Science.gov

Sample records for placental extracts

  1. Evaluation of Placental Extracts as an Adjuvant Therapy to Phenol in Treatment of Idiopathic Guttate Hypomelanosis

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Swati; Kaur, Manjinder

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Idiopathic Guttate Hypomelanosis (IGH) macules are hypo pigmented lesions occurring due to decreased functioning of melanocytes due to photosensitivity or persistent irritation of skin in middle aged and elderly. Aim To find out the efficacy of placental extracts when used as an adjunct with 88% phenol for the treatment of IGH macules. Materials and Methods A total of 40 patients were randomly divided into two groups (n=20 in each group), viz group P, (the control group, treated with only 88% phenol) and Group PP (study group, treated with Placental extracts along with 88% phenol). Spot peeling was done with 88% phenol in both the groups while group PP was advised to use placental extract at night for 3 months. Patients of both groups were assessed both subjectively and objectively after every session and at the end of 3 months of initiation of therapy. The statistical analysis was done using Chi-square test, Z-test and a p-value<0.05 was considered significant. Results Both the groups showed significant re-pigmentation of lesions i.e., 76.8% in group P and 79.1% in group PP; whereas, what group PP had shown was non- significantly (p=0.8203) better as compared to group P. Conclusion The clinical and patient acceptability of phenol along with the placental extracts as an adjuvant was better with similar results. Hence, the use of placental extract is recommended along with phenol in IGH lesions. PMID:27656538

  2. Complex regional pain syndrome type 1 relieved by acupuncture point injections with placental extract.

    PubMed

    Cho, Tae Hwan; Park, Kyeong Mee

    2014-06-01

    This is a case report of a female patient who developed complex regional pain syndrome in the left upper limb after a traumatic injury to the distal part of the left forearm. The pain was immediate and resistant to oral analgesics and continued transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. Five months after the injury, the patient presented to our clinic with severe pain, swelling, redness, cold sensation of the left hand, and loss of function from the left hand up to the left shoulder. Acupuncture points LI5, LU2, SI10, HT1, GB21, and SI11 (which are localized in the joints or in the muscles responsible for the movement of the left upper limb) were selected for the application of the placental extract. Injection of placental extract into the acupuncture points resulted in dramatic pain relief, swelling remission, motor recovery, temperature normalization, and disappearance of redness in this patient with complex regional pain syndrome type 1.

  3. Human placental extract mediated inhibition of proteinase K: implications of heparin and glycoproteins in wound physiology.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Kanika; Mukherjee, Chaitali; Roy, Siddhartha; De, Debashree; Bhattacharyya, Debasish

    2014-09-01

    Efficient debridement of the wound bed following the removal of microbial load prevents its progression into a chronic wound. Bacterial infection and excessive proteolysis characterize impaired healing and therefore, their inhibition might restore the disturbed equilibrium in the healing process. Human placental extract exhibits reversible, non-competitive inhibition towards Proteinase K, a microbial protease, by stabilizing it against auto-digestion. Scattering and fluorescence studies followed by biochemical analysis indicated the involvement of a glycan moiety. Surface plasmon resonance demonstrated specific interaction of heparin with Proteinase K having Kd in μM range. Further, Proteinase K contains sequence motifs similar to other heparin-binding proteins. Molecular docking revealed presence of clefts suitable for binding of heparin-derived oligosaccharides. Comprehensive analysis of this inhibitory property of placental extract partly explains its efficacy in curing wounds with common bacterial infections.

  4. Effect of Changing Gloves Before Placental Extraction on Incidence of Postcesarean Endometritis

    PubMed Central

    Banks, Tracey A.

    1996-01-01

    Objective: We sought to determine if changing the surgeon's gloves after delivery of the infant and prior to manual placental removal decreases the incidence of postcesarean endometritis. Methods: Laboring women undergoing cesarean delivery between September 1, 1994, and August 31, 1995, were prospectively randomized into either a change or no-change glove group. In the change-glove group, the surgeon's gloves were changed after delivery of the infant and before manual removal of the placenta. All patients enrolled received a single prophylactic dose of an IV antibiotic after clamping of the umbilical cord. Endometritis was diagnosed by an oral temperature of ≥38℃ on 2 occasions at least 6 h apart and >24 h after delivery, uterine tenderness, peripheral blood leukocytosis (≥15,000 cells/ml), and the exclusion of other foci of infection. In order to detect a reduction in endometritis from 14% to 2%, at P < 0.05 with 80% power, we needed 95 patients in each group. Results: Two hundred twenty-eight women were randomized to 2 groups: 113 were in the change group and 115 in the no-change group. No significant differences were noted between the groups with respect to demographics, duration of labor, length of ruptured membranes, number of vaginal examinations, duration of internal monitoring, length of surgery, blood loss, or infant weight. There was no decrease in the incidence of endometritis between the change group (17.7%) and the no-change group (15.7%) (relative risk 1.1, 95% confidence interval 0.75–1.47). Conclusions: In this study, the incidence of postcesarean endometritis was not decreased by changing the surgeon's gloves after delivery of the infant but before placental extraction. PMID:18476058

  5. Immunoglobulin isotype isolated from human placental extract does not interfere in complement-mediated bacterial opsonization within the wound milieu

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Kanika; Bhattacharyya, Debasish

    2015-01-01

    The wound healing potency of an aqueous extract of placenta can be evaluated through the presence of numerous regulatory components. The presence of glycans was detected by thin layer chromatography and fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis. Mass spectrometric analysis revealed the existence of multiple fragments of immunoglobulin G (IgG). IgG was present in the extract at a concentration of 25.2 ± 3.97 μg/ml. IgG possesses anti-complementary activity by diverting the complement activation from target surface. Thus, effect of placental IgG on complement–bacteria interaction was investigated through classical and alternative pathway and the preparation was ascertained to be safe with respect to their interference in the process of bacterial opsonization. PMID:25984442

  6. Placental insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... mother is as healthy as possible during the pregnancy. Smoking, alcohol, and other recreational drugs can interfere with the baby's growth. Avoiding these substances may help prevent placental insufficiency and other pregnancy complications.

  7. The effect on perioperative bleeding of placental extraction from an exteriorized uterus during caesarean section.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Cheng Wei; Climan, Allan B; Abenhaim, Haim A

    2014-05-01

    Objectif : Évaluer l’effet d’une technique parallèle en matière de césarienne (dans le cadre de laquelle l’extraction du placenta est menée pendant que l’utérus est extériorisé) sur les saignements périopératoires. Méthodes : Nous avons mené une étude de cohorte appariée rétrospective au moyen de données obtenues par l’intermédiaire d’une analyse de dossiers. Le groupe 1 était composé de femmes qui avaient subi une césarienne menée au moyen de la technique du retrait du placenta pendant que l’utérus était extériorisé, tandis que le groupe 2 était composé de femmes qui avaient subi une césarienne menée au moyen de la méthode conventionnelle de retrait du placenta d’un utérus non extériorisé. Les femmes de chacun de ces groupes ont été appariées en fonction du nombre de césariennes préalables, des indications ayant mené à la césarienne et de l’âge gestationnel. Le critère d’évaluation principal était la différence entre les concentrations en hémoglobine préopératoire et postopératoire. Parmi les critères d’évaluation secondaires, on trouvait l’incidence de la transfusion sanguine, la perte sanguine estimée (PSE), la durée opératoire, l’incidence de l’endométrite postopératoire et la durée de l’hospitalisation. Résultats : Au total, 90 dossiers ont été analysés (45 par groupe). Les caractéristiques cliniques de base étaient similaires dans les deux groupes. Lorsque nous avons comparé la baisse moyenne de la concentration en hémoglobine chez les femmes ayant subi une extraction du placenta menée à partir d’un utérus extériorisé et chez celles qui avaient subi une extraction conventionnelle du placenta, nous avons constaté une différence de l’ordre de 22 % (13,2 g/l dans le groupe 1 vs 16,9 g/l dans le groupe 2, P = 0,016). En ce qui concerne les critères d’évaluation secondaires, les femmes du groupe 1 ont subi une PSE moyenne moindre (531,1 ml vs 691

  8. Fusarium moniliforme extract fed before a single dose of diethylnitrosamine increases the numbers of placental glutathione S-transferase positive hepatocytes in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Lebepe, S.; Hendrich, S. )

    1991-03-11

    The carcinogenic potential of an alcohol:water (1:1) extract of Fusarium moniliforme (FUSX), containing 20 ppm fumonisin B{sub 1} was assayed. Groups of six 5-week-old female F344/N rats were fed a semipurified diet, with and without FUSX. A dose of initiating agent, diethylnitrosamine, was given orally. Placental glutathione S-transferase-positive (PGST(+)) hepatocytes were detected by immunohistochemistry and counted on 5 frozen hepatic sections/rat, as an endpoint to assess early stages of carcinogenesis. FUSX had significant co-initiating activity. Fusarium moniliforme infection of feed has been shown to promote hepatocarcinogenesis, and may pose a cocarcinogenic risk even during short-term, low-level exposure.

  9. Human placental extract exerts hair growth-promoting effects through the GSK-3β signaling pathway in human dermal papilla cells.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Tae-Rin; Oh, Chang Taek; Choi, Eun Ja; Park, Hye Min; Han, Hae Jung; Ji, Hyi Jeong; Kim, Beom Joon

    2015-10-01

    Human placental extract (HPE) is widely used in Korea to relieve fatigue. However, its effects on human dermal papilla cells (hDPCs) remain unknown. In the present study, in an effort to develop novel therapies to promote hair growth, we screened HPE. We demonstrate that HPE has hair growth‑promoting activities and induces β‑catenin expression through the inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase‑3β (GSK‑3β) by phosphorylation in hDPCs. Treatment with HPE significantly increased the viability of the hDPCs in a concentration‑dependent manner, as shown by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) assay. HPE also significantly increased the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) expression levels. The increased β‑catenin levels and the inhibition of GSK‑3β (Ser9) by phosphorylation suggested that HPE promoted the hair-inductive capacity of hDPCs. We compared the effects of treatment with HPE alone and treatment with HPE in conjunction with minoxidil (MXD). We found that HPE plus MXD effectively inhibited GSK‑3β by phosphorylation (Ser9) in the hDPCs. Moreover, we demonstrated that HPE was effective in inducing root hair elongation in rat vibrissa hair follicles, and that treatment with HPE led to a delay in catagen progression. Overall, our findings suggest that HPE promotes hair growth and may thus provide the basis of a novel therapeutic strategy for the clinical treatment of hair loss.

  10. Human placental extract exerts hair growth-promoting effects through the GSK-3β signaling pathway in human dermal papilla cells.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Tae-Rin; Oh, Chang Taek; Choi, Eun Ja; Park, Hye Min; Han, Hae Jung; Ji, Hyi Jeong; Kim, Beom Joon

    2015-10-01

    Human placental extract (HPE) is widely used in Korea to relieve fatigue. However, its effects on human dermal papilla cells (hDPCs) remain unknown. In the present study, in an effort to develop novel therapies to promote hair growth, we screened HPE. We demonstrate that HPE has hair growth‑promoting activities and induces β‑catenin expression through the inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase‑3β (GSK‑3β) by phosphorylation in hDPCs. Treatment with HPE significantly increased the viability of the hDPCs in a concentration‑dependent manner, as shown by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) assay. HPE also significantly increased the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) expression levels. The increased β‑catenin levels and the inhibition of GSK‑3β (Ser9) by phosphorylation suggested that HPE promoted the hair-inductive capacity of hDPCs. We compared the effects of treatment with HPE alone and treatment with HPE in conjunction with minoxidil (MXD). We found that HPE plus MXD effectively inhibited GSK‑3β by phosphorylation (Ser9) in the hDPCs. Moreover, we demonstrated that HPE was effective in inducing root hair elongation in rat vibrissa hair follicles, and that treatment with HPE led to a delay in catagen progression. Overall, our findings suggest that HPE promotes hair growth and may thus provide the basis of a novel therapeutic strategy for the clinical treatment of hair loss. PMID:26311045

  11. Preparation of a novel composite nanofiber gel-encapsulated human placental extract through layer-by-layer self-assembly

    PubMed Central

    LIU, GUOHUI; CHEN, XI; ZHOU, WU; YANG, SHUHUA; YE, SHUNAN; CAO, FAQI; LIU, YI; XIONG, YUAN

    2016-01-01

    Aqueous human placenta extract (HPE) has been previously used to treat chronic soft tissue ulcer; however, the optimal dosage of HPE has yet to be elucidated. The present study investigated a novel nanofiber gel composed through layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly, in which HPE was encapsulated. IKVAV, RGD, RAD16 and FGL-PA were screened and combined to produce an optimal vehicle nanofiber gel through LbL assembly. Subsequently, the aqueous HPE was encapsulated into this nanofiber at the appropriate concentration, and the morphology, particle size, drug loading efficacy, encapsulation rate, release efficiency and structure validation were detected. The encapsulation efficiency of all three HPE samples was >90%, the nanofiber gel exhibited a slow releasing profile, and the structure of HPE encapsulated in the nanofiber gel was unvaried. In conclusion, this type of novel composite nanocapsules may offer a promising delivery system for HPE. PMID:27073463

  12. Mosaic retroposon insertion patterns in placental mammals

    PubMed Central

    Churakov, Gennady; Kriegs, Jan Ole; Baertsch, Robert; Zemann, Anja; Brosius, Jürgen; Schmitz, Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    One and a half centuries after Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace outlined our current understanding of evolution, a new scientific era is dawning that enables direct observations of genetic variation. However, pure sequence-based molecular attempts to resolve the basal origin of placental mammals have so far resulted only in apparently conflicting hypotheses. By contrast, in the mammalian genomes where they were highly active, the insertion of retroelements and their comparative insertion patterns constitute a neutral, virtually homoplasy-free archive of evolutionary histories. The “presence” of a retroelement at an orthologous genomic position in two species indicates their common ancestry in contrast to its “absence” in more distant species. To resolve the placental origin controversy we extracted ∼2 million potentially phylogenetically informative, retroposon-containing loci from representatives of the major placental mammalian lineages and found highly significant evidence challenging all current single hypotheses of their basal origin. The Exafroplacentalia hypothesis (Afrotheria as the sister group to all remaining placentals) is significantly supported by five retroposon insertions, the Epitheria hypothesis (Xenarthra as the sister group to all remaining placentals) by nine insertion patterns, and the Atlantogenata hypothesis (a monophyletic clade comprising Xenarthra and Afrotheria as the sister group to Boreotheria comprising all remaining placentals) by eight insertion patterns. These findings provide significant support for a “soft” polytomy of the major mammalian clades. Ancestral successive hybridization events and/or incomplete lineage sorting associated with short speciation intervals are viable explanations for the mosaic retroposon insertion patterns of recent placental mammals and for the futile search for a clear root dichotomy. PMID:19261842

  13. Mosaic retroposon insertion patterns in placental mammals.

    PubMed

    Churakov, Gennady; Kriegs, Jan Ole; Baertsch, Robert; Zemann, Anja; Brosius, Jürgen; Schmitz, Jürgen

    2009-05-01

    One and a half centuries after Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace outlined our current understanding of evolution, a new scientific era is dawning that enables direct observations of genetic variation. However, pure sequence-based molecular attempts to resolve the basal origin of placental mammals have so far resulted only in apparently conflicting hypotheses. By contrast, in the mammalian genomes where they were highly active, the insertion of retroelements and their comparative insertion patterns constitute a neutral, virtually homoplasy-free archive of evolutionary histories. The "presence" of a retroelement at an orthologous genomic position in two species indicates their common ancestry in contrast to its "absence" in more distant species. To resolve the placental origin controversy we extracted approximately 2 million potentially phylogenetically informative, retroposon-containing loci from representatives of the major placental mammalian lineages and found highly significant evidence challenging all current single hypotheses of their basal origin. The Exafroplacentalia hypothesis (Afrotheria as the sister group to all remaining placentals) is significantly supported by five retroposon insertions, the Epitheria hypothesis (Xenarthra as the sister group to all remaining placentals) by nine insertion patterns, and the Atlantogenata hypothesis (a monophyletic clade comprising Xenarthra and Afrotheria as the sister group to Boreotheria comprising all remaining placentals) by eight insertion patterns. These findings provide significant support for a "soft" polytomy of the major mammalian clades. Ancestral successive hybridization events and/or incomplete lineage sorting associated with short speciation intervals are viable explanations for the mosaic retroposon insertion patterns of recent placental mammals and for the futile search for a clear root dichotomy. PMID:19261842

  14. Mosaic retroposon insertion patterns in placental mammals.

    PubMed

    Churakov, Gennady; Kriegs, Jan Ole; Baertsch, Robert; Zemann, Anja; Brosius, Jürgen; Schmitz, Jürgen

    2009-05-01

    One and a half centuries after Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace outlined our current understanding of evolution, a new scientific era is dawning that enables direct observations of genetic variation. However, pure sequence-based molecular attempts to resolve the basal origin of placental mammals have so far resulted only in apparently conflicting hypotheses. By contrast, in the mammalian genomes where they were highly active, the insertion of retroelements and their comparative insertion patterns constitute a neutral, virtually homoplasy-free archive of evolutionary histories. The "presence" of a retroelement at an orthologous genomic position in two species indicates their common ancestry in contrast to its "absence" in more distant species. To resolve the placental origin controversy we extracted approximately 2 million potentially phylogenetically informative, retroposon-containing loci from representatives of the major placental mammalian lineages and found highly significant evidence challenging all current single hypotheses of their basal origin. The Exafroplacentalia hypothesis (Afrotheria as the sister group to all remaining placentals) is significantly supported by five retroposon insertions, the Epitheria hypothesis (Xenarthra as the sister group to all remaining placentals) by nine insertion patterns, and the Atlantogenata hypothesis (a monophyletic clade comprising Xenarthra and Afrotheria as the sister group to Boreotheria comprising all remaining placentals) by eight insertion patterns. These findings provide significant support for a "soft" polytomy of the major mammalian clades. Ancestral successive hybridization events and/or incomplete lineage sorting associated with short speciation intervals are viable explanations for the mosaic retroposon insertion patterns of recent placental mammals and for the futile search for a clear root dichotomy.

  15. Diagnosis of placental malaria.

    PubMed

    Mockenhaupt, Frank P; Ulmen, Ulrike; von Gaertner, Christiane; Bedu-Addo, George; Bienzle, Ulrich

    2002-01-01

    In a group of 596 delivering Ghanaian women, the sensitivities of peripheral blood thick film microscopy, ICT Malaria P.f/P.v test, and PCR in detecting microscopically confirmed placental Plasmodium falciparum infection were 42, 80, and 97%, respectively. In addition to the gross underestimation of placental malaria by peripheral blood film microscopy, submicroscopic infections were found to be a risk factor for maternal anemia.

  16. Potential effect of Olea europea leaves, Sonchus oleraceus leaves and Mangifera indica peel extracts on aromatase activity in human placental microsomes and CYP19A1 expression in MCF-7 cell line: Comparative study.

    PubMed

    Shaban, N Z; Hegazy, W A; Abdel-Rahman, S M; Awed, O M; Khalil, S A

    2016-01-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) provide novel approaches to the adjuvant therapy for postmenopausal women with estrogen-receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancers. In this study, different plant extracts from Olea europaea leaves (OLE), Sonchus oleraceus L. (SOE) and Mangifera indica peels (MPE) were prepared to identify phytoconstituents and measure antioxidant capacities. The effects of these three extracts on aromatase activity in human placental microsomes were evaluated. Additionally, the effects of these extracts on tissue-specific promoter expression of CYP19A1 gene in cell culture model (MCF-7) were assessed using qRT-PCR. Results showed a concentration-dependent decrease in aromatase activity after treatment with OLE and MPE, whereas, SOE showed a biphasic effect. The differential effects of OLE, SOE and MPE on aromatase expression showed that OLE seems to be the most potent suppressor followed by SOE and then MPE. These findings indicate that OLE has effective inhibitory action on aromatase at both the enzymatic and expression levels, in addition to its cytotoxic effect against MCF-7 cells. Also, MPE may be has the potential to be used as a tissue-specific aromatase inhibitor (selective aromatase inhibitor) and it may be promising to develop a new therapeutic agent against ER+ breast cancer. PMID:27585256

  17. Malignant cancer and invasive placentation

    PubMed Central

    D'Souza, Alaric W.; Wagner, Günter P.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer metastasis is an invasive process that involves the transplantation of cells into new environments. Since human placentation is also invasive, hypotheses about a relationship between invasive placentation in eutherian mammals and metastasis have been proposed. The relationship between metastatic cancer and invasive placentation is usually presented in terms of antagonistic pleiotropy. According to this hypothesis, evolution of invasive placentation also established the mechanisms for cancer metastasis. Here, in contrast, we argue that the secondary evolution of less invasive placentation in some mammalian lineages may have resulted in positive pleiotropic effects on cancer survival by lowering malignancy rates. These positive pleiotropic effects would manifest themselves as resistance to cancer cell invasion. To provide a preliminary test of this proposal, we re-analyze data from Priester and Mantel (Occurrence of tumors in domestic animals. Data from 12 United States and Canadian colleges of veterinary medicine. J Natl Cancer Inst 1971;47:1333-44) about malignancy rates in cows, horses, cats and dogs. From our analysis we found that equines and bovines, animals with less invasive placentation, have lower rates of metastatic cancer than felines and canines in skin and glandular epithelial cancers as well as connective tissue sarcomas. We conclude that a link between type of placentation and species-specific malignancy rates is more likely related to derived mechanisms that suppress invasion rather than different degrees of fetal placental aggressiveness. PMID:25324490

  18. [Morphological variability and placental function].

    PubMed

    Malassiné, A

    2001-01-01

    In mammals, the blastocyst defines with the maternal organism, a structure which allows embryonic development during gestation: the placenta. The structure of this organ varies remarkably across species. In this review the different type of placentation have been described in a comparative manner using terms of classification such as: placental materno-fetal interdigitation, matemofetal blood flow interrelationships, layers of the placental interhemal barrier, trophoblast invasiveness and decidual cell reaction, formation of syncytiotrophoblast. The human hemomonochorial placenta is characterized by a strong decidualization of the uterus and a major invasiveness of the extravillous trophoblast. Furthermore, there is a spectrum of placental endocrine activities across species. In some mammals (e.g., mouse and rat) the placenta eclipses the pituitary in the maintenance of ovarian function. In the human and in the sheep, horse, cat and guinea pig, the placenta acquires the ability to substitute for the ovaries in the maintenance of gestation at various time during pregnancy. The human placenta is characterized by a high rate of steroïdogenesis (progesterone and estrogens) and by the production of a primate specific trophoblastic hormone: human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). Recently, it was demonstrated that mutation of many genes in mice results in embryonic mortality or fetal growth restriction, due to defects in placental development. Furthermore, distinct molecular pathways regulate the differentiation of various trophoblast cell subtype of the mouse placenta. An important question is whether or not placental differentiation in other mammals is regulated by the same molecular mechanisms. Due to the striking diversity in placental structure, endocrine function and gene expression, caution must be exercised in extrapolating findings regarding placental function and development from one species to another. PMID:11575143

  19. Placental Growth Factor Administration Abolishes Placental Ischemia-Induced Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Spradley, Frank T; Tan, Adelene Y; Joo, Woo S; Daniels, Garrett; Kussie, Paul; Karumanchi, S Ananth; Granger, Joey P

    2016-04-01

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-specific disorder of new-onset hypertension. Unfortunately, the most effective treatment is early delivery of the fetus and placenta. Placental ischemia appears central to the pathogenesis of preeclampsia because placental ischemia/hypoxia induced in animals by reduced uterine perfusion pressure (RUPP) or in humans stimulates release of hypertensive placental factors into the maternal circulation. The anti-angiogenic factor soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1), which antagonizes and reduces bioavailable vascular endothelial growth factor and placental growth factor (PlGF), is elevated in RUPP rats and preeclampsia. Although PlGF and vascular endothelial growth factor are both natural ligands for sFlt-1, vascular endothelial growth factor also has high affinity to VEGFR2 (Flk-1) causing side effects like edema. PlGF is specific for sFlt-1. We tested the hypothesis that PlGF treatment reduces placental ischemia-induced hypertension by antagonizing sFlt-1 without adverse consequences to the mother or fetus. On gestational day 14, rats were randomized to 4 groups: normal pregnant or RUPP±infusion of recombinant human PlGF (180 μg/kg per day; AG31, a purified, recombinant human form of PlGF) for 5 days via intraperitoneal osmotic minipumps. On day 19, mean arterial blood pressure and plasma sFlt-1 were higher and glomerular filtration rate lower in RUPP than normal pregnant rats. Infusion of recombinant human PlGF abolished these changes seen with RUPP along with reducing oxidative stress. These data indicate that the increased sFlt-1 and reduced PlGF resulting from placental ischemia contribute to maternal hypertension. Our novel finding that recombinant human PlGF abolishes placental ischemia-induced hypertension, without major adverse consequences, suggests a strong therapeutic potential for this growth factor in preeclampsia. PMID:26831193

  20. Epidermal growth factor, but not insulin, stimulates tyrosine phosphorylation of an endogenous protein of Mr 95,000 in triton extracts of human placental syncytiotrophoblast membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Tavaré, J M; Diggle, T A; Denton, R M

    1987-01-01

    1. Triton extracts of syncytiotrophoblast membranes were incubated with [gamma-32P]ATP, MgCl2 and MnCl2. Addition of epidermal growth factor (EGF) resulted in increased phosphorylation not only of the EGF receptor and a Mr-35,000 protein as previously described, but also a protein of Mr 95,000 on both tyrosine and serine residues. In addition, a small increase in the phosphorylation of a protein of Mr 105,000 was observed. Spermine had a similar effect on the phosphorylation of the Mr-95,000 protein, without affecting the phosphorylation of the other proteins. In the absence of MnCl2, the effect of spermine on the phosphorylation of Mr-95,000 protein was still evident, whereas that of EGF was greatly diminished. 2. The Mr-95,000 protein bound poorly to wheat-germ-lectin-Sepharose and was not precipitated by antisera specific for insulin and EGF receptors. The protein continued to exhibit serine and tyrosine phosphorylation on addition of [gamma-32P]ATP, MgCl2 and MnCl2 to a glycoprotein-depleted fraction prepared by chromatography on wheat-germ-lectin-Sepharose. The extent of phosphorylation was no longer increased by spermine or EGF, but was inhibited by heparin. 3. It is suggested that the Mr-95,000 protein not only is a possible direct substrate for the EGF-receptor (but not the insulin receptor) tyrosine kinase but is a substrate for other endogenous kinases, including a protein tyrosine kinase which is probably not a glycoprotein, and a protein serine kinase with properties similar to those of casein kinase II. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:3328613

  1. Human placental calcitonin receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, G C; D'Santos, C S; Evans, T; Moseley, J M; Kemp, B E; Michelangeli, V P; Martin, T J

    1988-01-01

    Receptors for the hypocalcaemic hormone, calcitonin (CT), have been identified in a membrane fraction prepared from term human placentae. Binding of 125I-labelled salmon CT (125I-sCT) to the membranes was time- and temperature-dependent, saturable (Bmax. 58 +/- 11 fmol/mg of protein), of high affinity (Kd 80 +/- 21 pM) and poorly reversible. Species-specific CTs and CT analogues competed for 125I-sCT binding with potencies proportional to their known biological potencies. Various unrelated peptide hormones did not compete, indicating that receptor binding was specific for CT. Photoaffinity labelling using a derivatized biologically active sCT analogue, [Arg11,18,3-nitrophenylazide-Lys14]sCT, identified a receptor component of Mr approximately 85,000, comparable with findings in osteoclasts and other target cells. The presence of CT receptors in the human placenta supports other evidence that CT may have a role in the regulation of placental function. PMID:2839149

  2. Programming placental nutrient transport capacity

    PubMed Central

    Fowden, A L; Ward, J W; Wooding, F P B; Forhead, A J; Constancia, M

    2006-01-01

    Many animal studies and human epidemiological findings have shown that impaired growth in utero is associated with physiological abnormalities in later life and have linked this to tissue programming during suboptimal intrauterine conditions at critical periods of development. However, few of these studies have considered the contribution of the placenta to the ensuing adult phenotype. In mammals, the major determinant of intrauterine growth is the placental nutrient supply, which, in turn, depends on the size, morphology, blood supply and transporter abundance of the placenta and on synthesis and metabolism of nutrients and hormones by the uteroplacental tissues. This review examines the regulation of placental nutrient transfer capacity and the potential programming effects of nutrition and glucocorticoid over-exposure on placental phenotype with particular emphasis on the role of the Igf2 gene in these processes. PMID:16439433

  3. Placental Adaptations in Growth Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Song; Regnault, Timothy R.H.; Barker, Paige L.; Botting, Kimberley J.; McMillen, Isabella C.; McMillan, Christine M.; Roberts, Claire T.; Morrison, Janna L.

    2015-01-01

    The placenta is the primary interface between the fetus and mother and plays an important role in maintaining fetal development and growth by facilitating the transfer of substrates and participating in modulating the maternal immune response to prevent immunological rejection of the conceptus. The major substrates required for fetal growth include oxygen, glucose, amino acids and fatty acids, and their transport processes depend on morphological characteristics of the placenta, such as placental size, morphology, blood flow and vascularity. Other factors including insulin-like growth factors, apoptosis, autophagy and glucocorticoid exposure also affect placental growth and substrate transport capacity. Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is often a consequence of insufficiency, and is associated with a high incidence of perinatal morbidity and mortality, as well as increased risk of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases in later life. Several different experimental methods have been used to induce placental insufficiency and IUGR in animal models and a range of factors that regulate placental growth and substrate transport capacity have been demonstrated. While no model system completely recapitulates human IUGR, these animal models allow us to carefully dissect cellular and molecular mechanisms to improve our understanding and facilitate development of therapeutic interventions. PMID:25580812

  4. Placental Sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum Malaria Parasites Is Mediated by the Interaction Between VAR2CSA and Chondroitin Sulfate A on Syndecan-1.

    PubMed

    Ayres Pereira, Marina; Mandel Clausen, Thomas; Pehrson, Caroline; Mao, Yang; Resende, Mafalda; Daugaard, Mads; Riis Kristensen, Anders; Spliid, Charlotte; Mathiesen, Line; E Knudsen, Lisbeth; Damm, Peter; G Theander, Thor; R Hansson, Stefan; A Nielsen, Morten; Salanti, Ali

    2016-08-01

    During placental malaria, Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes sequester in the placenta, causing health problems for both the mother and fetus. The specific adherence is mediated by the VAR2CSA protein, which binds to placental chondroitin sulfate (CS) on chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) in the placental syncytium. However, the identity of the CSPG core protein and the cellular impact of the interaction have remain elusive. In this study we identified the specific CSPG core protein to which the CS is attached, and characterized its exact placental location. VAR2CSA pull-down experiments using placental extracts from whole placenta or syncytiotrophoblast microvillous cell membranes showed three distinct CSPGs available for VAR2CSA adherence. Further examination of these three CSPGs by immunofluorescence and proximity ligation assays showed that syndecan-1 is the main receptor for VAR2CSA mediated placental adherence. We further show that the commonly used placental choriocarcinoma cell line, BeWo, express a different set of proteoglycans than those present on placental syncytiotrophoblast and may not be the most biologically relevant model to study placental malaria. Syncytial fusion of the BeWo cells, triggered by forskolin treatment, caused an increased expression of placental CS-modified syndecan-1. In line with this, we show that rVAR2 binding to placental CS impairs syndecan-1-related Src signaling in forskolin treated BeWo cells, but not in untreated cells. PMID:27556547

  5. Placental Sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum Malaria Parasites Is Mediated by the Interaction Between VAR2CSA and Chondroitin Sulfate A on Syndecan-1

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yang; Resende, Mafalda; Daugaard, Mads; Riis Kristensen, Anders; Damm, Peter; G. Theander, Thor; R. Hansson, Stefan; Salanti, Ali

    2016-01-01

    During placental malaria, Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes sequester in the placenta, causing health problems for both the mother and fetus. The specific adherence is mediated by the VAR2CSA protein, which binds to placental chondroitin sulfate (CS) on chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) in the placental syncytium. However, the identity of the CSPG core protein and the cellular impact of the interaction have remain elusive. In this study we identified the specific CSPG core protein to which the CS is attached, and characterized its exact placental location. VAR2CSA pull-down experiments using placental extracts from whole placenta or syncytiotrophoblast microvillous cell membranes showed three distinct CSPGs available for VAR2CSA adherence. Further examination of these three CSPGs by immunofluorescence and proximity ligation assays showed that syndecan-1 is the main receptor for VAR2CSA mediated placental adherence. We further show that the commonly used placental choriocarcinoma cell line, BeWo, express a different set of proteoglycans than those present on placental syncytiotrophoblast and may not be the most biologically relevant model to study placental malaria. Syncytial fusion of the BeWo cells, triggered by forskolin treatment, caused an increased expression of placental CS-modified syndecan-1. In line with this, we show that rVAR2 binding to placental CS impairs syndecan-1-related Src signaling in forskolin treated BeWo cells, but not in untreated cells. PMID:27556547

  6. Arsenic exposure in pregnant mice disrupts placental vasculogenesis and causes spontaneous abortion.

    PubMed

    He, Wenjie; Greenwell, Robert J; Brooks, Diane M; Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Beall, Howard D; Coffin, J Douglas

    2007-09-01

    Arsenic is an abundant toxicant in ground water and soil around areas with extractive industries. Human epidemiological studies have shown that arsenic exposure is linked to developmental defects and miscarriage. The placenta is known to utilize vasculogenesis to develop its circulation. The hypothesis tested here states the following: arsenic exposure causes placental dysmorphogenesis and defective placental vasculogenesis resulting in placental insufficiency and subsequent spontaneous abortion. To test this hypothesis, pregnant mice were exposed to sodium arsenite (AsIII) through drinking water from conception through weanling stages. Neonatal assessment of birth rates, pup weights, and litter sizes in arsenic exposed and control mothers revealed that AsIII-exposed mothers had only 40% the fecundity of controls. Preterm analysis at E12.5 revealed a loss of fecundity at E12.5 from either 20 ppm or greater exposures to AsIII. There was no loss of fecundity at E7.5 suggesting that spontaneous abortion occurs during placentation. Histomorphometry on E12.5 placentae from arsenic-exposed mice revealed placental dysplasia especially in the vasculature. These results suggest that arsenic toxicity is causative for mammalian spontaneous abortion by virtue of aberrant placental vasculogenesis and placental insufficiency. PMID:17569693

  7. Placental Origins of Chronic Disease.

    PubMed

    Burton, Graham J; Fowden, Abigail L; Thornburg, Kent L

    2016-10-01

    Epidemiological evidence links an individual's susceptibility to chronic disease in adult life to events during their intrauterine phase of development. Biologically this should not be unexpected, for organ systems are at their most plastic when progenitor cells are proliferating and differentiating. Influences operating at this time can permanently affect their structure and functional capacity, and the activity of enzyme systems and endocrine axes. It is now appreciated that such effects lay the foundations for a diverse array of diseases that become manifest many years later, often in response to secondary environmental stressors. Fetal development is underpinned by the placenta, the organ that forms the interface between the fetus and its mother. All nutrients and oxygen reaching the fetus must pass through this organ. The placenta also has major endocrine functions, orchestrating maternal adaptations to pregnancy and mobilizing resources for fetal use. In addition, it acts as a selective barrier, creating a protective milieu by minimizing exposure of the fetus to maternal hormones, such as glucocorticoids, xenobiotics, pathogens, and parasites. The placenta shows a remarkable capacity to adapt to adverse environmental cues and lessen their impact on the fetus. However, if placental function is impaired, or its capacity to adapt is exceeded, then fetal development may be compromised. Here, we explore the complex relationships between the placental phenotype and developmental programming of chronic disease in the offspring. Ensuring optimal placentation offers a new approach to the prevention of disorders such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and obesity, which are reaching epidemic proportions. PMID:27604528

  8. Placental oxygen transport estimated by the hyperoxic placental BOLD MRI response.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Anne; Sinding, Marianne; Peters, David A; Petersen, Astrid; Frøkjær, Jens B; Christiansen, Ole B; Uldbjerg, Niels

    2015-10-01

    Estimating placental oxygen transport capacity is highly desirable, as impaired placental function is associated with fetal growth restriction (FGR) and poor neonatal outcome. In clinical obstetrics, a noninvasive method to estimate the placental oxygen transport is not available, and the current methods focus on fetal well-being rather than on direct assessment of placental function. In this article, we aim to estimate the placental oxygen transport using the hyperoxic placental blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) response. In 21 normal pregnancies and in four cases of severe early onset FGR, placental BOLD MRI was performed in a 1.5 Tesla MRI system (TR:8000 msec, TE:50 msec, Flip angle:90). Placental histological examination was performed in the FGR cases. In normal pregnancies, the average hyperoxic placental BOLD response was 12.6 ± 5.4% (mean ± SD). In the FGR cases, the hyperoxic BOLD response was abnormal only in cases with histological signs of maternal hypoperfusion of the placenta. The hyperoxic placental BOLD response is mainly derived from an increase in the saturation of maternal venous blood. In the normal placenta, the pO2 of the umbilical vein is closely related to the pO2 of the uterine vein. Therefore, the hyperoxic placental BOLD response may reflect the placental oxygen supply to the fetus. In early onset FGR, the placental oxygen transport is reduced mainly because of the maternal hypoperfusion, and in these cases the placental BOLD response might be altered. Thus, the placental BOLD MRI might provide direct noninvasive assessment of placental oxygen transport. PMID:26471757

  9. Placental oxygen transport estimated by the hyperoxic placental BOLD MRI response.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Anne; Sinding, Marianne; Peters, David A; Petersen, Astrid; Frøkjær, Jens B; Christiansen, Ole B; Uldbjerg, Niels

    2015-10-01

    Estimating placental oxygen transport capacity is highly desirable, as impaired placental function is associated with fetal growth restriction (FGR) and poor neonatal outcome. In clinical obstetrics, a noninvasive method to estimate the placental oxygen transport is not available, and the current methods focus on fetal well-being rather than on direct assessment of placental function. In this article, we aim to estimate the placental oxygen transport using the hyperoxic placental blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) response. In 21 normal pregnancies and in four cases of severe early onset FGR, placental BOLD MRI was performed in a 1.5 Tesla MRI system (TR:8000 msec, TE:50 msec, Flip angle:90). Placental histological examination was performed in the FGR cases. In normal pregnancies, the average hyperoxic placental BOLD response was 12.6 ± 5.4% (mean ± SD). In the FGR cases, the hyperoxic BOLD response was abnormal only in cases with histological signs of maternal hypoperfusion of the placenta. The hyperoxic placental BOLD response is mainly derived from an increase in the saturation of maternal venous blood. In the normal placenta, the pO2 of the umbilical vein is closely related to the pO2 of the uterine vein. Therefore, the hyperoxic placental BOLD response may reflect the placental oxygen supply to the fetus. In early onset FGR, the placental oxygen transport is reduced mainly because of the maternal hypoperfusion, and in these cases the placental BOLD response might be altered. Thus, the placental BOLD MRI might provide direct noninvasive assessment of placental oxygen transport.

  10. Placental oxygen transport estimated by the hyperoxic placental BOLD MRI response

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Anne; Sinding, Marianne; Peters, David A; Petersen, Astrid; Frøkjær, Jens B; Christiansen, Ole B; Uldbjerg, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Estimating placental oxygen transport capacity is highly desirable, as impaired placental function is associated with fetal growth restriction (FGR) and poor neonatal outcome. In clinical obstetrics, a noninvasive method to estimate the placental oxygen transport is not available, and the current methods focus on fetal well-being rather than on direct assessment of placental function. In this article, we aim to estimate the placental oxygen transport using the hyperoxic placental blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) response. In 21 normal pregnancies and in four cases of severe early onset FGR, placental BOLD MRI was performed in a 1.5 Tesla MRI system (TR:8000 msec, TE:50 msec, Flip angle:90). Placental histological examination was performed in the FGR cases. In normal pregnancies, the average hyperoxic placental BOLD response was 12.6 ± 5.4% (mean ± SD). In the FGR cases, the hyperoxic BOLD response was abnormal only in cases with histological signs of maternal hypoperfusion of the placenta. The hyperoxic placental BOLD response is mainly derived from an increase in the saturation of maternal venous blood. In the normal placenta, the pO2 of the umbilical vein is closely related to the pO2 of the uterine vein. Therefore, the hyperoxic placental BOLD response may reflect the placental oxygen supply to the fetus. In early onset FGR, the placental oxygen transport is reduced mainly because of the maternal hypoperfusion, and in these cases the placental BOLD response might be altered. Thus, the placental BOLD MRI might provide direct noninvasive assessment of placental oxygen transport. PMID:26471757

  11. Placental Findings in Singleton Stillbirths

    PubMed Central

    Pinar, Halit; Goldenberg, Robert L.; Koch, Matthew A.; Heim-Hall, Josefine; Hawkins, Hal K.; Shehata, Bahig; Abramowsky, Carlos; Parker, Corette B.; Dudley, Donald J.; Silver, Robert M.; Stoll, Barbara; Carpenter, Marshall; Saade, George; Moore, Janet; Conway, Deborah; Varner, Michael W.; Hogue, Carol J.R.; Coustan, Donald R.; Sbrana, Elena; Thorsten, Vanessa; Willinger, Marian; Reddy, Uma M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare placental lesions for stillbirth cases and live birth controls in a population-based study. Methods Pathological examinations were performed on placentas from singleton pregnancies using a standard protocol. Data were analyzed overall and within gestational age groups at delivery. Results Placentas from 518 stillbirths and 1,200 live births were studied. Single umbilical artery was present in 7.7% of stillbirths and 1.7% of live births, velamentous cord insertion was present in 5% of stillbirths and 1.1% of live births, diffuse terminal villous immaturity was present in 10.3% of stillbirths and 2.3% of live births, inflammation (eg, acute chorioamnionitis of placental membranes) was present in 30.4% of stillbirths and 12% of live births, vascular degenerative changes in chorionic plate was present in 55.7% of stillbirths and 0.5% of live births, retroplacental hematoma was present in 23.8% of stillbirths and 4.2% of live births, intraparenchymal thrombi was present in 19.7% of stillbirths and 13.3% of live births, parenchymal infarction was present in 10.9% of stillbirths and 4.4% of live births, fibrin deposition was present in 9.2% of stillbirths and 1.5% of live births, fetal vascular thrombi was present in 23% of stillbirths and 7% of live births, avascular villi was present in 7.6% of stillbirths and 2.0% of live births, and hydrops was present in 6.4% of stillbirths and 1.0% of live births. Among stillbirths, inflammation and retroplacental hematoma were more common in placentas from early deliveries, while thrombotic lesions were more common in later gestation. Inflammatory lesions were especially common in early live births. Conclusion Placental lesions were highly associated with stillbirth compared to live births. All lesions associated with stillbirth were found in live births but often with variations by gestational age at delivery. Knowledge of lesion prevalence within gestational age groups in both stillbirths and live birth

  12. Placental membrane aging and HMGB1 signaling associated with human parturition.

    PubMed

    Menon, Ramkumar; Behnia, Faranak; Polettini, Jossimara; Saade, George R; Campisi, Judith; Velarde, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Aging is associated with the onset of several diseases in various organ systems; however, different tissues may age differently, rendering some of them dysfunctional sooner than others. Placental membranes (fetal amniochorionic membranes) protect the fetus throughout pregnancy, but their longevity is limited to the duration of pregnancy. The age-associated dysfunction of these membranes is postulated to trigger parturition. Here, we investigated whether cellular senescence-the loss of cell division potential as a consequence of stress-is involved in placental membrane function at term. We show telomere reduction, p38 MAPK activation, increase in p21 expression, loss of lamin B1 loss, increase in SA-β-galactosidase , and senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) gene expression in placental membranes after labor and delivery (term labor [TL]) compared to membranes prior to labor at term (term, not-in-labor [TNIL]). Exposing TNIL placental membranes to cigarette smoke extract, an oxidative stress inducer, also induced markers of cellular senescence similar to those in TL placental membranes. Bioinformatics analysis of differentially expressed SASP genes revealed HMGB1 signaling among the top pathways involved in labor. Further, we show that recombinant HMGB1 upregulates the expression of genes associated with parturition in myometrial cells. These data suggest that the natural physiologic aging of placental tissues is associated with cellular senescence and human parturition.

  13. Association between calcifying nanoparticles and placental calcification

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yanan; Zhang, Dechun; Lu, He; Luo, Shuang; Shen, Xuecheng

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to examine the possible contribution of calcifying nanoparticles to the pathogenesis of placental calcification. Methods Calcified placental tissues and distal tissue samples were collected from 36 confirmed placental calcification cases. In addition, 20 normal placental tissue samples were obtained as a control group. All the tissue samples were cultured using special nanobacterial culture methods. The cultured calcifying nanoparticles were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and their growth was monitored by optical density (OD) at a wavelength of 650 nm. 16S rRNA gene expression of the cultured calcifying nanoparticles was also isolated and sequenced. Results Novel calcifying nanoparticles wrapped with electron-dense shells between 50 nm to 500 nm in diameter were observed in the extracellular matrix of calcified placental tissues. They were detected in placental villi and hydroxyapatite crystals, and contained “nucleic acid-like materials”. After isolation and four weeks of culture, 28 of 36 calcified placental tissue samples showed white granular precipitates attached to the bottom of the culture tubes. OD650 measurements indicated that the precipitates from the calcified placental tissues were able to grow in culture, whereas no such precipitates from the control tissues were observed. The 16S rRNA genes were isolated from the cultured calcifying nanoparticles and calcified placental tissues, and their gene sequencing results implied that calcifying nanoparticles were novel nanobacteria (GenBank JF823648). Conclusion Our results suggest that these novel calcifying nanoparticles may play a role in placental calcification. PMID:22615531

  14. l-Methionine Placental Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, João R.; Correia-Branco, Ana; Ramalho, Carla; Gonçalves, Pedro; Pinho, Maria J.; Keating, Elisa

    2013-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate the influence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and GDM-associated conditions upon the placental uptake of 14C-l-methionine (14C-l-Met). The 14C-l-Met uptake by human trophoblasts (TBs) obtained from normal pregnancies (normal trophoblast [NTB] cells) is mainly system l-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1 [L])-mediated, although a small contribution of system y+LAT2 is also present. Comparison of 14C-l-Met uptake by NTB and by human TBs obtained from GDM pregnancies (diabetic trophoblast [DTB] cells) reveals similar kinetics, but a contribution of systems A, LAT2, and b0+ and a greater contribution of system y+LAT1 appears to exist in DTB cells. Short-term exposure to insulin and long-term exposure to high glucose, tumor necrosis factor-α, and leptin decrease 14C-l-Met uptake in a human TB (Bewo) cell line. The effect of leptin was dependent upon phosphoinositide 3-kinase, extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK/MEK 1/2), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. In conclusion, GDM does not quantitatively alter 14C-l-Met placental uptake, although it changes the nature of transporters involved in that process. PMID:23653387

  15. Intracellular Organisms as Placental Invaders

    PubMed Central

    Vigliani, Marguerite B.; Bakardjiev, Anna I.

    2015-01-01

    In this article we present a novel model for how the human placenta might get infected via the hematogenous route. We present a list of diverse placental pathogens, like Listeria monocytogenes or Cytomegalovirus, which are familiar to most obstetricians, but others, like Salmonella typhi, have only been reported in case studies or small case series. Remarkably, all of these organisms on this list are either obligate or facultative intracellular organisms. These pathogens are able to enter and survive inside host immune cells for at least a portion of their life cycle. We suggest that many blood-borne pathogens might arrive at the placenta via transportation inside of maternal leukocytes that enter the decidua in early pregnancy. We discuss mechanisms by which extravillous trophoblasts could get infected in the decidua and spread infection to other layers in the placenta. We hope to raise awareness among OB/GYN clinicians that organisms not typically associated with the TORCH list might cause placental infections and pregnancy complications.

  16. 21 CFR 862.1585 - Human placental lactogen test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Human placental lactogen test system. 862.1585... Systems § 862.1585 Human placental lactogen test system. (a) Identification. A human placental lactogen test system is a device intended to measure the hormone human placental lactogen (HPL), (also known...

  17. 21 CFR 862.1585 - Human placental lactogen test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Human placental lactogen test system. 862.1585... Systems § 862.1585 Human placental lactogen test system. (a) Identification. A human placental lactogen test system is a device intended to measure the hormone human placental lactogen (HPL), (also known...

  18. A stochastic model for early placental development†

    PubMed Central

    Cotter, Simon L.; Klika, Václav; Kimpton, Laura; Collins, Sally; Heazell, Alexander E. P.

    2014-01-01

    In the human, placental structure is closely related to placental function and consequent pregnancy outcome. Studies have noted abnormal placental shape in small-for-gestational-age infants which extends to increased lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease. The origins and determinants of placental shape are incompletely understood and are difficult to study in vivo. In this paper, we model the early development of the human placenta, based on the hypothesis that this is driven by a chemoattractant effect emanating from proximal spiral arteries in the decidua. We derive and explore a two-dimensional stochastic model, and investigate the effects of loss of spiral arteries in regions near to the cord insertion on the shape of the placenta. This model demonstrates that disruption of spiral arteries can exert profound effects on placental shape, particularly if this is close to the cord insertion. Thus, placental shape reflects the underlying maternal vascular bed. Abnormal placental shape may reflect an abnormal uterine environment, predisposing to pregnancy complications. Through statistical analysis of model placentas, we are able to characterize the probability that a given placenta grew in a disrupted environment, and even able to distinguish between different disruptions. PMID:24850904

  19. The purification and properties of placental histaminase

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J. K.

    1967-01-01

    1. Histaminase was extracted from desanguinated human placentae and purified by salt fractionation, ion-exchange chromatography and gel filtration. The purest preparation was still contaminated with haptoglobin–methaemoglobin. 2. Histaminase activity was measured by the o-aminobenzaldehyde method of Holmstedt & Tham (1959), Kapeller-Adler's (1951) test and a modified spectrophotometric indigodisulphonate test of greater sensitivity. 3. Unless contaminant metal ions were removed, enzymic activity on cadaverine, but not on histamine, fell during purification. When EDTA was added to the working buffers, a constant ratio between activities towards cadaverine and histamine was maintained throughout the later stages of purification, and activities towards the two substrates could not be separated by any of the highly resolving chromatographic analyses employed. 4. The purest preparation oxidized histamine, agmatine and benzylamine more slowly than the C4–C6 aliphatic diamines, but mixed-substrate experiments suggested that all these amines were substrates of histaminase. 5. The substrate and inhibitor specificities of placental histaminase were compared with those of related enzymes from other sources. PMID:4962162

  20. Postpartum deaths: piglet, placental, and umbilical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Rootwelt, V; Reksen, O; Farstad, W; Framstad, T

    2013-06-01

    The fetal growth of the piglet is highly dependent on its placenta, and the newborn piglet birth weight is highly associated with postpartum death. However, there is little information available in the literature on the assessment of the placenta in relation to postpartum death in piglets. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the placental area and placental weight, status of the umbilical cord, and piglet birth characteristics, such as blood parameters, vitality score, and birth weight on postpartum death. All live born piglets in litters from 26 Landrace-Yorkshire sows were monitored during farrowing and the status of each was recorded, including placental area and placental weight and blood variables obtained from the piglets and umbilical veins. Out of the 386 live-born piglets, 16.8% died before weaning at 5 wk. Among these, 78.5% died within the first 3 d of life. Mean blood concentration of lactate was increased in piglets that did not survive to weaning (P = 0.003). Concentrations of hemoglobin and hematocrit were decreased (P < 0.001) compared with survivors. Piglets born with a broken umbilical cord had a reduced vitality score vs. piglets born with an intact umbilical cord (P = 0.021), and they had an increased probability of dying before weaning (P = 0.050). Mean birth weight, body mass index, placental area (P < 0.001), and placental weight (P = 0.020) were reduced in piglets that died before weaning vs. those that survived. Birth weight and placental area were furthermore negatively associated with live litter size. Blood concentrations of IgG and albumin recorded at d 1 were decreased in piglets that died before weaning (P < 0.01), and blood concentration of albumin was positively associated with placental area (P < 0.001). We conclude that placental area and placental weight, status of the umbilical cord, birth weight, body mass index, blood concentrations of lactate, hemoglobin, and hematocrit recorded at birth, and blood

  1. Placental Genome and Maternal-Placental Genetic Interactions: A Genome-Wide and Candidate Gene Association Study of Placental Abruption

    PubMed Central

    Denis, Marie; Enquobahrie, Daniel A.; Tadesse, Mahlet G.; Gelaye, Bizu; Sanchez, Sixto E.; Salazar, Manuel; Ananth, Cande V.; Williams, Michelle A.

    2014-01-01

    While available evidence supports the role of genetics in the pathogenesis of placental abruption (PA), PA-related placental genome variations and maternal-placental genetic interactions have not been investigated. Maternal blood and placental samples collected from participants in the Peruvian Abruptio Placentae Epidemiology study were genotyped using Illumina’s Cardio-Metabochip platform. We examined 118,782 genome-wide SNPs and 333 SNPs in 32 candidate genes from mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative phosphorylation pathways in placental DNA from 280 PA cases and 244 controls. We assessed maternal-placental interactions in the candidate gene SNPS and two imprinted regions (IGF2/H19 and C19MC). Univariate and penalized logistic regression models were fit to estimate odds ratios. We examined the combined effect of multiple SNPs on PA risk using weighted genetic risk scores (WGRS) with repeated ten-fold cross-validations. A multinomial model was used to investigate maternal-placental genetic interactions. In placental genome-wide and candidate gene analyses, no SNP was significant after false discovery rate correction. The top genome-wide association study (GWAS) hits were rs544201, rs1484464 (CTNNA2), rs4149570 (TNFRSF1A) and rs13055470 (ZNRF3) (p-values: 1.11e-05 to 3.54e-05). The top 200 SNPs of the GWAS overrepresented genes involved in cell cycle, growth and proliferation. The top candidate gene hits were rs16949118 (COX10) and rs7609948 (THRB) (p-values: 6.00e-03 and 8.19e-03). Participants in the highest quartile of WGRS based on cross-validations using SNPs selected from the GWAS and candidate gene analyses had a 8.40-fold (95% CI: 5.8–12.56) and a 4.46-fold (95% CI: 2.94–6.72) higher odds of PA compared to participants in the lowest quartile. We found maternal-placental genetic interactions on PA risk for two SNPs in PPARG (chr3∶12313450 and chr3∶12412978) and maternal imprinting effects for multiple SNPs in the C19MC and IGF2/H19 regions

  2. Placental hypoxia: the lesions of maternal malperfusion.

    PubMed

    Parks, W Tony

    2015-02-01

    The placental lesions classically ascribed to placental hypoxia, here denoted maternal malperfusion (MMP), are among the more significant that a placental pathologist may encounter. Yet the appearance of these lesions may be subtle, and the clinical implication of their diagnosis is frequently unclear. The aim of this review is to provide a more nuanced perspective on the clinical utility of placental pathology for the detection of MMP. The review will first detail MMP lesions in the placenta and discuss their associations with pregnancy complications. The review will then delve into the diagnostic and interpretive difficulties of these lesions. Finally, recent research findings that may aid in the development of better diagnostic tools will be briefly discussed.

  3. Is assisted reproduction associated with abnormal placentation?

    PubMed

    Joy, Jolly; Gannon, Caroline; McClure, Neil; Cooke, Inez

    2012-01-01

    Artificial reproductive technologies (ART) and conception following a period of untreated infertility (>1 year) are independently associated with increased pregnancy complications in both singleton and multiple pregnancies. It is unknown if placental dysfunction associated with macroscopic and/or microscopic histological discrepancies might explain some of these variances. Our aim was to compare the histopathology of placentae from singleton pregnancies belonging to 3 groups, as follows: conception as a result of ART; spontaneous conception (<1 year of trying); and conception following untreated infertility (>1 year). Pathological examination of placentae from singleton pregnancies of nonsmoking, age-matched primiparous women with no significant medical history and no known uterine congenital anomalies was performed by a single pathologist blinded to the groups. Features were compared using analysis of variance and chi-square tests. A total of 89 placental pathology reports were available (control  =  39, infertility  =  17, ART  =  33). The mean placental thickness was significantly higher in the ART group when compared to the spontaneous conception group (P  =  0.02). There were significantly more placental hematomas in the ART group (P  =  0.04) compared to the other groups. There were no significant differences in rates of abnormal placental shapes or abnormal cord insertions. There were no statistically significant differences in the incidence of microscopic placental lesions, nor were there any statistically significant differences in the incidence of macroscopic and microscopic placental lesions between the infertility group and the other groups. Placentae of ART pregnancies show significantly increased thickness and a higher incidence of hematomas. Increased placental thickness has previously been linked to increased perinatal risk.

  4. Comparative aspects of trophoblast development and placentation

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Anthony M; Enders, Allen C

    2004-01-01

    Based on the number of tissues separating maternal from fetal blood, placentas are classified as epitheliochorial, endotheliochorial or hemochorial. We review the occurrence of these placental types in the various orders of eutherian mammals within the framework of the four superorders identified by the techniques of molecular phylogenetics. The superorder Afrotheria diversified in ancient Africa and its living representatives include elephants, sea cows, hyraxes, aardvark, elephant shrews and tenrecs. Xenarthra, comprising armadillos, anteaters and sloths, diversified in South America. All placentas examined from members of these two oldest superorders are either endotheliochorial or hemochorial. The superorder Euarchontoglires includes two sister groups, Glires and Euarchonta. The former comprises rodents and lagomorphs, which typically have hemochorial placentas. The most primitive members of Euarchonta, the tree shrews, have endotheliochorial placentation. Flying lemurs and all higher primates have hemochorial placentas. However, the lemurs and lorises are exceptional among primates in having epitheliochorial placentation. Laurasiatheria, the last superorder to arise, includes several orders with epitheliochorial placentation. These comprise whales, camels, pigs, ruminants, horses and pangolins. In contrast, nearly all carnivores have endotheliochorial placentation, whilst bats have endotheliochorial or hemochorial placentas. Also included in Laurasiatheria are a number of insectivores that have many conserved morphological characters; none of these has epitheliochorial placentation. Consideration of placental type in relation to the findings of molecular phylogenetics suggests that the likely path of evolution in Afrotheria was from endotheliochorial to hemochorial placentation. This is also a likely scenario for Xenarthra and the bats. We argue that a definitive epitheliochorial placenta is a secondary specialization and that it evolved twice, once in the

  5. The distinct proteome of placental malaria parasites.

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, Michal; Hixson, Kim K.; Anderson, Lori; Ogata, Yuko; Mutabingwa, Theonest K.; Duffy, Patrick E.

    2007-09-01

    Malaria proteins expressed on the surface of Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes (IE) mediate adhesion and are targeted by protective immune responses. During pregnancy, IE sequester in the placenta. Placental IE bind to the molecule chondroitin sulfate A (CSA) and preferentially transcribe the gene that encodes VAR2CSA, a member of the PfEMP1 variant surface antigen family. Over successive pregnancies women develop specific immunity to CSA-binding IE and antibodies to VAR2CSA. We used tandem mass spectrometry together with accurate mass and time tag technology to study IE membrane fractions of placental parasites. VAR2CSA peptides were detected in placental IE and in IE from children, but the MC variant of VAR2CSA was specifically associated with placental IE. We identified six conserved hypothetical proteins with putative TM or signal peptides that were exclusively expressed by the placental IE, and 11 such proteins that were significantly more abundant in placental IE. One of these hypothetical proteins, PFI1785w, is a 42kDa molecule detected by Western blot in parasites infecting pregnant women but not those infecting children.

  6. Technical comment on "The placental mammal ancestor and the post-K-Pg radiation of placentals".

    PubMed

    Springer, Mark S; Meredith, Robert W; Teeling, Emma C; Murphy, William J

    2013-08-01

    O'Leary et al. (Research Article, 8 February 2013, p. 662) examined mammalian relationships and divergence times and concluded that a single placental ancestor crossed the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) boundary. This conclusion relies on phylogenetic analyses that fail to discriminate between homology and homoplasy and further implies virus-like rates of nucleotide substitution in early Paleocene placentals. PMID:23929967

  7. Expression patterns of placental microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Mouillet, Jean-Francois; Chu, Tianjiao; Sadovsky, Yoel

    2016-01-01

    Among different types of small RNA molecules, distinct types of microRNAs (miRNAs) are expressed in many cell types, where they modulate RNA stability and translation, thus controlling virtually every aspect of tissue development, proliferation, differentiation, and function. Aberrant miRNA expression has been linked to discrete pathological processes. As the placenta plays a pivotal role in governing fetal development, it is not surprising that the placenta expresses numerous types of miRNAs. Whereas many of these miRNAs are ubiquitously expressed, certain miRNA species are largely unique to the placenta. Research in the field of placental miRNAs is in its early phase, with most studies centering on cataloging placental miRNA species or examining differences in placental miRNA expression between placentas from normal pregnancies and those from pregnancies complicated by pathologies that are associated with placental dysfunction. Recent research endeavors ventured to assess the function of miRNAs in cultured placental trophoblasts, using in vitro conditions that model relevant pathophysiological processes. The impact of miRNA-mediated repression on the trophoblast transcriptome, particularly in response to genetic and environmental perturbations, remains largely unknown. Further in depth studies are required to unravel the functional significance of miRNAs in molding placental robustness, which must constantly adapt to altered maternal physiological status in order to sustain optimal support to the developing embryo. In this review we summarize the current information about placental miRNAs expression, and the lingering challenges in this field. PMID:21425434

  8. Impaired placentation in fetal alcohol syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gundogan, F; Elwood, G; Longato, L; Tong, M; Feijoo, A; Carlson, R I; Wands, J R; de la Monte, S M

    2008-02-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is one of the key features of fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), and IUGR can be mediated by impaired placentation. Insulin-like growth factors (IGF) regulate placentation due to stimulatory effects on extravillous trophoblasts, which are highly motile and invasive. Previous studies demonstrated that extravillous trophoblasts express high levels of aspartyl-(asparaginyl) beta-hydroxylase (AAH), a gene that is regulated by IGF and has a critical role in cell motility and invasion. The present study examines the hypothesis that ethanol impaired placentation is associated with inhibition of AAH expression in trophoblasts. Pregnant Long Evans rats were fed isocaloric liquid diets containing 0% or 37% ethanol by caloric content. Placentas harvested on gestation day 16 were used for histopathological, mRNA, and protein studies to examine AAH expression in relation to the integrity of placentation and ethanol exposure. Chronic ethanol feeding prevented or impaired the physiological conversion of uterine vessels required for expansion of maternal circulation into placenta, a crucial process for adequate placentation. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR analysis demonstrated significant reductions in IRS-1, IRS-2, and significant increases in IGF-II and IGF-II receptor mRNA levels in ethanol-exposed placentas. These abnormalities were associated with significantly reduced levels of AAH expression in trophoblastic cells, particularly within the mesometrial triangle (deep placental bed) as demonstrated by real time quantitative RT-PCR, Western blot analysis, ELISA, and immunohistochemical staining. Ethanol-impaired placentation is associated with inhibition of AAH expression in trophoblasts. This effect of chronic gestational exposure to ethanol may contribute to IUGR in FAS.

  9. [Placental developmental defects in cloned mammalian animals].

    PubMed

    Ao, Zheng; Liu, Dewu; Cai, Gengyuan; Wu, Zhenfang; Li, Zicong

    2016-05-01

    The cloning technique, also called somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), has been successfully established and gradually applied to various mammalian species. However, the developmental rate of SCNT mammalian embryos is very low, usually at 1% to 5%, which limits the application of SCNT. Placental developmental defects are considered as the main cause of SCNT embryo development inhibition. Almost all of SCNT-derived mammalian placentas exhibit various abnormalities, such as placental hyperplasia, vascular defects and umbilical cord malformation. Mechanistically, these abnormalities result from failure of establishment of correct epigenetic modification in the trophectoderm genome, which leads to erroneous expression of important genes for placenta development-related, particularly imprinted genes. Consequently, aberrant imprinted gene expression gives rise to placental morphologic abnormalities and functional defects, therefore decreases developmental competence of cloned embryos. Currently, although numerous methods that can improve the developmental ability of SCNT-derived embryos have been reported, most of them are unable to substantially enhance the success rate of SCNT due to failure to eliminate the placental development defects. In this review, we summarize placental abnormalities and imprinted gene expression in mammalian cloning, and propose directions for the future research aiming to improve the cloning efficiency. PMID:27232488

  10. 21 CFR 862.1585 - Human placental lactogen test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... placental lactogen are used in the diagnosis and clinical management of high-risk pregnancies involving fetal distress associated with placental insufficiency. Measurements of HPL are also used in...

  11. Placental genetic variations in circadian clock-related genes increase the risk of placental abruption

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Chunfang; Gelaye, Bizu; Denis, Marie; Tadesse, Mahlet G; Enquobahrie, Daniel A; Ananth, Cande V; Pacora, Percy N; Salazar, Manuel; Sanchez, Sixto E; Williams, Michelle A

    2016-01-01

    The genetic architecture of placental abruption (PA) remains poorly understood. We examined variations in SNPs of circadian clock-related genes in placenta with PA risk. We also explored placental and maternal genomic contributions to PA risk. Placental genomic DNA samples were isolated from 280 PA cases and 244 controls. Genotyping was performed using the Illumina Cardio-MetaboChip. We examined 116 SNPs in 13 genes known to moderate circadian rhythms. Logistic regression models were fit to estimate odds ratios (ORs). The combined effect of multiple SNPs on PA risk was estimated using a weighted genetic risk score. We examined independent and joint associations of wGRS derived from placental and maternal genomes with PA. Seven SNPs in five genes (ARNTL2, CRY2, DEC1, PER3 and RORA), in the placental genome, were associated with PA risk. Each copy of the minor allele (G) of a SNP in the RORA gene (rs2899663) was associated with a 30% reduced odds of PA (95% CI 0.52-0.95). The odds of PA increased with increasing placental-wGRS (Ptrend<0.001). The ORs were 1.00, 2.16, 3.24 and 4.48 across quartiles. Associations persisted after the maternal-wGRS was included in the model. There was evidence of an additive contribution of placental and maternal genetic contributions to PA risk. Participants with placental- and maternal-wGRS in the highest quartile, compared with those in the lowest quartile, had a 15.57-fold (95% CI 3.34-72.60) increased odds of PA. Placental variants in circadian clock-related genes are associated with PA risk; and the association persists after control of genetic variants in the maternal genome. PMID:27186326

  12. Zika Virus Infects Human Placental Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Quicke, Kendra M; Bowen, James R; Johnson, Erica L; McDonald, Circe E; Ma, Huailiang; O'Neal, Justin T; Rajakumar, Augustine; Wrammert, Jens; Rimawi, Bassam H; Pulendran, Bali; Schinazi, Raymond F; Chakraborty, Rana; Suthar, Mehul S

    2016-07-13

    The recent Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak in Brazil has been directly linked to increased cases of microcephaly in newborns. Current evidence indicates that ZIKV is transmitted vertically from mother to fetus. However, the mechanism of intrauterine transmission and the cell types involved remain unknown. We demonstrate that the contemporary ZIKV strain PRVABC59 (PR 2015) infects and replicates in primary human placental macrophages, called Hofbauer cells, and to a lesser extent in cytotrophoblasts, isolated from villous tissue of full-term placentae. Viral replication coincides with induction of type I interferon (IFN), pro-inflammatory cytokines, and antiviral gene expression, but with minimal cell death. Our results suggest a mechanism for intrauterine transmission in which ZIKV gains access to the fetal compartment by directly infecting placental cells and disrupting the placental barrier. PMID:27247001

  13. Zika Virus Infects Human Placental Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Quicke, Kendra M; Bowen, James R; Johnson, Erica L; McDonald, Circe E; Ma, Huailiang; O'Neal, Justin T; Rajakumar, Augustine; Wrammert, Jens; Rimawi, Bassam H; Pulendran, Bali; Schinazi, Raymond F; Chakraborty, Rana; Suthar, Mehul S

    2016-07-13

    The recent Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak in Brazil has been directly linked to increased cases of microcephaly in newborns. Current evidence indicates that ZIKV is transmitted vertically from mother to fetus. However, the mechanism of intrauterine transmission and the cell types involved remain unknown. We demonstrate that the contemporary ZIKV strain PRVABC59 (PR 2015) infects and replicates in primary human placental macrophages, called Hofbauer cells, and to a lesser extent in cytotrophoblasts, isolated from villous tissue of full-term placentae. Viral replication coincides with induction of type I interferon (IFN), pro-inflammatory cytokines, and antiviral gene expression, but with minimal cell death. Our results suggest a mechanism for intrauterine transmission in which ZIKV gains access to the fetal compartment by directly infecting placental cells and disrupting the placental barrier.

  14. Hans Strahl's pioneering studies in comparative placentation.

    PubMed

    Carter, A M; Mess, A

    2010-10-01

    Hans Strahl, a contemporary of Duval and Hubrecht, made many important contributions to comparative placentation. Despite this he is not well known and some of his original observations tend to be attributed to later authors. Strahl published a classification of placental types based on their shape and relationship to maternal tissues. This greatly influenced the work of Otto Grosser, who became better known in part because his work was more accessible to other scientists and clinicians. Strahl described the development of the fetal membranes across a broad range of mammalian orders extending his observations beyond parturition to the post partum involution of the uterus. He paid close attention to structures designed for histotrophic nutrition including the areolae of moles, haemophagous organs of carnivores and tenrecs and chorionic vesicles of lemurs and lorises. We here provide a summary of some of the most important findings made by Strahl including work on placentation in carnivores and higher primates that remains unsurpassed.

  15. 21 CFR 862.1585 - Human placental lactogen test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Human placental lactogen test system. 862.1585 Section 862.1585 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Systems § 862.1585 Human placental lactogen test system. (a) Identification. A human placental...

  16. 21 CFR 862.1585 - Human placental lactogen test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Human placental lactogen test system. 862.1585 Section 862.1585 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Systems § 862.1585 Human placental lactogen test system. (a) Identification. A human placental...

  17. Placental Nutrient Transport and Intrauterine Growth Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Gaccioli, Francesca; Lager, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction refers to the inability of the fetus to reach its genetically determined potential size. Fetal growth restriction affects approximately 5–15% of all pregnancies in the United States and Europe. In developing countries the occurrence varies widely between 10 and 55%, impacting about 30 million newborns per year. Besides having high perinatal mortality rates these infants are at greater risk for severe adverse outcomes, such as hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy and cerebral palsy. Moreover, reduced fetal growth has lifelong health consequences, including higher risks of developing metabolic and cardiovascular diseases in adulthood. Numerous reports indicate placental insufficiency as one of the underlying causes leading to altered fetal growth and impaired placental capacity of delivering nutrients to the fetus has been shown to contribute to the etiology of intrauterine growth restriction. Indeed, reduced expression and/or activity of placental nutrient transporters have been demonstrated in several conditions associated with an increased risk of delivering a small or growth restricted infant. This review focuses on human pregnancies and summarizes the changes in placental amino acid, fatty acid, and glucose transport reported in conditions associated with intrauterine growth restriction, such as maternal undernutrition, pre-eclampsia, young maternal age, high altitude and infection. PMID:26909042

  18. Preeclampsia, biomarkers, syncytiotrophoblast stress, and placental capacity.

    PubMed

    Redman, Christopher W G; Staff, Anne Cathrine

    2015-10-01

    The maternal syndrome of preeclampsia is mediated by dysfunctional syncytiotrophoblast (STB). When this is stressed by uteroplacental malperfusion, its signaling to the mother changes, as part of a highly coordinated stress response. The STB signals are both proinflammatory and dysangiogenic such that the preeclamptic mother has a stronger vascular inflammatory response than normal, with an antiangiogenic bias. Angiogenic factors have limitations as preeclampsia biomarkers, especially for prediction and diagnosis of preeclampsia at term. However, if they are recognized as markers of STB stress, their physiological changes at term demonstrate that STB stress develops in all pregnancies. The biomarkers reveal that the duration of pregnancies is restricted by placental capacity, such that there is increasing placental dysfunction, at and beyond term. This capacity includes limitations imposed by the size of the uterus, the capacity of the uteroplacental circulation and, possibly, the supply of villous progenitor trophoblast cells. Limited placental capacity explains the increasing risks of postmaturity, including preeclampsia. Early-onset preeclampsia is predictable because STB stress and changes in its biomarkers are intrinsic to poor placentation, an early pregnancy pathology. Prediction of preeclampsia at term is not good because there is no early STB pathology. Moreover, biomarkers cannot accurately diagnose term preeclampsia against a background of universal STB dysfunction, which may or may not be clinically revealed before spontaneous or induced delivery. In this sense, postterm pregnancy is, at best, a pseudonormal state. However, the markers may prove useful in screening for women with more severe problems of postmaturity.

  19. BROMODICHLOROMETHANE INHIBITS HUMAN PLACENTAL TROPHOBLAST DIFFERENTIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    BROMODICHLOROMETHANE INHIBITS HUMAN PLACENTAL
    TROPHOBLAST DIFFERENTIATION
    Jiangang Chen, Twanda L. Thirkill, Peter N. Lohstroh, Susan R. Bielmeier, Michael
    G. Narotsky, Deborah S. Best, Randy A. Harrison, Kala Natarajan, Rex A. Pegram,
    Bill L. Lasley, and Gordon C. Do...

  20. Reduced placental volume and flow in severe growth restricted fetuses

    PubMed Central

    Abulé, Renata Montes Dourado; Bernardes, Lisandra Stein; Doro, Giovana Farina; Miyadahira, Seizo; Francisco, Rossana Pulcinelli Vieira

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate placental volume and vascular indices in pregnancies with severe fetal growth restriction and determine their correlations to normal reference ranges and Doppler velocimetry results of uterine and umbilical arteries. METHODS: Twenty-seven fetuses with estimated weights below the 3rd percentile for gestational age were evaluated. Placental volume and vascular indices, including vascularization, flow, and vascularization flow indices, were measured by three-dimensional ultrasound using a rotational technique and compared to a previously described nomogram. The observed-to-expected placental volume ratio for gestational age and observed-to-expected placental volume ratio for fetal weight were calculated. Placental parameters correlated with the Doppler velocimetry results of uterine and umbilical arteries. RESULTS: The mean uterine artery pulsatility index was negatively correlated with the observed-to-expected placental volume ratio for gestational age, vascularization index and vascularization flow index. The observed-to-expected placental volume ratio for gestational age and observed-to-expected placental volume ratio for fetal weight and vascularization index were significantly lower in the group with a bilateral protodiastolic notch. No placental parameter correlated with the umbilical artery pulsatility index. CONCLUSIONS: Pregnancies complicated by severe fetal growth restriction are associated with reduced placental volume and vascularization. These findings are related to changes in uterine artery Doppler velocimetry. Future studies on managing severe fetal growth restriction should focus on combined results of placental three-dimensional ultrasound and Doppler studies of uterine arteries. PMID:27438567

  1. Placental amino acid transport may be regulated by maternal vitamin D and vitamin D-binding protein: results from the Southampton Women's Survey.

    PubMed

    Cleal, J K; Day, P E; Simner, C L; Barton, S J; Mahon, P A; Inskip, H M; Godfrey, K M; Hanson, M A; Cooper, C; Lewis, R M; Harvey, N C

    2015-06-28

    Both maternal 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations during pregnancy and placental amino acid transporter gene expression have been associated with development of the offspring in terms of body composition and bone structure. Several amino acid transporter genes have vitamin D response elements in their promoters suggesting the possible linkage of these two mechanisms. We aimed to establish whether maternal 25(OH)D and vitamin D-binding protein (VDBP) levels relate to expression of placental amino acid transporters. RNA was extracted from 102 placental samples collected in the Southampton Women's Survey, and gene expression was analysed using quantitative real-time PCR. Gene expression data were normalised to the geometric mean of three housekeeping genes, and related to maternal factors and childhood body composition. Maternal serum 25(OH)D and VDBP levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. Maternal 25(OH)D and VDBP levels were positively associated with placental expression of specific genes involved in amino acid transport. Maternal 25(OH)D and VDBP concentrations were correlated with the expression of specific placental amino acid transporters, and thus may be involved in the regulation of amino acid transfer to the fetus. The positive correlation of VDBP levels and placental transporter expression suggests that delivery of vitamin D to the placenta may be important. This exploratory study identifies placental amino acid transporters which may be altered in response to modifiable maternal factors and provides a basis for further studies.

  2. Placental toxicology: tobacco smoke, abused drugs, multiple chemical interactions, and placental function.

    PubMed

    Sastry, B V

    1991-01-01

    There are increasing numbers of reports on the tobacco smoking and ingestion of abused drugs (e.g. morphine, cocaine) by pregnant women and the effects of the substances on the developing fetus and newborn infant. The passage of drugs and chemicals from the mother to the fetus is influenced by the placental transport and metabolism of the substances. Further, these drugs and chemicals affect the nutrient transport systems in the placenta. The three major drugs of abuse-nicotine, morphine and cocaine-depress both active amino-acid uptake by human placental villi and transplacental amino-acid transport by reason of the drugs' influence on placental cholinergic and opiate systems. Part of this depression (10-16%) is not reversible. Nicotine blocks the cholinergic receptor and thus blocks acetylcholine (ACh)-facilitated amino-acid transport. Morphine stimulates opiate kappa receptors and depresses ACh release. Cocaine blocks Ca2+ influx and thus blocks ACh release. ACh causes dilation of blood vessels and maintains placental blood flow by the activation of endothelial muscarinic receptors. By interfering with ACh release and placental blood flow, the three drugs of abuse may depress the diffusion of amino acids and other nutrients from the trophoblast into the placental circulation. Three regulatory systems are delineated for amino-acid uptake by the placenta: placental ACh, phospholipid N-methyltransferase, and the gammaglutamyl cycle. These systems operate in concert with one another and are dependent on cellular formation of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP). Placental hypoxia induced by carbon monoxide and other tobacco gases depresses the energy-dependent processes and thus the ATP levels of placental cells. Maternal tobacco smoking and drug abuse cause placental insufficiencies for amino-acid transport, which may partially explain the fetal intrauterine growth retardation caused by these substances. Part of the amino-acid deficits may be compensated for by the

  3. Maternal Factors Are Associated with the Expression of Placental Genes Involved in Amino Acid Metabolism and Transport

    PubMed Central

    Day, Pricilla E.; Ntani, Georgia; Crozier, Sarah R.; Mahon, Pam A.; Inskip, Hazel M.; Cooper, Cyrus; Harvey, Nicholas C.; Godfrey, Keith M.; Hanson, Mark A.; Lewis, Rohan M.; Cleal, Jane K.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Maternal environment and lifestyle factors may modify placental function to match the mother’s capacity to support the demands of fetal growth. Much remains to be understood about maternal influences on placental metabolic and amino acid transporter gene expression. We investigated the influences of maternal lifestyle and body composition (e.g. fat and muscle content) on a selection of metabolic and amino acid transporter genes and their associations with fetal growth. Methods RNA was extracted from 102 term Southampton Women’s Survey placental samples. Expression of nine metabolic, seven exchange, eight accumulative and three facilitated transporter genes was analyzed using quantitative real-time PCR. Results Increased placental LAT2 (p = 0.01), y+LAT2 (p = 0.03), aspartate aminotransferase 2 (p = 0.02) and decreased aspartate aminotransferase 1 (p = 0.04) mRNA expression associated with pre-pregnancy maternal smoking. Placental mRNA expression of TAT1 (p = 0.01), ASCT1 (p = 0.03), mitochondrial branched chain aminotransferase (p = 0.02) and glutamine synthetase (p = 0.05) was positively associated with maternal strenuous exercise. Increased glutamine synthetase mRNA expression (r = 0.20, p = 0.05) associated with higher maternal diet quality (prudent dietary pattern) pre-pregnancy. Lower LAT4 (r = -0.25, p = 0.05) and aspartate aminotransferase 2 mRNA expression (r = -0.28, p = 0.01) associated with higher early pregnancy diet quality. Lower placental ASCT1 mRNA expression associated with measures of increased maternal fat mass, including pre-pregnancy BMI (r = -0.26, p = 0.01). Lower placental mRNA expression of alanine aminotransferase 2 associated with greater neonatal adiposity, for example neonatal subscapular skinfold thickness (r = -0.33, p = 0.001). Conclusion A number of maternal influences have been linked with outcomes in childhood, independently of neonatal size; our finding of associations between placental expression of transporter

  4. Cigarette Smoke-Induced Placental Adrenomedullin Expression and Trophoblast Cell Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, Daniel M.; Feng, Liping; Heine, R. Phillips; Brown, Haywood L.; Caron, Kathleen M.; Murtha, Amy P.

