Science.gov

Sample records for pixel detector qualifizierungsmessungen

  1. Pixelated gamma detector

    SciTech Connect

    Dolinsky, Sergei Ivanovich; Yanoff, Brian David; Guida, Renato; Ivan, Adrian

    2016-12-27

    A pixelated gamma detector includes a scintillator column assembly having scintillator crystals and optical transparent elements alternating along a longitudinal axis, a collimator assembly having longitudinal walls separated by collimator septum, the collimator septum spaced apart to form collimator channels, the scintillator column assembly positioned adjacent to the collimator assembly so that the respective ones of the scintillator crystal are positioned adjacent to respective ones of the collimator channels, the respective ones of the optical transparent element are positioned adjacent to respective ones of the collimator septum, and a first photosensor and a second photosensor, the first and the second photosensor each connected to an opposing end of the scintillator column assembly. A system and a method for inspecting and/or detecting defects in an interior of an object are also disclosed.

  2. The ALICE Pixel Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercado-Perez, Jorge

    2002-07-01

    The present document is a brief summary of the performed activities during the 2001 Summer Student Programme at CERN under the Scientific Summer at Foreign Laboratories Program organized by the Particles and Fields Division of the Mexican Physical Society (Sociedad Mexicana de Fisica). In this case, the activities were related with the ALICE Pixel Group of the EP-AIT Division, under the supervision of Jeroen van Hunen, research fellow in this group. First, I give an introduction and overview to the ALICE experiment; followed by a description of wafer probing. A brief summary of the test beam that we had from July 13th to July 25th is given as well.

  3. Commissioning of the CMS Forward Pixel Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Ashish; /SUNY, Buffalo

    2008-12-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment is scheduled for physics data taking in summer 2009 after the commissioning of high energy proton-proton collisions at Large Hadron Collider (LHC). At the core of the CMS all-silicon tracker is the silicon pixel detector, comprising three barrel layers and two pixel disks in the forward and backward regions, accounting for a total of 66 million channels. The pixel detector will provide high-resolution, 3D tracking points, essential for pattern recognition and precise vertexing, while being embedded in a hostile radiation environment. The end disks of the pixel detector, known as the Forward Pixel detector, has been assembled and tested at Fermilab, USA. It has 18 million pixel cells with dimension 100 x 150 {micro}m{sup 2}. The complete forward pixel detector was shipped to CERN in December 2007, where it underwent extensive system tests for commissioning prior to the installation. The pixel system was put in its final place inside the CMS following the installation and bake out of the LHC beam pipe in July 2008. It has been integrated with other sub-detectors in the readout since September 2008 and participated in the cosmic data taking. This report covers the strategy and results from commissioning of CMS forward pixel detector at CERN.

  4. Readout and DAQ for Pixel Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platkevic, Michal

    2010-01-01

    Data readout and acquisition control of pixel detectors demand the transfer of significantly a large amounts of bits between the detector and the computer. For this purpose dedicated interfaces are used which are designed with focus on features like speed, small dimensions or flexibility of use such as digital signal processors, field-programmable gate arrays (FPGA) and USB communication ports. This work summarizes the readout and DAQ system built for state-of-the-art pixel detectors of the Medipix family.

  5. Physics performance of the ATLAS pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuno, S.

    2017-01-01

    In preparation for LHC Run-2 the ATLAS detector introduced a new pixel detector, the Insertable B-Layer (IBL). This detector is located between the beampipe and what was the innermost pixel layer. The tracking and vertex reconstruction are significantly improved and good performance is expected in high level objects such a b-quark jet tagging. This in turn, leads to better physics results. This note summarizes the impact of the IBL detector on physics results, especially focusing on the analyses using b-quark jets throughout 2016 summer physics program.

  6. LISe pixel detector for neutron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Elan; Hamm, Daniel; Wiggins, Brenden; Milburn, Rob; Burger, Arnold; Bilheux, Hassina; Santodonato, Louis; Chvala, Ondrej; Stowe, Ashley; Lukosi, Eric

    2016-10-01

    Semiconducting lithium indium diselenide, 6LiInSe2 or LISe, has promising characteristics for neutron detection applications. The 95% isotopic enrichment of 6Li results in a highly efficient thermal neutron-sensitive material. In this study, we report on a proof-of-principle investigation of a semiconducting LISe pixel detector to demonstrate its potential as an efficient neutron imager. The LISe pixel detector had a 4×4 of pixels with a 550 μm pitch on a 5×5×0.56 mm3 LISe substrate. An experimentally verified spatial resolution of 300 μm was observed utilizing a super-sampling technique.

  7. The Silicon Pixel Detector for ALICE Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Fabris, D.; Bombonati, C.; Dima, R.; Lunardon, M.; Moretto, S.; Pepato, A.; Bohus, L. Sajo; Scarlassara, F.; Segato, G.; Shen, D.; Turrisi, R.; Viesti, G.; Anelli, G.; Boccardi, A.; Burns, M.; Campbell, M.; Ceresa, S.; Conrad, J.; Kluge, A.; Kral, M.

    2007-10-26

    The Inner Tracking System (ITS) of the ALICE experiment is made of position sensitive detectors which have to operate in a region where the track density may be as high as 50 tracks/cm{sup 2}. To handle such densities detectors with high precision and granularity are mandatory. The Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD), the innermost part of the ITS, has been designed to provide tracking information close to primary interaction point. The assembly of the entire SPD has been completed.

  8. Towards spark-proof gaseous pixel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsigaridas, S.; Beuzekom, M. v.; Chan, H. W.; Graaf, H. v. d.; Hartjes, F.; Heijhoff, K.; Hessey, N. P.; Prodanovic, V.

    2016-11-01

    The micro-pattern gaseous pixel detector, is a promising technology for imaging and particle tracking applications. It is a combination of a gas layer acting as detection medium and a CMOS pixelated readout-chip. As a prevention against discharges we deposit a protection layer on the chip and then integrate on top a micromegas-like amplification structure. With this technology we are able to reconstruct 3D track segments of particles passing through the gas thanks to the functionality of the chip. We have turned a Timepix3 chip into a gaseous pixel detector and tested it at the SPS at Cern. The preliminary results are promising and within the expectations. However, the spark protection layer needs further improvement to make reliable detectors. For this reason, we have created a setup for spark-testing. We present the first results obtained from the lab-measurements along with preliminary results from the testbeam.

  9. Simulation study of pixel detector charge digitization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fuyue; Nachman, Benjamin; Sciveres, Maurice; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Team

    2017-01-01

    Reconstruction of tracks from nearly overlapping particles, called Tracking in Dense Environments (TIDE), is an increasingly important component of many physics analyses at the Large Hadron Collider as signatures involving highly boosted jets are investigated. TIDE makes use of the charge distribution inside a pixel cluster to resolve tracks that share one of more of their pixel detector hits. In practice, the pixel charge is discretized using the Time-over-Threshold (ToT) technique. More charge information is better for discrimination, but more challenging for designing and operating the detector. A model of the silicon pixels has been developed in order to study the impact of the precision of the digitized charge distribution on distinguishing multi-particle clusters. The output of the GEANT4-based simulation is used to train neutral networks that predict the multiplicity and location of particles depositing energy inside one cluster of pixels. By studying the multi-particle cluster identification efficiency and position resolution, we quantify the trade-off between the number of ToT bits and low-level tracking inputs. As both ATLAS and CMS are designing upgraded detectors, this work provides guidance for the pixel module designs to meet TIDE needs. Work funded by the China Scholarship Council and the Office of High Energy Physics of the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  10. Anode readout for pixellated CZT detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narita, Tomohiko; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Hong, Jaesub; Niestemski, Francis C.

    2004-02-01

    Determination of the photon interaction depth offers numerous advantages for an astronomical hard X-ray telescope. The interaction depth is typically derived from two signals: anode and cathode, or collecting and non-collecting electrodes. We present some preliminary results from our depth sensing detectors using only the anode pixel signals. By examining several anode pixel signals simultaneously, we find that we can estimate the interaction depth, and get sub-pixel 2-D position resolution. We discuss our findings and the requirements for future ASIC development.

  11. Commissioning of the ATLAS pixel detector

    SciTech Connect

    ATLAS Collaboration; Golling, Tobias

    2008-09-01

    The ATLAS pixel detector is a high precision silicon tracking device located closest to the LHC interaction point. It belongs to the first generation of its kind in a hadron collider experiment. It will provide crucial pattern recognition information and will largely determine the ability of ATLAS to precisely track particle trajectories and find secondary vertices. It was the last detector to be installed in ATLAS in June 2007, has been fully connected and tested in-situ during spring and summer 2008, and is ready for the imminent LHC turn-on. The highlights of the past and future commissioning activities of the ATLAS pixel system are presented.

  12. Proceedings of PIXEL98 -- International pixel detector workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.F.; Kwan, S.

    1998-08-01

    Experiments around the globe face new challenges of more precision in the face of higher interaction rates, greater track densities, and higher radiation doses, as they look for rarer and rarer processes, leading many to incorporate pixelated solid-state detectors into their plans. The highest-readout rate devices require new technologies for implementation. This workshop reviewed recent, significant progress in meeting these technical challenges. Participants presented many new results; many of them from the weeks--even days--just before the workshop. Brand new at this workshop were results on cryogenic operation of radiation-damaged silicon detectors (dubbed the Lazarus effect). Other new work included a diamond sensor with 280-micron collection distance; new results on breakdown in p-type silicon detectors; testing of the latest versions of read-out chip and interconnection designs; and the radiation hardness of deep-submicron processes.

  13. Modulation transfer function of a trapezoidal pixel array detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fan; Guo, Rongli; Ni, Jinping; Dong, Tao

    2016-01-01

    The modulation transfer function (MTF) is the tool most commonly used for quantifying the performance of an electro-optical imaging system. Recently, trapezoid-shaped pixels were designed and used in a retina-like sensor in place of rectangular-shaped pixels. The MTF of a detector with a trapezoidal pixel array is determined according to its definition. Additionally, the MTFs of detectors with differently shaped pixels, but the same pixel areas, are compared. The results show that the MTF values of the trapezoidal pixel array detector are obviously larger than those of rectangular and triangular pixel array detectors at the same frequencies.

  14. Operational experience with the ALICE pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastroserio, A.

    2017-01-01

    The Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD) constitutes the two innermost layers of the Inner Tracking System of the ALICE experiment and it is the closest detector to the interaction point. As a vertex detector, it has the unique feature of generating a trigger signal that contributes to the L0 trigger of the ALICE experiment. The SPD started collecting data since the very first pp collisions at LHC in 2009 and since then it has taken part in all pp, Pb-Pb and p-Pb data taking campaigns. This contribution will present the main features of the SPD, the detector performance and the operational experience, including calibration and optimization activities from Run 1 to Run 2.

  15. The Phase1 CMS Pixel detector upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavolaro, V. R.

    2016-12-01

    The pixel detector of the CMS experiment will be replaced in an extended end-of-year shutdown during winter 2016/2017 with an upgraded one able to cope with peak instantaneous luminosities beyond the nominal LHC instantaneous luminosity of 1 × 1034 cm-2 s-1. Under the conditions expected in the coming years, which will see an increase of a factor two in instantaneous luminosity, the present system would experience a dynamic inefficiency caused mainly by data losses due to buffer overflows. The Phase I upgrade of the CMS pixel detector, described in this paper, will operate at full efficiency at an instantaneous luminosity of 2 × 1034 cm-2 s-1 and beyond, thanks to a new readout chip. The new detector will feature one additional tracking point both in the barrel and in the forward regions, while reducing the material budget as a result of a new CO2 cooling system and optimised layout of the services. In this paper, the design and the technological choices of the Phase I detector will be reviewed and the status of the construction of the detector and the performance of its components will be discussed.

  16. The Belle II DEPFET pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, Hans-Günther

    2016-09-01

    The Belle II experiment at KEK (Tsukuba, Japan) will explore heavy flavour physics (B, charm and tau) at the starting of 2018 with unprecedented precision. Charged particles are tracked by a two-layer DEPFET pixel device (PXD), a four-layer silicon strip detector (SVD) and the central drift chamber (CDC). The PXD will consist of two layers at radii of 14 mm and 22 mm with 8 and 12 ladders, respectively. The pixel sizes will vary, between 50 μm×(55-60) μm in the first layer and between 50 μm×(70-85) μm in the second layer, to optimize the charge sharing efficiency. These innermost layers have to cope with high background occupancy, high radiation and must have minimal material to reduce multiple scattering. These challenges are met using the DEPFET technology. Each pixel is a FET integrated on a fully depleted silicon bulk. The signal charge collected in the 'internal gate' modulates the FET current resulting in a first stage amplification and therefore very low noise. This allows very thin sensors (75 μm) reducing the overall material budget of the detector (0.21% X0). Four fold multiplexing of the column parallel readout allows read out a full frame of the pixel matrix in only 20 μs while keeping the power consumption low enough for air cooling. Only the active electronics outside the detector acceptance has to be cooled actively with a two phase CO2 system. Furthermore the DEPFET technology offers the unique feature of an electronic shutter which allows the detector to operate efficiently in the continuous injection mode of superKEKB.

  17. Silicon buried channels for pixel detector cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boscardin, M.; Conci, P.; Crivellari, M.; Ronchin, S.; Bettarini, S.; Bosi, F.

    2013-08-01

    The support and cooling structures add important contributions to the thickness, in radiation length, of vertex detectors. In order to minimize the material budget of pixel sensors, we developed a new approach to integrate the cooling into the silicon devices. The microchannels are formed in silicon using isotropic SF6 plasma etching in a DRIE (deep reactive ion etcher) equipment. Due to their peculiar profiles, the channels can be sealed by a layer of a PECVD silicon oxide. We have realized on a silicon wafer microchannels with different geometries and hydraulic diameters. We describe the main fabrication steps of microchannels with focus on the channel definition. The experimental results are reported on the thermal characterization of several prototypes, using a mixture of glycol and water as a liquid coolant. The prototypes have shown high cooling efficiency and high-pressure breaking strength.

  18. Hit efficiency study of CMS prototype forward pixel detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dongwook; /Johns Hopkins U.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper the author describes the measurement of the hit efficiency of a prototype pixel device for the CMS forward pixel detector. These pixel detectors were FM type sensors with PSI46V1 chip readout. The data were taken with the 120 GeV proton beam at Fermilab during the period of December 2004 to February 2005. The detectors proved to be highly efficient (99.27 {+-} 0.02%). The inefficiency was primarily located near the corners of the individual pixels.

  19. Status of the CMS Phase I pixel detector upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spannagel, S.

    2016-09-01

    A new pixel detector for the CMS experiment is being built, owing to the instantaneous luminosities anticipated for the Phase I Upgrade of the LHC. The new CMS pixel detector provides four-hit tracking while featuring a significantly reduced material budget as well as new cooling and powering schemes. A new front-end readout chip mitigates buffering and bandwidth limitations, and comprises a low-threshold comparator. These improvements allow the new pixel detector to sustain and improve the efficiency of the current pixel tracker at the increased requirements imposed by high luminosities and pile-up. This contribution gives an overview of the design of the upgraded pixel detector and the status of the upgrade project, and presents test beam performance measurements of the production read-out chip.

  20. Small pixel CZT detector for hard X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Matthew David; Cernik, Robert; Chen, Henry; Hansson, Conny; Iniewski, Kris; Jones, Lawrence L.; Seller, Paul; Veale, Matthew C.

    2011-10-01

    A new small pixel cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector has been developed for hard X-ray spectroscopy. The X-ray performance of four detectors is presented and the detectors are analysed in terms of the energy resolution of each pixel. The detectors were made from CZT crystals grown by the travelling heater method (THM) bonded to a 20×20 application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) and data acquisition (DAQ) system. The detectors had an array of 20×20 pixels on a 250 μm pitch, with each pixel gold-stud bonded to an energy resolving circuit in the ASIC. The DAQ system digitised the ASIC output with 14 bit resolution, performing offset corrections and data storage to disc in real time at up to 40,000 frames per second. The detector geometry and ASIC design was optimised for X-ray spectroscopy up to 150 keV and made use of the small pixel effect to preferentially measure the electron signal. A 241Am source was used to measure the spectroscopic performance and uniformity of the detectors. The average energy resolution (FWHM at 59.54 keV) of each pixel ranged from 1.09±0.46 to 1.50±0.57 keV across the four detectors. The detectors showed good spectral performance and uniform response over almost all pixels in the 20×20 array. A large area 80×80 pixel detector will be built that will utilise the scalable design of the ASIC and the large areas of monolithic spectroscopic grade THM grown CZT that are now available. The large area detector will have the same performance as that demonstrated here.

  1. Detector apparatus having a hybrid pixel-waveform readout system

    DOEpatents

    Meng, Ling-Jian

    2014-10-21

    A gamma ray detector apparatus comprises a solid state detector that includes a plurality of anode pixels and at least one cathode. The solid state detector is configured for receiving gamma rays during an interaction and inducing a signal in an anode pixel and in a cathode. An anode pixel readout circuit is coupled to the plurality of anode pixels and is configured to read out and process the induced signal in the anode pixel and provide triggering and addressing information. A waveform sampling circuit is coupled to the at least one cathode and configured to read out and process the induced signal in the cathode and determine energy of the interaction, timing of the interaction, and depth of interaction.

  2. SLHC upgrade plans for the ATLAS pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šícho, Petr

    2009-08-01

    The ATLAS pixel detector is an 80 million channels silicon tracking system designed to detect charged tracks and secondary vertices with very high precision. An upgrade of the ATLAS pixel detector is presently being considered, enabling to cope with higher luminosity at Super Large Hadron Collider (SLHC). The increased luminosity leads to extremely high radiation doses in the innermost region of the ATLAS tracker. Options considered for a new detector are discussed, as well as some important R&D activities, such as investigations towards novel detector geometries and novel processes.

  3. The Phase-1 upgrade of the CMS pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Katja

    2017-02-01

    The CMS experiment features a pixel detector with three barrel layers and two discs per side, corresponding to an active silicon area of 1 m2. The detector delivered high-quality data during LHC Run 1. However, the CMS pixel detector was designed for the nominal instantaneous LHC luminosity of 1 ·1034cm-2s-1 . It is expected that the instantaneous luminosity will increase and reach twice the design value before Long Shutdown 3, scheduled for 2023. Under such conditions, the present readout chip would suffer from data loss due to buffer overflow, leading to significant inefficiencies of up to 16%. The CMS collaboration is presently constructing a new pixel detector to replace the present device during the winter shutdown 2016/2017. The design of this new detector will be outlined, the construction status summarized and the performance described.

  4. HEXITEC ASIC—a pixellated readout chip for CZT detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Lawrence; Seller, Paul; Wilson, Matthew; Hardie, Alec

    2009-06-01

    HEXITEC is a collaborative project with the aim of developing a new range of detectors for high-energy X-ray imaging. High-energy X-ray imaging has major advantages over current lower energy imaging for the life and physical sciences, including improved phase-contrast images on larger, higher density samples and with lower accumulated doses. However, at these energies conventional silicon-based devices cannot be used, hence, the requirement for a new range of high Z-detector materials. Underpinning the HEXITEC programme are the development of a pixellated Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors and a pixellated readout ASIC which will be bump-bonded to the detector. The HEXITEC ASIC is required to have low noise (20 electrons rms) and tolerate detector leakage currents. A prototype 20×20 pixel ASIC has been developed and manufactured on a standard 0.35 μm CMOS process.

  5. Monolithic pixel detectors in silicon on insulator technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisello, Dario

    2013-05-01

    Silicon On Insulator (SOI) is becoming an attractive technology to fabricate monolithic pixel detectors. The possibility of using the depleted resistive substrate as a drift collection volume and to connect it by means of vias through the buried oxide to the pixel electronic makes this kind of approach interesting both for particle and photon detection. In this paper I report the results obtained in the development of monolithic pixel detectors in an SOI technology by a collaboration between groups from the University and INFN of Padova (Italy) and the LBNL and the SCIPP at UCSC (USA).

  6. Intra-pixel response of infrared detector arrays for JWST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Tim; Baril, M. R.; Pazder, J.; Stilburn, J. S.

    2008-07-01

    The near-infrared instruments on the James Webb Space Telescope will use 5 micron cutoff HAWAII-2RG detector arrays. We have investigated the response of this type of detector at sub-pixel resolution to determine whether variations at this scale would affect the performance of the instruments. Using a simple experimental setup we were able to get measurements with a resolution of approximately 4 microns. We have measured an un-hybridized HAWAII-1RG multiplexer, a hybridized HAWAII-1RG device with a 5 micron cutoff HgCdTe detector layer, and a hybridized HAWAII-2RG device with a 5 micron cutoff substrate-removed HgCdTe detector layer. We found that the intra-pixel response functions of the hybrid devices are basically smooth and well behaved, and vary little from pixel to pixel. However, we did find numerous sub-pixel sized defects, notably some long straight thin features like scratches. We were not able to detect any significant variations with wavelength between 0.65 and 2.2 microns, but in the -1RG device there was a variation with temperature. When cooled from 80K to 40K, the pixel response became narrower, and some signal began to be lost at the edges of the pixel. We believe this reflects a reduction in charge diffusion at the lower temperature.

  7. Challenges of small-pixel infrared detectors: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogalski, A.; Martyniuk, P.; Kopytko, M.

    2016-04-01

    In the last two decades, several new concepts for improving the performance of infrared detectors have been proposed. These new concepts particularly address the drive towards the so-called high operating temperature focal plane arrays (FPAs), aiming to increase detector operating temperatures, and as a consequence reduce the cost of infrared systems. In imaging systems with the above megapixel formats, pixel dimension plays a crucial role in determining critical system attributes such as system size, weight and power consumption (SWaP). The advent of smaller pixels has also resulted in the superior spatial and temperature resolution of these systems. Optimum pixel dimensions are limited by diffraction effects from the aperture, and are in turn wavelength-dependent. In this paper, the key challenges in realizing optimum pixel dimensions in FPA design including dark current, pixel hybridization, pixel delineation, and unit cell readout capacity are outlined to achieve a sufficiently adequate modulation transfer function for the ultra-small pitches involved. Both photon and thermal detectors have been considered. Concerning infrared photon detectors, the trade-offs between two types of competing technology—HgCdTe material systems and III-V materials (mainly barrier detectors)—have been investigated.

  8. Fast neutron dosemeter using pixelated detector Timepix.

    PubMed

    Bulanek, Boris; Ekendahl, Daniela; Prouza, Zdenek

    2014-10-01

    A Timepix detector covered with polyethylene convertors of different thicknesses is presented as a fast neutron real-time dosemeter. The application of different weighting factors in connection with the position of a signal in a Timepix detector enables one to obtain an energy-dependent signal equal to neutron dose equivalents. A simulation of a Timepix detector covered with polyethylene convertors using monoenergetic neutrons is presented. The experimental set-up of a dosemeter was also produced. The first results of detector response using different fast neutron sources are presented.

  9. Techniques for precise energy calibration of particle pixel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroupa, M.; Campbell-Ricketts, T.; Bahadori, A.; Empl, A.

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate techniques to improve the accuracy of the energy calibration of Timepix pixel detectors, used for the measurement of energetic particles. The typical signal from such particles spreads among many pixels due to charge sharing effects. As a consequence, the deposited energy in each pixel cannot be reconstructed unless the detector is calibrated, limiting the usability of such signals for calibration. To avoid this shortcoming, we calibrate using low energy X-rays. However, charge sharing effects still occur, resulting in part of the energy being deposited in adjacent pixels and possibly lost. This systematic error in the calibration process results in an error of about 5% in the energy measurements of calibrated devices. We use FLUKA simulations to assess the magnitude of charge sharing effects, allowing a corrected energy calibration to be performed on several Timepix pixel detectors and resulting in substantial improvement in energy deposition measurements. Next, we address shortcomings in calibration associated with the huge range (from kiloelectron-volts to megaelectron-volts) of energy deposited per pixel which result in a nonlinear energy response over the full range. We introduce a new method to characterize the non-linear response of the Timepix detectors at high input energies. We demonstrate improvement using a broad range of particle types and energies, showing that the new method reduces the energy measurement errors, in some cases by more than 90%.

  10. Hybrid Pixel Detectors for gamma/X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzistratis, D.; Theodoratos, G.; Zografos, V.; Kazas, I.; Loukas, D.; Lambropoulos, C. P.

    2015-09-01

    Hybrid pixel detectors are made by direct converting high-Z semi-insulating single crystalline material coupled to complementary-metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) readout electronics. They are attractive because direct conversion exterminates all the problems of spatial localization related to light diffusion, energy resolution, is far superior from the combination of scintillation crystals and photomultipliers and lithography can be used to pattern electrodes with very fine pitch. We are developing 2-D pixel CMOS ASICs, connect them to pixilated CdTe crystals with the flip chip and bump bonding method and characterize the hybrids. We have designed a series of circuits, whose latest member consists of a 50×25 pixel array with 400um pitch and an embedded controller. In every pixel a full spectroscopic channel with time tagging information has been implemented. The detectors are targeting Compton scatter imaging and they can be used for coded aperture imaging too. Hybridization using CMOS can overcome the limit put on pixel circuit complexity by the use of thin film transistors (TFT) in large flat panels. Hybrid active pixel sensors are used in dental imaging and other applications (e.g. industrial CT etc.). Thus X-ray imaging can benefit from the work done on dynamic range enhancement methods developed initially for visible and infrared CMOS pixel sensors. A 2-D CMOS ASIC with 100um pixel pitch to demonstrate the feasibility of such methods in the context of X-ray imaging has been designed.

  11. Fabrication and performance of mercuric iodide pixellated detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, Lodewijk; Bastian, Lloyd F.; Zhang, Feng; Lenos, Howard; Capote, M. Albert

    2007-09-01

    The radiation detection efficiency and spectral resolution of mercuric iodide detectors can be improved significantly by increasing the volume of the detectors and by using a pixellated anode structure. Detector bodies with a thickness of nominally 10 mm and an active area of approximately 14 mm x 14 mm have been used for these experiments. The detectors were cut from single crystals grown by the physical vapor transport method. The cut surfaces were polished and etched using a string saw and potassium iodide solutions. The Palladium contacts were deposited by magnetron sputtering through stainless steel masks. The cathode contact is continuous; the anode contacts consist of an array of 11 x 11 pixels surrounded by a guard ring. The resistance between a pixel and its surrounding contacts should be larger than 0.25 Gohm. The detector is mounted on a substrate that makes it possible to connect the anode pixels to an ASIC, and is conditioned so that it is stable for all pixels at a bias of -3000 Volts. Under these conditions the spectral resolution for Cs-137 gamma rays (662 keV) is approximately 5% FWHM. When depth sensing correction methods are applied, the resolution improves to about 2% FWHM or better. It is expected that the performance of the devices can be improved by the careful selection of crystal parts that are free of structural defects. Details of the fabrication technologies will be described. The effects of material inhomogeneities and transport properties of the charge carriers will be discussed.

  12. Calibration analysis software for the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stramaglia, Maria Elena

    2016-07-01

    The calibration of the ATLAS Pixel Detector at LHC fulfils two main purposes: to tune the front-end configuration parameters for establishing the best operational settings and to measure the tuning performance through a subset of scans. An analysis framework has been set up in order to take actions on the detector given the outcome of a calibration scan (e.g. to create a mask for disabling noisy pixels). The software framework to control all aspects of the Pixel Detector scans and analyses is called calibration console. The introduction of a new layer, equipped with new FE-I4 chips, required an update of the console architecture. It now handles scans and scan analyses applied together to chips with different characteristics. An overview of the newly developed calibration analysis software will be presented, together with some preliminary results.

  13. Leakage current measurements of a pixelated polycrystalline CVD diamond detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zain, R. M.; Maneuski, D.; O'Shea, V.; Bates, R.; Blue, A.; Cunnigham, L.; Stehl, C.; Berderman, E.; Rahim, R. A.

    2013-01-01

    Diamond has several desirable features when used as a material for radiation detection. With the invention of synthetic growth techniques, it has become feasible to look at developing diamond radiation detectors with reasonable surface areas. Polycrystalline diamond has been grown using a chemical vapour deposition (CVD) technique by the University of Augsburg and detector structures fabricated at the James Watt Nanofabrication Centre (JWNC) in the University of Glasgow in order to produce pixelated detector arrays. The anode and cathode contacts are realised by depositing gold to produce ohmic contacts. Measurements of I-V characteristics were performed to study the material uniformity. The bias voltage is stepped from -1000V to 1000V to investigate the variation of leakage current from pixel to pixel. Bulk leakage current is measured to be less than 1nA.

  14. Silicon pixel detector prototyping in SOI CMOS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Roma; Bugiel, Szymon; Idzik, Marek; Kapusta, Piotr; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Turala, Michal

    2016-12-01

    The Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) CMOS is one of the most advanced and promising technology for monolithic pixel detectors design. The insulator layer that is implemented inside the silicon crystal allows to integrate sensors matrix and readout electronic on a single wafer. Moreover, the separation of electronic and substrate increases also the SOI circuits performance. The parasitic capacitances to substrate are significantly reduced, so the electronic systems are faster and consume much less power. The authors of this presentation are the members of international SOIPIX collaboration, that is developing SOI pixel detectors in 200 nm Lapis Fully-Depleted, Low-Leakage SOI CMOS. This work shows a set of advantages of SOI technology and presents possibilities for pixel detector design SOI CMOS. In particular, the preliminary results of a Cracow chip are presented.

  15. Pixel detectors in 3D technologies for high energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Deptuch, G.; Demarteau, M.; Hoff, J.; Lipton, R.; Shenai, A.; Yarema, R.; Zimmerman, T.; /Fermilab

    2010-10-01

    This paper reports on the current status of the development of International Linear Collider vertex detector pixel readout chips based on multi-tier vertically integrated electronics. Initial testing results of the VIP2a prototype are presented. The chip is the second embodiment of the prototype data-pushed readout concept developed at Fermilab. The device was fabricated in the MIT-LL 0.15 {micro}m fully depleted SOI process. The prototype is a three-tier design, featuring 30 x 30 {micro}m{sup 2} pixels, laid out in an array of 48 x 48 pixels.

  16. Design methodology: edgeless 3D ASICs with complex in-pixel processing for pixel detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Fahim Farah, Fahim Farah; Deptuch, Grzegorz W.; Hoff, James R.; Mohseni, Hooman

    2015-08-28

    The design methodology for the development of 3D integrated edgeless pixel detectors with in-pixel processing using Electronic Design Automation (EDA) tools is presented. A large area 3 tier 3D detector with one sensor layer and two ASIC layers containing one analog and one digital tier, is built for x-ray photon time of arrival measurement and imaging. A full custom analog pixel is 65μm x 65μm. It is connected to a sensor pixel of the same size on one side, and on the other side it has approximately 40 connections to the digital pixel. A 32 x 32 edgeless array without any peripheral functional blocks constitutes a sub-chip. The sub-chip is an indivisible unit, which is further arranged in a 6 x 6 array to create the entire 1.248cm x 1.248cm ASIC. Each chip has 720 bump-bond I/O connections, on the back of the digital tier to the ceramic PCB. All the analog tier power and biasing is conveyed through the digital tier from the PCB. The assembly has no peripheral functional blocks, and hence the active area extends to the edge of the detector. This was achieved by using a few flavors of almost identical analog pixels (minimal variation in layout) to allow for peripheral biasing blocks to be placed within pixels. The 1024 pixels within a digital sub-chip array have a variety of full custom, semi-custom and automated timing driven functional blocks placed together. The methodology uses a modified mixed-mode on-top digital implementation flow to not only harness the tool efficiency for timing and floor-planning but also to maintain designer control over compact parasitically aware layout. The methodology uses the Cadence design platform, however it is not limited to this tool.

  17. The BTeV pixel and microstrip detector

    SciTech Connect

    Simon W Kwan

    2003-06-04

    The BTeV pixel detector is one of the most crucial elements in the BTeV experiment. While the pixel detector is technically challenging, we have made great progress towards identifying viable solutions for individual components of the system. The forward silicon tracker is based on more mature technology and its design has benefited from the experience of other experiments. Nevertheless, we have started an R&D program on the forward silicon tracker and first results are expected some time next year.

  18. Construction of the Phase I Forward Pixel Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neylon, Ashton; Bartek, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    The silicon pixel detector is the innermost component of the CMS tracking system, providing high precision space point measurements of charged particle trajectories. The original CMS detector was designed for the nominal instantaneous LHC luminosity of 1 x 1034 cm-2s-1 . The LHC has already started to exceed this luminosity causing the CMS pixel detector to see a dynamic inefficiency caused by data losses due to buffer overflows. For this reason the CMS Collaboration has been building an upgraded pixel detector which is scheduled for installation during an extended year end technical stop during winter 2016/2017. The phase 1 upgrade includes four barrel layers and three forward disks, providing robust tracking and vertexing for LHC luminosities up to 2 x 1034 cm-2s-1 . The upgrade incorporates new readout chips, front-end electronics, DC-DC powering, and dual-phase CO2 cooling to achieve performance exceeding that of the present detector with a lower material budget. This contribution will review the design and technology choices of the Phase I detector and discuss the status of the detector. The challenges and difficulties encountered during the construction will also be presented, as well as the lessons learned for future upgrades. National Science Foundation.

  19. Phase 1 upgrade of the CMS pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Anirban

    2017-02-01

    The pixel tracker of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment is the innermost sub-detector, located close to the collision point, and is used for reconstruction of the tracks and vertices of charged particles. The present pixel detector was designed to work efficiently with the maximum instantaneous luminosity of 1 × 1034 cm‑2 s‑1. In 2017 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is expected to deliver a peak luminosity reaching up to 2 × 1034 cm‑2 s‑1, increasing the mean number of primary vertices to 50. Due to the radiation damage and significant data losses due to high occupancy in the readout chip of the pixel detector, the present system must be replaced by a new one in an extended end-of-year shutdown during winter 2016/2017 in order to maintain the excellent tracking and other physics performances. The main new features of the upgraded pixel detector are a ultra-light mechanical design with four barrel layers and three end-cap disks, digital readout chip with higher rate capability and a new cooling system. In this document, we discuss the motivations for the upgrade, the design, and technological choices made, the status of the construction of the new detector and the future plans for the installation and commissioning.

  20. Overview of the BTeV Pixel Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey A Appel

    2002-12-10

    BTeV is a new Fermilab beauty and charm experiment designed to operate in the CZero region of the Tevatron collider. Critical to the success of BTeV is its pixel detector. The unique features of this pixel detector include its proximity to the beam, its operation with a beam crossing time of 132 ns, and the need for the detector information to be read out quickly enough to be used for the lowest level trigger. This talk presents an overview of the pixel detector design, giving the motivations for the technical choices made. The status of the current R&D on detector components is also reviewed. Additional Pixel 2002 talks on the BTeV pixel detector are given by Dave Christian[1], Mayling Wong[2], and Sergio Zimmermann[3]. Table 1 gives a selection of pixel detector parameters for the ALICE, ATLAS, BTeV, and CMS experiments. Comparing the progression of this table, which I have been updating for the last several years, has shown a convergence of specifications. Nevertheless, significant differences endure. The BTeV data-driven readout, horizontal and vertical position resolution better than 9 {micro}m with the {+-} 300 mr forward acceptance, and positioning in vacuum and as close as 6 mm from the circulating beams remain unique. These features are driven by the physics goals of the BTeV experiment. Table 2 demonstrates that the vertex trigger performance made possible by these features is requisite for a very large fraction of the B meson decay physics which is so central to the motivation for BTeV. For most of the physics quantities of interest listed in the table, the vertex trigger is essential. The performance of the BTeV pixel detector may be summarized by looking at particular physics examples; e.g., the B{sub s} meson decay B{sub s} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -} K{sup +}. For that decay, studies using GEANT3 simulations provide quantitative measures of performance. For example, the separation between the B{sub s} decay point and the primary proton

  1. CMOS Hybrid Pixel Detectors for Scientific, Industrial and Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broennimann, Christian

    2009-03-01

    Crystallography is the principal technique for determining macromolecular structures at atomic resolution and uses advantageously the high intensity of 3rd generation synchrotron X-ray sources . Macromolecular crystallography experiments benefit from excellent beamline equipment, recent software advances and modern X-ray detectors. However, the latter do not take full advantage of the brightness of modern synchrotron sources. CMOS Hybrid pixel array detectors, originally developed for high energy physics experiments, meet these requirements. X-rays are recorded in single photon counting mode and data thus are stored digitally at the earliest possible stage. This architecture leads to several advantages over current detectors: No detector noise is added to the signal. Readout time is reduced to a few milliseconds. The counting rates are matched to beam intensities at protein crystallography beamlines at 3rd generation synchrotrons. The detector is not sensitive to X-rays during readout; therefore no mechanical shutter is required. The detector has a very sharp point spread function (PSF) of one pixel, which allows better resolution of adjacent reflections. Low energy X-rays can be suppressed by the comparator At the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland the first and largest array based on this technology was constructed: The Pilatus 6M detector. The detector covers an area of 43.1 x 44.8 cm2 , has 6 million pixels and is read out noise free in 3.7 ms. Since June 2007 the detector is in routine operation at the beamline 6S of the Swiss Light Source (SLS). The company DETCRIS Ltd, has licensed the technology from PSI and is commercially offering the PILATUS detectors. Examples of the wide application range of the detectors will be shown.

  2. Novel integrated CMOS pixel structures for vertex detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinfelder, Stuart; Bieser, Fred; Chen, Yandong; Gareus, Robin; Matis, Howard S.; Oldenburg, Markus; Retiere, Fabrice; Ritter, Hans Georg; Wieman, Howard H.; Yamamoto, Eugene

    2003-10-29

    Novel CMOS active pixel structures for vertex detector applications have been designed and tested. The overriding goal of this work is to increase the signal to noise ratio of the sensors and readout circuits. A large-area native epitaxial silicon photogate was designed with the aim of increasing the charge collected per struck pixel and to reduce charge diffusion to neighboring pixels. The photogate then transfers the charge to a low capacitance readout node to maintain a high charge to voltage conversion gain. Two techniques for noise reduction are also presented. The first is a per-pixel kT/C noise reduction circuit that produces results similar to traditional correlated double sampling (CDS). It has the advantage of requiring only one read, as compared to two for CDS, and no external storage or subtraction is needed. The technique reduced input-referred temporal noise by a factor of 2.5, to 12.8 e{sup -}. Finally, a column-level active reset technique is explored that suppresses kT/C noise during pixel reset. In tests, noise was reduced by a factor of 7.6 times, to an estimated 5.1 e{sup -} input-referred noise. The technique also dramatically reduces fixed pattern (pedestal) noise, by up to a factor of 21 in our tests. The latter feature may possibly reduce pixel-by-pixel pedestal differences to levels low enough to permit sparse data scan without per-pixel offset corrections.

  3. Design Methodology: ASICs with complex in-pixel processing for Pixel Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Fahim, Farah

    2014-10-31

    The development of Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASIC) for pixel detectors with complex in-pixel processing using Computer Aided Design (CAD) tools that are, themselves, mainly developed for the design of conventional digital circuits requires a specialized approach. Mixed signal pixels often require parasitically aware detailed analog front-ends and extremely compact digital back-ends with more than 1000 transistors in small areas below 100μm x 100μm. These pixels are tiled to create large arrays, which have the same clock distribution and data readout speed constraints as in, for example, micro-processors. The methodology uses a modified mixed-mode on-top digital implementation flow to not only harness the tool efficiency for timing and floor-planning but also to maintain designer control over compact parasitically aware layout.

  4. ATLAS pixel detector design for the HL-LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, B.

    2017-02-01

    The ATLAS Inner Detector will be replaced for the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) running in 2026. The new Inner Detector is called the Inner Tracker (ITk). The ITk will cover an extended η-range: at least to |η|<3.2, and likely up to 0|η|<4.. The ITk will be an all-Silicon based detector, consisting of a Silicon strip detector outside of a radius of 362 mm, and a Silicon pixel detector inside of this radius. Several novel designs are being considered for the ITk pixel detector, to cope with high-eta charged particle tracks. These designs are grouped into `extended' and `inclined' design-types. Extended designs have long pixel staves with sensors parallel to the beamline, while inclined designs have sensors angled such that they point towards the interaction point. The relative advantages and challenges of these two classes of designs will be examined in this paper, along with the mechanical solutions being considered. Thermal management, radiation-length mapping, and electrical services will also be discussed.

  5. Performance of the INTPIX6 SOI pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Y.; Bugiel, Sz.; Dasgupta, R.; Idzik, M.; Kapusta, P.; Kucewicz, W.; Miyoshi, T.; Turala, M.

    2017-01-01

    Characterization of the monolithic pixel detector INPTIX6, designed at KEK and fabricated in Lapis 0.2 μ m Fully-Depleted, Low-Leakage Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) CMOS technology, was performed. The INTPIX6 comprises a large area of 1408 × 896 integrating type squared pixels of 12 micron pitch. In this work the performance and measurement results of the prototypes produced on lower resistivity Czochralski type (CZ-n) and high resistivity floating zone (FZ-n) sensor wafers are presented. Using 241Am radioactive source the noise of INTPIX6 was measured, showing the ENC (Equivalent Noise Charge) of about 70 e-. The resolution calculated from the FWHM of the Iron-55 X-ray peak was about 100 e-. The radiation hardness of the SOI pixel detector was also investigated. The CZ-n type INTPIX6 received a dose of 60 krad and its performance has been continuously monitored during the irradiation.

  6. Large format, small pixel pitch and hot detectors at SOFRADIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reibel, Y.; Rouvie, A.; Nedelcu, A.; Augey, T.; Pere-Laperne, N.; Rubaldo, L.; Billon-Lanfrey, D.; Gravrand, O.; Rothman, J.; Destefanis, G.

    2013-10-01

    Recently Sofradir joined a very small circle of IR detector manufacturers with expertise every aspect of the cooled and uncooled IR technologies, all under one roof by consolidating all IR technologies available in France. These different technologies are complementary and are used depending of the needs of the applications mainly concerning the detection range needs as well as their ability to detect in bad weather environmental conditions. SNAKE (InGaAs) and SCORPIO LW (MCT) expand Sofradir's line of small pixel pitch TV format IR detectors from the mid-wavelength to the short and long wavelengths. Our dual band MW-LW QWIP detectors (25μm, 384×288 pixels) benefit to tactical platforms giving an all-weather performance and increasing flexibility in the presence of battlefield obscurants. In parallel we have been pursuing further infrared developments on future MWIR detectors, such as the VGA format HOT detector that consumes 2W and the 10μm pitch IR detector which gives us a leading position in innovation. These detectors are designed for long-range surveillance equipment, commander or gunner sights, ground-to-ground missile launchers and other applications that require higher resolution and sensitivity to improve reconnaissance and target identification. This paper discusses the system level performance in each detector type.

  7. Measurements with MÖNCH, a 25 μm pixel pitch hybrid pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramilli, M.; Bergamaschi, A.; Andrae, M.; Brückner, M.; Cartier, S.; Dinapoli, R.; Fröjdh, E.; Greiffenberg, D.; Hutwelker, T.; Lopez-Cuenca, C.; Mezza, D.; Mozzanica, A.; Ruat, M.; Redford, S.; Schmitt, B.; Shi, X.; Tinti, G.; Zhang, J.

    2017-01-01

    MÖNCH is a hybrid silicon pixel detector based on charge integration and with analog readout, featuring a pixel size of 25×25 μm2. The latest working prototype consists of an array of 400×400 identical pixels for a total active area of 1×1 cm2. Its design is optimized for the single photon regime. An exhaustive characterization of this large area prototype has been carried out in the past months, and it confirms an ENC in the order of 35 electrons RMS and a dynamic range of ~4×12 keV photons in high gain mode, which increases to ~100×12 keV photons with the lowest gain setting. The low noise levels of MÖNCH make it a suitable candidate for X-ray detection at energies around 1 keV and below. Imaging applications in particular can benefit significantly from the use of MÖNCH: due to its extremely small pixel pitch, the detector intrinsically offers excellent position resolution. Moreover, in low flux conditions, charge sharing between neighboring pixels allows the use of position interpolation algorithms which grant a resolution at the micrometer-level. Its energy reconstruction and imaging capabilities have been tested for the first time at a low energy beamline at PSI, with photon energies between 1.75 keV and 3.5 keV, and results will be shown.

  8. First results from electrical qualification measurements on DEPFET pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majewski, Petra; Andricek, Ladislav; Lauf, Thomas; Lechner, Peter; Lutz, Gerhard; Reiffers, Jonas; Richter, Rainer; Schaller, Gerhard; Schnecke, Martina; Schopper, Florian; Soltau, Heike; Stefanescu, Alexander; Strüder, Lothar; Treis, Johannes

    2010-07-01

    We report on the first results from a new setup for electrical qualification measurements of DEPFET pixel detector matrices. In order to measure the transistor properties of all pixels, the DEPFET device is placed into a benchtest setup and electrically contacted via a probecard. Using a switch matrix, each pixel of the detector array can be addressed individually for characterization. These measurements facilitate to pre-select the best DEPFET matrices as detector device prior to the mounting of the matrix and allow to investigate topics like the homogeneity of transistor parameters on device, wafer and batch level in order to learn about the stability and reproducibility of the production process. Especially with regard to the detector development for the IXO Wide Field Imager (WFI), this yield learning will be an important tool. The first electrical qualification measurements with this setup were done on DEPFET macropixel detector flight hardware, which will form the FPAs of the Mercury Imaging X-ray Spectrometer (MIXS) on board of the 5th ESA cornerstone mission BepiColombo. The DEPFET array consists of 64×64 macropixel for which the transfer, output and clear characteristics were measured.

  9. Sensor Development and Readout Prototyping for the STAR Pixel Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Greiner, L.; Anderssen, E.; Matis, H.S.; Ritter, H.G.; Stezelberger, T.; Szelezniak, M.; Sun, X.; Vu, C.; Wieman, H.

    2009-01-14

    The STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is designing a new vertex detector. The purpose of this upgrade detector is to provide high resolution pointing to allow for the direct topological reconstruction of heavy flavor decays such as the D{sup 0} by finding vertices displaced from the collision vertex by greater than 60 microns. We are using Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (MAPS) as the sensor technology and have a coupled sensor development and readout system plan that leads to a final detector with a <200 {micro}s integration time, 400 M pixels and a coverage of -1 < {eta} < 1. We present our coupled sensor and readout development plan and the status of the prototyping work that has been accomplished.

  10. Pixel detector system development at Diamond Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchal, J.; Horswell, I.; Gimenez, E. N.; Tartoni, N.

    2010-10-01

    Hybrid pixel detectors consisting of an array of silicon photodiodes bump-bonded to CMOS read-out chips provide high signal-to-noise ratio and high dynamic range compared to CCD-based detectors and Image Plates. These detector features are important for SAXS experiments where a wide range of intensities are present in the images. For time resolved SAXS experiments, high frame rates are compulsory. The latest CMOS read-out chip developed by the MEDIPIX collaboration provides high frame rate and continuous acquisition mode. A read-out system for an array of MEDIPIX3 sensors is under development at Diamond Light Source. This system will support a full resolution frame rate of 1 kHz at a pixel counter depth of 12-bit and a frame rate of 30 kHz at a counter depth of 1 bit. Details concerning system design and MEDIPIX sensors characterization are presented.

  11. Use of silicon pixel detectors in double electron capture experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cermak, P.; Stekl, I.; Shitov, Yu A.; Mamedov, F.; Rukhadze, E. N.; Jose, J. M.; Cermak, J.; Rukhadze, N. I.; Brudanin, V. B.; Loaiza, P.

    2011-01-01

    A novel experimental approach to search for double electron capture (EC/EC) is discussed in this article. R&D for a new generation EC/EC spectrometer based on silicon pixel detectors (SPDs) has been conducted since 2009 for an upgrade of the TGV experiment. SPDs built on Timepix technology with a spectroscopic readout from each individual pixel are an effective tool to detect the 2νEC/EC signature of the two low energy X-rays hitting two separate pixels. The ability of SPDs to indentify α/β/γ particles and localize them precisely leads to effective background discrimination and thus considerable improvement of the signal-to-background ratio (S/B). A multi-SPD system, called a Silicon Pixel Telescope (SPT), is planned based on the experimental approach of the TGV calorimeter which measures thin foils of enriched EC/EC-isotope sandwiched between HPGe detectors working in coincidence mode. The sources of SPD internal background have been identified by measuring SPD radiopurity with a low-background HPGe detector as well as by long-term SPD background runs in the Modane underground laboratory (LSM, France), and results of these studies are presented.

  12. Line profile modelling for multi-pixel CZT detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, T.; Vadawale, S. V.; Rao, A. R.; Bhattacharya, D.; Mithun, N. P. S.; Bhalerao, V.

    2016-07-01

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors have been the mainstay for hard X-ray astronomy for its high quantum efficiency, fine energy resolution, near room temperature operation, and radiation hardness. In order to fully utilize the spectroscopic capabilities of CZT detectors, it is important to generate accurate response matrix, which in turn requires precise modelling of the line profiles for the CZT detectors. We have developed a numerical model taking into account the mobility and lifetime of the charge carriers and intrpixel charge sharing for the CZT detectors. This paper describes the details of the modelling along with the experimental measurements of mobility, lifetime and charge sharing fractions for the CZT detector modules of thickness of 5 mm and 2.5 mm pixel size procured from Orbotech Medical Solutions (same modules used in AstroSat-CZTI).

  13. Spatial Pileup Considerations for Pixellated Gamma -ray Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Furenlid, L.R.; Clarkson, E.; Marks, D.G.; Barrett, H.H.

    2015-01-01

    High-spatial-resolution solid-state detectors being developed for gamma-ray applications benefit from having pixel dimensions substantially smaller than detector slab thickness. This leads to an enhanced possibility of charge partially spreading to neighboring pixels as a result of diffusion (and secondary photon emission) transverse to the drift direction. An undesirable consequence is the effective magnification of the event “size“ and the spatial overlap issues which result when two photons are absorbed in close proximity within the integration time of the detector/readout system. In this work, we develop the general statistics of spatial pileup in imaging systems and apply the results to detectors we are developing based on pixellated cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) and a multiplexing application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) readout. We consider the limitations imposed on total count rate capacity and explore in detail the consequences for the LISTMODE data-acquisition strategy. Algorithms are proposed for identifying and, where possible, resolving overlapping events by maximum-likelihood estimation. The efficacy and noise tolerance of these algorithms will be tested with a combination of simulated and experimental data in future work. PMID:26568675

  14. CMS Pixel Detector design for HL-LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliore, E.

    2016-12-01

    The LHC machine is planning an upgrade program which will smoothly bring the luminosity to about 7.5×1034cm-2s-1 in 2028, to possibly reach an integrated luminosity of 3000 fb-1 by the end of 2037. This High Luminosity scenario, HL-LHC, will present new challenges in higher data rates and increased radiation. In order to maintain its physics reach the CMS collaboration has undertaken a preparation program of the detector known as Phase-2 upgrade. The CMS Phase-2 Pixel upgrade will require a high bandwidth readout system and high radiation tolerance for sensors and on-detector ASICs. Several technologies for the upgrade sensors are being studied. Serial powering schemes are under consideration to accommodate significant constraints on the system. These prospective designs, as well as new layout geometries that include very forward pixel discs, will be presented together with performance estimation.

  15. Monolithic active pixel radiation detector with shielding techniques

    DOEpatents

    Deptuch, Grzegorz W.

    2016-09-06

    A monolithic active pixel radiation detector including a method of fabricating thereof. The disclosed radiation detector can include a substrate comprising a silicon layer upon which electronics are configured. A plurality of channels can be formed on the silicon layer, wherein the plurality of channels are connected to sources of signals located in a bulk part of the substrate, and wherein the signals flow through electrically conducting vias established in an isolation oxide on the substrate. One or more nested wells can be configured from the substrate, wherein the nested wells assist in collecting charge carriers released in interaction with radiation and wherein the nested wells further separate the electronics from the sensing portion of the detector substrate. The detector can also be configured according to a thick SOA method of fabrication.

  16. Characterization of indium and solder bump bonding for pixel detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Selcuk Cihangir and Simon Kwan

    2000-09-28

    A review of different bump-bonding processes used for pixel detectors is given. A large scale test on daisy-chained components from two vendors has been carried out at Fermilab to characterize the yield of these processes. The vendors are Advanced Interconnect Technology Ltd. (AIT) of Hong Kong and MCNC in North Carolina, US. The results from this test are presented and technical challenges encountered are discussed.

  17. A novel pixellated solid-state photon detector for enhancing the Everhart-Thornley detector.

    PubMed

    Chuah, Joon Huang; Holburn, David

    2013-06-01

    This article presents a pixellated solid-state photon detector designed specifically to improve certain aspects of the existing Everhart-Thornley detector. The photon detector was constructed and fabricated in an Austriamicrosystems 0.35 µm complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor process technology. This integrated circuit consists of an array of high-responsivity photodiodes coupled to corresponding low-noise transimpedance amplifiers, a selector-combiner circuit and a variable-gain postamplifier. Simulated and experimental results show that the photon detector can achieve a maximum transimpedance gain of 170 dBΩ and minimum bandwidth of 3.6 MHz. It is able to detect signals with optical power as low as 10 nW and produces a minimum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 24 dB regardless of gain configuration. The detector has been proven to be able to effectively select and combine signals from different pixels. The key advantages of this detector are smaller dimensions, higher cost effectiveness, lower voltage and power requirements and better integration. The photon detector supports pixel-selection configurability which may improve overall SNR and also potentially generate images for different analyses. This work has contributed to the future research of system-level integration of a pixellated solid-state detector for secondary electron detection in the scanning electron microscope.

  18. A semiconductor radiation imaging pixel detector for space radiation dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Kroupa, Martin; Bahadori, Amir; Campbell-Ricketts, Thomas; Empl, Anton; Hoang, Son Minh; Idarraga-Munoz, John; Rios, Ryan; Semones, Edward; Stoffle, Nicholas; Tlustos, Lukas; Turecek, Daniel; Pinsky, Lawrence

    2015-07-01

    Progress in the development of high-performance semiconductor radiation imaging pixel detectors based on technologies developed for use in high-energy physics applications has enabled the development of a completely new generation of compact low-power active dosimeters and area monitors for use in space radiation environments. Such detectors can provide real-time information concerning radiation exposure, along with detailed analysis of the individual particles incident on the active medium. Recent results from the deployment of detectors based on the Timepix from the CERN-based Medipix2 Collaboration on the International Space Station (ISS) are reviewed, along with a glimpse of developments to come. Preliminary results from Orion MPCV Exploration Flight Test 1 are also presented.

  19. Monolithic pixel detectors with 0.2 μm FD-SOI pixel process technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, Toshinobu; Arai, Yasuo; Chiba, Tadashi; Fujita, Yowichi; Hara, Kazuhiko; Honda, Shunsuke; Igarashi, Yasushi; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikemoto, Yukiko; Kohriki, Takashi; Ohno, Morifumi; Ono, Yoshimasa; Shinoda, Naoyuki; Takeda, Ayaki; Tauchi, Kazuya; Tsuboyama, Toru; Tadokoro, Hirofumi; Unno, Yoshinobu; Yanagihara, Masashi

    2013-12-01

    Truly monolithic pixel detectors were fabricated with 0.2 μm SOI pixel process technology by collaborating with LAPIS Semiconductor Co., Ltd. for particle tracking experiment, X-ray imaging and medical applications. CMOS circuits were fabricated on a thin SOI layer and connected to diodes formed in the silicon handle wafer through the buried oxide layer. We can choose the handle wafer and therefore high-resistivity silicon is also available. Double SOI (D-SOI) wafers fabricated from Czochralski (CZ)-SOI wafers were newly obtained and successfully processed in 2012. The top SOI layers are used as electric circuits and the middle SOI layers used as a shield layer against the back-gate effect and cross-talk between sensors and CMOS circuits, and as an electrode to compensate for the total ionizing dose (TID) effect. In 2012, we developed two SOI detectors, INTPIX5 and INTPIX3g. A spatial resolution study was done with INTPIX5 and it showed excellent performance. The TID effect study with D-SOI INTPIX3g detectors was done and we confirmed improvement of TID tolerance in D-SOI sensors.

  20. Imaging performance of the hybrid pixel detectors XPAD3-S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, F. Cassol; Clemens, J. C.; Hemmer, C.; Morel, C.

    2009-03-01

    Hybrid pixel detectors, originally developed for tracking particles in high-energy physics experiments, have recently been used in material sciences and macromolecular crystallography. Their capability to count single photons and to apply a threshold on the photon energy suggests that they could be optimal digital x-ray detectors in low energy beams such as for small animal computed tomography (CT). To investigate this issue, we have studied the imaging performance of photon counting hybrid pixel detectors based on the XPAD3-S chip. Two detectors are considered, connected either to a Si or to a CdTe sensor, the latter being of interest for its higher efficiency. Both a standard 'International Electrotechnical Commission' (IEC) mammography beam and a beam used for mouse CT results published in the literature are employed. The detector stability, linearity and noise are investigated as a function of the dose for several imaging exposures (~0.1-400 µGy). The perfect linearity of both detectors is confirmed, but an increase in internal noise for counting statistics higher than ~5000 photons has been found, corresponding to exposures above ~110 µGy and ~50 µGy for the Si and CdTe sensors, respectively. The noise power spectrum (NPS), the modulation transfer function (MTF) and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) are then measured for two energy threshold configurations (5 keV and 18 keV) and three doses (~3, 30 and 300 µGy), in order to obtain a complete estimation of the detector performances. In general, the CdTe sensor shows a clear superiority with a maximal DQE(0) of ~1, thanks to its high efficiency (~100%). The DQE of the Si sensor is more dependent on the radiation quality, due to the energy dependence of its efficiency its maximum is ~0.4 with respect to the softer radiation. Finally, we compare the XPAD3-S DQE with published curves of other digital devices in a similar radiation condition. The XPAD3-S/CdTe detector appears to be the best with the highest

  1. Pixel detectors for x-ray imaging spectroscopy in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treis, J.; Andritschke, R.; Hartmann, R.; Herrmann, S.; Holl, P.; Lauf, T.; Lechner, P.; Lutz, G.; Meidinger, N.; Porro, M.; Richter, R. H.; Schopper, F.; Soltau, H.; Strüder, L.

    2009-03-01

    Pixelated semiconductor detectors for X-ray imaging spectroscopy are foreseen as key components of the payload of various future space missions exploring the x-ray sky. Located on the platform of the new Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma satellite, the eROSITA (extended Roentgen Survey with an Imaging Telescope Array) instrument will perform an imaging all-sky survey up to an X-ray energy of 10 keV with unprecedented spectral and angular resolution. The instrument will consist of seven parallel oriented mirror modules each having its own pnCCD camera in the focus. The satellite born X-ray observatory SIMBOL-X will be the first mission to use formation-flying techniques to implement an X-ray telescope with an unprecedented focal length of around 20 m. The detector instrumentation consists of separate high- and low energy detectors, a monolithic 128 × 128 DEPFET macropixel array and a pixellated CdZTe detector respectively, making energy band between 0.5 to 80 keV accessible. A similar concept is proposed for the next generation X-ray observatory IXO. Finally, the MIXS (Mercury Imaging X-ray Spectrometer) instrument on the European Mercury exploration mission BepiColombo will use DEPFET macropixel arrays together with a small X-ray telescope to perform a spatially resolved planetary XRF analysis of Mercury's crust. Here, the mission concepts and their scientific targets are briefly discussed, and the resulting requirements on the detector devices together with the implementation strategies are shown.

  2. Position-Sensitive Nuclear Spectroscopy with Pixel Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Granja, Carlos; Vykydal, Zdenek; Jakubek, Jan; Pospisil, Stanislav

    2007-10-26

    State-of-the-art hybrid semiconductor pixel detectors such as Medipix2 are suitable for energy- and position-sensitive nuclear spectroscopy. In addition to excellent energy- and spatial-resolution, these devices can operate in spectroscopic, single-quantum counting and/or on-line tracking mode. A devoted compact USB-readout interface provides functionality and ease of operation. The compact and versatile Medipix2/USB radiation camera provides visualization, vacuum and room-temperature operation as a real-time portable active nuclear emulsion.

  3. Development of a Detector Control System for the ATLAS Pixel detector in the HL-LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, N.; Karagounis, M.; Kersten, S.; Zeitnitz, C.

    2016-11-01

    The upgrade of the LHC to the HL-LHC requires a new ITk detector. The innermost part of this new tracker is a pixel detector. The University of Wuppertal is developing a new DCS to monitor and control this new pixel detector. The current concept envisions three parallel paths of the DCS. The first path, called security path, is hardwired and provides an interlock system to guarantee the safety of the detector and human beings. The second path is a control path. This path is used to supervise the entire detector. The control path has its own communication lines independent from the regular data readout for reliable operation. The third path is for diagnostics and provides information on demand. It is merged with the regular data readout and provides the highest granularity and most detailed information. To reduce the material budget, a serial power scheme is the baseline for the pixel modules. A new ASIC used in the control path is in development at Wuppertal for this serial power chain. A prototype exists already and a proof of principle was demonstrated. Development and research is ongoing to guarantee the correct operation of the new ASIC in the harsh environment of the HL-LHC. The concept for the new DCS will be presented in this paper. A focus will be made on the development of the DCS chip, used for monitoring and control of pixel modules in a serial power chain.

  4. The ultralight DEPFET pixel detector of the Belle II experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luetticke, Florian

    2017-02-01

    An upgrade of the existing Japanese flavor factory (KEKB in Tsukuba, Japan) is under construction and foreseen for commissioning by the end of 2017. This new e+e- machine (SuperKEKB) will deliver an instantaneous luminosity 40 times higher than the luminosity world record set by KEKB. To fully exploit the increased number of events and provide high precision measurements of B-meson decay vertices in such a harsh environment, the Belle detector will be upgraded to Belle II, featuring a new silicon vertex detector with two pixel layers close to the interaction point based on the DEPFET (DEpleted P-channel Field Effect Transistor) technology. This technology combines particle detection together with in-pixel amplification by integrating a field effect transistor into a fully depleted silicon bulk. In Belle II, DEPFET sensors thinned down to 75 μm with low power consumption and low intrinsic noise will be used. The first large thin multi-chip production modules have been produced and characterization results on both large modules as well as small test systems will be presented in this contribution.

  5. Pixelated transmission-mode diamond X-ray detector.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tianyi; Ding, Wenxiang; Gaowei, Mengjia; De Geronimo, Gianluigi; Bohon, Jen; Smedley, John; Muller, Erik

    2015-11-01

    Fabrication and testing of a prototype transmission-mode pixelated diamond X-ray detector (pitch size 60-100 µm), designed to simultaneously measure the flux, position and morphology of an X-ray beam in real time, are described. The pixel density is achieved by lithographically patterning vertical stripes on the front and horizontal stripes on the back of an electronic-grade chemical vapor deposition single-crystal diamond. The bias is rotated through the back horizontal stripes and the current is read out on the front vertical stripes at a rate of ∼ 1 kHz, which leads to an image sampling rate of ∼ 30 Hz. This novel signal readout scheme was tested at beamline X28C at the National Synchrotron Light Source (white beam, 5-15 keV) and at beamline G3 at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (monochromatic beam, 11.3 keV) with incident beam flux ranges from 1.8 × 10(-2) to 90 W mm(-2). Test results show that the novel detector provides precise beam position (positional noise within 1%) and morphology information (error within 2%), with an additional software-controlled single channel mode providing accurate flux measurement (fluctuation within 1%).

  6. Pixelated transmission-mode diamond X-ray detector

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Tianyi; Ding, Wenxiang; Gaowei, Mengjia; De Geronimo, Gianluigi; Bohon, Jen; Smedley, John; Muller, Erik

    2015-09-29

    Fabrication and testing of a prototype transmission-mode pixelated diamond X-ray detector (pitch size 60–100 µm), designed to simultaneously measure the flux, position and morphology of an X-ray beam in real time, are described. The pixel density is achieved by lithographically patterning vertical stripes on the front and horizontal stripes on the back of an electronic-grade chemical vapor deposition single-crystal diamond. The bias is rotated through the back horizontal stripes and the current is read out on the front vertical stripes at a rate of ~1 kHz, which leads to an image sampling rate of ~30 Hz. This novel signal readout scheme was tested at beamline X28C at the National Synchrotron Light Source (white beam, 5–15 keV) and at beamline G3 at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (monochromatic beam, 11.3 keV) with incident beam flux ranges from 1.8 × 10-2to 90 W mm-2. Test results show that the novel detector provides precise beam position (positional noise within 1%) and morphology information (error within 2%), with an additional software-controlled single channel mode providing accurate flux measurement (fluctuation within 1%).

  7. Pixelated transmission-mode diamond X-ray detector

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Tianyi; Ding, Wenxiang; Gaowei, Mengjia; De Geronimo, Gianluigi; Bohon, Jen; Smedley, John; Muller, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Fabrication and testing of a prototype transmission-mode pixelated diamond X-ray detector (pitch size 60–100 µm), designed to simultaneously measure the flux, position and morphology of an X-ray beam in real time, are described. The pixel density is achieved by lithographically patterning vertical stripes on the front and horizontal stripes on the back of an electronic-grade chemical vapor deposition single-crystal diamond. The bias is rotated through the back horizontal stripes and the current is read out on the front vertical stripes at a rate of ∼1 kHz, which leads to an image sampling rate of ∼30 Hz. This novel signal readout scheme was tested at beamline X28C at the National Synchrotron Light Source (white beam, 5–15 keV) and at beamline G3 at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (monochromatic beam, 11.3 keV) with incident beam flux ranges from 1.8 × 10−2 to 90 W mm−2. Test results show that the novel detector provides precise beam position (positional noise within 1%) and morphology information (error within 2%), with an additional software-controlled single channel mode providing accurate flux measurement (fluctuation within 1%). PMID:26524304

  8. A new design for the gas pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muleri, Fabio; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Brez, Alessandro; Costa, Enrico; Fabiani, Sergio; Minuti, Massimo; Pinchera, Michele; Rubini, Alda; Soffitta, Paolo; Spandre, Gloria

    2012-09-01

    The Gas Pixel Detector, developed and continuously improved by Pisa INFN in collaboration with INAF-IAPS, can visualize the tracks produced within a low Z gas by photoelectrons of few keV. By reconstructing the impact point and the original direction of the photoelectrons, the GPD can measure the linear polarization of X-rays, while preserving the information on the absorption point, the energy and the time of arrival of individual photons. The Gas Pixel Detector filled with He-DME mixture at 1 bar is sensitive in the 2-10 keV energy range and this configuration has been the basis of a number of mission proposals, such as POLARIX or XPOL on-board XEUS/IXO, or the X-ray Imaging Polarimetry Explorer (XIPE) submitted in response to ESA small mission call in 2012. We have recently improved the design by modifying the geometry of the absorption cell to minimize any systematic effect which could leave a residual polarization signal for non polarized source. We report on the testing of this new concept with preliminary results on the new design performance.

  9. Diamond Pixel Detectors and 3D Diamond Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturi, N.

    2016-12-01

    Results from detectors of poly-crystalline chemical vapour deposited (pCVD) diamond are presented. These include the first analysis of data of the ATLAS Diamond Beam Monitor (DBM). The DBM module consists of pCVD diamond sensors instrumented with pixellated FE-I4 front-end electronics. Six diamond telescopes, each with three modules, are placed symmetrically around the ATLAS interaction point. The DBM tracking capabilities allow it to discriminate between particles coming from the interaction point and background particles passing through the ATLAS detector. Also, analysis of test beam data of pCVD DBM modules are presented. A new low threshold tuning algorithm based on noise occupancy was developed which increases the DBM module signal to noise ratio significantly. Finally first results from prototypes of a novel detector using pCVD diamond and resistive electrodes in the bulk, forming a 3D diamond device, are discussed. 3D devices based on pCVD diamond were successfully tested with test beams at CERN. The measured charge is compared to that of a strip detector mounted on the same pCVD diamond showing that the 3D device collects significantly more charge than the planar device.

  10. The LHCb Vertex Locator (VELO) Pixel Detector Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, E.

    2017-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is designed to perform high-precision measurements of CP violation and the decays of beauty and charm hadrons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. There is a planned upgrade during Long Shutdown 2 (LS2), expected in 2019, which will allow the detector to run at higher luminosities by transforming the entire readout to a trigger-less system. This will include a substantial upgrade of the Vertex Locator (VELO), the silicon tracker that surrounds the LHCb interaction region. The VELO is moving from silicon strip technology to hybrid pixel sensors, where silicon sensors are bonded to VeloPix ASICs. Sensor prototypes have undergone rigorous testing using the Timepix3 Telescope at the SPS, CERN. The main components of the upgrade are summarised and testbeam results presented.

  11. Multilayer fluorescence imaging on a single-pixel detector

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Kaikai; Jiang, Shaowei; Zheng, Guoan

    2016-01-01

    A critical challenge for fluorescence imaging is the loss of high frequency components in the detection path. Such a loss can be related to the limited numerical aperture of the detection optics, aberrations of the lens, and tissue turbidity. In this paper, we report an imaging scheme that integrates multilayer sample modeling, ptychography-inspired recovery procedures, and lensless single-pixel detection to tackle this challenge. In the reported scheme, we directly placed a 3D sample on top of a single-pixel detector. We then used a known mask to generate speckle patterns in 3D and scanned this known mask to different positions for sample illumination. The sample was then modeled as multiple layers and the captured 1D fluorescence signals were used to recover multiple sample images along the z axis. The reported scheme may find applications in 3D fluorescence sectioning, time-resolved and spectrum-resolved imaging. It may also find applications in deep-tissue fluorescence imaging using the memory effect. PMID:27446679

  12. Multilayer fluorescence imaging on a single-pixel detector.

    PubMed

    Guo, Kaikai; Jiang, Shaowei; Zheng, Guoan

    2016-07-01

    A critical challenge for fluorescence imaging is the loss of high frequency components in the detection path. Such a loss can be related to the limited numerical aperture of the detection optics, aberrations of the lens, and tissue turbidity. In this paper, we report an imaging scheme that integrates multilayer sample modeling, ptychography-inspired recovery procedures, and lensless single-pixel detection to tackle this challenge. In the reported scheme, we directly placed a 3D sample on top of a single-pixel detector. We then used a known mask to generate speckle patterns in 3D and scanned this known mask to different positions for sample illumination. The sample was then modeled as multiple layers and the captured 1D fluorescence signals were used to recover multiple sample images along the z axis. The reported scheme may find applications in 3D fluorescence sectioning, time-resolved and spectrum-resolved imaging. It may also find applications in deep-tissue fluorescence imaging using the memory effect.

