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Sample records for plana diptera stratiomyidae

  1. A new species of Culcua Walker (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) from Vietnam

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A new species of Culcua Walker (Diptera: Stratiomyidae), C. lingafelteri Woodley, new species, is described from northern Vietnam. It is diagnosed relative to other species using the recent revision of the genus by Rozkošný and Kozánek (2007). This is the first species of Culcua reported from Viet...

  2. Microchrysa flaviventris (Wiedemann), a new immigrant soldier fly in the United States (Diptera: Stratiomyidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Microchrysa flaviventris (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Stratiomyidae: Sarginae), a species widespread in the Old World, has been introduced and is apparently established in the eastern United States. Specimens were taken in Alexandria, Virginia in August of 2007....

  3. Influence of resources on Hermetia illucens (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) larval development.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Trinh T X; Tomberlin, Jeffery K; Vanlaerhoven, Sherah

    2013-07-01

    Arthropod development can be used to determine the time of colonization of human remains to infer a minimum postmortem interval. The black soldier fly, Hermetia illucens L. (Diptera. Stratiomyidae) is native to North America and is unique in that its larvae can consume a wide range of decomposing organic material, including carrion. Larvae development was observed on six resources: control poultry feed, liver, manure, kitchen waste, fruits and vegetables, and fish rendering. Larvae fed manure were shorter, weighed less, and took longer to develop. Kitchen waste produced longer and heavier larvae, whereas larvae fed fish had almost 100% mortality. Black soldier flies can colonize human remains, which in many instances can coincide with food and organic wastes. Therefore, it is necessary to understand black soldier fly development on different food resources other than carrion tissue to properly estimate their age when recovered from human remains.

  4. Kerteszmyia, a new genus of Pachygastrinae from the Neotropical Region (Diptera: Stratiomyidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A new genus and species, Kerteszmyia ecuadora gen. nov., sp. nov., (Diptera: Stratiomyidae, Pachygastrinae) is described from material from Ecuador (type locality), Venezuela, and Costa Rica. A key to the known Neotropical genera of Pachygastrinae with two or more scutellar spines is presented. ...

  5. Updated Italian checklist of Soldier Flies (Diptera, Stratiomyidae)

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Franco

    2013-01-01

    Abstract An updated checklist for Stratiomyidae of Italy is presented. Previous knowledge and information are put together in a comprehensive way, integrated also with results obtained by sampling with Malaise traps in some of the test areas of the LIFE+ project ManFor C.BD. At the time of writing, with 91 known species, the Italian fauna of Stratiomyidae is the richest in Europe. Neopachygaster meromelas (Dufour, 1841) and Zabrachia minutissima (Zetterstedt, 1838) are new to the Italian fauna. A comprehensive key to the European species of Chorisops Rondani, 1856 is given. PMID:24146573

  6. Vitilevumyia, an enigmatic new genus of Stratiomyidae from Fiji (Diptera)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A new genus of Stratiomyidae, Vitilevumyia gen. nov. (type species, V. bobwoodleyi, sp. nov.) is described from the island of Viti Levu, Fiji. It exhibits an unusual combination of character states, but is tentatively placed in the tribe Prosopochrysini of the subfamily Stratiomyinae. ...

  7. An illustrated catalogue of the types of Stratiomyidae (Diptera: Brachycera) in the collection of Museu Nacional, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Fachin, Diego Aguilar; Couri, Márcia Souto; De Mello-Patiu, Cátia Antunes

    2016-02-26

    A catalogue of the type specimens of Stratiomyidae (Diptera: Brachycera) held in the collection of Museu Nacional, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (MNRJ) is presented. A total number of 50 type specimens of 18 valid Neotropical species were recognized and are listed in alphabetical order of subfamily, genus and specific epithet. Photos of 12 primary types of the species and bibliographical data of the original descriptions, labels and condition of all type specimens are also provided.

  8. Novel arrangement and comparative analysis of hsp90 family genes in three thermotolerant species of Stratiomyidae (Diptera).

    PubMed

    Astakhova, L N; Zatsepina, O G; Przhiboro, A A; Evgen'ev, M B; Garbuz, D G

    2013-06-01

    The heat shock proteins belonging to the Hsp90 family (Hsp83 in Diptera) play a crucial role in the protection of cells due to their chaperoning functions. We sequenced hsp90 genes from three species of the family Stratiomyidae (Diptera) living in thermally different habitats and characterized by extraordinarily high thermotolerance. The sequence variation and structure of the hsp90 family genes were compared with previously described features of hsp70 copies isolated from the same species. Two functional hsp83 genes were found in the species studied, that are arranged in tandem orientation at least in one of them. This organization was not previously described. Stratiomyidae hsp83 genes share a high level of identity with hsp83 of Drosophila, and the deduced protein possesses five conserved amino acid sequence motifs characteristic of the Hsp90 family as well as the C-terminus MEEVD sequence characteristic of the cytosolic isoform. A comparison of the hsp83 promoters of two Stratiomyidae species from thermally contrasting habitats demonstrated that while both species contain canonical heat shock elements in the same position, only one of the species contains functional GAF-binding elements. Our data indicate that in the same species, hsp83 family genes show a higher evolution rate than the hsp70 family.

  9. Survival and Development of Hermetia illucens (Diptera: Stratiomyidae): A Biodegradation Agent of Organic Waste.

    PubMed

    Clariza Samayoa, Ana; Chen, Wei-Ting; Hwang, Shaw-Yhi

    2016-12-01

    The black soldier fly, Hermetia illucens (L.) (Diptera: Stratiomyidae), was reared on artificial diet (wheat bran and chicken feed) in the laboratory at 28ºC (immature stages) and under a greenhouse set at 28ºC (adults). Data were collected and analyzed based on an age-stage, two-sex life table. The intrinsic rate of increase (r), finite rate of increase (λ), net reproduction rate (R0), and mean generation time (T) were 0.0759 (d(-1)), 1.0759 (d(-1)), 68.225 offspring, and 55.635 d, respectively. The maximum reproductive value of females occurred at 54 d. Only six females out of 21 were able to successfully oviposit. The number of eggs laid per female ranged from 236 to a maximum of 1,088 eggs. We demonstrated that first-instar larvae of H. illucens are more susceptible to perishing when reared under artificial diet than are later instars.  La mosca soldado negro, Hermetia illucens (L.) (Diptera: Stratiomyidae), fue alimentada en una dieta artificial (salvado de trigo y alimento para pollos) en el laboratorio a 28ºC (estados inmaduros) y en un invernadero a 28ºC (adultos). Los datos fueron recopilados y analizados en base a la tabla de vida de ambos sexos, edad y etapa. La tasa intrínseca de crecimiento (r), tasa finita de crecimiento (λ), la tasa neta de reproducción (R0) y el tiempo medio generacional (T) fueron 0.0759 (d), 1.0759 (d), 68.225 crías, y 55.635 (d), respectivamente. El valor reproductivo máximo de las hembras se produjo a los 54 días. Sólo 6 de las 21 hembras fueron capaces de poner huevos con éxito. El número de huevos por hembra varió de 236 a un máximo de 1088 huevos. Hemos demostrado que cuando han sido criados en una dieta artificial, las larvas de H. illucens durante el primer instar son más susceptibles a perecer que los instares posteriores. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. A catalogue of the types of Stratiomyidae (Diptera: Brachycera) in the collection of the Museu de Zoologia da Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Fachin, Diego Aguilar; Lamas, Carlos José Einicker

    2015-02-12

    Following a recommendation of the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature, a catalogue of the type specimens of Stratiomyidae (Diptera: Brachycera) held in the collection of the Museu de Zoologia da Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil (MZUSP) is provided, with information on 30 type specimens (including 14 primary types) of 17 Neotropical species.

  11. Survival and Development of Hermetia illucens (Diptera: Stratiomyidae): A Biodegradation Agent of Organic Waste.

    PubMed

    Samayoa, Ana Clariza; Chen, Wei-Ting; Hwang, Shaw-Yhi

    2016-09-11

    The black soldier fly, Hermetia illucens (L.) (Diptera: Stratiomyidae), was reared on artificial diet (wheat bran and chicken feed) in the laboratory at 28°C (immature stages) and under a greenhouse set at 28°C (adults). Data were collected and analyzed based on an age-stage, two-sex life table. The intrinsic rate of increase (r), finite rate of increase (λ), net reproduction rate (R0), and mean generation time (T) were 0.0759 (d(-1)), 1.0759 (d(-1)), 68.225 offspring, and 55.635 d, respectively. The maximum reproductive value of females occurred at 54 d. Only six females out of 21 were able to successfully oviposit. The number of eggs laid per female ranged from 236 to a maximum of 1,088 eggs. We demonstrated that first-instar larvae of H. illucens are more susceptible to perishing when reared under artificial diet than are later instars. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Substrate effects on pupation and adult emergence of Hermetia illucens (Diptera: Stratiomyidae).

    PubMed

    Holmes, L A; Vanlaerhoven, S L; Tomberlin, J K

    2013-04-01

    Black soldier flies, Hermetia illucens (L.) (Diptera: Stratiomyidae), are of particular interest for their applications in waste management. Feeding on decaying organic waste, black soldier flies successfully reduce manure in confined animal feeding operations of poultry, swine, and cattle. To optimize waste conversion in confined animal feeding operations and landfill facilities, it is imperative to optimize black soldier fly development. Unfortunately, black soldier flies only convert waste during their larval feeding stages and therefore it is of interest to optimize the nonfeeding stages of development, specifically, the postfeeding and pupal stages. The time spent in these stages is thought to be determined by the pupation substrate encountered by the postfeeding larvae. The objective of this study was to determine the effect different pupation substrates have on postfeeding development time, pupation time, and adult emergence success. Five pupation substrates were compared: wood shavings, potting soil, topsoil, sand, and nothing. Postfeeding larvae took longer to reach pupation in the absence of a pupation substrate, although reaching pupation in the shortest time in potting soil and wood shavings. The time spent in the pupal stage was shortest in the absence of a pupation substrate. However, fewer adults emerged when a pupation substrate was not provided.

  13. Ability of Black Soldier Fly (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) Larvae to Recycle Food Waste.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Trinh T X; Tomberlin, Jeffery K; Vanlaerhoven, Sherah

    2015-04-01

    Accumulation of organic wastes, especially in livestock facilities, can be a potential pollution issue. The black soldier fly, Hermetia illucens L. (Diptera: Stratiomyidae), can consume a wide range of organic material and has the potential to be used in waste management. In addition, the prepupae stage of this insect can be harvested and used as a valuable nutritious feed for animal livestock. Five waste types with a wide range of organic source matter were specifically chosen to evaluate the consumption and reduction ability of black soldier fly larvae. H. illucens was able to reduce all waste types examined: 1) control poultry feed, 2) pig liver, 3) pig manure, 4) kitchen waste, 5) fruits and vegetables, and 6) rendered fish. Kitchen waste had the greatest mean rate of reduction (consumption by black soldier fly) per day and produced the longest and heaviest black soldier flies. Larvae reared on liver, manure, fruits and vegetables, and fish were approximately the same length and weight as larvae fed the control feed, although some diets produced larvae with a higher nutritional content. The black soldier fly has the ability to consume and reduce organic waste and be utilized as valuable animal feed. Exploration of the potential use of black soldier flies as an agent for waste management on a large-scale system should continue.

  14. Brianmyia stuckenbergi, a new genus and species of Prosopochrysini from South Africa (Diptera: Stratiomyidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A new genus and species of Stratiomyidae, Brianmyia stuckenbergi, gen. n., sp. n. is described from the Drakensberg Range, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The new genus is placed in the tribe Prosopochrysini of the subfamily Stratiomyinae, and is the first member of this tribe known from southern Afri...

  15. Grazing trails formed by soldier fly larvae (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) and their paleoenvironmental and paleoecological implications for the fossil record

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mangano, M.G.; Buatois, L.A.; Claps, G.L.

    1996-01-01

    Recent trails formed by soldier fly larvae (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) were examined in a shallow pond in the floodplain of a braided river in Jujuy Province, northwestern Argentina. Collected specimens were identified as Stratiomys convexa van der Wulp. Simple, irregularly meandering trails were produced across the surface of a muddy-silty substrate. Since soldier fly larvae extend their caudal respiratory tube to the water-air interface, they are restricted to extremely shallow water. The presence of benthic algal remains within the mouthparts of the larvae suggests a feeding habit of algal grazing. If preserved, these trails would be included in the ichnogenus Helminthopsis, a common element in ancient freshwater ichnofaunas. Helminthopsis preserved in pond and lacustrine margin deposits younger than Late Jurassic is regarded as one possible trace fossil analogue of the trails documented herein. Additionally, it is suggested that larvae of many aquatic Diptera with similar ecologic restrictions are potential tracemakers of Helminthopsis and other simple trails in these environments, particularly in post-Paleozoic deposits. Studies of modern shallow aquatic habitats and reexamination of the ichnologic record stress the importance of fly larvae as tracemakers in lake margin and pond ecosystems. Ecologic requirements of soldier fly larvae make them inappropriate analogues of Helminthopsis tracemakers in deeper water, lacustrine settings. ?? 1996 OPA (Overseas Publishers Association) Amsterdam B.V. Published in The Netherlands by Harwood Academic Publishers GmbH.

  16. The colonization of carrion by soldier fly, Ptecticus melanurus (Walker) (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) in a tropical forest in Malaysia: a new potential species for minimum PMI estimation.

    PubMed

    Azwandi, A; Omar, B

    2012-12-01

    This paper discusses the colonization of the stratiomyid species Ptecticus melanurus (Walker) (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) in monkey carrion and its potential for the determination of the minimum time since death (PMI). A study was conducted in a tropical forest at Bangi, Malaysia from 13 November 2009 to 8 June 2011. Twelve monkey carcasses (Macaca fascicularis Raffles) were used and divided in equal number into three different field trials. Adults of P. melanurus were first observed on monkey carrions on the second day the carcasses were placed in the field while their penultimate instar larvae were found in the wet soil under and beside carcass from day 8 to 31 days postmortem.

  17. Black soldier fly (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) colonization of pig carrion in south Georgia.

    PubMed

    Tomberlin, Jeffery K; Sheppard, D Craig; Joyce, John A

    2005-01-01

    The black soldier fly, Hermetia illucens (L.), is thought to colonize corpses 20-30 days postmortem. However, recent observations indicate this might not be true for all cases. Therefore, we conducted a study examining colonization by the black soldier fly and other Diptera on pig carrion in a plowed field in southern Georgia from 20 September through 21 February. Our data indicate black soldier flies could colonize a corpse within the first week after death. Knowing this information could prevent a serious mistake in estimating the time at which a corpse is colonized by this species. This study also represents the first record of Chrysomya rufifacies in Georgia.

  18. The Impact of Diet Protein and Carbohydrate on Select Life-History Traits of The Black Soldier Fly Hermetia illucens (L.) (Diptera: Stratiomyidae)

    PubMed Central

    Cammack, Jonathan A.; Tomberlin, Jeffery K.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the impact of diet protein and carbohydrate percentages as well as moisture on the immature development, survivorship, and resulting adult longevity and egg production of the black soldier fly, Hermetia illucens (L.) (Diptera: Stratiomyidae). Moisture impacted development and corresponding life-history traits more than protein:carbohydrate content; larvae were unable to develop on diets at 40% moisture. Larvae fed diets at 70% moisture developed faster, grew larger, and required less food than those reared on diets at 55% moisture. Larvae reared on the balanced diet (21% protein:21% carbohydrate) at 70% moisture developed the fastest on the least amount of food and had the greatest survivorship to the prepupal stage. Adult emergence and longevity were similar across treatments, indicating immature life-history traits were impacted the most. The control (Gainesville house fly) diet was superior to the artificial diets for all parameters tested. These differences could indicate that other constituents (e.g., associated microbes) serve a role in black soldier fly development. These data are valuable for industrialization of this insect as a “green” technology for recycling organic waste, which can be highly variable, to produce protein for use as feed in the livestock, poultry, and aquaculture industries, as well as for bioenergy production. PMID:28561763

  19. The black soldier fly Hermetia illucens (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) as a potential measure of human postmortem interval: observations and case histories.

    PubMed

    Lord, W D; Goff, M L; Adkins, T R; Haskell, N H

    1994-01-01

    The black soldier fly, Hermetia illucens (L.), has been shown to be a ubiquitous inhabitant of both surface and buried human remains throughout the southern, central and western United States and Hawaii. Unlike most other species of forensically important Diptera, this species frequently dominates bodies in the dry/post decay stage of decomposition. Adults of the black soldier fly appear to initiate oviposition (egg laying) 20 to 30 days postmortem. Even at warm temperatures (27.8 degrees C), subsequent completion of the life cycle can require an additional 55 days. Life history data for H. illucens, when used in combination with data for other cohabiting arthropod species and viewed in the context of local environmental conditions, can provide medicolegal investigators with valuable parameters for estimating the postmortem intervals for badly decomposed remains.

  20. Checklist of the ‘lower Brachycera’ of Finland: Tabanomorpha, Asilomorpha and associated families (Diptera)

    PubMed Central

    Kahanpää, Jere; Winqvist, Kaj; Zeegers, Theo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A checklist of the ‘lower Brachycera’ of Finland is presented. This part of the complete checklist of Finnish Diptera covers the families Acroceridae, Asilidae, Athericidae, Bombyliidae, Mythicomyiidae, Rhagionidae, Scenopinidae, Stratiomyidae, Tabanidae, Therevidae, Xylomyidae and Xylophagidae. PMID:25337015

  1. Rearing methods for the black soldier fly (Diptera: Stratiomyidae).

    PubMed

    Sheppard, D Craig; Tomberlin, Jeffery K; Joyce, John A; Kiser, Barbara C; Sumner, Sonya M

    2002-07-01

    The black soldier fly, Heretia illucens (L.), is a nonpest tropical and warm-temperate region insect that is useful for managing large concentrations of animal manure and other biosolids. Manure management relying on wild fly oviposition has been successful in several studies. However, confidence in this robust natural system was low and biological studies were hampered by the lack of a dependable source of eggs and larvae. Larvae had been reared easily by earlier investigators, but achieving mating had been problematic. We achieved mating reliably in a 2 by 2 by 4-m screen cage in a 7 by 9 by 5-m greenhouse where sunlight and adequate space for aerial mating were available. Mating occurred during the shortest days of winter if the sun was not obscured by clouds. Adults were provided with water, but no food was required. Techniques for egg collection and larval rearing are given. Larvae were fed a moist mixture of wheat bran, corn meal, and alfalfa meal. This culture has been maintained for 3 yr. Maintainance of a black soldier fly laboratory colony will allow for development of manure management systems in fully enclosed animal housing and in colder regions.

  2. Human furuncular myiasis caused by Hermetia illucens (Diptera: Stratiomyidae).

    PubMed

    Adler, A I; Brancato, F P

    1995-09-01

    Cutaneous myiasis caused by Hermetia illucens (L.) has not been reported previously. We present a case of facultative furuncular myiasis characterized by infestation with a single larva in a woman from Seattle, WA, who had traveled to East Africa.

  3. Microplastics effects in Scrobicularia plana.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Francisca; Garcia, Ana R; Pereira, Beatriz P; Fonseca, Maria; Mestre, Nélia C; Fonseca, Tainá G; Ilharco, Laura M; Bebianno, Maria João

    2017-09-15

    One of the most common plastics in the marine environment is polystyrene (PS) that can be broken down to micro sized particles. Marine organisms are vulnerable to the exposure to microplastics. This study assesses the effects of PS microplastics in tissues of the clam Scrobicularia plana. Clams were exposed to 1mgL(-1) (20μm) for 14days, followed by 7days of depuration. A qualitative analysis by infrared spectroscopy in diffuse reflectance mode period detected the presence of microplastics in clam tissues upon exposure, which were not eliminated after depuration. The effects of microplastics were assessed by a battery of biomarkers and results revealed that microplastics induce effects on antioxidant capacity, DNA damage, neurotoxicity and oxidative damage. S. plana is a significant target to assess the environmental risk of PS microplastics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A new species of Paraberismyia Woodley (Diptera, Stratiomyidae, Beridinae) from Chiapas, Mexico

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A new species of Paraberismyia Woodley, P. imitator, n. sp., is described from Chiapas, Mexico. The new species is compared to previously described species and diagnostic notes are presented regarding separation of Paraberismyia from Berismyia Giglio-Tos. ...

  5. Revision of the southeast Asian soldier-fly genus Parastratiosphecomyia Brunetti, 1923 (Diptera, Stratiomyidae, Pachygastrinae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The genus Parastratiosphecomyia Brunetti is revised with the description of two new species: P. freidbergi Woodley, sp. n. from India and P. rozkosnyi Woodley, sp. n. from Laos and Thailand. All four species in the genus are illustrated and a key to species is provided. Type localities of previous...

  6. Bacteria Mediate Oviposition by the Black Soldier Fly, Hermetia illucens (L.), (Diptera: Stratiomyidae)

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Longyu; Crippen, Tawni L.; Holmes, Leslie; Singh, Baneshwar; Pimsler, Meaghan L.; Benbow, M. Eric; Tarone, Aaron M.; Dowd, Scot; Yu, Ziniu; Vanlaerhoven, Sherah L.; Wood, Thomas K.; Tomberlin, Jeffery K.

    2013-01-01

    There can be substantial negative consequences for insects colonizing a resource in the presence of competitors. We hypothesized that bacteria, associated with an oviposition resource and the insect eggs deposited on that resource, serve as a mechanism regulating subsequent insect attraction, colonization, and potentially succession of insect species. We isolated and identified bacterial species associated with insects associated with vertebrate carrion and used these bacteria to measure their influence on the oviposition preference of adult black soldier flies which utilizes animal carcasses and is an important species in waste management and forensics. We also ascertained that utilizing a mixture of bacteria, rather than a single species, differentially influenced behavioral responses of the flies, as did bacterial concentration and the species of fly from which the bacteria originated. These studies provide insight into interkingdom interactions commonly occurring during decomposition, but not commonly studied. PMID:23995019

  7. Taxonomic revision and cladistic analysis of the Neotropical genus Acrochaeta Wiedemann, 1830 (Diptera: Stratiomyidae: Sarginae).

    PubMed

    Fachin, Diego Aguilar; Amorim, Dalton De Souza

    2015-11-30

    The Neotropical genus Acrochaeta Wiedemann is revised and a cladistics analysis of the genus based on morphological characters is presented. This paper raises the total number of extant Acrochaeta species from 10 to 14 with the description of nine new species, the synonymy of one species, the transfer of five species to other genera and the transfer of one species of Merosargus to Acrochaeta. The new species described (of which eight are from Brazil and one from Bolivia and Peru) are Acrochaeta asapha nov. sp., A. balbii nov. sp., A. dichrostyla nov. sp., A. polychaeta nov. sp., A. pseudofasciata nov. sp., A. pseudopolychaeta nov. sp., A. rhombostyla nov. sp. A. ruschii nov. sp. and A. stigmata nov. sp. The primary types of all Acrochaeta species were studied at least from photos, when possible with the study of dissected male or female terminalia. A. mexicana Lindner is proposed as a junior synonym of A. flaveola Bigot. M. chalconota (Brauer) comb. nov., M. degenerata (Lindner) comb. nov., M. longiventris (Enderlein) comb. nov. and M. picta (Brauer) comb. nov. are herein transferred from Acrochaeta to Merosargus Loew, and Chrysochlorina elegans (Perty) comb. nov. is transferred from Acrochaeta to Chrysochlorina James. A. convexifrons (McFadden) comb. nov. is transferred from Merosargus to Acrochaeta. The limits of the genus and its insertion in the Sarginae are considered, and an updated generic diagnosis is provided. All species of the genus are redescribed and diagnosed, and illustrated with photos of the habitus, thorax, wing, and drawings of the antenna and male and female terminalia. Distribution maps are provided for the species, along with an identification key for adults of all species. Parsimony analyses were carried out under equal and implied weight. Our matrix includes 43 terminal taxa--of which 26 are outgroup species from four different sargine genera--and 59 adult morphological characters. The phylogenetic analysis supports the monophyly of Acrochaeta based on features of the head, thorax and abdomen. An inner clade (Acrochaeta flaveola species group) within the genus was clearly recovered based on characters of male and female terminalia. There is good evidence for the paraphyly of Merosargus with Acrochaeta as a subclade, demanding a wider study of the subfamily for a sound solution for the genus Merosargus.

  8. Description of larva and puparium of Oplodontha rubrithorax (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) from the Oriental Region.

    PubMed

    Nerudová, Jana; Kovac, Damir; Tóthová, Andrea

    2015-05-01

    This is the first description of larva and puparium of Oplodontha rubrithorax (Macquart, 1838) from the Oriental Region. Larvae were found at a hot spring in North Thailand. The morphological features and cuticular structures of the larva are documented by drawings and SEM micrographs and the main characters are compared with the European O. viridula (Fabricius, 1775), the only described larva of this genus. Differences between larvae of both species were only found in pubescence. The characteristic, somewhat dilated and slightly clavate hairs on the dorsal surface of the body segments of O. viridula larva are apparently lacking in the larva of O. rubrithorax.

  9. Black soldier fly (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) larvae reduce Escherichia coli in dairy manure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiaolin; Tomberlin, Jeffery K; Brady, Jeff A; Sanford, Michelle R; Yu, Ziniu

    2008-12-01

    Escherichia coli labeled with a green fluorescent protein was inoculated into sterile dairy manure at 7.0 log cfu/g. Approximately 125 black soldier fly larvae were placed in manure inoculated and homogenized with E. coli. Manure inoculated with E. coli but without black soldier fly larvae served as the control. For the first experiment, larvae were introduced into 50, 75, 100, or 125 g sterilized dairy manure inoculated and homogenized with E. coli and stored 72 h at 27 degrees C. Black soldier fly larvae significantly reduced E. coli counts in all treatments. However, varying the amount of manure provided the black soldier fly larvae significantly affected their weight gain and their ability to reduce E. coli populations present. For the second experiment, larvae were introduced into 50 g manure inoculated with E. coli and stored for 72 h at 23, 27, 31, or 35 degrees C. Minimal bacterial growth was recorded in the control held at 35 degrees C and was excluded from the analysis. Black soldier fly larvae significantly reduced E. coli counts in manure held at remaining temperatures. Accordingly, temperature significantly influenced the ability of black soldier fly larvae to develop and reduce E. coli counts with greatest suppression occurring at 27 degrees C.

  10. First record of Hermetia illucens (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) on human corpses in Iberian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Sánchez, Anabel; Magaña, Concepción; Saloña, Marta; Rojo, Santos

    2011-03-20

    This article presents the first record of Hermetia illucens larvae on a human corpse in Spain (the second case report in Europe). Prepupae of H. illucens, and other insects, were recovered from the dead body of a 72-year-old man in an advanced stage of decomposition. The body was located in Reus (NE Spain), in October 1998. This article provides additional biological data on experimental studies and an update on the geographic distribution of this species in the Iberian Peninsula. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Development of black soldier fly (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) larvae fed dairy manure.

    PubMed

    Myers, Heidi M; Tomberlin, Jeffery K; Lambert, Barry D; Kattes, David

    2008-02-01

    Black soldier flies, Hermetia illucens L., are a common colonizer of animal wastes. However, all published development data for this species are from studies using artificial diets. This study represents the first examining black soldier fly development on animal wastes. Additionally, this study examined the ability of black soldier fly larvae to reduce dry matter and associated nutrients in manure. Black soldier fly larvae were fed four rates of dairy manure to determine their effects on larval and adult life history traits. Feed rate affected larval and adult development. Those fed less ration daily weighed less than those fed a greater ration. Additionally, larvae provided the least amount of dairy manure took longer to develop to the prepupal stage; however, they needed less time to reach the adult stage. Adults resulting from larvae provided 27 g dairy manure/d lived 3-4 d less than those fed 70 g dairy manure. Percentage survivorship to the prepupal or adult stages did not differ across treatments. Larvae fed 27 g dairy manure daily reduced manure dry matter mass by 58%, whereas those fed 70 g daily reduced dry matter 33%. Black soldier fly larvae were able to reduce available P by 61-70% and N by 30-50% across treatments. Based on results from this study, the black soldier fly could be used to reduce wastes and associated nutrients in confined bovine facilities.

  12. Bacteria mediate oviposition by the black soldier fly, Hermetia illucens (L.), (Diptera: Stratiomyidae).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Longyu; Crippen, Tawni L; Holmes, Leslie; Singh, Baneshwar; Pimsler, Meaghan L; Benbow, M Eric; Tarone, Aaron M; Dowd, Scot; Yu, Ziniu; Vanlaerhoven, Sherah L; Wood, Thomas K; Tomberlin, Jeffery K

    2013-01-01

    There can be substantial negative consequences for insects colonizing a resource in the presence of competitors. We hypothesized that bacteria, associated with an oviposition resource and the insect eggs deposited on that resource, serve as a mechanism regulating subsequent insect attraction, colonization, and potentially succession of insect species. We isolated and identified bacterial species associated with insects associated with vertebrate carrion and used these bacteria to measure their influence on the oviposition preference of adult black soldier flies which utilizes animal carcasses and is an important species in waste management and forensics. We also ascertained that utilizing a mixture of bacteria, rather than a single species, differentially influenced behavioral responses of the flies, as did bacterial concentration and the species of fly from which the bacteria originated. These studies provide insight into interkingdom interactions commonly occurring during decomposition, but not commonly studied.

  13. Effects of temperature and diet on black soldier fly, Hermetia illucens (L.) (Diptera: Stratiomyidae), development.

    PubMed

    Harnden, Laura M; Tomberlin, Jeffery K

    2016-09-01

    The black soldier fly, Hermetia illucens, is recognised for its use in a forensic context as a means for estimating the time of colonisation and potentially postmortem interval of decomposing remains. However, little data exist on this species outside of its use in waste management. This study offers a preliminary assessment of the development, and subsequent validation, of H. illucens. Larvae of H. illucens were reared at three temperatures (24.9°C, 27.6°C and 32.2°C) at 55% RH on beef loin muscle, pork loin muscle and a grain-based diet (control). Each of the temperatures and diets were found to significantly (P<0.05) affect all stages of immature growth except for pupation time. Overall, those reared on the pork diet required on average ≈23.1% and ≈139.7% more degree hours to complete larval development than those reared on the beef and grain-based diets, respectively. Larvae reared at 27.6°C and 32.2°C required on average ≈8.7% more degree hours to complete development and had a final larval weight ≈30% greater than larvae reared at 24.9°C. The validity of the laboratory larval length and weight data sets was assessed via estimating the age of field-reared larvae. Grain-diet data lacked accuracy when used to estimate larval age in comparison to estimates made with beef and pork-diet data, which were able to predict larval age for ≈55.6% and ≈88.9% of sampling points, respectively, when length and weight data were used in conjunction. Field-reared larval sizes exceeded the maximum observed under laboratory conditions in almost half of the samples, which reduced estimate accuracy. Future research should develop additional criteria for identifying development of each specific instar, which may aid in improving the accuracy and precision of larval age estimates for this species.

  14. Wohlfahrtiimonas larvae sp. nov., isolated from the larval gut of Hermetia illucens (Diptera: Stratiomyidae).

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Kook; Lee, Youn Yeop; Park, Kwan Ho; Sim, Jeonggu; Choi, Youngcheol; Lee, Sung-Jae

    2014-01-01

    A novel, Gram-negative, facultative anaerobic, motile and short rod-shaped bacterium, strain KBL006(T) was isolated from the larval gut of Hermetia illucens, Black soldier fly. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain KBL006(T) showed 96.4 % similarity to that of Wohlfahrtiimonas chitiniclastica S5(T). Strain KBL006(T) grew optimally at 30 °C, at pH 8.0 and in the presence of 1-2 % (w/v) NaCl. Oxidase activity and catalase activity were positive. The major fatty acids were C18:1 ω7c, C14:0, and C16:0. The major respiratory quinone was ubiquinone-8 (Q-8). The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, and diphosphatidylglycerol, and two phospholipids. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 45.2 mol%. Based on these polyphasic data, strain KBL006(T) is considered to represent a novel species in the genus Wohlfahrtiimonas, for which the name Wohlfahrtiimonas larvae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is KBL006(T) (= KACC 16839(T) = JCM 18424(T)).

  15. Susceptibility of black soldier fly (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) larvae and adults to four insecticides.

    PubMed

    Tomberlin, Jeffery K; Sheppard, D Craig; Joyce, John A

    2002-06-01

    Dosage-mortality regressions were determined for black soldier fly, Hermetia illucens (L.), larvae fed cyromazine or pyriproxifen treated media. Cyromazine LC50 for larvae dying before becoming prepupae ranged from 0.25 to 0.28 ppm with dosage-mortality regression slopes between 5.79 and 12.04. Cyromazine LC50s for larvae dying before emergence ranged from 0.13 to 0.19 ppm with dosage-mortality regression slopes between 3.94 and 7.69. Pyriproxifen dosage-mortality regressions were not generated for larvae failing to become prepupae since <32% mortality was recorded at the highest concentration of 1,857 ppm. LC50s for larvae failing to become adults ranged from 0.10 to 0.12 ppm with dosage mortality-regression slopes between 1.67 and 2.32. Lambda-cyhalothrin and permethrin dosage-mortality regressions were determined for wild adult black soldier flies and house flies, Musca domestica L., and for susceptible house flies. Our results indicate that the wild house fly, unlike the black soldier fly, population was highly resistant to each of these pyrethroids. Regression slopes for black soldier flies exposed to lambda-cyhalothrin were twice as steep as those determined for the wild house fly strain. Accordingly, LC50s for the black soldier fly and susceptible house fly were 10- to 30-fold lower than those determined for wild house flies. The differential sensitivity between wild black soldier flies and house flies might be due to behavioral differences. Adult house flies usually remain in animal facilities with the possibility of every adult receiving pesticide exposure, while black soldier fly adults are typically present only during emergence and oviposition thereby limiting their exposure.

  16. Development of the black soldier fly (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) in relation to temperature.

    PubMed

    Tomberlin, Jeffery K; Adler, Peter H; Myers, Heidi M

    2009-06-01

    The black soldier fly, Hermetia illucens L., was reared on a grain-based diet at 27, 30, and 36 degrees C. Survival of 4- to 6-d-old larvae to adults averaged 74-97% at 27 and 30 degrees C but was only 0.1% at 36 degrees C. Flies required a mean of approximately 4 d (11%) longer to complete larval and pupal development at 27 degrees C than at 30 degrees C. At 27 and 30 degrees C, females weighed an average of 17-19% more than males but required an average of 0.6-0.8 d (3.0-4.3%) longer to complete larval development. At both temperatures, adult females lived an average of approximately 3.5 d less than adult males. The duration of larval development was a significant predictor of adult longevity. Temperature differences of even 3 degrees C produce significant fitness tradeoffs for males and females, influencing life history attributes and having practical applications for forensic entomology.

  17. Bioconversion of dairy manure by black soldier fly (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) for biodiesel and sugar production.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Zheng, Longyu; Qiu, Ning; Cai, Hao; Tomberlin, Jeffery K; Yu, Ziniu

    2011-06-01

    Modern dairies cause the accumulation of considerable quantity of dairy manure which is a potential hazard to the environment. Dairy manure can also act as a principal larval resource for many insects such as the black soldier fly, Hermetia illucens. The black soldier fly larvae (BSFL) are considered as a new biotechnology to convert dairy manure into biodiesel and sugar. BSFL are a common colonizer of large variety of decomposing organic material in temperate and tropical areas. Adults do not need to be fed, except to take water, and acquired enough nutrition during larval development for reproduction. Dairy manure treated by BSFL is an economical way in animal facilities. Grease could be extracted from BSFL by petroleum ether, and then be treated with a two-step method to produce biodiesel. The digested dairy manure was hydrolyzed into sugar. In this study, approximately 1248.6g fresh dairy manure was converted into 273.4 g dry residue by 1200 BSFL in 21 days. Approximately 15.8 g of biodiesel was gained from 70.8 g dry BSFL, and 96.2g sugar was obtained from the digested dairy manure. The residual dry BSFL after grease extraction can be used as protein feedstuff.

  18. Bacteria mediate oviposition by the black soldier fly, Hermetia illucens (L.), (Diptera: Stratiomyidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There can be substantial negative consequences for insects colonizing a resource in the presence of competitors. We hypothesized that microbes associated with an oviposition resource and resulting eggs deposited by insects serve as a mechanism regulating subsequent insect attraction, colonization, ...

  19. A revision of the Neotropical genus Paraberismyia Woodley (Diptera, Stratiomyidae, Beridinae) with three new species

    PubMed Central

    Woodley, Norman E.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The Neotropical genus Paraberismyia Woodley, 1995, is revised. Three new species, P. chiapas sp. n., P. mathisi sp. n., and P. triunfo sp. n. are described, all having type localities in Chiapas, Mexico. A key to the four known species is provided. PMID:24294096

  20. A revision of the Neotropical genus Paraberismyia Woodley (Diptera, Stratiomyidae, Beridinae) with three new species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The genus Paraberismyia Woodley, 1995, is revised. Three new species, P. chiapas sp. n, P. mathisi sp. n, and P. triunfo sp. n are described, all having type localities in Chiapas, Mexico. A key to the four known species is provided. ...

  1. Combined DSEK and Transconjunctival Pars Plana Vitrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Sane, Mona; Shaikh, Naazli

    2016-01-01

    We report here three patients who underwent combined Descemet's stripping with endothelial keratoplasty and transconjunctival pars plana vitrectomy for bullous keratopathy and posterior segment pathology. A surgical technique and case histories are described. Anatomic and visual outcomes of combined Descemet's stripping with endothelial keratoplasty and vitrectomy were excellent. Our experience provides technical guidelines and limitations. The combined minimally invasive techniques allow for rapid anatomical recovery and return of function and visual acuity in a single sitting. PMID:27413563

  2. A Drosophila heat shock response represents an exception rather than a rule amongst Diptera species.

    PubMed

    Zatsepina, O G; Przhiboro, A A; Yushenova, I A; Shilova, V; Zelentsova, E S; Shostak, N G; Evgen'ev, M B; Garbuz, D G

    2016-08-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) is the major player that underlies adaptive response to hyperthermia in all organisms studied to date. We investigated patterns of Hsp70 expression in larvae of dipteran species collected from natural populations of species belonging to four families from different evolutionary lineages of the order Diptera: Stratiomyidae, Tabanidae, Chironomidae and Ceratopogonidae. All investigated species showed a Hsp70 expression pattern that was different from the pattern in Drosophila. In contrast to Drosophila, all of the species in the families studied were characterized by high constitutive levels of Hsp70, which was more stable than that in Drosophila. When Stratiomyidae Hsp70 proteins were expressed in Drosophila cells, they became as short-lived as the endogenous Hsp70. Interestingly, three species of Ceratopogonidae and a cold-water species of Chironomidae exhibited high constitutive levels of Hsp70 mRNA and high basal levels of Hsp70. Furthermore, two species of Tabanidae were characterized by significant constitutive levels of Hsp70 and highly stable Hsp70 mRNA. In most cases, heat-resistant species were characterized by a higher basal level of Hsp70 than more thermosensitive species. These data suggest that different trends were realized during the evolution of the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of the responses of Hsp70 genes to temperature fluctuations in the studied families. © 2016 The Royal Entomological Society.

  3. Terrestrial arthropods of Steel Creek, Buffalo National River, Arkansas. IV. Asilidae and other Diptera

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Jeffrey K.; Fisher, Danielle M.; Dowling, Ashley P. G.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background This is the fourth in a series of papers detailing the terrestrial arthropods collected during an intensive survey of a site near Steel Creek campground along the Buffalo National River in Arkansas. The survey was conducted over a period of eight and a half months in 2013 using twelve trap types, including Malaise and canopy traps, Lindgren multifunnel traps, and pan traps. New information We provide collection records for 38 species of Asilidae and other Diptera, 7 of which are new state records for Arkansas: (Asilidae) Lasiopogon opaculus Loew, 1874; (Lygistorrhinidae) Lygistorrhina sancthecatharinae Thompson, 1975; (Stratiomyidae) Cephalochrysa nigricornis (Loew, 1866), Gowdeyana punctifera (Malloch, 1915), Sargus decorus Say, 1824; (Ulidiidae) Callopistromyia annulipes Macquart, 1855; and (Xylophagidae) Rachicerus obscuripennis Loew, 1863. PMID:27660536

  4. Keratometric alterations following the 25-gauge transconjunctival sutureless pars plana vitrectomy versus the conventional pars plana vitrectomy.

    PubMed

    Citirik, Mehmet; Batman, Cosar; Bicer, Tolga; Zilelioglu, Orhan

    2009-09-01

    To assess the alterations in keratometric astigmatism following the 25-gauge transconjunctival sutureless pars plana vitrectomy versus the conventional pars plana vitrectomy. Sixteen consecutive patients were enrolled into the study. Conventional vitrectomy was applied to eight of the cases and 25-gauge transconjunctival sutureless vitrectomy was performed in eight patients. Keratometry was performed before and after the surgery. In the 25-gauge transconjunctival sutureless pars plana vitrectomy group, statistically significant changes were not observed in the corneal curvature in any post-operative follow-up measurement (p > 0.05); whereas in the conventional pars plana vitrectomy group, statistically significant changes were observed in the first postoperative day (p = 0.01) and first postoperative month (p = 0.03). We noted that these changes returned to baseline in three months (p = 0.26). Both 25-gauge transconjunctival sutureless and conventional pars plana vitrectomy are effective surgical modalities for selected diseases of the posterior segment. Surgical procedures are critical for the visual rehabilitation of the patients. The post-operative corneal astigmatism of the vitrectomised eyes can be accurately determined at least two months post-operatively.

  5. Caloparyphus palaearcticus sp. n. (Diptera, Stratiomyidae), the first record for the soldier fly genus in the Palaearctic

    PubMed Central

    Rozkošný, Rudolf; Hauser, Martin; Gelhaus, Jon K.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Caloparyphus palaearcticus sp. n. is described from Russia and two localities in Mongolia and is the first representative of this genus in the Palaearctic and the only species found outside the New World. The morphological characters of the species are described and illustrated, and relationships to related species of Caloparyphus are discussed. PMID:27408561

  6. Inoculating poultry manure with companion bacteria influences growth and development of black soldier fly (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) larvae.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guohui; Cheng, Ping; Chen, Yanhong; Li, Yongjian; Yang, Zihong; Chen, Yuanfeng; Tomberlin, Jeffery K

    2011-02-01

    The growth and development of black soldier fly, Hermetia illucens (L.), larvae fed chicken manure inoculated with bacteria isolated from black soldier fly larvae and associated larval feed was evaluated. Four strains of Bacillus subtilis were evaluated. B. subtilis strains S15, S16, S19, were isolated from the gut of black soldier fly larvae. B. natto strain D1 was isolated from the diet fed to black soldier fly larvae. These bacteria were added individually into nonsterile 200 g fresh hen manure at 10(6) cfu/g and homogenized. Treated manure was then inoculated with 4-d old black soldier fly larvae. Prepupal weight ranged from 0.0606 g in the control to 0.0946 g in manure treated with the S15 strain. Larval survivorship to the prepupal stage in all treatments ranged from 98.00 ± 2.65% to 99.33 ± 1.15%. Prepupal survivorship to the pupal stage ranged from 91.92 ± 1.87% to 97.95 ± 1.03%. Adult emergence from the pupal stage did not significantly (P < 0.05) differ across treatments and ranged from 98.95 ± 1.82% to 100.00 ± 0.00%. Adult body length resulting from the larvae in each of the treatments was significantly greater than those from the control. Longevity of adults did not differ significantly between treatments. Time from hatching to the development of the first pupa did not differ significantly across treatments; however, development time from hatching to 90% reaching the prepupual stage was significantly different between treatments and ranged from 29.00 ± 1.00 d to 34.33 ± 3.51 d. Development time from hatching to 90% reaching the adult stages was significantly different between treatments. Our results demonstrate that inoculating poultry manure with bacteria from black soldier fly larvae influences the growth and development of conspecific larvae feeding on the manure. © 2011 Entomological Society of America

  7. Developmental and waste reduction plasticity of three black soldier fly strains (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) raised on different livestock manures.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fen; Tomberlin, Jeffery K; Zheng, Longyu; Yu, Ziniu; Zhang, Jibin

    2013-11-01

    Black soldier flies, Hermetia illucens L., are distributed throughout the temperate and tropic regions of the world and are known an established method for sustainably managing animal wastes. Colonies used to conduct research on the black soldier fly within the past 20 yr have predominately been established from eggs or larvae received from a colony originated from Bacon County, GA. Consequently, little is known about the phenotypic plasticity (i.e., development and waste conversion) across strains from different regions. This study compared the development of three strains of the black soldier fly (Texas; Guangzhou, China; and Wuhan, China) and their ability to reduce dry matter and associated nutrients in swine, dairy, and chicken manure. The Wuhan strain appeared to be more fit. Larvae from Wuhan needed 17.7-29.9% less time to reach the prepupal stage than those from Guangzhou or Texas, respectively. Larvae from Wuhan weighed 14.4-37.0% more than those from Guanghzhou or Texas, respectively. Larvae from the Wuhan strain reduced dry matter 46.0% (swine), 40.1% (dairy), and 48.4% (chicken) more than the Guangzhou strain and 6.9, 7.2, and 7.9% more than the Texas strain. This study demonstrates that phenotypic plasticity (e.g., development and waste conversion) varies across populations of black soldier flies and should be taken into account when selecting and establishing a population as a waste management agent in a given region of the world.

  8. Characterization of the molecular features and expression patterns of two serine proteases in Hermetia illucens (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) larvae.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wontae; Bae, Sungwoo; Kim, Ayoung; Park, Kwanho; Lee, Sangbeom; Choi, Youngcheol; Han, Sangmi; Park, Younghan; Koh, Youngho

    2011-06-01

    To investigate the molecular scavenging capabilities of the larvae of Hermetia illucens, two serine proteases (SPs) were cloned and characterized. Multiple sequence alignments and phylogenetic tree analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences of Hi-SP1 and Hi-SP2 were suggested that Hi-SP1 may be a chymotrypsin- and Hi-SP2 may be a trypsin-like protease. Hi-SP1 and Hi-SP2 3-D homology models revealed that a catalytic triad, three disulfide bonds, and a substrate-binding pocket were highly conserved, as would be expected of a SP. E. coli expressed Hi-SP1 and Hi-SP2 showed chymotrypsin or trypsin activities, respectively. Hi-SP2 mRNAs were consistently expressed during larval development. In contrast, the expression of Hi-SP1 mRNA fluctuated between feeding and molting stages and disappeared at the pupal stages. These expression pattern differences suggest that Hi-SP1 may be a larval specific chymotrypsin-like protease involved with food digestion, while Hi-SP2 may be a trypsin-like protease with diverse functions at different stages.

  9. Description of the puparium of Hermetia pulchra (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pujol-Luz, José Roberto; Godoi, Fabio Siqueira Pitaluga DE; Barros-Cordeiro, Karine Brenda

    2016-12-07

    The puparium of Hermetia pulchra is described, based on a single specimen reared in laboratory under controlled conditions until the emergence of an adult female. The puparium of H. pulchra was compared with puparium of H. illucens and some differential features were indicated. A checklist of the Brazilian species of the genus Hermetia is included, with new distributional records for H. pulchra in the Brazilian States of Bahia and Distrito Federal. Hermetia sphecodes is recorded for the first time for Brazil (State of Amazonas).

  10. Revision of the southeast Asian soldier-fly genus Parastratiosphecomyia Brunetti, 1923 (Diptera, Stratiomyidae, Pachygastrinae)

    PubMed Central

    Woodley, Norman E.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The genus Parastratiosphecomyia Brunetti is revised with the description of two new species: Parastratiosphecomyia freidbergi sp. n. from India and Parastratiosphecomyia rozkosnyi sp. n. from Laos and Thailand. All four species in the genus are illustrated and a key to species is provided. Type localities of previously described taxa are briefly discussed. PMID:23226704

  11. Endophthalmitis following 27-Gauge Pars Plana Vitrectomy for Vitreous Floaters

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhong; Wu, Rong Han; Moonasar, Nived

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To report a case of Staphylococcus epidermidis endophthalmitis following 27-gauge pars plana vitrectomy for symptomatic vitreous floaters. Methods The clinical course and imaging findings, including fundus optomap, and spectral domain optical coherence tomography of a 24-year-old male patient were documented. Results The patient, with a preoperative best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of 1.0, developed endophthalmitis following 27-gauge pars plana vitrectomy for symptomatic vitreous floaters. After a series of treatments, including emergent vitreous tap and silicone oil injection, antibiotic treatment, and silicone oil removal, the patient regained a BCVA of 0.6. Conclusion Although rare, the potential risk of endophthalmitis should be explicitly discussed with patients considering surgical intervention for vitreous floaters. PMID:28101041

  12. Two cases of malignant glaucoma unresolved by pars plana vitrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Hosoda, Yoshikatsu; Akagi, Tadamichi; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2014-01-01

    Malignant glaucoma, which is characterized by a shallow or flat anterior chamber with high intraocular pressure, can usually be resolved by pars plana vitrectomy with anterior hyaloidectomy. We describe two cases in which malignant glaucoma was refractory to conventional treatment and complete vitrectomy. Case one an 88-year-old woman with pseudoexfoliation glaucoma underwent trabeculotomy and subsequently developed malignant glaucoma. Four months after transient recovery by pars plana vitrectomy, the malignant glaucoma recurred. She underwent peripheral iridectomy and local zonulectomy with successful control of her intraocular pressure. In case two, an 85-year-old man had a history of pseudoexfoliation glaucoma. Seven months after phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation, he developed malignant glaucoma that was refractory to pars plana vitrectomy. He underwent peripheral iridectomy, goniosynechialysis and trabectome surgery resulting in the successful control of his intraocular pressure. In rare cases of malignant glaucoma refractive to vitrectomy, peripheral iridectomy with or without local zonulectomy is a reasonable and minimally invasive surgical procedure. PMID:24729683

  13. Proprioceptive encoding of head position in the black soldier fly, Hermetia illucens (L.) (Stratiomyidae).

    PubMed

    Paulk, Angelique; Gilbert, Cole

    2006-10-01

    Because the eyes of insects cannot be moved independently of the head, information about head posture is essential for stabilizing the visual world or providing information about the direction of gaze. We examined the external anatomy and physiological capabilities of a head posture proprioceptor, the prosternal organ (PO), located at the base of the neck in the black soldier fly, Hermetia illucens (L.) (Family: Stratiomyidae). The PO is sexually isomorphic and is composed of two fused plates of about 130 mechanosensory hairs set in asymmetrical sockets whose orientation varies across the organ. A multi-joint mechanical coupling between the head, neck membrane, and contact sclerites deflects the hairs more or less to increase or decrease their level of excitation. The PO sensory afferents project to the central nervous system (CNS) via a pair of bilateral prosternal nerves (PN) to the fused thoracic ganglia. Simultaneous recording of spiking activity in the PN and videotaping of wind-induced and voluntary head movements around all three axes of head rotation reveal that a few PN afferents are active at rest, but activity increases tonically in response to head deflections. Activity is significantly modulated by change in head angles around the pitch (+/-40 degrees ), yaw (+/-30 degrees ) and roll (more than +/-90 degrees ) axes, although the dynamic range of spiking activity differs for each axis of rotation. Prosternal nerve afferents are bilaterally excited (inhibited) by pitch down (up); excited (inhibited) by head yaw toward the ipsilateral (contralateral) side; excited by roll down toward the ipsilateral side, but little inhibited by roll toward the opposite side. Although bilateral comparison of activity in PN afferents reliably encodes head posture around a given rotational axis, from the point of view of the CNS, the problem of encoding head posture is ill-posed with three axes of rotation and only two streams of afferent information. Furthermore, when the

  14. Supplementation of an Artificial Medium for the Parasitoid Exorista larvarum (Diptera: Tachnidae) With Hemolymph of Hermetia illucens (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) or Antheraea pernyi (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae).

    PubMed

    Dindo, Maria Luisa; Vandicke, Jonas; Marchetti, Elisa; Spranghers, Thomas; Bonte, Jochem; De Clercq, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    The effect of supplementing hemolymph of the black soldier fly, Hermetia illucens (L.), or the Chinese oak silkworm, Antheraea pernyi (Guérin-Méneville), to a basic insect-free artificial medium for the tachinid Exorista larvarum (L.) was investigated. The supplementation (20% w/w) was based on the assumption that insect additives may optimize the media for this parasitoid. Egg hatch, pupal and adult yields, and sex ratio did not differ among the enriched and basic media. Preimaginal development was faster on both hemolymph-enriched media than on the basic medium. Despite the shorter development on the medium supplemented with H. illucens hemolymph than on the basic medium, on the two media puparium weights were comparable. The female flies reared on the medium enriched with H. illucens hemolymph did not lay more eggs, but the latter yielded significantly more puparia compared with the control females. Conversely, the medium enriched with A. pernyi hemolymph yielded lower female puparium weights than the basic medium and produced only one ovipositing female out of the five obtained female adults. These results indicate that the in vitro development of E. larvarum improved when the basic artificial medium was enriched with H. illucens hemolymph, whereas the supplementation with A. pernyi hemolymph negatively affected the quality of the in vitro-reared females.

  15. David Kasner, MD, and the Road to Pars Plana Vitrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Blodi, Christopher F.

    2016-01-01

    David Kasner, MD (1927–2001), used his extensive dissections of eye bank eyes and experiences in teaching cataract surgery to resident physicians to realize that excision of vitreous when present in the anterior chamber of eyes undergoing cataract surgery was preferable to prior intraoperative procedures. Noting that eyes tolerated his maneuvers, he then performed planned subtotal open-sky vitrectomies; first on a traumatized eye in 1961, then on two eyes of patients with amyloidosis (1966–1967). The success of these operations was noted by others, most particularly Robert Machemer, MD. Kasner’s work directly led to further surgical developments, including closed pars plana vitrectomy. PMID:27660504

  16. Scuttle Flies (Diptera: Phoridae) Inhabiting Rabbit Carcasses Confined to Plastic Waste Bins in Malaysia Include New Records and an Undescribed Species

    PubMed Central

    Zuha, Raja M.; Huong-Wen, See; Disney, R. Henry L.; Omar, Baharudin

    2017-01-01

    Scuttle flies (Diptera: Phoridae) are small-sized insects of forensic importance. They are well known for diversified species and habitats, but in the context of forensic entomology, scuttle flies’ inhabitance of corpses remains inadequately explored. With recent reports indicating the existence of more scuttle fly species possibly inhabiting these environments, a decomposition study using animal carcasses in enclosed environments was conducted. The aim was to record the occurrence of scuttle flies on rabbit carcasses placed in sealed plastic waste bins for a 40-day period. The study was conducted as two replicates in Bangi, Selangor. Sampling was carried out at different time intervals inside a modified mosquito net as a trap. Inside the trap, adult scuttle flies were aspirated and preserved in 70% ethanol. The fly larvae and pupae were reared until their adult stage to facilitate identification. From this study, six scuttle fly species were collected, i.e., Dahliphora sigmoides (Schmitz) ♂, Gymnoptera simplex (Brues) ♀, Megaselia scalaris (Loew) ♂♀, Puliciphora borinquenensis (Wheeler) ♂, Puliciphora obtecta Meijere ♀ and Spiniphora sp. ♀. Both D. sigmoides and P. obtecta were newly recorded in Malaysia, whilst the Spiniphora sp. was considered an unknown species until it was linked to its male counterpart. The sealed waste bins were found to be accessible for the scuttle flies with delayed arrival (day 4–5). Megaselia scalaris was the primary scuttle fly species attracted to the carcass, and its occurrence could be observed between days 4–7 (replicate 1) and days 5–33 (replicate 2). This study also revealed Sarcophaga spp. (Diptera: Sarcophagidae) as the earliest species to colonize the remains and the longest to inhabit them (days 2–40). The larvae of Hermetia illucens (Linneaus) (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) and Fannia sp. (Diptera: Fanniidae) were found on the carcasses during the mid-advanced decay period. These findings expand the

  17. Scuttle Flies (Diptera: Phoridae) Inhabiting Rabbit Carcasses Confined to Plastic Waste Bins in Malaysia Include New Records and an Undescribed Species.

    PubMed

    Zuha, Raja M; Huong-Wen, See; Disney, R Henry L; Omar, Baharudin

    2017-01-01

    Scuttle flies (Diptera: Phoridae) are small-sized insects of forensic importance. They are well known for diversified species and habitats, but in the context of forensic entomology, scuttle flies' inhabitance of corpses remains inadequately explored. With recent reports indicating the existence of more scuttle fly species possibly inhabiting these environments, a decomposition study using animal carcasses in enclosed environments was conducted. The aim was to record the occurrence of scuttle flies on rabbit carcasses placed in sealed plastic waste bins for a 40-day period. The study was conducted as two replicates in Bangi, Selangor. Sampling was carried out at different time intervals inside a modified mosquito net as a trap. Inside the trap, adult scuttle flies were aspirated and preserved in 70% ethanol. The fly larvae and pupae were reared until their adult stage to facilitate identification. From this study, six scuttle fly species were collected, i.e., Dahliphora sigmoides (Schmitz) ♂, Gymnoptera simplex (Brues) ♀, Megaselia scalaris (Loew) ♂♀, Puliciphora borinquenensis (Wheeler) ♂, Puliciphora obtecta Meijere ♀ and Spiniphora sp. ♀. Both D. sigmoides and P. obtecta were newly recorded in Malaysia, whilst the Spiniphora sp. was considered an unknown species until it was linked to its male counterpart. The sealed waste bins were found to be accessible for the scuttle flies with delayed arrival (day 4-5). Megaselia scalaris was the primary scuttle fly species attracted to the carcass, and its occurrence could be observed between days 4-7 (replicate 1) and days 5-33 (replicate 2). This study also revealed Sarcophaga spp. (Diptera: Sarcophagidae) as the earliest species to colonize the remains and the longest to inhabit them (days 2-40). The larvae of Hermetia illucens (Linneaus) (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) and Fannia sp. (Diptera: Fanniidae) were found on the carcasses during the mid-advanced decay period. These findings expand the knowledge on the

  18. Diptera of forensic importance in the Iberian Peninsula: larval identification key.

    PubMed

    Velásquez, Y; Magaña, C; Martínez-Sánchez, A; Rojo, S

    2010-09-01

    A revision of the species and families of sarcosaprophagous flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae, Sarcophagidae, Muscidae, Fanniidae, Drosophilidae, Phoridae, Piophilidae and Stratiomyidae) suitable for forensic purposes in the Iberian Peninsula is presented. Morphological characteristics that allow the accurate identification of third instars of the species present in the Iberian Peninsula are described and presented in the form of a diagnostic key. For larval Calliphoridae, characteristics such as the spines of the body segments were useful for the genus Calliphora whereas features of the anal segment and the cephalopharyngeal skeleton were useful for larvae of Lucilia. Identification of three Chrysominae species present in the Iberian Peninsula is included. For larval Sarcophagidae, characters such as the arrangement and shape of spiracular openings, structures of the anal segment and the cephalopharyngeal skeleton were used for the first time. A new record of Sarcophaga cultellata Pandellé, from a human corpse, is also included as well as recent incursions into the European cadaveric entomofauna such as Synthesiomyia nudiseta (van der Wulp) and Hermetia illucens (Linnaeus). This work provides useful new information that could be applied to forensic investigations in the Iberian Peninsula and in southern Europe.

  19. Insects (Diptera) associated with cadavers at the Institute of Legal Medicine in Pernambuco, Brazil: implications for forensic entomology.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Tatiana Costa; Vasconcelos, Simao Dias

    2010-05-20

    Increasing rates of unsolved homicides in Brazil prompt the need for applied entomological data to be used as a complementary tool by criminal investigators. In that context, we analyzed the occurrence of forensically important insect species (Order Diptera) on 14 cadavers taken into the Institute of Legal Medicine (ILM), in Pernambuco, Brazil, according to the conditions of the body and the pattern of colonisation by insects. Simultaneously, we surveyed the diversity of insects in the surrounding environment using bait traps. Five species were present on cadavers: Chrysomya albiceps, Chrysomya megacephala and Cochliomyia macellaria (Calliphoridae), Oxysarcodexia riograndensis and Ravinia belforti (Sarcophagidae). A total of 4689 adult insects belonging to 24 species of seven dipteran families (Calliphoridae, Sarcophagidae, Muscidae, Fanniidae, Phoridae, Anthomyiidae and Stratiomyidae) was collected at the ILM premises. C. albiceps was the most frequent species on the corpses and the most abundant in the traps. Species referred to as of forensic importance, such as Lucilia eximia, Chrysomya putoria, Oxysarcodexia modesta and Ophyra chalcogaster were collected on traps, but not on cadavers. There seems to be a limited colonisation of cadavers at the scene of the death, despite the ubiquity of necrophagous species in the area. The results contribute to differentiate between species that are involved in decomposition and those found in and around the mortuary installations of the ILM, thus providing potential clues about the locality of death and the post-mortem interval.

  20. Detection of pars plana rupture by ultrasound biomicroscopy after cannula dislodgement during cataract wound hydration.

    PubMed

    Yonekawa, Yoshihiro; Thomas, Benjamin J; Lau-Sickon, Laurie K; Anderson, Bradley J; Ruby, Alan J

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) is a valuable diagnostic modality for imaging anterior ocular structures. Its utility has been well studied in anterior segment, lenticular, and pars plicata pathologies. However, imaging of the pars plana has been seldom described. We present the case of a 66-year-old woman referred for vitreous hemorrhage after expulsive cannula dislodgement into the posterior segment during wound hydration at the end of cataract surgery. B-scan ultrasonography initially detected a very anterior abnormality, but the resolution was insufficient for accurate diagnosis. Subsequent UBM clearly showed rupture of the pars plana and a mild cyclodialysis cleft. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a pars plana rupture detected by ultrasound, which expands the diagnostic capacities and indications for UBM.

  1. Verruca plana as a complication of CO2 laser treatment: a case report.

    PubMed

    Winn, Aubrey E; Kentosh, Joshua; Bingham, Jonathan L

    2015-04-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) laser treatment is a common therapeutic modality for many dermatologic conditions. It uses a high energy, infrared beam of light, which selectively targets water-containing tissue resulting in controlled ablative resurfacing. This modality, however, can manifest significant cosmetic side effects. Here we report a case of verruca plana manifesting as a response to CO2 laser treatment. A 74-year-old female with recent Mohs surgery for a basal cell carcinoma, presented for full-face-fractionated CO2 treatment to address her surgical scars in addition to treating her mild diffuse actinic damage. Six weeks post treatment, the patient developed erythematous thin plaques over the areas that had been treated. Histology was consistent with verruca plana. Lesions showed mild improvement with topical tretinoin. Verruca plana are benign and typically self-limited; however, they can present a significant cosmetic burden to patients and are an important complication to consider when performing elective cosmetic procedures.