    2014-01-01

    Smoking in pregnancy reduces preeclampsia risk, but the mechanism of this effect is unknown. Prior studies have demonstrated that women with preeclampsia have lower placental adrenomedullin (AM) expression, and cigarette smoke extract (CSE) treatment of placental trophoblast cells in culture increases AM cellular production. We hypothesized that CSE alters trophoblast invasion through an AM-mediated mechanism, and that placental AM expression is greater among smokers. HTR-8/SVneo trophoblast cells were incubated for 24 hours in Matrigel-invasion chambers with 6 treatment groups: nonstimulated (NS), AM, AM inhibitor (AM22-52), 1% CSE, AM + AM22-52, and 1% CSE + AM22-52. Cells that penetrated the lower surface of the chambers were quantified, invasion indices were calculated, and compared using a 1-way analysis of variance with Bonferroni corrections for multiple comparisons. Trophoblast cells treated with both AM and 1% CSE demonstrated increased cellular invasion compared to NS controls (1.5-fold [P < .01] and 1.45-fold [P < .01], respectively). Cotreatment with the AM inhibitor significantly attenuated the increased invasion seen with both AM and CSE alone. Next, the placental tissue was obtained from 11 smokers and 11 nonsmokers at term and processed for immunohistochemistry (IHC) and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for AM. Placentas from smokers demonstrated more intense AM staining and increased AM gene (ADM) expression compared to placentas from nonsmokers (P = .004 for IHC, P = .022 for PCR). The CSE increases trophoblast cell invasion through an AM-mediated process, and placental AM expression is increased among term smokers compared to nonsmokers. These findings provide evidence that the AM pathway may play a role in the protection from preeclampsia seen in smokers. PMID:23653390

  5. Placental mesenchymal dysplasia: chronological observation of placental images during gestation and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ohira, Satoshi; Ookubo, Nao; Tanaka, Kyoko; Takatsu, Akiko; Kobara, Hisanori; Kikuchi, Norihiko; Ohya, Ayumi; Kanai, Makoto; Shiozawa, Tanri

    2013-01-01

    Placental mesenchymal dysplasia (PMD) is characterized by multiple hypoechoic vesicles which are similar to molar changes in the placenta; however, the process of such morphological changes of PMD during pregnancy has not been fully understood. We performed a review of all PMD cases published in English and identified 49 articles including 110 cases. With regard to the gestational age at which the multicystic pattern was seen, approximately 70% of cases were diagnosed at 13-20 weeks of gestation. Another characteristic feature of PMD is varicose dilation of fetal chorionic vessels. As many as 90% of cases were diagnosed as placenta with dilated fetal chorionic vessels in the third trimester. We also report a case of PMD which was found at 10 weeks of gestation according to ultrasonic molar patterns. Serial observations of the placenta using ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging revealed that multicystic lesions became smaller after 23 weeks. In contrast, dilated placental vessels on the fetal side became apparent at 38 weeks. The present review highlights that placental vesicular lesions of PMD may precede dilation of fetal chorionic vessels during pregnancy. It also indicates the potential of a gradual reduction in size of PMD's placental vesicular lesions by serial study of placental images.

  6. Complexity analysis of placental blood flow in normal and high-risk pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Joern, H; Kahn, N; Baumann, M; Rath, W; Schmid-Schoenbein, H

    2002-01-01

    Various strategems of complexity analysis of microvascular blood flow were carried out in several fields of medicine in the past, as such as angiology, ophthalmology and neurology. The introduction of colour-angio-mode, a special form of colour coded Doppler sonography, now makes possible to perform complexity analysis of the placental blood displacement even in the absence of information about hydrodynamic details such as directionality, velocity profile and number of displaced blood cells. Algorithms were developed which allows to extract information concerning the time averaged power of phonon-erythrocytes collision events (from the square of the frequencies of back scattered ultrasound recorded during 166 ms) in 20,000 to 40,000 regions of interest. The obtained values are being displayed as false coloured pixels on a video-screen, we succeeded to obtain quantitative data about displacement rates.In cross-sectional and longitudinal studies we generated typical diagrams displaying the "occurrence rate" of various powers of displacement over time. By this mode of display contour plots can be generated, showing a large amount of low intensity pixels and a small amount of high intensity pixels representing the parenchymatous blood flow inside the placenta. As was to be expected, interdependencies between the placental blood flow and the maternal and fetal heart rates as well as the maternal breathing can be found. While there was only limited influence of maternal and fetal heart rate on the placental blood flow, maternal breathing showed striking influence. Surprisingly, during expiration the power of placental blood movement was decreased, and there was a marked increase during inspiration. In cases of severe intrauterine growth retardation, colour pixel intensities were seen to transiently vanish during end-expiration. The power of placental blood displacement was marked increased subsequent to reducing maternal hematocrit during hemodilution therapy by infusion

  7. Chronic Placental Inflammation in Twin Pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Heejin; Bae, Go Eun; Park, Ha Young; Kim, Yeon Mee; Choi, Suk-Joo; Oh, Soo-young; Roh, Cheong-Rae; Kim, Jung-Sun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic placental inflammation, such as villitis of unknown etiology (VUE) and chronic chorioamnionitis (CCA), is considered a placental manifestation of maternal anti-fetal rejection. The aim of this study is to investigate its frequency in twin pregnancies compared to singleton pregnancies. Methods: Three hundred twin placentas and 1,270 singleton placentas were consecutively collected at a tertiary medical center in Seoul, Republic of Korea from 2009 to 2012. Hematoxylin and eosin sections of tissue samples (full-thickness placental disc and chorioamniotic membranes) were reviewed. Results: Non-basal VUE was more frequent in twin placentas than in singleton placentas (6.0% vs 3.2%, p < .05). In preterm birth, CCA was found less frequently in twin placentas than in singleton placentas (9.6% vs 14.8%, p < .05), reaching its peak at an earlier gestational age in twin placentas (29–32 weeks) than in singleton placentas (33–36 weeks). CCA was more frequent in twin pregnancies with babies of a different sex than with those with the same sex (13.8% vs 6.9%, p=.052). Separate dichorionic diamniotic twin placentas were affected by chronic deciduitis more frequently than singleton placentas (16.9% vs 9.7%, p<.05). Conclusions: The higher frequency of non-basal VUE in twin placentas and of CCA in twin placentas with different fetal sex supports the hypothesis that the underlying pathophysiological mechanism is maternal anti-fetal rejection related to increased fetal antigens in twin pregnancies. The peak of CCA at an earlier gestational age in twin placentas than in singleton placentas suggests that CCA is influenced by placental maturation. PMID:26459409

  8. Placentation in mammals once grouped as insectivores.

    PubMed

    Carter, Anthony M; Enders, Allen C

    2010-01-01

    Interest in insectivoran grade mammals has been reawakened by taxonomic changes that place tenrecs and golden moles in a new order and separate hedgehogs from moles, shrews and solenodons. This survey of their placentation shows there is great variation even within families. As an example three subfamilies of tenrec have been examined. The interhemal region is cellular hemomonochorial in Echinops and Microgale but endotheliochorial in Micropotamogale. Golden moles, which are placed in the same order, have hemodichorial placentation. Many insectivores have complex arrangements for histotrophic nutrition involving columnar trophoblast cells. These range from areolae in moles through complexly folded hemophagous regions in tenrecs to the trophoblastic annulus in shrews. Of these placental characters, few offer support to current phylogenies. However, the case for placing hedgehogs and gymnures in a separate order (Erinaceomorpha) is bolstered by the presence of interstitial implantation, amniogenesis by cavitation, a hemochorial barrier and a prominent spongy zone; these features do not occur in shrews, moles or solenodons (Soricomorpha). Three insectivoran grade mammals deserve close attention as they have been selected for genome sequencing. One of these, the European hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus), has not been studied with current methodology and renewed investigation of this or the closely related genus Atelerix should be a priority.

  9. Neuropeptides and neurotransmitters in human placental villi.

    PubMed

    Zhang, C L; Cheng, L R; Wang, H; Zhuang, L Z; Huang, W Q

    1991-01-01

    The human placenta contains many kinds of bioactive substances which are more or less similar to those from the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Most of the studies were carried out mainly with term placenta. The present study, therefore, was attempted to identify, quantify and characterize these substances in the human placenta at the early pregnancy. Using the RIA, immunohistochemistry, HPLC, tissue culture and intrauterine injection methods, we have found that: (1) many kinds of neuropeptides and neurotransmitters are present in the placental villi; (2) LH-RH, NT and SRIF positive immunoreactive granules are localized in the cytotrophoblast and those of beta-EP, 5-HT positive granules in the syncytiotrophoblast; (3) synthetic LH-RH and dynorphin (Dyn) stimulate the hCG secretion of the early placental villi in vitro, and (4) the antisera of LH-RH, NT, Dyn and NE antagonist-alpha-MPT significantly reduced the number of blastocyst implantations in the early pregnant rat. These results indicate that in the human placenta there possibly exists a self-regulation mechanism for the synthesis and secretion of placental hormones and neurotransmitters. Therefore, the human placenta can be regarded as a neuroendocrine organ.

  10. Notes on placentation in the Suina.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, A A; Bosma, A A

    1985-01-01

    We examined the gross and microscopic anatomy of placental tissues and umbilical cords from six species representing the three living families of the Suina. These species included, of the Suidae, the wart hog (Phacochoerus aethiopicus), the giant forest hog (Hylochoerus meinertzhageni), the domestic pig (Sus scrofa), and the banded pig of Malaysia (Sus scrofa vittatus); of the Tayassuidae, the white-lipped peccary (Tayassu pecari); of the Hippopotamidae, the hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius) and the pigmy hippopotamus (Choeropsis liberiensis). All these species have a diffuse epitheliochorial placenta. The chorion is folded, and has on its surface rows of shallow ripples or villi, interrupted by round, oval or irregularly shaped areolae. Placental capillaries indent the epithelial layer covering the tops and sides of the interareolar villi, but not the columnar cell layer lying in the troughs between these villi or covering the areolae. Cuboidal cells cover the crests of the villi in the Suidae and Hippopotamidae, whereas in the Tayassuidae the epithelium is syncytial in appearance. The similarities in placental structure between the six species are more apparent than the differences. Suidae and Tayassuidae have smooth umbilical cords containing two arteries and one vein; those of the Hippopotamidae are pustule-encrusted and contain two arteries and two veins. PMID:3991477

  11. The placental mammal ancestor and the post-K-Pg radiation of placentals.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Maureen A; Bloch, Jonathan I; Flynn, John J; Gaudin, Timothy J; Giallombardo, Andres; Giannini, Norberto P; Goldberg, Suzann L; Kraatz, Brian P; Luo, Zhe-Xi; Meng, Jin; Ni, Xijun; Novacek, Michael J; Perini, Fernando A; Randall, Zachary S; Rougier, Guillermo W; Sargis, Eric J; Silcox, Mary T; Simmons, Nancy B; Spaulding, Michelle; Velazco, Paúl M; Weksler, Marcelo; Wible, John R; Cirranello, Andrea L

    2013-02-01

    To discover interordinal relationships of living and fossil placental mammals and the time of origin of placentals relative to the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) boundary, we scored 4541 phenomic characters de novo for 86 fossil and living species. Combining these data with molecular sequences, we obtained a phylogenetic tree that, when calibrated with fossils, shows that crown clade Placentalia and placental orders originated after the K-Pg boundary. Many nodes discovered using molecular data are upheld, but phenomic signals overturn molecular signals to show Sundatheria (Dermoptera + Scandentia) as the sister taxon of Primates, a close link between Proboscidea (elephants) and Sirenia (sea cows), and the monophyly of echolocating Chiroptera (bats). Our tree suggests that Placentalia first split into Xenarthra and Epitheria; extinct New World species are the oldest members of Afrotheria.

  12. Placental Dysfunction and Fetal Programming: The Importance of Placental Size, Shape, Histopathology, and Molecular Composition

    PubMed Central

    Longtine, Mark S.; Nelson, D. Michael

    2013-01-01

    Normal function of the placenta is pivotal for optimal fetal growth and development. Fetal programming commonly is associated with placental dysfunction that predisposes to obstetric complications and .suboptimal fetal outcomes. We consider several clinical phenotypes for placental dysfunction that likely predispose to fetal programming. Some of these reflect abnormal development of the chorioallantoic placenta in size, shape, or histopathology. Others result when exogenous stressors in the maternal environment combine with maladaptation of the placental response to yield small placentas with limited reserve, as typical of early-onset intrauterine growth restriction and preeclampsia. Still others reflect epigenetic changes, including altered expression of imprinted genes, altered enzymatic activity, or altered efficiencies in nutrient transport. Although the human placenta is a transient organ that persists only 9 months, the effects of this organ on the offspring remain for a lifetime. PMID:21710395

  13. Topological Analysis of Placental Arteries:. Correlation with Neonatal Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, H.; Yakubo, K.

    2007-07-01

    The aim of study was to assess whether any network index of placental surface arteries was associated with neonatal birth weight. Twenty-six placentas were randomly selected between 34 and 41 weeks of gestational ages. Placental weights ranged 385 to 770 g; and neonatal weights ranged 1960 to 3680 g. After visualization of placental surface arteries by a milk injection method, network indices including the number of nodes, network density, network diameter, average distance of nodes, and the degree centralization were determined. These network indices and placental weights were compared with neonatal birth weights. The Number of nodes, network density, network diameter, average distance of nodes, and the degree centralization were found to be as follows (Mean ± SD); 84.7 ± 29.3, 0.0262 ± 0.0088, 15.8 ± 2.77, 7.83 ± 1.13, 0.0263 ± 0.0091, respectively. We found that neonatal birth weights correlate with the number of nodes of placental surface arteries (correlation coefficient R=0.40) and placental weights (R=0.52) both. However, the number of nodes of placental surface arteries was not associated with the placental weights or the gestational age. We for the first time found that a topological factor, i.e., the number of nodes of placental surface arteries correlated with neonatal growth. There was no correlation between numbers of nodes and placental weights. This suggests that the number of nodes affects fetal growth independent of placental weights. A topological factor of placental vasculization might significantly affect fetal growth in utero and determine risks of vascular diseases in their future lives.

  14. Cesarean Delivery for a Life-threatening Preterm Placental Abruption

    PubMed Central

    Okafor, II; Ugwu, EO

    2015-01-01

    Placental abruption is one of the major life-threatening obstetric conditions. The fetomaternal outcome of a severe placental abruption depends largely on prompt maternal resuscitation and delivery. A case of severe preterm placental abruption with intrauterine fetal death. Following a failed induction of labor with a deteriorating maternal condition despite resuscitation, emergency cesarean delivery was offered with good maternal outcome. Cesarean delivery could avert further disease progression and possible maternal death in cases of severe preterm placental abruption where vaginal delivery is not imminent. However, further studies are necessary before this could be recommended for routine clinical practice. PMID:27057388

  15. Foetal placental blood flow in the lamb

    PubMed Central

    Faber, J. Job; Green, Thomas J.

    1972-01-01

    1. Fifteen sheep foetuses of 1·5-5·2 kg body weight were prepared with indwelling arterial and venous catheters for experimentation one to six days later. 2. Unanaesthetized foetuses were found to have mean arterial and central venous blood pressures of 40 ± 1·5 (S.E. of mean) and 2·0 ± 0·3 (S.E. of mean) mm Hg respectively, compared to intra-uterine pressure. Intra-uterine pressure was 16 ± 0·8 (S.E. of mean) mm Hg with respect to atmospheric pressure at mid-uterine level. 3. Mean placental blood flow of the foetuses was 199 ± 20 (S.E. of mean) ml./(min.kg body wt.). Mean cardiac output in eleven of the foetuses was 658 ± 102 (S.E. of mean) ml./(min.kg). 4. Mean foetal and maternal colloid osmotic pressures were 17·5 ± 0·7 (S.E. of mean) and 20·5 ± 0·6 (S.E. of mean) mm Hg respectively at 38° C. 5. Intravenous infusions into six ewes of 1·8 mole of mannitol and 0·4 mole of NaCl resulted in significant increases in foetal plasma osmolarity, sodium, potassium, and haemoglobin concentrations, without detectable transfer of mannitol to the foetal circulation. 6. In the sheep placenta there is osmotic and hydrostatic equilibration of water. As a consequence, there should be an interaction between foetal placental blood flow and foetal water exchange with the maternal circulation. It was concluded that this interaction tends to stabilize foetal placental blood flow. PMID:5039279

  16. Placental hormones, nutrition, and fetal development.

    PubMed

    Mulay, S; Browne, C A; Varma, D R; Solomon, S

    1980-02-01

    Fetal growth retardation due to maternal malnutrition is widespread especially in the Third World. Little is known about the mechanisms that regulate the growth of the fetus and placenta during protein malnutrition. It is known that the placental size and levels of circulating placental hormones such as human chorionic gonadotrophins (hCG), human placental lactogen (hPL), and estrogens are affected by the nutritional status of the mother. There is suggestive evidence that during malnutrition, hPL may increase lipolysis and exert a glucose sparing effect in the mother, thereby promoting glucose availability to the fetus. We have studied the influence of dietary protein deficiency on the binding of dexamethasone to the specific cytosol receptors in adult and fetal tissues. A low protein diet in adult male rats is associated with a decrease in dexamethasone binding to liver cytosol receptors. On the other hand, protein deprivation in pregnant female rats leads to an increase in dexamethasone binding to liver cytosol receptors of both the mother and fetus. However, the influences of maternal protein deprivation on dexamethasone receptors in the fetal liver and lungs are not similar. At 21 days gestation the binding of dexamethasone to fetal lung receptors of protein-deficient mothers is lower than that in the controls. These differences at a critical time in the fetal lung development indicate that a fall in receptors for dexamethasone may lead to impaired phospholipid synthesis in fetuses of protein-deficient mothers and point to the importance of nutritional factors in the biochemistry of fetal development. PMID:7353684

  17. Sildenafil attenuates placental ischemia-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    George, Eric M; Palei, Ana C; Dent, Edward A; Granger, Joey P

    2013-08-15

    Preeclampsia is a complication of pregnancy that is marked by hypertension, proteinuria, and maternal endothelial dysfunction. A central factor in the etiology of the disease is the development of placental hypoxia/ischemia, which releases pathogenic soluble factors. There is currently no effective treatment for preeclampsia, but the phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE-5) inhibitor sildenafil has been suggested, as PDE-5 is enriched in the uterus, and its antagonism could improve uteroplacental function. Here, we report in the reduced uterine perfusion pressure (RUPP) rat model that administration of oral sildenafil is effective in attenuating placental ischemia-induced hypertension during gestation. RUPP animals have significantly elevated arterial pressure compared with control animals (132 ± 3 vs. 100 ± 2 mmHg; P < 0.05). Administration of oral sildenafil (45 mg·kg⁻¹·day⁻¹) had no effect on blood pressure in control rats but decreased pressure in RUPP rats (115 ± 1 mmHg; P < 0.05). RUPP induced changes in placental sFlt-1, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was unaffected by sildenafil administration, as was the decrease in free plasma VEGF. RUPP animals had a significant increase in medullary PDE-5/β-actin ratio (1 ± 0.14 vs. 1.63 ± 0.18; P < 0.05) expression with a resulting reduction in renal medullary cGMP (1.5 ± 0.15 vs. 0.99 ± 0.1 pmol/μg protein, P < 0.05) compared with controls. Although sildenafil had no effect on renal medullary cGMP in control animals, it significantly increased cGMP in RUPP animals (1.3 ± 0.1 pmol/μg protein; P < 0.05). These data suggest that sildenafil might provide an effective therapeutic option for the management of hypertension during preeclampsia. PMID:23785075

  18. Maternal environment and placental vascularization in small ruminants.

    PubMed

    Bairagi, S; Quinn, K E; Crane, A R; Ashley, R L; Borowicz, P P; Caton, J S; Redden, R R; Grazul-Bilska, A T; Reynolds, L P

    2016-07-01

    Uteroplacental development is a crucial step facilitating conceptus growth. Normal placental development comprises extensive placental angiogenesis to support fetoplacental transport, meeting the metabolic demands of the fetus. Compromised pregnancies due to maternal stressors such as over or undernutrition, maternal age or parity, altered body mass index, or genetic background result in altered vascular development of the placenta. This negatively affects placental growth and placental function and ultimately results in poor pregnancy outcomes. Nonetheless, the placenta acts as a sensor to the maternal stressors and undergoes modifications, which some have termed placental programming, to ensure healthy development of the conceptus. Sex steroid hormones such as estradiol-17β and progesterone, chemokines such as chemokine ligand 12, and angiogenic/vasoactive factors such as vascular endothelial growth factors, placental growth factor, angiopoietins, and nitric oxide regulate uteroplacental development and hence are often used as therapeutic targets to rescue compromised pregnancies. Interestingly, the presence of sex steroid receptors has been identified in the fetal membranes (developing fetal placenta). Environmental steroid mimetics known as endocrine disrupting compounds disrupt conceptus development and lead to transgenerational impairments by epigenetic modification of placental gene expression, which is another area deserving intense research efforts. This review attempts to summarize current knowledge concerning intrinsic and extrinsic factors affecting selected reproductive functions with the emphasis on placental development. PMID:27173956

  19. Placental measurements associated with intelligence quotient at age 7 years.

    PubMed

    Misra, D P; Salafia, C M; Charles, A K; Miller, R K

    2012-06-01

    We hypothesized that placental villous branching that is measured by disk chorionic plate expansion and disk thickness is correlated with factors also involved in regulation of branching growth of other fetal viscera (e.g. lung, kidney) including neuronal dendrites, and thus may be associated with variation in childhood intelligence quotient (IQ). IQ at age 7 years was assessed using the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children. Placental measures [placental weight (g), thickness (mm), chorionic plate surface diameters (cm), area (cm2), shape, and cord length and cord eccentricity] were independent variables in regression analyses of age 7-year IQ in 12,926 singleton term live born infants with complete placental data. Analyses were stratified on gender with adjustment for socioeconomic status, race, parity, gestational age, exact age at testing and centered parental ages. After adjustment for covariates, placental measurements were independently associated with IQ at age 7 years but results varied by gender. Chorionic plate diameters were only associated with higher IQ in girls. Placental thickness was positively associated with higher IQ for boys and girls. We have previously shown that placental measures affect age 7-year body mass index and diastolic blood pressure. Here we demonstrate that specific measures, placental chorionic plate diameters in girls and disk thickness, independent of gender, are correlated with age 7-year IQ. Further exploration of the possible interaction of these factors on the placental villous arborization reflected by the chorionic plate expansion and placental thickness that correlate with age 7-year IQ, as well as other age 7 somatic features as previously addressed, is indicated.

  20. Discriminative Learning for Automatic Staging of Placental Maturity via Multi-layer Fisher Vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Baiying; Yao, Yuan; Chen, Siping; Li, Shengli; Li, Wanjun; Ni, Dong; Wang, Tianfu

    2015-07-01

    Currently, placental maturity is performed using subjective evaluation, which can be unreliable as it is highly dependent on the observations and experiences of clinicians. To address this problem, this paper proposes a method to automatically stage placenta maturity from B-mode ultrasound (US) images based on dense sampling and novel feature descriptors. Specifically, our proposed method first densely extracts features with a regular grid based on dense sampling instead of a few unreliable interest points. Followed by, these features are clustered using generative Gaussian mixture model (GMM) to obtain high order statistics of the features. The clustering representatives (i.e., cluster means) are encoded by Fisher vector (FV) for staging accuracy enhancement. Differing from the previous studies, a multi-layer FV is investigated to exploit the spatial information rather than the single layer FV. Experimental results show that the proposed method with the dense FV has achieved an area under the receiver of characteristics (AUC) of 96.77%, sensitivity and specificity of 98.04% and 93.75% for the placental maturity staging, respectively. Our experimental results also demonstrate that the dense feature outperforms the traditional sparse feature for placental maturity staging.

  1. Immunohistochemical Expression of Myeloperoxidase in Placental Samples of Systematic Lupus Erythematosus Pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Zahra; Mahmoudzadeh Sagheb, Hamidreza; Sheibak, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Reports of increased level of Myeloperoxidase (MPO) in plasma and placental extracts of Systematic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) has been proposed that MPO may have an important role in this pregnancy complication. In present study immunohistochemical MPO expression was investigated in placental samples of SLE women compared with normal controls. Materials and methods: Ten patients with SLE were recruited as case group. Control group was selected from mothers with normal uncomplicated pregnancies. A monoclonal antibody specific for MPO was used for immunohistochemical staining and then the staining was quantified and differences between groups were compared using Mann-Whitney U test. Results: There were significant differences in the expression levels of MPO in the syncytiotrophoblast cells and the extravillous trophoblast cells between the control and SLE groups (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences in the expression level of MPO in the vascular endothelium and the relative number of the MPO-positive leukocytes in placental tissue between SLE and control groups (p > 0.05). Conclusion: The present study showed that MPO expression is increased in syncytiotrophoblast cells and the extravillous trophoblast cells of SLE placentas compared to healthy subjects. It seems that these changes are able to impress structure and function of placenta and survival of the fetus. PMID:27648095

  2. Immunohistochemical Expression of Myeloperoxidase in Placental Samples of Systematic Lupus Erythematosus Pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Zahra; Mahmoudzadeh Sagheb, Hamidreza; Sheibak, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Reports of increased level of Myeloperoxidase (MPO) in plasma and placental extracts of Systematic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) has been proposed that MPO may have an important role in this pregnancy complication. In present study immunohistochemical MPO expression was investigated in placental samples of SLE women compared with normal controls. Materials and methods: Ten patients with SLE were recruited as case group. Control group was selected from mothers with normal uncomplicated pregnancies. A monoclonal antibody specific for MPO was used for immunohistochemical staining and then the staining was quantified and differences between groups were compared using Mann-Whitney U test. Results: There were significant differences in the expression levels of MPO in the syncytiotrophoblast cells and the extravillous trophoblast cells between the control and SLE groups (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences in the expression level of MPO in the vascular endothelium and the relative number of the MPO-positive leukocytes in placental tissue between SLE and control groups (p > 0.05). Conclusion: The present study showed that MPO expression is increased in syncytiotrophoblast cells and the extravillous trophoblast cells of SLE placentas compared to healthy subjects. It seems that these changes are able to impress structure and function of placenta and survival of the fetus.

  3. Brucella placentitis and seroprevalence in northern fur seals (Callorhinus ursinus) of the Pribilof Islands, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Colleen G; Tiller, Rebekah; Mathis, Demetrius; Stoddard, Robyn; Kersh, Gilbert J; Dickerson, Bobette; Gelatt, Tom

    2014-05-01

    Brucella species infect a wide range of hosts with a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations. In mammals, one of the most significant consequences of Brucella infection is reproductive failure. There is evidence of Brucella exposure in many species of marine mammals, but the outcome of infection is often challenging to determine. The eastern Pacific stock of northern fur seals (NFSs, Callorhinus ursinus) has declined significantly, spawning research into potential causes for this trend, including investigation into reproductive health. The objective of the current study was to determine if NFSs on St. Paul Island, Alaska have evidence of Brucella exposure or infection. Archived DNA extracted from placentas (n = 119) and serum (n = 40) samples were available for testing by insertion sequence (IS) 711 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the Brucella microagglutination test (BMAT), respectively. As well, placental tissue was available for histologic examination. Six (5%) placentas were positive by PCR, and a single animal had severe placentitis. Multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis profiles were highly clustered and closely related to other Brucella pinnipedialis isolates. A single animal was positive on BMAT, and 12 animals had titers within the borderline range; 1 borderline animal was positive by PCR on serum. The findings suggest that NFSs on the Pribilof Islands are exposed to Brucella and that the organism has the ability to cause severe placental disease. Given the population trend of the NFS, and the zoonotic nature of this pathogen, further investigation into the epidemiology of this disease is recommended. PMID:24803576

  4. Placental Origin of Prostaglandin F2α in the Domestic Cat

    PubMed Central

    Siemieniuch, Marta J.; Jursza, Ewelina; Szóstek, Anna Z.; Zschockelt, Lina; Boos, Alois; Kowalewski, Mariusz P.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, the question was addressed whether the feline placenta can synthesize prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α). The PGFS protein was elevated, particularly at 2.5–3 weeks of pregnancy compared to 7-8 (P < 0.05) and 8.5–9 weeks (P < 0.001). Transcripts for PGFS were significantly upregulated at 2.5–3 weeks of pregnancy and then gradually declined towards the end of gestation (P < 0.001). Transcripts for PTGS2 were only upregulated in placentas from queens close to term (P < 0.001) compared with earlier phases. Staining of PTGS2 showed distinct positive signals in placentas obtained during the last week before labor, particularly in the strongly invading trophoblast surrounding blood vessels, and also in decidual cells. Shortly after implantation, signals for PGFS were localized in the trophoblast cells. Near term, PGFS staining was seen mainly in decidual cells. Both placental PGF2α and plasma PGFM were elevated towards the end of pregnancy (P < 0.001) compared with earlier weeks of pregnancy. The content of PGF2α in extracted placenta mirrored the PGFM level in plasma of pregnant females. During late gestation there is a significant increase in PGFM levels in maternal blood and of PGF2α levels in placental tissue concomitant with an upregulation of placental PTGS2. PMID:24659861

  5. Discriminative Learning for Automatic Staging of Placental Maturity via Multi-layer Fisher Vector

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Baiying; Yao, Yuan; Chen, Siping; Li, Shengli; Li, Wanjun; Ni, Dong; Wang, Tianfu

    2015-01-01

    Currently, placental maturity is performed using subjective evaluation, which can be unreliable as it is highly dependent on the observations and experiences of clinicians. To address this problem, this paper proposes a method to automatically stage placenta maturity from B-mode ultrasound (US) images based on dense sampling and novel feature descriptors. Specifically, our proposed method first densely extracts features with a regular grid based on dense sampling instead of a few unreliable interest points. Followed by, these features are clustered using generative Gaussian mixture model (GMM) to obtain high order statistics of the features. The clustering representatives (i.e., cluster means) are encoded by Fisher vector (FV) for staging accuracy enhancement. Differing from the previous studies, a multi-layer FV is investigated to exploit the spatial information rather than the single layer FV. Experimental results show that the proposed method with the dense FV has achieved an area under the receiver of characteristics (AUC) of 96.77%, sensitivity and specificity of 98.04% and 93.75% for the placental maturity staging, respectively. Our experimental results also demonstrate that the dense feature outperforms the traditional sparse feature for placental maturity staging. PMID:26228175

  6. Brucella placentitis and seroprevalence in northern fur seals (Callorhinus ursinus) of the Pribilof Islands, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Colleen G; Tiller, Rebekah; Mathis, Demetrius; Stoddard, Robyn; Kersh, Gilbert J; Dickerson, Bobette; Gelatt, Tom

    2014-05-01

    Brucella species infect a wide range of hosts with a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations. In mammals, one of the most significant consequences of Brucella infection is reproductive failure. There is evidence of Brucella exposure in many species of marine mammals, but the outcome of infection is often challenging to determine. The eastern Pacific stock of northern fur seals (NFSs, Callorhinus ursinus) has declined significantly, spawning research into potential causes for this trend, including investigation into reproductive health. The objective of the current study was to determine if NFSs on St. Paul Island, Alaska have evidence of Brucella exposure or infection. Archived DNA extracted from placentas (n = 119) and serum (n = 40) samples were available for testing by insertion sequence (IS) 711 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the Brucella microagglutination test (BMAT), respectively. As well, placental tissue was available for histologic examination. Six (5%) placentas were positive by PCR, and a single animal had severe placentitis. Multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis profiles were highly clustered and closely related to other Brucella pinnipedialis isolates. A single animal was positive on BMAT, and 12 animals had titers within the borderline range; 1 borderline animal was positive by PCR on serum. The findings suggest that NFSs on the Pribilof Islands are exposed to Brucella and that the organism has the ability to cause severe placental disease. Given the population trend of the NFS, and the zoonotic nature of this pathogen, further investigation into the epidemiology of this disease is recommended.

  7. Placental vanadium in gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Manci, E A; Coffin, C M; Smith, S M; Ganong, C A

    1989-01-01

    Although many studies in animal models and in cell cultures have shown that vanadate has insulin-like effects, it has not been studied in human diabetes mellitus. In this study the levels of vanadium in human placentae from 23 pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus were compared with 18 uncomplicated non-diabetic pregnancies closely matched for maternal age, gravidity, and gestational age. Using the unpaired Student's t-test, the mid-disc placental levels in gestational diabetes (7.62 +/- 1.29 micrograms/g dry weight) were significantly lower (p less than 0.05) than controls (8.73 +/- 1.85 micrograms/g dry weight). These findings appear to be independent of placental size and birthweight. When these data were analyzed according to treatment, the vanadium levels in insulin-treated cases (8.07 +/- 1.32 micrograms/g dry weight) were not significantly different from the matched controls (8.84 +/- 1.69 micrograms/dry weight); the levels in noninsulin treated cases (7.08 +/- 1.25 micrograms/g dry weight), however, were significantly (p less than 0.005) lower than controls (8.99 +/- 1.96 micrograms/g dry weight). It is interesting to speculate that there may be increased binding of vanadium to maternal tissues in human diabetes mellitus when insulin is deficient.

  8. Assisted Reproduction Technologies Impair Placental Steroid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Collier, Abby C.; Miyagi, Shogo J.; Yamauchi, Yasuhiro; Ward, Monika A.

    2009-01-01

    The placenta plays a vital role in pregnancy by facilitating steroid passage from maternal to fetal circulation and/or direct production of hormones. Using a murine model, we demonstrated the differences in placental steroid metabolism between pregnancies conceived naturally and with assisted reproduction technologies (ART): in vitro fertilization (IVF) and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). While the ovarian steroid production was similar (estrone, 17β-estradiol) or higher (estriol) in ART pregnancies compared to mating, the levels of placental estriol were significantly lower in ART group. Placentas from ART had significantly higher activities of the steroid metabolizing enzymes UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) and sulfotransferase (SULT), which in ICSI were also coupled with decreased activity of the steroid regenerating enzymes β-glucuronidase (β-G) and Aryl sulfatase (AS). Levels of steroid metabolites androstane-3α-17β-diol glucuronide and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate were higher in fetal compared to maternal blood in ART, but not in mating. This study demonstrates that in murine ART pregnancies, higher metabolism and clearance of steroids by the placenta may seriously affect the passage of essential hormones to the fetus. If a similar phenomenon exists in humans, this could provide a plausible explanation for obstetric and neonatal complications associated with ART, including the higher incidence of low birth weight babies. PMID:19406239

  9. Confined placental mosaicisms and uniparental disomy

    SciTech Connect

    Kalousek, D.K.; Langlois, S.; Harrison, K.J.

    1994-09-01

    Approximately 2% of pregnancies studied with chorionic villous sampling (CVS) show confined placental mosaicism (CPM) which persists to term in 50-70% of cases. An increased frequency of complications, such as intrauterine fetal growth restriction or intrauterine death, is observed in these pregnancies. As trisomic zygote rescue is a common mechanism responsible for CPM, fetal uniparental disomy (UPD), resulting from the loss of the extra trisomic chromosome in the embryonic stem cells, would be expected to occur in a proportion of pregnancies with CPM. We have studied 27 pregnancies with CPM involving trisomies for chromosomes 2, 7, 9, 10, 12, and 16 for involvement of specific cell lineage(s) and levels of mosaicism in term placentas. Also, DNA from the parents and infant was analyzed for UPD or biparental disomy (BPD). Five infants with UPD for chromosome 16 and one infant with UPD for chromosome 7 were detected. All other infants showed BPD for the chromosome involved in CPM. For trisomy 16 mosaic gestations, a close correlation between high levels of trisomic cells in placenta and intrauterine fetal growth restriction has been found irrespective of the type of disomy present in the infant. The effect of other trisomies (2, 7, 9, 10, 12) on placental function appears to be similar, but the low numbers of pregnancies studied and lack of detection of UPD for chromosomes 2, 9, 10 and 12 does not allow a definitive conclusion.

  10. Comparison of placental blood microscopy and the ICT HRP2 rapid diagnostic test to detect placental malaria.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Ruth; Machevo, Sonia; Menéndez, Clara; Bardají, Azucena; Nhabomba, Augusto; Alonso, Pedro L; Mayor, Alfredo

    2012-09-01

    Monitoring interventions to prevent malaria in pregnancy requires sensitive detection of placental infection. Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) are good candidates, but little information is available on their sensitivity on placental blood. We have evaluated the agreement (kappa coefficient) between microscopy and a Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein 2 (HRP2)-based immuno-chromatographic test (ICT) on placental blood from 1151 women at delivery. Prevalences of placental infection by microscopy and RDT were 5.1% and 5.0%, respectively, showing 82.9% agreement (p<0.0001). Discordances were found at low parasitemias (<500 parasites/μL) or negative microscopy. The results suggest that the HRP2-RDTs from ICT diagnostics is a good alternative to microscopy for diagnosing placental malaria at delivery.

  11. Evidence for placental compensation in cattle.

    PubMed

    Van Eetvelde, M; Kamal, M M; Hostens, M; Vandaele, L; Fiems, L O; Opsomer, G

    2016-08-01

    Prenatal development is known to be extremely sensitive to maternal and environmental challenges. In this study, we hypothesize that body growth and lactation during gestation in cattle reduce nutrient availability for the pregnant uterus, with consequences for placental development. Fetal membranes of 16 growing heifers and 27 fully grown cows of the Belgian Blue (BB) breed were compared to determine the effect of body growth on placental development. Furthermore, the fetal membranes of 49 lactating Holstein Friesian (HF) cows and 27 HF heifers were compared to study the impact of dam lactation compared to dam body growth. After parturition, calf birth weight and body measurements of dam and calf were recorded, as well as weight of total fetal membranes, cotyledons and intercotyledonary membranes. All cotyledons were individually measured to calculate both the surface of each individual cotyledon and the total cotyledonary surface per placenta. Total cotyledonary surface was unaffected by breed or the breed×parity interaction. Besides a 0.3 kg lower cotyledonary weight (P=0.007), heifer placentas had a smaller total cotyledonary surface compared with placentas of cows (0.48±0.017 v. 0.54±0.014 m2, respectively, P<0.001). Within the BB breed, fetal membranes of heifers had a 1.5 kg lower total weight and 1.0 kg lower intercotyledonary membrane weight (P<0.005) compared with cows. A cotyledon number of only 91±5.4 was found in multiparous BB dams, while growing BB heifers had a higher cotyledon number (126±6.7, P<0.001), but a greater proportion of smaller cotyledons (<40 cm2). Within the HF breed, no parity effect on intercotyledonary membrane weight, cotyledon number and individual cotyledonary surface was found. Placental efficiency (calf weight/total cotyledonary surface) was similar in HF and BB heifers but significantly higher in multiparous BB compared with multiparous HF dams (106.0±20.45 v. 74.3±12.27 kg/m2, respectively, P<0.001). Furthermore, a

  12. Maternal dietary omega-3 fatty acids and placental function.

    PubMed

    Jones, Megan L; Mark, Peter J; Waddell, Brendan J

    2014-05-01

    The developing fetus requires substantial amounts of fatty acids to support rapid cellular growth and activity. Although the fatty acid composition delivered to the fetus is largely determined by maternal circulating levels, the placenta preferentially transfers physiologically important long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs), particularly omega-3 (n-3) PUFAs. Maternal dietary supplementation with n-3 PUFAs during pregnancy has been shown to increase gestation length, enhance fetal growth, and reduce the risk of pregnancy complications, although the precise mechanisms governing these effects remain uncertain. Omega-3 PUFAs are involved in several physiological pathways which could account for these effects, including anti-inflammatory, pro-resolving, and anti-oxidative pathways. Recent studies have shown that maternal dietary n-3 PUFA supplementation during rat pregnancy can reduce placental oxidative damage and increase placental levels of pro-resolving mediators, effects associated with enhanced fetal and placental growth. Because several placental disorders, such as intrauterine growth restriction, preeclampsia, and gestational diabetes mellitus, are associated with heightened placental inflammation and oxidative stress, there is considerable interest in the potential for dietary n-3 PUFAs as a therapeutic intervention for these disorders. In this study, we review the impact of dietary n-3 PUFAs on placental function, with particular focus on placental inflammation, inflammatory resolution, and oxidative stress.

  13. Maternal dietary omega-3 fatty acids and placental function.

    PubMed

    Jones, Megan L; Mark, Peter J; Waddell, Brendan J

    2014-05-01

    The developing fetus requires substantial amounts of fatty acids to support rapid cellular growth and activity. Although the fatty acid composition delivered to the fetus is largely determined by maternal circulating levels, the placenta preferentially transfers physiologically important long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs), particularly omega-3 (n-3) PUFAs. Maternal dietary supplementation with n-3 PUFAs during pregnancy has been shown to increase gestation length, enhance fetal growth, and reduce the risk of pregnancy complications, although the precise mechanisms governing these effects remain uncertain. Omega-3 PUFAs are involved in several physiological pathways which could account for these effects, including anti-inflammatory, pro-resolving, and anti-oxidative pathways. Recent studies have shown that maternal dietary n-3 PUFA supplementation during rat pregnancy can reduce placental oxidative damage and increase placental levels of pro-resolving mediators, effects associated with enhanced fetal and placental growth. Because several placental disorders, such as intrauterine growth restriction, preeclampsia, and gestational diabetes mellitus, are associated with heightened placental inflammation and oxidative stress, there is considerable interest in the potential for dietary n-3 PUFAs as a therapeutic intervention for these disorders. In this study, we review the impact of dietary n-3 PUFAs on placental function, with particular focus on placental inflammation, inflammatory resolution, and oxidative stress. PMID:24451224

  14. Early Dexamethasone Treatment Induces Placental Apoptosis in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Wenbin; Shang, Hongkai; Li, Shaofu; Sloboda, Deborah M.; Ehrlich, Loreen; Lange, Karolin; Xu, Huaisheng; Henrich, Wolfgang; Dudenhausen, Joachim W.; Plagemann, Andreas; Newnham, John P.; Challis, John R. G.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoid treatment given in late pregnancy in sheep resulted in altered placental development and function. An imbalance of placental survival and apoptotic factors resulting in an increased rate of apoptosis may be involved. We have now investigated the effects of dexamethasone (DEX) in early pregnancy on binucleate cells (BNCs), placental apoptosis, and fetal sex as a determinant of these responses. Pregnant ewes carrying singleton fetuses (n = 105) were randomized to control (n = 56, 2 mL saline/ewe) or DEX treatment (n = 49, intramuscular injections of 0.14 mg/kg ewe weight per 12 hours over 48 hours) at 40 to 41 days of gestation (dG). Placentomes were collected at 50, 100, 125, and 140 dG. At 100 dG, DEX in females reduced BNC numbers, placental antiapoptotic (proliferating cell nuclear antigen), and increased proapoptotic factors (Bax, p53), associated with a temporarily decrease in fetal growth. At 125 dG, BNC numbers and apoptotic markers were restored to normal. In males, ovine placental lactogen-protein levels after DEX were increased at 50 dG, but at 100 and 140 dG significantly decreased compared to controls. In contrast to females, these changes were independent of altered BNC numbers or apoptotic markers. Early DEX was associated with sex-specific, transient alterations in BNC numbers, which may contribute to changes in placental and fetal development. Furthermore, in females, altered placental apoptosis markers may be involved. PMID:25063551

  15. Developmental programing: impact of testosterone on placental differentiation.

    PubMed

    Beckett, E M; Astapova, O; Steckler, T L; Veiga-Lopez, A; Padmanabhan, V

    2014-08-01

    Gestational testosterone treatment causes maternal hyperinsulinemia, intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), low birth weight, and adult reproductive and metabolic dysfunctions. Sheep models of IUGR demonstrate placental insufficiency as an underlying cause of IUGR. Placental compromise is probably the cause of fetal growth retardation in gestational testosterone-treated sheep. This study tested whether testosterone excess compromises placental differentiation by its androgenic action and/or via altered insulin sensitivity. A comparative approach of studying gestational testosterone (aromatizable androgen) against dihydrotestosterone (non-aromatizable androgen) or testosterone plus androgen antagonist, flutamide, was used to determine whether the effects of testosterone on placental differentiation were programed by its androgenic actions. Co-treatment of testosterone with the insulin sensitizer, rosiglitazone, was used to establish whether the effects of gestational testosterone on placentome differentiation involved compromised insulin sensitivity. Parallel cohorts of pregnant females were maintained for lambing and the birth weight of their offspring was recorded. Placental studies were conducted on days 65, 90, or 140 of gestation. Results indicated that i) gestational testosterone treatment advances placental differentiation, evident as early as day 65 of gestation, and culminates in low birth weight, ii) placental advancement is facilitated at least in part by androgenic actions of testosterone and is not a function of disrupted insulin homeostasis, and iii) placental advancement, while helping to increase placental efficiency, was insufficient to prevent IUGR and low-birth-weight female offspring. Findings from this study may be of relevance to women with polycystic ovary syndrome, whose reproductive and metabolic phenotype is captured by the gestational testosterone-treated offspring.

  16. Developmental programming: impact of testosterone on placental differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Beckett, EM; Astapova, O; Steckler, TL; Veiga-Lopez, A; Padmanabhan, V

    2014-01-01

    Gestational testosterone (T) treatment causes maternal hyperinsulinemia, intra-uterine growth retardation (IUGR), low birth weight, and adult reproductive and metabolic dysfunctions. Sheep models of IUGR demonstrate placental insufficiency as an underlying cause of IUGR. Placental compromise is likely the cause of fetal growth retardation in gestational T-treated sheep. This study tested if T excess compromises placental differentiation by its androgenic action and/or via altered insulin sensitivity. A comparative approach of studying gestational T (aromatizable androgen) against dihydrotestosterone (DHT; non-aromatizable androgen) or T plus androgen antagonist, flutamide, was used to determine whether the effects of T in placental differentiation were programmed by its androgenic actions. Co-treatment of testosterone with the insulin sensitizer, rosiglitazone, was used to establish whether the effects of gestational T on placentome differentiation involved compromised insulin sensitivity. Parallel cohorts of pregnant females were maintained for lambing and the birth weight of their offspring was recorded. Placental studies were conducted on days 65, 90, or 140 of gestation. Results indicated that 1) gestational T treatment advances placental differentiation, evident as early as day 65 of gestation, and culminates in low birth weight, 2) placental advancement is facilitated at least in part by androgenic actions of T and is not a function of disrupted insulin homeostasis, and 3) placental advancement, while helping to increase placental efficiency, was insufficient to prevent IUGR and low birth weight female offspring. Findings from this study may be of relevance to women with PCOS, whose reproductive and metabolic phenotype is captured by the gestational T-treated offspring. PMID:24840528

  17. Placental exosomes in normal and complicated pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Murray D; Peiris, Hassendrini N; Kobayashi, Miharu; Koh, Yong Q; Duncombe, Gregory; Illanes, Sebastian E; Rice, Gregory E; Salomon, Carlos

    2015-10-01

    While there is considerable contemporary interest in elucidating the role of placenta-derived extracellular vesicles in normal and complicated pregnancies and their utility as biomarkers and therapeutic interventions, progress in the field is hindered by a lack of standardized extracellular vesicle taxonomy and isolation protocols. The term "extracellular vesicle" is nonspecific and refers to all membrane-bound vesicles from nanometer to micrometer diameters and of different biogenic origins. To meaningfully ascribe biological function and/or diagnostic and therapeutic utility to extracellular vesicles, and in particular exosomes, greater specificity and vesicle characterization is required. The current literature relating to exosome biology must be interpreted in this context. Exosomes are a subtype of extracellular vesicle that are specifically defined by an endosomal biogenesis and particle size (40-120 nm) and density (1.13-1.19 g/mL(-1)). Exosomes are specifically package with signaling molecules (including protein, messenger RNA, microRNA, and noncoding RNA) and are released by exocytosis into biofluid compartments. Exosomes regulate the activity of both proximal and distal target cells, including translational activity, angiogenesis, proliferation, metabolism, and apoptosis. As such, exosomal signaling represents an integral pathway mediating intercellular communication. During pregnancy, the placenta releases exosomes into the maternal circulation from as early as 6 weeks of gestation. Release is regulated by factors that include both oxygen tension and glucose concentration and correlates with placental mass and perfusion. The concentration of placenta-derived exosomes in maternal plasma increases progressively during gestation. Exosomes isolated from maternal plasma are bioactive in vitro and are incorporated into target cells by endocytosis. While the functional significance of placental exosomes in pregnancy remains to be fully elucidated, available

  18. Early placental insulin-like protein (INSL4 or EPIL) in placental and fetal membrane growth.

    PubMed

    Millar, Lynnae; Streiner, Nicole; Webster, Lisa; Yamamoto, Sandra; Okabe, Rachel; Kawamata, Tasha; Shimoda, Jacqueline; Büllesbach, Erika; Schwabe, Christian; Bryant-Greenwood, Gillian

    2005-10-01

    Early placental insulin-like protein (INSL4 or EPIL) is a member of the insulin superfamily of hormones, which is highly expressed in the placenta. We have confirmed this at term and shown it to be expressed by the maternal decidua. Although an abundance of locally acting growth factors are produced within the uterus during pregnancy, we hypothesized that INSL4 plays an important role in fetal and placental growth. We have demonstrated with cell lines and primary cells that it has a growth-inhibitory effect by causing apoptosis and loss of cell viability. We used primary amniotic epithelial cells for flow cytometry to show that INSL4 caused apoptosis, which was dose-related and significant (P < 0.05) at 50 ng/ml. This was confirmed by measurement of the nuclear matrix protein in the media. In comparison, relaxin treatment (up to 200 ng/ml) had no effect on apoptosis. The addition of INSL4 (3-30 ng/ml) also caused a loss of cell viability, although it had no effect on the numbers of cells at different phases of the cell cycle. Placental apoptosis is an important process in both normal placental development and in fetal growth restriction. Therefore, an in vivo clinical correlate was sought in fraternal twins exhibiting discordant growth. Expression of the INSL4 gene was doubled in the placenta of the growth-restricted twin compared to the normally grown sibling, suggesting that it may be linked to a higher level of apoptosis and loss of cell viability and, therefore, that it may contribute to fetal growth restriction.

  19. Chlamydia pecorum: fetal and placental lesions in sporadic caprine abortion.

    PubMed

    Giannitti, Federico; Anderson, Mark; Miller, Myrna; Rowe, Joan; Sverlow, Karen; Vasquez, Marce; Cantón, Germán

    2016-03-01

    Chlamydial abortion in small ruminants is usually associated with Chlamydia abortus infection. Although Chlamydia pecorum has been detected in aborted ruminants and epidemiological data suggests that C. pecorum is abortigenic in these species, published descriptions of lesions in fetuses are lacking. This work describes fetoplacental lesions in a caprine abortion with C. pecorum infection, and further supports the abortigenic role of C. pecorum in ruminants. A 16-month-old Boer goat aborted twin fetuses at ~130 days of gestation. Both fetuses (A and B) and the placenta of fetus A were submitted for postmortem examination and diagnostic workup. At autopsy, the fetuses had moderate anasarca, intermuscular edema in the hindquarters (A), and brachygnathia and palatoschisis (B). In the placenta, the cotyledons were covered by yellow fibrinosuppurative exudate that extended into the adjacent intercotyledonary areas. Histologically, there was severe suppurative and necrotizing placentitis with vasculitis (arteriolitis) and thrombosis, multifocal lymphohistiocytic and neutrophilic hepatitis (A), and fibrinosuppurative enteritis in both fetuses. Chlamydia antigen was detected in the placenta by the direct fluorescent antibody test and in fetal intestines by immunohistochemistry. Nested polymerase chain reaction of DNA extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of placenta and intestine amplified 400 bp of the Chlamydia 16S rRNA gene that was sequenced and found to be 99% identical to C. pecorum by BLAST analysis. Other known abortigenic infectious agents were ruled out by specific testing. It is concluded that C. pecorum infection is associated with fetoplacental lesions and sporadic abortion in goats. PMID:26965241

  20. [How to stimulate the placental function (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Fanard, A; Picazo, J J

    1976-01-01

    Imminent abortion, habitual abortion and threatened premature labor, all constitute difficult clinical problems. Those cases require on every occasion a diagnosis as acurate as possible, and unfortunately our present methods of biochemical determinations only represent a means to evaluate placental function. On those cases where a faulty placental function is detected thru the tests presently available, the authors recommend the utilization of a placentotropic substance, Gestanon, that is capable to stimulate and normalize the placental function, a is demostrated by the statistical results published in the international medical bibliography.

  1. Associations between intrapartum death and piglet, placental, and umbilical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Rootwelt, V; Reksen, O; Farstad, W; Framstad, T

    2012-12-01

    Intrapartum death in multiparous gestations in sows (Sus scrofa) is often caused by hypoxia. There is little information in the literature on the assessment of the placenta in relation to intrapartum death in piglets. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the placental area and weight upon piglet birth characteristics and intrapartum death. Litters from 26 Landrace-Yorkshire sows were monitored during farrowing and the status of each piglet was recorded, including blood parameters of piglets and their umbilical veins. Of 413 piglets born, 6.5% were stillborn. Blood concentrations of glucose, lactate, and CO(2) partial pressure were increased in the stillborn piglets (P < 0.05) and corresponding umbilical veins (P < 0.01) vs. live-born piglets, whereas pH and base excess were decreased (P < 0.001). Time from onset of parturition until birth was increased for piglets born dead vs. live (P < 0.001). Mean birth weight for piglets born dead was not different from live-born piglets (P = 0.631), whereas mean body mass index was reduced (P < 0.001). Mean placental area and placental weight belonging to stillborn piglets were not different from live-born piglets (P = 0.662 and P = 0.253, respectively). Blood concentrations of lactate, hemoglobin, and hematocrit recorded in all piglets pooled were associated with placental area (P < 0.05), but not with placental weight (P > 0.2). Piglet BW was positively correlated with placental area and placental weight (P < 0.001). The risk of being born dead increased with increasing birth order group, and broken umbilical cords explained 71% of the stillbirths (P = 0.001). We conclude that placental area and placental weight are both positively associated with piglet birth weight, but not with the probability of being born dead. Placental area was a better predictor of piglet vitality than placental weight. Because umbilical cord rupture and prolonged birth time were associated with being born dead, umbilical cord rupture

  2. Distribution of CA 125 in placental tissues.

    PubMed

    Fuith, L C; Müller-Holzner, E; Marth, C; Perkmann, E; Zeimet, A; Daxenbichler, G

    1989-01-01

    The presence of the tumor marker CA 125 was studied in different compartments of the human placenta. Levels of CA 125 in the cytosol of chorionic villi ranged from 27-17100 U/g (median 560 U/g). In the placental amnion and chorion concentrations ranged from 175-29000 U/g, median 1060 U/g and were not statistically different. In the umbilical cord values were significantly lower (range 44-7600 U/g; median 180 U/g). Maternal serum probes were above the upper limit of normal in all cases (range 48-500 U/ml; median 131 U/ml). Immunohistochemistry detected CA 125 exclusively within the amniotic cells of the placenta and the umbilical cord. This might be because CA 125 fixes more to insoluble structures in the amnion or because of contamination of chorionic villi with the underlying decidua.

  3. Placental copper transport in the brindled mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Garnica, A.; Bates, J.

    1986-03-01

    Pregnant brindled (brin) mice were injected at 16 or 19 days gestation with 2 doses of CuCl/sub 2/ 6 mcg/g/dose, separated by 12 h, and sacrificed 6 h after the second. The copper conc. in placenta (P) and kidneys (K) of uninjected (UI) brin mice were higher than in UI controls, while conc. in liver (L) and fetal carcass (F) were lower. After injection (I), placental copper conc. increased while the carcass conc. remained unchanged. Brin mouse is a model for the human inborn error of copper metabolism, Menkes syndrome, which is characterized by signs of copper deficiency. These data indicate that metabolism of copper in brin fetus is abnormal, but depressed fetal copper levels cannot be corrected by acute copper dosing because of the sequestration of copper in placenta.

  4. Seven placental transcripts characterize HELLP-syndrome.

    PubMed

    Buimer, M; Keijser, R; Jebbink, J M; Wehkamp, D; van Kampen, A H C; Boer, K; van der Post, J A M; Ris-Stalpers, C

    2008-05-01

    The human placenta is prerequisite for the development of gestational hypertensive diseases like early-onset preeclampsia (PE) and Hemolysis, Elevated Liver enzymes and Low platelets (HELLP) syndrome. Both syndromes are associated with extensive maternal and perinatal mortality, and morbidity with life long consequences. We aimed to investigate differences in gene expression between placental tissue obtained from normotensive pregnant women and women with PE and HELLP syndrome. Firstly, comparison of Serial Analysis of Gene Expression profiles of 28 weeks' control placenta (available after idiopathic premature delivery) to a HELLP/PE placenta matched for gestational age identified 404 differentially expressed transcripts. Secondly, using sqPCR, the expression levels of 37 of these transcripts were analyzed in placentas of 36 pregnant women, 22 with preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome. Thirdly, nearest centroid classification determined the HELLP specific molecular signature consisting of the upregulated expression of genes encoding the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (FLT1), leptin (LEP), pappalysin 2 (PAPPA2), and WW domain containing transcription regulator 1 (WWTR1) combined with down regulated expression of the genes encoding cadherin-associated protein (CTNNAL), glutathione S-transferase pi (GSTP1) and calgranulin A (S100A8). This set discriminates HELLP placenta from control and PE placenta with a 24% misclassification rate (95% CI 8.3-41.9%), independent from known risk factors like parity and ethnicity. The transcripts involved correspond to diverse molecular pathways, exemplifying the multigenic molecular basis of the disorder. This distinct placental molecular signature suggests that HELLP is not a PE variant but a separate disease entity. Our data may prove fundamental for the further molecular analysis of PE and HELLP syndrome.

  5. The new framework for understanding placental mammal evolution.

    PubMed

    Asher, Robert J; Bennett, Nigel; Lehmann, Thomas

    2009-08-01

    An unprecedented level of confidence has recently crystallized around a new hypothesis of how living placental mammals share a pattern of common descent. The major groups are afrotheres (e.g., aardvarks, elephants), xenarthrans (e.g., anteaters, sloths), laurasiatheres (e.g., horses, shrews), and euarchontoglires (e.g., humans, rodents). Compared with previous hypotheses this tree is remarkably stable; however, some uncertainty persists about the location of the placental root, and (for example) the position of bats within laurasiatheres, of sea cows and aardvarks within afrotheres, and of dermopterans within euarchontoglires. A variety of names for sub-clades within the new placental mammal tree have been proposed, not all of which follow conventions regarding priority and stability. More importantly, the new phylogenetic framework enables the formulation of new hypotheses and testing thereof, for example regarding the possible developmental dichotomy that seems to distinguish members of the newly identified southern and northern radiations of living placental mammals. PMID:19582725

  6. Multiscale modelling of the feto–placental vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Clark, A. R.; Lin, M.; Tawhai, M.; Saghian, R.; James, J. L.

    2015-01-01

    The placenta provides all the nutrients required for the fetus through pregnancy. It develops dynamically, and, to avoid rejection of the fetus, there is no mixing of fetal and maternal blood; rather, the branched placental villi ‘bathe’ in blood supplied from the uterine arteries. Within the villi, the feto–placental vasculature also develops a complex branching structure in order to maximize exchange between the placental and maternal circulations. To understand the development of the placenta, we must translate functional information across spatial scales including the interaction between macro- and micro-scale haemodynamics and account for the effects of a dynamically and rapidly changing structure through the time course of pregnancy. Here, we present steps towards an anatomically based and multiscale approach to modelling the feto–placental circulation. We assess the effect of the location of cord insertion on feto–placental blood flow resistance and flow heterogeneity and show that, although cord insertion does not appear to directly influence feto–placental resistance, the heterogeneity of flow in the placenta is predicted to increase from a 19.4% coefficient of variation with central cord insertion to 23.3% when the cord is inserted 2 cm from the edge of the placenta. Model geometries with spheroidal and ellipsoidal shapes, but the same volume, showed no significant differences in flow resistance or heterogeneity, implying that normal asymmetry in shape does not affect placental efficiency. However, the size and number of small capillary vessels is predicted to have a large effect on feto–placental resistance and flow heterogeneity. Using this new model as an example, we highlight the importance of taking an integrated multi-disciplinary and multiscale approach to understand development of the placenta. PMID:25844150

  7. Patterns of ossification in southern versus northern placental mammals.

    PubMed

    Hautier, Lionel; Bennett, Nigel C; Viljoen, Hermien; Howard, Lauren; Milinkovitch, Michel C; Tzika, Athanasia C; Goswami, Anjali; Asher, Robert J

    2013-07-01

    Consensus on placental mammal phylogeny is fairly recent compared to that for vertebrates as a whole. A stable phylogenetic hypothesis enables investigation into the possibility that placental clades differ from one another in terms of their development. Here, we focus on the sequence of skeletal ossification as a possible source of developmental distinctiveness in "northern" (Laurasiatheria and Euarchontoglires) versus "southern" (Afrotheria and Xenarthra) placental clades. We contribute data on cranial and postcranial ossification events during growth in Afrotheria, including elephants, hyraxes, golden moles, tenrecs, sengis, and aardvarks. We use three different techniques to quantify sequence heterochrony: continuous method, sequence-ANOVA (analysis of variance) and event-paring/Parsimov. We show that afrotherians significantly differ from other placentals by an early ossification of the orbitosphenoid and caudal vertebrae. Our analysis also suggests that both southern placental groups show a greater degree of developmental variability; however, they rarely seem to vary in the same direction, especially regarding the shifts that differ statistically. The latter observation is inconsistent with the Atlantogenata hypothesis in which afrotherians are considered as the sister clade of xenarthrans. Interestingly, ancestral nodes for Laurasiatheria and Euarchontoglires show very similar trends and our results suggest that developmental homogeneity in some ossification sequences may be restricted to northern placental mammals (Boreoeutheria).

  8. Feto-placental adaptations to maternal obesity in the baboon

    PubMed Central

    Farley, Darren; Tejero, Maria E.; Comuzzie, Anthony G.; Higgins, Paul B.; Cox, Laura; Werner, Sherry L.; Jenkins, Susan L.; Li, Cun.; Choi, Jaehyek; Dick, Edward J.; Hubbard, Gene B.; Frost, Patrice; Dudley, Donald D.; Ballesteros, Brandon; Wu, Guoyao; Nathanielsz, Peter W.; Schlabritz-Loutsevitch, Natalia E.

    2010-01-01

    Maternal obesity is present in 20–34% of pregnant women and has been associated with both intrauterine growth restriction and large-for-gestational age fetuses. While fetal and placental functions have been extensively studied in the baboon, no data are available on the effect of maternal obesity on placental structure and function in this species. We hypothesize that maternal obesity in the baboon is associated with a maternal inflammatory state and induces structural and functional changes in the placenta. The major findings of this study were 1) decreased placental syncytiotrophoblast amplification factor, intact syncytiotrophoblast endoplasmic reticulum structure and decreased system A placental amino acid transport in obese animals; 2) fetal serum amino acid composition and mononuclear cells (PBMC) transcriptome were different in fetuses from obese compared with non-obese animals 3) maternal obesity in humans and baboons is similar in regard of increased placental and adipose tissue macrophage infiltration, increased CD14 expression in maternal PBMC and maternal hyperleptinemia. In summary, these data demonstrate that in obese baboons in the absence of increased fetal weight, placental and fetal phenotype are consistent with those described for large- for-gestational age human fetuses. PMID:19632719

  9. Relationship between placental traits and maternal intrinsic factors in sheep.

    PubMed

    Ocak, S; Ogun, S; Onder, H

    2013-06-01

    The relationship between maternal intrinsic factors and placental traits was investigated on three Southern Mediterranean breed of sheep; Cukurova Assaf (CA), Cukurova (C) and Cukurova Meat Sheep (CMS). The effect of parity and birth type were also considered in the study as a potential influencing factor. Our hypothesis was to show that while differences in placental traits between breed, parity and birth type affected lamb condition and survivability, its correlation to maternal intrinsic behavioral factors may also be a strong indicator. The study found breed related differences of maternal behavioral factors and also showed significant correlation of these behavioral patterns to various placental traits. It confirmed earlier findings that parity played a major role in the refinement of these behavioral patterns. Significant differences in birth weight (P<0.05), placental weight (P<0.05), number of cotyledons (P<0.01) and cotyledon length (P<0.05) was seen between breeds. Cotyledon weight (P<0.05), width (P<0.01) and length (P<0.05) were found to differ by parity. Breed and parity interaction significantly influenced cotyledon quantity. While we detected breed specific differences in relation to maternal intrinsic factors we also noticed significant variance within breeds to these behavioral patterns when linked to placental traits. Further study is required on the correlation between placental traits and postnatal behavior on not just the ewes but also on their lambs. This could have a significant bearing on how producers manage and maximize lamb survivability.

  10. Association between PAPP-A and placental thickness

    PubMed Central

    Mesdaghi-nia, Elaheh; Behrashi, Mitra; Saeidi, Arezoo; Abedzadeh Kalahroodi, Masoomeh; Sehat, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Background: Measuring of maternal serum pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) in first trimester can be a way for early detection of adverse prenatal outcome due to faulty placenta. Objective: The aim was to Determination of association between placental thickness in second trimester with low level of PAPP-A in first trimester. Materials and Methods: In this cohort study, serum PAPP-A of 187 pregnant women was measured in the first trimester of pregnancy. Patients who had PAPP-A ≤0.8 MOM were in exposed and others who had PAPP-A >0.8 defined as unexposed group. The criteria of placental thickness in ultrasound study was thickness of 4 cm or more than 50% of placental length. Results: Of 187 patients, 87 patients had PAPP-A >0.8 and 93 patients had PAPP-A ≤0.8. Women with low levels of PAPP-A in the first trimester, had an increased incidence placental thickness of 34.4%, whereas another group had about 15% (p=0.002). Also, PAPP-A levels had acceptable sensitivity and specificity for placental thickness detection (71.1% and 54.8%, respectively. Conclusion: Our study showed that serum level of PAPP-A generally was low (≤0.8) in women with a thick placenta (>4 cm or >50% of placental length). The first trimester of pregnancy measurement of PAPP-A will be more predictable for healthy placenta. PMID:27525326

  11. Metabolism of bupropion by baboon hepatic and placental microsomes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoming; Abdelrahman, Doaa R.; Fokina, Valentina M.; Hankins, Gary D.V.; Ahmed, Mahmoud S.; Nanovskaya, Tatiana N.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to determine the biotransformation of bupropion by baboon hepatic and placental microsomes, identify the enzyme(s) catalyzing the reaction(s) and determine its kinetics. Bupropion was metabolized by baboon hepatic and placental microsomes to hydroxybupropion (OH-BUP), threo- (TB) and erythrohydrobupropion (EB). OH-bupropion was the major metabolite formed by hepatic microsomes (Km 36 ± 6 µM, Vmax 258 ± 32 pmol mg protein−1 min−1), however the formation of OH-BUP by placental microsomes was below the limit of quantification. The apparent Km values of bupropion for the formation of TB and EB by hepatic and placental microsomes were similar. The selective inhibitors of CYP2B6 (ticlopidine and phencyclidine) and monoclonal antibodies raised against human CYP2B6 isozyme caused 80% inhibition of OH-BUP formation by baboon hepatic microsomes. The chemical inhibitors of aldo-keto reductases (flufenamic acid), carbonyl reductases (menadione), and 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (18β-glycyrrhetinic acid) significantly decreased the formation of TB and EB by hepatic and placental microsomes. Data indicate that CYP2B of baboon hepatic microsomes is responsible for biotransformation of bupropion to OH-BUP, while hepatic and placental short chain dehydrogenases/reductases and to a lesser extent aldo-keto reductases are responsible for the reduction of bupropion to TB and EB. PMID:21570381

  12. Maternal dietary omega-3 fatty acid supplementation reduces placental oxidative stress and increases fetal and placental growth in the rat.

    PubMed

    Jones, Megan L; Mark, Peter J; Mori, Trevor A; Keelan, Jeffrey A; Waddell, Brendan J

    2013-02-01

    Placental oxidative stress plays a key role in the pathophysiology of several placenta-related disorders including intrauterine growth restriction. Oxidative stress occurs when accumulation of reactive oxygen species damages DNA, proteins, and lipids, an outcome normally limited by antioxidant defenses. Dietary supplementation with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) may limit oxidative stress by increasing antioxidant capacity, but n-3 PUFAs are also highly susceptible to lipid peroxidation; so n-3 PUFA supplementation is potentially harmful. Here we examined the effect of n-3 PUFAs on placental oxidative stress and on placental and fetal growth in the rat. We also investigated whether diet-induced changes in maternal plasma fatty acid profiles are associated with comparable changes in placental and fetal tissues. Rats were fed either standard or high n-3 PUFA diets from Day 1 of pregnancy, and tissues were collected on Day 17 or 22 (term = Day 23). Dietary supplementation with n-3 PUFAs increased fetal (6%) and placental (12%) weights at Day 22, the latter attributable primarily to growth of the labyrinth zone (LZ). Increased LZ weight was accompanied by reduced LZ F(2)-isoprostanes (by 31% and 11% at Days 17 and 22, respectively), a marker of oxidative damage. Maternal plasma PUFA profiles were altered by dietary fatty acid intake and were strongly predictive of corresponding profiles in placental and fetal tissues. Our data indicate that n-3 PUFA supplementation reduces placental oxidative stress and enhances placental and fetal growth. Moreover, fatty acid profiles in the mother, placenta, and fetus are highly dependent on dietary fatty acid intake.

  13. 2011 and 2012 Early Careers Achievement Awards: Placental programming: how the maternal environment can impact placental function.

    PubMed

    Vonnahme, K A; Lemley, C O; Shukla, P; O'Rourke, S T

    2013-06-01

    Proper establishment of the placenta is important for fetal survival; however, placental adaptations to inadequate maternal nutrition or other stressors are imperative for fetal growth to be optimal. The effects of maternal nutritional status and activity level on placental vascular function and uteroplacental blood flows are important to understand as improper placental function leads to reduced growth of the fetus. In environments where fetal growth can be compromised, potential therapeutics may augment placental function and delivery of nutrients to improve offspring performance during postnatal life. Factors that could enhance placental function include supplementation of specific nutrients, such as protein, hormone supplements, such as indolamines, and increased activity levels of the dam. To understand the mechanism of how the maternal environment can impact uterine or umbilical blood flows, assessment of placental vascular reactivity has been studied in several large animal models. As we begin to understand how the maternal environment impacts uterine and umbilical blood flows and other uteroplacental hemodynamic parameters, development of management methods and therapeutics for proper fetal growth can be achieved.

  14. Maternal testosterone and placental function: Effect of electroacupuncture on placental expression of angiogenic markers and fetal growth.

    PubMed

    Fornes, Romina; Hu, Min; Maliqueo, Manuel; Kokosar, Milana; Benrick, Anna; Carr, David; Billig, Håkan; Jansson, Thomas; Manni, Luigi; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet

    2016-09-15

    Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have elevated circulating androgens during pregnancy and are at an increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes. Here we tested the hypotheses that maternal androgen excess decrease placental and fetal growth, and placental expression of markers of steroidogenesis, angiogenesis and sympathetic activity, and that acupuncture with low-frequency electrical stimulation prevents these changes. Pregnant rats were exposed to vehicle or testosterone on gestational day (GD)15-19. Low-frequency electroacupuncture (EA) or handling, as a control for the EA procedure, was given to control or testosterone exposed dams on GD16-20. On GD21, blood pressure was measured and maternal blood, fetuses and placentas collected. Placental steroid receptor expression and proteins involved in angiogenic, neurotrophic and adrenergic signaling were analyzed. EA did not affect any variables in control rats except maternal serum corticosterone, which was reduced. EA in testosterone exposed dams compared with controls increased systolic pressure by 30%, decreased circulating norepinephrine and corticosterone, fetal and placental weight and placental VEGFR1 and proNGF protein expression, and increased the VEGFA/VEGFR1 ratio, mature NGF (mNGF) and the mNGF/proNGF ratio. In conclusion, low-frequency EA in control animals did not have any negative influence on any of the studied variables. In contrast, EA in pregnant dams exposed to testosterone increased blood pressure and impaired placental growth and function, leading to decreased fetal growth. PMID:27208621

  15. Partial separation of platelet and placental adenosine receptors from adenosine A2-like binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Zolnierowicz, S.; Work, C.; Hutchison, K.; Fox, I.H. )

    1990-04-01

    The ubiquitous adenosine A2-like binding protein obscures the binding properties of adenosine receptors assayed with 5'-N-({sup 3}H)ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (({sup 3}H)NECA). To solve this problem, we developed a rapid and simple method to separate adenosine receptors from the adenosine A2-like binding protein. Human platelet and placental membranes were solubilized with 1% 3-((3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio)-1-propanesulfonate. The soluble platelet extract was precipitated with polyethylene glycol and the fraction enriched in adenosine receptors was isolated from the precipitate by differential centrifugation. The adenosine A2-like binding protein was removed from the soluble placental extract with hydroxylapatite and adenosine receptors were precipitated with polyethylene glycol. The specificity of the ({sup 3}H)NECA binding is typical of an adenosine A2 receptor for platelets and an adenosine A1 receptor for placenta. This method leads to enrichment of adenosine A2 receptors for platelets and adenosine A1 receptors for placenta. This provides a useful preparation technique for pharmacologic studies of adenosine receptors.

