consistent with the recent analysis of relatively cool (~1 MK) active region loops. We also find, however, that at the lowest heights the observed densities are smaller than those predicted by uniform or footpoint heating.

  6. Canopy Components Temperature Retrieval through Bayesian inversion of Directional measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmermans, J.; Verhoef, W.; van der Tol, C.; Jia, L.; Su, Z.

    2008-12-01

    In the calculation of Evapotranspiration the kinematic temperature of the individual canopy components plays a crucial role. Most remote sensing algorithms, like SEBAL and SEBS, use a single surface temperature to calculate the evapotranspiration. These algorithms break down when used for canopies with a heterogeneous kinematic temperature profile. A two-source or four-source approach would result in much more realistic values of the evapotranspiration. Single view Nadir looking sensors are not able to extract the multiple kinetic temperatures with high precision. The use of multi-directional sensors is therefore essential. A bi-angular setup is sufficient to separate soil and canopy temperatures (e.g. Jia et al. 2003). For separation of sunlit and shaded soil or vegetation temperatures measurements at additional angles are needed. Calculation of the component temperatures from measured thermal radiances requires the use of more sophisticated radiative transfer models, because the use of fractional vegetation cover alone is no longer sufficient for an inversion scheme for four components. The radiative transfer model used for the calculation of the component temperatures was the four stream SAIL radiative transfer model (Verhoef et al. 2007). We present the algorithm used and the results obtained for the Bayesian inversion. The results were obtained using several directional measurement configurations. The configurations were chosen such to represent various present and future satellite-borne sensors. In this way the configurations give a clear indication of the possibilities of multi-directional thermal remote sensing. References Jia. L. Li, Z. -I., Menenti, M., Su, Z., Verhoef, W. and Wan, Z. (2003), "A practical algorithm to infer soil and foliage component temperatures from bi-angular ATSR-2 data", International Journal of Remote Sensing, 24:23, 4739-4760. Verhoef, W. Jia, L. Xiao, Q. Su, Z., (2007), "Unified optical-thermal four-stream radiative transfer

  7. Temperature measurements of explosively driven strong shock waves in gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Yoshio; Yoshida, Masatake; Kakudate, Yozo; Usuba, Shu; Yamawaki, Hiroaki; Aoki, Katsutoshi; Tanaka, Katsumi; Fujiwara, Shuzo

    1992-03-01

    Two types of explosively driven shock tube; one-dimensional shock tube, and cumulative shock tube were used to generate strong shock waves in gases. Temperature measurements were made by using a spectroscope with eight-PIN photodiode system over the visible wavelength range (440-740 nm). The color temperature as well as the brightness temperature for one-dimensional shock tube with atmospheric pressure argon agreed fairly well with theoretical calculations; the brightness temperature was 18,000 K and 19,200 K for shock velocity of 4.8 km/s and 5.7 km/s respectively with an accuracy of +/- 500 K. The brightness temperature in the cumulative shock tube was 62,200 +/- 2,010 K at shock velocity of 27 km/s for atmospheric pressure air and agreed with theoretical values.

  8. Validation of Temperature Measurements from the Airborne Raman Ozone Temperature and Aerosol Lidar During SOLVE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burris, John; McGee, Thomas; Hoegy, Walter; Lait, Leslie; Twigg, Laurence; Sumnicht, Grant; Heaps, William; Hostetler, Chris; Bui, T. Paul; Neuber, Roland; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Airborne Raman Ozone, Temperature and Aerosol Lidar (AROTEL) participated in the recent Sage III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE) by providing profiles of aerosols, polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs), ozone and temperature with high vertical and horizontal resolution. Temperatures were derived from just above the aircraft to approximately 60 kilometers geometric altitude with a reported vertical resolution of between 0.5 and 1.5 km. The horizontal footprint varied from 4 to 70 km. This paper explores the measurement uncertainties associated with the temperature retrievals and makes comparisons with independent, coincident, measurements of temperature. Measurement uncertainties range from 0.1 K to approximately 4 K depending on altitude and integration time. Comparisons between AROTEL and balloon sonde temperatures retrieved under clear sky conditions using both Rayleigh and Raman scattered data showed AROTEL approximately 1 K colder than sonde values. Comparisons between AROTEL and the Meteorological Measurement System (MMS) on NASA's ER-2 show AROTEL being from 2-3 K colder for altitudes ranging from 14 to 18 km. Temperature comparisons between AROTEL and the United Kingdom Meteorological Office's model showed differences of approximately 1 K below approximately 25 km and a very strong cold bias of approximately 12 K at altitudes between 30 and 35 km.

  9. Temperature measurements behind reflected shock waves in air. [radiometric measurement of gas temperature in self-absorbing gas flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bader, J. B.; Nerem, R. M.; Dann, J. B.; Culp, M. A.

    1972-01-01

    A radiometric method for the measurement of gas temperature in self-absorbing gases has been applied in the study of shock tube generated flows. This method involves making two absolute intensity measurements at identical wavelengths, but for two different pathlengths in the same gas sample. Experimental results are presented for reflected shock waves in air at conditions corresponding to incident shock velocities from 7 to 10 km/s and an initial driven tube pressure of 1 torr. These results indicate that, with this technique, temperature measurements with an accuracy of + or - 5 percent can be carried out. The results also suggest certain facility related problems.

  10. USGS Polar Temperature Logging System, Description and Measurement Uncertainties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clow, Gary D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides an updated technical description of the USGS Polar Temperature Logging System (PTLS) and a complete assessment of the measurement uncertainties. This measurement system is used to acquire subsurface temperature data for climate-change detection in the polar regions and for reconstructing past climate changes using the 'borehole paleothermometry' inverse method. Specifically designed for polar conditions, the PTLS can measure temperatures as low as -60 degrees Celsius with a sensitivity ranging from 0.02 to 0.19 millikelvin (mK). A modular design allows the PTLS to reach depths as great as 4.5 kilometers with a skid-mounted winch unit or 650 meters with a small helicopter-transportable unit. The standard uncertainty (uT) of the ITS-90 temperature measurements obtained with the current PTLS range from 3.0 mK at -60 degrees Celsius to 3.3 mK at 0 degrees Celsius. Relative temperature measurements used for borehole paleothermometry have a standard uncertainty (urT) whose upper limit ranges from 1.6 mK at -60 degrees Celsius to 2.0 mK at 0 degrees Celsius. The uncertainty of a temperature sensor's depth during a log depends on specific borehole conditions and the temperature near the winch and thus must be treated on a case-by-case basis. However, recent experience indicates that when logging conditions are favorable, the 4.5-kilometer system is capable of producing depths with a standard uncertainty (uZ) on the order of 200-250 parts per million.

  11. Improved Measurement of the Rotor Temperature in Analytical Ultracentrifugation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huaying; Balbo, Andrea; Metger, Howard; Clary, Robert; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Schuck, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Sedimentation velocity is a classical method for measuring the hydrodynamic, translational friction coefficient of biological macromolecules. In a recent study, comparing various analytical ultracentrifuges, we have shown that external calibration of the scan time, radial magnification, and temperature are critically important for accurate measurements (Anal. Biochem., 2013, doi: 10.1016/j.ab.2013.05.011). To achieve accurate temperature calibration, we have introduced the use of an autonomous miniature temperature logging integrated circuit (Maxim Thermochron iButton ™) that can be inserted in an ultracentrifugation cell assembly and spun at low rotor speeds. In the present work, we developed an improved holder for the temperature sensor located in the rotor handle. This has the advantage of not reducing the rotor capacity and allows for a direct temperature measurement of the spinning rotor during high-speed sedimentation velocity experiments up to 60,000 rpm. We demonstrate the sensitivity of this approach by monitoring the adiabatic cooling due to rotor stretching during rotor acceleration, and the reverse process upon rotor deceleration. Based on this, we developed a procedure to approximate isothermal rotor acceleration for better temperature control. PMID:24530285

  12. ACCURATE TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS IN A NATURALLY-ASPIRATED RADIATION SHIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzeja, R.

    2009-09-09

    Experiments and calculations were conducted with a 0.13 mm fine wire thermocouple within a naturally-aspirated Gill radiation shield to assess and improve the accuracy of air temperature measurements without the use of mechanical aspiration, wind speed or radiation measurements. It was found that this thermocouple measured the air temperature with root-mean-square errors of 0.35 K within the Gill shield without correction. A linear temperature correction was evaluated based on the difference between the interior plate and thermocouple temperatures. This correction was found to be relatively insensitive to shield design and yielded an error of 0.16 K for combined day and night observations. The correction was reliable in the daytime when the wind speed usually exceeds 1 m s{sup -1} but occasionally performed poorly at night during very light winds. Inspection of the standard deviation in the thermocouple wire temperature identified these periods but did not unambiguously locate the most serious events. However, estimates of sensor accuracy during these periods is complicated by the much larger sampling volume of the mechanically-aspirated sensor compared with the naturally-aspirated sensor and the presence of significant near surface temperature gradients. The root-mean-square errors therefore are upper limits to the aspiration error since they include intrinsic sensor differences and intermittent volume sampling differences.

  13. Improved measurement of the rotor temperature in analytical ultracentrifugation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huaying; Balbo, Andrea; Metger, Howard; Clary, Robert; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Schuck, Peter

    2014-04-15

    Sedimentation velocity is a classical method for measuring the hydrodynamic, translational friction coefficient of biological macromolecules. In a recent study comparing various analytical ultracentrifuges, we showed that external calibration of the scan time, radial magnification, and temperature is critically important for accurate measurements (Anal. Biochem. 440 (2013) 81-95). To achieve accurate temperature calibration, we introduced the use of an autonomous miniature temperature logging integrated circuit (Maxim Thermochron iButton) that can be inserted into an ultracentrifugation cell assembly and spun at low rotor speeds. In the current work, we developed an improved holder for the temperature sensor located in the rotor handle. This has the advantage of not reducing the rotor capacity and allowing for a direct temperature measurement of the spinning rotor during high-speed sedimentation velocity experiments up to 60,000rpm. We demonstrated the sensitivity of this approach by monitoring the adiabatic cooling due to rotor stretching during rotor acceleration and the reverse process on rotor deceleration. Based on this, we developed a procedure to approximate isothermal rotor acceleration for better temperature control.

  14. Ultrasonic bent waveguides approach for distributed temperature measurement.

    PubMed

    Periyannan, Suresh; Rajagopal, Prabhu; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan

    2017-02-01

    This paper describes novel techniques for simultaneous measurement of temperatures at multiple locations using two configurations (a) a single transducer attached to multiple waveguides of different lengths (each with a single bend) and (b) single waveguide with multiple bends connected to single transducer. These techniques improve upon the earlier reported studies using straight waveguides, where the non-consideration of the effect of temperature gradients was found to be a major limitation. The range of temperature measurement is from room temperature to maximum utility temperature of the waveguide material. The time of flight difference of reflected ultrasonic longitudinal guided wave modes (L(0,1)) from the bend, which is the reference signal, and another signal from the end of the waveguide, is utilized to measure the local temperature of the surrounding media. Finite element simulations were employed to obtain the appropriate dimensions and other design features of the multiple bent waveguide. This work is of interest to several industrial applications involving melters and furnaces.

  15. Containerless high temperature property measurements by atomic fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiffman, R. A.; Walker, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) techniques for containerless study of high temperature processes and material properties was studied. Gas jet and electromagnetic levitation and electromagnetic and laser heating techniques are used with LIF in earth-based containerless high temperature experiments. Included are the development of an apparatus and its use in the studies of (1) chemical reactions on Al2O3, molybdenum, tungsten and LaB6 specimens, (2) methods for noncontact specimen temperature measurement, (3) levitation jet properties and (4) radiative lifetime and collisional energy transfer rates for electronically excited atoms.

  16. Containerless high temperature property measurements by atomic fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The use of laser induced fluorescence (LIF) techniques for containerless study of high temperature processes and material properties is studied. Gas jet and electromagnetic levitation and electromagnetic and laser heating techniques are used with LIF in Earth-based containerless high temperature experiments. The work to date includes development of an apparatus and its use in studies of chemical reactions on Al2O3, molybdenum, and tungsten specimens, novel methods for noncontact specimen temperature measurement, and levitation jet properties. Brief summaries of these studies are given. The apparatus is described and detailed results for the current reporting period are presented.

  17. Method and apparatus for simultaneously measuring temperature and pressure

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, Tomas B.; Haugen, Gilbert R.

    1988-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for simultaneously measuring temperature and pressure in a class of crystalline materials having anisotropic thermal coefficients and having a coefficient of linear compression along the crystalline c-axis substantially the same as those perpendicular thereto. Temperature is determined by monitoring the fluorescence half life of a probe of such crystalline material, e.g., ruby. Pressure is determined by monitoring at least one other fluorescent property of the probe that depends on pressure and/or temperature, e.g., absolute fluorescent intensity or frequency shifts of fluorescent emission lines.

  18. Global temperature distributions from OGO-6 6300 A airglow measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blamont, J. E.; Luton, J. M.; Nisbet, J. S.

    1974-01-01

    The OGO-6 6300 A airglow temperature measurements have been used to develop models of the global temperature distributions under solstice and equinox conditions for the altitude region from 240 to 300 km and for times ranging from dawn in this altitude region to shortly after sunset. The distributions are compared with models derived from satellite orbital decay and incoherent scatter sounding. The seasonal variation of the temperature as a function of latitude is shown to be very different from that derived from static diffusion models with constant boundary conditions.

  19. Diamond micro-Raman thermometers for accurate gate temperature measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Roland B.; Pomeroy, James W.; Kuball, Martin

    2014-05-26

    Determining the peak channel temperature in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors and other devices with high accuracy is an important and challenging issue. A surface-sensitive thermometric technique is demonstrated, utilizing Raman thermography and diamond microparticles to measure the gate temperature. This technique enhances peak channel temperature estimation, especially when it is applied in combination with standard micro-Raman thermography. Its application to other metal-covered areas of devices, such as field plates is demonstrated. Furthermore, this technique can be readily applied to other material/device systems.

  20. Nonintrusive measurement of temperature and velocity in free convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Stefan

    1993-12-01

    A technique for simultaneously measuring the temperature and velocity in liquid flows is developed. Small droplets of thermochromic liquid crystals, suspended in the liquid, serve as tracer particles. The color of the light reflected by the crystals yields the temperature, while their velocity was measured via PIV (particle image velocimetry) from their displacement in a time interval. The measurement and evaluation are performed by digital image processing of color video images. By shifting the plane of observation, a three dimensional flow field can be scanned. The technique was applied to the convective flow in a box with two differentially heated opposite side walls. Two cases were considered: the influence of the thermal boundary conditions on a stationary flow and the onset of convection in a fluid initially at rest after imposing a temperature difference on the heated walls. The results were compared with numerical simulations.

  1. Experimental Time Resolved Electron Beam Temperature Measurements Using Bremsstrahlung Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Menge, P.R.; Maenchen, J.E.; Mazarakis, M.G.; Rosenthal, S.E.

    1999-06-25

    Electron beam temperature, {beta}{perpendicular} (= v{perpendicular}/v), is important to control for the development of high dose flash radiographic bremsstrahlung sources. At high voltage (> 5 MV) increasing electron beam temperature has a serious deleterious effect on dose production. The average and time resolved behavior of beam temperature was measured during radiographic experiments on the HERMES III accelerator (10 MV, 50 kA, 70 ns). A linear array of thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were used to estimate the time integrated average of beam temperature. On and off-axis photoconducting diamond (PCD) detectors were used to measure the time resolved bremsstrahlung dose rate, which is dependent on beam energy and temperature. The beam temperature can be determined by correlating PCD response with accelerator voltage and current and also by analyzing the ratio of PCD amplitudes on and off axis. This ratio is insensitive to voltage and current and thus, is more reliable than utilizing absolute dose rate. The data is unfolded using comparisons with Monte Carlo simulations to obtain absolute beam temperatures. The data taken on HERMES III show abrupt increases in {beta}{perpendicular} midway through the pulse indicating rapid onset of beam instability.

  2. HIGH TEMPERATURE HIGH PRESSURE THERMODYNAMIC MEASUREMENTS FOR COAL MODEL COMPOUNDS

    SciTech Connect

    Vinayak N. Kabadi

    1999-02-24

    The enthalpy of a fluid measured with respect to some reference temperature and pressure (enthalpy increment or Cp) is required for many engineering designs. Different techniques for determining enthalpy increments include direct measurement, integration of heat capacity as a function of temperature at constant pressure, and calculation from accurate density measurements as a function of temperature and pressure with ideal-gas enthalpies. Techniques have been developed for measurement of heat capacities using differential scanning calorimeters, but routine measurements with a precision better than 3% are rare. For thermodynamic model development, excess enthalpies or enthalpies of mixing of binary and ternary systems are generally required. Although these data can be calculated from measured values of incremental enthalpies of mixtures and corresponding pure components, the method of calculation involves subtraction of large numbers, and it is impossible to obtain accurate results from relatively accurate incremental enthalpy data. Directly measured heats of mixing provide better data for model development. In what follows, we give a brief literature survey of experimental methods available for measurement of incremental enthalpies as well as heats of mixing.

  3. Structural Origins of Martian Pit Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyrick, D.; Ferrill, D. A.; Morris, A. P.; Colton, S. L.; Sims, D. W.

