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Sample records for pkc inhibitor calphostin

  1. Design, Synthesis, and Investigation of Protein Kinase C Inhibitors: Total Syntheses of (+)-Calphostin D, (+)- Phleichrome, Cercosporin and New Photoactive Perylenequinones

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Barbara J.; Dey, Sangeeta; Johnson, Steven W.; Kozlowski, Marisa C.

    2010-01-01

    The total syntheses of the PKC inhibitors (+)-calphostin D, (+)-phleichrome, cercosporin, and 10 novel perylenequinones are detailed. The highly convergent and flexible strategy developed employed an enantioselective oxidative biaryl coupling and a double cuprate epoxide opening, allowing the selective syntheses of all the possible stereoisomers in pure form. In addition, this strategy permitted rapid access to a broad range of analogs, including those not accessible from the natural products. These compounds provided a powerful means for evaluation of the perylenequinones structural features necessary to PKC activity. Simpler analogs were discovered with superior PKC inhibitory properties and superior photopotentiation in cancer cell lines relative to the more complex natural products. PMID:19489582

  2. A novel PKCinhibitor abrogates cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Prajit; Desai, Shraddha; Patel, Rekha; Sajan, Mini; Farese, Robert; Ostrov, David; Acevedo-Duncan, Mildred

    2011-05-01

    Protein Kinase C-iota (PKC-ι), an atypical protein kinase C isoform manifests its potential as an oncogene by targeting various aspects of cancer cells such as growth, invasion and survival. PKC-ι confers resistance to drug-induced apoptosis in cancer cells. The acquisition of drug resistance is a major obstacle to good prognosis in neuroblastoma. The focus of this research was to identify the efficacy of [4-(5-amino-4-carbamoylimidazol-1-yl)-2,3-dihydroxycyclopentyl] methyl dihydrogen phosphate (ICA-1) as a novel PKCinhibitor in neuroblastoma cell proliferation and apoptosis. ICA-1 specifically inhibits the activity of PKC-ι but not that of PKC-zeta (PKC-ζ), the closely related atypical PKC family member. The IC(50) for the kinase activity assay was approximately 0.1μM which is 1000 times less than that of aurothiomalate, a known PKCinhibitor. Cyclin dependent kinase 7 (Cdk7) phosphorylates cyclin dependent kinases (cdks) and promotes cell proliferation. Our data shows that PKC-ι is an in vitro Cdk7 kinase and the phosphorylation of Cdk7 by PKC-ι was potently inhibited by ICA-1. Furthermore, our data shows that neuroblastoma cells proliferate via a PKC-ι/Cdk7/cdk2 cell signaling pathway and ICA-1 mediates its antiproliferative effects by inhibiting this pathway. ICA-1 (0.1μM) inhibited the in vitro proliferation of BE(2)-C neuroblastoma cells by 58% (P=0.01). Additionally, ICA-1 also induced apoptosis in neuroblastoma cells. Interestingly, ICA-1 did not affect the proliferation of normal neuronal cells suggesting its potential as chemotherapeutic with low toxicity. Hence, our results emphasize the potential of ICA-1 as a novel PKCinhibitor and chemotherapeutic agent for neuroblastoma.

  3. PKC/MEK inhibitors suppress oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy and potentiate the antitumor effects.

    PubMed

    Tsubaki, Masanobu; Takeda, Tomoya; Tani, Tadahumi; Shimaoka, Hirotaka; Suzuyama, Naohiro; Sakamoto, Kotaro; Fujita, Arisa; Ogawa, Naoki; Itoh, Tatsuki; Imano, Motohiro; Funakami, Yoshinori; Ichida, Seiji; Satou, Takao; Nishida, Shozo

    2015-07-01

    Oxaliplatin is a key drug commonly used in colorectal cancer treatment. Despite high clinical efficacy, its therapeutic application is limited by common, dose-limiting occurrence of neuropathy. As usual symptomatic neuropathy treatments fail to improve the patients' condition, there is an urgent need to advance our understanding of the pathogenesis of neuropathy to propose effective therapy and ensure adequate pain management. Oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy was recently reported to be associated with protein kinase C (PKC) activation. It is unclear, however, whether PKC inhibition can prevent neuropathy. In our current studies, we found that a PKC inhibitor, tamoxifen, inhibited oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy via the PKC/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/c-Fos pathway in lumbar spinal cords (lumbar segments 4-6). Additionally, tamoxifen was shown to act in synergy with oxaliplatin to inhibit growth in tumor cells-implanted mice. Moreover, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) 1/2 inhibitor, PD0325901, suppressed oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy and enhanced oxaliplatin efficacy. Our results indicate that oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy is associated with PKC/ERK/c-Fos pathway in lumbar spinal cord. Additionally, we demonstrate that disruption of this pathway by PKC and MEK inhibitors suppresses oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy, thereby suggesting that PKC and MEK inhibitors may be therapeutically useful in preventing oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy and could aid in combination antitumor pharmacotherapy.

  4. NOVEL ATYPICAL PKC INHIBITORS PREVENT VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTOR-INDUCED BLOOD-RETINAL BARRIER DYSFUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Titchenell, Paul M.; Lin, Cheng-Mao; Keil, Jason M.; Sundstrom, Jeffrey M.; Smith, Charles D.; Antonetti, David A.

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Pro-inflammatory cytokines and growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) contribute to the loss of the blood-retinal barrier (BRB) and subsequent macular edema in various retinal pathologies. VEGF signaling requires conventional PKC (PKCβ) activity; however, PKCβ inhibition only partially prevents VEGF-induced endothelial permeability and does not affect pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced permeability suggesting the involvement of alternative signaling pathways. Here, we provide evidence for the involvement of atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) signaling in VEGF-induced endothelial permeability and identify a novel class of inhibitors of aPKC that prevent BRB breakdown in vivo. Genetic and pharmacological manipulations of aPKC isoforms were used to assess their contribution to endothelial permeability in culture. A chemical library was screened using an in vitro kinase assay to identify novel small molecule inhibitors and further medicinal chemistry was performed to delineate a novel pharmacophore. We demonstrate that aPKC isoforms are both sufficient and required for VEGF-induced endothelial permeability. Furthermore, these specific, potent, non-competitive, small molecule inhibitors prevented VEGF-induced tight junction internalization and retinal endothelial permeability in response to VEGF in both primary culture and in rodent retina. These data suggest that aPKC inhibition with 2-amino-4-phenyl-thiophene derivatives may be developed to preserve the BRB in retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy or uveitis and the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in the presence of brain tumors. PMID:22721706

  5. Structural investigation of protein kinase C inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barak, D.; Shibata, M.; Rein, R.

    1991-01-01

    The phospholipid and Ca2+ dependent protein kinase (PKC) plays an essential role in a variety of cellular events. Inhibition of PKC was shown to arrest growth in tumor cell cultures making it a target for possible antitumor therapy. Calphostins are potent inhibitors of PKC with high affinity for the enzyme regulatory site. Structural characteristics of calphostins, which confer the inhibitory activity, are investigated by comparing their optimized structures with the existing models for PKC activation. The resulting model of inhibitory activity assumes interaction with two out of the three electrostatic interaction sites postulated for activators. The model shows two sites of hydrophobic interaction and enables the inhibitory activity of gossypol to be accounted for.

  6. PKC and PKA inhibitors reinstate morphine-induced behaviors in morphine tolerant mice.

    PubMed

    Smith, Forrest L; Javed, Ruby R; Smith, Paul A; Dewey, William L; Gabra, Bichoy H

    2006-12-01

    Male Swiss Webster mice exhibited antinociception, hypothermia and Straub tail 3h following a 75mg morphine pellet implantation. These signs disappeared by 72h, and the morphine-pelleted mice were indistinguishable from placebo-pelleted ones, although brain morphine concentrations ranged from 200 to 400ng/gm. We previously demonstrated that chemical inhibitors of protein kinase C (PKC) and A (PKA) are able to reverse morphine tolerance in acutely morphine-challenged mice. However, it was not known whether the reversal of tolerance was due to the interaction of kinase inhibitors with the morphine released from the pellet, the acutely injected morphine to challenge tolerant mice, or both. The present study aimed at determining the interaction between the PKC and PKA inhibitors and the morphine released "solely" from the pellet to reinstate the morphine-induced behavioral and physiological effects, 72h after implantation of morphine pellets. Placebo or 75mg morphine pellets were surgically implanted, and testing was conducted 72h later. Our results showed that the intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of the PKC inhibitors, bisindolylmaleimide I and Gö-6976 as well as the PKA inhibitors, 4-cyano-3-methylisoquinoline and KT-5720, restored the morphine-induced behaviors of antinociception, Straub tail and hypothermia in morphine-pelleted mice to the same extent observed 3h following the pellet implantation. The tail withdrawal and the hot plate reaction time expressed as percent maximum possible effect (%MPE) was increased to 80-100 and 41-90%, respectively, in PKC and PKA inhibitor-treated morphine tolerant mice compared to 2-10% in non-treated mice. Similarly, a significant hypothermia (1.3-4.0 degrees C decrease in body temperature) was detected in PKC and PKA inhibitor-treated morphine tolerant mice compared to an euthermic state in non-treated morphine tolerant mice. Finally, the Straub tail score was increased to 1.1-1.6 in PKC and PKA inhibitor

  7. Calphostin-C induction of vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis proceeds through phospholipase D and microtubule inhibition.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xi-Long; Gui, Yu; Du, Guangwei; Frohman, Michael A; Peng, Dao-Quan

    2004-02-20

    Calphostin-C, a protein kinase C inhibitor, induces apoptosis of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells. However, the mechanisms are not completely defined. Because apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells is critical in several proliferating vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and restenosis after angioplasty, we decided to investigate the mechanisms underlying the calphostin-C-induced apoptotic pathway. We show here that apoptosis is inhibited by the addition of exogenous phosphatidic acid, a metabolite of phospholipase D (PLD), and that calphostin-C inhibits completely the activities of both isoforms of PLD, PLD1 and PLD2. Overexpression of either PLD1 or PLD2 prevented the vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis induced by serum withdrawal but not the calphostin-C-elicited apoptosis. These data suggest that PLDs have anti-apoptotic effects and that complete inhibition of PLD activity by calphostin-C induces smooth muscle cell apoptosis. We also report that calphostin-C induced microtubule disruption and that the addition of exogenous phosphatidic acid inhibits calphostin-C effects on microtubules, suggesting a role for PLD in stabilizing the microtubule network. Overexpressing PLD2 in Chinese hamster ovary cells phenocopies this result, providing strong support for the hypothesis. Finally, taxol, a microtubule stabilizer, not only inhibited the calphostin-C-induced microtubule disruption but also inhibited apoptosis. We therefore conclude that calphostin-C induces apoptosis of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells through inhibiting PLD activity and subsequent microtubule polymerization. PMID:14660552

  8. Calphostin-C induction of vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis proceeds through phospholipase D and microtubule inhibition.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xi-Long; Gui, Yu; Du, Guangwei; Frohman, Michael A; Peng, Dao-Quan

    2004-02-20

    Calphostin-C, a protein kinase C inhibitor, induces apoptosis of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells. However, the mechanisms are not completely defined. Because apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells is critical in several proliferating vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and restenosis after angioplasty, we decided to investigate the mechanisms underlying the calphostin-C-induced apoptotic pathway. We show here that apoptosis is inhibited by the addition of exogenous phosphatidic acid, a metabolite of phospholipase D (PLD), and that calphostin-C inhibits completely the activities of both isoforms of PLD, PLD1 and PLD2. Overexpression of either PLD1 or PLD2 prevented the vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis induced by serum withdrawal but not the calphostin-C-elicited apoptosis. These data suggest that PLDs have anti-apoptotic effects and that complete inhibition of PLD activity by calphostin-C induces smooth muscle cell apoptosis. We also report that calphostin-C induced microtubule disruption and that the addition of exogenous phosphatidic acid inhibits calphostin-C effects on microtubules, suggesting a role for PLD in stabilizing the microtubule network. Overexpressing PLD2 in Chinese hamster ovary cells phenocopies this result, providing strong support for the hypothesis. Finally, taxol, a microtubule stabilizer, not only inhibited the calphostin-C-induced microtubule disruption but also inhibited apoptosis. We therefore conclude that calphostin-C induces apoptosis of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells through inhibiting PLD activity and subsequent microtubule polymerization.

  9. ETV6-NTRK3 as a therapeutic target of small molecule inhibitor PKC412

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, Hoang Thanh; Ly, Bui Thi Kim; Kano, Yasuhiko; Tojo, Arinobu; Sato, Yuko

    2012-12-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ETV6-NTRK3 is an oncogene with transformation activity in multiple cell lineages. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PKC412 could block ETV6-NTRK3 activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Loss of ETV6-NTRK3 phosphorylation leads to inactivation of its downstream signaling pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of ETV6-NTRK3 activation by PKC412 could be a novel strategy for the treatment. -- Abstract: The ETV6-NTRK3 (EN) fusion gene which encodes a chimeric tyrosine kinase was first identified by cloning of the t(12;15)(p13;q25) translocation in congenital fibrosarcoma (CFS). Since then, EN has been also found in congenital mesoblastic nephroma (CMN), secretory breast carcinoma (SBC) and acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Using IMS-M2 and M0-91 cell lines harboring the EN fusion gene, and Ba/F3 cells stably transfected with EN, we demonstrated that PKC412, also known as midostaurin, is an inhibitor of EN. Inhibition of EN activity by PKC412 suppressed the activity of it downstream molecules leading to inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis. Our data for the first time suggested that PKC412 could serve as therapeutic drug for treatment of patients with this fusion.

  10. Protein Kinase C (PKC)ζ Pseudosubstrate Inhibitor Peptide Promiscuously Binds PKC Family Isoforms and Disrupts Conventional PKC Targeting and Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Bogard, Amy S.

    2015-01-01

    PKMζ is generated via an alternative transcriptional start site in the atypical protein kinase C (PKC)ζ isoform, which removes N-terminal regulatory elements, including the inhibitory pseudosubstrate domain, consequently rendering the kinase constitutively active. Persistent PKMζ activity has been proposed as a molecular mechanism for the long-term maintenance of synaptic plasticity underlying some forms of memory. Many studies supporting a role for PKMζ in synaptic plasticity and memory have relied on the PKCζ pseudosubstrate-derived ζ-inhibitory peptide (ZIP). However, recent studies have demonstrated that ZIP-induced impairments to synaptic plasticity and memory occur even in the absence of PKCζ, suggesting that ZIP exerts its actions via additional cellular targets. In this study, we demonstrated that ZIP interacts with conventional and novel PKC, in addition to atypical PKC isoforms. Moreover, when brain abundance of each PKC isoform and affinity for ZIP are taken into account, the signaling capacity of ZIP-responsive pools of conventional and novel PKCs may match or exceed that for atypical PKCs. Pseudosubstrate-derived peptides, like ZIP, are thought to exert their cellular action primarily by inhibiting PKC catalytic activity; however, the ZIP-sensitive catalytic core of PKC is known to participate in the enzyme’s subcellular targeting, suggesting an additional mode of ZIP action. Indeed, we have demonstrated that ZIP potently disrupts PKCα interaction with the PKC-targeting protein A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) 79 and interferes with ionomycin-induced translocation of conventional PKC to the plasma membrane. Thus, ZIP exhibits broad-spectrum action toward the PKC family of enzymes, and this action may contribute to its unique ability to impair memory. PMID:26199377

  11. Role of PKC and RhoA/ROCK pathways in the spontaneous phasic activity in the rectal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jagmohan; Rattan, Satish

    2013-04-15

    The role of PKC and RhoA/ROCK pathways in the phasic activities in the rectal smooth muscles (RSM) in the basal state is not known. We examined this issue by determining the effects of PKC inhibitors (calphostin C and Gö-6850) and a ROCK inhibitor (Y-27632) on the slow-rate (~3/min) and fast-rate (~25/min) phasic activities. We also examined the corresponding signal transduction cascades and the PKC and ROCK enzymatic activities in the RSM in the basal state. PKC inhibition with calphostin C and Gö-6850 (10(-5) M) caused a significant decrease (~25%) in slow-rate (but not fast-rate) phasic activity (monitored by frequency and amplitude of contractions) of the RSM. Conversely, ROCK inhibition with Y-27632 (10(-5) M) caused a significant decrease not only in slow-rate, but also fast-rate, phasic activity caused by ROCK inhibition in the RSM. Western blot analysis revealed that the PKC inhibition-induced decrease in RSM phasic activity was associated with decreases in PKCα translocation, phosphorylated (Thr(38)) PKC-potentiated inhibitor (CPI-17), and phosphorylated (Thr(18)/Ser(19)) 20-kDa myosin regulatory light chain. Conversely, decreases in the phasic activity in the RSM by ROCK inhibition were accompanied by the additional decrease in phosphorylated (Thr(696)) myosin phosphatase target subunit 1. Data show that while PKC and RhoA/ROCK pathways play a significant role in slow-rate high-amplitude spontaneous phasic activity, only the RhoA/ROCK pathway primarily mediates fast-rate low-amplitude phasic activity, in the RSM. Such knowledge is important in the understanding of the pathophysiology of large intestinal motility disorders. Relative contributions of the PKC vs. the RhoA/ROCK pathway in the phasic activity remain to be determined.

  12. Effect of rottlerin, a PKC-{delta} inhibitor, on TLR-4-dependent activation of murine microglia

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dong-Chan; Kim, Sun-Hee; Jeong, Min-Woo; Baek, Nam-in; Kim, Kyong-Tai . E-mail: ktk@postech.ac.kr

    2005-11-11

    In microglia, Toll-like receptors have been shown to recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns and initiate innate immune responses upon interaction with infectious agents. The effect of rottlerin, a PKC-{delta} specific inhibitor, on TLR-4-mediated signaling was investigated in murine microglia stimulated with lipopolysaccharide and taxol. Pretreatment of microglia cells with rottlerin decreased LPS- and taxol-induced nitric oxide production in a concentration-dependent manner (IC{sub 50} = 99.1 {+-} 1.5 nM). Through MTT and FACS analysis, we found that the inhibition effect of rottlerin was not due to microglial cell death. Rottlerin pretreatment also attenuated LPS-induced phosphorylation of I{kappa}B-{alpha}, nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B, and expression of type II nitric oxide synthase. In addition, microglial phagocytosis in response to TLR-4 activation was diminished in which rottlerin was pretreated. Together, these data raise the possibility that certain PKC-{delta} specific inhibitors can modulate TLR-4-derived signaling and inflammatory target gene expression, and can alter susceptibility to microbial infection and chronic inflammatory diseases in central nervous system.

  13. Comparison of ability of protein kinase C inhibitors to arrest cell growth and to alter cellular protein kinase C localisation.

    PubMed Central

    Courage, C.; Budworth, J.; Gescher, A.

    1995-01-01

    Inhibitors of protein kinase C (PKC) such as the staurosporine analogues UCN-01 and CGP 41251 possess antineoplastic properties, but the mechanism of their cytostatic action is not understood. We tested the hypothesis that the ability of these compounds to arrest growth is intrinsically linked with their propensity to inhibit PKC. Compounds with varying degrees of potency and specificity for PKC were investigated in A549 and MCF-7 carcinoma cells. When the log values of drug concentration which arrested cell growth by 50% (IC50) were plotted against the logs of the IC50 values for inhibition of cytosolic PKC activity, two groups of compound could be distinguished. The group which comprised the more potent inhibitors of enzyme activity (calphostin C, staurosporine and its analogues UCN-01, RO 31-8220, CGP 41251) were the stronger growth inhibitors, whereas the weaker enzyme inhibitors (trimethylsphingosine, miltefosine, NPC-15437, H-7, H-7I) affected proliferation less potently. GF 109203X was exceptional in that it inhibited PKC with an IC50 in the 10(-8) M range, yet was only weakly cytostatic. To substantiate the role of PKC in the growth inhibition caused by these agents, cells were depleted of PKC by incubation with bryostatin 1 (1 microM). The susceptibility of these enzyme-depleted cells towards growth arrest induced by staurosporine, RO 31-8220, UCN-01 or H-7 was studied. The drug concentrations which inhibited incorporation of [3H]thymidine into PKC-depleted A549 cells by 50% were slightly, but not significantly, lower than significantly, lower than those observed in control cells. These results suggest that PKC is unlikely to play a direct role in the arrest of the growth of A549 and MCF-7 cells mediated by these agents. Staurosporine is not only a strong inhibitor of PKC but also mimics activators of this enzyme in that it elicits the cellular redistribution of certain PKC isoenzymes. The ability of kinase inhibitors other than staurosporine to exert a

  14. Leishmania amazonensis: heme stimulates (Na(+)+K(+))ATPase activity via phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C/protein kinase C-like (PI-PLC/PKC) signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Almeida-Amaral, Elmo Eduardo; Cardoso, Viviane Carrozino; Francioli, Fernanda Gomes; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto

    2010-04-01

    In the present paper we studied the involvement of the phosphatidylinositol-specific PLC (PI-PLC)/protein kinase C (PKC) pathway in (Na(+)+K(+))ATPase stimulation by heme in Leishmania amazonensis promastigotes. Heme stimulated the PKC-like activity with a concentration of 50nM. Interestingly, the maximal stimulation of the PKC-like activity promoted by phorbol ester was of the same magnitude promoted by heme. However, the stimulatory effect of heme is completely abolished by ET-18-OCH(3) and U73122, specific inhibitors of PI-PLC. (Na(+)+K(+))ATPase activity is increased in the presence of increased concentrations of heme, being maximally affected at 50nM. This effect was completely reversed by 10nM calphostin C, an inhibitor of PKC. Thus, the effect of 50nM heme on (Na(+)+K(+))ATPase activity is completely abolished by ET-18-OCH(3) and U73122. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the heme receptor mediates the stimulatory effect of heme on the (Na(+)+K(+))ATPase activity through a PI-PLC/PKC signaling pathway. PMID:20045694

  15. Neuropeptide Y inhibits ciliary beat frequency in human ciliated cells via nPKC, independently of PKA.

    PubMed

    Wong, L B; Park, C L; Yeates, D B

    1998-08-01

    The intracellular mechanisms whereby the inhibitory neurotransmitter neuropeptide Y (NPY) decreases ciliary beat frequency (CBF) were investigated in cultured human tracheal and bronchial ciliated cells. CBF was measured by nonstationary analysis laser light scattering. NPY at 1 and 10 microM decreased CBF from a baseline of 6.7 +/- 0.5 (n = 12) to 6.1 +/- 0.5 (P < 0.05) and 5.8 +/- 0.4 (P < 0.01) Hz, respectively. Prior application of PYX-1, an NPY antagonist, prevented the decreases of CBF induced by both doses of NPY. Two broad protein kinase C (PKC) kinase inhibitors, staurosporine and calphostin C, also abolished the NPY-induced decrease in CBF. The NPY-induced decrease in CBF was abolished by GF 109203X, a novel PKC (nPKC) isoform inhibitor, whereas this decrease in CBF was not attenuated by Gö-6976, a specific inhibitor of conventional PKC isoforms. Because pretreatment with NPY did not block the stimulation of CBF by forskolin and pretreatment with forskolin did not abolish the NPY-induced inhibition of CBF, this NPY receptor-mediated signal transduction mechanism appears to be independent of the adenylate cyclase-protein kinase A (PKA) pathway. Inhibition of Ca2+-ATPase by thapsigargin also prevented the suppression of CBF induced by subsequent application of NPY. These novel data indicate that, in cultured human epithelia, NPY decreases CBF below its basal level via the activation of an nPKC isoform and Ca2+-ATPase, independent of the activity of PKA. This is consistent with the proposition that NPY is an autonomic efferent inhibitory neurotransmitter regulating mucociliary transport. PMID:9688598

  16. Verrucotoxin inhibits KATP channels in cardiac myocytes through a muscarinic M3 receptor-PKC pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Wu; Yazawa, Kazuto; Hao, Li-Ying; Onoue, Yoshio; Kameyama, Masaki

    2007-06-01

    Verrucotoxin is the major component of venom from the stonefish (Synanceia verrucosa). Stings from the dorsal spines of the stonefish produce intensive pain, convulsions, hypotension, paralysis, respiratory weakness and collapse of the cardiovascular system, occasionally leading to death. It has been reported that verrucotoxin might modulate ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) current in frog atrial fibers. However, the mechanism by which verrucotoxin acts on KATP current remains unclear. In this study, we examined whether verrucotoxin inhibited KATP current in guinea pig ventricular myocytes, using the patch clamp method. Verrucotoxin suppressed KATP current induced by pinacidil (KATP channel opener) in a concentration-dependent manner, with a half maximum concentration of 16.3 microg/ml. The effect of verrucotoxin on KATP current was suppressed by atropine (1 microM), a muscarinic receptor antagonist, or by 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine (100 nM), a muscarinic M3 receptor antagonist. Furthermore, the effect of verrucotoxin on KATP current was attenuated by the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor chelerythrine (10 microM) and calphostin C (10 microM), yet not by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) inhibitor H-89 (0.5 microM). These results suggest that verrucotoxin inhibits KATP current through the muscarinic M3 receptor-PKC pathway. These findings enhance our understanding of the toxic effects of verrucotoxin from the stonefish. PMID:17362922

  17. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Enhance the Apoptotic Activity of Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein-3 by Blocking PKC-Induced IGFBP-3 Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Seung Hyun; Whang, Young Mi; Min, Hye-Young; Han, Seung Ho; Kang, Ju-Hee; Song, Ki-Hoon; Glisson, Bonnie S.; Kim, Yeul Hong; Lee, Ho-Young

    2012-01-01

    Overexpression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-3 induces apoptosis of cancer cells. However, preexisting resistance to IGFBP-3 could limit its antitumor activities. This study characterizes the efficacy and mechanism of the combination of recombinant IGFBP-3 (rIGFBP-3) and HDAC inhibitors to overcome IGFBP-3 resistance in a subset of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells. The effects of the combination of rIGFBP-3 and a number of HDAC inhibitors on cell proliferation and apoptosis were assessed in vitro and in vivo by using the MTT assay, a flow cytometry-based TUNEL assay, western blot analyses, and the NSCLC xenograft tumor model. Combined treatment with HDAC inhibitors and rIGFBP-3 had synergistic antiproliferative effects accompanied by increased apoptosis rates in a subset of NSCLC and HNSCC cell lines in vitro. Moreover, combined treatment with depsipeptide and rIGFBP-3 completely suppressed tumor growth and increased the apoptosis rate in vivo in H1299 NSCLC xenografts. Evidence suggests that HDAC inhibitors increased the half-life of rIGFBP-3 protein by blocking protein kinase C (PKC)-mediated phosphorylation and degradation of rIGFBP-3. In addition, combined treatment of IGFBP-3 with an HDAC inhibitor facilitates apoptosis through up-regulation of rIGFBP-3 stability and Akt signaling inhibition. The ability of HDAC inhibitors to decrease PKC activation may enhance apoptotic activities of rIGFBP-3 in NSCLC cells in vitro and in vivo. These results indicated that combined treatment with HDAC inhibitor and rIGFBP-3 could be an effective treatment strategy for NSCLC and HNSCC with highly activated PKC. PMID:22362554

  18. Suppression of the invasive potential of Glioblastoma cells by mTOR inhibitors involves modulation of NFκB and PKC-α signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chandrika, Goparaju; Natesh, Kumar; Ranade, Deepak; Chugh, Ashish; Shastry, Padma

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive type of brain tumors in adults with survival period <1.5 years of patients. The role of mTOR pathway is documented in invasion and migration, the features associated with aggressive phenotype in human GBM. However, most of the preclinical and clinical studies with mTOR inhibitors are focused on antiproliferative and cytotoxic activity in GBM. In this study, we demonstrate that mTOR inhibitors-rapamycin (RAP), temisirolimus (TEM), torin-1 (TOR) and PP242 suppress invasion and migration induced by Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNFα) and tumor promoter, Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and also reduce the expression of the TNFα and IL1β suggesting their potential to regulate factors in microenvironment that support tumor progression. The mTOR inhibitors significantly decreased MMP-2 and MMP-9 mRNA, protein and activity that was enhanced by TNFα and PMA. The effect was mediated through reduction of Protein kinase C alpha (PKC-α) activity and downregulation of NFκB. TNFα- induced transcripts of NFκB targets -VEGF, pentraxin-3, cathepsin-B and paxillin, crucial in invasion were restored to basal level by these inhibitors. With limited therapeutic interventions currently available for GBM, our findings are significant and suggest that mTOR inhibitors may be explored as anti-invasive drugs for GBM treatment. PMID:26940200

  19. Suppression of the invasive potential of Glioblastoma cells by mTOR inhibitors involves modulation of NFκB and PKC-α signaling.

    PubMed

    Chandrika, Goparaju; Natesh, Kumar; Ranade, Deepak; Chugh, Ashish; Shastry, Padma

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive type of brain tumors in adults with survival period <1.5 years of patients. The role of mTOR pathway is documented in invasion and migration, the features associated with aggressive phenotype in human GBM. However, most of the preclinical and clinical studies with mTOR inhibitors are focused on antiproliferative and cytotoxic activity in GBM. In this study, we demonstrate that mTOR inhibitors-rapamycin (RAP), temisirolimus (TEM), torin-1 (TOR) and PP242 suppress invasion and migration induced by Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNFα) and tumor promoter, Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and also reduce the expression of the TNFα and IL1β suggesting their potential to regulate factors in microenvironment that support tumor progression. The mTOR inhibitors significantly decreased MMP-2 and MMP-9 mRNA, protein and activity that was enhanced by TNFα and PMA. The effect was mediated through reduction of Protein kinase C alpha (PKC-α) activity and downregulation of NFκB. TNFα- induced transcripts of NFκB targets -VEGF, pentraxin-3, cathepsin-B and paxillin, crucial in invasion were restored to basal level by these inhibitors. With limited therapeutic interventions currently available for GBM, our findings are significant and suggest that mTOR inhibitors may be explored as anti-invasive drugs for GBM treatment. PMID:26940200

  20. A novel mouse PKC{delta} splice variant, PKC{delta}IX, inhibits etoposide-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jung D.; Seo, Kwang W.; Lee, Eun A.; Quang, Nguyen N.; Cho, Hong R.; Kwon, Byungsuk

    2011-07-01

    Highlights: {yields} A novel PKC{delta} isoform, named PKC{delta}IX, that lacks the C1 domain and the ATP-binding site is ubiquitously expressed. {yields} PKC{delta}IX inhibits etoposide-induced apoptosis. {yields} PKC{delta}IX may function as an endogenous dominant negative isoform for PKC{delta}. -- Abstract: Protein kinase C (PKC) {delta} plays an important role in cellular proliferation and apoptosis. The catalytic fragment of PKC{delta} generated by caspase-dependent cleavage is essential for the initiation of etoposide-induced apoptosis. In this study, we identified a novel mouse PKC{delta} isoform named PKC{delta}IX (Genebank Accession No. (HQ840432)). PKC{delta}IX is generated by alternative splicing and is ubiquitously expressed, as seen in its full-length PKC{delta}. PKC{delta}IX lacks the C1 domain, the caspase 3 cleavage site, and the ATP binding site but preserves an almost intact c-terminal catalytic domain and a nuclear localization signal (NLS). The structural characteristics of PKC{delta}IX provided a possibility that this PKC{delta} isozyme functions as a novel dominant-negative form for PKC{delta} due to its lack of the ATP-binding domain that is required for the kinase activity of PKC{delta}. Indeed, overexpression of PKC{delta}IX significantly inhibited etoposide-induced apoptosis in NIH3T3 cells. In addition, an in vitro kinase assay showed that recombinant PKC{delta}IX protein could competitively inhibit the kinase activity of PKC{delta}. We conclude that PKC{delta}IX can function as a natural dominant-negative inhibitor of PKC{delta}in vivo.

  1. 2-(6-Phenyl-1H-indazol-3-yl)-1H-benzo[d]imidazoles: Design and synthesis of a potent and isoform selective PKC-[zeta] inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Trujillo, John I.; Kiefer, James R.; Huang, Wei; Thorarensen, Atli; Xing, Li; Caspers, Nicole L.; Day, Jacqueline E.; Mathis, Karl J.; Kretzmer, Kuniko K.; Reitz, Beverley A.; Weinberg, Robin A.; Stegeman, Roderick A.; Wrightstone, Ann; Christine, Lori; Compton, Robert; Li, Xiong

    2009-03-16

    The inhibition of PKC-{zeta} has been proposed to be a potential drug target for immune and inflammatory diseases. A series of 2-(6-phenyl-1H indazol-3-yl)-1H-benzo[d]imidazoles with initial high crossover to CDK-2 has been optimized to afford potent and selective inhibitors of protein kinase c-zeta (PKC-{zeta}). The determination of the crystal structures of key inhibitor:CDK-2 complexes informed the design and analysis of the series. The most selective and potent analog was identified by variation of the aryl substituent at the 6-position of the indazole template to give a 4-NH{sub 2} derivative. The analog displays good selectivity over other PKC isoforms ({alpha}, {beta}II, {gamma}, {delta}, {epsilon}, {mu}, {theta}, {eta} and {ell}/{lambda}) and CDK-2, however it displays marginal selectivity against a panel of other kinases (37 profiled).

  2. Involvement of HDAC1 and the PI3K/PKC signaling pathways in NF-{kappa}B activation by the HDAC inhibitor apicidin

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yong Kee . E-mail: yksnbk@kwandong.ac.kr; Seo, Dong-Wan; Kang, Dong-Won; Lee, Hoi Young; Han, Jeung-Whan; Kim, Su-Nam . E-mail: snkim@kist.re.kr

    2006-09-08

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are appreciated as one of promising anticancer drugs, but they exert differential responses depending on the cell type. We recently reported the critical role of NF-{kappa}B as a modulator in determining cell fate for apoptosis in response to an HDAC inhibitor. In this study, we investigate a possible signaling pathway required for NF-{kappa}B activation in response to the HDAC inhibitor apicidin. Treatment of HeLa cells with apicidin leads to an increase in transcriptional activity of NF-{kappa}B and the expression of its target genes, IL-8 and TNF-{alpha}. TNF-{alpha} expression by apicidin is induced at earlier time points than NF-{kappa}B activation or IL-8 expression. In addition, our data show that the early expression of TNF-{alpha} does not lead to activation of NF-{kappa}B, because disruption of TNF-{alpha} activity by a neutralizing antibody does not affect nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B, I{kappa}B{alpha} degradation or reporter gene activation by apicidin. However, this activation of NF-{kappa}B requires the PI3K and PKC signaling pathways, but not ERK or JNK. Furthermore, apicidin activation of NF-{kappa}B seems to result from HDAC1 inhibition, as evidenced by the observation that overexpression of HDAC1, but not HDAC2, 3 or 4, dramatically inhibits NF-{kappa}B reporter gene activity. Collectively, our results suggest that activation of NF-{kappa}B signaling by apicidin requires both the PI3K/PKC signaling pathways and HDAC1, and functions as a critical modulator in determining the cellular effect of apicidin.

  3. PARP-inhibitor treatment prevents hypertension induced cardiac remodeling by favorable modulation of heat shock proteins, Akt-1/GSK-3β and several PKC isoforms.

    PubMed

    Deres, Laszlo; Bartha, Eva; Palfi, Anita; Eros, Krisztian; Riba, Adam; Lantos, Janos; Kalai, Tamas; Hideg, Kalman; Sumegi, Balazs; Gallyas, Ferenc; Toth, Kalman; Halmosi, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) is a suitable model for studies of the complications of hypertension. It is known that activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase enzyme (PARP) plays an important role in the development of postinfarction as well as long-term hypertension induced heart failure. In this study, we examined whether PARP-inhibitor (L-2286) treatment could prevent the development of hypertensive cardiopathy in SHRs. 6-week-old SHR animals were treated with L-2286 (SHR-L group) or placebo (SHR-C group) for 24 weeks. Wistar-Kyoto rats were used as aged-matched, normotensive controls (WKY group). Echocardiography was performed, brain-derived natriuretic peptide (BNP) activity and blood pressure were determined at the end of the study. We detected the extent of fibrotic areas. The amount of heat-shock proteins (Hsps) and the phosphorylation state of Akt-1(Ser473), glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β(Ser9), forkhead transcription factor (FKHR)(Ser256), mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and protein kinase C (PKC) isoenzymes were monitored. The elevated blood pressure in SHRs was not influenced by PARP-inhibitor treatment. Systolic left ventricular function and BNP activity did not differ among the three groups. L-2286 treatment decreased the marked left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy which was developed in SHRs. Interstitial collagen deposition was also decreased by L-2286 treatment. The phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2(Thr183-Tyr185), Akt-1(Ser473), GSK-3β(Ser9), FKHR(Ser256), and PKC ε(Ser729) and the level of Hsp90 were increased, while the activity of PKC α/βII(Thr638/641), ζ/λ(410/403) were mitigated by L-2286 administration. We could detect signs of LV hypertrophy without congestive heart failure in SHR groups. This alteration was prevented by PARP inhibition. Our results suggest that PARP-inhibitor treatment has protective effect already in the early stage of hypertensive myocardial remodeling. PMID

  4. Inhibition of protein kinase C by calphostin C is light-dependent

    SciTech Connect

    Bruns, R.F.; Miller, F.D.; Merriman, R.L.; Howbert, J.J.; Heath, W.F.; Kobayashi, E.; Takahashi, I.; Tamaoki, T.; Nakano, H. )

    1991-04-15

    Calphostin C, a secondary metabolite of the fungus Cladosporium cladosporioides, inhibits protein kinase C by competing at the binding site for diacylglycerol and phorbol esters. Calphostin C is a polycyclic hydrocarbon with strong absorbance in the visible and ultraviolet ranges. In characterizing the activity of this compound, we unexpectedly found that the inhibition of ({sup 3}H)phorbol dibutyrate binding was dependent on exposure to light. Ordinary fluorescent light was sufficient for full activation. The inhibition of protein kinase C activity in cell-free systems and intact cells also required light. Light-dependent cytotoxicity was seen at concentrations about 5-fold higher than those inhibiting protein kinase C.

  5. Protein Kinase C (PKC) Activity Regulates Functional Effects of Kvβ1.3 Subunit on KV1.5 Channels

    PubMed Central

    David, Miren; Macías, Álvaro; Moreno, Cristina; Prieto, Ángela; Martínez-Mármol, Ramón; Vicente, Rubén; González, Teresa; Felipe, Antonio; Tamkun, Michael M.; Valenzuela, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Kv1.5 channels are the primary channels contributing to the ultrarapid outward potassium current (IKur). The regulatory Kvβ1.3 subunit converts Kv1.5 channels from delayed rectifiers with a modest degree of slow inactivation to channels with both fast and slow inactivation components. Previous studies have shown that inhibition of PKC with calphostin C abolishes the fast inactivation induced by Kvβ1.3. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon using electrophysiological, biochemical, and confocal microscopy approaches. To achieve this, we used HEK293 cells (which lack Kvβ subunits) transiently cotransfected with Kv1.5+Kvβ1.3 and also rat ventricular and atrial tissue to study native α-β subunit interactions. Immunocytochemistry assays demonstrated that these channel subunits colocalize in control conditions and after calphostin C treatment. Moreover, coimmunoprecipitation studies showed that Kv1.5 and Kvβ1.3 remain associated after PKC inhibition. After knocking down all PKC isoforms by siRNA or inhibiting PKC with calphostin C, Kvβ1.3-induced fast inactivation at +60 mV was abolished. However, depolarization to +100 mV revealed Kvβ1.3-induced inactivation, indicating that PKC inhibition causes a dramatic positive shift of the inactivation curve. Our results demonstrate that calphostin C-mediated abolishment of fast inactivation is not due to the dissociation of Kv1.5 and Kvβ1.3. Finally, immunoprecipitation and immunocytochemistry experiments revealed an association between Kv1.5, Kvβ1.3, the receptor for activated C kinase (RACK1), PKCβI, PKCβII, and PKCθ in HEK293 cells. A very similar Kv1.5 channelosome was found in rat ventricular tissue but not in atrial tissue. PMID:22547057

  6. “Slow” Voltage-Dependent Inactivation of CaV2.2 Calcium Channels Is Modulated by the PKC Activator Phorbol 12-Myristate 13-Acetate (PMA)

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lei; McDavid, Sarah; Currie, Kevin P. M.

    2015-01-01

    CaV2.2 (N-type) voltage-gated calcium channels (Ca2+ channels) play key roles in neurons and neuroendocrine cells including the control of cellular excitability, neurotransmitter / hormone secretion, and gene expression. Calcium entry is precisely controlled by channel gating properties including multiple forms of inactivation. “Fast” voltage-dependent inactivation is relatively well-characterized and occurs over the tens-to- hundreds of milliseconds timeframe. Superimposed on this is the molecularly distinct, but poorly understood process of “slow” voltage-dependent inactivation, which develops / recovers over seconds-to-minutes. Protein kinases can modulate “slow” inactivation of sodium channels, but little is known about if/how second messengers control “slow” inactivation of Ca2+ channels. We investigated this using recombinant CaV2.2 channels expressed in HEK293 cells and native CaV2 channels endogenously expressed in adrenal chromaffin cells. The PKC activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) dramatically prolonged recovery from “slow” inactivation, but an inactive control (4α-PMA) had no effect. This effect of PMA was prevented by calphostin C, which targets the C1-domain on PKC, but only partially reduced by inhibitors that target the catalytic domain of PKC. The subtype of the channel β-subunit altered the kinetics of inactivation but not the magnitude of slowing produced by PMA. Intracellular GDP-β-S reduced the effect of PMA suggesting a role for G proteins in modulating “slow” inactivation. We postulate that the kinetics of recovery from “slow” inactivation could provide a molecular memory of recent cellular activity and help control CaV2 channel availability, electrical excitability, and neurotransmission in the seconds-to-minutes timeframe. PMID:26222492

  7. ATP competitive protein kinase C inhibitors demonstrate distinct state-dependent inhibition.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ida M; Hoshi, Naoto

    2011-01-01

    We previously reported that some ATP competitive protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors are either competitive or uncompetitive inhibitors with respect to substrate peptides. In this report, we demonstrate how the interactions between PKC and inhibitors change PKC activation kinetics. A substrate competitive inhibitor, bisindolylmaleimide I, targets activated PKC and stabilizes PKC in the activated conformation. This leads to transient activation and prolonged deactivation of PKC in the presence of bisindolylmaleimide I. In contrast, an uncompetitive substrate inhibitor, bisindolylmaleimide IV, targets quiescent PKC and stabilizes PKC in the quiescent conformation, which generates slower activation and suppressed translocation upon activation of PKC.

  8. Dexmedetomidine-Induced Contraction in the Isolated Endothelium-Denuded Rat Aorta Involves PKC-δ-mediated JNK Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jongsun; Ok, Seong-Ho; Kim, Won Ho; Cho, Hyunhoo; Park, Jungchul; Shin, Il-Woo; Lee, Heon Keun; Chung, Young-Kyun; Choi, Mun-Jeoung; Kwon, Seong-Chun; Sohn, Ju-Tae

    2015-01-01

    Vasoconstriction mediated by the highly selective alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonist dexmedetomidine leads to transiently increased blood pressure and severe hypertension. The dexmedetomidine-induced contraction involves the protein kinase C (PKC)-mediated pathway. However, the main PKC isoform involved in the dexmedetomidine-induced contraction remains unknown. The goal of this in vitro study was to examine the specific PKC isoform that contributes to the dexmedetomidine-induced contraction in the isolated rat aorta. The endothelium-denuded rat aorta was suspended for isometric tension recording. Dexmedetomidine dose-response curves were generated in the presence or absence of the following inhibitors: the pan-PKC inhibitor, chelerythrine; the PKC-α and -β inhibitor, Go6976; the PKCinhibitor, safingol; the PKCinhibitor, ruboxistaurin; the PKCinhibitor, rottlerin; the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor, SP600125; and the myosin light chain kinase inhibitor, ML-7 hydrochloride. Western blot analysis was used to examine the effect of rottlerin on dexmedetomidine-induced PKC-δ expression and JNK phosphorylation in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and to investigate the effect of dexmedetomidine on PKC-δ expression in VSMCs transfected with PKC-δ small interfering RNA (siRNA) or control siRNA. Chelerythrine as well as SP600125 and ML-7 hydrochloride attenuated the dexmedetomidine-induced contraction. Go6976, safingol, and ruboxistaurin had no effect on the dexmedetomidine-induced contraction, whereas rottlerin inhibited the dexmedetomidine-induced contraction. Dexmedetomidine induced PKC-δ expression, whereas rottlerin and PKC-δ siRNA transfection inhibited dexmedetomidine-induced PKC-δ expression. Dexmedetomidine also induced JNK phosphorylation, which was inhibited by rottlerin. Taken together, these results suggest that the dexmedetomidine-induced contraction involves PKC-δ-dependent JNK phosphorylation in the isolated rat aorta.

  9. PKA and PKC Are Required for Long-Term but Not Short-Term in Vivo Operant Memory in "Aplysia"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michel, Maximilian; Green, Charity L.; Lyons, Lisa C.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the involvement of PKA and PKC signaling in a negatively reinforced operant learning paradigm in "Aplysia", learning that food is inedible (LFI). In vivo injection of PKA or PKC inhibitors blocked long-term LFI memory formation. Moreover, a persistent phase of PKA activity, although not PKC activity, was necessary for long-term…

  10. The linoleic acid derivative DCP-LA selectively activates PKC-epsilon, possibly binding to the phosphatidylserine binding site.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Hideyuki; Yaguchi, Takahiro; Hi, Rika; Mukasa, Takeshi; Fujikawa, Hirokazu; Nagata, Tetsu; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Tanaka, Akito; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2006-06-01

    This study examined the effect of 8-[2-(2-pentyl-cyclopropylmethyl)-cyclopropyl]-octanoic acid (DCP-LA), a newly synthesized linoleic acid derivative with cyclopropane rings instead of cis-double bonds, on protein kinase C (PKC) activity. In the in situ PKC assay with reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, DCP-LA significantly activated PKC in PC-12 cells in a concentration-dependent (10 nM-100 microM) manner, with the maximal effect at 100 nM, and the DCP-LA effect was blocked by GF109203X, a PKC inhibitor, or a selective inhibitor peptide of the novel PKC isozyme PKC-epsilon. Furthermore, DCP-LA activated PKC in HEK-293 cells that was inhibited by the small, interfering RNA against PKC-epsilon. In the cell-free PKC assay, of the nine isozymes examined here, DCP-LA most strongly activated PKC-epsilon, with >7-fold potency over other PKC isozymes, in the absence of dioleoyl-phosphatidylserine and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycerol; instead, the DCP-LA action was inhibited by dioleoyl-phosphatidylserine. DCP-LA also activated PKC-gamma, a conventional PKC, but to a much lesser extent compared with that for PKC-epsilon, by a mechanism distinct from PKC-epsilon activation. Thus, DCP-LA serves as a selective activator of PKC-epsilon, possibly by binding to the phosphatidylserine binding site on PKC-epsilon. These results may provide fresh insight into lipid signaling in PKC activation.

  11. CCK causes PKD1 activation in pancreatic acini by signaling through PKC-δ and PKC-independent pathways

    PubMed Central

    Berna, Marc J.; Hoffmann, K. Martin; Tapia, Jose A.; Thill, Michelle; Pace, Andrea; Mantey, Samuel A.; Jensen, Robert T.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Protein kinase D1 (PKD1) is involved in cellular processes including protein secretion, proliferation and apoptosis. Studies suggest PKD1 is activated by various stimulants including gastrointestinal (GI) hormones/neurotransmitters and growth factors in a protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent pathway. However, little is known about the mechanisms of PKD1 activation in physiologic GI tissues. We explored PKD1 activation by GI hormones/neurotransmitters and growth factors and the mediators involved in rat pancreatic acini. Only hormones/neurotransmitters activating phospholipase C caused PKD1 phosphorylation (S916, S744/748). CCK activated PKD1 and caused a time- and dose-dependant increase in serine phosphorylation by activation of high- and low-affinity CCKA receptor states. Inhibition of CCK-stimulated increases in phospholipase C, PKC activity or intracellular calcium decreased PKD1 S916 phosphorylation by 56%, 62% and 96%, respectively. PKC inhibitors GF109203X/Go6976/Go6983/PKC-ζ pseudosubstrate caused a 62/43/49/0% inhibition of PKD1 S916 phosphorylation and an 87/13/82/0% inhibition of PKD1 S744/748 phosphorylation. Expression of dominant negative PKC-δ, but not PKC-ε, or treatment with PKC-δ translocation inhibitor caused marked inhibition of PKD phosphorylation. Inhibition of Src/PI3K/MAPK/tyrosine phosphorylation had no effect. In unstimulated cells, PKD1 was mostly located in the cytoplasm. CCK stimulated translocation of total and phosphorylated PKD1 to the membrane. These results demonstrate that CCKA receptor activation leads to PKD activation by signaling through PKC-dependent and PKC-independent pathways. PMID:17306383

  12. PKC signaling mediates global enhancement of excitatory synaptogenesis in neurons triggered by local contact with astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hama, Hiroshi; Hara, Chikako; Yamaguchi, Kazuhiko; Miyawaki, Atsushi

    2004-02-01

    Here we provide evidence that astrocytes affect neuronal synaptogenesis by the process of adhesion. Local contact with astrocytes via integrin receptors elicited protein kinase C (PKC) activation in individual dissociated neurons cultured in astrocyte-conditioned medium. This activation, initially focal, soon spread throughout the entire neuron. We then demonstrated pharmacologically that the arachidonic acid cascade, triggered by the integrin reception, is responsible for the global activation of PKC. Local astrocytic contact also facilitated excitatory synaptogenesis throughout the neuron, a process which could be blocked by inhibitors of both integrins and PKC. Thus, propagation of PKC signaling represents an underlying mechanism for global neuronal maturation following local astrocyte adhesion.

  13. A short peptide is a protein kinase C (PKC) alpha-specific substrate.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jeong-Hun; Asai, Daisuke; Yamada, Satoshi; Toita, Riki; Oishi, Jun; Mori, Takeshi; Niidome, Takuro; Katayama, Yoshiki

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to find protein kinase C (PKC) isozyme-specific peptides. A peptide library containing 1772 sequences was designed using Scansite and screened by MALDI-TOF MS and kinase activity assays for PKC isozyme-specificity. A peptide (Alphatomega; H-FKKQGSFAKKK-NH(2)) with high specificity for PKC alpha relative to other isozymes was identified. The peptide was phosphorylated to a greater extent by tissue lysates from B16 melanoma, HepG2, and human breast cancer, which had higher levels of activated PKC alpha, when compared to normal skin, liver, and human breast tissue lysates, respectively. Moreover, addition of Ro-31-7549, an inhibitor with great specificity for PKC alpha, to the phosphorylation reaction caused a dose-dependent reduction in phosphorylation, but no inhibition was identified with the addition of rottlerin and H-89. These results show that this peptide has great potential as a PKC alpha-specific substrate.

  14. SP6616 as a new Kv2.1 channel inhibitor efficiently promotes β-cell survival involving both PKC/Erk1/2 and CaM/PI3K/Akt signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, T T; Quan, L L; Chen, L P; Du, T; Sun, K X; Zhang, J C; Yu, L; Li, Y; Wan, P; Chen, L L; Jiang, B H; Hu, L H; Chen, J; Shen, X

    2016-01-01

    Kv2.1 as a voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel subunit has a pivotal role in the regulation of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) and pancreatic β-cell apoptosis, and is believed to be a promising target for anti-diabetic drug discovery, although the mechanism underlying the Kv2.1-mediated β-cell apoptosis is obscure. Here, the small molecular compound, ethyl 5-(3-ethoxy-4-methoxyphenyl)-2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylidene)-7-methyl-3-oxo-2,3-dihydro-5H-[1,3]thiazolo[3,2–a]pyrimidine-6-carboxylate (SP6616) was discovered to be a new Kv2.1 inhibitor. It was effective in both promoting GSIS and protecting β cells from apoptosis. Evaluation of SP6616 on either high-fat diet combined with streptozocin-induced type 2 diabetic mice or db/db mice further verified its efficacy in the amelioration of β-cell dysfunction and glucose homeostasis. SP6616 treatment efficiently increased serum insulin level, restored β-cell mass, decreased fasting blood glucose and glycated hemoglobin levels, and improved oral glucose tolerance. Mechanism study indicated that the promotion of SP6616 on β-cell survival was tightly linked to its regulation against both protein kinases C (PKC)/extracellular-regulated protein kinases 1/2 (Erk1/2) and calmodulin(CaM)/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase(PI3K)/serine/threonine-specific protein kinase (Akt) signaling pathways. To our knowledge, this may be the first report on the underlying pathway responsible for the Kv2.1-mediated β-cell protection. In addition, our study has also highlighted the potential of SP6616 in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:27148689

  15. Influence of protein kinase C (PKC) on the prognosis of diabetic nephropathy patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jie; Zhang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To investigate the association between protein kinase C (PKC) and the prognosis of patients with diabetic nephropathy (DN). Methods: 92 patients with DN who had received treatments with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) or angiotensin-receptor blockade (ARB) were collected. The clinicopathologic characteristics were recorded and a 4-year follow-up with the final result of impaired renal functions (eGFR < 40 mL/min) was conducted. The expression of PKC was detected by immunohistochemical assay. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analysis were performed to estimate the effects of PKC on DN prognosis. Results: According to immunohistochemical analysis, there were 54 cases with positive expression of PKC (positive rate 58.7%). Meanwhile, during the follow-up, the urine protein, mean serum creatinine and eGFR in patients with positive PKC were all higher than those in negative expression group (P < 0.05). The expression of PKC was influenced by age (P < 0.001), course of disease (P < 0.001), blood pressure (P = 0.002), blood glucose (P < 0.001), HbA1c (P = 0.002), renal functions of patients before (P = 0.011) and after (P = 0.041) the biopsy. Besides, the Kaplan-Meier curve revealed that patients with positive PKC expression had shorter survival time than those with negative PKC expression (P < 0.001). Cox regression analysis indicated that HbA1c (P = 0.009), renal functions of patients after the biopsy (P = 0.002) and PKC (P = 0.028) were important factors in the prognosis of DN and they might be independent prognostic markers. Conclusion: The expression of PKC is relatively higher in DN patients than in healthy controls. And PKC may be a valuable prognostic marker for patients with DN. PMID:26823823

  16. Role of Calcium and PKC in Salivary Mucous Cell Exocrine Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Culp, D.J.; Zhang, Z.; Evans, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    Fluid and exocrine secretion of mucins by salivary mucous glands is regulated predominantly by parasympathetic activation of muscarinic receptors. A direct role for subsequent putative signaling steps, phospholipase C (PLC), increased intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i), and isoforms of protein kinase C (PKC) in mediating muscarinic exocrine secretion has not been elucidated, and these are potential therapeutic targets to enhance mucin secretion in hyposalivary patients. We found that muscarinic-induced mucin secretion by rat sublingual tubulo-acini was dependent upon PLC activation and the subsequent increase in [Ca2+]i, and further identified a transient PKC-independent component of secretion dependent upon Ca2+ release from intracellular stores, whereas sustained secretion required entry of extracellular Ca2+. Interactions among carbachol, PKC inhibitors, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, and thapsigargin to modulate [Ca2+]i implicated conventional PKC isoforms in mediating sustained secretion. With increasing times during carbachol perfusion of glands, in situ, PKC-α redistributed across glandular membrane compartments and underwent a rapid and persistent accumulation near the luminal borders of mucous cells. PKC-β1 displayed transient localization near luminal borders, whereas the novel PKCs, PKC-δ or PKC-ϵ, displayed little or no redistribution in mucous cells. Collective results implicate synergistic interactions between diacylglycerol (DAG) and increasing [Ca2+]i levels to activate cPKCs in mediating sustained muscarinic-induced secretion. PMID:21933938

  17. Opposition between PKC isoforms regulates histone deimination and neutrophil extracellular chromatin release

    PubMed Central

    Neeli, Indira; Radic, Marko

    2013-01-01

    In response to inflammation, neutrophils deiminate histones and externalize chromatin. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are an innate immune defense mechanism, yet NETs also may aggravate chronic inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. Activation of peptidylarginine deiminase 4 (PAD4) is associated with NET release (NETosis) but the precise mechanisms of PAD4 regulation are unknown. We observed that, in human neutrophils, calcium ionophore induced histone deimination, whereas phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), an activator of protein kinase C (PKC), suppressed ionophore-induced deimination. Conversely, low doses of chelerythrine and sanguinarine, two inhibitors of PKC, reversed PMA inhibition and enhanced ionophore-stimulated deimination. In addition, a peptide inhibitor of PKCα superinduced ionophore activation of PAD4, thus identifying PKCα as the PMA-induced inhibitor of PAD4. At higher doses, chelerythrine, sanguinarine, and structurally unrelated PKC inhibitors blocked histone deimination, suggesting that a different PKC isoform activates histone deimination. We identify PKCζ as activator of PAD4 because a specific peptide inhibitor of this PKC isoform suppressed histone deimination. Confocal microscopy confirmed that, in the presence of PMA, NETosis proceeds without detectable histone deimination, and that ionophore cooperates with PMA to induce more extensive NET release. Broad inhibition of PKC by chelerythrine or specific inhibition of PKCζ suppressed NETosis. Our observations thus reveal an intricate antagonism between PKC isoforms in the regulation of histone deimination, identify a dominant role for PKCα in the repression of histone deimination, and assign essential functions to PKCζ in the activation of PAD4 and the execution of NETosis. The precise balance between opposing PKC isoforms in the regulation of NETosis affirms the idea that NET release underlies specific and vitally important evolutionary selection pressures. PMID:23430963

  18. Absence of catalytic domain in a putative protein kinase C (PkcA) suppresses tip dominance in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Wasima; Ray, Sibnath; Brazill, Derrick; Baskar, Ramamurthy

    2015-09-01

    A number of organisms possess several isoforms of protein kinase C but little is known about the significance of any specific isoform during embryogenesis and development. To address this we characterized a PKC ortholog (PkcA; DDB_G0288147) in Dictyostelium discoideum. pkcA expression switches from prestalk in mound to prespore in slug, indicating a dynamic expression pattern. Mutants lacking the catalytic domain of PkcA (pkcA(-)) did not exhibit tip dominance. A striking phenotype of pkcA- was the formation of an aggregate with a central hollow, and aggregates later fragmented to form small mounds, each becoming a fruiting body. Optical density wave patterns of cAMP in the late aggregates showed several cAMP wave generation centers. We attribute these defects in pkcA(-) to impaired cAMP signaling, altered cell motility and decreased expression of the cell adhesion molecules - CadA and CsaA. pkcA(-) slugs showed ectopic expression of ecmA in the prespore region. Further, the use of a PKC-specific inhibitor, GF109203X that inhibits the activity of catalytic domain phenocopied pkcA(-). PMID:26183108

  19. PKC{eta} confers protection against apoptosis by inhibiting the pro-apoptotic JNK activity in MCF-7 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rotem-Dai, Noa; Oberkovitz, Galia; Abu-Ghanem, Sara; Livneh, Etta

    2009-09-10

    Apoptosis is frequently regulated by different protein kinases including protein kinase C family enzymes. Both inhibitory and stimulatory effects were demonstrated for several of the different PKC isoforms. Here we show that the novel PKC isoform, PKC{eta}, confers protection against apoptosis induced by the DNA damaging agents, UVC irradiation and the anti-cancer drug - Camptothecin, of the breast epithelial adenocarcinoma MCF-7 cells. The induced expression of PKC{eta} in MCF-7 cells, under the control of the tetracycline-responsive promoter, resulted in increased cell survival and inhibition of cleavage of the apoptotic marker PARP-1. Activation of caspase-7 and 9 and the release of cytochrome c were also inhibited by the inducible expression of PKC{eta}. Furthermore, JNK activity, required for apoptosis in MCF-7, as indicated by the inhibition of both caspase-7 cleavage and cytochrome c release from the mitochondria in the presence of the JNK inhibitor SP600125, was also suppressed by PKC{eta} expression. Hence, in contrast to most PKC isoforms enhancing JNK activation, our studies show that PKC{eta} is an anti-apoptotic protein, acting as a negative regulator of JNK activity. Thus, PKC{eta} could represent a target for intervention aimed to reduce resistance to anti-cancer treatments.

  20. Protein kinase C (PKC) role in bovine oocyte maturation and early embryo development.

    PubMed

    Mondadori, R G; Neves, J P; Gonçalves, P B D

    2008-08-01

    The aims of the present study were to determine the role of protein kinase C (PKC) on meiotic resumption and its effects on pronuclear formation and cleavage in the bovine. Oocytes were matured in the presence of 0, 1, 10 and 100 nM of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), to evaluate the percentage of germinal vesicle breakdown. To study pronuclear formation and cleavage, oocytes were randomly distributed in four groups and matured in modified TCM-199 with LH and FSH (negative control); 10% of estrous cow serum (positive control); 100 nM of PMA (treatment); 100 nM of 4alpha-PDD (phorbol ester control). Oocytes were also matured in positive control medium, fertilized and transferred to KSOM with increasing concentrations of a PKC inhibitor. The protein profile and the presence of PKC at the end of maturation period were determined by SDS-PAGE followed by Silver Stain and Western blot, respectively. PMA stimulated meiotic resumption in a concentration-dependent manner. PKC stimulation during oocyte maturation caused an increase in pronuclear formation and did not cause parthenogenetic activation. Inhibitor of PKC (MyrPKC) inhibited cleavage in a dose-dependent and irreversible manner. A protein band around 74 kDa was not detected in PMA-treated oocytes and PKC was not detected by Western blot at the end of the maturation period. In conclusion, meiotic resumption was accelerated and the rate of oocytes with two pronuclei was increased when PKC was activated during oocyte maturation. Moreover, cleavage was inhibited in the presence of PMA. PMID:17646065

  1. McEliece PKC Calculator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marek, Repka

    2015-01-01

    The original McEliece PKC proposal is interesting thanks to its resistance against all known attacks, even using quantum cryptanalysis, in an IND-CCA2 secure conversion. Here we present a generic implementation of the original McEliece PKC proposal, which provides test vectors (for all important intermediate results), and also in which a measurement tool for side-channel analysis is employed. To our best knowledge, this is the first such an implementation. This Calculator is valuable in implementation optimization, in further McEliece/Niederreiter like PKCs properties investigations, and also in teaching. Thanks to that, one can, for example, examine side-channel vulnerability of a certain implementation, or one can find out and test particular parameters of the cryptosystem in order to make them appropriate for an efficient hardware implementation. This implementation is available [1] in executable binary format, and as a static C++ library, as well as in form of source codes, for Linux and Windows operating systems.

  2. The interrelation between aPKC and glucose uptake in the skeletal muscle during contraction and insulin stimulation.

    PubMed

    Santos, J M; Benite-Ribeiro, S A; Queiroz, G; Duarte, J A

    2014-12-01

    Contraction and insulin increase glucose uptake in skeletal muscle. While the insulin pathway, better characterized, requires activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and atypical protein kinase (aPKC), muscle contraction seems to share insulin-activated components to increase glucose uptake. This study aimed to investigate the interrelation between the pathway involved in glucose uptake evoked by insulin and muscle contraction. Isolated muscle of rats was treated with solvent (control), insulin, wortmannin (PI3K inhibitor) and the combination of insulin plus wortmannin. After treatment, muscles were electrically stimulated (contracted) or remained at rest. Glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) localization, glucose uptake and phospho-aPKC (aPKC activated form) were assessed. Muscle contraction and insulin increased glucose uptake in all conditions when compared with controls not stimulating an effect that was accompanied by an increase in GLUT4 and of phospho-aPKC at the muscle membrane. Contracted muscles treated with insulin did not show additive effects on glucose uptake or aPKC activity compared with the response when these stimuli were applied alone. Inhibition of PI3K blocked insulin effect on glucose uptake and aPKC but not in the contractile response. Thus, muscle contraction seems to stimulate aPKC and glucose uptake independently of PI3K. Therefore, aPKC may be a convergence point and a rate limit step in the pathway by which, insulin and contraction, increase glucose uptake in skeletal muscle.

  3. PKC412 (CGP41251) modulates the proliferation and lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses of RAW 264.7 macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Miyatake, Katsutoshi; Inoue, Hiroshi . E-mail: hinoue@genome.tokushima-u.ac.jp; Hashimoto, Kahoko; Takaku, Hiroshi; Takata, Yoichiro; Nakano, Shunji; Yasui, Natsuo; Itakura, Mitsuo

    2007-08-17

    PKC412 (CGP41251) is a multitarget protein kinase inhibitor with anti-tumor activities. Here, we investigated the effects of PKC412 on macrophages. PKC412 inhibited the proliferation of murine RAW 264.7 macrophages through induction of G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. At non-toxic drug concentrations, PKC412 significantly suppressed the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced release of TNF-{alpha} and nitric oxide, while instead enhancing IL-6 secretion. PKC412 attenuated LPS-induced phosphorylations of MKK4 and JNK, as well as AP-1 DNA binding activities. Furthermore, PKC412 suppressed LPS-induced Akt and GSK-3{beta} phosphorylations. These results suggest that the anti-proliferative and immunomodulatory effects of PKC412 are, at least in part, mediated through its interference with the MKK4/JNK/AP-1 and/or Akt/GSK-3{beta} pathways. Since macrophages contribute significantly to the development of both acute and chronic inflammation, PKC412 may have therapeutic potential and applications in treating inflammatory and/or autoimmune diseases.

  4. A cell-death-defying factor, anamorsin mediates cell growth through inactivation of PKC and p38MAPK

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Yuri; Shibayama, Hirohiko; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Tanimura, Akira; Kanakura, Yuzuru

    2011-02-11

    Research highlights: {yields} Anamorsin (AM) (also called CIAPIN-1) is a cell-death-defying factor. {yields} Biological mechanisms of AM functions have not been elucidated yet. {yields} PKC{theta} , PKC{delta} and p38MAPK were more phosphorylated in AM deficient MEF cells. {yields} AM may negatively regulates PKCs and p38MAPK in MEF cells. -- Abstract: Anamorsin (AM) plays crucial roles in hematopoiesis and embryogenesis. AM deficient (AM KO) mice die during late gestation; AM KO embryos are anemic and very small compared to wild type (WT) embryos. To determine which signaling pathways AM utilizes for these functions, we used murine embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells generated from E-14.5 AM KO or WT embryos. Proliferation of AM KO MEF cells was markedly retarded, and PKC{theta}, PKC{delta}, and p38MAPK were more highly phosphorylated in AM KO MEF cells. Expression of cyclinD1, the target molecule of p38MAPK, was down-regulated in AM KO MEF cells. p38MAPK inhibitor as well as PKC inhibitor restored expression of cyclinD1 and cell growth in AM KO MEF cells. These data suggest that PKC{theta}, PKC{delta}, and p38MAPK activation lead to cell cycle retardation in AM KO MEF cells, and that AM may negatively regulate novel PKCs and p38MAPK in MEF cells.

  5. Peripheral involvement of PKA and PKC in subcutaneous bee venom-induced persistent nociception, mechanical hyperalgesia, and inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui-Sheng; Lei, Jing; He, Xiang; Qu, Fang; Wang, Yang; Wen, Wei-Wei; You, Hao-Jun; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2008-03-01

    The roles of central protein kinases A and C (PKA and PKC) in various pain states have intensively been investigated during the past decade. The aim of the present study was to investigate the peripheral involvement of PKA and PKC in persistent nociceptive response, evoked pain behaviors, and inflammation induced by subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of bee venom (BV, 0.2mg/50 microl) in rats. The effects of intraplantar injection of H-89 (a PKA inhibitor, 5-100 microg/50 microl) and chelerythrine chloride (a PKC inhibitor, 5-100 microg/50 microl) on BV-elicited persistent nociception (nociceptive flinching reflex), mechanical hyperalgesia, and inflammation were systematically investigated. Pre-treatment with H-89 dose-dependently inhibited only BV-induced mechanical hyperalgesia, but not the persistent nociception and inflammation. In contrast, pre-treatment with chelerythrine chloride dose-dependently inhibited BV-induced sustained nociception and inflammation, but not the mechanical hyperalgesia. Topical pre-treatment of the sciatic nerve with 1% capsaicin significantly blocked the inhibitory effects of the PKC inhibitor on BV-induced inflammation, but not the persistent flinching response. These results indicate that peripheral PKA and PKC involvements in BV-induced pain behaviors differ, and capsaicin-sensitive afferents appear to participate in the pro-inflammatory role of PKC in the BV pain model. Findings from the present study also suggest that targeting specific peripheral protein kinases might prove effective in the treatment of persistent pain and inflammation.

  6. Dual inhibition of protein kinase C and p53-MDM2 or PKC and mTORC1 are novel efficient therapeutic approaches for uveal melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Dahmani, Ahmed; Raymondie, Chloé; Cassoux, Nathalie; Piperno-Neumann, Sophie; Némati, Fariba; Laurent, Cécile; De Koning, Leanne; Halilovic, Ensar; Jeay, Sebastien; Wylie, Andrew; Emery, Caroline; Roman-Roman, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Uveal melanoma (UM) is the most common cancer of the eye in adults. Many UM patients develop metastases for which no curative treatment has been identified. Novel therapeutic approaches are therefore urgently needed. UM is characterized by mutations in the genes GNAQ and GNA11 which activate the PKC pathway, leading to the use of PKC inhibitors as a rational strategy to treat UM tumors. Encouraging clinical activity has been noted in UM patients treated with PKC inhibitors. However, it is likely that curative treatment regimens will require a combination of targeted therapeutic agents. Employing a large panel of UM patient-derived xenograft models (PDXs), several PKC inhibitor-based combinations were tested in vivo using the PKC inhibitor AEB071. The most promising approaches were further investigated in vitro using our unique panel of UM cell lines. When combined with AEB071, the two agents CGM097 (p53-MDM2 inhibitor) and RAD001 (mTORC1 inhibitor) demonstrated greater activity than single agents, with tumor regression observed in several UM PDXs. Follow-up studies in UM cell lines on these two drug associations confirmed their combination activity and ability to induce cell death. While no effective treatment currently exists for metastatic uveal melanoma, we have discovered using our unique panel of preclinical models that combinations between PKC/mTOR inhibitors and PKC/p53-MDM2 inhibitors are two novel and very effective therapeutic approaches for this disease. Together, our study reveals that combining PKC and p53-MDM2 or mTORC1 inhibitors may provide significant clinical benefit for UM patients. PMID:27507190

  7. Lysophosphatidic acid upregulates connective tissue growth factor expression in osteoblasts through the GPCR/PKC and PKA pathways.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zi-Li; Li, Dian-Qi; Huang, Xiang-Yu; Xing, Xin; Yu, Ru-Qing; Li, Zhi; Li, Zu-Bing

    2016-02-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is an efficient, bioactive phospholipid involved in various biological processes. In this study, LPA-induced connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) expression and the underlying mechanisms were investigated using the MC3T3-E1 cell line. The MC3T3-E1 cells were stimulated with an inhibitor of LPA receptors, an activator and inhibitor of protein kinase C (PKC) and protein kinase A (PKA) for indicated periods of time. RT-qPCR and western blot analyses were used to measure the expression levels of CCN2. Immunofluorescence staining was used to observe the translocation of PKC. The mRNA expression level of CCN2 was increased following stimulation of the cells with LPA; LPA transiently induced the mRNA expression of CCN2; maximum expression levels were observed 2 h following stimulation with LPA. This increase was accompanied by CCN2 protein synthesis. LPA receptor1/3 was inhibited by Ki16425, a specific inhibitor of LPA1/3; as a result, the LPA-induced increase in CCN2 expression was abrogated. LPA also induced the membrane translocation of PKC and enhanced PKC activity in the osteoblasts. Pre-treatment of the osteoblasts with staurosporine prevented the increase in CCN2 expression by induced by LPA, and the activation of PKC by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) enhanced CCN2 expression, indicating that the PKC pathway is involved in the LPA-induced increase in CCN2 expression. The interference of PKA signaling also led to the induction of CCN2 expresion by LPA. These data indicate that LPA increases CCN2 expression through the activation of PKC and PKA. Thus, the regulatory functions of the PKC and PKA pathways are implicated in the LPA-induced increase in CCN2 expression.

  8. Enhancement of potency and efficacy of NADA by PKC-mediated phosphorylation of vanilloid receptor.

    PubMed

    Premkumar, Louis S; Qi, Zhan-Heng; Van Buren, Jeremy; Raisinghani, Manish

    2004-03-01

    The search for an endogenous ligand for the vanilloid receptor (VR or TRPV1) has led to the identification of N-arachidonyl dopamine (NADA). This study investigates the role of protein kinase C (PKC)-mediated phosphorylation on NADA-induced membrane currents in Xenopus oocytes heterologously expressing TRPV1 and in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. In basal state, current induced by 10 microM NADA is 5-10% of the current induced by 1 microM capsaicin or protons at pH 5. However, PKC activator, phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) strongly potentiated ( approximately 15-fold) the NADA-induced current. Repeated application of NADA at short intervals potentiated its own response approximately fivefold in a PKC-dependent manner. PKC inhibitor, bisindolylmaleimide (BIM, 500 nM), a mutant TRPV1 (S800A/S502A), and maximal activation of PKC abolished the potentiation induced by repeated application of NADA. As a further confirmation that NADA could stimulate PKC, pretreatment with NADA potentiated the response of protons at pH 5 (approximately 20 fold), which was dramatically reduced in the mutant TRPV1. In DRG neurons, capsaicin (100 nM) induced a approximately 15 mV depolarization and initiated a train of action potentials compared with 1 microM NADA that produced a approximately 5 mV response. Pretreatment with PDBu induced significantly larger depolarization and potentiated NADA-induced current. Furthermore, exposure of NADA to the intracellular surface of the membrane-induced larger currents suggesting inaccessibility to the intracellular binding site might contribute to its weaker action. These results indicate that NADA is a potent agonist of VR when the receptor is in the PKC-mediated phosphorylation state.

  9. Targeting aPKC disables oncogenic signaling by both the EGFR and the proinflammatory cytokine TNFα in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Anthony S.; Rushing, Elisabeth J.; Mandell, Edward K.; Dietrich, Justin D.; Errasti, Andrea E.; Gibbs, Daniel; Berens, Michael E.; Loftus, Joseph C.; Hulme, Christopher; Yang, Weiwei; Lu, Zhimin; Aldape, Kenneth; Sanai, Nader; Rothlin, Carla V.; Ghosh, Sourav

    2015-01-01

    Grade IV glioblastoma is characterized by increased kinase activity of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR); however, EGFR kinase inhibitors have failed to improve survival in individuals with this cancer because resistance to these drugs often develops. We showed that tumor necrosis factor–α (TNFα) produced in the glioblastoma microenvironment activated atypical protein kinase C (aPKC), thereby producing resistance to EGFR kinase inhibitors. Additionally, we identified that aPKC was required both for paracrine TNFα-dependent activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and for tumor cell–intrinsic receptor tyrosine kinase signaling. Targeting aPKC decreased tumor growth in mouse models of glioblastoma, including models of EGFR kinase inhibitor–resistant glioblastoma. Furthermore, aPKC abundance and activity were increased in human glioblastoma tumor cells, and high aPKC abundance correlated with poor prognosis. Thus, targeting aPKC might provide an improved molecular approach for glioblastoma therapy. PMID:25118327

  10. The PKC-NFκB Signaling Pathway Induces APOBEC3B Expression in Multiple Human Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Brandon; McCann, Jennifer L.; Starrett, Gabriel J.; Kosyakovsky, Leah; Luengas, Elizabeth M.; Molan, Amy M.; Burns, Michael B.; McDougle, Rebecca M.; Parker, Peter J.; Brown, William L.; Harris, Reuben S.

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of the antiviral DNA cytosine deaminase APOBEC3B has been linked to somatic mutagenesis in many cancers. HPV infection accounts for APOBEC3B upregulation in cervical and head/neck cancers, but the mechanisms underlying non-viral malignancies are unclear. In this study, we investigated the signal transduction pathways responsible for APOBEC3B upregulation. Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) by the diacylglycerol (DAG) mimic phorbol-myristic acid (PMA) resulted in specific and dose-responsive increases in APOBEC3B expression and activity, which could then be strongly suppressed by PKC or NFκB inhibition. PKC activation caused the recruitment of RELB, but not RELA, to the APOBEC3B promoter implicating non-canonical NFκB signaling. Notably, PKC was required for APOBEC3B upregulation in cancer cell lines derived from multiple tumor types. By revealing how APOBEC3B is upregulated in many cancers, our findings suggest that PKC and NFκB inhibitors may be repositioned to suppress cancer mutagenesis, dampen tumor evolution, and decrease the probability of adverse outcomes such as drug resistance and metastases. PMID:26420215

  11. On the participation of hippocampal PKC in acquisition, consolidation and reconsolidation of spatial memory.

    PubMed

    Bonini, J S; Da Silva, W C; Bevilaqua, L R M; Medina, J H; Izquierdo, I; Cammarota, M

    2007-06-15

    Memory consolidation involves a sequence of temporally defined and highly regulated changes in the activation state of several signaling pathways that leads to the lasting storage of an initially labile trace. Despite appearances, consolidation does not make memories permanent. It is now known that upon retrieval well-consolidated memories can become again vulnerable to the action of amnesic agents and in order to persist must undergo a protein synthesis-dependent process named reconsolidation. Experiments with genetically modified animals suggest that some PKC isoforms are important for spatial memory and earlier studies indicate that several PKC substrates are activated following spatial learning. Nevertheless, none of the reports published so far analyzed pharmacologically the role played by PKC during spatial memory processing. Using the conventional PKC and PKCmu inhibitor 12-(2-cyanoethyl)-6,7,12,13-tetrahydro-13-methyl-5-oxo-5H-indolo[2,3-a]pyrrollo[3,4-c]carbazole (Gö6976) we found that the activity of these kinases is required in the CA1 region of the rat dorsal hippocampus for acquisition and consolidation of spatial memory in the Morris water maze learning task. Our results also show that when infused into dorsal CA1 after non-reinforced retrieval, Gö6976 produces a long-lasting amnesia that is independent of the strength of the memory trace, suggesting that post-retrieval activation of hippocampal PKC is essential for persistence of spatial memory.

  12. Contraction stimulates muscle glucose uptake independent of atypical PKC.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haiyan; Fujii, Nobuharu L; Toyoda, Taro; An, Ding; Farese, Robert V; Leitges, Michael; Hirshman, Michael F; Mul, Joram D; Goodyear, Laurie J

    2015-11-01

    Exercise increases skeletal muscle glucose uptake, but the underlying mechanisms are only partially understood. The atypical protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms λ and ζ (PKC-λ/ζ) have been shown to be necessary for insulin-, AICAR-, and metformin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle, but not for treadmill exercise-stimulated muscle glucose uptake. To investigate if PKC-λ/ζ activity is required for contraction-stimulated muscle glucose uptake, we used mice with tibialis anterior muscle-specific overexpression of an empty vector (WT), wild-type PKC-ζ (PKC-ζ(WT)), or an enzymatically inactive T410A-PKC-ζ mutant (PKC-ζ(T410A)). We also studied skeletal muscle-specific PKC-λ knockout (MλKO) mice. Basal glucose uptake was similar between WT, PKC-ζ(WT), and PKC-ζ(T410A) tibialis anterior muscles. In contrast, in situ contraction-stimulated glucose uptake was increased in PKC-ζ(T410A) tibialis anterior muscles compared to WT or PKC-ζ(WT) tibialis anterior muscles. Furthermore, in vitro contraction-stimulated glucose uptake was greater in soleus muscles of MλKO mice than WT controls. Thus, loss of PKC-λ/ζ activity increases contraction-stimulated muscle glucose uptake. These data clearly demonstrate that PKC-λζ activity is not necessary for contraction-stimulated glucose uptake.

  13. PKC-mediated cerebral vasoconstriction: Role of myosin light chain phosphorylation versus actin cytoskeleton reorganization.

    PubMed

    El-Yazbi, Ahmed F; Abd-Elrahman, Khaled S; Moreno-Dominguez, Alejandro

    2015-06-15

    Defective protein kinase C (PKC) signaling has been suggested to contribute to abnormal vascular contraction in disease conditions including hypertension and diabetes. Our previous work on agonist and pressure-induced cerebral vasoconstriction implicated PKC as a major contributor to force production in a myosin light chain (LC20) phosphorylation-independent manner. Here, we used phorbol dibutyrate to selectively induce a PKC-dependent constriction in rat middle cerebral arteries and delineate the relative contribution of different contractile mechanisms involved. Specifically, we employed an ultra-sensitive 3-step western blotting approach to detect changes in the content of phosphoproteins that regulate myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) activity, thin filament activation, and actin cytoskeleton reorganization. Data indicate that PKC activation evoked a greater constriction at a similar level of LC20 phosphorylation achieved by 5-HT. PDBu-evoked constriction persisted in the presence of Gö6976, a selective inhibitor of Ca(2+)-dependent PKC, and in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+). Biochemical evidence indicates that either + or - extracellular Ca(2+), PDBu (i) inhibits MLCP activity via the phosphorylation of myosin targeting subunit of myosin phosphatase (MYPT1) and C-kinase potentiated protein phosphatase-1 inhibitor (CPI-17), (ii) increases the phosphorylation of paxillin and heat shock protein 27 (HSP27), and reduces G-actin content, and (iii) does not change the phospho-content of the thin filament proteins, calponin and caldesmon. PDBu-induced constriction was more sensitive to disruption of actin cytoskeleton compared to inhibition of cross-bridge cycling. In conclusion, this study provided evidence for the pivotal contribution of cytoskeletal actin polymerization in force generation following PKC activation in cerebral resistance arteries. PMID:25931148

  14. Cystine dimethyl ester induces apoptosis through regulation of PKC-δ and PKC-ε in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gurbuz, Nilgun; Park, Margaret A; Dent, Paul; Abdel Mageed, Asim B; Sikka, Suresh C; Baykal, Asli

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinase C-δ (PKC-δ) and PKC-ε are reported to be effective in cancer prevention via S-thiolation-mediated mechanisms. This may be through stimulation of the pro-apoptotic, tumor-suppressive isozyme PKC-δ and/or inactivation of the growth stimulatory, oncogenic isozyme PKC-ε. We investigated oxidative regulatory responses of PKC-δ and PKC-ε to cystine dimethyl ester (CDME), a metabolic precursor of cystine, which, by inducing release of cellular cystine stimulates apoptosis in different prostate cancer cells, PC3 and LNCaP, compared to normal RWPE1 cells. Treatment of CDME in doses of 0.5mM and 5mM significantly induces apoptosis due to regulation of concentration-dependent PKC-δ stimulation and PKC-ε reduction in these prostate cancer cells. This apoptotic regulation was confirmed by immunoblot analyses and specific PKC enzyme assays in immunoprecipitated samples. Additionally, inhibition of PKC-δ by small interfering RNA (siRNA) proved that CDME-induced cell death was dependent on PKC-δ activity in prostate cancer cells. These data demonstrated that CDME induces apoptosis by cysteinylation of both PKC-δ and PKC-ε in tumorigenic prostate epithelial cells compared to control nontumorigenic cells. Cellular cystine may play a critical role in treatment and/or prevention of prostate cancer by regulating PKC activity.