  2. Ocular trauma treated with pars plana vitrectomy: early outcome report

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri, Mohammad Reza; Tabatabaei, Seyed Ali; Soleimani, Mohammad; Kiarudi, Mohammad Yaser; Molaei, Saber; Rouzbahani, Mehdi; Mireshghi, Meysam; Zaeferani, Mohsen; Ghasempour, Mehrbod

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate demographic variables and visual outcomes, among patients with ocular injuries involving the posterior segment, managed with pars plana vitrectomy. METHODS The records of patients were studied retrospectively from March to September 2010, to determine the age, gender, place of occurrence of trauma, visual acuity, anatomical site, nature of injury, wound length, the presence of an afferent pupillary defect, and the timing of vitrectomy. The Ocular Trauma Score was measured. The minimum follow-up from presentation was 6mo. RESULTS Ninety patients (77 males, 13 females), with a mean age of 32.7±15.8y were included over the 6-month period. The majority of cases occurred in the workplace (47 patients), followed by home (14 patients). The mean visual acuity (logMAR) of patients significantly improved from 2.36±0.72 preoperatively to 1.50±1.14 postoperatively. Twenty-three patients had preoperative vision better than 2.0 logMAR, the postoperative visual acuity was significantly better among these patients than patients with worse than 2.0 logMAR (P<0.001). Visual improvement between groups with early vitrectomy (<7d) and delayed vitrectomy (>7d) was not significantly different (P=0.66). Postoperative visual acuity was not significantly different between patients with injury in Zone I and II (P=0.64), but patients with injury in Zone III had significantly poorer visual acuity (P=0.02). Patients with relative afferent pupillary defect had significantly poorer postoperative visual acuity (P=0.02). Preoperative visual acuity, the difference of preoperative and postoperative visual acuity, and postoperative visual acuity were significantly different between groups with different ocular trauma scores (P<0.001). CONCLUSION Trauma is more likely to occur in men under 40y of age and in the workplace. The favorable final visual outcome is associated with the absence of afferent pupillary defect, ocular trauma score and presenting visual acuity as well as the zone

  3. PERSISTENT CORNEAL EPITHELIAL DEFECT AFTER PARS PLANA VITRECTOMY.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsi-Fu; Yeung, Ling; Yang, Ko-Jen; Sun, Chi-Chin

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the incidence, risk factors, and clinical course of persistent corneal epithelial defects (PCED) after pars plana vitrectomy (PPV). The charts of 426 consecutive patients (511 eyes) who received PPV from January 2008 to December 2011 were reviewed. Corneal complications were defined as the presence of corneal epithelial defects, corneal edema, or superficial punctate keratopathy at least 1 week after vitrectomy. The PCED was defined as corneal epithelial defects lasting longer than 2 weeks after vitrectomy despite conventional treatment. The demographic, preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative data were compared between PCED and non-PCED corneal complication groups to evaluate the risk factors and clinical outcomes. Postoperative corneal complications developed in 103 of 460 (22.4%) eyes. Diabetes was associated with postoperative corneal epithelial defects (P = 0.021) and superficial punctate keratopathy (P = 0.022) but not corneal edema (P = 0.925). Among 103 eyes with corneal complications, 21 eyes developed PCED. The eyes with PCED had poor final visual acuity, with 23.8% (5/21) of the eyes in the PCED group having visual acuity of 20/200 or better compared with 51.2% (42/82) of the eyes in the non-PCED group (P = 0.024). Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that diabetes mellitus (P = 0.025), use of perfluoropropane (P = 0.001), and assistance of a first-year resident (P = 0.029) were statistically significant risk factors for PCED after PPV. There was also a high incidence of geographic herpes simplex virus epithelial keratitis among recalcitrant PCEDs lasting longer than 4 weeks (36%, 4/11 eyes). The overall incidence of PCED after PPV was 4.8%. Diabetes mellitus, intravitreal tamponade with perfluoropropane, and assistance of a first-year resident were risk factors for PCED after PPV. Persistent corneal epithelial defects after PPV were correlated with poor postoperative visual outcomes. Early and aggressive management is

  4. A survey of bacterial diversity from successive life stages of black soldier fly (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) by using 16S rDNA pyrosequencing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Black soldier fly (BSF), Hermetia illucens (L.), larvae represent a sustainable method for reducing animal and plant wastes. Larvae reduce dry matter, bacteria, offensive odor, and house fly populations. The prepupae can be self-harvested and used as feedstuff for livestock and poultry. While som...

  5. A new genus and two new species of Oriental Oxycerini (Diptera, Stratiomyidae, Stratiomyinae) with notes on new generic synonyms in two other stratiomyine genera

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Oxycerina gen.n. of the Oriental Stratiomyinae including two new species, O. merzi sp.n. and O. sabaha sp.n., is described and compared with related genera of Stratiomyinae and Raphiocerinae. The monotypic genus Scapanocnema Enderlein, 1914 is considered to be a synonym of Odontomyia Meigen, 1803 a...

  6. A new species of Cyphomyia Wiedemann from the Dominican Republic with a key to Caribbean species of the genus (Diptera, Stratiomyidae, Clitellariinae)

    PubMed Central

    Woodley, Norman E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A new species of Cyphomyia Wiedemann, Cyphomyia baoruco sp. n., is described from the Dominican Republic. A key to the species of Cyphomyia known from the Caribbean islands is provided. PMID:25493061

  7. Two new species of Brachyodina Lindner from the Caribbean with a key to species of the genus from the region (Diptera, Stratiomyidae, Pachygastrinae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two new species of Brachyodina Lindner, B. janestanleyae sp. n., is described from the Dominican Republic, and B. caymanensis sp. n. from Grand Cayman Island. A key to the species known from the Caribbean islands is provided....

  8. A revision of the species of Evaza Walker described by J.C.H. de Meijere (Diptera, Stratiomyidae, Pachygastrinae).

    PubMed

    Rozkošný, Rudolf; Vaňhara, Jaromír

    2017-02-09

    Six Oriental species of Evaza Walker, 1856 were described by J.C.H. de Meijere in the period between 1911 and 1924. The type specimens are now deposited in the Museum Naturalis (Leiden). All species were redescribed, photographed and their diagnostic characters were defined. Male terminalia of five species with known males were illustrated in detail. The revised species were compared with recently described new species from Oriental China. Additional material belonging to the revised species was recorded for the first time from the following countries: Evaza demeijerei Brunetti, 1923 (= E. pallipes de Meijere, 1916a) and E. discolor de Meijere, 1916a were found in Malaysia, E. javanensis de Meijere 1911 in Singapore, E. kerteszi de Meijere, 1914 in Laos and Malaysia and E. maculifera de Meijere, 1914 in Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam.

  9. The black soldier-fly, Hermetia illucens (Diptera, Stratiomyidae), used to estimate the postmortem interval in a case in Amapá State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pujol-Luz, José R; Francez, Pablo Abdon da Costa; Ururahy-Rodrigues, Alexandre; Constantino, Reginaldo

    2008-03-01

    The black soldier-fly (Hermetia illucens) is a generalist detritivore which is commonly present in corpses in later stages of decomposition and may be useful in forensic entomology. This paper describes the estimation of the postmortem interval (PMI) based on the life cycle of the black soldier-fly in a case in northern Brazil. A male child was abducted from his home and 42 days later his corpse was found in an advanced stage of decay. Two black soldier-fly larvae were found associated with the body. The larvae emerged as adults after 25-26 days. Considering the development cycle of H. illucens, the date of oviposition was estimated as 24-25 days after abduction. Since H. illucens usually (but not always) colonizes corpses in more advanced stages of decay, this estimate is consistent with the hypothesis that the child was killed immediately after abduction.

  10. Paenalcaligenes hermetiae sp. nov., isolated from the larval gut of Hermetia illucens (Diptera: Stratiomyidae), and emended description of the genus Paenalcaligenes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youn Yeop; Lee, Jae Kook; Park, Kwan Ho; Kim, Seo-Yeon; Roh, Seong Woon; Lee, Sang-Beom; Choi, Youngcheol; Lee, Sung-Jae

    2013-11-01

    A novel Gram-stain-negative, facultatively anaerobic, non-motile and short rod-shaped bacterium, strain KBL009(T), was isolated from the larval gut of Hermetia illucens. Strain KBL009(T) grew optimally at 37 °C, at pH 6.0 and with 1-2 % (w/v) NaCl. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain KBL009(T) showed 97.6 % similarity to that of Paenalcaligenes hominis CCUG 53761A(T) indicating its classification with the genus Paenalcaligenes. The major fatty acids were cyclo-C17 : 0, C16 : 0 and summed feature 2 (comprising C14 : 0 3-OH/iso-C16 : 1). The respiratory quinones were ubiquinone-8 (Q-8), predominating, and a minor amount of Q-7. The polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, one unknown aminolipid and five unknown polar lipids. The polyamine pattern contained predominantly putrescine and relatively high amounts of spermidine. The betaproteobacterial-specific 2-hydroxyputrescine could only be detected in trace amounts. The G+C content of genomic DNA was 56.1 mol%. Results from DNA-DNA hybridization with P. hominis KCTC 23583(T) unambiguously demonstrated that strain KBL009(T) represents a novel species in the genus Paenalcaligenes. Based on phenotypic, genotypic and phylogenetic characterization, the novel species Paenalcaligenes hermetiae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is KBL009(T) ( = KACC 16840(T) = JCM 18423(T)). An emended description of the genus Paenalcaligenes is also provided.

  11. A survey of bacterial diversity from successive life stages of black soldier fly (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) by using 16S rDNA pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Longyu; Crippen, Tawni L; Singh, Baneshwar; Tarone, Aaron M; Dowd, Scot; Yu, Ziniu; Wood, Thomas K; Tomberlin, Jeffery K

    2013-05-01

    Sustainable methods for managing waste associated with people and animals have been proposed in the past. Black soldier fly, Hermetia illucens (L.), larvae represent one of the more promising methods. Larvae reduce dry matter, bacteria, offensive odor, and house fly populations. Prepupae can be used as feedstuff for livestock. However, it is not known if such a method results in the proliferation of potential pathogens. Although some bacterial species have been cultured and identified from black soldier fly, a true appreciation of fly associated bacterial diversity is not known. Such information is needed to understand pathogen colonization on decomposing animal and plant waste in the presence of black soldier fly larvae as well as develop research strategies for maximizing the use of this fly to reduce waste without risking environmental harm. Using 454 sequencing, we surveyed bacterial diversity associated with successive life stages of the black soldier fly reared on plant material. Bacteria diversity classified (99.8%) across all life stages spanned six bacterial phyla with > or = 80% bootstrap support. Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria were the most dominant phyla associated with the black soldier fly accounting for two-thirds of the fauna identified. Many of these bacteria would go undetected because of their inability to be cultured.

  12. A new genus and two new species of soldier fly (Diptera: Stratiomyidae: Chiromyzinae) from Australia, one found infesting sugarcane in central Queensland.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Greg

    2016-03-17

    Metridius nov. gen. and types species M. robertsoni nov. sp. with winged males and apterous females is described from adults and larvae found infesting sugarcane stools from near Mackay, central Queensland. A second new species, M. mcalpinei nov. sp., based only on males from near Sydney, New South Wales is also described. Notes on the biology of both species and an identification key to the genera of the subfamily Chiromyzinae and to the species are also given.

  13. Lethal and sublethal responses in the clam Scrobicularia plana exposed to different CO2-acidic sediments.

    PubMed

    Conradi, M; Riba, I; Almagro-Pastor, V; DelValls, T A

    2016-11-01

    One of the main impacts expected in CO2 leakage scenarios from carbon capture and storage in sub-seabed geological structures is the acidification of the environment. In the present work, laboratory-scale experiments were performed to investigate the effects of seawater acidification (pH 7.0, 6.5, 6.0, and control) in native clams (Scrobicularia plana) over 21 days of exposure. For this purpose, a battery of biomarkers (GSI, EROD, GST, GPX, LPO, and DNA damage) were analysed in the digestive glands of individuals collected on days 7, 14 and 21. Seawater acidification significantly affected the average life span of S. plana, and both the biomarkers analysed and the multivariate analysis approach demonstrated that seawater acidification induced a strong oxidative stress response in the clam. Oxidative stress overwhelmed the capacity of S. plana to defend its cells against it, resulting in DNA damage. Furthermore, the decline in the population of S. plana in their natural habitat could lead to a reduction in available food resources for avifauna, ichthyofauna, and for the local economy because this clam is a commercial species in the south of Europe.

  14. Posterior assisted levitation (PAL) by using Akahoshi/Wahab irrigating pars plana levitator.

    PubMed

    Wahab, Shahid; Ahmed, Jamshed; Das Hargun, Lakhani

    2012-11-01

    To assess the outcome of irrigating Akahoshi/Wahab pars plana levitator for posterior assisted levitation in dropped nucleus during phacoemulsification. A case series. Ophthalmology Unit-III, Dow University of Health Sciences at Sindh Government Lyari General Hospital and Al-Noor Eye Hospital, Karachi, from January 2008 to December 2009. Cases of dropped nucleus during phacoemulsification were recruited. Predisposing factors and stage of phacoemulsification at which dropped nucleus were recognized. Levitator was inserted through pars plana after vitrectomy around nucleus and levitation was carried out. Follow-up was done till 6 months. Thirty two patients including 18 males (56.3%) and 14 females (43.8%) underwent pars plana levitation. Predisposing factors were pupillary miosis in 9 cases, Brunescent cataract in 7 cases, pseudoexfoliation in another 7 cases, hypermature cataract in 5 cases and extended capsulorrhexis in 4 cases. Posterior capsular rent occurred in 22 (68.8%) cases while zonular dehiscence / rupture were found in 10 cases (31.3%). Nuclei were dropped during quadrant aspiration in 10 cases (31.3%) and during chopping in 8 cases (25%). Another 5 cases (15.6%) occurred during each hydrodissection and chopping while 4 cases (12.5%) were found during sculpting of nuclei. Final best corrected visual acuity was 6/12 and better in 22 cases (68.8%) while in 10 cases (31.3%) it was 6/18 to 6/36. No complication related to pars plana levitator was observed. Posterior assisted levitation of dropped nucleus during phacoemulsification by irrigating Akahoshi/Wahab pars plana levitator is a fast and safe surgical technique.

  15. Fauna europaea: Diptera - brachycera.

    PubMed

    Pape, Thomas; Beuk, Paul; Pont, Adrian Charles; Shatalkin, Anatole I; Ozerov, Andrey L; Woźnica, Andrzej J; Merz, Bernhard; Bystrowski, Cezary; Raper, Chris; Bergström, Christer; Kehlmaier, Christian; Clements, David K; Greathead, David; Kameneva, Elena Petrovna; Nartshuk, Emilia; Petersen, Frederik T; Weber, Gisela; Bächli, Gerhard; Geller-Grimm, Fritz; Van de Weyer, Guy; Tschorsnig, Hans-Peter; de Jong, Herman; van Zuijlen, Jan-Willem; Vaňhara, Jaromír; Roháček, Jindřich; Ziegler, Joachim; Majer, József; Hůrka, Karel; Holston, Kevin; Rognes, Knut; Greve-Jensen, Lita; Munari, Lorenzo; de Meyer, Marc; Pollet, Marc; Speight, Martin C D; Ebejer, Martin John; Martinez, Michel; Carles-Tolrá, Miguel; Földvári, Mihály; Chvála, Milan; Barták, Miroslav; Evenhuis, Neal L; Chandler, Peter J; Cerretti, Pierfilippo; Meier, Rudolf; Rozkosny, Rudolf; Prescher, Sabine; Gaimari, Stephen D; Zatwarnicki, Tadeusz; Zeegers, Theo; Dikow, Torsten; Korneyev, Valery A; Richter, Vera Andreevna; Michelsen, Verner; Tanasijtshuk, Vitali N; Mathis, Wayne N; Hubenov, Zdravko; de Jong, Yde

    2015-01-01

    Fauna Europaea provides a public web-service with an index of scientific names (including important synonyms) of all extant multicellular European terrestrial and freshwater animals and their geographical distribution at the level of countries and major islands (east of the Urals and excluding the Caucasus region). The Fauna Europaea project comprises about 230,000 taxonomic names, including 130,000 accepted species and 14,000 accepted subspecies, which is much more than the originally projected number of 100,000 species. Fauna Europaea represents a huge effort by more than 400 contributing taxonomic specialists throughout Europe and is a unique (standard) reference suitable for many user communities in science, government, industry, nature conservation and education. The Diptera-Brachycera is one of the 58 Fauna Europaea major taxonomic groups, and data have been compiled by a network of 55 specialists. Within the two-winged insects (Diptera), the Brachycera constitute a monophyletic group, which is generally given rank of suborder. The Brachycera may be classified into the probably paraphyletic 'lower brachyceran grade' and the monophyletic Eremoneura. The latter contains the Empidoidea, the Apystomyioidea with a single Nearctic species, and the Cyclorrhapha, which in turn is divided into the paraphyletic 'aschizan grade' and the monophyletic Schizophora. The latter is traditionally divided into the paraphyletic 'acalyptrate grade' and the monophyletic Calyptratae. Our knowledge of the European fauna of Diptera-Brachycera varies tremendously among families, from the reasonably well known hoverflies (Syrphidae) to the extremely poorly known scuttle flies (Phoridae). There has been a steady growth in our knowledge of European Diptera for the last two centuries, with no apparent slow down, but there is a shift towards a larger fraction of the new species being found among the families of the nematoceran grade (lower Diptera), which due to a larger number of small

  16. Monitoring of trace metal contamination in the Souss Estuary (South Morocco) using the clams Cerastoderma edule and Scrobicularia plana.

    PubMed

    Anajjar, El Mehdi; Chiffoleau, Jean-François; Bergayou, Hafida; Moukrim, Abdelatif; Burgeot, Thierry; Cheggour, Mohamed

    2008-03-01

    Concentrations of seven metals (Cd, Cu, Cr, Pb, Ni, Zn, Hg) were monitored monthly during 2 years in two bivalves, Cerastoderma edule and Scrobicularia plana collected from the Souss Estuary (South Morocco) before and after the commissioning of a sewage treatment plant in November 2002. According to trace metals, changes in concentrations were observed mainly in S. plana, characterised by a decrease of Cu, Hg and Pb when Cd was clearly increasing. Conversely, no clear changes were observed in C. edule during the same periods. This study suggests the use of S. plana in the monitoring of trace metal contamination of such coastal marine environments.

  17. Immunosuppression in the infaunal bivalve Scrobicularia plana environmentally exposed to mercury and association with its accumulation.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Iqbal; Coelho, João P; Mohmood, Iram; Pacheco, Mário; Santos, Maria A; Duarte, Armando C; Pereira, Eduarda

    2011-03-01

    This study aimed to test the hypothesis whether mercury (Hg) activates or suppresses inappropriately the immunity of the bivalve Scrobicularia plana inhabiting a Hg contaminated area (Laranjo basin, Ria de Aveiro, Portugal). Immunity endpoints, as well as lipid peroxidation (LPO) as a sign of damage, were evaluated in parallel with total Hg burden. Bivalves from both moderately (MO) and highly (HI) contaminated sites displayed higher haemolymph Hg load and reduced plasma agglutination. Increased haemocytes density and decreased phagocytosis were observed at HI, whereas increased oxidative burst activity (OBA) was observed at MO, pointing out that the immunotoxicity is a result of Hg direct contact involving no ROS intervention. OBA observed at MO was concomitantly associated to peroxidative damage as depicted by LPO increase in haemocytes and haemolymph plasma. Thus, S. plana can be suggested as a suitable bioindicator of metal pollution in coastal areas on the basis of Hg bioaccumulation and immunotoxicity responses.

  18. Endophthalmitis following pars plana vitrectomy: a literature review of incidence, causative organisms, and treatment outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Vivek Pravin; Pathengay, Avinash; Schwartz, Stephen G; Flynn, Harry W

    2014-01-01

    Endophthalmitis following pars plana vitrectomy is a very uncommon cause of endophthalmitis. Cases reported over the last decade show a decrease in incidence over time. To optimize visual outcome, early diagnosis and treatment are essential. In this review we report a summary of the incidence of endophthalmitis following vitrectomy, various risk factors for their occurrence, the microbiological profile and the visual outcomes post treatment. PMID:25382968

  19. MICROBIOLOGIC SPECTRUM AND VISUAL OUTCOMES OF ACUTE-ONSET ENDOPHTHALMITIS UNDERGOING THERAPEUTIC PARS PLANA VITRECTOMY.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Jayanth; Yonekawa, Yoshihiro; Kuriyan, Ajay E; Joseph, Anthony; Thomas, Benjamin J; Liang, Michelle C; Rayess, Nadim; Relhan, Nidhi; Wolfe, Jeremy D; Shah, Chirag P; Witkin, Andre J; Flynn, Harry W; Garg, Sunir J

    2017-07-01

    To report the clinical presentation, microbiologic spectrum, and visual outcomes associated with acute-onset infectious endophthalmitis undergoing therapeutic pars plana vitrectomy. Multicenter interventional retrospective noncomparative consecutive case series. Billing records were reviewed to identify all charts for patients undergoing pars plana vitrectomy within 14 days of diagnosis of acute-onset infectious endophthalmitis over a 4-year period at 5 large tertiary referral retina practices. Statistical analysis was performed to assess for factors associated with visual outcomes. Seventy patients were identified. The most common clinical setting was postcataract surgery (n = 20). Only 3 patients (4.3%) presented with 20/400 or better visual acuity (VA). Although most of the patients initially underwent vitreous tap and intravitreal antibiotic injection (n = 47, 67.1%), all patients eventually underwent pars plana vitrectomy within 14 days of presentation with 68.5% (48/70) of patients undergoing pars plana vitrectomy within 48 hours of presentation. Positive intraocular cultures were obtained in 56 patients (80%). The most common identified organism was Streptococcus sp (n = 19). Visual acuity at last follow-up was 20/400 or better in 19 patients (27.1%). Three patients underwent evisceration or enucleation (4.3%). Last recorded postoperative VA (mean LogMAR 1.99 ± 0.94, Snellen VA equivalent finger count) improved from presenting VA (mean LogMAR 2.37 ± 0.38, Snellen VA hand motions) (P ≤ 0.001). There was no statistically significant correlation between the underlying etiology or the timing of surgery with this VA outcome. Although less than one-third of patients achieved 20/400 or better VA, this VA often improved significantly from presenting VA.

  20. Visual Outcomes and Prognostic Factors after Pars Plana Vitrectomy for Traumatic Endophthalmitis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; Jiang, Jing; Wang, Renping; Lei, Jianlin; Zhou, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate visual outcomes and identify prognostic factors after pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) surgery for traumatic endophthalmitis. Methods. Medical records of 121 consecutive patients (121 eyes) diagnosed with traumatic endophthalmitis that had undergone pars plana vitrectomy were retrospectively reviewed. Results. 121 patients, aged from 6 to 71 years, all underwent PPV surgery. 113 cases had improved best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) after surgery and 60% of them obtained BCVA better than fingers counting (FC). Good final visual prognosis was significantly associated with time between trauma and initial treatment less than 12 hrs (40% versus 98%; P < 0.001), time between trauma and PPV treatment less than 24 hrs (62% versus 98%; P < 0.001), laceration length less than 10 mm (63% versus 96%; P < 0.001), and presenting VA better than LP (42% versus 96%; P < 0.001), while gender, type of laceration, presence of IOFB or retinal detachment, and the use of silicone oil tamponade were not significant factors resulting in better BCVA. Bacteria were identified in 43.8% of specimens and most of the microorganisms were identified as nonvirulent ones. Conclusions. Pars plana vitrectomy surgery was preferred as a primary treatment option for traumatic endophthalmitis. A good final visual prognosis was significantly associated with timely treatment, prompt vitrectomy surgery, shorter length of laceration, and better presenting visual acuity.

  1. A hairy affair: tarantula setae-induced panuveitis requiring pars plana vitrectomy.

    PubMed

    Hom-Choudhury, Anindita; Koukkoulli, Antigoni; Norris, Jonathan H; Mokete, Bataung; Backhouse, Oliver C

    2012-04-01

    Cases of ocular inflammation following penetration by urticating hairs from caterpillars and tarantulas have been previously reported and although rare, the condition is increasingly being recognised as a cause of chronic panuveitis. The long-term outcomes and prognosis of this condition are not well known. This article describes a case of chronic panuveitis as a result of ocular penetration by tarantula setae, and its challenging management that ultimately required pars plana vitrectomy. Interventional case report: A 29-year-old male presented with chronic panuveitis secondary to tarantula-hair penetration. Initial management with mechanical removal of hairs from the cornea and intensive topical steroid therapy for 18 months did not adequately control his symptoms. Pars plana vitrectomy was carried out and at 6-month follow-up the patient was symptom-free without any pharmacological therapy. We propose early pars plana vitrectomy as a management option for treatment-resistant panuveitis in cases of ophthalmia nodosa secondary to setae-related injury.

  2. Pars plana vitrectomy for malignant glaucoma in nonglaucomatous and in filtered glaucomatous eyes

    PubMed Central

    Matlach, Juliane; Slobodda, Joerg; Grehn, Franz; Klink, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To assess the outcomes of pars plana vitrectomy for the treatment of malignant glaucoma in patients with and without previous filtration surgery. Patients and methods Data of 15 patients developing malignant glaucoma after trabeculectomy (60%) or following ophthalmic interventions other than filtration surgery (40%) were recorded retrospectively. Pars plana vitrectomy was performed in case of failed medical or laser treatment recreating the normal pathway of aqueous humor. The main outcome measures were the postoperative intraocular pressure (IOP), the frequency of complications, and success rate based on the following criteria: IOP reduction by ≥20% and to ≤21 mmHg (definition one) or an IOP < 18 mmHg (definition two) with (qualified success) and without (complete success) glaucoma medication. Results Vitrectomy reduced IOP from baseline in eyes with and without previous trabeculectomy during a median follow-up of 16.4 months (range 7 days to 58 months); although the majority of patients required glaucoma medication to reach desired IOP. The complete success rates were 11% (both definitions) for patients with filtering blebs and none of the patients without previous trabeculectomy had complete success at the 12-month visit. Complications were few and included transient shallowing of the anterior chamber, choroidal detachment, corneal decompensation, filtering bleb failure, and need for further IOP-lowering procedures. Conclusion Pars plana vitrectomy is equally effective for malignant glaucoma caused by trabeculectomy or interventions other than filtration surgery, although IOP-lowering medication is necessary in nearly all cases to maintain target IOP. PMID:23226000

  3. Visual Outcomes and Prognostic Factors after Pars Plana Vitrectomy for Traumatic Endophthalmitis

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate visual outcomes and identify prognostic factors after pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) surgery for traumatic endophthalmitis. Methods. Medical records of 121 consecutive patients (121 eyes) diagnosed with traumatic endophthalmitis that had undergone pars plana vitrectomy were retrospectively reviewed. Results. 121 patients, aged from 6 to 71 years, all underwent PPV surgery. 113 cases had improved best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) after surgery and 60% of them obtained BCVA better than fingers counting (FC). Good final visual prognosis was significantly associated with time between trauma and initial treatment less than 12 hrs (40% versus 98%; P < 0.001), time between trauma and PPV treatment less than 24 hrs (62% versus 98%; P < 0.001), laceration length less than 10 mm (63% versus 96%; P < 0.001), and presenting VA better than LP (42% versus 96%; P < 0.001), while gender, type of laceration, presence of IOFB or retinal detachment, and the use of silicone oil tamponade were not significant factors resulting in better BCVA. Bacteria were identified in 43.8% of specimens and most of the microorganisms were identified as nonvirulent ones. Conclusions. Pars plana vitrectomy surgery was preferred as a primary treatment option for traumatic endophthalmitis. A good final visual prognosis was significantly associated with timely treatment, prompt vitrectomy surgery, shorter length of laceration, and better presenting visual acuity. PMID:28246599

  4. Cadmium sulfide quantum dots induce oxidative stress and behavioral impairments in the marine clam Scrobicularia plana.

    PubMed

    Buffet, Pierre-Emmanuel; Zalouk-Vergnoux, Aurore; Poirier, Laurence; Lopes, Christelle; Risso-de-Faverney, Christine; Guibbolini, Marielle; Gilliland, Douglas; Perrein-Ettajani, Hanane; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Mouneyrac, Catherine

    2015-07-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) quantum dots have a number of current applications in electronics and solar cells and significant future potential in medicine. The aim of the present study was to examine the toxic effects of CdS quantum dots on the marine clam Scrobicularia plana exposed for 14 d to these nanomaterials (10 µg Cd L(-1) ) in natural seawater and to compare them with soluble Cd. Measurement of labile Cd released from CdS quantum dots showed that 52% of CdS quantum dots remained in the nanoparticulate form. Clams accumulated the same levels of Cd regardless of the form in which it was delivered (soluble Cd vs CdS quantum dots). However, significant changes in biochemical responses were observed in clams exposed to CdS quantum dots compared with soluble Cd. Increased activities of catalase and glutathione-S-transferase were significantly higher in clams exposed in seawater to Cd as the nanoparticulate versus the soluble form, suggesting a specific nano effect. The behavior of S. plana in sediment showed impairments of foot movements only in the case of exposure to CdS quantum dots. The results show that oxidative stress and behavior biomarkers are sensitive predictors of CdS quantum dots toxicity in S. plana. Such responses, appearing well before changes might occur at the population level, demonstrate the usefulness of this model species and type of biomarker in the assessment of nanoparticle contamination in estuarine ecosystems. © 2015 SETAC.

  5. Cellular Biochemical Changes in Selaginella tamariscina (Beauv.) Spring and Sellaginella plana (Desv. ex Poir.) Heiron. as Induced by Desiccation

    PubMed Central

    Agduma, Angelo Rellama; Sese, Maribel Dionisio

    2016-01-01

    The biochemical changes in two Selaginella species namely, S. tamariscina (Beauv.) Spring and S. plana (Desv. ex Poir.) Heiron., as induced by desiccation and subsequent rehydration were explored. Plants were allowed to dehydrate naturally by withholding irrigation until shoot’s relative water content (RWC) reached <10%. After which, dehydrated plants were watered until fully rehydrated states were obtained which was about 90% RWC or more. Desiccation-tolerance characteristics were observed in S. tamariscina while desiccation-sensitivity features were seen in S. plana. Membrane integrity was maintained in S. tamariscina but not in S. plana as evidenced in the relative electrolyte leakage measurements during desiccation phase and the subsequent rehydration stage. Pigment analyses revealed conservation of some chlorophylls and carotenoids during desiccation and reaching control levels following rehydration in S. tamariscina. Very low pigment contents were found in S. plana during desiccation phase and the pigments were not recovered during rehydration attempt. Meanwhile, compatible solute determination showed rise in total sugar and proline contents of desiccated S. tamariscina only, indicating presence of biochemical protection machineries in this species and absence of such in S. plana during dehydrating conditions. These data indicate that one key element for desiccation-tolerance in lower vascular plants is the ability to protect tissues from severe damages caused by intense desiccation. PMID:27688850

  6. [Evaluation of results of combined pars plana vitrectomy and cataract removal].

    PubMed

    Wilczyński, Michał; Pikulski, Zbigniew; Dziegielewski, Krzysztof; Omulecki, Wojciech

    2005-01-01

    Cataract often coexists with pathologies of the vitreous body. Moreover, after several months after vitrectomy, the lens becomes opaque. Lens opacities interfere with appropriate visualisation of the vitreous chamber and the eye fundus, which makes performing vitreoretinal procedures difficult. For this reason, in such patients, a combined procedure of pars plana vitrectomy and cataract extraction can be considered. This is retrospective analysis of the indications and results of combined cataract extraction and pars plana vitrectomy. The data were based on case histories of patients who underwent combined cataract extraction and pars plana vitrectomy in the years 2001 - 2003, in the Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University of Lódź. The evaluated data included: diagnosis, pre- and postoperative best corrected visual acuity, intraocular pressure, pre- and postoperative state of the anterior and posterior segment of the eye and the employed surgical techniques. The examined group consisted of 40 patients (40 eyes), including 20 men and 20 women, at the age from 13 to 76 years old (mean 55.7, SD+/-14.6). The indications to vitrectomy were: vitreous haemorrhage, retinal detachment, vitreoretinal proliferations, intraocular foreign body, persistent hyaloid artery and endophthalmitis. Phacoemulsification was the most often used method of cataract extraction (34 people, 85%). In three patients cataract was removed by classical extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE), and in further 3 patients bimanual aspiration was used. In terms of anatomical results, therapeutic success was achieved in 35 cases (87,5%). Improvement of visual acuity was observed in 28 people (70%), unchanged visual acuity in 10 people (25%), and a decrease in visual acuity in 2 patients (5%). Improvement of visual acuity at least 2 lines on Snellen's chart was achieved in 20 patients (50%).

  7. A prospective study on postoperative discomfort after 20-gauge pars plana vitrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ji-guo; Ni, Fang; Xiang, Yi; Feng, Yi-fan; Wang, Jue; Fu, Xun-an

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate postoperative pain and other irritation symptoms after 20-gauge (20G) pars plana vitrectomy. Materials and methods A total of 110 consecutive patients were enrolled in our studies, and 87 patients who underwent the conventional 20G pars plana vitrectomy were included in the final analysis. All vitrectomies were performed using the same surgical technique by the same surgeon. Patients were examined before surgery and 1 day, 3 days, 7 days, 1 month, and 2 months postoperatively. The main outcome measures include patient age and sex, intraocular pressure (IOP), ocular pain, pain score, pain medication use, and other irritation symptoms comprising itching, foreign body sensation, burning, photophobia, and dryness. The pain was evaluated using the Numerical Rating Scale scored from 0 to 10. Results Postoperative pain was relatively common during the first day after surgery, as it was reported by 43 (49.4%) patients. Then, the prevalence gradually decreased to eleven (12.6%) patients at 2 months. Most patients reported mild or moderate pain, with a pain score of 1–5, but only four patients were given analgesics for ocular pain. A postoperative rise of IOP was noted in 25 patients at day 1. Most of these patients with high IOP reported moderate pain. Other ocular irritation symptoms were varied after surgery. There was still one-quarter of patients that had foreign body sensation and dryness symptoms at month 2 after surgery. Conclusion Mild and moderate ocular pain were relatively common after 20G vitrectomy, which is more often associated with elevated IOP. Other irritation symptoms were also presented after surgery and could affect the life quality of patients. Therefore, the discomforts after 20G pars plana vitrectomy should be of concern, and timely management should be provided as part of routine postoperative care. PMID:26244010

  8. Small-gauge pars plana vitrectomy: a report by the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

    PubMed

    Recchia, Franco M; Scott, Ingrid U; Brown, Gary C; Brown, Melissa M; Ho, Allen C; Ip, Michael S

    2010-09-01

    To review available peer-reviewed publications to evaluate the safety profile and visual outcomes associated with small-gauge pars plana vitrectomy. Literature searches of the PubMed and the Cochrane Library databases were last conducted on August 5, 2009, with no date restrictions. The searches were limited to articles published in English. These searches retrieved 328 articles, of which 76 were deemed topically relevant and rated according to strength of evidence. On the basis of level II and level III evidence, the overall safety profile of small-gauge pars plana vitrectomy is similar to that established for conventional 20-gauge pars plana vitrectomy and provides comparable visual acuity results. An increased incidence of infectious endophthalmitis after 25-gauge vitrectomy was reported in 2 comparative studies, but this was not found in multiple, larger, more recent studies, perhaps due to modifications in case selection and surgical technique over time. Compared with 20-gauge vitrectomy, small-gauge vitrectomy is associated with significantly lower levels of patient discomfort and ocular inflammation, and the time required for improvement in visual acuity is shorter. The technological advances of small-gauge vitrectomy seem to afford visual benefit comparable with that seen with traditional 20-gauge surgery, with more rapid healing, less discomfort, and an acceptably low incidence of adverse events comparable with those observed with conventional 20-gauge vitrectomy. As surgical techniques evolve and clinical experience grows, continued close surveillance is necessary for an accurate assessment of complications. Copyright © 2010 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Pars plana vitrectomy in treatment of ocular toxocariasis complications--case report].

    PubMed

    Oficjalska-Młyńczak, J; Duda, A; Muzyka-Woźniak, M; Zajac-Pytrus, H; Marek, J

    2001-01-01

    Ocular toxocariasis in adults may cause serious diagnostic and therapeutic problems. We describe a case of a 54-year-old farmer who developed peripheral granuloma with dense connective tissue strands joined to the disc. The diagnosis was confirmed by high ELISA titers in the serum and vitreous body. We performed pars plana vitrectomy with epiretinal membrane removal and laser photocoagulation of the inferior retina, obtaining improvement of visual acuity. After a few weeks the patient returned with central retinal detachment and macular hole. After the second vitrectomy with use of silicon oil we obtained reattachment of the retina but without functional improvement.

  10. Spatial distribution patterns of the peppery furrow shell Scrobicularia plana (da Costa, 1778) along the European coast: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Sílvia; Luttikhuizen, Pieternella C.; Campos, Joana; Heip, Carlo H. R.; van der Veer, Henk W.

    2011-10-01

    The bivalve Scrobicularia plana is an important species of shallow water benthic communities with a wide geographic distribution but also with a general patchy pattern, i.e. irregular in occurrence and in density. This review aims to determine the processes responsible for the species' spatial distribution pattern based on the available information on S. plana. Although several pre- and post-settlement processes are believed to influence spatial patterns of marine invertebrates, the general patchy distribution of S. plana seems to be determined by the existence of specific environmental conditions during settlement. Factors such as temperature, salinity, sediment type, hydrographic conditions and predation affect settlement and spat survival and not one but a combination of factors seems to explain the species distribution pattern. Future work should focus on determining the scale of patchiness, using hierarchical sampling, as well as the connectivity between populations by analysing the population genetic structure.

  11. Enhancing Descemet Membrane Endothelial Keratoplasty in Postvitrectomy Eyes With the Use of Pars Plana Infusion.

    PubMed

    Sorkin, Nir; Einan-Lifshitz, Adi; Ashkenazy, Zach; Boutin, Tanguy; Showail, Mahmood; Borovik, Armand; Alobthani, Murad; Chan, Clara C; Rootman, David S

    2017-03-01

    To present a modified surgical technique to perform Descemet membrane endothelial keratoplasty (DMEK) in previously vitrectomized eyes and to analyze its safety and efficacy. A retrospective analysis of previously vitrectomized eyes that underwent DMEK at Toronto Western Hospital was performed. The modified DMEK technique that was used included placement of a posterior pars plana infusion to reduce fluctuations in the anterior chamber depth and its excessive deepening. Twelve eyes of 12 patients (5 females and 7 males) aged 65.3 ± 21.5 years were included. Mean best-corrected visual acuity improved significantly from 1.72 ± 0.62 logMAR (mean Snellen ∼20/1040) preoperatively to 1.01 ± 0.64 logMAR (mean Snellen ∼20/200) at 6 months postoperatively (P = 0.017). Mean donor endothelial cell density was 2658 ± 229 cells/mm preoperatively and 1732 ± 454 cells/mm at 6 months after the procedure (mean percentage cell loss of 31.8%) (P = 0.046). There were no significant intraoperative complications, and no graft failures. One eye had graft detachment, which resolved after 2 rebubbling procedures. One eye had retinal detachment, which was corrected surgically. The use of posterior pars plana infusion in previously vitrectomized eyes stabilizes the anterior segment during DMEK, allowing for performance of DMEK surgery, and can potentially reduce intraoperative and postoperative complications.

  12. Surgical management of equine recurrent uveitis with single port pars plana vitrectomy.

    PubMed

    Frühauf, B.; Ohnesorge, B.; Deegen, E.; Boevé, M.

    1998-01-01

    Current information suggests that equine recurrent uveitis (ERU) is an immune-mediated reaction to infectious agents or to autologous ophthalmic tissue. Recurrences are associated with progression of irreversible ocular damage. This report describes the intraoperative technique, complications, and long-term results of 38 eyes in 35 horses with ERU that underwent pars plana vitrectomy. The majority of the horses were warm-blooded. Recurrence of ERU was prevented in 35 of the 38 eyes. Some horses, especially in patients with incipient cataracts, developed vision loss in postoperative, quiescent eyes which was usually associated with cataract formation. Vision was stable in 85% of all eyes that underwent vitrectomy. Pars plana vitrectomy in horses appears successful in interrupting the cycle of repeated episodes of ERU, and the subsequent globe destruction in the majority of eyes. Removal of uveitis-induced 'immunologic memory' in the vitreous by vitrectomy may reduce adverse interaction between the vitreous and the uveal tract, and therefore reduce the recurrence of ERU.

  13. Combined pars plana and limbal approach for removal of congenital cataracts.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Luo, Yi; Zhou, Xingtao; Jiang, Lin; Zhou, Peng; Lu, Yi

    2012-12-01

    We describe a combined pars plana-limbal approach using a 25-gauge transconjunctival sutureless vitrectomy system for removal of congenital cataracts in a 5-month-old boy. The operated eye had anterior capsulotomy, lensectomy, posterior capsulotomy, and anterior vitrectomy through a pars plana transconjunctival incision created with a 25-gauge trocar. A limbal port incision was used to introduce an infusion micro cannula to maintain the anterior chamber. Incisions did not require suture closure. Following the procedure, inflammation was mild, the pupil was circular and centric, and the intraocular pressure (IOP) was stable. The eyes were left aphakic, and vision was corrected with spectacles. Amblyopia treatment ensued. This surgical technique appears to be safe and effective for the removal of congenital cataracts. Advantages include a more precise capsulotomy and more sufficient lensectomy and anterior vitrectomy, stable intraoperative IOP, and reduced surgical trauma and inflammation. No author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2012 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Late-Onset Inadvertent Bleb Formation following Pars Plana M3 Molteno Implant Tube Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Abdul-Rahman, Anmar M.; Molteno, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To report a case of inadvertent bleb formation presenting 18 months after pars plana M3 Molteno implant tube obstruction in a patient with mixed mechanism glaucoma. Materials and Methods An 84-year-old Caucasian male with mixed mechanism glaucoma underwent slit-lamp examination, gonioscopy, colour anterior segment photography and anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT). Results An inadvertent bleb developed 18 months after pars plana implant tube re-positioning with a 6/0 Vicryl tie ligature. The bleb was located in the area anterior to the implant plate; it was characterised by a thin, transparent, avascular and multi-cystic wall, with a visible stoma at the posterior edge of the bleb. The bleb was functioning as demonstrated by an intraocular pressure of 6 mm Hg at presentation and a punctate fluorescein uptake pattern of the bleb wall. The bleb over the plate of the Molteno implant was non-functioning, likely secondary to tube obstruction by vitreous in the early postoperative period. AS-OCT showed a tract from the anterior chamber commencing at an entry wound through a corneal tunnel to the posterior stoma at the base of the inadvertent bleb. Conclusions We hypothesise that the pathophysiologic factors resulting in an inadvertent bleb are a result of a combination of apoptosis, late-onset wound dehiscence and internal gaping of a centrally placed corneal wound. In addition, aqueous hydrodynamic factors may play a role. PMID:28203200

  15. Geometry and Kinematics of Wrinkle Ridges on Lunae and Solis Plana, Mars: Implications for Fault/Fold Growth History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tate, A.; Mueller, K. J.; Golombek, M. P.

    2002-01-01

    The three dimensional geometry of wrinkle ridges on Lunae and Solis Plana suggest they form by rapid lateral propagation and linkage of fault-propagation fold segments above reactivated blind thrust faults. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  16. Intraoperative B-scan ultrasonography and pars plana vitrectomy for severe open globe injury with hemorrhagic retinal and choroidal detachment.

    PubMed

    Shiraki, Nobuhiko; Wakabayashi, Taku; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Sakaguchi, Hirokazu; Nishida, Kohji

    2017-08-30

    Our purpose was to report the initial clinical experience of intraoperative B-scan ultrasonography in combination with 25-gauge pars plana vitrectomy for severe open globe injury with hemorrhagic retinal and choroidal detachment. Six eyes of six consecutive patients with severe open globe injury underwent intraoperative B-scan ultrasonography and 25-gauge pars plana vitrectomy at Osaka University Hospital in Japan. The feasibility of intraoperative B-scan ultrasonography, best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), retinal reattachment, and intraoperative and postoperative complications were evaluated. Five patients presented with a ruptured globe and one patient with double penetration. Preoperative best-corrected visual acuity was no light perception in four eyes and light perception in two eyes. All patients underwent intraoperative B-scan ultrasonography and 25-gauge pars plana vitrectomy within 12 h after open globe injury. Intraoperative B-scan ultrasonography was feasible in all cases and was useful for diagnosing choroidal hemorrhage (four eyes), massive subretinal hemorrhage (two eyes), and retinal detachment (five eyes). In addition, serial real-time B-scan imaging facilitated successful evacuation of the choroidal hemorrhage and massive subretinal hemorrhage by external drainage, resulting in opening of the vitreous space to allow subsequent pars plana vitrectomy without entry site-related complications. After surgery, all patients had successful retinal attachment, and there was no loss of light perception. Intraoperative B-scan ultrasonography is technically feasible and may potentially improve the safety and efficacy of severe open globe injury repair.

  17. Morphology of Wrinkle Ridges on Lunae and Solis Plana, Mars from MOLA Topography: Implications for Their Kinematic Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tate, A.; Golombek, M. P.; Mueller, K. J.

    2001-01-01

    Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) topography is used to define the detailed morphology and kinematic development of martian wrinkle ridges on Lunae and Solis Plana. Changes in ridge morphology suggest they form as fault-propagation folds, often with significant backthrusts. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  18. Measurements of the genotoxic potential of (xeno-)oestrogens in the bivalve mollusc Scrobicularia plana, using the Comet assay.

    PubMed

    Petridis, Panos; Jha, Awadhesh N; Langston, William J

    2009-08-13

    There is increasing concern about the fate and effects of (geno)toxic and endocrine disrupting chemicals in sediments, highlighting the need to develop suitable monitoring tools. The deposit-feeding bivalve mollusc Scrobicularia plana has been put forward as a promising bioindicator of sediment contamination in estuaries. The recent demonstration of intersex in S. plana populations has been attributed to the feminisation of male clams following exposure to (xeno-)oestrogens, yet the mode of action of these endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) remains largely unclear. One hypothesis that warrants further investigation is the possible involvement of genotoxicity. The first objective of this study was to assess whether the blood cells of S. plana are suitable for genotoxicity screening, using the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet) assay. This was demonstrated successfully by exposing blood cells under in vitro conditions to a range of concentrations of the reference genotoxin hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)): strong correlations between H(2)O(2) concentration and various comet parameters were found. Subsequently, the Comet assay was used to test whether the natural oestrogen 17beta-oestradiol (E2) and the synthetic (xeno)oestrogens ethinyloestradiol (EE2) and nonylphenol (NP) can produce genotoxic effects in S. plana, which might indicate possible involvement of mutagenicity in the mode of action of intersex development. In these short-term tests, clear genotoxic effects (significantly more DNA in the comet tail) were demonstrated by all EDCs, albeit only at high doses: 100 ng/L E2, 1 microg/L EE2 and 100 microg/L NP in vitro; and 1 microg/L E2 and 1mg/L NP after a 6-day in vivo exposure. Nevertheless, this study provides valuable preliminary data on the application and sensitivity of S. plana blood cells and suggests that the Comet assay is a useful tool, to screen for genotoxicity in in faunal clams and to examine further the links with higher order

  19. Comparison of phacoemulsification and planned extracapsular cataract extraction in combined pars plana vitrectomy and posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Sheng-Yao; Wu, Wen-Chung

    2005-01-01

    To compare two kinds of cataract removal methods combined with pars plana vitrectomy and posterior chamber intraocular lens (PC-IOL) implantation. Cataract removal was performed by either phacoemulsification or extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE) and followed by pars plana vitrectomy and PC-IOL implantation. Between May 1996 and June 2001, 31 and 22 patients with cataract and vitreoretinal disease were treated by phacoemulsification and ECCE, respectively, combined with pars plana vitrectomy and PC-IOL implantation. Preoperative demographic data and postoperative vision, astigmatism change, and complications were analyzed. The mean age of patients in the phacoemulsification and ECCE groups was 62.5 and 63.4 years, respectively. Diabetes mellitus was the most common underlying disease resulting in vitreous opacity. Vision improved in 87.1% of the phacoemulsification group and 59.1% of the ECCE group. The change in astigmatism after surgery was 0.92+/-1.08 D (P = .001) in the ECCE group and 0.25+/-0.74 D (P = .087) in the phacoemulsification group. There were fewer postoperative complications, including recurrent vitreous hemorrhage, increased intraocular pressure, and iris changes in the phacoemulsification group than in the ECCE group. Phacoemulsification and ECCE combined with pars plana vitrectomy and PC-IOL implantation are both effective surgical methods to achieve better and more rapid visual rehabilitation for patients with combined cataract and vitreoretinal disease. In this study, phacoemulsification combined with pars plana vitrectomy and PC-IOL implantation resulted in greater improvement in vision, less astigmatism change, and fewer postoperative complications.

  20. Nd:YAG laser vitreolysis versus pars plana vitrectomy for vitreous floaters.

    PubMed

    Kokavec, Jan; Wu, Zhichao; Sherwin, Justin C; Ang, Alan Js; Ang, Ghee Soon

    2017-06-01

    The vitreous is the clear jelly of the eye and contains fine strands of proteins. Throughout life the composition of this vitreous changes, which causes the protein strands in it to bundle together and scatter light before it reaches the retina. Individuals perceive the shadows cast by these protein bundles as 'floaters'. Some people are so bothered by floaters that treatment is required to control their symptoms. Two major interventions for floaters include Nd:YAG laser vitreolysis and vitrectomy. Nd:YAG laser vitreolysis involves using laser energy to fragment the vitreous opacities via a non-invasive approach. Vitrectomy involves the surgical replacement of the patient's vitreous (including the symptomatic vitreous floaters) with an inert and translucent balanced salt solution, through small openings in the pars plana. To compare the effectiveness and safety of Nd:YAG laser vitreolysis to pars plana vitrectomy for symptomatic vitreous floaters. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Trials Register) (2016, Issue 12), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 17 January 2017), Embase Ovid (1947 to 17 January 2017), LILACS (Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database) (1982 to 17 January 2017), the ISRCTN registry (www.isrctn.com/editAdvancedSearch); searched 17 January 2017, ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov); searched 17 January 2017 and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en); searched 17 January 2017. We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We also searched conference proceedings to identify additional studies. We included only randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared Nd:YAG laser vitreolysis to pars plana vitrectomy for treatment of symptomatic floaters. We planned to use methods recommended by Cochrane. The primary outcome we planned

  1. Combined proteomic and metallomic analyses in Scrobicularia plana clams to assess environmental pollution of estuarine ecosystems.

    PubMed

    González-Domínguez, Raúl; Santos, Hugo Miguel; Bebianno, Maria João; García-Barrera, Tamara; Gómez-Ariza, José Luis; Capelo, José Luis

    2016-12-15

    Estuaries are very important ecosystems with great ecological and economic value, but usually highly impacted by anthropogenic pressure. Thus, the assessment of pollution levels in these habitats is critical in order to evaluate their environmental quality. In this work, we combined complementary metallomic and proteomic approaches with the aim to monitor the effects of environmental pollution on Scrobicularia plana clams captured in three estuarine systems from the south coast of Portugal; Arade estuary, Ria Formosa and Guadiana estuary. Multi-elemental profiling of digestive glands was carried out to evaluate the differential pollution levels in the three study areas. Then, proteomic analysis by means of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry revealed twenty-one differential proteins, which could be associated with multiple toxicological mechanisms induced in environmentally stressed organisms. Accordingly, it could be concluded that the combination of different omic approaches presents a great potential in environmental research.

  2. Traumatic Ghost Cell Glaucoma with Successful Resolution of Corneal Blood Staining Following Pars Plana Vitrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Alamri, Amal; Alkatan, Hind; Aljadaan, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Ghost cell glaucoma (GCG) was first described in 1976. It is a type of a secondary open angle glaucoma, which occurs following long-standing vitreous hemorrhage. The ghost cells are rigid and less pliable than fresh red blood cells; therefore, they may cause direct obstruction of the trabecular meshwork and secondary increase in the intraocular pressure (IOP). This case report presents the diagnosis and management of a rare case of traumatic GCG after vitreous hemorrhage in a phakic child. Pars plana vitrectomy was done after unsuccessful medical therapy and the diagnosis was confirmed by cytopathology. Surprisingly, spontaneous resolution of the corneal blood staining occurred. The outcome in this case was favorable with controlled IOP in the affected eye. PMID:27555716

  3. Physiological status and intersex in the endobenthic bivalve Scrobicularia plana from thirteen estuaries in northwest France.

    PubMed

    Tankoua, O Fossi; Amiard-Triquet, C; Denis, F; Minier, C; Mouneyrac, C; Berthet, B

    2012-08-01

    The bivalve Scrobicularia plana, an important species for the structure and functioning of estuarine and coastal mudflats, was studied in thirteen sites from NW France differing by their degree of contamination to document the presence of reproduction impairments (intersex, sex ratio, gonadosomatic indices) in relation to the condition revealed by using hepatosomatic and condition indices. In agreement with recent studies in other European estuaries, intersex was revealed in all the studied estuaries, including sites the chemical and ecological status of which is considered "good" according to the criteria of the European Water Framework Directive. The presence of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) could result in such disturbances. Our results re-inforce the concern linked to the subtle effects of EDCs, which are active at very low doses, often in the absence of any major sign of toxicity. However at this stage, no clear link may be established between intersex and population effects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Intraocular humidity immediately after fluid-air exchange in pars plana vitrectomy.

    PubMed

    Eter, Nicole; Brinken, Ralf; Garbe, Stephan; Spitznas, Manfred

    2006-03-01

    To study vitreous cavity humidity during fluid-air exchange in pars plana vitrectomy. Intraocular humidity in the vitreous cavity was recorded for 2 min in six artificial eyes, six enucleated pig eyes, and ten patient eyes, after the eyes had been filled with either humidified air (75% humidity) or dry air (8% humidity). In artificial eyes the humidity levelled off at a value that was approximately equal to the humidity of the infused air, i.e., a mean of 71.9% when humidified air was used and a mean of 14.4% when dry air was used. In enucleated pig eyes humidity increased slightly with humidified air and remained stable with dry air. In patients intraocular humidity increased to over 90%, regardless of whether humidified or dry air was used. In the living eye, dry air deprives the retinal tissue of humidity, which is lost into the vitreous cavity. This effect can be reduced by using humidified air.

  5. Nearctic Diptera: Twenty years later

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An overview of our knowledge of the Diptera of Nearctic America is presented. About two-thirds of all the flies estimated to occur in Nearctic America have been named and documented. Unfortunately, less than one percent of these flies are treated comprehensively in monographs and less than a quart...

  6. Pars Plana Vitrectomy with Internal Limiting Membrane Peeling for Nontractional Diabetic Macular Edema.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Jan Niklas

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus remains the leading cause of blindness among working age Americans with diabetic macular edema being the most common cause for moderate and severe vision loss. To investigate the anatomical and visual benefits of pars plana vitrectomy with inner limiting membrane peeling in patients with nontractional diabetic macular edema as well as correlation of integrity of outer retinal layers on spectral domain optical coherence tomography to visual outcomes. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 42 diabetic patients that underwent vitrectomy with internal limiting membrane peeling for nontractional diabetic macula edema. The integrity of outer retinal layers was evaluated and preoperative central macular thickness and visual acuity were compared with data at 1 month, 3 months and 6 months postoperatively. The student t-test was used to compare the groups. 31 eyes were included. While no differences were seen at 1 and 3 months, there was significant improvement of both central macular thickness and visual acuity at the 6 months follow up visit compared to preoperatively (357, 427 microns; p=0.03. 20/49, 20/82; p=0.03) . Patients with intact external limiting membrane and ellipsoid zone had better preoperative vision than patients with outer retinal layer irregularities (20/54, 20/100; p=0.03) and greater visual gains postoperatively (20/33, p<0.001 versus 20/81; p=non-significant). Pars plana vitrectomy with internal limiting membrane peeling can improve retinal anatomy and visual acuity in patients with nontractional diabetic macular edema. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography may help identify patients with potential for visual improvement.

  7. Nomenclatural Studies Toward a World List of Diptera Genus-Group Names. Part V: Pierre-Justin-Marie Macquart.

    PubMed

    Evenhuis, Neal L; Pape, Thomas; Pont, Adrian C

    2016-09-30

    The Diptera genus-group names of Pierre-Justin-Marie Macquart are reviewed and annotated. A total of 399 available genus-group names in 69 families of Diptera are listed alphabetically, for each name giving author, year and page of original publication, originally included species, type species and method of fixation, current status of the name, family placement, and a list of any emendations of it that have been found in the literature. Remarks are given to clarify nomenclatural or taxonomic information. In addition, an index to all the species-group names of Diptera proposed by Macquart (3,611, of which 3,543 are available) is given with bibliographic reference (year and page) to each original citation.        The following type species are designated herein: Agculocera nigra Macquart, 1855 for Onuxicera Macquart, 1855, present designation [Tachinidae]; Trixa imhoffi Macquart, 1834, for Semiomyia Macquart, 1848, present designation [Tachinidae].        The following type species are designated herein with fixation under ICZN Code Art. 70.3.2: Azelia nebulosa Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830 for Atomogaster Macquart, 1835, present designation [Muscidae]; Tachydromia vocatoria Fallén, 1816 for Chelipoda Macquart, 1835, present designation [Empididae]; Eriocera macquarti Enderlein, 1912 for Eriocera Macquart, 1838, present designation [Limoniidae]; Limosina acutangula Zetterstedt, 1847 for Heteroptera Macquart, 1835, present designation [Sphaeroceridae]; Phryxe pavoniae Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830 for Masicera Macquart, 1834, present designation [Tachinidae]; Pachymyia macquartii Townsend, 1916 for Pachymyia Macquart, 1844, present designation [Tachinidae].        Earlier valid subsequent type-species designations have been found in this study for the following: Anisophysa Macquart, 1835 [Sepsidae]; Diphysa Macquart, 1838 [Stratiomyidae]; Pachyrhina Macquart, 1834 [Tipulidae]; Silbomyia Macquart, 1844 [Calliphoridae].        One name is raised from

  8. Are the shells of Scrobicularia plana useful for monitoring trace metal pollution events?

    PubMed

    Pérez-Mayol, Sílvia; Blasco, Julián; Tornero, Victoria; Morales-Nin, Beatriz; Massanet, Ana; Tovar-Sánchez, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The rupture of a mine dam in Aznalcóllar (SW Spain) in April 1998 entailed the contamination of Guadalquivir River and its estuary. To study the ability of bivalve shells to monitor the temporal changes on metal composition in the area, two year old Scrobicularia plana were obtained from two different locations of the estuary (Pantalan highly influenced and Pantoca less influenced) during the year 2000 and 2007. Co, Hg, Mo, Ni and Zn content was measured in shell and soft tissue of S. plana. Metal composition in shells sampled by micromilling and corresponding to the years 1999, 2000, 2006 and 2007 was higher in Pantalan (Co: 5.88 +/- 2.7 microg g(-1); Hg: 0.04 +/- 0.03 microg g(-1); Mo: 0.41 +/- 7.90 microg g(-1); Ni: 37.66 +/- 25.56 microg g(-1) and Zn: 9.19 +/- 8.88 microg g(-1)) than in Pantoca (Co: 3.64 +/- 0.50 microg g(-1); Hg: 0.02 +/- 0.02 microg g(-1); Mo: 4.70 +/- 1.20 microg g(-1); Ni: 7.21 +/- 13.60 microg g(-1) and Zn: 3.90 +/- 1.89 microg g(-1)). A marked temporal decrease was observed for all metals in Pantalan station with concentrations of Co, Hg, Mo, Ni and Zn varying respectively from 7.35 +/- 3.02, 0.05 +/- 0.03, 19.90 +/- 2.40, 70.58 +/- 21.94 and 18.04 +/- 0.98 microg g(-1), in 1999 to 3.07 +/- 1.08, 0.009 +/- 0.001, 2.40 +/- 1.43, 10.11 +/- 3.80 and 1.11 +/- 0.33 microg g(-1) in 2007, indicating that the effect of the mine accident had diminished significantly. Metal content in soft tissues did not follow the same decreasing trend indicating that soft tissues present a different capacity to accumulate metals from the environment. Our results confirm that micromilling shells are a suitable tool to assess bioaccumulation ofcontaminants during the entire life-span of bivalves.

  9. Efficacy of Insecticide and Bioinsecticide Ground Sprays to Control Metisa plana Walker (Lepidoptera: Psychidae) in Oil Palm Plantations, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Salim, Hasber; Rawi, Che Salmah Md; Ahmad, Abu Hassan; Al-Shami, Salman Abdo

    2015-12-01

    The effectiveness of the synthetic insecticides trichlorfon, lambda-cyhalothrin, cypermethrin emulsion concentrated (EC) and cypermethrin emulsion water based (EW) and a bio-insecticide, Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki (Btk), was evaluated at 3, 7, 14 and 30 days after treatment (DAT) for the control of Metisa plana larvae in an oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) plantation in Malaysia. Although all synthetic insecticides effectively reduced the larval population of M. plana, trichlorfon, lambda-cyhalothrin and cypermethrin EC were the fastest-acting. The larval population dropped below the economic threshold level (ETL) 30 days after a single application of the synthetic insecticides. Application of Btk, however, gave poor results, with the larval population remaining above the ETL post treatment. In terms of operational productivity, ground spraying using power spray equipment was time-consuming and resulted in poor coverage. Power spraying may not be appropriate for controlling M. plana infestations in large fields. Using a power sprayer, one man could cover 2-3 ha per day. Hence, power spraying is recommended during outbreaks of infestation in areas smaller than 50 ha.

