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Sample records for plan sismp volume

  1. DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 Hanford Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    McCormack, R.L.

    1995-08-01

    The Hanford Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan (SISMP) is being developed in support of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 94-1 Integrated Program Plan (IPP). Volume 1 of the SISMP identifies the technical scope and costs associated with Hanford Site plans to resolve concerns identified in DNFSB Recommendation 94-1. Volume 2 of the SISMP provides the Resource Loaded Integrated Schedules for Spent Nuclear Fuel Project and Plutonium Finishing Plant activities identified in Volume 1 of the SISMP. Appendix A provides the schedules and progress curves related to spent nuclear fuel management. Appendix B provides the schedules and progress curves related to plutoniumbearing material management. Appendix C provides programmatic logic diagrams that were referenced in Volume 1 of the SISMP.

  2. DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 Hanford Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, E.W.

    1995-10-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has developed an Integrated Program Plan (IPP) to address concerns identified in Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 94-1. The IPP describes the actions that DOE plans to implement at its various sites to convert excess fissile materials to forms or conditions suitable for safe interim storage. The baseline IPP was issued as DOE`s Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 94-1 Implementation Plan (IP), which was transmitted to the DNFSB on February 28, 1995. The IPP is being further developed to include complex-wide requirements for research and development and a long-range facility requirements section. The planned additions to the baseline IPP are being developed based on a systems engineering approach that integrates facilities and capabilities at the various DOE sites and focuses on attaining safe interim storage with minimum safety risks and environmental impacts. Each affected DOE site has developed a Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan (SISMP) to identify individual site plans to implement the DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 and to provide a basis for formulating planned additions to the IPP. The SISMPs were developed based on the objectives, requirements, and commitments identified in the baseline DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 IPP. The SISMPs will be periodically updated to reflect improved integration between DOE sites as identified during the IPP systems engineering evaluations.

  3. Strategic Plan. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to present the strategic plan and associated organizational structure that the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) will utilize to achieve the defined mission and objectives provided by NASA. Much of the information regarding the background and establishment of the NSBRI by NASA has been provided in other documentation and will not be repeated in this Strategic Plan. This Strategic Plan is presented in two volumes. Volume I (this volume) begins with an Introduction (Section 2) that provides the Institute's NASA-defined mission and objectives, and the organizational structure adopted to implement these through three Strategic Programs: Countermeasure Research; Education, Training and Outreach; and Cooperative Research and Development. These programs are described in Sections 3 to 5. Each program is presented in a similar way, using four subsections: Goals and Objectives; Current Strategies; Gaps and Modifications; and Resource Requirements. Section 6 provides the administrative infrastructure and total budget required to implement the Strategic Programs and assures that they form a single cohesive plan. This plan will ensure continued success of the Institute for the next five years. Volume II of the Strategic Plan provides an in-depth analysis of the current and future strategic programs of the 12 current NSBRI teams, including their goals, objectives, mutual interactions and schedules.

  4. Groundwater Monitoring Plan. Volume 2. Final Quality Assurance Project Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-01

    Samples Added weekly blank for organic-free deionized water and Collected in the Field. filter blank. Specific to Project. 5-9 5.5 Sample Custody Greater...Gmoundwater Monitoing Plan, VOLUME/i Filter blanks will be collected at a frequency of 1 per lot. Organic-free, deionized water will be run through the filter ...using the filtering apparatus used to filter groundwater samples. The water will be collected in the appropriate sample bottles following filtering

  5. Draft Strategic Laboratory Missions Plan. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    This volume described in detail the Department`s research and technology development activities and their funding at the Department`s laboratories. It includes 166 Mission Activity Profiles, organized by major mission area, with each representing a discrete budget function called a Budget and Reporting (B & R) Code. The activities profiled here encompass the total research and technology development funding of the laboratories from the Department. Each profile includes a description of the activity and shows how the funding for that activity is distributed among the DOE laboratories as well as universities and industry. The profiles also indicate the principal laboratories for each activity, as well as which other laboratories are involved. The information in this volume is at the core of the Strategic Laboratory Mission Plan. It enables a reader to follow funds from the Department`s appropriation to a specific activity description and to specific R & D performing institutions. This information will enable the Department, along with the Laboratory Operations Board and Congress, to review the distribution of R & D performers chosen to execute the Department`s missions.

  6. Guidelines for Planning in Colleges and Universities. Volume Two, Management and Financial Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinnell, Charles; Wacholder, Michael

    This volume presents techniques and details involved in developing the management and program planning and the financial planning phases of a total planning system. Also discussed is a suggested organization for implementing a planning system. Areas emphasized under management and program planning are (1) institutional objectives, (2) planning…

  7. DNFSB recommendation 94-1 Hanford site integrated stabilization management plan

    SciTech Connect

    McCormack, R.L.

    1997-05-07

    In May 1994, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) issued DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 (Conway 1994), which identified concerns related to US Department of Energy (DOE) management of legacy fissile materials remaining from past defense production activities. The DNFSB expressed concern about the existing storage conditions for these materials and the slow pace at which the conditions were being remediated. The DNFSB also expressed its belief that additional delays in stabilizing these fissile materials would be accompanied by further deterioration of safety and unnecessary increased risks to workers and the public. In February 1995, DOE issued the DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 Implementation Plan (O`Leary 1995) to address the concerns identified in DNFSB Recommendation 94-1. The Implementation Plan (IP) identifies several DOE commitments to achieve safe interim storage for the legacy fissile materials, and constitutes DOE`s baseline DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 Integrated Program Plan (IPP). The IPP describes the actions DOE plans to implement within the DOE complex to convert its excess fissile materials to forms or conditions suitable for safe interim storage. The IPP was subsequently supplemented with an Integrated Facilities Plan and a Research and Development Plan, which further develop complex-wide research and development and long-range facility requirements and plans. The additions to the baseline IPP were developed based on a systems engineering approach that integrated facilities and capabilities at the various DOE sites and focused on attaining safe interim storage with minimum safety risks and environmental impacts. Each affected DOE site has developed a Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan (SISMP) to identify individual site plans to implement the DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 IPP. The SISMPs were developed based on the objectives, requirements, and commitments identified in the DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 IP. The SISMPs also supported

  8. Long Range Facilities Planning Plan Guide Lines. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-01

    Maritime Administration invited Richard M. Muther to address the group on the subject of long range facility planning. Atlanta, Georgia. by MARAD was...NASSCO submitted a contract proposal to MARAD for cost sharing the development of NASSCO’s Long Range Facility Plan. Richard M. Muther addressed...given from United States A week-long seminar sponsored to train facility planners shipyards in the Muther tech- niques of long range facility planning

  9. Guidelines for Planning in Colleges and Universities. Volume 5: Physical Plant Planning, Utilities Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinnell, Charles; Wacholder, Michael

    The fifth and final volume of a series concerned with higher educational facilities planning expands the discussion of the utilities planning process initiated in the overview of volume one. Three major classes of utilities--energy utilities, service utilities, and communications utilities are studied. Their influences on the overall physical…

  10. Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Plan. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel Nevada

    1999-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy manages the Nevada Test Site in a manner that meets evolving DOE Missions and responds to the concerns of affected and interested individuals and agencies. This Routine Radiological Monitoring Plan addressess complicance with DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 and other drivers requiring routine effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance on the Nevada Test Site. This monitoring plan, prepared in 1998, addresses the activities conducted onsite NTS under the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision. This radiological monitoring plan, prepared on behalf of the Nevada Test Site Landlord, brings together sitewide environmental surveillance; site-specific effluent monitoring; and operational monitoring conducted by various missions, programs, and projects on the NTS. The plan provides an approach to identifying and conducting routine radiological monitoring at the NTS, based on integrated technical, scientific, and regulatory complicance data needs.

  11. OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION--PLANNING AND PROGRAMMING. VOLUME TWO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KOTZ, ARNOLD

    ADDITIONAL POSITION PAPERS BASED ON INFORMATION GATHERED IN THE RECONNAISSANCE SURVEYS OF PLANNING AND PROGRAMING IN OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION, REPORTED IN VOLUME ONE (VT 005 041), ARE PRESENTED. PART IV, CONCERNED WITH PROGRAM STRUCTURE AND BUDGETING AND THEIR RELATION TO THE PLANNING PROCESS, INCLUDES THE PAPERS--(1) "CURRENT POLICIES AND…

  12. Final consolidated action plan to Tiger Team. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    This document is a compilation of different issues identified by the Tiger Teams at the several locations of the Sandia National Laboratory. In this volume there are findings/concerns and the resultant responses and planned actions for these issues. Also included are the schedules and costs for the planned actions.

  13. Savannah River Site Environmental Implementation Plan. Volume 2, Protection programs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-08-01

    Formal sitewide environmental planning at the . Savannah River Site (SRS) began in 1986 with the development and adoption of the Strategic Environmental Plan. The Strategic Environmental Plan describes the philosophy, policy, and overall program direction of environmental programs for the operation of the SRS. The Strategic Environmental Plan (Volume 2) provided the basis for development of the Environmental Implementation Plan (EIP). The EIP is the detailed, comprehensive environmental master plan for operating contractor organizations at the SRS. The EIP provides a process to ensure that all environmental requirements and obligations are being met by setting specific measurable goals and objectives and strategies for implementation. The plan is the basis for justification of site manpower and funding requests for environmental projects and programs over a five-year planning period.

  14. Ornamental Horticulture: Program Planning Guide: Volume 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Roger R.; Stitt, Thomas R.

    The program planning guide for ornamental horticulture was written to assist Applied Biological and Agricultural Occupations (ABAO) teachers in enriching existing programs and/or to provide the basis for expansion of offerings to include additional materials for the cluster areas of arboriculture, floriculture, greenhouse operation and management,…

  15. Forestry: Program Planning Guide: Volume 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Paul L.; And Others

    The program planning guide for forestry was written to assist Applied Biological and Agricultural Occupations (ABAO) teachers in enriching existing programs and/or to provide the basis for expansion of offerings to include additional materials for the cluster areas of forests, forest protection, logging, wood utilization, recreation, and special…

  16. Agricultural Products: Program Planning Guide: Volume 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welton, Richard; Robb, Sam

    The program planning guide for agricultural products was written to assist Applied Biological and Agricultural Occupations (ABAO) teachers in enriching existing programs and/or to provide the basis for expansion of offerings to include additional materials for the cluster areas of meat and meat byproducts, dairy processing, fruit and vegetable…

  17. Limitations of the planning organ at risk volume (PRV) concept

    SciTech Connect

    Stroom, Joep C. . E-mail: j.stroom@nki.nl; Heijmen, Ben J.M.

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: Previously, we determined a planning target volume (PTV) margin recipe for geometrical errors in radiotherapy equal to M{sub T} = 2{sigma} + 0.7{sigma}, with {sigma} and {sigma} standard deviations describing systematic and random errors, respectively. In this paper, we investigated margins for organs at risk (OAR), yielding the so-called planning organ at risk volume (PRV). Methods and Materials: For critical organs with a maximum dose (D{sub max}) constraint, we calculated margins such that D{sub max} in the PRV is equal to the motion averaged D{sub max} in the (moving) clinical target volume (CTV). We studied margins for the spinal cord in 10 head-and-neck cases and 10 lung cases, each with two different clinical plans. For critical organs with a dose-volume constraint, we also investigated whether a margin recipe was feasible. Results: For the 20 spinal cords considered, the average margin recipe found was: M{sub R} = 1.6{sigma} + 0.2{sigma} with variations for systematic and random errors of 1.2{sigma} to 1.8{sigma} and -0.2{sigma} to 0.6{sigma}, respectively. The variations were due to differences in shape and position of the dose distributions with respect to the cords. The recipe also depended significantly on the volume definition of D{sub max}. For critical organs with a dose-volume constraint, the PRV concept appears even less useful because a margin around, e.g., the rectum changes the volume in such a manner that dose-volume constraints stop making sense. Conclusion: The concept of PRV for planning of radiotherapy is of limited use. Therefore, alternative ways should be developed to include geometric uncertainties of OARs in radiotherapy planning.

  18. Federal Facilities Compliance Act, Draft Site Treatment Plan: Compliance Plan Volume. Part 2, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1994-08-31

    This document presents the details of the implementation of the Site Treatment Plan developed by Ames Laboratory in compliance with the Federal Facilities Compliance Act. Topics discussed in this document include: implementation of the plan; milestones; annual updates to the plan; inclusion of new waste streams; modifications of the plan; funding considerations; low-level mixed waste treatment plan and schedules; and TRU mixed waste streams.

  19. Draft Site Treatment Plan (DSTP), Volumes I and II

    SciTech Connect

    D`Amelio, J.

    1994-08-30

    Site Treatment Plans (STP) are required for facilities at which the DOE generates or stores mixed waste. This Draft Site Treatment Plan (DSTP) the second step in a three-phase process, identifies the currently preferred options for treating mixed waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS) or for developing treatment technologies where technologies do not exist or need modification. The DSTP reflects site-specific preferred options, developed with the state`s input and based on existing available information. To the extent possible, the DSTP identifies specific treatment facilities for treating the mixed waste and proposes schedules. Where the selection of specific treatment facilities is not possible, schedules for alternative activities such as waste characterization and technology assessment are provided. All schedule and cost information presented is preliminary and is subject to change. The DSTP is comprised of two volumes: this Compliance Plan Volume and the Background Volume. This Compliance Plan Volume proposes overall schedules with target dates for achieving compliance with the land disposal restrictions (LDR) of RCRA and procedures for converting the target dates into milestones to be enforced under the Order. The more detailed discussion of the options contained in the Background Volume is provided for informational purposes only.

  20. Approved Site Treatment Plan, Volumes 1 and 2. Revision 4

    SciTech Connect

    Helmich, E.H.; Molen, G.; Noller, D.

    1996-03-22

    The US Department of Energy, Savannah River Operations Office (DOE-SR), has prepared the Site Treatment Plan (STP) for Savannah River Site (SRS) mixed wastes in accordance with RCRA Section 3021(b), and SCDHEC has approved the STP (except for certain offsite wastes) and issued an order enforcing the STP commitments in Volume 1. DOE-SR and SCDHEC agree that this STP fulfills the requirements contained in the FFCAct, RCRA Section 3021, and therefore, pursuant to Section 105(a) of the FFCAct (RCRA Section 3021(b)(5)), DOE`s requirements are to implement the plan for the development of treatment capacities and technologies pursuant to RCRA Section 3021. Emerging and new technologies not yet considered may be identified to manage waste more safely, effectively, and at lower cost than technologies currently identified in the plan. DOE will continue to evaluate and develop technologies that offer potential advantages in public acceptance, privatization, consolidation, risk abatement, performance, and life-cycle cost. Should technologies that offer such advantages be identified, DOE may request a revision/modification of the STP in accordance with the provisions of Consent Order 95-22-HW. The Compliance Plan Volume (Volume 1) identifies project activity schedule milestones for achieving compliance with Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR). Information regarding the technical evaluation of treatment options for SRS mixed wastes is contained in the Background Volume (Volume 2) and is provided for information.

  1. Systems Engineering Management Plan. Volume 5 of the MRS Project Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Project Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) is to define and establish the MRS Project Systems Engineering process that implements the approved policy and requirements of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This plan is Volume 5 of the MRS Project Management Plan (PMP). This plan provides the framework for implementation of systems engineering on the MRS Project consistent with DOE Order 4700.1, the OCRWM Program Management System Manual (PMSM), and the OCRWM Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP).

  2. Space station human productivity study. Volume 5: Management plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The 67 Management Plans represent recommended study approaches for resolving 108 of the 305 Issues which were identified. Each study Management Plan is prepared in three formats: Management Plan Overview (lists the subsumed Issues, study background, and related overview information); Study Plan (details the study approach by tasks, lists special needs, and describes expected study products); Schedule-Task Flow (provides a time-lined schedule for the study tasks and resource requirements). The Management Relationships Matrix, included in this volume, shows the data input-output relationships among all recommended studies. A listing is also included which cross-references the unresolved requirements to Issues to management plans. A glossary of all abbreviations utilized is provided.

  3. [Clinical to planning target volume margins in prostate cancer radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Ramiandrisoa, F; Duvergé, L; Castelli, J; Nguyen, T D; Servagi-Vernat, S; de Crevoisier, R

    2016-10-01

    The knowledge of inter- and intrafraction motion and deformations of the intrapelvic target volumes (prostate, seminal vesicles, prostatectomy bed and lymph nodes) as well as the main organs at risk (bladder and rectum) allow to define rational clinical to planning target volume margins, depending on the different radiotherapy techniques and their uncertainties. In case of image-guided radiotherapy, prostate margins and seminal vesicles margins can be between 5 and 10mm. The margins around the prostatectomy bed vary from 10 to 15mm and those around the lymph node clinical target volume between 7 and 10mm. Stereotactic body radiotherapy allows lower margins, which are 3 to 5mm around the prostate. Image-guided and stereotactic body radiotherapy with adequate margins allow finally moderate or extreme hypofractionation.

  4. Guidelines for Planning in Colleges and Universities. Volume 4: Physical Plant Planning, Facilities Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinnell, Charles; Wacholder, Michael

    The fourth of a five-volume series concerned with higher educational planning provides techniques for the estimation of an institution's facility requirements. The facilities are discussed within the framework of two broad categories--(1) academic program facilities, and (2) residential housing facilities. The academic program facilities provide…

  5. Guidance and Control Software Project Data - Volume 1: Planning Documents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayhurst, Kelly J. (Editor)

    2008-01-01

    The Guidance and Control Software (GCS) project was the last in a series of software reliability studies conducted at Langley Research Center between 1977 and 1994. The technical results of the GCS project were recorded after the experiment was completed. Some of the support documentation produced as part of the experiment, however, is serving an unexpected role far beyond its original project context. Some of the software used as part of the GCS project was developed to conform to the RTCA/DO-178B software standard, "Software Considerations in Airborne Systems and Equipment Certification," used in the civil aviation industry. That standard requires extensive documentation throughout the software development life cycle, including plans, software requirements, design and source code, verification cases and results, and configuration management and quality control data. The project documentation that includes this information is open for public scrutiny without the legal or safety implications associated with comparable data from an avionics manufacturer. This public availability has afforded an opportunity to use the GCS project documents for DO-178B training. This report provides a brief overview of the GCS project, describes the 4-volume set of documents and the role they are playing in training, and includes the planning documents from the GCS project. Volume 1 contains five appendices: A. Plan for Software Aspects of Certification for the Guidance and Control Software Project; B. Software Development Standards for the Guidance and Control Software Project; C. Software Verification Plan for the Guidance and Control Software Project; D. Software Configuration Management Plan for the Guidance and Control Software Project; and E. Software Quality Assurance Activities.

  6. Optimized Planning Target Volume for Intact Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Alvin; Jensen, Lindsay G.; Sun Shuai; Song, William Y.; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Mundt, Arno J.; Zhang Fuquan; Jiang, Steve B.; Mell, Loren K.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To model interfraction clinical target volume (CTV) variation in patients with intact cervical cancer and design a planning target volume (PTV) that minimizes normal tissue dose while maximizing CTV coverage. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 50 patients undergoing external-beam radiotherapy for intact cervical cancer using daily online cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). The CBCTs (n = 972) for each patient were rigidly registered to the planning CT. The CTV was delineated on the planning CT (CTV{sub 0}) and the set of CBCTs ({l_brace}CTV{sub 1}-CTV{sub 25}{r_brace}). Manual (n = 98) and automated (n = 668) landmarks were placed over the surface of CTV{sub 0} with reference to defined anatomic structures. Normal vectors were extended from each landmark, and the minimum length required for a given probability of encompassing CTV{sub 1}-CTV{sub 25} was computed. The resulting expansions were used to generate an optimized PTV. Results: The mean (SD; range) normal vector length to ensure 95% coverage was 4.3 mm (2.7 mm; 1-16 mm). The uniform expansion required to ensure 95% probability of CTV coverage was 13 mm. An anisotropic margin of 20 mm anteriorly and posteriorly and 10 mm superiorly, inferiorly, and laterally also would have ensured a 95% probability of CTV coverage. The volume of the 95% optimized PTV (1470 cm{sup 3}) was significantly lower than both the anisotropic PTV (2220 cm{sup 3}) and the uniformly expanded PTV (2110 cm{sup 3}) (p < 0.001). For a 95% probability of CTV coverage, normal lengths of 1-3 mm were found along the superior and lateral regions of CTV{sub 0}, 5-10 mm along the interfaces of CTV{sub 0} with the bladder and rectum, and 10-14 mm along the anterior surface of CTV{sub 0} at the level of the uterus. Conclusion: Optimizing PTV definition according to surface landmarking resulted in a high probability of CTV coverage with reduced PTV volumes. Our results provide data justifying planning margins to use in practice and

  7. Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan. Volume II.

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewig, H.; Powers, D. A.; Hewson, John C.; LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Wright, A.; Phillips, J.; Zeyen, R.; Clement, B.; Garner, Frank; Walters, Leon; Wright, Steve; Ott, Larry J.; Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma; Denning, Richard; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Ohno, S.; Miyhara, S.; Yacout, Abdellatif; Farmer, M.; Wade, D.; Grandy, C.; Schmidt, R.; Cahalen, J.; Olivier, Tara Jean; Budnitz, R.; Tobita, Yoshiharu; Serre, Frederic; Natesan, Ken; Carbajo, Juan J.; Jeong, Hae-Yong; Wigeland, Roald; Corradini, Michael; Thomas, Justin; Wei, Tom; Sofu, Tanju; Flanagan, George F.; Bari, R.; Porter D.; Lambert, J.; Hayes, S.; Sackett, J.; Denman, Matthew R.

    2012-05-01

    Expert panels comprised of subject matter experts identified at the U.S. National Laboratories (SNL, ANL, INL, ORNL, LBL, and BNL), universities (University of Wisconsin and Ohio State University), international agencies (IRSN, CEA, JAEA, KAERI, and JRC-IE) and private consultation companies (Radiation Effects Consulting) were assembled to perform a gap analysis for sodium fast reactor licensing. Expert-opinion elicitation was performed to qualitatively assess the current state of sodium fast reactor technologies. Five independent gap analyses were performed resulting in the following topical reports: (1) Accident Initiators and Sequences (i.e., Initiators/Sequences Technology Gap Analysis), (2) Sodium Technology Phenomena (i.e., Advanced Burner Reactor Sodium Technology Gap Analysis), (3) Fuels and Materials (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Fuels and Materials: Research Needs), (4) Source Term Characterization (i.e., Advanced Sodium Fast Reactor Accident Source Terms: Research Needs), and (5) Computer Codes and Models (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Gaps Analysis of Computer Codes and Models for Accident Analysis and Reactor Safety). Volume II of the Sodium Research Plan consolidates the five gap analysis reports produced by each expert panel, wherein the importance of the identified phenomena and necessities of further experimental research and code development were addressed. The findings from these five reports comprised the basis for the analysis in Sodium Fast Reactor Research Plan Volume I.

  8. Selected Bibliographies and State-of-the-Art Review for Health Manpower Planning. Volume 3: Health Manpower Planning References. International Health Planning Reference Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White (E.H.) Co., San Francisco, CA.

    Intended as a companion piece to volume 3 in the Method Series, Health Manpower Planning (CE 024 231), this third of six volumes in the International Health Planning Reference Series is a combined literature review and annotated bibliography dealing with health manpower planning for developing countries. The review identifies literature relevant…

  9. Savannah River Site Approved Site Treatment Plan, 2001 Annual Update (Volumes I and II)

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, B.

    2001-04-30

    The Compliance Plan Volume (Volume I) identifies project activity scheduled milestones for achieving compliance with Land Disposal Restrictions. Information regarding the technical evaluation of treatment options for SRS mixed wastes is contained in the Background Volume (Volume II) and is provided for information.

  10. Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Plan, Volume 2 Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel Nevada

    1998-12-31

    Supporting material for the plan includes: QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR NTS AIR; QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR WATER ON AND OFF THE NEVADA TEST SITE; QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR NTS BIOTA; QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR DIRECT RADIATION MONITORING; DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES PROCESS; VADOSE ZONE MONITORING PLAN CHECKLIST.

  11. Metropolitan Spokane Region Water Resources Study. Appendix H. Volume 1. Plan Formulation and Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-01-01

    Characteristics G Planning Criteria N (VOLUME 1) PLAN FORMULATION AND EVALUATION H (Volume 2) Plan Formulation and Eva] uation I Institutional Analysis J Water...Needs. Forty-nine water systems have cross connection deficiencies. As with the lack of disinfection faci - lities, the systems outside the City of Spokane...costs for each element to be used in cost effectiveness analysis . Mapping The maps included herein as Figures B through Y are developed as overlays on

  12. National Data Program for the Marine Environment Technical Development Plan. Final Report, Volume Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    System Development Corp., Santa Monica, CA.

    A national data program for the marine environment is recommended. Volume 2 includes: (1) objectives, scope, and methodology; (2) summary of the technical development plan; (3) agency development plans - Great Lakes and coastal development and (4) marine data network development plans. (Author)

  13. Savannah River Site environmental implementation plan. Volume 1, Executive summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-08-01

    Formal sitewide environmental planning at the Savannah River Site (SRS) began in 1986 with the development and adoption of the Strategic Environmental Plan. The Strategic Environmental Plan describes the philosophy, policy, and overall program direction of environmental programs for the operation of the SRS. The Strategic Environmental Plan provided the basis for development of the Environmental Implementation Plan (EIP). The EIP is the detailed, comprehensive environmental master plan for operating contractor organizations at the SRS. The EIP provides a process to ensure that all environmental requirements and obligations are being met by setting specific measurable goals and objectives and strategies for implementation. The plan is the basis for justification of site manpower and funding requests for environmental projects and programs over a five-year planning period.

  14. Turnaround Operations Analysis for OTV. Volume 3: Technology Development Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    An integrated technology development plan for the technologies required to process both GBOTVs and SBOTVs are described. The plan includes definition of the tests and experiments to be accomplished on the ground, in a Space Shuttle Sortie Mission, on an Expendable Launch Vehicle, or at the Space Station as a Technology Development Mission (TDM). The plan reflects and accommodates current and projected research and technology programs where appropriate.

  15. [Definition of accurate planning target volume margins for esophageal cancer radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Lesueur, P; Servagi-Vernat, S

    2016-10-01

    More than 4000 cases of esophagus neoplasms are diagnosed every year in France. Radiotherapy, which can be delivered in preoperative or exclusive with a concomitant chemotherapy, plays a central role in treatment of esophagus cancer. Even if efficacy of radiotherapy no longer has to be proved, the prognosis of esophagus cancer remains unfortunately poor with a high recurrence rate. Toxicity of esophageal radiotherapy is correlated with the irradiation volume, and limits dose escalation and local control. Esophagus is a deep thoracic organ, which undergoes cardiac and respiratory motion, making the radiotherapy delivery more difficult and increasing the planning target volume margins. Definition of accurate planning target volume margins, taking into account the esophagus' intrafraction motion and set up margins is very important to be sure to cover the clinical target volume and restrains acute and late radiotoxicity. In this article, based on a review of the literature, we propose planning target volume margins adapted to esophageal radiotherapy.

  16. Studies in Family Planning. Volume 2, Number 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worth, George; And Others

    This year's annual review of family planning in Korea and Taiwan is represented in three articles. The first, "Korea/Taiwan 1970: Report on the National Family Planning Programs," separately views the program administration, budget, personnel, and evaluation, as well as the various methods employed in controlling the number of births,…

  17. Planning Educational Change: Volume II. Human Resources in School Desegregation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chesler, Mark A.; And Others

    This manual is designed to assist school superintendents in planning and implementing complete school desegregation as prescribed by law. Chapters I through VI discuss specific techniques applicable to the following stages of the desegregation planning process: Identification of goals; diagnosing the school situation; development, testing, and…

  18. Studies in Family Planning, Volume 3 Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Population Council, New York, NY.

    A new design for government family planning programs is proposed in "Family Planning Programs: An Economic Approach," the principal article in this monthly publication of The Population Council. The design is intended primarily for low-income countries that seek large and rapid reductions in fertility. Thirteen elements of the proposed system of…

  19. Studies in Family Planning, Volume 2 Number 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Population Council, New York, NY.

    A typology of incentives and the general effects of incentives for family planning are discussed in "Incentives in the Diffusion of Family Planning Innovations," the first of three studies in this monthly publication of The Population Council. A brief review of the history of incentives and their present status in the fields is given, together…

  20. Business Plan : Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement, Volume 2, Appendices.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-02-01

    This document contains the appendices for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Business Plan: Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Included are: BPA products and services; Rate design; Methodology and assumptions for numerical analysis; Retail utility operations; Comments and responses to the draft business plan EIS.

  1. Bibliography of Family Planning and Population, Volume 1 Number 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linzell, Dinah, Comp.

    Compiled from the world's research literature, this bi-monthly classified list of references on population and family planning emphasizes recently published material, primarily journal literature. Topics covered include: population and fertility; reproductive behaviour; the family; education in population, family planning, and sex; family…

  2. MCC/shuttle test plan. Volume 1: Philosophy and guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The Mission Control Center/Shuttle Test Plan is defined from development through operations to a level of detail which will support the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and contractor management in the following areas: test management, test tool development, and resource and schedule planning.

  3. Remedial Investigation concept plan for Picatinny Arsenal: Volume 2, Descriptions of and sampling plans for Remedial Investigation Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Benioff, P.A.; Bhattacharyya, M.H.; Biang, C.; Chiu, S.Y.; Miller, S.; Patton, T.; Pearl, R.; Yonk, A.; Yuen, C.R. )

    1991-03-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has prepared a Remedial Investigation (RI) Concept Plan for Picatinny Arsenal in New Jersey. Based on types of activity and location, the 156 RI Sites identified during the study are grouped into 16 Areas. The plan assesses the environmental status and identifies additional data needed for each RI Site in each Area. The plan was developed to comply with state and federal hazardous waste and water quality regulations. The plan also provides a ranking of the 16 Areas according to their potential for impacts on public health and the environment. Volume 2 describes the history, geology and hydrology, existing contamination, closure plan (if any), and proposed RI plan for each Site within each Area. 102 refs., 178 figs., 74 tabs.

  4. Combined Recipe for Clinical Target Volume and Planning Target Volume Margins

    SciTech Connect

    Stroom, Joep; Gilhuijs, Kenneth; Vieira, Sandra; Chen, Wei; Salguero, Javier; Moser, Elizabeth; Sonke, Jan-Jakob

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To develop a combined recipe for clinical target volume (CTV) and planning target volume (PTV) margins. Methods and Materials: A widely accepted PTV margin recipe is M{sub geo} = aΣ{sub geo} + bσ{sub geo}, with Σ{sub geo} and σ{sub geo} standard deviations (SDs) representing systematic and random geometric uncertainties, respectively. On the basis of histopathology data of breast and lung tumors, we suggest describing the distribution of microscopic islets around the gross tumor volume (GTV) by a half-Gaussian with SD Σ{sub micro}, yielding as possible CTV margin recipe: M{sub micro} = ƒ(N{sub i}) × Σ{sub micro}, with N{sub i} the average number of microscopic islets per patient. To determine ƒ(N{sub i}), a computer model was developed that simulated radiation therapy of a spherical GTV with isotropic distribution of microscopic disease in a large group of virtual patients. The minimal margin that yielded D{sub min} <95% in maximally 10% of patients was calculated for various Σ{sub micro} and N{sub i}. Because Σ{sub micro} is independent of Σ{sub geo}, we propose they should be added quadratically, yielding for a combined GTV-to-PTV margin recipe: M{sub GTV-PTV} = √([aΣ{sub geo}]{sup 2} + [ƒ(N{sub i})Σ{sub micro}]{sup 2}) + bσ{sub geo}. This was validated by the computer model through numerous simultaneous simulations of microscopic and geometric uncertainties. Results: The margin factor ƒ(N{sub i}) in a relevant range of Σ{sub micro} and N{sub i} can be given by: ƒ(N{sub i}) = 1.4 + 0.8log(N{sub i}). Filling in the other factors found in our simulations (a = 2.1 and b = 0.8) yields for the combined recipe: M{sub GTV-PTV} = √((2.1Σ{sub geo}){sup 2} + ([1.4 + 0.8log(N{sub i})] × Σ{sub micro}){sup 2}) + 0.8σ{sub geo}. The average margin difference between the simultaneous simulations and the above recipe was 0.2 ± 0.8 mm (1 SD). Calculating M{sub geo} and M{sub micro} separately and adding them linearly overestimated PTVs by on

  5. Proposed Site Treatment Plan (PSTP). Volumes 1 and 2 and Reference Document

    SciTech Connect

    Helmich, E.; Noller, D.K.; Wierzbicki, K.S.; Bailey, L.L.

    1994-12-22

    The Compliance Plan Volume provides overall schedules with target dates for achieving compliance with the land disposal restrictions (LDR) and contains procedures to establish milestones to be enforced under the Order. Information regarding the technical evaluation of treatment options for SRS mixed wastes is contained in the Background Volume and is provided for informational purposes only.

  6. The Follow Through Planned Variation Experiment; Volume V. Appendix: Analysis of Interim Follow Through Evaluation Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villaume, John; Haney, Walt

    This report is the appendix to the last volume in a five volume series on the national evaluation study of the Follow Through Planned Variation Model. The appendix is organized in three sections. Section I provides detailed summaries of five major national Follow Through evaluation reports not published as part of this series. Section II is an…

  7. Space Station Mission Planning System (MPS) development study. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klus, W. J.

    1987-01-01

    The process and existing software used for Spacelab payload mission planning were studied. A complete baseline definition of the Spacelab payload mission planning process was established, along with a definition of existing software capabilities for potential extrapolation to the Space Station. This information was used as a basis for defining system requirements to support Space Station mission planning. The Space Station mission planning concept was reviewed for the purpose of identifying areas where artificial intelligence concepts might offer substantially improved capability. Three specific artificial intelligence concepts were to be investigated for applicability: natural language interfaces; expert systems; and automatic programming. The advantages and disadvantages of interfacing an artificial intelligence language with existing FORTRAN programs or of converting totally to a new programming language were identified.

  8. 40 CFR Appendix D to Part 112 - Determination of a Worst Case Discharge Planning Volume

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .../or operated in such a manner that the multiple tanks function as one storage unit (i.e., multiple... plan that tanks with common piping or piping systems are not operated as one unit. If such evidence is... tanks that function as one oil storage unit, the worst case discharge planning volume would be based...

  9. 40 CFR Appendix D to Part 112 - Determination of a Worst Case Discharge Planning Volume

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .../or operated in such a manner that the multiple tanks function as one storage unit (i.e., multiple... plan that tanks with common piping or piping systems are not operated as one unit. If such evidence is... tanks that function as one oil storage unit, the worst case discharge planning volume would be based...

  10. 40 CFR Appendix D to Part 112 - Determination of a Worst Case Discharge Planning Volume

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .../or operated in such a manner that the multiple tanks function as one storage unit (i.e., multiple... plan that tanks with common piping or piping systems are not operated as one unit. If such evidence is... tanks that function as one oil storage unit, the worst case discharge planning volume would be based...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix D to Part 112 - Determination of a Worst Case Discharge Planning Volume

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .../or operated in such a manner that the multiple tanks function as one storage unit (i.e., multiple... plan that tanks with common piping or piping systems are not operated as one unit. If such evidence is... tanks that function as one oil storage unit, the worst case discharge planning volume would be based...

  12. Engineering task plan for AX-104 residual waste volume and inventory data collection

    SciTech Connect

    Boechler, G.N., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-06

    The purpose of this Engineering Task Plan is to document the strategy, equipment and responsibilities of the tasks required to preform the volume and inventory data collection of tank AX-104. The project is a part of the Hanford Tanks Initiative Plan document number WHC-SD-WM-PMP-022 Revision D.

  13. The National Manpower Survey of the Criminal Justice System. Volume Six: Criminal Justice Manpower Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Planning Association, Washington, DC.

    Focusing on data needs and methods for manpower planning and manpower projections, this document is one in a series of six volumes reporting the results of the National Manpower Survey (NMS) of the Criminal Justice System. Chapter 1 of five chapters discusses the role and objectives of criminal justice manpower planning at different levels of…

  14. Community College Journal for Research and Planning, Volume VII, Numbers 1 and 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Edith H., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Providing a forum for the exchange of information among members of the National Council for Research and Planning, this refereed journal offers articles on various aspects of community college research, management, and planning. The two issues of volume 7 contain the following articles: (1) "Case Studies of Community College High Risk Students:…

  15. Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration commercialization actions plans. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kaupanger, R.M.; Glore, D.

    1994-04-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) is sponsored by US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development. BWID supports the development and demonstration of a suite of technologies that when integrated with commercially available baseline technologies form a comprehensive system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste throughout the DOE complex. BWID evaluates, validates, and demonstrates technologies and transfers this information throughout DOE and private industry to support DOE. remediation planning and implementation activities. This report documents commercialization action plans for five technologies with near-term commercialization/ implementation potential as well as provides a status of commercial and academic partners for each technology.

  16. System Development of Estimated Figures of Volume Production Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brazhnikov, Maksim A.; Khorina, Irina V.; Minina, Yulia I.; Kolyasnikova, Lyudmila V.; Streltsov, Aleksey V.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of this problem is primarily determined by a necessity of improving production efficiency in conditions of innovative development of the economy and implementation of Import Substitution Program. The purpose of the article is development of set of criteria and procedures for the comparative assessment of alternative volume production…

  17. Volume reduction philosophy and techniques in use or planned

    SciTech Connect

    Row, T.H.

    1984-01-01

    Siting and development of nuclear waste disposal facilities is an expensive task. In the private sector, such developments face siting and licensing issues, public intervention, and technology challenges. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) faces similar challenges in the management of waste generated by the research and production facilities. Volume reduction can be used to lengthen the service life of existing facilities. A wide variety of volume reduction techniques are applied to different waste forms. Compressible waste is compacted into drums, cardboard and metal boxes, and the loaded drums are supercompacted into smaller units. Large metallic items are size-reduced and melted for recycle or sent to shallow land burial. Anaerobic digestion is a process that can reduce cellulosic and animal wastes by 80%. Incinerators of all types have been investigated for application to nuclear wastes and a number of installations operate or are constructing units for low-level and transuranic solid and liquid combustibles. Technology may help solve many of the problems in volume reduction, but the human element also has an important part in solving the puzzle. Aggressive educational campaigns at two sites have proved very successful in reducing waste generation. This overview of volume reduction is intended to transfer the current information from many DOE facilities. 44 references, 85 figures, 5 tables.

  18. Federal Facilities Compliance Act, Draft Site Treatment Plan: Background Volume, Part 2, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1994-08-31

    This Draft Site Treatment Plan was prepared by Ames Laboratory to meet the requirements of the Federal Facilities Compliance Act. Topics discussed include: purpose and scope of the plan; site history and mission; draft plant organization; waste minimization; waste characterization; preferred option selection process; technology for treating low-level radioactive wastes and TRU wastes; future generation of mixed waste streams; funding; and process for evaluating disposal issues in support of the site treatment plan.

  19. Twenty Five Lesson Plans for Distributive Education. Volume 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Nora; And Others

    The teaching guide for distributive education, grade levels 11 and 12, was developed by distributive education majors at Delaware State College. It contains five lesson plans for each of the instructional areas of: (1) the functions of marketing and distribution, (2) fundamental skills, (3) product or service technology, (4) social skills and…

  20. Studies in Family Planning, Volume 3, Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Population Council, New York, NY.

    Presented in the principal article, "Planning, Starting, and Operating an Educational Incentives Project," is a summary of activities to date in an educational savings project in Taiwan. The incentive project is designed to reward those couples who limit their family size, by providing funds for their children's secondary and higher education. To…

  1. Learner-Centered Instruction (LCI). Volume 3. Plan of Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pieper, William J.; And Others

    A plan of instruction (POI) is presented for an experimental course to train flight line weapon control systems technicians for the F-111A. The POI is based on the job behavioral description of this technician's job prepared earlier. The two basic decisions establishing the character of the POI are the overall objective of producing graduates…

  2. Planning Educational Change. Volume 3: Integrating the Desegregated School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chesler, Mark; And Others

    This manual has been designed to assist teachers and principals to achieve integrated schools, primary attention being focused on the problems of racial integration--the issues between blacks and whites in the schools. Chapters deal with the following: the meaning of integration and of planning for school change, delineating a six-stage scheme for…

  3. Solar System Exploration Division Strategic Plan, volume 1. Executive summary and overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This first document is the first of a six-volume series presenting the Solar System Exploration Division's Strategic Plan for the 10-year period FY 1994 to FY 2003. The overall strategy is characterized by five fundamental precepts: (1) execute the current program; (2) improve the vitality of the program and the planetary science community; (3) initiate innovative, small, low-cost planetary missions; (4) initiate new major and moderate missions; and (5) prepare for the next generation of missions. This Strategic Plan describes in detail our proposed approach to accomplish these goals. Volume 1 provides first an Executive Summary of highlights of each of the six volumes, and then goes on to present an overview of the plan, including a discussion of the planning context and strategic approach. Volumes 2, 3, 4, and 5 describe in detail the initiatives proposed. An integral part of each of these volumes is a set of responses to the mission selection criteria questions developed by the Space and Earth Science Advisory Committee. Volume 2, Mission From Planet Earth, describes a strategy for exploring the Moon and Mars and sets forth proposed moderate missions--Lunar Observer and a Mars lander network. Volume 3, Pluto Flyby/Neptune Orbiter, discusses our proposed major new start candidate for the FY 1994 to FY 1998 time frame. Volume 4, Discovery, describes the Near-Earth Asteroid Rendezvous, as well as other candidates for this program of low-cost planetary missions. Volume 5, Toward Other Planetary Systems, describes a major research and analysis augmentation that focuses on extrasolar planet detection and the study of planetary system processes. Finally, Volume 6 summarizes the technology program that the division has structured around these four initiatives.

  4. High Performance Schools Best Practices Manual. Volume I: Planning [and] Volume II: Design [and] Volume III: Criteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eley, Charles, Ed.

    This three-volume manual, focusing on California's K-12 public schools, presents guidelines for establishing schools that are healthy, comfortable, energy efficient, resource efficient, water efficient, secure, adaptable, and easy to operate and maintain. The first volume describes why high performance schools are important, what components are…

  5. Guidelines for Analysis of Environmental Health Planning in Developing Countries. Volume 2: Environmental Health Planning. International Health Planning Methods Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Renee White; Shani, Hadasa

    Intended to assist Agency for International Development (AID) officers, advisors, and health officials in incorporating health planning into national plans for economic development, this second of ten manuals in the International Health Planning Methods Series deals with assessment, planning, and evaluation in the field of environmental health.…

  6. Guidelines for Analysis of Health Manpower Planning. Volume 3: Health Manpower Planning. International Health Planning Methods Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staff, Robert J.; Porter, Dennis R.

    Intended to assist Agency for International Development (AID) officers, advisors, and health officials in incorporating health planning into national plans for economic development, this third of ten manuals in the International Health Planning Methods Series deals with health manpower planning and assessment. It provides a conceptual and…

  7. Developing and Testing Simulated Occupational Experiences for Distributive Education Students in Rural Communities: Volume III: Training Plans: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg.

    Volume 3 of a three volume final report presents prototype job training plans developed as part of a research project which pilot tested a distributive education program for rural schools utilizing a retail store simulation plan. The plans are for 15 entry-level and 15 career-level jobs in seven categories of distributive business (department…

  8. Space physics strategy: Implementation study. Volume 2: Program plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    In June, 1989, the Space Science and Applications Advisory Committee (SSAAC) authorized its Space Physics Subcommittee (SPS) to prepare a plan specifying the future missions, launch sequence, and encompassing themes of the Space Physics Division. The plan, now complete, is the product of a year-long study comprising two week-long workshops - in January and June 1990 - assisted by pre-workshop, inter-workshop, and post-workshop preparation and assessment activities. The workshops engaged about seventy participants, drawn equally from the Division's four science disciplines: cosmic and heliospheric physics, solar physics, magnetosphere physics, and ionosphere-thermosphere-mesospheric physics. An earlier report records the outcome of the first workshop; this is the report of the final workshop.

  9. In-space propellant logistics. Volume 4: Project planning data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The prephase A conceptual project planning data as it pertains to the development of the selected logistics module configuration transported into earth orbit by the space shuttle orbiter. The data represents the test, implementation, and supporting research and technology requirements for attaining the propellant transfer operational capability for early 1985. The plan is based on a propellant module designed to support the space-based tug with cryogenic oxygen-hydrogen propellants. A logical sequence of activities that is required to define, design, develop, fabricate, test, launch, and flight test the propellant logistics module is described. Included are the facility and ground support equipment requirements. The schedule of activities are based on the evolution and relationship between the R and T, the development issues, and the resultant test program.

  10. Formulation of consumables management models. Volume 1: Mission planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torian, J. G.; Zamora, M. A.

    1978-01-01

    Development of an STS (Space Transportation System) interactive computer program MPP (Mission Planning Processor) working model was conducted. A summary of the computer program development and those supporting tasks conducted is presented. Development of the MPP Computer Program is discussed. This development was supported by several parallel tasks. These tasks either directly supported the program development, or provided information for future application and/or modification to the program in relation to the flight planning and flight operations of the STS and advanced spacecraft. The supporting tasks also included development of a Space Station MPP to demonstrate the applicability of the analytical methods developed under this RTOP to more advanced spacecraft than the STS.

  11. C3I Analysis Tools for Development Planning. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-27

    modeling method was developed for use in Command, Control Communications and Intelligence (C ) systems planning and evaluation. Model is based on...algrebraic relationship for each node of a tree structure which describes decision process in command and control systems for strategic and ballistic...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE Unclassified SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE Cont of Block 18: 3 C I Command, Control , Communications

  12. Integrated payload and mission planning, phase 3. Volume 1: Integrated payload and mission planning process evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sapp, T. P.; Davin, D. E.

    1977-01-01

    The integrated payload and mission planning process for STS payloads was defined, and discrete tasks which evaluate performance and support initial implementation of this process were conducted. The scope of activity was limited to NASA and NASA-related payload missions only. The integrated payload and mission planning process was defined in detail, including all related interfaces and scheduling requirements. Related to the payload mission planning process, a methodology for assessing early Spacelab mission manager assignment schedules was defined.

  13. Environmental Assessment, Wing Infrastructure Development Outlook (WINDO) Implementation Plan (FY 04-06). Volume 1, Beale Air Force Base, California

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    Environmental Assessment Wing Infrastructure Development Outlook (WINDO) Implementation Plan (FY 04-06) Volume 1 Beale Air Force Base, California ...Development Outlook (WINDO) Implementation Plan (FY 04-06) Volume 1 Beale Air Force Base, California 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...THE PROPOSED ACTION Wing Infrastructure Development Outlook (WINDO) Implementation Plan at Beale Air Force Base (AFB), California : Volume 1

  14. Split-Volume Treatment Planning of Multiple Consecutive Vertebral Body Metastases for Cyberknife Image-Guided Robotic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Sahgal, Arjun Chuang, Cynthia; Larson, David; Huang, Kim; Petti, Paula; Weinstein, Phil; Ma Lijun

    2008-10-01

    Cyberknife treatment planning of multiple consecutive vertebral body metastases is challenging due to large target volumes adjacent to critical normal tissues. A split-volume treatment planning technique was developed to improve the treatment plan quality of such lesions. Treatment plans were generated for 1 to 5 consecutive thoracic vertebral bodies (CVBM) prescribing a total dose of 24 Gy in 3 fractions. The planning target volume (PTV) consisted of the entire vertebral body(ies). Treatment plans were generated considering both the de novo clinical scenario (no prior radiation), imposing a dose limit of 8 Gy to 1 cc of spinal cord, and the retreatment scenario (prior radiation) with a dose limit of 3 Gy to 1 cc of spinal cord. The split-volume planning technique was compared with the standard full-volume technique only for targets ranging from 2 to 5 CVBM in length. The primary endpoint was to obtain best PTV coverage by the 24 Gy prescription isodose line. A total of 18 treatment plans were generated (10 standard and 8 split-volume). PTV coverage by the 24-Gy isodose line worsened consistently as the number of CVBM increased for both the de novo and retreatment scenario. Split-volume planning was achieved by introducing a 0.5-cm gap, splitting the standard full-volume PTV into 2 equal length PTVs. In every case, split-volume planning resulted in improved PTV coverage by the 24-Gy isodose line ranging from 4% to 12% for the de novo scenario and, 8% to 17% for the retreatment scenario. We did not observe a significant trend for increased monitor units required, or higher doses to spinal cord or esophagus, with split-volume planning. Split-volume treatment planning significantly improves Cyberknife treatment plan quality for CVBM, as compared to the standard technique. This technique may be of particular importance in clinical situations where stringent spinal cord dose limits are required.

  15. Solid earth science in the 1990s. Volume 1: Program plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This is volume one of a three volume series. A plan for solid earth science research for the next decade is outlined. The following topics are addressed: scientific requirements; status of current research; major new emphasis in the 1990's; interagency and international participation; and the program implementation plan. The following fields are represented: plate motion and deformation; lithospheric structure and evolution; volcanology; land surface (processes of change); earth structure and dynamics; earth rotation and reference frames; and geopotential fields. Other topics of discussion include remote sensing, space missions, and space techniques.

  16. The Federal Aviation Administration Plan for Research, Engineering and Development. Volume 2. Project Descriptions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    DTIC FILE COPY ......... FLOWS N 21:37 - EL 2.5 9.5I" I 4’ EA a~ a , a A A a a2.25* n t -pa 5.2 90~ ~ 05054 It K Cover Photograph: Terminal Doppler...presented in Chapters 1 througn 4 of Volume I. This volume contains detailed descriptions of the projects included in the RE&D Plan. For planning purposes...requirements. This document details the operational requirements for the aviation system as envisioned in 1995. Specific requirements and supporting analysis

  17. Beam-specific planning volumes for scattered-proton lung radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Flampouri, S; Hoppe, B S; Slopsema, R L; Li, Z

    2014-08-21

    This work describes the clinical implementation of a beam-specific planning treatment volume (bsPTV) calculation for lung cancer proton therapy and its integration into the treatment planning process. Uncertainties incorporated in the calculation of the bsPTV included setup errors, machine delivery variability, breathing effects, inherent proton range uncertainties and combinations of the above. Margins were added for translational and rotational setup errors and breathing motion variability during the course of treatment as well as for their effect on proton range of each treatment field. The effect of breathing motion and deformation on the proton range was calculated from 4D computed tomography data. Range uncertainties were considered taking into account the individual voxel HU uncertainty along each proton beamlet. Beam-specific treatment volumes generated for 12 patients were used: a) as planning targets, b) for routine plan evaluation, c) to aid beam angle selection and d) to create beam-specific margins for organs at risk to insure sparing. The alternative planning technique based on the bsPTVs produced similar target coverage as the conventional proton plans while better sparing the surrounding tissues. Conventional proton plans were evaluated by comparing the dose distributions per beam with the corresponding bsPTV. The bsPTV volume as a function of beam angle revealed some unexpected sources of uncertainty and could help the planner choose more robust beams. Beam-specific planning volume for the spinal cord was used for dose distribution shaping to ensure organ sparing laterally and distally to the beam.

  18. Beam-specific planning volumes for scattered-proton lung radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flampouri, S.; Hoppe, B. S.; Slopsema, R. L.; Li, Z.

    2014-08-01

    This work describes the clinical implementation of a beam-specific planning treatment volume (bsPTV) calculation for lung cancer proton therapy and its integration into the treatment planning process. Uncertainties incorporated in the calculation of the bsPTV included setup errors, machine delivery variability, breathing effects, inherent proton range uncertainties and combinations of the above. Margins were added for translational and rotational setup errors and breathing motion variability during the course of treatment as well as for their effect on proton range of each treatment field. The effect of breathing motion and deformation on the proton range was calculated from 4D computed tomography data. Range uncertainties were considered taking into account the individual voxel HU uncertainty along each proton beamlet. Beam-specific treatment volumes generated for 12 patients were used: a) as planning targets, b) for routine plan evaluation, c) to aid beam angle selection and d) to create beam-specific margins for organs at risk to insure sparing. The alternative planning technique based on the bsPTVs produced similar target coverage as the conventional proton plans while better sparing the surrounding tissues. Conventional proton plans were evaluated by comparing the dose distributions per beam with the corresponding bsPTV. The bsPTV volume as a function of beam angle revealed some unexpected sources of uncertainty and could help the planner choose more robust beams. Beam-specific planning volume for the spinal cord was used for dose distribution shaping to ensure organ sparing laterally and distally to the beam.

  19. A method to individualize adaptive planning target volumes for deformable targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Pauliina; Redpath, Anthony Thomas; Høyer, Morten; Muren, Ludvig Paul

    2009-12-01

    We have investigated a method to individualize the planning target volume (PTV) for deformable targets in radiotherapy by combining a computer tomography (CT) scan with multiple cone beam (CB)CT scans. All combinations of the CT and up to five initial CBCTs were considered. To exclude translational motion, the clinical target volumes (CTVs) in the CBCTs were matched to the CTV in the CT. PTVs investigated were the unions, the intersections and all other structures defined by a volume with a constant CTV location frequency. The method was investigated for three bladder cancer patients with a CT and 20-27 CBCTs. Reliable alternatives to a standard PTV required use of at least four scans for planning. The CTV unions of four or five scans gave similar results when considering the fraction of individual repeat scan CTVs they volumetrically covered to at least 99%. For patient 1, 64% of the repeat scan CTVs were covered by these unions and for patient 2, 86% were covered. Further, the PTVs defined by the volume occupied by the CTV in all except one of the four or five planning scans seemed clinically feasible. On average, 52% of the repeat CBCT CTVs for patient 1 and 64% for patient 2 were covered to minimum 99% of their total volume. For patient 3, the method failed due to poor volume control of the bladder. The suggested PTVs could, with considerably improved conformity, complement the standard PTV.

