Science.gov

Sample records for planar microfluidic interconnections

  1. Microfluidic interconnects

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    2001-01-01

    A miniature connector for introducing microliter quantities of solutions into microfabricated fluidic devices. The fluidic connector, for example, joins standard high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) tubing to 1 mm diameter holes in silicon or glass, enabling ml-sized volumes of sample solutions to be merged with .mu.l-sized devices. The connector has many features, including ease of connect and disconnect; a small footprint which enables numerous connectors to be located in a small area; low dead volume; helium leak-tight; and tubing does not twist during connection. Thus the connector enables easy and effective change of microfluidic devices and introduction of different solutions in the devices.

  2. Microfluidic interconnects

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    2001-01-01

    A miniature connector for introducing microliter quantities of solutions into microfabricated fluidic devices, and which incorporates a molded ring or seal set into a ferrule cartridge, with or without a compression screw. The fluidic connector, for example, joins standard high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) tubing to 1 mm diameter holes in silicon or glass, enabling ml-sized volumes of sample solutions to be merged with .mu.l-sized devices. The connector has many features, including ease of connect and disconnect; a small footprint which enables numerous connectors to be located in a small area; low dead volume; helium leak-tight; and tubing does not twist during connection. Thus the connector enables easy and effective change of microfluidic devices and introduction of different solutions in the devices.

  3. Micro-fluidic interconnect

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Galambos, Paul C.; Benavides, Gilbert L.; Hetherington, Dale L.

    2006-02-28

    An apparatus for simultaneously aligning and interconnecting microfluidic ports is presented. Such interconnections are required to utilize microfluidic devices fabricated in Micro-Electromechanical-Systems (MEMS) technologies, that have multiple fluidic access ports (e.g. 100 micron diameter) within a small footprint, (e.g. 3 mm.times.6 mm). Fanout of the small ports of a microfluidic device to a larger diameter (e.g. 500 microns) facilitates packaging and interconnection of the microfluidic device to printed wiring boards, electronics packages, fluidic manifolds etc.

  4. Manufacturing of planar ceramic interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, B.L.; Coffey, G.W.; Meinhardt, K.D.; Armstrong, T.R.

    1996-12-31

    The fabrication of ceramic interconnects for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) and separator plates for electrochemical separation devices has been a perennial challenge facing developers. Electrochemical vapor deposition (EVD), plasma spraying, pressing, tape casting and tape calendering are processes that are typically utilized to fabricate separator plates or interconnects for the various SOFC designs and electrochemical separation devices. For sake of brevity and the selection of a planar fuel cell or gas separation device design, pressing will be the only fabrication technique discussed here. This paper reports on the effect of the characteristics of two doped lanthanum manganite powders used in the initial studies as a planar porous separator for a fuel cell cathode and as a dense interconnect for an oxygen generator.

  5. Formation of interconnections to microfluidic devices

    DOEpatents

    Matzke, Carolyn M [Los Lunas, NM; Ashby, Carol I. H. [Edgewood, NM; Griego, Leonardo [Tijeras, NM

    2003-07-29

    A method is disclosed to form external interconnections to a microfluidic device for coupling of a fluid or light or both into a microchannel of the device. This method can be used to form optical or fluidic interconnections to microchannels previously formed on a substrate, or to form both the interconnections and microchannels during the same process steps. The optical and fluidic interconnections are formed parallel to the plane of the substrate, and are fluid tight.

  6. Planarization of metal films for multilevel interconnects

    DOEpatents

    Tuckerman, D.B.

    1985-08-23

    In the fabrication of multilevel integrated circuits, each metal layer is planarized by heating to momentarily melt the layer. The layer is melted by sweeping laser pulses of suitable width, typically about 1 microsecond duration, over the layer in small increments. The planarization of each metal layer eliminates irregular and discontinuous conditions between successive layers. The planarization method is particularly applicable to circuits having ground or power planes and allows for multilevel interconnects. Dielectric layers can also be planarized to produce a fully planar multilevel interconnect structure. The method is useful for the fabrication of VLSI circuits, particularly for wafer-scale integration.

  7. Planarization of metal films for multilevel interconnects

    DOEpatents

    Tuckerman, D.B.

    1985-06-24

    In the fabrication of multilevel integrated circuits, each metal layer is planarized by heating to momentarily melt the layer. The layer is melted by sweeping lase pulses of suitable width, typically about 1 microsecond duration, over the layer in small increments. The planarization of each metal layer eliminates irregular and discontinuous conditions between successive layers. The planarization method is particularly applicable to circuits having ground or power planes and allows for multilevel interconnects. Dielectric layers can also be planarized to produce a fully planar multilevel interconnect structure. The method is useful for the fabrication of VLSI circuits, particularly for wafer-scale integration.

  8. Planarization of metal films for multilevel interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Tuckerman, D.B.

    1989-03-21

    In the fabrication of multilevel integrated circuits, each metal layer is planarized by heating to momentarily melt the layer. The layer is melted by sweeping laser pulses of suitable width, typically about 1 microsecond duration, over the layer in small increments. The planarization of each metal layer eliminates irregular and discontinuous conditions between successive layers. The planarization method is particularly applicable to circuits having ground or power planes and allows for multilevel interconnects. Dielectric layers can also be planarized to produce a fully planar multilevel interconnect structure. The method is useful for the fabrication of VLSI circuits, particularly for wafer-scale integration. 6 figs.

  9. Planarization of metal films for multilevel interconnects

    DOEpatents

    Tuckerman, D.B.

    1989-03-21

    In the fabrication of multilevel integrated circuits, each metal layer is planarized by heating to momentarily melt the layer. The layer is melted by sweeping laser pulses of suitable width, typically about 1 microsecond duration, over the layer in small increments. The planarization of each metal layer eliminates irregular and discontinuous conditions between successive layers. The planarization method is particularly applicable to circuits having ground or power planes and allows for multilevel interconnects. Dielectric layers can also be planarized to produce a fully planar multilevel interconnect structure. The method is useful for the fabrication of VLSI circuits, particularly for wafer-scale integration. 6 figs.

  10. Planarization of metal films for multilevel interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Tuckerman, David B.

    1987-01-01

    In the fabrication of multilevel integrated circuits, each metal layer is anarized by heating to momentarily melt the layer. The layer is melted by sweeping laser pulses of suitable width, typically about 1 microsecond duration, over the layer in small increments. The planarization of each metal layer eliminates irregular and discontinuous conditions between successive layers. The planarization method is particularly applicable to circuits having ground or power planes and allows for multilevel interconnects. Dielectric layers can also be planarized to produce a fully planar multilevel interconnect structure. The method is useful for the fabrication of VLSI circuits, particularly for wafer-scale integration.

  11. Planarization of metal films for multilevel interconnects

    DOEpatents

    Tuckerman, David B.

    1989-01-01

    In the fabrication of multilevel integrated circuits, each metal layer is anarized by heating to momentarily melt the layer. The layer is melted by sweeping laser pulses of suitable width, typically about 1 microsecond duration, over the layer in small increments. The planarization of each metal layer eliminates irregular and discontinuous conditions between successive layers. The planarization method is particularly applicable to circuits having ground or power planes and allows for multilevel interconnects. Dielectric layers can also be planarized to produce a fully planar multilevel interconnect structure. The method is useful for the fabrication of VLSI circuits, particularly for wafer-scale integration.

  12. Design of reconfigurable GRIN planar optical interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Reino, C.; Flores-Arias, M. T.; Perez, M. V.; Bao, C.; Castelo, A.; Nieto, D.

