Science.gov

Sample records for plains site measured

  1. Aerosol measurements at the Southern Great Plains Site: Design and surface installation

    SciTech Connect

    Leifer, R.; Knuth, R.H.; Guggenheim, S.F.; Albert, B.

    1996-04-01

    To impropve the predictive capabilities of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program radiation models, measurements of awserosol size distributions, condensation particle concentrations, aerosol scattering coefficients at a number of wavelenghts, and the aerosol absorption coefficients are needed at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. Alos, continuous measurements of ozone concnetrations are needed for model validation. The environmental Measuremenr Laboratory (EMK) has the responsibility to establish the surface aerosol measurements program at the SGP site. EML has designed a special sampling manifold.

  2. Site/Systems Operations, Maintenance and Facilities Management of the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Susan

    2005-08-01

    This contract covered the site/systems operations, maintenance, and facilities management of the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site.

  3. Surface summertime radiative forcing by shallow cumuli at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains site

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Larry K.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Long, Charles N.; Mills Jr., David L.

    2011-01-08

    Although shallow cumuli are common over large areas of the globe, their impact on the surface radiative forcing has not been carefully evaluated. This study addresses this shortcoming by analyzing data from days with shallow cumuli collected over eight summers (2000-2007) at the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (collectively ACRF) Southern Great Plains site. During periods with clouds, the average shortwave and longwave radiative forcings are 45.5 W m-2 and +11.6 W m-2, respectively. The forcing has been defined so that a negative (positive) forcing indicates a surface cooling (warming). On average, the shortwave forcing is negative, however, instances with positive shortwave forcing are observed approximately 20% of the time. These positive values of shortwave forcing are associated with three-dimensional radiative effects of the clouds. The three-dimensional effects are shown to be largest for intermediate cloud amounts. The magnitude of the three-dimensional effects decreased with averaging time, but it is not negligibly small even for large averaging times as long as four hours.

  4. Application of Aerosol Hygroscopicity Measured at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program's Southern Great Plains Site to Examine Composition and Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasparini, Roberto; Runjun, Li; Collins, Don R.; Ferrare, Richard A.; Brackett, Vincent G.

    2006-01-01

    A Differential Mobility Analyzer/Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (DMA/TDMA) was used to measure submicron aerosol size distributions, hygroscopicity, and occasionally volatility during the May 2003 Aerosol Intensive Operational Period (IOP) at the Central Facility of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program's Southern Great Plains (ARM SGP) site. Hygroscopic growth factor distributions for particles at eight dry diameters ranging from 0.012 micrometers to 0.600 micrometers were measured throughout the study. For a subset of particle sizes, more detailed measurements were occasionally made in which the relative humidity or temperature to which the aerosol was exposed was varied over a wide range. These measurements, in conjunction with backtrajectory clustering, were used to infer aerosol composition and to gain insight into the processes responsible for evolution. The hygroscopic growth of both the smallest and largest particles analyzed was typically less than that of particles with dry diameters of about 0.100 micrometers. It is speculated that condensation of secondary organic aerosol on nucleation mode particles is largely responsible for the minimal hygroscopic growth observed at the smallest sizes considered. Growth factor distributions of the largest particles characterized typically contained a nonhygroscopic mode believed to be composed primarily of dust. A model was developed to characterize the hygroscopic properties of particles within a size distribution mode through analysis of the fixed size hygroscopic growth measurements. The performance of this model was quantified through comparison of the measured fixed size hygroscopic growth factor distributions with those simulated through convolution of the size-resolved concentration contributed by each of the size modes and the mode-resolved hygroscopicity. This transformation from sizeresolved hygroscopicity to mode-resolved hygroscopicity facilitated examination of changes in the hygroscopic

  5. Environmental assessment for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program: Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site

    SciTech Connect

    Policastro, A.J.; Pfingston, J.M.; Maloney, D.M.; Wasmer, F.; Pentecost, E.D.

    1992-03-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is aimed at supplying improved predictive capability of climate change, particularly the prediction of cloud-climate feedback. The objective will be achieved by measuring the atmospheric radiation and physical and meteorological quantities that control solar radiation in the earth`s atmosphere and using this information to test global climate and related models. The proposed action is to construct and operate a Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) research site in the southern Great Plains as part of the Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program whose objective is to develop an improved predictive capability of global climate change. The purpose of this CART research site in southern Kansas and northern Oklahoma would be to collect meteorological and other scientific information to better characterize the processes controlling radiation transfer on a global scale. Impacts which could result from this facility are described.

  6. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Site

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the largest global change research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. To achieve this goal, ARM scientists and researchers around the world use continuous data obtained through the ARM Climate Research Facility. ARM maintains four major, permanent sites for data collection and deploys the ARM Mobile Facility to other sites as determined. Scientists are using the information obtained from the permanent SGP site to improve cloud and radiative models and parameterizations and, thereby, the performance of atmospheric general circulation models used for climate research. More than 30 instrument clusters have been placed around the SGP site. The locations for the instruments were chosen so that the measurements reflect conditions over the typical distribution of land uses within the site. The continuous observations at the SGP site are supplemented by intensive observation periods, when the frequency of measurements is increased and special measurements are added to address specific research questions. During such periods, 2 gigabytes or more of data (two billion bytes) are generated daily. SGP data sets from 1993 to the present reside in the ARM Archive at http://www.archive.arm.gov/ http. Users will need to register for a password, but all files are then free for viewing or downloading. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  7. Comparison Between Lidar and Nephelometer Measurements of Aerosol Hygroscopicity at the Southern Great Plains Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pahlow, M.; Feingold, G.; Jefferson, A.; Andrews, E.; Ogren, J. A.; Wang, J.; Lee, Y.-N.; Ferrare, R. A.

    2004-01-01

    Aerosol hygroscopicity has a significant effect on radiative properties of aerosols. Here a lidar method, applicable to cloud-capped, well-mixed atmospheric boundary layers, is employed to determine the hygroscopic growth factor f(RH) under unperturbed, ambient atmospheric conditions. The data used for the analysis were collected under a wide range of atmospheric aerosol levels during both routine measurement periods and during the intensive operations period (IOP) in May 2003 at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility in Oklahoma, USA, as part of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. There is a good correlation (approx. 0.7) between a lidar-derived growth factor (measured over the range 85% RH to 96% RH) with a nephelometer-derived growth factor measured over the RH range 40% to 85%. For these RH ranges, the slope of the lidar-derived growth factor is much steeper than that of the nephelometer-derived growth factor, reflecting the rapid increase in particle size with increasing RH. The results are corroborated by aerosol model calculations of lidar and nephelometer equivalent f(RH) based on in situ aerosol size and composition measurements during the IOP. It is suggested that the lidar method can provide useful measurements of the dependence of aerosol optical properties on relative humidity, and under conditions closer to saturation than can currently be achieved with humidified nephelometers.

  8. Field measures show methanotroph sensitivity to soil moisture follows precipitation regime of the grassland sites across the US Great Plains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, A.; Webb, C. T.; Johnson, N. G.; Brewer, P. E.; von Fischer, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Methane uptake rates are known to have temporal variation in response to changing soil moisture levels. However, the relative importance of soil diffusivity vs. methanotroph physiology has not been disentangled to date. Testing methanotroph physiology in the laboratory can lead to misleading results due to changes in the fine-scale habitat where methanotrophs reside. To assay the soil moisture sensitivity of methanotrophs under field conditions, we studied 22 field plots scattered across eight Great Plains grassland sites that differed in precipitation regime and soil moisture, making ca. bi-weekly measures during the growing seasons over three years. Quantification of methanotroph activity was achieved from chamber-based measures of methane uptake coincident with SF6-derived soil diffusivity, and interpretation in a reaction-diffusion model. At each plot, we also measured soil water content (SWC), soil temperature and inorganic nitrogen (N) contents. We also assessed methanotroph community composition via 454 sequencing of the pmoA gene. Statistical analyses showed that methanotroph activity had a parabolic response with SWC (concave down), and significant differences in the shape of this response among sites. Moreover, we found that the SWC at peak methanotroph activity was strongly correlated with mean annual precipitation (MAP) of the site. The sequence data revealed distinct composition patterns, with structure that was associated with variation in MAP and soil texture. These results suggest that local precipitation regime shapes methanotroph community composition, which in turn lead to unique sensitivity of methane uptake rates with soil moisture. Our findings suggest that methanotroph activity may be more accurately modeled when the biological and environmental responses are explicitly described.

  9. The Vertical Distribution of Aerosols Over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains Site Measured versus Modeled

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrare, R.; Turner, D.D.; Clayton, M.; Guibert, S.; Schulz, M.; Chin, M.

    2005-03-18

    Aerosol extinction profiles measured by the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Raman lidar are used to evaluate aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness (AOT) simulated by aerosol models as part of the Aerosol module inter- Comparison in global models (AEROCOM) project. This project seeks to diagnose aerosol modules of global models and subsequently identify and eliminate weak components in aerosol modules used for global modeling; AEROCOM activities also include assembling data sets to be used in the evaluations. The AEROCOM average aerosol extinction profiles typically show good agreement with the Raman lidar profiles for altitudes above about 2 km; below 2 km the average model profiles are significantly (30-50%) lower than the Raman lidar profiles. The vertical variability in the average aerosol extinction profiles simulated by these models is less than the variability in the corresponding Raman lidar pro files. The measurements also show a much larger diurnal variability than the Interaction with Chemistry and Aerosols (INCA) model, particularly near the surface where there is a high correlation between aerosol extinction and relative humidity.

  10. Online measurements of ambient fluorescent aerosol particles by WIBS at a polluted regional site in the North China Plain: potential impact of burning activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, H.; Wang, Z.; Cheng, Y.; Xie, Z.; Kecorius, S.; McMeeking, G. R.; Yu, X.; Pöhlker, C.; Zhang, M.; Wiedensohler, A.; Kuhn, U.; Poeschl, U.; Huffman, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Online measurements of ambient fluorescent aerosol particles by WIBS at a polluted regional site in the North China Plain: potential impact of burning activities Zhibin Wang1, Xiawei Yu1,3, Simonas Kecorius2, Zhouqing Xie3, Gavin McMeeking4, Christopher Pöhlker1, Minghui, Zhang1, Alfred Wiedensohler2, Uwe Kuhn1, Yafang Cheng1, Ulrich Pöschl1, Hang Su1,*1Multiphase Chemistry and Biogeochemistry Departments, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Mainz 55128, Germany2Leibniz-Institute for Tropospheric Research, Leipzig 04318, Germany3School of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026, China4Droplet Measurement Technologies, Boulder 80301, USA ABSTRACTBioaerosols are the main subset of super-micron particles, and significantly influence the evolution of cloud and precipitation, as well as the public health. Currently, the detection of ambient biological materials in real-time is mainly based on the presence of fluorophores in the particles. In this study, we present the wideband integrated bioaerosol spectrometer (WIBS) measurement results to characterize the fluorescent aerosol particles (FAP) at a polluted regional site (Xianghe, 39.80 °N, 116.96 °E) in the North China Plain. We observed substantially much higher number concentration of FAP as compared with those of previous studies in clean environments. We found the good agreement between the FAP number fraction in coarse mode particles (> 1 mm) and BC mass fraction in fine particles (< 1 mm), possibly indicating a majority of the observed FAP is to a certain extent related to the anthropogenic burning activities nearby. This interference and uncertainty should be especially noticed when performing fluorescence measurements in the polluted area, where the certain non-biological compounds (such as SOA, PAH and soot) may significantly lead to a positive fluorescence measurement artifacts and an overestimation of actual fluorescent biological aerosol particles. We also

  11. Snake River Plain FORGE Site Characterization Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Robert Podgorney

    2016-04-18

    The site characterization data used to develop the conceptual geologic model for the Snake River Plain site in Idaho, as part of phase 1 of the Frontier Observatory for Research in Geothermal Energy (FORGE) initiative. This collection includes data on seismic events, groundwater, geomechanical models, gravity surveys, magnetics, resistivity, magnetotellurics (MT), rock physics, stress, the geologic setting, and supporting documentation, including several papers. Also included are 3D models (Petrel and Jewelsuite) of the proposed site. Data for wells INEL-1, WO-2, and USGS-142 have been included as links to separate data collections. These data have been assembled by the Snake River Geothermal Consortium (SRGC), a team of collaborators that includes members from national laboratories, universities, industry, and federal agencies, lead by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Other contributors include the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CEAS), the University of Idaho, Idaho State University, Boise State University, University of Wyoming, University of Oklahoma, Energy and Geoscience Institute-University of Utah, US Geothermal, Baker Hughes Campbell Scientific Inc., Chena Power, US Geological Survey (USGS), Idaho Department of Water Resources, Idaho Geological Survey, and Mink GeoHydro.

  12. Water vapor from sunradiometry in comparison wit microwave and balloon-sonde measurements at the Southern Great Plains ARM site

    SciTech Connect

    Michalsky, J.J.; Harrison, L.C.; Liljegren, J.C.

    1994-12-31

    Water vapor plays an important role in weather in climate; it is the most important greenhouse gas and the most variable in space and time. The DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program is studying the column abundance and distribution of water vapor with altitude. Although the Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) is mainly for measurements of spectral short-wave radiation and spectral extinction by aerosol, it can also measure total column water vapor. This paper reports a preliminary investigation of MFRSR`s capabilities for total column water vapor under cloudless conditions.

  13. Retrieval of Cloud Ice Water Content Profiles from Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-B Brightness Temperatures Near the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains Site

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, E-K.; Liu, G.

    2005-03-18

    One of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program important goals is to develop and test radiation and cloud parameterizations of climate models using single column modeling (SCMs) (Randall et al. 1996). As forcing terms, SCMs need advection tendency of cloud condensates besides the tendencies of temperature, moisture and momentum. To compute the tendency terms of cloud condensates, 3D distribution of cloud condensates over a scale much larger than the climate model's grid scale is needed. Since they can cover a large area within a short time period, satellite measurements are useful utilities to provide advection tendency of cloud condensates for SCMs. However, so far, most satellite retrieval algorithms only retrieve vertically integrated quantities, for example, in the case of cloud ice, ice water path (IWP). To fulfill the requirement of 3D ice water content field for computing ice water advection, in this study, we develop an ice water content profile retrieval algorithm by combining the vertical distribution characteristics obtained from long-term surface radar observations and satellite high-frequency microwave observations that cover a large area. The algorithm is based on the Bayesian theorem using a priori database derived from analyzing cloud radar observations at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The end product of the algorithm is a 3D ice water content covering 10{sup o} x 10{sup o} surrounding the SGP site during the passage of the satellite. This 3D ice water content, together with wind field analysis, can be used to compute the advection tendency of ice water for SCMs.

  14. High Plains Regional Ground-water Study web site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Qi, Sharon L.

    2000-01-01

    Now available on the Internet is a web site for the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program- High Plains Regional Ground-Water Study. The purpose of the web site is to provide public access to a wide variety of information on the USGS investigation of the ground-water resources within the High Plains aquifer system. Typical pages on the web site include the following: descriptions of the High Plains NAWQA, the National NAWQA Program, the study-area setting, current and past activities, significant findings, chemical and ancillary data (which can be downloaded), listing and access to publications, links to other sites about the High Plains area, and links to other web sites studying High Plains ground-water resources. The High Plains aquifer is a regional aquifer system that underlies 174,000 square miles in parts of eight States (Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming). Because the study area is so large, the Internet is an ideal way to provide project data and information on a near real-time basis. The web site will be a collection of living documents where project data and information are updated as it becomes available throughout the life of the project. If you have an interest in the High Plains area, you can check this site periodically to learn how the High Plains NAWQA activities are progressing over time and access new data and publications as they become available.

  15. Impacts of the triggering function of cumulus parameterization on warm-season diurnal rainfall cycles at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi-Chi; Pan, Hua-Lu; Hsu, Huang-Hsiung

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the impacts of the triggering function of the deep convection scheme on diurnal rainfall variation in the middle latitudes by using the single-column version of the Community Atmospheric Model (SCAM). Using the climate statistics of a long-term ensemble analysis of SCAM simulations, we quantified and validated the diurnal rainfall climatological regimes at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The results showed that the averaged diurnal rainfall cycle simulated using the default Zhang-Mcfarlane (ZM) scheme of the SCAM peaks near noon, which is far earlier than the observed nighttime peak phase. This bias was due to the ZM scheme, which produced spurious daytime rainfall, even during days in which only light rainfall was observed. By contrast, using a weather-focused scheme, the Simplified Arakawa-Schubert (SAS) scheme, we successfully simulated the nocturnal peak of the diurnal cycle. Experiments conducted on the ZM and SAS schemes featuring different triggering functions revealed that the relaxation of launching parcels above the planetary boundary layer (PBL) and the inclusion of convective inhibition (CIN) were crucial designs for the model to capture the nocturnal rainfall events of the SGP. The inclusion of CIN reduces spurious weak convective events, and the allowance of launching parcels being above the PBL better captures convective cloud base. The results of this study highlight the modulatory effect of low-level inhomogeneity on the diurnal variation of convection over midlatitudes and the importance of the triggering function of the deep convection scheme in capturing those variations.

  16. A Climatology of Fair-Weather Cloud Statistics at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Southern Great Plains Site: Temporal and Spatial Variability

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Larry K.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Long, Charles N.; Gustafson, William I.

    2006-03-30

    In previous work, Berg and Stull (2005) developed a new parameterization for Fair-Weather Cumuli (FWC). Preliminary testing of the new scheme used data collected during a field experiment conducted during the summer of 1996. This campaign included a few research flights conducted over three locations within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. A more comprehensive verification of the new scheme requires a detailed climatology of FWC. Several cloud climatologies have been completed for the ACRF SGP, but these efforts have focused on either broad categories of clouds grouped by height and season (e.g., Lazarus et al. 1999) or height and time of day (e.g., Dong et al. 2005). In these two examples, the low clouds were not separated by the type of cloud, either stratiform or cumuliform, nor were the horizontal chord length (the length of the cloud slice that passed directly overhead) or cloud aspect ratio (defined as the ratio of the cloud thickness to the cloud chord length) reported. Lane et al. (2002) presented distributions of cloud chord length, but only for one year. The work presented here addresses these shortcomings by looking explicitly at cases with FWC over five summers. Specifically, we will address the following questions: •Does the cloud fraction (CF), cloud-base height (CBH), and cloud-top height (CTH) of FWC change with the time of day or the year? •What is the distribution of FWC chord lengths? •Is there a relationship between the cloud chord length and the cloud thickness?

  17. Moisture and temperature balances at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains Site in forecasts with the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, D. L.; Boyle, J.; Cederwall, R.; Fiorino, M.; Hnilo, J.; Olson, J.; Phillips, T.; Potter, G.; Xie, S. C.

    2005-08-01

    We compare the balance of terms in moisture and temperature prediction equations during short forecasts by the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM2) with observed estimates at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains site for two intensive observing periods (IOPs). The goal is to provide insight into parameterization errors which ultimately should lead to model improvements. The atmospheric initial conditions are obtained from high-resolution numerical weather prediction (NWP) analyses. The land initial conditions are spun up to be consistent with those analyses. Three cases are considered: (1) June/July 1997 when the atmosphere is relatively moist and surface evaporation corresponds to 90% of the precipitation with advection accounting for the remainder; (2) rainy days in April 1997 when the atmosphere is less moist and horizontal advection accounts for much of the precipitation with a small contribution from surface evaporation and the balance being derived from the water already present in the column; and (3) nonrainy days of the April 1997 when the moist process parameterizations are inactive and the planetary boundary layer (PBL) parameterization is dominant. For the first case the Zhang-McFarlane deep convective parameterization drives the model to a wrong state. For the second the Hack shallow convective parameterization appears to be not acting deep enough. During both periods inconsistencies between CAM2 and ARM surface fluxes, land surface conditions and the net surface radiative fluxes indicate that the exchange parameterizations should be examined further. For the third case the PBL parameterization does not appear to create the correct vertical structure. In addition, the individual components of the dynamical tendency are very different between CAM2 and ARM, although the total dynamical tendency is similar in the two. Although these observations do not imply that those components are themselves wrong since they may be responding

  18. Comparison of CERES-MODIS Stratus Cloud Properties with Ground-Based Measurements at the DOE ARM Southern Great Plains Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dong, Xiquan; Minnis Patrick; Xi, Baike; Sun-Mack, Sunny; Chen, Yan

    2008-01-01

    Overcast stratus cloud properties derived for the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy system (CERES) Project using Terra and Aqua Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data are compared with observations taken at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains site from March 2000 through December 2004. Retrievals from ARM surface-based data were averaged over a 1-hour interval centered at the time of each satellite overpass, and the CERES-MODIS cloud properties were averaged within a 30-km x 30 km box centered on the ARM SGP site. Two datasets were analyzed: all of the data (ALL) which include multilayered, single-layered, and slightly broken stratus decks and a subset, single-layered unbroken decks (SL). The CERES-MODIS effective cloud heights were determined from effective cloud temperature using a lapse rate method with the surface temperature specified as the 24-h mean surface air temperature. For SL stratus, they are, on average, within the ARM radar-lidar estimated cloud boundaries and are 0.534 +/- 0.542 km and 0.108 +/- 0.480 km lower than the cloud physical tops and centers, respectively, and are comparable for day and night observations. The mean differences and standard deviations are slightly larger for ALL data, but not statistically different to those of SL data. The MODIS-derived effective cloud temperatures are 2.7 +/- 2.4 K less than the surface-observed SL cloud center temperatures with very high correlations (0.86-0.97). Variations in the height differences are mainly caused by uncertainties in the surface air temperatures, lapse rates, and cloud-top height variability. The biases are mainly the result of the differences between effective and physical cloud top, which are governed by cloud liquid water content and viewing zenith angle, and the selected lapse rate, -7.1 K km(exp -1). Based on a total of 43 samples, the means and standard deviations of the differences between the daytime Terra and surface

  19. Site Scientific Mission Plan for the Southern Great Plains CART site: January--June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, J.M.; Lamb, P.J.; Sisterson, D.L.

    1993-12-01

    The Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site is designed to help satisfy the data needs of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Science Team. This document defines the scientific priorities for site activities during the six months beginning on January 1, 1994, and also looks forward in lesser detail to subsequent six-month periods. The primary purpose of this Site Scientific Mission Plan is to provide guidance for the development of plans for site operations. It also provides information on current plans to the ARM Functional Teams (Management Team, Experiment Support Team, Operations Team, Data Management Team, Instrument Team, and Campaign Team), and it serves to disseminate the plans more generally within the ARM Program and among the Science Team. This document includes a description of the site`s operational status and the primary envisaged site activities, together with information concerning approved and proposed Intensive Observation Periods. Amendments will be prepared and distributed whenever the content changes by more than 30% within a six-month period. The primary users of this document are the site operator, the site scientist, the Science Team through the ARM Program Science Director, the ARM Program Experiment Center, and the aforementioned ARM Program Functional Teams. This plan is a living document that will be updated and reissued every six months as the observational facilities are developed, tested, and augmented and as priorities are adjusted in response to developments in scientific planning and understanding.

  20. Site Scientific Mission Plan for the Southern Great Plains CART site, July--December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, J.M.; Lamb, P.J.; Sisterson, D.L.

    1994-07-01

    The Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site is designed to help satisfy the data needs of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Science Team. This document defines the scientific priorities for site activities during the six months beginning on July 1, 1994, and also looks forward in lesser detail to subsequent six-month periods. The primary purpose of this Site Scientific Mission Plan is to provide guidance for the development of plans for site operations. It also provides information on current plans to the ARM Functional Teams (Management Team, Experiment Support Team, Operations Team, Data Management Team, Instrument Team, and Campaign Team), and it serves to disseminate the plans more generally within the ARM Program and among the Science Team. This document includes a description of the site`s operational status and the primary envisaged site activities, together with information concerning approved and proposed Intensive Observation Periods. Amendments will be prepared and distributed whenever the content changes by more than 30% within a six-month period. The primary users of this document are the site operator, the site scientist, the Science Team through the ARM Program Science Director, the ARM Program Experiment Center, and the aforementioned ARM Program Functional Teams. This plan is a living document that will be updated and reissued every six months as the observational facilities are developed, tested, and augmented and as priorities are adjusted in response to developments in scientific planning and understanding.

  1. Site scientific mission plan for the Southern Great Plains CART site: July--December 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Peppler, R.A.; Lamb, P.; Sisterson, D.L.

    1998-07-01

    The Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site was designed to help satisfy the data needs of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Science Team. This Site Scientific Mission Plan defines the scientific priorities for site activities during the six months beginning on July 1, 1998, and looks forward in lesser detail to subsequent six-month periods. The primary purpose of this document is to provide scientific guidance for the development of plans for site operations. It also provides information on current plans to the ARM functional teams (Management Team, Data and Science Integration Team [DSIT], Operations Team, and Instrument Team [IT]) and serves to disseminate the plans more generally within the ARM Program and among the members of the Science Team. This document includes a description of the operational status of the site and the primary site activities envisioned, together with information concerning approved and proposed intensive observation periods (IOPs). The primary users of this document are the site operator, the site program manager, the Site Scientist Team (SST), the Science Team through the ARM Program science director, the ARM program Experiment Center, and the aforementioned ARM Program functional teams. This plan is a living document that is updated and reissued every six months as the observational facilities are developed, tested, and augmented and as priorities are adjusted in response to developments in scientific planning and understanding.

  2. Site scientific mission plan for the Southern Great Plains CART Site, January--June 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Peppler, R.A.; Sisterson, D.L.; Lamb, P.

    1999-03-10

    The Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site was designed to help satisfy the data needs of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Science Team. This Site Scientific Mission Plan defines the scientific priorities for site activities during the six months beginning on January 1, 1999, and looks forward in lesser detail to subsequent six-month periods. The primary purpose of this document is to provide scientific guidance for the development of plans for site operations. It also provides information on current plans to the ARM functional teams (Management Team, Data and Science Integration Team [DSIT], Operations Team, and Instrument Team [IT]) and serves to disseminate the plans more generally within the ARM Program and among the members of the Science Team. This document includes a description of the operational status of the site and the primary site activities envisioned, together with information concerning approved and proposed intensive observation periods (IOPs). The primary users of this document are the site operator, the site program manager, the Site Scientist Team (SST), the Science Team through the ARM Program science director, the ARM Program Experiment Center, and the aforementioned ARM Program functional teams. This plan is a living document that is updated and reissued every six months as the observational facilities are developed, tested, and augmented and as priorities are adjusted in response to developments in scientific planning and understanding.

  3. Whooping crane stopover site use intensity within the Great Plains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearse, Aaron T.; Brandt, David A.; Harrell, Wade C.; Metzger, Kristine L.; Baasch, David M.; Hefley, Trevor J.

    2015-09-23

    Whooping cranes (Grus americana) of the Aransas-Wood Buffalo population migrate twice each year through the Great Plains in North America. Recovery activities for this endangered species include providing adequate places to stop and rest during migration, which are generally referred to as stopover sites. To assist in recovery efforts, initial estimates of stopover site use intensity are presented, which provide opportunity to identify areas across the migration range used more intensively by whooping cranes. We used location data acquired from 58 unique individuals fitted with platform transmitting terminals that collected global position system locations. Radio-tagged birds provided 2,158 stopover sites over 10 migrations and 5 years (2010–14). Using a grid-based approach, we identified 1,095 20-square-kilometer grid cells that contained stopover sites. We categorized occupied grid cells based on density of stopover sites and the amount of time cranes spent in the area. This assessment resulted in four categories of stopover site use: unoccupied, low intensity, core intensity, and extended-use core intensity. Although provisional, this evaluation of stopover site use intensity offers the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and partners a tool to identify landscapes that may be of greater conservation significance to migrating whooping cranes. Initially, the tool will be used by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and other interested parties in evaluating the Great Plains Wind Energy Habitat Conservation Plan.

  4. Site scientific mission plan for the Southern Great Plains CART site, January-June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, J.M.; Lamb, P.J.; Sisterson, D.L.

    1994-12-01

    The Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site is designed to help satisfy the data needs of the Atmospheric Measurement (ARM) Program Science Team. This document defines the scientific priorities for site activities during the six months beginning on January 1, 1995, and also looks forward in lesser detail to subsequent six-month periods. The primary purpose of this Site Scientific Mission Plan is to provide guidance for the development of plans for site operations. It also provides information on current plans to the ARM functional teams (Management Team, Experiment Support Team [EST], Operations Team, Data Management Team [DMT], Instrument Team [IT], and Campaign Team) and serves to disseminate the plans more generally within the ARM Program and among the members of the Science Team. This document includes a description of the operational status of the site and the primary envisaged site activities, together with information concerning approved and proposed Intensive Observation Periods (IOPs). Amendments will be prepared and distributed whenever the content changes by more than 30% within a six-month period. The primary users of this document are the site operator, the site scientist, the Science Team through the ARM Program Science Director, The ARM Program Experiment Center, and the aforementioned ARM Program functional teams. This plan is a living document that will be updated and reissued every six months as the observational facilities are developed, tested, and augmented and as priorities are adjusted in response to developments in scientific planning and understanding.

  5. Site scientific mission plan for the Southern Great Plains CART site January--June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Peppler, R.A.; Lamb, P.J.; Sisterson, D.L.

    1996-01-01

    The Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site is designed to help satisfy the data needs of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Science Team. This document defines the scientific priorities for site activities during the six months beginning on January 1, 1996, and looks forward in lesser detail to subsequent six-month periods. The primary purpose of this Site Scientific Mission Plan is to provide guidance for the development of plans for site operations. It also provides information on current plans to the ARM functional teams (Management Team, Data and Science Integration Team [DSIT], Operations Team, instrument Team [IT], and Campaign Team) and serves to disseminate the plans more generally within the ARM Program and among the members of the Science Team. This document includes a description of the operational status of the site and the primary site activities envisioned, together with information concerning approved and proposed Intensive Observation Periods (IOPs). The primary users of this document are the site operator, the Site Scientist Team (SST), the Science Team through the ARM Program science director, the ARM Program Experiment Center, and the aforementioned ARM program functional teams. This plan is a living document that is updated and reissued every six months as the observational facilities are developed, tested, and augmented and as priorities are adjusted in response to developments in scientific planning and understanding.

  6. Site scientific mission plan for the Southern Great Plains CART site: January 1997--June 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Peppler, R.A.; Lamb, P.J.; Sisterson, D.L.

    1997-01-01

    The Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site is designed to help satisfy the data needs of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Science Team. This document defines the scientific priorities for site activities during the six months beginning on January 1, 1997, and looks forward in lesser detail to subsequent six-month periods. The primary purpose of this Site Scientific Mission Plan is to provide guidance for the development of plans for site operations. It also provides information on current plans to the ARM functional teams (Management Team, Data and Science Integration Team [DSIT], Operations Team, Instrument Team [IT], and Campaign Team) and serves to disseminate the plans more generally within the ARM Program and among the members of the Science Team. This document includes a description of the operational status of the site and the primary site activities envisioned, together with information concerning approved and proposed intensive observation periods (IOPs). The primary users of this document are the site operator, the Site Scientist Team (SST), the Science Team through the ARM Program science director, the ARM Program Experiment Center, and the aforementioned ARM Program functional teams. This plan is a living document that is updated and reissued every six months as the observational facilities are developed, tested, and augmented and as priorities are adjusted in response to developments in scientific planning and understanding.

  7. Site scientific mission plan for the southern Great Plain CART site July-December 1997.

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, P.J.; Peppler, R.A.; Sisterson, D.L.

    1997-08-28

    The Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site is designed to help satisfy the data needs of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Science Team. This document defines the scientific priorities for site activities during the six months beginning on July 1, 1997, and looks forward in lesser detail to subsequent six-month periods. The primary purpose of this Site Scientific Mission Plan is to provide guidance for the development of plans for site operations. It also provides information on current plans to the ARM functional teams (Management Team, Data and Science Integration Team [DSIT], Operations Team, Instrument Team [IT], and Campaign Team) and serves to disseminate the plans more generally within the ARM Program and among the members of the Science Team. This document includes a description of the operational status of the site and the primary site activities envisioned, together with information concerning approved and proposed intensive observation periods (IOPs). The primary users of this document are the site operator, the Site Scientist Team (SST), the Science Team through the ARM Program science director, the ARM Program Experiment Center, and the aforementioned ARM Program functional teams. This plan is a living document that is updated and reissued every six months as the observational facilities are developed, tested, and augmented and as priorities are adjusted in response to developments in scientific planning and understanding.

  8. Failure and Redemption of Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR)/Normal Incidence Multifilter Radiometer (NIMFR) Cloud Screening: Contrasting Algorithm Performance at Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) and Southern Great Plains (SGP) Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Flynn, Connor J.; Koontz, Annette S.; Sivaraman, Chitra; Barnard, James C.

    2013-09-11

    Well-known cloud-screening algorithms, which are designed to remove cloud-contaminated aerosol optical depths (AOD) from AOD measurements, have shown great performance at many middle-to-low latitude sites around the world. However, they may occasionally fail under challenging observational conditions, such as when the sun is low (near the horizon) or when optically thin clouds with small spatial inhomogeneity occur. Such conditions have been observed quite frequently at the high-latitude Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites. A slightly modified cloud-screening version of the standard algorithm is proposed here with a focus on the ARM-supported Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) and Normal Incidence Multifilter Radiometer (NIMFR) data. The modified version uses approximately the same techniques as the standard algorithm, but it additionally examines the magnitude of the slant-path line of sight transmittance and eliminates points when the observed magnitude is below a specified threshold. Substantial improvement of the multi-year (1999-2012) aerosol product (AOD and its Angstrom exponent) is shown for the NSA sites when the modified version is applied. Moreover, this version reproduces the AOD product at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, which was originally generated by the standard cloud-screening algorithms. The proposed minor modification is easy to implement and its application to existing and future cloud-screening algorithms can be particularly beneficial for challenging observational conditions.

  9. Site scientific mission plan for the southern Great Plains CART site, January--June 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Peppler, R.A.; Lamb, P.J.; Sisterson, D.L.

    1998-01-01

    The Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site is designed to help satisfy the data needs of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Science Team. The primary purpose of this site scientific mission plan is to provide guidance for the development of plans for site operations. It also provides information on current plans to the ARM functional teams (Management Team, Data and Science Integration Team, Operations Team, and Instrument Team) and serves to disseminate the plans more generally within the ARM Program and among the members of the Science Team. This document includes a description of the operational status of the site and the primary site activities envisioned, together with information concerning approved and proposed intensive observation periods (IOPs). The primary users of this document are the Site operator, the Site Scientist Team (SST), the Science Team through the ARM Program science director, the ARM Program Experiment Center, and the aforementioned ARM Program functional teams. This plan is a living document that is updated and reissued every six months as the observational facilities are developed, tested, and augmented and as priorities are adjusted in response to developments in scientific planning and understanding.

  10. Site scientific mission plan for the Southern Great Plains CART site: July--December 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Peppler, R.A.; Lamb, P.J.; Sisterson, D.L.

    1996-07-01

    The Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site is designed to help satisfy the data needs of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Science Team. This document defines the scientific priorities for site activities during the six months beginning on July 1, 1996, and looks forward in lesser detail to subsequent six-month periods. The primary purpose of this Site Scientific Mission Plan is to provide guidance for the development of plans for site operations. It also provides information on current plans to the ARM functional teams (Management Team, Data and Science Integration Team [DSIT], Operations Team, Instrument Team [IT], and Campaign Team) and serves to disseminate the plans more generally within the ARM Program and among the members of the Science Team. This document includes a description of the operational status of the site and the primary site activities envisioned, together with information concerning approved and proposed intensive observation periods (IOPs). This plan is a living document that is updated and reissued every six months as the observational facilities are developed, tested, and augmented and as priorities are adjusted in response to developments in scientific planning and understanding. The primary objectives of the ARM program are: to describe the radiative energy flux profile of the clear and cloudy atmosphere; to understand the processes determining the flux profile; and to parameterize the processes determining the flux profile for incorporation into general circulation models.

  11. Site scientific mission plan for the southern great plains CART site, July--December 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Splitt, M.E.; Lamb, P.J.; Sisterson, D.L.

    1995-07-01

    The Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site is designed to help satisfy the data needs Of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Science Team. This document defines the scientific Priorities for site activities during the six months beginning on July 1, 1995, and looks forward in lesser detail to subsequent six-month periods. The Primary Purpose of this Site Scientific Mission Plan is to provide guidance for the development of plans for site operations. It also provides information on current plans to the ARM functional teams and serves to disseminate the plans more generally within the ARM Program and among the members of the Science Team. This document includes a description of the operational status of the site and the primary envisioned site activities, together with information concerning approved and proposed Intensive Observation Periods (IOPs). This plan is a living document that will be updated and reissued every six months as the observational facilities are developed, tested, and augmented and as Priorities are adjusted in response to developments in scientific planning and understanding.

  12. Site scientific mission plan for the Southern Great Plains CART site: July--December 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Peppler, R.A.; Lamb, P.J.; Sisterson, D.L.

    1997-07-01

    The Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site is designed to help satisfy the data needs of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Science Team. This document defines the scientific priorities for site activities during the six months beginning on July 1, 1997, and looks forward in lesser detail to subsequent six-month periods. The primary purpose of this Site Scientific Mission Plan is to provide guidance for the development of plans for site operations. It also provides information on current plans to the ARM functional teams and serves to disseminate the plans more generally within the ARM Program and among the members of the Science Team. This document includes a description of the operational status of the site and the primary site activities envisioned, together with information concerning approved and proposed intensive observation periods (IOPs). This plan is a living document that is updated and reissued every six months as the observational facilities are developed, tested, and augmented and as priorities are adjusted in response to developments in scientific planning and understanding.

  13. ESTAR Measurements During the Southern Great Plains Experiment (SGP99)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, D. M.; Jackson, T. J.; Swift, C. T.; Haken, M.; Bidwell, S.; Zukor, Dorothy J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    During the Southern Great Plains experiment, the synthetic aperture radiometer, ESTAR, mapped L-band brightness temperature over a swath about 50 km wide and about 300 km long extending west from Oklahoma City to El Reno and north from the Little Washita River watershed to the Kansas border. ESTAR flew on the NASA P-3B Orion aircraft at an altitude of 7.6 km and maps were made on 7 days between July 8-20, 1999. The brightness temperature maps reflect the patterns of soil moisture expected from rainfall and are consistent with values of soil moisture observed at the research sites within the SGP99 study area and with previous measurements in this area. The data add to the resources for hydrologic modeling in this area and are further validation of the technology represented by ESTAR as a potential path to a future mission to map soil moisture globally from space.

  14. AmeriFlux US-ARc ARM Southern Great Plains control site- Lamont

    SciTech Connect

    Torn, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-ARc ARM Southern Great Plains control site- Lamont. Site Description - The ARM SGP Control site is located in the native tallgrass prairies of the USDA Grazinglands Research Laboratory near El Reno, OK. One of two adjacent 35 ha plots with identical towers, measurements at the US-ARc unburned plot are used as the experimental control. The second plot, US-Arb, was burned on 2005/03/08. Measurement comparisons between the control and burn plot are used to address questions regarding the effects of burning activities on carbon fluxes. The region evaded burning activities for at least 15 years. Current disturbances consist of only light grazing activities.

  15. Plain film measurement error in acute displaced midshaft clavicle fractures

    PubMed Central

    Archer, Lori Anne; Hunt, Stephen; Squire, Daniel; Moores, Carl; Stone, Craig; O’Dea, Frank; Furey, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Background Clavicle fractures are common and optimal treatment remains controversial. Recent literature suggests operative fixation of acute displaced mid-shaft clavicle fractures (DMCFs) shortened more than 2 cm improves outcomes. We aimed to identify correlation between plain film and computed tomography (CT) measurement of displacement and the inter- and intraobserver reliability of repeated radiographic measurements. Methods We obtained radiographs and CT scans of patients with acute DMCFs. Three orthopedic staff and 3 residents measured radiographic displacement at time zero and 2 weeks later. The CT measurements identified absolute shortening in 3 dimensions (by subtracting the length of the fractured from the intact clavicle). We then compared shortening measured on radiographs and shortening measured in 3 dimensions on CT. Interobserver and intraobserver reliability were calculated. Results We reviewed the fractures of 22 patients. Bland–Altman repeatability coefficient calculations indicated that radiograph and CT measurements of shortening could not be correlated owing to an unacceptable amount of measurement error (6 cm). Interobserver reliability for plain radiograph measurements was excellent (Cronbach α = 0.90). Likewise, intraobserver reliabilities for plain radiograph measurements as calculated with paired t tests indicated excellent correlation (p > 0.05 in all but 1 observer [p = 0.04]). Conclusion To establish shortening as an indication for DMCF fixation, reliable measurement tools are required. The low correlation between plain film and CT measurements we observed suggests further research is necessary to establish what imaging modality reliably predicts shortening. Our results indicate weak correlation between radiograph and CT measurement of acute DMCF shortening. PMID:27438054

  16. Chenier Plain Sediment Burial Pipe Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moeller, Chris; Gunshor, Mat; Huh, Oscar; Winch, Dale

    2000-01-01

    These field notes describe the logistical circumstances and field conditions experienced by the researchers, who measured the waterlines on a series of vertical pipes previously buried in shallow coastal water. The purpose of the measurements was to monitor a portion of the Gulf coast in Louisiana for erosion.

  17. Groundwater recharge at five representative sites in the Hebei Plain, China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaohui; Jin, Menggui; van Genuchten, Martinus Th; Wang, Bingguo

    2011-01-01

    Accurate estimates of groundwater recharge are essential for effective management of groundwater, especially when supplies are limited such as in many arid and semiarid areas. In the Hebei Plain, China, water shortage is increasingly restricting socioeconomic development, especially for agriculture, which heavily relies on groundwater. Human activities have greatly changed groundwater recharge there during the past several decades. To obtain better estimates of recharge in the plain, five representative sites were selected to investigate the effects of irrigation and water table depth on groundwater recharge. At each site, a one-dimensional unsaturated flow model (Hydrus-1D) was calibrated using field data of climate, soil moisture, and groundwater levels. A sensitivity analysis of evapotranspirative fluxes and various soil hydraulic parameters confirmed that fine-textured surface soils generally generate less recharge. Model calculations showed that recharge on average is about 175 mm/year in the piedmont plain to the west, and 133 mm/year in both the central alluvial and lacustrine plains and the coastal plain to the east. Temporal and spatial variations in the recharge processes were significant in response to rainfall and irrigation. Peak time-lags between infiltration (rainfall plus irrigation) and recharge were 18 to 35 days in the piedmont plain and 3 to 5 days in the central alluvial and lacustrine plains, but only 1 or 2 days in the coastal plain. This implies that different time-lags corresponding to different water table depths must be considered when estimating or modeling groundwater recharge.

  18. Variability in ultraplankton at the Porcupine Abyssal Plain study site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Adrian P.; Zubkov, Mikhail V.; Holland, Ross J.; Tarran, Glen; Burkill, Peter

    2010-08-01

    Observations of the ultraplankton (<5 μm) are presented from a 4 day mesoscale survey centred on the Porcupine Abyssal Plain (PAP) study site (49°00'N 16°30'W), in July 2006. The organisms enumerated include two groups of phytoplankton, Synechococcus cyanobacteria, heterotrophic bacteria, large viruses, and two size classes of heterotrophic protist. The dataset comprises over 400 samples from the mixed layer taken over a 100 × 100 km 2 area at a spatial resolution of typically 2-3 km. For phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria there is a clear bimodal structure to the histograms of abundance indicative of two distinct communities in the region. Using the strong bimodality of one of the phytoplankton groups' histogram as a basis, the dataset is split into two subsets, with roughly 200 points in each, corresponding to the two histogram peaks. Doing so provides evidence that Synechococcus and viruses may also have a bimodal structure. Correlations between all pairings of these five organisms (both phytoplankton groups, Synechococcus, heterotrophic bacteria and viruses) are positive and quite high (r>0.7). The two communities can therefore be characterised as high and low abundance. Although there is a coincidence of low abundances with high temperatures in the southwest corner of the region, where there was known to be an eddy present, the spatial distributions of these organisms over the whole region is poorly predicted by temperature (or salinity or density). Furthermore, the spatial distributions of heterotrophic protists are found to differ strongly from those of the other organisms, having a unimodal structure and no obvious large scale structure. The more random structure of the heterotrophs' spatial distribution compared to their prey is consistent with previous results from the continental shelf, but is demonstrated for the open ocean here for the first time. Spatial variability is a large potential source of error in point samples, such as those

  19. Surface Forcing from CH4 at the North Slope of Alaska and Southern Great Plains Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, W.; Feldman, D.; Turner, D. D.

    2014-12-01

    Recent increases in atmospheric CH4 have been spatially heterogeneous as indicated by in situ flask measurements and space-borne remote-sensing retrievals from the AIRS instrument, potentially leading to increased radiative forcing. We present detailed, specialized measurements at the DOE ARM North Slope of Alaska (NSA) and Southern Great Plains (SGP) sites to derive the time-series of both CH4 atmospheric concentrations and associated radiative implications at highly-contrasting natural and anthropogenic sources. Using a combination of spectroscopic measurements, in situ observations, and ancillary data for the atmospheric thermodynamic state from radiosondes and cloud-clearing from active sounders, we can separate out the contribution of CH4 to clear-sky downwelling radiance spectra and its infrared surface forcing. The time-series indicates year-to-year variation in shoulder season increases of CH4 concentration and forcing at NSA and large signals from anthropogenic activity at SGP.

  20. Clear Sky Identification Using Data From Remote Sensing Systems at ARM's Southern Great Plains Site

    SciTech Connect

    Delle Monache, L.; Rodriguez, D.; Cederwall, R.

    2000-06-27

    Clouds profoundly affect our weather and climate due, in large part, to their interactions with radiation. Unfortunately, our understanding of these interactions is, at best, incomplete, making it difficult to improve the treatment of atmospheric radiation in climate models. The improved treatment of clouds and radiation, and a better understanding of their interaction, in climate models is one of the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's major goals. To learn more about the distribution of water and ice, i.e., clouds, within an atmospheric column, ARM has chosen to use the remote sensing of clouds, water vapor and aerosols at its three climatologically-diverse sites as its primary observational method. ARM's most heavily instrumented site, which has operated continuously for more than a decade, is its Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility, located near Lamont, OK. Cloud-observing instruments at the Central Facility include the Whole Sky Imager, ceilometers, lidar, millimeter cloud radar, microwave radiometers and radiosondes.

  1. A one-year climatology using data from the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site micropulse lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Mace, G.G.; Ackerman, T.P.; Spinhirne, J.; Scott, S.

    1996-04-01

    The micropulse lidar (MPL) has been operational at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program for the past 15 months. The compact MPL is unique among research lidar systems in that it is eye-safe and operates continuously, except during precipitation. The MPL is capable of detecting cloud base throughout the entire depth of the troposphere. The MPL data set is an unprecedented time series of cloud heights. It is a vital resource for understanding the frequency of cloud ocurrence and the impact of clouds on the surface radiation budget, as well as for large-scale model validation and satellite retrieval verification. The raw lidar data are processed for cloud base height at a temporal frequency of one minute and a vertical resolution of 270 m. The resultant time series of cloud base is used to generate histograms as a function of month and time of day. Sample results are described.

  2. Environmental Radioactivity Measurements in Harran Plain of Sanliurfa, Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Bozkurt, A.; Yorulmaz, N.; Kam, E.

    2007-04-23

    This study aims to assess the environmental radioactivity levels of Harran Plain located within the boundaries of the south-eastern province of Sanliurfa, Turkey. In addition to being at the center of Turkey's major irrigation and development project (South Eastern Anatolian Project, GAP), this 1500 km2 region is famous for its historic attractions. The outdoor gamma dose rates were measured at selected points of the study area using a plastic scintillator. The activity concentrations in the soil samples collected from the study area were determined by gamma spectrometry for the natural radionuclides 238U, 232Th and 40K and the fission product 137Cs. The gross alpha and beta activities in the water samples collected from the region was measured using a low-level gamma spectrometry device. A comparison of the measurement results obtained in this study with those of national and world averages are presented in graphical and tabular forms.

  3. SELECTING LEAST-DISTURBED SURVEY SITES FOR GREAT PLAINS STREAMS AND RIVERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    True reference condition probably does not exist for streams in highly utilized regions such as the Great Plains. Selecting least-disturbed sites for large regions is confounded by the association between human uses and natural gradients, and by multiple kinds of disturbance. U...

  4. AmeriFlux US-ARb ARM Southern Great Plains burn site- Lamont

    SciTech Connect

    Torn, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-ARb ARM Southern Great Plains burn site- Lamont. Site Description - The ARM SGP Burn site is located in the native tallgrass prairies of the USDA Grazinglands Research Laboratory near El Reno, OK. One of two adjacent 35 ha plots, the US-ARb plot was burned on 2005/03/08. The second plot, US-ARc, was left unburned as the control for experimental purposes. Aside from 2005, the region evaded burning activities for at least 15 years. Current disturbances consist of only light grazing activities.

  5. Atrazine retention and degradation in the vadose zone at a till plain site in central Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bayless, E.R.

    2001-01-01

    The vadose zone was examined as an environmental compartment where significant quantities of atrazine and its degradation compounds may be stored and transformed. The vadose zone was targeted because regional studies in the White River Basin indicated a large discrepancy between the mass of atrazine applied to fields and the amount of the pesticide and its degradation compounds that are measured in ground and surface water. A study site was established in a rotationally cropped field in the till plain of central Indiana. Data were gathered during the 1994 growing season to characterize the site hydrogeology and the distribution of atrazine, desethylatrazine, deisopropylatrazine, didealkylatrazine and hydroxyatrazine in runoff, pore water, and ground water. The data indicated that atrazine and its degradation compounds were transported from land surface to a depth of 1.5 m within 60 days of application, but were undetected in the saturated zone at nearby monitoring wells. A numerical model was developed, based on the field data, to provide information about processes that could retain and degrade atrazine in the vadose zone. Simulations indicated that evapotranspiration is responsible for surface directed soil-moisture flow during much of the growing season. This process causes retention and degradation of atrazine in the vadose zone. Increased residence time in the vadose zone leads to nearly complete transformation of atrazine and its degradation products to unquantified degradation compounds. As a result of mascropore flow, small quantities of atrazine and its degradation compounds may reach the saturated zone.

  6. Comparison of optimal irrigation scheduling and groundwater recharge at representative sites in the North China Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ying

    2014-05-01

    The North China Plain (NCP) is an important food production area in China, facing an increasing water shortage and overexploitation of groundwater. It is critical to optimize the irrigation scheduling and accurately estimate groundwater recharge for saving water and increasing crop water use efficiency. However, the water cycle and crop responses to irrigation are quite various in different areas, because of the spatial variation of climatic, soil, water table and other management practices in the NCP. In this study, three representative sites (LC site in the piedmont plain, TZ site in the northern alluvial and lacustrine plain, YC site in the southern alluvial and lacustrine plain) were selected to compare the optimal irrigation scheduling and corresponding groundwater recharge under different hydrological years for winter wheat-summer maize double cropping system. At each site, a physically based agro-hydrological model (SWAP) was calibrated using field data of soil moisture. Then, scenarios under different irrigation time and amount were simulated. Results showed that the optimal irrigation scheduling and corresponding groundwater recharge were significant different between the three representative sites. The mean water table depth at the LC (33.0 m), YC (10.3 m), and TZ site (2.5 m) caused great different time lags of infiltrated water and groundwater contribution to evapotranspiration. Then, the most irrigation amount was required for the TZ site but the least requirement for the YC site at each hydrologic year. As most clay contents in the deep soils at the LC site increased tortuosity and limited water movement, which resulted in lower rates of recharge compared to more sandy soils at the other two sites. Averagely, using the optimal irrigation scheduling could save 2.04×109 m3 irrigation water and reduce about 84.3% groundwater over-exploitation in winter wheat growth period in the NCP. Therefore, comparison of the simulation results among the three

  7. A comparison of radiometric fluxes influenced by parameterization cirrus clouds with observed fluxes at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) cloud and radiation testbed (CART) site

    SciTech Connect

    Mace, G.G.; Ackerman, T.P.; George, A.T.

    1996-04-01

    The data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program`s Southern Great plains Site (SCP) is a valuable resource. We have developed an operational data processing and analysis methodology that allows us to examine continuously the influence of clouds on the radiation field and to test new and existing cloud and radiation parameterizations.

  8. Geochemistry of aerosols from an urban site, Varanasi, in the Eastern Indo-Gangetic Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram, Kirpa; Norra, Stefan; Zirzov, Felix; Singh, Sunita; Mehra, Manisha; Nanad Tripathi, Sachichida

    2016-04-01

    PM2.5 aerosol samples were collected from an urban site, Varanasi, in the eastern Indo-Gangetic Plain on weekly basis during 19 March to 29 May 2015 (n=12), along with daily samples (n=8) during 11 to 18 March 2015 to study the geochemical and morphological features of aerosols. Samples were collected with a low volume sampler (Leckel GmbH, Germany) on the terrace of the Institute of Environment and Sustainable Development building, located in the Banaras Hindu University campus in the southern part of the city. Samples were analyzed for element concentration by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry and particle morphology by Scanning Electron Microscope. PM2.5 concentration ranged between 22.3 and 70.5 μgm‑3 in daily samples, whereas those varied between 52.0 and 106 μgm‑3 in weekly samples. Lead, potassium, aluminum, zinc and iron have conspicuously higher concentrations with Pb concentration exceeding above the annual limit of 50 ngm‑3 in four samples. First results show a trend of corresponding concentrations of chemical elements originated from anthropogenic and geogenic sources. The biogenic particles are a minor fraction of the total particulate aerosols. The Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) back trajectory analysis of air parcels indicate that the air mass for the low loaded days originate from eastern directions including the region of the gulf of Bengal, where as high aerosols concentrations in cases of air masses arriving from north-western direction transporting the air pollutants from the Gangetic Plain towards Varanasi. Black carbon (BC) concentration, measured using an microaethalometer (AE-51), exhibit a strong variability (4.4 to 8.4 μg m‑3) in the University campus which are ˜20-40% lower than those measured in the Varanasi city. The carbon content was found to be high with soot particles constituting the largest part in these samples and exist as single particle as well as attachment to other

  9. Geochemistry of aerosols from an urban site, Varanasi, in the Eastern Indo-Gangetic Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram, Kirpa; Norra, Stefan; Zirzov, Felix; Singh, Sunita; Mehra, Manisha; Nanad Tripathi, Sachichida

    2016-04-01

    PM2.5 aerosol samples were collected from an urban site, Varanasi, in the eastern Indo-Gangetic Plain on weekly basis during 19 March to 29 May 2015 (n=12), along with daily samples (n=8) during 11 to 18 March 2015 to study the geochemical and morphological features of aerosols. Samples were collected with a low volume sampler (Leckel GmbH, Germany) on the terrace of the Institute of Environment and Sustainable Development building, located in the Banaras Hindu University campus in the southern part of the city. Samples were analyzed for element concentration by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry and particle morphology by Scanning Electron Microscope. PM2.5 concentration ranged between 22.3 and 70.5 μgm-3 in daily samples, whereas those varied between 52.0 and 106 μgm-3 in weekly samples. Lead, potassium, aluminum, zinc and iron have conspicuously higher concentrations with Pb concentration exceeding above the annual limit of 50 ngm-3 in four samples. First results show a trend of corresponding concentrations of chemical elements originated from anthropogenic and geogenic sources. The biogenic particles are a minor fraction of the total particulate aerosols. The Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) back trajectory analysis of air parcels indicate that the air mass for the low loaded days originate from eastern directions including the region of the gulf of Bengal, where as high aerosols concentrations in cases of air masses arriving from north-western direction transporting the air pollutants from the Gangetic Plain towards Varanasi. Black carbon (BC) concentration, measured using an microaethalometer (AE-51), exhibit a strong variability (4.4 to 8.4 μg m-3) in the University campus which are ˜20-40% lower than those measured in the Varanasi city. The carbon content was found to be high with soot particles constituting the largest part in these samples and exist as single particle as well as attachment to other particles

  10. Light non-methane hydrocarbons at two sites in the Indo-Gangetic Plain.

    PubMed

    Lal, S; Sahu, L K; Venkataramani, S; Mallik, C

    2012-04-01

    Measurements of light (C(2)-C(5)) non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) were made along with ozone (O(3)), oxides of nitrogen (NO(x)), carbon monoxide (CO) and methane (CH(4)) at Hissar and Kanpur in the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) in India during the month of December, 2004. Air samplings during noon and evening hours provided an opportunity to study the emission characteristics and changes during this period at these sites. The mixing ratio of O(3) was higher during noon hours due to photochemical formation, while the levels of precursor gases showed elevated values during the evening hours on a clear sky day. On foggy days there is no such variation. The lower mixing ratios of O(3) observed on foggy days could be due to the slower rate of photochemical formation caused by a reduction in solar flux and surface deposition caused by the presence of a stable planetary boundary layer. Propene and ethene show the highest evening to noon ratio due to their faster reactivities with OH radicals. Correlations among different species of the measured gases indicate contributions of emissions from biomass and biofuel burning as well as fossil fuel combustion. Although qualitatively in relation to O(3), the propylene (propene) equivalents of NMHCs have been calculated to investigate their roles in O(3) photochemistry and compared with the data from Ahmedabad, an urban site in western India. The important result, which has emerged from the analysis of the observed data, is that while the total amount of these NMHCs is least at Hissar and highest at Ahmedabad, the total propylene-equivalent is highest at Hissar and lowest at Ahmedabad. Further, these two sites in the IGP show significant contributions, almost 72-77%, by propene and ethene while the contribution by these two gases at Ahmedabad is only about 47%. The surface level mixing ratios of O(3) could be treated as representative for the chemical characterization of air mass at a regional scale over the IGP as the month long

  11. S-wave velocity structure and site effect parameters derived from microtremor arrays in the Western Plain of Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Chun-Hsiang; Chen, Chun-Te; Lin, Che-Min; Wen, Kuo-Liang; Huang, Jyun-Yan; Chang, Shun-Chiang

    2016-10-01

    In this study, microtremor array measurements were conducted at 45 sites in the Western Plain of Taiwan. The arrays were approximately 30 m or 60 m in radius, depending on the site. The maximum-likelihood frequency-wavenumber method was adopted to obtain the phase velocities of Rayleigh waves, and then a genetic algorithm technique based on an inversion scheme of the fundamental mode of the Rayleigh waves' dispersion curves was applied to calculate a preliminary S-wave velocity (Vs) profile at each site. Because a layer of thick sediment covers the bedrock in the Western Plain of Taiwan, microtremor arrays in this size range cannot estimate the structure of the entire sediment. Therefore, this study implemented further inversion of the horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratios of the microtremors to estimate the deeper structures up to the bedrock of Vs greater than 1000 m/s. Previously logged velocity profiles for different depths at or near our study sites were collected and compared with the Vs profiles derived from our microtremor array measurements; the results were found to be highly comparable. Therefore, we could delineate the depth distributions for the layer depths for Vs = 600 m/s and 1000 m/s in this region. The depth for Vs = 600 m/s is approximately 50 m in the piedmont area and approximately 300 m at the coastline; moreover, the depths for Vs = 1000 m/s increase from 200 m in the piedmont area to approximately 1000 m at the coastline. The depths for Vs = 1.0 km/s (Z1.0), which is an important parameter that accounts for the basin effect in recent ground motion prediction equations, are consequently available at the study sites. The distribution of Z1.0 as a function of Vs30 indicates higher similarity to that in Japan than in the San Francisco Bay area.

  12. Flood-plain and channel aggradation of selected bridge sites in the Iowa and Skunk River basins, Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eash, D.A.

    1996-01-01

    Flood-plain and channel-aggradation rates were estimated at 10 bridge sites on the Iowa River upstream of Coralville Lake and at two bridge sites in the central part of the Skunk River Basin. Four measurement methods were used to quantify aggradation rates: (1) a dendrogeomorphic method that used tree-age data and sediment-deposition depths, (2) a bridge-opening cross-section method that compared historic and recent cross sections of bridge openings, (3) a stage-discharge rating-curve method that compared historic and recent stages for the 5-year flood discharge and the average discharge, and (4) nine sediment pads that were installed on the Iowa River flood plain at three bridge sites in the vicinity of Marshalltown. The sediment pads were installed prior to overbank flooding in 1993. Sediments deposited on the pads as a result of the 1993 flood ranged in depth from 0.004 to 2.95 feet. Measurement periods used to estimate average aggradation rates ranged from 1 to 98 years and varied among methods and sites. The highest aggradation rates calculated for the Iowa River Basin using the dendrogeomorphic and rating- curve measurement methods were for the State Highway 14 crossing at Marshalltown, where these highest rates were 0.045 and 0.124 feet per year, respectively. The highest aggradation rates calculated for the Skunk River Basin were for the U.S. Highway 63 crossing of the South Skunk River near Oskaloosa, where these highest rates were 0.051 and 0.298 feet per year, respectively.

  13. Periglacial landforms at the Phoenix landing site and the northern plains of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellon, Michael T.; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Marlow, Jeffrey J.; Phillips, Roger J.; Asphaug, Erik

    2008-11-01

    We examine potentially periglacial landforms in Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) and High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) images at the Phoenix landing site and compare them with numerical models of permafrost processes to better understand the origin, nature, and history of the permafrost and the surface of the northern plains of Mars. Small-scale (3-6 m) polygonal-patterned ground is ubiquitous throughout the Phoenix landing site and northern plains. Larger-scale (20-25 m) polygonal patterns and regularly spaced (20-35 m) rubble piles (localized collections of rocks and boulders) are also common. Rubble piles were previously identified as ``basketball terrain'' in MOC images. The small polygon networks exhibit well-developed and relatively undegraded morphology, and they overlay all other landforms. Comparison of the small polygons with a numerical model shows that their size is consistent with a thermal contraction origin on current-day Mars and are likely active. In addition, the observed polygon size is consistent with a subsurface rheology of ice-cemented soil on depth scales of about 10 m. The size and morphology of the larger polygonal patterns and rubble piles indicate a past episode of polygon formation and rock sorting in thermal contraction polygons, while the ice table was about twice as deep as it is presently. The pervasive nature of small and large polygons, and the extensive sorting of surface rocks, indicates that widespread overturning of the surface layer to depths of many meters has occurred in the recent geologic past. This periglacial reworking has had a significant influence on the landscape at the Phoenix landing site and over the Martian northern plains.

  14. Recent Subsidence and Erosion at Diverse Wetland Sites in the Southeastern Mississippi Delta Plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, Robert A.; Bernier, Julie C.; Kelso, Kyle W.

    2009-01-01

    A prior study (U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2005-1216) examined historical land- and water-area changes and estimated magnitudes of land subsidence and erosion at five wetland sites in the Terrebonne hydrologic basin of the Mississippi delta plain. The present study extends that work by analyzing interior wetland loss and relative magnitudes of subsidence and erosion at five additional wetland sites in the adjacent Barataria hydrologic basin. The Barataria basin sites were selected for their diverse physical settings and their recent (post-1978) conversion from marsh to open water. Historical aerial photography, datum-corrected marsh elevations and water depths, sediment cores, and radiocarbon dates were integrated to evaluate land-water changes in the Mississippi delta plain on both historical and geological time scales. The thickness of the organic-rich sediments (peat) and the elevation of the stratigraphic contact between peat and underlying mud were compared at marsh and open-water sites across areas of formerly continuous marsh to estimate magnitudes of recent delta-plain elevation loss caused by vertical erosion and subsidence of the wetlands. Results of these analyses indicate that erosion exceeded subsidence at most of the study areas, although both processes have contributed to historical wetland loss. Comparison of these results with prior studies indicates that subsidence largely caused rapid interior wetland loss in the Terrebonne basin before 1978, whereas erosional processes primarily caused more gradual interior wetland loss in the Barataria basin after 1978. Decadal variations in rates of relative sea-level rise at a National Ocean Service tide gage, elevation changes between repeat benchmark-leveling surveys, and GPS height monitoring at three National Geodetic Survey Continuously Operating Reference Stations indicate that subsidence rates since the early 1990s are substantially lower than those previously reported and are similar in

  15. Geophysical detection of on-site wastewater plumes in the North Carolina Coastal Plain, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Matthew

    Nonpoint source pollution (NPS) continues to be the leading cause of water quality degradation in the United States. On-site wastewater systems (OWS) contribute to NPS; however, due to the range of system designs and complexity of the subsurface, OWS contributions to groundwater pollution are not well understood. As the population of coastal North Carolina continues to increase, better methods to locate and characterize wastewater impacted groundwater are needed. Previous studies have demonstrated the ability of non-intrusive geophysical methods to provide high resolution information on various contaminants in different geologic settings. The goals of this study were to evaluate the utility of ground penetrating radar (GPR) and capacitively coupled resistivity (CCR) for detecting OWS components, delineating associated wastewater plumes, and monitoring temporal variations in groundwater quality. Cross-sectional and three dimensional (3D) geophysical surveys were conducted periodically over a one year period (February 2011--January 2012) at two schools utilizing OWS in the lower Neuse River Basin (NRB) in the North Carolina Coastal Plain (NCCP). Cores were collected at both study sites; as well as monthly groundwater depth, temperature, and specific conductivity measurements to better constrain the geophysical interpretations. Additionally, dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and Cl concentrations were monitored bi-monthly to assess nutrient transport at the sites. The 3D GPR surveys effectively located the wastewater drainage trenches at both sites, in close agreement with locations described in as-built OWS blueprints. Regression analysis of resistivity versus groundwater specific conductivity revealed an inverse relationship, suggesting resistivity ≤ 250 ohm.m was indicative of wastewater impacted groundwater at both sites. The 3D resistivity models identified regions of low resistivity beneath the drainfields relative to background values. Regression analysis of

  16. Geomorphology of the 2007 Phoenix Mission Landing Sites in the Northern Plains of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seelos, K. D.; Arvidson, R. E.; Golombek, M.; Parker, T.; Tamppari, L.; Smith, P.

    2005-12-01

    In 2008, the Phoenix lander will touch down in the northern plains of Mars to sample and characterize near surface and underlying ice-rich soils, gather meteorological data, and provide insight into the evolution of the surrounding landscape. Three regions from 65 to 72 N and (A) 250-270E, (B) 120-140E, and (C) 65-85E that meet both engineering and scientific constraints were chosen for concentrated acquisition of remote data to support landing site selection. Smaller areas (150x75 km) within these regions devoid of large craters or other hazards were selected as potential landing sites; center coordinates for these targeted areas are (A) 68N, 260E, (B) 67.5N, 130E, and (C) 70N, 80E. MOLA topographic data along with MOC imagery and THEMIS 36m/pixel visible, 18m/pixel visible, and ~100m/pixel infrared data are utilized to produce geomorphologic maps at 36m/pixel for the larger regions and 18m/pixel for the targeted sites. All regions are dominated by intercrater plains units, with the plains in regions B and C comprised of slightly elevated, multiple kilometer-scale polygonal blocks surrounded or infilled by finer-grained material. The plains unit of region A lacks large polygons, instead exhibiting a smooth to mottled appearance. Patterned ground is ubiquitous throughout all regions. The characteristic dimpled texture of "basketball" terrain is most common, being superposed on the large polygons in regions B and C, and often organized into stripes with orientations partially controlled by local slopes. Small-scale polygonal ground is also observed usually in association with crater ejecta. Craters throughout all regions appear highly degraded, with most small craters (< 1km) remarkably worn with little or no rim definition and ejecta present only as a faint dark halo. Larger craters frequently exhibit pedestal-style ejecta. The style and state of landform degradation and the consistent presence of patterned ground throughout all regions suggests the long

  17. Base-flow measurements at partial-record sites on small streams in South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, Carroll

    1986-01-01

    This report contains site descriptions and base-flow data collected at 362 partial-record sites in South Carolina. These data include site name, site description, latitude, longitude, drainage area, instantaneous streamflow, and date of the streamflow measurement. The base-flow data can be used as an aid to estimate low flow characteristics at ungaged locations on streams in South Carolina. Partial record data collection sites were established in all physiographic provinces except the lower Coastal Plain. Data collection sites were not established in the lower Coastal Plain because of the widespread occurrence of zero during drought periods in all but the larger streams. (USGS)

  18. Bed site selection by neonate deer in grassland habitats on the northern Great Plains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grovenburg, T.W.; Jacques, C.N.; Klaver, R.W.; Jenks, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Bed site selection is an important behavioral trait influencing neonate survival. Vegetation characteristics of bed sites influence thermal protection of neonates and concealment from predators. Although previous studies describe bed site selection of neonatal white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in regions of forested cover, none determined microhabitat effects on neonate bed site selection in the Northern Great Plains, an area of limited forest cover. During summers 2007–2009, we investigated bed site selection (n  =  152) by 81 radiocollared neonate white-tailed deer in north-central South Dakota, USA. We documented 80 (52.6%) bed sites in tallgrass–Conservation Reserve Program lands, 35 (23.0%) bed sites in forested cover, and 37 (24.3%) in other habitats (e.g., pasture, alfalfa, wheat). Bed site selection varied with age and sex of neonate. Tree canopy cover (P < 0.001) and tree basal area (P < 0.001) decreased with age of neonates, with no bed sites observed in forested cover after 18 days of age. Male neonates selected sites with less grass cover (P < 0.001), vertical height of understory vegetation (P < 0.001), and density of understory vegetation (P < 0.001) but greater bare ground (P  =  0.047), litter (P  =  0.028), and wheat (P  =  0.044) than did females. Odds of bed site selection increased 3.5% (odds ratio  =  1.035, 95% CI  =  1.008–1.062) for every 1-cm increase in vertical height of understory vegetation. Management for habitat throughout the grasslands of South Dakota that maximizes vertical height of understory vegetation would enhance cover characteristics selected by neonates.

  19. Siting MSW landfills using MCE methodology in GIS environment (Case study: Birjand plain, Iran).

    PubMed

    Motlagh, Zeynab Karimzadeh; Sayadi, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-12-01

    The rapid municipal solid waste growth of Birjand plain causes to find an appropriate site selection for the landfill. In order to reduce the negative impacts of waste, the use of novel tools and technologies to gain a suitable site for landfill seems imperative. The present paper aimed to exhibits the Multi Criteria Evaluation (MCE) for the landfill site selection of the Birjand plain because till date a suitable action has not been implicated. In the present research, the parameters such as environmental and socio-economical factors have been used. The factors like slope, water resources, soil parameters, landuse, fault and protected areas in the model of effective environmental criteria and the factors viz. distance from road, urban areas, village, airport, historical place, and industries in the model of socio-economic criteria were investigated and with the use of Weighted Linear Combination (WLC) and Analytical Network Process (ANP) models were compounded and according to the Ordered Weighted Averaging (OWA) and Fuzzy Linguistic Quantifier (LQ) were aggregated. The paper focuses on the OWA method as well as an approach for integrating Geographic Information System (GIS) and OWA. OWA has been developed as a generalization of multi-criteria combination. In this study we attained comparable data via the technique of ANP and five scenarios of OWA method were used. The results of field studies, fifth scenario for the study area proposed. Based on the research findings, OWA method had a great potential and flexibility in the modeling of the complex decision-making problems. PMID:26321380

  20. Geoarchaeology and Geochronology of the Miami (Clovis) Site, Southern High Plains of Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holliday, Vance T.; Haynes, C. Vance; Hofman, Jack L.; Meltzer, David J.

    1994-03-01

    The Miami site, excavated in 1937, is in a small "playa" basin on the High Plains surface. The site is one of the earliest documented co-occurrences of Clovis points and mammoth. Reinvestigation of the site and related collections was undertaken to better understand the stratigraphy, geochronology, and archaeology. The basin, 23 m diameter × 1.6 m deep, filled with (1) dark gray silty clay, and (2) near the top of the section, a lens of well-sorted silt or loess. The basin started to fill ca. 13,700 yr B.P., the loess dates to ca. 11,400 yr B.P., and the bone bed probably dates to ca. 11,400-10,500 yr B.P. The loess may be the local manifestation of a "Clovis drought." The partial remains of five mammoths (three adults and two juveniles) were recovered in 1937; no other animal remains are known. The bone is heavily weathered and there are no clear indications of human modification. Artifacts found at the site include three Clovis points and a scraper found among the bones and two flakes and a scraper found on the surface near the playa. The origins of the bone and stone assemblage are uncertain but four scenarios are offered: a successful mammoth kill, an unsuccessful kill with wounded animals dying at the watering hole, opportunistic scavenging following natural deaths, or a palimpsest of multiple deaths following both natural and human causes.