  16. Placental Cadmium Levels Are Associated with Increased Preeclampsia Risk

    PubMed Central

    Laine, Jessica E.; Ray, Paul; Bodnar, Wanda; Cable, Peter H.; Boggess, Kim; Offenbacher, Steven; Fry, Rebecca C.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental exposure to heavy metals is a potentially modifiable risk factor for preeclampsia (PE). Toxicologically, there are known interactions between the toxic metal cadmium (Cd) and essential metals such as selenium (Se) and zinc (Zn), as these metals can protect against the toxicity of Cd. As they relate to preeclampsia, the interaction between Cd and these essential metals is unknown. The aims of the present study were to measure placental levels of Cd, Se, and Zn in a cohort of 172 pregnant women from across the southeast US and to examine associations of metals levels with the odds of PE in a nested case-control design. Logistic regressions were performed to assess odds ratios (OR) for PE with exposure to Cd controlling for confounders, as well as interactive models with Se or Zn. The mean placental Cd level was 3.6 ng/g, ranging from 0.52 to 14.5 ng/g. There was an increased odds ratio for PE in relationship to placental levels of Cd (OR = 1.5; 95% CI: 1.1–2.2). The Cd-associated OR for PE increased when analyzed in relationship to lower placental Se levels (OR = 2.0; 95% CI: 1.1–3.5) and decreased with higher placental Se levels (OR = 0.98; 95% CI: 0.5–1.9). Similarly, under conditions of lower placental Zn, the Cd-associated OR for PE was elevated (OR = 1.8; 95% CI: 0.8–3.9), whereas with higher placental Zn it was reduced (OR = 1.3; 95% CI: 0.8–2.0). Data from this pilot study suggest that essential metals may play an important role in reducing the odds of Cd-associated preeclampsia and that replication in a larger cohort is warranted. PMID:26422011

  17. Labor Inhibits Placental Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    LAGER, Susanne; AYE, Irving L.M.H.; GACCIOLI, Francesca; RAMIREZ, Vanessa I.; JANSSON, Thomas; POWELL, Theresa L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Labor induces a myriad of changes in placental gene expression. These changes may represent a physiological adaptation inhibiting placental cellular processes associated with a high demand for oxygen and energy (e.g., protein synthesis and active transport) thereby promoting oxygen and glucose transfer to the fetus. We hypothesized that mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling, a positive regulator of trophoblast protein synthesis and amino acid transport, is inhibited by labor. Methods Placental tissue was collected from healthy, term pregnancies (n=15 no-labor; n=12 labor). Activation of Caspase-1, IRS1/Akt, STAT, mTOR, and inflammatory signaling pathways was determined by Western blot. NFκB p65 and PPARγ DNA binding activity was measured in isolated nuclei. Results Labor increased Caspase-1 activation and mTOR complex 2 signaling, as measured by phosphorylation of Akt (S473). However, mTORC1 signaling was inhibited in response to labor as evidenced by decreased phosphorylation of mTOR (S2448) and 4EBP1 (T37/46 and T70). Labor also decreased NFκB and PPARγ DNA binding activity, while having no effect on IRS1 or STAT signaling pathway. Discussion and conclusion Several placental signaling pathways are affected by labor, which has implications for experimental design in studies of placental signaling. Inhibition of placental mTORC1 signaling in response to labor may serve to down-regulate protein synthesis and amino acid transport, processes that account for a large share of placental oxygen and glucose consumption. We speculate that this response preserves glucose and oxygen for transfer to the fetus during the stressful events of labor. PMID:25454472

  18. The significance of placental ratios in pregnancies complicated by small for gestational age, preeclampsia, and gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Sun; Cho, Soo Hyun; Kwon, Han Sung; Sohn, In Sook

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate the placental weight, volume, and density, and investigate the significance of placental ratios in pregnancies complicated by small for gestational age (SGA), preeclampsia (PE), and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Methods Two hundred and fifty-four pregnant women were enrolled from August 2005 through July 2013. Participants were divided into four groups: control (n=82), SGA (n=37), PE (n=102), and GDM (n=33). The PE group was classified as PE without intrauterine growth restriction (n=65) and PE with intrauterine growth restriction (n=37). Birth weight, placental weight, placental volume, placental density, and placental ratios including birth weight/placental weight ratio (BPW) and birth weight/placental volume ratio (BPV) were compared between groups. Results Birth weight, placental weight, and placental volume were lower in the SGA group than in the control group. However, the BPW and BPV did not differ between the two groups. Birth weight, placental weight, placental volume, BPW, and BPV were all significantly lower in the PE group than in the control group. Compared with the control group, birth weight, BPW, and BPV were higher in the GDM group, whereas placental weight and volume did not differ in the two groups. Placental density was not significantly different among the four groups. Conclusion Placental ratios based on placental weight, placental volume, placental density, and birth weight are helpful in understanding the pathophysiology of complicated pregnancies. Moreover, they can be used as predictors of pregnancy complications. PMID:25264525

  19. Bidirectional Transfer Study of Polystyrene Nanoparticles across the Placental Barrier in an ex Vivo Human Placental Perfusion Model

    PubMed Central

    Grafmueller, Stefanie; Manser, Pius; Diener, Liliane; Diener, Pierre-André; Maeder-Althaus, Xenia; Maurizi, Lionel; Jochum, Wolfram; Krug, Harald F.; Buerki-Thurnherr, Tina; von Mandach, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Background Nanoparticle exposure in utero might not be a major concern yet, but it could become more important with the increasing application of nanomaterials in consumer and medical products. Several epidemiologic and in vitro studies have shown that nanoparticles can have potential toxic effects. However, nanoparticles also offer the opportunity to develop new therapeutic strategies to treat specifically either the pregnant mother or the fetus. Previous studies mainly addressed whether nanoparticles are able to cross the placental barrier. However, the transport mechanisms underlying nanoparticle translocation across the placenta are still unknown. Objectives In this study we examined which transport mechanisms underlie the placental transfer of nanoparticles. Methods We used the ex vivo human placental perfusion model to analyze the bidirectional transfer of plain and carboxylate modified polystyrene particles in a size range between 50 and 300 nm. Results We observed that the transport of polystyrene particles in the fetal to maternal direction was significantly higher than for the maternal to fetal direction. Regardless of their ability to cross the placental barrier and the direction of perfusion, all polystyrene particles accumulated in the syncytiotrophoblast of the placental tissue. Conclusions Our results indicate that the syncytiotrophoblast is the key player in regulating nanoparticle transport across the human placenta. The main mechanism underlying this translocation is not based on passive diffusion, but is likely to involve an active, energy-dependent transport pathway. These findings will be important for reproductive toxicology as well as for pharmaceutical engineering of new drug carriers. Citation Grafmueller S, Manser P, Diener L, Diener PA, Maeder-Althaus X, Maurizi L, Jochum W, Krug HF, Buerki-Thurnherr T, von Mandach U, Wick P. 2015. Bidirectional transfer study of polystyrene nanoparticles across the placental barrier in an ex vivo human

  20. Heterogeneous models place the root of the placental mammal phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Claire C; Foster, Peter G; Webb, Andrew E; Pisani, Davide; McInerney, James O; O'Connell, Mary J

    2013-09-01

    Heterogeneity among life traits in mammals has resulted in considerable phylogenetic conflict, particularly concerning the position of the placental root. Layered upon this are gene- and lineage-specific variation in amino acid substitution rates and compositional biases. Life trait variations that may impact upon mutational rates are longevity, metabolic rate, body size, and germ line generation time. Over the past 12 years, three main conflicting hypotheses have emerged for the placement of the placental root. These hypotheses place the Atlantogenata (common ancestor of Xenarthra plus Afrotheria), the Afrotheria, or the Xenarthra as the sister group to all other placental mammals. Model adequacy is critical for accurate tree reconstruction and by failing to account for these compositional and character exchange heterogeneities across the tree and data set, previous studies have not provided a strongly supported hypothesis for the placental root. For the first time, models that accommodate both tree and data set heterogeneity have been applied to mammal data. Here, we show the impact of accurate model assignment and the importance of data sets in accommodating model parameters while maintaining the power to reject competing hypotheses. Through these sophisticated methods, we demonstrate the importance of model adequacy, data set power and provide strong support for the Atlantogenata over other competing hypotheses for the position of the placental root.

  1. Important aspects of placental-specific gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Melissa R; Albers, Renee E; Keoni, Chanel; Kulkarni-Datar, Kashmira; Natale, David R; Brown, Thomas L

    2014-10-15

    The placenta is a unique and highly complex organ that develops only during pregnancy and is essential for growth and survival of the developing fetus. The placenta provides the vital exchange of gases and wastes, the necessary nutrients for fetal development, acts as immune barrier that protects against maternal rejection, and produces numerous hormones and growth factors that promote fetal maturity to regulate pregnancy until parturition. Abnormal placental development is a major underlying cause of pregnancy-associated disorders that often result in preterm birth. Defects in placental stem cell propagation, growth, and differentiation are the major factors that affect embryonic and fetal well-being and dramatically increase the risk of pregnancy complications. Understanding the processes that regulate placentation is important in determining the underlying factors behind abnormal placental development. The ability to manipulate genes in a placenta-specific manner provides a unique tool to analyze development and eliminates potentially confounding results that can occur with traditional gene knockouts. Trophoblast stem cells and mouse embryos are not overly amenable to traditional gene transfer techniques. Most viral vectors, however, have a low infection rate and often lead to mosaic transgenesis. Although the traditional method of embryo transfer is intrauterine surgical implantation, the methodology reported here, combining lentiviral blastocyst infection and nonsurgical embryo transfer, leads to highly efficient and placental-specific gene transfer. Numerous advantages of our optimized procedures include increased investigator safety, a reduction in animal stress, rapid and noninvasive embryo transfer, and higher a rate of pregnancy and live birth.

  2. Regional changes of placental vascularization in preeclampsia: a review.

    PubMed

    Sahay, Akriti S; Sundrani, Deepali P; Joshi, Sadhana R

    2015-08-01

    Preeclampsia is characterized by vascular dysfunction and results in maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. The placenta plays a critical role in the growth and development of the fetus, and recent studies indicate that placental architecture, oxygen availability, and oxidative stress indices vary across different regions of the placenta. Our earlier studies have reported altered maternal angiogenesis and differential placental gene expression and methylation patterns of angiogenic factors in women with preeclampsia when compared with normotensive women. We have also demonstrated lower maternal and placental neurotrophin (NT) levels in women with preeclampsia. Studies suggest that oxidative stress is associated with proteases like matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and growth factors like NTs and angiogenic factors known to be involved in the process of angiogenesis. Recently, we have reported regionwise differential oxidative stress, antioxidant enzyme activity, and NT levels in placenta from normotensive control women and women with preeclampsia. The current review describes the regional changes in the placenta and highlights the role of placental oxidative stress in influencing regional differences in the expression of angiogenic factors, MMPs, and NTs. This review discusses the need for further research on various growth factors and proteins involved in the process of placental development across different regions of the placenta. This would help to understand whether regional differences in these factors affect the growth and development of the fetus. PMID:26269153

  3. MicroRNAs in Human Placental Development and Pregnancy Complications

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Guodong; Brkić, Jelena; Hayder, Heyam; Peng, Chun

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs, which function as critical posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression by promoting mRNA degradation and translational inhibition. Placenta expresses many ubiquitous as well as specific miRNAs. These miRNAs regulate trophoblast cell differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, invasion/migration, and angiogenesis, suggesting that miRNAs play important roles during placental development. Aberrant miRNAs expression has been linked to pregnancy complications, such as preeclampsia. Recent research of placental miRNAs focuses on identifying placental miRNA species, examining differential expression of miRNAs between placentas from normal and compromised pregnancies, and uncovering the function of miRNAs in the placenta. More studies are required to further understand the functional significance of miRNAs in placental development and to explore the possibility of using miRNAs as biomarkers and therapeutic targets for pregnancy-related disorders. In this paper, we reviewed the current knowledge about the expression and function of miRNAs in placental development, and propose future directions for miRNA studies. PMID:23528856

  4. Maternal protein restriction regulates IGF2 system in placental labyrinth.

    PubMed

    Gao, Haijun; Sathishkumar, Kunju Reddiar; Yallampalli, Uma; Balakrishnan, Meena; Li, Xilong; Wu, Guoyao; Yallampalli, Chandra

    2012-01-01

    This study was to test the hypothesis that altered IGF2 system in the placental labyrinth zone (LZ) impairs feto-placental growth in response to maternal protein restriction. Rats were fed a 20% protein diet and an isocaloric 6 % protein diet (LP) from day 1 to days 14, 18, or 21 of pregnancy. The effects of diet, gender of placenta and fetus, and day of pregnancy on placental weight, fetal weight, and expression of the IGF2 axis in the placental LZ and amino acids in maternal plasma were analyzed. Growth restriction occurred in both female and male fetuses by LP, coincident with impaired LZ growth and efficiency. The expression of Igf2, Igf2P0, Igf1r, Igf2r, Insr, Igfbp1, and Igfbp2 in placental LZ were affected by diet, gender and/or day of pregnancy. Concentrations of total essential amino acids and total nonessential amino acids were reduced and increased, respectively, in maternal plasma of LP-fed rats. These results indicate that adaptation of the IGF2 system in rat LZ occurs in a sex- and time-dependent manner in response to maternal protein restriction; however, these adaptations cannot prevent the growth restriction of both male and female fetuses during late pregnancy.

  5. Heterogeneous Models Place the Root of the Placental Mammal Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Claire C.; Foster, Peter G.; Webb, Andrew E.; Pisani, Davide; McInerney, James O.; O’Connell, Mary J.

    2013-01-01

    Heterogeneity among life traits in mammals has resulted in considerable phylogenetic conflict, particularly concerning the position of the placental root. Layered upon this are gene- and lineage-specific variation in amino acid substitution rates and compositional biases. Life trait variations that may impact upon mutational rates are longevity, metabolic rate, body size, and germ line generation time. Over the past 12 years, three main conflicting hypotheses have emerged for the placement of the placental root. These hypotheses place the Atlantogenata (common ancestor of Xenarthra plus Afrotheria), the Afrotheria, or the Xenarthra as the sister group to all other placental mammals. Model adequacy is critical for accurate tree reconstruction and by failing to account for these compositional and character exchange heterogeneities across the tree and data set, previous studies have not provided a strongly supported hypothesis for the placental root. For the first time, models that accommodate both tree and data set heterogeneity have been applied to mammal data. Here, we show the impact of accurate model assignment and the importance of data sets in accommodating model parameters while maintaining the power to reject competing hypotheses. Through these sophisticated methods, we demonstrate the importance of model adequacy, data set power and provide strong support for the Atlantogenata over other competing hypotheses for the position of the placental root. PMID:23813979

  6. Assisted reproductive technique increases the risk of placental polyp.

    PubMed

    Baba, Tsuyoshi; Endo, Toshiaki; Ikeda, Keiko; Shimizu, Ayumi; Morishita, Miyuki; Kuno, Yoshika; Honnma, Hiroyuki; Kiya, Tamotsu; Ishioka, Shin-ichi; Saito, Tsuyoshi

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the risk factors and outcomes of placental polyp. This retrospective study was conducted on 1645 patients delivered or aborted in Sapporo Medical University from 2007 through 2011. Transvaginal color Doppler ultrasonography, hysteroscopy, contrast-enhanced MRI or 3D-CT angiography were performed. There were 1532 deliveries and 113 abortions. Seventy-one (4.3%) were ART-conceived and the remaining 1574 (95.7%) were non-ART pregnancies. Fifteen (0.91%) cases were confirmed as having placental polyp. Nine cases of placental polyp were identified among the 1574 (0.57%) as non-ART-related pregnancies, and 6 were identified among the 71 (8.5%) as ART-related pregnancies. Thus, pregnancies achieved through ART showed 20x greater incidence of complicating placental polyp than pregnancies achieved through without ART (p = 9.02 × 10(-6); odds ratio, 19.59; 95% confidence interval, 5.27-72.84, logistic regression analysis). Evaluation of blood flow within the polyp showed that in five of seven patients with low blood flow, the polyps spontaneously dropped off 79-115 days postpartum. Thus, ART-related pregnancies may be a risk factor of placental polyp, and spontaneous drop-off of the polyp is often observed in cases with low blood flow within the mass.

  7. Blocking Endogenous Leukemia Inhibitory Factor During Placental Development in Mice Leads to Abnormal Placentation and Pregnancy Loss

    PubMed Central

    Winship, Amy; Correia, Jeanne; Krishnan, Tara; Menkhorst, Ellen; Cuman, Carly; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Nicola, Nicos A.; Dimitriadis, Evdokia

    2015-01-01

    The placenta forms the interface between the maternal and fetal circulation and is critical for the establishment of a healthy pregnancy. Specialized trophoblast cells derived from the embryonic trophectoderm play a pivotal role in the establishment of the placenta. Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) is one of the predominant cytokines present in the placenta during early pregnancy. LIF has been shown to regulate trophoblast adhesion and invasion in vitro, however its precise role in vivo is unknown. We hypothesized that LIF would be required for normal placental development in mice. LIF and LIFRα were immunolocalized to placental trophoblasts and fetal vessels in mouse implantation sites during mid-gestation. Temporally blocking LIF action during specific periods of placental development via intraperitoneal administration of our specific LIFRα antagonist, PEGLA, resulted in abnormal placental trophoblast and vascular morphology and reduced activated STAT3 but not ERK. Numerous genes regulating angiogenesis and oxidative stress were altered in the placenta in response to LIF inhibition. Pregnancy viability was also significantly compromised in PEGLA treated mice. Our data suggest that LIF plays an important role in placentation in vivo and the maintenance of healthy pregnancy. PMID:26272398

  8. Human placental coated vesicles contain receptor-bound transferrin.

    PubMed Central

    Booth, A G; Wilson, M J

    1981-01-01

    Human placental coated vesicles have been purified by a method involving sucrose-density-gradient centrifugation and treatment with wheat-germ agglutinin. These preparations were free of contamination by placental microvillus fragments. Crossed immunoelectrophoresis demonstrated that the coated vesicles contained a single serum protein, which was identified as transferrin. This transferrin was only observed after the vesicles were treated with a non-ionic detergent, and its behaviour during crossed hydrophobic-interaction immunoelectrophoresis suggested that a large proportion of it was receptor-bound. No other serum proteins, including immunoglobulin G, could be detected in these preparations. Receptor-bound transferrin was the only antigen common to placental coated vesicles and microvilli, implying that other plasma-membrane proteins are excluded from the region of membrane involved in coated-vesicle formation. Images PLATE 2 PLATE 1 Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:6272755

  9. Non-placental causes of intrauterine growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Hendrix, Nancy; Berghella, Vincenzo

    2008-06-01

    Placental insufficiency, in some form or fashion, is associated with the majority of cases of intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). There are numerous causes of IUGR which are not caused primarily by placental insufficiency, but indirectly lead to it. The causes of IUGR can be subdivided into fetal and maternal etiologies. The fetal etiologies consist of genetic diseases, congenital malformations, infections, multiple gestations, and placental/cord abnormalities. The maternal etiologies are categorized as follows: (1) decreased uteroplacental blood flow, (2) reduced blood volume, (3) decreased oxygen carrying capacity, (4) nutrition status, (5) teratogens, and (6) miscellaneous causes such as short interpregnancy intervals, race, maternal age, and low socioeconomic status. Knowledge of the etiologies of fetal growth restriction is essential, so that future care can be targeted at prevention. There are several primary and secondary prevention strategies that can be adopted.

  10. Animal models of human placentation--a review.

    PubMed

    Carter, A M

    2007-04-01

    This review examines the strengths and weaknesses of animal models of human placentation and pays particular attention to the mouse and non-human primates. Analogies can be drawn between mouse and human in placental cell types and genes controlling placental development. There are, however, substantive differences, including a different mode of implantation, a prominent yolk sac placenta, and fewer placental hormones in the mouse. Crucially, trophoblast invasion is very limited in the mouse and transformation of uterine arteries depends on maternal factors. The mouse also has a short gestation and delivers poorly developed young. Guinea pig is a good alternative rodent model and among the few species known to develop pregnancy toxaemia. The sheep is well established as a model in fetal physiology but is of limited value for placental research. The ovine placenta is epitheliochorial, there is no trophoblast invasion of uterine vessels, and the immunology of pregnancy may be quite different. We conclude that continued research on non-human primates is needed to clarify embryonic-endometrial interactions. The interstitial implantation of human is unusual, but the initial interaction between trophoblast and endometrium is similar in macaques and baboons, as is the subsequent lacunar stage. The absence of interstitial trophoblast cells in the monkey is an important difference from human placentation. However, there is a strong resemblance in the way spiral arteries are invaded and transformed in the macaque, baboon and human. Non-human primates are therefore important models for understanding the dysfunction that has been linked to pre-eclampsia and fetal growth restriction. Models that are likely to be established in the wake of comparative genomics include the marmoset, tree shrew, hedgehog tenrec and nine-banded armadillo.

  11. Sex-Specific Placental Responses in Fetal Development

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The placenta is an ephemeral but critical organ for the survival of all eutherian mammals and marsupials. It is the primary messenger system between the mother and fetus, where communicational signals, nutrients, waste, gases, and extrinsic factors are exchanged. Although the placenta may buffer the fetus from various environmental insults, placental dysfunction might also contribute to detrimental developmental origins of adult health and disease effects. The placenta of one sex over the other might possess greater ability to respond and buffer against environmental insults. Given the potential role of the placenta in effecting the lifetime health of the offspring, it is not surprising that there has been a resurging interest in this organ, including the Human Placental Project launched by the National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development. In this review, we will compare embryological development of the laboratory mouse and human chorioallantoic placentae. Next, evidence that various species, including humans, exhibit normal sex-dependent structural and functional placental differences will be examined followed by how in utero environmental changes (nutritional state, stress, and exposure to environmental chemicals) might interact with fetal sex to affect this organ. Recent data also suggest that paternal state impacts placental function in a sex-dependent manner. The research to date linking placental maladaptive responses and later developmental origins of adult health and disease effects will be explored. Finally, we will focus on how sex chromosomes and epimutations may contribute to sex-dependent differences in placental function, the unanswered questions, and future directions that warrant further consideration. PMID:26241064

  12. Human Placental MicroRNAs and Preeclampsia1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dong-bao; Wang, Wen

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT MicroRNAs are a class of noncoding small RNAs that regulate the expression of nearly 30% of all the human genes and participate in all fundamental cell processes. Genome-wide analysis has revealed that human placenta expresses more than 600 miRNA species, including placenta-specific ones with high levels of expression. Comparative analysis also has revealed many differentially expressed miRNAs with either high or low levels of expression in human placentas from normal versus preeclamptic pregnancies, indicating an important role of miRNAs in normal and pathological placental physiology. Although limited information is currently available as to how miRNA regulates human placental development and function, there are studies suggesting that preeclampsia-associated differentially expressed miRNAs possess critical roles in regulating placental development and function via targeting specific genes with diverse known functions. Herein we summarize the current findings regarding the expression of placental miRNAs and their function, especially in the trophoblast cells. We have recently found that the angiogenesis-associated miR-17-family miRNAs are upregulated in preeclamptic compared with normotensive placentas and they target the ephrin-B2/Eph receptor B4 (EPHB4) system. Because ephrin-B2 and EPHB4 has been previously shown to play a crucial role in trophoblast invasion into maternal spiral artery and vascular patterning during early human placental development, the miR-17-ephrin-B2/EPHB4 pathway seems to be a novel miRNA pathway for regulating normal and aberrant placental development during preeclampsia. PMID:23575145

  13. Interleukin-11 alters placentation and causes preeclampsia features in mice

    PubMed Central

    Winship, Amy L.; Koga, Kaori; Menkhorst, Ellen; Van Sinderen, Michelle; Rainczuk, Katarzyna; Nagai, Miwako; Cuman, Carly; Yap, Joanne; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Simmons, David; Young, Morag J.; Dimitriadis, Evdokia

    2015-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is a pregnancy-specific disorder characterized by hypertension and proteinuria after 20 wk gestation. Abnormal extravillous trophoblast (EVT) invasion and remodeling of uterine spiral arterioles is thought to contribute to PE development. Interleukin-11 (IL11) impedes human EVT invasion in vitro and is elevated in PE decidua in women. We demonstrate that IL11 administered to mice causes development of PE features. Immunohistochemistry shows IL11 compromises trophoblast invasion, spiral artery remodeling, and placentation, leading to increased systolic blood pressure (SBP), proteinuria, and intrauterine growth restriction, although nonpregnant mice were unaffected. Real-time PCR array analysis identified pregnancy-associated plasma protein A2 (PAPPA2), associated with PE in women, as an IL11 regulated target. IL11 increased PAPPA2 serum and placental tissue levels in mice. In vitro, IL11 compromised primary human EVT invasion, whereas siRNA knockdown of PAPPA2 alleviated the effect. Genes regulating uterine natural killer (uNK) recruitment and differentiation were down-regulated and uNK cells were reduced after IL11 treatment in mice. IL11 withdrawal in mice at onset of PE features reduced SBP and proteinuria to control levels and alleviated placental labyrinth defects. In women, placental IL11 immunostaining levels increased in PE pregnancies and in serum collected from women before development of early-onset PE, shown by ELISA. These results indicate that elevated IL11 levels result in physiological changes at the maternal–fetal interface, contribute to abnormal placentation, and lead to the development of PE. Targeting placental IL11 may provide a new treatment option for PE. PMID:26655736

  14. Interleukin-11 alters placentation and causes preeclampsia features in mice.

    PubMed

    Winship, Amy L; Koga, Kaori; Menkhorst, Ellen; Van Sinderen, Michelle; Rainczuk, Katarzyna; Nagai, Miwako; Cuman, Carly; Yap, Joanne; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Simmons, David; Young, Morag J; Dimitriadis, Evdokia

    2015-12-29

    Preeclampsia (PE) is a pregnancy-specific disorder characterized by hypertension and proteinuria after 20 wk gestation. Abnormal extravillous trophoblast (EVT) invasion and remodeling of uterine spiral arterioles is thought to contribute to PE development. Interleukin-11 (IL11) impedes human EVT invasion in vitro and is elevated in PE decidua in women. We demonstrate that IL11 administered to mice causes development of PE features. Immunohistochemistry shows IL11 compromises trophoblast invasion, spiral artery remodeling, and placentation, leading to increased systolic blood pressure (SBP), proteinuria, and intrauterine growth restriction, although nonpregnant mice were unaffected. Real-time PCR array analysis identified pregnancy-associated plasma protein A2 (PAPPA2), associated with PE in women, as an IL11 regulated target. IL11 increased PAPPA2 serum and placental tissue levels in mice. In vitro, IL11 compromised primary human EVT invasion, whereas siRNA knockdown of PAPPA2 alleviated the effect. Genes regulating uterine natural killer (uNK) recruitment and differentiation were down-regulated and uNK cells were reduced after IL11 treatment in mice. IL11 withdrawal in mice at onset of PE features reduced SBP and proteinuria to control levels and alleviated placental labyrinth defects. In women, placental IL11 immunostaining levels increased in PE pregnancies and in serum collected from women before development of early-onset PE, shown by ELISA. These results indicate that elevated IL11 levels result in physiological changes at the maternal-fetal interface, contribute to abnormal placentation, and lead to the development of PE. Targeting placental IL11 may provide a new treatment option for PE. PMID:26655736

  15. Dietary protein during gestation affects placental development in heifers.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, T M; Micke, G C; Magalhaes, R S; Phillips, N J; Perry, V E A

    2009-09-01

    The influence of nutritional protein during the first and second trimesters of pregnancy on placental measures at term and caruncle numbers in the uteri of adult offspring was determined in composite beef heifers. At artificial insemination (AI), heifers were divided by weight and composite genotype into four dietary treatment groups, identified by the level of protein components fed during the first and second trimesters: high/high (HH), high/low (HL), low/high (LH), low/low (LL). Expelled placentas were collected and weighed, and cotyledons were dissected, counted, weighed, and measured. Uteri from mature female offspring were dissected at slaughter and caruncles counted. The number of cotyledons in the expelled placenta was increased by high dietary protein in the second trimester (P=0.02) and varied with genotype (P=0.03). Placental weight was influenced by maternal undernutrition during early gestation dependent on dam genotype (P=0.001). Placental efficiency, as determined by calf weight:placental weight, increased with dam age (P=0.03). Calf birth weight was closely associated with placental weight (P=0.002) and cotyledonary weight (P=0.001) and surface area (P=0.04), but not with the number of cotyledons. Leptin concentrations during early (R=-0.29) and late gestation (R=-0.25) correlated with placental weight, and Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins throughout gestation correlated with the number of cotyledons (R=-0.28 to-0.33). The number of uterine caruncles in the nonpregnant adult offspring did not correlate with the dam's genotype, nutrition treatment, or cotyledon number in the expelled placenta.

  16. Infant sex-specific placental cadmium and DNA methylation associations

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanty, April F.; Farin, Fred M.; Bammler, Theo K.; MacDonald, James W.; Afsharinejad, Zahra; Burbacher, Thomas M.; Siscovick, David S.; and others

    2015-04-15

    Background: Recent evidence suggests that maternal cadmium (Cd) burden and fetal growth associations may vary by fetal sex. However, mechanisms contributing to these differences are unknown. Objectives: Among 24 maternal-infant pairs, we investigated infant sex-specific associations between placental Cd and placental genome-wide DNA methylation. Methods: We used ANOVA models to examine sex-stratified associations of placental Cd (dichotomized into high/low Cd using sex-specific Cd median cutoffs) with DNA methylation at each cytosine-phosphate-guanine site or region. Statistical significance was defined using a false discovery rate cutoff (<0.10). Results: Medians of placental Cd among females and males were 5 and 2 ng/g, respectively. Among females, three sites (near ADP-ribosylation factor-like 9 (ARL9), siah E3 ubiquitin protein ligase family member 3 (SIAH3), and heparin sulfate (glucosamine) 3-O-sulfotransferase 4 (HS3ST4) and one region on chromosome 7 (including carnitine O-octanoyltransferase (CROT) and TP5S target 1 (TP53TG1)) were hypomethylated in high Cd placentas. Among males, high placental Cd was associated with methylation of three sites, two (hypomethylated) near MDS1 and EVI1 complex locus (MECOM) and one (hypermethylated) near spalt-like transcription factor 1 (SALL1), and two regions (both hypomethylated, one on chromosome 3 including MECOM and another on chromosome 8 including rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) 10 (ARHGEF10). Differentially methylated sites were at or close to transcription start sites of genes involved in cell damage response (SIAH3, HS3ST4, TP53TG1) in females and cell differentiation, angiogenesis and organ development (MECOM, SALL1) in males. Conclusions: Our preliminary study supports infant sex-specific placental Cd-DNA methylation associations, possibly accounting for previously reported differences in Cd-fetal growth associations across fetal sex. Larger studies are needed to replicate and extend these

  17. Sources for Comparative Studies of Placentation. II. Genomic Resources

    PubMed Central

    Wildman, Derek E.

    2008-01-01

    The genomes of dozens of placental mammal species are now publicly available. These genome sequences have the potential to provide insight into the development and evolution of the placenta. In particular, the variable anatomy of the placenta has likely been affected by natural selection on the genomes of living and extinct mammals. In this note the current availability of mammal genome sequences is reviewed, and strengths and limitations of these data are discussed. Additionally, museums, zoos, and commercial entities are available to provide genomic resources to the placental research community. Recommendations for tissue storage conditions of placentas in genomic research are given. PMID:18155141

  18. Concurrent conjunctivitis and placentitis in aborted bovine fetuses.

    PubMed

    Murray, R D

    1991-11-01

    Consistent histopathological lesions were found in 10 out of 136 aborted fetuses examined during a three year period, using a multi-disciplinary diagnostic investigation technique. Fetuses exhibited a generalized mononuclear inflammatory cell infiltration, accompanied by distinctive lesions of conjunctival hyperplasia and goblet cell formation, alveolitis, and necrotic placentitis. In two cases where amnion was also examined, a chronic amnionitis was present. No consistent laboratory findings could be related to these cases. The fetal and placental lesions described were similar to those associated with experimental inoculation of Ureaplasma diversum in pregnant cows, and with field isolations of the same organism in aborting cattle.

  19. Determination of benzophenones in human placental tissue samples by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vela-Soria, F; Jiménez-Díaz, I; Rodríguez-Gómez, R; Zafra-Gómez, A; Ballesteros, O; Navalón, A; Vílchez, J L; Fernández, M F; Olea, N

    2011-09-30

    Benzophenones (BPs) are a family of compounds widely used to protect the skin and hair from UV irradiation. Despite human exposure to BPs through dermal application of products containing sunscreen agents and the increasing evidence that BPs are able to interfere with endocrine systems, few studies have examined the occurrence of BPs in humans. In this work, we propose a new liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method to determine six BPs, namely, benzophenone-1 (BP-1), benzophenone-2 (BP-2), benzophenone-3 (BP-3), benzophenone-6 (BP-6), benzophenone-8 (BP-8) and 4-hydroxybenzophenone (4-OH-BP) in human placental tissue samples. The method involves an extraction step of the analytes from the samples using ethyl acetate, followed by a clean-up step using centrifugation prior to their quantification by LC-MS/MS using an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) interface in the positive mode. Benzophenone-d(10) (BP-d(10)) was used as surrogate. Found detection limits (LOD) ranged from 0.07 to 0.3 ng g(-1) and quantification limits (LOQ) from 0.3 to 1.0 ng g(-1), while inter- and intra-day variability was under 5%. The method was validated using standard addition calibration and a recovery assay. Recovery rates for spiked samples ranged from 98 to 104%. This method was satisfactorily applied for the determination of BPs in 16 placental tissue samples collected from women who live in Granada (Spain).

  20. Placental CLIC3 is increased in fetal growth restriction and pre-eclampsia affected human pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Murthi, P; Stevenson, J L; Money, T T; Borg, A J; Brennecke, S P; Gude, N M

    2012-09-01

    Chloride intracellular channel (CLIC) proteins constitute a subgroup of the glutathione-S-transferase (GSTs) superfamily. In humans, the CLIC family of proteins consists of six members, designated CLIC 1-6, which have a conserved C-terminal 240 residue module and one major transmembrane domain. CLIC proteins regulate fundamental cellular processes including regulation of chloride ion concentration, stabilization of cell membrane potential, trans-epithelial transport, regulation of cell volume and stimulation of apoptotic processes in response to cellular stress. Previously, we described the expression profile of a member of the CLIC family of proteins, CLIC3, in human placentae and fetal membranes. In the current study, we determined CLIC3 expression in placentae from pregnancies complicated with either fetal growth restriction (FGR, n=19), pre-eclampsia (PE, n=16) or both FGR and PE combined (n=12) compared to gestation-matched controls (n=13) using real-time PCR and a CLIC3 specific immunoassay. Significantly increased CLIC3 mRNA and protein were detected in placental extracts from pregnancies with FGR, PE and PE with FGR compared to controls. Our results suggest that increased expression of CLIC3 may play a role in abnormal placental function associated with the human pregnancy disorders FGR and PE. PMID:22795578

  1. The Comparison of Adipose Stem Cell and Placental Stem Cell in Secretion Characteristics and in Facial Antiaging

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yan; Guo, Shilei; Wei, Cui; Li, Honglan; Chen, Lei; Yin, Chang; Zhang, Chuansen

    2016-01-01

    Background. Mesenchymal stem cells are the most commonly used seed cells in biomedical research and tissue engineering. Their secretory proteins have also been proven to play an important role in tissue healing. Methods. We isolated adipose stem cells and placental stem cells and performed analysis examining characteristics. The secretory proteins were extracted from conditioned medium and analyzed by MALDI-TOF/TOF. The antiaging effect of conditioned mediums was evaluated by the results of facial skin application. Results. Adipose stem cells and placental stem cells were found to be very similar in their surface markers and multipotency. The specific proteins secreted from adipose stem cells were more adept at cell adhesion, migration, wound healing, and tissue remodeling, while the proteins secreted by placental stem cells were more adept at angiogenesis, cell proliferation, differentiation, cell survival, immunomodulation, and collagen degradation. While these two types of conditioned medium could improve the facial index, the improvement of Melanin index after injection of the adipose stem cell conditioned medium was much more significant. Conclusion. The results suggest that the secreted proteins are ideal cell-free substances for regeneration medicine, especially in the antiaging field. PMID:27057176

  2. The Comparison of Adipose Stem Cell and Placental Stem Cell in Secretion Characteristics and in Facial Antiaging.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Guo, Shilei; Wei, Cui; Li, Honglan; Chen, Lei; Yin, Chang; Zhang, Chuansen

    2016-01-01

    Background. Mesenchymal stem cells are the most commonly used seed cells in biomedical research and tissue engineering. Their secretory proteins have also been proven to play an important role in tissue healing. Methods. We isolated adipose stem cells and placental stem cells and performed analysis examining characteristics. The secretory proteins were extracted from conditioned medium and analyzed by MALDI-TOF/TOF. The antiaging effect of conditioned mediums was evaluated by the results of facial skin application. Results. Adipose stem cells and placental stem cells were found to be very similar in their surface markers and multipotency. The specific proteins secreted from adipose stem cells were more adept at cell adhesion, migration, wound healing, and tissue remodeling, while the proteins secreted by placental stem cells were more adept at angiogenesis, cell proliferation, differentiation, cell survival, immunomodulation, and collagen degradation. While these two types of conditioned medium could improve the facial index, the improvement of Melanin index after injection of the adipose stem cell conditioned medium was much more significant. Conclusion. The results suggest that the secreted proteins are ideal cell-free substances for regeneration medicine, especially in the antiaging field. PMID:27057176

  3. MicroRNAs in placental health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Mouillet, Jean-Francois; Ouyang, Yingshi; Coyne, Carolyn; Sadovsky, Yoel

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) constitute a large family of small non-coding RNAs encoded by the genomes of most organisms. They regulate gene expression through post-transcriptional mechanisms to attenuate protein output in various genetic networks. The discovery of miRNAs has transformed our understanding of gene regulation and sparked intense efforts intended to harness their potential as diagnostic markers and therapeutic tools. Over the last decade a flurry of studies have shed light on placental miRNAs but have also raised many questions regarding the scope of their biological action. Moreover, the recognition that miRNAs of placental origin are continually released in the maternal circulation throughout pregnancy suggested that circulating miRNAs might serve as biomarkers for placental function during pregnancy. While this generated much enthusiasm, recently recognized challenges have delayed the application of miRNA-based biomarkers and therapeutics in clinical practice. In this review, we summarize key findings in the field and discuss current knowledge related to miRNAs in the context of placental biology. PMID:26428496

  4. Defective implantation and placentation: laying the blueprint for pregnancy complications.

    PubMed

    Norwitz, Errol R

    2006-10-01

    Normal implantation and placentation is critical for pregnancy success. Many pregnancy-related complications that present late in gestation (such as pre-eclampsia and preterm labour) appear to have their origins early in pregnancy with abnormalities in implantation and placental development. Implantation is characterized by invasion of the maternal tissues of the uterus by fetal trophoblast, and the degree to which trophoblast invades these tissues appears to be a major determinant of pregnancy outcome. Excessive invasion can lead to abnormally firm attachment of the placenta to the myometrium (placenta accreta) with increased maternal and perinatal morbidity. Inadequate invasion, specifically restricted endovascular invasion, has been implicated in the pathophysiology of such conditions as pre-eclampsia (gestational proteinuric hypertension), preterm premature rupture of membranes, preterm labour, and intrauterine growth restriction. The molecular and cellular mechanisms responsible for implantation remain enigmatic. This review will include an overview of implantation followed by a discussion of a number of molecular mechanisms implicated in defective implantation and placentation including the role of decidual prostaglandins and haemorrhage in regulating trophoblast invasion. An improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms responsible for abnormal implantation and placentation will likely improve clinicians' abilities to treat disorders that occur along this continuum, including infertility, recurrent pregnancy loss, pre-eclampsia, and preterm birth.

  5. Defective implantation and placentation: laying the blueprint for pregnancy complications.

    PubMed

    Norwitz, Errol R

    2007-01-01

    Normal implantation and placentation is critical for pregnancy success. Many pregnancy-related complications that present late in gestation (such as pre-eclampsia and preterm labour) appear to have their origins early in pregnancy with abnormalities in implantation and placental development. Implantation is characterized by invasion of the maternal tissues of the uterus by fetal trophoblast, and the degree to which trophoblast invades these tissues appears to be a major determinant of pregnancy outcome. Excessive invasion can lead to abnormally firm attachment of the placenta to the myometrium (placenta accreta) with increased maternal and perinatal morbidity. Inadequate invasion, specifically restricted endovascular invasion, has been implicated in the pathophysiology of such conditions as pre-eclampsia (gestational proteinuric hypertension), preterm premature rupture of membranes, preterm labour, and intrauterine growth restriction. The molecular and cellular mechanisms responsible for implantation remain enigmatic. This review will include an overview of implantation followed by a discussion of a number of molecular mechanisms implicated in defective implantation and placentation including the role of decidual prostaglandins and haemorrhage in regulating trophoblast invasion. An improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms responsible for abnormal implantation and placentation will likely improve clinicians' abilities to treat disorders that occur along this continuum, including infertility, recurrent pregnancy loss, pre-eclampsia, and preterm birth.

  6. Placental transfer of the actinides and related heavy elements

    SciTech Connect

    Sikov, M.R.

    1986-11-01

    A selective literature review dealing with prenatal exposure of animals and humans to actinides and related heavy elements, comparative aspects of placental transfer and fetoplacental distribution are considered. General patterns have been derived from typical quantitative values, and used to compare similarities and dissimilarities, and to examine factors responsible for observed differences. 37 refs., 2 tabs.

  7. Placental ischemia induces changes in gene expression in chorionic tissue

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, Michael R.; Granger, Joey P.

    2014-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a serious and common hypertensive complication of pregnancy, affecting ~5 to 8 % of pregnancies. The underlying cause of preeclampsia is believed to be placental ischemia, which causes secretion of pathogenic factors into the maternal circulation. While a number of these factors have been identified, it is likely that others remain to be elucidated. Here, we have utilized a relevant preclinical rodent model of placental ischemia-induced hypertension, the reduced uterine perfusion pressure (RUPP) model, to determine the effect of chronic placental ischemia on the underlying chorionic tissue and placental villi. Tissue from control and RUPP rats were isolated on gestational day 19 and mRNA from these tissues was subjected to microarray analysis to determine differential gene expression. At a statistical cutoff of p <0.05, some 2,557 genes were differentially regulated between the two groups. Interestingly, only a small subset (22) of these genes exhibited changes of greater than 50 % versus control, a large proportion of which were subsequently confirmed using qRT-PCR analysis. Network analysis indicated a strong effect on inflammatory pathways, including those involving NF-κB and inflammatory cytokines. Of the most differentially expressed genes, the predominant gene classes were extracellular remodeling proteins, pro-inflammatory proteins, and a coordinated upregulation of the prolactin genes. The functional implications of these novel factors are discussed. PMID:24668059

  8. Placental Mechanics in the Zika-Microcephaly Relationship.

    PubMed

    Adibi, Jennifer J; Zhao, Yaqi; Cartus, Abigail R; Gupta, Phalguni; Davidson, Lance A

    2016-07-13

    How the Zika virus (ZIKV) accesses the embryo remains unknown. In this issue, Quicke et al. (2016) use an in vitro model of the human placenta to show that placental macrophages are more permissive to ZIKV infection than trophoblasts, which may be refractory to infection (Bayer et al., 2016). PMID:27414496

  9. Placental Mechanics in the Zika-Microcephaly Relationship.

    PubMed

    Adibi, Jennifer J; Zhao, Yaqi; Cartus, Abigail R; Gupta, Phalguni; Davidson, Lance A

    2016-07-13

    How the Zika virus (ZIKV) accesses the embryo remains unknown. In this issue, Quicke et al. (2016) use an in vitro model of the human placenta to show that placental macrophages are more permissive to ZIKV infection than trophoblasts, which may be refractory to infection (Bayer et al., 2016).

  10. Placental diffusing capacities at varied carbon monoxide tensions.

    PubMed Central

    Bissonnette, J M; Wickham, W K; Drummond, W H

    1977-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that carbon monoxide transfer across the placenta is, in part, a facilitated process, we have looked for evidence of saturation kinetics for carbon monoxide. In eight pregnant ewes, fetal to maternal carbon monoxide transfer was examined in a preparation in which the fetal side of the placenta was perfused with blood. The carboxyhemoglobin concentrations on the fetal side of the placenta were varied from 4.8 to 70% in 23 measurements. At increased carbon monoxide tensions, the transfer from fetus to mother always decreased. The slope of log rate of carbon monoxide transfer vs. log partial pressure gradient across the placenta was significantly different from 1. Placental membrane diffusing capacity was calculated separately from total placental diffusing capacity which includes hemoglobin reaction rates and erythrocyte membrane diffusion. Placental membrane diffusing capacity decreased at increased carbon monoxide tensions. Placental permeability for urea did not change with increasing carbon monoxide tensions. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that carbon monoxide diffusion in the placenta is, in part, carrier mediated. PMID:864001

  11. Placental vitamin D receptor (VDR) expression is related to neonatal vitamin D status, placental calcium transfer, and fetal bone length in pregnant adolescents.

    PubMed

    Young, Bridget E; Cooper, Elizabeth M; McIntyre, Allison W; Kent, Tera; Witter, Frank; Harris, Z Leah; O'Brien, Kimberly O

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify determinants of placental vitamin D receptor (VDR) expression and placental calcium (Ca) transfer among pregnant adolescents. Placental tissue was obtained in 94 adolescents (≤18 yr) at term. In 12 of these teens, stable Ca isotopes were given intravenously ((42)Ca) and orally ((44)Ca) early in labor. Placental VDR expression was assessed via Western blot and validated by RT-PCR. Maternal-to-fetal Ca transfer was calculated as the enrichment in cord blood at delivery relative to maternal serum enrichment 2 h postdosing. Isotopic study outcomes were examined in relation to fetal long bone length, placental VDR, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D], and parathyroid hormone (PTH) in maternal circulation and cord blood at delivery. Placental VDR expression was inversely associated with neonatal 25(OH)D (P=0.012) and positively with neonatal 1,25(OH)2D (P=0.006). Placental VDR was a positive predictor of fetal femur length Z score (P=0.018; R(2)=0.06) and was positively correlated with maternal-to-fetal transfer of intravenous (42)Ca (P=0.004; R(2)=0.62). The fetus may regulate placental VDR expression given the significant associations with neonatal vitamin D metabolites. The association between placental VDR and fetal long bone length may indicate a role for VDR in fetal bone development, potentially by mediating transplacental Ca transfer.

  12. Placenta with Old, Diffuse Infarction that Was Difficult to Differentiate from a Placental Tumor.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Hidehiko; Miyazaki-Igarashi, Miwa; Suzuki, Shunji

    2015-01-01

    Placental lesions, including placental infarction, are associated with fetal and neonatal mortality and morbidity. We present a case of fetal growth restriction associated with an old, diffuse placental infarction. Because the placenta had only a single viable cotyledon, the others being atrophic, the lesion appeared to be a placental tumor on prenatal ultrasonography. The patient did not have pregnancy-induced hypertension. At 31 weeks of gestation, a cesarean delivery was performed because of fetal growth arrest and breech presentation. A small-for-gestational age infant was delivered with Apgar scores of 8 at both 1 and 5 minutes, and the infant had cleft palate and cleft lips. Pathological examination of the placenta revealed an old, diffuse infarction without neoplastic change. In cases in which a placental tumor causing fetal growth restriction is strongly suspected, diffuse placental infarction should be considered as part of the differential diagnosis, because placental tumors are associated with poor maternal prognosis.

  13. Syncytiotrophoblast Functions and Fetal Growth Restriction during Placental Malaria: Updates and Implication for Future Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Kidima, Winifrida B.

    2015-01-01

    Syncytiotrophoblast lines the intervillous space of the placenta and plays important roles in fetus growth throughout gestation. However, perturbations at the maternal-fetal interface during placental malaria may possibly alter the physiological functions of syncytiotrophoblast and therefore growth and development of the embryo in utero. An understanding of the influence of placental malaria on syncytiotrophoblast function is paramount in developing novel interventions for the control of placental pathology associated with placental malaria. In this review, we discuss how malaria changes syncytiotrophoblast function as evidenced from human, animal, and in vitro studies and, further, how dysregulation of syncytiotrophoblast function may impact fetal growth in utero. We also formulate a hypothesis, stemming from epidemiological observations, that nutrition may override pathogenesis of placental malaria-associated-fetal growth restriction. We therefore recommend studies on nutrition-based-interventional approaches for high placental malaria-risk women in endemic areas. More investigations on the role of nutrition on placental malaria pathogenesis are needed. PMID:26587536

  14. Placental fetal stem segmentation in a sequence of histology images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athavale, Prashant; Vese, Luminita A.

    2012-02-01

    Recent research in perinatal pathology argues that analyzing properties of the placenta may reveal important information on how certain diseases progress. One important property is the structure of the placental fetal stems. Analysis of the fetal stems in a placenta could be useful in the study and diagnosis of some diseases like autism. To study the fetal stem structure effectively, we need to automatically and accurately track fetal stems through a sequence of digitized hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained histology slides. There are many problems in successfully achieving this goal. A few of the problems are: large size of images, misalignment of the consecutive H&E slides, unpredictable inaccuracies of manual tracing, very complicated texture patterns of various tissue types without clear characteristics, just to name a few. In this paper we propose a novel algorithm to achieve automatic tracing of the fetal stem in a sequence of H&E images, based on an inaccurate manual segmentation of a fetal stem in one of the images. This algorithm combines global affine registration, local non-affine registration and a novel 'dynamic' version of the active contours model without edges. We first use global affine image registration of all the images based on displacement, scaling and rotation. This gives us approximate location of the corresponding fetal stem in the image that needs to be traced. We then use the affine registration algorithm "locally" near this location. At this point, we use a fast non-affine registration based on L2-similarity measure and diffusion regularization to get a better location of the fetal stem. Finally, we have to take into account inaccuracies in the initial tracing. This is achieved through a novel dynamic version of the active contours model without edges where the coefficients of the fitting terms are computed iteratively to ensure that we obtain a unique stem in the segmentation. The segmentation thus obtained can then be used as an

  15. Placental ABC transporters, cellular toxicity and stress in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Aye, Irving L M H; Keelan, Jeffrey A

    2013-04-25

    The human placenta, in addition to its roles as a nutrient transfer and endocrine organ, functions as a selective barrier to protect the fetus against the harmful effects of exogenous and endogenous toxins. Members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family of transport proteins limit the entry of xenobiotics into the fetal circulation via vectorial efflux from the placenta to the maternal circulation. Several members of the ABC family, including proteins from the ABCA, ABCB, ABCC and ABCG subfamilies, have been shown to be functional in the placenta with clinically significant roles in xenobiotic efflux. However, recent findings suggest that these transporters also protect placental tissue by preventing the cellular accumulation of cytotoxic compounds such as lipids, sterols and their derivatives. Such protective functions are likely to be particularly important in pregnancies complicated by inflammatory or oxidative stress, where the generation of toxic metabolites is enhanced. For example, ABC transporters have been shown to protect against the harmful effects of hypoxia and oxidative stress through increased expression and efflux of oxysterols and glutathione conjugated xenobiotics. However, this protective capacity may be diminished in response to the same stressors. Several studies in primary human trophoblast cells and animal models have demonstrated decreased expression and activity of placental ABC transporters with inflammatory, oxidative or metabolic stress. Several clinical studies in pregnancies complicated by inflammatory conditions such as preeclampsia and gestational diabetes support these findings, although further studies are required to determine the clinical relevance of the relationships between placental ABC transporter expression and activity, and placental function in stressed pregnancies. Such studies are necessary to fully understand the consequences of pregnancy disorders on placental function and viability in order to optimise pregnancy

  16. The impact of ionizing radiation on placental trophoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kanter, D.J.; O'Brien, M.B.; Shi, X.-H.; Chu, T.; Mishima, T.; Beriwal, S.; Epperly, M.W.; Wipf, P.; Greenberger, J.S.; Sadovsky, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Exposure to low-dose radiation is widespread and attributable to natural sources. However, occupational, medical, accidental, and terrorist-related exposures remain a significant threat. Information on radiation injury to the feto-placental unit is scant and largely observational. We hypothesized that radiation causes trophoblast injury, and alters the expression of injury-related transcripts in vitro or in vivo, thus affecting fetal growth. Methods Primary human trophoblasts (PHTs), BeWo or NCCIT cells were irradiated in vitro, and cell number and viability were determined. Pregnant C57Bl/6HNsd mice were externally irradiated on E13.5, and placentas examined on E17.5. RNA expression was analyzed using microarrays and RT-qPCR. The experiments were repeated in the presence of the gramicidin S (GS)-derived nitroxide JP4-039, used to mitigate radiation-induced cell injury. Results We found that survival of in vitro–irradiated PHT cell was better than that of irradiated BeWo trophoblast cell line or the radiosensitive NCCIT mixed germ cell tumor line. Radiation altered the expression of several trophoblast genes, with a most dramatic effect on CDKN1A (p21, CIP1). Mice exposed to radiation at E13.5 exhibited a 25% reduction in mean weight by E17.5, and a 9% reduction in placental weight, which was associated with relatively small changes in placental gene expression. JP4-039 had a minimal effect on feto-placental growth or on gene expression in irradiated PHT cells or mouse placenta. Discussion and conclusion While radiation affects placental trophoblasts, the established placenta is fairly resistant to radiation, and changes in this tissue may not fully account for fetal growth restriction induced by ionizing radiation. PMID:24418702

  17. Indomethacin is a Placental Vasodilator in the Dog

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, John G.; Branch, Robert A.; Hubbard, Walter C.; Nies, Alan S.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of 8 mg/kg of indomethacin on uterine blood flow, prostaglandin production, and intraamniotic fluid pressure was examined in late pregnant dogs. Uterine blood flow was measured with 15 μm radiolabeled microspheres. Because we found that a significant percentage of the microspheres shunted through the placental circulation into the lungs, we calculated placental blood flow by adding the shunted microspheres through the placenta to the nonshunted microspheres in the placenta. Total uterine blood flow significantly increased from 271±69 ml/min during control period to 371±72 ml/min (P < 0.01) 30 min after indomethacin. This increase was attributable to the change in blood flow to the placental circulation (222±58 to 325±63 ml/min; P < 0.01). Associated with these hemodynamic changes we found an almost complete suppression of uterine prostaglandin E2 production (1,654±305 to 51±25 pg/ml; P < 0.01) as measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. In addition, we found that indomethacin treatment resulted in uterine relaxation as measured by intraamniotic fluid pressure changes (11.2±1.3 mm Hg to 8.5±1.2 mm Hg; P < 0.001). We conclude that indomethacin causes an increase in placental blood flow without any change in flow to the rest of the uterus, and that this dose of the drug inhibits greater than 95% of uterine prostaglandin production. In addition, indomethacin is responsible for uterine relaxation. The increase in placental blood flow after indomethacin is probably a result of uterine relaxation, which is secondary to prostaglandin synthesis inhibition. PMID:659627

  18. Placental inflammation is not increased in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Taleban, Sasha; Gundogan, Fusun; Chien, Edward K.; Degli-Esposti, Silvia; Saha, Sumona

    2015-01-01

    Background Women with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are at increased risk for adverse birth outcomes such as preterm delivery and small for gestational age (SGA) infants. Most recognized cases of fetal growth restriction in singleton pregnancies have underlying placental causes. However, studies in IBD examining poor birth outcomes have focused on maternal factors. We examined whether women with IBD have a higher rate of placental inflammation than non-IBD controls. Methods Between 2008 and 2011, the placental tissue of 7 ulcerative colitis, 5 Crohn’s disease, and 2 IBD-unclassified subjects enrolled in the Pregnancy in Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Neonatal Outcome (PIANO) registry were evaluated for villitis, deciduitis, and chorioamnionitis with/without a fetal inflammatory response. The history and birth outcomes of all IBD subjects were reviewed and matched to 26 non-IBD controls by gestational age at delivery. Results Of women with IBD, 29% delivered preterm infants and 21% delivered SGA infants. Half of the IBD patients had mild-moderate disease flares during pregnancy. Five (36%) patients required corticosteroids, 2 (14%) were maintained on an immunomodulator, and 3 (21%) others received tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors during their pregnancy. Chorioamnionitis was the only identified placental pathology present in the placentas reviewed, occurring less frequently in cases compared to controls (7% vs. 27%, P=0.32). Conclusions Placental inflammatory activation does not appear to be responsible for the increase in adverse birth outcome in women with IBD. Further studies are necessary to validate these findings in IBD to explain poor birth outcomes. PMID:26423206

  19. Blastomere removal from cleavage-stage mouse embryos alters placental function, which is associated with placental oxidative stress and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Qi; Chen, Li; Liang, Yuanjiao; Sui, Liucai; Guo, Li; Zhou, Jingwei; Fan, Kai; Jing, Jun; Zhang, Yunhai; Yao, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Blastomere biopsy is an essential technique in preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), a screening test that can detect genetic abnormalities of embryos before their transfer into uterus. Our results showed that the weights of fetuses derived from biopsied embryos were lower than that of non-biopsied counterparts at E12.5, E15.5, and E18.5. The ratio of fetal/placental (F/P) weights in the biopsied group was significantly lower than that in the non-biopsied group at E18.5. At E18.5, the mRNAs for selected glucose transporters, system A amino acid transporters, system L amino acid transporters, and imprinted genes were downregulated in the placentae of biopsied group, and the GLUT1 and CAT3 protein levels were decreased too. More apoptotic cells were detected by TUNEL in the placentae of biopsied group. Placentae from biopsied embryos exhibited lower levels of SOD and GSH. Furthermore, the concentration of MDA increased in the placentae from biopsied group. The levels of IL1B, IL6, and TNFA also significantly increased in the placentae of biopsied group. This study suggested that placental function may be sensitive to blastomere biopsy procedures, and placental oxidative stress and inflammation associated with blastomere biopsy may be critical factors of abnormal placental function and further influence the fetal development. PMID:27109212

  20. Prenatal diagnosis of a placental infarction hematoma associated with fetal growth restriction, preeclampsia and fetal death: clinicopathological correlation.

    PubMed

    Aurioles-Garibay, Alma; Hernandez-Andrade, Edgar; Romero, Roberto; Qureshi, Faisal; Ahn, Hyunyoung; Jacques, Suzanne M; Garcia, Maynor; Yeo, Lami; Hassan, Sonia S

    2014-01-01

    The lesion termed 'placental infarction hematoma' is associated with fetal death and adverse perinatal outcome. Such a lesion has been associated with a high risk of fetal death and abruption placentae. The fetal and placental hemodynamic changes associated with placental infarction hematoma have not been reported. This paper describes a case of early and severe growth restriction with preeclampsia, and progressive deterioration of the fetal and placental Doppler parameters in the presence of a placental infarction hematoma.

  1. IFPA Meeting 2011 workshop report III: Placental immunology; epigenetic and microRNA-dependent gene regulation; comparative placentation; trophoblast differentiation; stem cells☆

    PubMed Central

    Ackerman, W.E.; Bulmer, J.N.; Carter, A.M.; Chaillet, J.R.; Chamley, L.; Chen, C.P.; Chuong, E.B.; Coleman, S.J.; Collet, G.P.; Croy, B.A.; de Mestre, A.M.; Dickinson, H.; Ducray, J.; Enders, A.C.; Fogarty, N.M.E.; Gauster, M.; Golos, T.; Haider, S.; Heazell, A.E.; Holland, O.J.; Huppertz, B.; Husebekk, A.; John, R.M.; Johnsen, G.M.; Jones, C.J.P.; Kalionis, B.; König, J.; Lorenzon, A.R.; Moffett, A.; de Mello, J.C. Moreira; Nuzzo, A.M.; Parham, P.; Parolini, O.; Petroff, M.G.; Pidoux, G.; Ramírez-Pinilla, M.P.; Robinson, W.P.; Rolfo, A.; Sadovsky, Y.; Soma, H.; Southcombe, J.H.; Tilburgs, T.; Lash, G.E.

    2014-01-01

    Workshops are an important part of the IFPA annual meeting as they allow for discussion of specialised topics. At IFPA meeting 2011 there were twelve themed workshops, five of which are summarized in this report. These workshops related to various aspects of placental biology: 1) immunology; 2) epigenetics; 3) comparative placentation; 4) trophoblast differentiation; 5) stem cells. PMID:22154501

  2. Relationship between Plasma D-Dimer Concentration and Three-Dimensional Ultrasound Placental Volume in Women at Risk for Placental Vascular Diseases: A Monocentric Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Fanget, Cécile; Chauleur, Céline; Stadler, Amandine; Presles, Emilie; Varlet, Marie-Noëlle; Gris, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to correlate placental volumes deduced from three-dimensional ultrasound and virtual organ computer-aided analysis (VOCAL) software with systemic concentrations of D-dimer and soluble endothelial protein C receptor (sEPCR). Methods This was a monocentric experimental prospective study conducted from October 2008 to July 2009. Forty consecutive patients at risk of placental vascular pathology (PVP) recurrence or occurrence were included. Placental volumes were systematically measured three times (11–14, 16–18 and 20–22 weeks of gestation (WG)) by two independent sonographers. D-dimers and sEPCR plasma concentrations were measured using ELISA kits (Enzyme Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay). Results Eleven patients had a PVP. The plasma D-dimer level was positively correlated with placental volume (r = 0.45, p < 0.001). A smaller placental volume and placental quotient was evidenced in women who developed a PVP at the three gestational ages, and the difference was more pronounced during the third exam (20 WG). No obvious correlation could be demonstrated between the development of a PVP and the levels of D-dimer and sEPCR. There was no significant difference in the values of placental volumes measured by the two sonographers. Conclusion The placenta growth could be a major determinant of the elevation of D-dimer during pregnancy. Consideration of placental volume could allow for modulation of the D-dimer concentrations for restoring their clinical interest. PMID:27294274

  3. The effects of Carthamus tinctorius L. on placental histomorphology and survival of the neonates in mice

    PubMed Central

    Louei Monfared, Ali; Salati, Amir Parviz

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Carthamus tinctorius L. (Safflower) is a member of the asteraceae family which is used as a food additive but also has medicinal applications. This study investigated its effects on placental histomorphology and survival of mice neonates. Materials and Methods: Eighty Balb/C pregnant mice were randomly distributed into one control and three experimental groups (n=20). The control group received only distilled water, whereas experimental groups were administered intraperitoneally C. tinctorius extract at doses of 0.7, 1.4, and 2.8 mg/kg during the organogenesis period (6th to 16th day of gestation). On the 17th day of gestation, half of the animals were euthanized; their fetuses and placentas were removed and histomorphological study was performed. In the rest of the animals after parturition, the number of neonates was counted. Survival rates were periodically calculated for neonates within days 5, 15, 25, and 42 after birth. The results were evaluated by one-way ANOVA. Results: The results showed that treatment with 1.4 and 2.8 mg/kg C. tinctorius extract caused reduction in the trophoblastic giant cells ratio and increasing in the proportion of labyrinthine interhemal membrane (LIM). Moreover, the size of the labyrinthine zone per whole placenta, weight, diameter, and thickness of the placenta in the mice administered with 1.4 and 2.8 mg/kg C. tinctorius extract became lower than those of controls (p<0.05). In addition, in the treated mice with 1.4 and 2.8 mg/kg C. tinctorius extract, the number of neonate was drastically decreased on days 5, 15, 25, and 42 after birth. Conclusion: It is concluded that treatment with C. tinctorius extract in doses of 1.4 and 2.8 mg/kg induces toxic changes in the placental structure so caution should be paid to popular consumption of this plant both as an alternative medicine and as a food additive. PMID:25050244

  4. Placental transfer of the polybrominated diphenyl ethers BDE-47, BDE-99 and BDE-209 in a human placenta perfusion system: an experimental study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have been widely used as flame retardants in consumer products. PBDEs may affect thyroid hormone homeostasis, which can result in irreversible damage of cognitive performance, motor skills and altered behaviour. Thus, in utero exposure is of very high concern due to critical windows in fetal development. Methods A human ex vivo placenta perfusion system was used to study the kinetics and extent of the placental transfer of BDE-47, BDE-99 and BDE-209 during four-hour perfusions. The PBDEs were added to the maternal circulation and monitored in the maternal and fetal compartments. In addition, the perfused cotyledon, the surrounding placental tissue as well as pre-perfusion placental tissue and umbilical cord plasma were also analysed. The PBDE analysis included Soxhlet extraction, clean-up by adsorption chromatography and GC-MS analysis. Results and Discussion Placental transfer of BDE-47 was faster and more extensive than for BDE-99. The fetal-maternal ratios (FM-ratio) after four hours of perfusion were 0.47 and 0.25 for BDE-47 and BDE-99, respectively, while the indicative permeability coefficient (IPC) measured after 60 minutes of perfusion was 0.26 h-1 and 0.10 h-1, respectively. The transport of BDE-209 seemed to be limited. These differences between the congeners may be related to the degree of bromination. Significant accumulation was observed for all congeners in the perfused cotyledon as well as in the surrounding placental tissue. Conclusion The transport of BDE-47 and BDE-99 indicates in utero exposure to these congeners. Although the transport of BDE-209 was limited, however, possible metabolic debromination may lead to products which are both more toxic and transportable. Our study demonstrates fetal exposure to PBDEs, which should be included in risk assessment of PBDE exposure of women of child-bearing age. PMID:20598165

  5. Placental transfer of radiopharmaceuticals and dosimetry in pregnancy

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, J.R.; Stabin, M.G.; Sparks, R.B.

    1999-01-01

    The calculation of radiation dose estimates to the fetus is often important in nuclear medicine. To obtain the best estimates of radiation dose to the fetus, the best biological and physical models should be employed. In this paper, after identification of radiopharmaceuticals often administered to women of childbearing age, the most recent data available on the placental crossover of these radiopharmaceuticals was used (with standard kinetic models describing the maternal distribution and retention and with the best available physical models) to obtain fetal dose estimates for these radiopharmaceuticals were identified as those most commonly administered to women of childbearing years. The literature yielded information on placental crossover of 15 radiopharmaceuticals, from animal or human data. Radiation dose estimates are presented in early pregnancy and at 3-, 6-, and 9-months gestation for these radiopharmaceuticals, as well as for many others used in nuclear medicine (the latter considering only maternal organ contributions to fetal dose). 46 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  6. Parvovirus infection: an immunohistochemical study using fetal and placental tissue.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing Jing; Henwood, Tony; Van Hal, Sebastian; Charlton, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    Parvovirus B19 infection causes 5% to 15% of cases of nonimmune hydrops fetalis. The aim of our study was to evaluate the use of immunohistochemistry in diagnosing parvovirus infection in fetal and placental tissue during routine fetal and perinatal autopsies. Histology slides of 20 cases of confirmed parvovirus infection were reviewed, and immunohistochemistry was applied to selected blocks of fetal and placental tissue. Immunohistochemistry was positive in all 20 cases, and histologic viral inclusions were seen in 19 cases. Immunohistochemical staining was closely correlated with histology and was more sensitive than histology in detecting virally infected cells, especially in autolyzed tissue. All cases also had confirmatory evidence of parvovirus infection by polymerase chain reaction of fetal liver and positive maternal serology, where it was available. We conclude that parvovirus immunohistochemistry is a reliable method for diagnosing parvovirus infection, especially in autolyzed tissue where histologic assessment may be suboptimal.

  7. The endocannabinoid system: A novel player in human placentation.

    PubMed

    Costa, M A

    2016-06-01

    Cannabis sativa is the most consumed illegal drug around the world. Its consumption during pregnancy is associated with gestational complications, particularly with fetal growth restriction. Endocannabinoids (eCBs) are lipid molecules that act by activating the G-protein coupled cannabinoid receptors, which are also target of the phytocannabinoid Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). The endocannabinoid system (ECS) participates in distinct biological processes, including pain, inflammation, neuroprotection, and several reproductive events. In addition, an abnormal expression of ECS is associated with infertility and miscarriages. This manuscript will review and discuss the expression of ECS in normal and pathological human placentas, and the role of eCBs and THC in trophoblast proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, and function. The current evidence points towards a role of ECS in human placentation, shedding light on the contribution of the eCBs in the coordination of human placentation, and in the cellular mechanisms underlying the deleterious effects of cannabis consumption during pregnancy. PMID:26965993

  8. Disease-Modifying Drug Possibly Linked to Placental Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Salahudheen, Sultan M.; Begam, Muzibunnisa A.

    2016-01-01

    Disease-modifying drugs (DMDs) such as interferon (IFN)-β and glatiramer acetate are often prescribed to slow disability progression in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). However, adverse pregnancy outcomes have been reported with these medications. We report the rare occurrence of severe placental complications in a 30-year-old pregnant woman with MS who continued to take IFN-β during her first trimester. She presented at the Tawam Hospital, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates, in 2013 with early-onset fetal growth restriction. At 30 gestational weeks, she developed severe pre-eclampsia. The baby was delivered via emergency Caesarean section and was discharged at the age of two months. Continuation of IFN-β during pregnancy may have contributed to the development of placental insufficiency in this patient. Increased education regarding the risks of DMDs for pregnant patients with MS is very important to ensure successful pregnancy outcomes. PMID:27606121

  9. Disease-Modifying Drug Possibly Linked to Placental Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Salahudheen, Sultan M.; Begam, Muzibunnisa A.

    2016-01-01

    Disease-modifying drugs (DMDs) such as interferon (IFN)-β and glatiramer acetate are often prescribed to slow disability progression in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). However, adverse pregnancy outcomes have been reported with these medications. We report the rare occurrence of severe placental complications in a 30-year-old pregnant woman with MS who continued to take IFN-β during her first trimester. She presented at the Tawam Hospital, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates, in 2013 with early-onset fetal growth restriction. At 30 gestational weeks, she developed severe pre-eclampsia. The baby was delivered via emergency Caesarean section and was discharged at the age of two months. Continuation of IFN-β during pregnancy may have contributed to the development of placental insufficiency in this patient. Increased education regarding the risks of DMDs for pregnant patients with MS is very important to ensure successful pregnancy outcomes.

  10. A microphysiological model of the human placental barrier.

    PubMed

    Blundell, Cassidy; Tess, Emily R; Schanzer, Ariana S R; Coutifaris, Christos; Su, Emily J; Parry, Samuel; Huh, Dongeun

    2016-08-01

    During human pregnancy, the fetal circulation is separated from maternal blood in the placenta by two cell layers - the fetal capillary endothelium and placental trophoblast. This placental barrier plays an essential role in fetal development and health by tightly regulating the exchange of endogenous and exogenous materials between the mother and the fetus. Here we present a microengineered device that provides a novel platform to mimic the structural and functional complexity of this specialized tissue in vitro. Our model is created in a multilayered microfluidic system that enables co-culture of human trophoblast cells and human fetal endothelial cells in a physiologically relevant spatial arrangement to replicate the characteristic architecture of the human placental barrier. We have engineered this co-culture model to induce progressive fusion of trophoblast cells and to form a syncytialized epithelium that resembles the syncytiotrophoblast in vivo. Our system also allows the cultured trophoblasts to form dense microvilli under dynamic flow conditions and to reconstitute expression and physiological localization of membrane transport proteins, such as glucose transporters (GLUTs), critical to the barrier function of the placenta. To provide a proof-of-principle for using this microdevice to recapitulate native function of the placental barrier, we demonstrated physiological transport of glucose across the microengineered maternal-fetal interface. Importantly, the rate of maternal-to-fetal glucose transfer in this system closely approximated that measured in ex vivo perfused human placentas. Our "placenta-on-a-chip" platform represents an important advance in the development of new technologies to model and study the physiological complexity of the human placenta for a wide variety of applications. PMID:27229450

  11. Sources for comparative studies of placentation I. embryological collections.

    PubMed

    Carter, A M

    2008-01-01

    A rich source of material for comparative studies of the placenta is the collections made by pioneers in the field such as H.W. Mossman, A.A.W. Hubrecht and J.P. Hill. This overview gives a brief description of collections known to be available and information on how each can be accessed. Included are some of the major series of human and animal embryos, such as the Boyd and Carnegie collections, as these also house placental material.

  12. Estetrol and utero-placental flow after progesterone load.

    PubMed

    Benassi, L; Alfieri, L; Debiasi, D; Trentadue, R; Salvadori, B

    1982-01-01

    On the basis of recent demonstration in animals of the effect of some hormones on uteroplacental flow, the Authors examined the response of plasmatic Estetrol (15 alpha-hydroxy-estriol) after the administration of progesterone to pregnant women with low Estrogen values. The increase of this compound was related to an improvement of placental function, probably dependent on an increase of available O2, and therefore on uterine blood flow. This can justify a progesterone treatment in such pregnancies. PMID:7168897

  13. Classics revisited. History of reptile placentology: Studiati's early account of placentation in a viviparous lizard.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Daniel G; Avanzati, Anna Marie; Paulesu, Luana

    2015-11-01

    Although placental diversity in mammals received growing attention in the 1600s through the early 1800s, placentation was not documented in reptiles until the mid-19th century. In his classic 1855 study on a viviparous lizard, Cesare Studiati (University of Pisa) described a structural/functional arrangement of fetal and maternal tissues that meets contemporary criteria for recognition of placentation. Through the fortuitous selection of a highly placentotrophic species, Chalcides chalcides, Studiati recognized the functional role of placental tissues in provision of oxygen as well as nutrients. Although Studiati worked in a pre-evolutionary milieu and without the benefits of histological techniques, his findings revealed that viviparous reptiles could exhibit placental specializations that paralleled those of mammals. Accordingly, his classic paper initiated a highly productive body of research that has continued to the present and highlighted specializations of a species that has figured importantly in placental research.

  14. Classics revisited. History of reptile placentology: Studiati's early account of placentation in a viviparous lizard.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Daniel G; Avanzati, Anna Marie; Paulesu, Luana

    2015-11-01

    Although placental diversity in mammals received growing attention in the 1600s through the early 1800s, placentation was not documented in reptiles until the mid-19th century. In his classic 1855 study on a viviparous lizard, Cesare Studiati (University of Pisa) described a structural/functional arrangement of fetal and maternal tissues that meets contemporary criteria for recognition of placentation. Through the fortuitous selection of a highly placentotrophic species, Chalcides chalcides, Studiati recognized the functional role of placental tissues in provision of oxygen as well as nutrients. Although Studiati worked in a pre-evolutionary milieu and without the benefits of histological techniques, his findings revealed that viviparous reptiles could exhibit placental specializations that paralleled those of mammals. Accordingly, his classic paper initiated a highly productive body of research that has continued to the present and highlighted specializations of a species that has figured importantly in placental research. PMID:26474917

  15. Time- and dose-dependent effects of roundup on human embryonic and placental cells.

    PubMed

    Benachour, N; Sipahutar, H; Moslemi, S; Gasnier, C; Travert, C; Séralini, G E

    2007-07-01

    Roundup is the major herbicide used worldwide, in particular on genetically modified plants that have been designed to tolerate it. We have tested the toxicity and endocrine disruption potential of Roundup (Bioforce on human embryonic 293 and placental-derived JEG3 cells, but also on normal human placenta and equine testis. The cell lines have proven to be suitable to estimate hormonal activity and toxicity of pollutants. The median lethal dose (LD(50)) of Roundup with embryonic cells is 0.3% within 1 h in serum-free medium, and it decreases to reach 0.06% (containing among other compounds 1.27 mM glyphosate) after 72 h in the presence of serum. In these conditions, the embryonic cells appear to be 2-4 times more sensitive than the placental ones. In all instances, Roundup (generally used in agriculture at 1-2%, i.e., with 21-42 mM glyphosate) is more efficient than its active ingredient, glyphosate, suggesting a synergistic effect provoked by the adjuvants present in Roundup. We demonstrated that serum-free cultures, even on a short-term basis (1 h), reveal the xenobiotic impacts that are visible 1-2 days later in serum. We also document at lower non-overtly toxic doses, from 0.01% (with 210 microM glyphosate) in 24 h, that Roundup is an aromatase disruptor. The direct inhibition is temperature-dependent and is confirmed in different tissues and species (cell lines from placenta or embryonic kidney, equine testicular, or human fresh placental extracts). Furthermore, glyphosate acts directly as a partial inactivator on microsomal aromatase, independently of its acidity, and in a dose-dependent manner. The cytotoxic, and potentially endocrine-disrupting effects of Roundup are thus amplified with time. Taken together, these data suggest that Roundup exposure may affect human reproduction and fetal development in case of contamination. Chemical mixtures in formulations appear to be underestimated regarding their toxic or hormonal impact.

  16. Placental Microbiome and Its Role in Preterm Birth

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Bin; Stout, Molly J.; Lee, Iris; Mysorekar, Indira U.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the well-known fact that the placenta has long-term effects on maternal and fetal health, the placenta remains a poorly understood and understudied organ. Not only is the placenta a site of exchange of nutrients and blood and gases between the fetal and maternal systems, but it also performs critical metabolic functions for supporting fetal development and maintaining maternal-fetal tolerance. It is also abundantly clear that impairment of placental function leads to severe pregnancy complications, including preterm birth (PTB), a significant cause of perinatal mortality and morbidity worldwide. Understanding the causes of PTB and other adverse outcomes is clearly essential for the development of effective methods of prevention and treatment. We focus our review of one major known cause of PTB, namely, infection. We also introduce a new and somewhat unexpected factor(s) that may well affect PTB and every aspect of placental biology and function: the placental microbiome. We discuss the implications of the placenta housing a microbial biomass for PTB and the effect of maternal microbiomes at various niches for fetal colonization and health outcomes. We suggest that the placenta is an integral part of the pipeline for microbe-powered driver of fetal destiny. PMID:25635174

  17. Human Placental Histopathology in Preterm Stillbirth: One Center's Experience.

    PubMed

    Salihoğlu, Özgül; Doğan, Keziban; Sever, Nurten; Oksay, Sinem Can; Yaşar, Levent

    2016-01-01

    Our aim is to identify maternal risk factors and to determine placental histopathologies in preterm stillbirths. We designed a prospective study involving a patient population (n = 136) composed of singleton stillbirth (n = 40) and singleton live-born neonates (n = 96) between 23 0/7 and 36 6/7 weeks of gestation. We divided the stillbirths into groups of early (n = 21) and late (n = 19) stillbirths. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS version 15 software. Small birth weight for gestational age and oligo-anhydramnios were significantly higher in the early stillbirth group (p = 0.001, p = 0.002 respectively). Antenatal follow up was significantly lower in the late stillbirth group (p = 0.001). Placental weight was statistically lower in the early stillbirth group (p = 0.001). We found no significant differences in maternal vascular underperfusion, fetal vascular obstruction, inflammation and villitis of unknown etiology. Placental pathologies causing preterm labor may play an important role in the etiology of stillbirths and antenatal follow up is essential for each pregnancy. PMID:27159738

  18. Good practices in collecting umbilical cord and placental blood 1

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Lauren Auer; Bernardino, Elizabeth; Crozeta, Karla; Guimarães, Paulo Ricardo Bittencourt

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to identify the factors related to the quality of umbilical cord and placental blood specimens, and define best practices for their collection in a government bank of umbilical cord and placental blood. Method: this was a descriptive study, quantitative approach, performed at a government umbilical cord and placental blood bank, in two steps: 1) verification of the obstetric, neonatal and operational factors, using a specific tool for gathering data as non-participant observers; 2) definition of best practices by grouping non-conformities observed before, during and after blood collection. The data was analyzed using descriptive statistics and the following statistical software: Statistica(r) and R(r). Results: while there was a correlation with obstetrical and neonatal factors, there was a larger correlation with operational factors, resulting in the need to adjust the professional practices of the nursing staff and obstetrical team involved in collecting this type of blood. Based on these non-conformities we defined best practices for nurses before, during and after blood collection. Conclusion: the best practices defined in this study are an important management tool for the work of nurses in obtaining blood specimens of high cell quality. PMID:27556876

  19. Geomolecular Dating and the Origin of Placental Mammals.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Matthew J

    2016-05-01

    In modern evolutionary divergence analysis the role of geological information extends beyond providing a timescale, to informing molecular rate variation across the tree. Here I consider the implications of this development. I use fossil calibrations to test the accuracy of models of molecular rate evolution for placental mammals, and reveal substantial misspecification associated with life history rate correlates. Adding further calibrations to reduce dating errors at specific nodes unfortunately tends to transfer underlying rate errors to adjacent branches. Thus, tight calibration across the tree is vital to buffer against rate model errors. I argue that this must include allowing maximum bounds to be tight when good fossil records permit, otherwise divergences deep in the tree will tend to be inflated by the interaction of rate errors and asymmetric confidence in minimum and maximum bounds. In the case of placental mammals I sought to reduce the potential for transferring calibration and rate model errors across the tree by focusing on well-supported calibrations with appropriately conservative maximum bounds. The resulting divergence estimates are younger than others published recently, and provide the long-anticipated molecular signature for the placental mammal radiation observed in the fossil record near the 66 Ma Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event.

  20. Glucose metabolism in pregnant sheep when placental growth is restricted

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, J.A.; Falconer, J.; Robinson, J.S. )

    1989-08-01

    The effect of restricting placental growth on glucose metabolism in pregnant sheep in late gestation was determined by primed constant infusions of D-(U-{sup 14}C)- and D-(2-{sup 3}H)glucose and antipyrine into fetuses of six control sheep and six sheep from which endometrial caruncles had been removed before pregnancy (caruncle sheep). In the latter, placental and fetal weights were reduced, as was the concentration of glucose in fetal arterial blood. Fetal glucose turnover in caruncle sheep was only 52-59% of that in controls, largely because of lower umbilical loss of glucose back to the placenta (38-39% of control) and lower fetal glucose utilization (61-74% of control). However, fetal glucose utilization on a weight-specific basis was similar in control and caruncle sheep. Significant endogenous glucose production occurred in control and caruncle fetal sheep. Maternal glucose production and partition of glucose between the gravid uterus and other maternal tissues were similar in control and caruncle sheep. In conclusion, when placental and fetal growth are restricted, fetal glucose utilization is maintained by reduced loss of glucose back to the placenta and mother and by maintaining endogenous glucose production.