  15. Widdrol-induced lipolysis is mediated by PKC and MEK/ERK in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyun Young; Yun, Hee Jung; Kim, Byung Woo; Lee, Eun Woo; Kwon, Hyun Ju

    2015-12-01

    Obesity is a serious medical condition causing various diseases such as heart disease, type-2 diabetes, and cancer. Fat cells (adipocytes) play an important role in the generation of energy through hydrolysis of lipids they accumulate. Therefore, induction of lipolysis (breakdown of lipids into fatty acids and glycerol), is one of the ways to treat obesity. In the present study, we investigated the lipolytic effect of widdrol in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and its mechanism. Widdrol considerably increased the amount of glycerol released from 3T3-L1 adipocytes into the medium in a time- and dose-dependent manner. To determine the mechanism of this effect, we investigated the alterations in glycerol release and protein expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes treated with widdrol alone or widdrol and inhibitors of proteins involved in the cAMP-dependent pathway or cAMP-independent PKC-MAPK pathway, which are known to induce lipolysis in adipocytes. The adenylyl cyclase inhibitor SQ-22536, PLA2 inhibitor dexamethasone, PI3K inhibitor wortmannin, and PKA inhibitor H-89, which were used to investigate the involvement of the cAMP-dependent pathway, did not affect the lipolytic effect of widdrol. Widdrol-induced phosphorylation of PKC, MEK, and ERK, which are related to the PKC-MAPK pathway, and their phosphorylation was inhibited by their inhibitors (H-7, U0126, and PD-98059, respectively). Moreover, the increase in glycerol release induced by widdrol was almost completely blocked by PKC, MEK, and ERK inhibitors. These results suggest that widdrol induces lipolysis through activation of the PKC-MEK-ERK pathway. PMID:26359088

  16. Amarogentin, a secoiridoid glycoside, abrogates platelet activation through PLC γ 2-PKC and MAPK pathways.

    PubMed

    Yen, Ting-Lin; Lu, Wan-Jung; Lien, Li-Ming; Thomas, Philip Aloysius; Lee, Tzu-Yin; Chiu, Hou-Chang; Sheu, Joen-Rong; Lin, Kuan-Hung

    2014-01-01

    Amarogentin, an active principle of Gentiana lutea, possess antitumorigenic, antidiabetic, and antioxidative properties. Activation of platelets is associated with intravascular thrombosis and cardiovascular diseases. The present study examined the effects of amarogentin on platelet activation. Amarogentin treatment (15~60  μM) inhibited platelet aggregation induced by collagen, but not thrombin, arachidonic acid, and U46619. Amarogentin inhibited collagen-induced phosphorylation of phospholipase C (PLC) γ2, protein kinase C (PKC), and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). It also inhibits in vivo thrombus formation in mice. In addition, neither the guanylate cyclase inhibitor ODQ nor the adenylate cyclase inhibitor SQ22536 affected the amarogentin-mediated inhibition of platelet aggregation, which suggests that amarogentin does not regulate the levels of cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP. In conclusion, amarogentin prevents platelet activation through the inhibition of PLC γ2-PKC cascade and MAPK pathway. Our findings suggest that amarogentin may offer therapeutic potential for preventing or treating thromboembolic disorders.

  17. Amoebic PI3K and PKC is required for Jurkat T cell death induced by Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Ah; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Min, Arim; Shin, Myeong Heon

    2014-08-01

    The enteric protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica is the causative agent of human amebiasis. During infection, adherence of E. histolytica through Gal/GalNAc lectin on the surface of the amoeba can induce caspase-3-dependent or -independent host cell death. Phosphorylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and protein kinase C (PKC) in E. histolytica play an important function in the adhesion, killing, or phagocytosis of target cells. In this study, we examined the role of amoebic PI3K and PKC in amoeba-induced apoptotic cell death in Jurkat T cells. When Jurkat T cells were incubated with E. histolytica trophozoites, phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization and DNA fragmentation in Jurkat cells were markedly increased compared to those of cells incubated with medium alone. However, when amoebae were pretreated with a PI3K inhibitor, wortmannin before being incubated with E. histolytica, E. histolytica-induced PS externalization and DNA fragmentation in Jurkat cells were significantly reduced compared to results for amoebae pretreated with DMSO. In addition, pretreatment of amoebae with a PKC inhibitor, staurosporine strongly inhibited Jurkat T cell death. However, E. histolytica-induced cleavage of caspase-3, -6, and -7 were not inhibited by pretreatment of amoebae with wortmannin or staurosporin. In addition, we found that amoebic PI3K and PKC have an important role on amoeba adhesion to host compartment. These results suggest that amebic PI3K and PKC activation may play an important role in caspase-independent cell death in Entamoeba-induced apoptosis.

  18. Amoebic PI3K and PKC is required for Jurkat T cell death induced by Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Ah; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Min, Arim; Shin, Myeong Heon

    2014-08-01

    The enteric protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica is the causative agent of human amebiasis. During infection, adherence of E. histolytica through Gal/GalNAc lectin on the surface of the amoeba can induce caspase-3-dependent or -independent host cell death. Phosphorylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and protein kinase C (PKC) in E. histolytica play an important function in the adhesion, killing, or phagocytosis of target cells. In this study, we examined the role of amoebic PI3K and PKC in amoeba-induced apoptotic cell death in Jurkat T cells. When Jurkat T cells were incubated with E. histolytica trophozoites, phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization and DNA fragmentation in Jurkat cells were markedly increased compared to those of cells incubated with medium alone. However, when amoebae were pretreated with a PI3K inhibitor, wortmannin before being incubated with E. histolytica, E. histolytica-induced PS externalization and DNA fragmentation in Jurkat cells were significantly reduced compared to results for amoebae pretreated with DMSO. In addition, pretreatment of amoebae with a PKC inhibitor, staurosporine strongly inhibited Jurkat T cell death. However, E. histolytica-induced cleavage of caspase-3, -6, and -7 were not inhibited by pretreatment of amoebae with wortmannin or staurosporin. In addition, we found that amoebic PI3K and PKC have an important role on amoeba adhesion to host compartment. These results suggest that amebic PI3K and PKC activation may play an important role in caspase-independent cell death in Entamoeba-induced apoptosis. PMID:25246714

  19. Sevoflurane Stimulates MAP Kinase Signal transduction through the Activation of PKC α and βII in Fetal Rat Cerebral Cortex Cultured Neuron

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Jun; Takekoshi, Susumu; Nagata, Hidetaka; Osamura, R. Yoshiyuki; Suzuki, Toshiyasu

    2006-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is a key enzyme that participates in various neuronal functions. PKC has also been identified as a target molecule for general anesthetic actions. Raf, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) have been thought to be target effectors of PKC. In the present study, we attempted to evaluate the effect of sevoflurane on PKC/MAPK cascade signaling in cultured fetal rat cerebral ­cortex neurons, prepared from embryonic day 18 fetuses. The effects of sevoflurane on the translocation of 7 PKC isoforms (α, βI, βII, γ, δ, ɛ and ζ) were observed by immunoblotting using isoform-selective antibodies to PKCs. The treatment of neurons with sevoflurane induced the translocation of PKC α and PKC βII species from the cytosol to the membrane fraction, which indicated the activation of these PKC isoforms. In contrast, there was no clear change in the distribution of other PKC isoforms. We next examined whether the specific activation of PKC α and βII by sevoflurane could stimulate the MAP kinase signaling pathway in cultured neurons. Raf phosphorylation was increased by the administration of 0.25 mM sevoflurane. The phosphorylation of Raf proteins reached a maximum at 5–10 min. Subsequently, the phosphorylation of MEK proteins was increased at 10–15 min after sevoflurane treatments. That of ERK proteins was induced at 15–60 min. Moreover, the phosphorylation of ERK induced by sevoflurane was significantly decreased by the treatment of PKC inhibitor (staurosporine) and MEK inhibitor (PD98059). On the other hand, the contents of total Raf, MEK and ERK proteins were relatively constant at all times examined. To examine the ­localization of phosphorylated-ERK protein, immunohistochemical staining of sevoflurane-treated cultured neurons was performed. The phosphorylated-ERK proteins were markedly accumulated in both the cytosol of the cell body and the neurites in the neuronal cells with time after 0

  20. Loss of pleckstrin defines a novel pathway for PKC-mediated exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Lurong; Wang, Yanfeng; Flick, Matthew; Choi, John; Scott, Edward W.; Degen, Jay; Lemmon, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Pleckstrin, the platelet and leukocyte C kinase substrate, is a prominent substrate of PKC in platelets, monocytes, macrophages, lymphocytes, and granulocytes. Pleckstrin accounts for 1% of the total protein in these cells, but it is best known for containing the 2 prototypic Pleckstrin homology, or PH, domains. Overexpressed pleckstrin can affect polyphosphoinositide second messenger–based signaling events; however, its true in vivo role has been unknown. Here, we describe mice containing a null mutation within the pleckstrin gene. Platelets lacking pleckstrin exhibit a marked defect in exocytosis of δ and α granules, αIIbβ3 activation, actin assembly, and aggregation after exposure to the PKC stimulant, PMA. Pleckstrin-null platelets aggregate normally in response to thrombin, but they fail to aggregate in response to thrombin in the presence of PI3K inhibitors, suggesting that a PI3K-dependent signaling pathway compensates for the loss of pleckstrin. Although pleckstrin-null platelets merged their granules in response to stimulation of PKC, they failed to empty their contents into the open canalicular system. This might be attributable to impaired actin assembly present in cells lacking pleckstrin. These data show that pleckstrin regulates the fusion of granules to the cell membrane and is an essential component of PKC-mediated exocytosis. PMID:19190246

  1. Effect of Protein Kinase C delta (PKC-δ) Inhibition on the Transcriptome of Normal and Systemic Sclerosis Human Dermal Fibroblasts In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wermuth, Peter J.; Addya, Sankar; Jimenez, Sergio A.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that protein kinase C- δ (PKC-δ) inhibition with the selective inhibitor, rottlerin, resulted in potent downregulation of type I collagen expression and production in normal human dermal fibroblasts and abrogated the exaggerated type I collagen production and expression in fibroblasts cultured from affected skin from patients with the fibrosing disorder systemic sclerosis (SSc). To elucidate the mechanisms involved in the ability of PKC-δ to regulate collagen production in fibroblasts, we examined the effects of PKC-δ inhibition on the transcriptome of normal and SSc human dermal fibroblasts. Normal and SSc human dermal fibroblasts were incubated with rottlerin (5 µM), and their gene expression was analyzed by microarrays. Pathway analysis and gene ontology analysis of differentially expressed genes in each comparison were performed. Identification of significantly overrepresented transcriptional regulatory elements (TREs) was performed using the Promoter Analysis and Interaction Network Toolset (PAINT) program. PKC-δ activity was also inhibited using RNA interference (siRNA) and by treating fibroblasts with a specific PKC-δ inhibitory cell permeable peptide. Differential gene expression of 20 genes was confirmed using real time PCR. PKC-δ inhibition caused a profound change in the transcriptome of normal and SSc human dermal fibroblasts in vitro. Pathway and gene ontology analysis identified multiple cellular and organismal pathways affected by PKC-δ inhibition. Furthermore, both pathway and PAINT analyses indicated that the transcription factor NFκB played an important role in the transcriptome changes induced by PKC-δ inhibition. Multiple genes involved in the degradation of the extracellular matrix components were significantly reduced in SSc fibroblasts and their expression was increased by PKC-δ inhibition. These results indicate that isoform-specific inhibition of PKC-δ profibrotic effects may represent a novel

  2. 17 beta-estradiol-BSA conjugates and 17 beta-estradiol regulate growth plate chondrocytes by common membrane associated mechanisms involving PKC dependent and independent signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Sylvia, V L; Walton, J; Lopez, D; Dean, D D; Boyan, B D; Schwartz, Z

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear receptors for 17 beta-estradiol (E(2)) are present in growth plate chondrocytes from both male and female rats and regulation of chondrocytes through these receptors has been studied for many years; however, recent studies indicate that an alternative pathway involving a membrane receptor may also be involved in the cell response. E(2) was found to directly affect the fluidity of chondrocyte membranes derived from female, but not male, rats. In addition, E(2) activates protein kinase C (PKC) in a nongenomic manner in female cells, and chelerythrine, a specific inhibitor of PKC, inhibits E(2)-dependent alkaline phosphatase activity and proteoglycan sulfation in these cells, indicating PKC is involved in the signal transduction mechanism. The aims of the present study were: (1) to examine the effect of a cell membrane-impermeable 17 beta-estradiol-bovine serum albumin conjugate (E(2)-BSA) on chondrocyte proliferation, differentiation, and matrix synthesis; (2) to determine the pathway that mediates the membrane effect of E(2)-BSA on PKC; and (3) to compare the action of E(2)-BSA to that of E(2). Confluent, fourth passage resting zone (RC) and growth zone (GC) chondrocytes from female rat costochondral cartilage were treated with 10(-9) to 10(-7) M E(2) or E(2)-BSA and changes in alkaline phosphatase specific activity, proteoglycan sulfation, and [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation measured. To examine the pathway of PKC activation, chondrocyte cultures were treated with E(2)-BSA in the presence or absence of GDP beta S (inhibitor of G-proteins), GTP gamma S (activator of G-proteins), U73122 or D609 (inhibitors of phospholipase C [PLC]), wortmannin (inhibitor of phospholipase D [PLD]) or LY294002 (inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase). E(2)-BSA mimicked the effects of E(2) on alkaline phosphatase specific activity and proteoglycan sulfation, causing dose-dependent increases in both RC and GC cell cultures. Both forms of estradiol inhibited [(3)H

  3. Inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Community Counts Blood Safety Inhibitors Articles & Key Findings Free Materials Videos Starting the Conversation Playing it Safe A Look at Hemophilia Joint Range of Motion My Story Links to Other Websites ...

  4. Lead acetate induces EGFR activation upstream of SFK and PKC{alpha} linkage to the Ras/Raf-1/ERK signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.-Y.; Wang, Y.-T.; Tzeng, D.-W.; Yang, J.-L.

    2009-03-01

    Lead acetate (Pb), a probable human carcinogen, can activate protein kinase C (PKC) upstream of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2). Yet, it remains unclear whether Pb activation of PKC {yields} ERK1/2 involves receptor/non-receptor tyrosine kinases and the Ras signaling transducer. Here we demonstrate a novel mechanism elicited by Pb for transmitting ERK1/2 signaling in CL3 human non-small-cell lung adenocarcinoma cells. Pb induction of higher steady-state levels of Ras-GTP was essential for increasing phospho-Raf-1{sup S338} and phospho-ERK1/2. Pre-treatment of the cells with a conventional PKC inhibitor Goe6976 or depleting PKC{alpha} using specific small interfering RNA blocked Pb induction of Ras-GTP. Pb also activated cellular tyrosine kinases. Specific pharmacological inhibitors, PD153035 for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and SU6656 for Src family tyrosine kinases (SFK), but not AG1296 for platelet-derived growth factor receptor, could suppress the Pb-induced tyrosine kinases, PKC{alpha}, Ras-GTP, phospho-Raf-1{sup S338} and phospho-ERK1/2. Furthermore, phosphorylation of tyrosines on the EGFR multiple autophosphorylation sites and the conserved SFK autophosphorylation site occurred during exposure of cells to Pb for 1-5 min and 5-30 min, respectively. Intriguingly, Pb activation of EGFR required the intrinsic kinase activity but not dimerization of the receptor. Inhibition of SFK or PKC{alpha} activities did not affect EGFR phosphorylation, while knockdown of EGFR blocked SFK phosphorylation and PKC{alpha} activation following Pb. Together, these results indicate that immediate activation of EGFR in response to Pb is obligatory for activation of SFK and PKC{alpha} and subsequent the Ras-Raf-1-MKK1/2-ERK1/2 signaling cascade.

  5. A Novel Effect of MARCKS Phosphorylation by Activated PKC: The Dephosphorylation of Its Serine 25 in Chick Neuroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Toledo, Andrea; Zolessi, Flavio R.; Arruti, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    MARCKS (Myristoylated Alanine-Rich C Kinase Substrate) is a peripheral membrane protein, especially abundant in the nervous system, and functionally related to actin organization and Ca-calmodulin regulation depending on its phosphorylation by PKC. However, MARCKS is susceptible to be phosphorylated by several different kinases and the possible interactions between these phosphorylations have not been fully studied in intact cells. In differentiating neuroblasts, as well as some neurons, there is at least one cell-type specific phosphorylation site: serine 25 (S25) in the chick. We demonstrate here that S25 is included in a highly conserved protein sequence which is a Cdk phosphorylatable region, located far away from the PKC phosphorylation domain. S25 phosphorylation was inhibited by olomoucine and roscovitine in neuroblasts undergoing various states of cell differentiation in vitro. These results, considered in the known context of Cdks activity in neuroblasts, suggest that Cdk5 is the enzyme responsible for this phosphorylation. We find that the phosphorylation by PKC at the effector domain does not occur in the same molecules that are phosphorylated at serine 25. The in situ analysis of the subcellular distribution of these two phosphorylated MARCKS variants revealed that they are also segregated in different protein clusters. In addition, we find that a sustained stimulation of PKC by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) provokes the progressive disappearance of phosphorylation at serine 25. Cells treated with PMA, but in the presence of several Ser/Thr phosphatase (PP1, PP2A and PP2B) inhibitors indicated that this dephosphorylation is achieved via a phosphatase 2A (PP2A) form. These results provide new evidence regarding the existence of a novel consequence of PKC stimulation upon the phosphorylated state of MARCKS in neural cells, and propose a link between PKC and PP2A activity on MARCKS. PMID:23634231

  6. A novel effect of MARCKS phosphorylation by activated PKC: the dephosphorylation of its serine 25 in chick neuroblasts.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Andrea; Zolessi, Flavio R; Arruti, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    MARCKS (Myristoylated Alanine-Rich C Kinase Substrate) is a peripheral membrane protein, especially abundant in the nervous system, and functionally related to actin organization and Ca-calmodulin regulation depending on its phosphorylation by PKC. However, MARCKS is susceptible to be phosphorylated by several different kinases and the possible interactions between these phosphorylations have not been fully studied in intact cells. In differentiating neuroblasts, as well as some neurons, there is at least one cell-type specific phosphorylation site: serine 25 (S25) in the chick. We demonstrate here that S25 is included in a highly conserved protein sequence which is a Cdk phosphorylatable region, located far away from the PKC phosphorylation domain. S25 phosphorylation was inhibited by olomoucine and roscovitine in neuroblasts undergoing various states of cell differentiation in vitro. These results, considered in the known context of Cdks activity in neuroblasts, suggest that Cdk5 is the enzyme responsible for this phosphorylation. We find that the phosphorylation by PKC at the effector domain does not occur in the same molecules that are phosphorylated at serine 25. The in situ analysis of the subcellular distribution of these two phosphorylated MARCKS variants revealed that they are also segregated in different protein clusters. In addition, we find that a sustained stimulation of PKC by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) provokes the progressive disappearance of phosphorylation at serine 25. Cells treated with PMA, but in the presence of several Ser/Thr phosphatase (PP1, PP2A and PP2B) inhibitors indicated that this dephosphorylation is achieved via a phosphatase 2A (PP2A) form. These results provide new evidence regarding the existence of a novel consequence of PKC stimulation upon the phosphorylated state of MARCKS in neural cells, and propose a link between PKC and PP2A activity on MARCKS.

  7. A novel effect of MARCKS phosphorylation by activated PKC: the dephosphorylation of its serine 25 in chick neuroblasts.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Andrea; Zolessi, Flavio R; Arruti, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    MARCKS (Myristoylated Alanine-Rich C Kinase Substrate) is a peripheral membrane protein, especially abundant in the nervous system, and functionally related to actin organization and Ca-calmodulin regulation depending on its phosphorylation by PKC. However, MARCKS is susceptible to be phosphorylated by several different kinases and the possible interactions between these phosphorylations have not been fully studied in intact cells. In differentiating neuroblasts, as well as some neurons, there is at least one cell-type specific phosphorylation site: serine 25 (S25) in the chick. We demonstrate here that S25 is included in a highly conserved protein sequence which is a Cdk phosphorylatable region, located far away from the PKC phosphorylation domain. S25 phosphorylation was inhibited by olomoucine and roscovitine in neuroblasts undergoing various states of cell differentiation in vitro. These results, considered in the known context of Cdks activity in neuroblasts, suggest that Cdk5 is the enzyme responsible for this phosphorylation. We find that the phosphorylation by PKC at the effector domain does not occur in the same molecules that are phosphorylated at serine 25. The in situ analysis of the subcellular distribution of these two phosphorylated MARCKS variants revealed that they are also segregated in different protein clusters. In addition, we find that a sustained stimulation of PKC by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) provokes the progressive disappearance of phosphorylation at serine 25. Cells treated with PMA, but in the presence of several Ser/Thr phosphatase (PP1, PP2A and PP2B) inhibitors indicated that this dephosphorylation is achieved via a phosphatase 2A (PP2A) form. These results provide new evidence regarding the existence of a novel consequence of PKC stimulation upon the phosphorylated state of MARCKS in neural cells, and propose a link between PKC and PP2A activity on MARCKS. PMID:23634231

  8. PKC-dependent Phosphorylation of the H1 Histamine Receptor Modulates TRPC6 Activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xingjuan; Egly, Christian; Riley, Ashley M; Li, Wennan; Tewson, Paul; Hughes, Thomas E; Quinn, Anne Marie; Obukhov, Alexander G

    2014-01-01

    Transient receptor potential canonical 6 (TRPC6) is a cation selective, DAG-regulated, Ca2+-permeable channel activated by the agonists of Gq-protein-coupled heptahelical receptors. Dysfunctions of TRPC6 are implicated in the pathogenesis of various cardiovascular and kidney conditions such as vasospasm and glomerulosclerosis. When stimulated by agonists of the histamine H1 receptor (H1R), TRPC6 activity decays to the baseline despite the continuous presence of the agonist. In this study, we examined whether H1R desensitization contributes to regulating the decay rate of TRPC6 activity upon receptor stimulation. We employed the HEK expression system and a biosensor allowing us to simultaneously detect the changes in intracellular diacylglycerol (DAG) and Ca2+ concentrations. We found that the histamine-induced DAG response was biphasic, in which a transient peak was followed by maintained elevated plateau, suggesting that desensitization of H1R takes place in the presence of histamine. The application of PKC inhibitor Gö6983 slowed the decay rate of intracellular DAG concentration. Activation of the mouse H1R mutant lacking a putative PKC phosphorylation site, Ser399, responsible for the receptor desensitization, resulted in a prolonged intracellular DAG increase and greater Mn2+ influx through the TRPC6 channel. Thus, our data support the hypothesis that PKC-dependent H1R phosphorylation leads to a reduced production of intracellular DAG that contributes to TRPC6 activity regulation.

  9. PKC-mediated potentiation of morphine analgesia by St. John's Wort in rodents and humans.

    PubMed

    Galeotti, Nicoletta; Farzad, Mersedeh; Bianchi, Enrica; Ghelardini, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Our purpose was to combine the use of morphine with clinically available inhibitors of protein kinase C (PKC), finally potentiating morphine analgesia in humans. Thermal tests were performed in rodents and humans previously administered with acute or chronic morphine combined or not with increasing doses of the PKC-blocker St. John's Wort (SJW) or its main component hypericin. Phosphorylation of the γ subunit of PKC enzyme was assayed by western blotting in the periaqueductal grey matter (PAG) from rodents co-administered with morphine and hypericin and was prevented in rodent PAG by SJW or hypericin co-administration with morphine, inducing a potentiation of morphine analgesia in thermal pain. The score of pain assessment in healthy volunteers were decreased by 40% when morphine was co-administered with SJW at a dose largely below those used to obtain an antidepressant or analgesic effect in both rodents and humans. The SJW/hypericin potentiating effect lasted in time and preserved morphine analgesia in tolerant mice. Our findings indicate that, in clinical practice, SJW could reduce the dose of morphine obtaining the same analgesic effect. Therefore, SJW and one of its main components, hypericin, appear ideal to potentiate morphine-induced analgesia.

  10. mTOR Directs Breast Morphogenesis through the PKC-alpha-Rac1 Signaling Axis

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Meghan M.; Young, Christian D.; Wang, Shan; Sobolik, Tammy; Sanchez, Violeta M.; Hicks, Donna J.; Cook, Rebecca S.; Brantley-Sieders, Dana M.

    2015-01-01

    Akt phosphorylation is a major driver of cell survival, motility, and proliferation in development and disease, causing increased interest in upstream regulators of Akt like mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2). We used genetic disruption of Rictor to impair mTORC2 activity in mouse mammary epithelia, which decreased Akt phosphorylation, ductal length, secondary branching, cell motility, and cell survival. These effects were recapitulated with a pharmacological dual inhibitor of mTORC1/mTORC2, but not upon genetic disruption of mTORC1 function via Raptor deletion. Surprisingly, Akt re-activation was not sufficient to rescue cell survival or invasion, and modestly increased branching of mTORC2-impaired mammary epithelial cells (MECs) in culture and in vivo. However, another mTORC2 substrate, protein kinase C (PKC)-alpha, fully rescued mTORC2-impaired MEC branching, invasion, and survival, as well as branching morphogenesis in vivo. PKC-alpha-mediated signaling through the small GTPase Rac1 was necessary for mTORC2-dependent mammary epithelial development during puberty, revealing a novel role for Rictor/mTORC2 in MEC survival and motility during branching morphogenesis through a PKC-alpha/Rac1-dependent mechanism. PMID:26132202

  11. Selectivity of Cx43 channels is regulated through PKC-dependent phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Ek-Vitorin, Jose F.; King, Timothy J.; Heyman, Nathanael S.; Lampe, Paul D.; Burt, Janis M.

    2006-01-01

    Coordinated contractile activation of the heart and resistance to ischemic injury depend, in part, on the intercellular communication mediated by Cx43-composed gap junctions. The function of these junctions is regulated at multiple levels (assembly to degradation) through phosphorylation at specific sites in the carboxyl terminus (CT) of the Cx43 protein. We show here that the selective permeability of Cx43 junctions is regulated through PKC-dependent phosphorylation at serine 368 (S368). Selective permeability was measured in several Cx43-expressing cell lines as the rate constant for intercellular dye diffusion relative to junctional conductance. The selective permeability of Cx43 junctions under control conditions was quite variable, as was the open state behavior of the comprising channels. Co-expression of the CT of Cx43 as a distinct protein, treatment with a PKC inhibitor, or mutation of S368 to alanine all reduced (or eliminated) phosphorylation at S368, reduced the incidence of 55–70pS channels, and reduced by ten fold the selective permeability of the junctions for a small cationic dye. Since PKC activation during pre-ischemic conditioning is cardio-protective during subsequent ischemic episodes, we examined no-flow, ischemic hearts for Cx43 phosphorylated at S368 (pS368). Consistent with early activation of PKC, pS368-Cx43 was increased in ischemic hearts; despite extensive lateralization of total Cx43, pS368-Cx43 remained predominantly at intercalated disks. Our data suggest that the selectivity of gap junction channels at intercalated disks is increased early in ischemia. PMID:16709897

  12. Erythrocyte deformability and nitric oxide mobilization under pannexin-1 and PKC dependence.

    PubMed

    Silva-Herdade, A S; Freitas, T; Almeida, J Pedro; Saldanha, C

    2015-01-01

    The erythrocyte adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is utilised for protein phosphorylation and exported through the pannexin 1 hemichannel (Px1) in the microcirculation. The physiological stimuli for ATP release are dependent of blood shear rate level and of the tissue oxygen content. The deoxygenated and oxygenated states of haemoglobin are respectively bound and unbound to N terminal domain of the protein band 3 of the erythrocyte membrane in dependence of its degree of phosphorylation. The protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) and protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) contribute to the phosphorylation degree of band 3 and are modulated by protein kinase C (PKC). Chelerythrine (Che) is a competitive inhibitor of ATP for PKC and a negative modulator of erythrocyte deformability. The aim of this study was to assess the mobilization of nitric oxide (NO) in erythrocyte in absence and presence of Che and Px1 inhibitor (carbenoxolone). Erythrocyte deformability was evaluated in presence of carbenoxolone (Carb). Regarding the effects observed in the erythrocyte by presence of Che or Carb, the values of efflux of NO and the concentration of nitrosogluthatione are similar and with no changes in relation to their absence. Px1inhibition by Carb 10 μM ameliorates the erythrocyte deformability at a shear force of 0.6 and 1.2 Pa. The PKC inhibitor shows similar effects to the Carb on the mobilization of nitric oxide in erythrocyte. The blockage of ATP release by Carb from erythrocytes suggests a possible benefit to develop in ischemia reperfusion or in inflammatory response where will be needed to rescue the excess of NO present and ameliorate the red blood cell deformability at low shear rates. PMID:24595130

  13. Arabinosylated lipoarabinomannan (Ara-LAM) mediated intracellular mechanisms against tuberculosis infection: involvement of protein kinase C (PKC) mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Das, Shibali; Bhattacharjee, Oindrila; Goswami, Avranil; Pal, Nishith K; Majumdar, Subrata

    2015-03-01

    Tuberculosis causes severe immunosuppression thereby ensuring the loss of the host protective immune responses. During Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, the pathogen modulates TLR-2 receptor down-stream signaling, indicating the possible involvement of TLR-2 in the regulation of the host immune response. Moreover, different PKC isoforms are also involved in the course of infection. Arabinosylated lipoarabinomannan (Ara-LAM) possesses immuno-modulatory properties which induce the pro-inflammatory responses via induction of TLR-2-mediated signaling. Here, we found that pretreatment of M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages with Ara-LAM caused a significant increase in the conventional PKC expression along with their active association with TLR-2. This association activated the TLR-2 -mediated downstream signaling, facilitating the activation of MAP kinase P38. All these events culminated in the up-regulation of proinflammatory response, which was abrogated by treatment with PKC-α and P38 inhibitors. Moreover, pretreatment of macrophages with Ara-LAM abrogated the IL-10 production while restored MHC-II expression in the infected macrophages. This study demonstrates that Ara-LAM confers protection against tuberculosis via TLR-2/PKC signaling crosstalk which is responsible for the induction of host protective immune response against tuberculosis.

  14. Gabapentin Effects on PKC-ERK1/2 Signaling in the Spinal Cord of Rats with Formalin-Induced Visceral Inflammatory Pain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-Bo; Guo, Zheng-Dong; Li, Mei-Yi; Fong, Peter; Zhang, Ji-Guo; Zhang, Can-Wen; Gong, Ke-Rui; Yang, Ming-Feng; Niu, Jing-Zhong; Ji, Xun-Ming; Lv, Guo-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the clinical management of visceral pain remains unsatisfactory for many patients suffering from this disease. While preliminary animal studies have suggested the effectiveness of gabapentin in successfully treating visceral pain, the mechanism underlying its analgesic effect remains unclear. Evidence from other studies has demonstrated the involvement of protein kinase C (PKC) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2) in the pathogenesis of visceral inflammatory pain. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that gabapentin produces analgesia for visceral inflammatory pain through its inhibitory effect on the PKC-ERK1/2 signaling pathway. Intracolonic injections of formalin were performed in rats to produce colitis pain. Our results showed that visceral pain behaviors in these rats decreased after intraperitoneal injection of gabapentin. These behaviors were also reduced by intrathecal injections of the PKC inhibitor, H-7, and the ERK1/2 inhibitor, PD98059. Neuronal firing of wide dynamic range neurons in L6-S1 of the rat spinal cord dorsal horn were significantly increased after intracolonic injection of formalin. This increased firing rate was inhibited by intraperitoneal injection of gabapentin and both the individual and combined intrathecal application of H-7 and PD98059. Western blot analysis also revealed that PKC membrane translocation and ERK1/2 phosphorylation increased significantly following formalin injection, confirming the recruitment of PKC and ERK1/2 during visceral inflammatory pain. These effects were also significantly reduced by intraperitoneal injection of gabapentin. Therefore, we concluded that the analgesic effect of gabapentin on visceral inflammatory pain is mediated through suppression of PKC and ERK1/2 signaling pathways. Furthermore, we found that the PKC inhibitor, H-7, significantly diminished ERK1/2 phosphorylation levels, implicating the involvement of PKC and ERK1/2 in the same signaling pathway. Thus, our

  15. Involvement of PKC{alpha} in insulin-induced PKC{delta} expression: Importance of SP-1 and NF{kappa}B transcription factors

    SciTech Connect

    Horovitz-Fried, Miriam; Sampson, Sanford R. . E-mail: sampsos@mail.biu.ac.il

    2007-01-05

    Protein kinase C delta (PKC{delta}) is a key molecule in insulin signaling essential for insulin-induced glucose transport in skeletal muscle. Recent studies in our laboratory have shown that insulin rapidly stimulates PKC{delta} activity and increases PKC{delta} protein and RNA levels, and that the SP-1 transcription factor is involved in insulin-induced transcription of the PKC{delta} gene. Activation of SP-1 involves serine phosphorylation and translocation to the nucleus. In this study we examined the possibility that PKC{alpha} might be involved in serine phosphorylation and activation of SP-1. We found that insulin rapidly phosphorylates and translocates SP-1. In the cytoplasm, SP-1 was constitutively associated with PKC{alpha}, and insulin stimulation caused these proteins to dissociate. In contrast, in the nucleus insulin induced an increase in association between PKC{alpha} and SP-1. PKC{alpha} inhibition blocked insulin-induced serine phosphorylation of SP-1 and its association with PKC{alpha} in the nucleus. Inhibition of PKC{alpha} also reduced the insulin-induced increase in PKC{delta} RNA and protein in the cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions. We also attempted to determine if another transcription factor might be involved in regulation of PKC{delta} expression. We earlier showed that insulin did not affect nuclear NF{kappa}B levels. Inhibition of NF{kappa}B, however, increased insulin-induced increase in PKC{delta} RNA and protein in the cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions. Surprisingly, this inhibition reduced the insulin-induced increase in cytoplasmic and nuclear PKC{alpha} RNA and protein. Inhibition of PKC{delta} reduced I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation as well as NF{kappa}B activation. Thus, PKC{alpha} regulates insulin-induced PKC{delta} expression levels and this regulation involves activation of SP-1 and NF{kappa}B.

  16. Mechanism of membrane redistribution of protein kinase C by its ATP-competitive inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hideyuki; Namiki, Hideo

    2007-07-15

    ATP-competitive inhibitors of PKC (protein kinase C) such as the bisindolylmaleimide GF 109203X, which interact with the ATP-binding site in the PKC molecule, have also been shown to affect several redistribution events of PKC. However, the reason why these inhibitors affect the redistribution is still controversial. In the present study, using immunoblot analysis and GFP (green fluorescent protein)-tagged PKC, we showed that, at commonly used concentrations, these ATP-competitive inhibitors alone induced redistribution of DAG (diacylglycerol)-sensitive PKCalpha, PKCbetaII, PKCdelta and PKCepsilon, but not atypical PKCzeta, to the endomembrane or the plasma membrane. Studies with deletion and point mutants showed that the DAG-sensitive C1 domain of PKC was required for membrane redistribution by these inhibitors. Furthermore, membrane redistribution was prevented by the aminosteroid PLC (phospholipase C) inhibitor U-73122, although an ATP-competitive inhibitor had no significant effect on acute DAG generation. Immunoblot analysis showed that an ATP-competitive inhibitor enhanced cell-permeable DAG analogue- or phorbol-ester-induced translocation of endogenous PKC. Furthermore, these inhibitors also enhanced [3H]phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate binding to the cytosolic fractions from PKCalpha-GFP-overexpressing cells. These results clearly demonstrate that ATP-competitive inhibitors cause redistribution of DAG-sensitive PKCs to membranes containing endogenous DAG by altering the DAG sensitivity of PKC and support the idea that the inhibitors destabilize the closed conformation of PKC and make the C1 domain accessible to DAG. Most importantly, our findings provide novel insights for the interpretation of studies using ATP-competitive inhibitors, and, especially, suggest caution about the interpretation of the relationship between the redistribution and kinase activity of PKC.

  17. Amarogentin, a Secoiridoid Glycoside, Abrogates Platelet Activation through PLCγ2-PKC and MAPK Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Ting-Lin; Lu, Wan-Jung; Lien, Li-Ming; Thomas, Philip Aloysius; Lee, Tzu-Yin; Chiu, Hou-Chang; Sheu, Joen-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Amarogentin, an active principle of Gentiana lutea, possess antitumorigenic, antidiabetic, and antioxidative properties. Activation of platelets is associated with intravascular thrombosis and cardiovascular diseases. The present study examined the effects of amarogentin on platelet activation. Amarogentin treatment (15~60 μM) inhibited platelet aggregation induced by collagen, but not thrombin, arachidonic acid, and U46619. Amarogentin inhibited collagen-induced phosphorylation of phospholipase C (PLC)γ2, protein kinase C (PKC), and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). It also inhibits in vivo thrombus formation in mice. In addition, neither the guanylate cyclase inhibitor ODQ nor the adenylate cyclase inhibitor SQ22536 affected the amarogentin-mediated inhibition of platelet aggregation, which suggests that amarogentin does not regulate the levels of cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP. In conclusion, amarogentin prevents platelet activation through the inhibition of PLCγ2-PKC cascade and MAPK pathway. Our findings suggest that amarogentin may offer therapeutic potential for preventing or treating thromboembolic disorders. PMID:24868545

  18. Dopaminergic neurotoxicant 6-OHDA induces oxidative damage through proteolytic activation of PKC{delta} in cell culture and animal models of Parkinson's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Latchoumycandane, Calivarathan; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Jin, Huajun; Kanthasamy, Anumantha; Kanthasamy, Arthi

    2011-11-15

    The neurotoxicant 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) is used to investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying selective degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease (PD). Oxidative stress and caspase activation contribute to the 6-OHDA-induced apoptotic cell death of dopaminergic neurons. In the present study, we sought to systematically characterize the key downstream signaling molecule involved in 6-OHDA-induced dopaminergic degeneration in cell culture and animal models of PD. Treatment of mesencephalic dopaminergic neuronal N27 cells with 6-OHDA (100 {mu}M) for 24 h significantly reduced mitochondrial activity and increased cytosolic cytochrome c, followed by sequential activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. Co-treatment with the free radical scavenger MnTBAP (10 {mu}M) significantly attenuated 6-OHDA-induced caspase activities. Interestingly, 6-OHDA induced proteolytic cleavage and activation of protein kinase C delta (PKC{delta}) was completely suppressed by treatment with a caspase-3-specific inhibitor, Z-DEVD-FMK (50 {mu}M). Furthermore, expression of caspase-3 cleavage site-resistant mutant PKC{delta}{sup D327A} and kinase dead PKC{delta}{sup K376R} or siRNA-mediated knockdown of PKC{delta} protected against 6-OHDA-induced neuronal cell death, suggesting that caspase-3-dependent PKC{delta} promotes oxidative stress-induced dopaminergic degeneration. Suppression of PKC{delta} expression by siRNA also effectively protected N27 cells from 6-OHDA-induced apoptotic cell death. PKC{delta} cleavage was also observed in the substantia nigra of 6-OHDA-injected C57 black mice but not in control animals. Viral-mediated delivery of PKC{delta}{sup D327A} protein protected against 6-OHDA-induced PKC{delta} activation in mouse substantia nigra. Collectively, these results strongly suggest that proteolytic activation of PKC{delta} is a key downstream event in dopaminergic degeneration, and these results may have important translational value for

  19. Dystrophin/α1-syntrophin scaffold regulated PLC/PKC-dependent store-operated calcium entry in myotubes.

    PubMed

    Sabourin, Jessica; Harisseh, Rania; Harnois, Thomas; Magaud, Christophe; Bourmeyster, Nicolas; Déliot, Nadine; Constantin, Bruno

    2012-12-01

    In skeletal muscles from patient suffering of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and from mdx mice, the absence of the cytoskeleton protein dystrophin has been shown to be essential for maintaining a normal calcium influx. We showed that a TRPC store-dependent cation influx is increased by loss of dystrophin or a scaffolding protein α1-syntrophin, however the mechanisms of this calcium mishandling are incompletely understood. First of all, we confirmed that TRPC1 but also STIM1 and Orai1 are supporting the store-operated cation entry which is enhanced in dystrophin-deficient myotubes. Next, we demonstrated that inhibition of PLC or PKC in dystrophin-deficient myotubes restores elevated cation entry to normal levels similarly to enforced minidystrophin expression. In addition, silencing α1-syntrophin also increased cation influx in a PLC/PKC dependent pathway. We also showed that α1-syntrophin and PLCβ are part of a same protein complex reinforcing the idea of their inter-relation in calcium influx regulation. This elevated cation entry was decreased to normal levels by chelating intracellular free calcium with BAPTA-AM. Double treatments with BAPTA-AM and PLC or PKC inhibitors suggested that the elevation of cation influx by PLC/PKC pathway is dependent on cytosolic calcium. All these results demonstrate an involvement in dystrophin-deficient myotubes of a specific calcium/PKC/PLC pathway in elevation of store-operated cation influx supported by the STIM1/Orai1/TRPC1 proteins, which is normally regulated by the α1-syntrophin/dystrophin scaffold.

  20. Heterologous, PKC-Mediated Desensitization of Human Histamine H3 Receptors Expressed in CHO-K1 Cells.

    PubMed

    Montejo-López, Wilber; Rivera-Ramírez, Nayeli; Escamilla-Sánchez, Juan; García-Hernández, Ubaldo; Arias-Montaño, José-Antonio

    2016-09-01

    Desensitization is a major mechanism to regulate the functional response of G protein-coupled receptors. In this work we studied whether the human histamine H3 receptor of 445 amino acids (hH3R445) experiences heterologous desensitization mediated by PKC activation. Bioinformatic analysis indicated the presence of Serine and Threonine residues susceptible of PKC-mediated phosphorylation on the third intracellular loop and the carboxyl terminus of the hH3R445. In CHO-K1 cells stably transfected with the hH3R445 direct PKC activation by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (TPA, 200 nM) abolished H3R-mediated inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation. Activation of endogenous purinergic receptors by ATP (adenosine 5'-triphosphate, 10 μM) increased the free calcium intracellular concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) confirming their coupling to phospholipase C stimulation. Incubation with ATP also abolished H3R-mediated inhibition of forskolin-induced cAMP accumulation, and this effect was prevented by the PKC inhibitors Ro-31-8220 and Gö-6976. Pre-incubation with TPA or ATP reduced H3R-mediated stimulation of [(35)S]-GTPγS binding to membranes from CHO-K1-hH3R445 cells by 39.7 and 54.2 %, respectively, with no change in the agonist potency, and the effect was prevented by either Ro-31-8220 or Gö-6976. Exposure to ATP or TPA also resulted in the loss of cell surface H3Rs (-30.4 and -45.1 %) as evaluated by [(3)H]-NMHA binding to intact cells. These results indicate that the hH3R445 undergoes heterologous desensitization upon activation of receptors coupled to PKC stimulation. PMID:27350581

  1. Suppression of PKC-α attenuates TNF-α-evoked cerebral barrier breakdown via regulations of MMP-2 and plasminogen-plasmin system.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Zuraidah; Bayraktutan, Ulvi

    2016-07-01

    Ischaemic stroke, accompanied by neuroinflammation, impairs blood-brain barrier integrity through a complex mechanism involving both protein kinase C (PKC) and urokinase. Using an in vitro model of human blood-brain barrier (BBB) composed of brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) and astrocytes, this study assessed the putative roles of these elements in BBB damage evoked by enhanced availability of pro-inflammatory cytokine, TNF-α. Treatment of HBMEC with TNF-α significantly increased the mRNA and protein expressions of all plasminogen-plasmin system (PPS) components, namely tissue plasminogen activator, urokinase, urokinase plasminogen activator receptor and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and also the activities of urokinase, total PKC and extracellular MMP-2. Inhibition of urokinase by amiloride abated the effects of TNF-α on BBB integrity and MMP-2 activity without affecting that of total PKC. Conversely, pharmacological inhibition of conventional PKC isoforms dramatically suppressed TNF-α-induced overactivation of urokinase. Knockdown of PKC-α gene via specific siRNA in HBMEC suppressed the stimulatory effects of TNF-α on protein expression of all PPS components, MMP-2 activity, DNA fragmentation rates and pro-apoptotic caspase-3/7 activities. Establishment of co-cultures with BMEC transfected with PKC-α siRNA attenuated the disruptive effects of TNF-α on BBB integrity and function. This was partly due to elevations observed in expression of a tight junction protein, claudin-5 and partly to prevention of stress fibre formation. In conclusion, specific inhibition of PKC-α in cerebral conditions associated with exaggerated release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, notably TNF-α may be of considerable therapeutic value and help maintain endothelial cell viability, appropriate cytoskeletal structure and basement membrane.

  2. α1-Adrenoceptor activation of PKC-ε causes heterologous desensitization of thromboxane receptors in the aorta of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yingzi; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Leung, Susan W S

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose In the aorta of adult spontaneously hypertensive (SHR), but not in that of normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY), rats, previous exposure to phenylephrine inhibits subsequent contractions to PGE2. The present experiments were designed to examine the mechanism(s) underlying this inhibition. Experimental Approach Isometric tension was measured in isolated rings of SHR and WKY aortae. Gene expression and protein presence were measured by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting respectively. Key Results In aorta of 18 weeks SHR, but not age-matched WKY, pre-exposure to phenylephrine inhibited subsequent contractions to PGE2 that were mediated by thromboxane prostanoid (TP) receptors. This inhibition was not observed in preparations of pre-hypertensive 5-week-old SHR, and was significantly larger in those of 36- than 18-week-old SHR. Pre-exposure to the PKC activator, phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate, also inhibited subsequent contractions to PGE2 in SHR aortae. The selective inhibitor of PKC-ε, ε-V1-2, abolished the desensitization caused by pre-exposure to phenylephrine. Two molecular PKC bands were detected and their relative intensities differed in 36-week-old WKY and SHR vascular smooth muscle. The mRNA expressions of PKC-α, PKC-ε, PK-N2 and PKC-ζ and of G protein-coupled kinase (GRK)-2, GRK4 and β-arrestin2 were higher in SHR than WKY aortae. Conclusions and Implications These experiments suggest that in the SHR but not the WKY aorta, α1-adrenoceptor activation desensitizes TP receptors through activation of PKC-ε. This heterologous desensitization is a consequence of the chronic exposure to high arterial pressure. PMID:25857252

  3. Nicotine reduces the levels of surfactant proteins A and D via Wnt/β-catenin and PKC signaling in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zou, Weifeng; Liu, Sha; Hu, Jinxing; Sheng, Qing; He, Fang; Li, Bing; Ran, Pixin

    2016-01-15

    A deficiency of surfactant proteins A and D has been proposed as a mechanism in airway remodeling, which is one characteristic of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We recently showed that in vitro nicotine exposure induces Wnt3a/β-catenin activation, which is a pathway that has also been implicated in altering levels of SP-A and SP-D. Nicotine induced activation of protein kinase C(PKC), and the involvement of PKC in mediating Wnt signaling has been demonstrated previously. The main aim of this study was to investigate whether human bronchial epithelial cells reduce levels of SP-A and SP-D in vitro following nicotine stimulation via the Wnt3a/β-catenin and PKC signaling pathway. We showed that nicotine activated the Wnt3a/β-catenin and PKC signaling pathway, and this activation was accompanied by a decrease in SP-A and SP-D expression. Knockdown of Wnt3a with small interfering RNA (siRNA) prevented translocation of β-catenin into the nucleus and reduction levels of SP-A and SP-D. Furthermore, a PKC inhibitor partially prevented these effects,which suggests in HBECs, Wnt3a/β-catenin and PKC pathways interact during nicotine-reduced levels of SP-A and SP-D. These results suggest that HBECs reduce the levels of surfactant proteins A and D in vitro via the Wnt3a/β-catenin and PKC signaling pathway upon nicotine stimulation.

  4. Effect of PKC-β Signaling Pathway on Expression of MCP-1 and VCAM-1 in Different Cell Models in Response to Advanced Glycation End Products (AGEs)

    PubMed Central

    Rempel, Lisienny C. T.; Finco, Alessandra B.; Maciel, Rayana A. P.; Bosquetti, Bruna; Alvarenga, Larissa M.; Souza, Wesley M.; Pecoits-Filho, Roberto; Stinghen, Andréa E. M.

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are compounds classified as uremic toxins in patients with chronic kidney disease that have several pro-inflammatory effects and are implicated in the development of cardiovascular diseases. To explore the mechanisms of AGEs–endothelium interactions through the receptor for AGEs (RAGE) in the PKC-β pathway, we evaluated the production of MCP-1 and VCAM-1 in human endothelial cells (HUVECs), monocytes, and a coculture of both. AGEs were prepared by albumin glycation and characterized by absorbance and electrophoresis. The effect of AGEs on cell viability was assessed with an MTT assay. The cells were also treated with AGEs with and without a PKCinhibitor. MCP-1 and VCAM-1 in the cell supernatants were estimated by ELISA, and RAGE was evaluated by immunocytochemistry. AGEs exposure did not affect cell viability, but AGEs induced RAGE, MCP-1, and VCAM-1 expression in HUVECs. When HUVECs or monocytes were incubated with AGEs and a PKCinhibitor, MCP-1 and VCAM-1 expression significantly decreased. However, in the coculture, exposure to AGEs and a PKCinhibitor produced no significant effect. This study demonstrates, in vitro, the regulatory mechanisms involved in MCP-1 production in three cellular models and VCAM-1 production in HUVECs, and thus mimics the endothelial dysfunction caused by AGEs in early atherosclerosis. Such mechanisms could serve as therapeutic targets to reduce the harmful effects of AGEs in patients with chronic kidney disease. PMID:26008233

  5. Expression and proliferation profiles of PKC, JNK and p38MAPK in physiologically stretched human bladder smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wazir, Romel; Luo, De-Yi; Dai, Yi; Yue, Xuan; Tian, Ye; Wang, Kun-Jie

    2013-08-30

    Highlights: •Stretch induces proliferation in human bladder smooth muscle cells (HBSMC). •5% Equibiaxial elongation produces maximum proliferation. •Physiologic stretch decreases apoptotic cell death. •PKC is involved in functional modulation of bladder. •JNK and p38 are not involved in proliferating HBSMC. -- Abstract: Objective: To determine protein kinase C (PKC), c-Jun NH2-Terminal Kinase (JNK) and P38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38MAPK) expression levels and effects of their respective inhibitors on proliferation of human bladder smooth muscle cells (HBSMCs) when physiologically stretched in vitro. Materials and methods: HBSMCs were grown on silicone membrane and stretch was applied under varying conditions; (equibiaxial elongation: 2.5%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 25%), (frequency: 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1 Hz). Optimal physiological stretch was established by assessing proliferation with 5-Bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) assay and flow cytometry. PKC, JNK and p38 expression levels were analyzed by Western blot. Specificity was maintained by employing specific inhibitors; (GF109203X for PKC, SP600125 for JNK and SB203580 for p38MAPK), in some experiments. Results: Optimum proliferation was observed at 5% equibiaxial stretch (BrdU: 0.837 ± 0.026 (control) to 1.462 ± 0.023)%, (P < 0.05) and apoptotic cell death rate decreased from 16.4 ± 0.21% (control) to 4.5 ± 0.13% (P < 0.05) applied at 0.1 Hz. Expression of PKC was upregulated with slight increase in JNK and no change in p38MAPK after application of stretch. Inhibition had effects on proliferation (1.075 ± 0.024, P < 0.05 GF109203X); (1.418 ± 0.021, P > 0.05 SP600125) and (1.461 ± 0.01, P > 0.05 SB203580). These findings show that mechanical stretch can promote magnitude-dependent proliferative modulation through PKC and possibly JNK but not via p38MAPK in hBSMCs.

  6. Proinsulin C-peptide stimulates a PKC/IkappaB/NF-kappaB signaling pathway to activate COX-2 gene transcription in Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Masashi; Shibata, Yasutaka; Hashimoto, Seiichi; Ohizumi, Yasushi; Yamakuni, Tohru

    2006-06-01

    Proinsulin C-peptide causes multiple molecular and physiological effects, and improves renal and neuronal dysfunction in patients with diabetes. However, whether C-peptide controls the inhibitor kappaB (IkappaB)/NF-kappaB-dependent transcription of genes, including inflammatory genes is unknown. Here we showed that 1 nM C-peptide increased the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mRNA and its protein in Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts. Consistently, C-peptide enhanced COX-2 gene promoter-activity, which was inhibited by GF109203X and Go6976, specific PKC inhibitors, and BAY11-7082, a specific nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) inhibitor, accompanied by increased phosphorylation and degradation of IkappaB. These results suggest that C-peptide stimulates the transcription of inflammatory genes via activation of a PKC/IkappaB/NF-kappaB signaling pathway.

  7. AXL mediates resistance to PI3Kα inhibition by activating the EGFR/PKC/mTOR axis in head and neck and esophageal squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Elkabets, Moshe; Pazarentzos, Evangelos; Juric, Dejan; Sheng, Qing; Pelossof, Raphael A.; Brook, Samuel; Benzaken, Ana Oaknin; Rodon, Jordi; Morse, Natasha; Yan, Jenny Jiacheng; Liu, Manway; Das, Rita; Chen, Yan; Tam, Angela; Wang, Huiqin; Liang, Jinsheng; Gurski, Joseph M.; Kerr, Darcy A.; Rosell, Rafael; Teixidó, Cristina; Huang, Alan; Ghossein, Ronald A.; Rosen, Neal; Bivona, Trever G.; Scaltriti, Maurizio; Baselga, José

    2015-01-01

    Summary Phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K)-α inhibitors have shown clinical activity in squamous carcinoma (SCC) of head and neck (H&N) bearing PIK3CA mutations or amplification. Studying models of therapeutic resistance we have observed that SCCs cells that become refractory to PI3Kα inhibition maintain PI3K-independent activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). This persistent mTOR activation is mediated by the tyrosine kinase receptor AXL. AXL is overexpressed in resistant tumors from both laboratory models and patients treated with the PI3Kα inhibitor BYL719. AXL dimerizes with and phosphorylates epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), resulting in activation of phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ)- protein kinase C (PKC), which in turn activates mTOR. Combined treatment with PI3Kα and either EGFR, AXL, or PKC inhibitors reverts this resistance. PMID:25873175

  8. (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate suppresses proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells induced by high glucose by inhibition of PKC and ERK1/2 signalings.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian; Han, Yu; Sun, Hailan; Chen, Caiyu; He, Duofen; Guo, Jing; Yu, Changqing; Jiang, Baoquan; Zhou, Lin; Zeng, Chunyu

    2011-11-01

    Proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) plays an important role in the development and progression of diabetes-related vascular complications. (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), the major catechin derived from green tea, is able to exert antidiabetes effects in animal models. However, it is not known whether or not EGCG inhibits VSMC proliferation induced by high glucose. This study tested the hypothesis that EGCG might have an inhibitory effect on VSMC proliferation induced by high glucose. VSMC proliferation was determined by [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation and uptake of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT). Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 phosphorylation was determined by immunoblotting, and ERK 1/2 activity was detected by measuring the ability to phosphorylate its substrate Elk-1. Glucose increased VSMC proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner, which was reduced in the presence of EGCG. VSMC proliferation mediated by high glucose (30 mM) was involved in protein kinase C (PKC) and ERK1/2 signalings, because its effect was blocked by PKC inhibitor (PKC inhibitor 19-31) and ERK1/2 inhibitor (PD98059). Pretreatment of VSMCs with EGCG significantly inhibited the stimulatory effect of high glucose on PKC and ERK1/2 activation, followed by attenuation of its downstream transcription factor Elk-1 phosphorylation. Taken together, these results suggest that EGCG could suppress VSMC proliferation induced by high glucose by inhibition of PKC and ERK1/2 signalings in VSMCs, which indicates that EGCG might be a possible medicine to reduce vascular complications in diabetes.

  9. Cocaine-seeking is associated with PKC-dependent reduction of excitatory signaling in accumbens shell D2 dopamine receptor-expressing neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ortinski, Pavel I.; Briand, Lisa A.; Pierce, R. Christopher; Schmidt, Heath D.

    2015-01-01

    Stimulation of D1-like dopamine receptors (D1DRs) or D2-like dopamine receptors (D2DRs) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell reinstates cocaine seeking in rats, an animal model of relapse. D2DRs and D1DRs activate protein kinase C (PKC) and recent studies indicate that activation of PKC in the NAc plays an important role in the reinstatement of drug seeking induced by a systemic cocaine priming injection. In the present study, pharmacological inhibition of PKC in the NAc shell attenuated cocaine seeking induced by intra-accumbens shell microinjection of a D2DR agonist, but not a D1DR agonist. D1DRs and D2DRs are primarily expressed on different accumbens medium spiny (MSN) neurons. Neuronal signaling and activity were assessed in these two populations of NAc neurons with transgenic mice expressing fluorescent labels under the control of D1DR and D2DR promoters. Following the extinction of cocaine self-administration, bath application of a PKC inhibitor produced similar effects on single evoked excitatory and inhibitory post-synaptic currents in D1DR- and D2DR-positive MSNs in the NAc shell. However, inhibition of PKC preferentially improved the ability of excitatory, but not inhibitory, synapses to sustain responding to brief train of stimuli specifically in D2DR-positive MSNs. This effect did not appear to involve modulation of presynaptic release mechanisms. Taken together, these findings indicate that the reinstatement of cocaine seeking is at least partially due to D2DR-dependent increases in PKC signaling in the NAc shell, which reduce excitatory synaptic efficacy in D2DR-expressing MSNs. PMID:25596492

  10. Cocaine-seeking is associated with PKC-dependent reduction of excitatory signaling in accumbens shell D2 dopamine receptor-expressing neurons.

    PubMed

    Ortinski, Pavel I; Briand, Lisa A; Pierce, R Christopher; Schmidt, Heath D

    2015-05-01

    Stimulation of D1-like dopamine receptors (D1DRs) or D2-like dopamine receptors (D2DRs) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell reinstates cocaine seeking in rats, an animal model of relapse. D2DRs and D1DRs activate protein kinase C (PKC) and recent studies indicate that activation of PKC in the NAc plays an important role in the reinstatement of drug seeking induced by a systemic cocaine priming injection. In the present study, pharmacological inhibition of PKC in the NAc shell attenuated cocaine seeking induced by intra-accumbens shell microinjection of a D2DR agonist, but not a D1DR agonist. D1DRs and D2DRs are primarily expressed on different accumbens medium spiny (MSN) neurons. Neuronal signaling and activity were assessed in these two populations of NAc neurons with transgenic mice expressing fluorescent labels under the control of D1DR and D2DR promoters. Following the extinction of cocaine self-administration, bath application of a PKC inhibitor produced similar effects on single evoked excitatory and inhibitory post-synaptic currents in D1DR- and D2DR-positive MSNs in the NAc shell. However, inhibition of PKC preferentially improved the ability of excitatory, but not inhibitory, synapses to sustain responding to brief train of stimuli specifically in D2DR-positive MSNs. This effect did not appear to involve modulation of presynaptic release mechanisms. Taken together, these findings indicate that the reinstatement of cocaine seeking is at least partially due to D2DR-dependent increases in PKC signaling in the NAc shell, which reduce excitatory synaptic efficacy in D2DR-expressing MSNs. PMID:25596492

  11. PDK1 in apical signaling endosomes participates in the rescue of the polarity complex atypical PKC by intermediate filaments in intestinal epithelia.

    PubMed

    Mashukova, Anastasia; Forteza, Radia; Wald, Flavia A; Salas, Pedro J

    2012-05-01

    Phosphorylation of the activation domain of protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms is essential to start a conformational change that results in an active catalytic domain. This activation is necessary not only for newly synthesized molecules, but also for kinase molecules that become dephosphorylated and need to be refolded and rephosphorylated. This "rescue" mechanism is responsible for the maintenance of the steady-state levels of atypical PKC (aPKC [PKCι/λ and ζ]) and is blocked in inflammation. Although there is consensus that phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1) is the activating kinase for newly synthesized molecules, it is unclear what kinase performs that function during the rescue and where the rescue takes place. To identify the activating kinase during the rescue mechanism, we inhibited protein synthesis and analyzed the stability of the remaining aPKC pool. PDK1 knockdown and two different PDK1 inhibitors-BX-912 and a specific pseudosubstrate peptide-destabilized PKCι. PDK1 coimmunoprecipitated with PKCι in cells without protein synthesis, confirming that the interaction is direct. In addition, we showed that PDK1 aids the rescue of aPKC in in vitro rephosphorylation assays using immunodepletion and rescue with recombinant protein. Surprisingly, we found that in Caco-2 epithelial cells and intestinal crypt enterocytes PDK1 distributes to an apical membrane compartment comprising plasma membrane and apical endosomes, which, in turn, are in close contact with intermediate filaments. PDK1 comigrated with the Rab11 compartment and, to some extent, with the transferrin compartment in sucrose gradients. PDK1, pT555-aPKC, and pAkt were dependent on dynamin activity. These results highlight a novel signaling function of apical endosomes in polarized cells.

  12. PKC-dependent extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 pathway is involved in the inhibition of Ib on AngiotensinII-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yu; Yan Tianhua; Wang Qiujuan Wang Wei; Xu Jinyi; Wu Xiaoming; Ji Hui

    2008-10-10

    AngiotensinII (AngII) induces vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation, which plays an important role in the development and progression of hypertension. AngII-induced cellular events have been implicated, in part, in the activation of protein kinase C (PKC) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2). In the present study, we investigated the effect of Ib, a novel nonpeptide AngII receptor type 1 (AT{sub 1}) antagonist, on the activation of PKC and ERK1/2 in VSMC proliferation induced by AngII. MTT, and [{sup 3}H]thymidine incorporation assay showed that AngII-induced VSMC proliferation was inhibited significantly by Ib. The specific binding of [{sup 125}I]AngII to AT{sub 1} receptors was blocked by Ib in a concentration-dependent manner with IC{sub 50} value of 0.96 nM. PKC activity assay and Western blot analysis demonstrated that Ib significantly inhibited the activation of PKC and phosphorylation of ERK1/2 induced by AngII, respectively. Furthermore, AngII-induced ERK1/2 activation was obviously blocked by GF109203X, a PKC inhibitor. These findings suggest that the suppression of Ib on AngII-induced VSMC proliferation may be attributed to its inhibitory effect on PKC-dependent ERK1/2 pathway.

  13. The role of PKA, CaMKII, and PKC in avoidance conditioning: permissive or instructive?

    PubMed

    Shobe, Justin

    2002-05-01

    This article explores the causal and correlative relationships between kinases and learning and memory. Specifically, the contributions of three kinases-protein kinase A (PKA), calcium calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), and protein kinase C (PKC)-are assessed during the consolidation phase of avoidance conditioning. The following sources of evidence are considered: inhibitor data, activity monitoring, and transgenic studies. An exhaustive effort is made to address several issues regarding the participation of these kinases in (a) posttraining timing and magnitude, (b) location across many brain regions, and (c) the use of multiple pharmacological agents and assays. In addition, this article attempts to integrate the behavioral data with the purported role of kinases in long-term potentiation (LTP).

  14. Locomotion in Lymphocytes is Altered by Differential PKC Isoform Expression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundaresan, A.; Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.

    1999-01-01

    Lymphocyte locomotion is critical for proper elicitation of the immune response. Locomotion of immune cells via the interstitium is essential for optimal immune function during wound healing, inflammation and infection. There are conditions which alter lymphocyte locomotion and one of them is spaceflight. Lymphocyte locomotion is severely inhibited in true spaceflight (true microgravity) and in rotating wall vessel culture (modeled microgravity). When lymphocytes are activated prior to culture in modeled microgravity, locomotion is not inhibited and the levels are comparable to those of static cultured lymphocytes. When a phorbol ester (PMA) is used in modeled microgravity, lymphocyte locomotion is restored by 87%. This occurs regardless if PMA is added after culture in the rotating wall vessel or during culture. Inhibition of DNA synthesis also does not alter restoration of lymphocyte locomotion by PMA. PMA is a direct activator of (protein kinase C) PKC . When a calcium ionophore, ionomycin is used it does not possess any restorative properties towards locomotion either alone or collectively with PMA. Since PMA brings about restoration without help from calcium ionophores (ionomycin), it is infer-red that calcium independent PKC isoforms are involved. Changes were perceived in the protein levels of PKC 6 where levels of the protein were downregulated at 24,72 and 96 hours in untreated rotated cultures (modeled microgravity) compared to untreated static (1g) cultures. At 48 hours there is an increase in the levels of PKC & in the same experimental set up. Studies on transcriptional and translational patterns of calcium independent isoforms of PKC such as 8 and E are presented in this study.

  15. Excretory-secretory products from Paragonimus westermani increase nitric oxide production in microglia in PKC-dependent and -independent manners.

    PubMed

    Jin, Youngnam; Choi, In Young; Kim, Chunsook; Hong, Suyoung; Kim, Won-Ki

    2009-10-01

    Excretory-secretory products (ESP) from helminthic parasites may play pivotal roles in the immune regulation in hosts. Previously, we reported that ESP produced from Paragonimus westermani induced morphological activation of microglial cells and markedly stimulated nitric oxide (NO) production via activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). In the present study, we investigated the role of protein kinase C and protein kinase A in MAPKs-dependent NO production by ESP. We found that treatment with protein kinase C inhibitor Go6976 strongly inhibited the phosphorylation of p38 and JNK, but not ERK, of MAPKs and decreased the production of NO in ESP-stimulated microglial cells. Inhibition of ERK, p38 or PKC decreased the ESP-induced activation of NF-kappaB, an important transcription factor for iNOS expression. Furthermore, ESP increased the level of p-CREB in microglial cells. However, adenylyl cyclase activator (forskolin), adenylyl cyclase inhibitor (SQ22536), cAMP analogue (db-cAMP) or protein kinase A inhibitor (H89) was not able to change iNOS expression and NO production in ESP-treated microglial cells. It implies that the cAMP-PKA-CREB pathway is not implicated in the ESP-evoked NO production in microglial cells. Thus, our results indicate that ESP stimulates microglial expression of iNOS via both PKC-dependent and -independent MAPKs phosphorylation and NF-kappaB activation.

  16. Suppression of A549 cell proliferation and metastasis by calycosin via inhibition of the PKC-α/ERK1/2 pathway: An in vitro investigation

    PubMed Central

    CHENG, XU-DONG; GU, JUN-FEI; YUAN, JIA-RUI; FENG, LIANG; JIA, XIAO-BIN

    2015-01-01

    The migration and invasion of lung cancer cells into the extracellular matrix contributes to the high mortality rates of lung cancer. The protein kinase C (PKC) and downstream signaling pathways are important in the invasion and migration of lung cancer cells. Calycosin (Cal), an effector chemical from Astragalus has been reported to affect the recurrence and metastasis of cancer cells via the regulation of the protein expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). The inhibition of Cal on the migration and invasion of A549 cells was investigated in the present study. Cell viability and apoptosis assays were performed using MTT and flow cytometric analyses. A wound healing assay and Transwell invasion assay were performed to evaluate the effect of Cal on A549 cell migration and invasion. Invasion-associated proteins, including MMP-2, MMP-9, E-cadherin (E-cad), integrin β1, PKC-α and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) were detected using western blotting. In addition, PKCinhibitor, AEB071, and ERK1/2 inhibitor, PD98059, were used to determine the association between the suppression of PKC-α/ERK1/2 and invasion, MMP-2, MMP-9, E-cad and integrin β1. Cal was observed to suppress cell proliferation and induce apoptosis. There were significant differences between the phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (TPA)-induced A549 cells treated with Cal and the untreated cells in the rates of migration and invasion. The levels of MMP-2, MMP-9, E-cad and integrin β1 in the TPA-induced A549 cells changed markedly, compared with the untreated cells. In addition, the suppression of Cal was affected by the PKC inhibitor, AEB071, an ERK1/2 inhibitor, PD98059. The results of the present study indicated that Cal inhibited the proliferation, adhesion, migration and invasion of the TPA-induced A549 cells. The Cal-induced repression of PKC-α/ERK1/2, increased the expression of E-Cad and inhibited the expression levels of MMP-2, MMP-9 and integrin β1, which possibly

  17. Ethanol and diolein stimulate PKC (protein kinase C) translocation in astroglial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Skwish, S. ); Shain, W. New York State Department of Health, Albany )

    1990-01-01

    Ethanol exposure stimulates taurine release from astroglial cells. To determine if ethanol mediates this release using protein kinase C (PKC), PKC activity was measured using LRM55 astroglial cells. When ethanol or diolein was applied to cells for 30 seconds, PKC activity was observed to decrease in the cytosol and increase in the membrane fraction of the cell while the whole cell activity remained unchanged. The membrane-associated activity increased by almost 100%. When ethanol and diolein were applied simultaneously, membrane-associated activity increased to become 3-5 times greater than when either PKC activator was applied alone. These changes in PKC activity parallel changes in taurine release observed when cells are exposed to ethanol and the PKC activator diolein. Ethanol-stimulated release may be associated with the translocation of PKC activity from the cytosol to the membrane.

  18. Different effect of chronic stress on learning and memory in BALB/c and C57BL/6 inbred mice: Involvement of hippocampal NO production and PKC activity.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, María Laura; Zorrilla Zubilete, María Aurelia; Cremaschi, Graciela Alicia; Genaro, Ana María

    2009-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been involved in many pathophysiological brain processes. Recently, we showed that neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-mediated decrease in NO production is involved in memory impairment induced by chronic mild stress (CMS) in BALB/c mice. Two genetically different inbred murine strains, C57BL/6 and BALB/c, show distinct behavioral responses, neurodevelopmental and neurochemical parameters. Here, we perform a comparative study on CMS effects upon learning and memory in both strains, analyzing the role of NO production and its regulation by protein kinase C (PKC). Stressed BALB/c, but not C57Bl/6 mice, showed a poor learning performance in both the open field and passive avoidance inhibitory tasks. Also, CMS induced a diminished NO production by nNOS, associated with an increment in gamma and zeta PKC isoenzymes in BALB/c mice. In C57BL/6 mice, CMS had no effect on NO production, but increased delta and decreased betaI PKC isoforms. In vivo administration of a NOS inhibitor induced behavioral alterations in both strains. These results suggest a differential effect of stress, with BALB/c being more vulnerable to stress than C57BL/6 mice. This effect could be related to a differential regulation of NOS and PKC isoenzymes, pointing to an important role of NO in learning and memory.

  19. Curcuminoids promote neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells through MAPK/ERK- and PKC-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Liao, Kuo-Kai; Wu, Ming-Jiuan; Chen, Pei-Yi; Huang, Szu-Wei; Chiu, Shu-Jun; Ho, Chi-Tang; Yen, Jui-Hung

    2012-01-11

    Curcuminoids, the predominant polyphenolic compounds in the rhizome of Curcuma longa Linn., consist of curcumin, demethoxycurcumin (DMC), and bisdemethoxycurcumin (BDMC). They exhibit multiple desirable characteristics for a neuroprotective agent including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiamyloid activities. In this work, we report the first investigation of the neurotrophic action and mechanism of curcuminoids in PC12 cells, which respond to nerve growth factor (NGF) and therefore serve as a model system for primary neuronal cells. The percentages of neurite-bearing cells for those treated with 20 μM curcumin, DMC, and BDMC for 72 h reached 21.6 ± 2.0%, 16.3 ± 2.4%, and 19.9 ± 2.5%, respectively, and were significantly higher than that of the negative control (2.0 ± 0.3%, p < 0.05). In parallel, increased expression of the neuronal differentiation markers, growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43), and neurofilament-L (NF-L) was found in curcuminoid-treated cells. All three curcuminoids (20 μM) activated extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and protein kinase C (PKC) signalings, and inhibition of these kinases with the respective pharmacological inhibitors effectively attenuated curcuminoid-induced neurite outgrowth. Furthermore, our results show that both curcumin and DMC, but not BDMC, induced phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and CRE-reporter gene activity significantly (p < 0.05). These inductions were markedly attenuated by the addition of MEK/ERK or PKC inhibitor; as a consequence, ERK- and PKC-dependent pathways may be involved in curcuminoid-mediated neuritogenesis in PC12 cells. Moreover, activation of CREB coupling with CRE-dependent gene transcription may play a vital role for curcumin- or DMC-induced PC12 differentiation. PMID:22145830

  20. A kinase inhibitor screen reveals protein kinase C-dependent endocytic recycling of ErbB2 in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Tameka A; Luan, Haitao; Tom, Eric; Bielecki, Timothy Alan; Mohapatra, Bhopal; Ahmad, Gulzar; George, Manju; Kelly, David L; Natarajan, Amarnath; Raja, Srikumar M; Band, Vimla; Band, Hamid

    2014-10-31

    ErbB2 overexpression drives oncogenesis in 20-30% cases of breast cancer. Oncogenic potential of ErbB2 is linked to inefficient endocytic traffic into lysosomes and preferential recycling. However, regulation of ErbB2 recycling is incompletely understood. We used a high-content immunofluorescence imaging-based kinase inhibitor screen on SKBR-3 breast cancer cells to identify kinases whose inhibition alters the clearance of cell surface ErbB2 induced by Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG. Less ErbB2 clearance was observed with broad-spectrum PKC inhibitor Ro 31-8220. A similar effect was observed with Go 6976, a selective inhibitor of classical Ca(2+)-dependent PKCs (α, β1, βII, and γ). PKC activation by PMA promoted surface ErbB2 clearance but without degradation, and ErbB2 was observed to move into a juxtanuclear compartment where it colocalized with PKC-α and PKC-δ together with the endocytic recycling regulator Arf6. PKC-α knockdown impaired the juxtanuclear localization of ErbB2. ErbB2 transit to the recycling compartment was also impaired upon PKC-δ knockdown. PMA-induced Erk phosphorylation was reduced by ErbB2 inhibitor lapatinib, as well as by knockdown of PKC-δ but not that of PKC-α. Our results suggest that activation of PKC-α and -δ mediates a novel positive feedback loop by promoting ErbB2 entry into the endocytic recycling compartment, consistent with reported positive roles for these PKCs in ErbB2-mediated tumorigenesis. As the endocytic recycling compartment/pericentrion has emerged as a PKC-dependent signaling hub for G-protein-coupled receptors, our findings raise the possibility that oncogenesis by ErbB2 involves previously unexplored PKC-dependent endosomal signaling.

  1. Glutamate-dependent transcriptional regulation of GLAST: role of PKC.

    PubMed

    López-Bayghen, Esther; Ortega, Arturo

    2004-10-01

    The Na+-dependent glutamate/aspartate transporter GLAST plays a major role in the removal of glutamate from the synaptic cleft. Short-term, as well as long-term changes in transporter activity are triggered by glutamate. An important locus of regulation is the density of transporter molecules present at the plasma membrane. A substrate-dependent change in the translocation rate of the transporter molecules accounts for the short-term effect, whereas the long-term modulation apparently involves transcriptional regulation. Using cultured chick cerebellar Bergmann glial cells, we report here that glutamate receptors activation mediate a substantial reduction in the transcriptional activity of the chglast promoter through the Ca2+/diacylglicerol-dependent protein kinase (PKC) signaling cascade. Overexpression of constitutive active PKC isoforms of mimic the glutamate effect. Accordingly, increased levels of c-Jun or c-Fos, but not Jun-B, Jun-D or Fos-B, lower the chglast promoter activity. Serial deletions and electrophorectic mobility shift assays were used to define a specific region within the 5' proximal region of the chglast promoter, associated with transcriptional repression. A putative glutamate response element could be defined in the proximal promoter stretch more likely between nts -40 and -78. These results demonstrate that GLAST is under glutamate-dependent transcriptional control through PKC, and support the notion of a pivotal role of this neurotransmitter in the regulation of its own removal from the synaptic cleft, thereby modulating, mainly in the long term, glutamatergic transmission.

  2. Glutamine contributes to maintenance of mouse embryonic stem cell self-renewal through PKC-dependent downregulation of HDAC1 and DNMT1/3a

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Jung Min; Lee, Sang Hun; Seong, Je Kyung; Han, Ho Jae

    2015-01-01

    Although glutamine (Gln) is not an essential amino acid, it is considered a critical substrate in many key metabolic processes that control a variety of physiological functions and are involved in regulating early embryonic development. Thus, we investigated the effect of Gln on regulation of mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) self-renewal and related signaling pathways. Gln deprivation decreased Oct4 expression as well as expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins. However, Gln treatment retained the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins and the Oct4 in mESCs, which were blocked by compound 968 (a glutaminase inhibitor). In addition, Gln stimulated PI3K/Akt pathway, which subsequently elicited PKCε translocation to membrane without an influx of intracellular Ca2+. Inhibition of Akt and PKC blocked Gln-induced Oct4 expression and proliferation. Gln also stimulated mTOR phosphorylation in a time-dependent manner, which abolished by PKC inhibition. Furthermore, Gln increased the cellular population of both Oct4 and bromodeoxyuridine positive cells, suggesting that Gln regulates self-renewal ability of mESCs. Gln induced a decrease in HDAC1, but not in HDAC2, which were blocked by PKC inhibitors. Gln treatment resulted in an increase in global histone acetylation and methylation. In addition, Gln significantly reduced methylation of the Oct4 promoter region through decrease in DNMT1 and DNMT3a expression, which were blocked by PKC and HDAC inhibitors. In conclusion, Gln stimulates mESC proliferation and maintains mESC undifferentiation status through transcription regulation via the Akt, PKCε, and mTOR signaling pathways. PMID:26375799

  3. Bryostatin activates HIV-1 latent expression in human astrocytes through a PKC and NF-ĸB-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Laura; Martínez-Bonet, Marta; Sánchez, Javier; Fernández-Pineda, Alejandra; Jiménez, José Luis; Muñoz, Eduardo; Moreno, Santiago; Álvarez, Susana; Muñoz-Fernández, Mª Ángeles

    2015-01-01

    Multiple studies have shown that HIV-1 patients may develop virus reservoirs that impede eradication; these reservoirs include the central nervous system (CNS). Despite an undetectable viral load in patients treated with potent antiretrovirals, current therapy is unable to purge the virus from these latent reservoirs. To broaden the inhibitory range and effectiveness of current antiretrovirals, the potential of bryostatin was investigated as a latent HIV-1 activator. We used primary astrocytes, NHA cells, and astrocytoma cells U-87. Infected cells with HIV-1NL4.3 were treated with bryostatin alone or in combination with different inhibitors. HIV-1 production was quantified by using ELISA. Transcriptional activity was measured using luciferase reporter gene assays by using lipofectin. We performed cotransfection experiments of the LTR promoter with the active NF-κB member p65/relA. To confirm the NF-κB role, Western blot and confocal microscopy were performed. Bryostatin reactivates latent viral infection in the NHA and U87 cells via activation of protein kinase C (PKC)-alpha and -delta, because the PKC inhibitors rottlerin and GF109203X abrogated the bryostatin effect. No alteration in cell proliferation was found. Moreover, bryostatin strongly stimulated LTR transcription by activating the transcription factor NF-κB. Bryostatin could be a beneficial adjunct to the treatment of HIV-1 brain infection. PMID:26199173

  4. Leptin inhibits the Na(+)/K(+) ATPase in Caco-2 cells via PKC and p38MAPK.

    PubMed

    El-Zein, Ola; Usta, Julnar; El Moussawi, Layla; Kreydiyyeh, Sawsan Ibrahim

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrated previously an inhibitory effect of luminal leptin on glucose absorption in differentiated Caco-2 cells. Since this process is dependent on the Na(+) gradient established by the Na(+)/K(+)ATPase this work was undertaken to investigate if the ATPase is one of the hormone's targets. Fully differentiated Caco-2 cells were incubated with 10nM luminal leptin and the activity of the Na(+)/K(+) ATPase was assayed by measuring the amount of inorganic phosphate liberated. To elucidate the signaling pathway involved, the suspected mediators, namely PKC, p38MAPK, ERK and PI3K, were inhibited with specific pharmacological inhibitors and their implication was confirmed by determining changes in the protein expression of their active phosphorylated forms by Western blot analysis. Leptin reduced significantly the activity of the Na(+)/K(+) ATPase, by activating p38MAPK via inhibition of PKC, an upstream inhibitor of the kinase. ERK and PI3K are modulators of the pump and are not along the pathway activated by leptin but cross talk with it at the level of p38MAPK.

  5. Increased extracellular pressure stimulates tumor proliferation by a mechanosensitive calcium channel and PKC-β.

    PubMed

    Basson, Marc D; Zeng, Bixi; Downey, Christina; Sirivelu, Madhu P; Tepe, Jetze J

    2015-02-01

    Large tumors exhibit high interstitial pressure heightened by growth against the constraining stroma. Such pressures could stimulate tumor proliferation via a mechanosensitive ion channel. We studied the effects of 0-80 mmHg increased extracellular pressure for 24 h on proliferation of SW620, Caco-2, and CT-26 colon; MCF-7 breast; and MLL and PC3 prostate cancer cells, and delineated its mechanism in SW620 cells with specific inhibitors and siRNA. Finally, we compared NF-kB, phospho-IkB and cyclin D1 immunoreactivity in the high pressure centers and low pressure peripheries of human tumors. Pressure-stimulated proliferation in all cells. Pressure-driven SW620 proliferation required calcium influx via the T-type Ca(2+) channel Cav3.3, which stimulated PKC-β to invoke the IKK-IkB-NF-kB pathway to increase proliferation and S-phase fraction. The mitotic index and immunoreactivity of NF-kB, phospho-IkB, and cyclin D1 in the center of 28 large human colon, lung, and head and neck tumors exceeded that in tumor peripheries. Extracellular pressure increases [Ca(2+)]i via Cav3.3, driving a PKC-β- IKK- IkB-NF-kB pathway that stimulates cancer cell proliferation. Rapid proliferation in large stiff tumors may increase intratumoral pressure, activating this pathway to stimulate further proliferation in a feedback cycle that potentiates tumor growth. Targeting this pathway may inhibit proliferation in large unresectable tumors.