  1. ERTS surveys a 500 km squared locust breeding site in Saudi Arabia. [Red Sea coastal plain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedgley, D. E.

    1974-01-01

    From September 1972 to January 1973, ERTS-1 precisely located a 500 sq km area on the Red Sea coastal plain of Saudi Arabia within which the Desert Locust (Schistocerca gregaria, Forsk.) bred successfully and produced many small swarms. Growth of vegetation shown by satellite imagery was confirmed from ground surveys and raingauge data. The experiment demonstrates the feasibility of detecting potential locust breeding sites by satellite, and shows that an operational satellite would be a powerful tool for routine survey of the 3 x 10 to the 7th power sq km invasion area of the Desert Locust in Africa and Asia, as well as of other locust species in the arid and semi-arid tropics.

  2. Movement, home range, and site fidelity of bluegills in a Great Plains Lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paukert, C.P.; Willis, D.W.; Bouchard, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    Little is known about the distribution, movement, and home ranges of bluegills Lepomis macrochirus in lentic environments. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to evaluate the seasonal and diel differences in movement rates, site fidelity, and home range of bluegills in a shallow, natural Great Plains lake. A total of 78 bluegills (200-273 mm total length) were implanted with radio transmitters in March and May 2000. Of these fish, 10 males and 10 females were randomly selected and located every 2 h during one 24-h period each month from April to September 2000. Bluegill movement peaked during midsummer: however, there was little difference in diel movements, suggesting relatively consistent movement throughout the 24-h period. Home range estimates (which included the 24-h tracking plus an additional six locations from the same fish located once per day for six consecutive days each month) ranged up to 172 ha, probably because only about half of the bluegills exhibited site fidelity during any month sampled. Bluegill movement did not appear to be strongly linked with water temperature, barometric pressure, or wind speed. These results suggest that bluegills move considerable distances and that many roam throughout this 332-ha shallow lake. However, diel patterns were not evident. Sampling bluegills in Great Plains lakes using passive gears (e.g., trap nets) may be most effective during the summer months, when fish are most active. Active sampling (e.g., electrofishing) may be more effective than the use of passive gears in spring and fall, when bluegills are less active.

  3. Raman Lidar Measurements of the Aerosol Extinction-to-Backscatter Ratio Over the Southern Great Plains

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrare, Richard; Turner, David D.; Brasseur, L. H.; Feltz, W. F.; Dubovik, O.; Tooman, Tim P.

    2001-09-16

    We derive profiles of the aerosol extinction-to-backscatter ratio, Sa, at 355 nm using aerosol extinction and backscatter profiles measured during 1998 and 1999 by the operational Raman lidar at the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program Southern Great Plains site in north central Oklahoma. Data from this Raman/Rayleigh-Mie lidar, which measures Raman scattering from nitrogen as well as the combined molecular (Rayleigh) and aerosol (Mie) scattering at the laser wavelength, are used to derive aerosol extinction and backscattering independently as a function of altitude. Because this lidar operates at 355 nm, where molecular backscattering is comparable with aerosol backscattering, Sa retrievals are generally limited to conditions where the aerosol extinction at 355 nm is > 0.03 km-1. The mean value of Sa at 355 nm derived for this period was 60 sr with a standard deviation of 12 sr. Sa was generally about 5-10 sr higher during high aerosol optical thickness (AOT) (> 0.3) conditions than during low AOT (< 0.1). A similar increase in Sa was found when the relative humidity increased from 30 to 80%. Large (> 15%) variations in the vertical profile of Sa occurred about 30% of the time, which implies significant variability in the vertical distribution of aerosol size distribution, shape, and/or composition often occurs. The Raman lidar measurements of Sa were compared with estimates of particle size and refractive index derived from an algorithm that uses ground-based Sun photometer measurements of Sun and sky radiance. For 17 cases of coincident Raman lidar and Sun and sky radiance measurements, Sa was linearly correlated with the aerosol fine mode effective radius and the volume ratio of fine/coarse particles.

  4. Geochronology and Geomorphology of the Pioneer Archaeological Site (10BT676), Upper Snake River Plain, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Keene, Joshua L.

    2015-04-01

    The Pioneer site in southeastern Idaho, an open-air, stratified, multi-component archaeological locality on the upper Snake River Plain, provides an ideal situation for understanding the geomorphic history of the Big Lost River drainage system. We conducted a block excavation with the goal of understanding the geochronological context of both cultural and geomorphological components at the site. The results of this study show a sequence of five soil formation episodes forming three terraces beginning prior to 7200 cal yr BP and lasting until the historic period, preserving one cultural component dated to ~3800 cal yr BP and multiple components dating to the last 800 cal yr BP. In addition, periods of deposition and stability at Pioneer indicate climate fluctuation during the middle Holocene (~7200-3800 cal yr BP), minimal deposition during the late Holocene, and a period of increased deposition potentially linked to the Little Ice Age. In addition, evidence for a high-energy erosion event dated to ~3800 cal yr BP suggest a catastrophic flood event during the middle Holocene that may correlate with volcanic activity at the Craters of the Moon lava fields to the northwest. This study provides a model for the study of alluvial terrace formations in arid environments and their potential to preserve stratified archaeological deposits.

  5. Influence of Relief on Vegetation Factors and Agrotechnical Differentiation Measures in Transylvania Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioana Moraru, Paula; Rusu, Teodor; Bogdan, Ileana; Ioan Pop, Adrian

    2016-04-01

    Transylvanian Plain (TP), with an area of 395.616 hectares, has a special importance for Romanian agriculture being characterized as a region orographically represented by hilly areas hills whereas climatically appears as a plain. Physical-geographical conditions from TP (low level of forestation; climate specific to plains) have resulted in numerous land degradation phenomena: land erosion, landslide, draining of gradient springs and groundwater level. These conditions create a favourable framework for the development of anthropic morphogenetic processes, as well as those triggered by natural mechanisms, thus intensifying the pace and their territorial expansion. Rainfall, through annual distribution and spring-summer pluvial aggressiveness, require the implementation of preservation measures on arable land, particularly for spring cultures. Along with rainfall, more factors are involved: relief, by the high degree of fragmentation and through tilting slopes; vegetation, by the dominance of cultivated plants and by the advanced state of degradation of vegetal grasslands (especially on southern slopes); lithology, by the predominance of loose rocks (sand, marl, sandstone etc.). In order to determine the influence of landscape morphology on the agro-technical characterization of land, 11 HOBO Micro Stations (H21-002) have been implemented from April to October in the locality Caianu, at various altitudes (311-441 m) at exposure coverage (N, NW, W, S, SE, E, NE). HOBO Smart Temp (S-TMB-M002) temperature sensors and Decagon EC-5 (S-SMC-M005) moisture sensors were connected to HOBO Micro Stations. Additionally, in 4 of the 11 sites, tipping bucket rain gauges (RG3-M) were deployed to measure precipitation. Each station stored electronic data regarding ground temperature at 3 depths (10, 20, 30 cm), humidity at a depth of 10 cm, air temperature (1 m) and precipitation. Data were downloaded from the Micro Stations via a laptop computer using HOBOware Pro Software Version

  6. Sampling design and procedures for fixed surface-water sites in the Georgia-Florida coastal plain study unit, 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatzell, H.H.; Oaksford, E.T.; Asbury, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    The implementation of design guidelines for the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program has resulted in the development of new sampling procedures and the modification of existing procedures commonly used in the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey. The Georgia-Florida Coastal Plain (GAFL) study unit began the intensive data collection phase of the program in October 1992. This report documents the implementation of the NAWQA guidelines by describing the sampling design and procedures for collecting surface-water samples in the GAFL study unit in 1993. This documentation is provided for agencies that use water-quality data and for future study units that will be entering the intensive phase of data collection. The sampling design is intended to account for large- and small-scale spatial variations, and temporal variations in water quality for the study area. Nine fixed sites were selected in drainage basins of different sizes and different land-use characteristics located in different land-resource provinces. Each of the nine fixed sites was sampled regularly for a combination of six constituent groups composed of physical and chemical constituents: field measurements, major ions and metals, nutrients, organic carbon, pesticides, and suspended sediments. Some sites were also sampled during high-flow conditions and storm events. Discussion of the sampling procedure is divided into three phases: sample collection, sample splitting, and sample processing. A cone splitter was used to split water samples for the analysis of the sampling constituent groups except organic carbon from approximately nine liters of stream water collected at four fixed sites that were sampled intensively. An example of the sample splitting schemes designed to provide the sample volumes required for each sample constituent group is described in detail. Information about onsite sample processing has been organized into a flowchart that describes a pathway for each of

  7. Inventory of site-derived {sup 36}Cl in the Snake River plain aquifier, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Beasley, T.M.

    1995-02-01

    Radioactive waste management practices at the U.S. Department of Energy`s Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in Idaho have introduced {sup 36}Cl (T{sub 1/2} = 301,000 yr) into the Snake River Plain aquifer underlying the site. The {sup 36}Cl is believed to originate from neutron activation of stable {sup 35}Cl in nuclear fuels (principally) and in reactor cooling/process water. Wastewater releases of {sup 3}H at the INEL have been documented by the site operators for the period 1952 to 1988. During this time, approximately 1.2 PBq of {sup 3}H (30,000 Ci) were introduced to the subsurface through disposal wells and seepage ponds. By sampling a number of monitoring and production wells downgradient from points of introduction, {sup 3}H movement and dispersion in the groundwater have been documented by the U.S. Geological Survey. The present report uses these historical {sup 3}H release and monitoring data to choose hydrologic parameters (matrix porosity and plume penetration depth) that produce concordance between the {sup 3}H release estimates and the inventory calculated from measurements of {sup 3}H in the subsurface. These parameters are then applied to {sup 36}Cl isopleths to generate an estimated {sup 36}Cl inventory in the subsurface. Using assumptions about irradiation times, neutron fluxes, and total fuel processed, as little as 23 g of stable chloride impurity in fuel elements would be adequate to produce the amount of {sup 36}Cl estimated to be in the groundwaters underlying the site. The highest atom concentration of {sup 36}Cl measured onsite (222x10{sup 10} atoms 1{sup -1}) corresponds to an activity level of {approximately}4 pCi 1{sup -1} and represents 0.2 percent of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) drinking water standard for this radionuclide (2000 pCi 1{sup -1}).

  8. Estimating switchgrass productivity in the Great Plains using satellite vegetation index and site environmental variables

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gu, Yingxin; Wylie, Bruce K.; Howard, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Switchgrass is being evaluated as a potential feedstock source for cellulosic biofuels and is being cultivated in several regions of the United States. The recent availability of switchgrass land cover maps derived from the National Agricultural Statistics Service cropland data layer for the conterminous United States provides an opportunity to assess the environmental conditions of switchgrass over large areas and across different geographic locations. The main goal of this study is to develop a data-driven multiple regression switchgrass productivity model and identify the optimal climate and environment conditions for the highly productive switchgrass in the Great Plains (GP). Environmental and climate variables used in the study include elevation, soil organic carbon, available water capacity, climate, and seasonal weather. Satellite-derived growing season averaged Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (GSN) was used as a proxy for switchgrass productivity. Multiple regression analyses indicate that there are strong correlations between site environmental variables and switchgrass productivity (r = 0.95). Sufficient precipitation and suitable temperature during the growing season (i.e., not too hot or too cold) are favorable for switchgrass growth. Elevation and soil characteristics (e.g., soil available water capacity) are also an important factor impacting switchgrass productivity. An anticipated switchgrass biomass productivity map for the entire GP based on site environmental and climate conditions and switchgrass productivity model was generated. Highly productive switchgrass areas are mainly located in the eastern part of the GP. Results from this study can help land managers and biofuel plant investors better understand the general environmental and climate conditions influencing switchgrass growth and make optimal land use decisions regarding switchgrass development in the GP.

  9. Analytical study of the effects of the Low-Level Jet on moisture convergence and vertical motion fields at the Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed site

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, X.; Zhong, S.; Whiteman, C.D.; Stage, S.A.

    1996-04-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) is located in a region that is strongly affected by a prominent meteorological phenomenon--the Great Plains Low-Level Jet (LLJ). Observations have shown that the LLJ plays a vital role in spring and summertime cloud formation and precipitation over the Great Plains. An improved understanding of the LLJ characteristics and its impact on the environment is necessary for addressing the fundamental issue of development and testing of radiational transfer and cloud parameterization schemes for the general circulation models (GCMs) using data from the SGP CART site. A climatological analysis of the summertime LLJ over the SGP has been carried out using hourly observations from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Wind Profiler Demonstration Network and from the ARM June 1993 Intensive Observation Period (IOP). The hourly data provide an enhanced temporal and spatial resolution relative to earlier studies which used 6- and 12-hourly rawinsonde observations at fewer stations.

  10. Multiple new-particle growth pathways observed at the US DOE Southern Great Plains field site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodshire, Anna L.; Lawler, Michael J.; Zhao, Jun; Ortega, John; Jen, Coty; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Brewer, Jared F.; Kodros, Jack K.; Barsanti, Kelley C.; Hanson, Dave R.; McMurry, Peter H.; Smith, James N.; Pierce, Jeffery R.

    2016-07-01

    New-particle formation (NPF) is a significant source of aerosol particles into the atmosphere. However, these particles are initially too small to have climatic importance and must grow, primarily through net uptake of low-volatility species, from diameters ˜ 1 to 30-100 nm in order to potentially impact climate. There are currently uncertainties in the physical and chemical processes associated with the growth of these freshly formed particles that lead to uncertainties in aerosol-climate modeling. Four main pathways for new-particle growth have been identified: condensation of sulfuric-acid vapor (and associated bases when available), condensation of organic vapors, uptake of organic acids through acid-base chemistry in the particle phase, and accretion of organic molecules in the particle phase to create a lower-volatility compound that then contributes to the aerosol mass. The relative importance of each pathway is uncertain and is the focus of this work. The 2013 New Particle Formation Study (NPFS) measurement campaign took place at the DOE Southern Great Plains (SGP) facility in Lamont, Oklahoma, during spring 2013. Measured gas- and particle-phase compositions during these new-particle growth events suggest three distinct growth pathways: (1) growth by primarily organics, (2) growth by primarily sulfuric acid and ammonia, and (3) growth by primarily sulfuric acid and associated bases and organics. To supplement the measurements, we used the particle growth model MABNAG (Model for Acid-Base chemistry in NAnoparticle Growth) to gain further insight into the growth processes on these 3 days at SGP. MABNAG simulates growth from (1) sulfuric-acid condensation (and subsequent salt formation with ammonia or amines), (2) near-irreversible condensation from nonreactive extremely low-volatility organic compounds (ELVOCs), and (3) organic-acid condensation and subsequent salt formation with ammonia or amines. MABNAG is able to corroborate the observed differing growth

  11. Automatic Training Site Selection for Agricultural Crop Classification: a Case Study on Karacabey Plain, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozdarici Ok, A.; Akyurek, Z.

    2011-09-01

    This study implements a traditional supervised classification method to an optical image composed of agricultural crops by means of a unique way, selecting the training samples automatically. Panchromatic (1m) and multispectral (4m) Kompsat-2 images (July 2008) of Karacabey Plain (~100km2), located in Marmara region, are used to evaluate the proposed approach. Due to the characteristic of rich, loamy soils combined with reasonable weather conditions, the Karacabey Plain is one of the most valuable agricultural regions of Turkey. Analyses start with applying an image fusion algorithm on the panchromatic and multispectral image. As a result of this process, 1m spatial resolution colour image is produced. In the next step, the four-band fused (1m) image and multispectral (4m) image are orthorectified. Next, the fused image (1m) is segmented using a popular segmentation method, Mean- Shift. The Mean-Shift is originally a method based on kernel density estimation and it shifts each pixel to the mode of clusters. In the segmentation procedure, three parameters must be defined: (i) spatial domain (hs), (ii) range domain (hr), and (iii) minimum region (MR). In this study, in total, 176 parameter combinations (hs, hr, and MR) are tested on a small part of the area (~10km2) to find an optimum segmentation result, and a final parameter combination (hs=18, hr=20, and MR=1000) is determined after evaluating multiple goodness measures. The final segmentation output is then utilized to the classification framework. The classification operation is applied on the four-band multispectral image (4m) to minimize the mixed pixel effect. Before the image classification, each segment is overlaid with the bands of the image fused, and several descriptive statistics of each segment are computed for each band. To select the potential homogeneous regions that are eligible for the selection of training samples, a user-defined threshold is applied. After finding those potential regions, the

  12. Observation of atmospheric peroxides during Wangdu Campaign 2014 at a rural site in the North China Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yin; Chen, Zhongming; Wu, Qinqin; Liang, Hao; Huang, Liubin; Li, Huan; Lu, Keding; Wu, Yusheng; Dong, Huabin; Zeng, Limin; Zhang, Yuanhang

    2016-09-01

    Measurements of atmospheric peroxides were made during Wangdu Campaign 2014 at Wangdu, a rural site in the North China Plain (NCP) in summer 2014. The predominant peroxides were detected to be hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), methyl hydroperoxide (MHP) and peroxyacetic acid (PAA). The observed H2O2 reached up to 11.3 ppbv, which was the highest value compared with previous observations in China at summer time. A box model simulation based on the Master Chemical Mechanism and constrained by the simultaneous observations of physical parameters and chemical species was performed to explore the chemical budget of atmospheric peroxides. Photochemical oxidation of alkenes was found to be the major secondary formation pathway of atmospheric peroxides, while contributions from alkanes and aromatics were of minor importance. The comparison of modeled and measured peroxide concentrations revealed an underestimation during biomass burning events and an overestimation on haze days, which were ascribed to the direct production of peroxides from biomass burning and the heterogeneous uptake of peroxides by aerosols, respectively. The strengths of the primary emissions from biomass burning were on the same order of the known secondary production rates of atmospheric peroxides during the biomass burning events. The heterogeneous process on aerosol particles was suggested to be the predominant sink for atmospheric peroxides. The atmospheric lifetime of peroxides on haze days in summer in the NCP was about 2-3 h, which is in good agreement with the laboratory studies. Further comprehensive investigations are necessary to better understand the impact of biomass burning and heterogeneous uptake on the concentration of peroxides in the atmosphere.

  13. Understanding Land-Atmosphere Coupling and its Predictability at the ARM Southern Great Plains Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, C. R.; Song, H. J.; Roundy, J. K.

    2015-12-01

    Ten years ago, the Global Energy and Water EXchanges Global Land Atmosphere Coupling Experiment (GLACE) spotlighted the Southern Great Plains (SGP) for being one of three hotspots globally for land-derived precipitation predictability. Since then, the GLACE results have served as the underlying motivation for numerous subsequent land-atmosphere (L-A) coupling studies over the SGP domain. The range of these studies includes: local point scale studies leveraging surface meteorological and flux measurements at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement SGP (ARM-SGP) Central Facility, regional pentad to monthly scale atmospheric moisture budget analyses based on atmospheric reanalysis, and regional limited duration (2-7 day) coupled model sensitivity experiments. This study has the following three objectives: (1) to provide the common historical context necessary for bridging past and future interdisciplinary characterizations of L-A coupling, (2) to isolate the mechanism(s) for the region's L-A coupling signal, and (3) to evaluate the short range (12-18hr) predictability of soil moisture-precipitation feedbacks. We produce a convective triggering potential—low-level humidity index (CTP-HI)—based climatology of L-A coupling at ARM-SGP for the period 1979-2014 using North American Regional Reanalysis and North American Land Data Assimilation System Phase 2 data. We link the underlying coupling regime classification timeseries to corresponding synoptic-mesoscale weather patterns and bulk atmospheric moisture budget analyses. On the whole, the region's precipitation variability is largely dependent on large-scale moisture transport and the role of the land is nominal. However, we show that surface sensible heat flux can play an important role in modulating diurnal precipitation cycle phase and amplitude—either directly (enhancing CTP) in water-limited conditions or indirectly (increasing HI) in energy-limited conditions. In fact, both 0700

  14. Surface BRDF estimation from an aircraft compared to MODIS and ground estimates at the Southern Great Plains site

    SciTech Connect

    Knobelspiesse, Kirk D.; Cairns, Brian; Schmid, Beat; Roman, Miguel O.; Schaaf, Crystal B.

    2008-10-21

    The surface spectral albedo is an important component of climate models since it determines the amount of incident solar radiation that is absorbed by the ground. The albedo can be highly heterogeneous, both in space and time, and thus adequate measurement and modeling is challenging. One source of measurements that constrain the surface albedo are satellite instruments that observe the Earth, such as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Satellites estimate the surface bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) by correcting top of the atmosphere (TOA) radiances for atmospheric effects and accumulating observations at a variety of viewing geometries. The BRDF can then be used to determine the albedo that is required in climate modeling. Other measurements that provide a more direct constraint on surface albedo are those made by upward and downward looking radiometers at the ground. One product in particular, the Best Estimate Radiation Flux (BEFLUX) value added product of the Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program at the Southern Great Plains Central Facility (SGP CF) in central Oklahoma, has been used to evaluate the quality of the albedo products derived from MODIS BRDF estimates. These comparisons have highlighted discrepancies between the energy absorbed at the surface that is calculated from the BEFLUX products and that is predicted from the MODIS BRDF product. This paper attempts to investigate these discrepancies by using data from an airborne scanning radiometer, the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) that was flown at low altitude in the vicinity of the SGP CF site during the Aerosol Lidar Validation Experiment (ALIVE) in September of 2005. The RSP is a polarimeter that scans in the direction of the aircraft ground track, and can thus estimate the BRDF in a period of seconds, rather than the days required by MODIS to accumulate enough viewing angles. Atmospheric correction is aided by the

  15. Implementation and evaluation of the Heffter method to calculate the height of the planetary boundary layer above the ARM Southern Great Plains site

    SciTech Connect

    Pesenson, Igor

    2003-11-30

    This paper explores the Heffter Method--an algorithm for finding the height of the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL). The algorithm is applied to the Balloon Borne Sounding System (BBSS) data collected over the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Site of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. After discussing the successes and shortcomings of the algorithm, the resulting PBL height estimates for dates in May of 2002 are related to CO{sub 2} concentration and wind data. The CO{sub 2} data used is from the Precision Gas System (PGS) while the wind data is a combination of data from the Portable CO{sub 2} Flux System on the SGP site and BBSS.

  16. Integrated evaluation of aerosols during haze-fog episodes at one regional background site in North China Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Qi; Li, Weijun; Zhou, Shengzhen; Yang, Lingxiao; Chi, Jianwei; Sui, Xiao; Wang, Wenxing

    2015-04-01

    To investigate haze-fog (HF) formation mechanisms and transport, trace gases and aerosols in the aged air masses during regional haze episodes were measured at a regional background site in the North China Plain during 4-19 July, 2011. Mixing state of individual particles, soluble ions of PM2.5, and particle number concentrations were studied using transmission electron microscope, ambient ion monitoring, and wide-range particle spectrometer, respectively. Average mass concentration of PM2.5 was 3 times higher on HF days (70 μg/m3) than on clear days (22 μg/m3). The major soluble ionic components (SO42 -, NO3-, and NH4+) in PM2.5 were over 4 times higher on HF days (40.6 μg/m3) than on clear days (9.1 μg/m3). The high sulfur oxidation ratios (SOR) and nitrogen oxidation ratios (NOR) values during HF days suggest that polluted weather favored transformation of SO2 and NOx into sulfates and nitrates compared to clear days. Particle number fraction of the accumulation mode increases from 11% on clear days up to 26% on HF days. Individual particle analysis shows that secondary inorganic particles (e.g., sulfate and nitrate) as the most abundant species likely determine internal mixing of individual particles and almost half of them mixed refractory particles (e.g., metal, fly ash, soot, and mineral) on HF days. These fine refractory particles were likely emitted from coal fired power plants, heavy industries, and urban city in Shandong and Hebei provinces. Our results suggest that aged air masses mostly contain aged particles of long-range transport and some from new particle formation and growth in the regional background atmosphere.

  17. Observation and modelling of ambient nitrous acid (HONO) at a rural site (Wangdu) in the North China Plain in summer 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuhan; Lu, Keding; Li, Xin; Dong, Huabin; Ye, Nini; Tan, Zhaofeng; Wu, Yusheng; Zeng, Liming; Bohn, Birger; Broch, Sebastian; Fuchs, Hendrik; Hofzumahaus, Andrease; Holland, Frank; Rohrer, Franz; Wahner, Andrease; Zhang, Yuanhang

    2016-04-01

    Significant missing daytime HONO sources were determined in many places worldwide from urban to rural conditions. In recent field campaigns performed in Chinese megacity regions such as Pearl River Delta, Yangtze River Delta and North China Plain, strong missing HONO sources were also determined and possible explanations including photoenhanced heterogeneous conversion of NO2, photolysis of particulate nitrate, soil emission, and emission from biomass burning. In the present work, we performed in situ measurements of ambient HONO concentration at a rural site (Wangdu) in North China Plain in summer 2014. The observed HONO concentration ranges from tens ppt to 5 ppb. The relations between observed HONO concentration and nitrogen oxide, aerosol and gas-phase chemistry are discussed with statistical methods. Moreover, we use an observational constrained box model to explore the possible roles of the state of art HONO production mechanisms. In addition, after the day of fertilization, we observed a daytime HONO peak around noon time which was distinct from other days by the HONO/NO2 ratio. We believe this peak is a strong indication of soil HONO emission since our site was located in center of a large wheat field. Compared to other days, this increased HONO concentration contributes significantly to the OH production around noontime.

  18. Enhanced Geothermal System Potential for Sites on the Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Robert K Podgorney; Thomas R. Wood; Travis L McLing; Gregory Mines; Mitchell A Plummer; Michael McCurry; Ahmad Ghassemi; John Welhan; Joseph Moore; Jerry Fairley; Rachel Wood

    2013-09-01

    The Snake River volcanic province overlies a thermal anomaly that extends deep into the mantle and represents one of the highest heat flow provinces in North America (Blackwell and Richards, 2004). This makes the Snake River Plain (SRP) one of the most under-developed and potentially highest producing geothermal districts in the United States. Elevated heat flow is typically highest along the margins of the topographic SRP and lowest along the axis of the plain, where thermal gradients are suppressed by the Snake River aquifer. Beneath this aquifer, however, thermal gradients rise again and may tap even higher heat flows associated with the intrusion of mafic magmas into the mid-crustal sill complex (e.g., Blackwell, 1989).

  19. Comparison of Vaisala radiosondes RS41 and RS92 at the ARM Southern Great Plains site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Michael P.; Holdridge, Donna J.; Survo, Petteri; Lehtinen, Raisa; Baxter, Shannon; Toto, Tami; Johnson, Karen L.

    2016-07-01

    In the fall of 2013, the Vaisala RS41 (fourth generation) radiosonde was introduced as a replacement for the RS92-SGP radiosonde with improvements in measurement accuracy of profiles of atmospheric temperature, humidity, and pressure. In order to help characterize these improvements, an intercomparison campaign was undertaken at the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility site in north-central Oklahoma, USA. During 3-8 June 2014, a total of 20 twin-radiosonde flights were performed in a variety of atmospheric conditions representing typical midlatitude continental summertime conditions. The results show that for most of the observed conditions the RS92 and RS41 measurements agree much better than the manufacturer-specified combined uncertainties with notable exceptions when exiting liquid cloud layers where the "wet-bulbing" effect appears to be mitigated for several cases in the RS41 observations. The RS41 measurements of temperature and humidity, with applied correction algorithms, also appear to show less sensitivity to solar heating. These results suggest that the RS41 does provide important improvements, particularly in cloudy conditions. For many science applications - such as atmospheric process studies, retrieval development, and weather forecasting and climate modeling - the differences between the RS92 and RS41 measurements should have little impact. However, for long-term trend analysis and other climate applications, additional characterization of the RS41 measurements and their relation to the long-term observational records will be required.

  20. Multiple new-particle growth pathways observed at the US DOE Southern Great Plains field site

    DOE PAGES

    Hodshire, Anna L.; Lawler, Michael J.; Zhao, Jun; Ortega, John; Jen, Coty; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Brewer, Jared F.; Kodros, Jack K.; Barsanti, Kelley C.; Hanson, Dave R.; et al

    2016-07-28

    New-particle formation (NPF) is a significant source of aerosol particles into the atmosphere. However, these particles are initially too small to have climatic importance and must grow, primarily through net uptake of low-volatility species, from diameters  ∼  1 to 30–100 nm in order to potentially impact climate. There are currently uncertainties in the physical and chemical processes associated with the growth of these freshly formed particles that lead to uncertainties in aerosol-climate modeling. Four main pathways for new-particle growth have been identified: condensation of sulfuric-acid vapor (and associated bases when available), condensation of organic vapors, uptake of organic acids through acid–base chemistrymore » in the particle phase, and accretion of organic molecules in the particle phase to create a lower-volatility compound that then contributes to the aerosol mass. The relative importance of each pathway is uncertain and is the focus of this work. The 2013 New Particle Formation Study (NPFS) measurement campaign took place at the DOE Southern Great Plains (SGP) facility in Lamont, Oklahoma, during spring 2013. Measured gas- and particle-phase compositions during these new-particle growth events suggest three distinct growth pathways: (1) growth by primarily organics, (2) growth by primarily sulfuric acid and ammonia, and (3) growth by primarily sulfuric acid and associated bases and organics. To supplement the measurements, we used the particle growth model MABNAG (Model for Acid–Base chemistry in NAnoparticle Growth) to gain further insight into the growth processes on these 3 days at SGP. MABNAG simulates growth from (1) sulfuric-acid condensation (and subsequent salt formation with ammonia or amines), (2) near-irreversible condensation from nonreactive extremely low-volatility organic compounds (ELVOCs), and (3) organic-acid condensation and subsequent salt formation with ammonia or amines. MABNAG is able to corroborate the

  1. Comparison of Vaisala radiosondes RS41 and RS92 at the ARM Southern Great Plains Site

    DOE PAGES

    Jensen, M. P.; Holdridge, D.; Survo, P.; Lehtinen, R.; Baxter, S.; Toto, T.; Johnson, K. L.

    2015-11-02

    In the fall of 2013, the Vaisala RS41-SG (4th generation) radiosonde was introduced as a replacement for the RS92-SGP radiosonde with improvements in measurement accuracy of profiles of atmospheric temperature, humidity and pressure. Thus, in order to help characterize these improvements, an intercomparison campaign was undertaken at the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Facility site in north Central Oklahoma USA. During 3–8 June 2014, a total of 20 twin-radiosonde flights were performed in a variety of atmospheric conditions representing typical midlatitude continental summertime conditions. The results suggest that the RS92 and RS41 measurements generally agree within manufacturermore » specified tolerances with notable exceptions when exiting liquid cloud layers where the "wet bulbing" effect is mitigated in the RS41 observations. The RS41 measurements also appear to show a smaller impact from solar heating. These results suggest that the RS41 does provide important improvements, particularly in cloudy conditions, but under most observational conditions the RS41 and RS92 measurements agree within the manufacturer specified limits and so a switch to RS41 radiosondes will have little impact on long-term observational records.« less

  2. Comparison of Vaisala radiosondes RS41 and RS92 at the ARM Southern Great Plains Site

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, M. P.; Holdridge, D.; Survo, P.; Lehtinen, R.; Baxter, S.; Toto, T.; Johnson, K. L.

    2015-11-02

    In the fall of 2013, the Vaisala RS41-SG (4th generation) radiosonde was introduced as a replacement for the RS92-SGP radiosonde with improvements in measurement accuracy of profiles of atmospheric temperature, humidity and pressure. Thus, in order to help characterize these improvements, an intercomparison campaign was undertaken at the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Facility site in north Central Oklahoma USA. During 3–8 June 2014, a total of 20 twin-radiosonde flights were performed in a variety of atmospheric conditions representing typical midlatitude continental summertime conditions. The results suggest that the RS92 and RS41 measurements generally agree within manufacturer specified tolerances with notable exceptions when exiting liquid cloud layers where the "wet bulbing" effect is mitigated in the RS41 observations. The RS41 measurements also appear to show a smaller impact from solar heating. These results suggest that the RS41 does provide important improvements, particularly in cloudy conditions, but under most observational conditions the RS41 and RS92 measurements agree within the manufacturer specified limits and so a switch to RS41 radiosondes will have little impact on long-term observational records.

  3. Modeling the Impact of Biogeochemical Hotspots and Hot Moments on Subsurface Carbon Fluxes from a Flood Plain Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, B.; Spycher, N.; Steefel, C. I.; King, E.; Conrad, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    Biogeochemical hotspots and hot moments are known to account for a high percentage of carbon and nutrient cycling within flood plain environments. To quantify the impact of these hotspots and hot moments on the carbon cycle, a 2D reactive transport model was developed for the saturated-unsaturated zone of a flood plain site in Rifle, CO. Previous studies have identified naturally reduced zones (NRZs) in the saturated zone of the Rifle site to be hotspots and important regions for subsurface biogeochemical cycling. Wavelet analysis of geochemical concentrations at the site suggested that hydrologic and temperature variations are hot moments and exert an important control on biogeochemical conditions in the Rifle aquifer. Here, we describe the development of a reactive transport model that couples hydrologic and biogeochemical processes to microbial functional distributions inferred from site-specific 'omic' data. The model includes microbial contributions from heterotrophic and chemolithoautotrophic processes. We use Monod based formulations to represent biomass formation and consider energy partitioning between catabolic and anabolic processes. We use this model to explore community emergence at the Rifle site and further constrain the extent and rates of nutrient uptake as well as abiotic and biotic reactions using stable carbon isotopes. Results from 2D model simulations with only abiotic reactions predict lower CO2 partial pressures in the unsaturated zone and severely underpredict (~200%) carbon fluxes to the river compared to simulations with chemolithoautotrophic pathways. δ13C-CO2 profiles also point to biotic sources for the locally observed high CO2 concentrations above NRZs. Results further indicate that groundwater carbon fluxes from the Rifle site to the river are underestimated by almost 180% (to 3.3 g m-2 d-1) when temperature fluctuations are ignored in the simulations. Preliminary results demonstrate the emergence of denitrifiers at specific depths

  4. Burn site groundwater interim measures work plan.

    SciTech Connect

    Witt, Jonathan L.; Hall, Kevin A.

    2005-05-01

    This Work Plan identifies and outlines interim measures to address nitrate contamination in groundwater at the Burn Site, Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico. The New Mexico Environment Department has required implementation of interim measures for nitrate-contaminated groundwater at the Burn Site. The purpose of interim measures is to prevent human or environmental exposure to nitrate-contaminated groundwater originating from the Burn Site. This Work Plan details a summary of current information about the Burn Site, interim measures activities for stabilization, and project management responsibilities to accomplish this purpose.

  5. Enhanced formation of fine particulate nitrate at a rural site on the North China Plain in summer: The important roles of ammonia and ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Liang; Chen, Jianmin; Yang, Lingxiao; Wang, Xinfeng; Xu, Caihong; Sui, Xiao; Yao, Lan; Zhu, Yanhong; Zhang, Junmei; Zhu, Tong; Wang, Wenxing

    2015-01-01

    Severe PM2.5 pollution was observed frequently on the North China Plain, and nitrate contributed a large fraction of the elevated PM2.5 concentrations. To obtain a comprehensive understanding of the formation pathways of these fine particulate nitrate and the key factors that affect these pathways, field measurements of fine particulate nitrate and related air pollutants were made at a rural site on the North China Plain in the summer of 2013. Extremely high concentrations of fine particulate nitrate were frequently observed at night and in the early morning. The maximum hourly concentration of fine particulate nitrate reached 87.2 μg m-3. This concentration accounted for 29.9% of the PM2.5. The very high NH3 concentration in the early morning significantly accelerated the formation of fine particulate nitrate, as indicated by the concurrent appearance of NH3 and NO3- concentration peaks and a rising neutralization ratio (the equivalent ratio of NH4+ to the sum of SO42- and NO3-). On a number of other episode days, strong photochemical activity during daytime led to high concentrations of O3 at night. The fast secondary formation of fine particulate nitrate was mainly attributed to the hydrolysis of N2O5, which was produced from O3 and NO2. Considering the important roles of NH3 and O3 in fine particulate nitrate formation, we suggest the control of NH3 emissions and photochemical pollution to address the high levels of fine particulate nitrate and the severe PM2.5 pollution on the North China Plain.

  6. PERFORMING QUALITY FLOW MEASUREMENTS AT MINE SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurate flow measurement data is vital to research, monitoring, and remediation efforts at mining sites. This guidebook has been prepared to provide a summary of information relating to the performance of low measurements, and how this information can be applied at mining sites....

  7. The latitudinal distribution of putative periglacial sites on the northern martian plains.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Alex; Balme, Matt; Patel, Manish; Hagermann, Axel

    2013-04-01

    Periglacial landscapes are found in cold regions of Earth where the freezing and thawing of the permafrost active layer plays an important role in shaping the landscape. A variety of distinctive landforms such as sorted circles, thermokarst depressions and solifluction lobes are indicative of periglacial environments on Earth. It has been suggested that similar features on the northern plains of Mars could be the result of the same, or similar processes (1). Since the formation of a periglacial landscape requires the freezing and thawing of water their presence on Mars would indicate that the thawing of water-ice has occurred in the geologically recent past. Periglacial landforms could have formed in past periods of higher obliquity when the environment was more conducive to the action of liquid water or due to the depression of the freezing point by brines under current conditions. We have conducted a survey of putative periglacial landforms across the northern Martian plains. Over 400 HiRISE images of the walls and floors of >1 km diameter craters have been examined to map the locations of these landforms across regions of Acidalia, Utopia and Arcadia Planitia between 30 and 80 Degrees North. These data allow an assessment of the latitudinal distribution of these features. Variations between the types of landform found in different regions of the Northern Plains of mars can also be assessed. Scalloped depressions and gullies have a similar latitude range, and are frequently found south of 60 Degrees North. There are a large number of scalloped depressions in Utopia as noted by other studies (2), similar features are found in both Acidalia and Arcadia but are not found over as wide a range of latitudes in Acidalia. Possible sorted landforms (lobes, polygons etc) can be found as far south as 40 and as far north as 70 Degrees North but most are found between 45-65 Degrees North. They seem to occur over a wider range of latitudes in Utopia Planitia than in Acidalia

  8. End-Pleistocene Soil Constituents from Selected Sites on the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain: First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecompte, M. A.; Rock, B. N.; Demitroff, M.; Reid, M.; Lucas, L.; Hughes, D.; Hayden, L. B.

    2008-12-01

    Stratigraphic analyses of soil samples taken from dated and undated sites located along the mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain have yielded evidence of increased contemporary biomass burning, compared to under and overlying strata. Host strata ages are known or projected to bracket the onset of the Younger Dryas cooling episode at 12.9 cal ka. This ongoing investigation includes samples from: 1) a late-Pleistocene aged periglacial feature located within the Pine Barrens of southern New Jersey; 2) an artifact dated stratum (~ 12.9 ka) in an embankment on the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland; and 3) an as yet undated (C14 test results pending) embankment of the Perquimans River in northeastern North Carolina projected to be age-appropriate. Sample analysis of scanning electron (SEM) micrographs from the Chesapeake Bay site revealed charred fragments of late-Wisconsinan Krummholz birch (Betula) and species of spruce (Picea) and fir (Abies), which are not extant on the modern-day, temperate Coastal Plain. In addition, organic faunal material is found in association with ancient charred boreal wood, including hollow hair and skin fragments that are as yet unidentified, perhaps from cold climate adapted animals as inferred from host sediment age. Charred wood fragments are found to be attracted to a neodymium magnet. Some aggregates of organic matter appear to contain magnetic spherule-like grains whose composition is awaiting geochemical analysis. Photomicrographs of all specimens and a stratigraphic breakdown in the relative amount of burned carbon associated with each site and strata will be presented, along with the results of various analyses that are currently underway.

  9. Migrating birds : assessment of impact on 915-MHz radar wind profiler performance at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program's southern great plains.

    SciTech Connect

    Pekour, M. S.

    2002-03-13

    The U. S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program is running a small network of 915-MHz radar wind profilers (RWPs) at its Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed site in northern Oklahoma and southern Kansas. Seasonal migration of passerines may cause significant interference with the operation of 915-MHz RWPs. The extent of this ''bird jamming'' depends on the radar's parameters, the place of deployment, the season, and the time of day. This poster presents a new diagnostic method for detecting possible bird contamination in RWP data, along with an evaluation of the method using a three-year data set for two RWPs.

  10. Southern Great Plains Safety Orientation

    SciTech Connect

    Schatz, John

    2014-05-01

    Welcome to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. This U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site is managed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). It is very important that all visitors comply with all DOE and ANL safety requirements, as well as those of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the National Fire Protection Association, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and with other requirements as applicable.

  11. The ridged plains as a possible landing site for the Mars sample return mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, Nadine G.

    1988-01-01

    Differences in the shape and density of crater size-frequency distribution curves have been interpreted as indicators of different impactor populations. Within the inner solar system two production populations are seen. The signature of the first is recorded in the heavily cratered regions of the Moon, Mercury, and Mars and displays a multi-sloped distribution curve which cannot be described by a power law function at all crater diameters. The signature of the second population is seen in the lightly cratered lunar and Martian plains, where the size-frequency distribution curve can be approximated by a power law function of -3 differential slope in the 8- to 70-km diameter range. Based on data obtained from the Apollo lunar samples and crater flux estimates, the first population is believed to have been emplaced during the period of heavy bombardment which, at least on the Moon, ended about 3.8 BY ago. The second population has dominated the cratering record since that time and is commonly assumed to be due to comets and asteroids.

  12. Evaluation of Daytime Measurements of Aerosols and Water Vapor made by an Operational Raman Lidar over the Southern Great Plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrare, Richard; Turner, David; Clayton, Marian; Schmid, Beat; Covert, David; Elleman, Robert; Orgren, John; Andrews, Elisabeth; Goldsmith, John E. M.; Jonsson, Hafidi

    2006-01-01

    Raman lidar water vapor and aerosol extinction profiles acquired during the daytime over the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in northern Oklahoma (36.606 N, 97.50 W, 315 m) are evaluated using profiles measured by in situ and remote sensing instruments deployed during the May 2003 Aerosol Intensive Operations Period (IOP). The automated algorithms used to derive these profiles from the Raman lidar data were first modified to reduce the adverse effects associated with a general loss of sensitivity of the Raman lidar since early 2002. The Raman lidar water vapor measurements, which are calibrated to match precipitable water vapor (PWV) derived from coincident microwave radiometer (MWR) measurements were, on average, 5-10% (0.3-0.6 g/m(exp 3) higher than the other measurements. Some of this difference is due to out-of-date line parameters that were subsequently updated in the MWR PWV retrievals. The Raman lidar aerosol extinction measurements were, on average, about 0.03 km(exp -1) higher than aerosol measurements derived from airborne Sun photometer measurements of aerosol optical thickness and in situ measurements of aerosol scattering and absorption. This bias, which was about 50% of the mean aerosol extinction measured during this IOP, decreased to about 10% when aerosol extinction comparisons were restricted to aerosol extinction values larger than 0.15 km(exp -1). The lidar measurements of the aerosol extinction/backscatter ratio and airborne Sun photometer measurements of the aerosol optical thickness were used along with in situ measurements of the aerosol size distribution to retrieve estimates of the aerosol single scattering albedo (omega(sub o)) and the effective complex refractive index. Retrieved values of omega(sub o) ranged from (0.91-0.98) and were in generally good agreement with omega(sub o) derived from airborne in situ measurements of scattering and absorption. Elevated aerosol

  13. Phopshorus and Nitrogen losses from a grassland site on a heavy clay soil in a fluvial plain in the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Salm, Caroline; Chardon, Wim J.; Koopmans, Gerwin F.

    2010-05-01

    Transport of dissolved nutrients by water through the soil matrix to groundwater and drains is assumed to be the dominant pathway for nutrient losses to ground- and surface water in level areas like the Netherlands. In 2003 a study was started to investigate nutrient losses from a grassland site on a heavy clay soil in a fluvial plain in the Netherlands. The site was drained by drains and trenches. Annual N and P surpluses (input minus uptake) were on average 115 kg N ha-1jr-1 en 11 kg P ha-1 jr.-1 The topsoil (10-40 cm) was non-calcareous, with an organic matter content of 5%, a clay content of 57% and a low degree of phosphate saturation (7%). The CaCO3content increased with depth to 7% at 1 m depth. Amount and composition of the discharge from the drains, trenches and ditches were monitored for five years. Monitoring results showed that rapid discharge by means of the trenches was the dominant pathway (60-90%) for water and nutrients. Discharge to the groundwater was negligible. The contribution of the drains to the discharge of the plot depended on the existence of shrinkage cracks in the clay soil. At the end of a dry summer (2002), cracks were abundant and discharge was equally divided to drains and trenches. After prolonged wet periods, cracks were absent and discharge by drains was almost negligible. Average N losses to surface water by trenches was 13.1 kg N ha-1jr,-1 with an average concentration of 6 mg/l. Average N losses by drains was 3.5 kg N ha-1jr-1 (5 mg/l). Average P losses to surface waters were 2.6 and 0.7 kg P ha-1jr-1 for respectively the trenches and drains with average concentrations of 1.2 mg/l and 0.7 mg/l respectively. These concentrations are remarkable high considering the low degree of phosphate saturation and low concentrations in the soil solution. Results of the first three measurement years showed that only a small part of the N and P losses were in dissolved inorganic form (25-50%), accordingly a large part of the annual losses

  14. Measurement of lateral acetabular coverage: a comparison between CT and plain radiography

    PubMed Central

    Chadayammuri, Vivek; Garabekyan, Tigran; Jesse, Mary-Kristen; Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia; Strickland, Colin; Milligan, Kenneth; Mei-Dan, Omer

    2015-01-01

    We prospectively evaluated the degree of absolute agreement between measurements of lateral center-edge angle (LCEA) on plain radiography (XR) and computed tomography (CT) in a consecutive cohort of 205 patients (410 hips) undergoing hip arthroscopy. Preoperative measurements of the LCEA were performed bilaterally utilizing standardized anteroposterior radiographs and coronal reformatted CT scans. Demographic variables including age, gender, height, weight, BMI and clinical diagnosis were recorded for all patients. Overall, measured values of the LCEA were 2.1° larger on CT compared with XR (32.9° versus 30.8°, P < 0.001). Subgroup analysis revealed the highest mean difference in hips with acetabular dysplasia and concomitant cam-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) [mean difference (CT–XR) 5.5°, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.7°–7.3°, P = 0.011], followed by hips with isolated acetabular dysplasia (mean difference [CT–XR] 4.9°, 95% CI 2.7°–7.0°, P < 0.001). In contrast, 119 (29.0%) of the hips demonstrated larger measurements of the LCEA on 25 XR relative to CT. Of these hips, 20 (16.8%) had pincer-FAI and 25 had cam-FAI (21.0%), representing a significantly higher proportion compared with all other clinical subgroups (P = 0.045 and 0.036, respectively). Our study demonstrates measured values of the LCEA are consistently inflated on CT relative to XR for a wide variety of hip pathologies, highlighting the need for standardization and validation of CT-based measurements to improve the quality of clinical decision making. Level of Evidence: Diagnostic Level II. PMID:27011864

  15. Comparison of Meteorological Measurements from Sparse and Dense Surface Observation Networks in the U.S. Southern Great Plains

    SciTech Connect

    JW Monroe; MT Ritsche; M Franklin; KE Kehoe

    2008-02-28

    The primary objective of this study was to analyze the spatial variability of temperature and relative humidity across Kansas (KS) and Oklahoma (OK) for sparse and dense networks by comparing data from (1) the Surface Meteorological Observing System (SMOS) installations at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM; Peppler et al. 2008) Program’s Southern Great Plains site and (2) the Oklahoma Mesonet (OKM; McPherson et al. 2007). Given the wealth of observations available from these networks, this study provided the unique opportunity to determine, within a quantifiable statistical limit, an optimal distance between stations deployed for observation of the climatological values of temperature and relative humidity. Average distances between a given station and its closest neighboring station for the ARM SMOS (~ 70 km) and the OKM (~ 30 km; Brotzge and Richardson 2003) networks provided an excellent framework for comparisons of sparse and dense observations (Figure 1). This study further lays groundwork for a future investigation to determine the necessary spacing between observations for initialization of gridded numerical models.

  16. Implementation of Raman lidar for profiling of atmospheric water vapor and aerosols at the Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed Site

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, J.E.M.; Bisson, S.E.; Blair, F.H.; Whiteman, D.N.; Melfi, S.H.

    1995-04-01

    There are clearly identified scientific requirements for continuous profiling of atmospheric water vapor at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site. Research conducted at several laboratories, including our own collaboration in a previous Instrument Development Project for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, has demonstrated the suitability of Raman lidar for providing measurements that are an excellent match to those requirements. We are currently building a rugged Raman lidar system that will reside permanently at the CART site and that is computer-automated to reduce the requirements for operator interaction. In addition to the design goal of profiling water vapor through most of the troposphere during nighttime and through the boundary layer during daytime, the lidar is intended to provide quantitative characterizations of aerosols and clouds, including depolarization measurements for particle phase studies. Raman lidar systems detect selected species by monitoring the wavelength-shifted molecular return produced by Raman scattering from the chosen molecule or molecules. For water-vapor measurements, the nitrogen Raman signal is observed simultaneously with the water-vapor Raman signal; proper ratioing of the signals yields the water-vapor mixing ratio. Similarly, when the backscatter signal at the laser wavelength (which contains contributions from both Rayleigh and aerosol scattering) is also recorded simultaneously, the ratio of the backscatter signal to the nitrogen Raman signal yields a quantitative measurement of the aerosol scattering ratio. A variety of aerosol and cloud parameters can be derived from this measurement. In aerosol-free regions of the atmosphere, temperature profiles can be derived from the density measurements obtained from the nitrogen Raman signal.

  17. Column Aerosol Optical Properties and Aerosol Radiative Forcing During a Serious Haze-Fog Month over North China Plain in 2013 Based on Ground-Based Sunphotometer Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Che, H.; Xia, X.; Zhu, J.; Li, Z.; Dubovik, O.; Holben, Brent N.; Goloub, P.; Chen, H.; Estelles, V.; Cuevas-Agullo, E.

    2014-01-01

    In January 2013, North China Plain experienced several serious haze events. Cimel sunphotometer measurements at seven sites over rural, suburban and urban regions of North China Plain from 1 to 30 January 2013 were used to further our understanding of spatial-temporal variation of aerosol optical parameters and aerosol radiative forcing (ARF). It was found that Aerosol Optical Depth at 500 nm (AOD500nm) during non-pollution periods at all stations was lower than 0.30 and increased significantly to greater than 1.00 as pollution events developed. The Angstrom exponent (Alpha) was larger than 0.80 for all stations most of the time. AOD500nm averages increased from north to south during both polluted and non-polluted periods on the three urban sites in Beijing. The fine mode AOD during pollution periods is about a factor of 2.5 times larger than that during the non-pollution period at urban sites but a factor of 5.0 at suburban and rural sites. The fine mode fraction of AOD675nm was higher than 80% for all sites during January 2013. The absorption AOD675nm at rural sites was only about 0.01 during pollution periods, while 0.03-0.07 and 0.01-0.03 during pollution and non-pollution periods at other sites, respectively. Single scattering albedo varied between 0.87 and 0.95 during January 2013 over North China Plain. The size distribution showed an obvious tri-peak pattern during the most serious period. The fine mode effective radius in the pollution period was about 0.01-0.08 microns larger than during nonpollution periods, while the coarse mode radius in pollution periods was about 0.06-0.38 microns less than that during nonpollution periods. The total, fine and coarse mode particle volumes varied by about 0.06-0.34 cu microns, 0.03-0.23 cu microns, and 0.03-0.10 cu microns, respectively, throughout January 2013. During the most intense period (1-16 January), ARF at the surface exceeded -50W/sq m, -180W/sq m, and -200W/sq m at rural, suburban, and urban sites

  18. Impact of soil texture on soil moisture measurement accuracy by TDR in Sistan plain of Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    sarani, noushin; Afrasiab, Peyman

    2014-05-01

    In the recent past, many researchers have developed various techniques for determining moisture content of soil. Among the various methods of estimating soil moisture, Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) method is a relatively new method. TDR has been widely used in water system investigation in Agriculture, Geosciences, etc. The purpose of this study is determination of moisture measurement accuracy by TDR in various soil textures in Sistan plain. For this purpose, six textures and for each of them three Iteration were used. The studied textures were clay, loam, sandy loam, sandy clay loam, clay loam and sandy. The experiments were carried out at the laboratory of water engineering department of Zabol University in Iran. The provided textures were laid in the PVC cylinder with 50 cm height and 30 cm diameter. After 24 h of saturation, the soil water content of the samples was measured by oven-dry gravimetric and TDR methods. In each day the moisture measurement of each texture was carried out by these two methods until a moisture range was determined. For comparison between measured moisture values by TDR and gravimetric method, two statistical parameters include coefficient of determination (R2) and root mean square error (RMSE) were applied here. The results showed that by using SPSS, statistically significant at probably level of 1% indicated no difference between the measured value of moisture by TDR device and gravimetric method. For heavy textures consist of sandy clay loam, clay loam, and clay with increasing clay content when the moisture was low, TDR measured the moisture values less than the gravimetric method. Furthermore for light textures consist of sandy loam and sand, the TDR device measured the moisture values more than the gravimetric method. Also for clay loam and sandy clay at high moisture values, data measured by TDR was close to the gravimetric method. For all studied textures with increasing of clay content, the fitted lines slope and RMSE

  19. Assessing the use of existing data to compare plains fish assemblages collected from random and fixed sites in Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zuellig, Robert E.; Crockett, Harry J.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Colorado Parks and Wildlife, assessed the potential use of combining recently (2007 to 2010) and formerly (1992 to 1996) collected data to compare plains fish assemblages sampled from random and fixed sites located in the South Platte and Arkansas River Basins in Colorado. The first step was to determine if fish assemblages collected between 1992 and 1996 were comparable to samples collected at the same sites between 2007 and 2010. If samples from the two time periods were comparable, then it was considered reasonable that the combined time-period data could be used to make comparisons between random and fixed sites. In contrast, if differences were found between the two time periods, then it was considered unreasonable to use these data to make comparisons between random and fixed sites. One-hundred samples collected during the 1990s and 2000s from 50 sites dispersed among 19 streams in both basins were compiled from a database maintained by Colorado Parks and Wildlife. Nonparametric multivariate two-way analysis of similarities was used to test for fish-assemblage differences between time periods while accounting for stream-to-stream differences. Results indicated relatively weak but significant time-period differences in fish assemblages. Weak time-period differences in this case possibly were related to changes in fish assemblages associated with environmental factors; however, it is difficult to separate other possible explanations such as limited replication of paired time-period samples in many of the streams or perhaps differences in sampling efficiency and effort between the time periods. Regardless, using the 1990s data to fill data gaps to compare random and fixed-site fish-assemblage data is ill advised based on the significant separation in fish assemblages between time periods and the inability to determine conclusive explanations for these results. These findings indicated that additional sampling will

  20. Determination of the 100-year flood plain on Upper Three Runs and selected tributaries, and the Savannah River at the Savannah River site, South Carolina, 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanier, T.H.

    1996-01-01

    The 100-year flood plain was determined for Upper Three Runs, its tributaries, and the part of the Savannah River that borders the Savannah River Site. The results are provided in tabular and graphical formats. The 100-year flood-plain maps and flood profiles provide water-resource managers of the Savannah River Site with a technical basis for making flood-plain management decisions that could minimize future flood problems and provide a basis for designing and constructing drainage structures along roadways. A hydrologic analysis was made to estimate the 100-year recurrence- interval flow for Upper Three Runs and its tributaries. The analysis showed that the well-drained, sandy soils in the head waters of Upper Three Runs reduce the high flows in the stream; therefore, the South Carolina upper Coastal Plain regional-rural-regression equation does not apply for Upper Three Runs. Conse- quently, a relation was established for 100-year recurrence-interval flow and drainage area using streamflow data from U.S. Geological Survey gaging stations on Upper Three Runs. This relation was used to compute 100-year recurrence-interval flows at selected points along the stream. The regional regression equations were applicable for the tributaries to Upper Three Runs, because the soil types in the drainage basins of the tributaries resemble those normally occurring in upper Coastal Plain basins. This was verified by analysis of the flood-frequency data collected from U.S. Geological Survey gaging station 02197342 on Fourmile Branch. Cross sections were surveyed throughout each reach, and other pertinent data such as flow resistance and land-use were col- lected. The surveyed cross sections and computed 100-year recurrence-interval flows were used in a step-backwater model to compute the 100-year flood profile for Upper Three Runs and its tributaries. The profiles were used to delineate the 100-year flood plain on topographic maps. The Savannah River forms the southwestern border

  1. Centrifugal pump inlet pressure site affects measurement.

    PubMed

    Augustin, Simon; Horton, Alison; Butt, Warwick; Bennett, Martin; Horton, Stephen

    2010-09-01

    During extracorporeal life support (ECLS), blood is exposed to a myriad of unphysiological factors that can affect outcome. One aspect of this is the sub-atmospheric pressure generated by the ECLS pump and imparted to blood elements along the pump inlet line. This pressure can be measured on the inlet line close to the pump head by adding a connector, or at the venous cannula connection site. We compared the two measurement sites located at both points; between the venous cannula-inlet tubing and inlet tubing-pump, with a range of cannulae and flows. We also investigated the effects on inlet pressure from pump afterload and increasing inlet tubing length.

  2. Clear-Water Contraction Scour at Selected Bridge Sites in the Black Prairie Belt of the Coastal Plain in Alabama, 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, K.G.; Hedgecock, T.S.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Alabama Department of Transportation, made observations of clear-water contraction scour at 25 bridge sites in the Black Prairie Belt of the Coastal Plain of Alabama. These bridge sites consisted of 54 hydraulic structures, of which 37 have measurable scour holes. Observed scour depths ranged from 1.4 to 10.4 feet. Theoretical clear-water contraction-scour depths were computed for each bridge and compared with observed scour. This comparison showed that theoretical scour depths, in general, exceeded the observed scour depths by about 475 percent. Variables determined to be important in developing scour in laboratory studies along with several other hydraulic variables were investigated to understand their influence within the Alabama field data. The strongest explanatory variables for clear-water contraction scour were channel-contraction ratio and velocity index. Envelope curves were developed relating both of these explanatory variables to observed scour. These envelope curves provide useful tools for assessing reasonable ranges of scour depth in the Black Prairie Belt of Alabama.

  3. Nevada Test Site seismic: telemetry measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, J N; Parker, L E; Horton, E H

    1983-08-01

    The feasibility and limitations of surface-to-tunnel seismic telemetry at the Nevada Test Site were explored through field measurements using current technology. Range functions for signaling were determined through analysis of monofrequency seismic signals injected into the earth at various sites as far as 70 km (43 mi) from installations of seismometers in the G-Tunnel complex of Rainier Mesa. Transmitted signal power at 16, 24, and 32 Hz was measured at two locations in G-Tunnel separated by 670 m (2200 ft). Transmissions from 58 surface sites distributed primarily along three azimuths from G-Tunnel were studied. The G-Tunnel noise environment was monitored over the 20-day duration of the field tests. Noise-power probability functions were calculated for 20-s and 280-s seismic-record populations. Signaling rates were calculated for signals transmitted from superior transmitter sites to G-Tunnel. A detection threshold of 13 dB re 1 nm/sup 2/ displacement power at 95% reliability was demanded. Consideration of field results suggests that even for the frequency range used in this study, substantially higher signaling rates are likely to be obtained in future work in view of the present lack of information relevant to hardware-siting criteria and the seismic propagation paths at the Nevada Test Site. 12 references.

  4. Soil moisture anomalies and convection: investigation using ground-based measurements at US Southern Great Plains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Soil moisture is one of the key factors modulating the atmospheric boundary layer and thus the climate system. In this study, we use ground-based measurements to investigate the mechanism by which soil moisture anomalies affect clouds and precipitation. From decade-long warm season observation by Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement at Southern Great Plains, we carefully select daytime weather regimes that are strongly coupled with land-surface processes such as clear-sky dry convection days, forced and active non-precipitating shallow cumuli days, and late-afternoon deep convective raining days (Zhang and Klein, 2010 and 2013). Based on this framework, we statistically assess: 1) the differences in soil moisture and surface heterogeneity between different convective regimes; and 2) the variances of the associated effects on surface and boundary layer meteorological conditions inside each convective regime. A specific question will be: under different soil moisture conditions, e.g. wet/dry, which convective weather regime will be favored and how this is related to large-scale environmental factors, such as free-troposphere stability and humidity? The answer to this question will improve our understanding of how soil moisture impacts boundary layer turbulence and thermodynamics, and influences the convection triggering and maintenance and their feedbacks on soil moisture, thus establish a link between soil moisture and convection at the process level. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-675737

  5. Background light measurements at the DUMAND site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aoki, T.; Kitamura, T.; Matsuno, S.; Mitsui, K.; Ohashi, Y.; Okada, A.; Cady, D. R.; Learned, J. G.; Oconnor, D.; Mcmurdo, M.

    1985-01-01

    Ambient light intensities at the DUMAND site, west of the island of Hawaii were measured around the one photoelectron level. Throughout the water column between 1,500m and 4,700m, a substantial amount of stimulateable bioluminescence is observed with a ship suspended detector. But non-stimulated bioluminescence level is comparable, or less than, K sup 40 background, when measured with a bottom tethered detector typical of a DUMAND optical module.

  6. SAR Interferometry for Measuring Recent Deformation of the Eastern Snake River Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, J.; Rodgers, D.; Payne, S.

    2003-12-01

    The Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) is a NE-trending volcanic basin that defines the track of the Yellowstone hotspot across southern Idaho. Previous studies of the ESRP interpreted up to 6 km of upper crustal subsidence and 15-25 % extension since 10-15 Ma. Leveling studies conducted between 1906 and 1983 and more recent GPS studies indicate that at least some ESRP regions continue to actively extend and/or subside. To document the regional pattern of active deformation, we have employed interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) techniques. Snow- and rain-free ERS-1 and ERS-2 SAR images from 1992-2003 with less than 400 m baselines were acquired for areas with large, young basaltic lava flows with flat surfaces, sparse vegetation and little soil cover, such as the Craters of the Moon, Wapi, and Hell's Half-Acre lava fields. These areas are ideal for preserving surface characteristics and maintaining SAR phase coherence between images for 4-10 years, time spans that are required to detect the slow rates of topographic change on the ESRP. Results from the Wapi region indicate that differential subsidence and/or extension from 1993-1997 was symmetrically disposed about the axis of the Great Rift, with greater Line of Sight (LOS) topographic change on the margins and less along the rift. Results from the Craters of the Moon region indicate variable amounts of upper crustal subsidence and extension from 1993-1997, although the absolute amount requires further calibration by GPS analysis. Up to 2 mm/yr of differential LOS change is evident in the region over this period, with a domain of less LOS change across the axis of the Great Rift and a domain of greater LOS change to the west. The line that separates domains is relatively sharp, oriented north-northwest, and if extrapolated northward is on strike with the surface trace of a west-dipping Basin-Range normal fault. One interpretation of this pattern is that Basin-Range half-graben fault blocks underlie the

  7. Laboratory-Measured and Property-Transfer Modeled Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity of Snake River Plain Aquifer Sediments at the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perkins, Kim S.

    2008-01-01

    Sediments are believed to comprise as much as 50 percent of the Snake River Plain aquifer thickness in some locations within the Idaho National Laboratory. However, the hydraulic properties of these deep sediments have not been well characterized and they are not represented explicitly in the current conceptual model of subregional scale ground-water flow. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the nature of the sedimentary material within the aquifer and to test the applicability of a site-specific property-transfer model developed for the sedimentary interbeds of the unsaturated zone. Saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) was measured for 10 core samples from sedimentary interbeds within the Snake River Plain aquifer and also estimated using the property-transfer model. The property-transfer model for predicting Ksat was previously developed using a multiple linear-regression technique with bulk physical-property measurements (bulk density [pbulk], the median particle diameter, and the uniformity coefficient) as the explanatory variables. The model systematically underestimates Ksat,typically by about a factor of 10, which likely is due to higher bulk-density values for the aquifer samples compared to the samples from the unsaturated zone upon which the model was developed. Linear relations between the logarithm of Ksat and pbulk also were explored for comparison.

  8. Forest transpiration from sap flux density measurements in a Southeastern Coastal Plain riparian buffer system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Forested riparian buffers are prevalent throughout the Southeastern Coastal Plain Region of the United States (US). Because they make up a significant portion of the regional landscape, transpiration within these riparian buffers is believed to have an important impact on the hydrologic budget of r...

  9. Atmospheric Concentrations, Gas/Particle Partitioning And Exposure Risk Of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) At Background, Rural Village And Urban Sites In The North China Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Simonich, S.; Zhao, J.; Xue, M.; Wang, W.; Tao, S.

    2009-05-01

    Particle- and gas-phase PAHs were measured in air collected from a background site (Xiaolongmen), two rural village sites (Gubeikou and Donghe), and an urban site (Beijing) located in the North China Plain for four seasons from September 2007 to August 2008 in order to evaluate their concentrations, relative abundance, and gas/particle partitioning. Sixteen PAHs, included in the U.S.EPA priority pollutant list, were determined in the particle (PM10) and gas phases. The annual average 15 PAH concentration in Donghe was 730.7±608.0 ng/m3, which was 18.2, 3.0, 1.8 times higher than Xiaolongmen, Gubeikou and Beijing, respectively. A good linear relationship between gas/particle partitioning coefficients, Kp and subcooled liquid vapor pressure, pl was obtained. At the rural and urban sites, the regression slopes were much steeper than -1, indicating that adsorption of PAH to particulate matter dominated over absorption possibly because, at these sites, the freshly emitted particulate matter and PAHs had not yet reached equilibrium. However, gas/particle partitioning of PAHs approached equilibrium at the background site because of long- range transport of PAHs. In addition, the gas/particle partitioning was studied according to three different models: The Junge-Pankow adsorption model, the Koa absorption model, and the dual organic matter absorption model combined with the soot carbon adsorption model. The Junge-Pankow model and Koa model both under-predicted our experimental Kp values. However, the dual model fit our experimental Kp values well suggesting that the main partitioning mechanism was PAH adsorption onto soot carbon in this region of China. The different particulate matter characteristics (including organic matter and elemental carbon fraction and available adsorption sites), temperature variation during sampling, the presence of a non- exchangeable PAH fraction and non-equilibrium were considered possible reasons for why our experimental Kp values deviated

  10. LASE measurements of water vapor and aerosol profiles during the Plains Elevated Convection at Night (PECAN) field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehrir, A. R.; Ferrare, R. A.; Kooi, S. A.; Butler, C. F.; Notari, A.; Hair, J. W.; Collins, J. E., Jr.; Ismail, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) system was deployed on the NASA DC-8 aircraft during the Plains Elevated Convection At Night (PECAN) field experiment, which was conducted during June-July 2015 over the central and southern plains. LASE is an active remote sensor that employs the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique to measure range resolved profiles of water vapor and aerosols above and below the aircraft. The DC-8 conducted nine local science flights from June 30- July 14 where LASE sampled water vapor and aerosol fields in support of the PECAN primary science objectives relating to better understanding nocturnal Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCSs), Convective Initiation (CI), the Low Level Jet (LLJ), bores, and to compare different airborne and ground based measurements. LASE observed large spatial and temporal variability in water vapor and aerosol distributions in advance of nocturnal MCSs, across bores resulting from MCS outflow boundaries, and across the LLJ associated with the development of MCSs and CI. An overview of the LASE data collected during the PECAN field experiment will be presented where emphasis will be placed on variability of water vapor profiles in the vicinity of severe storms and intense convection in the central and southern plains. Preliminary comparisons show good agreement between coincident LASE and radiosonde water vapor profiles. In addition, an advanced water vapor DIAL system being developed at NASA Langley will be discussed.

  11. Regional CO2 and latent heat surface fluxes in the Southern Great Plains: Measurements, modeling, and scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, W. J.; Biraud, S.C.; Torn, M.S.; Fischer, M.L.; Billesbach, D.P.; Berry, J.A.

    2009-08-15

    Characterizing net ecosystem exchanges (NEE) of CO{sub 2} and sensible and latent heat fluxes in heterogeneous landscapes is difficult, yet critical given expected changes in climate and land use. We report here a measurement and modeling study designed to improve our understanding of surface to atmosphere gas exchanges under very heterogeneous land cover in the mostly agricultural U.S. Southern Great Plains (SGP). We combined three years of site-level, eddy covariance measurements in several of the dominant land cover types with regional-scale climate data from the distributed Mesonet stations and Next Generation Weather Radar precipitation measurements to calibrate a land surface model of trace gas and energy exchanges (isotope-enabled land surface model (ISOLSM)). Yearly variations in vegetation cover distributions were estimated from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer normalized difference vegetation index and compared to regional and subregional vegetation cover type estimates from the U.S. Department of Agriculture census. We first applied ISOLSM at a 250 m spatial scale to account for vegetation cover type and leaf area variations that occur on hundred meter scales. Because of computational constraints, we developed a subsampling scheme within 10 km 'macrocells' to perform these high-resolution simulations. We estimate that the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility SGP region net CO{sub 2} exchange with the local atmosphere was -240, -340, and -270 gC m{sup -2} yr{sup -1} (positive toward the atmosphere) in 2003, 2004, and 2005, respectively, with large seasonal variations. We also performed simulations using two scaling approaches at resolutions of 10, 30, 60, and 90 km. The scaling approach applied in current land surface models led to regional NEE biases of up to 50 and 20% in weekly and annual estimates, respectively. An important factor in causing these biases was the complex leaf area index (LAI) distribution within

  12. Observation and modelling of the OH, HO2 and RO2 radicals at a rural site (Wangdu) in the North China Plain in summer 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Zhaofeng; Fuchs, Hendrik; Lu, Keding; Bohn, Birger; Broch, Sebastian; Haeseler, Rolf; Hofzumahaus, Andrease; Holland, Frank; Li, Xin; Liu, Ying; Rohrer, Franz; Shao, Min; Wang, Baolin; Wang, Ming; Wu, Yusheng; Zeng, Limin; Wahner, Andrease; Zhang, Yuanhang

    2016-04-01

    A comprehensive field campaign was carried out in summer 2014 in Wangdu located in the North China Plain. A month of continuous OH, HO2and RO2 measurements were obtained by a laser induced fluorescence system. High daytime OH, HO2 and RO2 radical concentrations were observed of which their daily maximum concentrations were (5 - 15)×106cm‑3, (3 - 14)×108 cm‑3 and (3 - 15)×108 cm‑3, respectively. A chemical box model constrained by observed trace gas compounds with state of art chemical mechanism is used to interpret the observed radical concentrations. The model underestimated the observed OH concentrations by a factor of 2 when NO is less than 100ppt in the afternoon hours. Like PRIDE-PRD2006 and CAREBEIJING2006, an additional OH recycling is required to reproduce the observed OH concentrations for the high VOC and low NOx conditions. Based on a few chemical modulation experiments we performed at the site, the determined OH interference signal were very small for the afternoon conditions. In addition, we found that observed RO2 concentrations were underestimated in the morning hours which indicated the existence of additional chemical sources of RO2 and an underestimation of the local ozone production rates in current model.