    2003-12-01

    Pit craters are circular to elliptical depressions found in alignments (chains), which in many cases coalesce into linear troughs, and are common on the surface of Mars. Pit craters lack an elevated rim, ejecta deposits, or lava flows that are associated with impact craters or calderas. It is generally agreed that these features are formed by collapse into a subsurface cavity. Hypotheses regarding the formation of pit crater chains require development of a substantial subsurface void to accommodate collapse of the overlying sediments. Suggested mechanisms of formation include: collapsed lava tubes, dike swarms, collapsed magma chamber, karst dissolution, fissuring beneath loose material, and dilational faulting. The research described here is intended to constrain current interpretations of pit crater chain formation by analyzing their distribution and morphology. The western hemisphere of Mars was systematically mapped using Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) images to generate ArcView Geographic Information System (GIS) coverages. All visible pit crater chains were mapped, including their orientations and associations with other structures. We found that pit chains commonly occur in areas that show regional extension or local fissuring. There is a strong correlation between pit chains and fault-bounded grabens. Frequently, there are transitions along strike from (i) visible faulting to (ii) faults and pits to (iii) pits alone. We performed a detailed quantitative analysis of pit crater morphology using MOC narrow angle images, Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) visual images and Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) data. This allowed us to interpret a pattern of pit chain evolution and calculate pit depth, slope, and volume. The information collected in the study was then compared with non-Martian examples of pit chains and physical analog models. We evaluated the various mechanisms for pit chain development based on the data collected and conclude that dilational

  4. Agreement between rectal and vaginal temperature measured with temperature loggers in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Suthar, Vishal; Burfeind, Onno; Maeder, Britta; Heuwieser, Wolfgang

    2013-05-01

    The overall objective of this study was to evaluate agreement between rectal (RT) and vaginal temperature (VT) measured with the same temperature loggers in dairy cows. Three experiments were conducted. The study began with a validation in vitro of 24 temperature loggers comparing them to a calibrated liquid-in-glass thermometer as a reference method. The association and agreement between the 24 temperature loggers with the reference method was r=0.996 (P<0.001) with a negligible coefficient of variance (0.005) between the loggers. In-vivo temperature loggers were tested in 11 healthy post-partum cows (Experiment 2) and 12 early post-partum cows with greater body temperature (Experiment 3). Temperature loggers were set to record VT and RT at 1-min intervals. To prevent rectal and vaginal straining and potential expulsion of temperature logger an epidural injection of 2.5 ml of 2% Procain was administered. Association between RT and VT was r=0.92 (P<0.001; Experiment 2) and r=0.94 (P<0.001; Experiment 3) with a negligible difference of -0.1 and 0.01 °C. Bland-Altman plots demonstrated agreement between RT and VT for healthy and early post-partum cows with greater body temperature in Experiments 2 and 3, respectively. Furthermore the intra-class correlation coefficient between RT and VT measured with identical loggers within cows of Experiments 2 and 3 also demonstrated greater agreements (P<0.001). Therefore, continuous VT monitoring with temperature loggers can be used as a measure of body temperature in dairy cows.

  5. Temperature measurement of ceramics in furnaces by 3-color thermograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Takuya; Hashimoto, Miyuki; Yano, Kenji; Tamura, Tetsuo; Iwata, Misao; Kitagawa, Kuniyuki; Arai, Norio

    2002-03-01

    Temperature control in the sintering process is important to secure the quality of ceramics. We have usually controlled the sintering process indirectly by making use of the temperature of the inside of a furnace. It has been a general understanding that infrared radiometric thermograph is not suitable for measuring directly the temperature of the targets such as ceramics placed in the furnace because of emissivity dependence of the targets and because of the effect of reflection from the furnace wall. The same can be said to 2-colored thermometers because of them, too, it has been impossible to eliminate the effect of reflection for correct temperature measurement. Recently we, however, contrive two new methods for direct measurement of the surface temperature of ceramics using a 3-colored thermograph. One is to measure the indefinite emissivity of the inside of a furnace and the effect of reflection from the furnace wall. The other is to eliminate such indefinite emissivity and effect of reflection. We will report the new methods of 3-colored thermograph and the result of inspecting the said methods.

  6. Ion temperature fluctuation measurements using a retarding field analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Nedzelskiy, I. S.; Silva, C.; Duarte, P.; Fernandes, H.

    2011-04-15

    The retarding field analyzer (RFA) is a widely used diagnostic tool for the ion temperature measurement in the scrape-off-layer (SOL) of the thermonuclear plasma devices. However, the temporal resolution in the standard RFA application is restricted to the ms timescale. In this paper, a dc operation of the RFA is considered, which allows for the measurement of the plasma ion temperature fluctuations. The method is based on the relation for the RFA current-voltage (I-V) characteristic resulted from a common RFA model of shifted Maxwellian distribution of the analyzed ions, and the measurements of two points on the exponentially decaying region of the I-V characteristic with two differently dc biased RFA electrodes. The method has been tested and compared with conventional RFA measurements of the ion temperature in the tokamak ISTTOK SOL plasma. An ion temperature of T{sub i}= 17 eV is obtained near the limiter position. The agreement between the results of the two methods is within {approx}25%. The amplitude of the ion temperature fluctuations is found to be around 5 eV at this location. The method has been validated by taking into account the effect of fluctuations in the plasma potential and the noise contamination, proving the reliability of the results obtained. Finally, constrains to the method application are discussed that include a negligible electron emission from the RFA grids and the restriction to operate in the exponentially decaying region of the I-V characteristic.

  7. Ion temperature fluctuation measurements using a retarding field analyzer.

    PubMed

    Nedzelskiy, I S; Silva, C; Duarte, P; Fernandes, H

    2011-04-01

    The retarding field analyzer (RFA) is a widely used diagnostic tool for the ion temperature measurement in the scrape-off-layer (SOL) of the thermonuclear plasma devices. However, the temporal resolution in the standard RFA application is restricted to the ms timescale. In this paper, a dc operation of the RFA is considered, which allows for the measurement of the plasma ion temperature fluctuations. The method is based on the relation for the RFA current-voltage (I-V) characteristic resulted from a common RFA model of shifted Maxwellian distribution of the analyzed ions, and the measurements of two points on the exponentially decaying region of the I-V characteristic with two differently dc biased RFA electrodes. The method has been tested and compared with conventional RFA measurements of the ion temperature in the tokamak ISTTOK SOL plasma. An ion temperature of T(i) = 17 eV is obtained near the limiter position. The agreement between the results of the two methods is within ∼25%. The amplitude of the ion temperature fluctuations is found to be around 5 eV at this location. The method has been validated by taking into account the effect of fluctuations in the plasma potential and the noise contamination, proving the reliability of the results obtained. Finally, constrains to the method application are discussed that include a negligible electron emission from the RFA grids and the restriction to operate in the exponentially decaying region of the I-V characteristic.

  8. An autonomous profiler for near surface temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Brian; Minnett, Peter J.

    This paper describes the profiling instrument SkinDeEP (Skin Depth Experimental Profiler), which measures the temperature of the water column from a depth of about 6 meters to the surface with high resolution thermometers. The instrument operates in an autonomous mode as it has the capability to change buoyancy by inflating a neoprene bladder attached to the body of the profiler. Measurements are recorded only during the ascending phase of the profile so as to minimize disturbances at the surface. Results from deployment of the profiler show strong temperature gradients within the bulk waters under conditions of high insolation. These data were compared to the skin temperatures as measured by the M-AERI (Marine—Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer), a high accuracy infrared spectroradiometer. The corresponding bulk-skin temperature differences, ΔT, were shown to have strong dependence on the depth of the bulk measurement during the daytime with low wind speeds, but at higher wind speeds, the depth dependence vanishes. One set of profiles under nighttime conditions is also presented, showing the presence of overturning and thus a heterogeneous temperature structure within the bulk.

  9. High temperature strain measurement with a resistance strain gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lei, Jih-Fen; Fichtel, ED; Mcdaniel, Amos

    1993-01-01

    A PdCr based electrical resistance strain gage was demonstrated in the laboratory to be a viable sensor candidate for static strain measurement at high temperatures. However, difficulties were encountered while transferring the sensor to field applications. This paper is therefore prepared for recognition and resolution of the problems likely to be encountered with PdCr strain gages in field applications. Errors caused by the measurement system, installation technique and lead wire attachment are discussed. The limitations and some considerations related to the temperature compensation technique used for this gage are also addressed.

  10. 7 CFR 52.779 - Freedom from pits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Freedom from pits. 52.779 Section 52.779 Agriculture... Freedom from pits. (a) General. The factor of freedom from pits refers to the incidence of pits and pit... 17 points. Canned red tart pitted cherries that fall into this classification shall not be...

  11. Turbine-engine applications of thermographic-phosphor temperature measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, B.W.; Turley, W.D.; Allison, S.W.

    1995-12-31

    The thermographic-phosphor (TP) method can measure temperature, heat flux, strain, and other physical quantities remotely in hostile and/or inaccessible environments such as the first-stage turbine components in turbine engines. It is especially useful in situations in which no other known method works well. This paper is a brief review of engine tests that demonstrated the utility of the TP method. For the most part, the results presented here are discussed only qualitatively. The papers in the bibliography describe these and other experiments and results in detail. The first viewgraph summarizes the many desirable features of the TP method. The second viewgraph describes TPs, and the third summarizes how the TP method works. To measure single-point temperatures in turbine-engine applications, we use the decay-time method, which depends on the fact that the luminescence following an impulse of ultraviolet excitation decays, with a characteristic decay time that. Is a monotonically decreasing function of temperature over some range of temperatures. The viewgraph is a set of calibration curves showing the behavior of some useful emission lines for ten important TPs. Consider Lu PO{sub 4}:Eu as an example. Below the {open_quotes}quenching{close_quotes} temperature near 900 Y, the decay time is nearly constant. Above it, the decay time decreases exponentially with the temperature. This strong functional dependence means that one can have a fairly large error in the lifetime measurement, as in environments with poor signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), yet still obtain high accuracy in the temperature measurement. Our more-recent data up to 1900 K show the same behavior.

  12. Low temperature measurement of the vapor pressures of planetary molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraus, George F.

    1989-01-01

    Interpretation of planetary observations and proper modeling of planetary atmospheres are critically upon accurate laboratory data for the chemical and physical properties of the constitutes of the atmospheres. It is important that these data are taken over the appropriate range of parameters such as temperature, pressure, and composition. Availability of accurate, laboratory data for vapor pressures and equilibrium constants of condensed species at low temperatures is essential for photochemical and cloud models of the atmospheres of the outer planets. In the absence of such data, modelers have no choice but to assume values based on an educated guess. In those cases where higher temperature data are available, a standard procedure is to extrapolate these points to the lower temperatures using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation. Last summer the vapor pressures of acetylene (C2H2) hydrogen cyanide (HCN), and cyanoacetylene (HC3N) was measured using two different methods. At the higher temperatures 1 torr and 10 torr capacitance manometers were used. To measure very low pressures, a technique was used which is based on the infrared absorption of thin film (TFIR). This summer the vapor pressure of acetylene was measured the TFIR method. The vapor pressure of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) was measured using capacitance manometers. Results for H2O agree with literature data over the common range of temperature. At the lower temperatures the data lie slightly below the values predicted by extrapolation of the Clausius-Clapeyron equation. Thin film infrared (TFIR) data for acetylene lie significantly below the values predicted by extrapolation. It is hoped to bridge the gap between the low end of the CM data and the upper end of the TFIR data in the future using a new spinning rotor gauge.

  13. Advances in Fast Response Acoustically Derived Air Temperature Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogoev, Ivan; Jacobsen, Larry; Horst, Thomas; Conrad, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    Fast-response accurate air-temperature measurements are required when estimating turbulent fluxes of heat, water and carbon dioxide by open-path eddy-covariance technique. In comparison with contact thermometers like thermocouples, ultra-sonic thermometers do not suffer from solar radiation loading, water vapor condensation and evaporative cooling effects. Consequently they have the potential to provide more accurate true air temperature measurements. The absolute accuracy of the ultrasonic thermometer is limited by the following parameters: the distance between the transducer pairs, transducer delays associated with the electrical-acoustic signal conversion that vary with temperature, components of the wind vector that are normal to the ultrasonic paths, and humidity. The distance between the transducer pairs is commonly obtained by coordinate measuring machine. Improved accuracy demonstrated in this study results from increased stiffness in the anemometer head to better maintain the ultrasonic path-length distances. To further improve accuracy and account for changes in transducer delays and distance as a function of temperature, these parameters are characterized in a zero-wind chamber over the entire operating temperature range. When the sonic anemometer is combined with a co-located fast-response water vapor analyzer, like in the IRGASON instrument, speed of sound can be compensated for humidity effects on a point-by-point basis resulting in a true fast-response air temperature measurement. Laboratory test results show that when the above steps are implemented in the calibration of the ultrasonic thermometer air-temperature accuracy better than ±0.5 degrees Celsius can be achieved over the entire operating range. The approach is also validated in a field inter-comparison with an aspirated thermistor probe mounted in a radiation shield.

  14. A lidar system for measuring atmospheric pressure and temperature profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.; Dombrowski, Mark; Korb, C. Laurence; Milrod, Jeffry; Walden, Harvey

    1987-01-01

    The design and operation of a differential absorption lidar system capable of remotely measuring the vertical structure of tropospheric pressure and temperature are described. The measurements are based on the absorption by atmospheric oxygen of the spectrally narrowband output of two pulsed alexandrite lasers. Detailed laser output spectral characteristics, which are critical to successful lidar measurements, are presented. Spectral linewidths of 0.026 and 0.018 per cm for the lasers were measured with over 99.99 percent of the energy contained in three longitudinal modes.

  15. Validation of UARS Microwave Limb Sounder Temperature and Pressure Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishbein, E. F.; Cofield, R. E.; Froidevaux, L.; Jarnot, R. F.; Lungu, T.; Read, W. G.; Shippony, Z.; Waters, J. W.; McDermid, I. S.; McGee, T. J.; Singh, U.; Gross, M.; Hauchecorne, A.; Keckhut, P.; Gelman, M. E.; Nagatani, R. M.

    1996-01-01

    The accuracy and precision of the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) atmospheric temperature and tangent-point pressure measurements are described. Temperatures and tangent- point pressure (atmospheric pressure at the tangent height of the field of view boresight) are retrieved from a 15-channel 63-GHz radiometer measuring O2 microwave emissions from the stratosphere and mesosphere. The Version 3 data (first public release) contains scientifically useful temperatures from 22 to 0.46 hPa. Accuracy estimates are based on instrument performance, spectroscopic uncertainty and retrieval numerics, and range from 2.1 K at 22 hPa to 4.8 K at 0.46 hPa for temperature and from 200 m (equivalent log pressure) at 10 hPa to 300 m at 0.1 hPa. Temperature accuracy is limited mainly by uncertainty in instrument characterization, and tangent-point pressure accuracy is limited mainly by the accuracy of spectroscopic parameters. Precisions are around 1 K and 100 m. Comparisons are presented among temperatures from MLS, the National Meteorological Center (NMC) stratospheric analysis and lidar stations at Table Mountain, California, Observatory of Haute Provence (OHP), France, and Goddard Spaceflight Center, Maryland. MLS temperatures tend to be 1-2 K lower than NMC and lidar, but MLS is often 5 - 10 K lower than NMC in the winter at high latitudes, especially within the northern hemisphere vortex. Winter MLS and OHP (44 deg N) lidar temperatures generally agree and tend to be lower than NMC. Problems with Version 3 MLS temperatures and tangent-point pressures are identified, but the high precision of MLS radiances will allow improvements with better algorithms planned for the future.

  16. Brain temperature measurement: A study of in vitro accuracy and stability of smart catheter temperature sensors.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunyan; Wu, Pei-Ming; Wu, Zhizhen; Ahn, Chong H; LeDoux, David; Shutter, Lori A; Hartings, Jed A; Narayan, Raj K

    2012-02-01

    The injured brain is vulnerable to increases in temperature after severe head injury. Therefore, accurate and reliable measurement of brain temperature is important to optimize patient outcome. In this work, we have fabricated, optimized and characterized temperature sensors for use with a micromachined smart catheter for multimodal intracranial monitoring. Developed temperature sensors have resistance of 100.79 ± 1.19Ω and sensitivity of 67.95 mV/°C in the operating range from15-50°C, and time constant of 180 ms. Under the optimized excitation current of 500 μA, adequate signal-to-noise ratio was achieved without causing self-heating, and changes in immersion depth did not introduce clinically significant errors of measurements (<0.01°C). We evaluated the accuracy and long-term drift (5 days) of twenty temperature sensors in comparison to two types of commercial temperature probes (USB Reference Thermometer, NIST-traceable bulk probe with 0.05°C accuracy; and IT-21, type T type clinical microprobe with guaranteed 0.1°C accuracy) under controlled laboratory conditions. These in vitro experimental data showed that the temperature measurement performance of our sensors was accurate and reliable over the course of 5 days. The smart catheter temperature sensors provided accuracy and long-term stability comparable to those of commercial tissue-implantable microprobes, and therefore provide a means for temperature measurement in a microfabricated, multimodal cerebral monitoring device.