  6. Increased extracellular pressure stimulates tumor proliferation by a mechanosensitive calcium channel and PKC

    PubMed Central

    Basson, Marc D.; Zeng, Bixi; Downey, Christina; Siriveluprabhakar, Madhu; Tepe, Jetze J.

    2014-01-01

    Large tumors exhibit high interstitial pressure heightened by growth against the constraining stroma. Such pressures could stimulate tumor proliferation via a mechanosensitive ion channel. We studied the effects of 0–80 mm Hg increased extracellular pressure for 24 hours on proliferation of SW620, Caco-2, and CT-26 colon; MCF-7 breast; and MLL and PC3 prostate cancer cells, and delineated its mechanism in SW620 cells with specific inhibitors and siRNA. Finally, we compared NF-kB, phospho-IkB and cyclin D1 immunoreactivity in the high pressure centers and low pressure peripheries of human tumors. Pressure stimulated proliferation in all cells. Pressure-driven SW620 proliferation required calcium influx via the T-type Ca2+ channel Cav3.3, which stimulated PKC-β to invoke the IKK-IkB-NF-kB pathway to increase proliferation and S-phase fraction. The mitotic index and immunoreactivity of NF-kB, phospho-IkB, and cyclin D1 in the center of 28 large human colon, lung, and head and neck tumors exceeded that in tumor peripheries. Extracellular pressure increases [Ca2+]i via Cav3.3, driving a PKC-β-IKK-IkB-NF-kB pathway that stimulates cancer cell proliferation. Rapid proliferation in large stiff tumors may increase intratumoral pressure, activating this pathway to stimulate further proliferation in a feedback cycle that potentiates tumor growth. Targeting this pathway may inhibit proliferation in large unresectable tumors. PMID:25454347

  7. Lipid emulsion inhibits vasodilation induced by a toxic dose of bupivacaine by suppressing bupivacaine-induced PKC and CPI-17 dephosphorylation but has no effect on vasodilation induced by a toxic dose of mepivacaine

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyunhoo; Ok, Seong Ho; Kwon, Seong Chun; Lee, Soo Hee; Baik, Jiseok; Kang, Sebin; Oh, Jiah

    2016-01-01

    Background The goal of this in vitro study was to investigate the effect of lipid emulsion on vasodilation caused by toxic doses of bupivacaine and mepivacaine during contraction induced by a protein kinase C (PKC) activator, phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu), in an isolated endothelium-denuded rat aorta. Methods The effects of lipid emulsion on the dose-response curves induced by bupivacaine or mepivacaine in an isolated aorta precontracted with PDBu were assessed. In addition, the effects of bupivacaine on the increased intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) and contraction induced by PDBu were investigated using fura-2 loaded aortic strips. Further, the effects of bupivacaine, the PKC inhibitor GF109203X and lipid emulsion, alone or in combination, on PDBu-induced PKC and phosphorylation-dependent inhibitory protein of myosin phosphatase (CPI-17) phosphorylation in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) was examined by western blotting. Results Lipid emulsion attenuated the vasodilation induced by bupivacaine, whereas it had no effect on that induced by mepivacaine. Lipid emulsion had no effect on PDBu-induced contraction. The magnitude of bupivacaine-induced vasodilation was higher than that of the bupivacaine-induced decrease in [Ca2+]i. PDBu promoted PKC and CPI-17 phosphorylation in aortic VSMCs. Bupivacaine and GF109203X attenuated PDBu-induced PKC and CPI-17 phosphorylation, whereas lipid emulsion attenuated bupivacaine-mediated inhibition of PDBu-induced PKC and CPI-17 phosphorylation. Conclusions These results suggest that lipid emulsion attenuates the vasodilation induced by a toxic dose of bupivacaine via inhibition of bupivacaine-induced PKC and CPI-17 dephosphorylation. This lipid emulsion-mediated inhibition of vasodilation may be partly associated with the lipid solubility of local anesthetics. PMID:27738501

  8. Virtual screening of protein kinase C inhibitors from natural product library to modulate general anaesthetic effects.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junhui; Zhou, Chuixian

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) plays a key role in neurotransmission in the central nervous system, and targeting PKC domain is considered as a strategy to modulate the anaesthetic effects. In this study, we described a synthetic pipeline to perform high-throughput virtual screening against a large library of 3D structural natural products released recently in order to discover those potential PKC modulators. A total of 100 natural products with top scores were raised, from which 12 promising candidates were tested to determine their inhibitory potencies against PKC. As might be expected, the promiscuous kinase inhibitor staurosporine showed a high PKC inhibitory activity (IC50 = 64 nM), and other two tested compounds, i.e. fisetin and tetrahydropapaverine, were also highly potent with their activities at nanomolar level (IC50 = 370 and 190, respectively).

  9. Requirements for PKC-augmented JNK activation by MKK4/7

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Bergami, Pablo; Ronai, Ze'ev

    2008-01-01

    The c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) are activated in response to stress, DNA damage, and cytokines by MKK4 and MKK7. We recently demonstrated that PKC can augment the degree of JNK activation by phosphorylating JNK, which requires the adaptor protein RACK1. Here we report on the conditions required for PKC-dependent JNK activation. In vitro kinase assays reveal that PKC phosphorylation of JNK is not sufficient for its activation but rather augments JNK activation by canonical JNK upstream kinases MKK4 or MKK7 alone or in combination. Further, to enhance JNK activity, PKC phosphorylation of JNK should precede its phosphorylation by MKK4/7. Inhibition of PKC phosphorylation of JNK affects both early and late phases of JNK activation following UV-irradiation and reduces the apoptotic response mediated by JNK. These data provide important insight into the requirements for PKC activation of JNK signaling. PMID:18182317

  10. Nicotine- and tar-free cigarette smoke induces cell damage through reactive oxygen species newly generated by PKC-dependent activation of NADPH oxidase.

    PubMed

    Asano, Hiroshi; Horinouchi, Takahiro; Mai, Yosuke; Sawada, Osamu; Fujii, Shunsuke; Nishiya, Tadashi; Minami, Masabumi; Katayama, Takahiro; Iwanaga, Toshihiko; Terada, Koji; Miwa, Soichi

    2012-01-01

    We examined cytotoxic effects of nicotine/tar-free cigarette smoke extract (CSE) on C6 glioma cells. The CSE induced plasma membrane damage (determined by lactate dehydrogenase leakage and propidium iodide uptake) and cell apoptosis {determined by MTS [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium] reduction activity and DNA fragmentation}. The cytotoxic activity decayed with a half-life of approximately 2 h at 37°C, and it was abolished by N-acetyl-L-cysteine and reduced glutathione. The membrane damage was prevented by catalase and edaravone (a scavenger of (•)OH) but not by superoxide dismutase, indicating involvement of (•)OH. In contrast, the CSE-induced cell apoptosis was resistant to edaravone and induced by authentic H(2)O(2) or O(2)(-) generated by the xanthine/xanthine oxidase system, indicating involvement of H(2)O(2) or O(2)(-) in cell apoptosis. Diphenyleneiodonium [NADPH oxidase (NOX) inhibitor] and bisindolylmaleimide I [BIS I, protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor] abolished membrane damage, whereas they partially inhibited apoptosis. These results demonstrate that 1) a stable component(s) in the CSE activates PKC, which stimulates NOX to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), causing membrane damage and apoptosis; 2) different ROS are responsible for membrane damage and apoptosis; and 3) part of the apoptosis is caused by oxidants independently of PKC and NOX. PMID:22302021

  11. Zinc pyrithione induces ERK- and PKC-dependent necrosis distinct from TPEN-induced apoptosis in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Carraway, Robert E; Dobner, Paul R

    2012-02-01

    Zinc dyshomeostasis can induce cell death. However, the mechanisms involved have not been fully elucidated in prostate cancer (PCa) cells, which differ dramatically from normal cells in their zinc handling ability. Here, we studied the effects of the ionophore Zn-pyrithione (ZP) and the chelator N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN). Both compounds induced cell death at micromolar concentrations when incubated with androgen-dependent (LNCaP), androgen-independent (PC3, DU145) and androgen-sensitive (C4-2) PCa cell-lines. Compared to PCa cells, RWPE1 prostate epithelial cells were less sensitive to ZP and more sensitive to TPEN, but total cellular zinc levels were changed similarly. ZnSO4 enhanced the toxicity of ZP, but inhibited the effects of TPEN as expected. The morphological/biochemical responses to ZP and TPEN differed. ZP decreased ATP levels and stimulated ERK, AKT and PKC phosphorylation. DNA laddering was observed only at low doses of ZP but all doses of TPEN. TPEN activated caspase 3/7 and induced PARP-cleavage, DNA-fragmentation, ROS-formation and apoptotic bodies. PKC and ERK-pathway inhibitors, and antioxidants protected against ZP-induced but not TPEN-induced death. Inhibitors of MPTP-opening protected both. Cell death in response to TPEN (but not ZP) was diminished by a calpain inhibitor and largely prevented by a caspase 3 inhibitor. Overall, the results indicated primarily a necrotic cell death for ZP and an apoptotic cell death for TPEN. The enhanced sensitivity of PCa cells to ZP and the apparent ability of ZP and TPEN to kill quiescent and rapidly dividing cells in a p53-independent manner suggest that ZP/TPEN might be used to develop adjunct treatments for PCa. PMID:22027089

  12. Regulation of aPKC activity by Nup358 dependent SUMO modification

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Santosh Kumar; Magre, Indrasen; Singh, Aditi; Khuperkar, Deepak; Joseph, Jomon

    2016-01-01

    Atypical PKC (aPKC) family members are involved in regulation of diverse cellular processes, including cell polarization. aPKCs are known to be activated by phosphorylation of specific threonine residues in the activation loop and turn motif. They can also be stimulated by interaction with Cdc42~GTP-Par6 complex. Here we report that PKCζ, a member of the aPKC family, is activated by SUMOylation. We show that aPKC is endogenously modified by SUMO1 and the nucleoporin Nup358 acts as its SUMO E3 ligase. Results from in vitro SUMOylation and kinase assays showed that the modification enhances the kinase activity of PKCζ by ~10-fold. By monitoring the phosphorylation of Lethal giant larvae (Lgl), a downstream target of aPKC, we confirmed these findings in vivo. Consistent with the function of Nup358 as a SUMO E3 ligase for aPKC, depletion of Nup358 attenuated the extent of SUMOylation and the activity of aPKC. Moreover, overexpression of the C-terminal fragment of Nup358 that possesses the E3 ligase activity enhanced SUMOylation of endogenous aPKC and its kinase activity. Collectively, our studies reveal a role for Nup358-dependent SUMOylation in the regulation of aPKC activity and provide a framework for understanding the role of Nup358 in cell polarity. PMID:27682244

  13. Implication of PKC in the seasonal variation of the immune response of the hemocytes of Mytilus galloprovincialis Lmk. and its role in interleukin-2-induced nitric oxide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Novas, Ana; Barcia, Ramiro; Ramos-Martínez, Juan Ignacio

    2007-10-01

    The hemocytes are the cells responsible for the immune response in marine mollusks. The role of NO in processes related to the activation of the hemocytes has turned out evident over the late years. In the case of the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis Lmk., hemocyte NO basal production varies throughout the year, showing a maximum in summer and a minimum in winter. IL-2 reverts the low winter NO basal production through a process mediated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase and by an apparent side effect of protein kinase C. The seasonal variation of NO production in the presence of the PKC inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide (BSM) allows suggesting a model in which PKC would modulate the activity of the enzymes responsible for nitric oxide production.

  14. Implication of PKC in the seasonal variation of the immune response of the hemocytes of Mytilus galloprovincialis Lmk. and its role in interleukin-2-induced nitric oxide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Novas, Ana; Barcia, Ramiro; Ramos-Martínez, Juan Ignacio

    2007-10-01

    The hemocytes are the cells responsible for the immune response in marine mollusks. The role of NO in processes related to the activation of the hemocytes has turned out evident over the late years. In the case of the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis Lmk., hemocyte NO basal production varies throughout the year, showing a maximum in summer and a minimum in winter. IL-2 reverts the low winter NO basal production through a process mediated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase and by an apparent side effect of protein kinase C. The seasonal variation of NO production in the presence of the PKC inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide (BSM) allows suggesting a model in which PKC would modulate the activity of the enzymes responsible for nitric oxide production. PMID:17852569

  15. PKC-ε pseudosubstrate and catalytic activity are necessary for membrane delivery during IgG-mediated phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Tiffany R.; Chow, Rachel Y.; Hanes, Cheryl M.; Zhang, Xuexin; Kashiwagi, Kaori; Shirai, Yasuhito; Trebak, Mohamed; Loegering, Daniel J.; Saito, Naoaki; Lennartz, Michelle R.

    2013-01-01

    In RAW 264.7 cells [1], PKC-ε regulates FcγR-mediated phagocytosis. BMDM behave similarly; PKC-ε concentrates at phagosomes and internalization are reduced in PKC-ε−/− cells. Two questions were asked: what is the role of PKC-ε? and what domains are necessary for PKC-ε concentration? Function was studied using BMDM and frustrated phagocytosis. On IgG surfaces, PKC-ε−/− macrophages spread less than WT. Patch-clamping revealed that the spreading defect is a result of the failure of PKC-ε−/− macrophages to add membrane. The defect is specific for FcγR ligation and can be reversed by expression of full-length (but not the isolated RD) PKC-ε in PKC-ε−/− BMDM. Thus, PKC-ε function in phagocytosis requires translocation to phagosomes and the catalytic domain. The expression of chimeric PKC molecules in RAW cells identified the εPS as necessary for PKC-ε targeting. When placed into (nonlocalizing) PKC-δ, εPS was sufficient for concentration, albeit to a lesser degree than intact PKC-ε. In contrast, translocation of δ(εPSC1B) resembled that of WT PKC-ε. Thus, εPS and εC1B cooperate for optimal phagosome targeting. Finally, cells expressing εK437W were significantly less phagocytic than their PKC-ε-expressing counterparts, blocked at the pseudopod-extension phase. In summary, we have shown that εPS and εC1B are necessary and sufficient for targeting PKC-ε to phagosomes, where its catalytic activity is required for membrane delivery and pseudopod extension. PMID:23670290

  16. aPKC phosphorylates p27Xic1, providing a mechanistic link between apicobasal polarity and cell-cycle control.

    PubMed

    Sabherwal, Nitin; Thuret, Raphael; Lea, Robert; Stanley, Peter; Papalopulu, Nancy

    2014-12-01

    During the development of the nervous system, apicobasally polarized stem cells are characterized by a shorter cell cycle than nonpolar progenitors, leading to a lower differentiation potential of these cells. However, how polarization might be directly linked to the kinetics of the cell cycle is not understood. Here, we report that apicobasally polarized neuroepithelial cells in Xenopus laevis have a shorter cell cycle than nonpolar progenitors, consistent with mammalian systems. We show that the apically localized serine/threonine kinase aPKC directly phosphorylates an N-terminal site of the cell-cycle inhibitor p27Xic1 and reduces its ability to inhibit the cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2), leading to shortening of G1 and S phases. Overexpression of activated aPKC blocks the neuronal differentiation-promoting activity of p27Xic1. These findings provide a direct mechanistic link between apicobasal polarity and the cell cycle, which may explain how proliferation is favored over differentiation in polarized neural stem cells.

  17. aPKC Phosphorylation of Bazooka Defines the Apical/Lateral Border in Drosophila Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Morais-de-Sá, Eurico; Mirouse, Vincent; St Johnston, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Summary Bazooka (PAR-3), PAR-6, and aPKC form a complex that plays a key role in the polarization of many cell types. In epithelial cells, however, Bazooka localizes below PAR-6 and aPKC at the apical/lateral junction. Here, we show that Baz is excluded from the apical aPKC domain in epithelia by aPKC phosphorylation, which disrupts the Baz/aPKC interaction. Removal of Baz from the complex is epithelial-specific because it also requires the Crumbs complex, which prevents the Baz/PAR-6 interaction. In the absence of Crumbs or aPKC phosphorylation of Baz, mislocalized Baz recruits adherens junction components apically, leading to a loss of the apical domain and an expansion of lateral. Thus, apical exclusion of Baz by Crumbs and aPKC defines the apical/lateral border. Although Baz acts as an aPKC targeting and specificity factor in nonepithelial cells, our results reveal that it performs a complementary function in positioning the adherens junction in epithelia. PMID:20434988

  18. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Activates PKC-Alpha to Invade Middle Ear Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Rahul; Grati, M’hamed; Yan, Denise; Liu, Xue Z.

    2016-01-01

    Otitis media (OM) is a group of complex inflammatory disorders affecting the middle ear which can be acute or chronic. Chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM) is a form of chronic OM characterized by tympanic membrane perforation and discharge. Despite the significant impact of CSOM on human population, it is still an understudied and unexplored research area. CSOM is a leading cause of hearing loss and life-threatening central nervous system complications. Bacterial exposure especially Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common cause of CSOM. Our previous studies have demonstrated that P. aeruginosa invades human middle ear epithelial cells (HMEECs). However, molecular mechanisms leading to bacterial invasion of HMEECs are not known. The aim of this study is to characterize the role of PKC pathway in the ability of P. aeruginosa to colonize HMEECs. We observed that otopathogenic P. aeruginosa activates the PKC pathway, specifically phosphorylation of PKC-alpha (PKC-α) in HMEECs. The ability of otopathogenic P. aeruginosa to phosphorylate PKC-α depends on bacterial OprF expression. The activation of PKC-α was associated with actin condensation. Blocking the PKC pathway attenuated the ability of bacteria to invade HMEECs and subsequent actin condensation. This study, for the first time, demonstrates that the host PKC-α pathway is involved in invasion of HMEECs by P. aeruginosa and subsequently to cause OM. Characterizing the role of the host signaling pathway in the pathogenesis of CSOM will provide novel avenues to design effective treatment modalities against the disease. PMID:26973629

  19. Dynamic, Rho1p-dependent localization of Pkc1p to sites of polarized growth.

    PubMed

    Andrews, P D; Stark, M J

    2000-08-01

    In eukaryotes, the Rho GTPases and their effectors are key regulators of the actin cytoskeleton, membrane trafficking and secretion, cell growth, cell cycle progression and cytokinesis. Budding yeast Pkc1p, a protein kinase C-like enzyme involved in cell wall biosynthesis and cytoskeletal polarity, is structurally and functionally related to the Rho-associated kinases (PRK/ROCK) of mammalian cells. In this study, localization of Pkc1p was monitored in live cells using a GFP fusion (Pkc1p-GFP). Pkc1p-GFP showed dynamic spatial and temporal localization at sites of polarized growth. Early in the cell cycle, Pkc1p-GFP was found at the pre-bud site and bud tips, becoming delocalized as the cell progressed further and finally relocalizing around the mother-daughter bud neck in an incomplete ring, which persisted until cell separation. Bud localization was actin-dependent but stability of Pkc1p-GFP at the neck was actin-independent, although localization at both sites required functional Rho1p. In addition, Pkc1p-GFP showed rapid relocalization after cell wall damage. These results suggest that the roles of Pkc1p in both polarized growth and the response to cell wall stress are mediated by dynamic changes in its localization, and suggest an additional potential role in cytokinesis.

  20. Tamoxifen inhibits tumor cell invasion and metastasis in mouse melanoma through suppression of PKC/MEK/ERK and PKC/PI3K/Akt pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuoka, Hiroshi; Tsubaki, Masanobu; Yamazoe, Yuzuru; Ogaki, Mitsuhiko; Satou, Takao; Itoh, Tatsuki; Kusunoki, Takashi; Nishida, Shozo

    2009-07-15

    In melanoma, several signaling pathways are constitutively activated. Among these, the protein kinase C (PKC) signaling pathways are activated through multiple signal transduction molecules and appear to play major roles in melanoma progression. Recently, it has been reported that tamoxifen, an anti-estrogen reagent, inhibits PKC signaling in estrogen-negative and estrogen-independent cancer cell lines. Thus, we investigated whether tamoxifen inhibited tumor cell invasion and metastasis in mouse melanoma cell line B16BL6. Tamoxifen significantly inhibited lung metastasis, cell migration, and invasion at concentrations that did not show anti-proliferative effects on B16BL6 cells. Tamoxifen also inhibited the mRNA expressions and protein activities of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Furthermore, tamoxifen suppressed phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and Akt through the inhibition of PKC{alpha} and PKC{delta} phosphorylation. However, other signal transduction factor, such as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) was unaffected. The results indicate that tamoxifen suppresses the PKC/mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/ERK and PKC/phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathways, thereby inhibiting B16BL6 cell migration, invasion, and metastasis. Moreover, tamoxifen markedly inhibited not only developing but also clinically evident metastasis. These findings suggest that tamoxifen has potential clinical applications for the treatment of tumor cell metastasis.

  1. εPKC confers acute tolerance to cerebral ischemic reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Bright, Rachel; Sun, Guo-Hua; Yenari, Midori A.; Steinberg, Gary K.; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2008-01-01

    In response to mild ischemic stress, the brain elicits endogenous survival mechanisms to protect cells against a subsequent lethal ischemic stress, referred to as ischemic tolerance. The molecular signals that mediate this protection are thought to involve the expression and activation of multiple kinases, including protein kinase C (PKC). Here we demonstrate that εPKC mediates cerebral ischemic tolerance in vivo. Systemic delivery of ψεRACK, an εPKC-selective peptide activator, confers neuroprotection against a subsequent cerebral ischemic event when delivered immediately prior to stroke. In addition, activation of εPKC by ψεRACK treatment decreases vascular tone in vivo, as demonstrated by a reduction in microvascular cerebral blood flow. Here we demonstrate the role of acute and transient εPKC in early cerebral tolerance in vivo and suggest that extra-parenchymal mechanisms, such as vasoconstriction, may contribute to the conferred protection. PMID:18586397

  2. PKC-NF-κB are involved in CCL2-induced Nav1.8 expression and channel function in dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Rui; Pei, Guo-Xian; Cong, Rui; Zhang, Hang; Zang, Cheng-Wu; Tian, Tong

    2014-01-01

    CCL2 [chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2] contributes to the inflammation-induced neuropathic pain through activating VGSC (voltage-gated sodium channel)-mediated nerve impulse conduction, but the underlying mechanism is currently unknown. Our study aimed to investigate whether PKC (protein kinase C)-NF-κB (nuclear factor κB) is involved in CCL2-induced regulation of voltage-gated sodium Nav1.8 currents and expression. DRG (dorsal root ganglion) neurons were prepared from adult male Sprague-Dawley rats and incubated with various concentration of CCL2 for 24 h. Whole-cell patch-clamps were performed to record the Nav1.8 currents in response to the induction by CCL2. After being pretreated with 5 and10 nM CCL2 for 16 h, CCR2 [chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 2] and Nav1.8 expression significantly increased and the peak currents of Nav1.8 elevated from the baseline 46.53±4.53 pA/pF to 64.28±3.12 pA/pF following 10 nM CCL2 (P<0.05). Compared with the control, significant change in Nav1.8 current density was observed when the CCR2 inhibitor INCB3344 (10 nM) was applied. Furthermore, inhibition of PKC by AEB071 significantly eliminated CCL2-induced elevated Nav1.8 currents. In vitro PKC kinase assays and autoradiograms suggested that Nav1.8 within DRG neurons was a substrate of PKC and direct phosphorylation of the Nav1.8 channel by PKC regulates its function in these neurons. Moreover, p65 expression was significantly higher in CCL2-induced neurons (P<0.05), and was reversed by treatment with INCB3344 and AEB071. PKC-NF-κB are involved in CCL2-induced elevation of Nav1.8 current density by promoting the phosphorylation of Nav1.8 and its expression. PMID:24724624

  3. Protein Kinase C (PkcA) of Aspergillus nidulans Is Involved in Penicillin Production

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Martina; Spröte, Petra; Brakhage, Axel A.

    2006-01-01

    The biosynthesis of the β-lactam antibiotic penicillin in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans is catalyzed by three enzymes that are encoded by the acvA, ipnA, and aatA genes. A variety of cis-acting DNA elements and regulatory factors form a complex regulatory network controlling these β-lactam biosynthesis genes. Regulators involved include the CCAAT-binding complex AnCF and AnBH1. AnBH1 acts as a repressor of the penicillin biosynthesis gene aatA. Until now, however, little information has been available on the signal transduction cascades leading to the transcription factors. Here we show that inhibition of protein kinase C (Pkc) activity in A. nidulans led to cytoplasmic localization of an AnBH1-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) fusion protein. Computer analysis of the genome and screening of an A. nidulans gene library revealed that the fungus possesses two putative Pkc-encoding genes, which we designated pkcA and pkcB. Only PkcA showed all the characteristic features of fungal Pkc's. Production of pkcA antisense RNA in A. nidulans led to reduced growth and conidiation in Aspergillus minimal medium, while in fermentation medium it led to enhanced expression of an aatAp-lacZ gene fusion, reduced pencillin production, and predominantly cytoplasmic localization of AnBH1. These data agree with the finding that inhibition of Pkc activity prevented nuclear localization of AnBH1-EGFP. As a result, repression of aatA expression was relieved. The involvement of Pkc in penicillin biosynthesis is also interesting in light of the fact that in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pkc plays a major role in maintaining cell integrity. PMID:16598003

  4. Protein kinase C (PkcA) of Aspergillus nidulans is involved in penicillin production.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Martina; Spröte, Petra; Brakhage, Axel A

    2006-04-01

    The biosynthesis of the beta-lactam antibiotic penicillin in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans is catalyzed by three enzymes that are encoded by the acvA, ipnA, and aatA genes. A variety of cis-acting DNA elements and regulatory factors form a complex regulatory network controlling these beta-lactam biosynthesis genes. Regulators involved include the CCAAT-binding complex AnCF and AnBH1. AnBH1 acts as a repressor of the penicillin biosynthesis gene aatA. Until now, however, little information has been available on the signal transduction cascades leading to the transcription factors. Here we show that inhibition of protein kinase C (Pkc) activity in A. nidulans led to cytoplasmic localization of an AnBH1-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) fusion protein. Computer analysis of the genome and screening of an A. nidulans gene library revealed that the fungus possesses two putative Pkc-encoding genes, which we designated pkcA and pkcB. Only PkcA showed all the characteristic features of fungal Pkc's. Production of pkcA antisense RNA in A. nidulans led to reduced growth and conidiation in Aspergillus minimal medium, while in fermentation medium it led to enhanced expression of an aatAp-lacZ gene fusion, reduced pencillin production, and predominantly cytoplasmic localization of AnBH1. These data agree with the finding that inhibition of Pkc activity prevented nuclear localization of AnBH1-EGFP. As a result, repression of aatA expression was relieved. The involvement of Pkc in penicillin biosynthesis is also interesting in light of the fact that in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pkc plays a major role in maintaining cell integrity.

  5. Role of calpain-9 and PKC-delta in the apoptotic mechanism of lumen formation in CEACAM1 transfected breast epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Charng-Jui; Nguyen, Tung; Shively, John E

    2010-02-15

    CEACAM1-4S (carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1) is a type I membrane protein with a short (12-amino acid) cytoplasmic tail. Wild type CEACAM1-4S-transfected MCF7 cells form glands with lumena when grown in 3D culture, while null mutations of two putative phosphorylation sites (T457A and S459A) in the cytoplasmic domain fail to undergo lumen formation. When gene chip analysis was performed on mRNA isolated from both wild type and T457A,S459A mutated CEACAM1-4S-transfected MCF7 cells grown in 3D culture, calpain-9 (CAPN9) was identified out of over 400 genes with a >2 log 2 difference as a potential inducer of lumen formation. Inhibition of CAPN9 expression in MCF7/CEACAM1-4S cells by RNAi or by calpeptin or PD150606 inhibited lumen formation. Transfection of CAPN9 into wild type MCF7 cells restores lumen formation demonstrating that calpain-9 may play a critical role in lumen formation. Additionally, we demonstrate that the apoptosis related kinase, PKC-delta, is activated by proteolytic cleavage during lumen formation exclusively in wild type CEACAM1-4S-transfected MCF7 cells grown in 3D culture and that lumen formation is inhibited by either RNAi to PKC-delta or by the PKC-delta inhibitor rottlerin.

  6. Ferroptosis, a newly characterized form of cell death in Parkinson's disease that is regulated by PKC.

    PubMed

    Do Van, Bruce; Gouel, Flore; Jonneaux, Aurélie; Timmerman, Kelly; Gelé, Patrick; Pétrault, Maud; Bastide, Michèle; Laloux, Charlotte; Moreau, Caroline; Bordet, Régis; Devos, David; Devedjian, Jean-Christophe

    2016-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a complex illness characterized by progressive dopaminergic neuronal loss. Several mechanisms associated with the iron-induced death of dopaminergic cells have been described. Ferroptosis is an iron-dependent, regulated cell death process that was recently described in cancer. Our present work show that ferroptosis is an important cell death pathway for dopaminergic neurons. Ferroptosis was characterized in Lund human mesencephalic cells and then confirmed ex vivo (in organotypic slice cultures) and in vivo (in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine mouse model). Some of the observed characteristics of ferroptosis differed from those reported previously. For example, ferroptosis may be initiated by PKCα activation, which then activates MEK in a RAS-independent manner. The present study is the first to emphasize the importance of ferroptosis dysregulation in PD. In neurodegenerative diseases like PD, iron chelators, Fer-1 derivatives and PKC inhibitors may be strong drug candidates to pharmacologically modulate the ferroptotic signaling cascade. PMID:27189756

  7. Albumin-stimulated DNA synthesis is mediated by Ca2+/PKC as well as EGF receptor-dependent p44/42 MAPK and NF-kappaB signal pathways in renal proximal tubule cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu Jin; Han, Ho Jae

    2008-03-01

    It is now recognized that significant tubular reabsorption of albumin occurs under physiological conditions that may play an important role in maintaining proximal tubular integrity and function. Therefore, this study examined the effect of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on DNA synthesis and its related signal molecules in primary cultured rabbit renal proximal tubule cells (PTCs). BSA increased the level of [(3)H]thymidine incorporation in a dose (> or =3 mg/ml)- and time (> or =3 h)-dependent manner, intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, and the level of protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation and stimulated the phosphorylation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which was inhibited by EGTA (extracellular Ca(2+) chelator), 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid acetoxymethyl ester (BAPTA-AM, intracellular Ca(2+) chelator), or PKC inhibitors (staurosporine or bisindolylmaleimide I). In addition, the PKC inhibitors or an EGFR inhibitor (AG-1478) blocked the BSA-induced phosphorylation of p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). BSA also increased the level of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) and inhibitor of NF-kappaB (IkappaB) phosphorylation, which was blocked by staurosporine, AG-1478, or PD-98059 (p44/42 MAPK inhibitor). Inhibition of Ca(2+), PKC, EGFR, p44/42 MAPK, or NF-kappaB signal pathways blocked the BSA-induced incorporation of [(3)H]thymidine. Consequently, the inhibition of Ca(2+), PKC, EGFR, p44/42 MAPKs, or NF-kappaB blocked the BSA-induced increases in cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)4, cyclin E, or CDK2 and restored the BSA-induced inhibition of p21(WAF/Cip1) and p27(Kip1) expression. In conclusion, BSA stimulates DNA synthesis that is mediated by Ca(2+)/PKC as well as the EGFR-dependent p44/42 MAPK and NF-kappaB signal pathways in PTCs.

  8. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein attenuated desmoglein 1 and desmocollin 2 expression via LOX-1/Ca(2+)/PKC-β signal in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan-Bin; Zhang, Qing-Hai; Chen, Zhuang; He, Zhi-Jun; Yi, Guang-Hui

    Numerous studies have reported the presence of oxidized LDL (ox-LDL) and expression of its lectin-like receptor, LOX-1, have been shown in atherosclerotic regions. The present study aims to investigate the effects of ox-LDL on expression of desmoglein 1 (DSG1) and desmocollin 2 (DSC2) in endothelial cells, and to explore the role of LOX-1 mediated signal in the permeability injury associated with DSG1 and DSC2 disruption induced by oxidized lipoprotein. RT-PCR and Western blotting were applied to determine the mRNA and protein expression levels of DSG1 and DSC2 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) respectively. Immunoreactivities of DSG1 and DSC2 were detected by laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM). HUVEC monolayers permeability was evaluated by FITC-labeled LDL in transwell assay system. The possible signal was assessed using in vitro blocking LOX-1 or Ca(2+) channel or PKC. The DSG1 and DSC2 expression were decreased by ox-LDL in concentration- and time-dependent manner. The effects of ox-LDL were mediated by its endothelial receptor, LOX-1. In parallel experiments, ox-LDL increased the influx of extracellular calcium, activation of protein kinase C (PKC) and permeability to LDL, which was inhibited by the LOX-1blocking antibody (10 μg/ml), Ca(2+) channel blocker (Diltiazem, 50 μmol/L) and PKCinhibitor (hispidin, 4 μmol/L). These results suggested that ox-LDL-induced decrease in DSG1 and DSC2 expression and monolayer barrier injury via calcium uptake and PKC-β activation following up-regulation of LOX-1 is one of the mechanisms of inducing greater permeability in HUVECs. PMID:26498522

  9. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein attenuated desmoglein 1 and desmocollin 2 expression via LOX-1/Ca(2+)/PKC-β signal in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan-Bin; Zhang, Qing-Hai; Chen, Zhuang; He, Zhi-Jun; Yi, Guang-Hui

    Numerous studies have reported the presence of oxidized LDL (ox-LDL) and expression of its lectin-like receptor, LOX-1, have been shown in atherosclerotic regions. The present study aims to investigate the effects of ox-LDL on expression of desmoglein 1 (DSG1) and desmocollin 2 (DSC2) in endothelial cells, and to explore the role of LOX-1 mediated signal in the permeability injury associated with DSG1 and DSC2 disruption induced by oxidized lipoprotein. RT-PCR and Western blotting were applied to determine the mRNA and protein expression levels of DSG1 and DSC2 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) respectively. Immunoreactivities of DSG1 and DSC2 were detected by laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM). HUVEC monolayers permeability was evaluated by FITC-labeled LDL in transwell assay system. The possible signal was assessed using in vitro blocking LOX-1 or Ca(2+) channel or PKC. The DSG1 and DSC2 expression were decreased by ox-LDL in concentration- and time-dependent manner. The effects of ox-LDL were mediated by its endothelial receptor, LOX-1. In parallel experiments, ox-LDL increased the influx of extracellular calcium, activation of protein kinase C (PKC) and permeability to LDL, which was inhibited by the LOX-1blocking antibody (10 μg/ml), Ca(2+) channel blocker (Diltiazem, 50 μmol/L) and PKCinhibitor (hispidin, 4 μmol/L). These results suggested that ox-LDL-induced decrease in DSG1 and DSC2 expression and monolayer barrier injury via calcium uptake and PKC-β activation following up-regulation of LOX-1 is one of the mechanisms of inducing greater permeability in HUVECs.

  10. Selective Phosphorylation Inhibitor of Delta Protein Kinase C-Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase Protein-Protein Interactions: Application for Myocardial Injury in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Qvit, Nir; Disatnik, Marie-Hélène; Sho, Eiketsu; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2016-06-22

    Protein kinases regulate numerous cellular processes, including cell growth, metabolism, and cell death. Because the primary sequence and the three-dimensional structure of many kinases are highly similar, the development of selective inhibitors for only one kinase is challenging. Furthermore, many protein kinases are pleiotropic, mediating diverse and sometimes even opposing functions by phosphorylating multiple protein substrates. Here, we set out to develop an inhibitor of a selective protein kinase phosphorylation of only one of its substrates. Focusing on the pleiotropic delta protein kinase C (δPKC), we used a rational approach to identify a distal docking site on δPKC for its substrate, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK). We reasoned that an inhibitor of PDK's docking should selectively inhibit the phosphorylation of only PDK without affecting phosphorylation of the other δPKC substrates. Our approach identified a selective inhibitor of PDK docking to δPKC with an in vitro Kd of ∼50 nM and reducing cardiac injury IC50 of ∼5 nM. This inhibitor, which did not affect the phosphorylation of other δPKC substrates even at 1 μM, demonstrated that PDK phosphorylation alone is critical for δPKC-mediated injury by heart attack. The approach we describe is likely applicable for the identification of other substrate-specific kinase inhibitors. PMID:27218445

  11. Lyn, PKC-delta, SHIP-1 interactions regulate GPVI-mediated platelet-dense granule secretion.

    PubMed

    Chari, Ramya; Kim, Soochong; Murugappan, Swaminathan; Sanjay, Archana; Daniel, James L; Kunapuli, Satya P

    2009-10-01

    Protein kinase C-delta (PKC-delta) is expressed in platelets and activated downstream of protease-activated receptors (PARs) and glycoprotein VI (GPVI) receptors. We have previously shown that PKC-delta positively regulates PAR-mediated dense granule secretion, whereas it negatively regulates GPVI-mediated dense granule secretion. We further investigated the mechanism of such differential regulation of dense granule release by PKC-delta in platelets. SH2 domain-containing inositol phosphatase-1 (SHIP-1) is phosphorylated on Y1020, a marker for its activation, upon stimulation of human platelets with PAR agonists SFLLRN and AYPGKF or GPVI agonist convulxin. GPVI-mediated SHIP-1 phosphorylation occurred rapidly at 15 seconds, whereas PAR-mediated phosphorylation was delayed, occurring at 1 minute. Lyn and SHIP-1, but not SHIP-2 or Shc, preferentially associated with PKC-delta on stimulation of platelets with a GPVI agonist, but not with a PAR agonist. In PKC-delta-null murine platelets, convulxin-induced SHIP-1 phosphorylation was inhibited. Furthermore, in Lyn null murine platelets, GPVI-mediated phosphorylations on Y-1020 of SHIP-1 and Y311 of PKC-delta were inhibited. In murine platelets lacking Lyn or SHIP-1, GPVI-mediated dense granule secretions are potentiated, whereas PAR-mediated dense granule secretions are inhibited. Therefore, we conclude that Lyn-mediated phosphorylations of PKC-delta and SHIP-1 and their associations negatively regulate GPVI-mediated dense granule secretion in platelets. PMID:19587372

  12. PKC{alpha} expression regulated by Elk-1 and MZF-1 in human HCC cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Y.-H.; Wu, T.-T.; Tsai, J.-H.; Huang, C.-Y.; Hsieh, Y.-S.; Liu, J.-Y. . E-mail: jyl@csmu.edu.tw

    2006-01-06

    Our previous study found that PKC{alpha} was highly expressed in the poor-differentiated human HCC cells and associated with cell migration and invasion. In this study, we further investigated the gene regulation of this enzyme. We showed that PKC{alpha} expression enhancement in the poor-differentiated human HCC cells was found neither by DNA amplification nor by increasing mRNA stability using differential PCR and mRNA decay assays. After screening seven transcription factors in the putative cis-acting regulatory elements of human PKC{alpha} promoters, only Elk-1 and MZF-1 antisense oligonucleotide showed a significant reduction in the PKC{alpha} mRNA level. They also reduced cell proliferation, cell migratory and invasive capabilities, and DNA binding activities in the PKC{alpha} promoter region. Over-expression assay confirmed that the PKC{alpha} expression may be modulated by these two factors at the transcriptional level. Therefore, these results may provide a novel mechanism for PKC{alpha} expression regulation in human HCC cells.

  13. Activation of PKC{beta}{sub II} and PKC{theta} is essential for LDL-induced cell proliferation of human aortic smooth muscle cells via Gi-mediated Erk1/2 activation and Egr-1 upregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Heo, Kyung-Sun; Kim, Dong-Uk; Kim, Lila; Nam, Miyoung; Baek, Seung-Tae; Park, Song-Kyu; Park, Youngwoo; Myung, Chang-Seon; Hwang, Sung-Ook Hoe, Kwang-Lae

    2008-03-28

    Native LDL may be a mitogenic stimulus of VSMC proliferation in lesions where endothelial disruption occurs. Recent studies have demonstrated that the mitogenic effects of LDL are accompanied by Erk1/2 activation via an unknown G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). In this article, we report that LDL translocated PKC{beta}{sub II} and PKC{theta} from cytosol to plasma membrane, and inhibition of PKC{beta}{sub II} and PKC{theta} decreased LDL effects via the deactivation of Erk1/2. Moreover, pertussis toxin, but not cholera toxin or heparin, inhibited LDL-induced translocation of PKC{beta}{sub II} and PKC{theta}, suggesting that Gi protein plays a role in LDL effects. Of LPA, S1P, and LDL, whose signaling is conveyed via Gi/o proteins, only LDL induced translocation of PKC{beta}{sub II} and PKC{theta}. Inhibition of PKC{beta}{sub II} or PKC{theta}, as well as of Erk1/2 and GPCR, decreases LDL-induced upregulation of Egr-1, which is critical for cell proliferation. This is the first report, to our knowledge, that the participation of PKC{theta} in VSMC proliferation is unique.

  14. Kv4.2 is a locus for PKC and ERK/MAPK cross-talk

    PubMed Central

    Schrader, Laura A.; Ren, Yajun; Cheng, Feng; Bui, Dui; Sweatt, J. David; Anderson, Anne E.

    2009-01-01

    Transient outward K+ currents are particularly important for the regulation of membrane excitability of neurons and repolarization of action potentials in cardiac myocytes. These currents are modulated by protein kinase C (PKC) activation, and the K+ channel subunit, Kv4.2, is a major contributor to these currents. Furthermore, the current recorded from Kv4.2 channels expressed in oocytes is reduced by PKC activation. The mechanism underlying PKC regulation of Kv4.2 currents is unknown. In this study, we determined that PKC directly phosphorylates the Kv4.2 channel protein. In vitro phosphorylation of the intracellular amino (N)- and carboxyl (C)-termini of Kv4.2 glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion protein revealed that the Kv4.2 C-terminal was phosphorylated by PKC, while the N-terminal was not. Amino acid mapping and site-directed mutagenesis revealed that the phosphorylated residues on the Kv4.2 C-terminal were Serine (Ser) 447 and Ser537. A phospho-site specific antibody showed that phosphorylation at the Ser537 site increased in the hippocampus in response to PKC activation. Surface biotinylation experiments revealed that alanine mutation to block phosphorylation at both of the PKC sites increased surface expression compared to wildtype Kv4.2. Electrophysiological recordings of the wildtype and both the alanine and aspartate mutant Kv4.2 channels expressed with KChIP3 revealed no significant difference in the half activation or inactivation voltage of the channel. Interestingly, the Ser537 site lies within a possible extracellular regulated kinase (ERK)/mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) recognition (docking) domain in the Kv4.2 C-terminal sequence. We found that phosphorylation of Kv4.2 by PKC enhanced ERK phosphorylation of the channel in vitro. These findings suggest the possibility that Kv4.2 is a locus for PKC and ERK cross-talk. PMID:18795890

  15. Correction of metabolic abnormalities in a rodent model of obesity, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes mellitus by inhibitors of hepatic protein kinase C-ι.

    PubMed

    Sajan, Mini P; Nimal, Sonali; Mastorides, Stephen; Acevedo-Duncan, Mildred; Kahn, C Ronald; Fields, Alan P; Braun, Ursula; Leitges, Michael; Farese, Robert V

    2012-04-01

    Excessive activity of hepatic atypical protein kinase (aPKC) is proposed to play a critical role in mediating lipid and carbohydrate abnormalities in obesity, the metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. In previous studies of rodent models of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus, adenoviral-mediated expression of kinase-inactive aPKC rapidly reversed or markedly improved most if not all metabolic abnormalities. Here, we examined effects of 2 newly developed small-molecule PKC-ι/λ inhibitors. We used the mouse model of heterozygous muscle-specific knockout of PKC-λ, in which partial deficiency of muscle PKC-λ impairs glucose transport in muscle and thereby causes glucose intolerance and hyperinsulinemia, which, via hepatic aPKC activation, leads to abdominal obesity, hepatosteatosis, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypercholesterolemia. One inhibitor, 1H-imidazole-4-carboxamide, 5-amino-1-[2,3-dihydroxy-4-[(phosphonooxy)methyl]cyclopentyl-[1R-(1a,2b,3b,4a)], binds to the substrate-binding site of PKC-λ/ι, but not other PKCs. The other inhibitor, aurothiomalate, binds to cysteine residues in the PB1-binding domains of aPKC-λ/ι/ζ and inhibits scaffolding. Treatment with either inhibitor for 7 days inhibited aPKC, but not Akt, in liver and concomitantly improved insulin signaling to Akt and aPKC in muscle and adipocytes. Moreover, both inhibitors diminished excessive expression of hepatic, aPKC-dependent lipogenic, proinflammatory, and gluconeogenic factors; and this was accompanied by reversal or marked improvements in hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, abdominal obesity, hepatosteatosis, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypercholesterolemia. Our findings highlight the pathogenetic importance of insulin signaling to hepatic PKC-ι in obesity, the metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes mellitus and suggest that 1H-imidazole-4-carboxamide, 5-amino-1-[2,3-dihydroxy-4-[(phosphonooxy)methyl]cyclopentyl-[1R-(1a,2b,3b,4a)] and aurothiomalate or similar agents that

  16. Estradiol-17beta-BSA stimulates Ca(2+) uptake through nongenomic pathways in primary rabbit kidney proximal tubule cells: involvement of cAMP and PKC.

    PubMed

    Han, H J; Lee, Y H; Park, S H

    2000-04-01

    The effect of estradiol-17beta-BSA (E(2)-BSA) on Ca(2+) uptake and its related signal pathways were examined in the primary cultured rabbit kidney proximal tubule cells. E(2)-BSA (10(-9) M) significantly stimulated Ca(2+) uptake from 2 h by 13% and at 8 h by 35% as compared to control, respectively. This stimulatory effect of E(2)-BSA was not inhibited by tamoxifen (10(-8) M, an intracellular estrogen receptor antagonist), actinomycin D (10(-7) M, a transcription inhibitor), and cycloheximide (4 x 10(-5) M, a protein synthesis inhibitor). However, E(2)-BSA-induced stimulation of Ca(2+) uptake was blocked by methoxyverapamil (10(-6) M, an L-type calcium channel blocker) and 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl)-amiloride (10(-5) M, a Na(+)/H(+) antiporter blocker). These results suggest that E(2)-BSA stimulates Ca(2+) uptake through nongenomic pathways. Thus, we investigated which signal pathways were related to E(2)-BSA-induced stimulation of Ca(2+) uptake. 8-Br-cAMP (10(-6) M) alone increased Ca(2+) uptake by 22% compared to control. When E(2)-BSA combined with 8-Br-cAMP, Ca(2+) uptake was not significantly stimulated compared to E(2)-BSA. SQ 22536 (10(-6) M, an adenylate cyclase inhibitor) and myristoylated protein kinase A inhibitor amide 14-22 (10(-6) M, a protein kinase A inhibitor) blocked E(2)-BSA-induced stimulation of Ca(2+) uptake and E(2)-BSA also increased cAMP generation by 26% of that of control. In addition, TPA (0.02 ng/ml, an artificial PKC promoter) stimulated the Ca(2+) uptake by 14%, and the cotreatment of TPA and E(2)-BSA did not significantly stimulate Ca(2+) uptake compared to E(2)-BSA. E(2)-BSA-induced stimulation of Ca(2+) uptake was blocked by U 73122 (10(-6) M, a phospholipase C inhibitor) or bisindolylmaleimide I (10(-6) M, a protein kinase C inhibitor). Indeed, E(2)-BSA stimulated PKC activity by 26%. In conclusion, E(2)-BSA (10(-9) M) stimulated Ca(2+) uptake by nongenomic action, which is mediated by cAMP and PKC pathways.

  17. Involvement of PKC{alpha} in PMA-induced facilitation of exocytosis and vesicle fusion in PC12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xue Renhao; Zhao Yanying; Chen Peng

    2009-03-06

    Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate, a stable analog of the important signaling membrane lipid diacylglycerol (DAG), is known to potentiate exocytosis and modulate vesicle fusion kinetics in neurons and endocrine cells. The exact mechanisms underlying the actions of PMA, however, is often not clear, largely because of the diversity of the DAG/PMA receptors involved in the exocytotic process, which include, most notably, various isoforms of protein kinase C (PKC). In this study, the roles of PKC{alpha} in PMA-mediated regulation of exocytosis were investigated by over-expressing wild-type PKC{alpha} (wt-PKC{alpha}) or dominant negative PKC{alpha} (dn-PKC{alpha}). Amperometric measurements based on carbon fiber microelectrodes demonstrated that PKC{alpha} has a key role in the PMA-mediated facilitation of exocytosis and vesicle fusion in neuroendocrine PC12 cells.

  18. Regulation of uridine diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase 1A3 activity by protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yongsheng; Yao, Yan; Jiang, Huidi; Lu, Chuan; Zeng, Su; Yu, Lushan

    2015-11-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a vital post-translational modification. This study investigated the effect of phosphorylation on human uridine diphosphate (UDP)-glucuronosyltransferase 1A3 (UGT1A3) activity. Curcumin and calphostin C suppressed the activity and phosphorylation of recombinant UGT1A3 expressed in Sf9 cells. These results indicate that UGT1A3 undergoes phosphorylation, which is required for its catalytic activity. Calphostin C is a highly specific protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, so three predicted PKC phosphorylation sites in UGT1A3 were examined. Site-directed mutation analysis at residues 28, 43 and 436 (from serine to glycine) was conducted. Compared with the wild-type, the S43G-mutant showed significantly decreased UGT1A3 catalytic activity. Furthermore, the UGT1A3 activity of wild-type and S43G-mutant was down-regulated by calphostin C, whereas the calphostin C inhibitory effect was much weaker on the S43G-mutant than the wild-type. In conclusion, phosphorylation plays an important role in UGT1A3 activity, and the serine at site 43 in UGT1A3 is most likely a phosphorylation site. PMID:26094731

  19. ROS Production via P2Y1-PKC-NOX2 Is Triggered by Extracellular ATP after Electrical Stimulation of Skeletal Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Vegas, Alexis; Campos, Cristian A; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel; Casas, Mariana; Buvinic, Sonja; Jaimovich, Enrique; Espinosa, Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    During exercise, skeletal muscle produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) via NADPH oxidase (NOX2) while inducing cellular adaptations associated with contractile activity. The signals involved in this mechanism are still a matter of study. ATP is released from skeletal muscle during electrical stimulation and can autocrinely signal through purinergic receptors; we searched for an influence of this signal in ROS production. The aim of this work was to characterize ROS production induced by electrical stimulation and extracellular ATP. ROS production was measured using two alternative probes; chloromethyl-2,7- dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate or electroporation to express the hydrogen peroxide-sensitive protein Hyper. Electrical stimulation (ES) triggered a transient ROS increase in muscle fibers which was mimicked by extracellular ATP and was prevented by both carbenoxolone and suramin; antagonists of pannexin channel and purinergic receptors respectively. In addition, transient ROS increase was prevented by apyrase, an ecto-nucleotidase. MRS2365, a P2Y1 receptor agonist, induced a large signal while UTPyS (P2Y2 agonist) elicited a much smaller signal, similar to the one seen when using ATP plus MRS2179, an antagonist of P2Y1. Protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors also blocked ES-induced ROS production. Our results indicate that physiological levels of electrical stimulation induce ROS production in skeletal muscle cells through release of extracellular ATP and activation of P2Y1 receptors. Use of selective NOX2 and PKC inhibitors suggests that ROS production induced by ES or extracellular ATP is mediated by NOX2 activated by PKC.

  20. Sustained activation of proton channels and NADPH oxidase in human eosinophils and murine granulocytes requires PKC but not cPLA2α activity

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Deri; Cherny, Vladimir V; Finnegan, Alison; Bollinger, James; Gelb, Michael H; DeCoursey, Thomas E

    2007-01-01

    The prevailing hypothesis that a signalling pathway involving cPLA2α is required to enhance the gating of the voltage-gated proton channel associated with NADPH oxidase was tested in human eosinophils and murine granulocytes. This hypothesis invokes arachidonic acid (AA) liberated by cPLA2α as a final activator of proton channels. In human eosinophils studied in the perforated-patch configuration, phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) stimulation elicited NADPH oxidase-generated electron current (Ie) and enhanced proton channel gating identically in the presence or absence of three specific cPLA2α inhibitors, Wyeth-1, pyrrolidine-2 and AACOCF3 (arachidonyl trifluoromethyl ketone). In contrast, PKC inhibitors GFX (GF109203X) or staurosporine prevented the activation of either proton channels or NADPH oxidase. PKC inhibition during the respiratory burst reversed the activation of both molecules, suggesting that ongoing phosphorylation is required. This effect of GFX was inhibited by okadaic acid, implicating phosphatases in proton channel deactivation. Proton channel activation by AA was partially reversed by GFX or staurosporine, indicating that AA effects are due in part to activation of PKC. In granulocytes from mice with the cPLA2α gene disrupted (knockout mice), PMA or fMetLeuPhe activated NADPH oxidase and proton channels in a manner indistinguishable from the responses of control cells. Thus, cPLA2α is not essential to activate the proton conductance or for a normal respiratory burst. Instead, phosphorylation of the proton channel or an activating molecule converts the channel to its activated gating mode. The existing paradigm for regulation of the concerted activity of proton channels and NADPH oxidase must be revised. PMID:17185330

  1. ROS Production via P2Y1-PKC-NOX2 Is Triggered by Extracellular ATP after Electrical Stimulation of Skeletal Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Vegas, Alexis; Campos, Cristian A.; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel; Casas, Mariana; Buvinic, Sonja; Jaimovich, Enrique; Espinosa, Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    During exercise, skeletal muscle produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) via NADPH oxidase (NOX2) while inducing cellular adaptations associated with contractile activity. The signals involved in this mechanism are still a matter of study. ATP is released from skeletal muscle during electrical stimulation and can autocrinely signal through purinergic receptors; we searched for an influence of this signal in ROS production. The aim of this work was to characterize ROS production induced by electrical stimulation and extracellular ATP. ROS production was measured using two alternative probes; chloromethyl-2,7- dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate or electroporation to express the hydrogen peroxide-sensitive protein Hyper. Electrical stimulation (ES) triggered a transient ROS increase in muscle fibers which was mimicked by extracellular ATP and was prevented by both carbenoxolone and suramin; antagonists of pannexin channel and purinergic receptors respectively. In addition, transient ROS increase was prevented by apyrase, an ecto-nucleotidase. MRS2365, a P2Y1 receptor agonist, induced a large signal while UTPyS (P2Y2 agonist) elicited a much smaller signal, similar to the one seen when using ATP plus MRS2179, an antagonist of P2Y1. Protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors also blocked ES-induced ROS production. Our results indicate that physiological levels of electrical stimulation induce ROS production in skeletal muscle cells through release of extracellular ATP and activation of P2Y1 receptors. Use of selective NOX2 and PKC inhibitors suggests that ROS production induced by ES or extracellular ATP is mediated by NOX2 activated by PKC. PMID:26053483

  2. ROS Production via P2Y1-PKC-NOX2 Is Triggered by Extracellular ATP after Electrical Stimulation of Skeletal Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Vegas, Alexis; Campos, Cristian A; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel; Casas, Mariana; Buvinic, Sonja; Jaimovich, Enrique; Espinosa, Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    During exercise, skeletal muscle produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) via NADPH oxidase (NOX2) while inducing cellular adaptations associated with contractile activity. The signals involved in this mechanism are still a matter of study. ATP is released from skeletal muscle during electrical stimulation and can autocrinely signal through purinergic receptors; we searched for an influence of this signal in ROS production. The aim of this work was to characterize ROS production induced by electrical stimulation and extracellular ATP. ROS production was measured using two alternative probes; chloromethyl-2,7- dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate or electroporation to express the hydrogen peroxide-sensitive protein Hyper. Electrical stimulation (ES) triggered a transient ROS increase in muscle fibers which was mimicked by extracellular ATP and was prevented by both carbenoxolone and suramin; antagonists of pannexin channel and purinergic receptors respectively. In addition, transient ROS increase was prevented by apyrase, an ecto-nucleotidase. MRS2365, a P2Y1 receptor agonist, induced a large signal while UTPyS (P2Y2 agonist) elicited a much smaller signal, similar to the one seen when using ATP plus MRS2179, an antagonist of P2Y1. Protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors also blocked ES-induced ROS production. Our results indicate that physiological levels of electrical stimulation induce ROS production in skeletal muscle cells through release of extracellular ATP and activation of P2Y1 receptors. Use of selective NOX2 and PKC inhibitors suggests that ROS production induced by ES or extracellular ATP is mediated by NOX2 activated by PKC. PMID:26053483

  3. PKC{eta} is a negative regulator of AKT inhibiting the IGF-I induced proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Shahaf, Galit; Rotem-Dai, Noa; Koifman, Gabriela; Raveh-Amit, Hadas; Frost, Sigal A.; Livneh, Etta

    2012-04-15

    The PI3K-AKT pathway is frequently activated in human cancers, including breast cancer, and its activation appears to be critical for tumor maintenance. Some malignant cells are dependent on activated AKT for their survival; tumors exhibiting elevated AKT activity show sensitivity to its inhibition, providing an Achilles heel for their treatment. Here we show that the PKC{eta} isoform is a negative regulator of the AKT signaling pathway. The IGF-I induced phosphorylation on Ser473 of AKT was inhibited by the PKC{eta}-induced expression in MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cancer cells. This was further confirmed in shRNA PKC{eta}-knocked-down MCF-7 cells, demonstrating elevated phosphorylation on AKT Ser473. While PKC{eta} exhibited negative regulation on AKT phosphorylation it did not alter the IGF-I induced ERK phosphorylation. However, it enhanced ERK phosphorylation when stimulated by PDGF. Moreover, its effects on IGF-I/AKT and PDGF/ERK pathways were in correlation with cell proliferation. We further show that both PKC{eta} and IGF-I confer protection against UV-induced apoptosis and cell death having additive effects. Although the protective effect of IGF-I involved activation of AKT, it was not affected by PKC{eta} expression, suggesting that PKC{eta} acts through a different route to increase cell survival. Hence, our studies show that PKC{eta} provides negative control on AKT pathway leading to reduced cell proliferation, and further suggest that its presence/absence in breast cancer cells will affect cell death, which could be of therapeutic value.

  4. Protein kinase C betaII peptide inhibitor exerts cardioprotective effects in rat cardiac ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Omiyi, Didi; Brue, Richard J; Taormina, Philip; Harvey, Margaret; Atkinson, Norrell; Young, Lindon H

    2005-08-01

    Ischemia followed by reperfusion (I/R) in the presence of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) results in a marked cardiac contractile dysfunction. A cell-permeable protein kinase C (PKC) betaII peptide inhibitor was used to test the hypothesis that PKC betaII inhibition could attenuate PMN-induced cardiac dysfunction by suppression of superoxide production from PMNs and increase NO release from vascular endothelium. The effects of the PKC betaII peptide inhibitor were examined in isolated ischemic (20 min) and reperfused (45 min) rat hearts with PMNs. The PKC betaII inhibitor (10 microM; n = 7) significantly attenuated PMN-induced cardiac dysfunction compared with I/R hearts (n = 9) receiving PMNs alone in left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP) and the maximal rate of LVDP (+dP/dt(max)) cardiac function indices (p < 0.01). The PKC betaII inhibitor at 10 microM significantly increased endothelial NO release from a basal value of 1.85 +/- 0.18 pmol NO/mg tissue to 3.49 +/- 0.62 pmol NO/mg tissue from rat aorta. It also significantly inhibited superoxide release (i.e., absorbance) from N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine-stimulated rat PMNs from 0.13 +/- 0.01 to 0.02 +/- 0.004 (p < 0.01) at 10 microM. Histological analysis of the left ventricle of representative rat hearts from each group showed that the PKC betaII peptide inhibitor-treated hearts experienced a marked reduction in PMN vascular adherence and infiltration into the postreperfused cardiac tissue compared with I/R + PMN hearts (p < 0.01). These results suggest that the PKC betaII peptide inhibitor attenuates PMN-induced post-I/R cardiac contractile dysfunction by increasing endothelial NO release and by inhibiting superoxide release from PMNs. PMID:15878997

  5. A PKC-SHP1 signaling axis desensitizes Fcγ receptor signaling by reducing the tyrosine phosphorylation of CBL and regulates FcγR mediated phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Fcγ receptors mediate important biological signals in myeloid cells including the ingestion of microorganisms through a process of phagocytosis. It is well-known that Fcγ receptor (FcγR) crosslinking induces the tyrosine phosphorylation of CBL which is associated with FcγR mediated phagocytosis, however how signaling molecules coordinate to desensitize these receptors is unclear. An investigation of the mechanisms involved in receptor desensitization will provide new insight into potential mechanisms by which signaling molecules may downregulate tyrosine phosphorylation dependent signaling events to terminate important signaling processes. Results Using the U937IF cell line, we observed that FcγR1 crosslinking induces the tyrosine phosphorylation of CBL, which is maximal at 5 min. followed by a kinetic pattern of dephosphorylation. An investigation of the mechanisms involved in receptor desensitization revealed that pretreatment of U937IF or J774 cells with PMA followed by Fcγ receptor crosslinking results in the reduced tyrosine phosphorylation of CBL and the abrogation of downstream signals, such as CBL-CRKL binding, Rac-GTP activation and the phagocytic response. Pretreatment of J774 cells with GF109203X, a PKC inhibitor was observed to block dephosphorylation of CBL and rescued the phagocytic response. We demonstrate that the PKC induced desensitization of FcγR/ phagocytosis is associated with the inactivation of Rac-GTP, which is deactivated in a hematopoietic specific phosphatase SHP1 dependent manner following ITAM stimulation. The effect of PKC on FcγR signaling is augmented by the transfection of catalytically active SHP1 and not by the transfection of catalytic dead SHP1 (C124S). Conclusions Our results suggest a functional model by which PKC interacts with SHP1 to affect the phosphorylation state of CBL, the activation state of Rac and the negative regulation of ITAM signaling i.e. Fcγ receptor mediated phagocytosis. These findings

  6. DNA damage targets PKC{eta} to the nuclear membrane via its C1b domain

    SciTech Connect

    Tamarkin, Ana; Zurgil, Udi; Braiman, Alex; Hai, Naama; Krasnitsky, Ella; Maissel, Adva; Ben-Ari, Assaf; Yankelovich, Liat; Livneh, Etta

    2011-06-10

    Translocation to cellular membranes is one of the hallmarks of PKC activation, occurring as a result of the generation of lipid secondary messengers in target membrane compartments. The activation-induced translocation of PKCs and binding to membranes is largely directed by their regulatory domains. We have previously reported that PKC{eta}, a member of the novel subfamily and an epithelial specific isoform, is localized at the cytoplasm and ER/Golgi and is translocated to the plasma membrane and the nuclear envelope upon short-term activation by PMA. Here we show that PKC{eta} is shuttling between the cytoplasm and the nucleus and that upon etoposide induced DNA damage is tethered at the nuclear envelope. Although PKC{eta} expression and its phosphorylation on the hydrophobic motif (Ser675) are increased by etoposide, this phosphorylation is not required for its accumulation at the nuclear envelope. Moreover, we demonstrate that the C1b domain is sufficient for translocation to the nuclear envelope. We further show that, similar to full-length PKC{eta}, the C1b domain could also confer protection against etoposide-induced cell death. Our studies demonstrate translocation of PKC{eta} to the nuclear envelope, and suggest that its spatial regulation could be important for its cellular functions including effects on cell death.

  7. Reperfusion-induced translocation of deltaPKC to cardiac mitochondria prevents pyruvate dehydrogenase reactivation.

    PubMed

    Churchill, Eric N; Murriel, Christopher L; Chen, Che-Hong; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Szweda, Luke I

    2005-07-01

    Cardiac ischemia and reperfusion are associated with loss in the activity of the mitochondrial enzyme pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH). Pharmacological stimulation of PDH activity improves recovery in contractile function during reperfusion. Signaling mechanisms that control inhibition and reactivation of PDH during reperfusion were therefore investigated. Using an isolated rat heart model, we observed ischemia-induced PDH inhibition with only partial recovery evident on reperfusion. Translocation of the redox-sensitive delta-isoform of protein kinase C (PKC) to the mitochondria occurred during reperfusion. Inhibition of this process resulted in full recovery of PDH activity. Infusion of the deltaPKC activator H2O2 during normoxic perfusion, to mimic one aspect of cardiac reperfusion, resulted in loss in PDH activity that was largely attributable to translocation of deltaPKC to the mitochondria. Evidence indicates that reperfusion-induced translocation of deltaPKC is associated with phosphorylation of the alphaE1 subunit of PDH. A potential mechanism is provided by in vitro data demonstrating that deltaPKC specifically interacts with and phosphorylates pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK)2. Importantly, this results in activation of PDK2, an enzyme capable of phosphorylating and inhibiting PDH. Thus, translocation of deltaPKC to the mitochondria during reperfusion likely results in activation of PDK2 and phosphorylation-dependent inhibition of PDH. PMID:15961716

  8. Corticotropin-releasing hormone stimulates mitotic kinesin-like protein 1 expression via a PLC/PKC-dependent signaling pathway in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Hui; Xu, Yongjun; Chen, Yanming; Zhang, Yanmin; Ni, Xin

    2012-10-15

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) has been shown to modulate dendritic development in hippocampus. Mitotic kinesin-like protein 1 (MKLP1) plays key roles in dendritic differentiation. In the present study, we examined the effects of CRH on MKLP1 expression in cultured hippocampal neurons and determine subsequent signaling pathways involved. CRH dose-dependently increased MKLP1 mRNA and protein expression. This effect can be reversed by CRHR1 antagonist but not by CRHR2 antagonist. CRHR1 knockdown impaired this effect of CRH. CRH stimulated GTP-bound Gαs protein and phosphorylated phospholipase C (PLC)-β3 expression, which were blocked by CRHR1 antagonist. Transfection of GP antagonist-2A, an inhibitory peptide of Gαq protein, blocked CRH-induced phosphorylated PLC-β3 expression. PLC and PKC inhibitors completely blocked whereas adenylyl cyclase (AC) and PKA inhibitors did not affect CRH-induced MKLP1 expression. Our results indicate that CRH act on CRHR1 to induce MKLP1 expression via PLC/PKC signaling pathway. CRH may regulate MKLP1 expression, thereby modulating dendritic development.

  9. Black Ink of Activated Carbon Derived From Palm Kernel Cake (PKC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selamat, M. H.; Ahmad, A. H.

    2009-06-01

    Recycling the waste from natural plant to produce useful end products will benefit many industries and help preserve the environment. The research reported in this paper is an investigation on the use of the natural waste of palm kernel cake (PKC) to produce carbon residue as a black carbon for pigment source by using pyrolysis process. The activated carbons (AC) is produced in powder form using ball milling process. Rheological spectra in ink is one of quality control process in determining its performance properties. Findings from this study will help expand the scientific knowledge-base for black ink production and formulation base on PKC. Various inks with different weight percentage compositions of AC will be made and tested against its respective rheological properties in order to determine ideal ink printing system. The items in the formulation used comprised of organic and bio-waste materials with added additive to improve the quality of the black ink. Modified Polyurethane was used as binder. The binder's properties highlighted an ideal vehicle to be applied for good black ink opacity performance. The rheological behaviour is a general foundation for ink characterization where the wt% of AC-PKC resulted in different pseudoplastic behaviors, including the Newtonian behavior. The result found that Newtonian field was located in between 2 wt% and 10 wt% of AC-PKC composition with binder. Mass spectroscopy results shown that the carbon content in PKC is high and very suitable for black performance. In the ageing test, the pigment of PKC perform fairly according to the standard pigment of Black carbon (CB) of ferum oxide pigment. The contact angle for substrate's wettability of the ink system shown a good angle proven to be a water resistive coating on paper subtrates; an advantage of the PKC ink pigment performance.

  10. Niacin activates the PI3K/Akt cascade via PKC- and EGFR-transactivation-dependent pathways through hydroxyl-carboxylic acid receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huawang; Li, Guo; Zhang, Wenjuan; Zhou, Qi; Yu, Yena; Shi, Ying; Offermanns, Stefan; Lu, Jianxin; Zhou, Naiming

    2014-01-01

    Niacin has been demonstrated to activate a PI3K/Akt signaling cascade to prevent brain damage after stroke and UV-induced skin damage; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms for HCA2-induced Akt activation remain to be elucidated. Using CHO-K1 cells stably expressing HCA2 and A431 cells, a human epidermoid cell line with high levels of endogenous expression of functional HCA2 receptors, we first demonstrated that niacin induced a robust Akt phosphorylation at both Thr308 and Ser473 in a time-dependent fashion, with a maximal activation at 5 min and a subsequent reduction to baseline by 30 min through HCA2, and that the activation was significantly blocked by pertussis toxin. The HCA2-mediated activation of Akt was also significantly inhibited by the PKC inhibitors GF109203x and Go6983 in both cell lines, by the PDGFR-selective inhibitor tyrphostin A9 in CHO-HCA2 cells and by the MMP inhibitor GM6001 and EGFR-specific inhibitor AG1478 in A431 cells. These results suggest that the PKC pathway and PDGFR/EGFR transactivation pathway play important roles in HCA2-mediated Akt activation. Further investigation indicated that PI3K and the Gβγ subunit were likely to play an essential role in HCA2-induced Akt activation. Moreover, Immunobloting analyses using an antibody that recognizes p70S6K1 phosphorylated at Thr389 showed that niacin evoked p70S6K1 activation via the PI3K/Akt pathway. The results of our study provide new insight into the signaling pathways involved in HCA2 activation.

  11. The structure of a dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A-PKC412 complex reveals disulfide-bridge formation with the anomalous catalytic loop HRD(HCD) cysteine.

    PubMed

    Alexeeva, Marina; Åberg, Espen; Engh, Richard A; Rothweiler, Ulli

    2015-05-01

    Dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A) is a protein kinase associated with neuronal development and brain physiology. The DYRK kinases are very unusual with respect to the sequence of the catalytic loop, in which the otherwise highly conserved arginine of the HRD motif is replaced by a cysteine. This replacement, along with the proximity of a potential disulfide-bridge partner from the activation segment, implies a potential for redox control of DYRK family activities. Here, the crystal structure of DYRK1A bound to PKC412 is reported, showing the formation of the disulfide bridge and associated conformational changes of the activation loop. The DYRK kinases represent emerging drug targets for several neurological diseases as well as cancer. The observation of distinct activation states may impact strategies for drug targeting. In addition, the characterization of PKC412 binding offers new insights for DYRK inhibitor discovery. PMID:25945585

  12. Regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase gene expression during hypoxia: role of Ca2+ and PKC.

    PubMed

    Raymond, R; Millhorn, D

    1997-02-01

    Gene expression for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine biosynthesis, is regulated by reductions in oxygen tension (hypoxia). Hypoxia-induced regulation of the TH gene is due to the binding of specific transcription factors to specific sites on the 5' flanking region of the gene. The purpose of this study was to identify the second messenger system(s) responsible for regulation of the TH gene during hypoxia. Fura-2 fluorescence imaging of rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells, an O2-sensitive cell line, revealed that there is an increase in cytosolic calcium (Ca2+) associated with exposure to hypoxia. Based on the evidence that the transcription factors that bind to the TH promoter during hypoxia can also be induced by elevations in cytosolic Ca2+, the role of Ca2+ in the hypoxic regulation of the TH gene was explored. To assay the effect of hypoxia on TH gene expression, Northern blot analyses of total RNA were performed on PC12 cells exposed to hypoxia in the presence or absence of specific inhibitors. The addition of the L-type calcium channel blockers nifedipine or verapamil caused partial inhibition of the hypoxia-induced increase in TH mRNA. The increase in cytosolic Ca2+ during hypoxia was also only partially inhibited by addition of nifedipine. Importantly, chelation of extracellular Ca2+ completely inhibited the increase in TH mRNA by hypoxia. Pretreatment of PC12 cells with BAPTA/AM, an intracellular Ca2+ chelator, inhibited the hypoxic induction of TH gene expression in a dose-dependent manner. Addition of chelerythrine chloride (CHL), a protein kinase C inhibitor, to the media before exposure to hypoxia also resulted in an inhibition of TH induction by hypoxia. These results suggest that hypoxia regulates TH gene expression by a mechanism that is dependent on influx of calcium from the extracellular stores, partially but not exclusively through the L-type calcium channels. These results further suggest that a member of the

  13. The protective role of zinc in palm kernel cake (PKC) toxicity in sheep.

    PubMed

    Hair Bejo, M; Alimon, A

    1995-03-01

    Male Malin x Polled Dorset crossbred sheep were stall-fed with grass (10%) and PKC (90%) and supplemented with either zinc at 500 ug/g, as zinc sulfate (PKC+Zn group) or zinc (113 ug/g) and ammonium molybdate (500 ug/g) (PKC+Zn+Mo group) or unsupplemented diet (PKC group) for 20 weeks. Another group which acts as a control was fed with a diet consisting of corn and fish meal (2 0%) and grass (80%). The animals were monitored daily and the body weights were recorded at a period of two weeks intervals throughout the trial. Blood samples were also collected for mineral analysis. At the end of the trial the animals were slaughtered. The carcasses were examined for gross lesions, whilst the right liver lobes and renal cortex were isolated for histopathological evaluation and mineral analysis. All animals in the PKC group died before the end of the trial with the main clinical signs of generalised jaundice and haemoglobinuria. The kidneys were firm, enlarged and reddened or darkened. Histologically, the hepatocytes were swollen, vacuolated and necrotized, particularly at the periacinar zone. Hepatic fibrosis was observed at the periportal zone. Cellular swelling, vacuolation and necrosis were found in the tubular epithelial cells of the renal cortex. Neither clinical signs nor gross or remarkable histological lesions were observed in the other groups of animals. The hepatic, renal and blood copper levels In the PKC group were elevated when compared to the control. Addition of zinc either with or without ammonium molybdate in PKC diet inhibit the copper content in the organs, however the zinc contents were increased. The average daily gain of the PKC group was remained consistent to those of the other groups, except it was reduced starting at about 1 to 2 weeks prior to death. It was concluded that feeding PKC In excess in sheep can cause chronic copper toxicity. However, this effect can be prevented by dietary zinc supplementation either with or without ammonium

  14. Role of PKC isozymes in low-power light-stimulated proliferation of cultured skin cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Nili; Kleitman, Vered; Meller, Julia; Kaufmann, Roland; Akgun, Nermin; Ruck, Angelika; Livneh, Etta; Lubart, Rachel

    2000-11-01

    Exposure of cultured skin cells to low power visible light leads to a transiently stimulated proliferation. Facilitation of this response requires the presence of active PKC, elevation of intracellular calcium, and involves reactive oxygen species. In the present study, the role of PKC(alpha) and PCK(eta) was examined using paired murine fibroblasts, differing in the level of these isozymes expression. The ability of the cells to respond to low power UVA light or HeNe laser by stimulated proliferation was correlated with an active state or overexpression of PKC(alpha) , but not PKC(eta) . A parallel response was obtained in cells that were loaded with A1PcS4 before photosensitization. Whenever this latter treatment caused a light-stimulated inhibition, it was accompanied by the intracellular calcium and photosensitizer dynamics typical of the effect of PDT on rate epithelial cells. Accordingly, added antioxidants that suppressed light-stimulated proliferation also suppressed this light-stimulated inhibition. The model systems employed in this study are the first to demonstrate the specific effect of PKC isozymes on light-stimulated proliferation, in relation to oxidative stress, and indicate their dual role in light-tissue interaction.

  15. Activation of protein synthesis in mouse uterine epithelial cells by estradiol-17β is mediated by a PKC-ERK1/2-mTOR signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuxiang; Zhu, Liyin; Kuokkanen, Satu; Pollard, Jeffrey W

    2015-03-17

    The uterine epithelium of mice and humans undergoes cyclical waves of cell proliferation and differentiation under the regulation of estradiol-17β (E2) and progesterone (P4). These epithelial cells respond to E2 with increased protein and DNA synthesis, whereas P4 inhibits only the E2-induced DNA synthetic response. Here we show that E2 regulates protein synthesis in these epithelial cells through activating PKC that in turn stimulates ERK1/2 to phosphorylate and thereby activate the central regulator of protein synthesis mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR). This mTOR pathway is not inhibited by P4. Inhibitor studies with an estrogen receptor (ESR1) antagonist showed the dependence of this mTOR pathway on ESR1 but that once activated, a phosphorylation cascade independent of ESR1 propagates the pathway. E2 also stimulates an IGF1 receptor (IGF1R) to PI3 kinase to AKT to GSK-3β pathway required for activation of the canonical cell cycle machinery that is inhibited by P4. PKC activation did not stimulate this pathway nor does inhibition of PKC or ERK1/2 affect it. These studies therefore indicate a mechanism whereby DNA and protein synthesis are regulated by two ESR1-activated pathways that run in parallel with only the one responsible for the initiation of DNA synthesis blocked by P4. Inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin in vivo resulted in inhibition of E2-induced protein and DNA synthesis. Proliferative diseases of the endometrium such as endometriosis and cancer are common and E2 dependent. Thus, defining this mTOR pathway suggests that local (intrauterine or peritoneal) rapamycin administration might be a therapeutic option for these diseases.

  16. Flotillin-1 is essential for PKC-triggered endocytosis and membrane microdomain localization of DAT.

    PubMed

    Cremona, M Laura; Matthies, Heinrich J G; Pau, Kelvin; Bowton, Erica; Speed, Nicole; Lute, Brandon J; Anderson, Monique; Sen, Namita; Robertson, Sabrina D; Vaughan, Roxanne A; Rothman, James E; Galli, Aurelio; Javitch, Jonathan A; Yamamoto, Ai

    2011-04-01

    Plasmalemmal neurotransmitter transporters (NTTs) regulate the level of neurotransmitters, such as dopamine (DA) and glutamate, after their release at brain synapses. Stimuli including protein kinase C (PKC) activation can lead to the internalization of some NTTs and a reduction in neurotransmitter clearance capacity. We found that the protein Flotillin-1 (Flot1), also known as Reggie-2, was required for PKC-regulated internalization of members of two different NTT families, the DA transporter (DAT) and the glial glutamate transporter EAAT2, and we identified a conserved serine residue in Flot1 that is essential for transporter internalization. Further analysis revealed that Flot1 was also required to localize DAT within plasma membrane microdomains in stable cell lines, and was essential for amphetamine-induced reverse transport of DA in neurons but not for DA uptake. In sum, our findings provide evidence for a critical role of Flot1-enriched membrane microdomains in PKC-triggered DAT endocytosis and the actions of amphetamine.