  13. Comparison of Seasonal Terrestrial Water Storage Variations from GRACE with Groundwater-level Measurements from the High Plains Aquifer (USA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strassberg, Gil; Scanlon, Bridget R.; Rodell, Matthew

    2007-01-01

    This study presents the first direct comparison of variations in seasonal GWS derived from GRACE TWS and simulated SM with GW-level measurements in a semiarid region. Results showed that variations in GWS and SM are the main sources controlling TWS changes over the High Plains, with negligible storage changes from surface water, snow, and biomass. Seasonal variations in GRACE TWS compare favorably with combined GWS from GW-level measurements (total 2,700 wells, average 1,050 GW-level measurements per season) and simulated SM from the Noah land surface model (R = 0.82, RMSD = 33 mm). Estimated uncertainty in seasonal GRACE-derived TWS is 8 mm, and estimated uncertainty in TWS changes is 11 mm. Estimated uncertainty in SM changes is 11 mm and combined uncertainty for TWS-SM changes is 15 mm. Seasonal TWS changes are detectable in 7 out of 9 monitored periods and maximum changes within a year (e.g. between winter and summer) are detectable in all 5 monitored periods. Grace-derived GWS calculated from TWS-SM generally agrees with estimates based on GW-level measurements (R = 0.58, RMSD = 33 mm). Seasonal TWS-SM changes are detectable in 5 out of the 9 monitored periods and maximum changes are detectable in all 5 monitored periods. Good correspondence between GRACE data and GW-level measurements from the intensively monitored High Plains aquifer validates the potential for using GRACE TWS and simulated SM to monitor GWS changes and aquifer depletion in semiarid regions subjected to intensive irrigation pumpage. This method can be used to monitor regions where large-scale aquifer depletion is ongoing, and in situ measurements are limited, such as the North China Plain or western India. This potential should be enhanced by future advances in GRACE processing, which will improve the spatial and temporal resolution of TWS changes, and will further increase applicability of GRACE data for monitoring GWS.

  14. Vertical profiles of black carbon measured by a micro-aethalometer in summer in the North China Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Liang; Deng, Zhaoze; Xu, Xiaobin; Yan, Peng; Lin, Weili; Wang, Ying; Tian, Ping; Wang, Pucai; Pan, Weilin; Lu, Daren

    2016-08-01

    Black carbon (BC) is a dominant absorber in the visible spectrum and a potent factor in climatic effects. Vertical profiles of BC were measured using a micro-aethalometer attached to a tethered balloon during the Vertical Observations of trace Gases and Aerosols (VOGA) field campaign, in summer 2014 at a semirural site in the North China Plain (NCP). The diurnal cycle of BC vertical distributions following the evolution of the mixing layer (ML) was investigated for the first time in the NCP region. Statistical parameters including identified mixing height (Hm) and average BC mass concentrations within the ML (Cm) and in the free troposphere (Cf) were obtained for a selected dataset of 67 vertical profiles. Hm was usually lower than 0.2 km in the early morning and rapidly rose thereafter due to strengthened turbulence. The maximum height of the ML was reached in the late afternoon. The top of a full developed ML exceeded 1 km on sunny days in summer, while it stayed much lower on cloudy days. The sunset triggered the collapse of the ML, and a stable nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) gradually formed. Accordingly, the highest level Cm was found in the early morning and the lowest was found in the afternoon. In the daytime, BC was almost uniformly distributed within the ML and significantly decreased above the ML. During the field campaign, Cm averaged about 5.16 ± 2.49 µg m-3, with a range of 1.12 to 14.49 µg m-3, comparable with observational results in many polluted urban areas such as Milan in Italy and Shanghai in China. As evening approached, BC gradually built up near the surface and exponentially declined with height. In contrast to the large variability found both in Hm and Cm, Cf stayed relatively unaffected through the day. Cf was less than 10 % of the ground level under clean conditions, while it amounted to half of the ground level in some polluted cases. In situ measurements of BC vertical profiles would hopefully have an important implication for

  15. Site, environmental and airflow characteristics for mono-slope beef cattle facilities in the Northern Great Plains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In conjunction with an emission monitoring study, long-term airflow and environmental data were collected from four regional producer-owned and -operated mono-slope beef cattle facilities in the Northern Great Plains. The barns were oriented east-west, with approximate dimensions of an 8-m south wal...

  16. Evaluation of hot dry rock exploration techniques in the Atlantic Coastal Plain: a test site on the Delmarva Peninsula of Maryland and Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    Detailed investigation of a potential Hot Dry Rock (HDR) energy extraction site in the area of Crisfield, Maryland, and Wallops Island, Virginia, (referred to as the Cris-Wall site) was carried out to evaluate HDR exploration techniques in the Atlantic Coastal Plain province. The findings favor the HDR exploration program that is outlined for locating a deep test hole in an area with presumed HDR potential (higher than normal heat flow). Six potential sites for extracting HDR energy have been identified within the Cris-Wall area. Each site is thought to have temperatures at the basement rock surface in excess of 75/sup 0/C and to be at least 1 km away from the nearest fault.

  17. Measuring and mitigating agricultural greenhouse gas production in the US Great Plains, 1870-2000.

    PubMed

    Parton, William J; Gutmann, Myron P; Merchant, Emily R; Hartman, Melannie D; Adler, Paul R; McNeal, Frederick M; Lutz, Susan M

    2015-08-25

    The Great Plains region of the United States is an agricultural production center for the global market and, as such, an important source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This article uses historical agricultural census data and ecosystem models to estimate the magnitude of annual GHG fluxes from all agricultural sources (e.g., cropping, livestock raising, irrigation, fertilizer production, tractor use) in the Great Plains from 1870 to 2000. Here, we show that carbon (C) released during the plow-out of native grasslands was the largest source of GHG emissions before 1930, whereas livestock production, direct energy use, and soil nitrous oxide emissions are currently the largest sources. Climatic factors mediate these emissions, with cool and wet weather promoting C sequestration and hot and dry weather increasing GHG release. This analysis demonstrates the long-term ecosystem consequences of both historical and current agricultural activities, but also indicates that adoption of available alternative management practices could substantially mitigate agricultural GHG fluxes, ranging from a 34% reduction with a 25% adoption rate to as much as complete elimination with possible net sequestration of C when a greater proportion of farmers adopt new agricultural practices. PMID:26240366

  18. Measuring and mitigating agricultural greenhouse gas production in the US Great Plains, 1870-2000.

    PubMed

    Parton, William J; Gutmann, Myron P; Merchant, Emily R; Hartman, Melannie D; Adler, Paul R; McNeal, Frederick M; Lutz, Susan M

    2015-08-25

    The Great Plains region of the United States is an agricultural production center for the global market and, as such, an important source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This article uses historical agricultural census data and ecosystem models to estimate the magnitude of annual GHG fluxes from all agricultural sources (e.g., cropping, livestock raising, irrigation, fertilizer production, tractor use) in the Great Plains from 1870 to 2000. Here, we show that carbon (C) released during the plow-out of native grasslands was the largest source of GHG emissions before 1930, whereas livestock production, direct energy use, and soil nitrous oxide emissions are currently the largest sources. Climatic factors mediate these emissions, with cool and wet weather promoting C sequestration and hot and dry weather increasing GHG release. This analysis demonstrates the long-term ecosystem consequences of both historical and current agricultural activities, but also indicates that adoption of available alternative management practices could substantially mitigate agricultural GHG fluxes, ranging from a 34% reduction with a 25% adoption rate to as much as complete elimination with possible net sequestration of C when a greater proportion of farmers adopt new agricultural practices.

  19. Measuring and mitigating agricultural greenhouse gas production in the US Great Plains, 1870–2000

    PubMed Central

    Parton, William J.; Gutmann, Myron P.; Merchant, Emily R.; Hartman, Melannie D.; Adler, Paul R.; McNeal, Frederick M.; Lutz, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    The Great Plains region of the United States is an agricultural production center for the global market and, as such, an important source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This article uses historical agricultural census data and ecosystem models to estimate the magnitude of annual GHG fluxes from all agricultural sources (e.g., cropping, livestock raising, irrigation, fertilizer production, tractor use) in the Great Plains from 1870 to 2000. Here, we show that carbon (C) released during the plow-out of native grasslands was the largest source of GHG emissions before 1930, whereas livestock production, direct energy use, and soil nitrous oxide emissions are currently the largest sources. Climatic factors mediate these emissions, with cool and wet weather promoting C sequestration and hot and dry weather increasing GHG release. This analysis demonstrates the long-term ecosystem consequences of both historical and current agricultural activities, but also indicates that adoption of available alternative management practices could substantially mitigate agricultural GHG fluxes, ranging from a 34% reduction with a 25% adoption rate to as much as complete elimination with possible net sequestration of C when a greater proportion of farmers adopt new agricultural practices. PMID:26240366

  20. Organic Aerosol Composition Measurements at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parworth, C. L.; Zhang, Q.; Fast, J. D.; Shippert, T.; Sivaraman, C.; Mei, F.; Tilp, A.

    2012-12-01

    Organic aerosol (OA) makes up a large portion of aerosols in the atmosphere. A better understanding of the chemical composition of OA is needed to quantify the effects that aerosols have on radiation and clouds. OA is composed of thousands of species making its chemical and physical properties difficult to characterize. The complex composition of OA can be decomposed into several factors representative of distinct sources and evolution processes through the application of Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) on ambient OA data acquired with aerosol mass spectrometers (AMS). Previous studies have shown that the OA factors thus determined can be particularly useful for closure studies on aerosol optical and cloud condensation properties. Three units of Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) were recently added to two long-term measurement sites (Tropical Western Pacific and Southern Great Plains) and a mobile facility supported by the DOE ARM program. An ACSM is a smaller version of an AMS that provides long term, continuous measurements of aerosols and requires low maintenance. In this presentation, we will report the development of methods that take measurements of total organic matter and mass spectral information from the ACSM and derive OA factors. We will describe how the OA factors are derived, the quality assurance (QA) procedures, and comparisons of side-by-side measurements from AMS and ACSM instruments. The code generated in this analysis will be run within the Data Management Facility of ARM and the new data product called the Organic Aerosol Composition (Oacomp) value-added product will be added to the ARM archive. We will also present data from over a year-long period from the SGP site, along with an analysis that explains the seasonal and multi-day variations in inorganic and organic aerosol components.

  1. A Carbon Flux Super Site. New Insights and Innovative Atmosphere-Terrestrial Carbon Exchange Measurements and Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Leclerc, Monique Y.

    2014-11-17

    This final report presents the main activities and results of the project “A Carbon Flux Super Site: New Insights and Innovative Atmosphere-Terrestrial Carbon Exchange Measurements and Modeling” from 10/1/2006 to 9/30/2014. It describes the new AmeriFlux tower site (Aiken) at Savanna River Site (SC) and instrumentation, long term eddy-covariance, sodar, microbarograph, soil and other measurements at the site, and intensive field campaigns of tracer experiment at the Carbon Flux Super Site, SC, in 2009 and at ARM-CF site, Lamont, OK, and experiments in Plains, GA. The main results on tracer experiment and modeling, on low-level jet characteristics and their impact on fluxes, on gravity waves and their influence on eddy fluxes, and other results are briefly described in the report.

  2. Constraining Methane Emissions from Beijing and the North China Plain Using Open-path, Mobile Measurements and FLEXPART-WRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, K.; Liu, Z.; Tao, L.; Miller, D. J.; Pan, D.; Zondlo, M. A.; Zhu, T.

    2015-12-01

    Methane is the second most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas. Although the global atmospheric methane budget is well constrained, the magnitude and trends of methane emissions from different source types and source regions are highly uncertain. Many studies have shown that bottom-up methane emission inventories are inconsistent with top-down approaches. China is the top emitter of greenhouse gases, and effective characterization of methane emissions is the key to cap Chinese carbon emissions by 2030. However, so far there have been very few top-down constraints on Chinese methane emissions at local to regional scales, due to a lack of in-situ measurements. In this study, mobile measurements of methane and other important tracers (NH3, CO2) were conducted on the North China Plain during the CAREBeijing/NCP campaigns in both 2013 and 2014. Simultaneous detection of multiple gas species provides chemical fingerprinting of methane emission sources. The high resolution (10 Hz) and large spatial coverage (5000 km) enable fine-grained mapping of methane concentrations over large area. Extended plumes with high methane mixing ratio (> 2.1 ppmv) were observed over the Beijing metropolitan area. Continuous mobile sampling over the 4th Ring Road in Beijing indicates that the urban background methane mixing ratio (1st percentile of each loop around the Ring Road) peaked at night due to the accumulation of emissions under the stable, shallow mixing layer. The on-road methane mixing ratio was 2.3±0.1 ppmv at noontime and 2.7±0.5 ppmv at night. To simulate atmospheric transport affecting the mobile measurement locations, we use a Lagrangian backward particle dispersion model (FLEXPART) driven by the WRF model with a nested spatial resolutions of 1 km near Beijing and 3 km in the entire North China Plain. Footprints given by FLEXPART-WRF and measurements of other tracers indicate that the Beijing urban area is a strong source of methane. Inverse methods will be applied to

  3. Long-term measurements of submicrometer aerosol chemistry at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) using an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parworth, Caroline; Fast, Jerome; Mei, Fan; Shippert, Tim; Sivaraman, Chitra; Tilp, Alison; Watson, Thomas; Zhang, Qi

    2015-04-01

    In this study the long-term trends of non-refractory submicrometer aerosol (NR-PM1) composition and mass concentration measured by an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are discussed. NR-PM1 data was recorded at ∼30 min intervals over a period of 19 months between November 2010 and June 2012. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) was performed on the measured organic mass spectral matrix using a rolling window technique to derive factors associated with distinct sources, evolution processes, and physiochemical properties. The rolling window approach also allows us to capture the dynamic variations of the chemical properties in the organic aerosol (OA) factors over time. Three OA factors were obtained including two oxygenated OA (OOA) factors, differing in degrees of oxidation, and a biomass burning OA (BBOA) factor. Back trajectory analyses were performed to investigate possible sources of major NR-PM1 species at the SGP site. Organics dominated NR-PM1 mass concentration for the majority of the study with the exception of winter, when ammonium nitrate increases due to transport of precursor species from surrounding urban and agricultural areas and also due to cooler temperatures. Sulfate mass concentrations have little seasonal variation with mixed regional and local sources. In the spring BBOA emissions increase and are mainly associated with local fires. Isoprene and carbon monoxide emission rates were obtained by the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN) and the 2011 U.S. National Emissions Inventory to represent the spatial distribution of biogenic and anthropogenic sources, respectively. The combined spatial distribution of isoprene emissions and air mass trajectories suggest that biogenic emissions from the southeast contribute to SOA formation at the SGP site during the summer.

  4. Long-term measurements of submicrometer aerosol chemistry at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) using an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM)

    SciTech Connect

    Parworth, Caroline; Tilp, Alison; Fast, Jerome; Mei, Fan; Shippert, Tim; Sivaraman, Chitra; Watson, Thomas; Zhang, Qi

    2015-04-01

    In this study the long-term trends of non-refractory submicrometer aerosol (NR-PM1) composition and mass concentration measured by an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are discussed. NR-PM1 data was recorded at ~30 min intervals over a period of 19 months between November 2010 and June 2012. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) was performed on the measured organic mass spectral matrix using a rolling window technique to derive factors associated with distinct sources, evolution processes, and physiochemical properties. The rolling window approach also allows us to capture the dynamic variations of the chemical properties in the organic aerosol (OA) factors over time. Three OA factors were obtained including two oxygenated OA (OOA) factors, differing in degrees of oxidation, and a biomass burning OA (BBOA) factor. Back trajectory analyses were performed to investigate possible sources of major NR-PM1 species at the SGP site. Organics dominated NR-PM1 mass concentration for the majority of the study with the exception of winter, when ammonium nitrate increases due to transport of precursor species from surrounding urban and agricultural areas and also due to cooler temperatures. Sulfate mass concentrations have little seasonal variation with mixed regional and local sources. In the spring BBOA emissions increase and are mainly associated with local fires. Isoprene and carbon monoxide emission rates were obtained by the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN) and the 2011 U.S. National Emissions Inventory to represent the spatial distribution of biogenic and anthropogenic sources, respectively. The combined spatial distribution of isoprene emissions and air mass trajectories suggest that biogenic emissions from the southeast contribute to SOA formation at the SGP site during the summer.

  5. Long-term measurements of submicrometer aerosol chemistry at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) using an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM)

    DOE PAGES

    Parworth, Caroline; Tilp, Alison; Fast, Jerome; Mei, Fan; Shippert, Tim; Sivaraman, Chitra; Watson, Thomas; Zhang, Qi

    2015-04-01

    In this study the long-term trends of non-refractory submicrometer aerosol (NR-PM1) composition and mass concentration measured by an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are discussed. NR-PM1 data was recorded at ~30 min intervals over a period of 19 months between November 2010 and June 2012. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) was performed on the measured organic mass spectral matrix using a rolling window technique to derive factors associated with distinct sources, evolution processes, and physiochemical properties. The rolling window approach also allows us to capture the dynamic variations ofmore » the chemical properties in the organic aerosol (OA) factors over time. Three OA factors were obtained including two oxygenated OA (OOA) factors, differing in degrees of oxidation, and a biomass burning OA (BBOA) factor. Back trajectory analyses were performed to investigate possible sources of major NR-PM1 species at the SGP site. Organics dominated NR-PM1 mass concentration for the majority of the study with the exception of winter, when ammonium nitrate increases due to transport of precursor species from surrounding urban and agricultural areas and also due to cooler temperatures. Sulfate mass concentrations have little seasonal variation with mixed regional and local sources. In the spring BBOA emissions increase and are mainly associated with local fires. Isoprene and carbon monoxide emission rates were obtained by the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN) and the 2011 U.S. National Emissions Inventory to represent the spatial distribution of biogenic and anthropogenic sources, respectively. The combined spatial distribution of isoprene emissions and air mass trajectories suggest that biogenic emissions from the southeast contribute to SOA formation at the SGP site during the summer.« less

  6. A long-term study of aerosol-cloud interactions and their radiative effect at the Southern Great Plains using ground-based measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sena, Elisa T.; McComiskey, Allison; Feingold, Graham

    2016-09-01

    Empirical estimates of the microphysical response of cloud droplet size distribution to aerosol perturbations are commonly used to constrain aerosol-cloud interactions in climate models. Instead of empirical microphysical estimates, here macroscopic variables are analyzed to address the influence of aerosol particles and meteorological descriptors on instantaneous cloud albedo and the radiative effect of shallow liquid water clouds. Long-term ground-based measurements from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program over the Southern Great Plains are used. A broad statistical analysis was performed on 14 years of coincident measurements of low clouds, aerosol, and meteorological properties. Two cases representing conflicting results regarding the relationship between the aerosol and the cloud radiative effect were selected and studied in greater detail. Microphysical estimates are shown to be very uncertain and to depend strongly on the methodology, retrieval technique and averaging scale. For this continental site, the results indicate that the influence of the aerosol on the shallow cloud radiative effect and albedo is weak and that macroscopic cloud properties and dynamics play a much larger role in determining the instantaneous cloud radiative effect compared to microphysical effects. On a daily basis, aerosol shows no correlation with cloud radiative properties (correlation = -0.01 ± 0.03), whereas the liquid water path shows a clear signal (correlation = 0.56 ± 0.02).

  7. Geochemical controls on the composition of soil pore waters beneath a mixed waste disposal site in the unsaturated zone. [SNAKE RIVER PLAIN AQUIFER

    SciTech Connect

    Rawson, S.A.; Hubbell, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Soil pore waters are collected routinely to monitor a thick unsaturated zone that separates a mixed waste disposal site containing transuranic and low-level radioactive wastes from the Snake River Plain aquifer. The chemistry of the soil pore waters has been studied to evaluate the possible control on the water composition by mineral equilibria and determine the extent, if any, of migration of radionuclides from the disposal site. Geochemical codes were used to perform speciation calculations for the waters. The results of speciation calculations suggest that the installation of the lysimeters affects the observed silica contents of the soil pore waters. The results also establish those chemical parameters that are controlled by secondary mineral precipitation. 15 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  8. An automated fog monitoring system for the Indo-Gangetic Plains based on satellite measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Dinesh; Chourey, Reema; Rizvi, Sarwar; Singh, Manoj; Gautam, Ritesh

    2016-05-01

    Fog is a meteorological phenomenon that causes reduction in regional visibility and affects air quality, thus leading to various societal and economic implications, especially disrupting air and rail transportation. The persistent and widespread winter fog impacts the entire the Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGP), as frequently observed in satellite imagery. The IGP is a densely populated region in south Asia, inhabiting about 1/6th of the world's population, with a strong upward pollution trend. In this study, we have used multi-spectral radiances and aerosol/cloud retrievals from Terra/Aqua MODIS data for developing an automated web-based fog monitoring system over the IGP. Using our previous and existing methodologies, and ongoing algorithm development for the detection of fog and retrieval of associated microphysical properties (e.g. fog droplet effective radius), we characterize the widespread fog detection during both daytime and nighttime. Specifically, for the night time fog detection, the algorithm employs a satellite-based bi-spectral brightness temperature difference technique between two spectral channels: MODIS band-22 (3.9μm) and band-31 (10.75μm). Further, we are extending our algorithm development to geostationary satellites, for providing continuous monitoring of the spatial-temporal variation of fog. We anticipate that the ongoing and future development of a fog monitoring system would be of assistance to air, rail and vehicular transportation management, as well as for dissemination of fog information to government agencies and general public. The outputs of fog detection algorithm and related aerosol/cloud parameters are operationally disseminated via http://fogsouthasia.com/.

  9. Partial Anhysteretic Anisotropy Measured in the Greys Landing Ignimbrite of the Central Snake River Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rea-Downing, G. H.; Finn, D. R.; Coe, R. S.; Brown, E. D.; Reichow, M. K.; Knott, T.; Branney, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic remanence directions recorded in the glassy sub-lithologies of mid-Miocene rheomorphic Snake River Plain ignimbrites are often discrepant compared to the more reliable directions in crystalline centers and underlying baked paleosols. The rocks have undergone no tectonic strain, and the rheomorphic deformation preserved in the rock occurs at ˜800°C, above magnetic blocking temperatures. Accounting for the discrepantly shallow directions is critical for the use of magnetic remanence for stratigraphic correlation and structural/tectonic reconstructions. Here we present paleomagnetic and rock magnetic data from the Grey's Landing Ignimbrite that demonstrate a strong magnetic anisotropy carried by pseudo-single to single domain magnetite grains which deflect the remanence direction by up to 40°. Strongly lineated anisotropic samples collected at distant sections ( ˜20 km separation) have their remanence deflected toward the respective flow directions inferred from their directions of maximum magnetic susceptibility (K1). Shallow K1 directions in the basal vitrophyre cause a shallowing of magnetic remanence, while a range of steep to shallow K1 directions in the folded upper vitrophyre cause both a steepening and shallowing of the remanence, respectively. There is a strong relationship between the magnitudes of remanence deflection, anisotropy of thermal remanence, coercivity, and strength of natural remanent magnetization between individual samples. There is also a strong relationship between the magnitudes of partial anisotropy of anhysteretic remanent magnetization (pAARM) and the deflection of the remanence vector difference directions, which both increase significantly with higher alternating magnetic fields. Correction of the vector difference direction using the inverse of the pAARM tensor for the same AF range is moderately successful. Previous work suggests that curvilinear demagnetization trends in the basal vitrophyre of an ignimbrite were

  10. Long-term Measurements of Submicrometer Aerosol Chemistry at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Using an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM)

    SciTech Connect

    Parworth, Caroline; Fast, Jerome D.; Mei, Fan; Shippert, Timothy R.; Sivaraman, Chitra; Tilp, Alison; Watson, Thomas; Zhang, Qi

    2015-04-01

    In this study the long-term trends of non-refractory submicrometer aerosol (NR-PM1) composition and mass concentration measured by an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are discussed. Over the period of 19 months (Nov. 20, 2010 – June 2012) highly time resolved (~30 min.) NR-PM1 data was recorded. Using this dataset the value-added product (VAP) of deriving organic aerosol components (OACOMP) is introduced. With this VAP, multivariate analysis of the measured organic mass spectral matrix can be performed on long term data to return organic aerosol (OA) factors that are associated with distinct sources, evolution processes, and physiochemical properties. Three factors were obtained from this VAP including two oxygenated OA (OOA) factors, differing in degrees of oxidation, and a biomass burning OA (BBOA) factor. Back trajectory analyses were performed to investigate possible sources of major NR-PM1 species at the SGP site. Organics dominated NR-PM1 mass concentration for the majority of the study with the exception of winter, when nitrate increased due to transport of precursor species from surrounding urban and agricultural areas and also due to cooler temperatures. Sulfate mass concentrations showed little seasonal variation with mixed regional and local sources. In the spring BBOA emissions increased and were mainly associated with local fires. Isoprene and carbon monoxide emission rates were computed by the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN) to represent the spatial distribution of biogenic and anthropogenic sources, respectively. From this model there is evidence to support that biogenic emissions from the southeast contribute to SOA formation at the SGP site during the summer.

  11. Joint space width measures cartilage thickness in osteoarthritis of the knee: high resolution plain film and double contrast macroradiographic investigation.

    PubMed Central

    Buckland-Wright, J C; Macfarlane, D G; Lynch, J A; Jasani, M K; Bradshaw, C R

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To test reliability of joint space width (JSW) measurements as a predictor of cartilage thickness in knees of patients with osteoarthritis (OA), using high definition microfocal radiography. METHOD--JSW was measured from weight bearing plain film macroradiographs taken in the tunnel view and compared with the sum of femoral and tibial cartilage thicknesses measured from double contrast macroarthrograms of the same regions of the same knees obtained in the non-weight bearing lateral position. RESULTS--All knees had medial compartment OA. Comparison of the JSW with the sum of the tibial and femoral cartilage thicknesses revealed a highly significant correlation (p < 0.0001) between the two measurements in the medial but not the lateral compartment. In the middle region of both compartments, JSW was smaller than the cartilage thickness, indicating that, on standing, the curvature of the femoral condyles compressed the cartilage in this region. CONCLUSIONS--JSW reliably measured cartilage thickness in the medial but not the lateral compartment of knees with medial compartment OA. Depending upon the stage of OA disease, JSW reliably reflects cartilage thinning and compression. Images PMID:7763102

  12. Low frequency amplification in deep alluvial basins: an example in the Po Plain (Northern Italy) and consequences for site specific SHA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascandola, Claudia; Massa, Marco; Barani, Simone; Lovati, Sara; Santulin, Marco

    2016-04-01

    This work deals with the problem of long period seismic site amplification that potentially might involve large and deep alluvial basins in case of strong earthquakes. In particular, it is here presented a case study in the Po Plain (Northern Italy), one of the most extended and deep sedimentary basin worldwide. Even if the studied area shows a low annul seismicity rate with rare strong events (Mw>6.0) and it is characterized by low to medium seismic hazard conditions, the seismic risk is significant for the high density of civil and strategic infrastructures (i.e. high degree of exposition) and the unfavourable geological conditions. The aim of this work is to provide general considerations about the seismic site response of the Po Plain, with particular attention on deep discontinuities (i.e. geological bedrock), in terms of potential low frequency amplification and their incidence on the PSHA. The current results were obtained through active and passive geophysical investigations performed near Castelleone, a site where a seismic station, which is part of the INGV (National Institute for Geophysics and Volcanology) Seismic National Network, is installed from 2009. In particular, the active analyses consisted in a MASW and a refraction survey, whereas the passive ones consisted in seismic ambient noise acquisitions with single stations and arrays of increasing aperture. The results in terms of noise HVSR indicate two main peaks, the first around 0.17 Hz and the second, as already stated in the recent literature, around 0.7 Hz. In order to correlate the amplified frequencies with the geological discontinuities, the array acquisitions were processed to obtain a shear waves velocity profile, computed with a joint inversion, considering the experimental dispersion curves and the HVSR results. The obtained velocity profile shows two main discontinuities: the shallower at ~165 m of depth, which can be correlated to the seismic bedrock (i.e. Vs > 800 m/) and the deeper

  13. [Transformation Mechanism and Sources of Secondary Inorganic Components in PM2.5 at an Agriculture Site (Quzhou) in the North China Plain in Summer].

    PubMed

    Chen, Shi-yi; Zeng, Li-min; Dong, Hua-bin; Zhu, Tong

    2015-10-01

    Simultaneously on-line measurements of major water-soluble inorganic ions and gaseous pollutants were performed from June 9 to July 11, 2014 at Quzhou, an agriculture site in the North China Plain using a gas-aerosol collector (GAC) and ion chromatograph (IC), aiming to track the diurnal variation rule of secondary inorganic components and gas-phase precursors as well as their interactions. The transformation mechanism and sources of fine particles (PM2.5) were also discussed. The results showed that these water-soluble ions in PM2.5 and their gas-phase precursors varied regularly. As the dominant ionic components of PM2.5 (accounting for 76.23%), the average concentrations of SO4(2-), NH4(+), NO3(-) were 26.28 μg x m(-3), 18.08 μg x m(-3) and 16.36 μg m(-3) respectively. Among the precursor gases, the NH3, generated from the discharges of local agricultural activities, displayed a significantly higher concentration at an average value of 44.85 μg x m(-3). The average fine sulfate and nitrate oxidation ratios (SOR and NOR) were SOR = 0.60, NOR = 0.30, revealing the remarkable characteristics of secondary pollution. As could be found from the relevant analysis, the NH4(+) of Quzhou showed well relations with NO3(-) and SO4(2-), and the environment here was rich of ammonia. The NH4(+) existed in the form of (NH4)2SO4 and the generation of NO3(-) was limited by the HNO3. From the analysis for the equilibrium of NH4NO3, we observed that the atmospheric environment of Quzhou was adverse to the generation and maintenance of NH4NO3 during the daytime,in contrast with the night. Integrated with the study, the results displayed that the secondary transformation was the main source of fine particles in Quzhou, and the NH3 from field and compost was the significant factor leading to the high value of S-N-A. PMID:26841585

  14. [Transformation Mechanism and Sources of Secondary Inorganic Components in PM2.5 at an Agriculture Site (Quzhou) in the North China Plain in Summer].

    PubMed

    Chen, Shi-yi; Zeng, Li-min; Dong, Hua-bin; Zhu, Tong

    2015-10-01

    Simultaneously on-line measurements of major water-soluble inorganic ions and gaseous pollutants were performed from June 9 to July 11, 2014 at Quzhou, an agriculture site in the North China Plain using a gas-aerosol collector (GAC) and ion chromatograph (IC), aiming to track the diurnal variation rule of secondary inorganic components and gas-phase precursors as well as their interactions. The transformation mechanism and sources of fine particles (PM2.5) were also discussed. The results showed that these water-soluble ions in PM2.5 and their gas-phase precursors varied regularly. As the dominant ionic components of PM2.5 (accounting for 76.23%), the average concentrations of SO4(2-), NH4(+), NO3(-) were 26.28 μg x m(-3), 18.08 μg x m(-3) and 16.36 μg m(-3) respectively. Among the precursor gases, the NH3, generated from the discharges of local agricultural activities, displayed a significantly higher concentration at an average value of 44.85 μg x m(-3). The average fine sulfate and nitrate oxidation ratios (SOR and NOR) were SOR = 0.60, NOR = 0.30, revealing the remarkable characteristics of secondary pollution. As could be found from the relevant analysis, the NH4(+) of Quzhou showed well relations with NO3(-) and SO4(2-), and the environment here was rich of ammonia. The NH4(+) existed in the form of (NH4)2SO4 and the generation of NO3(-) was limited by the HNO3. From the analysis for the equilibrium of NH4NO3, we observed that the atmospheric environment of Quzhou was adverse to the generation and maintenance of NH4NO3 during the daytime,in contrast with the night. Integrated with the study, the results displayed that the secondary transformation was the main source of fine particles in Quzhou, and the NH3 from field and compost was the significant factor leading to the high value of S-N-A.

  15. Understanding the ecological background of rice agriculture on the Ningshao Plain during the Neolithic Age: pollen evidence from a buried paddy field at the Tianluoshan cultural site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunhai; Zheng, Yunfei; Yu, Shiyong; Li, Yongxiang; Shen, Huadong

    2012-03-01

    The progressive rise of atmospheric CH4 level since 5 ka has been hypothesized to result from human agricultural activities that turned forested lands, which would otherwise be a carbon sink, into paddy fields. Increasing numbers of Neolithic cultural sites unearthed in coastal eastern China, providing unique opportunities to test this hypothesis. Here, we present detailed pollen data from a buried paddy field at Tianluoshan cultural site on the Ningshao Plain, eastern China, to reconstruct the ecological conditions associated with the establishment of paddy fields. Stratigraphic data, radiocarbon ages, and pollen analyses show that vegetation underwent six phases of evolution and paddy fields were developed from 7000 to 4200 cal. yr BP. We found no evidence of slash-and-burn agriculture at the study site. Together with no presence of the irrigation system, our pollen data suggest the paddy fields at this site originated from wetlands. Hence, our findings do not support the hypothesis that anthropogenic-induced deforestation play ed a significant role in the rise of the atmospheric CH4 rise since the middle Holocene.

  16. Ground-water flow, geochemistry, and effects of agricultural practices on nitrogen transport at study sites in the Piedmont and Coastal Plain physiographic provinces, Patuxent River basin, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McFarland, E. Randolph

    1997-01-01

    In an effort to improve water quality in Chesapeake Bay, agricultural practices are being promoted that are intended to reduce contaminant transport to the Bay. The effects of agricultural practices on nitrogen transport were assessed at two 10-acre study sites in the Patuxent River basin, Maryland, during 1986-92. Nitrogen load was larger in ground water than in surface runoff at both sites. At the study site in the Piedmont Province, nitrogen load in ground water decreased from 12 to 6 (lb/acre)/yr (pound per acre per year) as corn under no-till cultivation was replaced by no-till soybeans, continuous alfalfa, and contoured strip crops alternated among corn, alfalfa, and soybeans. At the study site in the Coastal Plain Province, no-till soybeans resulted in a nitrogen load in ground water of 12.55 (lb/acre)/yr, whereas conventional-till soybeans resulted in a nitrogen load in ground water of 11.51 (lb/acre)/yr.

  17. Debris-flow deposits in an alluvial-plain succession: The upper Triassic Callide coal measures of Queensland, Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, P.J.; Fielding, C.R.

    1999-09-01

    The Carnian-Rhaetian Callide Coal Measures are preserved in a small (22.5 km by 8 km), partially fault-bounded basin remnant in east-central Queensland, Australia. The <150 m thick coal-measure succession is interpreted to have accumulated during a phase of mild crustal extension that formed a series of discrete, intermontane basins in eastern Australia. The succession fines upward from a conglomerate-rich lower part into a finer-grained and coal-bearing upper section (including coal seams <34 m thick), and is interpreted as the deposits of an alluvial-plain environment. Anomalous, matrix-rich diamictites, breccias, and conglomerates have been recognized within the succession at several localities, in many cases interbedded with coals. These are interpreted as the product of debris flows. Two debris-flow lithofacies are recognized: (1) mixtures of fine carbonaceous material, clay, silt, sand, gravel, and volcaniclastic debris, and (2) breccias consisting principally of coal clasts in a coaly matrix with minor clastic and volcaniclastic debris. The distribution of debris flows in the Callide Coal Measures shows a coincidence with mapped faults and interpreted structural lineaments. The debris flows may have been triggered by fault movements, which formed rupture topography on the flat alluvial plain, and caused destabilization of water-saturated clastic and organic sediments. Some debris-flow bodies may have been mounded, such that subsequent peat formation was restricted until those bodies were buried. The preservation of debris-flow units at different stratigraphic levels along mapped structures suggests multiple paleoseismic events or multiple debris-flow units at different stratigraphic levels along mapped structures suggests multiple paleoseismic events or multiple debris-flow events along those structures. The mixing of volcaniclastic debris into debris-flow facies suggests that seismic events were coincident with (or perhaps caused by) nearby, explosive

  18. Northern Plains 'Crater'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    10 December 2004 The lower left (southwest) corner of this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows the location of a somewhat filled and buried meteor impact crater on the northern plains of Mars. The dark dots are boulders. A portion of a similar feature is seen in the upper right (northeast) corner of the image. This picture, showing landforms (including the odd mound north/northeast of the crater) that are typical of the martian northern lowland plains, was obtained as part of the MGS MOC effort to support the search for a landing site for the Phoenix Mars Scout lander. Phoenix will launch in 2007 and land on the northern plains in 2008. This image is located near 68.0oN, 227.4oW, and covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  19. Analysis of ground-measured and passive-microwave-derived snow depth variations in midwinter across the Northern Great Plains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chang, A.T.C.; Kelly, R.E.J.; Josberger, E.G.; Armstrong, R.L.; Foster, J.L.; Mognard, N.M.

    2005-01-01

    Accurate estimation of snow mass is important for the characterization of the hydrological cycle at different space and time scales. For effective water resources management, accurate estimation of snow storage is needed. Conventionally, snow depth is measured at a point, and in order to monitor snow depth in a temporally and spatially comprehensive manner, optimum interpolation of the points is undertaken. Yet the spatial representation of point measurements at a basin or on a larger distance scale is uncertain. Spaceborne scanning sensors, which cover a wide swath and can provide rapid repeat global coverage, are ideally suited to augment the global snow information. Satellite-borne passive microwave sensors have been used to derive snow depth (SD) with some success. The uncertainties in point SD and areal SD of natural snowpacks need to be understood if comparisons are to be made between a point SD measurement and satellite SD. In this paper three issues are addressed relating satellite derivation of SD and ground measurements of SD in the northern Great Plains of the United States from 1988 to 1997. First, it is shown that in comparing samples of ground-measured point SD data with satellite-derived 25 ?? 25 km2 pixels of SD from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Special Sensor Microwave Imager, there are significant differences in yearly SD values even though the accumulated datasets showed similarities. Second, from variogram analysis, the spatial variability of SD from each dataset was comparable. Third, for a sampling grid cell domain of 1?? ?? 1?? in the study terrain, 10 distributed snow depth measurements per cell are required to produce a sampling error of 5 cm or better. This study has important implications for validating SD derivations from satellite microwave observations. ?? 2005 American Meteorological Society.

  20. Distribution and sources of air pollutants in the North China Plain based on on-road mobile measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yi; Zhang, Jiping; Wang, Junxia; Chen, Wenyuan; Han, Yiqun; Ye, Chunxiang; Li, Yingruo; Liu, Jun; Zeng, Limin; Wu, Yusheng; Wang, Xinfeng; Wang, Wenxing; Chen, Jianmin; Zhu, Tong

    2016-10-01

    The North China Plain (NCP) has been experiencing severe air pollution problems with rapid economic growth and urbanisation. Many field and model studies have examined the distribution of air pollutants in the NCP, but convincing results have not been achieved, mainly due to a lack of direct measurements of pollutants over large areas. Here, we employed a mobile laboratory to observe the main air pollutants in a large part of the NCP from 11 June to 15 July 2013. High median concentrations of sulfur dioxide (SO2) (12 ppb), nitrogen oxides (NOx) (NO + NO2; 452 ppb), carbon monoxide (CO) (956 ppb), black carbon (BC; 5.5 µg m-3) and ultrafine particles (28 350 cm-3) were measured. Most of the high values, i.e. 95 percentile concentrations, were distributed near large cities, suggesting the influence of local emissions. In addition, we analysed the regional transport of SO2 and CO, relatively long-lived pollutants, based on our mobile observations together with wind field and satellite data analyses. Our results suggested that, for border areas of the NCP, wind from outside this area would have a diluting effect on pollutants, while south winds would bring in pollutants that have accumulated during transport through other parts of the NCP. For the central NCP, the concentrations of pollutants were likely to remain at high levels, partly due to the influence of regional transport by prevalent south-north winds over the NCP and partly by local emissions.

  1. The Plains of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpton, V. L.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic plains units of various types comprise at least 80% of the surface of Venus. Though devoid of topographic splendor and, therefore often overlooked, these plains units house a spectacular array of volcanic, tectonic, and impact features. Here I propose that the plains hold the keys to understanding the resurfacing history of Venus and resolving the global stratigraphy debate. The quasi-random distribution of impact craters and the small number that have been conspicuously modified from the outside by plains-forming volcanism have led some to propose that Venus was catastrophically resurfaced around 725×375 Ma with little volcanism since. Challenges, however, hinge on interpretations of certain morphological characteristics of impact craters: For instance, Venusian impact craters exhibit either radar dark (smooth) floor deposits or bright, blocky floors. Bright floor craters (BFC) are typically 100-400 m deeper than dark floor craters (DFC). Furthermore, all 58 impact craters with ephemeral bright ejecta rays and/or distal parabolic ejecta patterns have bright floor deposits. This suggests that BFCs are younger, on average, than DFCs. These observations suggest that DFCs could be partially filled with lava during plains emplacement and, therefore, are not strictly younger than the plains units as widely held. Because the DFC group comprises ~80% of the total crater population on Venus the recalculated emplacement age of the plains would be ~145 Ma if DFCs are indeed volcanically modified during plains formation. Improved image and topographic data are required to measure stratigraphic and morphometric relationships and resolve this issue. Plains units are also home to an abundant and diverse set of volcanic features including steep-sided domes, shield fields, isolated volcanoes, collapse features and lava channels, some of which extend for 1000s of kilometers. The inferred viscosity range of plains-forming lavas, therefore, is immense, ranging from the

  2. Measured and simulated soil water evaporation from four Great Plains soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The amount of soil water lost during stage one and stage two soil water evaporation is of interest to crop water use modelers. The ratio of measured soil surface temperature (Ts) to air temperature (Ta) was tested as a signal for the transition in soil water evaporation from stage one to stage two d...

  3. Error characterization of retrievals for active remote Sensing instruments in the ARM climate research facility at the Southern Great Plains site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekar, C. V.; Hardin, J. C.; Jensen, M. P.

    2012-12-01

    The ARM Climate Research Facility deploys a network of highly instrumented ground stations, including both mobile and aerial facilities to support the study of global climate change by the national and international research community. The Southern Great Plains facility (SGP) hosts a network of C, X, and K band radars; some are in scanning mode and some are in vertically pointing mode. As an example, the Mid-Latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) (Jensen, et al. 2011), was a joint DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) and NASA Global Precipitation Measurements (GPM) field campaign which took place from April - June 2011 in Central Oklahoma centered at the ARM SGP site. This paper presents retrieval methodologies for the ARM instrument suite with a focus on the error characterization for the radar measurements and the retrievals. There is extensive literature on retrieval algorithms for precipitation and cloud parameters from single frequency, dual-polarization radar systems. Multiple radar deployments are becoming more common, and the MC3E is a text book example of such a deployment. Additionally, networked deployments are becoming more common (Chandrasekar, et al. 2010), resulting in networked retrievals, initially used for attenuation mitigation. Since then, networked retrievals have expanded to include DSDs from networked X-band or Ku-band radars (Yoshikawa, et al., 2012). The above retrieval methodologies were for homogeneous, single frequency systems; the multi frequency nature of the deployment during the MC3E program is the motivation for the integrated formulation and error characterization presented in this paper. The set of radars consists of the NASA NPOL radar at S-band, as well as the C and X-band radars from the ARM program, namely the C-SAPR and X-SAPR family. This paper presents a comprehensive integrated retrieval methodology focusing on error characterization to obtain microphysical retrieval including drop size

  4. Quantifying the contribution of long-range transport to Particulate Matter (PM) mass loadings at a suburban site in the North-Western Indo Gangetic Plain (IGP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawar, H.; Garg, S.; Kumar, V.; Sachan, H.; Arya, R.; Sarkar, C.; Chandra, B. P.; Sinha, B.

    2015-04-01

    Many sites in the densely populated Indo Gangetic Plain (IGP) frequently exceed the national ambient air quality standard (NAAQS) of 100 μg m-3 for 24 h average PM10 and 60 μg m-3 for 24 h average PM2.5 mass loadings, exposing residents to hazardous levels of PM throughout the year. We quantify the contribution of long range transport to elevated PM levels and the number of exceedance events through a back trajectory climatology analysis of air masses arriving at the IISER Mohali Atmospheric Chemistry facility (30.667° N, 76.729° E; 310 m a.m.s.l.) for the period August 2011-June 2013. Air masses arriving at the receptor site were classified into 6 clusters, which represent synoptic scale air mass transport patterns and the average PM mass loadings and number of exceedance events associated with each air mass type were quantified for each season. Long range transport from the west leads to significant enhancements in the average coarse mode PM mass loadings during all seasons. The contribution of long range transport from the west and south west (Source region: Arabia, Thar desert, Middle East and Afghanistan) to coarse mode PM varied between 9 and 57% of the total PM10-2.5 mass. Local pollution episodes (wind speed < 1 m s-1) contributed to enhanced coarse mode PM only during winter season. South easterly air masses (Source region: Eastern IGP) were associated with significantly lower coarse mode PM mass loadings during all seasons. For fine mode PM too, transport from the west usually leads to increased mass loadings during all seasons. Local pollution episodes contributed to enhanced PM2.5 mass loadings during winter and summer season. South easterly air masses were associated with significantly lower PM2.5 mass loadings during all seasons. Using simultaneously measured gas phase tracers we demonstrate that most PM2.5 originated from combustion sources. The fraction of days in each season during which the PM mass loadings exceeded the national ambient air

  5. 47 CFR Figure 1 to Subpart N of... - Measurement Site

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Measurement Site 1 Figure 1 to Subpart N of Part 2 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO...—Measurement Site EC03JN91.005...

  6. Muon fluence measurements at the site boundary for 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Elwyn, A.J.

    1986-03-01

    Muon fluence (muons cm/sup -2/) was measured downstream of the experimental area beamlines, just beyond the Fermilab site boundary at Route 38. The purpose of these measurements was to obtain an estimate of the yearly off-site radiation exposure to the general population due to accelerator-produced muons during the 1985 800 GeV run.

  7. 3D mechanical analysis of aeronautical plain bearings: Validation of a finite element model from measurement of displacement fields by digital volume correlation and optical scanning tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germaneau, A.; Peyruseigt, F.; Mistou, S.; Doumalin, P.; Dupré, J.-C.

    2010-06-01

    On Airbus aircraft, spherical plain bearings are used on many components; in particular to link engine to pylon or pylon to wing. Design of bearings is based on contact pressure distribution on spherical surfaces. To determine this distribution, a 3D analysis of the mechanical behaviour of aeronautical plain bearing is presented in this paper. A numerical model has been built and validated from a comparison with 3D experimental measurements of kinematic components. For that, digital volume correlation (DVC) coupled with optical scanning tomography (OST) is employed to study the mechanical response of a plain bearing model made in epoxy resin. Experimental results have been compared with the ones obtained from the simulated model. This comparison enables us to study the influence of various boundary conditions to build the FE model. Some factors have been highlighted like the fitting behaviour which can radically change contact pressure distribution. This work shows the contribution of a representative mechanical environment to study precisely mechanical response of aeronautical plain bearings.

  8. Wind Shear Characteristics at Central Plains Tall Towers (presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, M.; Elliott, D.

    2006-06-05

    The objectives of this report are: (1) Analyze wind shear characteristics at tall tower sites for diverse areas in the central plains (Texas to North Dakota)--Turbines hub heights are now 70-100 m above ground and Wind measurements at 70-100+ m have been rare. (2) Present conclusions about wind shear characteristics for prime wind energy development regions.

  9. Gravity measured at the apollo 14 lading site.

    PubMed

    Nance, R L

    1971-12-01

    The gravity at the Apollo 14 landing site has been determined from the accelerometer data that were telemetered from the lunar module. The values for the lunar gravity measured at the Apollo 11, 12, and 14 sites were reduced to a common elevation and were then compared between sites. A theoretical gravity, based on the assumption of a spherical moon, was computed for each landing site and compared with the observed value. The observed gravity was also used to compute the lunar radius at each landing site.

  10. Measurements of N2O emissions from different vegetable fields on the North China Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, Tiantian; Xie, Liyong; Guo, Liping; Yan, Hongliang; Lin, Miao; Zhang, He; Lin, Jia; Lin, Erda

    2013-06-01

    Few studies have measured the N2O emission fluxes from vegetable fields. In order to identify the characteristics and the influencing factors of N2O emissions from different vegetable fields, we measured N2O emissions for a full year from four typical fields, including an open-ground vegetable field that has produced vegetables for over 20 years (OV20), a recently developed open-ground vegetable field that was converted from a maize field three years earlier (OV3), a recently developed greenhouse vegetable field that was converted from a maize field 3 years earlier (GV3) and a typical local maize field (Maize). Four different fertilization treatments were set additionally in the recently developed open-ground vegetable field. These were: no fertilizer or manure (OV3_CK), manure only (OV3_M) and the combination of manure with different rates of chemical fertilizer application (OV3_MF1 and OV3_MF3). The results showed that N2O emission fluxes fluctuated between 0.3 ± 0.1 and 912.4 ± 80.0 mg N2O-N m-2 h-1 with the highest emission peak occurring after fertilization followed by irrigation. Nitrogen application explained 64.6-84.5% of the N2O emission in the vegetable fields. The magnitude of the emission peaks depended on the nitrogen application rate and the duration of the emission peaks was mainly associated with soil temperature when appropriate irrigation was given after fertilization. The N2O emission peaks occurred later and lasted for a longer period when the soil temperature was <24 °C in May. However, emission peaks occurred earlier and lasted for a shorter period when the soil temperature was around 25-33 °C from June to August. The annual N2O emissions from the fertilized vegetable fields were 1.68-2.38 times higher than that from the maize field, which had an emission value of 2.88 ± 0.10 kg N ha-1 a-1. The N2O emission factor (EF) of manure nitrogen was 0.07% over the whole year, but was 0.11% and 0.02% in the spring cucumber season and the autumn

  11. Re-measuring the Slip Rate of the San Andreas Fault at Wallace Creek in the Carrizo Plain, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant Ludwig, L.; Akciz, S. O.; Arrowsmith, R.; Sato, T.; Cheiffetz, T.; Haddad, D. E.; Salisbury, J. B.; Marliyani, G. I.; Bohon, W.

    2015-12-01

    Sieh and Jahns (S&J) (1984) reported a slip rate of 33.9 +2.9 mm/yr for the San Andreas fault (SAF) at Wallace Creek (WC) in the Carrizo Plain. Referenced hundreds of times, their measurement provides critical constraint for many related studies. Paleoseismologic studies at Bidart Fan (BF), ~5 km southeast of WC, show rupture approximately every 88 yrs between ~A.D. 1350 and 1857 (Akciz et al., 2010). Measurements of slip per event for the last 5 or 6 earthquakes at WC (Liu et al., 2004; Liu-Zeng et al., 2006), when combined with rupture dates from BF, yield slip rates up to 50 mm/yr, well above widely accepted values of ~ 35 mm/yr. The apparent discrepancy between slip rates and slip per event measurements provided motivation to re-measure S&J's (1984) slip rate, which was based on 8 detrital charcoal samples, by collecting samples for radiocarbon dating with new methods that have improved dramatically since the early 1980s. We re-excavated S&J's (1984) original trenches WC-2, 7, 9, 10 and 11, and placed a new trench, WC-12. The new trench exposed a rich history of channel cut and fill prior to abandonment of the beheaded channel and incision of the modern channel. The youngest channel fills, which must be slightly younger than the abandonment, indicate that sedimentation occurred between 3675-3285 BP, after which the channel was fully abandoned. Using S&J's (1984) offset measurement of 130 m since ~3400 BP, we recalculate a late Holocene slip rate of ~38 mm/yr in our preliminary analysis. This rate is slightly higher than the S&J (1984) result of 33.9±2.9 mm/yr and Noriega et al. (2006) result of 32.4±3.1 mm/yr at the Van Matre Ranch in the southern Carrizo. Our results are closer to the higher end of the ~36±2 mm/yr velocity gradient across the SAF from decadal timescale geodetic measurements (Schmalzle, et al., 2006).

  12. Remote sensing strategy at the first Atmospheric Radiation Measurement field site

    SciTech Connect

    Wesely, M.L.; Griffin, J.W.

    1994-07-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program was initiated in 1990 by the US Department of Energy to improve climate model simulations of radiative energy transport and cloud formation, maintenance, and dissipation. ARM stresses the modeling of phenomena occurring at subgrid scales in general circulation models (GCMs). Measurements to support the modeling research will be made at three primary locations. The central facility, the primary location at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site for study of radiative transfer, uses ground-based remote sensing instrumentation to observe radiation and the atmospheric properties that affect it. Remote sensing instruments and balloon-borne sounding systems installed at several boundary facilities on the perimeter of the overall Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site evaluate vertical profiles of wind, temperature, and humidity. These observations are needed to run single-column models derived from GCMs for a single grid square with an area equivalent to the overall CART area. Observations of local meteorological conditions, air-surface exchange, and solar and infrared radiation at up to 23 extended facilities scattered throughout the CART site provide the surface boundary information needed in the single-column models. Finally, auxiliary facilities at the central facility and at a few locations within 10 km of the central facility will contain whole-sky imaging systems to map cloud characteristics. The purpose of this presentation is to describe the strategy used to obtain remote sensing instrumentation for continuous operation at the central facility.

  13. Aquifer geochemistry at potential aquifer storage and recovery sites in coastal plain aquifers in the New York city area, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, C.J.; Misut, P.E.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of injecting oxic water from the New York city (NYC) drinking-water supply and distribution system into a nearby anoxic coastal plain aquifer for later recovery during periods of water shortage (aquifer storage and recovery, or ASR) were simulated by a 3-dimensional, reactive-solute transport model. The Cretaceous aquifer system in the NYC area of New York and New Jersey, USA contains pyrite, goethite, locally occurring siderite, lignite, and locally varying amounts of dissolved Fe and salinity. Sediment from cores drilled on Staten Island and western Long Island had high extractable concentrations of Fe, Mn, and acid volatile sulfides (AVS) plus chromium-reducible sulfides (CRS) and low concentrations of As, Pb, Cd, Cr, Cu and U. Similarly, water samples from the Lloyd aquifer (Cretaceous) in western Long Island generally contained high concentrations of Fe and Mn and low concentrations of other trace elements such as As, Pb, Cd, Cr, Cu and U, all of which were below US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and NY maximum contaminant levels (MCLs). In such aquifer settings, ASR operations can be complicated by the oxidative dissolution of pyrite, low pH, and high concentrations of dissolved Fe in extracted water.The simulated injection of buffered, oxic city water into a hypothetical ASR well increased the hydraulic head at the well, displaced the ambient groundwater, and formed a spheroid of injected water with lower concentrations of Fe, Mn and major ions in water surrounding the ASR well, than in ambient water. Both the dissolved O2 concentrations and the pH of water near the well generally increased in magnitude during the simulated 5-a injection phase. The resultant oxidation of Fe2+ and attendant precipitation of goethite during injection provided a substrate for sorption of dissolved Fe during the 8-a extraction phase. The baseline scenario with a low (0.001M) concentration of pyrite in aquifer sediments, indicated that nearly 190% more water

  14. SITE-SPECIFIC MEASUREMENTS OF RESIDENTIAL RADON PROTECTION CATEGORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a series of benchmark measurements of soil radon potential at seven Florida sites and compares the measurements with regional estimates of radon potential from the Florida radon protection map. The measurements and map were developed under the Florida Radon R...

  15. Baseline measurements of terrestrial gamma radioactivity at the CEBAF site

    SciTech Connect

    Wollenberg, H.A.; Smith, A.R.

    1991-10-01

    A survey of the gamma radiation background from terrestrial sources was conducted at the CEBAF site, Newport News, Virginia, on November 12--16, 1990, to provide a gamma radiation baseline for the site prior to the startup of the accelerator. The concentrations and distributions of the natural radioelements in exposed soil were measured, and the results of the measurements were converted into gamma-ray exposure rates. Concurrently, samples were collected for laboratory gamma spectral analyses.

  16. Variability in aerosol optical properties over an urban site, Kanpur, in the Indo-Gangetic Plain: A case study of haze and dust events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram, Kirpa; Singh, Sunita; Sarin, M. M.; Srivastava, A. K.; Tripathi, S. N.

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we report on three important optical parameters, viz. absorption and scattering coefficients (babs, bscat) and single scattering abledo (SSA) based on one-year chemical-composition data collected from an urban site (Kanpur) in the Indo-Gangetic-Plain (IGP) of northern India. In addition, absorption Ängstrom exponent (AAE) was also estimated in order to understand the wavelength dependence of absorption and to decipher emission sources of carbonaceous aerosols, in particular of black carbon. The absorption and scattering coefficients ranged between 8.3 to 95.2 Mm- 1 (1 Mm- 1 = 10- 6 m- 1) and 58 to 564 Mm- 1, respectively during the study period (for n = 66; from January 2007 to March 2008) and exhibit large seasonal variability with higher values occurring in winter and lower in the summer. Single scattering albedo varied from 0.65 to 0.92 whereas AAE ranged from 0.79 to 1.40 during pre-monsoon and winter seasons, respectively. The strong seasonal variability in aerosol optical properties is attributed to varying contribution from different emission sources of carbonaceous aerosols in the IGP. A case study of haze and dust events further provide information on extreme variability in aerosol optical parameters, particularly SSA, a crucial parameter in atmospheric radiative forcing estimates.

  17. Heavy mineral delineation of the Cretaceous, Paleocene, and Eocene stratigraphic sections at the Savannah River Site, Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Cathcart, E.M. . Dept. of Geology); Sargent, K.A. . Dept. of Geology)

    1994-03-01

    The Upper Atlantic Coastal Plain of South Carolina consists of a fluvial-deltaic and shallow marine complex of unconsolidated sediments overlying the crystalline basement rocks of the North American continent. Because of the lateral and vertical variability of these sediments, stratigraphic boundaries have been difficult to distinguish. Portions of the Cretaceous, Paleocene, and eocene stratigraphic sections from cores recovered during the construction of two monitoring wells at the Savannah River Site were studied to determine if heavy mineral suites could be utilized to distinguish boundaries. The stratigraphic sections include: the Late Cretaceous Middendorf, Black Creek, and Steel Creek Formations, the Paleocene Snapp Formation, the late Paleocene-Early Eocene Fourmile Branch Formation, and the Early Eocene Congaree formation. In previous studies composite samples were taken over 2.5 ft. intervals along the cores and processed using a heavy liquid for heavy mineral recovery. During this study, heavy mineral distributions were determined by binocular microscope and the mineral identifications confirmed by x-ray diffraction analysis of hand-picked samples. The heavy mineral concentration data and grain size data were then compared to the stratigraphic boundary positions determined by other workers using more classical methods. These comparisons were used to establish the utility of this method for delineating the stratigraphic boundaries in the area of study.

  18. Black carbon and wavelength-dependent aerosol absorption in the North China Plain based on two-year aethalometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, L.; Deng, Z. Z.; Wang, P. C.; Xia, X. A.

    2016-10-01

    Light-absorbing components of atmospheric aerosols have gained particular attention in recent years due to their climatic and environmental effects. Based on two-year measurements of aerosol absorption at seven wavelengths, aerosol absorption properties and black carbon (BC) were investigated in the North China Plain (NCP), one of the most densely populated and polluted regions in the world. Aerosol absorption was stronger in fall and the heating season (from November to March) than in spring and summer at all seven wavelengths. Similar spectral dependence of aerosol absorption was observed in non-heating seasons despite substantially strong absorption in fall. With an average absorption Angström exponent (α) of 1.36 in non-heating seasons, freshly emitted BC from local fossil fuel burning was thought to be the major component of light-absorbing aerosols. In the heating season, strong ultraviolet absorption led to an average α of 1.81, clearly indicating the importance of non-BC light-absorbing components, which were possibly from coal burning for domestic heating and aging processes on a regional scale. Diurnally, the variation of BC mass concentrations experienced a double-peak pattern with a higher level at night throughout the year. However, the diurnal cycle of α in the heating season was distinctly different from that in non-heating seasons. α peaked in the late afternoon in non-heating seasons with concomitantly observed low valley in BC mass concentrations. In contrast, α peaked around the midnight in the heating season and lowered down during the daytime. The relationship of aerosol absorption and winds in non-heating seasons also differed from that in the heating season. BC mass concentrations declined while α increased with increasing wind speed in non-heating seasons, which suggested elevated non-BC light absorbers in transported aged aerosols. No apparent dependence of α on wind speed was found in the heating season, probably due to well mixed

  19. Utopia Plain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    5 March 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a dark-toned, cratered plain in southwest Utopia Planitia. Large, light-toned, windblown ripples reside on the floors of many of the depressions in the scene, including a long, linear, trough.

    Location near: 30.3oN, 255.3oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Winter

  20. A Three-Year Study of Ichyoplankton in Coastal Plains Reaches of the Savannah River Site and its Tributaries

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, D.

    2007-03-05

    Altering flow regimes of rivers has large effects on native floras and faunas because native species are adapted to the natural flow regime, many species require lateral connectivity with floodplain habitat for feeding or spawning, and the change in regime often makes it possible for invasive species to replace natives (Bunn & Arthington 2002). Floodplain backwaters, both permanent and temporary, are nursery areas for age 0+ fish and stable isotope studies indicate that much of the productivity that supports fish larvae is autochthonous to these habitats (Herwig et al. 2004). Limiting access by fish to floodplain habitat for feeding, spawning and nursery habitat is one of the problems noted with dams that regulate flow in rivers and is considered to be important as an argument to remove dams and other flow regulating structures from rivers (Shuman 1995; Bednarek 2001). While there have been a number of studies in the literature about the use of floodplain habitat for fish reproduction (Copp 1989; Killgore & Baker 1996; Humphries, et al. 1999; Humphries and Lake 2000; Crain et al. 2004; King 2004) there have been only a few studies that examined this aspect of stream ecology in more than a cursory way. The study reported here was originally designed to determine whether the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site was having a negative effect on fish reproduction in the Savannah River but its experimental design allowed examination of the interactions between the river, the floodplain and the tributaries entering the Savannah River across this floodplain. This study is larger in length of river covered than most in the literature and because of its landscape scale may be in important indicator of areas where further study is required.

  1. First 2 years of Atmospheric CO2 measurements in the Estany Llong plain (2100 masl, Parc Nacional d'Aigüestortes i Estany de Sant Maurici, Pyrenees, Catalonia, Spain).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curcoll, Roger; Recolons, Montserrat; Font, Anna; Agraz, Laura; Parga, Elena; Bacardit, Montse; Camarero, Lluís.; Pueyo, Salva; Rodó, Xavier; Morguí, Josep Anton

    2010-05-01

    Since April 2009, air samples are being taken bi-weekly at 10 GMT in the plain of the Estany Llong at 2100 masl. Estany Llong air sampling site (ELL, 42°34'29''N 0°57'17''E) is a remote site situated in the SW principal valley of the Parc Nacional d'Aigüestortes i Estany de Sant Maurici. New Flask-sampling equipment for Remote Mountain Sites was developed by the Institut Català de Ciències del Clima (IC3) to allow flask sampling in extreme weather conditions and carrying the sampling equipment for more than 10 km without damaging flasks. Dry Air analysis for CO2 are done at the Laboratory of IC3 using two coupled modified IRGA Licor-7000, where both pressure and flow are externally controlled. Far away from populated areas, ELL site acts as a remote site, but it is also responding to discrete events as snow melting, summer cattle breeding on pastures and trekking frequentation. Series of CO2 obtained are included as part of Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) at the Parc Nacional d'Aigüestortes i Estany de Sant Maurici. In the long term, these measurements show the mountain ecosystems contribution and geomorphologic influence on the CO2 budget of the air masses crossing a mountain range.

  2. Origin of lunar light plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, E. C. T.; Hodges, C. A.; Boyce, J. M.; Soderblom, L. A.

    1975-01-01

    In order to determine the origin of Cayley-type lunar light plains, their physical properties, distribution, and relative ages are examined from Apollo orbital and Lunar Orbiter photographs. The distribution and apparent age of the plains deposits and data on highly feldspathic breccias indicate that these superficial materials are neither locally derived nor part of the Imbrium ejecta. The existence of a planar facies of continuous ejecta at Orientale and in the ejecta blankets of small craters is demonstrated. The data and interpretation presented support the hypothesis that the surface and near-surface materials of some light plains, including those at the Apollo 16 site, are at least partly composed of ejecta from the Orientale basin and that the materials of many rugged areas, such as the Descartes highlands, are overlain by similar material. The possibility that some Cayley-type plains may have a different origin is not excluded.

  3. Chemical characteristics and mutagenic activity of PM₂.₅ at a site in the Indo-Gangetic plain, India.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Jitendra; Kumari, K Maharaj; Lakhani, Anita

    2015-04-01

    Airborne fine particulate matter PM2.5 was collected from May 2010 to December 2012 at Agra, a semi-urban site in north-central India. PM2.5 samples were chemically characterized for 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by gas chromatography. PM2.5 values varied between 8.4 and 300 µg m(-3) with 55% of the values exceeding the 24h average NAAQ (National Ambient Air Quality) standard of 65 µg m(-3). Particle associated total PAHs ranged between 8.9 and 2,065 ng m(-3) with a mean value of 880.8 ng m(-3) during the sampling period, indicated an alarming level of pollution in Agra. Strong relationship was observed between PM2.5 and total PAHs (r=0.88), suggesting an increasing PAHs concentration with increasing PM2.5 mass. On a mass basis 3-ring and 4-ring compounds were dominant. Seasonal variation in mass concentration of PAHs was observed with high concentration in winter followed by post monsoon, summer and monsoon. This seasonal pattern could be attributed to differences in source strength and climatic conditions. PAHs concentration were also observed to be negatively correlated with the meteorological parameters i.e. temperature, solar radiation, relative humidity and wind speed. Molecular diagnostic ratios revealed vehicular emissions and combustion of wood and coal as the probable sources. The estimated carcinogenicity of PAHs in terms of benzo(a)pyrene toxic equivalency (B[a]PTEQ) was assessed and confirmed that benzo[a]pyrene was the dominant PAH contributor (3.64%). Health risk of adults and children by way of PAHs was assessed by estimating the lifetime average daily dose (LADD) and corresponding incremental lifetime cancer risk (ILCR) using USEPA guidelines. The assessed cancer risk (ILCR) was found to be within the acceptable range (10(-6)-10(-4)). The particulate samples indicated the presence of both base pair and frame shift mutagens using TA98 and TA100 strains of Salmonella typhimurium. Enhanced mutagenic response was observed in the presence of

  4. Revisiting Plain Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazur, Beth

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the plain language movement and its origins. Reviews past and current resources related to plain language writing. Examines criticism of the movement while examining past and current plain language literature, with particular attention to the information design field. (SR)

  5. A new interpretation of deformation rates in the Snake River Plain and adjacent basin and range regions based on GPS measurements

    SciTech Connect

    S.J. Payne; R. McCaffrey; R.W. King; S.A. Kattenhorn

    2012-04-01

    We evaluate horizontal Global Positioning System (GPS) velocities together with geologic, volcanic, and seismic data to interpret extension, shear, and contraction within the Snake River Plain and the Northern Basin and Range Province, U.S.A. We estimate horizontal surface velocities using GPS data collected at 385 sites from 1994 to 2009 and present an updated velocity field within the Stable North American Reference Frame (SNARF). Our results show an ENE-oriented extensional strain rate of 5.9 {+-} 0.7 x 10{sup -9} yr{sup -1} in the Centennial Tectonic belt and an E-oriented extensional strain rate of 6.2 {+-} 0.3 x 10{sup -9} yr{sup -1} in the Intermountain Seismic belt combined with the northern Great Basin. These extensional strain rates contrast with the regional north-south contraction of -2.6 {+-} 1.1 x 10{sup -9} yr{sup -1} calculated in the Snake River Plain and Owyhee-Oregon Plateau over a 125 x 650 km region. Tests that include dike-opening reveal that rapid extension by dike intrusion in volcanic rift zones does not occur in the Snake River Plain at present. This slow internal deformation in the Snake River Plain is in contrast to the rapidly-extending adjacent Basin and Range provinces and implies shear along boundaries of the Snake River Plain. We estimate right-lateral shear with slip rates of 0.5-1.5 mm/yr along the northwestern boundary adjacent to the Centennial Tectonic belt and left-lateral oblique extension with slip rates of <0.5 to 1.7 mm/yr along the southeastern boundary adjacent to the Intermountain Seismic belt. The fastest lateral shearing occurs near the Yellowstone Plateau where strike-slip focal mechanisms and faults with observed strike-slip components of motion are documented. The regional GPS velocity gradients are best fit by nearby poles of rotation for the Centennial Tectonic belt, Idaho batholith, Snake River Plain, Owyhee-Oregon Plateau, and central Oregon, indicating that clockwise rotation is driven by extension to the

  6. Ontogeny of a flood plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moody, J.A.; Pizzuto, J.E.; Meade, R.H.

    1999-01-01

    The ontogeny of five flood-plain segments is described for a period of 18 yr following a major flood in 1978 on the Powder River in southeastern Montana. The flood plains developed on relatively elevated sand and gravel deposits left within the channel by the 1978 flood. In cross section, the flood plains resemble benches with well-developed natural levees. Flood-plain growth occurred as sediment was draped onto preexisting surfaces in layers of sand and mud a few centimeters to decimeters thick, resulting in some lateral, but mostly vertical accretion. Annual and biannual measurements indicated that, as the flood-plain segments grew upward, the annual rate of vertical accretion decreased as the partial duration recurrence interval for the threshold or bankfull discharge increased from 0.16 to 1.3 yr. It is clear that a constant recurrence interval for overbank flow cannot be meaningfully assigned to this type of flood-plain ontogeny. These flood plains did not grow on migrating point bars, and vertical accretion at least initially occurred within the channel, rather than across the valley flat during extensive overbank flows. Sediments of these flood plains define narrow, elongated stratigraphic units that border the active channel and onlap older flood-plain deposits. These characteristics are considerably different from those of many facies models for meandering river deposits. Facies similar to those described in this paper are likely to be preserved, thereby providing important evidence in the geologic record for episodes of periodic channel expansion by ancient rivers.

  7. Meteorological field measurements at potential and actual wind turbine sites

    SciTech Connect

    Renne, D.S.; Sandusky, W.F.; Hadley, D.L.

    1982-09-01

    An overview of experiences gained in a meteorological measurement program conducted at a number of locations around the United States for the purpose of site evaluation for wind energy utilization is provided. The evolution of the measurement program from its inception in 1976 to the present day is discussed. Some of the major accomplishments and areas for improvement are outlined. Some conclusions on research using data from this program are presented.

  8. 47 CFR Figure 1 to Subpart N of... - Measurement Site

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Measurement Site 1 Figure 1 to Subpart N of Part 2 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO... Position Indicating Radiobeacons (EPIRBs) Pt. 2, Subpt. N, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Subpart N of Part...

  9. Measurement Sets and Sites Commonly used for Characterizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary; Holekamp, Kara; Ryan, Robert; Blonski, Slawomir; Sellers, Richard; Davis, Bruce; Zanoni, Vicki

    2002-01-01

    Scientists with NASA's Earth Science Applications Directorate are creating a well-characterized Verification & Validation (V&V) site at the Stennis Space Center (SSC). This site enables the in-flight characterization of remote sensing systems and the data that they require. The data are predominantly acquired by commercial, high-spatial resolution satellite systems, such as IKONOS and QuickBird 2, and airborne systems. The smaller scale of these newer high-resolution remote sensing systems allows scientists to characterize the geometric, spatial, and radiometric data properties using a single V&V site. The targets and techniques used to characterize data from these newer systems can differ significantly from the earlier, coarser spatial resolution systems. Scientists are also using the SSC V&V site to characterize thermal infrared systems and active Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems. SSC employs geodetic targets, edge targets, radiometric tarps, and thermal calibration ponds to characterize remote sensing data products. This paper presents a proposed set of required measurements for visible-through-longwave infrared remote sensing systems, and a description of the Stennis characterization. Other topics discussed inslude: 1) use of ancillary atmospheric and solar measurements taken at SSC that support various characterizations, 2) other sites used for radiometric, geometric, and spatial characterization in the continental United States,a nd 3) the need for a standardized technique to be adopted by the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) and other organizations.