    2008-04-01

    Design of all-optics reconfigurable GRIN (Gradient-Index) planar structure for crossover and parallel interconnects will be presented. Design represents a unique combination of GRIN materials, simple geometry optics and waveguide technology for both parallel and distributed processing and communication networks. The optical analysis is based on-axis and off-axis multiple imaging property of GRIN components. The analysis includes the study of the Point Spread Function (PSF) for describing the performance of the GRIN planar structure and the evaluation of the Space Bandwidth Product (SBP) for estimating the number of channels which can be handled. The dependence of the number of channels on the wavelength of the light and the aperture of the planar interconnect is shown. The results are given for five working wavelengths of Laser Diode (LD) and for four transverse aperture of reconfigurable optical interconnect.

  13. Planarization of metal films for multilevel interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Tuckerman, D.B.

    1987-07-21

    This patent describes an electrical interconnection structure comprising aluminum or aluminum-silicon alloy layers separated by dielectric layers. Each aluminum or alloy layer has been planarized to form a flat surface by eliminating any oxide coating of the aluminum or alloy, forming a passivating and antireflection coating of silicon on the aluminum or alloy. Heating is applied to momentarily melt the layer to form a flat surface prior to the formation of an additional dielectric layer. The metal layers have been patterned after planarization according to a preselected pattern and interconnected through the dielectric layers.

  14. Packaging considerations for planar optical interconnection systems.

    PubMed

    Acklin, B; Jahns, J

    1994-03-10

    We discuss various aspects of building an integrated optoelectronic system that is based on the concept of planar optics. A particular optical interconnection system has been fabricated and demonstrated. It provides parallel interconnections with 1024 optical channels that could be useful as an optical backplane in an optoelectronic multichip module. We consider the design and the fabrication of the optical system, schemes for the hybrid integration with optoelectronic device arrays, and the thermal management of an integrated system. The proposed hybrid integration scheme is based on mature technologies such as thermal anodic bonding and flip-chip bonding. Possibilities for efficient heat sinking are described.

  15. Microfluidic plastic interconnects for multibioanalysis chip modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Piu Francis; Jones, Darren K.; Mastrangelo, Carlos H.

    1997-09-01

    This paper describes the fabrication and testing of plastic fluidic connectors suitable for the assembly of multichip microfluidic systems. The connectors basically consist of a series of 50-200 X 20 micrometers 2 capillaries embedded in a 70 micrometers -thick flexible polyimide substrate with large access holes ion both ends. The capillary walls and the connector exterior are coated with a thin layer of p- xylylene providing a high degree of chemical inertness and biocompatibility. These flexible connectors are inherently planar for ease of connection to flat substrates and are constructed using conventional batch lithographic techniques. The connector flow characteristics were tested in nitrogen gas and water. Multiple channel connectors with 3 and 5 capillaries 1.3-4.0 cm-long were constructed successfully.

  16. A low-cost, manufacturable method for fabricating capillary and optical fiber interconnects for microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Daniel M; Nevill, J Tanner; Pettigrew, Kenneth I; Votaw, Gregory; Kung, Pang-Jen; Crenshaw, Hugh C

    2008-04-01

    Microfluidic chips require connections to larger macroscopic components, such as light sources, light detectors, and reagent reservoirs. In this article, we present novel methods for integrating capillaries, optical fibers, and wires with the channels of microfluidic chips. The method consists of forming planar interconnect channels in microfluidic chips and inserting capillaries, optical fibers, or wires into these channels. UV light is manually directed onto the ends of the interconnects using a microscope. UV-curable glue is then allowed to wick to the end of the capillaries, fibers, or wires, where it is cured to form rigid, liquid-tight connections. In a variant of this technique, used with light-guiding capillaries and optical fibers, the UV light is directed into the capillaries or fibers, and the UV-glue is cured by the cone of light emerging from the end of each capillary or fiber. This technique is fully self-aligned, greatly improves both the quality and the manufacturability of the interconnects, and has the potential to enable the fabrication of interconnects in a fully automated fashion. Using these methods, including a semi-automated implementation of the second technique, over 10,000 interconnects have been formed in almost 2000 microfluidic chips made of a variety of rigid materials. The resulting interconnects withstand pressures up to at least 800psi, have unswept volumes estimated to be less than 10 femtoliters, and have dead volumes defined only by the length of the capillary.

  17. Planar microcoil-based microfluidic NMR probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massin, C.; Vincent, F.; Homsy, A.; Ehrmann, K.; Boero, G.; Besse, P.-A.; Daridon, A.; Verpoorte, E.; de Rooij, N. F.; Popovic, R. S.

    2003-10-01

    Microfabricated small-volume NMR probes consisting of electroplated planar microcoils integrated on a glass substrate with etched microfluidic channels are fabricated and tested. 1H NMR spectra are acquired at 300 MHz with three different probes having observed sample volumes of respectively 30, 120, and 470 nL. The achieved sensitivity enables acquisition of an 1H spectrum of 160 μg sucrose in D 2O, corresponding to a proof-of-concept for on-chip NMR spectroscopy. Increase of mass-sensitivity with coil diameter reduction is demonstrated experimentally for planar microcoils. Models that enable quantitative prediction of the signal-to-noise ratio and of the influence of microfluidic channel geometry on spectral resolution are presented and successfully compared to the experimental data. The main factor presently limiting sensitivity for high-resolution applications is identified as being probe-induced static magnetic field distortions. Finally, based on the presented model and measured data, future performance of planar microcoil-based microfluidic NMR probes is extrapolated and discussed.

  18. Planar microcoil-based microfluidic NMR probes.

    PubMed

    Massin, C; Vincent, F; Homsy, A; Ehrmann, K; Boero, G; Besse, P-A; Daridon, A; Verpoorte, E; de Rooij, N F; Popovic, R S

    2003-10-01

    Microfabricated small-volume NMR probes consisting of electroplated planar microcoils integrated on a glass substrate with etched microfluidic channels are fabricated and tested. 1H NMR spectra are acquired at 300 MHz with three different probes having observed sample volumes of respectively 30, 120, and 470 nL. The achieved sensitivity enables acquisition of an 1H spectrum of 160 microg sucrose in D2O, corresponding to a proof-of-concept for on-chip NMR spectroscopy. Increase of mass-sensitivity with coil diameter reduction is demonstrated experimentally for planar microcoils. Models that enable quantitative prediction of the signal-to-noise ratio and of the influence of microfluidic channel geometry on spectral resolution are presented and successfully compared to the experimental data. The main factor presently limiting sensitivity for high-resolution applications is identified as being probe-induced static magnetic field distortions. Finally, based on the presented model and measured data, future performance of planar microcoil-based microfluidic NMR probes is extrapolated and discussed.

  19. Construction of programmable interconnected 3D microfluidic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunziker, Patrick R.; Wolf, Marc P.; Wang, Xueya; Zhang, Bei; Marsch, Stephan; Salieb-Beugelaar, Georgette B.

    2015-02-01

    Microfluidic systems represent a key-enabling platform for novel diagnostic tools for use at the point-of-care in clinical contexts as well as for evolving single cell diagnostics. The design of 3D microfluidic systems is an active field of development, but construction of true interconnected 3D microfluidic networks is still a challenge, in particular when the goal is rapid prototyping, accurate design and flexibility. We report a novel approach for the construction of programmable 3D microfluidic systems consisting of modular 3D template casting of interconnected threads to allow user-programmable flow paths and examine its structural characteristics and its modular function. To overcome problems with thread template casting reported in the literature, low-surface-energy polymer threads were used, that allow solvent-free production. Connected circular channels with excellent roundness and low diameter variability were created. Variable channel termination allowed programming a flow path on-the-fly, thus rendering the resulting 3D microfluidic systems highly customizable even after production. Thus, construction of programmable/reprogrammable fully 3D microfluidic systems by template casting of a network of interconnecting threads is feasible, leads to high-quality and highly reproducible, complex 3D geometries.