  17. scribble mutants promote aPKC and JNK-dependent epithelial neoplasia independently of Crumbs

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Gregory R; Goulding, Karen R; Amin, Nancy; Richardson, Helena E; Brumby, Anthony M

    2009-01-01

    Background Metastatic neoplasias are characterized by excessive cell proliferation and disruptions to apico-basal cell polarity and tissue architecture. Understanding how alterations in cell polarity can impact upon tumour development is, therefore, a central issue in cancer biology. The Drosophila gene scribble (scrib) encodes a PDZ-domain scaffolding protein that regulates cell polarity and acts as a tumour suppressor in flies. Increasing evidence also implicates the loss of human Scrib in cancer. In this report, we investigate how loss of Scrib promotes epithelial tumourigenesis in Drosophila, both alone and in cooperation with oncogenic mutations. Results We find that genetically distinct atypical protein kinase C (aPKC)-dependent and Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)-dependent alterations in scrib mutants drive epithelial tumourigenesis. First, we show that over-expression of the apical cell polarity determinants Crumbs (Crb) or aPKC induces similar cell morphology defects and over-proliferation phenotypes as scrib loss-of-function. However, the morphological and proliferative defects in scrib mutants are independent of Crb function, and instead can be rescued by a dominant negative (kinase dead) aPKC transgene. Secondly, we demonstrate that loss of Scrib promotes oncogene-mediated transformation through both aPKC and JNK-dependent pathways. JNK normally promotes apoptosis of scrib mutant cells. However, in cooperation with oncogenic activated Ras or Notch signalling, JNK becomes an essential driver of tumour overgrowth and invasion. aPKC-dependent signalling in scrib mutants cooperates with JNK to significantly enhance oncogene-mediated tumour overgrowth. Conclusion These results demonstrate distinct aPKC and JNK-dependent pathways through which loss of Scrib promotes tumourigenesis in Drosophila. This is likely to have a direct relevance to the way in which human Scrib can similarly restrain an oncogene-mediated transformation and, more generally, on how the

  18. Effects of protein phosphatase and kinase inhibitors on the cardiac L- type Ca current suggest two sites are phosphorylated by protein kinase A and another protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    We previously showed (Frace, A.M. and H.C. Hartzell. 1993. Journal of Physiology. 472:305-326) that internal perfusion of frog atrial myocytes with the nonselective protein phosphatase inhibitors microcystin or okadaic acid produced an increase in the L-type Ca current (ICa) and a decrease in the delayed rectifier K current (IK). We hypothesized that microcystin revealed the activity of a protein kinase (PKX) that was basally active in the cardiac myocyte that could phosphorylate the Ca and K channels or regulators of the channels. The present studies were aimed at determining the nature of PKX and its phosphorylation target. The effect of internal perfusion with microcystin on ICa or IK was not attenuated by inhibitors of protein kinase A (PKA). However, the effect of microcystin on ICa was largely blocked by the nonselective protein kinase inhibitors staurosporine (10- 30 nM), K252a (250 nM), and H-7 (10 microM). Staurosporine and H-7 also decreased the stimulation of ICa by isoproterenol, but K252a was more selective and blocked the ability of microcystin to stimulate ICa without significantly reducing isoproterenol-stimulated current. Internal perfusion with selective inhibitors of protein kinase C (PKC), including the autoinhibitory pseudosubstrate PKC peptide (PKC(19-31)) and a myristoylated derivative of this peptide had no effect. External application of several PKC inhibitors had negative side effects that prevented their use as selective PKC inhibitors. Nevertheless, we conclude that PKX is not PKC. PKA and PKX phosphorylate sites with different sensitivities to the phosphatase inhibitors calyculin A and microcystin. In contrast to the results with ICa, the effect of microcystin on IK was not blocked by any of the kinase inhibitors tested, suggesting that the effect of microcystin on IK may not be mediated by a protein kinase but may be due to a direct effect of microcystin on the IK channel. PMID:8786340

  19. Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (GAPDH) Protein-Protein Interaction Inhibitor Reveals a Non-catalytic Role for GAPDH Oligomerization in Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Qvit, Nir; Joshi, Amit U; Cunningham, Anna D; Ferreira, Julio C B; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2016-06-24

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), an important glycolytic enzyme, has a non-catalytic (thus a non-canonical) role in inducing mitochondrial elimination under oxidative stress. We recently demonstrated that phosphorylation of GAPDH by δ protein kinase C (δPKC) inhibits this GAPDH-dependent mitochondrial elimination. δPKC phosphorylation of GAPDH correlates with increased cell injury following oxidative stress, suggesting that inhibiting GAPDH phosphorylation should decrease cell injury. Using rational design, we identified pseudo-GAPDH (ψGAPDH) peptide, an inhibitor of δPKC-mediated GAPDH phosphorylation that does not inhibit the phosphorylation of other δPKC substrates. Unexpectedly, ψGAPDH decreased mitochondrial elimination and increased cardiac damage in an animal model of heart attack. Either treatment with ψGAPDH or direct phosphorylation of GAPDH by δPKC decreased GAPDH tetramerization, which corresponded to reduced GAPDH glycolytic activity in vitro and ex vivo Taken together, our study identified the potential mechanism by which oxidative stress inhibits the protective GAPDH-mediated elimination of damaged mitochondria. Our study also identified a pharmacological tool, ψGAPDH peptide, with interesting properties. ψGAPDH peptide is an inhibitor of the interaction between δPKC and GAPDH and of the resulting phosphorylation of GAPDH by δPKC. ψGAPDH peptide is also an inhibitor of GAPDH oligomerization and thus an inhibitor of GAPDH glycolytic activity. Finally, we found that ψGAPDH peptide is an inhibitor of the elimination of damaged mitochondria. We discuss how this unique property of increasing cell damage following oxidative stress suggests a potential use for ψGAPDH peptide-based therapy. PMID:27129213

  20. AdipoR-increased intracellular ROS promotes cPLA2 and COX-2 expressions via activation of PKC and p300 in adiponectin-stimulated human alveolar type II cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsiao-Mei; Yang, Chuen-Mao; Chang, Jia-Feng; Wu, Chi-Sheng; Sia, Kee-Chin; Lin, Wei-Ning

    2016-08-01

    Adiponectin, an adipokine, accumulated in lung system via T-cadherin after allergens/ozone challenge. However, the roles of adiponectin on lung pathologies were controversial. Here we reported that adiponectin stimulated expression of inflammatory proteins, cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in human alveolar type II A549 cells. AdipoR1/2 involved in adiponectin-activated NADPH oxidase and mitochondria, which further promoted intracellular ROS accumulation. Protein kinase C (PKC) may involve an adiponectin-activated NADPH oxidase. Similarly, p300 phosphorylation and histone H4 acetylation occurred in adiponectin-challenged A549 cells. Moreover, adiponectin-upregulated cPLA2 and COX-2 expression was significantly abrogated by ROS scavenger (N-acetylcysteine) or the inhibitors of NADPH oxidase (apocynin), mitochondrial complex I (rotenone), PKC (Ro31-8220, Gö-6976, and rottlerin), and p300 (garcinol). Briefly, we reported that adiponectin stimulated cPLA2 and COX-2 expression via AdipoR1/2-dependent activation of PKC/NADPH oxidase/mitochondria resulting in ROS accumulation, p300 phosphorylation, and histone H4 acetylation. These results suggested that adiponectin promoted lung inflammation, resulting in exacerbation of pulmonary diseases via upregulating cPLA2 and COX-2 expression together with intracellular ROS production. Understanding the adiponectin signaling pathways on regulating cPLA2 and COX-2 may help develop therapeutic strategies on pulmonary diseases. PMID:27288489

  1. Natural Product Vibsanin A Induces Differentiation of Myeloid Leukemia Cells through PKC Activation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zu-Yin; Xiao, He; Wang, Li-Mei; Shen, Xing; Jing, Yu; Wang, Lin; Sun, Wen-Feng; Zhang, Yan-Feng; Cui, Yu; Shan, Ya-Jun; Zhou, Wen-Bing; Xing, Shuang; Xiong, Guo-Lin; Liu, Xiao-Lan; Dong, Bo; Feng, Jian-Nan; Wang, Li-Sheng; Luo, Qing-Liang; Zhao, Qin-Shi; Cong, Yu-Wen

    2016-05-01

    All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)-based cell differentiation therapy has been successful in treating acute promyelocytic leukemia, a unique subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, other subtypes of AML display resistance to ATRA-based treatment. In this study, we screened natural, plant-derived vibsane-type diterpenoids for their ability to induce differentiation of myeloid leukemia cells, discovering that vibsanin A potently induced differentiation of AML cell lines and primary blasts. The differentiation-inducing activity of vibsanin A was mediated through direct interaction with and activation of protein kinase C (PKC). Consistent with these findings, pharmacological blockade of PKC activity suppressed vibsanin A-induced differentiation. Mechanistically, vibsanin A-mediated activation of PKC led to induction of the ERK pathway and decreased c-Myc expression. In mouse xenograft models of AML, vibsanin A administration prolonged host survival and inhibited PKC-mediated inflammatory responses correlated with promotion of skin tumors in mice. Collectively, our results offer a preclinical proof of concept for vibsanin A as a myeloid differentiation-inducing compound, with potential application as an antileukemic agent. Cancer Res; 76(9); 2698-709. ©2016 AACR.

  2. Tyrosinase kinetics in epidermal melanocytes: analysis of DAG-PKC-dependent signaling pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolnitz, Mikhail M.; Peshkova, Anna Y.

    2001-05-01

    Tyrosinase is the key enzyme of melanogenesis with unusual enzyme kinetics. Protein kinase C plays an important role in regulating of tyrosinase activity. In the paper the mathematical model of PKC-DAG-dependent signal transduction pathway for UV-radiation is presented.

  3. PKC{delta}-mediated IRS-1 Ser24 phosphorylation negatively regulates IRS-1 function

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Michael W. . E-mail: michael.greene@bassett.org; Ruhoff, Mary S.; Roth, Richard A.; Kim, Jeong-a; Quon, Michael J.; Krause, Jean A.

    2006-10-27

    The IRS-1 PH and PTB domains are essential for insulin-stimulated IRS-1 Tyr phosphorylation and insulin signaling, while Ser/Thr phosphorylation of IRS-1 disrupts these signaling events. To investigate consensus PKC phosphorylation sites in the PH-PTB domains of human IRS-1, we changed Ser24, Ser58, and Thr191 to Ala (3A) or Glu (3E), to block or mimic phosphorylation, respectively. The 3A mutant abrogated the inhibitory effect of PKC{delta} on insulin-stimulated IRS-1 Tyr phosphorylation, while reductions in insulin-stimulated IRS-1 Tyr phosphorylation, cellular proliferation, and Akt activation were observed with the 3E mutant. When single Glu mutants were tested, the Ser24 to Glu mutant had the greatest inhibitory effect on insulin-stimulated IRS-1 Tyr phosphorylation. PKC{delta}-mediated IRS-1 Ser24 phosphorylation was confirmed in cells with PKC{delta} catalytic domain mutants and by an RNAi method. Mechanistic studies revealed that IRS-1 with Ala and Glu point mutations at Ser24 impaired phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate binding. In summary, our data are consistent with the hypothesis that Ser24 is a negative regulatory phosphorylation site in IRS-1.

  4. Kibra and aPKC regulate starvation-induced autophagy in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ahrum; Neufeld, Thomas P; Choe, Joonho

    Autophagy is a bulk degradation system that functions in response to cellular stresses such as metabolic stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, oxidative stress, and developmental processes. During autophagy, cytoplasmic components are captured in double-membrane vesicles called autophagosomes. The autophagosome fuses with the lysosome, producing a vacuole known as an autolysosome. The cellular components are degraded by lysosomal proteases and recycled. Autophagy is important for maintaining cellular homeostasis, and the process is evolutionarily conserved. Kibra is an upstream regulator of the hippo signaling pathway, which controls organ size by affecting cell growth, proliferation, and apoptosis. Kibra is mainly localized in the apical membrane domain of epithelial cells and acts as a scaffold protein. We found that Kibra is required for autophagy to function properly. The absence of Kibra caused defects in the formation of autophagic vesicles and autophagic degradation. We also found that the well-known cell polarity protein aPKC interacts with Kibra, and its activity affects autophagy upstream of Kibra. Constitutively active aPKC decreased autophagic vesicle formation and autophagic degradation. We confirmed the interaction between aPKC and Kibra in S2 cells and Drosophila larva. Taken together, our data suggest that Kibra and aPKC are essential for regulating starvation-induced autophagy.

  5. Kainate receptor activation induces glycine receptor endocytosis through PKC deSUMOylation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hao; Lu, Li; Zuo, Yong; Wang, Yan; Jiao, Yingfu; Zeng, Wei-Zheng; Huang, Chao; Zhu, Michael X; Zamponi, Gerald W; Zhou, Tong; Xu, Tian-Le; Cheng, Jinke; Li, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Surface expression and regulated endocytosis of glycine receptors (GlyRs) play a critical function in balancing neuronal excitability. SUMOylation (SUMO modification) is of critical importance for maintaining neuronal function in the central nervous system. Here we show that activation of kainate receptors (KARs) causes GlyR endocytosis in a calcium- and protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent manner, leading to reduced GlyR-mediated synaptic activity in cultured spinal cord neurons and the superficial dorsal horn of rat spinal cord slices. This effect requires SUMO1/sentrin-specific peptidase 1 (SENP1)-mediated deSUMOylation of PKC, indicating that the crosstalk between KARs and GlyRs relies on the SUMOylation status of PKC. SENP1-mediated deSUMOylation of PKC is involved in the kainate-induced GlyR endocytosis and thus plays an important role in the anti-homeostatic regulation between excitatory and inhibitory ligand-gated ion channels. Altogether, we have identified a SUMOylation-dependent regulatory pathway for GlyR endocytosis, which may have important physiological implications for proper neuronal excitability. PMID:25236484

  6. Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Hoc1, a Suppressor of Pkc1, Encodes a Putative Glycosyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Neiman, A. M.; Mhaiskar, V.; Manus, V.; Galibert, F.; Dean, N.

    1997-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene PKC1 encodes a protein kinase C isozyme that regulates cell wall synthesis. Here we describe the characterization of HOC1, a gene identified by its ability to suppress the cell lysis phenotype of pkc1-371 cells. The HOC1 gene (Homologous to OCH1) is predicted to encode a type II integral membrane protein that strongly resembles Och1p, an α-1,6-mannosyltransferase. Immunofluorescence studies localized Hoc1p to the Golgi apparatus. While overexpression of HOC1 rescued the pkc1-371 temperature-sensitive cell lysis phenotype, disruption of HOC1 lowered the restrictive temperature of the pkc1-371 allele. Disruption of HOC1 also resulted in hypersensitivity to Calcofluor White and hygromycin B, phenotypes characteristic of defects in cell wall integrity and protein glycosylation, respectively. The function of HOC1 appears to be distinct from that of OCH1. Taken together, these results suggest that HOC1 encodes a Golgi-localized putative mannosyltransferase required for the proper construction of the cell wall. PMID:9055074

  7. Agonist-mediated activation of Bombyx mori diapause hormone receptor signals to extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 through Gq-PLC-PKC-dependent cascade.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xue; Yang, Jingwen; Shen, Zhangfei; Chen, Yajie; Shi, Liangen; Zhou, Naiming

    2016-08-01

    Diapause is a developmental strategy adopted by insects to survive in challenging environments such as the low temperatures of a winter. This unique process is regulated by diapause hormone (DH), which is a neuropeptide hormone that induces egg diapause in Bombyx mori and is involved in terminating pupal diapause in heliothis moths. An G protein-coupled receptor from the silkworm, B. mori, has been identified as a specific cell surface receptor for DH. However, the detailed information on the DH-DHR system and its mechanism(s) involved in the induction of embryonic diapause remains unknown. Here, we combined functional assays with various specific inhibitors to elucidate the DHR-mediated signaling pathways. Upon activation by DH, B. mori DHR is coupled to the Gq protein, leading to a significant increase of intracellular Ca(2+) and cAMP response element-driven luciferase activity in an UBO-QIC, a specific Gq inhibitor, sensitive manner. B. mori DHR elicited ERK1/2 phosphorylation in a dose- and time-dependent manner in response to DH. This effect was almost completely inhibited by co-incubation with UBO-QIC and was also significantly suppressed by PLC inhibitor U73122, PKC inhibitors Gö6983 and the Ca(2+) chelator EGTA. Moreover, DHR-induced activation of ERK1/2 was significantly attenuated by treatment with the Gβγ specific inhibitors gallein and M119K and the PI3K specific inhibitor Wortmannin, but not by the Src specific inhibitor PP2. Our data also demonstrates that the EGFR-transactivation pathway is not involved in the DHR-mediated ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Future efforts are needed to clarify the role of the ERK1/2 signaling pathway in the DH-mediated induction of B. mori embryonic diapause. PMID:27318251

  8. Protein kinase C in the wood frog, Rana sylvatica: reassessing the tissue-specific regulation of PKC isozymes during freezing

    PubMed Central

    Storey, Kenneth B.

    2014-01-01

    The wood frog, Rana sylvatica, survives whole-body freezing and thawing each winter. The extensive adaptations required at the biochemical level are facilitated by alterations to signaling pathways, including the insulin/Akt and AMPK pathways. Past studies investigating changing tissue-specific patterns of the second messenger IP3 in adapted frogs have suggested important roles for protein kinase C (PKC) in response to stress. In addition to their dependence on second messengers, phosphorylation of three PKC sites by upstream kinases (most notably PDK1) is needed for full PKC activation, according to widely-accepted models. The present study uses phospho-specific immunoblotting to investigate phosphorylation states of PKC—as they relate to distinct tissues, PKC isozymes, and phosphorylation sites—in control and frozen frogs. In contrast to past studies where second messengers of PKC increased during the freezing process, phosphorylation of PKC tended to generally decline in most tissues of frozen frogs. All PKC isozymes and specific phosphorylation sites detected by immunoblotting decreased in phosphorylation levels in hind leg skeletal muscle and hearts of frozen frogs. Most PKC isozymes and specific phosphorylation sites detected in livers and kidneys also declined; the only exceptions were the levels of isozymes/phosphorylation sites detected by the phospho-PKCα/βII (Thr638/641) antibody, which remained unchanged from control to frozen frogs. Changes in brains of frozen frogs were unique; no decreases were observed in the phosphorylation levels of any of the PKC isozymes and/or specific phosphorylation sites detected by immunoblotting. Rather, increases were observed for the levels of isozymes/phosphorylation sites detected by the phospho-PKCα/βII (Thr638/641), phospho-PKCδ (Thr505), and phospho-PKCθ (Thr538) antibodies; all other isozymes/phosphorylation sites detected in brain remained unchanged from control to frozen frogs. The results of this study

  9. Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors prevent HIV protease inhibitor-induced atherosclerosis by ubiquitination and degradation of protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Emily L; Li, Xiang-An; Guerin, Theresa; Everson, William V; Wilson, Melinda E; Bruce-Keller, Annadora J; Greenberg, Richard N; Guo, Ling; Ross, Stuart A; Smart, Eric J

    2006-12-01

    HIV protease inhibitors are important pharmacological agents used in the treatment of HIV-infected patients. One of the major disadvantages of HIV protease inhibitors is that they increase several cardiovascular risk factors, including the expression of CD36 in macrophages. The expression of CD36 in macrophages promotes the accumulation of cholesterol, the development of foam cells, and ultimately atherosclerosis. Recent studies have suggested that alpha-tocopherol can prevent HIV protease inhibitor-induced increases in macrophage CD36 levels. Because of the potential clinical utility of using alpha-tocopherol to limit some of the side effects of HIV protease inhibitors, we tested the ability of alpha-tocopherol to prevent ritonavir, a common HIV protease inhibitor, from inducing atherosclerosis in the LDL receptor (LDLR) null mouse model. Surprisingly, alpha-tocopherol did not prevent ritonavir-induced atherosclerosis. However, cotreatment with the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), didanosine or D4T, did prevent ritonavir-induced atherosclerosis. Using macrophages isolated from LDLR null mice, we demonstrated that the NRTIs prevented the upregulation of CD36 and cholesterol accumulation in macrophages. Treatment of LDLR null mice with NRTIs promoted the ubiquitination and downregulation of protein kinase Calpha (PKC). Previous studies demonstrated that HIV protease inhibitor activation of PKC was necessary for the upregulation of CD36. Importantly, the in vivo inhibition of PKC with chelerythrine prevented ritonavir-induced upregulation of CD36, accumulation of cholesterol, and the formation of atherosclerotic lesions. These novel mechanistic studies suggest that NRTIs may provide protection from one of the negative side effects associated with HIV protease inhibitors, namely the increase in CD36 levels and subsequent cholesterol accumulation and atherogenesis.

  10. Prostaglandin E{sub 2} regulates melanocyte dendrite formation through activation of PKC{zeta}

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Glynis Fricke, Alex; Fender, Anne; McClelland, Lindy; Jacobs, Stacey

    2007-11-01

    Prostaglandins are lipid signaling intermediates released by keratinocytes in response to ultraviolet irradiation (UVR) in the skin. The main prostaglandin released following UVR is PGE{sub 2}, a ligand for 4 related G-protein-coupled receptors (EP{sub 1}, EP{sub 2}, EP{sub 3} and EP{sub 4}). Our previous work established that PGE{sub 2} stimulates melanocyte dendrite formation through activation of the EP{sub 1} and EP{sub 3} receptors. The purpose of the present report is to define the signaling intermediates involved in EP{sub 1}- and EP{sub 3}-dependent dendrite formation in human melanocytes. We recently showed that activation of the atypical PKC{zeta} isoform stimulates melanocyte dendricity in response to treatment with lysophosphatidylcholine. We therefore examined the potential contribution of PKC{zeta} activation on EP{sub 1}- and EP{sub 3}-dependent dendrite formation in melanocytes. Stimulation of the EP{sub 1} and EP{sub 3} receptors by selective agonists activated PKC{zeta}, and inhibition of PKC{zeta} activation abrogated EP{sub 1}- and EP{sub 3}-receptor-mediated melanocyte dendricity. Because of the importance of Rho-GTP binding proteins in the regulation of melanocyte dendricity, we also examined the effect of EP{sub 1} and EP{sub 3} receptor activation on Rac and Rho activity. Neither Rac nor Rho was activated upon treatment with EP{sub 1,3}-receptor agonists. We show that melanocytes express only the EP{sub 3A1} isoform, but not the EP{sub 3B} receptor isoform, previously associated with Rho activation, consistent with a lack of Rho stimulation by EP{sub 3} agonists. Our data suggest that PKC{zeta} activation plays a predominant role in regulation of PGE{sub 2}-dependent melanocyte dendricity.

  11. SARS-CoV proteins decrease levels and activity of human ENaC via activation of distinct PKC isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Hong-Long; Song, Weifeng; Gao, Zhiqian; Su, Xue-Feng; Nie, Hong-Guang; Jiang, Yi; Peng, Ji-Bin; He, Yu-Xian; Liao, Ying; Zhou, Yong-Jian; Tousson, Albert; Matalon, Sadis

    2009-01-01

    Among the multiple organ disorders caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), acute lung failure following atypical pneumonia is the most serious and often fatal event. We hypothesized that two of the hydrophilic structural coronoviral proteins (S and E) would regulate alveolar fluid clearance by decreasing the cell surface expression and activity of amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium (Na+) channels (ENaC), the rate-limiting protein in transepithelial Na+ vectorial transport across distal lung epithelial cells. Coexpression of either S or E protein with human α-, β-, and γ-ENaC in Xenopus oocytes led to significant decreases of both amiloride-sensitive Na+ currents and γ-ENaC protein levels at their plasma membranes. S and E proteins decreased the rate of ENaC exocytosis and either had no effect (S) or decreased (E) rates of endocytosis. No direct interactions among SARS-CoV E protein with either α- or γ-ENaC were indentified. Instead, the downregulation of ENaC activity by SARS proteins was partially or completely restored by administration of inhibitors of PKCα/β1 and PKCζ. Consistent with the whole cell data, expression of S and E proteins decreased ENaC single-channel activity in oocytes, and these effects were partially abrogated by PKCα/β1 inhibitors. Finally, transfection of human airway epithelial (H441) cells with SARS E protein decreased whole cell amiloride-sensitive currents. These findings indicate that lung edema in SARS infection may be due at least in part to activation of PKC by SARS proteins, leading to decreasing levels and activity of ENaC at the apical surfaces of lung epithelial cells. PMID:19112100

  12. aPKC Inhibition by Par3 CR3 Flanking Regions Controls Substrate Access and Underpins Apical-Junctional Polarization.

    PubMed

    Soriano, Erika V; Ivanova, Marina E; Fletcher, Georgina; Riou, Philippe; Knowles, Philip P; Barnouin, Karin; Purkiss, Andrew; Kostelecky, Brenda; Saiu, Peter; Linch, Mark; Elbediwy, Ahmed; Kjær, Svend; O'Reilly, Nicola; Snijders, Ambrosius P; Parker, Peter J; Thompson, Barry J; McDonald, Neil Q

    2016-08-22

    Atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) is a key apical-basal polarity determinant and Par complex component. It is recruited by Par3/Baz (Bazooka in Drosophila) into epithelial apical domains through high-affinity interaction. Paradoxically, aPKC also phosphorylates Par3/Baz, provoking its relocalization to adherens junctions (AJs). We show that Par3 conserved region 3 (CR3) forms a tight inhibitory complex with a primed aPKC kinase domain, blocking substrate access. A CR3 motif flanking its PKC consensus site disrupts the aPKC kinase N lobe, separating P-loop/αB/αC contacts. A second CR3 motif provides a high-affinity anchor. Mutation of either motif switches CR3 to an efficient in vitro substrate by exposing its phospho-acceptor site. In vivo, mutation of either CR3 motif alters Par3/Baz localization from apical to AJs. Our results reveal how Par3/Baz CR3 can antagonize aPKC in stable apical Par complexes and suggests that modulation of CR3 inhibitory arms or opposing aPKC pockets would perturb the interaction, promoting Par3/Baz phosphorylation. PMID:27554858

  13. PKC-permitted elevation of sarcolemmal KATP concentration may explain female-specific resistance to myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Andrew G; Rees, Meredith L; Gioscia, Rachel A; Zachman, Derek K; Lynch, Joshua M; Browder, Jason C; Chicco, Adam J; Moore, Russell L

    2009-12-01

    The female myocardium, relative to that of the male, exhibits sustained resistance to ischaemic tissue injury, a phenomenon termed sex-specific cardioprotection (SSC). SSC is dependent upon the sarcolemmal K(ATP) channel (sarcK(ATP)), and protein kinase C (PKC). Here we investigate whether PKC-mediated regulation of sarcK(ATP) concentration can explain this endogenous form of protection. Hearts from male (M) and female (F) rats were Langendorff-perfused for 30 min prior to either regional ischaemia-reperfusion (I/R), or global ischaemia (GISC). For both protocols, pre-ischaemic blockade of PKC was achieved by chelerythrine (Chel) in male (M + C) and female (F + C) hearts. Additional female hearts underwent sarcK(ATP) antagonism during I/R by HMR-1098 (HMR), either alone or in combination with Chel (HMR + Chel). GISC hearts were fractionated to assess cellular distribution of PKC and sarcK(ATP). Sex-specific infarct resistance was apparent under control I/R (F, 23 +/- 3% vs. M, 36 +/- 4%, P < 0.05) and abolished by Chel (F + C, 36 +/- 3%). Female infarct resistance was susceptible to sarcK(ATP) blockade (Control, 16 +/- 2% vs. HMR, 27 +/- 3%), and PKC blockade had no additional effect (HMR + Chel, 26 +/- 2%). The prevalence of Kir6.2 and SUR2 was higher in the sarcolemmal fractions of females (Kir6.2: F, 1.24 +/- 0.07 vs. M, 1.02 +/- 0.06; SUR2: F, 3.16 +/- 0.22 vs. M, 2.45 +/- 0.09; ratio units), but normalized by Chel (Kir6.2: F, 1.06 +/- 0.07 vs. M, 0.99 +/- 0.06; SUR2: F, 2.99 +/- 0.09 vs. M, 2.82 +/- 0.22, M; ratio units). Phosphorylation of sarcolemmal PKC was reduced by Chel (p-PKC/PKC: control, 0.43 +/- 0.02; Chel, 0.29 +/- 0.01; P < 0.01). We conclude that PKC-mediated regulation of sarcK(ATP) may account for the physiologically sustainable dependence of SSC upon both PKC and sarcK(ATP), and that this regulation involves PKC-permitted enrichment of the female sarcolemma with sarcK(ATP). As such, the PKC-sarcK(ATP) axis may represent a target for sustainable

  14. Melatonin induces the expression of Nrf2-regulated antioxidant enzymes via PKC and Ca2+ influx activation in mouse pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Santofimia-Castaño, Patricia; Clea Ruy, Deborah; Garcia-Sanchez, Lourdes; Jimenez-Blasco, Daniel; Fernandez-Bermejo, Miguel; Bolaños, Juan P; Salido, Gines M; Gonzalez, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the potential activation of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor and the antioxidant-responsive element (Nrf2-ARE) signaling pathway in response to melatonin in isolated mouse pancreatic acinar cells. Changes in intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration were followed by fluorimetric analysis of fura-2-loaded cells. The activations of PKC and JNK were measured by Western blot analysis. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was employed to detect the expression of Nrf2-regulated antioxidant enzymes. Immunocytochemistry was employed to determine nuclear location of phosphorylated Nrf2, and the cellular redox state was monitored following MitoSOX Red-derived fluorescence. Our results show that stimulation of fura-2-loaded cells with melatonin (1 µM to 1 mM), in the presence of Ca(2+) in the extracellular medium, induced a slow and progressive increase of [Ca(2+)](c) toward a stable level. Melatonin did not inhibit the typical Ca(2+) response induced by CCK-8 (1 nM). When the cells were challenged with indoleamine in the absence of Ca(2+) in the extracellular solution (medium containing 0.5 mM EGTA) or in the presence of 1 mM LaCl(3), to inhibit Ca(2+) entry, we could not detect any change in [Ca(2+)](c). Nevertheless, CCK-8 (1 nM) was able to induce the typical mobilization of Ca(2+). When the cells were incubated with the PKC activator PMA (1 µM) in the presence of Ca(2+) in the extracellular medium, we observed a response similar to that noted when the cells were challenged with melatonin 100 µM. However, in the presence of Ro31-8220 (3 µM), a PKC inhibitor, stimulation of cells with melatonin failed to evoke changes in [Ca(2+)]c. Immunoblots, using an antibody specific for phospho-PKC, revealed that melatonin induces PKCα activation, either in the presence or in the absence of external Ca(2+). Melatonin induced the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of the transcription factor Nrf2, and

  15. Central amygdala PKC-δ+ neurons mediate the influence of multiple anorexigenic signals

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Haijiang; Haubensak, Wulf; Anthony, Todd; Anderson, David J

    2014-01-01

    Feeding can be inhibited by multiple cues, including those associated with satiety, sickness or unpalatable food. How such anorexigenic signals inhibit feeding at the neural circuit level is incompletely understood. While some inhibitory circuits have been identified, it is not yet clear whether distinct anorexigenic influences are processed in a convergent or parallel manner. The amygdala central nucleus (CEA) has been implicated in feeding control, but its role is controversial. The lateral subdivision of CEA (CEl) contains a subpopulation of GABAergic neurons, marked by protein kinase C-δ. Here we show that CEl PKC-δ+ neurons in mice are activated by diverse anorexigenic signals in vivo, required for the inhibition of feeding by such signals, and strongly suppress food intake when activated. They receive pre-synaptic inputs from anatomically distributed neurons activated by different anorexigenic agents. These data suggest that CEl PKC-δ+ neurons constitute an important node that mediates the influence of multiple anorexigenic signals. PMID:25064852

  16. PKC and AMPK regulation of Kv1.5 potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Martin Nybo; Skibsbye, Lasse; Tang, Chuyi; Petersen, Frederic; MacAulay, Nanna; Rasmussen, Hanne Borger; Jespersen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The voltage-gated Kv1.5 potassium channel, conducting the ultra-rapid rectifier K+ current (IKur), is regulated through several pathways. Here we investigate if Kv1.5 surface expression is controlled by the 2 kinases PKC and AMPK, using Xenopus oocytes, MDCK cells and atrial derived HL-1 cells. By confocal microscopy combined with electrophysiology we demonstrate that PKC activation reduces Kv1.5 current, through a decrease in membrane expressed channels. AMPK activation was found to decrease the membrane expression in MDCK cells, but not in HL-1 cells and was furthermore shown to be dependent on co-expression of Nedd4–2 in Xenopus oocytes. These results indicate that Kv1.5 channels are regulated by both kinases, although through different molecular mechanisms in different cell systems. PMID:26043299

  17. PKC and AMPK regulation of Kv1.5 potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Martin Nybo; Skibsbye, Lasse; Tang, Chuyi; Petersen, Frederic; MacAulay, Nanna; Rasmussen, Hanne Borger; Jespersen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The voltage-gated Kv1.5 potassium channel, conducting the ultra-rapid rectifier K(+) current (IKur), is regulated through several pathways. Here we investigate if Kv1.5 surface expression is controlled by the 2 kinases PKC and AMPK, using Xenopus oocytes, MDCK cells and atrial derived HL-1 cells. By confocal microscopy combined with electrophysiology we demonstrate that PKC activation reduces Kv1.5 current, through a decrease in membrane expressed channels. AMPK activation was found to decrease the membrane expression in MDCK cells, but not in HL-1 cells and was furthermore shown to be dependent on co-expression of Nedd4-2 in Xenopus oocytes. These results indicate that Kv1.5 channels are regulated by both kinases, although through different molecular mechanisms in different cell systems. PMID:26043299

  18. Structure-based lead discovery for protein kinase C zeta inhibitor design by exploiting kinase-inhibitor complex crystal structure data and potential therapeutics for preterm labour.

    PubMed

    Shao, Qing-Chun; Zhang, Cui-Juan; Li, Jie

    2014-10-14

    The protein kinase C (PKC) is a family of serine/threonine kinases with a broad range of cellular targets. Members of the PKC family participate at the diverse biological events involved in cellular proliferation, differentiation and survival. The PKC isoform zeta (PKCζ) is an atypical member that has recently been found to play an essential role in promoting human uterine contractility and thus been raised as a new target for treating preterm labour and other tocolytic diseases. In this study, an integrative protocol was described to graft hundreds of inhibitor ligands from their complex crystal structures with cognate kinases into the active pocket of PKCζ and, based on the modeled structures, to evaluate the binding strength of these inhibitors to the non-cognate PKCζ receptor by using a consensus scoring strategy. A total of 32 inhibitors with top score were compiled, and eight out of them were tested for inhibitory potency against PKCζ. Consequently, five compounds, i.e. CDK6 inhibitor fisetin, PIM1 inhibitor myricetin, CDK9 inhibitor flavopiridol and PknB inhibitor mitoxantrone as well as the promiscuous kinase inhibitor staurosporine showed high or moderate inhibitory activity on PKCζ, with IC50 values of 58 ± 9, 1.7 ± 0.4, 108 ± 17, 280 ± 47 and 0.019 ± 0.004 μM, respectively, while other three compounds, including two marketed drugs dasatinib and sunitinib as well as the Rho inhibitor fasudil, have not been detected to possess observable activity. Next, based on the modeled structure data we modified three flavonoid kinase inhibitors, i.e. fisetin, myricetin and flavopiridol, to generate a number of more potential molecular entities, two of which were found to have a moderately improved activity as compared to their parent compounds.

  19. A calcium and free fatty acid-modulated protein kinase as putative effector of the fusicoccin 14-3-3 receptor.

    PubMed Central

    van der Hoeven, P C; Siderius, M; Korthout, H A; Drabkin, A V; de Boer, A H

    1996-01-01

    A protein kinase that is activated by calcium and cis-unsaturated fatty acids has been characterized from oat (Avena sativa L.) root plasma membranes. The kinase phosphorylates a synthetic peptide with a motif (-R-T-L-S-) that can be phosphorylated by both protein kinase C (PKC) and calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK)-type kinases. Calphostin C and chelerythrine, two PKC inhibitors, completely inhibited the kinase activity with values of inhibitor concentration for 50% inhibition of 0.7 and 30 microns, respectively. At low Ca2+ concentrations cis-unsaturated fatty acids (linolenic acid, linoleic acid, arachidonic acid, and oleic acid) stimulated the kinase activity almost 10-fold. The two inhibitors of the kinase, calphostin C and chelerythrin, strongly reduced the fusicoccin (FC)-induced H+ extrusion, and the activators of the kinase, the cis-unsaturated fatty acids, prevented [3H]FC binding to the FC 14-3-3 receptor. CDPK antibodies cross-reacted with a 43-kD band in the plasma membrane and in a purified FC receptor fraction. A polypeptide with the same apparent molecular mass was recognized by a synthetic peptide that has a sequence homologous to the annexin-like domain from barely 14-3-3. The possibility of the involvement of a kinase, with properties from both CDPK and PKC, and a phospholipase A2 in the FC Signal transduction pathway is discussed. PMID:8754686

  20. Shrinkage activates a nonselective conductance: involvement of a Walker-motif protein and PKC.

    PubMed

    Nelson, D J; Tien, X Y; Xie, W; Brasitus, T A; Kaetzel, M A; Dedman, J R

    1996-01-01

    The ability of all cells to maintain their volume during an osmotic challenge is dependent on the regulated movement of salt and water across the plasma membrane. We demonstrate the phosphorylation-dependent gating of a nonselective conductance in Caco-2 cells during cellular shrinkage. Intracellular application of exogenous purified rat brain protein kinase C (PKC) resulted in the activation of a current similar to that activated during shrinkage with a Na(+)-to-Cl- permeability ratio of approximately 1.7:1. To prevent possible PKC- and/or shrinkage-dependent activation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR), which is expressed at high levels in Caco-2 cells, a functional anti-peptide antibody, anti-CFTR505-511, was introduced into the cells via the patch pipette. Anti-CFTR505-511, which is directed against the Walker motif in the first nucleotide binding fold of CFTR, prevented the PKC/shrink-age current activation. The peptide CFTR505-511 also induced current inhibition, suggesting the possible involvement of a regulatory element in close proximity to the channel that shares sequence homology with the first nucleotide binding fold of CFTR and whose binding to the channel is required for channel gating. PMID:8772443

  1. Polydatin Attenuates H2O2-Induced Oxidative Stress via PKC Pathway

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction, which is found to precede the development of diverse cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). The aim of this study was to observe the protective effects of PD against H2O2-induced oxidative stress injury (OSI) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and the possible mechanism of PD in OSI treatment. HUVECs were subjected to H2O2 in the absence or presence of PD. It turned out that PD improved cell viability and adhesive and migratory abilities, inhibited the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and elevated the content of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and superoxide dismutase (SOD). TUNEL, fluorometric assays, and Western blotting showed that OSI upregulated the apoptosis ratio, the activity of caspase-3 and the level of proapoptotic protein Bax and decreased the level of antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2. However, PD treatment partially reversed these damage effects and Protein Kinase C (PKC) activation by thymeleatoxin (THX) in turn eliminated the antiapoptotic effect of PD. Furthermore, PD attenuated the H2O2-induced phosphorylation of PKCs α and δ and increased the phosphorylation of PKC ε. Our results indicated that PD might exert protective effects against OSI through various interactions with PKC pathway. PMID:26881030

  2. PI3K signalling in GnRH actions on dispersed goldfish pituitary cells: relationship with PKC-mediated LH and GH release and regulation of long-term effects on secretion and total cellular hormone availability.

    PubMed

    Pemberton, Joshua G; Orr, Michael E; Stafford, James L; Chang, John P

    2014-09-01

    Goldfish pituitary cells are exposed to two GnRHs, salmon (s)GnRH and chicken (c)GnRH-II. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and protein kinase C (PKC) both participate in acute sGnRH- and cGnRH-II-stimulated LH and GH release. Using goldfish pituitary cells, we examined the relationship between PI3K and PKC in acute LH and GH secretion, and PI3K involvement in chronic hormone release and total LH and GH availability. The PI3K inhibitor LY294002 did not affect PKC agonists-induced LH or GH release, and PKC agonists did not alter PI3K p85 phosphorylation, suggesting PKC activation is not upstream of PI3K in acute hormone release. In 2, 6, 12 and 24h treatments, LY294002 did not affect LH release but stimulated total LH availability at 6h. sGnRH stimulatory actions on LH release and total availability at 12 and 24h, and cGnRH-II effects on these parameters at 6h were inhibited by LY294002. LY294002 enhanced basal GH release at 2 and 6h, but reduced total GH at 12 and 24h. Increased GH release was seen following 6, 12 and 24h of sGnRH, and 2, 6 and 24h of cGnRH-II treatment but total GH availability was only elevated by 24h cGnRH-II treatment. Whereas LY294002 inhibited GH release responses to sGnRH at 12h and cGnRH-II at 6h, it attenuated cGnRH-II-elicited, but not sGnRH-induced, effects on total GH. These results indicate that PI3K differentially modulates long-term basal and GnRH-stimulated hormone release, and total hormone availability, in a time-, cell-type-, and GnRH isoform-selective manner.

  3. Expression of PKC iota affects neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells at least partly independent of kinase function

    PubMed Central

    Doonachar, Alana; Schoenfeld, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    Atypical PKC (aPKC) plays a role in establishing cell polarity and has been indicated in neuronal differentiation and polarization, including neurite formation in rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells, albeit by unclear mechanisms. Here, the role of the aPKC isoform, PKC iota (PKCι), in the early neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells was investigated. NGF-treated PC12 cells with stably expressed exogenous wild-type PKCι showed decreased expression of a neuroendocrine marker, increased expression of a neuronal marker, and increased neurite formation. Stable expression of a kinase- inactive PKCι, but not constitutively active PKCι lacking a regulatory domain, had similar although less potent effects. Pharmacological inhibition of endogenous aPKC kinase activity in parental PC12 cells did not inhibit neurite formation, suggesting that some of the observed effects of PKCι expression on neuronal differentiation are kinase- independent. Interestingly, exogenous expression of wild-type and kinase-inactive PKCι had little effect on overall PKCι activity, but caused a decrease in PKC zeta (PKCζ) kinase activity, suggesting an interplay between the two isoforms that may underlie the observed results. Overall, these findings suggest that in PC12 and perhaps other neuroendocrine precursor cells, PKCι influences an early differentiation decision between the neuroendocrine (chromaffin) and sympathetic neuron cell lineages, potentially by affecting PKCζ function. PMID:24910851

  4. aPKC phosphorylates JAM-A at Ser285 to promote cell contact maturation and tight junction formation

    PubMed Central

    Iden, Sandra; Misselwitz, Steve; Peddibhotla, Swetha S.D.; Tuncay, Hüseyin; Rehder, Daniela; Gerke, Volker; Robenek, Horst; Suzuki, Atsushi

    2012-01-01

    The PAR-3–atypical protein kinase C (aPKC)–PAR-6 complex has been implicated in the development of apicobasal polarity and the formation of tight junctions (TJs) in vertebrate epithelial cells. It is recruited by junctional adhesion molecule A (JAM-A) to primordial junctions where aPKC is activated by Rho family small guanosine triphosphatases. In this paper, we show that aPKC can interact directly with JAM-A in a PAR-3–independent manner. Upon recruitment to primordial junctions, aPKC phosphorylates JAM-A at S285 to promote the maturation of immature cell–cell contacts. In fully polarized cells, S285-phosphorylated JAM-A is localized exclusively at the TJs, and S285 phosphorylation of JAM-A is required for the development of a functional epithelial barrier. Protein phosphatase 2A dephosphorylates JAM-A at S285, suggesting that it antagonizes the activity of aPKC. Expression of nonphosphorylatable JAM-A/S285A interferes with single lumen specification during cyst development in three-dimensional culture. Our data suggest that aPKC phosphorylates JAM-A at S285 to regulate cell–cell contact maturation, TJ formation, and single lumen specification. PMID:22371556

  5. Mutant γPKC that causes spinocerebellar ataxia type 14 upregulates Hsp70, which protects cells from the mutant's cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Kota; Seki, Takahiro; Onji, Tomoya; Adachi, Naoko; Tanaka, Shigeru; Hide, Izumi; Saito, Naoaki; Sakai, Norio

    2013-10-11

    Several missense mutations in the protein kinase Cγ (γPKC) gene have been found to cause spinocerebellar ataxia type 14 (SCA14), an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease. We previously demonstrated that the mutant γPKC found in SCA14 is misfolded, susceptible to aggregation and cytotoxic. Molecular chaperones assist the refolding and degradation of misfolded proteins and prevention of the proteins' aggregation. In the present study, we found that the expression of mutant γPKC-GFP increased the levels of heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70) in SH-SY5Y cells. To elucidate the role of this elevation, we investigated the effect of siRNA-mediated knockdown of Hsp70 on the aggregation and cytotoxicity of mutant γPKC. Knockdown of Hsp70 exacerbated the aggregation and cytotoxicity of mutant γPKC-GFP by inhibiting this mutant's degradation. These findings suggest that mutant γPKC increases the level of Hsp70, which protects cells from the mutant's cytotoxicity by enhancing its degradation.

  6. Retrospective analysis of protein kinase C-beta (PKC-β) expression in lymphoid malignancies and its association with survival in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuyu; Phong, Mark; Lahn, Michael; Brail, Leslie; Sutton, Susan; Lin, Boris K; Thornton, Donald; Liao, Birong

    2007-01-01

    Background Both mechanistic features and recent correlative findings suggest a potential role for protein kinase C-beta (PKC-β) in tumor pathogenesis, particularly in B-cell malignancies. To evaluate the role of this gene in lymphoid malignancies, we analyzed global gene expression data to quantify PKC-β expression across diagnostic groups and, when possible, determined correlations between PKC-β expression and survival. Results Our analysis showed that the level of PKC-β expression was highest in chronic lymphocytic leukemia and follicular lymphoma. Within diffuse large-B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), PKC-β expression was significantly higher in activated B-cell- like subtype than germinal center B-cell- like subtype (P < 0.0001). Elevated PKC-β appeared to be associated with worse survival in both of these subtypes. When analyzed within clinically defined risk groups established by the International Prognostic Index (IPI), PKC-β expression was lowest in patients with low IPI scores (0–1). Within intermediate- and high-risk IPI groups, elevated PKC-β expression was associated with worse survival, suggesting that PKC-β may expand the prognostic value of the IPI. Results of global gene expression analyses of DLBCL samples corroborate previous observations that anti-apoptosis, cell proliferation, and B-cell proliferation signaling pathways are functionally related to PKC-β. Conclusion We present a first detailed pharmacogenomics report comparing PKC-β mRNA expression across different lymphoid malignancies and evaluating it as an outcome predictor. Our findings suggest that DLBCL patients with elevated PKC-β have a worse prognosis, indicating that further evaluation of PKC-β as a chemotherapeutic target for lymphoid malignancies is warranted. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Dr. Pierre Pontarotti, Dr. Kateryna Makova, and Dr. Matthew Coleman (nominated by Dr. Sandrine Dudoit). PMID:17313671

  7. Interaction between protein kinase C and protein kinase A can modulate transmitter release at the rat neuromuscular synapse.

    PubMed

    Santafé, M M; Garcia, N; Lanuza, M A; Tomàs, M; Tomàs, J

    2009-02-15

    We used intracellular recording to investigate the functional interaction between protein kinase C (PKC) and protein kinase A (PKA) signal transduction cascades in the control of transmitter release in the neuromuscular synapses from adult rats. Our results indicate that: 1) PKA and PKC are independently involved in asynchronous release. 2) Evoked acetylcholine (ACh) release is enhanced with the PKA agonist Sp-8-BrcAMP and the PKC agonist phorbol ester (PMA). 3) PKA has a constitutive role in promoting a component of normal evoked transmitter release because, when the kinase is inhibited with H-89, the release diminishes. However, the PKC inhibitor calphostin C (CaC) does not affect ACh release. 4) PKA regulates neurotransmission without PKC involvement because, after PMA or CaC modulation of the PKC activity, coupling to the ACh release of PKA can normally be stimulated with Sp-8-BrcAMP or inhibited with H-89. 5) After PKA inhibition with H-89, PKC stimulation with PMA (or inhibition with CaC) does not lead to any change in evoked ACh release. However, in PKA-stimulated preparations with Sp-8-BrcAMP, PKC becomes tonically active, thus potentiating a component of release that can now be blocked with CaC. In normal conditions, therefore, PKA was able to modulate ACh release independently of PKC activity, whereas PKA stimulation caused the PKC coupling to evoked release. In contrast, PKA inhibition prevent PKC stimulation (with the phorbol ester) and coupling to ACh output. There was therefore some dependence of PKC on PKA activity in the fine control of the neuromuscular synaptic functionalism and ACh release.

  8. TNF-α Up-Regulates Protein Level and Cell Surface Expression of the Leptin Receptor by Stimulating Its Export via a PKC-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Lixia; Guo, Kaiying; Cremona, Maria Laura; McGraw, Timothy E.; Leibel, Rudolph L.

    2012-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that inflammation/cytokines may modulate hypothalamic responses to leptin, which is a key regulator of energy homeostasis and inflammatory/stress responses. We investigated a possible role of TNF-α, a key early mediator of inflammation, in regulating the expression and trafficking of the long-isoform leptin receptor (LEPRb), the primary mediator of leptin signaling, in cultured cells. We found that TNF-α in a wide range of concentrations up-regulated LEPRb protein level and soluble LEPR (sLEPR) release via ectodomain shedding of LEPRb in multiple cell types, including neuronal cells. TNF-α also acutely increased LEPRb cell surface expression and leptin-induced STAT3 phosphorylation. In contrast, TNF-α had no significant effects on the protein level or cell surface expression of several other transmembrane proteins, including the transferrin receptor and cadherin. The stimulatory effects of TNF-α on LEPRb cell surface expression and sLEPR release were not dependent on de novo protein synthesis or functional lysosomes but were blocked by brefeldin A, suggesting that an intact Golgi or continuous endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi transport of newly synthesized proteins is required for these effects. However, TNF-α did not increase the half-life of cell surface LEPRb. Protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor GF109203X abrogated the effects of TNF-α, whereas the pan-PKC activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate mimicked the TNF-α effects. Taken together, our results suggest that TNF-α, via activation of PKC, regulates anterograde trafficking and/or degradation of LEPRb in the biosynthetic pathway, leading to concomitant increases in LEPRb protein level, cell surface expression, and sLEPR production. The finding that LEPRb cell surface expression and sLEPR production, key modulators of leptin sensitivity and bioavailability, are direct targets of TNF-α signaling could have a potentially important implication in the regulation of leptin

  9. Inosine strongly enhances proliferation of human C32 melanoma cells through PLC-PKC-MEK1/2-ERK1/2 and PI3K pathways.

    PubMed

    Soares, Ana Sofia; Costa, Vera Marisa; Diniz, Carmen; Fresco, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Malignant melanoma is the most deadly type of skin cancer. The lack of effective pharmacological approaches for this tumour can be related to the incomplete understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in melanoma cell proliferation. Adenosine has growth-promoting and growth inhibitory effects on tumour cells. We aimed to investigate effects of adenosine and its metabolic product, inosine, on human C32 melanoma cells and the signalling pathways involved. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) proliferation assays were used to evaluate adenosine, adenosine deaminase and inosine effects, in the absence or presence of adenosine receptor (AR), A3 AR and P2Y1 R antagonists and PLC, PKC, MEK1/2 and PI3K inhibitors. ERK1/2 levels were determined using an ELISA kit. Adenosine and inosine levels were quantified using an enzyme-coupled assay. Adenosine caused cell proliferation through AR activation. Adenosine deaminase increased inosine levels (nanomolar concentrations) on the extracellular space, in a time-dependent manner, inducing proliferation through A3 AR activation. Micromolar concentrations of inosine enhanced proliferation through A3 AR activation, causing an increase in ERK1/2 levels, and P2Y1 R activation via ENT-dependent mechanisms. We propose the simultaneous activation of PLC-PKC-MEK1/2-ERK1/2 and PI3K pathways as the main mechanism responsible for the proliferative effect elicited by inosine and its significant role in melanoma cancer progression.

  10. Inosine strongly enhances proliferation of human C32 melanoma cells through PLC-PKC-MEK1/2-ERK1/2 and PI3K pathways.

    PubMed

    Soares, Ana Sofia; Costa, Vera Marisa; Diniz, Carmen; Fresco, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Malignant melanoma is the most deadly type of skin cancer. The lack of effective pharmacological approaches for this tumour can be related to the incomplete understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in melanoma cell proliferation. Adenosine has growth-promoting and growth inhibitory effects on tumour cells. We aimed to investigate effects of adenosine and its metabolic product, inosine, on human C32 melanoma cells and the signalling pathways involved. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) proliferation assays were used to evaluate adenosine, adenosine deaminase and inosine effects, in the absence or presence of adenosine receptor (AR), A3 AR and P2Y1 R antagonists and PLC, PKC, MEK1/2 and PI3K inhibitors. ERK1/2 levels were determined using an ELISA kit. Adenosine and inosine levels were quantified using an enzyme-coupled assay. Adenosine caused cell proliferation through AR activation. Adenosine deaminase increased inosine levels (nanomolar concentrations) on the extracellular space, in a time-dependent manner, inducing proliferation through A3 AR activation. Micromolar concentrations of inosine enhanced proliferation through A3 AR activation, causing an increase in ERK1/2 levels, and P2Y1 R activation via ENT-dependent mechanisms. We propose the simultaneous activation of PLC-PKC-MEK1/2-ERK1/2 and PI3K pathways as the main mechanism responsible for the proliferative effect elicited by inosine and its significant role in melanoma cancer progression. PMID:24909096

  11. Caffeine inhibits UV-mediated NF-kappaB activation in A2058 melanoma cells: an ATM-PKCdelta-p38 MAPK-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Dashnamoorthy; Muniyappa, Harish; Das, Kumuda C

    2008-01-01

    Mammalian ultraviolet (UV) radiation response is a gene induction cascade activated by several transcription factors, including NF-kappaB. Although NF-kappaB is induced by UV radiation, the signal transduction mechanism remains relatively unclear. In the present study, we show that UV-induced NF-kappaB activation is mediated by the activation of Ataxia telangiecia mutated (ATM) and protein kinase C (PKC). We also show that caffeine specifically inhibits UV-mediated NF-kappaB activation, but not TNFalpha-mediated NF-kappaB activation. In addition, our study shows that ATM, but not ATM-Rad3-related (ATR) or DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is involved in UV-induced NF-kappaB activation. Because SB203580 (a p38 MAPK inhibitor), or Calphostin C or rottlerin (PKC inhibitors) was able to inhibit UV-mediated NF-kappaB activation, we evaluated whether caffeine could inhibit p38 MAPK or PKC activity. Caffeine or rottlerin inhibited UV-induced phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, but not anisomycin-induced phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, suggesting that p38 MAPK is downstream of PKC. Additionally, caffeine could effectively inhibit UV-induced increases in PKC activity. Taken together, our study demonstrates that caffeine is a potent inhibitor of UV-induced NF-kappaB activation. Additionally, this inhibition occurs due to the inhibitory action of caffeine on ATM and PKC, resulting in the inhibition of p38 MAPK activation.

  12. Inhibitory responses in Aplysia pleural sensory neurons act to block excitability, transmitter release, and PKC Apl II activation.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Tyler W; Farah, Carole A; Sossin, Wayne S

    2012-01-01

    Expression of the 5-HT(1Apl(a)) receptor in Aplysia pleural sensory neurons inhibited 5-HT-mediated translocation of the novel PKC Apl II in sensory neurons and prevented PKC-dependent synaptic facilitation at sensory to motoneuron synapses (Nagakura et al. 2010). We now demonstrate that the ability of inhibitory receptors to block PKC activation is a general feature of inhibitory receptors and is found after expression of the 5-HT(1Apl(b)) receptor and with activation of endogenous dopamine and FMRFamide receptors in sensory neurons. Pleural sensory neurons are heterogeneous for their inhibitory response to endogenous transmitters, with dopamine being the most prevalent, followed by FMRFamide, and only a small number of neurons with inhibitory responses to 5-HT. The inhibitory response is dominant, reduces membrane excitability and synaptic efficacy, and can reverse 5-HT facilitation at both naive and depressed synapses. Indeed, dopamine can reverse PKC translocation during the continued application of 5-HT. Reversal of translocation can also be seen after translocation mediated by an analog of diacylglycerol, suggesting inhibition is not through blockade of diacylglycerol production. The effects of inhibition on PKC translocation can be rescued by phosphatidic acid, consistent with the inhibitory response involving a reduction or block of production of this lipid. However, phosphatidic acid could not recover PKC-dependent synaptic facilitation due to an additional inhibitory effect on the non-L-type calcium flux linked to synaptic transmission. In summary, we find a novel mechanism downstream of inhibitory receptors linked to inhibition of PKC activation in Aplysia sensory neurons. PMID:21994260

  13. Inhibition of PKC-Induced COX-2 and IL-8 Expression in Human Breast Cancer Cells by Glucosamine.

    PubMed

    Chou, Wan-Yu; Chuang, Kun-Han; Sun, David; Lee, Yu-Hsiu; Kao, Pu-Hong; Lin, Yen-Yu; Wang, Hsei-Wei; Wu, Yuh-Lin

    2015-09-01

    Breast cancer is a common cancer leading to many deaths among females. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) are two highly expressed inflammatory mediators to be induced by the protein kinase C (PKC) signaling via various inflammatory stimuli and both contribute significantly to cancer metastasis/progression. Glucosamine has been shown to act as an anti-inflammation molecule. The aim of this study was to clarify the role and acting mechanism of glucosamine during the PKC-regulation of COX-2/IL-8 expression and the associated impact on breast cancer. In MCF-7 breast cancer cells, glucosamine effectively suppresses the PKC induction of COX-2 and IL-8 promoter activity, mRNA and protein levels, as well as the production of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) and IL-8. Glucosamine is able to promote COX-2 protein degradation in a calpain-dependent manner and IL-8 protein degradation in calpain-dependent and proteasome-dependent manners. The MAPK and NF-κB pathways are involved in PKC-induced COX-2 expression, but only the NF-κB pathway is involved in PKC-induced IL-8 expression. Glucosamine attenuates PKC-mediated IκBα phosphorylation, nuclear NF-κB translocation, and NF-κB reporter activation. Both PGE(2) and IL-8 promote cell proliferation and IL-8 induces cell migration; thus, glucosamine appears to suppress PKC-induced cell proliferation and migration. Furthermore, glucosamine significantly inhibits the growth of breast cancer xenografts and this is accompanied by a reduction in COX-2 and IL-8 expression. In conclusion, glucosamine seems to attenuate the inflammatory response in vitro and in vivo and this occurs, at least in part by targeting to the NF-κB signaling pathway, resulting in an inhibition of breast cancer cell growth.

  14. PKC phosphorylates residues in the N-terminal of the DA transporter to regulate amphetamine-induced DA efflux.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Bubula, Nancy; Brown, Jason; Wang, Yunliang; Kondev, Veronika; Vezina, Paul

    2016-05-27

    The DA transporter (DAT), a phosphoprotein, controls extracellular dopamine (DA) levels in the central nervous system through transport or reverse transport (efflux). Multiple lines of evidence support the claim that PKC significantly contributes to amphetamine-induced DA efflux. Other signaling pathways, involving CaMKII and ERK, have also been shown to regulate DAT mediated efflux. Here we assessed the contribution of putative PKC residues (S4, S7, S13) in the N-terminal of the DAT to amphetamine-induced DA efflux by transfecting DATs containing different serine to alanine (S-A) point mutations into DA pre-loaded HEK-293 cells and incubating these cells in amphetamine (2μM). The effects of a S-A mutation at the non-PKC residue S12 and a threonine to alanine (T-A) mutation at the ERK T53 residue were also assessed for comparison. WT-DATs were used as controls. In an initial experiment, we confirmed that inhibiting PKC with Go6976 (130nM) significantly reduced amphetamine-induced DA efflux. In subsequent experiments, cells transfected with the S4A, S12A, S13A, T53A and S4,7,13A mutants showed a reduction in amphetamine-induced DA efflux similar to that observed with Go6976. Interestingly, cells transfected with the S7A mutant, identified by some as a PKC-PKA residue, showed unperturbed WT-DAT levels of amphetamine-induced DA efflux. These results indicate that phosphorylation by PKC of select residues in the DAT N-terminal can regulate amphetamine-induced efflux. PKC can act either independently or in concert with other kinases such as ERK to produce this effect.

  15. A protein kinase C-encoding gene, pkcA, is essential to the viability of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Ichinomiya, Masayuki; Uchida, Hirotaka; Koshi, Yukako; Ohta, Akinori; Horiuchi, Hiroyuki

    2007-11-01

    A protein kinase C (PKC)-encoding gene (pkcA) was isolated from the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans. Although we attempted to isolate pkcA deletion mutants, we obtained only heterokaryons that had both DeltapkcA and pkcA(+) nuclei. Conidia produced by the heterokaryon germinated. The germ tubes, however, lysed frequently and no colony formation was observed, indicating that the pkcA gene is essential to the viability of A. nidulans. We constructed conditional mutants (alcA(p)-pkcA mutants) that expressed pkcA under the control of the alcA promoter (alcA(p)). Under alcA(p)-repressing conditions, their colonies were smaller than those of the wild-type strains and their hyphae lysed frequently. These phenotypes were not remedied under moderate- or high-osmolarity conditions; the growth defect deteriorated further under the latter. Under alcA(p)-inducing conditions, the alcA(p)-pkcA mutants also showed growth-sensitivity to cell wall destabilizing agents. These results indicate that pkcA plays an important role in the maintenance of cell integrity.

  16. [Suppressive effect of protein kinase C inhibitors on tumor cell function via phosphorylation of p53 protein in mice].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, K; Shinozuka, K; Kunitomo, M

    2000-12-01

    We examined the role of protein kinase C (PKC) in the phosphorylation of a p53 protein. Exposure to a protein kinase inhibitor, 1-(5-isoquinolinesulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine dihydrochloride (H7), increased the phosphorylation of the wild type p53 protein, whereas exposure to a tumor promoter phorbol ester, 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA), decreased it in vivo after incubation with mouse epidermal JB6 cells for 3 h. Exposure to a cAMP dependent protein kinase (PKA) activator, forskolin, did not decrease the phosphorylation of p53 protein. In the transient transfection/luciferase reporter transactivation assay, H7 slightly increased the mouse double minute (MDM) 2 reporter transactivation activity of the p53 protein after treatment for 24 h, whereas TPA completely blocked it. Exposure to H7 and a specific PKC inhibitor, bisindolylmaleimide (bis), dose-dependently reduced the lung-colonizing potential of highly metastatic B16-F10 mouse melanoma cells in syngeneic mice. These results suggest that the phosphorylation of the wild type p53 protein is inversely related to PKC activation, and also suggest that the phosphorylation of the p53 protein is involved in the function of its transcription factor. The PKC inhibitor may exhibit a potent anti-metastatic effect through the phosphorylation of wild type p53 protein and the activation of its function. PMID:11193387

  17. BDNF regulates atypical PKC at spinal synapses to initiate and maintain a centralized chronic pain state

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic pain is an important medical problem affecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide. Mechanisms underlying the maintenance of chronic pain states are poorly understood but the elucidation of such mechanisms have the potential to reveal novel therapeutics capable of reversing a chronic pain state. We have recently shown that the maintenance of a chronic pain state is dependent on an atypical PKC, PKMζ, but the mechanisms involved in controlling PKMζ in chronic pain are completely unknown. Here we have tested the hypothesis that brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) regulates PKMζ, and possibly other aPKCs, to maintain a centralized chronic pain state. Results We first demonstrate that although other kinases play a role in the initiation of persistent nociceptive sensitization, they are not involved in the maintenance of this chronic pain state indicating that a ZIP-reversible process is responsible for the maintenance of persistent sensitization. We further show that BDNF plays a critical role in initiating and maintaining persistent nociceptive sensitization and that this occurs via a ZIP-reversible process. Moreover, at spinal synapses, BDNF controls PKMζ and PKCλ nascent synthesis via mTORC1 and BDNF enhances PKMζ phosphorylaton. Finally, we show that BDNF signaling to PKMζ and PKCλ is conserved across CNS synapses demonstrating molecular links between pain and memory mechanisms. Conclusions Hence, BDNF is a key regulator of aPKC synthesis and phosphorylation and an essential mediator of the maintenance of a centralized chronic pain state. These findings point to BDNF regulation of aPKC as a potential therapeutic target for the permanent reversal of a chronic pain state. PMID:23510079

  18. Platelet PKC-θ deficiency with human RUNX1 mutation: PRKCQ is a transcriptional target of RUNX1

    PubMed Central

    Jalagadugula, Gauthami; Mao, Guangfen; Kaur, Gurpreet; Dhanasekaran, Danny N; Rao, A. Koneti

    2011-01-01

    Objective Mutations in hematopoietic transcription factor RUNX1 cause thrombocytopenia and impaired platelet function. In a patient with a heterozygous mutation in RUNX1 we have described decreased platelet pleckstrin phosphorylation and protein kinase C-θ (PKC-θ, gene PRKCQ) associated with thrombocytopenia, impaired platelet aggregation, and dense granule secretion. Little is known regarding regulation of PKC-θ in megakaryocytes/platelets. We have addressed the hypothesis that PRKCQ is a direct transcriptional target of RUNX1. Methods and Results In chromatin immunoprecipitation assay using megakaryocytic cells there was RUNX1 binding in vivo to PRKCQ promoter region −1225/−1056 bp containing a RUNX1 consensus site ACCGCA at −1088/−1069 bp; electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed RUNX1 binding to the specific site. In RUNX1 overexpression studies, PKC-θ protein expression and promoter activity were enhanced; mutation of RUNX1 site showed decreased activity even with RUNX1 overexpression. Lastly, PRKCQ promoter activity and PKC-θ protein were decreased by siRNA knockdown of RUNX1. Conclusion Our results provide the first evidence that PRKCQ is regulated at the transcriptional level by RUNX1 in megakaryocytic cells and a mechanism for PKC-θ deficiency associated with RUNX1 haplodeficiency. PMID:21252065

  19. PKC-Dependent GlyT1 Ubiquitination Occurs Independent of Phosphorylation: Inespecificity in Lysine Selection for Ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Barrera, Susana P.; Castrejon-Tellez, Vicente; Trinidad, Margarita; Robles-Escajeda, Elisa; Vargas-Medrano, Javier; Varela-Ramirez, Armando; Miranda, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Neurotransmitter transporter ubiquitination is emerging as the main mechanism for endocytosis and sorting of cargo into lysosomes. In this study, we demonstrate PKC-dependent ubiquitination of three different isoforms of the glycine transporter 1 (GlyT1). Incubation of cells expressing transporter with the PKC activator phorbol ester induced a dramatic, time-dependent increase in GlyT1 ubiquitination, followed by accumulation of GlyT1 in EEA1 positive early endosomes. This occurred via a mechanism that was abolished by inhibition of PKC. GlyT1 endocytosis was confirmed in both retinal sections and primary cultures of mouse amacrine neurons. Replacement of only all lysines in the N-and C-termini to arginines prevented ubiquitination and endocytosis, displaying redundancy in the mechanism of ubiquitination. Interestingly, a 40–50% reduction in glycine uptake was detected in phorbol-ester stimulated cells expressing the WT-GlyT1, whereas no significant change was for the mutant protein, demonstrating that endocytosis participates in the reduction of uptake. Consistent with previous findings for the dopamine transporter DAT, ubiquitination of GlyT1 tails functions as sorting signal to deliver transporter into the lysosome and removal of ubiquitination sites dramatically attenuated the rate of GlyT1 degradation. Finally, we showed for the first time that PKC-dependent GlyT1 phosphorylation was not affected by removal of ubiquitination sites, suggesting separate PKC-dependent signaling events for these posttranslational modifications. PMID:26418248

  20. Induction of TRIM22 by IFN-γ Involves JAK and PC-PLC/PKC, but Not MAPKs and pI3K/Akt/mTOR Pathways.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bo; Xu, Wei; Wang, Yaxin; Zhong, Linmao; Xiong, Sidong

    2013-10-01

    Tripartite motif (TRIM) 22 plays an important role in interferons (IFNs)-mediated antiviral activity. We previously demonstrated that interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) played a central role in IFN-γ-induced TRIM22 expression via binding to a special cis-element named 5' extended IFN-stimulating response element (5'eISRE). In this study, we sought to identify the signaling pathways involved in TRIM22 induction by IFN-γ. By using various pharmacological inhibitors, it was found that the activity of tyrosine kinase and phosphatidylcholine-phospholipase C (PC-PLC), but not phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase C (PI-PLC) and phospholipase D (PLD), was required for IFN-γ-induced TRIM22 expression in HepG2 cells. Tyrosine kinase Janus kinase (JAK), not SRC and PYK2, played an indispensable role in TRIM22 induction. Inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) activity also significantly attenuated IFN-γ induction of TRIM22. Although treatment with IFN-γ resulted in the stimulation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) (p38, ERK, and JNK) and pI3K/Akt/mTOR pathways in HepG2 cells, the inhibition of their activity did not affect IFN-γ-stimulated TRIM22 expression. Further studies showed that overexpression of JAK1 and PKCα activated TRIM22 promoter activity in a 5'eISRE-dependent manner, and inhibition of not only JAK but also PC-PLC/PKC pathways significantly attenuated IFN-γ-induced IRF-1 expression in HepG2 cells. Taken together, these data indicated that IFN-γ induced TRIM22 expression via activation of JAK and PC-PLC/PKC signaling pathways, which involved the cis-element 5'eISRE and the transactivator IRF-1.

  1. Induction of TRIM22 by IFN-γ Involves JAK and PC-PLC/PKC, but Not MAPKs and pI3K/Akt/mTOR Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Bo; Xu, Wei; Wang, Yaxin; Zhong, Linmao

    2013-01-01

    Tripartite motif (TRIM) 22 plays an important role in interferons (IFNs)-mediated antiviral activity. We previously demonstrated that interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) played a central role in IFN-γ-induced TRIM22 expression via binding to a special cis-element named 5′ extended IFN-stimulating response element (5′eISRE). In this study, we sought to identify the signaling pathways involved in TRIM22 induction by IFN-γ. By using various pharmacological inhibitors, it was found that the activity of tyrosine kinase and phosphatidylcholine-phospholipase C (PC-PLC), but not phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase C (PI-PLC) and phospholipase D (PLD), was required for IFN-γ-induced TRIM22 expression in HepG2 cells. Tyrosine kinase Janus kinase (JAK), not SRC and PYK2, played an indispensable role in TRIM22 induction. Inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) activity also significantly attenuated IFN-γ induction of TRIM22. Although treatment with IFN-γ resulted in the stimulation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) (p38, ERK, and JNK) and pI3K/Akt/mTOR pathways in HepG2 cells, the inhibition of their activity did not affect IFN-γ-stimulated TRIM22 expression. Further studies showed that overexpression of JAK1 and PKCα activated TRIM22 promoter activity in a 5′eISRE-dependent manner, and inhibition of not only JAK but also PC-PLC/PKC pathways significantly attenuated IFN-γ-induced IRF-1 expression in HepG2 cells. Taken together, these data indicated that IFN-γ induced TRIM22 expression via activation of JAK and PC-PLC/PKC signaling pathways, which involved the cis-element 5′eISRE and the transactivator IRF-1. PMID:23659673

  2. Agonist-induced activation of histamine H3 receptor signals to extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 through PKC-, PLD-, and EGFR-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lai, Xiangru; Ye, Lingyan; Liao, Yuan; Jin, Lili; Ma, Qiang; Lu, Bing; Sun, Yi; Shi, Ying; Zhou, Naiming

    2016-04-01

    The histamine H3 receptor (H3R), abundantly expressed in the central and the peripheral nervous system, has been recognized as a promising target for the treatment of various important CNS diseases including narcolepsy, Alzheimer's disease, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The H3R acts via Gi/o -proteins to inhibit adenylate cyclase activity and modulate MAPK activity. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms for H3R mediation of the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) remain to be elucidated. In this study, using HEK293 cells stably expressing human H3R and mouse primary cortical neurons endogenously expressing mouse H3R, we found that the H3R-mediated activation of ERK1/2 was significantly blocked by both the pertussis toxin and the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126. Upon stimulation by H3R agonist histamine or imetit, H3R was shown to rapidly induce ERK1/2 phosphorylation via PLC/PKC-, PLDs-, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) transactivation-dependent pathways. Furthermore, it was also indicated that while the βγ-subunits play a key role in H3R-activated ERK1/2 phosphorylation, β-arrestins were not required for ERK1/2 activation. In addition, when the cultured mouse cortical neurons were exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation conditions (OGD), imetit exhibited neuroprotective properties through the H3R. Treatment of cells with the inhibitor UO126 abolished these protective effects. This suggests a possible neuroprotective role of the H3R-mediated ERK1/2 pathway under hypoxia conditions. These observations may provide new insights into the pharmacological effects and the physiological functions modulated by the H3R-mediated activation of ERK1/2. Histamine H3 receptors are abundantly expressed in the brain and play important roles in various CNS physiological functions. However, the underlying mechanisms for H3R-induced activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 remain largely unknown. Here

  3. Agonist-induced activation of histamine H3 receptor signals to extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 through PKC-, PLD-, and EGFR-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lai, Xiangru; Ye, Lingyan; Liao, Yuan; Jin, Lili; Ma, Qiang; Lu, Bing; Sun, Yi; Shi, Ying; Zhou, Naiming

    2016-04-01

    The histamine H3 receptor (H3R), abundantly expressed in the central and the peripheral nervous system, has been recognized as a promising target for the treatment of various important CNS diseases including narcolepsy, Alzheimer's disease, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The H3R acts via Gi/o -proteins to inhibit adenylate cyclase activity and modulate MAPK activity. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms for H3R mediation of the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) remain to be elucidated. In this study, using HEK293 cells stably expressing human H3R and mouse primary cortical neurons endogenously expressing mouse H3R, we found that the H3R-mediated activation of ERK1/2 was significantly blocked by both the pertussis toxin and the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126. Upon stimulation by H3R agonist histamine or imetit, H3R was shown to rapidly induce ERK1/2 phosphorylation via PLC/PKC-, PLDs-, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) transactivation-dependent pathways. Furthermore, it was also indicated that while the βγ-subunits play a key role in H3R-activated ERK1/2 phosphorylation, β-arrestins were not required for ERK1/2 activation. In addition, when the cultured mouse cortical neurons were exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation conditions (OGD), imetit exhibited neuroprotective properties through the H3R. Treatment of cells with the inhibitor UO126 abolished these protective effects. This suggests a possible neuroprotective role of the H3R-mediated ERK1/2 pathway under hypoxia conditions. These observations may provide new insights into the pharmacological effects and the physiological functions modulated by the H3R-mediated activation of ERK1/2. Histamine H3 receptors are abundantly expressed in the brain and play important roles in various CNS physiological functions. However, the underlying mechanisms for H3R-induced activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 remain largely unknown. Here

  4. The Cdc42/Par6/aPKC polarity complex regulates apoptosis-induced compensatory proliferation in epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Stephen J.; Yashiro, Hanako; Longmore, Gregory D.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background In response to stress- or tissue damage-induced apoptosis, unaffected epithelial cells undergo compensatory proliferation to maintain the integrity of the epithelium. Proximal signals regulating this response are not fully appreciated, but JNK activity appears to be critical for both apoptosis and compensatory proliferation. Since disruption of epithelial cell apical-basal polarity, as can occur in early cancer development and is correlated with increased proliferation by means not fully characterized, we considered whether disruption of the various polarity complexes could provide signals identifying damaged epithelial cells, and thus lead to apoptosis-induced compensatory proliferation. Results We identify the Cdc42/Par6/aPKC Par polarity complex as uniquely and specifically regulating apoptosis-induced compensatory proliferation in Drosophila epithelia. Genetic depletion of individual components or disruption of complex formation and localization, but not other polarity complexes, induces JNK-dependent apoptosis and JNK-dependent compensatory proliferation following radiation injury. When apoptosis execution is blocked, by P35 expression, Cdc42/Par6/aPKC depleted tissues uniquely hyperproliferate leading to tissue/organ overgrowth. Disruption of Cdc42/Par6/aPKC leads to activation of JNK through increased Rho1-Rok activity, and Rok’s capacity to activate Myosin, but not F-actin. Conclusions We show that the Cdc42/Par6/aPKC polarity complex influences both a physiologic compensatory proliferation response after irradiation injury as well as a contrived compensatory non-cell autonomous hyperproliferation response when cell autonomous apoptosis, resulting from Cdc42/Par6/aPKC disruption, is inhibited. These results suggest the possibility that in cancer where apoptotic regulation is disrupted, loss of the Cdc42/Par6/aPKC polarity complex organization or localization could contribute to tumor hyperproliferation and explain how polarity

  5. p62 modulates Akt activity via association with PKC{zeta} in neuronal survival and differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Joung, Insil . E-mail: ijoung@hanseo.ac.kr; Kim, Hak Jae; Kwon, Yunhee Kim . E-mail: kimyh@khu.ac.kr

    2005-08-26

    p62 is a ubiquitously expressed phosphoprotein that interacts with a number of signaling molecules and a major component of neurofibrillary tangles in the brain of Alzheimer's disease patients. It has been implicated in important cellular functions such as cell proliferation and anti-apoptotic pathways. In this study, we have addressed the potential role of p62 during neuronal differentiation and survival using HiB5, a rat neuronal progenitor cell. We generated a recombinant adenovirus encoding T7-epitope tagged p62 to reliably transfer p62 cDNA into the neuronal cells. The results show that an overexpression of p62 led not only to neuronal differentiation, but also to decreased cell death induced by serum withdrawal in HiB5 cells. In this process p62-dependent Akt phosphorylation occurred via the release of Akt from PKC{zeta} by association of p62 and PKC{zeta}, which is known as a negative regulator of Akt activation. These findings indicate that p62 facilitates cell survival through novel signaling cascades that result in Akt activation. Furthermore, we found that p62 expression was induced during neuronal differentiation. Taken together, the data suggest p62 is a regulator of neuronal cell survival and differentiation.

  6. Primary breast cancer induces pulmonary vascular hyperpermeability and promotes metastasis via the VEGF-PKC pathway.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Man; Qin, Chengyong; Han, Mingyong

    2016-06-01

    The lung is one of the most frequent target organs for breast cancer metastasis. When breast cancer cells from a primary tumor do not colonize the lung, which we named the premetastatic phase, the microenvironment of the lung has already been influenced by the primary tumor. However, little is known about the exact premetastatic alteration and regulatory mechanisms of the lung. Here, we used 4T1 cells (a mouse breast cancer cell line which can specifically metastasize to the lung) to build a mouse breast cancer model. We found that primary breast tumor induced increased pulmonary vascular permeability in the premetastatic phase, which facilitated the leakage of rhodamine-dextran and the extravasation of intravenous therapy injected cancer cells. Furthermore, tight junctions (TJs) were disrupted, and the expression of zonula occludens-1(ZO-1), one of the most important components of tight junctions, was decreased in the premetastatic lung. In addition, elevated serum vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was involved in the destabilization of tight junctions and the VEGF antagonist bevacizumab reversed the primary tumor-induced vascular hyperpermeability. Moreover, activation of the protein kinase C (PKC) pathway disrupted the integrity of TJs and accordingly, the disruption could be alleviated by blocking VEGF. Taken together, these data demonstrate that primary breast cancer may induce tight junction disruptions in the premetastatic lung via the VEGF-PKC pathway and promote pulmonary vascular hyperpermeability before metastasis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26152457

  7. Calcineurin regulates progressive motility activation of Rhinella (Bufo) arenarum sperm through dephosphorylation of PKC substrates.

    PubMed

    Krapf, Dario; O'Brien, Emma; Maidagán, Paula M; Morales, Enrique S; Visconti, Pablo E; Arranz, Silvia E

    2014-10-01

    Animals with external fertilization, as amphibians, store their sperm in a quiescent state in the testis. When spermatozoa are released into natural fertilization media, the hypotonic shock triggers activation of sperm motility. Rhinella (Bufo) arenarum sperm are immotile in artificial seminal plasma (ASP, resembling testicular plasma tonicity) but acquire in situ flagellar beating upon dilution. However, if components from the egg shelly coat are added to this medium, motility shifts to a progressive pattern. Recently, we have shown that the signal transduction pathway required for in situ motility activation involves a rise in intracellular cAMP through a transmembrane adenylyl cyclase and activation of PKA, mostly in the midpiece and in the sperm head. In this report, we demonstrate that activation of calcineurin (aka PP2B and PPP3) is required for the shift from in situ to progressive sperm motility. The effect of calcineurin is manifested by dephosphorylation of PKC substrates, and can be promoted by intracellular calcium rise by Ca(2+) ionophore. Both phosphorylated PKC substrates and calcineurin localized to the flagella, indicating a clear differentiation between compartmentalization of PKA and calcineurin pathways. Moreover, no crosstalk is observed between these signaling events, even though both pathways are required for progressive motility acquisition as discussed. PMID:24648036

  8. Leishmania amazonensis: PKC-like protein kinase modulates the (Na++K+)ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Almeida-Amaral, Elmo Eduardo de; Caruso-Neves, Celso; Lara, Lucienne Silva; Pinheiro, Carla Mônica; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto

    2007-08-01

    The present study aimed to identify the presence of protein kinase C-like (PKC-like) in Leishmania amazonensis and to elucidate its possible role in the modulation of the (Na(+)+K(+))ATPase activity. Immunoblotting experiments using antibody against a consensus sequence (Ac 543-549) of rabbit protein kinase C (PKC) revealed the presence of a protein kinase of 80 kDa in L. amazonensis. Measurements of protein kinase activity showed the presence of both (Ca(2+)-dependent) and (Ca(2+)-independent) protein kinase activity in plasma membrane and cytosol. Phorbol ester (PMA) activation of the Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase stimulated the (Na(+)+K(+))ATPase activity, while activation of the Ca(2+)-independent protein kinase was inhibitory. Both effects of protein kinase on the (Na(+)+K(+))ATPase of the plasma membrane were lower than that observed in intact cells. PMA induced the translocation of protein kinase from cytosol to plasma membrane, indicating that the maximal effect of protein kinase on the (Na(+)+K(+))ATPase activity depends on the synergistic action of protein kinases from both plasma membrane and cytosol. This is the first demonstration of a protein kinase activated by PMA in L. amazonensis and the first evidence for a possible role in the regulation of the (Na(+)+K(+))ATPase activity in this trypanosomatid. Modulation of the (Na(+)+K(+))ATPase by protein kinase in a trypanosomatid opens up new possibilities to understand the regulation of ion homeostasis in this parasite. PMID:17475255

  9. PKC in motorneurons underlies self-learning, a form of motor learning in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Colomb, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Tethering a fly for stationary flight allows for exquisite control of its sensory input, such as visual or olfactory stimuli or a punishing infrared laser beam. A torque meter measures the turning attempts of the tethered fly around its vertical body axis. By punishing, say, left turning attempts (in a homogeneous environment), one can train a fly to restrict its behaviour to right turning attempts. It was recently discovered that this form of operant conditioning (called operant self-learning), may constitute a form of motor learning in Drosophila. Previous work had shown that Protein Kinase C (PKC) and the transcription factor dFoxP were specifically involved in self-learning, but not in other forms of learning. These molecules are specifically involved in various forms of motor learning in other animals, such as compulsive biting in Aplysia, song-learning in birds, procedural learning in mice or language acquisition in humans. Here we describe our efforts to decipher which PKC gene is involved in self-learning in Drosophila. We also provide evidence that motorneurons may be one part of the neuronal network modified during self-learning experiments. The collected evidence is reminiscent of one of the simplest, clinically relevant forms of motor learning in humans, operant reflex conditioning, which also relies on motorneuron plasticity. PMID:27168980

  10. PKC in motorneurons underlies self-learning, a form of motor learning in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Colomb, Julien; Brembs, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Tethering a fly for stationary flight allows for exquisite control of its sensory input, such as visual or olfactory stimuli or a punishing infrared laser beam. A torque meter measures the turning attempts of the tethered fly around its vertical body axis. By punishing, say, left turning attempts (in a homogeneous environment), one can train a fly to restrict its behaviour to right turning attempts. It was recently discovered that this form of operant conditioning (called operant self-learning), may constitute a form of motor learning in Drosophila. Previous work had shown that Protein Kinase C (PKC) and the transcription factor dFoxP were specifically involved in self-learning, but not in other forms of learning. These molecules are specifically involved in various forms of motor learning in other animals, such as compulsive biting in Aplysia, song-learning in birds, procedural learning in mice or language acquisition in humans. Here we describe our efforts to decipher which PKC gene is involved in self-learning in Drosophila. We also provide evidence that motorneurons may be one part of the neuronal network modified during self-learning experiments. The collected evidence is reminiscent of one of the simplest, clinically relevant forms of motor learning in humans, operant reflex conditioning, which also relies on motorneuron plasticity. PMID:27168980

  11. Control of MT1-MMP transport by atypical PKC during breast-cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Rossé, Carine; Lodillinsky, Catalina; Fuhrmann, Laetitia; Nourieh, Maya; Monteiro, Pedro; Irondelle, Marie; Lagoutte, Emilie; Vacher, Sophie; Waharte, François; Paul-Gilloteaux, Perrine; Romao, Maryse; Sengmanivong, Lucie; Linch, Mark; van Lint, Johan; Raposo, Graça; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Bièche, Ivan; Parker, Peter J; Chavrier, Philippe

    2014-05-01

    Dissemination of carcinoma cells requires the pericellular degradation of the extracellular matrix, which is mediated by membrane type 1-matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP). In this article, we report a co-up-regulation and colocalization of MT1-MMP and atypical protein kinase C iota (aPKCι) in hormone receptor-negative breast tumors in association with a higher risk of metastasis. Silencing of aPKC in invasive breast-tumor cell lines impaired the delivery of MT1-MMP from late endocytic storage compartments to the surface and inhibited matrix degradation and invasion. We provide evidence that aPKCι, in association with MT1-MMP-containing endosomes, phosphorylates cortactin, which is present in F-actin-rich puncta on MT1-MMP-positive endosomes and regulates cortactin association with the membrane scission protein dynamin-2. Thus, cell line-based observations and clinical data reveal the concerted activity of aPKC, cortactin, and dynamin-2, which control the trafficking of MT1-MMP from late endosome to the plasma membrane and play an important role in the invasive potential of breast-cancer cells.