  10. Measurement Sets and Sites Commonly Used for Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary; Holekamp, Kara; Ryan, Robert; Sellers, Richard; Davis, Bruce; Zanoni, Vicki

    2002-01-01

    Scientists at NASA's Earth Science Applications Directorate are creating a well-characterized Verification & Validation (V&V) site at the Stennis Space Center. This site enables the in-flight characterization of remote sensing systems and the data they acquire. The data are predominantly acquired by commercial, high spatial resolution satellite systems, such as IKONOS and QuickBird 2, and airborne systems. The smaller scale of these newer high resolution remote sensing systems allows scientists to characterize the geometric, spatial, and radiometric data properties using a single V&V site. The targets and techniques used to characterize data from these newer systems can differ significantly from the techniques used to characterize data from the earlier, coarser spatial resolution systems. Scientists are also using the SSC V&V site to characterize thermal infrared systems and active LIDAR systems. SSC employs geodetic targets, edge targets, radiometric tarps, and thermal calibration ponds to characterize remote sensing data products. This paper presents a proposed set of required measurements for visible through long-wave infrared remote sensing systems and a description of the Stennis characterization. Other topics discussed include: 1) The use of ancillary atmospheric and solar measurements taken at SSC that support various characterizations; 2) Additional sites used for radiometric, geometric, and spatial characterization in the continental United States; 3) The need for a standardized technique to be adopted by CEOS and other organizations.

  11. Arid site water balance: evapotranspiration modeling and measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, G.W.; Kirkham, R.R.

    1984-09-01

    In order to evaluate the magnitude of radionuclide transport at an aird site, a field and modeling study was conducted to measure and predict water movement under vegetated and bare soil conditions. Significant quantities of water were found to move below the roo of a shallow-rooted grass-covered area during wet years at the Hanford site. The unsaturated water flow model, UNSAT-1D, was resonably successful in simulating the transient behavior of the water balance at this site. The effects of layered soils on water balance were demonstrated using the model. Models used to evaluate water balance in arid regions should not rely on annual averages and assume that all precipitation is removed by evapotranspiration. The potential for drainage at arid sites exists under conditions where shallow rooted plants grow on coarse textured soils. This condition was observed at our study site at Hanford. Neutron probe data collected on a cheatgrass community at the Hanford site during a wet year indicated that over 5 cm of water drained below the 3.5-m depth. The unsaturated water flow model, UNSAT-1D, predicted water drainage of about 5 cm (single layer, 10 months) and 3.5 cm (two layers, 12 months) for the same time period. Additional field measurements of hydraulic conductivity will likely improve the drainage estimate made by UNSAT-1D. Additional information describing cheatgrass growth and water use at the grass site could improve model predictions of sink terms and subsequent calculations of water storage within the rooting zone. In arid areas where the major part of the annual precipitation occurs during months with low average potential evapotranspiration and where soils are vegetated but are coarse textured and well drained, significant drainage can occur. 31 references, 18 figures, 1 table.

  12. Surface seismic refraction/reflection measurement determinations of potential site resonances and the areal uniformity of NEHRP site class D in Memphis, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, R.A.; Wood, S.; Stephenson, W.J.; Odum, J.K.; Meremonte, M.E.; Street, R.; Worley, D.M.

    2003-01-01

    We determined S-wave velocities (Vs) to about 40-m depth at 65 locations in the Memphis-Shelby County, Tennessee, area. The Vs measurements were made using high-resolution seismic refraction and reflection methods on the ground surface. We find a clear difference in the Vs profiles between sites located on the Mississippi River flood plain and those located to the east, mostly covered by loess, in the urban areas of Memphis. The average Vs to 30-m depth at 19 sites on the modern Mississippi River floodplain averages 197 m/s (?? 15 m/s) and places 17 of these sites at the low end of NEHRP soil profile category type D (average Vs 180-360 m/s). The two remaining sites are type E. Vs to 30-m depth at 46 sites in the urban areas east of the modern floodplain are more variable and generally higher than the floodplain sites, averaging about 262 m/s (??45 m/s), still within category D. We often observed the base of the loess as a prominent S-wave reflection and as an increase in Vs to about 500 m/s. Based on the two-way travel time of this reflection, during an earthquake the impedance boundary at the loess base may generate resonances in the 3- to 6-Hz range over many areas of Memphis. Amplitude spectra from four local earthquakes recorded at one site located on loess indicate consistent resonance peaks in the 4.5- to 6.5-Hz range.

  13. Two Years of Site Diversity Measurements in Guam, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Roberto J.; Morse, J.; Zemba, M.; Nessel, J.

    2012-01-01

    As NASA communication networks upgrade to higher frequencies, such as Ka-Band, atmospherically induced attenuation can become significant. This attenuation is caused by rain, clouds and atmospheric gases (oxygen and water vapor), with rain having the most noticeable effects. One technique to circumvent the increase in attenuation is to operate two terminals separated by a distance that exceeds the average rain cell size. The fact that rain cells are of finite size can then be exploited by rerouting the signal to the terminal with the strongest link. This technique, known as site diversity, is best suited for climates that have compact (less than 2km) and intense rain cells such as in Guam. In order to study the potential diversity gain at the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) Remote Ground Terminal (GRGT) complex in Guam a site test interferometer (STI) was installed in May of 2010. The STI is composed of two terminals with a 900m baseline that observe the same unmodulated beacon signal broadcast from a geostationary satellite (e.g., UFO 8). The potential site diversity gain is calculated by measuring the difference in signal attenuation seen at each terminal. Over the two years of data collection the cumulative distribution function (CDF) of the site diversity gain shows a better than 3 dB improvement for 90% of the time over standard operation. These results show that the use of site diversity in Guam can be very effective in combating rain fades.

  14. Ozone measurements from a global network of surface sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oltmans, Samuel J.; Levy, Hiram, II

    1994-01-01

    From a network of surface ozone monitoring sites distributed primarily over the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, the seasonal, day-to-day, and diurnal patterns are delineated. At most of the NH (Northern Hemisphere) sites there is a spring maximum and late summer or autumn minimum. At Barrow, AK (70 deg N) and Barbados (14 deg N), however, there is a winter maximum, but the mechanisms producing the maximum are quite different. All the sites in the SH (Southern Hemisphere) show winter maxima and summer minima. At the subtropical and tropical sites, there are large day-to-day variations that reflect the changes in flow patterns. Air of tropical origin has much lower ozone concentrations than air from higher latitudes. At the two tropical sites (Barbados and Samoa), there is a marked diurnal ozone variation with highest amounts in the early morning and lowest values in the afternoon. At four of the locations (Barrow, AK; Mauna Loa, HI; American Samoa; and South Pole), there are 15- through 20-year records which allow us to look at longer term changes. At Barrow there has been a large summer increase over the 20 years of measurements. At South Pole, on the other hand, summer decreases have led to an overall decline in surface ozone amounts.

  15. Extensive goniometric spectral measurements at desert sites for military engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, T. E.; Morgan, J. C.; Furey, J. S.; DeMoss, T. A.; Kelley, J. R.; McKenna, J. R.

    2012-10-01

    Remote-sensing technology designed to exploit disturbed earth signatures has become extremely useful in the detection of disturbed soil in military areas of operation. Soil reflectance can be exploited for this purpose and is dependent on atmospheric conditions. An understanding of the in situ soil background is vital to any type of change detection. Researchers from the Engineering Research and Development Center (ERDC) conducted OCONUS soil spectral measurements at ten sites in Afghanistan from July to November, 2011. Sampling sites were chosen on the basis of geomorphic setting, surface-soil characteristics, and field-expedient conditions. Goniometric spectral measurements at these sites have provided high quality bi-directional reflectance data, and their analyses are presented in the context of threat recognition and discrimination. These data can also provide the basis for BDRF model validation. Most spectral data were acquired under ambient solar lighting, but other data were collected at night and under artificial illumination conditions. Bidirectional measurements of soil reflectance in the VIS/NIR and SWIR were taken using the University of Lethbridge Goniometer System (ULGS) at dawn, mid-day, dusk and after sunset with a light. Soil surface roughness and reflectance varied, depending on the presence of desert varnish and desert pavement at some sites. Sun angle and dust and smoke in the atmosphere impacted soil reflectance and noise in the SWIR part of the light spectrum, in particular. The presence of minerals such as calcium carbonate, gypsum, and oxidized iron in the subsurface directly impacted reflectance measurements in disturbed soil.

  16. Underground measurements of seismic vibrations at the SSC site

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.D.; Parkhomchuk, V.V.; Weaver, H.J.

    1995-03-17

    The results of underground measurements of seismic vibrations at the tunnel depth of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) site are presented. Spectral analysis of the data obtained in the frequency band from 0.05 Hz to 1500 Hz is performed. It is found that amplitudes of ambient ground motion are less than requirements for the Collider, but cultural vibrations are unacceptably large and will cause fast growth of transverse emittance of the SSC beams.

  17. Measurement of long-term land subsidence by combination of InSAR and time series analysis - Application study to Kanto Plains of Japan -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deguchi, T.; Rokugawa, S.; Matsushima, J.

    2009-04-01

    InSAR is an application technique of synthetic aperture radars and is now drawing attention as a methodology capable of measuring subtle surface deformation over a wide area with a high spatial resolution. In this study, the authors applied the method of measuring long-term land subsidence by combining InSAR and time series analysis to Kanto Plains of Japan using 28 images of ENVISAT/ASAR data. In this measuring method, the value of land deformation is set as an unknown parameter and the optimal solution to the land deformation amount is derived by applying a smoothness-constrained inversion algorithm. The vicinity of the Kanto Plain started to subside in the 1910s, and became exposed to extreme land subsidence supposedly in accordance with the reconstruction efforts after the Second World War and the economic development activities. The main causes of the land subsidence include the intake of underground water for the use in industries, agriculture, waterworks, and other fields. In the Kujukuri area, the exploitation of soluble natural gas also counts. The Ministry of Environment reported in its documents created in fiscal 2006 that a total of 214 km2 in Tokyo and the six prefectures around the Plain had undergone a subsidence of 1 cm or more per a year. As a result of long-term land subsidence over approximately five and a half years from 13th January, 2003, to 30th June, 2008, unambiguous land deformation was detected in six areas: (i) Haneda Airport, (ii) Urayasu City, (iii) Kasukabe-Koshigaya, (iv) Southern Kanagawa, (v) Toride-Ryugasaki, and (vi) Kujukuri in Chiba Prefecture. In particular, the results for the Kujukuri area were compared with the leveling data taken around the same area to verify the measuring accuracy. The comparative study revealed that the regression formula between the results obtained by time series analysis and those by the leveling can be expressed as a straight line with a gradient of approximately 1, though including a bias of about

  18. Influence of assessment site in measuring transcutaneous bilirubin

    PubMed Central

    da Conceição, Cristiane Maria; Dornaus, Maria Fernanda Pellegrino da Silva; Portella, Maria Aparecida; Deutsch, Alice D'Agostini; Rebello, Celso Moura

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To investigate the influence of the site of measurement of transcutaneous bilirubin (forehead or sternum) in reproducibility of results as compared to plasma bilirubin. Methods: A cohort study including 58 term newborns with no hemolytic disease. Transcutaneous measurements were performed on the forehead (halfway between the headline and the glabella, from the left toward the right side, making consecutive determinations, one-centimeter apart) and the sternum (five measurements, from the suprasternal notch to the xiphoid process with consecutive determinations, one-centimeter apart) using Bilicheck® (SpectRx Inc, Norcross, Georgia, USA). The correlation and agreement between both methods and plasma bilirubin were calculated. Results: There was a strong linear correlation between both determinations of serum bilirubin at the forehead and sternum (r=0.704; p<0.01 and r=0.653; p<0.01, respectively). There was correspondence of the mean values of transcutaneous bilirubin measured on the sternum (9.9±2.2mg/dL) compared to plasma levels (10.2±1.7mg/dL), but both differ from the values measured on the forehead (8.6±2.0mg/dL), p<0.05. Conclusion: In newborn term infants with no hemolytic disease, measuring of transcutaneous bilirubin on the sternum had higher accuracy as compared to serum bilirubin measurement on the forehead. PMID:24728239

  19. Measurements of particulate sugars at urban and forested suburban sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tominaga, Sae; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Kaneyasu, Naoki; Shigihara, Ado; Katono, Koichi; Igawa, Manabu

    2011-04-01

    Neutral sugars (arabinose, fucose, galactose, glucose, mannose, rhamnose, and xylose) in fine and coarse aerosols were measured at urban and forested suburban sites in Japan. The most dominant compound in the sugar group was glucose at both sites. Size partitioning of the sugars generally showed dominance in the fine mode range but shifted toward the coarse mode range in summer. Seasonal trends in the sugar concentrations in the fine and coarse mode ranges were opposite: higher concentrations of fine mode sugars were found in winter, although coarse mode sugars increased in summer. Fine mode glucose consisted dominantly of the combined form, whereas free glucose increased in the coarse mode range. Although the sources of the sugars in the aerosols remain largely uncertain, primary biogenic particles can be considered as candidates of main sources of the sugars in both coarse and fine mode ranges.

  20. Towards increasing the spatial resolution of luminescence chronologies - Portable luminescence reader measurements and standardized growth curves applied to the beach-ridge plain of Phra Thong Island, Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brill, Dominik; Jankaew, Kruawun; Brückner, Helmut

    2016-04-01

    Since optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating is time consuming and cost intensive, age information available for individual study sites is usually restricted to significantly less than 100 ages. In particular the interpretation of complex depositional systems with temporally and spatially diverse sedimentation histories may suffer from the effects of a poor spatial resolution or an ineffective distribution of chronological data. In these cases, time and cost efficient approaches that provide reasonable dating accuracy are required to substitute or complement full luminescence dating. For the sandy beach-ridge plain of Phra Thong Island, Thailand, which is chronologically constrained by a set of approximately 50 luminescence ages, we evaluated the potential (i) of luminescence profiling using a portable luminescence reader, and (ii) of standardized growth curves (SGCs) to improve the resolution and sampling strategy of OSL dating in coastal settings. Although SGCs are related to some shortcomings in dating accuracy, and luminescence profiling with even the favorable conditions provided by the homogeneous sandy stratigraphy of the beach-ridge plain does not equal full luminescence dating, both approaches are capable of reproducing some of the main chronostratigraphic features of the island. This includes the differentiation between Holocene and last interglacial ridges, as well as the identification of the general east-west progradation and some (but not all) of several 1500-2000 year hiatuses within the Holocene sediment succession. However, while both approaches can successfully identify relative chronological trends, robust absolute age estimates can only be achieved by considering the highly variable dosimetry, which is the main contributing factor to bulk luminescence signals apart from deposition age on Phra Thong Island. At Phra Thong, portable reader signals as a proxy for palaeodoses combined with sample-specific dose rates proved as the best

  1. Measurements of Mass Concentrations of Black Carbon by Using Four Instruments at the Summit of Mount Tai, in the Center of the North China Plain in June 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanaya, Y.; Komazaki, Y.; Pochanart, P.; Liu, Y.; Akimoto, H.; Gao, J.; Wang, T.; Wang, Z.

    2007-12-01

    Although the emission rate of black carbon (BC) aerosols from the North China Plain (NCP) has been estimated to be high and it would impact climate severely, the BC mass concentrations at a regionally representative location in the plain have been scarcely observed. During a comprehensive field campaign performed at the summit of Mount Tai (36.26 N, 117.11 E, 1534 m asl) in June 2006, BC (or elemental carbon, EC) concentrations were measured by four instruments: an Aethalometer, a Multi-Angle Absorption Photometry (MAAP) instrument, a Particle Soot Absorption Photometer, and a semi-continuous ECOC analyzer with two thermal protocols (IMPROVE and NIOSH). The hourly BC concentration (PM2.5) as measured by the MAAP instrument ranged from -0.1 to 40.8 μgC m-3, with an average of 3.7 μgC m-3. For both of the first 20-day and the latter 10-day periods during the campaign, for which all the instruments provided PM1 and PM2.5 measurements, respectively, we found strong correlations (R2 >0.88) for all the pairs with which >30 hours of coincident observations were made. The slopes and the intercept values of regression lines ranged from 1.00 to 1.42 and from -0.2 to +0.8 μgC m-3, respectively. This general agreement suggested that we were able to determine the BC concentrations regionally representative over the NCP with an uncertainty of ±50% and thereby reduce the uncertainty factor of >4 associating with the BC emission rate from China. The temporal variation of BC concentrations in June 2006 was dominated by the influence from crop (winter wheat) residue burning after the harvest. The relative importance of BC in comparison to CO2 in terms of heating of the atmosphere over this region is also discussed.

  2. Sulfate Deposition in Regolith Exposed in Trenches on the Plains Between the Spirit Landing Site and Columbia Hills in Gusev Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Alian; Haskin, L. A.; Squyres, S. W.; Arvidson, R.; Crumpler, L.; Gellert, R.; Hurowitz, J.; Schroeder, C.; Tosca, N.; Herkenhoff, K.

    2005-01-01

    During its exploration within Gusev crater between sol 01 and sol 158, the Spirit rover dug three trenches (Fig. 1) to expose the subsurface regolith [1, 2, 9]. Laguna trench (approx. 6 cm deep, approx.203 m from the rim of Bonneville crater) was dug in Laguna Hollow at the boundary of the impact ejecta from Bonneville crater and the surrounding plains. The Big Hole trench (approx. 6-7 cm deep) and The Boroughs trench (approx. 11 cm deep) were dug in the plains between the Bonneville crater and the Columbia Hills (approx.556 m and approx.1698 m from the rim of Bonneville crater respectively). The top, wall and floor regolith of the three trenches were investigated using the entire set of Athena scientific instruments [10].

  3. Radiological investigations at the "Taiga" nuclear explosion site: Site description and in situ measurements.

    PubMed

    Ramzaev, V; Repin, V; Medvedev, A; Khramtsov, E; Timofeeva, M; Yakovlev, V

    2011-07-01

    In the summer of 2009, we performed a field survey of the "Taiga" peaceful underground nuclear explosion site, the Perm region, Russia (61.30° N, 56.60° E). The explosion was carried out by the USSR in 1971. This paper provides an extended summary of the available published data on the "Taiga" experiment. A detailed description of the site is illustrated by original aerial and ground-level photos. A large artificial lake (700 m long and 350 m wide) currently occupies the central area of the experimental site. The ground lip surrounding the lake is covered by a newly grown mixed forest. In situ measurements, performed in August 2009, revealed elevated levels of the γ-ray dose rate in air on the banks of the lake "Taiga". Two hot spots were detected on the eastern bank of the lake. The excess of the γ-ray radiation is attributable to the man-made radionuclides (60)Co and (137)Cs. The current external γ-ray dose rate to a human from the contaminations associated with the "Taiga" experiment was between 9 and 70 μSv per week. Periodic monitoring the site is recommended.

  4. Dunes on Plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03047 Dunes on Plains

    These dunes are located on the plains around Doanus Vallis.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 62.3S, Longitude 335.3E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  5. Distribution of atmospheric reactive nitrogen at two sites of different socio- economic characteristics in IndoGangetic Plain(IGP) region, India.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S.; Sharma, A.; Kulshrestha, U. C.

    2015-12-01

    In India, most of the human population lives in rural areas. People depends on agriculture products to meet the demand of food supply. In order to get higher yield of agriculture and food product, increased practice of fertilizer application has added extra burden of nutrients especially, the reactive nitrogen (Nr) species viz NH3 and NOx. Growing energy demands has resulted in increased emissions of NOx from coal combustion in thermal power plant and the petroleum combustion in transport sector. In addition, biomass burning in traditional cooking and heating has become significant source of NH3 and NOx in Indian region. Significance of the study lies in the fact that increasing Nr emissions have adverse impact on human health, plant, soil and water bodies directly and to see the effect, knowledge of emission and deposition for Nr at different sites. Hence, the selection of the sites for present study was done very carefully. Delhi city and Mai village were selected to represent typical characteristics of high and low socioeconomic region respectively. Delhi is the capital of India, known for higher income group urban cluster where rural site having agricultural dominance has its importance in Indian scenario because still in India our primary source of income is agriculture. Atmospheric abundance of two major gaseous inorganic (Nr) species i.e NH3 and NO2 has been measured for one year, on monthly basis. Average concentrations of NH3 at urban and rural site have been recorded as 40.4 ±16.8 and 51.57 ±22.8 μg/m3 respectively. The average concentrations of NO2 have been recorded as 24.4 ±13.5 and 18.8 ± 12.6 μg/m3 at urban & rural site respectively. Study, also presents seasonal and diurnal variations of gaseous reactive nitrogen species at urban & rural sites to observe the contribution of different the sources of atmospheric Nr. Dynamics of Nr at both sites will be discussed in details at the conference.

  6. Direct measurements of transport properties are essential for site characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J.; Conca, J.L.

    1994-08-01

    Direct measurements of transport parameters on subsurface sediments using, the UFA method provided detailed hydrostratigraphic mapping, and subsurface flux distributions at a mixed-waste disposal site at Hanford. Seven hundred unsaturated conductivity measurements on fifty samples were obtained in only six months total of UFA run time. These data are used to provide realistic information to conceptual models, predictive models and restoration strategies. The UFA instrument consists of an ultracentrifuge with a constant, ultralow flow pump that provides fluid to the sample surface through a rotating seal assembly and microdispersal system. Effluent from the sample is collected in a transparent, volumetrically-calibrated chamber at the bottom of the sample assembly. Using a strobe light, an observer can check the chamber while the sample is being centrifuged. Materials can be run in the UFA as recomposited samples or in situ samples can be subcored directly into the sample UFA chamber.

  7. Measurement of volatile organic chemicals at selected sites in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Hanwant B.; Salas, L.; Viezee, W.; Sitton, B.; Ferek, R.

    1992-01-01

    Urban air concentrations of 24 selected volatile organic chemicals that may be potentially hazardous to human health and environment were measured during field experiments conducted at two California locations, at Houston, and at Denver. Chemicals measured included chlorofluorocarbons, halomethanes, haloethanes, halopropanes, chloroethylenes, and aromatic hydrocarbons. With emphasis on California sites, data from these studies are analyzed and interpreted with respect to variabilities in ambient air concentrations, diurnal changes, relation to prevailing meteorology, sources and trends. Except in a few instances, mean concentrations are typically between 0 and 5 ppb. Significant variabilities in atmospheric concentrations associated with intense sources and adverse meteorological conditions are shown to exist. In addition to short-term variability, there is evidence of systematic diurnal and seasonal trends. In some instances it is possible to detect declining trends resulting from the effectiveness of control strategies.

  8. Data assimilation of a ten-day period during June 1993 over the Southern Great Plains Site using a nested mesoscale model

    SciTech Connect

    Dudhia, J.; Guo, Y.R.

    1996-04-01

    A goal of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has been to obtain a complete representation of physical processes on the scale of a general circulation model (GCM) grid box in order to better parameterize radiative processes in these models. Since an observational network of practical size cannot be used alone to characterize the Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site`s 3D structure and time development, data assimilation using the enhanced observations together with a mesoscale model is used to give a full 4D analysis at high resolution. The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)/Penn State Mesoscale Model (MM5) has been applied over a ten-day continuous period in a triple-nested mode with grid sizes of 60, 20 and 6.67 in. The outer domain covers the United States` 48 contiguous states; the innermost is a 480-km square centered on Lamont, Oklahoma. A simulation has been run with data assimilation using the Mesoscale Analysis and Prediction System (MAPS) 60-km analyses from the Forecast Systems Laboratory (FSL) of the National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The nested domains take boundary conditions from and feed back continually to their parent meshes (i.e., they are two-way interactive). As reported last year, this provided a simulation of the basic features of mesoscale events over the CART site during the period 16-26 June 1993 when an Intensive Observation Period (IOP) was under way.

  9. Detection limit for activation measurements in ultralow background sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trache, Livius; Chesneanu, D.; Margineanu, R.; Pantelica, A.; Ghita, D. G.; Burducea, I.; Straticiuc, M.; Tang, X. D.

    2014-09-01

    We used 12C +13C fusion at the beam energies E = 6, 7 and 8 MeV to determine the sensitivity and the limits of activation method measurements in ultralow background sites. A 13C beam of 0.5 μA from the 3 MV Tandem accelerator of the Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering - IFIN HH impinged on thick graphite targets. After about 24 hrs of irradiation targets were measured in two different laboratories: one with a heavy shielded Ge detector in the institute (at the surface) and one located underground in the microBequerel laboratory, in the salt mine of Slanic-Prahova, Romania. The 1369- and 2754 keV peaks from 24Na deactivation were clearly observed in the γ-ray spectra obtained for acquisitions lasting a few hours, or a few days. Determination of the detection limit in evaluating the cross sections for the target irradiated at Ec . m = 3 MeV indicates the fact that it is possible to measure gamma spectrum in underground laboratory down to Ec . m = 2 . 6 MeV. Cleaning the spectra with beta-gamma coincidences and increasing beam intensity 20 times will take as further down. The measurements are motivated by the study of the 12 C +12 C reaction at astrophysical energies.

  10. Mountain-Plains Handbook: The Design and Operation of a Residential Family Based Education Program. Appendix. Supplement Four to Volume Three. Measurement and Evaluation: The Research Services Division.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyle, David A.; And Others

    One of five supplements which accompany chapter 3 of "Mountain-Plains Handbook: The Design and Operation of a Residential, Family Oriented Career Education Model" (CE 014 630), this document contains a master listing of all Mountain-Plains curriculum, compiled by job title, course, unit, and Learning activity package (LAPS) and arranged in…

  11. Field measurements and numerical modeling for the run-up heights and inundation distances of the 2011 Tohoku-oki tsunami at Sendai Plain, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Kazuhisa; Fujima, Koji; Sugawara, Daisuke; Fujino, Shigehiro; Imai, Kentaro; Tsudaka, Ryouta; Abe, Tomoya; Haraguchi, Tsuyoshi

    2012-12-01

    We conducted an urgent field survey at the Sendai Plain to measure the run-up heights and inundation distances of the 2011 Tohoku-oki tsunami. We used GPS measurements because of the remarkably long inundation distances (ca. 5.4 km). We established an accurate measurement scheme using the far electric reference points (about 350 km). Using this method, we quickly measured 69 run-up heights within 3 days. The tsunami run-up heights and inundation distances varied mainly according to the local topography, ranging from 9.6 m at 0.4 km to 0.2 m at 5.4 km, respectively. Furthermore, artificial structures and topography played an important role in constraining the inundation limit. Our observations are important for future analyses using aerial and satellite imagery and numerical modeling in the area because the maximum inundation area might be underestimated in the images as a result of the subtle traces of the tsunami inundation, which were difficult to identify in the field. However, results show that numerical modeling might not reproduce minor inundation beyond the highway without sufficiently high-resolution topographic data because data for the modeling are usually rough, and the highway, small channels, and street gutters, which played an important role in local inundation, are too small a resolution to be recognized in the model.

  12. Lunar weather measurements at three Apollo sites 1969-1976

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollick, Monique; O'Brien, Brian J.

    2013-11-01

    first lunar weather stations, matchbox-sized, 270 g Apollo Dust Detector Experiments about 100 cm above the surface of the Moon near Apollo 12, 14, and 15 landing sites, measured dust accretion, charged particle radiation, and temperature changes—three environmental factors proved during Apollo to affect technical systems deployed on the Moon. Degradation of seven horizontal solar cells was measured every lunar daytime from 1969 to 1976. The anomalously intense August 1972 solar particle event (SPE) degraded three covered cells by less than 1%, while two cells desensitized by intense preirradiation showed no measurable effects. Although independent studies estimated the long-term fluence bombarding the cells was less than half that of the August SPE, long-term gradual degradation of five covered cells (normalized to 2000 days) was an order of magnitude greater, between 4% and 10%. If the long-term effects were totally caused by dust, with articulated caveats including simulated (maria) Minnesota Lunar Simulant-1 dust particles with diameters 20 to 38 µm, this provides the first direct measured long-term net accretion of dust with an upper limit of order 100 µg cm-2 yr-1, equivalent to a layer 1 mm thick in 1000 years, but it may be significantly less. Two bare cells were abruptly degraded by 7% during the August SPE, however long-term they measured additional damage of 29% and 24%, indicating a long-neglected suite of low-energy radiation, posing risks for bare materials exposed on the surface of the Moon.

  13. Site characterization using a portable optically stimulated luminescence reader: delineating disrupted stratigraphy in Holocene eolian deposits on the Canadian Great Plains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munyikwa, K.; Gilliland, K.; Gibson, T.; Plumb, E.

    2012-12-01

    The use of portable optically stimulated luminescence (POSL) readers to elucidate on complex depositional sequences has been demonstrated in a number of recent studies. POSL readers are robust versions of the traditional lab-bound luminescence readers and they can be used in the field, allowing for rapid decisions to be made when collecting samples for dating. Furthermore, in contrast with lab-bound readers, POSL readers can perform measurements on bulk samples, negating the need to carry out time-intensive mineralogical separations. The POSL reader is equipped with both infra-red and blue light (OSL) stimulating sources such that signal separation during measurement can be carried out by selectively exciting feldspar using the IR source (IRSL) after which a quartz dominant signal is obtained from the same sample using post-IR blue OSL. The signals obtained are then plotted to give luminescence profiles that depict the variation of the luminescence signal with depth. Signal intensities depend on mineralogical concentrations, grain luminescence sensitivities, dose rates as well as on burial ages of the grains. Where all these variables, apart from the burial age, are held constant up the depositional sequence the luminescence profile serves as a proxy for the chronostratigraphy. As a contribution to a growing archive of studies that have employed POSL readers to unravel complex depositional sequences, this study uses a POSL system developed by the Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre to characterize the stratigraphy at an archaeological site that lies next to an oilfield plant located on a Holocene fossil dune landscape in southern Alberta, Canada. Oilfield activity was initiated at the site several decades ago and it involved the laying of pipelines below ground which disturbed considerable archaeological deposits. Subsequent work led to the discovery of the archeological site which was previously occupied by ancestral indigenous peoples at various

  14. Kennedy Space Center Press Site (SWMU 074) Interim Measure Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Applegate, Joseph L.

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes the Interim Measure (IM) activities conducted at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Press Site ("the Press Site"). This facility has been designated as Solid Waste Management Unit 074 under KSC's Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Corrective Action program. The activities were completed as part of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) Area Land Use Controls Implementation Plan (LUCIP) Elimination Project. The purpose of the VAB Area LUCIP Elimination Project was to delineate and remove soil affected with constituents of concern (COCs) that historically resulted in Land Use Controls (LUCs). The goal of the project was to eliminate the LUCs on soil. LUCs for groundwater were not addressed as part of the project and are not discussed in this report. This report is intended to meet the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) Corrective Action Management Plan requirement as part of the KSC Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments permit and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA's) Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) self-implementing polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) cleanup requirements of 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 761.61(a).

  15. 'Endurance' Goal Across the Plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This mosaic image from the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's panoramic camera provides an overview of the rover's drive direction toward 'Endurance Crater,' which is in the upper right corner of image.

    The plains appear to be uniform in character from the rovers current position all the way to Endurance Crater. Granules of various sizes blanket the plains. Spherical granules fancifully called blueberries are present some intact and some broken. Larger granules pave the surface, while smaller grains, including broken blueberries, form small dunes. Randomly distributed 1-centimeter (0.4 inch) sized pebbles (as seen just left of center in the foreground of the image) make up a third type of feature on the plains. The pebbles' composition remains to be determined. Scientists plan to examine these in the coming sols.

    Examination of this part of Mars by NASA's Mars Global Surveyor orbiter revealed the presence of hematite, which led NASA to choose Meridiani Planum as Opportunity's landing site. The rover science conducted on the plains of Meridiani Planum serves to integrate what the rovers are seeing on the ground with what orbital data have shown.

    Opportunity will make stop at a small crater called 'Fram' (seen in the upper left, with relatively large rocks nearby) before heading to the rim of Endurance Crater.

  16. Use of AVHRR-derived spectral reflectances to estimate surface albedo across the Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, J.; Gao, W.

    1997-03-01

    Substantial variations in surface albedo across a large area cause difficulty in estimating regional net solar radiation and atmospheric absorption of shortwave radiation when only ground point measurements of surface albedo are used to represent the whole area. Information on spatial variations and site-wide averages of surface albedo, which vary with the underlying surface type and conditions and the solar zenith angle, is important for studies of clouds and atmospheric radiation over a large surface area. In this study, a bidirectional reflectance model was used to inversely retrieve surface properties such as leaf area index and then the bidirectional reflectance distribution was calculated by using the same radiation model. The albedo was calculated by converting the narrowband reflectance to broadband reflectance and then integrating over the upper hemisphere.

  17. Acid aerosol measurements at a suburban Connecticut site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeler, Gerald J.; Spengler, John D.; Castillo, Raymond A.

    Atmospheric acidity data were gathered during a year-long field project investigating the possible health effects of acid aerosol in a rural community in southwestern Connecticut. This site was chosen because the air quality is frequently influenced by pollutants transported from the New York-New Jersey corridor as well as from the Midwest U.S. An annular denuder filter-pack system utilized to obtain daily measurements of gaseous HNO 3, HONO, SO 2, and NH 3; plus fine particle SO 42-, NO 3-, and H +. Fine particle mass ( d ⩽ 2.1 μm) and PM10 (particles d ⩽ 10 μm) were also measured. Ozone concentrations and basic meteorological data were also obtained continuously. The atmosphere was acidic with average concentrations of HONO (16 nmol m -3), HNO 3 (42 nmol m -3), and H + (42 nmol m -3), observed from May to September 1988. Atmospheric ammonia concentrations were fairly low averaging 34 nmol m -3 during the same period, and suggesting the neutralizing capacity of the air was significant to neutralize all the acidic species present. Neutralization of acidic particles by reactions on the filter media after collection resulted in a loss of approximately 10% of the measured particle strong acidity for the summertime period investigated. Concentrations of ozone and acidic gases tended to peak with mixed layer flow from the south-southwest while particulate acidity was highest with flow predominantly from the west-soutwest. Hourly ozone concentrations greater than 100 ppb were observed on 31 different days during the monitoring, and concentrations greater than 150 ppb measured on 14 days. HNO 3 and aerosol strong acidity (H +) concentrations reached 174 and 199 nmol m -3, respectively during the summer months.

  18. Preventing surgical-site infections: measures other than antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Chauveaux, D

    2015-02-01

    Surgical-site infections (SSIs) due to intra-operative contamination are chiefly ascribable to airborne particles carrying microorganisms, mainly Staphylococcus aureus, which settle on the surgeon's hands and instruments. SSI prevention therefore rests on minimisation of airborne contaminated particle counts, although these have not been demonstrated to correlate significantly with SSI rates. Maintaining clear air in the operating room classically involves the use of ultra clean ventilation systems combining laminar airflow and high-efficiency particulate air filters to create a physical barrier around the surgical table; in addition to a stringent patient preparation protocol, appropriate equipment, and strict operating room discipline on the part of the surgeon and other staff members. SSI rates in clean surgery, although influenced by the type of procedure and by patient-related factors, are consistently very low, of about 1% to 2%. These low rates, together with the effectiveness of prophylactic antibiotic therapy and the multiplicity of parameters influencing the SSI risk, are major obstacles to the demonstration that a specific measure is effective in decreasing SSIs. As a result, controversy surrounds the usefulness of many measures, including laminar airflow, body exhaust suits, patient preparation techniques, and specific surgical instruments. Impeccable surgical technique and operating room behaviour, in contrast, are clearly essential.

  19. Preventing surgical-site infections: measures other than antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Chauveaux, D

    2015-02-01

    Surgical-site infections (SSIs) due to intra-operative contamination are chiefly ascribable to airborne particles carrying microorganisms, mainly Staphylococcus aureus, which settle on the surgeon's hands and instruments. SSI prevention therefore rests on minimisation of airborne contaminated particle counts, although these have not been demonstrated to correlate significantly with SSI rates. Maintaining clear air in the operating room classically involves the use of ultra clean ventilation systems combining laminar airflow and high-efficiency particulate air filters to create a physical barrier around the surgical table; in addition to a stringent patient preparation protocol, appropriate equipment, and strict operating room discipline on the part of the surgeon and other staff members. SSI rates in clean surgery, although influenced by the type of procedure and by patient-related factors, are consistently very low, of about 1% to 2%. These low rates, together with the effectiveness of prophylactic antibiotic therapy and the multiplicity of parameters influencing the SSI risk, are major obstacles to the demonstration that a specific measure is effective in decreasing SSIs. As a result, controversy surrounds the usefulness of many measures, including laminar airflow, body exhaust suits, patient preparation techniques, and specific surgical instruments. Impeccable surgical technique and operating room behaviour, in contrast, are clearly essential. PMID:25623269

  20. The exposure history of the Apollo 16 sites. An assessment based on methane and carbide measurements. [in lunar soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pillinger, C. T.; Eglinton, C.; Gowar, A. P.; Jull, A. J. T.; Maxwell, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    Soils from eight stations at the Apollo 16 landing site have been analyzed for methane and carbide. These results, in conjunction with published data from photogeology, bulk chemistry, rare gases, primordial and radionuclides, and agglutinate abundances have been interpreted in terms of differing contributions from three components, North and South Ray crater ejecta and Cayley Plains material.

  1. Forage intake by and site and extent of digestion in beef cattle grazing midgrass prairie rangeland or plains bluestem pasture throughout the summer.

    PubMed

    Gunter, S A; McCollum, F T; Gillen, R L

    1997-02-01

    Eight beef steers fitted with esophageal (four steers/pasture) and 12 beef calves fitted ruminal and duodenal (six calves/pasture; beginning BW = 267 +/- 6 kg) cannulas grazed either midgrass prairie rangeland (excellent range condition; MIDGRASS) or plains bluestem (Bothriochloa ischaemum var. Plains) pasture (BLUESTEM) during mid-May, late June, mid-August, and mid-October of 1990 and 1991 in order to compare nutrient intake and digestion. Forage OM intake (OMI) by cattle grazing MIDGRASS or BLUESTEM was similar (P > .05) in June and August. In May and October, cattle grazing MIDGRASS consumed more (P < .05) OM than cattle grazing BLUESTEM. The extent of true ruminal OM digestion was similar (P > .05) between forage types except in October 1991, when the extent of digestion for BLUESTEM was greater (P < .05) than for MIDGRASS. The N intake by cattle interacted by year and forage (P < .05). Nitrogen intake by cattle grazing MIDGRASS tended to be lower in June and August than in May and October. The N intake by cattle grazing BLUESTEM peaked (P < .05) in August during 1990; however, N intake was lowest (P < .05) in August during 1991. Duodenal non-ammonia N (NAN) flow was higher (P < .05) in cattle grazing BLUESTEM than in cattle grazing MIDGRASS from May through August; however, duodenal NAN flow in cattle grazing BLUESTEM was lower (P < .05) in October 1991. Duodenal microbial N synthesis (grams/day) responded quadratically (P < .05) to total ruminal OM digestion (kilograms/day). Extent of true ruminal N digestion of both forages decreased (P < .05) as forage became more mature and lower in total N. Midgrass prairie seemed superior to BLUESTEM in May and October because of higher energy intakes and BLUESTEM seemed to be a good alternative to MIDGRASS during June through August, suggesting that these forages would make excellent complements. Furthermore, these data suggest that, in cattle grazing either forage, duodenal NAN flow was disproportionately high

  2. Ozonesonde measurements from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site in Billings, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    Ozonesonde instruments were prepared and released at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site located near Billings, Oklahoma. Ozone sensors, associated radiosondes, balloons, and other parts and pieces required for the ozone observations were provided by WFF on a reimbursable arrangement with ANL. Observations were scheduled daily at 1,700 UTC beginning on September 22, 1995. Attempts to maintain this schedule were frustrated by a few simultaneous operations involving different electronic devices in use resulting in considerable rf noise. Since radiosondes are necessarily low-cost instruments their reception is particularly susceptible to noisy rf fields. Overall, however, 36 ozonesonde flights were made with the last observation occurring on November 1, 1995. Ozone data were processed on-site through the ground-station software and preliminary data delivered to Mike Splitt at the ARM site.

  3. Different ages of lunar light plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neukum, G.

    1977-01-01

    The crater populations of 18 lunar light plains (Cayley plains) show a variation in relative ages by a factor of about 4 in crater frequency in regions in the surroundings of the Orientale and Imbrium basin, and by a factor of greater than 25 for more distant sites. Thus the idea of a moon-wide synchronism in the emplacement of the lunar light plains with the formation of the basins Imbrium or Orientale cannot be supported. Some light plains are younger than the youngest basin Orientale. Since these plains cannot have been emplaced by any other basin-forming event and local impact-derived origin can certainly be excluded, an endogenic (magmatic) origin is proposed for these plains. Age determination data (D sub L values) by Soderblom and Lebofsky (1972) and Soderblom and Boyce (1972) are shown to be correlated with own cumulative crater frequency data (N) for surfaces younger than about 3.8 b.y. It is found that D sub L is proportional to the 0.6 power of N. For ages greater than 3.8 b.y., the D sub L data by those authors, especially their light plains data, are incompatible with the present crater frequency data.

  4. The Plains City Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Olphen, Marcela; Rios, Francisco; Berube, William; Dexter, Robin; McCarthy, Robert

    2006-01-01

    This case study portrays a contemporary phenomenon that affects many U.S. school districts. Specifically, the authors address the challenges that the superintendent of the Plains City school district faced as a result of a change in the demographic distribution of his district. The gradual development of the pig farming industry in Plains City…

  5. Nitrogen oxide measurements at rural sites in Switzerland: Bias of conventional measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbacher, M.; Zellweger, C.; Schwarzenbach, B.; Bugmann, S.; Buchmann, B.; OrdóñEz, C.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Hueglin, C.

    2007-06-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) in the atmosphere are often measured using instruments equipped with molybdenum converters. NO2 is catalytically converted to NO on a heated molybdenum surface and subsequently measured by chemiluminescence after reaction with ozone. The drawback of this technique is that other oxidized nitrogen compounds such as peroxyacetyl nitrate and nitric acid are also partly converted to NO. Thus such NO2 measurements are really surrogate NO2 measurements because the resultant values systematically overestimate the true value because of interferences of these compounds, especially when sampling photochemically aged air masses. However, molybdenum converters are widely used, and a dense network of surrogate NO2 measurements exists. As an alternative with far less interference, photolytic converters using ultraviolet light are nowadays applicable also for long-term measurements. This work presents long-term collocated NO2 measurements using molybdenum and photolytic converters at two rural sites in Switzerland. On a relative scale, the molybdenum converter instruments overestimate the NO2 concentrations most during spring/summer because of prevalent photochemistry. On a monthly basis, only 70-83% of the "surrogate" NO2 can be attributed to "real" NO2 at the non-elevated site and even less (43-76%) at the elevated one. The observed interferences have to be taken into account for monitoring and regulatory issues and to be considered when using these data for ground-truthing of satellite data or for validation of chemical transport models. Alternatively, an increased availability of artifact-free data would also be beneficial for these issues.

  6. Ages of Lunar Light Plains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiesinger, Harald; Howes van der Bogert, Carolyn; Thiessen, Fiona; Robinson, Mark

    2013-04-01

    Light plains are characterized by their relative smoothness and lower crater densities (compared to the highlands), and their occurrence as crater fills. They also exhibit highland-like characteristics, such as high albedos (in comparison to mare basalts) and their geological and stratigraphic setting. Despite the long history of investigating light plains, there are still numerous open questions concerning their mode of emplacement, their mineralogical composition, their ages, and their origin. We dated 16 light plains with crater size-frequency distribution (CSFD) measurements. All dated regions were previously identified as light plains in the geologic maps [1-5] and either mapped as smooth light plains (Ip) or light plains with undulatory surfaces (INp). The studied light plains occur both inside and outside the South Pole-Aitken (SPA) basin within a latitudinal band between ~-36° and ~-75°. In particular, we investigated the following smooth light plains: Janssen (40.82°E, -44.96°; Ip [1]), Nishina (-170.8°E, -44.57°; Ip [2]), South of Nishina (Ip [2]), Obruchev (162.43°E, -38.67°; Ip [2]), Oresme (169.22°E, -42.61°, Ip [2]), Schrödinger (132.93°E, -74.73°; Ip [3]), Nearch (39.01°E, -58.58°; Ip [3]), Nasmyth (-56.39°E, -50.49°; Ip [3]), Manzinus (26.37°E, -67.51°; Ip [3]), Klaproth (-26.26°E, -69.85°; Ip [3]), Phocylides (-57.31°E, -52.79°, Ip [3]), Buffon (-133.53°E, -40.64°; Ip [4]), Roche (136.54°E, -42.37°; Ip [5]). We also dated the following light plains with undulatory surfaces: Koch (150.33°E, -42.13°; INp [2]), Garavito (156.78°E, -47.21°; INp [2]), Eötvös (134.43°E, -35.61°; INp [5]). Our CSFD measurements resulted in absolute model ages of 3.71 to 4.02 Ga for all investigated light plains, thus confirming the Imbrian and/or Nectarian ages of the geologic maps [1-5]. We only dated three INp light plains, but they appear to have ages that are close to the upper limit, i.e., 3.96-4.02 Ga. However, further CSFDs of INp

  7. Measuring the Influence of Pearlite Dissolution on the Transient Dynamic Strength of Rapidly Heated Plain Carbon Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mates, Steven; Stoudt, Mark; Gangireddy, Sindhura

    2016-07-01

    Carbon steels containing ferrite-pearlite microstructures weaken dramatically when pearlite dissolves into austenite on heating. The kinetics of this phase transformation, while fast, can play a role during dynamic, high-temperature manufacturing processes, including high-speed machining, when the time scale of this transformation is on the order of the manufacturing process itself. In such a regime, the mechanical strength of carbon steel can become time dependent. The present work uses a rapidly heated, high-strain-rate mechanical test to study the effect of temperature and time on the amount of pearlite dissolved and on the resulting transient effect on dynamic strength of a low and a high carbon (eutectoid) steel. Measurements indicate that the transient effect occurs for heating times less than about 3 s. The 1075 steel loses about twice the strength compared to the 1018 steel (85 MPa to 45 MPa) owing to its higher initial pearlite volume fraction. Pearlite dissolution is confirmed by metallographic examination of tested samples. Despite the different starting pearlite fractions, the kinetics of dissolution are comparable for the two steels, owing to the similarity in their initial pearlite morphology.

  8. Rocky Martian Plain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The rocky Martian plain surrounding Viking 2 is seen in high resolution in this 85-degree panorama sweeping from north at the left to east at right during the Martian afternoon on September 5. Large blocks litter the surface. Some are porous, sponge-like rocks like the one at the left edge (size estimate: 1 1/2 to 2 feet); others are dense and fine-grained, such as the very bright rounded block (1 to 1 1/2 feet across) toward lower right. Pebbled surface between the rocks is covered in places by small drifts of very fine material similar to drifts seen at the Viking 1 landing site some 4600 miles to the southwest. The fine-grained material is banked up behind some rocks, but wind tails seen by Viking 1 are not well-developed here. On the right horizon, flat-topped ridges or hills are illuminated by the afternoon sun. Slope of the horizon is due to the 8-degree tilt of the spacecraft.

  9. Characteristics and recent trends of sulfur dioxide at urban, rural, and background sites in north China: effectiveness of control measures.

    PubMed

    Lin, Weili; Xu, Xiaobin; Ma, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Huarong; Liu, Xiwen; Wang, Ying

    2012-01-01

    SO2 measurements made in recent years at sites in Beijing and its surrounding areas are performed to study the variations and trends of surface SO2 at different types of sites in Northern China. The overall average concentrations of SO2 are (16.8 +/- 13.1) ppb, (14.8 +/- 9.4) ppb, and (7.5 +/- 4.0) ppb at China Meteorological Administration (CMA, Beijing urban area), Gucheng (GCH, relatively polluted rural area, 110 km to the southwest of Beijing urban area), and Shangdianzi (SDZ, clean background area, 100 km to the northeast of Beijing urban area), respectively. The SO2 levels in winter (heating season) are 4-6 folds higher than those in summer. There are highly significant correlations among the daily means of SO2 at different sites, indicating regional characteristics of SO2 pollution. Diurnal patterns of surface SO2 at all sites have a common feature with a daytime peak, which is probably caused by the downward mixing and/or the advection transport of SO2-richer air over the North China Plain. The concentrations of SO2 at CMA and GCH show highly significant downward trends (-4.4 ppb/yr for CMA and -2.4 ppb/yr for GCH), while a less significant trend (-0.3 ppb/yr) is identified in the data from SDZ, reflecting the character of SDZ as a regional atmospheric background site in North China. The SO2 concentrations of all three sites show a significant decrease from period before to after the control measures for the 2008 Olympic Games, suggesting that the SO2 pollution control has long-term effectiveness and benefits. In the post-Olympics period, the mean concentrations of SO2 at CMA, GCH, and SDZ are (14.3 +/- 11.0) ppb, (12.1 +/- 7.7) ppb, and (7.5 +/- 4.0) ppb, respectively, with reductions of 26%, 36%, and 13%, respectively, compared to the levels before. Detailed analysis shows that the differences of temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, and wind direction were not the dominant factors for the significant differences of SO2 between the pre-Olympics and

  10. [Analysis of Single Particle Aging and Mixing State at an Agriculture Site (Quzhou) in the North China Plain in Summer Using a Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Huang, Zi-long; Zeng, Li-mm; Dong, I-Iua-Bin; Li, Mei; Zhu, Tong

    2016-04-15

    To characterize the size distribution and chemical ompsitins f abiet prtices t a agicuturesit intheNorh o Chinese Plain, a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS) was deployed from June 30 to July 8, 2013. A total of 230,152 particles in the size range of 0.2-2.0 pm were chemically analyzed with both positive and negative ion spectra. The results revealed that aerosol could he classified into eight dominant groups, including elemental carbon (EC, 55.5%), organic carbon (OC, 10.7%), alkalis (Na-K, 17.4%), other metals (1.7%), Fe-rich (6.3%), Pb-rich (3.1%), dust (4.8%), and other (0.8%). The observed eight types of particles contained secondary components such as 46NO2-, 62NO3-, 96SO3-, 96SO4-, 97HSO4-, showing that they probably went through different aging processes. The analysis of particle size distribution showed that 700-800 nm was the peak value of all particles, and that dust and Fe particles were mainly in the coarse size range. EC particles subtype group research revealed EC particles tended to be aging with the above mentioned secondary ions and eventually led to a particle type conversion from EC to the less aging ECN and the more serious aging ECS, the diurnal variation of which was obviously negatively correlated, and there was a possibility of forming OC/EC mixture with the adsorption of secondary organic matter on EC surface.

  11. [Analysis of Single Particle Aging and Mixing State at an Agriculture Site (Quzhou) in the North China Plain in Summer Using a Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Huang, Zi-long; Zeng, Li-mm; Dong, I-Iua-Bin; Li, Mei; Zhu, Tong

    2016-04-15

    To characterize the size distribution and chemical ompsitins f abiet prtices t a agicuturesit intheNorh o Chinese Plain, a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS) was deployed from June 30 to July 8, 2013. A total of 230,152 particles in the size range of 0.2-2.0 pm were chemically analyzed with both positive and negative ion spectra. The results revealed that aerosol could he classified into eight dominant groups, including elemental carbon (EC, 55.5%), organic carbon (OC, 10.7%), alkalis (Na-K, 17.4%), other metals (1.7%), Fe-rich (6.3%), Pb-rich (3.1%), dust (4.8%), and other (0.8%). The observed eight types of particles contained secondary components such as 46NO2-, 62NO3-, 96SO3-, 96SO4-, 97HSO4-, showing that they probably went through different aging processes. The analysis of particle size distribution showed that 700-800 nm was the peak value of all particles, and that dust and Fe particles were mainly in the coarse size range. EC particles subtype group research revealed EC particles tended to be aging with the above mentioned secondary ions and eventually led to a particle type conversion from EC to the less aging ECN and the more serious aging ECS, the diurnal variation of which was obviously negatively correlated, and there was a possibility of forming OC/EC mixture with the adsorption of secondary organic matter on EC surface. PMID:27548937

  12. Hydrogeologic framework, hydrology, and refined conceptual model of groundwater flow for Coastal Plain aquifers at the Standard Chlorine of Delaware, Inc. Superfund Site, New Castle County, Delaware, 2005-12

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brayton, Michael J.; Cruz, Roberto M.; Myers, Luke; Degnan, James R.; Raffensperger, Jeff P.

    2015-01-01

    The regional hydrogeologic framework indicates that the site is underlain by Coastal Plain sediments of the Columbia, Merchantville, and Potomac Formations. Two primary aquifers underlying the site, the Columbia and the upper Potomac, are separated by the Merchantville Formation confining unit. Local groundwater flow in the surficial (Columbia) aquifer is controlled by topography and generally flows northward and discharges to nearby surface water. Regional flow within the Potomac aquifer is towards the southeast, and is strongly influenced by major water withdrawals locally. Previous investigations at the site indicated that contaminants, primarily benzene and chlorinated benzene compounds, were present in the Columbia aquifer in most locations; however, there were only limited detections in the upper Potomac aquifer as of 2004. From 2005 through 2012, the USGS designed a monitoring network, assisted with exploratory drilling, collected data at monitoring wells, conducted geophysical surveys, evaluated water-level responses in wells during pumping of a production well, and evaluated major aquifer withdrawals. Data collected through these efforts were used to refine the local conceptual flow system. The refined conceptual flow system for the site includes: (a) identification of gaps in confining units in the study area, (b) identification and correlation of multiple water-bearing sand intervals within the upper Potomac Formation, (c) connections between groundwater and surface water, (d) connections between shallow and deeper groundwater, (e) new water-level (or potentiometric surface) maps and inferred flow directions, and (f) identification of major local pumping well influences. The implications of the revised conceptual flow system on the occurrence and movement of site contaminants are that the resulting detection of contaminants in the upper Potomac aquifer at specific well locations can be attributed primarily to either advective lateral transport, direct

  13. Effectiveness of a physical barrier for contaminant control in an unconfined coastal plain aquifer: the case study of the former industrial site of Bagnoli (Naples, southern Italy).

    PubMed

    Arienzo, Michele; Allocca, Vincenzo; Manna, Ferdinando; Trifuoggi, Marco; Ferrara, Luciano

    2015-12-01

    A vertical engineered barrier (VEB) coupled with a water treatment plant was surveyed in the framework of a vast remedial action at the brownfield site of the former ILVA of Bagnoli steel making facility located in western Naples, Italy. The VEB was put in place to minimize contaminant migration from the brownfield site toward the sea at the shorelines sites of Bagnoli and Coroglio. The efficiency of the VEB was monitored through 12 piezometers, 8 at the Bagnoli shoreline and 4 at the Coroglio shoreline. Concentrations of inorganic and organic pollutants were examined in upstream and downstream groundwater relative to the VEB. The mean levels of Al, As, Fe, and Mn largely exceeded the legal limits, 10-15-fold, whereas that of Hg was up to 3-fold the rules. The VEB decreased the outlet concentrations only at certain specific location of the barrier, four times for Al, 6-fold for Hg, and by 20% for Mn with means largely exceeding the rules. At the other sites, the downstream water showed marked increases of the pollutants up to 3-fold. Outstanding levels of the hydrocarbons > 12 were detected in the inlet water with means of some hundred times the limits at both sites. Likewise most of screened inorganic pollutants, the downstream water showed marked increases of the hydrocarbons up to ~113%. The treatment plant was very effective, with removal efficiencies >80% for As, Al, Fe, and Mn. The study evidenced the need to put alternative groundwater remedial actions.

  14. Effectiveness of a physical barrier for contaminant control in an unconfined coastal plain aquifer: the case study of the former industrial site of Bagnoli (Naples, southern Italy).

    PubMed

    Arienzo, Michele; Allocca, Vincenzo; Manna, Ferdinando; Trifuoggi, Marco; Ferrara, Luciano

    2015-12-01

    A vertical engineered barrier (VEB) coupled with a water treatment plant was surveyed in the framework of a vast remedial action at the brownfield site of the former ILVA of Bagnoli steel making facility located in western Naples, Italy. The VEB was put in place to minimize contaminant migration from the brownfield site toward the sea at the shorelines sites of Bagnoli and Coroglio. The efficiency of the VEB was monitored through 12 piezometers, 8 at the Bagnoli shoreline and 4 at the Coroglio shoreline. Concentrations of inorganic and organic pollutants were examined in upstream and downstream groundwater relative to the VEB. The mean levels of Al, As, Fe, and Mn largely exceeded the legal limits, 10-15-fold, whereas that of Hg was up to 3-fold the rules. The VEB decreased the outlet concentrations only at certain specific location of the barrier, four times for Al, 6-fold for Hg, and by 20% for Mn with means largely exceeding the rules. At the other sites, the downstream water showed marked increases of the pollutants up to 3-fold. Outstanding levels of the hydrocarbons > 12 were detected in the inlet water with means of some hundred times the limits at both sites. Likewise most of screened inorganic pollutants, the downstream water showed marked increases of the hydrocarbons up to ~113%. The treatment plant was very effective, with removal efficiencies >80% for As, Al, Fe, and Mn. The study evidenced the need to put alternative groundwater remedial actions. PMID:26581607

  15. Guide for selecting Manning's roughness coefficients for natural channels and flood plains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arcement, George J.; Schneider, Verne R.

    1989-01-01

    Although much research has been done on Manning's roughness coefficient, n, for stream channels, very little has been done concerning the roughness values for densely vegetated flood plains. The n value is determined from the values of the factors that affect the roughness of channels and flood plains. In densely vegetated flood plains, the major roughness is caused by trees, vines, and brush. The n value for this type of flood plain can be determined by measuring the vegetation density of the flood plain. Photographs of flood-plain segments where n values have been verified can be used as a comparison standard to aid in assigning n values to similar flood plains.

  16. Widespread Plains Volcanism on Mercury Ended by 3.6 Ga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, P. K.; Ostrach, L. R.; Fassett, C.; Chapman, C. R.; Evans, A. J.; Klimczak, C.; Banks, M. E.; Head, J. W., III; Solomon, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    The largest volcanic plains deposits on Mercury are situated in its northern hemisphere and include the extensive northern smooth plains and the Caloris interior plains. Crater size-frequency analyses have shown that both deposits were emplaced around 3.8 Ga, for any of the published model production function (MPF) chronologies for impact crater formation on Mercury. The largest volcanic deposit in the southern hemisphere, the Rembrandt interior plains, has a model age of ~3.7 Ga. To test the hypothesis that all major volcanic smooth plains on Mercury were emplaced at about the same time, we determined crater size-frequency distributions for nine additional deposits (see Table 1). The diameters of craters that superpose the smooth plains at each site were measured with CraterTools, yielding crater areal densities in terms of N(10), the number of craters ≥10 km in diameter per 106 km2 area (Table 1). Our crater density measurements span N(10) values of 29-146, a range that encompasses corresponding values for the larger areas of smooth plains. With CraterStats, we fit our data (for craters ≥4 km in diameter) to the MPF chronologies of Le Feuvre and Wieczorek. For porous scaling, the model ages of all nine sites span a narrow window (Table 1). Non-porous scaling fails to match the crater size-frequency distributions. We show that widespread plains volcanism, likely the primary process by which Mercury's crust developed, had ended by 3.6 Ga. Younger volcanic deposits have been identified on the planet, but only within impact structures and at volumes much less than the smallest deposit considered here. Superposition relations between shortening landforms and craters on Mercury indicate that global contraction in response to interior cooling was underway by ~3.6 Ga. The cessation of widespread plains volcanism on Mercury may therefore reflect the onset of a stress state within the planet's lithosphere that inhibited magma ascent. Conversely, mantle thermochemical

  17. Billing in Plain English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Sarah Jane

    1987-01-01

    The author describes the efforts of the Federal Trade Commission to make credit communications more readable and informative. The group working on the project uses "plain English" as the writing model for forms and manuals. (CH)

  18. MEASURING BASE-FLOW CHEMISTRY AS AN INDICATOR OF REGIONAL GROUND-WATER QUALITY IN THE MID-ATLANTIC COASTAL PLAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Water quality in headwater (first-order) streams of the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain during base flow in the winter and spring is related to land use, hydrogeology, and other natural and human influences. A random survey of water quality in 174 headwater streams in the Mid-Atlantic...

  19. Diagnosing causes of cloud parameterization deficiencies using ARM measurements over SGP site

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, W.; Liu, Y.; Betts, A. K.

    2010-03-15

    Decade-long continuous surface-based measurements at Great Southern Plains (SGP) collected by the US Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility are first used to evaluate the three major reanalyses (i.e., ERA-Interim, NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis I and NCEP/DOE Reanalysis II) to identify model biases in simulating surface shortwave cloud forcing and total cloud fraction. The results show large systematic lower biases in the modeled surface shortwave cloud forcing and cloud fraction from all the three reanalysis datasets. Then we focus on diagnosing the causes of these model biases using the Active Remote Sensing of Clouds (ARSCL) products (e.g., vertical distribution of cloud fraction, cloud-base and cloud-top heights, and cloud optical depth) and meteorological measurements (temperature, humidity and stability). Efforts are made to couple cloud properties with boundary processes in the diagnosis.

  20. Amplitude measurements in ambient noise correlations -- application to attenuation and site response measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowden, D. C.; Tsai, V. C.; Lin, F.

    2013-12-01

    Traditional ambient noise cross correlations between seismic stations have proven to be an effective means of extracting travel time information of surface waves. However, while the raw noise data is usually processed in a way which suppresses large amplitude earthquake events, it also distorts all relative amplitude information. Such information is the key to accurately retrieving attenuation and local site response measurements. Previous work using earthquake sources to track wave front propagation across the U.S. Array has been used to distinguish between effects on amplitude variation. Applying a similar approach to ambient noise studies offers potentially increased flexibility in such studies. We attempt a varied application of the methods which should preserve relative amplitudes in the Noise Correlation Function (NCF) across a given day or hour. Considering each station as a virtual source, a large number of travel time and relative amplitude maps can be constructed. By applying spatial differential operators to these maps, we track the effect of phase-front focusing and defocusing. By comparing amplitude variation for waves propagating in opposite directions, we attempt to independently infer the effects of seismic intrinsic attenuation and local site response. We have applied the approach on two datasets of vastly different scale. A dense array of single-component, broadband seismometers in Long Beach, CA (>4000 in an area around 100 sq-km) allows us to explore the higher frequency end of these measurements, up to 4Hz. In contrast, data collected over 4 years from the U.S. Array provide continental scale application, with useful periods of 8-30 seconds and depth sensitivities down to the uppermost mantle. We compare our results with previous studies based on earthquakes.

  1. Active Layer and Moisture Measurements for Intensive Site 0 and 1, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer

    John Peterson

    2015-04-17

    These are measurements of Active Layer Thickness collected along several lines beginning in September, 2011 to the present. The data were collected at several time periods along the Site0 L2 Line, the Site1 AB Line, and an ERT Monitoring Line near Area A in Site1.

  2. Nest sites and conservation of endangered Interior Least Terns Sterna antillarum athalassos on an alkaline flat in the south-central Great Plains (USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winton, Brian R.; Leslie, David M.

    2003-01-01

    We monitored nest sites of endangered Interior Least Terns on a 5 095 ha alkaline flat in north-central Oklahoma, USA. After nest loss, Least Terns commonly renested and experienced 30% apparent nest success in 1995-1996 (n = 233 nests). Nest success and predation differed by location on the alkaline flat in 1995 and overall, but nest success and flooding did not differ by microhabitat type. Predation was highest at nests ??? 5 cm from debris (driftwood/hay) in 1995. No differences in nesting success, flooding, or predation were observed on comparing nests inside and outside electrified enclosures. Coyotes and Striped Skunks were confirmed nest predators, and Ring-billed Gulls were suspected nest predators. We identified one location on the alkaline flat of about 1 000 ha with consistently lower nest losses attributable to flooding and predation and the highest hatching success compared with other parts of the alkaline flat; it was typified by open ground and bisected by several creeks. Management activities that minimize flooding and predation in this area could further enhance nest success and theoretically increase overall productivity of this population of Least Terns. However, the efficacy of electrified enclosures and nest-site enhancements, as currently undertaken, is questionable because of considerable annual variation in use by and protection of Least Terns.

  3. The Great Plains low-level jet (LLJ) during the atmospheric radiation measurement (ARM) intensive observation period (IOP)-4 and simulations of land use pattern effect on the LLJ

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Raman, S.

    1996-04-01

    The Great Plains low-level jet (LLJ) is an important element of the low-level atmospheric circulation. It transports water vapor from the Gulf of Mexico, which in turn affects the development of weather over the Great Plains of the central United States. The LLJ is generally recognized as a complex response of the atmospheric boundary layer to the diurnal cycle of thermal forcing. Early studies have attributed the Great Plains LLJ to the diurnal oscillations of frictional effect, buoyancy over sloping terrain, and the blocking effects of the Rocky Mountains. Recent investigations show that the speed of the LLJ is also affected by the soil type and soil moisture. Some studies also suggest that synoptic patterns may play an important role in the development of the LLJ. Land surface heterogeneties significantly affect mesoscale circulations by generating strong contrasts in surface thermal fluxes. Thus one would expect that the land use pattern should have effects on the LLJ`s development and structure. In this study, we try to determine the relative roles of the synoptic forcing, planetary boundary layers (PBL) processes, and the land use pattern in the formation of the LLJ using the observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Intensive Operation Period (IOP)-4 and numerical sensitivity tests.

  4. Savannah River Site Experiences in In Situ Field Measurements of Radioactive Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, F.S.

    1999-10-07

    This paper discusses some of the field gamma-ray measurements made at the Savannah River Site, the equipment used for the measurements, and lessons learned during in situ identification and characterization of radioactive materials.

  5. Backwater at bridges and densely wooded flood plains, Tallahala Creek at Waldrup, Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colson, B.E.; Ming, C.O.; Arcement, George J.

    1978-01-01

    Floodflow data that will provide a base for evaluating digital models relating to open-channel flow were obtained at 22 sites on streams in Alabama, Louisiana, and Mississippi. Thirty-five floods were measured. Analysis of the data indicated that backwater and discharges computed by standard indirect methods currently in use would be inaccurate where densely vegetated flood plains are crossed by highway embankments and single-opening bridges. This atlas presents flood information at the site on Tallahala Creek at Waldrup, Miss. Water depths, velocities, and discharges through bridge openings on Tallahala Creek at Waldrup, Miss., for floods of April 14, 1969, February 21, 1971, and April 13, 1974, were measured together with peak water surface elevations along embankments and along cross sections. Manning 's roughness coefficient values in different parts of the flood plain are shown on maps, and flood-frequency relations are shown on graphs. (Woodard-USGS)

  6. Result of storage term measurements at a sandy grassland site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pintér, Krisztina; Barcza, Zoltán; Balogh, János; Nagy, Zoltán

    2015-04-01

    Eddy covariance (EC) technique is common technique to investigate fluxes over ecosystems. In the past 20 years the focus was on the carbon dioxide (CO2) budget of ecosystems measured as net ecosystem exchange (NEE). Night underestimation of fluxes is a frequent problem, addressed by several EC studies. When the turbulence is low the accumulation of CO2 close to the ground can be significant, so the storage term (rate of change of storage, RCS) has to be taken into account. In the case of tall vegetation storage measurements are routinely done, but in the case of short vegetation it is often neglected based on the assumption that its positive values after sunset and negative values at dawn extinguish each other when calculating daily and yearly sums. The EC system at the sandy grassland (Bugacpuszta, Hungary) was complemented by a 5-level (0.2, 0.5, 1, 2 and 4m) concentration profile measuring system and the storage term was calculated from the profile at half-hourly intervals. RCS was also calculated using only the concentration measurements of the EC system assuming linear concentration profile between the surface and the level of the measurement (linear approach). When comparing the uncorrected and the corrected (profile method) half-hourly fluxes storage correction did not affect the daytime NEE values (slope=1.0084, const=-0.0053, R2=0.9922) and had only a minor effect on the measured Reco values (slope=0.9577, const=0.0066, R2=0.9173). Yearly sums were calculated for the first whole year (August, 2013 - July, 2014) of the concentration profile measurement. Application of the linear approach storage correction enhanced the sink (more negative NEE) by 12 gC m-2 year-1 as compared to the uncorrected yearly sum. On the other hand, the use of storage terms calculated from the concentration profile measurements increased the sink activity by 54 gC m-2 year-1. Considering this more than 4 fold difference, concentration profiling should also be considered in case of

  7. Radiation measurements over a snowfield at an elevated site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korff, H. C.; Gailiun, J. J.; Vonderhaar, T. H.

    1974-01-01

    The components of short wave radiation were measured over a snowfield in a valley of the Rocky Mountains at a height of 2700 m above sea level. Global and reflected radiation were obtained by a set of Eppley pyranometers. In addition, the direct solar radiation and the turbidity of the atmosphere were derived from pyrheliometric data on cloud-free days. Emphasis was given to the reflectance of the snowfield in relation to the position of the sun, especially at low elevation angles. These reflectance values were measured for cloudless as well as for cloudy days and compared with already published values for arctic and antarctic conditions.

  8. Aspects of the quality of data from the Southern Great Plains (SGP) cloud and radiation testbed (CART) site broadband radiation sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Splitt, M.E.; Wesely, M.L.

    1996-04-01

    A systmatic evaluation of the performance of broadband radiometers at the Radiation Testbed (CART) site is needed to estimate the uncertainties of the irradiance observations. Here, net radiation observed with the net radiometer in the enrgy balance Bowen ratio station at the Central facility is compared with the net radiation computed as the sum of component irradiances recorded by nearby pyranameters and pyrgeometers. In addition, data obtained from the central facility pyranometers, pyrgeometers, and pyrheliometers are examined for April 1994, when intensive operations periods were being carried out. The data used in this study are from central facility radiometers in a solar and infrared observation station, and EBBR station, the so-called `BSRN` set of upward pointing radiometers, and a set of radiometers pointed down at the 25-m level of a 60-m tower.

  9. Iridoid glycoside content ofEuphydryas anicia (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae) and its major hostplant,Besseya plantaginea (Scrophulariaceae), at a high plains colorado site.

    PubMed

    L'empereur, K M; Stermitz, F R

    1990-01-01

    The checkerspot butterfly,Euphydryas anicia, utilizes mainlyBesseya plantaginea and only occasionallyCastilleja integra as a larval hostplant at Michigan Hill, a few kilometers from a site whereC. integra is used by over 90% of the butterflies. TheB. plantaginea leaves that are consumed contain 9-22% iridoid glycosides, composed mainly of catalpol and catalpol esters, while larvae from the same plants contain 6-18% iridoids, mainly catalpol and no esters. Field-collected adult butterflies contain 0.5-4.3% iridoids. Laboratory-reared adults secrete iridoids in the meconium upon eclosion and retain similar amounts. The adult and meconium iridoid content is considerably lower than in the larvae, and metabolism in the pupal stage may be occurring.

  10. Surface refractivity measurements at NASA spacecraft tracking sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, P. E.

    1972-01-01

    High-accuracy spacecraft tracking requires tropospheric modeling which is generally scaled by either estimated or measured values of surface refractivity. This report summarizes the results of a worldwide surface-refractivity test conducted in 1968 in support of the Apollo program. The results are directly applicable to all NASA radio-tracking systems.

  11. Measuring enjoyable informal learning using augmented reality at cultural heritage site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendit, Ulka Chandini; Zaibon, Syamsul Bahrin; Bakar, Juliana Aida Abu

    2016-08-01

    The instrument of evaluation of measuring enjoyable informal learning at cultural heritage site was produced by validity and reliability analysis. It involved two cycles of steps, content validity and face validity and content validity and reliability analysis. From the analysis, it was found out that the instrument is reliable to be measure enjoyable informal learning at cultural heritage site.