  20. Reusable, adhesiveless and arrayed in-plane microfluidic interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, R.; Meng, E.

    2011-05-01

    A reusable, arrayed interconnect capable of providing multiple simultaneous connections to and from a microfluidic device in an in-plane manner without the use of adhesives is presented. This method uses a 'pin-and-socket' design in which an SU-8 anchor houses multiple polydimethysiloxane septa (the socket) that each receive a syringe needle (the pin). A needle array containing multiple commercially available 33G (203 µm outer diameter) needles (up to eight) spaced either 2.54 or 1 mm (center-to-center) pierces the septa to access the microfluidic device interior. Finite element modeling and photoelastic stress experiments were used to determine the stress distribution during needle insertion; these results guided the SU-8 septa housing and septa design. The impact of needle diameter, needle tip style, insertion rate and number of needles on pre-puncture, post-puncture and removal forces was characterized. Pressurized connections to SU-8 channel systems withstood up to 62 kPa of pressurized water and maintained 25 kPa of pressurized water for over 24 h. The successful integration and functionality of the interconnect design with surface micromachined Parylene C microchannels was verified using Rhodamine B dye. Dual septa systems to access a single microchannel were demonstrated. Arrayed interconnects were compatible with integrated microfluidic systems featuring electrochemical sensors and actuators.

  1. Pulsed laser planarization of metal films for multilevel interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Tuckerman, D.B.; Schmitt, R.L.

    1985-05-01

    Multilevel interconnect schemes for integrated circuits generally require one or more planarization steps, in order to maintain an acceptably flat topography for lithography and thin-film step coverage on the higher levels. Traditional approaches have involved planarization of the interlevel insulation (dielectric) layers, either by spin-on application (e.g., polyimide), or by reflow (e.g., phosphosilicate glass). We have pursued an alternative approach, in which each metal level is melted (hence planarized) using a pulsed laser prior to patterning. Short (approx.1 ..mu..s) pulses are used to preclude undesirable metallurgical reactions between the film, adhesion or barrier layer, and dielectric layer. Laser planarization of metals is particularly well suited to multilevel systems which include ground or power planes. Results are presented for planarization of gold films on SiO/sub 2/ dielectric layers using a flashlamp-pumped dye laser. The pulse duration is approx.1 ..mu..s, which allows the heat pulse to uniformly penetrate the gold while not penetrating substantially through the underlying SiO/sub 2/ (hence not perturbing the lower levels of metal). Excellent planarization of the gold films is achieved (less than 0.1 ..mu..m surface roughness, even starting with extreme topographic variations), as well as improved conductivity. To demonstrate the process, numerous planarized two-layer structures (transmission lines under a ground plane) were fabricated and characterized. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  2. All-zigzag graphene nanoribbons for planar interconnect application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Po-An; Chiang, Meng-Hsueh; Hsu, Wei-Chou

    2017-07-01

    A feasible "lightning-shaped" zigzag graphene nanoribbon (ZGNR) structure for planar interconnects is proposed. Based on the density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function, the electron transport properties are evaluated. The lightning-shaped structure increases significantly the conductance of the graphene interconnect with an odd number of zigzag chains. This proposed technique can effectively utilize the linear I-V characteristic of asymmetric ZGNRs for interconnect application. Variability study accounting for width/length variation and the edge effect is also included. The transmission spectra, transmission eigenstates, and transmission pathways are analyzed to gain the physical insights. This lightning-shaped ZGNR enables all 2D material-based devices and circuits on flexible and transparent substrates.

  3. Tuning of the droplet motion in interconnected microfluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Guoqing; Song, Kui; Zhang, Li

    2010-11-01

    The problem of controlling the droplet motions in multiphase flows on the microscale has gained increasing attention because the droplet-based microfluidic devices provide great potentials for chemical/biological applications such as drug discovery, chemical kinetics study, material synthesis, and DNA/cell assays. It is critical to understand the relevant physics on droplet hydrodynamics and thus control the generation, motion, splitting, and coalescence of droplets in complex microfluidic networks. The operation of those applications sometimes requires the arrival of droplets from different branch microchannels at a designated location within a transit time. We propose a simple design for interconnected microfluidic devices that implement the feedback mechanism to synchronize the droplet motion via a passive way. Numerical simulations using the Volume of Fluid (VOF) algorithm are conducted to investigate the time-dependent dynamics of droplets in both gas-liquid and liquid-liquid systems. An analytical mode based on the electronic-hydraulic analogy is also developed to describe the transit behavior of the droplet traffic. Both the numerical and theoretical results agree well with the corresponding experimental results. Furthermore, we optimize the microfluidic networks to control the motion of a series of droplets.

  4. A novel monolithic fabrication method for a plastic microfluidic chip with liquid interconnecting ports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Bong-Kee; Kwon, Tai Hun

    2010-10-01

    In the present study, a novel monolithic fabrication method was developed for the manufacturing of a plastic microfluidic chip with liquid interconnecting ports. As the present method can realize both interconnecting ports and through holes, which are essential components for the delivery of working fluids, in the plastic microfluidic chip, no additional processes and external ports are required. Furthermore, the connection of external silicone tubing can be simply achieved by utilizing an elastic deformation of the used tubing. As one representative example, a microinjection molding of a prototype microfluidic chip having two types of interconnecting ports was demonstrated. After obtaining upper and lower plates by the microinjection molding process utilizing mold cores with pin structures, the thermal bonding of the molded plates was carried out, resulting in the prototype plastic microfluidic chip with interconnecting ports. From microfluidic experiments using the fabricated prototype, it was found that the present method could be quite useful in various microfluidic applications.

  5. Planarization of metal films for multilevel interconnects by pulsed laser heating

    DOEpatents

    Tuckerman, David B.

    1987-01-01

    In the fabrication of multilevel integrated circuits, each metal layer is planarized by heating to momentarily melt the layer. The layer is melted by sweeping laser pulses of suitable width, typically about 1 microsecond duration, over the layer in small increments. The planarization of each metal layer eliminates irregular and discontinuous conditions between successive layers. The planarization method is particularly applicable to circuits having ground or power planes and allows for multilevel interconnects. Dielectric layers can also be planarized to produce a fully planar multilevel interconnect structure. The method is useful for the fabrication of VLSI circuits, particularly for wafer-scale integration.

  6. Non-planar PDMS microfluidic channels and actuators: a review.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Yongha; Candler, Rob N

    2017-09-01

    This review examines the state of the art for manufacturing non-planar miniature channels and actuators from PDMS, where non-planar structures are defined here as those beyond simple extrusions of 2D designs, either with rounded or variable cross sections or with an emergence of the channel trajectory out-of-plane. The motivation for 3D PDMS structures and advances in their fabrication are described, focusing on geometries that were previously unachievable through conventional microfabrication. The motivation for non-planar microfluidic channels and actuators is first discussed and the existing literature is grouped into general fabrication themes and described. The structures are organized by their method of fabrication and evaluated based on their relevant properties, including the capability of producing structures with complex geometry, automation of the fabrication process, and minimum feature size. Additional properties are included for work in the more recently emerging field of non-planar PDMS actuators, where the feature size, actuation stroke, and actuation method are the key parameters of interest. In particular, this review considers the impact from recent advances in additive manufacturing, which now allow creation of truly arbitrary 3D structures down to ∼100 μm size scales.