  17. Reconstructing bottom water temperatures from measurements of temperature and thermal diffusivity in marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miesner, F.; Lechleiter, A.; Müller, C.

    2015-07-01

    Continuous monitoring of oceanic bottom water temperatures is a complicated task, even in relatively easy-to-access basins like the North or Baltic seas. Here, a method to determine annual bottom water temperature variations from inverse modeling of instantaneous measurements of temperatures and sediment thermal properties is presented. This concept is similar to climate reconstructions over several thousand years from deep borehole data. However, in contrast, the presented method aims at reconstructing the recent temperature history of the last year from sediment thermal properties and temperatures from only a few meters depth. For solving the heat equation, a commonly used forward model is introduced and analyzed: knowing the bottom water temperature variations for the preceding years and the thermal properties of the sediments, the forward model determines the sediment temperature field. The bottom water temperature variation is modeled as an annual cosine defined by the mean temperature, the amplitude and a phase shift. As the forward model operator is non-linear but low-dimensional, common inversion schemes such as the Newton algorithm can be utilized. The algorithms are tested for artificial data with different noise levels and for two measured data sets: from the North Sea and from the Davis Strait. Both algorithms used show stable and satisfying results with reconstruction errors in the same magnitude as the initial data error. In particular, the artificial data sets are reproduced with accuracy within the bounds of the artificial noise level. Furthermore, the results for the measured North Sea data show small variances and resemble the bottom water temperature variations recorded from a nearby monitoring site with relative errors smaller than 1 % in all parameters.

  18. Measuring Rocket Engine Temperatures with Hydrogen Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrmeyer, Joseph A.; Osborne, Robin J.; Trinh, Huu P.

    2003-09-01

    Optically accessible, high-pressure, hot-fire test articles are available at NASA-Marshall for use in development of advanced rocket-engine propellant injectors. Single laser-pulse UV Raman spectroscopy has been used, in the past, in these devices for analysis of high pressure H2- and CH4-fueled combustion, but relies on an independent pressure measurement in order to provide temperature information. A variation of UV Raman (High Resolution Hydrogen Raman Spectroscopy) is under development and will allow temperature measurement without the need for an independent pressure measurement, useful for flows where local pressure may not be accurately known. The technique involves the use of a spectrometer with good spectral resolution, requiring a small entrance slit for the spectrometer. The H2 Raman spectrum, when created by a narrow-linewidth laser source and obtained from a good spectral resolution spectrograph, has a spectral shape related to temperature. By best-fit matching an experimental spectrum to theoretical spectra at various temperatures, a temperature measurement is obtained. The spectral model accounts for collisional narrowing, collisional broadening, Doppler broadening, and collisional line shifting of each Raman line making up the H2 Stokes vibrational Q-branch spectrum. At pressures from atmospheric up to those associated with advanced preburner components (5500 psia), collisional broadening, though present, does not cause significant overlap of the Raman lines, allowing high resolution H2 Raman to be used for temperature measurements in plumes and in high pressure test articles. Experimental demonstrations of the technique are performed for rich H2-air flames at atmospheric pressure. Spectrometer imaging quality is identified as being critical for successful implementation of the technique.

  19. Measuring Rocket Engine Temperatures with Hydrogen Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wehrmeyer, Joseph A.; Osborne, Robin J.; Trinh, Huu P.; Turner, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Optically accessible, high pressure, hot fire test articles are available at NASA Marshall for use in development of advanced rocket engine propellant injectors. Single laser-pulse ultraviolet (UV) Raman spectroscopy has been used in the past in these devices for analysis of high pressure H2- and CH4-fueled combustion, but relies on an independent pressure measurement in order to provide temperature information. A variation of UV Raman (High Resolution Hydrogen Raman Spectroscopy) is under development and will allow temperature measurement without the need for an independent pressure measurement, useful for flows where local pressure may not be accurately known. The technique involves the use of a spectrometer with good spectral resolution, requiring a small entrance slit for the spectrometer. The H2 Raman spectrum, when created by a narrow linewidth laser source and obtained from a good spectral resolution spectrograph, has a spectral shape related to temperature. By best-fit matching an experimental spectrum to theoretical spectra at various temperatures, a temperature measurement is obtained. The spectral model accounts for collisional narrowing, collisional broadening, Doppler broadening, and collisional line shifting of each Raman line making up the H2 Stokes vibrational Q-branch spectrum. At pressures from atmospheric up to those associated with advanced preburner components (5500 psia), collisional broadening though present does not cause significant overlap of the Raman lines, allowing high resolution H2 Raman to be used for temperature measurements in plumes and in high pressure test articles. Experimental demonstrations of the technique are performed for rich H2-air flames at atmospheric pressure and for high pressure, 300 K H2-He mixtures. Spectrometer imaging quality is identified as being critical for successful implementation of technique.

  20. Studying Stratospheric Temperature Variation with Cosmic Ray Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaohang; He, Xiaochun

    2015-04-01

    The long term stratospheric cooling in recent decades is believed to be equally important as surface warming as evidence of influences of human activities on the climate system. Un- fortunatly, there are some discrepancies among different measurements of stratospheric tem- peratures, which could be partially caused by the limitations of the measurement techniques. It has been known for decades that cosmic ray muon flux is sensitive to stratospheric temperature change. Dorman proposed that this effect could be used to probe the tempera- ture variations in the stratophere. In this talk, a method for reconstructing stratospheric temperature will be discussed. We verify this method by comparing the stratospheric tem- perature measured by radiosonde with the ones derived from cosmic ray measurement at multiple locations around the globe.

  1. [Study of plasma temperature measurements for oxygen discharge].

    PubMed

    Li, Liu-Cheng; Wang, Zeng-Qiang; Li, Gu-Fu; Duo, Li-Ping

    2011-10-01

    A radio-frequency discharge setup was constructed by two shell-shaped copper electrodes and a 30 cm long pyrex glass tube (i. d. = 1.65 cm) to examine the gas temperature of oxygen plasma in electric discharge oxygen iodine laser. The discharge was supplied by a 500 watt, 13.56 MHz radio-frequency power. The gas pressure in the discharge cavity was 1 330 Pa. The temperature of oxygen discharge plasma was measured by using the P branch of O2 (b, v = 0) rotational emission spectrum. Two methods were used to deduce the oxygen gas temperature. They are Boltzman plotting method and computer simulating spectrum method, respectively. Gauss fitting method was used to distinguish spectrum peaks for lower resolution spectrum. The spectrum peak area was used to characterize the optical emission intensity. The gas temperature of oxygen discharge plasma was obtained by Boltzmann plotting method. Alternatively, the optical emission spectrum was simulated by computer modeling with spectrometer slit function which was obtained by He-Ne laser. Consequently, the gas temperature of oxygen plasma was obtained by comparing the computer simulating spectrum and the experimentally observed spectrum according to the least square fitting rule. The measurement results with the two methods agree well. It was concluded that the simple optical technique can be used conveniently in the temperature diagnostics of oxygen radio-frequency discharge plasma.

  2. Temperature measurements during the CAMP program. [Cold Arctic Mesopause Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philbrick, C. R.; Barnett, J.; Gerndt, R.; Offermann, D.; Pendleton, W. R., Jr.; Schlyter, P.; Witt, G.; Schmidlin, J. F.

    1984-01-01

    The Cold Arctic Mesopause Program (CAMP) was conducted at ESRANGE, Sweden, in July/August 1982. During the time period of several weeks, the temperature was monitored by ground-based OH emission spectrometers and by satellite radiance measurements. Rocket launchings occurred on the nights of 3/4 and 11/12 August. On 3/4 August, seven rocket payloads were launched during a period of noctilucent cloud sighting over ESRANGE. The presence of the NLC was confirmed by several rocket-borne photometer profiles. The temperature measurements showed that the temperature profiles in the stratosphere and lower mesosphere were near the expected values of high latitude summer models. A large amplitude wave structure with three temperature minima of 139K, 114K and 111K were observed at altitudes between 83 and 94 km. The temperature minimum at 83 km was the location of the observed NLC. The temperature minima caused by the growth of the gravity wave amplitude in the highly stable mesosphere provide the regions for the growth of particles by nucleation to optical scattering size, as well as regions where the nuclei for condensation can be formed through ion chemistry paths.

  3. Seasonal variations of snow chemistry and mineral dust in the snow pit at GV7, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jung-Ho; Hwang, Heejin; Han, Yongchoul; Hong, Sang Bum; Lee, Khanghyun; Do Hur, Soon; Frezzotti, Massimo; Narcisi, Biancamaria

    2015-04-01

    We conducted the scientific ice coring project led by PNRA and KOPRI during the 2013/2014 Italian-Korean Antarctic Expedition in the framework of International Partnerships in Ice Core Science (IPICS) to understand the climatic variability in the last 2000 years. In the part of project, we collected a 3.0 m-depth snow pit at the site of GV7 (S 70° 41'17.1", E 158° 51'48.9", 1950 m a.s.l.), Antarctica. Here, we present the results obtained from the analysis of the water isotope compositions, the major ion concentrations, and the mineral dust concentrations from the snow pit. Snow densities and temperatures also measured in the field. At KOPRI, the samples were melted, then the stable water isotopes, major ions, and particle size distribution were analyzed with the cavity ring-down spectrometers (L1102-i, Piccaro), ion chromatography (ICS-2100, Thermo), and coulter counter (Multisizer 3, Beckman Coulter), respectively. The δ18O varies between -38.3 and -24.1o with a mean value of -31.0o. The δD ranges between -331 and -186o with a mean value of -243o. Among the ion concentrations (Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Cl-, SO42-, CH3SO3-(MSA)) from the snow pit, MSA concentrations show a clear seasonal variation. The mineral dust in the pit characterized with the differences of the concentration and the particle size distribution by the seasonality. These data allow us to assume about 4.5 years of snow deposition covered from 2009 to 2013 by these oscillations of the isotopes and geochemical characteristics.

  4. Dynamic temperature and velocity measurements using neutron resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, V.W.; Asay, B.W.; Boat, R.

    1997-08-01

    The use of Doppler broadening in neutron resonances as a quantitative way to measure temperatures has been proposed and investigated for cases of static or quasi-static temperature measurements. Neutrons are temperature probes that can penetrate a sample to view its interior. At the same time products that may shield a sample optically are not opaque to neutrons so that temperature measurements can be made in their presence. When neutrons are attenuated by a sample material, the time-of-flight (TOF) spectrum of the transmitted neutrons exhibits a series of characteristic dips or resonances. These resonances appear when neutrons are captured from the beam in the formation of excited states in the A + 1 nucleus (n + A {ge} (A + 1){sup *}). Subsequent de-excitation of these states, by gamma emission or particle emission into 4{pi} steradians, effectively eliminates the captured neutrons from the transmitted beam. The resonance locations and lineshapes which appear in the TOF spectrum are unique to each isotopic element, and temperature determinations can be localized through the positioning of resonant tags.

  5. Photoacoustic temperature measurements for monitoring of thermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shiou-Han; Wei, Chen-Wei; Jee, Shiou-Hwa; Li, Pai-Chi

    2009-02-01

    Plasmonic photothermal therapy is a new cancer thermotherapy method based on surface plasmon resonance of nanoparticles. It is important to measure the temperature during thermotherapy for safety and efficacy. In this study, we apply a photoacoustic (PA) method for real-time, non-invasive temperature measurements. In particular, this method can be effectively combined with a photothermal therapy system that we developed in parallel. The method is based on the fact that the PA pressure amplitude is linearly related to temperature. To explore its potential, a home-made, 20 MHz PA transducer was used, in which an optical fiber was inserted in its center for emitting laser pulses while the PA signal was simultaneously detected. Continuous wave (CW) laser was used to heat the subject, including both phantoms and mice. The temperature of the region of interest was also measured by a fine-needle thermal couple. Results show that the temperature was linearly proportional to the PA signal with good correlation with the CW laser irradiation. The in vivo study also demonstrated potential of this technique.

  6. Non-contact temperature measurements for biotechnology discipline working group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Robert S.

    1988-01-01

    In the biotechnology research areas, there is interest in measuring temperature changes over very small dimensions, such as the surface of a 10-micrometer diameter biological cell immersed in cell culture fluid. Non-interference measurements of other properties, such as chemical constituents and their concentrations, are also needed. Contacting probes for pH have recently been developed to penetrate a cell but questions have been raised about their accuracy and net value.

  7. Passive Acoustic Tomography Tested for Measuring Gas Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C.; Kleppe, John

    2004-01-01

    The requirements of higher performance, better fuel economy, and lower emissions place an increasing premium on knowing the internal operating parameters of jet engines. One of the most important is the gas temperature in the post combustor section of the engine. Typically the gas temperature is measured with a thermocouple probe or by some optical technique such as Rayleigh scattering. Probes, while providing valuable information, have several limitations. The probe signal must be corrected for radiation and conduction losses, probes provide only a point measurement, and probes must be constructed of materials whose melting points are lower than the temperature of the environment into which they are inserted. Some of the disadvantages of probes are overcome by various optical techniques. Nothing needs to be inserted into the flow, and the temperature can be directly related to the signal by known physical laws. However, optical techniques require optical access (i.e., a window) and a light source (such as a laser), and they are very sensitive to the presence of particles in the flow. To overcome these problems, researchers from the NASA Glenn Research Center and The University of Nevada are developing a technique that uses sound instead of light to measure gas temperature. Like optical techniques, it is nonintrusive--no probe need be exposed to the combustion environment--and the temperature is directly related to a measured quantity--the speed of sound, which is proportional to the square root of the absolute temperature. The temperature profile inside the engine is constructed from the differences in arrival time between correlated signals from an array of microphones placed around the circumference of the engine. In much the same way as a complete picture of the inside of your body can be constructed from an array of x-ray photographs taken at different angles, the temperature profile in the engine is constructed from the angular array of microphones. It is

  8. Luminescence imaging for aerodynamic temperature and pressure measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gallery, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    A luminescent temperature sensitive paint containing the molecule rhodamine B base (rhBb) is described whose emission intensity can be monitored by video camera to produce qualitative and quantitative two dimensional surface temperature maps. This paint was designed for use with the pressure sensitive paint containing platinum octaethylporphyrin (PtOEP), but is also a useful tool when used alone in the measurement of heat flow, boundary layer transition, and quantitative surface temperature during wind tunnel studies. The ability of the rhBb paint to produce a continuous temperature map makes it possible to locate structures in the temperature field on an airfoil that are otherwise undetected by surface mounted thermocouples spaced a finite distance apart. A dual temperature/pressure sensitive paint was investigated with both the rhBb and PtOEP dyes incorporated into the silicone polymer paint base of the pressure sensor. Photodegradation and batch variations in the polymer were found to compromise the calibration parameters of the PtOEP paint and therefore the accuracy of pressure predictions. Suggestions are made for improving the prediction ability of the paint. The molecule europium(III) thenoyltrifluoroacetonate (EuTTA) is also discussed as a temperature sensor for a two layer temperature/pressure paint. EuTTA can not be directly incorporated into the silicone paint base of the PtOEP paint (as the rhBp paint can), but performs well in non-oxygenpermeable coatings. Benefits of the EuTTA temperature paint include: (1) decreased photodegradation, (2) very bright luminescence intensity, and (3) long luminescent lifetime (several hundred microseconds). The long lifetime facilitates lifetime imaging, a technique currently under development as an alternative detection method where luminescent lifetimes rather than emission intensity are related to temperature and pressure.

  9. Infrared fiber optic sensor for measurements of nonuniform temperature distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belotserkovsky, Edward; Drizlikh, S.; Zur, Albert; Bar-Or, O.; Katzir, Abraham

    1992-04-01

    Infrared (IR) fiber optic radiometry of thermal surfaces offers several advantages over refractive optics radiometry. It does not need a direct line of sight to the measured thermal surface and combines high capability of monitoring small areas with high efficiency. These advantages of IR fibers are important in the control of nonuniform temperature distributions, in which the temperature of closely situated points differs considerably and a high spatial resolution is necessary. The theoretical and experimental transforming functions of the sensor during scanning of an area with a nonuniform temperature distribution were obtained and their dependence on the spacial location of the fiber and type of temperature distribution were analyzed. Parameters such as accuracy and precision were determined. The results suggest that IR fiber radiometric thermometry may be useful in medical applications such as laser surgery, hyperthermia, and hypothermia.

  10. Temperature measuring analysis of the nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, F. E-mail: zdenko.zavodny@stuba.sk; Kučák, L. E-mail: zdenko.zavodny@stuba.sk; Bereznai, J. E-mail: zdenko.zavodny@stuba.sk; Závodný, Z. E-mail: zdenko.zavodny@stuba.sk; Muškát, P. E-mail: zdenko.zavodny@stuba.sk

    2014-08-06

    Study was based on rapid changes of measured temperature values from the thermocouple in the VVER 440 nuclear reactor fuel assembly. Task was to determine origin of fluctuations of the temperature values by experiments on physical model of the fuel assembly. During an experiment, heated water was circulating in the system and cold water inlet through central tube to record sensitivity of the temperature sensor. Two positions of the sensor was used. First, just above the central tube in the physical model fuel assembly axis and second at the position of the thermocouple in the VVER 440 nuclear reactor fuel assembly. Dependency of the temperature values on time are presented in the diagram form in the paper.