  1. Geomolecular Dating and the Origin of Placental Mammals.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Matthew J

    2016-05-01

    In modern evolutionary divergence analysis the role of geological information extends beyond providing a timescale, to informing molecular rate variation across the tree. Here I consider the implications of this development. I use fossil calibrations to test the accuracy of models of molecular rate evolution for placental mammals, and reveal substantial misspecification associated with life history rate correlates. Adding further calibrations to reduce dating errors at specific nodes unfortunately tends to transfer underlying rate errors to adjacent branches. Thus, tight calibration across the tree is vital to buffer against rate model errors. I argue that this must include allowing maximum bounds to be tight when good fossil records permit, otherwise divergences deep in the tree will tend to be inflated by the interaction of rate errors and asymmetric confidence in minimum and maximum bounds. In the case of placental mammals I sought to reduce the potential for transferring calibration and rate model errors across the tree by focusing on well-supported calibrations with appropriately conservative maximum bounds. The resulting divergence estimates are younger than others published recently, and provide the long-anticipated molecular signature for the placental mammal radiation observed in the fossil record near the 66 Ma Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event. PMID:26658702

  2. Use of Placental Membranes for the Treatment of Chronic Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Brantley, Jonathan N.; Verla, Thomas D.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Chronic diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) remain a challenge for physicians to treat. High mortality rates for DFU patients have pointed to the low effectiveness of standard care and lack of quality wound care products. The composition (collagen-rich tissue matrix and endogenous growth factors and cells) and functional properties (anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, and angiogenic) of placental membranes are uniquely suited to address the needs of chronic wounds. This led to the commercialization of placental membranes, which are now widely available to physicians as a new advanced wound treatment option. Recent Advances: Progress in tissue processing and preservation methods has facilitated the development of placental products for wounds. Currently, a variety of commercial placental products are available to physicians for the treatment of chronic DFUs and other wounds. This review summarizes the key factors that negatively impact DFU healing (including social factors, such as smoking, vascular deficiencies, hyperglycemia, and other metabolic abnormalities), describes the structure and biology of placental membranes, and overviews commercially available placental products for wounds and data from the most recent DFU clinical trials utilizing commercial placental membranes. Critical Issues: Although the effects of diabetes on wound healing are complex and not fully understood, some of the key factors and pathways that interfere with healing have been identified. However, a multidisciplinary approach for the assessment of patients with chronic DFUs and guidelines for selection of appropriate treatment modalities remain to be implemented. Future Directions: The biological properties of placental membranes show benefits for the treatment of chronic DFUs, but scientific and clinical data for commercially available placental products are limited. Therefore, we need (1) more randomized, controlled clinical trials for commercial placental products; (2) studies

  3. Definitions and reporting of placental insufficiency in biomedical journals: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Kathryn; Kennedy, Stephen H; Vatish, Manu

    2016-10-01

    Placental insufficiency is a major problem worldwide for both mothers and babies. However, we have demonstrated in a review of the biomedical literature, that both the terminology used to describe, and techniques used to measure suboptimal placental function, are remarkably varied and inconsistent in both clinical and scientific studies. We, therefore, present a case for the development of a standardised approach to studying placental insufficiency. PMID:27591716

  4. Disease-Modifying Drug Possibly Linked to Placental Insufficiency: Severe placental complications in a pregnant woman with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Salahudheen, Sultan M; Begam, Muzibunnisa A

    2016-08-01

    Disease-modifying drugs (DMDs) such as interferon (IFN)-β and glatiramer acetate are often prescribed to slow disability progression in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). However, adverse pregnancy outcomes have been reported with these medications. We report the rare occurrence of severe placental complications in a 30-year-old pregnant woman with MS who continued to take IFN-β during her first trimester. She presented at the Tawam Hospital, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates, in 2013 with early-onset fetal growth restriction. At 30 gestational weeks, she developed severe pre-eclampsia. The baby was delivered via emergency Caesarean section and was discharged at the age of two months. Continuation of IFN-β during pregnancy may have contributed to the development of placental insufficiency in this patient. Increased education regarding the risks of DMDs for pregnant patients with MS is very important to ensure successful pregnancy outcomes. PMID:27606121

  5. Utero-placental transfer of alternate energy substrates and glucose homeostasis in the newborn pig

    SciTech Connect

    Thulin, A.J.

    1985-01-01

    In the first experiment, three sows in late gestation were infused with (/sup 14/C)..beta..-hydroxybutyrate to evaluate utero-placental transfer of ketones. ..beta..-Hydroxy-butyrate (BOHB) concentrations were low in both the mother and fetus throughout the experiments (0.0189, 0.0197, 0.0054, and 0.0063 mmole/liter blood for UV, UA, FV, and FA, respectively). Radioactive BOHB was detected in fetal blood within two minutes post-injection. Lipid extracts of liver and adipose tissue exhibited the greatest relative incorporation of (/sup 14/C)..beta..-hydroxybutyrate followed by lung and heart tissues (3540, 3674, 1214, and 528 dpm/g wet weight, respectively). In a second study, five gravid gilts during late gestation were used to determine utero-placental transfer of maternal free fatty acids (FFA). Using similar techniques as Exp. 1, injections were given containing (/sup 14/C) linoleic acid and (/sup 3/H) palmitic acid or (/sup 14/C) octanoic acid. In a third experiment, gravid gilts were fed supplemental energy as starch (C), soybean oil (SO) or medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) during late gestation to determine the influence on colostrum composition and neonatal pig glucose homeostasis. Energy content of colostrum was increased (P = 0.05 by feeding SO and MCT. After a 36 h fast, mean piglet glucose concentrations were higher (P < 0.05) for MCT pigs. Glucose and creatinine levels showed quadratic effects, while FFA and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) exhibited cubic patterns during the fasting period. Although creatine levels were similar, BUN concentrations were higher (P < 0.01) for MCT progeny.

  6. Placental expression profile of imprinted genes impacts birth weight

    PubMed Central

    Kappil, Maya A; Green, Benjamin B; Armstrong, David A; Sharp, Andrew J; Lambertini, Luca; Marsit, Carmen J; Chen, Jia

    2015-01-01

    The importance of imprinted genes in regulating feto-placental development has been long established. However, a comprehensive assessment of the role of placental imprinted gene expression on fetal growth has yet to be conducted. In this study, we examined the association between the placental expression of 108 established and putative imprinted genes and birth weight in 677 term pregnancies, oversampled for small for gestational age (SGA) and large for gestational age (LGA) infants. Using adjusted multinomial regression analyses, a 2-fold increase in the expression of 9 imprinted genes was positively associated with LGA status: BLCAP [odds ratio (OR) = 3.78, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.83, 7.82], DLK1 [OR = 1.63, 95% CI: 1.27, 2.09], H19 [OR = 2.79, 95% CI: 1.77, 4.42], IGF2 [OR = 1.43, 95% CI:1.31, 2.40], MEG3 [OR = 1.42, 95% CI: 1.19, 1.71], MEST [OR = 4.78, 95% CI: 2.64, 8.65], NNAT [OR = 1.40, 95% CI: 1.05, 1.86], NDN [OR = 2.52, 95% CI: 1.72, 3.68], and PLAGL1 [OR = 1.85, 95% CI: 1.40, 2.44]. For SGA status, a 2-fold increase in MEST expression was associated with decreased risk [OR = 0.31, 95% CI: 0.17, 0.58], while a 2-fold increase in NNAT expression was associated with increased risk [OR = 1.52, 95% CI: 1.1, 2.1]. Following a factor analysis, all genes significantly associated with SGA or LGA status loaded onto 2 of the 8 gene-sets underlying the variability in the dataset. Our comprehensive placental profiling of imprinted genes in a large birth cohort supports the importance of these genes for fetal growth. Given that abnormal birth weight is implicated in numerous diseases and developmental abnormalities, the expression pattern of placental imprinted genes has the potential to be developed as a novel biomarker for postnatal health outcomes. PMID:26186239

  7. Review: Exploration of placentation from human beings to ocean-living species.

    PubMed

    Soma, H; Murai, N; Tanaka, K; Oguro, T; Kokuba, H; Yoshihama, I; Fujita, K; Mineo, S; Toda, M; Uchida, S; Mogoe, T

    2013-03-01

    This review covers four topics. 1) Placental pathology in Himalayan mountain people. To determine morphological changes of the placenta at high altitude, pathological examination was made of 1000 Himalayan placentas obtained in Nepal and Tibet and the results compared with Japanese placentas delivered at sea level. Characteristic findings in the placental villi of the Himalayan group included high incidences of villous chorangiosis and chorangioma. These processes were clarified by ultrastructural observation. 2) Placentation in Sirenians. The giant Takikawa sea cow, which lived 5 million years ago, was discovered on Hokkaido, Japan. It was an ancestor of the dugong as well as the manatees. Sirenia, the sea cow group, shares a common ancestor with Proboscidea, the elephants, even though they now inhabit quite different environments. A comparison was made of their zonary endothelial type of placentation. 3) Placentation in sharks and rays. The remarkable placentation of hammerhead sharks and manta rays is described. 4) Placentation in the Antarctic minke whale. Placental tissue samples of this whale were obtained from the Japan Institute of Cetacean Research. In an ultrastructural study of the utero-placental junction, microfilamental processes of the allantochorionic zone and crypt formation were visualized.

  8. Determination of placental weight using two-dimensional sonography and volumetric mathematic modeling.

    PubMed

    Azpurua, Humberto; Funai, Edmund F; Coraluzzi, Luisa M; Doherty, Leo F; Sasson, Isaac E; Kliman, Merwin; Kliman, Harvey J

    2010-02-01

    An abnormally decreased placental weight has been linked to increased perinatal complications, including intrauterine fetal demise (IUFD) and fetal growth restriction (IUGR). Despite its promise, determining placental weight prenatally using three-dimensional systems is time-consuming and requires expensive technology and expertise. We propose a novel method using two-dimensional sonography that provides an immediate estimation of placental volume. Placental volume was calculated in 29 third-trimester pregnancies using linear measurements of placental width, height, and thickness to calculate the convex-concave shell volume within 24 hours of birth. Data were analyzed to calculate Spearman's rho (r (s)) and significance. There was a significant correlation between estimated placental volume (EPV) and actual placental weight (r (s) = 0.80, P < 0.001). Subgroup analysis of preterm gestations ( N = 14) revealed an even more significant correlation of EPV to actual placental weight (r (s) = 0.89, P < 0.001). Placental weight can be accurately predicted by two-dimensional ultrasound with volumetric calculations. This method is simple, rapid, and accurate, making it practical for routine prenatal care, as well as for high-risk cases with decreased fetal movement and IUGR. Routine EPV surveillance may decrease the rates of perinatal complications and unexpected IUFD. PMID:19653142

  9. Review: Exploration of placentation from human beings to ocean-living species.

    PubMed

    Soma, H; Murai, N; Tanaka, K; Oguro, T; Kokuba, H; Yoshihama, I; Fujita, K; Mineo, S; Toda, M; Uchida, S; Mogoe, T

    2013-03-01

    This review covers four topics. 1) Placental pathology in Himalayan mountain people. To determine morphological changes of the placenta at high altitude, pathological examination was made of 1000 Himalayan placentas obtained in Nepal and Tibet and the results compared with Japanese placentas delivered at sea level. Characteristic findings in the placental villi of the Himalayan group included high incidences of villous chorangiosis and chorangioma. These processes were clarified by ultrastructural observation. 2) Placentation in Sirenians. The giant Takikawa sea cow, which lived 5 million years ago, was discovered on Hokkaido, Japan. It was an ancestor of the dugong as well as the manatees. Sirenia, the sea cow group, shares a common ancestor with Proboscidea, the elephants, even though they now inhabit quite different environments. A comparison was made of their zonary endothelial type of placentation. 3) Placentation in sharks and rays. The remarkable placentation of hammerhead sharks and manta rays is described. 4) Placentation in the Antarctic minke whale. Placental tissue samples of this whale were obtained from the Japan Institute of Cetacean Research. In an ultrastructural study of the utero-placental junction, microfilamental processes of the allantochorionic zone and crypt formation were visualized. PMID:23332416

  10. Maternal Obesity is Associated with a Lipotoxic Placental Environment

    PubMed Central

    Saben, Jessica; Lindsey, Forrest; Zhong, Ying; Thakali, Keshari; Badger, Thomas M.; Andres, Aline; Gomez-Acevedo, Horacio; Shankar, Kartik

    2014-01-01

    Maternal obesity is associated with placental lipotoxicity, oxidative stress, and inflammation, where MAPK activity may play a central role. Accordingly, we have previously shown that placenta from obese women have increased activation of MAPK-JNK. Here, we performed RNA-sequencing on term placenta from twenty-two subjects who were dichotomized based on pre-pregnancy BMI into lean (BMI 19–24 kg/m2; n = 12) and obese groups (BMI, 32–43 kg/m2; n = 12). RNA-seq revealed 288 genes to be significantly different in placenta from obese women by ≥1.4-fold. GO analysis identified genes related to lipid metabolism, angiogenesis, hormone activity, and cytokine activity to be altered in placenta from obese women. Indicative of a lipotoxic environment, increased placental lipid and CIDEA protein were associated with decreased AMPK and increased activation of NF-κB(p65) in placenta from obese women. Furthermore, we observed a 25% decrease in total antioxidant capacity and increased nuclear FOXO4 localization in placenta from obese women that was significantly associated with JNK activation, suggesting that maternal obesity may also be associated with increased oxidative stress in placenta. Maternal obesity was also associated with decreased HIF-1α protein expression, suggesting a potential link between increased inflammation/oxidative stress and decreased angiogenic factors. Together, these findings indicate that maternal obesity leads to a lipotoxic placental environment that is associated with decreased regulators of angiogenesis and increased markers of inflammation and oxidative stress. PMID:24484739

  11. A novel software-based technique for quantifying placental calcifications and infarctions from ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, John T.; McAuliffe, Fionnuala; Higgins, Mary; Stanton, Marie; Brennan, Patrick

    2008-03-01

    In obstetrics, antenatal ultrasound assessment of placental morphology comprises an important part of the estimation of fetal health. Ultrasound analysis of the placenta may reveal abnormalities such as placental calcification and infarcts. Current methods of quantification of these abnormalities are subjective and involve a grading system of Grannum stages I-III. The aim of this project is to develop a software tool that quantifies semi-automatically placental ultrasound images and facilitates the assessment of placental morphology. We have developed a 2D ultrasound imaging software tool that allows the obstetrician or sonographer to define the placental region of interest. A secondary reference map is created for use in our quantification algorithm. Using a slider technique the user can easily define an upper threshold based on high intensity for calcification classification and a lower threshold to define infarction regions based on low intensity within the defined region of interest. The percentage of the placental area that is calcified and also the percentage of infarction is calculated and this is the basis of our new metric. Ultrasound images of abnormal and normal placentas have been acquired to aid our software development. A full clinical prospective evaluation is currently being performed and we are currently applying this technology to the three-dimensional ultrasound domain. We have developed a novel software-based technique for calculating the extent of placental calcification and infarction, providing a new metric in this field. Our new metric may provide a more accurate measurement of placental calcification and infarction than current techniques.

  12. Placental Malaria in Colombia: Histopathologic Findings in Plasmodium vivax and P. falciparum Infections

    PubMed Central

    Carmona-Fonseca, Jaime; Arango, Eliana; Maestre, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    Studies on gestational malaria and placental malaria have been scarce in malaria-endemic areas of the Western Hemisphere. To describe the histopathology of placental malaria in Colombia, a longitudinal descriptive study was conducted. In this study, 179 placentas were studied by histologic analysis (112 with gestational malaria and 67 negative for malaria). Placental malaria was confirmed in 22.35%, 50.0% had previous infections, and 47.5% had acute infections. Typical malaria-associated changes were observed in 37%. The most common changes were villitis, intervillitis, deciduitis, increased fibrin deposition, increased syncytial knots, mononuclear (monocytes/macrophages and lymphocytes), polymorphonuclear cell infiltration, and trophozoites in fetal erythrocytes. No association was found between type of placental changes observed and histopathologic classification of placental malaria. The findings are consistent with those reported for placental malaria in other regions. Plasmodium vivax was the main parasite responsible for placental and gestational malaria, but its role in the pathogenesis of placental malaria was not conclusive. PMID:23546807

  13. Modern management of hypervascular placental polypoid mass following spontaneous abortion: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Marques, Kevin; Looney, Christopher; Hayslip, Clifford; Gavrilova-Jordan, Larisa

    2011-08-01

    Hypervascular placental polypoid mass is a possible source of acute hemorrhage after pregnancy. We present a case report and literature review of a rare case after spontaneous miscarriage. We describe the diagnosis, imaging, and management of placental polyps, which includes the use of iliac artery occlusion catheters with concomitant hysteroscopic resection.

  14. Effect of Fetal Size on Fetal Placental Hyaluronan and Hyaluronoglucosaminidases Throughout Gestation in the Pig

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous results indicated that the trophoblast-endometrial epithelial cell bilayer of porcine placenta undergoes microscopic folding during gestation, and the folded bilayer is embedded in placental stroma. We hypothesized that hyaluronan was a component of placental stroma, and that hyaluronidases...

  15. Malignant cancer and invasive placentation: A case for positive pleiotropy between endometrial and malignancy phenotypes.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Alaric W; Wagner, Günter P

    2014-01-01

    Cancer metastasis is an invasive process that involves the transplantation of cells into new environments. Since human placentation is also invasive, hypotheses about a relationship between invasive placentation in eutherian mammals and metastasis have been proposed. The relationship between metastatic cancer and invasive placentation is usually presented in terms of antagonistic pleiotropy. According to this hypothesis, evolution of invasive placentation also established the mechanisms for cancer metastasis. Here, in contrast, we argue that the secondary evolution of less invasive placentation in some mammalian lineages may have resulted in positive pleiotropic effects on cancer survival by lowering malignancy rates. These positive pleiotropic effects would manifest themselves as resistance to cancer cell invasion. To provide a preliminary test of this proposal, we re-analyze data from Priester and Mantel (Occurrence of tumors in domestic animals. Data from 12 United States and Canadian colleges of veterinary medicine. J Natl Cancer Inst 1971; 47: :1333-44) about malignancy rates in cows, horses, cats and dogs. From our analysis we found that equines and bovines, animals with less invasive placentation, have lower rates of metastatic cancer than felines and canines in skin and glandular epithelial cancers as well as connective tissue sarcomas. We conclude that a link between type of placentation and species-specific malignancy rates is more likely related to derived mechanisms that suppress invasion rather than different degrees of fetal placental aggressiveness. PMID:25324490

  16. [Potentialities of ultrasound study in the evaluation of developing chronic placental insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Nagaĭtseva, E A; Serova, N S

    2013-01-01

    The paper clarifies the ultrasound semiotics of the normal echographic pattern of the placenta in physiological pregnancy. It gives and systematizes the possible variants of the atypical placental structure in placental insufficiency in patients with spontaneous pregnancy and in women undergoing in vitro fertilization.

  17. Selection for placental efficiency in swine: genetic parameters and trends.

    PubMed

    Mesa, H; Safranski, T J; Fischer, K A; Cammack, K M; Lamberson, W R

    2005-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to estimate response to divergent selection for an index of placental efficiency in swine, and to evaluate the effect of placental efficiency on litter size. The selection index (SI) included total born (TB), birth weight (BRWT), and placental weight (PW), and was designed to increase in the high line (H) or decrease in the low line (L) the efficiency of the placental function (PE), defined as the ratio BRWT:PW. (Co)variance components were estimated for direct and maternal additive effects by using an animal model with MTDFREML procedures. Estimated breeding values were calculated by using records on individual BRWT (n = 2,111), PW (n = 2,006), PE (n = 1,677), and SI (n = 1,677). Litter traits were evaluated using records on 193 litters. The model included the fixed effects of contemporary group for all traits, with the addition of sex for individual traits and parity for litter traits. Litter was fitted as an uncorrelated random effect for all traits, and TB was used as a linear and quadratic covariate for BRWT, PW, and PE. Direct heritability estimates from single-trait models were 0.03, 0.25, 0.18, 0.11, and 0.08 for BRWT, PW, PE, SI, and TB, respectively. Estimated breeding values were compared between lines by using a model including generation, line within generation, and replicate within line as the error term. Estimates of genetic divergence were 20.7 +/- 2.7 g, 0.24 +/- 0.03, 0.11 +/- 0.02, and 0.07 +/- 0.02 per generation for PW, PE, SI, and TB, respectively (P < 0.01), but divergence was not significant for BRWT. At Generation 4, direct EBV was higher in L than in H for PW (55.9 +/- 8.7 vs. -24.2 +/- 9.5 g, respectively; P < 0.01) and higher in H than in L for PE (0.58 +/- 0.10 vs. -0.35 +/- 0.09 g, respectively; P < 0.01). However, EBV was not different for BRWT, SI, or TB. These results indicate that PW and PE are susceptible to change by genetic selection; however, the correlated response in TB was an unexpected

  18. Making the impossible possible: rooting the tree of placental mammals.

    PubMed

    Teeling, Emma C; Hedges, S Blair

    2013-09-01

    Untangling the root of the evolutionary tree of placental mammals has been nearly an impossible task. The good news is that only three possibilities are seriously considered. The bad news is that all three possibilities are seriously considered. Paleontologists favor a root anchored by Xenarthra (e.g., sloths and anteater), whereas molecular evolutionists have favored the two other possible roots: Afrotheria (e.g., elephants, hyraxes, and tenrecs) and Atlantogenata (Afrotheria + Xenarthra). Now, two groups of researchers have scrutinized the largest available genomic data sets bearing on the question and have come to opposite conclusions, as reported in this issue of Molecular Biology and Evolution. Needless to say, more research is needed.

  19. Placental DEPTOR as a stress sensor during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mparmpakas, Dionisis; Zachariades, Elena; Goumenou, Anastasia; Gidron, Yori; Karteris, Emmanouil

    2012-04-01

    DEPTOR [DEP-domain-containing and mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin)-interacting protein] is a modulator of mTOR signalling that binds to mTORC (mTOR complex) 1 and mTORC2. However, to date, the precise functions of DEPTOR are not fully elucidated, particularly in reproductive tissues where mTOR acts as a placental nutrient sensor. Pregnancy is associated with major physiological and psychosocial changes and adaptation to these changes is crucial for normal fetal development. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that maternal stress can affect mTOR signalling at term, and, as a result, influence placental growth. We first investigated the expression of DEPTOR, mTOR, rictor (rapamycin-insensitive companion of mTOR) and raptor (regulatory associated protein of mTOR) from human placentas (n=23) using Q-PCR (quantitative PCR), and correlated these data to days of pregnancy and maternal stress, as well as placental and fetal weight. Maternal and fetal cortisol levels were also measured. JEG-3 and BeWo cells, used as placental in vitro models, were treated with cortisol and DEPTOR expression was assessed using Q-PCR. DEPTOR appears to be the predominant transcript in the human placenta compared with mTOR, rictor and raptor in both term (n=13) and preterm (n=10) placentas as assessed by Q-PCR. There was a significantly lower level only of log-DEPTOR gene expression in the high stress group (-1.34) than in the low stress group (0.07; t₂₀=2.41, P=0.026). Interestingly, mothers with high stress had significantly elevated levels of cortisol (8555 pg/ml) compared with those with low stress (4900 pg/ml). We then tested the hypothesis that cortisol can directly affect DEPTOR expression. When BeWo cells were treated with cortisol 10, 100 and 1000 nM, the expression of DEPTOR was significantly down-regulated by 50, 41 and 39% (all P<0.05) respectively when compared with basal levels. Treatment of JEG-3 cells with cortisol, led to a significant decrease of DEPTOR

  20. Maternal omega-3 fatty acid intake increases placental labyrinthine antioxidant capacity but does not protect against fetal growth restriction induced by placental ischaemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Jones, Megan L; Mark, Peter J; Waddell, Brendan J

    2013-12-01

    Placental oxidative stress plays a key role in the pathophysiology of several placenta-related disorders. Oxidative stress occurs when excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) damages cellular components, an outcome limited by antioxidant enzymes; mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) also limits ROS production. We recently reported that maternal dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 PUFA) supplementation reduced placental oxidative damage and enhanced fetal and placental growth in the rats. Here, we examined the effect of n-3 PUFAs on placental antioxidant defences and whether n-3 PUFA supplementation could prevent growth restriction induced by placental ischaemia-reperfusion (IR), a known inducer of oxidative stress. Rats were fed either standard or high-n-3 PUFA diets from day 1 of pregnancy. Placentas were collected on days 17 and 22 in untreated pregnancies (term=day 23) and at day 22 following IR treatment on day 17. Expression of several antioxidant enzyme genes (Sod1, Sod2, Sod3, Cat, Txn1 and Gpx3) and Ucp2 was measured by quantitative RT-PCR in the placental labyrinth zone (LZ) and junctional zone (JZ). Cytosolic superoxide dismutase (SOD), mitochondrial SOD and catalase (CAT) activities were also analyzed. Maternal n-3 PUFA supplementation increased LZ mRNA expression of Cat at both gestational days (2- and 1.5-fold respectively; P<0.01) and female Sod2 at day 22 (1.4-fold, P<0.01). Cytosolic SOD activity increased with n-3 PUFA supplementation at day 22 (1.3-fold, P<0.05). Sod1 and Txn1 expression decreased marginally (30 and 22%, P<0.05). JZ antioxidant defences were largely unaffected by diet. Despite increased LZ antioxidant defences, maternal n-3 PUFA supplementation did not protect against placental IR-induced growth restriction of the fetus and placental LZ.

  1. Placental expression and molecular characterization of aromatase cytochrome P450 in the spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta).

    PubMed

    Conley, A J; Corbin, C J; Browne, P; Mapes, S M; Place, N J; Hughes, A L; Glickman, S E

    2007-07-01

    At birth, the external genitalia of female spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta) are the most masculinized of any known mammal, but are still sexually differentiated. Placental aromatase cytochrome P450 (P450arom) is an important route of androgen metabolism protecting human female fetuses from virilization in utero. Therefore, placental P450arom expression was examined in spotted hyenas to determine levels during genital differentiation, and to compare molecular characteristics between the hyena and human placental enzymes. Hyena placental P450arom activity was determined at gestational days (GD) 31, 35, 45, 65 and 95 (term, 110), and the relative sensitivity of hyena and human placental enzyme to inhibition by the specific inhibitor, Letrozole, was also examined. Expression of hyena P450arom in placenta was localized by immuno-histochemistry, and a full-length cDNA was cloned for phylogenetic analysis. Aromatase activity increased from GD31 to a peak at 45 and 65, apparently decreasing later in gestation. This activity was more sensitive to inhibition by Letrozole than was human placental aromatase activity. Expression of P450arom was localized to syncytiotrophoblast and giant cells of mid-gestation placentas. The coding sequence of hyena P450arom was 94% and 86% identical to the canine and human enzymes respectively, as reflected by phylogenetic analyses. These data demonstrate for the first time that hyena placental aromatase activity is comparable to that of human placentas when genital differentiation is in progress. This suggests that even in female spotted hyenas clitoral differentiation is likely protected from virilization by placental androgen metabolism. Decreased placental aromatase activity in late gestation may be equally important in allowing androgen to program behaviors at birth. Although hyena P450arom is closely related to the canine enzyme, both placental anatomy and P450arom expression differ. Other hyaenids and carnivores must be investigated to

  2. An Ex vivo culture model for placental cytomegalovirus infection using slices of Guinea pig placental tissue.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Souichi; Katano, Harutaka; Sato, Yuko; Fukuchi, Saki; Hashimoto, Kaede; Inoue, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Congenital infection with human cytomegalovirus (CMV) through the placenta is one of the major causes of birth and developmental abnormalities. Guinea pig CMV (GPCMV) causes in utero infection, which makes its animal models useful for studies on congenital diseases. Here, we established an ex vivo culture method for tissue slices prepared from guinea pig placentas and demonstrated that viral spread in the model resembles those in the placenta of GPCMV-infected animals and that the infection is independent of the pentameric glycoprotein complex for endothelial/epithelial cell tropism. Thus, this model affords a useful tool for pathobiological studies on CMV placental infection.

  3. Cool sperm: why some placental mammals have a scrotum.

    PubMed

    Lovegrove, B G

    2014-05-01

    Throughout the Cenozoic, the fitness benefits of the scrotum in placental mammals presumably outweighed the fitness costs through damage, yet a definitive hypothesis for its evolution remains elusive. Here, I present an hypothesis (Endothermic Pulses Hypothesis) which argues that the evolution of the scrotum was driven by Cenozoic pulses in endothermy, that is, increases in normothermic body temperature, which occurred in Boreotheria (rodents, primates, lagomorphs, carnivores, bats, lipotyphylans and ungulates) in response to factors such as cursoriality and climate adaptation. The model argues that stabilizing selection maintained an optimum temperature for spermatogenesis and sperm storage throughout the Cenozoic at the lower plesiomorphic levels of body temperature that prevailed in ancestral mammals for at least 163 million years. Evolutionary stasis may have been driven by reduced rates of germ-cell mutations at lower body temperatures. Following the extinction of the dinosaurs at the Cretaceous-Palaeogene boundary 65.5 mya, immediate pulses in endothermy occurred associated with the dramatic radiation of the modern placental mammal orders. The fitness advantages of an optimum temperature of spermatogenesis outweighed the potential costs of testes externalization and paved the way for the evolution of the scrotum. The scrotum evolved within several hundred thousand years of the K-Pg extinction, probably associated initially with the evolution of cursoriality, and arguably facilitated mid- and late Cenozoic metabolic adaptations to factors such as climate, flight in bats and sociality in primates.

  4. Clinical and pathologic aspects of recurrent placental villitis.

    PubMed

    Redline, R W; Abramowsky, C R

    1985-07-01

    In a retrospective survey, recurrent villitis was identified in ten of 59 patients in whom placental villitis had been diagnosed. The ten patients had a total of 41 pregnancies, with a reproductive loss of 60 per cent. In addition to enhanced fetal losses in all trimesters of gestation and postnatally, the incidences of fetal growth retardation and premature delivery were increased. There was no evidence of recent TORCH (toxoplasma, rubella, cytomegalovirus, herpes) infection, but all patients tested had rubella immunity. In six patients genital cultures were positive for gonorrhea and assorted microorganisms. Uterine abnormalities, including two septate uteri, one incompetent cervix, one submucosal leiomyoma, and one retroflexion, were common, and vaginal bleeding had occurred in five patients. Other factors included obesity (five patients) and clinical and laboratory evidence of autoimmunity (four of the five patients tested). In a control group of 20 patients with nonrecurrent villitis, the perinatal loss rate (37 per cent) was lower, and the incidences of positive cultures, uterine structural anomalies, obesity, and autoimmunity were also lower. Placental histologic findings included decidual plasma cell and intervillous fibrin and histiocytic infiltration, in addition to villous inflammation. These lesions, although consistent for a given patient, defined two clinically relevant groups of patients. The results of this study suggest that recurrent villitis is more frequent than previously reported, that it is associated with high perinatal mortality, and that immunologic and structural abnormalities in the host may play a role in its pathogenesis.

  5. Placental pathology: a systematic approach with clinical correlations.

    PubMed

    Redline, R W

    2008-03-01

    Despite advances over the past 25 years in the monitoring of in utero fetal status, the gravid uterus remains a "black box" integrating underlying genetic risk factors, preexisting maternal disease, and injurious extrinsic events in a poorly understood way to produce an evolving state linked to pregnancy outcome. It is currently believed that many short- and long-term adverse pregnancy outcomes and even some long-term chronic diseases extending into adult life are at least in part determined by processes occurring during intrauterine life. The placenta has been described as a "diary of intrauterine life" and has the potential to illuminate many aspects of these processes. Unfortunately a systematic and objective catalog of placental abnormalities has never been agreed upon. This report outlines a simple conceptual framework separating placental patterns of injury and maladaptation into three categories of lesions affecting the maternal and fetal vasculature (maldevelopment, obstruction, and disruption) and two categories of inflammatory lesions (infectious and idiopathic). Data are presented supporting the importance of these processes for an understanding of preterm delivery, intrauterine growth restriction, hypoxic-ischemic injury, and recurrent pregnancy loss.

  6. Placentation in mammals: Definitive placenta, yolk sac, and paraplacenta.

    PubMed

    Carter, A M; Enders, A C

    2016-07-01

    An overview is given of variations in placentation with particular focus on yolk sac, paraplacenta, and other structures important to histotrophic nutrition. The placenta proper varies in general shape, internal structure, and the number of tissues in the interhemal barrier. Yolk sac membranes persist to term in insectivores, colugos, rodents, and lagomorphs. In the latter two orders, they are of known importance for maternal-fetal transfer of antibodies, vitamins, lipids, and proteins. The detached yolk sac of bats is also active throughout gestation. A vascular paraplacenta, or smooth chorioallantois, has known functions in ruminants and carnivores and is found in several other orders of mammal where its function has yet to be explored. In human gestation, the chorion (avascular chorioallantois) is important for hormone synthesis. The true chorion of squirrels and hedgehogs is avascular but may nevertheless allow transfer from mother to fetus through the exocelom. Hemophagous areas with columnar trophoblast are paraplacental structures in carnivores and elephants but occur also within the placenta as in hyenas and moles. In shrews, it is the yolk sac that ingests and processes red cells. Areolas and chorionic vesicles are other structures important for absorption of uterine secretions and ingestion of cellular debris. In conclusion, we find that paraplacental structures, while showing less variation than the placenta proper, contribute not just to the integrity of overall placentation, but in various ways to maternal-fetal interrelationships. PMID:27155730

  7. Bovine placental lactogen: isolation purification and measurement in biological fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, C.R.

    1986-01-01

    Studies were conducted to isolate and purify bovine placental lactogen (bPL) and to develop a radioimmunoassay to this protein. Bovine placental lactogen was isolated from culture medium after a 24 hr culture of fetal cotyledonary tissue. Cotyledonary explants were stimulated to secrete bPL by either addition of bovine growth hormone (NIH-B8) to the medium or co-culture of cotyledon and caruncular tissue. Production of bPL was greatly affected by explant size and 70% of that produced in a 48 hr culture was released in the first 12 hr. Purification of bPL was accomplished using a column chromatographic scheme that involved gel filtration, ion exchange and chromatofocusing chromatography. A radioimmunoassay to bPL was developed using an antibody raised at the USDA Beltsville (F56). Dose response curves of amniotic or allantoic fluid or fetal and maternal serum were parallel to the standard curve and bPL was quantitatively recovered at from 82-125%. Using the radioimmunoassay, samples of amniotic and allantoic fluids and fetal and maternal serum were measured for bPL. Concentrations of bPL ranged from undetectable to 50 ng/ml, with fetal blood having the highest concentrations and amniotic fluid the lowest.

  8. Observer reliability in assessing placental maturity by histology.

    PubMed Central

    Khong, T Y; Staples, A; Bendon, R W; Chambers, H M; Gould, S J; Knowles, S; Shen-Schwarz, S

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--To evaluate the ability of five experienced perinatal pathologists to assess placental maturity reliably by histology. METHODS--Twenty four haematoxylin and eosin slides, six each from placentas of 27, 31, 35, and 39 weeks' gestation, were circulated to five pathologists on three separate occasions. The slides were labelled with the correct or incorrect gestational ages. RESULTS--The mean absolute error over all 360 readings was 2.72 weeks. Only 54% of the slides were assessed within two weeks of the correct gestation. Pathologist tended to overestimate younger gestations and underestimate older gestations. Two, and possibly three, pathologist were influenced by the gestational age state on the label. One pathologist, who did not appear to be influenced by the label, was more accurate in diagnosing gestation of the placentas than other colleagues. CONCLUSIONS--Experienced pathologists can have difficulty in assessing the villous maturity of placentas by histology. They can also be influenced by clinical information provided, such as gestational age. Other observer reliability studies must address the issue of the influence of labelled information on observer variation. A difference in maturation would have to be of a six week magnitude to have a chance of being detected by current methods. This may limit the value of the histological diagnosis of placental dysmaturity as a surrogate marker for uteroplacental ischaemia. PMID:7629287

  9. Placental Ischemia and Resultant Phenotype in Animal Models of Preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    LaMarca, Babbette; Amaral, Lorena M; Harmon, Ashlyn C; Cornelius, Denise C; Faulkner, Jessica L; Cunningham, Mark W

    2016-04-01

    Preeclampsia is new onset (or worsening of preexisting) hypertension that occurs during pregnancy. It is accompanied by chronic inflammation, intrauterine growth restriction, elevated anti-angiogenic factors, and can occur with or without proteinuria. Although the exact etiology is unknown, it is thought that preeclampsia begins early in gestation with reduced uterine spiral artery remodeling leading to decreased vasculogenesis of the placenta as the pregnancy progresses. Soluble factors, stimulated by the ischemic placenta, shower the maternal vascular endothelium and are thought to cause endothelial dysfunction and to contribute to the development of hypertension during pregnancy. Due to the difficulty in studying such soluble factors in pregnant women, various animal models have been designed. Studies from these models have contributed to a better understanding of how factors released in response to placental ischemia may lead to increased blood pressure and reduced fetal weight during pregnancy. This review will highlight various animal models and the major findings indicating the importance of placental ischemia to lead to the pathophysiology observed in preeclamptic patients. PMID:27076345

  10. A Rare Cause of Placental Abruption: Uterine Torsion.

    PubMed

    Ulu, Ipek; Güneş, Muhammed Siraç; Kiran, Gürkan; Gülşen, Mehmet Serdar

    2016-01-01

    Uterine torsion is defined as a rotation on its long axis and it is a dangerous, unexpected obstetric emergency. We report a case of uterine torsion at 32 weeks of gestation in a singleton pregnancy. A 37-year-old woman with multiple prior cesarean deliveries referred to emergency unit of our hospital at 32 weeks of gestation with severe abdominal pain and mild vaginal bleeding. Ultrasonography showed a single fetus in vertex position, with a normal amniotic fluid. Fetal biometer was appropriate for 32 weeks of gestation. Placental location was anterior with a subchorionic hypoechogenic small area which was suspected to be a sign of placental abruption. An emergency cesarean section was performed under general anesthesia. The 180° uterine torsion was diagnosed and it was not possible to perform detorsion of the gravid uterus by exteriorization by pfannenstiel incision. Posterior hysterotomy was performed and a male baby of 1830 grams weight was delivered. The newborn was transported to Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) of another hospital and discharged within two weeks. Patient recovered well and was discharged on second postoperation day. Uterine torsion is a very rare and life threatening situation. In unexpected cases posterior low transuerse hysterotomy is generally performed and it is suggested as a safe choice when detorsion was not accomplished. It is not easy to keep in mind the possibility of uterine torsion in cases of abdominal pain during pregnancy. Because it generally causes abruption, management of abruption is vitally important to prevent fetal mortality. PMID:26894131

  11. Placental microRNA expression in pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Enquobahrie, Daniel A.; Abetew, Dejene F.; Sorensen, Tanya K.; Willoughby, David; Chidambaram, Kumaravel; Williams, Michelle A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The role of post-transcription regulation in preeclampsia is largely unknown. We investigated preeclampsia related placental microRNA (miRNA) expression using microarray and confirmatory qRT-PCR experiments. Study design Placental expressions of characterized and novel miRNAs (1,295 probes) were measured in samples collected from 20 preeclampsia cases and 20 controls. Differential expression was evaluated using Students T-test and fold change analyses. In pathway analysis, we examined functions/functional relationships of targets of differentially expressed miRNAs. Results Eight miRNAs were differentially expressed (1 up- and 7 down-regulated) among preeclampsia cases compared with controls. These included previously identified candidates (miR-210, miR-1 and a miRNA in the 14q32.31 cluster region) and others that are novel (miR- 584 and miR-34c-5p). These miRNAs target genes that participate in organ/system development (cardiovascular and reproductive system), immunologic dysfunction, cell adhesion, cell cycle and signaling. Conclusion Expression of microRNAs that target genes in diverse pathophysiological processes is altered in the setting of preeclampsia. PMID:21093846

  12. Impact of placental insufficiency on fetal skeletal muscle growth.

    PubMed

    Brown, Laura D; Hay, William W

    2016-11-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) caused by placental insufficiency is one of the most common and complex problems in perinatology, with no known cure. In pregnancies affected by placental insufficiency, a poorly functioning placenta restricts nutrient supply to the fetus and prevents normal fetal growth. Among other significant deficits in organ development, the IUGR fetus characteristically has less lean body and skeletal muscle mass than their appropriately-grown counterparts. Reduced skeletal muscle growth is not fully compensated after birth, as individuals who were born small for gestational age (SGA) from IUGR have persistent reductions in muscle mass and strength into adulthood. The consequences of restricted muscle growth and accelerated postnatal "catch-up" growth in the form of adiposity may contribute to the increased later life risk for visceral adiposity, peripheral insulin resistance, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease in individuals who were formerly IUGR. This review will discuss how an insufficient placenta results in impaired fetal skeletal muscle growth and how lifelong reductions in muscle mass might contribute to increased metabolic disease risk in this vulnerable population.

  13. Maternal passive smoking and its effect on maternal, neonatal and placental parameters.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, K N; Vidyadaran, M K; Goh, Y M; Nasaruddin, A A; Jammal, A B E; Zainab, S

    2005-08-01

    A study was undertaken to 1) determine the effects of tobacco smoke exposure on maternal and neonatal weight and body mass index (BMI) and placental weight, volume and surface area and 2) establish any correlations between the placental surface area, volume and weight with maternal and neonatal body weight and BMI in mothers exposed to cigarette smoke. A total of 154 full-term placentae, 65 from mothers exposed to tobacco smoke and 89 from non-exposed mothers were collected from Kuala Lumpur Maternity Hospital. The placental surface area was determined using a stereological grid, the volume by Scherle's method and the weight by using an electronic weighing machine. In general there were no differences in maternal, placental and neonatal parameters between the exposed and non-exposed groups. However, there were significant correlations between placental weight with maternal weight and maternal BMI in both exposed (r = 0.315; p = 0.013) and (r = 0.265; p = 0.038), and non-exposed (r = 0.224; p = 0.035) and (r = 0.241; p = 0.023) mothers. It was also found that the maternal weight on admission correlated significantly with placental weight in both Malay (r = 0.405; p = 0.020) and Indian (r = 0.553; p = 0.050) passive smokers. Correcting the placental parameters for the maternal weight had no effect on the results. PMID:16379184

  14. Placental profiling of UGT1A enzyme expression and activity and interactions with preeclampsia at term.

    PubMed

    Collier, Abby C; Thévenon, Audrey D; Goh, William; Hiraoka, Mark; Kendal-Wright, Claire E

    2015-12-01

    Placental UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes have critical roles in hormone, nutrient, chemical balance and fetal exposure during pregnancy. Placental UGT1A isoforms were profiled and differences between preeclamptic (PE) and non-PE placental UGT expression determined. In third trimester villous placenta, UGT1A1, 1A4, 1A6 and 1A9 were expressed and active in all specimens (n = 10), but UGT1A3, 1A5, 1A7, 1A8 and 1A10 were absent. The UGT1A activities were comparable to human liver microsomes per milligram, but placental microsome yields were only 2 % of liver (1 mg/g of tissue vs. 45 mg/g of tissue). For successful PCR, placental collection and processing within 60 min from delivery, including DNAse and ≥300 ng of RNA in reverse transcription were essential and snap freezing in liquid nitrogen immediately was the best preservation method. Although UGT1A6 mRNA was lower in PE (P < 0.001), there were no other significant effects on UGT mRNA, protein or activities. A more comprehensive tissue sample set is required for confirmation of PE interactions with UGT. Placental UGT1A enzyme expression patterns are similar to the liver and a detoxicative role for placental UGT1A is inferred. PMID:25465229

  15. Ultrasound determination of gestational age using placental thickness in female dogs: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, André Luiz Louzada; Araujo Júnior, Edward; Mendonça, Débora Sartori; Nardozza, Luciano Marcondes Machado; Moron, Antonio Fernandes; Ajzen, Sérgio Aron

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To verify if the placental thickness allows determining the gestational age, evaluating the correlation between the referred gestational age with the studied one, and the accuracy of the placental thickness measurement (biometry) with fetal morphologic parameters in bitches. Methods. The placental thickness of 336 bitches of diverse breeds was evaluated. Bitches were divided in three groups by body weight: small, medium, and big large size. The gestations pregnancies were evaluated by ultrasound from the third week of gestation. An analysis was performed between the mean values of the gestational age obtained of placental thickness by adjustment of curves and the reported gestational age. Student's t-test was applied to compare the mean of reported and placental thickness gestational age. Significance was defined as P < 0.05. Results. A positive and statistically significant correlation exists between the placental thickness and gestational age. The expression that presents the best correlation coefficient and explanation was thickness of placenta = 0.021x gestational age -0.314. Conclusion. It is possible to determine the gestational age in relation to the placental thickness measured by ultrasound in bitches with a satisfactory accuracy in relation to fetal morphologic parameters as gestational vesicle, ribs, or kidneys. PMID:22848867

  16. Ultrasound Determination of Gestational Age Using Placental Thickness in Female Dogs: An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado, André Luiz Louzada; Araujo Júnior, Edward; Mendonça, Débora Sartori; Nardozza, Luciano Marcondes Machado; Moron, Antonio Fernandes; Ajzen, Sérgio Aron

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To verify if the placental thickness allows determining the gestational age, evaluating the correlation between the referred gestational age with the studied one, and the accuracy of the placental thickness measurement (biometry) with fetal morphologic parameters in bitches. Methods. The placental thickness of 336 bitches of diverse breeds was evaluated. Bitches were divided in three groups by body weight: small, medium, and big large size. The gestations pregnancies were evaluated by ultrasound from the third week of gestation. An analysis was performed between the mean values of the gestational age obtained of placental thickness by adjustment of curves and the reported gestational age. Student's t-test was applied to compare the mean of reported and placental thickness gestational age. Significance was defined as P < 0.05. Results. A positive and statistically significant correlation exists between the placental thickness and gestational age. The expression that presents the best correlation coefficient and explanation was thickness of placenta = 0.021x gestational age −0.314. Conclusion. It is possible to determine the gestational age in relation to the placental thickness measured by ultrasound in bitches with a satisfactory accuracy in relation to fetal morphologic parameters as gestational vesicle, ribs, or kidneys. PMID:22848867

  17. Novel expression of EGFL7 in placental trophoblast and endothelial cells and its implication in preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Lacko, Lauretta A.; Massimiani, Micol; Sones, Jenny L.; Hurtado, Romulo; Salvi, Silvia; Ferrazzani, Sergio; Davisson, Robin L.; Campagnolo, Luisa; Stuhlmann, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian placenta is the site of nutrient and gas exchange between the mother and fetus, and is comprised of two principal cell types, trophoblasts and endothelial cells. Proper placental development requires invasion and differentiation of trophoblast cells, together with coordinated fetal vasculogenesis and maternal vascular remodeling. Disruption in these processes can result in placental pathologies such as preeclampsia (PE), a disease characterized by late gestational hypertension and proteinuria. Epidermal Growth Factor Like Domain 7 (EGFL7) is a largely endothelial-restricted secreted factor that is critical for embryonic vascular development, and functions by modulating the Notch signaling pathway. However, the role of EGFL7 in placental development remains unknown. In this study, we use mouse models and human placentas to begin to understand the role of EGFL7 during normal and pathological placentation. We show that Egfl7 is expressed by the endothelium of both the maternal and fetal vasculature throughout placental development. Importantly, we uncovered a previously unknown site of EGFL7 expression in the trophoblast cell lineage, including the trophectoderm, trophoblast stem cells, and placental trophoblasts. Our results demonstrate significantly reduced Egfl7 expression in human PE placentas, concurrent with a downregulation of Notch target genes. Moreover, using the BPH/5 mouse model of PE, we show that the downregulation of Egfl7 in compromised placentas occurs prior to the onset of characteristic maternal signs of PE. Together, our results implicate Egfl7 as a possible factor in normal placental development and in the etiology of PE. PMID:24751645

  18. The Uterine Placental Bed Renin-Angiotensin System in Normal and Preeclamptic Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Anton, Lauren; Merrill, David C.; Neves, Liomar A. A.; Diz, Debra I.; Corthorn, Jenny; Valdes, Gloria; Stovall, Kathryn; Gallagher, Patricia E.; Moorefield, Cheryl; Gruver, Courtney; Brosnihan, K. Bridget

    2009-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated activation of the renin-angiotensin system in the fetal placental chorionic villi, but it is unknown whether the immediately adjacent area of the maternal uterine placental bed is regulated similarly. This study measured angiotensin peptides, renin-angiotensin system component mRNAs, and receptor binding in the fundus from nonpregnant subjects (n = 19) and in the uterine placental bed from normal (n = 20) and preeclamptic (n = 14) subjects. In the uterine placental bed from normal pregnant women, angiotensin II peptide levels and angiotensinogen, angiotensin-converting enzyme, angiotensin receptor type 1 (AT1), AT2, and Mas mRNA expression were lower as compared with the nonpregnant subjects. In preeclamptic uterine placental bed, angiotensin II peptide levels and renin and angiotensin-converting enzyme mRNA expression were significantly higher than normal pregnant subjects. The AT2 receptor was the predominant receptor subtype in the nonpregnant fundus, whereas all angiotensin receptor binding was undetectable in normal and preeclamptic pregnant uterine placental bed compared with nonpregnant fundus. These findings suggest that the maternal uterine placental bed may play an endocrine role by producing angiotensin II, which acts in the adjacent placenta to vasoconstrict fetal chorionic villi vessels where we have shown previously that AT1 receptors predominate. This would lead to decreased maternal-fetal oxygen exchange and fetal nutrition, a known characteristic of preeclampsia. PMID:19520788

  19. Human placental perfusion method in the assessment of transplacental passage of antiepileptic drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Myllynen, Paeivi . E-mail: paivi.k.myllynen@oulu.fi; Pienimaeki, Paeivi; Vaehaekangas, Kirsi

    2005-09-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological diseases, affecting about 0.5 to 1% of pregnant women. It is commonly accepted that older antiepileptic drugs bear teratogenic potential. So far, no agreement has been reached about the safest antiepileptic drug during pregnancy. It is known that nearly all drugs cross the placenta at least to some extent. Nowadays, there is very little information available of the pharmacokinetics of drugs in the feto-placental unit. Detailed information about drug transport across the placenta would be valuable for the development of safe and effective treatments. For reasons of safety, human studies on placental transfer are restricted to a limited number of drugs. Interspecies differences limit the extrapolation of animal data to humans. Several in vitro methods for the study of placental transfer have been developed over the past decades. The placental perfusion method is the only experimental method that has been used to study human placental transfer of substances in organized placental tissue. The aim of this article is to review human placental perfusion data on antiepileptic drugs. According to perfusion data, it seems that most of the antiepileptic drugs are transferred across the placenta meaning significant fetal exposure.

  20. Maternal fructose drives placental uric acid production leading to adverse fetal outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Asghar, Zeenat A.; Thompson, Alysha; Chi, Maggie; Cusumano, Andrew; Scheaffer, Suzanne; Al-Hammadi, Noor; Saben, Jessica L.; Moley, Kelle H.

    2016-01-01

    Maternal metabolic diseases increase offspring risk for low birth weight and cardiometabolic diseases in adulthood. Excess fructose consumption may confer metabolic risks for both women and their offspring. However, the direct consequences of fructose intake per se are unknown. We assessed the impact of a maternal high-fructose diet on the fetal-placental unit in mice in the absence of metabolic syndrome and determined the association between maternal serum fructose and placental uric acid levels in humans. In mice, maternal fructose consumption led to placental inefficiency, fetal growth restriction, elevated fetal serum glucose and triglyceride levels. In the placenta, fructose induced de novo uric acid synthesis by activating the activities of the enzymes AMP deaminase and xanthine oxidase. Moreover, the placentas had increased lipids and altered expression of genes that control oxidative stress. Treatment of mothers with the xanthine oxidase inhibitor allopurinol reduced placental uric acid levels, prevented placental inefficiency, and improved fetal weights and serum triglycerides. Finally, in 18 women delivering at term, maternal serum fructose levels significantly correlated with placental uric acid levels. These findings suggest that in mice, excess maternal fructose consumption impairs placental function via a xanthine oxidase/uric acid-dependent mechanism, and similar effects may occur in humans. PMID:27125896

  1. Docosahexaenoic Acid Supplementation Early in Pregnancy May Prevent Deep Placentation Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal, Jorge A.

    2014-01-01

    Uteroplacental ischemia may cause preterm birth, either due to preterm labor, preterm premature rupture of membranes, or medical indication (in the presence of preeclampsia or fetal growth restriction). Uteroplacental ischemia is the product of defective deep placentation, a failure of invasion, and transformation of the spiral arteries by the trophoblast. The failure of normal placentation generates a series of clinical abnormalities nowadays called “deep placentation disorders”; they include preeclampsia, fetal growth restriction, preterm labor, preterm premature rupture of membranes, in utero fetal death, and placental abruption. Early reports suggested that a LC-PUFAs (long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids) rich diet reduces the incidence of deep placentation disorders. Recent randomized controlled trials are inconsistent to show the benefit of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) supplementation during pregnancy to prevent deep placentation disorders, but most of them showed that DHA supplementation was associated with lower risk of early preterm birth. We postulate that DHA supplementation, early in pregnancy, may reduce the incidence of deep placentation disorders. If our hypothesis is correct, DHA supplementation, early in pregnancy, will become a safe and effective strategy for primary prevention of highly relevant pregnancy diseases, such as preterm birth, preeclampsia, and fetal growth restriction. PMID:25019084

  2. Clinical development of placental malaria vaccines and immunoassays harmonization: a workshop report.

    PubMed

    Chêne, Arnaud; Houard, Sophie; Nielsen, Morten A; Hundt, Sophia; D'Alessio, Flavia; Sirima, Sodiomon B; Luty, Adrian J F; Duffy, Patrick; Leroy, Odile; Gamain, Benoit; Viebig, Nicola K

    2016-01-01

    Placental malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum infection constitutes a major health problem manifesting as severe disease and anaemia in the mother, impaired fetal development, low birth weight or spontaneous abortion. Prevention of placental malaria currently relies on two key strategies that are losing efficacy due to spread of resistance: long-lasting insecticide-treated nets and intermittent preventive treatment during pregnancy. A placental malaria vaccine would be an attractive, cost-effective complement to the existing control tools. Two placental malaria vaccine candidates are currently in Phase Ia/b clinical trials. During two workshops hosted by the European Vaccine Initiative, one in Paris in April 2014 and the other in Brussels in November 2014, the main actors in placental malaria vaccine research discussed the harmonization of clinical development plans and of the immunoassays with a goal to define standards that will allow comparative assessment of different placental malaria vaccine candidates. The recommendations of these workshops should guide researchers and clinicians in the further development of placental malaria vaccines. PMID:27639691

  3. Placental vascular defects in compromised pregnancies: effects of assisted reproductive technologies and other maternal stressors.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Lawrence P; Borowicz, Pawel P; Palmieri, Chiara; Grazul-Bilska, Anna T

    2014-01-01

    Many factors negatively affect pregnancy establishment and subsequent fetal growth and development, including maternal factors such as nutritional stress, age, body mass index, and genetic background, and external factors including environmental stress, psychosocial stress, multiple fetuses, medical conditions (e.g., polycystic ovary syndrome), lifestyle choices (e.g., alcohol consumption, smoking), and assisted reproductive technologies. These same factors have similar consequences for placental growth and development, including vascular development. We and others have shown that placental vascular development begins very early in pregnancy and determines, to a large extent, placental function-that is, the magnitude of the increase in placental blood flow and thus nutrient transport to the fetus. During the peri-implantation period and also later in pregnancy, cloned (somatic cell nuclear transfer) embryos exhibit a variety of placental defects including reduced vascularization and altered expression of angiogenic factors. Although placental defects are less pronounced in pregnancies resulting from the transfer of in vitro fertilized embryos, we and others have recently demonstrated that vascularization, expression of angiogenic factors, sex steroid receptors, several epigenetic markers, and growth of utero-placental tissues all were altered during early pregnancy after transfer of embryos obtained through natural mating, in vitro fertilization, or other assisted reproductive techniques. These observations are in agreement with the recent reports that in humans even singleton pregnancies established with assisted reproductive techniques are at increased risk of preterm delivery and low birth weight, and seem especially relevant considering the rapidly expanding use of these techniques in humans and animals. PMID:25015812

  4. Placental abnormalities in equine pregnancies generated by SCNT from one donor horse.

    PubMed

    Pozor, Malgorzata A; Sheppard, Barbara; Hinrichs, Katrin; Kelleman, Audrey A; Macpherson, Margo L; Runcan, Erin; Choi, Young-Ho; Diaw, Mouhamadou; Mathews, Philip M

    2016-10-01

    Placental changes associated with SCNT have been described in several species, but little information is available in this area in the horse. We evaluated the ultrasonographic, gross, and histopathological characteristics of placentas from three successful and five unsuccessful equine SCNT pregnancies, established using cells from a single donor horse. Starting at approximately 6-month gestation, the pregnancies were monitored periodically using transrectal (TR) and transabdominal (TA) ultrasonography (US) to examine the placentas, fetal fluids, and fetuses. Of the five mares that aborted, one mare did so suddenly without any abnormal signs detected by US and four had enlarged umbilical vessels visible on TA-US before abortion. Placental edema (TR-US) and intravascular thrombi in the umbilical cords were seen (TA-US) in two of these four mares; one mare aborted shortly after acute placental separation was identified on TA-US. In three mares that delivered live foals, TA-US showed engorged allantoic vessels and enlarged umbilical vessels. Two of these mares had placental thickening visible on TR-US, interpreted as a sign of placentitis, that subsided after aggressive medical treatment. Seven of the eight placentas were submitted for gross and histopathological examinations after delivery. All placentas had some degree of edema, abnormally engorged allantoic vessels, and enlarged umbilical vessels. Placentitis, large allantoic vesicles, cystic pouches in the fetal part of the cord, and hemorrhages and thrombi in the umbilical vessels were detected only in placentas from mares that aborted. Equine pregnancies resulting from SCNT may be associated with placental pathologies that can be detected using ultrasonography. However, interpreting their severity is difficult. Although placental abnormalities have been observed in SCNT pregnancies in other species, to the best of our knowledge, placentitis has not been previously reported and may be an important complication of

  5. Expression of glypican 3 in placental site trophoblastic tumor

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Glypican-3 (GPC3) is a membrane-bound heparan sulfate proteoglycan that functions in embryonic cell growth and differentiation and is highly expressed in the placenta. GPC3 is mutated in Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome, which is characterized by tissue overgrowth and an increased risk of embryonal malignancies. GPC3 has also been implicated in sporadic cancer, particularly hepatocellular carcinoma, for which it has been shown to be a useful diagnostic marker. Although GPC3 expression has been studied in non-neoplastic placental tissue, its presence in gestational trophoblastic diseases has not been previously explored. The purpose of this study was to investigate the immunohistochemical expression of GPC3 in placental site trophoblastic tumor (PSTT), a very rare gestational trophoblastic neoplasm which may be morphologically confused with non-trophoblastic tumors, and to assess its possible utility as a diagnostic marker. Methods Fifteen cases of PSTT, as well as samples from placental site nodule (PSN) (n = 2), leiomyosarcoma (n = 1), leiomyoma (n = 1), invasive cervical squamous cell carcinoma (n = 7) and endometrial adenocarcinoma (n = 11) were examined. Immunoreactivity was semi-quantitatively evaluated as negative (0, < 5% of cells stained), focally positive (1+, 5-10% of cells stained), positive (2+, 11-50% of cells stained) or diffusely positive (3+, > 50% of cells stained). Staining intensity for each subtype was graded from 0 to 3 and a mean intensity was calculated. Results Eighty percent of PSTT (12/15) were immunoreactive for GPC3 (0, 20; 1+, 20%; 2+, 40%; 3+, 20%) with a mean intensity of 1.3. Stronger, predominately cytoplasmic staining was seen in larger multi- and mononucleated cells with smaller mononucleate cells showing weak muddy cytoplasmic staining. Both PSN cases were positive (1+, 50%; 2+, 50%) and two of nine invasive cervical squamous cell carcinomas showed staining (0, 57%; 1+, 29%; 2+, 14%), predominately in a basal

  6. Matrotrophy and placentation in invertebrates: a new paradigm.

    PubMed

    Ostrovsky, Andrew N; Lidgard, Scott; Gordon, Dennis P; Schwaha, Thomas; Genikhovich, Grigory; Ereskovsky, Alexander V

    2016-08-01

    histophagy are rarer, plausibly evolving through heterochronous development of the embryonic mouthparts and digestive system. During gestation, matrotrophic modes can shift, intergrade, and be performed simultaneously. Invertebrate matrotrophic adaptations are less complex structurally than in chordates, but they are more diverse, being formed either by a parent, embryo, or both. In a broad and still preliminary sense, there are indications of trends or grades of evolutionarily increasing complexity of nutritive structures: formation of (i) local zones of enhanced nutritional transport (placental analogues), including specialized parent-offspring cell complexes and various appendages increasing the entire secreting and absorbing surfaces as well as the contact surface between embryo and parent, (ii) compartmentalization of the common incubatory space into more compact and 'isolated' chambers with presumably more effective nutritional relationships, and (iii) internal secretory ('milk') glands. Some placental analogues in onychophorans and arthropods mimic the simplest placental variants in vertebrates, comprising striking examples of convergent evolution acting at all levels-positional, structural and physiological.

  7. Matrotrophy and placentation in invertebrates: a new paradigm.

    PubMed

    Ostrovsky, Andrew N; Lidgard, Scott; Gordon, Dennis P; Schwaha, Thomas; Genikhovich, Grigory; Ereskovsky, Alexander V

    2016-08-01

    histophagy are rarer, plausibly evolving through heterochronous development of the embryonic mouthparts and digestive system. During gestation, matrotrophic modes can shift, intergrade, and be performed simultaneously. Invertebrate matrotrophic adaptations are less complex structurally than in chordates, but they are more diverse, being formed either by a parent, embryo, or both. In a broad and still preliminary sense, there are indications of trends or grades of evolutionarily increasing complexity of nutritive structures: formation of (i) local zones of enhanced nutritional transport (placental analogues), including specialized parent-offspring cell complexes and various appendages increasing the entire secreting and absorbing surfaces as well as the contact surface between embryo and parent, (ii) compartmentalization of the common incubatory space into more compact and 'isolated' chambers with presumably more effective nutritional relationships, and (iii) internal secretory ('milk') glands. Some placental analogues in onychophorans and arthropods mimic the simplest placental variants in vertebrates, comprising striking examples of convergent evolution acting at all levels-positional, structural and physiological. PMID:25925633

  8. Induced pluripotent stem cells from human placental chorion for perinatal tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guihua; Di Bernardo, Julie; DeLong, Cynthia J; Monteiro da Rocha, André; O'Shea, K Sue; Kunisaki, Shaun M

    2014-09-01

    The reliable derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from a noninvasive autologous source at birth would facilitate the study of patient-specific in vitro modeling of congenital diseases and would enhance ongoing efforts aimed at developing novel cell-based treatments for a wide array of fetal and pediatric disorders. Accordingly, we have successfully generated iPSCs from human fetal chorionic somatic cells extracted from term pregnancies by ectopic expression of OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, and cMYC. The isolated parental somatic cells exhibited an immunophenotypic profile consistent with that of chorionic mesenchymal stromal cells (CMSCs). CMSC-iPSCs maintained pluripotency in feeder-free systems for more than 15 passages based on morphology, immunocytochemistry, and gene expression studies and were capable of embryoid body formation with spontaneous trilineage differentiation. CMSC-iPSCs could be selectively differentiated in vitro into various germ layer derivatives, including neural stem cells, beating cardiomyocytes, and definitive endoderm. This study demonstrates the feasibility of term placental chorion as a novel noninvasive alternative to dermal fibroblasts and cord blood for human perinatal iPSC derivation and may provide additional insights regarding the reprogramming capabilities of extra-embryonic tissues as they relate to developmental ontogeny and perinatal tissue engineering applications.

  9. Thyroid hormone receptors bind to defined regions of the growth hormone and placental lactogen genes.

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, J W; Voz, M L; Eliard, P H; Mathy-Harter, M; De Nayer, P; Economidis, I V; Belayew, A; Martial, J A; Rousseau, G G

    1986-01-01

    The intracellular receptor for thyroid hormone is a protein found in chromatin. Since thyroid hormone stimulates transcription of the growth hormone gene through an unknown mechanism, the hypothesis that the thyroid hormone-receptor complex interacts with defined regions of this gene has been investigated in a cell-free system. Nuclear extracts from human lymphoblastoid IM-9 cells containing thyroid hormone receptors were incubated with L-3,5,3'-tri[125I]iodothyronine and calf thymus DNA-cellulose. Restriction fragments of the human growth hormone gene were added to determine their ability to inhibit labeled receptor binding to DNA-cellulose. These fragments encompassed nucleotide sequences from about three kilobase pairs upstream to about four kilobase pairs downstream from the transcription initiation site. The thyroid hormone-receptor complex bound preferentially to the 5'-flanking sequences of the growth hormone gene in a region between nucleotide coordinates -290 and -129. The receptor also bound to an analogous promoter region in the human placental lactogen gene, which has 92% nucleotide sequence homology with the growth hormone gene. These binding regions appear to be distinct from those that are recognized by the receptor for glucocorticoids, which stimulate growth hormone gene expression synergistically with thyroid hormone. The presence of thyroid hormone was required for binding of its receptor to the growth hormone gene promoter, suggesting that thyroid hormone renders the receptor capable of recognizing specific gene regions. PMID:3466175

  10. The Human Placenta Project: placental structure, development, and function in real time.

    PubMed

    Guttmacher, A E; Maddox, Y T; Spong, C Y

    2014-05-01

    Despite its crucial role in the health of both the fetus and the pregnant woman, the placenta is the least understood human organ. Since a growing body of evidence also underscores the importance of placental development in the lifelong health of both mother and offspring, this lack of knowledge about placental structure and function is particularly concerning. Given modern approaches and technologies and the ability to develop new methods, we propose a coordinated "Human Placenta Project", with the ultimate goal of understanding human placental structure, development, and function in real time.

  11. The role of placental urokinase inhibitor in toxemia of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Terao, T; Kobayashi, T

    1983-01-01

    The fibrinolysis of the uterus can be reversed during the course of pregnancy. The chief cause of this physiologic change is an increase of urokinase (UK) inhibitor in the placenta. The UK inhibitor also has a pathologic aspect that can influence the course of pregnancy. We have proven that the hypofibrinolysis of toxemic pregnant urine results from increased UK inhibitor. Furthermore, we have shown the existence of UK inhibitor in toxemic pregnant serum and the glomerulus. On the basis of these facts we propose that UK inhibitor leaks into the maternal blood stream from the placenta and inhibits the fibrinolytic activity of UK, forming microthrombuses in the glomerulus. Excess UK inhibitor in the placenta also suppresses the fibrinolytic activity of placental plasminogen activator (PPA). Thus microthrombuses are apt to be formed in both the placenta and glomerulus. Such pathologic inhibition of fibrinolysis strongly influences the course of toxemia. PMID:6360225

  12. Screening and analyzing genes associated with Amur tiger placental development.

    PubMed

    Li, Q; Lu, T F; Liu, D; Hu, P F; Sun, B; Ma, J Z; Wang, W J; Wang, K F; Zhang, W X; Chen, J; Guan, W J; Ma, Y H; Zhang, M H

    2014-09-26

    The Amur tiger is a unique endangered species in the world, and thus, protection of its genetic resources is extremely important. In this study, an Amur tiger placenta cDNA library was constructed using the SMART cDNA Library Construction kit. A total of 508 colonies were sequenced, in which 205 (76%) genes were annotated and mapped to 74 KEGG pathways, including 29 metabolism, 29 genetic information processing, 4 environmental information processing, 7 cell motility, and 5 organismal system pathways. Additionally, PLAC8, PEG10 and IGF-II were identified after screening genes from the expressed sequence tags, and they were associated with placental development. These findings could lay the foundation for future functional genomic studies of the Amur tiger.

  13. Abnormal Placentation: Placenta Previa, Vasa Previa, and Placenta Accreta.

    PubMed

    Silver, Robert M

    2015-09-01

    Placental disorders such as placenta previa, placenta accreta, and vasa previa are all associated with vaginal bleeding in the second half of pregnancy. They are also important causes of serious fetal and maternal morbidity and even mortality. Moreover, the rates of previa and accreta are increasing, probably as a result of increasing rates of cesarean delivery, maternal age, and assisted reproductive technology. The routine use of obstetric ultrasonography as well as improving ultrasonographic technology allows for the antenatal diagnosis of these conditions. In turn, antenatal diagnosis facilitates optimal obstetric management. This review emphasizes an evidence-based approach to the clinical management of pregnancies with these conditions as well as highlights important knowledge gaps.

  14. Placental calcification: ultrastructural and X-ray microanalytic studies.

    PubMed

    Varma, V A; Kim, K M

    1985-01-01

    Calcification is common in human placentas and is widely recognized as a normal part of maturation and aging of this organ. Eleven human placentas were studied by light and electron microscopy to elucidate the mechanism of placental calcification. Earliest mineral deposits were seen along the trophoblastic basement membrane of the chorionic villi undergoing fibrinoid degeneration. Transmission electron microscopic examination revealed crystalline deposits within small membrane-bound vesicles; the latter appear to be derived from degenerating cells and were particularly numerous within the basement membrane. X-ray microanalysis of these deposits revealed calcium and phosphorus peaks and the pattern of calcium hydroxyapatite was noted by electron diffraction. This pattern of calcification, i.e., precipitation of calcium hydroxyapatite in association with extracellular membrane bound vesicles, is similar to that seen in physiologic and pathologic calcifications of other tissues.

  15. Trophoblast phagocytic program: roles in different placental systems.

    PubMed

    Bevilacqua, Estela; Hoshida, Mara-Sandra; Amarante-Paffaro, Andrea; Albieri-Borges, Andrea; Zago Gomes, Sara

    2010-01-01

    Although not belonging to the class of professional phagocytes, in many species trophoblast cells exhibit intense phagocytic activity. The complete range of physiological functions of trophoblast phagocytosis has not yet been fully characterized. Close association between the trophoblast and nutrition was determined many years ago. Hubrecht (1889) when proposing for the first time the name trophoblast to the external layer of the blastocyst, directly established the nutritive significance of this embryonic layer. Indeed, histotrophic phagocytosis, i.e. the internalization of maternal cells and secreted materials, is considered an important function of the trophoblast before the completion of the placenta. Recently, however, unexpected characteristics of the trophoblast have significantly enhanced our understanding of this process. Roles in acquisition of space for embryo development, in tissue remodeling during implantation and placentation and in defense mechanisms are highlighting how this cellular activity may be relevant for the maternal-fetal relationship beyond its nutritional function.

  16. Making the impossible possible: rooting the tree of placental mammals.

    PubMed

    Teeling, Emma C; Hedges, S Blair

    2013-09-01

    Untangling the root of the evolutionary tree of placental mammals has been nearly an impossible task. The good news is that only three possibilities are seriously considered. The bad news is that all three possibilities are seriously considered. Paleontologists favor a root anchored by Xenarthra (e.g., sloths and anteater), whereas molecular evolutionists have favored the two other possible roots: Afrotheria (e.g., elephants, hyraxes, and tenrecs) and Atlantogenata (Afrotheria + Xenarthra). Now, two groups of researchers have scrutinized the largest available genomic data sets bearing on the question and have come to opposite conclusions, as reported in this issue of Molecular Biology and Evolution. Needless to say, more research is needed. PMID:23813980

  17. Maternal Administration of Sildenafil Citrate Alters Fetal and Placental Growth and Fetal-Placental Vascular Resistance in the Growth-Restricted Ovine Fetus.

    PubMed

    Oyston, Charlotte; Stanley, Joanna L; Oliver, Mark H; Bloomfield, Frank H; Baker, Philip N

    2016-09-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) causes short- and long-term morbidity. Reduced placental perfusion is an important pathogenic component of IUGR; substances that enhance vasodilation in the uterine circulation, such as sildenafil citrate (sildenafil), may improve placental blood flow and fetal growth. This study aimed to examine the effects of sildenafil in the growth-restricted ovine fetus. Ewes carrying singleton pregnancies underwent insertion of vascular catheters, and then, they were randomized to receive uterine artery embolization (IUGR) or to a control group. Ewes in the IUGR group received a daily infusion of sildenafil (IUGR+SC; n=10) or vehicle (IUGR+V; n=8) for 21 days. The control group received no treatment (n=9). Umbilical artery blood flow was measured using Doppler ultrasound and the resistive index (RI) calculated. Fetal weight, biometry, and placental weight were obtained at postmortem after treatment completion. Umbilical artery RI in IUGR+V fell less than in controls; the RI of IUGR+SC was intermediate to that of the other 2 groups (mean±SEM for control versus IUGR+V versus IUGR+SC: ∆RI, 0.09±0.03 versus -0.01±0.02 versus 0.03±0.02; F(2, 22)=4.21; P=0.03). Compared with controls, lamb and placental weights were reduced in IUGR+V but not in IUGR+SC (control versus IUGR+V versus IUGR+SC: fetal weight, 4381±247 versus 3447±235 versus 3687±129 g; F(2, 24)=5.49; P=0.01 and placental weight: 559.7±35.0 versus 376.2±32.5 versus 475.2±42.5 g; F(2, 24)=4.64; P=0.01). Sildenafil may be a useful adjunct in the management of IUGR. An increase in placental weight and fall in fetal-placental resistance suggests that changes to growth are at least partly mediated by changes to placental growth rather than alterations in placental efficiency.

  18. Maternal Administration of Sildenafil Citrate Alters Fetal and Placental Growth and Fetal-Placental Vascular Resistance in the Growth-Restricted Ovine Fetus.

    PubMed

    Oyston, Charlotte; Stanley, Joanna L; Oliver, Mark H; Bloomfield, Frank H; Baker, Philip N

    2016-09-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) causes short- and long-term morbidity. Reduced placental perfusion is an important pathogenic component of IUGR; substances that enhance vasodilation in the uterine circulation, such as sildenafil citrate (sildenafil), may improve placental blood flow and fetal growth. This study aimed to examine the effects of sildenafil in the growth-restricted ovine fetus. Ewes carrying singleton pregnancies underwent insertion of vascular catheters, and then, they were randomized to receive uterine artery embolization (IUGR) or to a control group. Ewes in the IUGR group received a daily infusion of sildenafil (IUGR+SC; n=10) or vehicle (IUGR+V; n=8) for 21 days. The control group received no treatment (n=9). Umbilical artery blood flow was measured using Doppler ultrasound and the resistive index (RI) calculated. Fetal weight, biometry, and placental weight were obtained at postmortem after treatment completion. Umbilical artery RI in IUGR+V fell less than in controls; the RI of IUGR+SC was intermediate to that of the other 2 groups (mean±SEM for control versus IUGR+V versus IUGR+SC: ∆RI, 0.09±0.03 versus -0.01±0.02 versus 0.03±0.02; F(2, 22)=4.21; P=0.03). Compared with controls, lamb and placental weights were reduced in IUGR+V but not in IUGR+SC (control versus IUGR+V versus IUGR+SC: fetal weight, 4381±247 versus 3447±235 versus 3687±129 g; F(2, 24)=5.49; P=0.01 and placental weight: 559.7±35.0 versus 376.2±32.5 versus 475.2±42.5 g; F(2, 24)=4.64; P=0.01). Sildenafil may be a useful adjunct in the management of IUGR. An increase in placental weight and fall in fetal-placental resistance suggests that changes to growth are at least partly mediated by changes to placental growth rather than alterations in placental efficiency. PMID:27432857

  19. Placental Syncytium Forms a Biophysical Barrier against Pathogen Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Zeldovich, Varvara B.; Clausen, Casper H.; Bradford, Emily; Fletcher, Daniel A.; Maltepe, Emin; Robbins, Jennifer R.; Bakardjiev, Anna I.

    2013-01-01

    Fetal syncytiotrophoblasts form a unique fused multinuclear surface that is bathed in maternal blood, and constitutes the main interface between fetus and mother. Syncytiotrophoblasts are exposed to pathogens circulating in maternal blood, and appear to have unique resistance mechanisms against microbial invasion. These are due in part to the lack of intercellular junctions and their receptors, the Achilles heel of polarized mononuclear epithelia. However, the syncytium is immune to receptor-independent invasion as well, suggesting additional general defense mechanisms against infection. The difficulty of maintaining and manipulating primary human syncytiotrophoblasts in culture makes it challenging to investigate the cellular and molecular basis of host defenses in this unique tissue. Here we present a novel system to study placental pathogenesis using murine trophoblast stem cells (mTSC) that can be differentiated into syncytiotrophoblasts and recapitulate human placental syncytium. Consistent with previous results in primary human organ cultures, murine syncytiotrophoblasts were found to be resistant to infection with Listeria monocytogenes via direct invasion and cell-to-cell spread. Atomic force microscopy of murine syncytiotrophoblasts demonstrated that these cells have a greater elastic modulus than mononuclear trophoblasts. Disruption of the unusually dense actin structure – a diffuse meshwork of microfilaments - with Cytochalasin D led to a decrease in its elastic modulus by 25%. This correlated with a small but significant increase in invasion of L. monocytogenes into murine and human syncytium. These results suggest that the syncytial actin cytoskeleton may form a general barrier against pathogen entry in humans and mice. Moreover, murine TSCs are a genetically tractable model system for the investigation of specific pathways in syncytial host defenses. PMID:24348256

  20. Engine and radiator: fetal and placental interactions for heat dissipation.

    PubMed

    Schröder, H J; Power, G G

    1997-03-01

    The 'engine' of fetal metabolism generates heat (3-4 W kg-1 in fetal sheep) which has to be dissipated to the maternal organism. Fetal heat may move through the amniotic/allantoic fluids to the uterine wall (conductive pathway; total conductance, 1.1 W degrees C-1 kg-1) and with the umbilical arterial blood flow (convective pathway) to the placenta. Because resistance to heat flow is larger than zero fetal temperature exceeds maternal temperature by about 0.5 degree C (0.3-1 degree C). Probably 85% of fetal heat is lost to the maternal organism through the placenta, which thus serves as the main 'radiator'. Placental heat conductivity appears to be extremely high and this may lead to impaired heat exchange (guinea-pig placenta). A computer simulation demonstrates that fetal temperature is essentially clamped to maternal temperature, and that fetal thermoregulatory efforts to gain thermal independence would be futile. Indeed, when the late gestational fetus in utero is challenged by cold stress, direct and indirect indicators of (non-shivering) thermogenesis (oxygen consumption, increase of plasma glycerol and free fatty acid levels) change only moderately. In prematurely delivered lambs, however, cold stress provokes summit metabolism and maximum heat production. Only when birth is imitated in utero (by cord clamping, external artificial lung ventilation and cooling) do thermogenic efforts approach levels typical of extra-uterine life. This suggests the presence of inhibitors of thermogenesis of placental origin, e.g. prostaglandins and adenosine. When the synthesis of prostaglandins is blocked by pretreatment with indomethacin, sheep fetuses react to intra-uterine cooling with vigorous thermogenic responses, which can be subdued by infusion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Since the sheep placenta is known to produce sufficient amounts of PGE2, it seems that the placenta controls fetal thermogenic responses to some extent. This transforms the fetus into an ectothermic

  1. Chloride transport across placental microvillous membranes measured by fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Illsley, N.P.; Glaubensklee, C.; Davis, B.; Verkman, A.S. )

    1988-12-01

    Chloride transport across human placental microvillous vesicle membrane was investigated using the fluorescent probe SPQ (6-methoxy-N(3-sulfopropyl)quinolinium). Chloride influx (J{sub Cl}) was calculated from the initial rate of quenching of intravesicular SPQ fluorescence by chloride. J{sub Cl} measured by SPQ fluorescence was not significantly different from J{sub Cl} measured by uptake of {sup 36}Cl; SPQ did not affect measurements of J{sub Cl}. J{sub Cl} was increased 51% by a 58-mV membrane potential. Voltage-stimulated J{sub Cl} showed a saturable dependence on chloride concentration with a dissociation constant (K{sub d}) of 18 {plus minus} 5 mM and was inhibited by diphenylamine-2-carboxylate with an apparent inhibitory constant of 0.13 {plus minus} 0.03 mM. The activation energy calculated for voltage-stimulated J{sub Cl} was 4.6 {plus minus} 0.6 kcal/mol. J{sub Cl} was also stimulated by a reduction in the external pH from 7.0 to 5.5 (internal pH = 70). pH-stimulated chloride influx was increased by trans-HCO{sub 3} and was inhibited by dihydro-4,4{prime}-diisothiocyano-2,2{prime}-disulfonic stilbene. Uptake of {sup 36}Cl into microvillous vesicles was stimulated by trans-Cl. pH-stimulated J{sub Cl} showed a saturable dependence on chloride with a K{sub d} of 38 {plus minus} 6 mM but was not affected by membrane potential. No evidence was found for Na- or K-coupled chloride cotransport. These findings demonstrate the presence of a saturable chloride conductance and an electroneutral chloride-bicarbonate exchanger in the placental microvillous membrane.