  7. Fabrication and testing of planar chalcogenide waveguide integrated microfluidic sensor.

    PubMed

    Hu, Juejun; Tarasov, Vladimir; Agarwal, Anu; Kimerling, Lionel; Carlie, Nathan; Petit, Laeticia; Richardson, Kathleen

    2007-03-05

    We have fabricated and tested, to the best of our knowledge, the first microfluidic device monolithically integrated with planar chalcogenide glass waveguides on a silicon substrate. High-quality Ge(23)Sb(7)S(70) glass films have been deposited onto oxide coated silicon wafers using thermal evaporation, and high-index-contrast channel waveguides have been defined using SF(6) plasma etching. Microfluidic channel patterning in photocurable resin (SU8) and channel sealing by a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) cover completed the device fabrication. The chalcogenide waveguides yield a transmission loss of 2.3 dB/cm at 1550 nm. We show in this letter that using this device, N-methylaniline can be detected using its well-defined absorption fingerprint of the N-H bond near 1496 nm. Our measurements indicate linear response of the sensor to varying N-methylaniline concentrations. From our experiments, a sensitivity of this sensor down to a N-methylaniline concentration 0.7 vol. % is expected. Given the low-cost fabrication process used, and robust device configuration, our integration scheme provides a promising device platform for chemical sensing applications.

  8. An easy-to-use microfluidic interconnection system to create quick and reversibly interfaced simple microfluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfreundt, Andrea; Brandt Andersen, Karsten; Dimaki, Maria; Svendsen, Winnie E.

    2015-11-01

    The presented microfluidic interconnection system provides an alternative for the individual interfacing of simple microfluidic devices fabricated in polymers such as polymethylmethacrylate, polycarbonate and cyclic olefin polymer. A modification of the device inlet enables the direct attachment of tubing (such as polytetrafluoroethylene tubing) secured and sealed by using a small plug, without the need for additional assembly, glue or o-rings. This provides a very clean connection that does not require additional, potentially incompatible, materials. The tightly sealed connection can withstand pressures above 250 psi and therefore supports applications with high flow rates or highly viscous fluids. The ease of incorporation, configuration, fabrication and use make this interconnection system ideal for the rapid prototyping of simple microfluidic devices or other integrated systems that require microfluidic interfaces. It provides a valuable addition to the toolbox of individual and small arrays of connectors suitable for micromachined or template-based injection molded devices since it does not require protruding, threaded or glued modifications on the inlet and avoids bulky and expensive fittings.

  9. Controllable gas in oil in water double emulsion formation in a non-planar microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Cong; Zhang, Hong-Bo; Koch, Katharina K. C.; Yin, Rui-Xue; Zhang, Wen-Jun

    2017-02-01

    We present a simple yet robust way to fabricate mono-dispersed gas-in-oil-in-water (G/O/W) double emulsions in a non-planar microfluidic device. The microfluidic device is composed of two pieces of chip which make the non-planar structure in microchannel be implemented. By manipulating the flow rate of each phase, the structure of the microbubbles can be tuned. This approach is also valid to the generation of G/W/O double emulsions.

  10. World-to-chip interconnects for efficient loading of genomic DNA into microfluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, Tim; Andersson, Johan; Södervall, Ulf; Melvin, Tracy

    2009-10-01

    A novel sloped interconnect for the efficient delivery of long genomic DNA fragments into a microfluidic channel is designed, fabricated and tested. Out-of-plane slopes are fabricated in silicon wafers using the deep reactive-ion etch lag phenomenon and a combination of anisotropic and isotropic etching. The final structure is capped with anodically bonded glass. Based upon a series of etch-lag calibration studies, the interconnect was designed using finite element analysis to provide a channel with flow acceleration properties appropriate to straighten DNA molecules. The efficiency of transit of the 48.5 kb DNA fragments (~16.5 µm long when fully extended) through the microfluidic device, established using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, is 95 ± 7.3%.

  11. LaCrO{sub 3}-dispersed Cr for metallic interconnect of planar SOFC

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Rak-Hyun; Shin, Dong Ryul; Dokiya, Masayuki

    1996-12-31

    In the planar SOFC, the interconnect materials plays two roles as an electrical connection and as a gas separation plate in a cell stack. The interconnect materials must be chemically stable in reducing and oxidizing environments, and have high electronic conductivity, high thermal conductivity, matching thermal expansion with an electrolyte, high mechanical strength, good fabricability, and gas tightness. Lanthanum chromite so far has been mainly used as interconnect materials in planar SOFC. However, the ceramic materials are very weak in mechanical strength and have poor machining property as compared with metal. Also the metallic materials have high electronic conductivity and high thermal conductivity. Recently some researchers have studied metallic interconnects such as Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Inconel 600 cermet, Ni-20Cr coated with (LaSr)CoO{sub 3}, and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3-} or La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-dispersed Cr alloy. These alloys have still some problems because Ni-based alloys have high thermal expansion, the added Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and La{sub 2}O{sub 3} to metals have no electronic conductivity, and the oxide formed on the surface of Cr alloy has high volatility. To solve these problems, in this study, LaCrO{sub 3}-dispersed Cr for metallic interconnect of planar SOFC was investigated. The LaCrO{sub 3}-dispersed Cr can be one candidate of metallic interconnect because LaCrO{sub 3} possesses electronic conductivity and Cr metal has relatively low thermal expansion. The content of 25 vol.% LaCrO{sub 3} Was selected on the basis of a theoretically calculated thermal expansion. The thermal expansion, electrical and oxidation properties were examined and the results were discussed as related to SOFC requirements.

  12. Three-Dimensional Waveguide Interconnection in Planar Lightwave Circuits by Direct Writing with Femtosecond Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasu, Yusuke; Kohtoku, Masaki; Hibino, Yoshinori; Inoue, Yasuyuki

    2005-11-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) interconnection of waveguides in planar lightwave circuits (PLCs) is demonstrated. A femtosecond laser successfully interconnects the waveguides of PLCs with low loss by writing 3D waveguides in the PLCs. A directly written waveguide with a length of about 2000 μm crossed over another waveguide without any interaction. The excess losses at 1550 nm were 2.7 and 2.8 dB for the transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) modes, respectively.

  13. Operational parameters of an opto-electronic neural network employing fixed planar holographic interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, P.E.; Gmitro, A.F.

    1993-07-01

    A prototype neutral network system of multifaceted, planar interconnection holograms and opto-electronic neurons is analyzed. This analysis shows that a hologram fabricated with electron-beam lithography has the capacity to connect 6700 neuron outputs to 6700 neuron inputs and that the encoded synaptic weights have a precision of approximately 5 bits. Higher interconnection densities can be achieved by accepting a lower synaptic weight accuracy. For systems employing laser diodes at the outputs of the neurons, processing rates in the range of 45 to 720 trillion connections per second can potentially be achieve.

  14. Guiding neuron development with planar surface gradients of substrate cues deposited using microfluidic devices

    PubMed Central

    Millet, Larry J.; Stewart, Matthew E.; Nuzzo, Ralph G.