  20. SeaWiFS calibration and validation plan, volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, Stanford B. (Editor); Firestone, Elaine R. (Editor); Mcclain, Charles R.; Esaias, Wayne E.; Barnes, William; Guenther, Bruce; Endres, Daniel; Mitchell, B. Greg; Barnes, Robert

    1992-01-01

    The Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) will be the first ocean-color satellite since the Nimbus-7 Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS), which ceased operation in 1986. Unlike the CZCS, which was designed as a proof-of-concept experiment, SeaWiFS will provide routine global coverage every 2 days and is designed to provide estimates of photosynthetic concentrations of sufficient accuracy for use in quantitative studies of the ocean's primary productivity and biogeochemistry. A review of the CZCS mission is included that describes that data set's limitations and provides justification for a comprehensive SeaWiFS calibration and validation program. To accomplish the SeaWiFS scientific objectives, the sensor's calibration must be constantly monitored, and robust atmospheric corrections and bio-optical algorithms must be developed. The plan incorporates a multi-faceted approach to sensor calibration using a combination of vicarious (based on in situ observations) and onboard calibration techniques. Because of budget constraints and the limited availability of ship resources, the development of the operational algorithms (atmospheric and bio-optical) will rely heavily on collaborations with the Earth Observing System (EOS), the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) oceans team, and projects sponsored by other agencies, e.g., the U.S. Navy and the National Science Foundation (NSF). Other elements of the plan include the routine quality control of input ancillary data (e.g., surface wind, surface pressure, ozone concentration, etc.) used in the processing and verification of the level-0 (raw) data to level-1 (calibrated radiances), level-2 (derived products), and level-3 (gridded and averaged derived data) products.

  1. SeaWiFS calibration and validation plan, volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Hooker, S.B.; Firestone, E.R.; Mcclain, C.R.; Esaias, W.E.; Barnes, W.; Guenther, B.; Endres, D.; Mitchell, B.G.; Barnes, R.

    1992-09-01

    The Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) will be the first ocean-color satellite since the Nimbus-7 Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS), which ceased operation in 1986. Unlike the CZCS, which was designed as a proof-of-concept experiment, SeaWiFS will provide routine global coverage every 2 days and is designed to provide estimates of photosynthetic concentrations of sufficient accuracy for use in quantitative studies of the ocean's primary productivity and biogeochemistry. A review of the CZCS mission is included that describes that data set's limitations and provides justification for a comprehensive SeaWiFS calibration and validation program. To accomplish the SeaWiFS scientific objectives, the sensor's calibration must be constantly monitored, and robust atmospheric corrections and bio-optical algorithms must be developed. The plan incorporates a multi-faceted approach to sensor calibration using a combination of vicarious (based on in situ observations) and onboard calibration techniques. Because of budget constraints and the limited availability of ship resources, the development of the operational algorithms (atmospheric and bio-optical) will rely heavily on collaborations with the Earth Observing System (EOS), the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) oceans team, and projects sponsored by other agencies, e.g., the U.S. Navy and the National Science Foundation (NSF). Other elements of the plan include the routine quality control of input ancillary data (e.g., surface wind, surface pressure, ozone concentration, etc.) used in the processing and verification of the level-0 (raw) data to level-1 (calibrated radiances), level-2 (derived products), and level-3 (gridded and averaged derived data) products.

  2. Space Station Mission Planning Study (MPS) development study. Volume 3: Software development plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klus, W. L.

    1987-01-01

    A software development plan is presented for the definition, design, and implementation of the Space Station (SS) Payload Mission Planning System (MPS). This plan is an evolving document and must be updated periodically as the SS design and operations concepts as well as the SS MPS concept evolve. The major segments of this plan are as follows: an overview of the SS MPS and a description of its required capabilities including the computer programs identified as configurable items with an explanation of the place and function of each within the system; an overview of the project plan and a detailed description of each development project activity breaking each into lower level tasks where applicable; identification of the resources required and recommendations for the manner in which they should be utilized including recommended schedules and estimated manpower requirements; and a description of the practices, standards, and techniques recommended for the SS MPS Software (SW) development.

  3. Lymphatic atlas-based target volume definition for intensity-modulated radiation therapy planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qatarneh, S. M.; Kiricuta, I. C.; Brahme, A.; Noz, M. E.; Ferreira, B.; Kim, W. C.; Lind, B. K.

    2007-10-01

    Despite the improvements in current imaging modalities such as CT and MRI, the detection of normal or malignant lymph nodes remains a challenge due to the large variability in lymph node characteristics and the variation in imaging quality and the limited imaging resolution. A computerized lymph node atlas could be the ideal tool for target volume definition based on the distribution of normal lymph nodes surrounding the verified malignant nodes to improve the accuracy of intensity-modulated radiation therapy planning. The standard lymph node topography in the newly constructed 3D lymph node atlas offers a detailed topographical distribution of discrete nodal locations in relation to surrounding organs at risk. In the present paper, the recently developed lymph node atlas is used for selection and delineation of target volumes in the head and neck, thorax and pelvic region. Image registration techniques were implemented to integrate the topography of the lymph node atlas into the patient's data set. By combining the knowledge-based lymph node distribution with the patient's data set, more detailed definitions of the target volumes were obtained to facilitate biologically based treatment plan optimization. The response values of the biologically optimized treatment plans were used to derive the probability of tumor control and the probability of complications in organs at risk. The treatment outcome of the lung reference plan showed a lower probability of recurrence in comparison to planning without the lymph node atlas. The lymph node atlas can improve and standardize the target volume definition by including more accurate anatomical knowledge for target volume definition and biologically optimized radiation therapy planning.

  4. Monte Carlo Simulations for Dosimetry in Prostate Radiotherapy with Different Intravesical Volumes and Planning Target Volume Margins

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Wei; Yu, Dong; He, Hengda; Liu, Qian

    2016-01-01

    In prostate radiotherapy, the influence of bladder volume variation on the dose absorbed by the target volume and organs at risk is significant and difficult to predict. In addition, the resolution of a typical medical image is insufficient for visualizing the bladder wall, which makes it more difficult to precisely evaluate the dose to the bladder wall. This simulation study aimed to quantitatively investigate the relationship between the dose received by organs at risk and the intravesical volume in prostate radiotherapy. The high-resolution Visible Chinese Human phantom and the finite element method were used to construct 10 pelvic models with specific intravesical volumes ranging from 100 ml to 700 ml to represent bladders of patients with different bladder filling capacities during radiotherapy. This series of models was utilized in six-field coplanar 3D conformal radiotherapy simulations with different planning target volume (PTV) margins. Each organ’s absorbed dose was calculated using the Monte Carlo method. The obtained bladder wall displacements during bladder filling were consistent with reported clinical measurements. The radiotherapy simulation revealed a linear relationship between the dose to non-targeted organs and the intravesical volume and indicated that a 10-mm PTV margin for a large bladder and a 5-mm PTV margin for a small bladder reduce the effective dose to the bladder wall to similar degrees. However, larger bladders were associated with evident protection of the intestines. Detailed dosimetry results can be used by radiation oncologists to create more accurate, individual water preload protocols according to the patient’s anatomy and bladder capacity. PMID:27441944

  5. 40 CFR Appendix D to Part 112 - Determination of a Worst Case Discharge Planning Volume

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Determination of a Worst Case Discharge Planning Volume D Appendix D to Part 112 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... determined by the RA that the facility could cause substantial harm to the environment. The calculation of...

  6. Savannah River Site Environmental Monitoring Plan. Volume 1, Section 1000 Addendum: Revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    Jannik, G.T.

    1994-10-01

    This document -- the Savannah River Site Environmental Monitoring Plan (SRS EM Plan) -- has been prepared according to guidance contained in the DOE 5400 Series orders, in 10 CFR 834, and in DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and environmental Surveillance [DOE, 1991]. The SRS EM Plan`s purpose is to define the criteria, regulations, and guideline requirements with which SRS will comply. These criteria and requirements are applicable to environmental monitoring activities performed in support of the SRS Environmental Monitoring Program (SRS EM Program), WSRC-3Q1-2, Volume 1, Section 1100. They are not applicable to monitoring activities utilized exclusively for process monitoring/control. The environmental monitoring program requirements documented in the SRS EM Plan incorporate all applicable should requirements of DOE/EH-0173T and expand upon them to include nonradiological environmental monitoring program requirements.

  7. The spill prevention, control, and countermeasures (SPCC) plan for the Y-12 Plant. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    This spill prevention, control and countermeasures (SPCC) Plan is divided into two volumes. Volume I addresses Y-12`s compliance with regulations pertinent to the content of SPCC Plans. Volume II is the SPCC Hazardous Material Storage Data Base, a detailed tabulation of facility-specific information and data on potential spill sources at the Y-12 Plant. Volume I follows the basic format and subject sequence specified in 40 CFR 112.7. This sequence is prefaced by three additional chapters, including this introduction and brief discussions of the Y-12 Plant`s background/environmental setting and potential spill source categories. Two additional chapters on containers and container storage areas and PCB and PCB storage for disposal facilities are inserted into the required sequence. The following required subjects are covered in this volume: Spill history, site drainage; secondary containment/diversion structures and equipment; contingency plans; notification and spill response procedures; facility drainage; bulk storage tanks; facility transfer operations, pumping, and in-plant processes; transfer stations (facility tank cars/tank tracks); inspections and records; security, and personnel, training, and spill prevention procedures.

  8. A Five-Year Plan for Meeting the Automatic Data Processing and Telecommunications Needs of the Federal Government. Volume l: Planning Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Commerce, Washington, DC.

    The first of two volumes, this document describes the planning process of a 5-year plan for meeting the telecommunications and automatic data processing (ADP) needs of the federal government, examines the planning efforts of several typical agencies, and explores issues involved in managing new technology as it evolves. For each agency,…

  9. Cassini atmospheric chemistry mapper. Volume 1. Investigation and technical plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, William Hayden; Baines, Kevin Hays; Drossart, Pierre; Fegley, Bruce; Orton, Glenn; Noll, Keith; Reitsema, Harold; Bjoraker, Gordon L.

    1990-01-01

    The Cassini Atmospheric Chemistry Mapper (ACM) enables a broad range of atmospheric science investigations for Saturn and Titan by providing high spectral and spatial resolution mapping and occultation capabilities at 3 and 5 microns. ACM can directly address the major atmospheric science objectives for Saturn and for Titan, as defined by the Announcement of Opportunity, with pivotal diagnostic measurements not accessible to any other proposed Cassini instrument. ACM determines mixing ratios for atmospheric molecules from spectral line profiles for an important and extensive volume of the atmosphere of Saturn (and Jupiter). Spatial and vertical profiles of disequilibrium species abundances define Saturn's deep atmosphere, its chemistry, and its vertical transport phenomena. ACM spectral maps provide a unique means to interpret atmospheric conditions in the deep (approximately 1000 bar) atmosphere of Saturn. Deep chemistry and vertical transport is inferred from the vertical and horizontal distribution of a series of disequilibrium species. Solar occultations provide a method to bridge the altitude range in Saturn's (and Titan's) atmosphere that is not accessible to radio science, thermal infrared, and UV spectroscopy with temperature measurements to plus or minus 2K from the analysis of molecular line ratios and to attain an high sensitivity for low-abundance chemical species in the very large column densities that may be achieved during occultations for Saturn. For Titan, ACM solar occultations yield very well resolved (1/6 scale height) vertical mixing ratios column abundances for atmospheric molecular constituents. Occultations also provide for detecting abundant species very high in the upper atmosphere, while at greater depths, detecting the isotopes of C and O, constraining the production mechanisms, and/or sources for the above species. ACM measures the vertical and horizontal distribution of aerosols via their opacity at 3 microns and, particularly, at 5

  10. Data fusion for planning target volume and isodose prediction in prostate brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouranian, Saman; Ramezani, Mahdi; Mahdavi, S. Sara; Spadinger, Ingrid; Morris, William J.; Salcudean, Septimiu E.; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2015-03-01

    In low-dose prostate brachytherapy treatment, a large number of radioactive seeds is implanted in and adjacent to the prostate gland. Planning of this treatment involves the determination of a Planning Target Volume (PTV), followed by defining the optimal number of seeds, needles and their coordinates for implantation. The two major planning tasks, i.e. PTV determination and seed definition, are associated with inter- and intra-expert variability. Moreover, since these two steps are performed in sequence, the variability is accumulated in the overall treatment plan. In this paper, we introduce a model based on a data fusion technique that enables joint determination of PTV and the minimum Prescribed Isodose (mPD) map. The model captures the correlation between different information modalities consisting of transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) volumes, PTV and isodose contours. We take advantage of joint Independent Component Analysis (jICA) as a linear decomposition technique to obtain a set of joint components that optimally describe such correlation. We perform a component stability analysis to generate a model with stable parameters that predicts the PTV and isodose contours solely based on a new patient TRUS volume. We propose a framework for both modeling and prediction processes and evaluate it on a dataset of 60 brachytherapy treatment records. We show PTV prediction error of 10:02+/-4:5% and the V100 isodose overlap of 97+/-3:55% with respect to the clinical gold standard.

  11. Environmental Assessment, Wing Infrastructure Development Outlook (WINDO) Implementation Plan (FY 04-06). Volume 2, Beale Air Force Base, California

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    Environmental Assessment Wing Infrastructure Development Outlook (WINDO) Implementation Plan (FY 04-06) Volume 2 Beale Air Force Base, California ...Development Outlook (WINDO) Implementation Plan (FY 04-06) Volume 2 Beale Air Force Base, California 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...Beale Air Force Base (AFB). California : Volume 2. 2.0 DESCRIPTION OF PROPOSED ACTION AND NO ACTION ALTERNATIVES Proposed Action. The Proposed Action

  12. Comparative analysis of operational forecasts versus actual weather conditions in airline flight planning, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keitz, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    The impact of more timely and accurate weather data on airline flight planning with the emphasis on fuel savings is studied. This volume of the report discusses the results of Task 1 of the four major tasks included in the study. Task 1 compares flight plans based on forecasts with plans based on the verifying analysis from 33 days during the summer and fall of 1979. The comparisons show that: (1) potential fuel savings conservatively estimated to be between 1.2 and 2.5 percent could result from using more timely and accurate weather data in flight planning and route selection; (2) the Suitland forecast generally underestimates wind speeds; and (3) the track selection methodology of many airlines operating on the North Atlantic may not be optimum resulting in their selecting other than the optimum North Atlantic Organized Track about 50 percent of the time.

  13. Launch vehicle test and checkout plan. - Volume 2: Saturn 1B launch vehicle Skylab R (rescue) and AS-208 flow plan and listings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The launch operations test and checkout plan is a planning document that establishes all launch site checkout activity, including the individual tests and sequence of testing required to fulfill the development center and KSC test and checkout requirements. This volume contains the launch vehicle test and checkout plan encompassing S-1B, S-4B, IU stage, and ground support equipment tests. The plan is based upon AS-208 flow utilizing a manned spacecraft, LUT 1, and launch pad 39B facilities.

  14. Management plan documentation standard and Data Item Descriptions (DID). Volume of the information system life-cycle and documentation standards, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callender, E. David; Steinbacher, Jody

    1989-01-01

    This is the second of five volumes of the Information System Life-Cycle and Documentation Standards. This volume provides a well-organized, easily used standard for management plans used in acquiring, assuring, and developing information systems and software, hardware, and operational procedures components, and related processes.

  15. Final consolidated action plan to Tiger Team. Volume 2, Change 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    Two separate Tiger Team assessments were conducted at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The first was conducted at the California site in Livermore between April 30, 1990, and May 18, 1990. A second Tiger Team assessment was conducted at the New Mexico site in Albuquerque between April 15 and May 24, 1991. This report is volume two, change one. One purpose of this Action Plan is to provide a formal written response to each of the findings and/or concerns cited in the SNL Tiger Team assessment reports. A second purpose is to present actions planned to be conducted to eliminate deficiencies identified by the Tiger Teams. A third purpose is to consolidate (group) related findings and to identify priorities assigned to the planned actions for improved efficiency and enhanced management of the tasks. A fourth and final purpose is to merge the two original SNL Action Plans for the New Mexico [Ref. a] and California [Ref. b] sites into a single Action Plan as a major step toward managing all SNL ES&H activities more similarly. Included in this combined SNL Action Plan are descriptions of the actions to be taken by SNL to liminate all problems identified in the Tiger Teams` findings/concerns, as well as estimated costs and schedules for planned actions.

  16. Closure plan for Solid Waste Storage Area 6: Volume 1, Closure plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    This Closure Plan for Solid Waste Storage Area 6 (SWSA 6) a disposal area for low-level radioactive wastes and hazardous materials, of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) describes how portions of SWSA 6 will be closed under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Interim Status per 40 CFR 265 Subpart G (TN Rule 1200-1-11-.05(7)). An overview is provided of activities necessary for final closure and corrective measures for all of SWSA 6. Results of surface waters and groundwater sampling are provided.

  17. Strategic Planning: An Integrated Academic Information Management System (IAIMS) at Georgetown University Medical Center. Volume 1, Implementation Plan. Volume 2, Planning Accomplishments. Volume 3, Environmental Forecast. Volume 4, Institutional Self Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broering, Naomi C.; And Others

    Strategic planning for an Integrated Academic Information Management System (IAIMS) for Georgetown University Medical Center is considered. The goal is to organize and transmit accessible and timely biomedical information where it is needed. Activities are proposed for education, research, patient care, management, sharing information on…

  18. Impact of the accuracy of automatic tumour functional volume delineation on radiotherapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Le Maitre, Amandine; Hatt, Mathieu; Pradier, Olivier; Cheze-le Rest, Catherine; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2012-09-07

    Over the past few years several automatic and semi-automatic PET segmentation methods for target volume definition in radiotherapy have been proposed. The objective of this study is to compare different methods in terms of dosimetry. For such a comparison, a gold standard is needed. For this purpose, realistic GATE-simulated PET images were used. Three lung cases and three H&N cases were designed with various shapes, contrasts and heterogeneities. Four different segmentation approaches were compared: fixed and adaptive thresholds, a fuzzy C-mean and the fuzzy locally adaptive Bayesian method. For each of these target volumes, an IMRT treatment plan was defined. The different algorithms and resulting plans were compared in terms of segmentation errors and ground-truth volume coverage using different metrics (V(95), D(95), homogeneity index and conformity index). The major differences between the threshold-based methods and automatic methods occurred in the most heterogeneous cases. Within the two groups, the major differences occurred for low contrast cases. For homogeneous cases, equivalent ground-truth volume coverage was observed for all methods but for more heterogeneous cases, significantly lower coverage was observed for threshold-based methods. Our study demonstrates that significant dosimetry errors can be avoided by using more advanced image-segmentation methods.

  19. Impact of the accuracy of automatic tumour functional volume delineation on radiotherapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Maitre, Amandine; Hatt, Mathieu; Pradier, Olivier; Cheze-le Rest, Catherine; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2012-09-01

    Over the past few years several automatic and semi-automatic PET segmentation methods for target volume definition in radiotherapy have been proposed. The objective of this study is to compare different methods in terms of dosimetry. For such a comparison, a gold standard is needed. For this purpose, realistic GATE-simulated PET images were used. Three lung cases and three H&N cases were designed with various shapes, contrasts and heterogeneities. Four different segmentation approaches were compared: fixed and adaptive thresholds, a fuzzy C-mean and the fuzzy locally adaptive Bayesian method. For each of these target volumes, an IMRT treatment plan was defined. The different algorithms and resulting plans were compared in terms of segmentation errors and ground-truth volume coverage using different metrics (V95, D95, homogeneity index and conformity index). The major differences between the threshold-based methods and automatic methods occurred in the most heterogeneous cases. Within the two groups, the major differences occurred for low contrast cases. For homogeneous cases, equivalent ground-truth volume coverage was observed for all methods but for more heterogeneous cases, significantly lower coverage was observed for threshold-based methods. Our study demonstrates that significant dosimetry errors can be avoided by using more advanced image-segmentation methods.

  20. Comparative study of old and new versions of treatment planning system using dose volume histogram indices of clinical plans

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, Gangarapu Sri; Srinivas, Vuppu; Ayyangar, K. M.; Reddy, Palreddy Yadagiri

    2016-01-01

    Recently, Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) version 8.8 was upgraded to the latest version 13.6. It is customary that the vendor gives training on how to upgrade the existing software to the new version. However, the customer is provided less inner details about changes in the new software version. According to manufacturer, accuracy of point dose calculations and irregular treatment planning is better in the new version (13.6) compared to the old version (8.8). Furthermore, the new version uses voxel-based calculations while the earlier version used point dose calculations. Major difference in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans was observed between the two versions after re-optimization and re-calculations. However, minor difference was observed for IMRT cases after performing only re-calculations. It is recommended TPS quality assurance to be performed after any major upgrade of software. This can be done by performing dose calculation comparisons in TPS. To assess the difference between the versions, 25 clinical cases from the old version were compared keeping all the patient data intact including the monitor units and comparing the differences in dose calculations using dose volume histogram (DVH) analysis. Along with DVH analysis, uniformity index, conformity index, homogeneity index, and dose spillage index were also compared for both versions. The results of comparative study are presented in this paper. PMID:27651566

  1. PTV-based IMPT optimization incorporating planning risk volumes vs robust optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Wei; Li Xiaoqiang; Zhu, Ron. X.; Mohan, Radhe; Frank, Steven J.; Li Yupeng

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: Robust optimization leads to intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans that are less sensitive to uncertainties and superior in terms of organs-at-risk (OARs) sparing, target dose coverage, and homogeneity compared to planning target volume (PTV)-based optimized plans. Robust optimization incorporates setup and range uncertainties, which implicitly adds margins to both targets and OARs and is also able to compensate for perturbations in dose distributions within targets and OARs caused by uncertainties. In contrast, the traditional PTV-based optimization considers only setup uncertainties and adds a margin only to targets but no margins to the OARs. It also ignores range uncertainty. The purpose of this work is to determine if robustly optimized plans are superior to PTV-based plans simply because the latter do not assign margins to OARs during optimization. Methods: The authors retrospectively selected from their institutional database five patients with head and neck (H and N) cancer and one with prostate cancer for this analysis. Using their original images and prescriptions, the authors created new IMPT plans using three methods: PTV-based optimization, optimization based on the PTV and planning risk volumes (PRVs) (i.e., 'PTV+PRV-based optimization'), and robust optimization using the 'worst-case' dose distribution. The PRVs were generated by uniformly expanding OARs by 3 mm for the H and N cases and 5 mm for the prostate case. The dose-volume histograms (DVHs) from the worst-case dose distributions were used to assess and compare plan quality. Families of DVHs for each uncertainty for all structures of interest were plotted along with the nominal DVHs. The width of the 'bands' of DVHs was used to quantify the plan sensitivity to uncertainty. Results: Compared with conventional PTV-based and PTV+PRV-based planning, robust optimization led to a smaller bandwidth for the targets in the face of uncertainties {l_brace}clinical target volume [CTV

  2. Viability Assessment of a Repository at Yucca Mountain. Volume 4: License Application Plan and Costs

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    Volume 4 provides the DOE plan and cost estimate for the remaining work necessary to proceed from completing this VA to submitting an LA to NRC. This work includes preparing an EIS and evaluating the suitability of the site. Both items are necessary components of the documentation required to support a decision in 2001 by the Secretary of Energy on whether or not to recommend that the President approve the site for development as a repository. If the President recommends the site to Congress and the site designation becomes effective, then DOE will submit the LA to NRC in 2002 for authorization to construct the repository. The work described in Volume 4 constitutes the last step in the characterization of the Yucca Mountain site and the design and evaluation of the performance of a repository system in the geologic setting of this site. The plans in this volume for the next 4 years' work are based on the results of the previous 15 years' work, as reported in Volumes 1, 2, and 3 of this VA. Volume 1 summarizes what DOE has learned to date about the Yucca Mountain site. Volume 2 describes the current, reference repository design, several design options that might enhance the performance of the reference design, and several alternative designs that represent substantial departures from the reference design. Volume 2 also summarizes the results of tests of candidate materials for waste packages and for support of the tunnels into which waste would be emplaced. Volume 3 provides the results of the latest performance assessments undertaken to evaluate the performance of the design in the geologic setting of Yucca Mountain. The results described in Volumes 1, 2, and 3 provide the basis for identifying and prioritizing the work described in this volume. DOE believes that the planned work, together with the results of previous work, will be sufficient to support a site suitability evaluation for site recommendation and, if the site is recommended and designated, a

  3. Resource management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation. Volume 27, Wildlife Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Parr, P.D.; Evans, J.W.

    1992-06-01

    A plan for management of the wildlife resources on the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation is outlined in this document. Management includes wildlife population control (hunts, trapping, and removal), handling specific problems with wildlife, restoration of species, coordination with researchers on wildlife studies, preservation and management of habitats, and law enforcement. Wildlife resources are divided into five categories, each with a specific set of objectives and procedures for obtaining these objectives. These categories are (1) species-richness management to ensure that all resident wildlife species exist on the Reservation in viable numbers; (2) featured species management to produce selected species in desired numbers on designated land units; (3) management of game species for research, education, recreation, and public safety, (4) endangered species management designed to preserve and protect both the species and habitats critical to the survival of those species; and (5) pest management. Achievement of the objectives is a joint effort between the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Environmental Sciences Division.

  4. [Margin determination from clinical to planning target volume for lung cancer treated with conformal or intensity-modulated irradiation].

    PubMed

    Berthelot, K; Thureau, S; Giraud, P

    2016-10-01

    Technological progress in radiotherapy enables more precision for treatment planning and delivery. The margin determination between the clinical target volume and the planning target volumes stem from the estimation of geometric uncertainties of the tumour localization into the radiation beam. The inner motion complexity of lung tumours has led to the use of 4D computed tomography and nurtures specific dosimetric concerns. Few strategies consisting in integrating tumour motion allow margin reduction regarding inner movements. The patient immobilization and onboard imagery improvement decrease the setup uncertainties. Each step between the initial planning imagery and treatment delivery has to be analysed as systematic or random errors to calculate the optimal planning margin.

  5. Management response plan for the Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 146 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. To address the facility-specific and site-specific vulnerabilities, responsible DOE and site-contractor line organizations have developed initial site response plans. These plans, presented as Volume 2 of this Management Response Plan, describe the actions needed to mitigate or eliminate the facility- and site-specific vulnerabilities identified by the CSV Working Group field verification teams. Initial site response plans are described for: Brookhaven National Lab., Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering Lab., Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Los Alamos National Lab., Oak Ridge Reservation, Rocky Flats Plant, Sandia National Laboratories, and Savannah River Site.

  6. Comparative analysis of operational forecasts versus actual weather conditions in airline flight planning, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keitz, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    The impact of more timely and accurate weather data on airline flight planning with the emphasis on fuel savings is studied. This volume of the report discusses the results of Task 2 of the four major tasks included in the study. Task 2 compares various catagories of flight plans and flight tracking data produced by a simulation system developed for the Federal Aviation Administrations by SRI International. (Flight tracking data simulate actual flight tracks of all aircraft operating at a given time and provide for rerouting of flights as necessary to resolve traffic conflicts.) The comparisons of flight plans on the forecast to flight plans on the verifying analysis confirm Task 1 findings that wind speeds are generally underestimated. Comparisons involving flight tracking data indicate that actual fuel burn is always higher than planned, in either direction, and even when the same weather data set is used. Since the flight tracking model output results in more diversions than is known to be the case, it was concluded that there is an error in the flight tracking algorithm.

  7. Dose and volume parameters for MRI-based treatment planning in intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kirisits, Christian . E-mail: Christian.Kirisits@meduniwien.ac.at; Poetter, Richard; Lang, Stefan; Dimopoulos, Johannes; Wachter-Gerstner, Natascha; Georg, Dietmar

    2005-07-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based treatment planning in intracavitary brachytherapy allows optimization of the dose distribution on a patient-by-patient basis. In addition to traditionally used point dose and volume parameters, dose-volume histogram (DVH) analysis enables further possibilities for prescribing and reporting. This study reports the systematic development of our concept applied in clinical routine. Methods and Materials: A group of 22 patients treated with 93 fractions using a tandem-ring applicator and MRI-based individual treatment planning for each application was analyzed in detail. High-risk clinical target volumes and gross tumor volumes were contoured. The dose to bladder, rectum, and sigma was analyzed according to International Commission of Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) Report 38 and DVH parameters (e.g., D{sub 2cc} represents the minimal dose for the most irradiated 2 cm{sup 3}). Total doses, including external beam radiotherapy and the values for each individual brachytherapy fraction, were biologically normalized to conventional 2-Gy fractions ({alpha}/{beta} 10 Gy for target, 3 Gy for organs at risk). Results: The total prescribed dose was about 85 Gy{sub {alpha}}{sub {beta}}{sub 10}, which was mainly achieved by 45 Gy external beam radiotherapy plus 4 x 7 Gy brachytherapy (total 84 Gy{sub {alpha}}{sub {beta}}{sub 10}). The mean value was 82 Gy{sub {alpha}}{sub {beta}}{sub 10} for the point A dose (left, right) and 84 cm{sup 3} for the volume of the prescribed dose. The average dose to the clinical target volume was 66 Gy{sub {alpha}}{sub {beta}}{sub 10} for the minimum target dose, 87 Gy{sub {alpha}}{sub {beta}}{sub 10} for the dose received by at least 90% of the volume, with a mean volume treated with at least the prescribed dose of 89%. The mean D{sub 2cc} for the bladder was 83 Gy{sub {alpha}}{sub {beta}}{sub 3}, the ICRU point dose was 75 Gy{sub {alpha}}{sub {beta}}{sub 3}, and the dose at the ICRU point

  8. Lesson Plans for the Busy Librarian: A Standards Based Approach for the Elementary Library Media Center, Volume 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeling, Joyce

    2005-01-01

    The author designed this book, like Volume I of the set, to give elementary school librarians a quick, enjoyable way to coordinate with teachers to teach information literacy and literacy skills aligned with national standards. The chapters in the book include: (1) Kindergarten Lesson Plans; (2) First-Grade Lesson Plans; (3) Second-Grade Lesson…

  9. Comparative analysis of operational forecasts versus actual weather conditions in airline flight planning, volume 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keitz, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    The impact of more timely and accurate weather data on airline flight planning with the emphasis on fuel savings is studied. This volume of the report discusses the results of Task 4 of the four major tasks included in the study. Task 4 uses flight plan segment wind and temperature differences as indicators of dates and geographic areas for which significant forecast errors may have occurred. An in-depth analysis is then conducted for the days identified. The analysis show that significant errors occur in the operational forecast on 15 of the 33 arbitrarily selected days included in the study. Wind speeds in an area of maximum winds are underestimated by at least 20 to 25 kts. on 14 of these days. The analysis also show that there is a tendency to repeat the same forecast errors from prog to prog. Also, some perceived forecast errors from the flight plan comparisons could not be verified by visual inspection of the corresponding National Meteorological Center forecast and analyses charts, and it is likely that they are the result of weather data interpolation techniques or some other data processing procedure in the airlines' flight planning systems.

  10. WE-B-304-02: Treatment Planning Evaluation and Optimization Should Be Biologically and Not Dose/volume Based

    SciTech Connect

    Deasy, J.

    2015-06-15

    The ultimate goal of radiotherapy treatment planning is to find a treatment that will yield a high tumor control probability (TCP) with an acceptable normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Yet most treatment planning today is not based upon optimization of TCPs and NTCPs, but rather upon meeting physical dose and volume constraints defined by the planner. It has been suggested that treatment planning evaluation and optimization would be more effective if they were biologically and not dose/volume based, and this is the claim debated in this month’s Point/Counterpoint. After a brief overview of biologically and DVH based treatment planning by the Moderator Colin Orton, Joseph Deasy (for biological planning) and Charles Mayo (against biological planning) will begin the debate. Some of the arguments in support of biological planning include: this will result in more effective dose distributions for many patients DVH-based measures of plan quality are known to have little predictive value there is little evidence that either D95 or D98 of the PTV is a good predictor of tumor control sufficient validated outcome prediction models are now becoming available and should be used to drive planning and optimization Some of the arguments against biological planning include: several decades of experience with DVH-based planning should not be discarded we do not know enough about the reliability and errors associated with biological models the radiotherapy community in general has little direct experience with side by side comparisons of DVH vs biological metrics and outcomes it is unlikely that a clinician would accept extremely cold regions in a CTV or hot regions in a PTV, despite having acceptable TCP values Learning Objectives: To understand dose/volume based treatment planning and its potential limitations To understand biological metrics such as EUD, TCP, and NTCP To understand biologically based treatment planning and its potential limitations.

  11. WE-B-304-01: Treatment Planning Evaluation and Optimization Should Be Dose/volume and Not Biologically Based

    SciTech Connect

    Mayo, C.

    2015-06-15

    The ultimate goal of radiotherapy treatment planning is to find a treatment that will yield a high tumor control probability (TCP) with an acceptable normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Yet most treatment planning today is not based upon optimization of TCPs and NTCPs, but rather upon meeting physical dose and volume constraints defined by the planner. It has been suggested that treatment planning evaluation and optimization would be more effective if they were biologically and not dose/volume based, and this is the claim debated in this month’s Point/Counterpoint. After a brief overview of biologically and DVH based treatment planning by the Moderator Colin Orton, Joseph Deasy (for biological planning) and Charles Mayo (against biological planning) will begin the debate. Some of the arguments in support of biological planning include: this will result in more effective dose distributions for many patients DVH-based measures of plan quality are known to have little predictive value there is little evidence that either D95 or D98 of the PTV is a good predictor of tumor control sufficient validated outcome prediction models are now becoming available and should be used to drive planning and optimization Some of the arguments against biological planning include: several decades of experience with DVH-based planning should not be discarded we do not know enough about the reliability and errors associated with biological models the radiotherapy community in general has little direct experience with side by side comparisons of DVH vs biological metrics and outcomes it is unlikely that a clinician would accept extremely cold regions in a CTV or hot regions in a PTV, despite having acceptable TCP values Learning Objectives: To understand dose/volume based treatment planning and its potential limitations To understand biological metrics such as EUD, TCP, and NTCP To understand biologically based treatment planning and its potential limitations.

  12. Education as Experimentation: A Planned Variation Model. Volume IV-E. Supplementary Analyses: Reanalysis of Selected Data Sets. Volume IV-F. Supplementary Analyses: Appendix.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proper, Elizabeth C.; And Others

    This segment of the national evaluation study of the Follow Through Planned Variation Model discusses findings of analyses of achievement test data which have been adjusted to take into consideration the preschool experience of children in three Follow Through cohorts. These analyses serve as a supplement to analyses presented in Volume IV-A of…

  13. Comparative analysis of operational forecasts versus actual weather conditions in airline flight planning, volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keitz, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    The impact of more timely and accurate weather data on airline flight planning with the emphasis on fuel savings is studied. This volume of the report discusses the results of Task 3 of the four major tasks included in the study. Task 3 compares flight plans developed on the Suitland forecast with actual data observed by the aircraft (and averaged over 10 degree segments). The results show that the average difference between the forecast and observed wind speed is 9 kts. without considering direction, and the average difference in the component of the forecast wind parallel to the direction of the observed wind is 13 kts. - both indicating that the Suitland forecast underestimates the wind speeds. The Root Mean Square (RMS) vector error is 30.1 kts. The average absolute difference in direction between the forecast and observed wind is 26 degrees and the temperature difference is 3 degree Centigrade. These results indicate that the forecast model as well as the verifying analysis used to develop comparison flight plans in Tasks 1 and 2 is a limiting factor and that the average potential fuel savings or penalty are up to 3.6 percent depending on the direction of flight.

  14. Comp Plan: A computer program to generate dose and radiobiological metrics from dose-volume histogram files

    SciTech Connect

    Holloway, Lois Charlotte; Miller, Julie-Anne; Kumar, Shivani; Whelan, Brendan M.; Vinod, Shalini K.

    2012-10-01

    Treatment planning studies often require the calculation of a large number of dose and radiobiological metrics. To streamline these calculations, a computer program called Comp Plan was developed using MATLAB. Comp Plan calculates common metrics, including equivalent uniform dose, tumor control probability, and normal tissue complication probability from dose-volume histogram data. The dose and radiobiological metrics can be calculated for the original data or for an adjusted fraction size using the linear quadratic model. A homogeneous boost dose can be added to a given structure if desired. The final output is written to an Excel file in a format convenient for further statistical analysis. Comp Plan was verified by independent calculations. A lung treatment planning study comparing 45 plans for 7 structures using up to 6 metrics for each structure was successfully analyzed within approximately 5 minutes with Comp Plan. The code is freely available from the authors on request.

  15. Selected Bibliographies and State-of-the-Art Review for Environmental Health. Volume 2: Environmental Health References. International Health Planning Reference Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Renee White; Shani, Hadasa

    Intended as a companion piece to volume 2 in the Method Series, Environmental Health Planning (CE 024 230), this second of six volumes in the International Health Planning Reference Series is a combined literature review and annotated bibliography dealing with environmental factors in health planning for developing countries. The review identifies…

  16. Maximum-Intensity Volumes for Fast Contouring of Lung Tumors Including Respiratory Motion in 4DCT Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Rietzel, Eike Liu, Arthur K.; Chen, George T.Y.; Choi, Noah C.

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To assess the accuracy of maximum-intensity volumes (MIV) for fast contouring of lung tumors including respiratory motion. Methods and Materials: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) data of 10 patients were acquired. Maximum-intensity volumes were constructed by assigning the maximum Hounsfield unit in all CT volumes per geometric voxel to a new, synthetic volume. Gross tumor volumes (GTVs) were contoured on all CT volumes, and their union was constructed. The GTV with all its respiratory motion was contoured on the MIV as well. Union GTVs and GTVs including motion were compared visually. Furthermore, planning target volumes (PTVs) were constructed for the union of GTVs and the GTV on MIV. These PTVs were compared by centroid position, volume, geometric extent, and surface distance. Results: Visual comparison of GTVs demonstrated failure of the MIV technique for 5 of 10 patients. For adequate GTV{sub MIV}s, differences between PTVs were <1.0 mm in centroid position, 5% in volume, {+-}5 mm in geometric extent, and {+-}0.5 {+-} 2.0 mm in surface distance. These values represent the uncertainties for successful MIV contouring. Conclusion: Maximum-intensity volumes are a good first estimate for target volume definition including respiratory motion. However, it seems mandatory to validate each individual MIV by overlaying it on a movie loop displaying the 4DCT data and editing it for possible inadequate coverage of GTVs on additional 4DCT motion states.

  17. Remedial Investigation concept plan for Picatinny arsenal: Volume 1, Environmental setting, applicable regulations, summaries of site sampling plans, sampling priorities, and supporting appendixes

    SciTech Connect

    Benioff, P.A.; Bhattacharyya, M.H.; Biang, C.; Chiu, S.Y.; Miller, S.; Patton, T.; Pearl, R.; Yonk, A.; Yuen, C.R. )

    1991-03-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has prepared a Remedial Investigation (RI) Concept Plan for Picatinny Arsenal in New Jersey. Based on types of activity and location, the 156 RI Sites identified during the study are grouped into 16 Areas. The plan assesses the environmental status and identifies additional data needed for each RI Site in each Area. The plan was developed to comply with state and federal hazardous waste and water quality regulations. The plan also provides a ranking of the 16 Areas according to their potential for impacts on public health and the environment. Volume 1 describes the environmental setting of Picatinny Arsenal, discusses applicable federal and state environmental regulations, briefly describes the Areas and the Sites within each Area, provides a ranking of the Areas, summarizes the proposed RI sampling plan for each Site in each Area, and gives supplementary information. 60 refs., 9 figs., 25 tabs.

  18. West Antarctic Ice Sheet Initiative. Volume 1: Science and Implementation Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bindschadler, Robert A. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The Science and Implementation Plan of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet Initiative (WAIS) is described. The goal of this initiative is the prediction of the future behavior of this ice sheet and an assessment of its potential to collapse, rapidly raising global sea level. The multidisciplinary nature of WAIS reflects the complexity of the polar ice sheet environment. The project builds upon past and current polar studies in many fields and meshes with future programs of both the U.S. and other countries. Important tasks in each discipline are described and a coordinated schedule by which the majority of these tasks can be accomplished in 5 years is presented. The companion report (Volume 2) contains seven discipline review papers on the state of knowledge of Antarctica and opinions on how that knowledge must be increased to attain the WAIS goal.

  19. Planning for an energy-efficient future: The experience with implementing energy conservation programs for new residential and commercial buildings: Volume 2, Program descriptions

    SciTech Connect

    Vine, E.; Harris, J.

    1988-09-01

    This volume contains the descriptions of programs contained in Volume 1 of our main report: Planning for an Energy-Efficient Future: The Experience With Implementing Energy Conservation Programs For New Residential and Commercial Buildings (LBL-25525).

  20. SU-E-T-546: Use of Implant Volume for Quality Assurance of Low Dose Rate Brachytherapy Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkinson, D; Kolar, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To analyze the application of volume implant (V100) data as a method for a global check of low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy plans. Methods: Treatment plans for 335 consecutive patients undergoing permanent seed implants for prostate cancer and for 113 patients treated with plaque therapy for ocular melanoma were analyzed. Plaques used were 54 COMS (10 to 20 mm, notched and regular) and 59 Eye Physics EP917s with variable loading. Plots of treatment time x implanted activity per unit dose versus v100 ^.667 were made. V100 values were obtained using dose volume histograms calculated by the treatment planning systems (Variseed 8.02 and Plaque Simulator 5.4). Four different physicists were involved in planning the prostate seed cases; two physicists for the eye plaques. Results: Since the time and dose for the prostate cases did not vary, a plot of implanted activity vs V100 ^.667 was made. A linear fit with no intercept had an r{sup 2} = 0.978; more than 94% of the actual activities fell within 5% of the activities calculated from the linear fit. The greatest deviations were in cases where the implant volumes were large (> 100 cc). Both COMS and EP917 plaque linear fits were good (r{sup 2} = .967 and .957); the largest deviations were seen for large volumes. Conclusions: The method outlined here is effective for checking planning consistency and quality assurance of two types of LDR brachytherapy treatment plans (temporary and permanent). A spreadsheet for the calculations enables a quick check of the plan in situations were time is short (e.g. OR-based prostate planning)

  1. Management response plan for the Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 146 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. Volume 1 contains a discussion of the chemical safety improvements planned or already underway at DOE sites to correct facility or site-specific vulnerabilities. The main part of the report is a discussion of each of the programmatic deficiencies; a description of the tasks to be accomplished; the specific actions to be taken; and the organizational responsibilities for implementation.

  2. Data-Driven Approach to Generating Achievable Dose-Volume Histogram Objectives in Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Binbin; Ricchetti, Francesco; Sanguineti, Giuseppe; Kazhdan, Michael; Simari, Patricio; Jacques, Robert; Taylor, Russell; McNutt, Todd

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To propose a method of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) planning that generates achievable dose-volume histogram (DVH) objectives using a database containing geometric and dosimetric information of previous patients. Methods and Materials: The overlap volume histogram (OVH) is used to compare the spatial relationships between the organs at risk and targets of a new patient with those of previous patients in a database. From the OVH analysis, the DVH objectives of the new patient were generated from the database and used as the initial planning goals. In a retrospective OVH-assisted planning demonstration, 15 patients were randomly selected from a database containing clinical plans (CPs) of 91 previous head-and-neck patients treated by a three-level IMRT-simultaneous integrated boost technique. OVH-assisted plans (OPs) were planned in a leave-one-out manner by a planner who had no knowledge of CPs. Thus, DVH objectives of an OP were generated from a subdatabase containing the information of the other 90 patients. Those DVH objectives were then used as the initial planning goals in IMRT optimization. Planning efficiency was evaluated by the number of clicks of the 'Start Optimization' button in the course of planning. Although the Pinnacle{sup 3} treatment planning system allows planners to interactively adjust the DVH parameters during optimization, planners in our institution have never used this function in planning. Results: The average clicks required for completing the CP and OP was 27.6 and 1.9, respectively (p <.00001); three OPs were finished within a single click. Ten more patient's cord + 4 mm reached the sparing goal D{sub 0.1cc} <44 Gy (p <.0001), where D{sub 0.1cc} represents the dose corresponding to 0.1 cc. For planning target volume uniformity, conformity, and other organ at risk sparing, the OPs were at least comparable with the CPs. Additionally, the averages of D{sub 0.1cc} to the cord + 4 mm decreased by 6.9 Gy (p <.0001

  3. Radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma based on a tumor growth model: improving target volume delineation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unkelbach, Jan; Menze, Bjoern H.; Konukoglu, Ender; Dittmann, Florian; Le, Matthieu; Ayache, Nicholas; Shih, Helen A.

    2014-02-01

    Glioblastoma differ from many other tumors in the sense that they grow infiltratively into the brain tissue instead of forming a solid tumor mass with a defined boundary. Only the part of the tumor with high tumor cell density can be localized through imaging directly. In contrast, brain tissue infiltrated by tumor cells at low density appears normal on current imaging modalities. In current clinical practice, a uniform margin, typically two centimeters, is applied to account for microscopic spread of disease that is not directly assessable through imaging. The current treatment planning procedure can potentially be improved by accounting for the anisotropy of tumor growth, which arises from different factors: anatomical barriers such as the falx cerebri represent boundaries for migrating tumor cells. In addition, tumor cells primarily spread in white matter and infiltrate gray matter at lower rate. We investigate the use of a phenomenological tumor growth model for treatment planning. The model is based on the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation, which formalizes these growth characteristics and estimates the spatial distribution of tumor cells in normal appearing regions of the brain. The target volume for radiotherapy planning can be defined as an isoline of the simulated tumor cell density. This paper analyzes the model with respect to implications for target volume definition and identifies its most critical components. A retrospective study involving ten glioblastoma patients treated at our institution has been performed. To illustrate the main findings of the study, a detailed case study is presented for a glioblastoma located close to the falx. In this situation, the falx represents a boundary for migrating tumor cells, whereas the corpus callosum provides a route for the tumor to spread to the contralateral hemisphere. We further discuss the sensitivity of the model with respect to the input parameters. Correct segmentation of the brain appears to be the most

  4. Savannah River Site mixed waste Proposed Site Treatment Plan (PSTP). Volumes 1 and 2 and reference document: Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Helmich, E.; Noller, D.K.; Wierzbicki, K.S.; Bailey, L.L.

    1995-07-13

    The DOE is required by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act to prepare site treatment plans describing the development of treatment capacities and technologies for treating mixed waste. This proposed plan contains Savannah River Site`s preferred options and schedules for constructing new facilities, and otherwise obtaining treatment for mixed wastes. The proposed plan consists of 2 volumes. Volume 1, Compliance Plan, identifies the capacity to be developed and the schedules as required. Volume 2, Background, provides a detailed discussion of the preferred options with technical basis, plus a description of the specific waste streams. Chapters are: Introduction; Methodology; Mixed low level waste streams; Mixed transuranic waste; High level waste; Future generation of mixed waste streams; Storage; Process for evaluation of disposal issues in support of the site treatment plans discussions; Treatment facilities and treatment technologies; Offsite waste streams for which SRS treatment is the Preferred Option (Naval reactor wastes); Summary information; and Acronyms and glossary. This revision does not contain the complete revised report, but only those pages that have been revised.

  5. ICPP tank farm closure study. Volume 3: Cost estimates, planning schedules, yearly cost flowcharts, and life-cycle cost estimates

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    This volume contains information on cost estimates, planning schedules, yearly cost flowcharts, and life-cycle costs for the six options described in Volume 1, Section 2: Option 1 -- Total removal clean closure; No subsequent use; Option 2 -- Risk-based clean closure; LLW fill; Option 3 -- Risk-based clean closure; CERCLA fill; Option 4 -- Close to RCRA landfill standards; LLW fill; Option 5 -- Close to RCRA landfill standards; CERCLA fill; and Option 6 -- Close to RCRA landfill standards; Clean fill. This volume is divided into two portions. The first portion contains the cost and planning schedule estimates while the second portion contains life-cycle costs and yearly cash flow information for each option.

  6. Integrated operations plan for the MFTF-B Mirror Fusion Test Facility. Volume II. Integrated operations plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-12-01

    This document defines an integrated plan for the operation of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B). The plan fulfills and further delineates LLNL policies and provides for accomplishing the functions required by the program. This plan specifies the management, operations, maintenance, and engineering support responsibilities. It covers phasing into sustained operations as well as the sustained operations themselves. Administrative and Plant Engineering support, which are now being performed satisfactorily, are not part of this plan unless there are unique needs.

  7. Guidelines for Analysis of Communicable Disease Control Planning in Developing Countries. Volume 1: Communicable Diseases Control Planning. International Health Planning Methods Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chin, James

    Intended to assist Agency for International Development (AID) officers, advisors, and health officials in incorporating health planning into national plans for economic development, this first of ten manuals in the International Health Planning Methods Series deals with planning and evaluation of communicable disease control programs. The first…

  8. Guidelines for Analysis of Pharmaceutical Supply System Planning in Developing Countries. Volume 7: Pharmaceutical Supply System Planning. International Health Planning Methods Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaumann, Leif; And Others

    Intended to assist Agency for International Development (AID) officers, advisors, and health officials in incorporating health planning into national plans for economic development, this seventh of ten manuals in the Interational Health Planning Methods Series deals with pharmaceutical supply systems planning in developing countries. Following an…

  9. The benefit of using bladder sub-volume equivalent uniform dose constraints in prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jian; Simon, Antoine; Haigron, Pascal; Lafond, Caroline; Acosta, Oscar; Shu, Huazhong; Castelli, Joel; Li, Baosheng; De Crevoisier, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    Background To assess the benefits of bladder wall sub-volume equivalent uniform dose (EUD) constraints in prostate cancer intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) planning. Methods Two IMRT plans, with and without EUD constraints on the bladder wall, were generated using beams that deliver 80 Gy to the prostate and 46 Gy to the seminal vesicles and were compared in 53 prostate cancer patients. The bladder wall was defined as the volume between the external manually delineated wall and a contraction of 7 mm apart from it. The bladder wall was then separated into two parts: the internal-bladder wall (bla-in) represented by the portion of the bladder wall that intersected with the planning target volume (PTV) plus 5 mm extension; the external-bladder wall (bla-ex) represented by the remaining part of the bladder wall. In the IMRT plan with EUD constraints, the values of “a” parameter for the EUD models were 10.0 for bla-in and 2.3 for bla-ex. The plans with and without EUD constraints were compared in terms of dose–volume histograms, 5-year bladder and rectum normal tissue complication probability values, as well as tumor control probability (TCP) values. Results The use of bladder sub-volume EUD constraints decreased both the doses to the bladder wall (V70: 22.76% vs 19.65%, Dmean: 39.82 Gy vs 35.45 Gy) and the 5-year bladder complication probabilities (≥LENT/SOMA Grade 2: 20.35% vs 17.96%; bladder bleeding: 10.63% vs 8.64%). The doses to the rectum wall and the rectum complication probabilities were also slightly decreased by the EUD constraints compared to physical constraints only. The minimal dose and the V76Gy of PTVprostate were, however, slightly decreased by EUD optimization, nevertheless without significant difference in TCP values between the two plans, and the PTV parameters finally respected the Groupe d’Etude des Tumeurs Uro-Génitales recommendations. Conclusion Separating the bladder wall into two parts with appropriate EUD optimization may

  10. Test Plans and Procedures for the Baseline SAF for BDS-D Sites (ModSAF). Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-20

    1. AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave blank) j 2REPORT DATE 3 . REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVEREDUI 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 05. FUNDING NUMBERS Test Plans and Procedures...Praed by ANSI Sid Z39-18 298-102 ADST/WDL/TR-93-W003271 VOLUME 2 of 2; Ver 1.0 3 TEST CASE 1.1 Architecture STEP OPERATOR/SYSTEM ACTION EXPECTED RESULT...8217 I< I ’or SDis ft ADST/WDL/TR-93-W003271 VOLUME 2 of 2; Ver 1.0 3 TEST CASE 1.2 Configuration STEP OPERATOR/SYSTEM ACTION EXPECTED RESULT STATUS S SA

  11. Defining the Clinical Target Volume for Bladder Cancer Radiotherapy Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, Peter; Anjarwalla, Salim; Gilbert, Hugh; Kinder, Richard

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: There are currently no data for the expansion margin required to define the clinical target volume (CTV) around bladder tumors. This information is particularly relevant when perivesical soft tissue changes are seen on the planning scan. While this appearance may reflect extravesical extension (EVE), it may also be an artifact of previous transurethral resection (TUR). Methods and Materials: Eighty patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer who had undergone radical cystectomy were studied. All patients underwent preoperative TUR and staging computed tomography (CT) scans. The presence and extent of tumor growth beyond the outer bladder wall was measured radiologically and histopathologically. Results: Forty one (51%) patients had histologically confirmed tumor extension into perivesical fat. The median and mean extensions beyond the outer bladder wall were 1.7 and 3.1 mm, respectively. Thirty five (44%) patients had EVE, as seen on CT scans. The sensitivity and specificity of CT scans for EVE were 56% and 79%, respectively. False-positive results were infrequent and not affected by either the timing or the amount of tissue resected at TUR. CT scans consistently tended to overestimate the extent of EVE. Tumor size and the presence of either lymphovascular invasion or squamoid differentiation predict a greater extent of EVE. Conclusions: In patients with radiological evidence of extravesical disease, the CTV should comprise the outer bladder wall plus a 10-mm margin. In patients with no evidence of extravesical disease on CT scans, the CTV should be restricted to the outer bladder wall plus a 6-mm margin. These recommendations would encompass microscopic disease extension in 90% of cases.