  2. Placental diversity in malagasy tenrecs: placentation in shrew tenrecs (Microgale spp.), the mole-like rice tenrec (Oryzorictes hova) and the web-footed tenrec (Limnogale mergulus).

    PubMed

    Enders, A C; Blankenship, T N; Goodman, S M; Soarimalala, V; Carter, A M

    2007-07-01

    Placentation in tenrecs of the subfamily Oryzorictinae, family Tenrecidae, has not been described previously. The structure of the placenta of this group and especially of the genus Microgale was investigated to determine its similarity or dissimilarity to previously described placentas of the tenrec subfamilies Potamogalinae and Tenrecinae. Fifteen specimens of the genus Microgale ranging from an early yolk sac stage to near term were available for study. Placentation in Microgale was found to be different from other tenrecids in that there is an early simple lateral rather than central haemophagous region. In addition, a more villous portion of the placental disk forms before the formation of a more compact labyrinth. Although the definitive placenta is cellular haemomonochorial, it lacks the spongy zone found in the Tenrecinae. Neither does it resemble the endotheliochorial condition found in the Potamogalinae. Of the two genera of the subfamily Oryzorictinae represented by single specimens, the placenta of Limnogale resembled that of the Microgale but Oryzorictes had several differences including a lobulated placental disk. It is concluded that there is more variation in placentation both within the subfamily Oryzorictinae and within the family Tenrecidae than would ordinarily be expected.

  3. Case Report of Autopsy and Placental Examination After Radiofrequency Ablation of an Acardiac Twin.

    PubMed

    Kashireddy, Papreddy; Larson, Alexandra; Minturn, Lucy; Ernst, Linda

    2015-01-01

    We report the autopsy and placental findings in a monochorionic twin gestation complicated by twin reversed arterial perfusion (TRAP) sequence. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) was performed at 24 weeks gestation to abort the acardiac fetus, and vaginal delivery of the co-twin and acardiac fetus occurred at 33 weeks gestation. An autopsy of the acardiac fetus revealed multiple congenital anomalies including complete absence of the upper extremities and poor development of the skull and facial structures. In contrast to the upper body, the lower half of the body, although malformed, was more developed. The monochorionic twin placenta showed velamentous, atrophied, proximal artery-artery and vein-vein intertwin vascular connections which essentially bypassed the placental parenchyma for the acardiac fetus. Ink injection and histologic examination confirmed thrombosis of these critical intertwin vascular connections after RFA. This report highlights the fetal and placental anatomy of TRAP sequence and stresses the importance of placental examination after fetal surgical techniques. PMID:26199267

  4. Contemporary issues in the management of abnormal placentation during pregnancy in developing nations: An Indian perspective.

    PubMed

    Bajwa, Sukhwinder Kaur; Singh, Anita; Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh

    2013-07-01

    The gap between the developed and developing nations with regards to maternal mortality and morbidity may have narrowed but still a lot of dedicated work is required to bridge these differences. Obstetrical haemorrhage is the leading cause of maternal deaths in these developing nations especially in India. The most common causes of this fatal haemorrhage are the placental abnormalities which rarely get detected before delivery. Numerous factors have been incremental in the causation of this abnormal placental implantation with resultant complications. The present article is an attempt to review possible predictors of abnormal placental implantation. Also, a genuine attempt has been made to enumerate possible measures to identify the predictors of abnormal placentation during early pregnancy and their suitable prevention and management.

  5. Chromosomal Mosaicism in Human Feto-Placental Development: Implications for Prenatal Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Grati, Francesca Romana

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal mosaicism is one of the primary interpretative issues in prenatal diagnosis. In this review, the mechanisms underlying feto-placental chromosomal mosaicism are presented. Based on the substantial retrospective diagnostic experience with chorionic villi samples (CVS) of a prenatal diagnosis laboratory the following items are discussed: (i) The frequency of the different types of mosaicism (confined placental, CPM, and true fetal mosaicisms, TFM); (ii) The risk of fetal confirmation after the detection of a mosaic in CVS stratified by chromosome abnormality and placental tissue involvement; (iii) The frequency of uniparental disomy for imprinted chromosomes associated with CPM; (iv) The incidence of false-positive and false-negative results in CVS samples analyzed by only (semi-)direct preparation or long term culture; and (v) The implications of the presence of a feto-placental mosaicism for microarray analysis of CVS and non-invasive prenatal screening (NIPS). PMID:26237479

  6. Rna-seq analysis of the functional compartments within the rat placentation site

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rat placentation site is distinctly organized into interacting zones, the so-called labyrinth, junctional, and metrial gland compartments. These zones house unique cell populations equipped to undertake myriad prescribed functions including transport, hormonal responses, and immune interactions....

  7. Long-term maternal morbidity and mortality associated with ischemic placental disease.

    PubMed

    Adams, Tracy; Yeh, Corinne; Bennett-Kunzier, Nadia; Kinzler, Wendy L

    2014-04-01

    Ischemic placental disease can have long-term maternal health implications. In this article, we discuss the three conditions of ischemic placental disease (preeclampsia, fetal growth restriction, and abruption placenta) and its associated long-term maternal morbidity. Retrospective observational studies comparing pregnancies complicated by ischemic placental disease to uncomplicated pregnancies suggest an increased long-term risk of hypertension, cardiovascular death, metabolic syndrome, and cerebrovascular disease. This association is much stronger in women who had an indicated-preterm delivery due to ischemic placental disease. It is important to adequately counsel women who are diagnosed with these conditions about their future health risks. Increased awareness of the potential health risks and multidisciplinary collaboration remains paramount to instituting the appropriate screening and preventative strategies (i.e., behavior modification) for affected women.

  8. Intrauterine Growth Restriction Associated with Hematologic Abnormalities: Probable Manifestations of Placental Mesenchymal Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Payo, Cristina; Bernabeu, Rocio Alvarez; Villar, Isabel Salas; Goy, Enrique Iglesias

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Placental mesenchymal dysplasia is a rare vascular disease associated with intrauterine growth restriction, fetal demise as well as Beckwith–Wiedemann syndrome. Some neonates present hematologic abnormalities possibly related to consumptive coagulopathy and hemolytic anemia in the placental circulation. Case report We present a case of placental mesenchymal dysplasia in a fetus with intrauterine growth restriction and cerebellar hemorrhagic injury diagnosed in the 20th week of pregnancy. During 26th week, our patient had an intrauterine fetal demise in the context of gestational hypertension. We have detailed the ultrasound findings that made us suspect the presence of hematologic disorders during 20th week. Discussion We believe that the cerebellar hematoma could be the consequence of thrombocytopenia accompanied by anemia. If hemorrhagic damage during fetal life is found, above all associates with an anomalous placental appearance and with intrauterine growth restriction, PMD should be suspected along other etiologies. PMID:26495159

  9. Immunoperoxidase localisation of human placental lactogen: a marker for the placental origin of the giant cells in 'syncytial endometritis' of pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Heyderman, E; Gibbons, A R; Rosen, S W

    1981-01-01

    One hundred endometrial biopsies of various histological patterns, and material from 10 tubal pregnancies together with their associated uterine decidua, were examined for the presence of human placental lactogen using affinity-purified first and second antibodies and an indirect immunoperoxidase technique. Positive cells in endometrial curettings were seen only in association with an intrauterine pregnancy and morphologically resembled syncytiotrophoblast. Decidua associated with tubal pregnancy, pseudodecidua in progestogen-treated patients, and proliferative, secretory, and basal endometria were all negative. An immunoperoxidase stain for human placental lactogen is a useful marker for intrauterine pregnancy and supports the placental origin of the syncytial giant cells in so-called 'syncytial endometritis'. The technique is of potential value in those endometrial biopsies where pregnancy is suspected but no villi are seen. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7014653

  10. Virus-Free Human Placental Cell Lines To Study Genetic Functions | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development's Section on Cellular Differentiation is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize immortalized virus-free human placental cell lines.The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development's Section on Cellular Differentiation is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize immortalized virus-free human placental cell lines.

  11. Adaptations in placental phenotype support fetal growth during undernutrition of pregnant mice.

    PubMed

    Coan, P M; Vaughan, O R; Sekita, Y; Finn, S L; Burton, G J; Constancia, M; Fowden, A L

    2010-02-01

    Undernutrition during pregnancy reduces birth weight and programmes adult phenotype with consequences for life expectancy, but its effects on the phenotype of the placenta, responsible for supplying nutrients for fetal growth, remain largely unknown. Using molecular, morphological and functional analyses, placental phenotype was examined in mice during restriction of dietary intake to 80% of control from day 3 of pregnancy. At day 16, undernutrition reduced placental, but not fetal, weight in association with decreased junctional zone volume and placental expression of glucose transporter Slc2a1. At day 19, both placental and fetal weights were reduced in undernourished mice (91% and 87% of control, respectively, P < 0.01), as were the volume and surface area of the labyrinthine zone responsible for placental nutrient transfer (85% and 86%, respectively, P < 0.03). However, unidirectional materno-fetal clearance of tracer glucose was maintained and methyl-aminoisobutyric acid increased 166% (P < 0.005) per gram of undernourished placenta, relative to controls. This was associated with an 18% and 27% increased placental expression of glucose and system A amino acid transporters Slc2a1 and Slc38a2, respectively, at day 19 (P < 0.04). At both ages, undernutrition decreased expression of the placental specific transcript of the Igf2 gene by 35% (P < 0.01), although methylation of its promoter was unaffected. The placenta, therefore, adapts to help maintain fetal growth when its own growth is compromised by maternal undernutrition. Consequently, placental phenotype is responsive to environmental conditions and may help predict the risk of adult disease programmed in utero.

  12. Loss of inherited genomic imprints in mice leads to severe disruption in placental lipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Himes, K. P.; Young, A.; Koppes, E.; Stolz, D.; Barak, Y.; Sadovsky, Y.; Chaillet, J.R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Monoallelic expression of imprinted genes is necessary for placental development and normal fetal growth. Differentially methylated domains (DMDs) largely determine the parental-specific monoallelic expression of imprinted genes. Maternally derived DNA (cytosine-5-) -methyltransferase 1o (DNMT1o) maintains DMDs during the eight-cell stage of development. DNMT1o-deficient mouse placentas have a generalized disruption of genomic imprints. Previous studies have demonstrated that DNMT1o deficiency alters placental morphology and broadens the embryonic weight distribution in late gestation. Lipids are critical for fetal growth. Thus, we assessed the impact of disrupted imprinting on placental lipids. Methods Lipids were quantified from DNMT1o-deficient mouse placentas and embryos at E17.5 using a modified Folch method. Expression of select genes critical for lipid metabolism was quantified with RT-qPCR. Mitochondrial morphology was assessed by TEM and mitochondrial aconitase and cytoplasmic citrate concentrations quantified. DMD methylation was determined by EpiTYPER. Results We found that DNMT1o deficiency is associated with increased placental triacylglycerol levels. Neither fetal triacylglycerol concentrations nor expression of select genes that mediate placental lipid transport were different from wild type. Placental triacylglycerol accumulation was associated with impaired beta-oxidation and abnormal citrate metabolism with decreased mitochondrial aconitase activity and increased cytoplasmic citrate concentrations. Loss of methylation at the MEST DMD was strongly associated with placental triacylglycerol accumulation. Discussion A generalized disruption of genomic imprints leads to triacylglycerol accumulation and abnormal mitochondrial function. This could stem directly from a loss of methylation at a given DMD, such as MEST, or represent a consequence of abnormal placental development. PMID:25662615

  13. Placental Responses to Changes in the Maternal Environment Determine Fetal Growth

    PubMed Central

    Dimasuay, Kris Genelyn; Boeuf, Philippe; Powell, Theresa L.; Jansson, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Placental responses to maternal perturbations are complex and remain poorly understood. Altered maternal environment during pregnancy such as hypoxia, stress, obesity, diabetes, toxins, altered nutrition, inflammation, and reduced utero-placental blood flow may influence fetal development, which can predispose to diseases later in life. The placenta being a metabolically active tissue responds to these perturbations by regulating the fetal supply of nutrients and oxygen and secretion of hormones into the maternal and fetal circulation. We have proposed that placental nutrient sensing integrates maternal and fetal nutritional cues with information from intrinsic nutrient sensing signaling pathways to balance fetal demand with the ability of the mother to support pregnancy by regulating maternal physiology, placental growth, and placental nutrient transport. Emerging evidence suggests that the nutrient-sensing signaling pathway mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays a central role in this process. Thus, placental nutrient sensing plays a critical role in modulating maternal–fetal resource allocation, thereby affecting fetal growth and the life-long health of the fetus. PMID:26858656

  14. Does Method of Placental Removal or Site of Uterine Incision Repair Alter Endometritis After Cesarean Delivery?

    PubMed Central

    Dodson, Mark K.; Harris, Robert L.; Floyd, Randall C.; Martin, James N.; Morrison, John C.

    1993-01-01

    Objective: his investigation was undertaken to evaluate the relationship between postcesarean endometritis and (1) method of placental removal and (2) site for uterine repair. Methods: This prospective, randomized study included 120 patients who underwent primary or repeat abdominal delivery for arrest of progress in labor, fetal distress, or breech presentation. Parturients were divided into four groups: I—spontaneous placental detachment, in situ uterine repair; II—spontaneous placental detachment, exteriorized uterine repair; III—manual placental removal, in situ uterine repair; and IV—manual placental removal, exteriorized uterine repair. Prophylactic antibiotics were not used. Results: Endometritis was significantly increased in the manual removal/exteriorized uterine repair group versus all the other groups including the spontaneous removal in situ (group I, P = 0.012), the spontaneous removal/exteriorized repair group (group II, P = 0.034), and the manual removal/in situ repair group (group III, P = 0.043). Comparison of group IV (manual removal/ exteriorized repair) with the combined groups I, II, and III (spontaneous removal/in situ repair, spontaneous removal/exteriorized repair, and manual removal/in situ repair) was significantly different (P = 0.005). Prior to delivery, use of an internal monitoring system, skill of the operating surgeon, and type of anesthesia were similar among groups. Conclusions: The findings of this investigation suggest that; when other known causes of infectious morbidity are constant, manual placental remvol in association with exteriorization for uterine repair significantly increases postcesarean endometritis. PMID:18476211

  15. Dickkopf-1 induced apoptosis in human placental choriocarcinoma is independent of canonical Wnt signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Sha; Miao Chenglin; Li Jing; Fan Xiujun; Cao Yujing; Duan Enkui . E-mail: duane@ioz.ac.cn

    2006-11-24

    Placental choriocarcinoma, a reproductive system carcinoma in women, has about 0.81% occurrence frequency in China, which leads to over 90% lethality due to indistinct pathogenesis and the absence of efficient therapeutic treatment. In the present study, using immunostaining and reverse transcription PCR, we reported that Dickkopf-1 (Dkk-1) is prominently expressed in human cytotrophoblast (CTB) cell, but absent in the human placental choriocarcinoma cell line JAR and JEG3, implicating an unknown correlation between Dkk-1 and carcinogenesis of placental choriocarcinoma. Further, through exogenous introduction of Dkk-1, we found repressed proliferation in JAR and JEG3, induced apoptosis in JAR, and discovered significant tumor suppression effects of Dkk-1 in placental choriocarcinoma. Moreover we found that this function of Dkk-1 is achieved through c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), whereas the canonical Wnt pathway may not have a great role. This discovery is not symphonic to previous functional understanding of Dkk-1, a canonical Wnt signaling antagonist. Together, our data indicate the possible correlation between Dkk-1 and human placental choriocarcinoma and suggest potential applications of Dkk-1 in treatment of human placental choriocarcinomas.

  16. The Interrelationships of Placental Mammals and the Limits of Phylogenetic Inference.

    PubMed

    Tarver, James E; Dos Reis, Mario; Mirarab, Siavash; Moran, Raymond J; Parker, Sean; O'Reilly, Joseph E; King, Benjamin L; O'Connell, Mary J; Asher, Robert J; Warnow, Tandy; Peterson, Kevin J; Donoghue, Philip C J; Pisani, Davide

    2016-02-01

    Placental mammals comprise three principal clades: Afrotheria (e.g., elephants and tenrecs), Xenarthra (e.g., armadillos and sloths), and Boreoeutheria (all other placental mammals), the relationships among which are the subject of controversy and a touchstone for debate on the limits of phylogenetic inference. Previous analyses have found support for all three hypotheses, leading some to conclude that this phylogenetic problem might be impossible to resolve due to the compounded effects of incomplete lineage sorting (ILS) and a rapid radiation. Here we show, using a genome scale nucleotide data set, microRNAs, and the reanalysis of the three largest previously published amino acid data sets, that the root of Placentalia lies between Atlantogenata and Boreoeutheria. Although we found evidence for ILS in early placental evolution, we are able to reject previous conclusions that the placental root is a hard polytomy that cannot be resolved. Reanalyses of previous data sets recover Atlantogenata + Boreoeutheria and show that contradictory results are a consequence of poorly fitting evolutionary models; instead, when the evolutionary process is better-modeled, all data sets converge on Atlantogenata. Our Bayesian molecular clock analysis estimates that marsupials diverged from placentals 157-170 Ma, crown Placentalia diverged 86-100 Ma, and crown Atlantogenata diverged 84-97 Ma. Our results are compatible with placental diversification being driven by dispersal rather than vicariance mechanisms, postdating early phases in the protracted opening of the Atlantic Ocean. PMID:26733575

  17. Assessment of Placental Stiffness Using Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Elastography in Pregnant Women with Fetal Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Göya, Cemil; Tunç, Senem; Teke, Memik; Hattapoğlu, Salih

    2016-01-01

    Objective We aimed to evaluate placental stiffness measured by acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography in pregnant women in the second trimester with a normal fetus versus those with structural anomalies and non-structural findings. Materials and Methods Forty pregnant women carrying a fetus with structural anomalies diagnosed sonographically at 18–28 weeks of gestation comprised the study group. The control group consisted of 34 healthy pregnant women with a sonographically normal fetus at a similar gestational age. Placental shear wave velocity (SWV) was measured by ARFI elastography and compared between the two groups. Structural anomalies and non-structural findings were scored based on sonographic markers. Placental stiffness measurements were compared among fetus anomaly categories. Doppler parameters of umbilical and uterine arteries were compared with placental SWV measurements. Results All placental SWV measurements, including minimum SWV, maximum SWV, and mean SWV were significantly higher in the study group than the control group ([0.86 ± 0.2, 0.74 ± 0.1; p < 0.001], [1.89 ± 0.7, 1.59 ± 0.5; p = 0.04], and [1.26 ± 0.4, 1.09 ± 0.2; p = 0.01]), respectively. Conclusion Placental stiffness evaluated by ARFI elastography during the second trimester in pregnant women with fetuses with congenital structural anomalies is higher than that of pregnant women with normal fetuses. PMID:26957906

  18. Placental Hypomethylation Is More Pronounced in Genomic Loci Devoid of Retroelements

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Aniruddha; Macaulay, Erin C.; Rodger, Euan J.; Stockwell, Peter A.; Parry, Matthew F.; Roberts, Hester E.; Slatter, Tania L.; Hung, Noelyn A.; Devenish, Celia J.; Morison, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    The human placenta is hypomethylated compared to somatic tissues. However, the degree and specificity of placental hypomethylation across the genome is unclear. We assessed genome-wide methylation of the human placenta and compared it to that of the neutrophil, a representative homogeneous somatic cell. We observed global hypomethylation in placenta (relative reduction of 22%) compared to neutrophils. Placental hypomethylation was pronounced in intergenic regions and gene bodies, while the unmethylated state of the promoter remained conserved in both tissues. For every class of repeat elements, the placenta showed lower methylation but the degree of hypomethylation differed substantially between these classes. However, some retroelements, especially the evolutionarily younger Alu elements, retained high levels of placental methylation. Surprisingly, nonretrotransposon-containing sequences showed a greater degree of placental hypomethylation than retrotransposons in every genomic element (intergenic, introns, and exons) except promoters. The differentially methylated fragments (DMFs) in placenta and neutrophils were enriched in gene-poor and CpG-poor regions. The placentally hypomethylated DMFs were enriched in genomic regions that are usually inactive, whereas hypermethylated DMFs were enriched in active regions. Hypomethylation of the human placenta is not specific to retroelements, indicating that the evolutionary advantages of placental hypomethylation go beyond those provided by expression of retrotransposons and retrogenes. PMID:27172225

  19. Placental fractalkine is up-regulated in severe early onset preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Siwetz, Monika; Dieber-Rotheneder, Martina; Cervar-Zivkovic, Mila; Kummer, Daniel; Kremshofer, Julia; Weiss, Gregor; Herse, Florian; Huppertz, Berthold; Gauster, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of preeclampsia includes the release of placental factors into the maternal circulation inducing an inflammatory environment in the mother. One of the factors may be the pro-inflammatory chemokine fractalkine, which is expressed in the syncytiotrophoblast of human placenta, from where it is released into the maternal circulation by constitutive shedding. We examined whether placental fractalkine is up-regulated in severe early onset preeclampsia and whether the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin-6 are able to increase the expression of fractalkine. Gene expression analysis, ELISA, and immunohistochemistry consistently showed increased fractalkine expression in placentas from severe early onset preeclampsia, compared to gestational age-matched controls. Expression of the metalloproteinases ADAM10 and ADAM17, which convert transmembrane fractalkine into the soluble form, was significantly increased in these cases. Incubation of first trimester placental explants with TNF-α provoked a significant increase in fractalkine expression and release of the soluble form, whereas interleukin-6 had no effect. TNF-α-mediated up-regulation of placental fractalkine was reversed in the presence of the Aspirin-derivative salicylate, which impaired activation of NF-κB p65 in TNF-α-treated explants. Based on data from placental explants we suggest that increased maternal TNF-α may up-regulate the expression and release of placental fractalkine, which in turn may contribute to an exaggerated systemic inflammatory response in preeclampsia. PMID:25769431

  20. The Endocannabinoid System in the Postimplantation Period: A Role during Decidualization and Placentation

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, B. M.; Correia-da-Silva, G.; Almada, M.; Costa, M. A.; Teixeira, N. A.

    2013-01-01

    Although the detrimental effects of cannabis consumption during gestation are known for years, the vast majority of studies established a link between cannabis consumption and foetal development. The complex maternal-foetal interrelationships within the placental bed are essential for normal pregnancy, and decidua definitively contributes to the success of this process. Nevertheless, the molecular signalling network that coordinates strategies for successful decidualization and placentation are not well understood. The discovery of the endocannabinoid system highlighted new signalling mediators in various physiological processes, including reproduction. It is known that endocannabinoids present regulatory functions during blastocyst development, oviductal transport, and implantation. In addition, all the endocannabinoid machinery was found to be expressed in decidual and placental tissues. Additionally, endocannabinoid's plasmatic levels were found to fluctuate during normal gestation and to induce decidual cell death and disturb normal placental development. Moreover, aberrant endocannabinoid signalling during the period of placental development has been associated with pregnancy disorders. It indicates the existence of a possible regulatory role for these molecules during decidualization and placentation processes, which are known to be particularly vulnerable. In this review, the influence of the endocannabinoid system in these critical processes is explored and discussed. PMID:24228028

  1. The Interrelationships of Placental Mammals and the Limits of Phylogenetic Inference

    PubMed Central

    Tarver, James E.; dos Reis, Mario; Mirarab, Siavash; Moran, Raymond J.; Parker, Sean; O’Reilly, Joseph E.; King, Benjamin L.; O’Connell, Mary J.; Asher, Robert J.; Warnow, Tandy; Peterson, Kevin J.; Donoghue, Philip C.J.; Pisani, Davide

    2016-01-01

    Placental mammals comprise three principal clades: Afrotheria (e.g., elephants and tenrecs), Xenarthra (e.g., armadillos and sloths), and Boreoeutheria (all other placental mammals), the relationships among which are the subject of controversy and a touchstone for debate on the limits of phylogenetic inference. Previous analyses have found support for all three hypotheses, leading some to conclude that this phylogenetic problem might be impossible to resolve due to the compounded effects of incomplete lineage sorting (ILS) and a rapid radiation. Here we show, using a genome scale nucleotide data set, microRNAs, and the reanalysis of the three largest previously published amino acid data sets, that the root of Placentalia lies between Atlantogenata and Boreoeutheria. Although we found evidence for ILS in early placental evolution, we are able to reject previous conclusions that the placental root is a hard polytomy that cannot be resolved. Reanalyses of previous data sets recover Atlantogenata + Boreoeutheria and show that contradictory results are a consequence of poorly fitting evolutionary models; instead, when the evolutionary process is better-modeled, all data sets converge on Atlantogenata. Our Bayesian molecular clock analysis estimates that marsupials diverged from placentals 157–170 Ma, crown Placentalia diverged 86–100 Ma, and crown Atlantogenata diverged 84–97 Ma. Our results are compatible with placental diversification being driven by dispersal rather than vicariance mechanisms, postdating early phases in the protracted opening of the Atlantic Ocean. PMID:26733575

  2. Development of Non-Viral, Trophoblast-Specific Gene Delivery for Placental Therapy.

    PubMed

    Abd Ellah, Noura; Taylor, Leeanne; Troja, Weston; Owens, Kathryn; Ayres, Neil; Pauletti, Giovanni; Jones, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Low birth weight is associated with both short term problems and the fetal programming of adult onset diseases, including an increased risk of obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Placental insufficiency leading to intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) contributes to the prevalence of diseases with developmental origins. Currently there are no therapies for IUGR or placental insufficiency. To address this and move towards development of an in utero therapy, we employ a nanostructure delivery system complexed with the IGF-1 gene to treat the placenta. IGF-1 is a growth factor critical to achieving appropriate placental and fetal growth. Delivery of genes to a model of human trophoblast and mouse placenta was achieved using a diblock copolymer (pHPMA-b-pDMAEMA) complexed to hIGF-1 plasmid DNA under the control of trophoblast-specific promoters (Cyp19a or PLAC1). Transfection efficiency of pEGFP-C1-containing nanocarriers in BeWo cells and non-trophoblast cells was visually assessed via fluorescence microscopy. In vivo transfection and functionality was assessed by direct placental-injection into a mouse model of IUGR. Complexes formed using pHPMA-b-pDMAEMA and CYP19a-923 or PLAC1-modified plasmids induce trophoblast-selective transgene expression in vitro, and placental injection of PLAC1-hIGF-1 produces measurable RNA expression and alleviates IUGR in our mouse model, consequently representing innovative building blocks towards human placental gene therapies.

  3. Assisted reproduction causes placental maldevelopment and dysfunction linked to reduced fetal weight in mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuqiang; Sun, Fang-zhen; Huang, Xiuying; Wang, Xiaohong; Tang, Na; Zhu, Baoyi; Li, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Compelling evidence indicates that stress in utero, as manifested by low birth weight (LBW), increases the risk of metabolic syndrome in adulthood. Singletons conceived by assisted reproductive technology (ART) display a significant increase in LBW risk and ART offspring have a different metabolic profile starting at birth. Here, used mouse as a model, we found that ART resulted in reduced fetal weight and placental overgrowth at embryonic day 18.5 (E18.5). The ART placentae exhibited histomorphological alterations with defects in placental layer segregation and glycogen cells migration at E18.5. Further, ART treatments resulted in downregulation of a majority of placental nutrient transporters and reduction in placental efficiency. Moreover, the ART placentae were associated with increased methylation levels at imprinting control regions of H19, KvDMR1 and disrupted expression of a majority of imprinted genes important for placental development and function at E18.5. Our results from the mouse model show the first piece of evidence that ART treatment could affect fetal growth by disrupting placental development and function, suggests that perturbation of genomic imprinting resulted from embryo manipulation may contribute to these problems. PMID:26085229

  4. A prospective study to compare serum human placental lactogen and menstrual dates for determining gestational age.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, P G; Lind, T; Lawson, J Y

    1987-01-01

    In a group of 575 healthy pregnant women with certain menstrual dates the estimation of the length of gestation from maternal serum human placental lactogen concentrations has been compared with gestational age calculated from the last menstrual period and ultrasonic measurements of the fetal biparietal diameter. In 412 of these patients labor started spontaneously, and the estimated dates of delivery determined by these three methods were also compared. In the range of 9 to 17 weeks of pregnancy, gestational age can be determined by human placental lactogen measurement to within 7 days (+/- 1 SD) which compares favorably with other methods. Regarding the prediction of the expected date of delivery, 88% were delivered within 2 weeks of the date predicted by last menstrual period, 82% within 2 weeks of the sonar date, and 80% by the date determined by human placental lactogen assessment. Prediction of delivery in a further group of 139 women with uncertain dates gave 73% within 2 weeks by sonar date and 69% within 2 weeks by human placental lactogen determination. We suggest human placental lactogen measurements should become part of routine antenatal care complementing rather than replacing the role of ultrasonic scanning. For those doctors and patients who wish to avoid more exposure to ultrasonic scanning than absolutely necessary, human placental lactogen estimates offer an alternative method for assessing the length of gestation.

  5. Placental fractalkine is up-regulated in severe early-onset preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Siwetz, Monika; Dieber-Rotheneder, Martina; Cervar-Zivkovic, Mila; Kummer, Daniel; Kremshofer, Julia; Weiss, Gregor; Herse, Florian; Huppertz, Berthold; Gauster, Martin

    2015-05-01

    The pathogenesis of preeclampsia (PE) includes the release of placental factors into the maternal circulation, inducing an inflammatory environment in the mother. One of the factors may be the proinflammatory chemokine fractalkine, which is expressed in the syncytiotrophoblast of human placenta, from where it is released into the maternal circulation by constitutive shedding. We examined whether placental fractalkine is up-regulated in severe early-onset PE and whether the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-6 are able to increase the expression of fractalkine. Gene expression analysis, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and immunohistochemistry consistently showed increased fractalkine expression in placentas from severe early-onset PE, compared to gestational age-matched controls. Expression of a disintegrin and metalloproteinases (ADAMs) 10 and 17, which convert transmembrane fractalkine into the soluble form, was significantly increased in these cases. Incubation of first-trimester placental explants with TNF-α provoked a significant increase in fractalkine expression and release of the soluble form, whereas IL-6 had no effect. TNF-α-mediated up-regulation of placental fractalkine was reversed in the presence of the aspirin-derivative salicylate, which impaired activation of NF-κB p65 in TNF-α-treated explants. On the basis of data from placental explants, we suggest that increased maternal TNF-α may up-regulate the expression and release of placental fractalkine, which, in turn, may contribute to an exaggerated systemic inflammatory response in PE. PMID:25769431

  6. CD4+ T cells are important mediators of oxidative stress that cause hypertension in response to placental ischemia.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Kedra; Cornelius, Denise C; Scott, Jeremy; Heath, Judith; Moseley, Janae; Chatman, Krystal; LaMarca, Babbette

    2014-11-01

    Preeclampsia is associated with oxidative stress, which is suspected to play a role in hypertension, placental ischemia, and fetal demise associated with the disease. Various cellular sources of oxidative stress, such as neutrophils, monocytes, and CD4(+) T cells have been suggested as culprits in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia. The objective of this study was to examine a role of circulating and placental CD4(+) T cells in oxidative stress in response to placental ischemia during pregnancy. CD4(+) T cells and oxidative stress were measured in preeclamptic and normal pregnant women, placental ischemic and normal pregnant rats, and normal pregnant recipient rats of placental ischemic CD4(+) T cells. Women with preeclampsia had significantly increased circulating (P=0.02) and placental CD4(+) T cells (P=0.0001); lymphocyte secretion of myeloperoxidase (P=0.004); and placental reactive oxygen species (P=0.0004) when compared with normal pregnant women. CD4(+) T cells from placental ischemic rats cause many facets of preeclampsia when injected into normal pregnant recipient rats on gestational day 13. On gestational day 19, blood pressure increased in normal pregnant recipients of placental ischemic CD4(+) T cells (P=0.002) compared with that in normal pregnant rats. Similar to preeclamptic patients, CD4(+) T cells from placental ischemic rats secreted significantly more myeloperoxidase (P=0.003) and induced oxidative stress in cultured vascular cells (P=0.003) than normal pregnant rat CD4(+)Tcells. Apocynin, a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate inhibitor, attenuated hypertension and all oxidative stress markers in placental ischemic and normal pregnant recipient rats of placental ischemic CD4(+)Tcells (P=0.05). These data demonstrate an important role for CD4(+) T cells in mediating another factor, oxidative stress, to cause hypertension during preeclampsia.

  7. Human fetal weight and placental weight growth curves. A mathematical analysis from a population at sea level.

    PubMed

    Bonds, D R; Mwape, B; Kumar, S; Gabbe, S G

    1984-01-01

    A mathematical analysis of human fetal and placental growth curves was made on data collected prospectively from a population at sea level. Both the fetal and placental growth curves can best be described by a form of the logistic equation inhibited growth model. The fetal growth rate reaches its maximum approximately 4 weeks after the placental growth rate has reached its maximum. Growth rate constants were calculated for several populations at various altitudes. PMID:6733167

  8. CD4+T cells are important mediators of oxidative stress that cause hypertension in response to placental ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Kedra; Cornelius, Denise C.; Scott, Jeremy; Heath, Judith; Moseley, Janae; Chatman, Krystal; LaMarca, Babbette

    2014-01-01

    Preeclampsia is associated with oxidative stress which is suspected to play a role in hypertension, placental ischemia and fetal demise associated with the disease. Various cellular sources of oxidative stress such as neutrophils, monocytes and CD4+T cells have been suggested as culprits in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia. The objective of this study was to examine a role for circulating and placental CD4+T cells in oxidative stress in response to placental ischemia during pregnancy. CD4+T cells and oxidative stress was measured in preeclamptic and normal pregnant women, placental ischemic and normal pregnant rats and normal pregnant recipient rats of placental ischemic CD4+ T cells. Preeclamptic women had significantly increased circulating (p=0.02) and placental CD4+T cells (p=0.0001); lymphocyte secretion of myeloperoxidase (p=0.004); and placental reactive oxygen species (p=0.0004) compared to normal pregnant women. CD4+T cells from placental ischemic rats cause many facets of preeclampsia when injected into normal pregnant recipient rats on gestational day 13. On gestational day 19 blood pressure increased in normal pregnant recipients of placental ischemic CD4+T cells (p=0.002) compared to normal pregnant rats. Similar to preeclamptic patients, CD4+ T cells from placental ischemic rats secreted significantly more myeloperoxidase (p=0.003) and induced oxidative stress in cultured vascular cells (p=0.003) than normal pregnant rat CD4+Tcells. Apocynin, an NADPH inhibitor, attenuated hypertension, and all oxidative stress markers in placental ischemic and normal pregnant recipient rats of placental ischemic CD4+Tcells (p=0.05). These data demonstrate an important role for CD4+T cells in mediating another factor, oxidative stress, to cause hypertension during preeclampsia. PMID:25259742

  9. Translational analysis of mouse and human placental protein and mRNA reveals distinct molecular pathologies in human preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Cox, Brian; Sharma, Parveen; Evangelou, Andreas I; Whiteley, Kathie; Ignatchenko, Vladimir; Ignatchenko, Alex; Baczyk, Dora; Czikk, Marie; Kingdom, John; Rossant, Janet; Gramolini, Anthony O; Adamson, S Lee; Kislinger, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) adversely impacts ~5% of pregnancies. Despite extensive research, no consistent biomarkers or cures have emerged, suggesting that different molecular mechanisms may cause clinically similar disease. To address this, we undertook a proteomics study with three main goals: (1) to identify a panel of cell surface markers that distinguish the trophoblast and endothelial cells of the placenta in the mouse; (2) to translate this marker set to human via the Human Protein Atlas database; and (3) to utilize the validated human trophoblast markers to identify subgroups of human preeclampsia. To achieve these goals, plasma membrane proteins at the blood tissue interfaces were extracted from placentas using intravascular silica-bead perfusion, and then identified using shotgun proteomics. We identified 1181 plasma membrane proteins, of which 171 were enriched at the maternal blood-trophoblast interface and 192 at the fetal endothelial interface with a 70% conservation of expression in humans. Three distinct molecular subgroups of human preeclampsia were identified in existing human microarray data by using expression patterns of trophoblast-enriched proteins. Analysis of all misexpressed genes revealed divergent dysfunctions including angiogenesis (subgroup 1), MAPK signaling (subgroup 2), and hormone biosynthesis and metabolism (subgroup 3). Subgroup 2 lacked expected changes in known preeclampsia markers (sFLT1, sENG) and uniquely overexpressed GNA12. In an independent set of 40 banked placental specimens, GNA12 was overexpressed during preeclampsia when co-incident with chronic hypertension. In the current study we used a novel translational analysis to integrate mouse and human trophoblast protein expression with human microarray data. This strategy identified distinct molecular pathologies in human preeclampsia. We conclude that clinically similar preeclampsia patients exhibit divergent placental gene expression profiles thus implicating divergent

  10. Placental-derived stem cells: Culture, differentiation and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Maira S; Barreto-Filho, João B

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is a promising approach to clinical healing in several diseases. A great variety of tissues (bone marrow, adipose tissue, and placenta) are potentially sources of stem cells. Placenta-derived stem cells (p-SCs) are in between embryonic and mesenchymal stem cells, sharing characteristics with both, such as non-carcinogenic status and property to differentiate in all embryonic germ layers. Moreover, their use is not ethically restricted as fetal membranes are considered medical waste after birth. In this context, the present review will be focused on the biological properties, culture and potential cell therapy uses of placental-derived stem cells. Immunophenotype characterization, mainly for surface marker expression, and basic principles of p-SC isolation and culture (mechanical separation or enzymatic digestion of the tissues, the most used culture media, cell plating conditions) will be presented. In addition, some preclinical studies that were performed in different medical areas will be cited, focusing on neurological, liver, pancreatic, heart, muscle, pulmonary, and bone diseases and also in tissue engineering field. Finally, some challenges for stem cell therapy applications will be highlighted. The understanding of the mechanisms involved in the p-SCs differentiation and the achievement of pure cell populations (after differentiation) are key points that must be clarified before bringing the preclinical studies, performed at the bench, to the medical practice. PMID:26029347

  11. Placental Induced Growth Factor (PIGf) in Coronary Artery Disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundaresan, Alamelu; Carabello, Blaise; Mehta, Satish; Schlegel, Todd; Pellis, Neal; Ott, Mark; Pierson, Duane

    2010-01-01

    Our previous studies on normal human lymphocytes have shown a five-fold increase (p less than 0.001) in angiogenic inducers such as Placental Induced Growth Factor (PIGf) in physiologically stressful environments such as modeled microgravity, a space analog. This suggests de-regulation of cardiovascular signalling pathways indicated by upregulation of PIGf. In the current study, we measured PIGf in the plasma of 33 patients with and without coronary artery disease (CAD) to investigate whether such disease is associated with increased levels of PIGf. A control consisting of 31 sex matched apparently healthy subjects was also included in the study. We observed that the levels of PIGf in CAD patients were significantly increased compared to those in healthy control subjects (p less than 0.001) and usually increased beyond the clinical threshold level (greater than 27ng/L). The mechanisms leading to up-regulation of angiogenic factors and the adaptation of organisms to stressful environments such as isolation, high altitude, hypoxia, ischemia, microgravity, increased radiation, etc are presently unknown and require further investigation in spaceflight and these other physiologically stressed environments.

  12. [Placental epigenetic programming in intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR)].

    PubMed

    Casanello, Paola; Castro-Rodríguez, José A; Uauy, Ricardo; Krause, Bernardo J

    2016-01-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is a perinatal condition affecting foetal growth, with under the 10th percentile of the weight curve expected for gestational age. This condition has been associated with higher cardiovascular and metabolic risk and post-natal obesity. There are also major changes in placental function, and particularly in a key molecule in this regulation, nitric oxide. The synthesis of nitric oxide has numerous control mechanisms and competition with arginase for their common substrate, the amino acid L-arginine. This competition is reflected in various vascular diseases and particularly in the endothelium of the umbilical vessels of babies with IUGR. Along with this, there is regulation at the epigenetic level, where methylation in specific regions of some gene promoters, such as the nitric oxide synthase, regulating their expression. It is currently of great interest to understand the mechanisms by which diseases such as IUGR may be conditioned, particularly by maternal nutritional and metabolic conditions, and epigenetic mechanisms that could eventually be modifiable, and thus a focus of interest for health interventions.

  13. Human placental trophoblasts express the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-35.

    PubMed

    Mao, Haiting; Gao, Wenjuan; Ma, Chao; Sun, Jintang; Liu, Jia; Shao, Qianqian; Song, Bingfeng; Qu, Xun

    2013-07-01

    Studies of maternal-fetal tolerance focus on defining mechanisms for establishment of immunological privilege within the uterus during pregnancy. Fetal trophoblasts play a key role in maternal tolerance, in part through cytokines production. As a novel inhibitory cytokine, IL-35 is produced by Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) and mediates maximal suppression of Tregs. The purpose of the study is to analyze the expression of IL-35 in first-trimester human placental trophoblasts. IL-35 expression was detected at both protein and mRNA levels by immunohistochemical staining and quantitative real-time PCR method, respectively and secretion of IL-35 was measured by ELISA assay. Our results demonstrated that human trophoblasts constitutively expressed IL-35. Ebi3 and p35 (two subunits of IL-35) mRNA was shown to be co-expressed in trophoblast cells. Moreover, large amounts of secreted IL-35 were detected in the supernatants of trophoblast cells. But we did not detect the constitutive expression of IL-35 in decidual stromal cells. Our findings confirmed for the first time that first-trimester human trophoblast cells expressed and secreted IL-35, which might contribute to their suppressive capacity to maternal immune cells. Therefore, IL-35 may be an important factor of the cytokine network regulating local immune responses during human pregnancy.

  14. Pseudo-placentational endometrial cysts in a bitch.

    PubMed

    Bartel, C; Schönkypl, S; Walter, I

    2010-02-01

    Cystic alterations of the canine endometrium compromise reproduction and fertility of the bitch and may lead to life-threatening diseases, such as pyometra. Even without clinical evidence, reduction of the uterine lumen by cysts implicates disturbances during migration, nidation and development of the embryo. Several studies point to the high variability of morphology of uterine endometrial cysts but they lack detailed analyses of alterations. In the present study, immunohistochemistry was used to investigate the expression of steroid hormone receptors (oestrogen, progesterone), proliferation activity, inflammation and infection in the cystic affected tissue regions in contrast to the normal endometrium. Oestrogen receptor expression showed a high density of receptors throughout the surface epithelial cells, crypt epithelial cells, glandular epithelial cells and stromal cells of the normal endometrium as well as the cystic affected regions. Proliferation in the cysts was verified in the middle and basal cells of the crypts. Neither in the endometrium nor in the cysts inflammatory processes or evidence of infection could be detected. Furthermore, lectin histochemistry and electron microscopic methods showed that lectin binding patterns and cell morphology of internal epithelial lining and surface epithelium of the cysts can be used to characterize and distinguish different types of cystic alterations. Analogies between epithelial cells of the glandular chambers of the canine placenta and the cystic cellular morphology, steroid hormone receptor distribution as well as lectin binding patterns of the endometrial cysts, as observed in this study, suggest to introduce the term 'pseudo-placentational endometrial cysts'. PMID:19891664

  15. [Modification of the obstetric hysterectomy in placental acretism].

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Villalobos, Roberto Carlos; González-Gómez, Israel Alejandro; Luna-Covarrubias, Edith Esmeralda; Bañuelos-Franco, Alberto; Serrano-Enríquez, Raymundo Felipe

    2014-03-01

    Acretismo is a condition of abnormal placentation, in which the villi invade the myometrium at the implantation site, Representing a risk of massive obstetric hemorrhage with possible alterations of the coagulation, besides to the damage to other organs. Moving forward even to his death, so it is a challenge for the obstetric services, to make a correct diagnosis and in a timely manner, along with the programming of the interruption of pregnancy, as well as the utilization of proper surgical techniques and the involvement of a multidisciplinary team to the possible complications. The following describes a surgical technique modified for patients with a diagnosis of acretismo placentario, used in the Hospital General de Occidente in Jalisco, Mexico from 1 year ago, presenting two clinical cases of patients who underwent surgery with this technique, considering it necessary to present up to the moment a significant decrease in the amount of bleeding, zero days stay of patients in intensive care, any complications in the mother as well as in the product, and more importantly, it has remained at the hospital with no maternal death by this pathology in the last year, considering the nature of being a referral hospital for the whole entity by the Servicios de Salud Jalisco. It is necessary to consider the risks/benefits in the short, medium and long term for the institution, the mother and the product, allowing present good practices that will impinge on the permanent reduction of the maternal death by this pathology.

  16. Role of transporters in placental transfer of drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Ganapathy, Vadivel . E-mail: vganapat@mail.mcg.edu; Prasad, Puttur D.

    2005-09-01

    Human placenta functions as an important transport organ that mediates the exchange of nutrients and metabolites between maternal and fetal circulations. This function is made possible because of the expression of a multitude of transport proteins in the placental syncytiotrophoblast with differential localization in the maternal-facing brush border membrane versus the fetal-facing basal membrane. Even though the physiological role of most of these transport proteins is to handle nutrients, many of them interact with xenobiotics and pharmacological agents. These transport proteins therefore play a critical role in the disposition of drugs across the maternal-fetal interface, with some transporters facilitating the entry of drugs from maternal circulation into fetal circulation whereas others preventing such entry by actively eliminating drugs from the placenta back into maternal circulation. The net result as to whether the placenta enhances the exposure of the developing fetus to drugs and xenobiotics or functions as a barrier to protect the fetus from such agents depends on the types of transporters expressed in the brush border membrane and basal membrane of the syncytiotrophoblast and on the functional mode of these transporters (influx versus efflux)

  17. Placental Protein 13 (galectin-13) has decreased placental expression but increased shedding and maternal serum concentrations in patients presenting with preterm preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Than, Nandor Gabor; Rahman, Omar Abdul; Magenheim, Rita; Nagy, Balint; Fule, Tibor; Hargitai, Beata; Sammar, Marei; Hupuczi, Petronella; Tarca, Adi L.; Szabo, Gabor; Kovalszky, Ilona; Meiri, Hamutal; Sziller, Istvan; Rigo, Janos; Romero, Roberto; Papp, Zoltan

    2009-01-01

    Placental Protein 13 (PP13) is a galectin expressed by the syncytiotrophoblast. Women who subsequently develop preterm preeclampsia have low first trimester maternal serum PP13 concentrations. This study revealed that third trimester maternal serum PP13 concentration increased with gestational age in normal pregnancies (p<0.0001), and it was significantly higher in women presenting with preterm preeclampsia (p=0.02) and HELLP syndrome (p=0.01) than in preterm controls. Conversely, placental PP13 mRNA (p=0.03) and protein, as well as cytoplasmic PP13 staining of the syncytiotrophoblast (p<0.05) was decreased in these pathological pregnancies compared to controls. No differences in placental expression and serum concentrations of PP13 were found at term between patients with preeclampsia and control women. In contrast, the immunoreactivity of the syncytiotrophoblast microvillous membrane was stronger in both term and preterm preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome than in controls. Moreover, large syncytial cytoplasm protrusions, membrane blebs and shed microparticles strongly stained for PP13 in preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome. In conclusion, parallel to its decreased placental expression, an augmented membrane shedding of PP13 contributes to the increased third trimester maternal serum PP13 concentrations in women with preterm preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome. PMID:18791734

  18. RNA-seq analysis of the rat placentation site reveals maternal obesity-associated changes in placental and offspring thyroid hormone signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction In animal models, maternal obesity (OB) leads to augmented risk of offspring OB. While placental function is influenced by maternal habitus, the effect of maternal obesity on the interacting zones of the placenta [the labyrinth (LZ), junctional (JZ) and metrial gland (MG)] remains unkno...

  19. Overlap Chronic Placental Inflammation Is Associated with a Unique Gene Expression Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Kripa; Wang, Huaqing; Troncone, Michael J.; Khan, Waliul I.; Pare, Guillaume; Terry, Jefferson

    2015-01-01

    Breakdown of the balance between maternal pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways is thought to allow an anti-fetal maternal immune response that underlies development of chronic placental inflammation. Chronic placental inflammation is manifested by the influx of maternal inflammatory cells, including lymphocytes, histiocytes, and plasma cells, into the placental membranes, villi, and decidua. These infiltrates are recognized pathologically as chronic chorioamnionitis, chronic villitis of unknown etiology, and chronic deciduitis. Each of these histological entities is associated with adverse fetal outcomes including intrauterine growth restriction and preterm birth. Studying the gene expression patterns in chronically inflamed placenta, particularly when overlapping histologies are present, may lead to a better understanding of the underlying mechanism(s). Therefore, this study compared tissue with and without chronic placental inflammation, manifested as overlapping chronic chorioamnionitis, chronic villitis of unknown etiology, and chronic deciduitis. RNA expression profiling was conducted on formalin fixed, paraffin embedded placental tissue using Illumina microarrays. IGJ was the most significant differentially expressed gene identified and had increased expression in the inflamed tissue. In addition, IGLL1, CXCL13, CD27, CXCL9, ICOS, and KLRC1 had increased expression in the inflamed placental samples. These differentially expressed genes are associated with T follicular helper cells, natural killer cells, and B cells. Furthermore, these genes differ from those typically associated with the individual components of chronic placental inflammation, such as chronic villitis, suggesting that the inflammatory infiltrate associated with overlapping chronic chorioamnionitis, chronic villitis of unknown etiology, and chronic deciduitis differs is unique. To further explore and validate gene expression findings, we conducted immunohistochemical assessment of protein level

  20. Dietary protein during gestation affects circulating indicators of placental function and fetal development in heifers.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, T M; Micke, G C; Magalhaes, R S; Martin, G B; Wallace, C R; Green, J A; Perry, V E A

    2009-04-01

    The influences of nutritional protein during the first and second trimesters of pregnancy on placental hormones and fetal growth were determined in composite beef heifers. At artificial insemination, heifers were stratified by weight within each composite genotype into 4 treatment groups: High High (HH=1.4kg crude protein (CP)/day for first and second trimesters of gestation; n=16), High Low (HL=1.4kg CP/day for first trimester and 0.4kg CP/day for second trimester; n=19), Low High (LH=0.4kg CP/day for first trimester and 1.4kg CP/day for second trimester; n=17) or Low Low (LL=0.4kg CP/day for first and second trimesters; n=19). Maternal plasma bovine pregnancy associated glycoprotein (bPAG) and progesterone (P4) were determined at gestation day (gd) 28, 82, 179 and 271 (mean gestation length 286 days) in addition to P4 at term. Estrone sulphate (ES) and bovine placental lactogen (bPL) concentrations were measured at gd 124, 179, 236 and 271 and at term in addition to ES at gd 82. Low dietary protein increased placental function as indicated by increased bPAG (P<0.001) and ES (P=0.02) concentrations in first trimester and increased bPL concentrations (P=0.01) in the second trimester of gestation. In the third trimester, when dietary treatment had ceased, placental function was no longer associated with previous dietary treatments. Dam genotype affected placental function as measured by bPL (P<0.001) and ES concentrations (P=0.02). Calf gender, heifer age and maternal insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I, -II and leptin did not affect hormonal indicators or circulating markers of placental function. Enhanced placental function during the third trimester, as measured by ES, was associated with increased calf birth weight (P=0.003).

  1. Placental development during early pregnancy in sheep: Effects of embryo origin on vascularization

    PubMed Central

    Grazul-Bilska, Anna T.; Johnson, Mary Lynn; Borowicz, Pawel P.; Bilski, Jerzy J.; Cymbaluk, Taylor; Norberg, Spencer; Redmer, Dale A.; Reynolds, Lawrence P.

    2014-01-01

    Utero-placental growth and vascular development are critical for pregnancy establishment that may be altered by various factors including assisted reproductive technologies (ART), nutrition, or others, leading to compromised pregnancy. We hypothesized that placental vascularization and expression of angiogenic factors are altered early in pregnancies after transfer of embryos created using selected ART methods. Pregnancies were achieved through natural mating (NAT), or transfer of embryos from natural mating (NAT-ET), or in vitro fertilization (IVF) or activation (IVA). Placental tissues were collected on day 22 of pregnancy. In maternal caruncles (CAR), vascular cell proliferation was less (P<0.05) for IVA than other groups. Compared to NAT, density of blood vessels was less (P<0.05) for IVF and IVA in fetal membranes (FM), and for NAT-ET, IVF and IVA in CAR. In FM, mRNA expression was decreased (P<0.01–0.08) in NAT-ET, IVF and IVA compared to NAT for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor FLT-1, placental growth factor (PGF), neuropilin (NP) 1 and 2, angiopoietin (ANGPT) 1 and 2, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3), hypoxia inducible factor-1A (HIF1A), fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 2 and its receptor FGFR2. In CAR, mRNA expression was decreased (P<0.01–0.05) in NAT-ET, IVF and IVA compared to NAT for VEGF, FLT-1, PGF, ANGPT1 and TEK. Decreased mRNA expression for 12 of 14 angiogenic factors across FM and CAR in NAT-ET, IVF and IVA pregnancies was associated with reduced placental vascular development, which would lead to poor placental function and compromised fetal and placental growth and development. PMID:24472816

  2. Selected Persistent Organic Pollutants in Human Placental Tissue from the United States

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Rachael M.; Li, An; Stodgell, Christopher J.; Walker, Cheryl; Szabo, Sara; Leuthner, Steve; Durkin, Maureen S.; Moye, Jack; Miller, Richard K.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging and legacy environmental pollutants such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides (DDE) are found in human placenta, indicating prenatal exposure, but data from the United States are sparse. We sought to determine concentrations of these compounds in human placentae as part of a formative research project conducted by the National Children’s Study Placenta Consortium. A total of 169 tissue specimens were collected at different time points post delivery from 42 human placentae at three U.S. locations, and analyzed by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry following extraction using matrix solid phase dispersion. PBDEs, PCBs, and DDE were detected in all specimens. The concentrations of 10 PBDEs (∑10PBDEs), 32 PCBs (∑32PCBs) and p,p’-DDE were 43–1,723, 76–856 and 10–1,968 pg/g wet weight, respectively, in specimens collected shortly after delivery. Significant geographic differences in PBDEs were observed, with higher concentrations in placentae collected in Davis, CA than in those from Rochester, NY or Milwaukee, WI. We combined these with other published data and noted first-order declining trends for placental PCB and DDE concentrations over the past decades, with half-lives of about 5 and 8 years, respectively. The effect of time to tissue collection from refrigerated placentae on measured concentrations of these three classes of persistent organic pollutants was additionally examined, with no significant effect observed up to 120 hours. The results of this work indicate that widespread prenatal exposure to persistent organic pollutants in the United States continues. PMID:24485817

  3. Evaluation of the Wharton׳s jelly poroelastic parameters through compressive tests on placental and foetal ends of human umbilical cords.

    PubMed

    Gervaso, Francesca; Boschetti, Federica; Pennati, Giancarlo

    2014-07-01

    The umbilical cord is a conduit between the developing foetus and the placenta. In physiological conditions it contains two arteries and one vein immersed in a mucoid tissue called Wharton׳s jelly. Although the extreme importance of such a structure is fully recognized, the umbilical cord and its components have been scarcely studied. A deep investigation on the biomechanics of the umbilical cord could help to understand if the pregnancy outcome is influenced by umbilical cord mechanical properties, however, detailed biomechanical data are still lacking. In the present study, the mechanical properties during compression of the human Wharton׳s jelly have been evaluated using a poroelastic approach. Multi-ramp stress-relaxation tests in both confined and unconfined configurations were performed on Wharton׳s jelly samples extracted from foetal and placental sides of twenty human umbilical cords. The Young modulus and Aggregate modulus were calculated at three strain levels and the hydraulic permeability was found by fitting the confined stress-relaxation data to the analytical solution and minimizing the stress least square differences. The Wharton׳s jelly exhibits a highly non linear and viscoelastic behaviour showing a dependence on the applied strain values and a ~90% and ~85% relaxation in unconfined and confined configuration, respectively. Moreover, equilibrium Young and Aggregate moduli resulted significantly higher and the permeability significantly lower at the foetal than the placental site, showing a dependence of the three material parameters on the location (foetal or placental) and, consequently, a non-homogeneity in the Wharton׳s jelly mechanical properties.

  4. High Doses of Ursodeoxycholic Acid Up-Regulate the Expression of Placental Breast Cancer Resistance Protein in Patients Affected by Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Azzaroli, Francesco; Raspanti, Maria Elena; Simoni, Patrizia; Montagnani, Marco; Lisotti, Andrea; Cecinato, Paolo; Arena, Rosario; Simonazzi, Giuliana; Farina, Antonio; Rizzo, Nicola; Mazzella, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Background Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) administration in intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) induces bile acids (BA) efflux from the foetal compartment, but the molecular basis of this transplacental transport is only partially defined. Aim To determine if placental breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), able to transport BA, is regulated by UDCA in ICP. Methods 32 pregnant women with ICP (14 untreated, 34.9±5.17 years; 18 treated with UDCA - 25 mg/Kg/day, 32.7±4.62 years,) and 12 healthy controls (33.4±3.32 years) agreed to participate in the study. Placentas were obtained at delivery and processed for membrane extraction. BCRP protein expression was evaluated by immunoblotting techniques and chemiluminescence quantified with a luminograph measuring emitted photons; mRNA expression with real time PCR. Statistical differences between groups were evaluated by ANOVA with Dunn’s Multiple Comparison test. Results BCRP was expressed only on the apical membrane of the syncytiotrophoblast. A significant difference was observed among the three groups both for mRNA (ANOVA, p = 0.0074) and protein (ANOVA, p<0.0001) expression. BCRP expression was similar in controls and in the untreated ICP group. UDCA induced a significant increase in placental BCRP mRNA and protein expression compared to controls (350.7±106.3 vs 100±18.68% of controls, p<0.05 and 397.8±56.02 vs 100±11.44% of controls, p<0.001, respectively) and untreated ICP (90.29±17.59% of controls, p<0.05 and 155.0±13.87%, p<0.01). Conclusion Our results confirm that BCRP is expressed only on the apical membrane of the syncytiotrophoblast and show that ICP treatment with high dose UDCA significantly upregulates placental BCRP expression favouring BA efflux from the foetal compartment. PMID:23717540

  5. A dating success story: genomes and fossils converge on placental mammal origins.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Anjali

    2012-08-10

    The timing of the placental mammal radiation has been a source of contention for decades. The fossil record of mammals extends over 200 million years, but no confirmed placental mammal fossils are known prior to 64 million years ago, which is approximately 1.5 million years after the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) mass extinction that saw the end of non-avian dinosaurs. Thus, it came as a great surprise when the first published molecular clock studies suggested that placental mammals originated instead far back in the Cretaceous, in some cases doubling divergence estimates based on fossils. In the last few decades, more than a hundred new genera of Mesozoic mammals have been discovered, and molecular divergence studies have grown from simple clock-like models applied to a few genes to sophisticated analyses of entire genomes. Yet, molecular and fossil-based divergence estimates for placental mammal origins have remained remote, with knock-on effects for macro-scale reconstructions of mammal evolution. A few recent molecular studies have begun to converge with fossil-based estimates, and a new phylogenomic study in particular shows that the palaeontological record was mostly correct; most placental mammal orders diversified after the K-Pg mass extinction. While a small gap still remains for Late Cretaceous supraordinal divergences, this study has significantly improved the congruence between molecular and palaeontological data and heralds a broader integration of these fields of evolutionary science.

  6. The placentation of eulipotyphla-reconstructing a morphotype of the Mammalian placenta.

    PubMed

    Ferner, Kirsten; Siniza, Swetlana; Zeller, Ulrich

    2014-10-01

    Placentation determines the developmental status of the neonate, which can be considered as the most vulnerable stage in the mammalian life cycle. In this respect, the different evolutionary and ecological adaptations of marsupial and placental mammals have most likely been associated with the different reproductive strategies of the two therian clades. The morphotypes of marsupial and placental neonates, as well as the placental stem species pattern of Marsupialia, have already been reconstructed. To contribute to a better understanding of the evolution of Placentalia, a histological and ultrastructural investigation of the placenta in three representatives of Eulipotyphla, that is, core insectivores, has been carried out in this study. We studied the Musk shrew (Suncus murinus), the four-toed hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris), and the Iberian mole (Talpa occidentalis). As a result, a eulipotyphlan placental morphotype consisting of a compact and invasive placenta was reconstructed. This supports the widely accepted hypothesis that the stem lineage of Placentalia is characterized by an invasive, either endothelio- or hemochorial placenta. Evolutionary transformations toward a diffuse, noninvasive placenta occurred in the stem lineages of lower primates and cetartiodactyles and were associated with prolonged gestation and the production of few and highly precocial neonates. Compared to the choriovitelline placenta of Marsupialia, the chorioallantoic placenta of Placentalia allows for a more intimate contact and is associated with more advanced neonates.

  7. Animal Models to Study Placental Development and Function throughout Normal and Dysfunctional Human Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Grigsby, Peta L

    2016-01-01

    Abnormalities of placental development and function are known to underlie many pathologies of pregnancy, including spontaneous preterm birth, fetal growth restriction, and preeclampsia. A growing body of evidence also underscores the importance of placental dysfunction in the lifelong health of both mother and offspring. However, our knowledge regarding placental structure and function throughout pregnancy remains limited. Understanding the temporal growth and functionality of the human placenta throughout the entirety of gestation is important if we are to gain a better understanding of placental dysfunction. The utilization of new technologies and imaging techniques that could enable safe monitoring of placental growth and function in vivo has become a major focus area for the National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development, as evident by the establishment of the "Human Placenta Project." Many of the objectives of the Human Placenta Project will necessitate preclinical studies and testing in appropriately designed animal models that can be readily translated to the clinical setting. This review will describe the advantages and limitations of relevant animals such as the guinea pig, sheep, and nonhuman primate models that have been used to study the role of the placenta in fetal growth disorders, preeclampsia, or other maternal diseases during pregnancy.

  8. Animal Models to Study Placental Development and Function throughout Normal and Dysfunctional Human Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Grigsby, Peta L.

    2016-01-01

    Abnormalities of placental development and function are known to underlie many pathologies of pregnancy, including spontaneous preterm birth, fetal growth restriction and preeclampsia. A growing body of evidence also underscores the importance of placental dysfunction in the lifelong health of both mother and offspring. However, our knowledge regarding placental structure and function throughout pregnancy remains limited. Understanding the temporal growth and functionality of the human placenta throughout the entirety of gestation is important if we are to gain a better understanding of placental dysfunction. The utilization of new technologies and imaging techniques that could enable safe monitoring of placental growth and function in vivo has become a major focus area for the National Institutes of Child Health & Human Development, as evident by the establishment of the “Human Placenta Project”. Many of the objectives of the Human Placenta Project will necessitate pre-clinical studies and testing in appropriately designed animal models that can be readily translated to the clinical setting. This review will describe the advantages and limitations of relevant animals such as the guinea pig, sheep and non-human primate models that have been used to study the role of the placenta in fetal growth disorders, preeclampsia or other maternal diseases during pregnancy. PMID:26752715

  9. The effects of dietary supplementation during pregnancy on placental morphology, pathology, and histomorphometry.

    PubMed

    Rush, D; Kristal, A; Navarro, C; Chauhan, P; Blanc, W; Naeye, R; Susser, M W

    1984-06-01

    We related the macroscopic and microscopic morphology and the histomorphometry of the placenta to prenatal nutritional supplementation. In the Prenatal Project, a controlled clinical trial, three dietary treatments (supplement, a high-protein beverage; complement, a balanced protein-calorie beverage, or routine vitamin and mineral tablets) were randomly allocated to poor Black pregnant women, and the outcome was assessed. Herein we report the effects on placental morphology and histomorphometry. There were significantly fewer preterm deliveries in the complement group, and this was reflected by an increase in the size of decidual cells, an index associated with placental aging. Several other characteristics of the placentas of the complement group may have been more directly associated with improved perinatal outcome: decreased intervillous fibrin, lower incidence of gross surface infarct, and smaller (and presumably less edematous) cells of the villous stroma, may have mediated increased placental perfusion. There was no evidence of any placental change associated with the increase in very preterm delivery and the highly significant depressed birth weight among preterm deliveries in the supplement group. The significantly lower incidence of meconium staining of Wharton's jelly among controls seems likely to have been a chance finding. While there were several other indices that reflected placental aging, the significantly increased chorioamnionitis, acute funisitis , and acute decidual inflammation among placentas of those who delivered prematurely [the former two associated with very early delivery (less than 35 wk gestation)] were likely to have been involved as causes of premature delivery.

  10. Prevalence of gestational, placental and congenital malaria in north-west Colombia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The frequency of pregnancy-associated malaria is increasingly being documented in American countries. In Colombia, with higher frequency of Plasmodium vivax over Plasmodium falciparum infection, recent reports confirmed gestational malaria as a serious public health problem. Thick smear examination is the gold standard to diagnose malaria in endemic settings, but in recent years, molecular diagnostic methods have contributed to elucidate the dimension of the problem of gestational malaria. The study was aimed at exploring the prevalence of gestational, placental and congenital malaria in women who delivered at the local hospitals of north-west Colombia, between June 2008 and April 2011. Methods A group of 129 parturient women was selected to explore the prevalence of gestational, placental and congenital malaria in a descriptive, prospective and transversal (prevalence) design. Diagnosis was based on the simultaneous application of two independent diagnostic tests: microscopy of thick blood smears and a polymerase chain reaction assay (PCR). Results The prevalence of gestational malaria (thick smear /PCR) was 9.1%/14.0%; placental malaria was 3.3%/16.5% and congenital malaria was absent. A history of gestational malaria during the current pregnancy was significantly associated with gestational malaria at delivery. Plasmodium vivax caused 65% of cases of gestational malaria, whereas P. falciparum caused most cases of placental malaria. Conclusions Gestational and placental malaria are a serious problem in the region, but the risk of congenital malaria is low. A history of malaria during pregnancy may be a practical indicator of infection at delivery. PMID:24053184

  11. Placental Metal Concentrations in Relation to Maternal and Infant Toenails in a U.S. Cohort.

    PubMed

    Punshon, Tracy; Li, Zhigang; Marsit, Carmen J; Jackson, Brian P; Baker, Emily R; Karagas, Margaret R

    2016-02-01

    Metal contaminants cross the placenta, presenting a heightened risk of perturbing fetal development. Information about placental concentrations and transfer of multiple potentially toxic metals from low to moderate exposure is lacking. We measured concentrations of Cd, Pb, Hg, Mn, Se, and Zn in 750 placentas collected from women enrolled in the New Hampshire Birth Cohort Study and examined the correlation between elements, and profiles of potentially toxic metals (Cd, Pb, Hg, and Mn) stratified by nutrient concentrations (Zn and Se) using principal components analyses. We further examined the indirect effects of maternal metal concentrations on infant metal concentrations through placental metal concentrations using structural equation models. Placental metal concentrations were all correlated, particularly Zn and Mn, and Zn and Cd, and the principal component of metals differed by stratum of high versus low Zn and Se. Associations were observed between placenta and maternal toenail Se (β = 63.49; P < 0.0001) and Pb (β = 0.90; P < 0.0001) but not other metals. Structural equation models did not indicate any statistically significant indirect effects through placental metal concentrations. Placental metal concentrations may represent a distinct biomarker of metal exposure and adverse health impacts to the fetus, particularly those stemming from the placenta. PMID:26727403

  12. Sirh7/Ldoc1 knockout mice exhibit placental P4 overproduction and delayed parturition.

    PubMed

    Naruse, Mie; Ono, Ryuichi; Irie, Masahito; Nakamura, Kenji; Furuse, Tamio; Hino, Toshiaki; Oda, Kanako; Kashimura, Misho; Yamada, Ikuko; Wakana, Shigeharu; Yokoyama, Minesuke; Ishino, Fumitoshi; Kaneko-Ishino, Tomoko

    2014-12-01

    Sirh7/Ldoc1 [sushi-ichi retrotransposon homolog 7/leucine zipper, downregulated in cancer 1, also called mammalian retrotransposon-derived 7 (Mart7)] is one of the newly acquired genes from LTR retrotransposons in eutherian mammals. Interestingly, Sirh7/Ldoc1 knockout (KO) mice exhibited abnormal placental cell differentiation/maturation, leading to an overproduction of placental progesterone (P4) and placental lactogen 1 (PL1) from trophoblast giant cells (TGCs). The placenta is an organ that is essential for mammalian viviparity and plays a major endocrinological role during pregnancy in addition to providing nutrients and oxygen to the fetus. P4 is an essential hormone in the preparation and maintenance of pregnancy and the determination of the timing of parturition in mammals; however, the biological significance of placental P4 in rodents is not properly recognized. Here, we demonstrate that mouse placentas do produce P4 in mid-gestation, coincident with a temporal reduction in ovarian P4, suggesting that it plays a role in the protection of the conceptuses specifically in this period. Pregnant Sirh7/Ldoc1 knockout females also displayed delayed parturition associated with a low pup weaning rate. All these results suggest that Sirh7/Ldoc1 has undergone positive selection during eutherian evolution as a eutherian-specific acquired gene because it impacts reproductive fitness via the regulation of placental endocrine function.

  13. Placental Insufficiency Associated with Loss of Cited1 Causes Renal Medullary Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Sparrow, Duncan B.; Boyle, Scott C.; Sams, Rebecca S.; Mazuruk, Bogdan; Zhang, Li; Moeckel, Gilbert W.; Dunwoodie, Sally L.; de Caestecker, Mark P.

    2009-01-01

    A number of studies have shown that placental insufficiency affects embryonic patterning of the kidney and leads to a decreased number of functioning nephrons in adulthood; however, there is circumstantial evidence that placental insufficiency may also affect renal medullary growth, which could account for cases of unexplained renal medullary dysplasia and for abnormalities in renal function among infants who had experienced intrauterine growth retardation. We observed that mice with late gestational placental insufficiency associated with genetic loss of Cited1 expression in the placenta had renal medullary dysplasia. This was not caused by lower urinary tract obstruction or by defects in branching of the ureteric bud during early nephrogenesis but was associated with decreased tissue oxygenation and increased apoptosis in the expanding renal medulla. Loss of placental Cited1 was required for Cited1 mutants to develop renal dysplasia, and this was not dependent on alterations in embryonic Cited1 expression. Taken together, these findings suggest that renal medullary dysplasia in Cited1 mutant mice is a direct consequence of decreased tissue oxygenation resulting from placental insufficiency. PMID:19297558

  14. A role for GPR55 in human placental venous endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kremshofer, Julia; Siwetz, Monika; Berghold, Veronika M; Lang, Ingrid; Huppertz, Berthold; Gauster, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Endocannabinoids and their G protein-coupled receptors have been suggested to play a key role in human pregnancy, by regulating important aspects such as implantation, decidualization, placentation and labor. G protein-coupled receptor 55 (GPR55) was previously postulated to be another cannabinoid receptor, since specific cannabinoids were shown to act independently of the classical cannabinoid receptors CB1 or CB2. Current knowledge about GPR55 expression and function in human placenta is very limited and motivated us to evaluate human placental GPR55 expression in relation to other human peripheral tissues and to analyze spatiotemporal GPR55 expression in human placenta. Gene expression analysis revealed low GPR55 levels in human placenta, when compared to spleen and lung, the organs showing highest GPR55 expression. Moreover, expression analysis showed 5.8 fold increased placental GPR55 expression at term compared to first trimester. Immunohistochemistry located GPR55 solely at the fetal endothelium of first trimester and term placentas. qPCR and immunocytochemistry consistently confirmed GPR55 expression in isolated primary placental arterial and venous endothelial cells. Incubation with L-α-lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI), the specific and functional ligand for GPR55, at a concentration of 1 µM, significantly enhanced migration of venous, but not arterial endothelial cells. LPI-enhanced migration was inhibited by the GPR55 antagonist O-1918, suggesting a role of the LPI-GPR55 axis in placental venous endothelium function. PMID:25869640

  15. Sirh7/Ldoc1 knockout mice exhibit placental P4 overproduction and delayed parturition.

    PubMed

    Naruse, Mie; Ono, Ryuichi; Irie, Masahito; Nakamura, Kenji; Furuse, Tamio; Hino, Toshiaki; Oda, Kanako; Kashimura, Misho; Yamada, Ikuko; Wakana, Shigeharu; Yokoyama, Minesuke; Ishino, Fumitoshi; Kaneko-Ishino, Tomoko

    2014-12-01

    Sirh7/Ldoc1 [sushi-ichi retrotransposon homolog 7/leucine zipper, downregulated in cancer 1, also called mammalian retrotransposon-derived 7 (Mart7)] is one of the newly acquired genes from LTR retrotransposons in eutherian mammals. Interestingly, Sirh7/Ldoc1 knockout (KO) mice exhibited abnormal placental cell differentiation/maturation, leading to an overproduction of placental progesterone (P4) and placental lactogen 1 (PL1) from trophoblast giant cells (TGCs). The placenta is an organ that is essential for mammalian viviparity and plays a major endocrinological role during pregnancy in addition to providing nutrients and oxygen to the fetus. P4 is an essential hormone in the preparation and maintenance of pregnancy and the determination of the timing of parturition in mammals; however, the biological significance of placental P4 in rodents is not properly recognized. Here, we demonstrate that mouse placentas do produce P4 in mid-gestation, coincident with a temporal reduction in ovarian P4, suggesting that it plays a role in the protection of the conceptuses specifically in this period. Pregnant Sirh7/Ldoc1 knockout females also displayed delayed parturition associated with a low pup weaning rate. All these results suggest that Sirh7/Ldoc1 has undergone positive selection during eutherian evolution as a eutherian-specific acquired gene because it impacts reproductive fitness via the regulation of placental endocrine function. PMID:25468940

  16. Sirh7/Ldoc1 knockout mice exhibit placental P4 overproduction and delayed parturition

    PubMed Central

    Naruse, Mie; Ono, Ryuichi; Irie, Masahito; Nakamura, Kenji; Furuse, Tamio; Hino, Toshiaki; Oda, Kanako; Kashimura, Misho; Yamada, Ikuko; Wakana, Shigeharu; Yokoyama, Minesuke; Ishino, Fumitoshi; Kaneko-Ishino, Tomoko

    2014-01-01

    Sirh7/Ldoc1 [sushi-ichi retrotransposon homolog 7/leucine zipper, downregulated in cancer 1, also called mammalian retrotransposon-derived 7 (Mart7)] is one of the newly acquired genes from LTR retrotransposons in eutherian mammals. Interestingly, Sirh7/Ldoc1 knockout (KO) mice exhibited abnormal placental cell differentiation/maturation, leading to an overproduction of placental progesterone (P4) and placental lactogen 1 (PL1) from trophoblast giant cells (TGCs). The placenta is an organ that is essential for mammalian viviparity and plays a major endocrinological role during pregnancy in addition to providing nutrients and oxygen to the fetus. P4 is an essential hormone in the preparation and maintenance of pregnancy and the determination of the timing of parturition in mammals; however, the biological significance of placental P4 in rodents is not properly recognized. Here, we demonstrate that mouse placentas do produce P4 in mid-gestation, coincident with a temporal reduction in ovarian P4, suggesting that it plays a role in the protection of the conceptuses specifically in this period. Pregnant Sirh7/Ldoc1 knockout females also displayed delayed parturition associated with a low pup weaning rate. All these results suggest that Sirh7/Ldoc1 has undergone positive selection during eutherian evolution as a eutherian-specific acquired gene because it impacts reproductive fitness via the regulation of placental endocrine function. PMID:25468940

  17. The placental pursuit for an adequate oxidant balance between the mother and the fetus

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Emilio A.; Krause, Bernardo; Ebensperger, German; Reyes, Roberto V.; Casanello, Paola; Parra-Cordero, Mauro; Llanos, Anibal J.