    2010-01-01

    Wiring the nervous system relies on the interplay of intrinsic and extrinsic signaling molecules that control neurite extension, neuronal polarity, process maturation and experience-dependent refinement. Extrinsic signals establish and enrich neuron-neuron interactions during development. Understanding how such extrinsic cues direct neurons to establish neural connections in vitro will facilitate the development of organised neural networks for investigating the development and function of nervous system networks. Producing ordered networks of neurons with defined connectivity in vitro presents special technical challenges because the results must be compliant with the biological requirements of rewiring neural networks. Here we demonstrate the ability to form stable, instructive surface-bound gradients of laminin that guide postnatal hippocampal neuron development in vitro. Our work uses a three-channel, interconnected microfluidic device that permits the production of adlayers of planar substrates through the combination of laminar flow, diffusion and physisorption. Through simple flow modifications, a variety of patterns and gradients of laminin (LN) and flourescein-conjugated poly-lysine (FITC-PLL) were deposited to present neurons with an instructive substratum to guide neuronal development. We present three variations in substrate design that produce distinct growth regimens for postnatal neurons in dispersed cell cultures. In the first approach, diffusion-mediated gradients of LN were formed on coverslips to guide neurons toward increasing LN concentrations. In the second approach, a combined gradient of LN and FITC-PLL was produced using aspiration-driven laminar flow to restrict neuronal growth to a 15 μm-wide growth zone at the center of the two superimposed gradients. The last approach demonstrates the capacity to combine binary lines of FITC-PLL in conjunction with surface gradients of LN and bovine serum albumin (BSA) to produce substrate adlayers

  15. Flexible microfluidic devices with three-dimensional interconnected microporous walls for gas and liquid applications.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Po Ki; DeRosa, Michael E

    2011-10-07

    This article presents a simple, low-cost method of fabrication and the applications of flexible polystyrene microfluidic devices with three-dimensional (3D) interconnected microporous walls based on treatment using a solvent/non-solvent mixture at room temperature. The complete fabrication process from device design concept to working device can be completed in less than an hour in a regular laboratory setting, without the need for expensive equipment. Microfluidic devices were used to demonstrate gas generation and absorption reactions by acidifying water with carbon dioxide (CO(2)) gas. By selectively treating the microporous structures with oxygen plasma, acidification of water by acetic acid (distilled white vinegar) perfusion was also demonstrated with the same device design.

  16. A Magnetic Resonance (MR) Microscopy System using a Microfluidically Cryo-Cooled Planar Coil

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Chiwan; Godley, Richard F.; Park, Jaewon; McDougall, Mary P.; Wright, Steven M.; Han, Arum

    2011-01-01

    We present the development of a microfluidically cryo-cooled planar coil for magnetic resonance (MR) microscopy. Cryogenically cooling radiofrequency (RF) coils for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can improve the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the experiment. Conventional cryostats typically use a vacuum gap to keep samples to be imaged, especially biological samples, at or near room temperature during cryo-cooling. This limits how close a cryo-cooled coil can be placed to the sample. At the same time, a small coil-to-sample distance significantly improves the MR imaging capability due to the limited imaging depth of planar MR microcoils. These two conflicting requirements pose challenges to the use of cryo-cooling in MR microcoils. The use of a microfluidic based cryostat for localized cryo-cooling of MR microcoils is a step towards eliminating these constraints. The system presented here consists of planar receive-only coils with integrated cryo-cooling microfluidic channels underneath, and an imaging surface on top of the planar coils separated by a thin nitrogen gas gap. Polymer microfluidic channel structures fabricated through soft lithography processes were used to flow liquid nitrogen under the coils in order to cryo-cool the planar coils to liquid nitrogen temperature (−196°C). Two unique features of the cryo-cooling system minimize the distance between the coil and the sample: 1) The small dimension of the polymer microfluidic channel enables localized cooling of the planar coils, while minimizing thermal effects on the nearby imaging surface. 2) The imaging surface is separated from the cryo-cooled planar coil by a thin gap through which nitrogen gas flows to thermally insulate the imaging surface, keeping it above 0°C and preventing potential damage to biological samples. The localized cooling effect was validated by simulations, bench testing, and MR imaging experiments. Using this cryo-cooled planar coil system inside a 4.7 Tesla MR system

  17. A magnetic resonance (MR) microscopy system using a microfluidically cryo-cooled planar coil.

    PubMed

    Koo, Chiwan; Godley, Richard F; Park, Jaewon; McDougall, Mary P; Wright, Steven M; Han, Arum

    2011-07-07

    We present the development of a microfluidically cryo-cooled planar coil for magnetic resonance (MR) microscopy. Cryogenically cooling radiofrequency (RF) coils for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can improve the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the experiment. Conventional cryostats typically use a vacuum gap to keep samples to be imaged, especially biological samples, at or near room temperature during cryo-cooling. This limits how close a cryo-cooled coil can be placed to the sample. At the same time, a small coil-to-sample distance significantly improves the MR imaging capability due to the limited imaging depth of planar MR microcoils. These two conflicting requirements pose challenges to the use of cryo-cooling in MR microcoils. The use of a microfluidic based cryostat for localized cryo-cooling of MR microcoils is a step towards eliminating these constraints. The system presented here consists of planar receive-only coils with integrated cryo-cooling microfluidic channels underneath, and an imaging surface on top of the planar coils separated by a thin nitrogen gas gap. Polymer microfluidic channel structures fabricated through soft lithography processes were used to flow liquid nitrogen under the coils in order to cryo-cool the planar coils to liquid nitrogen temperature (-196 °C). Two unique features of the cryo-cooling system minimize the distance between the coil and the sample: (1) the small dimension of the polymer microfluidic channel enables localized cooling of the planar coils, while minimizing thermal effects on the nearby imaging surface. (2) The imaging surface is separated from the cryo-cooled planar coil by a thin gap through which nitrogen gas flows to thermally insulate the imaging surface, keeping it above 0 °C and preventing potential damage to biological samples. The localized cooling effect was validated by simulations, bench testing, and MR imaging experiments. Using this cryo-cooled planar coil system inside a 4.7 Tesla MR system

  18. A laminar flow-based single stack of flow-over planar microfluidic fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seoung Hwan; Ahn, Yoomin

    2017-05-01

    Power densities of microfluidic fuel cells are still not high enough for power source applications. In this study, we propose a novel planar stack to increase the total power of a microfluidic fuel cell. Electrical connections in serial or parallel are made within one channel by using multiple laminar flow. A planar structure with flow-over electrodes of platinum are adopted for easy integration with other planar micro devices. These structures are made by micromachining with a thin film process. Fuel cell performance and total ohmic resistances are measured experimentally with a formic acid-based fuel. The results show that the proposed single stacks provide more power density with a comparatively small total ohmic resistance and require less space than that of the fuel cell arrays. The peak volumetric power density improves by 97.5% and 39.3% using parallel and serial electrical connections, respectively, at a 300 μL min-1 flow rate. Utilizing this single stack, we believe that microfluidic fuel cells can be integrated into a compact planar configuration to achieve a power high enough for energy source applications.