  11. Method for Accurate Surface Temperature Measurements During Fast Induction Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larregain, Benjamin; Vanderesse, Nicolas; Bridier, Florent; Bocher, Philippe; Arkinson, Patrick

    2013-07-01

    A robust method is proposed for the measurement of surface temperature fields during induction heating. It is based on the original coupling of temperature-indicating lacquers and a high-speed camera system. Image analysis tools have been implemented to automatically extract the temporal evolution of isotherms. This method was applied to the fast induction treatment of a 4340 steel spur gear, allowing the full history of surface isotherms to be accurately documented for a sequential heating, i.e., a medium frequency preheating followed by a high frequency final heating. Three isotherms, i.e., 704, 816, and 927°C, were acquired every 0.3 ms with a spatial resolution of 0.04 mm per pixel. The information provided by the method is described and discussed. Finally, the transformation temperature Ac1 is linked to the temperature on specific locations of the gear tooth.

  12. CARS Temperature Measurements in a Combustion-Heated Supersonic Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedder, S. A.; Danehy, P. M.; Magnotti, G.; Cutler, A. D.

    2009-01-01

    Measurements were made in a combustion-heated supersonic axi-symmetric free jet from a nozzle with a diameter of 6.35 cm using dual-pump Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS). The resulting mean and standard deviation temperature maps are presented. The temperature results show that the gas temperature on the centerline remains constant for approximately 5 nozzle diameters. As the heated gas mixes with the ambient air further downstream the mean temperature decreases. The standard deviation map shows evidence of the increase of turbulence in the shear layer as the jet proceeds downstream and mixes with the ambient air. The challenges of collecting data in a harsh environment are discussed along with influences to the data. The yield of the data collected is presented and possible improvements to the yield is presented are discussed.

  13. Measurement of temperature and temperature gradient in millimeter samples by chlorine NQR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lužnik, Janko; Pirnat, Janez; Trontelj, Zvonko

    2009-09-01

    A mini-thermometer based on the 35Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) frequency temperature dependence in the chlorates KClO3 and NaClO3 was built and successfully tested by measuring temperature and temperature gradient at 77 K and higher in about 100 mm3 active volume of a mini Joule-Thomson refrigerator. In the design of the tank-circuit coil, an array of small coils connected in series enabled us (a) to achieve a suitable ratio of inductance to capacity in the NQR spectrometer input tank circuit, (b) to use a single crystal of KClO3 or NaClO3 (of 1-2 mm3 size) in one coil as a mini-thermometer with a resolution of 0.03 K and (c) to construct a system for measuring temperature gradients when the spatial coordinates of each chlorate single crystal within an individual coil are known.

  14. Infrared Thermography for Temperature Measurement and Non-Destructive Testing

    PubMed Central

    Usamentiaga, Rubèn; Venegas, Pablo; Guerediaga, Jon; Vega, Laura; Molleda, Julio; Bulnes, Francisco G.

    2014-01-01

    The intensity of the infrared radiation emitted by objects is mainly a function of their temperature. In infrared thermography, this feature is used for multiple purposes: as a health indicator in medical applications, as a sign of malfunction in mechanical and electrical maintenance or as an indicator of heat loss in buildings. This paper presents a review of infrared thermography especially focused on two applications: temperature measurement and non-destructive testing, two of the main fields where infrared thermography-based sensors are used. A general introduction to infrared thermography and the common procedures for temperature measurement and non-destructive testing are presented. Furthermore, developments in these fields and recent advances are reviewed. PMID:25014096

  15. Infrared thermography for temperature measurement and non-destructive testing.

    PubMed

    Usamentiaga, Rubén; Venegas, Pablo; Guerediaga, Jon; Vega, Laura; Molleda, Julio; Bulnes, Francisco G

    2014-07-10

    The intensity of the infrared radiation emitted by objects is mainly a function of their temperature. In infrared thermography, this feature is used for multiple purposes: as a health indicator in medical applications, as a sign of malfunction in mechanical and electrical maintenance or as an indicator of heat loss in buildings. This paper presents a review of infrared thermography especially focused on two applications: temperature measurement and non-destructive testing, two of the main fields where infrared thermography-based sensors are used. A general introduction to infrared thermography and the common procedures for temperature measurement and non-destructive testing are presented. Furthermore, developments in these fields and recent advances are reviewed.

  16. Ultra sound absorption measurements in rock samples at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herminghaus, C.; Berckhemer, H.

    1974-01-01

    A new technique, comparable with the reverberation method in room acoustics, is described. It allows Q-measurements at rock samples of arbitrary shape in the frequency range of 50 to 600 kHz in vacuum (.1 mtorr) and at low temperatures (+20 to -180 C). The method was developed in particular to investigate rock samples under lunar conditions. Ultrasound absorption has been measured at volcanics, breccia, gabbros, feldspar and quartz of different grain size and texture yielding the following results: evacuation raises Q mainly through lowering the humidity in the rock. In a dry compact rock, the effect of evacuation is small. With decreasing temperature, Q generally increases. Between +20 and -30 C, Q does not change much. With further decrease of temperature in many cases distinct anomalies appear, where Q becomes frequency dependent.

  17. Laser Diagnostics for combustion temperature and species measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckbreth, Alan C.

    1988-01-01

    Laser optical diagnostic techniques for the measurement of combustion gaseous-phase temperatures and, or species concentrations are discussed. The techniques fall into two classes: incoherent (Rayleigh scattering, spontaneous Raman scattering, laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy) and coherent (coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy). The advantages, disadvantages and applicability of each method are outlined.

  18. 40 CFR 91.309 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... must be made within 100 cm of the air-intake of the engine. The measurement location must be either in... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Engine intake air temperature... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Emission Test...

  19. 40 CFR 91.309 - Engine intake air temperature measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... must be made within 100 cm of the air-intake of the engine. The measurement location must be either in... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine intake air temperature... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Emission Test...

  20. Instrument accurately measures small temperature changes on test surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, W. D.; Miller, H. B.

    1966-01-01

    Calorimeter apparatus accurately measures very small temperature rises on a test surface subjected to aerodynamic heating. A continuous thin sheet of a sensing material is attached to a base support plate through which a series of holes of known diameter have been drilled for attaching thermocouples to the material.

  1. Transducer measures temperature differentials in presence of strong electromagnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Measurement of temperature rise of cooling water under pressure and in strong electromagnetic fields is accomplished by a transducer using a magnetically shielded thermocouple arrangement. The thermocouple junctions are immersed in oil to isolate them from electric currents in the water.

  2. Noncontact temperature measurement in glass and other transparent materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doremus, Robert H.

    1988-01-01

    The relationship between the optical properties of glass and temperature measurements in it by radiation pyrometry are described. Equations for the calculation of emissivity are presented and the transmittance, surface reflection and absorption characteristics of glass are defined. Recommendations are given regarding the selection of pyrometer wavelength sensitivity and the use of a blackbody radiator.

  3. The measured temperature and pressure of EDC37 detonation products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, J. W.; Richley, J. C.; Sutton, B. D.; Price, E.; Ota, T. A.

    2017-01-01

    We present the experimentally determined temperature and pressure of the detonation products of EDC37; a HMX based conventional high explosive. These measurements were performed on a series of cylinder tests. The temperature measurements were undertaken at the end of the cylinder with optical fibres observing the bare explosive through a LiF window. The temperature of the products was measured for approximately 2 µs using single colour pyrometry, multicolour pyrometry and also using time integrated optical emission spectroscopy with the results from all three methods being broadly consistent. The peak temperature was found to be ≈ 3600 K dropping to ≈ 2400 K at the end of the measurement window. The spectroscopy was time integrated and showed that the emission spectra can be approximated using a grey body curve between 520 - 800 nm with no emission or absorption lines being observed. The pressure was obtained using an analytical method which requires the velocity of the expanding cylinder wall and the velocity of detonation. The pressure drops from an initial CJ value of ≈ 38 GPa to ≈ 4 GPa after 2 µs.

  4. Laser/Heterodyne Measurement of Temperature and Salinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jobson, D. J.; Fales, C. L.; Katzberg, S. J.

    1982-01-01

    Proposed visible-light laser/heterodyne receiver would remotely measure temperature and salinity of subsurface water. Operation is based on acoustic/optical scattering of light by sound waves. Application of this concept is foreseen in current research on energy conversion from ocean currents produced by thermal gradients and on future marine remote-sensing program.

  5. Physics of ECE Temperature Measurements and Prospects for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Luna, E. de la

    2008-03-12

    The physics of the electron cyclotron emission (ECE) temperature measurements is reviewed. The current understanding of the expected ECE spectra in ITER is summarized, for perpendicular as well as oblique propagation. The relevance of the use of oblique ECE for investigating the shape of the electron distribution function at low energies is discussed.

  6. Note: Zeeman splitting measurements in a high-temperature plasma.

    PubMed

    Golingo, R P; Shumlak, U; Den Hartog, D J

    2010-12-01

    The Zeeman effect has been used for measurement of magnetic fields in low-temperature plasma, but the diagnostic technique is difficult to implement in a high-temperature plasma. This paper describes new instrumentation and methodology for simultaneous measurement of the entire Doppler-broadened left and right circularly polarized Zeeman spectra in high-temperature plasmas. Measurements are made using spectra emitted parallel to the magnetic field by carbon impurities in high-temperature plasma. The Doppler-broadened width is much larger than the magnitude of the Zeeman splitting, thus simultaneous recording of the two circularly polarized Zeeman line profiles is key to accurate measurement of the magnetic field in the ZaP Z-pinch plasma device. Spectral data are collected along multiple chords on both sides of the symmetry axis of the plasma. This enables determination of the location of the current axis of the Z-pinch and of lower-bound estimates of the local magnetic field at specific radial locations in the plasma.

  7. Note: Zeeman splitting measurements in a high-temperature plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Golingo, R. P.; Shumlak, U.; Den Hartog, D. J.

    2010-12-15

    The Zeeman effect has been used for measurement of magnetic fields in low-temperature plasma, but the diagnostic technique is difficult to implement in a high-temperature plasma. This paper describes new instrumentation and methodology for simultaneous measurement of the entire Doppler-broadened left and right circularly polarized Zeeman spectra in high-temperature plasmas. Measurements are made using spectra emitted parallel to the magnetic field by carbon impurities in high-temperature plasma. The Doppler-broadened width is much larger than the magnitude of the Zeeman splitting, thus simultaneous recording of the two circularly polarized Zeeman line profiles is key to accurate measurement of the magnetic field in the ZaP Z-pinch plasma device. Spectral data are collected along multiple chords on both sides of the symmetry axis of the plasma. This enables determination of the location of the current axis of the Z-pinch and of lower-bound estimates of the local magnetic field at specific radial locations in the plasma.

  8. Spectroscopic measurements of electron temperature on VX-10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciamma, Ella; Lee, Charles; Bengtson, Roger; Jacobson, Verlin; Lavagni-Bolanos, Frank; McCaskill, Greg

    2004-11-01

    We have made spectroscopic measurements at several locations in the VX-10 experiment in the near UV, visible, and near IR spectral region. We estimate electron temperatures using a collisional radiative model. Residual gas analysis is also performed with plasma discharges. Quantitative estimates of plasma composition are also discussed.

  9. Axillary temperature measurement: a less stressful alternative for hospitalised cats?

    PubMed

    Girod, M; Vandenheede, M; Farnir, F; Gommeren, K

    2016-02-20

    Rectal temperature measurement (RTM) can promote stress and defensive behaviour in hospitalised cats. The aim of this study was to assess if axillary temperature measurement (ATM) could be a reliable and less stressful alternative for these animals. In this prospective study, paired rectal and axillary temperatures were measured in 42 cats, either by a veterinarian or a student. To assess the impact of these procedures on the cat's stress state, their heart rate was checked and a cat stress score (CSS) was defined and graded from 1 (relaxed) to 5 (terrified). A moderate correlation was found between RTM and ATM (r=0.52; P<0.0001). RTM was on average 0.9 °C (1.6 °F) higher than ATM (P<0.0001), although a wide variation was found in the difference between these two measurements (-2.1 °C to 3.6 °C (-3.8 °F to 6.5 °F)). ATM failed to identify hypothermia in 25 per cent of the cases and hyperthermia in 19 per cent of the cases but may be considered less stressful than RTM. Indeed, RTM induced a mildly greater increase in heart rate (+6 bpm; P=0.01) and in CSS (+0.2; P=0.001) than ATM. The results were not affected by operator type. In conclusion, RTM should remain the standard method to obtain accurate temperatures in cats.

  10. 7 CFR 52.3754 - Size designations for whole and pitted styles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... of Canned Ripe Olives 1 Product Description, Types, Styles, and Grades § 52.3754 Size designations for whole and pitted styles. (a) General. (1) “Average count” for canned whole ripe olives is... olives. (2) Diameters of canned whole and pitted ripe olives are determined by measuring the...

  11. 7 CFR 52.3754 - Size designations for whole and pitted styles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... of Canned Ripe Olives 1 Product Description, Types, Styles, and Grades § 52.3754 Size designations for whole and pitted styles. (a) General. (1) “Average count” for canned whole ripe olives is... olives. (2) Diameters of canned whole and pitted ripe olives are determined by measuring the...

  12. absorption sensor for sensitive temperature and species measurements in high-temperature gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spearrin, R. M.; Ren, W.; Jeffries, J. B.; Hanson, R. K.

    2014-09-01

    A continuous-wave laser absorption diagnostic, based on the infrared CO2 bands near 4.2 and 2.7 μm, was developed for sensitive temperature and concentration measurements in high-temperature gas systems using fixed-wavelength methods. Transitions in the respective R-branches of both the fundamental υ 3 band (~2,350 cm-1) and combination υ 1 + υ 3 band (~3,610 cm-1) were chosen based on absorption line-strength, spectral isolation, and temperature sensitivity. The R(76) line near 2,390.52 cm-1 was selected for sensitive CO2 concentration measurements, and a detection limit of <5 ppm was achieved in shock tube kinetics experiments (~1,300 K). A cross-band, two-line thermometry technique was also established utilizing the R(96) line near 2,395.14 cm-1, paired with the R(28) line near 3,633.08 cm-1. This combination yields high temperature sensitivity (ΔE" = 3,305 cm-1) and expanded range compared with previous intra-band CO2 sensors. Thermometry performance was validated in a shock tube over a range of temperatures (600-1,800 K) important for combustion. Measured temperature accuracy was demonstrated to be better than 1 % over the entire range of conditions, with a standard error of ~0.5 % and µs temporal resolution.

  13. Dewatering of the Jenkins open pit uranium mine

    SciTech Connect

    Straskraba, V.; Kissinger, L.E.

    1984-12-01

    Mining of low grade uranium sandstones in the Jenkins open pit mine in the Shirley Basin, Wyoming was troubled by slope failures and wet conditions in the pit. Since the mine was expanding toward a river, the possibility of drainage from this river into the mine raised serious concern during the mine planning. A baseline hydrogeologic study was performed and dewatering measures were designed with the help of a numerical mathematical model. A combination of dewatering wells installed from the surface around the perimeter of the pit and horizontal drains in areas of high slope failure potential substantially improved the mining conditions and slope stability. This procedure consequently led to the successful ore recovery from the highly saturated sandstone strata. The development of drawdown during the dewatering of two separated aquifers in the overburden was close to that predicted by the model.

  14. Innovative Instrumentation and Analysis of the Temperature Measurement for High Temperature Gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Seong W. Lee

    2006-09-30

    The project entitled, ''Innovative Instrumentation and Analysis of the Temperature Measurement for High Temperature Gasification'', was successfully completed by the Principal Investigator, Dr. S. Lee and his research team in the Center for Advanced Energy Systems and Environmental Control Technologies at Morgan State University. The major results and outcomes were presented in semi-annual progress reports and annual project review meetings/presentations. Specifically, the literature survey including the gasifier temperature measurement, the ultrasonic application in cleaning application, and spray coating process and the gasifier simulator (cold model) testing has been successfully conducted during the first year. The results show that four factors (blower voltage, ultrasonic application, injection time intervals, particle weight) were considered as significant factors that affect the temperature measurement. Then the gasifier simulator (hot model) design and the fabrication as well as the systematic tests on hot model were completed to test the significant factors on temperature measurement in the second year. The advanced Industrial analytic methods such as statistics-based experimental design, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and regression methods were applied in the hot model tests. The results show that operational parameters (i.e. air flow rate, water flow rate, fine dust particle amount, ammonia addition) presented significant impact on the temperature measurement inside the gasifier simulator. The experimental design and ANOVA are very efficient way to design and analyze the experiments. The results show that the air flow rate and fine dust particle amount are statistically significant to the temperature measurement. The regression model provided the functional relation between the temperature and these factors with substantial accuracy. In the last year of the project period, the ultrasonic and subsonic cleaning methods and coating materials were tested

  15. INNOVATIVE INSTRUMENTATION AND ANALYSIS OF THE TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE GASIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Seong W. Lee

    2004-04-01

    The systematic tests of the gasifier simulator were conducted in this reporting period. In the systematic test, two (2) factors were considered as the experimental parameters, including air injection rate and water injection rate. Each experimental factor had two (2) levels, respectively. A special water-feeding device was designed and installed to the gasifier simulator. Analysis of Variances (ANOVA) was applied to the results of the systematic tests. The ANOVA shows that the air injection rate did have the significant impact to the temperature measurement in the gasifier simulator. The ANOVA also shows that the water injection rate did not have the significant impact to the temperature measurements in the gasifier simulator. The ANOVA analysis also proves that the thermocouple assembly we proposed was immune to the moisture environment, the temperature measurement remained accurate in moisture environment. Within this reporting period, the vibration application for cleaning purpose was explored. Both ultrasonic and sub-sonic vibrations were considered. A feasibility test was conducted to prove that the thermocouple vibration did not have the significant impact to the temperature measurements in the gasifier simulator. This feasibility test was a 2{sup 2} factorial design. Two factors including temperature levels and motor speeds were set to two levels respectively. The sub-sonic vibration tests were applied to the thermocouple to remove the concrete cover layer (used to simulate the solid condensate in gasifiers) on the thermocouple tip. It was found that both frequency and amplitude had significant impacts on removal performance of the concrete cover layer.