  13. A germanium hybrid pixel detector with 55μm pixel size and 65,000 channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennicard, D.; Struth, B.; Hirsemann, H.; Sarajlic, M.; Smoljanin, S.; Zuvic, M.; Lampert, M. O.; Fritzsch, T.; Rothermund, M.; Graafsma, H.

    2014-12-01

    Hybrid pixel semiconductor detectors provide high performance through a combination of direct detection, a relatively small pixel size, fast readout and sophisticated signal processing circuitry in each pixel. For X-ray detection above 20 keV, high-Z sensor layers rather than silicon are needed to achieve high quantum efficiency, but many high-Z materials such as GaAs and CdTe often suffer from poor material properties or nonuniformities. Germanium is available in large wafers of extremely high quality, making it an appealing option for high-performance hybrid pixel X-ray detectors, but suitable technologies for finely pixelating and bump-bonding germanium have not previously been available. A finely-pixelated germanium photodiode sensor with a 256 by 256 array of 55μm pixels has been produced. The sensor has an n-on-p structure, with 700μm thickness. Using a low-temperature indium bump process, this sensor has been bonded to the Medipix3RX photoncounting readout chip. Tests with the LAMBDA readout system have shown that the detector works successfully, with a high bond yield and higher image uniformity than comparable high-Z systems. During cooling, the system is functional around -80°C (with warmer temperatures resulting in excessive leakage current), with -100°C sufficient for good performance.

  14. X-ray micro-beam characterization of a small pixel spectroscopic CdTe detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veale, M. C.; Bell, S. J.; Seller, P.; Wilson, M. D.; Kachkanov, V.

    2012-07-01

    A small pixel, spectroscopic, CdTe detector has been developed at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) for X-ray imaging applications. The detector consists of 80 × 80 pixels on a 250 μm pitch with 50 μm inter-pixel spacing. Measurements with an 241Am γ-source demonstrated that 96% of all pixels have a FWHM of better than 1 keV while the majority of the remaining pixels have FWHM of less than 4 keV. Using the Diamond Light Source synchrotron, a 10 μm collimated beam of monochromatic 20 keV X-rays has been used to map the spatial variation in the detector response and the effects of charge sharing corrections on detector efficiency and resolution. The mapping measurements revealed the presence of inclusions in the detector and quantified their effect on the spectroscopic resolution of pixels.

  15. High-speed readout of high-Z pixel detectors with the LAMBDA detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennicard, D.; Smoljanin, S.; Sheviakov, I.; Xia, Q.; Rothkirch, A.; Yu, Y.; Struth, B.; Hirsemann, H.; Graafsma, H.

    2014-12-01

    High-frame-rate X-ray pixel detectors make it possible to perform time-resolved experiments at synchrotron beamlines, and to make better use of these sources by shortening experiment times. LAMBDA is a photon-counting hybrid pixel detector based on the Medipix3 chip, designed to combine a small pixel size of 55 μm, a large tileable module design, high speed, and compatibility with ``high-Z'' sensors for hard X-ray detection. This technical paper focuses on LAMBDA's high-speed-readout functionality, which allows a frame rate of 2000 frames per second with no deadtime between successive images. This takes advantage of the Medipix3 chip's ``continuous read-write'' function and highly parallelised readout. The readout electronics serialise this data and send it back to a server PC over two 10 Gigabit Ethernet links. The server PC controls the detector and receives, processes and stores the data using software designed for the Tango control system. As a demonstration of high-speed readout of a high-Z sensor, a GaAs LAMBDA detector was used to make a high-speed X-ray video of a computer fan.

  16. Tracking performance of GasPixel detectors in test beam studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldyrev, A. S.; Hartjes, F.; Hessey, N. P.; Fransen, M.; Konovalov, S. P.; Koppert, W.; Romaniouk, A.; Shulga, E.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Van der Graaf, H.; Vorobev, K.

    2016-01-01

    A combination of a pixel chip and a gas chamber (GasPixel detectors) opens new opportunities for particle detectors. GasPixel detectors consist of an electron drift volume, an amplification gap and an anode plane based on a semiconductor chip. This technology promises large benefits in high-energy charged-particle tracking. It allows reconstruction of a 3D image of a particle track segment in a single detector layer with high accuracy. Several prototypes of GasPixel detectors based on micromegas technology with different gas mixtures and drift gaps were studied in a test beam. A spatial resolution of 8 μm and angular accuracy of about 0.2° in a chip plane were obtained. A dedicated Monte Carlo simulation of GasPixel detectors shows good agreement with experimental data.

  17. From vertex detectors to inner trackers with CMOS pixel sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besson, A.; Pérez, A. Pérez; Spiriti, E.; Baudot, J.; Claus, G.; Goffe, M.; Winter, M.

    2017-02-01

    The use of CMOS Pixel Sensors (CPS) for high resolution and low material vertex detectors has been validated with the 2014 and 2015 physics runs of the STAR-PXL detector at RHIC/BNL. This opens the door to the use of CPS for inner tracking devices, with 10-100 times larger sensitive area, which require therefore a sensor design privileging power saving, response uniformity and robustness. The 350 nm CMOS technology used for the STAR-PXL sensors was considered as too poorly suited to upcoming applications like the upgraded ALICE Inner Tracking System (ITS), which requires sensors with one order of magnitude improvement on readout speed and improved radiation tolerance. This triggered the exploration of a deeper sub-micron CMOS technology, Tower-Jazz 180 nm, for the design of a CPS well adapted for the new ALICE-ITS running conditions. This paper reports the R & D results for the conception of a CPS well adapted for the ALICE-ITS.

  18. Compensation for radiation damage of SOI pixel detector via tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, M.; Arai, Y.; Fujita, Y.; Hamasaki, R.; Ikegami, Y.; Kurachi, I.; Miyoshi, T.; Nishimura, R.; Tauchi, K.; Tsuboyama, T.

    2016-09-01

    We are developing a method for removing holes trapped in the oxide layer of a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) monolithic pixel detector after irradiation. Radiation that passes through the detector generates positive charge by trapped holes in the buried oxide layer (BOX) underneath the MOSFET. The positive potential caused by these trapped holes modifies the characteristics of the MOSFET of the signal readout circuit. In order to compensate for the effect of the positive potential, we tried to recombine the trapped holes with electrons via Fowler-Nordheim (FN) tunneling. By applying high voltage to the buried p-well (BPW) under the oxide layer with the MOSFET fixed at 0 V, electrons are injected into the BOX by FN tunneling. X-rays cause a negative shift in the threshold voltage Vth of the MOSFET. We can successfully recover Vth close to its pre-irradiation level after applying VBPW ≥ 120 V. However, the drain leakage current increased after applying VBPW; we find that this can be suppressed by applying a negative voltage to the BPW.

  19. Characterization of Pixelated Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride Detectors for Astrophysical Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Sharma, Dharma; Ramsey, Brian; Seller, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Comparisons of charge sharing and charge loss measurements between two pixelated Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CdZnTe) detectors are discussed. These properties along with the detector geometry help to define the limiting energy resolution and spatial resolution of the detector in question. The first detector consists of a 1-mm-thick piece of CdZnTe sputtered with a 4x4 array of pixels with pixel pitch of 750 microns (inter-pixel gap is 100 microns). Signal readout is via discrete ultra-low-noise preamplifiers, one for each of the 16 pixels. The second detector consists of a 2-mm-thick piece of CdZnTe sputtered with a 16x16 array of pixels with a pixel pitch of 300 microns (inter-pixel gap is 50 microns). This crystal is bonded to a custom-built readout chip (ASIC) providing all front-end electronics to each of the 256 independent pixels. These detectors act as precursors to that which will be used at the focal plane of the High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) telescope currently being developed at Marshall Space Flight Center. With a telescope focal length of 6 meters, the detector needs to have a spatial resolution of around 200 microns in order to take full advantage of the HERO angular resolution. We discuss to what degree charge sharing will degrade energy resolution but will improve our spatial resolution through position interpolation.

  20. Adhesive Testing for the BTeV Pixel Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, C.M.; Kwan, Simon; Hicks, D.; Hahn, Eileen; Hoffman, Jay; Austin, Sharon; Jones, Renee; /Fermilab

    2005-12-01

    The basic unit of the BTeV pixel detector is a multi-chip module which is comprised of a silicon sensor module bump-bonded to a number of readout chips. The pixel module will then be glued to a high intensity interconnect (HDI) cable using electrically conductive adhesive, and then onto a substrate using another kind of adhesive with reasonable thermal conductivity. This report is mostly addressed to the need of the latter--the substrate adhesive. The aim of this technical note is to summarize the testing efforts and results of this substrate adhesive covering a period since 2001 till the end of 2004. The substrate will serve two purposes: mechanical support and cooling of the modules. Stresses and strains will be generated when there is a thermal change on the substrate. In addition, since there are many kinds of materials, with different coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), being glued together to form the complete detector assembly, the substrate may get distorted due to the CTE mismatches. As stress is directly proportional to the material modulus, a significant amount of effort was concentrated in understanding the adhesive modulus. There are other constraints which need to be considered as well. For instance, the detector will be placed in a vacuum close to the beam, and it will be exposed to significant radiation during operation. As there are so many requirements on the adhesive, it is certainly not that easy to find one that meets all the demands. With a reasonable screening that the adhesive candidates being radiation hard and have low outgassing, searching for suitable adhesives was focused on those with low modulus. That is because (1) a mechanically reliable and fail-proof adhesive structure with low stress is needed, and (2) the leaking current characteristics of the modules will increase if mechanical stresses are too high. However, much of the technical information needed is usually not available from the vendor and therefore testing on our own

  1. Commissioning of the upgraded ATLAS Pixel Detector for Run2 at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobos, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    The Pixel Detector of the ATLAS experiment has shown excellent performance during the whole Run-1 of LHC. Taking advantage of the long showdown, the detector was extracted from the experiment and brought to the surface, to equip it with new service quarter panels, to repair modules and to ease installation of the Insertable B-Layer, a fourth layer of pixel detectors, installed in May 2014 between the existing Pixel Detector and a new smaller radius beam-pipe at a radius of 3.3 cm. To cope with the high radiation and pixel occupancy due to the proximity to the interaction point, a new read-out chip and two different silicon sensor technologies (planar and 3D) have been developed. An overview of the refurbishing of the Pixel Detector and of the IBL project as well as early performance tests using cosmic rays and beam data will be presented.

  2. Qualification of the modules for the Phase 1 upgrade of the CMS forward pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving; CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The innermost component of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector, the silicon pixel tracker, will be replaced by a new device in early 2017 to cope with the significant increase in instantaneous luminosity expected for the remainder of Run 2 of the Large Hadron Collider. The upgraded detector is composed of two subcomponents: the barrel pixel (BPIX) and the forward pixel (FPIX). In this work, we describe the testing and calibration procedures that the FPIX detector subcomponents underwent as well as the quality assurance criteria used for selecting the best detector modules for the final installation. NSF

  3. Small-Scale Readout System Prototype for the STAR PIXEL Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Szelezniak, Michal; Anderssen, Eric; Greiner, Leo; Matis, Howard; Ritter, Hans Georg; Stezelberger, Thorsten; Sun, Xiangming; Thomas, James; Vu, Chinh; Wieman, Howard

    2008-10-10

    Development and prototyping efforts directed towards construction of a new vertex detector for the STAR experiment at the RHIC accelerator at BNL are presented. This new detector will extend the physics range of STAR by allowing for precision measurements of yields and spectra of particles containing heavy quarks. The innermost central part of the new detector is a high resolution pixel-type detector (PIXEL). PIXEL requirements are discussed as well as a conceptual mechanical design, a sensor development path, and a detector readout architecture. Selected progress with sensor prototypes dedicated to the PIXEL detector is summarized and the approach chosen for the readout system architecture validated in tests of hardware prototypes is discussed.

  4. Characterization of high resolution CMOS monolithic active pixel detector in SOI technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M. I.; Arai, Y.; Glab, S.; Idzik, M.; Kapusta, P.; Miyoshi, T.; Takeda, A.; Turala, M.

    2015-05-01

    Novel CMOS monolithic pixel detectors designed at KEK and fabricated at Lapis Semiconductor in 0.2 μm Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) technology are presented. A thin layer of silicon oxide separates high and low resistivity silicon layers, allowing for optimization of design of detector and readout parts. Shallow wells buried under the oxide in the detector part screen the entire pixel electronics from electrical field applied to the detector. Several integration type SOI pixel detectors have been developed with pixel sizes 8-20 μm. The general features of 14 × 14 μm2 detectors designed on different wafers (CZ-n, FZ-n and FZ-p) were measured and compared. The detector performance was studied under irradiation with visible and infra-red laser, and also X-ray ionizing source. Using X-rays from an Am-241 source the noise of readout electronics was measured at different working conditions, showing the ENC in the range of 88-120 e-. The pixel current was calculated from average DC pedestal shift while varying the pixel integration time. The operation of the detector was studied under partial and full depletion conditions. The effects of temperature and detector bias voltage on noise and leakage current were studied. Characteristics of an ADC integrated in the front-end chip are also presented.

  5. The upgraded Pixel Detector of the ATLAS Experiment for Run 2 at the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backhaus, M.

    2016-09-01

    During Run 1 of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the ATLAS Pixel Detector has shown excellent performance. The ATLAS collaboration took advantage of the first long shutdown of the LHC during 2013 and 2014 and extracted the ATLAS Pixel Detector from the experiment, brought it to surface and maintained the services. This included the installation of new service quarter panels, the repair of cables, and the installation of the new Diamond Beam Monitor (DBM). Additionally, a completely new innermost pixel detector layer, the Insertable B-Layer (IBL), was constructed and installed in May 2014 between a new smaller beam pipe and the existing Pixel Detector. With a radius of 3.3 cm the IBL is located extremely close to the interaction point. Therefore, a new readout chip and two new sensor technologies (planar and 3D) are used in the IBL. In order to achieve best possible physics performance the material budget was improved with respect to the existing Pixel Detector. This is realized using lightweight staves for mechanical support and a CO2 based cooling system. This paper describes the improvements achieved during the maintenance of the existing Pixel Detector as well as the performance of the IBL during the construction and commissioning phase. Additionally, first results obtained during the LHC Run 2 demonstrating the distinguished tracking performance of the new Four Layer ATLAS Pixel Detector are presented.

  6. A MCM-D-type module for the ATLAS pixel detector

    SciTech Connect

    Becks, K.H.; Beyne, E.; Ehrmann, O.; Gerlach, P.; Gregor, I.M.; Pieters, P.; Toepper, M.; Truzzi, C.; Wolf, J.

    1999-12-01

    For the ATLAS experiment at the planned Large Hadron Collider LHC at CERN hybrid pixel detectors are being built as innermost layers of the inner tracking detector system. Modules are the basic building blocks of the ATLAS pixel detector. A module consists of a sensor tile with an active area of 16.4 mm x 60.4 mm, 16 read out IC's, each serving 24 x 160 pixel unit cells, a module controller chip, an optical transceiver and the local signal interconnection and power distribution busses. The dies are attached by flip-chip assembly to the sensor diodes and the local busses.

  7. Using an Active Pixel Sensor In A Vertex Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Matis, Howard S.; Bieser, Fred; Chen, Yandong; Gareus, Robin; Kleinfelder, Stuart; Oldenburg, Markus; Retiere, Fabrice; Ritter, HansGeorg; Wieman, Howard H.; Wurzel, Samuel E.; Yamamoto, Eugene

    2004-04-22

    Research has shown that Active Pixel CMOS sensors can detect charged particles. We have been studying whether this process can be used in a collider environment. In particular, we studied the effect of radiation with 55 MeV protons. These results show that a fluence of about 2 x 10{sup 12} protons/cm{sup 2} reduces the signal by a factor of two while the noise increases by 25%. A measurement 6 months after exposure shows that the silicon lattice naturally repairs itself. Heating the silicon to 100 C reduced the shot noise and increased the collected charge. CMOS sensors have a reduced signal to noise ratio per pixel because charge diffuses to neighboring pixels. We have constructed a photogate to see if this structure can collect more charge per pixel. Results show that a photogate does collect charge in fewer pixels, but it takes about 15 ms to collect all of the electrons produced by a pulse of light.

  8. Characterization of edgeless pixel detectors coupled to Medipix2 readout chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalliopuska, Juha; Tlustos, Lukas; Eränen, Simo; Virolainen, Tuula

    2011-08-01

    VTT has developed a straightforward and fast process to fabricate four-side buttable (edgeless) microstrip and pixel detectors on 6 in. (150 mm) wafers. The process relies on advanced ion implantation to activate the edges of the detector instead of using polysilicon. The article characterizes 150 μm thick n-on-n edgeless pixel detector prototypes with a dead layer at the edge below 1 μm. Electrical and radiation response characterization of 1.4×1.4 cm2 n-on-n edgeless detectors has been done by coupling them to the Medipix2 readout chips. The distance of the detector's physical edge from the pixels was either 20 or 50 μm. The leakage current of flip-chip bonded edgeless Medipix2 detector assembles were measured to be ˜90 nA/cm2 and no breakdown was observed below 110 V. Radiation response characterization includes X-ray tube and radiation source responses. The characterization results show that the detector's response at the pixels close to the physical edge of the detector depend dramatically on the pixel-to-edge distance.

  9. Imaging and spectroscopic performance studies of pixellated CdTe Timepix detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maneuski, D.; Astromskas, V.; Fröjdh, E.; Fröjdh, C.; Gimenez, E. N.; Marchal, J.; O'Shea, V.; Stewart, G.; Tartoni, N.; Wilhelm, H.; Wraight, K.; Zain, R. M.

    2012-01-01

    In this work the results on imaging and spectroscopic performances of 14 × 14 × 1 mm CdTe detectors with 55 × 55 μm and 110 × 110 μm pixel pitch bump-bonded to a Timepix chip are presented. The performance of the 110 × 110 μm pixel detector was evaluated at the extreme conditions beam line I15 of the Diamond Light Source. The energy of X-rays was set between 25 and 77 keV. The beam was collimated through the edge slits to 20 μm FWHM incident in the middle of the pixel. The detector was operated in the time-over-threshold mode, allowing direct energy measurement. Energy in the neighbouring pixels was summed for spectra reconstruction. Energy resolution at 77 keV was found to be ΔE/E = 3.9%. Comparative imaging and energy resolution studies were carried out between two pixel size detectors with a fluorescence target X-ray tube and radioactive sources. The 110 × 110 μm pixel detector exhibited systematically better energy resolution in comparison to 55 × 55 μm. An imaging performance of 55 × 55 μm pixellated CdTe detector was assessed using the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) technique and compared to the larger pixel. A considerable degradation in MTF was observed for bias voltages below -300 V. Significant room for improvement of the detector performance was identified both for imaging and spectroscopy and is discussed.

  10. Direct charge sharing observation in single-photon-counting pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, G.; Maiorino, M.; Blanchot, G.; Chmeissani, M.; Garcia, J.; Lozano, M.; Martinez, R.; Puigdengoles, C.; Ullan, M.

    2007-04-01

    In photon-counting imaging devices, charge sharing can limit the detector spatial resolution and contrast, as multiple counts can be induced in adjacent pixels as a result of the spread of the charge cloud generated from a single X-ray photon of high energy in the detector bulk. Although debated for a long time, the full impact of charge sharing has not been completely assessed. In this work, the importance of charge sharing in pixellated CdTe and silicon detectors is studied by exposing imaging devices to different low activity sources. These devices are made of Si and CdTe pixel detector bump-bonded to Medipix2 single-photon-counting chips with a 55 μm pixel pitch. We will show how charge sharing affects the spatial detector resolution depending on incident particle type (alpha, beta and gamma), detector bias voltage and read-out chip threshold. This study will give an insight on the impact on the design and operation of pixel detectors coupled to photon-counting devices for imaging applications.

  11. Si pixel detectors in the detection of EC/EC decay

    SciTech Connect

    Jose, J. M.; Čermák, P.; Fajt, L.; Štekl, I.; Rukhadze, N. I.; Shitov, Yu. A.

    2015-08-17

    The SPT collaboration has been investigating the applicability of pixel detectors in the detection of two neutrino double electron capture (2νEC/EC) in{sup 106}Cd. The collaboration has proposed a Silicon Pixel Telescope (SPT) where a pair of Si pixel detectors with enriched Cd foil in the middle forms the detection unit. The Pixel detector gives spatial information along with energy of the particle, thus helps to identify and remove the background signals. Four units of SPT prototype (using 0.5 and 1 mm Si sensors) were fabricated and installed in the LSM underground laboratory, France. Recent progress in the SPT experiment and preliminary results from background measurements are presented.

  12. High-speed X-ray imaging pixel array detector for synchrotron bunch isolation

    PubMed Central

    Philipp, Hugh T.; Tate, Mark W.; Purohit, Prafull; Shanks, Katherine S.; Weiss, Joel T.; Gruner, Sol M.

    2016-01-01

    A wide-dynamic-range imaging X-ray detector designed for recording successive frames at rates up to 10 MHz is described. X-ray imaging with frame rates of up to 6.5 MHz have been experimentally verified. The pixel design allows for up to 8–12 frames to be stored internally at high speed before readout, which occurs at a 1 kHz frame rate. An additional mode of operation allows the integration capacitors to be re-addressed repeatedly before readout which can enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of cyclical processes. This detector, along with modern storage ring sources which provide short (10–100 ps) and intense X-ray pulses at megahertz rates, opens new avenues for the study of rapid structural changes in materials. The detector consists of hybridized modules, each of which is comprised of a 500 µm-thick silicon X-ray sensor solder bump-bonded, pixel by pixel, to an application-specific integrated circuit. The format of each module is 128 × 128 pixels with a pixel pitch of 150 µm. In the prototype detector described here, the three-side buttable modules are tiled in a 3 × 2 array with a full format of 256 × 384 pixels. The characteristics, operation, testing and application of the detector are detailed. PMID:26917125

  13. X-ray Characterization of a Multichannel Smart-Pixel Array Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Steve; Haji-Sheikh, Michael; Huntington, Andrew; Kline, David; Lee, Adam; Li, Yuelin; Rhee, Jehyuk; Tarpley, Mary; Walko, Donald A.; Westberg, Gregg; Williams, George; Zou, Haifeng; Landahl, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The Voxtel VX-798 is a prototype X-ray pixel array detector (PAD) featuring a silicon sensor photodiode array of 48 x 48 pixels, each 130 mu m x 130 mu m x 520 mu m thick, coupled to a CMOS readout application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The first synchrotron X-ray characterization of this detector is presented, and its ability to selectively count individual X-rays within two independent arrival time windows, a programmable energy range, and localized to a single pixel is demonstrated. During our first trial run at Argonne National Laboratory's Advance Photon Source, the detector achieved a 60 ns gating time and 700 eV full width at half-maximum energy resolution in agreement with design parameters. Each pixel of the PAD holds two independent digital counters, and the discriminator for X-ray energy features both an upper and lower threshold to window the energy of interest discarding unwanted background. This smart-pixel technology allows energy and time resolution to be set and optimized in software. It is found that the detector linearity follows an isolated dead-time model, implying that megahertz count rates should be possible in each pixel. Measurement of the line and point spread functions showed negligible spatial blurring. When combined with the timing structure of the synchrotron storage ring, it is demonstrated that the area detector can perform both picosecond time-resolved X-ray diffraction and fluorescence spectroscopy measurements.

  14. High-speed X-ray imaging pixel array detector for synchrotron bunch isolation

    DOE PAGES

    Philipp, Hugh T.; Tate, Mark W.; Purohit, Prafull; ...

    2016-01-28

    A wide-dynamic-range imaging X-ray detector designed for recording successive frames at rates up to 10 MHz is described. X-ray imaging with frame rates of up to 6.5 MHz have been experimentally verified. The pixel design allows for up to 8–12 frames to be stored internally at high speed before readout, which occurs at a 1 kHz frame rate. An additional mode of operation allows the integration capacitors to be re-addressed repeatedly before readout which can enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of cyclical processes. This detector, along with modern storage ring sources which provide short (10–100 ps) and intense X-ray pulses atmore » megahertz rates, opens new avenues for the study of rapid structural changes in materials. The detector consists of hybridized modules, each of which is comprised of a 500 µm-thick silicon X-ray sensor solder bump-bonded, pixel by pixel, to an application-specific integrated circuit. The format of each module is 128 × 128 pixels with a pixel pitch of 150 µm. In the prototype detector described here, the three-side buttable modules are tiled in a 3 × 2 array with a full format of 256 × 384 pixels. Lastly, we detail the characteristics, operation, testing and application of the detector.« less

  15. Tracking performance of a single-crystal and a polycrystalline diamond pixel-detector

    SciTech Connect

    Menasce, D.; et al.

    2013-06-01

    We present a comparative characterization of the performance of a single-crystal and a polycrystalline diamond pixel-detector employing the standard CMS pixel readout chips. Measurements were carried out at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility, FTBF, using protons of momentum 120 GeV/c tracked by a high-resolution pixel telescope. Particular attention was directed to the study of the charge-collection, the charge-sharing among adjacent pixels and the achievable position resolution. The performance of the single-crystal detector was excellent and comparable to the best available silicon pixel-detectors. The measured average detection-efficiency was near unity, ε = 0.99860±0.00006, and the position-resolution for shared hits was about 6 μm. On the other hand, the performance of the polycrystalline detector was hampered by its lower charge collection distance and the readout chip threshold. A new readout chip, capable of operating at much lower threshold (around 1 ke$-$), would be required to fully exploit the potential performance of the polycrystalline diamond pixel-detector.

  16. High-speed X-ray imaging pixel array detector for synchrotron bunch isolation

    SciTech Connect

    Philipp, Hugh T.; Tate, Mark W.; Purohit, Prafull; Shanks, Katherine S.; Weiss, Joel T.; Gruner, Sol M.

    2016-01-28

    A wide-dynamic-range imaging X-ray detector designed for recording successive frames at rates up to 10 MHz is described. X-ray imaging with frame rates of up to 6.5 MHz have been experimentally verified. The pixel design allows for up to 8–12 frames to be stored internally at high speed before readout, which occurs at a 1 kHz frame rate. An additional mode of operation allows the integration capacitors to be re-addressed repeatedly before readout which can enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of cyclical processes. This detector, along with modern storage ring sources which provide short (10–100 ps) and intense X-ray pulses at megahertz rates, opens new avenues for the study of rapid structural changes in materials. The detector consists of hybridized modules, each of which is comprised of a 500 µm-thick silicon X-ray sensor solder bump-bonded, pixel by pixel, to an application-specific integrated circuit. The format of each module is 128 × 128 pixels with a pixel pitch of 150 µm. In the prototype detector described here, the three-side buttable modules are tiled in a 3 × 2 array with a full format of 256 × 384 pixels. Lastly, we detail the characteristics, operation, testing and application of the detector.

  17. High Dynamic Range Pixel Array Detector for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tate, Mark W; Purohit, Prafull; Chamberlain, Darol; Nguyen, Kayla X; Hovden, Robert; Chang, Celesta S; Deb, Pratiti; Turgut, Emrah; Heron, John T; Schlom, Darrell G; Ralph, Daniel C; Fuchs, Gregory D; Shanks, Katherine S; Philipp, Hugh T; Muller, David A; Gruner, Sol M

    2016-02-01

    We describe a hybrid pixel array detector (electron microscope pixel array detector, or EMPAD) adapted for use in electron microscope applications, especially as a universal detector for scanning transmission electron microscopy. The 128×128 pixel detector consists of a 500 µm thick silicon diode array bump-bonded pixel-by-pixel to an application-specific integrated circuit. The in-pixel circuitry provides a 1,000,000:1 dynamic range within a single frame, allowing the direct electron beam to be imaged while still maintaining single electron sensitivity. A 1.1 kHz framing rate enables rapid data collection and minimizes sample drift distortions while scanning. By capturing the entire unsaturated diffraction pattern in scanning mode, one can simultaneously capture bright field, dark field, and phase contrast information, as well as being able to analyze the full scattering distribution, allowing true center of mass imaging. The scattering is recorded on an absolute scale, so that information such as local sample thickness can be directly determined. This paper describes the detector architecture, data acquisition system, and preliminary results from experiments with 80-200 keV electron beams.

  18. Edge pixel response studies of edgeless silicon sensor technology for pixellated imaging detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maneuski, D.; Bates, R.; Blue, A.; Buttar, C.; Doonan, K.; Eklund, L.; Gimenez, E. N.; Hynds, D.; Kachkanov, S.; Kalliopuska, J.; McMullen, T.; O'Shea, V.; Tartoni, N.; Plackett, R.; Vahanen, S.; Wraight, K.

    2015-03-01

    Silicon sensor technologies with reduced dead area at the sensor's perimeter are under development at a number of institutes. Several fabrication methods for sensors which are sensitive close to the physical edge of the device are under investigation utilising techniques such as active-edges, passivated edges and current-terminating rings. Such technologies offer the goal of a seamlessly tiled detection surface with minimum dead space between the individual modules. In order to quantify the performance of different geometries and different bulk and implant types, characterisation of several sensors fabricated using active-edge technology were performed at the B16 beam line of the Diamond Light Source. The sensors were fabricated by VTT and bump-bonded to Timepix ROICs. They were 100 and 200 μ m thick sensors, with the last pixel-to-edge distance of either 50 or 100 μ m. The sensors were fabricated as either n-on-n or n-on-p type devices. Using 15 keV monochromatic X-rays with a beam spot of 2.5 μ m, the performance at the outer edge and corners pixels of the sensors was evaluated at three bias voltages. The results indicate a significant change in the charge collection properties between the edge and 5th (up to 275 μ m) from edge pixel for the 200 μ m thick n-on-n sensor. The edge pixel performance of the 100 μ m thick n-on-p sensors is affected only for the last two pixels (up to 110 μ m) subject to biasing conditions. Imaging characteristics of all sensor types investigated are stable over time and the non-uniformities can be minimised by flat-field corrections. The results from the synchrotron tests combined with lab measurements are presented along with an explanation of the observed effects.

  19. Detection and Real Time Spectroscopy of Charged Particles with the TimePix Pixel Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granja, Carlos; Jakubek, Jan; Platkevic, Michal; Pospisil, Stanislav; Vykydal, Zdenek

    2010-01-01

    We tested the position—, spectral— and time—resolution capability of the TimePix semiconductor detector together with the USB readout interface and Pixelman control and DAQ software tool for detection and visualization of particles. Event—by—event spectroscopy can be achieved by real time analysis of the characteristic tracks and specific response of different radiation in the pixel detector.

  20. Pixel architectures in a HV-CMOS process for the ATLAS inner detector upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degerli, Y.; Godiot, S.; Guilloux, F.; Hemperek, T.; Krüger, H.; Lachkar, M.; Liu, J.; Orsini, F.; Pangaud, P.; Rymaszewski, P.; Wang, T.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, design details and simulation results of new pixel architectures designed in LFoundry 150 nm high voltage CMOS process in the framework of the ATLAS high luminosity inner detector upgrade are presented. These pixels can be connected to the FE-I4 readout chip via bump bonding or glue and some of them can also be tested without a readout chip. Negative high voltage is applied to the high resistivity (> 2 kΩ .cm) substrate in order to deplete the deep n-well charge collection diode, ensuring good charge collection and radiation tolerance. In these pixels, the front-end has been implemented inside the diode using both NMOS and PMOS transistors. The pixel pitch is 50 μm × 250 μm for all pixels. These pixels have been implemented in a demonstrator chip called LFCPIX.

  1. Performance evaluation of a serially powered pixel detector prototype for the HL-LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonella, L.; Filimonov, V.; Hügging, F.; Hemperek, T.; Janssen, J.; Krüger, H.; Pohl, D.-L.; Wermes, N.

    2017-03-01

    Efficient and low mass power distribution presents a challenge for vertex and tracking detectors at the HL-LHC . Different approaches have been considered to transmit power at low current and high voltage. This paper presents the serial powering scheme proposed as baseline for the ATLAS and CMS pixel detectors at the HL-LHC . A serially powered detector prototype with six pixel modules has been built, featuring all elements needed for current distribution, redundancy, data transmission, and sensor biasing. Results of the characterisation of the prototype in standard operating conditions as well as in more challenging scenarios including increased digital activity are presented.

  2. Physics performance and upgrade for Run II of the ATLAS pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miglioranzi, S.

    2015-05-01

    The ATLAS pixel detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle trajectories in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. The operation and performance of the pixel detector during the first years of LHC running are described. More than 96% of the detector modules were operational during this period, with an average intrinsic hit efficiency larger than 99%. The alignment of the detector was found to be stable at the few-micron level over long periods of time. Detector material description, tracking performances in Run I and expectations for the upcoming Run II are presented.

  3. Hard x-ray response of pixellated CdZnTe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbene, L.; Del Sordo, S.; Caroli, E.; Gerardi, G.; Raso, G.; Caccia, S.; Bertuccio, G.

    2009-06-01

    In recent years, the development of cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) detectors for x-ray and gamma ray spectrometry has grown rapidly. The good room temperature performance and the high spatial resolution of pixellated CdZnTe detectors make them very attractive in space-borne x-ray astronomy, mainly as focal plane detectors for the new generation of hard x-ray focusing telescopes. In this work, we investigated on the spectroscopic performance of two pixellated CdZnTe detectors coupled with a custom low noise and low power readout application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The detectors (10×10×1 and 10×10×2 mm3 single crystals) have an anode layout based on an array of 256 pixels with a geometric pitch of 0.5 mm. The ASIC, fabricated in 0.8 μm BiCMOS technology, is equipped with eight independent channels (preamplifier and shaper) and characterized by low power consumption (0.5 mW/channel) and low noise (150-500 electrons rms). The spectroscopic results point out the good energy resolution of both detectors at room temperature [5.8% full width at half maximum (FWHM) at 59.5 keV for the 1 mm thick detector; 5.5% FWHM at 59.5 keV for the 2 mm thick detector) and low tailing in the measured spectra, confirming the single charge carrier sensing properties of the CdZnTe detectors equipped with a pixellated anode layout. Temperature measurements show optimum performance of the system (detector and electronics) at T =10 °C and performance degradation at lower temperatures. The detectors and the ASIC were developed by our collaboration as two small focal plane detector prototypes for hard x-ray multilayer telescopes operating in the 20-70 keV energy range.

  4. Hard x-ray response of pixellated CdZnTe detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Abbene, L.; Caccia, S.; Bertuccio, G.

    2009-06-15

    In recent years, the development of cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) detectors for x-ray and gamma ray spectrometry has grown rapidly. The good room temperature performance and the high spatial resolution of pixellated CdZnTe detectors make them very attractive in space-borne x-ray astronomy, mainly as focal plane detectors for the new generation of hard x-ray focusing telescopes. In this work, we investigated on the spectroscopic performance of two pixellated CdZnTe detectors coupled with a custom low noise and low power readout application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The detectors (10x10x1 and 10x10x2 mm{sup 3} single crystals) have an anode layout based on an array of 256 pixels with a geometric pitch of 0.5 mm. The ASIC, fabricated in 0.8 mum BiCMOS technology, is equipped with eight independent channels (preamplifier and shaper) and characterized by low power consumption (0.5 mW/channel) and low noise (150-500 electrons rms). The spectroscopic results point out the good energy resolution of both detectors at room temperature [5.8% full width at half maximum (FWHM) at 59.5 keV for the 1 mm thick detector; 5.5% FWHM at 59.5 keV for the 2 mm thick detector) and low tailing in the measured spectra, confirming the single charge carrier sensing properties of the CdZnTe detectors equipped with a pixellated anode layout. Temperature measurements show optimum performance of the system (detector and electronics) at T=10 deg.C and performance degradation at lower temperatures. The detectors and the ASIC were developed by our collaboration as two small focal plane detector prototypes for hard x-ray multilayer telescopes operating in the 20-70 keV energy range.

  5. Interconnect and bonding techniques for pixelated X-ray and gamma-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, A.; Veale, M. C.; Duarte, D. D.; Bell, S. J.; Wilson, M. D.; Lipp, J. D.; Seller, P.

    2015-02-01

    In the last decade, the Detector Development Group at the Technology Department of the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), U.K., established a variety of fabrication and bonding techniques to build pixelated X-ray and γ-ray detector systems such as the spectroscopic X-ray imaging detector HEXITEC [1]. The fabrication and bonding of such devices comprises a range of processes including material surface preparation, photolithography, stencil printing, flip-chip and wire bonding of detectors to application-specific integrated circuits (ASIC). This paper presents interconnect and bonding techniques used in the fabrication chain for pixelated detectors assembled at STFC. For this purpose, detector dies (~ 20× 20 mm2) of high quality, single crystal semiconductors, such as cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) are cut to the required thickness (up to 5mm). The die surfaces are lapped and polished to a mirror-finish and then individually processed by electroless gold deposition combined with photolithography to form 74× 74 arrays of 200 μ m × 200 μ m pixels with 250 μ m pitch. Owing to a lack of availability of CZT wafers, lithography is commonly carried out on individual detector dies which represents a significant technical challenge as the edge of the pixel array and the surrounding guard band lies close to the physical edge of the crystal. Further, such detector dies are flip-chip bonded to readout ASIC using low-temperature curing silver-loaded epoxy so that the stress between the bonded detector die and the ASIC is minimized. In addition, this reduces crystalline modifications of the detector die that occur at temperature greater than 150\\r{ }C and have adverse effects on the detector performance. To allow smaller pitch detectors to be bonded, STFC has also developed a compression cold-weld indium bump bonding technique utilising bumps formed by a photolithographic lift-off technique.

  6. Signal modeling of charge sharing effect in simple pixelated CdZnTe detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae Cheon; Kaye, William R.; He, Zhong

    2014-05-01

    In order to study the energy resolution degradation in 3D position-sensitive pixelated CdZnTe (CZT) detectors, a detailed detector system modeling package has been developed and used to analyze the detector performance. A 20 × 20 × 15 mm3 CZT crystal with an 11 × 11 simple-pixel anode array and a 1.72 mm pixel pitch was modeled. The VAS UM/TAT4 Application Specific Integrated Circuitry (ASIC) was used for signal read-out. Components of the simulation package include gamma-ray interactions with the CZT crystal, charge induction, electronic noise, pulse shaping, and ASIC triggering procedures. The charge induction model considers charge drift, trapping, diffusion, and sharing between pixels. This system model is used to determine the effects of electron cloud sharing, weighting potential non-uniformity, and weighting potential cross-talk which produce non-uniform signal responses for different gamma-ray interaction positions and ultimately degrade energy resolution. The effect of the decreased weighting potential underneath the gap between pixels on the total pulse amplitude of events has been studied. The transient signals induced by electron clouds collected near the gap between pixels may generate false signals, and the measured amplitude can be even greater than the photopeak. As the number of pixels that collect charge increases, the probability of side-neighbor events due to charge sharing significantly increases. If side-neighbor events are not corrected appropriately, the energy resolution of pixelated CZT detectors in multiple-pixel events degrades rapidly.

  7. Compressive holography with a single-pixel detector.

    PubMed

    Clemente, Pere; Durán, Vicente; Tajahuerce, Enrique; Andrés, Pedro; Climent, Vicent; Lancis, Jesús

    2013-07-15

    This Letter develops a framework for digital holography at optical wavelengths by merging phase-shifting interferometry with single-pixel optical imaging based on compressive sensing. The field diffracted by an input object is sampled by Hadamard patterns with a liquid crystal spatial light modulator. The concept of a single-pixel camera is then adapted to perform interferometric imaging of the sampled diffraction pattern by using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. Phase-shifting techniques together with the application of a backward light propagation algorithm allow the complex amplitude of the object under scrutiny to be resolved. A proof-of-concept experiment evaluating the phase distribution of an ophthalmic lens with compressive phase-shifting holography is provided.

  8. A new generation of small pixel pitch/SWaP cooled infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espuno, L.; Pacaud, O.; Reibel, Y.; Rubaldo, L.; Kerlain, A.; Péré-Laperne, N.; Dariel, A.; Roumegoux, J.; Brunner, A.; Kessler, A.; Gravrand, O.; Castelein, P.

    2015-10-01

    Following clear technological trends, the cooled IR detectors market is now in demand for smaller, more efficient and higher performance products. This demand pushes products developments towards constant innovations on detectors, read-out circuits, proximity electronics boards, and coolers. Sofradir was first to show a 10μm focal plane array (FPA) at DSS 2012, and announced the DAPHNIS 10μm product line back in 2014. This pixel pitch is a key enabler for infrared detectors with increased resolution. Sofradir recently achieved outstanding products demonstrations at this pixel pitch, which clearly demonstrate the benefits of adopting 10μm pixel pitch focal plane array-based detectors. Both HD and XGA Daphnis 10μm products also benefit from a global video datapath efficiency improvement by transitioning to digital video interfaces. Moreover, innovative smart pixels functionalities drastically increase product versatility. In addition to this strong push towards a higher pixels density, Sofradir acknowledges the need for smaller and lower power cooled infrared detector. Together with straightforward system interfaces and better overall performances, latest technological advances on SWAP-C (Size, Weight, Power and Cost) Sofradir products enable the advent of a new generation of high performance portable and agile systems (handheld thermal imagers, unmanned aerial vehicles, light gimbals etc...). This paper focuses on those features and performances that can make an actual difference in the field.

  9. Performance of silicon pixel detectors at small track incidence angles for the ATLAS Inner Tracker upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viel, Simon; Banerjee, Swagato; Brandt, Gerhard; Carney, Rebecca; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Hard, Andrew Straiton; Kaplan, Laser Seymour; Kashif, Lashkar; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Rieger, Julia; Wolf, Julian; Wu, Sau Lan; Yang, Hongtao

    2016-09-01

    In order to enable the ATLAS experiment to successfully track charged particles produced in high-energy collisions at the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider, the current ATLAS Inner Detector will be replaced by the Inner Tracker (ITk), entirely composed of silicon pixel and strip detectors. An extension of the tracking coverage of the ITk to very forward pseudorapidity values is proposed, using pixel modules placed in a long cylindrical layer around the beam pipe. The measurement of long pixel clusters, detected when charged particles cross the silicon sensor at small incidence angles, has potential to significantly improve the tracking efficiency, fake track rejection, and resolution of the ITk in the very forward region. The performance of state-of-the-art pixel modules at small track incidence angles is studied using test beam data collected at SLAC and CERN.

  10. Charge Sharing and Charge Loss in a Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride Fine-Pixel Detector Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, J. A.; Sharma, D. P.; Ramsey, B. D.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Because of its high atomic number, room temperature operation, low noise, and high spatial resolution a Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) multi-pixel detector is ideal for hard x-ray astrophysical observation. As part of on-going research at MSFC (Marshall Space Flight Center) to develop multi-pixel CdZnTe detectors for this purpose, we have measured charge sharing and charge loss for a 4x4 (750micron pitch), lmm thick pixel array and modeled these results using a Monte-Carlo simulation. This model was then used to predict the amount of charge sharing for a much finer pixel array (with a 300micron pitch). Future work will enable us to compare the simulated results for the finer array to measured values.

  11. Evaluation of a Wobbling Method Applied to Correcting Defective Pixels of CZT Detectors in SPECT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhaoheng; Li, Suying; Yang, Kun; Xu, Baixuan; Ren, Qiushi

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a wobbling method to correct bad pixels in cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors, using information of related images. We build up an automated device that realizes the wobbling correction for small animal Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) imaging. The wobbling correction method is applied to various constellations of defective pixels. The corrected images are compared with the results of conventional interpolation method, and the correction effectiveness is evaluated quantitatively using the factor of peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) and structural similarity (SSIM). In summary, the proposed wobbling method, equipped with the automatic mechanical system, provides a better image quality for correcting defective pixels, which could be used for all pixelated detectors for molecular imaging. PMID:27240368

  12. Imaging detector development for nuclear astrophysics using pixelated CdTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez, J. M.; Gálvez, J. L.; Hernanz, M.; Isern, J.; Llopis, M.; Lozano, M.; Pellegrini, G.; Chmeissani, M.

    2010-11-01

    The concept of focusing telescopes in the energy range of lines of astrophysical interest (i.e., of energies around 1 MeV) should allow to reach unprecedented sensitivities, essential to perform detailed studies of cosmic explosions and cosmic accelerators. Our research and development activities aim to study a detector suited for the focal plane of a γ-ray telescope mission. A CdTe/CdZnTe detector operating at room temperature, that combines high detection efficiency with good spatial and spectral resolution is being studied in recent years as a focal plane detector, with the interesting option of also operating as a Compton telescope monitor. We present the current status of the design and development of a γ-ray imaging spectrometer in the MeV range, for nuclear astrophysics, consisting of a stack of CdTe pixel detectors with increasing thicknesses. We have developed an initial prototype based on CdTe ohmic detector. The detector has 11×11 pixels, with a pixel pitch of 1 mm and a thickness of 2 mm. Each pixel is stud bonded to a fanout board and routed to an front end ASIC to measure pulse height and rise time information for each incident γ-ray photon. First measurements of a 133Ba and 241Am source are reported here.

  13. Low-cost bump-bonding processes for high energy physics pixel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caselle, M.; Blank, T.; Colombo, F.; Dierlamm, A.; Husemann, U.; Kudella, S.; Weber, M.

    2016-01-01

    In the next generation of collider experiments detectors will be challenged by unprecedented particle fluxes. Thus large detector arrays of highly pixelated detectors with minimal dead area will be required at reasonable costs. Bump-bonding of pixel detectors has been shown to be a major cost-driver. KIT is one of five production centers of the CMS barrel pixel detector for the Phase I Upgrade. In this contribution the SnPb bump-bonding process and the production yield is reported. In parallel to the production of the new CMS pixel detector, several alternatives to the expensive photolithography electroplating/electroless metal deposition technologies are developing. Recent progress and challenges faced in the development of bump-bonding technology based on gold-stud bonding by thin (15 μm) gold wire is presented. This technique allows producing metal bumps with diameters down to 30 μm without using photolithography processes, which are typically required to provide suitable under bump metallization. The short setup time for the bumping process makes gold-stud bump-bonding highly attractive (and affordable) for the flip-chipping of single prototype ICs, which is the main limitation of the current photolithography processes.

  14. Large monolithic particle pixel-detector in high-voltage CMOS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perić, I.; Takacs, C.

    2010-12-01

    A large monolithic particle pixel-detector implemented as system on a chip in a high-voltage 0.35 μm CMOS technology will be presented. The detector uses high-voltage n-well/p-substrate diodes as pixel-sensors. The diodes can be reversely biased with more than 60 V. In this way, depleted zones of about 10 μm thickness are formed, where the signal charges can be collected by drift. Due to fast charge collection in the strong electric-field zones, a higher radiation tolerance of the sensor is expected than in the case of the standard MAPS detectors. Simple pixel-readout electronics are implemented inside the n-wells. The readout is based on a source follower with one select- and two reset-transistors. Due to embedding of the pixel-readout electronics inside the collecting electrodes (n-wells) there are no insensitive zones within the pixel matrix. The detector chip contains a 128×128 matrix consisting of pixels of 21×21 μm2 -size. The diode voltages of one selected pixel-row are received at the bottom of the matrix by 128 eight-bit single-slope ADCs. All ADCs operate in parallel. The ADC codes are read out using eight LVDS 500 MBit/s output links. The readout electronics are designed to allow the readout of the whole pixel matrix in less than 50 μs. The total DC power consumption of the chip is 50 mW. All analog parts of the chip are implemented using radiation-hard layout techniques. Experimental results will be presented.

  15. 14C autoradiography with an energy-sensitive silicon pixel detector.

    PubMed

    Esposito, M; Mettivier, G; Russo, P

    2011-04-07

    The first performance tests are presented of a carbon-14 ((14)C) beta-particle digital autoradiography system with an energy-sensitive hybrid silicon pixel detector based on the Timepix readout circuit. Timepix was developed by the Medipix2 Collaboration and it is similar to the photon-counting Medipix2 circuit, except for an added time-based synchronization logic which allows derivation of energy information from the time-over-threshold signal. This feature permits direct energy measurements in each pixel of the detector array. Timepix is bump-bonded to a 300 µm thick silicon detector with 256 × 256 pixels of 55 µm pitch. Since an energetic beta-particle could release its kinetic energy in more than one detector pixel as it slows down in the semiconductor detector, an off-line image analysis procedure was adopted in which the single-particle cluster of hit pixels is recognized; its total energy is calculated and the position of interaction on the detector surface is attributed to the centre of the charge cluster. Measurements reported are detector sensitivity, (4.11 ± 0.03) × 10(-3) cps mm(-2) kBq(-1) g, background level, (3.59 ± 0.01) × 10(-5) cps mm(-2), and minimum detectable activity, 0.0077 Bq. The spatial resolution is 76.9 µm full-width at half-maximum. These figures are compared with several digital imaging detectors for (14)C beta-particle digital autoradiography.

  16. Novel module production methods for the CMS pixel detector, upgrade phase I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blank, T.; Caselle, M.; Weber, M.; Kudella, S.; Colombo, F.; Hansen, K.; Arab, S.

    2015-02-01

    For the High-Luminosity upgrade of the LHC (HL-LHC), phase I, the CMS pixel detector needs to be replaced. In order to improve the tracking resolution even at high luminosity the pixel detector is upgraded by a fourth barrel layer. This paper describes the production process and results for the fourth barrel layer for the CMS silicon pixel detector, upgrade phase I. The additional barrel layer will be produced by KIT and DESY. Both research centers have commonly developed and investigated new production processes, including SAC solder bump jetting, gold stud bumping and "Precoat by Powder Processes" (PPS) to bump the sensor tiles and prepare them for the flip-chip process. First bare modules have been produced with the new digital ROC.

  17. Recent progress in the development of a B-factory monolithic active pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanič, S.; Aihara, H.; Barbero, M.; Bozek, A.; Browder, T.; Hazumi, M.; Kennedy, J.; Kent, N.; Olsen, S.; Palka, H.; Rosen, M.; Ruckman, L.; Trabelsi, K.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uchida, K.; Varner, G.; Yang, Q.

    2006-11-01

    Due to the need for precise vertexing at future higher luminosity B-factories with the expectedly increasing track densities and radiation exposures, upgrade of present silicon strip detectors with thin, radiation resistant pixel detectors is highly desired. Considerable progress in the technological development of thin CMOS based Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) in the last years makes them a realistic upgrade option and the feasibility studies of their application in Belle are actively pursued. The most serious concerns are their radiation hardness and their read-out speed. To address them, several prototypes denoted as Continuous Acquisition Pixel (CAP) sensors have been developed and tested. The latest of the CAP sensor prototypes is CAP3, designed in the TSMC 0.25 μm process with a 5-deep sample pair pipeline in each pixel. A setup with several CAP3 sensors will be used to assess the performance of a full scale pixel read-out system running at realistic read-out speed. The results and plans for the next stages of R&D towards a full Pixel Vertex Detector (PVD) are presented.

  18. 18F-FDG positron autoradiography with a particle counting silicon pixel detector.

    PubMed

    Russo, P; Lauria, A; Mettivier, G; Montesi, M C; Marotta, M; Aloj, L; Lastoria, S

    2008-11-07

    We report on tests of a room-temperature particle counting silicon pixel detector of the Medipix2 series as the detector unit of a positron autoradiography (AR) system, for samples labelled with (18)F-FDG radiopharmaceutical used in PET studies. The silicon detector (1.98 cm(2) sensitive area, 300 microm thick) has high intrinsic resolution (55 microm pitch) and works by counting all hits in a pixel above a certain energy threshold. The present work extends the detector characterization with (18)F-FDG of a previous paper. We analysed the system's linearity, dynamic range, sensitivity, background count rate, noise, and its imaging performance on biological samples. Tests have been performed in the laboratory with (18)F-FDG drops (37-37 000 Bq initial activity) and ex vivo in a rat injected with 88.8 MBq of (18)F-FDG. Particles interacting in the detector volume produced a hit in a cluster of pixels whose mean size was 4.3 pixels/event at 11 keV threshold and 2.2 pixels/event at 37 keV threshold. Results show a sensitivity for beta(+) of 0.377 cps Bq(-1), a dynamic range of at least five orders of magnitude and a lower detection limit of 0.0015 Bq mm(-2). Real-time (18)F-FDG positron AR images have been obtained in 500-1000 s exposure time of thin (10-20 microm) slices of a rat brain and compared with 20 h film autoradiography of adjacent slices. The analysis of the image contrast and signal-to-noise ratio in a rat brain slice indicated that Poisson noise-limited imaging can be approached in short (e.g. 100 s) exposures, with approximately 100 Bq slice activity, and that the silicon pixel detector produced a higher image quality than film-based AR.

  19. A history of hybrid pixel detectors, from high energy physics to medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delpierre, P.

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the development of hybrid pixel detectors from the origin to the application on medical imaging. We are going to recall the need for fast 2D detectors in the high energy physics experiments and to follow the different pixel electronic circuits created to satisfy this demand. The adaptation of these circuits for X-rays will be presented as well as their industrialization. Today, a number of applications are open for these cameras, particularly for biomedical imaging applications. Some developments for clinical CT will also be shown.

  20. Compressive spectral polarization imaging by a pixelized polarizer and colored patterned detector.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chen; Arguello, Henry; Sadler, Brian M; Arce, Gonzalo R

    2015-11-01

    A compressive spectral and polarization imager based on a pixelized polarizer and colored patterned detector is presented. The proposed imager captures several dispersed compressive projections with spectral and polarization coding. Stokes parameter images at several wavelengths are reconstructed directly from 2D projections. Employing a pixelized polarizer and colored patterned detector enables compressive sensing over spatial, spectral, and polarization domains, reducing the total number of measurements. Compressive sensing codes are specially designed to enhance the peak signal-to-noise ratio in the reconstructed images. Experiments validate the architecture and reconstruction algorithms.

  1. Coloured computational imaging with single-pixel detectors based on a 2D discrete cosine transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bao-Lei; Yang, Zhao-Hua; Liu, Xia; Wu, Ling-An

    2017-02-01

    We propose and demonstrate a computational imaging technique that uses structured illumination based on a two-dimensional discrete cosine transform to perform imaging with a single-pixel detector. A scene is illuminated by a projector with two sets of orthogonal patterns, then by applying an inverse cosine transform to the spectra obtained from the single-pixel detector a full-color image is retrieved. This technique can retrieve an image from sub-Nyquist measurements, and the background noise is easily canceled to give excellent image quality. Moreover, the experimental setup is very simple.

  2. X-ray imaging using a 320 x 240 hybrid GaAs pixel detector

    SciTech Connect

    Irsigler, R.; Andersson, J.; Alverbro, J.

    1999-06-01

    The authors present room temperature measurements on 200 {micro}m thick GaAs pixel detectors, which were hybridized to silicon readout circuits. The whole detector array contains 320 x 240 square shaped pixel with a pitch of 38 {micro}m and is based on semi-insulating liquid-encapsulated Czochralski (LEC) GaAs material. After fabricating and dicing, the detector chips were indium bump flip chip bonded to CMOS readout circuits based on charge integration and finally evaluated. This readout chip was originally designed for the readout of flip chip bonded infrared detectors, but appears to be suitable for X-ray applications as well. A bias voltage between 50 V and 100 V was sufficient to operate the detector at room temperature. The detector array did respond to x-ray radiation by an increase in current due to production of electron hole pairs by the ionization processes. Images of various objects and slit patterns were acquired by using a standard X-ray source for dental imaging. The new X-ray hybrid detector was analyzed with respect to its imaging properties. Due to the high absorption coefficient for X-rays in GaAs and the small pixel size, the sensor shows a high modulation transfer function up to the Nyquist frequency.

  3. Versatile, reprogrammable area pixel array detector for time-resolved synchrotron x-ray applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gruner, Sol

    2010-05-01

    The final technical report for DOE grant DE-SC0004079 is presented. The goal of the grant was to perform research, development and application of novel imaging x-ray detectors so as to effectively utilize the high intensity and brightness of the national synchrotron radiation facilities to enable previously unfeasible time-resolved x-ray research. The report summarizes the development of the resultant imaging x-ray detectors. Two types of detector platforms were developed: The first is a detector platform (called a Mixed-Mode Pixel Array Detector, or MM-PAD) that can image continuously at over a thousand images per second while maintaining high efficiency for wide dynamic range signals ranging from 1 to hundreds of millions of x-rays per pixel per image. Research on an even higher dynamic range variant is also described. The second detector platform (called the Keck Pixel Array Detector) is capable of acquiring a burst of x-ray images at a rate of millions of images per second.

  4. 3D silicon pixel detectors for the High-Luminosity LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, J.; Carulla Areste, M.; Cavallaro, E.; Förster, F.; Grinstein, S.; López Paz, I.; Manna, M.; Pellegrini, G.; Quirion, D.; Terzo, S.; Vázquez Furelos, D.

    2016-11-01

    3D silicon pixel detectors have been investigated as radiation-hard candidates for the innermost layers of the HL-LHC upgrade of the ATLAS pixel detector. 3D detectors are already in use today in the ATLAS IBL and AFP experiments. These are based on 50 × 250 μm2 large pixels connected to the FE-I4 readout chip. Detectors of this generation were irradiated to HL-LHC fluences and demonstrated excellent radiation hardness with operational voltages as low as 180 V and power dissipation of 12-15 mW/cm2 at a fluence of about 1016 neq/cm2, measured at -25°C. Moreover, to cope with the higher occupancies expected at the HL-LHC, a first run of a new generation of 3D detectors designed for the HL-LHC was produced at CNM with small pixel sizes of 50 × 50 and 25 × 100 μm2, matched to the FE-I4 chip. They demonstrated a good performance in the laboratory and in beam tests with hit efficiencies of about 97% at already 1-2 V before irradiation.

  5. Charge Loss and Charge Sharing Measurements for Two Different Pixelated Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Sharma, Dharma; Ramsey, Brian; Seller, Paul

    2003-01-01

    As part of ongoing research at Marshall Space Flight Center, Cadmium-Zinc- Telluride (CdZnTe) pixilated detectors are being developed for use at the focal plane of the High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) telescope. HERO requires a 64x64 pixel array with a spatial resolution of around 200 microns (with a 6m focal length) and high energy resolution (< 2% at 60keV). We are currently testing smaller arrays as a necessary first step towards this goal. In this presentation, we compare charge sharing and charge loss measurements between two devices that differ both electronically and geometrically. The first device consists of a 1-mm-thick piece of CdZnTe that is sputtered with a 4x4 array of pixels with pixel pitch of 750 microns (inter-pixel gap is 100 microns). The signal is read out using discrete ultra-low-noise preamplifiers, one for each of the 16 pixels. The second detector consists of a 2-mm-thick piece of CdZnTe that is sputtered with a 16x16 array of pixels with a pixel pitch of 300 microns (inter-pixel gap is 50 microns). Instead of using discrete preamplifiers, the crystal is bonded to an ASIC that provides all of the front-end electronics to each of the 256 pixels. what degree the bias voltage (i.e. the electric field) and hence the drift and diffusion coefficients affect our measurements. Further, we compare the measured results with simulated results and discuss to

  6. Simulation of active-edge pixelated CdTe radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, D. D.; Lipp, J. D.; Schneider, A.; Seller, P.; Veale, M. C.; Wilson, M. D.; Baker, M. A.; Sellin, P. J.

    2016-01-01

    The edge surfaces of single crystal CdTe play an important role in the electronic properties and performance of this material as an X-ray and γ-ray radiation detector. Edge effects have previously been reported to reduce the spectroscopic performance of the edge pixels in pixelated CdTe radiation detectors without guard bands. A novel Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD) model based on experimental data has been developed to investigate these effects. The results presented in this paper show how localized low resistivity surfaces modify the internal electric field of CdTe creating potential wells. These result in a reduction of charge collection efficiency of the edge pixels, which compares well with experimental data.

  7. Study of indium and solder bumps for the BTeV Pixel Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Simon W Kwan et al.

    2003-11-05

    The pixel detector proposed for the BTeV experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron will use bump-bonding technology based on either Indium or Pb/Sn solder to connect the front-end readout chips to the silicon pixel sensors. We have studied the strength of the bumps by visual inspection of the bumps bonding silicon sensor modules to dummy chips made out of glass. The studies were done before and after thermal cycles, exposed to intense irradiation, and with the assemblies glued to a graphite substrate. We have also carried out studies on effects of temperature changes on both types of bump bonds by observing the responses of single-chip pixel detectors to an Sr{sup 90} source. We report the results from these studies and our plan to measure the effect of cryogenic temperatures on the bumps.

  8. Module production for the Phase 1 upgrade of the CMS forward pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siado Castaneda, Joaquin

    2017-01-01

    For Run 2 the Large Hadron Collider will run at a much higher instantaneous luminosity, which requires an upgrade of the CMS pixel detector. The detector consists of rectangular silicon sensors, segmented into 100 μm by 150 μm pixels, bonded to readout chips, with one sensor and a 8x2 array of readout chips forming a module. Due to its high granularity and good spatial resolution, about 10 μm for a single hit, the pixel detector is used for track reconstruction, pileup mitigation, and b-quark tagging in many physics analyses. Being the innermost sub-detector of CMS it receives the most radiation damage, and therefore needs to be replaced most often. For the phase 1 upgrade an additional disk in the forward region and increased buffer space in the readout chip will improve the pixel performance by increasing efficiency and reducing fake rates. The University of Nebraska-Lincoln is one of the two sites where modules are being assembled. This talk features the steps of the assembly process as well as challenges encountered and overcome during production of over 500 modules. The CMS Collaboration.

  9. H4RG Near-IR Detectors with 10 micron pixels for WFIRST and Space Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruk, Jeffrey W.; Rauscher, B. J.

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid sensor chip assemblies (SCAs) employing HgCdTe photo-diode arrays integrated with CMOS read-out integrated circuits (ROICs) have become the detector of choice for many cutting-edge ground-based and space-based astronomical instruments operating at near infrared wavelengths. 2Kx2K arrays of 18-micron pixels are in use at many ground-based observatories and will fly on JWST and Euclid later this decade. The Wide-Field Infra-Red Survey Telescope (WFIRST) mission, which will survey large areas of the sky with reasonably-fine sampling, is extending these prior designs by developing 4Kx4K HgCdTe NIR hybrid detectors with 10 micron pixels. These will provide four times as many pixels as the current 2Kx2K detectors in a package that is only slightly larger. Four prototype 4Kx4K devices with conservative pixel designs were produced in 2011; these devices met many though not all WFIRST performance requirements. A Strategic Astrophysics Technology proposal was submitted to further the development of these detectors. This poster describes the technology development plan, progress made in the first year of the program, and plans for the future.

  10. A near-infrared 64-pixel superconducting nanowire single photon detector array with integrated multiplexed readout

    SciTech Connect

    Allman, M. S. Verma, V. B.; Stevens, M.; Gerrits, T.; Horansky, R. D.; Lita, A. E.; Mirin, R.; Nam, S. W.; Marsili, F.; Beyer, A.; Shaw, M. D.; Kumor, D.

    2015-05-11

    We demonstrate a 64-pixel free-space-coupled array of superconducting nanowire single photon detectors optimized for high detection efficiency in the near-infrared range. An integrated, readily scalable, multiplexed readout scheme is employed to reduce the number of readout lines to 16. The cryogenic, optical, and electronic packaging to read out the array as well as characterization measurements are discussed.

  11. A Triple-GEM Detector with Pixel Readout for High-Rate Beam Tracking in COMPASS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, T.; Austregesilo, A.; Haas, F.; Ketzer, B.; Konorov, I.; Krämer, M.; Mann, A.; Paul, S.

    2008-06-01

    For its physics program with a high-intensity hadron beam of 2 · 107 particles/s, the COMPASS experiment at CERN requires tracking of charged particles scattered by very small angles with respect to the incident beam direction. While good resolution in time and space is mandatory, the challenge is imposed by the high beam intensity, requiring radiation-hard detectors which add very little material to the beam path in order to minimise secondary interactions. To this end, a set of triple-GEM detectors with pixel readout in the beam region and 2-D strip readout in the periphery is currently being built. The pixel size has been chosen to be 1×1 mm2, which constitutes a compromise between the spatial resolution achievable and the number of readout channels. Surrounding the pixel area, a 2-D strip readout with a pitch of 400 μm has been realised on the same printed circuit foil. In total an active area of 10 × 10 cm2 is covered using 2048 readout channels. Analogue readout by the APV25 ASIC has been chosen in order to profit from amplitude measurements which help to improve the spatial resolution by clustering neighbouring hit strips or pixels. A detector prototype has been tested successfully in the 5 · 107 particles/s COMPASS muon beam, as well as in a focused hadron beam. The design of the detector and first results concerning its performance as a beam tracker will be presented.

  12. Optimal fine ϕ-slicing for single-photon-counting pixel detectors

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Marcus; Wang, Meitian; Schulze-Briese, Clemens

    2012-01-01

    The data-collection parameters used in a macromolecular diffraction experiment have a strong impact on data quality. A careful choice of parameters leads to better data and can make the difference between success and failure in phasing attempts, and will also result in a more accurate atomic model. The selection of parameters has to account for the application of the data in various phasing methods or high-resolution refinement. Furthermore, experimental factors such as crystal characteristics, available experiment time and the properties of the X-ray source and detector have to be considered. For many years, CCD detectors have been the prevalent type of detectors used in macromolecular crystallography. Recently, hybrid pixel X-ray detectors that operate in single-photon-counting mode have become available. These detectors have fundamentally different characteristics compared with CCD detectors and different data-collection strategies should be applied. Fine ϕ-slicing is a strategy that is particularly well suited to hybrid pixel detectors because of the fast readout time and the absence of readout noise. A large number of data sets were systematically collected from crystals of four different proteins in order to investigate the benefit of fine ϕ-­slicing on data quality with a noise-free detector. The results show that fine ϕ-slicing can substantially improve scaling statistics and anomalous signal provided that the rotation angle is comparable to half the crystal mosaicity. PMID:22194332

  13. Simultaneous real-time visible and infrared video with single-pixel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgar, Matthew. P.; Gibson, Graham M.; Bowman, Richard W.; Sun, Baoqing; Radwell, Neal; Mitchell, Kevin J.; Welsh, Stephen S.; Padgett, Miles J.

    2015-05-01

    Conventional cameras rely upon a pixelated sensor to provide spatial resolution. An alternative approach replaces the sensor with a pixelated transmission mask encoded with a series of binary patterns. Combining knowledge of the series of patterns and the associated filtered intensities, measured by single-pixel detectors, allows an image to be deduced through data inversion. In this work we extend the concept of a ‘single-pixel camera’ to provide continuous real-time video at 10 Hz , simultaneously in the visible and short-wave infrared, using an efficient computer algorithm. We demonstrate our camera for imaging through smoke, through a tinted screen, whilst performing compressive sampling and recovering high-resolution detail by arbitrarily controlling the pixel-binning of the masks. We anticipate real-time single-pixel video cameras to have considerable importance where pixelated sensors are limited, allowing for low-cost, non-visible imaging systems in applications such as night-vision, gas sensing and medical diagnostics.

  14. 18k Channels single photon counting readout circuit for hybrid pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maj, P.; Grybos, P.; Szczygiel, R.; Zoladz, M.; Sakumura, T.; Tsuji, Y.

    2013-01-01

    We have performed measurements of an integrated circuit named PXD18k designed for hybrid pixel semiconductor detectors used in X-ray imaging applications. The PXD18k integrated circuit, fabricated in CMOS 180 nm technology, has dimensions of 9.64 mm×20 mm and contains approximately 26 million transistors. The core of the IC is a matrix of 96×192 pixels with 100 μm×100 μm pixel size. Each pixel works in a single photon counting mode. A single pixel contains two charge sensitive amplifiers with Krummenacher feedback scheme, two shapers, two discriminators (with independent thresholds A and B) and two 16-bit ripple counters. The data are read out via eight low voltage differential signaling (LVDS) outputs with 100 Mbps rate. The power consumption is dominated by analog blocks and it is about 23 μW/pixel. The effective peaking time at the discriminator input is 30 ns and is mainly determined by the time constants of the charge sensitive amplifier (CSA). The gain is equal to 42.5 μV/e- and the equivalent noise charge is 168 e- rms (with bump-bonded silicon pixel detector). Thanks to the use of trim DACs in each pixel, the effective threshold spread at the discriminator input is only 1.79 mV. The dead time of the front end electronics for a standard setting is 172 ns (paralyzable model). In the standard readout mode (when the data collection time is separated from the time necessary to readout data from the chip) the PXD18k IC works with two energy thresholds per pixel. The PXD18k can also be operated in the continuous readout mode (with a zero dead time) where one can select the number of bits readout from each pixel to optimize the PXD18k frame rate. For example, for reading out 16 bits/pixel the frame rate is 2.7 kHz and for 4 bits/pixel it rises to 7.1 kHz.

  15. Real-time control of the beam attenuation with XPAD hybrid pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawiec, A.; Garreau, Y.; Bisou, J.; Hustache, S.; Kanoute, B.; Picca, F.; Renaud, G.; Coati, A.

    2016-12-01

    In order to fully benefit from a beam produced by modern synchrotron light sources, characterised by a wide and continuous energy spectrum, high brightness and a very high intensity, advancement in detector technology has been made over the last decades. However, one of the main limitations of the state-of-the-art counting hybrid pixel detectors is the maximum count-rate that is very often few orders of magnitudes lower than of the incident, reflected or diffracted beam flux. Therefore, direct beam attenuation is mandatory in order to perform the measurements according to the detector's characteristics. In this work we present a major upgrade of a fast attenuation system developed at Synchrotron SOLEIL, which allows for a dynamical change of the beam attenuation as a function of the photon flux received by XPAD S140 photon counting detector. The system performs a cyclic real-time estimation of the flux received by every pixel during acquisition of an image and searches for clusters of at least two pixels that exceed user defined levels of counts/s. The beam attenuation is immediately and automatically changed in order to guarantee that the detector will always operate in its linear range even during a long continuous scan, by acting on the direct attenuators.

  16. Development of 3D-DDTC pixel detectors for the ATLAS upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalla Betta, Gian-Franco; Boscardin, Maurizio; Darbo, Giovanni; Gemme, Claudia; La Rosa, Alessandro; Pernegger, Heinz; Piemonte, Claudio; Povoli, Marco; Ronchin, Sabina; Zoboli, Andrea; Zorzi, Nicola

    2011-04-01

    We report on the development of n-on-p, 3D Double-Side Double Type Column (3D-DDTC) pixel detectors fabricated at FBK-irst (Trento, Italy) and oriented to the ATLAS upgrade. The considered fabrication technology is simpler than that required for full 3D detectors with active edge, but the detector efficiency and radiation hardness critically depend on the columnar electrode overlap and should be carefully evaluated. The first assemblies of these sensors (featuring 2, 3, or 4 columns per pixel) with the ATLAS FEI3 read-out chip have been tested in laboratory. Selected results from the electrical and functional characterization with radioactive sources are discussed here.