  10. Efficacy of Insecticide and Bioinsecticide Ground Sprays to Control Metisa plana Walker (Lepidoptera: Psychidae) in Oil Palm Plantations, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Salim, Hasber; Rawi, Che Salmah Md.; Ahmad, Abu Hassan; Al-Shami, Salman Abdo

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of the synthetic insecticides trichlorfon, lambda-cyhalothrin, cypermethrin emulsion concentrated (EC) and cypermethrin emulsion water based (EW) and a bio-insecticide, Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki (Btk), was evaluated at 3, 7, 14 and 30 days after treatment (DAT) for the control of Metisa plana larvae in an oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) plantation in Malaysia. Although all synthetic insecticides effectively reduced the larval population of M. plana, trichlorfon, lambda-cyhalothrin and cypermethrin EC were the fastest-acting. The larval population dropped below the economic threshold level (ETL) 30 days after a single application of the synthetic insecticides. Application of Btk, however, gave poor results, with the larval population remaining above the ETL post treatment. In terms of operational productivity, ground spraying using power spray equipment was time-consuming and resulted in poor coverage. Power spraying may not be appropriate for controlling M. plana infestations in large fields. Using a power sprayer, one man could cover 2–3 ha per day. Hence, power spraying is recommended during outbreaks of infestation in areas smaller than 50 ha. PMID:26868711

  11. Role of pars plana vitrectomy and membrane peel in vitreomacular traction associated with retinal vasoproliferative tumors

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Navarro, Verónica; Saktanasate, Jarin; Say, Emil Anthony T.; Chiang, Allen; Shields, Carol Lally

    2016-01-01

    To report a case of retinal vasoproliferative tumor (VPT) with secondary epiretinal membrane (ERM) formation and vitreo-macular traction managed by pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) and membrane peel. A 29-year-old male was referred for management of decreased vision in the right eye (OD) for 1 week. Presenting visual acuity was 20/50 Snellen feet (ft) OD, and fundus examination showed an ERM associated with a reddish-yellow mass in the inferotemporal quadrant with overlying exudation, hemorrhage, and subretinal fluid consistent with VPT, and cryotherapy was recommended. Two months later, there was complete tumor regression, but there was decreased vision from progressive vitreomacular traction to 20/400 ft. PPV with combined ERM and internal limiting membrane (ILM) peel were performed with resolution of vitreomacular traction and improvement of visual acuity to 20/50 ft at 6 months. PPV with combined ERM and ILM peel is effective for vision loss secondary to ERM and vitreomacular traction associated with retinal VPT. PMID:27843233

  12. Pars Plana Vitrectomy Combined with Focal Endolaser Photocoagulation for Idiopathic Macular Telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Terauchi, Gaku; Matsumoto, Celso Soiti; Shinoda, Kei; Matsumoto, Harue; Imamura, Yutaka; Watanabe, Emiko; Kondo, Takaaki; Mizota, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    Background. To report the outcome of pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) combined with intraoperative endolaser focal photocoagulation (PC) on eyes with idiopathic macular telangiectasis (MacTel) type 1. Methods. This was a retrospective study of two female patients with MacTel type 1 who were resistant to focal photocoagulation, sub-Tenon triamcinolone injection, and/or antiangiogenic drugs. The best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was determined, and fluorescein angiography (FA) and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) were performed before and after surgery for up to 19 months. Results. After surgery, the BCVA gradually improved from 20/100 to 20/20 at 19 months in Case 1 and from 20/50 to 20/13 at 13 months in Case 2. Fluorescein angiography (FA) showed leakage at the late phase, and OCT showed that the cystoid macular edema was resolved and the fovea was considerably thinner postoperatively. Conclusion. Patients with MacTel type 1 who are refractory to the other types of treatments can benefit from PPV combined with intraoperative endolaser focal PC with functional and morphological improvements. PMID:24876845

  13. Linkage disequilibrium mapping of the cornea plana congenita gene CNA2

    SciTech Connect

    Tahvanainen, E.; Karila, E.; Kolehmainen, J.

    1995-12-10

    We recently assigned a gene for autosomal recessive cornea plana congenita (CNA2; MIM No. 217300) by linkage analysis to the approximately 3-cM interval between markers D12S82 and D12S327. Here, we extended these studies by exploiting the haplotype and linkage disequilibrium information that can be derived from the genetically isolated Finnish population and its subpopulations. By testing 32 independent families with 10 polymorphic markers in the CNA2 interval, strong allelic association between CNA2 and a set of markers with a peak at marker D12S351 was detected. Based on linkage disequilibrium analysis, the critical region for CNA2 could be narrowed to only 0.04-0.3 cM from marker D12S351, thus defining a critical interval 0.08-0.60 cM in length. These results provide a basis for highly focused positional cloning of CNA2. 18 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Late Closure of a Stage III Idiopathic Macular Hole after Pars Plana Vitrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Afrashi, Filiz; Öztaş, Zafer; Nalçacı, Serhad

    2015-01-01

    A 57-year-old female presented to our hospital with decreased vision in her right eye. Detailed ocular examination was performed, and a macular hole was detected in the right eye. The presence of a full-thickness stage III macular hole was confirmed with optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. Pars plana vitrectomy followed by long-acting gas tamponade (C3F8) was performed as treatment. One month after surgery, clinical examination revealed a persistent macular hole, confirmed by an OCT scan. Although the patient was scheduled for reoperation, the surgery was postponed due to personal reasons of the patient. Surprisingly, after five months, a closure pattern with accompanying epiretinal membrane was observed in the macular hole area. The closure of the macular hole was completed without any further intervention 8 months post-surgery. In cases of unclosed macular hole after the first surgery, if a second surgery cannot be performed, follow-up with OCT recommended due to the possibility of spontaneous closure. However, spontaneous closure of a persistent macular hole following PPV is rare, so early diagnosis and surgical repair of unclosed macular holes must remain the primary goal. PMID:27800248

  15. Biological indices, energy reserves, steroid hormones and sexual maturity in the infaunal bivalve Scrobicularia plana from three sites differing by their level of contamination.

    PubMed

    Mouneyrac, C; Linot, S; Amiard, J-C; Amiard-Triquet, C; Métais, I; Durou, C; Minier, C; Pellerin, J

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate in situ biometric (condition index, hepato-somatic index, gonado-somatic index), biochemical (glycogen, lipids, sexual steroids) and histological (sex, sexual maturation stage) variables in the infaunal bivalve Scrobicularia plana. First, the reproductive cycle of S. plana was assessed by collecting bivalves from a reference site (the bay of Bourgneuf, Fr) in April, May, July, September and November 2005 and in January and March 2006. Then, S. plana were collected at three key periods of their sexual cycle (March 2006, beginning of gametogenesis; June 2006, spawning; and September 2006, spent) in three sites differing by their level of contamination (bay of Bourgneuf, reference site; Loire and Seine estuaries; Fr, impacted sites). The reproductive cycle of S. plana was well defined with a clear spawning period between May and July, sexual repose from November to January. Development of the gonad began in January and ended in September. Sex-ratio was determined during spawning and the influence of sex on biochemical variables was examined. Progesterone, 17beta-estradiol and testosterone levels in the gonad of S. plana were close to those reported in other bivalves. This study is the first to demonstrate in situ influence of site, sex and sexual maturity on energy reserves, and sexual steroids in S. plana. Even if interpretation of results is complex due to interferences between natural and anthropogenic factors, S. plana is a suitable species for estuarine studies and a better understanding of its reproduction will permit to assess impacts of environmental pollutants.

  16. Combined pars plana vitrectomy and artificial iris diaphragm implant after globe rupture.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Tommaso; Boccassini, Barbara; Iossa, Mario; Lesnoni, Guido; Mutolo, Maria Giulia; Mutolo, P Alessandro

    2009-04-01

    Retinal detachment (RD) associated with aniridia due to globe rupture (GR) is an uncommon condition with a severe prognosis. Surgical technique must address anterior and posterior segment issues secondary to the altered compartmentalization and increased risk for corneal toxicity. The purpose of this paper is to report a series of GR patients undergoing combined pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) and artificial iris diaphragm (AID) implant for the repair of RD associated to aniridia. The authors retrospectively reviewed 12 consecutive patients operated on by a single surgeon. Surgery consisted of a standard three-port PPV with extensive bimanual dissection of vitreous base and ciliary body membrane and combined AID implant. Office visits included Snellen visual acuity (VA), intraocular pressure measurement, biomicroscopy and indirect ophthalmoscopy. AID prosthesis included aniridic IOLs, Heimann's PMMA and silicone diaphragm. Mean age was 53 years and mean follow-up was 19 months. At the end of follow-up, seven patients gained more than two lines (58.3%), two lost their vision (16.6%) and three were unchanged (25%). Seven patients (58.3%) had a VA better than 20/400 and one (8%) 20/40 vision. Eight patients (66.6%) retained a clear cornea, two (16.6%) had minimal corneal oedema and two (16.6%) corneal decompensation. Implanted prosthesis included two silicone diaphragms, four PMMA diaphragms and six aniridic IOLs. After an average 1.6 operations, the retina was completely attached in six patients (50%), partially attached in four (33.3%) and detached in two (16.6%). RD associated to GR carries a guarded prognosis both due to RD complexity and hypotony. The combined repair of RD and aniridia after GR offers the advantage of addressing all issues at one time allowing correct eye compartmentalization and better tamponade effect. Successful anatomical and functional results can be achieved although multiple surgeries are often needed.

  17. Pars Plana Vitrectomy With in Vivo Cyst Lysis for Intraocular Cysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Azad, Shorya; Takkar, Brijesh; Roy, Sangeeta; Gangwe, Anil B; Kumar, Mahesh; Kumar, Atul

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate efficacy and safety of pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) and in vivo cyst lysis for intraocular cysticercosis. Retrospective analysis of the records of 15 patients undergoing PPV for intraocular cysticercosis at a tertiary eye care center was done. All patients had undergone in vivo cyst lysis. Of these 15 patients, one had intravitreal cysticercosis (IVC) with vitritis, two cases had IVC with vitritis with tractional retinal detachment (TRD), four cases had subretinal cysticercosis (SRC), four cases had SRC with extensive fibrosis without TRD, and five cases had SRC with fibrosis with TRD. Postoperative visual acuity at 3 months of follow-up was analyzed as the primary outcome measure. Mean age of patients was 26 years ± 12.27 years. Four out of 15 patients were female. Mean preoperative best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was 1.55 logMAR units ± 0.62 logMAR units, whereas mean postoperative BCVA at last follow-up (3 months) was 1.26 logMAR units ± 0.65 log-MAR units. Mean visual gain (0.29 logMAR units) post-surgery was statistically significant (P = .018). The final visual acuity correlated with preoperative BCVA with Pearson's coefficient being 0.78 (95% CI, 0.44-0.92; P = .001). Anatomical success was achieved in 13 of 15 (87%) cases. In one case the cyst was dead and calcified and could not be removed. TRD was associated with poor visual gain. Intravitreal cyst lysis is a safe and successful approach for managing intraocular cysticercosis. Visual results depend on preoperative condition. TRD implicates poor visual prognoses. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:665-669.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Fauna Europaea: Diptera – Brachycera

    PubMed Central

    Beuk, Paul; Pont, Adrian Charles; Shatalkin, Anatole I.; Ozerov, Andrey L.; Woźnica, Andrzej J.; Merz, Bernhard; Bystrowski, Cezary; Raper, Chris; Bergström, Christer; Kehlmaier, Christian; Clements, David K.; Greathead, David; Kameneva, Elena Petrovna; Nartshuk, Emilia; Petersen, Frederik T.; Weber, Gisela; Bächli, Gerhard; Geller-Grimm, Fritz; Van de Weyer, Guy; Tschorsnig, Hans-Peter; de Jong, Herman; van Zuijlen, Jan-Willem; Vaňhara, Jaromír; Roháček, Jindřich; Ziegler, Joachim; Majer, József; Hůrka, Karel; Holston, Kevin; Rognes, Knut; Greve-Jensen, Lita; Munari, Lorenzo; de Meyer, Marc; Pollet, Marc; Speight, Martin C. D.; Ebejer, Martin John; Martinez, Michel; Carles-Tolrá, Miguel; Földvári, Mihály; Chvála, Milan; Barták, Miroslav; Evenhuis, Neal L.; Chandler, Peter J.; Cerretti, Pierfilippo; Meier, Rudolf; Rozkosny, Rudolf; Prescher, Sabine; Gaimari, Stephen D.; Zatwarnicki, Tadeusz; Zeegers, Theo; Dikow, Torsten; Korneyev, Valery A.; Richter, Vera Andreevna; Michelsen, Verner; Tanasijtshuk, Vitali N.; Mathis, Wayne N.; Hubenov, Zdravko

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Fauna Europaea provides a public web-service with an index of scientific names (including important synonyms) of all extant multicellular European terrestrial and freshwater animals and their geographical distribution at the level of countries and major islands (east of the Urals and excluding the Caucasus region). The Fauna Europaea project comprises about 230,000 taxonomic names, including 130,000 accepted species and 14,000 accepted subspecies, which is much more than the originally projected number of 100,000 species. Fauna Europaea represents a huge effort by more than 400 contributing taxonomic specialists throughout Europe and is a unique (standard) reference suitable for many user communities in science, government, industry, nature conservation and education. The Diptera–Brachycera is one of the 58 Fauna Europaea major taxonomic groups, and data have been compiled by a network of 55 specialists. Within the two-winged insects (Diptera), the Brachycera constitute a monophyletic group, which is generally given rank of suborder. The Brachycera may be classified into the probably paraphyletic 'lower brachyceran grade' and the monophyletic Eremoneura. The latter contains the Empidoidea, the Apystomyioidea with a single Nearctic species, and the Cyclorrhapha, which in turn is divided into the paraphyletic 'aschizan grade' and the monophyletic Schizophora. The latter is traditionally divided into the paraphyletic 'acalyptrate grade' and the monophyletic Calyptratae. Our knowledge of the European fauna of Diptera–Brachycera varies tremendously among families, from the reasonably well known hoverflies (Syrphidae) to the extremely poorly known scuttle flies (Phoridae). There has been a steady growth in our knowledge of European Diptera for the last two centuries, with no apparent slow down, but there is a shift towards a larger fraction of the new species being found among the families of the nematoceran grade (lower Diptera), which due to a larger

  19. [Transconjunctival sutureless pars plana vitrectomy and Brilliant Peel (BP)-assisted ILM peeling in patients with macular holes].

    PubMed

    Maier, M M; Rass, S; Mueller, C; Feucht, N; Lohmann, C P

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the visual and anatomic outcome after 23-gauge transconjunctival sutureless pars plana vitrectomy and Brilliant Peel (BP)-assisted ILM peeling in patients with macular holes. In a consecutive retrospective study in 41 eyes of 41 patients with macular holes a standardised 23-G transconjunctival sutureless pars plana vitrectomy with ILM-peeling and gas tamponade was performed. All patients underwent preoperative measurements of visual acuity (VA), the maximum hole diameter, basis, height, and intraretinal changes using high resolution optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT; Spectralis; Heidelberg Engineering). Main outcome measures included visual acuity 1, 3, and 6 months after surgery and the closure rate. We also evaluated photoreceptor inner/outer segment (IS/OS) integrity as seen in SD-OCT for correlation with visual outcomes after macular hole surgery. At baseline the mean best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was 0.2 (0.77 logMAR). BCVA improved significantly to 0.4 (0.46 logMAR) after 1 month, to 0.44 (0.41 logMAR) after 3 months and to 0.58 (0.28 logMAR) after 6 months, respectively. A closure rate of 95.1 % was achieved. The morphological parameter photoreceptor IS/OS integrity was measured semiquantitatively and showed a positive correlation to BCVA. Transconjunctival sutureless pars plana vitrectomy and Brilliant Peel (BP)-assisted ILM peeling in patients with macular holes is a very safe procedure and leads to good functional and anatomic results. The integrity of the IS/OS segment is a good predictive parameter for BCVA improvement after macular hole surgery. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. PARS PLANA VITRECTOMY AND WIDE INTERNAL LIMITING MEMBRANE PEELING WITH PERFLUOROPROPANE TAMPONADE FOR HIGHLY MYOPIC FOVEOSCHISIS-ASSOCIATED MACULAR HOLE.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaotian; Wei, Yantao; Jiang, Xintong; Zhang, Shaochong

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the outcomes of pars plana vitrectomy and wide internal limiting membrane peeling with perfluoropropane tamponade (C3F8) for highly myopic foveoschisis-associated macular hole. Prospective consecutive cases with highly myopic foveoschisis-associated macular hole were recruited. All the patients underwent pars plana vitrectomy and indocyanine green-aided internal limiting membrane peeling, the range of internal limiting membrane peeling was broadened beyond the vascular arcades and to the nasal side of the optic disc. With tamponade of 16% C3F8, all the patients kept a face-down position postoperatively. The main outcomes were best-corrected visual acuity and primary anatomical success rate. There were 25 patients (25 eyes) included, with a mean age of 54.8 ± 7.2 years. The mean follow-up duration was 14.2 ± 3.9 months. The mean preoperative logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution best-corrected visual acuity (Snellen equivalent) was 1.489 ± 0.558 (20/617). The mean postoperative logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution best-corrected visual acuity at the final follow-up was 0.882 ± 0.522 (20/152), the difference being statistically significant with the preoperative one (P < 0.001). At the final follow-up, 17 eyes (68.0%) had vision improvement, and the primary anatomical success rate was 84.0% (21/25). Pars plana vitrectomy and wide internal limiting membrane peeling with C3F8 tamponade is effective and safe to achieve a high anatomical success rate of highly myopic foveoschisis-associated macular hole closure and regain visual function.

  1. Endophthalmitis after pars plana vitrectomy a 20- and 25-gauge comparison.

    PubMed

    Hu, Allen Y H; Bourges, Jean-Louis; Shah, Sumit P; Gupta, Anurag; Gonzales, Christine R; Oliver, Scott C N; Schwartz, Steven D

    2009-07-01

    Recent retrospective analyses have suggested that postoperative endophthalmitis may be more frequent with 25- than 20-gauge pars plana vitrectomy (PPV). Because the infection risk may depend on the suturing status of the sclerotomy, and the perioperative anti-infection protocol, we compared the incidence rate of endophthalmitis after sutureless 25-gauge versus sutured 20-gauge PPV on a large cohort of patients operated with a standardized perioperative anti-infection protocol. Retrospective comparative case series. Consecutive patients who underwent 20- or 25-gauge PPVs at a single center over a multi-year period. We analyzed 3597 consecutive PPVs. Patients with a pre-PPV diagnosis of endophthalmitis, PPVs performed for implantation of drug delivery devices, or 25-gauge PPVs with all sclerotomies sutured closed were excluded. Patients with > or =1 week of follow-up were divided into 2 study groups by sclerotomy status at the end of surgery: the 20-gauge group had 3 sutured 20-gauge sclerotomies, and the 25-gauge group had > or =1 unsutured 25-gauge sclerotomy. Endophthalmitis was defined by clinical criteria independent of microbiological results. The incidence of endophthalmitis was compared between 25- versus 20-gauge groups. Of 3372 PPV surgeries meeting inclusion and exclusion criteria, 1948 and 1424 surgeries were 20- and 25-gauge PPVs, respectively. Average age (+/- standard deviation) of patients was 54.6 (+/- 22.6) and 64.4 (+/- 16.5) years in the 20- and 25-gauge PPV groups, respectively (P<0.0001). Median post-PPV follow-up time was not significantly different between the 2 groups (12.5 vs 13.0 months; P = 0.69). Endophthalmitis was observed in 1 patient (0.07%; 95% confidence interval, 0%-0.21%) from the 25-gauge group and none in the 20-gauge group (P = 0.42; Fisher exact test, 2-tailed). The use of air/gas endotamponade (P<0.0001) and intravitreal triamcinolone (P<0.001) was more common in 25- versus 20-gauge PPV. The incidence of endophthalmitis was

  2. Binocular indirect ophthalmo microscope-assistant gas-perfused pars plana vitrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Luyi; Yang, Xiaoli; Zheng, Qingqing; Wu, Miaoqin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The vitreous sample has been used for the diagnosis of uveitis and intraocular malignancy for decades. The sample volume is usually limited to 1 mL with current techniques. In the present study, a novel technique for higher amount of vitreous sample acquisition, that is, Binocular Indirect Ophthalmo Microscope-assistant gas-perfused pars plana vitrectomy (BAG-PPV) was invented. For diagnostic purpose, BAG-PPV with 23-ga vitrectomy system was performed on a 54-year-old Chinese male with the symptom of bilateral atypical uveitis. More than 3 mL of vitreous sample per eye was collected without any significant complications. Cytopathology was confirmed on the basis of cell surface markers and released cytokines by flow cytometry analysis and cytokine assays respectively. A monoclonal B-cell population with the pattern of CD5−, CD10−, cyKi67+, CD71+, FMC7+, CD23−, and kappa light chain single expression for the right eye and a monoclonal B-cell pattern with CD5−, CD10−, cyKi67+, and kappa light chain restriction for the left eye were identified. The cytokine assay revealed high levels of interleukin (IL)-10 (90,838.30 and 41,098.0 pg/mL for the right and left eyes, respectively) and IL10/IL6 ratios for both eyes (with 90.78 and 63.26 for the IL10/IL6 ratios of the right and left eyes, respectively), while those for the cerebrospinal fluid were low (4.77 pg/mL for the IL10 level and 0.65 for the IL10/IL6 ratio). Based on the results, the patient was diagnosed with primary intraocular lymphoma for bilateral eyes. Our results demonstrated that diagnostic vitrectomy with BAG-PPV using the 23-ga vitrectomy system was safe, efficient, and able to provide useful diagnostic information for suspicious intraocular malignancy and other atypical uveitis. PMID:27930538

  3. Diagnostic cellular yield is superior with full pars plana vitrectomy compared with core vitreous biopsy.

    PubMed

    Mudhar, H S; Sheard, R

    2013-01-01

    Vitreous biopsy for the cytological assessment of suspected intraocular lymphoma and vitritis of uncertain aetiology is a standard investigation. The types of specimens generated and the diagnostic rate are variable within and between centres. There are many reasons for this but one observation that has not been considered previously is the differential distribution of cells in the vitreous gel. To test this possibility, five consecutive patients with suspected vitreous involvement by lymphoma or vitritis of uncertain aetiology underwent a core vitreous biopsy immediately before a planned full pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) and the cellularity of the two sampling techniques compared. A prospective study of five consecutive patients requiring vitreous sampling to secure a firm diagnosis. For each of five patients, the core vitreous biopsy specimen was received in a universal tube and the PPV specimen was received in a vitreous cassette. Fluid (0.25 ml) was removed from both specimens, centrifuged and haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained slides prepared per sampling method. The slides were examined with a light microscope, the most cellular field selected and the number of cells per mm(2) counted and compared between sampling techniques. PPV specimen's, revealed a cellularity range that was 7.4 to 78 × (average 31 ×) greater than a core vitreous biopsy. In the two cases of a final diagnosis of intraocular lymphoma, the vitreous core biopsy was non-diagnostic. Furthermore, the PPV specimen generated additional cellular material for numerous ancillary investigations to permit a secure diagnosis. The results of this differential vitreous sampling study has strengthened our anecdotal slit lamp clinical observations that inflammatory cells and lymphoma cells are concentrated more in the cortical vitreous. Therefore, vitreous cells have less chance to be sampled if a single core vitreous biopsy is performed. Indeed, the two cases of confirmed lymphoma generated a non

  4. Pollution biomarkers in two estuarine invertebrates, Nereis diversicolor and Scrobicularia plana, from a Marsh ecosystem in SW Spain.

    PubMed

    Solé, Montserrat; Kopecka-Pilarczyk, Justyna; Blasco, Julián

    2009-04-01

    The polychaete worm Nereis diversicolor and the clam Scrobicularia plana were collected from several sites, affected by different types of contamination, in a littoral enclosure in the SW Spain (Caño Sancti-Petri and Rio San Pedro). N. diversicolor was present in 6 sampling sites whereas S. plana in 4 of them. The aim of our study was to relate several pollution biomarkers to chemical sources (metals and organic pollutants e.g. PCB, PAH) in these species, thereby confirming their adequacy as sentinels for this habitat. The biomarkers surveyed in the two invertebrates were the activities of the antioxidant enzyme catalase (CAT), the phase II detoxifying enzyme glutathione S-transferase (GST) and the neurotoxicity marker acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Metallothionein (MT) levels were measured as a biomarker of exposure to metals. The results suggested a different response in the two sediment-dwelling organisms, the sediment-eating polychaete and the water-filtering clam, probably as a consequence of different contamination exposures. The results also suggested that samples from the "Caño Sancti-Petri" were exposed to biologically active compounds that altered some of their biochemical responses. Of all the biomarkers tested, AChE was the most sensitive one and N. diversicolor the potentially most robust sentinel in this ecosystem. In this low to moderately polluted environment, the biochemical approach better reflected temporal trends than site-related differences although it was also able to detect punctual chemical insults.

  5. Metal partitioning and availability in estuarine surface sediments: Changes promoted by feeding activity of Scrobicularia plana and Liza ramada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedro, Sílvia; Duarte, Bernardo; Reis, Givaldo; Pereira, Eduarda; Duarte, Armando C.; Costa, José Lino; Caçador, Isabel; Almeida, Pedro Raposo de

    2015-12-01

    Several works have evidenced in the past the importance and influence of plants and terrestrial invertebrates in metal availability in soils and sediments through changes in metal speciation. In contrast, the impact of estuarine invertebrates and fishes in this process has been poorly explored. The partition of metals in estuarine surface sediments was studied in a controlled environment according to four operationally defined fractions. Sediments were analyzed before and after the passage through the gut of two detritivorous species. Scrobicularia plana feeds on the bottom and suspended sediment particles through the inhalant siphon. Liza ramada is an interface feeder, filtering the superficial layer of the sediment and suspended particles in the water column. Cd, Cu and Ni bound to carbonates increased in the pellets of S. plana, compared with the ingested sediment, as did exchangeable Zn. Similarly, Cd and Zn bound to carbonates have also increased in the pellets of L. ramada; on the contrary, a decrease of Ni was observable in the pellets of this fish. The outcome of the controlled experiments pointed to a potential increase in some metals' availability in the estuarine environment, as a result of the more mobile metal forms in the excreted fecal pellets. This draws the attention to a relevant impact of the trophic activity of both species, alongside with the potential enhancement brought to it by the bioturbation promoted by them, in the role that the estuary itself has as a contaminants' buffer.

  6. COMBINED PARS PLANA VITRECTOMY AND SCLERAL FIXATION OF AN INTRAOCULAR LENS USING GORE-TEX SUTURE: One-Year Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Khan, M Ali; Samara, Wasim A; Gerstenblith, Adam T; Chiang, Allen; Mehta, Sonia; Garg, Sunir J; Hsu, Jason; Gupta, Omesh P

    2017-05-10

    To report the 1-year clinical outcomes of combined pars plana vitrectomy and ab externo scleral fixation of an intraocular lens using Gore-Tex suture. Retrospective, interventional case series. Outcome measures were change in visual acuity and occurrence of intraoperative and postoperative complications with minimum follow-up of 1 year. Eighty-four eyes of 83 patients were identified. The mean best available visual acuity improved from 20/782 preoperatively to 20/65 postoperatively (P < 0.001). The mean follow-up was 598 ± 183 days (median 533 days, range 365-1,323 days). There were no intraoperative complications noted. A Bausch & Lomb Akreos AO60 intraocular lens was implanted in 77 eyes and an Alcon CZ70BD in 7 eyes. Postoperative complications included transient vitreous hemorrhage in six eyes (7.1%), cystoid macular edema in four eyes (4.8%), ocular hypertension in three eyes (3.6%), hyphema in two eyes (2.4%), and transient corneal edema in two eyes (2.4%). There were no cases of postoperative endophthalmitis, suture erosion/breakage, hypotony, retinal detachment, suprachoroidal hemorrhage, choroidal detachment, uveitis-glaucoma-hyphema syndrome, or persistent postoperative inflammation during the follow-up period. Combined pars plana vitrectomy and ab externo scleral fixation of an intraocular lens with Gore-Tex suture was well tolerated at a minimum of 1-year follow-up. No suture-related complications were encountered.

  7. Emplacement and fabric-forming conditions of plutons from structural and magnetic fabric analysis: A case study of the Plana pluton (Central Bulgaria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Neven; Henry, Bernard; Jordanova, Neli; Jordanova, Diana; Naydenov, Kalin

    2014-08-01

    The relationship between intensity parameters, such as the corrected anisotropy degree P‧ and mean susceptibility Km for plutons with similar magnetic mineralogy, yields a criterion to determine the origin of their magnetic fabric: for a same mineralogy, the higher the P‧ values for the same mean susceptibility Km (irrespective of its absolute value) the higher tectonic effect was possible. Using this criterion, comparison of the magnetic fabric of the Upper Cretaceous mid- to shallow crustal level Plana pluton with that of other small Upper Cretaceous plutonic bodies in Sredna Gora Zone (Central and Southeast Bulgaria) highlights the structural evolution of the Plana pluton. The central part of Plana pluton and its southwest, west and east margins have preserved their emplacement fabric. Along its northern contact the pluton is affected by the last movements within the Okol Shear Zone where high-temperature S/L mylonites developed. The fabric of the pluton at its southeastern border was disturbed during the intrusion of the neighboring Gutsal pluton. The similarity in the orientation of magmatic and magnetic structures preserved in the central and southern parts of the Plana pluton and the transition from magmatic to high-temperature superimposed foliations and lineations at its north contact point to a composite superimposed shear-induced and emplacement-related magmatic magnetic fabric. Nearly vertical orientation of magnetic and magmatic foliations and lineations from the undeformed parts of the pluton shows a process of vertical magma rising and emplacement. The sub-vertical high-temperature solid-state mylonitic foliation and dip-parallel stretching lineation in the pluton along its northern contact reveals the transpression nature of the deformation in the vicinity of Okol Shear Zone with a strong pure shear component. The smooth transition between the deformed and undeformed parts of Plana pluton reveals the syn-kinematic character of the emplacement.

  8. Intraocular pressure elevation after uncomplicated pars plana vitrectomy: results of the Pan American Collaborative Retina Study Group.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lihteh; Berrocal, Maria H; Rodriguez, Francisco J; Maia, Mauricio; Morales-Canton, Virgilio; Figueroa, Marta; Serrano, Martín; Roca, José A; Arévalo, J Fernando; Navarro, Rodrigo; Hernández, Hector; Salinas, Samantha; Romero, Rafael; Alpizar-Alvarez, Natalia; Chico, Giovanna

    2014-10-01

    To compare the incident rates of sustained elevation of intraocular pressure (IOP) after uncomplicated pars plana vitrectomy for idiopathic epiretinal membrane and the unoperated fellow eye. Retrospective multicenter study of 198 patients who underwent pars plana vitrectomy for an idiopathic epiretinal membrane that was followed for at least 12 months. The diagnosis of sustained IOP elevation was defined as an elevation of IOP ≥ 24 mmHg or an increase of ≥ 5 mmHg in the IOP from baseline on 2 separate visits that warranted the initiation of ocular hypotensive therapy. The main outcome measured was the development of sustained IOP elevation as defined above. Patients were followed for an average of 47.3 ± 24 months (range, 12-106 months). In the vitrectomized eyes, 38 of the 198 (19.2%) patients developed elevated IOP compared with 9 of the 198 (4.5%) unoperated fellow eyes (P < 0.0001, Fisher exact test; odds ratio, 4.988). Possible risk factors include a family history of open-angle glaucoma (P = 0.0004 Fisher exact test; odds ratio, 7.206) and cataract surgery (P = 0.0270 Fisher exact test; odds ratio, 2.506). Uncomplicated PPV seems to increase the IOP, particularly in those who are pseudophakic and have a family history of open-angle glaucoma. This increase in IOP may lead to glaucomatous damage if not managed appropriately. Patients with a previous PPV need to be followed by an ophthalmologist to monitor the IOP in the vitrectomized eye.

  9. Seasonal variability in somatic and reproductive investment of the bivalve Scrobicularia plana (da Costa, 1778) along a latitudinal gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Sílvia; Cardoso, Joana F. M. F.; Carvalho, Célia; Luttikhuizen, Pieternella C.; van der Veer, Henk W.

    2011-03-01

    Monthly investment in soma and gonads in the bivalve Scrobicularia plana is described for three populations along its distributional range: Minho estuary, Portugal; Westerschelde estuary, The Netherlands and Buvika estuary, Norway. Seasonal cycles in body mass (BMI), somatic mass (SMI) and gonadal mass (GMI) indices were observed for all populations. In Portugal, BMI and SMI peaked in mid-autumn, while in The Netherlands both indices were at their highest in mid-spring. Norway showed a different pattern with two distinct peaks: one in mid-autumn and a second peak in spring. GMI reached maximum values in July in Portugal and Netherlands and in June in Norway. Overall, mean BMI and SMI were lower in Portugal while mean GMI was lower in Norway. The spawning period lasted the whole summer in Portugal, but was shorter (only two months) in The Netherlands and Norway. The reproductive investment in The Netherlands was significantly higher than in Portugal and Norway, with the lowest values being observed in Norway. Differences in annual cycles between populations were attributed to environmental factors, namely temperature and food availability. Temperature seems important in shaping the reproductive pattern with more northern populations showing shorter reproductive periods starting later in the year, and a lower reproductive output. In addition, winter water temperatures can explain the lower mean body and somatic mass values observed in Portugal. Food availability influenced the physiological performance of the species with peaks in somatic mass coinciding with phytoplankton blooms. This relation between physiological performance and environmental factors influences S. plana distribution, densities and even survival, with natural consequences on its commercial importance.

  10. Biochemical, physiological and behavioural markers in the endobenthic bivalve Scrobicularia plana as tools for the assessment of estuarine sediment quality.

    PubMed

    Boldina-Cosqueric, Inna; Amiard, Jean-Claude; Amiard-Triquet, Claude; Dedourge-Geffard, Odile; Métais, Isabelle; Mouneyrac, Catherine; Moutel, Benjamin; Berthet, Brigitte

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to link the responses at different levels of biological organisation of the endobenthic bivalve Scrobicularia plana differentially exposed to anthropogenic pressure. Clams were collected in April 2008 from three estuaries along a pollution gradient (Goyen < Loire < Seine). Biomarkers of defence (metallothionein concentration and glutathione-S-transferase activity) were activated in the Loire and the Seine. Biomarkers of damage revealed neurotoxicity (decreased AChE activity) and impairment of digestive enzyme activities (cellulase or amylase) in these estuaries. The highest lactate dehydrogenase activity was registered in the Loire estuary, in parallel with enhanced levels of vanadium (a metal present in petroleum), likely as a consequence of a small oil spill that occurred one month before the sampling collection. Physiological biomarkers (energy reserves as glycogen, lipids and proteins, condition and gonado-somatic indices) showed a few intersite differences. However, the median size was significantly lower in clams exposed to direct (chemicals) or indirect (available food) effects in the most contaminated site. Burrowing behaviour was disturbed in clams from both of the Loire and Seine estuaries, a response probably due to physiological impairment rather than to avoidance of contaminated sediment. The activation of defence mechanisms towards metals (metallothionein) and other classes of contaminants (the biotransformation enzyme glutathione-S-transferase) do not ensure a total protection since a number of impairments were observed at the infra-organismal (AChE and digestive enzyme activities) and individual (burrowing behaviour) levels in relation to the degree of anthropogenic pressure. However, even in the most contaminated estuary (Seine), historical records do not show a consistent decrease of S. plana populations.

  11. SCLEROTOMY LEAKAGE IN TRANSCONJUNCTIVAL SMALL-GAUGE PARS PLANA VITRECTOMY: Effect of Removing the Cannula Over the Light Pipe.

    PubMed

    Javey, Golnaz; Rigi, Mohammed; Barkmeier, Andrew J; Heffez, Jordan L; Carvounis, Petros E

    2017-06-01

    To determine the effect of cannula removal over the light pipe on the incidence of sclerotomy leakage and to evaluate other factors that may influence the incidence of sclerotomy leaks and hypotony on conclusion of small-gauge transconjunctival pars plana vitrectomy. Retrospective, interventional clinical study of consecutive patients who underwent small-gauge transconjunctival pars plana vitrectomy at a single academic center. Eyes were divided into a group in which cannulae were removed over the light pipe (Group L) and a group in which cannulae were simply pulled out (Group N). The primary comparison was the comparison in requirement for suturing of sclerotomies between Groups L and N. Forty-eight eyes of 48 patients were included in the study (Group L: 21 eyes; Group N: 27 eyes). In Group L, 14/42 (33%) superior sclerotomies required suturing compared with 7/54 (13%) sclerotomies in Group N (P = 0.024). Superior sclerotomy leaks were also more common in Group L (28/42, 67%) compared with Group N (23/54, 43%, P = 0.024). Similarly, more eyes had hypotony after cannula removal in Group L (11/21; 52%) compared with Group N (5/27; 19%, P = 0.03). There were no differences in any of these measures when comparing fluid-filled to air- or gas-filled eyes. Removing the cannula over the light pipe results in a greater frequency of leaking, including leaking that results in hypotony or that requires suturing. The technique of cannula removal affects the risk of leakage and the risk of requiring suturing of a sclerotomy.

  12. Evaluation of traps for monitoring higher Diptera

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The two main members of the higher Diptera for which monitoring traps have been developed (at least in countries where tsetse does not exist) are the house fly, Musca domestica, and the stable fly, Stomoxys calcitrans. Both flies are major pest species in the US and elsewhere and the development of ...

  13. Trapping systems for Zaprionus indianus (Diptera: Drosophilidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    62nd Annual Meeting of the Entomological Society of America 16-19 November 2014; Portland, OR Title: Trapping systems for Zaprionus indianus (Diptera: Drosophilidae) Nancy D. Epsky, Micah A. Gill, C. Teri Allen, Dong H. Cha, and Peter J. Landolt Nancy D. Epsky USDA-ARS, Subtropical Horticulture...

  14. Gall midges (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) in forest ecosystems

    Treesearch

    Marcela Skuhrav& #225; ; Marcela NO-VALUE

    1991-01-01

    The family Cecidomyiidae is one of the largest of the Diptera. Gall midges are small, inconspicuous flies, but they may be very important both in forest ecosystems and in agroecosystems. Many phytophagous gall midge species attack forest trees, and some of them can be serious pests, such as the Dasineura rozhkovii Mamaev and Nikolsky, which develops...

  15. An open, comparative clinical study on the efficacy and safety of 10% trichloroacetic acid, 25% trichloroacetic acid and cryotherapy for verruca plana.

    PubMed

    Cengiz, Fatma Pelin; Emiroglu, Nazan

    2015-01-01

    Although there are several methods to treat Verruca plana, warts do not respond well to the common therapeutic options. In this study, we compared the safety and efficacy of 10% trichloroacetic acid, 25% trichloroacetic acid, and cryotherapy for the treatment of warts caused by Verruca plana. Ten percent and 25% trichloroacetic acid were applied to warts weekly until all lesions cleared. Cryotherapy was performed by liquid nitrogen spray for 5-10 seconds for each lesion per week until the lesions cleared. The number of Verruca plana lesions and adverse effects were evaluated five times during the treatment (the initial visit, week 2, week 4, week 6, and week 8). The number of lesions decreased through week 8 for all three treatments, and the reductions in the mean numbers of lesions were statistically similar (p > 0.05). Those in the cryotherapy group exhibited more erythema, pain, erosions, bullae, and hyperpigmentation (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p < 0.05, and p = 0.001, respectively) than those in either TCA group. Itching was more common among those in the trichloroacetic acid groups than in the cryotherapy group (p < 0.05). Additionally, hyperpigmentation, erythema, pain, and itching were more frequent in the 25% trichloroacetic acid group than in the 10% trichloroacetic acid group (p < 0.001), (p < 0.05), (p < 0.05), (p < 0.05). Ten percent trichloroacetic acid, 25% trichloroacetic acid, and cryotherapy are effective methods to treat Verruca plana. 10% trichloroacetic acid offers a safer and easier treatment than either 25% trichloroacetic acid or cryotherapy.

  16. The impacts of pharmaceutical drugs under ocean acidification: New data on single and combined long-term effects of carbamazepine on Scrobicularia plana.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Rosa; Almeida, Ângela; Calisto, Vânia; Velez, Cátia; Moreira, Anthony; Schneider, Rudolf J; Esteves, Valdemar I; Wrona, Frederick J; Figueira, Etelvina; Soares, Amadeu M V M

    2016-01-15

    Ocean acidification and increasing discharges of pharmaceutical contaminants into aquatic systems are among key and/or emerging drivers of environmental change affecting marine ecosystems. A growing body of evidence demonstrates that ocean acidification can have direct and indirect impacts on marine organisms although combined effects with other stressors, namely with pharmaceuticals, have received very little attention to date. The present study aimed to evaluate the impacts of the pharmaceutical drug Carbamazepine and pH 7.1, acting alone and in combination, on the clam Scrobicularia plana. For this, a long-term exposure (28 days)was conducted and a set of oxidative stress markers was investigated. The results obtained showed that S. plana was able to develop mechanisms to prevent oxidative damage when under low pH for a long period, presenting higher survival when exposed to this stressor compared to CBZ or the combination of CBZ with pH 7.1. Furthermore, the toxicity of CBZ on S. plana was synergistically increased under ocean acidification conditions (CBZ + pH 7.1): specimens survival was reduced and oxidative stress was enhanced when compared to single exposures. These findings add to the growing body of evidence that ocean acidification will act to increase the toxicity of CBZ to marine organisms,which has clear implications for coastal benthic ecosystems suffering chronic pollution from pharmaceutical drugs.

  17. A marine mesocosm study on the environmental fate of silver nanoparticles and toxicity effects on two endobenthic species: the ragworm Hediste diversicolor and the bivalve mollusc Scrobicularia plana.

    PubMed

    Buffet, Pierre-Emmanuel; Zalouk-Vergnoux, Aurore; Châtel, Amélie; Berthet, Brigitte; Métais, Isabelle; Perrein-Ettajani, Hanane; Poirier, Laurence; Luna-Acosta, Andrea; Thomas-Guyon, Hélène; Risso-de Faverney, Christine; Guibbolini, Marielle; Gilliland, Douglas; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Mouneyrac, Catherine

    2014-02-01

    Silver nanoparticles are widely used in a range of products and processes for their antibacterial properties, electrical and thermal conductivity. The fate and effects of Ag nanoparticles were examined in two endobenthic species (Scrobicularia plana, Hediste diversicolor), under environmentally realistic conditions in outdoor mesocosms exposed to Ag at 10 μg L(-1) in nanoparticulate (Ag NPs) or soluble salt (AgNO3) forms for 21 days. Labile Ag was determined in water and sediment by using diffusive gradient in thin films. Ag levels were equivalent in contaminated Ag NPs mesocosms to those contaminated with the soluble form. Bioaccumulation of Ag was observed for both species exposed to either Ag in the nanoparticulate or ionic forms. Concerning biomarker responses, both soluble and nanoparticulate Ag forms, induced defenses against oxidative stress, detoxification, apoptosis, genotoxicity and immunomodulation. Nevertheless, DNA damages measured by the comet assay in the digestive gland of S. plana, and Phenoloxidase and lysozyme activities in S. plana and H. diversicolor, respectively, were higher in the presence of Ag NPs compared to soluble Ag suggesting a specific nano effect.

  18. Role of non-enzymatic antioxidants on the bivalves' adaptation to environmental mercury: Organ-specificities and age effect in Scrobicularia plana inhabiting a contaminated lagoon.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, I; Mohmood, I; Coelho, J P; Pacheco, M; Santos, M A; Duarte, A C; Pereira, E

    2012-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate the role of non-enzymatic antioxidants on adaptive skills over time in the bivalve Scrobicularia plana environmentally exposed to mercury. Inter-age (2(+), 3(+), 4(+), 5(+) year old) and organ-specific (gills, digestive gland) approaches were applied in bivalves collected from moderately and highly contaminated sites at Ria de Aveiro (Portugal). S. plana's adaptive skills were dependent on the contamination extent; under moderate contamination scenario, the intervention of the different antioxidants took place harmoniously, evidencing an adjustment capacity increasing with the age. Under higher contamination degree, S. plana failed to cope with mercury threat, showing an age-dependent deterioration of the defense abilities. In organ-specific approach, the differences were particularly evident for thiol-compounds, since only gills displayed the potential to respond to moderate levels by increasing non-protein thiols and total glutathione. Under high contamination degree, both organs were unable to increase thiol-compounds, which were compensated by the ascorbic acid elevation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Metalimnobia crane flies (Diptera: Limoniidae) from Korea.

    PubMed

    Podenas, Sigitas; Byun, Hye-Woo

    2016-06-30

    Korean species of the crane fly genus Metalimnobia Matsumura, 1911 (Diptera: Limoniidae), are taxonomically revised. Metalimnobia (Metalimnobia) channpayna new species, is described and figured, M. (M.) bifasciata (Schrank, 1781), M. (M.) quadrinotata (Meigen, 1818) and M. (M.) zetterstedti (Tjeder, 1968) are listed for the first time in Korea, new information for previously known species, M. (M.) quadrimaculata (Linnaeus, 1760) is added. Identification key for all Korean Metalimnobia species is given. Wings, male and female terminalia are illustrated for all species.

  20. Sutureless 25-Gauge Pars Plana Vitrectomy Combined with Retropupillary Fixation of an Iris-Claw Intraocular Lens

    PubMed Central

    Chalkiadakis, Spyridon E.; Parikakis, Efstratios A.; Taylor, Simon R.J.

    2016-01-01

    Background The surgical case of a dropped intraocular lens inside the vitreous cavity constitutes a real challenge for the operating surgeon. Herein, we describe a case series where an alternative optical rehabilitation technique for late intraocular lens-bag complex dislocation has been used. Methods A modern vitrectomy device was used to remove the capsule with the dropped intraocular lens using sutureless 25-gauge pars plana vitrectomy. To ensure a better aesthetic result, with faster patient recovery and a reduced number of operations, the whole procedure was performed during the same operating session; an iris-claw intraocular lens for aphakia was selected for implantation. The implant was passed behind the constricted iris with the concave surface facing it. The lens was grasped with the manufacturer's holding forceps and fixed onto the posterior surface of the iris using the special enclavation needles. Results We have operated 12 eyes in two different clinical centres successfully, with minimal intra- and/or postoperative complications. Conclusion We believe that this is a viable solution for the visual rehabilitation of patients, who would otherwise need more than one operation for a lens exchange. PMID:27790132

  1. A retrospective study comparing outcomes of primary rhegmatogenous retinal detachment repair by scleral buckling and pars plana vitrectomy in Finland

    PubMed Central

    Sahanne, Sari; Tuuminen, Raimo; Haukka, Jari; Loukovaara, Sirpa

    2017-01-01

    Background Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) is the most common form of retinal detachment and an ophthalmic emergency. Here, we compared outcomes of primary RRD eyes operated with conventional scleral buckling (SB) with cryoretinopexy to those operated with standard pars plana vitrectomy (PPV). Methods This is an institutional, retrospective, register-based, observational, comparative study. Based on the surgical procedure, 319 eyes of 319 patients were divided into two groups: SB plus cryotherapy (n=50) and PPV (n=269). Changes in intraocular pressure (IOP) and best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) were recorded at 30 days and reoperation rates within 180 days postoperatively. Results Eyes operated with PPV had less reoperations within the first 180 days as compared with SB eyes (P=0.001, log-rank test); however, changes in IOP were more prominent (mean ± standard deviation: +8.1±8.8 vs. +4.4±7.0 mmHg, respectively; P=0.006). Changes in BCVA did not differ between the surgical procedures. Conclusion PPV was associated with higher primary anatomic success rates and lower risk of reoperation but significant IOP elevation when compared to SB. These factors should be case-specifically considered when choosing treatment modality for primary RRD. PMID:28331284

  2. Intraoperative optical coherence tomography in macula involving rhegmatogenous retinal detachment repair with pars plana vitrectomy and perfluoron

    PubMed Central

    Toygar, O; Riemann, C D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate microanatomical relationships during surgical repair of macula involving retinal detachment with pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) and perfluoron (PFO) with a microscope-integrated intraoperative optical coherence tomography (iOCT) device. Patients and methods This consecutive case series included nine eyes of nine patients with macula involving retinal detachment operated by a single surgeon at the Cincinnati Eye Institute. All patients underwent PPV, PFO injection, endolaser, and air–fluid exchange. The macula was imaged with iOCT before PFO injection, after PFO injection, and after air–fluid exchange in all eyes. Results iOCT imaging was ergonomically easy to obtain in all eyes. iOCT clearly demonstrated submacular fluid (SMF) at the beginning of the surgery, macular flattening under PFO in all eyes, small residual SMF under PFO in six of nine eyes, and increased occult SMF following air–fluid exchange in all eyes. Conclusion Microscope-integrated iOCT is a versatile and powerful imaging modality that holds a great deal of promise in the future. Its confirmation of persistent occult SMF in this small series of macular involving retinal detachment repair with PFO, may inform surgical decision making, and demonstrates a pathophysiological rationale for initial face-down positioning after retinal detachment repair. PMID:26656086

  3. Eragrostis plana Nees as a novel eco-friendly adsorbent for removal of crystal violet from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Filho, Augusto Cezar D; Mazzocato, Ana C; Dotto, Guilherme L; Thue, Pascal S; Pavan, Flávio A

    2017-07-08

    Eragrostis plana Nees (EPN) was used as new and eco-friendly adsorbent for the removal of crystal violet dye (CV) from aqueous solution. Specific surface area (BET), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), point of zero charge (pHPZC), and modified Boehm titration method were used to characterize the EPN material. The effects of initial pH of solution, adsorbent mass, contact time and initial dye concentration, and temperature were studied in batch adsorption mode. Kinetic data were evaluated by pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order models. The result exhibited that pseudo-second-order model well described the adsorption kinetics of CV onto EPN. Langmuir, Freundlich, and Sips isotherm models were used for analysis of the isothermal data. The equilibrium data of adsorption of CV onto EPN was better fitted with the Sips isotherm. Based on the Sips isotherm model, the maximum adsorption capacity was 76.20 ± 1.20 mg g(-1) at 333 K. A high desorption of CV from EPN was obtained using 1.00 mol L(-1) of CH3COOH as eluent. The thermodynamic data indicated that the adsorption was spontaneous, endothermic, and physical process. EPN can be used as alternative adsorbent to remove CV from aqueous solution.

  4. MRI in patients with tuberculous spondylitis presenting as vertebra plana: a retrospective analysis and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Sureka, J; Samuel, S; Keshava, S N; Venkatesh, K; Sundararaj, G D

    2013-01-01

    To present the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of 10 patients with histopathologically proven tuberculous spondylitis (TS) presenting as vertebra plana (VP) on radiographs. Radiographs of 451 adult TS patients were reviewed. In this consecutive series, there were 11 patients who presented as VP. MRI of 10 of these patients was available for review. VP-like collapse of a single vertebral body of the dorsal spine with preserved endplates and disc was seen in all cases. Epidural, pre- and para-vertebral soft tissue was found in all patients. Epidural soft tissue presenting on sagittal images as a convexity of the posterior longitudinal ligament was also found in all the signal of which was different from the involved vertebra on axial images. All patients showed posterior element involvement, which was characterized by preserved cortical outline without expansion. TS presenting with VP-like collapse of the bone is rare, accounting for 2.4% of the cases in the present series. MRI may show a collapsed vertebra with preserved endplates and disc. MRI findings that are suggestive of TS include: (1) signal intensity of the epidural soft-tissue mass on axial images, which is different from the vertebral body; (2) presence of a thin, T2-weighted hypointense capsule of the para-vertebral soft tissue; (3) posterior element involvement characterized by intact hypointense cortical outline without expansion; and (4) involvement of the costovertebral joint. Copyright © 2012 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Ultrastructural and histopathologic findings after pars plana vitrectomy with a new hypersonic vitrector system. Qualitative preliminary assessment.

    PubMed

    Pastor-Idoate, Salvador; Bonshek, Richard; Irion, Luciane; Zambrano, Isaac; Carlin, Paul; Mironov, Aleksandr; Bishop, Paul; McLeod, David; Stanga, Paulo Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    Preliminary assessment of a new prototype ultrasound-based hypersonic vitrector (HV) by qualitatively examining the histopathological changes in the retina and vitreous body after pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) and its ability to fragment vitreous collagen. Fourteen porcine cadaveric eyes, 20 eyes in live swine and six human cadaveric eyes underwent PPV using the HV or a pneumatic guillotine vitrector (GV). An additional 4 porcine crystalline lenses were touched with either the HV or GV for 1 minute. Following PPV, human vitreous was removed and processed for electron microscopy (EM). Eyes and lenses were fixed and sectioned for light microscopy (LM). There were no macroscopic retinal or optic nerve defects associated with either HV or GV PPVs. Cadaveric retinal specimens showed separation of the inner limiting membrane (ILM) and vacuolization and fragmentation at the nerve fiber layer (NFL) and the ganglion cell layer (GCL). ILM fragmentation and separation were found after PPV in live swine with both vitrectors. Small disruptions of the posterior capsule or structural lens defects were found after HV touch. The EM analysis revealed more fragmentation of human vitreous collagen fibrils after HV compared to GV PPV. LM and EM analysis of retina, vitreous, and crystalline lens after PPV showed similar morphological changes using the HV or the GV. Vitreous fragmentation appeared more effective with the HV. Overall this study suggests that the HV may be a promising new technology. More work is needed to quantitatively assess its safety and efficacy.

  6. Ultrastructural and histopathologic findings after pars plana vitrectomy with a new hypersonic vitrector system. Qualitative preliminary assessment

    PubMed Central

    Bonshek, Richard; Irion, Luciane; Zambrano, Isaac; Carlin, Paul; Mironov, Aleksandr; Bishop, Paul; McLeod, David; Stanga, Paulo Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Preliminary assessment of a new prototype ultrasound-based hypersonic vitrector (HV) by qualitatively examining the histopathological changes in the retina and vitreous body after pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) and its ability to fragment vitreous collagen. Methods Fourteen porcine cadaveric eyes, 20 eyes in live swine and six human cadaveric eyes underwent PPV using the HV or a pneumatic guillotine vitrector (GV). An additional 4 porcine crystalline lenses were touched with either the HV or GV for 1 minute. Following PPV, human vitreous was removed and processed for electron microscopy (EM). Eyes and lenses were fixed and sectioned for light microscopy (LM). Results There were no macroscopic retinal or optic nerve defects associated with either HV or GV PPVs. Cadaveric retinal specimens showed separation of the inner limiting membrane (ILM) and vacuolization and fragmentation at the nerve fiber layer (NFL) and the ganglion cell layer (GCL). ILM fragmentation and separation were found after PPV in live swine with both vitrectors. Small disruptions of the posterior capsule or structural lens defects were found after HV touch. The EM analysis revealed more fragmentation of human vitreous collagen fibrils after HV compared to GV PPV. Conclusions LM and EM analysis of retina, vitreous, and crystalline lens after PPV showed similar morphological changes using the HV or the GV. Vitreous fragmentation appeared more effective with the HV. Overall this study suggests that the HV may be a promising new technology. More work is needed to quantitatively assess its safety and efficacy. PMID:28399127

  7. Pars Plana Vitrectomy and Evisceration Resulting in Death Due to Misdiagnosis of Retinoblastoma in Children: A Review of 3 Cases.

    PubMed

    Shen, Tao; Liu, Rongjiao; Lin, Jing; Huang, Huiqun; Li, Xiuling; Yan, Jianhua

    2015-08-01

    Retinoblastoma is a curable intraocular malignancy in children. However, in clinical practice, retinoblastoma can sometimes be misdiagnosed and mismanaged, leading to extraocular extension and even death. In this report, a series of 3 cases are related that emphasize the conditions and consequences resulting from misdiagnosis and mismanagement of retinoblastoma. The clinical features, imaging findings, histopatholigical examination, and management in 3 case reports of children with misdiagnosed retinoblastoma are presented. Two of the cases received pars plana vitrectomy after being misdiagnosed with Coats disease or ocular blunt trauma, whereas the third case received evisceration after being misdiagnosed with suppurative endophthalmitis. When the diagnosis of retinoblastoma had been confirmed after a second surgery was performed in our hospital, only 2 of the cases received adjuvant orbital radiotherapy. All 3 cases died of systemic tumor metastases. Intraocular surgical procedures should be avoided in any equivocal case until the possibility of latent retinoblastoma is eliminated.We strongly recommend that early enucleation be executed as soon as possible followed by postoperative adjuvant therapy under conditions wherein an intraocular surgery was inadvertently performed in an eye with retinoblastoma.

  8. Low Volume Vertebral Augmentation with Cortoss® Cement for Treatment of High Degree Vertebral Compression Fractures and Vertebra Plana

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Robert E; Hatgis, Jesse; Berti, Aldo

    2017-01-01

    This is a retrospective analysis of a consecutive series of patients undergoing vertebroplasty and vertebral augmentation in an outpatient setting for high degree osteoporotic vertebral fractures or vertebra plana using consistently low volumes (less than 3 cc) of Cortoss® cement, rather than polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). The results in these patients demonstrate that it is both technically feasible to do vertebroplasty on these patients and using a low volume hydrophilic silica-based cement is effective in providing diffuse vertebral body fill with minimal complications. There was no increased risk of complications, such as cement leakage, displacement of bone fragments, or progression of the angulation. Specifically, with over a 24-month follow-up, the preoperative collapse or angulation did not worsen and none of the patients developed adjacent level fractures or required further surgery at the involved vertebral level. PMID:28367395

  9. Biochemical and behavioural responses of the endobenthic bivalve Scrobicularia plana to silver nanoparticles in seawater and microalgal food.

    PubMed

    Buffet, Pierre-Emmanuel; Pan, Jin-Fen; Poirier, Laurence; Amiard-Triquet, Claude; Amiard, Jean-Claude; Gaudin, Pierre; Risso-de Faverney, Christine; Guibbolini, Marielle; Gilliland, Douglas; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Mouneyrac, Catherine

    2013-03-01

    Because of their bactericidal effects, Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs) have promising industrial development but could lead to potential ecological risks. The aim of this study was to examine the uptake and effect of silver (soluble or as lactate Ag NPs of 40 nm) at low concentrations (10 μg L(-1)) in the endobenthic bivalve Scrobicularia plana exposed, for 14 days, directly (water) or via the diet (microalgae). The stability of Ag NPs in seawater was examined using dynamic light scattering. Release of soluble Ag from Ag NPs in the experimental media was quantified by using diffusive gradient in thin film. Bioaccumulation of Ag in bivalves was measured by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Behavioural and biochemical biomarkers were determined in bivalves. Aggregation of Ag NPs and the release of soluble Ag from Ag NPs were observed in the experimental media. For both forms of Ag, bioaccumulation was much more important for waterborne than for dietary exposure. The response of oxidative stress biomarkers (catalase, glutathion S-transferase, superoxide dismutase) was more important after dietary than waterborne exposure to Ag (soluble and NPs). These defences were relatively efficient since they led to a lack of response of damage biomarkers. Burrowing was not affected for bivalves exposed directly or through the diet to both Ag forms but feeding behaviour was impaired after 10 days of dietary exposure. Since no differences of responses to Ag either soluble or nanoparticulate were observed, it seems that labile Ag released from Ag NPs was mainly responsible for toxicity.

  10. Numerous Transitions of Sex Chromosomes in Diptera

    PubMed Central

    Vicoso, Beatriz; Bachtrog, Doris

    2015-01-01

    Many species groups, including mammals and many insects, determine sex using heteromorphic sex chromosomes. Diptera flies, which include the model Drosophila melanogaster, generally have XY sex chromosomes and a conserved karyotype consisting of six chromosomal arms (five large rods and a small dot), but superficially similar karyotypes may conceal the true extent of sex chromosome variation. Here, we use whole-genome analysis in 37 fly species belonging to 22 different families of Diptera and uncover tremendous hidden diversity in sex chromosome karyotypes among flies. We identify over a dozen different sex chromosome configurations, and the small dot chromosome is repeatedly used as the sex chromosome, which presumably reflects the ancestral karyotype of higher Diptera. However, we identify species with undifferentiated sex chromosomes, others in which a different chromosome replaced the dot as a sex chromosome or in which up to three chromosomal elements became incorporated into the sex chromosomes, and others yet with female heterogamety (ZW sex chromosomes). Transcriptome analysis shows that dosage compensation has evolved multiple times in flies, consistently through up-regulation of the single X in males. However, X chromosomes generally show a deficiency of genes with male-biased expression, possibly reflecting sex-specific selective pressures. These species thus provide a rich resource to study sex chromosome biology in a comparative manner and show that similar selective forces have shaped the unique evolution of sex chromosomes in diverse fly taxa. PMID:25879221

  11. Numerous transitions of sex chromosomes in Diptera.

    PubMed

    Vicoso, Beatriz; Bachtrog, Doris

    2015-04-01

    Many species groups, including mammals and many insects, determine sex using heteromorphic sex chromosomes. Diptera flies, which include the model Drosophila melanogaster, generally have XY sex chromosomes and a conserved karyotype consisting of six chromosomal arms (five large rods and a small dot), but superficially similar karyotypes may conceal the true extent of sex chromosome variation. Here, we use whole-genome analysis in 37 fly species belonging to 22 different families of Diptera and uncover tremendous hidden diversity in sex chromosome karyotypes among flies. We identify over a dozen different sex chromosome configurations, and the small dot chromosome is repeatedly used as the sex chromosome, which presumably reflects the ancestral karyotype of higher Diptera. However, we identify species with undifferentiated sex chromosomes, others in which a different chromosome replaced the dot as a sex chromosome or in which up to three chromosomal elements became incorporated into the sex chromosomes, and others yet with female heterogamety (ZW sex chromosomes). Transcriptome analysis shows that dosage compensation has evolved multiple times in flies, consistently through up-regulation of the single X in males. However, X chromosomes generally show a deficiency of genes with male-biased expression, possibly reflecting sex-specific selective pressures. These species thus provide a rich resource to study sex chromosome biology in a comparative manner and show that similar selective forces have shaped the unique evolution of sex chromosomes in diverse fly taxa.

  12. Checklist of the Empidoidea of Finland (Insecta, Diptera)

    PubMed Central

    Kahanpää, Jere

    2014-01-01

    Abstract An updated checklist of the Atelestidae, Brachystomatidae, Dolichopodidae, Empididae and Hybotidae (Diptera) recorded from Finland is presented. The genera with uncertain placement within superfamily Empidoidea (= the Iteaphila group) are also included in this paper. PMID:25337016

  13. Endophthalmitis and Concurrent or Delayed-Onset Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachment Managed With Pars Plana Vitrectomy, Intravitreal Antibiotics, and Silicone Oil.

    PubMed

    Dave, Vivek Pravin; Pathengay, Avinash; Relhan, Nidhi; Sharma, Pranjali; Jalali, Subhadra; Pappuru, Rajeev Reddy; Tyagi, Mudit; Narayanan, Raja; Chhablani, Jay; Das, Taraprasad; Flynn, Harry W

    2017-07-01

    The current study describes the treatment outcomes in patients with endophthalmitis and concurrent or delayed-onset retinal detachment managed with pars plana vitrectomy, intravitreal antibiotics, and silicone oil. In this noncomparative, retrospective case series, the medical records of patients diagnosed with endophthalmitis and retinal detachment from January 1991 through December 2014 at a tertiary eye care center in South India were reviewed. All patients received silicone oil for the management of retinal detachment either concurrently or during follow-up treatment. A total of 93 patients were included in the current study. Retinal detachment was diagnosed at presentation in 20 of 93 patients (21.5%) (concurrent group: Group 1) and during follow-up in the remaining 73 of 93 patients (78.5%) (delayed-onset group: Group 2). In Group 1, the initial treatment consisted of vitrectomy, intravitreal antibiotics, and silicone oil injection in 19 of 20 patients. In Group 2, patients did not receive silicone oil during initial treatment but underwent silicone oil injection during subsequent surgery for repair of retinal detachment. Rates of complete retinal reattachment and visual acuity of 20/400 or better were 73.7% and 30.0%, respectively, in Group 1 and 98.5% and 39.7%, respectively, in Group 2. The median visual acuity at last follow-up in 44 eyes undergoing silicone oil removal was 20/100 (logMAR 0.7), whereas in the remaining 49 eyes that did not undergo silicone oil removal, median visual acuity was 20/2000 (logMAR 2.0). In these patients with endophthalmitis with concurrent or delayed-onset retinal detachment, the use of silicone oil can be a useful adjunct. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2017;48:546-551.]. © 2017 Dave, Pathengay, Relhan, et al.