  16. Thin-Filament Pyrometry Developed for Measuring Temperatures in Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunderland, Peter B.

    2004-01-01

    Many valuable advances in combustion science have come from observations of microgravity flames. This research is contributing to the improved efficiency and reduced emissions of practical combustors and is benefiting terrestrial and spacecraft fire safety. Unfortunately, difficulties associated with microgravity have prevented many types of measurements in microgravity flames. In particular, temperature measurements in flames are extremely important but have been limited in microgravity. A novel method of measuring temperatures in microgravity flames is being developed in-house at the National Center for Microgravity Research and the NASA Glenn Research Center and is described here. Called thin-filament pyrometry, it involves using a camera to determine the local gas temperature from the intensity of inserted fibers glowing in a flame. It is demonstrated here to provide accurate measurements of gas temperatures in a flame simultaneously at many locations. The experiment is shown. The flame is a laminar gas jet diffusion flame fueled by methane (CH4) flowing from a 14-mm round burner at a pressure of 1 atm. A coflowing stream of air is used to prevent flame flicker. Nine glowing fibers are visible. These fibers are made of silicon carbide (SiC) and have a diameter of 15 m (for comparison, the average human hair is 75 m in diameter). Because the fibers are so thin, they do little to disturb the flame and their temperature remains close to that of the local gas. The flame and glowing filaments were imaged with a digital black-and-white video camera. This camera has an imaging area of 1000 by 1000 pixels and a wide dynamic range of 12 bits. The resolution of the camera and optics was 0.1 mm. Optical filters were placed in front of the camera to limit incoming light to 750, 850, 950, and 1050 nm. Temperatures were measured in the same flame in the absence of fibers using 50-m Btype thermocouples. These thermocouples provide very accurate temperatures, but they

  17. Pyrometric method for measuring emittances at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballestrín, J.; Rodríguez, J.; Carra, M. E.; Cañadas, I.; Roldan, M. I.; Barbero, J.; Marzo, A.

    2016-05-01

    In this work an alternative method for emittance determination based on pyrometric measurements is presented. The measurement procedure has been applied to AISI 310S steel samples in the Plataforma Solar de Almería vertical axis solar furnace SF5. The experimental results show that emittance increases with increasing temperature and decreases with increasing wavelength. This behaviour is in agreement with experimental results obtained by other authors. Analysis of tests has revealed a good repeatability (1%) and accuracy (< 2%) of this measurement procedure.

  18. Atmospheric Temperature Profile Measurements Using Mobile High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razenkov, Ilya I.; Eloranta, Edwin W.

    2016-06-01

    The High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) designed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison discriminates between Mie and Rayleigh backscattering [1]. It exploits the Doppler effect caused by thermal motion of molecules, which broadens the spectrum of the transmitted laser light. That allows for absolute calibration of the lidar and measurements of the aerosol volume backscatter coefficient. Two iodine absorption filters with different absorption line widths (a regular iodine vapor filter and Argon buffered iodine filter) allow for atmospheric temperature profile measurements. The sensitivity of the measured signal-to-air temperature ratio is around 0.14%/K. The instrument uses a shared telescope transmitter-receiver design and operates in eyesafe mode (the product of laser average power and telescope aperture equals 0.1 Wm2 at 532 nm).

  19. Noninvasive measurement system for human respiratory condition and body temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toba, Eiji; Sekiguchi, Sadamu; Nishimatsu, Toyonori

    1995-06-01

    A special chromel (C) and alumel wire (A) thermopile has been developed which can measure the human respiratory condition and body temperature without directly contacting a sensor to the human body. The measurement system enables high speed, real time, noninvasive, and simultaneous measurement of respiratory rates and body temperature with the same sensor. The special CA thermopile, with each sensing junction of approximately 25 μm, was constructed by using spot welded thermopile junctions. The thermoelectric power of 17 pairs of special CA thermopile is 0.7 mV/ °C. The special CA thermopile provides high sensitivity and fine frequency characteristics, of which the gain is flat to approximately 10 Hz.

  20. Evaluation of colour space transformation suitability to optical temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemba, A.; Fornalik-Wajs, E.

    2016-09-01

    All optical measurement methods base on the image analysis and relation between the measured parameter and some image features. In Digital Particle Image Thermometry (DPIT), such relation represents a function between the temperature and particles’ colour (i.a. Thermochromic Liquid Crystals). For the quantitative data acquisition the “colour” information is necessary, therefore the colour spaces based on hue H are used. Due to the big number of numerical operations needed in the analysis, the choice of colour space transformation is significant due to the accuracy and computational time. In this paper commonly applied RGB to HSI colour spaces’ transformations were compared and evaluation of their suitability to temperature measurement was performed. Time of obtaining the final results was considered as the main criterion. Appropriate calculations were conducted and presented.

  1. Water Plume Temperature Measurements by an Unmanned Aerial System (UAS)

    PubMed Central

    DeMario, Anthony; Lopez, Pete; Plewka, Eli; Wix, Ryan; Xia, Hai; Zamora, Emily; Gessler, Dan; Yalin, Azer P.

    2017-01-01

    We report on the development and testing of a proof of principle water temperature measurement system deployed on an unmanned aerial system (UAS), for field measurements of thermal discharges into water. The primary elements of the system include a quad-copter UAS to which has been integrated, for the first time, both a thermal imaging infrared (IR) camera and an immersible probe that can be dipped below the water surface to obtain vertical water temperature profiles. The IR camera is used to take images of the overall water surface to geo-locate the plume, while the immersible probe provides quantitative temperature depth profiles at specific locations. The full system has been tested including the navigation of the UAS, its ability to safely carry the sensor payload, and the performance of both the IR camera and the temperature probe. Finally, the UAS sensor system was successfully deployed in a pilot field study at a coal burning power plant, and obtained images and temperature profiles of the thermal effluent. PMID:28178215

  2. Water Plume Temperature Measurements by an Unmanned Aerial System (UAS).

    PubMed

    DeMario, Anthony; Lopez, Pete; Plewka, Eli; Wix, Ryan; Xia, Hai; Zamora, Emily; Gessler, Dan; Yalin, Azer P

    2017-02-07

    We report on the development and testing of a proof of principle water temperature measurement system deployed on an unmanned aerial system (UAS), for field measurements of thermal discharges into water. The primary elements of the system include a quad-copter UAS to which has been integrated, for the first time, both a thermal imaging infrared (IR) camera and an immersible probe that can be dipped below the water surface to obtain vertical water temperature profiles. The IR camera is used to take images of the overall water surface to geo-locate the plume, while the immersible probe provides quantitative temperature depth profiles at specific locations. The full system has been tested including the navigation of the UAS, its ability to safely carry the sensor payload, and the performance of both the IR camera and the temperature probe. Finally, the UAS sensor system was successfully deployed in a pilot field study at a coal burning power plant, and obtained images and temperature profiles of the thermal effluent.

  3. Attachment of Free Filament Thermocouples for Temperature Measurements on CMC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lei, Jih-Fen; Cuy, Michael D.; Wnuk, Stephen P.

    1997-01-01

    Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMC) are being developed for use as enabling materials for advanced aeropropulsion engine and high speed civil transport applications. The characterization and testing of these advanced materials in hostile, high-temperature environments require accurate measurement of the material temperatures. Commonly used wire Thermo-Couples (TC) can not be attached to this ceramic based material via conventional spot-welding techniques. Attachment of wire TC's with commercially available ceramic cements fail to provide sufficient adhesion at high temperatures. While advanced thin film TC technology provides minimally intrusive surface temperature measurement and has good adhesion on the CMC, its fabrication requires sophisticated and expensive facilities and is very time consuming. In addition, the durability of lead wire attachments to both thin film TC's and the substrate materials requires further improvement. This paper presents a newly developed attachment technique for installation of free filament wire TC's with a unique convoluted design on ceramic based materials such as CMC's. Three CMC's (SiC/SiC CMC and alumina/alumina CMC) instrumented with type IC, R or S wire TC's were tested in a Mach 0.3 burner rig. The CMC temperatures measured from these wire TC's were compared to that from the facility pyrometer and thin film TC's. There was no sign of TC delamination even after several hours exposure to 1200 C. The test results proved that this new technique can successfully attach wire TC's on CMC's and provide temperature data in hostile environments. The sensor fabrication process is less expensive and requires very little time compared to that of the thin film TC's. The same installation technique/process can also be applied to attach lead wires for thin film sensor systems.

  4. Commercial Instrument for Automated Specific Heat Measurements at Millikelvin Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neils, W. K.; Martien, Dinesh; Bauer, E. D.; Mixson, D.; Hur, N.; Thompson, J. D.; Sarrao, J. L.

    2006-09-01

    The specific heat of CeRhIn5-xSnx was measured down to 55 mK using a novel, fully automated measurement system. The system consists of a dilution refrigerator designed to operate in a Quantum Design Physical Property Measurement System, a calorimeter optimized for millikelvin temperatures and very low addenda heat capacity, electronics to perform the measurement, and software to automate the measurement. The compound CeRhIn5 exhibits antiferromagnetism at a Neel temperature of TN = 3.8 K which is suppressed at a critical pressure Pc ˜ 25 kbar, indicating a quantum critical point (QCP). At pressures above ˜ 15 kbar, CeRhIn5 exhibits antiferromagnetism and superconductivity simultaneously. Measurement of the specific heat of CeRhIn5-xSnx in magnetic field offers an additional tool to probe the antiferromagnetic QCP. Preliminary measurements up to H = 3 T for CeRhIn4.77Sn0.23 are reported.

  5. Comparing Central Peak and Central Pit Craters on Mercury and Mars: Implications for Crustal Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, Nadine G.; Horstman, Ryan M.

    2016-10-01

    We have measured and classified 20,782 impact craters on Mercury and 24,495 craters on Mars 5 km in diameter and larger for a comparison study of these features. We identified 1144 floor pit and 638 summit pit craters on Mars and 32 summit pit craters but no floor pits on Mercury. We also identified 1682 central peak craters on Mars and 1764 on Mercury. We computed the ratio of the pit or basal peak diameter to the crater diameter in each case and compared the results for the two bodies. Summit pits on Mars have a median pit-to-crater diameter (Dp/Dc) ratio of 0.12 compared to 0.09 on Mercury, indicating pits are slightly larger relative to their parent crater on Mars. We find no correlation of the distribution of Mercury's central pits with features attributed to volatiles, i.e. radar-bright polar craters and craters containing hollows. This indicates that Mercury's central pits form by collapse of a weak brecciated core in the central peak and do not require the presence of volatiles, as is commonly assumed for central pit formation. The median peak-to-crater diameter (Dpk/Dc) ratio for the peaks on which summit pits are found on both bodies is statistically identical to that of the respective normal unpitted central peaks. This indicates that the peaks on which summit pits occur form in the same manner as normal central peaks but subsequently undergo core collapse to create the summit pit. Interestingly, the median Dpk/Dc for Martian peaks is twice as high as for their Mercurian counterparts (0.30 versus 0.15, respectively). Because Mercury and Mars have essentially the same surface gravity, the only major difference between the two bodies that could explain this observation is target characteristics. Prior studies of the composition of the crust and the detection of larger-than-normal secondary craters have led to the proposal that Mercury's crust is stronger than the crusts of the other terrestrial planets. Mercury's low number of central pit craters, the

  6. Core Temperature Measurement During Submaximal Exercise: Esophageal, Rectal, and Intestinal Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Stuart M. C.; Williams, W. Jon; Schneider, Suzanne M.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if intestinal temperature (Tin) might be in acceptable alternative to esophageal (Tes) and rectal temperature (Trec) to assess thermoregulation during supine exercise. We hypothesized that Tin would have values similar to Tes and a response time similar to Trec, but the rate of temperature change across time would not be different between measurement sites. Seven subjects completed a continuous supine protocol of 20 min of rest, 20 min of cycle exercise at 40% peak oxygen consumption (VO2pk), 20 min of cycle exercise at 65% V02pk, and 20 min of recovery. Tes, Trec, and Tin were recorded each min throughout the test. Temperatures were not different after 20 min of rest, but Trec was less than the Tes and Tin at the end of the 40% and 65% VO2pk stages. After 20 min of recovery, Tes was less than either Trec or Tin, which were not different from each other. Time to threshold for increased temperature from rest was greater for Trec than Tes but not different from Tin. Time to reach peak temperature was greater for Tin and Trec than Tes. Similarly, time to a decrease in temperature after exercise was greater for Trec than Tes, but not different from Tin. The rate of temperature change from threshold to the end of the 40% VO2pk stage was not different between measurement sites. However, the rate of change during recovery was more negative for Tes than Tin and Trec, which were different from each other. Measurement of Tin may he an acceptable alternative to Tes and Trec with an understanding of its limitations.

  7. Temperature Measurement in WTE Boilers Using Suction Pyrometers

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Fabio; Najafi, Behzad

    2013-01-01

    The temperature of the flue-gas in the post combustion zone of a waste to energy (WTE) plant has to be maintained within a fairly narrow range of values, the minimum of which is prescribed by the European Waste Directive 2000/76/CE, whereas the maximum value must be such as to ensure the preservation of the materials and the energy efficiency of the plant. A high degree of accuracy in measuring and controlling the aforementioned temperature is therefore required. In almost the totality of WTE plants this measurement process is carried out by using practical industrial thermometers, such as bare thermocouples and infrared radiation (IR) pyrometers, even if affected by different physical contributions which can make the gas temperature measurements incorrect. The objective of this paper is to analyze errors and uncertainties that can arise when using a bare thermocouple or an IR pyrometer in a WTE plant and to provide a method for the in situ calibration of these industrial sensors through the use of suction pyrometers. The paper describes principle of operation, design, and uncertainty contributions of suction pyrometers, it also provides the best estimation of the flue-gas temperature in the post combustion zone of a WTE plant and the estimation of its expanded uncertainty. PMID:24248279

  8. Temperature measurement in WTE boilers using suction pyrometers.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Fabio; Najafi, Behzad

    2013-11-15

    The temperature of the flue-gas in the post combustion zone of a waste to energy (WTE) plant has to be maintained within a fairly narrow range of values, the minimum of which is prescribed by the European Waste Directive 2000/76/CE, whereas the maximum value must be such as to ensure the preservation of the materials and the energy efficiency of the plant. A high degree of accuracy in measuring and controlling the aforementioned temperature is therefore required. In almost the totality of WTE plants this measurement process is carried out by using practical industrial thermometers, such as bare thermocouples and infrared radiation (IR) pyrometers, even if affected by different physical contributions which can make the gas temperature measurements incorrect. The objective of this paper is to analyze errors and uncertainties that can arise when using a bare thermocouple or an IR pyrometer in a WTE plant and to provide a method for the in situ calibration of these industrial sensors through the use of suction pyrometers. The paper describes principle of operation, design, and uncertainty contributions of suction pyrometers, it also provides the best estimation of the flue-gas temperature in the post combustion zone of a WTE plant and the estimation of its expanded uncertainty.

  9. Electro optical system to measure strains at high temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sciammarella, Cesar A.

    1991-01-01

    The measurement of strains at temperatures of the order of 1000 C has become a very important field of research. Technological advances in areas such as the analysis of high speed aircraft structures and high efficiency thermal engines require operational temperatures of this order of magnitude. Current techniques for the measurement of strains, such as electrical strain gages, are at the limit of their useful range and new methods need to be developed. Optical techniques are very attractive in this type of application because of their noncontacting nature. Holography is of particular interest because a minimal preparation of the surfaces is required. Optoelectronics holography is specially suited for this type of application, from the point of view of industrial use. There are a number of technical problems that need to be overcome to measure strains using holographic interferometry at high temperatures. Some of these problems are discussed, and solutions are given. A specimen instrumented with high temperature strains gages is used to compare the results of both technologies.

  10. Temperature and heat flux measurements: Challenges for high temperature aerospace application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neumann, Richard D.

    1992-01-01

    The measurement of high temperatures and the influence of heat transfer data is not strictly a problem of either the high temperatures involved or the level of the heating rates to be measured at those high temperatures. It is a problem of duration during which measurements are made and the nature of the materials in which the measurements are made. Thermal measurement techniques for each application must respect and work with the unique features of that application. Six challenges in the development of measurement technology are discussed: (1) to capture the character and localized peak values within highly nonuniform heating regions; (2) to manage large volumes of thermal instrumentation in order to efficiently derive critical information; (3) to accommodate thermal sensors into practical flight structures; (4) to broaden the capabilities of thermal survey techniques to replace discrete gages in flight and on the ground; (5) to provide supporting instrumentation conduits which connect the measurement points to the thermally controlled data acquisition system; and (6) to develop a class of 'vehicle tending' thermal sensors to assure the integrity of flight vehicles in an efficient manner.