  12. Southern Great Plains Newsletter

    SciTech Connect

    J. Prell L. R. Roeder

    2010-09-01

    This months issue contains the following articles: (1) Scientists convene at SGP site for complex convective cloud experiment; (2) VORTEX2 spins down; (3) Sunphotometer supports SPARTICUS (a Sun and Aureole Measurement imaging sunphotometer) campaign and satellite validation studies; and (4) Ceilometer represents first deployment of new ground-based instruments from Recovery Act.

  13. Judging the fitness of on-site measurements by their uncertainty, including the contribution from sampling.

    PubMed

    Boon, Katy A; Ramsey, Michael H

    2012-03-01

    Chemical measurements made on-site can be very effective in underpinning environmental decisions, but they are often mistrusted in favour of measurements made on samples removed off-site to a remote, usually accredited, laboratory. The uncertainty present in all measurements, wherever they are made, includes contributions from the sampling and sample preparation processes, and also from often unsuspected systematic errors. Once this total uncertainty has been estimated in a rigorous way under statistical control for each investigation, it is demonstrated using two case studies that on-site measurements can be fit for decision-making purposes. Uncertainty from sampling and sample preparation often dominates many measurement systems, whether they are based on-site or off-site, and makes the analytical contribution less critical for judging fitness. The value of this total uncertainty can be used to make a probabilistic, rather than deterministic, classification of the contamination. Uncertainty values can also be used to calculate how the measurement method can be modified to achieve an optimal value that it fit-for-purpose (e.g. using composite samples or measurements). The rapid availability of on-site measurements, together with known uncertainty, is shown to be capable of enabling equal reliability of decisions to the off-site approach, whilst minimising the cost of the decision making process. Challenges in estimating the uncertainty of on-site measurements are identified as (i) potential ambiguity in the true value that is being estimated (i.e. the measurand), and (ii) the fact that off-site lab measurements can have values of analytical precision that are larger than those quoted by the lab (e.g. 54% rather than 30% for TPH, at 95% confidence) and which make their use in the validation of on-site measurements problematic.

  14. Trace metal enrichment in agricultural soils of Jianghan Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, R.; Ying, S.; Daniel, J. N.; Bu, J.; Gan, Y.; Wang, Y.; Schaefer, M.; Fendorf, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    Coal consumption in China is increasing annually due to constantly rising energy demand. As a result, a massive amount of coal combustion byproducts, particularly in the form of fly ash, are expelled from power plants and distributed through atmospheric transport. The fly ash is eventually deposited on to land, potentially contaminating agricultural soils. Coal fly ash contains high concentration of a suite of toxic trace metals including lead, chromium, and arsenic. In this study, we surveyed the concentration of trace metals in agricultural soils at 131 sites within a 20 km radius of Yangluo Power Plant, a 2400 MW plant within the highly populated Jianghan Plain of Central China. Using X-ray fluorecence (XRF) spectrometry, the total concentration of trace metals in homogenized surface and subsurface soil samples were measured to calculate the corresponding enrichment factor at each site. Our initial findings demonstrate that Pb is enriched in a majority of sites, independent of land use, whereas As and Cr are generally not enriched in this region. Further studies using Pb isotopes as a source-tracing tool will help determine the Pb pollution's origin. Ultimately, the results of this study may inform whether crops grown within the Jianghan Plain have the potential of being contaminated by metals emitted from coal power plants.

  15. Protection measures against mine subsidence taken at a building site

    SciTech Connect

    Marino, G.G.; Abdel-Maksoud, M.G.

    2006-03-15

    With little mining information, old abandoned coal workings were grouted beneath a proposed building site. Mine stabilization was found necessary after an investigation of subsidence potential was performed. The investigation indicated that the 67 m deep abandoned mine, although old, still had not collapsed and consequently presented a significant risk of subsidence in the future. Further, based on the history of subsidence over old mines in the area, mine grouting was recommended. To stabilize the mine, about 11,468 m{sup 3} of grout were pumped. The grouting was designed to account for the significant amount of rubble which existed in the mine. There were three grout mixes of different flowability characteristics specified. The 1,725 kPa grout was hatched at a slump of 10 and 20-22 cm and at a flow rate of 30-40 s. Permeation, squeeze (or intrusion), and compaction grouting was performed per the project specifications. Also, to economize on the amount of grouting necessary, subsidence resistant features were incorporated into the design of the building.

  16. Recent Solar Measurements Results at the Parabolic Dish Test Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    After the Mexican volcanic eruptions of March 28, April 3 and 4, 1982, the question of its effect on insolation levels at the Parabolic Dish Test Site (PDTS) naturally arose. Clearly, the answer to the original question is that the Mexican volcanic explosion had a significant impact on energy and insolation levels at the PDTS and, furthermore, it has been quite long lasting. The first really significant decrease in energy and insolation levels occurred in June 1982 when the energy level decreased by 19.7% while the peak insolation levels went down by 4.0%. June of 1982 was also the first month (of 13 consecutive months) when peak insolation levels did not equal or exceed 1,000 W/sq m. Signs of a recovery from the effects of the volcanic explosion began to appear in May of 1983, when the energy level exceeded that of May 1981 as well as May 1982. It would appear that energy and insolation levels are improving at the PDTS, but have not quite reached normal or pre-volcanic levels. At this time the data would seem to suggest a return to normal energy and insolation levels will occur in the very near future.

  17. Near-wall vorticity measurements at the SLTST site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foss, John; Treat, Scott; Neal, Douglas

    2003-11-01

    Two, four-sensor, vorticity probes were positioned at 15cm above the playa (desert floor) at the STLTEST [1] site (13 June 2003). Portions of the 3-hour record exhibit neutral stability conditions. The recently developed (Hicks, et al. [2]) 100kHz Pulse Width Modulated-Constant Temperature Anemometer was sampled at 50kHz to ensure the complete resolution of the smallest scales of motion. ω _z(t) and ω _y(t) data, derived using the processing algorithms described in Foss and Hicks [3], will be interrogated for insight into the balance: partial u'v'/partial y = v'ω z w'ω _y+ as well as various turbulence properties. ONR support (N00014-00-1-0753), R. Joslin, Program Director, through a subcontract from the Univ. of Utah, is gratefully acknowledged for these experiments. [1] J.C. Klewicki and M.M. Metzger, "Studies of high Reynolds number turbulence in the atmospheric surface layer over the salt playa of western Utah," in A.J. Smits, ed. IUTAM Symposium on Reynolds Number Scaling in Turbulent Flow, Kluwer, Princeton, NJ, 2002. [2] J.F. Foss and Hicks, T.J., "Processing Time Series Data (Velocity, Shear Stress) from the Pulse Width Modulated-Constant Temperature Anemometer (PWM-CTA)", 19th International Congress on Instrumentation in Aerospace Simulations Facilities, IEEE, pp. 448-453 (2001). [3] Hicks, T.J., J.K. Schwannecke, M.J. Norconk, A.M. Hellum and J.F. Foss, "The Evolved 100kHz PWM-CTA", ICIASF'03, Göttengen, Germany, 2003.

  18. Late Eocene to middle Miocene (33 to 13 million years ago) vegetation and climate development on the North American Atlantic Coastal Plain (IODP Expedition 313, Site M0027)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotthoff, U.; Greenwood, D. R.; McCarthy, F. M. G.; Müller-Navarra, K.; Prader, S.; Hesselbo, S. P.

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the palynology of sediment cores from Site M0027 of IODP (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program) Expedition 313 on the New Jersey shallow shelf to examine vegetation and climate dynamics on the east coast of North America between 33 and 13 million years ago and to assess the impact of over-regional climate events on the region. Palynological results are complemented with pollen-based quantitative climate reconstructions. Our results indicate that the hinterland vegetation of the New Jersey shelf was characterized by oak-hickory forests in the lowlands and conifer-dominated vegetation in the highlands from the early Oligocene to the middle Miocene. The Oligocene witnessed several expansions of conifer forest, probably related to cooling events. The pollen-based climate data imply an increase in annual temperatures from ∼11.5 °C to more than 16 °C during the Oligocene. The Mi-1 cooling event at the onset of the Miocene is reflected by an expansion of conifers and mean annual temperature decrease of ∼4 °C, from ∼16 °C to ∼12 °C around 23 million years before present. Relatively low annual temperatures are also recorded for several samples during an interval around ∼20 million years before present, which may reflect the Mi-1a and the Mi-1aa cooling events. Generally, the Miocene ecosystem and climate conditions were very similar to those of the Oligocene. Miocene grasslands, as known from other areas in the USA during that time period, are not evident for the hinterland of the New Jersey shelf, possibly reflecting moisture from the proto-Gulf Stream. The palaeovegetation data reveal stable conditions during the mid-Miocene climatic optimum at ∼15 million years before present, with only a minor increase in deciduous-evergreen mixed forest taxa and a decrease in swamp forest taxa. Pollen-based annual temperature reconstructions show average annual temperatures of ∼14 °C during the mid-Miocene climatic optimum, ∼2

  19. A case study of the Great Plains low-level jet using wind profiler network data and a high resolution mesoscale model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, S.; Fast, J.D.; Bian, X.; Stage, S.

    1996-04-01

    The Great Plains low-level jet (LLJ) has important effects on the life cycle of clouds and on radiative and surface heat and moisture fluxes at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site. This diurnal phenomenon governs the transport and convergence of low-level moisture into the region and often leads to the development of clouds and precipitation. A full understanding of the life cycle of clouds at the SGP CART site and their proper representation in single column and global climate models cannot be obtained without an improved understanding of this important phenomenon.

  20. Wind Shear Characteristics at Central Plains Tall Towers

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, M.; Elliott, D.

    2006-01-01

    The object of this study is to analyze wind shear characteristics at tall tower sites in the Central Plains of the United States. The hub heights of modern turbines used for wind farm projects are now 70 meters (m) to 100 m above ground and some advanced turbines under development for deployment during the second half of this decade are rated at 2-5 megawatts of energy generation with rotor diameters near 100 m and hub heights of 100-120 m. These advanced turbines will take advantage of the higher wind speeds aloft to generate more wind energy. Specific knowledge of important wind shear characteristics near and at turbine hub height is needed to optimize turbine design and wind farm layout. Unfortunately, wind speed shear measurements at heights of 80-120 m were virtually nonexistent a few years ago and are still quite uncommon today. The Central Plains is a prime wind energy development region and knowledge about the wind shear characteristics will reduce uncertainty about the resource and enhance wind farm design. Previous analyses of tall tower data (Schwartz and Elliott, 2005) concentrated on data from specific states. The wind energy community has recognized the need to fill the gap of direct wind speed measurements at levels 70 m and higher above the ground. Programs instituted during the last 5 years at the state level and supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) State Energy Program initiative have placed anemometers and vanes at several levels on existing tall (70 m+) communication towers. The Central Plains has a fairly high concentration of tall tower sites. The distribution of tall tower sites varies among the states in the Central Plains, because the tall tower program is new and the available state and federal funding to establish tall towers is variable. Our wind resource assessment group at DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has obtained much of these necessary measurement data from both individual state sources and regional

  1. Mountain-Plains Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mountain-Plains Education and Economic Development Program, Inc., Glasgow AFB, MT.

    The document lists the Mountain-Plains curriculum by job title (where applicable), including support courses. The curriculum areas covered are mathematics skills, communication skills, office education, lodging services, food services, marketing and distribution, welding support, automotive, small engines, career guidance, World of Work, health…

  2. Chemical composition of pre-monsoon air in the Indo-Gangetic Plain measured using a new air quality facility and PTR-MS: high surface ozone and strong influence of biomass burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, V.; Kumar, V.; Sarkar, C.

    2014-06-01

    One seventh of the world's population lives in the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) and the fertile region sustains agricultural food crop production for much of South Asia, yet it remains one of the most under-studied regions of the world in terms of atmospheric composition and chemistry. In particular, the emissions and chemistry of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that form surface ozone and secondary organic aerosol through photochemical reactions involving nitrogen oxides are not well understood. In this study, ambient levels of VOCs such as methanol, acetone, acetaldehyde, acetonitrile and isoprene were measured for the first time in the IGP. A new atmospheric chemistry facility that combines India's first high-sensitivity proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer, an ambient air quality station and a meteorological station, was used to quantify in situ levels of several VOCs and air pollutants in May 2012 at a suburban site in Mohali (northwest IGP). Westerly winds arriving at high wind speeds (5-20 m s-1) in the pre-monsoon season at the site were conducive for chemical characterization of regional emission signatures. Average levels of VOCs and air pollutants in May~2012 ranged from 1.2 to 2.7 nmol mol-1 for aromatic VOCs, 5.9 to 37.5 nmol mol-1 for the oxygenated VOCs, 1.4 nmol mol-1 for acetonitrile, 1.9 nmol mol-1 for isoprene, 567 nmol mol-1 for carbon monoxide, 57.8 nmol mol-1 for ozone, 11.5 nmol mol-1 for nitrogen oxides, 7.3 nmol mol-1 for sulfur dioxide, 104 μg m-3 for PM2.5 and 276 μg m-3 for PM10. By analyzing the one-minute in situ data with meteorological parameters and applying chemical tracers (e.g., acetonitrile for biomass burning) and inter-VOC correlations, we were able to constrain major emission source activities on both temporal and diel scales. Wheat residue burning caused massive increases (> 3 times the baseline values) for all the measured VOCs and primary pollutants. Other forms of biomass burning at night were also a significant

  3. The Productivity of Plain English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Commerce, Washington, DC.

    Focusing on a meeting held in January 1983, this pamphlet describes the Forum on the Productivity of Plain English, from which grew the permanent Plain English Forum, which is committed to spreading the message that plain English is good business. The pamphlet includes quotations from leaders in business and industry explaining why they feel that…

  4. Backwater at bridges and densely wooded flood plains, west fork Amite River near Liberty, Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colson, B.E.; Ming, C.O.; Arcement, George J.

    1979-01-01

    Floodflow data that will provide a base for evaluating digital models relating to open-channel flow were obtained at 22 sites on streams in Alabama, Louisiana, and Mississippi. Thirty-five floods were measured. Analysis of the data indicated methods currently in use would be inaccurate where densely vegetated flood plains are crossed by highway embankments and single-opening bridges. This atlas presents flood information at the site on West Fork Amite River near Liberty, MS. Water depths , velocities, and discharges through bridge openings on West Fork Amite River near Liberty, MS for floods of December 6, 1971 , and March 25, 1973, are shown, together with peak water-surface elevations along embankments and along cross sections. Manning 's roughness coefficient values in different parts of the flood plain are shown on maps, and flood-frequency relations are shown on a graph. (USGS).

  5. Backwater at bridges and densely wooded flood plains, Thompson Creek near Clara, Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colson, B.E.; Ming, C.O.; Arcement, George J.

    1979-01-01

    Floodflow data that will provide a base for evaluating digital models relating to open-channel flow were obtained at 22 sites on streams in Alabama, Louisiana, and Mississippi. Thirty-five floods were measured. Analysis of the data indicated methods currently in use would be inaccurate where densely vegetated flood plains are crossed by highway embankments and single-opening bridges. This atlas presents flood information at the site on Thompson Creek near Clara, MS: Water depths, velocities, and discharges through bridge openings on Thompson Creek near Clara, MS, for flood of March 3, 1971, are shown, together with peak water-surface elevations along embankments and along cross sections. Manning 's roughness coefficient values in different parts of the flood plain are shown on maps, and flood-frequency relations are shown on a graph. (USGS).

  6. Backwater at bridges and densely wooded flood plains, Yockanookany River near Thomastown, Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colson, B.E.; Ming, C.O.; Arcement, George J.

    1979-01-01

    Floodflow data that will provide a base for evaluating digital models relating to open-channel flow were obtained at 22 sites on streams in Alabama, Louisiana, and Mississippi. Thirty-five floods were measured. Analysis of the data indicated methods currently in use would be inaccurate where densely vegetated flood plains are crossed by highway embankments and single-opening bridges. This atlas presents flood information at the site on Yockanookany River near Thomastown, Miss. Water depths, velocities, and discharges through bridge openings on Yockanookany River near Thomastown, Miss., for floods of April 12, 1969, January 2, 1970, and March 15, 1975, are shown, together with peak water-surface elevations along embankments and along cross sections. Manning 's roughness coefficient values in different parts of the flood plain are shown on maps, and flood-frequency relations are shown on a graph. (Kosco-USGS)

  7. Properties of a 5500-year-old flood-plain in the Loup River Basin, Nebraska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, David W.

    2003-12-01

    Flood-plain aggradation within the Loup River Basin of central Nebraska was episodic and alternated with incision throughout much of the Holocene. A widespread episode of flood-plain stability, however, occurred about 5700-5100 cal. year BP. The purpose of this paper is to describe the properties of this buried flood-plain at six sites in the basin, to consider why the properties of the buried flood-plain vary from site to site, and to evaluate possible reasons why the Loup River flood-plains stabilized 5500 years ago. Episodic valley-bottom aggradation was common during flood-plain formation at five of the six sites. The radiocarbon ages, particle-size data, and organic-carbon data for the buried flood-plain reveal that valley-bottom aggradation generally slowed between about 5700 and 5100 cal. year BP. Erratic down-profile changes in percentages of sand, clay, and organic matter indicate flood-plain sedimentation and soil formation were often episodic. Sand and clay rarely show a steady fining-upward trend. Organic matter fluctuates with depth; at some sites multiple, incipient A horizons were buried during waning valley-bottom aggradation. At two localities, the buried flood-plain is evident as a clay-rich stratum that must have been deposited in a paleochannel. Flood-plain stabilization between 5700 and 5100 cal. year BP probably occurred in response to the effects of external climate forcing on vegetation and hydrologic changes. Flood-plains of other rivers in the central Great Plains also stabilized at this time, further supporting a climatic explanation for slowing of valley aggradation and formation of a flood-plain at this time. Recognition of buried flood-plains is important to both soil mapping in valleys and to the discovery of cultural resources in valleys.

  8. Occurrence and variability of mining-related lead and zinc in the Spring River flood plain and tributary flood plains, Cherokee County, Kansas, 2009--11

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Juracek, Kyle E.

    2013-01-01

    Historical mining activity in the Tri-State Mining District (TSMD), located in parts of southeast Kansas, southwest Missouri, and northeast Oklahoma, has resulted in a substantial ongoing input of cadmium, lead, and zinc to the environment. To provide some of the information needed to support remediation efforts in the Cherokee County, Kansas, superfund site, a 4-year study was begun in 2009 by the U.S. Geological Survey that was requested and funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. A combination of surficial-soil sampling and coring was used to investigate the occurrence and variability of mining-related lead and zinc in the flood plains of the Spring River and several tributaries within the superfund site. Lead- and zinc-contaminated flood plains are a concern, in part, because they represent a long-term source of contamination to the fluvial environment. Lead and zinc contamination was assessed with reference to probable-effect concentrations (PECs), which represent the concentrations above which adverse aquatic biological effects are likely to occur. The general PECs for lead and zinc were 128 and 459 milligrams per kilogram, respectively. The TSMD-specific PECs for lead and zinc were 150 and 2,083 milligrams per kilogram, respectively. Typically, surficial soils in the Spring River flood plain had lead and zinc concentrations that were less than the general PECs. Lead and zinc concentrations in the surficial-soil samples were variable with distance downstream and with distance from the Spring River channel, and the largest lead and zinc concentrations usually were located near the channel. Lead and zinc concentrations larger than the general or TSMD-specific PECs, or both, were infrequent at depth in the Spring River flood plain. When present, such contamination typically was confined to the upper 2 feet of the core and frequently was confined to the upper 6 inches. Tributaries with few or no lead- and zinc-mined areas in the basin—Brush Creek

  9. Analysis of a long-term measurement of air pollutants (2007-2011) in North China Plain (NCP); Impact of emission reduction during the Beijing Olympic Games.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ruiguang; Tang, Guiqian; Wang, Yuesi; Tie, Xuexi

    2016-09-01

    Five years measurements were used to evaluate the effect of emission controls on the changes of air pollutants in Beijing and its surroundings in the NCP during 2008 Olympic Games (2008OG). The major challenge of this study was to filter out the effect of variability of meteorological conditions, when compared the air pollutants during the game to non-game period. We used four-year (2007, 2009-2011) average as the Non-2008OG to smooth the temporal variability caused by meteorological parameters. To study the spatial variability and regional transport, 6 sites (urban, rural, a mega city, a heavy industrial city, and a remote site) were selected. The result showed that the annually meteorological variability was significantly reduced. Such as, in BJ the differences between 2008OG and 5-years averaged values were 2.7% for relative humidity and 0.6% for wind speed. As a result, the anomaly of air pollutants between 2008OG and Non-2008OG can largely attribute to the emission control. The comparison showed that the major pollutants (PM10, PM2.5, NO, NOx) at the 6 sites in 2008OG were consistently lowered. For example, PM2.5 in BJ decreased from 75 to 45 μg/m(3) (40% reduction). However, the emission controls had minor effect on O3 concentrations (1% reduction). In contrast, the O3 precursor (NOx) reduced from 19.7 to 13.2 ppb (33% reduction). The in-sensitivity between NOx and O3 suggested that the O3 formation was under VOCs control condition in NCP, showing that strong VOC emission control is needed in order to significantly reduce O3 concentration in the region.

  10. Analysis of a long-term measurement of air pollutants (2007-2011) in North China Plain (NCP); Impact of emission reduction during the Beijing Olympic Games.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ruiguang; Tang, Guiqian; Wang, Yuesi; Tie, Xuexi

    2016-09-01

    Five years measurements were used to evaluate the effect of emission controls on the changes of air pollutants in Beijing and its surroundings in the NCP during 2008 Olympic Games (2008OG). The major challenge of this study was to filter out the effect of variability of meteorological conditions, when compared the air pollutants during the game to non-game period. We used four-year (2007, 2009-2011) average as the Non-2008OG to smooth the temporal variability caused by meteorological parameters. To study the spatial variability and regional transport, 6 sites (urban, rural, a mega city, a heavy industrial city, and a remote site) were selected. The result showed that the annually meteorological variability was significantly reduced. Such as, in BJ the differences between 2008OG and 5-years averaged values were 2.7% for relative humidity and 0.6% for wind speed. As a result, the anomaly of air pollutants between 2008OG and Non-2008OG can largely attribute to the emission control. The comparison showed that the major pollutants (PM10, PM2.5, NO, NOx) at the 6 sites in 2008OG were consistently lowered. For example, PM2.5 in BJ decreased from 75 to 45 μg/m(3) (40% reduction). However, the emission controls had minor effect on O3 concentrations (1% reduction). In contrast, the O3 precursor (NOx) reduced from 19.7 to 13.2 ppb (33% reduction). The in-sensitivity between NOx and O3 suggested that the O3 formation was under VOCs control condition in NCP, showing that strong VOC emission control is needed in order to significantly reduce O3 concentration in the region. PMID:27355197

  11. Dating fluvial archives of the Riverine Plain, Southeastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Daniela; Cohen, Tim; Reinfelds, Ivars; Jacobs, Zenobia; Shulmeister, James

    2016-04-01

    The Riverine Plain of Southeastern Australia is characterized by a multiplicity of relict river channels. Compared to the modern drainage system the most prominent of those distinct features are defined by large bankfull channel widths, large meander wavelengths and coarse sediment loads. Such morphological differences provide evidence for regimes of higher discharge, stemming from significant changes in runoff volumes, flood-frequency regimes and sediment supply. An existing geochronology for some of these channels is based on multi-grain thermoluminescence (Murrumbidgee River; Page et al., 1996) or radio-carbon dating (Goulburn River; Bowler, 1978) and indicates enhanced fluvial activity between 30 to 13 ka. The absence of exact Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, 21 ± 3 ka) ages of the Murrumbidgee palaeochannels was interpreted to indicate decreased fluvial activity during the peak of the LGM but was not inferred for the nearby Goulburn River. Recent developments in optical dating, especially measurements of individual grains of quartz, allow for an examination of these previous findings. Key sites along the Murrumbidgee and Goulburn Rivers have been revisited and new sites of the adjacent Murray River have been investigated. A revised, high-resolution geochronology based on single-grain optically stimulated luminescence dating is used to examine the precise occurrence of those massive channels and their implications for the Southern Hemisphere LGM. References: Page, K., Nanson, G., Price, D. (1996). Chronology of Murrumbidgee River palaeochannels on the Riverine Plain, southeastern Australia. Journal of Quaternary Science 11(4): 311-326. Bowler, J. (1978). Quaternary Climate and Tectonics in the Evolution of the Riverine Plain, Southeastern Australia. In: Davies, J. & Williams, M. (Editors). Landform Evolution in Australia, Australian National University Press: Canberra. p. 70-112.

  12. Summertime Low-Level Jets over the Great Plains

    SciTech Connect

    Stensrud, D.J.

    1996-04-01

    The sky over the southern Great Plains Cloud and Atmospheric Radiation Testbed (CART) site of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program during the predawn and early morning hours often is partially obstructed by stratocumulus, stratus fractus, or cumulus fractus that are moving rapidly to the north, even through the surface winds are weak. This cloud movement is evidence of the low-level jet (LLJ), a wind speed maximum that occurs in the lowest few kilometers of the atmosphere. Owing to the wide spacing between upper-air sounding sites and the relatively infrequent sounding launches, LLJ evolution has been difficult to observe adequately, even though the effects of LLJs on moisture flux into North America are large. Model simulation of the LLJ is described.

  13. Dynamics of playa lakes in the Texas High Plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, C. C., Jr. (Principal Investigator)

    1972-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Three small playa lake basins on the southern High Plains, Texas, have been examined by geologists, pedologists, hydrologists, and botanists to establish ground truth for correlation with ERTS-1 imagery. Although the sites are recognizable, details of the three playa basins are too small, at present resolution, to be accurately determined by the available MSS imagery. However, a fourth study site, consisting of a dual playa complex approximately 5 miles long in a basin of 9 square miles, does resolve available imagery allowing accurate measurement of water fluctuations and water depth. Of the available MSS imagery, Band 5 is the most usable. Definition of Band 4 is less due to reduced tonal contrast. The greatest tonal contrast appears on Band 6 and Band 7 between dry land and water areas. Band 6 is particularly good for defining large water areas, Band 7 being best for small lake basins, and Band 5 for growing fields.

  14. 78 FR 76391 - Proposed Enhancements to the Motor Carrier Safety Measurement System (SMS) Public Web Site

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-17

    ...: Background On November 5, 2013 (78 FR 66420), FMCSA published a notice in the Federal Register requesting... System (SMS) Public Web Site AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), DOT. ACTION... Safety Measurement System (SMS) public Web site. On December 6, 2013, Advocates ] for Highway and...

  15. Source apportionment and risk assessment of PM1 bound trace metals collected during foggy and non-foggy episodes at a representative site in the Indo-Gangetic plain.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dharmendra Kumar; Gupta, Tarun

    2016-04-15

    The concentration, spatial distribution and source of 13-PM1 bound trace metals (Fe, Cu, Mn, Cr, Zn, Cd, Ni, K, Mg, Na, Ca, Pb and V) and adverse health effects of 5-PM1 bound trace metals (Mn, Zn, Ni, Cr and Cd) collected during foggy and non-foggy episodes are presented. Twenty-four samples from each period (foggy and non-foggy episodes) were collected from Kanpur, a typical densely populated city and the most polluted representative site in the Indo-Gangetic plain of India, and were analyzed for carcinogenic (Ni, Cr and Cd) and non-carcinogenic metals (Mn and Zn). The average mass concentration of PM1 during foggy and non-foggy episodes was found to be 160.16±37.70 and 132.87±27.97μg/m(3). Source identification via principle component analysis suggested that vehicular emission and anthropogenic, industrial and crustal dust were the dominant sources in this region. During both episodes the decreasing order of hazard quotient (Hq) for adult and children was as Mn>Cr>Cd>Ni>Zn. In a non-foggy episode the hazardous index (Hi) values of these 5 trace metals were found to be ~3.5 times higher than a foggy episode's exposed population, respectively. In a foggy episode, due to the exposure to total carcinogenic trace metals (Ni, Cr and Cd) present in the ambient air, 95% probability total incremental lifetime cancer risks (TIlcR) were ~687 cancer cases and ~402 cancer cases per million in the adult population and children population respectively. These cancer cases were ~1.6 times higher than a non-foggy episode's exposed population.

  16. A METHOD FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF SITE-SPECIFIC TAUTOMERIC AND ZWITTERIONIC MICROSPECIES EQUILIBRIUM CONSTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We describe a method for the individual measurement of simultaneously occurring, unimolecular, site-specific "microequilibrium" constants as in, for example, prototropic tautomerism and zwitterionic equilibria. Our method represents an elaboration of that of Nygren et al. (Anal. ...

  17. METHOD FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF SITE-SPECIFIC TAUTOMERIC AND ZWITTERIONIC MICROSPECIES EQUILIBRIUM CONSTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We describe a method for the individual measurement of simultaneously occurring, unimolecular, site-specific “microequilibrium” constants as in, for example, prototropic tautomerism and zwitterionic equilibria. Our method represents an elaboration of that of Nygren et al. (Anal. ...

  18. Spatial Variability of Surface Irradiance Measurements at the Manus ARM Site

    SciTech Connect

    Riihimaki, Laura D.; Long, Charles N.

    2014-05-16

    The location of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site on Manus island in Papua New Guinea was chosen because it is very close the coast, in a geographically at, near-sea level area of the island, minimizing the impact of local island effects on the meteorology of the measurements [Ackerman et al., 1999]. In this study, we confirm that the Manus site is in deed less impacted by the island meteorology than slightly inland by comparing over a year of broadband surface irradiance and ceilometer measurements and derived quantities at the standard Manus site and a second location 7 km away as part of the AMIE-Manus campaign. The two sites show statistically similar distributions of irradiance and other derived quantities for all wind directions except easterly winds, when the inland site is down wind from the standard Manus site. Under easterly wind conditions, which occur 17% of the time, there is a higher occurrence of cloudiness at the down wind site likely do to land heating and orographic effects. This increased cloudiness is caused by shallow, broken clouds often with bases around 700 m in altitude. While the central Manus site consistently measures a frequency of occurrence of low clouds (cloud base height less than 1200 m) about 25+4% regardless of wind direction, the AMIE site has higher frequencies of low clouds (38%) when winds are from the east. This increase in low, locally produced clouds causes an additional -20 W/m2 shortwave surface cloud radiative effect at the AMIE site in easterly conditions than in other meteorological conditions that exhibit better agreement between the two sites.

  19. Light Plains in the South-Pole Aitken Basin: Surface Ages and Mineralogical Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiessen, F.; Hiesinger, H.; van der Bogert, C. H.; Pasckert, J. H.; Robinson, M. S.

    2012-04-01

    We studied light plains in the north-eastern South-Pole Aitken basin to investigate their origin, ages, and mineralogical composition. Light plains, also known as the Cayley Formation, occur on the near- and farside of the Moon. Due to their smooth texture, lower crater densities, and occurrence as crater fills, they were thought to be of volcanic origin [e.g., 1]. However, Apollo 16 samples of light plains deposits were in fact highly brecciated rocks [2]. Therefore, the Imbrium and Orientale impacts were thought to have formed light plains because they reshaped the surface thousands of kilometers from their impact sites. Subsequent studies revealed varying surface ages of light plains [e.g., 3] and different mineralogical compositions, which are in some cases more highland-like and in others more mare-like. Hence, an origin solely from the Imbrium and/or Orientale impacts is unlikely. Thus, the question whether light plains formed due to large impacts or regional cratering, or through endogenic processes remains open. We performed crater size-frequency measurements [e.g., 4] on Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Wide Angle Camera images and obtained absolute model ages between 3.43 and 3.81 Ga. We observed neither a distinctive peak of light plains ages nor clustering of similar ages in any specific regions of the studied area. Due to the fact that the derived ages vary as much as 380 Ma, an origin by a single event seems unlikely. Moreover, some ages even post-date the Imbrium and Orientale impacts, and thus an origin related to those impacts is not likely. Examination of multispectral data from Clementine [5] shows that the Ti abundances vary between 0.2 and 3 wt % and Fe abundances between 12.5 and 19 wt %. We observed a regional difference in distribution: light plains units within the Apollo basin have lower Fe and Ti values and are more highland-like, whereas light plains outside the Apollo basin show higher Fe and Ti values and are more mare-like. Furthermore, M

  20. Estimating 1980 ground-water pumpage for irrigation on the High Plains in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heimes, F.J.; Luckey, R.R.

    1983-01-01

    Current ground-water use is required for the High Plains Regional Aquifer-System Analysis. In response to this need, a sampling approach was developed to estimate water pumped for irrigation on the High Plains during 1980. Pumpage was computed by combining application estimates with mapped irrigated-acreage information. Irrigation application (inches of water applied) was measured at 480 sites in 15 counties in the High Plains during the 1980 growing season. The relationship between calculated Blaney-Criddle irrigation demand and measured application was used to estimate application for unsampled areas of the High Plains. Application estimates multiplied by irrigated-acreate estimates, compiled from Landsat-satellite imagery, yielded the volume of ground water pumped for irrigation. The estimate of ground water pumped for irrigation in the High Plains during 1980 and 18,902,000 acre-feet for 13 ,715,000 irrigated areas. The sampled application data were evaluated for significant trends. The application was greater for crops requiring more water such as corn and hay and less for crops such as sorghum, grain, and cotton. The data showed greater application for flood-irrigated systems than for sprinkler-irrigation systems. Areas of the High Plains with thin saturated thickness tended to have a smaller average discharge per well, fewer irrigated acres per well, and a predominance of crops requiring less water crops. (USGS).

  1. Net Ecosystem Production (NEP) of the Great Plains, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howard, Daniel; Gilmanov, Tagir; Gu, Yingxin; Wylie, Bruce; Zhang, Li

    2012-01-01

    Flux tower networks, such as AmeriFlux and FLUXNET, consist of a growing number of eddy covariance flux tower sites that provide a synoptic record of the exchange of carbon, water, and energy between the ecosystem and atmosphere at various temporal frequencies. These towers also detect and measure certain site characteristics, such as wind, temperature, precipitation, humidity, atmospheric pressure, soil features, and phenological progressions. Efforts are continuous to combine flux tower network data with remote sensing data to upscale the conditions observed at specific sites to a regional and, ultimately, worldwide scale. Data-driven regression tree models have the ability to incorporate flux tower records and remote sensing data to quantify exchanges of carbon with the atmosphere (Wylie and others, 2007; Xiao and others, 2010; Zhang and others, 2010; Zhang and others, 2011). Previous study results demonstrated the dramatic effect weather has on NEP and revealed specific ecoregions and times acting as carbon sinks or sources. As of 2012, more than 100 site-years of flux tower measurements, represented by more than 50 individual cropland or grassland sites throughout the Great Plains and surrounding area, have been acquired, quality controlled, and partitioned into gross photosynthesis (Pg) and ecosystem Re using detailed light-response, soil temperature, and vapor pressure deficit (VPD) based analysis.

  2. Cracked Plain, Buried Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    4 September 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a cracked plain in western Utopia Planitia. The three circular crack patterns indicate the location of three buried meteor impact craters. These landforms are located near 41.9oN, 275.9oW. The image covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates this scene from the lower left.

  3. Recommended Procedures for Measuring Radon Fluxes from Disposal Sites of Residual Radioactive Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Young, J. A.; Thomas, V. W.; Jackson, P. O.

    1983-03-01

    This report recommends instrumentation and methods suitable for measuring radon fluxes emanating from covered disposal sites of residual radioactive materials such as uranium mill tailings. Problems of spatial and temporal variations in radon flux are discussed and the advantages and disadvantages of several instruments are examined. A year-long measurement program and a two month measurement methodology are then presented based on the inherent difficulties of measuring average radon flux over a cover using the recommended instrumentation.

  4. Ozone measurements in urban and semi-rural sites at Burgos (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tricio, V.; Viloria, R.; Minguito, A.

    2003-04-01

    During the last few years, relevant contributions to the study of the ozone measurements in urban sites the EU. Ozone measurements are not numerous in some parts of southern Europe. In Spain, ozone concentrations are usually measured in urban sites, but ozone in rural and semi-rural sites is not examined satisfactorily. With the objective of determining ozone, an automated ozone measuring station has been installed at the Villafría Airport (Burgos, Spain) during the first months of 2001; ground based continuous measurements of ozone., here we present ozone data collected at a single height. In this work, ozone data corresponding to measuring stations installed at urban sites are analysed. In this work, we present results obtained from concentrations data acquisition and comparisons between the values of ozone measurements in urban and semi-rural sites at Burgos (Spain) have been carried out. Also, the influence of some meteorological variables over ozone concentrations is analysed, and ozone episodes corresponding to 2001 and 2002 years are studied. Acknowledgements The partial financial support by the Junta de Castilla y León (project BU05/02) is gratefully acknowledged. We would also like to thank the Ayuntamiento de Burgos and particularly to Heliodoro Revenga for his cooperation, and also to the Junta de Castilla y León by the data from the regional network of pollution control.

  5. The advertised price of cigarette packs in retail outlets across Australia before and after the implementation of plain packaging: a repeated measures observational study

    PubMed Central

    Scollo, Michelle; Bayly, Megan; Wakefield, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study monitored the advertised price of the most prominently promoted and the cheapest single packs of cigarettes in Australian retail outlets before and after the implementation of plain packaging. Methods A panel of 421 outlets in four large Australian cities was visited monthly from May 2012 to August 2013 and the brand, pack size and price of the most-prominently listed and lowest-priced single cigarette pack were recorded from each store's tobacco price board. Changes in the inflation-adjusted stick price were examined using linear mixed models, controlling for fixed effects of city, store type, area socioeconomic status and random effects of time. The adjusted stick price was also examined over time by tobacco manufacturer and pack size. Results The inflation-adjusted stick price of the most-prominently advertised single packs was significantly higher than in May–July 2012 from August–October 2012 for mainstream and premium brands and from February–April 2013 for value brands. Adjusted average stick prices of lowest-priced packs in August 2013 were $0.02 (95% CI $0.02 to $0.03, p<0.001) higher than in May–July 2012 ($Aug13). A large real increase in stick price was seen in February–April 2013 across all major manufacturers, market segments and pack size categories. Discussion The price of cigarettes most prominently promoted on price boards did not decrease in the months following implementation of Australia's plain packaging legislation. Retail prices continued to increase above the level resulting from automatic indexation of excise/customs duty even at the lowest-priced end of the Australian market.

  6. Radiological verification survey results at the Pompton Plains Railroad Spur, Pequannock, New Jersey (PJ008V)

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, R.E.; Johnson, C.A.

    1995-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) conducted remedial action during 1993 at the Pompton Plains railroad spur and eight vicinity properties in the Wayne and Pequannock Townships in New Jersey as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). These properties are in the vicinity of the DOE-owned Wayne Interim Storage Site (WISS), formerly the W.R. Grace facility. The property at the Pompton Plains Railroad Spur, Pequannock, New Jersey is one of these vicinity properties. At the request of DOE, a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted an independent radiological verification survey at this property. The purpose of the survey, conducted between September and December 1993, was to confirm the success of the remedial actions performed to remove any radioactive materials in excess of the identified guidelines. The verification survey included surface gamma scans and gamma readings at 1 meter, beta-gamma scans, and the collection of soil and debris samples for radionuclide analysis. Results of the survey demonstrated that all radiological measurements on the property at the Pompton Plains railroad spur were within applicable DOE guidelines. Based on the results of the remedial action data and confirmed by the verification survey data, the portions of the site that had been remediated during this action successfully meet the DOE remedial action objectives.

  7. In situ radiation measurements at the former Soviet Nuclear Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Tipton, W.J.

    1996-06-01

    A team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory conducted a series of in situ radiological measurements at the former Soviet Nuclear Test Site near Semipalatinsk, Kazakhstan, during the period of July 21-30, 1994. The survey team measured the terrestrial gamma radiation at selected areas on the site to determine the levels of natural and man-made radiation. The survey was part of a cooperative effort between the United States team and teams of radiation scientists from the National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan and the V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute in St. Petersburg, Russia. In addition to in situ radiation measurements made by the United States and Russian teams, soil samples were collected and analyzed by the Russian and Kazakhstani teams. All teams conducted their measurements at ten locations within the test site. The United States team also made a number of additional measurements to locate and verify the positions of three potential fallout plumes containing plutonium contamination from nonnuclear tests. In addition, the United States team made several measurements in Kurchatov City, the housing area used by personnel and their families who work(ed) at the test sites. Comparisons between the United States and Russian in situ measurements and the soil sample results are presented as well as comparisons with a Soviet aerial survey conducted in 1990-1991. The agreement between the different types of measurements made by all three countries was quite good.

  8. Ambient measurements of selected VOCs in populated and remote sites of the Sahara desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yassaa, Noureddine; Ciccioli, Paolo; Brancaleoni, Enzo; Frattoni, Massimiliano; Meklati, Brahim Youcef

    2011-04-01

    For the first time, ambient levels of benzene, toluene, carbon tetrachloride and selected oxygenated organic compounds have been measured in both populated and remote sites in the Sahara desert. The levels of these species were generally found to be high in the industrialized regions of the North Sahara, progressively decreasing with latitude so that lowest levels were reached in remote desert sites close to the Equator. The emissions from traffic, and the oil production and its transformation, together with the solvent use were the main anthropogenic sources determining the levels of aromatic, aliphatic and chlorinated organic compounds in desert sites near two Algerian cities. Substantial levels of acetone and some semi-volatile compounds, emitted or formed by photochemical reactions, were also found. Although some of these compounds were below the detection limits in the most remote sites of the Sahara desert located in Mauritania and Niger, measurable levels of benzene and toluene were still found together with significant amounts of acetone. Data seem to indicate that forest fires occurring in the tropical regions of the North African continent were the most likely sources for the background levels measured during most of our measurements. The data presented here did not differ too much from those measured in the most isolated sites of the northern hemisphere.

  9. PM over summertime India: Sources and trends investigated using long term measurements and multi-receptor site back trajectory analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Vinod; Sarkar, Chinmoy; Sachan, Himanshu; Kumar, Devender; Sinha, Baerbel

    2013-04-01

    We apply multi-receptor site residence-time weighted concentration back trajectory analysis to a ten year data set (1991-2003) of PM10 and TSP measurement data from four Indian megacities Delhi, Mumbai, Kolkata and Chennai. The dataset was sourced from the published and peer reviewed work of Gupta and Kumar (2006). Sources and trends of PM10 and TSP during the pre-monsoon season (March-June) were investigated. Residence-time weighted concentration maps were derived using 72 hour HYSPLIT back trajectory ensemble calculations. Trajectory runs were started 100 m AGL and the observed PM monthly averages were attributed to all trajectory runs in a month and each trajectory of the ensemble runs with equal probability. For investigating trends the dataset was further subdivided into two groups of four year durations each (1992-1995 and 2000-2003). We found a linear correlation with a slope of 1.0 (R2=0.9) between estimated seasonal average TSP (2000-2003) using our approach and the measured seasonal averages (2006-2007) for Kanpur, Ahmedabad, Pune and Bangalore. A linear fit between predicted and measured PM10 concentration for 19 sites with PM10 observations of at least one seasonal average between 1999-2009 shows a slope of 1.4 (R2=0.4). For the observation period 2000-2003, the Thar Desert and Taklimakan Desert emerged as largest sources for both PM10 (>180 μg/m3 and >200 μg/m3 respectively) and TSP (>650 μg/m3 and >725 μg/m3 respectively). In-situ observation at Bikaner (central Thar Desert) and in Jhunjhunu (semi-arid site at the border of the Thar Desert) indicate that both TSP and PM10 inside the desert source region are underpredicted by a factor of 10 compared to in-situ observations while for the semi arid area bordering the desert PM10 and TSP are underpredicted by a factor of 5 and 3 respectively. This indicates that strong sources are underpredicted by a receptor site centred approach. The entire North-Western Indo-Gangetic Basin (NW-IGB), where crop

  10. Effect of measurement site on the dimensional accuracy of die-forming materials and techniques.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Cynthia S; Walker, Mary P; Theodotou, Nicholas; Glaros, Alan G; Williams, Karen

    2004-01-01

    To date, the comparisons of dimensional accuracy of various die materials has been investigated primarily by using a one-dimensional measurement on one die. However, a single measurement may not adequately represent the complex preparations that are encountered frequently in clinical dentistry. This investigation utilized a standardized model with two identical dies to measure die accuracy at four sites, using five different die-forming materials/techniques.

  11. Effect of measurement site on the dimensional accuracy of die-forming materials and techniques.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Cynthia S; Walker, Mary P; Theodotou, Nicholas; Glaros, Alan G; Williams, Karen

    2004-01-01

    To date, the comparisons of dimensional accuracy of various die materials has been investigated primarily by using a one-dimensional measurement on one die. However, a single measurement may not adequately represent the complex preparations that are encountered frequently in clinical dentistry. This investigation utilized a standardized model with two identical dies to measure die accuracy at four sites, using five different die-forming materials/techniques. PMID:15206253

  12. Department of Energy Plutonium ES&H Vulnerability Assessment Savannah River Site interim compensatory measures

    SciTech Connect

    Bickford, W.E.

    1994-09-15

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has recently completed a self-assessment of potential vulnerabilities associated with plutonium and other transuranic materials stored at the site. An independent Working Group Assessment Team (WGAT) appointed by DOE/ES&H also performed an independent assessment, and reviewed and validated the site self-assessment. The purpose of this report is to provide a status of interim compensatory measures at SRS to address hazards in advance of any corrective actions. ES&H has requested this status for all vulnerabilities ranked medium or higher with respect to potential consequences to workers, environment, and the public.

  13. Novel active comb-shaped dry electrode for EEG measurement in hairy site.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan-Jun; Wu, Chung-Yu; Wong, Alice May-Kuen; Lin, Bor-Shyh

    2015-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is an important biopotential, and has been widely applied in clinical applications. The conventional EEG electrode with conductive gels is usually used for measuring EEG. However, the use of conductive gel also encounters with the issue of drying and hardening. Recently, many dry EEG electrodes based on different conductive materials and techniques were proposed to solve the previous issue. However, measuring EEG in the hairy site is still a difficult challenge. In this study, a novel active comb-shaped dry electrode was proposed to measure EEG in hairy site. Different form other comb-shaped or spike-shaped dry electrodes, it can provide more excellent performance of avoiding the signal attenuation, phase distortion, and the reduction of common mode rejection ratio. Even under walking motion, it can effectively acquire EEG in hairy site. Finally, the experiments for alpha rhythm and steady-state visually evoked potential were also tested to validate the proposed electrode.

  14. Report of Informal Working Group on Measuring and Monitoring Site Ties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gipson, J. M.; Behrend, D.; Ma, C.; Meertens, C.; Pearlman, M.; Nothnagel, A.; Sarti, P.; Aiken, C.; Fancher, K.; Foster, J.; Richardson, J.; Lokken, D.; Long, J.; Stowers, D.

    2008-12-01

    Precise measurement and maintenance of the Terrestrial Reference Frame (TRF) is essential to long-term monitoring of global change. The TRF is realized through the integration of high precision GNSS, SLR, VLBI and DORIS networks. Each of these techniques has unique strengths and weaknesses. Station positions and velocities from the different techniques are combined to obtain the most accurate and robust TRF. An essential ingredient in this combination is the local eccentricity vectors at collocation sites. Hence accurate measurement of this vector is very important. At a few sites different techniques give different results for site position evolution. Determining the cause of this requires re-measuring the eccentricity vectors. The problem is further complicated because the "invariant point" for most techniques cannot be measured directly, and must be inferred. In September 2008 an informal working group with representatives from most of the space geodesy techniques looked at the application of new surveying and measuring technologies to improve the measurement and the monitoring of local ties. We looked at factors such as ease of use, ability to automate, and cost. We also studied issues such as site layout and monumentation. We report on our conclusions from this workshop and plans for future work. One goal is to perform a proof of concept experiment in the near future. We welcome input from the global geodetic community.

  15. [Biodegradation Coefficients of Typical Pollutants in the Plain Rivers Network].

    PubMed

    Feng, Shuai; Li, Xu-yongl; Deng, Jian-cai

    2016-05-15

    Biodegradation is a significant part of pollutant integrated degradation, the process rate of which is represented by the biodegradation coefficient. To investigate the biodegradation law of typical pollutants in the plain rivers network located in the upstream of the Lake Taihu, experiments were conducted in site in September 2015, one order kinetics model was used to measure the biodegradation coefficients for permanganate index, ammonia, total nitrogen and total phosphorus, and influencing factors of the biodegradation coefficients were also analyzed. The results showed that the biodegradation coefficients for permanganate index, ammonia, total nitrogen and total phosphorus were 0.008 3-0.126 4 d⁻¹, 0.002 1-0.213 8 d⁻¹, 0.002 1-0.090 5 d⁻¹ and 0.011 0- 0.152 8 d⁻¹, respectively. The influencing factors of the biodegradation coefficients for permanganate index were permanganate index and pH; those for ammonia were ammonia concentration and pH; those for total nitrogen were inorganic nitrogen concentration, total dissolved solid concentration and nitrite concentration; and those for total phosphorus were background concentration and pH. The research results were of important guiding significance for pollutants removal and ecological restoration of the plain rivers network located in the unstream of the Lake Taihu. PMID:27506025

  16. [Biodegradation Coefficients of Typical Pollutants in the Plain Rivers Network].

    PubMed

    Feng, Shuai; Li, Xu-yongl; Deng, Jian-cai

    2016-05-15

    Biodegradation is a significant part of pollutant integrated degradation, the process rate of which is represented by the biodegradation coefficient. To investigate the biodegradation law of typical pollutants in the plain rivers network located in the upstream of the Lake Taihu, experiments were conducted in site in September 2015, one order kinetics model was used to measure the biodegradation coefficients for permanganate index, ammonia, total nitrogen and total phosphorus, and influencing factors of the biodegradation coefficients were also analyzed. The results showed that the biodegradation coefficients for permanganate index, ammonia, total nitrogen and total phosphorus were 0.008 3-0.126 4 d⁻¹, 0.002 1-0.213 8 d⁻¹, 0.002 1-0.090 5 d⁻¹ and 0.011 0- 0.152 8 d⁻¹, respectively. The influencing factors of the biodegradation coefficients for permanganate index were permanganate index and pH; those for ammonia were ammonia concentration and pH; those for total nitrogen were inorganic nitrogen concentration, total dissolved solid concentration and nitrite concentration; and those for total phosphorus were background concentration and pH. The research results were of important guiding significance for pollutants removal and ecological restoration of the plain rivers network located in the unstream of the Lake Taihu.

  17. Second chance for the plains bison

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Freese, Curtis H.; Aune, K.; Boyd, D.; Derr, James N.; Forrest, Steven C.; Gates, C. Cormack; Gogan, Peter J.; Grassel, Shaun M.; Halbert, Natalie D.; Kunkel, Kyran; Redford, K.

    2007-01-01

    Before European settlement the plains bison (Bison bison bison) numbered in the tens of millions across most of the temperate region of North America. Within the span of a few decades during the mid- to late-1800s its numbers were reduced by hunting and other factors to a few hundred. The plight of the plains bison led to one of the first major movements in North America to save an endangered species. A few individuals and the American Bison Society rescued the remaining animals. Attempts to hybridize cattle and bison when bison numbers were low resulted in extensive cattle gene introgression in bison. Today, though approximately 500,000 plains bison exist in North America, few are free of cattle gene introgression, 96% are subject to anthropogenic selection for commodity production, and only 4% are in herds managed primarily for conservation purposes. Small herd size, artificial selection, cattle-gene introgression, and other factors threaten the diversity and integrity of the bison genome. In addition, the bison is for all practical purposes ecologically extinct across its former range, with multiple consequences for grassland biodiversity. Urgent measures are needed to conserve the wild bison genome and to restore the ecological role of bison in grassland ecosystems. Socioeconomic trends in the Great Plains, combined with new information about bison conservation needs and new conservation initiatives by both the public and public sectors, have set the stage for significant progress in bison conservation over the next few years.

  18. Monitoring the vernal advancement and retrogradation (green wave effect) of natural vegetation. [Great Plains Corridor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouse, J. W., Jr. (Principal Investigator); Haas, R. H.; Deering, D. W.; Schell, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The Great Plains Corridor rangeland project utilizes natural vegetation systems as phenological indicators of seasonal development and climatic effects upon regional growth conditions. A method has been developed for quantitative measurement of vegetation conditions over broad regions using ERTS-1 MSS data. Radiance values recorded in ERTS-1 spectral bands 5 and 7, corrected for sun angle, are used to compute a band ratio parameter which is shown to be correlated with green biomass and vegetation moisture content. This report details the progress being made toward determining factors associated with the transformed vegetation index (TVI) and limitations on the method. During the first year of ERTS-1 operation (cycles 1-20), an average of 50% usable ERTS-1 data was obtained for the ten Great Plains Corridor test sites.

  19. Biometeorological and air quality assessment in an industrialized area of eastern Mediterranean: the Thriassion Plain, Greece.

    PubMed

    Mavrakis, Anastasios; Spanou, Anastasia; Pantavou, Katerina; Katavoutas, George; Theoharatos, George; Christides, Anastasios; Verouti, Eleni

    2012-07-01

    Evidence that heat wave events are associated with poor air quality conditions and health hazards has become stronger in recent years. In this study, the impact of two heat wave episodes on human thermal discomfort and air quality is examined during summer 2007, in an industrial plain of eastern Mediterranean: the Thriassion Plain, Greece. For this purpose, two biometeorological indices-Discomfort Index (DI) and Heat Load (HL)-as well as an air quality index-Air Quality Stress Index (AQSI)-were calculated using data from seven measuring sites. A land-use map was procured in order to examine the effect of different land cover types on human thermal comfort. The results indicated high level of thermal discomfort and increased air pollution levels, while a significant correlation between the DI and the AQSI was identified.

  20. Northern Plains Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-513, 14 October 2003

    Patterns are common on the northern plains of Mars. Like their terrestrial counterparts in places like Siberia, Alaska, and northern Canada, patterned ground on Mars might be an indicator of the presence of ground ice. Whether it is true that the patterns on Mars are related to ground ice and whether the ice is still present beneath the martian surface are unknown. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) picture shows an example of patterned ground on the martian northern plains near 72.4oN, 252.6oW. The dark dots and lines are low mounds and chains of mounds. The circular feature near the center of the image is the location of a buried meteor impact crater; its presence today is marked only by the dark boulders on its rim and ejecta blanket that have managed to remain uncovered at the martian surface. The area shown is 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  1. Monitoring the Vernal Advancement and Retrogradation (Green Wave Effect) of Natural Vegetation. [Great Plains Corridor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouse, J. W., Jr. (Principal Investigator); Haas, R. H.; Deering, D. W.; Schell, J. A.; Harlan, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The Great Plains Corridor rangeland project successfully utilized natural vegetation systems as phenological indicators of seasonal development and climatic effects upon regional growth conditions. An effective method was developed for quantitative measurement of vegetation conditions, including green biomass estimates, recorded in bands 5 and 6, corrected for sun angle, were used to compute a ratio parameter (TV16) which is shown to be highly correlated with green biomass and vegatation moisture content. Analyses results of ERTS-1 digital data and correlated ground data are summarized. Attention was given to analyzing weather influences and test site variables on vegetation condition measurements with ERTS-1 data.

  2. Quantifying the contribution of long-range transport to particulate matter (PM) mass loadings at a suburban site in the north-western Indo-Gangetic Plain (NW-IGP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawar, H.; Garg, S.; Kumar, V.; Sachan, H.; Arya, R.; Sarkar, C.; Chandra, B. P.; Sinha, B.

    2015-08-01

    Many sites in the densely populated Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) frequently exceed the national ambient air quality standard (NAAQS) of 100 μg m-3 for 24 h average PM10 and 60 μg m-3 for 24 h average PM2.5 mass loadings, exposing residents to hazardous levels of particulate matter (PM) throughout the year. We quantify the contribution of long-range transport to elevated PM levels and the number of exceedance events through a back-trajectory climatology analysis of air masses arriving at the IISER Mohali Atmospheric Chemistry facility (30.667° N, 76.729° E; 310 m a.m.s.l.) for the period August 2011-June 2013. Air masses arriving at the receptor site were classified into six clusters, which represent synoptic-scale air-mass transport patterns. Long-range transport from the west leads to significant enhancements in the average fine- and coarse-mode PM mass loadings during all seasons. The contribution of long-range transport from the west and south-west (source regions: Arabia, Thar Desert, Middle East and Afghanistan) to coarse-mode PM varied between 9 and 57 % of the total PM10-2.5 mass. Local pollution episodes (wind speed < 1 m s-1) contributed to enhanced PM2.5 mass loadings during both the winter and summer seasons and to enhanced coarse-mode PM only during the winter season. South-easterly air masses (source region: eastern IGP) were associated with significantly lower fine- and coarse-mode PM mass loadings during all seasons. The fraction of days in each season during which the PM mass loadings exceeded the national ambient air quality standard was controlled by long-range transport to a much lesser degree. For the local cluster, which represents regional air masses (source region: NW-IGP), the fraction of days during which the national ambient air quality standard (NAAQS) of 60 μg m-3 for 24 h average PM2.5 was exceeded varied between 36 % of the days associated with this synoptic-scale transport during the monsoon, and 95 % during post-monsoon and winter

  3. The Sensitivity of Genetic Connectivity Measures to Unsampled and Under-Sampled Sites

    PubMed Central

    Koen, Erin L.; Bowman, Jeff; Garroway, Colin J.; Wilson, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Landscape genetic analyses assess the influence of landscape structure on genetic differentiation. It is rarely possible to collect genetic samples from all individuals on the landscape and thus it is important to assess the sensitivity of landscape genetic analyses to the effects of unsampled and under-sampled sites. Network-based measures of genetic distance, such as conditional genetic distance (cGD), might be particularly sensitive to sampling intensity because pairwise estimates are relative to the entire network. We addressed this question by subsampling microsatellite data from two empirical datasets. We found that pairwise estimates of cGD were sensitive to both unsampled and under-sampled sites, and FST, Dest, and deucl were more sensitive to under-sampled than unsampled sites. We found that the rank order of cGD was also sensitive to unsampled and under-sampled sites, but not enough to affect the outcome of Mantel tests for isolation by distance. We simulated isolation by resistance and found that although cGD estimates were sensitive to unsampled sites, by increasing the number of sites sampled the accuracy of conclusions drawn from landscape genetic analyses increased, a feature that is not possible with pairwise estimates of genetic differentiation such as FST, Dest, and deucl. We suggest that users of cGD assess the sensitivity of this measure by subsampling within their own network and use caution when making extrapolations beyond their sampled network. PMID:23409155

  4. Distribution of gamma exposure rates in a reactor effluent stream flood plain system.

    PubMed

    Gladden, J B; Brown, K L; Smith, M H; Towns, A

    1985-01-01

    Ground-level gamma dosimetry surveys were conducted along the length of a radiocesium-contaminated reactor effluent stream flood plain system to determine the extent and patterns of isotope distribution over a decade after reactor releases were stopped. The maximum mean exposure rates were found at upstream locations near the source of the contamination and in a downstream sedimentary delta. Gamma exposure rates were not uniformly distributed and high exposure rates were generally restricted to small areas of the flood plain. There was little similarity in either the spatial distribution or magnitudes of maximum gamma exposure rates across flood plains along the stream. Frequency the measured exposure rates tended to be highly skewed and most closely approximated the log-normal distribution in most areas along the stream. However, the complex and changing patterns of dose distributions strongly affected the ability to predict the probability of encountering unusually high exposure rates. Complex statistical and distributional models are required to provide precise descriptions of the dosimetry environment in such complex ecosystems and different models could be required on a site-by-site basis.

  5. Quantitative, directional measurement of electric field heterogeneity in the active site of ketosteroid isomerase.

    PubMed

    Fafarman, Aaron T; Sigala, Paul A; Schwans, Jason P; Fenn, Timothy D; Herschlag, Daniel; Boxer, Steven G

    2012-02-01

    Understanding the electrostatic forces and features within highly heterogeneous, anisotropic, and chemically complex enzyme active sites and their connection to biological catalysis remains a longstanding challenge, in part due to the paucity of incisive experimental probes of electrostatic properties within proteins. To quantitatively assess the landscape of electrostatic fields at discrete locations and orientations within an enzyme active site, we have incorporated site-specific thiocyanate vibrational probes into multiple positions within bacterial ketosteroid isomerase. A battery of X-ray crystallographic, vibrational Stark spectroscopy, and NMR studies revealed electrostatic field heterogeneity of 8 MV/cm between active site probe locations and widely differing sensitivities of discrete probes to common electrostatic perturbations from mutation, ligand binding, and pH changes. Electrostatic calculations based on active site ionization states assigned by literature precedent and computational pK(a) prediction were unable to quantitatively account for the observed vibrational band shifts. However, electrostatic models of the D40N mutant gave qualitative agreement with the observed vibrational effects when an unusual ionization of an active site tyrosine with a pK(a) near 7 was included. UV-absorbance and (13)C NMR experiments confirmed the presence of a tyrosinate in the active site, in agreement with electrostatic models. This work provides the most direct measure of the heterogeneous and anisotropic nature of the electrostatic environment within an enzyme active site, and these measurements provide incisive benchmarks for further developing accurate computational models and a foundation for future tests of electrostatics in enzymatic catalysis.

  6. Prairie grassland bidirectional reflectances measured by different instruments at the FIFE site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deering, D. W.; Middleton, E. M.; Irons, J. R.; Blad, B. L.; Walter-Shea, E. A.; Hays, C. J.; Walthall, C.; Eck, T. F.; Ahmad, S. P.; Banerjee, B. P.

    1992-01-01

    Land surface reflectance measurements were obtained during the First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE) field campaigns utilizing a variety of airborne and ground-based spectral radiometers. To study the validity of the assumption that the values obtained by the several different teams and instruments were interchangeable, the surface radiation measurement teams converged on a common site for one day during the fifth intensive field campaign in 1989. The bidirectional reflectances from the various instruments were basically found to be comparable.

  7. Continuous Profiles of Cloud Microphysical Properties for the Fixed Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, M; Jensen, K

    2006-06-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program defined a specific metric for the third quarter of Fiscal Year 2006 to produce and refine a one-year continuous time series of cloud microphysical properties based on cloud radar measurements for each of the fixed ARM sites. To accomplish this metric, we used a combination of recently developed algorithms that interpret radar reflectivity profiles, lidar backscatter profiles, and microwave brightness temperatures into the context of the underlying cloud microphysical structure.

  8. Measurement of the group velocity of light in sea water at the ANTARES site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; Al Samarai, I.; Albert, A.; André, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; Assis Jesus, A. C.; Astraatmadja, T.; Aubert, J.-J.; Baret, B.; Basa, S.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bigi, A.; Bigongiari, C.; Bogazzi, C.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouhou, B.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Camarena, F.; Capone, A.; Cârloganu, C.; Carminati, G.; Carr, J.; Cecchini, S.; Charif, Z.; Charvis, Ph.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; De Bonis, G.; Decowski, M. P.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Dorosti, Q.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; Emanuele, U.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Escoffier, S.; Fermani, P.; Ferri, M.; Flaminio, V.; Folger, F.; Fritsch, U.; Fuda, J.-L.; Galatà, S.; Gay, P.; Geyer, K.; Giacomelli, G.; Giordano, V.; Gómez-González, J. P.; Graf, K.; Guillard, G.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G.; van Haren, H.; Hartman, J.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Herold, B.; Hößl, J.; Hsu, C. C.; de Jong, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Kavatsyuk, O.; Kooijman, P.; Kopper, C.; Kouchner, A.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Lamare, P.; Larosa, G.; Lattuada, D.; Lefèvre, D.; Lim, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Loehner, H.; Loucatos, S.; Mangano, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Martínez-Mora, J. A.; McMillan, J. E.; Meli, A.; Montaruli, T.; Moscoso, L.; Motz, H.; Neff, M.; Nezri, E.; Palioselitis, D.; Păvălaş, G. E.; Payet, K.; Payre, P.; Petrovic, J.; Piattelli, P.; Picot-Clemente, N.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Presani, E.; Racca, C.; Reed, C.; Riccobene, G.; Richardt, C.; Richter, R.; Rivière, C.; Robert, A.; Roensch, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Ruiz-Rivas, J.; Rujoiu, M.; Russo, G. V.; Salesa, F.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sapienza, P.; Schöck, F.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schüssler, F.; Seitz, T.; Shanidze, R.; Simeone, F.; Spies, A.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Sánchez-Losa, A.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Thompson, L. F.; Toscano, S.; Vallage, B.; Van Elewyck, V.; Vannoni, G.; Vecchi, M.; Vernin, P.; Wagner, S.; Wijnker, G.; Wilms, J.; de Wolf, E.; Yepes, H.; Zaborov, D.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.

    2012-04-01

    The group velocity of light has been measured at eight different wavelengths between 385 nm and 532 nm in the Mediterranean Sea at a depth of about 2.2 km with the ANTARES optical beacon systems. A parametrisation of the dependence of the refractive index on wavelength based on the salinity, pressure and temperature of the sea water at the ANTARES site is in good agreement with these measurements.

  9. SITE-SPECIFIC PROTOCOL FOR MEASURING SOIL RADON POTENTIALS FOR FLORIDA HOUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a protocol for site-specific measurement of radon potentials for Florida houses that is consistent with existing residential radon protection maps. The protocol gives further guidance on the possible need for radon-protective house construction features. In a...

  10. Measurements of particulate matter concentrations at a landfill site (Crete, Greece)

    SciTech Connect

    Chalvatzaki, E.; Kopanakis, I.; Kontaksakis, M.; Glytsos, T.; Kalogerakis, N.; Lazaridis, M.

    2010-11-15

    Large amounts of solid waste are disposed in landfills and the potential of particulate matter (PM) emissions into the atmosphere is significant. Particulate matter emissions in landfills are the result of resuspension from the disposed waste and other activities such as mechanical recycling and composting, waste unloading and sorting, the process of coating residues and waste transport by trucks. Measurements of ambient levels of inhalable particulate matter (PM{sub 10}) were performed in a landfill site located at Chania (Crete, Greece). Elevated PM{sub 10} concentrations were measured in the landfill site during several landfill operations. It was observed that the meteorological conditions (mainly wind velocity and temperature) influence considerably the PM{sub 10} concentrations. Comparison between the PM{sub 10} concentrations at the landfill and at a PM{sub 10} background site indicates the influence of the landfill activities on local concentrations at the landfill. No correlation was observed between the measurements at the landfill and the background sites. Finally, specific preventing measures are proposed to control the PM concentrations in landfills.

  11. IN SITU APPARENT CONDUCTIVITY MEASUREMENTS AND MICROBIAL POPULATION DISTRIBUTION AT A HYDROCARBON CONTAMINATED SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We investigated the bulk electrical conductivity and microbial population distribution in sediments at a site contaminated with light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL). The bulk conductivity was measured using in situ vertical resistivity probes, while the most probable number met...

  12. Improved measurement of aluminum in irradiated fuel reprocessed at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, S.L. III.

    1991-01-01

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), irradiated fuel from research reactor operators or their contract fuel service companies is reprocessed in the H-Canyon Separations Facility. Final processing costs are based on analytical measurements of the amount of total metal dissolved. Shipper estimates for uranium and uranium-235 and measured values at SRS have historically agreed very well. There have occasionally been significant differences between shipper estimates for aluminum and the aluminum content determined at SRS. To minimize analytical error that might contribute to poor shipper-receiver agreement for the reprocessing of off-site fuel, a new analytical method to measure aluminum was developed by SRS Analytical Laboratories at the Central Laboratory Facilities. An EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) titration method, subject to dissolver matrix interferences, was previously used at SRS to measure aluminum in H-Canyon dissolver during the reprocessing of offsite fuel. The new method combines rapid ion exchange technology with direct current argon plasma spectrometry to enhance the reliability of aluminum measurements for off-site fuel. The technique rapidly removes spectral interferences such as uranium and significantly lowers gamma levels due to fission products. Aluminium is separated quantitatively by using an anion exchange technique that employs oxalate complexing, small particle size resin and rapid flow rates. The new method, which has eliminated matrix interference problems with these analyses and improved the quality of aluminum measurements, has improved the overall agreement between shipper-receiver values for offsite fuel processed SRS.

  13. Improved measurement of aluminum in irradiated fuel reprocessed at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, S.L. III

    1991-12-31

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), irradiated fuel from research reactor operators or their contract fuel service companies is reprocessed in the H-Canyon Separations Facility. Final processing costs are based on analytical measurements of the amount of total metal dissolved. Shipper estimates for uranium and uranium-235 and measured values at SRS have historically agreed very well. There have occasionally been significant differences between shipper estimates for aluminum and the aluminum content determined at SRS. To minimize analytical error that might contribute to poor shipper-receiver agreement for the reprocessing of off-site fuel, a new analytical method to measure aluminum was developed by SRS Analytical Laboratories at the Central Laboratory Facilities. An EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) titration method, subject to dissolver matrix interferences, was previously used at SRS to measure aluminum in H-Canyon dissolver during the reprocessing of offsite fuel. The new method combines rapid ion exchange technology with direct current argon plasma spectrometry to enhance the reliability of aluminum measurements for off-site fuel. The technique rapidly removes spectral interferences such as uranium and significantly lowers gamma levels due to fission products. Aluminium is separated quantitatively by using an anion exchange technique that employs oxalate complexing, small particle size resin and rapid flow rates. The new method, which has eliminated matrix interference problems with these analyses and improved the quality of aluminum measurements, has improved the overall agreement between shipper-receiver values for offsite fuel processed SRS.

  14. Sediment Retention Within Coastal Plain Bottomland Forested Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, K. M.; Hupp, C. R.

    2002-12-01

    Coastal Plain forested wetlands are unique ecosystems where fluvial geomorphic processes control sediment retention and vegetation patterns, which are intimately connected to each other. Yet, these inter-disciplinary associations are typically lacking in traditional ecologic or geomorphic research within these ecosystems. Floodplain sedimentation rates and patterns, suspended sediment concentrations, substrate characteristics, vegetation and fluvial geomorphology were measured in field studies in eight 1-ha sites along three tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay to determine the dominant physical processes controlling deposition, substrate, and vegetation patterns in forested wetlands. Annual deposition was measured at 104 locations with feldspar clay pads. Sedimentation rates across the floodplain sites are highly variable, ranging from 0.5 mm/yr to 26.6 mm/yr. Multiple regression analyses suggest that the spatial patterns in net-annual and long-term deposition and substrate properties (grain sizes, sand:clay, and sorting) are controlled by the frequency and duration of inundation events and the total number of inundated days per year, the manner that sediment is distributed through the floodplain (dominant flow paths and/or the presence of slough networks, for example), and the potential for deposition of suspended sediments. Similarly, floodplain community diversity is significantly related to fluvial geomorphic processes (annual net deposition rates, percent inundation per year, and inundation duration per event). The results of this study provide valuable information on the development and evolution of Coastal Plain floodplains in the context of vegetation diversity patterns that have significant implications for the restoration and conservation of these systems.

  15. Snake River Plain FORGE Well Data for USGS-142

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Podgorney

    2015-11-23

    Well data for the USGS-142 well located in eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho. This data collection includes lithology reports, borehole logs, and photos of rhyolite core samples. This collection of data has been assembled as part of the site characterization data used to develop the conceptual geologic model for the Snake River Plain site in Idaho, as part of phase 1 of the Frontier Observatory for Research in Geothermal Energy (FORGE) initiative. They were assembled by the Snake River Geothermal Consortium (SRGC), a team of collaborators that includes members from national laboratories, universities, industry, and federal agencies, lead by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL).

  16. Cracked and Pitted Plain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-536, 6 November 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a typical view--at 1.5 meters (5 feet) per pixel--of surfaces in far western Utopia Planitia. In this region, the plains have developed cracks and pit chains arranged in a polygonal pattern. The pits form by collapse along the trend of a previously-formed crack. This picture is located near 45.0oN, 275.4oW. This April 2003 image covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  17. Bias corrections of precipitation measurements across experimental sites in different ecoclimatic regions of western Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xicai; Yang, Daqing; Li, Yanping; Barr, Alan; Helgason, Warren; Hayashi, Masaki; Marsh, Philip; Pomeroy, John; Janowicz, Richard J.