  12. Space Station Mission Planning System (MPS) development study. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klus, W. J.

    1987-01-01

    The basic objective of the Space Station (SS) Mission Planning System (MPS) Development Study was to define a baseline Space Station mission plan and the associated hardware and software requirements for the system. A detailed definition of the Spacelab (SL) payload mission planning process and SL Mission Integration Planning System (MIPS) software was derived. A baseline concept was developed for performing SS manned base payload mission planning, and it was consistent with current Space Station design/operations concepts and philosophies. The SS MPS software requirements were defined. Also, requirements for new software include candidate programs for the application of artificial intelligence techniques to capture and make more effective use of mission planning expertise. A SS MPS Software Development Plan was developed which phases efforts for the development software to implement the SS mission planning concept.

  13. The 30/20 GHz flight experiment system, phase 2. Volume 4: Experiment system development plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bronstein, L.; Kawamoto, Y.; Riberich, J. J.; Scope, J. R.; Forman, B. J.; Bergman, S. G.; Reisenfeld, S.

    1981-01-01

    The development plan for the 30/20 GHz flight experiment system is presented. A master program schedule with detailed development plans for each subsystem is planned with careful attention given to how technology items to ensure a minimal risk. The work breakdown structure shows the organization of the program management with detailed task definitions. The ROM costs based on the development plan are also given.

  14. Scheduling language and algorithm development study. Volume 2, phase 2: Introduction to plans programming. [user guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, D. R.; Ishikawa, M. K.; Paulson, R. E.; Ramsey, H. R.

    1975-01-01

    A user guide for the Programming Language for Allocation and Network Scheduling (PLANS) is presented. Information is included for the construction of PLANS programs. The basic philosophy of PLANS is discussed, and access and update reference techniques are described along with the use of tree structures.

  15. Manned Orbital Transfer Vehicle (MOTV). Volume 6: Five year program plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyland, R. E.; Sherman, S. W.; Morfin, H. W.

    1979-01-01

    The five year program plan for the manned orbit transfer vehicle (MOTV) is presented. The planning, schedules, cost estimates, and supporting data (objectives, constraints, assumptions, etc.) associated with the development of the MOTV are discussed. The plan, in addition to the above material, identifies the supporting research and technology required to resolve issues critical to MOTV development.

  16. System design of the Pioneer Venus spacecraft. Volume 14: Test planning trades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedretti, C. D.

    1973-01-01

    Pioneer Venus system test plans and trade studies which were first published as Study Tasks (References 1 through 5) are reviewed. The plan and trade studies are presented in a condensed form. Greater detail may be found in the referenced study tasks if desired. All significant conclusions and plan outlines of the original studies are, presented.

  17. Systems design study of the Pioneer Venus spacecraft. Volume 2. Preliminary program development plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The preliminary development plan for the Pioneer Venus program is presented. This preliminary plan treats only developmental aspects that would have a significant effect on program cost. These significant development areas were: master program schedule planning; test planning - both unit and system testing for probes/orbiter/ probe bus; ground support equipment; performance assurance; and science integration Various test planning options and test method techniques were evaluated in terms of achieving a low-cost program without degrading mission performance or system reliability. The approaches studied and the methodology of the selected approach are defined.

  18. Project Columbiad: Mission to the Moon. Book 2, volume 3: Stage configuration designs; volume 4: Program plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Earth Orbital Rendezvous (EOR) configuration for the piloted mission is composed of three propulsive elements in addition to the Crew Module (CM): Primary Trans-Lunar Injection (PTLI), Lunar Braking Module (LBM), and Earth Return Module (ERM). The precursor mission is also composed of three propulsive elements in addition to its surface payloads: PTLI, LBM and the Payload Landing Module (PLM). Refer to Volume 1, Section 5.1 and 5.2 for a break-up of the different stages into the four launches. A quick summary is as follows: PTLI is on Launch 1 and 3 while the LBM, PLM, and surface payloads are on Launch 2 and another LBM, ERM, and CM on Launch 4. The precursor mission is designed to be as modular as possible with the piloted mission for developmental cost considerations. The following topics are discussed: launch vehicle description; primary trans-lunar injection stage; lunar braking module; earth return module; crew module; payload landing module; and surface payload description.

  19. SSTAC/ARTS review of the draft Integrated Technology Plan (ITP). Volume 6: Controls and guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs of briefings from the Space Systems and Technology Advisory Committee (SSTAC)/ARTS review of the draft Integrated Technology Plan (ITP) on controls and guidance are included. Topics covered include: strategic avionics technology planning and bridging programs; avionics technology plan; vehicle health management; spacecraft guidance research; autonomous rendezvous and docking; autonomous landing; computational control; fiberoptic rotation sensors; precision instrument and telescope pointing; microsensors and microinstruments; micro guidance and control initiative; and earth-orbiting platforms controls-structures interaction.

  20. Closure plan for Solid Waste Storage Area 6: Volume 1, Closure plan. Remedial investigation/feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    This Closure Plan for Solid Waste Storage Area 6 (SWSA 6) a disposal area for low-level radioactive wastes and hazardous materials, of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) describes how portions of SWSA 6 will be closed under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Interim Status per 40 CFR 265 Subpart G [TN Rule 1200-1-11-.05(7)]. An overview is provided of activities necessary for final closure and corrective measures for all of SWSA 6. Results of surface waters and groundwater sampling are provided.

  1. Liquid rocket booster study. Volume 2, book 3, appendices 2-5: PPIP, transition plan, AMOS plan, and environmental analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    This Preliminary Project Implementation Plan (PPIP) was used to examine the feasibility of replacing the current Solid Rocket Boosters on the Space Shuttle with Liquid Rocket Boosters (LRBs). The need has determined the implications of integrating the LRB with the Space Transportation System as the earliest practical date. The purpose was to identify and define all elements required in a full scale development program for the LRB. This will be a reference guide for management of the LRB program, addressing such requirement as design and development, configuration management, performance measurement, manufacturing, product assurance and verification, launch operations, and mission operations support.

  2. Alaska Statewide Plan for Postsecondary Education, 1986-1990: A Draft for Public Comment. Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Commission on Postsecondary Education, Juneau.

    This report, the first statewide master plan for postsecondary education in Alaska, outlines strategies and recommendations to achieve the following planning goals: (1) promote excellence to improve educational service; (2) enhance accountability of the educational process; (3) foster efficiency within the enterprise; and (4) improve access to…

  3. Study of solid rocket motor for space shuttle booster, Volume 3: Program acquisition planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The program planning acquisition functions for the development of the solid propellant rocket engine for the space shuttle booster is presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) program management, (2) contracts administration, (3) systems engineering, (4) configuration management, and (5) maintenance engineering. The plans for manufacturing, testing, and operations support are included.

  4. Training Materials. A Vocational Education Planning System for Local School Districts. Volume VIII.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Government Studies & Systems, Philadelphia, PA.

    The manual, one of several resulting from a project to design planning procedures for local and State vocational education agencies, contains a variety of materials used in workshops, orientations, and briefings during the development of the Vocational Education Planning System. Two sections are particularly detailed: An Approach to the Vocational…

  5. Clinical implementation of dose-volume histogram predictions for organs-at-risk in IMRT planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, K. L.; Appenzoller, L. M.; Tan, J.; Michalski, J. M.; Thorstad, W. L.; Mutic, S.

    2014-03-01

    True quality control (QC) of the planning process requires quantitative assessments of treatment plan quality itself, and QC in IMRT has been stymied by intra-patient anatomical variability and inherently complex three-dimensional dose distributions. In this work we describe the development of an automated system to reduce clinical IMRT planning variability and improve plan quality using mathematical models that predict achievable OAR DVHs based on individual patient anatomy. These models rely on the correlation of expected dose to the minimum distance from a voxel to the PTV surface, whereby a three-parameter probability distribution function (PDF) was used to model iso-distance OAR subvolume dose distributions. DVH models were obtained by fitting the evolution of the PDF with distance. Initial validation on clinical cohorts of 40 prostate and 24 head-and-neck plans demonstrated highly accurate model-based predictions for achievable DVHs in rectum, bladder, and parotid glands. By quantifying the integrated difference between candidate DVHs and predicted DVHs, the models correctly identified plans with under-spared OARs, validated by replanning all cases and correlating any realized improvements against the predicted gains. Clinical implementation of these predictive models was demonstrated in the PINNACLE treatment planning system by use of existing margin expansion utilities and the scripting functionality inherent to the system. To maintain independence from specific planning software, a system was developed in MATLAB to directly process DICOM-RT data. Both model training and patient-specific analyses were demonstrated with significant computational accelerations from parallelization.

  6. Space shuttle program: Shuttle Avionics Integration Laboratory. Volume 7: Logistics management plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The logistics management plan for the shuttle avionics integration laboratory defines the organization, disciplines, and methodology for managing and controlling logistics support. Those elements requiring management include maintainability and reliability, maintenance planning, support and test equipment, supply support, transportation and handling, technical data, facilities, personnel and training, funding, and management data.

  7. Community College Journal for Research and Planning; Volume 4, Numbers 1-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Edith H., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Designed as a forum for the exchange of information among members of the National Council for Research and Planning, these two journal issues offer 10 articles concerning community college research and planning. The first issue presents: (1) "Just Testing," by Arthur M. Cohen; (2) "Enrollment Patterns of Adult Learning in a Community College," by…

  8. Mod-2 wind turbine system cluster research test program. Volume 1: Initial plan E-1290

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, L. H.

    1982-01-01

    Upon completion of the design and development of three Mod-2 wind turbines, a series of research experiments are planned to gather data on and evaluate the performance, environmental effects, and operation of a cluster as well as a single, large multimegawatt wind turbine. Information on the program objectives, a Mod-2 system description, a planned schedule, organizational roles, and responsibilities, is included.

  9. Acute small bowel toxicity and preoperative chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer: Investigating dose-volume relationships and role for inverse planning

    SciTech Connect

    Tho, Lye Mun . E-mail: l.tho@beatson.gla.ac.uk; Glegg, Martin; Paterson, Jennifer; Yap, Christina; MacLeod, Alice; McCabe, Marie; McDonald, Alexander C.

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: The relationship between volume of irradiated small bowel (VSB) and acute toxicity in rectal cancer radiotherapy is poorly quantified, particularly in patients receiving concurrent preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Using treatment planning data, we studied a series of such patients. Methods and Materials: Details of 41 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer were reviewed. All received 45 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks, 3-4 fields three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with daily 5-fluorouracil and folinic acid during Weeks 1 and 5. Toxicity was assessed prospectively in a weekly clinic. Using computed tomography planning software, the VSB was determined at 5 Gy dose intervals (V{sub 5}, V{sub 1}, etc.). Eight patients with maximal VSB had dosimetry and radiobiological modeling outcomes compared between inverse and conformal three-dimensional planning. Results: VSB correlated strongly with diarrheal severity at every dose level (p < 0.03), with strongest correlation at lowest doses. Median VSB differed significantly between patients experiencing Grade 0-1 and Grade 2-4 diarrhea (p {<=} 0.05). No correlation was found with anorexia, nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramps, age, body mass index, sex, tumor position, or number of fields. Analysis of 8 patients showed that inverse planning reduced median dose to small bowel by 5.1 Gy (p = 0.008) and calculated late normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) by 67% (p = 0.016). We constructed a model using mathematical analysis to predict for acute diarrhea occurring at V{sub 5} and V{sub 15}. Conclusions: A strong dose-volume relationship exists between VSB and acute diarrhea at all dose levels during preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Our constructed model may be useful in predicting toxicity, and this has been derived without the confounding influence of surgical excision on bowel function. Inverse planning can reduce calculated dose to small bowel and late NTCP, and its clinical role warrants further

  10. Dose-Volume Differences for Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Segmentation and Planning for Proton Prostate Cancer Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yeung, Anamaria R.; Vargas, Carlos E. Falchook, Aaron; Louis, Debbie C.; Olivier, Kenneth; Keole, Sameer; Yeung, Daniel; Mendenhall, Nancy P.; Li Zuofeng

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the influence of magnetic-resonance-imaging (MRI)-vs. computed-tomography (CT)-based prostate and normal structure delineation on the dose to the target and organs at risk during proton therapy. Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients were simulated in the supine position using both CT and T2 MRI. The prostate, rectum, and bladder were delineated on both imaging modalities. The planning target volume (PTV) was generated from the delineated prostates with a 5-mm axial and 8-mm superior and inferior margin. Two plans were generated and analyzed for each patient: an MRI plan based on the MRI-delineated PTV, and a CT plan based on the CT-delineated PTV. Doses of 78 Gy equivalents (GE) were prescribed to the PTV. Results: Doses to normal structures were lower when MRI was used to delineate the rectum and bladder compared with CT: bladder V50 was 15.3% lower (p = 0.04), and rectum V50 was 23.9% lower (p = 0.003). Poor agreement on the definition of the prostate apex was seen between CT and MRI (p = 0.007). The CT-defined prostate apex was within 2 mm of the apex on MRI only 35.7% of the time. Coverage of the MRI-delineated PTV was significantly decreased with the CT-based plan: the minimum dose to the PTV was reduced by 43% (p < 0.001), and the PTV V99% was reduced by 11% (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Using MRI to delineate the prostate results in more accurate target definition and a smaller target volume compared with CT, allowing for improved target coverage and decreased doses to critical normal structures.

  11. Formal Methods Specification and Verification Guidebook for Software and Computer Systems. Volume 1; Planning and Technology Insertion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Formal Methods Specification and Verification Guidebook for Software and Computer Systems describes a set of techniques called Formal Methods (FM), and outlines their use in the specification and verification of computer systems and software. Development of increasingly complex systems has created a need for improved specification and verification techniques. NASA's Safety and Mission Quality Office has supported the investigation of techniques such as FM, which are now an accepted method for enhancing the quality of aerospace applications. The guidebook provides information for managers and practitioners who are interested in integrating FM into an existing systems development process. Information includes technical and administrative considerations that must be addressed when establishing the use of FM on a specific project. The guidebook is intended to aid decision makers in the successful application of FM to the development of high-quality systems at reasonable cost. This is the first volume of a planned two-volume set. The current volume focuses on administrative and planning considerations for the successful application of FM.

  12. Final consolidated action plan to Tiger Team. Volume 1, Change 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    Two separate Tiger Team assessments were conducted at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The first was conducted at the California site in Livermore between April 30, 1990, and May 18, 1990. A second Tiger team assessment was conducted at the New Mexico site in Albuquerque between April 15 and May 24, 1991. One purpose of this Action Plan is to provide a formal written response to each of the findings and/or concerns cited in the SNL Tiger Team assessment reports. A second purpose is to present actions planned to be conducted to eliminate deficiencies identified by the Tiger Teams. A third purpose is to consolidate (group) related findings and to identify priorities assigned to the planned actions for improved efficiency and enhanced management of the tasks. A fourth and final purpose is to merge the two original SNL Action Plans for the New Mexico and California sites into a single Action Plan as a major step toward managing all SNL ES&H activities more similarly. Included in this combined SNL Action Plan are descriptions of the actions to be taken by SNL to liminate all problems identified in the Tiger Teams` findings/concerns, as well as estimated costs and schedules for planned actions.

  13. Satellite power systems (SPS) concept definition study. Volume 7: SPS program plan and economic analysis, appendixes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanley, G.

    1978-01-01

    Three appendixes in support of Volume 7 are contained in this document. The three appendixes are: (1) Satellite Power System Work Breakdown Structure Dictionary; (2) SPS cost Estimating Relationships; and (3) Financial and Operational Concept. Other volumes of the final report that provide additional detail are: Executive Summary; SPS Systems Requirements; SPS Concept Evolution; SPS Point Design Definition; Transportation and Operations Analysis; and SPS Technology Requirements and Verification.

  14. Manned space flight nuclear system safety. Volume 6: Space base nuclear system safety plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A qualitative identification of the steps required to assure the incorporation of radiological system safety principles and objectives into all phases of a manned space base program are presented. Specific areas of emphasis include: (1) radiological program management, (2) nuclear system safety plan implementation, (3) impact on program, and (4) summary of the key operation and design guidelines and requirements. The plan clearly indicates the necessity of considering and implementing radiological system safety recommendations as early as possible in the development cycle to assure maximum safety and minimize the impact on design and mission plans.

  15. Space station systems technology study (add-on task). Volume 3: Technology advancement program plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Program plans are given for an integrating controller for space station autonomy as well as for controls and displays. The technical approach, facility requirements and candidate facilities, development schedules, and resource requirements estimates are given.

  16. Bioresearch module design definition and space shuttle vehicle integration. Volume 3: Management and funding plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    A description is given of the proposed project organization, documentation and reports, project planning, direction and control, related experience and facilities, and cost estimate data and options for the implementation of the bioresearch module development program.

  17. SSTAC/ARTS review of the draft Integrated Technology Plan (ITP). Volume 1: Plenary Session

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Briefings from the plenary session of the conference on SSTAC/ARTS Review of the Draft Integrated Technology Plan (ITP) held on 24-28 Jun. 1991 are included. Viewgraphs from the presentations are included.

  18. Eleventh annual Department of Energy low-level waste management conference. Volume 2: Low-level waste strategy and planning, decontamination and decommissioning, compliance monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    1989-11-01

    Nineteen papers are presented in volume 2. The 11 papers in the LLW Strategy and Planning section discuss plans for disposal facilities in Texas, Pennsylvania, Hanford, the Southwest and Southeast Compacts, and others. Three papers discuss decontamination technology and activities. Environmental monitoring requirements and recommendations at LLW facilities are discussed in 5 papers. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  19. Rectal planning risk volume correlation with acute and late toxicity in 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Dias, R S; Giordani, A J; Souhami, L; Segreto, R A; Segreto, H R C

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate rectum motion during 3-Dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) in prostate cancer patients, to derive a planning volume at risk (PRV) and to correlate the PRV dose-volume histograms (DVH) with treatment complications.This study was conducted in two phases. Initially, the PRV was defined prospectively in 50 consecutive prostate cancer patients (Group 1) who received a radical course of 3-D CRT. Then, the obtained PRV was used in the radiotherapy planning of these same 50 patients plus another 59 prostate cancer patients (Group 2) previously treated between 2004 and 2008. All these patients' data, including the rectum and PRV DVHs, were correlated to acute and late complications, according to the Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) v4.0.The largest displacement occurred in the anterior axis. Long-term gastrointestinal (GI) complications grade ≥ 2 were seen in 9.2% of the cases. Factors that influenced acute GI reactions were: doses at 25% (p 5 0.011) and 40% (p 5 0.005) of the rectum volume and at 40% of the PRV (p 5 0.012). The dose at 25% of the rectum volume (p 5 0.033) and acute complications ≥ grade 2 (p 5 0.018) were prognostic factors for long-term complications. The PRV DVH did not correlate with late toxicity. The rectum showed a significant inter-fraction motion during 3D-CRT for prostate cancer. PRV dose correlated with acute gastrointestinal complications and may be a useful tool to predict and reduce their occurrence.

  20. ICESat (GLAS) Science Processing Software Document Series. Volume 2; Science Data Management Plan; 4.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jester, Peggy L.; Hancock, David W., III

    1999-01-01

    This document provides the Data Management Plan for the GLAS Standard Data Software (SDS) supporting the GLAS instrument of the EOS ICESat Spacecraft. The SDS encompasses the ICESat Science Investigator-led Processing System (I-SIPS) Software and the Instrument Support Facility (ISF) Software. This Plan addresses the identification, authority, and description of the interface nodes associated with the GLAS Standard Data Products and the GLAS Ancillary Data.

  1. Determination of Internal Target Volume for Radiation Treatment Planning of Esophageal Cancer by Using 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography (4DCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiaojian; Lu, Haijun; Tai, An; Johnstone, Candice; Gore, Elizabeth; Li, X. Allen

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To determine an efficient strategy for the generation of the internal target volume (ITV) for radiation treatment planning for esophageal cancer using 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT). Methods and Materials: 4DCT sets acquired for 20 patients with esophageal carcinoma were analyzed. Each of the 4DCT sets was binned into 10 respiratory phases. For each patient, the gross tumor volume (GTV) was delineated on the 4DCT set at each phase. Various strategies to derive ITV were explored, including the volume from the maximum intensity projection (MIP; ITV{sub M}IP), unions of the GTVs from selected multiple phases ITV2 (0% and 50% phases), ITV3 (ITV2 plus 80%), and ITV4 (ITV3 plus 60%), as well as the volumes expanded from ITV2 and ITV3 with a uniform margin. These ITVs were compared to ITV10 (the union of the GTVs for all 10 phases) and the differences were measured with the overlap ratio (OR) and relative volume ratio (RVR) relative to ITV10 (ITVx/ITV10). Results: For all patients studied, the average GTV from a single phase was 84.9% of ITV10. The average ORs were 91.2%, 91.3%, 94.5%, and 96.4% for ITV{sub M}IP, ITV2, ITV3, and ITV4, respectively. Low ORs were associated with irregular breathing patterns. ITV3s plus 1 mm uniform margins (ITV3+1) led to an average OR of 98.1% and an average RVR of 106.4%. Conclusions: The ITV generated directly from MIP underestimates the range of the respiration motion for esophageal cancer. The ITV generated from 3 phases (ITV3) may be used for regular breathers, whereas the ITV generated from 4 phases (ITV4) or ITV3 plus a 1-mm uniform margin may be applied for irregular breathers.

  2. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada: Volume 9, Index

    SciTech Connect

    1988-12-01

    This site characterization plan (SCP) has been developed for the candidate repository site at Yucca Mountain in the State of Nevada. The SCP includes a description of the Yucca Mountain site (Chapters 1-5), a conceptual design for the repository (Chapter 6), a description of the packaging to be used for the waste to be emplaced in the repository (Chapter 7), and a description of the planned site characterization activities (Chapter 8). The schedules and milestones presented in Sections 8.3 and 8.5 of the SCP were developed to be consistent with the June 1988 draft Amendment to the DOE`s Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. The five month delay in the scheduled start of exploratory shaft construction that was announced recently is not reflected in these schedules.

  3. Breckinridge Project, initial effort. Report VII, Volume 4. Safety and health plan

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-01

    The Safety and Health Plan recognizes the potential hazards associated with the Project and has been developed specifically to respond to these risks in a positive manner. Prevention, the primary objective of the Plan, starts with building safety controls into the process design and continues through engineering, construction, start-up, and operation of the Project facilities and equipment. Compliance with applicable federal, state, and local health and safety laws, regulations, and codes throughout all Project phases is required and assured. The Plan requires that each major Project phase be thoroughly reviewed and analyzed to determine that those provisions required to assure the safety and health of all employees and the public, and to prevent property and equipment losses, have been provided. The Plan requires followup on those items or situations where corrective action needs were identified to assure that the action was taken and is effective. Emphasis is placed on loss prevention. Exhibit 1 provides a breakdown of Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc.'s (ASFI's) Loss Prevention Program. The Plan recognizes that the varied nature of the work is such as to require the services of skilled, trained, and responsible personnel who are aware of the hazards and know that the work can be done safely, if done correctly. Good operating practice is likewise safe operating practice. Training is provided to familiarize personnel with good operational practice, the general sequence of activities, reporting requirements, and above all, the concept that each step in the operating procedures must be successfully concluded before the following step can be safely initiated. The Plan provides for periodic review and evaluation of all safety and loss prevention activities at the plant and departmental levels.

  4. Space Station Furnace Facility Preliminary Project Implementation Plan (PIP). Volume 2, Appendix 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkey, John K.

    1992-01-01

    The Space Station Furnace Facility (SSFF) is an advanced facility for materials research in the microgravity environment of the Space Station Freedom and will consist of Core equipment and various sets of Furnace Module (FM) equipment in a three-rack configuration. This Project Implementation Plan (PIP) document was developed to satisfy the requirements of Data Requirement Number 4 for the SSFF study (Phase B). This PIP shall address the planning of the activities required to perform the detailed design and development of the SSFF for the Phase C/D portion of this contract.

  5. Fiscal years 1994--1998 Information Technology Strategic Plan. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    A team of senior managers from across the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), working with the Office of Information Resources Management (IRM), has completed an NRC Strategic Information Technology (IT) Plan. The Plan addresses three major areas: (1) IT Program Management, (2) IT Infrastructure, and (3) Information and Applications Management. Key recommendations call for accelerating the replacement of Agency workstations, implementing a new document management system, applying business process reengineering to selected Agency work processes, and establishing an Information Technology Council to advise the Director of IRM.

  6. IUS/TUG orbital operations and mission support study. Volume 4: Project planning data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Planning data are presented for the development phases of interim upper stage (IUS) and tug systems. Major project planning requirements, major event schedules, milestones, system development and operations process networks, and relevant support research and technology requirements are included. Topics discussed include: IUS flight software; tug flight software; IUS/tug ground control center facilities, personnel, data systems, software, and equipment; IUS mission events; tug mission events; tug/spacecraft rendezvous and docking; tug/orbiter operations interface, and IUS/orbiter operations interface.

  7. The optimization of intensity modulated radiotherapy in cases where the planning target volume extends into the build-up region.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T B; Hoole, A C F; Burnet, N G; Thomas, S J

    2009-04-21

    A common clinical problem in IMRT, especially when treating head and neck cases, is that the clinical target volume (CTV) stops short of the skin surface, whilst the margin for geometric uncertainties may take the planning target volume (PTV) to the skin surface or beyond. In these cases, optimization leads to over-dosing of the skin, unless the planner resorts to procedural tricks to avoid this, such as the use of pretend bolus or reduction of the PTV followed by adding 'flash' after optimization. This paper describes a method of avoiding the need for these tricks by using a multiple-isocentre CTV-based objective function. This enables plans to be produced that will give good coverage of the CTV for all the geometrical uncertainties that would have been covered by the PTV without causing the problem of over-dosing the skin. Eight isocentre shifts, equally distributed on the surface of a sphere with a radius equal to the CTV-PTV margin, are shown to be adequate for the optimization process. The resulting fluence maps are much simpler than those resulting from PTV optimization and will therefore be simpler to deliver. The method also permits better sparing of organs at risk such as the spinal cord.

  8. The optimization of intensity modulated radiotherapy in cases where the planning target volume extends into the build-up region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. B.; Hoole, A. C. F.; Burnet, N. G.; Thomas, S. J.

    2009-04-01

    A common clinical problem in IMRT, especially when treating head and neck cases, is that the clinical target volume (CTV) stops short of the skin surface, whilst the margin for geometric uncertainties may take the planning target volume (PTV) to the skin surface or beyond. In these cases, optimization leads to over-dosing of the skin, unless the planner resorts to procedural tricks to avoid this, such as the use of pretend bolus or reduction of the PTV followed by adding 'flash' after optimization. This paper describes a method of avoiding the need for these tricks by using a multiple-isocentre CTV-based objective function. This enables plans to be produced that will give good coverage of the CTV for all the geometrical uncertainties that would have been covered by the PTV without causing the problem of over-dosing the skin. Eight isocentre shifts, equally distributed on the surface of a sphere with a radius equal to the CTV-PTV margin, are shown to be adequate for the optimization process. The resulting fluence maps are much simpler than those resulting from PTV optimization and will therefore be simpler to deliver. The method also permits better sparing of organs at risk such as the spinal cord.

  9. Fully Automatic Guidance and Control for Rotorcraft Nap-of-the-earth Flight Following Planned Profiles. Volume 2: Mathematical Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, Warren F.; Gorder, Peter J.; Jewell, Wayne F.

    1991-01-01

    Developing a single-pilot, all-weather nap-of-the-earth (NOE) capability requires fully automatic NOE (ANOE) navigation and flight control. Innovative guidance and control concepts are investigated in a four-fold research effort that: (1) organizes the on-board computer-based storage and real-time updating of NOE terrain profiles and obstacles in course-oriented coordinates indexed to the mission flight plan; (2) defines a class of automatic anticipative pursuit guidance algorithms and necessary data preview requirements to follow the vertical, lateral, and longitudinal guidance commands dictated by the updated flight profiles; (3) automates a decision-making process for unexpected obstacle avoidance; and (4) provides several rapid response maneuvers. Acquired knowledge from the sensed environment is correlated with the forehand knowledge of the recorded environment (terrain, cultural features, threats, and targets), which is then used to determine an appropriate evasive maneuver if a nonconformity of the sensed and recorded environments is observed. This four-fold research effort was evaluated in both fixed-base and moving-base real-time piloted simulations; thereby, providing a practical demonstration for evaluating pilot acceptance of the automated concepts, supervisory override, manual operation, and re-engagement of the automatic system. Volume one describes the major components of the guidance and control laws as well as the results of the piloted simulations. Volume two describes the complete mathematical model of the fully automatic guidance system for rotorcraft NOE flight following planned flight profiles.

  10. An Inventory of Documents on Educational Planning and Management in Asia and the Pacific, Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Regional Office for Education in Asia and the Pacific.

    This inventory of documents on educational planning and management includes from 20 UNESCO (United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization) member countries in Asia and the Pacific. A new section in this edition, the Asia and Pacific region, includes citations that address trends and conceptual issues affecting member states of…

  11. Structures for Science: A Handbook for Planning Facilities for Undergraduate Natural Science Communities, Volume Three.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Narum, Jeanne L., Ed.

    The goal of this handbook is to enable those who plan structures for undergraduate science communities to see the process as evolutionary and organic, a process integrally related to ongoing efforts to provide a quality learning experience for the students on the campus. The handbook presents many of the questions that need to be addressed as…

  12. Issues of Language Assessment. Volume II: Language Assessment and Curriculum Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seidner, Stanley S., Ed.

    These 25 papers address issues of second language assessment and curriculum planning. The papers are divided into three categories: theoretical foundations, assessment approaches, and research and policy. Among the specific topics discussed are: whether tests measure language or intelligence, additive versus subtractive bilingualism, the…

  13. Studies in Family Planning, Volume 5 Number 5. East Asia Review, 1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeny, S. M., Ed.

    An annual review, third in a series, covers developments in the field of population and family planning in East Asia. For each of the 10 countries involved (Hong Kong, Indonesia, South Korea, Laos, Malaysia, Phillipines, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, and South Vietnam) there is an article written by the agent responsible for the family planning…

  14. Scheduling Algorithm for Mission Planning and Logistics Evaluation (SAMPLE). Volume 2: Mission payloads subsystem description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupnick, E.; Wiggins, D.

    1980-01-01

    The scheduling algorithm for mission planning and logistics evaluation (SAMPLE) is presented. Two major subsystems are included: The mission payloads program; and the set covering program. Formats and parameter definitions for the payload data set (payload model), feasible combination file, and traffic model are documented.

  15. Study of solid rocket motors for a space shuttle booster. Volume 3: Program acquisition planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonderesch, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    Plans for conducting Phase C/D for a solid rocket motor booster vehicle are presented. Methods for conducting this program with details of scheduling, testing, and program management and control are included. The requirements of the space shuttle program to deliver a minimum cost/maximum reliability booster vehicle are examined.

  16. SSTAC/ARTS review of the draft Integrated Technology Plan (ITP). Volume 5: Human Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs of briefings from the Space Systems and Technology Advisory Committee (SSTAC)/ARTS review of the draft integrated technology plan (ITP) on human support are included. Topics covered include: human support program; human factors; life support technology; fire safety; medical support technology; advanced refrigeration technology; EVA suit system; advanced PLSS technology; and ARC-EVA systems research program.

  17. STUDENT'S PERSONAL ADJUSTMENT TO WORK, SUGGESTED PLANS FOR GROUP DISCUSSIONS IN VOCATIONAL INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION. VOLUME II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin. Industrial Education Div.

    VOCATIONAL TEACHERS CAN USE THIS STUDY GUIDE AS AN ORGANIZED PLAN OF DEVELOPING APPROPRIATE DISCUSSION TOPICS RELATIVE TO JOB ORIENTATION IN 2-YEAR PART-TIME CLASSES. IT WAS DEVELOPED BY AN INSTRUCTOR-COORDINATOR AND AN ADVISORY COMMITTEE. MAJOR DIVISIONS ARE (1) PERSONAL TRAITS, (2) MONEY AND BANKING, (3) SCHOOL RELATIONS, (4) CIVIC…

  18. Community College Journal for Research and Planning, Volume 3, Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Edith H., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Designed as a forum for the exchange of ideas among research and planning professionals, this journal presents articles and reviews books on topics of concern to community colleges. First, E. Timothy Lightfield examines 10 socioeconomic trends and offers suggestions to enable colleges to thrive in the face of these changes in his essay,…

  19. Integrated payload and mission planning, phase 3. Volume 3: Ground real-time mission operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, W. J.

    1977-01-01

    The payloads tentatively planned to fly on the first two Spacelab missions were analyzed to examine the cost relationships of providing mission operations support from onboard vs the ground-based Payload Operations Control Center (POCC). The quantitative results indicate that use of a POCC, with data processing capability, to support real-time mission operations is the most cost effective case.

  20. Proposed site treatment plan (PSTP) Volumes I & II & reference document, Revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    Helmich, E.; Noller, D.K.; Wierzbicki, K.S.

    1995-09-27

    The Federal Facility Compliance Act requires the Department of Energy to undertake a national effort to develop Site Treatment Plans for each of its sites generating or storing mixed waste. Mixed waste contains both a hazardous waste subject to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and radioactive material subject to the Atomic Energy Act of 1954. The Site Treatment Plan for the Savannah River Site proposes how SRS will treat mixed waste that is now stored on the site and mixed waste that Will be generated in the future. Also, the Site Treatment Plan identifies Savannah River Site mixed wastes that other Department of Energy facilities could treat and mixed waste from other facilities that the Savannah River Site could treat. The Site Treatment Plan has been approved by the State of South Carolina. The Department of Energy Will enter into a consent order with the State of South Carolina by October 6, 1995. The consent order will contain enforceable commitments to treat mixed waste.

  1. Greater Postimplant Swelling in Small-Volume Prostate Glands: Implications for Dosimetry, Treatment Planning, and Operating Room Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Eugene; Stenmark, Matthew H.; Evans, Cheryl; Narayana, Vrinda; McLaughlin, Patrick W.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Postimplant prostatic edema has been implicated in suboptimal permanent implants, and smaller prostates have been reported to have worse dosimetric coverage. In this study we compare the degree of postimplant edema between larger and smaller prostates and examine the effects of prostate size on the dose delivered to 90% of the prostate (D90). Methods and Materials: From September 2003 to February 2006, 105 hormone-naive patients underwent permanent prostate brachytherapy with {sup 125}I Rapid Strand (Oncura Inc., Arlington Heights, IL). All patients underwent pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) within 3 weeks before implant, transrectal ultrasound at the time of implant, and both computed tomography and MRI 2.5 to 3 weeks after implant. Prostates were divided into 5 subgroups based on preimplant MRI volumes: less than 25 mL, 25 to 35 mL, 35 to 45 mL, 45 to 55 mL, and greater than 55 mL. Prostate swelling was assessed by use of preimplant and postimplant MRI volumes. Postimplant dosimetry was determined by MRI and compared between the subgroups. Results: All prostates showed postimplant swelling on MRI when compared with preimplant MRI, with a mean increase of 31% {+-} 31% (p < 0.0001). The greatest swelling was noted in small prostates (volume less than 25 mL), with a mean increase of 70% {+-} 36%. The degree of swelling in the group with a volume less than 25 mL was significantly larger than the degree of swelling in all other prostate subgroups (p < 0.003). Transrectal ultrasound significantly overestimates the prostate volume when compared with MRI by a mean of 15% {+-} 25% (p = 0.0006) and is more pronounced for smaller prostates. Although prostates with volumes less than 25 mL did not have significantly worse D90 compared with larger prostates, they had the largest percent of suboptimal implants by the standard ratio of D90 divided by the prescription dose. Conclusions: Although small prostates have the greatest postimplant edema, planning

  2. Dosimetric evaluation of planning target volume margin reduction for prostate cancer via image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Taejin; Kang, Sei-Kwon; Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Park, Soah; Yoon, Jai-Woong; Han, Taejin; Kim, Haeyoung; Lee, Meyeon; Kim, Kyoung-Joo; Bae, Hoonsik; Suh, Tae-Suk

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively estimate the dosimetric benefits of the image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) system for the prostate intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivery. The cases of eleven patients who underwent IMRT for prostate cancer without a prostatectomy at our institution between October 2012 and April 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. For every patient, clinical target volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV) margins were uniformly used: 3 mm, 5 mm, 7 mm, 10 mm, 12 mm, and 15 mm. For each margin size, the IMRT plans were independently optimized by one medical physicist using Pinnalce3 (ver. 8.0.d, Philips Medical System, Madison, WI) in order to maintain the plan quality. The maximum geometrical margin (MGM) for every CT image set, defined as the smallest margin encompassing the rectum at least at one slice, was between 13 mm and 26 mm. The percentage rectum overlapping PTV (%V ROV ), the rectal normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) and the mean rectal dose (%RD mean ) increased in proportion to the increase of PTV margin. However the bladder NTCP remained around zero to some extent regardless of the increase of PTV margin while the percentage bladder overlapping PTV (%V BOV ) and the mean bladder dose (%BD mean ) increased in proportion to the increase of PTV margin. Without relatively large rectum or small bladder, the increase observed for rectal NTCP, %RDmean and %BD mean per 1-mm PTV margin size were 1.84%, 2.44% and 2.90%, respectively. Unlike the behavior of the rectum or the bladder, the maximum dose on each femoral head had little effect on PTV margin. This quantitative study of the PTV margin reduction supported that IG-IMRT has enhanced the clinical effects over prostate cancer with the reduction of normal organ complications under the similar level of PTV control.

  3. The effect of image-guided radiation therapy on the margin between the clinical target volume and planning target volume in lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Jun; Li, Minghui; Zhang, Tao; Han, Wei; Chen, Dongfu; Hui, Zhouguang; Lv, Jima; Zhang, Zhong; Zhang, Yin; Zhang, Liansheng; Zheng, Rong; Dai, Jianrong; Wang, Luhua

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) on the margin between the clinical target volume (CTV) and planning target volume (PTV) in lung cancer. Methods: The CTV and PTV margin were determined in three dimensions by four radiation oncologists using a standard method in 10 lung cancer patients, and compared to consensus values. Transfer error was measured using a rigid phantom containing gold markers. Systematic error and random error set up errors were calculated in three dimensions from pre-treatment and post-treatment cone beam CT scans. Finally, the margin between the CTV and PTV was corrected for set up error and calculated. Results: The margins between the CTV and PTV with IGRT (and without IGRT) were 0.88 cm (0.96 cm), 0.99 cm (1.08 cm) and 1.28 cm (1.82 cm) in the anterior and posterior (AP), left and right (LR) and superior and inferior (SI) directions, respectively. Images from two other patients verified the validity of the corrected margin. The target delineation errors of the radiation oncologists are considered to be the largest compared with the set up errors. The application of IGRT reduced the set up errors and the margins between CTV and PTV. Conclusions: The delineation errors of radiation oncologists are the most important factor to consider for the margin between CTV and PTV for lung cancer. IGRT can reduce the margins by reducing the set up errors, especially in the SI direction. Further research is required to assess whether the reduction in the margin is solely based on set up errors.

  4. Selected Bibliographies and State-of the-Art Review for Socio-cultural Factors in Health. Volume 4: Socio-cultural Factors in Health References. International Health Planning Reference Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Renee White; Shani, Hadasa

    Intended as a companion picce to volume 4 in the Method Series, Sociocultural Factors in Health Planning (CE 024 232), this fourth of six volumes in the International Health Planning Reference Series is a combined literature review and annotated bibliography dealing with social, cultural, and behavioral aspects of delivering, planning, and…

  5. Integrated payload and mission planning, phase 3. Volume 4: Optimum utilization of Spacelab racks and pallets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logston, R. G.; Budris, G. D.

    1977-01-01

    The methodology to optimize the utilization of Spacelab racks and pallets and to apply this methodology to the early STS Spacelab missions was developed. A review was made of Spacelab Program requirements and flow plans, generic flow plans for racks and pallets were examined, and the principal optimization criteria and methodology were established. Interactions between schedule, inventory, and key optimization factors; schedule and cost sensitivity to optional approaches; and the development of tradeoff methodology were addressed. This methodology was then applied to early spacelab missions (1980-1982). Rack and pallet requirements and duty cycles were defined, a utilization assessment was made, and several trade studies performed involving varying degrees of Level IV integration, inventory level, and shared versus dedicated Spacelab racks and pallets.

  6. A solar extreme ultraviolet telescope and spectrograph for space shuttle. Volume 1: Investigation and technical plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neupert, W. M.

    1978-01-01

    A scientific investigation of heating and mass transport in the solar corona that is currently planned for a future Shuttle/Spacelab flight is outlined. The instrument to be used is a near-normal incidence grating spectrograph fed by a grazing incidence Wolter Type 2 telescope. A toroidal grating design provides stigmatic images of the corona up to 8 arc min in extent over the spectral region from 225 A to 370 A. Spatial resolution of at least 2 arc sec and spectral resolution of 0.050 A is achievable throughout the central 4 arc min field or view. Primary scientific data are recorded on Schumann-type film. An H-alpha slit jaw monitor and zero order extreme ultraviolet monitor are also planned to support instrument operation.

  7. PLANS; a finite element program for nonlinear analysis of structures. Volume 2: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pifko, A.; Armen, H., Jr.; Levy, A.; Levine, H.

    1977-01-01

    The PLANS system, rather than being one comprehensive computer program, is a collection of finite element programs used for the nonlinear analysis of structures. This collection of programs evolved and is based on the organizational philosophy in which classes of analyses are treated individually based on the physical problem class to be analyzed. Each of the independent finite element computer programs of PLANS, with an associated element library, can be individually loaded and used to solve the problem class of interest. A number of programs have been developed for material nonlinear behavior alone and for combined geometric and material nonlinear behavior. The usage, capabilities, and element libraries of the current programs include: (1) plastic analysis of built-up structures where bending and membrane effects are significant, (2) three dimensional elastic-plastic analysis, (3) plastic analysis of bodies of revolution, and (4) material and geometric nonlinear analysis of built-up structures.

  8. Ultrahigh head pump/turbine development program: Volume 8, Confirmatory testing plan: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, T.

    1987-01-01

    This report concerns the studies made in Task 6, ''Confirmatory Model Testing Plan and Procedure.'' This task reviews the entire design and testing development program of the two-stage pump/turbine. Task 6 is aimed at evaluating whatever additional work is required to demonstrate and verify to the utilities the reliability and actual performance of the developed machine. Purpose of this entire program is to provide the utilities with the best available technological and practical design for a trouble free two-stage pump/turbine. The following three plans are proposed and studied to further confirm the reliability and performance of the prototype pump/turbine: construction of pilot machine; actual head test in laboratory; and component tests in shop.

  9. Jefferson Proving Ground, South of the Firing Line, Quality Control Plan. Volume III

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    CERCLA CLP CNES COC CRL DOT DQOs EPA ID JPG NCP NEPA OSHA PID QA/QC QAP QCP RI/FS SARA semi-VOCs TPH USATHAMA UTM uxo VOCs...assurance/quality control Quality Assurance Program Quality Control Plan Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Studies Superfund Amendments and...Program (QAP) requirements and the requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act ( CERCLA ) as amended by

  10. Multiple IMU system test plan, volume 4. [subroutines for space shuttle requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landey, M.; Vincent, K. T., Jr.; Whittredge, R. S.

    1974-01-01

    Operating procedures for this redundant system are described. A test plan is developed with two objectives. First, performance of the hardware and software delivered is demonstrated. Second, applicability of multiple IMU systems to the space shuttle mission is shown through detailed experiments with FDI algorithms and other multiple IMU software: gyrocompassing, calibration, and navigation. Gimbal flip is examined in light of its possible detrimental effects on FDI and navigation. For Vol. 3, see N74-10296.

  11. Northeast Artificial Intelligence Consortium (NAIC). Volume 2. Discussing, Using, and Recognizing Plans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    plans as schedules of events for third parties (or multiple agents) [131, 10 2.3 INTENSIONAL REPRESENTATIONS We now give an overview of our...This is a more natural way of modeling actions and avoids the need for specifying multiple operators for doing the same action in different situations...on the context that exists at that time. This flexibility in dynamically determining the effects of acts is what enables us to avoid having multiple

  12. Northeast Artificial Intelligence Consortium Annual Report. Volume 2. 1988 Discussing, Using, and Recognizing Plans (NLP)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-01

    must also be usable by the agent to understand other agents’ actions. We are not treating plans as schedules of events for third parties (or multiple ...the need for specifying multiple operators for doing the same action in different situations, which is a major criticism of earlier planners[6]. In...the effects of acts is what enables us to avoid having multiple operators for the same action. When preconditions for an act exist and some of them

  13. Asian Security Challenges-Planning the Face of Strategic Uncertainties. Volume 1. Main Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-10-01

    body of cold-war analytic and planning techniques to be unseated; methodologically, the region is tabula rasa . We found that net assessments have their...countries. The result was substantially enhanced comprehension of the roles played by the U.S. and Soviet research, deVelopment, and acquisition processes...address these challenges. Technology will no doubt have an important role in the military power of many Asian nations, although not necessarily in

  14. The space shuttle payload planning working groups. Volume 6: Communications and navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The findings of the Communications and Navigation working group of the space shuttle payload planning activity are presented. The basic goals to be accomplished are to increase the use of space systems and to develop new space capabilities for providing communication and navigation services to the user community in the 1980 time period. Specific experiments to be conducted for improving space communication and navigation capabilities are defined. The characteristics of the experimental equipment required to accomplish the mission are discussed.

  15. The space shuttle payload planning working groups. Volume 3: High energy astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The findings of the High Energy Astrophysics working group of the space shuttle payload planning activity are presented. The objectives to be accomplished during space shuttle missions are defined as: (1) X-ray astronomy, (2) hard X-ray and gamma ray astronomy, and (3) cosmic ray astronomy. The instruments and test equipment required to accomplish the mission are identified. Recommendations for managing the installation of the equipment and conducting the missions are included.

  16. The space shuttle payload planning working groups. Volume 10: Space technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The findings and recommendations of the Space Technology group of the space shuttle payload planning activity are presented. The elements of the space technology program are: (1) long duration exposure facility, (2) advanced technology laboratory, (3) physics and chemistry laboratory, (4) contamination experiments, and (5) laser information/data transmission technology. The space technology mission model is presented in tabular form. The proposed experiments to be conducted by each test facility are described. Recommended approaches for user community interfacing are included.

  17. The space shuttle payload planning working groups. Volume 2: Atmospheric and space physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The findings of the Atmospheric and Space Physics working group of the space shuttle mission planning activity are presented. The principal objectives defined by the group are: (1) to investigate the detailed mechanisms which control the near-space environment of the earth, (2) to perform plasma physics investigations not feasible in ground-based laboratories, and (3) to conduct investigations which are important in understanding planetary and cometary phenomena. The core instrumentation and laboratory configurations for conducting the investigations are defined.

  18. Gulf War Air Power Survey. Volume 1. Planning and Command and Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    Marine Corps. It was divided into task forces, most of which were run by civilians working temporarily for the Air Force. The work produced by the Survey...United States’ coalition partners also made available individuals and records that were vital to the Survey’s work . Many participants in the war, including...authors discov- ered several points. First, planners had put forth an extraordinary amount of work on the first phase of the air campaign plan-the

  19. A Study of Strategic Lessons Learned in Vietnam. Volume 5. Planning the War

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-04

    that a foreiqn oolicy which is designed to exploit those as well as other national strengths, such as economic and technological powers, will be...deficiencies, especially in meeting the US-ARVN high- technological capability, were obviously many. 3. Objectives and Strategies of the Soviet Union in Review...a major US commitment is the assumption of a policy decision to monilize Army reserve uiits. b. Constraiits on Planning Options a. Geneva Accords and

  20. Space Station crew safety alternatives study. Volume 5: Space Station safety plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mead, G. H.; Peercy, R. L., Jr.; Raasch, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    The Space Station Safety Plan has been prepared as an adjunct to the subject contract final report, suggesting the tasks and implementation procedures to ensure that threats are addressed and resolution strategy options identified and incorporated into the space station program. The safety program's approach is to realize minimum risk exposure without levying undue design and operational constraints. Safety objectives and risk acceptances are discussed.

  1. Shuttle/Agena study. Volume 2, part 3: Preliminary test plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Proposed testing for the Agena tug program is based upon best estimates of shuttle and Agena tug requirements and upon the Agena configuration currently envisioned to meet these requirements. The proposed tests are presented in development, qualification, system, and launch base test plans. These plans are based upon generalized requirements and assumed situations. The limitations of this study precluded all but minimal consideration of related shuttle orbiter and shuttle ground systems. The test plans include provisions for all testing from major component to systems level, identified as necessary to aid in confirmation of the modified Agena configuration for the space tug; considerations that crew safety requirements and new environmental conditions from shuttle interface effects do impose some new Agena testing requirements; considerations that many existing Agena flight-qualified components will be utilized and qualification testing will be minimal; testing not only for the Agena tug but also for new or modified items of handling or servicing equipment for supporting the Agena factory-to-launch sequence; and the assembly of required testing into a sequence-ordered series of events.

  2. SU-E-T-294: Dosimetric Analysis of Planning Phase Using Overlap Volume Histogram for Respiratory Gated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S; Kim, D; Kim, T; Shin, D; Cho, M; Kim, K; Suh, T; Kim, S; Park, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: End-of-exhale (EOE) phase is generally preferred for gating window because tumor position is more reproducible. However, other gating windows might be more appropriate for dose distribution perspective. In this pilot study, we proposed to utilize overlap volume histogram (OVH) to search optimized gating window and demonstrated its feasibility. Methods: We acquired 4DCT of 10 phases for 3 lung patients (2 with a target at right middle lobe and 1 at right upper lobe). After structures were defined in every phase, the OVH of each OAR was generated to quantify the three dimensional spatial relationship between the PTV and OARs (bronchus, esophagus, heart and cord etc.) at each phase. OVH tells the overlap volume of an OAR according to outward distance from the PTV. Relative overlap volume at 20 mm outward distance from the PTV (ROV-20) was also defined as a metric for measuring overlap volume and obtained. For dose calculation, 3D CRT plans were made for all phases under the same beam angles and objectives (e.g., 95% of the PTV coverage with at least 100% of the prescription dose of 50 Gy). The gating window phase was ranked according to ROV-20, and the relationship between the OVH and dose distribution at each phase was evaluated by comparing the maximum dose, mean dose, and equivalent uniform dose of OAR. Results: OVHs showed noticeable difference from phase to phase, implying it is possible to find optimal phases for gating window. For 2 out of 3 patients (both with a target at RML), maximum dose, mean dose, and EUD increased as ROV-20 increased. Conclusion: It is demonstrated that optimal phases (in dose distribution perspective) for gating window could exist and OVH can be a useful tool for determining such phases without performing dose optimization calculations in all phases. This work was supported by the Radiation Technology R&D program (No. 2013M2A2A7043498) and the Mid-career Researcher Program (2012-007883) through the National Research Foundation

  3. Application of radar for automotive collision avoidance. Volume 2: Development plan and progress reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichtenberg, Christopher L. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this project was research and development of an automobile collision avoidance radar system. Items within the scope of the one-year effort were to: (1) review previous authors' work in this field; (2) select a suitable radar approach; (3) develop a system design; (4) perform basic analyses and observations pertinent to radar design, performance, and effects; (5) fabricate and collect radar data from a data collection radar; (6) analyze and derive conclusions from the radar data; and (7) make recommendations about the likelihood of success of the investigated radar techniques. The final technical report presenting all conclusions is contained in Volume 1.