  11. Nucleation Of Ge 3D-islands On Pit-patterned Si Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Novikov, P. L.; Smagina, J. V.; Vlasov, D. Yu.; Deryabin, A. S.; Kozhukhov, A. S.; Dvurechenskii, A. V.

    2011-12-23

    Joint experimental and theoretical study of Ge nanoislands growth on pit-patterned Si substrate is carried out. Si substrates that have been templated by means of electron beam lithography and reactive ion etching have been used to grow Ge by molecular-beam epitaxy. Atomic-force-microscopy studies show that at Si(100) substrate temperature 550 deg. C, Ge nanoislands are formed at the pits' edges, rather than between the pits. The effect is interpreted in terms of energy barrier, that is formed near the edge of a pit and prevents Ge transport inside the pit. By molecular dynamics calculations the value of the energy barrier 0.9 eV was obtained.

  12. Nighttime temperatures and ion chemistry from OGO 6 plasma measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanatani, S.; Breig, E. L.

    1980-01-01

    Results are presented of a statical investigation of temperature and molecular ion chemistry in the nighttime thermosphere, with data from plasma measurements between 400 and 450 km from the retarding potential analyzer on the OGO 6 satellite. Temperatures and ion concentrations from the equatorial region are discussed. Emphasis is placed on statistical analyses of all data acquired within small cells of finite width in latitude and day of observation. Attention is given to a significant fraction of the nighttime hemisphere between low summer and middle winter latitudes.

  13. Measurements of fluctuating gas temperatures using compensated fine wire thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nina, M. N. R.; Pita, G. P.

    1985-09-01

    Thermocouples with three different wire diameters (15, 40 and 50 microns) were used in association with an analog compensation circuit connected to a data acquisition system. Measurements of the time constant were performed using two different heating techniques; Joule effect and external heating by laser beam. The thermocouples were used to quantify the fluctuating temperature field in a hot air jet and in a premixed propane flame. In the reacting case the catalytic effect was evaluated by comparing coated and uncoated wires. Conclusions were also obtained regarding frequency spectra, temperature probability distribution function and time constant.

  14. Low-temperature measurements on shock loaded tin.

    SciTech Connect

    Seifter, A.; Holtkamp, D. B.; Payton, J. R.; Rodriguez, P.; Obst, A. W.; Turley, D.; Grover, M.

    2004-01-01

    In an effort to understand the influence of different surface finishes and the effect of ejecta mass on free surface temperature measurements, we performed a series of high-explosively (HE) shocked tin experiments. In this series of experiments the surface finish (i.e, specular, shallow grooves (16 {mu}inch), deep grooves (200 {mu}inch) and 'ball-rolled' surfaces) and the ambient atmosphere (from 1.2 torr, to atmospheric air, as well as 1 atm helium) were varied. With a {approx}180 kbar shock pressure the temperature results agreed for all but the very deep groove (>200 {mu}inch) surfaces investigated.

  15. Low-Temperature Measurements on Shock Loaded Tin

    SciTech Connect

    A. Seifter; M. Grover; D.B. Holtkamp; J.R. Payton; P. Rodriguez; D. Turley; A.W. Obst

    2004-09-01

    In an effort to understand the influence of different surface finishes and the effect of ejecta mass on free surface temperature measurements, we performed a series of high-explosively shocked tin experiments. In this series of experiments the surface finish (i.e., specular, shallow grooves, deep grooves, and ''ball-rolled'' surfaces) and the ambient atmosphere (from 1.2 torr, to atmospheric air, as well as 1 atm helium) were varied. With {approx}180 kbar shock pressure the temperature results agreed for all but the very deep groove surfaces investigated.

  16. Mars Exospheric Temperature Trends as Revealed by MAVEN NGIMS Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bougher, Stephen W.; Olsen, Kirk; Roeten, Kali; Bell, Jared; Mahaffy, Paul; Benna, Mehdi; Elrod, Meredith; Jakosky, Bruce

    2015-11-01

    The Martian dayside upper thermosphere and exosphere temperatures (Texo) have been the subject of considerable debate and study since the first Mariner ultraviolet spectrometer (UVS) measurements (1969-1972), up to recent Mars Express SPICAM UVS measurements (2004-present) (e.g., see reviews by Stewart 1987; Bougher et al. 2000, 2014; Müeller-Wodarg et al. 2008; Stiepen et al. 2014). Prior to MAVEN, the Martian upper atmosphere thermal structure was poorly constrained by a limited number of both in-situ and remote sensing measurements at selected locations, seasons, and periods scattered throughout the solar cycle. Nevertheless, it is recognized that the Mars orbit eccentricity determines that both the solar cycle and seasonal variations in upper atmosphere temperatures must be considered together. The MAVEN NGIMS instrument measures the neutral composition of the major gas species (e.g. He, N, O, CO, N2, O2, NO, Ar and CO2) and their major isotopes, with a vertical resolution of ~5 km for targeted species and a target accuracy of <25% for most of these species (Mahaffy et al. 2014; 2015). Corresponding temperatures can now be derived from the neutral scale heights (especially CO2, Ar, and N2) (e.g. Mahaffy et al. 2015; Bougher et al. 2015). Texo mean temperatures spanning ~200 to 300 km are examined for both Deep Dip and Science orbits over 11-February 2015 (Ls ~ 290) to 14-July 2015 (Ls ~ 12). During these times, dayside sampling below 300 km occurred from the dusk terminator, across the dayside, and approaching the dawn terminator. NGIMS temperatures are investigated to extract spatial (e.g. SZA) and temporal (e.g. orbit-to-orbit, seasonal, solar rotational) variability and trends over this sampling period. Solar and seasonal driven trends in Texo are clearly visible, but orbit-to-orbit variability is significant, and demands further investigation to uncover the major drivers that are responsible.

  17. Erasure temperature measurements of heat assisted magnetic recording media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. J.; Yang, H. Z.; Leong, S. H.; Cher, K. M.; Hu, J. F.; Sethi, P.; Lew, W. S.

    2015-05-01

    For heat assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) media development, measurement of erasure temperature (Te) is interesting and important for practical HAMR testing and applications. Here, we present an investigation on Te measurements of L10 ordered FePt granular HAMR media made using a Laser Heating (LH) method on a home-built HAMR write test system versus that from a bulk heating approach. The HAMR write test system provides HAMR writing, micro-MOKE (magneto-optical Kerr effect) signal detection, and MOKE imaging functions at the same testing spot in one single system. Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) and magnetic Kerr microscopy observations of the scanning laser induced degradation/erasure/demagnetization of the pre-recorded magnetic patterns on disk media (over a wide area of a few hundreds of μm2) show that the magnetic (MFM and Kerr signal) amplitude of the pre-recorded magnetic patterns decreases slowly with increasing laser power (Pw) (/temperature rise) for Pw ≲ 66 mW and then drops sharply to nearly zero for Pw ≥ ˜72 mW (the laser power corresponding to complete thermal erasure when the media temperature is ˜Te). It was further found that this trend of magnetic amplitude reduction with increased Pw is similar to that from magnetic amplitude decrease of pre-recorded magnetic patterns with increased bulk heating temperature. The temperature for complete erasure at laser power, Pw = 72 mW for the LH method, corresponds therefore to ˜650 K (≈Te) for the bulk heating methods. Besides fast measurement, LH (as a comparable and viable approach for erasure measurement) is dynamic, localized, and has time scales closer to practical HAMR situation.

  18. Real-time simultaneous temperature and strain measurements at cryogenic temperatures in an optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahar, Scott; Geng, Jihong; Schultz, Joel; Minervini, Joseph; Jiang, Shibin; Titus, Peter; Takayasu, Makoto; Gung, Chen-yu; Tian, Wenyan; Chavez-Pirson, Arturo

    2008-08-01

    A novel fiber optic sensor has been developed to be used in superconducting magnets for fusion reactors and other large cable-in-conduit superconductor (CICC) magnet applications. These large superconducting magnets need a diagnostic that can measure the temperature and strain throughout the magnet in real-time, which was not possible until now. Simultaneous temperature and strain measurements at cryogenic temperatures have been demonstrated, using spontaneous Brillouin scattering in an optical fiber. Using an extremely narrow (100 Hz) linewidth Brillouin laser with very low noise as a frequency shifted local oscillator, the frequency shift of spontaneous Brillouin scattered light was measured using heterodyne detection. A pulsed laser was used to probe the fiber using Optical Time Domain Reflectometry (OTDR) to determine spatial resolution. The spontaneous Brillouin frequency shift and linewidth as a function of temperature agree with previous literature on stimulated Brillouin scattering data from room temperature down to 4 K. For the first time, the spontaneous Brillouin frequency shift, linewidth, and intensity as a function of strain have been measured down to 4 K. Analyzing the frequency spectrum of the scattered light after an FFT gives the Brillouin frequency shift, linewidth, and intensity of the scattered light. 65,000 pulses, with 53 ns pulse widths, were averaged in under one second, providing a 5 meter spatial resolution along a fiber that was about 100 m long. Measuring these three parameters allow the simultaneous determination of temperature and strain in real-time throughout a fiber with a spatial resolution on the order of several meters.

  19. Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostic for Dynamic Measurement of Velocity and Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, Richard G.; Panda, J.

    2001-01-01

    A new technique for measuring dynamic gas velocity and temperature is described. The technique is based on molecular Rayleigh scattering of laser light, so no seeding of the flow is necessary. The Rayleigh scattered light is filtered with a fixed cavity, planar mirror Fabry-Perot interferometer. A minimum number of photodetectors were used in order to allow the high data acquisition rate needed for dynamic measurements. One photomultiplier tube (PMT) was used to measure the total Rayleigh scattering, which is proportional to the gas density. Two additional PMTs were used to detect light that passes through two apertures in a mask located in the interferometer fringe plane. An uncertainty analysis was used to select the optimum aperture parameters and to predict the measurement uncertainty due to photon shot-noise. Results of an experiment to measure the velocity of a subsonic free jet are presented.

  20. Research on auto monitoring and control instrument of deep foundation pit engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Qian; Li, Heng; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Xutao; Wang, Hao; Xu, Xueyong

    2012-01-01

    At present, deep foundation pit supporting structure and slope soil deep displacement monitoring of conventional method is artificial repeated measurements, but sometimes pit instability is sudden, use this method to reach the purposes of real-time monitoring. This paper developed the instrument from the ordinary inclinometer, based on artificial measurement, improve it to the automatic measurement, monitoring personnel remain within doors can be remote, real-time control and obtaining measurement data, can really achieve real-time monitoring, can meet the requirements of building deep foundation pit monitoring needs, also has a geological disaster monitoring application prospect.

  1. Research on auto monitoring and control instrument of deep foundation pit engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Qian; Li, Heng; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Xutao; Wang, Hao; Xu, Xueyong

    2011-11-01

    At present, deep foundation pit supporting structure and slope soil deep displacement monitoring of conventional method is artificial repeated measurements, but sometimes pit instability is sudden, use this method to reach the purposes of real-time monitoring. This paper developed the instrument from the ordinary inclinometer, based on artificial measurement, improve it to the automatic measurement, monitoring personnel remain within doors can be remote, real-time control and obtaining measurement data, can really achieve real-time monitoring, can meet the requirements of building deep foundation pit monitoring needs, also has a geological disaster monitoring application prospect.

  2. Temperature Measurement Technique Using Phosphorescence of Porphyrin Dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kura, Kentaro; Someya, Satoshi; Okamoto, Koji

    2007-11-01

    LIF have been developed to measure the temperature, pH and the oxygen concentration in the fluid. However, the frequent excitation of the fluorescent dye causes the quenching effect. In addition, two color LIF should be applied in order to cancel the effect of non-uniform light intensity of excitation. The phosphor emitting the phosphorescence for a few milliseconds by an excitation was measured at the high time resolution, while the phosphorescence lifetime is the function of the temperature. As the phosphorescence dyes, PtTFPP and PdTFPP were tested. Those mixed with Coumarin30 were also demonstrated. These dyes were excited by a CW laser with the wavelength of 405nm. As the result, it was clarified to be able to measure the temperature using these dyes and this laser. Present study is the result of ``High speed three-dimensional direct measurement technology development for the evaluation of heat flux and flow of liquid metal'' entrusted to the University of Tokyo by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan (MEXT).

  3. Measurement of Ion Temperature in a Laboratory Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiachen; Dorfman, Seth; Carter, Troy; Gekelman, Walter; Pribyl, Patrick; Bondarenko, Anton

    2014-10-01

    Alfvén waves are low-frequency oscillating waves in a magnetized plasma. These modes may play a significant role in the heating of the solar corona, solar wind turbulence, and in fast ion transport in tokamaks. Effects that arise in a hot ion plasma are of particular interest; a new plasma source has been installed in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA to study this regime. In the present work, the ion temperature in this new plasma is measured using the width of the Helium ion spectral line emission. A monochromator is first used to measure cold (~0.1 ev) spectral lines of a mercury lamp to account for instrumental broadening. After acquiring this calibration data, we convolve it with plasma simulation (PrismSPECT) data for a series of known ion temperatures. The result is then compared to the actual plasma measurements to obtain the plasma ion temperature. Currently, we are working to implement a matching F-number lens system to improve the resolution of the spectral line. Results of these measurements will aid future Alfvén wave research in hot ion plasmas; this research may shed light on some of the plasma physics problems mentioned above. Supported by DOE and NSF.

  4. Use of aluminum nitride to obtain temperature measurements in a high temperature and high radiation environment

    SciTech Connect

    Wernsman, Bernard R.; Blasi, Raymond J.; Tittman, Bernhard R.; Parks, David A.

    2016-04-26

    An aluminum nitride piezoelectric ultrasonic transducer successfully operates at temperatures of up to 1000.degree. C. and fast (>1 MeV) neutron fluencies of more than 10.sup.18 n/cm.sup.2. The transducer comprises a transparent, nitrogen rich aluminum nitride (AlN) crystal wafer that is coupled to an aluminum cylinder for pulse-echo measurements. The transducer has the capability to measure in situ gamma heating within the core of a nuclear reactor.

  5. Pellet ablation and temperature profile measurements in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, D.K.; Schmidt, G.L.; Cavallo, A.; Grek, B.; Hulse, R.; Johnson, D.; Mansfield, D.; McNeill, D.; Park, H.; Taylor, G.

    1988-01-01

    Single and multiple deuterium pellets have been injected into a variety of TFTR plasmas, including ohmically heated plasmas with wide range of electron temperatures, neutral beam heated plasmas at several NBI powers and high T/sub e/, post NBI plasmas. Pellet penetration into these plasmas was determined by measuring the pellet speed and duration of the H/sub ..cap alpha..//D/sub ..cap alpha../ light emission during pellet ablation in the plasma. These penetration measurements are compared to the predicted penetration computed using the ablation model developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The plasma density profiles before and after pellet injection are used to estimate the number of particles deposited in the plasma. The plasma particle increase compared to the estimated number of atoms in the pellet yields a measure of the fueling efficiency of pellets in TFTR. The ablation cloud parameters are discussed based on polychromater measurements of the H/sub ..cap alpha..//D/sub ..cap alpha../ line emission from the neutral cloud surrounding the pellet. The electron temperature profile evolution after pellet injection is examined for the case of multiple pellet injection into an ohmically heated plasma. The ORNL pellet ablation code was used to compare measured pellet penetration depths with a theoretical model. The measured input parameters to the model are the electron density and temperature profiles, the neutral beam heating profile, the neutral density profile, the pellet size, pellet speed and pellet composition. The free parameter in the model is the thickness of the neutral cloud surrounding the pellet. This parameter is adjusted to arrive at a reasonable agreement between measured and calculated pellet penetration depths. The output of the model which is directly comparable to experiment is the calculated ablation rate. It is assumed that the broad-band H/sub ..cap alpha..//D/sub ..cap alpha../ emission is proportional to the ablation rate.

  6. Optical pyrometer for the measurement of turbine blade surface temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charpenel, M.; Wilhelm, J.

    An optical pyrometer with high spatial and temporal resolution has been developed to allow the determination of turbine blade surface temperature distributions in studies of blade cooling. The pyrometer is based on a water cooled metallic tube with a deflecting prism placed in front of a circular aperture which receives the infrared radiation emitted by a blade surface region as it passes by the probe. Blade temperature is determined from the measurement of the intensity of the sampled radiation, and the probe may be placed between turbine stages. The temperature field is reconstructed from averaged infrared intensity signals by computer, taking into account the emissivity of the surface examined as well as parasitic reflections of radiation from adjacent blades. The pyrometer has been applied to the determination of local transport coefficients on moving blades following the cutoff of blade cooling, and has been found simpler to use than techniques employing thermocouples.

  7. High Accuracy Temperature Measurements Using RTDs with Current Loop Conditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Gerald M.