  17. Analysis of full charge reconstruction algorithms for x-ray pixelated detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Baumbaugh, A.; Carini, G.; Deptuch, G.; Grybos, P.; Hoff, J.; Siddons, P., Maj.; Szczygiel, R.; Trimpl, M.; Yarema, R.; /Fermilab

    2011-11-01

    Existence of the natural diffusive spread of charge carriers on the course of their drift towards collecting electrodes in planar, segmented detectors results in a division of the original cloud of carriers between neighboring channels. This paper presents the analysis of algorithms, implementable with reasonable circuit resources, whose task is to prevent degradation of the detective quantum efficiency in highly granular, digital pixel detectors. The immediate motivation of the work is a photon science application requesting simultaneous timing spectroscopy and 2D position sensitivity. Leading edge discrimination, provided it can be freed from uncertainties associated with the charge sharing, is used for timing the events. Analyzed solutions can naturally be extended to the amplitude spectroscopy with pixel detectors.

  18. Analysis of Full Charge Reconstruction Algorithms for X-Ray Pixelated Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Baumbaugh, A.; Carini, G.; Deptuch, G.; Grybos, P.; Hoff, J.; Siddons, P., Maj.; Szczygiel, R.; Trimpl, M.; Yarema, R.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-21

    Existence of the natural diffusive spread of charge carriers on the course of their drift towards collecting electrodes in planar, segmented detectors results in a division of the original cloud of carriers between neighboring channels. This paper presents the analysis of algorithms, implementable with reasonable circuit resources, whose task is to prevent degradation of the detective quantum efficiency in highly granular, digital pixel detectors. The immediate motivation of the work is a photon science application requesting simultaneous timing spectroscopy and 2D position sensitivity. Leading edge discrimination, provided it can be freed from uncertainties associated with the charge sharing, is used for timing the events. Analyzed solutions can naturally be extended to the amplitude spectroscopy with pixel detectors.

  19. Cat-eye effect target recognition with single-pixel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Weijian; Li, Li; Zhang, Xiaoyue

    2015-12-01

    A prototype of cat-eye effect target recognition with single-pixel detectors is proposed. Based on the framework of compressive sensing, it is possible to recognize cat-eye effect targets by projecting a series of known random patterns and measuring the backscattered light with three single-pixel detectors in different locations. The prototype only requires simpler, less expensive detectors and extends well beyond the visible spectrum. The simulations are accomplished to evaluate the feasibility of the proposed prototype. We compared our results to that obtained from conventional cat-eye effect target recognition methods using area array sensor. The experimental results show that this method is feasible and superior to the conventional method in dynamic and complicated backgrounds.

  20. Test of a fine pitch SOI pixel detector with laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; Lu, Yunpeng; Ju, Xudong; Qun, Ou-Yang

    2016-01-01

    A silicon pixel detector with fine pitch size of 19 μm × 19 μm, developed based on SOI (silicon-on-insulator) technology, was tested under the illumination of infrared laser pulses. As an alternative method for particle beam tests, the laser pulses were tuned to very short duration and small transverse profile to simulate the tracks of MIPs (minimum ionization particles) in silicon. Hit cluster sizes were measured with focused laser pulses propagating through the SOI detector perpendicular to its surface and most of the induced charge was found to be collected inside the seed pixel. For the first time, the signal amplitude as a function of the applied bias voltage was measured for this SOI detector, deepening understanding of its depletion characteristics. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11375226)

  1. Production quality characterisation techniques of sensors and prototypes for the BELLE II Pixel Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avella, P.; Andricek, L.; Koffmane, C.; Lehmann, R.; Liemann, G.; Moser, H.-G.; Ninkovic, J.; Richter, R. H.; Ritter, A.; Scheugenpflug, E.; Schaller, G.; Schopper, F.; Schnecke, M.; Valentan, M.; Wassatsch, A.

    2015-01-01

    The Belle II detector is a system currently under upgrade at the B-factory SuperKEKB in Tsukuba, Japan. The main novelty is the introduction of an additional position sensitive sub-detector in the vertex detector, between the beam pipe and the strip detector system. The sensor of choice for the Belle II Pixel Detector is the Depleted p-channel Field Effect Transistor (DEPFET) sensor. In this paper the latest production of sensors and prototypes performed at the semiconductor Laboratory of the Max Planck Society, i.e. the PXD9 and the Electrical Multi-Chip Module (EMCM), are described. Wafer-level characterisation methods and techniques for faults in the metal system are also reported.

  2. Comparator threshold settings and the effective pixel width of the PICASSO detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, F. C. M.; Rigon, L.; Fardin, L.; Arfelli, F.; Bergamaschi, A.; Dreossi, D.; Longo, M.; Schmitt, B.; Vallazza, E.; Longo, R.

    2014-05-01

    Charge sharing plays an important role in the performance of single-photon counting microstrip detectors, since the comparator threshold defines the effective pixel width. In this contribution, the PICASSO (Phase Imaging for Clinical Application with Silicon detector and Synchrotron radiatiOn) single-photon counting microstrip detector oriented in edge-on configuration has been used to study its spatial resolution as a function of the comparator threshold. The experiment was carried out with monochromatic x-rays at the SYRMEP beamline of the Elettra synchrotron radiation facility in Trieste (Italy). The Edge Spread Function (i.e. the integral of the Line spread Function, LSF) was measured by horizontally translating vertical slits from a bar-pattern test-object in front of the detector, at four different photon energies (19, 20, 22, and 25 keV) and for several different values of the comparator threshold. The effect of charge sharing between strips on the spatial resolution has been quantified by calculating the horizontal Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). Moreover, the composite LSF from neighboring pixels was obtained: this allowed estimating the optimal threshold for each photon energy by selecting the threshold at which the composite LSF would approach unity along the entire width of the pixel. The results show that at thresholds lower than half of the photon energy, charge sharing increases the effective pixel width, causing a drop of the MTF, and it is responsible for the appearance of peaks in the composite LSF. Conversely, at thresholds higher than half of the photon energy, the effective pixel width is reduced and the spatial resolution is increased, but the collection efficiency is compromised, as demonstrated by the presence of valleys in the composite LSF.

  3. Development of a Prototype for the Fluorescence Detector Array of Single-Pixel Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, T.; Malacari, M.; Bertaina, M.; Casolino, M.; Dawson, B.; Jiang, J.; Matalon, A.; Matthews, J. N.; Motloch, P.; Privitera, P.; Takizawa, Y.; Yamazaki, K.

    We present a concept for large-area, low-cost detection of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) with a Fluorescence detector Array of Single-pixel Telescopes (FAST), addressing the requirements for the next generation of UHECR experiments. In the FAST design, a large field of view is covered by a few pixels at the focal plane of a mirror or Fresnel lens. We report preliminary results of a FAST prototype installed at the Telescope Array site, consisting of a single 200 mm photo-multiplier tube at the focal plane of a 1 m2 Fresnel lens system taken from the prototype of the JEM-EUSO experiment.

  4. Performance of a Medipix3RX spectroscopic pixel detector with a high resistivity gallium arsenide sensor.

    PubMed

    Hamann, Elias; Koenig, Thomas; Zuber, Marcus; Cecilia, Angelica; Tyazhev, Anton; Tolbanov, Oleg; Procz, Simon; Fauler, Alex; Baumbach, Tilo; Fiederle, Michael

    2015-03-01

    High resistivity gallium arsenide is considered a suitable sensor material for spectroscopic X-ray imaging detectors. These sensors typically have thicknesses between a few hundred μm and 1 mm to ensure a high photon detection efficiency. However, for small pixel sizes down to several tens of μm, an effect called charge sharing reduces a detector's spectroscopic performance. The recently developed Medipix3RX readout chip overcomes this limitation by implementing a charge summing circuit, which allows the reconstruction of the full energy information of a photon interaction in a single pixel. In this work, we present the characterization of the first Medipix3RX detector assembly with a 500 μm thick high resistivity, chromium compensated gallium arsenide sensor. We analyze its properties and demonstrate the functionality of the charge summing mode by means of energy response functions recorded at a synchrotron. Furthermore, the imaging properties of the detector, in terms of its modulation transfer functions and signal-to-noise ratios, are investigated. After more than one decade of attempts to establish gallium arsenide as a sensor material for photon counting detectors, our results represent a breakthrough in obtaining detector-grade material. The sensor we introduce is therefore suitable for high resolution X-ray imaging applications.

  5. Energy calibration of the pixels of spectral X-ray detectors.

    PubMed

    Panta, Raj Kumar; Walsh, Michael F; Bell, Stephen T; Anderson, Nigel G; Butler, Anthony P; Butler, Philip H

    2015-03-01

    The energy information acquired using spectral X-ray detectors allows noninvasive identification and characterization of chemical components of a material. To achieve this, it is important that the energy response of the detector is calibrated. The established techniques for energy calibration are not practical for routine use in pre-clinical or clinical research environment. This is due to the requirements of using monochromatic radiation sources such as synchrotron, radio-isotopes, and prohibitively long time needed to set up the equipment and make measurements. To address these limitations, we have developed an automated technique for calibrating the energy response of the pixels in a spectral X-ray detector that runs with minimal user intervention. This technique uses the X-ray tube voltage (kVp) as a reference energy, which is stepped through an energy range of interest. This technique locates the energy threshold where a pixel transitions from not-counting (off) to counting (on). Similarly, we have developed a technique for calibrating the energy response of individual pixels using X-ray fluorescence generated by metallic targets directly irradiated with polychromatic X-rays, and additionally γ-rays from (241)Am. This technique was used to measure the energy response of individual pixels in CdTe-Medipix3RX by characterizing noise performance, threshold dispersion, gain variation and spectral resolution. The comparison of these two techniques shows the energy difference of 1 keV at 59.5 keV which is less than the spectral resolution of the detector (full-width at half-maximum of 8 keV at 59.5 keV). Both techniques can be used as quality control tools in a pre-clinical multi-energy CT scanner using spectral X-ray detectors.

  6. Modeling and Analysis of Hybrid Pixel Detector Deficiencies for Scientific Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fahim, Farah; Deptuch, Grzegorz W.; Hoff, James R.; Mohseni, Hooman

    2015-08-28

    Semiconductor hybrid pixel detectors often consist of a pixellated sensor layer bump bonded to a matching pixelated readout integrated circuit (ROIC). The sensor can range from high resistivity Si to III-V materials, whereas a Si CMOS process is typically used to manufacture the ROIC. Independent, device physics and electronic design automation (EDA) tools are used to determine sensor characteristics and verify functional performance of ROICs respectively with significantly different solvers. Some physics solvers provide the capability of transferring data to the EDA tool. However, single pixel transient simulations are either not feasible due to convergence difficulties or are prohibitively long. A simplified sensor model, which includes a current pulse in parallel with detector equivalent capacitor, is often used; even then, spice type top-level (entire array) simulations range from days to weeks. In order to analyze detector deficiencies for a particular scientific application, accurately defined transient behavioral models of all the functional blocks are required. Furthermore, various simulations, such as transient, noise, Monte Carlo, inter-pixel effects, etc. of the entire array need to be performed within a reasonable time frame without trading off accuracy. The sensor and the analog front-end can be modeling using a real number modeling language, as complex mathematical functions or detailed data can be saved to text files, for further top-level digital simulations. Parasitically aware digital timing is extracted in a standard delay format (sdf) from the pixel digital back-end layout as well as the periphery of the ROIC. For any given input, detector level worst-case and best-case simulations are performed using a Verilog simulation environment to determine the output. Each top-level transient simulation takes no more than 10-15 minutes. The impact of changing key parameters such as sensor Poissonian shot noise, analog front-end bandwidth, jitter due to

  7. Modeling and analysis of hybrid pixel detector deficiencies for scientific applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahim, Farah; Deptuch, Grzegorz W.; Hoff, James R.; Mohseni, Hooman

    2015-08-01

    Semiconductor hybrid pixel detectors often consist of a pixellated sensor layer bump bonded to a matching pixelated readout integrated circuit (ROIC). The sensor can range from high resistivity Si to III-V materials, whereas a Si CMOS process is typically used to manufacture the ROIC. Independent, device physics and electronic design automation (EDA) tools are used to determine sensor characteristics and verify functional performance of ROICs respectively with significantly different solvers. Some physics solvers provide the capability of transferring data to the EDA tool. However, single pixel transient simulations are either not feasible due to convergence difficulties or are prohibitively long. A simplified sensor model, which includes a current pulse in parallel with detector equivalent capacitor, is often used; even then, spice type top-level (entire array) simulations range from days to weeks. In order to analyze detector deficiencies for a particular scientific application, accurately defined transient behavioral models of all the functional blocks are required. Furthermore, various simulations, such as transient, noise, Monte Carlo, inter-pixel effects, etc. of the entire array need to be performed within a reasonable time frame without trading off accuracy. The sensor and the analog front-end can be modeling using a real number modeling language, as complex mathematical functions or detailed data can be saved to text files, for further top-level digital simulations. Parasitically aware digital timing is extracted in a standard delay format (sdf) from the pixel digital back-end layout as well as the periphery of the ROIC. For any given input, detector level worst-case and best-case simulations are performed using a Verilog simulation environment to determine the output. Each top-level transient simulation takes no more than 10-15 minutes. The impact of changing key parameters such as sensor Poissonian shot noise, analog front-end bandwidth, jitter due to

  8. The shunt-LDO regulator to power the upgraded ATLAS pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonella, L.; Barbero, M.; Hügging, F.; Krüger, H.; Wermes, N.

    2012-01-01

    The shunt-LDO regulator is a new regulator concept which combines a shunt and a Low Drop-Out (LDO) regulator. Designed as an improved shunt regulator to match the needs of serially powered detector systems, it can also be used as a pure LDO regulator for general application in powering schemes requiring linear regulation. The flexibility of the design makes the shunt-LDO regulator a good candidate for use in the powering schemes envisaged for the upgrades of the ATLAS pixel detector. Two shunt-LDO regulators integrated in the prototype of the next ATLAS pixel front-end chip, the FE-I4A, are used to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed powering solutions.

  9. Firmware development and testing of the ATLAS Pixel Detector / IBL ROD card

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrielli, A.; Backhaus, M.; Balbi, G.; Bindi, M.; Chen, S. P.; Falchieri, D.; Flick, T.; Hauck, S.; Hsu, S. C.; Kretz, M.; Kugel, A.; Lama, L.; Travaglini, R.; Wensing, M.

    2015-03-01

    The ATLAS Experiment is reworking and upgrading systems during the current LHC shut down. In particular, the Pixel detector has inserted an additional inner layer called the Insertable B-Layer (IBL). The Readout-Driver card (ROD), the Back-of-Crate card (BOC), and the S-Link together form the essential frontend data path of the IBL's off-detector DAQ system. The strategy for IBL ROD firmware development was three-fold: keeping as much of the Pixel ROD datapath firmware logic as possible, employing a complete new scheme of steering and calibration firmware, and designing the overall system to prepare for a future unified code version integrating IBL and Pixel layers. Essential features such as data formatting, frontend-specific error handling, and calibration are added to the ROD data path. An IBL DAQ test bench using a realistic front-end chip model was created to serve as an initial framework for full offline electronic system simulation. In this document, major firmware achievements concerning the IBL ROD data path implementation, test on the test bench and ROD prototypes, will be reported. Recent Pixel collaboration efforts focus on finalizing hardware and firmware tests for the IBL. The plan is to approach a complete IBL DAQ hardware-software installation by the end of 2014.

  10. ATLAS-TPX: a two-layer pixel detector setup for neutron detection and radiation field characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, B.; Caicedo, I.; Leroy, C.; Pospisil, S.; Vykydal, Z.

    2016-10-01

    A two-layer pixel detector setup (ATLAS-TPX), designed for thermal and fast neutron detection and radiation field characterization is presented. It consists of two segmented silicon detectors (256 × 256 pixels, pixel pitch 55 μm, thicknesses 300 μm and 500 μm) facing each other. To enhance the neutron detection efficiency a set of converter layers is inserted in between these detectors. The pixelation and the two-layer design allow a discrimination of neutrons against γs by pattern recognition and against charged particles by using the coincidence and anticoincidence information. The neutron conversion and detection efficiencies are measured in a thermal neutron field and fast neutron fields with energies up to 600 MeV. A Geant4 simulation model is presented, which is validated against the measured detector responses. The reliability of the coincidence and anticoincidence technique is demonstrated and possible applications of the detector setup are briefly outlined.

  11. The CT-PPS tracking system with 3D pixel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravera, F.

    2016-11-01

    The CMS-TOTEM Precision Proton Spectrometer (CT-PPS) detector will be installed in Roman pots (RP) positioned on either side of CMS, at about 210 m from the interaction point. This detector will measure leading protons, allowing detailed studies of diffractive physics and central exclusive production in standard LHC running conditions. An essential component of the CT-PPS apparatus is the tracking system, which consists of two detector stations per arm equipped with six 3D silicon pixel-sensor modules, each read out by six PSI46dig chips. The front-end electronics has been designed to fulfill the mechanical constraints of the RP and to be compatible as much as possible with the readout chain of the CMS pixel detector. The tracking system is currently under construction and will be installed by the end of 2016. In this contribution the final design and the expected performance of the CT-PPS tracking system is presented. A summary of the studies performed, before and after irradiation, on the 3D detectors produced for CT-PPS is given.

  12. FITPix data preprocessing pipeline for the Timepix single particle pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, V.; Holik, M.; Jakubek, J.; Georgiev, V.

    2012-04-01

    The semiconductor pixel detector Timepix contains an array of 256 × 256 square pixels with a pitch of 55 μm. The single quantum counting detector Timepix can also provide information about the energy or arrival time of a particle from every single pixel. This device is a powerful tool for radiation imaging and ionizing particle tracking. The Timepix device can be read-out via a serial or parallel interface enabling speeds of 100 fps or 3200 fps, respectively. The device can be connected to a PC via the USB 2.0 based interface FITPix, which currently supports the serial output of Timepix reaching a speed of 90 fps. FITPix supports adjustable clock frequency and hardware triggering which is a useful tool for the synchronized operation of multiple devices. The FITPix interface can handle up to 16 detectors in daisy chain. The complete system including the FITPix interface and Timepix detector is controlled from the PC by the Pixelman software package. A pipeline structure is now implemented in the new version of the readout interface of FITPix. This version also supports parallel Timepix readout. The pipeline architecture brings the possibility of data preprocessing directly in the hardware. The first pipeline stage converts the raw Timepix data into the form of a matrix or stream of pixel values. Another stage performs further data processing such as event thresholding and data compression. Complex data processing currently performed by Pixelman in the PC is significantly reduced in this way. The described architecture together with the parallel readout increases data throughput reaching a higher frame-rate and reducing the dead time. Significant data compression is performed directly in the hardware especially for sparse data sets from particle tracking applications. The data frame size is typically compressed by factor of 10-100.

  13. Review of hybrid pixel detector readout ASICs for spectroscopic X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballabriga, R.; Alozy, J.; Campbell, M.; Frojdh, E.; Heijne, E. H. M.; Koenig, T.; Llopart, X.; Marchal, J.; Pennicard, D.; Poikela, T.; Tlustos, L.; Valerio, P.; Wong, W.; Zuber, M.

    2016-01-01

    Semiconductor detector readout chips with pulse processing electronics have made possible spectroscopic X-ray imaging, bringing an improvement in the overall image quality and, in the case of medical imaging, a reduction in the X-ray dose delivered to the patient. In this contribution we review the state of the art in semiconductor-detector readout ASICs for spectroscopic X-ray imaging with emphasis on hybrid pixel detector technology. We discuss how some of the key challenges of the technology (such as dealing with high fluxes, maintaining spectral fidelity, power consumption density) are addressed by the various ASICs. In order to understand the fundamental limits of the technology, the physics of the interaction of radiation with the semiconductor detector and the process of signal induction in the input electrodes of the readout circuit are described. Simulations of the process of signal induction are presented that reveal the importance of making use of the small pixel effect to minimize the impact of the slow motion of holes and hole trapping in the induced signal in high-Z sensor materials. This can contribute to preserve fidelity in the measured spectrum with relatively short values of the shaper peaking time. Simulations also show, on the other hand, the distortion in the energy spectrum due to charge sharing and fluorescence photons when the pixel pitch is decreased. However, using recent measurements from the Medipix3 ASIC, we demonstrate that the spectroscopic information contained in the incoming photon beam can be recovered by the implementation in hardware of an algorithm whereby the signal from a single photon is reconstructed and allocated to the pixel with the largest deposition.

  14. Calibration status and plans for the charge integrating JUNGFRAU pixel detector for SwissFEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redford, S.; Bergamaschi, A.; Brückner, M.; Cartier, S.; Dinapoli, R.; Ekinci, Y.; Fröjdh, E.; Greiffenberg, D.; Mayilyan, D.; Mezza, D.; Mozzanica, A.; Rajeev, R.; Ramilli, M.; Ruder, C.; Schädler, L.; Schmitt, B.; Shi, X.; Thattil, D.; Tinti, G.; Zhang, J.

    2016-11-01

    JUNGFRAU (adJUstiNg Gain detector FoR the Aramis User station) is a two-dimensional hybrid pixel detector under development for photon science applications at free electron laser and synchrotron facilities. In particular, JUNGFRAU detectors will equip the Aramis end stations of SwissFEL, an X-ray free electron laser currently under construction at the Paul Scherrer Institut in Villigen, Switzerland. JUNGFRAU has been designed specifically to meet the challenges of photon science at XFELs, including high frame rates, single photon sensitivity in combination with a high dynamic range, vacuum compatibility and tilable modules. This has resulted in a charge integrating detector with three dynamically adjusting gains, a low noise of 55 ENC RMS, readout speeds in excess of 2 kHz, single photon sensitivity down to 2 keV (with a signal to noise ratio of 10) and a dynamic range covering four orders of magnitude at 12 keV. Each JUNGFRAU module consists of eight chips of 256 × 256 pixels, each 75 × 75 μm2 in size. The chips are arranged in 2 × 4 formation and bump-bonded to a single silicon sensor 320 μm thick, resulting in an active area of approximately 4 × 8 cm2 per module. Multi-module vacuum compatible systems comprising up to 16 Mpixels (32 modules) will be used at SwissFEL. The design of SwissFEL and the JUNGFRAU system for the Aramis end station A will be introduced, together with results from early prototypes and a characterisation using the first batch of final JUNGFRAU modules. Plans and first results of the pixel-by-pixel calibration will also be shown. The vacuum compatibility of the JUNGFRAU module is demonstrated for the first time.

  15. Investigating the Inverse Square Law with the Timepix Hybrid Silicon Pixel Detector: A CERN [at] School Demonstration Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whyntie, T.; Parker, B.

    2013-01-01

    The Timepix hybrid silicon pixel detector has been used to investigate the inverse square law of radiation from a point source as a demonstration of the CERN [at] school detector kit capabilities. The experiment described uses a Timepix detector to detect the gamma rays emitted by an [superscript 241]Am radioactive source at a number of different…

  16. Prototypes and system test stands for the Phase 1 upgrade of the CMS pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, S.

    2016-09-01

    The CMS pixel phase-1 upgrade project replaces the current pixel detector with an upgraded system with faster readout electronics during the extended year-end technical stop of 2016/2017. New electronics prototypes for the system have been developed, and tests in a realistic environment for a comprehensive evaluation are needed. A full readout test stand with either the same hardware as used in the current CMS pixel detector or the latest prototypes of upgrade electronics has been built. The setup enables the observation and investigation of a jitter increase in the data line associated with trigger rate increases. This effect is due to the way in which the clock and trigger distribution is implemented in CMS. A new prototype of the electronics with a PLL based on a voltage controlled quartz crystal oscillator (QPLL), which works as jitter filter, in the clock distribution path was produced. With the test stand, it was confirmed that the jitter increase is not seen with the prototype, and also good performance was confirmed at the expected detector operation temperature (-20 °C).

  17. The Belle-II Depfet Pixel Detector at the Superkekb Flavour Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heindl, Stefan

    2012-08-01

    The ongoing upgrade of the asymmetric electron positron collider KEKB also requires extensive detector upgrades to cope with the new design luminosity of 8 · 1035 cm-2 · s-1 · Of critical importance is the new silicon pixel vertex tracker, which will significantly improve the decay vertex resolution, crucial for time dependent CP violation measurements. This new detector will consist of two layers of DEPFET pixel seii8ors very close to the interaction point. These sensors combine both particle detection and amplification of the signal by embedding a field effect transistor into a 75 μm thick fully depleted silicon substrate, providing very high signal to noise ratios and excellent spatial resolution. Using this technology satisfies the given requirements of extremely low material and high radiation tolerance at the new Belle II experiment. The power dissipation due to continuous readout at high rate and spatial constraints also give strict requirements for the mechanical support and cooling of the new detector. We will discuss the overall concept of the pixel vertex tracker, its expected performance and the challenging mechanical integration.

  18. Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) grown thin films for ultra-fine pitch pixel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Härkönen, J.; Ott, J.; Mäkelä, M.; Arsenovich, T.; Gädda, A.; Peltola, T.; Tuovinen, E.; Luukka, P.; Tuominen, E.; Junkes, A.; Niinistö, J.; Ritala, M.

    2016-09-01

    In this report we cover two special applications of Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) thin films to solve these challenges of the very small size pixel detectors. First, we propose to passivate the p-type pixel detector with ALD grown Al2O3 field insulator with a negative oxide charge instead of using the commonly adopted p-stop or p-spray technologies with SiO2, and second, to use plasma-enhanced ALD grown titanium nitride (TiN) bias resistors instead of the punch through biasing structures. Surface passivation properties of Al2O3 field insulator was studied by Photoconductive Decay (PCD) method and our results indicate that after appropriate annealing Al2O3 provides equally low effective surface recombination velocity as thermally oxidized Si/SiO2 interface. Furthermore, with properly designed annealing steps, the TiN thin film resistors can be tuned to have up to several MΩ resistances with a few μm of physical size required in ultra-fine pitch pixel detectors.

  19. A 65 nm CMOS analog processor with zero dead time for future pixel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaioni, L.; Braga, D.; Christian, D. C.; Deptuch, G.; Fahim, F.; Nodari, B.; Ratti, L.; Re, V.; Zimmerman, T.

    2017-02-01

    Next generation pixel chips at the High-Luminosity (HL) LHC will be exposed to extremely high levels of radiation and particle rates. In the so-called Phase II upgrade, ATLAS and CMS will need a completely new tracker detector, complying with the very demanding operating conditions and the delivered luminosity (up to 5×1034 cm-2 s-1 in the next decade). This work is concerned with the design of a synchronous analog processor with zero dead time developed in a 65 nm CMOS technology, conceived for pixel detectors at the HL-LHC experiment upgrades. It includes a low noise, fast charge sensitive amplifier featuring a detector leakage compensation circuit, and a compact, single ended comparator that guarantees very good performance in terms of channel-to-channel dispersion of threshold without needing any pixel-level trimming. A flash ADC is exploited for digital conversion immediately after the charge amplifier. A thorough discussion on the design of the charge amplifier and the comparator is provided along with an exhaustive set of simulation results.

  20. The electro-mechanical integration of the NA62 GigaTracker time tagging pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morel, M.; Kluge, A.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Carassiti, V.; Ceccucci, A.; Daguin, J.; Fiorini, M.; Jarron, P.; Kaplon, J.; Mapelli, A.; Marchetto, F.; Noy, M.; Nuessle, G.; Perktold, L.; Petagna, P.; Riedler, P.

    2010-12-01

    The NA62 GigaTracker is a low mass time tagging hybrid pixel detector operating in a beam with a particle rate of 750 MHz. It consists of three stations with a sensor size of 60 × 27mm2 containing 18000 pixels, each 300 × 300μm2. The active area is connected to a matrix of 2 × 5 pixel ASICs, which time tag the arrival of the particles with a binning of 100 ps. The detector operates in vacuum at -20 to 0°C and the material budget per station must be below 0.5% X0. Due to the high radiation environment of 2 × 1014 1 MeV neutron equivalent cm-2/yr-1 it is planned to exchange the detector modules regularly. The low material budget, cooling requirements and the request for easy module access has driven the electro-mechanical integration of the GigaTracker, which is presented in this paper.

  1. [Reproducibility of dynamic chest radiography with a flat-panel detector - respiratory changes in pixel value].

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Hiroki; Tanaka, Rie; Sanada, Shigeru

    2009-06-20

    Dynamic chest radiography using a flat panel detector (FPD) with a large field of view is expected to be a useful pulmonary functional evaluation method based on the respiratory changes in pixel value. For clinical use as a follow-up and therapeutic evaluation tool, the system must have a high degree of reproducibility in measurements of pixel values. The present study was performed to investigate the reproducibility of respiratory changes in pixel values. Dynamic chest radiographs of five normal subjects and one patient were obtained. Imaging was performed twice in each subject. The slope (X-ray translucency variation) was then calculated from the changes in pixel value from distance lung apex-diaphragm, and the slopes of two sequences were compared. The results showed there were no significant differences in changes in pixel value between the two sequences in all normal subject (5 males, p>0.05). The results indicated that the present method has reproducibility for measuring pulmonary function and also has potential as a tool for follow-up and therapeutic evaluation.

  2. Fully 3D-Integrated Pixel Detectors for X-Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Deptuch, Grzegorz W.; Gabriella, Carini; Enquist, Paul; Grybos, Pawel; Holm, Scott; Lipton, Ronald; Maj, Piotr; Patti, Robert; Siddons, David Peter; Szczygiel, Robert; Yarema, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    The vertically integrated photon imaging chip (VIPIC1) pixel detector is a stack consisting of a 500-μm-thick silicon sensor, a two-tier 34-μm-thick integrated circuit, and a host printed circuit board (PCB). The integrated circuit tiers were bonded using the direct bonding technology with copper, and each tier features 1-μm-diameter through-silicon vias that were used for connections to the sensor on one side, and to the host PCB on the other side. The 80-μm-pixel-pitch sensor was the direct bonding technology with nickel bonded to the integrated circuit. The stack was mounted on the board using Sn–Pb balls placed on a 320-μm pitch, yielding an entirely wire-bond-less structure. The analog front-end features a pulse response peaking at below 250 ns, and the power consumption per pixel is 25 μW. We successful completed the 3-D integration and have reported here. Additionally, all pixels in the matrix of 64 × 64 pixels were responding on well-bonded devices. Correct operation of the sparsified readout, allowing a single 153-ns bunch timing resolution, was confirmed in the tests on a synchrotron beam of 10-keV X-rays. An equivalent noise charge of 36.2 e- rms and a conversion gain of 69.5 μV/e- with 2.6 e- rms and 2.7 μV/e- rms pixel-to-pixel variations, respectively, were measured.

  3. Fully 3D-Integrated Pixel Detectors for X-Rays

    DOE PAGES

    Deptuch, Grzegorz W.; Gabriella, Carini; Enquist, Paul; ...

    2016-01-01

    The vertically integrated photon imaging chip (VIPIC1) pixel detector is a stack consisting of a 500-μm-thick silicon sensor, a two-tier 34-μm-thick integrated circuit, and a host printed circuit board (PCB). The integrated circuit tiers were bonded using the direct bonding technology with copper, and each tier features 1-μm-diameter through-silicon vias that were used for connections to the sensor on one side, and to the host PCB on the other side. The 80-μm-pixel-pitch sensor was the direct bonding technology with nickel bonded to the integrated circuit. The stack was mounted on the board using Sn–Pb balls placed on a 320-μm pitch,more » yielding an entirely wire-bond-less structure. The analog front-end features a pulse response peaking at below 250 ns, and the power consumption per pixel is 25 μW. We successful completed the 3-D integration and have reported here. Additionally, all pixels in the matrix of 64 × 64 pixels were responding on well-bonded devices. Correct operation of the sparsified readout, allowing a single 153-ns bunch timing resolution, was confirmed in the tests on a synchrotron beam of 10-keV X-rays. An equivalent noise charge of 36.2 e- rms and a conversion gain of 69.5 μV/e- with 2.6 e- rms and 2.7 μV/e- rms pixel-to-pixel variations, respectively, were measured.« less

  4. Development of a pixel sensor with fine space-time resolution based on SOI technology for the ILC vertex detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Shun; Togawa, Manabu; Tsuji, Ryoji; Mori, Teppei; Yamada, Miho; Arai, Yasuo; Tsuboyama, Toru; Hanagaki, Kazunori

    2017-02-01

    We have been developing a new monolithic pixel sensor with silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology for the International Linear Collider (ILC) vertex detector system. The SOI monolithic pixel detector is realized using standard CMOS circuits fabricated on a fully depleted sensor layer. The new SOI sensor SOFIST can store both the position and timing information of charged particles in each 20×20 μm2 pixel. The position resolution is further improved by the position weighted with the charges spread to multiple pixels. The pixel also records the hit timing with an embedded time-stamp circuit. The sensor chip has column-parallel analog-to-digital conversion (ADC) circuits and zero-suppression logic for high-speed data readout. We are designing and evaluating some prototype sensor chips for optimizing and minimizing the pixel circuit.

  5. A new data acquisition system for the CMS Phase 1 pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornmayer, A.

    2016-12-01

    A new pixel detector will be installed in the CMS experiment during the extended technical stop of the LHC at the beginning of 2017. The new pixel detector, built from four layers in the barrel region and three layers on each end of the forward region, is equipped with upgraded front-end readout electronics, specifically designed to handle the high particle hit rates created in the LHC environment. The DAQ back-end was entirely redesigned to handle the increased number of readout channels, the higher data rates per channel and the new digital data format. Based entirely on the microTCA standard, new front-end controller (FEC) and front-end driver (FED) cards have been developed, prototyped and produced with custom optical link mezzanines mounted on the FC7 AMC and custom firmware. At the same time as the new detector is being assembled, the DAQ system is set up and its integration into the CMS central DAQ system tested by running the pilot blade detector already installed in CMS. This work describes the DAQ system, integration tests and gives an outline for the activities up to commissioning the final system at CMS in 2017.

  6. Verification of Dosimetry Measurements with Timepix Pixel Detectors for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroupa, M.; Pinsky, L. S.; Idarraga-Munoz, J.; Hoang, S. M.; Semones, E.; Bahadori, A.; Stoffle, N.; Rios, R.; Vykydal, Z.; Jakubek, J.; Pospisil, S.; Turecek, D.; Kitamura, H.

    2014-01-01

    The current capabilities of modern pixel-detector technology has provided the possibility to design a new generation of radiation monitors. Timepix detectors are semiconductor pixel detectors based on a hybrid configuration. As such, the read-out chip can be used with different types and thicknesses of sensors. For space radiation dosimetry applications, Timepix devices with 300 and 500 microns thick silicon sensors have been used by a collaboration between NASA and University of Houston to explore their performance. For that purpose, an extensive evaluation of the response of Timepix for such applications has been performed. Timepix-based devices were tested in many different environments both at ground-based accelerator facilities such as HIMAC (Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba, Japan), and at NSRL (NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, NY), as well as in space on board of the International Space Station (ISS). These tests have included a wide range of the particle types and energies, from protons through iron nuclei. The results have been compared both with other devices and theoretical values. This effort has demonstrated that Timepix-based detectors are exceptionally capable at providing accurate dosimetry measurements in this application as verified by the confirming correspondence with the other accepted techniques.

  7. Three-dimensional cascaded system analysis of a 50 µm pixel pitch wafer-scale CMOS active pixel sensor x-ray detector for digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, C.; Vassiljev, N.; Konstantinidis, A. C.; Speller, R. D.; Kanicki, J.

    2017-03-01

    High-resolution, low-noise x-ray detectors based on the complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensor (APS) technology have been developed and proposed for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). In this study, we evaluated the three-dimensional (3D) imaging performance of a 50 µm pixel pitch CMOS APS x-ray detector named DynAMITe (Dynamic Range Adjustable for Medical Imaging Technology). The two-dimensional (2D) angle-dependent modulation transfer function (MTF), normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were experimentally characterized and modeled using the cascaded system analysis at oblique incident angles up to 30°. The cascaded system model was extended to the 3D spatial frequency space in combination with the filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction method to calculate the 3D and in-plane MTF, NNPS and DQE parameters. The results demonstrate that the beam obliquity blurs the 2D MTF and DQE in the high spatial frequency range. However, this effect can be eliminated after FBP image reconstruction. In addition, impacts of the image acquisition geometry and detector parameters were evaluated using the 3D cascaded system analysis for DBT. The result shows that a wider projection angle range (e.g.  ±30°) improves the low spatial frequency (below 5 mm‑1) performance of the CMOS APS detector. In addition, to maintain a high spatial resolution for DBT, a focal spot size of smaller than 0.3 mm should be used. Theoretical analysis suggests that a pixelated scintillator in combination with the 50 µm pixel pitch CMOS APS detector could further improve the 3D image resolution. Finally, the 3D imaging performance of the CMOS APS and an indirect amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin-film transistor (TFT) passive pixel sensor (PPS) detector was simulated and compared.

  8. Three-dimensional cascaded system analysis of a 50 µm pixel pitch wafer-scale CMOS active pixel sensor x-ray detector for digital breast tomosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, C; Vassiljev, N; Konstantinidis, A C; Speller, R D; Kanicki, J

    2017-03-07

    High-resolution, low-noise x-ray detectors based on the complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensor (APS) technology have been developed and proposed for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). In this study, we evaluated the three-dimensional (3D) imaging performance of a 50 µm pixel pitch CMOS APS x-ray detector named DynAMITe (Dynamic Range Adjustable for Medical Imaging Technology). The two-dimensional (2D) angle-dependent modulation transfer function (MTF), normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were experimentally characterized and modeled using the cascaded system analysis at oblique incident angles up to 30°. The cascaded system model was extended to the 3D spatial frequency space in combination with the filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction method to calculate the 3D and in-plane MTF, NNPS and DQE parameters. The results demonstrate that the beam obliquity blurs the 2D MTF and DQE in the high spatial frequency range. However, this effect can be eliminated after FBP image reconstruction. In addition, impacts of the image acquisition geometry and detector parameters were evaluated using the 3D cascaded system analysis for DBT. The result shows that a wider projection angle range (e.g.  ±30°) improves the low spatial frequency (below 5 mm(-1)) performance of the CMOS APS detector. In addition, to maintain a high spatial resolution for DBT, a focal spot size of smaller than 0.3 mm should be used. Theoretical analysis suggests that a pixelated scintillator in combination with the 50 µm pixel pitch CMOS APS detector could further improve the 3D image resolution. Finally, the 3D imaging performance of the CMOS APS and an indirect amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin-film transistor (TFT) passive pixel sensor (PPS) detector was simulated and compared.

  9. Charge sharing in common-grid pixelated CdZnTe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae Cheon; Anderson, Stephen E.; Kaye, Willy; Zhang, Feng; Zhu, Yuefeng; Kaye, Sonal Joshi; He, Zhong

    2011-10-01

    The charge sharing effect in pixelated CdZnTe (CZT) detectors with a common anode steering grid has been studied. The impact on energy resolution of weighting potential cross-talk and ballistic deficit due to cathode signal shaping has been investigated. A detailed system modeling package considering charge induction, electronic noise, pulse shaping, and ASIC triggering procedures has been developed to study the characteristics of common-grid CZT detectors coupled to the VAS_UM/TAT4 ASIC. Besides an actual common-grid CZT detector coupled to VAS_UM/TAT4 ASIC, a prototype digital read-out system has been developed to better understand the nature of the charge sharing effect.

  10. Improving detector spatial resolution using pixelated scintillators with a barrier rib structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Langechuan; Lu, Minghui; Cao, Wanqing; Peng, Luke; Chen, Arthur

    2016-03-01

    Indirect conversion flat panel detectors (FPDs) based on amorphous silicon (a-Si) technology are widely used in digital X-ray imaging. In such FPDs a scintillator layer is used for converting X-rays into visible light photons. However, the lateral spread of these photons inside the scintillator layer reduces spatial resolution of the FPD. In this study, FPDs incorporating pixelated scintillators with a barrier rib structure were developed to limit lateral spread of light photons thereby improving spatial resolution. For the pixelated scintillator, a two-dimensional barrier rib structure was first manufactured on a substrate layer, coated with reflective materials, and filled to the rim with the scintillating material of gadolinium oxysulfide (GOS). Several scintillator samples were fabricated, with pitch size varying from 160 to 280 μm and rib height from 200 to 280 μm. The samples were directly coupled to an a-Si flat panel photodiode array with a pitch of 200 μm to convert optical photons to electronic signals. With the pixelated scintillator, the detector modulation transfer function was shown to improve significantly (by 94% at 2 cycle/mm) compared to a detector using an unstructured GOS layer. However, the prototype does show lower sensitivity due to the decrease in scintillator fill factor. The preliminary results demonstrated the feasibility of using the barrier-rib structure to improve the spatial resolution of FPDs. Such an improvement would greatly benefit nondestructive testing applications where the spatial resolution is the most important parameter. Further investigation will focus on improving the detector sensitivity and exploring its medical applications.

  11. Characterization of a pixelated CdTe Timepix detector operated in ToT mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billoud, T.; Leroy, C.; Papadatos, C.; Pichotka, M.; Pospisil, S.; Roux, J. S.

    2017-01-01

    A 1 mm thick CdTe sensor bump-bonded to a Timepix readout chip operating in Time-over-Threshold (ToT) mode has been characterized in view of possible applications in particle and medical physics. The CdTe sensor layer was segmented into 256 × 256 pixels, with a pixel pitch of 55 μm. This CdTe Timepix device, of ohmic contact type, has been exposed to alpha-particles and photons from an 241Am source, photons from a 137Cs source, and protons of different energies (0.8–10 MeV) delivered by the University of Montreal Tandem Accelerator. The device was irradiated on the negatively biased backside electrode. An X-ray per-pixel calibration commonly used for this type of detector was done and its accuracy and resolution were assessed and compared to those of a 300 μm thick silicon Timepix device. The electron mobility-lifetime product (μeτe) of CdTe for protons of low energy has been obtained from the Hecht equation. Possible polarization effects have been also investigated. Finally, information about the homogeneity of the detector was obtained from X-ray irradiation.

  12. Response of a hybrid pixel detector (MEDIPIX3) to different radiation sources for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chumacero, E. Miguel; De Celis Alonso, B.; Martínez Hernández, M. I.; Vargas, G.; Moreno Barbosa, F.; Moreno Barbosa, E.

    2014-11-01

    The development in semiconductor CMOS technology has enabled the creation of sensitive detectors for a wide range of ionizing radiation. These devices are suitable for photon counting and can be used in imaging and tomography X-ray diagnostics. The Medipix[1] radiation detection system is a hybrid silicon pixel chip developed for particle tracking applications in High Energy Physics. Its exceptional features (high spatial and energy resolution, embedded ultra fast readout, different operation modes, etc.) make the Medipix an attractive device for applications in medical imaging. In this work the energy characterization of a third-generation Medipix chip (Medipix3) coupled to a silicon sensor is presented. We used different radiation sources (strontium 90, iron 55 and americium 241) to obtain the response curve of the hybrid detector as a function of energy. We also studied the contrast of the Medipix as a measure of pixel noise. Finally we studied the response to fluorescence X rays from different target materials (In, Pd and Cd) for the two data acquisition modes of the chip; single pixel mode and charge summing mode.

  13. Response of a hybrid pixel detector (MEDIPIX3) to different radiation sources for medical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chumacero, E. Miguel; De Celis Alonso, B.; Martínez Hernández, M. I.; Vargas, G.; Moreno Barbosa, E.; Moreno Barbosa, F.

    2014-11-07

    The development in semiconductor CMOS technology has enabled the creation of sensitive detectors for a wide range of ionizing radiation. These devices are suitable for photon counting and can be used in imaging and tomography X-ray diagnostics. The Medipix[1] radiation detection system is a hybrid silicon pixel chip developed for particle tracking applications in High Energy Physics. Its exceptional features (high spatial and energy resolution, embedded ultra fast readout, different operation modes, etc.) make the Medipix an attractive device for applications in medical imaging. In this work the energy characterization of a third-generation Medipix chip (Medipix3) coupled to a silicon sensor is presented. We used different radiation sources (strontium 90, iron 55 and americium 241) to obtain the response curve of the hybrid detector as a function of energy. We also studied the contrast of the Medipix as a measure of pixel noise. Finally we studied the response to fluorescence X rays from different target materials (In, Pd and Cd) for the two data acquisition modes of the chip; single pixel mode and charge summing mode.

  14. New concept of a submillimetric pixellated Silicon detector for intracerebral application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit, M.; Märk, J.; Weiss, P.; Benoit, D.; Clemens, J. C.; Fougeron, D.; Janvier, B.; Jevaud, M.; Karkar, S.; Menouni, M.; Pain, F.; Pinot, L.; Morel, C.; Laniece, P.

    2011-12-01

    A new beta+ radiosensitive microprobe implantable in rodent brain dedicated to in vivo and autonomous measurements of local time activity curves of beta radiotracers in a volume of brain tissue of a few mm3 has been developed recently. This project expands the concept of the previously designed beta microprobe, which has been validated extensively in neurobiological experiments performed on anesthetized animals. Due to its limitations considering recordings on awake and freely moving animals, we have proposed to develop a wireless setup that can be worn by an animal without constraining its movements. To that aim, we have chosen a highly beta sensitive Silicon-based detector to devise a compact pixellated probe. Miniaturized wireless electronics is used to read-out and transfer the measurement data. Initial Monte-Carlo simulations showed that high resistive Silicon pixels are appropriate for this purpose, with their dimensions to be adapted to our specific signals. More precisely, we demonstrated that 200 μm thick pixels with an area of 200 μm×500 μm are optimized in terms of beta+sensitivity versus relative transparency to the gamma background. Based on this theoretical study, we now present the development of the novel sensor, including the system simulations with technology computer-assisted design (TCAD) to investigate specific configurations of guard rings and their potential to increase the electrical isolation and stabilization of the pixel, as well as the corresponding physical tests to validate the particular geometries of this new sensor.

  15. Development of an X-ray imaging system with SOI pixel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Ryutaro; Arai, Yasuo; Miyoshi, Toshinobu; Hirano, Keiichi; Kishimoto, Shunji; Hashimoto, Ryo

    2016-09-01

    An X-ray imaging system employing pixel sensors in silicon-on-insulator technology is currently under development. The system consists of an SOI pixel detector (INTPIX4) and a DAQ system based on a multi-purpose readout board (SEABAS2). To correct a bottleneck in the total throughput of the DAQ of the first prototype, parallel processing of the data taking and storing processes and a FIFO buffer were implemented for the new DAQ release. Due to these upgrades, the DAQ throughput was improved from 6 Hz (41 Mbps) to 90 Hz (613 Mbps). The first X-ray imaging system with the new DAQ software release was tested using 33.3 keV and 9.5 keV mono X-rays for three-dimensional computerized tomography. The results of these tests are presented.

  16. Front-end electronics for DEPFET pixel detectors at SuperBelle (BELLE II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Hans; Depfet Collaboration

    2010-05-01

    This article gives an overview of the front-end electronics development for the DEPFET pixel vertex detector at the Super KEK-B experiment (BELLE II). The planned upgrade of the KEK-B factory will lead to a peak luminosity of 8×1035 cm-2 s-1. This increase in luminosity (×50 compared to the existing experiment) will make high demands on the performance of the vertex detector. The proposed two layer vertex detector consists of 'all-silicon' modules: the read-out and control ASICs will be bump bonded on the rigid edges of the DEPFET substrate whereas in the region of the active pixel matrix the substrate will be thinned down to 50 μm. The front-end electronics is subdivided in three different ASIC types: one chip will provide up to 20 V output swing for the control voltages of the DEPFET matrix (SWITCHER), the current signals are being digitized by a multichannel ADC chip (DCD) and the processing of the digital data and module control functionality is implemented in a data handling chip (DHP). An overview of the module concept and the status of the developments including results of current prototype chips will be given.

  17. Impact of the Belle II pixel detector on the analysis of CP-violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abudinén, F.

    2017-03-01

    The new asymmetric electron positron collider SuperKEKB in Tsukuba, Japan, is currently being commissioned. With a design luminosity of 8 · 1035 cm‑2 s‑1, leading ultimately to an integrated luminosity of about 50 ab‑1, it will overtake by almost two orders of magnitude the record integrated luminosity reached by its predecessor KEKB. With the upgrade, the beam energy asymmetry will be reduced resulting in a lower boost. Thus, the increase in luminosity and the reduction of the boost set stringent requirements on the performance of the Belle II detector, currently under construction, in order to cope with the expected large physics rates. Consisting of two layers mounted at 14 mm and 22 mm radius from the interaction point, the new Belle II pixel vertex detector based on DEPFET technology will provide the necessary three dimensional high precision position measurements of the trajectories of charged particles. This will allow the precise reconstruction of short lived particle vertices. The physics performance of the Belle II pixel vertex detector and its impact in the reduction of experimental uncertainties will be discussed focusing on the measurement of the CP-violating parameters in B-meson decay.

  18. Studies of the possibility to use Gas Pixel Detector as a fast trigger tracking device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinev, N.; Bashindzhagyan, G.; Korotkova, N.; Romaniouk, A.; Tikhomirov, V.

    2016-02-01

    Gas Pixel Detector (GPD) technology offers new possibilities, which make them very attractive for application in existing and future accelerator experiments and beyond. GPDs combine advantages of silicon and gaseous detectors. They can be produced radiation hard and with low power consumption using relatively cheap technology. Low capacitance of the individual pixel channel allows us to obtain a large signal to noise ratio. Using a time projection method for GPD readout one obtains 3D track image with precise coordinate (31 µm) and angular information (0.40°). This feature would allow us to achieve performance of one GPD layer equal to a few layers of silicon detectors. Implementation of a fast readout and data processing at the front-end level allows one to reconstruct a track segment in less than 1 μs, and to use this information for the first level trigger generation. The relevant algorithms of data acquisition and analysis are described and the results of simulations are presented in this paper.

  19. Integration of front-end electronics with GaAs pixel detectors: Experimental and feasibility analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bertuccio, G.; Longoni, A.; De Geronimo, G.; Canali, C.; Lanzieri, C.; Nava, F.

    1999-08-01

    This work aims to study the feasibility of the integration, on the same chip, of GaAs pixel detectors and frontend electronics employing GaAs metal semiconductor FET`s (MESFET`s) or high electron mobility transistors (HEMT`s). The interest of fully integrated GaAs systems lies in X and {gamma}-ray spectroscopy and Imaging for scientific, industrial, and medical applications. The system design criteria and the prediction of the performance have been derived on the basis of recent experimental results on semi-insulating GaAs pixel detectors. Measurements of the relevant parameters of GaAs FET`s suitable for the stringent requirements of a specroscopy-grade frontend amplifier are analyzed. It is shown that an optimized GaAs integrated system can reach an electronic noise level below 100 electrons rms (<1 keV FWHM) even at room temperature. Some open problems regarding the detector-electronics integration are highlighted and discussed.

  20. Evaluation of Compton gamma camera prototype based on pixelated CdTe detectors.

    PubMed

    Calderón, Y; Chmeissani, M; Kolstein, M; De Lorenzo, G

    2014-06-01

    A proposed Compton camera prototype based on pixelated CdTe is simulated and evaluated in order to establish its feasibility and expected performance in real laboratory tests. The system is based on module units containing a 2×4 array of square CdTe detectors of 10×10 mm(2) area and 2 mm thickness. The detectors are pixelated and stacked forming a 3D detector with voxel sizes of 2 × 1 × 2 mm(3). The camera performance is simulated with Geant4-based Architecture for Medicine-Oriented Simulations(GAMOS) and the Origin Ensemble(OE) algorithm is used for the image reconstruction. The simulation shows that the camera can operate with up to 10(4) Bq source activities with equal efficiency and is completely saturated at 10(9) Bq. The efficiency of the system is evaluated using a simulated (18)F point source phantom in the center of the Field-of-View (FOV) achieving an intrinsic efficiency of 0.4 counts per second per kilobecquerel. The spatial resolution measured from the point spread function (PSF) shows a FWHM of 1.5 mm along the direction perpendicular to the scatterer, making it possible to distinguish two points at 3 mm separation with a peak-to-valley ratio of 8.

  1. Evaluation of Compton gamma camera prototype based on pixelated CdTe detectors

    PubMed Central

    Calderón, Y.; Chmeissani, M.; Kolstein, M.; De Lorenzo, G.

    2014-01-01

    A proposed Compton camera prototype based on pixelated CdTe is simulated and evaluated in order to establish its feasibility and expected performance in real laboratory tests. The system is based on module units containing a 2×4 array of square CdTe detectors of 10×10 mm2 area and 2 mm thickness. The detectors are pixelated and stacked forming a 3D detector with voxel sizes of 2 × 1 × 2 mm3. The camera performance is simulated with Geant4-based Architecture for Medicine-Oriented Simulations(GAMOS) and the Origin Ensemble(OE) algorithm is used for the image reconstruction. The simulation shows that the camera can operate with up to 104 Bq source activities with equal efficiency and is completely saturated at 109 Bq. The efficiency of the system is evaluated using a simulated 18F point source phantom in the center of the Field-of-View (FOV) achieving an intrinsic efficiency of 0.4 counts per second per kilobecquerel. The spatial resolution measured from the point spread function (PSF) shows a FWHM of 1.5 mm along the direction perpendicular to the scatterer, making it possible to distinguish two points at 3 mm separation with a peak-to-valley ratio of 8. PMID:24932209

  2. Spectral and polarimetric characterization of the Gas Pixel Detector filled with dimethyl ether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muleri, F.; Soffitta, P.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Brez, A.; Costa, E.; Fabiani, S.; Krummenacher, F.; Latronico, L.; Lazzarotto, F.; Minuti, M.; Pinchera, M.; Rubini, A.; Sgró, C.; Spandre, G.

    2010-08-01

    The Gas Pixel Detector belongs to the very limited class of gas detectors optimized for the measurement of X-ray polarization in the emission of astrophysical sources. The choice of the mixture in which X-ray photons are absorbed and photoelectrons propagate, deeply affects both the energy range of the instrument and its performance in terms of gain, track dimension and ultimately, polarimetric sensitivity. Here we present the characterization of the Gas Pixel Detector with a 1 cm thick cell filled with dimethyl ether (DME) at 0.79 atm, selected among other mixtures for the very low diffusion coefficient. Almost completely polarized and monochromatic photons were produced at the calibration facility built at INAF/IASF-Rome exploiting Bragg diffraction at nearly 45°. For the first time ever, we measured the modulation factor and the spectral capabilities of the instrument at energies as low as 2.0 keV, but also at 2.6, 3.7, 4.0, 5.2 and 7.8 keV. These measurements cover almost completely the energy range of the instrument and allows to compare the sensitivity achieved with that of the standard mixture, composed of helium and DME.

  3. Energy calibration and gain correction of pixelated spectroscopic x-ray detectors using correlation optimised warping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egan, C. K.; Scuffham, J. W.; Veale, M. C.; Wilson, M. D.; Seller, P.; Cernik, R. J.

    2017-01-01

    We describe the implementation of a reliable, robust and flexible gain correction and energy calibration algorithm for pixelated spectroscopic x-ray detectors. This algorithm uses a data processing method known as correlation optimised warping which aligns shifted datasets by means of a segmental linear stretching and compression of the spectral data in order to best correlate with a reference spectrum. We found the algorithm to be very robust against low-count spectroscopy, and was reliable in a range of different spectroscopic applications. Analysis of the integrated spectrum over all pixels for a Cerium K-alpha x-ray emission (at 34.72 keV) yielded a peak width of 2.45 keV before alignment and 1.11 keV after alignment. This compares favourably with the best in class pixel peak width of 0.76 keV and the mean peak width for all pixels of 1.00 keV. We also found the algorithm to be more user friendly than other peak-search algorithms because there is less external input. A key advantage of this algorithm is that it requires no prior knowledge of the input spectral characteristics, shape or quality of the data. This therefore lends itself to being useful for in-line processing and potentially removes the need for a separate calibration standard (e.g. a radioactive source). This algorithm can be used for any system that simultaneously collects large numbers of spectral data—including multi-element detectors.

  4. Optimizing Pinhole and Parallel Hole Collimation for Scintimammography With Compact Pixellated Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Mark F. Smith; Stan Majewski; Andrew G. Weisenberger

    2002-11-01

    The relative resolution and sensitivity advantages of pinhole and parallel hole collimators for planar scintimammography with compact, pixellated gamma detectors were investigated using analytic models. Collimator design was studied as follows. A desired object resolution was specified for a pixellated detector with a given crystal size and intrinsic spatial resolution and for a given object-to- collimator distance. Using analytic formulas, pinhole and parallel hole collimator parameters were calculated that satisfy this object resolution with optimal geometric sensitivity. Analyses were performed for 15 cm x 20 cm field of view detectors with crystal elements 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 mm on a side and 140 keV incident photons. The sensitivity for a given object resolution was greater for pinhole collimation at smaller distances, as expected. The object distance at which the pinhole and parallel hole sensitivity curves cross each other is important. The crossover distances increased with larger crystal size for a constant object resolution and increased as the desired object resolution decreases for a constant crystal size. For example, for 4 mm object resolution and a pinhole collimator with focal length 13 cm, these distances were 5.5 cm, 6.5 cm and 8 cm for the 1 mm, 2 mm and 3 mm crystal detectors, respectively. The results suggest a strategy of parallel hole collimation for whole breast imaging and pinhole collimation for imaging focal uptake. This could be accomplished with a dual detector system with a different collimator type on each head or a single head system equipped with two collimators and a rapid switching mechanism.

  5. 3-D Spatial Resolution of 350 μm Pitch Pixelated CdZnTe Detectors for Imaging Applications

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yongzhi; Chen, Ximeng; Wu, Heyu; Komarov, Sergey; Garson, Alfred; Li, Qiang; Guo, Qingzhen; Krawczynski, Henric; Meng, Ling-Jian; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    We are currently investigating the feasibility of using highly pixelated Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe) detectors for sub-500 μm resolution PET imaging applications. A 20 mm × 20 mm × 5 mm CdZnTe substrate was fabricated with 350 μm pitch pixels (250 μm anode pixels with 100 μm gap) and coplanar cathode. Charge sharing among the pixels of a 350 μm pitch detector was studied using collimated 122 keV and 511 keV gamma ray sources. For a 350 μm pitch CdZnTe detector, scatter plots of the charge signal of two neighboring pixels clearly show more charge sharing when the collimated beam hits the gap between adjacent pixels. Using collimated Co-57 and Ge-68 sources, we measured the count profiles and estimated the intrinsic spatial resolution of 350 μm pitch detector biased at −1000 V. Depth of interaction was analyzed based on two methods, i.e., cathode/anode ratio and electron drift time, in both 122 keV and 511 keV measurements. For single-pixel photopeak events, a linear correlation between cathode/anode ratio and electron drift time was shown, which would be useful for estimating the DOI information and preserving image resolution in CdZnTe PET imaging applications. PMID:28250476

  6. Development of an Indium bump bond process for silicon pixel detectors at PSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broennimann, Ch.; Glaus, F.; Gobrecht, J.; Heising, S.; Horisberger, M.; Horisberger, R.; Kästli, H. C.; Lehmann, J.; Rohe, T.; Streuli, S.

    2006-09-01

    The hybrid pixel detectors used in the high-energy physics experiments currently under construction use a vertical connection technique, the so-called bump bonding. As the pitch below 100 μm, required in these applications, cannot be fulfilled with standard industrial processes (e.g. the IBM C4 process), an in-house bump bond process using reflowed indium bumps was developed at PSI as part of the R&D for the CMS-pixel detector. The bump deposition on the sensor is performed in two subsequent lift-off steps. As the first photolithographic step a thin under bump metalization (UBM) is sputtered onto bump pads. It is wettable by indium and defines the diameter of the bump. The indium is evaporated via a second photolithographic step with larger openings and is reflowed afterwards. The height of the balls is defined by the volume of the indium. On the readout chip only one photolithographic step is carried out to deposit the UBM and a thin indium layer for better adhesion. After mating both parts a second reflow is performed for self-alignment and obtaining high mechanical strength. For the placement of the chips a manual and an automatic machine were constructed. The former is very flexible in handling different chip and module geometries but has a limited throughput while the latter features a much higher grade of automatization and is therefore much more suited for producing hundreds of modules with a well-defined geometry. The reliability of this process was proven by the successful construction of the PILATUS detector. The construction of PILATUS 6M (60 modules) and the CMS pixel barrel (roughly 800 modules) has started in early 2006.

  7. High rate particle tracking and ultra-fast timing with a thin hybrid silicon pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorini, M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Carassiti, V.; Ceccucci, A.; Cortina Gil, E.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Dellacasa, G.; Garbolino, S.; Jarron, P.; Kaplon, J.; Kluge, A.; Marchetto, F.; Mapelli, A.; Martin, E.; Mazza, G.; Morel, M.; Noy, M.; Nuessle, G.; Perktold, L.; Petagna, P.; Petrucci, F.; Poltorak, K.; Riedler, P.; Rivetti, A.; Statera, M.; Velghe, B.

    2013-08-01

    The Gigatracker (GTK) is a hybrid silicon pixel detector designed for the NA62 experiment at CERN. The beam spectrometer, made of three GTK stations, has to sustain high and non-uniform particle rate (∼ 1 GHz in total) and measure momentum and angles of each beam track with a combined time resolution of 150 ps. In order to reduce multiple scattering and hadronic interactions of beam particles, the material budget of a single GTK station has been fixed to 0.5% X0. The expected fluence for 100 days of running is 2 ×1014 1 MeV neq /cm2, comparable to the one foreseen in the inner trackers of LHC detectors during 10 years of operation. To comply with these requirements, an efficient and very low-mass (< 0.15 %X0) cooling system is being constructed, using a novel microchannel cooling silicon plate. Two complementary read-out architectures have been produced as small-scale prototypes: one is based on a Time-over-Threshold circuit followed by a TDC shared by a group of pixels, while the other makes use of a constant-fraction discriminator followed by an on-pixel TDC. The read-out ASICs are produced in 130 nm IBM CMOS technology and will be thinned down to 100 μm or less. An overview of the Gigatracker detector system will be presented. Experimental results from laboratory and beam tests of prototype bump-bonded assemblies will be described as well. These results show a time resolution of about 170 ps for single hits from minimum ionizing particles, using 200 μm thick silicon sensors.

  8. Assembly and test of the gas pixel detector for X-ray polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Feng, H.; Muleri, F.; Bellazzini, R.; Minuti, M.; Soffitta, P.; Brez, A.; Spandre, G.; Pinchera, M.; Sgró, C.; Baldini, L.; She, R.; Costa, E.

    2015-12-01

    The gas pixel detector (GPD) dedicated for photoelectric X-ray polarimetry is selected as the focal plane detector for the ESA medium-class mission concept X-ray Imaging and Polarimetry Explorer (XIPE). Here we show the design, assembly, and preliminary test results of a small GPD for the purpose of gas mixture optimization needed for the phase A study of XIPE. The detector is assembled in house at Tsinghua University following a design by the INFN-Pisa group. The improved detector design results in a good uniformity for the electric field. Filled with pure dimethyl ether (DME) at 0.8 atm, the measured energy resolution is 18% at 6 keV and inversely scales with the square root of the X-ray energy. The measured modulation factor is well consistent with that from simulation, up to ~0.6 above 6 keV. The residual modulation is found to be 0.30 ± 0.15 % at 6 keV for the whole sensitive area, which can be translated into a systematic error of less than 1% for polarization measurement at a confidence level of 99%. The position resolution of the detector is about 80 μm in FWHM, consistent with previous studies and sufficient for XIPE requirements.

  9. Material specific X-ray imaging using an energy-dispersive pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egan, Christopher K.; Wilson, Matthew D.; Veale, Matthew C.; Seller, Paul; Jacques, Simon D. M.; Cernik, Robert J.

    2014-04-01

    By imaging the X-ray spectral properties or ‘colours’ we have shown how material specific imaging can be performed. Using a pixelated energy-dispersive X-ray detector we record the absorbed and emitted hard X-radiation and measure the energy (colour) and intensity of the photons. Using this technology, we are not only able to obtain attenuation contrast but also to image chemical (elemental) variations inside objects, potentially opening up a very wide range of applications from materials science to medical diagnostics.

  10. Nanopillar optical antenna nBn detectors for subwavelength infrared pixels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Chung Hong; Senanayake, Pradeep; Lee, Wook-Jae; Farrell, Alan; Hsieh, Nick; Huffaker, Diana L.

    2015-06-01

    The size, weight and power (SWaP) of state of the art infrared focal plane arrays are limited by the pixel size approaching the diffraction limit. We investigate a novel detector architecture which allows improvements in detectivity by shrinking the absorber volume while maintaining high quantum efficiency and wide field of view (FOV). It has been previously shown that the Nanopillar Optical Antenna (NOA) utilizes 3D plasmonic modes to funnel light into a subwavelength nanopillar absorber. We show detailed electro-optical simulations for the NOA-nBn architecture for overcoming generation recombination current with suitable surface passivation to achieve background limited infrared performance.

  11. Characterization of a module with pixelated CdTe detectors for possible PET, PEM and compton camera applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariño-Estrada, G.; Chmeissani, M.; de Lorenzo, G.; Puigdengoles, C.; Martínez, R.; Cabruja, E.

    2014-05-01

    We present the measurement of the energy resolution and the impact of charge sharing for a pixel CdTe detector. This detector will be used in a novel conceptual design for diagnostic systems in the field of nuclear medicine such as positron emission tomography (PET), positron emission mammography (PEM) and Compton camera. The detector dimensions are 10 mm × 10 mm × 2 mm and with a pixel pitch of 1 mm × 1 mm. The pixel CdTe detector is a Schottky diode and it was tested at a bias of -1000 V. The VATAGP7.1 frontend ASIC was used for the readout of the pixel detector and the corresponding single channel electronic noise was found to be σ < 2 keV for all the pixels. We have achieved an energy resolution, FWHM/Epeak, of 7.1%, 4.5% and 0.98% for 59.5, 122 and 511 keV respectively. The study of the charge sharing shows that 16% of the events deposit part of their energy in the adjacent pixel.

  12. Hybrid pixel-waveform CdTe/CZT detector for use in an ultrahigh resolution MRI compatible SPECT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Liang; Meng, Ling-Jian

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we will present a new small pixel CdTe/CZT detector for sub-500 μm resolution SPECT imaging application inside MR scanner based on a recently developed hybrid pixel-waveform (HPWF) readout circuitry. The HPWF readout system consists of a 2-D multi-pixel circuitry attached to the anode pixels to provide the X-Y positions of interactions, and a high-speed digitizer to read out the pulse-waveform induced on the cathode. The digitized cathode waveform could provide energy deposition information, precise timing and depth-of-interaction information for gamma ray interactions. Several attractive features with this HPWF detector system will be discussed in this paper. To demonstrate the performance, we constructed several prototype HPWF detectors with pixelated CZT and CdTe detectors of 2-5 mm thicknesses, connected to a prototype readout system consisting of energy-resolved photon-counting ASIC for readout anode pixels and an Agilent high-speed digitizer for digitizing the cathode signals. The performances of these detectors based on HPWF are discussed in this paper.

  13. Hybrid pixel-waveform CdTe/CZT detector for use in an ultrahigh resolution MRI compatible SPECT system.

    PubMed

    Cai, Liang; Meng, Ling-Jian

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we will present a new small pixel CdTe/CZT detector for sub-500 μm resolution SPECT imaging application inside MR scanner based on a recently developed hybrid pixel-waveform (HPWF) readout circuitry. The HPWF readout system consists of a 2-D multi-pixel circuitry attached to the anode pixels to provide the X-Y positions of interactions, and a high-speed digitizer to read out the pulse-waveform induced on the cathode. The digitized cathode waveform could provide energy deposition information, precise timing and depth-of-interaction information for gamma ray interactions. Several attractive features with this HPWF detector system will be discussed in this paper. To demonstrate the performance, we constructed several prototype HPWF detectors with pixelated CZT and CdTe detectors of 2-5 mm thicknesses, connected to a prototype readout system consisting of energy-resolved photon-counting ASIC for readout anode pixels and an Agilent high-speed digitizer for digitizing the cathode signals. The performances of these detectors based on HPWF are discussed in this paper.

  14. Hybrid pixel-waveform CdTe/CZT detector for use in an ultrahigh resolution MRI compatible SPECT system

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Liang; Meng, Ling-Jian

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we will present a new small pixel CdTe/CZT detector for sub-500 μm resolution SPECT imaging application inside MR scanner based on a recently developed hybrid pixel-waveform (HPWF) readout circuitry. The HPWF readout system consists of a 2-D multi-pixel circuitry attached to the anode pixels to provide the X–Y positions of interactions, and a high-speed digitizer to read out the pulse-waveform induced on the cathode. The digitized cathode waveform could provide energy deposition information, precise timing and depth-of-interaction information for gamma ray interactions. Several attractive features with this HPWF detector system will be discussed in this paper. To demonstrate the performance, we constructed several prototype HPWF detectors with pixelated CZT and CdTe detectors of 2–5 mm thicknesses, connected to a prototype readout system consisting of energy-resolved photon-counting ASIC for readout anode pixels and an Agilent high-speed digitizer for digitizing the cathode signals. The performances of these detectors based on HPWF are discussed in this paper. PMID:24371365

  15. Direct tests of a pixelated microchannel plate as the active element of a shower maximum detector

    DOE PAGES

    Apresyan, A.; Los, S.; Pena, C.; ...

    2016-05-07

    One possibility to make a fast and radiation resistant shower maximum detector is to use a secondary emitter as an active element. We report our studies of microchannel plate photomultipliers (MCPs) as the active element of a shower-maximum detector. We present test beam results obtained using Photonis XP85011 to detect secondary particles of an electromagnetic shower. We focus on the use of the multiple pixels on the Photonis MCP in order to find a transverse two-dimensional shower distribution. A spatial resolution of 0.8 mm was obtained with an 8 GeV electron beam. As a result, a method for measuring themore » arrival time resolution for electromagnetic showers is presented, and we show that time resolution better than 40 ps can be achieved.« less

  16. Direct tests of a pixelated microchannel plate as the active element of a shower maximum detector

    SciTech Connect

    Apresyan, A.; Los, S.; Pena, C.; Presutti, F.; Ronzhin, A.; Spiropulu, M.; Xie, S.