    2016-10-01

    This study assesses a filtering procedure on accumulating precipitation gauge measurements and quantifies the effects of bias corrections for wind-induced undercatch across four ecoclimatic regions in western Canada, including the permafrost regions of the subarctic, the Western Cordillera, the boreal forest, and the prairies. The bias corrections increased monthly precipitation by up to 163 % at windy sites with short vegetation and sometimes modified the seasonal precipitation regime, whereas the increases were less than 13 % at sites shielded by forest. On a yearly basis, the increase of total precipitation ranged from 8 to 20 mm (3-4 %) at sites shielded by vegetation and 60 to 384 mm (about 15-34 %) at open sites. In addition, the bias corrections altered the seasonal precipitation patterns at some windy sites with high snow percentage ( > 50 %). This study highlights the need for and importance of precipitation bias corrections at both research sites and operational networks for water balance assessment and the validation of global/regional climate-hydrology models.

  18. Application of passive sampling for measuring dissolved concentrations of organic contaminants in the water column at three marine superfund sites

    EPA Science Inventory

    At contaminated sediment sites, including U.S. EPA Superfund sites, it is critical to measure water column concentrations of freely dissolved contaminants to understand the complete exposure of aquatic organisms to hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs). However, historically a...

  19. Experimental Results of Site Calibration and Sensitivity Measurements in OTR for UWB Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanadham, Chandana; Rao, P. Mallikrajuna

    2016-08-01

    System calibration and parameter accuracy measurement of electronic support measures (ESM) systems is a major activity, carried out by electronic warfare (EW) engineers. These activities are very critical and needs good understanding in the field of microwaves, antennas, wave propagation, digital and communication domains. EW systems are broad band, built with state-of-the art electronic hardware, installed on different varieties of military platforms to guard country's security from time to time. EW systems operate in wide frequency ranges, typically in the order of thousands of MHz, hence these are ultra wide band (UWB) systems. Few calibration activities are carried within the system and in the test sites, to meet the accuracies of final specifications. After calibration, parameters are measured for their accuracies either in feed mode by injecting the RF signals into the front end or in radiation mode by transmitting the RF signals on to system antenna. To carry out these activities in radiation mode, a calibrated open test range (OTR) is necessary in the frequency band of interest. Thus site calibration of OTR is necessary to be carried out before taking up system calibration and parameter measurements. This paper presents the experimental results of OTR site calibration and sensitivity measurements of UWB systems in radiation mode.

  20. Radiation measurements of excavated items at a radioactive-waste burial site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stromswold, D. C.; Alvarez, J. L.; Ludowise, J. D.

    1995-12-01

    Radiation measurements on items excavated from a radioactive-waste burial ground were part of a field test of excavation techniques for the cleanup of subsurface sites. The waste resulted from plutonium production for nuclear weapons at Hanford, WA. The radiation measurements investigated techniques for classifying bulk waste for placement into a permanent disposal facility. Hand-held γ-ray survey instruments measured exposure rates (mR/h) from contaminated dirt and radioactive objects as they were removed by heavy excavation equipment. Gamma-ray detectors mounted on the excavation equipment provided additional data that were transmitted by radio. Exposure rates from identifiable objects (e.g. specific reactor components) were compared with expected exposure rates calculated from site-disposal records and computer modeling. Selected objects were subjected to additional on-site measurements using a high-purity germanium detector. Detected nuclides included 60Co, 137Cs, 152,154Eu, and 108mAg. A large-volume neutron detector checked for possible transuranic nuclides. Alpha and β spectrometry also were tested. but their utility for this application was limited due to the short range of the particles and the difficulty of maintaining a repeatable measurement geometry in the field.

  1. Filling the gaps in meteorological continuous data measured at FLUXNET sites with ERA-Interim reanalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Vuichard, N.

    2015-07-13

    In this study, exchanges of carbon, water and energy between the land surface and the atmosphere are monitored by eddy covariance technique at the ecosystem level. Currently, the FLUXNET database contains more than 500 registered sites, and up to 250 of them share data (free fair-use data set). Many modelling groups use the FLUXNET data set for evaluating ecosystem models' performance, but this requires uninterrupted time series for the meteorological variables used as input. Because original in situ data often contain gaps, from very short (few hours) up to relatively long (some months) ones, we develop a new and robust method for filling the gaps in meteorological data measured at site level. Our approach has the benefit of making use of continuous data available globally (ERA-Interim) and a high temporal resolution spanning from 1989 to today. These data are, however, not measured at site level, and for this reason a method to downscale and correct the ERA-Interim data is needed. We apply this method to the level 4 data (L4) from the La Thuile collection, freely available after registration under a fair-use policy. The performance of the developed method varies across sites and is also function of the meteorological variable. On average over all sites, applying the bias correction method to the ERA-Interim data reduced the mismatch with the in situ data by 10 to 36 %, depending on the meteorological variable considered. In comparison to the internal variability of the in situ data, the root mean square error (RMSE) between the in situ data and the unbiased ERA-I (ERA-Interim) data remains relatively large (on average over all sites, from 27 to 76 % of the standard deviation of in situ data, depending on the meteorological variable considered). The performance of the method remains poor for the wind speed field, in particular regarding its capacity to conserve a standard deviation similar to the one measured at FLUXNET stations.

  2. Development of corrective measures technology for shallow land burial facilities at arid sites

    SciTech Connect

    Nyhan, J.W.; Abeele, W.V.; Perkins, B.A.; Lane, L.J.

    1984-01-01

    The field research program involving corrective measure technologies for arid shallow land burial (SLB) sites is described. Soil erosion and infiltration of water into a simulated trench cap with various surface treatments was measured and compared with similar data from agricultural systems across the United States. Field testing of biointrustion barriers at closed-out waste disposal sites at Los Alamos and in the experimental clusters are reported. The final results of an experiment designed to measure the extent of contaminant transport to the surface of a SLB facility, and the influence of plants on this relationship, are presented. An experiment designed to determine the effects of subsidence on the performance of a cobble-gravel biobarrier system is described and current field data are presented. 11 references, 11 figures, 5 tables.

  3. [Field measurement of Gobi surface emissivity spectrum at Dunhuang calibration site of China].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Li, Yuan; Rong, Zhi-guo; Hu, Xiu-qing; Zhang, Li-jun; Liu, Jing-jing

    2009-05-01

    Gobi surface emissivity spectrum of Dunhuang radiometric calibration site of China is one of the key factors to calibrate the thermal infrared remote sensors using land surface. Based on the iterative spectrally smooth temperature/emissivity separation (ISSTES)algorithm, Dunhuang Gobi surface emissivity spectrum was measured using BOMEM MR154 Fourier transform spectroradiometer and Infrared Golden Board. Emissivity spectrum data were obtained at different time and locations. These spectrum data were convolved with the channel response function of CE312 radiometer and compared with the channel emissivity measured by the same instrument. The results showed that the difference between these two kinds of channel emissivity was within 0.012 and exhibited a good consistency. With these measured emissivity spectra, all of the mainstream thermal infrared remote sensors can be calibrated using Dunhuang Gobi surface at radiometric calibration site of China.

  4. Standard Measurement and Verification Plan for Lighting Retrofit Projects for Buildings and Building Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Richman, Eric E.

    2012-10-31

    This document provides a framework for standard measurement and verification (M&V) of lighting retrofit and replacement projects. It was developed to provide site owners, contractors, and other involved organizations with the essential elements of a robust M&V plan for lighting projects. It includes details on all aspects of effectively measuring light levels of existing and post-retrofit projects, conducting power measurement, and developing cost-effectiveness analysis. This framework M&V plan also enables consistent comparison among similar lighting projects, and may be used to develop M&V plans for non--lighting-technology retrofits and new installations.

  5. Raman Lidar Water Vapor Measurements at the DOE SGP CART Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, David N.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA/GSFC Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL) was deployed to the Department of Energy's (DOE) Cloud and Radiation Testbed site in northern Oklahoma September - December, 2000 for two DOE sponsored field campaigns: 1) the Water Vapor Intensive Operations Experiment 2000 and 2) the Atmospheric Radiations Measurement First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Experiment Experiment (AFWEX). WvIOP2000 focussed on water vapor measurements in the lower troposphere while AFWEX focussed on upper tropospheric water vapor. For the first time ever, four water vapor lidars were operated simultaneously: one airborne and three ground-based systems. Intercomparisons of these measurements and others will be presented at the meeting.

  6. CUES - A Study Site for Measuring Snowpack Energy Balance in the Sierra Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bair, Edward; Dozier, Jeff; Davis, Robert; Colee, Michael; Claffey, Keran

    2015-09-01

    Accurate measurement and modeling of the snowpack energy balance are critical to understanding the terrestrial water cycle. Most of the water resources in the western US come from snowmelt, yet statistical runoff models that rely on the historical record are becoming less reliable because of a changing climate. For physically based snow melt models that do not depend on past conditions, ground based measurements of the energy balance components are imperative for verification. For this purpose, the US Army Corps of Engineers Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL) and the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) established the “CUES” snow study site (CRREL/UCSB Energy Site, http://www.snow.ucsb.edu/) at 2940 m elevation on Mammoth Mountain, California. We describe CUES, provide an overview of research, share our experience with scientific measurements, and encourage future collaborative research. Snow measurements began near the current CUES site for ski area operations in 1969. In the 1970s, researchers began taking scientific measurements. Today, CUES benefits from year round gondola access and a fiber optic internet connection. Data loggers and computers automatically record and store over 100 measurements from more than 50 instruments each minute. CUES is one of only five high altitude mountain sites in the Western US where a full suite of energy balance components are measured. In addition to measuring snow on the ground at multiple locations, extensive radiometric and meteorological measurements are recorded. Some of the more novel measurements include scans by an automated terrestrial LiDAR, passive and active microwave imaging of snow stratigraphy, microscopic imaging of snow grains, snowflake imaging with a multi-angle camera, fluxes from upward and downward looking radiometers, snow water equivalent from different types of snow pillows, snowmelt from lysimeters, and concentration of impurities in the snowpack. We give an

  7. Establishing the Antarctic Dome C community reference standard site towards consistent measurements from Earth observation satellites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cao, C.; Uprety, S.; Xiong, J.; Wu, A.; Jing, P.; Smith, D.; Chander, G.; Fox, N.; Ungar, S.

    2010-01-01

    Establishing satellite measurement consistency by using common desert sites has become increasingly more important not only for climate change detection but also for quantitative retrievals of geophysical variables in satellite applications. Using the Antarctic Dome C site (75°06′S, 123°21′E, elevation 3.2 km) for satellite radiometric calibration and validation (Cal/Val) is of great interest owing to its unique location and characteristics. The site surface is covered with uniformly distributed permanent snow, and the atmospheric effect is small and relatively constant. In this study, the long-term stability and spectral characteristics of this site are evaluated using well-calibrated satellite instruments such as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS). Preliminary results show that despite a few limitations, the site in general is stable in the long term, the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) model works well, and the site is most suitable for the Cal/Val of reflective solar bands in the 0.4–1.0 µm range. It was found that for the past decade, the reflectivity change of the site is within 1.35% at 0.64 µm, and interannual variability is within 2%. The site is able to resolve calibration biases between instruments at a level of ~1%. The usefulness of the site is demonstrated by comparing observations from seven satellite instruments involving four space agencies, including OrbView-2–SeaWiFS, Terra–Aqua MODIS, Earth Observing 1 (EO-1) – Hyperion, Meteorological Operational satellite programme (MetOp) – Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), Envisat Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) – dvanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR), and Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+). Dome C is a promising candidate site for climate quality calibration of satellite radiometers towards more consistent satellite measurements, as part

  8. Geophysical Log Analysis of Selected Test Holes and Wells in the High Plains Aquifer, Central Platte River Basin, Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, J. Alton; Morin, Roger H.; Cannia, James C.; Williams, John H.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Central Platte Natural Resources District is investigating the hydrostratigraphic framework of the High Plains aquifer in the Central Platte River basin. As part of this investigation, a comprehensive set of geophysical logs was collected from six test holes at three sites and analyzed to delineate the penetrated stratigraphic units and characterize their lithology and physical properties. Flow and fluid-property logs were collected from two wells at one of the sites and analyzed along with the other geophysical logs to determine the relative transmissivity of the High Plains aquifer units. The integrated log analysis indicated that the coarse-grained deposits of the alluvium and the upper part of the Ogallala Formation contributed more than 70 percent of the total transmissivity at this site. The lower part of the Ogallala with its moderately permeable sands and silts contributed some measureable transmissivity, as did the fine-grained sandstone of the underlying Arikaree Group, likely as a result of fractures and bedding-plane partings. Neither the lower nor the upper part of the siltstone- and claystone-dominated White River Group exhibited measurable transmissivity. The integrated analysis of the geophysical logs illustrated the utility of these methods in the detailed characterization of the hydrostratigraphy of the High Plains aquifer.

  9. Site Specific Emission of Marcellus Shale Development using Fast Mobile Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, J. D.; Floerchinger, C. R.; Fortner, E.; Wormhoudt, J.; Massoli, P.; Herndon, S.; Kolb, C. E.; Knighton, B.; Knipping, E. M.; Shaw, S. L.

    2013-12-01

    The Marcellus Shale is the largest shale gas resource in the United States and is found in parts of Pennsylvania, New York, Ohio, Maryland, and West Virginia. The rapid large-scale development, and lack of measured air emissions make the impact of Marcellus shale development on local and regional air quality and the global climate highly uncertain. Emission sources include transitory emission from well pad development such as well pad preparation, well drilling, hydraulic fracturing, well completions, and trucking. Long-term sources of emission are natural gas infrastructure such as producing wells, pipelines, and compressor stations. During the summer of 2012 the Aerodyne Inc. Mobile Laboratory equipped with a suite of real-time (~ 1 Hz) instrumentation was used to measure source emissions associated with Marcellus Shale development and to characterize regional air quality in the Marcellus basin. The Aerodyne Inc. Mobile Laboratory was equipped to measure Methane, Ethane, N2O (tracer gas), C2H2 (tracer gas), CO2, CO, NOx, SOx, and aerosol number, mass, and composition. Tracer-release methods were employed at selected source locations to estimate emission rates from Marcellus shale operations. Site-specific emissions from transitory and permanent sources were estimated at tracer release locations using regression analysis on single multi-species plumes and by utilizing plume dispersion modeling. Multiple plume intersections per site were averaged to determine an overall emission for each measured species at that site. Tracer release was employed at twelve individual Marcellus sites with the majority of the sites being compressor stations and well pads. Emission plumes associated with natural gas compressor stations commonly exhibited elevated levels of combustion species (i.e. particulate matter, CO, CO2, NOx,) and natural gas constituents. Both emission types were well correlated with tracer gas plumes. Emission plumes associated with well pads exhibited elevated

  10. Real-time Measurements of Biological Particles at Several Continental Sites using the WIBS-4A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMeeking, G. R.; Kok, G. L.; Petters, M. D.; Wright, T.; Hader, J.; Mccubbin, I. B.; Hallar, A. G.; Twohy, C. H.; Toohey, D. W.; DeMott, P. J.; McCluskey, C.; Baumgardner, D.

    2013-12-01

    Biological particles (bacteria, fungi/fungal spores, viruses, algae and fragments of biological material) may play a significant role in modifying cloud properties by acting as ice nuclei and thus have an indirect effect on climate forcing. Little is known, however, regarding the abundance and distribution of biological particles and their importance to cloud microphysics in different environments. On-line, continuous measurement systems offer the potential to measure biological systems at high time resolution and sensitivity, providing greater insight into their distribution in the atmosphere, dispersal mechanisms and potential soures. The WIBS-4A (Wideband Integrated Bioaerosol Sensor) detects fluorescent biological material in real-time associated with individual particles. It measures five properties: a) optical size via light scattering, b) fluorescent emissions in the wavelength range 310-400 following excitation by 280 nm light, c) fluorescent emissions in the wavelength range 420-650 following excitation by 280 nm light, d) fluorescent emissions in the wavelength range 420-650 following excitation by 370 nm light, and e) particle asymmetry factor based on intensities of forward scattered light onto a 4-element detector. Together, these properties aid the classification of sampled particles that contain biofluorophores such as tryptophan or NAD(P)H, which can be found in biological particles. Here we present results from a series of laboratory, ground- and aircraft-based measurements of biological particles using the WIBS-4A. The studies include airborne measurements over the United States, ground-based measurements at a coastal site, an urban site in the southeast US and a high alpine site, and laboratory measurements of a variety of biological and non-biological particles. Our analysis focused on both the characterization of the instrument response as well as an evaluation of its suitability for performing ambient measurements and potential artifacts. We

  11. Representativeness of the ground observational sites and up-scaling of the point soil moisture measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jinlei; Wen, Jun; Tian, Hui

    2016-02-01

    Soil moisture plays an increasingly important role in the cycle of energy-water exchange, climate change, and hydrologic processes. It is usually measured at a point site, but regional soil moisture is essential for validating remote sensing products and numerical modeling results. In the study reported in this paper, the minimal number of required sites (NRS) for establishing a research observational network and the representative single sites for regional soil moisture estimation are discussed using the soil moisture data derived from the "Maqu soil moisture observational network" (101°40‧-102°40‧E, 33°30‧-35°45‧N), which is supported by Chinese Academy of Science. Furthermore, the best up-scaling method suitable for this network has been studied by evaluating four commonly used up-scaling methods. The results showed that (1) Under a given accuracy requirement R ⩾ 0.99, RMSD ⩽ 0.02 m3/m3, NRS at both 5 and 10 cm depth is 10. (2) Representativeness of the sites has been validated by time stability analysis (TSA), time sliding correlation analysis (TSCA) and optimal combination of sites (OCS). NST01 is the most representative site at 5 cm depth for the first two methods; NST07 and NST02 are the most representative sites at 10 cm depth. The optimum combination sites at 5 cm depth are NST01, NST02, and NST07. NST05, NST08, and NST13 are the best group at 10 cm depth. (3) Linear fitting, compared with other three methods, is the best up-scaling method for all types of representative sites obtained above, and linear regression equations between a single site and regional soil moisture are established hereafter. "Single site" obtained by OCS has the greatest up-scaling effect, and TSCA takes the second place. (4) Linear fitting equations show good practicability in estimating the variation of regional soil moisture from July 3, 2013 to July 3, 2014, when a large number of observed soil moisture data are lost.

  12. Site evaluation study for the Indian National Large Solar Telescope using microthermal measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhananjay, K.

    2014-01-01

    A microthermal seeing measurement device has been developed in-house to measure the temperature structure function DT(r, h) and the air temperature Tair(h). A pressure sensor, located adjacent to it, measures the average barometric pressure P(h). From the data measured, the temperature structure coefficient C_T^2(r, h) and the refractive index structure constant C_N^2(h) are computed for the five equidistant microthermal seeing layers in the 3-15 m range in the surface layers. A statistical analysis is performed on the local coherence length ro(loc)(h1, h2). Corresponding values of the atmospheric seeing ɛ(loc)(h1, h2) for all 10 microthermal seeing slabs is also computed and plotted, and the data are logged in real time. Because the characterization of the three sites is under way and the best site for the National Large Solar Telescope facility is yet to be determined, in this paper I discuss the preliminary results obtained from the Hanle site. A summary of the first results is as follows: ɛ(loc) (3 m, 6 m) = 0.663 arcsec, ɛ(loc) (6 m, 9 m) = 0.465 arcsec, ɛ(loc) (9 m, 12 m) = 0.363 arcsec and ɛ(loc) (12 m, 15 m) = 0.315 arcsec.

  13. Comparing measured and modelled soil carbon: which site-specific variables are linked to high stability?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Andy; Schipanski, Meagan; Ma, Liwang; Ahuja, Lajpat; McNamara, Niall; Smith, Pete; Davies, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Changes in soil carbon (C) stocks have been studied in depth over the last two decades, as net greenhouse gas (GHG) sinks are highlighted to be a partial solution to the causes of climate change. However, the stability of this soil C is often overlooked when measuring these changes. Ultimately a net sequestration in soils is far less beneficial if labile C is replacing more stable forms. To date there is no accepted framework for measuring soil C stability, and as a result there is considerable uncertainty associated with the simulated impacts of land management and land use change when using process-based systems models. However, a recent effort to equate measurable soil C fractions to model pools has generated data that help to assess the impacts of land management, and can ultimately help to reduce the uncertainty of model predictions. Our research compiles this existing fractionation data along with site metadata to create a simplistic statistical model able to quantify the relative importance of different site-specific conditions. Data was mined from 23 published studies and combined with original data to generate a dataset of 100+ land use change sites across Europe. For sites to be included they required soil C fractions isolated using the Zimmermann et al. (2007) method and specific site metadata (mean annual precipitation, MAP; mean annual temperature, MAT; soil pH; land use; altitude). Of the sites, 75% were used to develop a generalized linear mixed model (GLMM) to create coefficients where site parameters can be used to predict influence on the measured soil fraction C stocks. The remaining 25% of sites were used to evaluate uncertainty and validate this empirical model. Further, four of the aforementioned sites were used to simulate soil C dynamics using the RothC, DayCent and RZWQM2 models. A sensitivity analysis (4096 model runs for each variable applying Latin hypercube random sampling techniques) was then used to observe whether these models place

  14. Analysis of Hydrogen Tunneling in an Enzyme Active Site using von Neumann Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Sumner, Isaiah; Iyengar, Srinivasan S.

    2010-01-01

    We build on our earlier quantum wavepacket study of hydrogen transfer in the biological enzyme, soybean lipoxygenase-1, by using von Neumann quantum measurement theory to gain qualitative insights into the transfer event. We treat the enzyme active site as a measurement device which acts on the tunneling hydrogen nucleus via the potential it exerts at each configuration. A series of changing active site geometries during the tunneling process effects a sequential projection of the initial, reactant state onto the final, product state. We study this process using several different kinds of von Neumann measurements and show how a discrete sequence of such measurements not only progressively increases the projection of the hydrogen nuclear wavepacket onto the product side but also favors proton over deuteron transfer. Several qualitative features of the hydrogen tunneling problem found in wavepacket dynamics studies are also recovered here. These include the shift in the “transition state” towards the reactant as a result of nuclear quantization, greater participation of excited states in the case of deuterium, and presence of critical points along the reaction coordinate that facilitate hydrogen and deuterium transfer and coincide with surface crossings. To further “tailor” the dynamics, we construct a perturbation to the sequence of measurements, that is a perturbation to the dynamical sequence of active site geometry evolution, which leads us to insight on the existence of sensitive regions of the reaction profile where subtle changes to the dynamics of the active site can have an effect on the hydrogen and deuterium transfer process. PMID:22933858

  15. Anatomy of protein pockets and cavities: measurement of binding site geometry and implications for ligand design.

    PubMed Central

    Liang, J.; Edelsbrunner, H.; Woodward, C.

    1998-01-01

    Identification and size characterization of surface pockets and occluded cavities are initial steps in protein structure-based ligand design. A new program, CAST, for automatically locating and measuring protein pockets and cavities, is based on precise computational geometry methods, including alpha shape and discrete flow theory. CAST identifies and measures pockets and pocket mouth openings, as well as cavities. The program specifies the atoms lining pockets, pocket openings, and buried cavities; the volume and area of pockets and cavities; and the area and circumference of mouth openings. CAST analysis of over 100 proteins has been carried out; proteins examined include a set of 51 monomeric enzyme-ligand structures, several elastase-inhibitor complexes, the FK506 binding protein, 30 HIV-1 protease-inhibitor complexes, and a number of small and large protein inhibitors. Medium-sized globular proteins typically have 10-20 pockets/cavities. Most often, binding sites are pockets with 1-2 mouth openings; much less frequently they are cavities. Ligand binding pockets vary widely in size, most within the range 10(2)-10(3)A3. Statistical analysis reveals that the number of pockets and cavities is correlated with protein size, but there is no correlation between the size of the protein and the size of binding sites. Most frequently, the largest pocket/cavity is the active site, but there are a number of instructive exceptions. Ligand volume and binding site volume are somewhat correlated when binding site volume is < or =700 A3, but the ligand seldom occupies the entire site. Auxiliary pockets near the active site have been suggested as additional binding surface for designed ligands (Mattos C et al., 1994, Nat Struct Biol 1:55-58). Analysis of elastase-inhibitor complexes suggests that CAST can identify ancillary pockets suitable for recruitment in ligand design strategies. Analysis of the FK506 binding protein, and of compounds developed in SAR by NMR (Shuker SB et

  16. Measuring and modeling near surface reflected and emitted radiation fluxes at the FIFE site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blad, Blaine L.; Norman, John M.; Walter-Shea, Elizabeth; Starks, Patrick; Vining, Roel; Hays, Cynthia

    1988-01-01

    Research was conducted during the four Intensive Field Campaigns (IFC) of the FIFE project in 1987. The research was done on a tall grass prairie with specific measurement sites on and near the Konza Prairie in Kansas. Measurements were made to help meet the following objectives: determination of the variability in reflected and emitted radiation fluxes in selected spectral wavebands as a function of topography and vegetative community; development of techniques to account for slope and sun angle effects on the radiation fluxes; estimation of shortwave albedo and net radiation fluxes using the reflected and emitted spectral measurements described; estimation of leaf and canopy spectral properties from calculated normalized differences coupled with off-nadir measurements using inversion techniques; estimation of plant water status at several locations with indices utilizing plant temperature and other environmental parameters; and determination of relationships between estimated plant water status and measured soil water content. Results are discussed.

  17. Evaluation of the H+/site ratio of mitochondrial electron transport from rate measurements.

    PubMed

    Reynafarje, B; Brand, M D; Lehninger, A L

    1976-12-10

    The mitochondrial H+/site ratio (i.e. the number of protons ejected per pair of electrons traversing each of the energy-conserving sites of the respiratory chain) has been evaluated employing a new experimental approach. In this method the rates of oxygen uptake and H+ ejection were measured simultaneously during the initial period of respiration evoked by addition of succinate to aerobic, rotenone-inhibited, de-energized mitochondria. Either K+, in the presence of valinomycin, or Ca2+, was used as mobile cation to dissipate the membrane potential and allow quantitative H+ ejection into the medium. The H+/site ratio observed with this method in the absence of precautions to inhibit the uptake of phosphate was close to 2.0, in agreement with values obtained using the oxygen pulse technique (Mitchell, P. and Moyle, J. (1967) Biochem. J. 105, 1147-1162). However, when phosphate movements were eliminated either by inhibition of the phosphate-hydroxide antiporter with N-ethylamaleimide or by depleting the mitochondria of their endogenous phosphate content, H+/site ratios close to 4.0 were consistently observed. This ratio was independent of the concentration of succinate, of mitochondrial protein, of pH between 6 and 8, and of ionic composition of the medium, provided that sufficient K+ (plus valinomycin) or Ca2+ were present. Specific inhibitors of the hydrolysis of endogenous ATP or transport of other ions (adenine nucleotides, tricarboxylates, HCO3-, etc.) were shown not to affect the observed H+/site ratio. Furthermore, the replacement of succinate by alpha-glycerol phosphate, a substrate which is oxidized on the outer surface of the inner membrane and thus does not need to enter the matrix, gave the same H+/site ratios as did succinate. It is concluded that the H+/site ratio of mitochondrial electron transport, when phosphate movements are eliminated, may be close to 4.0.

  18. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the North Slope Alaska (NSA) Site

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the largest global change research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. To achieve this goal, ARM scientists and researchers around the world use continuous data obtained through the ARM Climate Research Facility. ARM maintains four major, permanent sites for data collection and deploys the ARM Mobile Facility to other sites as determined. The North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site is a permanent site providing data about cloud and radiative processes at high latitudes. These data are being used to refine models and parameterizations as they relate to the Arctic. Centered at Barrow and extending to the south (to the vicinity of Atqasuk), west (to the vicinity of Wainwright), and east (towards Oliktok), the NSA site has become a focal point for atmospheric and ecological research activity on the North Slope. Approximately 300,000 NSA data sets from 1993 to the present reside in the ARM Archive at http://www.archive.arm.gov/. Users will need to register for a password, but all files are then free for viewing or downloading. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  19. The intercrater plains of Mercury and the Moon: Their nature, origin and role in terrestrial planet evolution. Measurement and errors of crater statistics. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leake, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    Planetary imagery techniques, errors in measurement or degradation assignment, and statistical formulas are presented with respect to cratering data. Base map photograph preparation, measurement of crater diameters and sampled area, and instruments used are discussed. Possible uncertainties, such as Sun angle, scale factors, degradation classification, and biases in crater recognition are discussed. The mathematical formulas used in crater statistics are presented.

  20. Site-resolved measurement of the spin-correlation function in the Fermi-Hubbard model.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Maxwell F; Mazurenko, Anton; Chiu, Christie S; Ji, Geoffrey; Greif, Daniel; Greiner, Markus

    2016-09-16

    Exotic phases of matter can emerge from strong correlations in quantum many-body systems. Quantum gas microscopy affords the opportunity to study these correlations with unprecedented detail. Here, we report site-resolved observations of antiferromagnetic correlations in a two-dimensional, Hubbard-regime optical lattice and demonstrate the ability to measure the spin-correlation function over any distance. We measure the in situ distributions of the particle density and magnetic correlations, extract thermodynamic quantities from comparisons to theory, and observe statistically significant correlations over three lattice sites. The temperatures that we reach approach the limits of available numerical simulations. The direct access to many-body physics at the single-particle level demonstrated by our results will further our understanding of how the interplay of motion and magnetism gives rise to new states of matter. PMID:27634527

  1. Historical and current environmental influences on an endemic great plains fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fischer, John R.; Paukert, C.P.

    2008-01-01

    Native fishes of the Great Plains are at risk of decline due to disturbances to physical habitat caused by changes in land and water use, as well as shifts in species assemblages driven by the invasion of introduced species with the loss of natives. We used historical and current fish assemblage data in conjunction with current habitat information to assess these influences on an endemic Great Plains stream fish, the plains topminnow (Fundulus sciadicus). Of the 31 sites where the plains topminnow occurred historically (1939-1940), it was found in only seven of those sites in 2003-2005. Our results demonstrate a shift in fish assemblage over time that coincides with the loss of plains topminnow. Changes in fish assemblages were characterized by increases in occurrence of exotic, invasive and generalist species with declines in occurrences of native fishes. An information theoretic approach was used to evaluate candidate models of current fish assemblage and physical/chemical habitat on the presence of the plains topminnow. Candidate models that included both instream habitat (e.g., vegetation coverage, undercut banks) and the native fish species assemblage are important to predicting presence of the plains topminnow within its historic range. Conservation of Great Plains fishes including the plains topminnow will need a combination of habitat protection and enhancement.

  2. Exploratory Evaluation of the Effect of Axial Rotation, Focal Film Distance and Measurement Methods on the Magnitude of Projected Lumbar Retrolisthesis on Plain Film Radiographs

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Roger R.; Cremata, Edward J.; Lopes, Mark A.; Suttles, Rick A.; Fairbanks, Vaughn R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this exploratory study was to evaluate the amount of error in retrolisthesis measurement due to measurement methods or projection factors inherent in spinal radiography. In addition, this study compared how accurately these methods determine positions of the lumbar vertebrae being studied and the expected projected size of the retrolisthesis. Methods Vertebral models were situated in a retrolisthesis position. Radiographs of the models were obtained in positive and negative y-axis rotations at 40- and 84-in focal film distances. The projected retrolisthesis was measured using the Gohl, Iguchi, and Lopes methods. Results At the 40-in focal film distance, the Iguchi method and Lopes methods were significantly more accurate than the Gohl method. At the 84-in focal film distance, the Lopes method was significantly more accurate than the Gohl method. Almost all measurements overestimated both the actual amount of retrolisthesis as well as the amount of trigonometrically calculated retrolisthesis that should have been present on the radiographs. Findings suggest that measurements were less accurate with vertebrae rotated more than 10°. Conclusions This study demonstrated that lumbar vertebral rotation, focal film distance, and measurement methods are potential sources of error in retrolisthesis measurement. PMID:25435838

  3. Thermal properties measurements on rocksalt samples from the site of the proposed Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, J. N.; McCreight, J. E.

    1980-05-13

    Thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, and specific heat measurements have been made on a number of specimens. The specific heat measurements were made by differential scanning calorimetry and the results showed that the specific heats of both clean rocksalt samples and of dirty samples with less than or equal to 7% insoluble impurities were essentially identical to the published specific heat for pure NaCl. In the thermal expansion measurements, two distinct groups of samples were identified. The first group had average expansion coefficients in the temperature range 300 to 700/sup 0/K close to that reported for pure NaCl. All the samples in this group were composed predominantly of halite, with only small amounts of other minerals or materials present. A second group of samples had expansion coefficients only approx. 0.3 to 0.5 that of NaCl. The samples in this group were composed largely of polyhalite, anhydrite, or siltstone. The measurements first reported by Acton on the thermal conductivity of samples taken from a borehole at the site of the proposed nuclear waste isolation pilot plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, NM, have been extended to include additional samples and higher temperature measurements. This is not believed to be the result of the onset of radiative thermal transport because the deviations are negative as well as positive. Infrared transmission measurements on rocksalt samples from the proposed WIPP site show no transmission in the 3 to 10 ..mu..m wavelength range for samples > 5 cm thick. Use of the estimated infrared absorption coefficient leads to the conclusion that there is little radiative heat transport for T < 800/sup 0/K. All samples were dense with little or no porosity evident. On the basis of these experiments, it is concluded that the thermal conductivity of materials found at the site can be predicted to an accuracy +- 30% from knowledge of the composition and grain size of these materials.

  4. The intercrater plains of Mercury and the Moon: Their nature, origin and role in terrestrial planet evolution. Areal measurement of Mercury's first quadrant. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leake, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    Various linear and areal measurements of Mercury's first quadrant which were used in geological map preparation, map analysis, and statistical surveys of crater densities are discussed. Accuracy of each method rests on the determination of the scale of the photograph, i.e., the conversion factor between distances on the planet (in km) and distances on the photograph (in cm). Measurement errors arise due to uncertainty in Mercury's radius, poor resolution, poor coverage, high Sun angle illumination in the limb regions, planetary curvature, limited precision in measuring instruments, and inaccuracies in the printed map scales. Estimates are given for these errors.

  5. Filling the gaps in meteorological continuous data measured at FLUXNET sites with ERA-Interim reanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuichard, N.; Papale, D.

    2015-07-01

    Exchanges of carbon, water and energy between the land surface and the atmosphere are monitored by eddy covariance technique at the ecosystem level. Currently, the FLUXNET database contains more than 500 registered sites, and up to 250 of them share data (free fair-use data set). Many modelling groups use the FLUXNET data set for evaluating ecosystem models' performance, but this requires uninterrupted time series for the meteorological variables used as input. Because original in situ data often contain gaps, from very short (few hours) up to relatively long (some months) ones, we develop a new and robust method for filling the gaps in meteorological data measured at site level. Our approach has the benefit of making use of continuous data available globally (ERA-Interim) and a high temporal resolution spanning from 1989 to today. These data are, however, not measured at site level, and for this reason a method to downscale and correct the ERA-Interim data is needed. We apply this method to the level 4 data (L4) from the La Thuile collection, freely available after registration under a fair-use policy. The performance of the developed method varies across sites and is also function of the meteorological variable. On average over all sites, applying the bias correction method to the ERA-Interim data reduced the mismatch with the in situ data by 10 to 36 %, depending on the meteorological variable considered. In comparison to the internal variability of the in situ data, the root mean square error (RMSE) between the in situ data and the unbiased ERA-I (ERA-Interim) data remains relatively large (on average over all sites, from 27 to 76 % of the standard deviation of in situ data, depending on the meteorological variable considered). The performance of the method remains poor for the wind speed field, in particular regarding its capacity to conserve a standard deviation similar to the one measured at FLUXNET stations. The ERA-Interim reanalysis data de-biased at

  6. Filling the gaps in meteorological continuous data measured at FLUXNET sites with ERA-interim reanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuichard, N.; Papale, D.

    2015-01-01

    Exchanges of carbon, water and energy between the land surface and the atmosphere are monitored by eddy covariance technique at the ecosystem level. Currently, the FLUXNET database contains more than 500 sites registered and up to 250 of them sharing data (Free Fair Use dataset). Many modelling groups use the FLUXNET dataset for evaluating ecosystem model's performances but it requires uninterrupted time series for the meteorological variables used as input. Because original in-situ data often contain gaps, from very short (few hours) up to relatively long (some months), we develop a new and robust method for filling the gaps in meteorological data measured at site level. Our approach has the benefit of making use of continuous data available globally (ERA-interim) and high temporal resolution spanning from 1989 to today. These data are however not measured at site level and for this reason a method to downscale and correct the ERA-interim data is needed. We apply this method on the level 4 data (L4) from the LaThuile collection, freely available after registration under a Fair-Use policy. The performances of the developed method vary across sites and are also function of the meteorological variable. On average overall sites, the bias correction leads to cancel from 10 to 36% of the initial mismatch between in-situ and ERA-interim data, depending of the meteorological variable considered. In comparison to the internal variability of the in-situ data, the root mean square error (RMSE) between the in-situ data and the un-biased ERA-I data remains relatively large (on average overall sites, from 27 to 76% of the standard deviation of in-situ data, depending of the meteorological variable considered). The performance of the method remains low for the wind speed field, in particular regarding its capacity to conserve a standard deviation similar to the one measured at FLUXNET stations. The ERA-interim reanalysis data debiased at FLUXNET sites can be downloaded from the

  7. Aerosol measurements at a high-elevation site: composition, size, and cloud condensation nuclei activity

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Beth; Zelenyuk, Alla; Beranek, Josef; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Hallar, Anna G.; McCubbin, Ian; Thornton, Joel A.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2013-12-09

    We present measurements of CCN concentrations and associated aerosol composition and size properties at a high-elevation research site in March 2011. CCN closure and aerosol hygroscopicity were assessed using simplified assumptions of bulk aerosol properties as well as a new method utilizing single particle composition and size to assess the importance of particle mixing state in CCN activation. Free troposphere analysis found no significant difference between the CCN activity of free tropospheric aerosol and boundary layer aerosol at this location. Closure results indicate that using only size and number information leads to adequate prediction, in the majority of cases within 50%, of CCN concentrations, while incorporating the hygroscopicity parameters of the individual aerosol components measured by single particle mass spectrometry adds to the agreement, in most cases within 20%, between predicted and measured CCN concentrations. For high-elevation continental sites, with largely aged aerosol and low amounts of local area emissions, a lack of chemical knowledge and hygroscopicity may not hinder models in predicting CCN concentrations. At sites influenced by fresh emissions or more heterogeneous particle types, single particle composition information may be more useful in predicting CCN concentrations and understanding the importance of particle mixing state on CCN activation.

  8. Pulsed EPR Distance Measurements in Soluble Proteins by Site-directed Spin-labeling (SDSL)

    PubMed Central

    de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S.; Blackburn, Mandy E.; Galiano, Luis; Fanucci, Gail E.

    2015-01-01

    The resurgence of pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) in structural biology centers on recent improvements in distance measurements using the double electron-electron resonance (DEER) technique. This unit focuses on EPR-based distance measurements by site-directed spin-labeling (SDSL) of engineered cysteine residues in soluble proteins, with HIV-1 protease used as a model. To elucidate conformational changes in proteins, experimental protocols were optimized and existing data analysis programs were employed to derive distance distribution profiles. Experimental considerations, sample preparation and error analysis for artifact suppression are also outlined here. PMID:24510645

  9. Measurement of the fast neutron flux in the MNSR inner irradiation site.

    PubMed

    Khattab, K

    2007-01-01

    The WIMSD4 code was used to calculate the fast neutron flux spectrum and the fast neutron fission cross-sections for (238)U, using six energy groups ranging from 0.5 to 10 MeV. These results, with the measured radioactivities of the (140)Ba, (131)I, (103)Ru, (95)Zr and (97)Zr fission products emerging from the fission of the (238)U foil covered with a cadmium filter, were used to measure the fast neutron flux in the Syrian Miniature Neutron Source Reactor inner irradiation site.

  10. Plain packaging of cigarettes: do we have sufficient evidence?

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Collin N; Kraemer, John D; Johnson, Andrea C; Mays, Darren

    2015-01-01

    Tobacco industry marketing is a primary factor influencing cigarette smoking behavior and the cigarette pack has become an important marketing vehicle for tobacco companies. Standardized “plain” cigarette packaging is advocated as a public health policy to prevent and reduce morbidity and mortality caused by smoking by reducing youth smoking initiation and promoting cessation among smokers. Plain packaging was implemented in Australia in December 2012, and several other countries are considering doing so, but each faces foreseeable legal resistance from opponents to such measures. Tobacco companies have challenged these public health policies, citing international trade agreements and intellectual property laws. Decision-making in these court cases will hinge in part on whether the evidence indicates the public health benefits of plain packaging outweigh any potential harm to tobacco manufacturers’ interests. We reviewed the available evidence in support of plain packaging, finding evidence from observational, experimental, and population-based studies. Results indicate that plain packaging can reduce positive perceptions of smoking and dissuade tobacco use. Governments deciding to implement plain cigarette packaging measures can rely on this evidence to help make a strong case that plain packaging plays an important role in the context of comprehensive smoking prevention efforts. PMID:25897269

  11. Evaluation of measurement reproducibility using the standard-sites data, 1994 Fernald field characterization demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Rautman, C.A.

    1996-02-01

    The US Department of Energy conducted the 1994 Fernald (Ohio) field characterization demonstration project to evaluate the performance of a group of both industry-standard and proposed alternative technologies in describing the nature and extent of uranium contamination in surficial soils. Detector stability and measurement reproducibility under actual operating conditions encountered in the field is critical to establishing the credibility of the proposed alternative characterization methods. Comparability of measured uranium activities to those reported by conventional, US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-certified laboratory methods is also required. The eleven (11) technologies demonstrated included (1) EPA-standard soil sampling and laboratory mass-spectroscopy analyses, and currently-accepted field-screening techniques using (2) sodium-iodide scintillometers, (3) FIDLER low-energy scintillometers, and (4) a field-portable x-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Proposed advanced characterization techniques included (5) alpha-track detectors, (6) a high-energy beta scintillometer, (7) electret ionization chambers, (8) and (9) a high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometer in two different configurations, (10) a field-adapted laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) technique, and (11) a long-range alpha detector. Measurement reproducibility and the accuracy of each method were tested by acquiring numerous replicate measurements of total uranium activity at each of two ``standard sites`` located within the main field demonstration area. Meteorological variables including temperature, relative humidity. and 24-hour rainfall quantities were also recorded in conjunction with the standard-sites measurements.

  12. MEASUREMENT AND PREDICTION OF RADIOLYTIC HYDROGEN PRODUCTION IN DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING SLURRIES AT SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Bibler, N; John Pareizs, J; Terri Fellinger, T; Cj Bannochie, C

    2007-01-10

    This paper presents results of measurements and predictions of radiolytic hydrogen production rates from two actual process slurries in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at Savannah River Site (SRS). Hydrogen is a flammable gas and its production in nuclear facilities can be a safety hazard if not mitigated. Measurements were made in the Shielded Cells of Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) using a sample of Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) currently being processed by the DWPF. Predictions were made using published values for rates of radiolytic reactions producing H{sub 2} in aqueous solutions and the measured radionuclide and chemical compositions of the two slurries. The agreement between measured and predicted results for nine experiments ranged from complete agreement to 24% difference. This agreement indicates that if the composition of the slurry being processed is known, the rate of radiolytic hydrogen production can be reasonably estimated.

  13. Characterization of Lunar Farside Plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mest, S.C.; Garry, W. B.; Ostrach, L. R.; Han, S.-C.; Staid, M. I.

    2016-01-01

    The Moon contains broad and isolated areas of plains that have been recognized as mare, cryptomare, impact ejecta, or impact melt. These deposits have been extensively studied on the lunar nearside by remote sensing via telescopes and numerous spacecraft, and in some cases, in situ robotically and by astronauts. Only recently have the deposits on the entire farside been able to be observed and evaluated to the same degree. There are spatially extensive plains deposits located throughout the lunar farside highlands whose formation has remained ambiguous. Many of the plains deposits in the lunar farside highlands display higher albedos than mare materials. Some deposits are located in close proximity to relatively younger impact craters suggesting that plains could be composed of cryptomare or ejecta materials. Some deposits are within the range in which ejecta from large basin-forming events (e.g., SPA and Orientale) likely distributed large amounts of ejecta across the surface. Here we are conducting a series of observations and models in order to resolve the nature and origin of lunar farside plains deposits. Understanding these plains is important for understanding the volcanic and impact histories of the lunar farside, and is important for future mapping and thermal modeling studies.

  14. Measurement of Gaseous Oxidized Mercury at a SEARCH Network Site in Florida, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J.; Miller, M. B.; Gustin, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    There are three operationally defined forms of mercury (Hg) that have been measured in the atmosphere. These include gaseous elemental Hg (GEM), gaseous oxidized Hg (GOM), and particle-bound Hg (PBM). The chemical compounds that make up GOM are currently not well understood, and because of this we do not understand its transport and fate. Additionally, there are limitations associated with the current measurement method, the Tekran 2537/1130/1135 system. Recent work has shown that this system underestimates GOM concentrations, and may not measure all forms. Here we describe work building on ongoing research that focuses on understanding the limitations associated with the instrument, and the chemical forms of GOM. Mercury data have been collected at a Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization (SEARCH) network site, Outlying Landing Field (OLF), by the University of Nevada-Reno since 2006. This site is located near the Gulf of Mexico in western Florida. This site is potentially influenced by multiple Hg sources including marine air, electricity generating facilities, mobile sources, and long range transport from high elevation and inland regions. Recent work using data from this location and two others in Florida indicated that on top of background deposition, Hg input to OLF is due to local mobile sources, and long range transport in the spring. Air masses with different chemistry have been hypothesized to carry different GOM compounds. To test this hypothesis, an active Hg sampling system that collects GOM on nylon and cation-exchange membranes is being deployed at OLF. Measurements started March 2013. Here we will present data collected so far, and compare concentrations measured to those obtained using a Tekran system. Ancillary data including meteorology, criteria air pollutants, and those collected using surrogated surfaces for dry Hg deposition and Hg passive samplers will be applied to help understand the sources of GOM. Back trajectory analyses

  15. Nitrogen oxides measurements in an Amazon site and enhancements associated with a cold front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordova, A. M.; Longo, K.; Freitas, S.; Gatti, L. V.; Artaxo, P.; Procópio, A.; Silva Dias, M. A. F.; Freitas, E. D.

    2004-05-01

    An intensive atmospheric chemistry study was carried out in a pristine Amazonian forest site (Balbina), Amazonas state, Brazil during the 2001 wet season, as part of the LBA/CLAIRE 2001 (The Large Scale Biosphere Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia/Cooperative LBA Airborne Regional Experiment) field campaign. Measurements of nitrogen oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3) were performed simultaneously with aerosol particles and black carbon concentrations and meteorological parameters observations. Very low trace gases and aerosol concentrations are typically observed at this pristine tropical site. During the measurement period, there was a three-day episode of enhancement of NO2 and black carbon concentration. NO2 concentration reached a maximum value of 4 ppbv, which corresponds to three times the background concentration observed for this site. Black carbon concentration increased from the approximated 100 ng/m3 average value to a 200 ng/m3 maximum during the same period. Biomass burning spots were detected southward, between latitudes 15 to 10° S, 5-6 days before this episode from GOES-8 WF_ABBA (Wildfire Automated Biomass Burning Algorithm). An atmospheric numerical simulation of the whole measurement period was carried out using the RAMS model coupled to a biomass burning emission and transport model. The simulation results pictured a smoke transport event from Central Brazil associated to an approach of a mid-latitude cold front, reinforcing the hypothesis of biomass burning products being long-range transported from the South by the cold front and crossing the Equator. This transport event shows how the pristine atmosphere pattern in Amazonia is impacted by biomass burning emissions from sites very far away.

  16. Long Term Agroecosystem Research in the southern plains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Southern Plains (SP) site of the Long Term Agroecosystem Research (LTAR) network is headquartered at USDA-ARS’s Grazinglands Research Laboratory (GRL) in El Reno, Oklahoma. The GRL was established in 1948. A long-term watershed and climate research program was established in the Little Washita ...

  17. The dawn of the Southern Plains Range Research Station

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    On 31 October 1913, U.S. Senator Thomas P. Gore announced that Woodward would be the site of the government experiment farm in western Oklahoma. This marked the beginning of a century of USDA agricultural research on the southern Great Plains. A 160 acre parcel of land located southwest of the cit...

  18. Measuring and computing natural ground-water recharge at sites in south-central Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sophocleous, M.A.; Perry, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    To measure the natural groundwater recharge process, two sites in south-central Kansas were instrumented with sensors and data microloggers. The atmospheric-boundary layer and the unsaturated and saturated soil zones were monitored as a single regime. Direct observations also were used to evaluate the measurements. Atmospheric sensors included an anemometer, a tipping-bucket rain gage, an air-temperature thermistor, a relative-humidity probe, a net radiometer, and a barometric-pressure transducer. Sensors in the unsaturated zone consisted of soil-temperature thermocouples, tensiometers coupled with pressure transducers and dial gages, gypsum blocks, and a neutron-moisture probe. The saturated-zone sensors consisted of a water-level pressure transducer, a conventional float gage connected to a variable potentiometer, soil thermocouples, and a number of multiple-depth piezometers. Evaluation of the operation of these sensors and recorders indicates that certain types of equipment, such as pressure transducers, are very sensitive to environmental conditions. A number of suggestions aimed at improving instrumentation of recharge investigations are outlined. Precipitation and evapotranspiration data, taken together with soil moisture profiles and storage changes, water fluxes in the unsaturated zone and hydraulic gradients in the saturated zone at various depths, soil temperature, water table hydrographs, and water level changes in nearby wells, describe the recharge process. Although the two instrumented sites are located in sand-dune environments in area characterized by a shallow water table and a sub-humid continental climate, a significant difference was observed in the estimated total recharge. The estimates ranged from less than 2.5 mm at the Zenith site to approximately 154 mm at the Burrton site from February to June 1983. The principal reasons that the Burrton site had more recharge than the Zenith site were more precipitation, less evapotranspiration, and a

  19. Determination of a standard site for the measurement of bone mineral density of the human calcaneus

    PubMed Central

    BURSTON, B.; McNALLY, D. S.; NICHOLSON, H. D.

    1998-01-01

    Ultrasound of the calcaneus may be used as a cheap, ionising radiation-free and easy to use indicator of skeletal status, and hence of osteoporotic fracture risk. At present ultrasound is not widely used as it suffers from high precision errors. As ultrasound parameters are determined in part by bone mineral density (BMD), an increase in the accuracy and precision of BMD measurements should reduce the precision error associated with ultrasound measurements. The aim of this study was to define an anatomical site on the calcaneus at which accurate and precise measurements of BMD can be made. Ten dry calcanei and 10 cadaveric feet were scanned using a DXA scanner; 9 anatomically defined regions (1 cm2) were selected in the posterior part of the calcaneus for analysis. The centre of region 1 was positioned halfway along the line joining the anterior border of the calcaneal tubercle and the peak of the posterior superior tubercle, and the remaining 8 regions were placed around this central area. The BMD in these 9 regions was compared with the whole bone BMD and the variability of BMD within each of the 9 regions was measured. The reproducibility of the technique was assessed by taking 10 repeated measurements of 2 bone and 2 cadaveric specimens, each specimen being removed and repositioned between measurements. Region 1 was found to be the most representative of total BMD in cadaveric feet. This region also showed the least variability of BMD and consistently gave the lowest coefficients of variation in the reproducibility study both in the bone and the cadaveric specimens. This region is hence the most suitable site on the calcaneus for measuring absolute values of and changes in BMD. The surface position of region 1 was found to be consistently 5/9 along the line at 45° to the vertical, from the lateral malleolus to the heel. The identification of the surface location of region 1 relative to anatomical landmarks of the foot has enabled the same anatomical site to be

  20. Filling the gaps in meteorological continuous data measured at FLUXNET sites with ERA-Interim reanalysis

    DOE PAGES

    Vuichard, N.; Papale, D.

    2015-07-13

    In this study, exchanges of carbon, water and energy between the land surface and the atmosphere are monitored by eddy covariance technique at the ecosystem level. Currently, the FLUXNET database contains more than 500 registered sites, and up to 250 of them share data (free fair-use data set). Many modelling groups use the FLUXNET data set for evaluating ecosystem models' performance, but this requires uninterrupted time series for the meteorological variables used as input. Because original in situ data often contain gaps, from very short (few hours) up to relatively long (some months) ones, we develop a new and robustmore » method for filling the gaps in meteorological data measured at site level. Our approach has the benefit of making use of continuous data available globally (ERA-Interim) and a high temporal resolution spanning from 1989 to today. These data are, however, not measured at site level, and for this reason a method to downscale and correct the ERA-Interim data is needed. We apply this method to the level 4 data (L4) from the La Thuile collection, freely available after registration under a fair-use policy. The performance of the developed method varies across sites and is also function of the meteorological variable. On average over all sites, applying the bias correction method to the ERA-Interim data reduced the mismatch with the in situ data by 10 to 36 %, depending on the meteorological variable considered. In comparison to the internal variability of the in situ data, the root mean square error (RMSE) between the in situ data and the unbiased ERA-I (ERA-Interim) data remains relatively large (on average over all sites, from 27 to 76 % of the standard deviation of in situ data, depending on the meteorological variable considered). The performance of the method remains poor for the wind speed field, in particular regarding its capacity to conserve a standard deviation similar to the one measured at FLUXNET stations.« less

  1. Cloud Classes and Radiative Heating profiles at the Manus and Nauru Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Mather, James H.; McFarlane, Sally A.

    2009-10-07

    The Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) is a convective regime; however, the frequency and depth of convection is dependant on dynamical forcing which exhibits variability on a range of temporal scales and also on location within the region. Manus Island, Papua New Guinea lies in the heart of the western Pacific warm pool region and exhibits frequent deep convection much of the time while Nauru, which lies approximately 20 degrees to the East of Manus, lies in a transition zone where the frequency of convection is dependent on the phase of the El Nino/Southern Oscillation. Because of this difference in dynamical regime, the distribution of clouds and the associated radiative heating is quite different at the two sites. Individual cloud types: boundary layer cumulus, thin cirrus, stratiform convective outflow, do occur at both sites – but with different frequencies. In this study we compare cloud profiles and heating profiles for specific cloud types at these two sites using data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF). Results of this comparison indicate that, while the frequency of specific cloud types differ between the two sites as one would expect, the characteristics of individual cloud classes are remarkably similar. This information could prove to be very useful for applying tropical ARM data to the broader region.

  2. Measurements of integrated water vapor and cloud liquid water from microwave radiometers at the DOE ARM Cloud and Radiation Testbed in the U.S. Southern Great Plains

    SciTech Connect

    Liljegren, J.C.; Lesht, B.M.

    1996-06-01

    The operation and calibration of the ARM microwave radiometers is summarized. Measured radiometric brightness temperatures are compared with calculations based on the model using co-located radiosondes. Comparisons of perceptible water vapor retrieved from the radiometer with integrated soundings and co-located GPS retrievals are presented. The three water vapor sensing systems are shown to agree to within about 1 mm.

  3. Tropospheric delay statistics measured by two site test interferometers at Goldstone, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morabito, David D.; D'Addario, Larry R.; Acosta, Roberto J.; Nessel, James A.

    2013-12-01

    Site test interferometers (STIs) have been deployed at two locations within the NASA Deep Space Network tracking complex in Goldstone, California. An STI measures the difference of atmospheric delay fluctuations over a distance comparable to the separations of microwave antennas that could be combined as phased arrays for communication and navigation. The purpose of the Goldstone STIs is to assess the suitability of Goldstone as an uplink array site and to statistically characterize atmosphere-induced phase delay fluctuations for application to future arrays. Each instrument consists of two ~1 m diameter antennas and associated electronics separated by ~200 m. The antennas continuously observe signals emitted by geostationary satellites and produce measurements of the phase difference between the received signals. The two locations at Goldstone are separated by 12.5 km and differ in elevation by 119 m. We find that their delay fluctuations are statistically similar but do not appear as shifted versions of each other, suggesting that the length scale for evolution of the turbulence pattern is shorter than the separation between instruments. We also find that the fluctuations are slightly weaker at the higher altitude site.

  4. Sediment transport time measured with U-Series isotopes: Resultsfrom ODP North Atlantic Drill Site 984

    SciTech Connect

    DePaolo, Donald J.; Maher, Kate; Christensen, John N.; McManus,Jerry

    2006-06-05

    High precision uranium isotope measurements of marineclastic sediments are used to measure the transport and storage time ofsediment from source to site of deposition. The approach is demonstratedon fine-grained, late Pleistocene deep-sea sediments from Ocean DrillingProgram Site 984A on the Bjorn Drift in the North Atlantic. The sedimentsare siliciclastic with up to 30 percent carbonate, and dated by sigma 18Oof benthic foraminifera. Nd and Sr isotopes indicate that provenance hasoscillated between a proximal source during the last three interglacialperiods volcanic rocks from Iceland and a distal continental sourceduring glacial periods. An unexpected finding is that the 234U/238Uratios of the silicate portion of the sediment, isolated by leaching withhydrochloric acid, are significantly less than the secular equilibriumvalue and show large and systematic variations that are correlated withglacial cycles and sediment provenance. The 234U depletions are inferredto be due to alpha-recoil loss of234Th, and are used to calculate"comminution ages" of the sediment -- the time elapsed between thegeneration of the small (<_ 50 mu-m) sediment grains in the sourceareas by comminution of bedrock, and the time of deposition on theseafloor. Transport times, the difference between comminution ages anddepositional ages, vary from less than 10 ky to about 300 to 400 ky forthe Site 984A sediments. Long transport times may reflect prior storagein soils, on continental shelves, or elsewhere on the seafloor. Transporttime may also be a measure of bottom current strength. During the mostrecent interglacial periods the detritus from distal continental sourcesis diluted with sediment from Iceland that is rapidly transported to thesite of deposition. The comminution age approach could be used to dateQuaternary non-marine sediments, soils, and atmospheric dust, and may beenhanced by concomitant measurement of 226Ra/230Th, 230Th/234U, andcosmogenic nuclides.

  5. Observations from the Williams Tower measurement site during TexAQS 2000: an Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imre, D.; Brechtel, F.; Zelenyuk, A.; Doskey, P.; Spicer, C.; Joseph, D.; Berkowitz, C.; Alexander, M.; Cowin, J.; Weinstein-Lloyd, J.; Baumann, K.

    2002-12-01

    The Williams Tower measurement site operated during TexAQS 2000 provided a unique sampling opportunity making it possible to study the meteorological and chemical day-night evolution of the planetary boundary layer. The skyscraper measurements were made from the 62nd floor of Williams Tower located in uptown Houston. Teams of scientists from six organizations set up 20 instruments for sampling 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Participant groups included Battelle's Columbus Operations, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, State University of New York at Old Westbury, Georgia Institute of Technology, University of California at Davis, and the Texas Natural Resources Conservation Commission. The measurement systems filled two rooms; one room was used primarily for gas-phase measurements of O3, NO/NOy, PAN, SO2, CO, CH2O, HNO3, HONO, H2O2, and organic peroxide. Temperature, pressure and moisture were also monitored. The measurements in the 2nd room focused on aerosol characterization some of which used new techniques. Aerosol size distribution was obtained using two scanning differential mobility analyzers. Aerosol bulk composition was obtained using time resolved filter sampling. Single particle size and composition was measured using a sampler that provides atomic composition using scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersed X-ray analysis, and real-time single particle time of flight mass spectrometer. This paper will present the overview of the tower observations made at the height of 830 feet above the ground in the context of results from aircraft and other surface site observations. The data provide a rather complete suite of gas and aerosol measurements which makes it possible to characterize the Houston air west of the major emission sources. The elevated measurement site also makes it possible to investigate the chemistry within and above the nocturnal boundary layer. Results from box

  6. Measurements of Turbulence at Two Tidal Energy Sites in Puget Sound, WA

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, Jim; Polagye, Brian; Durgesh, Vibhav; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2012-06-05

    Field measurements of turbulence are pre- sented from two sites in Puget Sound, WA (USA) that are proposed for electrical power generation using tidal current turbines. Rapidly sampled data from multiple acoustic Doppler instruments are analyzed to obtain statistical mea- sures of fluctuations in both the magnitude and direction of the tidal currents. The resulting turbulence intensities (i.e., the turbulent velocity fluctuations normalized by the harmonic tidal currents) are typically 10% at the hub- heights (i.e., the relevant depth bin) of the proposed turbines. Length and time scales of the turbulence are also analyzed. Large-scale, anisotropic eddies dominate the energy spectra, which may be the result of proximity to headlands at each site. At small scales, an isotropic turbulent cascade is observed and used to estimate the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy. Data quality and sampling parameters are discussed, with an emphasis on the removal of Doppler noise from turbulence statistics.

  7. Isotopes and sustainability of ground water resources, North China Plain.

    PubMed

    Zongyu, Chen; Zhenlong, Nie; Zhaoji, Zhang; Jixiang, Qi; Yunju, Nan

    2005-01-01

    Ground water in deep confined aquifers is one of the major water resources for agricultural, industrial, and domestic uses in the North China Plain. Detailed information on ground water age and recharge is vital for the proper management of these water resources, and to this end, we used carbon 14 of dissolved inorganic carbon and tritium in water to measure the age and determine the recharge areas of ground water in the North China Plain. These isotopic data suggest that most ground water in the piedmont part of the North China Plain is <40 years old and is recharged locally. In contrast, ground water in the central and littoral portions of the North China Plain is 10,000 to 25,000 years old. The delta18O (deltaD) values of this ground water are 1.7 per thousand (11 per thousand) less than that in the piedmont plain ground water and possibly reflect water recharged during a cooler climate during the last glaciation. The temperature of this recharge, based on delta18O values, ranges from 3.7 degrees C to 8.4 degrees C, compared to 12 degrees C to 13 degrees C of modern recharge water. The isotopic data set combined indicates that ground water in the central and littoral part of the North China Plain is being mined under non-steady state conditions.

  8. Dynamics of playa lakes in the Texas High Plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, C. C., Jr. (Principal Investigator)

    1972-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Regional viewing of ERTS-1 imagery around the test sites shows that storm paths can be accurately traced and a count made of the number of intermittent lake basins filled by the storm. Therefore, during wet years ERTS-type imagery can be used to conduct a reliable count of the tens of thousands of natural lake basins on the southern High Plains which contain water. This type of regional overview of water filled basins in the normally arid southern High Plains is illustrated by bands 6 and 7, ERTS E-1078-16524.

  9. Overall dry deposition velocities of trace elements measured at harbor and traffic site in central Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Fang, Guor-Cheng; Wu, Yuh-Shen; Chang, Shih-Yu; Lin, Jum-Bo; Lin, Jhih-Guang

    2007-03-01

    For reasonable and convenient assessments of the characteristics of the dry deposition velocities between Taichung harbor site and Wuchi town site in central Taiwan, the overall dry deposition velocities of several metallic elements were calculated as the particulate diameter (D(p)) distributions of large particles (D(p) > 10 microm), coarse particles (10 microm < D(p) < 2.5 microm), and fine particles (D(p) < 2.5 microm) based on the ambient measurements during March-December of 2004. In this work, the dry deposition fluxes showed the higher correlation with coarse particle concentrations than large particle concentrations; however, the least well correlation was observed between the dry deposition fluxes and the fine particle concentrations. The calculated best-fit overall dry deposition velocities obtained using coarse particle concentrations varied from approximately 0.2 cm s(-1) for Cr to 1.5 cm s(-1) for Pb and 0.2 cm s(-1) for Fe to 2.6 cm s(-1) for Pb at Taichung harbor and Wuchi town site, respectively. In general, the crustal elements had higher deposition velocities than anthropogenic elements. In addition, overall dry deposition velocities for crustal elements were higher in Wuchi town site than in Taichung harbor site. The results identified the dry deposition flux was mainly contributed from large and coarse particles due to their high deposition velocities. The results also indicated that the best approach to estimate overall dry deposition was by depending on the characteristics of particles with diameters larger than 2.5 microm. PMID:17166552

  10. Spatial variation of aerosol optical properties in North China Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xuehua

    2013-04-01

    The column-integrated optical properties of aerosol in Beijing and Xianghe situated at North China Plain were investigated based on Sun/sky radiometer measurements made at Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites. Only version 2 and level 2 quality-assured data were presented and analyzed in this paper. Time intervals differ for the two sites, with Beijing having 9 years of data (Mar.-May, 2001; Apr., 2002-Dec., 2011),while Xianghe having 6 years of data (Mar.-Apr., 2001;Sep., 2004-Dec.,2011). Monthly mean 500 nm AOT values reach a maximum in June (0.95) and exceed 0.55 from March through September, and the minimum values occur during the late fall and winter months of November through February at Beijing. The monthly mean AOT values at Xianghe are very close to those measured at Beijing. The absolute differences of AOT between the two sites are less than 0.1 except in June and July. The reason of large difference in June and July is the frequently cloud contamination in summer result in the monthly means over the two sites computed from a large number of measurements of different date. The monthly averaged AOT with the same date in June and July are re-computed and the absolute difference of AOT between Beijing and Xianghe reduced to 0.01 and 0.03 in June and July respectively. The monthly mean Angstrom Exponent (AE) in Beijing and Xianghe sites are very close, with the absolute difference less than 0.075. The monthly mean AE in the two sites varied between ~1.0 and ~1.3 except in spring (March-May), therefore clearly dominated by fine mode aerosol for most of the year. All monthly averaged SSA at Beijing showed much lower value as compared to Xianghe though the seasonal variations are similar for the two sites, which indicates that aerosol absorption is greater in Beijing. All monthly averaged imaginary part of refractive index at Beijing has much higher value than Xianghe. The absolute differences of SSA between the two sites range from 0.016 to 0.037 except that

  11. Digital Accessible Knowledge and well-inventoried sites for birds in Mexico: baseline sites for measuring faunistic change

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Sigüenza, Adolfo G.; Martínez-Meyer, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Background Faunal change is a basic and fundamental element in ecology, biogeography, and conservation biology, yet vanishingly few detailed studies have documented such changes rigorously over decadal time scales. This study responds to that gap in knowledge, providing a detailed analysis of Digital Accessible Knowledge of the birds of Mexico, designed to marshal DAK to identify sites that were sampled and inventoried rigorously prior to the beginning of major global climate change (1980). Methods We accumulated DAK records for Mexican birds from all relevant online biodiversity data portals. After extensive cleaning steps, we calculated completeness indices for each 0.05° pixel across the country; we also detected ‘hotspots’ of sampling, and calculated completeness indices for these broader areas as well. Sites were designated as well-sampled if they had completeness indices above 80% and >200 associated DAK records. Results We identified 100 individual pixels and 20 broader ‘hotspots’ of sampling that were demonstrably well-inventoried prior to 1980. These sites are catalogued and documented to promote and enable resurvey efforts that can document events of avifaunal change (and non-change) across the country on decadal time scales. Conclusions Development of repeated surveys for many sites across Mexico, and particularly for sites for which historical surveys document their avifaunas prior to major climate change processes, would pay rich rewards in information about distributional dynamics of Mexican birds.

  12. Digital Accessible Knowledge and well-inventoried sites for birds in Mexico: baseline sites for measuring faunistic change

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Sigüenza, Adolfo G.; Martínez-Meyer, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Background Faunal change is a basic and fundamental element in ecology, biogeography, and conservation biology, yet vanishingly few detailed studies have documented such changes rigorously over decadal time scales. This study responds to that gap in knowledge, providing a detailed analysis of Digital Accessible Knowledge of the birds of Mexico, designed to marshal DAK to identify sites that were sampled and inventoried rigorously prior to the beginning of major global climate change (1980). Methods We accumulated DAK records for Mexican birds from all relevant online biodiversity data portals. After extensive cleaning steps, we calculated completeness indices for each 0.05° pixel across the country; we also detected ‘hotspots’ of sampling, and calculated completeness indices for these broader areas as well. Sites were designated as well-sampled if they had completeness indices above 80% and >200 associated DAK records. Results We identified 100 individual pixels and 20 broader ‘hotspots’ of sampling that were demonstrably well-inventoried prior to 1980. These sites are catalogued and documented to promote and enable resurvey efforts that can document events of avifaunal change (and non-change) across the country on decadal time scales. Conclusions Development of repeated surveys for many sites across Mexico, and particularly for sites for which historical surveys document their avifaunas prior to major climate change processes, would pay rich rewards in information about distributional dynamics of Mexican birds. PMID:27651986

  13. A proposed wind measurement and analysis approach for evaluating a prospective wind plant site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendell, L. L.; Barnard, J. C.; Morris, V. R.

    1994-05-01

    On the basis of research results, cooperative efforts with wind energy developers, and work with meteorological consultants, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has proposed an approach for performing wind measurement assessments for prospective wind plant sites. The primary goal of this approach is to effectively balance comprehensiveness with expense. The approach begins with the acquisition of high-resolution digital terrain data for the site. These data are used in computational and visual analyses to determine the best locations for a reference tower and several satellite towers used for wind measurements. The reference tower has wind sensors at three levels: 20, 30, and 40 m. The satellite towers have one sensor at 30 m. The sensors measure the vertical wind speed as well as the horizontal speed and direction. The sampling rate must be at least 4 times per second. The data acquisition system keeps track of turbulence statistics that are saved at intervals from ten minutes to one hour. Statistics for the 30-m level at the satellite towers, as well as the reference tower, provide the mean and variance of the total speed and covariances of the component speeds. The data base produced by this approach over 1-2 years should be valuable for both routine and in-depth analyses. This approach takes advantage of some recent technological developments. It is not being proposed as a standard at this time, but as a tool to be refined with experience.

  14. Magnetism and the interior of the moon. [measured at Apollo landing sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyal, P.; Parkin, C. W.; Daily, W. D.

    1974-01-01

    During the time period 1961-1972 eleven magnetometers were sent to the moon. The results of lunar magnetometer data analysis are reviewed, with emphasis on the lunar interior. Magnetic fields have been measured on the lunar surface at the Apollo 12, 14, 15, and 16 landing sites. The remanent field values at these sites are given. Satellite and surface measurements show strong evidence that the lunar crust is magnetized over much of the lunar globe. The origin of the lunar remanent field is not yet satisfactorily understood; several source models are presented. Simultaneous data from the Apollo 12 lunar surface magnetometer and the Explorer 35 Ames magnetometer are used to construct a wholemoon hysteresis curve, from which the global lunar permeability is determined. Total iron abundance is calculated for two assumed compositional models of the lunar interior. Other lunar models with a small iron core and with a shallow iron-rich layer are also discussed in light of the measured global permeability.

  15. Mercury species measured atop the Moody Tower TRAMP site, Houston, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Steven; Luke, Winston; Cohen, Mark; Kelly, Paul; Lefer, Barry; Rappenglück, Bernhard

    2010-10-01

    Atmospheric mercury speciation was monitored within Houston, Texas, USA, August 6-October 14, 2006 as part of the TexAQS Radical and Aerosol Measurement Program (TRAMP). On average, all mercury levels were significantly elevated compared to a rural Gulf of Mexico coastal site. Concentrations varied from very clean to very dirty. Multi-day periods of stagnant or low-wind conditions brought elevated concentrations of all mercury species, whereas multi-day periods of strong winds, particularly southerly winds off the Gulf of Mexico, brought very low values of mercury species. Over the entire mercury measurement period, the daily averages of mercury species showed distinct and consistent relationships with the average planetary boundary layer dynamics, with gaseous elemental and particulate-bound mercury near-surface concentrations enhanced by a shallow nocturnal boundary layer, and reactive gaseous mercury concentration enhanced by midday convective boundary layer air entrainment transporting air aloft to the surface. Mercury concentrations were not significantly correlated with known products of combustion, likely indicating non-combustion mercury sources from the Houston area petrochemical complexes. On the morning of August 31, 2006 an observed emission event at a refinery complex on the Houston Ship Channel resulted in extremely high concentrations of aerosol mass and particulate-bound mercury at the TRAMP measurement site 20 km downwind.