    2014-01-01

    The placenta is the exchange organ that regulates metabolic processes between the mother and her developing fetus. The adequate function of this organ is clearly vital for a physiologic gestational process and a healthy baby as final outcome. The umbilico-placental vasculature has the capacity to respond to variations in the materno-fetal milieu. Depending on the intensity and the extensity of the insult, these responses may be immediate-, mediate-, and long-lasting, deriving in potential morphostructural and functional changes later in life. These adjustments usually compensate the initial insults, but occasionally may switch to long-lasting remodeling and dysfunctional processes, arising maladaptation. One of the most challenging conditions in modern perinatology is hypoxia and oxidative stress during development, both disorders occurring in high-altitude and in low-altitude placental insufficiency. Hypoxia and oxidative stress may induce endothelial dysfunction and thus, reduction in the perfusion of the placenta and restriction in the fetal growth and development. This Review will focus on placental responses to hypoxic conditions, usually related with high-altitude and placental insufficiency, deriving in oxidative stress and vascular disorders, altering fetal and maternal health. Although day-to-day clinical practice, basic and clinical research are clearly providing evidence of the severe impact of oxygen deficiency and oxidative stress establishment during pregnancy, further research on umbilical and placental vascular function under these conditions is badly needed to clarify the myriad of questions still unsettled. PMID:25009498

  18. Measures of placental growth in relation to birth weight and gestational age.

    PubMed

    Salafia, Carolyn M; Maas, Elizabeth; Thorp, John M; Eucker, Barbara; Pezzullo, John C; Savitz, David A

    2005-11-15

    Fetal growth depends in part on placental growth. The authors tested placental measures derived from digital images for reliability and to evaluate their association with birth weight and gestational age. A total of 628 women recruited into the Pregnancy, Infection, and Nutrition Study, a prospective cohort study of preterm birth in central North Carolina between 2002 and 2004, delivered singleton liveborn infants after 24 completed weeks' gestation. Novel chorionic plate morphometric parameters captured off digital images of the gross placenta were analyzed as estimators of gestational age and birth weight. Without acknowledgment to placental weight, digitally obtained lateral chorionic plate growth measures accounted for 17 percent of gestational age variance and 35 percent of birth weight variance, overall. Chorionic plate measures accounted for 10 percent of birth weight variance beyond that accounted for by placental weight alone. Among preterm births, 34 percent of gestational age variance and 63 percent of birth weight variance were accounted for by lateral chorionic plate growth measures. Intraclass correlation coefficients for the novel digital measures ranged from 0.96 to 0.98. Reliable digital measures of lateral chorionic plate growth estimate birth weight variance more strongly than gestational age, project variance that is not accounted for by placental weight, and project these outcomes to a greater degree in preterm births than at term.

  19. Modeling oxygen transport in human placental terminal villi.

    PubMed

    Gill, J S; Salafia, C M; Grebenkov, D; Vvedensky, D D

    2011-12-21

    Oxygen transport from maternal blood to fetal blood is a primary function of the placenta. Quantifying the effectiveness of this exchange remains key in identifying healthy placentas because of the great variability in capillary number, caliber and position within the villus-even in placentas deemed clinically "normal". By considering villous membrane to capillary membrane transport, stationary oxygen diffusion can be numerically solved in terminal villi represented by digital photomicrographs. We aim to provide a method to determine whether and if so to what extent diffusional screening may operate in placental villi. Segmented digital photomicrographs of terminal villi from the Pregnancy, Infection and Nutrition study in North Carolina 2002 are used as a geometric basis for solving the stationary diffusion equation. Constant maternal villous oxygen concentration and perfect fetal capillary membrane absorption are assumed. System efficiency is defined as the ratio of oxygen flux into a villus and the sum of the capillary areas contained within. Diffusion screening is quantified by comparing numerical and theoretical maximum oxygen fluxes. A strong link between various measures of villous oxygen transport efficiency and the number of capillaries within a villus is established. The strength of diffusional screening is also related to the number of capillaries within a villus. Our measures of diffusional efficiency are shown to decrease as a function of the number of capillaries per villus. This low efficiency, high capillary number relationship supports our hypothesis that diffusional screening is present in this system. Oxygen transport per capillary is reduced when multiple capillaries compete for diffusing oxygen. A complete picture of oxygen fluxes, capillary and villus areas is obtainable and presents an opportunity for future work.

  20. Cholinergic urethral brush cells are widespread throughout placental mammals.

    PubMed

    Deckmann, Klaus; Krasteva-Christ, Gabriela; Rafiq, Amir; Herden, Christine; Wichmann, Judy; Knauf, Sascha; Nassenstein, Christina; Grevelding, Christoph G; Dorresteijn, Adriaan; Chubanov, Vladimir; Gudermann, Thomas; Bschleipfer, Thomas; Kummer, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    We previously identified a population of cholinergic epithelial cells in murine, human and rat urethrae that exhibits a structural marker of brush cells (villin) and expresses components of the canonical taste transduction signaling cascade (α-gustducin, phospholipase Cβ2 (PLCβ2), transient receptor potential cation channel melanostatin 5 (TRPM5)). These cells serve as sentinels, monitoring the chemical composition of the luminal content for potentially hazardous compounds such as bacteria, and initiate protective reflexes counteracting further ingression. In order to elucidate cross-species conservation of the urethral chemosensory pathway we investigated the occurrence and molecular make-up of urethral brush cells in placental mammals. We screened 11 additional species, at least one in each of the five mammalian taxonomic units primates, carnivora, perissodactyla, artiodactyla and rodentia, for immunohistochemical labeling of the acetylcholine synthesizing enzyme, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), villin, and taste cascade components (α-gustducin, PLCβ2, TRPM5). Corresponding to findings in previously investigated species, urethral epithelial cells with brush cell shape were immunolabeled in all 11 mammals. In 8 species, immunoreactivities against all marker proteins and ChAT were observed, and double-labeling immunofluorescence confirmed the cholinergic nature of villin-positive and chemosensory (TRPM5-positive) cells. In cat and horse, these cells were not labeled by the ChAT antiserum used in this study, and unspecific reactions of the secondary antiserum precluded conclusions about ChAT-expression in the bovine epithelium. These data indicate that urethral brush cells are widespread throughout the mammalian kingdom and evolved not later than about 64.5millionyears ago. PMID:26044348

  1. Placental lipases in pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM).

    PubMed

    Barrett, Helen L; Kubala, Marta H; Scholz Romero, Katherin; Denny, Kerina J; Woodruff, Trent M; McIntyre, H David; Callaway, Leonie K; Nitert, Marloes Dekker

    2014-01-01

    Infants of women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are more likely to be born large for gestational age with a higher percentage body fat. Elevated maternal lipids may contribute to this. Placental lipases such as lipoprotein lipase (LPL), endothelial lipase (EL) and hormone sensitive lipase (HSL) are involved in transferring lipids from mother to fetus. Previous studies of expression of these lipases in placentae in women with diabetes in pregnancy have reported divergent results. Intracellular lipases such as adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), and HSL are central to lipid droplet metabolism. The activities of these lipases are both influenced by Perilipin 1, and ATGL is also activated by a co-factor comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58) and inhibited by G0/G1 switch gene 2 (GS02). None of these modifying factors or ATGL have been examined previously in placenta. The purpose of this study was therefore to examine the expression of ATGL, HSL, LPL, EL, as well as Perilipin 1, GS02 and CGI-58 in term pregnancies complicated by GDM. mRNA and protein expression of the lipases were measured in placentae from 17 women with GDM and 17 normoglycaemic pregnancies, matched for maternal BMI and gestational age of delivery. ATGL mRNA expression was increased and HSL mRNA expression reduced in placentae from GDM although there was no differences in protein expression of any of the lipases. All lipases were localised to trophoblasts and endothelial cells. The expression of Perilipin 1 and CGI-58 mRNA was increased and GS02 not altered in GDM. These results suggest that there is no difference in expression in these four lipases between GDM and normoglycaemic placentae, and therefore altered lipid transfer via these lipases does not contribute to large for gestational age in infants of women with GDM. PMID:25118138

  2. Cholinergic urethral brush cells are widespread throughout placental mammals.

    PubMed

    Deckmann, Klaus; Krasteva-Christ, Gabriela; Rafiq, Amir; Herden, Christine; Wichmann, Judy; Knauf, Sascha; Nassenstein, Christina; Grevelding, Christoph G; Dorresteijn, Adriaan; Chubanov, Vladimir; Gudermann, Thomas; Bschleipfer, Thomas; Kummer, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    We previously identified a population of cholinergic epithelial cells in murine, human and rat urethrae that exhibits a structural marker of brush cells (villin) and expresses components of the canonical taste transduction signaling cascade (α-gustducin, phospholipase Cβ2 (PLCβ2), transient receptor potential cation channel melanostatin 5 (TRPM5)). These cells serve as sentinels, monitoring the chemical composition of the luminal content for potentially hazardous compounds such as bacteria, and initiate protective reflexes counteracting further ingression. In order to elucidate cross-species conservation of the urethral chemosensory pathway we investigated the occurrence and molecular make-up of urethral brush cells in placental mammals. We screened 11 additional species, at least one in each of the five mammalian taxonomic units primates, carnivora, perissodactyla, artiodactyla and rodentia, for immunohistochemical labeling of the acetylcholine synthesizing enzyme, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), villin, and taste cascade components (α-gustducin, PLCβ2, TRPM5). Corresponding to findings in previously investigated species, urethral epithelial cells with brush cell shape were immunolabeled in all 11 mammals. In 8 species, immunoreactivities against all marker proteins and ChAT were observed, and double-labeling immunofluorescence confirmed the cholinergic nature of villin-positive and chemosensory (TRPM5-positive) cells. In cat and horse, these cells were not labeled by the ChAT antiserum used in this study, and unspecific reactions of the secondary antiserum precluded conclusions about ChAT-expression in the bovine epithelium. These data indicate that urethral brush cells are widespread throughout the mammalian kingdom and evolved not later than about 64.5millionyears ago.

  3. Uterine and placental interactions during necrotic tip development in the pig from day 22 to 42 of gestation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Placental development is important for fetal development and nutrient and waste transport. The pig, a litter bearing animal, has an epitheliochorial placenta that forms a noninvasive attachment with the uterine endometrium. Insufficient placental development is one of the primary causes of fetal dea...

  4. Fatal placental subinvolution in a captive capybara (Hydrochaeris hydrochaeris, Order Rodentia).

    PubMed

    Juan-Sallés, C; Martínez, L S; Garner, M M

    2005-07-01

    An adult, captive-born female capybara died of systemic thrombosis and hemoperitoneum associated with placental subinvolution. Grossly, the uterus was enlarged, segmentally thickened, and associated with a large blood clot in the abdominal cavity. There was hemometra and a large ovoid mass in each uterine horn weakly adhered to the endometrium, and the right uterine horn wall had a small perforation over the mass. The mesometrial veins were markedly dilated due to thrombosis and occasionally perforated. Histologically, the uterine masses consisted of partly necrotic placental and subplacental tissue. The uterine wall surrounding the masses had full-thickness coagulative necrosis of the myometrium and diffuse endometrial ulceration with abundant syncytiotrophoblast-like cells within capillaries. Vascular lesions in the uterus and mesometrium consisted of mural invasion by cytotrophoblast and syncytiotrophoblast-like cells, thrombosis, fibrinoid necrosis, and/or heterophilic vasculitis. This is the first report of placental subinvolution in capybaras or any rodent species, to the authors' knowledge.

  5. Characterization of the phosphatidylinositol-glycan membrane anchor of human placental alkaline phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, A.D.; Berger, J.; Gerber, L.; Familletti, P.; Udenfriend, S.

    1987-09-01

    Placental alkaline phosphatase (orthophosphoric-monoester phosphohydrolase (alkaline optimum), EC 3.1.3.1) is a member of a diverse group of membrane proteins whose attachment to the lipid bilayer is mediated by a phosphatidylinositol-glycan. To investigate structural aspects of the glycolipid anchor, cultured WISH cells were used because, they produce the enzyme in abundant quantities. When cell suspensions were incubated with purified phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C, most of the placental alkaline phosphatase was released from membranes in a hydrophilic form. On incubation of the cells with (/sup 14/C)ethanolamine, (/sup 14/C)myristic acid, or myo(/sup 3/H)inositol, each was incorporated into the phosphatase near the carboxyl terminus, showing that these components, which are found in other phosphatidylinositol membrane-linked proteins, are also present in placental alkaline phosphatase.

  6. Zika Virus Infection during Pregnancy in Mice Causes Placental Damage and Fetal Demise.

    PubMed

    Miner, Jonathan J; Cao, Bin; Govero, Jennifer; Smith, Amber M; Fernandez, Estefania; Cabrera, Omar H; Garber, Charise; Noll, Michelle; Klein, Robyn S; Noguchi, Kevin K; Mysorekar, Indira U; Diamond, Michael S

    2016-05-19

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in pregnant women causes intrauterine growth restriction, spontaneous abortion, and microcephaly. Here, we describe two mouse models of placental and fetal disease associated with in utero transmission of ZIKV. Female mice lacking type I interferon signaling (Ifnar1(-/-)) crossed to wild-type (WT) males produced heterozygous fetuses resembling the immune status of human fetuses. Maternal inoculation at embryonic day 6.5 (E6.5) or E7.5 resulted in fetal demise that was associated with ZIKV infection of the placenta and fetal brain. We identified ZIKV within trophoblasts of the maternal and fetal placenta, consistent with a trans-placental infection route. Antibody blockade of Ifnar1 signaling in WT pregnant mice enhanced ZIKV trans-placental infection although it did not result in fetal death. These models will facilitate the study of ZIKV pathogenesis, in utero transmission, and testing of therapies and vaccines to prevent congenital malformations.

  7. A clinical case of equine fungal placentitis with reference to hormone profiles and ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    MURASE, Harutaka; NIWA, Hidekazu; KATAYAMA, Yoshinari; SATO, Fumio; HADA, Tetsuro; NAMBO, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fungal placentitis is an infectious disease inducing abortion in pregnant mares. In the present report, we describe a field case of abortion caused by fungal placentitis with consecutive examinations. The progesterone level and combined thickness of the uterus and placenta (CTUP) were abnormal before the onset of clinical signs. Additionally, the estradiol level started to change before the appearance of clinical signs. Abnormal serum amyloid A values and an abnormal fetal heart rate were observed after the onset of clinical signs. The present report demonstrates that the progesterone level and CTUP may be adequate as early diagnostic markers of fungal placentitis and bacterial infection. Endocrinological evaluation based on cutoff values or serial measurements were also useful for early diagnosis. PMID:26858578

  8. Oxidative stress status and placental implications in diabetic rats undergoing swimming exercise after embryonic implantation.

    PubMed

    Volpato, Gustavo Tadeu; Damasceno, Débora Cristina; Sinzato, Yuri Karen; Ribeiro, Viviane Maria; Rudge, Marilza Vieira Cunha; Calderon, Iracema Mattos Paranhos

    2015-05-01

    The potential benefits and risks of physical exercise on fetal development during pregnancy remain unclear. The aim was to analyze maternal oxidative stress status and the placental morphometry to relate to intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) from diabetic female rats submitted to swimming program after embryonic implantation. Pregnant Wistar rats were distributed into 4 groups (11 animals/group): control-nondiabetic sedentary rats, control exercised-nondiabetic exercised rats, diabetic-diabetic sedentary rats, and diabetic exercised-diabetic exercised rats. A swimming program was used as an exercise model. At the end of pregnancy, the maternal oxidative stress status, placental morphology, and fetal weight were analyzed. The swimming program was not efficient to reduce the hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress. This fact impaired placental development, resulting in altered blood flow and energy reserves, which contributed to a deficient exchange of nutrients and oxygen for the fetal development, leading to IUGR. PMID:25361551

  9. Feto-placental morphological effects of prenatal exposure to drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Ortigosa, S; Friguls, B; Joya, X; Martinez, S; Mariñoso, M L; Alameda, F; Vall, O; Garcia-Algar, O

    2012-08-01

    The aim of the study was to find morphological changes in the feto-placental unit due to prenatal exposure to drugs of abuse. A blind histomorphometric study was performed using 225 placentas. Based on meconium testing, the fetuses were classified as exposed or unexposed to opiates, cocaine, cannabis or alcohol. To establish prenatal tobacco exposure, cotinine in cord blood was analyzed. At the microscopic level a non statistically significant reduction of placental vascularization was observed in cocaine, opiates and alcohol using mothers. In addition, alcohol-consuming mothers did not present with larger placental vessel diameter than controls. Prenatal use of cocaine and tobacco was associated with a decrease in newborn weight and length. Furthermore, tobacco use was associated with a higher rate of previous abortions. In conclusion, placentas from mothers using tobacco, cocaine, opiates or alcohol during pregnancy present vasculature changes that may explain the adverse perinatal outcomes in their newborns.

  10. The Necessity of Awareness of Early Symptoms of Placental Abruption Among Pregnant Japanese Women

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Shunji; Shinmura, Hiroki

    2016-01-01

    Background In 2012, the recommendation for immediate contact and visit to obstetric institutions by pregnant women was emphasized by The Japan Obstetric Compensation System for Cerebral Palsy (JOCSC). In this study, we examined whether or not the increased awareness has led to the improvement of perinatal outcomes of placental abruption managed at private clinics. Methods We reviewed the obstetric records of 38 singleton pregnant women complicated by placental abruption that developed at home, and were managed at private clinics from April 2008 through April 2016. Results The perinatal outcomes, specifically the rate of cases with ≥ 1 hour time interval between symptom onset and clinic visit, have not changed significantly after the intervention. Conclusion The provision of information regarding the early clinical symptoms associated with placental abruption in pregnant women has not been well documented in Japan. PMID:27540442

  11. Oxidative Stress Status and Placental Implications in Diabetic Rats Undergoing Swimming Exercise After Embryonic Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Damasceno, Débora Cristina; Sinzato, Yuri Karen; Ribeiro, Viviane Maria; Rudge, Marilza Vieira Cunha; Calderon, Iracema Mattos Paranhos

    2015-01-01

    The potential benefits and risks of physical exercise on fetal development during pregnancy remain unclear. The aim was to analyze maternal oxidative stress status and the placental morphometry to relate to intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) from diabetic female rats submitted to swimming program after embryonic implantation. Pregnant Wistar rats were distributed into 4 groups (11 animals/group): control—nondiabetic sedentary rats, control exercised—nondiabetic exercised rats, diabetic—diabetic sedentary rats, and diabetic exercised—diabetic exercised rats. A swimming program was used as an exercise model. At the end of pregnancy, the maternal oxidative stress status, placental morphology, and fetal weight were analyzed. The swimming program was not efficient to reduce the hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress. This fact impaired placental development, resulting in altered blood flow and energy reserves, which contributed to a deficient exchange of nutrients and oxygen for the fetal development, leading to IUGR. PMID:25361551

  12. A high-affinity estrogen-binding protein in rat placental trophoblast.

    PubMed

    McCormack, S A; Glasser, S R

    1976-09-01

    A high-affinity, low-capacity estradiol-binding molecule (RE) has been demonstrated in the basal zone trophoblast (BZT) of the pregnant rat. On day 11 of pregnancy (day 0 = first sperm-positive day) RE is present in BZT cytosol, where it has a ka of 1.2 X 10(6)M-1 sec-1, t1/2 = 12.7 min, at 20 C. The Kd, under similar conditions, consists of 2 components, 1.3 X 10(-4) sec-1, t1/2 = 90 min, and 5.9 X 10(-5) sec-1, t1/2 = 196 min. When one uses the faster component, the equilibrium constant, Kd, obtained from kd/ka is 1.1 X 10(-10)M, in close agreement with that obtained from Scatchard analysis of specific estradiol (E2) binding at 20 C. On day 11 there were approximately 12,000 sites/cell in BZT cytosol. Scatchard analysis of nuclear RE on day 11 indicated a Kd of 1.85 X 10(-10)M and approximately 21,000 sites/nucleus, but, in day 15 BZT, nuclear RE was undetectable. Neither cytosol nor nuclei prepared from placental labyrinthine zone (LZT) tissue (fetal placenta) showed evidence of high-affinity, low-capacity E2 binding. Sucrose density gradient analysis on 5-20% linear gradients showed the cytosol RE to be approximately 4S whether in high or low-salt conditions. When measured against binding by 3H-labeled estradiol (*E2), the cytosol BTZ RE was competed for strongly (80-90%) by estrone, estriol, diethylstilbestrol, and estradiol-17alpha at 200 times excess. Nafoxidine-HCl, also at 200X excess, competed to approximately 50%. Corticosterone, progesterone, testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone, and pregnenolone did not compete. The hormone specificity of nuclear BZT RE was similar to that of the comparable cytosol RE with the exception that nafoxidine did not compete. This was probably due to differences in kinetics, nafoxidine requiring a longer time to reach equilibrium than the other estrogens. The size of the nuclear RE by sucrose density gradient analysis was approximately 2S by KCl extraction (which was inefficient) or 4S by trypsin extraction. We conclude that

  13. Characterization of the adverse effects of nicotine on placental development: in vivo and in vitro studies

    PubMed Central

    Holloway, A. C.; Salomon, A.; Soares, M. J.; Garnier, V.; Raha, S.; Sergent, F.; Nicholson, C. J.; Feige, J. J.; Benharouga, M.

    2013-01-01

    In utero exposure to nicotine is associated with increased risk of numerous adverse fetal and neonatal outcomes, which suggests that it acts directly to affect placental development and the establishment of the fetomaternal circulation (FC). This study used both in vivo [Wistar rats treated with 1 mg/kg nicotine from 2 wk prior to mating until gestational day (GD) 15] and in vitro (RCHO-1 cell line; treated with 10−9 to 10−3M nicotine) models to examine the effects of nicotine on these pathways. At GD 15, control and treated placentas were examined for the impact of nicotine on 1) trophoblast invasion, proliferation, and degree of hypoxia, 2) labyrinth vascularization, 3) expression of key genes of placental development, and 4) expression of placental angiogenic factors. The RCHO-1 cell line was used to determine the direct effects of nicotine on trophoblast differentiation. Our in vivo experiments show that nicotine inhibits trophoblast interstitial invasion, increases placental hypoxia, downregulates labyrinth vascularization as well as key transcription factors Hand1 and GCM1, and decreases local and circulating EG-VEGF, a key placental angiogenic factor. The in vitro experiments confirmed the inhibitory effects of nicotine on the trophoblast migration, invasion, and differentiation processes and demonstrated that those effects are most likely due to a dysregulation in the expression of nicotine receptors and a decrease in MMP9 activity. Taken together, these data suggest that adverse effects of maternal smoking on pregnancy outcome are due in part to direct and endocrine effects of nicotine on the main processes of placental development and establishment of FC. PMID:24368670

  14. Prenatal caffeine exposure induced a lower level of fetal blood leptin mainly via placental mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi-Meng; Luo, Han-Wen; Kou, Hao; Wen, Yin-Xian; Shen, Lang; Pei, Ling-Guo; Zhou, Jin; Zhang, Yuan-Zhen; Wang, Hui

    2015-11-15

    It's known that blood leptin level is reduced in intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) fetus, and placental leptin is the major source of fetal blood leptin. This study aimed to investigate the decreased fetal blood leptin level by prenatal caffeine exposure (PCE) and its underlying placental mechanisms. Pregnant Wistar rats were intragastrically administered caffeine (30-120 mg/kg day) from gestational day 9 to 20. The level of fetal serum leptin and the expression of placental leptin-related genes were analyzed. Furthermore, we investigated the molecular mechanism of the reduced placental leptin's expression by treatment with caffeine (0.8-20 μM) in the BeWo cells. In vivo, PCE significantly decreased fetal serum leptin level in caffeine dose-dependent manner. Meanwhile, placental mRNA expression of adenosine A2a receptor (Adora2a), cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB), a short-type leptin receptor (Ob-Ra) and leptin was reduced in the PCE groups. In vitro, caffeine significantly decreased the mRNA expression of leptin, CREB and ADORA2A in concentration and time-dependent manners. The addition of ADORA2A agonist or adenylyl cyclase (AC) agonist reversed the inhibition of leptin expression induced by caffeine. PCE induced a lower level of fetal blood leptin, which the primary mechanism is that caffeine inhibited antagonized Adora2a and AC activities to decreased cAMP synthesis, thus inhibited the expression of the transcription factor CREB and target gene leptin in the placenta. Meantime, the reduced transportation of maternal leptin by placental Ob-Ra also contributed to the reduced fetal blood leptin. Together, PCE decreased fetal blood leptin mainly via reducing the expression and transportation of leptin in the placenta.

  15. Even a Chronic Mild Hyperglycemia Affects Membrane Fluidity and Lipoperoxidation in Placental Mitochondria in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa-García, María del Consuelo; Espinosa-García, María Teresa; Martinez-Montes, Federico; Palomar-Morales, Martín; Mejía-Zepeda, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    It is known the deleterious effects of diabetes on embryos, but the effects of diabetes on placenta and its mitochondria are still not well known. In this work we generated a mild hyperglycemia model in female wistar rats by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin in 48 hours-old rats. The sexual maturity onset of the female rats was delayed around 6–7 weeks and at 16 weeks-old they were mated, and sacrificed at day 19th of pregnancy. In placental total tissue and isolated mitochondria, the fatty acids composition was analyzed by gas chromatography, and lipoperoxidation was measured by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances. Membrane fluidity in mitochondria was measured with the excimer forming probe dipyrenylpropane and mitochondrial function was measured with a Clark-type electrode. The results show that even a chronic mild hyperglycemia increases lipoperoxidation and decreases mitochondrial function in placenta. Simultaneously, placental fatty acids metabolism in total tissue is modified but in a different way than in placental mitochondria. Whereas the chronic mild hyperglycemia induced a decrease in unsaturated to saturated fatty acids ratio (U/S) in placental total tissue, the ratio increased in placental mitochondria. The measurements of membrane fluidity showed that fluidity of placenta mitochondrial membranes increased with hyperglycemia, showing consistency with the fatty acids composition through the U/S index. The thermotropic characteristics of mitochondrial membranes were changed, showing lower transition temperature and activation energies. All of these data together demonstrate that even a chronic mild hyperglycemia during pregnancy of early reproductive Wistar rats, generates an increment of lipoperoxidation, an increase of placental mitochondrial membrane fluidity apparently derived from changes in fatty acids composition and consequently, mitochondrial malfunction. PMID:26630275

  16. Even a Chronic Mild Hyperglycemia Affects Membrane Fluidity and Lipoperoxidation in Placental Mitochondria in Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    Figueroa-García, María del Consuelo; Espinosa-García, María Teresa; Martinez-Montes, Federico; Palomar-Morales, Martín; Mejía-Zepeda, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    It is known the deleterious effects of diabetes on embryos, but the effects of diabetes on placenta and its mitochondria are still not well known. In this work we generated a mild hyperglycemia model in female wistar rats by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin in 48 hours-old rats. The sexual maturity onset of the female rats was delayed around 6-7 weeks and at 16 weeks-old they were mated, and sacrificed at day 19th of pregnancy. In placental total tissue and isolated mitochondria, the fatty acids composition was analyzed by gas chromatography, and lipoperoxidation was measured by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances. Membrane fluidity in mitochondria was measured with the excimer forming probe dipyrenylpropane and mitochondrial function was measured with a Clark-type electrode. The results show that even a chronic mild hyperglycemia increases lipoperoxidation and decreases mitochondrial function in placenta. Simultaneously, placental fatty acids metabolism in total tissue is modified but in a different way than in placental mitochondria. Whereas the chronic mild hyperglycemia induced a decrease in unsaturated to saturated fatty acids ratio (U/S) in placental total tissue, the ratio increased in placental mitochondria. The measurements of membrane fluidity showed that fluidity of placenta mitochondrial membranes increased with hyperglycemia, showing consistency with the fatty acids composition through the U/S index. The thermotropic characteristics of mitochondrial membranes were changed, showing lower transition temperature and activation energies. All of these data together demonstrate that even a chronic mild hyperglycemia during pregnancy of early reproductive Wistar rats, generates an increment of lipoperoxidation, an increase of placental mitochondrial membrane fluidity apparently derived from changes in fatty acids composition and consequently, mitochondrial malfunction. PMID:26630275

  17. The association of anti-phospholipid antibodies with parity in placental malaria

    PubMed Central

    Owens, S; Chamley, L W; Ordi, J; Brabin, B J; Johnson, P M

    2005-01-01

    Anti-phospholipid antibodies (aPL) are autoantibodies associated with both infections and the pathogenesis of certain pregnancy complications. In the latter, but not the former, aPL are dependent on a co-factor, β2 glycoprotein I (β2GPI), which can also be used as an antigen for detection of such aPL in pregnancy. A cross-sectional study was carried out on serum samples from Kumasi, Ghana, to determine the occurrence and β2GPI-dependence of aPL in placental malaria. Anti-cardiolipin, anti-phosphatidylserine and anti-β2GPI enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) were performed on sera from 103 HIV-non-infected gravid women. Placental malaria, both active and past infection, was diagnosed in 33/103 (32%) based on placental histology. In multiparae, β2GPI-independent IgM antibodies to cardiolipin (P = 0·018) and phosphatidylserine (P = 0·009) were observed, which were most pronounced in past placental malaria infection. In primiparae, no association emerged between aPL and placental malaria. Trends for improved clinical parameters were identified in infected women with levels of anti-cardiolipin beyond the 99th multiple of the median for a healthy, non-malarious population. This study in placental malaria reports parity associations of β2GPI-independent aPL profiles, and does not support a role for β2GPI-dependent aPL. It is of significance in the context of the known parity differences in pregnancy malaria immunity. PMID:16297164

  18. A "cure" for preeclampsia: Improving neonatal outcomes by overcoming excess fetal placental vascular resistance.

    PubMed

    Byrne, T J

    2015-09-01

    From a broad perspective there are only three arterial systems that respond to relative hypoxia with vasoconstriction. They are the placental, the pulmonic and the renal vascular beds. The renal system's adaptation to hypoxia is markedly different from the other two circulatory beds and will not be further considered here. Regional vasoconstriction is adaptive in the placenta and lung because it redirects red blood cells from areas of relative hypoxia to more oxygenated areas thereby maximizing oxygen uptake for a given cardiac output. The fetal placental and pulmonary vascular systems are unique because their smooth muscle cells have a unique and possibly identical potassium channel that responds to hypoxia by closing, thereby depolarizing the cell membrane allowing calcium ion influx and muscle contraction. It may be that a variety of initial causes of temporary or local placental hypoxia initiate a cascade of first fetal placental then maternal vasoconstriction and endothelial activation leading to the clinical syndrome we call preeclampsia. The response cascades seen in preeclampsia, which for purposes of this article I will abbreviate as (PECL), after development of widespread vasoconstriction, will also be seen to be identical or at least parallel in pulmonary hypertension (PAH). This means that some or all of the pharmacotherapies presently used, tested or considered in early PAH may also have a therapeutic effect in PECL by reducing fetal placental arterial resistance thereby increasing fetal placental flow. This would allow increased oxygen and other nutrient uptake and possibly increased fetal cardiac output in the face of reduced fetal cardiac work. This may allow a delay in delivery in which fetuses grow and are better oxygenated in preterm PECL, improving neonatal outcomes. PMID:26105573

  19. Investigating the effect of excess caffeine exposure on placental angiogenesis using chicken 'functional' placental blood vessel network.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zheng-Lai; Wang, Guang; Lu, Wen-Hui; Cheng, Xin; Chuai, Manli; Lee, Kenneth Ka Ho; Yang, Xuesong

    2016-02-01

    It is now known that over-consumption of caffeine by pregnant mothers could have detrimental effects on normal fetal development. However, it remains obscure how caffeine's harmful effect impacts directly or indirectly on the developing embryo/fetus through damaging placenta development. In this study, we demonstrated the morphological similarities between the yolk sac and chorioallantoic membranes (CAM) of chick embryos and the villi of the mammalian placenta. Using the chick yolk sac and the CAM as a model, we found that 5-15 µmol per egg of caffeine exposure inhibited angiogenesis. Under the same condition, cell proliferation in extraembryonic mesoderm was reduced while apoptosis was enhanced. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that caffeine treatment down-regulated VEGF, VEGFR2, PIGF, IGF2 and NRP1 expression, but up-regulated Ang1 and Ang2 expression. We performed in situ hybridization to show VE-cadherin expression and as to demonstrate the blood vessels in the CAM and yolk sac membranes. This distribution of the VE-cadherin(+) blood vessels was determined to be reduced after caffeine treatment. Furthermore, MDA activity was induced after caffeine exposure, but GSH-PX activity was inhibited after caffeine exposure; SOD activity was unchanged as compared with the control. In summary, our results suggest that caffeine exposure could negatively impact on angiogenesis in the chick yolk sac and CAM by targeting angiogenesis-related genes. Some of these genes are also involved in regulating excess ROS generation. The results implied that the negative impact of caffeine on fetal development was partly attributed to impaired placental angiogenesis.

  20. The physiologic and therapeutic role of heparin in implantation and placentation.

    PubMed

    Quaranta, Michela; Erez, Offer; Mastrolia, Salvatore Andrea; Koifman, Arie; Leron, Elad; Eshkoli, Tamar; Mazor, Moshe; Holcberg, Gershon

    2015-01-01

    Implantation, trophoblast development and placentation are crucial processes in the establishment and development of normal pregnancy. Abnormalities of these processes can lead to pregnancy complications known as the great obstetrical syndromes: preeclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction, fetal demise, premature prelabor rupture of membranes, preterm labor, and recurrent pregnancy loss. There is mounting evidence regarding the physiological and therapeutic role of heparins in the establishment of normal gestation and as a modality for treatment and prevention of pregnancy complications. In this review, we will summarize the properties and the physiological contributions of heparins to the success of implantation, placentation and normal pregnancy.

  1. A study of placental transfer mechanisms in nonhuman primates using (/sup 14/C)phenylalanine

    SciTech Connect

    Pueschel, S.M.; Boylan, J.M.; Jackson, B.T.; Piasecki, G.J.

    1982-02-01

    Placental transfer mechanisms were investigated in pregnant Macaca Fascicularis and Macaca mulatta during the gestational age of 120 to 130 days. These primates underwent an operative procedure that allowed continuous fetal blood sampling. The administration of (/sup 14/C)phenylalanine into the maternal circulation revealed a significant increase of radioactive material in the fetal circulation, indicating an active placental transport mechanism unidirectional to the fetus. When (/sup 14/C)phenylalanine was injected into the fetus, radioactive aromatic amino acids in the maternal circulation increased only slightly over time, resembling a simple diffusion process.

  2. The physiologic and therapeutic role of heparin in implantation and placentation

    PubMed Central

    Quaranta, Michela; Mastrolia, Salvatore Andrea; Koifman, Arie; Leron, Elad; Eshkoli, Tamar; Mazor, Moshe; Holcberg, Gershon

    2015-01-01

    Implantation, trophoblast development and placentation are crucial processes in the establishment and development of normal pregnancy. Abnormalities of these processes can lead to pregnancy complications known as the great obstetrical syndromes: preeclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction, fetal demise, premature prelabor rupture of membranes, preterm labor, and recurrent pregnancy loss. There is mounting evidence regarding the physiological and therapeutic role of heparins in the establishment of normal gestation and as a modality for treatment and prevention of pregnancy complications. In this review, we will summarize the properties and the physiological contributions of heparins to the success of implantation, placentation and normal pregnancy. PMID:25653897

  3. Hypertension produced by placental ischemia in pregnant rats is associated with increased soluble endoglin expression.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Jeffrey S; Gilbert, Sara A B; Arany, Marietta; Granger, Joey P

    2009-02-01

    Recent clinical studies indicate that an excess of angiostatic factors, such as soluble endoglin (sEng), is related to the occurrence of preeclampsia. Although recent clinical studies report that sEng is increased in preeclamptic women, the mechanisms underlying its overexpression remain unclear. Evidence suggests that hypoxia and induction of heme oxygenase-1 have opposing effects on sEng expression, the former stimulatory and the latter inhibitory. Hence, we hypothesized that placental ischemia because of reduced uterine perfusion pressure (RUPP) in the pregnant rat would increase sEng expression and decrease heme oxygenase-1. Mean arterial pressure was obtained via arterial catheter, and serum and placental proteins were measured by Western blot. Mean arterial pressure was increased (132+/-3 mm Hg versus 102+/-2 mm Hg; P<0.001), and fetal (2.35+/-0.05 g versus 1.76+/-0.08 g; P<0.001) and placental weight were decreased (0.47+/-0.04 g versus 0.58+/-0.03 g; P<0.01) in the RUPP compared with normal pregnant controls. Serum sEng (0.10+/-0.02 arbitrary pixel units [apu] versus 0.05+/-0.01 apu; P<0.05) and placental endoglin (4.7+/-2.3 apu versus 1.45+/-0.42 apu; P<0.05) were increased along with placental hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (1.42+/-0.25 apu versus 0.68+/-0.09 apu; P<0.05) expression in the RUPP versus the normal pregnant dams. Placental HO-1 (1.4+/-0.3 apu versus 2.5+/-0.1 apu; P<0.05) expression decreased in the RUPP compared with normal pregnant dams. The present findings support our hypothesis that placental ischemia because of RUPP increases the expression of sEng and shifts the balance of angiogenic factors in the maternal circulation toward an angiostatic state. The present study provides further evidence that placental ischemia is a strong in vivo stimulus of angiostatic factors during pregnancy.

  4. Placental calcitriol synthesis and IGF-I levels in normal and preeclamptic pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Halhali, Ali; Díaz, Lorenza; Barrera, David; Avila, Euclides; Larrea, Fernando

    2014-10-01

    Placenta is an extrarenal source of calcitriol and pregnancy is associated with increased maternal serum levels of this hormone. It has been reported that insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) stimulates placental calcitriol synthesis and that circulating levels of both hormones are low in preeclampsia. Since calcitriol production has not been determined in placental homogenates in preeclampsia, the aim of the present study was to establish if placental calcitriol synthesis and IGF-I concentration are altered in this tissue obtained from preeclamptic pregnancies. Placental samples were obtained from 8 preeclamptic (PE group) and 8 normotensive (NT group) pregnant women. Calcitriol synthesis was determined using [(3)H]-25(OH)D3 (2.94nM) as precursor and [(3)H]-1,25(OH)2D3 produced was calculated as the percentage of radioactivity co-eluting with unlabelled 1,25(OH)2D3 after two successive high pressure liquid chromatographies. Placental IGF-I levels were determined by RIA. In addition, maternal and umbilical calcitriol and IGF-I levels were also determined in these 2 groups using radioreceptor assay and RIA, respectively. The results of the present study showed that placentas from both groups were able to convert [(3)H]-25(OH)D3 into more polar metabolites. In the PE group, placental [(3)H]-1,25(OH)2D3 synthesis was significantly lower than in the NT group (19.6±6.2 vs 29.9±8.1fmoles/200mg wet weight, P=0.013). Regarding IGF-I, its levels were significantly lower in placentas of the PE group than in the NT group (15.2±3.9 vs 21.6±4.9ng/g wet weight, P=0.012). Maternal and umbilical calcitriol levels were significantly lower in the PE than in the NT group (P<0.001). In the PE group, serum IGF-I levels were significantly lower only in the maternal circulation (P<0.05). In conclusion, placental calcitriol synthesis and IGF-I levels are low in preeclampsia which may contribute to decreased local placental functions related to these two hormones and/or to decreased

  5. Hypertension produced by placental ischemia in pregnant rats is associated with increased soluble endoglin expression.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Jeffrey S; Gilbert, Sara A B; Arany, Marietta; Granger, Joey P

    2009-02-01

    Recent clinical studies indicate that an excess of angiostatic factors, such as soluble endoglin (sEng), is related to the occurrence of preeclampsia. Although recent clinical studies report that sEng is increased in preeclamptic women, the mechanisms underlying its overexpression remain unclear. Evidence suggests that hypoxia and induction of heme oxygenase-1 have opposing effects on sEng expression, the former stimulatory and the latter inhibitory. Hence, we hypothesized that placental ischemia because of reduced uterine perfusion pressure (RUPP) in the pregnant rat would increase sEng expression and decrease heme oxygenase-1. Mean arterial pressure was obtained via arterial catheter, and serum and placental proteins were measured by Western blot. Mean arterial pressure was increased (132+/-3 mm Hg versus 102+/-2 mm Hg; P<0.001), and fetal (2.35+/-0.05 g versus 1.76+/-0.08 g; P<0.001) and placental weight were decreased (0.47+/-0.04 g versus 0.58+/-0.03 g; P<0.01) in the RUPP compared with normal pregnant controls. Serum sEng (0.10+/-0.02 arbitrary pixel units [apu] versus 0.05+/-0.01 apu; P<0.05) and placental endoglin (4.7+/-2.3 apu versus 1.45+/-0.42 apu; P<0.05) were increased along with placental hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (1.42+/-0.25 apu versus 0.68+/-0.09 apu; P<0.05) expression in the RUPP versus the normal pregnant dams. Placental HO-1 (1.4+/-0.3 apu versus 2.5+/-0.1 apu; P<0.05) expression decreased in the RUPP compared with normal pregnant dams. The present findings support our hypothesis that placental ischemia because of RUPP increases the expression of sEng and shifts the balance of angiogenic factors in the maternal circulation toward an angiostatic state. The present study provides further evidence that placental ischemia is a strong in vivo stimulus of angiostatic factors during pregnancy. PMID:19075097

  6. Chorioamniotic membrane separation caused by the seromucinous collection from a placental chorioangioma

    PubMed Central

    Eom, Hye Mi; Choi, Byung Hee; Jeong, Eun Jeong; Byun, Jung Mi; Jeong, Dae Hoon; Sung, Moon Su; Lee, Kyung Bok; Kim, Ki Tae; Yoon, Hye Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    Placental chorioangioma is a benign non-trophoblastic tumor of the placenta that can have various adverse effects on the mother and fetus depending on its size. Chorioamniotic membrane separation is rare condition of detachment between the amniotic membrane and chorionic membrane. Chorioamniotic membrane separation after the second trimester of pregnancy is usually occurs after invasive procedures or may occur spontaneously; it is mostly associated with fetal abnormalities. Here, we report a case of chorioamniotic membrane separation that might be occurred caused by the seromucinous secretion from a placental chorioangioma. PMID:27200315

  7. What fossils can tell us about the evolution of viviparity and placentation.

    PubMed

    Carter, A M

    2008-11-01

    Recently a fossil of one of the earliest jawed fishes was found with a fetal skeleton and the remains of a cord. It was from the Devonian period and takes the history of vertebrate placentation back to 380 million years ago. This and later fossil evidence for viviparity in marine reptiles and early mammals is reviewed. Of particular interest are the fossils of horses as they document that a reproductive strategy with a single precocial newborn was evolved early on. In one instance there is sufficient representation of soft tissue to imply that early horses had a diffuse placenta, much as had been predicted by phylogenetic analyses of placentation.

  8. Genetic recapitulation of human pre-eclampsia risk during convergent evolution of reduced placental invasiveness in eutherian mammals

    PubMed Central

    Elliot, Michael G.; Crespi, Bernard J.

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between phenotypic variation arising through individual development and phenotypic variation arising through diversification of species has long been a central question in evolutionary biology. Among humans, reduced placental invasion into endometrial tissues is associated with diseases of pregnancy, especially pre-eclampsia, and reduced placental invasiveness has also evolved, convergently, in at least 10 lineages of eutherian mammals. We tested the hypothesis that a common genetic basis underlies both reduced placental invasion arising through a developmental process in human placental disease and reduced placental invasion found as a derived trait in the diversification of Euarchontoglires (rodents, lagomorphs, tree shrews, colugos and primates). Based on whole-genome analyses across 18 taxa, we identified 1254 genes as having evolved adaptively across all three lineages exhibiting independent evolutionary transitions towards reduced placental invasion. These genes showed strong evidence of enrichment for associations with pre-eclampsia, based on genetic-association studies, gene-expression analyses and gene ontology. We further used in silico prediction to identify a subset of 199 genes that are likely targets of natural selection during transitions in placental invasiveness and which are predicted to also underlie human placental disorders. Our results indicate that abnormal ontogenies can recapitulate major phylogenetic shifts in mammalian evolution, identify new candidate genes for involvement in pre-eclampsia, imply that study of species with less-invasive placentation will provide useful insights into the regulation of placental invasion and pre-eclampsia, and recommend a novel comparative functional-evolutionary approach to the study of genetically based human disease and mammalian diversification. PMID:25602073

  9. Simultaneous determination of acrylamide, its metabolite glycidamide and antipyrine in human placental perfusion fluid and placental tissue by liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Annola, Kirsi; Keski-Rahkonen, Pekka; Vähäkangas, Kirsi; Lehtonen, Marko

    2008-12-15

    A rapid and sensitive method using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was developed for the simultaneous determination of acrylamide (AA) and its genotoxic metabolite glycidamide (GA) with a test marker antipyrine (AP) in placental tissue and perfusion medium used in human placental perfusion studies. An internal standard ((13)C-acrylamide) was added to the samples which were then deproteinized with acetonitrile. Chromatographic separation was performed on a reversed phase column with a gradient elution of acetonitrile and 0.01% formic acid at a flow rate of 0.3 mL/min. Detection and quantification of the analytes were carried out with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer using positive electrospray ionization (ESI) and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). The method was validated and linear over a concentration range of 0.5-20 microg/mL for acrylamide and glycidamide and 5-200 microg/mL for antipyrine. The lower limit of quantification for acrylamide and glycidamide was 0.5 microg/mL and for antipyrine 5 microg/mL. The method was selective, and good accuracy, precision, recovery, and stability were obtained for concentrations within the standard curve. The method was successfully used to analyze the placental perfusion medium and tissue samples in a toxicokinetic study for transplacental transfer of acrylamide and glycidamide. This is the first time that acrylamide, glycidamide and antipyrine are measured simultaneously.

  10. Role of the Placental Vitamin D Receptor in Modulating Feto-Placental Growth in Fetal Growth Restriction and Preeclampsia-Affected Pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Murthi, Padma; Yong, Hannah E. J.; Ngyuen, Thy P. H.; Ellery, Stacey; Singh, Harmeet; Rahman, Rahana; Dickinson, Hayley; Walker, David W.; Davies-Tuck, Miranda; Wallace, Euan M.; Ebeling, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    Fetal growth restriction (FGR) is a common pregnancy complication that affects up to 5% of pregnancies worldwide. Recent studies demonstrate that Vitamin D deficiency is implicated in reduced fetal growth, which may be rescued by supplementation of Vitamin D. Despite this, the pathway(s) by which Vitamin D modulate fetal growth remains to be investigated. Our own studies demonstrate that the Vitamin D receptor (VDR) is significantly decreased in placentae from human pregnancies complicated by FGR and contributes to abnormal placental trophoblast apoptosis and differentiation and regulation of cell-cycle genes in vitro. Thus, Vitamin D signaling is important for normal placental function and fetal growth. This review discusses the association of Vitamin D with fetal growth, the function of Vitamin D and its receptor in pregnancy, as well as the functional significance of a placental source of Vitamin D in FGR. Additionally, we propose that for Vitamin D to be clinically effective to prevent and manage FGR, the molecular mechanisms of Vitamin D and its receptor in modulating fetal growth requires further investigation. PMID:26924988

  11. Difference in expression patterns of placental cholesterol transporters, ABCA1 and SR-BI, in Meishan and Yorkshire pigs with different placental efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Linjun; Xu, Xiangdong; Huang, Ji; Lei, Minggang; Xu, Dequan; Zhao, Shuhong; Yu, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol is a key cell membrane component and precursor of steroid hormones. The maternal cholesterol is an important exogenous cholesterol source for the developing embryos and its transportation is mediated by ABCA1 and SR-BI. Here we reported that during the peri-implantation period in pigs, ABCA1 was expressed by uterine luminal epithelium (LE) and interestingly, its expression was more abundantly in LE on mesometrial side of uterus. However, SR-BI was expressed primarily by LE, glandular epithelial cells (GE) and trophoblast cells (Tr). During the placentation period, the expression levels of ABCA1 and SR-BI proteins at epithelial bilayer and placental areolae were significantly higher in Chinese Meishan pigs compared to Yorkshire pigs. Consisitently, mRNA levels of HMGCR, the rate-limiting enzyme for cholesterol synthesis, were significantly higher in Meishan placentas than in Yorkshire placentas. Our findings revealed the routes of transplacental cholesterol transport mediated by ABCA1 and SR-BI in pigs and indicated that ABCA1 related pathway may participate in anchoring the conceptus to the mesometrial side of uterus. Additionally, an ABCA1 dependent compensatory mechanism related to the placental efficiency in response to the smaller placenta size in Meishan pigs was suggested. PMID:26852751

  12. An investigation of a recent outbreak of nocardioform placentitis caused abortions in horses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nocardioform placentitis caused by Gram-staining positive, branching actinomycetes caused a record number of abortions diagnosed by the University of Kentucky Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory (UKVDL) during 2010-2011 foaling season. In 76 abortion cases, which all were diagnosed as nocardioform plac...

  13. A liposomal Gd contrast agent does not cross the mouse placental barrier.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Anil N; Pautler, Robia; Ghagahda, Ketan; Rendon, David; Gao, Haijun; Starosolski, Zbigniew; Bhavane, Rohan; Patel, Chandreshkumar; Annapragada, Ananth; Yallampalli, Chandrasekhar; Lee, Wesley

    2016-06-14

    The trans-placental permeability of liposomal Gadolinium (Gd) nanoparticle contrast agents was evaluated in a pregnant mouse model. Pregnant Balb/c mice at 16.5 (±1) days of gestation were imaged using a 3D Spoiled Gradient Echo method at 9.4 T using two contrast agents: a clinically approved Gd chelate, Multihance(®) (gadobenate dimeglumine), and a novel experimental liposomal Gd agent. A Dynamic Contrast Enhancement (DCE) protocol was used to capture the dynamics of contrast entry and distribution in the placenta, and clearance from circulation. A blinded clinical radiologist evaluated both sets of images. A reference region model was used to measure the placental flow and physiological parameters; volume transfer constant (K(trans)), efflux rate constant (K(ep)). The Gd content of excised placentae and fetuses was measured, using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). MRI images of pregnant mice and ICP-MS analyses of placental and fetal tissue demonstrated undetectably low transplacental permeation of the liposomal Gd agent, while the clinical agent (Multihance) avidly permeated the placental barrier. Image interpretation and diagnostic quality was equivalent between the two contrast agents. Additional testing to determine both maternal and fetal safety of liposomal Gd is suggested.

  14. Effects of cadmium on the placental uptake and transport to the fetus of nutrients.

    PubMed

    Danielsson, B R; Dencker, L

    1984-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is known to produce malformations, growth inhibition of the fetus, and placental necrosis in rodents at higher doses (3-4 mg/kg body wt). We studied the influence of Cd in various doses (0.5-4 mg/kg body wt) and at different survival intervals on the placental uptake and transfer to the fetus of vitamin B12 (vit. B12), zinc (Zn), alpha-aminobutyric acid (AIB), and deoxyglucose (DOX). These were chosen to represent various mechanisms of membrane transport. We show that vit. B12, which is accumulated in the placenta by a presumed receptor-mediated mechanism, is most easily disturbed by Cd. Thus, a significant decrease in transfer to the fetus was seen already 1 h after a high dose (4 mg/kg body wt) of Cd, and also at longer intervals (24 h) after low doses (0.5 mg/kg body wt). The transport of Zn (chemically similar to Cd) was also disturbed, but its inhibition was probably due in part to a decreased maternal serum concentration. The transport of AIB and DOX was largely unaffected. We conclude that inhibition of nutrient transfer to the fetus may be the underlying mechanism of growth retardation and possibly of the malformations produced by Cd. Vitamin B12 may be a sensitive indicator of early and subtle disturbances of placental function, not only for Cd but also for other chemicals suspected of causing placental disturbances. PMID:6478011

  15. Neonatally Induced Mild Diabetes in Rats and Its Effect on Maternal, Placental, and Fetal Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Sinzato, Yuri Karen; Volpato, Gustavo Tadeu; Iessi, Isabela Lovizutto; Bueno, Aline; Calderon, Iracema de Mattos Paranhos; Rudge, Marilza Vieira Cunha; Damasceno, Débora Cristina

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess placental changes and reproductive outcomes in neonatally induced mild diabetic dams and fetal development in their offspring. At birth, female rats were assigned either to control or diabetic group (100 mg of streptozotocin/Kg, subcutaneously). At adulthood, the female rats were mated. During pregnancy, the blood glucose levels and glucose and insulin tolerance tests were performed. At term, maternal reproductive outcomes, fetal and placental weight, and placental morphology were analyzed. Diabetic rats had smaller number of living fetuses, implantations and corpora lutea, and increased rate of embryonic loss. Placenta showed morphometric alterations in decidua area. Our results showed that mild diabetes was sufficient to trigger alterations in maternal organism leading to impaired decidua development contributing to failure in embryonic implantation and early embryonic losses. Regardless placental decidua alteration, the labyrinth, which is responsible for the maternal-fetal exchanges, showed no morphometric changes contributing to an appropriate fetal development, which was able to maintain normal fetal weight at term in mild diabetic rats. Thus, this experimental model of diabetes induction at the day of birth was more effective to reproduce the reproductive alterations of diabetic women. PMID:22778712

  16. Reflectance spectrometry of placental vessels in cases of twin-twin transfusion syndrome: experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lines, Collin; Kim, Oleg; McMurdy, John; Luks, Francois; Alber, Mark; Crawford, Greg

    2013-03-01

    A stochastic photon transport model in multilayer skin tissue combined with reflectance spectroscopy measurements is used to study placental vessels in cases of twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS). TTTS occurs in about 12% of monozygotic (identical) twin pregnancies wherein flow within placental vessels linking the twins together becomes unbalanced, leading to dual mortality. Endoscopic laser ablation can halt the syndrome by occluding the anastomoses connecting the two fetuses. The objective of this study is to develop a technique to determine hemoglobin (Hb) content through spectral analysis of diffuse reflectance spectra of placental vessels to aid in identification of the anastomoses. Previous work by researchers at Brown University has shown that the reflectance spectra of the donor twin and recipient twin are considerably different in the wavelengths for Hb absorbance. This presentation will give preliminary results for a Monte Carlo model adapted to fit the physiology of the placenta that can be used to quantitative determine the Hb levels. The reflectance spectra of the vessels are simulated for different values of Hb as well oxygenation and water concentration with the vessel and placental mass. The preliminary results will be shown to be in good approximation with the prior experimental data. The combination of modeling with spectroscopic measurement will provide a new tool for detailed prenatal study.

  17. Placental accommodations for transport and metabolism during intra-uterine crowding in pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Litter size and birth weights are limited by uterine capacity, defined as the ability of the uterus to maintain the appropriate development of some number of conceptuses. Uterine capacity is the result of the combined effects of uterine, placental and embryo/fetal function. The number of living conc...

  18. Effect of Microcystin-LR on human placental villous trophoblast differentiation in vitro

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microcystin-LR is a cyanobacterial toxin found in surface and recreational waters that inhibits protein phosphatases and may disrupt the cytoskeleton. Microcystins induce apoptosis in hepatocytes at ≤2.0 μM. Nothing is known about the effects of microcystins on human placental tr...

  19. Grafix®, a Cryopreserved Placental Membrane, for the Treatment of Chronic/Stalled Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Gary W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the use of Grafix®, a commercially available, cryopreserved placental membrane, for the treatment of chronic/stalled wounds of different etiologies. Approach: To describe the unique composition of Grafix, to provide an overview of the existing clinical evidence supporting the benefits of Grafix for wound treatment, and to share the experience of the South Shore Hospital Center for Wound Healing (Weymouth, MA) with Grafix for the treatment of nonhealing wounds. Results: Clinical evidence supports the safety and efficacy of Grafix for the treatment of chronic/stalled wounds, including those that have failed other advanced treatment modalities. Innovation: Grafix is a cryopreserved placental membrane manufactured utilizing a novel technology that enables the preservation of all placental membrane components in their native state. Placental membranes have a unique composition of extracellular matrix, growth factors, and cells (including mesenchymal stem cells), which makes this tissue unique among other advanced biological wound treatment modalities. Conclusion: Clinical evidences support the benefits of Grafix for head-to-toe wound treatment. PMID:26339532

  20. Carrier-mediated placental transport of cimetidine and valproic acid across differentiating JEG-3 cell layers.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, K; Ueda, C; Yamada, K; Nakamura, A; Hatsuda, Y; Kawanishi, S; Nishii, S; Ogawa, M

    2015-07-01

    Human choriocarcinoma has been used as a model to study trophoblast transcellular drug transport in the placenta. Previous models had limitations regarding low molecular weight drug transport through the intracellular gap junction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate placental carrier-mediated transport across a differentiating JEG-3 choriocarcinoma cell (DJEGs) layer model in which the intracellular gap junction was restricted. Cimetidine is the substrate of an efflux transporter, breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). BCRP highly expressed in the placenta, and its function in the DJEGs model was investigated. In addition, the placental drug transport of another efflux transporter, multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs), and an influx transporter, monocarboxylate transporter (MCT), were examined with various substrates. Cimetidine permeated from the fetal side to the maternal side at significantly high levels and saturated in a dose-dependent manner. The permeability coefficient of a MRP substrate, fluorescein, across the DJEGs model was significantly increased by inhibiting MRP function with probenecid. On the other hand, permeation in the influx direction to the fetal side with a substrate of MCT, valproic acid, had a gentle dose-dependent saturation. These findings suggest that the DJEGs model could be used to evaluate transcellular placental drug transport mediated by major placental transporters.

  1. Recent progress towards understanding the role of DNA methylation in human placental development

    PubMed Central

    Mayne, Benjamin T; Buckberry, Sam; Breen, James; Rodriguez Lopez, Carlos M; Roberts, Claire T

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications, and particularly DNA methylation, have been studied in many tissues, both healthy and diseased, and across numerous developmental stages. The placenta is the only organ that has a transient life of 9 months and undergoes rapid growth and dynamic structural and functional changes across gestation. Additionally, the placenta is unique because although developing within the mother, its genome is identical to that of the foetus. Given these distinctive characteristics, it is not surprising that the epigenetic landscape affecting placental gene expression may be different to that in other healthy tissues. However, the role of epigenetic modifications, and particularly DNA methylation, in placental development remains largely unknown. Of particular interest is the fact that the placenta is the most hypomethylated human tissue and is characterized by the presence of large partially methylated domains (PMDs) containing silenced genes. Moreover, how and why the placenta is hypomethylated and what role DNA methylation plays in regulating placental gene expression across gestation are poorly understood. We review genome-wide DNA methylation studies in the human placenta and highlight that the different cell types that make up the placenta have very different DNA methylation profiles. Summarizing studies on DNA methylation in the placenta and its relationship with pregnancy complications are difficult due to the limited number of studies available for comparison. To understand the key steps in placental development and hence what may be perturbed in pregnancy complications requires large-scale genome-wide DNA methylation studies coupled with transcriptome analyses. PMID:27026712

  2. Plasmodium falciparum malaria elicits inflammatory responses that dysregulate placental amino acid transport.

    PubMed

    Boeuf, Philippe; Aitken, Elizabeth H; Chandrasiri, Upeksha; Chua, Caroline Lin Lin; McInerney, Bernie; McQuade, Leon; Duffy, Michael; Molyneux, Malcolm; Brown, Graham; Glazier, Jocelyn; Rogerson, Stephen J

    2013-02-01

    Placental malaria (PM) can lead to poor neonatal outcomes, including low birthweight due to fetal growth restriction (FGR), especially when associated with local inflammation (intervillositis or IV). The pathogenesis of PM-associated FGR is largely unknown, but in idiopathic FGR, impaired transplacental amino acid transport, especially through the system A group of amino acid transporters, has been implicated. We hypothesized that PM-associated FGR could result from impairment of transplacental amino acid transport triggered by IV. In a cohort of Malawian women and their infants, the expression and activity of system A (measured by Na⁺-dependent ¹⁴C-MeAIB uptake) were reduced in PM, especially when associated with IV, compared to uninfected placentas. In an in vitro model of PM with IV, placental cells exposed to monocyte/infected erythrocytes conditioned medium showed decreased system A activity. Amino acid concentrations analyzed by reversed phase ultra performance liquid chromatography in paired maternal and cord plasmas revealed specific alterations of amino acid transport by PM, especially with IV. Overall, our data suggest that the fetoplacental unit responds to PM by altering its placental amino acid transport to maintain adequate fetal growth. However, IV more profoundly compromises placental amino acid transport function, leading to FGR. Our study offers the first pathogenetic explanation for FGR in PM.

  3. Sex Steroids Modulate Uterine-Placental Vasculature: Implications for Obstetrics and Neonatal Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Maliqueo, Manuel; Echiburú, Bárbara; Crisosto, Nicolás

    2016-01-01

    Adequate blood supply to the uterine-placental region is crucial to ensure the transport of oxygen and nutrients to the growing fetus. Multiple factors intervene to achieve appropriate uterine blood flow and the structuring of the placental vasculature during the early stages of pregnancy. Among these factors, oxygen concentrations, growth factors, cytokines, and steroid hormones are the most important. Sex steroids are present in extremely high concentrations in the maternal circulation and are important paracrine and autocrine regulators of a wide range of maternal and placental functions. In this regard, progesterone and estrogens act as modulators of uterine vessels and decrease the resistance of the spiral uterine arteries. On the other hand, androgens have the opposite effect, increasing the vascular resistance of the uterus. Moreover, progesterone and estrogens modulate the synthesis and release of angiogenic factors by placental cells, which regulates trophoblastic invasion and uterine artery remodeling. In this scenario, it is not surprising that women with pregnancy-related pathologies, such as early miscarriages, preterm delivery, preeclampsia, and fetal growth restriction, exhibit altered sex steroid concentrations. PMID:27199767

  4. Placental transfer of cadmium in rats: influence of dose and gestational age.

    PubMed Central

    Sonawane, B R; Nordberg, M; Nordberg, G F; Lucier, G W

    1975-01-01

    Placental transfer rates of cadmium were investigated in rats in relation to dose (0.1, 0.4, and 1.6 mg Cd/kg) and the gestational age (12, 15, and 20 days) when rats were treated. Pregnant rats were injected intravenously with a single dose of 109CdCl2 (approximately 20 muCi/animal), and animals were sacrificed after 24 hr. 109Cd concentrations were measured in the fetus, placenta, maternal liver, and blood. Cadmium crossed the placenta at all doses and at all gestational ages tested. However, higher percentages of administered cadmium accumulated in the fetus with increasing dose and increasing gestational age. For example, after pregnant rats were injected with low, middle, and high doses of Cd on day 12 of gestation, fetuses accumulated 0.0001, 0.0028, and 0.0095 per cent of the injected dose, respectively. Percentages of administered Cd detected in placental tissue did not change consistently with dose but Cd levels did increase with gestational age. Placental to maternal blood Cd concentration ratios increased with gestational age but not with dose. Maternal liver to fetal liver concentration ratios were 295, 137, and 27 for low, middle and high doses, respectively, 24 hr after pregnant rats were treated on day 20 of gestation. These results are discussed in relation to placental damage, metallothionein inducibility, and fetotoxicity. PMID:1227867

  5. Safety of cesarean delivery through placental incision in patients with anterior placenta previa

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Deok-Ho; Kim, Eugene; Kyeong, Kyu-Sang; Hong, Seung Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate the safety of fetal delivery through placental incision in a placenta previa pregnancy. Methods We examined the medical records of 80 women with singleton pregnancy diagnosed with placenta previa who underwent cesarean section between May 2010 and May 2015 at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Chungbuk National University Hospital. Among the women with placenta previa, those who did not have the placenta in the uterine incision site gave birth via conventional uterine incision, while those with anterior placenta previa or had placenta attached to the uterine incision site gave birth via uterine incision plus placental incision. We compared the postoperative hemoglobin level and duration of hospital stay for the mother and newborn of the two groups. Results There was no difference between the placental incision group and non-incision group in terms of preoperative and postoperative hemoglobin change, the amount of blood transfusions required by the mother, newborns with 1-min or 5-min Apgar scores below 7 points or showing signs of acidosis on umbilical cord blood gas analysis result of pH below 7.20. Moreover, neonatal hemoglobin levels did not differ between the two groups. Conclusion Fetal delivery through placental incision during cesarean section for placenta previa pregnancy does not negatively influence the prognosis of the mother or the newborn, and therefore, is considered a safe surgical technique. PMID:27004200

  6. Association between delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase polymorphism and placental lead levels.

    PubMed

    Kayaaltı, Zeliha; Sert, Selda; Kaya-Akyüzlü, Dilek; Söylemez, Esma; Söylemezoğlu, Tülin

    2016-01-01

    Lead inhibits the delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) activity and results in neurotoxic aminolevulinic acid accumulation in the blood. During pregnancy, lead in the maternal blood can easily cross the placenta. The aim of this study was to determine whether the maternal ALAD G177C polymorphism (rs1800435) was related to the placental lead levels. The study population comprised 97 blood samples taken from mothers to investigate ALAD G177C polymorphism and their placentas to measure lead levels. ALAD G177C polymorphism was detected by standard polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) technique and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) equipped with a graphite furnace and Zeeman background correction system was used for lead determination. The median placental lead levels for ALAD1-1, ALAD1-2 and ALAD2-2 genotypes were 7.54 μg/kg, 11.78 μg/kg and 18.53 μg/kg, respectively. Statistically significant association was found between the maternal ALAD G177C polymorphism and placental lead levels (p<0.05). This study suggested that maternal ALAD G177C polymorphism was associated with placental lead levels.

  7. NOTE: Polyhydramnios and arterio-arterial placental anastomoses may beneficially affect monochorionic twin pregnancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Gemert, Martin J. C.; Kranenburg-Lakeman, Phillis; Milovanovic, Zeljko; Vergroesen, Isabelle; Boer, Kees

    2001-03-01

    Our objective was to appraise whether an increased amniotic fluid pressure by polyhydramnios can beneficially affect monochorionic twins that are haemodynamically connected by arterio-venous plus arterio-arterial placental anastomoses. We assessed the effects of polyhydramnios in monochorionic twin placentas, combining (a) data from previous in vitro placental perfusion experiments in singleton term placentas under simulated normal and increased amniotic fluid pressures with (b) logical deduction from observations made in monochorionic twins. Our hypothesis is that in monochorionic placentas, an increased amniotic fluid pressure increases the placental microvascular resistance but not the resistance of placental chorionic plate arteries. Hence, an increased amniotic fluid pressure increases the microvascular resistance of the joint cotyledon, the arterio-venous resistance, but not the arterio-arterial resistance. This proposed mechanism reduces arterio-venous but not oppositely directed arterio-arterial transfusion. Therefore, reversal of the normal direction of net foeto-foetal transfusion may develop, which will reduce the circulatory imbalance that evolved between the monochorionic foetal twins. In contrast, in monochorionic twins connected by unidirectional or bidirectional arterio-venous anastomoses reversal of the normal direction of net foeto-foetal transfusion will not occur. In conclusion, reversal of the normal direction of net foeto-foetal transfusion, induced by polyhydramnios, is protective against the onset and severity of twin-twin transfusion syndrome in monochorionic twins connected by arterio-venous plus arterio-arterial anastomoses, but not by unidirectional or bidirectional arterio-venous anastomoses.

  8. Development of analytic models for placental transfer of the heaviest metals

    SciTech Connect

    Sikov, M.R.; Kelman, B.J.

    1987-12-01

    Inferential information concerning placental passage has been obtained from sequential measurements of concentration ratios in the embryo/fetus and in pregnant animals following injection, and experiments in perfused placentas have provided kinetic data. Although wide ranges of values are reported, results generally indicate that most heavy metals do not readily cross the placental barriers or deposit in the conceptus after acute exposures. Concentration measurements in human and in wild and domestic animal populations, which provide data relating to environmental exposures, suggest that relative fetal deposition is greater with chronic than with acute exposures. There are several factors that influence placental transfer and fetoplacental content. These include mass and physicochemical state, route of administration, species-specific changes in placental structure and function relative to stage of gestation at exposure, and stage-related changes in tissue affinities. We will compare the fetoplacental metabolism of the heaviest metallic elements (Z greater than or equal to 82) to illustrate these several concepts, and to examine and compare the models that have been proposed to describe and explain these patterns and to provide a basis for extrapolation to man.

  9. Increased Umbilical Cord PAI-1 Levels in Placental Insufficiency Are Associated with Fetal Hypoxia and Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Seferovic, Maxim D.; Gupta, Madhulika B.

    2016-01-01

    In intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), a subset of pregnancies undergoes placental vascular dysregulation resulting in restricted blood flow and fetal hypoxemia. Altered transcription of hypoxic regulated plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) has been associated with pregnancy complications and angiogenic regulation. Here we assessed circulating PAI-1 as an indicator of placental insufficiency. Venous umbilical PAI-1 of hypoxemic (VpO2 20 versus 35 mmHg, p < 0.0001) placental insufficient pregnancies (resistance index 0.9 versus 0.63, p < 0.05) (n = 18) was compared to controls (n = 12). PAI-1 was increased (~10-fold, p < 0.001) and had a positive predictive ratio of 6.7. Further, PAI-1 levels correlated to blood oxygen (r = −0.68, p < 0.0001). The plasma's angiogenic potency measured in vitro was associated with umbilical cord blood PAI-1 levels (r = 0.65, p < 0.01). This association was attenuated by PAI-1 inhibiting antibody (p < 0.001). The results demonstrate PAI-1 as a potential marker of placental insufficiency and identify its close association with pathological hypoxia and angiogenesis in a subset of growth restricted pregnancies. PMID:26903689

  10. A liposomal Gd contrast agent does not cross the mouse placental barrier

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Anil N.; Pautler, Robia; Ghagahda, Ketan; Rendon, David; Gao, Haijun; Starosolski, Zbigniew; Bhavane, Rohan; Patel, Chandreshkumar; Annapragada, Ananth; Yallampalli, Chandrasekhar; Lee, Wesley

    2016-01-01

    The trans-placental permeability of liposomal Gadolinium (Gd) nanoparticle contrast agents was evaluated in a pregnant mouse model. Pregnant Balb/c mice at 16.5 (±1) days of gestation were imaged using a 3D Spoiled Gradient Echo method at 9.4 T using two contrast agents: a clinically approved Gd chelate, Multihance® (gadobenate dimeglumine), and a novel experimental liposomal Gd agent. A Dynamic Contrast Enhancement (DCE) protocol was used to capture the dynamics of contrast entry and distribution in the placenta, and clearance from circulation. A blinded clinical radiologist evaluated both sets of images. A reference region model was used to measure the placental flow and physiological parameters; volume transfer constant (Ktrans), efflux rate constant (Kep). The Gd content of excised placentae and fetuses was measured, using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). MRI images of pregnant mice and ICP-MS analyses of placental and fetal tissue demonstrated undetectably low transplacental permeation of the liposomal Gd agent, while the clinical agent (Multihance) avidly permeated the placental barrier. Image interpretation and diagnostic quality was equivalent between the two contrast agents. Additional testing to determine both maternal and fetal safety of liposomal Gd is suggested. PMID:27298076

  11. EFFECT OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE ON CHORIONIC GONADOTROPHIN SECRETION BY HUMAN PLACENTAL TROPHOBLAST CULTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    EFFECT OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE ON CHORIONIC GONADOTROPHIN SECRETION BY HUMAN PLACENTAL TROPHOBLAST CULTURES

    Jiangang Chen1, Gordon C. Douglas1?,Twanda L. Thirkill1?, Peter N. Lohstroh1, Susan R. Bielmeier2, Michael G. Narotsky3, Deborah S. Best3, Randy A. Harrison3, Kala ...

  12. Ancient origin of placental expression in the growth hormone genes of anthropoid primates.

    PubMed

    Papper, Zack; Jameson, Natalie M; Romero, Roberto; Weckle, Amy L; Mittal, Pooja; Benirschke, Kurt; Santolaya-Forgas, Joaquin; Uddin, Monica; Haig, David; Goodman, Morris; Wildman, Derek E

    2009-10-01

    In anthropoid primates, growth hormone (GH) genes have undergone at least 2 independent locus expansions, one in platyrrhines (New World monkeys) and another in catarrhines (Old World monkeys and apes). In catarrhines, the GH cluster has a pituitary-expressed gene called GH1; the remaining GH genes include placental GHs and placental lactogens. Here, we provide cDNA sequence evidence that the platyrrhine GH cluster also includes at least 3 placenta expressed genes and phylogenetic evidence that placenta expressed anthropoid GH genes have undergone strong adaptive evolution, whereas pituitary-expressed GH genes have faced strict functional constraint. Our phylogenetic evidence also points to lineage-specific gene gain and loss in early placental mammalian evolution, with at least three copies of the GH gene present at the time of the last common ancestor (LCA) of primates, rodents, and laurasiatherians. Anthropoid primates and laurasiatherians share gene descendants of one of these three copies, whereas rodents and strepsirrhine primates each maintain a separate copy. Eight of the amino-acid replacements that occurred on the lineage leading to the LCA of extant anthropoids have been implicated in GH signaling at the maternal-fetal interface. Thus, placental expression of GH may have preceded the separate series of GH gene duplications that occurred in catarrhines and platyrrhines (i.e., the roles played by placenta-expressed GHs in human pregnancy may have a longer evolutionary history than previously appreciated).

  13. Conservation of placentation during the tertiary radiation of mammals in South America.

    PubMed

    Carter, Anthony Michael; Mess, Andrea Maria

    2013-05-01

    The eutherian placenta is considered to possess great plasticity, but it is not clear how this variation reflects adaptation to different ecological niches. Because South America was isolated for most of the Tertiary, it represents a natural laboratory to examine this question. We here describe placentation in three South American groups: Xenarthra have been part of the fauna from at least the mid-Paleocene whereas caviomorph rodents and Neotropical primates are each derived from a single founder that reached South America in the Eocene and Oligocene, respectively. The common ancestor of Xenarthra had a villous, haemochorial placenta, from which the labyrinthine, endotheliochorial placenta of sloths later evolved. Placentation in Caviomorpha follows an extraordinary stable pattern, characterized by a haemomonochorial, labyrinthine and highly lobed structure with specialized growing areas. This pattern was present before arrival of these rodents in South America and enabled a successful radiation especially during the spread of grasslands. Neotropical primates have haemochorial, trabecular placentas with a specialized maternal blood supply; a pattern that contrasts with that of Old World monkeys and may have been present in the founder generation on arrival in South America. In conclusion, there is a dichotomy within Xenarthra but otherwise the ancient South American mammals do not show much variation in principal placental characters. Thus, the successful radiation of these three groups, and their adaptation to diverse ecological niches, did not require substantial alterations in placentation.

  14. Conservation of placentation during the tertiary radiation of mammals in South America.

    PubMed

    Carter, Anthony Michael; Mess, Andrea Maria

    2013-05-01

    The eutherian placenta is considered to possess great plasticity, but it is not clear how this variation reflects adaptation to different ecological niches. Because South America was isolated for most of the Tertiary, it represents a natural laboratory to examine this question. We here describe placentation in three South American groups: Xenarthra have been part of the fauna from at least the mid-Paleocene whereas caviomorph rodents and Neotropical primates are each derived from a single founder that reached South America in the Eocene and Oligocene, respectively. The common ancestor of Xenarthra had a villous, haemochorial placenta, from which the labyrinthine, endotheliochorial placenta of sloths later evolved. Placentation in Caviomorpha follows an extraordinary stable pattern, characterized by a haemomonochorial, labyrinthine and highly lobed structure with specialized growing areas. This pattern was present before arrival of these rodents in South America and enabled a successful radiation especially during the spread of grasslands. Neotropical primates have haemochorial, trabecular placentas with a specialized maternal blood supply; a pattern that contrasts with that of Old World monkeys and may have been present in the founder generation on arrival in South America. In conclusion, there is a dichotomy within Xenarthra but otherwise the ancient South American mammals do not show much variation in principal placental characters. Thus, the successful radiation of these three groups, and their adaptation to diverse ecological niches, did not require substantial alterations in placentation. PMID:23355381

  15. Conversion of ethanol to acetaldehyde by human placental homogenates and villi in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Blomquist, C.H.; Lindemann, N.J.; Hakanson, E.Y.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have previously reported that placental villi in vitro metabolize acetaldehyde (Ach), and that Ach forms adducts with placental subcellular fractions. In the experiments reported here the authors have investigated the capacity of placental homogenates and villi to generate Ach from ethanol (EtOH). When placental homogenates (0.5 g wet weight) prepared in 50 mM Tris. pH 7.5, were incubated with 20 ..mu..M (1-/sup 14/C)ethanol and an NADP- generating system, Ach was formed at the rate of 0.18 nmol/h/g wet weight of tissue, based on counts trappable with semicarbazide. NAD was as effective as NADP. Omission of cofactor resulted in a 69% decrease in activity. The addition of a human serum ultrafiltrate (25,000 m.w. cut-off) to 20% had no effect on Ach formation, whole serum at 20% reduced reaction by 60%. Sodium azide at 40 mM completely abolished Ach formation, 1,10-phenanthroline at 0.4 mM inhibited approximately 50%. In contrast, no Ach formation was detected when 1.0-g fragments of villous tissue were incubated with 20 ..mu..M (1-/sup 14/C)EtOH. The data suggest that villous tissue is capable of Ach formation by a catalase-like activity, but the capacity of intact villi for EtOH oxidation is low.

  16. Placental localization in abdominal pregnancy using technetium-99m-labeled red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, B.; Payan, J.M.; Jones, J.S.; Buse, M.G. )

    1990-06-01

    In a patient with third trimester abdominal pregnancy with fetal demise, technetium-99m-labeled erythrocytes ({sup 99m}Tc-RBCs) localized the placenta preoperatively, after nonvisualization by ultrasonography and arteriography. Extrauterine placental localization by blood-pool imaging may be useful when ultrasound fails.

  17. Placental transfer and distribution of /sup 241/Am in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Hisamatsu, S.; Takizawa, Y.

    1983-04-01

    The placental transfer and distribution of /sup 241/Am in the feto-placental system were studied in pregnant rats. Rats were injected intravenously with /sup 241/Am citrate at 15 or 18 days of gestation. Groups injected at 15 days of gestation were sacrificed 2, 24, 48, or 120 hr after injection, and the group injected at 18 days was sacrificed 24 hr after. The radioactivities of /sup 241/Am in fetus, fetal membrane, and placenta were determined, and its distribution in the feto-placental system was investigated by high-speed autoradiography using a silver-activated zinc sulfide-coated membrane as an intensifying screen. The deposition of /sup 241/Am in feto-placenta units increased with the number of days of gestation. Results of autoradiography revealed that major deposition sites of /sup 241/Am in the fetus are the skeleton and liver. Heavy deposition of /sup 241/Am in the yolksac splanchnopleure and its existence in the exocoelom strongly suggest that the yolk sac placenta plays an important role in the placental transfer of this nuclide.