  12. PKC-permitted elevation of sarcolemmal KATP concentration may explain female-specific resistance to myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Andrew G; Rees, Meredith L; Gioscia, Rachel A; Zachman, Derek K; Lynch, Joshua M; Browder, Jason C; Chicco, Adam J; Moore, Russell L

    2009-01-01

    The female myocardium, relative to that of the male, exhibits sustained resistance to ischaemic tissue injury, a phenomenon termed sex-specific cardioprotection (SSC). SSC is dependent upon the sarcolemmal KATP channel (sarcKATP), and protein kinase C (PKC). Here we investigate whether PKC-mediated regulation of sarcKATP concentration can explain this endogenous form of protection. Hearts from male (M) and female (F) rats were Langendorff-perfused for 30 min prior to either regional ischaemia–reperfusion (I/R), or global ischaemia (GISC). For both protocols, pre-ischaemic blockade of PKC was achieved by chelerythrine (Chel) in male (M + C) and female (F + C) hearts. Additional female hearts underwent sarcKATP antagonism during I/R by HMR-1098 (HMR), either alone or in combination with Chel (HMR + Chel). GISC hearts were fractionated to assess cellular distribution of PKCɛ and sarcKATP. Sex-specific infarct resistance was apparent under control I/R (F, 23 ± 3%vs. M, 36 ± 4%, P < 0.05) and abolished by Chel (F + C, 36 ± 3%). Female infarct resistance was susceptible to sarcKATP blockade (Control, 16 ± 2%vs. HMR, 27 ± 3%), and PKC blockade had no additional effect (HMR + Chel, 26 ± 2%). The prevalence of Kir6.2 and SUR2 was higher in the sarcolemmal fractions of females (Kir6.2: F, 1.24 ± 0.07 vs. M, 1.02 ± 0.06; SUR2: F, 3.16 ± 0.22 vs. M, 2.45 ± 0.09; ratio units), but normalized by Chel (Kir6.2: F, 1.06 ± 0.07 vs. M, 0.99 ± 0.06; SUR2: F, 2.99 ± 0.09 vs. M, 2.82 ± 0.22, M; ratio units). Phosphorylation of sarcolemmal PKCɛ was reduced by Chel (p-PKCɛ/PKCɛ: control, 0.43 ± 0.02; Chel, 0.29 ± 0.01; P < 0.01). We conclude that PKC-mediated regulation of sarcKATP may account for the physiologically sustainable dependence of SSC upon both PKC and sarcKATP, and that this regulation involves PKC-permitted enrichment of the female sarcolemma with sarcKATP. As such, the PKC-sarcKATP axis may represent a target for sustainable prophylactic induction of

  13. Simultaneous determination of multi-mycotoxins in palm kernel cake (PKC) using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS).

    PubMed

    Yibadatihan, S; Jinap, S; Mahyudin, N A

    2014-01-01

    Palm kernel cake (PKC) is a useful source of protein and energy for livestock. Recently, it has been used as an ingredient in poultry feed. Mycotoxin contamination of PKC due to inappropriate handling during production and storage has increased public concern about economic losses and health risks for poultry and humans. This concern has accentuated the need for the evaluation of mycotoxins in PKC. Furthermore, a method for quantifying mycotoxins in PKC has so far not been established. The aims of this study were therefore (1) to develop a method for the simultaneous determination of mycotoxins in PKC and (2) to validate and verify the method. A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method using an electrospray ionisation interface (ESI) in both positive- and negative-ion modes was developed for the simultaneous determination of aflatoxins (AFB₁, AFB₂, AFG₁ and AFG₂), ochratoxin A (OTA), zearalenone (ZEA), deoxynivalenol (DON), fumonisins (FB₁ and FB₂), T-2 and HT-2 toxin in PKC. An optimum method using a 0.2 ml min⁻¹ flow rate, 0.2% formic acid in aqueous phase, 10% organic phase at the beginning and 90% organic phase at the end of the gradient was achieved. The extraction of mycotoxins was performed using a solvent mixture of acetonitrile-water-formic acid (79:20:1, v/v) without further clean-up. The mean recoveries of mycotoxins in spiked PKC samples ranged from 81% to 112%. Limits of detection (LODs) and limits of quantification (LOQs) for mycotoxin standards and PKC samples ranged from 0.02 to 17.5 μg kg⁻¹ and from 0.06 to 58.0 μg kg⁻¹, respectively. Finally, the newly developed method was successfully applied to PKC samples. The results illustrated the fact that the method is efficient and accurate for the simultaneous multi-mycotoxin determination in PKC, which can be ideal for routine analysis. PMID:25396715

  14. The DNA Methyltransferase DNMT1 and Tyrosine-Protein Kinase KIT Cooperatively Promote Resistance to 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (Decitabine) and Midostaurin (PKC412) in Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Yan, Fei; Shen, Na; Pang, Jiuxia; Molina, Julian R; Yang, Ping; Liu, Shujun

    2015-07-24

    Lung cancer cells are sensitive to 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (decitabine) or midostaurin (PKC412), because decitabine restores the expression of methylation-silenced tumor suppressor genes, whereas PKC412 inhibits hyperactive kinase signaling, which is essential for cancer cell growth. Here, we demonstrated that resistance to decitabine (decitabine(R)) or PKC412 (PKC412(R)) eventually results from simultaneously remethylated DNA and reactivated kinase cascades. Indeed, both decitabine(R) and PKC412(R) displayed the up-regulation of DNA methyltransferase DNMT1 and tyrosine-protein kinase KIT, the enhanced phosphorylation of KIT and its downstream effectors, and the increased global and gene-specific DNA methylation with the down-regulation of tumor suppressor gene epithelial cadherin CDH1. Interestingly, decitabine(R) and PKC412(R) had higher capability of colony formation and wound healing than parental cells in vitro, which were attributed to the hyperactive DNMT1 or KIT, because inactivation of KIT or DNMT1 reciprocally blocked decitabine(R) or PKC412(R) cell proliferation. Further, DNMT1 knockdown sensitized PKC412(R) cells to PKC412; conversely, KIT depletion synergized with decitabine in eliminating decitabine(R). Importantly, when engrafted into nude mice, decitabine(R) and PKC412(R) had faster proliferation with stronger tumorigenicity that was caused by the reactivated KIT kinase signaling and further CDH1 silencing. These findings identify functional cross-talk between KIT and DNMT1 in the development of drug resistance, implying the reciprocal targeting of protein kinases and DNA methyltransferases as an essential strategy for durable responses in lung cancer.

  15. Simultaneous determination of multi-mycotoxins in palm kernel cake (PKC) using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS).

    PubMed

    Yibadatihan, S; Jinap, S; Mahyudin, N A

    2014-01-01

    Palm kernel cake (PKC) is a useful source of protein and energy for livestock. Recently, it has been used as an ingredient in poultry feed. Mycotoxin contamination of PKC due to inappropriate handling during production and storage has increased public concern about economic losses and health risks for poultry and humans. This concern has accentuated the need for the evaluation of mycotoxins in PKC. Furthermore, a method for quantifying mycotoxins in PKC has so far not been established. The aims of this study were therefore (1) to develop a method for the simultaneous determination of mycotoxins in PKC and (2) to validate and verify the method. A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method using an electrospray ionisation interface (ESI) in both positive- and negative-ion modes was developed for the simultaneous determination of aflatoxins (AFB₁, AFB₂, AFG₁ and AFG₂), ochratoxin A (OTA), zearalenone (ZEA), deoxynivalenol (DON), fumonisins (FB₁ and FB₂), T-2 and HT-2 toxin in PKC. An optimum method using a 0.2 ml min⁻¹ flow rate, 0.2% formic acid in aqueous phase, 10% organic phase at the beginning and 90% organic phase at the end of the gradient was achieved. The extraction of mycotoxins was performed using a solvent mixture of acetonitrile-water-formic acid (79:20:1, v/v) without further clean-up. The mean recoveries of mycotoxins in spiked PKC samples ranged from 81% to 112%. Limits of detection (LODs) and limits of quantification (LOQs) for mycotoxin standards and PKC samples ranged from 0.02 to 17.5 μg kg⁻¹ and from 0.06 to 58.0 μg kg⁻¹, respectively. Finally, the newly developed method was successfully applied to PKC samples. The results illustrated the fact that the method is efficient and accurate for the simultaneous multi-mycotoxin determination in PKC, which can be ideal for routine analysis.

  16. Rho1- and Pkc1-dependent phosphorylation of the F-BAR protein Syp1 contributes to septin ring assembly

    PubMed Central

    Merlini, Laura; Bolognesi, Alessio; Juanes, Maria Angeles; Vandermoere, Franck; Courtellemont, Thibault; Pascolutti, Roberta; Séveno, Martial; Barral, Yves; Piatti, Simonetta

    2015-01-01

    In many cell types, septins assemble into filaments and rings at the neck of cellular appendages and/or at the cleavage furrow to help compartmentalize the plasma membrane and support cytokinesis. How septin ring assembly is coordinated with membrane remodeling and controlled by mechanical stress at these sites is unclear. Through a genetic screen, we uncovered an unanticipated link between the conserved Rho1 GTPase and its effector protein kinase C (Pkc1) with septin ring stability in yeast. Both Rho1 and Pkc1 stabilize the septin ring, at least partly through phosphorylation of the membrane-associated F-BAR protein Syp1, which colocalizes asymmetrically with the septin ring at the bud neck. Syp1 is displaced from the bud neck upon Pkc1-dependent phosphorylation at two serines, thereby affecting the rigidity of the new-forming septin ring. We propose that Rho1 and Pkc1 coordinate septin ring assembly with membrane and cell wall remodeling partly by controlling Syp1 residence at the bud neck. PMID:26179915

  17. The effect of acute ethanol (EtOH) exposure on protein kinase C (PKC) activity in anterior pituitary.

    PubMed

    Steiner, J; Kirsteins, L; LaPaglia, N; Lawrence, A; Williams, D; Emanuele, N; Emanuele, M

    1997-01-01

    Alterations in the protein kinase C (PKC) pathway may interrupt anterior pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH) synthesis and/or secretion, which may impair normal reproductive function. Work by our laboratory and others has shown that EtOH has profound deleterious effects on the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. The present study focuses on PKC translocation from the cytosol to the membrane of anterior pituitary after acute EtOH exposure. Serum levels of LH were measured at three time points (15, 30, and 90 min) after an IP injection of either saline or 3 g/kg EtOH in adult castrated male rats. LH levels dropped significantly (p < 0.03) in EtOH-injected compared to saline-injected control animals. In the same animals, EtOH significantly suppressed PKC localization at its active site at the pituitary cell membrane (p < 0.05). These findings suggest that the mechanism of EtOH's suppression of LH is mediated, at least in part, through a decrease in PKC translocation to the anterior pituitary cell membrane.

  18. Sustained Wnt/β-catenin signalling causes neuroepithelial aberrations through the accumulation of aPKC at the apical pole.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Antonio; Saade, Murielle; Menendez, Anghara; Marti, Elisa; Pons, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    β-Catenin mediates the canonical Wnt pathway by stimulating Tcf-dependent transcription and also associates to N-cadherin at the apical complex (AC) of neuroblasts. Here, we show that while β-catenin activity is required to form the AC and to maintain the cell polarity, oncogenic mutations that render stable forms of β-catenin (sβ-catenin) maintain the stemness of neuroblasts, inhibiting their differentiation and provoking aberrant growth. In examining the transcriptional and structural roles of β-catenin, we find that while β-catenin/Tcf transcriptional activity induces atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) expression, an alternative effect of β-catenin restricts aPKC to the apical pole of neuroepithelial cells. In agreement, we show that a constitutively active form of aPKC reproduces the neuroepithelial aberrations induced by β-catenin. Therefore, we conclude that β-catenin controls the cell fate and polarity of the neuroblasts through the expression and localization of aPKC. PMID:24942669

  19. Signaling through Lrg1, Rho1 and Pkc1 Governs Candida albicans Morphogenesis in Response to Diverse Cues

    PubMed Central

    Leach, Michelle D.; Hogan, Deborah A.; Robbins, Nicole; Cowen, Leah E.

    2016-01-01

    The capacity to transition between distinct morphological forms is a key virulence trait for diverse fungal pathogens. A poignant example of a leading opportunistic fungal pathogen of humans for which an environmentally responsive developmental program underpins virulence is Candida albicans. C. albicans mutants that are defective in the transition between yeast and filamentous forms typically have reduced virulence. Although many positive regulators of C. albicans filamentation have been defined, there are fewer negative regulators that have been implicated in repression of filamentation in the absence of inducing cues. To discover novel negative regulators of filamentation, we screened a collection of 1,248 C. albicans homozygous transposon insertion mutants to identify those that were filamentous in the absence of inducing cues. We identified the Rho1 GAP Lrg1, which represses filamentous growth by stimulating Rho1 GTPase activity and converting Rho1 to its inactive, GDP-bound form. Deletion of LRG1 or introduction of a RHO1 mutation that locks Rho1 in constitutively active, GTP-bound state, leads to filamentation in the absence of inducing cues. Deletion of the Rho1 downstream effector PKC1 results in defective filamentation in response to diverse host-relevant inducing cues, including serum. We further established that Pkc1 is not required to sense filament-inducing cues, but its kinase activity is critical for the initiation of filamentous growth. Our genetic analyses revealed that Pkc1 regulates filamentation independent of the canonical MAP kinase cascade. Further, although Ras1 activation is not impaired in a pkc1Δ/pkc1Δ mutant, adenylyl cyclase activity is reduced, consistent with a model in which Pkc1 functions in parallel with Ras1 in regulating Cyr1 activation. Thus, our findings delineate a signaling pathway comprised of Lrg1, Rho1 and Pkc1 with a core role in C. albicans morphogenesis, and illuminate functional relationships that govern activation

  20. Proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Teicher, Beverly A; Tomaszewski, Joseph E

    2015-07-01

    Proteasome inhibitors have a 20 year history in cancer therapy. The first proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib (Velcade, PS-341), a break-through multiple myeloma treatment, moved rapidly through development from bench in 1994 to first approval in 2003. Bortezomib is a reversible boronic acid inhibitor of the chymotrypsin-like activity of the proteasome. Next generation proteasome inhibitors include carfilzomib and oprozomib which are irreversible epoxyketone proteasome inhibitors; and ixazomib and delanzomib which are reversible boronic acid proteasome inhibitors. Two proteasome inhibitors, bortezomib and carfilzomib are FDA approved drugs and ixazomib and oprozomib are in late stage clinical trials. All of the agents are potent cytotoxics. The disease focus for all the proteasome inhibitors is multiple myeloma. This focus arose from clinical observations made in bortezomib early clinical trials. Later preclinical studies confirmed that multiple myeloma cells were indeed more sensitive to proteasome inhibitors than other tumor cell types. The discovery and development of the proteasome inhibitor class of anticancer agents has progressed through a classic route of serendipity and scientific investigation. These agents are continuing to have a major impact in their treatment of hematologic malignancies and are beginning to be explored as potential treatment agent for non-cancer indications. PMID:25935605

  1. PKC-α contributes to high NaCl-induced activation of NFAT5 (TonEBP/OREBP) through MAPK ERK1/2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Ferraris, Joan D; Klein, Janet D; Sands, Jeff M; Burg, Maurice B; Zhou, Xiaoming

    2015-01-15

    High NaCl in the renal medullary interstitial fluid powers the concentration of urine but can damage cells. The transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T cells 5 (NFAT5) activates the expression of osmoprotective genes. We studied whether PKC-α contributes to the activation of NFAT5. PKC-α protein abundance was greater in the renal medulla than in the cortex. Knockout of PKC-α reduced NFAT5 protein abundance and expression of its target genes in the inner medulla. In human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293 cells, high NaCl increased PKC-α activity, and small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of PKC-α attenuated high NaCl-induced NFAT5 transcriptional activity. Expression of ERK1/2 protein and phosphorylation of ERK1/2 were higher in the renal inner medulla than in the cortex. Knockout of PKC-α decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation in the inner medulla, as did knockdown of PKC-α in HEK-293 cells. Also, knockdown of ERK2 reduced high NaCl-dependent NFAT5 transcriptional activity in HEK-293 cells. Combined knockdown of PKC-α and ERK2 had no greater effect than knockdown of either alone. Knockdown of either PKC-α or ERK2 reduced the high NaCl-induced increase of NFAT5 transactivating activity. We have previously found that the high NaCl-induced increase of phosphorylation of Ser(591) on Src homology 2 domain-containing phosphatase 1 (SHP-1-S591-P) contributes to the activation of NFAT5 in cell culture, and here we found high levels of SHP-1-S591-P in the inner medulla. PKC-α has been previously shown to increase SHP-1-S591-P, which raised the possibility that PKC-α might be acting through SHP-1. However, we did not find that knockout of PKC-α in the renal medulla or knockdown in HEK-293 cells affected SHP-1-S591-P. We conclude that PKC-α contributes to high NaCl-dependent activation of NFAT5 through ERK1/2 but not through SHP-1-S591. PMID:25391900

  2. Atypical PKC-iota Controls Stem Cell Expansion via Regulation of the Notch Pathway.

    PubMed

    Mah, In Kyoung; Soloff, Rachel; Hedrick, Stephen M; Mariani, Francesca V

    2015-11-10

    The number of stem/progenitor cells available can profoundly impact tissue homeostasis and the response to injury or disease. Here, we propose that an atypical PKC, Prkci, is a key player in regulating the switch from an expansion to a differentiation/maintenance phase via regulation of Notch, thus linking the polarity pathway with the control of stem cell self-renewal. Prkci is known to influence symmetric cell division in invertebrates; however a definitive role in mammals has not yet emerged. Using a genetic approach, we find that loss of Prkci results in a marked increase in the number of various stem/progenitor cells. The mechanism used likely involves inactivation and symmetric localization of NUMB, leading to the activation of NOTCH1 and its downstream effectors. Inhibition of atypical PKCs may be useful for boosting the production of pluripotent stem cells, multipotent stem cells, or possibly even primordial germ cells by promoting the stem cell/progenitor fate.

  3. PKC regulates the delta2 glutamate receptor interaction with S-SCAM/MAGI-2 protein.

    PubMed

    Yap, Chan Choo; Muto, Yuko; Kishida, Haruo; Hashikawa, Tsutomu; Yano, Ryoji

    2003-02-21

    Inside cells, membrane proteins are localized at particular surface domains to perform their precise functions. Various kinds of PDZ domain proteins have been shown to play important roles in the intracellular trafficking and anchoring of membrane proteins. In this study, we show that delta2 glutamate receptor is interacting with S-SCAM/MAGI-2, a PDZ domain protein localized in the perinuclear region and postsynaptic sites of cerebellar Purkinje cells. The binding is regulated by PKC (protein kinase-C) mediated phosphorylation of the receptor with a unique repetitive structure in S-SCAM/MAGI-2. Co-expression of both proteins resulted in drastic changes of the receptor localization in COS7 cells. These results show a novel regulatory mechanism for the binding of PDZ domain proteins and suggest that the interaction between delta2 receptor and S-SCAM/MAGI-2 may be important for intracellular trafficking of the receptor.

  4. Glomerular clusterin is associated with PKC-alpha/beta regulation and good outcome of membranous glomerulonephritis in humans.

    PubMed

    Rastaldi, M P; Candiano, G; Musante, L; Bruschi, M; Armelloni, S; Rimoldi, L; Tardanico, R; Sanna-Cherchi, S; Cherchi, S Sanna; Ferrario, F; Montinaro, V; Haupt, R; Parodi, S; Carnevali, M L; Allegri, L; Camussi, G; Gesualdo, L; Scolari, F; Ghiggeri, G M

    2006-08-01

    Mechanisms for human membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN) remain elusive. Most up-to-date concepts still rely on the rat model of Passive Heymann Nephritis that derives from an autoimmune response to glomerular megalin, with complement activation and membrane attack complex assembly. Clusterin has been reported as a megalin ligand in immunodeposits, although its role has not been clarified. We studied renal biopsies of 60 MGN patients by immunohistochemistry utilizing antibodies against clusterin, C5b-9, and phosphorylated-protien kinase C (PKC) isoforms (pPKC). In vitro experiments were performed to investigate the role of clusterin during podocyte damage by MGN serum and define clusterin binding to human podocytes, where megalin is known to be absent. Clusterin, C5b-9, and pPKC-alpha/beta showed highly variable glomerular staining, where high clusterin profiles were inversely correlated to C5b-9 and PKC-alpha/beta expression (P=0.029), and co-localized with the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R). Glomerular clusterin emerged as the single factor influencing proteinuria at multivariate analysis and was associated with a reduction of proteinuria after a follow-up of 1.5 years (-88.1%, P=0.027). Incubation of podocytes with MGN sera determined strong upregulation of pPKC-alpha/beta that was reverted by pre-incubation with clusterin, serum de-complementation, or protein-A treatment. Preliminary in vitro experiments showed podocyte binding of biotinilated clusterin, co-localization with LDL-R and specific binding inhibition with anti-LDL-R antibodies and with specific ligands. These data suggest a central role for glomerular clusterin in MGN as a modulator of inflammation that potentially influences the clinical outcome. Binding of clusterin to the LDL-R might offer an interpretative key for the pathogenesis of MGN in humans.

  5. Platelet Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shifrin, Megan M; Widmar, S Brian

    2016-03-01

    Antithrombotic medications have become standard of care for management of acute coronary syndrome. Platelet adhesion, activation, and aggregation are essential components of platelet function; platelet-inhibiting medications interfere with these components and reduce incidence of thrombosis. Active bleeding is a contraindication for administration of platelet inhibitors. There is currently no reversal agent for platelet inhibitors, although platelet transfusion may be used to correct active bleeding after administration of platelet inhibitors. PMID:26897422

  6. Corrosion inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Wisotsky, M.J.; Metro, S.J.

    1989-10-31

    A corrosion inhibitor for use in synthetic ester lubricating oils is disclosed. It comprises an effective amount of: at least one aromatic amide; and at least one hydroxy substituted aromatic compound. The corrosion inhibitor thus formed is particularly useful in synthetic ester turbo lubricating oils.

  7. Protein kinase c inhibitor attenuates cyanide toxicity in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Maduh, E.U.; Nealley, E.W.; Song, H.; Wang, P.C.; Baskin, S.I.

    1995-12-31

    We have examined the effect of pretreatment with a potent protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, l-(5-isoquinoline sulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine (H-7), against metabolic alterations induced by sodium cyanide (NaCN), 4.2 mg/kg, in brain of anesthetized male micropigs (6-10 kg). Brain high energy phosphates were analyzed using a 3/P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic surface coil in a 4.7 Tesla horizontal bore magnet. H-7, I mg/kg, was given intravenously (i.v.) 30 min before NaCN challenge (H-7 + CN). Prior to NaCN, H-7, or H-7 + CN administration, baseline 31P resonance spectra of 1-min duration were acquired for 5-10 min, and continued for an additional 60 min following i.v. NaCN injection, each animal serving as its own control. Peaks were identified as phosphomonoester (PME), inorganic phosphate (Pi), phosphodiester (PDE), phosphocreatine (PCr) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP), based on their respective chemical shifts. Without H-7 pretreatment, NaCN effects were marked by a rising Pi and a declining PCr peak 2 min after injection, with only 2/5 of the animals surviving the 60 min experiment. Through a pretreatment period of 30 min, H-7 did not affect baseline cell energy profile as reflected by the 31P-NMR spectra, but in its presence, those changes (i.e. diminishing PCr and rising Pi peaks) elicited by NaCN were markedly blunted; 4/5 of the animals in this group survived the NaCN challenge. It is proposed that H-7, a pharmacologic inhibitor of PKC, may be useful in CN antagonism, underscoring the role of PKC in cyanide intoxication.

  8. aPKC regulates apical localization of Lgl to restrict elongation of microridges in developing zebrafish epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Renuka; Damle, Indraneel; Rote, Rahul; Banerjee, Shamik; Dingare, Chaitanya; Sonawane, Mahendra

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial cells exhibit apical membrane protrusions, which confer specific functions to epithelial tissues. Microridges are short actin protrusions that are laterally long and form a maze-like pattern in the apical domain. They are widely found on vertebrate squamous epithelia including epidermis and have functions in mucous retention, membrane storage and abrasion resistance. It is largely unknown how the formation of these laterally long actin projections is regulated. Here, we show that antagonistic interactions between aPKC and Lgl–regulators of apical and basolateral domain identity, respectively,–control the length of microridges in the zebrafish periderm, the outermost layer of the epidermis. aPKC regulates the levels of Lgl and the active form of non-muscle myosinII at the apical cortex to prevent actin polymerization-dependent precocious fusion and elongation of microridges. Our data unravels the functional significance of exclusion of Lgl from the apical domain in epithelial cells. PMID:27249668

  9. PKA, PKC, and the protein phosphatase 2A influence HAND factor function: a mechanism for tissue-specific transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Firulli, Beth A; Howard, Marthe J; McDaid, Jennifer R; McIlreavey, Leanne; Dionne, Karen M; Centonze, Victoria E; Cserjesi, Peter; Virshup, David M; Firulli, Anthony B

    2003-11-01

    The bHLH factors HAND1 and HAND2 are required for heart, vascular, neuronal, limb, and extraembryonic development. Unlike most bHLH proteins, HAND factors exhibit promiscuous dimerization properties. We report that phosphorylation/dephosphorylation via PKA, PKC, and a specific heterotrimeric protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) modulates HAND function. The PP2A targeting-subunit B56delta specifically interacts with HAND1 and -2, but not other bHLH proteins. PKA and PKC phosphorylate HAND proteins in vivo, and only B56delta-containing PP2A complexes reduce levels of HAND1 phosphorylation. During RCHOI trophoblast stem cell differentiation, B56delta expression is downregulated and HAND1 phosphorylation increases. Mutations in phosphorylated residues result in altered HAND1 dimerization and biological function. Taken together, these results suggest that site-specific phosphorylation regulates HAND factor functional specificity.

  10. F-actin links Epac-PKC signaling to purinergic P2X3 receptor sensitization in dorsal root ganglia following inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yanping; Wang, Congying; Li, GuangWen

    2016-01-01

    Sensitization of purinergic P2X3 receptors (P2X3Rs) contributes to the production of exaggerated nociceptive responses following inflammatory injury. We showed previously that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) potentiates P2X3R-mediated ATP currents in dorsal root ganglion neurons isolated from both control and complete Freund’s adjuvant-induced inflamed rats. PGE2 potentiation of ATP currents depends only on PKA signaling in control neurons, but it depends on both PKA and PKC signaling in inflamed neurons. We further found that inflammation evokes an increase in exchange proteins directly activated by cAMP (Epacs) in dorsal root ganglions. This increase promotes the activation of PKC to produce a much enhanced PGE2 effect on ATP currents and to elicit Epac-dependent flinch nocifensive behavioral responses in complete Freund’s adjuvant rats. The link between Epac-PKC signaling and P2X3R sensitization remains unexplored. Here, we show that the activation of Epacs promotes the expression of phosphorylated PKC and leads to an increase in the cytoskeleton, F-actin, expression at the cell perimeter. Depolymerization of F-actin blocks PGE2-enhanced ATP currents and inhibits P2X3R-mediated nocifensive responses after inflammation. Thus, F-actin is dynamically involved in the Epac-PKC-dependent P2X3R sensitization. Furthermore, Epacs induce a PKC-dependent increase in the membrane expression of P2X3Rs. This increase is abolished by F-actin depolymerization, suggesting that F-actin mediates Epac-PKC signaling of P2X3R membrane expression. Thus, after inflammation, an Epac-PKC dependent increase in F-actin in dorsal root ganglion neurons enhances the membrane expression of P2X3Rs to bring about sensitization of P2X3Rs and abnormal pain behaviors. PMID:27385722

  11. The Novel Functions of the PLC/PKC/PKD Signaling Axis in G Protein-Coupled Receptor-Mediated Chemotaxis of Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xuehua; Jin, Tian

    2015-01-01

    Chemotaxis, a directional cell migration guided by extracellular chemoattractant gradients, plays an essential role in the recruitment of neutrophils to sites of inflammation. Chemotaxis is mediated by the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling pathway. Extracellular stimuli trigger activation of the PLC/PKC/PKD signaling axis, which controls several signaling pathways. Here, we concentrate on the novel functions of PLC/PKC/PKD signaling in GPCR-mediated chemotaxis of neutrophils. PMID:26605346

  12. The transmembrane protein Crumbs displays complex dynamics during follicular morphogenesis and is regulated competitively by Moesin and aPKC

    PubMed Central

    Sherrard, Kristin M.; Fehon, Richard G.

    2015-01-01

    The transmembrane protein Crumbs (Crb) functions in apical polarity and epithelial integrity. To better understand its role in epithelial morphogenesis, we examined Crb localization and dynamics in the late follicular epithelium of Drosophila. Crb was unexpectedly dynamic during middle-to-late stages of egg chamber development, being lost from the marginal zone (MZ) in stage 9 before abruptly returning at the end of stage 10b, then undergoing a pulse of endocytosis in stage 12. The reappearance of MZ Crb is necessary to maintain an intact adherens junction and MZ. Although Crb has been proposed to interact through its juxtamembrane domain with Moesin (Moe), a FERM domain protein that regulates the cortical actin cytoskeleton, the functional significance of this interaction is poorly understood. We found that whereas the Crb juxtamembrane domain was not required for adherens junction integrity, it was necessary for MZ localization of Moe, aPKC and F-actin. Furthermore, Moe and aPKC functioned antagonistically, suggesting that Moe limits Crb levels by reducing its interactions with the apical Par network. Additionally, Moe mutant cells lost Crb from the apical membrane and accumulated excess Crb at the MZ, suggesting that Moe regulates Crb distribution at the membrane. Together, these studies reveal reciprocal interactions between Crb, Moe and aPKC during cellular morphogenesis. PMID:25926360

  13. Huntingtin Is Required for Epithelial Polarity through RAB11A-Mediated Apical Trafficking of PAR3-aPKC

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Salah; McGuire, John Russel; Yu, Hua; Humbert, Sandrine

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of apical-basolateral polarity is important for both normal development and disease, for example, during tumorigenesis and metastasis. During this process, polarity complexes are targeted to the apical surface by a RAB11A-dependent mechanism. Huntingtin (HTT), the protein that is mutated in Huntington disease, acts as a scaffold for molecular motors and promotes microtubule-based dynamics. Here, we investigated the role of HTT in apical polarity during the morphogenesis of the mouse mammary epithelium. We found that the depletion of HTT from luminal cells in vivo alters mouse ductal morphogenesis and lumen formation. HTT is required for the apical localization of PAR3-aPKC during epithelial morphogenesis in virgin, pregnant, and lactating mice. We show that HTT forms a complex with PAR3, aPKC, and RAB11A and ensures the microtubule-dependent apical vesicular translocation of PAR3-aPKC through RAB11A. We thus propose that HTT regulates polarized vesicular transport, lumen formation and mammary epithelial morphogenesis. PMID:25942483

  14. Cardiac connexin-43 and PKC signaling in rats with altered thyroid status without and with omega-3 fatty acids intake.

    PubMed

    Szeiffová Bačová, B; Egan Beňová, T; Viczenczová, C; Soukup, T; Rauchová, H; Pavelka, S; Knezl, V; Barančík, M; Tribulová, N

    2016-09-19

    Thyroid hormones are powerful modulators of heart function and susceptibility to arrhythmias via both genomic and non-genomic actions. We aimed to explore expression of electrical coupling protein connexin-43 (Cx43) in the heart of rats with altered thyroid status and impact of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (omega-3) supplementation. Adult male Lewis rats were divided into following six groups: euthyroid controls, hyperthyroid (treated with T(3)) and hypothyroid (treated with methimazol) with or without six-weeks lasting supplementation with omega-3 (20 mg/100 g/day). Left and right ventricles, septum and atria were used for immunoblotting of Cx43 and protein kinase C (PKC). Total expression of Cx43 and its phosphorylated forms were significantly increased in all heart regions of hypothyroid rats compared to euthyroid controls. In contrast, the total levels of Cx43 and its functional phosphorylated forms were decreased in atria and left ventricle of hyperthyroid rats. In parallel, the expression of PKC epsilon that phosphorylates Cx43, at serine 368, was increased in hypothyroid but decreased in hyperthyroid rat hearts. Omega-3 intake did not significantly affect either Cx43 or PKC epsilon alterations. In conclusion, there is an inverse relationship between expression of cardiac Cx43 and the levels of circulating thyroid hormones. It appears that increased propensity of hyperthyroid while decreased of hypothyroid individuals to malignant arrhythmias may be in part attributed to the changes in myocardial Cx43.

  15. Cardiac connexin-43 and PKC signaling in rats with altered thyroid status without and with omega-3 fatty acids intake.

    PubMed

    Szeiffová Bačová, B; Egan Beňová, T; Viczenczová, C; Soukup, T; Rauchová, H; Pavelka, S; Knezl, V; Barančík, M; Tribulová, N

    2016-09-19

    Thyroid hormones are powerful modulators of heart function and susceptibility to arrhythmias via both genomic and non-genomic actions. We aimed to explore expression of electrical coupling protein connexin-43 (Cx43) in the heart of rats with altered thyroid status and impact of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (omega-3) supplementation. Adult male Lewis rats were divided into following six groups: euthyroid controls, hyperthyroid (treated with T(3)) and hypothyroid (treated with methimazol) with or without six-weeks lasting supplementation with omega-3 (20 mg/100 g/day). Left and right ventricles, septum and atria were used for immunoblotting of Cx43 and protein kinase C (PKC). Total expression of Cx43 and its phosphorylated forms were significantly increased in all heart regions of hypothyroid rats compared to euthyroid controls. In contrast, the total levels of Cx43 and its functional phosphorylated forms were decreased in atria and left ventricle of hyperthyroid rats. In parallel, the expression of PKC epsilon that phosphorylates Cx43, at serine 368, was increased in hypothyroid but decreased in hyperthyroid rat hearts. Omega-3 intake did not significantly affect either Cx43 or PKC epsilon alterations. In conclusion, there is an inverse relationship between expression of cardiac Cx43 and the levels of circulating thyroid hormones. It appears that increased propensity of hyperthyroid while decreased of hypothyroid individuals to malignant arrhythmias may be in part attributed to the changes in myocardial Cx43. PMID:27643942

  16. Innate signals compensate for the absence of PKC-{theta} during in vivo CD8(+) T cell effector and memory responses.

    PubMed

    Marsland, Benjamin J; Nembrini, Chiara; Schmitz, Nicole; Abel, Brian; Krautwald, Stefan; Bachmann, Martin F; Kopf, Manfred

    2005-10-01

    PKC- is central to T-helper (Th) 2 cell differentiation and effector function; however, its importance for antiviral effector, and in particular memory CD8(+) T cell responses, remains unclear. We have investigated the role of PKC- during in vivo and in vitro responses against influenza virus, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, vaccinia virus, and replication-deficient virus-like particles. In the absence of PKC-, antiviral CD8(+) T cells presented an unresponsive phenotype in vitro, which could be restored with exogenous IL-2 or by Toll-like receptor ligand-activated dendritic cells. In striking contrast, PKC- appeared to be superfluous for in vivo antiviral responses irrespective of whether the virus infected systemically, was localized to the lung, or did not replicate. In addition, CD8(+) CCR7-effector memory responses were normal in PKC--deficient mice, both in lymphoid and peripheral tissues. Our data show that increased activation signals delivered in vivo by highly activated dendritic cells, as present during viral infections, overcome the requirement for PKC- during CD8(+) T cell antiviral responses. PMID:16186501

  17. Innate signals compensate for the absence of PKC-θ during in vivo CD8+ T cell effector and memory responses

    PubMed Central

    Marsland, Benjamin J.; Nembrini, Chiara; Schmitz, Nicole; Abel, Brian; Krautwald, Stefan; Bachmann, Martin F.; Kopf, Manfred

    2005-01-01

    PKC-θ is central to T-helper (Th) 2 cell differentiation and effector function; however, its importance for antiviral effector, and in particular memory CD8+ T cell responses, remains unclear. We have investigated the role of PKC-θ during in vivo and in vitro responses against influenza virus, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, vaccinia virus, and replication-deficient virus-like particles. In the absence of PKC-θ, antiviral CD8+ T cells presented an unresponsive phenotype in vitro, which could be restored with exogenous IL-2 or by Toll-like receptor ligand-activated dendritic cells. In striking contrast, PKC-θ appeared to be superfluous for in vivo antiviral responses irrespective of whether the virus infected systemically, was localized to the lung, or did not replicate. In addition, CD8+ CCR7-effector memory responses were normal in PKC-θ-deficient mice, both in lymphoid and peripheral tissues. Our data show that increased activation signals delivered in vivo by highly activated dendritic cells, as present during viral infections, overcome the requirement for PKC-θ during CD8+ T cell antiviral responses. PMID:16186501

  18. PKC theta and p38 MAPK activate the EBV lytic cycle through autophagy induction.

    PubMed

    Gonnella, Roberta; Granato, Marisa; Farina, Antonella; Santarelli, Roberta; Faggioni, Alberto; Cirone, Mara

    2015-07-01

    PKC activation by combining TPA with sodium butyrate (T/B) represents the most effective and widely used strategy to induce the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) lytic cycle. The results obtained in this study show that novel PKCθ is involved in such process and that it acts through the activation of p38 MAPK and autophagy induction. Autophagy, a mechanism of cellular defense in stressful conditions, is manipulated by EBV to enhance viral replication. Besides promoting the EBV lytic cycle, the activation of p38 and autophagy resulted in a pro-survival effect, as indicated by p38 or ATG5 knocking down experiments. However, this pro-survival role was counteracted by a pro-death activity of PKCθ, due to the dephosphorylation of AKT. In conclusion, this study reports, for the first time, that T/B activates a PKCθ-p38 MAPK axis in EBV infected B cells, that promotes the viral lytic cycle and cell survival and dephosphorylates AKT, balancing cell life and cell death. PMID:25827954

  19. Mammalian aPKC/Par polarity complex mediated regulation of epithelial division orientation and cell fate

    SciTech Connect

    Vorhagen, Susanne; Niessen, Carien M.

    2014-11-01

    Oriented cell division is a key regulator of tissue architecture and crucial for morphogenesis and homeostasis. Balanced regulation of proliferation and differentiation is an essential property of tissues not only to drive morphogenesis but also to maintain and restore homeostasis. In many tissues orientation of cell division is coupled to the regulation of differentiation producing daughters with similar (symmetric cell division, SCD) or differential fate (asymmetric cell division, ACD). This allows the organism to generate cell lineage diversity from a small pool of stem and progenitor cells. Division orientation and/or the ratio of ACD/SCD need to be tightly controlled. Loss of orientation or an altered ratio can promote overgrowth, alter tissue architecture and induce aberrant differentiation, and have been linked to morphogenetic diseases, cancer and aging. A key requirement for oriented division is the presence of a polarity axis, which can be established through cell intrinsic and/or extrinsic signals. Polarity proteins translate such internal and external cues to drive polarization. In this review we will focus on the role of the polarity complex aPKC/Par3/Par6 in the regulation of division orientation and cell fate in different mammalian epithelia. We will compare the conserved function of this complex in mitotic spindle orientation and distribution of cell fate determinants and highlight common and differential mechanisms in which this complex is used by tissues to adapt division orientation and cell fate to the specific properties of the epithelium.

  20. PAR3-aPKC regulates Tiam1 by modulating suppressive internal interactions

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzawa, Kenji; Akita, Hiroki; Watanabe, Takashi; Kakeno, Mai; Matsui, Toshinori; Wang, Shujie; Kaibuchi, Kozo

    2016-01-01

    Tiam1 is one of the most extensively analyzed activators of the small GTPase Rac. However, fundamental aspects of its regulation are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that Tiam1 is functionally suppressed by internal interactions and that the PAR complex participates in its full activation. The N-terminal region of Tiam1 binds to the protein-binding and catalytic domains to inhibit its localization and activation. Atypical PKCs phosphorylate Tiam1 to relieve its intramolecular interactions, and the subsequent stabilization of its interaction with PAR3 allows it to exert localized activity. By analyzing Tiam1 regulation by PAR3-aPKC within the context of PDGF signaling, we also show that PAR3 directly binds PDGF receptor β. Thus we provide the first evidence for the negative regulation of Tiam1 by internal interactions, elucidate the nature of Tiam1 regulation by the PAR complex, and reveal a novel role for the PAR complex in PDGF signaling. PMID:26941335

  1. Polycystin-1 binds Par3/aPKC and controls convergent extension during renal tubular morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Castelli, Maddalena; Boca, Manila; Chiaravalli, Marco; Ramalingam, Harini; Rowe, Isaline; Distefano, Gianfranco; Carroll, Thomas; Boletta, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Several organs, including the lungs and kidneys, are formed by epithelial tubes whose proper morphogenesis ensures correct function. This is best exemplified by the kidney, where defective establishment or maintenance of tubular diameter results in polycystic kidney disease, a common genetic disorder. Most polycystic kidney disease cases result from loss-of-function mutations in the PKD1 gene, encoding Polycystin-1, a large receptor of unknown function. Here we demonstrate that PC-1 has an essential role in the establishment of correct tubular diameter during nephron development. Polycystin-1 associates with Par3 favouring the assembly of a pro-polarizing Par3/aPKC complex and it regulates a programme of cell polarity important for oriented cell migration and for a convergent extension-like process during tubular morphogenesis. Par3 inactivation in the developing kidney results in defective convergent extension and tubular morphogenesis, and in renal cyst formation. Our data define Polycystin-1 as central to cell polarization and to epithelial tube morphogenesis and homeostasis. PMID:24153433

  2. Mammalian aPKC/Par polarity complex mediated regulation of epithelial division orientation and cell fate.

    PubMed

    Vorhagen, Susanne; Niessen, Carien M

    2014-11-01

    Oriented cell division is a key regulator of tissue architecture and crucial for morphogenesis and homeostasis. Balanced regulation of proliferation and differentiation is an essential property of tissues not only to drive morphogenesis but also to maintain and restore homeostasis. In many tissues orientation of cell division is coupled to the regulation of differentiation producing daughters with similar (symmetric cell division, SCD) or differential fate (asymmetric cell division, ACD). This allows the organism to generate cell lineage diversity from a small pool of stem and progenitor cells. Division orientation and/or the ratio of ACD/SCD need to be tightly controlled. Loss of orientation or an altered ratio can promote overgrowth, alter tissue architecture and induce aberrant differentiation, and have been linked to morphogenetic diseases, cancer and aging. A key requirement for oriented division is the presence of a polarity axis, which can be established through cell intrinsic and/or extrinsic signals. Polarity proteins translate such internal and external cues to drive polarization. In this review we will focus on the role of the polarity complex aPKC/Par3/Par6 in the regulation of division orientation and cell fate in different mammalian epithelia. We will compare the conserved function of this complex in mitotic spindle orientation and distribution of cell fate determinants and highlight common and differential mechanisms in which this complex is used by tissues to adapt division orientation and cell fate to the specific properties of the epithelium.

  3. RACK1, a PKC Targeting Protein, Is Exclusively Localized to Basal Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Slager, Rebecca E.; DeVasure, Jane M.; Pavlik, Jaqueline A.; Sisson, Joseph H.; Wyatt, Todd A.

    2008-01-01

    The novel isoform of protein kinase C (PKC), PKCɛ, is an important regulator of ciliated cell function in airway epithelial cells, including cilia motility and detachment of ciliated cells after environmental insult. However, the mechanism of PKCɛ signaling in the airways and the potential role of the PKCɛ-interacting protein, receptor for activated C kinase 1 (RACK1), has not been widely explored. We used immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis to show that RACK1 is localized exclusively to basal, non-ciliated (and non-goblet) bovine and human bronchial epithelial cells. Our immunohistochemistry experiments used the basal body marker pericentrin, a marker for cilia, β-tubulin, and an airway goblet cell marker, MUC5AC, to confirm that RACK1 was excluded from differentiated airway cell subtypes and is only expressed in the basal cells. These results suggest that PKCɛ signaling in the basal airway cell may involve RACK1; however, PKCɛ regulation in ciliated cells uses RACK1-independent pathways. (J Histochem Cytochem 56:7–14, 2008) PMID:17875659

  4. PKC theta and p38 MAPK activate the EBV lytic cycle through autophagy induction.

    PubMed

    Gonnella, Roberta; Granato, Marisa; Farina, Antonella; Santarelli, Roberta; Faggioni, Alberto; Cirone, Mara

    2015-07-01

    PKC activation by combining TPA with sodium butyrate (T/B) represents the most effective and widely used strategy to induce the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) lytic cycle. The results obtained in this study show that novel PKCθ is involved in such process and that it acts through the activation of p38 MAPK and autophagy induction. Autophagy, a mechanism of cellular defense in stressful conditions, is manipulated by EBV to enhance viral replication. Besides promoting the EBV lytic cycle, the activation of p38 and autophagy resulted in a pro-survival effect, as indicated by p38 or ATG5 knocking down experiments. However, this pro-survival role was counteracted by a pro-death activity of PKCθ, due to the dephosphorylation of AKT. In conclusion, this study reports, for the first time, that T/B activates a PKCθ-p38 MAPK axis in EBV infected B cells, that promotes the viral lytic cycle and cell survival and dephosphorylates AKT, balancing cell life and cell death.

  5. Calcium influx through L-type channels generates protein kinase M to induce burst firing of dopamine cells in the rat ventral tegmental area.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yudan; Dore, Jules; Chen, Xihua

    2007-03-23

    Enhanced activity of the dopaminergic system originating in the ventral tegmental area is implicated in addictive and psychiatric disorders. Burst firing increases dopamine levels at the synapse to signal novelty and salience. We have previously reported a calcium-dependent burst firing of dopamine cells mediated by L-type channels following cholinergic stimulation; this paper describes a cellular mechanism resulting in burst firing following L-type channel activation. Calcium influx through L-type channels following FPL 64176 or (S)-(-)-Bay K8644 induced burst firing independent of dopamine, glutamate, or calcium from the internal stores. Burst firing induced as such was completely blocked by the substrate site protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor chelerythrine but not by the diacylglycerol site inhibitor calphostin C. Western blotting analysis showed that FPL 64176 and (S)-(-)-Bay K8644 increased the cleavage of PKC to generate protein kinase M (PKM) and the specific calpain inhibitor MDL28170 blocked this increase. Prevention of PKM production by inhibiting calpain or depleting PKC blocked burst firing induction whereas direct loading of purified PKM into cells induced burst firing. Activation of the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid type glutamate or cholinergic receptors known to induce burst firing increased PKM expression. These results indicate that calcium influx through L-type channels activates a calcium-dependent protease that cleaves PKC to generate constitutively active and labile PKM resulting in burst firing of dopamine cells, a pathway that is involved in glutamatergic or cholinergic modulation of the central dopamine system.

  6. Enzastaurin (LY317615), a Protein Kinase C Beta Selective Inhibitor, Enhances Antiangiogenic Effect of Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Willey, Christopher D.; Xiao Dakai; Tu Tianxiang; Kim, Kwang Woon; Moretti, Luigi; Niermann, Kenneth J.; Tawtawy, Mohammed N.; Quarles, Chad C. Ph.D.; Lu Bo

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Angiogenesis has generated interest in oncology because of its important role in cancer growth and progression, particularly when combined with cytotoxic therapies, such as radiotherapy. Among the numerous pathways influencing vascular growth and stability, inhibition of protein kinase B(Akt) or protein kinase C(PKC) can influence tumor blood vessels within tumor microvasculature. Therefore, we wanted to determine whether PKC inhibition could sensitize lung tumors to radiation. Methods and Materials: The combination of the selective PKC{beta} inhibitor Enzastaurin (ENZ, LY317615) and ionizing radiation were used in cell culture and a mouse model of lung cancer. Lung cancer cell lines and human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC) were examined using immunoblotting, cytotoxic assays including cell proliferation and clonogenic assays, and Matrigel endothelial tubule formation. In vivo, H460 lung cancer xenografts were examined for tumor vasculature and proliferation using immunohistochemistry. Results: ENZ effectively radiosensitizes HUVEC within in vitro models. Furthermore, concurrent ENZ treatment of lung cancer xenografts enhanced radiation-induced destruction of tumor vasculature and proliferation by IHC. However, tumor growth delay was not enhanced with combination treatment compared with either treatment alone. Analysis of downstream effectors revealed that HUVEC and the lung cancer cell lines differed in their response to ENZ and radiation such that only HUVEC demonstrate phosphorylated S6 suppression, which is downstream of mTOR. When ENZ was combined with the mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, in H460 lung cancer cells, radiosensitization was observed. Conclusion: PKC appears to be crucial for angiogenesis, and its inhibition by ENZ has potential to enhance radiotherapy in vivo.

  7. PKC activators enhance GABAergic neurotransmission and paired-pulse facilitation in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Xu, C; Liu, Q-Y; Alkon, D L

    2014-05-30

    Bryostatin-1, a potent agonist of protein kinase C (PKC), has recently been found to enhance spatial learning and long-term memory in rats, mice, rabbits and the nudibranch Hermissenda, and to exert profound neuroprotective effects on Alzheimer's disease (AD) in transgenic mice. However, details of the mechanistic effects of bryostatin on learning and memory remain unclear. To address this issue, whole-cell recording, a dual-recording approach and extracellular recording techniques were performed on young (2-4months) Brown-Norway rats. We found that bath-applied bryostatin-1 significantly increased the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs). The firing rate of GABAergic interneurons significantly was also increased as recorded with a loosely-attached extracellular recording configuration. Simultaneous recordings from communicating cell pairs of interneuron and pyramidal neuron revealed unique activity-dependent properties of GABAergic synapses. Furthermore, the bryostatin-induced increase of the frequency and amplitude of IPSCs was blocked by methionine enkephalin which selectively suppressed the excitability of interneurons. Pretreatment with RO-32-0432, a relatively specific PKCα antagonist, blocked the effect of bryostatin on sIPSCs. Finally, bryostatin increased paired-pulse ratio of GABAergic synapses that lasted for at least 20min while pretreatment with RO-32-0432 significantly reduced the ratio. In addition, 8-[2-(2-pentyl-cyclopropylmethl)-cyclopropyl]-octanoic acid (DCP-LA), a selective PKCε activator, also increased the frequency and amplitude of sIPSCs. Taken together, these results suggest that bryostatin enhances GABAergic neurotransmission in pyramidal neurons by activating the PKCα & ε-dependent pathway and by a presynaptic mechanism with excitation of GABAergic interneurons. These effects of bryostatin on GABAergic transmissions and modifiability may contribute to the improvement of learning and memory

  8. Evidence for protein kinase C-dependent and -independent activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase in T cells: potential role of additional diacylglycerol binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Puente, L G; Stone, J C; Ostergaard, H L

    2000-12-15

    Activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) is a critical signal transduction event for CTL activation, but the signaling mechanisms responsible are not fully characterized. Protein kinase C (PKC) is thought to contribute to MAPK activation following TCR stimulation. We have found that dependence on PKC varies with the method used to stimulate the T cells. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation in CTL stimulated with soluble cross-linked anti-CD3 is completely inhibited by the PKC inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide (BIM). In contrast, only the later time points in the course of ERK activation are sensitive to BIM when CTL are stimulated with immobilized anti-CD3, a condition that stimulates CTL degranulation. Surprisingly, MAPK activation in response to immobilized anti-CD3 is strongly inhibited at all time points by the diacylglycerol (DAG)-binding domain inhibitor calphostin C implicating the contribution of a DAG-dependent but PKC-independent pathway in the activation of ERK in CTL clones. Chronic exposure to phorbol ester down-regulates the expression of DAG-responsive PKC isoforms; however, this treatment of CTL clones does not inhibit anti-CD3-induced activation of MAPK. Phorbol ester-treated cells have reduced expression of several isoforms of PKC but still express the recently described DAG-binding Ras guanylnucleotide-releasing protein. These results indicate that the late phase of MAPK activation in CTL clones in response to immobilized anti-CD3 stimulation requires PKC while the early phase requires a DAG-dependent, BIM-resistant component.

  9. Protein kinase C activation induces phosphatidylserine exposure on red blood cells.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Kitty; Rettig, Michael P; Low, Philip S; Kuypers, Frans A

    2002-10-15

    We have shown previously that red blood cells (RBCs) can be induced to influx Ca(2+) when treated with lipid mediators, such as lysophosphatidic acid and prostaglandin E(2), that are released during clot formation. Since calcium loading of RBCs can lead to both protein kinase C (PKC) activation and phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure, we decided to investigate the possible linkage between PKC activation and membrane PS scrambling using phorbol 12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), a commonly used activator of PKC. Treatment of RBCs with PMA in a calcium-containing buffer caused immediate PS exposure in an RBC subpopulation. The size of the subpopulation did not change upon further incubation, indicating that not all RBCs are equally susceptible to this treatment. Using a fluorescent indicator, we found a subpopulation of RBCs with elevated intracellular calcium levels. In the absence of extracellular calcium, no PS exposure was found. However, we did find cells with high levels of calcium that did not expose PS, and a variable percentage of PS-exposing cells that did not show elevated calcium concentrations. Inhibition of PKC with either calphostin C, a blocker of the PMA binding site, or chelerythrine chloride, an inhibitor of the active site, diminished the level of formation of PS-exposing cells. However, the inhibitors had different effects on calcium internalization, indicating that a high calcium concentration alone was not responsible for inducing PS exposure in the absence of PKC activity. Moreover, PKC inhibition could prevent PS exposure induced by calcium and ionophore treatment of RBCs. We conclude that PKC is implicated in the mechanism of membrane phospholipid scrambling.

  10. Activation of muscarinic receptors in porcine airway smooth muscle elicits a transient increase in phospholipase D activity.

    PubMed

    Mamoon, A M; Smith, J; Baker, R C; Farley, J M

    1999-01-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) is a phosphodiesterase that catalyses hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine to produce phosphatidic acid and choline. In the presence of ethanol, PLD also catalyses the formation of phosphatidylethanol, which is a unique characteristic of this enzyme. Muscarinic receptor-induced changes in the activity of PLD were investigated in porcine tracheal smooth muscle by measuring the formation of [3H]phosphatidic acid ([3H]PA) and [3H]phosphatidylethanol ([3H]PEth) after labeling the muscle strips with [3H]palmitic acid. The cholinergic receptor agonist acetylcholine (Ach) significantly but transiently increased formation of both [3H]PA and [3H]PEth in a concentration-dependent manner (>105-400% vs. controls in the presence of 10(-6) to 10(-4) M Ach) when pretreated with 100 mM ethanol. The Ach receptor-mediated increase in PLD activity was inhibited by atropine (10(-6) M), indicating that activation of PLD occurred via muscarinic receptors. Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) increased PLD activity that was effectively blocked by the PKC inhibitors calphostin C (10(-8) to 10(-6) M) and GFX (10(-8) to 10(-6) M). Ach-induced increases in PLD activity were also significantly, but incompletely, inhibited by both GFX and calphostin C. From the present data, we conclude that in tracheal smooth muscle, muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-induced PLD activation is transient in nature and coupled to these receptors via PKC. However, PKC activation is not solely responsible for Ach-induced activation of PLD in porcine tracheal smooth muscle.

  11. Signaling pathway involved in the immunomodulatory effect of Ganoderma atrum polysaccharide in spleen lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qiang; Nie, Shao-Ping; Wang, Jun-Qiao; Huang, Dan-Fei; Li, Wen-Juan; Xie, Ming-Yong

    2015-03-18

    The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanism underlying the immunomodulatory effect of Ganoderma atrum polysaccharide (PSG-1) in spleen lymphocytes. Our results showed that PSG-1 increased the intracellular Ca2+ concentration and calcineurin (CaN) activity. Moreover, PSG-1 was found to elevate nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) activity, but this effect could be diminished by the treatment of CaN inhibitors (cyclosporin A and FK506). PSG-1-induced interleukin (IL)-2 production was also inhibited by cyclosporin A and FK506. In addition, PSG-1 was found to significantly enhance protein kinase C (PKC) activity. PKC was involved in induction of NFAT activity by PSG-1, as evidenced by abrogation of NFAT activity by PKC inhibitor calphostin C, which significantly decreased PSG-1-induced IL-2 production. On the basis of these results, we concluded that PSG-1 may induce activation of spleen lymphocytes at least in part via the Ca2+/CaN/NFAT/IL-2 signaling pathway and the PKC/NFAT/IL-2 signaling pathway cooperatively regulated PSG-1-induced activation of spleen lymphocytes.

  12. FRET Study of the Structural and Kinetic Effects of PKC Phosphomimetic Cardiac Troponin T Mutants on Thin Filament Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Schlecht, William; Zhou, Zhiqun; Li, King-Lun; Rieck, Daniel; Ouyang, Yexin; Dong, Wen-Ji

    2014-01-01

    FRET was used to investigate the structural and kinetic effects that PKC phosphorylations exert on Ca2+ and myosin subfragment-1 dependent conformational transitions of the cardiac thin filament. PKC phosphorylations of cTnT were mimicked by glutamate substitution. Ca2+ and S1-induced distance changes between the central linker of cTnC and the switch region of cTnI (cTnI-Sr) were monitored in reconstituted thin filaments using steady state and time resolved FRET, while kinetics of structural transitions were determined using stopped flow. Thin filament Ca2+ sensitivity was found to be significantly blunted by the presence of the cTnT(T204E) mutant, whereas pseudo-phosphorylation at additional sites increased the Ca2+-sensitivty. The rate of Ca2+-dissociation induced structural changes was decreased in the C-terminal end of cTnI-Sr in the presence of pseudo-phosphorylations while remaining unchanged at the N-terminal end of this region. Additionally, the distance between cTnI-Sr and cTnC was decreased significantly for the triple and quadruple phosphomimetic mutants cTnT(T195E/S199E/T204E) and cTnT(T195E/S199E/T204E/T285E), which correlated with the Ca2+-sensitivity increase seen in these same mutants. We conclude that significant changes in thin filament Ca2+-sensitivity, structure and kinetics are brought about through PKC phosphorylation of cTnT. These changes can either decrease or increase Ca2+-sensitivity and likely play an important role in cardiac regulation. PMID:24708997

  13. Mouse Sphingosine Kinase 1a Is Negatively Regulated through Conventional PKC-Dependent Phosphorylation at S373 Residue

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Yong-Seok; Bae, Sun Sik; Park, Jong Bae; Ha, Sang Hoon; Ryu, Sung Ho; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2015-01-01

    Sphingosine kinase is a lipid kinase that converts sphingosine into sphingosine-1-phosphate, an important signaling molecule with intracellular and extracellular functions. Although diverse extracellular stimuli influence cellular sphingosine kinase activity, the molecular mechanisms underlying its regulation remain to be clarified. In this study, we investigated the phosphorylation-dependent regulation of mouse sphingosine kinase (mSK) isoforms 1 and 2. mSK1a was robustly phosphorylated in response to extracellular stimuli such as phorbol ester, whereas mSK2 exhibited a high basal level of phosphorylation in quiescent cells regardless of agonist stimulation. Interestingly, phorbol ester-induced phosphorylation of mSK1a correlated with suppression of its activity. Chemical inhibition of conventional PKCs (cPKCs) abolished mSK1a phosphorylation, while overexpression of PKCα, a cPKC isoform, potentiated the phosphorylation, in response to phorbol ester. Furthermore, an in vitro kinase assay showed that PKCα directly phosphorylated mSK1a. In addition, phosphopeptide mapping analysis determined that the S373 residue of mSK1a was the only site phosphorylated by cPKC. Interestingly, alanine substitution of S373 made mSK1a refractory to the inhibitory effect of phorbol esters, whereas glutamate substitution of the same residue resulted in a significant reduction in mSK1a activity, suggesting the significant role of this phosphorylation event. Taken together, we propose that mSK1a is negatively regulated through cPKC-dependent phosphorylation at S373 residue. PMID:26642194

  14. Nuclear PKC-θ facilitates rapid transcriptional responses in human memory CD4+ T cells through p65 and H2B phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jasmine; Hardy, Kristine; Phetsouphanh, Chan; Tu, Wen Juan; Sutcliffe, Elissa L.; McCuaig, Robert; Sutton, Christopher R.; Zafar, Anjum; Munier, C. Mee Ling; Zaunders, John J.; Xu, Yin; Theodoratos, Angelo; Tan, Abel; Lim, Pek Siew; Knaute, Tobias; Masch, Antonia; Zerweck, Johannes; Brezar, Vedran; Milburn, Peter J.; Dunn, Jenny; Casarotto, Marco G.; Turner, Stephen J.; Seddiki, Nabila; Kelleher, Anthony D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Memory T cells are characterized by their rapid transcriptional programs upon re-stimulation. This transcriptional memory response is facilitated by permissive chromatin, but exactly how the permissive epigenetic landscape in memory T cells integrates incoming stimulatory signals remains poorly understood. By genome-wide ChIP-sequencing ex vivo human CD4+ T cells, here, we show that the signaling enzyme, protein kinase C theta (PKC-θ) directly relays stimulatory signals to chromatin by binding to transcriptional-memory-responsive genes to induce transcriptional activation. Flanked by permissive histone modifications, these PKC-enriched regions are significantly enriched with NF-κB motifs in ex vivo bulk and vaccinia-responsive human memory CD4+ T cells. Within the nucleus, PKC-θ catalytic activity maintains the Ser536 phosphorylation on the p65 subunit of NF-κB (also known as RelA) and can directly influence chromatin accessibility at transcriptional memory genes by regulating H2B deposition through Ser32 phosphorylation. Furthermore, using a cytoplasm-restricted PKC-θ mutant, we highlight that chromatin-anchored PKC-θ integrates activating signals at the chromatin template to elicit transcriptional memory responses in human memory T cells. PMID:27149922

  15. Nuclear PKC-θ facilitates rapid transcriptional responses in human memory CD4+ T cells through p65 and H2B phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jasmine; Hardy, Kristine; Phetsouphanh, Chan; Tu, Wen Juan; Sutcliffe, Elissa L; McCuaig, Robert; Sutton, Christopher R; Zafar, Anjum; Munier, C Mee Ling; Zaunders, John J; Xu, Yin; Theodoratos, Angelo; Tan, Abel; Lim, Pek Siew; Knaute, Tobias; Masch, Antonia; Zerweck, Johannes; Brezar, Vedran; Milburn, Peter J; Dunn, Jenny; Casarotto, Marco G; Turner, Stephen J; Seddiki, Nabila; Kelleher, Anthony D; Rao, Sudha

    2016-06-15

    Memory T cells are characterized by their rapid transcriptional programs upon re-stimulation. This transcriptional memory response is facilitated by permissive chromatin, but exactly how the permissive epigenetic landscape in memory T cells integrates incoming stimulatory signals remains poorly understood. By genome-wide ChIP-sequencing ex vivo human CD4(+) T cells, here, we show that the signaling enzyme, protein kinase C theta (PKC-θ) directly relays stimulatory signals to chromatin by binding to transcriptional-memory-responsive genes to induce transcriptional activation. Flanked by permissive histone modifications, these PKC-enriched regions are significantly enriched with NF-κB motifs in ex vivo bulk and vaccinia-responsive human memory CD4(+) T cells. Within the nucleus, PKC-θ catalytic activity maintains the Ser536 phosphorylation on the p65 subunit of NF-κB (also known as RelA) and can directly influence chromatin accessibility at transcriptional memory genes by regulating H2B deposition through Ser32 phosphorylation. Furthermore, using a cytoplasm-restricted PKC-θ mutant, we highlight that chromatin-anchored PKC-θ integrates activating signals at the chromatin template to elicit transcriptional memory responses in human memory T cells. PMID:27149922

  16. Time-resolved multiphoton imaging of the interaction between the PKC and the NFκB signalling pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Penny E.; Ng, Tony; Roberts, Sarah A.; Vojnovic, Borivoj; Ameer-Beg, Simon M.

    2003-10-01

    Using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measured by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) we have explored the protein-protein interactions between fluorescent protein tagged fusion proteins of the activation pathways of PKC and NFkB. We observe FRET between CFP-IκB and YFP-p65 in unstimulated cells and when treated with TNFα. We also observed a reduction of the fluorescent lifetime of CFP-IκB in the absence of YFP-p65 when TNFα is present.

  17. Collaboration of AMPK and PKC to induce phosphorylation of Ser413 on PIP5K1B resulting in decreased kinase activity and reduced PtdIns(4,5)P2 synthesis in response to oxidative stress and energy restriction.

    PubMed

    van den Bout, Iman; Jones, David R; Shah, Zahid H; Halstead, Jonathan R; Keune, Willem-Jan; Mohammed, Shabaz; D'Santos, Clive S; Divecha, Nullin

    2013-11-01

    The spatial and temporal regulation of the second messenger PtdIns(4,5)P2 has been shown to be crucial for regulating numerous processes in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Three isoforms of PIP5K1 (phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase), A, B and C, are responsible for the regulation of the major pools of cellular PtdIns(4,5)P2. PIP5K1B is negatively regulated in response to oxidative stress although it remains unclear which pathways regulate its activity. In the present study, we have investigated the regulation of PIP5K1B by protein phosphorylation. Using MS analysis, we identified 12 phosphorylation sites on PIP5K1B. We developed a phospho-specific antibody against Ser413 and showed that its phosphorylation was increased in response to treatment of cells with phorbol ester, H2O2 or energy restriction. Using inhibitors, we define a stress-dependent pathway that requires the activity of the cellular energy sensor AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase) and PKC (protein kinase C) to regulate Ser413 phosphorylation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PKC can directly phosphorylate Ser413 in vitro. Mutation of Ser413 to aspartate to mimic serine phosphorylation decreased both PIP5K1B activity in vitro and PtdIns(4,5)P2 synthesis in vivo. Our studies show that collaboration between AMPK and PKC dictates the extent of Ser413 phosphorylation on PIP5K1B and regulates PtdIns(4,5)P2 synthesis.

  18. Regulation of phospholipase D by muscarinic receptors in rat submandibular ductal cells.

    PubMed

    Pochet, Stéphanie; Métioui, Mourad; Grosfils, Katrina; Gómez-Muñoz, Antonio; Marino, Aida; Dehaye, Jean-Paul

    2003-01-01

    The muscarinic agonist carbachol stimulated phospholipase D (PLD) in rat submandibular gland (RSMG) ductal cells in a time and concentration-dependent manner. This effect was inhibited by chelation of extracellular calcium with ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA). PLD could also be activated by epinephrine and AlF(4)(-), two polyphosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PPI-PLC) activators, and by the phorbol ester o-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) which activates protein kinase C (PKC). Ionomycin and thapsigargin only slightly increased PLD activity. Ortho-vanadate, a tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, also stimulated PLD activity. Both carbachol and o-vanadate increased the formation of inositol phosphates and the tyrosine phosphorylation of at least two proteins (55-60 and 120 kDa). Calphostin C (a PKC inhibitor), U73122 (a PPI-PLC inhibitor) and genistein (a tyrosine kinase inhibitor) blocked the activation of PLD, of PLC and the phosphorylation of tyrosyl residues in response to carbachol and vanadate. Taken together, these results suggest that rat submandibular gland ductal cells express a calcium-dependent PLD activity. This enzyme is regulated by carbachol via a PLC-PKC-tyrosine kinase pathway. PMID:12401525

  19. 1–42 β-Amyloid peptide requires PDK1/nPKC/Rac 1 pathway to induce neuronal death

    PubMed Central

    Manterola, L; Hernando-Rodríguez, M; Ruiz, A; Apraiz, A; Arrizabalaga, O; Vellón, L; Alberdi, E; Cavaliere, F; Lacerda, H M; Jimenez, S; Parada, L A; Matute, C; Zugaza, J L

    2013-01-01

    1–42 β-Amyloid (Aβ1–42) peptide is a key molecule involved in the development of Alzheimer's disease. Some of its effects are manifested at the neuronal morphological level. These morphological changes involve loss of neurites due to cytoskeleton alterations. However, the mechanism of Aβ1–42 peptide activation of the neurodegenerative program is still poorly understood. Here, Aβ1–42 peptide-induced transduction of cellular death signals through the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/phosphoinositol-dependent kinase (PDK)/novel protein kinase C (nPKC)/Rac 1 axis is described. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of PDK1 and nPKC activities blocks Rac 1 activation and neuronal cell death. Our results provide insights into an unsuspected connection between PDK1, nPKCs and Rac 1 in the same signal-transduction pathway and points out nPKCs and Rac 1 as potential therapeutic targets to block the toxic effects of Aβ1–42 peptide in neurons. PMID:23340502

  20. 1-42 β-amyloid peptide requires PDK1/nPKC/Rac 1 pathway to induce neuronal death.

    PubMed

    Manterola, L; Hernando-Rodríguez, M; Ruiz, A; Apraiz, A; Arrizabalaga, O; Vellón, L; Alberdi, E; Cavaliere, F; Lacerda, H M; Jimenez, S; Parada, L A; Matute, C; Zugaza, J L

    2013-01-22

    1-42 β-Amyloid (Aβ(1-42)) peptide is a key molecule involved in the development of Alzheimer's disease. Some of its effects are manifested at the neuronal morphological level. These morphological changes involve loss of neurites due to cytoskeleton alterations. However, the mechanism of Aβ(1-42) peptide activation of the neurodegenerative program is still poorly understood. Here, Aβ(1-42) peptide-induced transduction of cellular death signals through the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/phosphoinositol-dependent kinase (PDK)/novel protein kinase C (nPKC)/Rac 1 axis is described. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of PDK1 and nPKC activities blocks Rac 1 activation and neuronal cell death. Our results provide insights into an unsuspected connection between PDK1, nPKCs and Rac 1 in the same signal-transduction pathway and points out nPKCs and Rac 1 as potential therapeutic targets to block the toxic effects of Aβ(1-42) peptide in neurons.

  1. Activation of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors induces a PKC-dependent switch in AMPA receptor subtypes in mouse cerebellar stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lu; June Liu, Siqiong

    2007-09-01

    The repetitive activation of synaptic glutamate receptors can induce a lasting change in the number or subunit composition of synaptic AMPA receptors (AMPARs). However, NMDA receptors that are present extrasynaptically can also be activated by a burst of presynaptic activity, and thus may be involved in the induction of synaptic plasticity. Here we show that the physiological-like activation of extrasynaptic NMDARs induces a lasting change in the synaptic current, by changing the subunit composition of AMPARs at the parallel fibre-to-cerebellar stellate cell synapse. This extrasynaptic NMDAR-induced switch in synaptic AMPARs from GluR2-lacking (Ca(2+)-permeable) to GluR2-containing (Ca(2+)-impermeable) receptors requires the activation of protein kinase C (PKC). These results indicate that the activation of extrasynaptic NMDARs by glutamate spillover is an important mechanism that detects the pattern of afferent activity and subsequently exerts a remote regulation of AMPAR subtypes at the synapse via a PKC-dependent pathway.

  2. Clostridium perfringens Phospholipase C Induced ROS Production and Cytotoxicity Require PKC, MEK1 and NFκB Activation

    PubMed Central

    Monturiol-Gross, Laura; Flores-Díaz, Marietta; Pineda-Padilla, Maria Jose; Castro-Castro, Ana Cristina; Alape-Giron, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens phospholipase C (CpPLC), also called α-toxin, is the most toxic extracellular enzyme produced by this bacteria and is essential for virulence in gas gangrene. At lytic concentrations, CpPLC causes membrane disruption, whereas at sublytic concentrations this toxin causes oxidative stress and activates the MEK/ERK pathway, which contributes to its cytotoxic and myotoxic effects. In the present work, the role of PKC, ERK 1/2 and NFκB signalling pathways in ROS generation induced by CpPLC and their contribution to CpPLC-induced cytotoxicity was evaluated. The results demonstrate that CpPLC induces ROS production through PKC, MEK/ERK and NFκB pathways, the latter being activated by the MEK/ERK signalling cascade. Inhibition of either of these signalling pathways prevents CpPLC's cytotoxic effect. In addition, it was demonstrated that NFκB inhibition leads to a significant reduction in the myotoxicity induced by intramuscular injection of CpPLC in mice. Understanding the role of these signalling pathways could lead towards developing rational therapeutic strategies aimed to reduce cell death during a clostridialmyonecrosis. PMID:24466113

  3. Clostridium perfringens phospholipase C induced ROS production and cytotoxicity require PKC, MEK1 and NFκB activation.

    PubMed

    Monturiol-Gross, Laura; Flores-Díaz, Marietta; Pineda-Padilla, Maria Jose; Castro-Castro, Ana Cristina; Alape-Giron, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens phospholipase C (CpPLC), also called α-toxin, is the most toxic extracellular enzyme produced by this bacteria and is essential for virulence in gas gangrene. At lytic concentrations, CpPLC causes membrane disruption, whereas at sublytic concentrations this toxin causes oxidative stress and activates the MEK/ERK pathway, which contributes to its cytotoxic and myotoxic effects. In the present work, the role of PKC, ERK 1/2 and NFκB signalling pathways in ROS generation induced by CpPLC and their contribution to CpPLC-induced cytotoxicity was evaluated. The results demonstrate that CpPLC induces ROS production through PKC, MEK/ERK and NFκB pathways, the latter being activated by the MEK/ERK signalling cascade. Inhibition of either of these signalling pathways prevents CpPLC's cytotoxic effect. In addition, it was demonstrated that NFκB inhibition leads to a significant reduction in the myotoxicity induced by intramuscular injection of CpPLC in mice. Understanding the role of these signalling pathways could lead towards developing rational therapeutic strategies aimed to reduce cell death during a clostridialmyonecrosis. PMID:24466113

  4. PKC-Theta is a Novel SC35 Splicing Factor Regulator in Response to T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    McCuaig, Robert Duncan; Dunn, Jennifer; Li, Jasmine; Masch, Antonia; Knaute, Tobias; Schutkowski, Mike; Zerweck, Johannes; Rao, Sudha

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing of nuclear pre-mRNA is essential for generating protein diversity and regulating gene expression. While many immunologically relevant genes undergo alternative splicing, the role of regulated splicing in T cell immune responses is largely unexplored, and the signaling pathways and splicing factors that regulate alternative splicing in T cells are poorly defined. Here, we show using a combination of Jurkat T cells, human primary T cells, and ex vivo naïve and effector virus-specific T cells isolated after influenza A virus infection that SC35 phosphorylation is induced in response to stimulatory signals. We show that SC35 colocalizes with RNA polymerase II in activated T cells and spatially overlaps with H3K27ac and H3K4me3, which mark transcriptionally active genes. Interestingly, SC35 remains coupled to the active histone marks in the absence of continuing stimulatory signals. We show for the first time that nuclear PKC-θ co-exists with SC35 in the context of the chromatin template and is a key regulator of SC35 in T cells, directly phosphorylating SC35 peptide residues at RNA recognition motif and RS domains. Collectively, our findings suggest that nuclear PKC-θ is a novel regulator of the key splicing factor SC35 in T cells. PMID:26594212

  5. Angiotensin II AT1 receptor stimulates Na+–K+ ATPase activity through a pathway involving PKC-ζ in rat thyroid cells

    PubMed Central

    Marsigliante, S; Muscella, A; Elia, M G; Greco, S; Storelli, C

    2003-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) receptor subtype 1, AT1, is expressed by the rat thyroid. A relationship between thyroid function and several components of the renin-angiotensin system has also been established, but the Ang II cellular effects in thyrocytes and its transduction signalling remain undefined. The aim of the present paper was to investigate the modulation of the activity of the Na+-K+ ATPase by Ang II and its intracellular transduction pathway in PC-Cl3 cells, an established epithelial cell line derived from rat thyroid. Here we have demonstrated, by RT-PCR analysis, the expression of mRNA for the Ang II AT1 receptor in PC-Cl3 cells; mRNA for the Ang II AT2 receptor was not detected. Ang II was not able to affect the intracellular Ca2+ concentration in fura-2-loaded cells, but it stimulated the translocation from the cytosol to the plasma membrane of atypical protein kinase C-zeta (PKC-ζ) and -iota (PKC-ι) isoforms with subsequent phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1 and 2). Translocated atypical PKCs displayed temporally different activations, the activation of PKC-ζ being the fastest. PC-Cl3 cells stimulated with increasing Ang II concentrations showed dose- and time-dependent activation of the Na+-K+ ATPase activity, which paralleled the PKC-ζ translocation time course. Na+-K+ ATPase activity modulation was dependent on PKC activation since the PKC antagonist staurosporine abolished the stimulatory effect of Ang II. The inhibition of the ERK kinases 1 and 2 (MEK1 and 2) by PD098059 (2′-amino-3′-methoxyflavone) failed to block the effect of Ang II on the Na+-K+ ATPase activity. In conclusion, our results suggest that Ang II modulates Na+-K+ ATPase activity in PC-Cl3 cells through the AT1 receptor via activation of atypical PKC-ζ while the Ang II-activated PKC-ζ appears to have other as yet unknown functions. PMID:12527732

  6. The DNA Methyltransferase DNMT1 and Tyrosine-Protein Kinase KIT Cooperatively Promote Resistance to 5-Aza-2′-deoxycytidine (Decitabine) and Midostaurin (PKC412) in Lung Cancer Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Fei; Shen, Na; Pang, Jiuxia; Molina, Julian R.; Yang, Ping; Liu, Shujun

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer cells are sensitive to 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (decitabine) or midostaurin (PKC412), because decitabine restores the expression of methylation-silenced tumor suppressor genes, whereas PKC412 inhibits hyperactive kinase signaling, which is essential for cancer cell growth. Here, we demonstrated that resistance to decitabine (decitabineR) or PKC412 (PKC412R) eventually results from simultaneously remethylated DNA and reactivated kinase cascades. Indeed, both decitabineR and PKC412R displayed the up-regulation of DNA methyltransferase DNMT1 and tyrosine-protein kinase KIT, the enhanced phosphorylation of KIT and its downstream effectors, and the increased global and gene-specific DNA methylation with the down-regulation of tumor suppressor gene epithelial cadherin CDH1. Interestingly, decitabineR and PKC412R had higher capability of colony formation and wound healing than parental cells in vitro, which were attributed to the hyperactive DNMT1 or KIT, because inactivation of KIT or DNMT1 reciprocally blocked decitabineR or PKC412R cell proliferation. Further, DNMT1 knockdown sensitized PKC412R cells to PKC412; conversely, KIT depletion synergized with decitabine in eliminating decitabineR. Importantly, when engrafted into nude mice, decitabineR and PKC412R had faster proliferation with stronger tumorigenicity that was caused by the reactivated KIT kinase signaling and further CDH1 silencing. These findings identify functional cross-talk between KIT and DNMT1 in the development of drug resistance, implying the reciprocal targeting of protein kinases and DNA methyltransferases as an essential strategy for durable responses in lung cancer. PMID:26085088

  7. NFκB inhibitors induce cell death in glioblastomas.

    PubMed

    Zanotto-Filho, Alfeu; Braganhol, Elizandra; Schröder, Rafael; de Souza, Luís Henrique T; Dalmolin, Rodrigo J S; Pasquali, Matheus A Bittencourt; Gelain, Daniel Pens; Battastini, Ana Maria Oliveira; Moreira, José Cláudio Fonseca

    2011-02-01

    Identification of novel target pathways in glioblastoma (GBM) remains critical due to poor prognosis, inefficient therapies and recurrence associated with these tumors. In this work, we evaluated the role of nuclear-factor-kappa-B (NFκB) in the growth of GBM cells, and the potential of NFκB inhibitors as antiglioma agents. NFκB pathway was found overstimulated in GBM cell lines and in tumor specimens compared to normal astrocytes and healthy brain tissues, respectively. Treatment of a panel of established GBM cell lines (U138MG, U87, U373 and C6) with pharmacological NFκB inhibitors (BAY117082, parthenolide, MG132, curcumin and arsenic trioxide) and NFκB-p65 siRNA markedly decreased the viability of GBMs as compared to inhibitors of other signaling pathways such as MAPKs (ERK, JNK and p38), PKC, EGFR and PI3K/Akt. In addition, NFκB inhibitors presented a low toxicity to normal astrocytes, indicating selectivity to cancerous cells. In GBMs, mitochondrial dysfunction (membrane depolarization, bcl-xL downregulation and cytochrome c release) and arrest in the G2/M phase were observed at the early steps of NFκB inhibitors treatment. These events preceded sub-G1 detection, apoptotic body formation and caspase-3 activation. Also, NFκB was found overstimulated in cisplatin-resistant C6 cells, and treatment of GBMs with NFκB inhibitors overcame cisplatin resistance besides potentiating the effects of the chemotherapeutics, cisplatin and doxorubicin. These findings support NFκB as a potential target to cell death induction in GBMs, and that the NFκB inhibitors may be considered for in vivo testing on animal models and possibly on GBM therapy.