    1997-01-01

    To measure temperatures with a greater degree of accuracy than is possible with thermocouples, RTDs (Resistive Temperature Detectors) are typically used. Calibration standards use specialized high precision RTD probes with accuracies approaching 0.001 F. These are extremely delicate devices, and far too costly to be used in test facility instrumentation. Less costly sensors which are designed for aeronautical wind tunnel testing are available and can be readily adapted to probes, rakes, and test rigs. With proper signal conditioning of the sensor, temperature accuracies of 0.1 F is obtainable. For reasons that will be explored in this paper, the Anderson current loop is the preferred method used for signal conditioning. This scheme has been used in NASA Lewis Research Center's 9 x 15 Low Speed Wind Tunnel, and is detailed.

  8. Radiative temperature measurements at Kupaianaha lava lake, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Luke P.; Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.; Gradie, Jonathan C.; Lucey, Paul G.

    1993-01-01

    The radiative temperature of the surface of Kupaianaha lava lake is computed using field spectroradiometer data. Observations were made during periods of active overturning. The lake surface exhibits three stages of activity. Magma fountaining and overturning events characterize stage 1, which exhibits the hottest crustal temperatures and the largest fractional hot areas. Rifting events between plates of crust mark stage 2; crustal temperatures in this stage are between 100 C and 340 C, and fractional hot areas are at least an order of magnitude smaller than those in stage 1. Stage 3 is characterized by quiescent periods when the lake is covered by a thick crust. This stage dominates the activity of the lake more than 90 percent of the time. The results of this study are relevant for satellite and airborne measurement of the thermal characteristics of active volcanoes, and indicate that the thermal output of a lava lake varies on a time scale of seconds to minutes.

  9. Ground temperature measurement by PRT-5 for maps experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, S. K.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1978-01-01

    A simple algorithm and computer program were developed for determining the actual surface temperature from the effective brightness temperature as measured remotely by a radiation thermometer called PRT-5. This procedure allows the computation of atmospheric correction to the effective brightness temperature without performing detailed radiative transfer calculations. Model radiative transfer calculations were performed to compute atmospheric corrections for several values of the surface and atmospheric parameters individually and in combination. Polynomial regressions were performed between the magnitudes or deviations of these parameters and the corresponding computed corrections to establish simple analytical relations between them. Analytical relations were also developed to represent combined correction for simultaneous variation of parameters in terms of their individual corrections.

  10. Temperature changes over storms from measurements of spacecraft TIMED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pylypenko, S. Motsyk, O.; Kozak, L.

    2016-09-01

    In the present work we have studied changes of mesospheric temperature over the powerful storms Wilma, Haitang, and Katrina using measurements of the space vehicle TIMED. We have found the temperature increasing at the altitude range 80-100 km. We have found the explanations for the obtained results by the dissipation of the gravity waves. Propagation of atmospheric gravity waves in a non-isothermal, windless atmosphere, with taking into account the viscosity and the thermal conductivity, has also been modelled in this work. We have determined that the maximum of amplitude of the atmospheric-gravity waves at the considered characteristics corresponds to altitudes of near 90 km (mesopause). It was found that the main factor influencing propagation and dissipation of the wave in such cases is the vertical temperature gradient. Viscosity and thermal conductivity have less influence on the wave amplitude.

  11. Sea-surface temperature and salinity mapping from remote microwave radiometric measurements of brightness temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hans-Juergen, C. B.; Kendall, B. M.; Fedors, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    A technique to measure remotely sea surface temperature and salinity was demonstrated with a dual frequency microwave radiometer system. Accuracies in temperature of 1 C and in salinity of part thousand for salinity greater than 5 parts per thousand were attained after correcting for the influence of extraterrestrial background radiation, atmospheric radiation and attenuation, sea-surface roughness, and antenna beamwidth. The radiometers, operating at 1.43 and 2.65 GHz, comprise a third-generation system using null balancing and feedback noise injection. Flight measurements from an aircraft at an altitude of 1.4 km over the lower Chesapeake Bay and coastal areas of the Atlantic Ocean resulted in contour maps of sea-surface temperature and salinity with a spatial resolution of 0.5 km.

  12. Microwave Imager Measures Sea Surface Temperature Through Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This image was acquired over Tropical Atlantic and U.S. East Coast regions on Aug. 22 - Sept. 23, 1998. Cloud data were collected by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES). Sea Surface Temperature (SST) data were collected aboard the NASA/NASDA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite by The TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI). TMI is the first satellite microwave sensor capable of accurately measuring sea surface temperature through clouds, as shown in this scene. For years scientists have known there is a strong correlation between sea surface temperature and the intensity of hurricanes. But one of the major stumbling blocks for forecasters has been the precise measurement of those temperatures when a storm begins to form. In this scene, clouds have been made translucent to allow an unobstructed view of the surface. Notice Hurricane Bonnie approaching the Carolina Coast (upper left) and Hurricane Danielle following roughly in its path (lower right). The ocean surface has been falsely colored to show a map of water temperature--dark blues are around 75oF, light blues are about 80oF, greens are about 85oF, and yellows are roughly 90oF. A hurricane gathers energy from warm waters found at tropical latitudes. In this image we see Hurricane Bonnie cross the Atlantic, leaving a cooler trail of water in its wake. As Hurricane Danielle followed in Bonnie's path, the wind speed of the second storm dropped markedly, as available energy to fuel the storm dropped off. But when Danielle left Bonnie's wake, wind speeds increased due to temperature increases in surface water around the storm. As a hurricane churns up the ocean, it's central vortex draws surface heat and water into the storm. That suction at the surface causes an upwelling of deep water. At depth, tropical ocean waters are significantly colder than water found near the surface. As they're pulled up to meet the storm, those colder waters essentially leave a footprint in the storm's wake

  13. INNOVATIVE INSTRUMENTATION AND ANALYSIS OF THE TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE GASIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Seong W. Lee

    2003-09-01

    During this reporting period, the literature survey including the gasifier temperature measurement literature, the ultrasonic application and its background study in cleaning application, and spray coating process are completed. The gasifier simulator (cold model) testing has been successfully conducted. Four factors (blower voltage, ultrasonic application, injection time intervals, particle weight) were considered as significant factors that affect the temperature measurement. The Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) was applied to analyze the test data. The analysis shows that all four factors are significant to the temperature measurements in the gasifier simulator (cold model). The regression analysis for the case with the normalized room temperature shows that linear model fits the temperature data with 82% accuracy (18% error). The regression analysis for the case without the normalized room temperature shows 72.5% accuracy (27.5% error). The nonlinear regression analysis indicates a better fit than that of the linear regression. The nonlinear regression model's accuracy is 88.7% (11.3% error) for normalized room temperature case, which is better than the linear regression analysis. The hot model thermocouple sleeve design and fabrication are completed. The gasifier simulator (hot model) design and the fabrication are completed. The system tests of the gasifier simulator (hot model) have been conducted and some modifications have been made. Based on the system tests and results analysis, the gasifier simulator (hot model) has met the proposed design requirement and the ready for system test. The ultrasonic cleaning method is under evaluation and will be further studied for the gasifier simulator (hot model) application. The progress of this project has been on schedule.

  14. High temperature measurements in irradiated environment using Raman fiber optics distributed temperature sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecomte, Pierre; Blairon, Sylvain; Boldo, Didier; Taillade, Frédéric; Caussanel, Matthieu; Beauvois, Gwendal; Duval, Hervé; Grieu, Stéphane; Laffont, Guillaume; Lainé, Frédéric; Carrel, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    Optical fiber temperature sensors using Raman effect are a promising technology for temperature mapping of nuclear power plant pipes. These pipes are exposed to high temperature (350 °C) and gamma radiations, which is a harsh environment for standard telecom fibers. Therefore metal coated fibers are to be used to perform measurement over 300 °C. Temperature variations can affect the attenuation of the metallic coated fiber before irradiation. The latter induces an extra attenuation, due to light absorption along the fiber by radiation-induced defects. The recombination of these defects can be strongly accelerated by the high temperature value. As backscattered Raman signal is weak it is important to test optical fibers under irradiation to observe how it gets attenuated. Different experiments are described in this conference paper: two in situ irradiation campaigns with different dose rates at, both ambient and high temperature. We observe that the tested off-the-shelf metallic coated fibers have a high attenuation under irradiation. We also noticed the fact that thermal annealing plays a massive role in the +300 °C temperature range.

  15. A Microwave Radiometer for Internal Body Temperature Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheeler, Robert Patterson

    This thesis presents the analysis and design of a microwave radiometer for internal body temperature measurements. There is currently no available method for non-invasive temperature measurement inside the human body. However, knowledge of both relative and absolute temperature variations over time is important to a number of medical applications. The research presented in this thesis details a proof-of-concept near-field microwave radiometer demonstrating relative thermometry of a multi-layer phantom. There are a number of technical challenges addressed in this thesis for radiometric determination of sub-degree temperature variations in the human body. A theoretical approach is developed for determining sensing depth from known complex layered tissues, which is defined as a figure of merit, and is shown to be dependent on frequency, electrical properties of the tissues, and the near-field probe. In order to obtain depth resolution, multiple frequency operation can be used, so multi-frequency probes are designed and demonstrated in this work. The choice of frequencies is determined not only by the tissue material properties, but also by the ever increasing radio interference in the environment. In this work, quiet bands allocated to radio astronomy are investigated. The radiometer and probe need to be compact to be wearable, and several advancements are made towards a fully wearable device: multi-frequency low-profile probes are designed and fabricated on a flexible substrate and the process of on-chip integration is demonstrated by a GaAs MMIC cold noise source for radiometer calibration. The implemented proof-of-concept device consists of two radiometers at 1.4 GHz and 2.7 GHz, designed with commercial inexpensive devices that can enable sufficient sensitivity. The device is tested on a phantom with two water layers whose temperatures are varied in a controlled manner, and focused on the human body temperature range. Measured results are discussed qualitatively

  16. Methods of Temperature and Emission Measure Determination of Coronal Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirtain, J. W.; Schmelz, J. T.; Martens, P. C. H.

    2002-05-01

    Recent observational results from both SOHO-EIT and TRACE indicate that coronal loops are isothermal along their length (axially). These results are obtained from a narrowband filter ratio method that assumes that the plasma is isothermal along the line of sight (radially). However, these temperatures vary greatly from those derived from differential emission measure (DEM) curves produced from spectral lines recorded by SOHO-CDS. The DEM results indicate that the loops are neither axially nor radially isothermal. This discrepancy was investigated by Schmelz et al. (2001). They chose pairs of iron lines from the same CDS data set to mimic the EIT and TRACE loop results. Ratios of different lines gave different temperatures, indicating that the plasma was not radially isothermal. In addition the results indicated that the loop was axially isothermal, even though the DEM analysis of the same data showed this result to be false. Here we have analyzed the EIT data for the CDS loop published by Schmelz et al. (2001). We took the ratios of the 171-to-195 and 195-to-284 filter data, and made temperature maps of the loop. The results indicate that the loop is axially isothermal, but different temperatures were found for each pair of filters. Both ratio techniques force the resultant temperature to lie within the range where the response functions (for filters) or the emissivity functions (for lines) overlap; isothermal loops are therefore a byproduct of the analysis. This conclusion strengthens support for the idea that temperature and emission measure results from filter ratio methods may be misleading or even drastically wrong. This research was funded in part by the NASA/TRACE MODA grant for Montana State University. Solar physics research at the University of Memphis is supported by NASA grant NAG5-9783.

  17. Comparison Testings between Two High-temperature Strain Measurement Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lei, J.-F.; Castelli, M. G.; Androjna, D.; Blue, C.; Blue, R.; Lin, R. Y.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental evaluation was conducted at NASA Lewis Research Center to compare and contrast the performance of a newly developed resistance strain gage, the PdCr temperature-compensated wire strain gage, to that of a conventional high-temperature extensometry. The evaluation of the two strain measurement systems was conducted through the application of various thermal and mechanical loading spectra using a high-temperature thermomechanical uniaxial testing system equipped with quartz lamp heating. The purpose of the testing was not only to compare and contrast the two strain sensors but also to investigate the applicability of the PdCr strain gage to the testing environment typically employed when characterizing the high-temperature mechanical behavior of structural materials. Strain measurement capabilities to 8OO C were investigated with a nickel base superalloy IN100 substrate material, and application to titanium matrix composite (TMC) materials was examined with the SCS-6/Ti-15-3 08 system. PdCr strain gages installed by three attachment techniques, namely, flame spraying, spot welding and rapid infrared joining were investigated.

  18. Multi-stage temperature compensation method for Lamb wave measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dworakowski, Ziemowit; Ambrozinski, Lukasz; Stepinski, Tadeusz

    2016-11-01

    One of the important issues related to the applications of Lamb waves for structural health monitoring is their undesired sensitivity to variation of environmental conditions. Temperature is the main factor that can affect wave propagation and hence significantly reduce performance of a SHM system. Therefore, there is a need for development of robust monitoring methods with low sensitivity to temperature variations. This paper is aimed at verification of efficiency of four methods designed for damage detection using Lamb wave measurements performed in variable environmental conditions. The methods investigated in the comparison are the following: optimal baseline selection approach, the damage index based on a signal alignment with respect to instantaneous phase, and a group measurement approach capable of distinguishing local damage-related changes from temperature-induced global ones. The fourth method relies on fusion all these solutions simultaneously. The methods' ability to damage detection is compared using a specimen that is subjected to large temperature changes. It is found that although all the methods have their strengths and weaknesses, a cooperation of all solutions allows for significant increase of the damage detection efficiency.

  19. Hybrid-type temperature sensor for in situ measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Iuchi, Tohru; Hiraka, Kensuke

    2006-11-15

    A hybrid-type surface temperature sensor combines the contact and noncontact methods, which allows us to overcome the shortcomings of both methods. The hybrid-type surface thermometer is composed mainly of two components: a metal film sheet that makes contact with an object and a radiometer that is used to detect the radiance of the rear surface of the metal film, which is actually a modified radiation thermometer. Temperature measurement using the hybrid-type thermometer with a several tens micrometer thick Hastelloy sheet, a highly heat and corrosion resistant alloy, is possible with a systematic error of -0.5 K and random errors of {+-}0.5 K, in the temperature range from 900 to 1000 K. This thermometer provides a useful means for calibration of in situ temperature measurement in various processes, especially in the silicon semiconductor industry. This article introduces the basic idea of the hybrid-type surface sensor, presents experimental results and discussions, and finally describes some applications.

  20. In-flight and simulated aircraft fuel temperature measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svehla, Roger A.

    1990-01-01

    Fuel tank measurements from ten flights of an L1011 commercial aircraft are reported for the first time. The flights were conducted from 1981 to 1983. A thermocouple rake was installed in an inboard wing tank and another in an outboard tank. During the test periods of either 2 or 5 hr, at altitudes of 10,700 m (35,000 ft) or higher, either the inboard or the outboard tank remained full. Fuel temperature profiles generally developed in the expected manner. The bulk fuel was mixed by natural convection to a nearly uniform temperature, especially in the outboard tank, and a gradient existed at the bottom conduction zone. The data indicated that when full, the upper surface of the inboard tank was wetted and the outboard tank was unwetted. Companion NASA Lewis Research Center tests were conducted in a 0.20 cubic meter (52 gal) tank simulator of the outboard tank, chilled on the top and bottom, and insulated on the sides. Even though the simulator tank had no internal components corresponding to the wing tank, temperatures agreed with the flight measurements for wetted upper surface conditions, but not for unwetted conditions. It was concluded that if boundary conditions are carefully controlled, simulators are a useful way of evaluating actual flight temperatures.

  1. Temperature insensitive measurements of displacement using fiber Bragg grating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shuang; Li, Jun; Xu, Shengming; Sun, Miao; Tang, Yuquan; Gao, Gang; Dong, Fengzhong

    2016-11-01

    Optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) displacement sensors play an important role in various areas due to the high sensitivity to displacement. However, it becomes a serious problem of FBG cross-sensitivity of temperature and displacement in applications with FBG displacement sensing. This paper presents a method of temperature insensitive measurement of displacement via using an appropriate layout of the sensor. A displacement sensor is constructed with two FBGs mounted on the opposite surface of a cantilever beam. The wavelengths of the FBGs shift with a horizontal direction displacement acting on the cantilever beam. Displacement measurement can be achieved by demodulating the wavelengths difference of the two FBGs. In this case, the difference of the two FBGs' wavelengths can be taken in order to compensate for the temperature effects. Four cantilever beams with different shapes are designed and the FBG strain distribution is quite different from each other. The deformation and strain distribution of cantilever beams are simulated by using finite element analysis, which is used to optimize the layout of the FBG displacement sensor. Experimental results show that an obvious increase in the sensitivity of this change on the displacement is obtained while temperature dependence greatly reduced. A change in the wavelength can be found with the increase of displacement from 0 to 10mm for a cantilever beam. The physical size of the FBG displacement sensor head can be adjusted to meet the need of different applications, such as structure health monitoring, smart material sensing, aerospace, etc.

  2. Measured Performance of a Low Temperature Air Source Heat Pump

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R. K.