  16. Lower tropospheric ozone and aerosol measurements at a coastal mountain site in Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, A.; Conley, S. A.; Zhao, Y.; Cliff, S. S.; Faloona, I. C.; Wexler, A. S.; Lighthall, D.

    2012-12-01

    Increasing concern over the impacts of exogenous air pollution in California's Central Valley have prompted the establishment of a coastal, high altitude monitoring site at the Chews Ridge Observatory (1550 m) approximately 30 km east of Point Sur in Monterey County. Six months of ozone and aerosol measurements are presented in the context of long-range transport and its potential impact on surface air quality in the southern San Joaquin Valley. Moreover, approximately monthly ozone surveys are conducted by aircraft upwind, over the Pacific Ocean, and downwind, over the Central Valley, to characterize horizontal and vertical transport across the coastal mountains. The measurements exhibit no systematic diurnal variations of ozone or water vapor, an indication that the site primarily samples lower free tropospheric air which has not been significantly influenced by either local emissions or convective coupling to the surface. Aerosol size is measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer and composition is analyzed with an 8-stage rotating drum impactor whose substrates are characterized by X-ray fluorescence. Various elemental ratios and back trajectory calculations are used to infer the temporal patterns of influence that long range transport has on California air quality.

  17. Diabetes and Hypertension Quality Measurement in Four Safety-Net Sites

    PubMed Central

    Benkert, R.; Dennehy, P.; White, J.; Hamilton, A.; Tanner, C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background In this new era after the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act of 2009, the literature on lessons learned with electronic health record (EHR) implementation needs to be revisited. Objectives Our objective was to describe what implementation of a commercially available EHR with built-in quality query algorithms showed us about our care for diabetes and hypertension populations in four safety net clinics, specifically feasibility of data retrieval, measurements over time, quality of data, and how our teams used this data. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted from October 2008 to October 2012 in four safety-net clinics located in the Midwest and Western United States. A data warehouse that stores data from across the U.S was utilized for data extraction from patients with diabetes or hypertension diagnoses and at least two office visits per year. Standard quality measures were collected over a period of two to four years. All sites were engaged in a partnership model with the IT staff and a shared learning process to enhance the use of the quality metrics. Results While use of the algorithms was feasible across sites, challenges occurred when attempting to use the query results for research purposes. There was wide variation of both process and outcome results by individual centers. Composite calculations balanced out the differences seen in the individual measures. Despite using consistent quality definitions, the differences across centers had an impact on numerators and denominators. All sites agreed to a partnership model of EHR implementation, and each center utilized the available resources of the partnership for Center-specific quality initiatives. Conclusions Utilizing a shared EHR, a Regional Extension Center-like partnership model, and similar quality query algorithms allowed safety-net clinics to benchmark and improve the quality of care across differing patient populations and health care

  18. Using NMR, SIP, and MS measurements for monitoring subsurface biogeochemical reactions at the Rifle IFRC site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosier, C. L.; Keating, K.; Williams, K. H.; Robbins, M.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Grunewald, E.; Walsh, D. O.

    2013-12-01

    The Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site is located on a former uranium ore-processing facility in Rifle, Colorado (USA). Although removal of tailings and contaminated surface materials was completed in 1996, residual uranium contamination of groundwater and subsurface sediments remains. Since 2002, research at the site has primarily focused on quantifying uranium mobility associated with stimulated and natural biogeochemical processes. Uranium mobility at the Rifle IFRC site is typically quantified through direct sampling of groundwater; however, direct sampling does not provide information about the solid phase material outside of the borehole and continuous measurements are not always possible due to multiple constraints. Geophysical methods have been suggested as a minimally invasive alternative approach for long term monitoring of biogeochemical reactions associated with uranium remediation. In this study, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), spectral induced polarization (SIP), and magnetic susceptibility (MS) are considered as potential geophysical methods for monitoring the biogeochemical reactions occurring at the Rifle IFRC site. Additionally, a pilot field study using an NMR borehole-logging tool was carried out at the Rifle IFRC site. These methods are sensitive to changes in the chemical and physical subsurface properties that occur as a result of bioremediation efforts; specifically, changes in the redox state and chemical form of iron, production of iron sulfide minerals, production of the magnetic mineral magnetite, and associated changes in the pore geometry. Laboratory experiments consisted of monitoring changes in the NMR, SIP and MS response of an acetate-amended columns packed with sediments from the Rifle IFRC site over the course of two months. The MS values remained relatively stable throughout the course of the experiment suggesting negligible production of magnetic phases (e.g. magnetite, pyrrhotite) as a result of enhanced

  19. Is the axilla the right site for temperature measurement in children by chemical thermometer?

    PubMed

    Kara, Ateş; Devrim, Ilker; Cengiz, Ali Bülent; Celik, Filiz; Tezer, Hasan; Uludağ, Ali Kerem; Seçmeer, Gülten

    2009-01-01

    Although each method has its own advantages and disadvantages compared with the conservative mercury-in-glass thermometers, there are conflicting opinions about the optimal anatomic site for measuring body temperature as well about the variations in measurements with different methods. In this study, we aimed to assess the accuracy and reliability of measurements obtained from the axilla with the chemical thermometer (Tempa DOT TM) compared with the classic mercury-in-glass instruments. Sixty randomly selected pediatric patients who were admitted to our hospital were enrolled. Simultaneous temperature axillary measurements (n: 1300) were performed with the chemical thermometer and mercury-in-glass instruments. The mean results of the axillary mercury-in-glass thermometers and axillary chemical thermometer were 36.8 +/- 0.6 and 37.2 +/- 0.7, respectively. The Bland-Altman plot of differences suggests that 95% of the chemical thermometer (Tempa.DOT TM) readings were within limits of agreement (+0.37 and -1.24 degrees C) when mercury-in-glass thermometer is considered as the standard. Our results showed that limits of agreement were wide (+0.37 and -1.24 degrees C) between readings of axillary mercury-in-glass thermometers and chemical thermometers. Since approximately 20% of febrile patients with mercury-in-glass temperature were misdiagnosed as afebrile with measurements via chemical thermometer, we suggest that the axilla is not a suitable anatomic site for screening of fever with Tempa.DOT. Further studies involving larger study groups with similar age should be done to more definitely assess its screening value in pediatrics.

  20. Static and dynamic stress analyses of the prototype high head Francis runner based on site measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, X.; Oram, C.; Sick, M.

    2014-03-01

    More efforts are put on hydro-power to balance voltage and frequency within seconds for primary control in modern smart grids. This requires hydraulic turbines to run at off-design conditions. especially at low load or speed-no load. Besides. the tendency of increasing power output and decreasing weight of the turbine runners has also led to the high level vibration problem of the runners. especially high head Francis runners. Therefore. it is important to carry out the static and dynamic stress analyses of prototype high head Francis runners. This paper investigates the static and dynamic stresses on the prototype high head Francis runner based on site measurements and numerical simulations. The site measurements are performed with pressure transducers and strain gauges. Based on the measured results. computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations for the flow channel from stay vane to draft tube cone are performed. Static pressure distributions and dynamic pressure pulsations caused by rotor-stator interaction (RSI) are obtained under various operating conditions. With the CFD results. static and dynamic stresses on the runner at different operating points are calculated by means of the finite element method (FEM). The agreement between simulation and measurement is analysed with linear regression method. which indicates that the numerical result agrees well with that of measurement. Furthermore. the maximum static and dynamic stresses on the runner blade are obtained at various operating points. The relations of the maximum stresses and the power output are discussed in detail. The influences of the boundary conditions on the structural behaviour of the runner are also discussed.

  1. Electric field gradients at indium sites in spinels measured by perturbed angular correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquevich, A. F.

    2005-07-01

    The Electric Field Gradient (EFG) at 111Cd isotope (produced by the Electron Capture (EC) decay of 111In) has been measured using Perturbed Angular Correlations (PAC) technique in many spinels. In the present work, data arising from such experiments were collected. The experimental EFG values, obtained at room temperature, at the B site of normal spinels are compared with those calculated considering the monopole moment of the ions and the dipole polarization of the anions. This comparison allows the determination of the u-parameter, which gives the anion position in the lattice.

  2. Continuous Water Vapor Profiles for the Fixed Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, M.; Troyan, D.

    2006-01-09

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program defined a specific metric for the first quarter of Fiscal Year 2006 to complete a continuous time series of the vertical profile of water vapor for selected 30-day periods from each of the fixed ARM sites. In order to accomplish this metric, a new technique devised to incorporate radiosonde data, microwave radiometer data and analysis information from numerical weather forecast models has been developed. The product of this analysis, referred to as the merged sounding value-added product, includes vertical profiles of atmospheric water vapor concentration and several other important thermodynamic state variables at 1-minute time intervals and 266 vertical levels.

  3. KSC Press Site Transformer Bldg. (K7-1205c) SWMU 074 Interim Measure Work Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, A. Scott; Applegate, Joe

    2014-01-01

    This document presents and discusses the Interim Measure (IM) Work Plan for the Press Site Transformer Building (K7-1205C). The purpose of the proposed IM activities is to remove soil affected with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) greater than the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) residential direct-exposure Soil Cleanup Target Level (R-SCTL) of 0.5 milligrams per kilogram and encapsulate concrete exhibiting PCB concentration greater than the Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) threshold of 50 milligrams per kilogram.

  4. Reliability of neuroanatomical measurements in a multi-site longitudinal study of youth at risk for psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Tyrone D.; Sun, Frank; McEwen, Sarah Jacobson; Papademetris, Xenophon; He, George; van Erp, Theo G.M.; Jacobson, Aron; Bearden, Carrie E.; Walker, Elaine; Hu, Xiaoping; Zhou, Lei; Seidman, Larry J.; Thermenos, Heidi W.; Cornblatt, Barbara; Olvet, Doreen M.; Perkins, Diana; Belger, Aysenil; Cadenhead, Kristin; Tsuang, Ming; Mirzakhanian, Heline; Addington, Jean; Frayne, Richard; Woods, Scott W.; McGlashan, Thomas H.; Constable, R. Todd; Qiu, Maolin; Mathalon, Daniel H.; Thompson, Paul; Toga, Arthur W.

    2013-01-01

    Multi-site longitudinal neuroimaging designs are used to identify differential brain structural change associated with onset or progression of disease. The reliability of neuroanatomical measurements over time and across sites is a crucial aspect of power in such studies. Prior work has found that while within-site reliabilities of neuroanatomical measurements are excellent, between-site reliability is generally more modest. Factors that may increase between-site reliability include standardization of scanner platform and sequence parameters and correction for between-scanner variations in gradient nonlinearities. Factors that may improve both between- and within-site reliability include use of registration algorithms that account for individual differences in cortical patterning and shape. In this study 8 healthy volunteers were scanned twice on successive days at 8 sites participating in the North American Prodrome Longitudinal Study (NAPLS). All sites employed 3 Tesla scanners and standardized acquisition parameters. Site accounted for 2 to 30% of the total variance in neuroanatomical measurements. However, site-related variations were trivial (<1%) among sites using the same scanner model and 12-channel coil or when correcting for between-scanner differences in gradient nonlinearity and scaling. Adjusting for individual differences in sulcal-gyral geometries yielded measurements with greater reliabilities than those obtained using an automated approach. Neuroimaging can be performed across multiple sites at the same level of reliability as at a single site, achieving within- and between-site reliabilities of 0.95 or greater for gray matter density in the majority of voxels in the prefrontal and temporal cortical surfaces as well as for the volumes of most subcortical structures. PMID:23982962

  5. Using natural range of variation to set decision thresholds: a case study for great plains grasslands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Symstad, Amy J.; Jonas, Jayne L.; Edited by Guntenspergen, Glenn R.

    2014-01-01

    Natural range of variation (NRV) may be used to establish decision thresholds or action assessment points when ecological thresholds are either unknown or do not exist for attributes of interest in a managed ecosystem. The process for estimating NRV involves identifying spatial and temporal scales that adequately capture the heterogeneity of the ecosystem; compiling data for the attributes of interest via study of historic records, analysis and interpretation of proxy records, modeling, space-for-time substitutions, or analysis of long-term monitoring data; and quantifying the NRV from those data. At least 19 National Park Service (NPS) units in North America’s Great Plains are monitoring plant species richness and evenness as indicators of vegetation integrity in native grasslands, but little information on natural, temporal variability of these indicators is available. In this case study, we use six long-term vegetation monitoring datasets to quantify the temporal variability of these attributes in reference conditions for a variety of Great Plains grassland types, and then illustrate the implications of using different NRVs based on these quantities for setting management decision thresholds. Temporal variability of richness (as measured by the coefficient of variation, CV) is fairly consistent across the wide variety of conditions occurring in Colorado shortgrass prairie to Minnesota tallgrass sand savanna (CV 0.20–0.45) and generally less than that of production at the same sites. Temporal variability of evenness spans a greater range of CV than richness, and it is greater than that of production in some sites but less in other sites. This natural temporal variability may mask undesirable changes in Great Plains grasslands vegetation. Consequently, we suggest that managers consider using a relatively narrow NRV (interquartile range of all richness or evenness values observed in reference conditions) for designating a surveillance threshold, at which

  6. Velocity statistics and spectra over a forested site measured with a tall mast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segalini, Antonio; Alfredsson, Henrik; Dellwik, Ebba; Arnqvist, Johan; Bergström, Hans

    2012-11-01

    In the large expansion of wind power it becomes necessary to use also non-ideal sites for the placement of turbines. Such sites may have a complex terrain in terms of surface elevation as well as being forested. The atmospheric boundary layer is assumed to be severely different as compared to the one over flat, low-vegetation areas, which changes the mean velocity distribution as well as the turbulence intensity, thereby negatively affecting both the power production and loads on the turbines. In this study we use data from a 140 m tall mast in a forest in South-Eastern Sweden, where a unique measurement campaign with sonic anemometers has been running since November 2010 for 16 months. The sonic anemometers give the three velocity components with a frequency resolution of about 10 Hz. The site is covered by approximately 20 m high trees and a 40 degree sector, representative of an approximately homogeneous forest flow, is selected for the analysis of the velocity statistics. The screening of the results indicates the presence of a constant stress layer up to 3-5 canopy heights from the ground. An evaluation of the turbulence statistics in this layer and the levels above is presented. In addition, the spectra are evaluated and compared with the commonly used turbulence models.

  7. Environmental Measurement-While-Drilling System and Horizontal Directional Drilling Technology Demonstration, Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C.V.; Lockwood, G.J.; Normann, R.A.; Myers, D.A.; Gardner, M.G.; Williamson, T.; Huffman, J.

    1999-06-01

    The Environmental Measurement-While-Drilling (EMWD) system and Horizontal Directional Drilling (HDD) were successfully demonstrated at the Mock Tank Leak Simulation Site and the Drilling Technology Test Site, Hanford, Washington. The use of directional drilling offers an alternative to vertical drilling site characterization. Directional drilling can develop a borehole under a structure, such as a waste tank, from an angled entry and leveling off to horizontal at the desired depth. The EMWD system represents an innovative blend of new and existing technology that provides the capability of producing real-time environmental and drill bit data during drilling operations. The technology demonstration consisted of the development of one borehole under a mock waste tank at a depth of {approximately} {minus}8 m ({minus}27 ft.), following a predetermined drill path, tracking the drill path to within a radius of {approximately}1.5 m (5 ft.), and monitoring for zones of radiological activity using the EMWD system. The purpose of the second borehole was to demonstrate the capability of drilling to a depth of {approximately} {minus}21 m ({minus}70 ft.), the depth needed to obtain access under the Hanford waste tanks, and continue drilling horizontally. This report presents information on the HDD and EMWD technologies, demonstration design, results of the demonstrations, and lessons learned.

  8. MPL-Net Measurements of Aerosol and Cloud Vertical Distributions at Co-Located AERONET Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; Campbell, James R.; Berkoff, Timothy A.; Spinhirne, James D.; Tsay, Si-Chee; Holben, Brent; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In the early 1990s, the first small, eye-safe, and autonomous lidar system was developed, the Micropulse Lidar (MPL). The MPL acquires signal profiles of backscattered laser light from aerosols and clouds. The signals are analyzed to yield multiple layer heights, optical depths of each layer, average extinction-to-backscatter ratios for each layer, and profiles of extinction in each layer. In 2000, several MPL sites were organized into a coordinated network, called MPL-Net, by the Cloud and Aerosol Lidar Group at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) using funding provided by the NASA Earth Observing System. tn addition to the funding provided by NASA EOS, the NASA CERES Ground Validation Group supplied four MPL systems to the project, and the NASA TOMS group contributed their MPL for work at GSFC. The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) also agreed to make their data available to the MPL-Net project for processing. In addition to the initial NASA and ARM operated sites, several other independent research groups have also expressed interest in joining the network using their own instruments. Finally, a limited amount of EOS funding was set aside to participate in various field experiments each year. The NASA Sensor Intercomparison and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Oceanic Studies (SIMBIOS) project also provides funds to deploy their MPL during ocean research cruises. All together, the MPL-Net project has participated in four major field experiments since 2000. Most MPL-Net sites and field experiment locations are also co-located with sunphotometers in the NASA Aerosol Robotic Network. (AERONET). Therefore, at these locations data is collected on both aerosol and cloud vertical structure as well as column optical depth and sky radiance. Real-time data products are now available from most MPL-Net sites. Our real-time products are generated at times of AERONET aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements. The AERONET AOD is used as input to our

  9. Clinical applications and issues of oxygen saturation level measurements obtained from peripheral sites.

    PubMed

    Foo, Jong Yong Abdiel; Chua, Kok Poo; Tan, Xin Ji Alan

    2013-08-01

    Studies have suggested that the saturated oxygen level within one's arterial blood can provide crucial information about the status of one's cardiopulmonary system. Currently, a popular and convenient approach is to obtain this vital physiological sign through non-invasive measurement on suitable peripheral sites such as a finger, toe or ear lobe. This measurement is known as the SpO2 parameter. It has been increasingly adopted in not only clinical settings but also remote monitoring purposes. In order to measure this optical based parameter, light sources of both the red and infrared wavelengths are required. The most recognized waveform feature is the peripheral pulse or its AC component which is synchronized to each heartbeat. The AC component is superimposed on a constant DC baseline attributed to breathing efforts, sympathetic nervous system activities and thermoregulation. The popularity of the SpO2 parameter may be due to its viable cost, simplicity to build and portability. Moreover, the basic building blocks of a SpO2 based measurement consists of control, filtering and amplification functions that can easily be incorporated with an embedded system. In this review, a brief description of the SpO2 measurement, its normative values and technical issues in its application as a clinical monitor are discussed.

  10. Aerosol backscatter measurements at 10. 6 micrometers with airborne and ground-based CO sub 2 Doppler lidars over the Colorado high plains. 1. Lidar intercomparison

    SciTech Connect

    Bowdle, D.A. ); Rothermel, J. ); Vaughan, J.M.; Brown, D.W. ); Post, M.J. )

    1991-03-20

    An airborne continuous wave (CW) focused CO{sub 2} Doppler lidar and a ground-based pulsed CO{sub 2} Doppler lidar were used to obtain seven pairs of comparative measurements of tropospheric aerosol backscatter profiles at 10.6 {mu}m wavelength, near Denver, Colorado, during a 20-day period in July 1982. In regions of uniform backscatter the two lidars show good agreement, with differences usually less than {approximately}50% near 8-km altitude and less than a factor of 2 or 3 elsewhere but with the pulsed lidar often lower than the CW lidar. Near sharp backscatter gradients the two lidars show poorer agreement, with the pulsed lidar usually higher than the CW lidar. Most discrepancies arise from a combination of atmospheric factors and instrument factors, particularly small-scale areal and temporal backscatter heterogeneity above the planetary boundary layer, unusual large-scale vertical backscatter structure in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, and differences in the spatial resolution, detection threshold, and noise estimation for the two lidars.

  11. Convective Signals from Surface Measurements at ARM Tropical Western Pacific Site: Manus

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yi; Long, Charles N.; Mather, James H.; Liu, Xiaodong

    2011-02-23

    The Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) signal has been detected using observations from the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Tropical Western Pacific (TWP). With downwelling shortwave radiative fluxes and fractional sky cover from the ACRF TWP Manus site, and the statistical tools of wavelet and spectrum power, we report finding major convective signals from surface observations spanning the period from 1996 to 2006. Our findings are confirmed with the satellite-retrieved values of precipitation from the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP), and interpolated outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) satellite measurements from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) for the same location. Our results indicate that the MJO convective signal has a strong seasonal-to-interannual evolution that is likely correlated with the interannual variability of El Ni ˜no Southern Oscillation (ENSO).

  12. Prairie grassland bidirectional reflectances measured by different instruments at the FIFE site

    SciTech Connect

    Deering, D.W.; Middleton, E.M.; Irons, J.R. ); Blad, B.L.; Walter-Shea, E.A.; Haws, C.J. ); Walthall, C. ); Eck, T.F.; Ahmad, S.P.; Banerjee, B.P. )

    1992-11-30

    This work is part of the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE), an international land-surface-atmosphere experiment aimed at improving the way climate models represent energy, water, heat, and carbon exchanges, and improving the utilization of satellite based remote sensing to monitor such parameters. This paper reports on cross calibration measurements between instruments used to measure bidirectional reflectances on the FIFE site. Two ground based and one helicopter based Spectron Engineering SE590, one ground and one helicopter based Barnes modular multiband radiometer, and the portable instrument PARABOLA were compared. The bidirectional reflectances for the different instruments were found to be quite comparable. The spectral vegetation indexes were found to have a strong dependence on the solar viewing angle and on the sensor viewing angle.

  13. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) Site.

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the largest global change research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. To achieve this goal, ARM scientists and researchers around the world use continuous data obtained through the ARM Climate Research Facility. ARM maintains four major, permanent sites for data collection and deploys the ARM Mobile Facility to other sites as determined. The Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site is one of the four fixed sites. It consists of three climate research facilities; the Manus facility on Los Negros Island in Manus, Papua New Guinea (established in 1996); the Nauru facility on Nauru Island, Republic of Nauru (1998); and the Darwin facility in Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia (2002). The operations are supported by government agencies in each host country. Covering the area roughly between 10 degrees N and 10 degrees S of the equator and from 130 degrees E to 167 degrees E, the TWP locale includes a region that plays a large role in the interannual variability observed in the global climate system. More than 250,000 TWP data sets from 1996 to the present reside in the ARM Archive. Begin at the TWP information page for links or access data directly from the ARM Archive at http://www.archive.arm.gov/. Users will need to register for a password, but all files are then free for viewing or downloading. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  14. Empirically Modeling Carbon Fluxes over the Northern Great Plains Grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Wylie, B. K.; Ji, L.; Gilmanov, T.; Tieszen, L. L.

    2007-12-01

    Grasslands cover nearly one-fifth of the global terrestrial surface and store most of their carbon below ground. The grassland ecosystem in the Great Plains occupies over 1.5 million km2 of land area and is the primary resource for livestock production in North America. However, the contributions of grasslands to local and regional carbon budgets remain uncertain due to the lack of carbon flux data for the expansive grassland ecosystems under various managements, land uses, and climate variability. A quantitative understanding of carbon fluxes across these systems is essential for developing regional, national, and global carbon budgets and providing guidance to policy makers and managers when substantial conversion to biofuels are implemented. Additionally, these estimates will provide insights into how the grassland ecosystem will respond to future climate and what systems are sustainable and offer net carbon sinks. This knowledge base and decisions support tools are needed for developing land management strategies for the region under a variety of environmental conditions and land use options. In the past, we used a remote sensing-based piecewise regression (PWR) model to estimate the grassland carbon fluxes in the northern Great Plains using the 1-km SPOT VEGETATION normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data. We estimated the carbon fluxes through integrated spatial databases and remotely sensed extrapolations of flux tower data to regional scales. The PWR model was applied to derive an empirical relationship between environmental variables and tower-based measurements. The PWR equations were then applied through time and space to estimate carbon fluxes across the study area at 1-km resolution. We now improve this modeling approach by 1) using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data with higher temporal, spatial, and spectral resolutions (8-day, 500-m, and 7-band) as input; 2) incorporating the actual vegetation evapotranspiration

  15. Roundhouse (RND) Mountain Top Research Site: Measurements and Uncertainties for Winter Alpine Weather Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gultepe, I.; Isaac, G. A.; Joe, P.; Kucera, P. A.; Theriault, J. M.; Fisico, T.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work is to better understand and summarize the mountain meteorological observations collected during the Science of Nowcasting Winter Weather for the Vancouver 2010 Olympics and Paralympics (SNOW-V10) project that was supported by the Fog Remote Sensing and Modeling (FRAM) project. The Roundhouse (RND) meteorological station was located 1,856 m above sea level that is subject to the winter extreme weather conditions. Below this site, there were three additional observation sites at 1,640, 1,320, and 774 m. These four stations provided some or all the following measurements at 1 min resolution: precipitation rate (PR) and amount, cloud/fog microphysics, 3D wind speed (horizontal wind speed, U h; vertical air velocity, w a), visibility (Vis), infrared (IR) and shortwave (SW) radiative fluxes, temperature ( T) and relative humidity with respect to water (RHw), and aerosol observations. In this work, comparisons are made to assess the uncertainties and variability for the measurements of Vis, RHw, T, PR, and wind for various winter weather conditions. The ground-based cloud imaging probe (GCIP) measurements of snow particles using a profiling microwave radiometer (PMWR) data have also been shown to assess the icing conditions. Overall, the conclusions suggest that uncertainties in the measurements of Vis, PR, T, and RH can be as large as 50, >60, 50, and >20 %, respectively, and these numbers may increase depending on U h, T, Vis, and PR magnitude. Variability of observations along the Whistler Mountain slope (~500 m) suggested that to verify the models, model space resolution should be better than 100 m and time scales better than 1 min. It is also concluded that differences between observed and model based parameters are strongly related to a model's capability of accurate prediction of liquid water content (LWC), PR, and RHw over complex topography.

  16. Evaluation of pier-scour measurement methods and pier-scour predictions with observed scour measurements at selected bridge sites in New Hampshire, 1995-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boehmler, Erick M.; Olimpio, Joseph R.

    2000-01-01

    In a previous study, 44 of 48 bridge sites examined in New Hampshire were categorized as scour critical. In this study, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) evaluated pier-scour measurement methods and predictions at many of these sites. This evaluation included measurement of pier-scour depths at 20 bridge sites using Ground- Penetrating Radar (GPR) surveys. Pier scour was also measured during floods by teams at 5 of these 20 sites. At 4 of the 20 sites, fixed instruments were installed to monitor scour. At only one bridge site investigated by a team was any pier scour measurable during a flood event. A scour depth of 0.7 foot (0.21 m) was measured at a pier in the channel at the State Route 18 bridge over the Connecticut River in Littleton. Measurements made using GPR and (or) fixed instruments indicated pier scour for six sites. The GPR surveys indicated scour along the side of a pier and further upstream from the nose of a pier that was not detected by flood-team measurements at two sites. Most pier-scour equations selected for this examination were reviewed and published in previous scour investigations. Graphical comparison of residual pier-scour depths indicate that the Shen equation yielded pier-scour depth predictions closest to those measured, without underestimating. Measured depths of scour, however, were zero feet for 14 of the 20 sites. For the Blench-Inglis II equation and the Simplified Chinese equation, most differences between measured and predicted scour depths were within 5 feet. These two equations underpredicted scour for one of six sites with measurable scour. The underprediction, however, was within the resolution of the depth measurements. The Simplified Chinese equation is less sensitive than other equations to velocity and depth input variables, and is one of the few empirical equations to integrate the influence of flow competence, or a measure of the maximum streambed particle size that a stream is capable of transporting, in the

  17. A reliable aptamer array prepared by repeating inkjet-spotting toward on-site measurement.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Suzuyo; Seyama, Michiko; Miura, Toru; Horiuchi, Tsutomu; Iwasaki, Yuzuru; Takahashi, Jun-Ichi; Hayashi, Katsuyoshi; Tamechika, Emi

    2016-11-15

    A preparation protocol is proposed for a reliable aptamer array utilizing an ink-jet spotter. We accumulated streptavidin and biotinylated-aptamer in this order on a biotinylated-polyethylene glycol-coated gold substrate to prepare an aptamer array. The aptamer array was prepared with an alternate spotting structure where each aptamer spot was placed between reference spots formed with blocking solution thus suppressing contamination from neighboring spots during the blocking and washing processes. Four aptamer spots were prepared in a small area of 1×4.8mm(2) with five reference spots made of blocking solution. We evaluated the thrombin binding ability of the spotted aptamer array using a multi-analysis surface plasmon resonance sensor. We prepared a disposable capillary-driven flow chip designed for on-site measurement (Miura et al., 2010) with our aptamer array and detected thrombin from phosphate-buffered saline at concentrations of 50ngmL(-1) and 1μgmL(-1) (equivalent to 1.35 and 27nM, respectively). A correlation was observed between the refractive index shift and thrombin concentration. This implies that our array preparation protocol meets the requirement for the preparation of a one-time-use chip for on-site measurement. PMID:27315520

  18. PROGENITOR DIAGNOSTICS FOR STRIPPED CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE: MEASURED METALLICITIES AT EXPLOSION SITES

    SciTech Connect

    Modjaz, M.; Bloom, J. S.; Filippenko, A. V.; Perley, D.; Silverman, J. M.; Kewley, L.

    2011-04-10

    Metallicity is expected to influence not only the lives of massive stars but also the outcome of their deaths as supernovae (SNe) and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). However, there are surprisingly few direct measurements of the local metallicities of different flavors of core-collapse SNe (CCSNe). Here, we present the largest existing set of host-galaxy spectra with H II region emission lines at the sites of 35 stripped-envelope CCSNe. We derive local oxygen abundances in a robust manner in order to constrain the SN Ib/c progenitor population. We obtain spectra at the SN sites, include SNe from targeted and untargeted surveys, and perform the abundance determinations using three different oxygen-abundance calibrations. The sites of SNe Ic (the demise of the most heavily stripped stars, having lost both H and He layers) are systematically more metal rich than those of SNe Ib (arising from stars that retained their He layer) in all calibrations. A Kolmogorov-Smirnov test yields the very low probability of 1% that SN Ib and SN Ic environment abundances, which are different on average by {approx}0.2 dex (in the Pettini and Pagel scale), are drawn from the same parent population. Broad-lined SNe Ic (without GRBs) occur at metallicities between those of SNe Ib and SNe Ic. Lastly, we find that the host-galaxy central oxygen abundance is not a good indicator of the local SN metallicity; hence, large-scale SN surveys need to obtain local abundance measurements in order to quantify the impact of metallicity on stellar death.

  19. Measurement and simulation of evapotranspiration at a wetland site in the New Jersey Pinelands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sumner, David M.; Nicholson, Robert S.; Clark, Kenneth L.

    2012-01-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) was monitored above a wetland forest canopy dominated by pitch-pine in the New Jersey Pinelands during November 10, 2004-February 20, 2007, using an eddy-covariance method. Twelve-month ET totals ranged from 786 to 821 millimeters (mm). Minimum and maximum ET rates occurred during December-February and in July, respectively. Relations between ET and several environmental variables (incoming solar radiation, air temperature, relative humidity, soil moisture, and net radiation) were explored. Net radiation (r = 0.72) and air temperature (r = 0.73) were the dominant explanatory variables for daily ET. Air temperature was the dominant control on evaporative fraction with relatively more radiant energy used for ET at higher temperatures. Soil moisture was shown to limit ET during extended dry periods. With volumetric soil moisture below a threshold of about 0.15, the evaporative fraction decreased until rain ended the dry period, and the evaporative fraction sharply recovered. A modified Hargreaves ET model, requiring only easily obtainable daily temperature data, was shown to be effective at simulating measured ET values and has the potential for estimating historical or real-time ET at the wetland site. The average annual ET measured at the wetland site during 2005-06 (801 mm/yr) is about 32 percent higher than previously reported ET for three nearby upland sites during 2005-09. Periodic disturbance by fire and insect defoliation at the upland sites reduced ET. When only undisturbed periods were considered, the wetland ET was 17 percent higher than the undisturbed upland ET. Interannual variability in wetlands ET may be lower than that of uplands ET because the upland stands are more susceptible to periodic drought conditions, disturbance by fire, and insect defoliation. Precipitation during the study period at the nearby Indian Mills weather station was slightly higher than the long-term (1902-2011) annual mean of 1,173 millimeters (mm), with

  20. Measurements of environmental radiation exposure dose rates at selected sites in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, W C; Penna-Franca, E; Ribeiro, C C; Nogueira, A R; Londres, H; Oliveira, A E

    1981-12-01

    Two types of portable instruments were developed by the former Health and Safety Laboratory of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission to characterize external gamma radiation fields and to estimate individual exposure dose rates from major natural or fission radionuclides distributed in the soil: a pressurized ionization chamber and a NaI(T1) gamma-ray spectrometer. The two instruments were used to measure environmental radiation exposure rates at three distinct geological areas of Brazil: - in the towns of Guarapari and Meaípe located on the monazite sand belt, ES. - on the vicinities of the uranium mine of Poços de Caldas, MG. - around the site of the Brazilian first nuclear power plant, in Angra dos Reis, RJ. The radiometric survey demonstrated once more the usefulness and versatility of the two instruments used. The measurements around the nuclear installations of Poços de Caldas and Angra dos Reis, allowed a rapid assessment of the local radiation background and its variability, as well as the selection of stations for the routine monitoring program. Radioactive anomalies were detected and characterized previously to the start of plant operations. The survey in Guarapari and Meaípe confirmed the results obtained by Roser and Cullen in 1958 and 1962, except on sites where considerable changes took place since then. The spectrometric measurements gave estimations of the relative proportion of 40K, 238U and 232Th series in the ground and also indications on the homogeneity of their distribution in the soil.

  1. Measurements of methane emissions at natural gas production sites in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Allen, David T.; Torres, Vincent M.; Thomas, James; Sullivan, David W.; Harrison, Matthew; Hendler, Al; Herndon, Scott C.; Kolb, Charles E.; Fraser, Matthew P.; Hill, A. Daniel; Lamb, Brian K.; Miskimins, Jennifer; Sawyer, Robert F.; Seinfeld, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Engineering estimates of methane emissions from natural gas production have led to varied projections of national emissions. This work reports direct measurements of methane emissions at 190 onshore natural gas sites in the United States (150 production sites, 27 well completion flowbacks, 9 well unloadings, and 4 workovers). For well completion flowbacks, which clear fractured wells of liquid to allow gas production, methane emissions ranged from 0.01 Mg to 17 Mg (mean = 1.7 Mg; 95% confidence bounds of 0.67–3.3 Mg), compared with an average of 81 Mg per event in the 2011 EPA national emission inventory from April 2013. Emission factors for pneumatic pumps and controllers as well as equipment leaks were both comparable to and higher than estimates in the national inventory. Overall, if emission factors from this work for completion flowbacks, equipment leaks, and pneumatic pumps and controllers are assumed to be representative of national populations and are used to estimate national emissions, total annual emissions from these source categories are calculated to be 957 Gg of methane (with sampling and measurement uncertainties estimated at ±200 Gg). The estimate for comparable source categories in the EPA national inventory is ∼1,200 Gg. Additional measurements of unloadings and workovers are needed to produce national emission estimates for these source categories. The 957 Gg in emissions for completion flowbacks, pneumatics, and equipment leaks, coupled with EPA national inventory estimates for other categories, leads to an estimated 2,300 Gg of methane emissions from natural gas production (0.42% of gross gas production). PMID:24043804

  2. Measurements of methane emissions at natural gas production sites in the United States.

    PubMed

    Allen, David T; Torres, Vincent M; Thomas, James; Sullivan, David W; Harrison, Matthew; Hendler, Al; Herndon, Scott C; Kolb, Charles E; Fraser, Matthew P; Hill, A Daniel; Lamb, Brian K; Miskimins, Jennifer; Sawyer, Robert F; Seinfeld, John H

    2013-10-29

    Engineering estimates of methane emissions from natural gas production have led to varied projections of national emissions. This work reports direct measurements of methane emissions at 190 onshore natural gas sites in the United States (150 production sites, 27 well completion flowbacks, 9 well unloadings, and 4 workovers). For well completion flowbacks, which clear fractured wells of liquid to allow gas production, methane emissions ranged from 0.01 Mg to 17 Mg (mean = 1.7 Mg; 95% confidence bounds of 0.67-3.3 Mg), compared with an average of 81 Mg per event in the 2011 EPA national emission inventory from April 2013. Emission factors for pneumatic pumps and controllers as well as equipment leaks were both comparable to and higher than estimates in the national inventory. Overall, if emission factors from this work for completion flowbacks, equipment leaks, and pneumatic pumps and controllers are assumed to be representative of national populations and are used to estimate national emissions, total annual emissions from these source categories are calculated to be 957 Gg of methane (with sampling and measurement uncertainties estimated at ± 200 Gg). The estimate for comparable source categories in the EPA national inventory is ~1,200 Gg. Additional measurements of unloadings and workovers are needed to produce national emission estimates for these source categories. The 957 Gg in emissions for completion flowbacks, pneumatics, and equipment leaks, coupled with EPA national inventory estimates for other categories, leads to an estimated 2,300 Gg of methane emissions from natural gas production (0.42% of gross gas production).

  3. Jaccard index based similarity measure to compare transcription factor binding site models

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Positional weight matrix (PWM) remains the most popular for quantification of transcription factor (TF) binding. PWM supplied with a score threshold defines a set of putative transcription factor binding sites (TFBS), thus providing a TFBS model. TF binding DNA fragments obtained by different experimental methods usually give similar but not identical PWMs. This is also common for different TFs from the same structural family. Thus it is often necessary to measure the similarity between PWMs. The popular tools compare PWMs directly using matrix elements. Yet, for log-odds PWMs, negative elements do not contribute to the scores of highly scoring TFBS and thus may be different without affecting the sets of the best recognized binding sites. Moreover, the two TFBS sets recognized by a given pair of PWMs can be more or less different depending on the score thresholds. Results We propose a practical approach for comparing two TFBS models, each consisting of a PWM and the respective scoring threshold. The proposed measure is a variant of the Jaccard index between two TFBS sets. The measure defines a metric space for TFBS models of all finite lengths. The algorithm can compare TFBS models constructed using substantially different approaches, like PWMs with raw positional counts and log-odds. We present the efficient software implementation: MACRO-APE (MAtrix CompaRisOn by Approximate P-value Estimation). Conclusions MACRO-APE can be effectively used to compute the Jaccard index based similarity for two TFBS models. A two-pass scanning algorithm is presented to scan a given collection of PWMs for PWMs similar to a given query. Availability and implementation MACRO-APE is implemented in ruby 1.9; software including source code and a manual is freely available at http://autosome.ru/macroape/ and in supplementary materials. PMID:24074225

  4. Traceability for measurements of radioactivity in waste materials arising from nuclear site decommissioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, Julian C. J.; Adsley, Ian; Burgess, Peter H.

    2007-08-01

    Site decommissioning is now a major aspect of the work of the nuclear industry worldwide. One of its many technical challenges is the need to measure levels of radioactivity in a range of materials (e.g. concrete, brick and steel) in order that radioactive waste may be identified, sentenced and consigned to the appropriate waste stream in accordance with national regulations. This is done using any of a number of measurement techniques, falling under three categories: (i) bulk monitoring (for γ and neutron emitters), (ii) surface monitoring (predominantly for α and β emitters) and (iii) radiochemical analysis. The last is often used to determine a 'radionuclide fingerprint' for a particular operational area for use in conjunction with data from in situ monitoring. Traceability to national standards can be difficult to demonstrate for measurements of this type. Only a limited number of standards and reference materials are available, and their chemical and physical forms do not match those of the very wide range of samples being measured. Traceability for surface measurements is further complicated by the subjective nature of monitoring using hand-held detectors. This paper describes some of the detector types used for γ non-destructive assay (NDA) and for surface measurements, gives examples of currently available standards and calibration procedures and provides some guidance in how to achieve traceability. A generic analysis regime for an operational area is presented which demonstrates points where traceability can, in principle, be attained. A new methodology for developing 'realistic' large-volume standard sources, traceable to national standards, has been developed by the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), and this is described.

  5. Computation of backwater and discharge at width constrictions of heavily vegetated flood plains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schneider, V.R.; Board, J.W.; Colson, B.E.; Lee, F.N.; Druffel, Leroy

    1977-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, cooperated with the Federal Highway Administration and the State Highway Departments of Mississippi, Alabama, and Louisiana, to develop a proposed method for computing backwater and discharge at width constrictions of heavily vegetated flood plains. Data were collected at 20 single opening sites for 31 floods. Flood-plain width varied from 4 to 14 times the bridge opening width. The recurrence intervals of peak discharge ranged from a 2-year flood to greater than a 100-year flood, with a median interval of 6 years. Measured backwater ranged from 0.39 to 3.16 feet. Backwater computed by the present standard Geological Survey method averaged 29 percent less than the measured, and that computed by the currently used Federal Highway Administration method averaged 47 percent less than the measured. Discharge computed by the Survey method averaged 21 percent more then the measured. Analysis of data showed that the flood-plain widths and the Manning 's roughness coefficient are larger than those used to develop the standard methods. A method to more accurately compute backwater and discharge was developed. The difference between the contracted and natural water-surface profiles computed using standard step-backwater procedures is defined as backwater. The energy loss terms in the step-backwater procedure are computed as the product of the geometric mean of the energy slopes and the flow distance in the reach was derived from potential flow theory. The mean error was 1 percent when using the proposed method for computing backwater and 3 percent for computing discharge. (Woodard-USGS)

  6. Plain English Laws: Symbolic or Real?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timm, Paul R.; Oswald, Daniel

    1985-01-01

    Surveyed business communication educators and found widespread confusion about the existence and nature of Plain English laws. Concludes that legally compelling business to use plain language in consumer documents may be futile. (PD)

  7. Verification of Satellite Rainfall Estimates from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission over Ground Validation Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, B. L.; Wolff, D. B.; Silberstein, D. S.; Marks, D. M.; Pippitt, J. L.

    2007-12-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission's (TRMM) Ground Validation (GV) Program was originally established with the principal long-term goal of determining the random errors and systematic biases stemming from the application of the TRMM rainfall algorithms. The GV Program has been structured around two validation strategies: 1) determining the quantitative accuracy of the integrated monthly rainfall products at GV regional sites over large areas of about 500 km2 using integrated ground measurements and 2) evaluating the instantaneous satellite and GV rain rate statistics at spatio-temporal scales compatible with the satellite sensor resolution (Simpson et al. 1988, Thiele 1988). The GV Program has continued to evolve since the launch of the TRMM satellite on November 27, 1997. This presentation will discuss current GV methods of validating TRMM operational rain products in conjunction with ongoing research. The challenge facing TRMM GV has been how to best utilize rain information from the GV system to infer the random and systematic error characteristics of the satellite rain estimates. A fundamental problem of validating space-borne rain estimates is that the true mean areal rainfall is an ideal, scale-dependent parameter that cannot be directly measured. Empirical validation uses ground-based rain estimates to determine the error characteristics of the satellite-inferred rain estimates, but ground estimates also incur measurement errors and contribute to the error covariance. Furthermore, sampling errors, associated with the discrete, discontinuous temporal sampling by the rain sensors aboard the TRMM satellite, become statistically entangled in the monthly estimates. Sampling errors complicate the task of linking biases in the rain retrievals to the physics of the satellite algorithms. The TRMM Satellite Validation Office (TSVO) has made key progress towards effective satellite validation. For disentangling the sampling and retrieval errors, TSVO has developed

  8. Long-term Agroecosystem Research in the Northern Great Plains.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmer, M.; Sanderson, M.; Liebig, M. A.; Wienhold, B.; Awada, T.; Papiernik, S.; Osborne, S.; Kemp, W.; Okalebo, J. A.; Riedall, W.

    2015-12-01

    The Northern Great Plains is the bread basket of the United States, accounting for a substantial portion of U.S. agricultural production. This region faces critical challenges regarding balancing food needs, resource conservation (e.g Ogallala aquifer), environmental concerns, and rural economy development. Developing transformative, multifunctional systems will require equally imaginative and efficient tools to help farmers manage complex agroecosystems in a rapidly changing climate. The Northern Plains long-term agroecosystem research (LTAR) site at Mandan, ND and the Platte River High Plains LTAR (ARS/University of Nebraska-Lincoln) at Lincoln, NE in collaboration with USDA-ARS research units in Brookings, SD and Fargo, ND are collaborating to address the grand challenge of providing and sustaining multiple service provisions from Northern Great Plains agroecosystems. We propose to attain these goals through sustainable intensification based on the adoption of conservation agriculture principles including reduced soil disturbance, livestock integration, and greater complexity and diversity in the cropping system. Here, we summarize new concepts these locations have pioneered in dynamic cropping systems, resource use efficiency, and agricultural management technologies. As part of the LTAR network, we will conduct long-term cross-site research to design and assess new agricultural practices and systems aimed at improving our understanding of decision making processes and outcomes across an array of agricultural systems.

  9. Stochastic analysis of concentration measurements in the transport experiment at Twin Lake Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagan, G.; Indelman, P.; Moltyaner, G.

    1997-04-01

    A procedure to identify the parameters characterizing flow and transport in heterogeneous aquifers with the aid of concentration measurements in tracer field experiments is developed. Unlike previous studies, which employed the measured plume spatial moments at different times and their theoretical expressions, we rely here on breakthrough curves and temporal moments in order to analyze the field tests at Chalk River Site. In these experiments, breakthrough curves of a radioactive tracer were measured continuously at a large number of points in parallel control planes. We derive theoretical expressions of the temporal moments of the breakthrough curves by the same Lagrangian approach that was used previously for spatial moment. We assume a stationary random velocity field of constant mean and relate it to the axisymmetric log conductivity covariance by a first-order approximation in the variance, with neglect of the effect of pore-scale dispersion. The final theoretical results relate the temporal moments to U (the mean velocity), σY2 (the log conductivity variance), IYh (the horizontal integral scale), and b(e) (a function of the anisotropy ratio e=IYυ/IYh). By assuming ergodicity, we identify the temporal moments at the Chalk River Site experiment from measured breakthrough curves. With the aid of the theoretical results and by a best fit we could estimate U, σY2, IYh, and IYh/b(e). An attempt to identify the vertical and transverse integral scales from temporal-spatial moments in the control planes was not successful. We took advantage of the dense measurements of breakthrough curves along vertical transects (at intervals of 1 cm) in order to identify the experimental concentration two-point covariance. We derived a simplified theoretical expression for its dependence on the log conductivity vertical integral scale IYυ, which was identified by a best fit with experimental results. This procedure, applied for the first time to analysis of field tests, led to

  10. Measurement of in situ phytoextraction of zinc by spontaneous metallophytes growing on a former smelter site.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, C; Gérard, E; Perronnet, K; Morel, J L

    2001-11-12

    This work was undertaken to measure the in situ phytoextraction of zinc using a former zinc-smelter site where metallophyte plants have been growing for 30 years. The site exhibited a gradient in the total metal concentration in the upper horizon (from 3230 to 8530 mg Zn kg(-1)). Soils were sampled from four different sectors (I-IV), and plant shoots were harvested, identified, their biomass weighed and analysed for zinc. The results showed that three plant species were dominant on the site, including Arabidopsis halleri (cress), Armeria maritima (seathrift), and Arrhenatherum elatius (fromental). A. maritima was the predominant species according to the biomass production on the most polluted sector 1. As the concentration of metals in soils decreased. A. maritima disappeared and A. halleri increased. The biomass of A. elatius was the highest on the less polluted soils. Concentrations in zinc in the aerial parts of plants varied from 73 (sector IV) to 6269 mg kg(-1) DM (sector 1). The concentration of Zn in A. halleri decreased with the decrease in concentration of zinc in soil. Phytoextraction was calculated from the biomass and its concentration of metal. It was at a maximum in sector III with a high contribution of A. halleri and A. elatius and reached 10 kg Zn ha(-1), a promising amount for phytoextraction considering the absence of any agricultural practices. In sector 1, phytoextraction was four times lower despite a 2.6 times higher concentration of Zn in the upper horizon. In conclusion, phytoextraction was strongly dependent on the concentration of the available metal in soils which may limit the growth of plants, and favour tolerant but low biomass plant species such as A. maritima.

  11. Plain Language Clear and Simple.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Literacy Secretariat, Ottawa (Ontario).

    Written for Canadian public servants and written with their help, this handbook presents principles and tips to make official writing clear, concise, and well organized. The handbook defines "plain language" writing as a technique of organizing information in ways that make sense to the reader--using familiar, straightforward words. The handbook…

  12. Aerosol light scattering measurements as a function of relative humidity: a comparison between measurements made at three different sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Derek E.; Malm, William C.

    The water uptake by fine aerosol particles in the atmosphere has been investigated at three rural National Parks in the United States (Great Smoky Mountains, Grand Canyon and Big Bend National Parks). The relative humidity (RH) of sample aerosols was varied from less than 20% to greater than 90% using Perma Pure drying tubes as the scattering coefficient of the aerosol was measured with a Radiance Research M903 nephelometer. Data from these studies show that growth curves at all the three sites are similar in shape but the magnitude of growth can vary considerably from day to day. The growth curves from Great Smoky Mountains show smooth continuous growth over the entire range of RH, while the growth curves from the Grand Canyon and Big Bend show smooth and continuous growth on some days and deliquescence on other days. Comparing 12-h filter samples of chemical composition data with the aerosol growth curves, we find that higher fractions of soluble inorganic compounds (sulfate and nitrate) produce growth curves of greater magnitude than do higher concentrations of either organic carbon or soil material.

  13. Comparison of stress-measuring techniques at the DNA-UTP site, Rodgers Hollow, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, R.E.

    1994-12-01

    The Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA) is developing explosives technology through its Underground Technology Program (UTP). Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has supported the DNA by conducting research to characterize the in situ stress and rock mass deformability at one of the UTP underground sites at Rodgers Hollow, near Louisville, Kentucky on the Fort Knox Military Reservation. The purpose of SNL`s testing was to determine the in situ stress using three different measurement techniques and, if possible, to estimate the rock mass modulus near the underground opening. The three stress-measuring techniques are (1) borehole deformation measurements using overcoring, (2) Anelastic Strain Recovery (ASR) complemented by laboratory ultrasonic and mechanical properties testing, and (3) the in situ flatjack technique using cancellation pressure. Rock mass modulus around the underground opening was estimated using the load deformation history of the flatjack and surrounding rock. Borehole deformation measurements using the overcoring technique probably represent the most reliable method for in situ stress determination in boreholes up to 50 ft (15 m) deep in competent rock around an isolated excavation. The technique is used extensively by the tunneling and mining industries. The ASR technique is also a core-based technique and is used in the petroleum and natural gas industries for characterization of in situ stress from deep boreholes. The flatjack technique has also been used in the tunneling and mining industries, and until recently has been limited to measurement of the stress immediately around the excavation. Results from the flatjack technique must be further analyzed to calculate the in situ stress in the far field.

  14. Evaluation of a two-site immunoradiometric assay for measuring noncomplexed (free) prostate-specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Cuny, C; Pham, L; Kramp, W; Sharp, T; Soriano, T F

    1996-08-01

    Serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in men is present as two different molecular forms separable by gel-filtration chromatography (GFC). We have evaluated a two-site IRMA that measures only the noncomplexed (free) form of PSA (F-PSA). Verification that the F-PSA assay measures solely F-PSA was obtained by assaying GFC-fractionated serum samples with both the F-PSA IRMA and a commercial PSA assay that measures total PSA (T-PSA: F-PSA plus alpha 1-antichymotrypsin-complexed PSA). The F-PSA assay detected only the 30-kDa peak corresponding to the free form of PSA, whereas the T-PSA assay detected two peaks: complexed PSA at approximately 90 kDa and F-PSA at approximately 30 kDa. The F-PSA assay had an analytical detection limit of 0.03 microgram/L and a measuring range up to 50 micrograms/L. The intraassay CV was 1.7-10% in the concentration range of 0.2-30 micrograms/L. The interassay CV was 3.4-12.5% in the same concentration range. Dilution and recovery studies showed no significant deviation from linearity across the assay range. The assay was insensitive to interference from hemoglobin, bilirubin, and total lipids up to concentrations of 5, 0.2, and 10 g/L, respectively. No significant loss of immunological activity (analyte stability) was seen day-to-day ( < or = 5) or after repeated freeze/thaw ( < or = 5) cycles. We conclude that the F-PSA IRMA is an accurate, precise, and reliable tool for measuring F-PSA in human serum. PMID:8697584

  15. HOLDUP MEASUREMENTS FOR VISUAL EXAMINATION GLOVEBOXES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Sigg, R

    2006-05-03

    Visual Examination (VE) gloveboxes are used at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to remediate transuranic waste (TRU) drums. Noncompliant items are removed before the drums undergo further characterization in preparation for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Maintaining the flow of drums through the remediation process is critical to the program's seven-days-per-week operation. Conservative assumptions are used to ensure that glovebox contamination from this continual operation is below acceptable limits. Holdup measurements are performed in order to confirm that these assumptions are conservative. High Cs-137 backgrounds in the VE glovebox areas preclude the use of a sodium iodide spectrometer, so a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector, having superior resolution, is used. Plutonium-239 is usually the nuclide of interest; however, Pu-241, Np-237 (including its daughter Pa-233) and Pu-238 (if detected) are typically assayed. Cs-137 and Co-60 may also be detected but are not reported since they do not contribute to the Pu-239 Fissile Gram Equivalent or Pu-239 Equivalent Curies. HEPA filters, drums and waste boxes are also assayed by the same methodology. If--for example--the HEPA is contained in a stainless steel housing, attenuation corrections must be applied for both the filter and the housing. Dimensions, detector locations, materials and densities are provided as inputs to Ortec's ISOTOPIC software to estimate attenuation and geometry corrections for the measurement positions. This paper discusses the methodology, results and limitations of these measurements for different VE glovebox configurations.

  16. Aerosol optical depth estimates based on nephelometer measurements at the SGP arm site

    SciTech Connect

    Bergin, M.H.; Ogren, J.A.; Halthore, R.

    1996-03-01

    The scattering of shortwave radiation by anthropogenic aerosols during clear-sky conditions, termed direct aerosol forcing, has been estimated to be roughly 1 W/m{sup 2} on a global annual average and may be as high as 50 W/m{sup 2} locally and instantaneously new source regions. The extent of the direct aerosol forcing effect at a given time and place depends primarily in the aerosol optical depth, {tau}, as well as on other factors including the solar zenith angle, aerosol upscatter fraction, and the single scatter albedo (ratio of light scattering to total extinction). The aerosol optical depth at a given wavelength ({tau}{sub {lambda}}) can be written as the integral with height to the top of the atmosphere (toa) of the aerosol extinction coefficient, b{sub ext,p}. Where b{sub ext,p} is the sum of the aerosol extinction (b{sub ap}) and scattering (b{sub sp}) coefficients. The objectives of this research are to use nephelometer measurements of the scattering coefficient to estimate the aerosol optical depth at a specific wavelength (530 nm), and to compare these results with optical depths measured by a Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) and Cimel Sun Photometer. This comparison will used to determine if all of the key parameters related to aerosol optical depth are being measured at the SGP ARM site.

  17. Dryline on 22 May 2002 During IHOP: Convective Scale Measurements at the Profiling Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demoz, Belay; Flamant, Cyrille; Miller, David; Evans, Keith; Fabry, Federic; DiGirolamo, Paolo; Whiteman, David; Geerts, Bart; Weckwerth, Tammy; Brown, William

    2004-01-01

    A unique set of measurements of wind, water vapor mixing ratio and boundary layer height variability was observed during the first MOP dryline mission of 22 May 2002. Water vapor mixing ratio from the Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL), high-resolution profiles of aerosol backscatter from the HARLIE and wind profiles from the GLOW are combined with the vertical velocity derived from the NCAR/ISS/MAPR and the high-resolution FMCW radar to reveal the convective variability of the cumulus cloud-topped boundary layer. A combined analysis of the in-situ and remote sensing data from aircraft, radiosonde, lidars, and radars reveals moisture variability within boundary layer updraft and downdraft regions as well as characterizes the boundary layer height variability in the dry and moist sides of the dryline. The profiler site measurements will be tied to aircraft data to reveal the relative intensity and location of these updrafts to the dry line. This study provides unprecedented high temporal and spatial resolution measurements of wind, moisture and backscatter within a dryline and the associated convective boundary layer.

  18. HISTORY AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS OF THE US EPA'S SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION (SITE) MONITORING AND MEASUREMENT (MMT) PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manuscript presents the history and evolution of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Monitoring and Measurement Technology (MMT) Program. This includes a discussion of how the fundamental concepts of a performanc...

  19. 49 CFR 229.64 - Plain bearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Plain bearings. 229.64 Section 229.64 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION....64 Plain bearings. A plain bearing box shall contain visible free oil and may not be cracked to...

  20. 49 CFR 229.64 - Plain bearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Plain bearings. 229.64 Section 229.64 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION....64 Plain bearings. A plain bearing box shall contain visible free oil and may not be cracked to...

  1. 49 CFR 229.64 - Plain bearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Plain bearings. 229.64 Section 229.64 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION....64 Plain bearings. A plain bearing box shall contain visible free oil and may not be cracked to...

  2. 49 CFR 229.64 - Plain bearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Plain bearings. 229.64 Section 229.64 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION....64 Plain bearings. A plain bearing box shall contain visible free oil and may not be cracked to...

  3. 49 CFR 229.64 - Plain bearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Plain bearings. 229.64 Section 229.64 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION....64 Plain bearings. A plain bearing box shall contain visible free oil and may not be cracked to...

  4. Measuring youth exposure to alcohol marketing on social networking sites: challenges and prospects.

    PubMed

    Jernigan, David H; Rushman, Anne E

    2014-02-01

    Youth exposure to alcohol marketing has been linked to increased alcohol consumption and problems. On relatively new and highly interactive social networking sites (SNS) that are popular with youth, tools for measuring youth exposure to alcohol marketing in traditional media are inadequate. We critically review the existing policies of Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube designed to keep branded alcohol content away from underage youth. Looking at brand and user activity on Facebook for the 15 alcohol brands most popular among US youth, we found activity has grown dramatically in the past 3 years, and underage users may be accounting for some of this activity. Surveys of youth and adult participation in alcohol marketing on SNS will be needed to inform debate over these marketing practices.

  5. A Compact Microelectrode Array Chip with Multiple Measuring Sites for Electrochemical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Dimaki, Maria; Vergani, Marco; Heiskanen, Arto; Kwasny, Dorota; Sasso, Luigi; Carminati, Marco; Gerrard, Juliet A.; Emneus, Jenny; Svendsen, Winnie E.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the fabrication and electrochemical characterization of a microchip with 12 identical but individually addressable electrochemical measuring sites, each consisting of a set of interdigitated electrodes acting as a working electrode as well as two circular electrodes functioning as a counter and reference electrode in close proximity. The electrodes are made of gold on a silicon oxide substrate and are passivated by a silicon nitride membrane. A method for avoiding the creation of high edges at the electrodes (known as lift-off ears) is presented. The microchip design is highly symmetric to accommodate easy electronic integration and provides space for microfluidic inlets and outlets for integrated custom-made microfluidic systems on top. PMID:24878592

  6. Excreta Sampling as an Alternative to In Vivo Measurements at the Hanford Site.

    PubMed

    Carbaugh, Eugene H; Antonio, Cheryl L; Lynch, Timothy P

    2015-08-01

    The capabilities of indirect radiobioassay by urine and fecal sample analysis were compared with the direct radiobioassay methods of whole body counting and lung counting for the most common radionuclides and inhalation exposure scenarios encountered by Hanford workers. Radionuclides addressed by in vivo measurement included 137Cs, 60Co, 154Eu, and 241Am as an indicator for plutonium mixtures. The same radionuclides were addressed using gamma energy analysis of urine samples, augmented by radiochemistry and alpha spectrometry methods for plutonium in urine and fecal samples. It was concluded that in vivo whole body counting and lung counting capability should be maintained at the Hanford Site for the foreseeable future, however, urine and fecal sample analysis could provide adequate, though degraded, monitoring capability for workers as a short-term alternative, should in vivo capability be lost due to planned or unplanned circumstances. PMID:26102322

  7. Measuring youth exposure to alcohol marketing on social networking sites: challenges and prospects.

    PubMed

    Jernigan, David H; Rushman, Anne E

    2014-02-01

    Youth exposure to alcohol marketing has been linked to increased alcohol consumption and problems. On relatively new and highly interactive social networking sites (SNS) that are popular with youth, tools for measuring youth exposure to alcohol marketing in traditional media are inadequate. We critically review the existing policies of Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube designed to keep branded alcohol content away from underage youth. Looking at brand and user activity on Facebook for the 15 alcohol brands most popular among US youth, we found activity has grown dramatically in the past 3 years, and underage users may be accounting for some of this activity. Surveys of youth and adult participation in alcohol marketing on SNS will be needed to inform debate over these marketing practices. PMID:24284473

  8. Measurement of Mars Atmosphere Argon Density with the APXS on the Opportunity site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Economou, T. E.; Citron, R. I.; Pierrehumbert, R. T.

    2008-12-01

    Using the APXS on board the Opportunity rover on MER mission, we were able to measure the argon density variation in the martian atmosphere as a function of seasons. The freezing and melting of the CO2 in the martian atmosphere at the poles creates local atmospheric lows/highs that moves the air mass. The argon, however, never freezes and stays in the air. An enhancement of Ar/CO2 mixing ratio by a factor of six at the martian South pole during the winter has been observed by the GRS onboard the Odyssey orbiter. In order to study this effect from the ground at the Opportunity site on MER mission, we have been making dedicated APXS measurements of the Ar in the atmosphere. In this case, the only real peak in the X-ray spectrum is the Ar line. To a good approximation, the APXS count rate is proportional to the number of argon atoms in the sensing volume, and hence measures the atmospheric density of argon, ρAr. If the atmosphere were perfectly mixed, the argon partial pressure would be constant. If we define the Local Mix- ing Ratio (MRlocal) as equal to the ratio of the local Ar partial pressure to the global average, then the measurement PAr/T is proportional to the local mixing ratio. The APXS Ar experiment thus gives a direct measurement of the local mixing ratio at the MER landing sites and it is a direct probe of the global circulation between the polar CO2 resource/sink and the equatorial regions. We have found that the Ar amount in the martian atmosphere at the Opportunity landing site is not constant and it is changing with the changing seasons. The change of the Ar in the atmos-phere follows the overall change in the atmospheric pressure but it is not in phase with it. There is a delay of many months between the maximum in Ar/CO2 mixing ratio and the pressure maximum. In addition, we have even seen the asymmetry between the south and north martian poles due to a different degree of CO2 contribution from both poles during the martian year. The actual Ar

  9. Effects of Measurement Uncertainties of Meteorological Data on Estimates of Site Water Balance Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spank, Uwe; Schwärzel, Kai; Renner, Maik; Bernhofer, Christian

    2013-04-01

    Numerical water balance models are widely used in ecological and hydro sciences. However, their application is related to specific problems and uncertainties. The reliability of model prediction depends on (i) model concept, (ii) parameters, (iii) uncertainty of input data, and (iv) uncertainty of reference data. How model concept (i) and parameters (ii) affect the model performance is an often treated problem. On the contrary, the effects of (iii) and (iv) are seldom tackled although their effects are of similar magnitude. It should be considered that uncertainties of input data and reference data do not only affect the prediction accuracy but also the parameter identification (calibration and validation). The uncertainty has two different reasons: (a) actual measurement uncertainties and (b) limitations of representativeness as consequence of a scale gap between meteorological measurement and hydrological modelling. A separate analysis of both aspects is often not possible as most hydrological investigations operate on catchment scale where both effects interfere with each other. Our study is focused on site scale (< 1.5 km2). Thus, the scales of measurement and modelling are similar, and effects due to regionalisation and generalisation can be neglected. At site scale we take the micrometeorological perspective: primary reference is the evapotranspiration measured via the eddy covariance technique instead of runoff. Because of the use of evapotranspiration as a reference, it is possible to limit the investigations to the upper parts of the soil that are influenced by root water uptake. Thus, also the parameter uncertainty is significantly reduced as most parameters can be directly quantified. The analyses of effects due to input uncertainties are based on Monte-Carlo-Simulations with perturbated input series. The Monte-Carlo-Simulations were done for two water balance models of different complexity (HPTFs: black box model; BROOK90: process based complex model

  10. Evaluating indigenous grass species as on-site sediment trapping measures, northwest Ethiopian highlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekonnen, Mulatie; Keesstra, Saskia; Ritsema, Coen; Stroosnijder, Leo; Baartman, Jantiene

    2016-04-01

    Although many studies have been conducted to evaluate the sediment trapping efficacy (STE) of grass species as an on-site sediment trapping measure, still a lot of grass species are availab1e of which their STE is unknown. Lack of information on the STE of such grass species has a negative influence on their acceptance and practical application by the users. Therefore, this study was conducted at Debre Mewi watershed, northwestern Ethiopian highlands, to evaluate the STE of four locally dominant indigenous grass species (Desho, Senbelet, Akirma and Sebez) and one exotic species (Vetiver) using plot experiments. On average, the annual runoff produced was found to be 79; 64; 69; 71; 74; 75 l m-2, which resulted in 7; 1.7; 2.9; 3.6; 4.5 and 5.6 kg m-2 yr-1 of sediment yield on the Control, Desho, Vetiver, Senbelet, Akirma and Sebez plots, respectively. Desho had a trapping efficacy of 76 % because of its fast growth and lateral spreading nature. Vetiver and Senbelet reduced the transported sediment with 59 % and 49 % STE, respectively. Because of their slow growth nature, Akirma and Sebez showed low STEs, 36 % and 20 %, respectively. The grass species were found to be important sources of livestock feed in addition to trapping sediment and reducing soil loss. Desho, Senbelet, Akirma, Vetiver and Sebez provided 132, 106, 76, 69 and 51 t ha-1 yr-1 fresh biomass, respectively. The indigenous grass species provided a practical means to reduce sediment yield, therefore, it can be concluded that such indigenous grass species can be used as an on-site sediment trapping measure in the northwestern highlands of Ethiopia.

  11. Measuring site-level success in brownfield redevelopments: a focus on sustainability and green building.

    PubMed

    Wedding, G Christopher; Crawford-Brown, Douglas

    2007-10-01

    This research has met the following four objectives within the broader research topic of characterizing and quantifying success in brownfield revitalization: (1) to define 40 total indicators that define and determine the success of brownfield redevelopments in four categories: environment-health, finance, livability, and social-economic; (2) to use these indicators to develop a partially automated tool that stakeholders in brownfield redevelopment may use to more easily assess and communicate success (or failures) in these projects; (3) to integrate "green" building as an important aspect of successful brownfield redevelopments; and (4) to develop this tool within the framework of a specific multi-attribute decision method (MADM), the analytical hierarchical process (AHP). Future research should include the operationalization and application of this tool to specific sites. Currently, no such indicator framework or automated tool is known to exist or be in use. Indicators were chosen because of their ability to reduce data into comprehensible measurements and to systematically measure success in a standardized fashion. Appropriate indicators were selected based on (1) interviews with prominent private developers and national leaders in brownfield redevelopment, (2) a review of the relevant literature, (3) objective hierarchies created in this project, and (4) the ability for each indicator to serve goals in more than one of the four categories described above. These were combined to form the Sustainable Brownfields Redevelopment (SBR) Tool. A survey was conducted to serve as a preliminary assessment and proposed methodology for judging the validity of the SBR Tool. Professionals in the academic, private, and public sector were asked to provide an evaluation of the management tool and a weighting of the relative importance of each indicator and each of the four categories listed previously. Experts rated the tool at 7.68 out of 10 suggesting that this framework will

  12. Measuring site-level success in brownfield redevelopments: a focus on sustainability and green building.

    PubMed

    Wedding, G Christopher; Crawford-Brown, Douglas

    2007-10-01

    This research has met the following four objectives within the broader research topic of characterizing and quantifying success in brownfield revitalization: (1) to define 40 total indicators that define and determine the success of brownfield redevelopments in four categories: environment-health, finance, livability, and social-economic; (2) to use these indicators to develop a partially automated tool that stakeholders in brownfield redevelopment may use to more easily assess and communicate success (or failures) in these projects; (3) to integrate "green" building as an important aspect of successful brownfield redevelopments; and (4) to develop this tool within the framework of a specific multi-attribute decision method (MADM), the analytical hierarchical process (AHP). Future research should include the operationalization and application of this tool to specific sites. Currently, no such indicator framework or automated tool is known to exist or be in use. Indicators were chosen because of their ability to reduce data into comprehensible measurements and to systematically measure success in a standardized fashion. Appropriate indicators were selected based on (1) interviews with prominent private developers and national leaders in brownfield redevelopment, (2) a review of the relevant literature, (3) objective hierarchies created in this project, and (4) the ability for each indicator to serve goals in more than one of the four categories described above. These were combined to form the Sustainable Brownfields Redevelopment (SBR) Tool. A survey was conducted to serve as a preliminary assessment and proposed methodology for judging the validity of the SBR Tool. Professionals in the academic, private, and public sector were asked to provide an evaluation of the management tool and a weighting of the relative importance of each indicator and each of the four categories listed previously. Experts rated the tool at 7.68 out of 10 suggesting that this framework will

  13. Corrective measures technology for shallow land burial at arid sites: field studies of biointrusion barriers and erosion control

    SciTech Connect

    Nyhan, J.W.; Hakonson, T.E.; Lopez, E.A.

    1986-03-01

    The field research program involving corrective measures technologies for arid shallow land burial (SLB) sites is described. Results of field testing of a biointrusion barrier installed at a close-out waste disposal site (Area B) at Los Alamos are presented. Soil erosion and infiltration of water into a simulated trench cap with various surface treatments were measured, and the interaction between erosion control and subsurface water dynamics is discussed relative to waste management.

  14. Variation characteristics of ultraviolet radiation over the north china plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bo; Wang, Yuesi

    2014-01-01

    In situ measured data of broadband solar radiation ( R s) and ultraviolet ( U v) radiation were used to investigate the spatiotemporal variation properties of U v radiation and the ratio of U v radiation to R s over the North China Plain (NCP). Based on the analysis, an empirical model for estimating U v radiation under all weather conditions in this region was developed. The results showed that the annual U v radiation over the NCP ranges from 0.38-0.52 MJ m-2 d-1. The highest value during the study period was recorded at the Changwu site, which is located near the margin of the Loess Plateau, while the lowest value appeared at the station in Beijing. The seasonal variation pattern of the ratio of U v radiation to R s is similar to that of U v radiation; namely, the highest value appears in August and then decreases gradually until the lowest value appears in November. A small increasing trend in the U v radiation levels and the ratio of U v radiation to R s was observed over the NCP. The evaluation results showed that the empirical estimation model can be widely used to estimate U v radiation under all atmospheric conditions. The relative error between the modeled and measured daily values were within ±15%.