  18. Placental histology and neutrophil extracellular traps in lupus and pre-eclampsia pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Marder, Wendy; Knight, Jason S; Kaplan, Mariana J; Somers, Emily C; Zhang, Xu; O'Dell, Alexander A; Padmanabhan, Vasantha; Lieberman, Richard W

    2016-01-01

    Objective Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is associated with increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes, including pre-eclampsia, particularly in association with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS). While significant placental abnormalities are expected in pre-eclampsia, less is known about how lupus activity and APS in pregnancy affect the placenta. We describe placental pathology from a population of lupus pregnancies, several of which were complicated by APS-related thromboses, in which pre-eclampsia and other complications developed. We performed standard histopathological placental review and quantified neutrophils and neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) in the intervillous space, given the recognised association of NETs with lupus, APS and pre-eclampsia. Methods Pre-eclampsia, SLE and control placentas were scored for histological features, and neutrophils were quantified on H&E and immunohistochemical staining for the granular protein myeloperoxidase. NETs were identified by extracellular myeloperoxidase staining in the setting of decondensed nuclei. Non-parametric analysis was used to evaluate differences in netting and intact neutrophils between groups, with Kruskal–Wallis testing for associations between histological findings and neutrophils. Results Placentas were evaluated from 35 pregnancies: 10 controls, 11 pre-eclampsia, 4 SLE+pre-eclampsia and 10 SLE, including one complicated by catastrophic APS and one complicated by hepatic and splenic vein thromboses during pregnancy. Intrauterine growth restriction and oligohydramnios were observed in lupus cases but not controls. Significantly more NETs were found infiltrating placental intervillous spaces in pre-eclampsia, SLE+pre-eclampsia and all 10 SLE non-pre-eclampsia cases. The ratio of NETs to total neutrophils was significantly increased in all case groups compared with controls. When present, NETs were associated with maternal vasculitis, laminar decidual necrosis, maternal

  19. The cumulative effect of assisted reproduction procedures on placental development and epigenetic perturbations in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    de Waal, Eric; Vrooman, Lisa A; Fischer, Erin; Ord, Teri; Mainigi, Monica A; Coutifaris, Christos; Schultz, Richard M; Bartolomei, Marisa S

    2015-12-15

    Assisted reproductive technologies (ART) are associated with several complications including low birth weight, abnormal placentation and increased risk for rare imprinting disorders. Indeed, experimental studies demonstrate ART procedures independent of existing infertility induce epigenetic perturbations in the embryo and extraembryonic tissues. To test the hypothesis that these epigenetic perturbations persist and result in adverse outcomes at term, we assessed placental morphology and methylation profiles in E18.5 mouse concepti generated by in vitro fertilization (IVF) in two different genetic backgrounds. We also examined embryo transfer (ET) and superovulation procedures to ascertain if they contribute to developmental and epigenetic effects. Increased placental weight and reduced fetal-to-placental weight ratio were observed in all ART groups when compared with naturally conceived controls, demonstrating that non-surgical embryo transfer alone can impact placental development. Furthermore, superovulation further induced overgrowth of the placental junctional zone. Embryo transfer and superovulation defects were limited to these morphological changes, as we did not observe any differences in epigenetic profiles. IVF placentae, however, displayed hypomethylation of imprinting control regions of select imprinted genes and a global reduction in DNA methylation levels. Although we did not detect significant differences in DNA methylation in fetal brain or liver samples, rare IVF concepti displayed very low methylation and abnormal gene expression from the normally repressed allele. Our findings suggest that individual ART procedures cumulatively increase placental morphological abnormalities and epigenetic perturbations, potentially causing adverse neonatal and long-term health outcomes in offspring.

  20. Abundance of megalin and Dab2 is reduced in syncytiotrophoblast during placental malaria, which may contribute to low birth weight

    PubMed Central

    Lybbert, Jared; Gullingsrud, Justin; Chesnokov, Olga; Turyakira, Eleanor; Dhorda, Mehul; Guerin, Philippe J.; Piola, Patrice; Muehlenbachs, Atis; Oleinikov, Andrew V.

    2016-01-01

    Placental malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum contributes to ~200,000 child deaths annually, mainly due to low birth weight (LBW). Parasitized erythrocyte sequestration and consequent inflammation in the placenta are common attributes of placental malaria. The precise molecular details of placental changes leading to LBW are still poorly understood. We hypothesized that placental malaria may disturb maternofetal exchange of vitamins, lipids, and hormones mediated by the multi-ligand (n ~ 50) scavenging/signaling receptor megalin, which is abundantly expressed in placenta but was not previously analyzed in pregnancy outcomes. We studied abundance of megalin and its intracellular adaptor protein Dab2 by immunofluorescence microscopy in placental biopsies from Ugandan women with (n = 8) and without (n = 20) active placental malaria. We found that: (a) abundances of both megalin (p = 0.01) and Dab2 (p = 0.006) were significantly reduced in brush border of syncytiotrophoblast of infected placentas; (b) amounts of megalin and Dab2 were strongly correlated (Spearman’s r = 0.53, p = 0.003); (c) abundances of megalin and Dab2 (p = 0.046) were reduced in infected placentas from women with LBW deliveries. This study provides first evidence that placental malaria infection is associated with reduced abundance of megalin transport/signaling system and indicate that these changes may contribute to the pathology of LBW. PMID:27072056

  1. IFPA Meeting 2013 Workshop Report II: use of 'omics' in understanding placental development, bioinformatics tools for gene expression analysis, planning and coordination of a placenta research network, placental imaging, evolutionary approaches to understanding pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, W E; Adamson, L; Carter, A M; Collins, S; Cox, B; Elliot, M G; Ermini, L; Gruslin, A; Hoodless, P A; Huang, J; Kniss, D A; McGowen, M R; Post, M; Rice, G; Robinson, W; Sadovsky, Y; Salafia, C; Salomon, C; Sled, J G; Todros, T; Wildman, D E; Zamudio, S; Lash, G E

    2014-02-01

    Workshops are an important part of the IFPA annual meeting as they allow for discussion of specialized topics. At the IFPA meeting 2013 twelve themed workshops were presented, five of which are summarized in this report. These workshops related to various aspects of placental biology but collectively covered areas of new technologies for placenta research: 1) use of 'omics' in understanding placental development and pathologies; 2) bioinformatics and use of omics technologies; 3) planning and coordination of a placenta research network; 4) clinical imaging and pathological outcomes; 5) placental evolution.

  2. IFPA Meeting 2013 Workshop Report II: use of 'omics' in understanding placental development, bioinformatics tools for gene expression analysis, planning and coordination of a placenta research network, placental imaging, evolutionary approaches to understanding pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, W E; Adamson, L; Carter, A M; Collins, S; Cox, B; Elliot, M G; Ermini, L; Gruslin, A; Hoodless, P A; Huang, J; Kniss, D A; McGowen, M R; Post, M; Rice, G; Robinson, W; Sadovsky, Y; Salafia, C; Salomon, C; Sled, J G; Todros, T; Wildman, D E; Zamudio, S; Lash, G E

    2014-02-01

    Workshops are an important part of the IFPA annual meeting as they allow for discussion of specialized topics. At the IFPA meeting 2013 twelve themed workshops were presented, five of which are summarized in this report. These workshops related to various aspects of placental biology but collectively covered areas of new technologies for placenta research: 1) use of 'omics' in understanding placental development and pathologies; 2) bioinformatics and use of omics technologies; 3) planning and coordination of a placenta research network; 4) clinical imaging and pathological outcomes; 5) placental evolution. PMID:24315655

  3. Placental Kisspeptins Differentially Modulate Vital Parameters of Estrogen Receptor-Positive and -Negative Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rasoulzadeh, Zahra; Ghods, Roya; Kazemi, Tohid; Mirzadegan, Ebrahim; Ghaffari-Tabrizi-Wizsy, Nassim; Rezania, Simin; Kazemnejad, Somaieh; Arefi, Soheila; Ghasemi, Jamileh; Vafaei, Sedigheh; Mahmoudi, Ahmad-Reza; Zarnani, Amir-Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Kisspeptins (KPs) are major regulators of trophoblast and cancer invasion. Thus far, limited and conflicting data are available on KP-mediated modulation of breast cancer (BC) metastasis; mostly based on synthetic KP-10, the most active fragment of KP. Here, we report for the first time comprehensive functional effects of term placental KPs on proliferation, adhesion, Matrigel invasion, motility, MMP activity and pro-inflammatory cytokine production in MDA-MB-231 (estrogen receptor-negative) and MCF-7 (estrogen receptor-positive). KPs were expressed at high level by term placental syncytiotrophoblasts and released in soluble form. Placental explant conditioned medium containing KPs (CM) significantly reduced proliferation of both cell types compared to CM without (w/o) KP (CM-w/o KP) in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In MDA-MB-231 cells, placental KPs significantly reduced adhesive properties, while increased MMP9 and MMP2 activity and stimulated invasion. Increased invasiveness of MDA-MB-231 cells after CM treatment was inhibited by KP receptor antagonist, P-234. CM significantly reduced motility of MCF-7 cells at all time points (2–30 hr), while it stimulated motility of MDA-MB-231 cells. These effects were reversed by P-234. Co-treatment with selective ER modulators, Tamoxifen and Raloxifene, inhibited the effect of CM on motility of MCF-7 cells. The level of IL-6 in supernatant of MCF-7 cells treated with CM was higher compared to those treated with CM-w/o KP. Both cell types produced more IL-8 after treatment with CM compared to those treated with CM-w/o KP. Taken together, our observations suggest that placental KPs differentially modulate vital parameters of estrogen receptor-positive and -negative BC cells possibly through modulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine production. PMID:27101408

  4. Association between Placental Lesions, Cytokines and Angiogenic Factors in Pregnant Women with Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Weel, Ingrid C.; Baergen, Rebecca N.; Romão-Veiga, Mariana; Borges, Vera T.; Ribeiro, Vanessa R.; Witkin, Steven S.; Bannwart-Castro, Camila; Peraçoli, Jose C.; De Oliveira, Leandro; Peraçoli, Maria T.

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is considered the leading cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. The placenta seems to play an essential role in this disease, probably due to factors involved in its formation and development. The present study aimed to investigate the association between placental lesions, cytokines and angiogenic factors in pregnant women with preeclampsia (PE). We evaluated 20 normotensive pregnant women, 40 with early-onset PE and 80 with late-onset PE. Placental samples were analyzed for histopathology, immunohistochemistry and determination of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin-10 (IL-10), transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), placental growth factor (PlGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), fms-like tyrosine-kinase-1 (Flt-1) and endoglin (Eng) levels. Higher percentages of increased syncytial knots and increased perivillous fibrin deposits, and greater levels of TNF-α, TGF-β1and Flt-1 were detected in placentas from early-onset PE. Levels of IL-10, VEGF and PlGF were decreased in PE versus normotensive placentas. Both the TNF-α/IL-10 and sFlt-1/PlGF ratios were higher in placental homogenate of early-onset PE than late-onset PE and control groups. The more severe lesions and the imbalance between TNF-α/IL-10 and PlGF/sFlt-1 in placentas from early-onset PE allows differentiation of early and late-onset PE and suggests higher placental impairment in early-onset PE. PMID:27315098

  5. Increased Rat Placental Fatty Acid, but Decreased Amino Acid and Glucose Transporters Potentially Modify Intrauterine Programming.

    PubMed

    Nüsken, Eva; Gellhaus, Alexandra; Kühnel, Elisabeth; Swoboda, Isabelle; Wohlfarth, Maria; Vohlen, Christina; Schneider, Holm; Dötsch, Jörg; Nüsken, Kai-Dietrich

    2016-07-01

    Regulation of placental nutrient transport significantly affects fetal development and may modify intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and fetal programming. We hypothesized that placental nutrient transporters are differentially affected both by utero-placental insufficiency and prenatal surgical stress. Pregnant rats underwent bilateral uterine artery and vein ligation (LIG), sham operation (SOP) or no operation (controls, C) on gestational day E19. Placentas were obtained by caesarean section 4 h (LIG, n=20 placentas; SOP, n=24; C, n=12), 24 h (LIG, n=28; SOP, n=20; C, n=12) and 72 h (LIG, n=20; SOP, n=20; C, n=24) after surgery. Gene and protein expression of placental nutrient transporters for fatty acids (h-FABP, CD36), amino acids (SNAT1, SNAT2) and glucose (GLUT-1, Connexin 26) were examined by qRT-PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry. Interestingly, the mean protein expression of h-FABP was doubled in placentas of LIG and SOP animals 4, 24 (SOP significant) and 72 h (SOP significant) after surgery. CD36 protein was significantly increased in LIG after 72 h. SNAT1 and SNAT2 protein and gene expressions were significantly reduced in LIG and SOP after 24 h. Further significantly reduced proteins were GLUT-1 in LIG (4 h, 72 h) and SOP (24 h), and Connexin 26 in LIG (72 h). In conclusion, placental nutrient transporters are differentially affected both by reduced blood flow and stress, probably modifying the already disturbed intrauterine milieu and contributing to IUGR and fetal programming. Increased fatty acid transport capacity may affect energy metabolism and could be a compensatory reaction with positive effects on brain development. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1594-1603, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Influence of sex and glucocorticoid exposure on preterm placental pro-oxidant-antioxidant balance.

    PubMed

    Stark, M J; Hodyl, N A; Wright, I M R; Clifton, V L

    2011-11-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are known to influence fetal ROS production and anti-oxidant defences yet little attention has focused on the potential for effects in the placenta. We hypothesised that antenatal GC exposure alters placental pro-oxidant-anti-oxidant balance sex-specifically, based upon the known relationship between male sex and poor pregnancy outcome. Placentae were collected from 60 women who delivered between 24 and 31 completed weeks gestation and placental oxidative and nitrative stress (protein carbonyl, lipid hydroperoxide, and nitrotyrosine concentration) and anti-oxidant enzyme activity (glutathione peroxidase, thioredoxin reductase, and superoxide dismutase) measured. A pro-oxidant state was observed in placentae of male compared to female infants born within 72 h of antenatal GC exposure, with higher levels of protein carbonyl content (p = 0.04), lipid hydroperoxide (p < 0.01) and nitrotyrosine content (p = 0.02), and lower levels of glutathione peroxidase activity (p = 0.01). A pro-oxidant state continued to be observed in placentae of males compared to females born outside of 72 h, with higher protein carbonyl content (p = 0.04) and lower glutathione peroxidase activity (p = 0.01) than females, however no differences in placental lipid hydroperoxide and nitrotyrosine content were observed. These sex-specific alterations in products of placental oxidative stress could not purely be explained by differences in clinical illness severity (CRIB2 score). Therefore, these sex-specific alterations in placental pro-oxidant-antioxidant balance in response to antenatal betamethasone exposure, independent of illness severity, could contribute to the patho-physiologic processes underlying oxygen radical diseases of the newborn, conditions known to exhibit a male excess.

  7. Tolerance of human placental tissue to severe hypoxia and its relevance for dual ex vivo perfusion.

    PubMed

    Schneider, H

    2009-03-01

    In the dual ex vivo perfusion of an isolated human placental cotyledon it takes on average 20-30 min to set up stable perfusion circuits for the maternal and fetal vascular compartments. In vivo placental tissue of all species maintains a highly active metabolism and it continues to puzzle investigators how this tissue can survive 30 min of ischemia with more or less complete anoxia following expulsion of the organ from the uterus and do so without severe damage. There seem to be parallels between "depressed metabolism" seen in the fetus and the immature neonate in the peripartum period and survival strategies described in mammals with increased tolerance of severe hypoxia like hibernators in the state of torpor or deep sea diving turtles. Increased tolerance of hypoxia in both is explained by "partial metabolic arrest" in the sense of a temporary suspension of Kleiber's rule. Furthermore the fetus can react to major changes in surrounding oxygen tension by decreasing or increasing the rate of specific basal metabolism, providing protection against severe hypoxia as well as oxidative stress. There is some evidence that adaptive mechanisms allowing increased tolerance of severe hypoxia in the fetus or immature neonate can also be found in placental tissue, of which at least the villous portion is of fetal origin. A better understanding of the molecular details of reprogramming of fetal and placental tissues in late pregnancy may be of clinical relevance for an improved risk assessment of the individual fetus during the critical transition from intrauterine life to the outside and for the development of potential prophylactic measures against severe ante- or intrapartum hypoxia. Responses of the tissue to reperfusion deserve intensive study, since they may provide a rational basis for preventive measures against reperfusion injury and related oxidative stress. Modification of the handling of placental tissue during postpartum ischemia, and adaptation of the

  8. Macroscopic placental changes associated with fetal and maternal events in diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Salge, Ana Karina Marques; Rocha, Karlla Morgana Nunes; Xavier, Raphaela Maioni; Ramalho, Wilzianne Silva; Rocha, Érika Lopes; Guimarães, Janaína Valadares; Silva, Renata Calciolari Rossi e; Siqueira, Karina Machado; Abdalla, Douglas Reis; Michelin, Márcia Antoniazzi; Murta, Eddie Fernando Candido

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The current study sought to identify macroscopic placental changes associated with clinical conditions in women with or without diabetes and their newborns. METHODS: The study population consisted of 62 pregnant women clinically diagnosed with diabetes and 62 healthy women (control group). RESULTS: Among the subjects with diabetes, 43 women (69.3%) were diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus, 15 had diabetes mellitus I (24.2%), and four had diabetes mellitus II (6.5%). The mean age of the women studied was 28.5±5.71 years, and the mean gestational age of the diabetic women was 38.51 weeks. Of the 62 placentas from diabetic pregnancies, 49 (79%) maternal surfaces and 59 (95.2%) fetal surfaces showed abnormalities, including calcium and fibrin deposits, placental infarction, hematoma, and fibrosis. A statistical association was found between newborn gender and fetal and maternal placental changes (p = 0.002). The mean weight of the newborns studied was 3,287±563 g for women with diabetes mellitus, 3,205±544 g for those with gestational diabetes mellitus, 3,563±696 g for those with diabetes mellitus II, and 3,095±451 g for those with diabetes mellitus I. CONCLUSIONS: Infarction, hematoma, calcification, and fibrin were found on the maternal and fetal placental surfaces in women with diabetes. Women with gestational diabetes and post-term infants had more calcium deposits on the maternal placental surface as compared to those with type I and type II diabetes. PMID:23070348

  9. Excess LIGHT contributes to placental impairment increased secretion of vasoactive factors, hypertension and proteinuria in preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Parchim, Nicholas; Iriyama, Takayuki; Luo, Renna; Zhao, Cheng; Liu, Chen; Irani, Roxanna A.; Zhang, Weiru; Ning, Chen; Zhang, Yujin; Blackwell, Sean C.; Chen, Lieping; Tao, Lijian; Hicks, John; Kellems, Rodney E.; Xia, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE), a prevalent hypertensive disorder of pregnancy, is believed to be secondary to uteroplacental ischemia. Accumulating evidence indicates that hypoxia-independent mediators, including inflammatory cytokines and growth factors, are associated with PE, but it is unclear whether these signals directly contribute to placental damage and disease development in vivo. We report that LIGHT, a novel TNF superfamily member, is significantly elevated in the circulation and placentas of preeclamptic women compared to normotensive pregnant individuals. Injection of LIGHT into pregnant mice induced placental apoptosis, small fetuses and key features of PE-hypertension and proteinuria. Mechanistically, using neutralizing antibodies specific for LIGHT receptors, we found that the LIGHT receptors, herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM) and lymphotoxin β receptor (LTβR), are required for LIGHT-induced placental impairment, small fetuses and PE features in pregnant mice. Accordingly, we further revealed that LIGHT functions through these two receptors to induce secretion of soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1) and endothelin-1 (ET-1), two well-accepted pathogenic factors in PE, and thereby plays an important role in hypertension and proteinuria in pregnant mice. Lastly, we extended our animal findings to human studies and demonstrated that activation of LIGHT receptors resulted in increased apoptosis and elevation of sFlt-1 secretion in human placental villous explants. Overall, our human and mouse studies show that LIGHT signaling is a previously unrecognized pathway responsible for placental apoptosis, elevated secretion of vasoactive factors and subsequent maternal features of PE and reveal new therapeutic opportunities for the management of disease. PMID:24324043

  10. Localized toxoplasmosis in a ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) causing placentitis, stillbirths, and disseminated fetal infection.

    PubMed

    Juan-Sallés, Carles; Mainez, Mireia; Marco, Alberto; Sanchís, Ana M Malabia

    2011-09-01

    Localized, myocardial toxoplasmosis contributed to the death of a female ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) 1 week after the delivery of 4 stillborn offspring with disseminated toxoplasmosis; the diagnosis was obtained by histopathology and immunohistochemistry in all 5 lemurs. Varying degrees of placentitis and placental edema with intralesional Toxoplasma gondii immunolabeling were observed in the 3 available placentas. The dam had severe myocarditis, and T. gondii antigen was only detected in the myocardial lesions. Disseminated toxoplasmosis with mild encephalitis was noted in all 4 fetuses, and 2 of the fetuses had mild acute multifocal hepatic necrosis. Fetal death was attributed to placental insufficiency with subsequent hypoxia and amniotic fluid aspiration.

  11. Localized toxoplasmosis in a ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) causing placentitis, stillbirths, and disseminated fetal infection.

    PubMed

    Juan-Sallés, Carles; Mainez, Mireia; Marco, Alberto; Sanchís, Ana M Malabia

    2011-09-01

    Localized, myocardial toxoplasmosis contributed to the death of a female ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) 1 week after the delivery of 4 stillborn offspring with disseminated toxoplasmosis; the diagnosis was obtained by histopathology and immunohistochemistry in all 5 lemurs. Varying degrees of placentitis and placental edema with intralesional Toxoplasma gondii immunolabeling were observed in the 3 available placentas. The dam had severe myocarditis, and T. gondii antigen was only detected in the myocardial lesions. Disseminated toxoplasmosis with mild encephalitis was noted in all 4 fetuses, and 2 of the fetuses had mild acute multifocal hepatic necrosis. Fetal death was attributed to placental insufficiency with subsequent hypoxia and amniotic fluid aspiration. PMID:21908372

  12. Artificial oxygen carriers rescue placental hypoxia and improve fetal development in the rat pre-eclampsia model.

    PubMed

    Li, Heng; Ohta, Hidenobu; Tahara, Yu; Nakamura, Sakiko; Taguchi, Kazuaki; Nakagawa, Machiko; Oishi, Yoshihisa; Goto, Yu-Ichi; Wada, Keiji; Kaga, Makiko; Inagaki, Masumi; Otagiri, Masaki; Yokota, Hideo; Shibata, Shigenobu; Sakai, Hiromi; Okamura, Kunihiro; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2015-10-16

    Pre-eclampsia affects approximately 5% of all pregnant women and remains a major cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. The hypertension associated with pre-eclampsia develops during pregnancy and remits after delivery, suggesting that the placenta is the most likely origin of this disease. The pathophysiology involves insufficient trophoblast invasion, resulting in incomplete narrow placental spiral artery remodeling. Placental insufficiency, which limits the maternal-fetal exchange of gas and nutrients, leads to fetal intrauterine growth restriction. In this study, in our attempt to develop a new therapy for pre-eclampsia, we directly rescued placental and fetal hypoxia with nano-scale size artificial oxygen carriers (hemoglobin vesicles). The present study is the first to demonstrate that artificial oxygen carriers successfully treat placental hypoxia, decrease maternal plasma levels of anti-angiogenic proteins and ameliorate fetal growth restriction in the pre-eclampsia rat model.

  13. Placental calcifications: a clue for the identification of high-risk fetuses in the low-risk pregnant population?

    PubMed

    Mastrolia, Salvatore Andrea; Weintraub, Adi Yehuda; Sciaky-Tamir, Yael; Tirosh, Dan; Loverro, Giuseppe; Hershkovitz, Reli

    2016-03-01

    "What does it mean, Doctor?" and "Is it going to affect my baby in some way?". Those are the most typical questions of pregnant women to obstetricians. Answering is sometimes easier but placental calcification is not the case, since placental architecture and disease are two different faces of the same coin and the association between them is not completely clear. Placenta can function properly, even in the presence of architectural alterations, without any fetal consequences. So, remains the question, when does a placental structural anomaly become a sign of increased attention to maternal conditions, fetal development and well-being? The present review will analyze these concepts, with emphasis on placental calcification, its pathogenesis, and the state-of-the-art regarding the influence of this finding on pregnancy outcomes among low-risk pregnant patients.

  14. Artificial oxygen carriers rescue placental hypoxia and improve fetal development in the rat pre-eclampsia model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Heng; Ohta, Hidenobu; Tahara, Yu; Nakamura, Sakiko; Taguchi, Kazuaki; Nakagawa, Machiko; Oishi, Yoshihisa; Goto, Yu-ichi; Wada, Keiji; Kaga, Makiko; Inagaki, Masumi; Otagiri, Masaki; Yokota, Hideo; Shibata, Shigenobu; Sakai, Hiromi; Okamura, Kunihiro; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2015-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia affects approximately 5% of all pregnant women and remains a major cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. The hypertension associated with pre-eclampsia develops during pregnancy and remits after delivery, suggesting that the placenta is the most likely origin of this disease. The pathophysiology involves insufficient trophoblast invasion, resulting in incomplete narrow placental spiral artery remodeling. Placental insufficiency, which limits the maternal-fetal exchange of gas and nutrients, leads to fetal intrauterine growth restriction. In this study, in our attempt to develop a new therapy for pre-eclampsia, we directly rescued placental and fetal hypoxia with nano-scale size artificial oxygen carriers (hemoglobin vesicles). The present study is the first to demonstrate that artificial oxygen carriers successfully treat placental hypoxia, decrease maternal plasma levels of anti-angiogenic proteins and ameliorate fetal growth restriction in the pre-eclampsia rat model. PMID:26471339

  15. An international network (PlaNet) to evaluate a human placental testing platform for chemicals safety testing in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Brownbill, Paul; Chernyavsky, Igor; Bottalico, Barbara; Desoye, Gernot; Hansson, Stefan; Kenna, Gerry; Knudsen, Lisbeth E; Markert, Udo R; Powles-Glover, Nicola; Schneider, Henning; Leach, Lopa

    2016-09-01

    The human placenta is a critical life-support system that nourishes and protects a rapidly growing fetus; a unique organ, species specific in structure and function. We consider the pressing challenge of providing additional advice on the safety of prescription medicines and environmental exposures in pregnancy and how ex vivo and in vitro human placental models might be advanced to reproducible human placental test systems (HPTSs), refining a weight of evidence to the guidance given around compound risk assessment during pregnancy. The placental pharmacokinetics of xenobiotic transfer, dysregulated placental function in pregnancy-related pathologies and influx/efflux transporter polymorphisms are a few caveats that could be addressed by HPTSs, not the specific focus of current mammalian reproductive toxicology systems. An international consortium, "PlaNet", will bridge academia, industry and regulators to consider screen ability and standardisation issues surrounding these models, with proven reproducibility for introduction into industrial and clinical practice.

  16. An international network (PlaNet) to evaluate a human placental testing platform for chemicals safety testing in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Brownbill, Paul; Chernyavsky, Igor; Bottalico, Barbara; Desoye, Gernot; Hansson, Stefan; Kenna, Gerry; Knudsen, Lisbeth E; Markert, Udo R; Powles-Glover, Nicola; Schneider, Henning; Leach, Lopa

    2016-09-01

    The human placenta is a critical life-support system that nourishes and protects a rapidly growing fetus; a unique organ, species specific in structure and function. We consider the pressing challenge of providing additional advice on the safety of prescription medicines and environmental exposures in pregnancy and how ex vivo and in vitro human placental models might be advanced to reproducible human placental test systems (HPTSs), refining a weight of evidence to the guidance given around compound risk assessment during pregnancy. The placental pharmacokinetics of xenobiotic transfer, dysregulated placental function in pregnancy-related pathologies and influx/efflux transporter polymorphisms are a few caveats that could be addressed by HPTSs, not the specific focus of current mammalian reproductive toxicology systems. An international consortium, "PlaNet", will bridge academia, industry and regulators to consider screen ability and standardisation issues surrounding these models, with proven reproducibility for introduction into industrial and clinical practice. PMID:27327413

  17. The effect of maternal nutritional status during mid-gestation on placental characteristics in ewes.

    PubMed

    Sen, U; Sirin, E; Kuran, M

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of maternal nutritional status during mid-gestation on placental characteristics in ewes. Time of estrus of 3-5 years old Karayaka breed ewes was synchronized and mating was monitored to determine the day 0 of gestation. The ewes had similar body weights (47.8±0.7kg) and loin eye muscle values (thickness; 20.9±1.0mm and fat thickness; 4.7±0.5mm) at mating. The ewes were allocated into two treatment groups at day 30 of gestation; under-fed (UF; n=12) and well-fed (WF; n=13) groups. The ewes in UF group were fed with a diet to provide 50% of their daily requirement from day 30 to day 80 of gestation and 100% of their daily requirement during the rest of the gestation period. The ewes in WF group were fed at least 100% of their daily requirement throughout gestation. The singleton bearing ewes in the UF group had a lesser (P<0.05) placental weight (354.1 compared with 378.3g), average cotyledon weight (1.50 compared with 1.82g) and lamb birth weight (3.8 compared with 4.2kg) than singleton bearing ewes in the WF group. There were positive correlations between placental weight and lamb birth weight (r=.469; P<0.05), placental weight and average cotyledon weight (r=.695; P<0.01), average cotyledon weight and lamb birth weight (r=.742; P<0.01) and placental efficiency and cotyledon density (r=.853; P<0.01) for ewes in WF group. Additionally, the pattern of weight gain/loss was different (P<0.05) between the two groups. Ewes in UF group lost body weight progressively from day 30 of gestation until day 80. The results of present study show that under-feeding of ewes during mid-gestation may cause an insufficient placental development and hence alter fetal development resulting in a reduced birth weight from singleton pregnancies.

  18. Prenatal smoke exposure: effects on infant auditory system and placental gene expression.

    PubMed

    Katbamna, Bharti; Klutz, Nicole; Pudrith, Charles; Lavery, J Patrick; Ide, Charles F

    2013-01-01

    Prenatal smoke exposure has been shown to change cochlear echo response amplitudes and auditory brainstem response (ABR) wave latencies in newborns. Since gene expression changes are often synchronized in different tissue types, the goal of the present work was to determine the relationships between prenatal smoke exposure induced changes in hearing responses with changes in placental gene expression. Results showed significant cotinine level elevations in mothers who smoked ≥10cigarettes/day during their pregnancy compared to no detectable cotinine in nonsmoking mothers. Cochlear echo response amplitudes in the 2-8kHz range and ABR wave latencies, specifically wave V and interpeak interval I-V, were also significantly reduced in newborns of smoking mothers. Functional pathway analysis of upregulated placental genes using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) online software showed significant enrichment of terms associated with neurodevelopmental processes including glutamatergic and cholinergic systems and a number of wingless type proteins in the top two tiers with corrected enrichment p-values of ≤0.05. Other relevant functional pathways were significant at unadjusted enrichment p-values of 0.001-0.11 and included calcium signaling, neurotransmission/neurological processes and oxidative stress. The neurological process clusters included 7 genes (EML2, OTOR, SLC26A5, TBL1X, TECTA, USH1C and USH1G) known to modulate cochlear outer hair cell motility. We localized proteins encoded by the top two regulated genes, TBL1X and USH1C, using immunohistochemistry to placental stem and anchoring villi associated with active contractile function. These placental genes may mediate active contraction and relaxation in the placental villi, for example, during maternal-fetal perfusion matching, similar to the active lengthening and shortening of the cochlear outer hair cells during sensory transduction. Thus, the functional consequence

  19. Severe preeclampsia is characterized by increased placental expression of galectin-1

    PubMed Central

    Than, Nandor Gabor; Erez, Offer; Wildman, Derek E.; Tarca, Adi L.; Edwin, Samuel S.; Abbas, Asad; Hotra, John; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Gotsch, Francesca; Hassan, Sonia S.; Espinoza, Jimmy; Papp, Zoltan; Romero, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Objective Galectin-1 is a major anti-inflammatory protein expressed by the placenta and immune cells that can bias the character of inflammatory responses toward the Th2 type. Galectin-1 is expressed in immune privileged sites, it can facilitate immune tolerance and tumor immune escape, and it has been successfully used for the suppression of experimental autoimmune diseases as well as graft versus host disease in murine models. We propose that an abnormal immune response in some pregnancy complications may be associated with changes in placental expression of galectin-1. To test this hypothesis, we studied placental galectin-1 mRNA and protein expression and localization in women with preeclampsia (PE) and in those who delivered a small-for-gestational age (SGA) neonate. Study design This cross-sectional study included pregnant women matched for gestational age at delivery in the following groups: 1) severe PE (n=10); 2) severe PE complicated with SGA (n=10); 3) SGA without PE (n=10); and 4) controls (n=10). Galectin-1 mRNA and protein were localized in placentas by in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence microscopy. Galectin-1 mRNA expression was determined by quantitative real-time RT-PCR, and galectin-1 protein content by Western blot. Non-parametric statistics were used for analysis. Results 1) In normal term placentas, galectin-1 mRNA or immunofluorescence signals were detected in the trophoblasts, villous stromal cells, Hofbauer cells, endothelial cells of the villous blood vessels,,and the villous stroma. 2) Placental galectin-1 mRNA expression was significantly higher in severe PE (with or without SGA) than in controls (1.47 fold, p=0.004; 1.44 fold, p=0.003; respectively] and in SGA (1.68 fold, p=0.001; 1.64 fold, p=0.001; respectively]. 3) Trophoblasts in placentas of patients with severe PE had the most intense galectin-1 immunostaining. Conclusion 1) We report for the first time the placental expression and localization of galectin-1 mRNA and

  20. High avidity antibodies to full-length VAR2CSA correlate with absence of placental malaria.

    PubMed

    Tutterrow, Yeung Lo; Salanti, Ali; Avril, Marion; Smith, Joseph D; Pagano, Ian S; Ako, Simon; Fogako, Josephine; Leke, Rose G F; Taylor, Diane Wallace

    2012-01-01

    VAR2CSA mediates sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes in the placenta, increasing the risk of poor pregnancy outcomes. Naturally acquired antibodies (Ab) to placental parasites at delivery have been associated with improved pregnancy outcomes, but Ab levels and how early in pregnancy Ab must be present in order to eliminate placental parasites before delivery remains unknown. Antibodies to individual Duffy-binding like domains of VAR2CSA have been studied, but the domains lack many of the conformational epitopes present in full-length VAR2CSA (FV2). Thus, the purpose of this study was to describe the acquisition of Ab to FV2 in women residing in high and low transmission areas and determine how Ab levels during pregnancy correlate with clearance of placental parasites. Plasma samples collected monthly throughout pregnancy from pregnant women living in high and low transmission areas in Cameroon were evaluated for Ab to FV2 and the proportion of high avidity Ab (i.e., Ab that remain bound in the presence of 3M NH(4)SCN) was assessed. Ab levels and proportion of high avidity Ab were compared between women with placental malaria (PM(+)) and those without (PM(-)) at delivery. Results showed that PM(-) women had significantly higher Ab levels (p = 0.0047) and proportion of high avidity Ab (p = 0.0009) than PM(+) women throughout pregnancy. Specifically, women with moderate to high Ab levels (>5,000 MFI) and those with ≥ 35% high avidity Ab at 5-6 months were found to have 2.3 (95% CI, 1.0-4.9) and 7.6-fold (p = 0.0013, 95% CI: 1.2-50.0) reduced risk of placental malaria, respectively. These data show that high levels of Ab to FV2, particularly those with high avidity for FV2, produced by mid-pregnancy are important in clearing parasites from the placenta. Both high Ab levels and proportion of high avidity Ab to FV2 may serve as correlates of protection for assessing immunity against placental malaria. PMID:22761948

  1. Molecular phylogeny of living xenarthrans and the impact of character and taxon sampling on the placental tree rooting.

    PubMed

    Delsuc, Frédéric; Scally, Mark; Madsen, Ole; Stanhope, Michael J; de Jong, Wilfried W; Catzeflis, François M; Springer, Mark S; Douzery, Emmanuel J P

    2002-10-01

    Extant xenarthrans (armadillos, anteaters and sloths) are among the most derived placental mammals ever evolved. South America was the cradle of their evolutionary history. During the Tertiary, xenarthrans experienced an extraordinary radiation, whereas South America remained isolated from other continents. The 13 living genera are relics of this earlier diversification and represent one of the four major clades of placental mammals. Sequences of the three independent protein-coding nuclear markers alpha2B adrenergic receptor (ADRA2B), breast cancer susceptibility (BRCA1), and von Willebrand Factor (VWF) were determined for 12 of the 13 living xenarthran genera. Comparative evolutionary dynamics of these nuclear exons using a likelihood framework revealed contrasting patterns of molecular evolution. All codon positions of BRCA1 were shown to evolve in a strikingly similar manner, and third codon positions appeared less saturated within placentals than those of ADRA2B and VWF. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses of a 47 placental taxa data set rooted by three marsupial outgroups resolved the phylogeny of Xenarthra with some evidence for two radiation events in armadillos and provided a strongly supported picture of placental interordinal relationships. This topology was fully compatible with recent studies, dividing placentals into the Southern Hemisphere clades Afrotheria and Xenarthra and a monophyletic Northern Hemisphere clade (Boreoeutheria) composed of Laurasiatheria and Euarchontoglires. Partitioned likelihood statistical tests of the position of the root, under different character partition schemes, identified three almost equally likely hypotheses for early placental divergences: a basal Afrotheria, an Afrotheria + Xenarthra clade, or a basal Xenarthra (Epitheria hypothesis). We took advantage of the extensive sampling realized within Xenarthra to assess its impact on the location of the root on the placental tree. By resampling taxa

  2. Facilitated transporters mediate net efflux of amino acids to the fetus across the basal membrane of the placental syncytiotrophoblast.

    PubMed

    Cleal, J K; Glazier, J D; Ntani, G; Crozier, S R; Day, P E; Harvey, N C; Robinson, S M; Cooper, C; Godfrey, K M; Hanson, M A; Lewis, R M

    2011-02-15

    Fetal growth depends on placental transfer of amino acids from maternal to fetal blood. The mechanisms of net amino acid efflux across the basal membrane (BM) of the placental syncytiotrophoblast to the fetus, although vital for amino acid transport, are poorly understood. We examined the hypothesis that facilitated diffusion by the amino acid transporters TAT1, LAT3 and LAT4 plays an important role in this process, with possible effects on fetal growth. Amino acid transfer was measured in isolated perfused human placental cotyledons (n = 5 per experiment) using techniques which distinguish between different transport processes. Placental TAT1, LAT3 and LAT4 proteins were measured, and mRNA expression levels (measured using real-time quantitative-PCR) were related to fetal and neonatal anthropometry and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry measurements of neonatal lean mass in 102 Southampton Women's Survey (SWS) infants. Under conditions preventing transport by amino acid exchangers, all amino acids appearing in the fetal circulation were substrates of TAT1, LAT3 or LAT4. Western blots demonstrated the presence of TAT1, LAT3 and LAT4 in placental BM preparations. Placental TAT1 and LAT3 mRNA expression were positively associated with measures of fetal growth in SWS infants (P < 0.05). We provide evidence that the efflux transporters TAT1, LAT3 and LAT4 are present in the human placental BM, and may play an important role in the net efflux of amino acids to the fetus. Unlike other transporters they can increase fetal amino acid concentrations. Consistent with a role in placental amino acid transfer capacity and fetal growth TAT1 and LAT3 mRNA expression showed positive associations with infant size at birth.

  3. Induction of placental heme oxygenase-1 is protective against TNFalpha-induced cytotoxicity and promotes vessel relaxation.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, A.; Rahman, M.; Zhang, X.; Acevedo, C. H.; Nijjar, S.; Rushton, I.; Bussolati, B.; St John, J.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pregnancy is characterized by an inflammatory-like process and this may be exacerbated in preeclampsia. The heme oxygenase (HO) enzymes generate carbon monoxide (CO) that induces blood vessel relaxation and biliverdin that acts as an endogenous antioxidant. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We examined the expression and localization of HO-1 and HO-2 in normal and preeclamptic placenta using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), RNase protection assay, immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. In addition, the effect of HO activation on tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) induced placental damage and on feto-placental circulation was studied. RESULTS: We provide the first evidence for the role of HO as an endogenous placental factor involved with cytoprotection and placental blood vessel relaxation. HO-1 was significantly higher at term, compared with first trimester placentae indicating its role in placental vascular development and regulation. HO-1 predominantly localized in the extravascular connective tissue that forms the perivascular contractile sheath around the developing blood vessels. HO-2 was localized in the capillaries, as well as the villous stroma, with weak staining of trophoblast. Induction of HO-1 caused a significant attenuation of TNFalpha-mediated cellular damage in placental villous explants, as assessed by lactate dehydrogenase leakage (p < 0.01). HO-1 protein was significantly reduced in placentae from pregnancies complicated with preeclampsia, compared with gestationally matched normal pregnancies. This suggests that the impairment of HO-1 activation may compromise the compensatory mechanism and predispose the placenta to cellular injury and subsequent maternal endothelial cell activation. Isometric contractility studies showed that hemin reduced vascular tension by 61% in U46619-preconstricted placental arteries. Hemin-induced vessel relaxation and CO production was inhibited by HO inhibitor, tin protoporphyrin IX

  4. Automated vasculature extraction from placenta images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almoussa, Nizar; Dutra, Brittany; Lampe, Bryce; Getreuer, Pascal; Wittman, Todd; Salafia, Carolyn; Vese, Luminita

    2011-03-01

    Recent research in perinatal pathology argues that analyzing properties of the placenta may reveal important information on how certain diseases progress. One important property is the structure of the placental blood vessels, which supply a fetus with all of its oxygen and nutrition. An essential step in the analysis of the vascular network pattern is the extraction of the blood vessels, which has only been done manually through a costly and time-consuming process. There is no existing method to automatically detect placental blood vessels; in addition, the large variation in the shape, color, and texture of the placenta makes it difficult to apply standard edge-detection algorithms. We describe a method to automatically detect and extract blood vessels from a given image by using image processing techniques and neural networks. We evaluate several local features for every pixel, in addition to a novel modification to an existing road detector. Pixels belonging to blood vessel regions have recognizable responses; hence, we use an artificial neural network to identify the pattern of blood vessels. A set of images where blood vessels are manually highlighted is used to train the network. We then apply the neural network to recognize blood vessels in new images. The network is effective in capturing the most prominent vascular structures of the placenta.

  5. Influence of relative NK–DC abundance on placentation and its relation to epigenetic programming in the offspring

    PubMed Central

    Freitag, N; Zwier, M V; Barrientos, G; Tirado-González, I; Conrad, M L; Rose, M; Scherjon, S A; Plösch, T; Blois, S M

    2014-01-01

    Normal placentation relies on an efficient maternal adaptation to pregnancy. Within the decidua, natural killer (NK) cells and dendritic cells (DC) have a critical role in modulating angiogenesis and decidualization associated with pregnancy. However, the contribution of these immune cells to the placentation process and subsequently fetal development remains largely elusive. Using two different mouse models, we here show that optimal placentation and fetal development is sensitive to disturbances in NK cell relative abundance at the fetal–maternal interface. Depletion of NK cells during early gestation compromises the placentation process by causing alteration in placental function and structure. Embryos derived from NK-depleted dams suffer from intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), a phenomenon that continued to be evident in the offspring on post-natal day 4. Further, we demonstrate that IUGR was accompanied by an overall reduction of global DNA methylation levels and epigenetic changes in the methylation of specific hepatic gene promoters. Thus, temporary changes within the NK cell pool during early gestation influence placental development and function, subsequently affecting hepatic gene methylation and fetal metabolism. PMID:25165878

  6. Regulation of leptin expression by 17beta-estradiol in human placental cells involves membrane associated estrogen receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Gambino, Yésica P; Pérez Pérez, Antonio; Dueñas, José L; Calvo, Juan Carlos; Sánchez-Margalet, Víctor; Varone, Cecilia L

    2012-04-01

    The placenta produces a wide number of molecules that play essential roles in the establishment and maintenance of pregnancy. In this context, leptin has emerged as an important player in reproduction. The synthesis of leptin in normal trophoblastic cells is regulated by different endogenous biochemical agents, but the regulation of placental leptin expression is still poorly understood. We have previously reported that 17β-estradiol (E(2)) up-regulates placental leptin expression. To improve the understanding of estrogen receptor mechanisms in regulating leptin gene expression, in the current study we examined the effect of membrane-constrained E(2) conjugate, E-BSA, on leptin expression in human placental cells. We have found that leptin expression was induced by E-BSA both in BeWo cells and human placental explants, suggesting that E(2) also exerts its effects through membrane receptors. Moreover E-BSA rapidly activated different MAPKs and AKT pathways, and these pathways were involved in E(2) induced placental leptin expression. On the other hand we demonstrated the presence of ERα associated to the plasma membrane of BeWo cells. We showed that E(2) genomic and nongenomic actions could be mediated by ERα. Supporting this idea, the downregulation of ERα level through a specific siRNA, decreased E-BSA effects on leptin expression. Taken together, these results provide new evidence of the mechanisms whereby E(2) regulates leptin expression in placenta and support the importance of leptin in placental physiology.

  7. Fetal hydantoin syndrome: inhibition of placental folic acid transport as a potential mechanism for fetal growth retardation in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Will, M.; Barnard, J.A.; Said, H.M.; Ghishan, F.K.

    1985-04-01

    Maternal hydantoin ingestion during pregnancy results in a well defined clinical entity termed ''fetal hydantoin syndrome''. The clinical characteristics of this syndrome includes growth retardation, and congenital anomalies. Because folic acid is essential for protein synthesis and growth, and since hydantoin interferes with intestinal transport of folic acid, the authors postulated that part of the fetal hydantoin syndrome may be due to inhibition of placental folic acid by maternal hydantoin. Therefore, they studied in vivo placental folate transport in a well-established model for fetal hydantoin syndrome in the rat. Our results indicate that maternal hydantoin ingestion, significantly decreased fetal weight and placental and fetal uptake of folate compared to controls. To determine whether maternal hydantoin ingestion has a generalized or specific effect on placental function, they examined placental and fetal zinc transport in the same model. Our results indicate that zinc transport is not altered by hydantoin ingestion. They conclude that maternal hydantoin ingestion results in fetal growth retardation which may be due in part to inhibition of placental folate transport.

  8. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Co-Infection Increases Placental Parasite Density and Transplacental Malaria Transmission in Western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Perrault, Steven D.; Hajek, Jan; Zhong, Kathleen; Owino, Simon O.; Sichangi, Moses; Smith, Geoffrey; Shi, Ya Ping; Moore, Julie M.; Kain, Kevin C.

    2009-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 adversely interact in the context of pregnancy, however little is known regarding the influence of co-infection on the risk of congenital malaria. We aimed to determine the prevalence of placental and congenital malaria and impact of HIV co-infection on transplacental malaria transmission in 157 parturient women and their infants by microscopy and by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in western Kenya. The prevalence of placental and cord blood infections were 17.2% and 0% by microscopy, and 33.1% and 10.8% by PCR. HIV co-infection w as associated with a significant increase in placental parasite density (P < 0.05). Cord blood malaria prevalence was increased in co-infected women (odds ratio [OR] = 5.42; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.90–15.47) and correlated with placental parasite density (OR = 2.57; 95% CI = 1.80–3.67). A 1-log increase in placental monocyte count was associated with increased risk of congenital infection (P = 0.001) (OR = 48.15; 95% CI = 4.59–505.50). The HIV co-infected women have a significantly increased burden of placental malaria that increases the risk of congenital infection. PMID:19141849

  9. Placental alkaline phosphatase isoenzyme expression by the non-HeLa DoT cervical-carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Kottel, R H; Fishman, W H

    1981-01-01

    Expression of the oncodevelopmental protein, placental alkaline phosphatase, was observed in DoT cells, an epidermoid cell line derived from cervical carcinoma. Under normal conditions of growth in vitro, biochemical inhibition, cytochemical and immunological studies revealed that these cells express the term-placental (Regan) isoenzyme. Thus alkaline phosphatase activity was observed to be heat-stable and inhibited by L-phenylalanine. These properties, supported by immunoelectrophoretic analysis using antisera specific for liver, intestinal or term-placental isoenzymes, identified the isoenzyme as placental type. DoT cells treated with prednisolone (1 microgram/ml) increased total alkaline phosphatase specific activity. This activity was also identified as term-placental phosphatase isoenzyme. On the other hand, treatment of the same cells with sodium butyrate (1 mM) did not induce increased activity of the term-placental isoenzyme, an unexpected observation. As a result of these studies, DoT cells are proposed as a representative cell line for studies of the regulation of oncodevelopmental gene expression in human tumour cells of cervical origin. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:7342975

  10. Nucleotide and amino acid sequences of human intestinal alkaline phosphatase: close homology to placental alkaline phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Henthorn, P.S.; Raducha, M.; Edwards, Y.H.; Weiss, M.J.; Slaughter, C.; Lafferty, M.A.; Harris, H.

    1987-03-01

    A cDNA clone for human adult intestinal alkaline phosphatase (ALP) (orthophosphoric-monoester phosphohydrolase (alkaline optimum); EC 3.1.3.1) was isolated from a lambdagt11 expression library. The cDNA insert of this clone is 2513 base pairs in length and contains an open reading frame that encodes a 528-amino acid polypeptide. This deduced polypeptide contains the first 40 amino acids of human intestinal ALP, as determined by direct protein sequencing. Intestinal ALP shows 86.5% amino acid identity to placental (type 1) ALP and 56.6% amino acid identity to liver/bone/kidney ALP. In the 3'-untranslated regions, intestinal and placental ALP cDNAs are 73.5% identical (excluding gaps). The evolution of this multigene enzyme family is discussed.

  11. Reduction of biliverdin and placental transfer of bilirubin and biliverdin in the pregnant guinea pig.

    PubMed Central

    McDonagh, A F; Palma, L A; Schmid, R

    1981-01-01

    Biliverdin was reduced to bilirubin in pregnant and foetal guinea pigs, and the 100000 g supernatant from homogenates of foetal liver, placenta and maternal liver showed high biliverdin reductase activity. The placental transport of unconjugated bilirubin and biliverdin was compared by injecting unlabelled and radiolabelled pigments into the foetal or maternal circulation and analysing blood collected from the opposite side of the placenta. Injected bilirubin crossed the placenta from foetus to mother and vice versa, but injected biliverdin did not appear to cross without prior reduction to bilirubin. The guinea-pig placenta is apparently more permeable to bilirubin than biliverdin. Reduction of biliverdin to bilirubin in the foetus may, therefore, be essential for efficient elimination of haem catabolites from the foetus in placental mammals. PMID:7305981

  12. Afterbirths in the afterlife: cultural meaning of placental disposal in a Hmong American community.

    PubMed

    Helsel, Deborah G; Mochel, Marilyn

    2002-10-01

    Interviews were conducted with 94 Hmong Americans in California's Central Valley to explore attitudes regarding placental disposition and the cultural values that affect those attitudes. Research indicated a persistence of the traditional belief that placentas should be buried at home. The placenta is perceived to be essential for travel by the soul of the deceased into the spirit world to rejoin ancestors. Older respondents (older than age 35) and those who self-identified as animists were most likely to believe in the importance of home placental burial. Comments by respondents indicated some reluctance on the part of Hmong patients to ask health care providers for permission to take placentas home. Incorporating non-Western patients' traditional health care practices into Western health care delivery may be facilitated by an awareness of the reluctance of some patients to verbalize their wishes.

  13. [Imbalance of system of glutamin - glutamic acid in the placenta and amniotic fluid at placental insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Pogorelova, T N; Gunko, V O; Linde, V A

    2014-01-01

    Metabolism of glutamine and glutamic acid has been investigated in the placenta and amniotic fluid under conditions of placental insufficiency. The development of placental insufficiency is characterized by the increased content of glutamic acid and a decrease of glutamine in both placenta and amniotic fluid. These changes changes were accompanied by changes in the activity of enzymes involved in the metabolism of these amino acids. There was a decrease in glutamate dehydrogenase activity and an increase in glutaminase activity with the simultaneous decrease of glutamine synthetase activity. The compensatory decrease in the activity of glutamine keto acid aminotransferase did not prevent a decrease in the glutamine level. The impairments in the system glutamic acid-glutamine were more pronounced during the development of premature labor.

  14. Altered cytokine network in gestational diabetes mellitus affects maternal insulin and placental-fetal development.

    PubMed

    Wedekind, Lauren; Belkacemi, Louiza

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy is characterized by an altered inflammatory profile, compared to the non-pregnant state with an adequate balance between pro-and anti-inflammatory cytokines needed for normal development. Cytokines are small secreted proteins expressed mainly in immunocompetent cells in the reproductive system. From early developmental stages onward, the secretory activity of placenta cells clearly contributes to increase local as well as systemic levels of cytokines. The placental production of cytokines may affect mother and fetus independently. In turn because of this unique position at the maternal fetal interface, the placenta is also exposed to the regulatory influence of cytokines from maternal and fetal circulations, and hence, may be affected by changes in any of these. Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is associated with an overall alteration of the cytokine network. This review discusses the changes that occur in cytokines post GDM and their negative effects on maternal insulin and placental-fetal development. PMID:27230834

  15. A murine model for the assessment of placental and fetal development in teratogenicity studies.

    PubMed

    Hau, J; Basse, A; Wolstrup, C

    1987-01-01

    During normal pregnancy in the mouse, maternal serum levels of the analogues to human schwangerschaftsprotein-1 and alpha-fetoprotein correlate significantly with the growth of the placenta and fetus respectively. This relationship has been utilized in the analysis of the effect of sodium selenite on placental and fetal growth in mice. Moderate doses of sodium selenite did not affect the growth of the placenta and fetus significantly, whereas high doses of selenite resulted in a large percentage of abortions. The protein markers were found to be useful in the prediction of placental and fetal growth, and they are suggested to be of general use in the study of the impact of teratogenic substances, since they reflect the status of the fetoplacental mass during gestation.

  16. Comparison of ultrasonic and direct biparietal diameter measurements and placental localization.

    PubMed

    Staisch, K J; Cumberland, W G; Hammill, H; Geck, D

    1984-01-01

    The accuracy of fetal biparietal diameter (BPD) measurements and placental localizations performed by physicians in a university hospital obstetrical service using real-time ultrasound equipment was determined. The sonographic estimations were compared to caliper measurements on the neonate and to the implantation site of the placenta found at surgery in 40 patients undergoing repeat cesarean section. The correlation coefficient 0.93 and p less than 0.00001 indicate high agreement between the BPD measurements. The regression of caliper on sonar measurements gave 95% prediction intervals of +/- 3.50 mm compared to +/- 2.4 mm calculated from data reported by ultrasonic laboratories. Placental localization was in error in 5.9% of the cases. Thus, physicians should be aware that their errors are likely to be larger than those which have been published by experts in ultrasound diagnosis.

  17. Histological Appearance of Placental Solomonization in the Treatment of Twin–Twin Transfusion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Emery, Stephen P.; Nguyen, Lananh; Parks, W. Tony

    2016-01-01

    Background Placental laser equatorialization or “solomonization” during treatment for twin–twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) is associated with improved pregnancy outcomes. Concern exists, however, about the extent of placental injury caused by the technique, and of its ability to create “dichorionization,” or complete separation of the fetal vascular circuits. Case Study A “solomonized” placenta was histologically examined for depth of cell damage. Solomonization produces complete devascularization of the chorionic plate, but has minimal effect on the underlying villi. The median depth of the effect was 2,823 µm, or < 3 mm. Conclusion Solomonization produces complete devascularization of the chorionic plate, but has little effect on the underlying villi. “Dichorionization” is therefore not achieved. Ongoing surveillance of treated pregnancies is warranted. PMID:27127717

  18. Neutrophil Depletion Attenuates Placental Ischemia-Induced Hypertension in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Regal, Jean F.; Lillegard, Kathryn E.; Bauer, Ashley J.; Elmquist, Barbara J.; Loeks-Johnson, Alex C.; Gilbert, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Preeclampsia is characterized by reduced placental perfusion with placental ischemia and hypertension during pregnancy. Preeclamptic women also exhibit a heightened inflammatory state and greater number of neutrophils in the vasculature compared to normal pregnancy. Since neutrophils are associated with tissue injury and inflammation, we hypothesized that neutrophils are critical to placental ischemia-induced hypertension and fetal demise. Using the reduced uteroplacental perfusion pressure (RUPP) model of placental ischemia-induced hypertension in the rat, we determined the effect of neutrophil depletion on blood pressure and fetal resorptions. Neutrophils were depleted with repeated injections of polyclonal rabbit anti-rat polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) antibody (antiPMN). Rats received either antiPMN or normal rabbit serum (Control) on 13.5, 15.5, 17.5, and 18.5 days post conception (dpc). On 14.5 dpc, rats underwent either Sham surgery or clip placement on ovarian arteries and abdominal aorta to reduce uterine perfusion pressure (RUPP). On 18.5 dpc, carotid arterial catheters were placed and mean arterial pressure (MAP) was measured on 19.5 dpc. Neutrophil-depleted rats had reduced circulating neutrophils from 14.5 to 19.5 dpc compared to Control, as well as decreased neutrophils in lung and placenta on 19.5 dpc. MAP increased in RUPP Control vs Sham Control rats, and neutrophil depletion attenuated this increase in MAP in RUPP rats without any effect on Sham rats. The RUPP-induced increase in fetal resorptions and complement activation product C3a were not affected by neutrophil depletion. Thus, these data are the first to indicate that neutrophils play an important role in RUPP hypertension and that cells of the innate immune system may significantly contribute to pregnancy-induced hypertension. PMID:26135305

  19. Comparison of 2-D and 3-D estimates of placental volume in early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Aye, Christina Y L; Stevenson, Gordon N; Impey, Lawrence; Collins, Sally L

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound estimation of placental volume (PlaV) between 11 and 13 wk has been proposed as part of a screening test for small-for-gestational-age babies. A semi-automated 3-D technique, validated against the gold standard of manual delineation, has been found at this stage of gestation to predict small-for-gestational-age at term. Recently, when used in the third trimester, an estimate obtained using a 2-D technique was found to correlate with placental weight at delivery. Given its greater simplicity, the 2-D technique might be more useful as part of an early screening test. We investigated if the two techniques produced similar results when used in the first trimester. The correlation between PlaV values calculated by the two different techniques was assessed in 139 first-trimester placentas. The agreement on PlaV and derived "standardized placental volume," a dimensionless index correcting for gestational age, was explored with the Mann-Whitney test and Bland-Altman plots. Placentas were categorized into five different shape subtypes, and a subgroup analysis was performed. Agreement was poor for both PlaV and standardized PlaV (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001), with the 2-D technique yielding larger estimates for both indices compared with the 3-D method. The mean difference in standardized PlaV values between the two methods was 0.007 (95% confidence interval: 0.006-0.009). The best agreement was found for regular rectangle-shaped placentas (p = 0.438 and p = 0.408). The poor correlation between the 2-D and 3-D techniques may result from the heterogeneity of placental morphology at this stage of gestation. In early gestation, the simpler 2-D estimates of PlaV do not correlate strongly with those obtained with the validated 3-D technique.

  20. Placental Nitrosative Stress and Exposure to Ambient Air Pollution During Gestation: A Population Study.

    PubMed

    Saenen, Nelly D; Vrijens, Karen; Janssen, Bram G; Madhloum, Narjes; Peusens, Martien; Gyselaers, Wilfried; Vanpoucke, Charlotte; Lefebvre, Wouter; Roels, Harry A; Nawrot, Tim S

    2016-09-15

    The placenta plays a crucial role in fetal growth and development through adaptive responses to perturbations of the maternal environment. We investigated the association between placental 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NTp), a biomarker of oxidative stress, and exposure to air pollutants during various time windows of pregnancy. We measured the placental 3-NTp levels of 330 mother-newborn pairs enrolled in the Environmental Influence on Ageing in Early Life (ENVIRONAGE) Study, a Belgian birth cohort study (2010-2013). Daily concentrations of particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5 µm (PM2.5), black carbon (BC), and nitrogen dioxide were interpolated for each mother's residence using a spatiotemporal interpolation method. Placental 3-NTp levels, adjusted for covariates, increased by 35.0% (95% confidence interval (CI): 13.9, 60.0) for each interquartile-range increment in entire-pregnancy PM2.5 exposure. The corresponding estimate for BC exposure was 13.9% (95% CI: -0.21, 29.9). These results were driven by the first (PM2.5: 29.0% (95% CI: 4.9, 58.6); BC: 23.6% (95% CI: 4.4, 46.4)) and second (PM2.5: 39.3% (95% CI: 12.3, 72.7)) gestational exposure windows. This link between placental nitrosative stress and exposure to fine particle air pollution during gestation is in line with experimental evidence on cigarette smoke and diesel exhaust exposure. Further research is needed to elucidate potential health consequences experienced later in life through particle-mediated nitrosative stress incurred during fetal life.

  1. Mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate induces oxidative stress responses in human placental cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Tetz, Lauren M.; Cheng, Adrienne A.; Korte, Cassandra S.; Giese, Roger W.; Wang, Poguang; Harris, Craig; Meeker, John D.; Loch-Caruso, Rita

    2013-04-01

    Di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) is an environmental contaminant commonly used as a plasticizer in polyvinyl chloride products. Exposure to DEHP has been linked to adverse pregnancy outcomes in humans including preterm birth, low birth-weight, and pregnancy loss. Although oxidative stress is linked to the pathology of adverse pregnancy outcomes, effects of DEHP metabolites, including the active metabolite, mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP), on oxidative stress responses in placental cells have not been previously evaluated. The objective of the current study is to identify MEHP-stimulated oxidative stress responses in human placental cells. We treated a human placental cell line, HTR-8/SVneo, with MEHP and then measured reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation using the dichlorofluorescein assay, oxidized thymine with mass-spectrometry, redox-sensitive gene expression with qRT-PCR, and apoptosis using a luminescence assay for caspase 3/7 activity. Treatment of HTR-8 cells with 180 μM MEHP increased ROS generation, oxidative DNA damage, and caspase 3/7 activity, and resulted in differential expression of redox-sensitive genes. Notably, 90 and 180 μM MEHP significantly induced mRNA expression of prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2), an enzyme important for synthesis of prostaglandins implicated in initiation of labor. The results from the present study are the first to demonstrate that MEHP stimulates oxidative stress responses in placental cells. Furthermore, the MEHP concentrations used were within an order of magnitude of the highest concentrations measured previously in human umbilical cord or maternal serum. The findings from the current study warrant future mechanistic studies of oxidative stress, apoptosis, and prostaglandins as molecular mediators of DEHP/MEHP-associated adverse pregnancy outcomes. - Highlights: ► MEHP increased reactive oxygen species, oxidative DNA damage, and caspase activity. ► MEHP induced expression of PTGS2, a gene

  2. Placental characteristics of monochorionic diamniotic twin pregnancies in relation to perinatal outcome.

    PubMed

    Hack, K E A; Nikkels, P G J; Koopman-Esseboom, C; Derks, J B; Elias, S G; van Gemert, M J C; Visser, G H A

    2008-11-01

    To study placental characteristics in relation to perinatal outcome in 150 pairs of monochorionic diamniotic (MCDA) twins. Between January 1998 and January 2007 150 pairs of MCDA twins were delivered in the University Medical Center, Utrecht, The Netherlands. Mortality, neonatal morbidity and birth weight discordancy were studied in relation to type of anastomoses, type and distance between cord insertions and placental sharing. From 14 weeks onwards, there were 45 (15.0%) perinatal deaths. We found no clear relationship between perinatal mortality and type of anastomoses, distance between cord insertions and placental sharing. Perinatal mortality was significantly increased in the presence of velamentous cord insertion (OR 3.65, 95% CI 1.83-7.28). Data concerning neonatal morbidity were similar. TTTS occurred predominantly in the presence of AV-anastomoses without compensating superficial AA-anastomoses (p=0.005) and occurred more frequently in the presence of velamentous cord insertion (OR 1.79, 95% CI 0.94-3.44). Twins with unequal shared placentas had significantly more often severe birth weight discordancy, although only in the presence of AA-anastomoses (OR 4.09, 95% CI 1.74-9.63). If AA-anastomoses were absent in the unequally shared placenta, there was no relation between severe birth weight discordancy and unequal sharing of the placenta (OR 1.06, 95% CI 0.08-13.52). In MCDA twins, placental characteristics determine perinatal outcome, occurrence of TTTS and fetal growth. Prenatal identification of these characteristics by ultrasound may alter counselling and intensity of pregnancy surveillance.

  3. Placental changes caused by food restriction during early pregnancy in mice are reversible

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Jennifer L.; Caesar, Gerialisa A.; Pennington, Kathleen A.; Davis, J. Wade; Schulz, Laura Clamon

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study, 50% calorie restriction in mice from days 1.5–11.5 of pregnancy resulted in reduced placental weights and areas, relatively sparing of labyrinth zone area compared to junctional zone area, and dramatic changes in global gene expression profiles. However, little lasting effect was seen on adult offspring of these pregnancies, with a slight reduction in adiposity in males, and some changes in liver gene expression in both sexes. The goals of the present study were to determine whether the placental changes induced by caloric restriction in early pregnancy had permanent, irreversible effects on the placenta, and whether the changes in liver gene expression in adult offspring were present before birth. There were no differences in placental weights or areas, or the areas of individual placental zones near term in mice that had previously been food restricted. Global gene expression profiles at d18.5 were indistinguishable in placentas from control and previously food restricted mothers. In fetuses from restricted dams at d18.5, liver expression of Gck, a key regulator of glycogen synthesis was reduced, whereas its expression was increased in livers from adult offspring of restricted dams. Ppara expression was also reduced in fetal livers from restricted dams at d18.5, but not in adult offspring livers. We conclude that alterations in the placenta caused by nutrient restriction in early pregnancy are reversible, and that alterations in gene expression in livers of adult offspring are not a result of changes initiated during pregnancy and maintained through adulthood. PMID:26060317

  4. Uterine and placental expression of canine oxytocin receptor during pregnancy and normal and induced parturition.

    PubMed

    Gram, A; Boos, A; Kowalewski, M P

    2014-06-01

    Oxytocin (OT) plays an important role as an inducer of uterine contractility, acting together with its receptor (OTR) to increase synthesis of prostaglandins. Although OT is commonly used in the treatment for dystocia and uterine inertia in the bitch, little attention has been paid to the role of OT in mechanisms regulating parturition in the dog, so that knowledge about the expression of OTR in the canine uterus and placenta is sparse. Consequently, the expression and cellular localization of OTR were investigated in canine utero/placental compartments and interplacental sites throughout pregnancy and at normal and antigestagen-induced parturition, by real-time PCR, immunohistochemistry, western blot and in situ hybridization. The utero/placental and interplacental expression of OTR was constant from pre-implantation until mid-gestation, with a significant increase observed at prepartum luteolysis. In antigestagen-treated mid-pregnant dogs, OTR was upregulated in both interplacental and utero/placental samples. Besides clear myometrial signals, cellular localization of OTR was evident in the endometrial surface epithelial, stromal and vascular endothelial cells. Weaker signals were observed in superficial and deep uterine glandular epithelial cells. Placental OTR was localized in maternal decidual cells and capillary pericytes. Finally, OTR was colocalized with the progesterone receptor (PGR) in maternal decidual cells, coinciding with previously reported increased availability of prostaglandins in the foetal part of the placenta during normal and induced parturition. These findings suggest involvement of OTR in the signalling cascade leading to the prepartum release of prostaglandins from the pregnant canine uterus.

  5. In utero tobacco exposure epigenetically modifies placental CYP1A1 expression.

    PubMed

    Suter, Melissa; Abramovici, Adi; Showalter, Lori; Hu, Min; Shope, Cynthia Do; Varner, Michael; Aagaard-Tillery, Kjersti

    2010-10-01

    The metabolic pathways used by higher-eukaryotic organisms to deal with potentially carcinogenic xenobiotic compounds from tobacco smoke have been well characterized. Carcinogenic compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are metabolized sequentially in 2 phases: in phase I, CYP1A1 catalyzes conversion into harmful hydrophilic DNA adducts, whereas in phase II, GSTT1 enables excretion via conjugation into polar electrophiles. In an effort to understand susceptibility to in utero tobacco exposure, we previously characterized known metabolic functional polymorphisms and demonstrated that although deletion of fetal GSTT1 significantly modified birth weight in smokers, no polymorphism fully accounted for fetal growth restriction. Because smoking up-regulates CYP1A1 expression, we hypothesized that nonallelic (epigenetic) dysregulation of placental CYP1A1 expression via alterations in DNA methylation (meCpG) may further modify fetal growth. In the present article, we compared placental expression of multiple CYP family members among gravidae and observed significantly increased CYP1A1 expression among smokers relative to controls (4.4-fold, P < .05). To fully characterize CYP1A1 meCpG status, bisulfite modification and sequencing of the entire proximal 1-kilobase promoter (containing 59 CpG sites) were performed. CpG sites immediately proximal to the 5′-xenobiotic response element transcription factor binding element were significantly hypomethylated among smokers (55.6% vs 45.9% meCpG, P = .027), a finding that uniquely correlated with placental gene expression (r = 0.737, P = .007). Thus, in utero tobacco exposure significantly increases placental CYP1A1 expression in association with differential methylation at a critical xenobiotic response element. PMID:20462615

  6. MyD88 Signaling Is Directly Involved in the Development of Murine Placental Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Barboza, Renato; Reis, Aramys Silva; da Silva, Leandro Gustavo; Hasenkamp, Lutero; Pereira, Keitty Raquel Benevides; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva; Costa, Fabio Trindade Maranhão; Lima, Maria Regina D'Império; Alvarez, José Maria; Boscardin, Silvia Beatriz; Epiphanio, Sabrina

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is a widespread infectious disease caused by the parasite Plasmodium. During pregnancy, malaria infection leads to a range of complications that can affect both the mother and fetus, including stillbirth, infant mortality, and low birth weight. In this study, we utilized a mouse model of placental malaria (PM) infection to determine the importance of the protein MyD88 in the host immune response to Plasmodium during pregnancy. Initially, we demonstrated that Plasmodium berghei NK65GFP adhered to placental tissue via chondroitin sulfate A and induced PM in mice with a C57BL/6 genetic background. To evaluate the involvement of MyD88 in the pathology of PM, we performed a histopathological analysis of placentas obtained from MyD88−/− and wild-type (WT) mice following infection on the 19th gestational day. Our data demonstrated that the detrimental placental alterations observed in the infected mice were correlated with the expression of MyD88. Moreover, in the absence of this protein, production of interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) was significantly reduced in the infected mice. More importantly, in contrast to fetuses from infected WT mice, which exhibited a reduction in body weight, the fetuses from infected MyD88−/− mice did not display significant weight loss compared to their noninfected littermates. In addition, we observed a decrement of maternal care associated with malaria infection, which was attenuated in the MyD88-deficient mice. Collectively, the results of this study illustrate the pivotal importance of the MyD88 signaling pathway in the pathogenesis of placental malaria, thus presenting new possibilities for targeting MyD88 in therapeutic interventions. PMID:24478096

  7. Growth hormone-related genes from baboon (Papio hamadryas): characterization, placental expression and evolutionary aspects

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, Irám Pablo; Tejero, Maria Elizabeth; Cole, Shelley A.; Comuzzie, Anthony G.; Nathanielsz, Peter W.; Wallis, Michael; Barrera-Saldaña, Hugo A.

    2011-01-01

    Pregnancy is a complex physiological condition, and the growth hormone (GH)-related hormones produced in the placenta, which emerged during the evolution of primates, are thought to play an important metabolic role in pregnancy that is not yet fully understood. The aim of this study was to identify the genes and transcription products of the GH family in baboon (Papio hamadryas) and to assess these in relation to the evolution of this gene family. GH-related transcripts were amplified using total RNA from placental tissue, by reverse transcription coupled to polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Three different GH-related transcripts were identified in baboon placental tissue, with two encoding chorionic somatomammotropins (CSH) and one the placental variant of GH (GH-2). The CSH transcripts showed some minor allelic variation, and a splice variant of CSH-C that retains its in-frame third intron. Gene sequences for GH-1 (probably representing the GH gene expressed primarily in the pituitary gland), GH-2 and the two CSHs were identified in the baboon genomic database, together with a CSH-related pseudogene. Phylogenetic analysis of the baboon GH-related sequences, together with those of a related Old World monkey, macaque, and ape outgroup (human), showed the equivalence of the genes in baboon and macaque, and revealed evidence for several episodes of rapid adaptive evolution. Many of the substitutions seen during the evolution of these placental proteins have occurred in the receptor-binding sites, especially site 2, contrasting with the strong conservation of the hydrophobic core. PMID:19651193

  8. Asymptomatic "placental prolapse" with cervical funneling in a patient with complete placenta previa.

    PubMed

    Adekola, Henry; Lam-Rachlin, Jennifer; Bronshtein, Elena; Abramowicz, Jacques S

    2015-02-01

    We describe the transvaginal sonographic findings in a patient with complete placenta previa and increased risk of preterm birth owing to a prior history of mid-trimester pregnancy loss in whom we observed a short cervix and prolapse of the placenta and fetal membranes into the endocervical canal. We believe that this could lead to antepartum hemorrhage and mandate close observation when diagnosed. We introduced the term "placental prolapse" to describe our finding.

  9. Placental TonEBP/NFAT5 osmolyte regulation in an ovine model of intrauterine growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Juan A; Garcia-Jones, Pastora; Graham, Amanda; Teng, Cecilia C; Battaglia, Frederick C; Galan, Henry L

    2012-03-01

    TonEBP/NFAT5 (the tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein/nuclear factor of activated T cells) modulates cellular response to osmotic changes by accumulating inositol and sorbitol inside the cells. Our objective was to assess placental osmolytes, TonEBP/NFAT5 RNA and protein expression, and signaling molecules across gestation between control and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) ovine pregnancies. Pregnant sheep were placed in hyperthermic conditions to induce IUGR. Placental tissues were collected at 55, 95, and 130 days gestational age (dGA) to measure inositol, sorbitol, TonEBP/NFAT5 (NFAT5), sodium-dependent myo-inositol transporter (SMIT; official symbol SLC5A3), aldose reductase (AR), and NADPH (official symbol DE-CR1). Placental weight was reduced in IUGR compared to controls at 95 and 130 dGA. Osmolyte concentrations were similar between control and IUGR placentas, but both groups demonstrated a significant decrease in inositol concentration and an increase in sorbitol concentration with advancing gestation. Cytosolic NFAT5 protein decreased significantly from 55 to 95 dGA in both groups, and nuclear NFAT5 protein increased only at 130 dGA in the IUGR group, but no differences were seen between groups for either cytosolic or nuclear NFAT5 protein concentrations. DE-CR1 concentrations were similar between groups and increased significantly with advancing gestational age. AR was lowest at 55dGA, and SLC5A3 increased with advancing gestational age. We conclude that both placental osmolytes inositol and sorbitol (and their corresponding proteins SLC5A3 and AR) change with gestational age and are regulated, at least in part, by NFAT5 and DE-CR1 (NADPH). The inverse relationship between each osmolyte across gestation (e.g., inositol higher in early gestation and sorbitol higher in late gestation) may reflect nutritional needs that change across gestation. PMID:22190709

  10. Influence of an external medium on the ionic distribution in human allantochorial placental vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretto, Ph; Bara, M.; Guiet-Bara, A.; Michelet, C.

    1999-10-01

    Micro-Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) analysis was applied to determine the ionic composition of different layers of human placental vessels. The laminae of arterial walls were clearly identified by means of their elemental maps. In the same manner, the endothelial cells bordering the lumen were identified, cell by cell, and analyzed separately. Using this model, we investigated the influence of incubations in various physiological fluids on the ionic composition of the walls and of endothelial cells.

  11. Superfecundation and dual paternity in a twin pregnancy ending with placental abruption.

    PubMed

    Ambach, E; Parson, W; Brezinka, C

    2000-01-01

    A case of superfecundation and dual paternity in a twin pregnancy is presented. Placental abruption developed at week 33 of gestation and the two boys had to be saved by emergency cesarean section. As they shared one placenta, had almost identical weight and had the same sex, they were assumed to be monozygotic. However, a subsequent paternity suit led to the conclusion, based on DNA-analysis, that the twin brothers had been fathered by two different men. Obstetrical implications are discussed.

  12. Placental changes caused by food restriction during early pregnancy in mice are reversible.

    PubMed

    Harper, Jennifer L; Caesar, Gerialisa A; Pennington, Kathleen A; Davis, J Wade; Schulz, Laura Clamon

    2015-09-01

    In a previous study, 50% calorie restriction in mice from d1.5 to 11.5 of pregnancy resulted in reduced placental weights and areas,relative sparing of labyrinth zone area compared to junctional zone area, and dramatic changes in global gene expression profiles.However, little lasting effect was seen on adult offspring of these pregnancies, with a slight reduction in adiposity in males and some changes in liver gene expression in both sexes. The goals of the present study were to determine whether the placental changes induced by caloric restriction in early pregnancy had permanent, irreversible effects on the placenta, and whether the changes in liver gene expression in adult offspring were present before birth. There were no differences in placental weights or areas, or the areas of individual placental zones near term in mice that had previously been food restricted. Global gene expression profiles at d18.5 were indistinguishable in placentas from control and previously food-restricted mothers. In fetuses from restricted dams at d18.5, liver expression of Gck, a key regulator of glycogen synthesis, was reduced, whereas its expression was increased in livers from adult offspring of restricted dams. Ppara expression was also reduced in fetal livers from restricted dams at d18.5, but not in adult offspring livers. We conclude that alterations in the placenta caused by nutrient restriction in early pregnancy are reversible, and that alterations in gene expression in livers of adult offspring are not a result of changes initiated during pregnancy and maintained through adulthood.

  13. Cord Blood Insulin Levels: It's Correlation with Gender, Birth Weight and Placental Weight in Term Newborns.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Afzal; Mysore Srikantiah, Rukmini; Yadav, Charu; Agarwal, Ashish; Ajay Manjrekar, Poornima; Hegde, Anupama

    2016-10-01

    The cause of more insulin resistance in female than males are still unknown. To know the cause from early life, normal values of relevant parameters are required. So, aim of this study was to determine the reference levels of glucose and insulin in cord blood of term newborns and to examine their effects on gender, placental and birth weight of term newborns. In cross sectional study 60 consecutive term newborns were included from constituent hospitals. Placental and birth weights were measured and cord blood was collected for estimation of serum insulin and plasma glucose. Plasma glucose estimation was done by auto analyzer (GOD-POD method) and serum insulin analysis was done using Insulin ELISA Kit. After analysis, mean ± 2SD used for estimating cord blood insulin and glucose levels, which were 10.1 ± 7.8 μIU/mL and 67.8 ± 33.8 mg/dL respectively. Correlation of insulin with both birth weight and placental weight were r = 0.359 and 0.41 respectively; p < 0.001. Interestingly we found higher insulin levels in females as compared to male newborns in spite of having lower birth weight in them. In conclusion this study reported the levels of insulin and glucose in cord blood of term newborns. Incidentally, this is the first study as per our knowledge to report significant correlation between cord blood insulin, glucose with birth weight, placental weight and gender in south India. Female newborns had higher insulin levels than males, despite lesser birth weight can be attributed to intrinsic insulin resistance in them. PMID:27605744

  14. Acute placental infection due to Klebsiella pneumoniae: report of a unique case.

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, Salwa S; Amr, Samir S; Lage, Janice M

    2005-01-01

    A 40-year-old woman, gravida 9, with seven healthy children and a history of one abortion (p 7 + 1), presented at 18 weeks of gestation with fever and malodorous vaginal discharge. Ultrasound revealed a macerated fetus. The placenta showed acute chorioamnionitis and acute villitis with microabscess formation. Blood and vaginal cultures both grew Klebsiella pneumoniae. This is the first reported case in English literature of Klebsiella pneumoniae causing suppurative placentitis leading to fetal demise. PMID:16040328

  15. Cadmium levels in maternal blood, fetal cord blood, and placental tissues of pregnant women who smoke

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhnert, P.M.; Kuhnert, B.R.; Bottoms, S.F.; Erhard, P.