  14. Comparison of outcomes: scleral buckling and pars plana vitrectomy versus vitrectomy alone for primary repair of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment

    PubMed Central

    Lindsell, Luke B; Sisk, Robert A; Miller, Daniel M; Foster, Robert E; Petersen, Michael R; Riemann, Christopher D; Hutchins, Robert K

    2017-01-01

    Objective To assess the combination of scleral buckling (SB) and pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) versus PPV alone in the primary repair of rhegmatogenous retinal detachments (RRDs). Methods The current study was a retrospective, comparative, interventional, consecutive case series of 179 eyes of 174 patients who underwent primary RRD repair by five surgeons between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2010, utilizing SB with PPV or PPV. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to compare the efficacy of the two surgical strategies and assess for risk factors of proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR). Results Single surgery anatomic success (SSAS) was similar (P=0.76) between the PPV group (112 of 132 eyes, 85%) and SB with PPV group (39 of 47 eyes, 83%). Final anatomic success was 100% in each group. There was no difference in rates of PVR formation (PPV 16% vs SB with PPV 19%, P=0.70). Final logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution acuity was 0.33 (20/43) in the PPV group and 0.37 (20/47) in the SB with PPV group (P=0.62). Postoperative anterior chamber fibrin was highly correlated with PVR formation (PVR 13% vs no PVR 0.7%, P=0.003; odds ratio =68.37, P=0.007). Separate analysis of medium- to high-complexity cases showed similar SSAS (PPV 86% vs SB with PPV 83%, P=0.45). Conclusion SB with PPV versus PPV alone were similarly efficacious for repair of primary RRDs of varying complexity. SSAS rates, PVR incidence, and final visual acuities were not significantly different. PMID:28053500

  15. Integrated assessment of estuarine sediment quality based on a multi-biomarker approach in the bivalve Scrobicularia plana.

    PubMed

    Tankoua, O Fossi; Buffet, Pe; Amiard, J C; Berthet, B; Mouneyrac, C; Amiard-Triquet, C

    2013-02-01

    The bivalve Scrobicularia plana has been proposed as a sentinel species for the assessment of estuarine sediment quality. The aim of this study was to test the responsiveness of a set of biomarkers in bivalves originating from a moderately contaminated site (Loire estuary, France) and a comparatively cleaner site (Bay of Bourgneuf, France) used as reference. Temporal fluctuations were examined in animals collected on eight occasions from March 2008 to October 2009 for the determination of biochemical (MTs, GST, AChE), physiological (energy reserves as glycogen and lipids, condition, hepato-somatic and gonado-somatic indices), and behavioural biomarkers (burrowing). Metals in clams were examined with the aim of understanding the variations in MT concentrations. The current findings indicate that among biochemical markers MTs must be used in a precautionary fashion, and comparison with a reference site remains indispensable together with an appreciation of any salinity effects. Clearer responses were obtained for GST activity which contributes to defence against organic compounds. However, any such defence was not sufficient to ensure total protection since a number of impairments were observed at the individual level (burrowing behaviour, condition index, gonado-somatic index). The integrated biomarker response (IBR) illustrated higher levels of stress in clams collected from the Loire estuary compared to those gathered from the reference site at most of the sampling periods. The interpretation of responses involved in the cascade of energetic events (from available food, digestive enzyme activities, energy reserves to condition and reproductive status) is complex but did reveal disturbances in the Loire estuary which is far from being the most contaminated estuary in France and over the world. However, no links can be established between effects at individual and supra-individual levels in organisms in the Loire estuary, even in the case of a small oil spill which

  16. Valved versus nonvalved cannula small-gauge pars plana vitrectomy for repair of retinal detachments with Grade C proliferative vitreoretinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Oellers, Patrick; Stinnett, Sandra; Hahn, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Valved cannulas are a recent addition to small-gauge pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) and provide stable intraocular fluidics. The goal of this study was to compare outcomes and postoperative complication rates of valved vs nonvalved cannula small-gauge PPV for repair of retinal detachments (RDs) complicated by Grade C proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR). Methods A retrospective chart review of 364 consecutive eyes with either valved or nonvalved cannula PPV for RD repair was performed. The primary outcomes were single surgery and final anatomic success and change in best-corrected visual acuity for repair of RDs complicated by Grade C PVR. Results We identified 36 eyes in the valved group and 31 eyes in the nonvalved group with Grade C PVR RD. The single surgery success was 83% vs 77% (P=0.555) and the final anatomic success was 94% vs 87% (P=0.404) in the valved vs nonvalved eyes, respectively. The mean final visual acuity gain was −0.36 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR; approximate Early Treatment Diabetes Retinopathy Study [ETDRS] score =17 letters) in valved eyes vs −0.33 logMAR (approximate ETDRS score =16 letters) in nonvalved eyes (P=0.81). Postoperative complication rates including postoperative day 1 hypotony, hypertony, and anterior chamber fibrin formation; postoperative retention of intraocular or subretinal perfluorocarbon liquid; and subsequent epiretinal membrane peel were not statistically different between groups. Conclusion Valved cannula PPV yields equivalent visual acuity and anatomic outcomes without increased postoperative complication rates compared to traditional nonvalved cannula PPV for Grade C PVR-associated RD repair. PMID:27313445

  17. Five-year outcomes of pars plana vitrectomy for macular edema associated with branch retinal vein occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Akihiro; Kojima, Hiroshi; Kameda, Takanori; Mandai, Michiko; Kurimoto, Yasuo

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Long-term outcomes of pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) for macular edema (ME) associated with branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) have been previously reported, but the studies did not report the number of additional treatments after surgery. During 5 years of follow-up, we therefore investigated the efficacy and safety of PPV for BRVO and evaluated the incidence of additional treatments. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 25 eyes of 24 patients who underwent PPV for ME associated with BRVO and were followed up for at least 5 years. Best-corrected visual acuity was measured, and foveal thickness was assessed by optical coherence tomography. Additional treatments were also investigated. Results The logarithm of the minimal angle of resolution (logMAR) improved from 0.53±0.23 at baseline to 0.16±0.25 at 5 years (P<0.0001). The foveal thickness decreased from 535±222 µm at baseline to 205±143 µm at 5 years (P<0.0001). For the eyes with residual ME, the following additional treatments were performed within 5 years of follow-up: sub-Tenon injection of triamcinolone acetonide in two eyes, intravitreal injection of bevacizumab in three eyes, grid laser photocoagulation in one eye, and direct photocoagulation of macroaneurysm in one eye. Additional surgeries were performed in two eyes: for one eye, phacoemulsification extraction of the ocular lens and intraocular lens implantation were performed because of cataract progression, and for the other eye, additional PPV was done for postoperative retinal detachment. Conclusion PPV was effective for resolution of ME associated with BRVO and improved visual acuity with a small number of additional treatments during long-term follow-up. PMID:28255227

  18. Pressurized groundwater systems in Lunae and Ophir Plana (Mars): insights from small-scale morphology and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, Wouter A.; Kleinhans, Maarten G.; de Jong, Steven M.; Hauber, Ernst

    2015-04-01

    Large outflow channels on Mars reveal the past presence of water on the surface, possibly released from pressurized groundwater reservoirs. Due to a lack of understanding of the underlying processes, the hydrological and corresponding climate conditions remain a subject of debate. We investigate the detailed morphology of possible pressurized groundwater outflow systems in comparison to landscape evolution experiments. These experiments show that incised valleys like the classic outflow channels are a last erosional stage in morphological development. This is preceded by the formation of sedimentary lobes due to rapid water loss by infiltration. On Mars, we observed similar features related to different stages of groundwater outflow in Lunae and Ophir Plana, which form parts of the high standing plateaus adjacent to the huge depressions of the Valles Marineris. In both the experiment and the Martian cases, we observed lobate depositions that emerge from collapsed pits and pit chains. These lobes have channelized surfaces related to fluvial flow. In the experiments, pits formed adjacent to the valley heads due to the outflow. The pits in the source regions of Mars strongly relate to the regional tectonic structure and likely result from subsidence by extension and not by groundwater alone. Faulting, subsidence and collapse likely triggered outflow from a pressurized aquifer and could have aided in aquifer pressurization. This scenario is consistent with the presence of one or several cryosphere-confined aquifers from the Early Hesperian to at least the middle Amazonian. A pronounced spatial trend of larger and further developed outflow systems at lower elevations suggests that features ranging from small lobes to large outflow channels were sourced from a common aquifer or from aquifers with similar pressures. The required cryosphere indicates a cold climate and enables groundwater outflow even under atmospheric conditions unfavorable for sustained presence of

  19. Inverted fluvial features in the Aeolis-Zephyria Plana, western Medusae Fossae Formation, Mars: Evidence for post-formation modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefort, Alexandra; Burr, Devon M.; Beyer, Ross A.; Howard, Alan D.

    2012-03-01

    The Aeolis and Zephyria Plana contain the western-most portion of the Medusae Fossae Formation (MFF), an enigmatic and extensive light-toned deposit located in the Martian equatorial region and dated from the Hesperian to Amazonian epochs. This area hosts a large population of sinuous ridges (SRs), interpreted as inverted fluvial features, formed by precipitation, indurated by chemical cementation, buried by subsequent deposition, and finally exhumed. This interpretation of SRs as uniformly fluvial represents a modification to an earlier hypothesis for one particular SR of possible glaciofluvial (i.e. esker) formation. These SRs provide a tool to investigate the degree and character of post-fluvial modification processes in this region. We combined digital terrain models made from Context Camera (CTX) and High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) stereo image pairs with individual data points from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) to estimate relief, cross-sectional profiles, longitudinal profiles and slope directions of selected SRs. Longitudinal profiles of several SRs display undulations with amplitudes of up to order 100 m. While some of the lower amplitude undulations may be due to differential erosion, undulations having amplitudes in excess of SR relief require alternative explanations. Our combined morphologic and topographic analysis suggests that multiple post-flow processes, including compaction of the deposits and tectonic displacements, have modified the original SR profiles. Specification of the type(s) and magnitudes of these modification processes will contribute to understanding both the potential of post-flow modification of fluvial profiles elsewhere on Mars as well as the nature and properties of the MFF.

  20. New records of Sylvicola (Diptera: Anisopodidae) from Romania

    PubMed Central

    Dvořák, Libor; Beuk, Paul LT

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Anisopodidae (window gnats or wood gnats) is a small family of nematocerous Diptera. Until now only Sylvicola (Anisopus) punctatus (Fabricius, 1787) and Sylvicola (Sylvicola) fenestralis (Scopoli, 1763)​ were reported from Romania. New information New faunistic records of Sylvicola (Diptera: Anisopodidae) are presented. Sylvicola (Sylvicola) cinctus (Fabricius, 1787) and S. (Anisopus) fuscatus (Fabricius, 1775) are recorded from Romania for the first time. An identification key and illustrations of Romanian Sylvicola species are presented. PMID:26929721

  1. Revision of the Leucosphyrus Group of Anopheles (Cellia) (Diptera, Culicidae)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    Cellia) dirus (Diptera: Culicidae) of the Southeast Asian Leucosphyrus Group. Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington 82: 319–328. Baimai... Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington 38: 79–89. Kirnowardoyo, S. 1985. Status of Anopheles malaria vectors in Indonesia. The...world, Supplement II (Diptera: Culicidae). Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington 65: 117–140. Stone, A.; J. E. Scanlon; D. L

  2. Biodynamic modelling of the bioaccumulation of trace metals (Ag, As and Zn) by an infaunal estuarine invertebrate, the clam Scrobicularia plana.

    PubMed

    Kalman, J; Smith, B D; Bury, N R; Rainbow, P S

    2014-09-01

    Biodynamic modelling was used to investigate the uptake and accumulation of three trace metals (Ag, As, Zn) by the deposit feeding estuarine bivalve mollusc Scrobicularia plana. Radioactive labelling techniques were used to quantify the rates of trace metal uptake (and subsequent elimination) from water and sediment diet. The uptake rate constant from solution (±SE) was greatest for Ag (3.954±0.375 l g(-1) d(-1)) followed by As (0.807±0.129 l g(-1) d(-1)) and Zn (0.103±0.016 l g(-1) d(-1)). Assimilation efficiencies from ingested sediment were 40.2±1.3% (Ag), 31.7±1.0% (Zn) and 25.3±0.9% (As). Efflux rate constants after exposure to metals in the solution or sediment fell in the range of 0.014-0.060 d(-1). By incorporating these physiological parameters into biodynamic models, our results showed that dissolved metal is the predominant source of accumulated Ag, As and Zn in S. plana, accounting for 66-99%, 50-97% and 52-98% of total accumulation of Ag, As and Zn, respectively, under different field exposure conditions. In general, model-predicted steady state concentrations of Ag, As and Zn matched well with those observed in clams collected in SW England estuaries. Our findings highlight the potential of biodynamic modelling to predict Ag, As and Zn accumulation in S. plana, taking into account specific dissolved and sediment concentrations of the metals at a particular field site, together with local water and sediment geochemistries.

  3. Outcomes of 195 consecutive patients undergoing 2-port pars plana vitrectomy with slit-lamp illumination system for posterior segment disease: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Tavolato, Marco; Lo Giudice, Giuseppe; Cian, Roberto; Galan, Alessandro

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of 2-port 20-gauge pars plana vitrectomy with a slit-lamp illumination system in different vitreoretinal pathologies. : Retrospective, consecutive, interventional case series. One hundred and ninety-five consecutive eyes of 195 patients underwent 20-gauge 2-port pars plana vitrectomy with a combination of slit-lamp illumination and a plano-concave contact lens, at the San Paolo Ophthalmology Center, from September 2005 through November 2007. Postoperative visual acuity at baseline and at 1, 3, and 6 months; intraoperative and postoperative complication rate; and surgical time were evaluated. All patients completed 6 months of follow-up. The mean overall visual acuity was 0.74 ± 0.03 (mean ± SD) at baseline, improving to 0.56 ± 0.03 (P < 0.0001), 0.48 ± 0.03 (P < 0.0001), and 0.43 ± 0.03 (P < 0.0001) at 1, 3, and 6 months, respectively. No intraoperative complications occurred. Postoperative complications included retinal detachment in three patients, epiretinal membrane recurrence in three eyes, persistent macular hole in four eyes, and phthisis in one eye. Cataract formation was observed in 25 eyes. The total mean surgical time was 28.3 ± 10.1 minutes. No one had hypotony after the surgical procedure, and no cases of endophthalmitis were observed. Conversion to standard three-port vitrectomy was not necessary in any of the cases. Two-port 20-gauge pars plana vitrectomy with slit-lamp illumination is a safe and effective procedure for posterior segment surgeries.

  4. Pars plana vitrectomy combined with internal limiting membrane peeling for recurrent macular edema due to branch retinal vein occlusion after antivascular endothelial growth factor treatments.

    PubMed

    Shirakata, Yukari; Fukuda, Kouki; Fujita, Tomoyoshi; Nakano, Yuki; Nomoto, Hiroyuki; Yamaji, Hidetaka; Shiraga, Fumio; Tsujikawa, Akitaka

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the anatomic and functional outcomes of pars plana vitrectomy combined with internal limiting membrane peeling for recurrent macular edema (ME) due to branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) after intravitreal injections of antivascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) agents. Twenty-four eyes of 24 patients with treatment-naive ME from BRVO were treated with intravitreal injections of anti-VEGF agents. Recurred ME was treated with pars plana vitrectomy combined with internal limiting membrane peeling. After the surgery, ME was significantly reduced at 1 month (P=0.031) and the reduction increased with time (P=0.007 at the final visit). With the reduction in ME, treated eyes showed a slow improvement in visual acuity (VA). At the final visit, improvement in VA was statistically significant compared with baseline (P=0.048). The initial presence of cystoid spaces, serous retinal detachment, or subretinal hemorrhage under the fovea, as well as retinal perfusion status, showed no association with VA improvement. However, the presence of epiretinal membrane showed a significant association with the visual recovery. Although eyes without epiretinal membrane showed visual improvement (-0.10±0.32 in logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution [logMAR]), eyes with epiretinal membrane showed greater visual improvement (-0.38±0.12 in logMAR, P=0.012). For recurrent ME due to BRVO after anti-VEGF treatment, particularly when accompanied by epiretinal membrane, pars plana vitrectomy combined with internal limiting membrane peeling might be a possible treatment option.

  5. Comparison of the Effectiveness of Pars Plana Vitrectomy with and without Internal Limiting Membrane Peeling for Idiopathic Retinal Membrane Removal: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hanhan; Zuo, Shanru; Ding, Chun; Dai, Xunzhang; Zhu, Xiaohua

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis of published retrospective studies and compared the effectiveness of pars plana vitrectomy with and without internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling for idiopathic epiretinal membrane (IERM). The results revealed that patients in the IERM+ILM peeling group had better BCVA after surgery within 12 months than those in IERM peeling group. But patients in the IERM peeling group showed better BCVA in the 18th month. More retrospective studies or randomized controlled trials are required to investigate and compare the long-term effect of IERM removal with and without ILM peeling. PMID:26693348

  6. Comparison of the Effectiveness of Pars Plana Vitrectomy with and without Internal Limiting Membrane Peeling for Idiopathic Retinal Membrane Removal: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hanhan; Zuo, Shanru; Ding, Chun; Dai, Xunzhang; Zhu, Xiaohua

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis of published retrospective studies and compared the effectiveness of pars plana vitrectomy with and without internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling for idiopathic epiretinal membrane (IERM). The results revealed that patients in the IERM+ILM peeling group had better BCVA after surgery within 12 months than those in IERM peeling group. But patients in the IERM peeling group showed better BCVA in the 18th month. More retrospective studies or randomized controlled trials are required to investigate and compare the long-term effect of IERM removal with and without ILM peeling.

  7. Revision of the family Nothybidae (Diptera: Schizophora).

    PubMed

    Lonsdale, O; Marshall, S A

    2016-04-05

    The family Nothybidae (Diptera: Schizophora) is revised. The family consists of 11 species in the single genus Nothybus Rondani, which occurs in Papua New Guinea, Nepal and much of the Oriental Region. Three species are described as new: N. absens spec. nov. (China), N. cataractus spec. nov. (Laos, Thailand) and N. procerus spec. nov. (India). Nothybus longithorax Rondani, 1875 is treated as a junior synonym of N. longicollis (Walker, 1856). Nothybus decorus Meijere, 1924 syn. nov. is included as a junior synonym of N. lineifer Enderlein, 1922.

  8. Rhipidia crane flies (Diptera: Limoniidae) from Korea.

    PubMed

    Podenas, Sigitas; Byun, Hye-Woo; Kim, Sam-Kyu

    2016-07-07

    Korean species of the crane fly genus Rhipidia Meigen, 1818 (Diptera: Limoniidae), are taxonomically revised. Rhipidia (Rhipidia) serena, new species, is described and figured. Rhipidia (R.) longa Zhang, Li, Yang, 2014, R. (R.) maculata Meigen, 1818 and R. (R.) sejuga Zhang, Li, Yang, 2014 are recorded for the first time in Korea. Previously known species, Rhipidia (R.) septentrionis Alexander, 1913 is redescribed and illustrated. Identification key for all Korean Rhipidia species is given. Most antennae, wings, male and female terminalia of all species are illustrated for the first time.

  9. Pars plana suture fixation for intraocular lenses dislocated into the vitreous cavity using a closed-eye cow-hitch technique.

    PubMed

    Nakashizuka, Hiroyuki; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Iwasaki, Yutaka; Matsumoto, Yoko; Sato, Yukihiro

    2004-02-01

    We describe a modified intraocular cow-hitch technique for pars plana suture fixation of intraocular lenses (IOLs) that dislocated into the vitreous cavity in 3 patients who had a 3-port vitrectomy and IOL implantation because of retinal disease. To reposition the dislocated IOL after the residual vitreous was removed, 2 additional sclerotomies for suture fixation were made 3.0 mm posterior to the limbus. A loop (cow-hitch knot) was made with 10-0 polypropylene for suture fixation. After the neck of the cow-hitch loop was grasped with an intraocular forceps, the loop was used to lasso a haptic of the dislocated IOL, which was then pulled forward to the sclerotomy. The same procedure was used for the other haptic, and both sutures were secured to the sclera under scleral flaps. In all patients, the dislocated IOLs were repositioned without the need for extraction. The procedures were uneventful. Pars plana suture fixation with the intraocular cow-hitch technique can be used to reposition an IOL that has dislocated into the vitreous cavity.

  10. A NOVEL TECHNIQUE FOR SECURING SCLEROTOMIES IN 20-GAUGE TRANSCONJUNCTIVAL PARS PLANA VITRECTOMY: Surgical Outcomes and Complications in 529 Consecutive Cases.

    PubMed

    Abouammoh, Marwan A; Abouammoh, Mohammad A; Gale, Jeffrey S; Arevalo, J Fernando; Sharma, Sanjay

    2016-05-01

    To describe a novel technique for securing sclerotomies after 20-gauge transconjunctival pars plana vitrectomy and determine the efficacy, and short-term safety in various vitreoretinal diseases. Retrospective chart review of consecutive cases that underwent 20-gauge transconjunctival pars plana vitrectomy with sclerotomy hydration was conducted. The main outcome measures included intraocular pressure, intraocular gas bubble size in postoperative Day 1, and early postoperative complications. Secondary outcomes included postoperative visual acuity at 1-month postoperative visit. Five hundred and twenty-nine eyes were evaluated. Mean gas/air fill and mean intraocular pressure were 75.1% and 14.8 mmHg on postoperative Day 1. Seven eyes (1.32%) had hypotony (intraocular pressure <6 mmHg) on Day 1, which normalized in all eyes by Day 7 (P = 0.0083). On postoperative Day 7, mean intraocular pressure was 17.1 mmHg. Hypotony was associated with a preoperative diagnosis of retinal detachment (P = 0.022), and silicone oil tamponade (P = 0.017). Mean best corrected visual acuity was 20/320 preoperatively and 20/125 postoperatively at 1-month follow-up visit (P < 0.0001). Twenty-seven cases had intraoperative or postoperative complications (5.1%). Rate of complications was not associated with the type of tamponade (P = 0.076). Twenty-gauge transconjunctival sutureless vitrectomy with sclerotomy hydration appears to be safe with a low rate of hypotony and complications, and good final visual outcome.

  11. Recombination rate predicts inversion size in Diptera.

    PubMed Central

    Cáceres, M; Barbadilla, A; Ruiz, A

    1999-01-01

    Most species of the Drosophila genus and other Diptera are polymorphic for paracentric inversions. A common observation is that successful inversions are of intermediate size. We test here the hypothesis that the selected property is the recombination length of inversions, not their physical length. If so, physical length of successful inversions should be negatively correlated with recombination rate across species. This prediction was tested by a comprehensive statistical analysis of inversion size and recombination map length in 12 Diptera species for which appropriate data are available. We found that (1) there is a wide variation in recombination map length among species; (2) physical length of successful inversions varies greatly among species and is inversely correlated with the species recombination map length; and (3) neither the among-species variation in inversion length nor the correlation are observed in unsuccessful inversions. The clear differences between successful and unsuccessful inversions point to natural selection as the most likely explanation for our results. Presumably the selective advantage of an inversion increases with its length, but so does its detrimental effect on fertility due to double crossovers. Our analysis provides the strongest and most extensive evidence in favor of the notion that the adaptive value of inversions stems from their effect on recombination. PMID:10471710

  12. Coexistent anaphylaxis to Diptera and Hymenoptera.

    PubMed

    Freye, H B; Litwin, C

    1996-03-01

    Anaphylaxis to the bite of Diptera and specifically the bite of the Tabanidae family (horsefly) have been sparsely documented. The coexistent hypersensitivity to both the order Diptera and Hymenoptera has not been documented. We present a patient who experienced anaphylaxis to both insect species. Venom skin testing and RAST revealed sensitivity to several members of the Hymenoptera order. Prick, intradermal and RAST with whole body extracts of Tabanidae species is also documented in this patient. Twenty patients who are sensitive to Hymenoptera and have been bitten by horseflies but have had no reaction to the horsefly bite were used as controls. An anaphylactic reaction to horsefly bite has been documented in a 56-year-old white male. This patient also demonstrated evidence of anaphylactic reaction to Hymenoptera envenomation. In controls consisting of 20 patients with Hymenoptera sensitivity, there was no clinical history of reaction to horsefly bite despite the presence of positive prick and/or positive intradermal tests and/or positive RAST to mixed Tabanidae species extract. Skin testing to horsefly by prick and/or intradermal testing using whole body insect extract is not useful in making a diagnosis of Tabanidae hypersensitivity. RAST using Tabanidae species as antigen is similarly useless in making a diagnosis of Tabanidae hypersensitivity. In vivo and in vitro diagnosis of horsefly hypersensitivity may be achieved when the salivary gland antigen of the horsefly becomes available.

  13. Protocol for a feasibility cluster randomised controlled trial of a peer-led school-based intervention to increase the physical activity of adolescent girls (PLAN-A).

    PubMed

    Sebire, Simon J; Edwards, Mark J; Campbell, Rona; Jago, Russell; Kipping, Ruth; Banfield, Kathryn; Tomkinson, Keeley; Garfield, Kirsty; Lyons, Ronan A; Simon, Joanne; Blair, Peter S; Hollingworth, William

    2016-01-01

    Physical activity levels are low amongst adolescent girls, and this population faces specific barriers to being active. Peer influences on health behaviours are important in adolescence and peer-led interventions might hold promise to change behaviour. This paper describes the protocol for a feasibility cluster randomised controlled trial of Peer-Led physical Activity iNtervention for Adolescent girls (PLAN-A), a peer-led intervention aimed at increasing adolescent girls' physical activity levels. A two-arm cluster randomised feasibility trial will be conducted in six secondary schools (intervention n = 4; control n = 2) with year 8 (12-13 years old) girls. The intervention will operate at a year group level and consist of year 8 girls nominating influential peers within their year group to become peer-supporters. Approximately 15 % of the cohort will receive 3 days of training about physical activity and interpersonal communication skills. Peer-supporters will then informally diffuse messages about physical activity amongst their friends for 10 weeks. Data will be collected at baseline (time 0 (T0)), immediately after the intervention (time 1 (T1)) and 12 months after baseline measures (time 2 (T2)). In this feasibility trial, the primary interest is in the recruitment of schools and participants (both year 8 girls and peer-supporters), delivery and receipt of the intervention, data provision rates and identifying the cost categories for future economic analysis. Physical activity will be assessed using 7-day accelerometry, with the likely primary outcome in a fully-powered trial being daily minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Participants will also complete psychosocial questionnaires at each time point: assessing motivation, self-esteem and peer physical activity norms. Data analysis will be largely descriptive and focus on recruitment, attendance and data provision rates. The findings will inform the sample size required for a

  14. Surgical outcomes of 23-gauge transconjunctival pars plana vitrectomy combined with lensectomy for glaucomatous eyes with extremely shallow anterior chamber and cataract.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaotian; Zhang, Shaochong; Jiang, Xintong; Qiu, Suo; Wei, Yantao

    2016-01-04

    Glaucoma combined with an extremely shallow anterior chamber and cataracts remains as a complex condition to deal with. And the emergence of microincision vitrectomy surgery (MIVS) system may provide an ideal option for the treatment of that. We report a clinical study of surgical outcomes of 23-gauge transconjunctival pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) combined with lensectomy in the treatment of glaucomatous eyes with extremely shallow anterior chamber and cataract. Prospective, nonrandomized and noncomparative case series study. Consecutive patients with secondary glaucoma, extremely shallow anterior chamber and cataract were recruited to have combined surgeries of 23-gauge transconjunctival pars plana vitrectomy and lensectomy. The main outcomes were best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), intraocular pressure (IOP), anterior chamber depth (ACD), number of anti-glaucoma medications and surgery-associated complications. Seventeen consecutive patients with secondary glaucoma, extremely shallow anterior chamber and cataract were recruited. The mean follow-up was 21.2 ± 8.8 months. Postoperatively, there was no significant improvement of BCVA (P = 0.25). The mean intraocular (IOP) decreased significantly from 43.14 ± 6.53 mmHg to 17.29 ± 1.80 mmHg (P < 0.001), and the mean depth of anterior chamber increased significantly from 0.507 ± 0.212 mm to 3.080 ± 0.313 mm (P < 0.001). The mean number of anti-glaucoma medications decreased from 4.1 ± 0.8 to 0.6 ± 0.8 (P < 0.001). No severe vision-threatening intra- or post-operative complications occurred. Glaucoma with an extremely shallow anterior chamber and cataract can be managed well with the combined surgeries of 23-gauge pars plana vitrectomy and lensectomy. The surgical procedure is an effective and safe method to resolve the pupillary block and deepen the anterior chamber.

  15. Comparative study of photodynamic therapy with 5%, 10% and 20% aminolevulinic acid in the treatment of generalized recalcitrant facial verruca plana: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Li, Q; Jiao, B; Zhou, F; Tan, Q; Ma, Y; Luo, L; Zhai, J; Luan, Q; Li, C; Wang, G; Gao, T

    2014-12-01

    Generalised recalcitrant facial verruca plana responds poorly to current therapeutic options, including cryotherapy, topical drugs and carbon dioxide (CO2 ) laser. Case reports and uncontrolled studies suggested that topical photodynamic therapy (PDT) is effective choice of treatment free from potential complications associated with invasive therapies. To investigate the efficacy and safety of PDT with different concentrations of photosensitiser in the treatment of verruca plana. The two sides of a subject's face were separately randomized to receive aminolevulinic acid (ALA) of 5%, 10% or 20% concentration. All patients were irradiated with 633-nm red light for 339 J/cm(2) total dose. Complete response (CR) rate was assessed on Week 4, 8, and 16 respectively. The mean overall clearance rate was 74.1%, 68.8%, and 64.6% on Week 4, 8, and 12, respectively, in the 110 treated sides. The CR rate was lower in the 5%-ALA group than in the 10%-ALA group (14.3% vs. 33.3%, p < 0.05) and 20%-ALA group (14.3% vs. 26.3%, p < 0.05) after 12 weeks. The mean severity of pain measured by visual analogue scale (VAS) scoring was 3.8 (range: 2 to 10, depending on the lesion location). The overall recurrence rate was 16.7% (4/24) on Week 12. Hyperpigmentation was observed in 61% (67/110) of all treated sides. On Week 4, 8, and 16, hyperpigmentation was more developed in the 20%-ALA group than in the other two groups (p < 0.05). In terms of complete clearance rate, the 5% ALA-PDT group was significantly inferior to the 10% and 20% ALA-PDT groups at each follow-up. In contrast, the 20% ALA group showed a higher incidence rate of transient hyperpigmentation than the other two groups. This randomised clinical trial suggests that PDT with ALA of 10% concentration offers better efficacy and safety than 5% or 20% concentration for generalised recalcitrant facial verruca plana. © 2013 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  16. Pictorial Keys for the Identification of Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) Associated With Dengue Virus Transmission

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-03

    a new species (Diptera: Culicidae). Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington , 88(4), 634–649. Huang, Y.M. (1990) The subgenus Stegomyia...mosquitoes of the Afrotropical Region (Diptera: Culicidae). Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington , 103(1), 1–53. Huang, Y.M. and Ward...female of Aedes (Finlaya) niveus (Ludlow) (Diptera: Culicidae). Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washing- ton, 100(4), 824–827. Knight, K.L

  17. History of tachinid classification (Diptera, Tachinidae)

    PubMed Central

    O’Hara, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The history of the classification of the Tachinidae (Diptera) is traced from Meigen to the present. The contributions of Robineau-Desvoidy, Townsend, Villeneuve, Mesnil, Herting, Wood and many others are discussed within a chronological, taxonomic, and geographic context. The gradual development of the Tachinidae into its modern concept as a family of the Oestroidea and the emergence of the classificatory scheme of tribes and subfamilies in use today are reviewed. Certain taxa that have in the past been difficult to place, or continue to be of uncertain affinity, are considered and some are given in a table to show their varied historical treatments. The more significant systematic works published on the Tachinidae in recent decades are enumerated chronologically. PMID:23878512

  18. Rehydration of forensically important larval Diptera specimens.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Michelle R; Pechal, Jennifer L; Tomberlin, Jeffery K

    2011-01-01

    Established procedures for collecting and preserving evidence are essential for all forensic disciplines to be accepted in court and by the forensic community at large. Entomological evidence, such as Diptera larvae, are primarily preserved in ethanol, which can evaporate over time, resulting in the dehydration of specimens. In this study, methods used for rehydrating specimens were compared. The changes in larval specimens with respect to larval length and weight for three forensically important blow fly (Diptera: Calliphoridae) species in North America were quantified. Phormia regina (Meigen), Cochliomyia macellaria (F.), and Chrysomya rufifacies (Macquart) third-instar larvae were collected from various decomposing animals and preserved with three preservation methods (80% ethanol, 70% isopropyl alcohol, and hot-water kill then 80% ethanol). Preservative solutions were allowed to evaporate. Rehydration was attempted with either of the following: 80% ethanol, commercial trisodium phosphate substitute solution, or 0.5% trisodium phosphate solution. All three methods partially restored weight and length of specimens recorded before preservation. Analysis of variance results indicated that effects of preservation, rehydration treatment, and collection animal were different in each species. The interaction between preservative method and rehydration treatment had a significant effect on both P. regina and C. macellaria larval length and weight. In addition, there was a significant interaction effect of collection animal on larval C. macellaria measurements. No significant effect was observed in C. rufifacies larval length or weight among the preservatives or treatments. These methods could be used to establish a standard operating procedure for dealing with dehydrated larval specimens in forensic investigations.

  19. Morphological, compositional and ultrastructural changes in the Scrobicularia plana shell in response to environmental mercury--an indelible fingerprint of metal exposure?

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Iqbal; Singh, Manoj K; Pereira, Maria L; Pacheco, Mário; Santos, Maria A; Duarte, Armando C; Pereira, Eduarda; Grácio, José

    2013-03-01

    The study aimed to assess morphological, structural and compositional alterations in Scrobicularia plana nacre environmentally exposed to mercury in order to seek out the possibility of the assessed alterations as a monitoring tool to handle complexity and interactions of metals in the environment involving a non-invasive methodology. Bivalves were collected from a mercury contaminated site (Laranjo basin - Ria de Aveiro, Portugal) and a reference site in the same aquatic system. The combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) technique depicted a sheet like morphology of bivalve nacre collected from the reference site. Moreover, EDS plot exhibited the presence of potassium, oxygen, calcium, and carbon elements. Shells collected from the contaminated area depicted lamellar patches like structures with particle like morphology composition. SEM images corresponding to the elemental analysis by EDS plot clearly denoted the presence of mercury. SEM images from the other locations of the contaminated shells depicted large surface area, a broken or ruptured symmetry of organic matrix as well as crack-like gaps. The influence of environmental mercury affecting the surface morphology of S. plana nacre showed dimple like morphology (as proved by transmission electron microscopy, TEM). The possible explanation may be the replacement of calcium elements with other elements or alloys from the nacre composite collected from contaminated region. Therefore, the nacre fingerprint may be useful as innovative knowledge and applicable tool aiming at risk reduction from noxious mercury present in the environment. Overall results suggested the use of shell as an indelible fingerprint of metal exposure.

  20. Development and application of a QuEChERS-based extraction method for the analysis of 55 pesticides in the bivalve Scrobicularia plana by GC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Cruzeiro, Catarina; Rodrigues-Oliveira, Nádia; Velhote, Susana; Pardal, Miguel Ângelo; Rocha, Eduardo; Rocha, Maria João

    2016-05-01

    A method for quantitative determination of 55 pesticides in a bivalve matrix was established, based on QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged, and Safe) extraction and using gas chromatography (GC)-ion trap (IT) mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Accomplishing the European SANCO guidelines, this method was validated using 5 g of homogenized soft tissue, allowing the quantification of pesticides at ng/g of wet weight (ww). Quantification limits and recovery rates ranged from 0.33 to 10.3 μg/L and from 78 to 119 %, respectively. As an important mollusc, not only from an ecological perspective but also for food consumption, the peppery furrow shell (Scrobicularia plana) was sampled at three strategical sites (Ria Formosa Lagoon, in the south of Portugal) during 2012-2013, over six campaigns. A total of 2160 animals were pooled by place and sex. No statistical differences were found among sites or between sexes. Forty percent of the sampled pools were above quantification limits, reaching total annual average concentrations of ∑800 ng/g ww. Additionally, 83 % of the selected compounds showed concentrations above the legal limits set by the European Directive 2013/39/EU. In conclusion, the applied method was successful and proved that bivalves were contaminated by the selected pesticides. In future work, this methodology can be used to monitor body burdens and obtain data for predicting impacts in shellfish consumers. Graphical Abstract Resume of pesticides extraction and analyses process from S. plana.

  1. Variation of content of lipid classes, sterols and fatty acids in gonads and digestive glands of Scrobicularia plana in relation to environment pollution levels.

    PubMed

    Perrat, E; Couzinet-Mossion, A; Fossi Tankoua, O; Amiard-Triquet, C; Wielgosz-Collin, G

    2013-04-01

    Lipids are central for energy metabolism and their fate in bivalves is closely linked to environmental conditions and gametogenic cycle. In order to assess the pollution impact on lipid metabolism of bivalves, storage and structure lipids from samples of Scrobicularia plana were studied. These samples were collected during sexual maturity both from estuaries considered contaminated (Goyen and Blavet) and from a reference site (Bay of St Brieuc) for comparison. Lipids were extracted from the gonads and the digestive glands and further separated by column chromatography. Fatty acids and sterols were then analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Correlations were shown between dioxin-like compounds (Eq-TCDD) and triacyglycerol levels (TAG). In the same way, glycolipids and contamination by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and pollutants with estrogenic activity seem to be closely related. In a second time, lipid indices (ratio between storage and structure lipids) were evaluated. Whereas these indices are often used in fish to assess habitat quality with regards to differential anthropogenic pressure, the ratio TAG/sterols was not here significantly influenced by the site of origin of S. plana. Intersite fluctuations of the ratio TAG/phospholipids also remained very limited. This could be explained by the limited contamination level in studied sites but also by a contrasted response from organisms in different taxa (bivalves vs. fish). Environmental pollution is not the only factor able to induce changes in lipid classes. The trophic wealth seemed to be different between the reference site and contaminated estuaries, the total organic carbon content being higher in muddy estuarine sediments.

  2. Checklist of the family Syrphidae (Diptera) of Finland

    PubMed Central

    Haarto, Antti; Kerppola, Sakari

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A checklist of the Syrphidae (Diptera) recorded from Finland. Three species of Syrphidae, Platycheirus modestus Ide, 1926, Cheilosia barovskii (Stackelberg, 1930) and Mallota tricolor Loew, 1871, are published as new to the Finnish fauna. Platycheirus modestus is also new to the Palaearctic. PMID:25337020

  3. Ethology of Omniablautus nigronotum (Wilcox) (Diptera: Asilidae) in Wyoming

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In southwest Wyoming, Omniablautus nigronotum (Wilcox), hunted primarily from the surface of the sandy substrate in a greasewood community. Prey, captured in flight, represented four insect orders with Diptera and Hymenoptera predominating. Courtship consisted of the male approaching the female from...

  4. Initial survey of predacious diptera on hemlocks in Japan

    Treesearch

    Hisashi Ohishi; Shigehiko Shiyake; Yorio Miyatake; Ashley Lamb; Michael E. Montgomery

    2011-01-01

    Some species of Coleoptera and Diptera are specialist predators of adelgids. Previously, we reported our survey of predacious Coleoptera on hemlocks in Japan (Shiyake et al. 2008). Two of these beetles, Sasajiscymnus tsugae and Laricobius sp. nov., have been exported to the U.S. for biological control. Here, we provide the first...

  5. World catalog of extant and fossil Corethrellidae (Diptera).

    PubMed

    Borkent, Art

    2014-05-20

    A world catalog of extant and fossil frog-biting midges (Diptera: Corethrellidae) provides full type information, known life stages, and distribution of each species. There are 105 extant and seven fossil species of Corethrellidae but unnamed species are known from Costa Rica, Colombia and Madagascar. New information on types and other important specimens are provided.

  6. Development of Rhagoletis indifferens Curran (Diptera:Tephritidae) in crabapple

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Western cherry fruit fly, Rhagoletis indifferens, Curran, 1932 (Diptera: Tephritidae), was reared from naturally-infested Chinese crabapple, Malus spectabilis (Ait.) Borkh. (Rosaceae), in Washington state, U.S.A. Pupae from Chinese crabapple were smaller than those from sweet cherry, Prunus avium (...

  7. Crowdsourcing for large-scale mosquito (Diptera: Culicidae) sampling

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sampling a cosmopolitan mosquito (Diptera: Culicidae) species throughout its range is logistically challenging and extremely resource intensive. Mosquito control programmes and regional networks operate at the local level and often conduct sampling activities across much of North America. A method f...

  8. Six new species of Microdon Meigen from Madagascar (Diptera: Syrphidae).

    PubMed

    Reemer, Menno; Bot, Sander

    2015-10-28

    Six new species of the myrmecophilous hoverfly genus Microdon Meigen (Diptera: Syrphidae) are described from Madagascar. Redescriptions are given for the three other Madagascan species of this genus. Keys are presented to the Madagascan genera of the subfamily Microdontinae and to the Madagascan species of Microdon.

  9. Response of Lucilia sericata (Diptera: Calliphoridae) to Screwworm Oviposition Attractant

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The sheep blow fly, Lucilia sericata Meigen (Diptera: Calliphoridae), causes sheep myiasis in various parts of the world. The females are attracted to sheep, following various olfactory cues emanating from the sheep's body, and oviposit on suitable substrates on sheep ultimately causing myiasis. Ear...

  10. Cryopreservation of embryos of Lucilia sericata (Diptera: Calliphoridae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Embryos of Lucilia (Phaenicia) sericata (Meigen) (Diptera: Calliphoridae), the green blowfly, were successfully cryopreserved by vitrification in liquid nitrogen and stored for 8 yr. Embryos incubated at 19 deg. C for 17 h after oviposition were found to be the most appropriate stage to cryopreserve...

  11. Anopheles (Anopheles) pseudopunctipennis Theobald (Diptera: Culicidae): Neotype Designation and Description

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    Diptera Ð Culicidae). Guayaquil Univ., Guayaquil, Ecuador. Levi-Castillo, R. 1945. Los anofelinos de la Republica del Ecuador, vol. 1: 1Ð172. Artes ...BritishMuseumNatural History, Lon- don, England. Vargas, L., and A. Martinez Palacios. 1956. Anofelinos mexicanos . Taxonomia y distribucion. Secretaria

  12. Heterangaeus Alexander, 1925 crane flies (Diptera: Pediciidae) of Korea.

    PubMed

    Podenas, Sigitas; Podeniene, Virginija; Byun, Hye-Woo

    2015-08-25

    The Korean crane fly species of the genus Heterangaeus Alexander, 1925 (Diptera: Pediciidae) is taxonomically revised. H. gloriosus gloriosus (Alexander, 1924) is redescribed. A new species Heterangaeus koreanus n. sp., which is the first species of Pediciidae from South Korea, is described and illustrated.

  13. Osmoregulatory Organs of Immature Culicodes Sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The water saturated soils and wet feces in livestock feed lots support a variety of Diptera including Musca spp. and Culicoides spp. Aquatic insects that must regulate the ion concentrations of their haemolymph; and fresh water insects tend to loose ions to their aquatic environment. The larvae of C...

  14. Frass semiochemicals important to corn-infesting Ulidiidae (Diptera)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Several similarly appearing species of silk fly (Diptera: Ulidiidae) are extremely destructive pests of sweet corn in southern Florida. Currently, silk flies are managed solely with multiple broad spectrum insecticide applications, and there is concern that some species are developing resistance to ...

  15. Susceptibility of cranberries to Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Drosophila suzukii Mastsumura (Diptera: Drosophilidae), commonly referred to as the spotted-wing drosophila, is an exotic species that has proven a troublesome pest of fruit production in the U.S. The fly targets small fruit and thus represents a concern for the U.S. cranberry industry. Two studies ...

  16. Application of a Computerized General Purpose Information Management System (SELGEM) to Medically Important Arthropods (Diptera: Culcidae).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    COMPUTERIZED GENERAL PURPOSE INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (SELGE.M) TO KEDICALLY IMPORTANT ARTHROPODS (DIPTERA: CULICIDAE) Annual Report Terry L. Erwin June...GENERAL PURPOSE INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Annual--1 September 1979- (SEIGEM) TO MEDICALLY ThWORTANT ARTHROPODS 30 May 1980 (DIPTERA: CULICIDAE) 6

  17. The forgotten flies: the importance of non-syrphid Diptera as pollinators.

    PubMed

    Orford, Katherine A; Vaughan, Ian P; Memmott, Jane

    2015-04-22

    Bees, hoverflies and butterflies are taxa frequently studied as pollinators in agricultural and conservation contexts. Although there are many records of non-syrphid Diptera visiting flowers, they are generally not regarded as important pollinators. We use data from 30 pollen-transport networks and 71 pollinator-visitation networks to compare the importance of various flower-visiting taxa as pollen-vectors. We specifically compare non-syrphid Diptera and Syrphidae to determine whether neglect of the former in the literature is justified. We found no significant difference in pollen-loads between the syrphid and non-syrphid Diptera. Moreover, there was no significant difference in the level of specialization between the two groups in the pollen-transport networks, though the Syrphidae had significantly greater visitation evenness. Flower visitation data from 33 farms showed that non-syrphid Diptera made up the majority of the flower-visiting Diptera in the agricultural studies (on average 82% abundance and 73% species richness), and we estimate that non-syrphid Diptera carry 84% of total pollen carried by farmland Diptera. As important pollinators, such as bees, have suffered serious declines, it would be prudent to improve our understanding of the role of non-syrphid Diptera as pollinators.

  18. The forgotten flies: the importance of non-syrphid Diptera as pollinators

    PubMed Central

    Orford, Katherine A.; Vaughan, Ian P.; Memmott, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Bees, hoverflies and butterflies are taxa frequently studied as pollinators in agricultural and conservation contexts. Although there are many records of non-syrphid Diptera visiting flowers, they are generally not regarded as important pollinators. We use data from 30 pollen-transport networks and 71 pollinator-visitation networks to compare the importance of various flower-visiting taxa as pollen-vectors. We specifically compare non-syrphid Diptera and Syrphidae to determine whether neglect of the former in the literature is justified. We found no significant difference in pollen-loads between the syrphid and non-syrphid Diptera. Moreover, there was no significant difference in the level of specialization between the two groups in the pollen-transport networks, though the Syrphidae had significantly greater visitation evenness. Flower visitation data from 33 farms showed that non-syrphid Diptera made up the majority of the flower-visiting Diptera in the agricultural studies (on average 82% abundance and 73% species richness), and we estimate that non-syrphid Diptera carry 84% of total pollen carried by farmland Diptera. As important pollinators, such as bees, have suffered serious declines, it would be prudent to improve our understanding of the role of non-syrphid Diptera as pollinators. PMID:25808886

  19. Brain plasticity in Diptera and Hymenoptera

    PubMed Central

    Groh, Claudia; Meinertzhagen, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    To mediate different types of behaviour, nervous systems must coordinate the proper operation of their neural circuits as well as short- and long-term alterations that occur within those circuits. The latter ultimately devolve upon specific changes in neuronal structures, membrane properties and synaptic connections that are all examples of plasticity. This reorganization of the adult nervous system is shaped by internal and external influences both during development and adult maturation. In adults, behavioural experience is a major driving force of neuronal plasticity studied particularly in sensory systems. The range of adaptation depends on features that are important to a particular species, so that learning is essential for foraging in honeybees, while regenerative capacities are important in hemimetabolous insects with long appendages. Experience is usually effective during a critical period in early adult life, when neural function becomes tuned to future conditions in an insect's life. Changes occur at all levels, in synaptic circuits, neuropile volumes, and behaviour. There are many examples, and this review incorporates only a select few, mainly those from Diptera and Hymenoptera. PMID:20036946

  20. [Highest mosquito records (Diptera: Culicidae) in Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Navarro, Juan-Carlos; Del Ventura, Fabiola; Zorrilla, Adriana; Liria, Jonathan

    2010-03-01

    Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) are holometabolous insects with aquatic immature stages, which use a broad variety of larval habitats, from ground water bodies to Phytothelmata (water deposits in plants) and artificial deposits. The availability of breeding sites often determines the upper limits of mosquito ranges. We built a database with 9,607 records with 432 localities, 19 genera and 254 species. The Andean mountains have 77% of the highest mosquito records including Aedes euris with record at 3,133 m, followed by three species of Anopheles--subgenera Kerteszia--with the upper limit of 2,680 m. Wyeomyia bicornis and Culex daumastocampa at 2,550 m were the highest records in the Central-Coastal cordillera, while the highest record in Pantepui was Wyeomyia zinzala at 2,252 m. The species associated with phytothelmata (Bromeliaceae and Sarraceniaceae) represent 60% of the records. The upper limits of Culex quinquefasciatus and Anopheles (Kerteszia) species could represent the theoretical limit for transmission of filariasis or arboviruses, by Culex, and malaria by Anopheles (Kerteszia) in Venezuela. Similarly, a vector of Dengue, Aedes aegypti, has not been not recorded above 2,000 m.

  1. Comments on the association of immatures of Hemerodromia (Diptera, Empididae) and Simulium (Diptera, Simuliidae), and first record of this association in the Atlantic Forest (Brazil).

    PubMed

    Sánchez Molina, Óscar; Gil-Azevedo, Leonardo Henrique

    2016-11-01

    Larvae of Empididae (Diptera) prey on black fly immatures and its pupae can be collected from pupal cases of Simuliidae (Diptera). The aim of our work was to report the second record of association between immatures of Empididae and Simuliidae in the Neotropical Region and the first for the Atlantic Forest (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil). We collected 4982 pupae and exuviae of Simulium Latreille, (Diptera, Simuliidae) and found three with a pupa of Hemerodromia Meigen (Diptera, Empididae) inside. This shows that the use of black flies cocoons by dance flies occurs at extremely low frequencies, which might explain why this association is so rarely recorded. Our results are relevant for a better comprehension of the predator-prey relationship between these families.

  2. Intravitreal Fluorinated Gas Preference and Occurrence of Rare Ischemic Postoperative Complications after Pars Plana Vitrectomy: A Survey of the American Society of Retina Specialists

    PubMed Central

    Sigler, Eric J.; Randolph, John C.; Charles, Steve; Calzada, Jorge I.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To perform a survey of the American Society of Retina Specialists (ASRS) regarding the use of vitreous cavity fluorinated gas as an adjunct to pars plana vitrectomy for retinal detachment or macular hole repair. Methods. A multiple-choice online questionnaire was administered to members of ASRS. Physician experience, gas preference for vitrectomy, and categorical estimate of observation of blinding postoperative ischemic events were recorded. Results. 282 questionnaires were completed. Mean years in vitreoretinal practice were 15 ± 10. A decrease in yearly vitrectomy volume was associated with increased number of years in practice (P = 0.011). Greater than 95% of respondents preferred fluorinated gas to air alone for both retinal detachment and macular hole repair. 38% of respondents reported at least one observation of a blinding ischemic postoperative event. Overall estimated incidence of blinding postoperative ischemic event was 0.06 events/year in practice. Conclusions. Currently, C3F8 and SF6 are the postoperative gas preference for ASRS respondents, in contrast to previous North American surveys. The occurrence of blinding ischemic events appears unrelated to number of years in practice, was reported by less than half of those surveyed, and has occurred at an infrequent rate of approximately once for every ten years of practice for those observing the phenomena. PMID:22997567

  3. The influence of salinity on the fate and behavior of silver standardized nanomaterial and toxicity effects in the estuarine bivalve Scrobicularia plana.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Carole; Zalouk-Vergnoux, Aurore; Giambérini, Laure; Poirier, Laurence; Devin, Simon; Labille, Jérôme; Perrein-Ettajani, Hanane; Pagnout, Christophe; Châtel, Amélie; Levard, Clément; Auffan, Mélanie; Mouneyrac, Catherine

    2016-10-01

    Because of their antibacterial properties, silver (Ag) engineered nanomaterials are included in many products. The present study used a standardized Ag nanomaterial (NM-300K, 20 nm) supplied with a stabilizing agent. The aim was to investigate the behavior of Ag nanomaterial in an estuarine-like medium at 2 salinities (15 psu and 30 psu). Uptake as well as sublethal effects of Ag nanomaterial (10 μg Ag/L), its stabilizing agent, and AgNO3 (10 μg Ag/L) were assessed in the clam Scrobicularia plana, after 7 d of exposure. The release of soluble Ag from Ag nanomaterial in the experimental media was quantified by using diffusive gradient in thin films and ultrafiltration. A multibiomarker approach was employed to reveal responses of clams at subindividual and individual levels. The bioaccumulation of Ag was significantly greater at 15 psu versus 30 psu, which could be explained by differences in Ag speciation. In conclusion, the present study showed different impacts of Ag nanomaterial that were not always explained by the release of Ag ions in clams at both salinities; such impacts were particularly characterized by induction of oxidative stress, cell damage, and impairment of energetic levels. Burrowing of clams was affected by the stabilizing agent depending on the salinity tested, with stronger effects at 15 psu. Finally, the present study highlighted salinity-dependent changes in the physiology of estuarine bivalves. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2550-2561. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  4. Toxicity and the fractional distribution of trace metals accumulated from contaminated sediments by the clam Scrobicularia plana exposed in the laboratory and the field.

    PubMed

    Kalman, J; Bonnail-Miguel, E; Smith, B D; Bury, N R; Rainbow, P S

    2015-02-15

    The relationship between the subcellular distribution of accumulated toxic metals into five operational fractions (subsequently combined into presumed detoxified and non-detoxified components) and toxicity in the clam Scrobicularia plana was investigated under different laboratory exposures. Clams were exposed to metal contaminated media (water and diet) and analysed for the partitioning of accumulated As, Cu and Zn into subcellular fractions. In general, metallothionein-like proteins, metal-rich granules and cellular debris in different proportions acted as main storage sites of accumulated metals in the clam soft tissues for these three metals. No significant differences were noted in the accumulation rates of As, Cu and Zn of groups of individuals with or without apparent signs of toxicity after up to 30 days of exposure to naturally contaminated sediment mixtures. There was, however, an increased proportional accumulation of Cu in the non-detoxified fraction with increased Cu accumulation rate in the clams, suggesting that the Cu uptake rate from contaminated sediments exceeded the combined rates of elimination and detoxification of Cu, with the subsequent likelihood for toxic effects in the clams.

  5. The use of topical aqueous suppressants in the prevention of postoperative intraocular pressure elevation following pars plana vitrectomy with long-acting gas tamponade.

    PubMed Central

    Mittra, R A; Pollack, J S; Dev, S; Han, D P; Mieler, W F; Connor, T B

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine if topical aqueous suppressant therapy applied after pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) with gas tamponade successfully prevents postoperative elevation of intraocular pressure (IOP). METHODS: A prospective, controlled study was performed on patients who met inclusion criteria and underwent PPV with gas tamponade (SF6 18%-20% or C3F8 12%-16%) over a 1-year period. Treatment eyes received topical aqueous suppressants at the end of surgery. Postoperative IOP checks were performed at 4 to 6 hours, 1 day, and 1 week. RESULTS: Twenty-one control (C) and 20 treatment (T) eyes met the inclusion criteria. The IOP (in mm Hg) measured at 4 to 6 hours (23.05 [C], 14.73 [T] and 1 day (23.24 [C], 17.28 [T]) postoperatively showed a statistically significant difference between the groups (P = .0038) at 4 to 6 hours, and a trend toward significance (P = .057) at 1 day. Eleven control and 3 treatment eyes had an IOP spike above 25 mm Hg at 4 to 6 hours or 1 day postoperatively (P = .02), and 6 control and 1 treatment eye had a postoperative IOP above 30 mm Hg. A pressure rise above 40 mm Hg was seen in 2 control eyes and no treatment eyes. CONCLUSIONS: Use of topical aqueous suppressants following PPV with long-acting gas tamponade is effective in preventing significant postoperative IOP elevation in a majority of cases. PMID:10360287

  6. Direct cost of pars plana vitrectomy for the treatment of macular hole, epiretinal membrane and vitreomacular traction: a bottom-up approach.

    PubMed

    Nicod, Elena; Jackson, Timothy L; Grimaccia, Federico; Angelis, Aris; Costen, Marc; Haynes, Richard; Hughes, Edward; Pringle, Edward; Zambarakji, Hadi; Kanavos, Panos

    2016-11-01

    The direct cost to the National Health Service (NHS) in England of pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) is unknown since a bottom-up costing exercise has not been undertaken. Healthcare resource group (HRG) costing relies on a top-down approach. We aimed to quantify the direct cost of intermediate complexity PPV. Five NHS vitreoretinal units prospectively recorded all consumables, equipment and staff salaries during PPV undertaken for vitreomacular traction, epiretinal membrane and macular hole. Out-of-surgery costs between admission and discharge were estimated using a representative accounting method. The average patient time in theatre for 57 PPVs was 72 min. The average in-surgery cost for staff was £297, consumables £619, and equipment £82 (total £997). The average out-of-surgery costs were £260, including nursing and medical staff, other consumables, eye drops and hospitalisation. The total cost was therefore £1634, including 30 % overheads. This cost estimate was an under-estimate because it did not include out-of-theatre consumables or equipment. The average reimbursed HRG tariff was £1701. The cost of undertaking PPV of intermediate complexity is likely to be higher than the reimbursed tariff, except for hospitals with high throughput, where amortisation costs benefit from economies of scale. Although this research was set in England, the methodology may provide a useful template for other countries.

  7. Assessment of Anterior Segment Changes in Pseudophakic Eyes, Using Ultrasonic Biomicroscopic Imaging, after Pars Plana Vitrectomy with Silicone Oil or Gas Tamponade.

    PubMed

    Ünsal, Erkan; Eltutar, Kadir; Karini, Belma; Kızılay, Osman

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the morphological changes of the anterior segment using ultrasonic biomicroscopy (UBM) imaging in pseudophakic patients who underwent pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) with silicone oil or gas (C3F8) internal tamponade agent injection. Method. This prospective study included pseudophakic patients with planned PPV, divided into two groups according to internal tamponade agent: those in which silicone oil was used (n = 27, Group 1) and those in which gas (C3F8) was used (n = 24, Group 2). UBM measurements were performed in the supine position before and one week after surgery. Results. In patients of Group 1, postoperative trabecular meshwork-ciliary process distance (T-CPD) and iris-ciliary process distance (I-CPD), according to preoperative values, were found to be statistically significantly reduced, and postoperative mean value of scleral thickness (ST) and intraocular pressure (IOP), according to preoperative value, was found to be statistically significantly increased. In patients of Group 2, postoperative mean values of anterior chamber depth (ACD), ciliary body thickness (CBT), T-CPD, I-CPD, and IOP, according to preoperative values, were found to be statistically significantly reduced. Preoperatively, in Group 2 patients, according to Group 1 patients, TIA and IOP were found to be statistically significantly increased. Preoperative and postoperative IOP between the measured parameters with UBM showed no statistically significant correlation. Conclusions. Gases cause more morphological changes in the anterior segment structures. It is thought that complications such as increased intraocular pressure can be seen more frequently for this reason.

  8. Change of name for the Oriental robber fly Nyssomyia Hull, 1962 (Diptera: Asilidae, Asilinae), nec Nyssomyia Barretto, 1962 (Diptera: Psychodidae, Phlebotominae).

    PubMed

    Ibáñez-Bernal, Sergio; Fisher, Eric

    2015-08-14

    A new name for the Oriental genus Nyssomyia Hull, 1962 (Diptera: Asilidae) is proposed. Homonymy exists between this Oriental robber fly genus and the more senior Neotropical phlebotomine sand fly genus Nyssomyia Barretto, 1962 (sensu Galati 2003) (Diptera: Psychodidae), and the following replacement name is proposed: Ekkentronomyia nom. nov. for Nyssomyia Hull (nec Barretto 1962). Accordingly, a new combination is herein proposed for the only species currently included in this genus: Ekkentronomyia ochracea (Hull, 1962) comb. nov.

  9. Lekking behavior of Anastrepha Fraterculus (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    SciTech Connect

    Segura, D.; Petit-Marty, N.; Cladera, J.; Sciurano, R.; Calcagno, G.; Gomez Cendra, P.; Vilardi, J.; Vera, T.; Allinghi, A.

    2007-03-15

    Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Tephritidae) displays a lek mating system. Males form groups in which they simultaneously display signals (acoustical, visual, or chemical) to attract females with the purpose of mating. Females visit the lek and choose among signaling and courting males to mate. Scarce information is available in A. fraterculus about the main factors involved in female choice and the behavior of displaying males. This information could be important within the context of pest control programs with a sterile insect technique (SIT) component, because departures from normal sexual behavior caused by artificial rearing could affect males' performance in the field. In this study we assessed A. fraterculus male behavior within the leks and analyzed the importance of behavioral and morphological traits on their copulatory success. The existence of preferred places for lek formation was evaluated in field cages with trees inside and analyzed by dividing the trees in sectors according to a 3-dimensional system. Males were individually weighed, marked, and observed every 15 min. Morphometric and behavioral characteristics of successful and unsuccessful males were compared. Most successful males grouped in a region of the tree characterized by the highest light intensity in the first 2 h of the morning. Results showed that pheromone calling activity is positively associated with copulatory success. Copulations were more frequent for males calling inside the lek, indicating that pheromone calling activity and presence in the lek are key factors for copulatory success. A positive association between copulatory success and eye length was found; some characteristics of the face were also associated with copula duration and latency. (author) [Spanish] Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Tephritidae) presenta un sistema de apareamiento tipo lek. Los machos forman grupos y, en forma conjunta, emiten senales (acusticas, visuales, o quimicas) para

  10. Biology and ecology of higher Diptera from freshwater wetlands.

    PubMed

    Keiper, Joe B; Walton, William E; Foote, Benjamin A

    2002-01-01

    Although studies of freshwater entomofauna frequently do not include the biodiversity and ecological roles of higher Diptera, cyclorraphous flies are often numerous and species rich in wetlands. Seventeen families are commonly found in freshwater wetlands, with Ephydridae, Chloropidae, Sciomyzidae, Sphaeroceridae, and Scathophagidae being among the most important in terms of population size and species richness. Difficulty with sampling cryptic larval habitats and species identification challenges may account for the exclusion of acalyptrate and other dipterans from wetlands ecology studies. Large populations are facilitated by the high productivity of freshwater wetlands and the high intrinsic rate of increase characteristic of many species. Higher dipterans exist in all freshwater wetland types, are microhabitat selective, and play significant roles in food webs. The varied strategies for food acquisition and patterns of spatial and temporal distribution limit ecological overlap among the higher Diptera.

  11. Effect of octenol on engorgement by Tabanus nigrovittatus (Diptera: Tabanidae).

    PubMed

    Downer, Kelley E; Stoffolano, John G

    2006-05-01

    Adult female Tabanus nigrovittatus Macquart (Diptera: Tabanidae) were field collected from a salt marsh in Essex County, Massachusetts. The horse flies were transported back to and tested in the laboratory to determine the effects of octenol (1-octen-3-ol) on engorgement. Flies exposed to octenol strips had a significantly higher engorgement response compared with control flies. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate an important link between an odor stimulus and the feeding response in Tabanidae. Research examining the link between odor attractants and repellents on the engorgement response is lacking or limited in most hematophagous Diptera. Understanding the role odors have on ingestion is essential to knowing how to interrupt feeding behavior of blood-feeding arthropods, especially for important vectors.