  4. Armored Family of Vehicles (AFV) Automation and Communication. Resource Management Plan (ACRMP). Phase 1. Volume 15.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    BCE S 7 xi TRAINING U 8 XII FEA SPTG DOC S .% 9,10 Xill TECH ASSESSMENT S U . XIV LIGHT FORCES S 11 XV CRMP U XVI ACRONYMS/ABBR U (ITt 7 - ; 1 T1’ l...development, and producto n of the AFV n accordance with the AFV requirement and contractual baseline. 3.14 AFV ACRMP I SEPTEMBER 87 ,p VOLUME XV, CI...SUMMARY THE ARMOR’ED FAMILY OF VEHICLES SYSTEM OVERVI EW - CHASSIS: HEV MDI7I LIGHT SUB- TANK IFV LOSAD HWTR LO SAPPER LOSAT REARM NBCRSjMS RECON CEM

  5. Climate program plan. Volume 1 of 2. [For assessing interrelationships between energy and climate

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    As part of the United States Climate Program Plan developed by the Interdepartmental Committee for Atmospheric Sciences, DOE is responsible for developing an understanding of and assessment capabilities for the effects of climate and climate fluctuations on man's generation of power, the effects of power generation and its various fuel processes and/or control technologies on climate, and development of blends of power generation and distribution modes that minimize adverse environmental and climatic effects. The DOE Climate Program Plan focuses on these three major roles in basic and applied research. The purpose of this document is to present background information relevant to these roles, to identify the perceived and potential effects of energy technologies on climate that now merit assessment, to define the need for research on the prediction of weather and climate variations and assessment of their effects on power production, and to outline research goals appropriate to the DOE mission. This report focuses on the need for assessing the cycles and budgets of the entire range of substances emitted in power production by the many technologies now in use. Emissions include but are not limited to /sup 85/Kr, particles, sulfur, and nitrogen oxides, waste heat, and hydrocarbons. To provide the basis for assessing the impacts of these emissions, this plan calls for specialized, mission-oriented research to improve understanding of processes that determine how these emissions are transported, transformed, and scavenged in the atmosphere, and of the natural processes that can be affectd by energy activities. This latter category includes potential modification of surface properties caused, for example, by large arrays of solar collectors, extensive biomass production, and wind power modification of the boundary layer. (JGB)

  6. The space shuttle payload planning working groups. Volume 8: Earth and ocean physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The findings and recommendations of the Earth and Ocean Physics working group of the space shuttle payload planning activity are presented. The requirements for the space shuttle mission are defined as: (1) precision measurement for earth and ocean physics experiments, (2) development and demonstration of new and improved sensors and analytical techniques, (3) acquisition of surface truth data for evaluation of new measurement techniques, (4) conduct of critical experiments to validate geophysical phenomena and instrumental results, and (5) development and validation of analytical/experimental models for global ocean dynamics and solid earth dynamics/earthquake prediction. Tables of data are presented to show the flight schedule estimated costs, and the mission model.

  7. The space shuttle payload planning working groups. Volume 4: Life sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The findings of the Life Sciences working group of the space shuttle payload planning activity are presented. The objectives of the Life Sciences investigations are: (1) to continue the research directed at understanding the origin of life and the search for extraterrestrial evidence of life, (2) biomedical research to understand mechanisms and provide criteria for support of manned flight, (3) technology development for life support, protective systems, and work aids for providing environmental control, and (4) to study basic biological functions at all levels or organization influenced by gravity, radiation, and circadian rhythms. Examples of candidate experimental schedules and the experimental package functional requirements are included.

  8. The space shuttle payload planning working groups. Volume 5: Solar physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The findings of the Solar Physics working group of the space shuttle payload planning activity are presented. The areas to be investigated by the solar physics experiments are: (1) the production of mechanical energy in the subphotospheric layers and its transport and dissipation in the upper layers of the atmosphere, (2) the mass flux from the subphotospheric layers into the chromosphere and corona and beyond the solar wind, (3) solar activity and its relationship to magnetic fields, and (4) the production of solar flares. The approach to be followed in conducting the experiments and the equipment required are defined.

  9. The space shuttle payload planning working groups: Volume 9: Materials processing and space manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The findings and recommendations of the Materials Processing and Space Manufacturing group of the space shuttle payload planning activity are presented. The effects of weightlessness on the levitation processes, mixture stability, and control over heat and mass transport in fluids are considered for investigation. The research and development projects include: (1) metallurgical processes, (2) electronic materials, (3) biological applications, and (4)nonmetallic materials and processes. Additional recommendations are provided concerning the allocation of payload space, acceptance of experiments for flight, flight qualification, and private use of the space shuttle.

  10. ICESat (GLAS) Science Processing Software Document Series. Volume 1; Science Software Management Plan; 3.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hancock, David W., III

    1999-01-01

    This document provides the Software Management Plan for the GLAS Standard Data Software (SDS) supporting the GLAS instrument of the EOS ICESat Spacecraft. The SDS encompasses the ICESat Science Investigator-led Processing System (I-SIPS) Software and the Instrument Support Terminal (IST) Software. For the I-SIPS Software, the SDS will produce Level 0, Level 1, and Level 2 data products as well as the associated product quality assessments and descriptive information. For the IST Software, the SDS will accommodate the GLAS instrument support areas of engineering status, command, performance assessment, and instrument health status.

  11. Scheduling Algorithm for Mission Planning and Logistics Evaluation (SAMPLE). Volume 3: The GREEDY algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupnick, E.; Wiggins, D.

    1980-01-01

    The functional specifications, functional design and flow, and the program logic of the GREEDY computer program are described. The GREEDY program is a submodule of the Scheduling Algorithm for Mission Planning and Logistics Evaluation (SAMPLE) program and has been designed as a continuation of the shuttle Mission Payloads (MPLS) program. The MPLS uses input payload data to form a set of feasible payload combinations; from these, GREEDY selects a subset of combinations (a traffic model) so all payloads can be included without redundancy. The program also provides the user a tutorial option so that he can choose an alternate traffic model in case a particular traffic model is unacceptable.

  12. The space shuttle payload planning working groups. Volume 7: Earth observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The findings of the Earth Observations working group of the space shuttle payload planning activity are presented. The objectives of the Earth Observation experiments are: (1) establishment of quantitative relationships between observable parameters and geophysical variables, (2) development, test, calibration, and evaluation of eventual flight instruments in experimental space flight missions, (3) demonstration of the operational utility of specific observation concepts or techniques as information inputs needed for taking actions, and (4) deployment of prototype and follow-on operational Earth Observation systems. The basic payload capability, mission duration, launch sites, inclinations, and payload limitations are defined.

  13. Crop Identification Technolgy Assessment for Remote Sensing (CITARS). Volume 1: Task design plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, F. G.; Bizzell, R. M.

    1975-01-01

    A plan for quantifying the crop identification performances resulting from the remote identification of corn, soybeans, and wheat is described. Steps for the conversion of multispectral data tapes to classification results are specified. The crop identification performances resulting from the use of several basic types of automatic data processing techniques are compared and examined for significant differences. The techniques are evaluated also for changes in geographic location, time of the year, management practices, and other physical factors. The results of the Crop Identification Technology Assessment for Remote Sensing task will be applied extensively in the Large Area Crop Inventory Experiment.

  14. Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) system concept and technology definition study. Volume 2: Technology assessment and technology development plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnew, Donald L.; Jones, Peter A.

    1989-04-01

    A study was conducted to define reasonable and representative LDR system concepts for the purpose of defining a technology development program aimed at providing the requisite technological capability necessary to start LDR development by the end of 1991. This volume presents thirteen technology assessments and technology development plans, as well as an overview and summary of the LDR concepts. Twenty-two proposed augmentation projects are described (selected from more than 30 candidates). The five LDR technology areas most in need of supplementary support are: cryogenic cooling; astronaut assembly of the optically precise LDR in space; active segmented primary mirror; dynamic structural control; and primary mirror contamination control. Three broad, time-phased, five-year programs were synthesized from the 22 projects, scheduled, and funding requirements estimated.

  15. Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) system concept and technology definition study. Volume 2: Technology assessment and technology development plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agnew, Donald L.; Jones, Peter A.

    1989-01-01

    A study was conducted to define reasonable and representative LDR system concepts for the purpose of defining a technology development program aimed at providing the requisite technological capability necessary to start LDR development by the end of 1991. This volume presents thirteen technology assessments and technology development plans, as well as an overview and summary of the LDR concepts. Twenty-two proposed augmentation projects are described (selected from more than 30 candidates). The five LDR technology areas most in need of supplementary support are: cryogenic cooling; astronaut assembly of the optically precise LDR in space; active segmented primary mirror; dynamic structural control; and primary mirror contamination control. Three broad, time-phased, five-year programs were synthesized from the 22 projects, scheduled, and funding requirements estimated.

  16. The model and the planning method of volume and variety assessment of innovative products in an industrial enterprise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimov, V. G.; Anisimov, E. G.; Saurenko, T. N.; Sonkin, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    In the long term, the innovative development strategy efficiency is considered as the most crucial condition for assurance of economic system competitiveness in market conditions. It determines the problem relevance of such justification strategies with regard to specific systems features and conditions of their operation. The problem solution for industrial enterprises can be based on mathematical models of supporting the decision-making on the elements of the innovative manufacturing program. An optimization model and the planning method of innovative products volume and variety are suggested. The feature of the suggested model lies in the nonlinear nature of the objective function. It allows taking into consideration the law of diminishing marginal utility. The suggested method of optimization takes into account the system features and enables the effective implementation of manufacturing capabilities in modern conditions of production organization and sales in terms of market saturation.

  17. PLANS: A finite element program for nonlinear analysis of structures. Volume 1: Theoretical manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pifko, A.; Levine, H. S.; Armen, H., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The PLANS system is described which is a finite element program for nonlinear analysis. The system represents a collection of special purpose computer programs each associated with a distinct physical problem class. Modules of PLANS specifically referenced and described in detail include: (1) REVBY, for the plastic analysis of bodies of revolution; (2) OUT-OF-PLANE, for the plastic analysis of 3-D built-up structures where membrane effects are predominant; (3) BEND, for the plastic analysis of built-up structures where bending and membrane effects are significant; (4) HEX, for the 3-D elastic-plastic analysis of general solids; and (5) OUT-OF-PLANE-MG, for material and geometrically nonlinear analysis of built-up structures. The SATELLITE program for data debugging and plotting of input geometries is also described. The theoretical foundations upon which the analysis is based are presented. Discussed are the form of the governing equations, the methods of solution, plasticity theories available, a general system description and flow of the programs, and the elements available for use.

  18. SU-E-T-634: Analysis of Volume Based GYN HDR Brachytherapy Plans for Dose Calculation to Organs At Risk(OAR)

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, M; Li, C; White, M; Davis, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We have analyzed the dose volume histogram of 140 CT based HDR brachytherapy plans and evaluated the dose received to OAR ; rectum, bladder and sigmoid colon based on recommendations from ICRU and Image guided brachytherapy working group for cervical cancer . Methods: Our treatment protocol consist of XRT to whole pelvis with 45 Gy at 1.8Gy/fraction followed by 30 Gy at 6 Gy per fraction by HDR brachytherapy in 2 weeks . The CT compatible tandem and ovoid applicators were used and stabilized with radio opaque packing material. The patient was stabilized using special re-locatable implant table and stirrups for reproducibility of the geometry during treatment. The CT scan images were taken at 3mm slice thickness and exported to the treatment planning computer. The OAR structures, bladder, rectum and sigmoid colon were outlined on the images along with the applicators. The prescription dose was targeted to A left and A right as defined in Manchester system and optimized on geometry . The dosimetry was compared on all plans using the parameter Ci.sec.cGy-1 . Using the Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) obtained from the plans the doses to rectum, sigmoid colon and bladder for ICRU defined points and 2cc volume were analyzed and reported. The following criteria were used for limiting the tolerance dose by volume (D2cc) were calculated. The rectum and sigmoid colon doses were limited to <75Gy. The bladder dose was limited to < 90Gy from both XRT and HDR brachytherapy. Results: The average total (XRT+HDRBT) BED values to prescription volume was 120 Gy. Dose 2cc to rectum was 70Gy +/− 17Gy, dose to 2cc bladder was 82+/−32 Gy. The average Ci.sec.cGy-1 calculated for the HDR plans was 6.99 +/− 0.5 Conclusion: The image based treatment planning enabled to evaluati volume based dose to critical structures for clinical interpretation.

  19. Sci—Fri AM: Mountain — 06: Optimizing planning target volume in lung radiotherapy using deformable registration

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, P; Wierzbicki, M

    2014-08-15

    A four dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) image is acquired for all radically treated, lung cancer patients to define the internal target volume (ITV), which encompasses tumour motion due to breathing and subclinical disease. Patient set-up error and anatomical motion that is not due to breathing is addressed through an additional 1 cm margin around the ITV to obtain the planning target volume (PTV). The objective of this retrospective study is to find the minimum PTV margin that provides an acceptable probability of delivering the prescribed dose to the ITV. Acquisition of a kV cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image at each fraction was used to shift the treatment couch to accurately align the spinal cord and carina. Our method utilized deformable image registration to automatically position the planning ITV on each CBCT. We evaluated the percentage of the ITV surface that fell within various PTVs for 79 fractions across 18 patients. Treatment success was defined as a situation where at least 99% of the ITV is covered by the PTV. Overall, this is to be achieved in at least 90% of the treatment fractions. The current approach with a 1cm PTV margin was successful ∼96% of the time. This analysis revealed that the current margin can be reduced to 0.8cm isotropic or 0.6×0.6×1 cm{sup 3} non-isotropic, which were successful 92 and 91 percent of the time respectively. Moreover, we have shown that these margins maintain accuracy, despite intrafractional variation, and maximize CBCT image guidance capabilities.

  20. Comparative evaluation of target volumes defined by deformable and rigid registration of diagnostic PET/CT to planning CT in primary esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yanluan; Li, Jianbin; Zhang, Peng; Shao, Qian; Xu, Min; Li, Yankang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: To evaluate the geometrical differences of target volumes propagated by deformable image registration (DIR) and rigid image registration (RIR) to assist target volume delineation between diagnostic Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and planning CT for primary esophageal cancer (EC). Methods: Twenty-five patients with EC sequentially underwent a diagnostic 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET/CT scan and planning CT simulation. Only 19 patients with maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) ≥ 2.0 of the primary volume were available. Gross tumor volumes (GTVs) were delineated using CT and PET display settings. The PET/CT images were then registered with planning CT using MIM software. Subsequently, the PET and CT contours were propagated by RIR and DIR to planning CT. The properties of these volumes were compared. Results: When GTVCT delineated on CT of PET/CT after both RIR and DIR was compared with GTV contoured on planning CT, significant improvements using DIR were observed in the volume, displacements of the center of mass (COM) in the 3-dimensional (3D) direction, and Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) (P = 0.003; 0.006; 0.014). Although similar improvements were not observed for the same comparison using DIR for propagated PET contours from diagnostic PET/CT to planning CT (P > 0.05), for DSC and displacements of COM in the 3D direction of PET contours, the DIR resulted in the improved volume of a large percentage of patients (73.7%; 68.45%; 63.2%) compared with RIR. For diagnostic CT-based contours or PET contours at SUV2.5 propagated by DIR with planning CT, the DSC and displacements of COM in 3D directions in the distal segment were significantly improved compared to the upper and middle segments (P > 0.05). Conclusion: We observed a trend that deformable registration might improve the overlap for gross target volumes from diagnostic PET/CT to planning CT. The distal EC might benefit more from DIR

  1. Sparing Healthy Tissue and Increasing Tumor Dose Using Bayesian Modeling of Geometric Uncertainties for Planning Target Volume Personalization

    SciTech Connect

    Herschtal, Alan; Te Marvelde, Luc; Mengersen, Kerrie; Foroudi, Farshad; Eade, Thomas; Pham, Daniel; Caine, Hannah; Kron, Tomas

    2015-06-01

    Objective: To develop a mathematical tool that can update a patient's planning target volume (PTV) partway through a course of radiation therapy to more precisely target the tumor for the remainder of treatment and reduce dose to surrounding healthy tissue. Methods and Materials: Daily on-board imaging was used to collect large datasets of displacements for patients undergoing external beam radiation therapy for solid tumors. Bayesian statistical modeling of these geometric uncertainties was used to optimally trade off between displacement data collected from previously treated patients and the progressively accumulating data from a patient currently partway through treatment, to optimally predict future displacements for that patient. These predictions were used to update the PTV position and margin width for the remainder of treatment, such that the clinical target volume (CTV) was more precisely targeted. Results: Software simulation of dose to CTV and normal tissue for 2 real prostate displacement datasets consisting of 146 and 290 patients treated with a minimum of 30 fractions each showed that re-evaluating the PTV position and margin width after 8 treatment fractions reduced healthy tissue dose by 19% and 17%, respectively, while maintaining CTV dose. Conclusion: Incorporating patient-specific displacement patterns from early in a course of treatment allows PTV adaptation for the remainder of treatment. This substantially reduces the dose to healthy tissues and thus can reduce radiation therapy–induced toxicities, improving patient outcomes.

  2. Formulation of consumables management models. Volume 2: Mission planning processor user guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daly, J. K.; Torian, J. G.

    1978-01-01

    A user guide for the MPP (Mission Planning Processor) is presented. The MPP is used in the evaluation of particular missions, with appropriate display and storage of related consumables data. Design goals are accomplished by the use of an on-line/demand mode computer terminal Cathode Ray Tube Display. The process is such that the user merely adds specific mission/flight functions to a skeleton flight and/or alters the skeleton. The skeleton flight includes operational aspects from prelaunch through ground support equipment connect after rollout as required to place the STS (Space Transportation System) in a parking orbit, maintain the spacecraft and crew for the stated on-orbit period and return.

  3. Advanced Platform Systems Technology study. Volume 4: Technology advancement program plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    An overview study of the major technology definition tasks and subtasks along with their interfaces and interrelationships is presented. Although not specifically indicated in the diagram, iterations were required at many steps to finalize the results. The development of the integrated technology advancement plan was initiated by using the results of the previous two tasks, i.e., the trade studies and the preliminary cost and schedule estimates for the selected technologies. Descriptions for the development of each viable technology advancement was drawn from the trade studies. Additionally, a logic flow diagram depicting the steps in developing each technology element was developed along with descriptions for each of the major elements. Next, major elements of the logic flow diagrams were time phased, and that allowed the definition of a technology development schedule that was consistent with the space station program schedule when possible. Schedules show the major milestone including tests required as described in the logic flow diagrams.

  4. A Titan exploration study: Science, technology and mission planning options, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tindle, E. L.; Manning, L. A.; Sadin, S. R.; Edsinger, L. E.; Weissman, P. R.; Swenson, B. L.

    1976-01-01

    Mission concepts and technology advancements that can be used in the exploration of the outer planet satellites were examined. Titan, the seventh satellite of Saturn was selected as the target of interest. Science objectives for Titan exploration were identified, and recommended science payloads for four basic mission modes were developed (orbiter, atmospheric probe, surface penetrator and lander). Trial spacecraft and mission designs were produced for the various mission modes. Using these trial designs as a base, technology excursions were then made to find solutions to the problems resulting from these conventional approaches and to uncover new science, technology and mission planning options. Several mission modes were developed that take advantage of the unique conditions expected at Titan. They include a combined orbiter, atmosphere probe and lander vehicle, a combined probe and surface penetrator configuration and concepts for advanced remote sensing orbiters.

  5. Tracking and data acquisition system for the 1990's. Volume 8: TDAS frequency planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppe, S. B.; Elrod, B. D.

    1983-01-01

    Current planning calls for the TDAS to support new user and crosslink services, in addition to TDRSS-compatible services. TDRSS-compatible services would operate in current S-band and K-band channels used by TDRSS. New services, however, can take advantage of technology advances at microwave and optical frequencies. For augmented space-to-space services, 60 GHz and GaAs laser systems offer technical advantages, relative freedom from RFI, and a benign regulatory environment (i.e., minimal congestion and, in the case of 60 GHz, maximum regulatory support for TDAS-type services). For TDAS Earth-to-space and space-to-Earth services, the 30/20 GHz band offers the best mix of technical and regulatory advantages. But use of these bands would have to be coordinated with the U.S. military.

  6. Department of Energy plan for recovery and utilization of nuclear byproducts from defense wastes. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-08-01

    Nuclear wastes from the defense production cycle contain many uniquely useful, intrinsically valuable, and strategically important materials. These materials have a wide range of known and potential applications in food technology, agriculture, energy, public health, medicine, industrial technology, and national security. Furthermore, their removal from the nuclear waste stream can facilitate waste management and yield economic, safety, and environmental advantages in the management and disposal of the residual nuclear wastes that have no redemptive value. This document is the program plan for implementing the recovery and beneficial use of these valuable materials. An Executive Summary of this document, DOE/DP-0013, Vol. 1, January 1983, is available. Program policy, goals and strategy are stated in Section 2. Implementation tasks, schedule and funding are detailed in Section 3. The remaining five sections and the appendixes provide necessary background information to support these two sections. Section 4 reviews some of the unique properties of the individual byproduct materials and describes both demonstrated and potential applications. The amounts of byproduct materials that are available now for research and demonstration purposes, and the amounts that could be recovered in the future for expanded applications are detailed in Section 5. Section 6 describes the effects byproduct recovery and utilization have on the management and final disposal of nuclear wastes. The institutional issues that affect the recovery, processing and utilization of nuclear byproducts are discussed in Section 7. Finally, Section 8 presents a generalized mathematical process by which applications can be evaluated and prioritized (rank-ordered) to provide planning data for program management.

  7. Impact of 18FDG-PET/CT on biological target volume (BTV) definition for treatment planning for non-small cell lung cancer patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devic, Slobodan; Tomic, Nada; Faria, Sergio; Dean, Geoffrey; Lisbona, Robert; Parker, William; Kaufman, Chris; Podgorsak, Ervin B.

    2007-02-01

    This work represents our effort to test feasibility of FDG-based PET/CT on target volume delineation in radiotherapy treatment planning of NSCLC patients. Different methods have been developed to enable more precise target outlining using PET: Qualitative Visual Method, CTV=2.5 SUV units, linear SUV threshold function method, and CTV=40% Iso of Maximum Uptake Value. We are proposing reconstruction of three biological target volumes: necrotic BTV (same as PTV created by radiation oncologist using CT data), proliferating BTV (based on PET signal to background ratio 1:3) and hypoxic BTV (based on PET signal to background ratio of 1:19). Two IMRT plans were created and compared to the conventional treatment plan: "conservative" IMRT plan delivers 52.5 Gy to the necrotic BTV and 65 Gy to the hypoxic BTV; "radical" IMRT plan delivers 30 Gy to necrotic BTV, 52.5 Gy to proliferating BTV and 65 Gy to hypoxic BTV. Use of BTVs in IMRT plans is attractive because it increases dose to targets considered to need higher doses. It reduces considerably dose to heart and spinal cord, organs considered to limit dose escalation approaches in NSCLC treatment. "Conservative" IMRT approach can be understood as a PET/CT-based concomitant boost to the tumor expressing the highest FDG uptake. "Radical" plan implies deviation from the traditional uniform dose target coverage approach, with the intention of achieving better surrounding tissue sparing and ultimately allowing for dose escalation protocols relying on biologically based treatment planning.

  8. Dose as a Function of Lung Volume and Planned Treatment Volume in Helical Tomotherapy Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy-Based Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Small Lung Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Baisden, Joseph M.; Romney, Davis A.; Reish, Andrew G.; Cai Jing; Sheng Ke; Jones, David R.; Benedict, Stanley H.; Read, Paul W.; Larner, James M. . E-mail: JML2P@virginia.edu

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the limitations of Hi-Art Helical Tomotherapy (Middleton, WI) stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung lesions, and to provide an initial report on patients treated with this method. Stereotactic body radiotherapy was shown to be an effective, well-tolerated treatment for early-stage, non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0236 protocol is currently evaluating three-dimensional conformal SBRT that delivers 60 Gy in three fractions. Methods and Materials: Inverse treatment planning for hypothetical lung gross tumor volumes (GTV) and planned treatment volume (PTV) expansions were performed. We tested the hypothesis that the maximum acceptable dose (MAD) to be delivered to the lesion by SBRT could be predicted by PTV and lung volume. Dose constraints on normal tissue were as designated by the RTOG protocol. Inverse planning was performed to find the maximum tolerated SBRT dose up to 60 Gy. Results: Regression analysis of the data obtained indicated a linear relationship between MAD, PTV, and lung volume. This generated two equations which may be useful predictive tools. Seven patients with Stage I and II NSCLC treated at University of Virginia with this method tolerated the treatment extremely well, and suffered no greater than grade I toxicity, with no evidence of disease recurrence in follow-up from 2-20 months. Conclusions: Helical tomotherapy SBRT for lung lesions is well-tolerated. In addition, the likely MAD for patients considered for this type of treatment can be predicted by PTV and lung volume.

  9. Acoustic Treatment Design Scaling Methods. Volume 3; Test Plans, Hardware, Results, and Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, J.; Kwan, H. W.; Echternach, D. K.; Kraft, R. E.; Syed, A. A.

    1999-01-01

    The ability to design, build, and test miniaturized acoustic treatment panels on scale-model fan rigs representative of the full-scale engine provides not only a cost-savings, but an opportunity to optimize the treatment by allowing tests of different designs. To be able to use scale model treatment as a full-scale design tool, it is necessary that the designer be able to reliably translate the scale model design and performance to an equivalent full-scale design. The primary objective of the study presented in this volume of the final report was to conduct laboratory tests to evaluate liner acoustic properties and validate advanced treatment impedance models. These laboratory tests include DC flow resistance measurements, normal incidence impedance measurements, DC flow and impedance measurements in the presence of grazing flow, and in-duct liner attenuation as well as modal measurements. Test panels were fabricated at three different scale factors (i.e., full-scale, half-scale, and one-fifth scale) to support laboratory acoustic testing. The panel configurations include single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) perforated sandwich panels, SDOF linear (wire mesh) liners, and double-degree-of-freedom (DDOF) linear acoustic panels.

  10. Effect of various methods for rectum delineation on relative and absolute dose-volume histograms for prostate IMRT treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Kusumoto, Chiaki; Ohira, Shingo; Miyazaki, Masayoshi; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Isono, Masaru; Teshima, Teruki

    2016-07-01

    Several reports have dealt with correlations of late rectal toxicity with rectal dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for high dose levels. There are 2 techniques to assess rectal volume for reception of a specific dose: relative-DVH (R-DVH, %) that indicates relative volume for a vertical axis, and absolute-DVH (A-DVH, cc) with its vertical axis showing absolute volume of the rectum. The parameters of DVH vary depending on the rectum delineation method, but the literature does not present any standardization of such methods. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of different delineation methods on rectal DVHs. The enrollment for this study comprised 28 patients with high-risk localized prostate cancer, who had undergone intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with the prescription dose of 78 Gy. The rectum was contoured with 4 different methods using 2 lengths, short (Sh) and long (Lg), and 2 cross sections, rectum (Rec) and rectal wall (Rw). Sh means the length from 1 cm above the seminal vesicles to 1 cm below the prostate and Lg the length from the rectosigmoid junction to the anus. Rec represents the entire rectal volume including the rectal contents and Rw the rectal volume of the area with a wall thickness of 4 mm. We compared dose-volume parameters by using 4 rectal contour methods for the same plan with the R-DVHs as well as the A-DVHs. For the high dose levels, the R-DVH parameters varied widely. The mean of V{sub 70} for Sh-Rw was the highest (19.4%) and nearly twice as high as that for Lg-Rec (10.4%). On the contrary, only small variations were observed in the A-DVH parameters (4.3, 4.3, 5.5, and 5.5 cc for Sh-Rw, Lg-Rw, Sh-Rec, and Lg-Rec, respectively). As for R-DVHs, the parameters of V{sub 70} varied depending on the rectal lengths (Sh-Rec vs Lg-Rec: R = 0.76; Sh-Rw vs Lg-Rw: R = 0.85) and cross sections (Sh-Rec vs Sh-Rw: R = 0.49; Lg-Rec vs Lg-Rw: R = 0.65). For A-DVHs, however, the parameters of Sh rectal A-DVHs hardly changed

  11. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Ten-Year Program Plan Fiscal Year 2005, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    2005-03-01

    As reflected in the U.S. ''National Energy Policy'', nuclear energy has a strong role to play in satisfying our nation's future energy security and environmental quality needs. The desirable environmental, economic, and sustainability attributes of nuclear energy give it a cornerstone position, not only in the U.S. energy portfolio, but also in the world's future energy portfolio. Accordingly, on September 20, 2002, U.S. Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham announced that, ''The United States and nine other countries have agreed to develop six Generation IV nuclear energy concepts''. The Secretary also noted that the systems are expected to ''represent significant advances in economics, safety, reliability, proliferation resistance, and waste minimization''. The six systems and their broad, worldwide research and development (R&D) needs are described in ''A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems'' (hereafter referred to as the Generation IV Roadmap). The first 10 years of required U.S. R&D contributions to achieve the goals described in the Generation IV Roadmap are outlined in this Program Plan.

  12. Resource management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation: Volume 24, Threatened and endangered animal species

    SciTech Connect

    Kroodsma, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    United States and Tennessee laws provide protection for wildlife species that the US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) and the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA) have determined to be endangered or threatened. These laws and their implications for management of the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) are briefly discussed. The historical occurrence, current status, and recommended surveys and management plans for all threatened and endangered (T and E) wildlife species with a reasonable probability of occurring on the ORR are also discussed. Seventeen species of T and E mollusks historically occurred in the Oak Ridge area, but no management action is recommended because reservoir construction and other factors not related to Department of Energy operations have eliminated suitable habitat. Systematic surveys and management actions are also not recommended for three species of T and E fish, one amphibian species, one reptile species, six bird species, and two mammal species because of the very low potential for the occurrence of these species on the ORR. For three T and E bird species on the ORR, no feasible or significantly beneficial management actions could be identified. Surveys and consideration of possible management actions are recommended for three state-listed bird species that occur on or near the ORR and for two federally listed bat species that occur in East Tennessee and may occur on the ORR.

  13. A novel convolution-based approach to address ionization chamber volume averaging effect in model-based treatment planning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barraclough, Brendan; Li, Jonathan G.; Lebron, Sharon; Fan, Qiyong; Liu, Chihray; Yan, Guanghua

    2015-08-01

    The ionization chamber volume averaging effect is a well-known issue without an elegant solution. The purpose of this study is to propose a novel convolution-based approach to address the volume averaging effect in model-based treatment planning systems (TPSs). Ionization chamber-measured beam profiles can be regarded as the convolution between the detector response function and the implicit real profiles. Existing approaches address the issue by trying to remove the volume averaging effect from the measurement. In contrast, our proposed method imports the measured profiles directly into the TPS and addresses the problem by reoptimizing pertinent parameters of the TPS beam model. In the iterative beam modeling process, the TPS-calculated beam profiles are convolved with the same detector response function. Beam model parameters responsible for the penumbra are optimized to drive the convolved profiles to match the measured profiles. Since the convolved and the measured profiles are subject to identical volume averaging effect, the calculated profiles match the real profiles when the optimization converges. The method was applied to reoptimize a CC13 beam model commissioned with profiles measured with a standard ionization chamber (Scanditronix Wellhofer, Bartlett, TN). The reoptimized beam model was validated by comparing the TPS-calculated profiles with diode-measured profiles. Its performance in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA) for ten head-and-neck patients was compared with the CC13 beam model and a clinical beam model (manually optimized, clinically proven) using standard Gamma comparisons. The beam profiles calculated with the reoptimized beam model showed excellent agreement with diode measurement at all measured geometries. Performance of the reoptimized beam model was comparable with that of the clinical beam model in IMRT QA. The average passing rates using the reoptimized beam model increased substantially from 92.1% to

  14. Distance-to-Agreement Investigation of Tomotherapy's Bony Anatomy-Based Autoregistration and Planning Target Volume Contour-Based Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Steve; Schultheiss, Timothy E.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To compare Tomotherapy's megavoltage computed tomography bony anatomy autoregistration with the best achievable registration, assuming no deformation and perfect knowledge of planning target volume (PTV) location. Methods and Materials: Distance-to-agreement (DTA) of the PTV was determined by applying a rigid-body shift to the PTV region of interest of the prostate from its reference position, assuming no deformations. Planning target volume region of interest of the prostate was extracted from the patient archives. The reference position was set by the 6 degrees of freedom (dof)—x, y, z, roll, pitch, and yaw—optimization results from the previous study at this institution. The DTA and the compensating parameters were calculated by the shift of the PTV from the reference 6-dof to the 4-dof—x, y, z, and roll—optimization. In this study, the effectiveness of Tomotherapy's 4-dof bony anatomy–based autoregistration was compared with the idealized 4-dof PTV contour-based optimization. Results: The maximum DTA (maxDTA) of the bony anatomy-based autoregistration was 3.2 ± 1.9 mm, with the maximum value of 8.0 mm. The maxDTA of the contour-based optimization was 1.8 ± 1.3 mm, with the maximum value of 5.7 mm. Comparison of Pearson correlation of the compensating parameters between the 2 4-dof optimization algorithms shows that there is a small but statistically significant correlation in y and z (0.236 and 0.300, respectively), whereas there is very weak correlation in x and roll (0.062 and 0.025, respectively). Conclusions: We find that there is an average improvement of approximately 1 mm in terms of maxDTA on the PTV going from 4-dof bony anatomy-based autoregistration to the 4-dof contour-based optimization. Pearson correlation analysis of the 2 4-dof optimizations suggests that uncertainties due to deformation and inadequate resolution account for much of the compensating parameters, but pitch variation also makes a statistically significant

  15. Design and development of Stirling engines for stationary power generation applications in the 500 to 3000 horsepower range. Volume 2. Program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available,

    1980-09-15

    A plan for implementing the proposed state-of-the-art design described in Volume I has been developed. The main objective of the project is to demonstrate a large coal-fired Stirling engine and thus shorten the lead time to commercialization. The demonstration engine will be based on the concepts developed in the first phase of this program, as detailed in Volume I of this report. Thus the proposed program plan is based on the U-4 engine concept fired by a fluidized bed combustor with a two-stage gravity-assisted heat pipe. The plan is divided into five phases and an ongoing supporting technology program. Phase I, Conceptual Design, has been completed. The remaining phases are: Preliminary Design; Final Design; Fabrication; and Testing and Demonstration. The primary target is to begin testing the large coal-fired engine by the fifth year (1985) after the start of Preliminary Design.

  16. Defining the Optimal Planning Target Volume in Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiosurgery of Brain Metastases: Results of a Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, John P.; Wang, Zhiheng; Sampson, John H.; McSherry, Frances; Herndon, James E.; Allen, Karen J.; Duffy, Eileen; Hoang, Jenny K.; Chang, Zheng; Yoo, David S.; Kelsey, Chris R.; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To identify an optimal margin about the gross target volume (GTV) for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) of brain metastases, minimizing toxicity and local recurrence. Methods and Materials: Adult patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases less than 4 cm in greatest dimension, no previous brain radiation therapy, and Karnofsky performance status (KPS) above 70 were eligible for this institutional review board–approved trial. Individual lesions were randomized to 1- or 3- mm uniform expansion of the GTV defined on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The resulting planning target volume (PTV) was treated to 24, 18, or 15 Gy marginal dose for maximum PTV diameters less than 2, 2 to 2.9, and 3 to 3.9 cm, respectively, using a linear accelerator–based image-guided system. The primary endpoint was local recurrence (LR). Secondary endpoints included neurocognition Mini-Mental State Examination, Trail Making Test Parts A and B, quality of life (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Brain), radionecrosis (RN), need for salvage radiation therapy, distant failure (DF) in the brain, and overall survival (OS). Results: Between February 2010 and November 2012, 49 patients with 80 brain metastases were treated. The median age was 61 years, the median KPS was 90, and the predominant histologies were non–small cell lung cancer (25 patients) and melanoma (8). Fifty-five, 19, and 6 lesions were treated to 24, 18, and 15 Gy, respectively. The PTV/GTV ratio, volume receiving 12 Gy or more, and minimum dose to PTV were significantly higher in the 3-mm group (all P<.01), and GTV was similar (P=.76). At a median follow-up time of 32.2 months, 11 patients were alive, with median OS 10.6 months. LR was observed in only 3 lesions (2 in the 1 mm group, P=.51), with 6.7% LR 12 months after SRS. Biopsy-proven RN alone was observed in 6 lesions (5 in the 3-mm group, P=.10). The 12-month DF rate was 45.7%. Three months after SRS, no significant change in

  17. Treatment Planning and Volumetric Response Assessment for Yttrium-90 Radioembolization: Semiautomated Determination of Liver Volume and Volume of Tumor Necrosis in Patients with Hepatic Malignancy

    SciTech Connect

    Monsky, Wayne L.; Garza, Armando S.; Kim, Isaac; Loh, Shaun; Lin, Tzu-Chun; Li Chinshang; Fisher, Jerron; Sandhu, Parmbir; Sidhar, Vishal; Chaudhari, Abhijit J.; Lin, Frank; Deutsch, Larry-Stuart; Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: The primary purpose of this study was to demonstrate intraobserver/interobserver reproducibility for novel semiautomated measurements of hepatic volume used for Yttrium-90 dose calculations as well as whole-liver and necrotic-liver (hypodense/nonenhancing) tumor volume after radioembolization. The secondary aim was to provide initial comparisons of tumor volumetric measurements with linear measurements, as defined by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors criteria, and survival outcomes. Methods: Between 2006 and 2009, 23 consecutive radioembolization procedures were performed for 14 cases of hepatocellular carcinoma and 9 cases of hepatic metastases. Baseline and follow-up computed tomography obtained 1 month after treatment were retrospectively analyzed. Three observers measured liver, whole-tumor, and tumor-necrosis volumes twice using semiautomated software. Results: Good intraobserver/interobserver reproducibility was demonstrated (intraclass correlation [ICC] > 0.9) for tumor and liver volumes. Semiautomated measurements of liver volumes were statistically similar to those obtained with manual tracing (ICC = 0.868), but they required significantly less time to perform (p < 0.0001, ICC = 0.088). There was a positive association between change in linear tumor measurements and whole-tumor volume (p < 0.0001). However, linear measurements did not correlate with volume of necrosis (p > 0.05). Dose, change in tumor diameters, tumor volume, and necrotic volume did not correlate with survival (p > 0.05 in all instances). However, Kaplan-Meier curves suggest that a >10% increase in necrotic volume correlated with survival (p = 0.0472). Conclusion: Semiautomated volumetric analysis of liver, whole-tumor, and tumor-necrosis volume can be performed with good intraobserver/interobserver reproducibility. In this small retrospective study, measurements of tumor necrosis were suggested to correlate with survival.

  18. A method to obtain correct standard uptake values in Pinnacle treatment planning system for target volume delineation

    PubMed Central

    Salehzahi, Farshid; Tse, Jason; Lee, Jonathan; Selvaraj, Jothybasu

    2016-01-01

    Standardized uptake value (SUV) is an advanced tool for quantitative tumor identification and metabolic target volume delineation (TVD) in diagnostic and therapeutic settings. It is thus important to establish a quality assured process to maintain the traceability of data correctly by positron emission tomography (PET) systems. Patient administration of 18fluoro-deoxy-glucose is increasingly delivered by automated infusion systems (AISs). Whenever AIS is used, its accuracy and traceability measurement need verification. In addition, it was observed that the unreproducible SUV displayed in PET and the treatment planning system (TPS) may cause grave concerns for radiation oncologists for TVD. This concern may complicate the correlation of TVD on PET and TPS and their clinical reporting. The SUV traceability was established from the PET system to AIS. Its accuracy was verified by cross-referencing to the reference dose calibrator traceable to a primary standard. The SUV values were converted in TPS using the in-house “clinical tool” to be identical as in PET, to allow radiation oncologists to use SUV confidently. The outcome of this study enables the clinical groups to rely on the correct SUV values displayed on the TPS and to improve the quality of care for patients in clinical procedures. PMID:28144116

  19. Maryland National Capital Park and Planning Commission, Shady Grove Solar Office Building. Volume 1. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-10-01

    The Shady Grove Solar Office Building is located in Gaithersburg, Maryland, a suburb of Washington, DC. The 3500 square foot structure was designed from the ground up with solar energy as a primary consideration, incorporating both active and passive solar energy collection and storage. The active solar system is designed for heating only. It was determined in the initial design stage that the extra cost of heat exchangers, special piping and pumps would not be justified for DHW considering the small amount of hot water demand in the office. Solar energy is collected by 1500 ft/sup 2/ of KTA tubular solar collectors, stored in a 3000 gallon steel tank, and distributed throughout the building by three water to air heat exchangers in three air handlers. One additional fan coil unit is used for demonstration purposes in the lobby area. The passive system consists of 340 square feet of double glazed windows, oriented true south. This volume includes a narrative description of the building and solar energy system, specifications for the solar energy equipment, acceptance test plans, and photos of the completed project.

  20. Development of whole-building energy design targets for commercial buildings: Phase 1, Planning: Volume 2, Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Crawley, D.B.; Briggs, R.S.; Jones, J.W.; Seaton, W.W.; Kaufman, J.E.; Deringer, J.J.; Kennett, E.W.

    1987-08-01

    This is the second volume of the Phase 1 report and discusses the 10 tasks performed in Phase 1. The objective of this research is to develop a methodology for setting energy design targets to provide voluntary guidelines for the buildings industry. The whole-building energy targets project is being conducted at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) to encourage the construction of energy-efficient buildings by informing designers and owners about cost-effective goals for energy use in new commercial buildings. The outcome of this research will be a flexible methodology for setting such targets. The tasks are listed and discussed in this report as follows: Task 1 - Develop Detailed Project Goals and Objectives; Task 2 - Establish Buildings-Industry Liaison; Task 3 - Develop Approaches to the Energy Targets Model, Building Operations, and Climate; Task 4 - Develop an Approach for Treating Economic Considerations; Task 5 - Develop an Approach for Treating Energy Sources; Task 6 - Collect Energy-Use Data; Task 7 - Survey Energy Expert Opinion; Task 8 - Evaluation Procedure Specification and Integration; Task 9 - Phase 1 Report Development; and Task 10 - Phase 1 Review Planning.

  1. Quantification of Trade-Off Between Parotid Gland Sparing and Planning Target Volume Underdosages in Clinically Node-Negative Head-and-Neck Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kruijf, Wilhelmus de . E-mail: kruijf.de.w@bvi.nl; Heijmen, Ben; Levendag, Peter C.

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To quantify the trade-off between parotid gland sparing and planning target volume (PTV) underdosages for head-and-neck intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A planning study was performed for 4 patients with either soft palate or tonsil tumors treated with external radiotherapy up to 46 Gy. The trade-off between underdosages in the PTV and sparing of the parotid glands was investigated by systematically varying the optimization objectives for the inverse planning. A new way of presenting dose-volume information allows easy detection of small PTV subvolumes with underdosages that cannot be assessed in conventional cumulative dose-volume histograms. A simple radiobiological model to estimate the control probability for an electively irradiated neck level was developed. Results: The average dose to the parotid glands can decrease by >10 Gy by allowing the PTV to be underdosed in such a way that the radiobiological model predicts a decrease in subclinical disease control probability of (typically) 1% to a few percent. Conclusion: The trade-off between parotid gland sparing and underdosages in the PTV has been quantified by the use of an alternative method to present dose-volume information and by the use of a radiobiological model to predict subclinical disease control probability.

  2. Adapting and Testing Business Management Development Programs for Educational Administrators. Volume 5 of 6 Volumes. Appendix I-Planning Document: North Carolina LEA, Laurinburg-Scotland. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klawuhn, Raymond E.; Basso, Alexander J.

    This document is comprised of an appendix that provides a portion of the materials utilized in the project to test the feasibility of adapting business management practices to educational institutions. Included is the educational planning process document for one of the eight participating management teams. The planning process document states the…

  3. Dosimetric accuracy of a treatment planning system for actively scanned proton beams and small target volumes: Monte Carlo and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magro, G.; Molinelli, S.; Mairani, A.; Mirandola, A.; Panizza, D.; Russo, S.; Ferrari, A.; Valvo, F.; Fossati, P.; Ciocca, M.

    2015-09-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the accuracy of a commercial treatment planning system (TPS), in optimising proton pencil beam dose distributions for small targets of different sizes (5-30 mm side) located at increasing depths in water. The TPS analytical algorithm was benchmarked against experimental data and the FLUKA Monte Carlo (MC) code, previously validated for the selected beam-line. We tested the Siemens syngo® TPS plan optimisation module for water cubes fixing the configurable parameters at clinical standards, with homogeneous target coverage to a 2 Gy (RBE) dose prescription as unique goal. Plans were delivered and the dose at each volume centre was measured in water with a calibrated PTW Advanced Markus® chamber. An EBT3® film was also positioned at the phantom entrance window for the acquisition of 2D dose maps. Discrepancies between TPS calculated and MC simulated values were mainly due to the different lateral spread modeling and resulted in being related to the field-to-spot size ratio. The accuracy of the TPS was proved to be clinically acceptable in all cases but very small and shallow volumes. In this contest, the use of MC to validate TPS results proved to be a reliable procedure for pre-treatment plan verification.

  4. SU-E-J-88: Margin Reduction of Level II/III Planning Target Volume for Image-Guided Simultaneous Integrated Boost Head-And-Neck Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Can, S; Neylon, J; Qi, S; Santhanam, A; Low, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of improved normal tissue sparing for head-and-neck (H'N) image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) by employing tighter CTV-to-PTV margins for target level II/III though a GPU-based deformable image registration and dose accumulation framework. Methods: Ten H'N simultaneous integrated boost cases treated on TomoTherapy were retrospectively analyzed. Weekly kVCT scans in addition to daily MVCT scans were acquired for each patient. Reduced margin plans were generated with 0- mm margin for level II and III PTV (while 3-5 mm margin for PTV1) and compared with the standard margin plan using 3-5mm margin to all CTV1-3 (reference plan). An in-house developed GPU-based 3D image deformation tool was used to register and deform the weekly KVCTs with the planning CT and determine the delivered mean/minimum/maximum dose, dose volume histograms (DVHs), etc. Results: Compared with the reference plans, the averaged cord maximum, the right and left parotid doses reduced by 22.7 %, 16.5 %, and 9 % respectively in the reduced margin plans. The V95 for PTV2 and PTV3 were found within 2 and 5% between the reference and tighter margin plans. For the reduced margin plans, the averaged cumulative mean doses were consistent with the planned dose for PTV1, PTV2 and PTV3 within 1.5%, 1.7% and 1.4%. Similar dose variations of the delivered dose were seen for the reference and tighter margin plans. The delivered maximum and mean doses for the cord were 3.55 % and 2.37% higher than the planned doses; a 5 % higher cumulative mean dose for the parotids was also observed for the delivered dose than the planned doses in both plans. Conclusion: By imposing tighter CTV-to-PTV margins for level II and III targets for H'N irradiation, acceptable cumulative doses were achievable when coupled with weekly kVCT guidance while improving normal structure sparing.

  5. A New Brain Positron Emission Tomography Scanner With Semiconductor Detectors for Target Volume Delineation and Radiotherapy Treatment Planning in Patients With Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Katoh, Norio; Yasuda, Koichi; Shiga, Tohru; Hasegawa, Masakazu; Onimaru, Rikiya; Shimizu, Shinichi; Bengua, Gerard; Ishikawa, Masayori; Tamaki, Nagara; Shirato, Hiroki

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: We compared two treatment planning methods for stereotactic boost for treating nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC): the use of conventional whole-body bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillator positron emission tomography (PET{sub CONV}WB) versus the new brain (BR) PET system using semiconductor detectors (PET{sub NEW}BR). Methods and Materials: Twelve patients with NPC were enrolled in this study. [{sup 18}F]Fluorodeoxyglucose-PET images were acquired using both the PET{sub NEW}BR and the PET{sub CONV}WB system on the same day. Computed tomography (CT) and two PET data sets were transferred to a treatment planning system, and the PET{sub CONV}WB and PET{sub NEW}BR images were coregistered with the same set of CT images. Window width and level values for all PET images were fixed at 3000 and 300, respectively. The gross tumor volume (GTV) was visually delineated on PET images by using either PET{sub CONV}WB (GTV{sub CONV}) images or PET{sub NEW}BR (GTV{sub NEW}) images. Assuming a stereotactic radiotherapy boost of 7 ports, the prescribed dose delivered to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) was set to 2000 cGy in 4 fractions. Results: The average absolute volume ({+-}standard deviation [SD]) of GTV{sub NEW} was 15.7 ml ({+-}9.9) ml, and that of GTV{sub CONV} was 34.0 ({+-}20.5) ml. The average GTV{sub NEW} was significantly smaller than that of GTV{sub CONV} (p = 0.0006). There was no statistically significant difference between the maximum dose (p = 0.0585) and the mean dose (p = 0.2748) of PTV. The radiotherapy treatment plan based on the new gross tumor volume (PLAN{sub NEW}) significantly reduced maximum doses to the cerebrum and cerebellum (p = 0.0418) and to brain stem (p = 0.0041). Conclusion: Results of the present study suggest that the new brain PET system using semiconductor detectors can provide more accurate tumor delineation than the conventional whole-body BGO PET system and may be an important tool for functional and molecular radiotherapy

  6. Adapting and Testing Business Management Development Programs for Educational Administrators. Volume 3 of 6 Volumes. Appendix E-Planning Document: Maryland LEA, Prince George's Co., Appendix F-Planning Document: North Carolina SEA, Executive Staff. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klawuhn, Raymond E.; Basso, Alexander J.

    This document is comprised of two appendixes that provide a portion of the materials utilized in the project to test the feasibility of adapting business management practices to educational institutions. Included are the educational planning process documents for two of the eight participating management teams. Each planning process document…

  7. Adapting and Testing Business Management Development Programs for Educational Administrators. Volume 4 of 6 Volumes. Appendix G-Planning Document: North Carolina SEA, Program Services. Appendix H-Planning Document: North Carolina LEA, Cabarrus County. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klawuhn, Raymond E.; Basso, Alexander J.

    This document is comprised of two appendixes that provide a portion of the materials utilized in the project to test the feasibility of adapting business management practices to educational institutions. Included are the educational planning process documents for two of the eight participating management teams. Each planning process document…

  8. Prostate Planning Treatment Volume Margin Calculation Based on the ExacTrac X-Ray 6D Image-Guided System: Margins for Various Clinical Implementations

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso-Arrizabalaga, Sara Brualla Gonzalez, Luis; Rosello Ferrando, Juan V.; Pastor Peidro, Jorge; Lopez Torrecilla, Jose; Planes Meseguer, Domingo; Garcia Hernandez, Trinidad

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To assess the prostate motion from day-to-day setup, as well as during irradiation time, to calculate planning target volume (PTV) margins. PTV margins differ depending on the clinical implementation of an image-guided system. Three cases were considered in this study: daily bony anatomy match, center of gravity of the implanted marker seeds calculated with a limited number of imaged days, and daily online correction based on implanted marker seeds. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 30 nonrandomized patients and 1,330 pairs of stereoscopic kV images have been used to determine the prostate movement. The commercial image guided positioning tool employed was ExacTrac X-Ray 6D (BrainLAB AG, Feldkirchen, Germany). Results: Planning target volume margins such that a minimum of 95% of the prescribed dose covers the clinical target volume for 90% of the population are presented. PTV margins based on daily bony anatomy match, including intrafraction correction, would be 11.5, 13.5, and 4.5 mm in the anterior-posterior, superior-inferior, and right-left directions, respectively. This margin can be further reduced to 8.1, 8.6, and 4.8 mm (including intrafraction motion) if implanted marker seeds are used. Finally, daily on line correction based on marker seeds would result in the smallest of the studied margins: 4.7, 6.2, and 1.9 mm. Conclusion: Planning target volume margins are dependent on the local clinical use of the image-guided RT system available in any radiotherapy department.

  9. Site plan safety submission for sampling, monitoring and decontamination of mustard agent, South Plant, Rocky Mountain Arsenal. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-10-01

    The scope of this site plan safety submission (SPSS) includes: (1) Sampling plan to determine if H is a contaminant in Equipment and piping used in the 1970's for the H DEMIL program; (2) Monitoring plan for personnel involved in the sampling effort; and (3) Decon plan for personnel, equipment, and piping should contamination be identified. Additional sections and appendices include: (1) Historical use of Bld 637 and Bld 538; (2) Chemical information on H, HD, and HT; (3) Safety requirements; (4) Medical requirements and first aid procedures; (5) Piping drawings; and (6) RMA SOP's for sampling, monitoring, and decon.

  10. Site plan safety submission for sampling, monitoring, decontamination of GB agent - north plant Rocky Mountain Arsenal. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-10-01

    The scope of this site plan safety submission (SPSS), includes: sampling plan to determine if GB is a contaminant in equipment and piping used in the production and demil processes; monitoring plan for personnel involved in the sampling effort; decon plan for personnel, equipment, and piping should contamination be identified. Additional sections and appendices include: historical use of bldg 1501, 1503, 1504, 1506, 1601, 1602, 1603, 1606; chemical information on GB; safety requirements; medical requirements and first aid procedures; piping drawings; rma sop's for sampling, monitoring, and decon.

  11. Department of State Strategic Planning Workshop II. Center for Strategic Leadership Issue Paper, Volume 01-02

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-04-01

    This workshop was organized to expose State Department employees to the Army’s strategic planning process and how it is integrated into the...professional military education, and military strategic planning concepts and methodologies. State Department participants devoted the second day to

  12. Financial constraints in capacity planning: a national utility regulatory model (NUREG). Volume II of III: user's guide. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-10-29

    This volume is a User's Guide to the National Utility Regulatory Model (NUREG) and its implementation of the National Coal Model. This is the second of three volumes provided by ICF under contract number DEAC-01-79EI-10579. These three volumes are: a manual describing the NUREG methodology; a users guide; and a description of the software. This manual provides a brief introduction to the National Utility Regulation Model, describes the various programs that comprise the National Utility Regulatory Model, gives sample input files, and provides information needed to run the model.

  13. Financial constraints in capacity planning: a national utility regulatory model (NUREG). Volume I of III: methodology. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-10-29

    This report develops and demonstrates the methodology for the National Utility Regulatory (NUREG) Model developed under contract number DEAC-01-79EI-10579. It is accompanied by two supporting volumes. Volume II is a user's guide for operation of the NUREG software. This includes description of the flow of software and data, as well as the formats of all user data files. Finally, Volume III is a software description guide. It briefly describes, and gives a listing of, each program used in NUREG.