  8. Effect of electroacupuncture stimulation at Zusanli acupoint (ST36) on gastric motility: possible through PKC and MAPK signal transduction pathways

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Electroacupuncture (EA) stimulation has been shown to have a great therapeutic potential for treating gastrointestinal motility disorders. However, no evidence has clarified the mechanisms contributing to the effects of EA stimulation at the Zusanli acupoint (ST.36). This study was designed to investigate the regulative effect of EA stimulation at the ST.36 on gastric motility and to explore its possible mechanisms. Methods Thirty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: the ST.36 group, the non-acupoint group, and the control group. EA stimulation was set at 2 Hz, continuous mode, and 1 V for 30 min. The frequency and average peak amplitude of gastric motility were measured by electrogastrography. The protein kinase C (PKC) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways were assessed using real-time polymerase chain reactions. Caldesmon (CaD) and calponin (CaP) protein expression in the gastric antrum were detected on Western blots. A Computed Video Processing System was used to evaluate morphological changes in smooth muscle cells (SMCs) from the gastric antrum. Results EA stimulation at ST.36 had a dual effect on the frequency and average peak amplitude. Additionally, EA stimulation at ST.36 regulated the expression of some genes in the PKC and MAPK signaling pathways, and it regulated the expression of the CaD and CaP proteins. EA serum induced SMC contractility. Promotion of gastric motility may correlate with up-regulation of MAPK6 (ERK3), MAPK13, and Prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2) gene expression, and the down-regulation of the collagen, type I, alpha 1 (COL1A1) gene and CaD and CaP protein expression. Inhibition of gastric motility may correlate with down-regulation of the Interleukin-1 receptor type 2 (IL1R2) and Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) genes, and up-regulation of CaD and CaP protein expression. Conclusions EA stimulation at ST.36 regulated gastric motility, and the effects were

  9. Glutamate-induced protein phosphorylation in cerebellar granule cells: role of protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Eboli, M L; Mercanti, D; Ciotti, M T; Aquino, A; Castellani, L

    1994-10-01

    Protein phosphorylation in response to toxic doses of glutamate has been investigated in cerebellar granule cells. 32P-labelled cells have been stimulated with 100 microM glutamate for up to 20 min and analysed by one and two dimensional gel electrophoresis. A progressive incorporation of label is observed in two molecular species of about 80 and 43 kDa (PP80 and PP43) and acidic isoelectric point. Glutamate-stimulated phosphorylation is greatly reduced by antagonists of NMDA and non-NMDA glutamate receptors. The effect of glutamate is mimicked by phorbol esters and is markedly reduced by inhibitors of protein kinase C (PKC) such as staurosporine and calphostin C. PP80 has been identified by Western blot analysis as the PKC substrate MARCKS (myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate), while antibody to GAP-43 (growth associated protein-43), the nervous tissue-specific substrate of PKC, failed to recognize PP43. Our results suggest that PKC is responsible for the early phosphorylative events induced by toxic doses of glutamate in cerebellar granule cells. PMID:7891841

  10. Agonist-induced redistribution of calponin in contractile vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Parker, C A; Takahashi, K; Tao, T; Morgan, K G

    1994-11-01

    Calponin is a thin filament-associated protein that has been implicated in playing an auxiliary regulatory role in smooth muscle contraction. We have used immunofluorescence and digital imaging microscopy to determine the cellular distribution of calponin in single cells freshly isolated from the ferret portal vein. In resting cells calponin is distributed throughout the cytosol, associated with filamentous structures, and is excluded from the nuclear area of the cell. The ratio of surface cortex-associated calponin to cytosol-associated calponin (R) was found to be 0.639 +/- 0.021. Upon depolarization of the cell with physiological saline solution containing 96 mM K+, the distribution of calponin did not change from that of a resting cell (R = 0.678 +/- 0.025, P = 0.369). Upon stimulation with an agonist (10 microM phenylephrine) that is known to activate protein kinase C (PKC) in these cells, the cellular distribution of calponin changed from primarily cytosolic to primarily surface cortex associated (R = 1.24 +/- 0.085, P < 0.001). This agonist-induced redistribution of calponin was partially inhibited by the PKC inhibitor calphostin, overlapped in time with PKC translocation, and preceded contraction of these cells. These results suggest that the physiological function of calponin may be to mediate agonist-activated contraction via a PKC-dependent pathway. PMID:7526695

  11. The mTOR inhibitor Everolimus synergizes with the PI3K inhibitor GDC0941 to enhance anti-tumor efficacy in uveal melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Amirouchene-Angelozzi, Nabil; Frisch-Dit-Leitz, Estelle; Carita, Guillaume; Dahmani, Ahmed; Raymondie, Chloé; Liot, Géraldine; Gentien, David; Némati, Fariba; Decaudin, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Uveal melanoma (UM) is the most frequent malignant ocular tumor in adults. While the primary tumor is efficiently treated by surgery and/or radiotherapy, about one third of UM patients develop metastases, for which no effective treatment is currently available. The PKC, MAPK and PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling cascades have been shown to be associated with tumor growth. However, none of the compounds against those pathways results in tumor regression when used as single agents. To identify more effective therapeutic strategies for UM patients, we performed a combination screen using seven targeted agents inhibiting PKC, MEK, AKT, PI3K and mTOR in a panel of ten UM cell lines, representative of the UM disease. We identified a strong synergy between the mTOR inhibitor Everolimus and the PI3K inhibitor GDC0941. This combination resulted in an increase in apoptosis in several UM cell lines compared to monotherapies and enhanced the anti-tumor effect of each single agent in two patient-derived xenografts. Furthermore, we showed that the synergism between the two drugs was associated with the relief by GDC0491 of a reactivation of AKT induced by Everolimus. Altogether, our results highlight a novel and effective combination strategy, which could be beneficial for UM patients. PMID:26988753

  12. Annexin A1 translocates to nucleus and promotes the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in a PKC-dependent manner after OGD/R

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Baoming; Wang, Jing; Liu, Lu; Li, Xing; Liu, Shuangxi; Xia, Qian; Shi, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Annexin A1 (ANXA1) is a protein known to have multiple roles in the regulation of inflammatory responses. In this study, we find that after oxygen glucose deprivation/reoxygenation (ODG/R) injury, activated PKC phosphorylated ANXA1 at the serine 27 residue (p27S-ANXA1), and promoted the translocation of p27S-ANXA1 to the nucleus of BV-2 microglial cells. This in turn induced BV-2 microglial cells to produce large amounts of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The phenomenon could be mimicked by either transfecting a mutant form of ANXA1 with its serine 27 residue converted to aspartic acid, S27D, or by using the PKC agonist, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) in these microglial cells. In contrast, transfecting cells with an ANXA1 S27A mutant (serine 27 converted to alanine) or treating the cells with the PKC antagonist, GF103209X (GF) reversed this effet. Our study demonstrates that ANXA1 can be phosphorylated by PKC and is subsequently translocated to the nucleus of BV-2 microglial cells after OGD/R, resulting in the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:27426034

  13. Reduction of α1GABAA receptor mediated by tyrosine kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation in a mouse model of fragile X syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Weidong; Wang, Jiaqin; Song, Shunyi; Li, Fang; Yuan, Fangfang

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) caused by lack of fragile X mental retardation protein (Fmr1) is the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability and characterized by many cognitive disturbances like attention deficit, autistic behavior, and audiogenic seizure and have region-specific altered expression of some gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) receptor subunits. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blot experiments were performed in the cultured cortical neurons and forebrain obtained from wild-type (WT) and Fmr1 KO mice demonstrate the reduction in the expression of α1 gamma-aminobutyric acid (α1GABAA) receptor, phospho-α1GABAA receptor, PKC and phosphor-PKC in Fmr1 KO mice comparing with WT mice, both in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, we found that the phosphorylation of the α1GABAA receptor was mediated by PKC. Our results elucidate that the lower phosphorylation of the α1GABAA receptor mediated by PKC neutralizes the seizure-promoting effects in Fmr1 KO mice and point to the potential therapeutic targets of α1GABAA agonists for the treatment of fragile X syndrome. PMID:26550246

  14. Quinpirole Increases Melatonin-Augmented Pentobarbital Sleep via Cortical ERK, p38 MAPK, and PKC in Mice.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sa-Ik; Kwon, Seung-Hwan; Hwang, Ji-Young; Ma, Shi-Xun; Seo, Jee-Yeon; Ko, Yong-Hyun; Kim, Hyoung-Chun; Lee, Seok-Yong; Jang, Choon-Gon

    2016-03-01

    Sleep, which is an essential part of human life, is modulated by neurotransmitter systems, including gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and dopamine signaling. However, the mechanisms that initiate and maintain sleep remain obscure. In this study, we investigated the relationship between melatonin (MT) and dopamine D2-like receptor signaling in pentobarbital-induced sleep and the intracellular mechanisms of sleep maintenance in the cerebral cortex. In mice, pentobarbital-induced sleep was augmented by intraperitoneal administration of 30 mg/kg MT. To investigate the relationship between MT and D2-like receptors, we administered quinpirole, a D2-like receptor agonist, to MT- and pentobarbital-treated mice. Quinpirole (1 mg/kg, i.p.) increased the duration of MT-augmented sleep in mice. In addition, locomotor activity analysis showed that neither MT nor quinpirole produced sedative effects when administered alone. In order to understand the mechanisms underlying quinpirole-augmented sleep, we measured protein levels of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and cortical protein kinases related to MT signaling. Treatment with quinpirole or MT activated extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), p38 MAPK, and protein kinase C (PKC) in the cerebral cortex, while protein kinase A (PKA) activation was not altered significantl. Taken together, our results show that quinpirole increases the duration of MT-augmented sleep through ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, and PKC signaling. These findingssuggest that modulation of D2-like receptors might enhance the effect of MT on sleep. PMID:26902082

  15. Protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylates human platelet inositol trisphosphate 5/sup +/-/-phosphomonoesterase (IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase) increasing phosphatase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, T.M.; Majerus, P.W.

    1986-05-01

    Phosphoinositide breakdown in response to thrombin stimulation of human platelets generates messenger molecules that activate PKC (diglyceride) and mobilize Ca/sup + +/ (inositol tris-phosphates). The water soluble products of phospholipase C-mediated metabolism of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-diphosphate are inositol 1,4,5 P/sub 3/ (IP/sub 3/) and inositol 1:2-cyclic 4,5 P/sub 3/ (cIP/sub 3/). A specific phosphatase, IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase, cleaves the 5 phosphate from IP/sub 3/ or cIP/sub 3/ to form IP/sub 2/ or cIP/sub 2/ and P/sub i/, none of which mobilizes Ca/sup + +/. Thus, the IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase may regulate cellular responses to IP/sub 3/ or cIP/sub 3/. The authors find that IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase isolated from human platelets is phosphorylated by rat brain PKC, resulting in a 4-fold increase in IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase activity. The authors phosphorylated IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase using ..gamma.. /sup 32/P-ATP and found that the labeled enzyme comigrated on SDS-PAGE with the previously described 40K protein phosphorylated in response to thrombin stimulation of platelets. The similarity of the PKC-phosphorylated IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase observed in vitro and the thrombin-stimulated phosphorylated 40K protein known to be phosphorylated by PKC in vivo, suggests that these proteins may be the same. These results suggest that platelet Ca/sup + +/ mobilization maybe regulated by PKC phosphorylation of the IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase and can explain the observation that phorbol ester treatment of intact human platelets results in decreased production of IP/sub 3/ and decreased Ca/sup + +/ mobilization upon subsequent thrombin addition.

  16. Upregulation of cAMP-specific PDE-4 activity following ligation of the TCR complex on thymocytes is blocked by selective inhibitors of protein kinase C and tyrosyl kinases.

    PubMed

    Michie, A M; Rena, G; Harnett, M M; Houslay, M D

    1998-01-01

    We have previously shown that the major cAMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) isoforms present in murine thymocytes are the cGMP-stimulated PDE activity (PDE-2) and the cAMP-specific PDE activity (PDE-4), and that these isoforms are differentially regulated following ligation of the TCR (Michie, A.M., Lobban, M. D., Mueller, T., Harnett, M. M., and Houslay, M.D. [1996] Cell. Signalling 8, 97-110). We show here that the anti-CD3-stimulated elevation in PDE-4 activity in murine thymocytes is dependent on protein tyrosine kinase and protein kinase C (PKC)-mediated signals as the TCR-coupled increase in PDE-4 activity can be abrogated by both the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, genistein, and the PKC selective inhibitors chelerythrine and staurosporine. Moreover, the PKC-activating phorbol ester, phorbol-12-myristate, 13-acetate (PMA) caused an increase in PDE-4 activity, similar to that observed in cells challenged with anti-CD3 monoclonal antibodies and which was not additive with cochallenge using anti-CD3 antibodies. Both the PMA- and the anti-CD3 antibody-mediated increases in PDE-4 activity were blocked by treatment with either cycloheximide or actinomycin D. Despite the upregulation of PDE-4 activity consequent to TCR ligation, intracellular cAMP levels increased on challenge of thymocytes with anti-CD3 antibody, indicating that adenylate cyclase activity was also increased by TCR ligation. It is suggested that the anti-CD3-mediated increase in PDE-4 activity was owing to a rapid PKC-dependent induction of PDE-4 activity following crosslinking of the TCR complex. This identifies "crosstalk" occurring between the PKA and PKC signaling pathways initiated by ligation of the antigen receptor in murine thymocytes. That both adenylate cyclase and PDE-4 activities were increased may indicate the presence of compartmentalized cAMP responses present in these cells. PMID:9515165

  17. Glutathione preconditioning attenuates Ac-LDL-induced macrophage apoptosis via protein kinase C-dependent Ac-LDL trafficking.

    PubMed

    Rosenson-Schloss, Rene S; Chnari, Evangelia; Brieva, Thomas A; Dang, Anh; Moghe, Prabhas V

    2005-01-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) incorporation into intimally resident vascular cells via scavenger receptors marks one of the early steps in atherosclerosis. Cellular apoptotic damage results from two major serial intracellular events: the binding and scavenger receptor-mediated uptake of oxidizable lipoproteins and the intracellular oxidative responses of accumulated lipoproteins. Most molecular approaches to prevent apoptotic damage have focused on singular events within the cascade of lipoprotein trafficking. To identify a multifocal strategy against LDL-induced apoptosis, we evaluated the role of cellular preconditioning by glutathione-ethyl ester (GSH-Et), a native redox regulator, in the prevention of the uptake and apoptotic effects of an oxidizable scavenger receptor-specific ligand, acetylated low-density lipoprotein (Ac-LDL). Our results indicate that GSH-Et-mediated protein kinase C (PKC) pathway modulation regulates Ac-LDL binding and incorporation into GSH-Et preconditioned cells and subsequently delays reactive oxygen intermediate generation and apoptotic conversion. The GSH-Et protective effects on apoptosis and Ac-LDL binding were reversed by calphostin C, a PKC inhibitor, and were accompanied by an increase in PKC phosphorylation. However, the rate of reactive oxygen intermediate accumulation was not increased following calphostin C treatment, suggesting that GSH-Et may play an important nonreactive oxygen-intermediate-based protective role in regulating apoptotic dynamics. Overall, we report on the novel role for GSH-Et preconditioning as a molecular strategy to limit lipoprotein entry into the cells, which presents a proactive modality to prevent cellular apoptosis in contrast with the prevalent antioxidant approaches that treat damage retroactively. PMID:15618124

  18. HDAC Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Olzscha, Heidi; Bekheet, Mina E; Sheikh, Semira; La Thangue, Nicholas B

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation in proteins is one of the most abundant posttranslational modifications in eukaryotic cells. The dynamic homeostasis of lysine acetylation and deacetylation is dictated by the action of histone acetyltransferases (HAT) and histone deacetylases (HDAC). Important substrates for HATs and HDACs are histones, where lysine acetylation generally leads to an open and transcriptionally active chromatin conformation. Histone deacetylation forces the compaction of the chromatin with subsequent inhibition of transcription and reduced gene expression. Unbalanced HAT and HDAC activity, and therefore aberrant histone acetylation, has been shown to be involved in tumorigenesis and progression of malignancy in different types of cancer. Therefore, the development of HDAC inhibitors (HDIs) as therapeutic agents against cancer is of great interest. However, treatment with HDIs can also affect the acetylation status of many other non-histone proteins which play a role in different pathways including angiogenesis, cell cycle progression, autophagy and apoptosis. These effects have led HDIs to become anticancer agents, which can initiate apoptosis in tumor cells. Hematological malignancies in particular are responsive to HDIs, and four HDIs have already been approved as anticancer agents. There is a strong interest in finding adequate biomarkers to predict the response to HDI treatment. This chapter provides information on how to assess HDAC activity in vitro and determine the potency of HDIs on different HDACs. It also gives information on how to analyze cellular markers following HDI treatment and to analyze tissue biopsies from HDI-treated patients. Finally, a protocol is provided on how to detect HDI sensitivity determinants in human cells, based on a pRetroSuper shRNA screen upon HDI treatment. PMID:27246222

  19. The thiol proteinase inhibitor E-64-d ameliorates amyloid-β-induced reduction of sAPPα secretion by reversing ceramide-induced protein kinase C down-regulation in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Fuminori; Nakajima, Tomoko; Ito, Masahiko

    2013-11-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), enhancing α-secretase processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) is an important pathway to decrease neurotoxic amyloid β (Aβ) secretion. The α-secretase is reported to be regulated by protein kinase C (PKC) and various endogenous proteins or cell surface receptors. In this report, we first examined whether Aβ reduces α-secretase activity, and showed that Aβ peptide 1-40 (0.001 and 0.01 μM) reduced the secretion of soluble amyloid precursor protein α (sAPPα) in carbachol-stimulated SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. E-64-d (3 μM), which is a potent calpain inhibitor that prevents PKC degradation, ameliorated the Aβ-induced reduction of sAPPα secretion. In addition, we observed that Aβ significantly enhanced ceramide production by activating neutral sphingomyelinase. The cell-permeable ceramide analog, C2-ceramide (1 μg/mL), also reduced sAPPα secretion, and in addition, E-64-d eliminated the observed decrease of sAPPα secretion. C2-ceramide induced down-regulation of PKC-α, -β1, and -β2 isozymes in SH-SY5Y cells. These findings suggest that ceramide may play an important role in sAPPα processing by modulating PKC activity.

  20. Myricitrin, a nitric oxide and protein kinase C inhibitor, exerts antipsychotic-like effects in animal models.

    PubMed

    Pereira, M; Siba, I P; Chioca, L R; Correia, D; Vital, M A B F; Pizzolatti, M G; Santos, A R S; Andreatini, R

    2011-08-15

    Myricitrin is a nitric oxide (NO) and protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor that has central nervous system activity, including anxiolytic-like action. Nitric oxide inhibitors blocked the behavioral effects of apomorphine, suggesting an antipsychotic-like effect. Furthermore, PKC inhibition reduced psychotic symptoms in acute mania patients and blocked amphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion, suggesting a potential antipsychotic-like effect. The present study evaluated the effects of myricitrin in animal models that assess antipsychotic-like effects (apomorphine-induced stereotypy and climbing and the paw test) and extrapyramidal side effects (catalepsy test and paw test). Olanzapine was used as a positive control. 7-Nitroindazole (7-NI), a NOS inhibitor, and l-arginine, a NO precursor, were used to evaluate nitrergic modulation, and tamoxifen was used to test the effect of PKC inhibition. In mice, myricitrin dose-dependently and olanzapine blocked the stereotypy and climbing induced by apomorphine at doses that did not induce catalepsy. 7-Nitroindazole also blocked apomorphine-induced stereotypy and climbing, which were reversed by l-arginine pretreatment. l-arginine only attenuated the effects of myricitrin on apomorphine's effects. Tamoxifen also blocked apomorphine-induced stereotypy and climbing. In the paw test in rats, myricitrin and olanzapine increased hindlimb retraction time at doses that did not affect forelimb reaction time, whereas haloperidol affected both parameters at the same dose. Myricitrin did not induce catalepsy in the bar test. Tamoxifen did not affect hindlimb retraction time or forelimb retraction time, whereas 7-NI significantly increased hindlimb reaction time. Thus, myricitrin exhibited an antipsychotic-like profile at doses that did not induce catalepsy, and this effect may be related to nitrergic action.

  1. Two Mechanisms Regulate Keratin K15 Expression In Keratinocytes: Role of PKC/AP-1 and FOXM1 Mediated Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Amrita; Teh, Muy-Teck; Hutchison, Iain L.; Wan, Hong; Leigh, Irene M.; Waseem, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Background Keratin 15 (K15) is a type I keratin that is used as a marker of stem cells. Its expression is restricted to the basal layer of stratified epithelia, and the bulge in hair follicles. However, in certain clinical situations including oral lichen planus, K15 is induced in suprabasal layers, which is inconsistent with the role of a stem cell marker. This study provides insights into the mechanisms of K15 expression in the basal and differentiating keratinocytes. Methodology/Principal Findings Human keratinocytes were differentiated by three different methods; suspension in methylcellulose, high cell density and treatment with phorbol ester. The expression of mRNA was determined by quantitative PCR and protein by western blotting and immunostaining. Keratinocytes in suspension suppressed β1-integrin expression, induced differentiation-specific markers and K15, whereas FOXM1 (a cell cycle regulated protein) and K14 were downregulated. Rescuing β1-integrin by either fibronectin or the arginine-glycine-aspartate peptide suppressed K15 but induced K14 and FOXM1 expression. Specific inhibition of PKCδ, by siRNA, and AP-1 transcription factor, by TAM67 (dominant negative c-Jun), suppressed K15 expression, suggesting that PKC/AP-1 pathway plays a role in the differentiation-specific expression of K15. The basal cell-specific K15 expression may involve FOXM1 because ectopic expression of the latter is known to induce K15. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we have identified a single FOXM1 binding motif in the K15 promoter. Conclusions/Significance The data suggests that K15 is induced during terminal differentiation mediated by the down regulation of β1-integrin. However, this cannot be the mechanism of basal/stem cell-specific K15 expression in stratified epithelia, because basal keratinocytes do not undergo terminal differentiation. We propose that there are two mechanisms regulating K15 expression in stratified epithelia; differentiation-specific involving

  2. 12-Deoxyphorbols Promote Adult Neurogenesis by Inducing Neural Progenitor Cell Proliferation via PKC Activation

    PubMed Central

    Geribaldi-Doldán, Noelia; Flores-Giubi, Eugenia; Murillo-Carretero, Maribel; García-Bernal, Francisco; Carrasco, Manuel; Macías-Sánchez, Antonio J.; Domínguez-Riscart, Jesús; Verástegui, Cristina; Hernández-Galán, Rosario

    2016-01-01

    Background: Neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders frequently occur after brain insults associated with neuronal loss. Strategies aimed to facilitate neuronal renewal by promoting neurogenesis constitute a promising therapeutic option to treat neuronal death-associated disorders. In the adult brain, generation of new neurons occurs physiologically throughout the entire life controlled by extracellular molecules coupled to intracellular signaling cascades. Proteins participating in these cascades within neurogenic regions constitute potential pharmacological targets to promote neuronal regeneration of injured areas of the central nervous system. Methodology: We have performed in vitro and in vivo approaches to determine neural progenitor cell proliferation to understand whether activation of kinases of the protein kinase C family facilitates neurogenesis in the adult brain. Results: We have demonstrated that protein kinase C activation by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate induces neural progenitor cell proliferation in vitro. We also show that the nontumorogenic protein kinase C activator prostratin exerts a proliferative effect on neural progenitor cells in vitro. This effect can be reverted by addition of the protein kinase C inhibitor G06850, demonstrating that the effect of prostratin is mediated by protein kinase C activation. Additionally, we show that prostratin treatment in vivo induces proliferation of neural progenitor cells within the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone. Finally, we describe a library of diterpenes with a 12-deoxyphorbol structure similar to that of prostratin that induces a stronger effect than prostratin on neural progenitor cell proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions: This work suggests that protein kinase C activation is a promising strategy to expand the endogenous neural progenitor cell population to promote neurogenesis and highlights the potential of 12-deoxyphorbols as pharmaceutical

  3. Ret-PCP2 colocalizes with PKC in a subset of primate ON cone bipolar cells

    PubMed Central

    Sulaiman, Pyroja; Fina, Marie; Feddersen, Rod; Vardi, Noga

    2010-01-01

    Purkinje cell protein 2 (PCP2), a member of the family of guanine dissociation inhibitors and a strong interactor with the G-protein subunit Gαo, localizes to retinal ON bipolar cells. The retina-specific splice variant of PCP2, Ret-PCP2, accelerates the light response of rod bipolar cells by modulating the mGluR6 transduction cascade. All ON cone bipolar cells express mGluR6 and Gα o, but only a subset expresses Ret-PCP2. Here we test the hypothesis that Ret-PCP2 contributes to shaping the various temporal bandwidths of ON cone bipolar cells in monkey retina. We found that the retinal splice variants in monkey and mouse are similar and longer than the cerebellar variants. Ret-PCP2 is strongly expressed by diffuse cone bipolar type 4 cells (DB4; marked with anti-PKCα), and weakly expressed by midget bipolar dendrites (labeled by antibodies against Gα o, Gγ13, or mGluR6). Ret-PCP2 is absent from diffuse cone bipolar type 6 (DB6; marked with anti-CD15) and blue cone bipolar cells (marked with anti-CCK precursor). Thus, cone bipolar cells that terminate in stratum 3 of the inner plexiform layer (DB4) express more Ret-PCP2 than those that terminate in stratum 3+4 (midget bipolar cells), and these in turn express more than those that terminate in stratum 5 (DB6 and blue cone bipolar cells). This expression pattern approximates the arborization of ganglion cells (GC) with different temporal band-widths: parasol GCs stratifying near stratum 3 are faster than midget GCs stratifying in strata 3+4, and these are probably faster than the sluggish GCs that arborize in stratum 5. PMID:20127818

  4. Short- and long-term memory are differentially affected by metabolic inhibitors given into hippocampus and entorhinal cortex.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, L A; Vianna, M; Barros, D M; Mello e Souza, T; Ardenghi, P; Sant'Anna, M K; Rodrigues, C; Medinam, J H; Izquierdo, I

    2000-03-01

    Rats were implanted with cannulae in the CA1 area of the dorsal hippocampus or in the entorhinal cortex and trained in one-trial step-down inhibitory avoidance. Two retention tests were carried out in each animal, one at 1.5 h to measure short-term memory (STM) and another at 24 h to measure long-term memory (LTM). The purpose of the present study was to screen the effect on STM of various drugs previously shown to affect LTM of this task when given posttraining at the same doses that were used here. The drugs and doses were the guanylyl cyclase inhibitor LY83583 (LY, 2.5 microMg), the inhibitor of Tyr-protein kinase at low concentrations and of protein kinase G (PKG) at higher concentrations lavendustin A (LAV, 0.1 and 0.5 microMg), the PKG inhibitor KT5823 (2.0 microMg), the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor staurosporin (STAU, 2.5 microMg), the inhibitor of calcium/ calmodulin protein kinase II (CaMKII) KN62 (3.6 microMg), the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor KT5720 (0.5 microMg), and the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MAPKK) inhibitor PD098059 (PD, 0.05 microMg). PD was dissolved in saline; all the other drugs were dissolved in 20% dimethyl sulfoxide. In all cases the drugs affected LTM as had been described in previous papers. The drugs affected STM and LTM differentially depending on the brain structure into which they were infused. STM was inhibited by KT5720, LY, and PD given into CA1 and by STAU and KT5720 given into the entorhinal cortex. PD given into the entorhinal cortex enhanced STM. LTM was inhibited by STAU, KN62, KT5720, KT5823, and LAV (0.5 microMg) given into CA1 and by STAU, KT5720, and PD given into the entorhinal cortex. The results suggest that STM and LTM involve different physiological mechanisms but are to an extent linked. STM appears to require PKA, guanylyl cyclase, and MAPKK activity in CA1 and PKA and PKC activity in the entorhinal cortex; MAPKK seems to play an inhibitory role in STM in the entorhinal cortex. In contrast

  5. The Aspergillus fumigatus pkcAG579R Mutant Is Defective in the Activation of the Cell Wall Integrity Pathway but Is Dispensable for Virulence in a Neutropenic Mouse Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Marina Campos; de Godoy, Krissia Franco; de Castro, Patrícia Alves; Hori, Juliana Issa; Bom, Vinícius Leite Pedro; Brown, Neil Andrew; da Cunha, Anderson Ferreira; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique; Malavazi, Iran

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an opportunistic human pathogen, which causes the life-threatening disease, invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. In fungi, cell wall homeostasis is controlled by the conserved Cell Wall Integrity (CWI) pathway. In A. fumigatus this signaling cascade is partially characterized, but the mechanisms by which it is activated are not fully elucidated. In this study we investigated the role of protein kinase C (PkcA) in this signaling cascade. Our results suggest that pkcA is an essential gene and is activated in response to cell wall stress. Subsequently, we constructed and analyzed a non-essential A. fumigatus pkcAG579R mutant, carrying a Gly579Arg substitution in the PkcA C1B regulatory domain. The pkcAG579R mutation has a reduced activation of the downstream Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase, MpkA, resulting in the altered expression of genes encoding cell wall-related proteins, markers of endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response. Furthermore, PkcAG579R is involved in the formation of proper conidial architecture and protection to oxidative damage. The pkcAG579R mutant elicits increased production of TNF-α and phagocytosis but it has no impact on virulence in a murine model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. These results highlight the importance of PkcA to the CWI pathway but also indicated that additional regulatory circuits may be involved in the biosynthesis and/or reinforcement of the A. fumigatus cell wall during infection. PMID:26295576

  6. Heat Shock Protein 27-Targeted Heptapeptide of the PKC{Delta} Catalytic V5 Region Sensitizes Tumors With Radio- and Chemoresistance

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hae-June; Kim, Eun-Ho; Seo, Woo Duck; Choi, Tae Hyun; Cheon, Gi-Jeong; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Lee, Yun-Sil

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: Previous data suggest that the PKC{delta} catalytic V5 (PKC{delta}-V5) heptapeptide (HEPT) (FEQFLDI) binds HSP27 and blocks HSP27-mediated radio- or chemoresistance. Here we investigated further the in vivo function of the PKC{delta}-V5 HEPT. Methods and Materials: Labeling of HEPT with Cy5.5 or fluorescein isothiocyanate was performed to evaluate in vitro or in vivo distribution of HEPT. A clonogenic survival assay, flow cytometry, and Western blotting of cleaved caspase-3 were performed to determine in vitro sensitization effects of HEPT plus ionizing radiation (IR) versus IR alone or those of HEPT plus cisplatin(Cis) versus Cis alone. A nude mouse xenografting system was also applied to detect in vivo sensitizing effects of HEPT. Results: HEPT efficiently bound to HSP27 and showed sensitization after combined treatment with IR versus treatment with Cis alone in NCI-H1299 lung carcinoma cells, with higher HSP27 expression, which was similar to that of combined treatment with IR or with Cis alone in NCI-H460 lung carcinoma cells with lower HSP27 expression. In vivo image analysis using Cy5.5-labeled HEPT showed that HEPT was retained in HSP27-overexpressing cancer cells after xenografting to nude mice. Combined treatment of HEPT with IR versus that with Cis alone in xenografted mice showed that HEPT increased radio- or chemosensitization in NCI-H1299 cells compared to that in mice xenografted with NCI-H460 cells. Conclusions: The novel PKC{delta}-V5 HEPT may help overcome HSP27-mediated radio- or chemoresistance.

  7. Par-aPKC-dependent and -independent mechanisms cooperatively control cell polarity, Hippo signaling, and cell positioning in 16-cell stage mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Hirate, Yoshikazu; Hirahara, Shino; Inoue, Ken-Ichi; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Niwa, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Hiroshi

    2015-10-01

    In preimplantation mouse embryos, the Hippo signaling pathway plays a central role in regulating the fates of the trophectoderm (TE) and the inner cell mass (ICM). In early blastocysts with more than 32 cells, the Par-aPKC system controls polarization of the outer cells along the apicobasal axis, and cell polarity suppresses Hippo signaling. Inactivation of Hippo signaling promotes nuclear accumulation of a coactivator protein, Yap, leading to induction of TE-specific genes. However, whether similar mechanisms operate at earlier stages is not known. Here, we show that slightly different mechanisms operate in 16-cell stage embryos. Similar to 32-cell stage embryos, disruption of the Par-aPKC system activated Hippo signaling and suppressed nuclear Yap and Cdx2 expression in the outer cells. However, unlike 32-cell stage embryos, 16-cell stage embryos with a disrupted Par-aPKC system maintained apical localization of phosphorylated Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin (p-ERM), and the effects on Yap and Cdx2 were weak. Furthermore, normal 16-cell stage embryos often contained apolar cells in the outer position. In these cells, the Hippo pathway was strongly activated and Yap was excluded from the nuclei, thus resembling inner cells. Dissociated blastomeres of 8-cell stage embryos form polar-apolar couplets, which exhibit different levels of nuclear Yap, and the polar cell engulfed the apolar cell. These results suggest that cell polarization at the 16-cell stage is regulated by both Par-aPKC-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Asymmetric cell division is involved in cell polarity control, and cell polarity regulates cell positioning and most likely controls Hippo signaling.

  8. Ectodomain cleavage of the EGF ligands HB-EGF, neuregulin1-beta, and TGF-alpha is specifically triggered by different stimuli and involves different PKC isoenzymes.

    PubMed

    Herrlich, Andreas; Klinman, Eva; Fu, Jonathan; Sadegh, Cameron; Lodish, Harvey

    2008-12-01

    Metalloproteinase cleavage of transmembrane proteins (ectodomain cleavage), including the epidermal growth factor (EGF) ligands heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF), neuregulin (NRG), and transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha), is important in many cellular signaling pathways and is disregulated in many diseases. It is largely unknown how physiological stimuli of ectodomain cleavage--hypertonic stress, phorbol ester, or activation of G-protein-coupled receptors [e.g., by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)]--are molecularly connected to metalloproteinase activation. To study this question, we developed a fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)- based assay that measures cleavage of EGF ligands in single living cells. EGF ligands expressed in mouse lung epithelial cells are differentially and specifically cleaved depending on the stimulus. Inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) isoenzymes or metalloproteinase inhibition by batimastat (BB94) showed that different regulatory signals are used by different stimuli and EGF substrates, suggesting differential effects that act on the substrate, the metalloproteinase, or both. For example, hypertonic stress led to strong cleavage of HB-EGF and NRG but only moderate cleavage of TGF-alpha. HB-EGF, NRG, and TGF-alpha cleavage was not dependent on PKC, and only HB-EGF and NRG cleavage were inhibited by BB94. In contrast, phorbol 12-myristate-13-acetate (TPA) -induced cleavage of HB-EGF, NRG, and TGF-alpha was dependent on PKC and sensitive to BB94 inhibition. LPA led to significant cleavage of only NRG and TGF-alpha and was inhibited by BB94; only LPA-induced NRG cleavage required PKC. Surprisingly, specific inhibition of atypical PKCs zeta and iota [not activated by diacylglycerol (DAG) and calcium] significantly enhanced TPA-induced NRG cleavage. Employed in a high-throughput cloning strategy, our cleavage assay should allow the identification of candidate proteins involved in signal transduction of different

  9. Silencing of PKC-α, TRPC1 or NF-κB expression attenuates cisplatin-induced ICAM-1 expression and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bodiga, Vijaya Lakshmi; Kudle, Madhukar Rao; Bodiga, Sreedhar

    2015-11-01

    Platinum-based chemotherapy has been associated with increased long-term cardiovascular events. Also noteworthy is the accumulating awareness of early vascular toxicity occurring at the time of chemotherapy or immediately thereafter. The objective of the study was to delineate the molecular mechanisms associated with the early vascular toxicity and test the molecular silencing approach towards attenuating the endothelial dysfunction during platinum-based chemotherapy. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were treated with varying concentrations of cisplatin (1.0-10.0μg/ml) or vehicle control (0.1% dimethyl sulfoxide) for monitoring the changes in Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) mRNA and protein expression viz. a viz. altered activation of protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms, transient receptor potential channel (TRPC) 1 expression, Nuclear factor 'kappa-light-chain-enhancer' of activated B-cells (NF-κB), Store Operated Ca(2+) Entry (SOCE) in cisplatin-induced endothelial permeability and adherence of the activated endothelial cells to human monocyte-like U937 cells. Silencing of either PKC-α, TRPC1 or p65 subunit of NF-κB, all resulted in significant alleviation of cisplatin-induced endothelial dysfunction. At concentrations ≥8μg/ml, cisplatin induced a significant increase in the expression of ICAM-1 mRNA as well as protein. This was mediated by changes in PKC-α membrane translocation, NF-κB activation, increased expression as well as phosphorylation of TRPC1 and enhanced SOCE, leading to hyperpermeability and leakage of albumin. Increased adherence of U937 monocytes to cisplatin-activated endothelial cells was evident. Cisplatin challenge activates PKC-α, which in turn phosphorylated TRPC1 resulting in enhanced Ca(2+) entry. Increased Ca(2+) flux is required for activation of NF-κB and ICAM-1 expression. Enhanced ICAM-1 expression promotes monocyte binding to endothelial cells and increased endothelial hyperpermeability. PMID:26300057

  10. Differential roles of PDK1- and PDK2-phosphorylation sites in the yeast AGC kinases Ypk1, Pkc1 and Sch9.

    PubMed

    Roelants, Françoise M; Torrance, Pamela D; Thorner, Jeremy

    2004-10-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pkh1 and Pkh2 (orthologues of mammalian protein kinase, PDK1) are functionally redundant. These kinases activate three AGC family kinases involved in the maintenance of cell wall integrity: Ypk1 and Ypk2, two closely related, functionally redundant enzymes (orthologues of mammalian protein kinase SGK), and Pkc1 (orthologue of mammalian protein kinase PRK2). Pkh1 and Pkh2 activate Ypk1, Ypk2 and Pkc1 by phosphorylating a Thr in a conserved sequence motif (PDK1 site) within the activation loop of these proteins. A fourth protein kinase involved in growth control and stress response, Sch9 (orthologue of mammalian protein kinase c-Akt/PKB), also carries the conserved activation loop motif. Like other AGC family kinases, Ypk1, Ypk2, Pkc1 and Sch9 also carry a second conserved sequence motif situated in a region C-terminal to the catalytic domain, called the hydrophobic motif (PDK2 site). Currently, there is still controversy surrounding the identity of the enzyme responsible for phosphorylating this second site and the necessity for phosphorylation at this site for in vivo function. Here, genetic and biochemical methods have been used to investigate the physiological consequences of phosphorylation at the PDK1 and PDK2 sites of Ypk1, Pkc1 and Sch9. It was found that phosphorylation at the PDK1 site in the activation loop is indispensable for the essential functions of all three kinases in vivo, whereas phosphorylation at the PDK2 motif plays a non-essential and much more subtle role in modulating the ability of these kinases to regulate the downstream processes in which they participate. PMID:15470109

  11. Effect of selective PKC isoform activation and inhibition on TNF-α-induced injury and apoptosis in human intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Q; Tepperman, B L

    2003-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of specific PKC isoforms in TNF-α mediated cellular damage using a human intestinal cell line (SCBN). TNF-α treatment induced a decrease in the extent of intestinal cellular viability as determined by a formazan-based assay and an increase in the apoptotic index as assessed by immunohistology. These changes in cellular integrity were found to be related to the degradation of I-κBα, mobilization of NF-κB and release of mitochondrial cytochrome c. TNF-α treatment also induced the activation of selective PKC isoforms which were associated with the decrease in cellular viability and an increase of cellular apoptosis. Nonselective PKC antagonists, such as GF109203X and Gö6976 as well as isoform-selective PKC-inhibiting peptides would reverse the cellular injury as well as reduce the degradation of I-κBα and mitochondrial cytochrome c release. These effects were most highly correlated with changes in PKCδ and ɛ primarily. Intestinal cellular injury could be induced by treating cells with agonists selective for PKCδ and ɛ mainly. In conclusion, this study has shown that TNF-α treatment can induce the activation of PKCδ and ɛ in the human intestinal cell line, SCBN, and this response is closely associated with an increase in cellular damage and apoptosis. PKCδ and ɛ primarily mediate the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c and degradation of I-κBα and hence mobilization of NF-κB, which are responsible for the pathway leading to cell injury. PMID:12967933

  12. AKAP79, PKC, PKA and PDE4 participate in a Gq-linked muscarinic receptor and adenylate cyclase 2 cAMP signalling complex

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jia X.; Cooper, Dermot M. F.

    2014-01-01

    AC2 (adenylate cyclase 2) is stimulated by activation of Gq-coupled muscarinic receptors through PKC (protein kinase C) to generate localized cAMP in HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293 cells. In the present study, we utilized a sensitive live-cell imaging technique to unravel the proteins that play essential roles in a Gq-coupled muscarinic receptor-mediated cAMP signalling complex. We reveal that, upon agonist binding to the Gq-coupled muscarinic receptor, AKAP79 (A-kinase-anchoring protein 79) recruits PKC to activate AC2 to produce cAMP. The cAMP formed is degraded by PDE4 (phosphodiesterase 4) activated by an AKAP-anchored PKA (protein kinase A). Calcineurin, a phosphatase bound to AKAP79, is not involved in this regulation. Overall, a transient cAMP increase is generated from AC2 by Gq-coupled muscarinic receptor activation, subject to sophisticated regulation through AKAP79, PKC, PDE4 and PKA, which significantly enhances acetylcholine-mediated signalling. PMID:23889134

  13. An Atypical PKC Directly Associates and Colocalizes at the Epithelial Tight Junction with ASIP, a Mammalian Homologue of Caenorhabditis elegans Polarity Protein PAR-3

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Yasushi; Hirose, Tomonori; Tamai, Yoko; Hirai, Syu-ichi; Nagashima, Yoji; Fujimoto, Toyoshi; Tabuse, Yo; Kemphues, Kenneth J.; Ohno, Shigeo

    1998-01-01

    Cell polarity is fundamental to differentiation and function of most cells. Studies in mammalian epithelial cells have revealed that the establishment and maintenance of cell polarity depends upon cell adhesion, signaling networks, the cytoskeleton, and protein transport. Atypical protein kinase C (PKC) isotypes PKCζ and PKCλ have been implicated in signaling through lipid metabolites including phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphates, but their physiological role remains elusive. In the present study we report the identification of a protein, ASIP (atypical PKC isotype–specific interacting protein), that binds to aPKCs, and show that it colocalizes with PKCλ to the cell junctional complex in cultured epithelial MDCKII cells and rat intestinal epithelia. In addition, immunoelectron microscopy revealed that ASIP localizes to tight junctions in intestinal epithelial cells. Furthermore, ASIP shows significant sequence similarity to Caenorhabditis elegans PAR-3. PAR-3 protein is localized to the anterior periphery of the one-cell embryo, and is required for the establishment of cell polarity in early embryos. ASIP and PAR-3 share three PDZ domains, and can both bind to aPKCs. Taken together, our results suggest a role for a protein complex containing ASIP and aPKC in the establishment and/or maintenance of epithelial cell polarity. The evolutionary conservation of the protein complex and its asymmetric distribution in polarized cells from worm embryo to mammalian-differentiated cells may mean that the complex functions generally in the organization of cellular asymmetry. PMID:9763423

  14. Ganoderma atrum polysaccharide evokes antitumor activity via cAMP-PKA mediated apoptotic pathway and down-regulation of Ca(2+)/PKC signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shenshen; Nie, Shaoping; Huang, Danfei; Huang, Jianqin; Feng, Yanling; Xie, Mingyong

    2014-06-01

    Ganoderma atrum polysaccharide (PSG-1) has been commonly suggested as a candidate for prevention and therapy of cancer. We investigated the antitumor effect and the underlying molecular mechanisms of PSG-1. The results showed that PSG-1 inhibited tumor growth and resulted in tumor cell apoptosis in vivo. Here, the data revealed that PSG-1 caused a markedly increase in cAMP and PKA activities, rather than cGMP and PKC. Moreover, the treatment of PSG-1 induced a dramatic increase in the protein level of PKA. In contrast, the expression of PKC and intracellular [Ca(2+)]i were inhibited. Our study also revealed that treatment with PSG-1 increased the spleen and thymus weights, lymphocyte proliferation and macrophage phagocytic activity in tumor-bearing mice. Taken together, we conclude that PSG-1 could inhibit the tumor growth, possibly in part by enhancing the induction of apoptosis through cAMP-PKA signaling pathway and down-regulation of Ca(2+)/PKC signal pathway, activating host immune function in S180-bearing mice.

  15. Palmitate induces tumor necrosis factor-alpha expression in C2C12 skeletal muscle cells by a mechanism involving protein kinase C and nuclear factor-kappaB activation.

    PubMed

    Jové, Mireia; Planavila, Anna; Sánchez, Rosa M; Merlos, Manuel; Laguna, Juan Carlos; Vázquez-Carrera, Manuel

    2006-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for increased expression of TNF-alpha in skeletal muscle cells in diabetic states are not well understood. We examined the effects of the saturated acid palmitate on TNF-alpha expression. Exposure of C2C12 skeletal muscle cells to 0.75 mm palmitate enhanced mRNA (25-fold induction, P < 0.001) and protein (2.5-fold induction) expression of the proinflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha. This induction was inversely correlated with a fall in GLUT4 mRNA levels (57% reduction, P < 0.001) and glucose uptake (34% reduction, P < 0.001). PD98059 and U0126, inhibitors of the ERK-MAPK cascade, partially prevented the palmitate-induced TNF-alpha expression. Palmitate increased nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activation and incubation of the cells with the NF-kappaB inhibitors pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and parthenolide partially prevented TNF-alpha expression. Incubation of palmitate-treated cells with calphostin C, a strong and specific inhibitor of protein kinase C (PKC), abolished palmitate-induced TNF-alpha expression, and restored GLUT4 mRNA levels. Palmitate treatment enhanced the expression of phospho-PKCtheta, suggesting that this PKC isoform was involved in the changes reported, and coincubation of palmitate-treated cells with the PKC inhibitor chelerythrine prevented the palmitate-induced reduction in the expression of IkappaBalpha and insulin-stimulated Akt activation. These findings suggest that enhanced TNF-alpha expression and GLUT4 down-regulation caused by palmitate are mediated through the PKC activation, confirming that this enzyme may be a target for either the prevention or the treatment of fatty acid-induced insulin resistance.

  16. Proton pump inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are medicines that work by reducing the amount of stomach acid made by ... Proton pump inhibitors are used to: Relieve symptoms of acid reflux, or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This ...

  17. Scaffold State Switching Amplifies, Accelerates, and Insulates Protein Kinase C Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Greenwald, Eric C.; Redden, John M.; Dodge-Kafka, Kimberly L.; Saucerman, Jeffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    Scaffold proteins localize two or more signaling enzymes in close proximity to their downstream effectors. A-kinase-anchoring proteins (AKAPs) are a canonical family of scaffold proteins known to bind protein kinase A (PKA) and other enzymes. Several AKAPs have been shown to accelerate, amplify, and specify signal transduction to dynamically regulate numerous cellular processes. However, there is little theory available to mechanistically explain how signaling on protein scaffolds differs from solution biochemistry. In our present study, we propose a novel kinetic mechanism for enzymatic reactions on protein scaffolds to explain these phenomena, wherein the enzyme-substrate-scaffold complex undergoes stochastic state switching to reach an active state. This model predicted anchored enzymatic reactions to be accelerated, amplified, and insulated from inhibition compared with those occurring in solution. We exploited a direct interaction between protein kinase C (PKC) and AKAP7α as a model to validate these predictions experimentally. Using a genetically encoded PKC activity reporter, we found that both the strength and speed of substrate phosphorylation were enhanced by AKAP7α. PKC tethered to AKAP7α was less susceptible to inhibition from the ATP-competitive inhibitor Gö6976 and the substrate-competitive inhibitor PKC 20-28, but not the activation-competitive inhibitor calphostin C. Model predictions and experimental validation demonstrated that insulation is a general property of scaffold tethering. Sensitivity analysis indicated that these findings may be applicable to many other scaffolds as well. Collectively, our findings provide theoretical and experimental evidence that scaffold proteins can amplify, accelerate, and insulate signal transduction. PMID:24302730

  18. Angiotensin II inhibits the ROMK-like small conductance K channel in renal cortical collecting duct during dietary potassium restriction.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yuan; Zavilowitz, Beth; Satlin, Lisa M; Wang, Wen-Hui

    2007-03-01

    Base-line urinary potassium secretion in the distal nephron is mediated by small conductance rat outer medullary K (ROMK)-like channels. We used the patch clamp technique applied to split-open cortical collecting ducts (CCDs) isolated from rats fed a normal potassium (NK) or low potassium (LK) diet to test the hypothesis that AngII directly inhibits ROMK channel activity. We found that AngII inhibited ROMK channel activity in LK but not NK rats in a dose-dependent manner. The AngII-induced reduction in channel activity was mediated by AT1 receptor (AT1R) binding, because pretreatment of CCDs with losartan but not PD123319 AT1 and AT2 receptor antagonists, respectively, blocked the response. Pretreatment of CCDs with U73122 and calphostin C, inhibitors of phospholipase C (PLC) and protein kinase C (PKC), respectively, abolished the AngII-induced decrease in ROMK channel activity, confirming a role of the PLC-PKC pathway in this response. Studies by others suggest that AngII stimulates an Src family protein-tyrosine kinase (PTK) via PKC-NADPH oxidase. PTK has been shown to regulate the ROMK channel. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase with diphenyliodonium abolished the inhibitory effect of AngII or the PKC activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate on ROMK channels. Suppression of PTK by herbimycin A significantly attenuated the inhibitory effect of AngII on ROMK channel activity. We conclude that AngII inhibits ROMK channel activity through PKC-, NADPH oxidase-, and PTK-dependent pathways under conditions of dietary potassium restriction.

  19. Dissection of signals controlling T cell function and activation: H7, an inhibitor of protein kinase C, blocks induction of primary T cell proliferation by suppressing interleukin (IL)2 receptor expression without affecting IL2 production.

    PubMed

    Hengel, H; Allig, B; Wagner, H; Heeg, K

    1991-07-01

    T cell activation induced via cross-linking of the T cell receptor (TcR) stimulates hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol to the second messengers diacylglycerol (DAG) and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3). DAG is necessary for the activation and function of protein kinase C (PKC) which is suggested to play a key role in the cascade of signal transduction when translocated from the cytosol to the cell membrane. In this report, we investigated responses of resting vs. activated Ly-2+ and L3T4+ T lymphocytes in the presence of the PKC inhibitor H7 [1-(5-isoquinolinylsulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine]. H7 inhibited the induction of primary T cell proliferation, while interleukin 2 (IL 2) production was fully retained. The effect of the PKC inhibitor on primary T cells depended on the type of ligand interacting with the TcR: increasing doses of concanavalin A or of immobilized anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody (mAb), but not of anti-V beta 8 or of anti-TcR alpha/beta mAb, partly overcame the blockade, indicating a differential signaling compared to the former stimuli. The blockade of T cell proliferation by H7 was not due to an inhibition of PKC translocation, but occurred even 4-8 h after T cell induction and correlated with a significant reduction of IL 2 receptor (IL 2R) expression. In contrast, the mRNA levels of IL 2R and the cellular proto-oncogenes c-fos and c-myc were not affected. On activated T cells, H7 neither blocked proliferation nor IL2R expression. Consequently, H7 dissects the signal resulting in T cell proliferation from those governing the triggering of other T cell functions, i.e. IL 2 production, during primary responses of Ly-2+ or L3T4+ murine T lymphocytes.

  20. Effects of activation of protein kinase C (PKC) on the hormonal stimulation and inhibition of cAMP formation in intact human platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, K.A.; Haslam, R.J.

    1986-05-01

    Washed platelets, labelled by preincubation with (/sup 3/H)adenine and (/sup 32/P)P/sub i/, were studied in the presence of indomethacin, phosphocreatine and creatine phosphokinase to block thromboxane A/sub 2/ formation and inhibitory effects of released ADP. Addition of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) or 1,2-dioctanoyl-glycerol (diC/sub 8/) decreased the initial rate of accumulation of (/sup 3/H)cAMP observed with PGE/sub 1/ and 3-isobutyl 1- methylxanthine. Maximal decreases of 31% (1 ..mu..M PMA) and 42% (100 ..mu..M diC/sub 8/) were obtained. Also, the inhibition of (/sup 3/H)cAMP formation by epinephrine (5 ..mu..M) was decreased from 68% to 16% and 31% by 1..mu..M PMA and 100 ..mu..M diC/sub 8/, respectively. The effects of increasing concentrations of PMA and diC/sub 8/ on the stimulation of (/sup 3/H)cAMp formation by PGE/sub 1/ and on the inhibitory action of epinephrine correlated with increases in /sup 32/P incorporation into the major substrate of PKC (P47) and into two other polypeptides (P41 and P20). These results suggested that activation of PKC might explain the failure of some aggregating agents (e.g. PAF and vasopressin) to inhibit adenylate cyclase in intact platelets, although they are inhibitory with isolated membranes. However, comparison of the effects of PMA and these aggregating agents on the phosphorylation of platelet polypeptides indicated that activation of PKC by aggregating agents is inadequate to block their inhibitory effects on adenylate cyclase, when PGE/sub 1/ is present.

  1. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) ligand release by substrate-specific a disintegrin and metalloproteases (ADAMs) involves different protein kinase C (PKC) isoenzymes depending on the stimulus.

    PubMed

    Dang, Michelle; Dubbin, Karen; D'Aiello, Antonio; Hartmann, Monika; Lodish, Harvey; Herrlich, Andreas

    2011-05-20

    The dysregulation of EGF family ligand cleavage has severe consequences for the developing as well as the adult organism. Therefore, their production is highly regulated. The limiting step is the ectodomain cleavage of membrane-bound precursors by one of several a disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM) metalloproteases, and understanding the regulation of cleavage is an important goal of current research. We have previously reported that in mouse lung epithelial cells, the pro-EGF ligands TGFα, neuregulin 1β (NRG), and heparin-binding EGF are differentially cleaved depending on the cleavage stimulus (Herrlich, A., Klinman, E., Fu, J., Sadegh, C., and Lodish, H. (2008) FASEB J.). In this study in mouse embryonic fibroblasts that lack different ADAMs, we show that induced cleavage of EGF ligands can involve the same substrate-specific metalloprotease but does require different stimulus-dependent signaling pathways. Cleavage was stimulated by phorbol ester (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), a mimic of diacylglycerol and PKC activator), hypertonic stress, lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-induced G protein-coupled receptor activation, or by ionomycin-induced intracellular calcium release. Although ADAMs showed substrate preference (ADAM17, TGFα and heparin-binding EGF; and ADAM9, NRG), substrate cleavage differed substantially with the stimulus, and cleavage of the same substrate depended on the presence of different, sometimes multiple, PKC isoforms. For instance, classical PKC was required for TPA-induced but not hypertonic stress-induced cleavage of all EGF family ligands. Inhibition of PKCζ enhanced NRG release upon TPA stimulation, but it blocked NRG release in response to hypertonic stress. Our results suggest a model in which substantial regulation of ectodomain cleavage occurs not only on the metalloprotease level but also on the level of the substrate or of a third protein.

  2. African Swine Fever Virus Blocks the Host Cell Antiviral Inflammatory Response through a Direct Inhibition of PKC-θ-Mediated p300 Transactivation▿

    PubMed Central

    Granja, Aitor G.; Sánchez, Elena G.; Sabina, Prado; Fresno, Manuel; Revilla, Yolanda

    2009-01-01

    During a viral infection, reprogramming of the host cell gene expression pattern is required to establish an adequate antiviral response. The transcriptional coactivators p300 and CREB binding protein (CBP) play a central role in this regulation by promoting the assembly of transcription enhancer complexes to specific promoters of immune and proinflammatory genes. Here we show that the protein A238L encoded by African swine fever virus counteracts the host cell inflammatory response through the control of p300 transactivation during the viral infection. We demonstrate that A238L inhibits the expression of the inflammatory regulators cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) by preventing the recruitment of p300 to the enhanceosomes formed on their promoters. Furthermore, we report that A238L inhibits p300 activity during the viral infection and that its amino-terminal transactivation domain is essential in the A238L-mediated inhibition of the inflammatory response. Importantly, we found that the residue serine 384 of p300 is required for the viral protein to accomplish its inhibitory function and that ectopically expressed PKC-θ completely reverts this inhibition, thus indicating that this signaling pathway is disrupted by A238L during the viral infection. Furthermore, we show here that A238L does not affect PKC-θ enzymatic activity, but the molecular mechanism of this viral inhibition relies on the lack of interaction between PKC-θ and p300. These findings shed new light on how viruses alter the host cell antiviral gene expression pattern through the blockade of the p300 activity, which represents a new and sophisticated viral mechanism to evade the inflammatory and immune defense responses. PMID:19004945

  3. PKC-mediated inhibitory feedback of the cholecystokinin 1 receptor controls the shape of oscillatory Ca²⁺ signals.

    PubMed

    Willems, Peter H G M; Pahle, Jürgen; Stalpers, Xenia L; Mugahid, Douaa; Nikolaew, Alexander; Koopman, Werner J H; Kummer, Ursula

    2015-06-01

    Translation of extracellular hormonal input into cellular responses is often mediated by repetitive increases in cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+) ]c ). Amplitude, duration and frequency of these so-called [Ca(2+) ]c oscillations then carry information about the nature and concentration of the extracellular signalling molecule. At present, there are different hypotheses concerning the induction and control of these oscillations. Here, we investigated the role of agonist-induced receptor phosphorylation in this process using Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing a variant of the cholecystokinin 1 receptor (CCK1R) lacking the four consensus sites for protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation and deficient in CCK-induced receptor phosphorylation (CCK1R-mt cells). In the presence of cholecystokinin-(26-33)-peptide amide (CCK-8), these cells displayed Ca(2+) oscillations with a much more pronounced bursting dynamics rather than the dominant spiking dynamics observed in Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing the wild-type CCK1R. The bursting behaviour returned to predominantly spiking behaviour following removal of extracellular Ca(2+) , suggesting that CCK-8-induced, PKC-mediated CCK1R phosphorylation inhibits Ca(2+) influx across the plasma membrane. To gain mechanistic insight into the underlying mechanism we developed a mathematical model able to reproduce the experimental observations. From the model we conclude that binding of CCK-8 to the CCK1R leads to activation of PKC which subsequently phosphorylates the receptor to inhibit the receptor-mediated influx of Ca(2+) across the plasma membrane. Receptor-specific differences in this feedback mechanism may, at least in part, explain the observation that different agonists evoke [Ca(2+) ]c oscillations with different kinetics in the same cell type. PMID:25779353

  4. Impact of Rosuvastatin Treatment on HDL-Induced PKC-βII and eNOS Phosphorylation in Endothelial Cells and Its Relation to Flow-Mediated Dilatation in Patients with Chronic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Winzer, Ephraim B; Gaida, Pauline; Höllriegel, Robert; Fischer, Tina; Linke, Axel; Schuler, Gerhard; Adams, Volker; Erbs, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Background. Endothelial function is impaired in chronic heart failure (CHF). Statins upregulate endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and improve endothelial function. Recent studies demonstrated that HDL stimulates NO production due to eNOS phosphorylation at Ser(1177), dephosphorylation at Thr(495), and diminished phosphorylation of PKC-βII at Ser(660). The aim of this study was to elucidate the impact of rosuvastatin on HDL mediated eNOS and PKC-βII phosphorylation and its relation to endothelial function. Methods. 18 CHF patients were randomized to 12 weeks of rosuvastatin or placebo. At baseline, 12 weeks, and 4 weeks after treatment cessation we determined lipid levels and isolated HDL. Human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) were incubated with isolated HDL and phosphorylation of eNOS and PKC-βII was evaluated. Flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) was measured at the radial artery. Results. Rosuvastatin improved FMD significantly. This effect was blunted after treatment cessation. LDL plasma levels were reduced after rosuvastatin treatment whereas drug withdrawal resulted in significant increase. HDL levels remained unaffected. Incubation of HAEC with HDL had no impact on phosphorylation of eNOS or PKC-βII. Conclusion. HDL mediated eNOS and PKC-βII phosphorylation levels in endothelial cells do not change with rosuvastatin in CHF patients and do not mediate the marked improvement in endothelial function. PMID:27563480

  5. Impact of Rosuvastatin Treatment on HDL-Induced PKC-βII and eNOS Phosphorylation in Endothelial Cells and Its Relation to Flow-Mediated Dilatation in Patients with Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Gaida, Pauline; Höllriegel, Robert; Fischer, Tina; Linke, Axel; Schuler, Gerhard; Adams, Volker; Erbs, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Background. Endothelial function is impaired in chronic heart failure (CHF). Statins upregulate endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and improve endothelial function. Recent studies demonstrated that HDL stimulates NO production due to eNOS phosphorylation at Ser1177, dephosphorylation at Thr495, and diminished phosphorylation of PKC-βII at Ser660. The aim of this study was to elucidate the impact of rosuvastatin on HDL mediated eNOS and PKC-βII phosphorylation and its relation to endothelial function. Methods. 18 CHF patients were randomized to 12 weeks of rosuvastatin or placebo. At baseline, 12 weeks, and 4 weeks after treatment cessation we determined lipid levels and isolated HDL. Human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) were incubated with isolated HDL and phosphorylation of eNOS and PKC-βII was evaluated. Flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) was measured at the radial artery. Results. Rosuvastatin improved FMD significantly. This effect was blunted after treatment cessation. LDL plasma levels were reduced after rosuvastatin treatment whereas drug withdrawal resulted in significant increase. HDL levels remained unaffected. Incubation of HAEC with HDL had no impact on phosphorylation of eNOS or PKC-βII. Conclusion. HDL mediated eNOS and PKC-βII phosphorylation levels in endothelial cells do not change with rosuvastatin in CHF patients and do not mediate the marked improvement in endothelial function. PMID:27563480

  6. Transforming growth factor-beta1-induced activation of the Raf-MEK-MAPK signaling pathway in rat lung fibroblasts via a PKC-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Axmann, A; Seidel, D; Reimann, T; Hempel, U; Wenzel, K W

    1998-08-19

    In fibroblasts transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) regulates cell proliferation and turnover of macromolecular components of the extracellular matrix. Here, intracellular signaling events in growth-inhibited embryonic rat lung fibroblasts (RFL-6) upon stimulation with TGF-beta1 were investigated. TGF-beta1 rapidly induced the activation of c-Raf-1, MEK-1, and MAPK p42 and p44. The activation of this pathway by TGF-beta1 did not depend on autocrine platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) or basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Inhibition of the binding of growth factors to their tyrosine kinase receptors did not affect MAPK activation by TGF-beta1. Ras activation by TGF-beta1 was significantly lower compared to the activation by PDGF or bFGF. The intracellular transduction of the TGF-beta1 signal was completely suppressed by depletion or inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC). It is shown that calcium-dependent isoforms of PKC are required for MAPK activation by TGF-beta1. PMID:9712718

  7. Structural insight with mutational impact on tyrosinase and PKC-β interaction from Homo sapiens: Molecular modeling and docking studies for melanogenesis, albinism and increased risk for melanoma.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Arundhati; Ray, Sujay

    2016-10-30

    Human tyrosinase, is an important protein for biosynthetic pathway of melanin. It was studied to be phosphorylated and activated by protein kinase-C, β-subunit (PKC-β) through earlier experimentations with in vivo evidences. Documentation documents that mutation in two essentially vital serine residues in C-terminal end of tyrosinase leads to albinism. Due to the deficiency of protective shield like enzyme; melanin, albinos are at an increased peril for melanoma and other skin cancers. So, computational and residue-level insight including a mutational exploration with evolutionary importance into this mechanism lies obligatory for future pathological and therapeutic developments. Therefore, functional tertiary models of the relevant proteins were analyzed after satisfying their stereo-chemical features. Evolutionarily paramount residues for the activation of tyrosinase were perceived via multiple sequence alignment phenomena. Mutant-type tyrosinase protein (S98A and S102A) was thereby modeled, maintaining the wild-type proteins' functionality. Furthermore, this present comparative study discloses the variation in the stable residual participation (for mutant-type and wild-type tyrosinase-PKCβ complex). Mainly, an increased number of polar negatively charged residues from the wild-type tyrosinase participated with PKC-β, predominantly. Fascinatingly supported by evaluation of statistical significances, mutation even led to a destabilizing impact in tyrosinase accompanied by conformational switches with a helix-to-coil transition in the mutated protein. Even the allosteric sites in the protein got poorly hampered upon mutation leading to weaker tendency for binding partners to interact.

  8. Allium cepa Extract and Quercetin Protect Neuronal Cells from Oxidative Stress via PKC-ε Inactivation/ERK1/2 Activation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathophysiology of various neurologic disorders. Allium cepa extract (ACE) and their main flavonoid component quercetin (QCT) possess antioxidant activities and protect neurons from oxidative stress. We investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms, particularly those linked to the antioxidant effects of the ACE. Primary cortical neuronal cells derived from mouse embryos were preincubated with ACE or QCT for 30 min and exposed to L-buthionine sulfoximine for 4~24 h. We found that ACE and QCT significantly decreased neuronal death and the ROS increase induced by L-buthionine-S, R-sulfoximine (BSO) in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, ACE and QCT activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), leading to downregulation of protein kinase C-ε (PKC-ε) in BSO-stimulated neuronal cells. In addition, ACE and QCT decreased the phosphorylated levels of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. Our results provide new insight into the protective mechanism of ACE and QCT against oxidative stress in neuronal cells. The results suggest that the inactivation of PKC-ε induced by phosphorylating ERK1/2 is responsible for the neuroprotective effect of ACE and QCT against BSO-induced oxidative stress. PMID:27668036

  9. 6-Gingerol inhibits ROS and iNOS through the suppression of PKC-{alpha} and NF-{kappa}B pathways in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated mouse macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Tzung-Yan; Lee, Ko-Chen; Chen, Shih-Yuan; Chang, Hen-Hong

    2009-04-24

    Inflammation is involved in numerous diseases, including chronic inflammatory diseases and the development of cancer. Many plants possess a variety of biological activities, including antifungal, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory activities. However, our understanding of the anti-inflammatory effects of 6-gingerol is very limited. We used lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages as a model of inflammation to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of 6-gingerol, which contains phenolic structure. We found that 6-gingerol exhibited an anti-inflammatory effect. 6-Gingerol could decrease inducible nitric oxide synthase and TNF-{alpha} expression through suppression of I-{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation, NF-{kappa}B nuclear activation and PKC-{alpha} translocation, which in turn inhibits Ca{sup 2+} mobilization and disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Here, we demonstrate that 6-gingerol acts as an anti-inflammatory agent by blocking NF-{kappa}B and PKC signaling, and may be developed as a useful agent for the chemoprevention of cancer or inflammatory diseases.

  10. Allium cepa Extract and Quercetin Protect Neuronal Cells from Oxidative Stress via PKC-ε Inactivation/ERK1/2 Activation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathophysiology of various neurologic disorders. Allium cepa extract (ACE) and their main flavonoid component quercetin (QCT) possess antioxidant activities and protect neurons from oxidative stress. We investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms, particularly those linked to the antioxidant effects of the ACE. Primary cortical neuronal cells derived from mouse embryos were preincubated with ACE or QCT for 30 min and exposed to L-buthionine sulfoximine for 4~24 h. We found that ACE and QCT significantly decreased neuronal death and the ROS increase induced by L-buthionine-S, R-sulfoximine (BSO) in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, ACE and QCT activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), leading to downregulation of protein kinase C-ε (PKC-ε) in BSO-stimulated neuronal cells. In addition, ACE and QCT decreased the phosphorylated levels of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. Our results provide new insight into the protective mechanism of ACE and QCT against oxidative stress in neuronal cells. The results suggest that the inactivation of PKC-ε induced by phosphorylating ERK1/2 is responsible for the neuroprotective effect of ACE and QCT against BSO-induced oxidative stress.

  11. Binding of FGF2 to FGFR2 in an autocrine mode in trophectoderm cells is indispensable for mouse blastocyst formation through PKC-p38 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing; Zhang, Dan; Yu, Ying; Zhang, Run-Ju; Hu, Xiao-Ling; Huang, He-Feng; Lu, Yong-Chao

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGF1, FGF2 and FGF4) and fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFR1, FGFR2, FGFR3 and FGFR4) have been reported to be expressed in preimplantation embryos and be required for their development. However, the functions of these molecules in trophectoderm cells (TEs) that lead to the formation of the blastocyst as well as the underlying mechanism have not been elucidated. The present study has demonstrated for the first time that endogenous FGF2 secreted by TEs can regulate protein expression and distribution in TEs via the FGFR2-mediated activation of PKC and p38, which are important for the development of expanded blastocysts. This finding provides the first explanation for the long-observed phenomenon that only high concentrations of exogenous FGFs have effects on embryonic development, but in vivo the amount of endogenous FGFs are trace. Besides, the present results suggest that FGF2/FGFR2 may act in an autocrine fashion and activate the downstream PKC/p38 pathway in TEs during expanded blastocyst formation. PMID:26378412

  12. Novel corrosion inhibitor technology

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Ven, P.; Fritz, P.; Pellet, R.

    1999-11-01

    A novel, patented corrosion inhibitor technology has been identified for use in heat transfer applications such as automotive and heavy-duty coolant. The new technology is based on a low-toxic, virtually depletion-free carboxylic acid corrosion inhibitor package that performs equally well in mono ethylene glycol and in less toxic propylene glycol coolants. An aqueous inhibitor concentrate is available to provide corrosion protection where freezing protection is not an issue. In the present paper, this inhibitor package is evaluated in the different base fluids: mono ethylene glycol, mono propylene glycol and water. Results are obtained in both standardized and specific corrosion tests as well as in selected field trials. These results indicate that the inhibitor package remains effective and retains the benefits previously identified in automotive engine coolant applications: excellent corrosion protection under localized conditions, general corrosion conditions as well as at high temperature.

  13. Extracellular simian virus 40 induces an ERK/MAP kinase-independent signalling pathway that activates primary response genes and promotes virus entry.

    PubMed

    Dangoria, N S; Breau, W C; Anderson, H A; Cishek, D M; Norkin, L C

    1996-09-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) binding to growth-arrested cells activated an intracellular signalling pathway that induced the up-regulation of the primary response genes c-myc, c-jun and c-sis within 30 min and of JE within 90 min. The up-regulation of the primary response genes occurred in the presence of cycloheximide and when UV-inactivated SV40 was adsorbed to cells. SV40 binding did not activate Raf or mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP/ERK1), or mobilize intracellular Ca2+. The SV40-induced up-regulation of c-myc and c-jun was blocked by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, genistein, and by the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, calphostin C, but not by expression of the MAP kinase-specific phosphatase, MKP-1. These results suggest that the SV40-induced signalling pathway includes the activities of a tyrosine kinase and a Ca(2+)-independent isoform of PKC, but not of Raf or MAP kinase. Finally, SV40 infectious entry into cells was specifically and reversibly blocked by genistein.

  14. Cadmium exposure activates the ERK signaling pathway leading to altered osteoblast gene expression and apoptotic death in Saos-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Arbon, Kate S.; Christensen, Cody M.; Harvey, Wendy A.; Heggland, Sara J.

    2012-01-01

    Recent reports of cadmium in electronic waste and jewelry have increased public awareness regarding this toxic metal. Human exposure to cadmium is associated with the development of osteoporosis. We previously reported cadmium induces apoptosis in human tumor-derived Saos-2 osteoblasts. In this study, we examine the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) and protein kinase C (PKC) pathways in cadmium-induced apoptosis and altered osteoblast gene expression. Saos-2 osteoblasts were cultured in the presence or absence of 10 μM CdCl2 for 2–72 hours. We detected significant ERK activation in response to CdCl2 and pretreatment with the ERK inhibitor PD98059 attenuated cadmium-induced apoptosis. However, PKCα activation was not observed after exposure to CdCl2 and pretreatment with the PKC inhibitor, Calphostin C, was unable to rescue cells from cadmium-induced apoptosis. Gene expression studies were conducted using qPCR. Cells exposed to CdCl2 exhibited a significant decrease in the bone-forming genes osteopontin (OPN) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) mRNA. In contrast, SOST, whose protein product inhibits bone formation, significantly increased in response to CdCl2. Pretreatment with PD98059 had a recovery effect on cadmium-induced changes in gene expression. This research demonstrates cadmium can directly inhibit osteoblasts via ERK signaling pathway and identifies SOST as a target for cadmium-induced osteotoxicity. PMID:22019892

  15. Potentiation of antileukemic therapies by the dual PI3K/PDK-1 inhibitor, BAG956: effects on BCR-ABL– and mutant FLT3-expressing cells

    PubMed Central

    Weisberg, Ellen; Banerji, Lolita; Wright, Renee D.; Barrett, Rosemary; Ray, Arghya; Moreno, Daisy; Catley, Laurence; Jiang, Jingrui; Hall-Meyers, Elizabeth; Sauveur-Michel, Maira; Stone, Richard; Galinsky, Ilene; Fox, Edward; Kung, Andrew L.

    2008-01-01

    Mediators of PI3K/AKT signaling have been implicated in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Studies have shown that inhibitors of PI3K/AKT signaling, such as wortmannin and LY294002, are able to inhibit CML and AML cell proliferation and synergize with targeted tyrosine kinase inhi-bitors. We investigated the ability of BAG956, a dual PI3K/PDK-1 inhibitor, to be used in combination with inhibitors of BCR-ABL and mutant FLT3, as well as with the mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, and the rapamycin derivative, RAD001. BAG956 was shown to block AKT phosphorylation induced by BCR-ABL–, and induce apoptosis of BCR-ABL–expressing cell lines and patient bone marrow cells at concentrations that also inhibit PI3K signaling. Enhancement of the inhibitory effects of the tyrosine kinase inhibitors, imatinib and nilotinib, by BAG956 was demonstrated against BCR-ABL expressing cells both in vitro and in vivo. We have also shown that BAG956 is effective against mutant FLT3-expressing cell lines and AML patient bone marrow cells. Enhancement of the inhibitory effects of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, PKC412, by BAG956 was demonstrated against mutant FLT3-expressing cells. Finally, BAG956 and rapamycin/RAD001 were shown to combine in a nonantagonistic fashion against BCR-ABL– and mutant FLT3-expressing cells both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:18184863

  16. The STAT5 Inhibitor Pimozide Displays Efficacy in Models of Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Driven by FLT3 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Erik A.; Walker, Sarah R.; Xiang, Michael; Weisberg, Ellen; Bar-Natan, Michal; Barrett, Rosemary; Liu, Suiyang; Kharbanda, Surender; Christie, Amanda L.; Nicolais, Maria; Griffin, James D.; Stone, Richard M.; Kung, Andrew L.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of the transcription factor STAT5 is essential for the pathogenesis of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) containing the FLT3 internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutation. FLT3 ITD is a constitutively active tyrosine kinase that drives the activation of STAT5, leading to the growth and survival of AML cells. Although there has been some success in identifying tyrosine kinase inhibitors that block the function of FLT3 ITD, there remains a continued need for effective treatment of this disease. We have identified the psychotropic drug pimozide as an effective inhibitor of STAT5 function. Pimozide inhibits the tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT5, leading to the death of AML cells through the induction of apoptosis. Pimozide shows a combinatorial effect with the tyrosine kinase inhibitors midostaurin (PKC412) and sunitinib in the inhibition of STAT5 tyrosine phosphorylation and the induction of apoptosis. Significantly, pimozide reduces the tumor burden in a mouse model of FLT3-driven AML. Therefore, identifying STAT5 inhibitors may provide a new avenue for the treatment of AML, and these may be effective alone or in combination with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. PMID:23264850

  17. Artocarpol A stimulation of superoxide anion generation in neutrophils involved the activation of PLC, PKC and p38 mitogen-activated PK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Lin, Ruey-Hseng; Tsao, Lo-Ti; Lin, Chun-Nan; Wang, Jih-Pyang

    2005-06-01

    1 Artocarpol A (ART), a natural phenolic compound isolated from Artocarpus rigida, stimulated a slow onset and long-lasting superoxide anion generation in rat neutrophils, whereas only slightly activated the NADPH oxidase in a cell-free system. 2 Pretreatment of neutrophils with pertussis toxin (1 microg ml(-1)), 50 microM 2'-amino-3'-methoxyflavone (PD 98059), or 1 microM 1,4-diamino-2,3-dicyano-1,4-bis(2-aminophenylthio)butadiene (U0126) had no effect on ART-stimulated superoxide anion generation. ART (30 microM) did not induce extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation. 3 4-(4-Fluorophenyl)-2-(4-methylsulfinylphenyl)-5-(4-pyridyl)-1H-imidazole (SB 203580) markedly attenuated the ART-stimulated superoxide anion generation (IC50 value of 4.3+/-0.3 microM). Moreover, ART induced p38 mitogen-activated PK (MAPK) phosphorylation and activation. 4 The superoxide anion generation in response to ART was also substantially inhibited in a Ca2+-free medium, and by pretreatment with 1 microM 1-[6-((17beta-3-methoxyestra-1,3,5(10)-trien-17-yl)amino)hexyl]-1H-pyrrole-2,5-dione (U-73122) and 100 microM 2-aminoethyldiphenyl borate (2-APB). ART (30 microM) stimulated the [Ca2+]i elevation in the presence or absence of external Ca2+, and also increased the D-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate formation. 5 2-[1-(3-Dimethylaminopropyl)-1H-indol-3-yl]-3-(1H-indol-3-yl)-maleimide (GF 109203X) greatly inhibited the ART-stimulated superoxide anion generation (IC50 value of 7.8+/-1.0 nM). ART increased the recruitment of PKC-alpha, -betaI, and -betaII to the plasma membrane of neutrophils, and stimulated Ca2+-dependent PKC activation in the cytosol preparation. 6 ART induced the phosphorylation of p47phox, which was attenuated by GF 109203X. Moreover, ART evoked the membrane association of p47(phox), which was inhibited by GF 109203X and SB 203580. 7 These results indicate that the ART stimulation of superoxide anion generation involved the activation of p38 MAPK, PLC/Ca2

  18. Protein kinase C inhibitor sotrastaurin selectively inhibits the growth of CD79 mutant diffuse large B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Tara L; Tang, Huaping; Ratsch, Boris A; Enns, Andreas; Loo, Alice; Chen, Liqing; Lenz, Peter; Waters, Nigel J; Schuler, Walter; Dörken, Bernd; Yao, Yung-Mae; Warmuth, Markus; Lenz, Georg; Stegmeier, Frank

    2011-04-01

    The activated B-cell-like (ABC) subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) correlates with poor prognosis. The ABC subtype of DLBCL is associated with constitutive activation of the NF-κB pathway, and oncogenic lesions have been identified in its regulators, including CARD11/CARMA1 (caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 11), A20/TNFAIP3, and CD79A/B. In this study, we offer evidence of therapeutic potential for the selective PKC (protein kinase C) inhibitor sotrastaurin (STN) in preclinical models of DLBCL. A significant fraction of ABC DLBCL cell lines exhibited strong sensitivity to STN, and we found that the molecular nature of NF-κB pathway lesions predicted responsiveness. CD79A/B mutations correlated with STN sensitivity, whereas CARD11 mutations rendered ABC DLBCL cell lines insensitive. Growth inhibitory effects of PKC inhibition correlated with NF-κB pathway inhibition and were mediated by induction of G₁-phase cell-cycle arrest and/or cell death. We found that STN produced significant antitumor effects in a mouse xenograft model of CD79A/B-mutated DLBCL. Collectively, our findings offer a strong rationale for the clinical evaluation of STN in ABC DLBCL patients who harbor CD79 mutations also illustrating the necessity to stratify DLBCL patients according to their genetic abnormalities.

  19. Pathway modulators and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Smith, John A

    2009-07-01

    Inhibitors of specific cellular pathways are useful for investigating the roles of proteins of unknown function, and for selectively inhibiting a protein in complex pathways to uncover its relationships to other proteins in this and other interacting pathways. This appendix provides links to Web sites that describe cellular processes and pathways along with the various classes of inhibitors, numerous references, downloadable diagrams, and technical tips.

  20. Update on TNF Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kerdel, Francisco A

    2016-06-01

    The introduction of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibitors dramatically improved the management of psoriasis. Some newer or investigational biologics with different mechanisms of action have demonstrated noninferiority or superiority to etanercept, the first self-injectable anti-TNF-α agent to become available in the United States. Nonetheless, TNF-α inhibitors are likely to remain a mainstay of therapy for many years.

  1. Synthetic inhibitors of elastase.

    PubMed

    Edwards, P D; Bernstein, P R

    1994-03-01

    For more than two decades investigators around the world, in both academic and industrial institutions, have been developing inhibitors of human neutrophil elastase. A number of very elegant and insightful strategies have been reported. In the case of reversible peptidic inhibitors, this has resulted in the identification of some extremely potent compounds with dissociation constants in the 10(-11) M range. This is quite an accomplishment considering that these low molecular-weight inhibitors are only tri- and tetrapeptides. In the case of the heterocyclic-based inhibitors, the challenge of balancing the heterocycle's inherent reactivity and aqueous stability with the stability of the enzyme-inhibitor adduct has been meet by either using a latent, reactive functionality which is only activated within the enzyme, or by incorporating features which selectively obstruct deacylation but have little effect on the enzyme acylation step. The underlying goal of this research has been the identification of agents to treat diseases associated with HNE. Several animal models have been developed for evaluating the in vivo activity of elastase inhibitors, and compounds have been shown to be effective in all of these models by the intravenous, intratrachael or oral routes of administration. However, only a very small percentage of compounds have possessed all the necessary properties, including lack of toxicity, for progression into the clinic. The peptidyl TFMK ICI 200,880 (25-12) has many of the desired characteristics of a drug to treat the diseases associated with HNE: chemical stability, in vitro and in vivo activity, a long duration of action, and adequate metabolic stability. Currently ICI 200,880 is the only low molecular-weight HNE inhibitor known to be undergoing clinical trials, and may be the compound which finally demonstrates the clinical utility of a synthetic HNE inhibitor. PMID:8189835

  2. Participation of protein kinases in staurosporine-induced interleukin-6 production by rat peritoneal macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Yamaki, Kouya; Ohuchi, Kazuo

    1999-01-01

    The incubation of rat peritoneal macrophages in the presence of staurosporine, a non-specific protein kinase inhibitor, induced interleukin-6 (IL-6) production in a time- and concentration-dependent manner at 6.3–63 nM, but at 210 nM, the stimulant effect on IL-6 production was reduced.The levels of IL-6 mRNA as determined by a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction were also increased by staurosporine in parallel with the ability to induce IL-6 production.Compounds structurally related to staurosporine including K-252a (non-specific protein kinase inhibitor) and KT-5720 (inhibitor of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase, PKA), did not increase IL-6 production by peritoneal macrophages.Staurosporine-induced increases in IL-6 production and expression of IL-6 mRNA were decreased by the PKC inhibitors, H-7 (2.7–27 μM), Ro 31-8425 (1–10 μM) and calphostin C (0.3–3 μM) and by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) inhibitor LY294002 (30–100 μM), but were further increased by the protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitor, genistein (12–37 μM).The staurosporine-induced increase in IL-6 production was not affected by the PKA inhibitor, H-89 (0.1–3 μM).These findings suggest that the induction of IL-6 production by staurosporine is secondary to elevation of IL-6 mRNA level, which, in turn, is positively regulated by the activation of PKC and PI 3-kinase and negatively regulated by the activation of PTK. PKA does not appear to play a significant role. PMID:10455280

  3. Synergistic effect of high glucose and ANG II on proliferation of mouse embryonic stem cells: involvement of PKC and MAPKs as well as AT1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun Hee; Han, Ho Jae

    2008-05-01

    This study examined the synergistic effect of high glucose levels and ANG II on proliferation and its related signal pathways using mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. The combined use of a high glucose concentration (25 mM) and ANG II increased the level of [3H]thymidine/BrdU incorporation, and the number of cells compared with either treatment alone. Each treatment with high glucose or ANG II increased the cell population in the S phase compared with control, and the combined treatment of a high glucose concentration and ANG II significantly increased the number of cells in the S phase according to FACS analysis. Moreover, the high glucose-induced increase in [3H]thymidine incorporation was blocked by inhibiting the ANG II type 1 (AT1) receptor. The combined high glucose and ANG II significantly increased the STAT3 phosphorylation compared with high glucose or ANG II alone. ANG II stimulated the influx of Ca2+ in 25 mM glucose compared with 5 mM glucose. High glucose levels increase the level of PKC alpha, epsilon, and zeta translocation from the cytosol to the membrane fraction. In an examination of other signal pathways, the combined treatment significantly increased the level of p44/42, p38 MAPKs phosphorylation compared with either treatment alone. Indeed, the combined treatment increased the mRNA expression level of the protooncogenes and cell cycle regulatory proteins. In conclusion, the combined treatment of a high glucose concentration and ANG II had a synergistic effect in stimulating mouse ES cell proliferation through the Ca2+/PKC, MAPKs, and the AT1 receptor.