  15. Monitoring Soil Erosion of a Burn Site in the Central Basin and Range Ecoregion: Final Report on Measurements at the Gleason Fire Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Julianne; Etyemezian, Vicken; Shillito, Rose; Cablk, Mary; Fenstermaker, Lynn; Shafer, David

    2013-10-01

    The increase in wildfires in arid and semi-arid parts of Nevada and elsewhere in the southwestern United States has implications for post-closure management and long-term stewardship for Soil Corrective Action Units (CAUs) on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) for which the Nevada Field Office of the United States Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration has responsibility. For many CAUs and Corrective Action Sites, where closure-in-place alternatives are now being implemented or considered, there is a chance that these sites could burn over at some time while they still pose a risk to the environment or human health, given the long half lives of some of the radionuclide contaminants. This study was initiated to examine the effects and duration of wildfire on wind and water erodibility on sites analogous to those that exist on the NNSS. The data analyzed herein were gathered at the prescribed Gleason Fire site near Ely, Nevada, a site comparable to the northern portion of the NNSS. Quantification of wind erosion was conducted with a Portable In-Situ Wind ERosion Lab (PI-SWERL) on unburned soils, and on interspace and plant understory soils within the burned area. The PI-SWERL was used to estimate emissions of suspendible particles (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters less than or equal to 10 micrometers) at different wind speeds. Filter samples, collected from the exhaust of the PI-SWERL during measurements, were analyzed for chemical composition. Based on nearly three years of data, the Gleason Fire site does not appear to have returned to pre burn wind erosion levels. Chemical composition data of suspendible particles are variable and show a trend toward pre-burn levels, but provide little insight into how the composition has been changing over time since the fire. Soil, runoff, and sediment data were collected from the Gleason Fire site to monitor the water erosion potential over the nearly three-year period. Soil

  16. Selected hydrogeologic data from the Northern Great Plains area of Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levings, Gary W.

    1981-01-01

    Selected hydrologic data have been used in a 4-year study of aquifers of Cenozoic and Mesozoic age in the northern Great Plains to define the hydrologic system and to generate hydrologic maps. Records of 6,754 wells and 188 springs are tabulated in the report. The well data include site location, county, date completed, depth of well, casing diameter, type of lift, use of water, principal aquifer, altitude of land surface, water level, discharge, specific capacity, specific conductance, and water temperature. The spring data include site location, county, use of water, principal aquifer, altitude of land surface, type of spring, discharge, date discharge measured, specific conductance, and water temperature. Locations of the wells and springs are shown on a map at a scale of 1:1,000,000. (USGS)

  17. Intercomparison of ammonia measurement techniques at an intensively managed grassland site (Oensingen, Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, M.; Spirig, C.; Wolff, V.; Trebs, I.; Flechard, C.; Wisthaler, A.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Hansel, A.; Neftel, A.

    2009-04-01

    As part of a field campaign in the framework of the NitroEurope project, three different instruments for atmospheric ammonia (NH3) measurements were operated side-by-side on a managed grassland site in Switzerland: a modified Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS), a GRadient of AErosol and Gases Online Registrator (GRAEGOR), and an Automated Ammonia Analyzer (AiRRmonia). The modified PTR-MS approach is based on chemical ionization of NH3 using O2+ instead of H3O+ as ionizing agent, GRAEGOR and AiRRmonia measure NH4+ in liquids after absorption of gaseous NH3 in a rotating wet-annular denuder and through a gas permeable membrane, respectively. Bivariate regression slopes using uncorrected data from all three instruments ranged from 0.78 to 0.97 while measuring ambient NH3 levels between 2 and 25 ppbv during a 5 days intercomparison period. Correlation coefficients r2 were in the range of 0.79 to 0.94 for hourly average mixing ratios. Observed discrepancies could be partly attributed to temperature effects on the GRAEGOR calibration. Bivariate regression slopes using corrected data were >0.92 with offsets ranging from 0.22 to 0.58 ppbv. The intercomparison demonstrated the potential of PTR-MS to resolve short-time NH3 fluctuations which could not be measured by the two other slow-response instruments. During conditions favoring condensation in inlet lines, the PTR-MS underestimated NH3 mixing ratios, underlining the importance of careful inlet designs as an essential component for any inlet-based instrument.

  18. Intercomparison of ammonia measurement techniques at an intensively managed grassland site (Oensingen, Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, M.; Spirig, C.; Wolff, V.; Trebs, I.; Flechard, C.; Wisthaler, A.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Hansel, A.; Neftel, A.

    2008-11-01

    As part of a field campaign in the framework of the NitroEurope project, three different instruments for atmospheric ammonia (NH3) measurements were operated side-by-side on a managed grassland site in Switzerland: a modified Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS), a GRadient of AErosol and Gases Online Registrator (GRAEGOR), and an Automated Ammonia Analyzer (AiRRmonia). The modified PTR-MS approach is based on chemical ionization of NH3 using O2+ instead of H3O+ as ionizing agent, GRAEGOR and AiRRmonia measure NH4+ in liquids after absorption of gaseous NH3 in a rotating wet-annular denuder and through a gas permeable membrane, respectively. Bivariate regression slopes using uncorrected data from all three instruments ranged from 0.78 to 0.97 while measuring ambient NH3 levels between 2 and 25 ppbv during a 5 days intercomparison period. Correlation coefficients r2 were in the range of 0.79 to 0.94 for hourly average concentrations. Observed discrepancies could be partly attributed to temperature effects on the GRAEGOR calibration. Bivariate regression slopes using corrected data ranged 0.92 to 0.95 with offsets ranging from 0.22 to 0.58 ppbv. The intercomparison demonstrated the potential of PTR-MS to resolve short-time NH3 fluctuations which could not be measured by the two other slow-response instruments. During conditions favoring condensation in inlet lines, the PTR-MS underestimated NH3 concentrations, underlining the importance of careful inlet designs as an essential component for any inlet-based instrument.

  19. Use of a marker organism in poultry processing to identify sites of cross-contamination and evaluate possible control measures.

    PubMed

    Mead, G C; Hudson, W R; Hinton, M H

    1994-07-01

    1. Nine different sites at a poultry processing plant were selected in the course of a hazard analysis to investigate the degree of microbial cross-contamination that could occur during processing and the effectiveness of possible control measures. 2. At each site, carcases, equipment or working surfaces were inoculated with a non-pathogenic strain of nalidixic acid-resistant Escherichia coli K12; transmission of the organism among carcases being processed was followed qualitatively and, where appropriate, quantitatively. 3. The degree of cross-contamination and the extent to which it could be controlled by the proposed measures varied from one site to another. PMID:7953779

  20. Measurements of aerosol chemistry during new particle formation events at a remote rural mountain site.

    PubMed

    Creamean, Jessie M; Ault, Andrew P; Ten Hoeve, John E; Jacobson, Mark Z; Roberts, Gregory C; Prather, Kimberly A

    2011-10-01

    Determining the major sources of particles that act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) represents a critical step in the development of a more fundamental understanding of aerosol impacts on cloud formation and climate. Reported herein are direct measurements of the CCN activity of newly formed ambient particles, measured at a remote rural site in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of Northern California. Nucleation events in the winter of 2009 occurred during two pristine periods following precipitation, with higher gas-phase SO(2) concentrations during the second period, when faster particle growth occurred (7-8 nm/h). Amines, as opposed to ammonia, and sulfate were detected in the particle phase throughout new particle formation (NPF) events, increasing in number as the particles grew to larger sizes. Interestingly, long-range transport of SO(2) from Asia appeared to potentially play a role in NPF during faster particle growth. Understanding the propensity of newly formed particles to act as CCN is critical for predicting the effects of NPF on orographic cloud formation during winter storms along the Sierra Nevada Mountain range. The potential impact of newly formed particles in remote regions needs to be compared with that of transported urban aerosols when evaluating the impact of aerosols on clouds and climate.

  1. Size-resolved measurements of ice nucleating particles at North American and European sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, R.; Si, M.; Chou, C.; Irish, V.; Dickie, R.; Elizondo, P.; Wong, R.; Brintnell, M.; Elsasser, M.; Lassar, W.; Pierce, K.; Leaitch, W. R.; Macdonald, A. M.; Platt, A.; Desiree, T. S.; Sarda Esteve, R.; Schiller, C. L.; Suski, K. J.; Hill, T. C. J.; Abbatt, J.; Huffman, J. A.; DeMott, P. J.; Bertram, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    Ice nucleating particles (INPs) are a small fraction of the total aerosol population capable of catalyzing ice formation under atmospheric conditions, and may therefore influence the albedo and lifetime of mixed-phase and ice clouds. Compared to ambient measurements of the total number concentration of INPs, relatively little data exists on the size distribution of INPs in the atmosphere. Information on the size of INPs may be useful in source identification, modeling their transport in the atmosphere, and determining the degree to which common INP instrumentation captures the full atmospheric INP population. Measured using the micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor-droplet freezing technique (MOUDI-DFT), we report immersion-mode INP number concentrations as a function of particle size at ground-level sites in North America and Europe, including Arctic, alpine, coastal, marine, agricultural, and suburban environments. On average, more than 91 % of INPs active at -15 °C were found to be supermicron in size and 62 % were in the coarse mode (> 2.5 μm). While these percentages decreased with decreasing freezing temperature, many INPs remained in the supermicron with nearly half of those active at -25 °C belonging to the coarse mode.

  2. Lead precipitation fluxes at tropical oceanic sites determined from /sup 210/Pb measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Settle, D.M.; Patterson, C.C.; Turekian, K.K.; Cochran, J.K.

    1982-02-20

    Concentrations of lead, /sup 210/Pb, and /sup 210/Po were measured in rain selected for least influence by local sources of contamination at several tropical and subtropical islands (Enewetak; Pigeon Key, Florida; and American Samoa) and shipboard stations (near Bermuda and Tahiti). Ratios expressed as ng Pb/dpm /sup 210/Pb in rain were 250--900 for Pigeon Key (assuming 12% adsorption for /sup 210/Pb and no adsorption for lead), depending on whether the air masses containing the analyzed rain came from the Caribbean or from the continent, respectively; about 390 for the northern Sargasso Sea downwind from emissions of industrial lead in North America; 65 for Enewetak, remote from continental emissions of industrial lead in the northern hemisphere; and 14 near Tahiti, a remote location in the southern hemisphere where industrial lead emissions to the atmosphere are much less than in the northern hemisphere. (The American Samoa sample yielded a higher ratio than Tahiti; the reason for this is not clear but may be due to local Pb sources). The corresponding fluxes of lead to the oceans, based on measured or modeled /sup 210/Pb precipitation fluxes, are about 4 ng Pb/cm/sup 2/y for Tahiti, 10 for Enewetak, and 270 for the Sargasso Sea site, and between 110 to 390 at Pigeon Key.

  3. Peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) measurements at a remote site in New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Prestbo, E. ); Gaffney, J.S. )

    1988-09-01

    Photochemical oxidants are not limited to the criteria pollutant, ozone. Peroxyactyl nitrate (PAN) is probably one of the better known non-criteria oxidants. PAN was originally referred to as compound X, as it caused a unique type of plant damage to numerous crops in southern California. PAN was associated with Los Angeles photochemical smog and ozone in the late 1950s and 60s. It should not be confused with X-agent which has also been associated with photochemical oxidants. PAN has been found to be an important means of transporting NOx in remote regions. This is due to its rather long atmospheric lifetime. It reacts slowly with OH radical, is photochemically stable, and has a low water solubility. Its principal loss is due to unimolecular decomposition. The authors have been making ozone, NO, NO{sup 2}, and PAN measurements at a remote site near Los Alamos, New Mexico for an extended period of time. An automated gas chromatograph equipped with an electron capture detector is used to make the PAN measurements. Diffusion tubes with PAN/n-tridecane solutions are used to calibrate the instrument. Typical PAN data obtained at the sight are presented. The collected PAN and oxidant data are examined, and have been modeled to determine the possible concentrations of peracetic acid and methyl hydroperoxide in remote air. These studies are discussed in light of their possible implications for peroxide contributions to environmental impacts and aqueous chemistry reactions.

  4. Measurements of peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) and peroxypropionyl nitrate (PPN) at selected urban, rural and remote sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Hanwant B.; Salas, Louis J.

    1989-01-01

    PAN and PPN were measured in a series of eight field studies performed at urban, rural and remote locations in the contiguous U.S. during 1983-1985. Seven of the eight studies were performed in the winter/spring period, a period of sparsely available data. Nearly 2000 air samples were analyzed during these studies. Mean PAN and PPN levels in the range of 45-1600 ppt (max. 7.9 ppb) and 5-230 ppt (max. 0.9 ppb), respectively, were measured. Despite a great deal of observed variability, PAN and PPN showed virtually identical behavior at all sites and in all seasons, supporting the view that these nitrogenous compounds are produced and destroyed by very similar mechanisms. On the average PPN concentrations were about 8 percent (range 3-14 percent) of PAN values. It is inferred that PPN/PAN ratio is highest in urban areas and declines as polluted air masses are transported over long distances.

  5. Tobacco branding, plain packaging, pictorial warnings, and symbolic consumption.

    PubMed

    Hoek, Janet; Gendall, Philip; Gifford, Heather; Pirikahu, Gill; McCool, Judith; Pene, Gina; Edwards, Richard; Thomson, George

    2012-05-01

    We use brand association and symbolic consumption theory to explore how plain cigarette packaging would influence the identities young adults cocreate with tobacco products. Group discussions and in-depth interviews with 86 young adult smokers and nonsmokers investigated how participants perceive tobacco branding and plain cigarette packaging with larger health warnings. We examined the transcript data using thematic analysis and explored how removing tobacco branding and replacing this with larger warnings would affect the symbolic status of tobacco brands and their social connotations. Smokers used tobacco brand imagery to define their social attributes and standing, and their connection with specific groups. Plain cigarette packaging usurped this process by undermining aspirational connotations and exposing tobacco products as toxic. Replacing tobacco branding with larger health warnings diminishes the cachet brand insignia creates, weakens the social benefits brands confer on users, and represents a potentially powerful policy measure.

  6. Tobacco branding, plain packaging, pictorial warnings, and symbolic consumption.

    PubMed

    Hoek, Janet; Gendall, Philip; Gifford, Heather; Pirikahu, Gill; McCool, Judith; Pene, Gina; Edwards, Richard; Thomson, George

    2012-05-01

    We use brand association and symbolic consumption theory to explore how plain cigarette packaging would influence the identities young adults cocreate with tobacco products. Group discussions and in-depth interviews with 86 young adult smokers and nonsmokers investigated how participants perceive tobacco branding and plain cigarette packaging with larger health warnings. We examined the transcript data using thematic analysis and explored how removing tobacco branding and replacing this with larger warnings would affect the symbolic status of tobacco brands and their social connotations. Smokers used tobacco brand imagery to define their social attributes and standing, and their connection with specific groups. Plain cigarette packaging usurped this process by undermining aspirational connotations and exposing tobacco products as toxic. Replacing tobacco branding with larger health warnings diminishes the cachet brand insignia creates, weakens the social benefits brands confer on users, and represents a potentially powerful policy measure. PMID:22203384

  7. Integrated metagenomics and field measurements of polygon features at the NGEE-Arctic Barrow site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tas, N.; Wu, Y.; Smith, L. J.; Ulrich, C.; Kneafsey, T. J.; Torn, M. S.; Hubbard, S. S.; Wullschleger, S. D.; Jansson, J.

    2013-12-01

    Arctic soils contain an estimated 12-42% of terrestrial carbon, most of which is sequestered in permafrost. High latitudes have experienced the greatest regional warming in recent decades and observations suggest that permafrost degradation is now commonly observed in the region. With increasing global temperatures, permafrost soils are becoming a potential source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Because of widespread permafrost thaw much of the soil organic matter may be available for rapid mineralization by microorganisms in the soil. Yet little is known about the vulnerability of permafrost and the potential response of soil microorganisms to availability of new carbon sources. On the Alaskan North Slope the collapse and rise of soil due to formation of ice wedges and permafrost thaw create distinct features called polygons. As part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment (NGEE) in the Arctic, we aimed to determine the distribution of microbial populations across a range of polygon features and to correlate the microbial data to GHG flux data. To determine the microbial community distribution and metabolic potential, we collected seasonally thawed active layer soil samples along two polygon transects (Site 0 and AB), including high-centered, transitional and low-centered polygons. Illumina HiSeq technology was used to sequence 16SrRNA genes and metagenomes from these active layer soils. The sequence data was correlated to GHG flux measurements and to environmental data from the site, including geophysical and geochemical soil characteristics. Both the microbial communities and the flux measurements varied along the polygon transect. Each polygon had a distinct microbial community structure; however, these microbial communities shared many metabolic capabilities. For example, many genes involved in degradation of chitin could be found all three polygons. Functional genes involved in methanogenesis and CH4-flux measurements

  8. Solar Radiation Measurements at the Chesapeake Bay COVE Site and Comparison With Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Z.; Charlock, T.; Rutledge, K.

    2001-05-01

    To validate retrievals of flux and albedo in the CERES satellite program, broad-band upwelling and downwelling solar irradiances are measured routinely at the CERES Ocean Validation Experiment (COVE) site 25 km east of the coast of Virginia, near the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay. A full year of observations are compared with simulations from a coupled radiative transfer model. The coupled model treats absorption and scattering by layers of both the atmosphere and the ocean explicitly and consistently, in terms of the inherent optical properties of the air and the sea. Key input parameters for the model include aerosol optical depth, wind speed, and total precipitable water; these are measured at COVE. The modeled total downwelling irradiances, which depend mainly on the atmospheric optical properties, agree well with observations. But the modeled upwelling irradiances (and hence ocean surface albedo), which depend heavily on the the ocean optical properties, are generally less than the observations. The measured upwelling irradiances are strongly influenced by sea state and surface wind, resulting in a seasonal variation of the ocean surface albedo. Candidates to explain the discrepancy of observed and modeled albedo are (1) in-ocean scattering that was not included in the model (i.e., sediments or air bubbles), (2) possible inadequacy of the classical Cox-Munk distribution for the wind speed dependence of sea slopes, and (3) uncertainties in aerosol optical properties. We are presently testing SeaWiFS data as a source for the concentrations of chlorophyl and dissolved organic matter (DOM); and plan to compare the model with available upwelling spectral irradiances and radiances, in addition to the broadband fluxes as described above.

  9. Magnetic Measurements and Heavy Metal Concentrations at Formosa Mine Superfund Site, Douglas County, OR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upton, T. L.

    2015-12-01

    Advances in the field of environmental magnetism have led to exciting new applications for this field. Magnetic minerals are ubiquitous in the environment and tend to have an affinity for heavy metals. It has been demonstrated that magnetic properties are often significantly related to concentrations of heavy metals and/or pollution loading index (PLI). As a result, magnetic techniques have been used as proxy for determining hot spots of several types of pollution produced from a diversity of anthropogenic sources. Magnetic measurements are non-destructive and relatively inexpensive compared to geochemical analyses. The utility of environmental magnetic methods varies widely depending on biological, chemical and physical processes that create and transform soils and sediments. Applications in the direction of mapping heavy metals have been studied and shown to be quite useful in countries such as China and India but to date, little research has been done in the US. As such, there is need to expand the scope of research to a wider range of soil types and land uses, especially within the US. This study investigates the application of environmental magnetic techniques to mapping of heavy metal concentrations and PLI at the Formosa Mine Superfund Site, an abandoned mine about 25 miles southwest of Roseburg, OR. Using hotspot analysis, correlation and cluster analyses, interactions between metals and magnetic parameters are examined in relation to environmental factors such as proximity to seeps and adits. Preliminary results suggest significant correlation of magnetic susceptibility with certain heavy metals, signifying that magnetic methods may be useful in mapping heavy metal hotspots at this site.

  10. Snake River Plain FORGE Well Data for INEL-1

    DOE Data Explorer

    Robert Podgorney

    1979-03-01

    Well data for the INEL-1 well located in eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho. This data collection includes caliper logs, lithology reports, borehole logs, temperature at depth data, neutron density and gamma data, full color logs, fracture analysis, photos, and rock strength parameters for the INEL-1 well. This collection of data has been assembled as part of the site characterization data used to develop the conceptual geologic model for the Snake River Plain site in Idaho, as part of phase 1 of the Frontier Observatory for Research in Geothermal Energy (FORGE) initiative. They were assembled by the Snake River Geothermal Consortium (SRGC), a team of collaborators that includes members from national laboratories, universities, industry, and federal agencies, lead by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL).

  11. Snake River Plain FORGE Well Data for WO-2

    DOE Data Explorer

    Robert Podgorney

    1991-07-29

    Well data for the WO-2 well located in eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho. This data collection includes lithology reports, borehole logs, temperature at depth data, neutron density and gamma data, and rock strength parameters for the WO-2 well. This collection of data has been assembled as part of the site characterization data used to develop the conceptual geologic model for the Snake River Plain site in Idaho, as part of phase 1 of the Frontier Observatory for Research in Geothermal Energy (FORGE) initiative. They were assembled by the Snake River Geothermal Consortium (SRGC), a team of collaborators that includes members from national laboratories, universities, industry, and federal agencies, lead by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL).

  12. SITE TECHNOLOGY PROFILES - 11TH EDITION, MEASUREMENT AND MONITORING PROGRAM, VOLUME 3

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program, now in its eleventh year is an integral part of EPA's research into alternative cleanup methods for hazardous waste sites around the nation. The SITE Program was created to encourage the development and routine use o...

  13. SITE TECHNOLOGY PROFILES, TENTH EDITION, VOLUME 3 - MEASUREMENT AND MONITORING PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program, now in its thirteenth year, is an integral part of EPA's research into alternative cleanup methods for hazardous waste sites around the nation. The SITE Program was created to encourage the development and routine us...

  14. Airborne Spectral Measurements of Surface-Atmosphere Anisotropy for Skukuza and Mongu Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatebe, C. K.; King, Michael D.; Arnold, G. T.; Li, J. Y.

    2001-01-01

    The Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) was flown aboard the University of Washington Convair CV-580 research aircraft and took measurements on 23 flights between August 15 and September 16. On 12 of those flights, BRF (bidirectional reflection function) measurements were obtained over different natural surfaces and ecosystems in southern Africa. The BRF measurements were done to characterize surface anisotropy in support of SAFARI 2000 science objectives principally to validate products from NASA's EOS (Earth Observing System) satellites, and to parameterize and validate BRF models. In this paper we present results of BRFs taken over two EOS validation sites: Skukuza tower, South Africa (25.0 S, 31.5 E) and Mongu tower, Zambia (15.4 S, 23.3 E). The CAR is capable of measuring scattered light in fourteen spectral bands. The scan mirror, rotating at 100 rpm, directs the light into a Dall-Kirkham telescope where the beam is split into nine paths. Eight light beams pass through beam splitters, dichroics, and lenses to individual detectors (0.34-1.27 microns), and finally are registered by eight data channels. They are sampled simultaneously and continuously. The ninth beam passes through a spinning filter wheel to an InSb detector cooled by a Stirling cycle cooler. Signals registered by the ninth data channel are selected from among six spectral channels (1.55-2.30 microns). The filter wheel can either cycle through all six spectral bands at a prescribed interval (usually changing filter every fifth scan line), or lock onto any one of the six spectral bands and sample it continuously. To measure the BRF of the surface-atmosphere system, the University of Washington CV-580 had to bank at a comfortable roll angle of approximately 20 degrees and fly in a circle about 3 km in diameter above the surface for roughly two minutes. Replicated observations (multiple circular orbits) were acquired over selected surfaces so that average BRF smooth out small-scale surface and

  15. Investigation of ice cloud microphysical properties of DCSs using aircraft in situ measurements during MC3E over the ARM SGP site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingyu; Dong, Xiquan; Xi, Baike

    2015-04-01

    Six deep convective systems (DCSs) with a total of 5589 five-second samples and a range of temperatures from -41°C to 0°C during the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) were selected to investigate the ice cloud microphysical properties of DCSs over the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The ice cloud measurements of the DCS cases were made by the University of North Dakota Citation II research aircraft, and the ice cloud properties were derived through the following processes. First, the instances of supercooled liquid water in the ice-dominated cloud layers of DCSs have been eliminated using multisensor detection, including the Rosemount Icing Detector, King and Cloud Droplet Probes, as well as 2DC and Cloud Imaging Probe images. Then the Nevzorov-measured ice water contents (IWCs) at maximum diameter Dmax < 4000 µm are used as the best estimation to determine a new mass-dimensional relationship. Finally, the newly derived mass-dimensional relationship (a = 0.00365, b = 2.1) has been applied to a full spectrum of particle size distributions (PSDs, 120-30,000 µm) constructed from both 2DC and High-Volume Precipitation Spectrometer measurements to calculate the best-estimated IWCs of DCSs during MC3E. The averages of the total number concentrations (Nt), median mass diameter (Dm), maximum diameter (Dmax), and IWC from six selected cases are 0.035 cm-3, 1666 µm, 8841 µm, and 0.45 g m-3, respectively. The gamma-type-size distributions are then generated matching the observed PSDs (120-30,000 µm), and the fitted gamma parameters are compared with the observed PSDs through multimoment assessments including first moment (Dm), third moment (IWC), and sixth moment (equivalent radar reflectivity, Ze). For application of observed PSDs to the remote sensing community, a series of empirical relationships between fitted parameters and Ze values has been derived, and the bullet rosette

  16. Pesticides in surface water measured at select sites in the Sacramento River basin, California, 1996-1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Domagalski, Joseph L.

    2000-01-01

    Pesticides were measured in one urban stream, one agricultural stream, one site on the Sacramento River, and one large flood control channel over a period of 18 months during 1996-1998. All sites were located within the Sacramento River Basin of California. Measurements were made on 83 pesticides or pesticide transformation products by either gas chromatography/mass spectrometry or by high performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet light spectrometry. Some pesticides were detected frequently at the agricultural stream and downstream in the Sacramento River and at the flood control channel of the Sacramento River. These were pesticides related to rice farming (molinate, carbofuran, thiobencarb, and bentazon); herbicides used both agriculturally or for roadside maintenance (diuron, simazine, and metolachlor); or insecticides used on orchards and row corps (diazinon and chlorpyrifos). No pesticide concen-trations above enforceable water quality criteria were measured at either the agricultural site or the Sacramento River sites. In contrast to the agricul-tural site, insecticides used for household, lawn, or garden maintenance were the most frequently detected pesticides at the urban site. Diazinon, an organophosphate insecticide, exceeded recom-mended criteria for the protection of aquatic life, and the diazinon levels were frequently above known toxic levels for certain zooplankton species at the urban site. Because of the low discharge of the urban stream, pesticide concentrations were greatly diluted upon mixing with Sacramento River water.

  17. Acoustic-Seismic Coupling in Porous Ground - Measurements and Analysis for On-Site-Inspection Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebsch, Mattes; Gorschlüter, Felix; Altmann, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    During on-site inspections (OSI) of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organisation (CTBTO) a local seismic network can be installed to measure seismic aftershock signals of an assumed underground nuclear explosion. These signals are caused by relaxation processes in and near the cavity created by the explosion and when detected can lead to a localisation of the cavity. This localisation is necessary to take gas samples from the ground which are analysed for radioactive noble gas isotopes to confirm or dismiss the suspicion of a nuclear test. The aftershock signals are of very low magnitude so they can be masked by different sources, in particular periodic disturbances caused by vehicles and aircraft in the inspection area. Vehicles and aircraft (mainly helicopters) will be used for the inspection activities themselves, e.g. for overhead imagery or magnetic-anomaly sensing. While vehicles in contact with the ground can excite soil vibrations directly, aircraft and vehicles alike emit acoustic waves which excite soil vibrations when hitting the ground. These disturbing signals are of periodic nature while the seismic aftershock signals are pulse-shaped, so their separation is possible. The understanding of the coupling of acoustic waves to the ground is yet incomplete, a better understanding is necessary to improve the performance of an OSI, e.g. to address potential consequences for the sensor placement, the helicopter trajectories etc. In a project funded by the Young Scientist Research Award of the CTBTO to one of us (ML), we investigated the acoustic-seismic coupling of airborne signals of jet aircraft and artificially induced ones by a speaker. During a measurement campaign several acoustic and seismic sensors were placed below the take-off trajectory of an airport at 4 km distance. Therefore taking off and landing jet aircraft passed nearly straightly above the setup. Microphones were placed close to the ground to record the sound pressure of incident

  18. Young Craters on Smooth Plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Young craters (the largest of which is about 100 kilometers in diameter) superposed on smooth plains. Larger young craters have central peaks, flat floors, terraced walls, radial ejecta deposits, and surrounding fields of secondary craters. Smooth plains have well-developed ridges extending NW and NE. This image (FDS 167), acquired during the spacecraft's first encounter with Mercury, is located approximately 60 degrees N, 175 degrees W.

    The Mariner 10 mission, managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for NASA's Office of Space Science, explored Venus in February 1974 on the way to three encounters with Mercury-in March and September 1974 and in March 1975. The spacecraft took more than 7,000 photos of Mercury, Venus, the Earth and the Moon.

    Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Northwestern University

  19. Plain Polynomial Arithmetic on GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisul Haque, Sardar; Moreno Maza, Marc

    2012-10-01

    As for serial code on CPUs, parallel code on GPUs for dense polynomial arithmetic relies on a combination of asymptotically fast and plain algorithms. Those are employed for data of large and small size, respectively. Parallelizing both types of algorithms is required in order to achieve peak performances. In this paper, we show that the plain dense polynomial multiplication can be efficiently parallelized on GPUs. Remarkably, it outperforms (highly optimized) FFT-based multiplication up to degree 212 while on CPU the same threshold is usually at 26. We also report on a GPU implementation of the Euclidean Algorithm which is both work-efficient and runs in linear time for input polynomials up to degree 218 thus showing the performance of the GCD algorithm based on systolic arrays.

  20. Southern Great Plains Ice Nuclei Characterization Experiment Final Campaign Summary

    SciTech Connect

    DeMott, PJ; Suski, KJ; Hill, TCJ; Levin, EJT

    2015-03-01

    The first ever ice nucleating particle (INP) measurements to be collected at the Southern Great Plains site were made during a period from late April to June 2014, as a trial for possible longer-term measurements at the site. These measurements will also be used to lay the foundation for understanding and parameterizing (for cloud resolving modeling) the sources of these climatically important aerosols as well as to augment the existing database containing this knowledge. Siting the measurements during the spring was intended to capture INP sources in or to this region from plant, soil, dust transported over long distances, biomass burning, and pollution aerosols at a time when they may influence warm-season convective clouds and precipitation. Data have been archived of real-time measurements of INP number concentrations as a function of processing conditions (temperature and relative humidity) during 18 days of sampling that spanned two distinctly different weather situations: a warm, dry and windy period with regional dust and biomass burning influences in early May, and a cooler period of frequent precipitation during early June. Precipitation delayed winter wheat harvesting, preventing intended sampling during that perturbation on atmospheric aerosols. INP concentrations were highest and most variable at all temperatures in the dry period, where we attribute the INP activity primarily to soil dust emissions. Additional offline INP analyses are underway to extend the characterization of INP to cover the entire mixed phase cloud regime from -5°C to -35°C during the full study. Initial comparisons between methods on four days show good agreement and excellent future promise. The additional offline immersion freezing data will be archived as soon as completed under separate funding. Analyses of additional specialized studies for specific attribution of INP to biological and smoke sources are continuing via the National Science Foundation and National Aeronautics

  1. Solar-absorption measurements of ozone from two ground based FTIR sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaza, Eddy; Stremme, Wolfgang; Bezanilla, Alejandro; Grutter, Michel; Blumenstock, Thomas; Hase, Frank; Gisi, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Ozone reduces the amount of ultraviolet light entering earths atmosphere and continuous monitoring of total ozone column especially in higher latitudes has been a major task since the discovery of the stratospheric ozone depletion. As tropospheric ozone is a main greenhouse gas, monitoring of ozone in the lower atmosphere and also in the tropics gains importance. Tropospheric ozone also plays an important role in air quality and high levels of ozone in the boundary layer affects the public health. Ozone is produced through a complicated path of photochemistry processes from volatile organic compounds and nitrogen oxides (NOx)[1]. In large cities, these ozone precursors are mainly emitted from anthropogenic activities and in Mexico City the ozone concentration frequently exceedes the local standard for air quality (e.g. on 80% of the days of the year 2002)[2]. Since May 2012 high resolution Fourier transform infrared solar absorption spectra have been used for determining the total column and profile of ozone at the high altitude remote site Altzomoni (19°.12`N, 98°.65`E) located 60 km southeast of Mexico City at 4000 m a.s.l. These measurements are complemented with solar absorption spectra recorded with a moderate resolution FTIR spectrometer at the UNAM campus in Mexcio City (19°25`N, 99°10`W, 2240 m a.s.l.). The vertical profiles and total columns of ozone are inferred from solar spectra by using the retrieval code PROFFIT. The results are compared with simulations of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) and other correlative data. The ozone column amount in the polluted mixing layer of Mexico City is estimated from the intercomparison of measurements at the urban and remote sites and discussed. [1] Tie, X.; Brasseur, G.; Ying, Z. Impact of Model Resolution on Chemical Ozone Formation in Mexico City: Application of the Wrf-Chem Model. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics. 2010, 10, 8983-8995. [2] McKinley, G.; Zuk, M.; Hojer, M.; Avalos, M

  2. Lower tropospheric ozone and aerosol measurements at a coastal mountain site in Central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, A.; Faloona, I. C.; Lighthall, D.; Wexler, A. S.; Cliff, S. S.; Conley, S. A.; Zhao, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Increasing concern over the impacts of exogenous air pollution in California's Central Valley has prompted the establishment of a coastal, high altitude monitoring site at the Chews Ridge Observatory (1550 m) approximately 30 km east of Point Sur in Monterey County, operated by the Monterey Institute for Research in Astronomy. Eighteen months of ozone and aerosol measurements are presented in the context of long-range transport and its potential impact on surface air quality in the southern San Joaquin Valley. Moreover, several ozone surveys have been conducted by aircraft upwind, over the Pacific Ocean, and downwind, over the Central Valley, to characterize horizontal and vertical transport across the coastal mountains. Diurnal variations present at Chews Ridge indicate the formation of a convective boundary layer on the ridge during the daytime leading to a 6-8 ppb decrease in ozone accompanied by a rise in specific humidity of 2-3 g/kg due to coupling with the forest. During the nighttime, the sampled air masses are representative of free tropospheric conditions which have not been significantly influenced by either local emissions nor convective coupling to the surface. The maximum daily 8-hour average ozone concentration at Chews Ridge is used in lagged correlation analysis with two sites in the San Joaquin Valley, Fresno and Arvin, to de-emphasize the influence of locally produced, diurnally cycled ozone. The correlation coefficients (~0.60) peak between 9-21 hour lag and tend to decorrelate completely within 4-5 days. These and other analyses along with data provided by the aircraft sampling are used to provide a deeper understanding of ozone transport into the San Joaquin Valley. Aerosol size is measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer and composition is analyzed with an 8-stage rotating drum impactor whose substrates are characterized by X-ray fluorescence. Various elemental ratios and back trajectory calculations are used to infer the temporal

  3. Formaldehyde emission behavior of building materials: on-site measurements and modeling approach to predict indoor air pollution.

    PubMed

    Bourdin, Delphine; Mocho, Pierre; Desauziers, Valérie; Plaisance, Hervé

    2014-09-15

    The purpose of this paper was to investigate formaldehyde emission behavior of building materials from on-site measurements of air phase concentration at material surface used as input data of a box model to estimate the indoor air pollution of a newly built classroom. The relevance of this approach was explored using CFD modeling. In this box model, the contribution of building materials to indoor air pollution was estimated with two parameters: the convective mass transfer coefficient in the material/air boundary layer and the on-site measurements of gas phase concentration at material surfaces. An experimental method based on an emission test chamber was developed to quantify this convective mass transfer coefficient. The on-site measurement of gas phase concentration at material surface was measured by coupling a home-made sampler to SPME. First results had shown an accurate estimation of indoor formaldehyde concentration in this classroom by using a simple box model.

  4. Initial recommendations for restricting gamma-ray spectrometry measurements of radionuclides for on-site inspections

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, W F; Kreek, S A; Wild, J F

    1998-11-06

    The US paper "Radionuclide Sampling, Sample Handling and Analytical Laboratory Equipment for Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty On-Site Inspections," CTBT/PC/V/OSI/WSII/PR/29 identified the radionuclides of interest to an OS1 as 144Ce, 147Nd, 141Ce, 149Ba140La), 95 Zr(95Nb), 131mXe, 133mXe, 133gXe, 135gXe, and 37Ar. All of these nuclides (except 37Ar) can be measured via some form of conventional or coincidence-based gamma-ray spectrometry. The non-gaseous radionuclides [144Ce, 147Nd, 141Ce, 140Ba(140La), and 95Zr(95Nb)] can be measured via conventional high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry using a shielded, high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector. The gaseous radionuclides 131mXe, 133mXe, 133gXe, and 135gXe are best measured (after separation from their homologous elements) via a gamma & beta/electron coincidence technique such as that described in CTBT/WGB/TL-11/5 which could utilize either a HPGe or low-resolution (NaI(TI)) gamma-ray spectrometer to detect the gamma-ray/x-ray and a plastic scintillator to detect the beta particle/electron from the decay of the various Xe isotopes. The US paper CTBT/PC/V/IOSI/WSII/PR/29 (and other papers) identified a need to limit the information that can be extracted from high-resolution gamma-ray spectra to ensure that only information relevant to an OSI is accessible. The term "blinding" has been used to describe the need to limit the information available to the Inspection Team from the high-resolution gamma-ray measurement. A better term is "measurement restriction"; the need for restricting the information is particularly relevant to conventional high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry measurements, but not to the gamma & beta/electron coincidence-type measurements

  5. Estimation of Regional Net CO2 Exchange over the Southern Great Plains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biraud, S. C.; Riley, W. J.; Fischer, M. L.; Torn, M. S.; Cooley, H. S.

    2004-12-01

    Estimating spatially distributed ecosystem CO2 exchange is an important component of the North American Carbon Program. We describe here a methodology to estimate Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) over the Southern Great Plains, using: (1) data from the Department Of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) sites in Oklahoma and Kansas; (2) meteorological forcing data from the Mesonet facilities; (3) soil and vegetation types from 1 km resolution USGS databases; (4) vegetation status (e.g., LAI) from 1 km satellite measurements of surface reflectance (MODIS); (5) a tested land-surface model; and (6) a coupled land-surface and meteorological model (MM5/ISOLSM). This framework allows us to simulate regional surface fluxes in addition to ABL and free troposphere concentrations of CO2 at a continental scale with fine-scale nested grids centered on the ARM central facility. We use the offline land-surface and coupled models to estimate regional NEE, and compare predictions to measurements from the 9 Extended Facility sites with eddy correlation measurements. Site level comparisons to portable ECOR measurements in several crop types are also presented. Our approach also allows us to extend bottom-up estimates to periods and areas where meteorological forcing data are unavailable.

  6. Use of Temperature and Surface Gas Flux as Novel Measures of Microbial Activity at a Crude Oil Spill Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekins, B. A.; Warren, E.; Sihota, N. J.; Hostettler, F. D.

    2012-12-01

    Degradation of crude oil in the subsurface has been studied for over 30 years at a spill site located near Bemidji, Minnesota, USA. The well-characterized site is being used to experiment with the use of surface gas flux and temperature measurements as novel methods for quantifying microbial activity. In the largest subsurface oil body, a 2-m-thick smear zone spans the water table 6-8 m below the surface. Methane produced from degradation of the oil diffuses upward and mixes with oxygen from the surface supporting aerobic methanotrophy at 2-4 m depth. The methane oxidation produces CO2 and heat at rates which are hypothetically proportional to other measures of subsurface microbial activity. To test this hypothesis, vertical profiles of temperature and microbial populations, surface CO2 flux, and oil degradation state were measured at three sites in the oil body and one background site. Temperature increases in the oil zone near the water table were 1-4°C above the background site. The site with the highest temperature increase at the water table also had the highest concentrations of gene copy numbers for methanogens (mcrA) and methanotrophs (pmoA) along with the most degraded oil. Surface CO2 flux over the oil sites averaged more than twice that at the background site but was not consistently highest over the site with the highest activity by other measures. One possible explanation for this discrepancy is variation in the effective diffusion coefficient of the vadose zone between the methanotrophic zone and the surface. At the level of the methanotrophic zone, temperatures were elevated 2-6°C over the background values but again the site with greatest average annual temperature increase was not at the most active site. This may be due to enhanced recharge at the most active site, which lies at the center of a local topographic depression where focused recharge occurs. Overall, the temperature and flux data showed significant increases at the oil sites compared

  7. Comparison of surface fluxes and boundary-layer measurements at Arctic terrestrial sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grachev, Andrey; Uttal, Taneil; Persson, Ola; Stone, Robert; Crepinsek, Sara; Albee, Robert; Makshtas, Alexander; Kustov, Vasily; Repina, Irina; Artamonov, Arseniy

    2014-05-01

    Observational evidence suggests that atmospheric energy fluxes are a major contributor to the decrease of the Arctic pack ice, seasonal land snow cover and the warming of the surrounding land areas and permafrost layers. To better understand the atmosphere-surface exchange mechanisms, improve models, and to diagnose climate variability in the Arctic, accurate measurements are required of all components of the net surface energy budget and the carbon dioxide cycle over representative areas and over multiple years. This study analyzes and discusses variability of surface fluxes and basic meteorological parameters based on measurements made at several long-term research observatories near the coast of the Arctic Ocean located in USA (Barrow), Canada (Eureka), and Russia (Tiksi). Tower-based eddy covariance and solar radiation measurements provide a long-term near continuous temporal record of hourly average mass and energy fluxes respectively. The turbulent fluxes of the momentum, sensible heat, water vapor, and carbon dioxide are supported by additional atmospheric and surface/snow/permafrost measurements (mean wind speed, air temperature and humidity, upwelling and downwelling short-wave and long-wave atmospheric and surface radiation, snow depth, surface albedo, soil heat flux, active layer temperature profiles etc.) In this study we compare annual cycles of surface fluxes including solar radiation and other ancillary data to describe four seasons in the Arctic including spring onset of melt and fall onset of snow accumulation. Particular interest is a transition through freezing point, i.e. during transition from winter to spring and from summer to fall, when the carbon dioxide and/or water vapor turbulent fluxes change their direction. According to our data, in a summer period observed temporal variability of the carbon dioxide flux was generally in anti-phase with water vapor flux (downward CO2 flux and upward H2O flux). On average the turbulent flux of carbon

  8. Reexamining age, race, site, and thermometer type as variables affecting temperature measurement in adults – A comparison study

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Linda S

    2003-01-01

    Background As a result of the recent international vigilance regarding disease assessment, accurate measurement of body temperature has become increasingly important. Yet, trusted low-tech, portable mercury glass thermometers are no longer available. Thus, comparing accuracy of mercury-free thermometers with mercury devices is essential. Study purposes were 1) to examine age, race, site as variables affecting temperature measurement in adults, and 2) to compare clinical accuracy of low-tech Galinstan-in-glass device to mercury-in-glass at oral, axillary, groin, and rectal sites in adults. Methods Setting 176 bed accredited healthcare facility, rural northwest US Participants Convenience sample (N = 120) of hospitalized persons ≥ 18 years old. Instruments Temperatures (°F) measured at oral, skin (simultaneous), immediately followed by rectal sites with four each mercury-glass (BD) and Galinstan-glass (Geratherm) thermometers; 10 minute dwell times. Results Participants averaged 61.6 years (SD 17.9), 188 pounds (SD 55.3); 61% female; race: 85% White, 8.3% Native Am., 4.2% Hispanic, 1.7 % Asian, 0.8% Black. For both mercury and Galinstan-glass thermometers, within-subject temperature readings were highest rectally; followed by oral, then skin sites. Galinstan assessments demonstrated rectal sites 0.91°F > oral and ≅ 1.3°F > skin sites. Devices strongly correlated between and across sites. Site difference scores between devices showed greatest variability at skin sites; least at rectal site. 95% confidence intervals of difference scores by site (°F): oral (0.142 – 0.265), axilla (0.167 – 0.339), groin (0.037 – 0.321), and rectal (-0.111 – 0.111). Race correlated with age, temperature readings each site and device. Conclusion Temperature readings varied by age, race. Mercury readings correlated with Galinstan thermometer readings at all sites. Site mean differences between devices were considered clinically insignificant. Still considered the gold

  9. Mobile measurement of methane and hydrogen sulfide at natural gas production site fence lines in the Texas Barnett Shale.

    PubMed

    Eapi, Gautam R; Sabnis, Madhu S; Sattler, Melanie L

    2014-08-01

    Production of natural gas from shale formations is bringing drilling and production operations to regions of the United States that have seen little or no similar activity in the past, which has generated considerable interest in potential environmental impacts. This study focused on the Barnett Shale Fort Worth Basin in Texas, which saw the number of gas-producing wells grow from 726 in 2001 to 15,870 in 2011. This study aimed to measure fence line concentrations of methane and hydrogen sulfide at natural gas production sites (wells, liquid storage tanks, and associated equipment) in the four core counties of the Barnett Shale (Denton, Johnson, Tarrant, and Wise). A mobile measurement survey was conducted in the vicinity of 4788 wells near 401 lease sites, representing 35% of gas production volume, 31% of wells, and 38% of condensate production volume in the four-county core area. Methane and hydrogen sulfide concentrations were measured using a Picarro G2204 cavity ring-down spectrometer (CRDS). Since the research team did not have access to lease site interiors, measurements were made by driving on roads on the exterior of the lease sites. Over 150 hr of data were collected from March to July 2012. During two sets of drive-by measurements, it was found that 66 sites (16.5%) had methane concentrations > 3 parts per million (ppm) just beyond the fence line. Thirty-two lease sites (8.0%) had hydrogen sulfide concentrations > 4.7 parts per billion (ppb) (odor recognition threshold) just beyond the fence line. Measured concentrations generally did not correlate well with site characteristics (natural gas production volume, number of wells, or condensate production). t tests showed that for two counties, methane concentrations for dry sites were higher than those for wet sites. Follow-up study is recommended to provide more information at sites identified with high levels of methane and hydrogen sulfide. Implications: Information regarding air emissions from shale gas

  10. Mobile measurement of methane and hydrogen sulfide at natural gas production site fence lines in the Texas Barnett Shale.

    PubMed

    Eapi, Gautam R; Sabnis, Madhu S; Sattler, Melanie L

    2014-08-01

    Production of natural gas from shale formations is bringing drilling and production operations to regions of the United States that have seen little or no similar activity in the past, which has generated considerable interest in potential environmental impacts. This study focused on the Barnett Shale Fort Worth Basin in Texas, which saw the number of gas-producing wells grow from 726 in 2001 to 15,870 in 2011. This study aimed to measure fence line concentrations of methane and hydrogen sulfide at natural gas production sites (wells, liquid storage tanks, and associated equipment) in the four core counties of the Barnett Shale (Denton, Johnson, Tarrant, and Wise). A mobile measurement survey was conducted in the vicinity of 4788 wells near 401 lease sites, representing 35% of gas production volume, 31% of wells, and 38% of condensate production volume in the four-county core area. Methane and hydrogen sulfide concentrations were measured using a Picarro G2204 cavity ring-down spectrometer (CRDS). Since the research team did not have access to lease site interiors, measurements were made by driving on roads on the exterior of the lease sites. Over 150 hr of data were collected from March to July 2012. During two sets of drive-by measurements, it was found that 66 sites (16.5%) had methane concentrations > 3 parts per million (ppm) just beyond the fence line. Thirty-two lease sites (8.0%) had hydrogen sulfide concentrations > 4.7 parts per billion (ppb) (odor recognition threshold) just beyond the fence line. Measured concentrations generally did not correlate well with site characteristics (natural gas production volume, number of wells, or condensate production). t tests showed that for two counties, methane concentrations for dry sites were higher than those for wet sites. Follow-up study is recommended to provide more information at sites identified with high levels of methane and hydrogen sulfide. Implications: Information regarding air emissions from shale gas

  11. Measured energy savings of light colored roofs: Results from three California demonstration sites

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari, H.; Gartland, L.; Konopacki, S.

    1998-06-01

    Measured data and computer simulations have demonstrated the impact of roof albedo in reducing cooling energy use in buildings. Savings are a function of both climate and the amount of roof insulation. The cooling energy savings for reflective roofs are highest in hot climates. A reflective roof may also lead to higher heating energy use. Reflective coatings are also used in commercial buildings to protect the roofing membrane, and hence, maintain and prolong the useful life of the roof. Reflectivity of coatings changes with weathering and aging which in turn could have an effect on building cooling-energy savings. For that reason, reflective roof coatings are not primarily marketed for their energy savings potential. To monitor the field performance of reflective coatings, the authors initiated a demonstration project where three commercial buildings in California were painted with light-colored roof coatings. The buildings are two medical care centers and one drug store. At all sites, the roof reflectance, both fresh and aged, and cooling energy use were monitored. In addition, they measured temperature throughout the roof systems and inside the conditioned space. In the monitored buildings, increasing the roof reflectance from an initial value of about 20% to 60%, dropped the roof temperature on hot summer afternoons by about 45 F. Summertime standard-weekday average daily air-conditioning savings were 18% (198 kWh) in the first medical office building, 13% (86 kWh) in the second medical office building, and 2% (13 kWh) in the drug store. The overall u-value of the roofs had dictated the impact of roof reflectance.

  12. Simultaneous measurements of HONO and NO2 at a rural site in Northern China by IBBCEAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Min; Duan, Jun; Fang, Wu; Hu, Renzi; Lu, Xue; Shen, Lanlan; Li, Ang; Xie, Pinhua; Liu, Wenqing

    2016-04-01

    HONO arose the interests for its photolysis is an important source of OH radical. However, its source, especially the daytime source is still unclear. With high primary pollutants and aerosol concentrations, the characteristics of air pollutions in China can be expected to be sometimes quite different from the one observed in developed countries. HONO shows high level not only in urban areas but also in rural areas in China. The temporal behavior of HONO and NO2 was investigated at a rural site in Wangdu, Hebei Province, China, by using incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (IBBCEAS) during the CAREBEIJING-NCP Campaign from June 26th to July 9th 2014. The concentrations of HONO and NO2 measured by IBBCEAS were compared with a LOPAP (Long Path Absorption Photometer) instrument and a commercial NOx analyzer (Thermo 42i), and the results showed the well correlations for the correlation coefficient (R2) of HONO and NO2 were up to 0.878 and 0.989, respectively. During the measurements, the daytime rapid variations of HONO were found. The peak values of HONO at around noon even unexpected exceed 3ppb and the unknown daytime HONO source strength (PM) reached up to 14 ppb/h, while the concentrations of NO2 were very low (< 5ppb) and the peaks of HONO/NO2 even exceed 100%, which were different from the previous field observations. The possible formations were discussed in this paper, the so high value of daytime HONO could not be explained by the known direct emissions or reactions related to NO2 and might come from soils much possible or the other unknown sources.

  13. Correcting for Incomplete Saturation and Off-Resonance Effects in Multiple-Site Saturation-Transfer Kinetic Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingsley, Peter B.; Monahan, W. Gordon

    2000-09-01

    The effects of incomplete saturation and off-resonance irradiation on nuclear magnetic resonance saturation-transfer measurements of three-site chemical-exchange rates are discussed. A new method that uses double-saturation measurements is compared with two published methods, one that uses single-saturation measurements and one that uses a single-saturation measurement and a double-saturation measurement. Several formulas are compared for measuring the exchange rate constant kDE for exchange from a detected spin D to an exchanging spin E in the presence of exchange from spin D to a competing spin C. For each method, formulas are derived with corrections for incomplete saturation or off-resonance effects, with both corrections, and with neither correction. Exact formulas are available for three exchanging sites with incomplete saturation if there are no off-resonance effects. Off-resonance corrections are imperfect even with complete saturation.

  14. Field Measurements at River and Tidal Current Sites for Hydrokinetic Energy Development: Best Practices Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Neary, Vincent S; Gunawan, Budi

    2011-09-01

    In this report, existing data collection techniques and protocols for characterizing open channel flows are reviewed and refined to further address the needs of the MHK industry. The report provides an overview of the hydrodynamics of river and tidal channels, and the working principles of modern acoustic instrumentation, including best practices in remote sensing methods that can be applied to hydrokinetic energy site characterization. Emphasis is placed upon acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) and acoustic-Doppler current profiler (ADCP) instruments, as these represent the most practical and economical tools for use in the MHK industry. Incorporating the best practices as found in the literature, including the parameters to be measured, the instruments to be deployed, the instrument deployment strategy, and data post-processing techniques. The data collected from this procedure aims to inform the hydro-mechanical design of MHK systems with respect to energy generation and structural loading, as well as provide reference hydrodynamics for environmental impact studies. The standard metrics and protocols defined herein can be utilized to guide field experiments with MHK systems.

  15. Measurement of intact human parathyrin by an extracting two-site immunoradiometric assay

    SciTech Connect

    Blind, E.; Schmidt-Gayk, H.; Armbruster, F.P.; Stadler, A.

    1987-08-01

    This is an immunoradiometric assay of intact human parathyrin, hPTH(1-84). One antibody, directed against the N-terminal part of the hormone, was produced in goats and conjugated covalently to cellulose particles. hPTH(1-84) and the N-terminal fragments were extracted from EDTA-treated plasma by these particles and thus concentrated. Another antibody, against synthetic hPTH(53-84), was raised in rabbits; this bound to the C-terminal part of the hormone. The final step was labeling the second free binding site of this antibody with /sup 125/I-labeled Tyr52-hPTH(53-84) and measuring the bound radioactivity. This assay can detect intact PTH in concentrations as low as 0.6 pmol/L (1.2 X 10(-16) mol per tube). The assay did not cross react with hPTH(1-34), hPTH(1-44), hPTH(28-48), hPTH(39-84), hPTH(44-68), or hPTH(53-84) in concentrations up to 6400 pmol/L. In 60 normal subjects, hPTH(1-84) concentrations ranged from 1.9 to 6.8 pmol/L; in 32 patients with primary hyperparathyroidism, from 7.0 to 80 pmol/L. The hormone was not detected in four patients with hypoparathyroidism.

  16. Direct measurement of metal ion chelation in the active site of human ferrochelatase.

    PubMed

    Hoggins, M; Dailey, H A; Hunter, C N; Reid, J D

    2007-07-10

    The final step in heme biosynthesis, insertion of ferrous iron into protoporphyrin IX, is catalyzed by protoporphyrin IX ferrochelatase (EC 4.99.1.1). We demonstrate that pre-steady state human ferrochelatase (R115L) exhibits a stoichiometric burst of product formation and substrate consumption, consistent with a rate-determining step following metal ion chelation. Detailed analysis shows that chelation requires at least two steps, rapid binding followed by a slower (k approximately 1 s-1) irreversible step, provisionally assigned to metal ion chelation. Comparison with steady state data reveals that the rate-determining step in the overall reaction, conversion of free porphyrin to free metalloporphyrin, occurs after chelation and is most probably product release. We have measured rate constants for significant steps on the enzyme and demonstrate that metal ion chelation, with a rate constant of 0.96 s-1, is approximately 10 times faster than the rate-determining step in the steady state (kcat = 0.1 s-1). The effect of an additional E343D mutation is apparent at multiple stages in the reaction cycle with a 7-fold decrease in kcat and a 3-fold decrease in kchel. This conservative mutation primarily affects events occurring after metal ion chelation. Further evaluation of structure-function data on site-directed mutants will therefore require both steady state and pre-steady state approaches.

  17. Statistical Methods for Quantifying Uncertainty in ENSO on Wind Power in the Northern Great Plains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, B. R.

    2006-12-01

    The El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is a well-known source of inter-annual climate variability for both precipitation and temperature in the northern Great Plains. The northern Great Plains also have the largest wind resource in the United States. With the continued growth of wind energy, ENSO's effect on wind speed needs to be examined because of our current lack of understanding about how wind speeds are affected by inter-annual variability. After having previously established that a teleconnection to ENSO exists, we set out to quantify the uncertainty in this relationship with this study. Our method uses the sign test and resampling of hourly airport wind speed measurements for the past half-century at 4 airports in both North Dakota and South Dakota. Airport data are useful in this case because they have very long and continuous measurement of hourly wind speed. With this data, we were able to show that ENSO did have an effect on wind speeds as well as on wind power. The warm phase of El Nino, in particular, was correlated with the largest reductions in wind speed in South Dakota. In North Dakota, it was the cold phase that produced the largest reduction in wind power. The largest differences occurred in April, while the smallest differences occurred in July. It is our hope that this method will also be a useful tool for wind farm developers across the country to more accurately assess the value of their site based on limited in-situ data.

  18. Black carbon and its correlation with trace gases at a rural site in Beijing: Top-down constraints from ambient measurements on bottom-up emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuxuan; Wang, Xuan; Kondo, Yutaka; Kajino, Mizuo; Munger, J. William; Hao, Jiming

    2011-12-01

    The mass concentrations of black carbon (BC) were measured continuously at Miyun, a rural site near Beijing, concurrently with some trace gases (CO, CO2, NOy, SO2) during the nonheating seasons of 2010 (April to October). The average concentration of BC was 2.26 ± 2.33 μg m-3. About 70%-100% of the air masses arriving at the site from June to September were from the source region of Beijing and the North China Plain (NCP), while in the spring, 40% were of continental background origin. BC had moderate to strong positive correlations with CO (R2 = 0.51), NOy (R2 = 0.58), and CO2 (nonsummer, R2 = 0.54), but not with SO2 (R2 < 0.1). The observed ΔBC/ΔCO ratio was 0.0050 ± 0.0001 μg m-3/ppbv for the regional air masses (excluding the influence of biomass burning). This ratio increased by 68% to 0.0084 ± 0.0004 μg m-3/ppbv after excluding the influence of wet deposition. Accounting further for the impact of atmospheric processes on the observation, we derived an average top-down BC/CO emission ratio of 0.0095 ± 0.002 μg m-3/ppbv for the source region of Beijing and NCP that is 18%-21% lower than the average emission ratio from the bottom-up inventory of Zhang et al. (2009), whereas the difference is substantially lower than the uncertainty of emissions for either species. The difference between the mean bottom-up and top-down emission ratios is most likely to be attributed to the residential sector, which needs to have a lower share in the total emissions of BC or a much lower BC/CO emission ratio. The industry and transportation sectors are found to be dominant sources of BC from Beijing and the NCP rather than from the residential sector as suggested by the bottom-up inventory.

  19. Measuring the serotonin uptake site using (/sup 3/H)paroxetine--a new serotonin uptake inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Gleiter, C.H.; Nutt, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    Serotonin is an important neurotransmitter that may be involved in ethanol preference and dependence. It is possible to label the serotonin uptake site in brain using the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine, but this also binds to other sites. We have used the new high-affinity uptake blocker paroxetine to define binding to this site and report it to have advantages over imipramine as a ligand.

  20. LAPS Lidar Measurements at the ARM Alaska Northslope Site (Support to FIRE Project)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philbrick, C. Russell; Lysak, Daniel B., Jr.; Petach, Tomas M.; Esposito, Steven T.; Mulik, Karoline R.

    1998-01-01

    This report consists of data summaries of the results obtained during the May 1998 measurement period at Barrow Alaska. This report does not contain any data interpretation or analysis of the results which will follow this activity. This report is forwarded with a data set on magnetic media which contains the reduced data from the LAPS lidar in 15 minute intervals. The data was obtained during the period 15-30 May 1998. The measurement period overlapped with several aircraft flights conducted by NASA as part of the FIRE project. The report contains a summary list of the data obtained plus figures that have been prepared to help visualize the measurement periods. The order of the presentation is as follows: Section 1. A copy of the Statement of Work for the planned activity of the second measurement period at the ARM Northslope site is provided. Section 2. A list of the data collection periods shows the number of one minute data records stored during each hour of operation and the corresponding size (Mbytes) of the one hour data folders. The folder and file names are composed from the year, month, day, hour and minute. The date/time information is given in UTC for easier comparison with other data sets. Section 3. A set of 4 comparisons between the LAPS lidar results and the sondes released by the ARM scientists from a location nearby the lidar. The lidar results show the +/- 1 sigma statistical error on each of the independent 75 m altitude bins of the data. This set of 4 comparisons was used to set and validate the calibration value which was then used for the complete data set. Section 4. A set of false color figures with up to 10 hours of specific humidity measurements are shown in each graph. Two days of measurements are shown on each page. These plots are crude representations of the data and permit a survey which indicates when the clouds were very low or where interesting events may occur in the results. These plots are prepared using the real time sequence

  1. Estimates of mean monthly streamflow for selected sites in the Musselshell River basin, Montana, base period water years 1937-86

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parrett, Charles; Johnson, D.R.

    1989-01-01

    Estimates of mean monthly and mean annual streamflow were made for 56 selected sites in the Musselshell River basin and 1 site outside the basin. The study area was divided into a Mountain Region and a Plains Region and the estimation methods were applied separately in the two regions. Four methods were developed to estimate mean monthly streamflow at ungaged sites. The first method was based on the regression relation between mean monthly streamflow and various basin and climatic characteristics. The standard errors ranged from 35 to 71% in the Mountain Region and from 98 to 157% in the Plains Region. The second method was based on the regression relations between mean monthly streamflow and active-channel width. The standard errors ranged from 38 to 81% in the Mountain Region and from 71 to 98% in the Plains Region. The third method was based on correlation of measured streamflow at ungaged sites with concurrent daily mean streamflow at nearby gaged sites. The standard errors ranged from 36 to 66% in the Mountain Region and from 109 to 321% in the Plains Region. The fourth method, generally the most reliable, estimated mean monthly streamflows by weighing individual estimates in accordance with their variance and degree of independence. The standard error for this method when all three individual estimates were weighed ranged from 25 to 55% in the Mountain Region and from 71 to 97% in the Plains Region. (USGS)

  2. Hydraulic Fracture Measurements at Site C0009 of IODP Expedition 319, NanTroSEIZE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kano, Y.; Ito, T.; Lin, W.; Flemings, P. B.; Boutt, D. F.; Doan, M.; McNeill, L. C.; Byrne, T.; Saffer, D. M.; Araki, E.; Eguchi, N. O.; Takahashi, K.; Toczko, S.; Scientists, E.

    2009-12-01

    The drilling vessel Chikyu completed the first riser-drilling in IODP history to a depth of 1603 mbsf (meter below seafloor) at Site C0009 in the landward Kumano forearc basin in the Nankai convergent margin, Japan.To measure in situ stress we performed two types of hydraulic fracturing: 1) as part of routine drilling operations, we estimated least principle stress from a leak off test (LOT); and 2) we used Schlumberger’s dual wireline packer, the Modular Dynamics Tester (MDT). Two LOT’s were performed at the base of 20 inch casing (703.9 mbsf) as a part of standard drilling operations; the outer annulus was closed by the blowout preventor (BOP), fluid was pumped at a constant rate of 2.3 m3/s, and pressure was measured at the cement pumps. The leak-off pressures were interpreted to lie at the break in slope in a graph of pressure vs volume-pumped. These values were found to be 30.22 and 30.25 MPa. These leak off pressure is interpreted to record fluids entering hydraulic fractures and is approximately the the least principal stress. There is considerable uncertainty in picking the slopes of the lines to determine the least principal stress (S3). The MDT dual packer tests were carried out at depth of 873.7 and 1532.7 mbsf. The dual packer module isolates a 1-m section of the borehole for testing. Zones free from pre-existing fractures and with near circular hole shape were chosen for the stress measurements. In the HF test at 873.7 m, the pressure cycle was repeated 5 times maintaining flow rate of 20 cm3/s. Periods of each cycles were 80-300 s. We determined the instantaneous shut in pressure to be 34.8 MPa. In the test at 1532.7 m, only one pressure cycle with a flow rate of 20 cm3/s was maintained, which yielded an instantaneous shut in pressure of 41.6 MPa. We interpret the shut-in pressure to record the least principal stress (S3). We do not know the orientation of fractures which were induced or activated by hydraulic fracturing, because no borehole

  3. HOLDUP MEASUREMENTS FOR THREE VISUAL EXAMINATION AND TRU REMEDIATION GLOVEBOX FACILITIES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Dewberry, R; Donald Pak, D

    2007-05-04

    Visual Examination (VE) gloveboxes are used to remediate transuranic waste (TRU) drums at three separate facilities at the Savannah River Site. Noncompliant items are removed before the drums undergo further characterization in preparation for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Maintaining the flow of drums through the remediation process is critical to the program's seven-days-per-week operation. Conservative assumptions are used to ensure that glovebox contamination from this continual operation is below acceptable limits. Holdup measurements using cooled HPGe spectrometers are performed in order to confirm that these assumptions are conservative. {sup 239}Pu is the main nuclide of interest; however, {sup 241}Pu, equilibrium {sup 237}Np/{sup 233}Pa and {sup 238}Pu (if detected) are typically assayed. At the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) facility {sup 243,244,245}Cm are also generally observed and are always reported at either finite levels or at limits of detection. A complete assay at each of the three facilities includes a measure of TRU content in the gloveboxes and HEPA filters in the glovebox exhaust. This paper includes a description of the {gamma}-PHA acquisitions, of the modeling, and of the calculations of nuclide content. Because each of the remediation facilities is unique and ergonomically unfavorable to {gamma}-ray acquisitions, we have constructed custom detector support devices specific to each set of acquisitions. This paper includes a description and photographs of these custom devices. The description of modeling and calculations include determination and application of container and matrix photon energy dependent absorption factors and also determination and application of geometry factors relative to our detector calibration geometry. The paper also includes a discussion of our measurements accuracy using off-line assays of two SRNL HEPA filters. The comparison includes assay of the filters inside of 55-gallon

  4. Measurement of black carbon (BC) by an optical method and a thermal-optical method: Intercomparison for four sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Tanveer; Dutkiewicz, Vincent A.; Shareef, Akhtar; Tuncel, Gurdal; Tuncel, Semra; Husain, Liaquat

    2009-12-01

    Comparison of black carbon (BC) measurements obtained by two methods was performed for aerosols samples collected on Whatman 41 (W-41) filters, using an optical method (Magee Scientific Optical Transmissometer Model OT-21) and a thermal-optical method (Sunset Laboratory Thermal-optical analyzer). Samples were collected from four sites: Albany (a small urban site, NY), Antalya (coastal site, Turkey), Whiteface Mountain (remote site, NY) and Mayville (rural site, NY). At Albany, comparison between the two methods showed excellent agreement; a least-squares regression line yielded a slope of 1.02, and r2 = 0.88. Similar comparisons at Antalya (slope of 1.02, r2 = 0.5) and Whiteface Mountain (slope of 0.92 and r2 = 0.58) also gave very good relationship. At Mayville, the relationship between the two methods yielded somewhat lower regression: a slope of 0.75, and r2 = 0.44. The data from the four locations, when plotted together, yielded an excellent agreement: a slope of 0.91, and r2 of 0.84. Based on our measurements, it appears that optical measurement using the OT-21 can be successfully applied to determination of BC in W-41 filters. However, because of the variability in the chemical composition of BC aerosol at different locations, it is suggested that the calibration of OT-21 when using W-41 filters should be performed with a statistically significant numbers of samples for specific sites.

  5. A Study of Geological Formation on Different Sites in Batu Pahat, Malaysia Based On HVSR Method Using Microtremor Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noor, M. A. M.; Madun, A.; Kamarudin, A. F.; Daud, M. E.

    2016-07-01

    Geological formation is a one of information need to know during site reconnaissance. Conventional method like borehole has been known is very accurate to identify the formation of geology of a site. However, the problem of this technique is very expensive and not economical for large area. In the last decade, microtremor measurement has been introduced as an alternative technique and widely used in the geological formation study. Therefore, the aim in this study is to determine the geological formation underneath of surface in Batu Pahat district using microtremor measurement. There are two parameters have been carried out from microtremor measurement in term of natural frequency and HVSR curves images. Microtremor measurements are done conducted at 15 sites surrounding of Batu Pahat. Horizontal to vertical spectral ratio (HVSR) method was used for analyzing microtermor measurement data, to determine the natural frequency and also HVSR curves image. In this study, values of natural frequencies are used to classify the soil types with range in the between 0.93 to 5.35 Hz, meanwhile the pattern of HVSR curve images has been shown exists a few groups of soil types surrounding Batu Pahat district. Hence, microtremor measurement indirectly can be used as a one technique to add value in the site reconnaissance in the future.

  6. High concentrations of regional dust from deserts to plains across the central Rocky Mountains, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, R. L.; Munson, S. M.; Fernandez, D. P.; Neff, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Regional mineral dust in the American Southwest affects snow-melt rates, biogeochemical cycling, visibility, and public health. We measured total suspended particulates (TSP) across a 500-km-long sampling network of five remote sites in Utah and Colorado, USA, forming a gradient in distance from major dust emitting areas. The two westernmost sites on the Colorado Plateau desert had similar TSP concentrations (2008-2012, daily average=126 μg m-3; max. daily average over a two-week period=700 μg m-3 at Canyonlands National Park, Utah), while the easternmost High Plains site, close to cropped and grazed areas in northeastern Colorado, had an average concentration of 143 μg m-3 in 2011-2012 (max. daily average=656 μg m-3). Such concentrations rank comparably with those of TSP in several African and Asian cities in the paths of frequent dust storms. Dust loadings at the two intervening montane sites decreased from the western slope of the Rocky Mountains (Telluride, daily average=68 μg m-3) to an eastern site (Niwot Ridge, daily average=58 μg m-3). Back-trajectory analyses and satellite retrievals indicated that the three westernmost sites received most dust from large desert-source regions as far as 300 km to their southwest. These sources also sometimes sent dust to the two easternmost sites, which additionally captured dust from sources north and northwest of the central Rocky Mountains as well as locally at the Plains site. The PM10 fraction accounted for <15% of TSP, but most TSP is only slightly larger (typical median size, 15-20 μm) after about 100-800 km transport distances. Correlations between TSP and PM10 values indicate increases in both fractions during regional wind storms, especially related to Pacific frontal systems during late winter to late spring. These measurements and observations indicate that most dust deposition and associated air-quality problems in the interior American West are connected to regional dust sources and not to those in

  7. FIELD MEASUREMENT OF VAPOR INTRUSION RATES AT A PCE SITE (ABSTRACT ONLY)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field study was performed to evaluate vapor intrusion (VI) of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and other chlorinated solvents at a commercial retail site in Dallas, TX. The building is approximately 40 years old and once housed a dry cleaning operation. Results from an initial site ch...

  8. Spatial Upscaling of Long-term In Situ LAI Measurements from Global Network Sites for Validation of Remotely Sensed Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, B.; Jing, L.; Qinhuo, L.; Zeng, Y.; Yin, G.; Fan, W.; Zhao, J.

    2015-12-01

    Leaf area index (LAI) is a key parameter in terrestrial ecosystem models, and a series of global LAI products have been derived from satellite data. To effectively apply these LAI products, it is necessary to evaluate their accuracy reasonablely. The long-term LAI measurements from the global network sites are an important supplement to the product validation dataset. However, the spatial scale mismatch between the site measurement and the pixel grid hinders the utilization of these measurements in LAI product validation. In this study, a pragmatic approach based on the Bayesian linear regression between long-term LAI measurements and high-resolution images is presented for upscaling the point-scale measurements to the pixel-scale. The algorithm was evaluated using high-resolution LAI reference maps provided by the VALERI project at the Järvselja site and was implemented to upscale the long-term LAI measurements at the global network sites. Results indicate that the spatial scaling algorithm can reduce the root mean square error (RMSE) from 0.42 before upscaling to 0.21 after upscaling compared with the aggregated LAI reference maps at the pixel-scale. Meanwhile, the algorithm shows better reliability and robustness than the ordinary least square (OLS) method for upscaling some LAI measurements acquired at specific dates without high-resolution images. The upscaled LAI measurements were employed to validate three global LAI products, including MODIS, GLASS and GEOV1. Results indicate that (i) GLASS and GEOV1 show consistent temporal profiles over most sites, while MODIS exhibits temporal instability over a few forest sites. The RMSE of seasonality between products and upscaled LAI measurement is 0.25-1.72 for MODIS, 0.17-1.29 for GLASS and 0.36-1.35 for GEOV1 along with different sites. (ii) The uncertainty for products varies over different months. The lowest and highest uncertainty for MODIS are 0.67 in March and 1.53 in August, for GLASS are 0.67 in November