  14. Air Force Global Weather Central System Architecture Study. Final System/Subsystem Summary Report. Volume 6. Aerospace Ground Equipment Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-03-01

    1, 2, and 3) Volume 3 - Classified Requirements Topics (Secret) Volume 4 - Systems Analysis and Trade Studies Volume 5 - System Description ...General 18 3.1.1 End Item Description and Types of Functions 18 3.1.2 Factors Affecting Operating AGE 19 3.2 Operational Complex Operating Functions... Description of System (Maintenance Aspects) . . . 54 3.1.2 Development of Maintenance Complex 57 1v ■MML ""’:"irfcMiirMiiii i k ■ ■ ■ ’ wnwmf

  15. Evaluation of sampling plans for in-service inspection of steam generator tubes. Volume 2, Comprehensive analytical and Monte Carlo simulation results for several sampling plans

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, R.J.; Heasler, P.G.; Baird, D.B.

    1994-02-01

    This report summarizes the results of three previous studies to evaluate and compare the effectiveness of sampling plans for steam generator tube inspections. An analytical evaluation and Monte Carlo simulation techniques were the methods used to evaluate sampling plan performance. To test the performance of candidate sampling plans under a variety of conditions, ranges of inspection system reliability were considered along with different distributions of tube degradation. Results from the eddy current reliability studies performed with the retired-from-service Surry 2A steam generator were utilized to guide the selection of appropriate probability of detection and flaw sizing models for use in the analysis. Different distributions of tube degradation were selected to span the range of conditions that might exist in operating steam generators. The principal means of evaluating sampling performance was to determine the effectiveness of the sampling plan for detecting and plugging defective tubes. A summary of key results from the eddy current reliability studies is presented. The analytical and Monte Carlo simulation analyses are discussed along with a synopsis of key results and conclusions.

  16. Power Extension Package (PEP) system definition extension, orbital service module systems analysis study. Volume 10: PEP project plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Contents: project plan summary; project and mission objectives; related studies and technology support activities; technical summary; management; procurement approach; project definition items and schedule; resources; management review; controlled items; and safety, reliability, and quality assurance.

  17. Preliminary analysis of an integrated logistics system for OSSA payloads. Volume 3: OSSA integrated logistics support planning document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palguta, T.; Bradley, W.; Stockton, T.

    1988-01-01

    Guidance in preparing and updating an integrated logistics support plan (ILSP) is given. Clear, concise, and detailed instructions are provided on the preparation and content of an ILSP in order to ensure a quality document that reflects total program requirements.

  18. SeaWiFS Technical Report Series. Volume 42; Satellite Primary Productivity Data and Algorithm Development: A Science Plan for Mission to Planet Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falkowski, Paul G.; Behrenfeld, Michael J.; Esaias, Wayne E.; Balch, William; Campbell, Janet W.; Iverson, Richard L.; Kiefer, Dale A.; Morel, Andre; Yoder, James A.; Hooker, Stanford B. (Editor); Firestone, Elaine R. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    Two issues regarding primary productivity, as it pertains to the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) Program and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Mission to Planet Earth (MTPE) are presented in this volume. Chapter 1 describes the development of a science plan for deriving primary production for the world ocean using satellite measurements, by the Ocean Primary Productivity Working Group (OPPWG). Chapter 2 presents discussions by the same group, of algorithm classification, algorithm parameterization and data availability, algorithm testing and validation, and the benefits of a consensus primary productivity algorithm.

  19. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Corrective Action Plan in response to Tiger Team assessment. Volume 2, Revision 5

    SciTech Connect

    Kuliasha, Michael A.

    1991-08-23

    This report presents a complete response to the Tiger Team assessment that was conducted to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) from October 2, 1990, through November 30, 1990. The action plans have undergone both a discipline review and a cross-cutting review with respect to root cause. In addition, the action plans have been integrated with initiatives being pursued across Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., in response to Tiger Team findings at other DOE facilities operated by Energy Systems. The root cause section is complete and describes how ORNL intends to address the root cause of the findings identified during the assessment. This report is concerned with reactors safety and health findings, responses, and planned actions. Specific areas include: organization and administration; quality verification; operations; maintenance; training and certification; auxiliary systems; emergency preparedness; technical support; nuclear criticality safety; security/safety interface; experimental activities; site/facility safety review; radiological protection; personnel protection; fire protection; management findings, responses, and planned actions; self-assessment findings, responses, and planned actions; and summary of planned actions, schedules, and costs.

  20. U.S. Department of Energy Space and Defense Power Systems Program Ten-Year Strategic Plan, Volume 1 and Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Dwight, Carla

    2013-06-01

    The Department of Energy's Space and Defense Power Systems program provides a unique capability for supplying power systems that function in remote or hostile environments. This capability has been functioning since the early 1960s and counts the National Aeronautics and Space Administration as one of its most prominent customers. This enabling technology has assisted the exploration of our solar system including the planets Jupiter, Saturn, Mars, Neptune, and soon Pluto. This capability is one-of-kind in the world in terms of its experience (over five decades), breadth of power systems flown (over two dozen to date) and range of power levels (watts to hundreds of watts). This document describes the various components of that infrastructure, work scope, funding needs, and its strategic plans going forward.

  1. Tank Waste Remediation System fiscal year 1996 multi-year program plan WBS 1.1. Revision 1, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The 1995 Hanford Mission Plan specifically addresses the tank waste issue and clarifies the link with other initiatives, such as improving management practices and the Hanford Site Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Program Plan (DOE/RL-91-31). This document captures the results of decision making regarding the application of systems engineering at the Hanford Site, external involvement policy, and site end-state goals. Section 3.5 of the Hanford Mission Plan on Decisions and Directives provides an integrating discussion of the actions of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), and DOE policy, guidance, and decisions associated with binding agreements such as the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement). Two significant components of the Hanford Mission Plan 1994 planning basis are (1) the decisions regarding the disposition of onsite material inventory, and the key programs and interfaces to accomplish this; and (2) the Program Interface Issues section, which identified issues that stretch across program boundaries.

  2. Site Characterization Plan: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada: Volume 3, Part A: Chapters 6 and 7

    SciTech Connect

    1988-12-01

    This site characterization plan (SCP) has been developed for the candidate repository site at Yucca Mountain in the State of Nevada. The SCP includes a description of the Yucca Mountain site (Chapters 1-5), a conceptual design for the repository (Chapter 6), a description of the packaging to be used for the waste to be emplaced in the repository (Chapter 7), and a description of the planned site characterization activities (Chapter 8). The schedules and milestones presented in Sections 8.3 and 8.5 of the SCP were developed to be consistent with the June 1988 draft Amendment to the DOE`s Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. The five month delay in the scheduled start of exploratory shaft construction that was announced recently is not reflected in these schedules. 218 figs., 50 tabs.

  3. Technique for integrative energy planning in developing nations with illustrative application to Pakistan. (Volumes I and II)

    SciTech Connect

    Ciliano, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on the conceptual definition, development and illustrative application of a new methodology for integrative energy planning in less developed countries (LDCs). The author terms his approach the Integrative Planning Technique (IPT). The IPT provides a direct linkage between sectoral activity levels and targets specified in the overall economic development plan and the energy system physical infrastructure and resource flows upon which they depend. Central concepts within the IPT include (a) the Energy Resource Delivery Network (ERDN), a network representation of the overall energy system from resource extraction through ultimate end-use; and (b) the Resource Coefficient Table (RCT), a computational matrix method which prepares inputs to the ERDN and provides the building block basis for translating policy initiatives relating to new technology penetration, interfuel substitution, and re-directed development targets into corresponding energy requirements associated with policy implementation.

  4. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada: Volume 1, Part A: Chapters 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    1988-12-01

    This site characterization plan (SCP) has been developed for the candidate repository site at Yucca Mountain in the State of Nevada. The SCP includes a description of the Yucca Mountain site (Chapters 1-5), a conceptual design for the repository (Chapter 6), a description of the packaging to be used for the waste to be emplaced in the repository (Chapter 7), and a description of the planned site characterization activities (Chapter 8). The schedules and milestones presented in Sections 8.3 and 8.5 of the SCP were developed to be consistent with the June 1988 draft Amendment to the DOE`s Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. The five month delay in the scheduled start of exploratory shaft construction that was announced recently is not reflected in these schedules. 750 refs., 123 figs., 42 tabs.

  5. MOX capsule post-irradiation examination. Volume 2: Test plan for 30-GWd/MT burnup fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, R.N.

    1997-12-01

    This test plan is a Level-2 document as defined in the Fissile Materials Disposition Program Light-Water Reactor Mixed-Oxide Fuel Irradiation Test Project Plan. The planned post-irradiation examination (PIE) work to be performed on the mixed uranium and plutonium oxide fuel capsules that have received burnups of approximately 30 GWd/MT is described. The major emphasis of this PIE task will be material interactions, particularly indications of gallium transport and interactions. This PIE will include gamma scanning, ceramography, metallography, pellet radial gallium analysis, and clad gallium analysis. A preliminary PIE report will be generated before all the work is completed so that the progress of the fuel irradiation may be known in a timely manner.

  6. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Corrective Action Plan in response to Tiger Team assessment. Volume 1, Revision 5

    SciTech Connect

    Kuliasha, Michael A.

    1991-08-23

    This report presents a complete response to the Tiger Team assessment that was conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) from October 22, 1990, through November 30, 1990. The action plans have undergone both a discipline review and a cross-cutting review with respect to root cause. In addition, the action plans have been integrated with initiatives being pursued across Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., in response to Tiger Team findings at other DOE facilities operated by Energy Systems. The root cause section is complete and describes how ORNL intends to address the root causes of the findings identified during the assessment. The action plan has benefited from a complete review by various offices at DOE Headquarters as well as review by the Tiger Team that conducted the assessment to ensure that the described actions are responsive to the observed problems.

  7. Performance-based ratemaking for electric utilities: Review of plans and analysis of economic and resource-planning issues. Volume 2, Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Comnes, G.A.; Stoft, S.; Greene, N.; Hill, L.J.

    1995-11-01

    This document contains summaries of the electric utilities performance-based rate plans for the following companies: Alabama Power Company; Central Maine Power Company; Consolidated Edison of New York; Mississippi Power Company; New York State Electric and Gas Corporation; Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation; PacifiCorp; Pacific Gas and Electric; Southern California Edison; San Diego Gas & Electric; and Tucson Electric Power. In addition, this document also contains information about LBNL`s Power Index and Incentive Properties of a Hybrid Cap and Long-Run Demand Elasticity.

  8. The Coordination of Program Planning and Evaluation Systems for Occupational Education. Volume 2: A Targeting System for Occupational Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riverside Research Inst., New York, NY.

    The second volume of the final report deals with the targeting system--one of a hierarchy of systems required to support the effective delivery of superior occupational education. It determines that program objectives match student training in occupations, that the best choice of occupations in which to train students has been made, and that the…

  9. Entrepreneurship Education for Agriculture. Phase "O" Planning Project Report. Performance Report. Volume II: Bibliography and Storyboard Scripts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee and Associates, Starkville, MS.

    Volume 2 of this report is supplementary and contains three bibliographies: (1) Annotated Bibliography on Minority Entrepreneurship in Agriculture; (2) Annotated Bibliography on Entrepreneurship Education in Agriculture; (3) Bibliography on Entrepreneurship. The next section presents three storyboard scripts for instructional videotapes on…

  10. Fully automatic guidance and control for rotorcraft nap-of-the-Earth flight following planned profiles. Volume 1: Real-time piloted simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, Warren F.; Gorder, Peter J.; Jewell, Wayne F.

    1991-01-01

    Developing a single-pilot, all-weather nap-of-the-earth (NOE) capability requires fully automatic NOE (ANOE) navigation and flight control. Innovative guidance and control concepts are investigated in a four-fold research effort that: (1) organizes the on-board computer-based storage and real-time updating of NOE terrain profiles and obstacles in course-oriented coordinates indexed to the mission flight plan; (2) defines a class of automatic anticipative pursuit guidance algorithms and necessary data preview requirements to follow the vertical, lateral, and longitudinal guidance commands dictated by the updated flight profiles; (3) automates a decision-making process for unexpected obstacle avoidance; and (4) provides several rapid response maneuvers. Acquired knowledge from the sensed environment is correlated with the forehand knowledge of the recorded environment (terrain, cultural features, threats, and targets), which is then used to determine an appropriate evasive maneuver if a nonconformity of the sensed and recorded environments is observed. This four-fold research effort was evaluated in both fixed-based and moving-based real-time piloted simulations, thereby, providing a practical demonstration for evaluating pilot acceptance of the automated concepts, supervisory override, manual operation, and re-engagement of the automatic system. Volume one describes the major components of the guidance and control laws as well as the results of the piloted simulations. Volume two describes the complete mathematical model of the fully automatic guidance system for rotorcraft NOE flight following planned flight profiles.

  11. Old hydrofracture facility tanks contents removal action operations plan at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Text. Volume 2: Checklists and work instructions

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    This Operations Plan summarizes the operating activities for transferring contents of five low-level (radioactive) liquid waste storage tanks associated with the Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) to the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST) for secure storage. The transfer will be accomplished through sluicing and pumping operations which are designed to pump the slurry in a closed circuit system using a sluicing nozzle to resuspend the sludge. Once resuspended, the slurry will be transferred to the MVST. The report documenting the material transfer will be prepared after transfer of the tank materials has been completed. The OBF tanks contain approximately 52,600 gal (199,000 L) of low-level radioactive waste consisting of both sludge and supernatant. This material is residual from the now-abandoned grout injection operations conducted from 1964 to 1980. Total curie content is approximately 30,000 Ci. A sluicing and pumping system has been specifically designed for the OHF tanks contents transfer operations. This system is remotely operated and incorporates a sluicing nozzle and arm (Borehole Miner) originally designed for use in the mining industry. The Borehole Miner is an in-tank device designed to deliver a high pressure jet spray via an extendable nozzle. In addition to removing the waste from the tanks, the use of this equipment will demonstrate applicability for additional underground storage tank cleaning throughout the U.S. Department of Energy complex. Additional components of the complete sluicing and pumping system consist of a high pressure pumping system for transfer to the MVST, a low pressure pumping system for transfer to the recycle tank, a ventilation system for providing negative pressure on tanks, and instrumentation and control systems for remote operation and monitoring.

  12. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1988-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site; to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for a repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. Chapter 3 summarizes present knowledge of the regional and site hydrologic systems. The purpose of the information presented is to (1) describe the hydrology based on available literature and preliminary site-exploration activities that have been or are being performed and (2) provide information to be used to develop the hydrologic aspects of the planned site characterization program. Chapter 4 contains geochemical information about the Yucca Mountain site. The chapter references plan for continued collection of geochemical data as a part of the site characterization program. Chapter 4 describes and evaluates data on the existing climate and site meterology, and outlines the suggested procedures to be used in developing and validating methods to predict future climatic variation. 534 refs., 100 figs., 72 tabs.

  13. A Bibliography of Literature on Planned or Implemented Automated Library Projects, Part I; Volume 9, World Survey Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrinostro, Frank S., Comp.; Sanders, Nancy P., Ed.

    The primary purposes of this bibliography are to present an overview of published works which relate to the use of new technologies in library operations, to call attention to a number of valuable reference works published on the subject, and to assist librarians and library systems scientists who are engaged in the planning and/or implementation…

  14. Chaos Theory & Higher Education: Leadership, Planning, & Policy. Higher Education: Questions about the Purpose(s) of Colleges & Universities. Volume 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutright, Marc, Ed.

    This anthology considers some ways that chaos theory might be not only a descriptive metaphor for the conditions of leadership, planning, and policy in higher education, but also a prescriptive metaphor that might be used to improve these functions and others. The essays are: (1) "Introduction: Metaphor, Chaos Theory, and This Book" (Marc…

  15. Steps for Developing a School Emergency Management Plan. Helpful Hints for School Emergency Management. Volume 2, Issue 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Education's Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools strongly encourages schools and school districts to develop emergency management plans within the context of the four phases of emergency management: prevention, mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery. In addition, schools should collaborate closely with police, fire…

  16. Planning and Conducting a Functional Exercise. Helpful Hints for School Emergency Management. Volume 2, Issue 4, 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    A key component of comprehensive school and school district emergency management plans is an exercise program that includes the five types of exercises: (1) orientation seminars; (2) drills; (3) tabletop exercises; and (4) functional exercises. Functional exercises are excellent tools for testing the extent to which an existing emergency…

  17. Updating and Maintaining School Emergency Management Plans. Helpful Hints for School Emergency Management. Volume 2, Issue 3, 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    "Helpful Hints" offers a quick overview of school emergency preparedness topics that are frequently the subject of inquiries. Developing and implementing comprehensive, multi-hazard emergency management plans is an ongoing process that must be consistently reinforced and strengthened. Opportunities for reviewing, strengthening and updating…

  18. SU-E-T-288: Dose Volume Population Histogram (DVPH): A New Method to Evaluate Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Plans With Geometrical Uncertainties

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, T; Mai, N; Nguyen, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In Proton therapy, especially intensity modulated proton therapy(IMPT), the dose distribution shape is very sensitive to errors due to sharp dose gradients at the Bragg peaks. The concept of the conventional margin is based on the assumption that dose distribution is shifted rather than deformed due to geometrical uncertainties. The goal of this study is to access the validity of the margin concept as well as propose a new approach using Dose Volume Population Histogram (DVPH) in evaluating IMPT plans. Methods: For a prostate case, an intensity modulated proton therapy is optimized based on the conventional PTV based objective function. The plan is evaluated based on the PTV DVH and CTV DVPH (dose volume population histogram) which explicitly taking into account geometric uncertainties. The DVPH is calculated based on 2197 dose distributions at different CTV possible positions for both random and systematic errors. The DVPH with a 90% confidence level is used for the comparison. Results: The minimum dose of the CTV DVPH with a 90% confidence level is only about 18% of the prescribed dose, while the minimum dose of the PTV is 95%. For bladder DVHs, the D50 and D35 is 26% and 30%, compared to 65% and 70% of the prescribed dose from the bladder DVPH with 90% confidence level. Conclusion: The results showed that the PTV concept for ensuring the prescribed dose actually delivered to the CTV is invalid in proton therapy. The good PTV DVH might Result in an underdose to the target and should not be used for IMPT optimization. For OARs, the conventional evaluation approach underestimates dose volume end points. The new concept DVPH has been proved to provide a more accurate DVH evaluation in proton therapy.

  19. Government Performance and Results Act: Performance plan FY 1999, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Fuches, J.L.

    1998-02-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC) strategic plan [NUREG-1614, Vol. 1, September 1997] establishes a strategic framework that will guide future decision-making and will help the NRC continue to meet its responsibility for protecting public health and safety, promoting the common defense and security, and protecting the environment. This performance plan complements the agency`s strategic plan by setting annual goals with measurable target levels of performance for FY 1999, as required by the Government Performance and Results Act. No significant contribution was made to the preparation of the performance plan by any non-Federal entity. However, a contractor was used to help facilitate discussions and resolution of issues. Within six months after the close of FY 1999, the NRC will submit to the President and the Congress a report on program performance for FY 1999. This performance report will review the success of the agency in achieving the performance goals established for FY 1999. Where those goals have been achieved, the underlying assumptions and strategies will be examined to ensure that continued applicability is warranted in the future. If any of the FY 1999 performance goals are not met, the agency will conduct a thorough analysis of why it did not meet the goal and the actions necessary to meet-the goal in the future. One result of this analysis will be the documentation of plans and schedules for achieving the established performance goal. If the analysis should indicate that the performance goal is impractical or infeasible, the performance report will document why that is the case and what action is recommended.

  20. Photovoltaic system criteria documents. Volume 1: Guidelines for evaluating the management and operations planning of photovoltaic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, John C.; Billitti, Joseph W.; Tallon, John M.

    1979-01-01

    Guidelines are provided to the Field Centers for organization, scheduling, project and cost control, and performance in the areas of project management and operations planning for Photovoltaics Test and Applications. These guidelines may be used in organizing a T and A Project Team for system design/test, site construction and operation, and as the basis for evaluating T and A proposals. The attributes are described for project management and operations planning to be used by the Field Centers. Specifically, all project management and operational issues affecting costs, schedules and performance of photovoltaic systems are addressed. Photovoltaic tests and applications include residential, intermediate load center, central station, and stand-alone systems. The sub-categories of system maturity considered are: Initial System Evaluation Experiments (ISEE); System Readiness Experiments (SRE); and Commercial Readiness Demonstration Projects (CRDP).

  1. Site Plan Safety Submission for Sampling, Monitoring and Decontamination of Mustard Agent, South Plant, Rocky Mountain Arsenal. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-01

    Mustard is an insidious vesicant or blistering agent and has been identified as carcinogenic , mutagenic, and teratogenic. The agent’s garlic-like odor...butyl rubber . " Nonstandard gloves will be used only in a manner which prohibits intentional contact and has low potential for unintentional contact... rubber impermeable protective clothing will burn and does not possess self-extinguishing properties. Therefore, contact with an SPSS Plan - South Plant

  2. Strategy Planning Visualization Tool (SPVT) for the Air Operations Center (AOC) Volume I: SPVT Summary and COA Sketch

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    significant role during the ops assessment process by dictating how much each individual lower level assessment is able to influence the success or...portions of the plan, from Assumptions and Limitations, to desired effects, objectives and tasks. For example, an influence operations area, a named...participants provided a breadth of experience across the AOC strategy, operational assessment, combat operations, influence operations and intelligence roles

  3. SSTAC/ARTS review of the draft Integrated Technology Plan (ITP). Volume 3: Space power and thermal management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs of briefings from the SSTAC/ARTS review of the draft integrated technology plan on thermal power and thermal management are presented. Topics covered include: space energy conversion research and technology; space photovoltaic energy conversion; chemical energy conversion and storage; thermal energy conversion; power management; thermal management; space nuclear power; high capacity power; surface power and thermal management; space platforms power and thermal management; and project SELENE.

  4. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 7

    SciTech Connect

    1988-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain site in Neavada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended and approved for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site;to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package;and to present the plans for obtaining hte geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for a repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare and environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. This introduction begins with a brief section on the process for siting and developing a repository, followed by a discussion of the pertinent legislation and regulations. A description of site characterization is presented next;it describes the facilities to be constructed for the site characterization program and explains the principal activities to be conducted during the program. Finally, the purpose, content, organizing principles, and organization of this site characterization plan are outlined, and compliance with applicable regulations is discussed.

  5. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 4

    SciTech Connect

    1988-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended and approved by the President for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site; to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package; and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstate the suitability of the site for a repository, to desin the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. This introduction begins with a brief section on the process for siting and developing a repository, followed by a discussion of the pertinent legislation and regulations. A description of site characterization is presented next; it describes the facilities to be constructed for the site characterization program and explains the principal activities to be conducted during the program. Finally, the purpose, content, organizing principles, and organization of this site characterization plan are outlined, and compliance with applicable regulations is discussed.

  6. Woodbridge Army Research Facility RI/FS; volume 1. Field sampling plan. Report for 1995-1996

    SciTech Connect

    Choynowski, J.; Ehlers, M.; Elias, M.; Garcia, M.; Henry, C.

    1996-02-01

    U.S. Army Woodbridge Research Facility (WRF) was used in the past as a major military communications center and a research and development laboratory where electromagnetic pulse energy was tested on military and other equipment. WRF is presently an inactive facility pursuant to the 1991 Base Realignment and Closure list. Past investigation activities indicate that polychlorinated biphenyl compounds (PCBs) are primary chemicals of concern. The WRF is presently in the process of being turned over to the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to be used as a wildlife refuge and training facility. This task calls for provision of the necessary staff and equipment to provide remedial investigation/feasibility support for the USAEC BRAC Program investigation at WRF. The scope of work includes Focused Feasibility Studies, Remedial Investigations, Feasibility Studies, ecological assessments, risk assessments, proposed plans, RODs, and community relations support. This Field Sampling Plan contains a description of the site, sample location rationale, technical approach to field operations, site safety procedures, and methods for ecological assessments, analyses of samples, data management, and disposal of investigation-derived wastes. Information contained in other plans which accompany this submittal is identified.

  7. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1988-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in acordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site;to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for a repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. This introduction begins with a brief section on the process for siting and eveloping a repository, followed by a discussion of the pertinent legislation and regulations. A description of site characterization is presented next;it describes the facilities to be constructed for the site characterization program and explains the principal activities to be conducted during the program. Finally, the purpose, content, organizing prinicples, and organization of this site characterization plan are outlined, and compliance with applicable regulations is discussed. 880 refs., 130 figs., 25 tabs.

  8. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 6

    SciTech Connect

    1988-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site;to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package;and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. This introduction begins with a brief section on the process for siting and developing a repository, followed by a discussion of the pertinent legislation and regulations. A description of site characterization is presented next;it describes the facilities to be constructed for the site characterization program and explains the principal activities to be conducted during the program. Finally, the purpose, content, organizing principles, and organization of this site characterization plan are outlined, and compliance with applicable regulations is discussed.

  9. Resource Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation: Volume 22, Resource information and site analysis for planning on the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect

    Chance, W.W.

    1986-12-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) consists of approximately 15,000 ha (37,000 acres) of federally owned lands; it contains three major facilities (Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant) operated by a single contractor and a number of other facilities operated either by DOE or under contract to others. This report documents the various land use elements, land use constraints (physical, programmatic, and geopolitical), and site potential capabilities and provides current documentation of related data for making land use and site development decisions. The ORR has physical, programmatic, and geopolitical constraints that have been identified, measured, and mapped. The constraints and opportunities map was used to identify developable land areas. Many of these sites have only remote potential for meeting any planned needs for expansion of existing facilities. However, stand-alone research functions or other facilities are possible on these sites. These studied and measured findings lead to the conclusion that extreme care must be taken in the evaluation of future use or disposition of available land. Furthermore, it is time to consider and evaluate the feasibility for renewal. The potential for recycling lands formerly used by programs and functions that have been completed or terminated is very real, considering the age, condition, and obsolescence of these facilities.

  10. A study on planning organ at risk volume for the rectum using cone beam computed tomography in the treatment of prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhakar, Ramachandran; Oates, Richard; Jones, Daryl; Kron, Tomas; Cramb, Jim; Foroudi, Farshad; Geso, Moshi; Gill, Suki

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we analyzed planning organ at risk volume (PRV) for the rectum using a series of cone beam computed tomographies (CBCTs) acquired during the treatment of prostate cancer and evaluated the dosimetric effect of different PRV definitions. Overall, 21 patients with prostate cancer were treated radically with 78 Gy in 39 fractions had in total 418 CBCTs, each acquired at the end of the first 5 fractions and then every alternate fraction. The PRV was generated from the Boolean sum volume of the rectum obtained from first 5 fractions (PRV-CBCT-5) and from all CBCTs (PRV-CBCT-All). The PRV margin was compared at the superior, middle, and inferior slices of the contoured rectum to compare PRV-CBCT-5 and PRV-CBCT-All. We also compared the dose received by the planned rectum (Rectum-computed tomography [CT]), PRV-CBCT-5, PRV-CBCT-All, and average rectum (CBCT-AV-dose-volume histogram [DVH]) at critical dose levels. The average measured rectal volume for all 21 patients for Rectum-CT, PRV-CBCT-5, and PRV-CBCT-All was 44.3 ± 15.0, 92.8 ± 40.40, and 121.5 ± 36.7 cm{sup 3}, respectively. For PRV-CBCT-All, the mean ± standard deviation displacement in the anterior, posterior, right, and left lateral directions in centimeters was 2.1 ± 1.1, 0.9 ± 0.5, 0.9 ± 0.8, and 1.1 ± 0.7 for the superior rectum; 0.8 ± 0.5, 1.1 ± 0.5, 1.0 ± 0.5, and 1.0 ± 0.5 for the middle rectum; and 0.3 ± 0.3; 0.9 ± 0.5; 0.4 ± 0.2, and 0.5 ± 0.3 for the inferior rectum, respectively. The first 5 CBCTs did not predict the PRV for individual patients. Our study shows that the PRV margin is different for superior, middle, and the inferior parts of the rectum, it is wider superiorly and narrower inferiorly. A uniform PRV margin does not represent the actual rectal variations during treatment for all treatment fractions. The large variation in interpatient rectal size implies a potential role for adaptive radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

  11. Coregistration of Prechemotherapy PET-CT for Planning Pediatric Hodgkin's Disease Radiotherapy Significantly Diminishes Interobserver Variability of Clinical Target Volume Definition

    SciTech Connect

    Metwally, Hussein; Courbon, Frederic; David, Isabelle; Filleron, Thomas; Blouet, Aurelien; Rives, Michel; Izar, Francoise; Zerdoud, Slimane; Plat, Genevieve; Vial, Julie; Robert, Alain; Laprie, Anne

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the interobserver variability in clinical target volume (CTV) definitions when using registered {sup 18}F-labeled deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET-CT) versus side-by-side image sets in pediatric Hodgkin's disease (HD). Methods and Materials: Prechemotherapy FDG-PET-CT scans performed in the treatment position were acquired from 20 children (median age, 14 years old) with HD (stages 2A to 4B) and registered with postchemotherapy planning CT scans. The patients had a median age of 14 years and stages of disease ranging between 2A and 4B. Image sets were coregistered using a semiautomatic coregistration system. The biological target volume was defined on all the coregistered images as a guide to defining the initial site of involvement and to avoid false-positive or negative results. Five radiation oncologists independently defined the CTV for all 20 patients: once using separate FDG-PET-CT images as a guide (not registered) to define CTVa and once using the registered FDG-PET-CT data to define CTVb. The total volumes were compared, as well as their coefficients of variation (COV). To assess the interobserver variability, the percentages of intersection between contours drawn by all observers for each patient were calculated for CTVa and for CTVb. Results: The registration of a prechemotherapy FDG-PET-CT scan caused a change in the CTV for all patients. Comparing CTVa with CTVb showed that the mean CTVb increased in 14 patients (range, 0.61%-101.96%) and decreased in 6 patients (range, 2.97%-37.26%). The COV for CTVb significantly decreased for each patient; the mean COVs for CTVa and CTVb were 45% (21%-65%) and 32% (13%-57%), respectively (p = 0.0004). The percentage of intersection among all CTVbs for the five observers increased significantly by 89.77% (1.99%-256.41%) compared to that of CTVa (p = 0.0001). Conclusions: High observer variability can occur during CT-based definition of CTVs for children diagnosed with HD

  12. SU-E-T-513: Investigating Dose of Internal Target Volume After Correcting for Tissue Heterogeneity in SBRT Lung Plans with Homogeneity Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, P; Zhuang, T; Magnelli, A; Djemil, T; Shang, Q; Balik, S; Andrews, M; Stephans, K; Videtic, G; Xia, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose It was recommended to use the prescription of 54 Gy/3 with heterogeneity corrections for previously established dose scheme of 60 Gy/3 with homogeneity calculation. This study is to investigate dose coverage for the internal target volume (ITV) with and without heterogeneity correction. Methods Thirty patients who received stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to a dose of 60 Gy in 3 fractions with homogeneous planning for early stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were selected. ITV was created either from 4DCT scans or a fusion of multi-phase respiratory scans. Planning target volume (PTV) was a 5 mm expansion of the ITV. For this study, we recalculated homogeneous clinical plans using heterogeneity corrections with monitor units set as clinically delivered. All plans were calculated with 3 mm dose grids and collapsed cone convolution algorithm. To account for uncertainties from tumor delineation and image-guided radiotherapy, a structure ITV2mm was created by expanding ITV with 2 mm margins. Dose coverage to the PTV, ITV and ITV2mm were compared with a student paired t-test. Results With heterogeneity corrections, the PTV V60Gy decreased by 10.1% ± 18.4% (p<0.01) while the maximum dose to the PTV increased by 3.7 ± 4.3% (p<0.01). With and without corrections, D99% was 65.8 ± 4.0 Gy and 66.7 ± 4.8 Gy (p=0.15) for the ITV, and 63.9 ± 3.4 Gy and 62.9 ± 4.6 Gy for the ITV2mm (p=0.22), respectively. The mean dose to the ITV and ITV2mm increased 3.6% ± 4.7% (p<0.01) and 2.3% ± 5.2% (p=0.01) with heterogeneity corrections. Conclusion After heterogeneity correction, the peripheral coverage of the PTV decreased to approximately 54 Gy, but D99% of the ITV and ITV2mm was unchanged and the mean dose to the ITV and ITV2mm was increased. Clinical implication of these results requires more investigation.

  13. Geopressured-Geothermal Drilling and Testing Plan, Volume II, Testing Plan; Dow Chemical Co. - Dept. of Energy Dow-DOE Sweezy No. 1 Well, Vermilion Parish, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    1982-02-01

    The Dow/D.O.E. L. R. Sweezy No. 1 geopressured geothermal production well was completed in August of 1981. The well was perforated and gravel packed in approximately 50 feet of sand from 13,344 feet to 13,395 feet. Permeabilities of 6 to 914 millidarcies were measured with porosity of 25 to 36%. Static surface pressure after well clean-up was 5000 psi. At 1000 B/D flow rate the drawdown was 50 psi. The water produced in clean-up contained 100,000 ppm TDS. This report details the plan for testing this well with the goal of obtaining sufficient data to define the total production curve of the small, 939 acre, reservoir. A production time of six to nine months is anticipated. The salt water disposal well is expected to be completed and surface equipment installed such that production testing will begin by April 1, 1982. The program should be finished and reports written by February 28, 1983. The brine will be produced from the No.1 well, passed through a separator where the gas is removed, then reinjected into the No.2 (SWD) well under separator pressure. Flow rates of up to 25,000 B/D are expected. The tests are divided into a two-week short-term test and six to nine-month long-term tests with periodic downhole measurement of drawdown and buildup rates. Data obtained in the testing will be relayed by phoneline computer hookup to Otis Engineering in Dallas, Texas, where the reservoir calculations and modeling will be done. At the point where sufficient data has been obtained to reach the objectives of the program, production will be ended, the wells plugged and abandoned, and a final report will be issued.

  14. Handbook for Evaluation and Life Cycle Planning for Software. Volume 4. Test and Independent Verification and Validation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-01

    CPCI configuration to which ( ) the test plan applies specifically been identified? (b.) C. TESi CONCt.PTs (7) Is there sufficient background...4 N ’ ~. . 4 4 C " rr . * / WY4 /4 4’ V -. i~?’- ti 4 ,A.4 "’.4. ,. awr sIX .4 -4’...-- 44 *4$~ p4W .3 𔃻 - C . . 4’ . 𔃾: t’ S 9 V IgV Ř -~ -.~ StAr’ie K-A *1I ~+ ~ ’w r~’.t . 44 1 i ~.( F’ . . 4 ~ "-’trw *

  15. Operationally efficient propulsion system study (OEPSS) data book. Volume 9; Preliminary Development Plan for an Integrated Booster Propulsion Module (BPM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiBlasi, Angelo G.

    1992-01-01

    A preliminary development plan for an integrated propulsion module (IPM) is described. The IPM, similar to the Space Transportation Main engine (STME) engine, is applicable to the Advanced Launch System (ALS) baseline vehicle. The same STME development program ground rules and time schedule were assumed for the IPM. However, the unique advantages of testing an integrated engine element, in terms of reduced number of hardware and number of system and reliability tests, compared to single standalone engine and MPTA, are highlighted. The potential ability of the IPM to meet the ALS program goals for robustness, operability and reliability is emphasized.

  16. Tracking and data system support for the Viking 1975 mission to Mars. Volume 1: Prelaunch planning, implementation, and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mudgway, D. J.; Traxler, M. R.

    1977-01-01

    The tracking and data acquisition support for the 1975 Viking Missions to Mars is described. The history of the effort from its inception in late 1968 through the launches of Vikings 1 and 2 from Cape Kennedy in August and September 1975 is given. The Viking mission requirements for tracking and data acquisition support in both the near earth and deep space phases involved multiple radar tracking and telemetry stations, and communications networks together with the global network of tracking stations, communications, and control center. The planning, implementation, testing and management of the program are presented.

  17. Alaska Regional Energy Resources Planning Project. Phase 2: coal, hydroelectric and energy alternatives. Volume I. Beluga Coal District Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rutledge, G.; Lane, D.; Edblom, G.

    1980-01-01

    This volume deals with the problems and procedures inherent in the development of the Beluga Coal District. Socio-economic implications of the development and management alternatives are discussed. A review of permits and approvals necessary for the initial development of Beluga Coal Field is presented. Major land tenure issues in the Beluga Coal District as well as existing transportation routes and proposed routes and sites are discussed. The various coal technologies which might be employed at Beluga are described. Transportation options and associated costs of transporting coal from the mine site area to a connecting point with a major, longer distance transportation made and of transporting coal both within and outside (exportation) the state are discussed. Some environmental issues involved in the development of the Beluga Coal Field are presented. (DMC)

  18. Verification of Planning Target Volume Settings in Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy by Using In-Treatment 4-Dimensional Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Wataru; Yamashita, Hideomi; Kida, Satoshi; Masutani, Yoshitaka; Sakumi, Akira; Ohtomo, Kuni; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Haga, Akihiro

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate setup error and tumor motion during beam delivery by using 4-dimensional cone beam computed tomography (4D CBCT) and to assess the adequacy of the planning target volume (PTV) margin for lung cancer patients undergoing volumetric modulated arc therapy for stereotactic body radiation therapy (VMAT-SBRT). Methods and Materials: Fifteen lung cancer patients treated by single-arc VMAT-SBRT were selected in this analysis. All patients were treated with an abdominal compressor. The gross tumor volumes were contoured on maximum inspiration and maximum expiration CT datasets from 4D CT respiratory sorting and merged into internal target volumes (ITVs). The PTV margin was isotropically taken as 5 mm. Registration was automatically performed using “pre-3D” CBCT. Treatment was performed with a D95 prescription of 50 Gy delivered in 4 fractions. The 4D tumor locations during beam delivery were determined using in-treatment 4D CBCT images acquired in each fraction. Then, the discrepancy between the actual tumor location and the ITV was evaluated in the lateral, vertical, and longitudinal directions. Results: Overall, 55 4D CBCT sets during VMAT-SBRT were successfully obtained. The amplitude of tumor motion was less than 10 mm in all directions. The average displacements between ITV and actual tumor location during treatment were 0.41 ± 0.93 mm, 0.15 ± 0.58 mm, and 0.60 ± 0.99 mm for the craniocaudal, left-right, and anteroposterior directions, respectively. The discrepancy in each phase did not exceed 5 mm in any direction. Conclusions: With in-treatment 4D CBCT, we confirmed the required PTV margins when the registration for moving target was performed using pre-3D CBCT. In-treatment 4D CBCT is a direct method for quantitatively assessing the intrafractional location of a moving target.

  19. Life sciences payload definition and integration study, task C and D. Volume 2: Payload definition, integration, and planning studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The Life Sciences Payload Definition and Integration Study was composed of four major tasks. Tasks A and B, the laboratory definition phase, were the subject of prior NASA study. The laboratory definition phase included the establishment of research functions, equipment definitions, and conceptual baseline laboratory designs. These baseline laboratories were designated as Maxi-Nom, Mini-30, and Mini-7. The outputs of Tasks A and B were used by the NASA Life Sciences Payload Integration Team to establish guidelines for Tasks C and D, the laboratory integration phase of the study. A brief review of Tasks A and B is presented provide background continuity. The tasks C and D effort is the subject of this report. The Task C effort stressed the integration of the NASA selected laboratory designs with the shuttle sortie module. The Task D effort updated and developed costs that could be used by NASA for preliminary program planning.

  20. Incorporating global warming risks in power sector planning: A case study of the New England region. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, F.; Busch, J.; Koomey, J.

    1992-11-01

    Growing international concern over the threat of global climate change has led to proposals to buy insurance against this threat by reducing emissions of carbon (short for carbon dioxide) and other greenhouse gases below current levels. Concern over these and other, non-climatic environmental effects of electricity generation has led a number of states to adopt or explore new mechanisms for incorporating environmental externalities in utility resource planning. For example, the New York and Massachusetts utility commissions have adopted monetized surcharges (or adders) to induce emission reductions of federally regulated air pollutants (notably, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and particulates) beyond federally mandated levels. These regulations also include preliminary estimates of the cost of reducing carbon emissions, for which no federal regulations exist at this time. Within New England, regulators and utilities have also held several workshops and meetings to discuss alternative methods of incorporating externalities as well as the feasibility of regional approaches. This study examines the potential for reduced carbon emissions in the New England power sector as well as the cost and rate impacts of two policy approaches: environmental externality surcharges and a target- based approach. We analyze the following questions: Does New England have sufficient low-carbon resources to achieve significant reductions (10% to 20% below current levels) in fossil carbon emissions in its utility sector? What reductions could be achieved at a maximum? What is the expected cost of carbon reductions as a function of the reduction goal? How would carbon reduction strategies affect electricity rates? How effective are environmental externality cost surcharges as an instrument in bringing about carbon reductions? To what extent could the minimization of total electricity costs alone result in carbon reductions relative to conventional resource plans?

  1. Beam-specific planning target volumes incorporating 4D CT for pencil beam scanning proton therapy of thoracic tumors.

    PubMed

    Lin, Liyong; Kang, Minglei; Huang, Sheng; Mayer, Rulon; Thomas, Andrew; Solberg, Timothy D; McDonough, James E; Simone, Charles B

    2015-11-08

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether organ sparing and target coverage can be simultaneously maintained for pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy treatment of thoracic tumors in the presence of motion, stopping power uncertainties, and patient setup variations. Ten consecutive patients that were previously treated with proton therapy to 66.6/1.8 Gy (RBE) using double scattering (DS) were replanned with PBS. Minimum and maximum intensity images from 4D CT were used to introduce flexible smearing in the determination of the beam specific PTV (BSPTV). Datasets from eight 4D CT phases, using ± 3% uncertainty in stopping power and ± 3 mm uncertainty in patient setup in each direction, were used to create 8 × 12 × 10 = 960 PBS plans for the evaluation of 10 patients. Plans were normalized to provide identical coverage between DS and PBS. The average lung V20, V5, and mean doses were reduced from 29.0%, 35.0%, and 16.4 Gy with DS to 24.6%, 30.6%, and 14.1 Gy with PBS, respectively. The average heart V30 and V45 were reduced from 10.4% and 7.5% in DS to 8.1% and 5.4% for PBS, respectively. Furthermore, the maximum spinal cord, esophagus, and heart doses were decreased from 37.1 Gy, 71.7 Gy, and 69.2 Gy with DS to 31.3 Gy, 67.9 Gy, and 64.6 Gy with PBS. The conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), and global maximal dose were improved from 3.2, 0.08, 77.4 Gy with DS to 2.8, 0.04, and 72.1 Gy with PBS. All differences are statistically significant, with p-values <0.05, with the exception of the heart V45 (p = 0.146). PBS with BSPTV achieves better organ sparing and improves target coverage using a repainting method for the treatment of thoracic tumors. Incorporating motion-related uncertainties is essential.

  2. Beam-specific planning target volumes incorporating 4D CT for pencil beam scanning proton therapy of thoracic tumors.

    PubMed

    Lin, Liyong; Kang, Minglei; Huang, Sheng; Mayer, Rulon; Thomas, Andrew; Solberg, Timothy D; McDonough, James E; Simone, Charles B

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether organ sparing and target coverage can be simultaneously maintained for pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy treatment of thoracic tumors in the presence of motion, stopping power uncertainties, and patient setup variations. Ten consecutive patients that were previously treated with proton therapy to 66.6/1.8 Gy (RBE) using double scattering (DS) were replanned with PBS. Minimum and maximum intensity images from 4D CT were used to introduce flexible smearing in the determination of the beam specific PTV (BSPTV). Datasets from eight 4D CT phases, using ±3% uncertainty in stopping power and ±3 mm uncertainty in patient setup in each direction, were used to create 8×12×10=960 PBS plans for the evaluation of 10 patients. Plans were normalized to provide identical coverage between DS and PBS. The average lung V20, V5, and mean doses were reduced from 29.0%, 35.0%, and 16.4 Gy with DS to 24.6%, 30.6%, and 14.1 Gy with PBS, respectively. The average heart V30 and V45 were reduced from 10.4% and 7.5% in DS to 8.1% and 5.4% for PBS, respectively. Furthermore, the maximum spinal cord, esophagus, and heart doses were decreased from 37.1 Gy, 71.7 Gy, and 69.2 Gy with DS to 31.3 Gy, 67.9 Gy, and 64.6 Gy with PBS. The conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), and global maximal dose were improved from 3.2, 0.08, 77.4 Gy with DS to 2.8, 0.04, and 72.1 Gy with PBS. All differences are statistically significant, with p-values <0.05, with the exception of the heart V45 (p=0.146). PBS with BSPTV achieves better organ sparing and improves target coverage using a repainting method for the treatment of thoracic tumors. Incorporating motion-related uncertainties is essential. PACS number: 87.55.D.

  3. Site characterization plan: Conceptual design report: Volume 4, Appendices F-O: Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project

    SciTech Connect

    MacDougall, H R; Scully, L W; Tillerson, J R

    1987-09-01

    The site for the prospective repository is located at Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada, and the waste emplacement area will be constructed in the underlying volcanic tuffs. The target horizon for waste emplacement is a sloping bed of densely welded tuff more than 650 ft below the surface and typically more than 600 ft above the water table. The conceptual design described in this report is unique among repository designs in that it uses ramps in addition to shafts to gain access to the underground facility, the emplacement horizon is located above the water table, and it is possible that 300- to 400-ft-long horizontal waste emplacement boreholes will be used. This report summarizes the design bases, design and performance criteria, and the design analyses performed. The current status of meeting the preclosure performance objectives for licensing and of resolving the repository design and preclosure issues is presented. The repository design presented in this report will be expanded and refined during the advanced conceptual design, the license application design, and the final procurement and construction design phases. Volume 4 contains Appendices F to O.

  4. Performance evaluation of Automatic Extraction System. Volume IV. Recommended operating, maintenance, and training plans. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Frantz, R.L.; King, R.H.; Bartsch, D.L.

    1980-07-01

    Since the AES is a different and more sochisticated machine, it became apparent during the in-mine trial that more than on-the-job training (OJT) is desirable for the operators. The AES is unique in that it should remain in the face for long periods rather than be moved often from the face to face. In addition, the operator should learn to trust the ACS in order to be more aware of the hazards in the face area. More training is one way to help increase operator and machine efficiency and safety consciousness. The lack of formal, organized, scheduled, non-productive-mode training of the AES operators appeared to affect the performance of the AES during mining, tramming, maneuvering, and bolting. Therefore, before the operator and bolters do their jobs and the mechanics maintain the AES on a regular basis in a production-mode, they should attend classes, including: (1) formal above ground classroom training, (2) non-productive-mode underground training, and (3) productive-mode OJT. The training department should have the authority and resources to train workers beforehand, and also whenever subsequent instruction is needed. This plan includes only those areas peculiar to the AES. It is assumed that mature, competent individuals (operators and bolters) have already been trained to use similar machines. If this is not the case, the training will require significantly more time.

  5. Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report. Volume 1: Site selection, drill plan preparation, drilling, logging, and coring operations

    SciTech Connect

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Kirr, J.N.

    1987-04-01

    The recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. BDM corporation located, planned, and drilled a long radius turn horizontal well in the Devonian shale Lower Huron section in Wayne County, West Virginia, demonstrating that state-of-the-art technology is capable of drilling such wells. BDM successfully tested drilling, coring, and logging in a horizontal well using air as the circulating medium; conducted reservoir modeling studies to protect flow rates and reserves in advance of drilling operations; observed two phase flow conditions in the wellbore not observed previously; cored a fracture zone which produced gas; observed that fractures in the core and the wellbore were not systematically spaced (varied from 5 to 68 feet in different parts of the wellbore); observed that highest gas show rates reported by the mud logger corresponded to zone with lowest fracture spacing (five feet) or high fracture frequency. Four and one-half inch casting was successfully installed in the borehole and was equipped to isolate the horizontal section into eight (8) zones for future testing and stimulation operations. 6 refs., 48 figs., 10 tabs.

  6. Resource management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation. Volume 29, Rare plants on the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, M.; Pounds, L.; Oberholster, S.; Parr, P.; Mann, L.; Edwards, L.; Rosensteel, B.

    1993-08-01

    Rare plant species listed by state or federal agencies and found on or near the Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) are identified. Seventeen species present on the ORR are listed by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation as either endangered, threatened, or of special concern. Four of these are under review by the US Fish and Wildlife Service for possible listing as threatened or endangered species. Ten species listed by the state occur near and may be present on the ORR; four are endangered in Tennessee, and one is a candidate for federal listing. A range of habitats supports the rare taxa on the ORR: River bluffs, calcareous barrens, wetlands, and deciduous forest. Sites for listed rare species on the ORR have been designated as Research Park Natural Areas. Consideration of rare plant habitats is an important component of resource management and land-use planning; protection of rare species in their natural habitat is the best method of ensuring their long-term survival. In addition, the National Environmental Policy Act requires that federally funded projects avoid or mitigate impacts to listed species. The list of rare plant species and their location on the ORR should be considered provisional because the entire ORR has not been surveyed, and state and federal status of all species continues to be updated.

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Target Volume Delineation in Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning for Brain Tumors Using Localized Region-Based Active Contour

    SciTech Connect

    Aslian, Hossein; Sadeghi, Mahdi; Mahdavi, Seied Rabie; Babapour Mofrad, Farshid; Astarakee, Mahdi; Khaledi, Navid; Fadavi, Pedram

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical application of a robust semiautomatic image segmentation method to determine the brain target volumes in radiation therapy treatment planning. Methods and Materials: A local robust region-based algorithm was used on MRI brain images to study the clinical target volume (CTV) of several patients. First, 3 oncologists delineated CTVs of 10 patients manually, and the process time for each patient was calculated. The averages of the oncologists’ contours were evaluated and considered as reference contours. Then, to determine the CTV through the semiautomatic method, a fourth oncologist who was blind to all manual contours selected 4-8 points around the edema and defined the initial contour. The time to obtain the final contour was calculated again for each patient. Manual and semiautomatic segmentation were compared using 3 different metric criteria: Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance. A comparison also was performed between volumes obtained from semiautomatic and manual methods. Results: Manual delineation processing time of tumors for each patient was dependent on its size and complexity and had a mean (±SD) of 12.33 ± 2.47 minutes, whereas it was 3.254 ± 1.7507 minutes for the semiautomatic method. Means of Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance between manual contours were 0.84 ± 0.02, 2.05 ± 0.66 cm, and 0.78 ± 0.15 cm, and they were 0.82 ± 0.03, 1.91 ± 0.65 cm, and 0.7 ± 0.22 cm between manual and semiautomatic contours, respectively. Moreover, the mean volume ratio (=semiautomatic/manual) calculated for all samples was 0.87. Conclusions: Given the deformability of this method, the results showed reasonable accuracy and similarity to the results of manual contouring by the oncologists. This study shows that the localized region-based algorithms can have great ability in determining the CTV and can be appropriate alternatives for manual approaches in brain cancer.

  8. Dynamic evaluation of airflow rates for a variable air volume system serving an open-plan office.

    PubMed

    Mai, Horace K W; Chan, Daniel W T; Burnett, John

    2003-09-01

    In a typical air-conditioned office, the thermal comfort and indoor air quality are sustained by delivering the amount of supply air with the correct proportion of outdoor air to the breathing zone. However, in a real office, it is not easy to measure these airflow rates supplied to space, especially when the space is served by a variable air volume (VAV) system. The most accurate method depends on what is being measured, the details of the building and types of ventilation system. The constant concentration tracer gas method as a means to determine ventilation system performance, however, this method becomes more complicated when the air, including the tracer gas is allowed to recirculate. An accurate measurement requires significant resource support in terms of instrumentation set up and also professional interpretation. This method deters regular monitoring of the performance of an airside systems by building managers, and hence the indoor environmental quality, in terms of thermal comfort and indoor air quality, may never be satisfactory. This paper proposes a space zone model for the calculation of all the airflow parameters based on tracer gas measurements, including flow rates of outdoor air, VAV supply, return space, return and exfiltration. Sulphur hexafluoride (SF6) and carbon dioxide (CO2) are used as tracer gases. After using both SF6 and CO2, the corresponding results provide a reference to justify the acceptability of using CO2 as the tracer gas. The validity of using CO2 has the significance that metabolic carbon dioxide can be used as a means to evaluate real time airflow rates. This approach provides a practical protocol for building managers to evaluate the performance of airside systems.