  4. Structural insight with mutational impact on tyrosinase and PKC-β interaction from Homo sapiens: Molecular modeling and docking studies for melanogenesis, albinism and increased risk for melanoma.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Arundhati; Ray, Sujay

    2016-10-30

    Human tyrosinase, is an important protein for biosynthetic pathway of melanin. It was studied to be phosphorylated and activated by protein kinase-C, β-subunit (PKC-β) through earlier experimentations with in vivo evidences. Documentation documents that mutation in two essentially vital serine residues in C-terminal end of tyrosinase leads to albinism. Due to the deficiency of protective shield like enzyme; melanin, albinos are at an increased peril for melanoma and other skin cancers. So, computational and residue-level insight including a mutational exploration with evolutionary importance into this mechanism lies obligatory for future pathological and therapeutic developments. Therefore, functional tertiary models of the relevant proteins were analyzed after satisfying their stereo-chemical features. Evolutionarily paramount residues for the activation of tyrosinase were perceived via multiple sequence alignment phenomena. Mutant-type tyrosinase protein (S98A and S102A) was thereby modeled, maintaining the wild-type proteins' functionality. Furthermore, this present comparative study discloses the variation in the stable residual participation (for mutant-type and wild-type tyrosinase-PKCβ complex). Mainly, an increased number of polar negatively charged residues from the wild-type tyrosinase participated with PKC-β, predominantly. Fascinatingly supported by evaluation of statistical significances, mutation even led to a destabilizing impact in tyrosinase accompanied by conformational switches with a helix-to-coil transition in the mutated protein. Even the allosteric sites in the protein got poorly hampered upon mutation leading to weaker tendency for binding partners to interact. PMID:27450914

  5. Kisspeptin induction of somatolactin-α release in goldfish pituitary cells: functional role of cAMP/PKA-, PLC/PKC-, and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent cascades.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Quan; He, Mulan; Ko, Wendy K W; Wong, Anderson O L

    2014-11-15

    Although the importance of kisspeptin in the pituitary is firmly established, the signaling mechanisms for the pituitary actions of kisspeptin are still largely unknown. Somatolactin (SL), a member of the growth hormone (GH)/prolactin (PRL) family, is a pituitary hormone with pleiotropic functions in fish, but its regulation by kisspeptin has not been examined. To investigate the functional role of kisspeptin in SL regulation, expression of two paralogues of goldfish Kiss1 receptors (Kiss1ra and Kiss1rb) were confirmed in immunoidentified SLα but not SLβ cells isolated by RT-PCR coupled with laser capture microdissection. In goldfish pituitary cells prepared from neurointermediate lobe (NIL), synthetic goldfish Kiss decapeptides (gKiss1-10 and gKiss2-10) could increase SLα release. Consistent with the lack of Kiss1r expression in SLβ cells, SLβ release was not altered by kisspeptin stimulation. In parallel experiments, goldfish gKiss1-10 could elevate cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) production, upregulate protein kinase A (PKA) and protein kinase C (PKC) activities, and trigger a rapid rise in intracellular Ca(2+) levels in goldfish NIL cells. Using a pharmacological approach, cAMP/PKA and phospholipase C (PLC)/PKC pathways and subsequent activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent cascades were shown to be involved in SLα release induced by gKiss1-10. Apparently, the Ca(2+)-dependent cascades were triggered by extracellular Ca(2+) entry via voltage-sensitive Ca(2+) channels and mobilization of inositol trisphosphate-sensitive intracellular Ca(2+) stores. Our results demonstrate that gKiss1-10 can act directly at the pituitary level to trigger SLα release via a complex network of post-receptor signaling mechanisms.

  6. Evidence that simulated microgravity may alter the vascular nonreceptor tyrosine kinase second messenger pathway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahwaji, C. I.; Sheibani, S.; Han, S.; Siu, W. O.; Kaka, A. H.; Fathy, T. M.; el-Abbadi, N. H.; Purdy, R. E.

    2000-01-01

    Simulated microgravity (hind limb unweighting; HU) reduces maximal contractile capacity to norepinephrine (NE) but not 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in the rat abdominal aorta of male Wistar rats. Our earlier study showed that voltage-operated calcium channels, the MAPK pathway [1], and vasoconstrictive prostaglandins contribute to the NE-induced contraction of control (C) but not HU, aorta rings. Genistein, a general tyrosine kinase inhibitor, caused a significant reduction in vascular contractility in C but not HU arteries. The present study explored the role of protein kinase C (PKC) and extracellular receptor-activated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) in the HU-induced vascular hyporesponsiveness to NE. Microgravity was simulated in Wistar rats by 20 day HU. The abdominal aorta was removed from control and HU rats, cut into 3 mm rings, and mounted in tissue baths to measure isometric contraction. Protein levels were determined using Western blot analysis. PD98059, a selective MAPKK inhibitor, caused a marked inhibition of NE-induced contraction in both C and HU arteries. Calphostin C, a PKC inhibitor, completely abolished the contractile response to NE in both C and HU tissues. Phosphorylated (activated) ERK1/2 protein mass was greater in C, compared to HU, aortas, and was reduced by genistein only in C tissues. MAPK total protein levels in the rat aorta were increased in the HU-treated, compared to C, animals. These results indicate that PKC represents an early transduction step in the contractile response to NE in the rat abdominal aorta. That inhibition of the step immediately before activation of MAPK reduced contraction in both C and HU tissues, while general tyrosine kinase inhibition with genistein blocked only the control responses, suggests that a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase may be involved in HU-induced vascular hyporesponsiveness to NE.

  7. Small-molecule caspase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhenodarova, S. M.

    2010-02-01

    The review considers low-molecular weight inhibitors of caspases, cysteine proteases being key contributors to apoptosis (programmed cell death). The inhibitors with aspartic acid residues or various heterocyclic systems (both synthetic and natural) are covered. Their possible mechanisms of action are discussed. Data on inhibitor structure-activity relationship studies are systematically surveyed. The interactions of the non-peptide fragments of an inhibitor with the enzymes are examined. Examples of the use of some inhibitors for apoptosis suppression are provided.

  8. Natural inhibitors of thrombin.

    PubMed

    Huntington, James A

    2014-04-01

    The serine protease thrombin is the effector enzyme of blood coagulation. It has many activities critical for the formation of stable clots, including cleavage of fibrinogen to fibrin, activation of platelets and conversion of procofactors to active cofactors. Thrombin carries-out its multiple functions by utilising three special features: a deep active site cleft and two anion binding exosites (exosite I and II). Similarly, thrombin inhibitors have evolved to exploit the unique features of thrombin to achieve rapid and specific inactivation of thrombin. Exogenous thrombin inhibitors come from several different protein families and are generally found in the saliva of haematophagous animals (blood suckers) as part of an anticoagulant cocktail that allows them to feed. Crystal structures of several of these inhibitors reveal how peptides and proteins can be targeted to thrombin in different and interesting ways. Thrombin activity must also be regulated by endogenous inhibitors so that thrombi do not occlude blood flow and cause thrombosis. A single protein family, the serpins, provides all four of the endogenous thrombin inhibitors found in man. The crystal structures of these serpins bound to thrombin have been solved, revealing a similar exosite-dependence on complex formation. In addition to forming the recognition complex, serpins destroy the structure of thrombin, allowing them to be released from cofactors and substrates for clearance. This review examines how the special features of thrombin have been exploited by evolution to achieve inhibition of the ultimate coagulation protease.

  9. SGLT2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dardi, I; Kouvatsos, T; Jabbour, S A

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a serious health issue and an economic burden, rising in epidemic proportions over the last few decades worldwide. Although several treatment options are available, only half of the global diabetic population achieves the recommended or individualized glycemic targets. Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are a new class of antidiabetic agents with a novel insulin-independent action. SGLT2 is a transporter found in the proximal renal tubules, responsible for the reabsorption of most of the glucose filtered by the kidney. Inhibition of SGLT2 lowers the blood glucose level by promoting the urinary excretion of excess glucose. Due to their insulin-independent action, SGLT2 inhibitors can be used with any degree of beta-cell dysfunction or insulin resistance, related to a very low risk of hypoglycemia. In addition to improving glycemic control, SGLT2 inhibitors have been associated with a reduction in weight and blood pressure when used as monotherapy or in combination with other antidiabetic agents in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Treatment with SGLT2 inhibitors is usually well tolerated; however, they have been associated with an increased incidence of urinary tract and genital infections, although these infections are usually mild and easy to treat. SGLT2 inhibitors are a promising new option in the armamentarium of drugs for patients with T2DM. PMID:26362302

  10. MAG-EPA and 17,18-EpETE target cytoplasmic signalling pathways to reduce short-term airway hyperresponsiveness.

    PubMed

    Khaddaj-Mallat, Rayan; Rousseau, Éric

    2015-07-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the role of eicosapentaenoic acid monoacylglyceride (MAG-EPA) and 17,18-epoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (17,18-EpETE) on the regulation of contractile reactivity and nuclear protein expression in 72-h-cultured and TNF-α-treated guinea pig tracheal rings. Tension measurements performed on native tissues demonstrated that the cytochrome P-450 epoxygenase (CYP450)-dependent EPA metabolite, 17,18-EpETE, displayed a higher potency than MAG-EPA in inhibiting U-46619-induced tone. Calphostin C (a PKC inhibitor), whether in association or not with MAG-EPA or 17,18-EpETE, had no further effect, while 17,18-EpETE and Y-27632 (a Rho kinase inhibitor) yielded additive effects. Of note, MAG-EPA and 17,18-EpETE pre-treatments normalized the contractile responses to broncho-constrictive agents in 72-h-cultured trachea. The enhanced expression of TNF-α, P-p65-nuclear factor kappaB (NF)-κB, c-fos and c-Jun in 72-h-cultured tissues likely contributed to the hyperresponsiveness. β-Escin-permeabilized preparations demonstrated that 17,18-EpETE abolished Ca(2+) hypersensitivity, suggesting a blunting of PKC and/or Rho kinase activation. Lastly, activation of NF-κB and activating protein-1 (AP-1) signalling by exogenous TNF-α markedly increased the contractile response to MCh, through an increase in 17-kDa PKC-potentiated inhibitory protein of PP1 (CPI-17) phosphorylation and IκBα degradation. Dual incubation of 17,18-EpETE with calphostin C or Y-27632 induced cumulative inhibitory effects on MCh responses in TNF-α-incubated tracheal rings. 17,18-EpETE also reduced the detection level of P-p65-NF-κB and AP-1 subunits. The present data provide evidence that MAG-EPA, through its bioactive metabolite, represents a prospective pharmacological target in respiratory diseases. PMID:25113382

  11. Cholinesterase inhibitors from botanicals

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Faiyaz; Ghalib, Raza Murad; Sasikala, P.; Ahmed, K. K. Mueen

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease, wherein a progressive loss of cholinergic synapses occurs in hippocampus and neocortex. Decreased concentration of the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine (ACh), appears to be critical element in the development of dementia, and the most appropriate therapeutic approach to treat AD and other form of dementia is to restore acetylcholine levels by inhibiting both major form of cholinesterase: Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Consequently, researches have focused their attention towards finding cholinesterase inhibitors from natural products. A large number of such inhibitors have been isolated from medicinal plants. This review presents a comprehensive account of the advances in field of cholinesterase inhibitor phytoconstituents. The structures of some important phytoconstituents (collected through www.Chemspider.com) are also presented and the scope for future research is discussed. PMID:24347920

  12. Cholinesterase inhibitors from botanicals.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Faiyaz; Ghalib, Raza Murad; Sasikala, P; Ahmed, K K Mueen

    2013-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease, wherein a progressive loss of cholinergic synapses occurs in hippocampus and neocortex. Decreased concentration of the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine (ACh), appears to be critical element in the development of dementia, and the most appropriate therapeutic approach to treat AD and other form of dementia is to restore acetylcholine levels by inhibiting both major form of cholinesterase: Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Consequently, researches have focused their attention towards finding cholinesterase inhibitors from natural products. A large number of such inhibitors have been isolated from medicinal plants. This review presents a comprehensive account of the advances in field of cholinesterase inhibitor phytoconstituents. The structures of some important phytoconstituents (collected through www.Chemspider.com) are also presented and the scope for future research is discussed. PMID:24347920

  13. Phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cockrill, Barbara A; Waxman, Aaron B

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) signaling plays a key role in modulating vascular tone and remodeling in the pulmonary circulation. The guanylate cyclase/cyclic guanylate monophosphate-signaling pathway primarily mediates nitric oxide signaling. This pathway is critical in normal regulation of the pulmonary vasculature, and is an important target for therapy in patients with pulmonary hypertension. In the pulmonary vasculature, degradation of cGMP is primarily regulated by PDE-5, and inhibition of this enzyme has important effects on pulmonary vasculature smooth muscle tone. Large randomized placebo-controlled trials of PDE-5 inhibitors demonstrated improved exercise capacity, hemodynamics and quality of life in adult patients with PAH. This chapter will discuss the mechanisms of NO signaling in the vasculature, characteristics of the PDE5-inhibitors approved for treatment of PH, and review available data on the use of phosphodiesterase inhibitors in PH. PMID:24092343

  14. Doxorubicin represses CARP gene transcription through the generation of oxidative stress in neonatal rat cardiac myocytes: possible role of serine/threonine kinase-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Aihara, Y; Kurabayashi, M; Tanaka, T; Takeda, S I; Tomaru, K; Sekiguchi, K I; Ohyama, Y; Nagai, R

    2000-08-01

    Doxorubicin (Dox), an anthracyclin antineoplastic agent, causes dilated cardiomyopathy. CARP has been identified as a nuclear protein whose mRNA levels are exquisitely sensitive to Dox. In this study we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the repression of CARP expression by Dox in cultured neonatal rat cardiac myocytes. Dox (1 micromol/l)-mediated decrease in CARP mRNA levels was strongly correlated with BNP but not with ANP mRNA levels. Hydrogen peroxide scavenger catalase (1 mg/ml) but not hydroxyl radical scavengers dimethylthiourea (10 mmol/l) or mannitol (10 mmol/l) blunted the Dox-mediated decrease in CARP and BNP expression. Superoxide dismutase inhibitor diethyldithiocarbamic acid (10 mmol/l), which inhibits the generation of hydrogen peroxide from superoxide metabolism, attenuated the repression. PD98059 (MEK1 inhibitor, 50 micromol/l), SB203580 (p38 MAP kinase inhibitor, 10 micromol/l), calphostin C (protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, 1 micromol/l), non-selective protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein (50 micromol/l) or herbimycin A (1 micromol/l) failed to abrogate the downregulation of CARP and BNP expression by Dox. In contrast, H7 (30 micromol/l), a potent inhibitor of serine/threonine kinase, significantly blocked Dox-mediated downregulation of CARP and BNP expression. Transient transfection of a series of 5'-deletion and site-specific mutation constructs revealed that M-CAT element located at -37 of the human CARP promoter mediates Dox-induced repression of CARP promoter activity. These results suggest that a genetic response to Dox is mediated through the generation of hydrogen peroxide, which is selectively linked to the activation of H7-sensitive serine/threonine kinase distinct from PKC and well characterized mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases (ERK and p38MAP kinase). Furthermore, our data implicated M-CAT element as a Dox-response element within the CARP promoter in cardiac myocytes.

  15. Potassium 2-(1-hydroxypentyl)-benzoate attenuated hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanli; Peng, Ying; Long, Yan; Xu, Shaofeng; Feng, Nan; Wang, Ling; Wang, Xiaoliang

    2012-04-01

    Potassium 2-(1-hydroxypentyl)-benzoate (dl-PHPB) has been shown to have potent neuroprotective effects, such as reducing the infarct volume and improving neurobehavioral deficits in the transient focal cerebral ischemic rat model. The present study is to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of dl-PHPB on hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-induced apoptosis and the possible mechanism in the human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells. Our results showed that dl-PHPB significantly attenuated H(2)O(2)-induced cell death, and reduced neuronal apoptosis. Dl-PHPB partially reversed the decrease of B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) protein level induced by H(2)O(2). Furthermore, dl-PHPB inhibited the elevation of pro-apoptotic Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) and caspase3, and alleviated the down-regulation of protein kinase C alpha (PKCα). The PKC inhibitor, Calphostin C significantly attenuated the protective effects of dl-PHPB. The findings suggest that dl-PHPB may protect neurons against H(2)O(2)-induced apoptosis by modulating apoptosis-related proteins, and PKC signaling pathway may be involved in the neuroprotection of dl-PHPB.

  16. Pectin methylesterase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Giovane, A; Servillo, L; Balestrieri, C; Raiola, A; D'Avino, R; Tamburrini, M; Ciardiello, M A; Camardella, L

    2004-02-12

    Pectin methylesterase (PME) is the first enzyme acting on pectin, a major component of plant cell wall. PME action produces pectin with different structural and functional properties, having an important role in plant physiology. Regulation of plant PME activity is obtained by the differential expression of several isoforms in different tissues and developmental stages and by subtle modifications of cell wall local pH. Inhibitory activities from various plant sources have also been reported. A proteinaceous inhibitor of PME (PMEI) has been purified from kiwi fruit. The kiwi PMEI is active against plant PMEs, forming a 1:1 non-covalent complex. The polypeptide chain comprises 152 amino acid residues and contains five Cys residues, four of which are connected by disulfide bridges, first to second and third to fourth. The sequence shows significant similarity with the N-terminal pro-peptides of plant PME, and with plant invertase inhibitors. In particular, the four Cys residues involved in disulfide bridges are conserved. On the basis of amino acid sequence similarity and Cys residues conservation, a large protein family including PMEI, invertase inhibitors and related proteins of unknown function has been identified. The presence of at least two sequences in the Arabidopsis genome having high similarity with kiwi PMEI suggests the ubiquitous presence of this inhibitor. PMEI has an interest in food industry as inhibitor of endogenous PME, responsible for phase separation and cloud loss in fruit juice manufacturing. Affinity chromatography on resin-bound PMEI can also be used to concentrate and detect residual PME activity in fruit and vegetable products.

  17. beta-hexosaminidase-induced activation of p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase is dependent on p21Ras and protein kinase C and mediates bovine airway smooth-muscle proliferation.

    PubMed

    Lew, D B; Dempsey, B K; Zhao, Y; Muthalif, M; Fatima, S; Malik, K U

    1999-07-01

    Late-phase and sustained activation of p44/42(MAPK) has been reported to be a critical factor in cell mitogenesis. We therefore hypothesized that p44/42(MAPK) is involved in mannosyl-rich glycoprotein-induced mitogenesis in bovine airway smooth-muscle cells (ASMC). Treatment of adherent ASMC with beta-hexosaminidase A (Hex A, 50 nM), an endogenous mannosyl-rich glycoprotein, resulted in a late-onset (30-min) activation of p44/42(MAPK) that lasted for 4 h. Activation of p44/42(MAPK) induced by Hex A was inhibited by an 18-mer phosphorothioate-derivatized antisense oligonucleotide (1-5 microM) directed to human p44(MAPK); the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK1) inhibitor PD98059 (5 microM); the p42(MAPK) inhibitor Tyrphostin AG-126 (0.2 microM); the farnesyl transferase inhibitors SCH-56582 (10 microM) and FPT III (10 miroM), which inhibit p21Ras activation; and Calphostin C (0.2 microM), an inhibitor of protein kinase C. These agents also inhibited Hex A-induced cell proliferation in bovine ASMC. These data suggest that Hex A activates p44/42(MAPK) in a p21Ras- and PKC-dependent manner and that this activation mediates Hex A- induced mitogenesis in bovine ASMC.

  18. Acyclic peptide inhibitors of amylases.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Nicola

    2005-12-01

    In this issue of Chemistry and Biology, a library screening approach reveals a linear octapeptide inhibitor of alpha-amylases reached by de novo design . The selected molecule shares characteristics with naturally occurring protein inhibitors -- a result that suggests general rules for the design of peptide-based amylase inhibitors may be achievable.

  19. Evaluation of [3-(1-Methyl-1H–indol –3-yl-methylene)-2–oxo-2, 3–dihydro-1H- indole–5-sulfonamide] (OXSI-2), as a Syk selective inhibitor in platelets

    PubMed Central

    Bhavaraju, Kamala; Kim, Soochong; Daniel, James L.; Kunapuli, Satya P.

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, we characterized OXSI-2 ([3-(1-Methyl-1H–indol –3-yl-methylene)-2–oxo-2, 3–dihydro-1H- indole–5-sulfonamide], a putative inhibitor of Syk, and determined its specificity and selectivity in platelets. We found that OXSI-2 completely abolished convulxin-induced platelet functional responses. In order to determine whether OXSI-2 inhibited Src family kinase-mediated platelet responses, we evaluated its effect on Src family kinase (SFK)-mediated signaling events in platelets, viz. Lyn-mediated phosphorylation of Y352 on Syk, LAT- Y191 phosphorylation by Syk, and protease-activated receptor (PAR)-mediated phosphorylation of ERK. In the present work, we report that convulxin mediated Syk tyrosine 352 phosphorylation is not inhibited by OXSI-2, whereas piceatannol and PP2 abolished it. Syk-mediated Y191 LAT phosphorylation is abolished by all the three inhibitors. AYPGKF-induced phosphorylation of ERK was marginally inhibited by OXSI-2, whereas treatment with PP2 and piceatannol completely abolished it. However, PAR mediated thromboxane generation (an event mediated by ERK) was potentiated by OXSI-2 whereas PP2 and piceatannol brought thromboxane to basal levels. Protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors are known to potentiate PAR-mediated thromboxane generation in platelets. In contrast, OXSI-2, unlike PKC inhibitors, did not inhibit secretion. Therefore, we conclude that OXSI-2 is not a Syk-selective inhibitor in platelets because of its unexplained non-specific effects. PMID:18068154

  20. [JAK2 inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Hernández Boluda, Juan Carlos; Gómez, Montse; Pérez, Ariadna

    2016-07-15

    Pharmacological inhibition of the kinase activity of JAK proteins can interfere with the signaling of immunomodulatory cytokines and block the constitutive activation of the JAK-STAT pathway that characterizes certain malignancies, including chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms. JAK inhibitors may, therefore, be useful to treat malignancies as well as inflammatory or immune disorders. Currently, the most significant advances have been made in the treatment of myelofibrosis, where these drugs may lead to a remarkable improvement in the control of hyperproliferative manifestations. However, available data suggest that this treatment is not curative of myelofibrosis. In general, JAK2 inhibition induces cytopaenias, with this being considered a class side-effect. By contrast, the extrahaematologic toxicity profile varies significantly among the different JAK inhibitors. At present, there are several clinical trials evaluating the combination of ruxolitinib with other drugs, in order to improve its therapeutic activity as well as reducing haematologic toxicity. PMID:27033437

  1. Coagulation inhibitors in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Esmon, C T

    2005-04-01

    Coagulation is triggered by inflammatory mediators in a number of ways. However, to prevent unwanted clot formation, several natural anticoagulant mechanisms exist, such as the antithrombin-heparin mechanism, the tissue factor pathway inhibitor mechanism and the protein C anticoagulant pathway. This review examines the ways in which these pathways are down-regulated by inflammation, thus limiting clot formation and decreasing the natural anti-inflammatory mechanisms that these pathways possess. PMID:15787615

  2. Neutrophil Elastase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Groutas, William C.; Dou, Dengfeng; Alliston, Kevin R.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) constitutes a worldwide health problem. There is currently an urgent and unmet need for the development of small molecule therapeutics capable of blocking and/or reversing the progression of the disorder. Recent studies have greatly illuminated our understanding of the multiple pathogenic processes associated with COPD. Of paramount importance is the key role played by proteases, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and inflammation. Insights gained from these studies have made possible the exploration of new therapeutic approaches. Areas covered An overview of major developments in COPD research with emphasis on low molecular weight neutrophil elastase inhibitors is described in this review. Expert opinion Great strides have been made toward our understanding of the biochemical and cellular events associated with COPD. However, our knowledge regarding the inter-relationships among the multiple pathogenic mechanisms and their mediators involved is till limited. The problem is further compounded by the unavailability of suitable validated biomarkers for assessing the efficacy of potential therapeutic interventions. The complexity of COPD suggests that effective therapeutic interventions may require the administration of more than one agent such as, for instance, an HNE or MMP-12 inhibitor with an anti-inflammatory agent such as a phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor, or a dual function agent capable of disrupting the cycle of proteolysis, apoptosis, inflammation and oxidative stress PMID:21235378

  3. Modulation of Na+/K+ ATPase Activity by Hydrogen Peroxide Generated through Heme in L. amazonensis.

    PubMed

    Rocco-Machado, Nathália; Cosentino-Gomes, Daniela; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania amazonensis is a protozoan parasite that occurs in many areas of Brazil and causes skin lesions. Using this parasite, our group showed the activation of Na+/K+ ATPase through a signaling cascade that involves the presence of heme and protein kinase C (PKC) activity. Heme is an important biomolecule that has pro-oxidant activity and signaling capacity. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can act as second messengers, which are required in various signaling cascades. Our goal in this work is to investigate the role of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generated in the presence of heme in the Na+/K+ ATPase activity of L. amazonensis. Our results show that increasing concentrations of heme stimulates the production of H2O2 in a dose-dependent manner until a concentration of 2.5 μM heme. To confirm that the effect of heme on the Na+/K+ ATPase is through the generation of H2O2, we measured enzyme activity using increasing concentrations of H2O2 and, as expected, the activity increased in a dose-dependent manner until a concentration of 0.1 μM H2O2. To investigate the role of PKC in this signaling pathway, we observed the production of H2O2 in the presence of its activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and its inhibitor calphostin C. Both showed no effect on the generation of H2O2. Furthermore, we found that PKC activity is increased in the presence of H2O2, and that in the presence of calphostin C, H2O2 is unable to activate the Na+/K+ ATPase. 100 μM of Mito-TEMPO was capable of abolishing the stimulatory effect of heme on Na+/K+ ATPase activity, indicating that mitochondria might be the source of the hydrogen peroxide production induced by heme. The modulation of L. amazonensis Na+/K+ ATPase by H2O2 opens new possibilities for understanding the signaling pathways of this parasite. PMID:26070143

  4. Estrogenic compounds inhibit gap junctional intercellular communication in mouse Leydig TM3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Iwase, Yumiko . E-mail: Iwase.Yumiko@mg.m-pharma.co.jp; Fukata, Hideki . E-mail: fukata@faculty.chiba-u.jp; Mori, Chisato . E-mail: cmori@faculty.chiba-u.jp

    2006-05-01

    Some estrogenic compounds are reported to cause testicular disorders in humans and/or experimental animals by direct action on Leydig cells. In carcinogenesis and normal development, gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) plays an essential role in maintaining homeostasis. In this study, we examine the effects of diethylstilbestrol (DES, a synthetic estrogen), 17{beta}-estradiol (E{sub 2}, a natural estrogen), and genistein (GEN, a phytoestrogen) on GJIC between mouse Leydig TM3 cells using Lucifer yellow microinjection. The three compounds tested produced GJIC inhibition in the TM3 cells after 24 h. Gradually, 10 {mu}M DES began to inhibit GJIC for 24 h and this effect was observed until 72 h. On the other hand, both 20 {mu}M E{sub 2} and 25 {mu}M GEN rapidly inhibited GJIC in 6 h and 2 h, respectively. The effects continued until 24 h, but weakened by 72 h. Furthermore, a combined effect at {mu}M level between DES and E{sub 2} on GJIC inhibition was observed, but not between GEN and E{sub 2}. DES and E{sub 2} showed GJIC inhibition at low dose levels (nearly physiological estrogen levels) after 72 h, but GEN did not. DES-induced GJIC inhibition at 10 pM and 10 {mu}M was completely counteracted by ICI 182,780 (ICl), an estrogen receptor antagonist. On the other hand, the inhibitory effects on GJIC with E{sub 2} (10 pM and 20 {mu}M) and GEN (25 {mu}M) were partially blocked by ICI or calphostin C, a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, and were completely blocked by the combination of ICI and calphostin C. These results demonstrate that DES inhibits GJIC between Leydig cells via the estrogen receptor (ER), and that E{sub 2} and GEN inhibit GJIC via ER and PKC. These estrogenic compounds may have different individual nongenotoxic mechanism including PKC pathway on testicular carcinogenesis or development.

  5. Efficient down-regulation of PKC-α gene expression in A549 lung cancer cells mediated by antisense oligodeoxynucleotides in dendrosomes.

    PubMed

    Movassaghian, Sara; Moghimi, Hamid R; Shirazi, Farshad H; Koshkaryev, Alexander; Trivedi, Malav S; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2013-01-30

    The completion of human genome project has increased our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of many diseases, including cancer, thus providing new opportunities for gene therapy. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (AsODN) possess great potential as sequence-specific therapeutic agents, which in contrast to classic treatments provide more efficient and target-specific approach to modulate disease-related genes. To be therapeutically effective, sufficient concentrations of intact AsODN must bypass membrane barriers and access the site of action. In this study, a dendrosome delivery strategy was designed to improve the encapsulation of AsODN in non-cationic liposomes to target PKC-α in lung cancer cells in vitro. Subcellular trafficking of fluorescently labeled AsODN was visualized using confocal microscopy. Uptake and expression of mRNA and target protein after AsODN delivery was measured by flow cytometry, qRT-PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. Dendrosomes showed favorable physicochemical parameters: high encapsulation efficiency and uptake in serum-containing medium with no apparent cytotoxicity. AsODN encapsulated in dendrosome efficiently and specifically suppress the target gene at both mRNA and protein levels. Additional in vivo studies on the application of dendrosome as a delivery system for nucleic acid molecules may lead to improvement of this technology and facilitate the development of therapeutic antisense techniques. PMID:23262426

  6. The aPKC/Par3/Par6 Polarity Complex and Membrane Order Are Functionally Interdependent in Epithelia During Vertebrate Organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Abu-Siniyeh, Ahmed; Owen, Dylan M; Benzing, Carola; Rinkwitz, Silke; Becker, Thomas S; Majumdar, Arindam; Gaus, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    The differential distribution of lipids between apical and basolateral membranes is necessary for many epithelial cell functions, but how this characteristic membrane organization is integrated within the polarity network during ductal organ development is poorly understood. Here we quantified membrane order in the gut, kidney and liver ductal epithelia in zebrafish larvae at 3-11 days post fertilization (dpf) with Laurdan 2-photon microscopy. We then applied a combination of Laurdan imaging, antisense knock-down and analysis of polarity markers to understand the relationship between membrane order and apical-basal polarity. We found a reciprocal relationship between membrane order and the cell polarity network. Reducing membrane condensation by exogenously added oxysterol or depletion of cholesterol reduced apical targeting of the polarity protein, aPKC. Conversely, using morpholino knock down in zebrafish, we found that membrane order was dependent upon the Crb3 and Par3 polarity protein expression in ductal epithelia. Hence our data suggest that the biophysical property of membrane lipid packing is a regulatory element in apical basal polarity.

  7. Effect of Hyp delivery system on PKCα activity: What will happen after pkcα gene silencing and Hyp photo-activation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misuth, Matus; Joniova, Jaroslava; Ferencakova, Michaela; Miskovsky, Pavol; Nadova, Zuzana

    2015-08-01

    Low density lipoproteins (LDL) are considered as suitable natural in vivo delivery system for hydrophobic photosensitizers (pts) such as hypericin (Hyp) and it was shown that over expression of LDL-receptors in tumor cells can be used for specific targeting. Activation of pts by irradiation results in a formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the place of light application and starts destructive mechanism. PKCα plays a key role in the cell survival and its overexpression was observed in glioma cell lines. In the present study we aim to present the effectivity of the pts delivery in the glioma cells and consequences of silencing pkcα gene on cell death/survival after Hyp photo-activation. Pts can be delivered through two pathways: endocytosis - when cells are incubated with LDL/Hyp complex and Hyp transport through cellular membrane without any carrier. Preliminary results show that incubation of cells with or without LDL leads to PKCα activation. Photo-activated Hyp seems to be more effective in terms of apoptosis induction when compared to photo-activated LDL/Hyp complex. We have evaluated the influence of photo-activated Hyp on cell death in non-transfected and transfected (PKCα-) human glioma cells (U87-MG). Level of ROS production and type of cell death was notably affected by silencing pkca gene resulting in significant increase of necrosis after Hyp photo-activation.

  8. β-arrestin-1 mediates the TCR-triggered re-routing of distal receptors to the immunological synapse by a PKC-mediated mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Arenas, Elena; Calleja, Enrique; Martínez-Martín, Nadia; Gharbi, Severine I; Navajas, Rosana; García-Medel, Noel; Penela, Petronila; Alcamí, Antonio; Mayor, Federico; Albar, Juan P; Alarcón, Balbino

    2014-01-01

    T-cell receptors (TCR) recognize their antigen ligand at the interface between T cells and antigen-presenting cells, known as the immunological synapse (IS). The IS provides a means of sustaining the TCR signal which requires the continual supply of new TCRs. These are endocytosed and redirected from distal membrane locations to the IS. In our search for novel cytoplasmic effectors, we have identified β-arrestin-1 as a ligand of non-phosphorylated resting TCRs. Using dominant-negative and knockdown approaches we demonstrate that β-arrestin-1 is required for the internalization and downregulation of non-engaged bystander TCRs. Furthermore, TCR triggering provokes the β-arrestin-1-mediated downregulation of the G-protein coupled chemokine receptor CXCR4, but not of other control receptors. We demonstrate that β-arrestin-1 recruitment to the TCR, and bystander TCR and CXCR4 downregulation, are mechanistically mediated by the TCR-triggered PKC-mediated phosphorylation of β-arrestin-1 at Ser163. This mechanism allows the first triggered TCRs to deliver a stop migration signal, and to promote the internalization of distal TCRs and CXCR4 and their translocation to the IS. This receptor crosstalk mechanism is critical to sustain the TCR signal. PMID:24502978

  9. Protein kinase C-δ inhibitor, Rottlerin inhibits growth and survival of mycobacteria exclusively through Shikimate kinase.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Sapna; Chatterjee, Aditi; Jaiswal, Swati; Kumar, Sanjay; Ramachandran, Ravishankar; Srivastava, Kishore K

    2016-09-16

    The molecular bases of disease provide exceptional prospect to translate research findings into new drugs. Nevertheless, to develop new and novel chemical entities takes huge amount of time and efforts, mainly due to the stringent processes. Therefore, drug repurposing is one of such strategies which is being used in recent times to identify new pharmacophores. The essential first step in discovery of the specific inhibitor with low toxicity is the identification and elucidation of pathways exclusive to target pathogen. One such target is the shikimate pathway, which is essential for algae, higher plants, bacteria and fungi. Since, this enzyme system is absent in higher eukaryotes and in mammals, the enzymes involved in the pathway provide an attractive target for the development of potentially selective and non toxic antimicrobial agents. Since, so far there is no specific inhibitor which is able to restrain mycobacterial shikimate pathway; we expanded the use of a known kinase inhibitor; Rottlerin, in order to predict the prototype in discovering the specific molecules against this enzyme. For the first time we have shown that Rottlerin inhibits extracellular mycobacteria by affecting Shikimate Kinase (SK) and this effect is further enhanced during the intracellular infection due to the added effect of PKC- δ down-regulation. The molecular docking of Rottlerin with both the mycobacterial SKs, corroborated the inhibition data, and revealed that the effects of SK, in slow and in fast grower mycobacteria are due to the changes in affinity of binding with the drug. PMID:27498028

  10. Protein farnesyltransferase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ayral-Kaloustian, Semiramis; Salaski, Edward J

    2002-05-01

    Specific mutations in the ras gene impair the guanosine triphophatase (GTPase) activity of Ras proteins, which play a fundamental role in the signaling cascade, leading to uninterrupted growth signals and to the transformation of normal cells into malignant phenotypes. It has been shown that normal cells transfected with mutant ras gene become cancerous and that unfarnesylated, cytosolic mutant Ras protein does not anchor onto cell membranes and cannot induce this transformation. Posttranslational modification and plasma membrane association of mutant Ras is necessary for this transforming activity. Since its identification, the enzyme protein farnesyltransferase (FTase) that catalyzes the first and essential step of the three Ras-processing steps has emerged as the most promising target for therapeutic intervention. FTase has been implicated as a potential target in inhibiting the prenylation of a variety of proteins, thus in controlling varied disease states (e.g. cancer, neurofibromatosis, restenosis, viral hepatitis, bone resorption, parasitic infections, corneal inflammations, and diabetes) associated with prenyl modifications of Ras and other proteins. Furthermore, it has been suggested that FTase inhibitors indirectly help in inhibiting tumors via suppression of angiogenesis and induction of apoptosis. Major milestones have been achieved with small-molecule FTase inhibitors that show efficacy without toxicity in vitro, as well as in mouse models bearing ras-dependent tumors. With the determination of the crystal structure of mammalian FTase, existent leads have been fine-tuned and new potent molecules of diverse structural classes have been designed. A few of these molecules are currently in the clinic, with at least three drug candidates in Phase II studies and one in Phase III. This article will review the progress that has been reported with FTase inhibitors in drug discovery and in the clinic. PMID:12733981

  11. The pharmacological NFkappaB inhibitors BAY117082 and MG132 induce cell arrest and apoptosis in leukemia cells through ROS-mitochondria pathway activation.

    PubMed

    Zanotto-Filho, Alfeu; Delgado-Cañedo, Andrés; Schröder, Rafael; Becker, Matheus; Klamt, Fábio; Moreira, José Cláudio Fonseca

    2010-02-28

    A growing body of evidence suggests the inhibition of NFkappaB as a strategy to induce cell death in tumor cells. In this work, we evaluated the effects of the pharmacological NFkappaB inhibitors BAY117082 and MG132 on leukemia cells apoptosis. BAY117082 and MG132 presented potent apoptotic effects compared to inhibitors of MAPKs, EGFR, PI3K/Akt, PKC and PKA signaling pathways. Non-tumor peripheral blood cells were insensitive to BAY117082 and MG132 apoptotic effects. BAY117082 and MG132-induced apoptosis was dependent on their ability to increase ROS as a prelude to mitochondria membrane potential (MMP) depolarization, permeability transition pore opening and cytochrome c release. Antioxidants blocked MG132 and BAY117082 effects on ROS, MMP and cell death. Although apoptotic markers as phosphatidylserine externalization, chromatin condensation and sub-G1 were detected in BAY117082-treated cells, caspases activation did not occur and apoptosis was insensitive to caspase inhibitors, suggesting a caspase-independent mechanism. In contrast, MG132 induced classical apoptosis through ROS-mitochondria and subsequent caspase-9/caspase-3 activation. At sub-apoptotic concentrations, BAY117082 and MG132 arrested cells in G2/M phase of the cell cycle and blocked doxorubicin-induced NFkappaB, which sensitized doxorubicin-resistant cells. Data suggest that the NFkappaB inhibitors MG132 and BAY117082 are potential anti-leukemia agents.

  12. Synthesis of Lysine Methyltransferase Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Tao; Hui, Chunngai

    2015-07-01

    Lysine methyltransferase which catalyze methylation of histone and nonhistone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and has emerged as a promising target for the development of various human diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and psychiatric disorders. However, inhibiting Lysine methyltransferases selectively has presented many challenges to medicinal chemists. During the past decade, lysine methyltransferase inhibitors covering many different structural classes have been designed and developed. In this review, we describe the development of selective, small-molecule inhibitors of lysine methyltransferases with an emphasis on their discovery and chemical synthesis. We highlight the current state of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for lysine methyltransferase inhibitor discovery.

  13. High performance oilfield scale inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Duccini, Y.; Dufour, A.; Hann, W.M.; Sanders, T.W.; Weinstein, B.

    1997-08-01

    Sea water often reacts with the formation water in offshore fields to produce barium, calcium and strontium sulfate deposits that hinder oil production. Newer fields often have more difficult to control scale problems than older ones, and current technology scale inhibitors are not able to control the deposits as well as needed. In addition, ever more stringent regulations designed to minimize the impact of inhibitors on the environment are being enacted. Three new inhibitors are presented that overcome many of the problems of older technology scale inhibitors.

  14. Regulations of Reversal of Senescence by PKC Isozymes in Response to 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-Acetate via Nuclear Translocation of pErk1/2.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun Yeong; Ryu, Min Sook; Kim, Hong Seok; Suganuma, Masami; Song, Kye Yong; Lim, In Kyoung

    2016-03-01

    The mechanism by which 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) bypasses cellular senescence was investigated using human diploid fibroblast (HDF) cell replicative senescence as a model. Upon TPA treatment, protein kinase C (PKC) α and PKCβ1 exerted differential effects on the nuclear translocation of cytoplasmic pErk1/2, a protein which maintains senescence. PKCα accompanied pErk1/2 to the nucleus after freeing it from PEA-15pS(104) via PKCβ1 and then was rapidly ubiquitinated and degraded within the nucleus. Mitogen-activated protein kinase docking motif and kinase activity of PKCα were both required for pErk1/2 transport to the nucleus. Repetitive exposure of mouse skin to TPA downregulated PKCα expression and increased epidermal and hair follicle cell proliferation. Thus, PKCα downregulation is accompanied by in vivo cell proliferation, as evidenced in 7, 12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-TPA-mediated carcinogenesis. The ability of TPA to reverse senescence was further demonstrated in old HDF cells using RNA-sequencing analyses in which TPA-induced nuclear PKCα degradation freed nuclear pErk1/2 to induce cell proliferation and facilitated the recovery of mitochondrial energy metabolism. Our data indicate that TPA-induced senescence reversal and carcinogenesis promotion share the same molecular pathway. Loss of PKCα expression following TPA treatment reduces pErk1/2-activated SP1 biding to the p21(WAF1) gene promoter, thus preventing senescence onset and overcoming G1/S cell cycle arrest in senescent cells.

  15. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mid2p Is a Potential Cell Wall Stress Sensor and Upstream Activator of the PKC1-MPK1 Cell Integrity Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ketela, Troy; Green, Robin; Bussey, Howard

    1999-01-01

    The MID2 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a protein with structural features indicative of a plasma membrane-associated cell wall sensor. MID2 was isolated as a multicopy activator of the Skn7p transcription factor. Deletion of MID2 causes resistance to calcofluor white, diminished production of stress-induced cell wall chitin under a variety of conditions, and changes in growth rate and viability in a number of different cell wall biosynthesis mutants. Overexpression of MID2 causes hyperaccumulation of chitin and increased sensitivity to calcofluor white. α-Factor hypersensitivity of mid2Δ mutants can be suppressed by overexpression of upstream elements of the cell integrity pathway, including PKC1, RHO1, WSC1, and WSC2. Mid2p and Wsc1p appear to have overlapping roles in maintaining cell integrity since mid2Δ wsc1Δ mutants are inviable on medium that does not contain osmotic support. A role for MID2 in the cell integrity pathway is further supported by the finding that MID2 is required for induction of Mpk1p tyrosine phosphorylation during exposure to α-factor, calcofluor white, or high temperature. Our data are consistent with a role for Mid2p in sensing cell wall stress and in activation of a response that includes both increased chitin synthesis and the Mpk1p mitogen-activated protein kinase cell integrity pathway. In addition, we have identified an open reading frame, MTL1, which encodes a protein with both structural and functional similarity to Mid2p. PMID:10348843

  16. Regulations of Reversal of Senescence by PKC Isozymes in Response to 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-Acetate via Nuclear Translocation of pErk1/2.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun Yeong; Ryu, Min Sook; Kim, Hong Seok; Suganuma, Masami; Song, Kye Yong; Lim, In Kyoung

    2016-03-01

    The mechanism by which 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) bypasses cellular senescence was investigated using human diploid fibroblast (HDF) cell replicative senescence as a model. Upon TPA treatment, protein kinase C (PKC) α and PKCβ1 exerted differential effects on the nuclear translocation of cytoplasmic pErk1/2, a protein which maintains senescence. PKCα accompanied pErk1/2 to the nucleus after freeing it from PEA-15pS(104) via PKCβ1 and then was rapidly ubiquitinated and degraded within the nucleus. Mitogen-activated protein kinase docking motif and kinase activity of PKCα were both required for pErk1/2 transport to the nucleus. Repetitive exposure of mouse skin to TPA downregulated PKCα expression and increased epidermal and hair follicle cell proliferation. Thus, PKCα downregulation is accompanied by in vivo cell proliferation, as evidenced in 7, 12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-TPA-mediated carcinogenesis. The ability of TPA to reverse senescence was further demonstrated in old HDF cells using RNA-sequencing analyses in which TPA-induced nuclear PKCα degradation freed nuclear pErk1/2 to induce cell proliferation and facilitated the recovery of mitochondrial energy metabolism. Our data indicate that TPA-induced senescence reversal and carcinogenesis promotion share the same molecular pathway. Loss of PKCα expression following TPA treatment reduces pErk1/2-activated SP1 biding to the p21(WAF1) gene promoter, thus preventing senescence onset and overcoming G1/S cell cycle arrest in senescent cells. PMID:26912086

  17. Cell cycle arrest or survival signaling through αv integrins, activation of PKC and ERK1/2 lead to anoikis resistance of ovarian cancer spheroids.

    PubMed

    Carduner, Ludovic; Picot, Cédric R; Leroy-Dudal, Johanne; Blay, Lyvia; Kellouche, Sabrina; Carreiras, Franck

    2014-01-15

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic cancer mainly due to spheroids organization of cancer cells that disseminate within the peritoneal cavity. We have investigated the molecular mechanisms by which ovarian cancer spheroids resist anoikis, choosing as models the 2 well-characterized human ovarian cancer cell lines IGROV1 and SKOV3. These cell lines have the propensity to float as clusters, and were isolated from tumor tissue and ascites, respectively. To form spheroids, IGROV1 and SKOV3 ovarian adenocarcinoma cells were maintained under anchorage-independent culture conditions, in which both lines survive at least a week. A short apoptotic period prior to a survival signaling commitment was observed for IGROV1 cells whereas SKOV3 cells entered G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. This difference in behavior was due to different signals. With regard to SKOV3 cells, activation of p38 and an increase in p130/Rb occurred once anchorage-independent culture was established. Analyses of the survival signaling pathway switched on by IGROV1 cells showed that activation of ERK1/2 was required to evade apoptosis, an effect partly dependent on PKC activation and αv integrins. αv-integrin expression is essential for survival through activation of ERK1/2 phosphorylation. The above data indicate that ovarian cancer cells can resist anoikis in the spheroid state by arrest in the cell cycle or through activation of αv-integrin-ERK-mediated survival signals. Such signaling might result in the selection of resistant cells within disseminating spheroids, favoring further relapse in ovarian cancers. PMID:24291221

  18. Regulations of Reversal of Senescence by PKC Isozymes in Response to 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-Acetate via Nuclear Translocation of pErk1/2

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yun Yeong; Ryu, Min Sook; Kim, Hong Seok; Suganuma, Masami; Song, Kye Yong; Lim, In Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism by which 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) bypasses cellular senescence was investigated using human diploid fibroblast (HDF) cell replicative senescence as a model. Upon TPA treatment, protein kinase C (PKC) α and PKCβ1 exerted differential effects on the nuclear translocation of cytoplasmic pErk1/2, a protein which maintains senescence. PKCα accompanied pErk1/2 to the nucleus after freeing it from PEA-15pS104 via PKCβ1 and then was rapidly ubiquitinated and degraded within the nucleus. Mitogen-activated protein kinase docking motif and kinase activity of PKCα were both required for pErk1/2 transport to the nucleus. Repetitive exposure of mouse skin to TPA downregulated PKCα expression and increased epidermal and hair follicle cell proliferation. Thus, PKCα downregulation is accompanied by in vivo cell proliferation, as evidenced in 7, 12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-TPA-mediated carcinogenesis. The ability of TPA to reverse senescence was further demonstrated in old HDF cells using RNA-sequencing analyses in which TPA-induced nuclear PKCα degradation freed nuclear pErk1/2 to induce cell proliferation and facilitated the recovery of mitochondrial energy metabolism. Our data indicate that TPA-induced senescence reversal and carcinogenesis promotion share the same molecular pathway. Loss of PKCα expression following TPA treatment reduces pErk1/2-activated SP1 biding to the p21WAF1 gene promoter, thus preventing senescence onset and overcoming G1/S cell cycle arrest in senescent cells. PMID:26912086

  19. Early BMP, Wnt and Ca(2+)/PKC pathway activation predicts the bone forming capacity of periosteal cells in combination with calcium phosphates.

    PubMed

    Bolander, Johanna; Chai, Yoke Chin; Geris, Liesbet; Schrooten, Jan; Lambrechts, Dennis; Roberts, Scott J; Luyten, Frank P

    2016-04-01

    The development of osteoinductive calcium phosphate- (CaP) based biomaterials has, and continues to be, a major focus in the field of bone tissue engineering. However, limited insight into the spatiotemporal activation of signalling pathways has hampered the optimisation of in vivo bone formation and subsequent clinical translation. To gain further knowledge regarding the early molecular events governing bone tissue formation, we combined human periosteum derived progenitor cells with three types of clinically used CaP-scaffolds, to obtain constructs with a distinct range of bone forming capacity in vivo. Protein phosphorylation together with gene expression for key ligands and target genes were investigated 24 hours after cell seeding in vitro, and 3 and 12 days post ectopic implantation in nude mice. A computational modelling approach was used to deduce critical factors for bone formation 8 weeks post implantation. The combined Ca(2+)-mediated activation of BMP-, Wnt- and PKC signalling pathways 3 days post implantation were able to discriminate the bone forming from the non-bone forming constructs. Subsequently, a mathematical model able to predict in vivo bone formation with 96% accuracy was developed. This study illustrates the importance of defining and understanding CaP-activated signalling pathways that are required and sufficient for in vivo bone formation. Furthermore, we demonstrate the reliability of mathematical modelling as a tool to analyse and deduce key factors within an empirical data set and highlight its relevance to the translation of regenerative medicine strategies. PMID:26901484

  20. FTY720P inhibits hepatic Na(+)-K(+) ATPase via S1PR2 and PGE2.

    PubMed

    Al Alam, Nadine; Kreydiyyeh, Sawsan Ibrahim

    2016-08-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) was found previously to inhibit Na(+)-K(+) ATPase in HepG2 cells. Whether fingolimod (FTY720), a S1P receptor (S1PR) agonist, similarly inhibits the ATPase is a question that needs to be addressed. The aim of this work was to study the effect of FTY720P, the active form of the drug, on the activity of Na(+)-K(+) ATPase in HepG2 cells and determine its mechanism of action. The activity of the ATPase was assayed by measuring the amount of inorganic phosphate liberated in the presence and the absence of ouabain. FTY720-P (7.5 nmol/L, 15 min) significantly reduced the activity of the ATPase. This effect disappeared completely in the presence of JTE-013, which is a specific blocker of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1PR2), as well as in the presence of calphostin and indomethacin, which are inhibitors of protein kinase C (PKC) and COX-2, respectively. The effect of FTY720P was mimicked by prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and PMA, but abrogated by NF-κB inhibition. When NF-κB was inhibited, the effect of exogenous PGE2 still appeared, but that of PMA did not manifest, suggesting that NF-κB is upstream of PGE2 and downstream of PKC. It was concluded that FTY720P activates via S1PR2, PKC, and NF-κB. The latter induces PGE2 generation and inhibits Na(+)-K(+) ATPase. PMID:27501354

  1. Characterization of the biological effects of a novel protein kinase D inhibitor in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Evans, Ian M; Bagherzadeh, Azadeh; Charles, Mark; Raynham, Tony; Ireson, Chris; Boakes, Alexandra; Kelland, Lloyd; Zachary, Ian C

    2010-08-01

    VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) plays an essential role in angiogenesis during development and in disease largely mediated by signalling events initiated by binding of VEGF to its receptor, VEGFR2 (VEGF receptor 2)/KDR (kinase insert domain receptor). Recent studies indicate that VEGF activates PKD (protein kinase D) in endothelial cells to regulate a variety of cellular functions, including signalling events, proliferation, migration and angiogenesis. To better understand the role of PKD in VEGF-mediated endothelial function, we characterized the effects of a novel pyrazine benzamide PKD inhibitor CRT5 in HUVECs (human umbilical vein endothelial cells). The activity of the isoforms PKD1 and PKD2 were blocked by this inhibitor as indicated by reduced phosphorylation, at Ser916 and Ser876 respectively, after VEGF stimulation. The VEGF-induced phosphorylation of three PKD substrates, histone deacetylase 5, CREB (cAMP-response-element-binding protein) and HSP27 (heat-shock protein 27) at Ser82, was also inhibited by CRT5. In contrast, CRT6, an inactive analogue of CRT5, had no effect on PKD or HSP27 Ser82 phosphorylation. Furthermore, phosphorylation of HSP27 at Ser78, which occurs solely via the p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) pathway, was also unaffected by CRT5. In vitro kinase assays show that CRT5 did not significantly inhibit several PKC isoforms expressed in endothelial cells. CRT5 also decreased VEGF-induced endothelial migration, proliferation and tubulogenesis, similar to effects seen when the cells were transfected with PKD siRNA (small interfering RNA). CRT5, a novel specific PKD inhibitor, will greatly facilitate the study of the role of PKD signalling mechanisms in angiogenesis. PMID:20497126

  2. Heterologous desensitization of the sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors by purinoceptor activation in renal mesangial cells

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Cuiyan; Ren, Shuyu; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Huwiler, Andrea

    2004-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is considered a potent mitogen for mesangial cells and activates the classical mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade via S1P receptors. In this study, we show that S1P signalling is rapidly desensitized upon S1P receptor activation. A complete loss of S1P sensitivity occurs after 10 min of S1P pretreatment and remains for at least 8 h. A similar desensitization is also seen with the S1P mimetic FTY720-phosphate, but not with the nonphosphorylated FTY720, nor with sphingosine or ceramide. Prestimulating the cells with extracellular ATP or UTP, which bind to and activate P2Y receptors on mesangial cells, a similar rapid desensitization of the S1P receptor occurs, suggesting a heterologous desensitization of S1P receptors by P2Y receptor activation. Furthermore, adenosine binding to P1 receptors triggers a similar desensitization. In contrast, two other growth factors, PDGF-BB and TGFβ2, have no significant effect on S1P-induced MAPK activation. S1P also triggers increased inositol trisphosphate (IP3) formation, which is completely abolished by S1P pretreatment but only partially by ATP pretreatment, suggesting that IP3 formation and MAPK activation stimulated by S1P involve different receptor subtypes. Increasing intracellular cAMP levels by forskolin pretreatment has a similar effect on desensitization as adenosine. Moreover, a selective A3 adenosine receptor agonist, which couples to phospholipase C and increases IP3 formation, exerted a similar effect. Pretreatment of cells with various protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors prior to ATP prestimulation and subsequent S1P stimulation leads to a differential reversal of the ATP effect. Whereas the broad-spectrum protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine potently reverses the effect, the PKCinhibitor CGP41251, the PKCinhibitor rottlerin and calphostin C show only a partial reversal at maximal concentrations. Suramin, which is reported as a selective S1P3 receptor antagonist

  3. Osteocompatibility of Biofilm Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Rawson, Monica; Haggard, Warren; Jennings, Jessica A

    2014-01-01

    The demand for infection prevention therapies has led to the discovery of several biofilm inhibitors. These inhibiting signals are released by bacteria, fungi, or marine organisms to signal biofilm dispersal or disruption in Gram-positive, Gram-negative, and fungal microorganisms. The purpose of this study was to test the biocompatibility of five different naturally-produced biofilm chemical dispersal and inhibition signals with osteoblast-like cells: D-amino acids (D-AA), lysostaphin (LS), farnesol, cis-2-decenoic acid (C2DA), and desformyl flustrabromine (dFBr). In this preliminary study, compatibility of these anti-biofilm agents with differentiating osteoblasts was examined over a 21 days period at levels above and below concentrations active against bacterial biofilm. Anti-biofilm compounds listed above were serially diluted in osteogenic media and added to cultures of MC3T3 cells. Cell viability and cytotoxicity, after exposure to each anti-biofilm agent, were measured using a DNA assay. Differentiation characteristics of osteoblasts were determined qualitatively by observing staining of mineral deposits and quantitatively with an alkaline phosphatase assay. D-AA, LS, and C2DA were all biocompatible within the reported biofilm inhibitory concentration ranges and supported osteoblast differentiation. Farnesol and dFBr induced cytotoxic responses within the reported biofilm inhibitory concentration range and low doses of dFBr were found to inhibit osteoblast differentiation. At high concentrations, such as those that may be present after local delivery, many of these biofilm inhibitors can have effects on cellular viability and osteoblast function. Concentrations at which negative effects on osteoblasts occur should serve as upper limits for delivery to orthopaedic trauma sites and guide development of these potential therapeutics for orthopaedics. PMID:25505496

  4. Osteocompatibility of biofilm inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Rawson, Monica; Haggard, Warren; Jennings, Jessica A

    2014-01-01

    The demand for infection prevention therapies has led to the discovery of several biofilm inhibitors. These inhibiting signals are released by bacteria, fungi, or marine organisms to signal biofilm dispersal or disruption in Gram-positive, Gram-negative, and fungal microorganisms. The purpose of this study was to test the biocompatibility of five different naturally-produced biofilm chemical dispersal and inhibition signals with osteoblast-like cells: D-amino acids (D-AA), lysostaphin (LS), farnesol, cis-2-decenoic acid (C2DA), and desformyl flustrabromine (dFBr). In this preliminary study, compatibility of these anti-biofilm agents with differentiating osteoblasts was examined over a 21 days period at levels above and below concentrations active against bacterial biofilm. Anti-biofilm compounds listed above were serially diluted in osteogenic media and added to cultures of MC3T3 cells. Cell viability and cytotoxicity, after exposure to each anti-biofilm agent, were measured using a DNA assay. Differentiation characteristics of osteoblasts were determined qualitatively by observing staining of mineral deposits and quantitatively with an alkaline phosphatase assay. D-AA, LS, and C2DA were all biocompatible within the reported biofilm inhibitory concentration ranges and supported osteoblast differentiation. Farnesol and dFBr induced cytotoxic responses within the reported biofilm inhibitory concentration range and low doses of dFBr were found to inhibit osteoblast differentiation. At high concentrations, such as those that may be present after local delivery, many of these biofilm inhibitors can have effects on cellular viability and osteoblast function. Concentrations at which negative effects on osteoblasts occur should serve as upper limits for delivery to orthopaedic trauma sites and guide development of these potential therapeutics for orthopaedics. PMID:25505496

  5. Biological abatement of cellulase inhibitors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bio-abatement uses a fungus to metabolize and remove fermentation inhibitors. To determine whether bio-abatement could alleviate enzyme inhibitor effects observed in biomass liquors after pretreatment, corn stover at 10% (w/v) solids was pretreated with either dilute acid or liquid hot water. The ...

  6. Anthranilamide inhibitors of factor Xa.

    PubMed

    Mendel, David; Marquart, Angela L; Joseph, Sajan; Waid, Philip; Yee, Ying K; Tebbe, Anne Louise; Ratz, Andrew M; Herron, David K; Goodson, Theodore; Masters, John J; Franciskovich, Jeffry B; Tinsley, Jennifer M; Wiley, Michael R; Weir, Leonard C; Kyle, Jeffrey A; Klimkowski, Valentine J; Smith, Gerald F; Towner, Richard D; Froelich, Larry L; Buben, John; Craft, Trelia J

    2007-09-01

    SAR about the B-ring of a series of N(2)-aroyl anthranilamide factor Xa (fXa) inhibitors is described. B-ring o-aminoalkylether and B-ring p-amine probes of the S1' and S4 sites, respectively, afforded picomolar fXa inhibitors that performed well in in vitro anticoagulation assays.

  7. Breakdown of the FLT3-ITD/STAT5 axis and synergistic apoptosis induction by the histone deacetylase inhibitor panobinostat and FLT3-specific inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pietschmann, Kristin; Bolck, Hella Anna; Buchwald, Marc; Spielberg, Steffi; Polzer, Harald; Spiekermann, Karsten; Bug, Gesine; Heinzel, Thorsten; Böhmer, Frank-Dietmar; Krämer, Oliver H

    2012-11-01

    Activating mutations of the class III receptor tyrosine kinase FLT3 are the most frequent molecular aberration in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Mutant FLT3 accelerates proliferation, suppresses apoptosis, and correlates with poor prognosis. Therefore, it is a promising therapeutic target. Here, we show that RNA interference against FLT3 with an internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD) potentiates the efficacy of the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) panobinostat (LBH589) against AML cells expressing FLT3-ITD. Similar to RNA interference, tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI; AC220/cpd.102/PKC412) in combination with LBH589 exhibit superior activity against AML cells. Median dose-effect analyses of drug-induced apoptosis rates of AML cells (MV4-11 and MOLM-13) revealed combination index (CI) values indicating strong synergism. AC220, the most potent and FLT3-specific TKI, shows highest synergism with LBH589 in the low nanomolar range. A 4-hour exposure to LBH589 + AC220 already generates more than 50% apoptosis after 24 hours. Different cell lines lacking FLT3-ITD as well as normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells are not significantly affected by LBH589 + TKI, showing the specificity of this treatment regimen. Immunoblot analyses show that LBH589 + TKI induce apoptosis via degradation of FLT3-ITD and its prosurvival target STAT5. Previously, we showed the LBH589-induced proteasomal degradation of FLT3-ITD. Here, we show that activated caspase-3 also contributes to the degradation of FLT3-ITD and that STAT5 is a direct target of this protease. Our data strongly emphasize HDACi/TKI drug combinations as promising modality for the treatment of FLT3-ITD-positive AMLs. PMID:22942377

  8. Hsp90 inhibitor PU-H71, a multimodal inhibitor of malignancy, induces complete responses in triple-negative breast cancer models.

    PubMed

    Caldas-Lopes, Eloisi; Cerchietti, Leandro; Ahn, James H; Clement, Cristina C; Robles, Ana I; Rodina, Anna; Moulick, Kamalika; Taldone, Tony; Gozman, Alexander; Guo, Yunke; Wu, Nian; de Stanchina, Elisa; White, Julie; Gross, Steven S; Ma, Yuliang; Varticovski, Lyuba; Melnick, Ari; Chiosis, Gabriela

    2009-05-19

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) are defined by a lack of expression of estrogen, progesterone, and HER2 receptors. Because of the absence of identified targets and targeted therapies, and due to a heterogeneous molecular presentation, treatment guidelines for patients with TNBC include only conventional chemotherapy. Such treatment, while effective for some, leaves others with high rates of early relapse and is not curative for any patient with metastatic disease. Here, we demonstrate that these tumors are sensitive to the heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitor PU-H71. Potent and durable anti-tumor effects in TNBC xenografts, including complete response and tumor regression, without toxicity to the host are achieved with this agent. Notably, TNBC tumors respond to retreatment with PU-H71 for several cycles extending for over 5 months without evidence of resistance or toxicity. Through a proteomics approach, we show that multiple oncoproteins involved in tumor proliferation, survival, and invasive potential are in complex with PU-H71-bound Hsp90 in TNBC. PU-H71 induces efficient and sustained downregulation and inactivation, both in vitro and in vivo, of these proteins. Among them, we identify downregulation of components of the Ras/Raf/MAPK pathway and G(2)-M phase to contribute to its anti-proliferative effect, degradation of activated Akt and Bcl-xL to induce apoptosis, and inhibition of activated NF-kappaB, Akt, ERK2, Tyk2, and PKC to reduce TNBC invasive potential. The results identify Hsp90 as a critical and multimodal target in this most difficult to treat breast cancer subtype and support the use of the Hsp90 inhibitor PU-H71 for clinical trials involving patients with TNBC.

  9. Proteinaceous alpha-amylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Birte; Fukuda, Kenji; Nielsen, Peter K; Bønsager, Birgit C

    2004-02-12

    Proteins that inhibit alpha-amylases have been isolated from plants and microorganisms. These inhibitors can have natural roles in the control of endogenous alpha-amylase activity or in defence against pathogens and pests; certain inhibitors are reported to be antinutritional factors. The alpha-amylase inhibitors belong to seven different protein structural families, most of which also contain evolutionary related proteins without inhibitory activity. Two families include bifunctional inhibitors acting both on alpha-amylases and proteases. High-resolution structures are available of target alpha-amylases in complex with inhibitors from five families. These structures indicate major diversity but also some similarity in the structural basis of alpha-amylase inhibition. Mutational analysis of the mechanism of inhibition was performed in a few cases and various protein engineering and biotechnological approaches have been outlined for exploitation of the inhibitory function. PMID:14871655

  10. Authentic HIV-1 integrase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chenzhong; Marchand, Christophe; Burke, Terrence R; Pommier, Yves; Nicklaus, Marc C

    2010-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is indispensable for HIV-1 replication and has become a validated target for developing anti-AIDS agents. In two decades of development of IN inhibition-based anti-HIV therapeutics, a significant number of compounds were identified as IN inhibitors, but only some of them showed antiviral activity. This article reviews a number of patented HIV-1 IN inhibitors, especially those that possess high selectivity for the strand transfer reaction. These compounds generally have a polar coplanar moiety, which is assumed to chelate two magnesium ions in the binding site. Resistance to those compounds, when given to patients, can develop as a result of IN mutations. We refer to those compounds as authentic IN inhibitors. Continued drug development has so far delivered one authentic IN inhibitor to the market (raltegravir in 2007). Current and future attention will be focused on the development of novel authentic IN inhibitors with the goal of overcoming viral resistance. PMID:21426159

  11. Anti-neuroinflammatory efficacy of the aldose reductase inhibitor FMHM via phospholipase C/protein kinase C-dependent NF-κB and MAPK pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Ke-Wu; Li, Jun; Dong, Xin; Wang, Ying-Hong; Ma, Zhi-Zhong; Jiang, Yong; Jin, Hong-Wei; Tu, Peng-Fei

    2013-11-15

    Aldose reductase (AR) has a key role in several inflammatory diseases: diabetes, cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, AR inhibition seems to be a useful strategy for anti-inflammation therapy. In the central nervous system (CNS), microglial over-activation is considered to be a central event in neuroinflammation. However, the effects of AR inhibition in CNS inflammation and its underlying mechanism of action remain unknown. In the present study, we found that FMHM (a naturally derived AR inhibitor from the roots of Polygala tricornis Gagnep.) showed potent anti-neuroinflammatory effects in vivo and in vitro by inhibiting microglial activation and expression of inflammatory mediators. Mechanistic studies showed that FMHM suppressed the activity of AR-dependent phospholipase C/protein kinase C signaling, which further resulted in downstream inactivation of the IκB kinase/IκB/nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) inflammatory pathway. Therefore, AR inhibition-dependent NF-κB inactivation negatively regulated the transcription and expression of various inflammatory genes. AR inhibition by FMHM exerted neuroprotective effects in lipopolysaccharide-induced neuron–microglia co-cultures. These findings suggested that AR is a potential target for neuroinflammation inhibition and that FMHM could be an effective agent for treating or preventing neuroinflammatory diseases. - Highlights: • FMHM is a natural-derived aldose reductase (AR) inhibitor. • FMHM inhibits various neuroinflammatory mediator productions in vitro and in vivo. • FMHM inhibits neuroinflammation via aldose reductase/PLC/PKC-dependent NF-κB pathway. • FMHM inhibits neuroinflammation via aldose reductase/PLC/PKC-dependent MAPK pathway. • FMHM protects neurons against inflammatory injury in microglia-neuron co-cultures.

  12. Differential effect of 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} on Hsp28 and PKC{beta} gene expression in the phorbol ester-resistant human myeloid HL-525 leukemic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yong J.; Galoforo, S.S.; Berns, C.M.

    1997-08-01

    We investigated the effect of 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} [1,25-(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}] on the expression of the 28-kDa heat shock protein gene (hsp28) and the protein kinase C beta gene (PKC{beta}) in the human myeloid HL-60 leukemic cell variant HL-525, which is resistance to phorbol ester-induced macrophage differentiation. Northern and Western blot analysis showed little or no hsp28 gene expression in the HL-60 cell variant, HL-205, which is susceptible to such differentiation, while a relatively high basal level of hps28 gene expression was observed in the HL-525 cells. However, both cell lines demonstrated heat shock-induced expression of this gene. During treatment with 50-300 nM 1,25-(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}, a marked reduction of hsp28 gene expression was not associated with heat shock transcription factor-heat shock element (HSF-HSE) binding activity. Our results suggest that the differential effect of 1,25-(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} on hsp28 and PKC{beta} gene expression is due to the different sequence composition of the vitamin D response element in the in the promoter region as well as an accessory factor for each gene or that 1,25-(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} increases PKC{beta} gene expression, which in turn negatively regulates the expression of the hsp28 gene, or vice versa.

  13. Oxidized mucus proteinase inhibitor: a fairly potent neutrophil elastase inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Boudier, C; Bieth, J G

    1994-01-01

    N-chlorosuccinimide oxidizes one of the methionine residues of mucus proteinase inhibitor with a second-order rate constant of 1.5 M-1.s-1. Cyanogen bromide cleavage and NH2-terminal sequencing show that the modified residue is methionine-73, the P'1 component of the inhibitor's active centre. Oxidation of the inhibitor decreases its neutrophil elastase inhibitory capacity but does not fully abolish it. The kinetic parameters describing the elastase-oxidized inhibitor interaction are: association rate constant kass. = 2.6 x 10(5) M-1.s-1, dissociation rate constant kdiss. = 2.9 x 10(-3) s-1 and equilibrium dissociation constant Ki = 1.1 x 10(-8) M. Comparison with the native inhibitor indicates that oxidation decreases kass. by a factor of 18.8 and increases kdiss. by a factor of 6.4, and therefore leads to a 120-fold increase in Ki. Yet, the oxidized inhibitor may still act as a potent elastase inhibitor in the upper respiratory tract where its concentration is 500-fold higher than Ki, i.e. where the elastase inhibition is pseudo-irreversible. Experiments in vitro with fibrous human lung elastin, the most important natural substrate of elastase, support this view: 1.35 microM elastase is fully inhibited by 5-6 microM oxidized inhibitor whether the enzyme-inhibitor complex is formed in the presence or absence of elastin and whether elastase is pre-adsorbed on elastin or not. PMID:7945266

  14. The identification of inhibitors of Schistosoma mansoni miracidial transformation by incorporating a medium-throughput small-molecule screen.

    PubMed

    Taft, Andrew S; Norante, Francesca A; Yoshino, Timothy P

    2010-06-01

    In Schistosoma mansoni, the miracidium-to-primary sporocyst transformation process is associated with many physiological, morphological, transcriptional and biochemical changes. In the present study, we use a medium-throughput small-molecule screen to identify chemical compounds inhibiting or delaying the in vitro transformation of miracidia to the sporocyst stage. The Sigma-Aldrich Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC) contains 1280 well-characterized chemical compounds with various modes of action including enzyme inhibitors, antibiotics, cell-cycle regulators, apoptosis inducers and GPCR ligands. We identified 47 compounds that greatly reduce or delay this transformation process during a primary screen of live miracidia. The majority of compounds inhibiting larval transformation were from dopaminergic, serotonergic, ion channel and phosphorylation classes. Specifically, we found that dopamine D2-type antagonists, serotonin reuptake inhibitors, voltage-gated calcium channel antagonists and a PKC activator significantly reduced in vitro miracidial transformation rates. Many of the targets of these compounds regulate adenylyl cyclase activity, with the inhibition or activation of these targets resulting in increased cAMP levels in miracidia and concomitant blocking/delaying of larval transformation. PMID:20060828

  15. Small Molecule Inhibitors of BAF; A Promising Family of Compounds in HIV-1 Latency Reversal

    PubMed Central

    Stoszko, Mateusz; De Crignis, Elisa; Rokx, Casper; Khalid, Mir Mubashir; Lungu, Cynthia; Palstra, Robert-Jan; Kan, Tsung Wai; Boucher, Charles; Verbon, Annelies; Dykhuizen, Emily C.; Mahmoudi, Tokameh

    2015-01-01

    Persistence of latently infected cells in presence of Anti-Retroviral Therapy presents the main obstacle to HIV-1 eradication. Much effort is thus placed on identification of compounds capable of HIV-1 latency reversal in order to render infected cells susceptible to viral cytopathic effects and immune clearance. We identified the BAF chromatin remodeling complex as a key player required for maintenance of HIV-1 latency, highlighting its potential as a molecular target for inhibition in latency reversal. Here, we screened a recently identified panel of small molecule inhibitors of BAF (BAFi's) for potential to activate latent HIV-1. Latency reversal was strongly induced by BAFi's Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester and Pyrimethamine, two molecules previously characterized for clinical application. BAFi's reversed HIV-1 latency in cell line based latency models, in two ex vivo infected primary cell models of latency, as well as in HIV-1 infected patient's CD4 + T cells, without inducing T cell proliferation or activation. BAFi-induced HIV-1 latency reversal was synergistically enhanced upon PKC pathway activation and HDAC-inhibition. Therefore BAFi's constitute a promising family of molecules for inclusion in therapeutic combinatorial HIV-1 latency reversal. PMID:26870822

  16. Small Molecule Inhibitors of BAF; A Promising Family of Compounds in HIV-1 Latency Reversal.

    PubMed

    Stoszko, Mateusz; De Crignis, Elisa; Rokx, Casper; Khalid, Mir Mubashir; Lungu, Cynthia; Palstra, Robert-Jan; Kan, Tsung Wai; Boucher, Charles; Verbon, Annelies; Dykhuizen, Emily C; Mahmoudi, Tokameh

    2016-01-01

    Persistence of latently infected cells in presence of Anti-Retroviral Therapy presents the main obstacle to HIV-1 eradication. Much effort is thus placed on identification of compounds capable of HIV-1 latency reversal in order to render infected cells susceptible to viral cytopathic effects and immune clearance. We identified the BAF chromatin remodeling complex as a key player required for maintenance of HIV-1 latency, highlighting its potential as a molecular target for inhibition in latency reversal. Here, we screened a recently identified panel of small molecule inhibitors of BAF (BAFi's) for potential to activate latent HIV-1. Latency reversal was strongly induced by BAFi's Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester and Pyrimethamine, two molecules previously characterized for clinical application. BAFi's reversed HIV-1 latency in cell line based latency models, in two ex vivo infected primary cell models of latency, as well as in HIV-1 infected patient's CD4 + T cells, without inducing T cell proliferation or activation. BAFi-induced HIV-1 latency reversal was synergistically enhanced upon PKC pathway activation and HDAC-inhibition. Therefore BAFi's constitute a promising family of molecules for inclusion in therapeutic combinatorial HIV-1 latency reversal. PMID:26870822

  17. Flavivirus Entry Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-Yin; Shi, Pei-Yong

    2015-09-11

    Many flaviviruses are significant human pathogens that are transmitted by mosquitoes and ticks. Although effective vaccines are available for yellow fever virus, Japanese encephalitic virus, and tick-borne encephalitis virus, these and other flaviviruses still cause thousands of human deaths and millions of illnesses each year. No clinically approved antiviral therapy is available for flavivirus treatment. To meet this unmet medical need, industry and academia have taken multiple approaches to develop antiflavivirus therapy, among which targeting viral entry has been actively pursued in the past decade. Here we review the current knowledge of flavivirus entry and its use for small molecule drug discovery. Inhibitors of two major steps of flaviviral entry have been reported: (i) molecules that block virus-receptor interaction; (ii) compounds that prevent conformational change of viral envelope protein during virus-host membrane fusion. We also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of targeting viral entry for treatment of flavivirus infection as compared to targeting viral replication proteins. PMID:27617926

  18. Small molecules inhibitors of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 - an overview.

    PubMed

    Rouch, Anne; Vanucci-Bacqué, Corinne; Bedos-Belval, Florence; Baltas, Michel

    2015-03-01

    PAI-1, a glycoprotein from the serpin family and the main inhibitor of tPA and uPA, plays an essential role in the regulation of intra and extravascular fibrinolysis by inhibiting the formation of plasmin from plasminogen. PAI-1 is also involved in pathological processes such as thromboembolic diseases, atherosclerosis, fibrosis and cancer. The inhibition of PAI-1 activity by small organic molecules has been observed in vitro and with some in vivo models. Based on these findings, PAI-1 appears as a potential therapeutic target for several pathological conditions. Over the past decades, many efforts have therefore been devoted to developing PAI-1 inhibitors. This article provides an overview of the publishing activity on small organic molecules used as PAI-1 inhibitors. The chemical synthesis of the most potent inhibitors as well as their biological and biochemical evaluations is also presented.

  19. Synthetic conversion of ACAT inhibitor to acetylcholinesterase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Obata, R; Sunazuka, T; Otoguro, K; Tomoda, H; Harigaya, Y; Omura, S

    2000-06-19

    Natural product acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) inhibitor pyripyropene A was synthetically converted to acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor via heterolitic cleavage of the 2-pyrone ring, followed by gamma-acylation/cyclization with several aroyl chlorides. The 4-pyridyl analogue selectively showed AChE inhibitory activity (IC50 7.9 microM) and no ACAT inhibitory activity IC50 = >1000 microM. PMID:10890154

  20. Glycosylasparaginase inhibition studies: competitive inhibitors, transition state mimics, noncompetitive inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Risley, J M; Huang, D H; Kaylor, J J; Malik, J J; Xia, Y Q

    2001-01-01

    Glycosylasparaginase catalyzes the hydrolysis of the N-glycosylic bond between asparagine and N-acetylglucosamine in the catabolism of N-linked glycoproteins. Previously only three competitive inhibitors, one noncompetitive inhibitor, and one irreversible inhibitor of glycosylasparaginase activity had been reported. Using human glycosylasparaginase from human amniotic fluid, L-aspartic acid and four of its analogues, where the alpha-amino group was substituted with a chloro, bromo, methyl or hydrogen, were competitive inhibitors having Ki values between 0.6-7.7 mM. These results provide supporting evidence for a proposed intramolecular autoproteolytic activation reaction. A proposed phosphono transition state mimic and a sulfo transition state mimic were competitive inhibitors with Ki values 0.9 mM and 1.4 mM, respectively. These results support a mechanism for the enzyme-catalyzed reaction involving formation of a tetrahedral high-energy intermediate. Three analogues of the natural substrate were noncompetitive inhibitors with Ki values between 0.56-0.75 mM, indicating the presence of a second binding site that may recognize (substituted)acetamido groups.

  1. Selective Inhibitors of Protein Methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that protein methyltransferases (PMTs), which catalyze methylation of histone and nonhistone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and human diseases. In particular, PMTs have been recognized as major players in regulating gene expression and chromatin state. PMTs are divided into two categories: protein lysine methyltransferases (PKMTs) and protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs). There has been a steadily growing interest in these enzymes as potential therapeutic targets and therefore discovery of PMT inhibitors has also been pursued increasingly over the past decade. Here, we present a perspective on selective, small-molecule inhibitors of PMTs with an emphasis on their discovery, characterization, and applicability as chemical tools for deciphering the target PMTs’ physiological functions and involvement in human diseases. We highlight the current state of PMT inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for PMT inhibitor discovery. PMID:25406853

  2. Synthesis of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Chunngai; Ye, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Lysine methyltransferase which catalyze methylation of histone and non-histone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and has emerged as a promising target for the development of various human diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and psychiatric disorders. However, inhibiting lysine methyltransferases selectively has presented many challenges to medicinal chemists. During the past decade, lysine methyltransferase inhibitors covering many different structural classes have been designed and developed. In this review, we describe the development of selective, small-molecule inhibitors of lysine methyltransferases with an emphasis on their discovery and chemical synthesis. We highlight the current state of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for lysine methyltransferase inhibitor discovery. PMID:26258118

  3. [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and PKC-{alpha} are involved in the inhibitory effects of Ib, a novel nonpeptide AngiotensinII subtype AT{sub 1} receptor antagonist, on AngiotensinII-induced vascular contraction in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yu; Wang Wei; Wang Qiujuan Wu Jinhui; Xu Jinyi; Wu Xiaoming

    2007-12-07

    The vasoactive peptide AngiotensinII (AngII) is an important factor in the cardiovascular system, exerting most of its effects through AngII receptor type 1 (AT{sub 1}). Ib, a new nonpeptide AT{sub 1} receptor antagonist, has been observed to play a positive role in the treatment of hypertension in preclinical tests. In this study, the inhibitory effects of Ib on AngII-induced vascular contraction in vitro were investigated, and its molecular mechanisms were further explored. In endothelium-denuded aortic rings from rabbits, Ib produced a rightward shift in the concentration-response curve for AngII with a decrease in the maximal contractile response and the pD{sub 2}{sup '} was 7.29. In vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), the specific binding of [{sup 125}I]AngII to AT{sub 1} receptors was inhibited by Ib in a concentration-dependent manner with IC{sub 50} value of 0.96 nM. Ib could inhibit both AngII-induced Ca{sup 2+} mobilization from internal stores and Ca{sup 2+} influx. Moreover, the translocation of PKC-{alpha} stimulated by AngII was inhibited by Ib. Thus, the inhibitory effects of Ib might be related with the depression on AngII-induced increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and translocation of PKC-{alpha} through blocking AT{sub 1} receptors.

  4. [Pharmacology of bone resorption inhibitor].