    2016-05-07

    One possibility to make a fast and radiation resistant shower maximum detector is to use a secondary emitter as an active element. We report our studies of microchannel plate photomultipliers (MCPs) as the active element of a shower-maximum detector. We present test beam results obtained using Photonis XP85011 to detect secondary particles of an electromagnetic shower. We focus on the use of the multiple pixels on the Photonis MCP in order to find a transverse two-dimensional shower distribution. A spatial resolution of 0.8 mm was obtained with an 8 GeV electron beam. As a result, a method for measuring the arrival time resolution for electromagnetic showers is presented, and we show that time resolution better than 40 ps can be achieved.

  17. Development of a Cost-Effective Modular Pixelated NaI(Tl) Detector for Clinical SPECT Applications

    PubMed Central

    Rozler, Mike; Liang, Haoning; Chang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    A new pixelated detector for high-resolution clinical SPECT applications was designed and tested. The modular detector is based on a scintillator block comprised of 2.75×2.75×10 mm3 NaI(Tl) pixels and decoded by an array of 51 mm diameter single-anode PMTs. Several configurations, utilizing two types of PMTs, were evaluated using a collimated beam source to measure positioning accuracy directly. Good pixel separation was observed, with correct pixel identification ranging from 60 to 72% averaged over the entire area of the modules, depending on the PMT type and configuration. This translates to a significant improvement in positioning accuracy compared to continuous slab detectors of the same thickness, along with effective reduction of “dead” space at the edges. The observed 10% average energy resolution compares well to continuous slab detectors. The combined performance demonstrates the suitability of pixelated detectors decoded with a relatively small number of medium-sized PMTs as a cost-effective approach for high resolution clinical SPECT applications, in particular those involving curved detector geometries. PMID:24146436

  18. Radiation tolerance of prototype BTeV pixel detector readout chips

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriele Chiodini et al.

    2002-07-12

    High energy and nuclear physics experiments need tracking devices with increasing spatial precision and readout speed in the face of ever-higher track densities and increased radiation environments. The new generation of hybrid pixel detectors (arrays of silicon diodes bump bonded to arrays of front-end electronic cells) is the state of the art technology able to meet these challenges. We report on irradiation studies performed on BTeV pixel readout chip prototypes exposed to a 200 MeV proton beam at Indiana University Cyclotron Facility. Prototype pixel readout chip preFPIX2 has been developed at Fermilab for collider experiments and implemented in standard 0.25 micron CMOS technology following radiation tolerant design rules. The tests confirmed the radiation tolerance of the chip design to proton total dose up to 87 MRad. In addition, non destructive radiation-induced single event upsets have been observed in on-chip static registers and the single bit upset cross section has been extensively measured.

  19. The NA62 Gigatracker: Detector properties and pixel read-out architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorini, M.; Carassiti, V.; Ceccucci, A.; Cortina, E.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Dellacasa, G.; Jarron, P.; Kaplon, J.; Kluge, A.; Marchetto, F.; Martin, E.; Martoiu, S.; Mazza, G.; Noy, M.; Petrucci, F.; Riedler, P.; Rivetti, A.; Tiuraniemi, S.

    2010-12-01

    The beam spectrometer of the NA62 experiment, named Gigatracker, has to perform single track reconstruction with unprecedented time resolution (150 ps rms) in a harsh radiation environment. To meet these requirements, and in order to reduce material budget to a minimum, three hybrid silicon pixel detector stations will be installed in vacuum. An adequate strategy to compensate for the discriminator time-walk must be implemented and R&D investigating two different options is ongoing. Two read-out chip prototypes have been designed in order to compare their performance: one approach is based on the use of a constant-fraction discriminator followed by an on-pixel TDC, while the other one is based on the use of a time-over-threshold circuit followed by a TDC shared by a group of pixels. This paper describes the Gigatracker system, presents the global architectures of both read-out ASICs and reviews the current status of the R&D project.

  20. Multiple-image encryption scheme with a single-pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Sheng; Liu, Xuemei; Zhou, Xin; Li, Zhongyang

    2016-08-01

    A multiple-image encryption (MIE) scheme with a single-pixel detector has been proposed according to the principle of ghost imaging. In this scheme, each of the spatially coherent laser beams is modified by a set of phase-mask keys and illuminates on a secret image. All of the transmitted lights are recorded together by a single-pixel (bucket) detector to obtain a ciphertext, but anyone of the secret images can be decrypted from the ciphertext independently without any mutually overlapped despite some noise in them. The MIE scheme will bring convenience for data storage and transmission, especially in the case that different secret images need to be distributed to different authorized users, because the ciphertext is a real-valued function and this scheme can effectively avoid the secret images being extracted mutually. The basic principle of the MIE scheme is described theoretically and verified by computer simulations. Finally, the feasibility, robustness and encryption capacity are also tested numerically.

  1. Pixelated CdTe detectors to overcome intrinsic limitations of crystal based positron emission mammographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lorenzo, G.; Chmeissani, M.; Uzun, D.; Kolstein, M.; Ozsahin, I.; Mikhaylova, E.; Arce, P.; Cañadas, M.; Ariño, G.; Calderón, Y.

    2013-01-01

    A positron emission mammograph (PEM) is an organ dedicated positron emission tomography (PET) scanner for breast cancer detection. State-of-the-art PEMs employing scintillating crystals as detection medium can provide metabolic images of the breast with significantly higher sensitivity and specificity with respect to standard whole body PET scanners. Over the past few years, crystal PEMs have dramatically increased their importance in the diagnosis and treatment of early stage breast cancer. Nevertheless, designs based on scintillators are characterized by an intrinsic deficiency of the depth of interaction (DOI) information from relatively thick crystals constraining the size of the smallest detectable tumor. This work shows how to overcome such intrinsic limitation by substituting scintillating crystals with pixelated CdTe detectors. The proposed novel design is developed within the Voxel Imaging PET (VIP) Pathfinder project and evaluated via Monte Carlo simulation. The volumetric spatial resolution of the VIP-PEM is expected to be up to 6 times better than standard commercial devices with a point spread function of 1 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) in all directions. Pixelated CdTe detectors can also provide an energy resolution as low as 1.5% FWHM at 511 keV for a virtually pure signal with negligible contribution from scattered events.

  2. Pixelated CdTe detectors to overcome intrinsic limitations of crystal based positron emission mammographs.

    PubMed

    De Lorenzo, G; Chmeissani, M; Uzun, D; Kolstein, M; Ozsahin, I; Mikhaylova, E; Arce, P; Cañadas, M; Ariño, G; Calderón, Y

    2013-01-01

    A positron emission mammograph (PEM) is an organ dedicated positron emission tomography (PET) scanner for breast cancer detection. State-of-the-art PEMs employing scintillating crystals as detection medium can provide metabolic images of the breast with significantly higher sensitivity and specificity with respect to standard whole body PET scanners. Over the past few years, crystal PEMs have dramatically increased their importance in the diagnosis and treatment of early stage breast cancer. Nevertheless, designs based on scintillators are characterized by an intrinsic deficiency of the depth of interaction (DOI) information from relatively thick crystals constraining the size of the smallest detectable tumor. This work shows how to overcome such intrinsic limitation by substituting scintillating crystals with pixelated CdTe detectors. The proposed novel design is developed within the Voxel Imaging PET (VIP) Pathfinder project and evaluated via Monte Carlo simulation. The volumetric spatial resolution of the VIP-PEM is expected to be up to 6 times better than standard commercial devices with a point spread function of 1 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) in all directions. Pixelated CdTe detectors can also provide an energy resolution as low as 1.5% FWHM at 511 keV for a virtually pure signal with negligible contribution from scattered events.

  3. Pixelated CdTe detectors to overcome intrinsic limitations of crystal based positron emission mammographs

    PubMed Central

    De Lorenzo, G.; Chmeissani, M.; Uzun, D.; Kolstein, M.; Ozsahin, I.; Mikhaylova, E.; Arce, P.; Cañadas, M.; Ariño, G.; Calderón, Y.

    2013-01-01

    A positron emission mammograph (PEM) is an organ dedicated positron emission tomography (PET) scanner for breast cancer detection. State-of-the-art PEMs employing scintillating crystals as detection medium can provide metabolic images of the breast with significantly higher sensitivity and specificity with respect to standard whole body PET scanners. Over the past few years, crystal PEMs have dramatically increased their importance in the diagnosis and treatment of early stage breast cancer. Nevertheless, designs based on scintillators are characterized by an intrinsic deficiency of the depth of interaction (DOI) information from relatively thick crystals constraining the size of the smallest detectable tumor. This work shows how to overcome such intrinsic limitation by substituting scintillating crystals with pixelated CdTe detectors. The proposed novel design is developed within the Voxel Imaging PET (VIP) Pathfinder project and evaluated via Monte Carlo simulation. The volumetric spatial resolution of the VIP-PEM is expected to be up to 6 times better than standard commercial devices with a point spread function of 1 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) in all directions. Pixelated CdTe detectors can also provide an energy resolution as low as 1.5% FWHM at 511 keV for a virtually pure signal with negligible contribution from scattered events. PMID:23750176

  4. Energy-windowed, pixellated X-ray diffraction using the Pixirad CdTe detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Flynn, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Minuti, M.; Brez, A.; Pinchera, M.; Spandre, G.; Moss, R.; Speller, R. D.

    2017-01-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) is a powerful tool for material identification. In order to interpret XRD data, knowledge is required of the scattering angles and energies of X-rays which interact with the sample. By using a pixellated, energy-resolving detector, this knowledge can be gained when using a spectrum of unfiltered X-rays, and without the need to collimate the scattered radiation. Here we present results of XRD measurements taken with the Pixirad detector and a laboratory-based X-ray source. The cadmium telluride sensor allows energy windows to be selected, and the 62 μm pixel pitch enables accurate spatial information to be preserved for XRD measurements, in addition to the ability to take high resolution radiographic images. Diffraction data are presented for a variety of samples to demonstrate the capability of the technique for materials discrimination in laboratory, security and pharmaceutical environments. Distinct diffraction patterns were obtained, from which details on the molecular structures of the items under study were determined.

  5. Characterisation of edgeless technologies for pixellated and strip silicon detectors with a micro-focused X-ray beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, R.; Blue, A.; Christophersen, M.; Eklund, L.; Ely, S.; Fadeyev, V.; Gimenez, E.; Kachkanov, V.; Kalliopuska, J.; Macchiolo, A.; Maneuski, D.; Phlips, B. F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Stewart, G.; Tartoni, N.; Zain, R. M.

    2013-01-01

    Reduced edge or ``edgeless'' detector design offers seamless tileability of sensors for a wide range of applications from particle physics to synchrotron and free election laser (FEL) facilities and medical imaging. Combined with through-silicon-via (TSV) technology, this would allow reduced material trackers for particle physics and an increase in the active area for synchrotron and FEL pixel detector systems. In order to quantify the performance of different edgeless fabrication methods, 2 edgeless detectors were characterized at the Diamond Light Source using an 11 μm FWHM 15 keV micro-focused X-ray beam. The devices under test were: a 150 μm thick silicon active edge pixel sensor fabricated at VTT and bump-bonded to a Medipix2 ROIC; and a 300 μm thick silicon strip sensor fabricated at CIS with edge reduction performed by SCIPP and the NRL and wire bonded to an ALiBaVa readout system. Sub-pixel resolution of the 55 μm active edge pixels was achieved. Further scans showed no drop in charge collection recorded between the centre and edge pixels, with a maximum deviation of 5% in charge collection between scanned edge pixels. Scans across the cleaved and standard guard ring edges of the strip detector also show no reduction in charge collection. These results indicate techniques such as the scribe, cleave and passivate (SCP) and active edge processes offer real potential for reduced edge, tiled sensors for imaging detection applications.

  6. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: Study of the characteristics of a scintillation array and single pixels for nuclear medicine imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jie; Ma, Hong-Guang; Ma, Wen-Yan; Zeng, Hui; Wang, Zhao-Min; Xu, Zi-Zong

    2009-04-01

    By using a pixelized Nal(Tl) crystal array coupled to a R2486 PSPMT, the characteristics of the array and of a single pixel, such as the light output, energy resolution, peak-to-valley ratio (P/V) and imaging performance of the detector were studied. The pixel size of the NaI(TI) scintillation pixel array is 2 mm×2 mm×5 mm. There are in total 484 pixels in a 22 × 22 matrix. In the pixel spectrum an average peak-to-valley ratio (P/V) of 16 was obtained. In the image of all the pixels, good values for the Peak-to-Valley ratios could be achieved, namely a mean of 17, a maximum of 45 and the average peak FWHM (the average value of intrinsic spatial resolution) of 2.3 mm. However, the PSPMT non-uniform response and the scintillation pixels array inhomogeneities degrade the imaging performance of the detector.

  7. A sub-millimeter resolution PET detector module using a multi-pixel photon counter array

    PubMed Central

    Song, Tae Yong; Wu, Heyu; Komarov, Sergey; Siegel, Stefan B; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2010-01-01

    A PET block detector module using an array of sub-millimeter lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) crystals read out by an array of surface-mount, semiconductor photosensors has been developed. The detector consists of a LSO array, a custom acrylic light guide, a 3 × 3 multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC) array (S10362-11-050P, Hamamatsu Photonics, Japan) and a readout board with a charge division resistor network. The LSO array consists of 100 crystals, each measuring 0.8 × 0.8 × 3 mm3 and arranged in 0.86 mm pitches. A Monte Carlo simulation was used to aid the design and fabrication of a custom light guide to control distribution of scintillation light over the surface of the MPPC array. The output signals of the nine MPPC are multiplexed by a charge division resistor network to generate four position-encoded analog outputs. Flood image, energy resolution and timing resolution measurements were performed using standard NIM electronics. The linearity of the detector response was investigated using gamma-ray sources of different energies. The 10 × 10 array of 0.8 mm LSO crystals was clearly resolved in the flood image. The average energy resolution and standard deviation were 20.0% full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) and ±5.0%, respectively, at 511 keV. The timing resolution of a single MPPC coupled to a LSO crystal was found to be 857 ps FWHM, and the value for the central region of detector module was 1182 ps FWHM when ±10% energy window was applied. The nonlinear response of a single MPPC when used to read out a single LSO was observed among the corner crystals of the proposed detector module. However, the central region of the detector module exhibits significantly less nonlinearity (6.5% for 511 keV). These results demonstrate that (1) a charge-sharing resistor network can effectively multiplex MPPC signals and reduce the number of output signals without significantly degrading the performance of a PET detector and (2) a custom light guide to permit light sharing

  8. The Gas Pixel Detector as a solar X-ray polarimeter and imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabiani, Sergio; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Brez, Alessandro; di Cosimo, Sergio; Lazzarotto, Francesco; Muleri, Fabio; Rubini, Alda; Soffitta, Paolo; Spandre, Gloria

    The sun is the nearest astrophysical source with an interesting emission in the X-ray band. The study of energetic events, such as solar flares, can help us to understand the behaviour of the magnetic field of our star. There are in literature numerous studies published about polarization predictions, for a wide range of solar flare models. All these models involve emission from thermal and/or nonthermal processes. Furthermore, results of flare observations in the X-ray band have never been exhaustive. We want to present a new kind of instrument with polarimetric and imaging capabilities in the X-ray band. This instrument is the Gas Pixel Detector (GPD). It has been developed by the INFN and the IASF-Roma / INAF Italian research institutes. The GPD was born to achieve X-ray polarimetric measurements as well as X-ray images for astrophysical sources. It has a good spectroscopic sensitivity thanks to an energy resolution of some per cent and it allows also to perform timing measurements. Differently from all the other kinds of today's polarimeters, it doesn't need rotation! The GPD exploits the dependence of photoelectric cross section to photon polarization direction to the aim of measuring polarization. This instrument is essentially a ionization chamber: a cell filled by gas into which radiation enters through a window of 1.5 cm x 1.5 cm. The cell has a depth of some centimeters: typically from 1 to 2 cm. Every time that a photon is absorbed by the gas, a photoelectron is emitted with more probability in the direction of the electric vector of the photon absorbed. The photoelectron propagates and produces a track of ionization that is drifted, amplified and actually collected on a fine sub-divided pixeled detector, whose pixels have a dimension of 50 µm. At the present the chip integrates more than 16.5 millions of transistors. It has an active area of 105600 pixels organized in a honeycomb matrix 300x352. It is a self triggered system able to select itself the

  9. CZT pixel detectors equipped with effective Ohmic contacts; their spectroscopic performance and the enigma of why they thus behave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Hanany, Uri; Shahar, Allon; Tsigelman, A.

    1999-10-01

    The performance of CZT pixel detectors, with dedicated ICs and electronic processors, have been demonstrated. These nuclear imaging modules, developed primarily for the medical market, may be utilized for other applications, such as large area nuclear spectrometers. An improved crystal growth technique ensures a practical supply of wafers of which high performance detectors are fabricated. We believe that the high spectroscopic quality of these detectors stems from their effective Ohmic behavior, coupled with the geometrical, 'small pixel' effect. The Ohmic operation of these detectors has been described in a schematic way only, where the detailed non-equilibrium mechanism, responsible for it, still remains to be explained in detail. The IMARAD detector type 2, with contacts which strongly limit the dark current, exhibit even improved spectroscopic behavior, due to a dynamic Ohmic behavior of these contacts.

  10. Charge-sharing observations with a CdTe pixel detector irradiated with a 57Co source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiorino, M.; Pellegrini, G.; Blanchot, G.; Chmeissani, M.; Garcia, J.; Martinez, R.; Lozano, M.; Puigdengoles, C.; Ullan, M.

    2006-07-01

    Charge sharing is a limiting factor of detector spatial resolution and contrast in photon counting imaging devices because multiple counts can be induced in adjacent pixels as a result of the spread of the charge cloud generated from a single X-ray photon of high energy in the detector bulk. Although this topic has been debated for a long time, the full impact of charge sharing has not been completely assessed. In this work, we look at the importance of charge sharing in CdTe pixel detectors by exposing such a device to a low-activity (37 kBq) 57Co source, whose main emission line is at 122 keV.The detectors used are 1 mm thick with a pixel pitch of 55 μm. These detectors are bump-bonded to Medipix2 photon-counting chips. This study gives an insight of the impact on the design and operation of pixel detectors coupled to photon-counting devices for imaging applications.

  11. Design Studies of a CZT-based Detector Combined with a Pixel-Geometry-Matching Collimator for SPECT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Fenghua; Bagchi, Srijeeta; Huang, Qiu; Seo, Youngho

    2014-01-01

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) suffers limited efficiency due to the need for collimators. Collimator properties largely decide the data statistics and image quality. Various materials and configurations of collimators have been investigated in many years. The main thrust of our study is to evaluate the design of pixel-geometry-matching collimators to investigate their potential performances using Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations. Here, a pixel-geometry-matching collimator is defined as a collimator which is divided into the same number of pixels as the detector’s and the center of each pixel in the collimator is a one-to-one correspondence to that in the detector. The detector is made of Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT), which is one of the most promising materials for applications to detect hard X-rays and γ-rays due to its ability to obtain good energy resolution and high light output at room temperature. For our current project, we have designed a large-area, CZT-based gamma camera (20.192 cm×20.192 cm) with a small pixel pitch (1.60 mm). The detector is pixelated and hence the intrinsic resolution can be as small as the size of the pixel. Materials of collimator, collimator hole geometry, detection efficiency, and spatial resolution of the CZT detector combined with the pixel-matching collimator were calculated and analyzed under different conditions. From the simulation studies, we found that such a camera using rectangular holes has promising imaging characteristics in terms of spatial resolution, detection efficiency, and energy resolution. PMID:25378898

  12. Detailed Studies of Pixelated CZT Detectors Grown with the Modified Horizontal Bridgman Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jung, I.; Krawczynski, H.; Burger, A.; Guo, M.; Groza, M.

    2007-01-01

    The detector material Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) achieves excellent spatial resolution and good energy resolution over a broad energy range, several keV up to some MeV. Presently, there are two main methods to grow CZT crystals, the Modified High-Pressure Bridgman (MHB) and the High-Pressure Bridgman (HPB) process. The study presented in this paper is based on MHB CZT substrates from the company Orbotech Medical Solutions Ltd. [Orbotech Medical Solutions Ltd., 10 Plaut St., Park Rabin, P.O. Box 2489, Rehovot, Israel, 76124]. Former studies have shown that high-work-function materials on the cathode side reduce the leakage current and, therefore, improve the energy resolution at lower energies. None of the studies have emphasized on the anode contact material. Therefore, we present in this paper the result of a detailed study in which for the first time the cathode material was kept constant and the anode material was varied. We used four different anode materials: Indium, Titanium, Chromium and Gold, metals with work-functions between 4.1 eV and 5.1 eV. The detector size was 2.0 x 2.0 x 0.5 cu cm with 8 x 8 pixels and a pitch of 2.46 mm. The best performance was achieved with the low-work-function materials Indium and Titanium with energy resolutions of 2.0 keV (at 59 keV) and 1.9 keV (at 122 keV) for Titanium and 2.1 keV (at 59 keV) and 2.9 keV (at 122 keV) for Indium. Taking into account the large pixel pitch of 2.46 mm, these resolutions are very competitive in comparison to those achieved with detectors made of material produced with the more expensive conventional HPB method. We present a detailed comparison of our detector response with 3D simulations. The latter comparisons allow us to determine the mobility-lifetime-products (mu tau-products) for electrons and holes. Finally, we evaluated the temperature dependency of the detector performance and ls-products. For many applications temperature dependence is important, therefore, we extended the scope of

  13. Imaging of Ra-223 with a small-pixel CdTe detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scuffham, J. W.; Pani, S.; Seller, P.; Sellin, P. J.; Veale, M. C.; Wilson, M. D.; Cernik, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    Ra-223 Dichloride (Xofigo™) is a promising new radiopharmaceutical offering survival benefit and palliation of painful bone metastases in patients with hormone-refractory prostate cancer [1]. The response to radionuclide therapy and toxicity are directly linked to the absorbed radiation doses to the tumour and organs at risk respectively. Accurate dosimetry necessitates quantitative imaging of the biodistribution and kinetics of the radiopharmaceutical. Although primarily an alpha-emitter, Ra-223 also has some low-abundance X-ray and gamma emissions, which enable imaging of the biodistribution in the patient. However, the low spectral resolution of conventional gamma camera detectors makes in-vivo imaging of Ra-223 challenging. In this work, we present spectra and image data of anthropomorphic phantoms containing Ra-223 acquired with a small-pixel CdTe detector (HEXITEC) [2] with a pinhole collimator. Comparison is made with similar data acquired using a clinical gamma camera. The results demonstrate the advantages of the solid state detector in terms of scatter rejection and quantitative accuracy of the images. However, optimised collimation is needed in order for the sensitivity to rival current clinical systems. As different dosage levels and administration regimens for this drug are explored in current clinical trials, there is a clear need to develop improved imaging technologies that will enable personalised treatments to be designed for patients.

  14. Comparison of allocation algorithms for unambiguous registration of hits in presence of charge sharing in pixel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otfinowski, P.; Maj, P.; Deptuch, G.; Fahim, F.; Hoff, J.

    2017-01-01

    Charge sharing is the fractional collection of the charge cloud generated in a detector by two or more adjacent pixels. It may lead to excessive or inefficient registration of hits comparing to the number of impinging photons depending on how discrimination thresholds are set in typical photon counting pixel detector. The problems are particularly exposed for fine pixel sizes and/or for thick planar detectors. Presence of charge sharing is one of the limiting factors that discourages decreasing sizes of pixels in photon counting mode X-ray radiation imaging systems. Currently, a few different approaches tackling with the charge sharing problem exist (e.g. Medipix3RX, PIXIE, miniVIPIC or PIX45). The general idea is, first, to reconstruct the entire signal from adjacent pixels and, secondly, to allocate the hit to a single pixel. This paper focuses on the latter part of the process, i.e. on a comparison of how different hit allocation algorithms affect the spatial accuracy and false registration vs. missed hit probability. Different hit allocation algorithms were simulated, including standard photon counting (no full signal reconstruction) and the C8P1 algorithm. Also, a novel approach, based on a detection of patterns, with significantly limited analog signal processing, was proposed and characterized.

  15. A 2D 4×4 Channel Readout ASIC for Pixelated CdTe Detectors for Medical Imaging Applications

    PubMed Central

    Macias-Montero, Jose-Gabriel; Sarraj, Maher; Chmeissani, Mokhtar; Martínez, Ricardo; Puigdengoles, Carles

    2015-01-01

    We present a 16-channel readout integrated circuit (ROIC) with nanosecond-resolution time to digital converter (TDC) for pixelated Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) gamma-ray detectors. The 4 × 4 pixel array ROIC is the proof of concept of the 10 × 10 pixel array readout ASIC for positron-emission tomography (PET) scanner, positron-emission mammography (PEM) scanner, and Compton gamma camera. The electronics of each individual pixel integrates an analog front-end with switchable gain, an analog to digital converter (ADC), configuration registers, and a 4-state digital controller. For every detected photon, the pixel electronics provides the energy deposited in the detector with 10-bit resolution, and a fast trigger signal for time stamp. The ASIC contains the 16-pixel matrix electronics, a digital controller, five global voltage references, a TDC, a temperature sensor, and a band-gap based current reference. The ASIC has been fabricated with TSMC 0.25 μm mixed-signal CMOS technology and occupies an area of 5.3 mm × 6.8 mm. The TDC shows a resolution of 95.5 ps, a precision of 600 ps at full width half maximum (FWHM), and a power consumption of 130 μW. In acquisition mode, the total power consumption of every pixel is 200 μW. An equivalent noise charge (ENC) of 160 e−RMS at maximum gain and negative polarity conditions has been measured at room temperature. PMID:26744545

  16. A 2D 4×4 Channel Readout ASIC for Pixelated CdTe Detectors for Medical Imaging Applications.

    PubMed

    Macias-Montero, Jose-Gabriel; Sarraj, Maher; Chmeissani, Mokhtar; Martínez, Ricardo; Puigdengoles, Carles

    2015-10-01

    We present a 16-channel readout integrated circuit (ROIC) with nanosecond-resolution time to digital converter (TDC) for pixelated Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) gamma-ray detectors. The 4 × 4 pixel array ROIC is the proof of concept of the 10 × 10 pixel array readout ASIC for positron-emission tomography (PET) scanner, positron-emission mammography (PEM) scanner, and Compton gamma camera. The electronics of each individual pixel integrates an analog front-end with switchable gain, an analog to digital converter (ADC), configuration registers, and a 4-state digital controller. For every detected photon, the pixel electronics provides the energy deposited in the detector with 10-bit resolution, and a fast trigger signal for time stamp. The ASIC contains the 16-pixel matrix electronics, a digital controller, five global voltage references, a TDC, a temperature sensor, and a band-gap based current reference. The ASIC has been fabricated with TSMC 0.25 μm mixed-signal CMOS technology and occupies an area of 5.3 mm × 6.8 mm. The TDC shows a resolution of 95.5 ps, a precision of 600 ps at full width half maximum (FWHM), and a power consumption of 130 μW. In acquisition mode, the total power consumption of every pixel is 200 μW. An equivalent noise charge (ENC) of 160 e(-)RMS at maximum gain and negative polarity conditions has been measured at room temperature.

  17. Distortion of the per-pixel signal in the Timepix detector observed in high energy carbon ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, B.; Soukup, P.; Granja, C.; Jakubek, J.; Pospíšil, S.; Jäkel, O.; Martišíková, M.

    2014-09-01

    Within the application of the pixelated semiconductor Timepix detector for ion beam therapy purposes, distortion and non-linearity in the spectrometric pixel response to high energy carbon ions were observed. In this contribution, these effects are studied in detail. A distinct correlation between the arrival time of a particle during the exposure time and the respective detector signal was found. The hypothesis to explain these findings by oscillations in the pixel electronics leading to a second rise of the preamplifier output above threshold is discussed. Depending on the particle arrival time, the distortions can result in an artificially increased counter value and consequently an enlarged detector signal in energy mode. The effect appears when the signal per-pixel is above approximately 1 MeV, therefore becomig especially significant for measurements with heavy ions. The results presented in this publication are part of: B. Hartmann, A Novel Approach to Ion Spectroscopy of Therapeutic Ion Beams Using a Pixelated Semiconductor Detector, Ph.D. thesis, University of Heidelberg, Germany (2013).

  18. Characterization and performance of silicon n-in-p pixel detectors for the ATLAS upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigell, P.; Beimforde, M.; Gallrapp, Ch.; La Rosa, A.; Macchiolo, A.; Nisius, R.; Pernegger, H.; Richter, R. H.

    2011-12-01

    The existing ATLAS tracker will be at its functional limit for particle fluences of 10 15 neq/cm2 (LHC). Thus for the upgrades at smaller radii like in the case of the planned Insertable B-Layer (IBL) and for increased LHC luminosities (super LHC) the development of new structures and materials which can cope with the resulting particle fluences is needed. n-in-p silicon devices are a promising candidate for tracking detectors to achieve these goals, since they are radiation hard, cost efficient and are not type inverted after irradiation. A n-in-p pixel production based on a MPP/HLL design and performed by CiS (Erfurt, Germany) on 300 μm thick Float-Zone material is characterised and the electrical properties of sensors and single chip modules (SCM) are presented, including noise, charge collection efficiencies, and measurements with MIPs as well as an 241Am source. The SCMs are built with sensors connected to the current ATLAS read-out chip FE-I3. The characterisation has been performed with the ATLAS pixel read-out systems, before and after irradiation with 24 GeV/ c protons. In addition preliminary testbeam results for the tracking efficiency and charge collection, obtained with a SCM, are discussed.

  19. Reduction of ring artifacts in CBCT: Detection and correction of pixel gain variations in flat panel detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Altunbas, Cem; Lai, Chao-Jen; Zhong, Yuncheng; Shaw, Chris C.

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: In using flat panel detectors (FPD) for cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), pixel gain variations may lead to structured nonuniformities in projections and ring artifacts in CBCT images. Such gain variations can be caused by change in detector entrance exposure levels or beam hardening, and they are not accounted by conventional flat field correction methods. In this work, the authors presented a method to identify isolated pixel clusters that exhibit gain variations and proposed a pixel gain correction (PGC) method to suppress both beam hardening and exposure level dependent gain variations. Methods: To modulate both beam spectrum and entrance exposure, flood field FPD projections were acquired using beam filters with varying thicknesses. “Ideal” pixel values were estimated by performing polynomial fits in both raw and flat field corrected projections. Residuals were calculated by taking the difference between measured and ideal pixel values to identify clustered image and FPD artifacts in flat field corrected and raw images, respectively. To correct clustered image artifacts, the ratio of ideal to measured pixel values in filtered images were utilized as pixel-specific gain correction factors, referred as PGC method, and they were tabulated as a function of pixel value in a look-up table. Results: 0.035% of detector pixels lead to clustered image artifacts in flat field corrected projections, where 80% of these pixels were traced back and linked to artifacts in the FPD. The performance of PGC method was tested in variety of imaging conditions and phantoms. The PGC method reduced clustered image artifacts and fixed pattern noise in projections, and ring artifacts in CBCT images. Conclusions: Clustered projection image artifacts that lead to ring artifacts in CBCT can be better identified with our artifact detection approach. When compared to the conventional flat field correction method, the proposed PGC method enables characterization of nonlinear

  20. 50 μm pixel pitch wafer-scale CMOS active pixel sensor x-ray detector for digital breast tomosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, C; Konstantinidis, A C; Zheng, Y; Anaxagoras, T; Speller, R D; Kanicki, J

    2015-12-07

    Wafer-scale CMOS active pixel sensors (APSs) have been developed recently for x-ray imaging applications. The small pixel pitch and low noise are very promising properties for medical imaging applications such as digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). In this work, we evaluated experimentally and through modeling the imaging properties of a 50 μm pixel pitch CMOS APS x-ray detector named DynAMITe (Dynamic Range Adjustable for Medical Imaging Technology). A modified cascaded system model was developed for CMOS APS x-ray detectors by taking into account the device nonlinear signal and noise properties. The imaging properties such as modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were extracted from both measurements and the nonlinear cascaded system analysis. The results show that the DynAMITe x-ray detector achieves a high spatial resolution of 10 mm(-1) and a DQE of around 0.5 at spatial frequencies  <1 mm(-1). In addition, the modeling results were used to calculate the image signal-to-noise ratio (SNRi) of microcalcifications at various mean glandular dose (MGD). For an average breast (5 cm thickness, 50% glandular fraction), 165 μm microcalcifications can be distinguished at a MGD of 27% lower than the clinical value (~1.3 mGy). To detect 100 μm microcalcifications, further optimizations of the CMOS APS x-ray detector, image aquisition geometry and image reconstruction techniques should be considered.

  1. Design, simulation, fabrication, and preliminary tests of 3D CMS pixel detectors for the super-LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Koybasi, Ozhan; Bortoletto, Daniela; Hansen, Thor-Erik; Kok, Angela; Hansen, Trond Andreas; Lietaer, Nicolas; Jensen, Geir Uri; Summanwar, Anand; Bolla, Gino; Kwan, Simon Wing Lok; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    The Super-LHC upgrade puts strong demands on the radiation hardness of the innermost tracking detectors of the CMS, which cannot be fulfilled with any conventional planar detector design. The so-called 3D detector architectures, which feature columnar electrodes passing through the substrate thickness, are under investigation as a potential solution for the closest operation points to the beams, where the radiation fluence is estimated to reach 10{sup 16} n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}. Two different 3D detector designs with CMS pixel readout electronics are being developed and evaluated for their advantages and drawbacks. The fabrication of full-3D active edge CMS pixel devices with p-type substrate has been successfully completed at SINTEF. In this paper, we study the expected post-irradiation behaviors of these devices with simulations and, after a brief description of their fabrication, we report the first leakage current measurement results as performed on wafer.

  2. Pixel detector Timepix operated in pile-up mode for pulsed imaging with ultra-soft X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krejci, F.; Jakubek, J.; Kroupa, M.; Bruza, P.; Panek, D.

    2012-12-01

    The hybrid semiconductor pixel detector Timepix operated in the Time-over-Threshold mode (ToT) enables direct energy measurement in each pixel. The advantage of noiseless position sensitive detection combined with per pixel spectroscopic capability opens the way to numerous new applications, which were till now, however, restricted to detection of radiation which is basically above the detector energy threshold (typically 3-4 keV). This limitation excludes application of the hybrid pixel technology to highly interesting fields such as plasma diagnostics or X-ray microscopy. In this contribution we demonstrate how the Timepix detector working in ToT mode can be operated as a detector for particles which are in principle below the detector threshold, namely for soft X-ray photons with energy typically 0.5 keV. The approach is based on the detection of a larger number of photons incoming in the pixel signal processing chain in a time significantly shorter than the shaping time of the pixel electronics, i.e. forming signal pile-up. The proposed approach enables a CCD-like integrating operation with the many advantages of the hybrid counting technology (direct conversion, high sensitivity, dark-current free, room temperature operation, fully digital output and possibility to utilize various read-out architectures). Using the proposed approach we performed single-shot X-ray radiography with a laser-induced plasma source in the spectral region of water window. The same technique was used for the characterization of the source itself.

  3. Characterization of silicon 3D pixel detectors for the ATLAS Forward Physics experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez Paz, I.; Cavallaro, E.; Lange, J.; Grinstein, S.

    2015-07-01

    The ATLAS Forward Physics (AFP) project aims to measure protons scattered under a small angle from the pp collisions in ATLAS. In order to perform such measurements, a new silicon tracker, together with a time-of-flight detector for pile-up removal, are planned to be installed at ∼210 m from the interaction point and at 2-3 mm from the LHC proton beam. To cope with such configuration and maximize the physics outcome, the tracker has to fulfil three main requirements: endure highly non-uniform radiation doses, due to the very inhomogeneous beam profile, have slim and efficient edges to improve the acceptance of the tracker, and provide good position resolution. Recent laboratory and beam test characterization results of AFP prototypes will be presented. Slim-edged 3D pixel detectors down to 100-200 μm were studied and later non-uniformly irradiated (with a peak fluence of several 10{sup 15} n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}) to determine the fulfilment of the AFP requirements. (authors)

  4. The magic cube and the pixel ionization chamber: detectors for monitor and dosimetry of radiotherapy beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amerio, S.; Boriano, A.; Bourhaleb, F.; Cirio, R.; Donetti, M.; Garelli, E.; Giordanengo, S.; Madon, E.; Marchetto, F.; Nastasi, U.; Peroni, C.; Sanz Freire, C. J.; Sardo, A.; Trevisiol, E.

    2003-09-01

    Tumor therapy takes advantage of the energy deposition of radiation to concentrate high doses in the target while sparing healthy tissue. Elective pathologies for highly conformal radiotherapies such as photon Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) and radiotherapy with hadrons are head and neck, eye, prostate and in general all tumors that are either deep or located close to critical organs. In the world there are several centers that are using such techniques and a common problem that is being experienced is the verification of treatment plans and monitoring of the beam. We have designed and built two detectors that allow 2D and 3D measurements of dose and fluence of such beams. The detectors allow measurements on big surfaces, up to 25∗25 cm2. The active media are parallel plate, strip and pixel segmented ionization chambers with front-end Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) readout and PC based data acquistion. The description of dosimeter, chamber and electronics will be given with results from beam tests and therapy plan verification.

  5. A vertically integrated pixel readout device for the Vertex Detector at the International Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Deptuch, Grzegorz; Christian, David; Hoff, James; Lipton, Ronald; Shenai, Alpana; Trimpl, Marcel; Yarema, Raymond; Zimmerman, Tom; /Fermilab

    2008-12-01

    3D-Integrated Circuit technology enables higher densities of electronic circuitry per unit area without the use of nanoscale processes. It is advantageous for mixed mode design with precise analog circuitry because processes with conservative feature sizes typically present lower process dispersions and tolerate higher power supply voltages, resulting in larger separation of a signal from the noise floor. Heterogeneous wafers (different foundries or different process families) may be combined with some 3D integration methods, leading to the optimization of each tier in the 3D stack. Tracking and vertexing in future High-Energy Physics (HEP) experiments involves construction of detectors composed of up to a few billions of channels. Readout electronics must record the position and time of each measurement with the highest achievable precision. This paper reviews a prototype of the first 3D readout chip for HEP, designed for a vertex detector at the International Linear Collider. The prototype features 20 x 20 {micro}m{sup 2} pixels, laid out in an array of 64 x 64 elements and was fabricated in a 3-tier 0.18 {micro}m Fully Depleted SOI CMOS process at MIT-Lincoln Laboratory. The tests showed correct functional operation of the structure. The chip performs a zero-suppressed readout. Successive submissions are planned in a commercial 3D bulk 0.13 {micro}m CMOS process to overcome some of the disadvantages of an FDSOI process.

  6. A GaAs pixel detectors-based digital mammographic system: Performances and imaging tests results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annovazzi, A.; Amendolia, S. R.; Bigongiari, A.; Bisogni, M. G.; Catarsi, F.; Cesqui, F.; Cetronio, A.; Colombo, F.; Delogu, P.; Fantacci, M. E.; Gilberti, A.; Lanzieri, C.; Lavagna, S.; Novelli, M.; Passuello, G.; Paternoster, G.; Pieracci, M.; Poletti, M.; Quattrocchi, M.; Rosso, V.; Stefanini, A.; Testa, A.; Venturelli, L.

    2007-06-01

    The prototype presented in this paper is based on GaAs pixel detectors read-out by the PCC/MEDIPIX I circuit. The active area of a sensor is about 1 cm 2 therefore to cover the typical irradiation field used in mammography (18×24 cm 2), 18 GaAs detection units have been organized in two staggered rows of nine chips each and moved by a stepper motor in the orthogonal direction. The system is integrated in a mammographic equipment which comprehends the X-ray tube, the bias and data acquisition systems and the PC-based control system. The prototype has been developed in the framework of the Integrated Mammographic Imaging (IMI) project, an industrial research activity aiming to develop innovative instrumentation for morphologic and functional imaging. The project has been supported by the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research (MIUR) and by five Italian High Tech companies, Alenia Marconi Systems (AMS), CAEN, Gilardoni, LABEN and Poli.Hi.Tech., in collaboration with the universities of Ferrara, Roma "La Sapienza", Pisa and the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN). In this paper, we report on the electrical characterization and the first imaging test results of the digital mammographic system. To assess the imaging capability of such a detector we have built a phantom, which simulates the breast tissue with malignancies. The radiographs of the phantom, obtained by delivering an entrance dose of 4.8 mGy, have shown particulars with a measured contrast below 1%.

  7. Serial powering: Proof of principle demonstration of a scheme for the operation of a large pixel detector at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ta, D. B.; Stockmanns, T.; Hügging, F.; Fischer, P.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Runolfsson, Ö.; Wermes, N.

    2006-02-01

    Large detectors in high-energy physics experiments are mostly built from many identical individual building blocks, called modules, which possess individual parts of the services. The modules are usually also powered by parallel power lines such that they can be individually operated. The main disadvantage of such a parallel powering scheme is the vast amount of necessary power cables which constitutes also a large amount of material in the path of the particles to be detected. For the LHC experiments already now this is a major problem for the optimal performance of the detectors and it has become evident, that for an upgrade programme alternative powering schemes must be investigated. We prove and demonstrate here for the example of the large scale pixel detector of ATLAS that Serial Powering of pixel modules is a viable alternative. A powering scheme using dedicated voltage regulators and modified flex hybrid circuits has been devised and implemented for ATLAS pixel modules. The modules have been intensively tested in the lab and in test beams and have been compared to those powered in parallel with respect to noise and threshold stability performance. Finally, the equivalent of a pixel ladder consisting of six serially powered pixel modules with about 0.3 Mpixels has been built and the performance with respect to operation failures has been studied.

  8. Development of CdTe pixel detectors combined with an aluminum Schottky diode sensor and photon-counting ASICs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyokawa, H.; Saji, C.; Kawase, M.; Wu, S.; Furukawa, Y.; Kajiwara, K.; Sato, M.; Hirono, T.; Shiro, A.; Shobu, T.; Suenaga, A.; Ikeda, H.

    2017-01-01

    We have been developing CdTe pixel detectors combined with a Schottky diode sensor and photon-counting ASICs. The hybrid pixel detector was designed with a pixel size of 200 μ m by 200 μm and an area of 19 mm by 20 mm or 38.2 mm by 40.2 mm. The photon-counting ASIC, SP8-04F10K, has a preamplifier, a shaper, 3-level window-type discriminators and a 24-bits counter in each pixel. The single-chip detector with 100 by 95 pixels successfully operated with a photon-counting mode selecting X-ray energy with the window comparator and stable operation was realized at 20 degrees C. We have performed a feasibility study for a white X-ray microbeam experiment. Laue diffraction patterns were measured during the scan of the irradiated position in a silicon steel sample. The grain boundaries were identified by using the differentials between adjacent images at each position.

  9. Experience with 3D integration technologies in the framework of the ATLAS pixel detector upgrade for the HL-LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aruntinov, D.; Barbero, M.; Gonella, L.; Hemperek, T.; Hügging, F.; Krüger, H.; Wermes, N.; Breugnon, P.; Chantepie, B.; Clemens, J. C.; Fei, R.; Fougeron, D.; Godiot, S.; Pangaud, P.; Rozanov, A.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Mekkaoui, A.

    2013-12-01

    3D technologies are investigated for the upgrade of the ATLAS pixel detector at the HL-LHC. R&D focuses on both, IC design in 3D, as well as on post-processing 3D technologies such as Through Silicon Via (TSV). The first one uses a so-called via first technology, featuring the insertion of small aspect ratio TSV at the pixel level. As discussed in the paper, this technology can still present technical challenges for the industrial partners. The second one consists of etching the TSV via last. This technology is investigated to enable 4-side abuttable module concepts, using today's pixel detector technology. Both approaches are presented in this paper and results from first available prototypes are discussed.

  10. Similarities and differences of recent hybrid pixel detectors for X-ray and high energy physics developed at the Paul Scherrer Institut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinti, G.; Bergamaschi, A.; Cartier, S.; Dinapoli, R.; Greiffenberg, D.; Horisberger, R.; Johnson, I.; Jungmann-Smith, J. H.; Mezza, D.; Mozzanica, A.; Schmitt, B.; Shi, X.

    2015-04-01

    Hybrid pixel detectors are being developed for both photon science and high energy physics. The article will cover similarities and differences in pixel detectors for both applications using two of the pixel detectors developed at the Paul Scherrer Institute (Switzerland) as examples: the EIGER photon counting detector and the psi46dig chip, which has been developed for the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) tracking pixel detector upgrade. EIGER is a single photon counting hybrid pixel detector for applications at synchrotron light sources in the energy range from a few to 25 keV. It is characterized by a small pixel size (75 × 75 μm2), high count rate capability (106 counts/pixel/s) and very high data rate, which reaches 6 Gb/s for a 256 × 256 pixel chip. The CMS pixel detector is designed to provide charge information from the pixels in the harsh radiation environment at the Large Hadron Collider. The short time between bunches of 25 ns and the high event rate at luminosity up to 2 × 1034cm-2s-1 require a detector with high hit efficiency, with good timing resolution and the ability to retain timestamp information for the hits. The readout architecture is based on the transfer of hits from the pixels to the periphery, where the trigger validation is performed before data transfer. The data rates of the digitized output reach 160 Mb/s for a 52×80 pixel chip.The specific timing and rate requirements for the detectors, the analog performances (minimum threshold and noise), the power consumption and the radiation hardness will be compared. An overview on future developments based on mutual learning and common solutions will be discussed.

  11. The Cryogenic AntiCoincidence detector for ATHENA: the progress towards the final pixel design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macculi, Claudio; Piro, Luigi; Cea, Donatella; Colasanti, Luca; Lotti, Simone; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Gatti, Flavio; Bagliani, Daniela; Biasotti, Michele; Corsini, Dario; Pizzigoni, Giulio; Torrioli, Guido; Barbera, Marco; Mineo, Teresa; Perinati, Emanuele

    2014-07-01

    "The Hot and Energetic Universe" is the scientific theme approved by the ESA SPC for a Large mission to be flown in the next ESA slot (2028th) timeframe. ATHENA is a space mission proposal tailored on this scientific theme. It will be the first X-ray mission able to perform the so-called "Integral field spectroscopy", by coupling a high-resolution spectrometer, the X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU), to a high performance optics so providing detailed images of its field of view (5' in diameter) with an angular resolution of 5" and fine energy-spectra (2.5eV@E<7keV). The X-IFU is a kilo-pixel array based on TES (Transition Edge Sensor) microcalorimeters providing high resolution spectroscopy in the 0.2-12 keV range. Some goals is the detection of faint and diffuse sources as Warm Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM) or galaxies outskirts. To reach its challenging scientific aims, it is necessary to shield efficiently the X-IFU instrument against background induced by external particles: the goal is 0.005 cts/cm^2/s/keV. This scientific requirement can be met by using an active Cryogenic AntiCoincidence (CryoAC) detector placed very close to X-IFU (~ 1 mm below). This is shown by our GEANT4 simulation of the expected background at L2 orbit. The CryoAC is a TES based detector as the X-IFU sharing with it thermal and mechanical interfaces, so increasing the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of the payload. It is a 2x2 array of microcalorimeter detectors made by Silicon absorber (each of about 80 mm^2 and 300 μm thick) and sensed by an Ir TES. This choice shows that it is possible to operate such a detector in the so-called athermal regime which gives a response faster than the X-IFU (< 30 μs), and low energy threshold (above few keV). Our consortium has developed and tested several samples, some of these also featured by the presence of Al-fins to efficiently collect the athermal phonons, and increased x-ray absorber area (up to 1 cm^2). Here the results of deep test

  12. Linear fitting of multi-threshold counting data with a pixel-array detector for spectral X-ray imaging

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Ryan D.; Pogranichney, Nicholas R.; Muir, J. Lewis; Sullivan, Shane Z.; Battaile, Kevin P.; Mulichak, Anne M.; Toth, Scott J.; Keefe, Lisa J.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2014-01-01

    Experiments and modeling are described to perform spectral fitting of multi-threshold counting measurements on a pixel-array detector. An analytical model was developed for describing the probability density function of detected voltage in X-ray photon-counting arrays, utilizing fractional photon counting to account for edge/corner effects from voltage plumes that spread across multiple pixels. Each pixel was mathematically calibrated by fitting the detected voltage distributions to the model at both 13.5 keV and 15.0 keV X-ray energies. The model and established pixel responses were then exploited to statistically recover images of X-ray intensity as a function of X-ray energy in a simulated multi-wavelength and multi-counting threshold experiment. PMID:25178010

  13. HEPS-BPIX, a single photon counting pixel detector with a high frame rate for the HEPS project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei; Zhang, Jie; Ning, Zhe; Lu, Yunpeng; Fan, Lei; Li, Huaishen; Jiang, Xiaoshan; Lan, Allan K.; Ouyang, Qun; Wang, Zheng; Zhu, Kejun; Chen, Yuanbo; Liu, Peng

    2016-11-01

    China's next generation light source, named the High Energy Photon Source (HEPS), is currently under construction. HEPS-BPIX (HEPS-Beijing PIXel) is a dedicated pixel readout chip that operates in single photon counting mode for X-ray applications in HEPS. Designed using CMOS 0.13 μm technology, the chip contains a matrix of 104×72 pixels. Each pixel measures 150 μm×150 μm and has a counting depth of 20 bits. A bump-bonded prototyping detector module with a 300-μm thick silicon sensor was tested in the beamline of Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. A fast stream of X-ray images was demonstrated, and a frame rate of 1.2 kHz was proven, with a negligible dead time. The test results showed an equivalent noise charge of 115 e- rms after bump bonding and a threshold dispersion of 55 e- rms after calibration.

  14. Pixel CdTe semiconductor module to implement a sub-MeV imaging detector for astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gálvez, J.-L.; Hernanz, M.; Álvarez, L.; Artigues, B.; Álvarez, J.-M.; Ullán, M.; Pellegrini, G.; Lozano, M.; Cabruja, E.; Martínez, R.; Chmeissani, M.; Puigdengoles, C.

    2017-03-01

    Stellar explosions are relevant and interesting astrophysical phenomena. Since long ago we have been working on the characterization of nova and supernova explosions in X and gamma rays, with the use of space missions such as INTEGRAL, XMM-Newton and Swift. We have been also involved in feasibility studies of future instruments in the energy range from several keV up to a few MeV, in collaboration with other research institutes, such as GRI, DUAL and e-ASTROGAM. High sensitivities are essential to perform detailed studies of cosmic explosions and cosmic accelerators, e.g., Supernovae, Classical Novae, Supernova Remnants (SNRs), Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). In order to fulfil the combined requirement of high detection efficiency with good spatial and energy resolution, an initial module prototype based on CdTe pixel detectors is being developed. The detector dimensions are 12.5mm x 12.5mm x 2mm, with a pixel pitch of 1mm x 1mm. Each pixel is bump bonded to a fanout board made of Sapphire substrate and routed to the corresponding input channel of the readout ASIC, to measure pixel position and pulse height for each incident gamma-ray photon. An ohmic CdTe pixel detector has been characterised by means of 57Co, 133Ba and 22Na sources. Based on this, its spectroscopic performance and the influence of charge sharing is reported here. The pixel study is complemented by the simulation of the CdTe module performance using the GEANT 4 and MEGALIB tools, which will help us to optimise the pixel size selection.

  15. Development of Small-Pixel CZT Detectors for Future High-Resolution Hard X-ray Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beilicke, Matthias

    Owing to recent breakthroughs in grazing incidence mirror technology, next-generation hard X-ray telescopes will achieve angular resolutions of between 5 and 10 arc seconds - about an order of magnitude better than that of the NuSTAR hard X-ray telescope. As a consequence, the next generation of hard X-ray telescopes will require pixelated hard X- ray detectors with pixels on a grid with a lattice constant of between 120 and 240 um. Additional detector requirements include a low energy threshold of less than 5 keV and an energy resolution of less than 1 keV. The science drivers for a high angular-resolution hard X-ray mission include studies and measurements of black hole spins, the cosmic evolution of super-massive black holes, AGN feedback, and the behavior of matter at very high densities. We propose a R&D research program to develop, optimize and study the performance of 100-200 um pixel pitch CdTe and Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors of 1-2 mm thickness. Our program aims at a comparison of the performance achieved with CdTe and CZT detectors, and the optimization of the pixel, steering grid, and guard ring anode patterns. Although these studies will use existing ASICs (Application Specific Integrated Circuits), our program also includes modest funds for the development of an ultra-low noise ASIC with a 2-D grid of readout pads that can be directly bonded to the 100-200 um pixel pitch CdTe and CZT detectors. The team includes the Washington University group (Prof. M. Beilicke and Co-I Prof. H.S.W. Krawczynski et al.), and co-investigator G. De Geronimo at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The Washington University group has a 10 year track record of innovative CZT detector R&D sponsored by the NASA Astronomy and Physics Research and Analysis (APRA) program. The accomplishments to date include the development of CZT detectors with pixel pitches between 350 um and 2.5 mm for the ProtoExist, EXIST, and X-Calibur hard X-ray missions with some of the best

  16. Development of a rest gas ionisation profile monitor for the CERN Proton Synchrotron based on a Timepix3 pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levasseur, S.; Dehning, B.; Gibson, S.; Sandberg, H.; Sapinski, M.; Sato, K.; Schneider, G.; Storey, J.

    2017-02-01

    A fast non-destructive transverse profile monitor, named PS Beam Gas Ionization monitor (PS- BGI), is under development at CERN for the Proton Synchrotron (PS). This monitor infers the beam profile from the transverse distribution of electrons created by the ionisation of rest gas molecules by the high energy beam particles. The distribution is measured by accelerating the electrons onto an imaging detector based on Timepix3 (TPX3). This detector consists of hybrid pixel detector assemblies mounted on a ceramic carrier board and flexible printed circuit cables which have been developed specifically for operation in an ultra high vacuum environment.

  17. Results from a 64-pixel PIN-diode detector system for low-energy beta-electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuestling, Sascha; Fraenkle, F.; Habermehl, F.; Renschler, P.; Steidl, M.

    2010-12-01

    The KATRIN neutrino mass experiment is based on a precise energy measurement (Δ E/ E=5×10 -5) of electrons emerging from tritium beta decay ( Emax=18.6 keV). This is done by a large electrostatic retarding spectrometer (MAC-E Filter), which is followed by an electron detector. Key requirements for this detector are a large sensitive area (˜80 cm 2), a certain energy resolution (Δ E=600 eV @ 18.6 keV) but also a certain spatial resolution (˜3 mm), which leads to a multi-pixel design. As a tentative design on the way to the final detector, but also for operational service on the so-called pre-spectrometer experiment, a detector system with a reduced size (16 cm 2) and a reduced pixel number (64), making use of a monolithic segmented silicon PIN diode, was designed and built. While the design and very first measurements have been presented in Wuestling et al. [6], this publication shows the operational performance of the detector system. The robust concept of the electronics allowed adaptation to mechanically different experimental setups. The spacial resolution of the detector system proved to be essential in examining Penning trap induced background and other effects in the pre-spectrometer experiment. The detector performance test runs include energy resolution and calibration, background rates, correlation between pixels (crosstalk), spatially resolved rate analysis, and a dead-layer measurement [7]. The detector allows for background searches with a sensitivity as low as 1.3×10 -3 cps/cm 2 in the energy range of 20 keV. This allows the pre-spectrometer to be characterized with e-gun illumination with a signal to background ratio of better than 10 5 and the search for ultra low Penning discharge emissions.

  18. Distortion of the pixel grid in HST WFC3/UVIS and ACS/WFC CCD detectors and its astrometric correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozhurina-Platais, Vera; Mackenty, John; Golimovski, David; Sirianni, Marco; Borncamp, David; Anderson, Jay; Grogin, Norman

    2016-07-01

    The geometric distortion of the CCD detectors used in the Hubble Space TelescopeWide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) and Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) instruments is characterized by both large and fine-scale distortions. The large-scale distortion, due to the complexity of the HST optical assembly, can be modeled by a high-order polynomial. The majority of fine-distortion is inherent to the CCD detectors themselves, which manifests itself as fine-scale, correlated systematic offsets in the residuals from the best-fit polynomial solution. Such systematic offsets across the CCD chip introduce astrometric errors at the level of about 0.1 pix (up to 1.5 μm within the 15 μm pixels). These fine-scale and low-amplitude distortions apparently arise from the spatial irregularities in the pixel grid. For the WFC3/UVIS CCD chips, there is a clear pattern of periodic skew in the lithographic-mask stencil imprinted onto the detector. Similar irregularities in the pixel grid of ACS/WFC CCD chips are even more pronounced by the narrow (68×2048 pixel) lithographic-mask stencil. To remove these distortions, a 2-D correction in the form of a look-up table has been developed using HST images of very dense stellar fields. The post-correction of fine-scale astrometric errors can be removed down to the level of 0.01 pix (0.15 μm) or better.

  19. High-sensitivity brain SPECT system using cadmium telluride (CdTe) semiconductor detector and 4-pixel matched collimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Atsuro; Takeuchi, Wataru; Ishitsu, Takafumi; Tsuchiya, Katsutoshi; Morimoto, Yuichi; Ueno, Yuichiro; Kobashi, Keiji; Kubo, Naoki; Shiga, Tohru; Tamaki, Nagara

    2013-11-01

    For high-sensitivity brain imaging, we have developed a two-head single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system using a CdTe semiconductor detector and 4-pixel matched collimator (4-PMC). The term, ‘4-PMC’ indicates that the collimator hole size is matched to a 2 × 2 array of detector pixels. By contrast, a 1-pixel matched collimator (1-PMC) is defined as a collimator whose hole size is matched to one detector pixel. The performance of the higher-sensitivity 4-PMC was experimentally compared with that of the 1-PMC. The sensitivities of the 1-PMC and 4-PMC were 70 cps/MBq/head and 220 cps/MBq/head, respectively. The SPECT system using the 4-PMC provides superior image resolution in cold and hot rods phantom with the same activity and scan time to that of the 1-PMC. In addition, with half the usual scan time the 4-PMC provides comparable image quality to that of the 1-PMC. Furthermore, 99mTc-ECD brain perfusion images of healthy volunteers obtained using the 4-PMC demonstrated acceptable image quality for clinical diagnosis. In conclusion, our CdTe SPECT system equipped with the higher-sensitivity 4-PMC can provide better spatial resolution than the 1-PMC either in half the imaging time with the same administered activity, or alternatively, in the same imaging time with half the activity.

  20. THE IMAGING PROPERTIES OF THE GAS PIXEL DETECTOR AS A FOCAL PLANE POLARIMETER

    SciTech Connect

    Fabiani, S.; Costa, E.; Del Monte, E.; Muleri, F.; Soffitta, P.; Rubini, A.; Bellazzini, R.; Brez, A.; De Ruvo, L.; Minuti, M.; Pinchera, M.; Sgró, C.; Spandre, G.; Spiga, D.; Tagliaferri, G.; Pareschi, G.; Basso, S.; Citterio, O.; Burwitz, V.; Burkert, W.; and others

    2014-06-01

    X-rays are particularly suited to probing the physics of extreme objects. However, despite the enormous improvements of X-ray astronomy in imaging, spectroscopy, and timing, polarimetry remains largely unexplored. We propose the photoelectric polarimeter Gas Pixel Detector (GPD) as a candidate instrument to fill the gap created by more than 30 yr without measurements. The GPD, in the focus of a telescope, will increase the sensitivity of orders of magnitude. Moreover, since it can measure the energy, the position, the arrival time, and the polarization angle of every single photon, it allows us to perform polarimetry of subsets of data singled out from the spectrum, the light curve, or an image of the source. The GPD has an intrinsic, very fine imaging capability, and in this work we report on the calibration campaign carried out in 2012 at the PANTER X-ray testing facility of the Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik of Garching (Germany) in which, for the first time, we coupled it with a JET-X optics module with a focal length of 3.5 m and an angular resolution of 18 arcsec at 4.5 keV. This configuration was proposed in 2012 aboard the X-ray Imaging Polarimetry Explorer (XIPE) in response to the ESA call for a small mission. We derived the imaging and polarimetric performance for extended sources like pulsar wind nebulae and supernova remnants as case studies for the XIPE configuration and also discuss possible improvements by coupling the detector with advanced optics that have a finer angular resolution and larger effective areas to study extended objects with more detail.

  1. Large area pixel detector WIDEPIX with full area sensitivity composed of 100 Timepix assemblies with edgeless sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubek, J.; Jakubek, M.; Platkevic, M.; Soukup, P.; Turecek, D.; Sykora, V.; Vavrik, D.

    2014-04-01

    The superior properties of the single particle counting semiconductor pixel detectors in radiation imaging are well known. They are namely: very high dynamic range due to digital counting, absence of integration and read-out noise, high spatial resolution and energy sensitivity. The major disadvantage of current pixel devices preventing their broad exploitation has been their relatively small sensitive area of few cm2. This disadvantage is often solved using tiling method placing many detector units side by side forming a large matrix. The current tiling techniques require rather large gaps of few millimeters between tiles. These gaps stand as areas insensitive to radiation which is acceptable only in some applications such as diffraction imaging. However standard transmission radiography requires fully continuous area sensitivity. In this article we present the new large area device WIDEPIX composed of a matrix of 10 × 10 tiles of silicon pixel detectors Timepix (each of 256 × 256 pixels with pitch of 55 μm) having fully sensitive area of 14.3 × 14.3 cm2 without any gaps between the tiles. The device contains a total of 6.5 mega pixels. This achievement was reached thanks to new technology of edgeless semiconductor sensors together with precise alignment technique and multilevel architecture of readout electronics. The mechanical construction of the device is fully modular and scalable. This concept allows replacing any single detector tile which significantly improves production yield. The first results in the field of X-ray radiography and material sensitive X-ray radiography are presented in this article.

  2. Fabrication of 721-pixel silicon lens array of a microwave kinetic inductance detector camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsui, Kenji; Nitta, Tom; Okada, Norio; Sekimoto, Yutaro; Karatsu, Kenichi; Sekiguchi, Shigeyuki; Sekine, Masakazu; Noguchi, Takashi

    2015-04-01

    We have been developed a lens-integrated superconducting camera for millimeter and submillimeter astronomy. High-purity silicon (Si) is suitable for the lens array of the microwave kinetic inductance detector camera due to its high refractive index and low dielectric loss at low temperatures. The camera is an antenna-coupled Al coplanar waveguide on a Si substrate. Thus the lens and the device are made of the same material. We report a fabrication method of a 721-pixel Si lens array with an antireflection (AR) coating. The Si lens array was fabricated with an ultraprecision cutting machine. It uses TiAlN-coated carbide end mills attached with a high-speed spindle. The shape accuracy was less than 50 μm peak-to-valley and the surface roughness was arithmetic average roughness (Ra) of 1.8 μm. The mixed epoxy was used as an AR coating to adjust the refractive index. It was shaved to yield a thickness of 185 μm for 220 GHz. Narrow grooves were made between the lenses to prevent cracking due to the different thermal expansion coefficients of Si and the epoxy. The surface roughness of the AR coating was Ra of 2.4 to 4.2 μm.

  3. Performance of the reconstruction algorithms of the FIRST experiment pixel sensors vertex detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rescigno, R.; Finck, Ch.; Juliani, D.; Spiriti, E.; Baudot, J.; Abou-Haidar, Z.; Agodi, C.; Alvarez, M. A. G.; Aumann, T.; Battistoni, G.; Bocci, A.; Böhlen, T. T.; Boudard, A.; Brunetti, A.; Carpinelli, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cortes-Giraldo, M. A.; Cuttone, G.; De Napoli, M.; Durante, M.; Gallardo, M. I.; Golosio, B.; Iarocci, E.; Iazzi, F.; Ickert, G.; Introzzi, R.; Krimmer, J.; Kurz, N.; Labalme, M.; Leifels, Y.; Le Fevre, A.; Leray, S.; Marchetto, F.; Monaco, V.; Morone, M. C.; Oliva, P.; Paoloni, A.; Patera, V.; Piersanti, L.; Pleskac, R.; Quesada, J. M.; Randazzo, N.; Romano, F.; Rossi, D.; Rousseau, M.; Sacchi, R.; Sala, P.; Sarti, A.; Scheidenberger, C.; Schuy, C.; Sciubba, A.; Sfienti, C.; Simon, H.; Sipala, V.; Tropea, S.; Vanstalle, M.; Younis, H.

    2014-12-01

    Hadrontherapy treatments use charged particles (e.g. protons and carbon ions) to treat tumors. During a therapeutic treatment with carbon ions, the beam undergoes nuclear fragmentation processes giving rise to significant yields of secondary charged particles. An accurate prediction of these production rates is necessary to estimate precisely the dose deposited into the tumours and the surrounding healthy tissues. Nowadays, a limited set of double differential carbon fragmentation cross-section is available. Experimental data are necessary to benchmark Monte Carlo simulations for their use in hadrontherapy. The purpose of the FIRST experiment is to study nuclear fragmentation processes of ions with kinetic energy in the range from 100 to 1000 MeV/u. Tracks are reconstructed using information from a pixel silicon detector based on the CMOS technology. The performances achieved using this device for hadrontherapy purpose are discussed. For each reconstruction step (clustering, tracking and vertexing), different methods are implemented. The algorithm performances and the accuracy on reconstructed observables are evaluated on the basis of simulated and experimental data.

  4. Power and area efficient 4-bit column-level ADC in a CMOS pixel sensor for the ILD vertex detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Morel, F.; Hu-Guo, Ch; Hu, Y.

    2013-01-01

    A 48 × 64 pixels prototype CMOS pixel sensor (CPS) integrated with 4-bit column-level, self triggered ADCs for the outer layers of the ILD vertex detector (VTX) was developed and fabricated in a 0.35 μm CMOS process with a pixel pitch of 35 μm. The pixel concept combines in-pixel amplification with a correlated double sampling (CDS) operation. The ADCs accommodating the pixel read out in a rolling shutter mode complete the conversion by performing a multi-bit/step approximation. The design was optimised for power saving at sampling frequency. The prototype sensor is currently at the stage of being started testing and evaluation. So what is described is based on post simulation results rather than test data. This 4-bit ADC dissipates, at a 3-V supply and 6.25-MS/s sampling rate, 486 μW in its inactive mode, which is by far the most frequent. This value rises to 714 μW in case of the active mode. Its footprint amounts to 35 × 545 μm2.

  5. Efficient phase contrast imaging in STEM using a pixelated detector. Part 1: Experimental demonstration at atomic resolution

    DOE PAGES

    Pennycook, Timothy J.; Lupini, Andrew R.; Yang, Hao; ...

    2014-10-15

    In this paper, we demonstrate a method to achieve high efficiency phase contrast imaging in aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with a pixelated detector. The pixelated detector is used to record the Ronchigram as a function of probe position which is then analyzed with ptychography. Ptychography has previously been used to provide super-resolution beyond the diffraction limit of the optics, alongside numerically correcting for spherical aberration. Here we rely on a hardware aberration corrector to eliminate aberrations, but use the pixelated detector data set to utilize the largest possible volume of Fourier space to create high efficiency phasemore » contrast images. The use of ptychography to diagnose the effects of chromatic aberration is also demonstrated. In conclusion, the four dimensional dataset is used to compare different bright field detector configurations from the same scan for a sample of bilayer graphene. Our method of high efficiency ptychography produces the clearest images, while annular bright field produces almost no contrast for an in-focus aberration-corrected probe.« less

  6. Efficient phase contrast imaging in STEM using a pixelated detector. Part 1: Experimental demonstration at atomic resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Pennycook, Timothy J.; Lupini, Andrew R.; Yang, Hao; Murfitt, Matthew F.; Jones, Lewys; Nellist, Peter D.

    2014-10-15

    In this paper, we demonstrate a method to achieve high efficiency phase contrast imaging in aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with a pixelated detector. The pixelated detector is used to record the Ronchigram as a function of probe position which is then analyzed with ptychography. Ptychography has previously been used to provide super-resolution beyond the diffraction limit of the optics, alongside numerically correcting for spherical aberration. Here we rely on a hardware aberration corrector to eliminate aberrations, but use the pixelated detector data set to utilize the largest possible volume of Fourier space to create high efficiency phase contrast images. The use of ptychography to diagnose the effects of chromatic aberration is also demonstrated. In conclusion, the four dimensional dataset is used to compare different bright field detector configurations from the same scan for a sample of bilayer graphene. Our method of high efficiency ptychography produces the clearest images, while annular bright field produces almost no contrast for an in-focus aberration-corrected probe.

  7. Hard-X and gamma-ray imaging detector for astrophysics based on pixelated CdTe semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gálvez, J.-L.; Hernanz, M.; Álvarez, L.; Artigues, B.; Ullán, M.; Lozano, M.; Pellegrini, G.; Cabruja, E.; Martínez, R.; Chmeissani, M.; Puigdengoles, C.

    2016-01-01

    Stellar explosions are astrophysical phenomena of great importance and interest. Instruments with high sensitivities are essential to perform detailed studies of cosmic explosions and cosmic accelerators. In order to achieve the needed performance, a hard-X and gamma-ray imaging detector with mm spatial resolution and large enough efficiency is required. We present a detector module which consists of a single CdTe crystal of 12.5 × 12.5mm 2 and 2mm thick with a planar cathode and with the anode segmented in an 11x11 pixel array with a pixel pitch of 1 mm attached to the readout chip. Two possible detector module configurations are considered: the so-called Planar Transverse Field (PTF) and the Parallel Planar Field (PPF). The combination of several modules in PTF or PPF configuration will achieve the desired performance of the imaging detector. The sum energy resolution of all pixels of the CdTe module measured at 122 keV and 356 keV is 3.8% and 2% respectively, in the following operating conditions: PPF irradiation, bias voltage -500 V and temperature -10̂ C.

  8. Construction and testing of a pixellated CZT detector and shield for a hard x-ray astronomy balloon flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloser, Peter F.; Narita, Tomohiko; Jenkins, Jonathan A.; Grindlay, Jonathan E.

    2000-12-01

    We report on the construction and laboratory testing of pixellated CZT detectors mounted in a flip-chip, tiled fashion and read out by an ASIC, as required for proposed hard X-ray astronomy missions. Two 10 mm X 10 mm X 5 mm detectors were fabricated, one out of standard eV Products high-pressure Bridgman CZT and one out of IMARAD horizontal Bridgman CZT. Each was fashioned with a 4 X 4 array of gold pixels on 2.5 mm pitch with a surrounding guard ring. The detectors were mounted side by side on a carrier card, such that the pixel pitch was preserved, and read out by a 32-channel VA-TA ASIC from IDE AS Corp. controlled by a PC/104 single-board computer. A passive shield/collimator surrounded by plastic scintillator encloses the detectors on five sides and provides an approximately 40 degree field of view. Thus this experiment tests key techniques required for future hard X-ray survey instruments. The experiment was taken to Ft. Sumner, NM in May 2000 in preparation for a scientific balloon flight aboard the joint Harvard-MSFC EXITE2/HERO payload. Although we did not receive a flight opportunity, and are currently scheduled to fly in September 2000, we present our calibration data in the flight configuration together with data analysis techniques and simulations of the expected flight background spectrum.