  9. THE PREPARATION OF CURRICULUM MATERIALS AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF TEACHERS FOR AN EXPERIMENTAL APPLICATION OF THE CLUSTER CONCEPT OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION AT THE SECONDARY SCHOOL LEVEL. VOLUME II, INSTRUCTIONAL PLANS FOR THE CONSTRUCTION CLUSTER.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MALEY, DONALD

    DESIGNED FOR USE WITH 11TH AND 12TH GRADE STUDENTS, THIS CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR THE OCCUPATIONAL CLUSTER IN CONSTRUCTION WAS DEVELOPED BY PARTICIPATING TEACHERS FROM RESULTS OF THE RESEARCH PROCEDURES DESCRIBED IN VOLUME I (VT 004 162). THE COURSE DESCRIPTION, NEED FOR THE COURSE, COURSE OBJECTIVES, PROCEDURE, AND INSTRUCTIONAL PLAN ARE DISCUSSED…

  10. Assessment of Planning Target Volume Margins for Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy of the Prostate Gland: Role of Daily Inter- and Intrafraction Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Tanyi, James A.; He, Tongming; Summers, Paige A.; Mburu, Ruth G.; Kato, Catherine M.; Rhodes, Stephen M.; Hung, Arthur Y.; Fuss, Martin

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: To determine planning target volume margins for prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy based on inter- and intrafraction motion using four daily localization techniques: three-point skin mark alignment, volumetric imaging with bony landmark registration, volumetric imaging with implanted fiducial marker registration, and implanted electromagnetic transponders (beacons) detection. Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients who underwent definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer formed the basis of this study. Each patient was implanted with three electromagnetic transponders and underwent a course of 39 treatment fractions. Daily localization was based on three-point skin mark alignment followed by transponder detection and patient repositioning. Transponder positioning was verified by volumetric imaging with cone-beam computed tomography of the pelvis. Relative motion between the prostate gland and bony anatomy was quantified by offline analyses of daily cone-beam computed tomography. Intratreatment organ motion was monitored continuously by the Calypso (registered) System for quantification of intrafraction setup error. Results: As expected, setup error (that is, inter- plus intrafraction motion, unless otherwise stated) was largest with skin mark alignment, requiring margins of 7.5 mm, 11.4 mm, and 16.3 mm, in the lateral (LR), longitudinal (SI), and vertical (AP) directions, respectively. Margin requirements accounting for intrafraction motion were smallest for transponder detection localization techniques, requiring margins of 1.4 mm (LR), 2.6 mm (SI), and 2.3 mm (AP). Bony anatomy alignment required 2.1 mm (LR), 9.4 mm (SI), and 10.5 mm (AP), whereas image-guided marker alignment required 2.8 mm (LR), 3.7 mm (SI), and 3.2 mm (AP). No marker migration was observed in the cohort. Conclusion: Clinically feasible, rapid, and reliable tools such as the electromagnetic transponder detection system for pretreatment target localization

  11. SU-E-J-76: Incorporation of Ultrasound Elastography in Target Volume Delineation for Partial Breast Radiotherapy Planning: A Comparative Study

    SciTech Connect

    Juneja, P; Harris, E; Bamber, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: There is substantial observer variability in the delineation of target volumes for post-surgical partial breast radiotherapy because the tumour bed has poor x-ray contrast. This variability may result in substantial variations in planned dose distribution. Ultrasound elastography (USE) has an ability to detect mechanical discontinuities and therefore, the potential to image the scar and distortion in breast tissue architecture. The goal of this study was to compare USE techniques: strain elastography (SE), shear wave elastography (SWE) and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging using phantoms that simulate features of the tumour bed, for the purpose of incorporating USE in breast radiotherapy planning. Methods: Three gelatine-based phantoms (10% w/v) containing: a stiff inclusion (gelatine 16% w/v) with adhered boundaries, a stiff inclusion (gelatine 16% w/v) with mobile boundaries and fluid cavity inclusion (to mimic seroma), were constructed and used to investigate the USE techniques. The accuracy of the elastography techniques was quantified by comparing the imaged inclusion with the modelled ground-truth using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). For two regions of interest (ROI), the DSC measures their spatial overlap. Ground-truth ROIs were modelled using geometrical measurements from B-mode images. Results: The phantoms simulating stiff scar tissue with adhered and mobile boundaries and seroma were successfully developed and imaged using SE and SWE. The edges of the stiff inclusions were more clearly visible in SE than in SWE. Subsequently, for all these phantoms the measured DSCs were found to be higher for SE (DSCs: 0.91–0.97) than SWE (DSCs: 0.68–0.79) with an average relative difference of 23%. In the case of seroma phantom, DSC values for SE and SWE were similar. Conclusion: This study presents a first attempt to identify the most suitable elastography technique for use in breast radiotherapy planning. Further analysis will

  12. TU-EF-304-02: 4D Optimized Treatment Planning for Actively Scanned Proton Therapy Delivered to Moving Target Volume

    SciTech Connect

    Bernatowicz, K; Zhang, Y; Weber, D; Lomax, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a 4D treatment optimization approach for Pencil Beam Scanned (PBS) proton therapy that includes breathing variability. Method: PBS proton therapy delivers a pattern of proton pencil beams (PBs), distributed to cover the target volume and optimized such as to achieve a homogenous dose distribution across the target. In this work, this optimization step has been enhanced to include advanced 4D dose calculations of liver tumors based on motion extracted from either 4D-CT (representing a single and averaged respiratory cycle) or 4D-CT(MRI) (including breathing variability). The 4D dose calculation is performed per PB on deforming dose grid, and according to the timestamp of each PB, a displacement due to patient’s motion and a change in radiological depth.Three different treatment fields have been optimized in 3D on the end-exhale phase of a 4D-CT liver data set (3D-opt) and then in 4D using the motion extracted from either 4D-CT or 4D-CT(MRI) using deformable image registration. All plans were calculated directly on the PTV without the use of an ITV. The delivery characteristics of the PSI Gantry 2 have been assumed for all calculations. Results: Dose inhomogeneities (D5-D95) in the CTV for the 3D optimized plans recalculated under conditions of variable motion were increased by on average 19.8% compared to the static case. These differences could be reduced by 4D-CT based 4D optimization to 10.5% and by 4D-CT(MRI) based optimization to only 2.3% of the static value. Liver V25 increased by less than 1% using 4D optimization. Conclusion: 4D optimized PBS treatment plans taking into account breathing variability provide for significantly improved robustness against motion and motion variability than those based on 4D-CT alone, and may negate the need of motion specific target expansions. Swiss National Fund Grant (320030-1493942-1)

  13. SU-C-BRE-02: BED Vs. Local Control: Radiobiological Effect of Tumor Volume in Monte Carlo (MC) Lung SBRT Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Pokhrel, D; Badkul, R; Jiang, H; Estes, C; Park, J; Kumar, P; Wang, F

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: SBRT with hypofractionated dose schemata has emerged a compelling treatment modality for medically inoperable early stage lung cancer patients. It requires more accurate dose calculation and treatment delivery technique. This report presents the relationship between tumor control probability(TCP) and size-adjusted biological effective dose(sBED) of tumor volume for MC lung SBRT patients. Methods: Fifteen patients who were treated with MC-based lung SBRT to 50Gy in 5 fractions to PTVV100%=95% were studied. ITVs were delineated on MIP images of 4DCT-scans. PTVs diameter(ITV+5mm margins) ranged from 2.7–4.9cm (mean 3.7cm). Plans were generated using non-coplanar conformal arcs/beams using iPlan XVMC algorithm (BrainLABiPlan ver.4.1.2) for Novalis-TX with HD-MLCs and 6MVSRS(1000MU/min) mode, following RTOG-0813 dosimetric guidelines. To understand the known uncertainties of conventional heterogeneities-corrected/uncorrected pencil beam (PBhete/ PB-homo) algorithms, dose distributions were re-calculated with PBhete/ PB-homo using same beam configurations, MLCs and monitor units. Biologically effective dose(BED10) was computed using LQ-model with α/β=10Gy for meanPTV and meanITV. BED10-c*L, gave size-adjusted BED(sBED), where c=10Gy/cm and L=PTV diameter in centimeter. The TCP model was adopted from Ohri et al.(IJROBP, 2012): TCP = exp[sBEDTCD50]/ k /(1.0 + exp[sBED-TCD50]/k), where k=31Gy corresponding to TCD50=0Gy; and more realistic MC-based TCP was computed for PTV(V99%). Results: Mean PTV PB-hete TCP value was 6% higher, but, mean PTV PB-homo TCP value was 4% lower compared to mean PTV MC TCP. Mean ITV PB-hete/PB-homo TCP values were comparable (within ±3.0%) to mean ITV MC TCP. The mean PTV(V99%)had BED10=90.9±3.7%(median=92.2%),sBED=54.1±8.2%(median=53.5%) corresponding to mean MC TCP value of 84.8±3.3%(median=84.9%) at 2- year local control. Conclusion: The TCP model which incorporates BED10 and tumor diameter indicates that radiobiological

  14. Dose-volume histogram parameters of high-dose-rate brachytherapy for Stage I-II cervical cancer (≤4cm) arising from a small-sized uterus treated with a point A dose-reduced plan.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Akiko; Ohno, Tatsuya; Noda, Shin-ei; Kubo, Nobuteru; Kuwako, Keiko; Saitoh, Jun-Ichi; Nakano, Takashi

    2014-07-01

    We investigated the rectal dose-sparing effect and tumor control of a point A dose-reduced plan in patients with Stage I-II cervical cancer (≤4 cm) arising from a small-sized uterus. Between October 2008 and August 2011, 19 patients with Stage I-II cervical cancer (≤4 cm) were treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for the pelvis and CT-guided brachytherapy. Seven patients were treated with brachytherapy with standard loading of source-dwell positions and a fraction dose of 6 Gy at point A (conventional brachy-plan). The other 12 patients with a small uterus close to the rectum or small intestine were treated with brachytherapy with a point A dose-reduction to match D2cc of the rectum and <6 Gy as the dose constraint ('point A dose-reduced plan') instead of the 6-Gy plan at point A ('tentative 6-Gy plan'). The total doses from EBRT and brachytherapy were added up and normalized to a biological equivalent dose of 2 Gy per fraction (EQD2). The median doses to the high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) D90 in the conventional brachy-plan, tentative 6-Gy plan and point A dose-reduced plan were 62 GyEQD2, 80 GyEQD2 and 64 GyEQD2, respectively. The median doses of rectal D2cc in the corresponding three plans were 42 GyEQD2, 62 GyEQD2 and 51 GyEQD2, respectively. With a median follow-up period of 35 months, three patients developed Grade-1 late rectal complications and no patients developed local recurrence. Our preliminary results suggested that CT-guided brachytherapy using an individualized point A dose-reduced plan might be useful for reducing late rectal complications while maintaining primary tumor control.

  15. A Phase II Comparative Study of Gross Tumor Volume Definition With or Without PET/CT Fusion in Dosimetric Planning for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC): Primary Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0515

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, Jeffrey; Bae, Kyounghwa; Choi, Noah; Forster, Ken; Siegel, Barry A.; Brunetti, Jacqueline; Purdy, James; Faria, Sergio; Vu, Toni; Thorstad, Wade; Choy, Hak

    2012-01-01

    Background: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0515 is a Phase II prospective trial designed to quantify the impact of positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) compared with CT alone on radiation treatment plans (RTPs) and to determine the rate of elective nodal failure for PET/CT-derived volumes. Methods: Each enrolled patient underwent definitive radiation therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer ({>=}60 Gy) and had two RTP datasets generated: gross tumor volume (GTV) derived with CT alone and with PET/CT. Patients received treatment using the PET/CT-derived plan. The primary end point, the impact of PET/CT fusion on treatment plans was measured by differences of the following variables for each patient: GTV, number of involved nodes, nodal station, mean lung dose (MLD), volume of lung exceeding 20 Gy (V20), and mean esophageal dose (MED). Regional failure rate was a secondary end point. The nonparametric Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test was used with Bonferroni adjustment for an overall significance level of 0.05. Results: RTOG 0515 accrued 52 patients, 47 of whom are evaluable. The follow-up time for all patients is 12.9 months (2.7-22.2). Tumor staging was as follows: II = 6%; IIIA = 40%; and IIIB = 54%. The GTV was statistically significantly smaller for PET/CT-derived volumes (98.7 vs. 86.2 mL; p < 0.0001). MLDs for PET/CT plans were slightly lower (19 vs. 17.8 Gy; p = 0.06). There was no significant difference in the number of involved nodes (2.1 vs. 2.4), V20 (32% vs. 30.8%), or MED (28.7 vs. 27.1 Gy). Nodal contours were altered by PET/CT for 51% of patients. One patient (2%) has developed an elective nodal failure. Conclusions: PET/CT-derived tumor volumes were smaller than those derived by CT alone. PET/CT changed nodal GTV contours in 51% of patients. The elective nodal failure rate for GTVs derived by PET/CT is quite low, supporting the RTOG standard of limiting the target volume to the primary tumor and involved nodes.

  16. Dose–volume histogram parameters of high-dose-rate brachytherapy for Stage I–II cervical cancer (≤4cm) arising from a small-sized uterus treated with a point A dose-reduced plan

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Akiko; Ohno, Tatsuya; Noda, Shin-ei; Kubo, Nobuteru; Kuwako, Keiko; Saitoh, Jun-ichi; Nakano, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the rectal dose-sparing effect and tumor control of a point A dose-reduced plan in patients with Stage I–II cervical cancer (≤4 cm) arising from a small-sized uterus. Between October 2008 and August 2011, 19 patients with Stage I–II cervical cancer (≤4 cm) were treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for the pelvis and CT-guided brachytherapy. Seven patients were treated with brachytherapy with standard loading of source-dwell positions and a fraction dose of 6 Gy at point A (conventional brachy-plan). The other 12 patients with a small uterus close to the rectum or small intestine were treated with brachytherapy with a point A dose-reduction to match D2cc of the rectum and <6 Gy as the dose constraint (‘point A dose-reduced plan’) instead of the 6-Gy plan at point A (‘tentative 6-Gy plan’). The total doses from EBRT and brachytherapy were added up and normalized to a biological equivalent dose of 2 Gy per fraction (EQD2). The median doses to the high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) D90 in the conventional brachy-plan, tentative 6-Gy plan and point A dose-reduced plan were 62 GyEQD2, 80 GyEQD2 and 64 GyEQD2, respectively. The median doses of rectal D2cc in the corresponding three plans were 42 GyEQD2, 62 GyEQD2 and 51 GyEQD2, respectively. With a median follow-up period of 35 months, three patients developed Grade-1 late rectal complications and no patients developed local recurrence. Our preliminary results suggested that CT-guided brachytherapy using an individualized point A dose-reduced plan might be useful for reducing late rectal complications while maintaining primary tumor control. PMID:24566721

  17. TH-E-BRE-03: A Novel Method to Account for Ion Chamber Volume Averaging Effect in a Commercial Treatment Planning System Through Convolution

    SciTech Connect

    Barraclough, B; Li, J; Liu, C; Yan, G

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Fourier-based deconvolution approaches used to eliminate ion chamber volume averaging effect (VAE) suffer from measurement noise. This work aims to investigate a novel method to account for ion chamber VAE through convolution in a commercial treatment planning system (TPS). Methods: Beam profiles of various field sizes and depths of an Elekta Synergy were collected with a finite size ion chamber (CC13) to derive a clinically acceptable beam model for a commercial TPS (Pinnacle{sup 3}), following the vendor-recommended modeling process. The TPS-calculated profiles were then externally convolved with a Gaussian function representing the chamber (σ = chamber radius). The agreement between the convolved profiles and measured profiles was evaluated with a one dimensional Gamma analysis (1%/1mm) as an objective function for optimization. TPS beam model parameters for focal and extra-focal sources were optimized and loaded back into the TPS for new calculation. This process was repeated until the objective function converged using a Simplex optimization method. Planar dose of 30 IMRT beams were calculated with both the clinical and the re-optimized beam models and compared with MapCHEC™ measurements to evaluate the new beam model. Results: After re-optimization, the two orthogonal source sizes for the focal source reduced from 0.20/0.16 cm to 0.01/0.01 cm, which were the minimal allowed values in Pinnacle. No significant change in the parameters for the extra-focal source was observed. With the re-optimized beam model, average Gamma passing rate for the 30 IMRT beams increased from 92.1% to 99.5% with a 3%/3mm criterion and from 82.6% to 97.2% with a 2%/2mm criterion. Conclusion: We proposed a novel method to account for ion chamber VAE in a commercial TPS through convolution. The reoptimized beam model, with VAE accounted for through a reliable and easy-to-implement convolution and optimization approach, outperforms the original beam model in standard IMRT QA

  18. SU-E-T-364: Estimating the Minimum Number of Patients Required to Estimate the Required Planning Target Volume Margins for Prostate Glands

    SciTech Connect

    Bakhtiari, M; Schmitt, J; Sarfaraz, M; Osik, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To establish a minimum number of patients required to obtain statistically accurate Planning Target Volume (PTV) margins for prostate Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT). Methods: A total of 320 prostate patients, consisting of a total number of 9311 daily setups, were analyzed. These patients had gone under IMRT treatments. Daily localization was done using the skin marks and the proper shifts were determined by the CBCT to match the prostate gland. The Van Herk formalism is used to obtain the margins using the systematic and random setup variations. The total patient population was divided into different grouping sizes varying from 1 group of 320 patients to 64 groups of 5 patients. Each grouping was used to determine the average PTV margin and its associated standard deviation. Results: Analyzing all 320 patients lead to an average Superior-Inferior margin of 1.15 cm. The grouping with 10 patients per group (32 groups) resulted to an average PTV margin between 0.6–1.7 cm with the mean value of 1.09 cm and a standard deviation (STD) of 0.30 cm. As the number of patients in groups increases the mean value of average margin between groups tends to converge to the true average PTV of 1.15 cm and STD decreases. For groups of 20, 64, and 160 patients a Superior-Inferior margin of 1.12, 1.14, and 1.16 cm with STD of 0.22, 0.11, and 0.01 cm were found, respectively. Similar tendency was observed for Left-Right and Anterior-Posterior margins. Conclusion: The estimation of the required margin for PTV strongly depends on the number of patients studied. According to this study at least ∼60 patients are needed to calculate a statistically acceptable PTV margin for a criterion of STD < 0.1 cm. Numbers greater than ∼60 patients do little to increase the accuracy of the PTV margin estimation.

  19. Advanced space system concepts and their orbital support needs (1980 - 2000). Volume 4: Detailed data. Part 2: Program plans and common support needs (a study of the commonality of space vehicle applications to future national needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bekey, I.; Mayer, H. L.; Wolfe, M. G.

    1976-01-01

    The methodology of alternate world future scenarios is utilized for selecting a plausible, though not advocated, set of future scenarios each of which results in a program plan appropriate for the respective environment. Each such program plan gives rise to different building block and technology requirements, which are analyzed for common need between the NASA and the DoD for each of the alternate world scenarios. An essentially invariant set of system, building block, and technology development plans is presented at the conclusion, intended to allow protection of most of the options for system concepts regardless of what the actual future world environment turns out to be. Thus, building block and technology needs are derived which support: (1) each specific world scenario; (2) all the world scenarios identified in this study; or (3) generalized scenarios applicable to almost any future environment. The output included in this volume consists of the building blocks, i.e.: transportation vehicles, orbital support vehicles, and orbital support facilities; the technology required to support the program plans; identification of their features which could support the DoD and NASA in common; and a complete discussion of the planning methodology.

  20. Educational Planning in the Context of Current Development Problems. An IIEP Seminar (Paris, France, October 3-8, 1983). Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). International Inst. for Educational Planning.

    The International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) selected three areas of inquiry as its focal concerns for the years 1984-1989. The first of these centered on the influences on each other of education and technological development, and on the implications of these mutual influences for educational planning on a national scale,…

  1. The 25 kW power module evolution study. Part 3: Conceptual designs for power module evolution. Volume 2: Program plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A plan is presented for the evolutionary development and deployment of the power module system with performance capabilities required to support the 1983 to 1990 user requirements. Aspects summarized include program functional, operational, and hardware elements; program work breakdown and specification items; development plans and schedules for developmental and technology milestones; test concepts and timeliness; and ground and orbit operations concepts.

  2. Space transfer concepts and analysis for exploration missions. Implementation plan and element description document. Volume 1: Major trades. Book 1: Draft final

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This document presents trade studies and reference concept designs accomplished during a study of Space Transfer Concepts and Analyses for Exploration Missions (STCAEM). This volume contains the major top level trades, level 2 trades conducted in support of NASA's Lunar/Mars Exploration Program Office, and a synopsis of the vehicles for different propulsion systems under trade consideration. The vehicles are presented in more detail in other volumes of this report. Book 1 of Volume 1 covers the following analyses: lunar/Mars commonality trades, lunar/Mars mission operations, and Mars transfer systems.

  3. Power Extension Package (PEP) system definition extension, orbital service module systems analysis study. Volume 9: PEP design, development and test plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A plan for the production of two PEP flight systems is defined. The task's milestones are described. Provisions for the development and assembly of new ground support equipment required for both testing and launch operations are included.

  4. Integrated Hatchery Operations Team: Operations Plans for Anadromous Fish Production Facilities in the Columbia River Basin, Volume IV of V; 1992 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Peck, Larry

    1993-04-01

    Operational plans for Cowlitz, Elokomin, Grays River, Kalama Falls, Lewis River and Speelyai, Lower Kalama, Lyons Ferry, Methow, Priest Rapids, Ringold Springs, Rock Island, Toutle, Washougal, and Wells Salmon Hatcheries are individually described.

  5. Adapting and Testing Business Management Development Programs for Educational Administrators. Volume 6 of 6 Volumes. Appendix J-Evaluation Report, Maxwell School. Appendix K-Schematic of Planning Process and Narrative Description. Appendix L-Narrative Description. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klawuhn, Raymond E.; Basso, Alexander J.

    This report constitutes an evaluation of the first year of a 2-year training program conducted by the American Management Association. The program focuses on organizational planning in two State educational agencies and involves the sequential implementation of three distinct, offsite, residential training efforts. The first of these, the…

  6. Popliteal-to-Dorsalis Pedis In-Situ Small Saphenous Vein Bypass under Planning with Mapping Using Computed Tomography Volume Rendering Technique.

    PubMed

    Byun, Seung-Jae

    2015-09-01

    The small saphenous vein (SSV) is an important graft in limb salvage surgery. It is frequently translocated for bypass surgery. Sometimes, the use of the SSV as an in-situ graft for posterior tibial artery or peroneal artery reconstruction offers the advantages of reduced vein graft injury and improved patency. Recently, saphenous vein mapping through computed tomography (CT) volume rendering technique offers a great quality view to the surgeon. We experienced a patient in whom a CT image with volume rendering technique revealed an aberrant SSV connected with the great saphenous vein at the medial malleolus level. This case indicates that an aberrant SSV may be successfully used as an in-situ conduit for bypass to the dorsalis pedis artery. Here, we present the case of a popliteal-to-dorsalis pedis in-situ vein bypass using a LeMaitre valvulotome (LeMaitre Vascular Inc., USA) under mapping of the aberrant SSV by CT volume rendering technique.

  7. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada: Volume 2, Part A: Chapters 3, 4, and 5

    SciTech Connect

    1988-12-01

    This site characterization plan (SCP) has been developed for the candidate repository site at Yucca Mountain in the State of Nevada. The SCP includes a description of the Yucca Mountain site (Chapters 1--5), a conceptual design for the repository (Chapter 6), a description of the packaging to be used for the waste to be emplaced in the repository (Chapter 7), and a description of the planned site characterization activities (Chapter 8). The schedules and milestones presented in Sections 8.3 and 8.5 of the SCP were developed to be consistent with the June 1988 draft Amendment to the DOE`s Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. The five month delay in the scheduled start of exploratory shaft construction that was announced recently is not reflected in these schedules. 575 refs., 84 figs., 68 tabs.

  8. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada: Volume 4, Part B: Chapter 8, Sections 8.0 through 8.3.1.4

    SciTech Connect

    1988-12-01

    This site characterization plan (SCP) has been developed for the candidate repository site at Yucca Mountain in the State of Nevada. The SCP includes a description of the Yucca Mountain site (Chapters 1-5), a conceptual design for the repository (Chapter 6), a description of the packaging to be used for the waste to be emplaced in the repository (Chapter 7), and a description of the planned site characterization activities (Chapter 8). The schedules and milestones presented in Sections 8.3 and 8.5 of the SCP were developed to be consistent with the June 1988 draft Amendment to the DOE`s Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. The five month delay in the scheduled start of exploratory shaft construction that was announced recently is not reflected in these schedules. 74 figs., 32 tabs.

  9. Power Extension Package (PEP) system definition extension, orbital service module systems analysis study. Volume 7: PEP logistics and training plan requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Recommendations for logistics activities and logistics planning are presented based on the assumption that a system prime contractor will perform logistics functions to support all program hardware and will implement a logistics system to include the planning and provision of products and services to assure cost effective coverage of the following: maintainability; maintenance; spares and supply support; fuels; pressurants and fluids; operations and maintenance documentation training; preservation, packaging and packing; transportation and handling; storage; and logistics management information reporting. The training courses, manpower, materials, and training aids required will be identified and implemented in a training program.

  10. Restoration of bighorn sheep metapopulations in and near 15 national parks: Conservation of a severely fragmented species; Volume I, Planning, problem definition, findings, and restoration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singer, Francis J.; Gudorf, Michelle A.

    1999-01-01

    This report details the 7-year restoration of bighorn sheep to all currently suitable historic habitats in the national parks of the former Rocky Mountain Region (now the Intermountain and Midwest regions of the National Park Service). The purpose of the first phase of the restoration during 1991-93 was to conduct research and population surveys and to formulate the restoration plans. The purpose of the second phase of the initiative during 1994-97 was to conduct GIS-based habitat and biological assessments of prospective restoration sites, write restoration plans, and restore and monitor the released bighorn sheep.

  11. Atmospheric, Magnetospheric and Plasmas in Space (AMPS) spacelab payload definition study - program analysis and planning for phase C/D document - Volume 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keeley, J. T.

    1976-01-01

    Typical missions identified for AMPS flights in the arly 1980's are described. Experiment objectives and typical scientific instruments selected to accomplish these objectives are discussed along with mission requirements and shuttle and Spacelab capabilities assessed to determine any AMPS unique requirements. Preliminary design concepts for the first two AMPS flights form the basis for the Phase C/D program plan. This plan implements flights 1 and 2 and indicates how both the scientific and flight support hardware can be systematically evolved for future AMPS flights.

  12. Investigation Development Plan for Reflight of the Small Helium-cooled Infrared Telescope Experiment. Volume 1: Investigation and Technical/management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The Infrared Telescope (IRT) is designed to survey extended celestial sources of infrared radiation between 4 and 120 micrometers wavelength. It will provide data regarding Space Shuttle induced environmental contamination and the zodical light. And, it will provide experience in the management of large volumes of superfluid helium in the space environment.

  13. Making A Difference: What Communities Can Do To Prevent Mental Handicap and Promote Lives of Quality. Volume I: Planning for Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kappel, Bruce

    The first of five volumes on the means by which Canadian communities can reduce the incidence of mental retardation, minimize existing impairment, and improve the quality of life of the mentally retarded, this booklet provides an overview of the types of conditions leading to mental handicap and what can be done to prevent or ameliorate those…

  14. Stone volume is best predictor of operative time required in retrograde intrarenal surgery for renal calculi: implications for surgical planning and quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Igor; Cardona-Grau, Diana K; Rehfuss, Alexandra; Birney, Alan; Stavrakis, Costas; Leinwand, Gabriel; Herr, Allen; Feustel, Paul J; White, Mark D

    2016-11-01

    Retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS) is highly successful at eliminating renal stones of various sizes and compositions. As urologists are taking on more complex procedures using RIRS, this has led to an increase in operative (OR) times. Our objective was to determine the best predictor of OR time in patients undergoing RIRS. We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients undergoing unilateral RIRS for solitary stones over a 10 year time span. Stones were fragmented and actively extracted using a basket. Variables potentially affecting OR time such as patient age, sex, BMI, lower pole stone location, volume, Hounsfield units (HU), composition, ureteral access sheath (UAS) use, and pre-operative stenting were collected. Multivariable linear and stepwise regression was used to evaluate the predictors of OR time. There were 118 patients that met inclusion criteria. The median stone volume was 282.6 mm(3) (IQR 150.7-644.7) and the mean OR time was 50 min (±25.9 SD). On univariate linear regression, stone volume had a moderate correlation with OR time (y = 0.022x + 38.2, r (2) = 0.363, p < 0.01). On multivariable stepwise regression, stone volume had the strongest impact on OR time, increasing time by 2.0 min for each 100 mm(3) increase in stone volume (p < 0.001). UAS added 13.5 (SE 3.9, p = 0.001) minutes and renal lower pole location added 9 min (SE 4.3, p = 0.03) in each case they were used. Pre-operative stenting, HU, calcium oxalate stone composition, sex, and age had no significant effect on OR time. Amongst the main stone factors in RIRS, stone volume has the strongest impact on operative time. This can be used to predict the length of the procedure by roughly adding 2 min per 100 mm(3) increase in stone volume.

  15. Remedial action plan and site conceptual design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico. Volume 3, Appendix F, Final plans and specifications: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    This volume deals with the main construction subcontract for the uranium mill tailings remedial action of Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico. Contents of subcontract documents AMB-4 include: bidding requirements; terms and conditions; specifications which cover general requirements and sitework; and subcontract drawings.

  16. Development of Water Resources in Appalachia. Main Report. Part 2. Volume 5a. Sub-Regional Plans. Chapters 13 thru 16

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1969-11-01

    finance, entertainment , and medical and other professional services grew in importance. *i The population:worker ratio in State Planning Sub-region 13...EDUCATION OF PERSONS 25 YRS. AND OVER, 1960 1-8 Years 1-4 Years I or More Yrs. Total Elementary School ligh School of College Number 25,825 17,796

  17. Preliminary design study of advanced composite blade and hub and nonmechanical control system for the tilt-rotor aircraft. Volume 2: Project planning data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Project planning data for a rotor and control system procurement and testing program for modifications to the XV-15 tilt-rotor research demonstrator aircraft is presented. The design, fabrication, and installation of advanced composite blades compatible with the existing hub, an advanced composite hub, and a nonmechanical control system are required.

  18. Saugus River and Tributaries, Lynn Malden, Revere and Saugus, Massachusetts. Flood Damage Reduction. Volume 6. Appendix I. Planning Correspondence: Lynn, Malden, Revere, Saugus, Interest Groups, and News Articles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    TUMORS . LOBSTER HAD HIGH LEVELS OF CANCER CAUSING PCB"S AND CLAMS SHOWED HIGH LEVELS OF VIRUSES AND DISEASES. THIS IS FACT IN BOSTON HARBOR AND QUINCY BAY...te corp IsI ’paring plans far I. An Is million Roughans Peb VIATTL. - Par I 1-9 DAILY EVENING ITEM. Lynn, Mama .. Friday, May 16, 1986 Flood control

  19. STS payloads mission control study. Volume 2-A, Task 1: Joint products and functions for preflight planning of flight operations, training and simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Specific products and functions, and associated facility availability, applicable to preflight planning of flight operations were studied. Training and simulation activities involving joint participation of STS and payload operations organizations, are defined. The prelaunch activities required to prepare for the payload flight operations are emphasized.

  20. Design study of RL10 derivatives. Volume 3, part 2: Operational and flight support plan. [analysis of transportation requirements for rocket engine in support of space tug program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shubert, W. C.

    1973-01-01

    Transportation requirements are considered during the engine design layout reviews and maintenance engineering analyses. Where designs cannot be influenced to avoid transportation problems, the transportation representative is advised of the problems permitting remedies early in the program. The transportation representative will monitor and be involved in the shipment of development engine and GSE hardware between FRDC and vehicle manufacturing plant and thereby will be provided an early evaluation of the transportation plans, methods and procedures to be used in the space tug support program. Unanticipated problems discovered in the shipment of development hardware will be known early enough to permit changes in packaging designs and transportation plans before the start of production hardware and engine shipments. All conventional transport media can be used for the movement of space tug engines. However, truck transport is recommended for ready availability, variety of routes, short transit time, and low cost.

  1. A plan for application system verification tests: The value of improved meteorological information, volume 1. [economic consequences of improved meteorological information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The framework within which the Applications Systems Verification Tests (ASVTs) are performed and the economic consequences of improved meteorological information demonstrated is described. This framework considers the impact of improved information on decision processes, the data needs to demonstrate the economic impact of the improved information, the data availability, the methodology for determining and analyzing the collected data and demonstrating the economic impact of the improved information, and the possible methods of data collection. Three ASVTs are considered and program outlines and plans are developed for performing experiments to demonstrate the economic consequences of improved meteorological information. The ASVTs are concerned with the citrus crop in Florida, the cotton crop in Mississippi and a group of diverse crops in Oregon. The program outlines and plans include schedules, manpower estimates and funding requirements.

  2. A state-of-the-art review of transportation systems evaluation techniques relevant to air transportation, volume 1. [urban planning and urban transportation using decision theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haefner, L. E.

    1975-01-01

    Mathematical and philosophical approaches are presented for evaluation and implementation of ground and air transportation systems. Basic decision processes are examined that are used for cost analyses and planning (i.e, statistical decision theory, linear and dynamic programming, optimization, game theory). The effects on the environment and the community that a transportation system may have are discussed and modelled. Algorithmic structures are examined and selected bibliographic annotations are included. Transportation dynamic models were developed. Citizen participation in transportation projects (i.e, in Maryland and Massachusetts) is discussed. The relevance of the modelling and evaluation approaches to air transportation (i.e, airport planning) is examined in a case study in St. Louis, Missouri.

  3. SSTAC/ARTS review of the draft Integrated Technology Plan (ITP). Volume 8: Aerothermodynamics Automation and Robotics (A/R) systems sensors, high-temperature superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-01

    Viewgraphs of briefings presented at the SSTAC/ARTS review of the draft Integrated Technology Plan (ITP) on aerothermodynamics, automation and robotics systems, sensors, and high-temperature superconductivity are included. Topics covered include: aerothermodynamics; aerobraking; aeroassist flight experiment; entry technology for probes and penetrators; automation and robotics; artificial intelligence; NASA telerobotics program; planetary rover program; science sensor technology; direct detector; submillimeter sensors; laser sensors; passive microwave sensing; active microwave sensing; sensor electronics; sensor optics; coolers and cryogenics; and high temperature superconductivity.

  4. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Rifle, Colorado. Volume 2, Appendices D and E: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    This appendix assesses the present conditions and data gathered about the two inactive uranium mill tailings sites near Rifle, Colorado, and the designated disposal site six miles north of Rifle in the area of Estes Gulch. It consolidates available engineering, radiological, geotechnical, hydrological, meteorological, and other information pertinent to the design of the Remedial Action Plan (RAP). The data characterize conditions at the mill, tailings, and disposal site so that the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC) may complete final designs for the remedial actions.

  5. Survey Plan For Characterization of the Subsurface Underlying the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Volume 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Topic considered include: survey objectives; technologies for non-Invasive imaging of subsurface; cost; data requirements and sources; climatic condition; hydrology and geology; chemicals; magnetometry; electrical(resistivity, potential); optical-style imaging; reflection/refraction seismics; gravitometry; photo-acoustic activation;well drilling and borehole analysis; comparative assessment matrix; ground sensors; choice of the neutron sources; logistic of operations; system requirements; health and safety plans.

  6. Space transfer concepts and analysis for exploration missions. Implementation plan and element description document (draft final). Volume 5: Nuclear electric propulsion vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) concept design developed in support of the Space Transfer Concepts and Analysis for Exploration Missions (STCAEM) study is presented. The evolution of the NEP concept is described along with the requirements, guidelines, and assumptions for the design. Operating modes and options are defined and a systems description of the vehicle is presented. Artificial gravity configuration options and space and ground support systems are discussed. Finally, an implementation plan is presented which addresses technology needs, schedules, facilities and costs.

  7. Integrated Hatchery Operations Team: Operations Plans for Anadromous Fish Production Facilities in the Columbia River Basin, Volume I of V; 1992 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Shelldrake, Tom

    1993-08-01

    Individual operational plans for 1993 are provided for the Abernathy Salmon Culture Technology Center, Carson National Fish Hatchery, Dworshak National Fish Hatchery, Eagle Creek National Fish Hatchery, Entiat National Fish Hatchery, Hagerman National Fish Hatchery, Kooskia National Fish Hatchery, Leavenworth National Fish Hatchery, Little White Salmon National Fish Hatchery, Spring Creek National Fish Hatchery, Warm Springs National Fish Hatchery, Willard National Fish Hatchery, and the Winthrop National Fish Hatchery.

  8. Tracking and data system support for the Pioneer project. Volume 2: Pioneer 11 prelaunch planning through second trajectory correction, to 1 May 1973

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, W. R.; Miller, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    The tracking and data system support of the planning, testing, launch, near-earth, and deep space phases of the Pioneer 11 Jupiter Mission are described, including critical phases of spacecraft flight and guidance. Scientific instruments aboard the spacecraft registered information relative to interplanetary particles and fields. Knowledge of the celestial mechanics of the solar system was improved through radiometric data gathering. Network performance, details of network support activity, and special support activities are discussed.

  9. SSTAC/ARTS review of the draft Integrated Technology Plan (ITP). Volume 8: Aerothermodynamics Automation and Robotics (A/R) systems sensors, high-temperature superconductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs of briefings presented at the SSTAC/ARTS review of the draft Integrated Technology Plan (ITP) on aerothermodynamics, automation and robotics systems, sensors, and high-temperature superconductivity are included. Topics covered include: aerothermodynamics; aerobraking; aeroassist flight experiment; entry technology for probes and penetrators; automation and robotics; artificial intelligence; NASA telerobotics program; planetary rover program; science sensor technology; direct detector; submillimeter sensors; laser sensors; passive microwave sensing; active microwave sensing; sensor electronics; sensor optics; coolers and cryogenics; and high temperature superconductivity.

  10. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 3, Sampling and analysis plan (SAP): Phase 1, Task 4, Field Investigation: Draft

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    In April 1990, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB), initiated an investigation to evaluate a potential Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) removal action to prevent, to the extent practicable, the offsite migration of contaminated ground water from WPAFB. WPAFB retained the services of the Environmental Management Operations (EMO) and its principle subcontractor, International Technology Corporation (IT) to complete Phase 1 of the environmental investigation of ground-water contamination at WPAFB. Phase 1 of the investigation involves the short-term evaluation and potential design for a program to remove ground-water contamination that appears to be migrating across the western boundary of Area C, and across the northern boundary of Area B along Springfield Pike. Primarily, Task 4 of Phase 1 focuses on collection of information at the Area C and Springfield Pike boundaries of WPAFB. This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) has been prepared to assist in completion of the Task 4 field investigation and is comprised of the Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) and the Field Sampling Plan (FSP).

  11. Transition projects, Fiscal Year 1996: Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) for WBS 1.31, 7.1, and 6.13. Revision 1, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Cartmell, D.B.

    1995-09-01

    Based on US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL) review, specific areas of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), Transition Projects ``Draft`` Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) were revised in preparation for the RL approval ceremony on September 26, 1995. These changes were reviewed with the appropriate RL Project Manager. The changes have been incorporated to the MYPP electronic file, and hard copies replacing the ``Draft`` MYPP will be distributed after the formal signing. In addition to the comments received, a summary level schedule and outyear estimates for the K Basin deactivation beginning in FY 2001 have been included. The K Basin outyear waste data is nearing completion this week and will be incorporated. This exclusion was discussed with Mr. N.D. Moorer, RL, Facility Transition Program Support/Integration. The attached MYPP scope/schedule reflects the Integrated Target Case submitted in the April 1995 Activity Data Sheets (ADS) with the exception of B Plant and the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The 8 Plant assumption in FY 1997 reflects the planning case in the FY 1997 ADS with a shortfall of $5 million. PFP assumptions have been revised from the FY 1997 ADS based on the direction provided this past summer by DOE-Headquarters. This includes the acceleration of the polycube stabilization back to its originally planned completion date. Although the overall program repricing in FY 1996 allowed the scheduled acceleration to fall with the funding allocation, the FY 1997 total reflects a shortfall of $6 million.

  12. SU-E-T-79: A Study of the Effect of Clinical Tumor Volume Displacement On the Dosage of Post Modified Radical Mastectomy Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Plans for Left-Sided Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W; Ma, C; Li, D; Wu, F

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To explore the effect of clinical tumor volume (CTV) displacement on the dosage of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans for left-sided breast cancer after modified radical mastectomy. Methods: We created 2 sets of IMRT plans based on PTV0.5 and PTV0.7 (with CTV displacement of 0.5cm and 0.7cm respectively) for each of the ten consecutive left-sided breast cancer patients after modified radical mastectomy, and compared the difference in PTV coverage and organ at risk (OAR) sparing between the two groups. And then, we compared the difference in PTV coverage in IMRT plans based on PTV0.5 between the group with properly estimated CTV displacement (presuming the actual CTV displacement was 0.5cm) and the one with underestimated CTV displacement (presuming the actual CTV displacement was 0.7cm). The difference in results between the corresponding two groups was compared using paired-sample t-test. P values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: IMRT plans derived from PTV0.5 had more homogenous PTV coverage, and less heart, left lung, right breast, right lung, left humeral head and B-P radiation exposure, as well as less total Mu as compared with the ones stemmed from PTV0.7 (all p<0.05). IMRT plans with appropriate estimation of CTV displacement had better PTV coverage compared with the ones with underestimated CTV displacement (all p<0.01). Conclusion: The IMRT plans with smaller CTV displacement in post modified radical mastectomy radiotherapy for left-sided breast cancer has dosimetrical advantages over the ones with larger CTV displacement. Underestimation of CTV displacement can lead to significant reduction of PTV coverage. Individually quantifying and minimizing CTV displacement can significantly improve PTV coverage and OAR (including heart and left lung) sparing. This work was supported by the Medical Scientific Research Foundation of Guangdong Procvince (A2014455 to Changchun Ma)

  13. Design and manufacture of wheels for a dual-mode (manned - automatic) lunar surface roving vehicle. Volume 2: Proposed test plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    A developmental test plan for the wheel and wheel drive assembly of the dual-mode (manned/automated) lunar surface roving vehicle is presented. The tests cover performance, as well as critical environmental characteristics. Insofar as practical, the environmental conditions imposed will be in the sequence expected during the hardware's life from storage through the lunar mission. Test procedures are described for static load deflection and endurance tests. Soft soil tests to determine mobility characteristics including drawbar-pull and thrust vs slip, and motion resistance for various wheel loads are also discussed. Test designs for both ambient and thermal vacuum conditions are described. Facility, transducer, and instrumentation requirements are outlined.

  14. Space transfer concepts and analysis for exploration missions. Implementation plan and element description document (draft final). Volume 4: Solar electric propulsion vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-03-01

    This document presents the solar electric propulsion (SEP) concept design developed as part of the Space Transfer Concepts and Analysis for Exploration Missions (STCAEM) study. The evolution of the SEP concept is described along with the requirements, guidelines and assumptions for the design. Operating modes and options are defined and a systems description of the vehicle is presented. Artificial gravity configuration options and space and ground support systems are discussed. Finally, an implementation plan is presented which addresses technology needs, schedules, facilities, and costs.

  15. Space transfer concepts and analysis for exploration missions. Implementation plan and element description document (draft final). Volume 4: Solar electric propulsion vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This document presents the solar electric propulsion (SEP) concept design developed as part of the Space Transfer Concepts and Analysis for Exploration Missions (STCAEM) study. The evolution of the SEP concept is described along with the requirements, guidelines and assumptions for the design. Operating modes and options are defined and a systems description of the vehicle is presented. Artificial gravity configuration options and space and ground support systems are discussed. Finally, an implementation plan is presented which addresses technology needs, schedules, facilities, and costs.

  16. Space transfer concepts and analysis for exploration missions. Implementation plan and element description document (draft final). Volume 3: Nuclear thermal rocket vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This document presents the nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) concept design developed in support of the Space Transfer Concepts and Analysis for Exploration Missions (STCAEM) study. The evolution of the NTR concept is described along with the requirements, guidelines and assumptions for the design. Operating modes and options are defined and a systems description of the vehicle is presented. Artificial gravity configuration options and space and ground support systems are discussed. Finally, an implementation plan is presented which addresses technology needs, schedules, facilities and costs.

  17. Remedial Action Plan and final design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings at Green River, Utah. Volume 1, Text, Appendices A, B, and C: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, M.L.; Alkema, K.

    1991-03-01

    This Remedial Action Plan (RAP) has been developed to serve a threefold purpose. It presents the series of activities that are proposed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of radioactive materials at the inactive uranium processing site located near Green River, Utah. It provides a characterization of the present conditions of the site. It also serves to document the concurrence of the state of Utah and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by the DOE and the state of Utah, and concurrence by the NRC, becomes Appendix 8 of the Cooperative Agreement.

  18. Space transfer concepts and analysis for exploration missions. Implementation plan and element description document (draft final). Volume 2: Cryo/aerobrake vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The cryogenic/aerobrake (CAB) and the cryogenic all-propulsive (CAP) concept designs developed in support of the Space Transfer Concepts and Analysis for Exploration Missions (STCAEM) study are presented. The evolution of the CAB and CAP concepts is described along with the requirements, guidelines and assumptions for the designs. Operating modes and options are defined and systems descriptions of the vehicles are presented. Artificial gravity configuration options and space and ground support systems are discussed. Finally, an implementation plan is presented which addresses technology needs, schedules, facilities, and costs.

  19. Guidance for implementing an environmental, safety, and health-assurance program. Volume 15. A model plan for line organization environmental, safety, and health-assurance programs

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingson, A.C.; Trauth, C.A. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    This is 1 of 15 documents designed to illustrate how an Environmental, Safety and Health (ES and H) Assurance Program may be implemented. The generic definition of ES and H Assurance Programs is given in a companion document entitled An Environmental, Safety and Health Assurance Program Standard. This particular document presents a model operational-level ES and H Assurance Program that may be used as a guide by an operational-level organization in developing its own plan. The model presented here reflects the guidance given in the total series of 15 documents.

  20. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright- Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 4, Health and Safety Plan (HSP); Phase 1, Task 4 Field Investigation report: Draft

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    This Health and Safety Plan (HSP) was developed for the Environmental Investigation of Ground-water Contamination Investigation at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base near Dayton, Ohio, based on the projected scope of work for the Phase 1, Task 4 Field Investigation. The HSP describes hazards that may be encountered during the investigation, assesses the hazards, and indicates what type of personal protective equipment is to be used for each task performed. The HSP also addresses the medical monitoring program, decontamination procedures, air monitoring, training, site control, accident prevention, and emergency response.

  1. Preliminary design study of underground pumped hydro and compressed-air energy storage in hard rock. Volume 4: System planning studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-04-01

    Preliminary design and planning studies of water compensated compressed air energy storage (CAES) and underground pumped hydroelectric (UPH) power plants are presented. The costs of the CAES and UPH plant designs, and the results of economic evaluations performed for the PEPCO system are presented. The PEPCO system planning analysis was performed in parallel stages with plant design development. Analyses performed early in the project indicated a requirement for 1000 MW/10,000 MWH of energy storage on a daily operating schedule, with economic installation in two segments of 500 MW in 1990 and 1997. The analysis was updated eighteen months later near the end of the project to reflect the impact of new growth projections and revised plant costs. The revised results indicated economic installations for either UPH or CAES of approximately 675 MW/6750 MWH on a daily cycle, installed in blocks of approximately 225 MW in 1990, 1993 and 1995. Significant savings in revenue requirements and oil fuel over the combustion turbine alternative were identified for both CAES and UPH.

  2. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Primary Lung Cancer at a Dose of 50 Gy Total in Five Fractions to the Periphery of the Planning Target Volume Calculated Using a Superposition Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Atsuya; Sanuki, Naoko; Kunieda, Etsuo Ohashi, Toshio; Oku, Yohei; Takeda, Toshiaki; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Kubo, Atsushi

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively analyze the clinical outcomes of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for patients with Stages 1A and 1B non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer treated with curative intent between Dec 2001 and May 2007. All patients had histopathologically or cytologically confirmed disease, increased levels of tumor markers, and/or positive findings on fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography. Staging studies identified their disease as Stage 1A or 1B. Performance status was 2 or less according to World Health Organization guidelines in all cases. The prescribed dose of 50 Gy total in five fractions, calculated by using a superposition algorithm, was defined for the periphery of the planning target volume. Results: One hundred twenty-one patients underwent SBRT during the study period, and 63 were eligible for this analysis. Thirty-eight patients had Stage 1A (T1N0M0) and 25 had Stage 1B (T2N0M0). Forty-nine patients were not appropriate candidates for surgery because of chronic pulmonary disease. Median follow-up of these 49 patients was 31 months (range, 10-72 months). The 3-year local control, disease-free, and overall survival rates in patients with Stages 1A and 1B were 93% and 96% (p = 0.86), 76% and 77% (p = 0.83), and 90% and 63% (p = 0.09), respectively. No acute toxicity was observed. Grade 2 or higher radiation pneumonitis was experienced by 3 patients, and 1 of them had fatal bacterial pneumonia. Conclusions: The SBRT at 50 Gy total in five fractions to the periphery of the planning target volume calculated by using a superposition algorithm is feasible. High local control rates were achieved for both T2 and T1 tumors.

  3. Integrated payload and mission planning, phase 3. Volume 2: Logic/Methodology for preliminary grouping of spacelab and mixed cargo payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, T. E.; Johnson, J. F.

    1977-01-01

    The logic and methodology for a preliminary grouping of Spacelab and mixed-cargo payloads is proposed in a form that can be readily coded into a computer program by NASA. The logic developed for this preliminary cargo grouping analysis is summarized. Principal input data include the NASA Payload Model, payload descriptive data, Orbiter and Spacelab capabilities, and NASA guidelines and constraints. The first step in the process is a launch interval selection in which the time interval for payload grouping is identified. Logic flow steps are then taken to group payloads and define flight configurations based on criteria that includes dedication, volume, area, orbital parameters, pointing, g-level, mass, center of gravity, energy, power, and crew time.

  4. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound in planning thermal ablation of liver metastases: Should the hypervascular halo be included in the ablation volume?().

    PubMed

    Andreano, A; Meneghel, E; Bovo, G; Ippolito, D; Salvioni, A; Filice, C; Sironi, S; Meloni, M F

    2010-12-01

    Sommario INTRODUZIONE: All’ecografia con Mezzo di Contrasto (CEUS) dei tumori secondari epatici si evidenzia spesso un alone periferico ipervascolare, che non ha corrispondenza sull’immagine ecografica di base e non è ancora stato caratterizzato istologicamente. Lo scopo dello studio è di caratterizzare tale alone al fine di determinare se sia necessario includerlo nel volume di necrosi pianificato. MATERIALI E METODI: Questo studio prospettico ha incluso 25 pazienti inviati per terapia termo-ablativa di tumori secondari epatici. Prima del trattamento tutti i pazienti sono stati sottoposti a CEUS. Il diametro maggiore della lesione è stato determinato: pre-contrasto, durante la fase arteriosa e durante la fase venosa portale. I diametri delle lesioni pre e post-contrasto sono stati confrontati mediante il test di Turkey–Kramer. Due campioni bioptici sono stati prelevati con ago 21-gauge e analizzati istologicamente: 1) uno dalla zona centrale del tumore e 2) uno dall’alone periferico ipervascolare, identificato alla CEUS solamente nella fase arteriosa. RISULTATI: Il diametro massimo medio delle lesioni è risultato (±deviazione standard): 2,67 ± 1,2 cm pre-contrasto; 3,50 ± 1,4 cm in fase arteriosa; 2,71 ± 1,2 cm in fase venosa. La differenza media tra il diametro massimo pre-contrasto e in fase arteriosa è risultata di 0,84 ± 0,45cm (p<0,0001). All’esame istologico, 24/25 campioni (96%) hanno dimostrato flogosi senza evidenza di tumore microscopico. DISCUSSIONE: L’alone ipervascolare periferico è costituito da infiltrato infiammatorio, non da tessuto tumorale. Esistono evidenze in letteratura che l’infiammazione cronica promuova la neovascolarizzazione e la produzione di fattori di crescita per le cellule neoplastiche. Sembra quindi opportuno includere completamente l’alone ipervascolare periferico evidente alla CEUS nel volume di termo-ablazione.

  5. Life sciences payload definition and integration study. Volume 2: Requirements, design, and planning studies for the carry-on laboratories. [for Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The task phase concerned with the requirements, design, and planning studies for the carry-on laboratory (COL) began with a definition of biomedical research areas and candidate research equipment, and then went on to develop conceptual layouts for COL which were each evaluated in order to arrive at a final conceptual design. Each step in this design/evaluation process concerned itself with man/systems integration research and hardware, and life support and protective systems research and equipment selection. COL integration studies were also conducted and include attention to electrical power and data management requirements, operational considerations, and shuttle/Spacelab interface specifications. A COL program schedule was compiled, and a cost analysis was finalized which takes into account work breakdown, annual funding, and cost reduction guidelines.

  6. Sound Waste Management Plan environmental operations, and used oil management system: Restoration project 97115. Exxon Valdez oil spill restoration project final report: Volumes 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    This project constitutes Phase 2 of the Sound Waste Management Plan and created waste oil collection and disposal facilities, bilge water collection and disposal facilities, recycling storage, and household hazardous waste collection and storage, and household hazardous waste collection and storage facilities in Prince William Sound. A wide range of waste streams are generated within communities in the Sound including used oil generated from vehicles and vessels, and hazardous wastes generated by households. This project included the design and construction of Environmental Operations Stations buildings in Valdez, Cordova, Whittier, Chenega Bay and Tatitlek to improve the overall management of oily wastes. They will house new equipment to facilitate oily waste collection, treatment and disposal. This project also included completion of used oil management manuals.