    PubMed

    Menuki, Kunitaka; Sakai, Akinori

    2015-10-01

    Currently, bone resorption inhibitor is mainly used for osteoporosis. A number of these agents have been developed. These pharmacological action are various. Bisphosphonate inhibit functions of the osteoclasts by inducing apoptosis. On the one hand, RANK-ligand inhibitor and selective estrogen receptor modulator inhibit formation of osteoclasts. It is important to understand these pharmacological action for the selection of the appropriate medicine. PMID:26529923

  5. PIF-pocket as a target for C. albicans Pkh selective inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pastor-Flores, Daniel; Schulze, Jörg O; Bahí, Anna; Giacometti, Romina; Ferrer-Dalmau, Jofre; Passeron, Susana; Engel, Matthias; Süss, Evelyn; Casamayor, Antonio; Biondi, Ricardo M

    2013-10-18

    The phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1, PDK1, is a master kinase that phosphorylates the activation loop of up to 23 AGC kinases. S. cerevisiae has three PDK1 orthologues, Pkh1-3, which also phosphorylate AGC kinases (e.g., Ypk, Tpk, Pkc1, and Sch9). Pkh1 and 2 are redundant proteins involved in multiple essential cellular functions, including endocytosis and cell wall integrity. Based on similarities with the budding yeast, the Pkh of fungal infectious species was postulated as a novel target for antifungals. Here, we found that depletion of Pkh eventually induces oxidative stress and DNA double-strand breaks, leading to programmed cell death. This finding supports Pkh as an antifungal target since pharmacological inhibition of Pkh would lead to the death of yeast cells, the ultimate goal of antifungals. It was therefore of interest to further investigate the possibility to develop Pkh inhibitors with selectivity for Candida Pkh that would not inhibit the human ortholog. Here, we describe C. albicans Pkh2 biochemically, structurally and by using chemical probes in comparison to human PDK1. We found that a regulatory site on the C. albicans Pkh2 catalytic domain, the PIF-pocket, diverges from human PDK1. Indeed, we identified and characterized PS77, a new small allosteric inhibitor directed to the PIF-pocket, which has increased selectivity for C. albicans Pkh2. Together, our results describe novel features of the biology of Pkh and chemical biology approaches that support the validation of Pkh as a drug target for selective antifungals. PMID:23911092

  6. Peptidomimetic inhibitors of HIV protease.

    PubMed

    Randolph, John T; DeGoey, David A

    2004-01-01

    There are currently (July, 2002) six protease inhibitors approved for the treatment of HIV infection, each of which can be classified as peptidomimetic in structure. These agents, when used in combination with other antiretroviral agents, produce a sustained decrease in viral load, often to levels below the limits of quantifiable detection, and a significant reconstitution of the immune system. Therapeutic regimens containing one or more HIV protease inhibitors thus provide a highly effective method for disease management. The important role of protease inhibitors in HIV therapy, combined with numerous challenges remaining in HIV treatment, have resulted in a continued effort both to optimize regimens using the existing agents and to identify new protease inhibitors that may provide unique properties. This review will provide an overview of the discovery and clinical trials of the currently approved HIV protease inhibitors, followed by an examination of important aspects of therapy, such as pharmacokinetic enhancement, resistance and side effects. A description of new peptidomimetic compounds currently being investigated in the clinic and in preclinical discovery will follow. PMID:15193140

  7. Microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Kędzior, Mateusz; Seredyński, Rafał; Gutowicz, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Cysteine proteases are one of the major classes of proteolytic enzymes involved in a number of physiological and pathological processes in plants, animals and microorganisms. When their synthesis, activity and localization in mammalian cells are altered, they may contribute to the development of many diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis and cancer. Therefore, cysteine proteases have become promising drug targets for the medical treatment of these disorders. Inhibitors of cysteine proteases are also produced by almost every group of living organisms, being responsible for the control of intracellular proteolytic activity. Microorganisms synthesize cysteine protease inhibitors not only to regulate the activity of endogenous, often virulent enzymes, but also to hinder the host's proteolytic defense system and evade its immune responses against infections. Present work describes known to date microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases in terms of their structure, enzyme binding mechanism, specificity and pathophysiological roles. The overview of both proteinaceous and small-molecule inhibitors produced by all groups of microorganisms (bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists) and viruses is provided. Subsequently, possible applications of microbial inhibitors in science, medicine and biotechnology are also highlighted. PMID:27048482

  8. Evolutionary families of peptidase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Rawlings, Neil D; Tolle, Dominic P; Barrett, Alan J

    2004-01-01

    The proteins that inhibit peptidases are of great importance in medicine and biotechnology, but there has never been a comprehensive system of classification for them. Some of the terminology currently in use is potentially confusing. In the hope of facilitating the exchange, storage and retrieval of information about this important group of proteins, we now describe a system wherein the inhibitor units of the peptidase inhibitors are assigned to 48 families on the basis of similarities detectable at the level of amino acid sequence. Then, on the basis of three-dimensional structures, 31 of the families are assigned to 26 clans. A simple system of nomenclature is introduced for reference to each clan, family and inhibitor. We briefly discuss the specificities and mechanisms of the interactions of the inhibitors in the various families with their target enzymes. The system of families and clans of inhibitors described has been implemented in the MEROPS peptidase database (http://merops.sanger.ac.uk/), and this will provide a mechanism for updating it as new information becomes available. PMID:14705960

  9. Microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Kędzior, Mateusz; Seredyński, Rafał; Gutowicz, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Cysteine proteases are one of the major classes of proteolytic enzymes involved in a number of physiological and pathological processes in plants, animals and microorganisms. When their synthesis, activity and localization in mammalian cells are altered, they may contribute to the development of many diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis and cancer. Therefore, cysteine proteases have become promising drug targets for the medical treatment of these disorders. Inhibitors of cysteine proteases are also produced by almost every group of living organisms, being responsible for the control of intracellular proteolytic activity. Microorganisms synthesize cysteine protease inhibitors not only to regulate the activity of endogenous, often virulent enzymes, but also to hinder the host's proteolytic defense system and evade its immune responses against infections. Present work describes known to date microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases in terms of their structure, enzyme binding mechanism, specificity and pathophysiological roles. The overview of both proteinaceous and small-molecule inhibitors produced by all groups of microorganisms (bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists) and viruses is provided. Subsequently, possible applications of microbial inhibitors in science, medicine and biotechnology are also highlighted.

  10. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.; Langstrom, B.

    1990-04-03

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  11. Electrochemical studies of corrosion inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of single salts, as well as multicomponent mixtures, on corrosion inhibition was studied for type 1010 steel; for 5052, 1100, and 2219-T87 aluminum alloys; and for copper. Molybdate-containing inhibitors exhibit an immediate, positive effect for steel corrosion, but an incubation period may be required for aluminum before the effect of a given inhibitor can be determined. The absence of oxygen was found to provide a positive effect (smaller corrosion rate) for steel and copper, but a negative effect for aluminum. This is attributed to the two possible mechanisms by which aluminum can oxidize. Corrosion inhibition is generally similar for oxygen-rich and oxygen-free environments. The results show that the electrochemical method is an effective means of screening inhibitors for the corrosion of single metals, with caution to be exercised in the case of aluminum.

  12. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.

    1987-05-22

    This invention involved a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide in activators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography. 2 figs.

  13. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, Joanna S.; MacGregor, Robert R.; Wolf, Alfred P.; Langstrom, Bengt

    1990-01-01

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  14. Corrosion inhibitors from expired drugs.

    PubMed

    Vaszilcsin, Nicolae; Ordodi, Valentin; Borza, Alexandra

    2012-07-15

    This paper presents a method of expired or unused drugs valorization as corrosion inhibitors for metals in various media. Cyclic voltammograms were drawn on platinum in order to assess the stability of pharmaceutically active substances from drugs at the metal-corrosive environment interface. Tafel slope method was used to determine corrosion rates of steel in the absence and presence of inhibitors. Expired Carbamazepine and Paracetamol tablets were used to obtain corrosion inhibitors. For the former, the corrosion inhibition of carbon steel in 0.1 mol L(-1) sulfuric acid solution was about 90%, whereas for the latter, the corrosion inhibition efficiency of the same material in the 0.25 mol L(-1) acetic acid-0.25 mol L(-1) sodium acetate buffer solution was about 85%.

  15. An environmentally friendly scale inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbs, J.B.; Brown, J.M.

    1999-11-01

    This paper describes a method of inhibiting the formation of scales such as barium and strontium sulfate in low pH aqueous systems, and calcium carbonate in systems containing high concentrations of dissolved iron. The solution, chemically, involves treating the aqueous system with an inhibitor designed to replace organic-phosphonates. Typical low pH aqueous systems where the inhibitor is particularly useful are oilfield produced-water, resin bed water softeners that form scale during low pH, acid regeneration operations. Downhole applications are recommended where high concentrations of dissolved iron are present in the produced water. This new approach to inhibition replaces typical organic phosphonates and polymers with a non-toxic, biodegradable scale inhibitor that performs in harsh environments.

  16. Diverse inhibitors of aflatoxin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Robert A; Boston, Rebecca S; Payne, Gary A

    2008-03-01

    Pre-harvest and post-harvest contamination of maize, peanuts, cotton, and tree nuts by members of the genus Aspergillus and subsequent contamination with the mycotoxin aflatoxin pose a widespread food safety problem for which effective and inexpensive control strategies are lacking. Since the discovery of aflatoxin as a potently carcinogenic food contaminant, extensive research has been focused on identifying compounds that inhibit its biosynthesis. Numerous diverse compounds and extracts containing activity inhibitory to aflatoxin biosynthesis have been reported. Only recently, however, have tools been available to investigate the molecular mechanisms by which these inhibitors affect aflatoxin biosynthesis. Many inhibitors are plant-derived and a few may be amenable to pathway engineering for tissue-specific expression in susceptible host plants as a defense against aflatoxin contamination. Other compounds show promise as protectants during crop storage. Finally, inhibitors with different modes of action could be used in comparative transcriptional and metabolomic profiling experiments to identify regulatory networks controlling aflatoxin biosynthesis.

  17. Inorganic pyrophosphate generation by transforming growth factor-beta-1 is mainly dependent on ANK induction by Ras/Raf-1/extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathways in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Cailotto, Frederic; Bianchi, Arnaud; Sebillaud, Sylvie; Venkatesan, Narayanan; Moulin, David; Jouzeau, Jean-Yves; Netter, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    ANK is a multipass transmembrane protein transporter thought to play a role in the export of intracellular inorganic pyrophosphate and so to contribute to the pathophysiology of chondrocalcinosis. As transforming growth factor-beta-1 (TGF-beta1) was shown to favor calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition, we investigated the contribution of ANK to the production of extracellular inorganic pyrophosphate (ePPi) by chondrocytes and the signaling pathways involved in the regulation of Ank expression by TGF-beta1. Chondrocytes were exposed to 10 ng/mL of TGF-beta1, and Ank expression was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. ePPi was quantified in cell supernatants. RNA silencing was used to define the respective roles of Ank and PC-1 in TGF-beta1-induced ePPi generation. Finally, selective kinase inhibitors and dominant-negative/overexpression plasmid strategies were used to explore the contribution of several signaling pathways to Ank induction by TGF-beta1. TGF-beta1 strongly increased Ank expression at the mRNA and protein levels, as well as ePPi production. Using small interfering RNA technology, we showed that Ank contributed approximately 60% and PC-1 nearly 20% to TGF-beta1-induced ePPi generation. Induction of Ank by TGF-beta1 required activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway but not of p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase or of protein kinase A. In line with the general protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor calphostin C, Gö6976 (a Ca2+-dependent PKC inhibitor) diminished TGF-beta1-induced Ank expression by 60%, whereas a 10% inhibition was observed with rottlerin (a PKCdelta inhibitor). These data suggest a regulatory role for calcium in TGF-beta1-induced Ank expression. Finally, we demonstrated that the stimulatory effect of TGF-beta1 on Ank expression was inhibited by the suppression of the Ras/Raf-1 pathway, while being enhanced by their constitutive activation. Transient overexpression of Smad 7, an

  18. Nonnucleoside inhibitors of adenosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Gomtsyan, Arthur; Lee, Chih-Hung

    2004-01-01

    Adenosine (ADO) is an endogenous inhibitory neuromodulator that increases nociceptive thresholds in response to tissue trauma and inflammation. Adenosine kinase (AK) is a key intracellular enzyme regulating intra- and extracellular concentrations of ADO. AK inhibition selectively amplifies extracellular ADO levels at cell and tissue sites where accelerated release of ADO occurs. AK inhibitors have been shown to provide effective antinociceptive, antiinflammatory and anticonvulsant activity in animal models, thus suggesting their potential therapeutic utility for pain, inflammation, epilepsy and possibly other central and peripheral nervous system diseases associated with cellular trauma and inflammation. This beneficial outcome may potentially lack nonspecific effects associated with the systemic administration of ADO receptor agonists. Until recently all of the reported AK inhibitors contained adenosine-like structural motif. The present review will discuss design, synthesis and analgesic and antiinflammatory properties of the novel nonnucleoside AK inhibitors that do not have close structural resemblance with the natural substrate ADO. Two classes of the nonnucleoside AK inhibitors are built on pyridopyrimidine and alkynylpyrimidine cores.

  19. C1-inhibitor and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kirschfink, Michael

    2002-09-01

    Excessive activation of the protein cascade systems has been associated with post-transplantation inflammatory disorders. There is increasing evidence that complement not only significantly contributes to ischemia/reperfusion injury upon cold storage of the organ but also, although to a different degree, to allograft rejection. Complement activation is most fulminant in hyperacute rejection but seems also to contribute to acute transplant rejection. Therapeutic substitution of appropriate regulators, therefore, appears to be a reasonable approach to reduce undesirable inflammatory reactions in the grafted organ. C1-inhibitor, a multifunctional regulator of the various kinin-generating cascade systems (for review see: E. Hack, chapter in this issue), is frequently reduced in patients suffering from severe inflammatory disorders. Studies applying pathophysiologically relevant animal models of allo- and xenotransplantation as well as promising first clinical results from successful allotransplantation now provide evidence that C1-inhibitor may also serve as an effective means to protect the grafted organ against inflammatory tissue injury. In xenotransplantation, complement inhibition by specific regulators such as C1-inhibitor may help to overcome hyperacute graft rejection. After a brief introduction on the significance of complement to allo- and xenotransplantation the following review will focus on the impact of C1-inhibitor treatment on transplantation-associated inflammatory disorders, where complement contributes to the pathogenesis.

  20. Bivalent Inhibitors of Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Gower, Carrie M.; Chang, Matthew E. K.; Maly, Dustin J.

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases are key players in a large number of cellular signaling pathways. Dysregulated kinase activity has been implicated in a number of diseases, and members of this enzyme family are of therapeutic interest. However, due to the fact that most inhibitors interact with the highly conserved ATP-binding sites of kinases, it is a significant challenge to develop pharmacological agents that target only one of the greater than 500 kinases present in humans. A potential solution to this problem is the development of bisubstrate and bivalent kinase inhibitors, in which an active site-directed moiety is tethered to another ligand that targets a location outside of the ATP-binding cleft. Because kinase signaling specificity is modulated by regions outside of the ATP-binding site, strategies that exploit these interactions have the potential to provide reagents with high target selectivity. This review highlights examples of kinase interaction sites that can potentially be exploited by bisubstrate and bivalent inhibitors. Furthermore, an overview of efforts to target these interactions with bisubstrate and bivalent inhibitors is provided. Finally, several examples of the successful application of these reagents in a cellular setting are described. PMID:24564382

  1. PDE-5 inhibitors: clinical points.

    PubMed

    Doumas, Michael; Lazaridis, Antonios; Katsiki, Niki; Athyros, Vasilios

    2015-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction is usually of vascular origin and is frequently encountered in men with cardiovascular disease. The introduction of phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors has revolutionized the management of patients with erectile dysfunction. Currently available phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors have distinct pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties, thus permitting for tailoring sexual therapy according to patient characteristics and needs. Phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors possess vasorelaxing properties and exert systemic hemodynamic effects, which need to be taken into account when other cardiovascular drugs are co-administered. Special caution is needed with alpha-blockers, while the co-administration with nitrates is contra-indicated due to the risk of life-threatening hypotension. This review presents the advent of sexual therapy, describes the mechanism of action and the specific characteristics of commercially available phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, summarizes the efficacy and safety of these drugs with special emphasis on the cardiovascular system, and discusses the clinical criteria used for the selection of each drug for the individual patient. PMID:25392015

  2. Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors: Pharmacology and Toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Čolović, Mirjana B; Krstić, Danijela Z; Lazarević-Pašti, Tamara D; Bondžić, Aleksandra M; Vasić, Vesna M

    2013-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase is involved in the termination of impulse transmission by rapid hydrolysis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in numerous cholinergic pathways in the central and peripheral nervous systems. The enzyme inactivation, induced by various inhibitors, leads to acetylcholine accumulation, hyperstimulation of nicotinic and muscarinic receptors, and disrupted neurotransmission. Hence, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, interacting with the enzyme as their primary target, are applied as relevant drugs and toxins. This review presents an overview of toxicology and pharmacology of reversible and irreversible acetylcholinesterase inactivating compounds. In the case of reversible inhibitors being commonly applied in neurodegenerative disorders treatment, special attention is paid to currently approved drugs (donepezil, rivastigmine and galantamine) in the pharmacotherapy of Alzheimer’s disease, and toxic carbamates used as pesticides. Subsequently, mechanism of irreversible acetylcholinesterase inhibition induced by organophosphorus compounds (insecticides and nerve agents), and their specific and nonspecific toxic effects are described, as well as irreversible inhibitors having pharmacological implementation. In addition, the pharmacological treatment of intoxication caused by organophosphates is presented, with emphasis on oxime reactivators of the inhibited enzyme activity administering as causal drugs after the poisoning. Besides, organophosphorus and carbamate insecticides can be detoxified in mammals through enzymatic hydrolysis before they reach targets in the nervous system. Carboxylesterases most effectively decompose carbamates, whereas the most successful route of organophosphates detoxification is their degradation by corresponding phosphotriesterases. PMID:24179466

  3. Biocatalysts with enhanced inhibitor tolerance

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Shihui; Linger, Jeffrey; Franden, Mary Ann; Pienkos, Philip T.; Zhang, Min

    2015-12-08

    Disclosed herein are biocatalysts for the production of biofuels, including microorganisms that contain genetic modifications conferring tolerance to growth and fermentation inhibitors found in many cellulosic feedstocks. Methods of converting cellulose-containing materials to fuels and chemicals, as well as methods of fermenting sugars to fuels and chemicals, using these biocatalysts are also disclosed.

  4. Involvement of TRPV2 and SOCE in calcium influx disorder in DMD primary human myotubes with a specific contribution of α1-syntrophin and PLC/PKC in SOCE regulation.

    PubMed

    Harisseh, Rania; Chatelier, Aurélien; Magaud, Christophe; Déliot, Nadine; Constantin, Bruno

    2013-05-01

    Calcium homeostasis is critical for several vital functions in excitable and nonexcitable cells and has been shown to be impaired in many pathologies including Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Various studies using murine models showed the implication of calcium entry in the dystrophic phenotype. However, alteration of store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 2 (TRPV2)-dependant cation entry has not been investigated yet in human skeletal muscle cells. We pharmacologically characterized basal and store-operated cation entries in primary cultures of myotubes prepared from muscle of normal and DMD patients and found, for the first time, an increased SOCE in DMD myotubes. Moreover, this increase cannot be explained by an over expression of the well-known SOCE actors: TRPC1/4, Orai1, and stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) mRNA and proteins. Thus we investigated the modes of regulation of this cation entry. We firstly demonstrated the important role of the scaffolding protein α1-syntrophin, which regulates SOCE in primary human myotubes through its PDZ domain. We also studied the implication of phospholipase C (PLC) and protein kinase C (PKC) in SOCE and showed that their inhibition restores normal levels of SOCE in DMD human myotubes. In addition, the involvement of TRPV2 in calcium deregulation in DMD human myotubes was explored. We showed an abnormal elevation of TRPV2-dependant cation entry in dystrophic primary human myotubes compared with normal ones. These findings show that calcium homeostasis mishandling in DMD myotubes depends on SOCE under the influence of Ca(2+)/PLC/PKC pathway and α1-syntrophin regulation as well as on TRPV2-dependant cation influx.

  5. Proton pump inhibitor-induced hypomagnesemic hypoparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors are the one of the most widely used drugs in the world. Hypomagnesemic hypoparathyroidism has been reported with different proton pump inhibitors with prolonged oral use. We report the first reported case of possible such effect with intravenous preparation of proton pump inhibitor. This case report raises awareness among physicians worldwide of this often unknown association, as life-threatening cardiac and neuromuscular complications can arise with unrecognized hypocalcemia and hypomagnesemia with proton pump inhibitors.

  6. KID, a Kinase Inhibitor Database project.

    PubMed

    Collin, O; Meijer, L

    1999-01-01

    The Kinase Inhibitor Database is a small specialized database dedicated to the gathering of information on protein kinase inhibitors. The database is accessible through the World Wide Web system and gives access to structural and bibliographic information on protein kinase inhibitors. The data in the database will be collected and submitted by researchers working in the kinase inhibitor field. The submitted data will be checked by the curator of the database before entry.

  7. G-749, a novel FLT3 kinase inhibitor, can overcome drug resistance for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hee Kyu; Kim, Hong Woo; Lee, In Yong; Lee, Jungmi; Lee, Jaekyoo; Jung, Dong Sik; Lee, Sang Yeop; Park, Sung Ho; Hwang, Haejun; Choi, Jang-Sik; Kim, Jung-Ho; Kim, Se Won; Kim, Jung Keun; Cools, Jan; Koh, Jong Sung

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant activations of Fms-like tyrosine receptor kinase (FLT) 3 are implicated in the pathogenesis of 20% to 30% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). G-749 is a novel FLT3 inhibitor that showed potent and sustained inhibition of the FLT3 wild type and mutants including FLT3-ITD, FLT3-D835Y, FLT3-ITD/N676D, and FLT3-ITD/F691L in cellular assays. G-749 retained its inhibitory potency in various drug-resistance milieus such as patient plasma, FLT3 ligand surge, and stromal protection. Furthermore, it displayed potent antileukemic activity in bone marrow blasts from AML patients regardless of FLT3 mutation status, including those with little or only minor responses to AC220 or PKC412. Oral administration of G-749 yielded complete tumor regression and increased life span in animal models. Thus, G-749 appears to be a promising next-generation drug candidate for the treatment of relapsed and refractory AML patients with various FLT3-ITD/FLT3-TKD mutants and further shows the ability to overcome drug resistance. PMID:24532805

  8. Estrous cycle variations in GABAA receptor phosphorylation enable rapid modulation by anabolic androgenic steroids in the medial preoptic area

    PubMed Central

    Oberlander, JG; Porter, DM; Onakomaiya, MM; Penatti, CAA; Vithlani, M; Moss, SJ; Clark, AS; Henderson, LP

    2012-01-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS), synthetic testosterone derivatives that are used for ergogenic purposes, alter neurotransmission and behaviors mediated by GABAA receptors. Some of these effects may reflect direct and rapid action of these synthetic steroids at the receptor. The ability of other natural allosteric steroid modulators to alter GABAA receptor-mediated currents is dependent upon the phosphorylation state of the receptor complex. Here we show that phosphorylation of the GABAA receptor complex immunoprecipitated by β2/β3 subunit-specific antibodies from the medial preoptic area (mPOA) of the mouse varies across the estrous cycle; with levels being significantly lower in estrus. Acute exposure to the AAS, 17α-testosterone (17α-MeT), had no effect on the amplitude or kinetics of inhibitory postsynaptic currents in the mPOA of estrous mice when phosphorylation was low, but increased the amplitude of these currents from mice in diestrus, when it was high. Inclusion of the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, calphostin, in the recording pipette eliminated the ability of 17α-MeT to enhance currents from diestrous animals, suggesting that PKC-receptor phosphorylation is critical for the allosteric modulation elicited by AAS during this phase. In addition, a single injection of 17α-MeT was found to impair an mPOA-mediated behavior (nest-building) in diestrus, but not in estrus. PKC is known to target specific serine residues in the β3 subunit of the GABAA receptor. Although phosphorylation of these β3 serine residues showed a similar profile across the cycle, as did phosphoserine in mPOA lysates immunoprecipitated with β2/β3 antibody (lower in estrus than in diestrus or proestrus), the differences were not significant. These data suggest that the phosphorylation state of the receptor complex regulates both the ability of AAS to modulate receptor function in the mPOA and the expression of a simple mPOA-dependent behavior through PKC-dependent mechanism

  9. Estrous cycle variations in GABA(A) receptor phosphorylation enable rapid modulation by anabolic androgenic steroids in the medial preoptic area.

    PubMed

    Oberlander, J G; Porter, D M; Onakomaiya, M M; Penatti, C A A; Vithlani, M; Moss, S J; Clark, A S; Henderson, L P

    2012-12-13

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS), synthetic testosterone derivatives that are used for ergogenic purposes, alter neurotransmission and behaviors mediated by GABA(A) receptors. Some of these effects may reflect direct and rapid action of these synthetic steroids at the receptor. The ability of other natural allosteric steroid modulators to alter GABA(A) receptor-mediated currents is dependent upon the phosphorylation state of the receptor complex. Here we show that phosphorylation of the GABA(A) receptor complex immunoprecipitated by β(2)/β(3) subunit-specific antibodies from the medial preoptic area (mPOA) of the mouse varies across the estrous cycle; with levels being significantly lower in estrus. Acute exposure to the AAS, 17α-methyltestosterone (17α-MeT), had no effect on the amplitude or kinetics of inhibitory postsynaptic currents in the mPOA of estrous mice when phosphorylation was low, but increased the amplitude of these currents from mice in diestrus, when it was high. Inclusion of the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, calphostin, in the recording pipette eliminated the ability of 17α-MeT to enhance currents from diestrous animals, suggesting that PKC-receptor phosphorylation is critical for the allosteric modulation elicited by AAS during this phase. In addition, a single injection of 17α-MeT was found to impair an mPOA-mediated behavior (nest building) in diestrus, but not in estrus. PKC is known to target specific serine residues in the β(3) subunit of the GABA(A) receptor. Although phosphorylation of these β(3) serine residues showed a similar profile across the cycle, as did phosphoserine in mPOA lysates immunoprecipitated with β2/β3 antibody (lower in estrus than in diestrus or proestrus), the differences were not significant. These data suggest that the phosphorylation state of the receptor complex regulates both the ability of AAS to modulate receptor function in the mPOA and the expression of a simple mPOA-dependent behavior through a

  10. Salicylanilide inhibitors of Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Fomovska, Alina; Wood, Richard D; Mui, Ernest; Dubey, Jitenter P; Ferreira, Leandra R; Hickman, Mark R; Lee, Patricia J; Leed, Susan E; Auschwitz, Jennifer M; Welsh, William J; Sommerville, Caroline; Woods, Stuart; Roberts, Craig; McLeod, Rima

    2012-10-11

    Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) is an apicomplexan parasite that can cause eye disease, brain disease, and death, especially in congenitally infected and immune-compromised people. Novel medicines effective against both active and latent forms of the parasite are greatly needed. The current study focused on the discovery of such medicines by exploring a family of potential inhibitors whose antiapicomplexan activity has not been previously reported. Initial screening efforts revealed that niclosamide, a drug approved for anthelmintic use, possessed promising activity in vitro against T. gondii. This observation inspired the evaluation of the activity of a series of salicylanilides and derivatives. Several inhibitors with activities in the nanomolar range with no appreciable in vitro toxicity to human cells were identified. An initial structure-activity relationship was explored. Four compounds were selected for evaluation in an in vivo model of infection, and two derivatives with potentially enhanced pharmacological parameters demonstrated the best activity profiles.

  11. Salicylanilide Inhibitors of Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Fomovska, Alina; Wood, Richard D.; Mui, Ernest; Dubey, Jitenter P.; Ferriera, Leandra R.; Hickman, Mark R.; Lee, Patricia J.; Leed, Susan E.; Auschwitz, Jennifer M.; Welsh, William J.; Sommerville, Caroline; Woods, Stuart; Roberts, Craig; McLeod, Rima

    2012-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii(T. gondii) is an apicomplexan parasite that can cause eye disease, brain disease, and death, especially in congenitally infected and immune-compromised people. Novel medicines effective against both active and latent forms of the parasite are greatly needed. The current study focused on the discovery of such medicines by exploring a family of potential inhibitors whose anti-apicomplexan activity has not been previously reported. Initial screening efforts revealed that niclosamide, a drug approved for anthelmintic use, possessed promising activity in vitro against T. gondii. This observation inspired the evaluation of the activity of a series of salicylanilides and derivatives. Several inhibitors with activities in the nanomolar range with no appreciable in vitro toxicity to human cells were identified. An initial structure-activity relationship was explored. Four compounds were selected for evaluation in an in vivo model of infection, and two derivatives with potentially enhanced pharmacological parameters demonstrated the best activity profiles. PMID:22970937

  12. Macrocyclic compounds as corrosion inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Quraishi, M.A.; Rawat, J.; Ajmal, M.

    1998-12-01

    The influence of three macrocyclic compounds on corrosion of mild steel (MS) in hydrochloric acid (HCl) was investigated using weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization, alternating current (AC) impedance, and hydrogen permeation techniques. All the investigated compounds showed significant efficiencies and reduced permeation of hydrogen through MS in HCl. Inhibition efficiency (IE) varied with the nature and concentrations of the inhibitors, temperature, and concentrations of the acid solutions. The addition of iodide ions (I{sup {minus}}) increased IE of all the tested compounds as a result of the synergistic effect. Potentiodynamic polarization results revealed that macrocyclic compounds acted as mixed inhibitors in 1 M HCl to 5 M HCl. Adsorption on the metal surface obeyed Temkin`s adsorption isotherm. Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) of the polished MS surface, exposed with tetraphenyldithia-octaazacyclotetradeca-hexaene (PTAT) proved adsorption of this compound on the surface through nitrogen and sulfur atoms.

  13. [Proteasome inhibitors in cancer therapy].

    PubMed

    Romaniuk, Wioletta; Ołdziej, Agnieszka Ewa; Zińczuk, Justyna; Kłoczko, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    Proteasomes are multisubunit enzyme complexes. They contain three enzymatic active sites which are termed chymotrypsin-like, trypsin-like, and caspase-like. The elementary function of the proteasomes is degradation of damaged proteins. Proteasome inhibition leads to accumulation of damaged protein, which leads to caspase activation and cell death. This relationship is used in cancer therapy. Bortezomib is the first proteasome inhibitor approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma. Carfilzomib belongs to the second generation of drugs, which was approved by the US FDA in 2012. Currently in the study phase there are four new inhibitors: ixazomib (MLN9780/MLN2238), delanzomib (CEP-18770), oprozomib (ONX0912/PR-047) and marizomib (NPI-0052). PMID:27259216

  14. Aromatase Inhibitors and Other Compounds for Lowering Breast Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... References Aromatase inhibitors and other compounds for lowering breast cancer risk Aromatase inhibitors (drugs that lower estrogen levels) ... day. Can aromatase inhibitors lower the risk of breast cancer? Aromatase inhibitors are used mainly to treat hormone ...

  15. Conformation-specific inhibitors of Raf kinases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolun; Schleicher, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    Since the discovery linking B-Raf mutations to human tumors in 2002, significant advances in the development of Raf inhibitors have been made, leading to the recent approval of two Raf inhibitor drugs. This chapter includes a brief introduction to B-Raf as a validated target and focuses on the three different binding modes observed with Raf small-molecule inhibitors. These various binding modes lock the Raf kinase in different conformations that impact the toxicity profiles of the inhibitors. Possible solutions to mitigate the side effects caused by inhibitor-induced dimerization are also discussed.

  16. Thioredoxin Reductase and its Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Saccoccia, Fulvio; Angelucci, Francesco; Boumis, Giovanna; Carotti, Daniela; Desiato, Gianni; Miele, Adriana E; Bellelli, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Thioredoxin plays a crucial role in a wide number of physiological processes, which span from reduction of nucleotides to deoxyriboucleotides to the detoxification from xenobiotics, oxidants and radicals. The redox function of Thioredoxin is critically dependent on the enzyme Thioredoxin NADPH Reductase (TrxR). In view of its indirect involvement in the above mentioned physio/pathological processes, inhibition of TrxR is an important clinical goal. As a general rule, the affinities and mechanisms of binding of TrxR inhibitors to the target enzyme are known with scarce precision and conflicting results abound in the literature. A relevant analysis of published results as well as the experimental procedures is therefore needed, also in view of the critical interest of TrxR inhibitors. We review the inhibitors of TrxR and related flavoreductases and the classical treatment of reversible, competitive, non competitive and uncompetitive inhibition with respect to TrxR, and in some cases we are able to reconcile contradictory results generated by oversimplified data analysis. PMID:24875642

  17. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors drug design.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Robert; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of the metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) has pharmacologic applications in the field of antiglaucoma, anticonvulsant, antiobesity, and anticancer agents but is also emerging for designing anti-infectives (antifungal and antibacterial agents) with a novel mechanism of action. As a consequence, the drug design of CA inhibitors (CAIs) is a very dynamic field. Sulfonamides and their isosteres (sulfamates/sulfamides) constitute the main class of CAIs which bind to the metal ion in the enzyme active site. Recently the dithiocarbamates, possessing a similar mechanism of action, were reported as a new class of inhibitors. Other families of CAIs possess a distinct mechanism of action: phenols, polyamines, some carboxylates, and sulfocoumarins anchor to the zinc-coordinated water molecule. Coumarins and five/six-membered lactones are prodrug inhibitors, binding in hydrolyzed form at the entrance of the active site cavity. Novel drug design strategies have been reported principally based on the tail approach for obtaining all these types of CAIs, which exploit more external binding regions within the enzyme active site (in addition to coordination to the metal ion), leading thus to isoform-selective compounds. Sugar-based tails as well as click chemistry were the most fruitful developments of the tail approach. Promising compounds that inhibit CAs from bacterial and fungal pathogens, of the dithiocarbamate, phenol and carboxylate types have also been reported. PMID:24146385

  18. ANTIDEPRESSANT ACTIONS OF HDAC INHIBITORS

    PubMed Central

    Covington, Herbert E.; Maze, Ian; LaPlant, Quincey C.; Vialou, Vincent F.; Yoshinori, Ohnishi N.; Berton, Olivier; Fass, Dan M.; Renthal, William; Rush, Augustus J.; Wu, Emma Y.; Ghose, Subroto; Krishnan, Vaishnav; Russo, Scott J.; Tamminga, Carol; Haggarty, Stephen J.; Nestler, Eric J.

    2009-01-01

    Persistent symptoms of depression suggest the involvement of stable molecular adaptations in brain, which may be reflected at the level of chromatin remodeling. We find that chronic social defeat stress in mice causes a transient decrease, followed by a persistent increase, in levels of acetylated histone H3 in the nucleus accumbens, an important limbic brain region. This persistent increase in H3 acetylation is associated with decreased levels of histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) in the nucleus accumbens. Similar effects were observed in the nucleus accumbens of depressed humans studied postmortem. These changes in H3 acetylation and HDAC2 expression mediate long-lasting positive neuronal adaptations, since infusion of HDAC inhibitors into the nucleus accumbens, which increases histone acetylation, exerts robust antidepressant-like effects in the social defeat paradigm and other behavioral assays. HDAC inhibitor (MS-275) infusion also reverses the effects of chronic defeat stress on global patterns of gene expression in the nucleus accumbens, as determined by microarray analysis, with striking similarities to the effects of the standard antidepressant, fluoxetine. Stress-regulated genes whose expression is normalized selectively by MS-275 may provide promising targets for the future development of novel antidepressant treatments. Together, these findings provide new insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms of depression and antidepressant action, and support the antidepressant potential of HDAC inhibitors and perhaps other agents that act at the level of chromatin structure. PMID:19759294

  19. Investigating the selectivity of metalloenzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Day, Joshua A; Cohen, Seth M

    2013-10-24

    The inhibitory activity of a broad group of known metalloenzyme inhibitors against a panel of metalloenzymes was evaluated. Clinically approved inhibitors were selected as well as several other reported metalloprotein inhibitors in order to represent a broad range of metal binding groups (MBGs), including hydroxamic acid, carboxylate, hydroxypyridinonate, thiol, and N-hydroxyurea functional groups. A panel of metalloenzymes, including carbonic anhydrase (hCAII), several matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), histone deacetylase (HDAC-2), and tyrosinase (TY), was selected based on their clinical importance for a range of pathologies. In addition, each inhibitor was evaluated for its ability to remove Fe(3+) from holo-transferrin to gauge the ability of the inhibitors to access Fe(3+) from a primary transport protein. The results show that the metalloenzyme inhibitors are quite selective for their intended targets, suggesting that despite their ability to bind metal ions, metalloprotein inhibitors are not prone to widespread off-target enzyme inhibition activity.

  20. The burden of inhibitors in haemophilia patients.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Christopher E; Jiménez-Yuste, Víctor; Auerswald, Guenter; Grancha, Salvador

    2016-08-31

    The burden of disease in haemophilia patients has wide ranging implications for the family and to society. There is evidence that having a current inhibitor increases the risk of morbidity and mortality. Morbidity is increased by the inability to treat adequately and its consequent disabilities, which then equates to a poor quality of life compared with non-inhibitor patients. The societal cost of care, or `burden of inhibitors', increases with the ongoing presence of an inhibitor. Therefore, it is clear that successful eradication of inhibitors by immune tolerance induction (ITI) is the single most important milestone one can achieve in an inhibitor patient. The type of factor VIII (FVIII) product used in ITI regimens varies worldwide. Despite ongoing debate, there is in vitro and retrospective clinical evidence to support the use of plasma-derived VWF-containing FVIII concentrates in ITI regimens in order to achieve early and high inhibitor eradication success rates. PMID:27528280

  1. Investigating the Selectivity of Metalloenzyme Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Day, Joshua A.; Cohen, Seth M.

    2013-01-01

    The inhibitory activity of a broad group of known metalloenzyme inhibitors against a panel of metalloenzymes was evaluated. Clinically approved inhibitors were selected as well as several other reported metalloprotein inhibitors, in order to represent a broad range of metal binding groups (MBGs), including hydroxamic acid, carboxylate, hydroxypyridinonate, thiol, and N-hydroxyurea functional groups. A panel of metalloenzymes, including carbonic anhydrase (hCAII), several matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), histone deacetylase (HDAC-2), and tyrosinase (TY) was selected based on their clinical importance for a range of pathologies. In addition, each inhibitor was evaluated for its ability to remove Fe3+ from holo-transferrin to gauge the ability of the inhibitors to access Fe3+ from a primary transport protein. The results show that the metalloenzyme inhibitors are quite selective for their intended targets, suggesting that despite their ability to bind metal ions, metalloprotein inhibitors are not prone to widespread off-target enzyme inhibition activity. PMID:24074025

  2. Microbial phenolic metabolites improve glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and protect pancreatic beta cells against tert-butyl hydroperoxide-induced toxicity via ERKs and PKC pathways.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Millán, Elisa; Ramos, Sonia; Alvarez, Carmen; Bravo, Laura; Goya, Luis; Martín, María Ángeles

    2014-04-01

    Oxidative stress is accepted as one of the causes of beta cell failure in type 2 diabetes. Therefore, identification of natural antioxidant agents that preserve beta cell mass and function is considered an interesting strategy to prevent or treat diabetes. Recent evidences indicated that colonic metabolites derived from flavonoids could possess beneficial effects on various tissues. The aim of this work was to establish the potential anti-diabetic properties of the microbial-derived flavonoid metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DHPAA), 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA) and 3-hydroxyphenylpropionic acid (HPPA). To this end, we tested their ability to influence beta cell function and to protect against tert-butyl hydroperoxide-induced beta cell toxicity. DHPAA and HPPA were able to potentiate glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in a beta cell line INS-1E and in rat pancreatic islets. Moreover, pre-treatment of cells with both compounds protected against beta cell dysfunction and death induced by the pro-oxidant. Finally, experiments with pharmacological inhibitors indicate that these effects were mediated by the activation of protein kinase C and the extracellular regulated kinases pathways. Altogether, these findings strongly suggest that the microbial-derived flavonoid metabolites DHPAA and HPPA may have anti-diabetic potential by promoting survival and function of pancreatic beta cells. PMID:24491264

  3. Non-ATP competitive protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Garuti, L; Roberti, M; Bottegoni, G

    2010-01-01

    Protein kinases represent an attractive target in oncology drug discovery. Most of kinase inhibitors are ATP-competitive and are called type I inhibitors. The ATP-binding pocket is highly conserved among members of the kinase family and it is difficult to find selective agents. Moreover, the ATP-competitive inhibitors must compete with high intracellular ATP levels leading to a discrepancy between IC50s measured by biochemical versus cellular assays. The non-ATP competitive inhibitors, called type II and type III inhibitors, offer the possibility to overcome these problems. These inhibitors act by inducing a conformational shift in the target enzyme such that the kinase is no longer able to function. In the DFG-out form, the phenylalanine side chain moves to a new position. This movement creates a hydrophobic pocket available for occupation by the inhibitor. Some common features are present in these inhibitors. They contain a heterocyclic system that forms one or two hydrogen bonds with the kinase hinge residue. They also contain a hydrophobic moiety that occupies the pocket formed by the shift of phenylalanine from the DFG motif. Moreover, all the inhibitors bear a hydrogen bond donor-acceptor pair, usually urea or amide, that links the hinge-binding portion to the hydrophobic moiety and interacts with the allosteric site. Examples of non ATP-competitive inhibitors are available for various kinases. In this review small molecules capable of inducing the DFG-out conformation are reported, especially focusing on structural feature, SAR and biological properties.

  4. D-Saccharic acid 1,4-lactone protects diabetic rat kidney by ameliorating hyperglycemia-mediated oxidative stress and renal inflammatory cytokines via NF-κB and PKC signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Semantee; Manna, Prasenjit; Sil, Parames C.

    2013-02-15

    Increasing evidence suggests that oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN) and this can be attenuated by antioxidants. D-Saccharic acid 1,4-lactone (DSL) is known for its detoxifying and antioxidant properties. Our early investigation showed that DSL can ameliorate alloxan (ALX) induced diabetes mellitus and oxidative stress in rats by inhibiting pancreatic β-cell apoptosis. In the present study we, therefore, investigated the protective role of DSL against renal injury in ALX induced diabetic rats. ALX exposure (at a dose of 120 mg/kg body weight, i. p., once) elevated the blood glucose level, serum markers related to renal injury, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and disturbed the intra-cellular antioxidant machineries. Oral administration of DSL (80 mg/kg body weight) restored all these alterations close to normal. In addition, DSL could also normalize the aldose reductase activity which was found to increase in the diabetic rats. Investigating the mechanism of its protective activity, we observed the activation of different isoforms of PKC along with the accumulation of matrix proteins like collagen and fibronectin. The diabetic rats also showed nuclear translocation of NF-κB and increase in the concentration of inflammatory cytokines in the renal tissue. The activation of mitochondria dependent apoptotic pathway was observed in the diabetic rat kidneys. However, treatment of diabetic rats with DSL counteracted all these changes. These findings, for the first time, demonstrated that DSL could ameliorate renal dysfunction in diabetic rats by suppressing the oxidative stress related signalling pathways. - Highlights: ► Sustained hyperglycemia and oxidative stress lead to diabetic renal injury. ► D-saccharic acid 1,4-lactone prevents renal damage in alloxan-induced diabetes. ► It restores intra-cellular antioxidant machineries and kidney apoptosis. ► DSL reduces hyperglycemia-mediated oxidative stress

  5. Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors: Clinical Review

    PubMed Central

    Remick, Ronald A.; Froese, Colleen

    1990-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are effective antidepressant agents. They are increasingly and effectively used in a number of other psychiatric and non-psychiatric medical syndromes. Their potential for serious toxicity (i.e., hypertensive reaction) is far less than original reports suggest, and newer reversible substrate-specific MAOIs may offer even less toxicity. The author reviews the pharmacology, mechanism of action, clinical indications, and dosing strategies of MAOIs. The common MAOI side-effects (hypotension, weight gain, sexual dysfunction, insomnia, daytime sedation, myoclonus, and hypertensive episodes) are described and management techniques suggested. Recent clinical developments involving MAOIs are outlined. PMID:21233984

  6. Techniques for Screening Translation Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Osterman, Ilya A.; Bogdanov, Alexey A.; Dontsova, Olga A.; Sergiev, Petr V.

    2016-01-01

    The machinery of translation is one of the most common targets of antibiotics. The development and screening of new antibiotics usually proceeds by testing antimicrobial activity followed by laborious studies of the mechanism of action. High-throughput methods for new antibiotic screening based on antimicrobial activity have become routine; however, identification of molecular targets is usually a challenge. Therefore, it is highly beneficial to combine primary screening with the identification of the mechanism of action. In this review, we describe a collection of methods for screening translation inhibitors, with a special emphasis on methods which can be performed in a high-throughput manner. PMID:27348012

  7. Oligopeptide cyclophilin inhibitors: a reassessment.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Michael; Jahreis, Günther; Kahlert, Viktoria; Lücke, Christian; Fischer, Gunter

    2011-11-01

    Potent cyclophilin A (CypA) inhibitors such as non-immunosuppressive cyclosporin A (CsA) derivatives have been already used in clinical trials in patients with viral infections. CypA is a peptidyl prolyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) that catalyzes slow prolyl bond cis/trans interconversions of the backbone of substrate peptides and proteins. In this study we investigate whether the notoriously low affinity inhibitory interaction of linear proline-containing peptides with the active site of CypA can be increased through a combination of a high cis/trans ratio and a negatively charged C-terminus as has been recently reported for Trp-Gly-Pro. Surprisingly, isothermal titration calorimetry did not reveal formation of an inhibitory CypA/Trp-Gly-Pro complex previously described within a complex stability range similar to CsA, a nanomolar CypA inhibitor. Moreover, despite of cis content of 41% at pH 7.5 Trp-Gly-Pro cannot inhibit CypA-catalyzed standard substrate isomerization up to high micromolar concentrations. However, in the context of the CsA framework a net charge of -7 clustered at the amino acid side chain of position 1 resulted in slightly improved CypA inhibition.

  8. Carborane-based carbonic anhydrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Brynda, Jiří; Mader, Pavel; Šícha, Václav; Fábry, Milan; Poncová, Kristýna; Bakardiev, Mario; Grüner, Bohumír; Cígler, Petr; Řezáčová, Pavlína

    2013-12-16

    CA inhibitors: Human carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are diagnostic and therapeutic targets. Various carborane cages are shown to act as active-site-directed inhibitors, and substitution with a sulfamide group and other substituents leads to compounds with high selectivity towards the cancer-specific isozyme IX. Crystal structures of the carboranes in the active site provide information that can be applied to the structure-based design of specific inhibitors. PMID:24307504

  9. Antiproliferative effect of elevated glucose in human microvascular endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamal, K.; Du, W.; Mills, I.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1998-01-01

    Diabetic microangiopathy has been implicated as a fundamental feature of the pathological complications of diabetes including retinopathy, neuropathy, and diabetic foot ulceration. However, previous studies devoted to examining the deleterious effects of elevated glucose on the endothelium have been performed largely in primary cultured cells of macrovessel origin. Difficulty in the harvesting and maintenance of microvascular endothelial cells in culture have hindered the study of this relevant population. Therefore, the objective of this study was to characterize the effect of elevated glucose on the proliferation and involved signaling pathways of an immortalized human dermal microvascular endothelial cell line (HMEC-1) that possess similar characteristics to their in vivo counterparts. Human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) were grown in the presence of normal (5 mM) or high D-glucose (20 mM) for 14 days. The proliferative response of HMEC-1 was compared under these conditions as well as the cAMP and PKC pathways by in vitro assays. Elevated glucose significantly inhibited (P < 0.05) HMEC-1 proliferation after 7, 10, and 14 days. This effect was not mimicked by 20 mM mannitol. The antiproliferative effect was more pronounced with longer exposure (1-14 days) to elevated glucose and was irreversible 4 days after a 10-day exposure. The antiproliferative effect was partially reversed in the presence of a PKA inhibitor, Rp-cAMP (10-50 microM), and/or a PKC inhibitor, Calphostin C (10 nM). HMEC-1 exposed to elevated glucose (20 mM) for 14 days caused an increase in cyclic AMP accumulation, PKA, and PKC activity but was not associated with the activation of downstream events such as CRE and AP-1 binding activity. These data support the hypothesis that HMEC-1 is a suitable model to study the deleterious effects of elevated glucose on microvascular endothelial cells. Continued studies with HMEC-1 may prove advantageous in delineation of the molecular

  10. The PKs PKA and ERK 1/2 are involved in phosphorylation of TH at Serine 40 and 31 during morphine withdrawal in rat hearts

    PubMed Central

    Almela, P; Milanés, M V; Laorden, M L

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Our previous studies have shown that morphine withdrawal induced hyperactivity of cardiac noradrenergic pathways. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of morphine withdrawal on site-specific phosphorylation of TH in the heart. Experimental approach: Dependence on morphine was induced by a 7-day s.c. implantation of morphine pellets in rats. Morphine withdrawal was precipitated on day 8 by an injection of naloxone (2 mg kg−1). TH phosphorylation was determined by quantitative blot immunolabelling using phosphorylation state-specific antibodies. Key results: Naloxone-induced morphine withdrawal induced phosphorylation of TH at serine (Ser)40 and Ser31 in the right ventricle, associated with both an increase in total TH levels and an enhancement of TH activity. When HA-1004 (PK A inhibitor) was infused, concomitantly with morphine, it diminished the increase in noradrenaline turnover, total TH levels and TH phosphorylation at Ser40 in morphine-withdrawn rats. In contrast, the infusion of calphostin C (PKC inhibitor), did not modify the morphine withdrawal-induced increase in noradrenaline turnover and total TH levels. In addition, we show that the ability of morphine withdrawal to stimulate phosphorylation at Ser31 was reduced by SL327, an inhibitor of ERK 1/2 activation. Conclusions and implications: The present findings demonstrate that the enhancement of total TH levels and the increased phosphorylation state of TH during morphine withdrawal were dependent on PKA and ERK activities and suggest that these transduction pathways might contribute to the activation of the cardiac catecholaminergic neurons in response to morphine withdrawal. PMID:18536752

  11. KH-30 Parafin Inhibitor Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Rochelle, J.

    2001-09-30

    United Energy Corporation (UNRG) and the U.S. Department of Energy personnel tested KH-30 at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) outside Casper, Wyoming on two separate occasions. KH-30 is a non-toxic, non-hazardous product, which combines the functions of a solvent dispersant, crystal modifier and inhibitor into a single solution. The first test was held in March of 2001, wherein five wells were treated with a mixture of KH-30 and brine water, heated to 180 degrees F. No increase in production was attained in these tests. In June, 2001, three shallow, low pressure RMOTC wells with 30 years of production were treated with a mixture of 40% KH-30 and 60% diesel. Increases were seen in three wells. The wells then returned to their original rates.

  12. Natural Products as Aromatase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Balunas, Marcy J.; Su, Bin; Brueggemeier, Robert W.; Kinghorn, A. Douglas

    2010-01-01

    With the clinical success of several synthetic aromatase inhibitors (AIs) in the treatment of postmenopausal estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, researchers have also been investigating also the potential of natural products as AIs. Natural products from terrestrial and marine organisms provide a chemically diverse array of compounds not always available through current synthetic chemistry techniques. Natural products that have been used traditionally for nutritional or medicinal purposes (e.g., botanical dietary supplements) may also afford AIs with reduced side effects. A thorough review of the literature regarding natural product extracts and secondary metabolites of plant, microbial, and marine origin that have been shown to exhibit aromatase inhibitory activity is presented herein. PMID:18690828

  13. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors and Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Abruzzese, Elisabetta; Trawinska, Malgorzata Monika; Perrotti, Alessio Pio; De Fabritiis, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The management of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) during pregnancy has become recently a matter of continuous debate. The introduction of the Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors (TKIs) in clinical practice has dramatically changed the prognosis of CML patients; in fact, patients diagnosed in chronic phase can reasonably expect many years of excellent disease control and good quality of life, as well as a normal life expectancy, including the necessity to address issues relating to fertility and pregnancy. Physicians are frequently being asked for advice regarding the need for, and/or the appropriateness of, stopping treatment in order to conceive. In this report, we will review the data published in terms of fertility, conception, pregnancy, pregnancy outcome and illness control for TKI treated CML patients, as well as how to manage a planned and/or unplanned pregnancy. PMID:24804001

  14. Glycine Transporters and Their Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilfillan, Robert; Kerr, Jennifer; Walker, Glenn; Wishart, Grant

    Glycine plays a ubiquitous role in many biological processes. In the central nervous system it serves as an important neurotransmitter acting as an agonist at strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors and as an essential co-agonist with glutamate at the NMDA receptor complex. Control of glycine concentrations in the vicinity of these receptors is mediated by the specific glycine transporters, GlyT1 and GlyT2. Inhibition of these transporters has been postulated to be of potential benefit in several therapeutic indications including schizophrenia and pain. In this review we discuss our current knowledge of glycine transporters and focus on recent advances in the medicinal chemistry of GlyT1 and GlyT2 inhibitors.

  15. Enzyme-Inhibitor Association Thermodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Resat, Haluk; Marrone, Tami J.; McCammon, J. Andrew

    1997-01-01

    Studying the thermodynamics of biochemical association reactions at the microscopic level requires efficient sampling of the configurations of the reactants and solvent as a function of the reaction pathways. In most cases, the associating ligand and receptor have complementary interlocking shapes. Upon association, loosely connected or disconnected solvent cavities at and around the binding site are formed. Disconnected solvent regions lead to severe statistical sampling problems when simulations are performed with explicit solvent. It was recently proposed that, when such limitations are encountered, they might be overcome by the use of the grand canonical ensemble. Here we investigate one such case and report the association free energy profile (potential of mean force) between trypsin and benzamidine along a chosen reaction coordinate as calculated using the grand canonical Monte Carlo method. The free energy profile is also calculated for a continuum solvent model using the Poisson equation, and the results are compared to the explicit water simulations. The comparison shows that the continuum solvent approach is surprisingly successful in reproducing the explicit solvent simulation results. The Monte Carlo results are analyzed in detail with respect to solvation structure. In the binding site channel there are waters bridging the carbonyl oxygen groups of Asp189 with the NH2 groups of benzamidine, which are displaced upon inhibitor binding. A similar solvent-bridging configuration has been seen in the crystal structure of trypsin complexed with bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor. The predicted locations of other internal waters are in very good agreement with the positions found in the crystal structures, which supports the accuracy of the simulations. ImagesFIGURE 5 PMID:9017183

  16. Pyridopyrimidine analogues as novel adenosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zheng, G Z; Lee, C; Pratt, J K; Perner, R J; Jiang, M Q; Gomtsyan, A; Matulenko, M A; Mao, Y; Koenig, J R; Kim, K H; Muchmore, S; Yu, H; Kohlhaas, K; Alexander, K M; McGaraughty, S; Chu, K L; Wismer, C T; Mikusa, J; Jarvis, M F; Marsh, K; Kowaluk, E A; Bhagwat, S S; Stewart, A O

    2001-08-20

    A novel series of pyridopyrimidine analogues 9 was identified as potent adenosine kinase inhibitors based on the SAR and computational studies. Substitution of the C7 position of the pyridopyrimidino core with C2' substituted pyridino moiety increased the in vivo potency and enhanced oral bioavailability of these adenosine kinase inhibitors.

  17. Rust inhibitor and oil composition containing same

    SciTech Connect

    Bialy, J.J.; Cullen, W.P.; Dorn, P.; Nebzydoski, J.W.; Sung, R.L.

    1981-04-21

    A rust inhibitor comprising the reaction product of a hydrocarbylsuccinic anhydride in which the hydrocarbyl radical has from about 6 to 30 carbon atoms and an aminotriazole is provided. The rust inhibitor is effective in motor fuel and lubricating oil compositions.

  18. Intellectual property issues of immune checkpoint inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Storz, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors are drugs that interfere with tumor escape responses. Some members of this class are already approved, and expected to be blockbusters in the future. Many companies have developed patent activities in this field. This article focuses on the patent landscape, and discusses key players and cases related to immune checkpoint inhibitors. PMID:26466763

  19. Intellectual property issues of immune checkpoint inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Storz, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors are drugs that interfere with tumor escape responses. Some members of this class are already approved, and expected to be blockbusters in the future. Many companies have developed patent activities in this field. This article focuses on the patent landscape, and discusses key players and cases related to immune checkpoint inhibitors.

  20. Computer simulation of inhibitor application -- A review

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, G.; Vasanth, K.L.

    1997-12-01

    The rapid development of powerful software as well as hardware in computer technology has changed the traditional approach to all areas of science and technology. In the field of corrosion inhibitors, computers are used to model, simulate, analyze and monitor inhibitor applications in both laboratory and industrial environments. This paper will present an up-to-date critical review of such simulation studies.

  1. Intellectual property issues of immune checkpoint inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Storz, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors are drugs that interfere with tumor escape responses. Some members of this class are already approved, and expected to be blockbusters in the future. Many companies have developed patent activities in this field. This article focuses on the patent landscape, and discusses key players and cases related to immune checkpoint inhibitors. PMID:26466763

  2. Aminofurazans as potent inhibitors of AKT kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Rouse, Meagan B.; Seefeld, Mark A.; Leber, Jack D.; McNulty, Kenneth C.; Sun, Lihui; Miller, William H.; Zhang, ShuYun; Minthorn, Elisabeth A.; Concha, Nestor O.; Choudhry, Anthony E.; Schaber, Michael D.; Heerding, Dirk A.

    2009-06-24

    AKT inhibitors containing an imidazopyridine aminofurazan scaffold have been optimized. We have previously disclosed identification of the AKT inhibitor GSK690693, which has been evaluated in clinical trials in cancer patients. Herein we describe recent efforts focusing on investigating a distinct region of this scaffold that have afforded compounds (30 and 32) with comparable activity profiles to that of GSK690693.

  3. Trypsin inhibitors of buffalo seminal plasma.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, N; Ramesh, V

    1992-03-01

    Two trypsin inhibitors from acid-treated buffalo seminal plasma were purified by gel filtration and affinity chromatography. These acid-stable trypsin inhibitors having charge heterogeneity were homogeneous with respect to size as revealed by gel filtration and SDS-PAGE. Gel filtration data suggest molecular weight value of 9,900 Da for inhibitor I and 10,900 Da for inhibitor II. Molecular weight estimated by SDS-PAGE was found to be 10,600 Da and 11,200 Da for inhibitors I and II, respectively. The hydrodynamic properties such as Stokes radii (1.58 nm and 1.62 nm); intrinsic viscosity (2.5725 ml/g and 2.5025 ml/g) and diffusion coefficient (13.499 x 10(-11) m2/sec. and 13.166X10(-11) m2/sec) respectively for inhibitor I and II were determined by analytical gel filtration. These inhibitors were fairly thermostable and could not be stained by PAS reagent. Both the inhibitors were found to inhibit buffalo acrosin but not bovine chymotrypsin.

  4. MAO inhibitors: risks, benefits, and lore.

    PubMed

    Wimbiscus, Molly; Kostenko, Olga; Malone, Donald

    2010-12-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors were the first antidepressants introduced, but their use has dwindled because of their reported side effects, their food and drug interactions, and the introduction of other classes of agents. However, interest in MAO inhibitors is reviving. Here, we discuss their use, risks, and benefits in clinical medicine.

  5. Exploring the scaffold universe of kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ye; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The scaffold concept was applied to systematically determine, analyze, and compare core structures of kinase inhibitors. From publicly available inhibitors of the human kinome, scaffolds and cyclic skeletons were systematically extracted and organized taking activity data, structural relationships, and retrosynthetic criteria into account. Scaffold coverage varied greatly across the kinome, and many scaffolds representing compounds with different activity profiles were identified. The majority of kinase inhibitor scaffolds were involved in well-defined yet distinct structural relationships, which had different consequences on compound activity. Scaffolds exclusively representing highly potent compounds were identified as well as structurally analogous scaffolds with very different degrees of promiscuity. Scaffold relationships presented herein suggest a variety of hypotheses for inhibitor design. Our detailed organization of the kinase inhibitor scaffold universe with respect to different activity and structural criteria, all scaffolds, and the original compound data assembled for our analysis are made freely available.

  6. A Spider-Derived Kunitz-Type Serine Protease Inhibitor That Acts as a Plasmin Inhibitor and an Elastase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Hu; Lee, Kwang Sik; Kim, Bo Yeon; Zou, Feng Ming; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Je, Yeon Ho; Li, Jianhong; Jin, Byung Rae

    2013-01-01

    Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitors are involved in various physiological processes, such as ion channel blocking, blood coagulation, fibrinolysis, and inflammation. While spider-derived Kunitz-type proteins show activity in trypsin or chymotrypsin inhibition and K+ channel blocking, no additional role for these proteins has been elucidated. In this study, we identified the first spider (Araneus ventricosus) Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor (AvKTI) that acts as a plasmin inhibitor and an elastase inhibitor. AvKTI possesses a Kunitz domain consisting of a 57-amino-acid mature peptide that displays features consistent with Kunitz-type inhibitors, including six conserved cysteine residues and a P1 lysine residue. Recombinant AvKTI, expressed in baculovirus-infected insect cells, showed a dual inhibitory activity against trypsin (Ki 7.34 nM) and chymotrypsin (Ki 37.75 nM), defining a role for AvKTI as a spider-derived Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor. Additionally, AvKTI showed no detectable inhibitory effects on factor Xa, thrombin, or tissue plasminogen activator; however, AvKTI inhibited plasmin (Ki 4.89 nM) and neutrophil elastase (Ki 169.07 nM), indicating that it acts as an antifibrinolytic factor and an antielastolytic factor. These findings constitute molecular evidence that AvKTI acts as a plasmin inhibitor and an elastase inhibitor and also provide a novel view of the functions of a spider-derived Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor. PMID:23308198

  7. Designing Inhibitors of Anthrax Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Nestorovich, Ekaterina M.; Bezrukov, Sergey M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Present-day rational drug design approaches are based on exploiting unique features of the target biomolecules, small- or macromolecule drug candidates, and physical forces that govern their interactions. The 2013 Nobel Prize in chemistry awarded “for the development of multiscale models for complex chemical systems” once again demonstrated the importance of the tailored drug discovery that reduces the role of the trial and error approach to a minimum. The “rational drug design” term is rather comprehensive as it includes all contemporary methods of drug discovery where serendipity and screening are substituted by the information-guided search for new and existing compounds. Successful implementation of these innovative drug discovery approaches is inevitably preceded by learning the physics, chemistry, and physiology of functioning of biological structures under normal and pathological conditions. Areas covered This article provides an overview of the recent rational drug design approaches to discover inhibitors of anthrax toxin. Some of the examples include small-molecule and peptide-based post-exposure therapeutic agents as well as several polyvalent compounds. The review also directs the reader to the vast literature on the recognized advances and future possibilities in the field. Expert opinion Existing options to combat anthrax toxin lethality are limited. With the only anthrax toxin inhibiting therapy (PA-targeting with a monoclonal antibody, raxibacumab) approved to treat inhalational anthrax, in our view, the situation is still insecure. The FDA’s animal rule for drug approval, which clears compounds without validated efficacy studies on humans, creates a high level of uncertainty, especially when a well-characterized animal model does not exist. Besides, unlike PA, which is known to be unstable, LF remains active in cells and in animal tissues for days. Therefore, the effectiveness of the post-exposure treatment of the individuals

  8. High-affinity Cyclic Peptide Matriptase Inhibitors*

    PubMed Central

    Quimbar, Pedro; Malik, Uru; Sommerhoff, Christian P.; Kaas, Quentin; Chan, Lai Y.; Huang, Yen-Hua; Grundhuber, Maresa; Dunse, Kerry; Craik, David J.; Anderson, Marilyn A.; Daly, Norelle L.

    2013-01-01

    The type II transmembrane serine protease matriptase is a key activator of multiple signaling pathways associated with cell proliferation and modification of the extracellular matrix. Deregulated matriptase activity correlates with a number of diseases, including cancer and hence highly selective matriptase inhibitors may have therapeutic potential. The plant-derived cyclic peptide, sunflower trypsin inhibitor-1 (SFTI-1), is a promising drug scaffold with potent matriptase inhibitory activity. In the current study we have analyzed the structure-activity relationships of SFTI-1 and Momordica cochinchinensis trypsin inhibitor-II (MCoTI-II), a structurally divergent trypsin inhibitor from Momordica cochinchinensis that also contains a cyclic backbone. We show that MCoTI-II is a significantly more potent matriptase inhibitor than SFTI-1 and that all alanine mutants of both peptides, generated using positional scanning mutagenesis, have decreased trypsin affinity, whereas several mutations either maintain or result in enhanced matriptase inhibitory activity. These intriguing results were used to design one of the most potent matriptase inhibitors known to date with a 290 pm equilibrium dissociation constant, and provide the first indication on how to modulate affinity for matriptase over trypsin in cyclic peptides. This information might be useful for the design of more selective and therapeutically relevant inhibitors of matriptase. PMID:23548907

  9. Leflunomide, a Reversible Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Petzer, Jacobus P; Petzer, Anél

    2016-01-01

    A screening study aimed at identifying inhibitors of the enzyme, monoamine oxidase (MAO), among clinically used drugs have indicated that the antirheumatic drug, leflunomide, is an inhibitor of both MAO isoforms. Leflunomide inhibits human MAO-A and MAO-B and exhibits IC50 values of 19.1 μM and 13.7 μM, respectively. The corresponding Ki values are 17.7 μM (MAO-A) and 10.1 μM (MAO-B). Dialyses of mixtures of the MAO enzymes and leflunomide show that inhibition of the MAOs by leflunomide is reversible. The principal metabolite of leflunomide, teriflunomide (A77 1726), in contrast is not an MAO inhibitor. This study concludes that, although leflunomide is only moderately potent as an MAO inhibitor, isoxazole derivatives may represent a general class of MAO inhibitors and this heterocycle may find application in MAO inhibitor design. In this respect, MAO inhibitors are used in the clinic for the treatment of depressive illness and Parkinson's disease, and are under investigation as therapy for certain types of cancer, Alzheimer's disease and age-related impairment of cardiac function. PMID:26299850

  10. Discovery and optimization of 1,7-disubstituted-2,2-dimethyl-2,3-dihydroquinazolin-4(1H)-ones as potent and selective PKCθ inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Taisuke; Takai, Takafumi; Yukawa, Takafumi; Tsukamoto, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Etsurou; Mototani, Hideyuki; Arita, Takeo; Hayashi, Hiroki; Nakagawa, Hideyuki; Klein, Michael G; Zou, Hua; Sang, Bi-Ching; Snell, Gyorgy; Nakada, Yoshihisa

    2016-06-01

    A high-throughput screening campaign helped us to identify an initial lead compound (1) as a protein kinase C-θ (PKCθ) inhibitor. Using the docking model of compound 1 bound to PKCθ as a model, structure-based drug design was employed and two regions were identified that could be explored for further optimization, i.e., (a) a hydrophilic region around Thr442, unique to PKC family, in the inner part of the hinge region, and (b) a lipophilic region at the forefront of the ethyl moiety. Optimization of the hinge binder led us to find 1,3-dihydro-2H-imidazo[4,5-b]pyridin-2-one as a potent and selective hinge binder, which resulted in the discovery of compound 5. Filling the lipophilic region with a suitable lipophilic substituent boosted PKCθ inhibitory activity and led to the identification of compound 10. The co-crystal structure of compound 10 bound to PKCθ confirmed that both the hydrophilic and lipophilic regions were fully utilized. Further optimization of compound 10 led us to compound 14, which demonstrated an improved pharmacokinetic profile and inhibition of IL-2 production in a mouse. PMID:27117263

  11. SGLT2 Inhibitors May Predispose to Ketoacidosis

    PubMed Central

    Blau, Jenny E.; Rother, Kristina I.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are antidiabetic drugs that increase urinary excretion of glucose, thereby improving glycemic control and promoting weight loss. Since approval of the first-in-class drug in 2013, data have emerged suggesting that these drugs increase the risk of diabetic ketoacidosis. In May 2015, the Food and Drug Administration issued a warning that SGLT2 inhibitors may lead to ketoacidosis. Evidence Acquisition: Using PubMed and Google, we conducted Boolean searches including terms related to ketone bodies or ketoacidosis with terms for SGLT2 inhibitors or phlorizin. Priority was assigned to publications that shed light on molecular mechanisms whereby SGLT2 inhibitors could affect ketone body metabolism. Evidence Synthesis: SGLT2 inhibitors trigger multiple mechanisms that could predispose to diabetic ketoacidosis. When SGLT2 inhibitors are combined with insulin, it is often necessary to decrease the insulin dose to avoid hypoglycemia. The lower dose of insulin may be insufficient to suppress lipolysis and ketogenesis. Furthermore, SGLT2 is expressed in pancreatic α-cells, and SGLT2 inhibitors promote glucagon secretion. Finally, phlorizin, a nonselective inhibitor of SGLT family transporters decreases urinary excretion of ketone bodies. A decrease in the renal clearance of ketone bodies could also increase the plasma ketone body levels. Conclusions: Based on the physiology of SGLT2 and the pharmacology of SGLT2 inhibitors, there are several biologically plausible mechanisms whereby this class of drugs has the potential to increase the risk of developing diabetic ketoacidosis. Future research should be directed toward identifying which patients are at greatest risk for this side effect and also to optimizing pharmacotherapy to minimize the risk to patients. PMID:26086329

  12. Phorbol esters from Jatropha meal triggered apoptosis, activated PKC-δ, caspase-3 proteins and down-regulated the proto-oncogenes in MCF-7 and HeLa cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Oskoueian, Ehsan; Abdullah, Norhani; Ahmad, Syahida

    2012-09-10

    Jatropha meal produced from the kernel of Jatropha curcas Linn. grown in Malaysia contains phorbol esters (PEs). The potential benefits of PEs present in the meal as anticancer agent are still not well understood. Hence, this study was conducted to evaluate the cytotoxic effects and mode of actions of PEs isolated from Jatropha meal against breast (MCF-7) and cervical (HeLa) cancer cell lines. Isolated PEs inhibited cells proliferation in a dose-dependent manner of both MCF-7 and HeLa cell lines with the IC₅₀ of 128.6 ± 2.51 and 133.0 ± 1.96 µg PMA equivalents/mL respectively, while the values for the phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) as positive control were 114.7 ± 1.73 and 119.6 ± 3.73 µg/mL, respectively. Microscopic examination showed significant morphological changes that resemble apoptosis in both cell lines when treated with PEs and PMA at IC₅₀ concentration after 24 h. Flow cytometry analysis and DNA fragmentation results confirmed the apoptosis induction of PEs and PMA in both cell lines. The PEs isolated from Jatropha meal activated the PKC-δ and down-regulated the proto-oncogenes (c-Myc, c-Fos and c-Jun). These changes probably led to the activation of Caspase-3 protein and apoptosis cell death occurred in MCF-7 and HeLa cell lines upon 24 h treatment with PEs and PMA. Phorbol esters of Jatropha meal were found to be promising as an alternative to replace the chemotherapeutic drugs for cancer therapy.

  13. D-saccharic acid 1,4-lactone protects diabetic rat kidney by ameliorating hyperglycemia-mediated oxidative stress and renal inflammatory cytokines via NF-κB and PKC signaling.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Semantee; Manna, Prasenjit; Gachhui, Ratan; Sil, Parames C

    2013-02-15

    Increasing evidence suggests that oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN) and this can be attenuated by antioxidants. D-Saccharic acid 1,4-lactone (DSL) is known for its detoxifying and antioxidant properties. Our early investigation showed that DSL can ameliorate alloxan (ALX) induced diabetes mellitus and oxidative stress in rats by inhibiting pancreatic β-cell apoptosis. In the present study we, therefore, investigated the protective role of DSL against renal injury in ALX induced diabetic rats. ALX exposure (at a dose of 120 mg/kg body weight, i. p., once) elevated the blood glucose level, serum markers related to renal injury, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and disturbed the intra-cellular antioxidant machineries. Oral administration of DSL (80 mg/kg body weight) restored all these alterations close to normal. In addition, DSL could also normalize the aldose reductase activity which was found to increase in the diabetic rats. Investigating the mechanism of its protective activity, we observed the activation of different isoforms of PKC along with the accumulation of matrix proteins like collagen and fibronectin. The diabetic rats also showed nuclear translocation of NF-κB and increase in the concentration of inflammatory cytokines in the renal tissue. The activation of mitochondria dependent apoptotic pathway was observed in the diabetic rat kidneys. However, treatment of diabetic rats with DSL counteracted all these changes. These findings, for the first time, demonstrated that DSL could ameliorate renal dysfunction in diabetic rats by suppressing the oxidative stress related signalling pathways.

  14. Epstein-Barr virus envelope glycoprotein gp350 induces NF-kappaB activation and IL-1beta synthesis in human monocytes-macrophages involving PKC and PI3-K.

    PubMed

    D'Addario, M; Ahmad, A; Xu, J W; Menezes, J

    1999-12-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a highly immunotropic human herpesvirus with oncogenic potential and is involved in numerous pathologies. EBV utilizes its major envelope glycoprotein gp350 to bind to its receptor CR2/CD21 on target cells for initiating the infection. We have previously shown that EBV is able to modulate transcription and translation of a number of cytokine genes via its gp350-mediated binding to this receptor. However, the effects of the binding of purified gp350 to CR2/CD21 on plastic-adherent monocyte-macrophages (AMM) have not been investigated. These cells are a rich source of potent proinflammatory and immune-modulating cytokines, and express low levels of CR2/CD21. We show here for the first time that recombinant gp350 (rgp350) causes production of the potent proinflammatory cytokine IL-1beta in human AMM. Surprisingly, rgp350 is comparable in this capacity to the phorbol ester 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate. This induction of IL-1beta production was accompanied by increased steady-state levels of its mRNA in gp350-treated AMM, and was dependent on the specific binding of rgp350 to the EBV receptor CR2/CD21. We also show that the signaling pathways resulting in the induction of IL-1beta synthesis by rgp350 required protein kinase C and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5 triphosphate kinase activities and occurred via activation of the NF-kappaB family of transcription factors.-D'Addario, M., Ahmad, A., Xu, J. W., Menezes, J. Epstein-Barr virus envelope glycoprotein gp350 induces NF-kappaB activation and IL-1beta synthesis in human monocytes-macrophages involving PKC and PI3-K. PMID:10593868

  15. Thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Marx, Pauline F

    2004-09-01

    The coagulation system is a potent mechanism that prevents blood loss after vascular injury. It consists of a number of linked enzymatic reactions resulting in thrombin generation. Thrombin converts soluble fibrinogen into a fibrin clot. The clot is subsequently removed by the fibrinolytic system upon wound healing. Thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI), which is identical to the previously identified proteins procarboxypeptidase B, R, and U, forms a link between blood coagulation and fibrinolysis. TAFI circulates as an inactive proenzyme in the bloodstream, and becomes activated during blood clotting. The active form, TAFIa, inhibits fibrinolysis by cleaving off C-terminal lysine residues from partially degraded fibrin that stimulates the tissue-type plasminogen activator-mediated conversion of plasminogen to plasmin. Consequently, removal of these lysines leads to less plasmin formation and subsequently to protection of the fibrin clot from break down. Moreover, TAFI may also play a role in other processes such as, inflammation and tissue repair. In this review, recent developments in TAFI research are discussed. PMID:15379716

  16. HIV Protease Inhibitors and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Anuurad, Erdembileg; Bremer, Andrew; Berglund, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review To review the current scientific literature and recent clinical trials on HIV protease inhibitors (PIs) and their potential role in the pathogenesis of lipodystrophy and metabolic disorders. Recent findings HIV PI treatment may affect the normal stimulatory effect of insulin on glucose and fat storage. Further, chronic inflammation from HIV infection and PI treatment trigger cellular homeostatic stress responses with adverse effects on intermediary metabolism. The physiologic outcome is such that total adipocyte storage capacity is decreased, and the remaining adipocytes resist further fat storage. This process leads to a pathologic cycle of lipodystrophy and lipotoxicity, a pro-atherogenic lipid profile, and a clinical phenotype of increased central body fat distribution similar to the metabolic syndrome. Summary PIs are a key component of antiretroviral therapy and have dramatically improved the life expectancy of HIV-infected individuals. However, they are also associated with abnormalities in glucose/lipid metabolism and body fat distribution. Further studies are needed to better define the pathogenesis of PI-associated metabolic and body fat changes and their potential treatment. PMID:20717021

  17. MMP Inhibitors: Past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Cathcart, Jillian M; Cao, Jian

    2015-01-01

      Development of inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) has been fraught with challenges. Early compounds largely failed due to poor selectivity and bioavailability. Dose-limiting side effects, off-target interactions, and improperly designed clinical trials significantly impeded clinical success. As information becomes available and technology evolves, tools to combat these obstacles have been developed. Improved methods for high throughput screening and drug design have led to identification of compounds exhibiting high potency, binding affinity, and favorable pharmacokinetic profiles. Current research into MMP inhibitors employs innovative approaches for drug delivery methods and allosteric inhibitors. Such innovation is key for development of clinically successful compounds.

  18. An updated review of tyrosinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chang, Te-Sheng

    2009-06-01

    Tyrosinase is a multifunctional, glycosylated, and copper-containing oxidase, which catalyzes the first two steps in mammalian melanogenesis and is responsible for enzymatic browning reactions in damaged fruits during post-harvest handling and processing. Neither hyperpigmentation in human skin nor enzymatic browning in fruits are desirable. These phenomena have encouraged researchers to seek new potent tyrosinase inhibitors for use in foods and cosmetics. This article surveys tyrosinase inhibitors newly discovered from natural and synthetic sources. The inhibitory strength is compared with that of a standard inhibitor, kojic acid, and their inhibitory mechanisms are discussed. PMID:19582213

  19. An Updated Review of Tyrosinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Te-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    Tyrosinase is a multifunctional, glycosylated, and copper-containing oxidase, which catalyzes the first two steps in mammalian melanogenesis and is responsible for enzymatic browning reactions in damaged fruits during post-harvest handling and processing. Neither hyperpigmentation in human skin nor enzymatic browning in fruits are desirable. These phenomena have encouraged researchers to seek new potent tyrosinase inhibitors for use in foods and cosmetics. This article surveys tyrosinase inhibitors newly discovered from natural and synthetic sources. The inhibitory strength is compared with that of a standard inhibitor, kojic acid, and their inhibitory mechanisms are discussed. PMID:19582213

  20. Musical Hallucinations Treated with Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Blom, Jan Dirk; Coebergh, Jan Adriaan F.; Lauw, René; Sommer, Iris E. C.

    2015-01-01

    Musical hallucinations are relatively rare auditory percepts which, due to their intrusive nature and the accompanying fear of impending mental decline, tend to cause significant distress and impairment. Although their etiology and pathophysiology appear to be heterogeneous and no evidence-based treatment methods are available, case reports indicate that acetylcholinesterase inhibitors may yield positive results in patients with comorbid hearing loss. We present two female patients (aged 76 and 78 years) both of whom suffered from hearing impairment and practically incessant musical hallucinations. Both patients were successfully treated with the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor rivastigmine. Based on these two case descriptions and an overview of studies describing the use of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors in similar patients, we discuss possible mechanisms and propose further research on the use of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors for musical hallucinations experienced in concordance with hearing loss. PMID:25904872

  1. A tyrosinase inhibitor from Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Vasantha, K Y; Murugesh, C S; Sattur, A P

    2014-10-01

    Tyrosinase, in the presence of oxygen, is the main culprit in post harvest browning of food products, resulting in the drop in its commercial value. In an effort to seek natural tyrosinase inhibitors for food applications, a screening programme was undertaken. Of the 26 fungal cultures isolated from soil samples of Agumbe forest, India, one isolate S16, identified as Aspergillus niger, gave an inhibition of 84 % against the enzyme. The inhibitor was isolated by following an enzyme inhibition assay guided purification protocol. The structure of the inhibitor was elucidated and found to be kojic acid. The IC50 of the Competitive inhibitor was found to be 8.8 μg with a Ki of 0.085 mM.

  2. Inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase meet immunity.

    PubMed

    Pohanka, Miroslav

    2014-06-02

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors are widely used for the symptomatic treatment of Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. More recent use is for myasthenia gravis. Many of these inhibitors interact with the second known cholinesterase, butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Further, evidence shows that acetylcholine plays a role in suppression of cytokine release through a "cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway" which raises questions about the role of these inhibitors in the immune system. This review covers research and discussion of the role of the inhibitors in modulating the immune response using as examples the commonly available drugs, donepezil, galantamine, huperzine, neostigmine and pyridostigmine. Major attention is given to the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, a well-described link between the central nervous system and terminal effector cells in the immune system.

  3. Ocular Toxicity of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Mary Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To review common tyrosine kinase inhibitors, as well as their ocular side effects and management. Data Sources A comprehensive literature search was conducted using cINahl®, Pubmed, and cochrane databases for articles published since 2004 with the following search terms: ocular toxicities, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, ophthalmology, adverse events, eye, and vision. Data Synthesis Tyrosine kinase inhibitors can cause significant eye toxicity. Conclusions Given the prevalence of new tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapies and the complexity of possible pathogenesis of ocular pathology, oncology nurses can appreciate the occurrence of ocular toxicities and the role of nursing in the management of these problems. Implications for Nursing Knowledge of the risk factors and etiology of ocular toxicity of targeted cancer therapies can guide nursing assessment, enhance patient education, and improve care management. Including a review of eye symptoms and vision issues in nursing assessment can enhance early detection and treatment of ocular toxicity. PMID:26906134

  4. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Urea Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Verkman, Alan S.; Esteva-Font, Cristina; Cil, Onur; Anderson, Marc O.; Li, Fei; Li, Min; Lei, Tianluo; Ren, Huiwen; Yang, Baoxue

    2015-01-01

    Urea transporter (UT) proteins, which include isoforms of UT-A in kidney tubule epithelia and UT-B in vasa recta endothelia and erythrocytes, facilitate urinary concentrating function. Inhibitors of urea transporter function have potential clinical applications as sodium-sparing diuretics, or ‘urearetics,’ in edema from different etiologies, such as congestive heart failure and cirrhosis, as well as in syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH). High-throughput screening of drug-like small molecules has identified UT-A and UT-B inhibitors with nanomolar potency. Inhibitors have been identified with different UT-A versus UT-B selectivity profiles and putative binding sites on UT proteins. Studies in rodent models support the utility of UT inhibitors in reducing urinary concentration, though testing in clinically relevant animal models of edema has not yet been done. PMID:25298345

  5. Small-molecule inhibitors of myosin proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Lisa M; Tumbarello, David A; Kendrick-Jones, John; Buss, Folma

    2014-01-01

    Advances in screening and computational methods have enhanced recent efforts to discover/design small-molecule protein inhibitors. One attractive target for inhibition is the myosin family of motor proteins. Myosins function in a wide variety of cellular processes, from intracellular trafficking to cell motility, and are implicated in several human diseases (e.g., cancer, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, deafness and many neurological disorders). Potent and selective myosin inhibitors are, therefore, not only a tool for understanding myosin function, but are also a resource for developing treatments for diseases involving myosin dysfunction or overactivity. This review will provide a brief overview of the characteristics and scientific/therapeutic applications of the presently identified small-molecule myosin inhibitors before discussing the future of myosin inhibitor and activator design. PMID:23256812

  6. Polyaspartate scale inhibitors -- Biodegradable alternatives to polyacrylates

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, R.J.; Low, K.C.; Shan