  12. Tabanidae and other Diptera on Camel's Hump Vermont: Ecological Observations.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Jeffrey V

    2011-01-01

    A canopy trap and aerial nets led to finding 8 species of Tabanidae. There was an abundance of calyptrate muscoid flies. Camel's Hump is in the Green Mountains of western New England, USA. Discovering Diptera on Camel's Hump involved sixteen visits over 40 years. Upwards of 23 other Diptera species are listed. Habitats on the east side and above 762 m (2500 ft) elevation on Camel's Hump differ from the west slope but the boreal forest on both sides is influenced by cloud and fog precipitation on trees. The cliffs just above the 900 m level along the east side are often overlooked, are not seen from the summit and provide access to morning sun for insects. Recent visits explored the role of polarized skylight in relation to the canopy trap, the boreal forest environment and flies found there.

  13. Sarcosaprophagous Diptera assemblages in natural habitats in central Spain: spatial and seasonal changes in composition.

    PubMed

    Martín-Vega, D; Baz, A

    2013-03-01

    The composition and spatial distribution of sarcosaprophagous Diptera assemblages were studied using carrion-baited traps along a bioclimatic gradient of natural habitats in central Spain throughout the different seasons during 1 year. Calliphoridae and Muscidae were the most abundant families, accounting for, respectively, 41.9% and 35.1% of all Diptera specimens collected. Other abundant families were Heleomyzidae (8.4%), Sarcophagidae (6.9%) and Piophilidae (5.1%). Fly assemblage compositions differed among bioclimatic levels, with Chrysomya albiceps (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) being the dominant species in mesomediterranean habitats, Muscina levida (Harris) (Diptera: Muscidae) the dominant species in supramediterranean habitats, and Prochyliza nigrimana (Meigen) (Diptera: Piophilidae) the dominant species in oromediterranean habitats. Differences in assemblage composition were also found among seasons. Thermophobic species such as Calliphora vicina Robineau-Desvoidy (Diptera: Calliphoridae) and some species of Heleomyzidae were well represented during autumn, winter and spring in the three bioclimatic levels sampled. By contrast, thermophilic species such as Ch. albiceps and Lucilia sericata (Meigen) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) and most Muscidae and Sarcophagidae species were more abundant during summer and in mesomediterranean habitats located at lower elevations. Knowledge of the preferences of some species for certain habitats may be of ecological and forensic value and may establish a starting point for further research.

  14. Culex (Melanoconion) adamesi, a New Species from Panama (Diptera: Culicidae)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    Galindo 3 ABSTRACT. The adults of both sexes, pupa and 4th stage larva of CuZex (MeZanoconion) adamesi, a new species from Panama are described...Venezuelan encephalitis (VE) and several other arboviruses from wild caught adults of Culex (MeZanoconion) taeniopus Dyar and Knab and related species at...00-00-1980 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Culex (Melanoconion) adamesi, a New Species from Panama (Diptera: Culicidae) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT

  15. A Ventromedian Cervical Sclerite of Mosquito Larvae (Diptera: Culicidae)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-01-01

    Mosquito Sys tematics VOL. 8(2) 1976 205 A Ventromedian Cervical Sclerite oflMosquito Larvae (Diptera: Culicidae) John F. Rein& Department of...aegypt; (Linnaeus) by Hochman and Reinert (1974). The ventromedian cervical sclerite has a frag- mented appearance in a number of species of the...Dyar and Knab and dupreei (Coquillett)). Seventy-four species in 19 subgenera of Aedes examined possessed a ven- tromedian cervical sclerite. These

  16. Aphaereta ceratitivora sp. n. (Hymenoptera, Braconidae), a new parasitoid of Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) (Diptera, Tephritidae) from the Azores

    PubMed Central

    van Achterberg, Kees; Teixeira, Tânia; Oliveira, Luísa

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A new gregarious larval-pupal endoparasitoid of Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Tephritidae) is described and illustrated: Aphaereta ceratitivora sp. n. (Braconidae: Alysiinae: Alysiini). PMID:23129984

  17. Macular choroidal thickness after vitreoretinal surgery: Long-term effect of pars plana vitrectomy with and without encircling scleral buckling surgery.

    PubMed

    Gama, I; Proença, H; Gonçalves, A; Faria, M; Almeida, L; Bernardo, T; Couceiro, R; Monteiro-Grillo, M

    2017-07-03

    To evaluate the macular choroidal thickness (CT) of eyes subjected to pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) whether or not combined with encircling scleral buckling (ESB) surgery for primary rhegmatogenous retinal detachment repair at 6 months or more after surgery. This observational study included: 15 eyes (15 patients) submitted to combined ESB+PPV; 15 eyes submitted to PPV and their respective 30 normal fellow eyes (FE). Two 6mm lineal perpendicular optical coherence tomography B-scans centred on the fovea with enhanced depth imaging were performed on each eye. CT was measured at several macular locations: subfoveal (SF-CT) and at a radius of 1, 2, and 3mm from the fovea. CTs of the eyes in the CE+PPV group were compared to CT in the PPV group and the CTs of all operated eyes were compared to the CTs of their FE. SF-CT of the eyes in the ESB+PPV group was significantly increased compared to their FE (P=.001). CT at a radius of 1, 2, and 3mm from the fovea of the ESB+PPV group were significantly increased (P=.001, P=.005, and P=.001, respectively). The SF-CT of the PPV group was similar to their FE (P=.691). The SF-CT of the ESB+PPV group was significantly increased compared to SF-CT of the PPV group (P=.019). The CT of the eyes subjected to combined ESB and PPV was significantly increased at 6 months or more after surgery compared to the CT of their FE and to the CT of the eyes subjected to PPV alone, which could be explained by a venous engorgement caused by the ESB. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Assessment of Anterior Segment Changes in Pseudophakic Eyes, Using Ultrasonic Biomicroscopic Imaging, after Pars Plana Vitrectomy with Silicone Oil or Gas Tamponade

    PubMed Central

    Kızılay, Osman

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the morphological changes of the anterior segment using ultrasonic biomicroscopy (UBM) imaging in pseudophakic patients who underwent pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) with silicone oil or gas (C3F8) internal tamponade agent injection. Method. This prospective study included pseudophakic patients with planned PPV, divided into two groups according to internal tamponade agent: those in which silicone oil was used (n = 27, Group 1) and those in which gas (C3F8) was used (n = 24, Group 2). UBM measurements were performed in the supine position before and one week after surgery. Results. In patients of Group 1, postoperative trabecular meshwork-ciliary process distance (T-CPD) and iris-ciliary process distance (I-CPD), according to preoperative values, were found to be statistically significantly reduced, and postoperative mean value of scleral thickness (ST) and intraocular pressure (IOP), according to preoperative value, was found to be statistically significantly increased. In patients of Group 2, postoperative mean values of anterior chamber depth (ACD), ciliary body thickness (CBT), T-CPD, I-CPD, and IOP, according to preoperative values, were found to be statistically significantly reduced. Preoperatively, in Group 2 patients, according to Group 1 patients, TIA and IOP were found to be statistically significantly increased. Preoperative and postoperative IOP between the measured parameters with UBM showed no statistically significant correlation. Conclusions. Gases cause more morphological changes in the anterior segment structures. It is thought that complications such as increased intraocular pressure can be seen more frequently for this reason. PMID:27298733

  19. Two new species of fungus gnats (Diptera: Mycetophilidae) from Kunashir Island, Kuril Islands.

    PubMed

    Zaitzev, Alexander

    2017-04-05

    Two new species of Mycetophilidae (Diptera), Clastobasis subalternans sp. n. and Phthinia kurilensis sp. n. are described from Kunashir I. (South Kuril Is.). Their relationships with other species of Clastobasis Skuse and Phthinia Winnertz are briefly discussed.

  20. New neotropical species of Trupanea (Diptera: Tephritidae) with unusual wing patterns

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Four species of Trupanea (Diptera: Tephritidae) with unusual wing patterns are described from the Neotropical Region: T. dimorphica (Argentina), T. fasciata (Argentina), T. polita (Argentina and Bolivia), and T. trivittata (Argentina). Celidosphenella Hendel, 1914 and Melanotrypana Hering, 1944 are ...

  1. Release and establishment of Diachasmimorpha kraussii (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) against Bactrocera latifrons (Diptera: Tephritidae) in Hawaii

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Laboratory tests documented that Diachasmimorpha kraussii Fullaway (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) was a potentially effective biological control agent against Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) and Bactrocera latifrons (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae). Diachasmimorpha kraussii was approved for release in Hawa...

  2. New Dicranoptycha Osten Sacken, 1859 Crane flies (Diptera: Limoniidae) of North and South Korea.

    PubMed

    Podenas, Sigitas; Byun, Hye-Woo; Kim, Sam-Kyu

    2015-02-27

    Two new species of Dicranoptycha Osten Sacken, 1859, crane flies (Diptera, Limoniidae) from the Korean peninsula are described, illustrated and compared with already known and related species. An identification key and check-list of all Korean Dicranoptycha is presented.

  3. Checklist of the leaf-mining flies (Diptera, Agromyzidae) of Finland

    PubMed Central

    Kahanpää, Jere

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A checklist of the Agromyzidae (Diptera) recorded from Finland is presented. 279 (or 280) species are currently known from the country. Phytomyza linguae Lundqvist, 1947 is recorded as new to Finland. PMID:25337025

  4. Update to a protocol for a feasibility cluster randomised controlled trial of a peer-led school-based intervention to increase the physical activity of adolescent girls (PLAN-A).

    PubMed

    Sebire, Simon J; Edwards, Mark J; Campbell, Rona; Jago, Russell; Kipping, Ruth; Banfield, Kathryn; Kadir, Bryar; Garfield, Kirsty; Lyons, Ronan A; Blair, Peter S; Hollingworth, William

    2016-01-01

    Physical activity levels are low amongst adolescent girls, and this population faces specific barriers to being active. Peer influences on health behaviours are important in adolescence, and peer-led interventions might hold promise to change behaviour. This paper describes the protocol for a feasibility cluster randomised controlled trial of Peer-Led physical Activity iNtervention for Adolescent girls (PLAN-A), a peer-led intervention aimed at increasing adolescent girls' physical activity levels. In addition, this paper describes an update that has been made to the protocol for the PLAN-A feasibility cluster randomised controlled trial. A two-arm cluster randomised feasibility trial will be conducted in six secondary schools (intervention n = 4; control n = 2) with year 8 (12-13 years old) girls. The intervention will operate at a year group level and consist of year 8 girls nominating influential peers within their year group to become peer supporters. Approximately 15% of the cohort will receive 3 days of training about physical activity and interpersonal communication skills. Peer supporters will then informally diffuse messages about physical activity amongst their friends for 10 weeks. Data will be collected at baseline (time 0 (T0)), immediately after the intervention (time 1 (T1)) and 12 months after baseline measures (time 2 (T2)). In this feasibility trial, the primary interest is in the recruitment of schools and participants (both year 8 girls and peer supporters), delivery and receipt of the intervention, data provision rates and identifying the cost categories for future economic analysis. Physical activity will be assessed using 7-day accelerometry, with the likely primary outcome in a fully powered trial being daily minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Participants will also complete psychosocial questionnaires at each time point: assessing motivation, self-esteem and peer physical activity norms. Data analysis will be

  5. Six New Species of the Culex (Lophoceraomyia) Mammilifer Group from Thailand (Diptera: Culicidae)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1967-03-01

    608 and 412 pp. CoIIess, D. H. 1965. The genus Culex , subgenus LophoceraomyM, in Malaya (Diptera: Culicidae). Jour. ;Med. Ent. 2: 261-307. ...SIX NEW SPECIES OF THE CULEX (LOPHOCERAOMYIA) MAMMILIF-ER GROUP FROM THAILAND ( DIPTERA: CULICIDAIZ)~ F~ALPH A. BRAM and MANOP RAT~TAN- South...of de Cukr subgenus Lophoceraomyiu in any area of South East Asia was that of Colless ( 1965). This study described 14 new species, revalidated

  6. Isozyme Variation in Simulium (Edwardsellum) Damnosum S.L. (Diptera: simuliidae) from Kenya

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    1387. Raybould, J. N. and G. B. White. 1979. The distribu- uscript, tion, bionomics and control of onchocerciasis vec- tors (Diptera: Simuliidae) in...editions ire otssoiete U NCLAKSSIFE Reprinted from Journal of The American Mosquito Control Association Vol 3 June 1987 Number 2 196 JOURNAL OF THE...AMERICAN MOSQUITO CONTROL ASSOCIATION VOL. 3, No. 2 ISOZYME VARIATION IN SIMULIUM (EDWARDSELLUM) DAMNOSUM S.L. (DIPTERA: SIMULIIDAE) FROM KENYA YEMANE

  7. Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) Biting Deterrence: Structure-Activity Relationship of Saturated and Unsaturated Fatty Acids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    VECTOR CONTROL, PEST MANAGEMENT, RESISTANCE, REPELLENTS Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) Biting Deterrence: Structure- Activity Relationship of...deterrent effects of a series of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids against Aedes aegypti (L), yellow fever mosquito (Diptera: Culicidae) using theK...corresponding C12:0 and C12:1 homologues. KEYWORDS fatty acid, biting deterrence, repellent, structure-activity relationship, Aedes aegypti Mosquitoes transmit

  8. Characterisation of novel Bacillus thuringiensis isolates against Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) and Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephridae).

    PubMed

    Elleuch, Jihen; Tounsi, Slim; Ben Hassen, Najeh Belguith; Lacoix, Marie Noël; Chandre, Fabrice; Jaoua, Samir; Zghal, Raida Zribi

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is successfully used in pest management strategies as an eco-friendly bioinsecticide. Isolation and identification of new strains with a wide variety of target pests is an ever growing field. In this paper, new B. thuringiensis isolates were investigated to search for original strains active against diptera and able to produce novel toxins that could be used as an alternative for the commercial H14 strain. Biochemical and molecular characterization revealed a remarkable diversity among the studied strains. Using the PCR method, cry4C/Da1, cry30Ea, cry39A, cry40 and cry54 genes were detected in four isolates. Three strains, BLB355, BLB196 and BUPM109, showed feeble activities against Aedes aegypti larvae. Interestingly, spore-crystal mixtures of BLB361, BLB30 and BLB237 were found to be active against Ceratitis capitata with an LC50 value of about 65.375, 51.735 and 42.972 μg cm(-2), respectively. All the studied strains exhibited important mortality levels using culture supernatants against C. capitata larvae. This suggests that these strains produce a wide range of soluble factors active against C. capitata larvae.

  9. New genera of Australian stiletto flies (Diptera, Therevidae)

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Michael E.; Winterton, Shaun L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Two new stiletto fly genera of Agapophytinae (Diptera: Therevidae) are described from Australia. Sidarena gen. n. comprises six new species (Sidarena aurantia sp. n., Sidarena flavipalpa sp. n., Sidarena geraldton sp. n., Sidarena hortorum sp. n., Sidarena macfarlandi sp. n., and Sidarena yallingup sp. n.) and is largely endemic to Western Australia. Zelothrix gen. n. is described based on two species; Zelothrix warrumbungles sp. n. is a locally abundant species in Eastern Australia, while Zelothrix yeatesi sp. n. is restricted to southwestern Western Australia. These sister genera are likely closely related to Taenogerella Winterton & Irwin and Actenomeros Winterton & Irwin. PMID:27853402

  10. Skipping clues: forensic importance of the family Piophilidae (Diptera).

    PubMed

    Martín-Vega, Daniel

    2011-10-10

    Among the insects which are typically considered of forensic interest, the family Piophilidae (Diptera) is frequently cited because of its common occurrence on carcasses in different stages of decay. Piophilids are mainly known from the cosmopolitan species Piophila casei, which can be also a major pest for the food industry and an agent of myiasis. However, many other species of Piophilidae occur frequently on carrion, including human corpses; hence, it is essential to ensure a careful identification of specimens. Reviews of relevant published information about the Piophilidae species of potential forensic use, including recent interesting records, are presented.

  11. Ammonium carbonate loss rates from lures differentially affect trap captures of Rhagoletis indifferens (Diptera: Tephritidae) and non-target flies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Western cherry fruit fly, Rhagoletis indifferens Curran (Diptera: Tephritidae), is a pest of cherry (Prunus spp.) in western North America that can be monitored using traps baited with ammonia. However, ammonia-based attractants also attract non-target Diptera that clutter traps. Here, the hypothe...

  12. Benthic community structure and biomarker responses of the clam Scrobicularia plana in a shallow tidal creek affected by fish farm effluents (Rio San Pedro, SW Spain).

    PubMed

    Silva, Claudio; Mattioli, Mattia; Fabbri, Elena; Yáñez, Eleuterio; Delvalls, T Angel; Martín-Díaz, M Laura

    2012-10-15

    The effects of solid organic wastes from a marine fish farm on sediments were tested using benthic community as ecological indicators and biomarkers in native clam (Scrobicularia plana) as biochemical indicators. The benthic fauna and clam samples were collected in the intertidal sediment in October 2010 from five sites of the Rio San Pedro (RSP) creek, following a gradient of contamination from the aquaculture effluent to the control site. Numbers of species, abundance, richness and Shannon diversity were the biodiversity indicators measured in benthic fauna. Morphological and reproduction status of clams were assessed using the condition factor and gonado-somatic index, respectively. Phase I and Phase II detoxification enzymatic activities (ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD), glutathione S-transferase (GST)), antioxidant enzymatic activities (glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione reductase (GR)) and oxidative stress parameters (Lipid Peroxidation (LPO) and DNA strand breaks) were measured in clams' digestive gland tissues. In parallel, temperature and salinity in the adjacent water, redox potential, pH and organic matter in sediment, and dissolved oxygen in the interstitial water were measured. The results suggested that RSP showed a spatial gradient characterised by hypoxia/anoxia, reduced potential, acidic conditions and high organic enrichment in sediments at the most contaminated sites. Significant (p<0.05) decrease of biodiversity indicators were observed in the areas impacted by the aquaculture discharges. Biomarkers did not show a clear pattern and of all biochemical responses tested, GPX, DNA damage and LPO were the most sensitive ones and showed significant (p<0.05) increase in the polluted sites. Benthic biodiversity indicators were significantly (p<0.05) positively correlated with pH, redox potential and dissolved oxygen and negatively correlated with organic matter. On the contrary, antioxidant enzymatic responses (GPX) and oxidative stress

  13. Traumatic Myiasis Caused by an Association of Sarcophaga tibialis (Diptera: Sarcophagidae) and Lucilia sericata (Diptera: Calliphoridae) in a Domestic Cat in Italy.

    PubMed

    Pezzi, Marco; Whitmore, Daniel; Chicca, Milvia; Lanfredi, Margherita; Leis, Marilena

    2015-08-01

    We describe here a rare case of traumatic myiasis occurred in August 2014, caused by an association of 2 Diptera species, Sarcophaga tibialis Macquart (Diptera: Sarcophagidae) and Lucilia sericata (Meigen) (Diptera: Calliphoridae), in a domestic cat in northern Italy. Species identification was based on adult male morphology. The present case is the first report of S. tibialis as an agent of myiasis in Italy, and also the first ever report of myiasis caused by an association of S. tibialis and L. sericata. The cat developed an extensive traumatic myiasis in a large wound on the rump, which was treated pharmacologically and surgically. The biology, ecology, and distribution of S. tibialis and L. sericata are also discussed. A literature review is provided on cases of myiasis caused by S. tibialis, and cases of myiasis by L. sericata involving cats worldwide and humans and animals in Italy.

  14. Traumatic Myiasis Caused by an Association of Sarcophaga tibialis (Diptera: Sarcophagidae) and Lucilia sericata (Diptera: Calliphoridae) in a Domestic Cat in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Pezzi, Marco; Whitmore, Daniel; Chicca, Milvia; Lanfredi, Margherita; Leis, Marilena

    2015-01-01

    We describe here a rare case of traumatic myiasis occurred in August 2014, caused by an association of 2 Diptera species, Sarcophaga tibialis Macquart (Diptera: Sarcophagidae) and Lucilia sericata (Meigen) (Diptera: Calliphoridae), in a domestic cat in northern Italy. Species identification was based on adult male morphology. The present case is the first report of S. tibialis as an agent of myiasis in Italy, and also the first ever report of myiasis caused by an association of S. tibialis and L. sericata. The cat developed an extensive traumatic myiasis in a large wound on the rump, which was treated pharmacologically and surgically. The biology, ecology, and distribution of S. tibialis and L. sericata are also discussed. A literature review is provided on cases of myiasis caused by S. tibialis, and cases of myiasis by L. sericata involving cats worldwide and humans and animals in Italy. PMID:26323846

  15. Phylogenetic inference of calyptrates, with the first mitogenomes for Gasterophilinae (Diptera: Oestridae) and Paramacronychiinae (Diptera: Sarcophagidae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dong; Yan, Liping; Zhang, Ming; Chu, Hongjun; Cao, Jie; Li, Kai; Hu, Defu; Pape, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitogenome of the horse stomach bot fly Gasterophilus pecorum (Fabricius) and a near-complete mitogenome of Wohlfahrt's wound myiasis fly Wohlfahrtia magnifica (Schiner) were sequenced. The mitogenomes contain the typical 37 mitogenes found in metazoans, organized in the same order and orientation as in other cyclorrhaphan Diptera. Phylogenetic analyses of mitogenomes from 38 calyptrate taxa with and without two non-calyptrate outgroups were performed using Bayesian Inference and Maximum Likelihood. Three sub-analyses were performed on the concatenated data: (1) not partitioned; (2) partitioned by gene; (3) 3rd codon positions of protein-coding genes omitted. We estimated the contribution of each of the mitochondrial genes for phylogenetic analysis, as well as the effect of some popular methodologies on calyptrate phylogeny reconstruction. In the favoured trees, the Oestroidea are nested within the muscoid grade. Relationships at the family level within Oestroidea are (remaining Calliphoridae (Sarcophagidae (Oestridae, Pollenia + Tachinidae))). Our mito-phylogenetic reconstruction of the Calyptratae presents the most extensive taxon coverage so far, and the risk of long-branch attraction is reduced by an appropriate selection of outgroups. We find that in the Calyptratae the ND2, ND5, ND1, COIII, and COI genes are more phylogenetically informative compared with other mitochondrial protein-coding genes. Our study provides evidence that data partitioning and the inclusion of conserved tRNA genes have little influence on calyptrate phylogeny reconstruction, and that the 3rd codon positions of protein-coding genes are not saturated and therefore should be included.

  16. Phylogenetic inference of calyptrates, with the first mitogenomes for Gasterophilinae (Diptera: Oestridae) and Paramacronychiinae (Diptera: Sarcophagidae)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dong; Yan, Liping; Zhang, Ming; Chu, Hongjun; Cao, Jie; Li, Kai; Hu, Defu; Pape, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitogenome of the horse stomach bot fly Gasterophilus pecorum (Fabricius) and a near-complete mitogenome of Wohlfahrt's wound myiasis fly Wohlfahrtia magnifica (Schiner) were sequenced. The mitogenomes contain the typical 37 mitogenes found in metazoans, organized in the same order and orientation as in other cyclorrhaphan Diptera. Phylogenetic analyses of mitogenomes from 38 calyptrate taxa with and without two non-calyptrate outgroups were performed using Bayesian Inference and Maximum Likelihood. Three sub-analyses were performed on the concatenated data: (1) not partitioned; (2) partitioned by gene; (3) 3rd codon positions of protein-coding genes omitted. We estimated the contribution of each of the mitochondrial genes for phylogenetic analysis, as well as the effect of some popular methodologies on calyptrate phylogeny reconstruction. In the favoured trees, the Oestroidea are nested within the muscoid grade. Relationships at the family level within Oestroidea are (remaining Calliphoridae (Sarcophagidae (Oestridae, Pollenia + Tachinidae))). Our mito-phylogenetic reconstruction of the Calyptratae presents the most extensive taxon coverage so far, and the risk of long-branch attraction is reduced by an appropriate selection of outgroups. We find that in the Calyptratae the ND2, ND5, ND1, COIII, and COI genes are more phylogenetically informative compared with other mitochondrial protein-coding genes. Our study provides evidence that data partitioning and the inclusion of conserved tRNA genes have little influence on calyptrate phylogeny reconstruction, and that the 3rd codon positions of protein-coding genes are not saturated and therefore should be included. PMID:27019632

  17. Acetylcholinesterase genes within the Diptera: takeover and loss in true flies

    PubMed Central

    Huchard, Elise; Martinez, Michel; Alout, Haoues; Douzery, Emmanuel J.P; Lutfalla, Georges; Berthomieu, Arnaud; Berticat, Claire; Raymond, Michel; Weill, Mylène

    2006-01-01

    It has recently been reported that the synaptic acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in mosquitoes is encoded by the ace-1 gene, distinct and divergent from the ace-2 gene, which performs this function in Drosophila. This is an unprecedented situation within the Diptera order because both ace genes derive from an old duplication and are present in most insects and arthropods. Nevertheless, Drosophila possesses only the ace-2 gene. Thus, a secondary loss occurred during the evolution of Diptera, implying a vital function switch from one gene (ace-1) to the other (ace-2). We sampled 78 species, representing 50 families (27% of the Dipteran families) spread over all major subdivisions of the Diptera, and looked for ace-1 and ace-2 by systematic PCR screening to determine which taxonomic groups within the Diptera have this gene change. We show that this loss probably extends to all true flies (or Cyclorrhapha), a large monophyletic group of the Diptera. We also show that ace-2 plays a non-detectable role in the synaptic AChE in a lower Diptera species, suggesting that it has non-synaptic functions. A relative molecular evolution rate test showed that the intensity of purifying selection on ace-2 sequences is constant across the Diptera, irrespective of the presence or absence of ace-1, confirming the evolutionary importance of non-synaptic functions for this gene. We discuss the evolutionary scenarios for the takeover of ace-2 and the loss of ace-1, taking into account our limited knowledge of non-synaptic functions of ace genes and some specific adaptations of true flies. PMID:17002944

  18. Haltere morphology and campaniform sensilla arrangement across Diptera.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Sweta; Grimaldi, David; Fox, Jessica L

    2017-03-01

    One of the primary specializations of true flies (order Diptera) is the modification of the hind wings into club-shaped halteres. Halteres are complex mechanosensory structures that provide sensory feedback essential for stable flight control via an array of campaniform sensilla at the haltere base. The morphology of these sensilla has previously been described in a small number of dipteran species, but little is known about how they vary across fly taxa. Using a synoptic set of specimens representing 42 families from all of the major infraorders of Diptera, we used scanning electron microscopy to map the gross and fine structures of halteres, including sensillum shape and arrangement. We found that several features of haltere morphology correspond with dipteran phylogeny: Schizophora generally have smaller halteres with stereotyped and highly organized sensilla compared to nematoceran flies. We also found a previously undocumented high variation of haltere sensillum shape in nematoceran dipterans, as well as the absence of a dorsal sensillum field in multiple families. Overall, variation in haltere sensillar morphology across the dipteran phylogeny provides insight into the evolution of a highly specialized proprioceptive organ and a basis for future studies on haltere sensory function.

  19. Fumigant Toxicity of Phenylpropanoids Identified in Asarum sieboldii Aerial Parts to Lycoriella ingenua (Diptera: Sciaridae) and Coboldia fuscipes (Diptera: Scatopsidae).

    PubMed

    Yi, Jee Hwan; Perumalsamy, Haribalan; Sankarapandian, Karuppasamy; Choi, Byeoung-Ryeol; Ahn, Young-Joon

    2015-06-01

    Lycoriella ingenua (Dufour) (Diptera: Sciaridae) and Coboldia fuscipes (Meigen) (Diptera: Scatopsidae) are two of the most economically important insect pests of cultivated mushrooms. The toxicities to the fly larvae of the three phenylpropanoids (methyleugenol, myristicin, and safrole) from aerial parts of Asarum sieboldii Miquel (Aristolochiaceae) were compared with those of the currently available carbamate insecticide benfuracarb. In a contact+fumigant mortality bioassay with L. ingenua and C. fuscipes larvae, methyleugenol (1.46 and 2.33 µg/cm2) was the most toxic compound, followed by safrole (2.03 and 2.59 µg/cm2) and myristicin (3.59 and 4.96 µg/cm2), based on 24-h LC50 values. The phenylpropanoids were less toxic than benfuracarb (LC50, 0.75 and 0.55 µg/cm2). In vapor-phase mortality tests with the larvae, the phenylpropanoids were consistently more toxic in closed versus open containers, indicating that the effect of the compounds was largely a result of vapor action. Global efforts to reduce the level of highly toxic synthetic insecticides in the agricultural environment justify further studies on A. sieboldii plant-derived products as potential fumigants for the control of mushroom fly populations in mushroom houses and mushroom compost. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Species composition of forensically important blow flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae) and flesh flies (Diptera: Sarcophagidae) through space and time.

    PubMed

    Fremdt, Heike; Amendt, Jens

    2014-03-01

    Weekly monitoring of forensically important flight-active blow flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae) and flesh flies (Diptera: Sarcophagidae) was performed using small baited traps. Sampling took place in two rural, one suburban and two urban habitats in and around Frankfurt (Main), Germany, lasting two years and eight months. Highest values for species richness and Chao-Shen entropy estimator for Shannon's index in both families were found at the urban sites, peaking during summer. Space-time interaction was tested and found to be significant, demonstrating the value of a statistical approach recently developed for community surveys in ecology. K-means partitioning and analysis of indicator species gave significant temporal and habitat associations of particular taxa. Calliphora vicina was an indicator species for lower temperatures without being associated with a particular habitat. Lucilia sericata was an indicator for urban sites, whereas Lucilia ampullacea and Lucilia caesar were indicators for rural sites, supplemented by the less frequent species Calliphora vomitoria. Sarcophagidae were observed during a clearly shorter period of year. Sarcophaga subvicina+Sarcophaga variegata was found to be an indicator for urban habitats during summer as well as Sarcophaga albiceps for rural habitats. A significant association of Sarcophaga caerulescens to rural habitats as well as one of Sarcophaga similis to urban habitats was observed.

  1. Effects of tree and herb biodiversity on Diptera, a hyperdiverse insect order.

    PubMed

    Scherber, Christoph; Vockenhuber, Elke A; Stark, Andreas; Meyer, Hans; Tscharntke, Teja

    2014-04-01

    Biodiversity experiments have shown that plant diversity has largely positive effects on insect diversity and abundance. However, such relationships have rarely been studied in undisturbed and more complex ecosystems such as forests. Flies (Diptera) are among the most dominant taxa in temperate ecosystems, influencing many ecosystem processes. As it is unknown how Diptera respond to changes in forest biodiversity, we examined how community characteristics of Diptera respond to varying levels of tree and herb diversity and vegetation structure. The study was conducted in the Hainich National Park (Central Germany) on 84 plots along a gradient of tree (from two to nine species) and herb (from two to 28 species) diversity. We found that herb and canopy cover as well as spatial effects were the best predictors of Diptera community composition, consisting of 62 families, including 99 Empidoidea and 78 Phoridae species. Abundance of Empidoidea was positively influenced by herb diversity, indicating bottom-up control. A complex causal pathway influenced Dipteran species richness: species-rich forest stands, with low beech cover, had lower canopy cover, resulting in higher Dipteran species richness. In addition, Diptera benefited from a more dense and diverse herb community. Individual species responded differentially to herb layer diversity, indicating that effects of plant diversity on higher trophic levels depend on species identity. We conclude that tree and herb canopy cover as well as herb diversity predominately shape Dipteran communities in temperate deciduous forests, which is in contrast to expectations from grassland studies exhibiting much closer relationships between plant and insect diversity.

  2. DNA Barcodes for the Northern European Tachinid Flies (Diptera: Tachinidae)

    PubMed Central

    Kahanpää, Jere; Mutanen, Marko

    2016-01-01

    This data release provides COI barcodes for 366 species of parasitic flies (Diptera: Tachinidae), enabling the DNA based identification of the majority of northern European species and a large proportion of Palearctic genera, regardless of the developmental stage. The data will provide a tool for taxonomists and ecologists studying this ecologically important but challenging parasitoid family. A comparison of minimum distances between the nearest neighbors revealed the mean divergence of 5.52% that is approximately the same as observed earlier with comparable sampling in Lepidoptera, but clearly less than in Coleoptera. Full barcode-sharing was observed between 13 species pairs or triplets, equaling to 7.36% of all species. Delimitation based on Barcode Index Number (BIN) system was compared with traditional classification of species and interesting cases of possible species oversplits and cryptic diversity are discussed. Overall, DNA barcodes are effective in separating tachinid species and provide novel insight into the taxonomy of several genera. PMID:27814365

  3. Nocturnal colonization behavior of blowflies (Diptera: Calliphoridae) in southeastern Australia.

    PubMed

    George, Kelly A; Archer, Melanie S; Toop, Tes

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide research into nocturnal colonization by blowflies has produced many contradictory findings, prompting investigation specific to southeastern Australia. Initial experiments showed that blowfly colonization begins shortly after sunrise and continues until sunset; nocturnal colonization never occurred. Colonization peaks occurred at mid-morning, midday, and in the hours preceding sunset. In an additional experiment, wild blowflies were captured and placed in cages with colonization medium supplied nocturnally. Colonization occurred on four of five nights, and Calliphora augur (Fabricius) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) was the main species colonizing baits nocturnally. Results suggest that colonization is most likely to occur during warm weather and when flies are able to walk or crawl to bait. In particular, blowflies trapped within a confined space (such as a room or car) with warmer-than-ambient temperature may be stimulated to colonize nearby remains. Entomologists should consider these findings when estimating minimum postmortem interval under these environmental conditions.

  4. Bartonella species in bat flies (Diptera: Nycteribiidae) from western Africa.

    PubMed

    Billeter, S A; Hayman, D T S; Peel, A J; Baker, K; Wood, J L N; Cunningham, A; Suu-Ire, R; Dittmar, K; Kosoy, M Y

    2012-03-01

    Bat flies are obligate ectoparasites of bats and it has been hypothesized that they may be involved in the transmission of Bartonella species between bats. A survey was conducted to identify whether Cyclopodia greefi greefi (Diptera: Nycteribiidae) collected from Ghana and 2 islands in the Gulf of Guinea harbour Bartonella. In total, 137 adult flies removed from Eidolon helvum, the straw-coloured fruit bat, were screened for the presence of Bartonella by culture and PCR analysis. Bartonella DNA was detected in 91 (66·4%) of the specimens examined and 1 strain of a Bartonella sp., initially identified in E. helvum blood from Kenya, was obtained from a bat fly collected in Ghana. This is the first study, to our knowledge, to report the identification and isolation of Bartonella in bat flies from western Africa.

  5. The complete mitochondrial genome of Dixella aestivalis (Diptera: Nematocera: Dixidae).

    PubMed

    Briscoe, Andrew G; Sivell, Duncan; Harbach, Ralph E

    2017-01-01

    Dixidae, meniscus midges, belong to the suborder Nematocera of the order Diptera. The family includes 197 known species classified in nine genera. The complete mitochondrial genome of the Dixella aestivalis (Meigen) from the United Kingdom is reported here, along with its annotation and comparison with the genome of an unidentified species of Dixella from China. The circular genome consists of 16 465 bp and has a gene content consisting of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, two ribosomal RNA genes and a non-coding, A + T-rich, control region. The mitochondrial genome of D. aestivalis can be used to identify genetic markers for species identification, and will be valuable for resolving phylogenetic relationships within the genus, family Dixidae and suborder Nematocera.

  6. Observations on Hilltopping in Thick-Headed Flies (Diptera: Conopidae)

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Maurizio; Gibson, Joel F.; Skevington, Jeffrey H.

    2010-01-01

    Direct observations of hilltopping behaviour in the thick-headed flies (Diptera: Conopidae) have only been mentioned once in the literature. Hilltop collecting, however, may be an effective way to survey these endparasitoids. The first evidence of hilltopping in species belonging to the subfamilies Myopinae and Dalmanniinae is presented and discussed. Field observations were conducted on Colle Vescovo, Italy and Mount Rigaud, Canada, and museum specimens were examined. Observations and records indicate that four species in the genera Dalmannia, Myopa, and Zodion are hilltoppers on Colle Vescovo, while three species in the genera Myopa and Physocephala are hilltoppers on three hilltops near Ottawa, Canada. Fifteen additional species of conopids have been collected on hilltops and could possibly utilize hilltops in some years as a part of their mating strategy. Detailed phenologies and observations of mating and perching behaviours are given for species in the genera Dalmannia, Myopa, Physocephala, and Zodion. The importance of hilltop habitat preservation is stressed. PMID:20578949

  7. Invasion Biology of Aedes japonicus japonicus (Diptera: Culicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Dina M.

    2014-01-01

    Aedes japonicus japonicus (Theobald) (Diptera: Culicidae) has recently expanded beyond its native range of Japan and Korea into large parts of North America and Central Europe. Population genetic studies begun immediately after the species was detected in North America revealed genetically distinct introductions that subsequently merged, likely contributing to the successful expansion. Interactions, particularly in the larval stage, with other known disease vectors give this invasive subspecies the potential to influence local disease dynamics. Its successful invasion likely does not involve superior direct competitive abilities, but it is associated with the use of diverse larval habitats and a cold tolerance that allows an expanded seasonal activity range in temperate climates. We predict a continued but slower expansion of Ae. j. japonicus in North America and a continued rapid expansion into other areas as this mosquito will eventually be considered a permanent resident of much of North America, Europe, Asia, and parts of Hawaii. PMID:24397520

  8. Intraguild predation influences oviposition behavior of blow flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae).

    PubMed

    Galindo, Luciane A; Moral, Rafael A; Moretti, Thiago C; Godoy, Wesley A C; Demétrio, Clarice G B

    2016-05-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine whether blow flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae) are able to identify larvae of an intraguild predator species in the substrate and avoid laying eggs there. Blow flies oviposited in traps with different treatments: substrate only and substrate with larvae of Chrysomya albiceps (Wiedemann, 1819), Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius, 1794), or Chrysomya putoria (Wiedemann, 1830). Ch. megacephala, Ch. putoria, and Lucilia eximia (Wiedemann, 1819) avoided laying eggs in the trap containing Ch. albiceps larvae. Cochliomyia macellaria (Fabricius, 1775) did not oviposit differently in each substrate but had overall low abundance. The prevalence of species on corpses may be influenced by the ability of the species to detect the presence of other species, mainly predators. In this sense, intraguild predation may result in misinterpretations of a crime scene and should be considered when assessing the minimum postmortem interval.

  9. Quantifying the potential pathogens transmission of the blowflies (Diptera: Calliphoridae).

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Marcelo A; Centeno, Néstor

    2003-03-01

    To quantify the potential capability of transporting and passing infective pathogens of some blowflies (Diptera: Calliphoridae), Mihályi's danger-index was calculated for seven species. The original equation was modified to include synanthropic information to discriminate between asynanthropic, hemisynanthropic, and eusynanthropic status. Three groups were recognized, of which Phaenicia cluvia and Musca domestica proved the flies with lowest index value (D = 2.93 and 3.00 respectively); Cochliomyia macellaria, Chrysomya albiceps and Sarconesia chlorogaster presented a significantly higher index value (p<0.10; D = 4.28, 4.44 and 5.66 respectively) and C. megacephala, C. vicina and P. sericata appear to represent the heaviest potential sanitary risk with the highest index value (p<0.10; D = 15.54, 16.88 and 12.49 respectively).

  10. Biology of Phlebotomus papatasi (Diptera: Psychodidae) in the laboratory.

    PubMed

    Chelbi, I; Zhioua, E

    2007-07-01

    Details on the productivity and developmental times of a colony of Phlebotomus papatasi Scopoli (Diptera: Psychodidae) over 14 generations are reported and compared with findings of previous studies. The average productivity (percentage of eggs laid that were reared to adults) over six generations at 26-27 and at 29 -30 degrees C was 44.08 and 59.53%, respectively. The maximum productivity was 69.5%. The average developmental time over six generations at 26-27 and at 29 -30 degrees C was 35 and 26 d, respectively. The minimum developmental time from egg to adults was 25 d. The Tunisian strain of P. papatasi can reproduce autogenously or anautogenously, depending on the availability of a suitable bloodmeal source.

  11. Volatile Components Emitted from the Liverwort Marchantia paleacea subsp. diptera.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Kazutoshi; Tomiyama, Kenichi; Kawakami, Yukihiko; Ochiai, Nozomi; Yabe, Shigeki; Nakagawa, Tomomi; Asakawa, Yoshinori

    2016-02-01

    The volatile components from the thalloid liverwort, Marchantia paleacea subsp. diptera were investigated by HS-SPME-GC-MS analysis. The monocyclic monoterpene aldehyde, perillaldehyde was identified for the first time as the major component and its content was about 50% of the volatiles, along with β-pinene, limonene, β-caryophyllene, α-selinene and β-selinene as minor volatiles. Using MD (Multi-dimensional) GC-MS analysis equipped with a chiral column as the second column, the chirality was determined of both perillaldehyde and limonene, which was considered as the precursor of perillaldehyde. Both compounds were (S)-(-)-enantiomers (over 99.0 %) and (R)-enantiomers (less than 0.5 %). This is the first report of the existence of perillaldehyde in liverworts.

  12. Limonia crane flies (Diptera: Limoniidae) of Korea.

    PubMed

    Podenas, Sigitas; Podeniene, Virginija

    2017-02-09

    The Korean species of Limonia Meigen, 1803 crane flies (Diptera: Limoniidae) are taxonomically revised. Species L. annulata Lackschewitz, 1940 (Lackschewitz, Pagast, 1940), L. bidens Savchenko, 1979, L. episema Alexander, 1924, L. fusciceps fusciceps Alexander, 1924, L. juvenca Alexander, 1935, L. messaurea messaurea Mendl, 1971, L. nemoralis Savchenko, 1983 are new records for the Korean peninsula and L. pia n. sp. is described. Synonymy of L. venerabilis Alexander, 1938 with L. macrostigma (Schummel, 1829) is confirmed. L. tanakai (Alexander, 1921) is not confirmed for the Korean Peninsula. An identification key, redescriptions and illustrations of all species and both sexes of adults, if they were found in Korea, are presented. Descriptions, illustrations and habitat characteristics are given for the previously unknown larva and pupa of L. parvipennis Alexander, 1940. Distinguishing morphological characters of the last instar larvae of Korean Limonia are discussed. Keys to the known Korean Limonia larvae and pupae are compiled.

  13. Description of the Pupa of Aedes (Ochlerotatus) Grossbecki Dyar and Knab (Diptera: Culicidae)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    Diptera: Culicidae). Bull. Illinois Nat. 25:83-126. Hist. Surv. 24:1-96. Darsie , R.F., Jr . and R.A. Ward. 1981. Iden- Siverly, R.E. 1972. Mosquitoes of...Diptera: Culicidae). Mosq. Syst. 16:227- onomists’ glossary of mosquito anatomy. 270. Plexus Publ. Inc., Marlton, New Jersey. Ward, R.A. and R.F. Darsie , Jr ...Knight and Stone 1977, Knight 1978, Wood Maryland, Prince George’s County, Fort et al. 1979, Darsie and Ward 1981, Ward Washington, coll. no. BH 901, 28

  14. Facultative myiasis of domestic cats by Sarcophaga argyrostoma (Diptera: Sarcophagidae), Calliphora vicina and Lucilia sericata (Diptera: Calliphoridae) in northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Pezzi, Marco; Whitmore, Daniel; Bonacci, Teresa; Del Zingaro, Carlo Nicola Francesco; Chicca, Milvia; Lanfredi, Massimo; Leis, Marilena

    2017-08-12

    We describe five cases of myiasis of domestic cats, Felis silvestris catus L. (Carnivora: Felidae), reported in 2016 in northern Italy and caused by three Diptera species: Sarcophaga argyrostoma (Robineau-Desvoidy) (Sarcophagidae), Calliphora vicina Robineau-Desvoidy and Lucilia sericata (Meigen) (Calliphoridae). Three were cases of traumatic myiasis, one by S. argyrostoma and two by L. sericata, one was a case of auricular myiasis by C. vicina and one was a case of ophthalmomyiasis caused by an association of L. sericata and C. vicina. The myiasis by S. argyrostoma is the first reported case of this species in a cat, whereas the two myiases by C. vicina are the first reported cases in cats in Italy.

  15. Gene discovery and differential expression analysis of humoral immune response elements in female Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Female Culicoides sonorensis midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are vectors of pathogens that impact livestock and wildlife in the United States. Little is known about their molecular functioning, including components of their immune system. Because the insect immune response is involved ...

  16. An emerging example of tritrophic coevolution between flies (Diptera: Fergusoninidae) and nematodes (Nematoda: Neotylenchidae) on Myrtaceae host plants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A unique obligate mutualism occurs between species of Fergusonina Malloch flies (Diptera: Fergusoninidae) and nematodes of the genus Fergusobia Currie (Nematoda: Neotylenchidae). These mutualists together form different types of galls on Myrtaceae, mainly in Australia. The galling association appear...

  17. Description of a new genus and species of Eucoilinae (Hymenoptera: Cynipoidea:Figitidae) parasitoid of Ephydridae (Diptera)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Hydrelliaeucoila egeria, a new genus and species obtained from pupae of Hydrellia sp. nov. (Diptera: Ephydridae) mining in Egeria densa Planchon (Hydrocharitaceae), is described. Diagnostic photographs and data about the biology of this parasitoid are included. ...

  18. Strongygaster triangulifera (Diptera: Tachinidae) as a parasitoid of adults of the invasive Megacopta cribraria (Heteroptera: Plataspidae) in Alabama

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Strongygaster triangulifera (Loew) (Diptera:Tachinidae) is reported for the first time as a parasitoid of Megacopta cribraria (Fabricius) (Heteroptera: Plataspidae), the kudzu bug, an introduced pest of soybeans and other legume crops in the southeastern U.S....

  19. Prey suitability and phenology of Leucopis spp. (Diptera: Chamaemyiidae) associated with hemlock woolly adelgid (Hemiptera: Adelgidae) in the Pacific Northwest

    Treesearch

    Sarah M. Grubin; Darrell W. Ross; Kimberly F. Wallin

    2011-01-01

    Leucopis spp. (Diptera: Chamaemyiidae) from the Pacific Northwest previously were identified as potential biological control agents for the hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae Annand (Hemiptera: Adelgidae), in the eastern United States. We collected Leucopis spp. larvae from A. tsugae...

  20. Application of a Computerized General Purpose Information Management System (SELGEM) (SELf-GEnerating Master) to Medically Important Arthropods (Diptera: Culicidae).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    APPLICATION OF A COMPUTERIZED GENERAL PURPOSE INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (SELGEM) TO MEDICALLY IMPORTANT ARTHROPODS (DIPTERA: CULICIDAE) I’ Annual Report...Bailey. 1981. Application of a com- puterized information management system (SELGEM) to medically important arthropods (National Museum Mosquito

  1. Descriptions of Two New Species of Culex (Lophoceraomyia) with Notes on Three Other Species from the Papuan Subregion (Diptera: Culicidae)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1973-04-25

    male of Culex jaudatrix Theobald (Diptera, Culicidae) . Proc. Linn. Sot. N. S. W. 87: 382-90. 1965. The genus Culex , subgenus Lophoceraomyia, in...J. Med. Ent. Vol. 10, no. 2: 212-216 25 April 1973 DESCRIPTIONS OF TWO NEW SPECIES OF CULEX (LOPHOCERAOMYIA) WITH NOTES ON THREE OTHER SPECIES FROM...THE PAPUAN SUBREGION (DIPTERA: CULICIDAE)l By Sunthorn Sirivanakard Abstract: Two new species, Culex (Lobhoceraomyia) sub- marginalis and C. (L

  2. A Redescription of the Holotype Male of Aedes (Stegomyia) Tongae Edwards with a Note on Two Topotypic Females (Diptera: Culicidae)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1972-09-01

    A REDESCRIPTION OF THE HOLOTYPE MALE OF AEDES (STEGOMYIA) TONGAE EDWARDS WITH A NOTE ON TWO TOPOTYPIC FEMALES ( DIPTERA : CULICIDAE ) YIAU-MIN...Stegomyia) Tongae Edwards with a Note on Two Topotypic Females 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d... FEMALES ( DIPTERA : CULICIDAE ) ‘v2 YIAU-MIN HUANG, Southeast Asia Mosquito Project, Department of Entomology, Smithsonian Institution, Washington

  3. A Method for Rearing Pupae of Net-Winged Midges (Diptera: Blephariceridae) and Other Torrenticolous Flies

    Treesearch

    Gregory W. Courtney

    1998-01-01

    A method for obtaining reared adults of net-winged midges (Diptera: Blephariceridae) is presented. Rocks with attached pupae are removed from the stream and placed in a container maintained at high humidity. Survival and emergence rates exceeding 60% were recorded for several species of Nearctic Blephaecera. This method is ideal for associating...

  4. Aedes aegypti (Diptera: culicidae) biting deterrence: structure-activity relationship of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In this study we systematically evaluated for the first time the biting deterrent effects of a series of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids against Aedes aegypti [yellow fever mosquito (Diptera: Culicidae)] using the K & D bioassay system (Klun et al 2005). The saturated fatty acids (C6:0 to C16...

  5. A new species of Anastrepha (Diptera: Tephritidae) from Euphorbia tehuacana (Euphorbiaceae) in Mexico

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Anastrepha tehuacana, a new species of Tephritidae (Diptera) from Tehuacán, Puebla, Mexico reared from seeds of Euphorbia tehuacana (Brandegee) V.W. Steinm. (Euphorbiaceae), is described and illustrated. Its probable relationship to A. relicta Hernández-Ortiz is discussed....

  6. Laboratory effects of two organically-certified insecticides on Trichopoda pennipes (Diptera:Tachinidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this laboratory study was to determine the effects of two organically-certified insecticides, azadirachtin and spinosad, on the stink bug parasitoid Trichopoda pennipes (Fab.) (Diptera: Tachinidae) in residual, topical, and oral toxicity tests. The insecticide lambda-cyhalothrin was...

  7. [The mosquitoes (Diptera Culicidae) of Morocco. Bibliographic review (1916-2001) and inventory of the species].

    PubMed

    Trari, B; Dakki, M; Himmi, O; el Agbani, M A

    2003-11-01

    The history of the Culicidae of Morocco was related from bibliographical data. A synthesis of the almost entire works carried out on these Insects (Diptera) since 1916 allowed to bring out the main stages of research of which they were the subject, while emphasizing the important periods of large malaria epidemics in Morocco. A short list of species is also given.

  8. Tripius gyraloura n. sp. (Aphelenchoidea: Sphaerulariidae) parasitic in the gall midge Lasioptera donacis Coutin (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A new nematode, Tripius gyraloura sp. n., is described from the arundo gall midge, Lasioptera donacis Coutin (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae). This gall midge is being considered as a biological control agent for use in North America against the introduced giant reed, Arundo donax (L.) (Poaceae: Cyperales)....

  9. First North American record of the Palaearctic rhinophorid Stevenia deceptoria (Loew) (Diptera: Rhinophoridae).

    PubMed

    O'hara, James E; Cerretti, Pierfilippo; Dahlem, Gregory A

    2015-12-16

    The Rhinophoridae (Diptera) have a cosmopolitan distribution and a known fauna of about 150 species (Cerretti & Pape 2007). So far as known, all species are parasitoids of terrestrial woodlice (sow bugs) of the order Isopoda (Oniscoidea) (Pape 2010). Female rhinophorids lay eggs in the vicinity of potential hosts and the planidial first instars parasitize sow bugs as they pass by (Pape 1998).

  10. The oldest accurate record of Scenopinidae in the Lowermost Eocene amber of France (Diptera: Brachycera).

    PubMed

    Garrouste, Romain; Azar, Dany; Nel, Andre

    2016-03-22

    Eocenotrichia magnifica gen. et sp. nov. (Diptera: Scenopinidae: Metatrichini) is described and illustrated from the Lowermost Eocene amber of Oise (France) and represents the oldest definitive window fly fossil. The present discovery in the Earliest Eocene supports the Late Cretaceous-Paleocene age currently proposed for the emergence of Metatrichini.

  11. A remarkable new species of Eutrichopoda Townsend, 1908 (Diptera: Tachinidae: Phasiinae).

    PubMed

    Dios, Rodrigo De Vilhena Perez; Nihei, Silvio Shigueo

    2016-06-08

    A new Tachinidae species, Eutrichopoda flavipenna sp. nov. (Diptera: Tachinidae: Phasiinae), from Brazil and Paraguay is described and illustrated by photographs and line drawings. The remarkable yellow, feather-like setae on the hind tibia distinguishes the new species from all other species in the tribe Trichopodini.

  12. Pigeon louse fly, Pseudolynchia canariensis (Diptera: Hippoboscidae), collected by dry-ice trap.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Takeo; Tsuda, Yoshio; Sato, Yukita; Murata, Koichi

    2011-12-01

    During a mosquito collection, a female of the pigeon louse fly, Pseudolynchia canariensis (Diptera: Hippoboscidae), was collected by a mosquito trap baited with dry ice in Ishigaki-jima, Yaeyama Islands, Japan. This is the 1st record of P. canariensis from Yaeyama Islands.

  13. Toxicity of Acalypha indica (Euphorbiaceae) and Achyranthes aspera (Amaranthaceae) leaf extracts to Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Alternative control technologies envisioned for the dengue vector Aedes aegypti L. (Diptera: Culicidae) include botanical insecticides, which are believed to pose little threat to the environment or to human health and may provide a practical substitute for synthetic insecticides. In this study, we...

  14. Effects of new dietary ingredients used in artificial diet for screwworm larvae (Diptera: Calliphoridae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Spray-dried whole bovine blood, dry poultry egg, and a dry milk substitute are the constituents of the standard artificial diet currently used for mass rearing screwworm larvae, Cochliomyia hominivorax (Coquerel) (Diptera: Calliphoridae). Due to high cost and uncertainty of the commercial supply of ...

  15. Effects of Viral Infection on Blood-Feeding Behavior in Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) is the primary vector of bluetongue virus (BTV) in North America and a competent vector of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Little is known about how viral infection of this midge affects its blood feeding behavior. Midges were intrathoracically inoc...

  16. Effects of Viral Infection on Blood Feeding Behavior and Fecundity in Culicoides Sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) is the primary vector of bluetongue virus (BTV) in North America and a competent vector of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Little is known about how viral infection of this midge affects its blood feeding behavior and fecundity. Blood feeding succes...

  17. Blood Feeding Behavior of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Infected Culicoides Sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) is the primary vector of Bluetongue virus in North America and a competent vector of Vesicular Stomatitis virus (VSV). Little is known about how viral infection of this midge affects blood feeding behavior and how this might affect virus transmission....

  18. Annotated world bibliography of host plants of the melon fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae (Cocquillett) (Diptera:Tephritidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The melon fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae(Coquillett), is a widespread, economically important tephritid fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae) species. Bactrocera cucurbitae infests fruits and vegetables of a number of different plant species, with many host plants in the plant family Cucurbitaceae, but with ...

  19. A metagenomic assessment of the bacteria associated with Lucilia sericata and Lucilia cuprina (Diptera: Calliphoridae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Lucilia Robineau-Desvoidy (Diptera: Calliphoridae), is a blow fly genus of forensic, medical, veterinary, and agricultural importance. Both species of this genus causes myiasis and are vectors of disease causing bacteria. This genus is also famous because of its beneficial uses in maggot therapy. ...

  20. Long distance movement of batrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidale in Puna, Hawaii: How far can they go?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae), is considered a major economic threat in many regions world-wide including the island of Hawaii, in the Hawaiian archipelago. The need to control large populations over large areas helped initiate the USDA-ARS (United Stat...

  1. Vertical stratification of beetles (Coleoptera) and flies (Diptera) in temperate forest canopies.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Dorothy Y; Robert, Katleen; Brochu, Kristen; Larrivée, Maxim; Buddle, Christopher M; Wheeler, Terry A

    2014-02-01

    Forest canopies support high arthropod biodiversity, but in temperate canopies, little is known about the spatial distribution of these arthropods. This is an important first step toward understanding ecological roles of insects in temperate canopies. The objective of this study was to assess differences in the species composition of two dominant and diverse taxa (Diptera and Coleoptera) along a vertical gradient in temperate deciduous forest canopies. Five sugar maple trees from each of three deciduous forest sites in southern Quebec were sampled using a combination of window and trunk traps placed in three vertical strata (understory, mid-canopy, and upper-canopy) for three sampling periods throughout the summer. Coleoptera species richness and abundance did not differ between canopy heights, but more specimens and species of Diptera were collected in the upper-canopy. Community composition of Coleoptera and Diptera varied significantly by trap height. Window traps collected more specimens and species of Coleoptera than trunk traps, although both trap types should be used to maximize representation of the entire Coleoptera community. There were no differences in abundance, diversity, or composition of Diptera collected between trap types. Our data confirm the relevance of sampling all strata in a forest when studying canopy arthropod biodiversity.

  2. Lespesia melloi sp. nov. (Diptera: Tachinidae) from Brazil, a parasitoid of Xanthopastis timais(Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    PubMed

    Gil-Santana, Hélcio R; Nihei, Silvio Shigueo; Nunez, Enio

    2014-01-01

    A new species of the New World genus Lespesia, Lespesia melloi SP NOV: (Diptera: Tachinidae), is described from southeastern Brazil. The species is reported here as a parasitoid of Xanthopastis timais (Cramer, 1782) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). The caterpillars of this noctuid feed on leaves and bulbs of amaryllis (Amaryllidaceae) in Brazil.

  3. Lespesia melloi sp. nov. (Diptera: Tachinidae) from Brazil, a Parasitoid of Xanthopastis timais (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Santana, Hélcio R.; Nihei, Silvio Shigueo; Nunez, Enio

    2014-01-01

    A new species of the New World genus Lespesia, Lespesia melloi sp. nov. (Diptera: Tachinidae), is described from southeastern Brazil. The species is reported here as a parasitoid of Xanthopastis timais (Cramer, 1782) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). The caterpillars of this noctuid feed on leaves and bulbs of amaryllis (Amaryllidaceae) in Brazil. PMID:25368065

  4. Survival and fate of Salmonella enterica serovar Montevideo in adult Horn Flies (Diptera: Muscidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Contamination of cattle peripheral lymph nodes with Salmonella enterica is proposed to occur via a transdermal route of entry. If so, bacteria may be introduced to cattle by biting arthropods. Biting flies, such as horn flies (Haematobia irritans irritans (L.); Diptera: Muscidae), are intriguing ca...

  5. Pollinating flies (Diptera): A major contribution to plant diversity and agricultural production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Diptera are one of the three largest and most diverse animal groups of the world. As an often neglected, but important group of pollinators, they play a significant role in agrobiodiversity and biodiversity of plants everywhere. Flies are present in almost all habitats and biomes and for many food p...

  6. Effects of Melezitose and Stachyose on Adult Longevity and Virus Persistence in Culicoides Sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A wide variety of blood feeding Diptera feed on extrafloral sugar sources such as homopteran honeydew. he significance of these sugar sources to insect survival and disease transmission are poorly known. Culicoides sonorensis can survive on plant sugars but might feed on homopteran honeydew. The su...

  7. New genera, species and host plant records of Nearctic and Neotropical Tephritidae (Diptera)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Three new genera and 5 new species of Tephritidae (Diptera) are described from the Nearctic and Neotropical Regions. The new genera are: Agallamyia Norrbom (type species: A. pendula Norrbom, n. sp.), Neosphaeniscus Norrbom (type species: Euribia m-nigrum Hendel), and Phacelochaeta Norrbom (type spec...

  8. New species of Fannia Robineau-Desvoidy (Diptera: Fanniidae) from Colombia.

    PubMed

    Durango, Yesica; Ramírez-Mora, Manuel

    2013-12-20

    Fannia Robineau-Desvoidy is a genus of calyptrate Diptera that comprises 89 Neotropical species, of which only 23 occur in Colombia. Based on male characters (including terminalia), two new species from the Department of Antioquia (Fannia colazorrensis sp. nov. and Fannia laclara sp. nov.) are described. Illustrations of the male are presented.

  9. Two pests overlap: Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae) use of fruit exposed to Halyomorpha halys (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura) (Diptera: Drosophilidae), and brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys (Stål) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) are global economic pests. Both pests may co-occur on small fruits, and we investigated whether fruit recently exposed to H. halys woul...

  10. Wine and vinegar-based attractants for the African fig fly (Diptera: Drosophilidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The African fig fly (AFF), Zaprionus indianus Gupta (Diptera: Drosophilidae), is an invasive fruit pest that has spread rapidly through much of the eastern United States after first being detected in Florida in 2005. This drosophilid is a primary pest of figs in Brazil, so there were initial concern...

  11. Trapping African fig fly (Diptera: Drosophilidae) with combinations of vinegar and wine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The African fig fly, Zaprionus indianus Gupta (Diptera: Drosophilidae), is an invasive fruit pest that has spread rapidly through much of the eastern United States. Tests were conducted in southern Florida that recorded the response of Z. indianus to baits that included Merlot wine, rice vinegar, et...

  12. A four-component synthetic attractant for Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae) isolated from fermented bait headspace

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    BACKGROUND: A mixture of wine and vinegar is highly attractive to spotted wing drosophila (SWD) Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura) (Diptera: Drosophilidae), and ethanol and acetic acid are considered key to SWD attraction to such materials. In addition to ethanol and acetic acid, thirteen other wine an...

  13. Postharvest irradiation treatment for quarantine control of the invasive Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Irradiation is a postharvest quarantine treatment option for exported commodities such as stone fruits and small fruits to prevent movement of the new invasive pest spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii (Walker) (Diptera: Drosophilidae). The effects of irradiation on egg, larval, and pupal dev...

  14. Detection/monitoring of Bactrocera latifrons (Diptera: Tephritidae): assessing the potential of prospective new lures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bactrocera latifrons is a tephritid fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae) which has a host list of 59 plant species from 14 plant families, with over 70% of the host plant species coming from the plant families Solanaceae and Cucurbitaceae. Bactrocera latifrons is of primarily Asian distribution, but it...

  15. Molecular species identification of cryptic apple and snowberry maggots (Diptera: Tephritidae) in Western and Central Washington

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In Washington state, identification of the quarantine apple pest Rhagoletis pomonella (Walsh) is complicated by the presence of the cryptic species R. zephyria Snow (Diptera: Tephritidae). Distinguishing the two flies is important because there is a zero tolerance policy for R. pomonella in apple p...

  16. Effect of seasonality and perisulfakinin on engorgement by Tabanus nigrovittatus (Diptera: Tabanidae) in the laboratory

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The horse fly Tabanus nigrovittatus Macquart (Diptera: Tabanidae), a hematophagous insect, is a nuisance pest along the Atlantic Coast. A description of the engorgement pattern throughout the season is lacking in the literature for this species. The percentage of the flies engorging a bloodmeal in...

  17. Pangonius theodori a new horse fly species for science from Israel and Lebanon (Diptera: Tabanidae: Pangoniinae).

    PubMed

    Zeegers, Theo; Kravchenko, Vasiliy D; Müller, Günter C

    2013-03-01

    Pangonius theodori a new horse fly species (Diptera: Tabanidae: Pangoniinae) from northern Israel and southern Lebanon is described. The zoogeography, habitat preference and taxonomic position within the genus of the new species is discussed in detail. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A peculiar new Helina Robineau-Desvoidy (Diptera: Muscidae) from Mexico and Panama.