  19. A Planar Microfluidic Mixer Based on Logarithmic Spirals

    PubMed Central

    Scherr, Thomas; Quitadamo, Christian; Tesvich, Preston; Park, Daniel Sang-Won; Tiersch, Terrence; Hayes, Daniel; Choi, Jin-Woo; Nandakumar, Krishnaswamy

    2013-01-01

    A passive, planar micromixer design based on logarithmic spirals is presented. The device was fabricated using polydimethylsiloxane soft photolithography techniques, and mixing performance was characterized via numerical simulation and fluorescent microscopy. Mixing efficiency initially declined as Reynolds number increased, and this trend continued until a Reynolds number of 15 where a minimum was reached at 53%. Mixing efficiency then began to increase reaching a maximum mixing efficiency of 86% at Re = 67. Three-dimensional simulations of fluid mixing in this design were compared to other planar geometries such as the Archimedes spiral and Meandering-S mixers. The implementation of logarithmic curvature offers several unique advantages that enhance mixing, namely a variable cross-sectional area and a logarithmically varying radius of curvature that creates 3-D Dean vortices. These flow phenomena were observed in simulations with multilayered fluid folding and validated with confocal microscopy. This design provides improved mixing performance over a broader range of Reynolds numbers than other reported planar mixers, all while avoiding external force fields, more complicated fabrication processes, and the introduction of flow obstructions or cavities that may unintentionally affect sensitive or particulate-containing samples. Due to the planar design requiring only single-step lithographic features, this compact geometry could be easily implemented into existing micro-total analysis systems requiring effective rapid mixing. PMID:23956497

  20. Fluorescence particle detection using microfluidics and planar optoelectronic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettlitz, Siegfried W.; Moosmann, Carola; Valouch, Sebastian; Lemmer, Uli

    2014-05-01

    Detection of fluorescent particles is an integral part of flow cytometry for analysis of selectively stained cells. Established flow cytometer designs achieve great sensitivity and throughput but require bulky and expensive components which prohibit mass production of small single-use point-of-care devices. The use of a combination of innovative technologies such as roll-to-roll printed microuidics with integrated optoelectronic components such as printed organic light emitting diodes and printed organic photodiodes enables tremendous opportunities in cost reduction, miniaturization and new application areas. In order to harvest these benefits, the optical setup requires a redesign to eliminate the need for lenses, dichroic mirrors and lasers. We investigate the influence of geometric parameters on the performance of a thin planar design which uses a high power LED as planar light source and a PIN-photodiode as planar detector. Due to the lack of focusing optics and inferior optical filters, the device sensitivity is not yet on par with commercial state of the art flow cytometer setups. From noise measurements, electronic and optical considerations we deduce possible pathways of improving the device performance. We identify that the sensitivity is either limited by dark noise for very short apertures or by noise from background light for long apertures. We calculate the corresponding crossover length. For the device design we conclude that a low device thickness, low particle velocity and short aperture length are necessary to obtain optimal sensitivity.

  1. Chemical-mechanical planarization of aluminum and copper interconnects with magnetic liners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin

    2000-10-01

    Chemical Mechanical Planarization (CMP) has been employed to achieve Damascene patterning of aluminum and copper interconnects with unique magnetic liners. A one-step process was developed for each interconnect scheme, using a double-layered pad with mesh cells, pores, and perforations on a top hard layer. In a hydrogen peroxide-based slurry, aluminum CMP was a process of periodic removal and formation of a surface oxide layer. Cu CMP in the same slurry, however, was found to be a dissolution dominant process. In a potassium iodate-based slurry, copper removal was the result of two competing reactions: copper dissolution and a non-native surface layer formation. Guided by electrochemistry, slurries were developed to remove nickel in different regimes of the corrosion kinetics diagram. Nickel CMP in a ferric sulfate-based slurry resulted in periodic removal and formation of a passive surface layer. In a potassium permanganate-based slurry, nickel removal is a dissolution dominant process. Visible Al(Cu) surface damages obtained with copper-doped aluminum could be eliminated by understanding the interactions between the substrate, the pad, and the abrasive agglomerate. Increasing substrate hardness by annealing prior to CMP led to a surface finish free of visible scratches. A similar result was also obtained by preventing formation of abrasive agglomerates and minimizing their contact with the substrate.

  2. Integration of lateral porous silicon membranes into planar microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Leïchlé, Thierry; Bourrier, David

    2015-02-07

    In this work, we present a novel fabrication process that enables the monolithic integration of lateral porous silicon membranes into single-layer planar microchannels. This fabrication technique relies on the patterning of local electrodes to guide pore formation horizontally within the membrane and on the use of silicon-on-insulator substrates to spatially localize porous silicon within the channel depth. The feasibility of our approach is studied by current flow analysis using the finite element method and supported by creating 10 μm long mesoporous membranes within 20 μm deep microchannels. The fabricated membranes are demonstrated to be potentially useful for dead-end microfiltration by adequately retaining 300 nm diameter beads while macromolecules such as single-stranded DNA and immunoglobulin G permeate the membrane. The experimentally determined fluidic resistance is in accordance with the theoretical value expected from the estimated pore size and porosity. The work presented here is expected to greatly simplify the integration of membranes capable of size exclusion based separation into fluidic devices and opens doors to the use of porous silicon in planar lab on a chip devices.

  3. Hybridization of active and passive elements for planar photonic components and interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, M.; Bidnyk, S.; Balakrishnan, A.

    2007-02-01

    The deployment of Passive Optical Networks (PON) for Fiber-to-the-Home (FTTH) applications currently represents the fastest growing sector of the telecommunication industry. Traditionally, FTTH transceivers have been manufactured using commodity bulk optics subcomponents, such as thin film filters (TFFs), micro-optic collimating lenses, TO-packaged lasers, and photodetectors. Assembling these subcomponents into a single housing requires active alignment and labor-intensive techniques. Today, the majority of cost reducing strategies using bulk subcomponents has been implemented making future reductions in the price of manufacturing FTTH transceivers unlikely. Future success of large scale deployments of FTTH depends on further cost reductions of transceivers. Realizing the necessity of a radically new packaging approach for assembly of photonic components and interconnects, we designed a novel way of hybridizing active and passive elements into a planar lightwave circuit (PLC) platform. In our approach, all the filtering components were monolithically integrated into the chip using advancements in planar reflective gratings. Subsequently, active components were passively hybridized with the chip using fully-automated high-capacity flip-chip bonders. In this approach, the assembly of the transceiver package required no active alignment and was readily suitable for large-scale production. This paper describes the monolithic integration of filters and hybridization of active components in both silica-on-silicon and silicon-on-insulator PLCs.

  4. Single-layer planar on-chip flow cytometer using microfluidic drifting based three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic focusing.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiaole; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Dong, Cheng; Huang, Tony Jun

    2009-06-07

    In this work, we demonstrate an on-chip microfluidic flow cytometry system based on a three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic focusing technique, microfluidic drifting. By inducing Dean flow in a curved microfluidic channel, microfluidic drifting can be used to hydrodynamically focus cells or particles in the vertical direction and enables the 3D hydrodynamic focusing in a single-layer planar microfluidic device. Through theoretical calculation, numerical simulation, and experimental characterization, we found that the microfluidic drifting technique can be effectively applied to three-dimensionally focus microparticles with density and size equivalent to those of human CD4+ T lymphocytes. In addition, we developed a flow cytometry platform by integrating the 3D focusing device with a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection system. The system was shown to provide effective high-throughput flow cytometry measurements at a rate of greater than 1700 cells s(-1).

  5. Planar silicon patch-clamp electrodes integrated with polydimethylsiloxane microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarah, John Michael

    The patch-clamp technique allows one to probe single ion channels and macroscopic ion channel activity in their native environment and resolve their activity as their physical and chemical surroundings are varied. The traditional method of patch-clamping cells involves bringing a clean, flame-polished glass pipette tip with a 1-2 mum diameter pore into contact with a cell membrane to form a high electrical resistance seal. This technique is the gold standard for cellular electrophysiology investigations because it allows the observation of single ion channel protein dynamics as well as activity from an ensemble ion channels from a single cell. Furthermore, any drug approved by federal drug agencies must be screened against particular ion channels with the patch-clamp technique. However, this technique by its nature is serial, time consuming, difficult when exchanging pipette solutions, and difficult to integrate with other technologies. These reasons have prompted several investigators to explore alternative approaches to traditional pipette patch-clamping to increase the throughput of measurements. Herein, I describe the development of a silicon-wafer based device platform that enables the measurement of ion channel activities. The electrical nature of the cell/wafer seal is characterized for several pore design variations. The majority of gigaohm seals obtained falls in the range of 10-20GO. The cell-attached and whole cell configurations are demonstrated. Whole cell ion channel activity originating from various cell fines is consistent with the more traditional micropipette patch-clamp recordings. The silicon fabrication methods developed, although novel, utilize established semiconductor technologies, making them amenable to batch fabrication techniques. I integrate these silicon devices with PDMS microfluidics with monolithic valves, allowing ultra-fast solution exchange as low as tens of milliseconds for the extracellular solution. Furthermore, I developed a