  9. Measurements and TCAD simulation of novel ATLAS planar pixel detector structures for the HL-LHC upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nellist, C.; Dinu, N.; Gkougkousis, E.; Lounis, A.

    2015-06-01

    The LHC accelerator complex will be upgraded between 2020-2022, to the High-Luminosity-LHC, to considerably increase statistics for the various physics analyses. To operate under these challenging new conditions, and maintain excellent performance in track reconstruction and vertex location, the ATLAS pixel detector must be substantially upgraded and a full replacement is expected. Processing techniques for novel pixel designs are optimised through characterisation of test structures in a clean room and also through simulations with Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD). A method to study non-perpendicular tracks through a pixel device is discussed. Comparison of TCAD simulations with Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) measurements to investigate the doping profile of structures and validate the simulation process is also presented.

  10. On the possibility to use semiconductive hybrid pixel detectors for study of radiation belt of the Earth.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guskov, A.; Shelkov, G.; Smolyanskiy, P.; Zhemchugov, A.

    2016-02-01

    The scientific apparatus GAMMA-400 designed for study of electromagnetic and hadron components of cosmic rays will be launched to an elliptic orbit with the apogee of about 300 000 km and the perigee of about 500 km. Such a configuration of the orbit allows it to cross periodically the radiation belt and the outer part of magnetosphere. We discuss the possibility to use hybrid pixel detecters based on the Timepix chip and semiconductive sensors on board the GAMMA-400 apparatus. Due to high granularity of the sensor (pixel size is 55 mum) and possibility to measure independently an energy deposition in each pixel, such compact and lightweight detector could be a unique instrument for study of spatial, energy and time structure of electron and proton components of the radiation belt.

  11. A prototype of a new generation readout ASIC in 65nm CMOS for pixel detectors at HL-LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteil, E.; Pacher, L.; Paternò, A.; Loddo, F.; Demaria, N.; Gaioni, L.; De Canio, F.; Traversi, G.; Re, V.; Ratti, L.; Rivetti, A.; Da Rocha Rolo, M.; Dellacasa, G.; Mazza, G.; Marzocca, C.; Licciulli, F.; Ciciriello, F.; Marconi, S.; Placidi, P.; Magazzù, G.; Stabile, A.; Mattiazzo, S.; Veri, C.

    2016-12-01

    This paper describes a readout ASIC prototype designed by CHIPIX65 project, part of RD53, for a pixel detector at HL-LHC . A 64 × 64 matrix of 50 × 50 μ m2 pixels is realised. A digital architecture has been developed, with particle efficiency above 99.9% at 3 GHz/cm2 pixel rate, 1 MHz trigger rate with 12.5 μ s latency. Two analog front end designs, one synchronous and one asynchronous, are implemented. Charge is measured with 5-bit precision and the analog dead-time is below 1%. IP-blocks (DAC, ADC, BandGap, SER, sLVS-TX/RX) and very front ends are silicon proven, irradiated to 600-800Mrad.

  12. A prototype of pixel readout ASIC in 65 nm CMOS technology for extreme hit rate detectors at HL-LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paternò, A.; Pacher, L.; Monteil, E.; Loddo, F.; Demaria, N.; Gaioni, L.; De Canio, F.; Traversi, G.; Re, V.; Ratti, L.; Rivetti, A.; Da Rocha Rolo, M.; Dellacasa, G.; Mazza, G.; Marzocca, C.; Licciulli, F.; Ciciriello, F.; Marconi, S.; Placidi, P.; Magazzù, G.; Stabile, A.; Mattiazzo, S.; Veri, C.

    2017-02-01

    This paper describes a readout ASIC prototype designed by the CHIPIX65 project, part of RD53, for a pixel detector at HL-LHC . A 64×64 matrix of 50×50μm2 pixels is realised. A digital architecture has been developed, with particle efficiency above 99.5% at 3 GHz/cm2 pixel rate, trigger frequency of 1 MHz and 12.5μsec latency. Two analog front end designs, one synchronous and one asynchronous, are implemented. Charge is measured with 5-bit precision, analog dead-time below 1%. The chip integrates for the first time many of the components developed by the collaboration in the past, including the Digital-to-Analog converters, Bandgap reference, Serializer, sLVS drivers, and analog Front Ends. Irradiation tests on these components proved their reliability up to 600 Mrad.

  13. Five-element Johann-type x-ray emission spectrometer with a single-photon-counting pixel detector.

    PubMed

    Kleymenov, Evgeny; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A; David, Christian; Glatzel, Pieter; Janousch, Markus; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Studer, Marco; Willimann, Markus; Bergamaschi, Anna; Henrich, Beat; Nachtegaal, Maarten

    2011-06-01

    A Johann-type spectrometer with five spherically bent crystals and a pixel detector was constructed for a range of hard x-ray photon-in photon-out synchrotron techniques, covering a Bragg-angle range of 60°-88°. The spectrometer provides a sub emission line width energy resolution from sub-eV to a few eV and precise energy calibration, better than 1.5 eV for the full range of Bragg angles. The use of a pixel detector allows fast and easy optimization of the signal-to-background ratio. A concentration detection limit below 0.4 wt% was reached at the Cu Kα(1) line. The spectrometer is designed as a modular mobile device for easy integration in a multi-purpose hard x-ray synchrotron beamline, such as the SuperXAS beamline at the Swiss Light Source.

  14. Five-element Johann-type x-ray emission spectrometer with a single-photon-counting pixel detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kleymenov, Evgeny; Bokhoven, Jeroen A. van; David, Christian; Janousch, Markus; Studer, Marco; Willimann, Markus; Bergamaschi, Anna; Henrich, Beat; Nachtegaal, Maarten; Glatzel, Pieter; Alonso-Mori, Roberto

    2011-06-15

    A Johann-type spectrometer with five spherically bent crystals and a pixel detector was constructed for a range of hard x-ray photon-in photon-out synchrotron techniques, covering a Bragg-angle range of 60 deg. - 88 deg. The spectrometer provides a sub emission line width energy resolution from sub-eV to a few eV and precise energy calibration, better than 1.5 eV for the full range of Bragg angles. The use of a pixel detector allows fast and easy optimization of the signal-to-background ratio. A concentration detection limit below 0.4 wt% was reached at the Cu K{alpha}{sub 1} line. The spectrometer is designed as a modular mobile device for easy integration in a multi-purpose hard x-ray synchrotron beamline, such as the SuperXAS beamline at the Swiss Light Source.

  15. a Portable Pixel Detector Operating as AN Active Nuclear Emulsion and its Application for X-Ray and Neutron Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vykydal, Z.; Jakubek, J.; Holy, T.; Pospisil, S.

    2006-04-01

    This work is devoted to the development of a USB1.1 (Universal Serial Bus) based read out system for the Medipix2 detector to achieve maximum portability of this position sensitive detecting device. All necessary detector support is integrated into one compact system (80 × 50 × 20 mm3) including the detector bias source (up to 100 V). The read out interface can control external I2C based devices, so in case of tomography it is easy to synchronize detector shutter with stepper motor control. An additional significant advantage of the USB interface is the support of back side pulse processing. This feature enables to determine the energy additionally to the position of a heavy charged particle hitting the sensor. Due to the small pixel dimensions it is also possible to distinguish the type of single quanta of radiation from the track created in the pixel detector as in case of an active nuclear emulsion.

  16. Use of high-granularity CdZnTe pixelated detectors to correct response non-uniformities caused by defects in crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; De Geronimo, G.; Eger, J.; Emerick, A.; Fried, J.; Hossain, A.; Roy, U.; Salwen, C.; Soldner, S.; Vernon, E.; Yang, G.; James, R. B.

    2015-09-06

    Following our successful demonstration of the position-sensitive virtual Frisch-grid detectors, we investigated the feasibility of using high-granularity position sensing to correct response non-uniformities caused by the crystal defects in CdZnTe (CZT) pixelated detectors. The development of high-granularity detectors able to correct response non-uniformities on a scale comparable to the size of electron clouds opens the opportunity of using unselected off-the-shelf CZT material, whilst still assuring high spectral resolution for the majority of the detectors fabricated from an ingot. Here, we present the results from testing 3D position-sensitive 15×15×10 mm3 pixelated detectors, fabricated with conventional pixel patterns with progressively smaller pixel sizes: 1.4, 0.8, and 0.5 mm. We employed the readout system based on the H3D front-end multi-channel ASIC developed by BNL's Instrumentation Division in collaboration with the University of Michigan. We use the sharing of electron clouds among several adjacent pixels to measure locations of interaction points with sub-pixel resolution. By using the detectors with small-pixel sizes and a high probability of the charge-sharing events, we were able to improve their spectral resolutions in comparison to the baseline levels, measured for the 1.4-mm pixel size detectors with small fractions of charge-sharing events. These results demonstrate that further enhancement of the performance of CZT pixelated detectors and reduction of costs are possible by using high spatial-resolution position information of interaction points to correct the small-scale response non-uniformities caused by crystal defects present in most devices.

  17. Use of high-granularity CdZnTe pixelated detectors to correct response non-uniformities caused by defects in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; De Geronimo, G.; Eger, J.; Emerick, A.; Fried, J.; Hossain, A.; Roy, U.; Salwen, C.; Soldner, S.; Vernon, E.; Yang, G.; James, R. B.

    2016-01-01

    Following our successful demonstration of the position-sensitive virtual Frisch-grid detectors, we investigated the feasibility of using high-granularity position sensing to correct response non-uniformities caused by the crystal defects in CdZnTe (CZT) pixelated detectors. The development of high-granularity detectors able to correct response non-uniformities on a scale comparable to the size of electron clouds opens the opportunity of using unselected off-the-shelf CZT material, whilst still assuring high spectral resolution for the majority of the detectors fabricated from an ingot. Here, we present the results from testing 3D position-sensitive 15×15×10 mm3 pixelated detectors, fabricated with conventional pixel patterns with progressively smaller pixel sizes: 1.4, 0.8, and 0.5 mm. We employed the readout system based on the H3D front-end multi-channel ASIC developed by BNL's Instrumentation Division in collaboration with the University of Michigan. We use the sharing of electron clouds among several adjacent pixels to measure locations of interaction points with sub-pixel resolution. By using the detectors with small-pixel sizes and a high probability of the charge-sharing events, we were able to improve their spectral resolutions in comparison to the baseline levels, measured for the 1.4-mm pixel size detectors with small fractions of charge-sharing events. These results demonstrate that further enhancement of the performance of CZT pixelated detectors and reduction of costs are possible by using high spatial-resolution position information of interaction points to correct the small-scale response non-uniformities caused by crystal defects present in most devices.

  18. Development of a fast pixel array detector for use in microsecond time-resolved x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Barna, S.L.; Gruner, S.M.; Shepherd, J.A.

    1995-08-01

    A large-area pixel x-ray detector is being developed to collect eight successive frames of wide dynamic range two-dimensional images at 200kHz rates. Such a detector, in conjunction with a synchrotron radiation x-ray source, will enable time-resolved x-ray studies of proteins and other materials on time scales which have previously been inaccessible. The detector will consist of an array of fully-depleted 150 micron square diodes connected to a CMOS integrated electronics layer with solder bump-bonding. During each framing period, the current resulting from the x-rays stopped in the diodes is integrated in the electronics layer, and then stored in one of eight storage capacitors underneath the pixel. After the last frame, the capacitors are read out at standard data transmission rates. The detector has been designed for a well-depth of at least 10,000 x-rays (at 20keV), and a noise level of one x-ray. Ultimately, the authors intend to construct a detector with over one million pixels (1024 by 1024). They present the results of their development effort and various features of the design. The electronics design is discussed, with special attention to the performance requirements. The choice and design of the detective diodes, as they relate to x-ray stopping power and charge collection, are presented. An analysis of various methods of bump bonding is also presented. Finally, the authors discuss the possible need for a radiation-blocking layer, to be placed between the electronics and the detective layer, and various methods they have pursued in the construction of such a layer.

  19. Nuclear resonant scattering measurements on {sup 57}Fe by multichannel scaling with a 64-pixel silicon avalanche photodiode linear-array detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kishimoto, S. Haruki, R.; Mitsui, T.; Yoda, Y.; Taniguchi, T.; Shimazaki, S.; Ikeno, M.; Saito, M.; Tanaka, M.

    2014-11-15

    We developed a silicon avalanche photodiode (Si-APD) linear-array detector for use in nuclear resonant scattering experiments using synchrotron X-rays. The Si-APD linear array consists of 64 pixels (pixel size: 100 × 200 μm{sup 2}) with a pixel pitch of 150 μm and depletion depth of 10 μm. An ultrafast frontend circuit allows the X-ray detector to obtain a high output rate of >10{sup 7} cps per pixel. High-performance integrated circuits achieve multichannel scaling over 1024 continuous time bins with a 1 ns resolution for each pixel without dead time. The multichannel scaling method enabled us to record a time spectrum of the 14.4 keV nuclear radiation at each pixel with a time resolution of 1.4 ns (FWHM). This method was successfully applied to nuclear forward scattering and nuclear small-angle scattering on {sup 57}Fe.

  20. Preliminary test results of a new high-energy-resolution silicon and CdZnTe pixel detectors for application to x-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sushkov, V. V.; Hamilton, William J.; Hurley, Kevin; Maeding, Dale G.; Ogelman, Hakki; Paulos, Robert J.; Puetter, Richard C.; Tumer, Tumay O.; Zweerink, Jeffrey

    1999-10-01

    New, high spatial resolution CdZnTe (CZT) and silicon (Si) pixel detectors are highly suitable for x-ray astronomy. These detectors are planned for use in wide field of view, imaging x-ray, and low energy gamma-ray all-sky monitor (AXGAM) in a future space mission. The high stopping power of CZT detectors combined with low-noise front-end readout makes possible an order of magnitude improvement in spatial and energy resolution in x-ray detection. The AXGAM instrument will be built in the form of a fine coded aperture placed over two-dimensional, high spatial resolution and low energy threshold CZT pixel detector array. The preliminary result of CZT and silicon pixel detector test with low-noise readout electronics system are presented. These detectors may also be used with or without modification for medical and industrial imaging.

  1. Results from the NA62 Gigatracker Prototype: A Low-Mass and sub-ns Time Resolution Silicon Pixel Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorini, M.; Rinella, G. Aglieri; Carassiti, V.; Ceccucci, A.; Gil, E. Cortina; Ramusino, A. Cotta; Dellacasa, G.; Garbolino, S.; Jarron, P.; Kaplon, J.; Kluge, A.; Marchetto, F.; Mapelli, A.; Martin, E.; Mazza, G.; Morel, M.; Noy, M.; Nuessle, G.; Petagna, P.; Petrucci, F.; Perktold, L.; Riedler, P.; Rivetti, A.; Statera, M.; Velghe, B.

    The Gigatracker (GTK) is a hybrid silicon pixel detector developed for NA62, the experiment aimed at studying ultra-rare kaon decays at the CERN SPS. Three GTK stations will provide precise momentum and angular measurements on every track of the high intensity NA62 hadron beam with a time-tagging resolution of 150 ps. Multiple scattering and hadronic interactions of beam particles in the GTK have to be minimized to keep background events at acceptable levels, hence the total material budget is fixed to 0.5% X0 per station. In addition the calculated fluence for 100 days of running is 2×1014 1 MeV neq/cm2, comparable to the one expected for the inner trackers of LHC detectors in 10 years of operation. These requirements pose challenges for the development of an efficient and low-mass cooling system, to be operated in vacuum, and on the thinning of read-out chips to 100 μm or less. The most challenging requirement is represented by the time resolution, which can be achieved by carefully compensating for the discriminator time-walk. For this purpose, two complementary read-out architectures have been designed and produced as small-scale prototypes: the first is based on the use of a Time-over-Threshold circuit followed by a TDC shared by a group of pixels, while the other uses a constant-fraction discriminator followed by an on-pixel TDC. The readout pixel ASICs are produced in 130 nm IBM CMOS technology and bump-bonded to 200 μm thick silicon sensors. The Gigatracker detector system is described with particular emphasis on recent experimental results obtained from laboratory and beam tests of prototype bump-bonded assemblies, which show a time resolution of less than 200 ps for single hits.

  2. Characterization of CdTe sensors with Schottky contacts coupled to charge-integrating pixel array detectors for X-ray science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, J.; Tate, M. W.; Shanks, K. S.; Philipp, H. T.; Weiss, J. T.; Purohit, P.; Chamberlain, D.; Ruff, J. P. C.; Gruner, S. M.

    2016-12-01

    Pixel Array Detectors (PADs) consist of an x-ray sensor layer bonded pixel-by-pixel to an underlying readout chip. This approach allows both the sensor and the custom pixel electronics to be tailored independently to best match the x-ray imaging requirements. Here we present characterizations of CdTe sensors hybridized with two different charge-integrating readout chips, the Keck PAD and the Mixed-Mode PAD (MM-PAD), both developed previously in our laboratory. The charge-integrating architecture of each of these PADs extends the instantaneous counting rate by many orders of magnitude beyond that obtainable with photon counting architectures. The Keck PAD chip consists of rapid, 8-frame, in-pixel storage elements with framing periods < 150 ns. The second detector, the MM-PAD, has an extended dynamic range by utilizing an in-pixel overflow counter coupled with charge removal circuitry activated at each overflow. This allows the recording of signals from the single-photon level to tens of millions of x-rays/pixel/frame while framing at 1 kHz. Both detector chips consist of a 128 × 128 pixel array with (150 μm)2 pixels.

  3. Use of high-granularity CdZnTe pixelated detectors to correct response non-uniformities caused by defects in crystals

    DOE PAGES

    Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; ...

    2015-09-06

    Following our successful demonstration of the position-sensitive virtual Frisch-grid detectors, we investigated the feasibility of using high-granularity position sensing to correct response non-uniformities caused by the crystal defects in CdZnTe (CZT) pixelated detectors. The development of high-granularity detectors able to correct response non-uniformities on a scale comparable to the size of electron clouds opens the opportunity of using unselected off-the-shelf CZT material, whilst still assuring high spectral resolution for the majority of the detectors fabricated from an ingot. Here, we present the results from testing 3D position-sensitive 15×15×10 mm3 pixelated detectors, fabricated with conventional pixel patterns with progressively smaller pixelmore » sizes: 1.4, 0.8, and 0.5 mm. We employed the readout system based on the H3D front-end multi-channel ASIC developed by BNL's Instrumentation Division in collaboration with the University of Michigan. We use the sharing of electron clouds among several adjacent pixels to measure locations of interaction points with sub-pixel resolution. By using the detectors with small-pixel sizes and a high probability of the charge-sharing events, we were able to improve their spectral resolutions in comparison to the baseline levels, measured for the 1.4-mm pixel size detectors with small fractions of charge-sharing events. These results demonstrate that further enhancement of the performance of CZT pixelated detectors and reduction of costs are possible by using high spatial-resolution position information of interaction points to correct the small-scale response non-uniformities caused by crystal defects present in most devices.« less

  4. Investigation of CMOS pixel sensor with 0.18 μm CMOS technology for high-precision tracking detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Fu, M.; Zhang, Y.; Yan, W.; Wang, M.

    2017-01-01

    The Circular Electron Positron Collider (CEPC) proposed by the Chinese high energy physics community is aiming to measure Higgs particles and their interactions precisely. The tracking detector including Silicon Inner Tracker (SIT) and Forward Tracking Disks (FTD) has driven stringent requirements on sensor technologies in term of spatial resolution, power consumption and readout speed. CMOS Pixel Sensor (CPS) is a promising candidate to approach these requirements. This paper presents the preliminary studies on the sensor optimization for tracking detector to achieve high collection efficiency while keeping necessary spatial resolution. Detailed studies have been performed on the charge collection using a 0.18 μm CMOS image sensor process. This process allows high resistivity epitaxial layer, leading to a significant improvement on the charge collection and therefore improving the radiation tolerance. Together with the simulation results, the first exploratory prototype has bee designed and fabricated. The prototype includes 9 different pixel arrays, which vary in terms of pixel pitch, diode size and geometry. The total area of the prototype amounts to 2 × 7.88 mm2.

  5. The Gigatracker: An ultra-fast and low-mass silicon pixel detector for the NA62 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorini, M.; Carassiti, V.; Ceccucci, A.; Cortina, E.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Dellacasa, G.; Garbolino, S.; Jarron, P.; Kaplon, J.; Kluge, A.; Mapelli, A.; Marchetto, F.; Martin, E.; Martoiu, S.; Mazza, G.; Morel, M.; Noy, M.; Nuessle, G.; Petrucci, F.; Riedler, P.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Rivetti, A.; Tiuraniemi, S.

    2011-02-01

    The Gigatracker is a hybrid silicon pixel detector developed to track the highly intense NA62 hadron beam with a time resolution of 150 ps (rms). The beam spectrometer of the experiment is composed of three Gigatracker stations installed in vacuum in order to precisely measure momentum, time and direction of every traversing particle. Precise tracking demands a very low mass of the detector assembly ( <0.5% X0 per station) in order to limit multiple scattering and beam hadronic interactions. The high rate and especially the high timing precision requirements are very demanding: two R&D options are ongoing and the corresponding prototype read-out chips have been recently designed and produced in 0.13 μm CMOS technology. One solution makes use of a constant fraction discriminator and on-pixel analogue-based time-to-digital-converter (TDC); the other comprises a delay-locked loop based TDC placed at the end of each pixel column and a time-over-threshold discriminator with time-walk correction technique. The current status of the R&D program is overviewed and results from the prototype read-out chips test are presented.

  6. Fast Imaging Detector Readout Circuits with In-Pixel ADCs for Fourier Transform Imaging Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rider, D.; Blavier, J-F.; Cunningham, T.; Hancock, B.; Key, R.; Pannell, Z.; Sander, S.; Seshadri, S.; Sun, C.; Wrigley, C.

    2011-01-01

    Focal plane arrays (FPAs) with high frame rates and many pixels benefit several upcoming Earth science missions including GEO-CAPE, GACM, and ACE by enabling broader spatial coverage and higher spectral resolution. FPAs for the PanFTS, a high spatial resolution Fourier transform spectrometer and a candidate instrument for the GEO-CAPE mission are the focus of the developments reported here, but this FPA technology has the potential to enable a variety of future measurements and instruments. The ESTO ACT Program funded the developed of a fast readout integrated circuit (ROIC) based on an innovative in-pixel analog-to-digital converter (ADC). The 128 X 128 pixel ROIC features 60 ?m pixels, a 14-bit ADC in each pixel and operates at a continuous frame rate of 14 kHz consuming only 1.1 W of power. The ROIC outputs digitized data completely eliminating the bulky, power consuming signal chains needed by conventional FPAs. The 128 X 128 pixel ROIC has been fabricated in CMOS and tested at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The current version is designed to be hybridized with PIN photodiode arrays via indium bump bonding for light detection in the visible and ultraviolet spectral regions. However, the ROIC design incorporates a small photodiode in each cell to permit detailed characterization of the ROICperformance without the need for hybridization. We will describe the essential features of the ROIC design and present results of ROIC performance measurements.

  7. iPadPix—A novel educational tool to visualise radioactivity measured by a hybrid pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, O.; Schmeling, S.; Müller, A.; Benoit, M.

    2016-11-01

    With the ability to attribute signatures of ionising radiation to certain particle types, pixel detectors offer a unique advantage over the traditional use of Geiger-Müller tubes also in educational settings. We demonstrate in this work how a Timepix readout chip combined with a standard 300μm pixelated silicon sensor can be used to visualise radioactivity in real-time and by means of augmented reality. The chip family is the result of technology transfer from High Energy Physics at CERN and facilitated by the Medipix Collaboration. This article summarises the development of a prototype based on an iPad mini and open source software detailed in ref. [1]. Appropriate experimental activities that explore natural radioactivity and everyday objects are given to demonstrate the use of this new tool in educational settings.

  8. Energy calibration of energy-resolved photon-counting pixel detectors using laboratory polychromatic x-ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Hanbean; Han, Jong Chul; Kam, Soohwa; Yun, Seungman; Kim, Ho Kyung

    2014-10-01

    Recently, photon-counting detectors capable of resolving incident x-ray photon energies have been considered for use in spectral x-ray imaging applications. For reliable use of energy-resolved photon-counting detectors (ERPCDs), energy calibration is an essential procedure prior to their use because variations in responses from each pixel of the ERPCD for incident photons, even at the same energy, are inevitable. Energy calibration can be performed using a variety of methods. In all of these methods, the photon spectra with well-defined peak energies are recorded. Every pixel should be calibrated on its own. In this study, we suggest the use of a conventional polychromatic x-ray source (that is typically used in laboratories) for energy calibration. The energy calibration procedure mainly includes the determination of the peak energies in the spectra, flood-field irradiation, determination of peak channels, and determination of calibration curves (i.e., the slopes and intercepts of linear polynomials). We applied a calibration algorithm to a CdTe ERPCD comprised of 128×128 pixels with a pitch of 0.35 mm using highly attenuated polychromatic x-ray beams to reduce the pulse pile-up effect, and to obtain a narrow-shaped spectrum due to beam hardening. The averaged relative error in calibration curves obtained from 16,384 pixels was about 0.56% for 59.6 keV photons from an Americium radioisotope. This pixel-by-pixel energy calibration enhanced the signal- and contrast-to-noise ratios in images, respectively, by a factor of ~5 and 3 due to improvement in image homogeneity, compared to those obtained without energy calibration. One secondary finding of this study was that the x-ray photon spectra obtained using a common algorithm for computing x-ray spectra reasonably described the peaks in the measured spectra, which implies easier peak detection without the direct measurement of spectra using a separate spectrometer. The proposed method will be a useful alternative to

  9. Parallel optical coherence tomography in scattering samples using a two-dimensional smart-pixel detector array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducros, M.; Laubscher, M.; Karamata, B.; Bourquin, S.; Lasser, T.; Salathé, R. P.

    2002-02-01

    Parallel optical coherence tomography in scattering samples is demonstrated using a 58×58 smart-pixel detector array. A femtosecond mode-locked Ti:Sapphire laser in combination with a free space Michelson interferometer was employed to achieve 4 μm longitudinal resolution and 9 μm transverse resolution on a 260×260 μm2 field of view. We imaged a resolution target covered by an intralipid solution with different scattering coefficients as well as onion cells.

  10. Linear analysis of signal and noise characteristics of a nonlinear CMOS active-pixel detector for mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Seungman; Kim, Ho Kyung; Han, Jong Chul; Kam, Soohwa; Youn, Hanbean; Cunningham, Ian A.

    2017-03-01

    The imaging properties of a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) active-pixel photodiode array coupled to a thin gadolinium-based granular phosphor screen with a fiber-optic faceplate are investigated. It is shown that this system has a nonlinear response at low detector exposure levels (<10 mR), resulting in an over-estimation of the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) by a factor of two in some cases. Errors in performance metrics on this scale make it difficult to compare new technologies with established systems and predict performance benchmarks that can be achieved in practice and help understand performance bottlenecks. It is shown the CMOS response is described by a power-law model that can be used to linearize image data. Linearization removed an unexpected dependence of the DQE on detector exposure level.

  11. Correction of complex nonlinear signal response from a pixel array detector

    DOE PAGES

    van Driel, Tim Brandt; Herrmann, Sven; Carini, Gabriella; ...

    2015-04-22

    The pulsed free-electron laser light sources represent a new challenge to photon area detectors due to the intrinsic spontaneous X-ray photon generation process that makes single-pulse detection necessary. Intensity fluctuations up to 100% between individual pulses lead to high linearity requirements in order to distinguish small signal changes. In real detectors, signal distortions as a function of the intensity distribution on the entire detector can occur. Here a robust method to correct this nonlinear response in an area detector is presented for the case of exposures to similar signals. The method is tested for the case of diffuse scattering frommore » liquids where relevant sub-1% signal changes appear on the same order as artifacts induced by the detector electronics.« less

  12. Correction of complex nonlinear signal response from a pixel array detector

    PubMed Central

    van Driel, Tim Brandt; Herrmann, Sven; Carini, Gabriella; Nielsen, Martin Meedom; Lemke, Henrik Till

    2015-01-01

    The pulsed free-electron laser light sources represent a new challenge to photon area detectors due to the intrinsic spontaneous X-ray photon generation process that makes single-pulse detection necessary. Intensity fluctuations up to 100% between individual pulses lead to high linearity requirements in order to distinguish small signal changes. In real detectors, signal distortions as a function of the intensity distribution on the entire detector can occur. Here a robust method to correct this nonlinear response in an area detector is presented for the case of exposures to similar signals. The method is tested for the case of diffuse scattering from liquids where relevant sub-1% signal changes appear on the same order as artifacts induced by the detector electronics. PMID:25931072

  13. Correction of complex nonlinear signal response from a pixel array detector

    SciTech Connect

    van Driel, Tim Brandt; Herrmann, Sven; Carini, Gabriella; Nielsen, Martin Meedom; Lemke, Henrik Till

    2015-04-22

    The pulsed free-electron laser light sources represent a new challenge to photon area detectors due to the intrinsic spontaneous X-ray photon generation process that makes single-pulse detection necessary. Intensity fluctuations up to 100% between individual pulses lead to high linearity requirements in order to distinguish small signal changes. In real detectors, signal distortions as a function of the intensity distribution on the entire detector can occur. Here a robust method to correct this nonlinear response in an area detector is presented for the case of exposures to similar signals. The method is tested for the case of diffuse scattering from liquids where relevant sub-1% signal changes appear on the same order as artifacts induced by the detector electronics.

  14. Radiation hardness assessment of the charge-integrating hybrid pixel detector JUNGFRAU 1.0 for photon science

    SciTech Connect

    Jungmann-Smith, J. H. Bergamaschi, A.; Brückner, M.; Dinapoli, R.; Greiffenberg, D.; Jaggi, A.; Maliakal, D.; Mayilyan, D.; Mezza, D.; Mozzanica, A.; Ramilli, M.; Ruder, Ch.; Schädler, L.; Schmitt, B.; Shi, X.; Tinti, G.; Cartier, S.; Medjoubi, K.

    2015-12-15

    JUNGFRAU (adJUstiNg Gain detector FoR the Aramis User station) is a two-dimensional hybrid pixel detector for photon science applications in free electron lasers, particularly SwissFEL, and synchrotron light sources. JUNGFRAU is an automatic gain switching, charge-integrating detector which covers a dynamic range of more than 10{sup 4} photons of an energy of 12 keV with a good linearity, uniformity of response, and spatial resolving power. The JUNGFRAU 1.0 application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) features a 256 × 256 pixel matrix of 75 × 75 μm{sup 2} pixels and is bump-bonded to a 320 μm thick Si sensor. Modules of 2 × 4 chips cover an area of about 4 × 8 cm{sup 2}. Readout rates in excess of 2 kHz enable linear count rate capabilities of 20 MHz (at 12 keV) and 50 MHz (at 5 keV). The tolerance of JUNGFRAU to radiation is a key issue to guarantee several years of operation at free electron lasers and synchrotrons. The radiation hardness of JUNGFRAU 1.0 is tested with synchrotron radiation up to 10 MGy of delivered dose. The effect of radiation-induced changes on the noise, baseline, gain, and gain switching is evaluated post-irradiation for both the ASIC and the hybridized assembly. The bare JUNGFRAU 1.0 chip can withstand doses as high as 10 MGy with minor changes to its noise and a reduction in the preamplifier gain. The hybridized assembly, in particular the sensor, is affected by the photon irradiation which mainly shows as an increase in the leakage current. Self-healing of the system is investigated during a period of 11 weeks after the delivery of the radiation dose. Annealing radiation-induced changes by bake-out at 100 °C is investigated. It is concluded that the JUNGFRAU 1.0 pixel is sufficiently radiation-hard for its envisioned applications at SwissFEL and synchrotron beam lines.

  15. Radiation hardness assessment of the charge-integrating hybrid pixel detector JUNGFRAU 1.0 for photon science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungmann-Smith, J. H.; Bergamaschi, A.; Brückner, M.; Cartier, S.; Dinapoli, R.; Greiffenberg, D.; Jaggi, A.; Maliakal, D.; Mayilyan, D.; Medjoubi, K.; Mezza, D.; Mozzanica, A.; Ramilli, M.; Ruder, Ch.; Schädler, L.; Schmitt, B.; Shi, X.; Tinti, G.

    2015-12-01

    JUNGFRAU (adJUstiNg Gain detector FoR the Aramis User station) is a two-dimensional hybrid pixel detector for photon science applications in free electron lasers, particularly SwissFEL, and synchrotron light sources. JUNGFRAU is an automatic gain switching, charge-integrating detector which covers a dynamic range of more than 104 photons of an energy of 12 keV with a good linearity, uniformity of response, and spatial resolving power. The JUNGFRAU 1.0 application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) features a 256 × 256 pixel matrix of 75 × 75 μm2 pixels and is bump-bonded to a 320 μm thick Si sensor. Modules of 2 × 4 chips cover an area of about 4 × 8 cm2. Readout rates in excess of 2 kHz enable linear count rate capabilities of 20 MHz (at 12 keV) and 50 MHz (at 5 keV). The tolerance of JUNGFRAU to radiation is a key issue to guarantee several years of operation at free electron lasers and synchrotrons. The radiation hardness of JUNGFRAU 1.0 is tested with synchrotron radiation up to 10 MGy of delivered dose. The effect of radiation-induced changes on the noise, baseline, gain, and gain switching is evaluated post-irradiation for both the ASIC and the hybridized assembly. The bare JUNGFRAU 1.0 chip can withstand doses as high as 10 MGy with minor changes to its noise and a reduction in the preamplifier gain. The hybridized assembly, in particular the sensor, is affected by the photon irradiation which mainly shows as an increase in the leakage current. Self-healing of the system is investigated during a period of 11 weeks after the delivery of the radiation dose. Annealing radiation-induced changes by bake-out at 100 °C is investigated. It is concluded that the JUNGFRAU 1.0 pixel is sufficiently radiation-hard for its envisioned applications at SwissFEL and synchrotron beam lines.

  16. Radiation hardness assessment of the charge-integrating hybrid pixel detector JUNGFRAU 1.0 for photon science.

    PubMed

    Jungmann-Smith, J H; Bergamaschi, A; Brückner, M; Cartier, S; Dinapoli, R; Greiffenberg, D; Jaggi, A; Maliakal, D; Mayilyan, D; Medjoubi, K; Mezza, D; Mozzanica, A; Ramilli, M; Ruder, Ch; Schädler, L; Schmitt, B; Shi, X; Tinti, G

    2015-12-01

    JUNGFRAU (adJUstiNg Gain detector FoR the Aramis User station) is a two-dimensional hybrid pixel detector for photon science applications in free electron lasers, particularly SwissFEL, and synchrotron light sources. JUNGFRAU is an automatic gain switching, charge-integrating detector which covers a dynamic range of more than 10(4) photons of an energy of 12 keV with a good linearity, uniformity of response, and spatial resolving power. The JUNGFRAU 1.0 application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) features a 256 × 256 pixel matrix of 75 × 75 μm(2) pixels and is bump-bonded to a 320 μm thick Si sensor. Modules of 2 × 4 chips cover an area of about 4 × 8 cm(2). Readout rates in excess of 2 kHz enable linear count rate capabilities of 20 MHz (at 12 keV) and 50 MHz (at 5 keV). The tolerance of JUNGFRAU to radiation is a key issue to guarantee several years of operation at free electron lasers and synchrotrons. The radiation hardness of JUNGFRAU 1.0 is tested with synchrotron radiation up to 10 MGy of delivered dose. The effect of radiation-induced changes on the noise, baseline, gain, and gain switching is evaluated post-irradiation for both the ASIC and the hybridized assembly. The bare JUNGFRAU 1.0 chip can withstand doses as high as 10 MGy with minor changes to its noise and a reduction in the preamplifier gain. The hybridized assembly, in particular the sensor, is affected by the photon irradiation which mainly shows as an increase in the leakage current. Self-healing of the system is investigated during a period of 11 weeks after the delivery of the radiation dose. Annealing radiation-induced changes by bake-out at 100 °C is investigated. It is concluded that the JUNGFRAU 1.0 pixel is sufficiently radiation-hard for its envisioned applications at SwissFEL and synchrotron beam lines.

  17. Development of Superconducting Tunnel Junction X-ray Detector with High Absorption Yields Utilizing Silicon Pixel Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiki, Shigetomo; Fujii, Go; Ukibe, Masahiro; Kitajima, Yoshinori; Ohkubo, Masataka

    2016-07-01

    A superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) array detector along with silicon pixel absorbers (STJ-SPA) is fabricated to achieve high detection efficiency at X-ray energies below 10 keV. The STJ pixels have dimensions of 100 \\upmu m × 100 \\upmu m and are composed of Nb-Al/AlOX/Al-Nb thin layers. The SPAs are also 100 \\upmu m × 100 \\upmu m and have a depth of 400 \\upmu m, and are isolated from each other by a deep trench with a depth of 350 \\upmu m. The detection efficiency of the STJ-SPA exceeds 95 % at X-ray energies below 10 keV, and its energy resolution is 82 eV FWHM, as measured at the Si K\\upalpha line at 1740 eV. By means of the STJ-SPA detector, the X-ray absorption spectrum of the light element sulfur with a concentration of less than 0.1 wt% in a soda-lime glass sample was successfully acquired.

  18. High speed data transmission on small gauge cables for the ATLAS Phase-II Pixel detector upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahinian, J.; Volk, J.; Fadeyev, V.; Grillo, A. A.; Meimban, B.; Nielsen, J.; Wilder, M.

    2016-03-01

    The High Luminosity LHC will present a number of challenges for the upgraded ATLAS detector. In particular, data transmission requirements for the upgrade of the ATLAS Pixel detector will be difficult to meet. The expected trigger rate and occupancy imply multi-gigabit per second transmission rates will be required but radiation levels at the smallest radius preclude completely optical solutions. Electrical transmission up to distances of 7m will be necessary to move optical components to an area with lower radiation levels. Here, we explore the use of small gauge electrical cables as a high-bandwidth, radiation hard solution with a sufficiently small radiation length. In particular, we present a characterization of various twisted wire pair (TWP) configurations of various material structures, including measurements of their bandwidth, crosstalk, and radiation hardness. We find that a custom ``hybrid'' cable consisting of 1m of a multi-stranded TWP with Poly-Ether-Ether-Ketone (PEEK) insulation and a thin Al shield followed by 6m of a thin twin-axial cable presents a low-mass solution that fulfills bandwidth requirements and is expected to be sufficiently radiation hard. Additionally, we discuss preliminary results of using measured S-parameters to produce a SPICE model for a 1m sample of the custom TWP to be used for the development of new pixel readout chips.

  19. K-edge imaging with the XPAD3 hybrid pixel detector, direct comparison of CdTe and Si sensors.

    PubMed

    Cassol, F; Portal, L; Graber-Bolis, J; Perez-Ponce, H; Dupont, M; Kronland, C; Boursier, Y; Blanc, N; Bompard, F; Boudet, N; Buton, C; Clémens, J C; Dawiec, A; Debarbieux, F; Delpierre, P; Hustache, S; Vigeolas, E; Morel, C

    2015-07-21

    We investigate the improvement from the use of high-Z CdTe sensors for pre-clinical K-edge imaging with the hybrid pixel detectors XPAD3. We compare XPAD3 chips bump bonded to Si or CdTe sensors in identical experimental conditions. Image performance for narrow energy bin acquisitions and contrast-to-noise ratios of K-edge images are presented and compared. CdTe sensors achieve signal-to-noise ratios at least three times higher than Si sensors within narrow energy bins, thanks to their much higher detection efficiency. Nevertheless Si sensors provide better contrast-to-noise ratios in K-edge imaging when working at equivalent counting statistics, due to their better estimation of the attenuation coefficient of the contrast agent. Results are compared to simulated data in the case of the XPAD3/Si detector. Good agreement is observed when including charge sharing between pixels, which have a strong impact on contrast-to-noise ratios in K-edge images.

  20. X-ray tests of a Pixel Array Detector for coherent x-ray imaging at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koerner, L. J.; Philipp, H. T.; Hromalik, M. S.; Tate, M. W.; Gruner, S. M.

    2009-03-01

    Test results are presented of a pixel array detector (PAD) developed for x-ray imaging at the Stanford Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The basic module of the PAD consists of two bump-bonded chips: a reverse-biased silicon diode chip of 185 × 194 pixels, each of which is coupled by bump-bonds to a charge integrating CMOS ASIC with digitization in each pixel. The LCLS experiment requires a high signal-to-noise ratio for detection of single 8 keV x-rays, a pixel full-well exceeding 1,000 8 keV x-rays, a frame-rate of 120 Hz, and the ability to handle the arrival of thousands of x-rays per pixel in tens of femtoseconds. Measurements have verified a pixel full-well value of 2,700 8 keV x-rays. Single 8 keV photon detection has been shown with a signal-to-noise ratio of >6. Line-spread response measurements confirmed charge spreading to be limited to nearest neighbor pixels. Modules still functioned after dosages up to 75 Mrad(Si) at the detector face. Work is proceeding to incorporate an array of modules into a large-area detector.

  1. A PCIe DAQ board prototype for Pixel Detector in high energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lama, L.; Balbi, G.; Falchieri, D.; Pellegrini, G.; Preti, C.; Gabrielli, A.

    2017-01-01

    We present the design of the Pixel-ROD board, which is a PCIe data acquisition circuit designed to push data coming from custom links (like GBT) into the host computer memory. The board is designed in order to be flexible and highly-configurable, making it usable with different front end electronics devices via optical or electrical connections. The PCIe interface provides a high-bandwidth link towards the memory of a PC.

  2. Development of a pixelated CdTe detector module for a hard-x and gamma-ray imaging spectrometer application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvèz, J.-L.; Hernanz, M.; Álvarez, L.; Artigues, B.; Álvarez, J.-M.; Ullán, M.; Lozano, M.; Pellegrini, G.; Cabruja, E.; Martínez, R.; Chmeissani, M.; Puigdengoles, C.

    2016-07-01

    Stellar explosions are relevant and interesting astrophysical phenomena. Since long ago we have been working on the characterization of novae and supernovae in X and gamma-rays, with the use of space missions. We have also been involved in feasibility studies of future instruments in the energy range from several keV up to a few MeV, in collaboration with other research institutes. High sensitivities are essential to perform detailed studies of cosmic explosions and cosmic accelerators, e.g., Supernovae and Classical Novae. In order to fulfil the combined requirement of high detection efficiency with good spatial and energy resolution, an initial module prototype based on CdTe pixel detectors is being developed. The detector dimensions are 12.5mm x 12.5mm x 2mm with a pixel pitch of 1mm x 1mm. Two kinds of CdTe pixel detectors with different contacts have been tested: ohmic and Schottky. Each pixel is bump bonded to a fanout board made of Sapphire substrate and routed to the corresponding input channel of the readout VATAGP7.1 ASIC, to measure pixel position and pulse height for each incident gamma-ray photon. The study is complemented by the simulation of the CdTe module performance using the GEANT 4 and MEGALIB tools, which will help us to optimise the detector design. We will report on the spectroscopy characterisation of the CdTe detector module as well as the study of charge sharing.

  3. ATLAS IBL Pixel Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Rosa, A.; Atlas Ibl Collaboration

    2011-06-01

    The upgrade for ATLAS detector will undergo different phases towards super-LHC. The first upgrade for the Pixel detector will consist of the construction of a new pixel layer which will be installed during the first shutdown of the LHC machine (LHC phase-I upgrade). The new detector, called Insertable B-Layer (IBL), will be inserted between the existing pixel detector and a new (smaller radius) beam-pipe at a radius of 3.3 cm. The IBL will require the development of several new technologies to cope with increase of radiation or pixel occupancy and also to improve the physics performance which will be achieved by reducing the pixel size and of the material budget. Three different promising sensor technologies (planar-Si, 3D-Si and diamond) are currently under investigation for the pixel detector. An overview of the project with particular emphasis on the pixel module is presented in this paper.

  4. An algorithm for automatic crystal identification in pixelated scintillation detectors using thin plate splines and Gaussian mixture models.

    PubMed

    Schellenberg, Graham; Stortz, Greg; Goertzen, Andrew L

    2016-02-07

    A typical positron emission tomography detector is comprised of a scintillator crystal array coupled to a photodetector array or other position sensitive detector. Such detectors using light sharing to read out crystal elements require the creation of a crystal lookup table (CLUT) that maps the detector response to the crystal of interaction based on the x-y position of the event calculated through Anger-type logic. It is vital for system performance that these CLUTs be accurate so that the location of events can be accurately identified and so that crystal-specific corrections, such as energy windowing or time alignment, can be applied. While using manual segmentation of the flood image to create the CLUT is a simple and reliable approach, it is both tedious and time consuming for systems with large numbers of crystal elements. In this work we describe the development of an automated algorithm for CLUT generation that uses a Gaussian mixture model paired with thin plate splines (TPS) to iteratively fit a crystal layout template that includes the crystal numbering pattern. Starting from a region of stability, Gaussians are individually fit to data corresponding to crystal locations while simultaneously updating a TPS for predicting future Gaussian locations at the edge of a region of interest that grows as individual Gaussians converge to crystal locations. The algorithm was tested with flood image data collected from 16 detector modules, each consisting of a 409 crystal dual-layer offset LYSO crystal array readout by a 32 pixel SiPM array. For these detector flood images, depending on user defined input parameters, the algorithm runtime ranged between 17.5-82.5 s per detector on a single core of an Intel i7 processor. The method maintained an accuracy above 99.8% across all tests, with the majority of errors being localized to error prone corner regions. This method can be easily extended for use with other detector types through adjustment of the initial

  5. An algorithm for automatic crystal identification in pixelated scintillation detectors using thin plate splines and Gaussian mixture models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schellenberg, Graham; Stortz, Greg; Goertzen, Andrew L.

    2016-02-01

    A typical positron emission tomography detector is comprised of a scintillator crystal array coupled to a photodetector array or other position sensitive detector. Such detectors using light sharing to read out crystal elements require the creation of a crystal lookup table (CLUT) that maps the detector response to the crystal of interaction based on the x-y position of the event calculated through Anger-type logic. It is vital for system performance that these CLUTs be accurate so that the location of events can be accurately identified and so that crystal-specific corrections, such as energy windowing or time alignment, can be applied. While using manual segmentation of the flood image to create the CLUT is a simple and reliable approach, it is both tedious and time consuming for systems with large numbers of crystal elements. In this work we describe the development of an automated algorithm for CLUT generation that uses a Gaussian mixture model paired with thin plate splines (TPS) to iteratively fit a crystal layout template that includes the crystal numbering pattern. Starting from a region of stability, Gaussians are individually fit to data corresponding to crystal locations while simultaneously updating a TPS for predicting future Gaussian locations at the edge of a region of interest that grows as individual Gaussians converge to crystal locations. The algorithm was tested with flood image data collected from 16 detector modules, each consisting of a 409 crystal dual-layer offset LYSO crystal array readout by a 32 pixel SiPM array. For these detector flood images, depending on user defined input parameters, the algorithm runtime ranged between 17.5-82.5 s per detector on a single core of an Intel i7 processor. The method maintained an accuracy above 99.8% across all tests, with the majority of errors being localized to error prone corner regions. This method can be easily extended for use with other detector types through adjustment of the initial

  6. FDM Readout Assembly with Flexible, Superconducting Connection to Cryogenic kilo-Pixel TES Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruijn, M. P.; van der Linden, A. J.; Ridder, M. L.; van Weers, H. J.

    2016-07-01

    We describe a new fabrication process for a superconducting, flexible, and demountable connector to a kilo-pixel transition edge sensor. The demountable part contains planar coils for inductive coupling, in particular suited for AC-biased frequency domain multiplexed readout. A fixed connection to a chip with superconducting LC filters and SQUID readout is made by gold bump bonding with a connection resistance of 1.1 {× } 10^{-4} Ω . The Nb-based connecting lines on the flexible part show a superconducting transition around 7 K, which enables testing of connectors and LC filters in a simple L-He setup.

  7. PILATUS: A single photon counting pixel detector for X-ray applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrich, B.; Bergamaschi, A.; Broennimann, C.; Dinapoli, R.; Eikenberry, E. F.; Johnson, I.; Kobas, M.; Kraft, P.; Mozzanica, A.; Schmitt, B.

    2009-08-01

    The hybrid pixel technology combines silicon sensors with CMOS-processing chips by a 2D micro bump-bonding interconnection technology developed at Paul Scherrer Institute [C. Broennimann, E.F. Eikenberry, B. Henrich, R. Horisberger, G. Huelsen, E. Pohl, B. Schmitt, C. Schulze-Briese, M. Suzuki, T. Tomizaki, H. Toyokawa, A. Wagner. J. Synchrotron Rad. 13 (2005) 120 [1]; T. Rohe, C. Broennimann, F. Glaus, J. Gobrecht, S. Heising, M. Horisberger, R. Horisberger, H.C. Kaestl, J. Lehmann, S. Streuli, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. Phys. Res. A 565 (2006) 303 [2

  8. Prototype of a gigabit data transmitter in 65 nm CMOS for DEPFET pixel detectors at Belle-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishishita, T.; Krüger, H.; Hemperek, T.; Lemarenko, M.; Koch, M.; Gronewald, M.; Wermes, N.

    2013-08-01

    This paper describes the recent development of a gigabit data transmitter for the Belle-II pixel detector (PXD). The PXD is an innermost detector currently under development for the upgraded KEK-B factory in Japan. The PXD consists of two layers of DEPFET sensor modules located at 1.8 and 2.2 cm radii. Each module is equipped with three different ASIC types mounted on the detector substrate with a flip-chip technique: (a) SWITCHER for generating steering signals for the DEPFET sensors, (b) DCD for digitizing the signal currents, and (c) DHP for performing data processing and sending the data off the module to the back-end data handling hybrid via ∼ 40 cm Kapton flex and 12-15 m twisted pair (TWP) cables. To meet the requirements of the PXD data transmission, a prototype of the DHP data transmitter has been developed in a 65-nm standard CMOS technology. The transmitter test chip consists of current-mode logic (CML) drivers and a phase-locked loop (PLL) which generates a clock signal for a 1.6 Gbit/s output data stream from an 80 cm reference clock. A programmable pre-emphasis circuit is also implemented in the CML driver to compensate signal losses in the long cable by shaping the transmitted pulse response. The jitter performance was measured as 25 ps (1 σ distribution) by connecting the chip with 38 cm flex and 10 m TWP cables.

  9. Development of a CdTe pixel detector with a window comparator ASIC for high energy X-ray applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirono, T.; Toyokawa, H.; Furukawa, Y.; Honma, T.; Ikeda, H.; Kawase, M.; Koganezawa, T.; Ohata, T.; Sato, M.; Sato, G.; Takagaki, M.; Takahashi, T.; Watanabe, S.

    2011-09-01

    We have developed a photon-counting-type CdTe pixel detector (SP8-01). SP8-01 was designed as a prototype of a high-energy X-ray imaging detector for experiments using synchrotron radiation. SP8-01 has a CdTe sensor of 500 μm thickness, which has an absorption efficiency of almost 100% up to 50 keV and 45% even at 100 keV. A full-custom application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) was designed as a readout circuit of SP8-01, which is equipped with a window-type discriminator. The upper discriminator realizes a low-background measurement, because X-ray beams from the monochromator contain higher-order components beside the fundamental X-rays in general. ASIC chips were fabricated with a TSMC 0.25 μm CMOS process, and CdTe sensors were bump-bonded to the ASIC chips by a gold-stud bonding technique. Beam tests were performed at SPring-8. SP8-01 detected X-rays up to 120 keV. The capability of SP8-01 as an imaging detector for high-energy X-ray synchrotron radiation was evaluated with its performance characteristics.

  10. Characterization of a PET detector head based on continuous LYSO crystals and monolithic, 64-pixel silicon photomultiplier matrices.

    PubMed

    Llosá, G; Barrio, J; Lacasta, C; Bisogni, M G; Del Guerra, A; Marcatili, S; Barrillon, P; Bondil-Blin, S; de la Taille, C; Piemonte, C

    2010-12-07

    The characterization of a PET detector head based on continuous LYSO crystals and silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) arrays as photodetectors has been carried out for its use in the development of a small animal PET prototype. The detector heads are composed of a continuous crystal and a SiPM matrix with 64 pixels in a common substrate, fabricated specifically for this project. Three crystals of 12 mm × 12 mm × 5 mm size with different types of painting have been tested: white, black and black on the sides but white on the back of the crystal. The best energy resolution, obtained with the white crystal, is 16% FWHM. The detector response is linear up to 1275 keV. Tests with different position determination algorithms have been carried out with the three crystals. The spatial resolution obtained with the center of gravity algorithm is around 0.9 mm FWHM for the three crystals. As expected, the use of this algorithm results in the displacement of the reconstructed position toward the center of the crystal, more pronounced in the case of the white crystal. A maximum likelihood algorithm has been tested that can reconstruct correctly the interaction position of the photons also in the case of the white crystal.

  11. Test-beam results of a silicon pixel detector with Time-over-Threshold read-out having ultra-precise time resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aglieri Rinella, G.; Cortina Gil, E.; Fiorini, M.; Kaplon, J.; Kluge, A.; Marchetto, F.; Albarran, M. E. Martin; Morel, M.; Noy, M.; Perktold, L.; Tiuraniem, S.; Velghe, B.

    2015-12-01

    A time-tagging hybrid silicon pixel detector developed for beam tracking in the NA62 experiment has been tested in a dedicated test-beam at CERN with 10 GeV/c hadrons. Measurements include time resolution, detection efficiency and charge sharing between pixels, as well as effects due to bias voltage variations. A time resolution of less than 150 ps has been measured with a 200 μm thick silicon sensor, using an on-pixel amplifier-discriminator and an end-of-column DLL-based time-to-digital converter.

  12. Development of 36M-pixel x-ray detector for large field of view and high-resolution micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umetani, Keiji; Kawata, Yoshiki; Niki, Noboru

    2016-10-01

    A high-resolution and large field-of-view micro-CT system is indispensable for the visualization of fine threedimensional (3-D) structures of a large specimen. Such a system drastically increases the overall number of effective sensor pixels. At SPring-8 over a decade ago, a micro-CT system based on a 10M-pixel CCD camera was developed for 3-D specimen imaging of centimeter-sized objects with approximately 7 μm spatial resolution. Subsequently, more recent studies have required systems with higher spatial resolution and a wider field-of-view. Detectors with spatial resolution of around 5 μm can visualize capillaries. However, such detectors make it extremely expensive to develop a new x-ray detector with several tens of megapixels in a conventional manner. Fortunately, dizzying advances in image sensor technology for consumer appliances have enabled the development of x-ray detectors with spatial resolution of around 5 μm using a commercial digital single-lens reflex camera fitted with a 36M-pixel CMOS image sensor for the visualization of fine 3-D structures of large human lung specimens. This paper describes a comparison of the performance offered by the new 36M-pixel micro-CT system and the 10M-pixel system.

  13. The Dexela 2923 CMOS X-ray detector: A flat panel detector based on CMOS active pixel sensors for medical imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinidis, Anastasios C.; Szafraniec, Magdalena B.; Speller, Robert D.; Olivo, Alessandro

    2012-10-01

    Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors (CMOS) active pixel sensors (APS) have been introduced recently in many scientific applications. This work reports on the performance (in terms of signal and noise transfer) of an X-ray detector that uses a novel CMOS APS which was developed for medical X-ray imaging applications. For a full evaluation of the detector's performance, electro-optical and X-ray characterizations were carried out. The former included measuring read noise, full well capacity and dynamic range. The latter, which included measuring X-ray sensitivity, presampling modulation transfer function (pMTF), noise power spectrum (NPS) and the resulting detective quantum efficiency (DQE), was assessed under three beam qualities (28 kV, 50 kV (RQA3) and 70 kV (RQA5) using W/Al) all in accordance with the IEC standard. The detector features an in-pixel option for switching the full well capacity between two distinct modes, high full well (HFW) and low full well (LFW). Two structured CsI:Tl scintillators of different thickness (a “thin” one for high resolution and a thicker one for high light efficiency) were optically coupled to the sensor array to optimize the performance of the system for different medical applications. The electro-optical performance evaluation of the sensor results in relatively high read noise (∼360 e-), high full well capacity (∼1.5×106 e-) and wide dynamic range (∼73 dB) under HFW mode operation. When the LFW mode is used, the read noise is lower (∼165) at the expense of a reduced full well capacity (∼0.5×106 e-) and dynamic range (∼69 dB). The maximum DQE values at low frequencies (i.e. 0.5 lp/mm) are high for both HFW (0.69 for 28 kV, 0.71 for 50 kV and 0.75 for 70 kV) and LFW (0.69 for 28 kV and 0.7 for 50 kV) modes. The X-ray performance of the studied detector compares well to that of other mammography and general radiography systems, obtained under similar experimental conditions. This demonstrates the suitability

  14. Submillisecond X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy from a pixel array detector with fast dual gating and no readout dead-time

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qingteng; Dufresne, Eric M.; Grybos, Pawel; Kmon, Piotr; Maj, Piotr; Narayanan, Suresh; Deptuch, Grzegorz W.; Szczygiel, Robert; Sandy, Alec

    2016-01-01

    Small-angle scattering X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) studies were performed using a novel photon-counting pixel array detector with dual counters for each pixel. Each counter can be read out independently from the other to ensure there is no readout dead-time between the neighboring frames. A maximum frame rate of 11.8 kHz was achieved. Results on test samples show good agreement with simple diffusion. The potential of extending the time resolution of XPCS beyond the limit set by the detector frame rate using dual counters is also discussed. PMID:27140146

  15. Submillisecond X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy from a pixel array detector with fast dual gating and no readout dead-time

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Qingteng; Dufresne, Eric M.; Grybos, Pawel; ...

    2016-01-01

    Small-angle scattering X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) studies were performed using a novel photon-counting pixel array detector with dual counters for each pixel. Each counter can be read out independently from the other to ensure there is no readout dead-time between the neighboring frames. A maximum frame rate of 11.8 kHz was achieved. Results on test samples show good agreement with simple diffusion. As a result, the potential of extending the time resolution of XPCS beyond the limit set by the detector frame rate using dual counters is also discussed.

  16. Submillisecond X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy from a pixel array detector with fast dual gating and no readout dead-time

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qingteng; Dufresne, Eric M.; Grybos, Pawel; Kmon, Piotr; Maj, Piotr; Narayanan, Suresh; Deptuch, Grzegorz W.; Szczygiel, Robert; Sandy, Alec

    2016-01-01

    Small-angle scattering X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) studies were performed using a novel photon-counting pixel array detector with dual counters for each pixel. Each counter can be read out independently from the other to ensure there is no readout dead-time between the neighboring frames. A maximum frame rate of 11.8 kHz was achieved. Results on test samples show good agreement with simple diffusion. As a result, the potential of extending the time resolution of XPCS beyond the limit set by the detector frame rate using dual counters is also discussed.

  17. A pixel unit-cell targeting 16 ns resolution and radiation hardness in a column read-out particle vertex detector

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, M.; Millaud, J.; Nygren, D.

    1992-10-01

    A pixel unit cell (PUC) circuit architecture, optimized for a column read out architecture, is reported. Each PUC contains an integrator, active filter, comparator, and optional analog store. The time-over-threshold (TOT) discriminator allows an all-digital interface to the array periphery readout while passing an analog measure of collected charge. Use of (existing) radiation hard processes, to build a detector bump-bonded to a pixel readout array, is targeted. Here, emphasis is on a qualitative explanation of how the unique circuit implementation benefits operation for Super Collider (SSC) detector application.

  18. A High-Speed, Event-Driven, Active Pixel Sensor Readout for Photon-Counting Microchannel Plate Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimble, Randy A.; Pain, Bedabrata; Norton, Timothy J.; Haas, J. Patrick; Oegerle, William R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Silicon array readouts for microchannel plate intensifiers offer several attractive features. In this class of detector, the electron cloud output of the MCP intensifier is converted to visible light by a phosphor; that light is then fiber-optically coupled to the silicon array. In photon-counting mode, the resulting light splashes on the silicon array are recognized and centroided to fractional pixel accuracy by off-chip electronics. This process can result in very high (MCP-limited) spatial resolution while operating at a modest MCP gain (desirable for dynamic range and long term stability). The principal limitation of intensified CCD systems of this type is their severely limited local dynamic range, as accurate photon counting is achieved only if there are not overlapping event splashes within the frame time of the device. This problem can be ameliorated somewhat by processing events only in pre-selected windows of interest of by using an addressable charge injection device (CID) for the readout array. We are currently pursuing the development of an intriguing alternative readout concept based on using an event-driven CMOS Active Pixel Sensor. APS technology permits the incorporation of discriminator circuitry within each pixel. When coupled with suitable CMOS logic outside the array area, the discriminator circuitry can be used to trigger the readout of small sub-array windows only when and where an event splash has been detected, completely eliminating the local dynamic range problem, while achieving a high global count rate capability and maintaining high spatial resolution. We elaborate on this concept and present our progress toward implementing an event-driven APS readout.

  19. A High-Speed, Event-Driven, Active Pixel Sensor Readout for Photon-Counting Microchannel Plate Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimble, Randy A.; Pain, B.; Norton, T. J.; Haas, P.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Silicon array readouts for microchannel plate intensifiers offer several attractive features. In this class of detector, the electron cloud output of the MCP intensifier is converted to visible light by a phosphor; that light is then fiber-optically coupled to the silicon array. In photon-counting mode, the resulting light splashes on the silicon array are recognized and centroided to fractional pixel accuracy by off-chip electronics. This process can result in very high (MCP-limited) spatial resolution for the readout while operating at a modest MCP gain (desirable for dynamic range and long term stability). The principal limitation of intensified CCD systems of this type is their severely limited local dynamic range, as accurate photon counting is achieved only if there are not overlapping event splashes within the frame time of the device. This problem can be ameliorated somewhat by processing events only in pre-selected windows of interest or by using an addressable charge injection device (CID) for the readout array. We are currently pursuing the development of an intriguing alternative readout concept based on using an event-driven CMOS Active Pixel Sensor. APS technology permits the incorporation of discriminator circuitry within each pixel. When coupled with suitable CMOS logic outside the array area, the discriminator circuitry can be used to trigger the readout of small sub-array windows only when and where an event splash has been detected, completely eliminating the local dynamic range problem, while achieving a high global count rate capability and maintaining high spatial resolution. We elaborate on this concept and present our progress toward implementing an event-driven APS readout.

  20. 3D silicon sensors: Design, large area production and quality assurance for the ATLAS IBL pixel detector upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Via, Cinzia; Boscardin, Maurizio; Dalla Betta, Gian-Franco; Darbo, Giovanni; Fleta, Celeste; Gemme, Claudia; Grenier, Philippe; Grinstein, Sebastian; Hansen, Thor-Erik; Hasi, Jasmine; Kenney, Chris; Kok, Angela; Parker, Sherwood; Pellegrini, Giulio; Vianello, Elisa; Zorzi, Nicola

    2012-12-01

    3D silicon sensors, where electrodes penetrate the silicon substrate fully or partially, have successfully been fabricated in different processing facilities in Europe and USA. The key to 3D fabrication is the use of plasma micro-machining to etch narrow deep vertical openings allowing dopants to be diffused in and form electrodes of pin junctions. Similar openings can be used at the sensor's edge to reduce the perimeter's dead volume to as low as ˜4 μm. Since 2009 four industrial partners of the 3D ATLAS R&D Collaboration started a joint effort aimed at one common design and compatible processing strategy for the production of 3D sensors for the LHC Upgrade and in particular for the ATLAS pixel Insertable B-Layer (IBL). In this project, aimed for installation in 2013, a new layer will be inserted as close as 3.4 cm from the proton beams inside the existing pixel layers of the ATLAS experiment. The detector proximity to the interaction point will therefore require new radiation hard technologies for both sensors and front end electronics. The latter, called FE-I4, is processed at IBM and is the biggest front end of this kind ever designed with a surface of ˜4 cm2. The performance of 3D devices from several wafers was evaluated before and after bump-bonding. Key design aspects, device fabrication plans and quality assurance tests during the 3D sensors prototyping phase are discussed in this paper.

  1. SU-C-201-03: Coded Aperture Gamma-Ray Imaging Using Pixelated Semiconductor Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, S; Kaye, W; Jaworski, J; He, Z

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Improved localization of gamma-ray emissions from radiotracers is essential to the progress of nuclear medicine. Polaris is a portable, room-temperature operated gamma-ray imaging spectrometer composed of two 3×3 arrays of thick CdZnTe (CZT) detectors, which detect gammas between 30keV and 3MeV with energy resolution of <1% FWHM at 662keV. Compton imaging is used to map out source distributions in 4-pi space; however, is only effective above 300keV where Compton scatter is dominant. This work extends imaging to photoelectric energies (<300keV) using coded aperture imaging (CAI), which is essential for localization of Tc-99m (140keV). Methods: CAI, similar to the pinhole camera, relies on an attenuating mask, with open/closed elements, placed between the source and position-sensitive detectors. Partial attenuation of the source results in a “shadow” or count distribution that closely matches a portion of the mask pattern. Ideally, each source direction corresponds to a unique count distribution. Using backprojection reconstruction, the source direction is determined within the field of view. The knowledge of 3D position of interaction results in improved image quality. Results: Using a single array of detectors, a coded aperture mask, and multiple Co-57 (122keV) point sources, image reconstruction is performed in real-time, on an event-by-event basis, resulting in images with an angular resolution of ∼6 degrees. Although material nonuniformities contribute to image degradation, the superposition of images from individual detectors results in improved SNR. CAI was integrated with Compton imaging for a seamless transition between energy regimes. Conclusion: For the first time, CAI has been applied to thick, 3D position sensitive CZT detectors. Real-time, combined CAI and Compton imaging is performed using two 3×3 detector arrays, resulting in a source distribution in space. This system has been commercialized by H3D, Inc. and is being acquired for

  2. A pixellated γ-camera based on CdTe detectors clinical interests and performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambron, J.; Arntz, Y.; Eclancher, B.; Scheiber, Ch; Siffert, P.; Hage Hali, M.; Regal, R.; Kazandjian, A.; Prat, V.; Thomas, S.; Warren, S.; Matz, R.; Jahnke, A.; Karman, M.; Pszota, A.; Nemeth, L.

    2000-07-01

    A mobile gamma camera dedicated to nuclear cardiology, based on a 15 cm×15 cm detection matrix of 2304 CdTe detector elements, 2.83 mm×2.83 mm×2 mm, has been developed with a European Community support to academic and industrial research centres. The intrinsic properties of the semiconductor crystals - low-ionisation energy, high-energy resolution, high attenuation coefficient - are potentially attractive to improve the γ-camera performances. But their use as γ detectors for medical imaging at high resolution requires production of high-grade materials and large quantities of sophisticated read-out electronics. The decision was taken to use CdTe rather than CdZnTe, because the manufacturer (Eurorad, France) has a large experience for producing high-grade materials, with a good homogeneity and stability and whose transport properties, characterised by the mobility-lifetime product, are at least 5 times greater than that of CdZnTe. The detector matrix is divided in 9 square units, each unit is composed of 256 detectors shared in 16 modules. Each module consists in a thin ceramic plate holding a line of 16 detectors, in four groups of four for an easy replacement, and holding a special 16 channels integrated circuit designed by CLRC (UK). A detection and acquisition logic based on a DSP card and a PC has been programmed by Eurorad for spectral and counting acquisition modes. Collimators LEAP and LEHR from commercial design, mobile gantry and clinical software were provided by Siemens (Germany). The γ-camera head housing, its general mounting and the electric connections were performed by Phase Laboratory (CNRS, France). The compactness of the γ-camera head, thin detectors matrix, electronic readout and collimator, facilitates the detection of close γ sources with the advantage of a high spatial resolution. Such an equipment is intended to bedside explorations. There is a growing clinical requirement in nuclear cardiology to early assess the extent of an

  3. Preliminary results of 3D-DDTC pixel detectors for the ATLAS upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Rosa, A.

    3D Silicon sensors fabricated at FBK-irst with the Double-side Double Type Column (DDTC) approach and columnar electrodes only partially etched through p-type substrates were tested in laboratory and in a 1.35 Tesla magnetic field with a 180GeV pion beam at CERN SPS. The substrate thickness of the sensors is about 200um, and different column depths are available, with overlaps between junction columns (etched from the front side) and ohmic columns (etched from the back side) in the range from 110um to 150um. The devices under test were bump bonded to the ATLAS Pixel readout chip (FEI3) at SELEX SI (Rome, Italy). We report leakage current and noise measurements, results of functional tests with Am241 gamma-ray sources, charge collection tests with Sr90 beta-source and an overview of preliminary results from the CERN beam test.

  4. Development of Pixelated Linear Avalanche Integration Detector Using Silicon on Insulator Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Akihiro; Shimazoe, Kenji; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Hamasaki, Ryutaro; Orita, Tadashi; Onuki, Yoshiyuki; Otani, Wataru; Takeshita, Tohru; Kurachi, Ikuo; Miyoshi, Toshinobu; Nakamura, Isamu; Arai, Yasuo

    In various X-ray imaging applications such as single photon counting X-ray CT, micrometer scale spatial resolution and high detection efficiency possibility using structured porous scintillator took great interests. In order to achieve precise energy- and timing information measurements, high sensitive separately readable photo detector needs to be coupled to porous crystal. Therefore, we fabricated test element group (TEG) of micro sized linear avalanche integration detector (Plaid) on a silicon on insulator (SOI) wafer and inspected performance of each device. Measurements results showed guard ring structure achieved avalanche gain of magnitude from 10 to 1000 with lower gain saturation effect than non-guard ring structure. We concluded guard ring structure is desirable to achieve stable gain performance toward various optical powers and efficient to use for scintillation light read out.