    PubMed

    Couri, M S

    2012-12-01

    Helina sinaloensis n. sp. (Diptera: Muscidae) is described and illustrated from Mexico and Panama. The new species shows a unique combination of characters and can be distinguished from the other species of the genus by the prosternum with lateral cilia, pre-alar seta absent, anepimeron bare, katepimeron setulose, postalar wall setulose and scutellum with setulae on lateroventral margin.

  19. Picture-winged fly (Euxesta, Chaetopsis spp.; Diptera: Ulidiidae) semiochemical investigations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Picture-winged flies (Euxesta, Chaetopsis spp., Diptera: Ulidiidae) are severe primary pests of sweet corn in southern Florida. Females oviposit in silks and larvae consume the silks and kernels, rendering the ear unmarketable. Growers treat their fields with numerous broad spectrum insecticide ap...

  20. Checklist of the family Ephydridae of Finland (Insecta, Diptera)

    PubMed Central

    Zatwarnicki, Tadeusz; Kahanpää, Jere

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A checklist of 112 species of shore flies (Ephydridae, Diptera) recorded from Finland is presented. Comparing this to the list of Hackman (1980), 52 changes are made: 25 species are added (all but one recorded after 1980), 18 misidentifications are deleted, 5 junior synonyms are replaced and 5 updated generic combinations are given. PMID:25337031

  1. Evolution of Mitochondrial and Ribosomal Gene Sequences in Anophelinae (Diptera: Culicidae): Implications for Phylogeny Reconstruction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-03-01

    incongruence. Cladistics 10: 315-319. Felsenstein, J. (1993). PHYLIP (Phylogeny inference package), ver- sion 3.5. Department of Genetics, University of...disease vectors (Diptera, Culicidae): Impact of molecular biology and cladistic analysis. Annu. Rev. Entomol. 42: 351-369. Peyton, E. L

  2. The genus Camptochaeta in Nearctic caves, with the description of C. prolixa sp. n. (Diptera, Sciaridae)

    PubMed Central

    Vilkamaa, Pekka; Hippa, Heikki; Taylor, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Camptochaeta prolixa sp. n. (Diptera, Sciaridae) is described from caves in Nevada, and three other congeneric species are recorded from caves in Nevada and Arkansas, United States. The new species shows some indication to a subterranean mode of life, including long antenna and legs, and in some specimens, reduction of the eye bridge. PMID:22259302

  3. Annotated world bibliography of host fruits of Bactrocera latifrons (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bactrocera latifrons (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae) infests many solanaceous plant species, some of which are important horticultural crop species. It has also been found to infest a number of cucurbitaceous plant species as well as a few plant species in other plant families. B. latifrons is of ...

  4. A new species of Anastrepha (Diptera: Tephritidae) from Euphorbia tehuacana (Euphorbiaceae) in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Norrbom, Allen L; Castillo-Meza, Ana Lucía; García-Chávez, Juan Héctor; Aluja, Martín; Rull, Juan

    2014-03-24

    Anastrepha tehuacana, a new species of Tephritidae (Diptera) from Tehuacán, Puebla, Mexico reared from seeds of Euphorbia tehuacana (Brandegee) V.W. Steinm. (Euphorbiaceae), is described and illustrated. Its probable relationship to A. relicta Hernández-Ortiz is discussed.

  5. Attraction of Rhagoletis indifferens (Diptera: Tephitidae) to white light in the presence and absence of ammonia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Attraction of tephritid fruit flies to light and its role in fly biology and management has received little attention. Here, the objective was to show that western cherry fruit fly, Rhagoletis indifferens Curran (Diptera: Tephritidae), is attracted to white light in the presence and absence of ammo...

  6. Brachyceran Diptera (Insecta) in Cretaceous ambers, Part IV, Significant New Orthorrhaphous Taxa

    PubMed Central

    Grimaldi, David A.; Arillo, Antonio; Cumming, Jeffrey M.; Hauser, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Thirteen species of basal Brachycera (11 described as new) are reported, belonging to nine families and three infraorders. They are preserved in amber from the Early Cretaceous (Neocomian) of Lebanon, Albian of northern Spain, upper Albian to lower Cenomanian of northern Myanmar, and Late Cretaceous of New Jersey USA (Turonian) and Alberta, Canada (Campanian). Taxa are as follows, with significance as noted: In Stratiomyomorpha: Stratiomyidae (Cretaceogaster pygmaeus Teskey [2 new specimens in Canadian amber], Lysistrata emerita Grimaldi & Arillo, gen. et sp. n. [stem-group species of the family in Spanish amber]), and Xylomyidae (Cretoxyla azari Grimaldi & Cumming, gen. et sp. n. [in Lebanese amber], and an undescribed species from Spain). In Tabanomorpha: Tabanidae (Cratotabanus newjerseyensis Grimaldi, sp. n., in New Jersey amber). In Muscomorpha: Acroceridae (Schlingeromyia minuta Grimaldi & Hauser, gen. et sp. n. and Burmacyrtus rusmithi Grimaldi & Hauser gen. et sp. n., in Burmese amber, the only definitive species of the family from the Cretaceous); Mythicomyiidae (Microburmyia analvena Grimaldi & Cumming gen. et sp. n. and Microburmyia veanalvena Grimaldi & Cumming, sp. n., stem-group species of the family, both in Burmese amber); Apsilocephalidae or near (therevoid family-group) (Kumaromyia burmitica Grimaldi & Hauser, gen. et sp. n. [in Burmese amber]); Apystomyiidae (Hilarimorphites burmanica Grimaldi & Cumming, sp. n. [in Burmese amber], whose closest relatives are from the Late Jurassic of Kazachstan, the Late Cretaceous of New Jersey, and Recent of California). Lastly, two species belonging to families incertae sedis, both in Burmese amber: Tethepomyiidae (Tethepomyia zigrasi Grimaldi & Arillo sp. n., the aculeate oviscapt of which indicates this family was probably parasitoidal and related to Eremochaetidae); and unplaced to family is Myanmyia asteiformia Grimaldi, gen. et sp. n., a minute fly with highly reduced venation. These new taxa

  7. Brachyceran Diptera (Insecta) in Cretaceous ambers, Part IV, Significant New Orthorrhaphous Taxa.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, David A; Arillo, Antonio; Cumming, Jeffrey M; Hauser, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Thirteen species of basal Brachycera (11 described as new) are reported, belonging to nine families and three infraorders. They are preserved in amber from the Early Cretaceous (Neocomian) of Lebanon, Albian of northern Spain, upper Albian to lower Cenomanian of northern Myanmar, and Late Cretaceous of New Jersey USA (Turonian) and Alberta, Canada (Campanian). Taxa are as follows, with significance as noted: In Stratiomyomorpha: Stratiomyidae (Cretaceogaster pygmaeus Teskey [2 new specimens in Canadian amber], Lysistrata emerita Grimaldi & Arillo, gen. et sp. n. [stem-group species of the family in Spanish amber]), and Xylomyidae (Cretoxyla azari Grimaldi & Cumming, gen. et sp. n. [in Lebanese amber], and an undescribed species from Spain). In Tabanomorpha: Tabanidae (Cratotabanus newjerseyensis Grimaldi, sp. n., in New Jersey amber). In Muscomorpha: Acroceridae (Schlingeromyia minuta Grimaldi & Hauser, gen. et sp. n. and Burmacyrtus rusmithi Grimaldi & Hauser gen. etsp. n., in Burmese amber, the only definitive species of the family from the Cretaceous); Mythicomyiidae (Microburmyia analvena Grimaldi & Cumming gen. et sp. n. and Microburmyia veanalvena Grimaldi & Cumming, sp. n., stem-group species of the family, both in Burmese amber); Apsilocephalidae or near (therevoid family-group) (Kumaromyia burmitica Grimaldi & Hauser, gen. et sp. n. [in Burmese amber]); Apystomyiidae (Hilarimorphites burmanica Grimaldi & Cumming, sp. n. [in Burmese amber], whose closest relatives are from the Late Jurassic of Kazachstan, the Late Cretaceous of New Jersey, and Recent of California). Lastly, two species belonging to families incertae sedis, both in Burmese amber: Tethepomyiidae (Tethepomyia zigrasi Grimaldi & Arillo sp. n., the aculeate oviscapt of which indicates this family was probably parasitoidal and related to Eremochaetidae); and unplaced to family is Myanmyia asteiformia Grimaldi, gen. et sp. n., a minute fly with highly reduced venation. These new taxa significantly

  8. A New Visual Trap for Rhagoletis cerasi (L.) (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Claudia; Mathis, Samuel; Feichtinger, Georg

    2014-01-01

    The European cherry fruit fly, Rhagoletis cerasi (L.) (Diptera: Tephritidae), is the most important pest of sweet cherries in Europe. The aim of our experiments was to develop a new, cost-efficient, lead chromate-free and more eco-friendly trap for monitoring and mass trapping of R. cerasi. Five different-colored yellow panels and three different trap shapes were compared to a standard Rebell® amarillo trap in three experimental orchards in 2012. Trap color F, with a strong increase in reflectance at 500–550 nm and a secondary peak in the UV-region at 300–400 nm, captured significantly more flies than the standard Rebell® amarillo trap. Yellow traps with increased reflectance in the blue region (400–500 nm) were least attractive. Trap shape was of minor importance, as long as the object was three-dimensional and visible from all directions. Based on economic and practical considerations, a cylinder-shaped trap “UFA-Samen Kirschenfliegenfalle” was developed for commercial use and is currently under on-farm evaluation. PMID:26462825

  9. Response of Lucilia sericata (Diptera: Calliphoridae) to Screwworm Oviposition Attractant.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, M F; Zhu, J J; Skoda, S R

    2015-07-01

    The sheep blowfly, Lucilia sericata Meigen (Diptera: Calliphoridae), causes sheep myiasis in various parts of the world. Female flies are attracted to sheep following various olfactory cues emanating from the sheep's body, and oviposit on suitable substrates on sheep ultimately causing myiasis. Earlier workers attempted to reduce fly population in the field, with some success, using traps baited with various attractants. This research was conducted to determine if L. sericata would respond to a recently developed synthetic attractant that has attracted gravid screwworms, Cochliomyia hominivorax Coquerel, and stimulated them to oviposit. Results of the laboratory bioassays demonstrated that gravid females L. sericata were attracted to substrates treated with the synthetic screwworm attractant composed of five compounds--dimethyl disulfide, dimethyl trisulfide, phenol, p-cresol, and indole. Tests with various combinations of these compounds suggest that the sulfur compounds and indole are the most important compounds to elicit attraction and stimulate oviposition, while phenol and p-cresol may have minor roles. Semiochemical baits based on these compounds may be useful in the field to trap gravid L. sericata. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2015. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  10. Updated list of the mosquitoes of Colombia (Diptera: Culicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Mengual, Ximo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background A revised list of the mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) known to occur in Colombia is presented. A total of 324 species from 28 genera of Culicidae are included. The species names are organized in alphabetical order according to the current generic and subgeneric classification, along with their authorship. The list is compiled in order to support mosquito research in Colombia. New information Our systematic review and literature survey found, by 16 February 2015, 13 records of culicid species previously overlooked by mosquito catalogs for Colombia: Anopheles costai da Fonseca & da Silva Ramos, 1939, An. fluminensis Root, 1927, An. malefactor Dyar & Knab, 1907, An. shannoni Davis, 1931, An. vargasi Galbadón, Cova García & Lopez, 1941, Culex mesodenticulatus Galindo & Mendez, 1961, Haemagogus capricornii Lutz, 1904, Isostomyia espini (Martini, 1914), Johnbelkinia leucopus (Dyar & Knab, 1906), Mansonia indubitans Dyar & Shannon, 1925, Psorophora saeva Dyar & Knab, 1906, Sabethes glaucodaemon (Dyar & Shannon, 1925), and Wyeomyia intonca Dyar & Knab, 1909. Moreover, Wyeomyia (Dendromyia) luteoventralis Theobald, 1901 is recorded for Colombia for the first time. This work provides important insights into mosquito diversity in Colombia, using the current nomenclature and phylogenetic rankings. PMID:25829860

  11. Diel periodicity of Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae) under field conditions

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Richard K.; Toews, Michael D.

    2017-01-01

    Drosophila suzukii Matsumura (Diptera: Drosophilidae), an economically important pest of blueberry and other thin-skinned fruits, persists and prolifically reproduces under seemingly lethal climatic conditions in the field. However, behavioral and physiological mechanisms employed by D. suzukii to tolerate such extreme climatic conditions in the field are unknown. The primary objective of this project was to investigate diel periodicity of D. suzukii and their reproductive success under field conditions as related by climatic factors such as temperature and relative humidity. Results show that D. suzukii reproductive success was significantly higher during the night (including dawn and dusk periods) than the day in terms of oviposition, pupation, adult eclosion, and the number of progeny per female. Female D. suzukii reproductive success was not significantly different between specific regions of a blueberry bush in relation to the amount of shade provided by the canopy. Our studies indicate that D. suzukii flight activity is crepuscular and is sensitive to fluctuations in temperature and relative humidity. Results also suggest that the majority of fly activity during peak hours is concentrated in areas around the border and within the center of blueberry orchards with little activity in the surrounding wooded areas. These findings suggest that D. suzukii prefers microclimate with mild temperatures and high humidity, and does not function well when exposed to direct sunlight with extreme heat. The authors propose that D. suzukii management strategies should be implemented during the early morning and immediately before darkness to maximize efficacy. PMID:28187140

  12. Biology of Anastrepha grandis (Diptera: Tephritidae) in Different Cucurbits.

    PubMed

    Bolzan, Anderson; Nava, Dori E; Garcia, Flávio R M; Valgas, Ricardo A; Smaniotto, Giovani

    2015-06-01

    Anastrepha grandis (Macquart) (Diptera: Tephritidae) is one of the main pests of cucurbits in Brazil. Losses occur due to the damage caused to the fruits and the embargo on exports, as A. grandis is considered a quarantine pest in countries that import Brazilian cucurbits. This study aimed to evaluate the development of A. grandis in hosts of the Cucurbitaceae family. The hosts used were stem squash (Cucurbita pepo L.), squash (Cucurbita moschata Duchesne), chayote [Sechium edule (Jacq.) Swartz], mini watermelon [Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum & Nakai], Spanish melon (Cucumis melo L.), hybrid squash "Tetsukabuto" (C. moschata×Cucurbita maxima Duchesne), and salad cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.). We evaluated the viability and duration of egg-to-pupa period, pupal weight, sex ratio, and average number of pupae per fruit under controlled conditions of temperature, relative humidity, and photophase. The preoviposition and oviposition periods, fecundity, fertility, and longevity of females were determined for adults. Hosts of the genus Cucurbita provided a better development of A. grandis in comparison with other hosts, and presented a greater number of insects on fruit as well as higher infestation rate. Fecundity and longevity were also higher for females that developed in hosts of the genus Cucurbita, although values of these biological parameters varied between stem squash, squash, hybrid squash "Tetsukabuto."

  13. The larval head of Exechia (Mycetophilidae) and Bibio (Bibionidae) (Diptera).

    PubMed

    Bauernfeind, René; Schneeberg, Katharina; Beutel, Rolf Georg

    2015-07-01

    Exechia and Bibio have retained several plesiomorphic groundplan features of Diptera and Bibionomorpha, including a fully exposed and sclerotized head capsule, the transverse undivided labrum, the absence of movable premandibles, and undivided mandibles without combs. The fusion of the hypostomal bridge with the head capsule and largely reduced antennae are derived features shared by both taxa. The absence of teeth at the anterior hypostomal margin is a potential autapomorphy of Bibionomorpha. A basal position of Anisopodidae is suggested by a number of plesiomorphies retained in this family. Apomorphies of Bibionomorpha excluding Anisopodidae are the reduction of tentorial elements, the partial fusion of the labrum and clypeus, one-segmented antennae, the absence of a separate submental sclerite, the loss of the labial palpus, and the reduction of the pharyngeal filter apparatus. Head structures of Bibio are largely unmodified. The subprognathous orientation is one of few autapomorphic features. In contrast, the mouthparts of Exechia are highly modified in correlation with the specialized food uptake. The rasping counterrotating movements of maxillae and mandibles with teeth oriented in opposite directions are carried out by strongly developed extensors and flexors of the paired mouthparts. The modified labium mechanically supports the "drill head" formed by the mandibles und maxillae. The necessary stability of the head capsule is provided by the hypostomal bridge which also compensates the far-reaching reduction of the tentorium.

  14. DNA barcodes can distinguish species of Indian mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Kumar, N Pradeep; Rajavel, A R; Natarajan, R; Jambulingam, P

    2007-01-01

    Species identification of mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) based on morphological characteristics remains often difficult in field-collected mosquito specimens in vector-borne disease surveillance programs. The use of DNA barcodes has been proposed recently as a tool for identification of the species in many diverse groups of animals. However, the efficacy of this tool for mosquitoes remains unexplored. Hence, a study was undertaken to construct DNA barcodes for several species of mosquitoes prevalent in India, which included major vector species. In total, 111 specimens of mosquitoes belonging to 15 genera, morphologically identified to be 63 species, were used. This number also included multiple specimens for 22 species. DNA barcode approach based on DNA sequences of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase gene sequences could identify 62 species among these, in confirmation with the conventional taxonomy. However, two closely related species, Ochlerotatus portonovoensis (Tiwari & Hiriyan) and Ochlerotatus wardi (Reinert) could not be identified as separate species based on DNA barcode approach, their lineages indicating negligible genetic divergence (Kimura two-parameter genetic distance = 0.0043).

  15. Marking Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae) With Rubidium or 15N.

    PubMed

    Klick, J; Yang, W Q; Bruck, D J

    2015-06-01

    Drosophila suzukii Matsumura (Diptera: Drosophilidae) has caused significant economic damage to berry and stone fruit production regions. Markers that are systemic in plants and easily transferred to target organisms are needed to track D. suzukii exploitation of host resources and trophic interactions. High and low concentrations of the trace element, rubidium (Rb), and the stable isotope, 15N, were tested to mark D. suzukii larvae feeding on fruits of enriched strawberry plants grown in containers under greenhouse conditions. Fly marker content and proportion of flies marked 1, 7, and 14 d after emergence from enriched fruits and fly dry mass were analyzed. Nearly 100% of the flies analyzed 14 d after emerging from 15N-enriched plants were marked, whereas only 30-75% and 0-3% were marked 14 d after emerging from high and low Rb concentration plants, respectively. Rapid Rb decay, strong 15N persistence, and the economics of using these markers in the field to elucidate D. suzukii pest ecology are discussed. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Irradiation of Anastrepha ludens (Diptera: Tephritidae) revisited: optimizing sterility induction.

    PubMed

    Rull, Juan; Diaz-Fleischer, Francisco; Arredondo, Jose

    2007-08-01

    Irradiation doses currently applied to sterilize Mexican fruit flies, Anastrepha ludens (Loew) (Diptera: Tephritidae), for release under the sterile insect technique eradication campaign in Mexico, were reviewed in an effort to increase sterile male performance in the field. A dose maximizing sterility induction into wild populations was sought by balancing somatic fitness with genetic sterility. Doses of 40, 60, and 80 Gy induced 95% or more sterility in all males, which in turn induced similar degrees of sterility into a cohort of wild flies in the laboratory. However, a low dose of 40 Gy was sufficient to completely suppress egg production in females. Similarly, a mild carryover of genetic damage might have been transferred to the F1 progeny of males irradiated at 40 Gy crossed with fertile wild females. Our results suggest that the 80-Gy dose currently applied in Mexico can be lowered substantially without jeopardizing program goals. This view could be strengthened by comparing performance of males irradiated at different doses under more natural settings. In general, we discuss the value of determining irradiation doses for pest species where females are more radiosensitive than males, by selecting the dose that causes 100% sterility in females.

  17. Blood Meal Analysis of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in Central Tunisia

    PubMed Central

    Slama, Darine; Haouas, Najoua; Mezhoud, Habib; Babba, Hamouda; Chaker, Emna

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the host preferences of Culicoides species (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in Central Tunisia, we identified the source of blood meals of field collected specimens by sequencing of the cytochrome b (cyt b) mitochondrial locus and Prepronociceptine single copy nuclear gene. The study includes the most common and abundant livestock associated species of biting midges in Tunisia: C. imicola, C. jumineri, C. newsteadi, C. paolae, C. cataneii, C. circumscriptus, C. kingi, C. pseudojumineri, C. submaritimus, C. langeroni, C. jumineri var and some unidentified C. species. Analysis of cyt b PCR products from 182 field collected blood-engorged females’ midges revealed that 92% of them fed solely on mammalian species, 1.6% on birds, 2.4% on insects and 0.8% on reptiles. The blast results identified the blood origin of biting midges to the species level with exact or nearly exact matches (≥98%). The results confirm the presence of several Culicoides species, including proven vectors in Central Tunisia. Blood meal analyses show that these species will indeed feed on bigger mammals, thereby highlighting the risk that these viruses will be able to spread in Tunisia. PMID:25793285

  18. Sampling strategies for phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) in Europe.

    PubMed

    Alten, B; Ozbel, Y; Ergunay, K; Kasap, O E; Cull, B; Antoniou, M; Velo, E; Prudhomme, J; Molina, R; Bañuls, A-L; Schaffner, F; Hendrickx, G; Van Bortel, W; Medlock, J M

    2015-12-01

    The distribution of phlebotomine sand flies is widely reported to be changing in Europe. This can be attributed to either the discovery of sand flies in areas where they were previously overlooked (generally following an outbreak of leishmaniasis or other sand fly-related disease) or to true expansion of their range as a result of climatic or environmental changes. Routine surveillance for phlebotomines in Europe is localized, and often one of the challenges for entomologists working in non-leishmaniasis endemic countries is the lack of knowledge on how to conduct, plan and execute sampling for phlebotomines, or how to adapt on-going sampling strategies for other haematophagous diptera. This review brings together published and unpublished expert knowledge on sampling strategies for European phlebotomines of public health concern in order to provide practical advice on: how to conduct surveys; the collection and interpretation of field data; suitable techniques for the preservation of specimens obtained by different sampling methods; molecular techniques used for species identification; and the pathogens associated with sand flies and their detection methods.

  19. Distribution and abundance of Stomoxyini flies (Diptera: Muscidae) in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Changbunjong, Tanasak; Weluwanarak, Thekhawet; Ratanakorn, Parntep; Maneeon, Pattarapon; Ganpanakngan, Manoch; Apiwathnasorn, Chamnarn; Sungvornyothin, Sungsit; Sriwichai, Patchara; Sumruayphol, Suchada; Ruangsittichai, Jiraporn

    2012-11-01

    Stomoxyini flies (Diptera: Muscidae) include species of parasitic flies of medical and veterinary importance. The adult flies feed on the blood of mammals and may transmit several parasites and pathogens. We conducted an entomological survey of Stomoxyini flies from different sites in Thailand. Stomoxyini flies were collected at four major types of sites: zoos, livestock farms, wildlife conservation areas and a national park using vavoua traps between November 2010 and April 2011. A total of 3,314 Stomoxyini flies belonging to the genera Stomoxys, Haematobosca, Haematostoma and Haematobia were collected. Eight species were identified: S. calcitrans (46.6%), S. uruma (26.8%), S. pulla (4.3%), S. indicus (0.7%), S. sitiens (0.1%), H. sanguinolenta (11.2 %), H. austeni (0.5%) and H. irritans exigua (9.8%). The diversity of Stomoxyini flies in the livestock farms was higher than the other sites. Altitude correlated with the number of flies. This study provides information that may be useful for Stomoxyini flies control.

  20. Evolution and Structural Analyses of Glossina morsitans (Diptera; Glossinidae) Tetraspanins.

    PubMed

    Murungi, Edwin K; Kariithi, Henry M; Adunga, Vincent; Obonyo, Meshack; Christoffels, Alan

    2014-11-12

    Tetraspanins are important conserved integral membrane proteins expressed in many organisms. Although there is limited knowledge about the full repertoire, evolution and structural characteristics of individual members in various organisms, data obtained so far show that tetraspanins play major roles in membrane biology, visual processing, memory, olfactory signal processing, and mechanosensory antennal inputs. Thus, these proteins are potential targets for control of insect pests. Here, we report that the genome of the tsetse fly, Glossina morsitans (Diptera: Glossinidae) encodes at least seventeen tetraspanins (GmTsps), all containing the signature features found in the tetraspanin superfamily members. Whereas six of the GmTsps have been previously reported, eleven could be classified as novel because their amino acid sequences do not map to characterized tetraspanins in the available protein data bases. We present a model of the GmTsps by using GmTsp42Ed, whose presence and expression has been recently detected by transcriptomics and proteomics analyses of G. morsitans. Phylogenetically, the identified GmTsps segregate into three major clusters. Structurally, the GmTsps are largely similar to vertebrate tetraspanins. In view of the exploitation of tetraspanins by organisms for survival, these proteins could be targeted using specific antibodies, recombinant large extracellular loop (LEL) domains, small-molecule mimetics and siRNAs as potential novel and efficacious putative targets to combat African trypanosomiasis by killing the tsetse fly vector.

  1. Biogeography of Drosophila (Diptera: Drosophilidae) in East and Southeast Asia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fu-Guo Robert; Tsaur, Shun-Chern; Huang, Hsiao-Ting

    2015-01-01

    The causes of high biological diversity in biodiversity hotspots have long been a major subject of study in conservation biology. To investigate this matter, we conducted a phylogeographic study of five Drosophila (Diptera: Drosophilidae) species from East and Southeast Asia: Drosophila albomicans Duda, D. formosana Duda, D. immigrans Sturtevant, D. melanogaster Meigen, and D. simulans Sturtevant. We collected 185 samples from 28 localities in eight countries. From each collected individual, we sequenced the autosomal extra sex comb gene (esc) and seven mitochondrial genes, including nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide hydrate-reductase dehydrogenase subunit 4 (ND4), ND4L, tRNA-His, tRNA-Pro, tRNA-Thr, partial ND5, and partial ND6. Phylogenetic analyses using maximum- likelihood and Bayesian methods revealed interesting population structure and identified the existence of two distinct D. formosana lineages (Southeast Asian and Taiwanese populations). Genetic differentiation among groups of D. immigrans suggests the possibility of endemic speciation in Taiwan. In contrast, D. melanogaster remained one extensively large population throughout East and Southeast Asia, including nearby islets. A molecular clock was used to estimate divergence times, which were compared with past geographical events to infer evolutionary scenarios. Our findings suggest that interglacial periods may have caused population isolation, thus enhancing population differentiation more strongly for some of the Drosophila species. The population structure of each Drosophila species in East and Southeast Asia has been influenced by past geographic events.

  2. Quantifying bluetongue virus in adult Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).

    PubMed

    Veronesi, Eva; Mertens, Peter P C; Shaw, Andrew E; Brownlie, Joe; Mellor, Philip S; Carpenter, Simon T

    2008-01-01

    A TissueLyser system (QIAGEN) was used to rapidly and accurately estimate bluetongue virus "loads" in individual adult Culicoides sonorensis Wirth & Jones (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae). The optimized homogenization program that was developed, involved shaking insects for 1 min at 25 Hz with 2- or 3-mm stainless steel ball bearings. This program was used to measure the quantities of bluetongue virus present in insects that had either been inoculated or had ingested a viremic bloodmeal through an artificial membrane. The virus titers obtained using either infection technique and the optimized program did not differ significantly from those obtained using a polypropylene motor-driven pestle, a method that is currently in common use for studies of vector competence). The advantages of the new method, as a rapid means of detecting fully disseminated infections in individual field-caught flies, are discussed. Its use is compared with the processing of pools of Culicoides by conventional methods, where the extent of dissemination of the virus is unknown and could wrongly implicate species that are of low importance in transmission.

  3. The larvae of Nymphomyiidae (Diptera, Insecta) - ancestral and highly derived?

    PubMed

    Schneeberg, Katharina; Friedrich, Frank; Courtney, Gregory W; Wipfler, Benjamin; Beutel, Rolf G

    2012-05-01

    Larval head structures of Nymphomyia dolichopeza were examined and described in detail. The conditions are compared to those of other dipteran representatives. Our results support the monophyly of Nymphomyiidae. Potential apomorphies are dimorphic crochets on the abdominal prolegs and the complete loss of the tentorium. Possible synapomorphies of Nymphomyiidae and Deuterophlebiidae could be the rows of spatulate macrosetae covering the ventral surface of the labrum-epipharynx, the presence of distinct teeth along the anterior premento-hypopharyngeal margin, the absence of labral microtrichia and some other affinities concerning the life history of the two groups. A clade Blephariceromorpha is also supported by some larval features. Potential synapomorphies of Nymphomyiidae, Deuterophlebiidae and Blephariceridae are the vestigial M. labroepipharyngalis, the absence of a movable premandible, crochet-tipped prolegs, the complete loss of spiracles and non-retractable anal papillae. A clade Nymphomyiidae and Chironomidae is only weakly supported by characters of the larval head. The anteriorly serrate and posteriorly fused hypostoma is a potential apomorphic character. Our results support neither phylogenetic affinities between Nymphomyiidae and Axymyiidae nor a sistergroup relationship between Nymphomyiidae and the remaining Diptera. However, a comprehensive cladistic analysis is not presented in our study.

  4. Effect of temperature on metabolism of Phlebotomus papatasi (Diptera: Psychodidae).

    PubMed

    Benkova, Ivana; Volf, Petr

    2007-01-01

    Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli) (Diptera: Psychodidae) is the most important vector of Leishmania major, and previous experiments revealed that Leishmania development in the sand fly midgut is significantly affected by temperature. Therefore, we maintained blood-fed P. papatasi females at 23 or 28 degrees C to understand the effect of temperature on bloodmeal digestion and developmental times of this sand fly. At the lower temperature, the metabolic processes were slower and developmental times were longer: defecation, oviposition, and egg hatch started later and took longer to complete. Also, the mortality of blood-fed females was significantly lower. The defecation of bloodmeal remains was delayed for 12-36 h at 23 degrees C compared with the group maintained at 28 degrees C. Such delay would provide more time for Leishmania to establish the midgut infection and could partially explain the increased susceptibility of P. papatasi to Leishmania major at 23 degrees C. In both experimental groups, blood-fed females laid similar numbers of eggs (mean 60 and 70, maximum 104 and 115 per female). Egg numbers were positively correlated with the amount of hematin excreted in feces of ovipositing females. In parallel experiments, autogeny was recorded in 8% of females. The autogenous egg batches were smaller (mean, 12; range, 1-39), but they all produced viable larvae.

  5. New and poorly known Palaearctic fungus gnats (Diptera, Sciaroidea)

    PubMed Central

    Kolcsár, Levente-Péter

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Fungus gnats (Sciaroidea) are a globally species rich group of lower Diptera. In Europe, Fennoscandian peninsula in particular holds a notable diversity, ca. 1000 species, of which 10 % are still unnamed. Fungus gnats are predominantly terrestrial insects, but some species dwell in wetland habitats. New information Eight new fungus gnat species, belonging to the families Keroplatidae (Orfelia boreoalpina Salmela sp.n.) and Mycetophilidae (Sciophila holopaineni Salmela sp.n., S. curvata Salmela sp.n., Boletina sasakawai Salmela & Kolcsár sp.n., B. norokorpii Salmela & Kolcsár sp.n., Phronia sompio Salmela sp.n., P. reducta Salmela sp.n., P. prolongata Salmela sp.n.), are described. Four of the species are known from Fennoscandia only whilst two are supposed to have boreo-alpine disjunct ranges, i.e. having populations in Fennoscandia and the Central European Alps. One of the species probably has a boreal range (Finnish Lapland and Central Siberia). Type material of Boletina curta Sasakawa & Kimura from Japan was found to consist of two species, and a further species close to these taxa is described from Finland. Phronia elegantula Hackman is redescribed and reported for the first time from Norway. DNA barcodes are provided for the first time for five species. PMID:28325987

  6. Biogeography of Drosophila (Diptera: Drosophilidae) in East and Southeast Asia

    PubMed Central

    Robert Liu, Fu-Guo; Tsaur, Shun-Chern; Huang, Hsiao-Ting

    2015-01-01

    The causes of high biological diversity in biodiversity hotspots have long been a major subject of study in conservation biology. To investigate this matter, we conducted a phylogeographic study of five Drosophila (Diptera: Drosophilidae) species from East and Southeast Asia: Drosophila albomicans Duda, D. formosana Duda, D. immigrans Sturtevant, D. melanogaster Meigen, and D. simulans Sturtevant. We collected 185 samples from 28 localities in eight countries. From each collected individual, we sequenced the autosomal extra sex comb gene (esc) and seven mitochondrial genes, including nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide hydrate-reductase dehydrogenase subunit 4 (ND4), ND4L, tRNA-His, tRNA-Pro, tRNA-Thr, partial ND5, and partial ND6. Phylogenetic analyses using maximum- likelihood and Bayesian methods revealed interesting population structure and identified the existence of two distinct D. formosana lineages (Southeast Asian and Taiwanese populations). Genetic differentiation among groups of D. immigrans suggests the possibility of endemic speciation in Taiwan. In contrast, D. melanogaster remained one extensively large population throughout East and Southeast Asia, including nearby islets. A molecular clock was used to estimate divergence times, which were compared with past geographical events to infer evolutionary scenarios. Our findings suggest that interglacial periods may have caused population isolation, thus enhancing population differentiation more strongly for some of the Drosophila species. The population structure of each Drosophila species in East and Southeast Asia has been influenced by past geographic events. PMID:26078303

  7. A new trap and lure for Drosophila melanogaster (Diptera: Drosophilidae).

    PubMed

    Birmingham, Anna L; Kovacs, Ervin; Lafontaine, Jean Pierre; Avelino, Norman; Borden, John H; Andreller, Isak S; Gries, Gerhard

    2011-06-01

    We conducted a series of nine laboratory experiments testing the response of "vinegar flies," Drosophila melanogaster Meigen (Diptera: Drosophilidae), released in bioassay chambers to experimental traps and lures. These experiments showed that an effective trap could be constructed from a clear 225-ml screw-cap jar fitted with a hollow 8-mm-diameter cylindrical cross bridge. Flies could enter the trap from either end of the cylindrical "gate" and in turn could enter the interior chamber of the trap through a cut out portion at mid-span of the cylinder. The experiments also showed that a natural-component lure could be made using a teabag containing freeze-dried banana powder, yeast, and carrageenan gum powder as a humectant. When dipped in water for 10-15 s and then placed in the bottom of a trap, the teabag provided effective attraction for at least 7 d. Captured flies were immobilized on a sticky card placed in the trap, allowing them to be easily seen. Unlike other traps that cannot be opened and have liquid lures, the cylindrical-gate trap can be reused repeatedly if the teabag and sticky card are replaced. A final two experiments showed that the prototype operational cylindrical-gate trap with a teabag lure captured 3.3 and 2.3 times more released flies, respectively, than the next best of three commercially available traps.

  8. Culicoides Latreille (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) taxonomy: current challenges and future directions.

    PubMed

    Harrup, L E; Bellis, G A; Balenghien, T; Garros, C

    2015-03-01

    Culicoides Latreille biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) cause a significant biting nuisance to humans, livestock and equines, and are the biological vectors of a range of internationally important pathogens of both veterinary and medical importance. Despite their economic significance, the delimitation and identification of species and evolutionary relationships between species within this genus remains at best problematic. To date no phylogenetic study has attempted to validate the subgeneric classification of the genus and the monophyly of many of the subgenera remains doubtful. Many informal species groupings are also known to exist but few are adequately described, further complicating accurate identification. Recent contributions to Culicoides taxonomy at the species level have revealed a high correlation between morphological and molecular analyses although molecular analyses are revealing the existence of cryptic species. This review considers the methods for studying the systematics of Culicoides using both morphological and genetic techniques, with a view to understanding the factors limiting our current understanding of Culicoides biology and hence arbovirus epidemiology. In addition, we examine the global status of Culicoides identification, highlighting areas that are poorly addressed, including the potential implementation of emerging technologies. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Culicoides Latreille (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) taxonomy: Current challenges and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Harrup, L.E.; Bellis, G.A.; Balenghien, T.; Garros, C.

    2015-01-01

    Culicoides Latreille biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) cause a significant biting nuisance to humans, livestock and equines, and are the biological vectors of a range of internationally important pathogens of both veterinary and medical importance. Despite their economic significance, the delimitation and identification of species and evolutionary relationships between species within this genus remains at best problematic. To date no phylogenetic study has attempted to validate the subgeneric classification of the genus and the monophyly of many of the subgenera remains doubtful. Many informal species groupings are also known to exist but few are adequately described, further complicating accurate identification. Recent contributions to Culicoides taxonomy at the species level have revealed a high correlation between morphological and molecular analyses although molecular analyses are revealing the existence of cryptic species. This review considers the methods for studying the systematics of Culicoides using both morphological and genetic techniques, with a view to understanding the factors limiting our current understanding of Culicoides biology and hence arbovirus epidemiology. In addition, we examine the global status of Culicoides identification, highlighting areas that are poorly addressed, including the potential implementation of emerging technologies. PMID:25535946

  10. Susceptibility of cranberries to Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae).

    PubMed

    Steffan, Shawn A; Lee, Jana C; Singleton, Merritt E; Vilaire, Auriel; Walsh, Doug B; Lavine, Laura S; Patten, Kim

    2013-12-01

    Drosophila suzukii Matsumura (Diptera: Drosophilidae), commonly referred to as the spotted wing drosophila, is an exotic species that has proven a troublesome pest of fruit production in the United States. The fly targets small fruit and thus represents a concern for the U.S. cranberry industry. Two studies were conducted to assess whether cranberries may serve as hosts for D. suzukii. In the first study, the suitability of ripe, unripe, and over-ripe cranberries were assayed by examining adult oviposition and larval development in no-choice trials. In the second study, wounded and unwounded fruit were examined as potential hosts in choice and no-choice trials. Our first study showed that ripe, unripe, and over-ripe cranberries were unsuitable hosts (few eggs were laid, with no surviving puparia). In the wounded and unwounded berry study, no larvae survived to adulthood among unwounded berries. Within wounded fruit, D. suzukii readily fed and developed into adults. Together, these results suggest that unwounded cranberries--whether ripe, unripe, or over-ripe--are unsuitable as hosts for D. suzukii. Wounded rotting cranberries, however, can serve as hosts. Across the landscape, cranberry marshes with rotting fruit may contribute to D. suzukii source-sink dynamics.

  11. Adhesive attachments of the endangered botfly, Portschinskia magnifica (Diptera: Oestridae).

    PubMed

    Yang, Y Z; Zhang, D

    2014-10-01

    Portschinskia magnifica (Diptera: Oestridae) is an endangered subcutaneous parasitic fly that is mainly distributed in Eurasia. The external morphology of the main adhesive attachments that include the pretarsus and tarsus is studied using scanning electron microscopy. Two types of tenent setae that are characterised as spoon-like tip and pointed-like tip, which can increase the contact points for attachment to a surface, are described in this study. Hairs around the bristle of the empodium in P. magnifica are much denser than those of other flies, and thus, we proposed that the dense hairs around the empodium may be a more efficient way to perform the sensory function. Compared with saprophagous flies that are reported previously, the microsculpture of the unguitractor plate is obviously different in that microplates are scale-like and similar to those of the water bug, Ranatra linearis. In addition, microtrichia found in the lateral region of the unguitractor plate provides stronger fixation between two surfaces. These results provide anatomical information that allows us to understand the role of the pretarsus as an attachment device.

  12. Identification of Belgian mosquito species (Diptera: Culicidae) by DNA barcoding.

    PubMed

    Versteirt, V; Nagy, Z T; Roelants, P; Denis, L; Breman, F C; Damiens, D; Dekoninck, W; Backeljau, T; Coosemans, M; Van Bortel, W

    2015-03-01

    Since its introduction in 2003, DNA barcoding has proven to be a promising method for the identification of many taxa, including mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae). Many mosquito species are potential vectors of pathogens, and correct identification in all life stages is essential for effective mosquito monitoring and control. To use DNA barcoding for species identification, a reliable and comprehensive reference database of verified DNA sequences is required. Hence, DNA sequence diversity of mosquitoes in Belgium was assessed using a 658 bp fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) gene, and a reference data set was established. Most species appeared as well-supported clusters. Intraspecific Kimura 2-parameter (K2P) distances averaged 0.7%, and the maximum observed K2P distance was 6.2% for Aedes koreicus. A small overlap between intra- and interspecific K2P distances for congeneric sequences was observed. Overall, the identification success using best match and the best close match criteria were high, that is above 98%. No clear genetic division was found between the closely related species Aedes annulipes and Aedes cantans, which can be confused using morphological identification only. The members of the Anopheles maculipennis complex, that is Anopheles maculipennis s.s. and An. messeae, were weakly supported as monophyletic taxa. This study showed that DNA barcoding offers a reliable framework for mosquito species identification in Belgium except for some closely related species.

  13. Small-Gauge Pars Plana Vitrectomy for the Management of Symptomatic Posterior Vitreous Detachment after Phacoemulsification and Multifocal Intraocular Lens Implantation: A Pilot Study from the Pan-American Collaborative Retina Study Group

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Rodrigo M.; Machado, Leonardo M.; Maia, Ossires; Wu, Lihteh; Farah, Michel E.; Magalhaes, Octaviano; Arevalo, J. Fernando; Maia, Mauricio

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the efficacy of 23-gauge pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) for symptomatic posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) on visual acuity (VA) and quality after multifocal intraocular lenses (IOLs). Methods. In this prospective case series, patients who developed symptomatic PVD and were not satisfied with visual quality due to floaters and halos after multifocal IOL implantation underwent PPV. Examinations included LogMAR uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA), intraocular pressure, biomicroscopy, and indirect ophthalmoscopy at baseline and 1, 7, 30, and 180 days postoperatively. Ultrasonography and aberrometry were performed. The Visual Functioning Questionnaire 25 (VFQ-25) was administered preoperatively and at 30 days postoperatively. Both the postoperative UCVA and questionnaire results were compared to preoperative findings using the Wilcoxon test. Results. Sixteen eyes of 8 patients were included. VA significantly improved from 0.17 to 0.09 postoperatively (P = 0.017). All patients reported improvement of halos, glare, and floaters. VFQ-25 scores significantly improved in general vision (P = 0.023), near activities (P = 0.043), distance activities (P = 0.041), mental health (P = 0.011), role difficulties (P = 0.042), and driving (P = 0.016). Conclusion. PPV may increase UCVA and quality of vision in patients with bilateral multifocal IOLs and symptomatic PVD. Larger studies are advised. PMID:26504590

  14. Small-Gauge Pars Plana Vitrectomy for the Management of Symptomatic Posterior Vitreous Detachment after Phacoemulsification and Multifocal Intraocular Lens Implantation: A Pilot Study from the Pan-American Collaborative Retina Study Group.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Rodrigo M; Machado, Leonardo M; Maia, Ossires; Wu, Lihteh; Farah, Michel E; Magalhaes, Octaviano; Arevalo, J Fernando; Maia, Mauricio

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the efficacy of 23-gauge pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) for symptomatic posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) on visual acuity (VA) and quality after multifocal intraocular lenses (IOLs). Methods. In this prospective case series, patients who developed symptomatic PVD and were not satisfied with visual quality due to floaters and halos after multifocal IOL implantation underwent PPV. Examinations included LogMAR uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA), intraocular pressure, biomicroscopy, and indirect ophthalmoscopy at baseline and 1, 7, 30, and 180 days postoperatively. Ultrasonography and aberrometry were performed. The Visual Functioning Questionnaire 25 (VFQ-25) was administered preoperatively and at 30 days postoperatively. Both the postoperative UCVA and questionnaire results were compared to preoperative findings using the Wilcoxon test. Results. Sixteen eyes of 8 patients were included. VA significantly improved from 0.17 to 0.09 postoperatively (P = 0.017). All patients reported improvement of halos, glare, and floaters. VFQ-25 scores significantly improved in general vision (P = 0.023), near activities (P = 0.043), distance activities (P = 0.041), mental health (P = 0.011), role difficulties (P = 0.042), and driving (P = 0.016). Conclusion. PPV may increase UCVA and quality of vision in patients with bilateral multifocal IOLs and symptomatic PVD. Larger studies are advised.

  15. Pars Plana Vitrectomy Combined with Internal Limiting Membrane Peeling to Treat Persistent Macular Edema after Anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Treatment in Cases of Ischemic Central Retinal Vein Occlusion.

    PubMed

    Shirakata, Yukari; Fujita, Tomoyoshi; Nakano, Yuki; Shiraga, Fumio; Tsujikawa, Akitaka

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) combined with internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling in cases of ischemic central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) where macular edema (ME) persisted after anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) treatment. Fifteen eyes with ischemic CRVO-related ME were included in the study. Nine were treated with panretinal photocoagulation after initial examination. Anti-VEGF agents were injected intravitreally. Persistent ME was treated with PPV combined with ILM peeling. During surgery, laser photocoagulation was further applied to the non-perfused area. Mean retinal thickness gradually decreased after surgery (p = 0.024 at 6 months), although visual acuity did not improve significantly during the follow-up period (14.7 ± 11.6 months). Neovascular glaucoma subsequently developed in three cases and a trabeculectomy was performed in one case. In eyes with ischemic CRVO, PPV combined with ILM peeling contributed to a reduction in persistent ME. However, there was no significant improvement in visual acuity.

  16. Simuliid blackflies (Diptera: Simuliidae) and ceratopogonid midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) as vectors of Mansonella ozzardi (Nematoda: Onchocercidae) in northern Argentina.

    PubMed

    Shelley, A J; Coscarón, S

    2001-05-01

    Mansonella ozzardi, a relatively nonpathogenic filarial parasite of man in Latin America, is transmitted by either ceratopogonid midges or simuliid blackflies. In the only known focus of the disease in north-western Argentina the vectors have never been incriminated. This study investigated the potential vectors of M. ozzardi in this area. The only anthropophilic species of these Diptera families biting man at the time of the investigation were Simulium exiguum, S. dinellii, Culicoides lahillei and C. paraensis. Using experimentally infected flies S. exiguum and both species of Culicoides allowed full development of microfilariae to the infective stage, with C. lahillei being a more competent host than S. exiguum. Based on these data, biting rates and natural infectivity rates it is probable that at the begininning of the wet season C. lahillei is the main vector of M. ozzardi and both C. paraensis and S. exiguum secondary vectors. Additionally, it was found that a single dose of ivermectin was ineffectual in eradicating M. ozzardi from infected individuals in this area.

  17. First report of Zaprionus indianus (Diptera: Drosophilidae) in commercial fruits and vegetables in Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Neelendra K; Biddinger, David J; Demchak, Kathleen; Deppen, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Zaprionus indianus (Gupta) (Diptera: Drosophilidae), an invasive vinegar fly, was found for the first time in Adams County, Pennsylvania, in 2011. It was found in a commercial tart cherry orchard using apple cider vinegar (ACV) traps that were monitoring another invasive vinegar fly, the spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura) (Diptera: Drosophilidae). Coincidentally, the first record of D. suzukii found in Pennsylvania was also found in this same cherry orchard only 3 months earlier as part of a spotted wing drosophila survey effort in raspberry, blackberry, grape, and tart cherry in Adams County. These same crops plus blueberry and tomato were monitored again in 2012. In this article, adult Z. indianus captures in ACV traps and other traps deployed in the aforementioned crops during 2012 season are presented and the economic importance of Z. indianus is discussed.

  18. Tabanidae and other Diptera on Camel’s Hump Vermont: Ecological Observations

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Jeffrey V.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A canopy trap and aerial nets led to finding 8 species of Tabanidae. There was an abundance of calyptrate muscoid flies. Camel’s Hump is in the Green Mountains of western New England, USA. Discovering Diptera on Camel’s Hump involved sixteen visits over 40 years. Upwards of 23 other Diptera species are listed. Habitats on the east side and above 762 m (2500 ft) elevation on Camel’s Hump differ from the west slope but the boreal forest on both sides is influenced by cloud and fog precipitation on trees. The cliffs just above the 900 m level along the east side are often overlooked, are not seen from the summit and provide access to morning sun for insects. Recent visits explored the role of polarized skylight in relation to the canopy trap, the boreal forest environment and flies found there. PMID:22371675

  19. Confirming Hypoderma tarandi (Diptera: Oestridae) human ophthalmomyiasis by larval DNA barcoding.

    PubMed

    Rukke, Bjørn Arne; Cholidis, Symira; Johnsen, Arild; Ottesen, Preben

    2014-06-01

    DNA barcoding is a practical tool for species identification, when morphological classification of an organism is difficult. Herein we describe the utilisation of this technique in a case of ophthalmomyiasis interna. A 12-year-old boy was infested during a summer holiday in northern Norway, while visiting an area populated with reindeer. Following medical examination, a Diptera larva was surgically removed from the boy's eye and tentatively identified from its morphological traits as Hypoderma tarandi (L.) (Diptera: Oestridae). Ultimately, DNA barcoding confirmed this impression. The larval cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COI) DNA sequence was matched with both profiles of five adult H. tarandi from the same region where the boy was infested, and other established profiles of H. tarandi in the Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) identification engine.

  20. The Effect of Clothing on the Rate of Decomposition and Diptera Colonization on Sus scrofa Carcasses.

    PubMed

    Card, Allison; Cross, Peter; Moffatt, Colin; Simmons, Tal

    2015-07-01

    Twenty Sus scrofa carcasses were used to study the effect the presence of clothing had on decomposition rate and colonization locations of Diptera species; 10 unclothed control carcasses were compared to 10 clothed experimental carcasses over 58 days. Data collection occurred at regular accumulated degree day intervals; the level of decomposition as Total Body Score (TBSsurf ), pattern of decomposition, and Diptera present was documented. Results indicated a statistically significant difference in the rate of decomposition, (t427  = 2.59, p = 0.010), with unclothed carcasses decomposing faster than clothed carcasses. However, the overall decomposition rates from each carcass group are too similar to separate when applying a 95% CI, which means that, although statistically significant, from a practical forensic point of view they are not sufficiently dissimilar as to warrant the application of different formulae to estimate the postmortem interval. Further results demonstrated clothing provided blow flies with additional colonization locations.

  1. Multiple species of scuttle flies (Diptera: Phoridae) as contaminants in forensic entomology laboratory insect colony.

    PubMed

    Zuha, R M; Jenarthanan, L X Q; Disney, R H L; Omar, B

    2015-09-01

    In forensic entomology, larval rearing usually includes the presence of biological contaminants including scuttle flies (Diptera: Phoridae). Scuttle flies are recognized as forensically important insects and have been reported causing nuisance and contamination in laboratory environments. This paper reports for the first time the finding of multiple scuttle fly species affecting colonies of third instar larvae of the Oriental latrine blowfly, Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius) (Diptera: Calliphoridae), reared indoors at the Forensic Science Simulation Site, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia. Adult scuttle flies were discovered inside a rearing container after the emergence of adult C. megacephala., The scuttle fly species are Megaselia scalaris (Loew), M. spiracularis Schmitz and Puliciphora borinquenensis (Wheeler). Notes on the life history and biology of these species are discussed herein.

  2. First Report of Zaprionus indianus (Diptera: Drosophilidae) in Commercial Fruits and Vegetables in Pennsylvania

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Neelendra K.; Biddinger, David J.; Demchak, Kathleen; Deppen, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Zaprionus indianus (Gupta) (Diptera: Drosophilidae), an invasive vinegar fly, was found for the first time in Adams County, Pennsylvania, in 2011. It was found in a commercial tart cherry orchard using apple cider vinegar (ACV) traps that were monitoring another invasive vinegar fly, the spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura) (Diptera: Drosophilidae). Coincidentally, the first record of D. suzukii found in Pennsylvania was also found in this same cherry orchard only 3 months earlier as part of a spotted wing drosophila survey effort in raspberry, blackberry, grape, and tart cherry in Adams County. These same crops plus blueberry and tomato were monitored again in 2012. In this article, adult Z. indianus captures in ACV traps and other traps deployed in the aforementioned crops during 2012 season are presented and the economic importance of Z. indianus is discussed. PMID:25434039

  3. Phytosanitary Treatments Against Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae): Current Situation and Future Prospects.

    PubMed

    Dohino, Toshiyuki; Hallman, Guy J; Grout, Timothy G; Clarke, Anthony R; Follett, Peter A; Cugala, Domingos R; Minh Tu, Duong; Murdita, Wayan; Hernandez, Emilio; Pereira, Rui; Myers, Scott W

    2016-12-27

    Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae) is arguably the most important tephritid attacking fruits after Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Tephritidae). In 2003 it was found in Africa and quickly spread to most of the sub-Saharan part of the continent, destroying fruits and creating regulatory barriers to their export. The insect is causing new nutritional and economic losses across Africa, as well as the losses it has caused for decades in infested areas of Asia, New Guinea, and Hawaii. This new panorama represents a challenge for fruit exportation from Africa. Phytosanitary treatments are required to export quarantined commodities out of infested areas to areas where the pest does not exist and could become established. This paper describes current phytosanitary treatments against B. dorsalis and their use throughout the world, the development of new treatments based on existing research, and recommendations for further research to provide phytosanitary solutions to the problem.

  4. Second Supplement to "A Catalog of the Mosquitoes of the World" (Diptera: Culicidae)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    Faran 1979:27 (d*, ?*, P*, L*). Type-lot: 1.5 km S of Puyo, Pastaza, Ecuador (USNM). Name Rejected Anopheles subpictus var. vadakadiensis...25. Type Depositories AMC. Institute of Microbiology and Epidemiology, Academy of Medical Science, P.L.A., People’s Republic of China. BMC...YeZanoconion) from Bolivia and Ecuador (Diptera: Culicidae). Mosq. Syst. 11:135-138. Sirivanakarn, S. 1982 (1983). A review of the systematics and

  5. A New Species, Culex (Culex) Litwakae (Diptera: Culicidae), from the Coastal Region of Kenya

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    with existing keys and descriptions. Further study revealed that this species is closely related to Culex ( Culex ) antennatus (Becker), differing...254 Mosquito S.ystematics Vol. 17(3) 1985 A new species, Culicidae), Culex (Cu7ex) 7itwakae (Dipterf: from the coastal region of Kenya Ralph E...1985 to 00-00-1985 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A new species, Culex ( Culex ) litwakae (Diptera: Culicidae), from the coastal region of Kenya 5a. CONTRACT

  6. Morphological description of the fourth instar larva: Culicoides cataneii and Culicoides sahariensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).

    PubMed

    Slama, Darine; Khedher, Asma; Bdira, Sassi; Khayech, Fethi; Delecolle, Jean-claude; Mezhoud, Habib; Babba, Hamouda; Emna, Chaker

    2013-01-01

    This study was carried out of the region of Monastir in Central Tunisia, between July and August 2010. Larvae were collected using a floatation technique with magnesium sulfate in mud samples. The fourth instar larva of Culicoides cataneii Clastrier, 1957 and Culicoides sahariensis Callot, Kremer, Bailly-Choumara, 1970 are described, illustrated and drawn. Measurements of instars IV are also presented. This is the first record of Culicoides cataneii and Culicoides sahariensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) to Tunisia.

  7. Tanytarsini (Diptera: Chironomidae) from madicolous habitat in Southeast Brazil: new species and new records.

    PubMed

    Trivinho-Strixino, Susana; Shimabukuro, Erika Mayumi

    2017-05-23

    Tanytarsini (Diptera: Chironomidae: Chironominae) collected from madicolous habitats in Brazil are analyzed, and three new species of Tanytarsus van der Wulp are described and illustrated: T. angelae sp. n. and T. alaidae sp. n. as adult male and T. alienus sp. n. as male and female. New records of another Brazilian Tanytarsus species are also presented, and immature stages of Paratanytarsus silentii Trivinho-Strixino are described.

  8. Palpada panorama sp. n. (Diptera: Syrphidae), a big-eyed hoverfly from Peru and Suriname.

    PubMed

    Reemer, Menno; Morales, Mirian N

    2016-03-15

    The hoverfly species Palpada panorama sp. n. (Diptera: Syrphidae) is described based on specimens from Peru and Suriname. It belongs to the scutellaris species group and it is most similar to P. erratica (Curran, 1930), from which it differs most notably by the strongly enlarged ommatidia in the upper half of the eye. Additional differences between these two species and an adjustment for the latest identification key for the species of the scutellaris group are given.

  9. The crane flies (Diptera: Tipuloidea) of Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, Matthew J.; Parker, Charles R.; Bernard, Ernest

    2005-01-01

    The list of crane flies (Diptera: Ptychopteridae, Tipuloidea, Trichoceridae) known from Great Smoky Mountains National Park is updated. Sampling in association with the All Taxa Biodiversity Inventory of Great Smoky Mountains National Park resulted in the addition of 107 new Park records, bringing the current list to 250 species. This species assemblage is much richer than those of surrounding areas, although similar in composition. Total richness is estimated to be between 450 and 500 species for Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

  10. Review of the genus Parerigone Brauer (Diptera: Tachinidae) with five new species from China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Zhang, Chuntian; Wang, Xinhua

    2015-02-18

    The genus Parerigone (Diptera, Tachinidae) is reviewed. Five new species from China, P. atrisetosa sp. nov., P. flava sp. nov., P. flavisquama sp. nov., P. laxifrons sp. nov. and P. wangi sp. nov., are described and illustrated. Parerigone flavihirta (Chao & Sun) is proposed as a new synonym of P. takanoi Mesnil. Diagnosis of species examined and a key to the 15 species of Parerigone are provided.

  11. Effect ofalpha-difluormethylornithine on Anastrepha fraterculus (Diptera, Tephritidae) ovary size.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, V V; Moreira, J C F; Oliveira, A K

    2009-02-01

    Ovarian sizes (length and width) were measured in young females of Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann) (Diptera, Tephritidae) subjected or not to the inhibitor alpha-difluormethylornithine (alpha-DFMO). The most effective concentration of alpha-DMFO used was 50 mM and the ovarian measurements (length and width) of the treated females were smaller than those of females not treated with alpha-DMFO. These data may suggest some relationship between ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and sexual maturation in A. fraterculus.

  12. Morphological Analysis of Three Populations of Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus) Nuneztovari Gabaldon (Diptera: Culicidae) from Colombia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    populations of Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus) nuneztovari Gabaldón (Diptera: Culicidae) from Colombia Mayury Fajardo Ramos, Ranulfo González Obando/+, Marco...Fidel Suárez, David López, Richard Wilkerson1, Maria Anice Mureb Sallum2 Facultad de Ciencias Naturales y Exactas y Facultad de Salud , AA 25623...Universidad del Valle, Cali, Colombia 1Division of Entomology, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Silver Spring, MD, US 2Departamento de

  13. Aedes (Stegomyia) Bromeliae (Diptera: Culicidae), The Yellow Fever Virus Vector in East Africa

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-31

    J. Med. Entomol. Vol. 23, no. 2: 196-200 31 March 1986 AEDES (STEGOLMYIA) BROMELIAE (DIPTERA: CULICIDAE), THE YELLOW FEVER VIRUS VECTOR IN EAST...lilii, and Ae. bromeliae). The species from which Mahaffy, Had- dow, and others isolated yellow fever virus , and which is the most common and...and western Africa but is less prevalent than Ae. bromeliae, and no females have been recorded as biting man. Literature refer- ences to Ae

  14. New Contributions to Pseudonapomyza (Diptera: Agromyzidae) from Spain: Addition of Three New Species

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Ortiz, Ricardo; Martinez, Michel; Jiménez-Peydró, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    The genus Pseudonapomyza (Diptera: Agromyzidae) includes the main leafminer pests for monocots. Three new species are described that were captured using Malaise traps in “Tinença de Benifassà”, “Font Roja” and “Lagunas de La Mata-Torrevieja” (Spain) Natural Parks: Pseudonapomyza curvata n. sp., P. longitata n. sp., and P. sicicornis n. sp. Systematics. Ecological data are discussed. PMID:21062209

  15. Psorophora (Grabhamia) varinervis (Diptera: Culicidae) morphological description including pupa and fourth-stage larva previously unknown.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Gustavo C; Stein, Marina; Almirón, Walter R

    2008-05-01

    Psorophora (Grabhamia) varinervis Edwards (Diptera: Culicidae) is redescribed in the adult stage. Pupa and fourth-stage larva are described and illustrated for the first time. Information about distribution, bionomics, and taxonomy also is included. Adults of Ps. varinervis can be separated from the closely related species Ps. (Gra.) discolor (Coquillett) on the basis of the wing characters, and the larva by the siphon and antenna characters.

  16. Description of the Egg of Aedes (Aedimorphus) domesticus (Theobald) (Diptera: Culicidae)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1972-01-01

    Theobald) are herein des- cribed for the first time. Aedes vexans (Meigen) is the only other species in the subgenus Aedimorphus which has the eggs ...1972 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-1972 to 00-00-1972 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Description of the Egg of Aedes (Aedimorphus) domesticus...ANSI Std Z39-18 60 Description of the Egg of Aedes (Aedimorphus) domesticus (Theobald) (Diptera: Culicidae)l John F. Reinert* Department of

  17. Black flies (Diptera: Simuliidae) of Turkish Thrace, with a new record for Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Çalışkan, Hakan; Şahin, Yalçın

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background This paper includes 2742 specimens of 18 species of black flies (Diptera: Simuliidae) collected from 132 lotic sites in Turkish Thrace, the European part of Turkey, in the early summer of 2002 and 2003 and the spring of 2005 and 2006. New information All species are recorded from this region for the first time, and Metacnephia nigra (Rubtsov, 1940) is a new record for Turkey. Distributional and taxonomical remarks are given for each species. PMID:25941452

  18. Two New Species of Oxysarcodexia Townsend (Diptera: Sarcophagidae) From the Chaco Forest Ecoregion of South America.

    PubMed

    Dufek, M I; Mulieri, P R

    2017-04-03

    Two new Neotropical species of the genus Oxysarcodexia Townsend (Diptera: Sarcophagidae) from Chaco ecoregion of Argentina are described, O. berthet, sp. nov. and O. ibera, sp. nov. Both species were recovered from localities in the eastern part of the Chaco forest (Humid Chaco). The descriptions are based on the male external morphology and terminalia. Photographs and SEM images are provided to aid in the identification of the species.

  19. A new Mapinguari Papavero & Wilcox (Diptera, Mydidae, Mydinae) from Minas Gerais State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Calhau, Julia; Lamas, Carlos José Einicker; Nihei, Silvio Shigueo

    2016-10-31

    Mapinguari Papavero & Wilcox, 1974 (Diptera, Mydidae, Mydinae) is a very rare monotypic genus, with the type-species, M. politus (Wiedemann, 1828), occurring exclusively in Amazonia. With the description of Mapinguari uai sp. nov. from a remnant of the Atlantic Forest in southeastern Brazil, the distribution of the genus is greatly expanded. In addition, an updated diagnosis for the genus and its type-species is provided.