  7. Site characterization plan conceptual design report for a high-level nuclear waste repository in salt, vertical emplacement mode: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-12-01

    This Conceptual Design Report describes the conceptual design of a high-level nuclear waste repository in salt at a proposed site in Deaf Smith County, Texas. Waste receipt, processing, packing, and other surface facility operations are described. Operations in the shafts underground are described, including waste hoisting, transfer, and vertical emplacement. This report specifically addresses the vertical emplacement mode, the reference design for the repository. Waste retrieval capability is described. The report includes a description of the layout of the surface, shafts, and underground. Major equipment items are identified. The report includes plans for decommissioning and sealing of the facility. The report discusses how the repository will satisfy performance objectives. Chapters are included on basis for design, design analyses, and data requirements for completion of future design efforts. 105 figs., 52 tabs.

  8. Northeast Artificial Intelligence Consortium annual report. 1988 distributed planning for dynamic environments in the presence of time constraints. Volume 5. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, R.A.; Conry, S.; Cohen, P.R.; Lesser, V.R.

    1989-10-01

    Our primary goal has been one of developing a distributed firefighting simulator. This is necessary in order to provide an environment in which agents can cooperatively plan to contain fires. In order to accomplish this task, a number of issues related to timing, agent synchronization, management of thinking time and acting time, and agent capabilities must be resolved. The testbed simulator has not been designed simply as a distribution of the existing centralized firefighting simulator. The issues of time and agent synchronization in a multi-agent environment necessitated a complete redesign of the simulation. The new design permits multiple agents to work simultaneously and independently. It includes a facility for defining the characteristics of communications among agents, with available communication media independently specified. In addition, the new simulator will reflect much more realistic terrain representation and a significantly improved fire model than the existing centralized simulator.

  9. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Rifle, Colorado. Volume 1, Text: Appendices A, B, and C: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1990-02-01

    This document has been structured to provide a comprehensive understanding of the remedial action proposed for the Rifle sites. That remedial action consists of removing approximately 4,185,000 cubic yards (cy) of tailings and contaminated materials from their current locations, transporting, and stabilizing the tailings material at the Estes Gulch disposal site, approximately six miles north of Rifle. The tailings and contaminated materials are comprised of approximately 597,000 cy from Old Rifle, 3,232,000 cy from New Rifle, and 322,000 cy from vicinity properties and about 34,000 cy from demolition. The remedial action plan includes specific design requirements for the detailed design and construction of the remedial action. An extensive amount of data and supporting information have been generated for this remedial action and cannot all be incorporated into this document. Pertinent information and data are included with reference given to the supporting documents.

  10. Gulf of Mexico Sales 139 and 141: Central and western planning areas. Final Environmental Impact Statement: Volume 2, Sections 4.D through 9

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    This environmental impact statement (EIS) addresses two proposed Federal actions, lease Sales 139 and 141, that will offer for lease Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) areas that may contain economically recoverable oil and gas resources. The lease sales are proposed for 1992 and include lease blocks in the Central Gulf of Mexico Planning Area (CPA) and Western Gulf of Mexico Planning Area (WPA). Approximately 9700 blocks will be available for lease under the two proposed actions; only a small percentage is expected to be actually leased. On average, 432 blocks in the Central Gulf and 279 blocks in the Western Gulf have been leased in individual Gulf of Mexico OCS lease sales since 1984. Of the blocks that will be leased as a result of the two proposed actions, only a portion will be drilled and will likely result in subsequent production. The analytical methods used in this EIS have been formulated over a period of years and are based on the methodology outlined within the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The first step of the analysis is the identification of significant environmental and socioeconomic resources through the scoping process. A range of impact levels is then defined for each of the significant resources to be analyzed. A range of energy resource estimates is derived from geologic and economic assumptions and a range of alternatives to the proposed action is established. Estimated levels of exploration and development actively are assumed for the purposes of the analysis. A scoping process was used to obtain information and comments on the proposed actions and the potential environmental effects from diverse interests, including the affected States, Federal agencies, the petroleum industry, environmental and public interest groups, and concerned individuals.

  11. Sandia software guidelines: Software quality planning

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-08-01

    This volume is one in a series of Sandia Software Guidelines intended for use in producing quality software within Sandia National Laboratories. In consonance with the IEEE Standard for Software Quality Assurance Plans, this volume identifies procedures to follow in producing a Software Quality Assurance Plan for an organization or a project, and provides an example project SQA plan. 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. SU-E-T-147: Beam Specific Planning Target Volumes Incorporating 4DCT for Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy of Thoracic Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, L; Kang, M; Huang, S; McDonough, J; Solberg, T; Simone, C; Mayer, R; Thomas, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine whether organ sparing and target coverage can be simultaneously maintained for pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy treatment of thoracic tumors in the presence of motion, stopping power uncertainties and patient setup variations. Methods: Ten consecutive patients that were previously treated with proton therapy to 66.6/1.8 Gy (RBE) using double scattering (DS) were replanned with PBS. Minimum and maximum intensity images from 4DCT were used to introduce flexible smearing in the determination of the beam specific PTV (BSPTV). Datasets from eight 4DCT phases, using ±3% uncertainty in stopping power, and ±3 mm uncertainty in patient setup in each direction were used to create 8*12*10=960 PBS plans for the evaluation of ten patients. Plans were normalized to provide identical coverage between DS and PBS. Results: The average lung V20, V5, and mean doses were reduced from 29.0%, 35.0%, and 16.4 Gy with DS to 24.6%, 30.6%, and 14.1 Gy with PBS, respectively. The average heart V30 and V45 were reduced from 10.4% and 7.5% in DS to 8.1% and 5.4% for PBS, respectively. Furthermore, the maximum spinal cord, esophagus and heart dose were decreased from 37.1 Gy, 71.7 Gy and 69.2 Gy with DS to 31.3 Gy, 67.9 Gy and 64.6 Gy with PBS. The conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), and global maximal dose were improved from 3.2, 0.08, 77.4 Gy with DS to 2.8, 0.04 and 72.1 Gy with PBS. All differences are statistically significant, with p values <0.05, with the exception of the heart V45 (p= 0.146). Conclusion: PBS with BSPTV achieves better organ sparing and improves target coverage using a repainting method for the treatment of thoracic tumors. Incorporating motion-related uncertainties is essential This work was supported by the US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command under Contract Agreement No. DAMD17-W81XWH-07-2-0121 and W81XWH-09-2-0174.

  13. PlanHab: Hypoxia counteracts the erythropoietin suppression, but seems to exaggerate the plasma volume reduction induced by 3 weeks of bed rest.

    PubMed

    Keramidas, Michail E; Mekjavic, Igor B; Kölegård, Roger; Choukèr, Alexander; Strewe, Claudia; Eiken, Ola

    2016-04-01

    The study examined the distinct and synergistic effects of hypoxia and bed rest on the erythropoietin (EPO) concentration and relative changes in plasma volume (PV). Eleven healthy male lowlanders underwent three 21-day confinement periods, in a counterbalanced order: (1) normoxic bed rest (NBR; PIO2: 133.1 ± 0.3 mmHg); (2) hypoxic bed rest (HBR; PIO2: 90.0 ± 0.4 mmHg, ambient simulated altitude of ~4000 m); and (3) hypoxic ambulation (HAMB; PIO2: 90.0 ± 0.4 mmHg). Blood samples were collected before, during (days 2, 5, 14, and 21) and 2 days after each confinement to determineEPOconcentration. Qualitative differences inPVchanges were also estimated by changes in hematocrit and hemoglobin concentration along with concomitant changes in plasma renin concentration.NBRcaused an initial reduction inEPOby ~39% (P = 0.04). By contrast,HBRenhancedEPO(P = 0.001), but the increase was less than that induced byHAMB(P < 0.01). All three confinements caused a significant reduction inPV(P < 0.05), with a substantially greater drop inHBRthan in the other conditions (P < 0.001). Thus, present results suggest that hypoxia prevents theEPOsuppression, whereas it seems to exaggerate thePVreduction induced by bed rest.

  14. Study to evaluate the effect of EVA on payload systems. Volume 1: Executive summary. [project planning of space missions employing extravehicular activity as a means of cost reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patrick, J. W.; Kraly, E. F.

    1975-01-01

    Programmatic benefits to payloads are examined which can result from the routine use of extravehicular activity (EVA) during space missions. Design and operations costs were compared for 13 representative baseline payloads to the costs of those payloads adapted for EVA operations. The EVA-oriented concepts developed in the study were derived from these baseline concepts and maintained mission and program objectives as well as basic configurations. This permitted isolation of cost saving factors associated specifically with incorporation of EVA in a variety of payload designs and operations. The study results were extrapolated to a total of 74 payload programs. Using appropriate complexity and learning factors, net EVA savings were extrapolated to over $551M for NASA and U.S. civil payloads for routine operations. Adding DOD and ESRO payloads increases the net estimated savings of $776M. Planned maintenance by EVA indicated an estimated $168M savings due to elimination of automated service equipment. Contingency problems of payloads were also analyzed to establish expected failure rates for shuttle payloads. The failure information resulted in an estimated potential for EVA savings of $1.9 B.

  15. Time-Adjusted Internal Target Volume: A Novel Approach Focusing on Heterogeneity of Tumor Motion Based on 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography Imaging for Radiation Therapy Planning of Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nishibuchi, Ikuno; Kimura, Tomoki; Nakashima, Takeo; Ochi, Yusuke; Takahashi, Ippei; Doi, Yoshiko; Kenjo, Masahiro; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Ozawa, Syuichi; Murakami, Yuji; Wadasaki, Koichi; Nagata, Yasushi

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: To consider nonuniform tumor motion within the internal target volume (ITV) by defining time-adjusted ITV (TTV), a volume designed to include heterogeneity of tumor existence on the basis of 4-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT). Methods and Materials: We evaluated 30 lung cancer patients. Breath-hold CT (BH-CT) and free-breathing 4D-CT scans were acquired for each patient. The tumors were manually delineated using a lung CT window setting (window, 1600 HU; level, −300 HU). Tumor in BH-CT images was defined as gross tumor volume (GTV), and the sum of tumors in 4D-CT images was defined as ITV-4D. The TTV images were generated from the 4D-CT datasets, and the tumor existence probability within ITV-4D was calculated. We calculated the TTV{sub 80} value, which is the percentage of the volume with a tumor existence probability that exceeded 80% on ITV-4D. Several factors that affected the TTV{sub 80} value, such as the ITV-4D/GTV ratio or tumor centroid deviation, were evaluated. Results: Time-adjusted ITV images were acquired for all patients, and tumor respiratory motion heterogeneity was visualized. The median (range) ITV-4D/GTV ratio and median tumor centroid deviation were 1.6 (1.0-4.1) and 6.3 mm (0.1-30.3 mm), respectively. The median TTV{sub 80} value was 43.3% (2.9-98.7%). Strong correlations were observed between the TTV{sub 80} value and the ITV-4D/GTV ratio (R=−0.71) and tumor centroid deviation (R=−0.72). The TTV images revealed the tumor motion pattern features within ITV. Conclusions: The TTV images reflected nonuniform tumor motion, and they revealed the tumor motion pattern features, suggesting that the TTV concept may facilitate various aspects of radiation therapy planning of lung cancer while incorporating respiratory motion in the future.

  16. A study of IMRT planning parameters on planning efficiency, delivery efficiency, and plan quality

    SciTech Connect

    Mittauer, Kathryn; Lu Bo; Yan Guanghua; Kahler, Darren; Amdur, Robert; Liu Chihray; Gopal, Arun

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: To improve planning and delivery efficiency of head and neck IMRT without compromising planning quality through the evaluation of inverse planning parameters.Methods: Eleven head and neck patients with pre-existing IMRT treatment plans were selected for this retrospective study. The Pinnacle treatment planning system (TPS) was used to compute new treatment plans for each patient by varying the individual or the combined parameters of dose/fluence grid resolution, minimum MU per segment, and minimum segment area. Forty-five plans per patient were generated with the following variations: 4 dose/fluence grid resolution plans, 12 minimum segment area plans, 9 minimum MU plans, and 20 combined minimum segment area/minimum MU plans. Each plan was evaluated and compared to others based on dose volume histograms (DVHs) (i.e., plan quality), planning time, and delivery time. To evaluate delivery efficiency, a model was developed that estimated the delivery time of a treatment plan, and validated through measurements on an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator. Results: The uncertainty (i.e., variation) of the dose-volume index due to dose calculation grid variation was as high as 8.2% (5.5 Gy in absolute dose) for planning target volumes (PTVs) and 13.3% (2.1 Gy in absolute dose) for planning at risk volumes (PRVs). Comparison results of dose distributions indicated that smaller volumes were more susceptible to uncertainties. The grid resolution of a 4 mm dose grid with a 2 mm fluence grid was recommended, since it can reduce the final dose calculation time by 63% compared to the accepted standard (2 mm dose grid with a 2 mm fluence grid resolution) while maintaining a similar level of dose-volume index variation. Threshold values that maintained adequate plan quality (DVH results of the PTVs and PRVs remained satisfied for their dose objectives) were 5 cm{sup 2} for minimum segment area and 5 MU for minimum MU. As the minimum MU parameter was increased, the number of

  17. Evaluation of the Planning Target Volume in the Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy: What Is the Appropriate Expansion Margin in the Setting of Daily Image Guidance?

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M.; Farwell, D. Gregory; Luu, Quang; Donald, Paul J.; Perks, Julian; Purdy, James A.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To compare patterns of disease failure among patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in conjunction with daily image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) for head and neck cancer, according to the margins used to expand the clinical target volume (CTV) to create a planning target volume (PTV). Methods and Materials: Two-hundred and twenty-five patients were treated with IMRT for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Daily IGRT scans were acquired using either kilovoltage or megavoltage volumetric imaging prior to each delivered fraction. The first 95 patients were treated with IMRT with 5-mm CTV-to-PTV margins. The subsequent 130 patients were treated using 3-mm PTV expansion margins. Results: Two-year estimates of overall survival, local-regional control, and distant metastasis-free survival were 76%, 78%, and 81%, respectively. There were no differences with respect to any of these endpoints among patients treated with 5-mm and 3-mm PTV expansion margins (p > 0.05, all). The 2-year local-regional control rate for patients treated with IMRT with 5-mm and 3-mm PTV margins was 78% and 78%, respectively (p = 0.96). Spatial evaluation revealed no differences in the incidences of marginal failures among those treated with 5-mm and 3-mm PTV margins. Conclusions: The use of 3-mm PTV expansion margins appears adequate and did not increase local-regional failures among patients treated with IMRT for head and neck cancer. These data demonstrate the safety of PTV reduction of less than 5 mm and support current protocols recommending this approach in the setting of daily IGRT.

  18. 40 CFR Appendix E to Part 112 - Determination and Evaluation of Required Response Resources for Facility Response Plans

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... available storage capacity. 4.7The following is an example of a medium discharge volume planning calculation... as the planning volume. The effective daily recovery capacity is 50 percent of the planning volume... planning volume for identifying shoreline cleanup capacity (for Group 1 through Group 4 oils)....

  19. Graphics Display Test. Volume 1. Test Plan.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    OP Is Data Consolidation Porm (Tab 12) b. MOP lb Data Consolidation Form (Tab 13) a. MOP 2a Data Consolidation Porne (Tab 14) d. Data Consolidation...2. Which company CP is farthest away from the battalion O?9 Answer: 3. What are the six digit grid coordinates of.the water tower located west of...company CP is farthest away from the battalion CP ? Answer: 5. What is the six digit grid coordinate of the spot south of the battalion OP where the

  20. Subseabed Disposal Program Plan. Volume I. Overview

    SciTech Connect

    1981-07-01

    The primary objective of the Subseabed Disposal Program (SDP) is to assess the scientific, environmental, and engineering feasibility of disposing of processed and packaged high-level nuclear waste in geologic formations beneath the world's oceans. High-level waste (HLW) is considered the most difficult of radioactive wastes to dispose of in oceanic geologic formations because of its heat and radiation output. From a scientific standpoint, the understanding developed for the disposal of such HLW can be used for other nuclear wastes (e.g., transuranic - TRU - or low-level) and materials from decommissioned facilities, since any set of barriers competent to contain the heat and radiation outputs of high-level waste will also contain such outputs from low-level waste. If subseabed disposal is found to be feasible for HLW, then other factors such as cost will become more important in considering subseabed emplacement for other nuclear wastes. A secondary objective of the SDP is to develop and maintain a capability to assess and cooperate with the seabed nuclear waste disposal programs of other nations. There are, of course, a number of nations with nuclear programs, and not all of these nations have convenient access to land-based repositories for nuclear waste. Many are attempting to develop legislative and scientific programs that will avoid potential hazards to man, threats to other ocean uses, and marine pollution, and they work together to such purpose in meetings of the international NEA/Seabed Working Group. The US SDP, as the first and most highly developed R and D program in the area, strongly influences the development of subseabed-disposal-related policy in such nations.

  1. Fort Irwin Historic Preservation Plan. Volume 1. The Management Plan.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-01

    prepare an environmental impact statement for every Federal action of any consequence affecting the quality of the human environment . In May 1971...Public Law 96-95) . . . I - 20 Procedures for ARPA Permits I - 22 NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT OF 1969 (NEPA) (Public Law 91-190) I - 23 EXECUTIVE...with the "Geologic Environment ," "Analysis of Prehistoric Site Records" and "Recent Developments in Sampling Surveys." Information contained in the

  2. PATRAM '80. Proceedings. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Huebner, H.W.

    1980-01-01

    Volume 2 contains papers from the following sessions: Safeguards-Related Problems; Neutronics and Criticality; Operations and Systems Experience II; Plutonium Systems; Intermediate Storage in Casks; Operations and Systems Planning; Institutional Issues; Structural and Thermal Evaluation I; Poster Session B; Extended Testing I; Structural and Thermal Evaluation II; Extended Testing II; and Emergency Preparedness and Response. Individual papers were processed. (LM)

  3. Construction Cluster Volume 5 [Electrical].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Dept. of Justice, Harrisburg. Bureau of Correction.

    The document is the fifth of a series, to be integrated with a G.E.D. program, containing instructional materials for the construction cluster. The volume focuses on electrical work and consists of 20 instructional units which require a month of study: (1) safety precautions and first aid for electrical workers; (2) planning a simple installation;…

  4. FY 1996 solid waste integrated life-cycle forecast volume summary - Volume 1 and Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Valero, O.J.

    1996-02-22

    Solid waste forecast volumes to be generated or received ;at Westinghouse Hanford Company`s Solid Waste program over the life cycle of the site are described in this report. Previous forecast summary reports have covered only a 30-year period; however, the life-cycle approach was adopted for this FY 1996 report to ensure consistency with waste volumes reported in the 1996 Multi-Year Program Plans (MYPP). The volume data were collected on a life-cycle basis from onsite and offsite waste generators who currently ship or plan to ship solid waste to the Solid Waste program. The volumes described in detail are low-level mixed waste (LLMW) and transuranic/transuranic-mixed (TRU(M)) waste. The volumes reported in this document represent the external volume of the containers selected to ship the waste. Summary level information pertaining to low-level waste (LLW) is described in Appendix B. Hazardous waste volumes are also provided in Appendices E and F but are not described in detail since they will be managed by a commercial facility. Emphasis is placed on LLMW and TRU(M) waste because it will require processing and storage at Hanford Solid Waste`s Central Waste Complex (CORK) prior to final disposal. The LLW will generally be sent directly to disposal. The total baselines volume of LLMW and TRU(M) waste forecast to be received by the Solid Waste program (until 2070) is approximately 100,900 cubic meters. This total waste volume is composed of the following waste categories: 077,080 cubic meters of LLMW; 23,180 cubic meters of TRU(M); 640 cubic meters of greater-than-class III LLMW. This total is about 40% of the total volume reported last year (FY 1995).

  5. Sandia software guidelines, Volume 4: Configuration management

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    This volume is one in a series of Sandia Software Guidelines for use in producing quality software within Sandia National Laboratories. This volume is based on the IEEE standard and guide for software configuration management. The basic concepts and detailed guidance on implementation of these concepts are discussed for several software project types. Example planning documents for both projects and organizations are included.

  6. Recommendations from gynaecological (GYN) GEC ESTRO working group (II): concepts and terms in 3D image-based treatment planning in cervix cancer brachytherapy-3D dose volume parameters and aspects of 3D image-based anatomy, radiation physics, radiobiology.

    PubMed

    Pötter, Richard; Haie-Meder, Christine; Van Limbergen, Erik; Barillot, Isabelle; De Brabandere, Marisol; Dimopoulos, Johannes; Dumas, Isabelle; Erickson, Beth; Lang, Stefan; Nulens, An; Petrow, Peter; Rownd, Jason; Kirisits, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Gynaecological (GYN) GEC ESTRO Working Group (I): concepts and terms in 3D image-based 3D treatment planning in cervix cancer brachytherapy with emphasis on MRI assessment of GTV and CTV. Radiother Oncol 2005;74:235-245]). It is expected that the therapeutic ratio including target coverage and sparing of organs at risk can be significantly improved, if radiation dose is prescribed to a 3D image-based CTV taking into account dose volume constraints for OAR. However, prospective use of these recommendations in the clinical context is warranted, to further explore and develop the potential of 3D image-based cervix cancer brachytherapy.

  7. Savannah River Site approved site treatment plan, 2000 annual update

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, B.

    2000-04-20

    The Compliance Plan Volume (Volume 1) identifies project activity schedule milestones for achieving compliance with Land Disposal Restrictions. Information regarding the technical evaluation of treatment options for SRS mixed wastes is contained in the Background Volume (Volume 2) and is provided for information.

  8. Savannah River Site Approved Site Treatment Plan, 1998 Annual Update

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, B.

    1999-04-20

    The Compliance Plan Volume (Volume I) identifies project activity schedule milestones for achieving compliance with Land Disposal Restrictions. Information regarding the technical evaluation of treatment options for SRS mixed wastes is contained in the Background Volume (Volume II) and is provided for information.

  9. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Rifle, Colorado. Volume 5, Addenda D6--D8 to Appendix D: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-02-01

    This volume contains appendices D6 through D8 containing laboratory test data: from MK-F investigation, 1987, Old Rifle and New Rifle sites; on bentonite amended radon barrier material; and from MK-F investigation, 1987, riprap tests.

  10. Independent Living Training. A Guide to Programming. Volume I [and] Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmins, Tippy; And Others

    Information on curriculum offerings and program planning and administration of a community-based work and living program for deaf-blind and other severely disabled adolescents and young adults is presented in two volumes. Volume I, an administrative manual independently titled "Community Based Training. Work and Independent Living Training for…

  11. Combined Edition of Family Planning Library Manual and Family Planning Classification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Planned Parenthood--World Population, New York, NY. Katherine Dexter McCormick Library.

    This edition combines two previous publications of the Katharine Dexter McCormick Library into one volume: the Family Planning Library Manual, a guide for starting a family planning and population library or information center, and the Family Planning Classification, a coding system for organizing book and non-book materials so that they can be…

  12. Fire Plans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, June

    2011-01-01

    Many libraries have disaster recovery plans, but not all have prevention and action plans to prepare for an emergency in advance. This article presents the author's review of the prevention and action plans of several libraries: (1) Evergreen State College; (2) Interlochen Public Library; (3) University of Maryland, Baltimore-Marshall Law Library;…

  13. Planning Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paddock, Susan C.; Mercure, Nancy

    This handbook was designed to assist advisory councils, program staff and administrators, and community members in planning community education programs and in managing those programs effectively. Chapter I defines and describes planning: what it is, why it is used, and how to engage in the process. The critical role of planning leaders is…

  14. Appropriate technology sourcebook. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Darrow, K.; Keller, K.; Pam, R

    1981-01-01

    The second in a 2 volume set of guides to practical books and plans for village and small community technology, with over 500 annotated references in print in 1980/1. The forestry section includes material on deforestation, conservation, reforestation, firewood crops, agroforestry, timber drying and the safe use of chain saws. Improved cooking stoves and charcoal kilns are covered in another section, and there is also a section on aquaculture. A glossary and a general index are included.

  15. Cassini science planning process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paczkowski, Brian G.; Ray, Trina L.

    2004-01-01

    The mission design for Cassini-Huygens calls for a four-year orbital survey of the Saturnian system and the descent into the Titan atmosphere and eventual soft-landing of the Huygens probe. The Cassini orbiter tour consists of 76 orbits around Saturn with 44 close Titan flybys and 8 targeted icy satellite flybys. The Cassini orbiter spacecraft carries twelve scientific instruments that will perform a wide range of observations on a multitude of designated targets. The science opportunities, frequency of encounters, the length of the Tour, and the use of distributed operations pose significant challenges for developing the science plan for the orbiter mission. The Cassini Science Planning Process is the process used to develop and integrate the science and engineering plan that incorporates an acceptable level of science required to meet the primary mission objectives far the orbiter. The bulk of the integrated science and engineering plan will be developed prior to Saturn Orbit Insertion (Sol). The Science Planning Process consists of three elements: 1) the creation of the Tour Atlas, which identifies the science opportunities in the tour, 2) the development of the Science Operations Plan (SOP), which is the conflict-free timeline of all science observations and engineering activities, a constraint-checked spacecraft pointing profile, and data volume allocations to the science instruments, and 3) an Aftermarket and SOP Update process, which is used to update the SOP while in tour with the latest information on spacecraft performance, science opportunities, and ephemerides. This paper will discuss the various elements of the Science Planning Process used on the Cassini Mission to integrate, implement, and adapt the science and engineering activity plans for Tour.

  16. Waterpower`95. Volume 1-3

    SciTech Connect

    Cassidy, J.L.

    1995-12-31

    Waterpower `95 is organized around 70 sessions with four papers being presented in each session and a poster paper forum, There are 26 topic area, with Volume I containing 5 topics and the poster session papers; Volume II containing 11 topics, and Volume III containing 10 topics and the student paper submittals. The topics are: Volume I (1) environmental, (2) case studies, (3) legal and licensing, (4) performance testing, (5) performance measurement, (6) posters, (7) construction; Volume II (8) rehabilitation and modernization, (9) operation and maintenance, (10) turbines and pump turbines, (11) electrical systems and controls, (12) generators, (13) recreation, (14) EPRI, (15) planning, (16) economics and finance, (17) integrated resource management, (18) technology transfer; Volume III (19) research and development, (20) safety, (21) risk analysis, (22) reservoir system operations, (23) hydraulic analysis, (24) hydrologic analysis, (25) geotechnical, (26) mechanical systems, (27) civil works, and (28) scholarship contest.

  17. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada: Volume 6, Part B: Chapter 8, Sections 8.3.2 through 8.3.4.4

    SciTech Connect

    1988-12-01

    This site characterization plan (SCP) has been developed for the candidate repository site at Yucca Mountain in the State of Nevada. The SCP includes a description of the Yucca Mountain site (Chapters 1-5), a conceptual design for the repository (Chapter 6), a description of the packaging to be used for the waste to be emplaced in the repository (Chapter 7), and a description of the planned site characterization activities (Chapter 8). The schedules and milestones presented in Sections 8.3 and 8.5 of the SCP were developed to be consistent with the June 1988 draft Amendment to the DOE`s Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. The five month delay in the scheduled start of exploratory shaft construction that was announced recently is not reflected in these schedules. 35 figs., 70 tabs.

  18. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada: Volume 8, Part B: Chapter 8, Sections 8.3.5 through 8.3.5.20

    SciTech Connect

    1988-12-01

    This site characterization plan (SCP) has been developed for the candidate repository site at Yucca Mountain in the State of Nevada. The SCP includes a description of the Yucca Mountain site (Chapters 1-5), a conceptual design for the repository (Chapter 6), a description of the packaging to be used for the waste to be emplaced in the repository (Chapter 7), and a description of the planned site characterization activities (Chapter 8). The schedules and milestones presented in Sections 8.3 and 8.5 of the SCP were developed to be consistent with the June 1988 draft Amendment to the DOE`s Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. The five month delay in the scheduled start of exploratory shaft construction that was announced recently is not reflected in these schedules. 68 figs., 102 tabs.

  19. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada: Volume 5, Part B: Chapter 8, Sections 8.3.1.5 through 8.3.1.17

    SciTech Connect

    1988-12-01

    This site characterization plan (SCP) has been developed for the candidate repository site at Yucca Mountain in the State of Nevada. The SCP includes a description of the Yucca Mountain site (Chapters 1-5), a conceptual design for the repository (Chapter 6), a description of the packaging to be used for the waste to be emplaced in the repository (Chapter 7), and a description of the planned site characterization activities (Chapter 8). The schedules and milestones presented in Sections 8.3 and 8.5 of the SCP were developed to be consistent with the June 1988 draft Amendment to the SOE`s Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. The five month delay in the scheduled start of exploratory shaft construction that was announced recently is not reflected in these schedules.

  20. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada: Volume 8, Part B: Chapter 8, Sections 8.4 through 8.7; Glossary and Acronyms

    SciTech Connect

    1988-12-01

    This site characterization plan (SCP) has been developed for the candidate repository site at Yucca Mountain in the State of Nevada. The SCP includes a description of the Yucca Mountain site (Chapters 1-5), a conceptual design for the repository (Chapter 6), a description of the packaging to be used for the waste to be emplaced in the repository (Chapter 7), and a description of the planned site characterization activities (Chapter 8). The schedules and milestones presented in Section 8.3 and 8.5 of the SCP were developed to be consistent with the June 1988 draft Amendment to the DOE`s Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. The five month delay in the scheduled start of exploratory shaft construction that was announced recently is not reflected in these schedules. 88 figs., 42 tabs.

  1. THE PREPARATION OF CURRICULUM MATERIALS AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF TEACHERS FOR AN EXPERIMENTAL APPLICATION OF THE CLUSTER CONCEPT OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION AT THE SECONDARY SCHOOL LEVEL. VOLUME III, INSTRUCTIONAL PLANS FOR THE METAL FORMING AND FABRICATION CLUSTER.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MALEY, DONALD

    DESIGNED FOR USE WITH 11TH AND 12TH GRADE STUDENTS, THIS CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR THE OCCUPATIONAL CLUSTER IN METAL FORMING AND FABRICATION WAS DEVELOPED BY PARTICIPATING TEACHERS FROM RESULTS OF THE RESEARCH PROCEDURES DESCRIBED IN VOLUME I (VT 004 162). THE COURSE DESCRIPTION, NEED FOR THE COURSE, COURSE OBJECTIVES, PROCEDURES AND INSTRUCTIONAL PLAN…

  2. THE PREPARATION OF CURRICULUM MATERIALS AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF TEACHERS FOR AN EXPERIMENTAL APPLICATION OF THE CLUSTER CONCEPT OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION AT THE SECONDARY SCHOOL LEVEL. VOLUME IV, INSTRUCTIONAL PLANS FOR THE ELECTRO-MECHANICAL CLUSTER.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MALEY, DONALD

    DESIGNED FOR USE WITH 11TH AND 12TH GRADE STUDENTS, THIS CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR THE OCCUPATIONAL CLUSTER IN ELECTRO-MECHANICAL INSTALLATION AND REPAIR WAS DEVELOPED BY PARTICIPATING TEACHERS FROM RESULTS OF THE RESEARCH PROCEDURES DESCRIBED IN VOLUME I (VT 004 162). THE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS, NEED FOR THE COURSE, COURSE OBJECTIVES, PROCEDURES, AND…

  3. System Analysis, Program Development, and Cost-Effectiveness Modeling of Indian Education for the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Volume III, Planning and Cost-Effectiveness Modeling for BIA Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abt Associates, Inc., Cambridge, MA.

    Nine models developed principally for use at the central level of the Bureau of Indian Affairs in evaluating the costs and cost-effectiveness of alternative policies and programs are described in this document. The 9 models are: (1) Population Projection Model, (2) Enrollment Projection Model, (3) Facilities Planning Model, (4) Economic Projection…

  4. A Resource Manual for the Development and Evaluation of Special Programs for Exceptional Students. Volume III-J: Interagency Service Plans for the Profoundly Mentally Handicapped. [Part 1.] July 1, 1981-June 30, 1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leon County Schools, Tallahassee, FL.

    The manual, one of a series designed to help Florida school districts provide special programs for exceptional students, focuses on approaches for successful interagency planning for profoundly mentally handicapped (PMH) students. Chapter 1 introduces the principal agencies involved--state department of education, local school districts, and the…

  5. A Comprehensive Occupational Education System: Research and Experimentation in a Career Development Center. Volume II. Plan for a Comprehensive Occupational Education System in New York City's Borough of the Bronx.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Educational Planning and Support.

    Designed to gather and analyze the information needed to develop a plan for a model comprehensive occupational education system (COES), this research project is reported in five chapters. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the project which was conducted in the Bronx borough of New York City because this area exemplifies the problems of urban…

  6. Gulf War Air Power Survey. Volume 3. Logistics and Support

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    mm CPX 100K 500K 20 mm HEI 100K 415K 2.5M Durandal 780 9(S) Intvw, CENTAFILOW, 15 Apr 1992, ’°CIUNTAF Master Storage Plan 1 -89, CL:NTAIF/LOW; confirmed...Torrejon. * 5 Oct 1990: In addition to in-theater F- 1 5C support, A- 10 inter- mediate support is still planned for King Fahd; all other support...Report Volume J: Part 1 : Planning Report Part II: Command and Control Report Volume II: Part I: Operations Report Part II: Effectiveness Report Volume

  7. Consultancy on Strategic Information Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pejova, Zdravka, Ed.; Horton, Forest W., Ed.

    At the workshop, better management through strategic planning of information and consultancy was discussed as one way in which developing and Eastern European countries could tackle the complex information problems they are facing during the transition to a market economy. The sixteen papers in this volume are grouped into three basic categories:…

  8. Planning a College Union Building.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Chester Arthur

    This volume examines the background and characteristics of the college union and its buildings, discusses its purposes and the means by which they may be achieved, and considers the impact of these means on the building requirements. General planning principles are developed and applied to the union building and its various areas. The translation…

  9. Yearbook Planning, Editing, and Production.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, N. S.

    Numerous aspects of yearbook production are discussed in this volume. Following a discussion of the roles of the adviser and the staff, separate chapters deal with planning and organizing, circulation, and such yearbook features as themes or linking ideas, design and layout patterns, editorial content, photography, opening sections, division…

  10. Programmatic methods for addressing contaminated volume uncertainties.

    SciTech Connect

    DURHAM, L.A.; JOHNSON, R.L.; RIEMAN, C.R.; SPECTOR, H.L.; Environmental Science Division; U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS BUFFALO DISTRICT

    2007-01-01

    Accurate estimates of the volumes of contaminated soils or sediments are critical to effective program planning and to successfully designing and implementing remedial actions. Unfortunately, data available to support the preremedial design are often sparse and insufficient for accurately estimating contaminated soil volumes, resulting in significant uncertainty associated with these volume estimates. The uncertainty in the soil volume estimates significantly contributes to the uncertainty in the overall project cost estimates, especially since excavation and off-site disposal are the primary cost items in soil remedial action projects. The Army Corps of Engineers Buffalo District's experience has been that historical contaminated soil volume estimates developed under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) often underestimated the actual volume of subsurface contaminated soils requiring excavation during the course of a remedial activity. In response, the Buffalo District has adopted a variety of programmatic methods for addressing contaminated volume uncertainties. These include developing final status survey protocols prior to remedial design, explicitly estimating the uncertainty associated with volume estimates, investing in predesign data collection to reduce volume uncertainties, and incorporating dynamic work strategies and real-time analytics in predesign characterization and remediation activities. This paper describes some of these experiences in greater detail, drawing from the knowledge gained at Ashland1, Ashland2, Linde, and Rattlesnake Creek. In the case of Rattlesnake Creek, these approaches provided the Buffalo District with an accurate predesign contaminated volume estimate and resulted in one of the first successful FUSRAP fixed-price remediation contracts for the Buffalo District.

  11. On Constraints in Assembly Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Calton, T.L.; Jones, R.E.; Wilson, R.H.

    1998-12-17

    Constraints on assembly plans vary depending on product, assembly facility, assembly volume, and many other factors. Assembly costs and other measures to optimize vary just as widely. To be effective, computer-aided assembly planning systems must allow users to express the plan selection criteria that appIy to their products and production environments. We begin this article by surveying the types of user criteria, both constraints and quality measures, that have been accepted by assembly planning systems to date. The survey is organized along several dimensions, including strategic vs. tactical criteria; manufacturing requirements VS. requirements of the automated planning process itself and the information needed to assess compliance with each criterion. The latter strongly influences the efficiency of planning. We then focus on constraints. We describe a framework to support a wide variety of user constraints for intuitive and efficient assembly planning. Our framework expresses all constraints on a sequencing level, specifying orders and conditions on part mating operations in a number of ways. Constraints are implemented as simple procedures that either accept or reject assembly operations proposed by the planner. For efficiency, some constraints are supplemented with special-purpose modifications to the planner's algorithms. Fast replanning enables an interactive plan-view-constrain-replan cycle that aids in constraint discovery and documentation. We describe an implementation of the framework in a computer-aided assembly planning system and experiments applying the system to a number of complex assemblies, including one with 472 parts.

  12. Transition Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Statfeld, Jenna L.

    2011-01-01

    Post-school transition is the movement of a child with disabilities from school to activities that occur after the completion of school. This paper provides information about: (1) post-school transition; (2) transition plan; (3) transition services; (4) transition planning; (5) vocational rehabilitation services; (6) services that are available…

  13. Test plan :

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, Stephen F.

    2013-05-01

    This test plan is a document that provides a systematic approach to the planned testing of rooftop structures to determine their actual load carrying capacity. This document identifies typical tests to be performed, the responsible parties for testing, the general feature of the tests, the testing approach, test deliverables, testing schedule, monitoring requirements, and environmental and safety compliance.

  14. Campus Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dober, Richard P.

    This book suggests ways and means by which the development of campuses can be controlled so that functional goals can be aesthetically expressed. The first section, "Prospectus," defines campus planning, illuminating through historical examples the evolution of the campus as a design form, and describes the conditions that make campus planning so…

  15. An improved the volume trace transform by a sub-micro pattern for solving the Gaussian noise image problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ongkittikul, Surachai; Jundang, Nattapong; Srisuk, Sanun

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a new data compilation of the image transformation base on the series of the trace transform. The advantage of this new compilation is to solve the noise problem that usually appears in the pattern recognition. Submicro pattern analysis is employ to encode the series of the trace transform from a image which organizes by the shift-invariant sub-micro pattern scheme (SiSMP). Then, all data will sum to the final result by 2-D histogram with the Discriminant Feature Transform. The experiments of our approach show that the new compilation can increase the performance of the recognition compare with the LBP technique by using Brodatz texture database.

  16. Science Library of Test Items. Volume Twenty-Three. Geology (Part One). Free Response Testing Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopley, Ken; And Others

    The first of several planned volumes of Free Response Test Items contains geology questions developed by the Assessment and Evaluation Unit of the New South Wales Department of Education. Two additional geology volumes and biology and chemistry volumes are in preparation. The questions in this volume were written and reviewed by practicing…

  17. Multicriteria optimization informed VMAT planning

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Huixiao; Craft, David L.; Gierga, David P.

    2014-04-01

    We developed a patient-specific volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) optimization procedure using dose-volume histogram (DVH) information from multicriteria optimization (MCO) of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans. The study included 10 patients with prostate cancer undergoing standard fractionation treatment, 10 patients with prostate cancer undergoing hypofractionation treatment, and 5 patients with head/neck cancer. MCO-IMRT plans using 20 and 7 treatment fields were generated for each patient on the RayStation treatment planning system (clinical version 2.5, RaySearch Laboratories, Stockholm, Sweden). The resulting DVH of the 20-field MCO-IMRT plan for each patient was used as the reference DVH, and the extracted point values of the resulting DVH of the MCO-IMRT plan were used as objectives and constraints for VMAT optimization. Weights of objectives or constraints of VMAT optimization or both were further tuned to generate the best match with the reference DVH of the MCO-IMRT plan. The final optimal VMAT plan quality was evaluated by comparison with MCO-IMRT plans based on homogeneity index, conformity number of planning target volume, and organ at risk sparing. The influence of gantry spacing, arc number, and delivery time on VMAT plan quality for different tumor sites was also evaluated. The resulting VMAT plan quality essentially matched the 20-field MCO-IMRT plan but with a shorter delivery time and less monitor units. VMAT plan quality of head/neck cancer cases improved using dual arcs whereas prostate cases did not. VMAT plan quality was improved by fine gantry spacing of 2 for the head/neck cancer cases and the hypofractionation-treated prostate cancer cases but not for the standard fractionation–treated prostate cancer cases. MCO-informed VMAT optimization is a useful and valuable way to generate patient-specific optimal VMAT plans, though modification of the weights of objectives or constraints extracted from resulting DVH of MCO

  18. Northwest area contingency plan for region X

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The Northwest Area Contingency Plan (ACP) supersedes the working draft released in March 1993 which officially replaced the Local Contingency Plans for MSO Puget Sound and MSO Portland; it functions as the Inland Area Contingency Plan for the Environmental Protection Agency; and it replaces Washington and Oregon Statewide Master Plans as the primary response and planning document for oil spill response. This volume represents the basic plan. It is the summation of policies and procedures for two Coast Guard Captain of the Port Zones, the Statewide Master Plans for the States of Oregon and Washington, and EPA Inland Region Ten. It provides Federal, state, and local responders in the Pacific Northwest with a single comprehensive response and planning document.

  19. Objective evaluation of radiation treatment plans.

    PubMed Central

    Jain, N. L.; Kahn, M. G.

    1993-01-01

    The evaluation of radiation treatment plans involves making trade-offs among doses delivered to the tumor volumes and nearby normal tissues. Evaluating state-of-the-art three-dimensional (3D) plans is a difficult task because of the huge amount of planning data that needs to be deciphered. Multiattribute utility theory provides a methodology for specifying trade-offs and selecting the optimal plan from many competing plans. Using multiattribute utility theory, we are developing a clinically meaningful objective plan-evaluation model for 3D radiation treatment plans. Our model incorporates three of the factors involved in radiation treatment evaluation--treatment preferences of the radiation oncologist, clinical condition of the patient, and complexity of the treatment plan. PMID:8130449

  20. Savannah River Site Environmental Implementation Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-08-01

    Formal sitewide environmental planning at the . Savannah River Site (SRS) began in 1986 with the development and adoption of the Strategic Environmental Plan. The Strategic Environmental Plan describes the philosophy, policy, and overall program direction of environmental programs for the operation of the SRS. The Strategic Environmental Plan (Volume 2) provided the basis for development of the Environmental Implementation Plan (EIP). The EIP is the detailed, comprehensive environmental master plan for operating contractor organizations at the SRS. The EIP provides a process to ensure that all environmental requirements and obligations are being met by setting specific measurable goals and objectives and strategies for implementation. The plan is the basis for justification of site manpower and funding requests for environmental projects and programs over a five-year planning period.

  1. Pitfalls in normalization for intensity-modulated radiation therapy planning

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Greg . E-mail: greg.williams@hci.utah.edu; Tobler, Matt; Leavitt, Dennis

    2005-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) treatment planning often involves complex combinations of beam energies, treatment fields, and beam modifying devices. Even when a plan is devised that meets many treatment-planning objectives, limitations in the planner's ability to further adjust beam characteristics may require the radiation dose prescription to be normalized to an isodose level that best covers the target volume. While these normalizations help meet the volume coverage goals, they also result in adjustment of the dose delivered to the normal tissues and must be carefully evaluated. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning allows combinations of complex dose patterns, in order to achieve the desired treatment planning goals. These dose patterns are created by defining a set of treatment planning objectives and then allowing the treatment planning computer to create intensity patterns, through the use of moving multileaf collimation that will meet the requested goals. Often, when an IMRT treatment plan is created that meets many of the treatment planning goals but falls short of volume coverage requirements, the planner is tempted to apply normalization principles similar to those utilized with 3D treatment planning. Again, these normalizations help meet the volume coverage goals, but unlike 3D planning situations, may result in avoidable delivery of additional doses to the normal tissues. The focus of this study is to evaluate the effect of application of normalization for IMRT planning using multiple patient situations. Recommendations would favor re-optimization over normalization in most planning situations.

  2. Third Floor Plan, Second Floor Plan, First Floor Plan, Ground ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Third Floor Plan, Second Floor Plan, First Floor Plan, Ground Floor Plan, West Bunkhouse - Kennecott Copper Corporation, On Copper River & Northwestern Railroad, Kennicott, Valdez-Cordova Census Area, AK

  3. Southwest elevation, roof plan, site plan & main floor plan, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Southwest elevation, roof plan, site plan & main floor plan, loft plan, section looking east, north window head detail - Richard Buckminster Fuller & Anne Hewlett Fuller Dome Home, 407 South Forest Avenue, Carbondale, Jackson County, IL

  4. [Methods and importance of volume measurement in reconstructive and aesthetic breast surgery].

    PubMed

    Kunos, Csaba; Gulyás, Gusztáv; Pesthy, Pál; Kovács, Eszter; Mátrai, Zoltán

    2014-03-16

    Volume measurement of the breast allows for better surgical planning and implant selection in breast reconstructive and symmetrization procedures. The safety and accuracy of tumor removal, in accordance with oncoplastic principles, may be improved by knowing the true breast- and breast tumor volume. The authors discuss the methods of volume measurement of the breast and describe the method based on magnetic resonance imaging digital volume measurement in details. The volume of the breast parenchyma and the tumor was determined by processing the diagnostic magnetic resonance scans, and the difference in the volume of the two breasts was measured. Surgery was planned and implant selection was made based on the measured volume details. The authors conclude that digital volume measurement proved to be a valuable tool in preoperative planning of volume reducing mammaplasty, replacement of unknown size implants and in cases when breast asymmetry is treated.

  5. 33 CFR 154.1045 - Response plan development and evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., and storage capacity for any recovery of up to the maximum most probable discharge planning volume, as... devices, and storage capacity to recover the worst case discharge planning volumes. (4) The guidelines in... appropriate equipment in a response plan. These criteria reflect conditions used for planning purposes...

  6. Pressure distributions on three different cruciform aft-tail control surfaces of a wingless missile at mach 1.60, 2.36, and 3.70 Volume 1: Trapezoidal tail. [conducted in Langley Unitary Plan wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, M.; Sawyer, W. C.; Wassum, D. L.; Babb, C. D.

    1979-01-01

    The results of pressure distribution tests conducted in the Langley Unitary Plan wind tunnel are presented. The data were obtained for three sets of cruciform aft-tail control surfaces on a wingless missile model at Mach numbers of 1.60, 2.36, and 3.70 for angles of attack from -4 degrees to 20 degrees, model roll angles from 0 degrees to 90 degrees, and tail deflections of 0 degrees and 15 degrees. The test Reynolds number used was 6.6 million per meter.

  7. Results of tests 0A12 and IA9 in the Ames Research Center unitary plan wind tunnels on an 0.030 scale model of the space shuttle vehicle 2A to determine aerodynamic loads, volume 16

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spangler, R. H.

    1974-01-01

    Tests were conducted in the NASA/ARC Unitary Plan Wind Tunnels on an 0.030 scale replica of the space shuttle vehicle Configuration 2A. Aerodynamic loads data were obtained at Mach numbers from 0.6 to 3.5. The integrated vehicle was tested at angles of attack and sideslip from -8 degrees to +8 degrees. The isolated orbiter was tested at angles of attack from -15 degrees to +40 degrees and angles of sideslip from -10 degrees to +10 degrees as dictated by trajectory considerations. The effects of orbiter/external tank incidence angle and deflected control surfaces on aerodynamic loads were also investigated.

  8. Results of tests OA12 and IA9 in the Ames Research Center unitary plan wind tunnels on an 0.030-scale model of the space shuttle vehicle 2A to determine aerodynamic loads, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spangler, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    Tests were conducted in Unitary Plan wind tunnels on a 0.30 scale model of the space shuttle. Tests were conducted on the integrated configuration and on the isolated orbiter. The integrated vehicle was tested at angles of attack and sideslip from minus 8 degrees to plus 8 degrees. The isolated orbiter was tested at angles of attack from minus 15 degrees to plus 40 degrees and angles of sideslip from minus 10 degrees to plus 10 degrees as dictated by trajectory considerations. The effects of orbiter/external tank incidence angle and deflected control surfaces on aerodynamic loads were investigated.

  9. Remedial action plan and site conceptual design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico. Volume 1, Text, Appendices A, B, and C: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, M.L.; Mitzelfelt, R.

    1991-11-01

    This Remedial Action Plan (RAP) has been developed to serve a dual purpose. It presents the series of activities that is proposed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to stabilize and control radioactive materials at the inactive Phillips/United Nuclear uranium processing site designated as the Ambrosia Lake site in McKinley County, New Mexico. It also serves to document the concurrence of both State of New Mexico and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by the DOE and the state and concurrence by NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement.

  10. Test plan for composting studies involving weight and volume reduction of leaf and stalk biomass: DOE/OTD TTP{number_sign} SR17SS53 {ampersand} TTP{number_sign} SR18SS41

    SciTech Connect

    Wilde, E.W.; Kastner, J.; Murphy, C.; Santo Domingo, J.

    1997-05-28

    SRTC and a panel of experts from off-site previously determined that composting was the most attractive alternative for reducing the volume and weight of biomass that was slightly radioactive. The SRTC proposed scope of work for Subtask 2 of TTP{number_sign} SR17SS53 and TTP{number_sign} SR18SS41 involves bench scale studies to assess the rates and efficiencies of various composting schemes for volume and weight reduction of leaf and stalk biomass (SB). Ultimately, the data will be used to design a composting process for biomass proposed by MSE for phytoremediation studies at SRS. This could drastically reduce costs for transporting and disposing of contaminated biomass resulting from a future major phytoremediation effort for soil clean-up at the site. The composting studies at SRTC includes collaboration with personnel from the University of Georgia, who will conduct chemical analyses of the plant material after harvest, pre-treatment, and composting for specific time periods. Parameters to be measured will include: lignin, hemicellulose, cellulose, carbon and nitrogen. The overall objective of this project is to identify or develop: (1) an inexpensive source of inoculum (consisting of nutrients and/or microorganisms) capable of significantly enhancing biomass degradation, (2) an optimum range of operating parameters for the composting process, and (3) a process design for the solid state degradation of lignocellulosic biomass contaminated with radionuclides that is superior to existing alternatives for dealing with such waste.

  11. INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY COURSE, INSTRUCTORS' GUIDE. VOLUME 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Engineering Extension Service.

    INFORMATION RELATIVE TO THE LESSON PLANS IN "INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY COURSE, INSTRUCTOR'S GUIDE, VOLUME I" (VT 003 565) IS PRESENTED ON 52 INFORMATION SHEETS INCLUDING THE SUBJECTS SHIELDING EQUATIONS AND LOGARITHMS, METAL PROPERTIES, FIELD TRIP INSTRUCTIONS FOR STUDENTS, WELDING SYMBOLS AND SIZES, SAMPLE REPORT FORMS, AND TYPICAL SHIPPING…

  12. Equipment for the Disabled. Volumes 1 - 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilshere, E. Rosamond, Comp.

    Four volumes of equipment for the disabled which can simplify their lives and those who live with them are presented. The authors have not included surgical, medical, therapeutic, corrective or gymnastic equipment in the publication. Voume one includes house adaptations and planning, beds and bed accessories, chairs, and wheelchairs and…

  13. Reading and Teaching the Novel, Volume 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Roslyn M., Ed.

    This volume on reading and teaching the novel contains six articles: "Close Reading: The Novel in the Senior School" by S. E. Lee discusses the advantages of rereading and analytical reading in high school; "Teaching 'The Great Gatsby'" by David Mallick discusses the difficulties of teaching this novel and provides a lesson plan; "The Operation of…

  14. Clinician's guide to prostate IMRT plan assessment and optimisation.

    PubMed

    Martin, J M; Frantzis, J; Eade, T; Chung, P

    2010-12-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) offers dosimetric benefit for irregularly shaped treatment volumes compared to three-dimensional conformal approaches. Some groups advocate IMRT as the standard of care for prostate radiotherapy. For clinicians, assessment of an IMRT plan can introduce new opportunities and challenges. Although a standard IMRT plan may be deemed acceptable by meeting pre-set dose constraints, further optimisation may yield a superior treatment plan by further reducing dose to critical structures or improving target volume homogeneity. The aim of this article is to present aspects of IMRT planning relevant to clinicians to aid in plan critiquing.

  15. A case study of IMRT planning (Plan B) subsequent to a previously treated IMRT plan (Plan A)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, F.; Leong, C.; Schroeder, J.; Lee, B.

    2014-03-01

    Background and purpose: Treatment of the contralateral neck after previous ipsilateral intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer is a challenging problem. We have developed a technique that limits the cumulative dose to the spinal cord and brainstem while maximizing coverage of a planning target volume (PTV) in the contralateral neck. Our case involves a patient with right tonsil carcinoma who was given ipsilateral IMRT with 70Gy in 35 fractions (Plan A). A left neck recurrence was detected 14 months later. The patient underwent a neck dissection followed by postoperative left neck radiation to a dose of 66 Gy in 33 fractions (Plan B). Materials and Methods: The spinal cord-brainstem margin (SCBM) was defined as the spinal cord and brainstem with a 1.0 cm margin. Plan A was recalculated on the postoperative CT scan but the fluence outside of SCBM was deleted. A further modification of Plan A resulted in a base plan that was summed with Plan B to evaluate the cumulative dose received by the spinal cord and brainstem. Plan B alone was used to evaluate for coverage of the contralateral neck PTV. Results: The maximum cumulative doses to the spinal cord with 0.5cm margin and brainstem with 0.5cm margin were 51.96 Gy and 45.60 Gy respectively. For Plan B, 100% of the prescribed dose covered 95% of PTVb1. Conclusion: The use of a modified ipsilateral IMRT plan as a base plan is an effective way to limit the cumulative dose to the spinal cord and brainstem while enabling coverage of a PTV in the contralateral neck.