  5. Enhancing spatial resolution of (18)F positron imaging with the Timepix detector by classification of primary fired pixels using support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Liu, Zhen; Ziegler, Sibylle I; Shi, Kuangyu

    2015-07-07

    Position-sensitive positron cameras using silicon pixel detectors have been applied for some preclinical and intraoperative clinical applications. However, the spatial resolution of a positron camera is limited by positron multiple scattering in the detector. An incident positron may fire a number of successive pixels on the imaging plane. It is still impossible to capture the primary fired pixel along a particle trajectory by hardware or to perceive the pixel firing sequence by direct observation. Here, we propose a novel data-driven method to improve the spatial resolution by classifying the primary pixels within the detector using support vector machine. A classification model is constructed by learning the features of positron trajectories based on Monte-Carlo simulations using Geant4. Topological and energy features of pixels fired by (18)F positrons were considered for the training and classification. After applying the classification model on measurements, the primary fired pixels of the positron tracks in the silicon detector were estimated. The method was tested and assessed for [(18)F]FDG imaging of an absorbing edge protocol and a leaf sample. The proposed method improved the spatial resolution from 154.6   ±   4.2 µm (energy weighted centroid approximation) to 132.3   ±   3.5 µm in the absorbing edge measurements. For the positron imaging of a leaf sample, the proposed method achieved lower root mean square error relative to phosphor plate imaging, and higher similarity with the reference optical image. The improvements of the preliminary results support further investigation of the proposed algorithm for the enhancement of positron imaging in clinical and preclinical applications.

  6. Prototype of IGZO-TFT preamplifier and analog counter for pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimazoe, K.; Koyama, A.; Takahashi, H.; Shindoh, T.; Miyoshi, H.

    2017-02-01

    IGZO-TFT (Indium Galium Zinc Oxide-Thin Film Transistor) is a promising technology for controlling large display areas and large area sensors because of its very low leakage current in the off state and relatively low cost. IGZO has been used as a switching gate for a large area flat-panel detector. The photon counting capability for X-ray medical imaging has been investigated and expected for low-dose exposure and material determination. Here the design and fabrication of a charge sensitive preamplifier and analog counter using IGZO-TFT processes and its performance are reported for the first time to be used for radiation photon counting applications.

  7. Evaluation of Origin Ensemble algorithm for image reconstruction for pixelated solid-state detectors with large number of channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolstein, M.; De Lorenzo, G.; Mikhaylova, E.; Chmeissani, M.; Ariño, G.; Calderón, Y.; Ozsahin, I.; Uzun, D.

    2013-04-01

    The Voxel Imaging PET (VIP) Pathfinder project intends to show the advantages of using pixelated solid-state technology for nuclear medicine applications. It proposes designs for Positron Emission Tomography (PET), Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) and Compton gamma camera detectors with a large number of signal channels (of the order of 106). For PET scanners, conventional algorithms like Filtered Back-Projection (FBP) and Ordered Subset Expectation Maximization (OSEM) are straightforward to use and give good results. However, FBP presents difficulties for detectors with limited angular coverage like PEM and Compton gamma cameras, whereas OSEM has an impractically large time and memory consumption for a Compton gamma camera with a large number of channels. In this article, the Origin Ensemble (OE) algorithm is evaluated as an alternative algorithm for image reconstruction. Monte Carlo simulations of the PET design are used to compare the performance of OE, FBP and OSEM in terms of the bias, variance and average mean squared error (MSE) image quality metrics. For the PEM and Compton camera designs, results obtained with OE are presented.

  8. Evaluation of Origin Ensemble algorithm for image reconstruction for pixelated solid-state detectors with large number of channels

    PubMed Central

    Kolstein, M.; De Lorenzo, G.; Mikhaylova, E.; Chmeissani, M.; Ariño, G.; Calderón, Y.; Ozsahin, I.; Uzun, D.

    2013-01-01

    The Voxel Imaging PET (VIP) Pathfinder project intends to show the advantages of using pixelated solid-state technology for nuclear medicine applications. It proposes designs for Positron Emission Tomography (PET), Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) and Compton gamma camera detectors with a large number of signal channels (of the order of 106). For PET scanners, conventional algorithms like Filtered Back-Projection (FBP) and Ordered Subset Expectation Maximization (OSEM) are straightforward to use and give good results. However, FBP presents difficulties for detectors with limited angular coverage like PEM and Compton gamma cameras, whereas OSEM has an impractically large time and memory consumption for a Compton gamma camera with a large number of channels. In this article, the Origin Ensemble (OE) algorithm is evaluated as an alternative algorithm for image reconstruction. Monte Carlo simulations of the PET design are used to compare the performance of OE, FBP and OSEM in terms of the bias, variance and average mean squared error (MSE) image quality metrics. For the PEM and Compton camera designs, results obtained with OE are presented. PMID:23814604

  9. Evaluation of Origin Ensemble algorithm for image reconstruction for pixelated solid-state detectors with large number of channels.

    PubMed

    Kolstein, M; De Lorenzo, G; Mikhaylova, E; Chmeissani, M; Ariño, G; Calderón, Y; Ozsahin, I; Uzun, D

    2013-04-29

    The Voxel Imaging PET (VIP) Pathfinder project intends to show the advantages of using pixelated solid-state technology for nuclear medicine applications. It proposes designs for Positron Emission Tomography (PET), Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) and Compton gamma camera detectors with a large number of signal channels (of the order of 10(6)). For PET scanners, conventional algorithms like Filtered Back-Projection (FBP) and Ordered Subset Expectation Maximization (OSEM) are straightforward to use and give good results. However, FBP presents difficulties for detectors with limited angular coverage like PEM and Compton gamma cameras, whereas OSEM has an impractically large time and memory consumption for a Compton gamma camera with a large number of channels. In this article, the Origin Ensemble (OE) algorithm is evaluated as an alternative algorithm for image reconstruction. Monte Carlo simulations of the PET design are used to compare the performance of OE, FBP and OSEM in terms of the bias, variance and average mean squared error (MSE) image quality metrics. For the PEM and Compton camera designs, results obtained with OE are presented.

  10. Performance of n-in-p Pixel Detectors Irradiated at Fluences up to 5x1015 neq/cm2 for the Future ATLAS Upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macchiolo, A.; Gallrapp, C.; La Rosa, A.; Nisius, R.; Pernegger, H.; Richter, R. H.; Weigell, P.

    We present the results of the characterization of novel n-in-p planar pixel detectors, designed for the future upgrades of the ATLAS pixel system. N-in-p silicon devices are a promising candidate to replace the n-in-n sensors thanks to their radiation hardness and cost effectiveness, that allow for enlarging the area instrumented with pixel detectors. The n-in-p modules presented here are composed of pixel sensors produced by CiS connected by bump-bonding to the ATLAS readout chip FE-I3. The characterization of these devices has been performed with the ATLAS pixel read-out systems, TurboDAQ and USBPIX, before and after irradiation with 25 MeV protons and neutrons up to a fluence of 5x1015 neq/cm2. The charge collection measurements carried out with radioactive sources have proven the feasibility of employing this kind of detectors up to these particle fluences. The collected charge has been measured to be for any fluence in excess of twice the value of the FE-I3 threshold, tuned to 3200 e. The first results from beam test data with 120 GeV pions at the CERN-SPS are also presented, demonstrating a high tracking efficiency before irradiation and a high collected charge for a device irradiated at 1015 neq/cm2. This work has been performed within the framework of the RD50 Collaboration.

  11. Toward VIP-PIX: A Low Noise Readout ASIC for Pixelated CdTe Gamma-Ray Detectors for Use in the Next Generation of PET Scanners.

    PubMed

    Macias-Montero, Jose-Gabriel; Sarraj, Maher; Chmeissani, Mokhtar; Puigdengoles, Carles; Lorenzo, Gianluca De; Martínez, Ricardo

    2013-08-01

    VIP-PIX will be a low noise and low power pixel readout electronics with digital output for pixelated Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) detectors. The proposed pixel will be part of a 2D pixel-array detector for various types of nuclear medicine imaging devices such as positron-emission tomography (PET) scanners, Compton gamma cameras, and positron-emission mammography (PEM) scanners. Each pixel will include a SAR ADC that provides the energy deposited with 10-bit resolution. Simultaneously, the self-triggered pixel which will be connected to a global time-to-digital converter (TDC) with 1 ns resolution will provide the event's time stamp. The analog part of the readout chain and the ADC have been fabricated with TSMC 0.25 μm mixed-signal CMOS technology and characterized with an external test pulse. The power consumption of these parts is 200 μW from a 2.5 V supply. It offers 4 switchable gains from ±10 mV/fC to ±40 mV/fC and an input charge dynamic range of up to ±70 fC for the minimum gain for both polarities. Based on noise measurements, the expected equivalent noise charge (ENC) is 65 e(-) RMS at room temperature.

  12. Toward VIP-PIX: A Low Noise Readout ASIC for Pixelated CdTe Gamma-Ray Detectors for Use in the Next Generation of PET Scanners

    PubMed Central

    Macias-Montero, Jose-Gabriel; Sarraj, Maher; Chmeissani, Mokhtar; Puigdengoles, Carles; Lorenzo, Gianluca De; Martínez, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    VIP-PIX will be a low noise and low power pixel readout electronics with digital output for pixelated Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) detectors. The proposed pixel will be part of a 2D pixel-array detector for various types of nuclear medicine imaging devices such as positron-emission tomography (PET) scanners, Compton gamma cameras, and positron-emission mammography (PEM) scanners. Each pixel will include a SAR ADC that provides the energy deposited with 10-bit resolution. Simultaneously, the self-triggered pixel which will be connected to a global time-to-digital converter (TDC) with 1 ns resolution will provide the event’s time stamp. The analog part of the readout chain and the ADC have been fabricated with TSMC 0.25 μm mixed-signal CMOS technology and characterized with an external test pulse. The power consumption of these parts is 200 μW from a 2.5 V supply. It offers 4 switchable gains from ±10 mV/fC to ±40 mV/fC and an input charge dynamic range of up to ±70 fC for the minimum gain for both polarities. Based on noise measurements, the expected equivalent noise charge (ENC) is 65 e− RMS at room temperature. PMID:24187382

  13. Noninvasive, near-field terahertz imaging of hidden objects using a single-pixel detector

    PubMed Central

    Stantchev, Rayko Ivanov; Sun, Baoqing; Hornett, Sam M.; Hobson, Peter A.; Gibson, Graham M.; Padgett, Miles J.; Hendry, Euan

    2016-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) imaging can see through otherwise opaque materials. However, because of the long wavelengths of THz radiation (λ = 400 μm at 0.75 THz), far-field THz imaging techniques suffer from low resolution compared to visible wavelengths. We demonstrate noninvasive, near-field THz imaging with subwavelength resolution. We project a time-varying, intense (>100 μJ/cm2) optical pattern onto a silicon wafer, which spatially modulates the transmission of synchronous pulse of THz radiation. An unknown object is placed on the hidden side of the silicon, and the far-field THz transmission corresponding to each mask is recorded by a single-element detector. Knowledge of the patterns and of the corresponding detector signal are combined to give an image of the object. Using this technique, we image a printed circuit board on the underside of a 115-μm-thick silicon wafer with ~100-μm (λ/4) resolution. With subwavelength resolution and the inherent sensitivity to local conductivity, it is possible to detect fissures in the circuitry wiring of a few micrometers in size. THz imaging systems of this type will have other uses too, where noninvasive measurement or imaging of concealed structures is necessary, such as in semiconductor manufacturing or in ex vivo bioimaging. PMID:27386577

  14. The overvoltage protection module for the power supply system for the pixel detector at Belle II experiment at KEK

    SciTech Connect

    Kapusta, P.; Kisielewski, B.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper the overvoltage protection modules (OVP) for the power supply (PS) system of the Belle II pixel detector (PXD) are described. The aim of the OVP is to protect the detector and associated electronics against overvoltage conditions. Most critical in the system are voltages supplying the front-end ASICs. The PXD detector consists of the DEPFET sensor modules with integrated chips like the Drain Current Digitizer, the Switcher and the Data Handling Processor. These chips, implemented in modern sub-micron technologies, are quite vulnerable to variations in the supply voltages. The PXD will be placed in the Belle II experiment as close as possible to the interaction point, where access during experiment is very limited or even impossible, thus the PS and OVP systems exploit the remote-sensing method. Overvoltage conditions are due to failures of the PS itself, wrong setting of the output voltages or transient voltages coming out of hard noisy environment of the experiment. The OVP modules are parts of the PS modules. For powering the PXD 40 PS modules are placed 15 m outside the Belle II spectrometer. Each one is equipped with the OVP board. All voltages (22) are grouped in 4 domains: Analog, Digital, Steering and Gate which have independent grounds. The OVP boards are designed from integrated circuits from Linear Technology. All configurations were simulated with the Spice program. The control electronics is designed in a Xilinx CPLD. Two types of integrated circuits were used. LT4356 surge stopper protects loads from high voltage transients. The output voltages are limited to a safe value and also protect loads against over current faults. For less critical voltages, the LTC2912 voltage monitors are used that detect under-voltage and overvoltage events. It has to be noted that the OVP system is working independently of any other protection of the PS system, which increases its overall reliability. (authors)

  15. Opto-box: Optical modules and mini-crate for ATLAS pixel and IBL detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertsche, David

    2016-11-01

    The opto-box is a custom mini-crate for housing optical modules which process and transfer optoelectronic data. Many novel solutions were developed for the custom design and manufacturing. The system tightly integrates electrical, mechanical, and thermal functionality into a small package of size 35×10x8 cm3. Special attention was given to ensure proper shielding, grounding, cooling, high reliability, and environmental tolerance. The custom modules, which incorporate Application Specific Integrated Circuits, were developed through a cycle of rigorous testing and redesign. In total, fourteen opto-boxes have been installed and loaded with modules on the ATLAS detector. They are currently in operation as part of the LHC run 2 data read-out chain. This conference proceeding is in support of the poster presented at the International Conference on New Frontiers in Physics (ICNFP) 2015 [1].

  16. High-contrast X-ray micro-tomography of low attenuation samples using large area hybrid semiconductor pixel detector array of 10 × 5 Timepix chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karch, J.; Krejci, F.; Bartl, B.; Dudak, J.; Kuba, J.; Kvacek, J.; Zemlicka, J.

    2016-01-01

    State-of-the-art hybrid pixel semiconductor detectors provide excellent imaging properties such as unlimited dynamic range, high spatial resolution, high frame rate and energy sensitivity. Nevertheless, a limitation in the use of these devices for imaging has been the small sensitive area of a few square centimetres. In the field of microtomography we make use of a large area pixel detector assembled from 50 Timepix edgeless chips providing fully sensitive area of 14.3 × 7.15 cm2. We have successfully demonstrated that the enlargement of the sensitive area enables high-quality tomographic measurements of whole objects with high geometrical magnification without any significant degradation in resulting reconstructions related to the chip tilling and edgeless sensor technology properties. The technique of micro-tomography with the newly developed large area detector is applied for samples formed by low attenuation, low contrast materials such a seed from Phacelia tanacetifolia, a charcoalified wood sample and a beeswax seal sample.

  17. Crater Detection Algorithms Based on Pixel-Difference, Separated-Pixel-Difference, Roberts, Prewitt, Sobel and Frei-Chen Gradient Edge Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novosel, H.; Salamuniccar, G.; Loncaric, S.

    2007-03-01

    Implementations of six different crater detection algorithms based on six different well-known gradient edge detectors are presented. They are analyzed and compared using free-response receiver operating characteristics.

  18. EXCALIBUR: a small-pixel photon counting area detector for coherent X-ray diffraction - Front-end design, fabrication and characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchal, J.; Horswell, I.; Willis, B.; Plackett, R.; Gimenez, E. N.; Spiers, J.; Ballard, D.; Booker, P.; Thompson, J. A.; Gibbons, P.; Burge, S. R.; Nicholls, T.; Lipp, J.; Tartoni, N.

    2013-03-01

    Coherent X-ray diffraction experiments on synchrotron X-ray beamlines require detectors with high spatial resolution and large detection area. The read-out chip developed by the MEDIPIX3 collaboration offers a small pixel size of 55 microns resulting in a very high spatial resolution when coupled to a direct X-ray conversion segmented silicon sensor. MEDIPIX3 assemblies present also the advantages of hybrid pixel detectors working in single photon counting mode: noiseless imaging, large dynamic range, extremely high frame rate. The EXCALIBUR detector is under development for the X-ray Coherence and Imaging Beamline I13 of the Diamond Light Source. This new detector consists of three modules, each with 16 MEDIPIX3 chips which can be read-out at 100 frames per second in continuous mode or 1000 frames per second in burst mode. In each module, the sensor is a large single silicon die covering 2 rows of 8 individual MEDIPIX3 read-out chips and provides a continuous active detection region within a module. Each module includes 1 million solder bumps connecting the 55 microns pixels of the silicon sensor to the 55 microns pixels of the 16 MEDIPIX3 read-out chips. The detection area of the 3-module EXCALIBUR detector is 115 mm × 100 mm with a small 6.8 mm wide inactive region between modules. Each detector module is connected to 2 FPGA read-out boards via a flexi-rigid circuit to allow a fully parallel read-out of the 16 MEDIPIX3 chips. The 6 FPGA read-out boards used in the EXCALIBUR detector are interfaced to 6 computing nodes via 10Gbit/s fibre-optic links to maintain the very high frame-rate capability. The standard suite of EPICS control software is used to operate the detector and to integrate it with the Diamond Light Source beamline software environment. This article describes the design, fabrication and characterisation of the MEDIPIX3-based modules composing the EXCALIBUR detector.

  19. Development of an X-ray pixel detector with multi-port charge-coupled device for X-ray free-electron laser experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kameshima, Takashi; Ono, Shun; Kudo, Togo; Ozaki, Kyosuke; Kirihara, Yoichi; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Inubushi, Yuichi; Yabashi, Makina; Hatsui, Takaki; Horigome, Toshio; Holland, Andrew; Holland, Karen; Burt, David; Murao, Hajime

    2014-03-15

    This paper presents development of an X-ray pixel detector with a multi-port charge-coupled device (MPCCD) for X-ray Free-Electron laser experiments. The fabrication process of the CCD was selected based on the X-ray radiation hardness against the estimated annual dose of 1.6 × 10{sup 14} photon/mm{sup 2}. The sensor device was optimized by maximizing the full well capacity as high as 5 Me- within 50 μm square pixels while keeping the single photon detection capability for X-ray photons higher than 6 keV and a readout speed of 60 frames/s. The system development also included a detector system for the MPCCD sensor. This paper summarizes the performance, calibration methods, and operation status.

  20. Continued Development of Small-Pixel CZT and CdTe Detectors for Future High-Angular-Resolution Hard X-ray Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczynski, Henric

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) Small Explorer Mission was launched in June 2012 and has demonstrated the technical feasibility and high scientific impact of hard X-ray astronomy. We propose to continue our current R&D program to develop finely pixelated semiconductor detectors and the associated readout electronics for the focal plane of a NuSTAR follow-up mission. The detector-ASIC (Application Specific Integrated Circuit) package will be ideally matched to the new generation of low-cost, low-mass X-ray mirrors which achieve an order of magnitude better angular resolution than the NuSTAR mirrors. As part of this program, the Washington University group will optimize the contacts of 2x2 cm^2 footprint Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) and Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) detectors contacted with 100x116 hexagonal pixels at a next-neighbor pitch of 200 microns. The Brookhaven National Laboratory group will design, fabricate, and test the next generation of the HEXID ASIC matched to the new X-ray mirrors and the detectors, providing a low-power 100x116 channel ASIC with extremely low readout noise (i.e. with a root mean square noise of 13 electrons). The detectors will be tested with radioactive sources and in the focal plane of high-angular-resolution X-ray mirrors at the X-ray beam facilities at the Goddard and Marshall Space Flight Centers.

  1. Simulation of the expected performance of a seamless scanner for brain PET based on highly pixelated CdTe detectors.

    PubMed

    Mikhaylova, Ekaterina; De Lorenzo, Gianluca; Chmeissani, Mokhtar; Kolstein, Machiel; Cañadas, Mario; Arce, Pedro; Calderón, Yonatan; Uzun, Dilber; Ariño, Gerard; Macias-Montero, José Gabriel; Martinez, Ricardo; Puigdengoles, Carles; Cabruja, Enric

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this work is the evaluation of the design for a nonconventional PET scanner, the voxel imaging PET (VIP), based on pixelated room-temperature CdTe detectors yielding a true 3-D impact point with a density of 450 channels/cm(3), for a total 6 336 000 channels in a seamless ring shaped volume. The system is simulated and evaluated following the prescriptions of the NEMA NU 2-2001 and the NEMA NU 4-2008 standards. Results show that the excellent energy resolution of the CdTe detectors (1.6% for 511 keV photons), together with the small voxel pitch (1 × 1 × 2 mm(3)), and the crack-free ring geometry, give the design the potential to overcome the current limitations of PET scanners and to approach the intrinsic image resolution limits set by physics. The VIP is expected to reach a competitive sensitivity and a superior signal purity with respect to values commonly quoted for state-of-the-art scintillating crystal PETs. The system can provide 14 cps/kBq with a scatter fraction of 3.95% and 21 cps/kBq with a scatter fraction of 0.73% according to NEMA NU 2-2001 and NEMA NU 4-2008, respectively. The calculated NEC curve has a peak value of 122 kcps at 5.3 kBq/mL for NEMA NU 2-2001 and 908 kcps at 1.6 MBq/mL for NEMA NU 4-2008. The proposed scanner can achieve an image resolution of ~ 1 mm full-width at half-maximum in all directions. The virtually noise-free data sample leads to direct positive impact on the quality of the reconstructed images. As a consequence, high-quality high-resolution images can be obtained with significantly lower number of events compared to conventional scanners. Overall, simulation results suggest the VIP scanner can be operated either at normal dose for fast scanning and high patient throughput, or at low dose to decrease the patient radioactivity exposure. The design evaluation presented in this work is driving the development and the optimization of a fully operative prototype to prove the feasibility of the VIP concept.

  2. Simulation of the Expected Performance of a Seamless Scanner for Brain PET Based on Highly Pixelated CdTe Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Mikhaylova, Ekaterina; De Lorenzo, Gianluca; Chmeissani, Mokhtar; Kolstein, Machiel; Cañadas, Mario; Arce, Pedro; Calderón, Yonatan; Uzun, Dilber; Ariño, Gerard; Macias-Montero, José Gabriel; Martinez, Ricardo; Puigdengoles, Carles; Cabruja, Enric

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work is the evaluation of the design for a nonconventional PET scanner, the voxel imaging PET (VIP), based on pixelated room-temperature CdTe detectors yielding a true 3-D impact point with a density of 450 channels cm3, for a total 6 336 000 channels in a seamless ring shaped volume. The system is simulated and evaluated following the prescriptions of the NEMA NU 2-2001 and the NEMA NU 4-2008 standards. Results show that the excellent energy resolution of the CdTe detectors (1.6% for 511 keV photons), together with the small voxel pitch (1×1×2 mm3), and the crack-free ring geometry, give the design the potential to overcome the current limitations of PET scanners and to approach the intrinsic image resolution limits set by physics. The VIP is expected to reach a competitive sensitivity and a superior signal purity with respect to values commonly quoted for state-of-the-art scintillating crystal PETs. The system can provide 14 cps/kBq with a scatter fraction of 3.95% and 21 cps/kBq with a scatter fraction of 0.73% according to NEMA NU 2-2001 and NEMA NU 4-2008, respectively. The calculated NEC curve has a peak value of 122 kcps at 5.3 kBq/mL for NEMA NU 2-2001 and 908 kcps at 1.6 MBq/mL for NEMA NU 4-2008. The proposed scanner can achieve an image resolution of ~ 1 mm full-width at half-maximum in all directions. The virtually noise-free data sample leads to direct positive impact on the quality of the reconstructed images. As a consequence, high-quality high-resolution images can be obtained with significantly lower number of events compared to conventional scanners. Overall, simulation results suggest the VIP scanner can be operated either at normal dose for fast scanning and high patient throughput, or at low dose to decrease the patient radioactivity exposure. The design evaluation presented in this work is driving the development and the optimization of a fully operative prototype to prove the feasibility of the VIP concept. PMID:24108750

  3. The Cryogenic AntiCoincidence Detector for the ATHENA X-IFU: Design Aspects by Geant4 Simulation and Preliminary Characterization of the New Single Pixel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macculi, C.; Argan, A.; D'Andrea, M.; Lotti, S.; Piro, L.; Biasotti, M.; Corsini, D.; Gatti, F.; Orlando, A.; Torrioli, G.

    2016-08-01

    The ATHENA observatory is the second large-class ESA mission, in the context of the Cosmic Vision 2015-2025, scheduled to be launched on 2028 at L2 orbit. One of the two planned focal plane instruments is the X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU), which will be able to perform simultaneous high-grade energy spectroscopy and imaging over the 5 arcmin FoV by means of a kilo-pixel array of transition-edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeters, coupled to a high-quality X-ray optics. The X-IFU sensitivity is degraded by the particle background, induced by primary protons of both solar and cosmic rays' origin and secondary electrons. A Cryogenic AntiCoincidence (CryoAC) TES-based detector, located <1 mm below the TES array, will allow the mission to reach the background level that enables its scientific goals. The CryoAC is a 4-pixel detector made of Silicon absorbers sensed by Iridium TESs. We currently achieve a TRL = 3-4 at the single-pixel level. We have designed and developed two further prototypes in order to reach TRL = 4. The design of the CryoAC has been also optimized using the Geant4 simulation tool. Here we will describe some results from the Geant4 simulations performed to optimize the design and preliminary test results from the first of the two detectors, 1 cm2 area, made of 65 Ir TESs.

  4. The Cryogenic Anti-Coincidence detector for ATHENA X-IFU: pulse analysis of the AC-S7 single pixel prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Andrea, M.; Argan, A.; Lotti, S.; Macculi, C.; Piro, L.; Biasotti, M.; Corsini, D.; Gatti, F.; Torrioli, G.

    2016-07-01

    The ATHENA observatory is the second large-class mission in ESA Cosmic Vision 2015-2025, with a launch foreseen in 2028 towards the L2 orbit. The mission addresses the science theme "The Hot and Energetic Universe", by coupling a high-performance X-ray Telescope with two complementary focal-plane instruments. One of these is the X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU): it is a TES based kilo-pixel order array able to provide spatially resolved high-resolution spectroscopy (2.5 eV at 6 keV) over a 5 arcmin FoV. The X-IFU sensitivity is degraded by the particles background expected at L2 orbit, which is induced by primary protons of both galactic and solar origin, and mostly by secondary electrons. To reduce the background level and enable the mission science goals, a Cryogenic Anticoincidence (CryoAC) detector is placed < 1 mm below the TES array. It is a 4- pixel TES based detector, with wide Silicon absorbers sensed by Ir:Au TESes. The CryoAC development schedule foresees by Q1 2017 the delivery of a Demonstration Model (DM) to the X-IFU FPA development team. The DM is a single-pixel detector that will address the final design of the CryoAC. It will verify some representative requirements at single-pixel level, especially the detector operation at 50 mK thermal bath and the threshold energy at 20 keV. To reach the final DM design we have developed and tested the AC-S7 prototype, with 1 cm2 absorber area sensed by 65 Ir TESes. Here we will discuss the pulse analysis of this detector, which has been illuminated by the 60 keV line from a 241Am source. First, we will present the analysis performed to investigate pulses timings and spectrum, and to disentangle the athermal component of the pulses from the thermal one. Furthermore, we will show the application to our dataset of an alternative method of pulse processing, based upon Principal Component Analysis (PCA). This kind of analysis allow us to recover better energy spectra than achievable with traditional methods

  5. Developing fine-pixel CdTe detectors for the next generation of high-resolution hard x-ray telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christe, Steven

    Over the past decade, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been improving the angular resolution of hard X-ray (HXR; 20 "70 keV) optics to the point that we now routinely manufacture optics modules with an angular resolution of 20 arcsec Half Power Diameter (HDP), almost three times the performance of NuSTAR optics (Ramsey et al. 2013; Gubarev et al. 2013a; Atkins et al. 2013). New techniques are currently being developed to provide even higher angular resolution. High angular resolution HXR optics require detectors with a large number of fine pixels in order to adequately sample the telescope point spread function (PSF) over the entire field of view. Excessively over-sampling the PSF will increase readout noise and require more processing with no appreciable increase in image quality. An appropriate level of over-sampling is to have 3 pixels within the HPD. For the HERO mirrors, where the HPD is 26 arcsec over a 6-m focal length converts to 750 μm, the optimum pixel size is around 250 μm. At a 10-m focal length these detectors can support a 16 arcsec HPD. Of course, the detectors must also have high efficiency in the HXR region, good energy resolution, low background, low power requirements, and low sensitivity to radiation damage (Ramsey 2001). The ability to handle high counting rates is also desirable for efficient calibration. A collaboration between Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), MSFC, and Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK is developing precisely such detectors under an ongoing, funded APRA program (FY2015 to FY2017). The detectors use the RALdeveloped Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) dubbed HEXITEC, for High Energy X-Ray Imaging Technology. These HEXITEC ASICs can be bonded to 1- or 2- mm-thick Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) or Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) to create a fine (250 μm pitch) HXR detector (Jones et al. 2009; Seller et al. 2011). The objectives of this funded effort are to develop and test a HEXITEC

  6. Characterisation of the UFXC32k hybrid pixel detector for time-resolved pump-probe diffraction experiments at Synchrotron SOLEIL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawiec, A.; Maj, P.; Ciavardini, A.; Gryboś, P.; Laulhé, C.; Menneglier, C.; Szczygieł, R.

    2017-03-01

    The experimental set-up for time-resolved studies of ultra-fast photo-induced structural dynamics at the Synchrotron SOLEIL is based on a general pump-probe scheme that has been developed and implemented on the CRISTAL hard X-ray diffraction beamline [1,2]. In a so-called pump-probe cycle, the sample is excited with an ultra-short laser pulse of ≈40 fs duration (the pump), and induced changes in its atomic structure are studied by measuring, with a precisely controlled delay, a diffraction pattern from a single pulse of synchrotron radiation (the probe) with a 2-D pixel detector. An improvement to the classical scheme is proposed, where the sample's response is probed at two different delays after each laser excitation. The first measurement at short delays allows studying the photo-induced dynamics. The second one is a reference measurement taken after sample's relaxation, which permits detection of drifts in the experimental conditions (e.g. beam misalignment, sample degradation). A hybrid pixel detector with a very fast readout time, a high dynamic range and extended linearity was tested to achieve the experiment objectives. In this paper, the first results obtained with the UFXC32k single photon counting detector are presented.

  7. A synchronous analog very front-end in 65 nm CMOS with local fast ToT encoding for pixel detectors at HL-LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteil, E.; Pacher, L.; Paternò, A.; Demaria, N.; Rivetti, A.; Da Rocha Rolo, M.; Rotondo, F.; Leng, C.; Chai, J.

    2017-03-01

    This work describes the design, in 65 nm CMOS, of a very compact, low power, low threshold synchronous analog front-end for pixel detectors at HL-LHC . Threshold trimming is avoided using offset compensation techniques. Fast ToT encoding is possible, as the comparator can be turned into a Local Oscillator up to several hundreds MHz. Two small prototypes have been submitted and tested; a X-ray irradiation up to 600 Mrad has been performed. Detailed results in terms of gain, noise, ToT and threshold dispersion are presented. This design will be part of the CHIPIX65 demonstrator and of the RD53A chip.

  8. Bad pixel mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Roger M.; Hale, David; Wizinowich, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Bad pixels are generally treated as a loss of useable area and then excluded from averaged performance metrics. The definition and detection of "bad pixels" or "cosmetic defects" are seldom discussed, perhaps because they are considered self-evident or of minor consequence for any scientific grade detector, however the ramifications can be more serious than generally appreciated. While the definition of pixel performance is generally understood, the classification of pixels as useable is highly application-specific, as are the consequences of ignoring or interpolating over such pixels. CMOS sensors (including NIR detectors) exhibit less compact distributions of pixel properties than CCDs. The extended tails in these distributions result in a steeper increase in bad pixel counts as performance thresholds are tightened which comes as a surprise to many users. To illustrate how some applications are much more sensitive to bad pixels than others, we present a bad pixel mapping exercise for the Teledyne H2RG used as the NIR tip-tilt sensor in the Keck-1 Adaptive Optics system. We use this example to illustrate the wide range of metrics by which a pixel might be judged inadequate. These include pixel bump bond connectivity, vignetting, addressing faults in the mux, severe sensitivity deficiency of some pixels, non linearity, poor signal linearity, low full well, poor mean-variance linearity, excessive noise and high dark current. Some pixels appear bad by multiple metrics. We also discuss the importance of distinguishing true performance outliers from measurement errors. We note how the complexity of these issues has ramifications for sensor procurement and acceptance testing strategies.

  9. Submission of the first full scale prototype chip for upgraded ATLAS pixel detector at LHC, FE-I4A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbero, Marlon; Arutinov, David; Beccherle, Roberto; Darbo, Giovanni; Dube, Sourabh; Elledge, David; Fleury, Julien; Fougeron, Denis; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gensolen, Fabrice; Gnani, Dario; Gromov, Vladimir; Jensen, Frank; Hemperek, Tomasz; Karagounis, Michael; Kluit, Ruud; Kruth, Andre; Mekkaoui, Abderrezak; Menouni, Mohsine; Schipper, Jan David; Wermes, Norbert; Zivkovic, Vladimir

    2011-09-01

    A new ATLAS pixel chip FE-I4 is being developed for use in upgraded LHC luminosity environments, including the near-term Insertable B-Layer (IBL) upgrade. FE-I4 is designed in a 130 nm CMOS technology, presenting advantages in terms of radiation tolerance and digital logic density compared to the 0.25 μm CMOS technology used for the current ATLAS pixel IC, FE-I3. The FE-I4 architecture is based on an array of 80×336 pixels, each 50×250 μm2, consisting of analog and digital sections. In the summer 2010, a first full scale prototype FE-I4A was submitted for an engineering run. This IC features the full scale pixel array as well as the complex periphery of the future full-size FE-I4. The FE-I4A contains also various extra test features which should prove very useful for the chip characterization, but deviate from the needs for standard operation of the final FE-I4 for IBL. In this paper, focus will be brought to the various features implemented in the FE-I4A submission, while also underlining the main differences between the FE-I4A IC and the final FE-I4 as envisioned for IBL.

  10. Commissioning of the read-out driver (ROD) card for the ATLAS IBL detector and upgrade studies for the pixel Layers 1 and 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balbi, G.; Bindi, M.; Falchieri, D.; Gabrielli, A.; Travaglini, R.; Chen, S.-P.; Hsu, S.-C.; Hauck, S.; Kugel, A.

    2014-11-01

    The higher luminosity that is expected for the LHC after future upgrades will require better performance by the data acquisition system, especially in terms of throughput. In particular, during the first shutdown of the LHC collider in 2013/14, the ATLAS Pixel Detector will be equipped with a fourth layer - the Insertable B-Layer or IBL - located at a radius smaller than the present three layers. Consequently, a new front end ASIC (FE-I4) was designed as well as a new off-detector chain. The latter is composed mainly of two 9U-VME cards called the Back-Of-Crate (BOC) and Read-Out Driver (ROD). The ROD is used for data and event formatting and for configuration and control of the overall read-out electronics. After some prototyping samples were completed, a pre-production batch of 5 ROD cards was delivered with the final layout. Actual production of another 15 ROD cards is ongoing in Fall 2013, and commissioning is scheduled in 2014. Altogether 14 cards are necessary for the 14 staves of the IBL detector, one additional card is required by the Diamond Beam Monitor (DBM), and additional spare ROD cards will be produced for a total of 20 boards. This paper describes some integration tests that were performed and our plan to test the production of the ROD cards. Slices of the IBL read-out chain have been instrumented, and ROD performance is verified on a test bench mimicking a small-sized final setup. This contribution will report also one view on the possible adoption of the IBL ROD for ATLAS Pixel Detector Layer 2 (firstly) and, possibly, in the future, for Layer 1.

  11. Cosmic-ray Detector with Interdigitated-Finger Pixels for two-dimensional Position Information from a Singel Wafer Side

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Thomas J.; Mazed, Mohammad; Holtzman, Melinda J.; Fossum, Eric R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a type of cosmic ray detector for isotopic and energy detection of energetic nuclei which derives both dimensions of position information from one side of the detector. This simplifies the required readout electronics, since only one precision amplifier connected to the other side is required for an accurate detection of the energy loss.

  12. Measurements of Ultra-Fast single photon counting chip with energy window and 75 μm pixel pitch with Si and CdTe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maj, P.; Grybos, P.; Kasinski, K.; Koziol, A.; Krzyzanowska, A.; Kmon, P.; Szczygiel, R.; Zoladz, M.

    2017-03-01

    Single photon counting pixel detectors become increasingly popular in various 2-D X-ray imaging techniques and scientific experiments mainly in solid state physics, material science and medicine. This paper presents architecture and measurement results of the UFXC32k chip designed in a CMOS 130 nm process. The chip consists of about 50 million transistors and has an area of 9.64 mm × 20.15 mm. The core of the IC is a matrix of 128 × 256 pixels of 75 μm pitch. Each pixel contains a CSA, a shaper with tunable gain, two discriminators with correction circuits and two 14-bit ripple counters operating in a normal mode (with energy window), a long counter mode (one 28-bit counter) and a zero-dead time mode. Gain and noise performance were verified with X-ray radiation and with the chip connected to Si (320 μm thick) and CdTe (750 μ m thick) sensors.

  13. Spectroscopic performance of DEPFET active pixel sensor prototypes suitable for the high count rate Athena WFI detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller-Seidlitz, Johannes; Andritschke, Robert; Bähr, Alexander; Meidinger, Norbert; Ott, Sabine; Richter, Rainer H.; Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Treis, Johannes

    2016-07-01

    The focal plane of the WFI of Athena consists of two sensors. One features a large field of view of 40' X 40' and one is forseen to be used for bright point like sources. Both parts base on DEPFET active pixel sensors. To fulfil the count rate requirement for the smaller sensor of less than 1% pile-up for a one Crab source it has to have a sufficient high frame rate. Since therefore the readout becomes a large fraction of the total photon integration time, the probability of measurements with incomplete signals increases. A shutter would solve the problem of these so called misfits but is not in agreement with the required high throughput of more than 80%. The Infinipix design has implemented a storage in addition to separate the collection and the readout of the charges without discarding them. Its working principle was successfully shown by Bähr et al.1 on single pixel level. For the further development three layout variants were tested on a 32 X 32 pixel array scale. The measurements of the spectroscopic performance show very promising results even for the intended readout speed for the Athena WFI of 2:5 μs per sensor row. Although, there are still layout and technology improvements necessary to ensure the reliability needed for space missions. In this paper we present the measurement results on the comparison of the three prototype layout variants.

  14. A four-pixel single-photon pulse-position array fabricated from WSi superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, V. B. Horansky, R.; Lita, A. E.; Mirin, R. P.; Nam, S. W.; Marsili, F.; Stern, J. A.; Shaw, M. D.

    2014-02-03

    We demonstrate a scalable readout scheme for an infrared single-photon pulse-position camera consisting of WSi superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors. For an N × N array, only 2 × N wires are required to obtain the position of a detection event. As a proof-of-principle, we show results from a 2 × 2 array.

  15. A 4096-pixel MAPS detector used to investigate the single-electron distribution in a Young-Feynman two-slit interference experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrielli, A.; Giorgi, F. M.; Semprini, N.; Villa, M.; Zoccoli, A.; Matteucci, G.; Pozzi, G.; Frabboni, S.; Gazzadi, G. C.

    2013-01-01

    A monolithic CMOS detector, made of 4096 active pixels developed for HEP collider experiments, has been used in the Young-Feynman two-slit experiment with single electrons. The experiment has been carried out by inserting two nanometric slits in a transmission electron microscope that provided the electron beam source and the electro-optical lenses for projecting and focusing the interference pattern on the sensor. The fast readout of the sensor, in principle capable to manage up to 106 frames per second, allowed to record single-electron frames spaced by several empty frames. In this way, for the first time in a single-electron two-slit experiment, the time distribution of electron arrivals has been measured with a resolution of 165 μs. In addition, high statistics samples of single-electron events were collected within a time interval short enough to be compatible with the stability of the system and coherence conditions of the illumination.

  16. Fluorescence X-ray absorption spectroscopy using a Ge pixel array detector: application to high-temperature superconducting thin-film single crystals.

    PubMed

    Oyanagi, H; Tsukada, A; Naito, M; Saini, N L; Lampert, M O; Gutknecht, D; Dressler, P; Ogawa, S; Kasai, K; Mohamed, S; Fukano, A

    2006-07-01

    A Ge pixel array detector with 100 segments was applied to fluorescence X-ray absorption spectroscopy, probing the local structure of high-temperature superconducting thin-film single crystals (100 nm in thickness). Independent monitoring of pixel signals allows real-time inspection of artifacts owing to substrate diffractions. By optimizing the grazing-incidence angle theta and adjusting the azimuthal angle phi, smooth extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) oscillations were obtained for strained (La,Sr)2CuO4 thin-film single crystals grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The results of EXAFS data analysis show that the local structure (CuO6 octahedron) in (La,Sr)2CuO4 thin films grown on LaSrAlO4 and SrTiO3 substrates is uniaxially distorted changing the tetragonality by approximately 5 x 10(-3) in accordance with the crystallographic lattice mismatch. It is demonstrated that the local structure of thin-film single crystals can be probed with high accuracy at low temperature without interference from substrates.

  17. MediSPECT: Single photon emission computed tomography system for small field of view small animal imaging based on a CdTe hybrid pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accorsi, R.; Autiero, M.; Celentano, L.; Chmeissani, M.; Cozzolino, R.; Curion, A. S.; Frallicciardi, P.; Laccetti, P.; Lanza, R. C.; Lauria, A.; Maiorino, M.; Marotta, M.; Mettivier, G.; Montesi, M. C.; Riccio, P.; Roberti, G.; Russo, P.

    2007-02-01

    We describe MediSPECT, a new scanner developed at University and INFN Napoli, for SPECT studies on small animals with a small field of view (FOV) and high spatial resolution. The CdTe pixel detector (a 256×256 matrix of 55 μm square pixels) operating in single photon counting for detection of gamma-rays with low and medium energy (e.g. 125I, 27-35 keV, 99mTc, 140 keV), is bump bonded to the Medipix2 readout chip. The FOV of the MediSPECT scanner with a coded aperture mask collimator ranges from 6.3 mm (system spatial resolution 110 μm at 27-35 keV) to 24.3 mm. With a 0.30 mm pinhole the FOV ranges from 2.4 to 29 mm (where the system spatial resolution is 1.0 mm at 27-35 keV and 2.0 mm at 140 keV). MediSPECT will be used for in vivo imaging of small organs or tissue structures in mouse, e.g., brain, thyroid, heart or tumor.

  18. Note: application of a pixel-array area detector to simultaneous single crystal X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements.

    PubMed

    Sun, Cheng-Jun; Zhang, Bangmin; Brewe, Dale L; Chen, Jing-Sheng; Chow, G M; Venkatesan, T; Heald, Steve M

    2014-04-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) are two main x-ray techniques in synchrotron radiation facilities. In this Note, we present an experimental setup capable of performing simultaneous XRD and XAS measurements by the application of a pixel-array area detector. For XRD, the momentum transfer in specular diffraction was measured by scanning the X-ray energy with fixed incoming and outgoing x-ray angles. By selecting a small fixed region of the detector to collect the XRD signal, the rest of the area was available for collecting the x-ray fluorescence for XAS measurements. The simultaneous measurement of XRD and X-ray absorption near edge structure for Pr0.67Sr0.33MnO3 film was demonstrated as a proof of principle for future time-resolved pump-probe measurements. A static sample makes it easy to maintain an accurate overlap of the X-ray spot and laser pump beam.

  19. Quantum dosimetry and online visualization of X-ray and charged particle radiation in commercial aircraft at operational flight altitudes with the pixel detector Timepix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granja, Carlos; Pospisil, Stanislav

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the application of the hybrid semiconductor pixel detector Timepix for precise characterization, quantum sensitivity dosimetry and visualization of the charged particle radiation and X-ray field inside commercial aircraft at operational flight altitudes. The quantum counting capability and granularity of Timepix provides the composition and spectral-characteristics of the X-ray and charged-particle field with high sensitivity, wide dynamic range, high spatial resolution and particle type resolving power. For energetic charged particles the direction of trajectory and linear energy transfer can be measured. The detector is operated by the integrated readout interface FITPix for power, control and data acquisition together with the software package Pixelman for online visualization and real-time data processing. The compact and portable radiation camera can be deployed remotely being controlled simply by a laptop computer. The device performs continuous monitoring and accurate time-dependent measurements in wide dynamic range of particle fluxes, deposited energy, absorbed dose and equivalent dose rates. Results are presented for in-flight measurements at altitudes up to 12 km in various flights selected in the period 2006-2013.

  20. High-flux ptychographic imaging using the new 55 µm-pixel detector ‘Lambda’ based on the Medipix3 readout chip

    SciTech Connect

    Wilke, R. N. Wallentin, J.; Osterhoff, M.; Pennicard, D.; Zozulya, A.; Sprung, M.; Salditt, T.

    2014-11-01

    The Large Area Medipix-Based Detector Array (Lambda) has been used in a ptychographic imaging experiment on solar-cell nanowires. By using a semi-transparent central stop, the high flux density provided by nano-focusing Kirkpatrick–Baez mirrors can be fully exploited for high-resolution phase reconstructions. Suitable detection systems that are capable of recording high photon count rates with single-photon detection are instrumental for coherent X-ray imaging. The new single-photon-counting pixel detector ‘Lambda’ has been tested in a ptychographic imaging experiment on solar-cell nanowires using Kirkpatrick–Baez-focused 13.8 keV X-rays. Taking advantage of the high count rate of the Lambda and dynamic range expansion by the semi-transparent central stop, a high-dynamic-range diffraction signal covering more than seven orders of magnitude has been recorded, which corresponds to a photon flux density of about 10{sup 5} photons nm{sup −2} s{sup −1} or a flux of ∼10{sup 10} photons s{sup −1} on the sample. By comparison with data taken without the semi-transparent central stop, an increase in resolution by a factor of 3–4 is determined: from about 125 nm to about 38 nm for the nanowire and from about 83 nm to about 21 nm for the illuminating wavefield.

  1. Note: Application of a pixel-array area detector to simultaneous single crystal x-ray diffraction and x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Cheng-Jun Brewe, Dale L.; Heald, Steve M.; Zhang, Bangmin; Chen, Jing-Sheng; Chow, G. M.; Venkatesan, T.

    2014-04-15

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) are two main x-ray techniques in synchrotron radiation facilities. In this Note, we present an experimental setup capable of performing simultaneous XRD and XAS measurements by the application of a pixel-array area detector. For XRD, the momentum transfer in specular diffraction was measured by scanning the X-ray energy with fixed incoming and outgoing x-ray angles. By selecting a small fixed region of the detector to collect the XRD signal, the rest of the area was available for collecting the x-ray fluorescence for XAS measurements. The simultaneous measurement of XRD and X-ray absorption near edge structure for Pr{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.33}MnO{sub 3} film was demonstrated as a proof of principle for future time-resolved pump-probe measurements. A static sample makes it easy to maintain an accurate overlap of the X-ray spot and laser pump beam.

  2. Phase unwrapping in spectral X-ray differential phase-contrast imaging with an energy-resolving photon-counting pixel detector.

    PubMed

    Epple, Franz M; Ehn, Sebastian; Thibault, Pierre; Koehler, Thomas; Potdevin, Guillaume; Herzen, Julia; Pennicard, David; Graafsma, Heinz; Noël, Peter B; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-03-01

    Grating-based differential phase-contrast imaging has proven to be feasible with conventional X-ray sources. The polychromatic spectrum generally limits the performance of the interferometer but benefit can be gained with an energy-sensitive detector. In the presented work, we employ the energy-discrimination capability to correct for phase-wrapping artefacts. We propose to use the phase shifts, which are measured in distinct energy bins, to estimate the optimal phase shift in the sense of maximum likelihood. We demonstrate that our method is able to correct for phase-wrapping artefacts, to improve the contrast-to-noise ratio and to reduce beam hardening due to the modelled energy dependency. The method is evaluated on experimental data which are measured with a laboratory Talbot-Lau interferometer equipped with a conventional polychromatic X-ray source and an energy-sensitive photon-counting pixel detector. Our work shows, that spectral imaging is an important step to move differential phase-contrast imaging closer to pre-clinical and clinical applications, where phase wrapping is particularly problematic.

  3. A method for the dynamic range extension of a pixelated Silicon detector beam profilometer based on the incomplete reset mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caccia, M.; Santoro, R.; Antonello, M.

    2017-03-01

    The SUCIMA collaboration, within a project supported by the European Commission in the Fifth Framework Program, developed a sensor for non-disruptive real-time beam profilometry for hadron therapy centres. The sensor, named MIMOTERA, has been used at different European facilities, imaging beams by direct impact on the sensor and by the detection of secondary electrons emitted by thin targets. In 2015, the detector has been thinned to 50 μm, integrated in a high vacuum and cryogenic temperature compliant assembly and successfully commissioned as antiproton beam monitor for the AEbar gIS experiment at CERN. The detector contributed to the optimisation of the experiment functionality providing the shape and position of the beam on a spill-by-spill basis. However, it failed in measuring the fluctuations of the beam intensity because the deposited energy exceeded the full well capacity and saturated the output signal. In order to recover this information, a method was developed based on the persistence of the signal in a series of frames that follows the one corresponding to the beam impact, due to the incomplete sensor reset. A laboratory test that makes use of a laser with tuneable intensity was designed and the method was qualified. This paper reports the description of the procedure and the main outcomes.

  4. High density pixel array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiener-Avnear, Eliezer (Inventor); McFall, James Earl (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A pixel array device is fabricated by a laser micro-milling method under strict process control conditions. The device has an array of pixels bonded together with an adhesive filling the grooves between adjacent pixels. The array is fabricated by moving a substrate relative to a laser beam of predetermined intensity at a controlled, constant velocity along a predetermined path defining a set of grooves between adjacent pixels so that a predetermined laser flux per unit area is applied to the material, and repeating the movement for a plurality of passes of the laser beam until the grooves are ablated to a desired depth. The substrate is of an ultrasonic transducer material in one example for fabrication of a 2D ultrasonic phase array transducer. A substrate of phosphor material is used to fabricate an X-ray focal plane array detector.

  5. High-flux ptychographic imaging using the new 55 µm-pixel detector ‘Lambda’ based on the Medipix3 readout chip

    PubMed Central

    Wilke, R. N.; Wallentin, J.; Osterhoff, M.; Pennicard, D.; Zozulya, A.; Sprung, M.; Salditt, T.

    2014-01-01

    Suitable detection systems that are capable of recording high photon count rates with single-photon detection are instrumental for coherent X-ray imaging. The new single-photon-counting pixel detector ‘Lambda’ has been tested in a ptychographic imaging experiment on solar-cell nanowires using Kirkpatrick–Baez-focused 13.8 keV X-rays. Taking advantage of the high count rate of the Lambda and dynamic range expansion by the semi-transparent central stop, a high-dynamic-range diffraction signal covering more than seven orders of magnitude has been recorded, which corresponds to a photon flux density of about 105 photons nm−2 s−1 or a flux of ∼1010 photons s−1 on the sample. By comparison with data taken without the semi-transparent central stop, an increase in resolution by a factor of 3–4 is determined: from about 125 nm to about 38 nm for the nanowire and from about 83 nm to about 21 nm for the illuminating wavefield.

  6. PIXEL PUSHER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanfill, D. F.

    1994-01-01

    Pixel Pusher is a Macintosh application used for viewing and performing minor enhancements on imagery. It will read image files in JPL's two primary image formats- VICAR and PDS - as well as the Macintosh PICT format. VICAR (NPO-18076) handles an array of image processing capabilities which may be used for a variety of applications including biomedical image processing, cartography, earth resources, and geological exploration. Pixel Pusher can also import VICAR format color lookup tables for viewing images in pseudocolor (256 colors). This program currently supports only eight bit images but will work on monitors with any number of colors. Arbitrarily large image files may be viewed in a normal Macintosh window. Color and contrast enhancement can be performed with a graphical "stretch" editor (as in contrast stretch). In addition, VICAR images may be saved as Macintosh PICT files for exporting into other Macintosh programs, and individual pixels can be queried to determine their locations and actual data values. Pixel Pusher is written in Symantec's Think C and was developed for use on a Macintosh SE30, LC, or II series computer running System Software 6.0.3 or later and 32 bit QuickDraw. Pixel Pusher will only run on a Macintosh which supports color (whether a color monitor is being used or not). The standard distribution medium for this program is a set of three 3.5 inch Macintosh format diskettes. The program price includes documentation. Pixel Pusher was developed in 1991 and is a copyrighted work with all copyright vested in NASA. Think C is a trademark of Symantec Corporation. Macintosh is a registered trademark of Apple Computer, Inc.

  7. Imaging properties of pixellated scintillators with deep pixels

    PubMed Central

    Barber, H. Bradford; Fastje, David; Lemieux, Daniel; Grim, Gary P.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Miller, Brian W.; Parkhurst, Philip; Nagarkar, Vivek V.

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the light-transport properties of scintillator arrays with long, thin pixels (deep pixels) for use in high-energy gamma-ray imaging. We compared 10×10 pixel arrays of YSO:Ce, LYSO:Ce and BGO (1mm × 1mm × 20 mm pixels) made by Proteus, Inc. with similar 10×10 arrays of LSO:Ce and BGO (1mm × 1mm × 15mm pixels) loaned to us by Saint-Gobain. The imaging and spectroscopic behaviors of these scintillator arrays are strongly affected by the choice of a reflector used as an inter-pixel spacer (3M ESR in the case of the Proteus arrays and white, diffuse-reflector for the Saint-Gobain arrays). We have constructed a 3700-pixel LYSO:Ce Prototype NIF Gamma-Ray Imager for use in diagnosing target compression in inertial confinement fusion. This system was tested at the OMEGA Laser and exhibited significant optical, inter-pixel cross-talk that was traced to the use of a single-layer of ESR film as an inter-pixel spacer. We show how the optical cross-talk can be mapped, and discuss correction procedures. We demonstrate a 10×10 YSO:Ce array as part of an iQID (formerly BazookaSPECT) imager and discuss issues related to the internal activity of 176Lu in LSO:Ce and LYSO:Ce detectors. PMID:26236070

  8. Imaging properties of pixellated scintillators with deep pixels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, H. Bradford; Fastje, David; Lemieux, Daniel; Grim, Gary P.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Miller, Brian W.; Parkhurst, Philip; Nagarkar, Vivek V.

    2014-09-01

    We have investigated the light-transport properties of scintillator arrays with long, thin pixels (deep pixels) for use in high-energy gamma-ray imaging. We compared 10x10 pixel arrays of YSO:Ce, LYSO:Ce and BGO (1mm x 1mm x 20 mm pixels) made by Proteus, Inc. with similar 10x10 arrays of LSO:Ce and BGO (1mm x 1mm x 15mm pixels) loaned to us by Saint-Gobain. The imaging and spectroscopic behaviors of these scintillator arrays are strongly affected by the choice of a reflector used as an inter-pixel spacer (3M ESR in the case of the Proteus arrays and white, diffuse-reflector for the Saint-Gobain arrays). We have constructed a 3700-pixel LYSO:Ce Prototype NIF Gamma-Ray Imager for use in diagnosing target compression in inertial confinement fusion. This system was tested at the OMEGA Laser and exhibited significant optical, inter-pixel cross-talk that was traced to the use of a single-layer of ESR film as an inter-pixel spacer. We show how the optical cross-talk can be mapped, and discuss correction procedures. We demonstrate a 10x10 YSO:Ce array as part of an iQID (formerly BazookaSPECT) imager and discuss issues related to the internal activity of 176Lu in LSO:Ce and LYSO:Ce detectors.

  9. Imaging properties of pixellated scintillators with deep pixels.

    PubMed

    Barber, H Bradford; Fastje, David; Lemieux, Daniel; Grim, Gary P; Furenlid, Lars R; Miller, Brian W; Parkhurst, Philip; Nagarkar, Vivek V

    2014-08-17

    We have investigated the light-transport properties of scintillator arrays with long, thin pixels (deep pixels) for use in high-energy gamma-ray imaging. We compared 10×10 pixel arrays of YSO:Ce, LYSO:Ce and BGO (1mm × 1mm × 20 mm pixels) made by Proteus, Inc. with similar 10×10 arrays of LSO:Ce and BGO (1mm × 1mm × 15mm pixels) loaned to us by Saint-Gobain. The imaging and spectroscopic behaviors of these scintillator arrays are strongly affected by the choice of a reflector used as an inter-pixel spacer (3M ESR in the case of the Proteus arrays and white, diffuse-reflector for the Saint-Gobain arrays). We have constructed a 3700-pixel LYSO:Ce Prototype NIF Gamma-Ray Imager for use in diagnosing target compression in inertial confinement fusion. This system was tested at the OMEGA Laser and exhibited significant optical, inter-pixel cross-talk that was traced to the use of a single-layer of ESR film as an inter-pixel spacer. We show how the optical cross-talk can be mapped, and discuss correction procedures. We demonstrate a 10×10 YSO:Ce array as part of an iQID (formerly BazookaSPECT) imager and discuss issues related to the internal activity of (176)Lu in LSO:Ce and LYSO:Ce detectors.

  10. Detectors

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore; Bounds, John Alan; Allander, Krag

    2002-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide techniques through which both alpha and beta emission determinations can be made simultaneously using a simple detector structure. The technique uses a beta detector covered in an electrically conducting material, the electrically conducting material discharging ions generated by alpha emissions, and as a consequence providing a measure of those alpha emissions. The technique also offers improved mountings for alpha detectors and other forms of detectors against vibration and the consequential effects vibration has on measurement accuracy.

  11. Radiation tolerance of CMOS monolithic active pixel sensors with self-biased pixels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deveaux, M.; Amar-Youcef, S.; Besson, A.; Claus, G.; Colledani, C.; Dorokhov, M.; Dritsa, C.; Dulinski, W.; Fröhlich, I.; Goffe, M.; Grandjean, D.; Heini, S.; Himmi, A.; Hu, C.; Jaaskelainen, K.; Müntz, C.; Shabetai, A.; Stroth, J.; Szelezniak, M.; Valin, I.; Winter, M.

    2010-12-01

    CMOS monolithic active pixel sensors (MAPS) are proposed as a technology for various vertex detectors in nuclear and particle physics. We discuss the mechanisms of ionizing radiation damage on MAPS hosting the dead time free, so-called self bias pixel. Moreover, we introduce radiation hardened sensor designs which allow operating detectors after exposing them to irradiation doses above 1 Mrad.

  12. Characterization of the energy resolution and the tracking capabilities of a hybrid pixel detector with CdTe-sensor layer for a possible use in a neutrinoless double beta decay experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipenko, Mykhaylo; Gleixner, Thomas; Anton, Gisela; Durst, Jürgen; Michel, Thilo

    2013-04-01

    Many different experiments are being developed to explore the existence of the neutrinoless double beta decay (0 νββ) since it would imply fundamental consequences for particle physics. In this work we present results on the evaluation of Timepix detectors with cadmium-telluride sensor material to search for 0 νββ in 116Cd. This work was carried out with the COBRA collaboration and the Medipix collaboration. Due to the relatively small pixel dimension of 110×110×1000 μm3 the energy deposited by particles typically extends over several detector pixels leading to a track in the pixel matrix. We investigated the separation power regarding different event-types like α-particles, atmospheric muons, single electrons and electron-positron pairs produced at a single vertex. We achieved excellent classification power for α-particles and muons. In addition, we achieved good separation power between single electron and electron-positron pair production events. These separation abilities indicate a very good background reduction for the 0 νββ search. Further, in order to distinguish between 2 νββ and 0 νββ, the energy resolution is of particular importance. We carried out simulations which demonstrate that an energy resolution of 0.43 % is achievable at the Q-value for 0 νββ of 116Cd at 2.814 MeV. We measured an energy resolution of 1.6 % at a nominal energy of 1589 keV for electron-positron tracks which is about two times worse that predicted by our simulations. This deviation is probably due to the problem of detector calibration at energies above 122 keV which is discussed in this paper as well.

  13. The DEPFET Sensor-Amplifier Structure: A Method to Beat 1/f Noise and Reach Sub-Electron Noise in Pixel Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Gerhard; Porro, Matteo; Aschauer, Stefan; Wölfel, Stefan; Strüder, Lothar

    2016-01-01

    Depleted field effect transistors (DEPFET) are used to achieve very low noise signal charge readout with sub-electron measurement precision. This is accomplished by repeatedly reading an identical charge, thereby suppressing not only the white serial noise but also the usually constant 1/f noise. The repetitive non-destructive readout (RNDR) DEPFET is an ideal central element for an active pixel sensor (APS) pixel. The theory has been derived thoroughly and results have been verified on RNDR-DEPFET prototypes. A charge measurement precision of 0.18 electrons has been achieved. The device is well-suited for spectroscopic X-ray imaging and for optical photon counting in pixel sensors, even at high photon numbers in the same cell. PMID:27136549

  14. Randomized SUSAN edge detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Zhi-Guo; Wang, Ping; Gao, Ying-Hui; Wang, Peng

    2011-11-01

    A speed up technique for the SUSAN edge detector based on random sampling is proposed. Instead of sliding the mask pixel by pixel on an image as the SUSAN edge detector does, the proposed scheme places the mask randomly on pixels to find edges in the image; we hereby name it randomized SUSAN edge detector (R-SUSAN). Specifically, the R-SUSAN edge detector adopts three approaches in the framework of random sampling to accelerate a SUSAN edge detector: procedure integration of response computation and nonmaxima suppression, reduction of unnecessary processing for obvious nonedge pixels, and early termination. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  15. Depth of interaction and bias voltage depenence of the spectral response in a pixellated CdTe detector operating in time-over-threshold mode subjected to monochromatic X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fröjdh, E.; Fröjdh, C.; Gimenez, E. N.; Maneuski, D.; Marchal, J.; Norlin, B.; O'Shea, V.; Stewart, G.; Wilhelm, H.; Modh Zain, R.; Thungström, G.

    2012-03-01

    High stopping power is one of the most important figures of merit for X-ray detectors. CdTe is a promising material but suffers from: material defects, non-ideal charge transport and long range X-ray fluorescence. Those factors reduce the image quality and deteriorate spectral information. In this project we used a monochromatic pencil beam collimated through a 20μm pinhole to measure the detector spectral response in dependance on the depth of interaction. The sensor was a 1mm thick CdTe detector with a pixel pitch of 110μm, bump bonded to a Timepix readout chip operating in Time-Over-Threshold mode. The measurements were carried out at the Extreme Conditions beamline I15 of the Diamond Light Source. The beam was entering the sensor at an angle of \\texttildelow20 degrees to the surface and then passed through \\texttildelow25 pixels before leaving through the bottom of the sensor. The photon energy was tuned to 77keV giving a variation in the beam intensity of about three orders of magnitude along the beam path. Spectra in Time-over-Threshold (ToT) mode were recorded showing each individual interaction. The bias voltage was varied between -30V and -300V to investigate how the electric field affected the spectral information. For this setup it is worth noticing the large impact of fluorescence. At -300V the photo peak and escape peak are of similar height. For high bias voltages the spectra remains clear throughout the whole depth but for lower voltages as -50V, only the bottom part of the sensor carries spectral information. This is an effect of the low hole mobility and the longer range the electrons have to travel in a low field.

  16. WFC3 Pixel Area Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalirai, J. S.; Cox, C.; Dressel, L.; Fruchter, A.; Hack, W.; Kozhurina-Platais, V.; Mack, J.

    2010-04-01

    We present the pixel area maps (PAMs) for the WFC3/UVIS and WFC3/IR detectors, and discuss the normalization of these images. HST processed flt images suffer from geometric distortion and therefore have pixel areas that vary on the sky. The counts (electrons) measured for a source on these images depends on the position of the source on the detector, an effect that is implicitly corrected when these images are multidrizzled into drz files. The flt images can be multiplied by the PAMs to yield correct and uniform counts for a given source irrespective of its location on the image. To ensure consistency between the count rate measured for sources in drz images and near the center of flt images, we set the normalization of the PAMs to unity at a reference pixel near the center of the UVIS mosaic and IR detector, and set the SCALE in the IDCTAB equal to the square root of the area of this reference pixel. The implications of this choice for photometric measurements are discussed.

  17. Preliminary demonstration of an IonCCD as an alternative pixelated anode for direct MCP readout in a compact MS-based detector.

    PubMed

    Hadjar, Omar; Fowler, William K; Kibelka, Gottfried; Schnute, William C

    2012-02-01

    We report on the preliminary testing of a new position-sensitive detector (PSD) by combining a microchannel plate (MCP) and a charge-sensitive pixilated anode with a direct readout based on charge-coupled detector (CCD) technology, which will be referred to as IonCCD (Hadjar et al. J Am Soc Mass Spectrom 22(4):612-623, 2011; Johnson et al. J Am Soc Mass Spectrom 22(8):1388-1394, 2011; Hadjar et al. J Am Soc Mass Spectrom 22(10):1872-1884, 2011). This work exploits the recently discovered electron detection capability of the IonCCD (Hadjar et al. J Am Soc Mass Spectrom 22(4):612-623, 2011), allowing it to be used directly behind an MC. This MCP-IonCCD configuration potentially obviates the need for electro-optical ion detector systems (EOIDs), which typically feature a relatively difficult-to-implement 5-kV power source as well as a phosphorus screen behind the MCP for conversion of electrons to photons prior to signal generation in a photosensitive CCD. Thus, the new system (MCP-IonCCD) has the potential to be smaller, simpler, more robust, and more cost efficient than EOID-based technologies in many applications. The use of the IonCCD as direct MCP readout anode, as opposed to its direct use as an ion detector, will benefit from the instant three-to-four-order-of-magnitude gain of the MCP with virtually no additional noise. The signal/noise gain can be used for either sensitivity or speed enhancement of the detector. The speed enhancement may motivate the development of faster IonCCD readout speeds (currently at 2.7 ms) to achieve the 2 kHz frame rate for which the IonCCD chip was designed, a must for transient signal applications. The presented detector exhibits clear potential not only as a trace analysis detector in scan-free mass spectrometry and electron spectroscopy but also as a compact detector for photon and particle imaging applications.

  18. Pixel Perfect

    SciTech Connect

    Perrine, Kenneth A.; Hopkins, Derek F.; Lamarche, Brian L.; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2005-09-01

    cubic warp. During image acquisitions, the cubic warp is evaluated by way of forward differencing. Unwanted pixelation artifacts are minimized by bilinear sampling. The resulting system is state-of-the-art for biological imaging. Precisely registered images enable the reliable use of FRET techniques. In addition, real-time image processing performance allows computed images to be fed back and displayed to scientists immediately, and the pipelined nature of the FPGA allows additional image processing algorithms to be incorporated into the system without slowing throughput.

  19. Pixelated neutron image plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlapp, M.; Conrad, H.; von Seggern, H.

    2004-09-01

    Neutron image plates (NIPs) have found widespread application as neutron detectors for single-crystal and powder diffraction, small-angle scattering and tomography. After neutron exposure, the image plate can be read out by scanning with a laser. Commercially available NIPs consist of a powder mixture of BaFBr : Eu2+ and Gd2O3 dispersed in a polymer matrix and supported by a flexible polymer sheet. Since BaFBr : Eu2+ is an excellent x-ray storage phosphor, these NIPs are particularly sensitive to ggr-radiation, which is always present as a background radiation in neutron experiments. In this work we present results on NIPs consisting of KCl : Eu2+ and LiF that were fabricated into ceramic image plates in which the alkali halides act as a self-supporting matrix without the necessity for using a polymeric binder. An advantage of this type of NIP is the significantly reduced ggr-sensitivity. However, the much lower neutron absorption cross section of LiF compared with Gd2O3 demands a thicker image plate for obtaining comparable neutron absorption. The greater thickness of the NIP inevitably leads to a loss in spatial resolution of the image plate. However, this reduction in resolution can be restricted by a novel image plate concept in which a ceramic structure with square cells (referred to as a 'honeycomb') is embedded in the NIP, resulting in a pixelated image plate. In such a NIP the read-out light is confined to the particular illuminated pixel, decoupling the spatial resolution from the optical properties of the image plate material and morphology. In this work, a comparison of experimentally determined and simulated spatial resolutions of pixelated and unstructured image plates for a fixed read-out laser intensity is presented, as well as simulations of the properties of these NIPs at higher laser powers.

  20. Thermal kinetic inductance detector

    DOEpatents

    Cecil, Thomas; Gades, Lisa; Miceli, Antonio; Quaranta, Orlando

    2016-12-20

    A microcalorimeter for radiation detection that uses superconducting kinetic inductance resonators as the thermometers. The detector is frequency-multiplexed which enables detector systems with a large number of pixels.

  1. Single-pixel hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suo, Jinli; Wang, Yuwang; Bian, Liheng; Dai, Qionghai

    2016-10-01

    Conventional multispectral imaging methods detect photons of a 3D hyperspectral data cube separately either in the spatial or spectral dimension using array detectors, and are thus photon inefficient and spectrum range limited. Besides, they are usually bulky and highly expensive. To address these issues, this paper presents single-pixel multispectral imaging techniques, which are of high sensitivity, wide spectrum range, low cost and light weight. Two mechanisms are proposed, and experimental validation are also reported.

  2. A novel gamma-ray detector with submillimeter resolutions using a monolithic MPPC array with pixelized Ce:LYSO and Ce:GGAG crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, T.; Kataoka, J.; Nakamori, T.; Miura, T.; Matsuda, H.; Kishimoto, A.; Sato, K.; Ishikawa, Y.; Yamamura, K.; Nakamura, S.; Kawabata, N.; Ikeda, H.; Yamamoto, S.; Kamada, K.

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a large-area monolithic Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC) array consisting of 4×4 channels with a three-side buttable package. Each channel has a photosensitive area of 3×3 mm2 and 3600 Geiger mode avalanche photodiodes (APDs). For typical operational gain of 7.5×105 at +20 °C, gain fluctuation over the entire MPPC device is only ±5.6%, and dark count rates (as measured at the 1 p.e. level) amount to ≤400 kcps per channel. We first fabricated a gamma-ray camera consisting of the MPPC array with one-to-one coupling to a Ce-doped (Lu, Y)2(SiO4)O (Ce:LYSO) crystal array (4×4 array of 3×3×10 mm3 crystals). Energy and time resolutions of 11.5±0.5% (FWHM at 662 keV) and 493±22 ps were obtained, respectively. When using the charge division resistor network, which compiles signals into four position-encoded analog outputs, the ultimate positional resolution is estimated as 0.19 mm in both X and Y directions, while energy resolution of 10.2±0.4% (FWHM) was obtained. Finally, we fabricated submillimeter Ce:LYSO and Ce-doped Gd3Ga3Al2O12 (Ce:GGAG) scintillator matrices each consisting of 1.0×1.0, 0.7×0.7 and 0.5×0.5 mm2 pixels, to further improve the spatial resolution. In all types of Ce:LYSO and Ce:GGAG matrices, each crystal was clearly resolved in the position histograms when irradiated by a 137Cs source. The energy resolutions for 662 keV gamma-rays for each Ce:LYSO and Ce:GGAG scintillator matrix were ≤14.3%. These results suggest excellent potential for its use as a high spatial medical imaging device, particularly in positron emission tomography (PET).