  6. Direct Electrospinning of Ultrafine Fibers with Interconnected Macropores Enabled by in Situ Mixing Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wanjun; Zhu, Lei; Huang, Chen; Jin, Xiangyu

    2016-12-21

    Porous ultrafine fibers are of great importance to various applications. Herein, we report a method to directly fabricate macro-porous ultrafine fibers by an in situ mixing microfluidics which allows for the simultaneous electrospinning of solution immediately after mixing. The formation mechanism of macro-pores should be attributed to the incomplete mixing coupled with nonsolvent-induced phase separation, which was elucidated by systematical investigation of various solvent systems and mixing solvents. The diameter of the macro-porous fibers can be tuned from 1.80 ± 0.40 to 6.75 ± 0.48 μm by adjusting the solution concentration and the feeding rate of mixing solvent. The results indicated that macro-porous fibers exhibited higher specific surface area (48.66 ± 8.30 m(2) g(-1)), larger pore size (116.73 nm) and pore volume (0.169 ± 0.007 cm(3) g(-1)) than conventional electrospun porous fibers, enabling the high oil absorption capacities of 95.68, 57.98, and 34.82 g g(-1) for silicon oil, motor oil, and peanut oil, respectively. Our method has greatly expanded the solution scope for electrospinning from stable solution systems to unstable or substable solution systems, thus providing intriguing opportunities for the investigation and fabrication of heterogeneous fibers by in situ mixing of various immiscible solvents/solutions. Our findings can serve as guidelines for the electrospinning of ultrafine fibers with interconnected macro-pores (>50 nm).

  7. Electrochemical detection of catecholamine exocytosis using planar iridium oxide electrodes in nanoliter microfluidic cell culture volumes

    PubMed Central

    Ges, Igor A.; Currie, Kevin P.M.; Baudenbacher, Franz

    2013-01-01

    Release of neurotransmitters and hormones by Ca2+ regulated exocytosis is a fundamental cellular/molecular process that is disrupted in a variety of psychiatric, neurological, and endocrine disorders. Therefore, this area represents a relevant target for drug and therapeutic development, efforts that will be aided by novel analytical tools and devices that provide mechanistically rich data with increased throughput. Toward this goal, we have electrochemically deposited iridium oxide (IrOx) films onto planar thin film platinum electrodes (20×300µm2) and utilized these for quantitative detection of catecholamine exocytosis from adrenal chromaffin cells trapped in a microfluidic network. The IrOx electrodes show a linear response to norepinephrine in the range of 0–400µM, with a sensitivity of 23.1±0.5mA/(M·mm2). The sensitivity of the IrOx electrodes does not change in the presence of ascorbic acid, a substance commonly found in biological samples. A replica molded polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic device with nanoliter sensing volumes was aligned and sealed to a glass substrate with the sensing electrodes. Small populations of chromaffin cells were trapped in the microfluidic sensing chamber and stimulated by rapid perfusion with high potassium (50mM) containing Tyrode’s solution at a flow rate of 1nL/s. Stimulation of the cells produced a rapid increase in current due to oxidation of the released catecholamines, with an estimated maximum concentration in the microfluidic device ~52µM. Thus, we demonstrate the utility of an integrated microfluidic network with IrOx electrodes for real-time quantitative detection of catecholamines released from small populations of cells. PMID:22398270

  8. Planar lens integrated capillary action microfluidic immunoassay device for the optical detection of troponin I.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Mazher-Iqbal; Desmulliez, Marc P Y

    2013-01-01

    Optical based analysis in microfluidic and lab-on-a-chip systems are currently considered the gold standard methodology for the determination of end point reactions for various chemical and biological reaction processes. Typically, assays are performed using bulky ancillary apparatus such as microscopes and complex optical excitation and detection systems. Such instrumentation negates many of the advantages offered by device miniaturisation, particularly with respect to overall portability. In this article, we present a CO2 laser ablation technique for rapidly prototyping on-chip planar lenses, in conjunction with capillary action based autonomous microfluidics, to create a miniaturised and fully integrated optical biosensing platform. The presented self-aligned on-chip optical components offer an efficient means to direct excitation light within microfluidics and to directly couple light from a LED source. The device has been used in conjunction with a miniaturised and bespoke fluorescence detection platform to create a complete, palm sized system (≈60 × 80 × 60 mm) capable of performing fluoro-immunoassays. The system has been applied to the detection of cardiac Troponin I, one of the gold standard biomarkers for the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction, achieving a lower detection limit of 0.08 ng/ml, which is at the threshold of clinically applicable concentrations. The portable nature of the complete system and the biomarker detection capabilities demonstrate the potential of the devised instrumentation for use as a medical diagnostics device at the point of care.

  9. Planar lens integrated capillary action microfluidic immunoassay device for the optical detection of troponin I

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Mazher-Iqbal; Desmulliez, Marc P. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Optical based analysis in microfluidic and lab-on-a-chip systems are currently considered the gold standard methodology for the determination of end point reactions for various chemical and biological reaction processes. Typically, assays are performed using bulky ancillary apparatus such as microscopes and complex optical excitation and detection systems. Such instrumentation negates many of the advantages offered by device miniaturisation, particularly with respect to overall portability. In this article, we present a CO2 laser ablation technique for rapidly prototyping on-chip planar lenses, in conjunction with capillary action based autonomous microfluidics, to create a miniaturised and fully integrated optical biosensing platform. The presented self-aligned on-chip optical components offer an efficient means to direct excitation light within microfluidics and to directly couple light from a LED source. The device has been used in conjunction with a miniaturised and bespoke fluorescence detection platform to create a complete, palm sized system (≈60 × 80 × 60 mm) capable of performing fluoro-immunoassays. The system has been applied to the detection of cardiac Troponin I, one of the gold standard biomarkers for the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction, achieving a lower detection limit of 0.08 ng/ml, which is at the threshold of clinically applicable concentrations. The portable nature of the complete system and the biomarker detection capabilities demonstrate the potential of the devised instrumentation for use as a medical diagnostics device at the point of care. PMID:24396546

  10. Single-molecule sequence detection via microfluidic planar extensional flow at a stagnation point.

    PubMed

    Dylla-Spears, Rebecca; Townsend, Jacqueline E; Jen-Jacobson, Linda; Sohn, Lydia L; Muller, Susan J

    2010-06-21

    We demonstrate the use of a microfluidic stagnation point flow to trap and extend single molecules of double-stranded (ds) genomic DNA for detection of target sequences along the DNA backbone. Mutant EcoRI-based fluorescent markers are bound sequence-specifically to fluorescently labeled ds lambda-DNA. The marker-DNA complexes are introduced into a microfluidic cross slot consisting of flow channels that intersect at ninety degrees. Buffered solution containing the marker-DNA complexes flows in one channel of the cross slot, pure buffer flows in the opposing channel at the same flow rate, and fluid exits the two channels at ninety degrees from the inlet channels. This creates a stagnation point at the center of a planar extensional flow, where marker-DNA complexes may be trapped and elongated along the outflow axis. The degree of elongation can be controlled using the flow strength (i.e., a non-dimensional flow rate) in the device. Both the DNA backbone and the markers bound along the stretched DNA are observed directly using fluorescence microscopy, and the location of the markers along the DNA backbone is measured. We find that our method permits detection of each of the five expected target site positions to within 1.5 kb with standard deviations of <1.5 kb. We compare the method's precision and accuracy at molecular extensions of 68% and 88% of the contour length to binding distributions from similar data obtained via molecular combing. We also provide evidence that increased mixing of the sample during binding of the marker to the DNA improves binding to internal target sequences of dsDNA, presumably by extending the DNA and making the internal binding sites more accessible.