  20. A Modified Trap for Adult Sampling of Medically Important Flies (Insecta: Diptera)

    PubMed Central

    Akbarzadeh, Kamran; Rafinejad, Javad; Nozari, Jamasb; Rassi, Yavar; Sedaghat, Mohammad Mehdi; Hosseini, Mostafa

    2012-01-01

    Background: Bait-trapping appears to be a generally useful method of studying fly populations. The aim of this study was to construct a new adult flytrap by some modifications in former versions and to evaluate its applicability in a subtropical zone in southern Iran. Methods: The traps were constructed with modification by adding some equipment to a polyethylene container (18× 20× 33 cm) with lid. The fresh sheep meat was used as bait. Totally 27 adult modified traps were made and tested for their efficacies to attract adult flies. The experiment was carried out in a range of different topographic areas of Fars Province during June 2010. Results: The traps were able to attract various groups of adult flies belonging to families of: Calliphoridae, Sarcophagidae, Muscidae, and Faniidae. The species of Calliphora vicina (Diptera: Calliphoridae), Sarcophaga argyrostoma (Diptera: Sarcophagidae) and Musca domestica (Diptera: Muscidae) include the majority of the flies collected by this sheep-meat baited trap. Conclusion: This adult flytrap can be recommended for routine field sampling to study diversity and population dynamics of flies where conducting of daily collection is difficult. PMID:23378969

  1. Expanding the view of Clock and cycle gene evolution in Diptera.

    PubMed

    Chahad-Ehlers, S; Arthur, L P; Lima, A L A; Gesto, J S M; Torres, F R; Peixoto, A A; de Brito, R A

    2017-02-24

    We expanded the view of Clock (Clk) and cycle (cyc) gene evolution in Diptera by studying the fruit fly Anastrepha fraterculus (Afra), a Brachycera. Despite the high conservation of clock genes amongst insect groups, striking structural and functional differences of some clocks have appeared throughout evolution. Clk and cyc nucleotide sequences and corresponding proteins were characterized, along with their mRNA expression data, to provide an evolutionary overview in the two major groups of Diptera: Lower Diptera and Higher Brachycera. We found that AfraCYC lacks the BMAL (Brain and muscle ARNT-like) C-terminus region (BCTR) domain and is constitutively expressed, suggesting that AfraCLK has the main transactivation function, which is corroborated by the presence of poly-Q repeats and an oscillatory pattern. Our analysis suggests that the loss of BCTR in CYC is not exclusive of drosophilids, as it also occurs in other Acalyptratae flies such as tephritids and drosophilids, however, but it is also present in some Calyptratae, such as Muscidae, Calliphoridae and Sarcophagidae. This indicates that BCTR is missing from CYC of all higher-level Brachycera and that it was lost during the evolution of Lower Brachycera. Thus, we can infer that CLK protein may play the main role in the CLK\\CYC transcription complex in these flies, like in its Drosophila orthologues.

  2. Diptera of Medico-Legal Importance Associated With Pig Carrion in a Tropical Dry Forest.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, S D; Salgado, R L; Barbosa, T M; Souza, J R B

    2016-06-20

    The diversity of necrophagous Diptera is largely unknown in seasonally dry tropical forests, despite their medical, veterinary, and forensic relevance. We performed a study in the dry Caatinga forest exclusive to Brazil in order to assess the diversity and temporal pattern of Diptera species using pig carcasses as substrates. Adults were collected daily until complete skeletonization. We collected 17,142 adults from 18 families, 10 of which comprise species with known necrophagous habits. The most abundant families were Calliphoridae (47.3% of specimens), Sarcophagidae (20.8%), and Muscidae (15.5%), whereas Sarcophagidae stood out in terms of richness with 21 species. The native Cochliomyia macellaria (F.) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) and the invasive Chrysomya albiceps (Wiedmann) (Calliphoridae) were the dominant species. A total of 18 species reached the carcass during the first 48 h postdeath. The bloated and active decay stages had the highest richness and abundance of dipterans. From a forensic standpoint, C. macellaria and C. albiceps are likely to aid in establishing postmortem interval due to their early arrival and high abundance on the carcass. Despite harsh environmental conditions, the Caatinga harbors a rich assemblage of dipterans that play a key role in carrion decomposition. Their medico-veterinary importance is strengthened by the poor local sanitary conditions.

  3. The Community of Hymenoptera Parasitizing Necrophagous Diptera in an Urban Biotope

    PubMed Central

    Frederickx, Christine; Dekeirsschieter, Jessica; Verheggen, François J.; Haubruge, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Most reports published in the field of forensic entomology are focused on Diptera and neglect the Hymenoptera community. However, Hymenoptera are part of the entomofaunal colonization of a dead body. The use of Hymenoptera parasitoids in forensic entomology can be relevant to evaluate the time of death. Hymenoptera parasitoids of the larvae and pupae of flies may play an important role in the estimation of the post-mortem period because their time of attack is often restricted to a small, well-defined window of time in the development of the host insect. However, these parasitoids can interfere with the developmental times of colonizing Diptera, and therefore a better understanding of their ecology is needed. The work reported here monitored the presence of adult Hymenoptera parasitoids on decaying pig carcasses in an urban biotope during the summer season (from May to September). Six families and six species of parasitoids were recorded in the field: Aspilota fuscicornis Haliday (Braconidae), Alysia manducator Panzer, Nasonia vitripennis Walker (Pteromalidae), Tachinaephagus zealandicus Ashmead (Encyrtidae), Trichopria sp. (Diapriidae), and Figites sp. (Figitidae). In the laboratory, five species emerged from pupae collected in the field: Trichopria sp., Figites sp., A. manducator, N. vitripennis, and T. zealandicus. These five species colonize a broad spectrum of Diptera hosts, including those species associated with decomposing carcasses, namely those from the families Calliphoridae, Muscidae, Fanniidae, and Sarcophagidae. PMID:23895458

  4. Seasonal patterns in tree swallow prey (Diptera) abundance are affected by agricultural intensification.

    PubMed

    Paquette, Sébastien Rioux; Garant, Dany; Pelletier, Fanie; Bélisle, Marc

    2013-01-01

    In many parts of the world, farmland bird species are declining at faster rates than other birds. For aerial insectivores, this decline has been related to a parallel reduction in the abundance of their invertebrate prey in agricultural landscapes. While the effects of agricultural intensification (AI) on arthropod communities at the landscape level have been substantially studied in recent years, seasonal variation in these impacts has not been investigated. To assess the contention that intensive cultures negatively impact food resources for aerial insectivorous birds, we analyzed the spatiotemporal distribution patterns of Diptera, the main food resource for breeding tree swallows Tachycineta bicolor), across a gradient of AI in southeastern Quebec, Canada. Linear mixed models computed from a data set of 5000 samples comprising >150,000 dipterans collected over three years (2006-2008) suggest that both Diptera abundance and biomass varied greatly during swallow breeding season, following a quadratic curve. Globally, AI had a negative effect on Diptera abundance (but not biomass), but year-by-year analyses showed that in one of three years (2008), dipterans were more abundant in agro-intensive landscapes. Analyses also revealed a significant interaction between the moment in the season and AI: In early June, Diptera abundances were similar regardless of the landscape, but differences increased as the season progressed, with highly intensive landscapes harboring fewer prey, possibly creating an "ecological trap" for aerial insectivores. While global trends in our results are in agreement with expectations (negative impact of Al on insect abundance), strong discrepancies in 2008 highlight the difficulty of predicting the abundance of insect communities. Our study indicates that predicting the effects of AI may prove more challenging than generally assumed, even when large data sets are collected, and that temporal variation within a season is important to take into

  5. Integrated Taxonomy and DNA Barcoding of Alpine Midges (Diptera: Chironomidae)

    PubMed Central

    Montagna, Matteo; Mereghetti, Valeria; Lencioni, Valeria; Rossaro, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Rapid and efficient DNA-based tools are recommended for the evaluation of the insect biodiversity of high-altitude streams. In the present study, focused principally on larvae of the genus Diamesa Meigen 1835 (Diptera: Chironomidae), the congruence between morphological/molecular delimitation of species as well as performances in taxonomic assignments were evaluated. A fragment of the mitochondrial cox1 gene was obtained from 112 larvae, pupae and adults (Diamesinae, Orthocladiinae and Tanypodinae) that were collected in different mountain regions of the Alps and Apennines. On the basis of morphological characters 102 specimens were attributed to 16 species, and the remaining ten specimens were identified to the genus level. Molecular species delimitation was performed using: i) distance-based Automatic Barcode Gap Discovery (ABGD), with no a priori assumptions on species identification; and ii) coalescent tree-based approaches as the Generalized Mixed Yule Coalescent model, its Bayesian implementation and Bayesian Poisson Tree Processes. The ABGD analysis, estimating an optimal intra/interspecific nucleotide distance threshold of 0.7%-1.4%, identified 23 putative species; the tree-based approaches, identified between 25–26 entities, provided nearly identical results. All species belonging to zernyi, steinboecki, latitarsis, bertrami, dampfi and incallida groups, as well as outgroup species, are recovered as separate entities, perfectly matching the identified morphospecies. In contrast, within the cinerella group, cases of discrepancy arose: i) the two morphologically separate species D. cinerella and D. tonsa are neither monophyletic nor diagnosable exhibiting low values of between-taxa nucleotide mean divergence (0.94%); ii) few cases of larvae morphological misidentification were observed. Head capsule color is confirmed to be a valid character able to discriminate larvae of D. zernyi, D. tonsa and D. cinerella, but it is here better defined as a color

  6. Pseudacteon calderensis, a new fly species (Diptera:Phoridae) attacking the fire ant Solenopsis interrupta (Hymenoptera:Formicidae) in northwestern Argentina

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A new species of Pseudacteon phorid fly Pseudacteon calderis (Diptera: Phoridae) is described from females attacking worker ants of Solenopsis interrupta Santschi in Salta and Jujuy provinces, northwestern Argentina. Pseudacteon calderis differs from almost all other South American Pseudacteon speci...

  7. Implications of Rhagoletis zephyria, 1894 (Diptera: Tephritidae), captures for apple maggot surveys and fly ecology in Washington state, U.S.A

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The apple maggot, Rhagoletis pomonella (Walsh), 1867 (Diptera: Tephritidae), is an introduced quarantine pest of apple (Malus domestica Borkhausen) (Rosaceae) in Washington state, U.S.A. A morphologically similar native fly, Rhagoletis zephyria Snow, 1894, infests snowberries (Symphoricarpos spp.) ...

  8. Host plants of Solanum fruit fly, Bactrocera latifrons(Hendel)(Diptera: Tephritidae); and provisional list of suitable host plants of Bactrocera(Bactrocera)latifrons(Hendel)(Diptera: Tephritidae), Version 1.0

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bactrocera latifrons (Hendel)(Diptera: Tephritidae) infests many solanaceous plant species, some of which are important horticultural crop species. It has also been found to infest a number of cucurbitaceous plant species as well as a few plant species in other plant families. Bactrocera latifrons i...

  9. Host plants of Carambola fruit fly, Bactrocera carambolae Drew & Hancock(Diptera:Tephritidae);and provisional list of suitable host plants of Carambola fruit fly,(Bactrocera(Bactrocera) carambolae Drew & Hancock(Diptera:Tep

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bactrocera carambolae Drew & Hancock (Diptera: Tephritidae), commonly known as the carambola fruit fly, is native to Southeast Asia, but has extended its geographic range to several countries in South America. As with other tephritid fruit fly species, establishment of B.carambolae in areas where it...

  10. Host plants of Melon Fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae(Coquillett)(Diptera:Tephritidae); and provisional list of suitable host plants of the Melon Fly, Bactrocera(Zeugodacus)cucurbitae(Coquillett)(Diptera:Tephritidae),Version 2.0

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The melon fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae (Coquillett), is a widespread, economically important tephritid fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae) species. Bactrocera cucurbitae infests fruits and vegetables of a number of different plant species, with many host plants in the plant family Cucurbitaceae, but with...

  11. Key for European species of the Cheilosia proxima group (Diptera, Syrphidae) with a description of a new species.

    PubMed

    Vujić, Ante; Radenković, Snežana; Trifunov, Sonja; Nikolić, Tijana

    2013-01-01

    A new hoverfly species, Cheilosia barbafacies Vujić & Radenković sp. n. (Diptera, Syrphidae), is described and distinguished from the closely related species Cheilosia pascuorum Becker, 1894, based on material collected from the mountains of the Balkan Peninsula. Diagnostic characteristics and an identification key for the members of the proxima group of Cheilosia s. str., including the new taxon, are provided.

  12. New records for the horse fly fauna (Diptera: Tabanidae) of Jordan with remarks on ecology and zoogeography.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The horse fly fauna (Diptera: Tabanidae) of Jordan is the richest in the Levant, with 24 known species. During the 20-year project “the ecology and zoogeography of the Lepidoptera of the Near East,” USDA, Agricultural Research Service scientists in Gainesville, FL and Israeli scientists regularly c...

  13. Solidifying agent and processing of blood used for the larval diet affect screwworm (Diptera: Calliphoridae) life-history parameters

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The current artificial diet for mass rearing screwworm, Cochliomyia hominivorax, (Coquerel) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) larvae is a semi-solid medium consisting of dry whole bovine blood, poultry egg powder and a milk substitute mixed with a bulking and solidifying agent and water. To reduce the mass r...

  14. Attraction, oviposition preferences, and olfactory responses of corn-infesting Ulidiidae (Diptera) to various host-based substrates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fresh market sweet corn produced in Florida is threatened by larval damage by Euxesta stigmatias Loew, E. eluta Loew, and Chaetopsis massyla Walker (Diptera: Ulidiidae) that renders ears unmarketable. No standard lure exists for monitoring these pests. Oviposition and attraction bioassays were desig...

  15. Behavioral responses of Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae) to visual stimuli under laboratory, semi-field, and field conditions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura) (Diptera: Drosophilidae) is an invasive pest in the United States that attacks soft-skinned ripening fruit such as raspberries, blackberries, and blueberries. Little is known regarding specific cues D. suzukii utilizes to locate and select host fruit, and inconsistenc...

  16. A new genus and species of Cecidomyiidae (Diptera) from leaf blister galls on Ribes (Grosulariaceae)in North America

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ribesia sarae Gagné, new genus, new species(Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), is described from simple leaf blister galls on Ribes aureum(Grossulariaceae) from Montana. The female abdomen is superficially similar to that of CystiphoraKieffer and SackenomyiaFelt. The three genera are compared. Because of stro...

  17. A comparative analysis of resistance testing methods in Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) from St. Johns County, Florida

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aedes albopictus Skuse (Diptera: Culicidae) was tested for resistance to permethrin, bifenthrin, and malathion using Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) bottle bioassays and topical toxicology assays on adults and larval bioassays. Eggs were collected from 3 locations across St. Johns C...

  18. The geographic distribution of Rhagoletis pomonella (Diptera:Tephritidae) in the western United States: Introduced species or native population?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The apple maggot fly, Rhagoletis pomonella Walsh (Diptera: Tephritidae), is a major pest of commercially grown domesticated apple (Malus domestica) in North America. The shift of the fly from its native host hawthorn (Crataegus mollis) to apple in the eastern U.S. is often cited as an example of inc...

  19. [The mushroom bodies of the lower nematocera: a link between those of the higher Diptera and other mecopteroids].

    PubMed

    Panov, A A

    2012-01-01

    Nematoceran Diptera are nonuniform in the structure of their mushroom bodies. Members of the more basal families (Ptychopteridae, Pediciidae, and Tipulidae) have bipartite mushroom bodies, characteristic of members of the other mecopteroid complex orders. In members of Bibionomorpha (Bibionidae and Anisopodidae), tripartite mushroom bodies have been found characteristic of Brachycera Orthorrhapha.

  20. House fly (Musca domestica) (Diptera: Muscidae) mortality after exposure to commercial fungal formulations in a sugar bait

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    House flies (Musca domestica L.) (Diptera: Muscidae) are major pests of livestock. Biological control is an important tool in an integrated control framework. Increased mortality in filth flies has been documented with entomopathogenic fungi, and several strains are commercially available. Three str...

  1. Activity patterns and parasitism rates of fire ant decapitating flies (Diptera:Phoridae:Pseudacteon spp.) in their native Argentina

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Technical Abstract: This work describes the annual and daily activity patterns of two parasitoid fly communities of the fire ant S. invicta (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in their native Argentina. Pseudacteon (Diptera: Phoridae) flies were censused monthly for one year at two sites in northwestern Corr...

  2. Attraction and Mortality of Oriental Fruit Flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) to SPLAT-MAT- Methyl Eugenol with Spinosad

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Studies were conducted in Hawaii to quantify attraction and feeding responses resulting in mortality of male oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae), to SPLAT-MAT-methyl eugenol (ME) with spinosad in comparison with Min-U-Gel-ME with naled (Dibrom). Our approach invol...

  3. Peach is an occasional host for Rhagoletis pomonella (Walsh, 1867) (Diptera: Tephritidae) larvae in Western Washington State, USA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Peach, Prunus persica (L.) Batsch (Rosaceae), has been reported to be a host of the apple maggot fly, Rhagoletis pomonella (Walsh), 1867 (Diptera: Tephritidae), an important quarantine pest of apple (Malus domestica Borkhausen) (Rosaceae) in the western U.S.A. However, all reports of peach as a hos...

  4. Reduction in Emergence of Rhagoletis indifferens (Diptera: Tephritidae) from Sweet Cherries with Different Egg and Larval Distributions Using Newer Insecticides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Western cherry fruit fly, Rhagoletis indifferens Curran (Diptera: Tephritidae), is the major insect pest of sweet cherry, Prunus avium (L.) L., in the Pacific Northwest of the U.S. To reduce fly populations in unharvested fruit following the completion of commercial harvest, it is important to cont...

  5. Phytomyza omlandi spec. nov. – the first species of Agromyzidae (Diptera: Schizophora) reared from the family Gelsemiaceae (Asteridae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A new species of leafmining fly in the genus Phytomyza Fallén (Diptera: Agromyzidae) is described from Gelsemium Juss, representing the first known instance of an agromyzid feeding on Gelsemiaceae (Asteridae). The host plant, G. sempervirens (L.) (the “evening trumpetflower”), and possibly also G. r...

  6. Effect of fungus gnat Bradysia impatiens (Diptera: Sciaridae) feeding on subsequent Pythium aphanidermatum infection of geranium seedlings (Pelargonium x hortorum)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Dark-winged fungus gnats in the genus Bradysia (Diptera: Sciaridae) and root rot pathogens in the genus Pythium (Oomycetes) are important pests of greenhouse floriculture. Observations have pointed to a possible correlation between Pythium root rot disease and fungus gnat infestations; however, inte...

  7. The distribution and life history of Axymyia Furcata Mcatee (Diptera:Axymyhdae), a wood inhabiting, semi-aquatic fly

    Treesearch

    Matthew Wihlm; Gregory Courtney

    2011-01-01

    Axymyia furcata McAtee (Diptera: Axymyhdae), is a xylophilic, semi-aquatic fly from eastern North America. As part of a comprehensive study of the fly’s distribution, life history, and phylogeography, we surveyed populations of A. furcata in the eastern United States and Canada. Collecting and rearing methods are described, and use of the niche modeling software,...

  8. Revision of the net-winged midges of the genus Blepharicera macquart (diptera: blephariceridae) of eastern North America

    Treesearch

    Gregory W. Courtney

    2000-01-01

    The net-winged midges (Diptera: Blephariceridae: Blepharicera Macquart) of eastern North America are revised to include 16 species. Seven new species are described: B. caudata, n. sp., B. chooga, n. sp, B. corniculata, n. sp., B. magna, n. sp., and B. tuberosa, n. sp. from the southern Appalachians; B....

  9. New records of Tabanidae (Diptera) from Saudi Arabia, first record of Atylotus venturii Leclercq and Tabanus separatus Efflatoun.

    PubMed

    Amoudi, M A; Leclercq, M

    1996-04-01

    Atylotus venturii Leclercq and Tabanus separatu Efflatoun (Diptera: Tabanidae) are 2 additional species in Saudi Arabia; they lift up to 26 taxa known from the country. Some comments on new record of other species, zoogeographical distribution of Tabanus sufis, taxonomic significance of eye pattern of Tabanidae, exemplification with T. albifacies and T. unifasciatus, rehydration of dry specimens, are presented.

  10. Assessment of Navel oranges, Clementine tangerines and Rutaceous fruits as hosts of Bactrocera cucurbitae and Bactrocera latifrons (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Export of Citrus spp., widely cultivated throughout the tropics and subtropics, may require risk mitigation measures if grown in areas with established tephritid fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae) populations capable of infesting the fruits. Two tephritid fruit fly species whose geographic ranges have...

  11. Application of a Computerized General Purpose Information Management System (SELGEM) (SELf-GEnerating Master) to Medically Important Arthropods (Diptera: Culicidae).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-01

    GENERAL PURPOSE INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (SELGEM) TO MEDICALLY 0 IMPORTANT ARTHROPODS (DIPTERA: CULICIDAE) oAnnual Report Terry L. Erwin July...APPLICATION OF A COMPUTERIZED GENERAL PURPOSE Annual Report INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (SELGEM) TO July 1981 to June 1982 MEDICALLY IMPORTANT ARTHROPODS

  12. Mapping global potential risk of establishment of Rhagoletis pomonella (Diptera: Tephritidae) using MaxEnt and CLIMEX niche models

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The apple maggot, Rhagoletis pomonella (Walsh) (Diptera: Tephritidae), is a major quarantine pest of apples (Malus domestica Borkhausen) in the United States. Apple maggot is found only in North America and negatively impacts the apple industry in the western U.S. by reducing grower access to export...

  13. Development and oviposition preference of house flies and stable flies (Diptera: Muscidae) in six substrates from Florida equine facilities

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    House flies, Musca domestica L., and stable flies, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.), (Diptera: Muscidae), common pests on equine facilities, were studied in the laboratory to determine their oviposition preferences and larval development on six substrates commonly found on equine facilities. The substrates...

  14. Larval feeding behavior of the truncatus group of Thrypticus (Diptera:Dolichopodidae) that breed in the aerenchyma of Pontederiaceae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Larval feeding behavior of the truncatus group of Thrypticus (Diptera: Dolichopodidae) that breed in Pontederiaceae species are presented. The larvae of T. circularis Bickel & Hernández develop in globous petioles of Eichhornia crassipes (Martius) Solms- Laubach (Pontederiaceae), digging a mine near...

  15. An annotated checklist of the horse flies (Diptera: Tabanidae) of Lebanon with remarks on ecology and zoogeography: Pangoniinae and Chrysopsinae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Knowledge of the horse fly fauna (Diptera: Tabanidae) of Lebanon is fragmentary while in most neighboring countries it has been fairly well researched. Therefore USDA-CMAVE scientists and Israeli scientists worked cooperatively to survey the species of horse flies in the Lebanon. Chrysops flavipes ...

  16. Effects of seasonality and resource limitation on organic matter turnover by Chironomidae (Diptera) in southern Appalachian headwater streams

    Treesearch

    Angela Romito; Susan Eggert; Jeffrey Diez; J. Wallace

    2010-01-01

    Despite their high abundance, secondary production, and known reliance on detrital material, the role of chironomids (Diptera) in fine particulate organic matter (FPOM) dynamics has not been well quantified. We conducted field trials using fluorescent pigment markers to estimate seasonal rates of consumption, annual secondary production, assimilation efficiency (AE),...

  17. Temperature-mediated kill and oviposition of Western Cherry Fruit Fly (Diptera: Tephritidae) in the presence of Spinosad

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Western cherry fruit fly, Rhagoletis indifferens Curran (Diptera: Tephritidae), is a quarantine pest of sweet cherry (Prunus avium (L.) L.) that is managed using insecticides, including spinosad, an organic compound that can be applied in low spray volumes. Identifying factors that can increase the...

  18. New records of Rhagoletis species (Diptera: Tephritidae) and their host plants in western Montana, U.S.A.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Little information exists concerning the distribution of Rhagoletis fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) in the state of Montana in the western U.S.A. In this study, the presence of and host plant use by Rhagoletis species are documented in northwestern Montana. The western cherry fruit fly, Rhagolet...

  19. Sucrose mixed with spinosad enhances kill and reduces oviposition of Rhagoletis indifferens (Diptera: Tephritidae) under low-food conditions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Whether sugar mixed with insecticides enhances kill of western cherry fruit fly, Rhagoletis indifferens Curran (Diptera: Tephritidae), may depend on insecticide rate and food availability. Here, the hypothesis that sucrose mixed with the insecticide spinosad (in the Entrust® SC formulation) enhance...

  20. Impact of prolonged absence of low temperature on adult eclosion patterns of western cherry fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The western cherry fruit fly, Rhagoletis indifferens (Curran) (Diptera: Tephritidae), is a serious pest of cherries (Prunus spp.) in the Pacific Northwest of the U.S.A. Previous research suggests that R. indifferens is unlikely to establish in commercial cherry production areas in California and in ...

  1. How much can diptera-borne viruses persist over unfavourable seasons?

    PubMed

    Charron, Maud V P; Balenghien, Thomas; Seegers, Henri; Langlais, Michel; Ezanno, Pauline

    2013-01-01

    Diptera are vectors of major human and animal pathogens worldwide, such as dengue, West-Nile or bluetongue viruses. In seasonal environments, vector-borne disease occurrence varies with the seasonal variations of vector abundance. We aimed at understanding how diptera-borne viruses can persist for years under seasonal climates while vectors overwinter, which should stop pathogen transmission during winter. Modeling is a relevant integrative approach for investigating the large panel of persistence mechanisms evidenced through experimental and observational studies on specific biological systems. Inter-seasonal persistence of virus may occur in hosts due to viremia duration, chronic infection, or vertical transmission, in vector resistance stages, and due to a low continuous transmission in winter. Using a generic stochastic modeling framework, we determine the parameter ranges under which virus persistence could occur via these different mechanisms. The parameter ranges vary according to the host demographic regime: for a high host population turnover, persistence increases with the mechanism parameter, whereas for a low turnover, persistence is maximal for an optimal range of parameter. Persistence in hosts due to long viremia duration in a few hosts or due to vertical transmission is an effective strategy for the virus to overwinter. Unexpectedly, a low continuous transmission during winter does not give rise to certain persistence, persistence barely occurring for a low turnover of the susceptible population. We propose a generic framework adaptable to most diptera-borne diseases. This framework allows ones to assess the plausibility of each persistence mechanism in real epidemiological situations and to compare the range of parameter values theoretically allowing persistence with the range of values determined experimentally.

  2. How Much Can Diptera-Borne Viruses Persist over Unfavourable Seasons?

    PubMed Central

    Charron, Maud V. P.; Balenghien, Thomas; Seegers, Henri; Langlais, Michel; Ezanno, Pauline

    2013-01-01

    Diptera are vectors of major human and animal pathogens worldwide, such as dengue, West-Nile or bluetongue viruses. In seasonal environments, vector-borne disease occurrence varies with the seasonal variations of vector abundance. We aimed at understanding how diptera-borne viruses can persist for years under seasonal climates while vectors overwinter, which should stop pathogen transmission during winter. Modeling is a relevant integrative approach for investigating the large panel of persistence mechanisms evidenced through experimental and observational studies on specific biological systems. Inter-seasonal persistence of virus may occur in hosts due to viremia duration, chronic infection, or vertical transmission, in vector resistance stages, and due to a low continuous transmission in winter. Using a generic stochastic modeling framework, we determine the parameter ranges under which virus persistence could occur via these different mechanisms. The parameter ranges vary according to the host demographic regime: for a high host population turnover, persistence increases with the mechanism parameter, whereas for a low turnover, persistence is maximal for an optimal range of parameter. Persistence in hosts due to long viremia duration in a few hosts or due to vertical transmission is an effective strategy for the virus to overwinter. Unexpectedly, a low continuous transmission during winter does not give rise to certain persistence, persistence barely occurring for a low turnover of the susceptible population. We propose a generic framework adaptable to most diptera-borne diseases. This framework allows ones to assess the plausibility of each persistence mechanism in real epidemiological situations and to compare the range of parameter values theoretically allowing persistence with the range of values determined experimentally. PMID:24023929

  3. Conservation of capa peptide-induced nitric oxide signalling in Diptera.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Valerie P; McGettigan, James; Cabrero, Pablo; Maudlin, Ian M; Dow, Julian A T; Davies, Shireen-A

    2004-11-01

    In D. melanogaster Malpighian (renal) tubules, the capa peptides stimulate production of nitric oxide (NO) and guanosine 3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP), resulting in increased fluid transport. The roles of NO synthase (NOS), NO and cGMP in capa peptide signalling were tested in several other insect species of medical relevance within the Diptera (Aedes aegypti, Anopheles stephensi and Glossina morsitans) and in one orthopteran out-group, Schistocerca gregaria. NOS immunoreactivity was detectable by immunocytochemistry in tubules from all species studied. D. melanogaster, A. aegypti and A. stephensi express NOS in only principal cells, whereas G. morsitans and S. gregaria show more general NOS expression in the tubule. Measurement of associated NOS activity (NADPH diaphorase) shows that both D. melanogaster capa-1 and the two capa peptides encoded in the A. gambiae genome, QGLVPFPRVamide (AngCAPA-QGL) and GPTVGLFAFPRVamide (AngCAPA-GPT), all stimulate NOS activity in D. melanogaster, A. aegypti, A. stephensi and G. morsitans tubules but not in S. gregaria. Furthermore, capa-stimulated NOS activity in all the Diptera was inhibited by the NOS inhibitor l-NAME. All capa peptides stimulate an increase in cGMP content across the dipteran species, but not in the orthopteran S. gregaria. Similarly, all capa peptides tested stimulate fluid secretion in D. melanogaster, A. aegypti, A. stephensi and G. morsitans tubules but are either without effect or are inhibitory on S. gregaria. Consistent with these results, the Drosophila capa receptor was shown to be expressed in Drosophila tubules, and its closest Anopheles homologue was shown to be expressed in Anopheles tubules. Thus, we provide the first demonstration of physiological roles for two putative A. gambiae neuropeptides. We also demonstrate neuropeptide modulation of fluid secretion in tsetse tubule for the first time. Finally, we show the generality of capa peptide action, to stimulate NO/cGMP signalling and

  4. Impact of Humidity on the Biological Development of Aphidoletes aphidimyza (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae).

    PubMed

    Le Goff, Guillaume Jean; Nicolas, Aurore; Al Mohamad, Raki; Hance, Thierry

    2016-05-01

    Aphidoletes aphidimyza Rondani (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) is one of the most important predators used in the augmentative biological control of aphids worldwide. However, due to its particular life history, mass rearing A. aphidimyza remains difficult. Our results show that a high relative humidity level during pupation optimizes the development of A. aphidimyza By improving humidity levels during pupae storage, we improved the production efficiency and nearly achieved a 100% adult emergence rate. These results allow us to suggest a new rearing method for the aphid predator A. aphidimyza.

  5. Host Plant Record for the Fruit Flies, Anastrepha fumipennis and A. nascimentoi (Diptera, Tephritidae)

    PubMed Central

    Uramoto, Keiko; Martins, David S.; Lima, Rita C. A.; Zucchi, Roberto A.

    2008-01-01

    The first host plant record for Anastrepha fumipennis Lima (Diptera: Tephritidae) in Geissospermum laeve (Vell.) Baill (Apocynaceae) and for A. nascimentoi Zucchi found in Cathedra bahiensis Sleumer (Olacaceae) was determined in a host plant survey of fruit flies undertaken at the “Reserva Natural da Companhia Vale do Rio Doce”. This reserve is located in an Atlantic Rain Forest remnant area, in Linhares county, state of Espírito Santo, Brazil. The phylogenetic relationships of Anastrepha species and their hosts are discussed. The occurrence of these fruit fly species in relation to the distribution range of their host plants is also discussed. PMID:20302458

  6. Three New Species of the Genus Tripteroides, Subgenus Tripteroides Giles (Diptera: Culicidae)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1968-12-01

    Contract No. DA-49-193-MD-2672 from the U.S. Army Medical Research and Development Command, Office of the Sur- geon General. 2 Immediate publication...Tripteroides Giles (Diptera: Culicidae) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f...WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) Southeast Asia Mosquito Project,Smithsonian Institution,Washington,DC,20560 8

  7. Taxonomic notes and new records of the genus Tabanus Linnaeus 1758 (Diptera: Tabanidae) from Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Talafha, Hazem; Yaakop, Salmah Binti; Ghani, Idris Bin Abd

    2016-11-01

    Horsefly (Diptera: Tabanidae) fauna of Malaysia consists currently of 120 species belonging to eight genera. The present study added four new records to this hematophagous family. The new records were Tabanus crassus (Walker, 1850), T. griseipalpis Schuurmans Stekhoven (1926), T. melanognathus (Bigot, 1890), and T. mesogaus Burton (1978). Tabanus auricircus Philip (1979) was recorded here for the first time from peninsular Malaysia, whereas T. perakiensis Ricardo (1911) was recorded from Sabah for the first time. Key characters for new records were illustrated based on the examined materials and range of distribution for each species was given.

  8. Demographic and quality control parameters of Anastrepha Fraterculus (Diptera: Tephritidae) maintained under artificial rearing

    SciTech Connect

    Vera, T.; Abraham, S.; Oviedo, A.; Willink, E.

    2007-03-15

    The integration of the sterile insect technique (SIT) in the management of the South American fruit fly Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Tephritidae) is a promising alternative to chemically-based control in those areas where it is sympatric with Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Tephritidae) or other tephritid species for which the SIT is being used. Implementation of the SIT requires the development of a cost effective mass-rearing protocol. In this work, we present demographic and quality control parameters for the A. fraterculus strain reared at the Estacion Experimental Agroindustrial Obispo Colombres, Tucuman, Argentina. Considering the rearing cage as the reproduction unit, we observed that fecundity is optimal during the first 3 weeks after the onset of oviposition. Fertility was constant during this period. During 2003 and 2004, some improvements were made to the existing rearing protocol, which resulted in increased larval viability, pupal weight, and adult emergence. Current weekly egg production is 1 million per week. These eggs are used to maintain the colony and to assess quality parameters. Finally, research needs leading to improved yields and fly quality are discussed. (author) [Spanish] La integracion de la Tecnica del Insecto Esteril (TIE) en el combate integrado de la mosca Sudamericana de la fruta, Anastrepha fraterculus (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Tephritidae), es una alternativa interesante para reemplazar al control quimico en aquellas zonas donde esta especie es simpatrica con Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Tephritidae) u otros tefritidos para los que ya se utiliza la TIE. La implementacion de la TIE requiere del desarrollo de un protocolo de cria masiva que sea costo-efectivo. En este trabajo presentamos parametros demograficos y de control de calidad de la cepa criada en la Estacion Experimental Agroindustrial Obispo Colombres, Tucuman, Argentina. Considerando a la jaula de cria como unidad reproductiva, se observo

  9. Use of deer models to study larviposition by wild nasopharyngeal bot flies (Diptera: Oestridae).

    PubMed

    Anderson, J R

    1989-05-01

    Deer models baited with CO2 and with CO2 plus 1-octen-3-ol and Deer Trail Scent attracted and induced female Cephenemyia apicata Bennett & Sabrosky and C. jellisoni Townsend to larviposit on them. Larvae were not deposited on unbaited models. Females of both species were seen at baited models, and an insect trapping adhesive applied to the nostrials, muzzle, and lips of models revealed that all larvae were stuck to the lips and bottom part of the muzzle. The models also attracted and caught most other parasitic Diptera known to attack California black-tailed deer, Odocoileus hemionus columbianus (Richardson), in the study area.

  10. Warble infestations by Hypoderma tarandi (Diptera; Oestridae) recorded for the first time in West Greenland muskoxen☆

    PubMed Central

    Samuelsson, Fredrik; Nejsum, Peter; Raundrup, Katrine; Hansen, Tina Vicky Alstrup; Kapel, Christian Moliin Outzen

    2013-01-01

    In the northern hemisphere, Caribou (Rangifer spp.) populations are known to be infested with the skin-penetrating ectoparasite, Hypoderma tarandi (Diptera; Oestridae). Although regarded as host specific, H. tarandi has been reported from other species, and has become of increasing concern as a zoonosis infecting humans. In February 2012, concurrent with the hunting of muskoxen, we examined carcasses for muscle and tissue parasites, and recorded warble larvae infestations. DNA extracted from samples of larvae was amplified targeting 579 bp of the COI gene, and subsequently sequenced, to be confirmed as H. tarandi. Infestation by oestrid flies has not previously been reported in muskoxen in West Greenland. PMID:24533338

  11. Bartonella spp. in deer keds, Lipoptena mazamae (Diptera: Hippoboscidae), from Georgia and South Carolina, USA.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Will K; Nelder, Mark P; Cobb, Kristin D; Dasch, Gregory A

    2006-04-01

    Deer keds, Lipoptena mazamae (Diptera: Hippoboscidae), were collected from white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and humans in Georgia and South Carolina, USA (1 October 2001-6 January 2005) and screened for the presence of DNA from Bartonella spp. Forty deer keds were screened for Bartonella spp. by polymerase chain reaction using primers specific to the riboflavin synthase gene (ribC) of Bartonella. Bartonella species closely related to Bartonella schoenbuchensis and to the etiologic agent of cat-scratch disease (Bartonella henselae) were detected in 10 keds and one ked, respectively.

  12. Host plant record for the fruit flies, Anastrepha fumipennis and A. nascimentoi (Diptera, Tephritidae).

    PubMed

    Uramoto, Keiko; Martins, David S; Lima, Rita C A; Zucchi, Roberto A

    2008-01-01

    The first host plant record for Anastrepha fumipennis Lima (Diptera: Tephritidae) in Geissospermum laeve (Vell.) Baill (Apocynaceae) and for A. nascimentoi Zucchi found in Cathedra bahiensis Sleumer (Olacaceae) was determined in a host plant survey of fruit flies undertaken at the "Reserva Natural da Companhia Vale do Rio Doce". This reserve is located in an Atlantic Rain Forest remnant area, in Linhares county, state of Espírito Santo, Brazil. The phylogenetic relationships of Anastrepha species and their hosts are discussed. The occurrence of these fruit fly species in relation to the distribution range of their host plants is also discussed.

  13. A review of the New World Coproica (Diptera: Sphaeroceridae) with a description of 8 new species.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Matthew D; Marshall, Stephen A; Swann, John E

    2015-04-30

    The New World species of Coproica Rondani, 1861 (Diptera: Sphaeroceridae) are reviewed on the basis of over 17,000 examined specimens. The genus is divided into three major clades: the C. acutangula, C. vagans, and C. urbana species groups. Eight new species (C. bifurcata, C. bispatha, C. brachystyla, C. diabolica, C. emarginata, C. galapagosensis, C. novacula, and C. testudinea) are described, and redescriptions are provided for eleven additional species. Included are two keys (one for the twenty New World species only and one for all described species), updated New World distribution records, and illustrations of male and female genitalic structures.

  14. Phthiria sharafi sp. nov., a new record of the subfamily Phthiriinae (Bombyliidae, Diptera) from Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    El-Hawagry, Magdi S; Al Dhafer, Hathal M

    2014-10-10

    This new species (Phthiria sharafi sp. nov.) represents the first record of the subfamily Phthiriinae (Bombyliidae, Diptera) from Saudi Arabia. The species was collected from Garf Raydah Protected Area, Abha, Asir Province, south-western part of Saudi Arabia, using a Malaise trap erected in a site rich in olive, cactus and Juniper trees. The type locality has an Afrotropical influence, with the Afrotropical elements predominant, and a closer affiliation to the Afrotropical region than to the Palearctic region or the Eremic zone. 

  15. Revision of the genus Melanagromyza in California, with descriptions of three new species (Diptera: Agromyzidae).

    PubMed

    Shi, Li; Gaimari, Stephen D

    2015-08-20

    The 27 Californian species of the genus Melanagromyza Hendel (Diptera: Agromyzidae) are reviewed, including descriptions of three new species (Melanagromyza californiana sp. nov., M. chemsaki sp. nov. and M. gonzalesina sp. nov.) and the first record for one species (Melanagromyza martini Spencer) for California and the USA. All species in California are described or redescribed, with illustrations and photographs, and a key to the species is presented. Maps for the species in California, along with host distributions, are provided, with comments on biology and host plants.

  16. Origin and development of the tergotrochanteral muscle in Chironomus (Diptera: Nematocera).

    PubMed

    Lebart-Pedebas, M C

    1992-01-01

    The origin and the development of the tubular tergo-trochanteral muscle (TTD) was studied by light and electron microscopy in Chironomus (Diptera: Nematocera). Unlike the flight muscles, the TTD was found to develop from myoblasts located around a larval axon, without contribution from a larval muscle. The myoblasts fuse together to form myotubes. Innervation of the TTD arises from the larval axon. The myotubes send out sarcoplasmic extensions towards the axon branches issued from the larval axon. The first differentiated synapses are described. The TTD begins to grow later than the flight muscles. The implications of this developmental lag are discussed.

  17. A Sex Pheromone Receptor in the Hessian Fly Mayetiola destructor (Diptera, Cecidomyiidae)

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Martin N.; Corcoran, Jacob A.; Zhang, Dan-Dan; Hillbur, Ylva; Newcomb, Richard D.; Löfstedt, Christer

    2016-01-01

    The Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor Say (Diptera, Cecidomyiidae), is a pest of wheat and belongs to a group of gall-inducing herbivores. This species has a unique life history and several ecological features that differentiate it from other Diptera such as Drosophila melanogaster and blood-feeding mosquitoes. These features include a short, non-feeding adult life stage (1–2 days) and the use of a long-range sex pheromone produced and released by adult females. Sex pheromones are detected by members of the odorant receptor (OR) family within the Lepidoptera, but no receptors for similar long-range sex pheromones have been characterized from the Diptera. Previously, 122 OR genes have been annotated from the Hessian fly genome, with many of them showing sex-biased expression in the antennae. Here we have expressed, in HEK293 cells, five MdesORs that display male-biased expression in antennae, and we have identified MdesOR115 as a Hessian fly sex pheromone receptor. MdesOR115 responds primarily to the sex pheromone component (2S,8E,10E)-8,10-tridecadien-2-yl acetate, and secondarily to the corresponding Z,E-isomer. Certain sensory neuron membrane proteins (i.e., SNMP1) are important for responses of pheromone receptors in flies and moths. The Hessian fly genome is unusual in that it encodes six SNMP1 paralogs, of which five are expressed in antennae. We co-expressed each of the five antennal SNMP1 paralogs together with each of the five candidate sex pheromone receptors from the Hessian fly and found that they do not influence the response of MdesOR115, nor do they confer responsiveness in any of the non-responsive ORs to any of the sex pheromone components identified to date in the Hessian fly. Using Western blots, we detected protein expression of MdesOrco, all MdesSNMPs, and all MdesORs except for MdesOR113, potentially explaining the lack of response from this OR. In conclusion, we report the first functional characterization of an OR from the Cecidomyiidae

  18. New locality record of Isomyia paurogonita Fang & Fan, 1986 (Diptera: Calliphoridae) from Peninsular Malaysia and Borneo.

    PubMed

    Heo, C C; Aisha, S; Kurahashi, H; Omar, B

    2013-03-01

    Isomyia paurogonita Fang & Fan, 1986 (Diptera: Calliphoridae), a rare species of the subfamily Rhiniinae (tribe Cosminini) was recorded for the first time in Malaysia. We collected one male and two females during a field trip conducted at Genting Highland, Pahang, peninsular Malaysia in May 2011. A 3-day old cow liver was offered as attractant and dipterans collected were transferred to the laboratory for specimens processing and identification. The adults of I. paurogonita were attracted to the odour and then captured by using a sweep net. Isomyia paurogonita was also recorded from two other localities in Peninsular and Malaysian Borneo, namely Gombak Utara, Selangor and Sibu, Sarawak.

  19. A new species, new immature stages, and new synonymy in Australian Dasybasis flies (Diptera: Tabanidae: Diachlorini).

    PubMed

    Ferguson, David J; Yeates, David K

    2015-04-09

    Australian beach sand is a productive habitat for lower brachyceran fly larvae but often overlooked by collectors. We collected two species of tabanid larvae from coastal beach sand in southern New South Wales in August 2013. Both species belong to the Dasybasis macrophthalma species-group of Mackerras (1959), one a new species, and the other D. exulans (Erichson, 1842). We describe both new immature stages and the new species adult as Dasybasis rieki sp. nov. (Diptera: Tabanidae: Diachlorini). Trojan (1994b) elevated the D. macrophthalma species group to the genus Sznablius. We review the evidence for the generic status of Sznablius, and synonymize it with Dasybasis.

  20. Sex-biased captures of sarcosaprophagous Diptera in carrion-baited traps.

    PubMed

    Martín-Vega, Daniel; Baz, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    The use of carrion-baited traps is a common and widely extended practice in the study of sarcosaprophagous Diptera. However, it implies different areas of bias, one of them being the different responses of males and females to carrion bait, which results in possible biased sex ratios in the captures. In the present study, the use of carrion-baited traps revealed significant female-biased captures in the families Calliphoridae, Muscidae, and Sarcophagidae, whereas the collected species of the families Piophilidae, Heleomyzidae, and Ulidiidae showed different patterns in the observed sex ratios. Possible explanations according to existing literature and the types of mating behaviors of the different families are discussed.

  1. Effects of Dysoxylum malabaricum Bedd. (Meliaceae) extract on the malarial vector Anopheles stephensi Liston (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Senthil Nathan, Sengottayan; Kalaivani, Kandaswamy; Sehoon, Kim

    2006-11-01

    In recent years, use of environmentally friendly and biodegradable natural insecticides of plant origin have received renewed attention as agents for disease vector control. Methanol extracts of leaves from the Indian white cedar Dysoxylum malabaricum Bedd. (Meliaceae) were tested against mature and immature Anopheles stephensi Liston (Diptera) mosquitoes under laboratory conditions. The extract showed strong larvicidal, pupicidal, adulticidal, and antiovipositional activity. The maximum leaf extract concentration tested in this study was 4%, which produced pronounced effects. In general, first and second instars were more susceptible to leaf extract than older insects. Clear dose-response relationships were established, with the highest dose of 4% plant extract causing 97% mortality of first instars.

  2. Preservation of iridescent colours in Phorinia Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830 (Diptera: Tachinidae)

    PubMed Central

    Downes, Stephen; Simonis, Priscilla

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Iridescent blue-green colours are exhibited by various organisms including several taxa in the Tachinidae (Diptera) with notable examples within the Afrotropical members of the genus Phorinia Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830. The vivid colouration observed in life quickly fades to a dull golden-yellow when a specimen is dried. Although well known, no published explanation has been given for this phenomenon. New information We illustrate the mechanism associated with this colour change. We also test and propose technical alternatives to retain the living colours in dried specimens. PMID:26929707

  3. Description of the Terrestrial Larva of Parosca latipalpis (Macquart) (Diptera: Tabanidae) from Southern Chile.

    PubMed

    González, C R; Llanos, L; Saldarriaga-Córdoba, M

    2016-10-01

    The terrestrial larva of the austral horsefly, Parosca latipalpis (Macquart), identified by molecular techniques, is described. The larva of P. latipalpis resembles Scaptia auriflua (Donovan), Copidapha vicina (Taylor), Myioscaptia muscula (English), and Osca lata (Guérin-Meneville) in many morphological characters, as well as in their terrestrial habitats. Some characters that are shared between these species are unique among Tabanidae and provide evidence of their monophyletic origin, suggesting a typical Gondwanaland group. Larvae of P. latipalpis were found 2-3 cm below of the soil surface and associated with larvae of Coleoptera, Lepidoptera, and Diptera in southern Chile.

  4. The Anopheles (Anopheles) Crucians Subgroup in the United States (Diptera: Culicidae)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-01-01

    collected in light traps and dog-baited traps. Mosq. News 33:39-41. Darsie , R. F., Jr . 1949. Pupae of the anopheline mosquitoes of the north- eastern...United States (Diptera: Culicidae). Rev. de Entomol. 20:509-30. Darsie , R. F., Jr . 1973. A record of changes in mosquito taxonomy in the United States...of America, 1955-1972. Mosq. Syst. 5:187-93. 60 Darsie , R. F., Jr ., D. MacCreary, and L. A. Stearns. 1951. An annotated list of the mosquitoes of

  5. A case of verru plana on tattoo.

    PubMed

    Karadag, Ayse Serap; Bilgili, Serap Gunes; Onder, Sevda; Kosem, Mustafa

    2014-07-01

    Tattoo is a popular cosmetic decoration, however several different tattoo-induced complication have been described. Several tattoo related cutaneous reactions such as allergic, granulomatous, lichenoid reactions, and infections have been reported. A 20 year-old male presented with multiple papules on the dragon shaped tattoo. The clinical and histopathological assessments were consistent with verrucas. Tattoo has become increasingly popular among young people. People interested in tattoos should be informed on its related infections and complications during and following tattooing. Herein, we present this rare tattoo induced verru plane to point out tattoo related complications and its treatments.

  6. Higher Terrain between Sinai and Solis Plana

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-01-28

    The terrain in this observation from NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter looks like an ancient uplifted crustal block. The area is riddled with faults big cracks that allow rocks to slide and ridges that look like uncovered magma dikes. A Mars Orbital Camera picture shows the region to be moderately dusty, but rocks do poke out along the ridges. With a high resolution images, we want to know if the dikes are of the same composition as the flood lavas that surround this high terrain. And what material did the dikes intrude upon which can be eroded away? http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19287

  7. Genomic and bioinformatic analysis of NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase in Anopheles stephensi (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Suwanchaichinda, C; Brattsten, L B

    2014-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (P450) enzyme system is a major mechanism of xenobiotic biotransformation. The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) is required for transfer of electrons from NADPH to P450. One CPR gene was identified in the genome of the malaria-transmitting mosquito Anopheles stephensi Liston (Diptera: Culicidae). The gene encodes a polypeptide containing highly conserved flavin mononucleotide-, flavin adenine dinucleotide-, and NADPH-binding domains, a unique characteristic of the reductase. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the A. stephensi and other known mosquito CPRs belong to a monophyletic group distinctly separated from other insects in the same order, Diptera. Amino acid residues of CPRs involved in binding of P450 and cytochrome c are conserved between A. stephensi and the Norway rat Rattus norvegicus Berkenhout (Rodentia: Muridae). However, gene structure particularly within the coding region is evidently different between the two organisms. Such difference might arise during the evolution process as also seen in the difference of P450 families and isoforms found in these organisms. CPR in the mosquito A. stephensi is expected to be active and serve as an essential component of the P450 system. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  8. Assemblage of Necrophagous Diptera in Atlantic Insular Environments and Response to Different Levels of Human Presence.

    PubMed

    Carmo, R F R; Vasconcelos, S D

    2016-10-01

    Islands act as natural laboratories for ecological studies to explain bioinvasion processes and, in this scenario, necrophagous Diptera have never been used as model organisms. This study aimed to (i) describe assemblages of necrophagous Diptera (Calliphoridae and Sarcophagidae) in two insular environments of different origins and distances from mainland, (ii) investigate the effect of anthropogenic impact on the assemblage of carrion flies, (iii) to quantify the establishment of invasive species in the two islands, and (iv) to infer about the conservation status of the islands based on the ecological parameters. Sampling was performed in 2011-2012, in the dry and rainy season. Insects were collected by using traps with chicken liver or sardine baits. In each island, environments exposed to different degrees of human impact were sampled. Ecological analyses were carried out to characterize the assemblages of Calliphoridae and Sarcophagidae, with emphasis on the relation between native and invasive species. In total, 99,862 adults of 21 species of blow flies and flesh flies were collected. Overall abundance in the oceanic island was higher than in the continental island, although the richness of species was higher in the latter. The type of bait did not influence diversity of species sampled in either island. No difference was observed in total richness of both families according to the gradient of anthropogenic impact, in both islands. The invasive species Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius) was classified as dominant in all environments, irrespective of the anthropogenic impact, which raises concern about the conservation status of each island.

  9. Identification through DNA barcoding of Tabanidae (Diptera) vectors of surra disease in India.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Dhriti; Kumar, Vikas; Maity, Aniruddha; Ghosh, Biswatosh; Tyagi, Kaomud; Singha, Devkant; Kundu, Shantanu; Laskar, Boni Amin; Naskar, Atanu; Rath, Shibananda

    2015-10-01

    Horse flies and deer flies are common names applied to members of the family Tabanidae (Diptera). Tabanid flies are pestiferous and of veterinary and medical importance, with about 244 species in India. They are major vectors of Trypanosoma evansi that causes trypanosomiasis (surra disease). Lack of stable morphological characters, and scarcity of taxonomic expertise, is major impediments for accurate species identification of these important pest and disease vectors. Molecular data, especially DNA barcode data, has been widely used in the identification of Diptera of economic importance. We evaluated the utility of DNA barcode data to discriminate the vectors of surra disease (trypanosomiasis) from India. We used barcode gap and reciprocal monophyly (neighbor-joining and Bayesian tree) criteria to analyze barcode data. A total of 46 specimens belonging to 7 species under four genera in two subfamilies were used for this study. DNA barcode data was not available previously for these species. Analysis revealed that all morphologically identifiable species can be discriminated using DNA barcoding data. Further, our study clearly demonstrated the presence of cryptic species in Chrysops dispar. Moreover, we revealed that closely related species without stable taxonomic distinguishing characters in the "Tabanus striatus species complex" can be discriminated using DNA barcode data. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The adult head morphology of the hessian fly Mayetiola destructor (Diptera, Cecidomyiidae).

    PubMed

    Schneeberg, Katharina; Polilov, Alexey; Harris, Marion O; Beutel, Rolf G

    2013-11-01

    The adult head of the Hessian fly Mayetiola destructor was examined and described in detail. Morphological features are evaluated with respect to phylogenetic implications and possible effects of miniaturisation. Preserved groundplan features of Diptera are the orthognathous orientation of the head, the vestiture of small microtrichia (possible autapomorphy), filiform antennae inserted frontally between the compound eyes, the presence of a clypeolabral muscle (possible autapomorphy), the presence of labellae (autapomorphy), and the presence of only one premental retractor. Potential synapomorphies of the groups assigned to Bibionomorpha are the origin of M. tentorioscapalis medialis on the frons and the loss of M. craniolacinialis. Further apomorphies of Cecidomyiidae identified in Mayetiola are the unusually massive anterior tentorial arm, the absence of the labro-epipharyngeal food channel, the absence of the lacinia, and the presence of antennal sensilla connected by a seta, a feature not known from any other group of Diptera. The very large size of the compound eyes (in relation to the entire head surface) and the complete loss of ocelli are possible effects of miniaturization. The large size of the brain (in relation to the cephalic lumen), the unusual shape of the optic lobes, and the absence of the frontal ganglion as a separate structure are probably also linked with size reduction.

  11. Genome sequence of Phormia regina Meigen (Diptera: Calliphoridae): implications for medical, veterinary and forensic research.

    PubMed

    Andere, Anne A; Platt, Roy N; Ray, David A; Picard, Christine J

    2016-10-28

    Blow flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae) are important medical, veterinary and forensic insects encompassing 8 % of the species diversity observed in the calyptrate insects. Few genomic resources exist to understand the diversity and evolution of this group. We present the hybrid (short and long reads) draft assemblies of the male and female genomes of the common North American blow fly, Phormia regina (Diptera: Calliphoridae). The 550 and 534 Mb draft assemblies contained 8312 and 9490 predicted genes in the female and male genomes, respectively; including > 93 % conserved eukaryotic genes. Putative X and Y chromosomes (21 and 14 Mb, respectively) were assembled and annotated. The P. regina genomes appear to contain few mobile genetic elements, an almost complete absence of SINEs, and most of the repetitive landscape consists of simple repetitive sequences. Candidate gene approaches were undertaken to annotate insecticide resistance, sex-determining, chemoreceptors, and antimicrobial peptides. This work yielded a robust, reliable reference calliphorid genome from a species located in the middle of a calliphorid phylogeny. By adding an additional blow fly genome, the ability to tease apart what might be true of general calliphorids vs. what is specific of two distinct lineages now exists. This resource will provide a strong foundation for future studies into the evolution, population structure, behavior, and physiology of all blow flies.

  12. Genomic and Bioinformatic Analysis of NADPH-Cytochrome P450 Reductase in Anopheles stephensi (Diptera: Culicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Suwanchaichinda, C.; Brattsten, L. B.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (P450) enzyme system is a major mechanism of xenobiotic biotransformation. The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) is required for transfer of electrons from NADPH to P450. One CPR gene was identified in the genome of the malaria-transmitting mosquito Anopheles stephensi Liston (Diptera: Culicidae). The gene encodes a polypeptide containing highly conserved flavin mononucleotide-, flavin adenine dinucleotide-, and NADPH-binding domains, a unique characteristic of the reductase. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the A. stephensi and other known mosquito CPRs belong to a monophyletic group distinctly separated from other insects in the same order, Diptera. Amino acid residues of CPRs involved in binding of P450 and cytochrome c are conserved between A. stephensi and the Norway rat Rattus norvegicus Berkenhout (Rodentia: Muridae). However, gene structure particularly within the coding region is evidently different between the two organisms. Such difference might arise during the evolution process as also seen in the difference of P450 families and isoforms found in these organisms. CPR in the mosquito A. stephensi is expected to be active and serve as an essential component of the P450 system. PMID:25368081

  13. Transcriptomes of three species of Tipuloidea (Diptera, Tipulomorpha) and implications for phylogeny of Tipulomorpha

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Zehui; Zhang, Xiao; Ding, Shuangmei; Tang, Chufei; Wang, Yuyu; de Jong, Herman; Cameron, Stephen L.; Wang, Mengqing; Yang, Ding

    2017-01-01

    Tipulomorpha has long been a problematic taxon in terms of familial composition, phylogenetic relationships among families and position relative to other ‘lower’ Diptera. Whole-transcriptome shotgun sequencing provides a powerful basis for phylogenetic studies. We performed de novo transcriptome sequencing to produce the first transcriptome datasets representing the families Pediciidae, Limoniidae and Cylindrotomidae using high-throughput sequencing technologies. We assembled cDNA libraries for Pedicia vetusta (Alexander) (Pediciidae), Rhipidia sejuga Zhang, Li and Yang (Limoniidae) and Liogma simplicicornis Alexander (Cylindrotomidae). Using the Illumina RNA-Seq method, we obtained 28,252, 44,152 and 44,281 unigenes, from the three respective species. Based on sequence similarity searches, 12,475 (44.16%), 20,334 (46.05%) and 17,478 (39.47%) genes were identified. Analysis of genes highly conserved at the amino acid sequence level revealed there were 1,709 single-copy orthologs genes across the analyzed species. Phylogenetic trees constructed using maximum likelihood (ML) based on the 1,709 single-copy orthologs genes indicated that the relationship between the four major infraorders of lower Diptera was: Culicomorpha + (Tipulomorpha + (Psychodomorpha + (Bibionomorpha + Brachycera))). Trichoceridae belongs within Tipulomorpha as the sister-group of Tipuloidea. Highly supported relationships within the Tipuloidea are Pediciidae + (Limoniidae + (Cylindrotomidae + Tipulidae)). Four-cluster likelihood mapping was used to study potential incongruent signals supporting other topologies, however, results were congruent with the ML tree. PMID:28264066

  14. Structure and ultrastructure of spermatozoon in six species of Drosophilidae (Diptera).

    PubMed

    Gracielle, I M S; Tidon, R; Báo, S N

    2016-10-18

    The Drosophilidae family is formed by Brachycera Diptera distributed widely across different regions of the planet. It is composed of about 4000 species, 304 of which are found in Brazil. The objective of this work was to characterize morphologically the structure of the male internal reproductive apparatus and the ultrastructure of the spermatozoon in four Neotropical (Drosophila cardini, D. mercatorum, D. nebulosa and D. sturtevanti) and two invasive (D. simulans and Zaprionus indianus) species of drosophilids. The structural aspect of the internal reproductive apparatus corresponds with that described for other drosophilids; however, there are differences in the size and coloration of the structures, such as the testes, in each species analyzed. The spermatozoon of these species was seen to be long and fine, presenting morphological variation. The ultrastructure of the spermatozoon revealed that the morphological pattern is similar to that found in the majority of insects. The head region presents a nucleus with condensed chromatin and the acrosome positioned laterally to the nucleus. In the tail region, the axoneme presents the 9+9+2 pattern commonly described for other species of Diptera. The species presented differences regarding the shape and size of the mitochondrial derivatives. Cytochemical analysis using EPTA also revealed differences in terms of the location of the basic proteins in the mitochondrial derivates. The results obtained contribute to expanding the database for the Drosophilidae family, providing information that may contribute to intra- and inter-specific identification and supplying phylogenetic analyses.

  15. Scanning Electron Microscopy Investigations of Third-Instar Larva of Cordylobia rodhaini (Diptera: Calliphoridae), an Agent of Furuncular Myiasis.

    PubMed

    Pezzi, M; Cultrera, R; Chicca, M; Leis, M

    2015-05-01

    A scanning electron microscopy study of the third larval instar of Cordylobia rodhaini Gedoelst (Diptera: Calliphoridae), causing obligatory furuncular myiasis, is presented here for the first time. The larvae were collected from a patient exposed to them in the tropical rainforest of Kibale National Park (Uganda). Distinctive features are described in sequence from the anterior region to the posterior region, highlighting the morphological features of antennae, maxillary palps, structures related to mouth opening, sensory structures, thoracic and abdominal spines, and anterior and posterior spiracles. The results are compared with those of other Calyptrata flies, mainly from the family Calliphoridae and, when possible, with Cordylobia anthropophaga Blanchard (Diptera: Calliphoridae), the only other species of genus Cordylobia investigated by scanning electron microscopy.

  16. Mitochondrial genome sequences of Nematocera (lower Diptera): evidence of rearrangement following a complete genome duplication in a winter crane fly.

    PubMed

    Beckenbach, Andrew T

    2012-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial DNA sequences of eight representatives of lower Diptera, suborder Nematocera, along with nearly complete sequences from two other species, are presented. These taxa represent eight families not previously represented by complete mitochondrial DNA sequences. Most of the sequences retain the ancestral dipteran mitochondrial gene arrangement, while one sequence, that of the midge Arachnocampa flava (family Keroplatidae), has an inversion of the trnE gene. The most unusual result is the extensive rearrangement of the mitochondrial genome of a winter crane fly, Paracladura trichoptera (family Trichocera). The pattern of rearrangement indicates that the mechanism of rearrangement involved a tandem duplication of the entire mitochondrial genome, followed by random and nonrandom loss of one copy of each gene. Another winter crane fly retains the ancestral diperan gene arrangement. A preliminary mitochondrial phylogeny of the Diptera is also presented.

  17. Using Frons Width to Differentiate Blow Fly Species (Diptera: Calliphoridae) Phormia regina (Meigen) and Protophormia terraenovae (Robineau-Desvoidy).

    PubMed

    Langer, Sarah V; Kyle, Christopher J; Beresford, David V

    2017-03-01

    Protophormia terraenovae (Robineau-Desvoidy) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) and Phormia regina (Meigen) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) are morphologically similar blow fly species commonly used for estimating postmortem intervals. Field collection and storage of adults can result in color changes, in particular on calypters and palps; often collected specimens show damage such as wing fray or fungal growth. We measured the frons width: total head width ratio using photographs (ImageJ version 1.49) to differentiate these two species. Both sexes were distinguishable to species, with the greatest difference between males: 12.34% P. terraenovae versus 1.62% P. regina, less so for females: 40.25% P. terraenovae, versus 33.65% P. regina. Incorporating this feature into future blow fly keys would help with distinguishing field-caught specimens when other features are obstructed.