  3. Development activities of a CdTe/CdZnTe pixel detector for gamma-ray spectrometry with imaging and polarimetry capability in astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gálvez, J. L.; Hernanz, M.; Álvarez, J. M.; Álvarez, L.; La Torre, M.; Caroli, E.; Lozano, M.; Pellegrini, G.; Ullán, M.; Cabruja, E.; Martínez, R.; Chmeissani, M.; Puigdengoles, C.

    2013-05-01

    In the last few years we have been working on feasibility studies of future instruments in the gamma-ray range, from several keV up to a few MeV, in collaboration with other research institutes. High sensitivities are essential to perform detailed studies of cosmic explosions and cosmic accelerators, e.g., Supernovae, Classical Novae, Supernova Remnants (SNRs), Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), Pulsars, Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN).Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) and Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe) are very attractive materials for gamma-ray detection, since they have already demonstrated their great performance onboard current space missions, such as IBIS/INTEGRAL and BAT/SWIFT, and future projects like ASIM onboard the ISS. However, the energy coverage of these instruments is limited up to a few hundred keV, and there has not been yet a dedicated instrument for polarimetry.Our research and development activities aim to study a gamma-ray imaging spectrometer in the MeV range based on CdTe detectors, suited either for the focal plane of a focusing mission or as a calorimeter for a Compton camera. In addition, our undergoing detector design is proposed as the baseline for the payload of a balloon-borne experiment dedicated to hard X- and soft gamma-ray polarimetry, currently under study and called CμSP (CZT μ-Spectrometer Polarimeter). Other research institutes such as INAF-IASF, DTU Space, LIP, INEM/CNR, CEA, are involved in this proposal. We will report on the main features of the prototype we are developing at the Institute of Space Sciences, a gamma-ray detector with imaging and polarimetry capabilities in order to fulfil the combined requirement of high detection efficiency with good spatial and energy resolution driven by the science.

  4. Principle and modelling of Transient Current Technique for interface traps characterization in monolithic pixel detectors obtained by CMOS-compatible wafer bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronuzzi, J.; Mapelli, A.; Moll, M.; Sallese, J. M.

    2016-08-01

    In the framework of monolithic silicon radiation detectors, a fabrication process based on a recently developed silicon wafer bonding technique at low temperature was proposed. Ideally, this new process would enable direct bonding of a read-out electronic chip wafer on a highly resistive silicon substrate wafer, which is expected to present many advantages since it would combine high performance IC's with high sensitive ultra-low doped bulk silicon detectors. But electrical properties of the bonded interface are critical for this kind of application since the mobile charges generated by radiation inside the bonded bulk are expected to transit through the interface in order to be collected by the read-out electronics. In this work, we propose to explore and develop a model for the so-called Transient Current Technique (TCT) to identify the presence of deep traps at the bonded interface. For this purpose, we consider a simple PIN diode reversely biased where the ultra-low doped active region of interest is set in full depletion. In a first step, Synopsys Sentaurus TCAD is used to evaluate the soundness of this technique for interface traps characterization such as it may happen in bonded interfaces. Next, an analytical model is developed in details to give a better insight into the physics behind the TCT for interface layers. Further, this can be used as a simple tool to evidence what are the relevant parameters influencing the TCT signal and to set the basis for preliminary characterizations.

  5. Status and Construction of the Belle II DEPFET pixel system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lütticke, Florian

    2014-06-01

    DEpleted P-channel Field Effect Transistor (DEPFET) active pixel detectors combine detection with a first amplification stage in a fully depleted detector, resulting in an superb signal-to-noise ratio even for thin sensors. Two layers of thin (75 micron) silicon DEPFET pixels will be used as the innermost vertex system, very close to the beam pipe in the Belle II detector at the SuperKEKB facility. The status of the 8 million DEPFET pixels detector, latest developments and current system tests will be discussed.

  6. Pixel isolation of low dark-current large-format InAs/GaSb superlattice complementary barrier infrared detector focal plane arrays with high fill factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Jean; Hill, Cory J.; Rafol, Don; Keo, Sam; Soibel, Alexander; Ting, David Z.-Y.; Mumolo, Jason; Liu, John; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2011-01-01

    Low dark current and high fill factor are two crucial characteristics for the realization of the InAs/GaSb superlattice (SL) technology as third generation focal plane arrays (FPAs). Recent development proved high performance results for the complementary barrier infrared detector (CBIRD) design, and a high-quality etch technique is required to minimize surface leakage currents. We report on a n-CBIRD with 10.3 μm cutoff, exhibiting a responsivity of 1.7 A/W and dark current density of 1×10-5 A/cm2 at 77K under 0.2 V bias, without AR coating and without passivation. Results from four different mesa isolation techniques are compared on single element diodes: chemical wet etch using C4H6O6:H3PO4:H2O2:H2O, BCl3/Ar inductively coupled plasma (ICP), CH4/H2/Ar ICP, and CH4/H2/BCl3/Cl2/Ar ICP. The CH4/H2/BCl3/Cl2/Ar etched structures yielded more than 2.5 times improvement in dark current density and nearvertical sidewalls. Using this etching technique, we then implement a 1k x 1k p-CBIRD array with 11.5 μm cutoff and peak responsivity of 3 A/W. Operating at T = 80K, the array yielded a 81% fill factor with 98% operability and performance results of 21% quantum efficiency, 53 mK NE▵T, and NEI of 6.9×1013 photons/sec-cm2.

  7. A PFM based digital pixel with off-pixel residue measurement for 15μm pitch MWIR FPAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, Shahbaz; Shafique, Atia; Galioglu, Arman; Ceylan, Omer; Yazici, Melik; Gurbuz, Yasar

    2016-05-01

    Digital pixels based on pulse frequency modulation (PFM) employ counting techniques to achieve very high charge handling capability compared to their analog counterparts. Moreover, extended counting methods making use of leftover charge (residue) on the integration capacitor help improve the noise performance of these pixels. However, medium wave infrared (MWIR) focal plane arrays (FPAs) having smaller pixel pitch are constrained in terms of pixel area which makes it difficult to add extended counting circuitry to the pixel. Thus, this paper investigates the performance of digital pixels employing off-pixel residue measurement. A circuit prototype of such a pixel has been designed for 15μm pixel pitch and fabricated in 90nm CMOS. The prototype is composed of a pixel front-end based on a PFM loop. The frontend is a modified version of conventional design providing a means for buffering the signal that needs to be converted to a digital value by an off-pixel ADC. The pixel has an integration phase and a residue measurement phase. Measured integration performance of the pixel has been reported in this paper for various detector currents and integration times.

  8. The NA62 Gigatracker pixel detector system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazza, G.; Ceccucci, A.; Cortina, E.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Dellacasa, G.; Fiorini, M.; Garbolino, S.; Jarron, P.; Kaplon, J.; Kluge, A.; Marchetto, F.; Martin, E.; Martoiu, S.; Noy, M.; Petrucci, F.; Riedler, P.; Rivetti, A.; Tiuraniemi, S.

    2010-05-01

    The silicon tracker for the NA62 experiment has to provide both a time resolution of 150 ps rms and a space resolution of about 100 μm rms. These challenging specifications require the development of a new readout electronics in order to address the problem of measuring the tracks arrival time with such a high channel density. Moreover, the high particle density (up to 1.5 MHz/mm2 in the center and 0.8-1 GHz in total) requires a high speed measurement and data transmission in order to keep the dead time below 1%.

  9. PixelLearn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazzoni, Dominic; Wagstaff, Kiri; Bornstein, Benjamin; Tang, Nghia; Roden, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    PixelLearn is an integrated user-interface computer program for classifying pixels in scientific images. Heretofore, training a machine-learning algorithm to classify pixels in images has been tedious and difficult. PixelLearn provides a graphical user interface that makes it faster and more intuitive, leading to more interactive exploration of image data sets. PixelLearn also provides image-enhancement controls to make it easier to see subtle details in images. PixelLearn opens images or sets of images in a variety of common scientific file formats and enables the user to interact with several supervised or unsupervised machine-learning pixel-classifying algorithms while the user continues to browse through the images. The machinelearning algorithms in PixelLearn use advanced clustering and classification methods that enable accuracy much higher than is achievable by most other software previously available for this purpose. PixelLearn is written in portable C++ and runs natively on computers running Linux, Windows, or Mac OS X.

  10. Status of the CMS pixel project

    SciTech Connect

    Uplegger, Lorenzo; /Fermilab

    2008-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid Experiment (CMS) will start taking data at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in 2008. The closest detector to the interaction point is the silicon pixel detector which is the heart of the tracking system. It consists of three barrel layers and two pixel disks on each side of the interaction point for a total of 66 million channels. Its proximity to the interaction point means there will be very large particle fluences and therefore a radiation-tolerant design is necessary. The pixel detector will be crucial to achieve a good vertex resolution and will play a key role in pattern recognition and track reconstruction. The results from test beam runs prove that the expected performances can be achieved. The detector is currently being assembled and will be ready for insertion into CMS in early 2008. During the assembly phase, a thorough electronic test is being done to check the functionality of each channel to guarantee the performance required to achieve the physics goals. This report will present the final detector design, the status of the production as well as results from test beam runs to validate the expected performance.

  11. Detector requirements for space infrared astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, E. L.

    1986-01-01

    Requirements for background-limited (BLIP) detectors are discussed in terms of number of photons falling on each pixel, dark current, high detective quantum efficiencies, large numbers of pixels, and array size.

  12. Monolithic pixels on moderate resistivity substrate and sparsifying readout architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giubilato, P.; Battaglia, M.; Bisello, D.; Caselle, M.; Chalmet, P.; Demaria, L.; Ikemoto, Y.; Kloukinas, K.; Mansuy, S. C.; Mattiazzo, S.; Marchioro, A.; Mugnier, H.; Pantano, D.; Potenza, A.; Rivetti, A.; Rousset, J.; Silvestrin, L.; Snoeys, W.

    2013-12-01

    The LePix projects aim realizing a new generation monolithic pixel detectors with improved performances at lesser cost with respect to both current state of the art monolithic and hybrid pixel sensors. The detector is built in a 90 nm CMOS process on a substrate of moderate resistivity. This allows charge collection by drift while maintaining the other advantages usually offered by MAPS, like having a single piece detector and using a standard CMOS production line. The collection by drift mechanism, coupled to the low capacitance design of the collecting node made possible by the monolithic approach, provides an excellent signal to noise ratio straight at the pixel cell together with a radiation tolerance far superior to conventional un-depleted MAPS. The excellent signal-to-noise performance is demonstrated by the device ability to separate the 6 keV 55Fe double peak at room temperature. To achieve high granularity (10-20 μm pitch pixels) over large detector areas maintaining high readout speed, a completely new compressing architecture has been devised. This architecture departs from the mainstream hybrid pixel sparsification approach, which uses in-pixel logic to reduce data, by using topological compression to minimize pixel area and power consumption.

  13. Active Pixel Sensors: Are CCD's Dinosaurs?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R.

    1993-01-01

    Charge-coupled devices (CCD's) are presently the technology of choice for most imaging applications. In the 23 years since their invention in 1970, they have evolved to a sophisticated level of performance. However, as with all technologies, we can be certain that they will be supplanted someday. In this paper, the Active Pixel Sensor (APS) technology is explored as a possible successor to the CCD. An active pixel is defined as a detector array technology that has at least one active transistor within the pixel unit cell. The APS eliminates the need for nearly perfect charge transfer -- the Achilles' heel of CCDs. This perfect charge transfer makes CCD's radiation 'soft,' difficult to use under low light conditions, difficult to manufacture in large array sizes, difficult to integrate with on-chip electronics, difficult to use at low temperatures, difficult to use at high frame rates, and difficult to manufacture in non-silicon materials that extend wavelength response.

  14. Pixel telescope test in STAR at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiangming; Szelezniak, Michal; Greiner, Leo; Matis, Howard; Vu, Chinh; Stezelberger, Thorsten; Wieman, Howard

    2007-10-01

    The STAR experiment at RHIC is designing a new inner vertex detector called the Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT). The HFT's innermost two layers is called the PIXEL detector which uses Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor technology (MAPS). To test the MAPS technology, we just constructed and tested a telescope. The telescope uses a stack of three MIMOSTAR2 chips, Each MIMOSTAR2 sensor, which was designed by IPHC, is an array of 132x128 pixels with a square pixel size of 30 μ. The readout of the telescope makes use of the ALICE DDL/SIU cards, which is compatible with the future STAR data acquisition system called DAQ1000. The telescope was first studied in a 1.2 GeV/c electron beam at LBNL's Advanced Light Source. Afterwards, the telescope was outside the STAR magnet, and then later inside it, 145 cm away from STAR's center. We will describe this first test of MAPS technology in a collider environment, and report on the occupancy, particle flux, and performance of the telescope.

  15. [Study on the reflected and hyperspectral mixed-pixel character of aquatic plants and water].

    PubMed

    Sun, Tian-lin; Zhao, Yun-sheng; Liang, Ren-feng; Zhang, Xia

    2012-02-01

    A study on the reflected and hyperspectral mixed-pixel of aquatic plants and water was given by using a orthogonal experimental design with three factors and two levels. The results of F test suggest that for the single factors, the band and the area ratio of mixed-pixel on the reflected and hyperspectral mixed-pixel of the reflection effects are particularly significant, however, the detector angle had no significant effect under these experimental conditions; For the interaction, the band and the area ratio of mixed-pixel, the detector and the area ratio of mixed-pixel, the effects of these two interactions on the reflected and hyperspectral mixed-pixel are also particularly significant, This study did quantitative analysis of the factors affecting the reflected and hyperspectral mixed-pixel character and their interaction, and provided a new method for the indepth study of mixed-pixel.

  16. Performance studies of Micro Pixel Chamber for the ATLAS upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komai, H.; Ochi, A.; Homma, Y.; Edo, Y.; Yamaguchi, T.

    2013-03-01

    The Micro Pixel Chamber (μ-PIC) is being developed as a muon chamber of the ATLAS experiment in an HL-LHC environment. In the ATLAS muon system, a high flux of fast neutron background causes instability operation of the detectors. We performed neutron irradiation tests with μ-PIC to optimize the operation gas and detector structure. In addition, we studied neutron interactions with the detector, in order to understand the effect of fast neutrons.

  17. Fiber pixelated image database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinde, Anant; Perinchery, Sandeep Menon; Matham, Murukeshan Vadakke

    2016-08-01

    Imaging of physically inaccessible parts of the body such as the colon at micron-level resolution is highly important in diagnostic medical imaging. Though flexible endoscopes based on the imaging fiber bundle are used for such diagnostic procedures, their inherent honeycomb-like structure creates fiber pixelation effects. This impedes the observer from perceiving the information from an image captured and hinders the direct use of image processing and machine intelligence techniques on the recorded signal. Significant efforts have been made by researchers in the recent past in the development and implementation of pixelation removal techniques. However, researchers have often used their own set of images without making source data available which subdued their usage and adaptability universally. A database of pixelated images is the current requirement to meet the growing diagnostic needs in the healthcare arena. An innovative fiber pixelated image database is presented, which consists of pixelated images that are synthetically generated and experimentally acquired. Sample space encompasses test patterns of different scales, sizes, and shapes. It is envisaged that this proposed database will alleviate the current limitations associated with relevant research and development and would be of great help for researchers working on comb structure removal algorithms.

  18. Gaseous Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Maxim

    Since long time, the compelling scientific goals of future high-energy physics experiments were a driving factor in the development of advanced detector technologies. A true innovation in detector instrumentation concepts came in 1968, with the development of a fully parallel readout for a large array of sensing elements - the Multi-Wire Proportional Chamber (MWPC), which earned Georges Charpak a Nobel prize in physics in 1992. Since that time radiation detection and imaging with fast gaseous detectors, capable of economically covering large detection volumes with low mass budget, have been playing an important role in many fields of physics. Advances in photolithography and microprocessing techniques in the chip industry during the past decade triggered a major transition in the field of gas detectors from wire structures to Micro-Pattern Gas Detector (MPGD) concepts, revolutionizing cell-size limitations for many gas detector applications. The high radiation resistance and excellent spatial and time resolution make them an invaluable tool to confront future detector challenges at the next generation of colliders. The design of the new micro-pattern devices appears suitable for industrial production. Novel structures where MPGDs are directly coupled to the CMOS pixel readout represent an exciting field allowing timing and charge measurements as well as precise spatial information in 3D. Originally developed for the high-energy physics, MPGD applications have expanded to nuclear physics, photon detection, astroparticle and neutrino physics, neutron detection, and medical imaging.

  19. A novel CMOS sensor with in-pixel auto-zeroed discrimination for charged particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degerli, Y.; Guilloux, F.; Orsini, F.

    2014-05-01

    With the aim of developing fast and granular Monolithic Active Pixels Sensors (MAPS) as new charged particle tracking detectors for high energy physics experiments, a new rolling shutter binary pixel architecture concept (RSBPix) with in-pixel correlated double sampling, amplification and discrimination is presented. The discriminator features auto-zeroing in order to compensate process-related transistor mismatches. In order to validate the pixel, a first monolithic CMOS sensor prototype, including a pixel array of 96 × 64 pixels, has been designed and fabricated in the Tower-Jazz 0.18 μm CMOS Image Sensor (CIS) process. Results of laboratory tests are presented.

  20. Selecting Pixels for Kepler Downlink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryson, Stephen T.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Klaus, Todd C.; Cote, Miles T.; Quintana, Elisa V.; Hall, Jennifer R.; Ibrahim, Khadeejah; Chandrasekaran, Hema; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Van Cleve, Jeffrey E.; Haas, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    The Kepler mission monitors > 100,000 stellar targets using 42 2200 1024 pixel CCDs. Bandwidth constraints prevent the downlink of all 96 million pixels per 30-minute cadence, so the Kepler spacecraft downlinks a specified collection of pixels for each target. These pixels are selected by considering the object brightness, background and the signal-to-noise of each pixel, and are optimized to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio of the target. This paper describes pixel selection, creation of spacecraft apertures that efficiently capture selected pixels, and aperture assignment to a target. Diagnostic apertures, short-cadence targets and custom specified shapes are discussed.

  1. SNR improvement for hyperspectral application using frame and pixel binning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Sami Ur; Kumar, Ankush; Banerjee, Arup

    2016-05-01

    Hyperspectral imaging spectrometer systems are increasingly being used in the field of remote sensing for variety of civilian and military applications. The ability of such instruments in discriminating finer spectral features along with improved spatial and radiometric performance have made such instruments a powerful tool in the field of remote sensing. Design and development of spaceborne hyper spectral imaging spectrometers poses lot of technological challenges in terms of optics, dispersion element, detectors, electronics and mechanical systems. The main factors that define the type of detectors are the spectral region, SNR, dynamic range, pixel size, number of pixels, frame rate, operating temperature etc. Detectors with higher quantum efficiency and higher well depth are the preferred choice for such applications. CCD based Si detectors serves the requirement of high well depth for VNIR band spectrometers but suffers from smear. Smear can be controlled by using CMOS detectors. Si CMOS detectors with large format arrays are available. These detectors generally have smaller pitch and low well depth. Binning technique can be used with available CMOS detectors to meet the large swath, higher resolution and high SNR requirements. Availability of larger dwell time of satellite can be used to bin multiple frames to increase the signal collection even with lesser well depth detectors and ultimately increase the SNR. Lab measurements reveal that SNR improvement by frame binning is more in comparison to pixel binning. Effect of pixel binning as compared to the frame binning will be discussed and degradation of SNR as compared to theoretical value for pixel binning will be analyzed.

  2. Silicon pixel R&D for CLIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munker, M.

    2017-01-01

    Challenging detector requirements are imposed by the physics goals at the future multi-TeV e+ e‑ Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). A single point resolution of 3 μm for the vertex detector and 7 μm for the tracker is required. Moreover, the CLIC vertex detector and tracker need to be extremely light weighted with a material budget of 0.2% X0 per layer in the vertex detector and 1–2% X0 in the tracker. A fast time slicing of 10 ns is further required to suppress background from beam-beam interactions. A wide range of sensor and readout ASIC technologies are investigated within the CLIC silicon pixel R&D effort. Various hybrid planar sensor assemblies with a pixel size of 25×25 μm2 and 55×55 μm2 have been produced and characterised by laboratory measurements and during test-beam campaigns. Experimental and simulation results for thin (50 μm–500 μm) slim edge and active-edge planar, and High-Voltage CMOS sensors hybridised to various readout ASICs (Timepix, Timepix3, CLICpix) are presented.

  3. Simulation of Caliste-SO single pixel response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barylak, J.; Barylak, A.; Mrozek, T.; Podgórski, P.; Steślicki, M.; Ścisłowski, D.

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents a method for determining the pixel response using Geant4 package. The response is calculated for cadmium telluride sensor of Caliste-SO detector. Caliste-SO will be used in STIX instrument on board Solar Orbiter, which is M-class mission of the ESA's program Cosmic Vision 2015-2025. Solar Orbiter is to be launched in October 2018. STIX instrument will provide imaging spectroscopy of solar hard X-ray emissions (4 - 150 keV) using a Fourier-imaging technique. Response of pixels in pixelized Caliste-SO detector vary between each other due to different sizes and locations. This can influence the scientific data obtained from STIX. Additionally, in the simulation we considered detector effects, like: hole tailing, damage layer, Fano and electronic noise.

  4. Vertically integrated pixel readout chip for high energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Deptuch, Grzegorz; Demarteau, Marcel; Hoff, James; Khalid, Farah; Lipton, Ronald; Shenai, Alpana; Trimpl, Marcel; Yarema, Raymond; Zimmerman, Tom; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    We report on the development of the vertex detector pixel readout chips based on multi-tier vertically integrated electronics for the International Linear Collider. Some testing results of the VIP2a prototype are presented. The chip is the second iteration of the silicon implementation of the prototype, data-pushed concept of the readout developed at Fermilab. The device was fabricated in the 3D MIT-LL 0.15 {micro}m fully depleted SOI process. The prototype is a three-tier design, featuring 30 x 30 {micro}m{sup 2} pixels, laid out in an array of 48 x 48 pixels.

  5. Performance limits of a single photon counting pixel system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmeissani, M.; Mikulec, B.

    2001-03-01

    X-ray imaging using hybrid pixel detectors in single photon counting mode is a relatively recent and exciting development. The photon counting mode implies that each pixel has a threshold in energy above which a hit is recorded. Sharing of charge between adjacent pixels would therefore lead to a loss of registered hits and for medical imaging applications to a higher patient dose. This explains why the demand for high spatial resolution and consequently small pixel sizes (<100 μm) motivates the Medipix2 collaboration to study the effects of charge sharing between pixels on system performance. Two different simulation codes are used to simulate the energy loss inside the detector and the charge transport towards the pixel electrodes. The largest contribution to the lateral spreading of charge comes from diffusion and can result in a considerable loss of detection efficiency in photon counting systems for small pixel sizes. The Medipix2 collaboration consists of groups from Barcelona, Cagliari, CEA/Leti DEIN, CERN, Freiburg, Glasgow, Mitthögskolan, Napoli, NIKHEF, MRC lab Cambridge, Pisa, Prague and Sassari.

  6. A new ATLAS pixel front-end IC for upgraded LHC luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbero, M.; Arutinov, D.; Beccherle, R.; Darbo, G.; Ely, R.; Fougeron, D.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gnani, D.; Hemperek, T.; Karagounis, M.; Kluit, R.; Kostioukhine, V.; Mekkaoui, A.; Menouni, M.; Schipper, J.-D.

    2009-06-01

    A new pixel Front-End (FE) IC is being developed in a 130 nm technology for use in the upgraded ATLAS pixel detector. The new pixel FE will be made of smaller pixels (50×250 μm vs. 50×400 μm for the present FE, FE-I3), a much improved active area over inactive area ratio, and a new analog pixel chain tuned for low power and new detector input capacitance. The higher luminosity for which this IC is tuned implies a complete redefinition of the digital architecture logic, which will not be based on End-of-Column data buffering but on local pixel logic and local pixel data storage. An overview of the new FE is given with particular emphasis on the new digital logic architecture and possible architecture variations.

  7. Planar slim-edge pixel sensors for the ATLAS upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altenheiner, S.; Goessling, C.; Jentzsch, J.; Klingenberg, R.; Lapsien, T.; Muenstermann, D.; Rummler, A.; Troska, G.; Wittig, T.

    2012-02-01

    The ATLAS detector at CERN is a general-purpose experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost tracking detector of ATLAS and requires a sufficient level of hermeticity to achieve superb track reconstruction performance. The current planar n-type pixel sensors feature a pixel matrix of n+-implantations which is (on the opposite p-side) surrounded by so-called guard rings to reduce the high voltage stepwise towards the cutting edge and an additional safety margin. Because of the inactive region around the active area, the sensor modules have been shingled on top of each other's edge which limits the thermal performance and adds complexity in the present detector. The first upgrade phase of the ATLAS pixel detector will consist of the insertable b-layer (IBL), an additional b-layer which will be inserted into the present detector in 2013. Several changes in the sensor design with respect to the existing detector had to be applied to comply with the IBL's specifications and are described in detail. A key issue for the ATLAS upgrades is a flat arrangement of the sensors. To maintain the required level of hermeticity in the detector, the inactive sensor edges have to be reduced to minimize the dead space between the adjacent detector modules. Unirradiated and irradiated sensors with the IBL design have been operated in test beams to study the efficiency performance in the sensor edge region and it was found that the inactive edge width could be reduced from 1100 μm to less than 250 μm.

  8. ``The Read-Out Driver'' ROD card for the Insertable B-layer (IBL) detector of the ATLAS experiment: commissioning and upgrade studies for the Pixel Layers 1 and 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balbi, G.; Bindi, M.; Chen, S. P.; Falchieri, D.; Flick, T.; Gabrielli, A.; Hauck, S.; Hsu, S. C.; Kretz, M.; Kugel, A.; Lama, L.; Morettini, P.; Travaglini, R.; Wensing, M.

    2014-01-01

    The upgrade of the ATLAS experiment at LHC foresees the insertion of an innermost silicon layer, called the Insertable B-layer (IBL). The IBL read-out system will be equipped with new electronics. The Readout-Driver card (ROD) is a VME board devoted to data processing, configuration and control. A pre-production batch has been delivered for testing with instrumented slices of the overall acquisition chain, aiming to finalize strategies for system commissioning. In this paper system setups and results will be described, as well as preliminary studies on changes needed to adopt the ROD for the ATLAS Pixel Layers 1 and 2.

  9. Junction-side illuminated silicon detector arrays

    DOEpatents

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Patt, Bradley E.; Tull, Carolyn

    2004-03-30

    A junction-side illuminated detector array of pixelated detectors is constructed on a silicon wafer. A junction contact on the front-side may cover the whole detector array, and may be used as an entrance window for light, x-ray, gamma ray and/or other particles. The back-side has an array of individual ohmic contact pixels. Each of the ohmic contact pixels on the back-side may be surrounded by a grid or a ring of junction separation implants. Effective pixel size may be changed by separately biasing different sections of the grid. A scintillator may be coupled directly to the entrance window while readout electronics may be coupled directly to the ohmic contact pixels. The detector array may be used as a radiation hardened detector for high-energy physics research or as avalanche imaging arrays.

  10. Development of a pixel ionization chamber for beam monitor in proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Rosa, A.; Garella, M. A.; Attili, A.; Bourhaleb, F.; Cirio, R.; Donetti, M.; Giordanengo, S.; Givehchi, N.; Marchetto, F.; Mazza, G.; Meyroneinc, S.; Pecka, A.; Peroni, C.; Pittà, G.

    2007-03-01

    We have developed a detector to be used as monitor for proton therapy beam lines. The detector is a 2-D parallel plate ionization chamber, with the anode segmented in 1024 square pixels arranged in a 32×32 matrix. The detector characterization is presented.

  11. Small pixel uncooled imaging FPAs and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackwell, Richard; Franks, Glen; Lacroix, Daniel; Hyland, Sandra; Murphy, Robert

    2010-04-01

    BAE Systems continues to make dramatic progress in uncooled microbolometer sensors and applications. This paper will review the latest advancements in microbolometer technology at BAE Systems, including the development status of 17 micrometer pixel pitch detectors and imaging modules which are entering production and will be finding their way into BAE Systems products and applications. Benefits include increased die per wafer and potential benefits to SWAP for many applications. Applications include thermal weapons sights, thermal imaging modules for remote weapon stations, vehicle situational awareness sensors and mast/pole mounted sensors.

  12. Development of the Continuous Acquisition Pixel (CAP) sensor for high luminosity lepton colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varner, G.; Aihara, H.; Barbero, M.; Bozek, A.; Browder, T.; Hazumi, M.; Kennedy, J.; Martin, E.; Mueller, J.; Olsen, S.; Palka, H.; Rosen, M.; Ruckman, L.; Stanič, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uchida, K.; Yang, Q.; Yarema, R.

    2006-09-01

    A future higher luminosity B-factory detector and concept study detectors for the proposed International Linear Collider require precision vertex reconstruction while coping with high track densities and radiation exposures. Compared with current silicon strip and hybrid pixels, a significant reduction in the overall detector material thickness is needed to achieve the desired vertex resolution. Considerable progress in the development of thin CMOS-based Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) in recent years makes them a viable technology option and feasibility studies are being actively pursued. The most serious concerns are their radiation hardness and their readout speed. To address these, several prototypes denoted as the Continuous Acquisition Pixel (CAP) sensors have been developed and tested. The latest of the CAP sensor prototypes is CAP3, designed in the TSMC 0.25 μm process with a 5-deep Correlated Double Sample (CDS) pair pipeline in each pixel. A setup with several CAP3 sensors is under evaluation to assess the performance of a full-scale pixel readout system running at realistic readout speed. Given the similarity in the occupancy numbers and hit throughput requirements, per unit area, between a Belle vertex detector upgradation and the requirements for a future ILC pixel detector, this effort can be considered a small-scale functioning prototype for such a future system. The results and plans for the next stages of R&D towards a full Belle Pixel Vertex Detector (PVD) are presented.

  13. Testbeam and laboratory characterization of CMS 3D pixel sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubna, M.; Bortoletto, D.; Alagoz, E.; Krzywda, A.; Arndt, K.; Shipsey, I.; Bolla, G.; Hinton, N.; Kok, A.; Hansen, T.-E.; Summanwar, A.; Brom, J. M.; Boscardin, M.; Chramowicz, J.; Cumalat, J.; Dalla Betta, G. F.; Dinardo, M.; Godshalk, A.; Jones, M.; Krohn, M. D.; Kumar, A.; Lei, C. M.; Mendicino, R.; Moroni, L.; Perera, L.; Povoli, M.; Prosser, A.; Rivera, R.; Solano, A.; Obertino, M. M.; Kwan, S.; Uplegger, L.; Vigani, L.; Wagner, S.

    2014-07-01

    The pixel detector is the innermost tracking device in CMS, reconstructing interaction vertices and charged particle trajectories. The sensors located in the innermost layers of the pixel detector must be upgraded for the ten-fold increase in luminosity expected at the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). As a possible replacement for planar sensors, 3D silicon technology is under consideration due to its good performance after high radiation fluence. In this paper, we report on pre- and post- irradiation measurements of CMS 3D pixel sensors with different electrode configurations from different vendors. The effects of irradiation on electrical properties, charge collection efficiency, and position resolution are discussed. Measurements of various test structures for monitoring the fabrication process and studying the bulk and surface properties of silicon sensors, such as MOS capacitors, planar and gate-controlled diodes are also presented.

  14. Vertex detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lueth, V.

    1992-07-01

    The purpose of a vertex detector is to measure position and angles of charged particle tracks to sufficient precision so as to be able to separate tracks originating from decay vertices from those produced at the interaction vertex. Such measurements are interesting because they permit the detection of weakly decaying particles with lifetimes down to 10{sup {minus}13} s, among them the {tau} lepton and charm and beauty hadrons. These two lectures are intended to introduce the reader to the different techniques for the detection of secondary vertices that have been developed over the past decades. The first lecture includes a brief introduction to the methods used to detect secondary vertices and to estimate particle lifetimes. It describes the traditional technologies, based on photographic recording in emulsions and on film of bubble chambers, and introduces fast electronic registration of signals derived from scintillating fibers, drift chambers and gaseous micro-strip chambers. The second lecture is devoted to solid state detectors. It begins with a brief introduction into semiconductor devices, and then describes the application of large arrays of strip and pixel diodes for charged particle tracking. These lectures can only serve as an introduction the topic of vertex detectors. Time and space do not allow for an in-depth coverage of many of the interesting aspects of vertex detector design and operation.

  15. VeloPix: the pixel ASIC for the LHCb upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poikela, T.; De Gaspari, M.; Plosila, J.; Westerlund, T.; Ballabriga, R.; Buytaert, J.; Campbell, M.; Llopart, X.; Wyllie, K.; Gromov, V.; van Beuzekom, M.; Zivkovic, V.

    2015-01-01

    The LHCb Vertex Detector (VELO) will be upgraded in 2018 along with the other subsystems of LHCb in order to enable full readout at 40 MHz, with the data fed directly to the software triggering algorithms. The upgraded VELO is a lightweight hybrid pixel detector operating in vacuum in close proximity to the LHC beams. The readout will be provided by a dedicated front-end ASIC, dubbed VeloPix, matched to the LHCb readout requirements and the 55 × 55 μm VELO pixel dimensions. The chip is closely related to the Timepix3, from the Medipix family of ASICs. The principal challenge that the chip has to meet is a hit rate of up to 900 Mhits/s, resulting in a required output bandwidth of more than 16 Gbit/s. The occupancy across the chip is also very non-uniform, and the radiation levels reach an integrated 400 Mrad over the lifetime of the detector.VeloPix is a binary pixel readout chip with a data driven readout, designed in 130 nm CMOS technology. The pixels are combined into groups of 2 × 4 super pixels, enabling a shared logic and a reduction of bandwidth due to combined address and time stamp information. The pixel hits are combined with other simultaneous hits in the same super pixel, time stamped, and immediately driven off-chip. The analog front-end must be sufficiently fast to accurately time stamp the data, with a small enough dead time to minimize data loss in the most occupied regions of the chip. The data is driven off chip with a custom designed high speed serialiser. The current status of the ASIC design, the chip architecture and the simulations will be described.

  16. Pixel electronics for the ATLAS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, P.

    2001-06-01

    The ATLAS experiment at LHC will use 3 barrel layers and 2×5 disks of silicon pixel detectors as the innermost elements of the semiconductor tracker. The basic building blocks are pixel modules with an active area of 16.4 mm×60.8 mm which include an n + on n-type silicon sensor and 16 VLSI front-end (FE) chips. Every FE chip contains a low power, high speed charge sensitive preamplifier, a fast discriminator, and a readout system which operates at the 40 MHz rate of LHC. The addresses of hit pixels (as well as a low resolution pulse height information) are stored on the FE chips until arrival of a level 1 trigger signal. Hits are then transferred to a module controller chip (MCC) which collects the data of all 16 FE chips, builds complete events and sends the data through two optical links to the data acquisition system. The MCC receives clock and data through an additional optical link and provides timing and configuration information for the FE chips. Two additional chips are used to amplify and decode the pin diode signal and to drive the VCSEL laser diodes of the optical links.

  17. Pixelation Effects in Weak Lensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    High, F. William; Rhodes, Jason; Massey, Richard; Ellis, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Weak gravitational lensing can be used to investigate both dark matter and dark energy but requires accurate measurements of the shapes of faint, distant galaxies. Such measurements are hindered by the finite resolution and pixel scale of digital cameras. We investigate the optimum choice of pixel scale for a space-based mission, using the engineering model and survey strategy of the proposed Supernova Acceleration Probe as a baseline. We do this by simulating realistic astronomical images containing a known input shear signal and then attempting to recover the signal using the Rhodes, Refregier, and Groth algorithm. We find that the quality of shear measurement is always improved by smaller pixels. However, in practice, telescopes are usually limited to a finite number of pixels and operational life span, so the total area of a survey increases with pixel size. We therefore fix the survey lifetime and the number of pixels in the focal plane while varying the pixel scale, thereby effectively varying the survey size. In a pure trade-off for image resolution versus survey area, we find that measurements of the matter power spectrum would have minimum statistical error with a pixel scale of 0.09' for a 0.14' FWHM point-spread function (PSF). The pixel scale could be increased to 0.16' if images dithered by exactly half-pixel offsets were always available. Some of our results do depend on our adopted shape measurement method and should be regarded as an upper limit: future pipelines may require smaller pixels to overcome systematic floors not yet accessible, and, in certain circumstances, measuring the shape of the PSF might be more difficult than those of galaxies. However, the relative trends in our analysis are robust, especially those of the surface density of resolved galaxies. Our approach thus provides a snapshot of potential in available technology, and a practical counterpart to analytic studies of pixelation, which necessarily assume an idealized shape

  18. Design optimization of pixel sensors using device simulations for the phase-II CMS tracker upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, G.; Bhardwaj, A.; Dalal, R.; Eber, R.; Eichorn, T.; Fernandez, M.; Lalwani, K.; Messineo, A.; Palomo, F. R.; Peltola, T.; Printz, M.; Ranjan, K.; Villa, I.; Hidalgo, S.

    2016-07-01

    In order to address the problems caused by the harsh radiation environment during the high luminosity phase of the LHC (HL-LHC), all silicon tracking detectors (pixels and strips) in the CMS experiment will undergo an upgrade. And so to develop radiation hard pixel sensors, simulations have been performed using the 2D TCAD device simulator, SILVACO, to obtain design parameters. The effect of various design parameters like pixel size, pixel depth, implant width, metal overhang, p-stop concentration, p-stop depth and bulk doping density on the leakage current and critical electric field are studied for both non-irradiated as well as irradiated pixel sensors. These 2D simulation results of planar pixels are useful for providing insight into the behaviour of non-irradiated and irradiated silicon pixel sensors and further work on 3D simulation is underway.

  19. Integration of the ATLAS FE-I4 Pixel Chip in the Mini Time Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Thibodeaux, Mayra; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Kadyk, John; Oliver-Mallory, Kelsey

    2013-04-01

    This project deals with development of readout for a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) prototype. This is a type of detector proposed for direct detection of dark matter (WIMPS) with direction information. The TPC is a gaseous charged particle tracking detector composed of a field cage and a gas avalanche detector. The latter is made of two Gas Electron Multipliers in series, illuminating a pixel readout integrated circuit, which measures the distribution in position and time of the output charge. We are testing the TPC prototype, filled with ArCO2 gas, using a Fe-55 x-ray source and cosmic rays. The present prototype uses an FE-I3 chip for readout. This chip was developed about 10 years ago and is presently in use within the ATLAS pixel detector at the LHC. The aim of this work is to upgrade the TPC prototype to use an FE-I4 chip. The FE-I4 has an active area of 336 mm^2 and 26880 pixels, over nine times the number of pixels in the FE-I3 chip, and an active area about six times as much. The FE-I4 chip represents the state of the art of pixel detector readout, and is presently being used to build an upgrade of the ATLAS pixel detector.

  20. THE KEPLER PIXEL RESPONSE FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Bryson, Stephen T.; Haas, Michael R.; Dotson, Jessie L.; Koch, David G.; Borucki, William J.; Tenenbaum, Peter; Jenkins, Jon M.; Chandrasekaran, Hema; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Klaus, Todd; Gilliland, Ronald L.

    2010-04-20

    Kepler seeks to detect sequences of transits of Earth-size exoplanets orbiting solar-like stars. Such transit signals are on the order of 100 ppm. The high photometric precision demanded by Kepler requires detailed knowledge of how the Kepler pixels respond to starlight during a nominal observation. This information is provided by the Kepler pixel response function (PRF), defined as the composite of Kepler's optical point-spread function, integrated spacecraft pointing jitter during a nominal cadence and other systematic effects. To provide sub-pixel resolution, the PRF is represented as a piecewise-continuous polynomial on a sub-pixel mesh. This continuous representation allows the prediction of a star's flux value on any pixel given the star's pixel position. The advantages and difficulties of this polynomial representation are discussed, including characterization of spatial variation in the PRF and the smoothing of discontinuities between sub-pixel polynomial patches. On-orbit super-resolution measurements of the PRF across the Kepler field of view are described. Two uses of the PRF are presented: the selection of pixels for each star that maximizes the photometric signal-to-noise ratio for that star, and PRF-fitted centroids which provide robust and accurate stellar positions on the CCD, primarily used for attitude and plate scale tracking. Good knowledge of the PRF has been a critical component for the successful collection of high-precision photometry by Kepler.

  1. Advancement in 17-micron pixel pitch uncooled focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuan; Skidmore, George; Howard, Christopher; Clarke, Elwood; Han, C. J.

    2009-05-01

    This paper provides an update of 17 micron pixel pitch uncooled microbolometer development at DRS. Since the introduction of 17 micron pitch 640x480 focal plane arrays (FPAs) in 2006, significant progress has been made in sensor performance and manufacturing processes. The FPAs are now in initial production with an FPA noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD), detector thermal time constant, and pixel operability equivalent or better than that of the current 25 micron pixel pitch production FPAs. NETD improvement was achieved without compromising detector thermal response or thermal time constant by simultaneous reduction in bolometer heat capacity and thermal conductance. In addition, the DRS unique "umbrella" microbolometer cavities were optically tuned to optimize detector radiation absorption for specific spectral band applications. The 17 micron pixel pitch FPAs are currently being considered for the next generation soldier systems such as thermal weapon sights (TWS), vehicle driver vision enhancers (DVE), digitally fused enhanced night vision goggles (DENVG) and unmanned air vehicle (UAV) surveillance sensors, because of overall thermal imaging system size, weight and power advantages.

  2. Imaging by photon counting with 256x256 pixel matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tlustos, Lukas; Campbell, Michael; Heijne, Erik H. M.; Llopart, Xavier

    2004-09-01

    Using 0.25µm standard CMOS we have developed 2-D semiconductor matrix detectors with sophisticated functionality integrated inside each pixel of a hybrid sensor module. One of these sensor modules is a matrix of 256x256 square 55µm pixels intended for X-ray imaging. This device is called 'Medipix2' and features a fast amplifier and two-level discrimination for signals between 1000 and 100000 equivalent electrons, with overall signal noise ~150 e- rms. Signal polarity and comparator thresholds are programmable. A maximum count rate of nearly 1 MHz per pixel can be achieved, which corresponds to an average flux of 3x10exp10 photons per cm2. The selected signals can be accumulated in each pixel in a 13-bit register. The serial readout takes 5-10 ms. A parallel readout of ~300 µs could also be used. Housekeeping functions such as local dark current compensation, test pulse generation, silencing of noisy pixels and threshold tuning in each pixel contribute to the homogeneous response over a large sensor area. The sensor material can be adapted to the energy of the X-rays. Best results have been obtained with high-resistivity silicon detectors, but also CdTe and GaAs detectors have been used. The lowest detectable X-ray energy was about 4 keV. Background measurements have been made, as well as measurements of the uniformity of imaging by photon counting. Very low photon count rates are feasible and noise-free at room temperature. The readout matrix can be used also with visible photons if an energy or charge intensifier structure is interposed such as a gaseous amplification layer or a microchannel plate or acceleration field in vacuum.

  3. Characterization of a 2-mm thick, 16x16 Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride Pixel Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Richardson, Georgia; Mitchell, Shannon; Ramsey, Brian; Seller, Paul; Sharma, Dharma

    2003-01-01

    The detector under study is a 2-mm-thick, 16x16 Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride pixel array with a pixel pitch of 300 microns and inter-pixel gap of 50 microns. This detector is a precursor to that which will be used at the focal plane of the High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) telescope currently being developed at Marshall Space Flight Center. With a telescope focal length of 6 meters, the detector needs to have a spatial resolution of around 200 microns in order to take full advantage of the HERO angular resolution. We discuss to what degree charge sharing will degrade energy resolution but will improve our spatial resolution through position interpolation. In addition, we discuss electric field modeling for this specific detector geometry and the role this mapping will play in terms of charge sharing and charge loss in the detector.

  4. From Pixels to Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brownston, Lee; Jenkins, Jon M.

    2015-01-01

    The Kepler Mission was launched in 2009 as NASAs first mission capable of finding Earth-size planets in the habitable zone of Sun-like stars. Its telescope consists of a 1.5-m primary mirror and a 0.95-m aperture. The 42 charge-coupled devices in its focal plane are read out every half hour, compressed, and then downlinked monthly. After four years, the second of four reaction wheels failed, ending the original mission. Back on earth, the Science Operations Center developed the Science Pipeline to analyze about 200,000 target stars in Keplers field of view, looking for evidence of periodic dimming suggesting that one or more planets had crossed the face of its host star. The Pipeline comprises several steps, from pixel-level calibration, through noise and artifact removal, to detection of transit-like signals and the construction of a suite of diagnostic tests to guard against false positives. The Kepler Science Pipeline consists of a pipeline infrastructure written in the Java programming language, which marshals data input to and output from MATLAB applications that are executed as external processes. The pipeline modules, which underwent continuous development and refinement even after data started arriving, employ several analytic techniques, many developed for the Kepler Project. Because of the large number of targets, the large amount of data per target and the complexity of the pipeline algorithms, the processing demands are daunting. Some pipeline modules require days to weeks to process all of their targets, even when run on NASA's 128-node Pleiades supercomputer. The software developers are still seeking ways to increase the throughput. To date, the Kepler project has discovered more than 4000 planetary candidates, of which more than 1000 have been independently confirmed or validated to be exoplanets. Funding for this mission is provided by NASAs Science Mission Directorate.

  5. Development of planar pixel modules for the ATLAS high luminosity LHC tracker upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allport, P. P.; Ashby, J.; Bates, R. L.; Blue, A.; Burdin, S.; Buttar, C. M.; Casse, G.; Dervan, P.; Doonan, K.; Forshaw, D.; Lipp, J.; McMullen, T.; Pater, J.; Stewart, A.; Tsurin, I.

    2014-11-01

    The high-luminosity LHC will present significant challenges for tracking systems. ATLAS is preparing to upgrade the entire tracking system, which will include a significantly larger pixel detector. This paper reports on the development of large area planar detectors for the outer pixel layers and the pixel endcaps. Large area sensors have been fabricated and mounted onto 4 FE-I4 readout ASICs, the so-called quad-modules, and their performance evaluated in the laboratory and testbeam. Results from characterisation of sensors prior to assembly, experience with module assembly, including bump-bonding and results from laboratory and testbeam studies are presented.

  6. High-voltage pixel sensors for ATLAS upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perić, I.; Kreidl, C.; Fischer, P.; Bompard, F.; Breugnon, P.; Clemens, J.-C.; Fougeron, D.; Liu, J.; Pangaud, P.; Rozanov, A.; Barbero, M.; Feigl, S.; Capeans, M.; Ferrere, D.; Pernegger, H.; Ristic, B.; Muenstermann, D.; Gonzalez Sevilla, S.; La Rosa, A.; Miucci, A.; Nessi, M.; Iacobucci, G.; Backhaus, M.; Hügging, Fabian; Krüger, H.; Hemperek, T.; Obermann, T.; Wermes, N.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Quadt, A.; Weingarten, J.; George, M.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Rieger, J.; Bates, R.; Blue, A.; Buttar, C.; Hynds, D.

    2014-11-01

    The high-voltage (HV-) CMOS pixel sensors offer several good properties: a fast charge collection by drift, the possibility to implement relatively complex CMOS in-pixel electronics and the compatibility with commercial processes. The sensor element is a deep n-well diode in a p-type substrate. The n-well contains CMOS pixel electronics. The main charge collection mechanism is drift in a shallow, high field region, which leads to a fast charge collection and a high radiation tolerance. We are currently evaluating the use of the high-voltage detectors implemented in 180 nm HV-CMOS technology for the high-luminosity ATLAS upgrade. Our approach is replacing the existing pixel and strip sensors with the CMOS sensors while keeping the presently used readout ASICs. By intelligence we mean the ability of the sensor to recognize a particle hit and generate the address information. In this way we could benefit from the advantages of the HV sensor technology such as lower cost, lower mass, lower operating voltage, smaller pitch, smaller clusters at high incidence angles. Additionally we expect to achieve a radiation hardness necessary for ATLAS upgrade. In order to test the concept, we have designed two HV-CMOS prototypes that can be readout in two ways: using pixel and strip readout chips. In the case of the pixel readout, the connection between HV-CMOS sensor and the readout ASIC can be established capacitively.

  7. Iterative CT reconstruction with small pixel size: distance-driven forward projector versus Joseph's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, K.; Rassner, U.; Davidson, H. C.; Schöndube, H.; Stierstorfer, K.; Hornegger, J.; Noo, F.

    2015-03-01

    Over the last few years, iterative reconstruction methods have become an important research topic in x-ray CT imaging. This effort is motivated by increasing evidence that such methods may enable significant savings in terms of dose imparted to the patient. Conceptually, iterative reconstruction methods involve two important ingredients: the statistical model, which includes the forward projector, and a priori information in the image domain, which is expressed using a regularizer. Most often, the image pixel size is chosen to be equal (or close) to the detector pixel size (at field-of-view center). However, there are applications for which a smaller pixel size is desired. In this investigation, we focus on reconstruction with a pixel size that is twice smaller than the detector pixel size. Using such a small pixel size implies a large increase in computational effort when using the distance-driven method for forward projection, which models the detector size. On the other hand, the more efficient method of Joseph will create imbalances in the reconstruction of each pixel, in the sense that there will be large differences in the way each projection contributes to the pixels. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the impact of these imbalances on image quality in comparison with utilization of the distance-driven method. The evaluation involves computational effort, bias and noise metrics, and LROC analysis using human observers. The results show that Joseph's method largely remains attractive.

  8. Nano-optical observation of cascade switching in a parallel superconducting nanowire single photon detector

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, Robert M. Tanner, Michael G.; Casaburi, Alessandro; Hadfield, Robert H.; Webster, Mark G.; San Emeterio Alvarez, Lara; Jiang, Weitao; Barber, Zoe H.; Warburton, Richard J.

    2014-02-10

    The device physics of parallel-wire superconducting nanowire single photon detectors is based on a cascade process. Using nano-optical techniques and a parallel wire device with spatially separate pixels, we explicitly demonstrate the single- and multi-photon triggering regimes. We develop a model for describing efficiency of a detector operating in the arm-trigger regime. We investigate the timing response of the detector when illuminating a single pixel and two pixels. We see a change in the active area of the detector between the two regimes and find the two-pixel trigger regime to have a faster timing response than the one-pixel regime.

  9. Development of a super B-factory monolithic active pixel detector—the Continuous Acquisition Pixel (CAP) prototypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varner, G.; Barbero, M.; Bozek, A.; Browder, T.; Fang, F.; Hazumi, M.; Igarashi, A.; Iwaida, S.; Kennedy, J.; Kent, N.; Olsen, S.; Palka, H.; Rosen, M.; Ruckman, L.; Stanic, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uchida, K.

    2005-04-01

    Over the last few years great progress has been made in the technological development of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) such that upgrades to existing vertex detectors using this technology are now actively being considered. Future vertex detection at an upgraded KEK-B factory, already the highest luminosity collider in the world, will require a detector technology capable of withstanding the increased track densities and larger radiation exposures. Near the beam pipe the current silicon strip detectors have projected occupancies in excess of 100%. Deep sub-micron MAPS look very promising to address this problem. In the context of an upgrade to the Belle vertex detector, the major obstacles to realizing such a device have been concerns about radiation hardness and readout speed. Two prototypes implemented in the TSMC 0.35 μm process have been developed to address these issues. Denoted the Continuous Acquisition Pixel, or CAP, the two variants of this architecture are distinguished in that CAP2 includes an 8-deep sampling pipeline within each 22.5 μm 2 pixel. Preliminary test results and remaining R&D issues are presented.

  10. Edge effects in a small pixel CdTe for X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, D. D.; Bell, S. J.; Lipp, J.; Schneider, A.; Seller, P.; Veale, M. C.; Wilson, M. D.; Baker, M. A.; Sellin, P. J.; Kachkanov, V.; Sawhney, K. J. S.

    2013-10-01

    Large area detectors capable of operating with high detection efficiency at energies above 30 keV are required in many contemporary X-ray imaging applications. The properties of high Z compound semiconductors, such as CdTe, make them ideally suitable to these applications. The STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory has developed a small pixel CdTe detector with 80 × 80 pixels on a 250 μm pitch. Historically, these detectors have included a 200 μm wide guard band around the pixelated anode to reduce the effect of defects in the crystal edge. The latest version of the detector ASIC is capable of four-side butting that allows the tiling of N × N flat panel arrays. To limit the dead space between modules to the width of one pixel, edgeless detector geometries have been developed where the active volume of the detector extends to the physical edge of the crystal. The spectroscopic performance of an edgeless CdTe detector bump bonded to the HEXITEC ASIC was tested with sealed radiation sources and compared with a monochromatic X-ray micro-beam mapping measurements made at the Diamond Light Source, U.K. The average energy resolution at 59.54 keV of bulk and edge pixels was 1.23 keV and 1.58 keV, respectively. 87% of the edge pixels present fully spectroscopic performance demonstrating that edgeless CdTe detectors are a promising technology for the production of large panel radiation detectors for X-ray imaging.

  11. Local Pixel Bundles: Bringing the Pixels to the People

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Jay

    2014-12-01

    The automated galaxy-based alignment software package developed for the Frontier Fields program (hst2galign, see Anderson & Ogaz 2014 and http://www.stsci.edu/hst/campaigns/frontier-fields/) produces a direct mapping from the pixels of the flt frame of each science exposure into a common master frame. We can use these mappings to extract the flt-pixels in the vicinity of a source of interest and package them into a convenient "bundle". In addition to the pixels, this data bundle can also contain "meta" information that will allow users to transform positions from the flt pixels to the reference frame and vice-versa. Since the un-resampled pixels in the flt frames are the only true constraints we have on the astronomical scene, the ability to inter-relate these pixels will enable many high-precision studies, such as: point-source-fitting and deconvolution with accurate PSFs, easy exploration of different image-combining algorithms, and accurate faint-source finding and photometry. The data products introduced in this ISR are a very early attempt to provide the flt-level pixel constraints in a package that is accessible to more than the handful of experts in HST astrometry. The hope is that users in the community might begin using them and will provide feedback as to what information they might want to see in the bundles and what general analysis packages they might find useful. For that reason, this document is somewhat informally written, since I know that it will be modified and updated as the products and tools are optimized.

  12. Sub-pixel resolution with the Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI).

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, Max Louis; Smith, Jody Lynn; Nandy, Prabal

    2003-06-01

    The Multispectral Thermal Imager Satellite (MTI) has been used to test a sub-pixel sampling technique in an effort to obtain higher spatial frequency imagery than that of its original design. The MTI instrument is of particular interest because of its infrared detectors. In this spectral region, the detector size is traditionally the limiting factor in determining the satellite's ground sampling distance (GSD). Additionally, many over-sampling techniques require flexible command and control of the sensor and spacecraft. The MTI sensor is well suited for this task, as it is the only imaging system on the MTI satellite bus. In this super-sampling technique, MTI is maneuvered such that the data are collected at sub-pixel intervals on the ground. The data are then processed using a deconvolution algorithm using in-scene measured point spread functions (PSF) to produce an image with synthetically-boosted GSD.

  13. Measurement results of DIPIX pixel sensor developed in SOI technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Mohammed Imran; Arai, Yasuo; Idzik, Marek; Kapusta, Piotr; Miyoshi, Toshinobu; Turala, Michal

    2013-08-01

    The development of integration type pixel detectors presents interest for physics communities because it brings optimization of design, simplicity of production-which means smaller cost, and reduction of detector material budget. During the last decade a lot of research and development activities took place in the field of CMOS Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) technology resulting in improvement in wafer size, wafer resistivity and MIM capacitance. Several ideas have been tested successfully and are gradually entering into the application phase. Some of the novel concepts exploring SOI technology are pursued at KEK; several prototypes of dual mode integration type pixel (DIPIX) have been recently produced and described. This report presents initial test results of some of the prototypes including tests obtained with the infrared laser beams and Americium (Am-241) source. The Equivalent Noise Charge (ENC) of 86 e - has been measured. The measured performance demonstrates that SOI technology is a feasible choice for future applications.

  14. The Simbol-X Low Energy Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Lechner, Peter

    2009-05-11

    For the Low Energy Detector of Simbol-X a new type of active pixel sensor based on the integrated amplifier DEPFET has been developed. This concept combines large area, scalable pixel size, low noise, and ultra-fast readout. Flight representative prototypes have been processed with a performance matching the Simbol-X specifications and demonstrating the technology readiness.

  15. The Simbol-X Low Energy Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechner, Peter

    2009-05-01

    For the Low Energy Detector of Simbol-X a new type of active pixel sensor based on the integrated amplifier DEPFET has been developed. This concept combines large area, scalable pixel size, low noise, and ultra-fast readout. Flight representative prototypes have been processed with a performance matching the Simbol-X specifications and demonstrating the technology readiness.

  16. Metamaterial-based single pixel imaging system (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, Willie; Watts, Claire M.; Nadell, Christian; Montoya, John A.; Krishna, Sanjay

    2015-09-01

    Single pixel cameras are useful imaging devices where it is difficult or infeasible to fashion focal plan arrays. For example in the Far Infrared (FIR) it is difficult to perform imaging by conventional detector arrays, owing to the cost and size of such an array. The typical single pixel camera uses a spatial light modulator (SLM) - placed in the conjugate image plane - and is used to sample various portions of the image. The spatially modulated light emerging from the SLM is then sent to a single detector where the light is condensed with suitable optics for detection. Conventional SLMs are either based on liquid crystals or digital mirror devices. As such these devices are limited in modulation speeds of order 30 kHz. Further there is little control over the type of light that is modulated. We present metamaterial based spatial light modulators which provide the ability to digitally encode images - with various measurement matrix coefficients - thus permitting high speed and fidelity imaging capability. In particular we use the Hadamard matrix and related S-matrix to encode images for single pixel imaging. Metamaterials thus permit imaging in regimes of the electromagnetic spectrum where conventional SLMs are not available. Additionally, metamaterials offer several salient features that are not available with commercial SLMs. For example, metamaterials may be used to enable hyperspectral, polarimetric, and phase sensitive imaging. We present the theory and experimental results of single pixel imaging with digital metamaterials in the far infrared and highlight the future of this exciting field.

  17. Diamond pixel modules and the ATLAS beam conditions monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobos, D.; Pernegger, Heinz; RD42 Collaboration; ATLAS Diamond Pixel Upgrade Collaboration; ATLAS Beam Conditions Monitor Collaborations

    2011-02-01

    Chemical vapor deposition diamonds are considered among possible sensor materials for the next pixel upgrade in ATLAS. Full size diamond pixel modules have been constructed to the specification of the ATLAS Pixel Detector using poly-crystalline CVD diamond sensors to develop the production techniques required for industrial production. Those modules were tested in the lab and testbeam. Additionally we will present results of diamond pixel modules using single-crystal diamonds and results of proton irradiations up to 1.8 ×10 16 protons/cm 2. The ATLAS Beam Conditions Monitors (BCM) main purpose is to protect the experiments silicon tracker from beam incidents. In total 16 1×1 cm2 500 μm thick diamond pCVD sensors are used in eight positions around the LHC interaction point. They perform time difference measurements with sub nanosecond resolution to distinguish between particles from a collision and spray particles from a beam incident; an abundance of the latter can lead the BCM to provoke an abort of LHC beam. The BCM diamond detector modules, their readout system and the algorithms used to detect beam incidents are described. Results of the BCM operation with circulating LHC beams and its commissioning with first LHC collisions are reported.

  18. Computer-assisted area detector masking.

    PubMed

    Wright, Christopher J; Zhou, Xiao Dong

    2017-03-01

    Area detectors have become the predominant type of detector for the rapid acquisition of X-ray diffraction, small-angle scattering and total scattering. These detectors record the scattering for a large area, giving each shot good statistical significance to the resulting scattered intensity I(Q) pattern. However, many of these detectors have pixel level defects, which cause error in the resulting one-dimensional patterns. In this work, new software to automatically find and mask these dead pixels and other defects is presented. This algorithm is benchmarked with both ideal simulated and experimental datasets.

  19. ATLAS Phase-II-Upgrade Pixel data transmission development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wensing, M.

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS tracking system will be replaced by an all-silicon detector in the course of the planned upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider around 2025. The readout of the new pixel system will be most challenging in terms of data rate and readout speed. Simulations of the on-detector electronics based on the currently foreseen trigger rate of 1 MHz indicate that a readout speed of up to 5 Gbit/s per data link is necessary. Due to radiation levels, the first part of transmission has to be implemented electrically. System simulation and test results of cable candidates will be presented.

  20. How big is an OMI pixel?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, Martin; Sihler, Holger; Tilstra, Lieuwe G.; Stammes, Piet

    2016-08-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) is a push-broom imaging spectrometer, observing solar radiation backscattered by the Earth's atmosphere and surface. The incoming radiation is detected using a static imaging CCD (charge-coupled device) detector array with no moving parts, as opposed to most of the previous satellite spectrometers, which used a moving mirror to scan the Earth in the across-track direction. The field of view (FoV) of detector pixels is the solid angle from which radiation is observed, averaged over the integration time of a measurement. The OMI FoV is not quadrangular, which is common for scanning instruments, but rather super-Gaussian shaped and overlapping with the FoV of neighbouring pixels. This has consequences for pixel-area-dependent applications, like cloud fraction products, and visualisation.The shapes and sizes of OMI FoVs were determined pre-flight by theoretical and experimental tests but never verified after launch. In this paper the OMI FoV is characterised using collocated MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) reflectance measurements. MODIS measurements have a much higher spatial resolution than OMI measurements and spectrally overlap at 469 nm. The OMI FoV was verified by finding the highest correlation between MODIS and OMI reflectances in cloud-free scenes, assuming a 2-D super-Gaussian function with varying size and shape to represent the OMI FoV. Our results show that the OMPIXCOR product 75FoV corner coordinates are accurate as the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of a super-Gaussian FoV model when this function is assumed. The softness of the function edges, modelled by the super-Gaussian exponents, is different in both directions and is view angle dependent.The optimal overlap function between OMI and MODIS reflectances is scene dependent and highly dependent on time differences between overpasses, especially with clouds in the scene. For partially clouded scenes, the optimal overlap function was

  1. WFC3/IR Reference Pixel Characterization #1: Comparison of Bias Subtraction Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilbert, B.

    2012-03-01

    In this first of two ISRs about the WFC3/IR reference pixel performance, we compare five different methods for using the reference pixels on the detector to remove bias signal from the measured signal in the light-sensitive science pixels. None of these methods produce a significant improvement over the current approach in the calwf3 calibration pipeline. We also note the existence of an extra signal in addition to the bias signal in the inboard reference pixels. Thought to be a "signal memory", this signal was observed in ground tests of early, non-flight detectors but was thought not to be present in the current flight detector. The extra signal does not degrade the WFC3/IR calibration. Large (~100DN), long-lasting (~weeks) signal jumps in a subset of the reference pixels as well as nearby science pixels were also observed. A subsequent ISR will report on efforts to characterize these jumps and the long-term behavior of the reference pixels.

  2. The MIC photon counting detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fordham, J. L. A.; Bone, D. A.; Oldfield, M. K.; Bellis, J. G.; Norton, T. J.

    1992-12-01

    The MIC (Microchannel plate Intensified CCD (Charge Coupled Device)) detector is an advanced performance Micro Channel Plate (MCP) intensified CCD photon counting detector developed for high resolution, high dynamic range, astronomical applications. The heart of the detector is an MCP intensifier developed specifically for photon counting applications. The maximum detector format is 3072 by 2304 pixels. The measured resolution of the detector system is 18 micrometers FWHM at 490 nm. The detector is linear to approximately 1,000,000 events/detector area/sec on a flat field and linear to count rates up to 200 events/object/s on star images. Two versions of the system have been developed. The first for ground based astronomical applications based around a 40 mm diameter intensifier, was proven in trials at a number of large optical telescopes. The second, specifically for the ESA X-Ray Multi Mirror Mission (XMM), where the MIC has been accepted as the blue detector for the incorporated Optical Monitor (OM). For the XMM-OM, the system is based around a 25 mm diameter intensifier. At present, under development, is a 75 mm diameter version of the detector which will have a maximum format of 6144 by 4608 pixels. Details of the MIC detector and its performance are presented.

  3. Testbeam and laboratory characterization of 3D CMS pixel sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubna, Mayur; Krzwyda, Alex; Alagoz, Enver; Bortoletto, Daniela

    2013-04-01

    Future generations of colliders, like High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) at CERN will deliver much higher radiation doses to the particle detectors, specifically those closer to the beam line. Inner tracker detectors will be the most affected part, causing increased occupancy and radiation damage to Silicon detectors. Planar Silicon sensors have not shown enough radiation hardness for the innermost layers where the radiation doses can reach values around 10^16 neq/cm^2. As a possible replacement of planar pixel sensors, 3D Silicon technology is under consideration as they show higher radiation hardness, and efficiencies comparable to planar sensors. Several 3D CMS pixel designs were fabricated at FBK, CNM, and SINTEF. They were bump bonded to the CMS pixel readout chip and characterized in the laboratory using radioactive source (Sr90), and at Fermilab MTEST beam test facility. Sensors were also irradiated with 800 MeV protons at Los Alamos National Lab to study post-irradiation behavior. In addition, several diodes and test structures from FBK were studied before and after irradiation. We report the laboratory and testbeam measurement results for the irradiated 3D devices.

  4. The phase II ATLAS Pixel upgrade: the Inner Tracker (ITk)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flick, T.

    2017-01-01

    The entire tracking system of the ATLAS experiment will be replaced during the LHC Phase II shutdown (foreseen to take place around 2025) by an all-silicon detector called the ITk (Inner Tracker). The pixel detector will comprise the five innermost layers, and will be instrumented with new sensor and readout electronics technologies to improve the tracking performance and cope with the HL-LHC environment, which will be severe in terms of occupancy and radiation. Several layout options are being investigated. All of these include a barrel part and ring-shaped supports in the endcap regions. All structures will be based on low mass, highly stable and highly thermally conductive carbon-based materials cooled by evaporative carbon dioxide. Different designs of planar, 3D, and CMOS sensors are being investigated to identify the optimal technology for the different pixel layers. While the RD53 Collaboration is developing the new readout chip, the pixel off-detector readout electronics will be implemented in the framework of the general ATLAS trigger and DAQ system. A readout speed of up to 5 Gbit/s per data link (FE-chip) will be needed in the innermost layers going down to 640 Mbit/s for the outermost. This paper presents an overview of the different components of the ITk and the current status of the developments.

  5. Simulation of charge transport in pixelated CdTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolstein, M.; Ariño, G.; Chmeissani, M.; De Lorenzo, G.

    2014-12-01

    The Voxel Imaging PET (VIP) Pathfinder project intends to show the advantages of using pixelated semiconductor technology for nuclear medicine applications to achieve an improved image reconstruction without efficiency loss. It proposes designs for Positron Emission Tomography (PET), Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) and Compton gamma camera detectors with a large number of signal channels (of the order of 106). The design is based on the use of a pixelated CdTe Schottky detector to have optimal energy and spatial resolution. An individual read-out channel is dedicated for each detector voxel of size 1 × 1 × 2 mm3 using an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) which the VIP project has designed, developed and is currently evaluating experimentally. The behaviour of the signal charge carriers in CdTe should be well understood because it has an impact on the performance of the readout channels. For this purpose the Finite Element Method (FEM) Multiphysics COMSOL software package has been used to simulate the behaviour of signal charge carriers in CdTe and extract values for the expected charge sharing depending on the impact point and bias voltage. The results on charge sharing obtained with COMSOL are combined with GAMOS, a Geant based particle tracking Monte Carlo software package, to get a full evaluation of the amount of charge sharing in pixelated CdTe for different gamma impact points.

  6. Simulation of charge transport in pixelated CdTe

    PubMed Central

    Kolstein, M.; Ariño, G.; Chmeissani, M.; De Lorenzo, G.

    2014-01-01

    The Voxel Imaging PET (VIP) Pathfinder project intends to show the advantages of using pixelated semiconductor technology for nuclear medicine applications to achieve an improved image reconstruction without efficiency loss. It proposes designs for Positron Emission Tomography (PET), Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) and Compton gamma camera detectors with a large number of signal channels (of the order of 106). The design is based on the use of a pixelated CdTe Schottky detector to have optimal energy and spatial resolution. An individual read-out channel is dedicated for each detector voxel of size 1 × 1 × 2 mm3 using an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) which the VIP project has designed, developed and is currently evaluating experimentally. The behaviour of the signal charge carriers in CdTe should be well understood because it has an impact on the performance of the readout channels. For this purpose the Finite Element Method (FEM) Multiphysics COMSOL software package has been used to simulate the behaviour of signal charge carriers in CdTe and extract values for the expected charge sharing depending on the impact point and bias voltage. The results on charge sharing obtained with COMSOL are combined with GAMOS, a Geant based particle tracking Monte Carlo software package, to get a full evaluation of the amount of charge sharing in pixelated CdTe for different gamma impact points. PMID:25729404

  7. Simulation of charge transport in pixelated CdTe.

    PubMed

    Kolstein, M; Ariño, G; Chmeissani, M; De Lorenzo, G

    2014-12-01

    The Voxel Imaging PET (VIP) Pathfinder project intends to show the advantages of using pixelated semiconductor technology for nuclear medicine applications to achieve an improved image reconstruction without efficiency loss. It proposes designs for Positron Emission Tomography (PET), Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) and Compton gamma camera detectors with a large number of signal channels (of the order of 10(6)). The design is based on the use of a pixelated CdTe Schottky detector to have optimal energy and spatial resolution. An individual read-out channel is dedicated for each detector voxel of size 1 × 1 × 2 mm(3) using an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) which the VIP project has designed, developed and is currently evaluating experimentally. The behaviour of the signal charge carriers in CdTe should be well understood because it has an impact on the performance of the readout channels. For this purpose the Finite Element Method (FEM) Multiphysics COMSOL software package has been used to simulate the behaviour of signal charge carriers in CdTe and extract values for the expected charge sharing depending on the impact point and bias voltage. The results on charge sharing obtained with COMSOL are combined with GAMOS, a Geant based particle tracking Monte Carlo software package, to get a full evaluation of the amount of charge sharing in pixelated CdTe for different gamma impact points.