    2013-09-01

    A 4-ton Low Temperature Heat Pump (LTHP) manufactured by Hallowell International was installed in a residence near New Haven, Connecticut and monitored over two winters of operation. After attending to some significant service issues, the heat pump operated as designed. This report should be considered a review of the dual compressor 'boosted heat pump' technology. The Low Temperature Heat Pumpsystem operates with four increasing levels of capacity (heat output) as the outdoor temperature drops. The system was shown to select capacity correctly, supplying the appropriate amount of heat to the house across the full range of outdoor temperatures. The system's Coefficient of Performance (Seasonal COP, or SCOP) over two entire winters was calculated, based on measured data, to be 3.29over the first winter and 2.68 over the second winter. A second seasonal efficiency calculation by a different method yielded a SCOP of 2.78 for the first winter and 2.83 for the second winter. This second seasonal efficiency calculation was determined by comparing measured heat pump energy use to the in situ energy use with resistance heat alone. This method is the ratio of the slopes of thedaily energy use load lines.

  3. Measurements of coal particle shape, mass and temperature histories: Impact of particle irregularity on temperature predictions and measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Sampath, R.; Yeboah, Y.D.; Maloney, D.J.; Woodruff, S.D.; Zondlo, J.W.

    1996-06-01

    Individual coal and carbon particles were levitated in an electrodynamic balance (EDB) and characterized using high-speed diode array and video based imaging systems to determine particle surface area, volume, drag, mass and density. These same particles were then heated bidirectionally using a long pulsed Nd:YAG laser to simulate combustion level heating fluxes (heating rates on order of 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 5} K/s). Measurements of particle surface temperature, size and laser temporal power variation were made and recorded during each heating experiment. Measured temperature histories were compared with a heat transfer analysis that accounted for variations in particle shape, mass, density, and laser heating power. Results of this study indicate that with well characterized materials of known properties agreement between measurement and model of within 20 K is typical throughout an entire heating and cooling profile. Large particle to particle variations are observed in coal particle temperature histories during rapid heating. These variations can be explained in large part by accounting for particle to particle property (shape, mass and density) variations. Even when accounting for particle to particle shape and density variation, however, model predictions greatly underestimate observed temperature histories. It is concluded that these discrepancies are largely due to uncertainties in the thermal properties (heat capacity and thermal conductivity) typically used to model coal combustion behavior.

  4. Measuring velocity and temperature profile sectional pipeline behind confuser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siažik, Ján; Malcho, Milan; Lenhard, Richard; Novomestský, Marcel

    2016-06-01

    The article deals with the measuring of temperature and velocity profile in area behind confuser in real made scale model of bypass. For proper operation of the equipment it is necessary to know the actual flow in the pipe. Bypasses have wide application and can be also associated with devices for heat recovery, heat exchangers different designs in which may be used in certain circumstances. In the present case, the heat that would otherwise has not been used is used for heating of insulators, and heating the air in the spray-dryer. The measuring principle was verify how the above-mentioned temperature and velocity profile decomposition above confuser on real made scale model.

  5. [Detonation temperature measurement of epoxypropane using instantaneous spectrum method].

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Li, Ping; Xiao, Hai-Bo; Hu, Dong; Yuan, Chang-Ying

    2008-03-01

    After solving the problems of synchronization of the measuring system and the avoidance of false trigger signal, the instantaneous emission spectrum of epoxypropane with an exposure time of 2 micros and a resolution of 0.2 nm was acquired from a side window of a shock tube at the very moment when the epoxypropane transformed from deflagration to detonation. The measuring system consists of an advanced intensified charge-coupled-device spectroscopic detector, a digital delay generator DG535, an explosion shock tube and optical fibers. The DDT process was monitored by pressure transducers. After correcting the intensity of the spectrum obtained, the background curve of the heat radiation intensity of the detonation was given immediately. The detonation temperature of 2 416 K for epoxypropane was derived from fitting the curve with Planck blackbody formula by least squares principle. The detonation temperature of epoxypropane can provide an experimental datum for analyzing the microscopic mechanism of DDT process.

  6. Temperature measurements of a high-power microwave feedhorn window

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, Daniel J.; Perez, Raul M.; Glazer, Stuart D.

    1990-01-01

    Temperature measurements of a high-power microwave feedhorn window, obtained using an imaging IR radiometer during transmitter operation at 365 kW CW and 8.5 GHz, are discussed. The window under investigation was constructed of HTP-6, a high-thermal-performance material developed to shield the Space Shuttle Orbiter from the heat of reentry. The measurement technique is described, and experimental results are presented. The window performed adequately at 365 kW CW with a center temperature of 475 C. The tests verify that HTP-6 can be used as a window material or a support structure in high-power waveguides at power densities of 1.47 kW/sq cm for extended periods of time, with no change in its mechanical characteristics.

  7. Thermocouple design for measuring temperatures of small insects.

    PubMed

    Hanson, A A; Venette, R C

    2013-01-01

    Contact thermocouples often are used to measure surface body temperature changes of insects during cold exposure. However, small temperature changes of minute insects can be difficult to detect, particularly during the measurement of supercooling points. We developed two thermocouple designs, which use 0.51 mm diameter or 0.127 mm diameter copper-constantan wires, to improve our ability to resolve insect exotherms. We tested the designs with adults from three parasitoid species: Tetrastichus planipennisi, Spathius agrili, and S. floridanus. These species are <3 mm long and <0.1 mg. Mean exotherms were greater for fine-gauge thermocouples than thick-gauge thermocouples for the smallest species tested, T. planipennisi. This difference was not apparent for larger species S. agrili and S. floridanus. Thermocouple design did not affect the mean supercooling point for any of the species. The cradle thermocouple design developed with the fine gauge wire was reusable and allowed for easy insect recovery after cold exposure.

  8. Temperature measurements of a high-power microwave feedhorn window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppe, Daniel J.; Perez, Raul M.; Glazer, Stuart D.

    1990-06-01

    Temperature measurements of a high-power microwave feedhorn window, obtained using an imaging IR radiometer during transmitter operation at 365 kW CW and 8.5 GHz, are discussed. The window under investigation was constructed of HTP-6, a high-thermal-performance material developed to shield the Space Shuttle Orbiter from the heat of reentry. The measurement technique is described, and experimental results are presented. The window performed adequately at 365 kW CW with a center temperature of 475 C. The tests verify that HTP-6 can be used as a window material or a support structure in high-power waveguides at power densities of 1.47 kW/sq cm for extended periods of time, with no change in its mechanical characteristics.

  9. Measurement of Laser Weld Temperatures for 3D Model Input

    SciTech Connect

    Dagel, Daryl; Grossetete, Grant; Maccallum, Danny O.

    2016-10-01

    Laser welding is a key joining process used extensively in the manufacture and assembly of critical components for several weapons systems. Sandia National Laboratories advances the understanding of the laser welding process through coupled experimentation and modeling. This report summarizes the experimental portion of the research program, which focused on measuring temperatures and thermal history of laser welds on steel plates. To increase confidence in measurement accuracy, researchers utilized multiple complementary techniques to acquire temperatures during laser welding. This data serves as input to and validation of 3D laser welding models aimed at predicting microstructure and the formation of defects and their impact on weld-joint reliability, a crucial step in rapid prototyping of weapons components.

  10. Infrared Low Temperature Turbine Vane Rough Surface Heat Transfer Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, R. J.; Spuckler, C. M.; Lucci, B. L.; Camperchioli, W. P.

    2000-01-01

    Turbine vane heat transfer distributions obtained using an infrared camera technique are described. Infrared thermography was used because noncontact surface temperature measurements were desired. Surface temperatures were 80 C or less. Tests were conducted in a three vane linear cascade, with inlet pressures between 0.14 and 1.02 atm., and exit Mach numbers of 0.3, 0.7, and 0.9, for turbulence intensities of approximately 1 and 10%. Measurements were taken on the vane suction side, and on the pressure side leading edge region. The designs for both the vane and test facility are discussed. The approach used to account for conduction within the vane is described. Midspan heat transfer distributions are given for the range of test conditions.

  11. High Temperature High Pressure Thermodynamic Measurements for Coal Model Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    John C. Chen; Vinayak N. Kabadi

    1998-11-12

    The overall objective of this project is to develop a better thermodynamic model for predicting properties of high-boiling coal derived liquids, especially the phase equilibria of different fractions at elevated temperatures and pressures. The development of such a model requires data on vapor-liquid equilibria (VLE), enthalpy, and heat capacity which would be experimentally determined for binary systems of coal model compounds and compiled into a database. The data will be used to refine existing models such as UNIQUAC and UNIFAC. The flow VLE apparatus designed and built for a previous project was upgraded and recalibrated for data measurements for thk project. The modifications include better and more accurate sampling technique and addition of a digital recorder to monitor temperature, pressure and liquid level inside the VLE cell. VLE data measurements for system benzene-ethylbenzene have been completed. The vapor and liquid samples were analysed using the Perkin-Elmer Autosystem gas chromatography.

  12. Laser-based strain measurements for high temperature applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lant, Christian T.

    1992-01-01

    The Instrumentation and Control Technology Division at NASA Lewis Research Center has developed a high performance optical strain measurement system for high temperature applications using wires and fibers. The system is based on Yamaguchi's two-beam speckle-shift strain measurement technique. The system automatically calculates surface strains at a rate of 5 Hz using a digital signal processor in a high speed micro-computer. The system is fully automated, and can be operated remotely. This report describes the speckle-shift technique and the latest NASA system design. It also shows low temperature strain test results obtained from small diameter tungsten, silicon carbide, and sapphire specimens. These specimens are of interest due to their roles in composite materials research at NASA Lewis.

  13. Pits and Flutes on Stimpy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The rock 'Stimpy' is seen in this close-up image taken by the Sojourner rover's left front camera on Sol 70 (September 13). Detailed texture on the rock, such as pits and flutes, are clearly visible.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  14. Measurements of skin surface temperature during mobile phone use.

    PubMed

    Anderson, V; Rowley, J

    2007-02-01

    We measured maximum temperature rises on the side of the face after 6 min of continuous mobile phone operation using two models of AMPS analog phones operating in the 835 MHz band and three early model GSM digital phones operating in the 900 MHz band. For the GSM phones the highest recorded temperature rise difference was 2.3 degrees C and for the AMPS phones it was 4.5 degrees C, both at locations on the cheek. The higher differential temperature rise between AMPS and GSM may reflect the higher maximum average operating power of AMPS (600 mW) versus GSM900 (250 mW). Additionally, we compared temperature changes at a consistent location on the cheek for an AMPS phone that was inoperative (-0.7 degrees C), transmitting at full power (+2.6 degrees C) and in stand-by mode (+2.0 degrees C). Our results suggest that direct RF heating of the skin only contributes a small part of the temperature rise and that most is due to heat conduction from the handset.

  15. Recovery Temperature, Transition, and Heat Transfer Measurements at Mach 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinich, Paul F.

    1961-01-01

    Schlieren, recovery temperature, and heat-transfer measurements were made on a hollow cylinder and a cone with axes alined parallel to the stream. Both the cone and cylinder were equipped with various bluntnesses, and the tests covered a Reynolds number range up to 20 x 10(exp 6) at a free-stream Mach number of 4.95 and wall to free-stream temperature ratios from 1.8 to 5.2 (adiabatic). A substantial transition delay due to bluntness was found for both the cylinder and the cone. For the present tests (Mach 4.95), transition was delayed by a factor of 3 on the cylinder and about 2 on the cone, these delays being somewhat larger than those observed in earlier tests at Mach 3.1. Heat-transfer tests on the cylinder showed only slight effects of wall temperature level on transition location; this is to be contrasted to the large transition delays observed on conical-type bodies at low surface temperatures at Mach 3.1. The schlieren and the peak-recovery-temperature methods of detecting transition were compared with the heat-transfer results. The comparison showed that the first two methods identified a transition point which occurred just beyond the end of the laminar run as seen in the heat-transfer data.

  16. Flame attenuation effects on surface temperature measurements using IR thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, Jaap; Tabinowski, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Long-wave infrared (LWIR) cameras provide the unique ability to see through smoke and condensed water vapor. However, soot generated inside the flame does attenuate the LWIR signal. This work focuses on gas flame attenuation effects of LWIR signals originating from a blackbody. The experimental setup consists of time averaged, laboratory-scale turbulent diffusion flames with heat release rates set at 5 kW, 10 kW, and 15 kW. Propylene and ethylene were used as fuel, providing two different soot yields. A 30 cm by 30 cm blackbody was used with maximum surface temperatures set to 600°C. Both instantaneous and time-averaged blackbody temperature profiles through the flame were measured using a LWIR microbolometer camera (7.5-14 μm). Flame intermittency was quantified by color segmenting visible images. The experiments showed that low blackbody temperatures were significantly affected by the presence of the flame. At 600°C, the effect of flame absorption matches the emitted radiation from the flame itself. Using data obtained at various blackbody temperatures, the flame transmittance was obtained using a Generalized Reduced Gradient optimization method. The transmittance was lower for propylene flames compared to ethylene flames. Ethylene flames were shown to have higher temperatures. Using the values for flame radiance and transmissivity, the total averaged radiance of the flame plus the blackbody could be reproduced with 1% accuracy.

  17. Temperature Measurement and Control System for Transtibial Prostheses: Functional Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ghoseiri, Kamiar; Zheng, Yong Ping; Leung, Aaron K L; Rahgozar, Mehdi; Aminian, Gholamreza; Lee, Tat Hing; Safari, Mohammad Reza

    2016-10-03

    The accumulation of heat inside the prosthetic socket increases skin temperature and fosters perspiration, which consequently leads to high tissue stress, friction blister, discomfort, unpleasant odor, and decreased prosthesis suspension and use. In the present study, the prototype of a temperature measurement and control (TM&C) system was designed, fabricated, and functionally evaluated in a phantom model of the transtibial prosthetic socket. The TM&C system was comprised of 12 thermistors divided equally into two groups that arranged internal and external to a prosthetic silicone liner. Its control system was programmed to select the required heating or cooling function of a thermal pump to provide thermal equilibrium based on the amount of temperature difference from a defined set temperature, or the amount of difference between the mean temperature recorded by inside and outside thermistors. A thin layer of aluminum was used for thermal conduction between the thermal pump and different sites around the silicone liner. The results showed functionality of the TM&C system for thermoregulation inside the prosthetic socket. However, enhancing the structure of this TM&C system, increasing its thermal power, and decreasing its weight and cost are main priorities before further development.

  18. Silicon device performance measurements to support temperature range enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bromstead, James; Weir, Bennett; Nelms, R. Mark; Johnson, R. Wayne; Askew, Ray

    1994-01-01

    Silicon based power devices can be used at 200 C. The device measurements made during this program show a predictable shift in device parameters with increasing temperature. No catastrophic or abrupt changes occurred in the parameters over the temperature range. As expected, the most dramatic change was the increase in leakage currents with increasing temperature. At 200 C the leakage current was in the milliAmp range but was still several orders of magnitude lower than the on-state current capabilities of the devices under test. This increase must be considered in the design of circuits using power transistors at elevated temperature. Three circuit topologies have been prototyped using MOSFET's and IGBT's. The circuits were designed using zero current or zero voltage switching techniques to eliminate or minimize hard switching of the power transistors. These circuits have functioned properly over the temperature range. One thousand hour life data have been collected for two power supplies with no failures and no significant change in operating efficiency. While additional reliability testing should be conducted, the feasibility of designing soft switched circuits for operation at 200 C has been successfully demonstrated.

  19. Land Surface Temperature Measurements form EOS MODIS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wan, Zhengming

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a physics-based land-surface temperature (LST) algorithm for simultaneously retrieving surface band-averaged emissivities and temperatures from day/night pairs of MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) data in seven thermal infrared bands. The set of 14 nonlinear equations in the algorithm is solved with the statistical regression method and the least-squares fit method. This new LST algorithm was tested with simulated MODIS data for 80 sets of band-averaged emissivities calculated from published spectral data of terrestrial materials in wide ranges of atmospheric and surface temperature conditions. Comprehensive sensitivity and error analysis has been made to evaluate the performance of the new LST algorithm and its dependence on variations in surface emissivity and temperature, upon atmospheric conditions, as well as the noise-equivalent temperature difference (NE(Delta)T) and calibration accuracy specifications of the MODIS instrument. In cases with a systematic calibration error of 0.5%, the standard deviations of errors in retrieved surface daytime and nighttime temperatures fall between 0.4-0.5 K over a wide range of surface temperatures for mid-latitude summer conditions. The standard deviations of errors in retrieved emissivities in bands 31 and 32 (in the 10-12.5 micrometer IR spectral window region) are 0.009, and the maximum error in retrieved LST values falls between 2-3 K. Several issues related to the day/night LST algorithm (uncertainties in the day/night registration and in surface emissivity changes caused by dew occurrence, and the cloud cover) have been investigated. The LST algorithms have been validated with MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS) dada and ground-based measurement data in two field campaigns conducted in Railroad Valley playa, NV in 1995 and 1996. The MODIS LST version 1 software has been delivered.

  20. Diode Laser Measurements of Concentration and Temperature in Microgravity Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silver, Joel A.; Kane, Daniel J.

    1999-01-01

    Diode laser absorption spectroscopy provides a direct method of determinating species concentration and local gas temperature in combustion flames. Under microgravity conditions, diode lasers are particularly suitable, given their compact size, low mass and low power requirements. The development of diode laser-based sensors for gas detection in microgravity is presented, detailing measurements of molecular oxygen. Current progress of this work and future application possibilities for these methods on the International Space Station are discussed.