    1982-04-15

    Previous studies have reported that cigarette smoking is a major source of exposure to cadmium (Cd). This study was carried out to determine the degree of exposure to Cd of pregnant women who smoke and to determine the degree of exposure to Cd of pregnant women who smoke and to determine the disposition of the Cd in the maternal-fetoplacental unit. Our data reveal that pregnant women who smoke expose themselves and their placentas to levels of Cd higher than those to which they would normally be exposed. The percentage increase in Cd due to smoking was 32% in the placenta and 59% in maternal blood; these increases are statistically significant. The mean levels of Cd in maternal blood, cord blood, and placental tissues of pregnant women who smoked were all higher than the mean levels of Cd in the same tissues and blood of pregnant women who did not smoke. In addition, the levels of Cd in the maternal blood of smokers were significantly higher than levels of Cd in the cord blood of their infants; this relationship was not found in nonsmokers. On the basis of the Cd data on cord blood and placental tissues, the fetuses found in nonsmokers. On the basis of the Cd data on cord blood and placental tissues, the fetuses of pregnant women who smoke apparently receive very little additional exposure to Cd; however, this does not lessen concern for the fetus. The presently reported increase in exposure to Cd of pregnant women due to smoking must be viewed as undesirable because Cd has been shown to alter placental function in animals, and because Cd has no known biologic function.

  16. Maternal Body Weight and Gestational Diabetes Differentially Influence Placental and Pregnancy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Martino, J.; Sebert, S.; Segura, M. T.; García-Valdés, L.; Florido, J.; Padilla, M. C.; Marcos, A.; Rueda, R.; McArdle, H. J.; Budge, H.; Campoy, C.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Maternal obesity and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) can both contribute to adverse neonatal outcomes. The extent to which this may be mediated by differences in placental metabolism and nutrient transport remains to be determined. Objective: Our objective was to examine whether raised maternal body mass index (BMI) and/or GDM contributed to a resetting of the expression of genes within the placenta that are involved in energy sensing, oxidative stress, inflammation, and metabolic pathways. Methods: Pregnant women from Spain were recruited as part of the “Study of Maternal Nutrition and Genetics on the Foetal Adiposity Programming” survey at the first antenatal visit (12–20 weeks of gestation) and stratified according to prepregnancy BMI and the incidence of GDM. At delivery, placenta and cord blood were sampled and newborn anthropometry measured. Results: Obese women with GDM had higher estimated fetal weight at 34 gestational weeks and a greater risk of preterm deliveries and cesarean section. Birth weight was unaffected by BMI or GDM; however, women who were obese with normal glucose tolerance had increased placental weight and higher plasma glucose and leptin at term. Gene expression for markers of placental energy sensing and oxidative stress, were primarily affected by maternal obesity as mTOR was reduced, whereas SIRT-1 and UCP2 were both upregulated. In placenta from obese women with GDM, gene expression for AMPK was also reduced, whereas the downstream regulator of mTOR, p70S6KB1 was raised. Conclusions: Placental gene expression is sensitive to both maternal obesity and GDM which both impact on energy sensing and could modulate the effect of either raised maternal BMI or GDM on birth weight. PMID:26513002

  17. Growth hormone-related genes from baboon (Papio hamadryas): Characterization, placental expression and evolutionary aspects.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, Irám Pablo; Tejero, Maria Elizabeth; Cole, Shelley A; Comuzzie, Anthony G; Nathanielsz, Peter W; Wallis, Michael; Barrera-Saldaña, Hugo A

    2010-01-15

    Pregnancy is a complex physiological condition, and the growth hormone (GH)-related hormones produced in the placenta, which emerged during the evolution of primates, are thought to play an important metabolic role in pregnancy that is not yet fully understood. The aim of this study was to identify the genes and transcription products of the GH family in baboon (Papio hamadryas) and to assess these in relation to the evolution of this gene family. GH-related transcripts were amplified using total RNA from placental tissue, by reverse transcription coupled to polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Three different GH-related transcripts were identified in baboon placental tissue, with two encoding chorionic somatomammotropins (CSH) and one the placental variant of GH (GH-2). The CSH transcripts showed some minor allelic variation, and a splice variant of CSH-C that retains its in-frame third intron. Gene sequences for GH-1 (probably representing the GH gene expressed primarily in the pituitary gland), GH-2 and the two CSHs were identified in the baboon genomic database, together with a CSH-related pseudogene. Phylogenetic analysis of the baboon GH-related sequences, together with those of a related Old World monkey, macaque, and ape outgroup (human), showed the equivalence of the genes in baboon and macaque, and revealed evidence for several episodes of rapid adaptive evolution. Many of the substitutions seen during the evolution of these placental proteins have occurred in the receptor-binding sites, especially site 2, contrasting with the strong conservation of the hydrophobic core. PMID:19651193

  18. Placental Nitrosative Stress and Exposure to Ambient Air Pollution During Gestation: A Population Study.

    PubMed

    Saenen, Nelly D; Vrijens, Karen; Janssen, Bram G; Madhloum, Narjes; Peusens, Martien; Gyselaers, Wilfried; Vanpoucke, Charlotte; Lefebvre, Wouter; Roels, Harry A; Nawrot, Tim S

    2016-09-15

    The placenta plays a crucial role in fetal growth and development through adaptive responses to perturbations of the maternal environment. We investigated the association between placental 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NTp), a biomarker of oxidative stress, and exposure to air pollutants during various time windows of pregnancy. We measured the placental 3-NTp levels of 330 mother-newborn pairs enrolled in the Environmental Influence on Ageing in Early Life (ENVIRONAGE) Study, a Belgian birth cohort study (2010-2013). Daily concentrations of particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5 µm (PM2.5), black carbon (BC), and nitrogen dioxide were interpolated for each mother's residence using a spatiotemporal interpolation method. Placental 3-NTp levels, adjusted for covariates, increased by 35.0% (95% confidence interval (CI): 13.9, 60.0) for each interquartile-range increment in entire-pregnancy PM2.5 exposure. The corresponding estimate for BC exposure was 13.9% (95% CI: -0.21, 29.9). These results were driven by the first (PM2.5: 29.0% (95% CI: 4.9, 58.6); BC: 23.6% (95% CI: 4.4, 46.4)) and second (PM2.5: 39.3% (95% CI: 12.3, 72.7)) gestational exposure windows. This link between placental nitrosative stress and exposure to fine particle air pollution during gestation is in line with experimental evidence on cigarette smoke and diesel exhaust exposure. Further research is needed to elucidate potential health consequences experienced later in life through particle-mediated nitrosative stress incurred during fetal life. PMID:27601048

  19. Mono-2-Ethylhexyl Phthalate Induces Oxidative Stress Responses in Human Placental Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Tetz, Lauren M; Cheng, Adrienne A.; Korte, Cassandra S.; Giese, Roger W.; Wang, Poguang; Harris, Craig; Meeker, John D; Loch-Caruso, Rita

    2013-01-01

    Di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) is an environmental contaminant commonly used as a plasticizer in polyvinyl chloride products. Exposure to DEHP has been linked to adverse pregnancy outcomes in humans including preterm birth, low birth-weight, and pregnancy loss. Although oxidative stress is linked to the pathology of adverse pregnancy outcomes, effects of DEHP metabolites, including the active metabolite, mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP), on oxidative stress responses in placental cells have not been previously evaluated. The objective of the current study is to identify MEHP-stimulated oxidative stress responses in human placental cells. We treated a human placental cell line, HTR-8/SVneo, with MEHP and then measured reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation using the dichlorofluorescein assay, oxidized thymine with mass-spectrometry, redox-sensitive gene expression with qRT-PCR, and apoptosis using a luminescence assay for caspase 3/7 activity. Treatment of HTR-8 cells with 180 μM MEHP increased ROS generation, oxidative DNA damage, and caspase 3/7 activity, and resulted in differential expression of redox-sensitive genes. Notably, 90 and 180 μM MEHP significantly induced mRNA expression of prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2), an enzyme important for synthesis of prostaglandins implicated in initiation of labor. The results from the present study are the first to demonstrate that MEHP stimulates oxidative stress responses in placental cells. Furthermore, the MEHP concentrations used were within an order of magnitude of the highest concentrations measured previously in human umbilical cord or maternal serum. The findings from the current study warrant future mechanistic studies of oxidative stress, apoptosis, and prostaglandins as molecular mediators of DEHP/MEHP-associated adverse pregnancy outcomes. PMID:23360888

  20. Oxygen Sensitivity of Placental Trophoblast Connexins 43 and 46: A Role in Preeclampsia?

    PubMed

    Otto, Teresa; Gellhaus, Alexandra; Lüschen, Navina; Scheidler, Jan; Bendix, Ivo; Dunk, Caroline; Wolf, Nadine; Lennartz, Klaus; Köninger, Angela; Schmidt, Markus; Kimmig, Rainer; Fandrey, Joachim; Winterhager, Elke

    2015-12-01

    Several gap junction connexins have been shown to be essential for appropriate placental development and function. It is known that the expression and distribution of connexins change in response to environmental oxygen levels. The placenta develops under various oxygen levels, beginning at a low oxygen tension of approximately 2% and increasing to a tension of 8% after the onset of the uteroplacental circulation. Moreover, it has been shown that during preeclampsia (PE) placentas are subjected to chronic hypoxia. Therefore, we investigated oxygen sensitivity of placental connexins 43 and 46. Using the trophoblast cell line Jar, we demonstrated that the expression of connexin43 increased during acute hypoxia but decreased during chronic hypoxia. Chronic hypoxia resulted in the translocation of connexin43 from the membrane to the cytoplasm and in a reduction in its communication properties. In contrast, the expression of connexin46 was down-regulated during chronic hypoxia and was translocated from perinuclear areas to the cell membrane. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) knockdown showed that the translocation of connexin43 but not that of connexin46 was HIF-2α dependent and was mediated by phosphoinositide 3-kinase. The up-regulation of connexin43 in combination with the down-regulation of connexin46 was confirmed in placental explants cultivated under low oxygen and in placentas with early-onset PE. Taken together, in Jar cells, placental connexins 43 and 46 are regulated during periods of low oxygen in opposite manners. The oxygen sensing of connexins in the trophoblast may play a role in physiological and pathophysiological oxygen conditions and thus may contribute to PE.

  1. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors under epigenetic control in placental metabolism and fetal development.

    PubMed

    Lendvai, Ágnes; Deutsch, Manuel J; Plösch, Torsten; Ensenauer, Regina

    2016-05-15

    The placental metabolism can adapt to the environment throughout pregnancy to both the demands of the fetus and the signals from the mother. Such adaption processes include epigenetic mechanisms, which alter gene expression and may influence the offspring's health. These mechanisms are linked to the diversity of prenatal environmental exposures, including maternal under- or overnutrition or gestational diabetes. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are nuclear receptors that contribute to the developmental plasticity of the placenta by regulating lipid and glucose metabolism pathways, including lipogenesis, steroidogenesis, glucose transporters, and placental signaling pathways, thus representing a link between energy metabolism and reproduction. Among the PPAR isoforms, PPARγ appears to be the main modulator of mammalian placentation. Certain fatty acids and lipid-derived moieties are the natural activating PPAR ligands. By controlling the amounts of maternal nutrients that go across to the fetus, the PPARs play an important regulatory role in placenta metabolism, thereby adapting to the maternal nutritional status. As demonstrated in animal studies, maternal nutrition during gestation can exert long-term influences on the PPAR methylation pattern in offspring organs. This review underlines the current state of knowledge on the relationship between environmental factors and the epigenetic regulation of the PPARs in placenta metabolism and offspring development. PMID:26860983

  2. Effects of Antiviral Drugs on Organic Anion Transport in Human Placental BeWo Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Tatsuya; Kamiya, Yuki; Uwai, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Placental drug transfer is important for achieving better pharmacotherapy in pregnant women and in fetuses. In the present study, we examined the effects of anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) and anti-HIV drugs on organic anion transport in human placental BeWo cells. The cellular uptake of two fluorescence organic anions, 8-(2-[fluoresceinyl]aminoethylthio)adenosine-3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (8-FcAMP) and fluorescein, was temperature and concentration dependent. The Michaelis constant (Km) and the maximum uptake rate (Vmax) for 8-FcAMP transport in BeWo cells were estimated to be 6.45 ± 0.75 μM and 25.55 ± 5.93 pmol/mg protein/10 min, respectively. The Km and Vmax values for fluorescein uptake were estimated to be 31.2 ± 11.8 μM and 510.9 ± 90.6 pmol/mg protein/10 min, respectively. Several known substrates of organic anion transporters in human placenta, including atorvastatin, glibenclamide, estrone-3-sulfate, and rifampin, inhibited cellular uptake of 8-FcAMP and fluorescein in BeWo cells. Transport of 8-FcAMP and fluorescein was inhibited by the antiviral drugs boceprevir, telaprevir, elvitegravir, and maraviroc. These findings suggest that some antiviral drugs are sufficiently potent to influence placental drug transfer and cause drug-drug interactions. PMID:26416870

  3. The molecular phylogeny of uterine serpins and its relationship to evolution of placentation.

    PubMed

    Padua, Maria B; Kowalski, Andrés A; Cañas, Miryan Y; Hansen, Peter J

    2010-02-01

    Uterine serpins (USs), designated as SERPINA14, are expressed in the endometrium in response to progesterone. All species identified as having USs exhibit epitheliochorial placentation and are in the Ruminantia and Suidae orders of the Laurasiatheria superorder. The objective was to identify US genes in species within and outside Laurasiatheria and evaluate whether evolution of the US gene was associated with development of the epitheliochorial placenta. Through queries of nucleotide and genomic databases, known US genes were identified (caprine, bovine, porcine, water buffalo), and new US coding sequences were found in dolphins, horses, dogs, and cats. The cat sequence contained several stop codons. No sequence was found in completed genomic sequences for primates, rodents, rabbits, opossums, or duck-billed platypuses. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction confirmed expression of the US gene in the uterus of pregnant horses and dogs. The ratio of nonsynonymous/synonymous substitutions suggests that the US gene evolved under positive selection. In conclusion, the US gene evolved within the Laurasiatheria superorder to play a role in pregnancy for species with epitheliochorial placentation and some but not all Laurasiatheria species that have a different form of placentation. The positive selection taking place in the gene suggests development of species-specific functions.

  4. Placental Transfer of Lactate, Glucose and 2-deoxyglucose in Control and Diabetic Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Oon, Beryl B.; Lowy, Clara

    2001-01-01

    Placental transfer of lactate, glucose and 2-deoxyglucose was examined employing the in situ perfused placenta. Control and streptozotocin induced diabetic Wistar rats were infused with [U14C]-glucose and [3H]-2-deoxyglucose (2DG). The fetal side of the placenta was perfuseci with a cell free medium and glucose uptake was calculated in the adjacent fetuses. Despite the 5-fold higher maternal plasma glucose concentration in the diabetic dams the calculated fetal glucose metabolic index was not significantly different between the 2 groups. Placental blood flow was reduced in the diabetic animals compared with controls but reduction of transfer of [U14C]-glucose and [3H]-2-deoxyglucose and endogenously derived [14C]-Lactate to the fetal compartment, could not be accounted for by reduced placental blood flow alone. There was no significant net production or uptake of lactate into the perfusion medium that had perfused the fetal side of the placenta in either group. The plasma lactate levels in the fetuses adjacent to the perfused placenta were found to be higher than in the maternal plasma and significantly higher in the fetuses of the diabetic group compared with control group. In this model the in situ perfused placenta does not secrete significant quantities of lactate into the fetal compartment in either the control or diabetic group. PMID:12369714

  5. Evidence for Placental HPV Infection in Both HIV Positive and Negative Women

    PubMed Central

    Chisanga, Chrispin; Eggert, Dawn; Mitchell, Charles D.; Wood, Charles; Angeletti, Peter C.

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) have previously been reported to infect epithelial trophoblast cells of the placenta. To investigate this possibility, 200 placental samples from Zambian women were separated into HIV+ and HIV− groups and tested for HPV by redundant primer PCR, using GP5+/GP6+ and CPI/CPII primer sets. Three HPV genotypes (HPV6, 16 and 90) were detected in placental samples. Whereas, 20 different HPV genotypes were detected in vaginal sampling of the same patients, suggesting that compartment specific sub-populations of HPV may exist. The incidence of HPV16 in placental samples was almost 2-fold greater in HIV+ women compared to HIV− (p = 0.0241). HPV16 L1 expression, detected by immunochemistry, was significantly higher in HIV+ than HIV− samples (p = 0.0231). HPV16 DNA was detected in the nuclei of trophoblast cells by in situ hybridization. Overall, these results suggest that HPVs infect the placenta and that HIV significantly influences these infections. PMID:26865986

  6. Reassessing the relationship between brain size, life history, and metabolism at the marsupial/placental dichotomy.

    PubMed

    Weisbecker, Vera; Goswami, Anjali

    2014-09-01

    A vigorous discussion surrounds the question as to what enables some mammals--including primates and cetaceans--to evolve large brains. We recently published a study suggesting that the radiation of marsupial mammals is highly relevant to this question because of the unique reproductive and metabolic traits within this clade. In particular, we controversially suggested that marsupial brain sizes are not systematically smaller than those of placentals, and that elevated basal metabolic rates (BMR) are not linked to larger marsupial brains. As our dataset was found to contain some erroneous body size data, derived from a published source, we here use an updated and corrected dataset and employ standard as well as phylogenetically corrected analyses to re-assess and elaborate on our original conclusions. Our proposal that marsupials are not systematically smaller-brained than placentals remains supported, particularly when the unusually large-brained placental clade, Primates, is excluded. Use of the new dataset not only confirms that high metabolic rates are not associated with larger brain size in marsupials, but we additionally find some support for a striking negative correlation between BMR and brain size. The best supported correlates of large brain size remain the reproductive traits of weaning age and litter size. These results support our suggestion that mammalian brain sizes (including, by inference, those of monotremes) are predominantly constrained by the ability of females to fuel the growth of their offspring's large brains, rather than by the maintenance requirements of the adult brain. PMID:25186933

  7. Translocation of positively and negatively charged polystyrene nanoparticles in an in vitro placental model.

    PubMed

    Kloet, Samantha K; Walczak, Agata P; Louisse, Jochem; van den Berg, Hans H J; Bouwmeester, Hans; Tromp, Peter; Fokkink, Remco G; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M

    2015-10-01

    To obtain insight in translocation of nanoparticles across the placental barrier, translocation was studied for one positively and two negatively charged polystyrene nanoparticles (PS-NPs) of similar size in an in vitro model. The model consisted of BeWo b30 cells, derived from a human choriocarcinoma grown on a transwell insert forming a cell layer that separates an apical from a basolateral compartment. PS-NPs were characterized with respect to size, surface charge, morphology and protein corona. Translocation of PS-NPs was not related to PS-NP charge. Two PS-NPs were translocated across the BeWo transwell model to a lower extent than amoxicillin, a model compound known to be translocated over the placental barrier to only a limited extent, whereas one PS-NP showed a slightly higher translocation. Studies on the effect of transporter inhibitors on the translocation of the PS-NPs indicated that their translocation was not mediated by known transporters and mainly dependent on passive diffusion. It is concluded that the BeWo b30 model can be used as an efficient method to get an initial qualitative impression about the capacity of NPs to translocate across the placental barrier and set priorities in further in vivo studies on translocation of NPs to the fetus. PMID:26145586

  8. Zika Virus Targets Different Primary Human Placental Cells, Suggesting Two Routes for Vertical Transmission.

    PubMed

    Tabata, Takako; Petitt, Matthew; Puerta-Guardo, Henry; Michlmayr, Daniela; Wang, Chunling; Fang-Hoover, June; Harris, Eva; Pereira, Lenore

    2016-08-10

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infection during pregnancy is linked to severe birth defects, but mother-to-fetus transmission routes are unknown. We infected different primary cell types from mid- and late-gestation placentas and explants from first-trimester chorionic villi with the prototype Ugandan and a recently isolated Nicaraguan ZIKV strain. ZIKV infects primary human placental cells and explants-cytotrophoblasts, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and Hofbauer cells in chorionic villi and amniotic epithelial cells and trophoblast progenitors in amniochorionic membranes-that express Axl, Tyro3, and/or TIM1 viral entry cofactors. ZIKV produced NS3 and E proteins and generated higher viral titers in amniotic epithelial cells from mid-gestation compared to late-gestation placentas. Duramycin, a peptide that binds phosphatidylethanolamine in enveloped virions and precludes TIM1 binding, reduced ZIKV infection in placental cells and explants. Our results suggest that ZIKV spreads from basal and parietal decidua to chorionic villi and amniochorionic membranes and that targeting TIM1 could suppress infection at the uterine-placental interface. PMID:27443522

  9. Placental, Matrilineal, and Epigenetic Mechanisms Promoting Environmentally Adaptive Development of the Mammalian Brain

    PubMed Central

    Broad, Kevin D.; Rocha-Ferreira, Eridan; Hristova, Mariya

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of intrauterine development, vivipary, and placentation in eutherian mammals has introduced new possibilities and constraints in the regulation of neural plasticity and development which promote neural function that is adaptive to the environment that a developing brain is likely to encounter in the future. A range of evolutionary adaptations associated with placentation transfers disproportionate control of this process to the matriline, a period unique in mammalian development in that there are three matrilineal genomes interacting in the same organism at the same time (maternal, foetal, and postmeiotic oocytes). The interactions between the maternal and developing foetal hypothalamus and placenta can provide a template by which a mother can transmit potentially adaptive information concerning potential future environmental conditions to the developing brain. In conjunction with genomic imprinting, it also provides a template to integrate epigenetic information from both maternal and paternal lineages. Placentation also hands ultimate control of genomic imprinting and intergenerational epigenetic information transfer to the matriline as epigenetic markers undergo erasure and reprogramming in the developing oocyte. These developments, in conjunction with an expanded neocortex, provide a unique evolutionary template by which matrilineal transfer of maternal care, resources, and culture can be used to promote brain development and infant survival. PMID:27069693

  10. Gestational Diabetes Reduces Adenosine Transport in Human Placental Microvascular Endothelium, an Effect Reversed by Insulin

    PubMed Central

    Salomón, Carlos; Westermeier, Francisco; Puebla, Carlos; Arroyo, Pablo; Guzmán-Gutiérrez, Enrique; Pardo, Fabián; Leiva, Andrea; Casanello, Paola; Sobrevia, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) courses with increased fetal plasma adenosine concentration and reduced adenosine transport in placental macrovascular endothelium. Since insulin modulates human equilibrative nucleoside transporters (hENTs) expression/activity, we hypothesize that GDM will alter hENT2-mediated transport in human placental microvascular endothelium (hPMEC), and that insulin will restore GDM to a normal phenotype involving insulin receptors A (IR-A) and B (IR-B). GDM effect on hENTs expression and transport activity, and IR-A/IR-B expression and associated cell signalling cascades (p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinases (p42/44mapk) and Akt) role in hPMEC primary cultures was assayed. GDM associates with elevated umbilical whole and vein, but not arteries blood adenosine, and reduced hENTs adenosine transport and expression. IR-A/IR-B mRNA expression and p42/44mapk/Akt ratios (‘metabolic phenotype’) were lower in GDM. Insulin reversed GDM-reduced hENT2 expression/activity, IR-A/IR-B mRNA expression and p42/44mapk/Akt ratios to normal pregnancies (‘mitogenic phenotype’). It is suggested that insulin effects required IR-A and IR-B expression leading to differential modulation of signalling pathways restoring GDM-metabolic to a normal-mitogenic like phenotype. Insulin could be acting as protecting factor for placental microvascular endothelial dysfunction in GDM. PMID:22808198

  11. Translocation of positively and negatively charged polystyrene nanoparticles in an in vitro placental model.

    PubMed

    Kloet, Samantha K; Walczak, Agata P; Louisse, Jochem; van den Berg, Hans H J; Bouwmeester, Hans; Tromp, Peter; Fokkink, Remco G; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M

    2015-10-01

    To obtain insight in translocation of nanoparticles across the placental barrier, translocation was studied for one positively and two negatively charged polystyrene nanoparticles (PS-NPs) of similar size in an in vitro model. The model consisted of BeWo b30 cells, derived from a human choriocarcinoma grown on a transwell insert forming a cell layer that separates an apical from a basolateral compartment. PS-NPs were characterized with respect to size, surface charge, morphology and protein corona. Translocation of PS-NPs was not related to PS-NP charge. Two PS-NPs were translocated across the BeWo transwell model to a lower extent than amoxicillin, a model compound known to be translocated over the placental barrier to only a limited extent, whereas one PS-NP showed a slightly higher translocation. Studies on the effect of transporter inhibitors on the translocation of the PS-NPs indicated that their translocation was not mediated by known transporters and mainly dependent on passive diffusion. It is concluded that the BeWo b30 model can be used as an efficient method to get an initial qualitative impression about the capacity of NPs to translocate across the placental barrier and set priorities in further in vivo studies on translocation of NPs to the fetus.

  12. Metabolism of 17α-hydroxyprogesterone caproate by hepatic and placental microsomes of human and baboons

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ru; Nanovskaya, Tatiana N.; Zharikova, Olga L.; Mattison, Donald R.; Hankins, Gary D.V.; Ahmed, Mahmoud S.

    2008-01-01

    Recent data from our laboratory revealed the formation of an unknown metabolite of 17 hydroxyprogestrone caproate (17-HPC), used for treatment of preterm deliveries, during its perfusion across the dually perfused human placental lobule. Previously, we demonstrated that the drug is not hydrolyzed, neither in vivo nor in vitro, to progesterone and caproate. Therefore, the hypothesis for this investigation is that 17-HPC is actively metabolized by human and baboon (Papio cynocephalus) hepatic and placental microsomes. Baboon hepatic and placental microsomes were investigated to validate the nonhuman primate as an animal model for drug use during pregnancy. Data presented here indicate that human and baboon hepatic microsomes formed several mono-, di-, and tri-hydroxylated derivatives of 17-HPC. However, microsomes of human and baboon placentas metabolized 17-HPC to its mono-hydroxylated derivatives only in quantities that were a fraction of those formed by their respective livers, except for two metabolites (M16’ and M17’) that are unique for placenta and contributed to 25% and 75% of the total metabolites formed by human and baboon, respectively. The amounts of metabolites formed, relative to each other, by human and baboon microsomes were different suggesting that the affinity of 17-HPC to CYP enzymes and their activity could be species-dependent. PMID:18329004

  13. Evolutionary History of LINE-1 in the Major Clades of Placental Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Paul D.; Dobigny, Gauthier; Waddell, Peter J.; Robinson, Terence J.

    2007-01-01

    Background LINE-1 constitutes an important component of mammalian genomes. It has a dynamic evolutionary history characterized by the rise, fall and replacement of subfamilies. Most data concerning LINE-1 biology and evolution are derived from the human and mouse genomes and are often assumed to hold for all placentals. Methodology To examine LINE-1 relationships, sequences from the 3′ region of the reverse transcriptase from 21 species (representing 13 orders across Afrotheria, Xenarthra, Supraprimates and Laurasiatheria) were obtained from whole genome sequence assemblies, or by PCR with degenerate primers. These sequences were aligned and analysed. Principal Findings Our analysis reflects accepted placental relationships suggesting mostly lineage-specific LINE-1 families. The data provide clear support for several clades including Glires, Supraprimates, Laurasiatheria, Boreoeutheria, Xenarthra and Afrotheria. Within the afrotherian LINE-1 (AfroLINE) clade, our tree supports Paenungulata, Afroinsectivora and Afroinsectiphillia. Xenarthran LINE-1 (XenaLINE) falls sister to AfroLINE, providing some support for the Atlantogenata (Xenarthra+Afrotheria) hypothesis. Significance LINEs and SINEs make up approximately half of all placental genomes, so understanding their dynamics is an essential aspect of comparative genomics. Importantly, a tree of LINE-1 offers a different view of the root, as long edges (branches) such as that to marsupials are shortened and/or broken up. Additionally, a robust phylogeny of diverse LINE-1 is essential in testing that site-specific LINE-1 insertions, often regarded as homoplasy-free phylogenetic markers, are indeed unique and not convergent. PMID:17225861

  14. Does maternal MDR1 C1236T polymorphism have an effect on placental arsenic levels?

    PubMed

    Kaya-Akyüzlü, Dilek; Kayaaltı, Zeliha; Doğan, Derya; Söylemezoğlu, Tülin

    2016-01-01

    To detect whether maternal MDR1 C1236T polymorphism has an effect on placental arsenic levels, 112 mother-placenta pairs were examined. Venous blood samples from mothers were collected to investigate the C1236T polymorphism which was detected by standard PCR-RFLP technique. Placentas were collected to measure arsenic levels by GF-AAS. The MDR1 C1236T genotype frequencies of mothers were found as 30.3% homozygote typical (CC), 51.8% heterozygote (CT) and 17.9% homozygote atypical (TT). The mean placental arsenic level was 62.36±30.43 μg/kg. It was observed that the placental arsenic concentrations were higher in mothers with TT genotype than those with CC and CT genotypes, but this was not statistically significant (p=0.702). This finding was indicated that fetuses of mothers with TT genotype may be more susceptible to arsenic toxicity as compared to those of with CC and CT genotypes. We believe that this difference warrant further studies with larger study subjects.

  15. Induced Human Decidual NK-Like Cells Improve Utero-Placental Perfusion in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pernicone, Elizabeth; Korkes, Henri A.; Burke, Suzanne D.; Rajakumar, Augustine; Thadhani, Ravi I.; Roberts, Drucilla J.; Bhasin, Manoj; Karumanchi, S. Ananth

    2016-01-01

    Decidual NK (dNK) cells, a distinct type of NK cell, are thought to regulate uterine spiral artery remodeling, a process that allows for increased blood delivery to the fetal-placental unit. Impairment of uterine spiral artery remodeling is associated with decreased placental perfusion, increased uterine artery resistance, and obstetric complications such as preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction. Ex vivo manipulation of human peripheral blood NK (pNK) cells by a combination of hypoxia, TGFß-1 and 5-aza-2’-deoxycytidine yields cells with phenotypic and in vitro functional similarities to dNK cells, called idNK cells. Here, gene expression profiling shows that CD56Bright idNK cells derived ex vivo from human pNK cells, and to a lesser extent CD56Dim idNK cells, are enriched in the gene expression signature that distinguishes dNK cells from pNK cells. When injected into immunocompromised pregnant mice with elevated uterine artery resistance, idNK cells homed to the uterus and reduced the uterine artery resistance index, suggesting improved placental perfusion. PMID:27736914

  16. Folate ameliorates dexamethasone-induced fetal and placental growth restriction potentially via improvement of trophoblast migration.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Linfang; Zhang, Ai; Wang, Kai; Zhou, Qian; Duan, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Overexposure to prenatal dexamethasone (Dex) leads to small placental and fetal size and the alteration of fetal programming. Folate plays important roles in processes associated with successful pregnancy, including angiogenesis and trophoblast invasion. Placental folate transport is altered with prenatal Dex administration. The purpose of this study was to investigate the protective role of maternal folate administration in placentas exposed to Dex. In vitro, four groups of C57BL/6J pregnant mice were utilized: 1) normal drinking water+Saline injection group (NN); 2) normal drinking water+Dex injection group (ND); 3) drinking water with folate+Saline injection group (FN); and 4) drinking water with folate+Dex injection group (FD). In vivo, four treatment groups of the human extravillous trophoblast HTR-8/SVneo cells were classified: 1) control (NN); 2) Dex treatment (ND); 3) folate treatment (FN); and 4) folate and Dex treatment (FD). The results showed the maternal folate increases the placental size, birth weight, and expression of matrix metalloproteinases 9 (MMP9) in a mice model of Dex overexposure. In human extravillous trophoblast HTR8/SVneo, folate ameliorated the Dex-induced supress of cell migration and improved the expression/activity of MMP2 and MMP9. In conclusion, folate might be a potential therapy intervention to reduce the adverse effects of prenatal Dex exposure partially via improved trophoblast migration.

  17. Computational modelling of placental amino acid transfer as an integrated system.

    PubMed

    Panitchob, N; Widdows, K L; Crocker, I P; Johnstone, E D; Please, C P; Sibley, C P; Glazier, J D; Lewis, R M; Sengers, B G

    2016-07-01

    Placental amino acid transfer is essential for fetal development and its impairment is associated with poor fetal growth. Amino acid transfer is mediated by a broad array of specific plasma membrane transporters with overlapping substrate specificity. However, it is not fully understood how these different transporters work together to mediate net flux across the placenta. Therefore the aim of this study was to develop a new computational model to describe how human placental amino acid transfer functions as an integrated system. Amino acid transfer from mother to fetus requires transport across the two plasma membranes of the placental syncytiotrophoblast, each of which contains a distinct complement of transporter proteins. A compartmental modelling approach was combined with a carrier based modelling framework to represent the kinetics of the individual accumulative, exchange and facilitative classes of transporters on each plasma membrane. The model successfully captured the principal features of transplacental transfer. Modelling results clearly demonstrate how modulating transporter activity and conditions such as phenylketonuria, can increase the transfer of certain groups of amino acids, but that this comes at the cost of decreasing the transfer of others, which has implications for developing clinical treatment options in the placenta and other transporting epithelia. PMID:27045077

  18. Calcitriol downregulates TNF-α and IL-6 expression in cultured placental cells from preeclamptic women.

    PubMed

    Noyola-Martínez, Nancy; Díaz, Lorenza; Avila, Euclides; Halhali, Ali; Larrea, Fernando; Barrera, David

    2013-01-01

    Placenta is an important source and target of hormones that contribute to immunological tolerance and maintenance of pregnancy. In preeclampsia (PE), placental calcitriol synthesis is low; whereas pro-inflammatory cytokines levels are increased, threatening pregnancy outcome. Previously, we showed that calcitriol inhibits Th-1 cytokines under experimental inflammatory conditions in normal trophoblasts. However, a study of the regulation of inflammatory cytokines by calcitriol in trophoblasts from a natural inflammatory condition, such as PE, is still lacking. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate calcitriol effects upon TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-6 and IL-1β in cultured placental cells from preeclamptic women by using qPCR and ELISA. Placentas were collected after cesarean section from preeclamptic women and enriched trophoblastic preparations were cultured in the absence or presence of different calcitriol concentrations during 24h. In these cell cultures, pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 secretion and mRNA expression were downregulated by calcitriol (P<0.05). No significant effects of calcitriol upon IFN-γ and IL-1β were observed. In addition, basal expression of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β decreased as the cells formed syncytia. Our study supports an important autocrine/paracrine role of placental calcitriol in controlling adverse immunological responses at the feto-maternal interface, particularly in gestational pathologies associated with exacerbated inflammatory responses such as preeclampsia.

  19. Cretaceous eutherians and Laurasian origin for placental mammals near the K/T boundary.

    PubMed

    Wible, J R; Rougier, G W; Novacek, M J; Asher, R J

    2007-06-21

    Estimates of the time of origin for placental mammals from DNA studies span nearly the duration of the Cretaceous period (145 to 65 million years ago), with a maximum of 129 million years ago and a minimum of 78 million years ago. Palaeontologists too are divided on the timing. Some support a deep Cretaceous origin by allying certain middle Cretaceous fossils (97-90 million years old) from Uzbekistan with modern placental lineages, whereas others support the origin of crown group Placentalia near the close of the Cretaceous. This controversy has yet to be addressed by a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis that includes all well-known Cretaceous fossils and a wide sample of morphology among Tertiary and recent placentals. Here we report the discovery of a new well-preserved mammal from the Late Cretaceous of Mongolia and a broad-scale phylogenetic analysis. Our results exclude Cretaceous fossils from Placentalia, place the origin of Placentalia near the Cretaceous/Tertiary (K/T) boundary in Laurasia rather than much earlier within the Cretaceous in the Southern Hemisphere, and place afrotherians and xenarthrans in a nested rather than a basal position within Placentalia.

  20. Zika virus damages the human placental barrier and presents marked fetal neurotropism.

    PubMed

    Noronha, Lucia de; Zanluca, Camila; Azevedo, Marina Luize Viola; Luz, Kleber Giovanni; Santos, Claudia Nunes Duarte Dos

    2016-05-01

    An unusually high incidence of microcephaly in newborns has recently been observed in Brazil. There is a temporal association between the increase in cases of microcephaly and the Zika virus (ZIKV) epidemic. Viral RNA has been detected in amniotic fluid samples, placental tissues and newborn and fetal brain tissues. However, much remains to be determined concerning the association between ZIKV infection and fetal malformations. In this study, we provide evidence of the transplacental transmission of ZIKV through the detection of viral proteins and viral RNA in placental tissue samples from expectant mothers infected at different stages of gestation. We observed chronic placentitis (TORCH type) with viral protein detection by immunohistochemistry in Hofbauer cells and some histiocytes in the intervillous spaces. We also demonstrated the neurotropism of the virus via the detection of viral proteins in glial cells and in some endothelial cells and the observation of scattered foci of microcalcifications in the brain tissues. Lesions were mainly located in the white matter. ZIKV RNA was also detected in these tissues by real-time-polymerase chain reaction. We believe that these findings will contribute to the body of knowledge of the mechanisms of ZIKV transmission, interactions between the virus and host cells and viral tropism. PMID:27143490

  1. Skeletal development in the African elephant and ossification timing in placental mammals.

    PubMed

    Hautier, Lionel; Stansfield, Fiona J; Allen, W R Twink; Asher, Robert J

    2012-06-01

    We provide here unique data on elephant skeletal ontogeny. We focus on the sequence of cranial and post-cranial ossification events during growth in the African elephant (Loxodonta africana). Previous analyses on ossification sequences in mammals have focused on monotremes, marsupials, boreoeutherian and xenarthran placentals. Here, we add data on ossification sequences in an afrotherian. We use two different methods to quantify sequence heterochrony: the sequence method and event-paring/Parsimov. Compared with other placentals, elephants show late ossifications of the basicranium, manual and pedal phalanges, and early ossifications of the ischium and metacarpals. Moreover, ossification in elephants starts very early and progresses rapidly. Specifically, the elephant exhibits the same percentage of bones showing an ossification centre at the end of the first third of its gestation period as the mouse and hamster have close to birth. Elephants show a number of features of their ossification patterns that differ from those of other placental mammals. The pattern of the initiation of the ossification evident in the African elephant underscores a possible correlation between the timing of ossification onset and gestation time throughout mammals.

  2. Influence of zinc on ethanol-induced placental changes in the rat.

    PubMed

    Seyoum, G; Persaud, T V

    1995-01-01

    For normal fetal growth and development, an ample supply of nutrients and oxygen is essential. The placenta is the conduit for nutrient transfer and thus any factor that alters normal placental structure and function may adversely affect the nutritional status of the fetus. The effect of ethanol ingestion and zinc supplementation on placental structure was investigated by the simultaneous administration of ethanol and zinc to pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats from gestational day 6 through 12. One group of animals was given an ethanol liquid diet, a second group received the ethanol liquid diet plus zinc, and another group was pair-fed a control liquid diet. Placentas were recovered on day 20 of gestation. The mean placental weight in the ethanol group was significantly higher than that in either the pair-fed control or the ethanol plus zinc group. The ethanol-treated group revealed more stagnated blood in the basal-decidual and in the basal-labyrinthine junctions. Intervillous spaces in the labyrinthine zones were markedly dilated and filled with more blood corpuscles compared to the pair-fed control group. The giant cells of the basal zone were also larger in size in the ethanol-treated group. The frequency of occurrence of stagnated blood in either the labyrinthine zone and in the basal-labyrinthine junction was less in the ethanol plus zinc group compared to the ethanol group.

  3. Gestational protein restriction induces alterations in placental morphology and mitochondrial function in rats during late pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Rebelato, Hércules Jonas; Esquisatto, Marcelo Augusto Marreto; Moraes, Camila; Amaral, Maria Esmeria Corezola; Catisti, Rosana

    2013-12-01

    The placenta acts a regulator of nutrient composition and supply from mother to fetus and is the source of hormonal signals that affect maternal and fetal metabolism. Thus, appropriate development of the placenta is crucial for normal fetal development. We investigated the effect of gestational protein restriction (GPR) on placental morphology and mitochondrial function on day 19 of gestation. Pregnant dams were divided into two groups: normal (NP 17 % casein) or low-protein diet (LP 6 % casein). The placentas were processed for biochemical, histomorphometric and ultrastructural analysis. The integrity of rat placental mitochondria (RPM) isolated by conventional differential centrifugation was measured by oxygen uptake (Clark-type electrode). LP animals presented an increase in adipose tissue and triacylglycerol and a decrease in serum insulin levels. No alterations were observed in body, liver, fetus, or placenta weight. There was also no change in serum glucose, total protein, or lipid content. Gestational protein restriction had tissue-specific respiratory effects, with the observation of a small change in liver respiration (~13 %) and considerable respiratory inhibition in placenta samples (~37 %). The higher oxygen uptake by RPM in the LP groups suggests uncoupling between respiration and oxidative phosphorylation. In addition, ultrastructural analysis of junctional zone giant cells from LP placenta showed a disorganized cytoplasm, with loss of integrity of most organelles and intense vacuolization. The present results led us to hypothesize that GPR alters placental structure and morphology, induces sensitivity to insulin, mitochondrial abnormalities and suggests premature aging of the placenta. Further studies are needed to test this hypothesis.

  4. Changes in vitelline and utero-placental hemodynamics: implications for cardiovascular development

    PubMed Central

    Linask, Kersti K.; Han, Mingda; Bravo-Valenzuela, Nathalie J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Analyses of cardiovascular development have shown an important interplay between heart function, blood flow, and morphogenesis of heart structure during the formation of a four-chambered heart. It is known that changes in vitelline and placental blood flow seemingly contribute substantially to early cardiac hemodynamics. This suggests that in order to understand mammalian cardiac structure-hemodynamic functional relationships, blood flow from the extra-embryonic circulation needs to be taken into account and its possible impact on cardiogenesis defined. Previously published Doppler ultrasound analyses and data of utero-placental blood flow from human studies and those using the mouse model are compared to changes observed with environmental exposures that lead to cardiovascular anomalies. Use of current concepts and models related to mechanotransduction of blood flow and fluid forces may help in the future to better define the characteristics of normal and abnormal utero-placental blood flow and the changes in the biophysical parameters that may contribute to congenital heart defects. Evidence from multiple studies is discussed to provide a framework for future modeling of the impact of experimental changes in blood flow on the mouse heart during normal and abnormal cardiogenesis. PMID:25426076

  5. Maternal cadmium exposure reduces placental zinc transport and induces fetal growth restriction in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Wang, Ying; Bo, Qing-Li; Ji, Yan-Li; Liu, Lu; Hu, Yong-Fang; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Zhang, Jun; Zhao, Ling-Li; Xu, De-Xiang

    2016-08-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is linked with increased risk of fetal growth restriction (FGR). Nevertheless, the mechanism remains unknown. This study established a mouse model of Cd-induced FGR through two exposure methods. Pregnant mice were either administered with CdCl2 (5, 50 and 250ppm) throughout pregnancy through drinking water or intraperitoneally injected with CdCl2 (4.5mg/kg) on GD9. As expected, fetal weight and crown-rump length were reduced in a gender-independent manner. Interestingly, Mt1 and Mt2, two metallothionein genes, were up-regulated in maternal liver. Correspondingly, Cd accumulated mainly in maternal liver and kidney, and only trace amounts of Cd could pass from dam to placentas and fetuses. Further analysis showed that placental Zn concentration was elevated. Conversely, embryonic Zn concentration was reduced. Moreover, placental Znt1 and Znt2, two zinc transporters, were down-regulated in Cd-exposed mice. These results suggest that maternal Cd exposure during pregnancy reduces placental Zn transport and induces fetal growth restriction. PMID:27319394

  6. Zika virus damages the human placental barrier and presents marked fetal neurotropism

    PubMed Central

    de Noronha, Lucia; Zanluca, Camila; Azevedo, Marina Luize Viola; Luz, Kleber Giovanni; dos Santos, Claudia Nunes Duarte

    2016-01-01

    An unusually high incidence of microcephaly in newborns has recently been observed in Brazil. There is a temporal association between the increase in cases of microcephaly and the Zika virus (ZIKV) epidemic. Viral RNA has been detected in amniotic fluid samples, placental tissues and newborn and fetal brain tissues. However, much remains to be determined concerning the association between ZIKV infection and fetal malformations. In this study, we provide evidence of the transplacental transmission of ZIKV through the detection of viral proteins and viral RNA in placental tissue samples from expectant mothers infected at different stages of gestation. We observed chronic placentitis (TORCH type) with viral protein detection by immunohistochemistry in Hofbauer cells and some histiocytes in the intervillous spaces. We also demonstrated the neurotropism of the virus via the detection of viral proteins in glial cells and in some endothelial cells and the observation of scattered foci of microcalcifications in the brain tissues. Lesions were mainly located in the white matter. ZIKV RNA was also detected in these tissues by real-time-polymerase chain reaction. We believe that these findings will contribute to the body of knowledge of the mechanisms of ZIKV transmission, interactions between the virus and host cells and viral tropism. PMID:27143490

  7. The Placental Microbiome Varies in Association with Low Birth Weight in Full-Term Neonates.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jia; Xiao, Xinhua; Zhang, Qian; Mao, Lili; Yu, Miao; Xu, Jianping

    2015-08-01

    Substantial evidence indicated that low birth weight was an independent risk factor for obesity, impaired glucose regulation, and diabetes later in life. However, investigations into the association between low birth weight and placental microbiome in full-term neonates are limited. Placentas were collected from low birth weight (LBW) and normal birth weight (NBW) full-term neonates (gestational age 37 w0d-41 w6d) consecutively born at Peking Union Medical College Hospital. The anthropometric measurements were measured and 16S ribosomal DNAamplicon high-throughput sequencing were utilized to define bacteria within placenta tissues. It showed that birth weight, ponderal index, head circumference, and placenta weight were significantly lower in LBW than NBW neonates (p < 0.05). The operational taxonomic units (OTUs) (p < 0.05) and the estimators of community richness (Chao) indexes (p < 0.05) showed a significantly lower diversity in LBW than NBW neonates. There were significant variations in the composition of placenta microbiota between the LBW and NBW neonates at the phylum and genus level. Furthermore, it indicated that Lactobacillus percentage was positively associated with birth weight (r = 0.541, p = 0.025). In conclusion, our present study for the first time detected the relationship between birth weight and placental microbiome profile in full-term neonates. It is novel in showing that the placental microbiome varies in association with low birth weight in full-term neonates. PMID:26287241

  8. Zika Virus Infection during Pregnancy in Mice Causes Placental Damage and Fetal Demise.

    PubMed

    Miner, Jonathan J; Cao, Bin; Govero, Jennifer; Smith, Amber M; Fernandez, Estefania; Cabrera, Omar H; Garber, Charise; Noll, Michelle; Klein, Robyn S; Noguchi, Kevin K; Mysorekar, Indira U; Diamond, Michael S

    2016-05-19

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in pregnant women causes intrauterine growth restriction, spontaneous abortion, and microcephaly. Here, we describe two mouse models of placental and fetal disease associated with in utero transmission of ZIKV. Female mice lacking type I interferon signaling (Ifnar1(-/-)) crossed to wild-type (WT) males produced heterozygous fetuses resembling the immune status of human fetuses. Maternal inoculation at embryonic day 6.5 (E6.5) or E7.5 resulted in fetal demise that was associated with ZIKV infection of the placenta and fetal brain. We identified ZIKV within trophoblasts of the maternal and fetal placenta, consistent with a trans-placental infection route. Antibody blockade of Ifnar1 signaling in WT pregnant mice enhanced ZIKV trans-placental infection although it did not result in fetal death. These models will facilitate the study of ZIKV pathogenesis, in utero transmission, and testing of therapies and vaccines to prevent congenital malformations. PMID:27180225

  9. Human Placental and Decidual Organ Cultures to Study Infections at the Maternal-fetal Interface.

    PubMed

    Rizzuto, Gabrielle A; Kapidzic, Mirhan; Gormley, Matthew; Bakardjiev, Anna I

    2016-01-01

    The placenta shows a large degree of interspecies anatomic variability. To best understand biology and pathophysiology of the human placenta, it is imperative to design experiments using human cells and tissues. An advantage of organ culture is maintenance of three-dimensional (3D) structural organization and extracellular matrix. The goal of the method described here is successful establishment of ex vivo human gestational tissue organ cultures and their healthy culture maintenance for 72-96 hr. The protocol details the immediate processing of research-consented, placental and decidual specimens fresh from the operating suite. These are abundant specimens that would otherwise be discarded. Detailed instructions on the sterile collection of these samples, including morphologic details on how to select appropriate tissues to establish 3D organ cultures, is provided. Placental villous and decidual tissues are microdissected into 2-3 mm(3) pieces and placed separately on matrix-lined transwell filters and cultured for several days. Villous and decidual organ cultures are well suited for the study of human host-pathogen interaction. As compared to other model organisms, these human cultures are particularly advantageous to examine mechanism of infection for pathogens that demonstrate variable patterns of host specificity. As an example, we demonstrate infection of placental and decidual organ cultures with the clinically relevant, facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. PMID:27500727

  10. The formation and transformation of hormones in maternal, placental and fetal compartments: biological implications.

    PubMed

    Pasqualini, Jorge R; Chetrite, Gérard S

    2016-07-01

    The fetal endocrine system constitutes the earliest system developing in fetal life and operates during all the steps of gestation. Its regulation is in part dependent on the secretion of placental and/or maternal precursors emanating across the feto-maternal interface. Human fetal and placental compartments possess all the enzymatic systems necessary to produce steroid hormones. However, their activities are different and complementary: the fetus is very active in converting acetate into cholesterol, in transforming pregnanes to androstanes, various hydroxylases, sulfotransferases, while all these transformations are absent or very limited in the placenta. This compartment can transform cholesterol to C21-steroids, convert 5-ene to 4-ene steroids, and has a high capacity to aromatize C19 precursors and to hydrolyze sulfates. Steroid hormone receptors are present at an early stage of gestation and are functional for important physiological activities. The production rate of some steroids greatly increases with fetal evolution (e.g. estriol increases 500-1000 times in relation to non-pregnant women). Other hormones, such as glucocorticoids, in particular the stress hormone cortisol, adipokines (e.g. leptin, adiponectin), insulin-like growth factors, are also a key factor for regulating reproduction, metabolism, appetite and may be significant in programming the fetus and its growth. We can hypothesize that the fetal and placental factors controlling hormonal levels in the fetal compartment can be of capital importance in the normal development of extra-uterine life. PMID:27567599

  11. Zika Virus Targets Different Primary Human Placental Cells, Suggesting Two Routes for Vertical Transmission.

    PubMed

    Tabata, Takako; Petitt, Matthew; Puerta-Guardo, Henry; Michlmayr, Daniela; Wang, Chunling; Fang-Hoover, June; Harris, Eva; Pereira, Lenore

    2016-08-10

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infection during pregnancy is linked to severe birth defects, but mother-to-fetus transmission routes are unknown. We infected different primary cell types from mid- and late-gestation placentas and explants from first-trimester chorionic villi with the prototype Ugandan and a recently isolated Nicaraguan ZIKV strain. ZIKV infects primary human placental cells and explants-cytotrophoblasts, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and Hofbauer cells in chorionic villi and amniotic epithelial cells and trophoblast progenitors in amniochorionic membranes-that express Axl, Tyro3, and/or TIM1 viral entry cofactors. ZIKV produced NS3 and E proteins and generated higher viral titers in amniotic epithelial cells from mid-gestation compared to late-gestation placentas. Duramycin, a peptide that binds phosphatidylethanolamine in enveloped virions and precludes TIM1 binding, reduced ZIKV infection in placental cells and explants. Our results suggest that ZIKV spreads from basal and parietal decidua to chorionic villi and amniochorionic membranes and that targeting TIM1 could suppress infection at the uterine-placental interface.

  12. Zika virus damages the human placental barrier and presents marked fetal neurotropism.

    PubMed

    Noronha, Lucia de; Zanluca, Camila; Azevedo, Marina Luize Viola; Luz, Kleber Giovanni; Santos, Claudia Nunes Duarte Dos

    2016-05-01

    An unusually high incidence of microcephaly in newborns has recently been observed in Brazil. There is a temporal association between the increase in cases of microcephaly and the Zika virus (ZIKV) epidemic. Viral RNA has been detected in amniotic fluid samples, placental tissues and newborn and fetal brain tissues. However, much remains to be determined concerning the association between ZIKV infection and fetal malformations. In this study, we provide evidence of the transplacental transmission of ZIKV through the detection of viral proteins and viral RNA in placental tissue samples from expectant mothers infected at different stages of gestation. We observed chronic placentitis (TORCH type) with viral protein detection by immunohistochemistry in Hofbauer cells and some histiocytes in the intervillous spaces. We also demonstrated the neurotropism of the virus via the detection of viral proteins in glial cells and in some endothelial cells and the observation of scattered foci of microcalcifications in the brain tissues. Lesions were mainly located in the white matter. ZIKV RNA was also detected in these tissues by real-time-polymerase chain reaction. We believe that these findings will contribute to the body of knowledge of the mechanisms of ZIKV transmission, interactions between the virus and host cells and viral tropism.

  13. Image-Based Modeling of Blood Flow and Oxygen Transfer in Feto-Placental Capillaries

    PubMed Central

    Brownbill, Paul; Janáček, Jiří; Jirkovská, Marie; Kubínová, Lucie; Chernyavsky, Igor L.; Jensen, Oliver E.

    2016-01-01

    During pregnancy, oxygen diffuses from maternal to fetal blood through villous trees in the placenta. In this paper, we simulate blood flow and oxygen transfer in feto-placental capillaries by converting three-dimensional representations of villous and capillary surfaces, reconstructed from confocal laser scanning microscopy, to finite-element meshes, and calculating values of vascular flow resistance and total oxygen transfer. The relationship between the total oxygen transfer rate and the pressure drop through the capillary is shown to be captured across a wide range of pressure drops by physical scaling laws and an upper bound on the oxygen transfer rate. A regression equation is introduced that can be used to estimate the oxygen transfer in a capillary using the vascular resistance. Two techniques for quantifying the effects of statistical variability, experimental uncertainty and pathological placental structure on the calculated properties are then introduced. First, scaling arguments are used to quantify the sensitivity of the model to uncertainties in the geometry and the parameters. Second, the effects of localized dilations in fetal capillaries are investigated using an idealized axisymmetric model, to quantify the possible effect of pathological placental structure on oxygen transfer. The model predicts how, for a fixed pressure drop through a capillary, oxygen transfer is maximized by an optimal width of the dilation. The results could explain the prevalence of fetal hypoxia in cases of delayed villous maturation, a pathology characterized by a lack of the vasculo-syncytial membranes often seen in conjunction with localized capillary dilations. PMID:27788214

  14. The Placental Microbiome Varies in Association with Low Birth Weight in Full-Term Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jia; Xiao, Xinhua; Zhang, Qian; Mao, Lili; Yu, Miao; Xu, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Substantial evidence indicated that low birth weight was an independent risk factor for obesity, impaired glucose regulation, and diabetes later in life. However, investigations into the association between low birth weight and placental microbiome in full-term neonates are limited. Placentas were collected from low birth weight (LBW) and normal birth weight (NBW) full-term neonates (gestational age 37 w0d–41 w6d) consecutively born at Peking Union Medical College Hospital. The anthropometric measurements were measured and 16S ribosomal DNAamplicon high-throughput sequencing were utilized to define bacteria within placenta tissues. It showed that birth weight, ponderal index, head circumference, and placenta weight were significantly lower in LBW than NBW neonates (p < 0.05). The operational taxonomic units (OTUs) (p < 0.05) and the estimators of community richness (Chao) indexes (p < 0.05) showed a significantly lower diversity in LBW than NBW neonates. There were significant variations in the composition of placenta microbiota between the LBW and NBW neonates at the phylum and genus level. Furthermore, it indicated that Lactobacillus percentage was positively associated with birth weight (r = 0.541, p = 0.025). In conclusion, our present study for the first time detected the relationship between birth weight and placental microbiome profile in full-term neonates. It is novel in showing that the placental microbiome varies in association with low birth weight in full-term neonates. PMID:26287241

  15. Mechanical and metabolic viability of a placental perfusion system in vitro under oxygenated and anoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Illsley, N P; Aarnoudse, J G; Penfold, P; Bardsley, S E; Coade, S B; Stacey, T E; Hytten, F E

    1984-01-01

    In vitro dual circuit perfusion of the placenta with well-oxygenated medium results in the continuous and stable consumption of oxygen and glucose over a 2-h perfusion period. This is reflected in a stable production of lactate and an energy charge which is higher at the end of the perfusion period than that seen in fresh placental tissue immediately after vaginal delivery. Anoxic perfusion causes an increase in glucose consumption which is more than twofold higher than that seen in the oxygenated perfusion, resulting finally in placental uptake of glucose not only from the maternal but also from the fetal circulation. Lactate production is increased during the anoxic perfusion, while the final tissue energy charge value lies between the values observed for fresh tissue and for the oxygenated perfusion. The shift to anaerobic metabolism shown by placental tissue in anoxic conditions enables continued functioning of the tissue over the 2-h perfusion period but it appears that under anoxic conditions the tissue may incur an energy debt not observed in oxygenated perfusions.

  16. Bisphenol A differentially activates protein kinase C isoforms in murine placental tissue.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wenjuan; Huang, Hui; Wang, Yanfei; Wong, Tsz Yan; Wang, C C; Leung, Lai K

    2013-06-01

    Bisphenol A is utilized to make polycarbonate plastics and is an environmental pollutant. Recent research has indicated that it is an endocrine disruptor and may interfere with reproductive processes. Our lab has previously shown that bisphenol A could regulate corticotrophin releasing hormone and aromatase in cultured placental cells. In the present study, the effect of bisphenol A on these two genes in the placenta was investigated in mice. Pregnant ICR mice were gavaged with bisphenol A at 2, 20 and 200mg/kg body weight/day from E13 to E16 and were euthanized at E17. Compared to the control mice, increased plasma estrogen and corticotrophin releasing hormone were observed in bisphenol A-treated mice. Messenger RNA quantification indicated that placental crh but not cyp19 was induced in mice treated with bisphenol A. Tracking the related signaling pathway, we found that protein kinase C ζ/λ and δ were activated in the placentas of bisphenol A-treated mice. As the gene promoter of crh contains CRE and the half site of ERE, either phospho-PKC or estrogen could stimulate the gene transactivation. These results indicate that bisphenol A might increase plasma concentrations of estradiol, testosterone, corticotrophin releasing hormone and placental phospho-PKC ζ/λ and δ in mice. Ultimately, the incidence of premature birth in these mice could increase.

  17. Adverse Perinatal Outcome in Subsequent Pregnancy after Stillbirth by Placental Vascular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Monari, Francesca; Pedrielli, Giulia; Vergani, Patrizia; Pozzi, Elisa; Mecacci, Federico; Serena, Caterina; Neri, Isabella; Facchinetti, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate outcome in the pregnancy following a stillbirth (SB) by a placental vascular disorders. Study Design A prospective, observational, multicenter study was conducted in woman with a history of stillbirth (> 22 weeks) between 2005 and June 2013, in 3 Italian University Hospitals. Causes of SB were previously identified after extensive investigations. Pregnant women were enrolled within the first trimester. The main outcome was “adverse neonatal outcome”, including perinatal death, fetal growth restriction, early preterm birth <33+6 weeks, hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, intracranial hemorrhage or respiratory distress. Results Out of 364 index pregnancies, 320 women (87.9%) had a subsequent pregnancy during the study period. Forty-seven had an early pregnancy loss. Out of 273 babies, 67 (24.5%) had an adverse perinatal outcome, including 1 SB and 1 early neonatal death (3.7/1000). Women who had a SB related to placental vascular disorders (39.6%), were at higher risk of an adverse neonatal outcome compared with women whose SB was unexplained or resulted from other causes (Adj. OR = 2.1, 95%CI: 1.2–3.8). Moreover, also obesity independently predicts an adverse perinatal outcome (Adj OR = 2.1, 95%CI: 1.1–4.3). Conclusion When previous SB is related to placental vascular disorders there is a high risk for adverse neonatal outcomes in the subsequent pregnancy. Maternal obesity is an additional risk factor. PMID:27228078

  18. Placental transfer of cefazolin and piperacillin in pregnancies remote from term complicated by Rh isoimmunization.

    PubMed

    Brown, C E; Christmas, J T; Bawdon, R E

    1990-09-01

    Although the administration of prophylactic antibodies for intrauterine transfusion is controversial, little information is available regarding placental transfer of antibiotics administered to the mother, or whether the presence of hydrops affects this placental transfer. Sixteen intravascular intrauterine transfusions were performed in 10 patients. Seven (10 procedures) patients were given 2 gm of cefazolin before the procedure and samples were obtained by fetal vascular access. Three patients (six procedures) were given 4 gm of piperacillin and samples were similarly obtained. Specimens were obtained for fetal serum, maternal serum, and amniotic fluid antibiotic concentration. The mean serum cefazolin concentration in hydropic fetuses was 18.04 +/- 3.37 micrograms/ml, and in nonhydropic fetuses the concentration was 21.02 +/- 17.8 micrograms/ml (p = 0.72). The mean fetal serum concentration of piperacillin was 22 +/- 12 micrograms/ml. The placental transfer of both drugs was similar. We conclude that the transplacental passage of these antibiotics is prompt and that the presence of hydrops does not significantly impair the passage of cefazolin.

  19. Systematic review and meta-analysis: rapid diagnostic tests versus placental histology, microscopy and PCR for malaria in pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background During pregnancy, malaria infection with Plasmodium falciparum or Plasmodium vivax is related to adverse maternal health and poor birth outcomes. Diagnosis of malaria, during pregnancy, is complicated by the absence or low parasite densities in peripheral blood. Diagnostic methods, other than microscopy, are needed for detection of placental malaria. Therefore, the diagnostic accuracy of rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs), detecting antigen, and molecular techniques (PCR), detecting DNA, for the diagnosis of Plasmodium infections in pregnancy was systematically reviewed. Methods MEDLINE, EMBASE and Web of Science were searched for studies assessing the diagnostic accuracy of RDTs, PCR, microscopy of peripheral and placental blood and placental histology for the detection of malaria infection (all species) in pregnant women. Results The results of 49 studies were analysed in metandi (Stata), of which the majority described P. falciparum infections. Although both placental and peripheral blood microscopy cannot reliably replace histology as a reference standard for placental P. falciparum infection, many studies compared RDTs and PCR to these tests. The proportion of microscopy positives in placental blood (sensitivity) detected by peripheral blood microscopy, RDTs and PCR are respectively 72% [95% CI 62-80], 81% [95% CI 55-93] and 94% [95% CI 86-98]. The proportion of placental blood microscopy negative women that were negative in peripheral blood microscopy, RDTs and PCR (specificity) are 98% [95% CI 95-99], 94% [95% CI 76-99] and 77% [95% CI 71-82]. Based on the current data, it was not possible to determine if the false positives in RDTs and PCR are caused by sequestered parasites in the placenta that are not detected by placental microscopy. Conclusion The findings suggest that RDTs and PCR may have good performance characteristics to serve as alternatives for the diagnosis of malaria in pregnancy, besides any other limitations and practical considerations

  20. Simplified matrix solid phase dispersion procedure for the determination of parabens and benzophenone-ultraviolet filters in human placental tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Vela-Soria, F; Rodríguez, I; Ballesteros, O; Zafra-Gómez, A; Ballesteros, L; Cela, R; Navalón, A

    2014-12-01

    In recent decades, the industrial development has resulted in the appearance of a large amount of new chemicals that are able to produce disorders in the human endocrine system. These substances, so-called endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), include many families of compounds, such as parabens and benzophenone-UV filters. Taking into account the demonstrated biological activity of these compounds, it is necessary to develop new analytical procedures to assess the exposure in order to establish, in an accurate way, relationships between EDCs and harmful health effects in population. In the present work, a new method based on a simplified sample treatment by matrix solid phase dispersion (MSPD) followed by ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) analysis, is validated for the determination of four parabens (methyl-, ethyl-, propyl- and butylparaben) and six benzophenone-UV filters (benzophenone-1, benzophenone-2, benzophenone-3, benzophenone-6, benzophenone-8 and 4-hydroxybenzophenone) in human placental tissue samples. The extraction parameters were accurately optimized using multivariate optimization strategies. Ethylparaben ring-13C6 and benzophenone-d10 were used as surrogates. The found limits of quantification ranged from 0.2 to 0.4 ng g(-1) and inter-day variability (evaluated as relative standard deviation) ranged from 5.4% to 12.8%. The method was validated using matrix-matched standard calibration followed by a recovery assay with spiked samples. Recovery rates ranged from 96% to 104%. The method was satisfactorily applied for the determination of compounds in human placental tissue samples collected at the moment of delivery from 10 randomly selected women.

  1. Leptin Is an Anti-Apoptotic Effector in Placental Cells Involving p53 Downregulation

    PubMed Central

    Toro, Ayelén Rayen; Maymó, Julieta Lorena; Ibarbalz, Federico Matías; Pérez, Antonio Pérez; Maskin, Bernardo; Faletti, Alicia Graciela; Margalet, Víctor Sánchez; Varone, Cecilia Laura

    2014-01-01

    Leptin, a peripheral signal synthetized by the adipocyte to regulate energy metabolism, can also be produced by placenta, where it may work as an autocrine hormone. We have previously demonstrated that leptin promotes proliferation and survival of trophoblastic cells. In the present work, we aimed to study the molecular mechanisms that mediate the survival effect of leptin in placenta. We used the human placenta choriocarcinoma BeWo and first trimester Swan-71 cell lines, as well as human placental explants. We tested the late phase of apoptosis, triggered by serum deprivation, by studying the activation of Caspase-3 and DNA fragmentation. Recombinant human leptin added to BeWo cell line and human placental explants, showed a decrease on Caspase-3 activation. These effects were dose dependent. Maximal effect was achieved at 250 ng leptin/ml. Moreover, inhibition of endogenous leptin expression with 2 µM of an antisense oligonucleotide, reversed Caspase-3 diminution. We also found that the cleavage of Poly [ADP-ribose] polymerase-1 (PARP-1) was diminished in the presence of leptin. We analyzed the presence of low DNA fragments, products from apoptotic DNA cleavage. Placental explants cultivated in the absence of serum in the culture media increased the apoptotic cleavage of DNA and this effect was prevented by the addition of 100 ng leptin/ml. Taken together these results reinforce the survival effect exerted by leptin on placental cells. To improve the understanding of leptin mechanism in regulating the process of apoptosis we determined the expression of different intermediaries in the apoptosis cascade. We found that under serum deprivation conditions, leptin increased the anti-apoptotic BCL-2 protein expression, while downregulated the pro-apoptotic BAX and BID proteins expression in Swan-71 cells and placental explants. In both models leptin augmented BCL-2/BAX ratio. Moreover we have demonstrated that p53, one of the key cell cycle-signaling proteins, is

  2. Differential Expression of Placental Villous Angiopoietin-1 and -2 During Early, Mid and Late Baboon Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Babischkin, J. S.; Suresch, D. L.; Pepe, G. J.; Albrecht, E. D.

    2009-01-01

    Although vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1) and Ang-2 have important roles in angiogenesis, very little is known about the regulation of these factors in the villous placenta during human pregnancy. In the present study, to investigate whether placental expression of Ang-1, Ang-2 and VEGF was altered in a cell-specific manner with advancing baboon gestation, the mRNA levels of these growth factors were determined by RT-PCR in cells isolated by Percoll gradient centrifugation from and protein localization assessed by immunocytochemistry in the villous placenta at early (day 60), mid (day 100) and late (day 170, term is 184 days) baboon gestation. Mean (± SE) Ang-1 mRNA levels, relative to 18S rRNA, in villous syncytiotrophoblast (3.92 ± 0.68) and cytotrophoblast (1.31 ± 0.31) cell fractions were highest on day 60 of gestation, then decreased by approximately 2.5-fold (P<0.05) to 1.39 ± 0.29 and 0.49 ±0.07, respectively, on day 170. Moreover, Ang-1 mRNA levels in the villous stromal cells and Ang-2 mRNA levels in all placental villous cell fractions were similar on days 60, 100, and 170 of gestation. In contrast to Ang-1 and Ang-2, placental villous cytotrophoblast VEGF mRNA levels were increased 2.94 fold (P<0.05) between mid (0.67 ± 0.15) and late (1.97 ± 0.49) gestation. A corresponding decrease in Ang-1, absence of change in Ang-2, and increase in VEGF protein immunocytochemical expression were exhibited in placental trophoblast with advancing baboon pregnancy. Ang-1/-2 and the angiopoietin Tie-2 receptor were expressed in vascular endothelial cells of the villous placenta, indicating that these blood vessel cells are a major site of ligand-receptor interaction for angiogenesis during primate pregnancy. We conclude that there is a cell-specific differential change in placental villous trophoblast expression of VEGF, Ang-1, and Ang-2 which we propose is important in regulating angiogenesis in the villous placenta during

  3. IFPA Senior Award Lecture: making sense of pre-eclampsia - two placental causes of preeclampsia?

    PubMed

    Redman, C W; Sargent, I L; Staff, A C

    2014-02-01

    Incomplete spiral artery remodelling is the first of two stages of pre-eclampsia, typically of early onset. The second stage comprises dysregulated uteroplacental perfusion and placental oxidative stress. Oxidatively stressed syncytiotrophoblast (STB) over-secretes proteins that perturb maternal angiogenic balance and are considered to be pre-eclampsia biomarkers. We propose that, in addition and more fundamentally, these STB-derived proteins are biomarkers of a cellular (STB) stress response, which typically involves up-regulation of some proteins and down-regulation of others (positive and negative stress proteins respectively). Soluble vascular growth factor receptor-1 (sVEGFR-1) and reduced growth factor (PlGF) then exemplify positive and negative STB stress response proteins in the maternal circulation. Uncomplicated term pregnancy is associated with increasing sVEGFR-1 and decreasing PlGF, which can be interpreted as evidence of increasing STB stress. STB pathology, at or after term (for example focal STB necrosis) demonstrates this stress, with or without pre-eclampsia. We review the evidence that when placental growth reaches its limits at term, terminal villi become over-crowded with diminished intervillous pore size impeding intervillous perfusion with increasing intervillous hypoxia and STB stress. This type of STB stress has no antecedent pathology, so the fetuses are well-grown, as typifies late onset pre-eclampsia, and prediction is less effective than for the early onset syndrome because STB stress is a late event. In summary, abnormal placental perfusion and STB stress contribute to the pathogenesis of early and late onset pre-eclampsia. But the former has an extrinsic cause - poor placentation, whereas the latter has an intrinsic cause, 'microvillous overcrowding', as placental growth reaches its functional limits. This model explains important features of late pre-eclampsia and raises questions of how antecedent medical risk factors such as

  4. Activation of placental insulin and mTOR signaling in a mouse model of maternal obesity associated with fetal overgrowth.

    PubMed

    Rosario, Fredrick J; Powell, Theresa L; Jansson, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Fetal overgrowth is common in obese women and is associated with perinatal complications and increased risk for the child to develop metabolic syndrome later in life. Placental nutrient transport capacity has been reported to be increased in obese women giving birth to large infants; however, the underlying mechanisms are not well established. Obesity in pregnancy is characterized by elevated maternal serum insulin and leptin, hormones that stimulate placental amino acid transporters in vitro. We hypothesized that maternal obesity activates placental insulin/IGF-I/mTOR and leptin signaling pathways. We tested this hypothesis in a mouse model of obesity in pregnancy that is associated with fetal overgrowth. C57BL/6J female mice were fed a control (C) or a high-fat/high-sugar (HF/HS) pelleted diet supplemented by ad libitum access to sucrose (20%) solution. Placentas were collected at embryonic day 18.5. Using Western blot analysis, placental mTOR activity was determined along with energy, inflammatory, leptin, and insulin signaling pathways (upstream modulators of mTOR). Phosphorylation of S6 ribosomal protein (S-235/236), 4E-BP1 (T-37/46), Insulin receptor substrate 1 (Y-608), Akt (T-308), and STAT-3 (Y-705) was increased in obese dams. In contrast, expression of placental caspase-1, IкBα, IL-1β, and phosphorylated-JNK(p46/54-T183/Y185) was unaltered. Fetal amino acid availability is a key determinant of fetal growth. We propose that activation of placental insulin/IGF-I/mTOR and leptin signaling pathways in obese mice stimulates placental amino acid transport and contributes to increased fetal growth.

  5. Factor V Leiden, Prothrombin and MTHFR Mutation in Patients with Preeclamsia, Intrauterine Growth Restriction and Placental Abruption

    PubMed Central

    Livrinova, Vesna; Lega, Marija Hadzi; Dimcheva, Anita Hristova; Samardziski, Igor; Isjanovska, Rozalinda

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Factor V Leiden, Prothrombin and MTHFR gene mutation, could have an influence in pregnancy with adverse outcome Preeclamsia, IUGR and Placental abruption. AIM: The aim of this study is to investigate the presence of above mentioned inherited thrombophilias and its statistical significance, distribution among the complicated and normal pregnancy, and relative risk for carrier of mutation to develop preeclampsia, IUGR and placental abruption. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Prospective cohort study is implemented at University Clinic for Obstetric and Gynecology in Skopje, Republic of Macedonia. The study included 109 delivered patients: 40 with preeclapmsia, 22 with IUGR, 17 with placental abruption and 30 as control group with normal pregnancy. The amount of 3 ml venous blood has been used for detection of these point mutations using ThromboStrip -Opegen, QIAGEN kit manufactured for thrombotic risk. RESULTS: The highest frequency was found: in the group with preeclampsia 35% were MTHFR homozygous, IUGR -MTHFR heterozygous 45%, Placental abruption- 52.9% MTHFR heterozygous, and in the control group without thrombophilia 56.7%. There were combined thrombophilia in 3 patients. There aren`t statistical significance in presence of thrombophilia among groups (p > 0.05). Statistical significance (p < 0.05) was found between carriers of MTHFR homozygous in preeclampsia and group with placental abruption and control group. Relative risk in IUGR group for MTHFR homozygous was 5.54 (1.37placental abruption for Factor V Leiden heterozygous was 4.50 (0.47placental abruption. Further investigations with more patients are warranted. PMID:27275292

  6. Partial Loss of Genomic Imprinting Reveals Important Roles for Kcnq1 and Peg10 Imprinted Domains in Placental Development

    PubMed Central

    Koppes, Erik; Himes, Katherine P.; Chaillet, J. Richard

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in imprinted genes or their imprint control regions (ICRs) produce changes in imprinted gene expression and distinct abnormalities in placental structure, indicating the importance of genomic imprinting to placental development. We have recently shown that a very broad spectrum of placental abnormalities associated with altered imprinted gene expression occurs in the absence of the oocyte–derived DNMT1o cytosine methyltransferase, which normally maintains parent-specific imprinted methylation during preimplantation. The absence of DNMT1o partially reduces inherited imprinted methylation while retaining the genetic integrity of imprinted genes and their ICRs. Using this novel system, we undertook a broad and inclusive approach to identifying key ICRs involved in placental development by correlating loss of imprinted DNA methylation with abnormal placental phenotypes in a mid-gestation window (E12.5-E15.5). To these ends we measured DNA CpG methylation at 15 imprinted gametic differentially methylated domains (gDMDs) that overlap known ICRs using EpiTYPER-mass array technology, and linked these epigenetic measurements to histomorphological defects. Methylation of some imprinted gDMDs, most notably Dlk1, was nearly normal in mid-gestation DNMT1o-deficient placentas, consistent with the notion that cells having lost methylation on these DMDs do not contribute significantly to placental development. Most imprinted gDMDs however showed a wide range of methylation loss among DNMT1o-deficient placentas. Two striking associations were observed. First, loss of DNA methylation at the Peg10 imprinted gDMD associated with decreased embryonic viability and decreased labyrinthine volume. Second, loss of methylation at the Kcnq1 imprinted gDMD was strongly associated with trophoblast giant cell (TGC) expansion. We conclude that the Peg10 and Kcnq1 ICRs are key regulators of mid-gestation placental function. PMID:26241757

  7. Short-term and long-term ethanol administration inhibits the placental uptake and transport of valine in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Patwardhan, R.V.; Schenker, S.; Henderson, G.I.; Abou-Mourad, N.N.; Hoyumpa, A.M. Jr.

    1981-08-01

    Ethanol ingestion during pregnancy causes a pattern of fetal/neonatal dysfunction called the FAS. The effects of short- and long-term ethanol ingestion on the placental uptake and maternal-fetal transfer of valine were studied in rats. The in vivo placental uptake and fetal uptake were estimated after injection of 0.04 micromol of /sub 14/C-valine intravenously on day 20 of gestation in Sprague-Dawley rats. Short-term ethanol ingestion (4 gm/kg) caused a significant reduction in the placental uptake of /sub 14/C-valine by 33%, 60%, and 30%, and 31% at 2.5, 5, 10, and 15 min after valine administration, respectively (p less than 0.01), and a similar significant reduction occurred in the fetal uptake of /sub 14/C-valine (p less than 0.01). Long-term ethanol ingestion prior to and throughout gestation resulted in a 47% reduction in placental valine uptake (p less than 0.01) and a 46% reduction in fetal valine uptake (p less than 0.01). Long-term ethanol feeding from day 4 to day 20 of gestation caused a 32% reduction in placental valine uptake (p less than 0.01) and a 26% reduction in fetal valine uptake (p less than 0.01). We conclude that both short- and long-term ingestion of ethanol inhibit the placental uptake and maternal-fetal transfer of an essential amino acid--valine. An alteration of placental function may contribute to the pathogenesis of the FAS.