  8. The pixel tracking telescope at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, Simon; Lei, CM; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Prosser, Alan; Rivera, Ryan; Terzo, Stefano; Turqueti, Marcos; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vigani, Luigi; Dinardo, Mauro E.

    2016-03-01

    An all silicon pixel telescope has been assembled and used at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility (FTBF) since 2009 to provide precise tracking information for different test beam experiments with a wide range of Detectors Under Test (DUTs) requiring high resolution measurement of the track impact point. The telescope is based on CMS pixel modules left over from the CMS forward pixel production. Eight planes are arranged to achieve a resolution of less than 8 μm on the 120 GeV proton beam transverse coordinate at the DUT position. In order to achieve such resolution with 100 × 150 μm2 pixel cells, the planes were tilted to 25 degrees to maximize charge sharing between pixels. Crucial for obtaining this performance is the alignment software, called Monicelli, specifically designed and optimized for this system. This paper will describe the telescope hardware, the data acquisition system and the alignment software constituting this particle tracking system for test beam users.

  9. High accuracy injection circuit for the calibration of a large pixel sensor matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quartieri, E.; Comotti, D.; Manghisoni, M.

    2013-08-01

    Semiconductor pixel detectors, for particle tracking and vertexing in high energy physics experiments as well as for X-ray imaging, in particular for synchrotron light sources and XFELs, require a large area sensor matrix. This work will discuss the design and the characterization of a high-linearity, low dispersion injection circuit to be used for pixel-level calibration of detector readout electronics in a large pixel sensor matrix. The circuit provides a useful tool for the characterization of the readout electronics of the pixel cell unit for both monolithic active pixel sensors and hybrid pixel detectors. In the latter case, the circuit allows for precise analogue test of the readout channel already at the chip level, when no sensor is connected. Moreover, it provides a simple means for calibration of readout electronics once the detector has been connected to the chip. Two injection techniques can be provided by the circuit: one for a charge sensitive amplification and the other for a transresistance readout channel. The aim of the paper is to describe the architecture and the design guidelines of the calibration circuit, which has been implemented in a 130 nm CMOS technology. Moreover, experimental results of the proposed injection circuit will be presented in terms of linearity and dispersion.

  10. Scintillating pad detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.; Baumbaugh, B.; Borcherding, F.

    1996-12-31

    We have been investigating the performance of scintillating pad detectors, individual small tiles of scintillator that are read out with wavelength-shifting fibers and visible light photon counters, for application in high luminosity colliding beam experiments such as the D0 Upgrade. Such structures could provide {open_quotes}pixel{close_quotes} type readout over large fiducial volumes for tracking, preshower detection and triggering.

  11. Belle II Silicon Vertex Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, D.; Adamczyk, K.; Aihara, H.; Angelini, C.; Aziz, T.; Babu, V.; Bacher, S.; Bahinipati, S.; Barberio, E.; Baroncelli, Ti.; Baroncelli, To.; Basith, A. K.; Batignani, G.; Bauer, A.; Behera, P. K.; Bergauer, T.; Bettarini, S.; Bhuyan, B.; Bilka, T.; Bosi, F.; Bosisio, L.; Bozek, A.; Buchsteiner, F.; Bulla, L.; Caria, G.; Casarosa, G.; Ceccanti, M.; Červenkov, D.; Chendvankar, S. R.; Dash, N.; De Pietro, G.; Divekar, S. T.; Doležal, Z.; Forti, F.; Friedl, M.; Hara, K.; Higuchi, T.; Horiguchi, T.; Irmler, C.; Ishikawa, A.; Jeon, H. B.; Joo, C.; Kandra, J.; Kambara, N.; Kang, K. H.; Kawasaki, T.; Kodyš, P.; Kohriki, T.; Koike, S.; Kolwalkar, M. M.; Kumar, R.; Kun, W.; Kvasnička, P.; La Licata, C.; Lanceri, L.; Lettenbicher, J.; Libby, J.; Lueck, T.; Maki, M.; Mammini, P.; Mayekar, S. N.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohanty, S.; Morii, T.; Nakamura, K. R.; Natkaniec, Z.; Onuki, Y.; Ostrowicz, W.; Paladino, A.; Paoloni, E.; Park, H.; Pilo, F.; Profeti, A.; Rashevskaya, I.; Rao, K. K.; Rizzo, G.; Resmi, P. K.; Rozanska, M.; Sasaki, J.; Sato, N.; Schultschik, S.; Schwanda, C.; Seino, Y.; Shimizu, N.; Stypula, J.; Suzuki, J.; Tanaka, S.; Taylor, G. N.; Thalmeier, R.; Thomas, R.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uozumi, S.; Urquijo, P.; Vitale, L.; Watanuki, S.; Watanabe, M.; Watson, I. J.; Webb, J.; Wiechczynski, J.; Williams, S.; Würkner, B.; Yamamoto, H.; Yin, H.; Yoshinobu, T.; Zani, L.

    2017-02-01

    The Belle II experiment at the SuperKEKB asymmetric energy e+e‑ collider in KEK, Japan will operate at an instantaneous luminosity 40 times larger than that of its predecessor, Belle. It is built with an aim of collecting a huge amount of data (50 ab‑1 by 2025) for precise CP violation measurements and new physics search. Thus, we need an accurate vertex determination and reconstruction of low momentum tracks which will be achieved with the help of vertex detector (VXD). The Belle II VXD consists of two layers of DEPFET pixels (`Pixel Detector') and four layers of double-sided silicon microstrip sensors (`Silicon Vertex Detector'), assembled over carbon fibre ribs. In this paper, we discuss about the Belle II Silicon Vertex Detector, especially its design and key features; we also present its module (`ladder') assembly and testing procedures.

  12. Detectors for the SIMURIS payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patchett, B. E.; Carter, M. K.; Read, P. D.

    1992-05-01

    Detectors for the Solar Ultraviolet Network (SUN) and Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (IFTS) instruments, which are particularly challenging due to the requirements for high total count rate, high pixel count rate, and far UV sensitivity, are discussed. Count rates are exceptionally high for active regions, but with a spatial resolution of 0.001 inches it is also possible that high individual pixel counts will occur even on 'quiet' Sun observations. On the other hand it is planned to use the Solar Interferometric Mission for Ultrahigh Resolution Imaging and Spectroscopy (SIMURIS) for planetary observations where the detectors will be required to work efficiently and with very low noise levels. It seems unlikely that any one detector would suffice for all channels, and in any case this could potentially represent a single point of failure. The design and performance of a range of modular detectors which are built specifically with solar UV observing in mind are discussed along with plans for their future development.

  13. The FE-I4 Pixel Readout Chip and the IBL Module

    SciTech Connect

    Barbero, Marlon; Arutinov, David; Backhaus, Malte; Fang, Xiao-Chao; Gonella, Laura; Hemperek, Tomasz; Karagounis, Michael; Hans, Kruger; Kruth, Andre; Wermes, Norbert; Breugnon, Patrick; Fougeron, Denis; Gensolen, Fabrice; Menouni, Mohsine; Rozanov, Alexander; Beccherle, Roberto; Darbo, Giovanni; Caminada, Lea; Dube, Sourabh; Fleury, Julien; Gnani, Dario; /LBL, Berkeley /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Gottingen U. /SLAC

    2012-05-01

    FE-I4 is the new ATLAS pixel readout chip for the upgraded ATLAS pixel detector. Designed in a CMOS 130 nm feature size process, the IC is able to withstand higher radiation levels compared to the present generation of ATLAS pixel Front-End FE-I3, and can also cope with higher hit rate. It is thus suitable for intermediate radii pixel detector layers in the High Luminosity LHC environment, but also for the inserted layer at 3.3 cm known as the 'Insertable B-Layer' project (IBL), at a shorter timescale. In this paper, an introduction to the FE-I4 will be given, focusing on test results from the first full size FE-I4A prototype which has been available since fall 2010. The IBL project will be introduced, with particular emphasis on the FE-I4-based module concept.

  14. The STAR PXL detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contin, G.

    2016-12-01

    The PiXeL detector (PXL) of the STAR experiment at RHIC is the first application of the state-of-the-art thin Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) technology in a collider environment. Designed to extend the STAR measurement capabilities in the heavy flavor domain, it took data in Au+Au collisions, p+p and p+Au collisions at 0√sNN=20 GeV at RHIC, during the period 2014-2016. The PXL detector is based on 50 μm-thin MAPS sensors with a pitch of 20.7 μm. Each sensor includes an array of nearly 1 million pixels, read out in rolling shutter mode in 185.6 μs. The 170 mW/cm2 power dissipation allows for air cooling and contributes to reduce the global material budget to 0.4% radiation length on the innermost layer. Experience and lessons learned from construction and operations will be presented in this paper. Detector performance and results from 2014 Au+Au data analysis, demonstrating the STAR capabilities of charm reconstruction, will be shown.

  15. Single-pixel optical imaging with compressed reference intensity patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen; Chen, Xudong

    2015-03-01

    Ghost imaging with single-pixel bucket detector has attracted more and more current attention due to its marked physical characteristics. However, in ghost imaging, a large number of reference intensity patterns are usually required for object reconstruction, hence many applications based on ghost imaging (such as tomography and optical security) may be tedious since heavy storage or transmission is requested. In this paper, we report that the compressed reference intensity patterns can be used for object recovery in computational ghost imaging (with single-pixel bucket detector), and object verification can be further conducted. Only a small portion (such as 2.0% pixels) of each reference intensity pattern is used for object reconstruction, and the recovered object is verified by using nonlinear correlation algorithm. Since statistical characteristic and speckle averaging property are inherent in ghost imaging, sidelobes or multiple peaks can be effectively suppressed or eliminated in the nonlinear correlation outputs when random pixel positions are selected from each reference intensity pattern. Since pixel positions can be randomly selected from each 2D reference intensity pattern (such as total measurements of 20000), a large key space and high flexibility can be generated when the proposed method is applied for authenticationbased cryptography. When compressive sensing is used to recover the object with a small number of measurements, the proposed strategy could still be feasible through further compressing the recorded data (i.e., reference intensity patterns) followed by object verification. It is expected that the proposed method not only compresses the recorded data and facilitates the storage or transmission, but also can build up novel capability (i.e., classical or quantum information verification) for ghost imaging.

  16. A 128 pixel linear array for radiotherapy quality assurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, L.; Gómez, F.; Iglesias, A.; Lobato, R.; Marín, J.; Mosquera, J.; Pardo, J.; Pazos, A.; Pena, J.; Pombar, M.; Rodríguez, A.; Saavedra, D.; Sendón, J.; Yañez, A.

    2004-12-01

    New radiotherapy techniques require detectors able to verify and monitor the clinical beam with high spatial resolution and fast response. Room temperature organic liquid ionization detectors are becoming an alternative to standard air ionization chambers, due to their tissue equivalent behavior, their sensibility and small directional dependence. A liquid isooctane filled ionization linear array for radiotherapy quality assurance has been designed, built and tested. The detector consists of 128 pixels, each of them with an area of 1.7 mm×1.7 mm and a gap of 0.5 mm. The small pixel size makes the detector ideal for high gradient beam profiles like those present in Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy. The gap and the polarization voltage have been chosen in order to guarantee a linear relationship between the dose rate and the readout signal at high dose rates. As readout electronics we use the X-ray Data Acquisition System with the Xchip developed by the CCLRC.In the first device tests we have confirmed linearity up to a 6.7 Gy/min dose rate with a deviation less than 1%. A profile with a signal-to-noise ratio around 500 can be obtained for a 4 Gy/min dose rate with a 10 ms integration time.

  17. Recent achievements of the ATLAS upgrade Planar Pixel Sensors R&D project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casse, G.

    2014-04-01

    The ATLAS upgrade Planar Pixel Sensors (PPS) project aims to prove the suitability of silicon detectors processed with planar technology to equip all layers of the pixel vertex detector proposed for the upgrade of the ATLAS experiment for the future High Luminosity LHC at CERN (HL-LHC). The detectors need to be radiation tolerant to the extreme fluences expected to be received during the experimental lifetime, with optimised geometry for full coverage and high granularity and affordable in term of cost, due to the relatively large area of the upgraded ATLAS detector system. Here several solutions for the detector geometry and results with radiation hard technologies (n-in-n, n-in-p) are discussed.

  18. Pixel size adjustment in coherent diffractive imaging within the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld regime.

    PubMed

    Claus, Daniel; Rodenburg, John Marius

    2015-03-10

    The reconstruction of the smallest resolvable object detail in digital holography and coherent diffractive imaging when the detector is mounted close to the object of interest is restricted by the sensor's pixel size. Very high resolution information is intrinsically encoded in the data because the effective numerical aperture (NA) of the detector (its solid angular size as subtended at the object plane) is very high. The correct physical propagation model to use in the reconstruction process for this setup should be based on the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction integral, which is commonly implemented via a convolution operation. However, the convolution operation has the drawback that the pixel size of the propagation calculation is preserved between the object and the detector, and so the maximum resolution of the reconstruction is limited by the detector pixel size, not its effective NA. Here we show that this problem can be overcome via the introduction of a numerical spherical lens with adjustable magnification. This approach enables the reconstruction of object details smaller than the detector pixel size or of objects that extend beyond the size of the detector. It will have applications in all forms of near-field lensless microscopy.

  19. Shape determination of microcalcifications in simulated digital mammography images with varying pixel size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruschin, Mark; Bath, Magnus; Hemdal, Bengt; Tingberg, Anders

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this work was to study how the pixel size of digital detectors can affect shape determination of microcalcifications in mammography. Screen-film mammograms containing microcalcifications clinically proven to be indicative of malignancy were digitised at 100 lines/mm using a high-resolution Tango drum scanner. Forty microcalcifications were selected to cover an appropriate range of sizes, shapes and contrasts typically found of malignant cases. Based on the measured MTF and NPS of the combined screen-film and scanner system, these digitised images were filtered to simulate images acquired with a square sampling pixel size of 10 μm x 10 μm and a fill factor of one. To simulate images acquired with larger pixel sizes, these finely sampled images were re-binned to yield a range of effective pixel sizes from 20 μm up to 140 μm. An alternative forced-choice (AFC) observer experiment was conducted with eleven observers for this set of digitised microcalcifications to determine how pixel size affects the ability to discriminate shape. It was found that observer score increased with decreasing pixel size down to 60 μm (p<0.01), at which point no significant advantage was obtained by using smaller pixel sizes due to the excessive relative noise-per-pixel. The relative gain in shape discrimination ability at smaller pixel sizes was larger for microcalcifications that were smaller than 500 μm and circular.

  20. areaDetector: Software for 2-D Detectors in EPICS

    SciTech Connect

    Rivers, M.

    2011-09-23

    areaDetector is a new EPICS module designed to support 2-D detectors. It is modular C++ code that greatly simplifies the task of writing support for a new detector. It also supports plugins, which receive detector data from the driver and process it in some way. Existing plugins perform Region-Of-Interest extraction and analysis, file saving (in netCDF, HDF, TIFF and JPEG formats), color conversion, and export to EPICS records for image display in clients like ImageJ and IDL. Drivers have now been written for many of the detectors commonly used at synchrotron beamlines, including CCDs, pixel array and amorphous silicon detectors, and online image plates.

  1. Sub-pixel calibration for Weak Lensing and Astrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Michael

    We have recently developed and demonstrated a new method of sub-pixel detector calibration that offers orders of magnitude improvement in astrometry with CCD focal planes. Using this technique we have demonstrated centroiding of images to 1e 5 lambda/D in laboratory conditions. Our method allows reconstructing the true optical point spread function (PSF) of a telescope from pixelated stellar images. Although this technique was originally developed for centroiding of images across a large focal plane, it can also be applied to weak lensing program on WFIRST. We use a laser metrology technique to measure geometric imperfections in the focal plane array from pixel placement errors to non-uniform quantum efficiency (QE) within every pixel. With precise sub-pixel calibration one can use dithered images (e.g., a 2×2 dither) to derive Nyquist-sampled image of stars. The WFIRST telescope has a large 0.28 sq.deg field of view (FOV) with theoretical PSF varying considerably over that FOV. However, even at high galactic latitude there will be over 1,000 stars brighter than 16 mag and, with Nyquist-sampled images, it should be possible to calculate the spatially varying PSF at 1,000 locations in the focal plane. With knowledge of the optical PSF and sub-pixel calibration of the detector, one can remove biases in the shapes of galaxies introduced by the spatially varying PSF. The technique of sub-pixel calibration has so far only been demonstrated in with visible CCD detectors and applied to achieve ultra-precise image centroiding. The purpose of this proposal is to extend the technique of removing biases in the shape of galaxies due to pixilation and spatially varying PSF and to extend the calibration of visible detectors to NIR detectors. The new technique could be used to enable 4 10 microarcsecond (μas) astrometry within the 0.28 sq.deg FOV of the WFIRST telescope. Using the upcoming Gaia catalogue accurate to ~10 μas, we will be able to stitch the HgCdTe arrays on

  2. The 4D pixel challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartiglia, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Bellora, A.; Cenna, F.; Cirio, R.; Durando, S.; Ferrero, M.; Freeman, P.; Galloway, Z.; Gruey, B.; Mashayekhi, M.; Mandurrino, M.; Monaco, V.; Mulargia, R.; Obertino, M.; Ravera, F.; Sacchi, R.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Seiden, A.; Sola, V.; Spencer, N.; Staiano, A.; Wilder, M.; Woods, N.; Zatserklyaniy, A.

    2016-12-01

    Is it possible to design a detector able to concurrently measure time and position with high precision? This question is at the root of the research and development of silicon sensors presented in this contribution. Silicon sensors are the most common type of particle detectors used for charged particle tracking, however their rather poor time resolution limits their use as precise timing detectors. A few years ago we have picked up the gantlet of enhancing the remarkable position resolution of silicon sensors with precise timing capability. I will be presenting our results in the following pages.

  3. Design, optimization and evaluation of a "smart" pixel sensor array for low-dose digital radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kai; Liu, Xinghui; Ou, Hai; Chen, Jun

    2016-04-01

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin-film transistors (TFTs) have been widely used to build flat-panel X-ray detectors for digital radiography (DR). As the demand for low-dose X-ray imaging grows, a detector with high signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) pixel architecture emerges. "Smart" pixel is intended to use a dual-gate photosensitive TFT for sensing, storage, and switch. It differs from a conventional passive pixel sensor (PPS) and active pixel sensor (APS) in that all these three functions are combined into one device instead of three separate units in a pixel. Thus, it is expected to have high fill factor and high spatial resolution. In addition, it utilizes the amplification effect of the dual-gate photosensitive TFT to form a one-transistor APS that leads to a potentially high SNR. This paper addresses the design, optimization and evaluation of the smart pixel sensor and array for low-dose DR. We will design and optimize the smart pixel from the scintillator to TFT levels and validate it through optical and electrical simulation and experiments of a 4x4 sensor array.

  4. The Belle II Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piilonen, Leo; Belle Collaboration, II

    2017-01-01

    The Belle II detector is now under construction at the KEK laboratory in Japan. This project represents a substantial upgrade of the Belle detector (and the KEKB accelerator). The Belle II experiment will record 50 ab-1 of data, a factor of 50 more than that recorded by Belle. This large data set, combined with the low backgrounds and high trigger efficiencies characteristic of an e+e- experiment, should provide unprecedented sensitivity to new physics signatures in B and D meson decays, and in τ lepton decays. The detector comprises many forefront subsystems. The vertex detector consists of two inner layers of silicon DEPFET pixels and four outer layers of double-sided silicon strips. These layers surround a beryllium beam pipe having a radius of only 10 mm. Outside of the vertex detector is a large-radius, small-cell drift chamber, an ``imaging time-of-propagation'' detector based on Cerenkov radiation for particle identification, and scintillating fibers and resistive plate chambers used to identify muons. The detector will begin commissioning in 2017.

  5. Spectroscopic and imaging capabilities of a pixellated photon counting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amendolia, S. R.; Bisogni, M. G.; Bottigli, U.; Delogu, P.; Dipasquale, G.; Fantacci, M. E.; Marchi, A.; Marzulli, V. M.; Oliva, P.; Palmiero, R.; Rosso, V.; Stefanini, A.; Stumbo, S.; Zucca, S.

    2001-06-01

    We are studying the performance of various thickness GaAs pixel detectors bump-bonded to a dedicated photon counting chip (PCC) for medical imaging applications in different energy ranges. In this work we present the experimental results obtained with a 600 μm thick pixel matrix (64×64 square pixels, 170 μm side) in the 60-140 keV energy range to evaluate the possible use of such a system in the nuclear medicine field. In particular, we have measured the spectroscopic properties of the detector (charge collection efficiency, energy resolution and detection efficiency) and evaluated the discrimination capability of the electronics. Then we have measured the imaging properties of the whole system in terms of Point Spread Function and using a home made thyroid phantom. We present also a comparison with a traditional gamma camera and an evaluation, made by both experimental measurements and software simulations, of the imaging characteristics related to the use of a collimation system.

  6. The pixel tracking telescope at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Kwan, Simon; Lei, CM; Menasce, Dario; ...

    2016-03-01

    An all silicon pixel telescope has been assembled and used at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility (FTBF) since 2009 to provide precise tracking information for different test beam experiments with a wide range of Detectors Under Test (DUTs) requiring high resolution measurement of the track impact point. The telescope is based on CMS pixel modules left over from the CMS forward pixel production. Eight planes are arranged to achieve a resolution of less than 8 μm on the 120 GeV proton beam transverse coordinate at the DUT position. In order to achieve such resolution with 100 × 150 μm2 pixelmore » cells, the planes were tilted to 25 degrees to maximize charge sharing between pixels. Crucial for obtaining this performance is the alignment software, called Monicelli, specifically designed and optimized for this system. This paper will describe the telescope hardware, the data acquisition system and the alignment software constituting this particle tracking system for test beam users.« less

  7. SAR Image Complex Pixel Representations

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2015-03-01

    Complex pixel values for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images of uniform distributed clutter can be represented as either real/imaginary (also known as I/Q) values, or as Magnitude/Phase values. Generally, these component values are integers with limited number of bits. For clutter energy well below full-scale, Magnitude/Phase offers lower quantization noise than I/Q representation. Further improvement can be had with companding of the Magnitude value.

  8. Ultra-low material pixel layers for the Mu3e experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, N.; Dittmeier, S.; Henkelmann, L.; Herkert, A.; Meier Aeschbacher, F.; Ng, Y. W.; Noehte, L. O. S.; Schöning, A.; Wiedner, D.

    2016-12-01

    The upcoming Mu3e experiment will search for the charged lepton flavour violating decay of a muon at rest into three electrons. The maximal energy of the electrons is 53 MeV, hence a low material budget is a key performance requirement for the tracking detector. In this paper we summarize our approach to meet the requirement of about 1 ‰ of a radiation length per pixel detector layer. This includes the choice of thinned active monolithic pixel sensors in HV-CMOS technology, ultra-thin flexible printed circuits, and helium gas cooling.

  9. CMOS digital pixel sensors: technology and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skorka, Orit; Joseph, Dileepan

    2014-04-01

    CMOS active pixel sensor technology, which is widely used these days for digital imaging, is based on analog pixels. Transition to digital pixel sensors can boost signal-to-noise ratios and enhance image quality, but can increase pixel area to dimensions that are impractical for the high-volume market of consumer electronic devices. There are two main approaches to digital pixel design. The first uses digitization methods that largely rely on photodetector properties and so are unique to imaging. The second is based on adaptation of a classical analog-to-digital converter (ADC) for in-pixel data conversion. Imaging systems for medical, industrial, and security applications are emerging lower-volume markets that can benefit from these in-pixel ADCs. With these applications, larger pixels are typically acceptable, and imaging may be done in invisible spectral bands.

  10. Mapping Electrical Crosstalk in Pixelated Sensor Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seshadri, Suresh (Inventor); Cole, David (Inventor); Smith, Roger M (Inventor); Hancock, Bruce R. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The effects of inter pixel capacitance in a pixilated array may be measured by first resetting all pixels in the array to a first voltage, where a first image is read out, followed by resetting only a subset of pixels in the array to a second voltage, where a second image is read out, where the difference in the first and second images provide information about the inter pixel capacitance. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  11. Mapping Electrical Crosstalk in Pixelated Sensor Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seshadri, Suresh (Inventor); Cole, David (Inventor); Smith, Roger M. (Inventor); Hancock, Bruce R. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The effects of inter pixel capacitance in a pixilated array may be measured by first resetting all pixels in the array to a first voltage, where a first image is read out, followed by resetting only a subset of pixels in the array to a second voltage, where a second image is read out, where the difference in the first and second images provide information about the inter pixel capacitance. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  12. The Silicon Detector (SiD) And Linear Collider Detector R&D in Asia And North America

    SciTech Connect

    Brau, J.E.; Breidenbach, M.; Fujii, Y.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2005-08-11

    In Asia and North America research and development on a linear collider detector has followed complementary paths to that in Europe. Among the developments in the US has been the conception of a detector built around silicon tracking, which relies heavily on a pixel (CCD) vertex detector, and employs a silicon tungsten calorimeter. Since this detector is quite different from the TESLA detector, we describe it here, along with some of the sub-system specific R&D in these regions.

  13. Cosmic-Ray Detectors With Interdigitated Electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Thomas J.; Mazed, Mohammed; Holtzman, Melinda J.; Fossum, Eric R.

    1995-01-01

    Detectors measure both positions of incidence and energies of incident charged particles. Stack of detector wafers intercept cosmic ray. Measure positions of incidence to determine cosmic-ray trajectory and charge generated within them (proportional to cosmic-ray energy dissipated within them). Interdigital electrode pattern repeated over many rows and columns on tops of detector wafers in stack. Electrode pattern defines pixels within which points of incidence of incident cosmic rays located.

  14. Determining MTF of digital detector system with Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Eun Seon; Lee, Hyung Won; Nam, Sang Hee

    2005-04-01

    We have designed a detector based on a-Se(amorphous Selenium) and done simulation the detector with Monte Carlo method. We will apply the cascaded linear system theory to determine the MTF for whole detector system. For direct comparison with experiment, we have simulated 139um pixel pitch and used simulated X-ray tube spectrum.

  15. Pixel Hybridization Technologies for the HL-LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimonti, G.; Biasotti, M.; Ceriale, V.; Darbo, G.; Gariano, G.; Gaudiello, A.; Gemme, C.; Rossi, L.; Rovani, A.; Ruscino, E.

    2016-12-01

    During the 2024-2025 shut-down, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be upgraded to reach an instantaneous luminosity up to 7×1034 cm-2s-1. This upgrade of the collider is called High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). ATLAS and CMS detectors will be upgraded to meet the new challenges of HL-LHC: an average of 200 pile-up events in every bunch crossing and an integrated luminosity of 3000 fb-1 over ten years. In particular, the current trackers will be completely replaced. In HL-LHC the trackers should operate under high fluences (up to 1.4 × 1016 neq cm-2), with a correlated high radiation damage. The pixel detectors, the innermost part of the trackers, needed a completely new design in the readout electronics, sensors and interconnections. A new 65 nm front-end (FE) electronics is being developed by the RD53 collaboration compatible with smaller pixel sizes than the actual ones to cope with the high track densities. Consequently the bump density will increase up to 4 ·104 bumps/cm2. Preliminary results of two hybridization technologies study are presented in this paper. In particular, the on-going bump-bonding qualification program at Leonardo-Finmeccanica is discussed, together with alternative hybridization techniques, as the capacitive coupling for HV-CMOS detectors.

  16. Monolithic Active Pixel Matrix with Binary Counters (MAMBO) ASIC

    SciTech Connect

    Khalid, Farah F.; Deptuch, Grzegorz; Shenai, Alpana; Yarema, Raymond J.; /Fermilab

    2010-11-01

    Monolithic Active Matrix with Binary Counters (MAMBO) is a counting ASIC designed for detecting and measuring low energy X-rays from 6-12 keV. Each pixel contains analogue functionality implemented with a charge preamplifier, CR-RC{sup 2} shaper and a baseline restorer. It also contains a window comparator which can be trimmed by 4 bit DACs to remove systematic offsets. The hits are registered by a 12 bit ripple counter which is reconfigured as a shift register to serially output the data from the entire ASIC. Each pixel can be tested individually. Two diverse approaches have been used to prevent coupling between the detector and electronics in MAMBO III and MAMBO IV. MAMBO III is a 3D ASIC, the bottom ASIC consists of diodes which are connected to the top ASIC using {mu}-bump bonds. The detector is decoupled from the electronics by physically separating them on two tiers and using several metal layers as a shield. MAMBO IV is a monolithic structure which uses a nested well approach to isolate the detector from the electronics. The ASICs are being fabricated using the SOI 0.2 {micro}m OKI process, MAMBO III is 3D bonded at T-Micro and MAMBO IV nested well structure was developed in collaboration between OKI and Fermilab.

  17. Monolithic active pixel matrix with binary counters (MAMBO III) ASIC

    SciTech Connect

    Khalid, Farah; Deptuch, Grzegorz; Shenai, Alpana; Yarema, Raymond; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    Monolithic Active Matrix with Binary Counters (MAMBO) is a counting ASIC designed for detecting and measuring low energy X-rays from 6-12keV. Each pixel contains analogue functionality implemented with a charge preamplifier, CR-RC{sup 2} shaper and a baseline restorer. It also contains a window comparator which can be trimmed by 4 bit DACs to remove systematic offsets. The hits are registered by a 12 bit ripple counter which is reconfigured as a shift register to serially output the data from the entire ASIC. Each pixel can be tested individually. Two diverse approaches have been used to prevent coupling between the detector and electronics in MAMBO III and MAMBO IV. MAMBO III is a 3D ASIC, the bottom ASIC consists of diodes which are connected to the top ASIC using {mu}-bump bonds. The detector is decoupled from the electronics by physically separating them on two tiers and using several metal layers as a shield. MAMBO IV is a monolithic structure which uses a nested well approach to isolate the detector from the electronics. The ASICs are being fabricated using the SOI 0.2 {micro}m OKI process, MAMBO III is 3D bonded at T-Micro and MAMBO IV nested well structure was developed in collaboration between OKI and Fermilab.

  18. X-ray imaging characterization of active edge silicon pixel sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponchut, C.; Ruat, M.; Kalliopuska, J.

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this work was the experimental characterization of edge effects in active-edge silicon pixel sensors, in the frame of X-ray pixel detectors developments for synchrotron experiments. We produced a set of active edge pixel sensors with 300 to 500 μm thickness, edge widths ranging from 100 μm to 150 μm, and n or p pixel contact types. The sensors with 256 × 256 pixels and 55 × 55 μm2 pixel pitch were then bump-bonded to Timepix readout chips for X-ray imaging measurements. The reduced edge widths makes the edge pixels more sensitive to the electrical field distribution at the sensor boundaries. We characterized this effect by mapping the spatial response of the sensor edges with a finely focused X-ray synchrotron beam. One of the samples showed a distortion-free response on all four edges, whereas others showed variable degrees of distortions extending at maximum to 300 micron from the sensor edge. An application of active edge pixel sensors to coherent diffraction imaging with synchrotron beams is described.

  19. Hyperspectral Anomaly Detection by Graph Pixel Selection.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yuan; Ma, Dandan; Wang, Qi

    2016-12-01

    Hyperspectral anomaly detection (AD) is an important problem in remote sensing field. It can make full use of the spectral differences to discover certain potential interesting regions without any target priors. Traditional Mahalanobis-distance-based anomaly detectors assume the background spectrum distribution conforms to a Gaussian distribution. However, this and other similar distributions may not be satisfied for the real hyperspectral images. Moreover, the background statistics are susceptible to contamination of anomaly targets which will lead to a high false-positive rate. To address these intrinsic problems, this paper proposes a novel AD method based on the graph theory. We first construct a vertex- and edge-weighted graph and then utilize a pixel selection process to locate the anomaly targets. Two contributions are claimed in this paper: 1) no background distributions are required which makes the method more adaptive and 2) both the vertex and edge weights are considered which enables a more accurate detection performance and better robustness to noise. Intensive experiments on the simulated and real hyperspectral images demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms other benchmark competitors. In addition, the robustness of the proposed method has been validated by using various window sizes. This experimental result also demonstrates the valuable characteristic of less computational complexity and less parameter tuning for real applications.

  20. Making a trillion pixels dance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vivek; Hu, Bin; Toh, Kenny; Bollepalli, Srinivas; Wagner, Stephan; Borodovsky, Yan

    2008-03-01

    In June 2007, Intel announced a new pixelated mask technology. This technology was created to address the problem caused by the growing gap between the lithography wavelength and the feature sizes patterned with it. As this gap has increased, the quality of the image has deteriorated. About a decade ago, Optical Proximity Correction (OPC) was introduced to bridge this gap, but as this gap continued to increase, one could not rely on the same basic set of techniques to maintain image quality. The computational lithography group at Intel sought to alleviate this problem by experimenting with additional degrees of freedom within the mask. This paper describes the resulting pixelated mask technology, and some of the computational methods used to create it. The first key element of this technology is a thick mask model. We realized very early in the development that, unlike traditional OPC methods, the pixelated mask would require a very accurate thick mask model. Whereas in the traditional methods, one can use the relatively coarse approximations such as the boundary layer method, use of such techniques resulted not just in incorrect sizing of parts of the pattern, but in whole features missing. We built on top of previously published domain decomposition methods, and incorporated limitations of the mask manufacturing process, to create an accurate thick mask model. Several additional computational techniques were invoked to substantially increase the speed of this method to a point that it was feasible for full chip tapeout. A second key element of the computational scheme was the comprehension of mask manufacturability, including the vital issue of the number of colors in the mask. While it is obvious that use of three or more colors will give the best image, one has to be practical about projecting mask manufacturing capabilities for such a complex mask. To circumvent this serious issue, we eventually settled on a two color mask - comprising plain glass and etched

  1. Experience from design, prototyping and production of a DC-DC conversion powering scheme for the CMS Phase-1 Pixel Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feld, Lutz; Karpinski, Waclaw; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Preuten, Marius; Rauch, Max; Schmitz, Stefan; Wlochal, Michael

    2017-02-01

    The CMS pixel detector will be replaced during the technical stop 2016/2017. To allow the new pixel detector to be powered with the legacy cable plant and power supplies, a novel powering scheme based on DC-DC conversion will be employed. After the successful conclusion of an extensive development and prototyping phase, mass production of 1800 DC-DC converters as well as motherboards and other power PCBs has now been completed. This contribution reviews the lessons learned from the development of the power system for the Phase-1 pixel detector, and summarizes the experience gained from the production phase.

  2. Recent Results of the ATLAS Upgrade Planar Pixel Sensor R Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchiori, G.

    The ATLAS detector has to undergo significant updates at the end of the current decade, in order to withstand the increased occupancy and radiation damage that will be produced by the high-luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider. In this presentation we give an overview of the recent accomplishments of the R&D activity on the planar pixel sensors for the ATLAS Inner Detector upgrade.

  3. Dissolve Detection Using Intensity Change Information of Edge Pixels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Chul-Hyun; Han, Doo-Jin; Kim, Hyun-Sool; Lee, Myung-Ho; Park, Sang-Hui

    Shot transition detection is a core technology in video browsing, indexing systems and information retrieval. In this paper we propose a dissolve detection algorithm using the characteristics of edge in MPEG compressed video. Using the intensity change information of edge pixels obtained by Sobel edge detector, we detect the location of a dissolve and its precise duration. We also present a new reliable method to eliminate the false dissolves. The proposed algorithm is tested in various types of videos, and the experimental results show that the proposed algorithm is effective and robust.

  4. Pixel DAQ and trigger for HL-LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morettini, P.

    2017-03-01

    The read-out is one of the challenges in the design of a pixel detector for the High Luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC), that is expected to operate from 2026 at a leveled luminosity of 5 × 1034 cm‑2 s‑1. This is especially true if tracking information is needed in a low latency trigger system. The difficulties of a fast read-out will be reviewed, and possible strategies explained. The solutions that are being evaluated by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations for the upgrade of their trackers will be outlined and ideas on possible development beyond HL-LHC will be presented.

  5. Synchrotron beam test of a photon counting pixel prototype based on Double-SOI technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y.; Lu, Y.; Hashimoto, R.; Nishimura, R.; Kishimoto, S.; Arai, Y.; Ouyang, Q.

    2017-01-01

    The overall noise performances and first synchrotron beam measurement results of CPIXETEG3b, the first counting type Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) pixel sensor prototype without crosstalk issue, are reported. The prototype includes a 64 × 64 pixel matrix with 50 μm pitch size. Each pixel consists of an N-in-P charge collection diode, a charge sensitive preamplifier, a shaper, a discriminator with thresholds adjustable by an in-pixel 4-bit DAC, and a 6-bit counter. The study was performed using the beam line 14A at KEK Photon Factory (KEK-PF) . The homogeneous response of the prototype, including charging-sharing effects between pixels were studied. 16 keV and 8 keV monochromatic small size (~ 10 μm diameter) X-ray beams were used for the charge sharing study, and a flat-field was added for homogenous response investigation. The overall detector homogeneity and the influence of basic detector parameters on charge sharing between pixels has been investigated.

  6. Active pixel sensor with intra-pixel charge transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Mendis, Sunetra (Inventor); Kemeny, Sabrina E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An imaging device formed as a monolithic complementary metal oxide semiconductor integrated circuit in an industry standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor process, the integrated circuit including a focal plane array of pixel cells, each one of the cells including a photogate overlying the substrate for accumulating photo-generated charge in an underlying portion of the substrate, a readout circuit including at least an output field effect transistor formed in the substrate, and a charge coupled device section formed on the substrate adjacent the photogate having a sensing node connected to the output transistor and at least one charge coupled device stage for transferring charge from the underlying portion of the substrate to the sensing node.

  7. Active pixel sensor with intra-pixel charge transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Mendis, Sunetra (Inventor); Kemeny, Sabrina E. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An imaging device formed as a monolithic complementary metal oxide semiconductor integrated circuit in an industry standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor process, the integrated circuit including a focal plane array of pixel cells, each one of the cells including a photogate overlying the substrate for accumulating photo-generated charge in an underlying portion of the substrate, a readout circuit including at least an output field effect transistor formed in the substrate, and a charge coupled device section formed on the substrate adjacent the photogate having a sensing node connected to the output transistor and at least one charge coupled device stage for transferring charge from the underlying portion of the substrate to the sensing node.

  8. Active pixel sensor with intra-pixel charge transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Mendis, Sunetra (Inventor); Kemeny, Sabrina E. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An imaging device formed as a monolithic complementary metal oxide semiconductor integrated circuit in an industry standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor process, the integrated circuit including a focal plane array of pixel cells, each one of the cells including a photogate overlying the substrate for accumulating photo-generated charge in an underlying portion of the substrate, a readout circuit including at least an output field effect transistor formed in the substrate, and a charge coupled device section formed on the substrate adjacent the photogate having a sensing node connected to the output transistor and at least one charge coupled device stage for transferring charge from the underlying portion of the substrate to the sensing node.

  9. Serial Pixel Analog-to-Digital Converter

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, E D

    2010-02-01

    This method reduces the data path from the counter to the pixel register of the analog-to-digital converter (ADC) from as many as 10 bits to a single bit. The reduction in data path width is accomplished by using a coded serial data stream similar to a pseudo random number (PRN) generator. The resulting encoded pixel data is then decoded into a standard hexadecimal format before storage. The high-speed serial pixel ADC concept is based on the single-slope integrating pixel ADC architecture. Previous work has described a massively parallel pixel readout of a similar architecture. The serial ADC connection is similar to the state-of-the art method with the exception that the pixel ADC register is a shift register and the data path is a single bit. A state-of-the-art individual-pixel ADC uses a single-slope charge integration converter architecture with integral registers and “one-hot” counters. This implies that parallel data bits are routed among the counter and the individual on-chip pixel ADC registers. The data path bit-width to the pixel is therefore equivalent to the pixel ADC bit resolution.

  10. Test beam results of 3D silicon pixel sensors for the ATLAS upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenier, P.; Alimonti, G.; Barbero, M.; Bates, R.; Bolle, E.; Borri, M.; Boscardin, M.; Buttar, C.; Capua, M.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cobal, M.; Cristofoli, A.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Darbo, G.; Da Vià, C.; Devetak, E.; DeWilde, B.; Di Girolamo, B.; Dobos, D.; Einsweiler, K.; Esseni, D.; Fazio, S.; Fleta, C.; Freestone, J.; Gallrapp, C.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gariano, G.; Gemme, C.; Giordani, M.-P.; Gjersdal, H.; Grinstein, S.; Hansen, T.; Hansen, T.-E.; Hansson, P.; Hasi, J.; Helle, K.; Hoeferkamp, M.; Hügging, F.; Jackson, P.; Jakobs, K.; Kalliopuska, J.; Karagounis, M.; Kenney, C.; Köhler, M.; Kocian, M.; Kok, A.; Kolya, S.; Korokolov, I.; Kostyukhin, V.; Krüger, H.; La Rosa, A.; Lai, C. H.; Lietaer, N.; Lozano, M.; Mastroberardino, A.; Micelli, A.; Nellist, C.; Oja, A.; Oshea, V.; Padilla, C.; Palestri, P.; Parker, S.; Parzefall, U.; Pater, J.; Pellegrini, G.; Pernegger, H.; Piemonte, C.; Pospisil, S.; Povoli, M.; Roe, S.; Rohne, O.; Ronchin, S.; Rovani, A.; Ruscino, E.; Sandaker, H.; Seidel, S.; Selmi, L.; Silverstein, D.; Sjøbæk, K.; Slavicek, T.; Stapnes, S.; Stugu, B.; Stupak, J.; Su, D.; Susinno, G.; Thompson, R.; Tsung, J.-W.; Tsybychev, D.; Watts, S. J.; Wermes, N.; Young, C.; Zorzi, N.

    2011-05-01

    Results on beam tests of 3D silicon pixel sensors aimed at the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer and High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) upgrades are presented. Measurements include charge collection, tracking efficiency and charge sharing between pixel cells, as a function of track incident angle, and were performed with and without a 1.6 T magnetic field oriented as the ATLAS inner detector solenoid field. Sensors were bump-bonded to the front-end chip currently used in the ATLAS pixel detector. Full 3D sensors, with electrodes penetrating through the entire wafer thickness and active edge, and double-sided 3D sensors with partially overlapping bias and read-out electrodes were tested and showed comparable performance.

  11. Novel silicon n-on-p edgeless planar pixel sensors for the ATLAS upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bomben, M.; Bagolini, A.; Boscardin, M.; Bosisio, L.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Giacomini, G.; La Rosa, A.; Marchiori, G.; Zorzi, N.

    2013-12-01

    In view of the LHC upgrade phases towards HL-LHC, the ATLAS experiment plans to upgrade the inner detector with an all-silicon system. The n-on-p silicon technology is a promising candidate for the pixel upgrade thanks to its radiation hardness and cost effectiveness. The edgeless technology would allow for enlarging the area instrumented with pixel detectors. We report on the development of novel n-on-p edgeless planar pixel sensors fabricated at FBK (Trento, Italy), making use of the active edge concept for the reduction of the dead area at the periphery of the device. After discussing the sensor technology and fabrication process, we present device simulations (pre- and post-irradiation) performed for different sensor configurations. First preliminary results obtained with the test-structures of the production are shown.

  12. Development of Kilo-Pixel Arrays of Transition-Edge Sensors for X-Ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. S.; Bandler, S. R.; Busch, S. E.; Chervenak, J. A.; Chiao, M. P.; Eckart, M. E.; Ewin, A. J.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kelly, D. P.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Leutenegger, M. A.; Porst, J.-P.; Porter, F. S.; Ray, C. A.; Sadleir, J. E.; Smith, S. J.; Wassell, E. J.; Doriese, W. B.; Fowler, J. W.; Hilton, G. C.; Irwin, K. D.; Reintsema, C. D.; Smith, D. R.; Swetz, D. S.

    2012-01-01

    We are developing kilo-pixel arrays of transition-edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeters for future X-ray astronomy observatories or for use in laboratory astrophysics applications. For example, Athena/XMS (currently under study by the european space agency) would require a close-packed 32x32 pixel array on a 250-micron pitch with < 3.0 eV full-width-half-maximum energy resolution at 6 keV and at count-rates of up to 50 counts/pixel/second. We present characterization of 32x32 arrays. These detectors will be readout using state of the art SQUID based time-domain multiplexing (TDM). We will also present the latest results in integrating these detectors and the TDM readout technology into a 16 row x N column field-able instrument.

  13. The INFN-FBK pixel R&D program for HL-LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meschini, M.; Dalla Betta, G. F.; Boscardin, M.; Calderini, G.; Darbo, G.; Giacomini, G.; Messineo, A.; Ronchin, S.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the ATLAS and CMS joint research activity, which is aiming at the development of new, thin silicon pixel detectors for the Large Hadron Collider Phase-2 detector upgrades. This R&D is performed under special agreement between Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and FBK foundation (Trento, Italy). New generations of 3D and planar pixel sensors with active edges are being developed in the R&D project, and will be fabricated at FBK. A first planar pixel batch, which was produced by the end of year 2014, will be described in this paper. First clean room measurement results on planar sensors obtained before and after neutron irradiation will be presented.

  14. Performance Characteristics of Pixelated CZT Crystals used on the GammaTracker Project

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Eric M.; Seifert, Carolyn E.; Myjak, Mitchell J.; Erikson, Luke E.; Morris, Scott J.; Balvage, Duane R.; Lundy, Richard P.

    2011-08-21

    GammaTracker is a handheld radioisotope identification device in development at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory that uses eighteen pixelated Cadmium-Zinc Telluride (CZT) crystals to provide energy resolution approaching that of high-purity germanium without the need for cryogenic cooling. Additionally, these crystals can be used to provide directional and imaging capabilities that cannot be found in other handheld detectors. A significant number of CZT crystals have been procured during the development of the GammaTracker system; the majority of these were procured with the same set of specifications. Each of these detectors has been characterized in terms of key parameters, including current-voltage response and pixel-by-pixel energy resolution. The results of this testing indicate that the overall quality of CZT crystals is improving over time.

  15. Development of a Micro Pixel Chamber for the ATLAS Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochi, Atsuhiko; Homma, Yasuhiro; Komai, Hidetoshi; Edo, Yuki; Yamaguchi, Takahiro

    The Micro Pixel Chamber(μ-PIC)isbeingdevelopedasacandidateforthe muonsystemoftheATLAS detectorfor upgrading in LHC experiments. The μ-PICisa micro-patterngaseous detector that doesn'thave floating structure such as wires, mesh, or foil. This detector can be made by printed-circuit-board (PCB) technology, which is commercially available and suited for mass production. Operation tests have been performed under high flux neutrons under similar conditions to theATLAS cavern. Spark rates are measured using severalgas mixtures under7MeV neutron irradiation, andgoodpropertieswereobservedusingneon,ethane,andCF4mixtureofgases.Usingresistivematerialsas electrodes, we are also developing a new μ-PIC, which is not expected to damage the electrodes in the case of discharge sparks.

  16. High density pixel array and laser micro-milling method for fabricating array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiener-Avnear, Eliezer (Inventor); McFall, James Earl (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A pixel array device is fabricated by a laser micro-milling method under strict process control conditions. The device has an array of pixels bonded together with an adhesive filling the grooves between adjacent pixels. The array is fabricated by moving a substrate relative to a laser beam of predetermined intensity at a controlled, constant velocity along a predetermined path defining a set of grooves between adjacent pixels so that a predetermined laser flux per unit area is applied to the material, and repeating the movement for a plurality of passes of the laser beam until the grooves are ablated to a desired depth. The substrate is of an ultrasonic transducer material in one example for fabrication of a 2D ultrasonic phase array transducer. A substrate of phosphor material is used to fabricate an X-ray focal plane array detector.

  17. Infrared astronomy - Pixels to spare

    SciTech Connect

    Mccaughrean, M. )

    1991-07-01

    An infrared CCD camera containing an array with 311,040 pixels arranged in 486 rows of 640 each is tested. The array is a chip of platinum silicide (PtSi), sensitive to photons with wavelengths between 1 and 6 microns. Observations of the Hubble Space Telescope, Mars, Pluto and moon are reported. It is noted that the satellite's twin solar-cell arrays, at an apparent separation of about 1 1/4 arc second, are well resolved. Some two dozen video frames were stacked to make each presented image of Mars at 1.6 microns; at this wavelength Mars appears much as it does in visible light. A stack of 11 images at a wavelength of 1.6 microns is used for an image of Jupiter with its Great Red Spot and moons Io and Europa.

  18. Dead pixel replacement in LWIR microgrid polarimeters.

    PubMed

    Ratliff, Bradley M; Tyo, J Scott; Boger, James K; Black, Wiley T; Bowers, David L; Fetrow, Matthew P

    2007-06-11

    LWIR imaging arrays are often affected by nonresponsive pixels, or "dead pixels." These dead pixels can severely degrade the quality of imagery and often have to be replaced before subsequent image processing and display of the imagery data. For LWIR arrays that are integrated with arrays of micropolarizers, the problem of dead pixels is amplified. Conventional dead pixel replacement (DPR) strategies cannot be employed since neighboring pixels are of different polarizations. In this paper we present two DPR schemes. The first is a modified nearest-neighbor replacement method. The second is a method based on redundancy in the polarization measurements.We find that the redundancy-based DPR scheme provides an order-of-magnitude better performance for typical LWIR polarimetric data.

  19. Equivalence of a Bit Pixel Image to a Quantum Pixel Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Laurel Carlos; Dong, Shi-Hai; Cruz-Irisson, M.

    2015-11-01

    We propose a new method to transform a pixel image to the corresponding quantum-pixel using a qubit per pixel to represent each pixels classical weight in a quantum image matrix weight. All qubits are linear superposition, changing the coefficients level by level to the entire longitude of the gray scale with respect to the base states of the qubit. Classically, these states are just bytes represented in a binary matrix, having code combinations of 1 or 0 at all pixel locations. This method introduces a qubit-pixel image representation of images captured by classical optoelectronic methods. Supported partially by the project 20150964-SIP-IPN, Mexico

  20. Method for fabricating pixelated silicon device cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nielson, Gregory N.; Okandan, Murat; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Nelson, Jeffrey S.; Anderson, Benjamin John

    2015-08-18

    A method, apparatus and system for flexible, ultra-thin, and high efficiency pixelated silicon or other semiconductor photovoltaic solar cell array fabrication is disclosed. A structure and method of creation for a pixelated silicon or other semiconductor photovoltaic solar cell array with interconnects is described using a manufacturing method that is simplified compared to previous versions of pixelated silicon photovoltaic cells that require more microfabrication steps.

  1. Position-sensitive superconductor detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurakado, M.; Taniguchi, K.

    2016-12-01

    Superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) detectors and superconducting transition- edge sensors (TESs) are representative superconductor detectors having energy resolutions much higher than those of semiconductor detectors. STJ detectors are thin, thereby making it suitable for detecting low-energy X rays. The signals of STJ detectors are more than 100 times faster than those of TESs. By contrast, TESs are microcalorimeters that measure the radiation energy from the change in the temperature. Therefore, signals are slow and their time constants are typically several hundreds of μs. However, TESs possess excellent energy resolutions. For example, TESs have a resolution of 1.6 eV for 5.9-keV X rays. An array of STJs or TESs can be used as a pixel detector. Superconducting series-junction detectors (SSJDs) comprise multiple STJs and a single-crystal substrate that acts as a radiation absorber. SSJDs are also position sensitive, and their energy resolutions are higher than those of semiconductor detectors. In this paper, we give an overview of position-sensitive superconductor detectors.

  2. The MUSE instrument detector system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, Roland; Deiries, Sebastian; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Rupprecht, Gero

    2012-09-01

    The MUSE (Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer) instrument (see Bacon et al., this conference) for ESO's Very Large Telescope VLT employs 24 integral field units (spectrographs). Each of these is equipped with its own cryogenically cooled CCD head. The heads are individually cooled by continuous flow cryostats. The detectors used are deep depletion e2v CCD231-84 with 4096x4112 active 15 μm pixels. The MUSE Instrument Detector System is now in the final integration and test phase on the instrument. This paper gives an overview of the architecture and performance of the complex detector system including ESO's New General detector Controllers (NGC) for the 24 science detectors, the detector head electronics and the data acquisition system with Linux Local Control Units. NGC is sub-divided into 4 Detector Front End units each operating 6 CCDs. All CCDs are simultaneously read out through 4 ports to achieve short readout times at low noise levels. All science grade CCDs were thoroughly characterized on ESO's optical detectors testbench facility and the test results processed and documented in a semi-automated, reproducible way. We present the test methodology and the results that fully confirm the feasibility of these detectors for their use in this challenging instrument.

  3. Implementation of TDI based digital pixel ROIC with 15μm pixel pitch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceylan, Omer; Shafique, Atia; Burak, A.; Caliskan, Can; Abbasi, Shahbaz; Yazici, Melik; Gurbuz, Yasar

    2016-05-01

    A 15um pixel pitch digital pixel for LWIR time delay integration (TDI) applications is implemented which occupies one fourth of pixel area compared to previous digital TDI implementation. TDI is implemented on 8 pixels with oversampling rate of 2. ROIC provides 16 bits output with 8 bits of MSB and 8 bits of LSB. Pixel can store 75 M electrons with a quantization noise of 500 electrons. Digital pixel TDI implementation is advantageous over analog counterparts considering power consumption, chip area and signal-to-noise ratio. Digital pixel TDI ROIC is fabricated with 0.18um CMOS process. In digital pixel TDI implementation photocurrent is integrated on a capacitor in pixel and converted to digital data in pixel. This digital data triggers the summation counters which implements TDI addition. After all pixels in a row contribute, the summed data is divided to the number of TDI pixels(N) to have the actual output which is square root of N improved version of a single pixel output in terms of signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR).

  4. A CMOS Active Pixel Sensor for Charged Particle Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Matis, Howard S.; Bieser, Fred; Kleinfelder, Stuart; Rai, Gulshan; Retiere, Fabrice; Ritter, Hans George; Singh, Kunal; Wurzel, Samuel E.; Wieman, Howard; Yamamoto, Eugene

    2002-12-02

    Active Pixel Sensor (APS) technology has shown promise for next-generation vertex detectors. This paper discusses the design and testing of two generations of APS chips. Both are arrays of 128 by 128 pixels, each 20 by 20 {micro}m. Each array is divided into sub-arrays in which different sensor structures (4 in the first version and 16 in the second) and/or readout circuits are employed. Measurements of several of these structures under Fe{sup 55} exposure are reported. The sensors have also been irradiated by 55 MeV protons to test for radiation damage. The radiation increased the noise and reduced the signal. The noise can be explained by shot noise from the increased leakage current and the reduction in signal is due to charge being trapped in the epi layer. Nevertheless, the radiation effect is small for the expected exposures at RHIC and RHIC II. Finally, we describe our concept for mechanically supporting a thin silicon wafer in an actual detector.

  5. Chronopixels: particle detector R&D for the ATLAS phase 2 upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Christian; Baker, Keith; Barker, Thomas; Baltay, Charles; Sinev, Nikolai; Brau, Jim; Strom, David; Atlas Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The pixel detector comprises the innermost part of the ATLAS detector. Its proximity to the interaction point together with its micrometer resolution allow for impact parameter determination and vertex fitting. This proximity however exposes it also to the highest radiation fluences and particle densities. The latter poses a challenge in inferring particle tracks from hit pixels, while the former leads to progressive radiation damage of the pixel detector itself. These problems will worsen after the LHC's third long shutdown in 2025 when it will operate in high luminosity mode at about five times the current instantaneous luminosity. These conditions will require the pixel detector to be replaced by one staffed with pixel modules capable of enduring the harsher radiation environment, and with finer granularity to cope with the increased pileup. Several efforts in the community are on their way to produce such a pixel module. We are presenting here the current status of our R&D on such a pixel module: The Chronopixel for ATLAS phase 2, a fully monolithic active pixel sensor in CMOS technology. Sensing and readout electronics are included in each pixel here. As such it does not require expensive and labor intensive bump-bonding to a separate readout chip, reducing cost and material in the pixel detector. We gratefully acknowledge support by the Department of Energy, Office of High Energy Physics.

  6. Development of pixel sensors with 25 × 500 μm2 pitch for the ATLAS HL-LHC upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdin, S.; Casse, G.; Dervan, P.; Forshaw, D.; Hayward, H.; Tsurin, I.; Wormald, M.

    2014-11-01

    Upgrade of the ATLAS tracker detector for high-luminosity LHC conditions requires novel approaches to the pixel sensor design. Tests of different pitch layouts represent significant part of the ATLAS upgrade program. Better momentum resolution and multiple track reconstruction in the r - ϕ plane could be achieved with finer ϕ-segmentation. Changing the pitch from 50 × 250 μm2 to 25 × 500 μm2 in the outer pixel modules would improve the tracking performance of the upgraded ATLAS detector. The pixel sensors with 25 × 500 μm2 readout by FE-I4 chips have been designed at the University of Liverpool. The sensors were measured in the laboratory and test-beam. Results of these tests will be presented together with geometry characteristics of other novel pixel layouts, compatible with the FE-I4 floor-plan, which have been designed and produced.

  7. Integration and testing of the DAQ system for the CMS Phase 1 pixel upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akgün, B.

    2017-02-01

    The CMS pixel detector phase 1 upgrade in 2017 requires an upgraded data acquisition (DAQ) system to accept higher data rates. A new DAQ system has been developed based on a combination of custom and standard μTCA parts. Custom mezzanines on FC7 AMCs [1] provide a front-end driver for readout, and a front-end controller for configuration, clock and trigger. The DAQ system is undergoing a series of integration tests including readout of the pilot pixel detector already installed in CMS, checkout of the phase 1 detector during its assembly, and testing with the CMS central DAQ. This paper describes the DAQ system, integration tests and results, and an outline of the activities up to commissioning the final system at CMS in 2017.

  8. Integrated Dual Imaging Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, David M.

    1999-01-01

    A new type of image detector was designed to simultaneously analyze the polarization of light at all picture elements in a scene. The integrated Dual Imaging detector (IDID) consists of a lenslet array and a polarizing beamsplitter bonded to a commercial charge coupled device (CCD). The IDID simplifies the design and operation of solar vector magnetographs and the imaging polarimeters and spectroscopic imagers used, for example, in atmosphere and solar research. When used in a solar telescope, the vector magnetic fields on the solar surface. Other applications include environmental monitoring, robot vision, and medical diagnoses (through the eye). Innovations in the IDID include (1) two interleaved imaging arrays (one for each polarization plane); (2) large dynamic range (well depth of 10(exp 5) electrons per pixel); (3) simultaneous readout and display of both images; and (4) laptop computer signal processing to produce polarization maps in field situations.

  9. High throughput optoelectronic smart pixel systems using diffractive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chih-Hao

    1999-12-01

    Recent developments in digital video, multimedia technology and data networks have greatly increased the demand for high bandwidth communication channels and high throughput data processing. Electronics is particularly suited for switching, amplification and logic functions, while optics is more suitable for interconnections and communications with lower energy and crosstalk. In this research, we present the design, testing, integration and demonstration of several optoelectronic smart pixel devices and system architectures. These systems integrate electronic switching/processing capability with parallel optical interconnections to provide high throughput network communication and pipeline data processing. The Smart Pixel Array Cellular Logic processor (SPARCL) is designed in 0.8 m m CMOS and hybrid integrated with Multiple-Quantum-Well (MQW) devices for pipeline image processing. The Smart Pixel Network Interface (SAPIENT) is designed in 0.6 m m GaAs and monolithically integrated with LEDs to implement a highly parallel optical interconnection network. The Translucent Smart Pixel Array (TRANSPAR) design is implemented in two different versions. The first version, TRANSPAR-MQW, is designed in 0.5 m m CMOS and flip-chip integrated with MQW devices to provide 2-D pipeline processing and translucent networking using the Carrier- Sense-MultipleAccess/Collision-Detection (CSMA/CD) protocol. The other version, TRANSPAR-VM, is designed in 1.2 m m CMOS and discretely integrated with VCSEL-MSM (Vertical-Cavity-Surface- Emitting-Laser and Metal-Semiconductor-Metal detectors) chips and driver/receiver chips on a printed circuit board. The TRANSPAR-VM provides an option of using the token ring network protocol in addition to the embedded functions of TRANSPAR-MQW. These optoelectronic smart pixel systems also require micro-optics devices to provide high resolution, high quality optical interconnections and external source arrays. In this research, we describe an innovative

  10. Improvement in the energy resolving capabilities of photon counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, D.; Lim, K. T.; Park, K.; Cho, G.

    2016-12-01

    Patterned pixel array was proposed to increase the number of energy bins in a single pixel of photon counting detectors without adding more comparators and counters. The pixels were grouped into four different types and each pixel has a common threshold and a specific threshold assigned to each pixel type. The common threshold in every pixel records the total number of incident photons regardless of its pixel type and the specific thresholds classify incident photon energies. The patterned pixel array was evaluated with the pinhole gamma camera system based on the XRI-UNO detector flip-chip bonded with a 1mm thick CdTe sensor. The experimental data was acquired with time-over-threshold mode to avoid the charge sharing problem. The shared total charges created by one photon can be found by summing all pixels within the cluster. To correct the different response to the same energy of photon, the energy calibration of the time-over-threshold value was perfomed independently depending on the cluster size. The time-over-threshold values were separated into two energy bins since we assumed that each pixel has two thresholds. Although each pixel has only two thresholds, five images from different energy windows were obtained by sharing the spectal information from four adjacent pixels. Thus, degradation of the spatial resolution in the image occured in each energy window. The image of the entire energy, however, was not degraded since all four different types of pixels have a common threshold just above the noise level. In addition, the number of steps for the threshold scan method can be drastically reduced with the increased number of effective thresholds in a single pixel.

  11. Hardware solutions for the 65k pixel X-ray camera module of 75 μm pixel size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasinski, K.; Maj, P.; Grybos, P.; Koziol, A.

    2016-02-01

    We present three hardware solutions designed for a detector module built with a 2 cm × 2 cm hybrid pixel detector built from a single 320 or 450 μ m thick silicon sensor designed and fabricated by Hamamatsu and two UFXC32k readout integrated circuits (128 × 256 pixels with 75μ m pitch, designed in CMOS 130 nm at AGH-UST). The chips work in a single photon counting mode and provide ultra-fast X-ray imaging. The presented hardware modules are designed according to requirements of various tests and applications: ṡDevice A: a fast and flexible system for tests with various radiation sources. ṡDevice B: a standalone, all-in-one imaging device providing three standard interfaces (USB 2.0, Ethernet, Camera Link) and up to 640 MB/s bandwidth. ṡDevice C: a prototype large-area imaging system. The paper shows the readout system structure for each case with highlighted circuit board designs with details on power distribution and cooling on both FR4 and LTCC (low temperature co-fired ceramic) based circuits.

  12. HST/WFC3 Characteristics: gain, post-flash stability, UVIS low-sensitivity pixels, persistence, IR flats and bad pixel table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunning, Heather C.; Baggett, Sylvia; Gosmeyer, Catherine M.; Long, Knox S.; Ryan, Russell E.; MacKenty, John W.; Durbin, Meredith

    2015-08-01

    The Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) is a fourth-generation imaging instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Installed in May 2009, WFC3 is comprised of two observational channels covering wavelengths from UV/Visible (UVIS) to infrared (IR); both have been performing well on-orbit. We discuss the gain stability of both WFC3 channel detectors from ground testing through present day. For UVIS, we detail a low-sensitivity pixel population that evolves during the time between anneals, but is largely reset by the annealing procedure. We characterize the post-flash LED lamp stability, used and recommended to mitigate CTE effects for observations with less than 12e-/pixel backgrounds. We present mitigation options for IR persistence during and after observations. Finally, we give an overview on the construction of the IR flats and provide updates on the bad pixel table.

  13. Development of n-in-p pixel modules for the ATLAS upgrade at HL-LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macchiolo, A.; Nisius, R.; Savic, N.; Terzo, S.

    2016-09-01

    Thin planar pixel modules are promising candidates to instrument the inner layers of the new ATLAS pixel detector for HL-LHC, thanks to the reduced contribution to the material budget and their high charge collection efficiency after irradiation. 100-200 μm thick sensors, interconnected to FE-I4 read-out chips, have been characterized with radioactive sources and beam tests at the CERN-SPS and DESY. The results of these measurements are reported for devices before and after irradiation up to a fluence of 14 ×1015 neq /cm2 . The charge collection and tracking efficiency of the different sensor thicknesses are compared. The outlook for future planar pixel sensor production is discussed, with a focus on sensor design with the pixel pitches (50×50 and 25×100 μm2) foreseen for the RD53 Collaboration read-out chip in 65 nm CMOS technology. An optimization of the biasing structures in the pixel cells is required to avoid the hit efficiency loss presently observed in the punch-through region after irradiation. For this purpose the performance of different layouts have been compared in FE-I4 compatible sensors at various fluence levels by using beam test data. Highly segmented sensors will represent a challenge for the tracking in the forward region of the pixel system at HL-LHC. In order to reproduce the performance of 50×50 μm2 pixels at high pseudo-rapidity values, FE-I4 compatible planar pixel sensors have been studied before and after irradiation in beam tests at high incidence angle (80°) with respect to the short pixel direction. Results on cluster shapes, charge collection and hit efficiency will be shown.

  14. Novel silicon n-in-p pixel sensors for the future ATLAS upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Rosa, A.; Gallrapp, C.; Macchiolo, A.; Nisius, R.; Pernegger, H.; Richter, R. H.; Weigell, P.

    2013-08-01

    In view of the LHC upgrade phases towards HL-LHC the ATLAS experiment plans to upgrade the inner detector with an all silicon system. The n-in-p silicon technology is a promising candidate for the pixel upgrade thanks to its radiation hardness and cost effectiveness that allow for enlarging the area instrumented with pixel detectors. We present the characterization and performance of novel n-in-p planar pixel sensors produced by CiS (Germany) connected by bump bonding to the ATLAS readout chip FE-I3. These results are obtained before and after irradiation up to a fluence of 10161-MeV neq cm-2, and prove the operability of this kind of sensors in the harsh radiation environment foreseen for the pixel system at HL-LHC. We also present an overview of the new pixel production, which is on-going at CiS for sensors compatible with the new ATLAS readout chip FE-I4.

  15. High stroke pixel for a deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Robin R.; Papavasiliou, Alexandros P.

    2005-09-20

    A mirror pixel that can be fabricated using standard MEMS methods for a deformable mirror. The pixel is electrostatically actuated and is capable of the high deflections needed for spaced-based mirror applications. In one embodiment, the mirror comprises three layers, a top or mirror layer, a middle layer which consists of flexures, and a comb drive layer, with the flexures of the middle layer attached to the mirror layer and to the comb drive layer. The comb drives are attached to a frame via spring flexures. A number of these mirror pixels can be used to construct a large mirror assembly. The actuator for the mirror pixel may be configured as a crenellated beam with one end fixedly secured, or configured as a scissor jack. The mirror pixels may be used in various applications requiring high stroke adaptive optics.

  16. A pixel ionization chamber used as beam monitor at the Institut Curie—Centre de Protontherapie de Orsay (CPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Rosa, A.; Garella, M. A.; Bourhaleb, F.; Cirio, R.; Donetti, M.; Giordanengo, S.; Givehchi, N.; Marchetto, F.; Martin, F.; Meyroneinc, S.; Peroni, C.; Pittà, G.

    2006-09-01

    The Dipartimento di Fisica Sperimentale and the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Torino, in collaboration with the Institut Curie—Centre de Protontherapie de Orsay (CPO), have developed and built a pixel parallel plate ionization chamber to be used as monitor for the proton therapy beam line at the Institut Curie—CPO (Orsay, France). The sensitive area of the detector is (160×160) mm 2, with the anode segmented in 1024 square pixels arranged in a 32×32 matrix; the area of each pixel is (5×5) mm 2. The detector has been placed on the beam line just upstream of the last collimator to monitor the beam shape and to measure the stability and reproducibility of the delivery system. In this paper, we present a detailed description of the detector and the results of a set of preliminary tests.

  17. Near infrared detectors for SNAP

    SciTech Connect

    Schubnell, M.; Barron, N.; Bebek, C.; Brown, M.G.; Borysow, M.; Cole, D.; Figer, D.; Lorenzon, W.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Seshadri, S.; Smith, R.; Tarle, G.

    2006-05-23

    Large format (1k x 1k and 2k x 2k) near infrared detectors manufactured by Rockwell Scientific Center and Raytheon Vision Systems are characterized as part of the near infrared R&D effort for SNAP (the Super-Nova/Acceleration Probe). These are hybridized HgCdTe focal plane arrays with a sharp high wavelength cut-off at 1.7 um. This cut-off provides a sufficiently deep reach in redshift while it allows at the same time low dark current operation of the passively cooled detectors at 140 K. Here the baseline SNAP near infrared system is briefly described and the science driven requirements for the near infrared detectors are summarized. A few results obtained during the testing of engineering grade near infrared devices procured for the SNAP project are highlighted. In particular some recent measurements that target correlated noise between adjacent detector pixels due to capacitive coupling and the response uniformity within individual detector pixels are discussed.

  18. Simulations of planar pixel sensors for the ATLAS high luminosity upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderini, G.; Benoit, M.; Dinu, N.; Lounis, A.; Marchiori, G.

    2011-04-01

    A physics-based device simulation was used to study the charge carrier distribution and the electric field configuration inside simplified two-dimensional models for pixel layouts based on the ATLAS pixel sensor. In order to study the behavior of such detectors under different levels of irradiation, a three-level defect model was implemented into the simulation. Using these models, the number of guard rings, the dead edge width and the detector thickness were modified to investigate their influence on the detector depletion at the edge and on its internal electric field distribution in order to optimize the layout parameters. Simulations indicate that the number of guard rings can be reduced by a few hundred microns with respect to the layout used for the present ATLAS sensors, with a corresponding extension of the active area of the sensors. A study of the inter-pixel capacitance and of the capacitance between the implants and the high-voltage contact as a function of several parameters affecting the geometry and the doping level of the implants was also carried out. The results are needed in order to evaluate the noise and the cross-talk among neighboring pixels when connected t