  16. Interobserver Variation of Clinical Target Volume Delineation in Gastric Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, Edwin; Verheij, Marcel

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate interobserver variability in clinical target volume (CTV) delineation in gastric cancer performed with the help of a delineation guide. Patients and Methods: Ten radiotherapy centers that participate in the CRITICS Phase III trial were provided with a delineation atlas, preoperative CT scans, a postoperative planning CT scan, and clinical information for a gastric cancer case and were asked to construct a CTV and create a dosimetric plan according to departmental policy. Results: The volumes of the CTVs and planning target volumes (PTVs) differed greatly, with a mean (SD) CTV volume of 392 (176) cm{sup 3} (range, 240-821cm{sup 3}) and PTV volume of 915 (312) cm{sup 3} (range, 634-1677cm{sup 3}). The overlapping volume was 376cm{sup 3} for the CTV and 890cm{sup 3} for the PTV. The greatest differences in the CTV were seen at the cranial and caudal parts. After planning, dose coverage of the overlapping PTV volume showed less variability than the CTV. Conclusion: In this series of 10 plans, variability of the CTV in postoperative chemoradiotherapy for gastric cancer is large. Strict and clear delineation guidelines should be provided, especially in Phase III multicenter studies. Adaptations of these guidelines should be evaluated in clinical studies.

  17. Agricultural Development Workers Training Manual. Volume IV. Livestock.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacon, Neil; And Others

    This training manual, the last volume in a four-volume series for use in training Peace Corps workers, deals with livestock. The first chapter provides suggested guidelines for setting up and carrying out the livestock component of the agricultural development worker training course. Included in the second chapter are lesson plans covering the…

  18. 1987 Oak Ridge model conference: Proceedings: Volume 2, Environmental protection

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    See the abstract for Volume I for general information on the conference. Topics discussed in Volume II include data management techiques for environmental protection efforts, the use of models in environmental auditing, in emergency plans, chemical accident emergency response, risk assessment, monitoring of waste sites, air and water monitoring of waste sites, and in training programs. (TEM)

  19. Investigations of the 0.020-scale 88-OTS Integrated Space Shuttle Vehicle Jet-Plume Model in the NASA/Ames Research Center 11 by11-Foot Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (IA80). Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, M. E.

    1976-01-01

    The results are documented of jet plume effects wind tunnel test of the 0.020-scale 88-OTS launch configuration space shuttle vehicle model in the 11 x 11 foot leg of the NASA/Ames Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. This test involved cold gas main propulsion system (MPS) and solid rocket motor (SRB) plume simulations at Mach numbers from 0.6 to 1.4. Integrated vehicle surface pressure distributions, elevon and rudder hinge moments, and wing and vertical tail root bending and torsional moments due to MPS and SRB plume interactions were determined. Nozzle power conditions were controlled per pretest nozzle calibrations. Model angle of attack was varied from -4 deg to +4 deg; model angle of sideslip was varied from -4 deg to +4 deg. Reynolds number was varied for certain test conditions and configurations, with the nominal freestream total pressure being 14.69 psia. Plotted force and pressure data are presented.

  20. Response to comments and recommendations on RCRA Facility Investigation Plan for Group 4 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 2, Operable Unit 2: Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    This document has been prepared to respond to comments and recommendations resulting from the Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Working Group Meeting-Y12 that was attended by representatives from the DOE Oak Ridge Field Office; Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc.; Environmental Protection Agency Region IV; and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation. Comments and recommendations were provided to improve the sampling efforts proposed for the Abandoned Nitric Acid Pipeline (ANAPL) in the RCRA Facility Investigation Plan for Group 4 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (ES/ER-10/V1&D1 and ES/ER-10/V2&D1). Thus, the sampling methodology discussed in this document replaces the sampling approach discussed in Sect. 8.5 of that plan. The Nitric Acid Pipeline transported wastes from operations in Buildings 9215, 9212, and 9206 and discharged these wastes into the S-3 Ponds surface impoundments. Materials known to be discharged through the stainless steel pipeline included free nitric acid and depleted and enriched uranium. The revised sampling and analytical methodology for the ANAPL includes: Decreasing the number of soil sampling locations for this phase of the investigation; taking deeper samples from the proposed shallow soil sample sites and archiving all samples except the one taken nearest the pipeline; analyzing the sample taken nearest the pipeline for inductively coupled plasma metals, leachable nitrate, total uranium, and percent of {sup 235}U present; conducting field screening for volatile organic compounds; and proposing nitrate and uranium concentration action levels to trigger analysis of archived samples after analysis and evaluation of the samples taken nearest the pipeline.

  1. Strategies for automatic online treatment plan reoptimization using clinical treatment planning system: A planning parameters study

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Taoran; Wu, Qiuwen; Zhang, You; Vergalasova, Irina; Lee, W. Robert; Yin, Fang-Fang; Wu, Q. Jackie

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Adaptive radiation therapy for prostate cancer using online reoptimization provides an improved control of interfractional anatomy variations. However, the clinical implementation of online reoptimization is currently limited by the low efficiency of current strategies and the difficulties associated with integration into the current treatment planning system. This study investigates the strategies for performing fast (∼2 min) automatic online reoptimization with a clinical fluence-map-based treatment planning system; and explores the performance with different input parameters settings: dose-volume histogram (DVH) objective settings, starting stage, and iteration number (in the context of real time planning).Methods: Simulated treatments of 10 patients were reoptimized daily for the first week of treatment (5 fractions) using 12 different combinations of optimization strategies. Options for objective settings included guideline-based RTOG objectives, patient-specific objectives based on anatomy on the planning CT, and daily-CBCT anatomy-based objectives adapted from planning CT objectives. Options for starting stages involved starting reoptimization with and without the original plan's fluence map. Options for iteration numbers were 50 and 100. The adapted plans were then analyzed by statistical modeling, and compared both in terms of dosimetry and delivery efficiency.Results: All online reoptimized plans were finished within ∼2 min with excellent coverage and conformity to the daily target. The three input parameters, i.e., DVH objectives, starting stage, and iteration number, contributed to the outcome of optimization nearly independently. Patient-specific objectives generally provided better OAR sparing compared to guideline-based objectives. The benefit in high-dose sparing from incorporating daily anatomy into objective settings was positively correlated with the relative change in OAR volumes from planning CT to daily CBCT. The use of the

  2. A Framework for Multicultural Arts Education. Volume Three.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berk, Ellyn, Ed.

    Third in a three volume set, this book is concerned primarily with assisting teachers in broadening their cultural and ethnic horizons through providing an interdisciplinary curriculum guide, statement of purpose, and lesson plans. Five units, each comprised of two to four lesson plans, are designed to require in-depth cooperation among several…

  3. TACSCE Research Annual 1990. Volume 6, Number 1, Fall 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Association for Community Service and Continuing Education.

    This volume contains papers of interest to Texas Association for Community Service and Continuing Education (TACSCE) members. The editorial, "Planning to Fail" (Silvia Lesko), emphasizes the importance of strategic planning. A perspective paper, titled "Continuing Education as a Vehicle for Economic Development and/or Recovery"…

  4. Change in Seroma Volume During Whole-Breast Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Rajiv; Spierer, Marnee Mutyala, Subhakar; Thawani, Nitika; Cohen, Hillel W.; Hong, Linda; Garg, Madhur K.; Kalnicki, Shalom

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: After breast-conserving surgery, a seroma often forms in the surgical cavity. If not drained, it may affect the volume of tumor bed requiring a boost after whole-breast radiation therapy (WBRT). Our objective was to evaluate the change in seroma volume that occurs during WBRT, before boost planning. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was performed of women receiving breast-conserving therapy with evidence of seroma at the time of WBRT planning. Computed tomography (CT) simulation was performed before WBRT and before the tumor bed boost. All patients received either a hypofractionated (42.4 Gy/16 fraction + 9.6 Gy/4 fraction boost) or standard fractionated (50.4 Gy/28 fraction + 10 Gy/5 fraction boost) regimen. Seroma volumes were contoured and compared on CT at the time of WBRT simulation and tumor bed boost planning. Results: Twenty-four patients with evidence of seroma were identified and all patients received WBRT without drainage of the seroma. Mean seroma volume before WBRT and at boost planning were significantly different at 65.7 cm{sup 3} (SD, 50.5 cm{sup 3}) and 35.6 cm{sup 3} (SD, 24.8 cm{sup 3}), respectively (p < 0.001). Mean and median reduction in seroma volume during radiation were 39.6% (SD, 23.8%) and 46.2% (range, 10.7-76.7%), respectively. Fractionation schedule was not correlated with change in seroma volume. Length of time from surgery to start of radiation therapy showed an inverse correlation with change in seroma volume (Pearson correlation r = -0.53, p < 0.01). Conclusions: The volume of seroma changes significantly during WBRT. Consequently, the accuracy of breast boost planning is likely affected, as is the volume of normal breast tissue irradiated. CT-based boost planning before boost irradiation is suggested to ensure appropriate coverage.

  5. Multivariate volume rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Crawfis, R.A.

    1996-03-01

    This paper presents a new technique for representing multivalued data sets defined on an integer lattice. It extends the state-of-the-art in volume rendering to include nonhomogeneous volume representations. That is, volume rendering of materials with very fine detail (e.g. translucent granite) within a voxel. Multivariate volume rendering is achieved by introducing controlled amounts of noise within the volume representation. Varying the local amount of noise within the volume is used to represent a separate scalar variable. The technique can also be used in image synthesis to create more realistic clouds and fog.

  6. Modification to the Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Mexican Hat, Utah: Volume 1, Text, Attachments 1--6. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1989-01-01

    This document provides the modifications to the 1988 Remedial Action Plan (RAP) of the contaminated materials at the Monument Valley, Arizona, and Mexican Hat, Utah. The text detailing the modifications and attachments 1 through 6 are provided with this document. The RAP was developed to serve a two-fold purpose. It presents the activities proposed by the Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of the residual radioactive materials (RRM) from Monument Valley, Arizona, and Mexican Hat, Utah, at the Mexican Hat disposal site. It also serves to document the concurrence of both the Navajo Nation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by DOE and the Navajo Nation and concurrence by the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement. This document has been structured to provide a comprehensive understanding of the remedial action proposed for the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat sites. It includes specific design and construction requirements for the remedial action. Pertinent information and data are included with reference given to the supporting documents.

  7. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Rifle, Colorado: Final report. Volume 4, Addenda D1--D5 to Appendix D

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, James W.

    1990-02-01

    This radiologic characterization of tho two inactive uranium millsites at Rifle, Colorado, was conducted by Bendix Field Engineering Corporation (Bendix) for the US Department of Energy (DOE), Grand Junction Projects Office, in accord with a Statement of Work prepared by the DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Technical Assistance Contractor, Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc. (Jacobs). The purpose of this project is to define the extent of radioactive contamination at the Rifle sites that exceeds US Environmental Protection Agency, (EPA) standards for UMTRA sites. The data presented in this report are required for characterization of the areas adjacent to the tailings piles and for the subsequent design of cleanup activities. An orientation visit to the study area was conducted on 31 July--1 August 1984, in conjunction with Jacobs, to determine the approximate extent of contaminated area surrounding tho piles. During that visit, survey control points were located and baselines were defined from which survey grids would later be established; drilling requirements were assessed; and radiologic and geochemical data were collected for use in planning the radiologic fieldwork. The information gained from this visit was used by Jacobs, with cooperation by Bendix, to determine the scope of work required for the radiologic characterization of the Rifle sites. Fieldwork at Rifle was conducted from 1 October through 16 November 1984.

  8. Schoolhouse Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of School Business Officials, Chicago, IL.

    This publication was developed to suggest approaches to solving some of the basic problems faced by those planning new facilities and renovations or alterations of existing buildings. It is not intended as a total resource reference for school construction. The chapters in the book are presented in the same sequence as their subjects would…

  9. Reflected Deck Plan, Reflected Roof Plan, Deck Plan Bridgeport ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Reflected Deck Plan, Reflected Roof Plan, Deck Plan - Bridgeport Covered Bridge, Spanning South Fork of Yuba River at bypassed section of Pleasant Valley Road (originally Virginia Turnpike) in South Yuba River State Park , Bridgeport, Nevada County, CA

  10. Results of Experimental Investigations to Determine External Tank Protuberance Loads Using a 0.03-Scale Model of the Space Shuttle Launch Configuration (Model 47-OTS) in the NASA/ARC Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel, Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houlihan, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    Data were obtained on a 3-percent model of the Space Shuttle launch vehicle in the NASA/Ames Research Center 11x11-foot and 9x7-foot Unitary Plan Wind Tunnels. This test series has been identified as IA19OA/B and was conducted from 7 Feb. 1980 to 19 Feb. 1980 (IA19OA) and from 17 March 1980 to 19 March 1980 and from 8 May 1980 to 30 May 1980 (IA19OB). The primary test objective was to obtain structural loads on the following external tank protuberances: (1) LO2 feedline; (2) GO2 pressure line; (3) LO2 antigeyser line; (4) GH2 pressure line; (5) LH2 tank cable tray; (6) LO2 tank cable tray; (7) Bipod; (8) ET/SRB cable tray; and (9) Crossbeam/Orbiter cable tray. To fulfill these objectives the following steps were taken: Eight 3-component balances were used to measure forces on various sections of 1 thru 6 above; 315 pressure orifices were distributed over all 9 above items. The LO2 feedline was instrumented with 96 pressure taps and was rotated to four positions to yield 384 pressure measurements. The LO2 antigeyser line was instrumented with 64 pressure taps and was rotated to two positions to yield 128 pressure measurements; Three Chrysler miniature flow direction probes were mounted on a traversing mechanism on the tank upper surface centerline to obtain flow field data between the forward and aft attach structures; and Schlieren photographs and ultraviolet flow photographs were taken at all test conditions. Data from each of the four test phases are presented.

  11. Results of experimental investigations to determine external tank protuberance loads using a 0.03-scale model of the Space Shuttle launch configuration (model 47-OTS) in the NASA/ARC unitary plan wind tunnel, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houlihan, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    Data were obtained on a 3-percent model of the Space Shuttle launch vehicle in the NASA/Ames Research Center 11x11-foot and 9x7-foot Unitary Plan Wind Tunnels. This test series has been identified as IA190A/B and was conducted from 7 Feb. 1980 to 19 Feb. 1980 (IA190A) and from 17 March 1980 to 19 March 1980 and from 8 May 1980 to 30 May 1980 (IA190B). The primary test objective was to obtain structural loads on the following external tank protuberances: (1) LO2 feedline, (2) GO2 pressure line, (3) LO2 antigeyser line, (4) GH2 pressure line, (5) LH2 tank cable tray, (6) LO2 tank cable tray, (7) Bipod, (8) ET/SRB cable tray, and (9) Crossbeam/Orbiter cable tray. To fulfill these objectives the following steps were taken: (1) Eight 3-component balances were used to measure forces on various sections of 1 thru 6 above. (2) 315 pressure orifices were distributed over all 9 above items. The LO2 feedline was instrumented with 96 pressure taps and was rotated to four positions to yield 384 pressure measurements. The LO2 antigeyser line was instrumented with 64 pressure taps and was rotated to two positions to yield 128 pressure measurements. (3) Three Chrysler miniature flow direction probes were mounted on a traversing mechanism on the tank upper surface centerline to obtain flow field data between the forward and aft attach structures. (4) Schlieren photographs and ultraviolet flow photographs were taken at all test conditions. Data from each of the four test phases are presented.

  12. Scenarios for Deep Carbon Emission Reductions from Electricity by 2050 in Western North America using the Switch Electric Power Sector Planning Model: California's Carbon Challenge Phase II, Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, James; Mileva, Ana; Johnston, Josiah; Kammen, Daniel; Wei, Max; Greenblatt, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    This study used a state-of-the-art planning model called SWITCH for the electric power system to investigate the evolution of the power systems of California and western North America from present-day to 2050 in the context of deep decarbonization of the economy. Researchers concluded that drastic power system carbon emission reductions were feasible by 2050 under a wide range of possible futures. The average cost of power in 2050 would range between $149 to $232 per megawatt hour across scenarios, a 21 to 88 percent increase relative to a business-as-usual scenario, and a 38 to 115 percent increase relative to the present-day cost of power. The power system would need to undergo sweeping change to rapidly decarbonize. Between present-day and 2030 the evolution of the Western Electricity Coordinating Council power system was dominated by implementing aggressive energy efficiency measures, installing renewable energy and gas-fired generation facilities and retiring coal-fired generation. Deploying wind, solar and geothermal power in the 2040 timeframe reduced power system emissions by displacing gas-fired generation. This trend continued for wind and solar in the 2050 timeframe but was accompanied by large amounts of new storage and long-distance high-voltage transmission capacity. Electricity storage was used primarily to move solar energy from the daytime into the night to charge electric vehicles and meet demand from electrified heating. Transmission capacity over the California border increased by 40 - 220 percent by 2050, implying that transmission siting, permitting, and regional cooperation will become increasingly important. California remained a net electricity importer in all scenarios investigated. Wind and solar power were key elements in power system decarbonization in 2050 if no new nuclear capacity was built. The amount of installed gas capacity remained relatively constant between present-day and 2050, although carbon capture and sequestration was

  13. Programmatic methods for addressing contaminated volume uncertainties

    SciTech Connect

    Rieman, C.R.; Spector, H.L.; Durham, L.A.; Johnson, R.L.

    2007-07-01

    Accurate estimates of the volumes of contaminated soils or sediments are critical to effective program planning and to successfully designing and implementing remedial actions. Unfortunately, data available to support the pre-remedial design are often sparse and insufficient for accurately estimating contaminated soil volumes, resulting in significant uncertainty associated with these volume estimates. The uncertainty in the soil volume estimates significantly contributes to the uncertainty in the overall project cost estimates, especially since excavation and off-site disposal are the primary cost items in soil remedial action projects. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Buffalo District's experience has been that historical contaminated soil volume estimates developed under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) often underestimated the actual volume of subsurface contaminated soils requiring excavation during the course of a remedial activity. In response, the Buffalo District has adopted a variety of programmatic methods for addressing contaminated volume uncertainties. These include developing final status survey protocols prior to remedial design, explicitly estimating the uncertainty associated with volume estimates, investing in pre-design data collection to reduce volume uncertainties, and incorporating dynamic work strategies and real-time analytics in pre-design characterization and remediation activities. This paper describes some of these experiences in greater detail, drawing from the knowledge gained at Ashland 1, Ashland 2, Linde, and Rattlesnake Creek. In the case of Rattlesnake Creek, these approaches provided the Buffalo District with an accurate pre-design contaminated volume estimate and resulted in one of the first successful FUSRAP fixed-price remediation contracts for the Buffalo District. (authors)

  14. Report: EPA Could Improve Contingency Planning for Oil and Hazardous Substance Response

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #13-P-0152, February 15, 2013. EPA regions have expanded contingency planning by creating additional plans and materials, but regions cannot maintain this large volume of information with their limited resources.

  15. An Analysis of Plan Robustness for Esophageal Tumors: Comparing Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Plans and Spot Scanning Proton Planning

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Samantha; Partridge, Mike; Bolsi, Alessandra; Lomax, Anthony J.; Hurt, Chris; Crosby, Thomas; Hawkins, Maria A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Planning studies to compare x-ray and proton techniques and to select the most suitable technique for each patient have been hampered by the nonequivalence of several aspects of treatment planning and delivery. A fair comparison should compare similarly advanced delivery techniques from current clinical practice and also assess the robustness of each technique. The present study therefore compared volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and single-field optimization (SFO) spot scanning proton therapy plans created using a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) for dose escalation in midesophageal cancer and analyzed the effect of setup and range uncertainties on these plans. Methods and Materials For 21 patients, SIB plans with a physical dose prescription of 2 Gy or 2.5 Gy/fraction in 25 fractions to planning target volume (PTV)50Gy or PTV62.5Gy (primary tumor with 0.5 cm margins) were created and evaluated for robustness to random setup errors and proton range errors. Dose–volume metrics were compared for the optimal and uncertainty plans, with P<.05 (Wilcoxon) considered significant. Results SFO reduced the mean lung dose by 51.4% (range 35.1%-76.1%) and the mean heart dose by 40.9% (range 15.0%-57.4%) compared with VMAT. Proton plan robustness to a 3.5% range error was acceptable. For all patients, the clinical target volume D98 was 95.0% to 100.4% of the prescribed dose and gross tumor volume (GTV) D98 was 98.8% to 101%. Setup error robustness was patient anatomy dependent, and the potential minimum dose per fraction was always lower with SFO than with VMAT. The clinical target volume D98 was lower by 0.6% to 7.8% of the prescribed dose, and the GTV D98 was lower by 0.3% to 2.2% of the prescribed GTV dose. Conclusions The SFO plans achieved significant sparing of normal tissue compared with the VMAT plans for midesophageal cancer. The target dose coverage in the SIB proton plans was less robust to random setup errors and might be unacceptable for

  16. Energy planning and management plan

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    This paper contains printed copies of 60FR 53181, October 12, 1995 and 60 FR 54151. This is a record of decision concerning the Western Area Power Administration`s final draft and environmental impact statement, and Energy Planning and Management Program.

  17. Design Criteria for Microbiological Facilities at Fort Detrick. Volume I: Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Army Biological Labs., Fort Detrick, MD. Industrial Health and Safety Div.

    Volume I of a two volume manual serves as an introduction to design criteria for microbiological facilities. It is addressed to management personnel responsible for planning, budgeting, and making policy decisions for construction or remodeling of microbiological research laboratories. This volume is also concerned with--(1) microbiological safety…

  18. Pre-Employment Laboratory Training. General Agricultural Mechanics Volume II. Instructional Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Vocational Instructional Services.

    This course outline, the second volume of a two-volume set, consists of lesson plans for pre-employment laboratory training in general agricultural mechanics. Covered in the eight lessons included in this volume are cold metal work, soldering, agricultural safety programs, farm shops, farm structures, farm and ranch electrification, soil and water…

  19. Solid earth science in the 1990s. Volume 2: Panel reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This is the second volume of a three-volume report. Volume 2, Panel Reports, outlines a plan for solid Earth science research for the next decade. The science panels addressed the following fields: plate motion and deformation, lithospheric structure and evolution, volcanology, Earth structure and dynamics, Earth rotation and reference frames, and geopotential fields.

  20. Pre-Employment Laboratory Training. General Agricultural Mechanics Volume I. Instructional Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Vocational Instructional Services.

    This course outline, the first volume of a two-volume set, consists of lesson plans for pre-employment laboratory training in general agricultural mechanics. Covered in the 12 lessons included in this volume are selecting tractors and engines, diagnosing engine conditions, servicing electrical systems, servicing cooling systems, servicing fuel and…

  1. Direct interval volume visualization.

    PubMed

    Ament, Marco; Weiskopf, Daniel; Carr, Hamish

    2010-01-01

    We extend direct volume rendering with a unified model for generalized isosurfaces, also called interval volumes, allowing a wider spectrum of visual classification. We generalize the concept of scale-invariant opacity—typical for isosurface rendering—to semi-transparent interval volumes. Scale-invariant rendering is independent of physical space dimensions and therefore directly facilitates the analysis of data characteristics. Our model represents sharp isosurfaces as limits of interval volumes and combines them with features of direct volume rendering. Our objective is accurate rendering, guaranteeing that all isosurfaces and interval volumes are visualized in a crack-free way with correct spatial ordering. We achieve simultaneous direct and interval volume rendering by extending preintegration and explicit peak finding with data-driven splitting of ray integration and hybrid computation in physical and data domains. Our algorithm is suitable for efficient parallel processing for interactive applications as demonstrated by our CUDA implementation.

  2. Planning the Breast Boost: Comparison of Three Techniques and Evolution of Tumor Bed During Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Hepel, Jaroslaw T. Evans, Suzanne B.; Hiatt, Jessica R.; Price, Lori Lyn; DiPetrillo, Thomas; Wazer, David E.; MacAusland, Stephanie G.

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of two clinical techniques for electron boost planning compared with computed tomography (CT)-based planning. Additionally, we evaluated the tumor bed characteristics at whole breast planning and boost planning. Methods and Materials: A total of 30 women underwent tumor bed boost planning within 2 weeks of completing whole breast radiotherapy using three planning techniques: scar-based planning, palpation/clinical-based planning, and CT-based planning. The plans were analyzed for dosimetric coverage of the CT-delineated tumor bed. The cavity visualization score was used to define the CT-delineated tumor bed as well or poorly defined. Results: Scar-based planning resulted in inferior tumor bed coverage compared with CT-based planning, with the minimal dose received by 90% of the target volume >90% in 53% and a geographic miss in 53%. The results of palpation/clinical-based planning were significantly better: 87% and 10% for the minimal dose received by 90% of the target volume >90% and geographic miss, respectively. Of the 30 tumor beds, 16 were poorly defined by the cavity visualization score. Of these 16, 8 were well demarcated by the surgical clips. The evaluation of the 22 well-defined tumor beds revealed similar results. A comparison of the tumor bed volume from the initial planning CT scan to the boost planning CT scan revealed a decrease in size in 77% of cases. The mean decrease in volume was 52%. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that CT-based planning allows for optimal tumor bed coverage compared with clinical and scar-based approaches. However, in the setting of a poorly visualized cavity on CT without surgical clips, palpation/clinical-based planning can help delineate the appropriate target volumes and is superior to scar-based planning. CT simulation at boost planning could allow for a reduction in the boost volumes.

  3. Mars power system concept definition study. Volume 2: Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littman, Franklin D.

    1994-01-01

    This report documents the work performed by Rockwell International's Rocketdyne Division on NASA Contract No. NAS3-25808 (Task Order No. 16) entitled 'Mars Power System Definition Study'. This work was performed for NASA's Lewis Research Center (LeRC). The report is divided into two volumes as follows: Volume 1 - Study Results; and Volume 2 - Appendices. The results of the power system characterization studies, operations studies, and technology evaluations are summarized in Volume 1. The appendices include complete, standalone technology development plans for each candidate power system that was investigated.

  4. Mars power system concept definition study. Volume 2: Appendices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Littman, Franklin D.

    1994-12-01

    This report documents the work performed by Rockwell International's Rocketdyne Division on NASA Contract No. NAS3-25808 (Task Order No. 16) entitled 'Mars Power System Definition Study'. This work was performed for NASA's Lewis Research Center (LeRC). The report is divided into two volumes as follows: Volume 1 - Study Results; and Volume 2 - Appendices. The results of the power system characterization studies, operations studies, and technology evaluations are summarized in Volume 1. The appendices include complete, standalone technology development plans for each candidate power system that was investigated.

  5. NERSC Strategic Implementation Plan 2002-2006

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, William; Bethel, Wes; Craw, James; Draney, Brent; Fortney, William; Gorda, Brend; Harris, William; Meyer, Nancy; Ng, Esmond; Verdier, Francesca; Walter, Howard; Welcome, Tammy

    2002-09-01

    This strategic proposal presents NERSC's vision for its activities and new directions over the next five years. NERSC's continuing commitment to providing high-end systems and comprehensive scientific support for its users will be enhanced, and these activities will be augmented by two new strategic thrusts: support for Scientific Challenge Teams and deployment of a Unified Science Environment. The proposal is in two volumes, the Strategic Plan and the Implementation Plan.

  6. SU-E-T-580: Comparison of Cervical Carcinoma IMRT Plans From Four Commercial Treatment Planning Systems (TPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Y; Li, R; Chi, Z; Zhu, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Different treatment planning systems (TPS) use different treatment optimization and leaf sequencing algorithms. This work compares cervical carcinoma IMRT plans optimized with four commercial TPSs to investigate the plan quality in terms of target conformity and delivery efficiency. Methods: Five cervical carcinoma cases were planned with the Corvus, Monaco, Pinnacle and Xio TPSs by experienced planners using appropriate optimization parameters and dose constraints to meet the clinical acceptance criteria. Plans were normalized for at least 95% of PTV to receive the prescription dose (Dp). Dose-volume histograms and isodose distributions were compared. Other quantities such as Dmin(the minimum dose received by 99% of GTV/PTV), Dmax(the maximum dose received by 1% of GTV/PTV), D100, D95, D90, V110%, V105%, V100% (the volume of GTV/PTV receiving 110%, 105%, 100% of Dp), conformity index(CI), homogeneity index (HI), the volume of receiving 40Gy and 50 Gy to rectum (V40,V50) ; the volume of receiving 30Gy and 50 Gy to bladder (V30,V50) were evaluated. Total segments and MUs were also compared. Results: While all plans meet target dose specifications and normal tissue constraints, the maximum GTVCI of Pinnacle plans was up to 0.74 and the minimum of Corvus plans was only 0.21, these four TPSs PTVCI had significant difference. The GTVHI and PTVHI of Pinnacle plans are all very low and show a very good dose distribution. Corvus plans received the higer dose of normal tissue. The Monaco plans require significantly less segments and MUs to deliver than the other plans. Conclusion: To deliver on a Varian linear-accelerator, the Pinnacle plans show a very good dose distribution. Corvus plans received the higer dose of normal tissue. The Monaco plans have faster beam delivery.

  7. Graphite Technology Development Plan

    SciTech Connect

    W. Windes; T. Burchell; M.Carroll

    2010-10-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a helium-cooled High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) with a large graphite core. Graphite physically contains the fuel and comprises the majority of the core volume. Graphite has been used effectively as a structural and moderator material in both research and commercial high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. This development has resulted in graphite being established as a viable structural material for HTGRs. While the general characteristics necessary for producing nuclear grade graphite are understood, historical “nuclear” grades no longer exist. New grades must be fabricated, characterized, and irradiated to demonstrate that current grades of graphite exhibit acceptable non-irradiated and irradiated properties upon which the thermomechanical design of the structural graphite in NGNP is based. This Technology Development Plan outlines the research and development (R&D) activities and associated rationale necessary to qualify nuclear grade graphite for use within the NGNP reactor.

  8. X-ray volume imaging in bladder radiotherapy verification

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, Ann M. . E-mail: amhenry@doctors.net.uk; Stratford, Julia; McCarthy, Claire; Davies, Julie; Sykes, Jonathan R.; Amer, Ali; Marchant, Tom; Cowan, Richard; Wylie, James; Logue, John; Livsey, Jacqueline; Khoo, Vincent S.; Moore, Chris; Price, Pat

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the clinical utility of X-ray volume imaging (XVI) for verification of bladder radiotherapy and to quantify geometric error in bladder radiotherapy delivery. Methods and Materials: Twenty subjects undergoing conformal bladder radiotherapy were recruited. X-ray volume images and electronic portal images (EPIs) were acquired for the first 5 fractions and then once weekly. X-ray volume images were co-registered with the planning computed tomography scan and clinical target volume coverage assessed in three dimensions (3D). Interfraction bladder volume change was described by quantifying changes in bladder volume with time. Bony setup errors were compared from both XVI and EPI. Results: The bladder boundary was clearly visible on coronal XVI views in nearly all images, allowing accurate 3D treatment verification. In 93.5% of imaged fractions, the clinical target volume was within the planning target volume. Most subjects displayed consistent bladder volumes, but 25% displayed changes that could be predicted from the first three XVIs. Bony setup errors were similar whether calculated from XVI or EPI. Conclusions: Coronal XVI can be used to verify 3D bladder radiotherapy delivery. Image-guided interventions to reduce geographic miss and normal tissue toxicity are feasible with this technology.

  9. Meaning and Problems of Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brieve, Fred J.; Johnston, A. P.

    1973-01-01

    Examines the educational planning process. Discusses what planning is, how methodological planning can work in education, misunderstandings about planning, and difficulties in applying the planning methodology. (DN)

  10. Information architecture. Volume 3: Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this document, as presented in Volume 1, The Foundations, is to assist the Department of Energy (DOE) in developing and promulgating information architecture guidance. This guidance is aimed at increasing the development of information architecture as a Departmentwide management best practice. This document describes departmental information architecture principles and minimum design characteristics for systems and infrastructures within the DOE Information Architecture Conceptual Model, and establishes a Departmentwide standards-based architecture program. The publication of this document fulfills the commitment to address guiding principles, promote standard architectural practices, and provide technical guidance. This document guides the transition from the baseline or defacto Departmental architecture through approved information management program plans and budgets to the future vision architecture. This document also represents another major step toward establishing a well-organized, logical foundation for the DOE information architecture.

  11. SU-E-T-43: A Methodology for Quality Control of IMPT Treatment Plan Based On VMAT Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, S; Yang, Y; Liao, L; Wang, X; Li, H; Zhu, X; Zhang, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: IMPT plan design is highly dependent on planner’s experiences. VMAT plan design is relatively mature and can even be automated. The quality of IMPT plan designed by in-experienced planner could be inferior to that of VMAT plan designed by experienced planner or automatic planning software. Here we introduce a method for designing IMPT plan based on VMAT plan to ensure the IMPT plan be superior to IMRT/VMAT plan for majority clinical scenario. Methods: To design a new IMPT plan, a VMAT plan is first generated either by experienced planner or by in-house developed automatic planning system. An in-house developed tool is used to generate the dose volume constrains for the IMPT plan as plan template to Eclipse TPS. The beam angles for IMPT plan are selected based on the preferred angles in the VMAT plan. IMPT plan is designed by importing the plan objectives generated from VMAT plan. Majority thoracic IMPT plans are designed using this plan approach in our center. In this work, a thoracic IMPT plan under RTOG 1308 protocol is selected to demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of this approach. The dosimetric indices of IMPT are compared with VMAT plan. Results: The PTV D95, lung V20, MLD, mean heart dose, esophagus D1, cord D1 are 70Gy, 31%, 17.8Gy, 25.5Gy, 73Gy, 45Gy for IMPT plan and 65.3Gy, 34%, 21.6Gy, 35Gy, 74Gy, 48Gy for VMAT plan. For majority cases, the high dose region of the normal tissue which is in proximity of PTV is comparable between IMPT and VMAT plan. The low dose region of the IMPT plan is significantly better than VMAT plan. Conclusion: Using the knowledge gained in VMAT plan design can help efficiently and effectively design high quality IMPT plan. The quality of IMPT plan can be controlled to ensure the superiority of IMPT plan compared to VMAT/IMRT plan.

  12. Precision volume measurement system.

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Erin E.; Shugard, Andrew D.

    2004-11-01

    A new precision volume measurement system based on a Kansas City Plant (KCP) design was built to support the volume measurement needs of the Gas Transfer Systems (GTS) department at Sandia National Labs (SNL) in California. An engineering study was undertaken to verify or refute KCP's claims of 0.5% accuracy. The study assesses the accuracy and precision of the system. The system uses the ideal gas law and precise pressure measurements (of low-pressure helium) in a temperature and computer controlled environment to ratio a known volume to an unknown volume.

  13. Planning documents: a business planning strategy.

    PubMed

    Kaehrle, P A

    2000-06-01

    Strategic planning and business plan development are essential nursing management skills in today's competitive, fast paced, continually changing health care environment. Even in times of great uncertainty, nurse managers need to plan and forecast for the future. A well-written business plan allows nurse managers to communicate their expertise and proactively contribute to the programmatic decisions and changes occurring within their patient population or service area. This article presents the use of planning documents as a practical, strategic business planning strategy. Although the model addresses orthopedic services specifically, nurse managers can gain an understanding and working knowledge of planning concepts that can be applied to all patient populations.

  14. Satellite Power Systems (SPS) concept definition study. Volume 6: SPS technology requirements and verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanley, G.

    1978-01-01

    Volume 6 of the SPS Concept Definition Study is presented and also incorporates results of NASA/MSFC in-house effort. This volume includes a supporting research and technology summary. Other volumes of the final report that provide additional detail are as follows: (1) Executive Summary; (2) SPS System Requirements; (3) SPS Concept Evolution; (4) SPS Point Design Definition; (5) Transportation and Operations Analysis; and Volume 7, SPS Program Plan and Economic Analysis.

  15. Plan Representations for Distributed Planning and Execution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    Representation Planning is commonly associated with intelligent behavior in agents [Russell and Norvig , 2003]. The activity of planning can be defined...formulation [Russell and Norvig , 2003], is essential for enabling efficient problem-solving though search [Amarel, 1968]. The Planning Domain Definition... Norvig , 2003]. Preprocessing of planning domains is a technique that has been used to speed up the planning pro- cess [Dawson and Siklossy, 1977]. Perhaps

  16. Succession planning.

    PubMed

    Catanzaro, Thomas E

    2006-03-01

    This article provides the reader with an appreciation of the diverse elements that go into a buy-sell, affiliation, or merger situation for veterinary practices. In the changing market place of American veterinary medicine, old paradigms no longer hold comfort. The generational differences are briefly explored herein as well as the new economic realities. A few examples are offered to illustrate just how much variability exists in the current business of veterinary medicine and the subsequent practice transitions needed to enhance value. Functioning models are explored, as well as affiliation and merger options. Practice valuation is discussed in general terms, referencing the cutting-edge factors. The six-point summary provides almost all practices a solid operational base for daily operations and succession planning.

  17. WECC Variable Generation Planning Reference Book: Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, Yuri V.; Du, Pengwei; Etingov, Pavel V.; Ma, Jian; Vyakaranam, Bharat

    2013-05-13

    The document titled “WECC Variable Generation Planning Reference Book”. This book is divided into two volumes; one is the main document (volume 1)and the other is appendices (volume 2). The main document is a collection of the best practices and the information regarding the application and impact of variables generation on power system planning. This volume (appendices) has additional information on the following topics: Probabilistic load flow problems. 2. Additional useful indices. 3. high-impact low-frequency (HILF) events. 4. Examples of wide-area nomograms. 5. Transmission line ratings, types of dynamic rating methods. 6. Relative costs per MW-km of different electric power transmission technologies. 7. Ultra-high voltage (UHV) transmission. 8.High voltage direct current (VSC-HVDC). 9. HVDC. 10. Rewiring of existing transmission lines. 11. High-temperature low sag (HTLS) conductors. 12. The direct method and energy functions for transient stability analysis in power systems. 13.Blackouts caused by voltage instability. 14. Algorithm for parameter continuation predictor-corrector methods. 15. Approximation techniques available for security regions. 16. Impacts of wind power on power system small signals stability. 17. FIDVR. 18. FACTS. 19. European planning standard and practices. 20. International experience in wind and solar energy sources. 21. Western Renewable Energy Zones (WREZ). 22. various energy storage technologies. 23. demand response. 24. BA consolidation and cooperation options. 25. generator power management requirements and 26. European planning guidelines.

  18. Test plan for Simulated Saltcake Retrieval Test

    SciTech Connect

    HERTING, D.L.

    2000-07-19

    This document describes the plan for a bench-scale laboratory test to evaluate physical and chemical parameters associated with dissolution of a simulated saltcake waste. Parameters to be measured during the test include water addition rate, liquid drainage rate, visual observations of flow patterns, physical appearance and volume of dissolving saltcake, chemical composition of drained liquid, and polarized light microscopy analysis of solids.

  19. Waste feed delivery planning at Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    Certa, Paul J.; West, Elizha B.; Rodriguez, Juissepp S.; Hohl, Ted M.; Larsen, Douglas C.; Ritari, Jaakob S.; Kelly, James W.

    2013-01-10

    The Integrated Waste Feed Delivery Plan (IWFDP) describes how waste feed will be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) to safely and efficiently accomplish the River Protection Project (RPP) mission. The IWFDP, which is integrated with the Baseline Case operating scenario, is comprised of three volumes. Volume 1 - Process Strategy provides an overview of waste feed delivery (WFD) and describes how the WFD system will be used to prepare and deliver feed to the WTP based on the equipment configuration and functional capabilities of the WFD system. Volume 2 - Campaign Plan describes the plans for the first eight campaigns for delivery to the WTP, evaluates projected feed for systematic issues, projects 242-A Evaporator campaigns, and evaluates double-shell tank (DST) space and availability of contingency feed. Volume 3 - Project Plan identifies the scope and timing of the DST and infrastructure upgrade projects necessary to feed the WTP, and coordinates over 30 projectized projects and operational activities that comprise the needed WFD upgrades.

  20. Waste Feed Delivery Planning at Hanford - 13232

    SciTech Connect

    Certa, Paul J.; Hohl, Ted M.; Kelly, James W.; Larsen, Douglas C.; West, Elizha B.; Ritari, Jaakob S.; Rodriguez, Juissepp S.

    2013-07-01

    The Integrated Waste Feed Delivery Plan (IWFDP) describes how waste feed will be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) to safely and efficiently accomplish the River Protection Project (RPP) mission. The IWFDP, which is integrated with the Baseline Case operating scenario, is comprised of three volumes. Volume 1 - Process Strategy provides an overview of waste feed delivery (WFD) and describes how the WFD system will be used to prepare and deliver feed to the WTP based on the equipment configuration and functional capabilities of the WFD system. Volume 2 - Campaign Plan describes the plans for the first eight campaigns for delivery to the WTP, evaluates projected feed for systematic issues, projects 242-A Evaporator campaigns, and evaluates double-shell tank (DST) space and availability of contingency feed. Volume 3 - Project Plan identifies the scope and timing of the DST and infrastructure upgrade projects necessary to feed the WTP, and coordinates over 30 projectized projects and operational activities that comprise the needed WFD upgrades. (authors)

  1. The GPS Space Service Volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F. H.; Moreau, M. C.; Dahle-Melsaether, M. E.; Petrofski, W. P.; Stanton, B. J.; Thomason, S.; Harris, G. A.; Sena, R. P.; Temple, L. Parker, III

    2006-01-01

    Prior to the advent of artificial satellites, the concept of navigating in space and the desire to understand and validate the laws of planetary and satellite motion dates back centuries. At the initiation of orbital flight in 1957, space navigation was dominated by inertial and groundbased tracking methods, underpinned by the laws of planetary motion. It was early in the 1980s that GPS was first explored as a system useful for refining the position, velocity, and timing (PVT) of other spacecraft equipped with GPS receivers. As a result, an entirely new GPS utility was developed beyond its original purpose of providing PVT services for land, maritime, and air applications. Spacecraft both above and below the GPS constellation now receive the GPS signals, including the signals that spill over the limb of the Earth. The use of radionavigation satellite services for space navigation in High Earth Orbits is in fact a capability unique to GPS. Support to GPS space applications is being studied and planned as an important improvement to GPS. This paper discusses the formalization of PVT services in space as part of an overall GPS improvement effort. It describes the GPS Space Service Volume (SSV) and compares it to the Terrestrial Service Volume (TSV). It also discusses SSV coverage with the current GPS constellation, coverage characteristics as a function of altitude, expected power levels, and coverage figures of merit.

  2. Treatment planning for multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy of breast cancer – from Paris system to anatomy-based inverse planning

    PubMed Central

    Polgár, Csaba

    2017-01-01

    In the last decades, treatment planning for multicatheter interstitial breast brachytherapy has evolved considerably from fluoroscopy-based 2D to anatomy-based 3D planning. To plan the right positions of the catheters, ultrasound or computed tomography (CT) imaging can be used, but the treatment plan is always based on postimplant CT images. With CT imaging, the 3D target volume can be defined more precisely and delineation of the organs at risk volumes is also possible. Consequently, parameters calculated from dose-volume histogram can be used for quantitative plan evaluation. The catheter reconstruction is also easier and faster on CT images compared to X-ray films. In high dose rate brachytherapy, using a stepping source, a number of forward dose optimization methods (manual, geometrical, on dose points, graphical) are available to shape the dose distribution to the target volume, and these influence dose homogeneities to different extent. Currently, inverse optimization algorithms offer new possibilities to improve dose distributions further considering the requirements for dose coverage, dose homogeneity, and dose to organs at risk simultaneously and automatically. In this article, the evolvement of treatment planning for interstitial breast implants is reviewed, different forward optimization methods are discussed, and dose-volume parameters used for quantitative plan evaluation are described. Finally, some questions of the inverse optimization method are investigated and initial experiences of the authors are presented. PMID:28344609

  3. Volume 1 - Introduction

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    An introduction to the Emissions Inventory Improvement Program (EIIP) materials. Describes EIIP development, use of EIIP, inventory staff training, and planning, development, documentation, and reporting of inventories.

  4. Variable volume combustor

    DOEpatents

    Ostebee, Heath Michael; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Keener, Christopher Paul

    2017-01-17

    The present application provides a variable volume combustor for use with a gas turbine engine. The variable volume combustor may include a liner, a number of micro-mixer fuel nozzles positioned within the liner, and a linear actuator so as to maneuver the micro-mixer fuel nozzles axially along the liner.

  5. A Knowledge-Based Approach to Improving and Homogenizing Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Planning Quality Among Treatment Centers: An Example Application to Prostate Cancer Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Good, David; Lo, Joseph; Lee, W. Robert; Wu, Q. Jackie; Yin, Fang-Fang; Das, Shiva K.

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning can have wide variation among different treatment centers. We propose a system to leverage the IMRT planning experience of larger institutions to automatically create high-quality plans for outside clinics. We explore feasibility by generating plans for patient datasets from an outside institution by adapting plans from our institution. Methods and Materials: A knowledge database was created from 132 IMRT treatment plans for prostate cancer at our institution. The outside institution, a community hospital, provided the datasets for 55 prostate cancer cases, including their original treatment plans. For each “query” case from the outside institution, a similar “match” case was identified in the knowledge database, and the match case’s plan parameters were then adapted and optimized to the query case by use of a semiautomated approach that required no expert planning knowledge. The plans generated with this knowledge-based approach were compared with the original treatment plans at several dose cutpoints. Results: Compared with the original plan, the knowledge-based plan had a significantly more homogeneous dose to the planning target volume and a significantly lower maximum dose. The volumes of the rectum, bladder, and femoral heads above all cutpoints were nominally lower for the knowledge-based plan; the reductions were significantly lower for the rectum. In 40% of cases, the knowledge-based plan had overall superior (lower) dose–volume histograms for rectum and bladder; in 54% of cases, the comparison was equivocal; in 6% of cases, the knowledge-based plan was inferior for both bladder and rectum. Conclusions: Knowledge-based planning was superior or equivalent to the original plan in 95% of cases. The knowledge-based approach shows promise for homogenizing plan quality by transferring planning expertise from more experienced to less experienced institutions.

  6. 40 CFR 62.4845 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) requirements that impact TRS emission sources such as brownstock washer systems, low volume high concentration (LVHC) systems, steam strippers, and waste water treatment plants. Changes have also been made to... Existing Plants (Section 111(d) Plan). (b) The plan was officially submitted as follows: (1) Control...

  7. Study of Alternate Space Shuttle Concepts. Volume 2, Part 2: Concept Analysis and Definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    This is the final report of a Phase A Study of Alternate Space Shuttle Concepts by the Lockheed Missiles & Space Company (LMSC) for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The eleven-month study, which began on 30 June 1970, is to examine the stage-and-one-half and other Space Shuttle configurations and to establish feasibility, performance, cost, and schedules for the selected concepts. This final report consists of four volumes as follows: Volume I - Executive Summary, Volume II - Concept Analysis and Definition, Volume III - Program Planning, and Volume IV - Data Cost Data. This document is Volume II, Concept Analysis and Definition.

  8. Hanford Facility contingency plan

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, L.N.; Miskho, A.G.; Brunke, R.C.

    1993-10-01

    The Hanford Facility Contingency Plan, together with each TSD unit-specific contingency plan, meets the WAC 173-303 requirements for a contingency plan. This plan includes descriptions of responses to a nonradiological hazardous materials spill or release at Hanford Facility locations not covered by TSD unit-specific contingency plans or building emergency plans. This plan includes descriptions of responses for spills or releases as a result of transportation activities, movement of materials, packaging, and storage of hazardous materials.

  9. Roof Plans: Section "CC", Roof Plan; Roof Framing Plans: Section ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Roof Plans: Section "C-C", Roof Plan; Roof Framing Plans: Section "C-C", Section "D-D"; Roof Framing Sections: Cross Section "G-G", Cross Section "H-H" - Fort Washington, Fort Washington Light, Northeast side of Potomac River at Fort Washington Park, Fort Washington, Prince George's County, MD

  10. A Bibliography of Significant Features in Bilingual Education Programs. Planning Paper 2. Bilingual Instructional Features Planning Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nieves-Squires, Sarah; And Others

    This report is one of five submitted as products of a "Study Designed to Assist Planning of Research on Significant Instructional Features in Bilingual Education Programs." The reports are intended to assist the National Institute of Education in its plans for a major new research study in bilingual education. The present volume is an…

  11. Working Definitions of Terms for the Bilingual Instructional Features Study. Planning Paper 1. Bilingual Instructional Features Planning Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nieves-Squires, Sarah; Goodrich, Robert L.

    This report is one of five submitted as products of a "Study Designed to Assist Planning of Research on Significant Instructional Features in Bilingual Education Programs." The reports are intended to assist the National Institute of Education (NIE) in its plans for a major new research study in bilingual education. The present volume is…

  12. Hypersonic Experimental and Computational Capability, Improvement and Validation. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muylaert, Jean (Editor); Kumar, Ajay (Editor); Dujarric, Christian (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    The results of the phase 2 effort conducted under AGARD Working Group 18 on Hypersonic Experimental and Computational Capability, Improvement and Validation are presented in this report. The first volume, published in May 1996, mainly focused on the design methodology, plans and some initial results of experiments that had been conducted to serve as validation benchmarks. The current volume presents the detailed experimental and computational data base developed during this effort.

  13. Sandia software guidelines. Volume 3. Standards, practices, and conventions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-07-01

    This volume is one in a series of Sandia Software Guidelines intended for use in producing quality software within Sandia National Laboratories. In consonance with the IEEE Standard for Software Quality Assurance Plans, this volume identifies software standards, conventions, and practices. These guidelines are the result of a collective effort within Sandia National Laboratories to define recommended deliverables and to document standards, practices, and conventions which will help ensure quality software. 66 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. Graphical Requirements for Force Level Planning. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    constraints for categories of objects, e.g., bridge must alig -i with road or railroad track * Geometric Representation • Displayable features stored in...available toolkit, such as the HP Widgets. 7.3,3 NeWS NeWS, from Sun Microsystems, is another window system, similar in some respects to X. It is

  15. Studies in Family Planning, Volume 3, Number 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Population Council, New York, NY.

    The Commission on Population Growth and the American Future was established by Congress in March, 1970, to examine the impact of population change in the United States to the year 2000. Excerpts from their final report, submitted in March, 1972, are presented in this pamphlet. The first eight chapters focus on the present and prospective…

  16. General Urban Warfare Amphibious Logistics Applications. Volume 2. Operations Plan.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-23

    lists below, in the event local hospitals or clinics are not readily available. Pharmaceutical form and srn Total reuired Analggsics 1 acetylsalicylic ... acid tab 300mg 14,000 tab 2 paracetamol tab 500mg 7,000 tab Antihelminthic I piperazine tab 500mg 4,000 tab 2 piperazine syrup 500mg/5ml 10 litres 3...UNCLASSIFIED 2 chloroquine syrup 50mg/5ml base 10 litres ferrous salt and folic acid tab 60mg iron with 9,000 tab 0.25mg

  17. Software Master Plan. Volume 2. Background (Annexes A-G)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-09

    Management Roles ANNEX B Existing Policies , Standards, and Guidance Regarding Software and Systems ANNEX C Current Software Research and Development...Software related responsibilities include: - Developing policy and guidance for software acquisition programs. - Validating software acquisition...Advanced Technology) (DDDRE(R&AT)) Software related responsibilities include: - Providing review, management oversight, policy guidance, and coordination

  18. 2101-M pond closure plan. Volume 1, Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Izatt, R. D.; Lerch, R. E.

    1993-06-01

    This document describes activities for the closure of a surface impoundment (2101-M Pond) at the Hanford Site. The 2101-H Pond was initially constructed in 1953 to serve as a drainage collection area for the 2101-H Building. (Until the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) Laboratory was constructed in the 2101-M Building in 1979--1981, the only source contributing discharge to the pond was condensate water from the 2101-H Building heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system. The drains for the BWIP Laboratory rooms were plumbed into a 4-in., cast-iron, low-pressure drain pipe that carries waste water from the HVAC system to the pond. During the active life of the BWIP Laboratory, solutions of dissolved barium in groundwater samples were discharged to the 2101-M Pond via the laboratory drains. As a result of the discharges, a Part A permit application was initially submitted to the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) in August 1986 which designates the 2101-M Pond as a surface impoundment.

  19. Long Range Plan for Embedded Computer Systems Support. Volume II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    Configuration M anagem ent ..................................................... 5-1-0 5-4. Administrative Initiatives Related to Organizational S tru ctu...studies and ongoing activities such as the "Computer Technology Forecast and Weapon System Impact Study" (COMTEC-2000), 1-7 I_. All 0. 0) U o~ 0 0 Q 0 0 U...the major impacts of multiuse ECS is on the System and Item Managers. The assign- ment of an ECS to an SM and/or IM has serious ramifications from

  20. Neutral Site Planning Project, Final Report. Volume III: Curriculum Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Providence School Dept., RI.

    A curriculum package designed for Providence, Rhode Island's proposed magnet school program is presented in this report. Included are the curricula for Health Careers, Creative, Performing and Communications Arts, Business and Management, and Government and Law Magnet Programs. General information about each curriculum covers overall goals,…