  18. Descriptions of Zavortinkius, a New Subgenus of Aedes, and the Eleven Included Species from the Afrotropical Region (Diptera: Culicidae)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-01-01

    entomology studies -XVII. Biosystematics of Kenknightia, a new subgenus of the mosquito genus Aedes Meigen from the Oriental Region (Diptera: Culicidae...subgenus, Zavortinkius, in genus Aedes is described and includes 11 species of which four are new (Ae. brunhesi, Ae. geofioyi, Ae. huangae and Ae...Brygooi, Longipalpis and Monetus) based on features of the adults, female and male genitalia, pupae and fourth-instar larvae. Keys to adults, pupae

  19. Redescription of Four Oriental Species of Culex (Culiciomyia) and the Description of a New Species from Thailand (Diptera: Culicidae)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-01-01

    fauna of Southeast Asia - II. The genus Culex in Thailand (Diptera: Culicidae). Contrib. Am. Entomol. Inst. (Ann Arbor) Z(1): 1-296. 1967b...illustrated. A new species, C. harrisoni, from Thailand is rec- ognized. During the preliminary study of the CuZex material from Southeast Asia and...these spe- cies so that they will be readily recognized by other workers studying the Or- iental fauna. The descriptions of bahri, viridiventer and

  20. Effects of Different Pyrethroids on Landing Behavior of Female Aedes aegypti, Anopheles quadrimaculatus, and Culex quinquefasciatus Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    quadrimaculatus, and Culex quinquefasciatus Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) MIRIAM F. COOPERBAND1 AND SANDRA A. ALLAN Center for Medical, Agricultural and...genera, Aedes aegypti L., Anopheles quadrimaculatus Say, and Culex quinquefasciatus Say, were tested for facultative landing and resting behavior on...which justify the use of alternative terminology. The term “locomotive stimulant” is offered as an acceptable alternative. KEY WORDS insect behavior

  1. New Record of Lipoptena cervi and Updated Checklist of the Louse Flies (Diptera: Hippoboscidae) of the Republic of Korea

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    SHORT COMMUNICATIONS New Record of Lipoptena cervi and Updated Checklist of the Louse Flies (Diptera: Hippoboscidae) of the Republic of Korea HEUNG...Republic of Korea. A total of Þve females and 10 males was collected from eight of 29 Korean water deer ,Hydropotes inermis argyropus Swinhoe, from...collection records, and repositories are also noted. KEY WORDS louse ßy, Lipoptena cervi, Hippoboscidae, water deer , Korea Both sexes of louse ßies or

  2. Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus) konderi Galvao and Damasceno: Neotype Designation and Resurrection from Synonymy with Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus) oswaldoi (Peryassu) (Diptera: Culicidae)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-07

    AND RESURRECTION FROM SYNONYMY WITH ANOPHELES (NYSSORHYNCHUS) OSWALDOI (PERYASSU) (DIPTERA: CULICIDAE) CARMEN FLORES -MENDOZA, E. L. PEYTON, RICHARD C...Amazonas, Brazil, specimen 1629, 15-VIII-1998, C. Flores -Mendoza coil., deposited at Instituto Oswaldo Cruz (IOC), Rio de Janeiro, Bra- zil...Hygiene, Monographic Series 18. 1948. Notas sobre a distribui•fio e a biologia dos anofelinos das Regi6es Nordestina e Amaz6n- ica do Brasil

  3. Experimental Transmission of Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus by Strains of Aedes albopictus and A. taeniorhynchus (Diptera: Culicidae)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    AD-A281 335 0 Experimental Transmission of Eastern Equine Encephaliti Vi 4 by Strains of Aedes albopictus and A. taeniorhynch &1j (Diptera: Culicidae...co m •strains of Aedes albopictus (Skuse) was assessed for eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) virus isolated from Ae. albopictus collected in Polk...County, Florida. Both species became infected with and transmitted EEE virus by bite after feeding on 1-d-old chicks that had _been inoculated with EEE

  4. Key for European species of the Cheilosia proxima group (Diptera, Syrphidae) with a description of a new species

    PubMed Central

    Vujić, Ante; Radenković, Snežana; Trifunov, Sonja; Nikolić, Tijana

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A new hoverfly species, Cheilosia barbafacies Vujić & Radenković sp. n. (Diptera, Syrphidae), is described and distinguished from the closely related species Cheilosia pascuorum Becker, 1894, based on material collected from the mountains of the Balkan Peninsula. Diagnostic characteristics and an identification key for the members of the proxima group of Cheilosia s. str., including the new taxon, are provided. PMID:23653524

  5. Taxonomic revision of the Carpathian endemic Pedicia (Crunobia) staryi species–group (Diptera, Pediciidae) based on morphology and molecular data

    PubMed Central

    Dénes, Avar-Lehel; Kolcsár, Levente-Péter; Török, Edina; Keresztes, Lujza

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Three new species of the genus Pedicia, subgenus Crunobia (Diptera: Pediciidae) belonging to the staryi group are described on the basis of a combination of molecular and morphology datasets, and a key to discriminate between species of the subgenus Crunobia is added. Geographic projection of the identified taxa suggests insular-like distribution and shows the importance of the Carpathians as a genetic center which is home to an exceptionally high aquatic diversity in Europe. PMID:27110152

  6. Insects found on a human cadaver in central Italy including the blowfly Calliphora loewi (Diptera, Calliphoridae), a new species of forensic interest.

    PubMed

    Vanin, S; Gherardi, M; Bugelli, V; Di Paolo, M

    2011-04-15

    In the case of unidentified bodies the estimation of the period since death or of the season of death plays an important role to focus the attention on a reduced number of people among the ones reported missing. Forensic entomology can be one of the most important methods for these estimations, as occurred in this case. Flies are typically the first insects to colonize a dead body. The case reported here concerns the colonisation by insects of a male body in advanced decay found during the winter in Central Italy. This case is of particular interest as few data are available on the entomological evidence in the cold season. In particular, in this case we recovered Calliphora loewi (Calliphoridae), a species never collected before on dead bodies in Southern Europe. Larvae of the black soldier fly Hermetia illucens (Stratiomyidae), pupae and larvae belonging to genus Hydrothea (Muscidae), and Necrobia rufipes (Cleridae) specimens were also collected. The estimated PMI enabled identification of the cadaver, confirmed by DNA analysis.

  7. How to inventory tropical flies (Diptera)--One of the megadiverse orders of insects.

    PubMed

    Borkent, Art; Brown, Brian V

    2015-04-28

    A new approach to inventory Diptera species in tropical habitats is described. A 150 x 266 m patch of cloud forest at Zurquí de Moravia, Costa Rica (10.047N, 84.008W) at 1585 meters asl was sampled with two Malaise traps for slightly more than one year (Sept. 12, 2012-Oct. 18, 2013). Further concomitant sampling with a variety of trapping methods for three days every month and collecting during a one-week intensive "Diptera Blitz", with 19 collaborators collecting on-site, provided diverse additional samples used in the inventory. Two other Costa Rican sites at Tapantí National Park (9.720N, 83.774W, 1600 m) and Las Alturas (8.951N, 82.834W, 1540 m), 40 and 180 km southeast from Zurquí de Moravia, respectively, were each sampled with a single Malaise trap to allow for beta-diversity assessments. Tapantí National Park was sampled from Oct. 28, 2012-Oct. 13, 2013 and Las Alturas from Oct. 13, 2012-Oct. 13, 2013. A worldwide group of 54 expert systematists are identifying to species level all 72 dipteran families present in the trap samples. Five local technicians sampled and prepared material to the highest curatorial standards, ensuring that collaborator efforts were focused on species identification. This project, currently in its final, third year of operation (to end Sept. 1, 2015), has already recorded 2,348 species and with many more yet expected. Unlike previous All Taxon Biodiversity Inventories, this project has attainable goals and will provide the first complete estimate of species richness for one of the four megadiverse insect orders in a tropical region. Considering that this is the first complete survey of one of the largest orders of insects within any tropical region of the planet, there is clearly great need for a consistent and feasible protocol for sampling the smaller but markedly more diverse smaller insects in such ecosystems. By weight of their species diversity and remarkable divergence of habit, the Diptera are an excellent model to

  8. Fourier analysis of wing beat signals: assessing the effects of genetic alterations of flight muscle structure in Diptera.

    PubMed Central

    Hyatt, C J; Maughan, D W

    1994-01-01

    A method for determining and analyzing the wing beat frequency in Diptera is presented. This method uses an optical tachometer to measure Diptera wing movement during flight. The resulting signal from the optical measurement is analyzed using a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) technique, and the dominant frequency peak in the Fourier spectrum is selected as the wing beat frequency. Also described is a method for determining quantitatively the degree of variability of the wing beat frequency about the dominant frequency. This method is based on determination of a quantity called the Hindex, which is derived using data from the FFT analysis. Calculation of the H index allows computer-based selection of the most suitable segment of recorded data for determination of the representative wing beat frequency. Experimental data suggest that the H index can also prove useful in examining wing beat frequency variability in Diptera whose flight muscle structure has been genetically altered. Examples from Drosophila indirect flight muscle studies as well as examples of artificial data are presented to illustrate the method. This method fulfills a need for a standardized method for determining wing beat frequencies and examining wing beat frequency variability in insects whose flight muscles have been altered by protein engineering methods. PMID:7811927

  9. Patterns of Evolutionary Conservation of Microsatellites (SSRs) Suggest a Faster Rate of Genome Evolution in Hymenoptera Than in Diptera

    PubMed Central

    Stolle, Eckart; Kidner, Jonathan H.; Moritz, Robin F.A.

    2013-01-01

    Microsatellites, or simple sequence repeats (SSRs), are common and widespread DNA elements in genomes of many organisms. However, their dynamics in genome evolution is unclear, whereby they are thought to evolve neutrally. More available genome sequences along with dated phylogenies allowed for studying the evolution of these repetitive DNA elements along evolutionary time scales. This could be used to compare rates of genome evolution. We show that SSRs in insects can be retained for several hundred million years. Different types of microsatellites seem to be retained longer than others. By comparing Dipteran with Hymenopteran species, we found very similar patterns of SSR loss during their evolution, but both taxa differ profoundly in the rate. Relative to divergence time, Diptera lost SSRs twice as fast as Hymenoptera. The loss of SSRs on the Drosophila melanogaster X-chromosome was higher than on the other chromosomes. However, accounting for generation time, the Diptera show an 8.5-fold slower rate of SSR loss than the Hymenoptera, which, in contrast to previous studies, suggests a faster genome evolution in the latter. This shows that generation time differences can have a profound effect. A faster genome evolution in these insects could be facilitated by several factors very different to Diptera, which is discussed in light of our results on the haplodiploid D. melanogaster X-chromosome. Furthermore, large numbers of SSRs can be found to be in synteny and thus could be exploited as a tool to investigate genome structure and evolution. PMID:23292136

  10. Seasonal, Locality, and Habitat Variation in Assemblages of Carrion-Associated Diptera in Gauteng Province, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Parry, N J; Mansell, M W; Weldon, C W

    2016-11-01

    Seasonal, spatial, and habitat responses of carrion-associated Diptera assemblages can provide valuable information about the presence or absence of species and their relative abundance, and thereby enhance understanding of their responses to environmental variables and how this may have an impact on forensic investigations. Three different nature reserves (localities) within the Municipality of Tshwane, South Africa, were selected to determine whether species assemblages of carrion-feeding flies differ between seasons, localities, and habitat types. A total of 59,511 adult Diptera, identified to 35 species in eight different families, were collected using modified Redtop hanging traps, baited with liver and fish, during four seasons in three different habitat types. Species assemblages differed temporally, with season being the main factor determining species diversity and not locality or habitat. However, savanna and human-disturbed habitats supported a higher abundance and species richness than grassland habitats. Areas adjacent to the localities, such as large urban expanses in Dinokeng or agricultural holdings in Rietvlei, led to an increase in the abundance and mean species richness of carrion-associated Diptera, and in increased numbers of pest or invasive species such as Chrysomya megacephala (F.). Despite this, the overall species assemblages present in human-disturbed areas were very similar to those recorded in natural habitats.

  11. The relationship between epicuticular long-chained hydrocarbons and surface area - volume ratios in insects (Diptera, Hymenoptera, Lepidoptera)

    PubMed Central

    Brückner, Adrian; Heethoff, Michael; Blüthgen, Nico

    2017-01-01

    Long-chain cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) are common components of the epicuticle of terrestrial arthropods. CHC serve as a protective barrier against environmental influences but also act as semiochemicals in animal communication. Regarding the latter aspect, species- or intra-functional group specific CHCs composition and variation are relatively well studied. However, comparative knowledge about the relationship of CHC quantity and their relation to surface area—volume ratios in the context of water loss and protection is fragmentary. Hence, we aim to study the taxon-specific relationship of the CHC amount and surface-area to volume ratio related to their functional role (e.g. in water loss). We focused on flower visiting insects and analyzed the CHC amounts of three insect orders (Hymenoptera, Lepidoptera and Diptera) using gas chromatography—mass spectrometry (GC-MS). We included 113 species from two grassland plots, quantified their CHCs, and measured their body mass and surface area. We found differences in the surface area, CHCs per body mass and the CHC density (= amount of CHCs per surface area) across the three insect taxa. Especially the Hymenoptera had a higher CHC density compared to Diptera and Lepidoptera. CHC density could be explained by surface area-volume ratios in Hymenoptera but not in Diptera and Lepidoptera. Unexpectedly, CHC density decreased with increasing surface area—volume ratios. PMID:28384308

  12. The relationship between epicuticular long-chained hydrocarbons and surface area - volume ratios in insects (Diptera, Hymenoptera, Lepidoptera).

    PubMed

    Brückner, Adrian; Heethoff, Michael; Blüthgen, Nico

    2017-01-01

    Long-chain cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) are common components of the epicuticle of terrestrial arthropods. CHC serve as a protective barrier against environmental influences but also act as semiochemicals in animal communication. Regarding the latter aspect, species- or intra-functional group specific CHCs composition and variation are relatively well studied. However, comparative knowledge about the relationship of CHC quantity and their relation to surface area-volume ratios in the context of water loss and protection is fragmentary. Hence, we aim to study the taxon-specific relationship of the CHC amount and surface-area to volume ratio related to their functional role (e.g. in water loss). We focused on flower visiting insects and analyzed the CHC amounts of three insect orders (Hymenoptera, Lepidoptera and Diptera) using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). We included 113 species from two grassland plots, quantified their CHCs, and measured their body mass and surface area. We found differences in the surface area, CHCs per body mass and the CHC density (= amount of CHCs per surface area) across the three insect taxa. Especially the Hymenoptera had a higher CHC density compared to Diptera and Lepidoptera. CHC density could be explained by surface area-volume ratios in Hymenoptera but not in Diptera and Lepidoptera. Unexpectedly, CHC density decreased with increasing surface area-volume ratios.

  13. Nematocera flies recorded in Serra do Courel, northwest Spain, May 2012 (Diptera: Anisopodidae, Blepharoceridae, Cylindrotomidae, Limoniidae, Pediciidae, Tipulidae and Trichoceridae) including descriptions of two new species of Limoniidae.

    PubMed

    Hancock, E Geoffrey; Hewitt, Stephen M; Horsfield, David; Lyszkowsi, Richard M; Macgowan, Iain; Ricarte, Antonio; Rotheray, Graham E; Watt, Kenneth

    2015-01-19

    During May 2012 Diptera were sampled in the Serro do Courel area of Lugo Province, Galicia, northwest Spain. The authors of this paper, members of the Malloch Society (see website) are active in attempting to understand the detailed ecology of flies. Much of this work is through targeting larval stages often with an emphasis on saproxylic situations. By rearing adults from larvae direct relationships between them and their detailed habitat requirements are established. The list of nematocerous Diptera that were sampled includes 36 species two of them new to science and records of six others new to the Iberian peninsula are provided. We describe Lipsothrix galiciensis Hancock & Hewitt sp. nov., and Prionolabis pjotri Hancock sp. nov. of the family Limoniidae and provide a key to adults of European Lipsothrix species. Such results from this brief opportunity indicate the potential of the area for further field work in these and other families of Diptera

  14. Mitochondrial Genomes Provide Insights into the Phylogeny of Lauxanioidea (Diptera: Cyclorrhapha).

    PubMed

    Li, Xuankun; Li, Wenliang; Ding, Shuangmei; Cameron, Stephen L; Mao, Meng; Shi, Li; Yang, Ding

    2017-04-14

    The superfamily Lauxanioidea is a significant dipteran clade including over 2500 known species in three families: Lauxaniidae, Celyphidae and Chamaemyiidae. We sequenced the first five (three complete and two partial) lauxanioid mitochondrial (mt) genomes, and used them to reconstruct the phylogeny of this group. The lauxanioid mt genomes are typical of the Diptera, containing all 37 genes usually present in bilaterian animals. A total of three conserved intergenic sequences have been reported across the Cyclorrhapha. The inferred secondary structure of 22 tRNAs suggested five substitution patterns among the Cyclorrhapha. The control region in the Lauxanioidea has apparently evolved very fast, but four conserved structural elements were detected in all three complete mt genome sequences. Phylogenetic relationships based on the mt genome data were inferred by Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian methods. The traditional relationships between families within the Lauxanioidea, (Chamaemyiidae + (Lauxaniidae + Celyphidae)), were corroborated; however, the higher-level relationships between cyclorrhaphan superfamilies are mostly poorly supported.

  15. Sex chromosomes in mitotic and polytene tissues of Anastrepha fraterculus (Diptera, Tephritidae) from Argentina: a review

    PubMed Central

    Giardini, María Cecilia; Milla, Fabián H.; Lanzavecchia, Silvia; Nieves, Mariela; Cladera, Jorge L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cytogenetics, which is considered a fundamental tool to understand basic genetic and genomic issues of species, has greatly contributed to the description of polymorphisms both at inter- and intra-specific level. In fact, cytogenetics was one of the first approaches used to propose Anastrepha fraterculus (Diptera: Tephritidae) as a complex of cryptic species. Different morphological variants of sex chromosomes have been reported among Argentinean populations of Anastrepha fraterculus. However, since this high structural variability in sex chromosomes does not pose a reproductive barrier, their role in speciation is yet to be unveiled. This review provides an update on general aspects of cytogenetics in Argentinean Anastrepha fraterculus populations, focused on the prevalence of X-Y arrangements. PMID:26798255

  16. An integrative approach to unravel the Ceratitis FAR (Diptera, Tephritidae) cryptic species complex: a review

    PubMed Central

    De Meyer, Marc; Delatte, Hélène; Ekesi, Sunday; Jordaens, Kurt; Kalinová, Blanka; Manrakhan, Aruna; Mwatawala, Maulid; Steck, Gary; Van Cann, Joannes; Vaníčková, Lucie; Břízová, Radka; Virgilio, Massimiliano

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This paper reviews all information gathered from different disciplines and studies to resolve the species status within the Ceratitis FAR (Ceratitis fasciventris, Ceratitis anonae, Ceratitis rosa) complex, a group of polyphagous fruit fly pest species (Diptera, Tephritidae) from Africa. It includes information on larval and adult morphology, wing morphometrics, cuticular hydrocarbons, pheromones, microsatellites, developmental physiology and geographic distribution. The general consensus is that the FAR complex comprises Ceratitis anonae, two species within Ceratitis rosa (so-called R1 and R2) and two putatitve species under Ceratitis fasciventris. The information regarding the latter is, however, too limited to draw final conclusions on specific status. Evidence for this recognition is discussed with reference to publications providing further details. PMID:26798270

  17. Selection of Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae) Specific Recombinant Monoclonal Phage Display Antibodies for Prey Detection Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Monzó, César; Urbaneja, Alberto; Ximénez-Embún, Miguel; García-Fernández, Julia; García, José Luis; Castañera, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Several recombinant antibodies against the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Tephritidae), one of the most important pests in agriculture worldwide, were selected for the first time from a commercial phage display library of human scFv antibodies. The specificity and sensitivity of the selected recombinant antibodies were compared with that of a rabbit polyclonal serum raised in parallel using a wide range of arthropod species as controls. The selected recombinant monoclonal antibodies had a similar or greater specificity when compared with classical monoclonal antibodies. The selected recombinant antibodies were successfully used to detect the target antigen in the gut of predators and the scFv antibodies were sequenced and compared. These results demonstrate the potential for recombinant scFv antibodies to be used as an alternative to the classical monoclonal antibodies or even molecular probes in the post-mortem analysis studies of generalist predators. PMID:23272105

  18. Sex chromosomes in mitotic and polytene tissues of Anastrepha fraterculus (Diptera, Tephritidae) from Argentina: a review.

    PubMed

    Giardini, María Cecilia; Milla, Fabián H; Lanzavecchia, Silvia; Nieves, Mariela; Cladera, Jorge L

    2015-01-01

    Cytogenetics, which is considered a fundamental tool to understand basic genetic and genomic issues of species, has greatly contributed to the description of polymorphisms both at inter- and intra-specific level. In fact, cytogenetics was one of the first approaches used to propose Anastrepha fraterculus (Diptera: Tephritidae) as a complex of cryptic species. Different morphological variants of sex chromosomes have been reported among Argentinean populations of Anastrepha fraterculus. However, since this high structural variability in sex chromosomes does not pose a reproductive barrier, their role in speciation is yet to be unveiled. This review provides an update on general aspects of cytogenetics in Argentinean Anastrepha fraterculus populations, focused on the prevalence of X-Y arrangements.

  19. The type specimens of Calyptratae (Diptera) housed in non-traditional institutions in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Patitucci, Luciano Damián; Mulieri, Pablo Ricardo; Domínguez, M Cecilia; Mariluis, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-14

    The type material of species of Calyptratae Diptera belonging to Anthomyiidae, Calliphoridae, Fanniidae, Muscidae, Sarcophagidae, and Tachinidae, housed in the collections of non-traditional institutions in Argentina were examined. These collections were included in the recently created "Sistema Nacional de Datos Biológicos" (National Biological Data System). We examined four collections: "Administración Nacional de Laboratorios e Institutos de Salud 'Dr. Carlos G. Malbrán'" (ANLIS), "Instituto Nacional de Tecnología Agropecuaria, Castelar, Buenos Aires" (INTA), "Instituto Argentino de Investigaciones de las Zonas Áridas" (IADIZA); and "Fundación Félix de Azara" (CFA). Comparison of the original descriptions of these species with the label information revealed the existence of 24 holotypes, 5 lectotypes, 11 syntypes, and 441 paratypes/paralectotypes. Complete information is given for each type, including reference to the original description, label data, and preservation condition. 

  20. New records and new species of gall midges (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) developing on Chenopodiaceae in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Elsayed, Ayman Khamis; Skuhravá, Marcela; Karam, Hedaya Hamza; Elminshawy, Abdelaziz; Al-Eryan, Mohamed Awad

    2015-01-05

    The Cecidomyiidae (Diptera: Bibionomorpha) fauna of Egypt is poorly known. Investigations in northern Egypt in 2013 revealed the presence of seven species of gall midges on three host plant species: Atriplex halimus L., Arthrocnemum macrostachyum (Moric.) and Suaeda pruniosa Lange (all Chenopodiaceae). Among the gall midges, Baldratia salicorniae  Kieffer and Stefaniella trinacriae De Stefani are reconfirmed records in Egypt; Houardiella gracilis Dorchin & Freidberg and Asphondylia punica Marchal are new records; and Baldratia karamae Elsayed & Skuhraván. sp. , Primofavilla aegyptiaca Elsayed n. sp. and Stefaniella skuhravae Elsayed n. sp. are new to science. Adult morphology of the latter three new species is described and illustrated, and their biology and geographic distribution are given. 

  1. Catalogue of the type material of Phlebotominae (Diptera, Psychodidae) deposited in the Instituto Evandro Chagas, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Thiago Vasconcelos; Pinheiro, Maria Sueli Barros; de Andrade, Andrey José

    2014-01-01

    The available type material of Phlebotominae (Diptera, Psychodidae) deposited in the "Coleção de Flebotomíneos" of the Instituto Evandro Chagas (ColFleb IEC) is now presented in an annotated catalogue comprising a total of 121 type specimens belonging to 12 species as follow: Nyssomyia richardwardi (2 female paratypes), Nyssomyia shawi (9 male and 25 female paratypes), Nyssomyia umbratilis (female holotype and 1 female paratype), Nyssomyia yuilli yuilli (1 male and 1 female paratypes), Pintomyia gruta (1 male and 2 female paratypes), Psychodopygus lainsoni (2 male syntypes), Psychodopygus leonidasdeanei (male holotype, female "allotype" and 45 female paratypes), Psychodopygus llanosmartinsi (2 female paratypes), Psychodopygus wellcomei (1 male and 4 female "syntypes"), Trichophoromyia readyi (male holotype, female "allotype" and 1 male paratype), Trichophoromyia adelsonsouzai (male holotype, 13 male 5 female paratypes), and Trichophoromyia brachipyga (1 male paratype).

  2. Aggregation of Thaumatomyia glabra (Diptera: Chloropidae) Males on Iris spp. Flowers Releasing Methyl Anthranilate.

    PubMed

    Ohler, Bonnie J; Guédot, Christelle; Zack, Richard S; Landolt, Peter J

    2016-12-01

    Aggregations of Thaumatomyia glabra (Diptera: Chloropidae) were observed on flowers of Iris pallida Lamarck (Asparagales: Iridaceae), whereas no T. glabra (Meigen) were observed on nearby Iris germanica L. flowers. Sampling of T. glabra on I. pallida flowers revealed the presence of males only. In a previous study, T. glabra males were attracted to methyl anthranilate. We found methyl anthranilate in extracts of I. pallida flowers on which T. glabra aggregated, but not in extracts of I. germanica flowers. Applying methyl anthranilate to I. germanica flowers elicited attraction of T. glabra to the flowers. This study suggests that I. pallida flowers may attract T. glabra males to aggregate because they release the known attractant, methyl anthranilate, whereas I. germanica flowers may not be attractive because they do not release methyl anthranilate. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2016. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  3. Differential emergence of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) from on-farm breeding substrates in Northern Ireland.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Geoffrey M; Jess, Stephen; Murchie, Archie K

    2013-05-01

    Biting midges of the genus Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are vectors of a number of viral diseases worldwide. Following the unforeseen outbreak of bluetongue in northern Europe (2006–2009) there was a need to clarify on-farm breeding substrates utilized by temperate Culicoides spp. Six substrates (cow dung, cow slurry, horse dung, sheep dung, maize silage and soil) were investigated for Culicoides spp. emergence over a 31-week period. Overall, most Obsoletus group Culicoides emerged from the cow dung and the most Pulicaris group Culicoides emerged from the sheep dung. Furthermore, Culicoides of the Obsoletus group were found to be abundant in cow slurry and sheep dung. Temperature played a significant role in the emergence times of adult Culicoides. The Obsoletus group appear to have undergone 3 generations during the experimental period. The sex ratio of emergent Obsoletus group Culicoides was affected by substrate type, with a greater proportion of males emerging from cow dung and slurry compared with the other substrates.

  4. Retrocitomyia Lopes, 1982 (Diptera: Sarcophagidae): new species, new records, key to males, and an updated catalog.

    PubMed

    De Mello-Patiu, Cátia Antunes; Salazar-Souza, Mônica

    2016-09-29

    Prior to this work, Retrocitomyia Lopes (Diptera: Sarcophagidae) included ten recognized species distributed exclusively in the New World. We here add a new species to the genus, Retrocitomyia sisbiota sp. nov. from the Central-West Region of Brazil. Four other species of Retrocitomyia are recorded from this region for the first time, redescribed, compared, and illustrated, with emphasis on the male terminalia. Retrocitomyia paraguayensis Lopes is recorded from Brazil for the first time, R. fluminensis Lopes and R. retrocita (Hall) are newly recorded from the Brazilian states of Mato Grosso and Mato Grosso do Sul, and R. mizuguchiana Tibana & Xerez is newly recorded from the state of Mato Grosso do Sul. New generic diagnostic characters are added and the interpretation of some structures of the male terminalia is discussed. An updated catalog of all Retrocitomyia species and an identification key to the males of these species are also provided.

  5. Evolution of Lower Brachyceran Flies (Diptera) and Their Adaptive Radiation with Angiosperms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qingqing; Wang, Bo

    2017-01-01

    The Diptera (true flies) is one of the most species-abundant orders of Insecta, and it is also among the most important flower-visiting insects. Dipteran fossils are abundant in the Mesozoic, especially in the Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous. Here, we review the fossil record and early evolution of some Mesozoic lower brachyceran flies together with new records in Burmese amber, including Tabanidae, Nemestrinidae, Bombyliidae, Eremochaetidae, and Zhangsolvidae. The fossil records reveal that some flower-visiting groups had diversified during the mid-Cretaceous, consistent with the rise of angiosperms to widespread floristic dominance. These brachyceran groups played an important role in the origin of co-evolutionary relationships with basal angiosperms. Moreover, the rise of angiosperms not only improved the diversity of flower-visiting flies, but also advanced the turnover and evolution of other specialized flies. PMID:28484485

  6. New record of Lipoptena fortisetosa (Diptera: Hippoboscidae) collected from Siberian roe deer on Jeju Island, Korea.

    PubMed

    Choi, Chang-Yong; Lee, Sang; Moon, Kyoung-Ha; Kang, Chang-Wan; Yun, Young-Min

    2013-09-01

    Lipoptena deer keds (Diptera: Hippoboscidae) are blood-sucking ectoparasites of mammals, and only one species, Lipoptena cervi (L.), has previously been reported from the Republic of Korea. A study of Siberian roe deer Capreolus pygargus Pallas on Jeju Island, south of the Korean mainland, led to the discovery of a second species of deer ked, Lipoptena fortisetosa Maa, for Korea. In total, 518 deer keds were collected from 19 adult and juvenile deer examined from May to October 2012. The infestation of all of the deer examined and the occurrence on newly born deer suggest a high prevalence and abundance of L. fortisetosa parasitizing Siberian roe deer throughout Jeju Island. This deer represents a new host species for L. fortisetosa.

  7. Effects of bioirrigation of non-biting midges (Diptera: Chironomidae) on lake sediment respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, Viktor; Lewandowski, Jörg; Romeijn, Paul; Singer, Gabriel; Krause, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    Bioirrigation or the transport of fluids into the sediment matrix due to the activities of organisms such as bloodworms (larvae of Diptera, Chironomidae), has substantial impacts on sediment respiration in lakes. However, previous quantifications of bioirrigation impacts of Chironomidae have been limited by technical challenges such as the difficulty to separate faunal and bacterial respiration. This paper describes a novel method based on the bioreactive tracer resazurin for measuring respiration in-situ in non-sealed systems with constant oxygen supply. Applying this new method in microcosm experiments revealed that bioirrigation enhanced sediment respiration by up to 2.5 times. The new method is yielding lower oxygen consumption than previously reported, as it is only sensitive to aerobic heterotrophous respiration and not to other processes causing oxygen decrease. Hence it decouples the quantification of respiration of animals and inorganic oxygen consumption from microbe respiration in sediment.

  8. Thaumaleidae (Diptera) collected by the late Dr. W. Joost in the Caucasus Mountains.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Rüdiger; Bellstedt, Ronald

    2015-11-05

    The aquatic insect collection of the late Dr. W. Joost contained two new species of Thaumaleidae (Diptera) from the Caucasus Mountains: Thaumalea monikae sp. n. and Thaumalea biacuminata sp. n. These two new species are herein described, and the most abundant species in Dr. Joost's collection, Thaumalea martinovskyi Joost, 1979, is redescribed based on the type material. Figures of male and female genitalia for all species are provided. All three species show morphological similarities to taxa from the Eastern Mediterranean area. Thaumalea monikae is related to the European T. bezzii-species group, T. biacuminata to the T. serrata-group, and T. martinovskyi to T. kyladica Wagner, 1981 and T. malickyi Theischinger, 1979 from the Eastern Mediterranean area.

  9. Phylogenetic analysis and temporal diversification of mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) based on nuclear genes and morphology.

    PubMed

    Reidenbach, Kyanne R; Cook, Shelley; Bertone, Matthew A; Harbach, Ralph E; Wiegmann, Brian M; Besansky, Nora J

    2009-12-22

    Phylogenetic analyses provide a framework for examining the evolution of morphological and molecular diversity, interpreting patterns in biogeography, and achieving a stable classification. The generic and suprageneric relationships within mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) are poorly resolved, making these subjects difficult to address. We carried out maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood, including Bayesian, analyses on a data set consisting of six nuclear genes and 80 morphological characters to assess their ability to resolve relationships among 25 genera. We also estimated divergence times based on sequence data and fossil calibration points, using Bayesian relaxed clock methods. Strong support was recovered for the basal position and monophyly of the subfamily Anophelinae and the tribes Aedini and Sabethini of subfamily Culicinae. Divergence times for major culicid lineages date to the early Cretaceous. Deeper relationships within the family remain poorly resolved, suggesting the need for additional taxonomic sampling. Our results support the notion of rapid radiations early in the diversification of mosquitoes.

  10. Phylogenetic analysis and temporal diversification of mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) based on nuclear genes and morphology

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Phylogenetic analyses provide a framework for examining the evolution of morphological and molecular diversity, interpreting patterns in biogeography, and achieving a stable classification. The generic and suprageneric relationships within mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) are poorly resolved, making these subjects difficult to address. Results We carried out maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood, including Bayesian, analyses on a data set consisting of six nuclear genes and 80 morphological characters to assess their ability to resolve relationships among 25 genera. We also estimated divergence times based on sequence data and fossil calibration points, using Bayesian relaxed clock methods. Strong support was recovered for the basal position and monophyly of the subfamily Anophelinae and the tribes Aedini and Sabethini of subfamily Culicinae. Divergence times for major culicid lineages date to the early Cretaceous. Conclusions Deeper relationships within the family remain poorly resolved, suggesting the need for additional taxonomic sampling. Our results support the notion of rapid radiations early in the diversification of mosquitoes. PMID:20028549

  11. Molecular Phylogeny and Biogeography of the Hawaiian Craneflies Dicranomyia (Diptera: Limoniidae)

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Kari Roesch; O'Grady, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    The Hawaiian Diptera offer an opportunity to compare patterns of diversification across large and small endemic radiations with varying species richness and levels of single island endemism. The craneflies (Limoniidae: Dicranomyia) represent a small radiation of 13 described species that have diversified within the Hawaiian Islands. We used Bayesian and maximum likelihood approaches to generate a molecular phylogeny of the Hawaiian Dicranomyia using a combination of nuclear and mitochondrial loci, estimated divergence times and reconstructed ancestral ranges. Divergence time estimation and ancestral range reconstruction suggest that the colonization that led to most of the diversity within the craneflies arrived prior to the formation of Kauai and demonstrates that the two major clades within that radiation contrast sharply in their patterns of diversification. PMID:24058455

  12. Introduction and establishment of the exotic mosquito species Aedes japonicus japonicus (Diptera: Culicidae) in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Versteirt, V; Schaffner, F; Garros, C; Dekoninck, W; Coosemans, M; Van Bortel, W

    2009-11-01

    The establishment of the potential vector species Aedes (Finlaya) japonicusjaponicus (Theobald) (Diptera: Culicidae) in southern Belgium is reported. The species was most likely introduced through the international trade in used tires. It was first collected in 2002 on the premises of a second-hand tire company and was sampled using different sampling methods in the two consecutive years (2003-2004). It was only in 2007 and 2008, during a national mosquito survey (MODIRISK), that its presence as adults and larvae at the above-mentioned site and at another tire company in the area was confirmed based on morphological and molecular identification. This discovery is the first record for Belgium of an exotic mosquito species that established successfully and raises the question on the need for monitoring and control. Considering the accompanying species found during the surveys, we also report here the first observation of Culex (Maillotia) hortensis hortensis (Ficalbi) in Belgium.

  13. Distribution and abundance of chironomidae (Diptera, Insecta) in an impacted watershed in south-east Brazil.

    PubMed

    Marques, M M; Barbosa, F A; Callisto, M

    1999-11-01

    Patterns of abundance and distribution of chironomid midges (Diptera, Chironomidae) in the middle Rio Doce basin were analysed. Human activities (mining, steel processing, and Eucalyptus spp. forestry) contribute to environmental degradation and low water quality in this watershed. Physical and chemical water traits (dissolved oxygen, pH, total alkalinity, electric conductivity, phosphorus and nitrogen concentrations) of 20 sampling points were used in a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to establish the best and worst water quality. Sampling points recorded as the most polluted showed low genus richness of Chironomidae, less than five genera from the total 23, and dominance of the genus Chironomus, a bioindicator of environmental stress. Following Chironomus, the second most frequent and abundant genus was Cricotopus, whose distribution could not be related to pollution levels. The Tanypodinae sub-family showed certain sensitivity to low dissolved oxygen concentrations and high nutrients levels, and was not found at points of high pollution levels.

  14. A standard cytogenetic photomap for the mosquito Anopheles stephensi (Diptera: Culicidae): application for physical mapping.

    PubMed

    Sharakhova, Maria V; Xia, Ai; McAlister, Sarah I; Sharakhov, Igor V

    2006-09-01

    To facilitate physical genome mapping, we have developed a new cytogenetic photomap for Anopheles stephensi (Liston) (Diptera: Culicidae), an important malaria vector in Asia. The high-resolution images of the ovarian polytene chromosomes have been straightened and divided by numbered divisions and lettered subdivisions. The exact chromosomal locations of eight DNA probes have been determined by fluorescent in situ hybridization. Using the DNA sequences, we have established correspondence between chromosomal arms among An. stephensi, Anopheles gambiae (Patton), and Anopheles funestus (Giles). The results support previous cytogenetic observations of arm translocations taking place during diversification of the species. To make the cytogenetic map useful for population genetics studies, we have indicated the chromosomal positions for the breakpoints of 19 polymorphic inversions.

  15. Molecular phylogeny and biogeography of the Hawaiian craneflies Dicranomyia (Diptera: Limoniidae).

    PubMed

    Goodman, Kari Roesch; O'Grady, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    The Hawaiian Diptera offer an opportunity to compare patterns of diversification across large and small endemic radiations with varying species richness and levels of single island endemism. The craneflies (Limoniidae: Dicranomyia) represent a small radiation of 13 described species that have diversified within the Hawaiian Islands. We used Bayesian and maximum likelihood approaches to generate a molecular phylogeny of the Hawaiian Dicranomyia using a combination of nuclear and mitochondrial loci, estimated divergence times and reconstructed ancestral ranges. Divergence time estimation and ancestral range reconstruction suggest that the colonization that led to most of the diversity within the craneflies arrived prior to the formation of Kauai and demonstrates that the two major clades within that radiation contrast sharply in their patterns of diversification.

  16. First record of the avian ectoparasite Philornis downsi Dodge & Aitken, 1968 (Diptera: Muscidae) in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Silvestri, L; Antoniazzi, L R; Couri, M S; Monje, L D; Beldomenico, P M

    2011-10-01

    Species of Philornis Meinert, 1890 (Diptera, Muscidae) are Neotropical dipterans that include species with parasitic larvae which feed on nestling birds. To date, all Philornis species that have been recorded from Argentina have parasitic subcutaneous larvae. Here, for the first time for Argentina, we report the finding of Philornis downsi Dodge & Aitken, 1968, a fly with a nest-dwelling, semi-haematophagous larva. This record, from the humid Chaco ecoregion of Argentina in the nest of a saffron finch Sicalis flaveola pelzelni Sclater, substantially extends the known distribution of this species. We also report the consensus sequences of the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) and ITS2 regions of three of the specimens for future reference and comparison. Further investigation is needed to determine whether Argentina is part of the historical range of P. downsi or, alternatively, represents a recent expansion of its range, perhaps due to climatic changes or other factors of global environmental variation.

  17. New spider flies from the Neotropical Region (Diptera, Acroceridae) with a key to New World genera

    PubMed Central

    Schlinger, Evert I.; Gillung, Jessica P.; Borkent, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Two new genera and five new species of spider flies (Diptera: Acroceridae) are described from the Neotropical Region. A new genus of Philopotinae (Neophilopota brevirostris Schlinger gen. et sp. n.) is described from Mexico, while an unusual new species of Sphaerops Philippi, 1865 (Acrocerinae: Sphaerops micella Schlinger sp. n.) is described from Chile. A new Panopinae genus near Lasia Wiedemann, 1824 (Coquena stangei Schlinger gen. et sp. n.), is described from Argentina and two new species of Pialea Erichson, 1840 (Pialea brunea Schlinger sp. n. and Pialea corbiculata Schlinger sp. n.)are described from Venezuela. Each genus is diagnosed and figured, and a key to species provided. The Neotropical fauna presently includes 19 genera, containing approximately 100 species. A key to New World genera is also included. PMID:23730188

  18. Further characterisation of allergens associated with hypersensitivity to the "green nimitti" midge (Cladotanytarsus lewisi, Diptera: Chironomidae).

    PubMed

    Tee, R D; Cranston, P S; Kay, A B

    1987-01-01

    Chironomid midges are small (2-15 mm) non-biting flies, characteristically seen swarming by water at dusk. Allergens of the "green nimitti" midge, Cladotanytarsus lewisi (Freeman) (Diptera: Chironomidae), a cause of widespread hypersensitivity in the Sudan, were isolated and partially characterized by Sephacryl S200 chromatography. The allergenicity of the fractions was identified by "rocket" autoradiography, RAST inhibition, skin "prick" tests, and the immunoblot technique. The fractions were further analysed by isoelectric focusing and SDS-PAGE. Two major allergens with pI's ranging from 4.3 to 6.0 were identified and had molecular weights of approximately 17,000 and 32,000 daltons, sizes compatible with their being monomeric and dimeric haemoglobins. Since chironomids occur in nuisance numbers worldwide and their haemoglobins have been shown to produce severe hypersensitivity reactions in man, they should be seen as an important potential cause of environmental and occupational allergy.

  19. The relationship between morphological and behavioral mimicry in hover flies (Diptera: Syrphidae).

    PubMed

    Penney, Heather D; Hassall, Christopher; Skevington, Jeffrey H; Lamborn, Brent; Sherratt, Thomas N

    2014-02-01

    Palatable (Batesian) mimics of unprofitable models could use behavioral mimicry to compensate for the ease with which they can be visually discriminated or to augment an already close morphological resemblance. We evaluated these contrasting predictions by assaying the behavior of 57 field-caught species of mimetic hover flies (Diptera: Syrphidae) and quantifying their morphological similarity to a range of potential hymenopteran models. A purpose-built phylogeny for the hover flies was used to control for potential lack of independence due to shared evolutionary history. Those hover fly species that engage in behavioral mimicry (mock stinging, leg waving, wing wagging) were all large wasp mimics within the genera Spilomyia and Temnostoma. While the behavioral mimics assayed were good morphological mimics, not all good mimics were behavioral mimics. Therefore, while the behaviors may have evolved to augment good morphological mimicry, they do not advantage all good mimics.

  20. An integrative approach to unravel the Ceratitis FAR (Diptera, Tephritidae) cryptic species complex: a review.

    PubMed

    De Meyer, Marc; Delatte, Hélène; Ekesi, Sunday; Jordaens, Kurt; Kalinová, Blanka; Manrakhan, Aruna; Mwatawala, Maulid; Steck, Gary; Van Cann, Joannes; Vaníčková, Lucie; Břízová, Radka; Virgilio, Massimiliano

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews all information gathered from different disciplines and studies to resolve the species status within the Ceratitis FAR (Ceratitis fasciventris, Ceratitis anonae, Ceratitis rosa) complex, a group of polyphagous fruit fly pest species (Diptera, Tephritidae) from Africa. It includes information on larval and adult morphology, wing morphometrics, cuticular hydrocarbons, pheromones, microsatellites, developmental physiology and geographic distribution. The general consensus is that the FAR complex comprises Ceratitis anonae, two species within Ceratitis rosa (so-called R1 and R2) and two putatitve species under Ceratitis fasciventris. The information regarding the latter is, however, too limited to draw final conclusions on specific status. Evidence for this recognition is discussed with reference to publications providing further details.

  1. Phylogeny of Drosophilinae (Diptera: Drosophilidae), with comments on combined analysis and character support.

    PubMed

    Remsen, James; O'Grady, Patrick

    2002-08-01

    Drosophilidae (Diptera) is a diverse, cosmopolitan family of flies. Here, we present a combined analysis phylogeny of Drosophilinae, one of the two subfamilies of Drosophilidae, based on data from six different data partitions, including both molecular and morphological characters. Although our data show support for the monophyly of the Hawaiian Drosophilidae, and the subgenus Sophophora, neither the genus Drosophila nor the subgenus Drosophila is monophyletic. Partitioned Bremer support (PBS) indicates that morphological data taken from Grimaldi's monograph (Grimaldi, 1990a), as well as sequences from the mitochondrial (mt) 16S rDNA and the nuclear Adh gene, lend much support to our tree's topology. This is particularly interesting in the case of Grimaldi's data, since his published hypothesis conflicts with ours in significant ways. Our combined analysis cladogram phylogeny reflects the catch-all designation that the name Drosophila has become, in that the cladogram does not support the monophyly of either the genus or subgenus Drosophila.

  2. Three new species of Oxysarcodexia Townsend (Diptera: Sarcophagidae)
    from the Colombian Andes.

    PubMed

    Souza, Carina Mara De; Buenaventura, Eliana

    2016-02-24

    Three new species of Oxysarcodexia Townsend (Diptera: Sarcophagidae) from the Colombian Andes are described based on male specimens collected using decaying animal matter as bait: Oxysarcodexia catica sp. n., O. laclaricola sp. n., and O. liliarum sp. n. The straight and narrow cercal prong with an acute apex, and the juxta enlarged distally and folded backwards of O. catica sp. n. resemble these structures in O. fraterna Lopes, O. peruviana (Lopes) and O. vittata (Walker). The shape of the cercus of O. laclaricola sp. n. is similar to that of O. floricola Lopes, whereas its vesica is similar in shape to that of O. cyaniforceps (Hall). Oxysarcodexia liliarum sp. n. resembles O. favorabilis (Lopes) in the inflorescence-like phallus and enlarged juxta. The postero-distal phallic enlargement of O. catica sp. n. and O. liliarum sp. n. support the inclusion of these species in the so-called "Xarcophaga group" (sensu Lopes).

  3. Five new records of bee flies (Bombyliidae, Diptera) from Saudi Arabia with zoogeographical remarks

    PubMed Central

    El-Hawagry, Magdi S.; Dhafer, Hathal M. Al

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Five bee-fly species (Bombyliidae, Diptera) have been listed in this paper as new to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Four of the recorded species have been identified to the level of species, namely: Bombomyia discoidea (Fabricius, 1794), Spogostylum candidum (Sack, 1909), Exoprosopa linearis Bezzi, 1924, and Exoprosopa minos (Meigen, 1804), while the fifth one only to genus, Desmatoneura sp. The species have been collected from Al-Baha and Asir Provinces in the south-western part of the Kingdom. One of the four identified species, Exoprosopa linearis, has an Afrotropical affinity, and another two, Spogostylum candidum and Bombomyia discoidea, have considerable Afrotropical distributions, and this result agrees to some extent with studies considering these parts of the Arabian Peninsula, including Al-Baha and Asir Provinces, having Afrotropical influences and may be included in the Afrotropical Region rather than in the Palaearctic Region or the Eremic zone. PMID:25878533

  4. Selection of Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae) specific recombinant monoclonal phage display antibodies for prey detection analysis.

    PubMed

    Monzó, César; Urbaneja, Alberto; Ximénez-Embún, Miguel; García-Fernández, Julia; García, José Luis; Castañera, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Several recombinant antibodies against the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Tephritidae), one of the most important pests in agriculture worldwide, were selected for the first time from a commercial phage display library of human scFv antibodies. The specificity and sensitivity of the selected recombinant antibodies were compared with that of a rabbit polyclonal serum raised in parallel using a wide range of arthropod species as controls. The selected recombinant monoclonal antibodies had a similar or greater specificity when compared with classical monoclonal antibodies. The selected recombinant antibodies were successfully used to detect the target antigen in the gut of predators and the scFv antibodies were sequenced and compared. These results demonstrate the potential for recombinant scFv antibodies to be used as an alternative to the classical monoclonal antibodies or even molecular probes in the post-mortem analysis studies of generalist predators.

  5. An Additional Phytosanitary Cold Treatment Against Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae) in 'Oroblanco' Citrus Fruit.

    PubMed

    Gazit, Yoav; Kaspi, Roy

    2017-01-12

    For 'Oroblanco' ('Sweetie'), the sweet seedless pummelo-grapefruit hybrid, when exported from Israel to Japan, the standard cold treatment against Ceratitis capitata (Wied.) (Diptera: Tephritidae) is conducted at ≤ 1.5 °C, for 16 d. In recent years, the transportation means of exported citrus was changed from reefer vessels to individual refrigerated containers, where the fruit bulk is relatively small and may be exposed to temperature fluctuations and to the risk of chilling injuries. To reduce this risk, Israel proposed to Japan to increase the treatment temperature and extend its duration to 2.2 °C and 18 d, respectively. This study shows that the proposed treatment effectively kills the third instar larva of C. capitata, in Oroblanco.

  6. A fossil biting midge (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) from early Eocene Indian amber with a complex pheromone evaporator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stebner, Frauke; Szadziewski, Ryszard; Rühr, Peter T.; Singh, Hukam; Hammel, Jörg U.; Kvifte, Gunnar Mikalsen; Rust, Jes

    2016-10-01

    The life-like fidelity of organisms captured in amber is unique among all kinds of fossilization and represents an invaluable source for different fields of palaeontological and biological research. One of the most challenging aspects in amber research is the study of traits related to behaviour. Here, indirect evidence for pheromone-mediated mating behaviour is recorded from a biting midge (Ceratopogonidae) in 54 million-year-old Indian amber. Camptopterohelea odora n. sp. exhibits a complex, pocket shaped structure on the wings, which resembles the wing folds of certain moth flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) and scent organs that are only known from butterflies and moths (Lepidoptera) so far. Our studies suggests that pheromone releasing structures on the wings have evolved independently in biting midges and might be much more widespread in fossil as well as modern insects than known so far.

  7. Evolution of Lower Brachyceran Flies (Diptera) and Their Adaptive Radiation with Angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingqing; Wang, Bo

    2017-01-01

    The Diptera (true flies) is one of the most species-abundant orders of Insecta, and it is also among the most important flower-visiting insects. Dipteran fossils are abundant in the Mesozoic, especially in the Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous. Here, we review the fossil record and early evolution of some Mesozoic lower brachyceran flies together with new records in Burmese amber, including Tabanidae, Nemestrinidae, Bombyliidae, Eremochaetidae, and Zhangsolvidae. The fossil records reveal that some flower-visiting groups had diversified during the mid-Cretaceous, consistent with the rise of angiosperms to widespread floristic dominance. These brachyceran groups played an important role in the origin of co-evolutionary relationships with basal angiosperms. Moreover, the rise of angiosperms not only improved the diversity of flower-visiting flies, but also advanced the turnover and evolution of other specialized flies.

  8. Nocturnal activity of phlebotomine sandflies (Diptera: Psychodidae) in a cutaneous leishmaniasis focus in Chichaoua, Morocco.

    PubMed

    Guernaoui, S; Boussaa, S; Pesson, B; Boumezzough, A

    2006-02-01

    The nocturnal activity of phlebotomine sandflies (Diptera: Psychodidae) was studied "at an epidemic focus" on human cutaneous leishmaniasis due to Leishmania tropica Wright in Chichaoua province, in Morocco. Sandflies were collected using light and sticky-paper traps changed at 2-h intervals, inside and around houses, in August and October 2004. Overall, 633 sandflies, belonging to six species of Phlebotomus and three of Sergentomyia, were collected. Sandfly activity was nocturnal and higher at twilight. Several activity patterns were observed according to the species. Phlebotomus (Paraphlebotomus) sergenti Parrot, 1917, the suspected vector of L. tropica in this focus, was caught during each collection performed from 1900 to 0500 hours, the numbers of species caught peaked at 1900-2100 hours. There were seasonal variations of the nocturnal activity, which could be related to the variations in temperature and relative humidity.

  9. Laboratory estimation of degree-day developmental requirements of Phlebotomus papatasi (Diptera: Psychodidae).

    PubMed

    Kasap, Ozge Erisoz; Alten, Bulent

    2005-12-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis is one of the most important vector-borne endemic diseases in Turkey. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of temperature on the developmental rates of one important vector of leishmaniasis, Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli, 1786) (Diptera: Psychodidae). Eggs from laboratory-reared colonies of Phlebotomus papatasi were exposed to six constant temperature regimes from 15 to 32 degrees C with a daylength of 14 h and relative humidity of 65-75%. No adult emergence was observed at 15 degrees C. Complete egg to adult development ranged from 27.89 +/- 1.88 days at 32 degrees C to 246.43 +/- 13.83 days at 18 degrees C. The developmental zero values were estimated to vary from 11.6 degrees C to 20.25 degrees C depending on life stages, and egg to adult development required 440.55 DD above 20.25 degrees C.

  10. Pupal dimensions as predictors of adult size in fitness studies of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Koenraadt, C J M

    2008-03-01

    Adult body size is a central life history character in mosquito fitness studies. I evaluated the predictive values of pupal cephalothorax length, cephalothorax width, and wet weight for adult size (wing length) of male and female Aedes aegypti (L.) (Diptera: Culicidae). Cephalothorax length was the most consistent and accurate predictor of adult size. Width of the cephalothorax and wet weight were more variable, and they significantly decreased shortly before adult emergence. I propose that cephalothorax length could be used as a proxy for adult size to test how physical and biological factors such as resource-limited environments and competition affect mosquito fitness with the advantage that the specimen does not need to be killed.

  11. Unusual Occurrence of Cocoons in Population of Haplodiplosis marginata (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) in Belgium

    PubMed Central

    Censier, F.; Chavalle, S.; Knor, S.; De Proft, M.; Bodson, B.; Skuhravá, M.

    2014-01-01

    The saddle gall midge, Haplodiplosis marginata (von Roser) (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), is a phytophagous species that develops in saddle-shaped galls on stems of wheat Triticum vulgare, barley Hordeum sativum, rye Secale cereale, and some other species of Poaceae. Only one generation develops per year. Full-grown larvae leave galls and drop onto the soil where they remain up to the springtime of the following year. Larvae do not usually spin cocoons. However, formation of cocoons by larvae was observed in populations developing in western Europe: in England in 1954, in the Netherlands in the 1960s, and in Belgium in 2011. On the basis of our analysis, a part of the larval population forms cocoons as protection against unfavorable weather conditions, especially drought. PMID:25525104

  12. Effects of bioirrigation of non-biting midges (Diptera: Chironomidae) on lake sediment respiration

    PubMed Central

    Baranov, Viktor; Lewandowski, Jörg; Romeijn, Paul; Singer, Gabriel; Krause, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Bioirrigation or the transport of fluids into the sediment matrix due to the activities of organisms such as bloodworms (larvae of Diptera, Chironomidae), has substantial impacts on sediment respiration in lakes. However, previous quantifications of bioirrigation impacts of Chironomidae have been limited by technical challenges such as the difficulty to separate faunal and bacterial respiration. This paper describes a novel method based on the bioreactive tracer resazurin for measuring respiration in-situ in non-sealed systems with constant oxygen supply. Applying this new method in microcosm experiments revealed that bioirrigation enhanced sediment respiration by up to 2.5 times. The new method is yielding lower oxygen consumption than previously reported, as it is only sensitive to aerobic heterotrophous respiration and not to other processes causing oxygen decrease. Hence it decouples the quantification of respiration of animals and inorganic oxygen consumption from microbe respiration in sediment. PMID:27256514

  13. Knowledge of diptera in France from the beginning to the early twentieth century.

    PubMed

    Cambefort, Y

    2008-12-01

    Although insects have been objects of observation in French-speaking countries since the seventeenth century, and were illustrated by Reaumur and other scientists during the eighteenth, specialized dipterology only emerged in the first half of the nineteenth century. The two main divisions of the Order Diptera were defined by French entomologists, namely Nemocera (currently Nematocera) by Latreille in 1817, and Brachocera (currently Brachycera) by Macquart in 1834. Insects as a whole were rarely studied until the late nineteenth century, when the discovery of their role in the transmission of important diseases resulted in the creation of a new discipline: medical entomology. From this time on, medically important groups (mosquitoes, tsetse flies, etc.) have been objects of intense concern and study, especially at the Pasteur Institute and the Paris Faculté de médecine. But the most important French dipterist* in the twentieth century has probably been the Museum specialist Eugène Séguy.

  14. The black flies (Diptera: Simuliidae) from Thua Thien Hue and Lam Dong Provinces, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Takaoka, Hiroyuki; Sofian-Azirun, Mohd; Ya'cob, Zubaidah; Chen, Chee Dhang; Lau, Koon Weng; Pham, Xuan Da

    2015-05-21

    Surveys of pupae and larvae of black flies (Diptera: Simuliidae) were carried out in Thua Thien Hue Province of central Vietnam, and Lam Dong Province of southern Vietnam in 2014. A total of 26 species belonging to the genus Simulium were collected, consisting of eight known species, one newly recorded species, and 17 new species (of which three species of the subgenus Nevermannia were described in 2014). The remaining 14 new species (nine of the subgenus Gomphostilbia and five of the subgenus Simulium) are described here based on females, males, pupae and mature larvae. The total number of species of black flies in Vietnam is now 46. Keys to identify all 26 species recorded from the two provinces of Vietnam are given for females, males, pupae and mature larvae.

  15. Simulium (Asiosimulium) furvum, a new species of black fly (Diptera: Simuliidae) from Thailand.

    PubMed

    Takaoka, Hiroyuki; Srisuka, Wichai; Saeung, Atiporn; Choochote, Wej

    2013-05-01

    Simulium (Asiosimulium) furvum sp. nov. (Diptera: Simuliidae) is described from female, male, pupal, and larval specimens collected from Maewa National Park, Lampang Province, Thailand. This new species represents the fourth member of the subgenus Asiosimulium Takaoka & Chochoote, one of two small black fly subgenera endemic in the Oriental Region. It is characterized by a pear-shaped spermatheca in the female; a ventral plate in the male with a laterally compressed median keel directed ventrally and with a deep notch posteromedially, and aedeagal membrane with stout spines; and by 22 gill filaments in the pupa. Taxonomic notes are provided to separate this new species from three known species, Simulium (Asiosimulium) oblongum Takaoka & Choochote and Simulium (Asiosimulium) wanchaii Takaoka & Choochote, both from Thailand, and Simulium (Asiosimulium) suchitrae Takaoka from Nepal.

  16. Two new species of Simulium (Gomphostilbia) (Diptera: Simuliidae) from Peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Takaoka, Hiroyuki; Sofian-Azirun, Mohd; Hashim, Rosli; Yacob, Zubaidah; Chen, Chee-Dhang

    2012-07-01

    Two new species of black flies, Simulium (Comphostilbia) terengganuense sp. nov. and Simulium (Gomphostilbia) aziruni sp. nov. (Diptera: Simuliidae), are described on the basis of reared adult, pupal, and larval specimens collected from Peninsular Malaysia. Both species are placed in the batoense species-group within the subgenus Gomphostilbia, one of two dominant subgenera of the genus Simulium in Peninsular Malaysia as well as in the Oriental Region. Strikingly, three morphological characteristics that rarely occur in the subgenus Gomphostilbia are found in these two new species: the very narrow female frons and the mushroom-like pupal terminal hooks in S. (G.) terengganuense sp. nov. and the pupal gill composed of an inflated horn-like structure and eight slender filaments in S. (G.) aziruni sp. nov.

  17. Review of Australasian spider flies (Diptera, Acroceridae) with a revision of Panops Lamarck

    PubMed Central

    Winterton, Shaun L.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The Australasian spider flies (Diptera: Acroceridae) are reviewed, with all eight currently recognized genera diagnosed and figured. The panopine genus Panops Lamarck, 1804 from Australia and Indonesia is revised with four new species described, increasing the total number of species in the genus to nine: Panops aurum sp. n., Panops danielsi sp. n., Panops jade sp. n. and Panops schlingeri sp. n. Five species of Panops are redescribed: Panops austrae Neboiss, 1971, Panops baudini Lamarck, 1804, Panops boharti (Schlinger, 1959), comb. n., Panops conspicuus (Brunetti, 1926) and Panops grossi (Neboiss, 1971), comb. n. The monotypic genera Neopanops Schlinger, 1959 and Panocalda Neboiss, 1971 are synonymized with Panops. Keys to genera of Australasian Acroceridae and species of Panops, Helle Osten Sacken, 1896 and Australasian Pterodontia Gray, 1832 are included. PMID:22448114

  18. A fossil biting midge (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) from early Eocene Indian amber with a complex pheromone evaporator

    PubMed Central

    Stebner, Frauke; Szadziewski, Ryszard; Rühr, Peter T.; Singh, Hukam; Hammel, Jörg U.; Kvifte, Gunnar Mikalsen; Rust, Jes

    2016-01-01

    The life-like fidelity of organisms captured in amber is unique among all kinds of fossilization and represents an invaluable source for different fields of palaeontological and biological research. One of the most challenging aspects in amber research is the study of traits related to behaviour. Here, indirect evidence for pheromone-mediated mating behaviour is recorded from a biting midge (Ceratopogonidae) in 54 million-year-old Indian amber. Camptopterohelea odora n. sp. exhibits a complex, pocket shaped structure on the wings, which resembles the wing folds of certain moth flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) and scent organs that are only known from butterflies and moths (Lepidoptera) so far. Our studies suggests that pheromone releasing structures on the wings have evolved independently in biting midges and might be much more widespread in fossil as well as modern insects than known so far. PMID:27698490

  19. Sex-Biased Captures of Sarcosaprophagous Diptera in Carrion-Baited Traps

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Vega, Daniel; Baz, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    The use of carrion-baited traps is a common and widely extended practice in the study of sarcosaprophagous Diptera. However, it implies different areas of bias, one of them being the different responses of males and females to carrion bait, which results in possible biased sex ratios in the captures. In the present study, the use of carrion-baited traps revealed significant female-biased captures in the families Calliphoridae, Muscidae, and Sarcophagidae, whereas the collected species of the families Piophilidae, Heleomyzidae, and Ulidiidae showed different patterns in the observed sex ratios. Possible explanations according to existing literature and the types of mating behaviors of the different families are discussed. PMID:23885859

  20. Isolation of two neuropeptides in the AKH/RPCH-family from horseflies (Diptera).

    PubMed

    Jaffe, H; Raina, A K; Fraser, B A; Keim, P; Rao, K R; Zhang, Y S; Lancaster, J L; Hayes, D K

    1988-03-15

    Two neuropeptides (DCCI and DCCII) in the adipokinetic/red pigment concentrating hormone-family have been isolated and purified from the corpora cardiaca of horseflies (Diptera : Tabanidae). Both peptides were purified by a sequence of three reversed phase-high performance liquid chromatographic steps. Amino acid analysis of the purified peptides indicated the following composition for DCCI: Glx(l), Gly(1), Leu(1), Phe(1), Pro(1), Thr(2) and for DCCII: Glx(1), Gly(2), Leu(1), Phe(1), Pro(1), Thr(2), and Tyr(1). Photodiode array ultraviolet spectroscopy indicated the presence of tryptophan in both DCCI and II. Both DCCI and II had red pigment concentrating hormone activity in the crab, Uca pugilator.