  11. Efficient energy based modeling and experimental validation of liquid filling in planar micro-fluidic components and networks.

    PubMed

    Treise, I; Fortner, N; Shapiro, B; Hightower, A

    2005-03-01

    This paper presents a model that describes how liquid flow fills micro-fluidic components and networks. As an alternative to computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations, we use a constrained energy minimization approach. This approach is based on two assumptions that hold in many micro-fluidic devices: (i) The length scales are small, and we consider slow filling rates, hence fluid momentum and viscous terms are small compared to surface tension forces, consequently the liquid/gas interfaces can be viewed as a succession of quasi-steady equilibrium configurations. (ii) Any equilibrium configuration corresponds to a surface tension energy minima which is constrained by the device shape and the volume of liquid in the device. The model is developed for planar micro-fluidic devices, is based on a fundamental physical principle, and shows accurate agreement with experimental data. It takes us only a few minutes to evaluate the model for a planar component of any shape using the Surface Evolver software, and this is significantly less then the computer run time required for CFD simulations. Moreover, once a library of component models has been created (which takes less than an hour of computer time) it then takes only seconds to simulate different network architectures with thousands of components. This fast "reconfigure the network and simulate in seconds" capability is essential for the design of truly complex networks that will enable the next generation of passive, micro-fluidic, lab-on-a-chip systems.

  12. Selection and Evaluation of Heat-Resistant Alloys for Planar SOFC Interconnect Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z Gary; Weil, K. Scott; Paxton, Dean M.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2002-11-21

    Over the past several years, the steady reduction in SOFC operating temperatures to the intermediate range of 700~850oC [1] has made it feasible for lanthanum chromite to be supplanted by metals or alloys as the interconnect materials. Compared to doped lanthanum chromite, metals or alloys offer significantly lower raw material and fabrication costs. However, to be a durable and reliable, a metal or alloy has to satisfy several functional requirements specific to the interconnect under SOFC operating conditions. Specifically, the interconnect metal or alloy should possess the following properties: (i) Good surface stability (resistance to oxidation, hot corrosion, and carburization) in both cathodic (air) and anodic (fuel) atmospheres; (ii) Thermal expansion matching to the ceramic PEN (positive cathode-electrolyte-negative anode) and seal materials (as least for a rigid seal design); (iii) High electrical conductivity through both the bulk material and in-situ formed oxide scales; (iv) Bulk and interfacial thermal mechanical reliability and durability at the operating temperature; (v) Compatibility with other materials in contact with interconnects such as seals and electrical contact materials.

  13. Fusion of single proteoliposomes with planar, cushioned bilayers in microfluidic flow cells

    PubMed Central

    Karatekin, Erdem; Rothman, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Many biological processes rely on membrane fusion, therefore assays to study its mechanisms are necessary. Here we report an assay with sensitivity to single-vesicle, even to single-molecule events using fluorescently labeled vesicle-associated v-SNARE liposomes and target-membrane-associated t-SNARE-reconstituted planar, supported bilayers (SBLs). Docking and fusion events can be detected using conventional far-field epifluorescence or total internal reflection fluorsecence microscopy. Unlike most previous attempts, fusion here is dependent on SNAP25, one of the t-SNARE subunits that is required for fusion in vivo. The success of the assay is due to the use of (i) bilayers covered with a thin layer of poly(ethylene glycol) to control bilayer-bilayer and bilayer-substrate interactions, (ii) microfluidic flow channels which presents many advantages such as the removal of non-specifically bound liposomes by flow. The protocol takes 6–8 days to complete. Analysis can take up to two weeks. PMID:22517259

  14. Fusion of single proteoliposomes with planar, cushioned bilayers in microfluidic flow cells.

    PubMed

    Karatekin, Erdem; Rothman, James E

    2012-04-19

    Many biological processes rely on membrane fusion, and therefore assays to study its mechanisms are necessary. Here we report an assay with sensitivity to single-vesicle, and even to single-molecule events using fluorescently labeled vesicle-associated v-SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) liposomes and target-membrane-associated t-SNARE-reconstituted planar, supported bilayers (t-SBLs). Docking and fusion events can be detected using conventional far-field epifluorescence or total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. In this assay, fusion is dependent on SNAP-25, one of the t-SNARE subunits that is required for fusion in vivo. The success of the assay is due to the use of: (i) bilayers covered with a thin layer of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) to control bilayer-bilayer and bilayer-substrate interactions, and (ii) microfluidic flow channels that present many advantages, such as the removal of nonspecifically bound liposomes by flow. The protocol takes 6-8 d to complete. Analysis can take up to 2 weeks.

  15. Power module packaging with double sided planar interconnection and heat exchangers

    DOEpatents

    Liang, Zhenxian; Marlino, Laura D.; Ning, Puqi; Wang, Fei

    2015-05-26

    A double sided cooled power module package having a single phase leg topology includes two IGBT and two diode semiconductor dies. Each IGBT die is spaced apart from a diode semiconductor die, forming a switch unit. Two switch units are placed in a planar face-up and face-down configuration. A pair of DBC or other insulated metallic substrates is affixed to each side of the planar phase leg semiconductor dies to form a sandwich structure. Attachment layers are disposed on outer surfaces of the substrates and two heat exchangers are affixed to the substrates by rigid bond layers. The heat exchangers, made of copper or aluminum, have passages for carrying coolant. The power package is manufactured in a two-step assembly and heating process where direct bonds are formed for all bond layers by soldering, sintering, solid diffusion bonding or transient liquid diffusion bonding, with a specially designed jig and fixture.

  16. Modeling and Simulation of Ionic Currents in Three-Dimensional Microfluidic Devices with Nanofluidic Interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Aveek N.; Cannon, Donald M.; Gatimu, Enid N.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.; Aluru, Narayana R.; Bohn, Paul W.

    2005-10-01

    Electrokinetic fluid flow in nanocapillary array (NCA) membranes between vertically separated microfluidic channels offers an attractive alternative to using mechanical action to achieve fluidic communication between different regions of lab-on-a-chip devices. By adjusting the channel diameter, a, and the inverse Debye length, k, and applying the appropriate external potential, the nanochannel arrays, can be made to behave like digital fluidic switches, and the movement of molecules from one side of the array to the other side can be controlled. However, inherent differences in ionic mobility lead to non-equilibrium ion populations on the downstream side, which, in turn, shows up through transient changes in the microchannel conductance. Here we describe coupled calculations and experiments in which the electrical properties of a microfluidic-nanofluidic hybrid architecture are simulated by a combination of a compact model for the bulk electrical properties and iterative self-consistent solutions of the coupled Poisson, Nernst-Planck, and Navier-Stokes equations to recover the detailed ion motion in the nanopores. The transient electrical conductivity in the microchannel, after application of a forward bias pulse to the NCA membrane, is recovered in quantitative detail. The surface charge density of the nanopores and the capacitance of the membrane, which are critical determinants of electrokinetic flow through NCA, fall out of the analysis in a natural way, providing a clear mechanism to determine these critically important parameters.

  17. Electrochemical planarization

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, A.F.; Contolini, R.J.

    1993-10-26

    In a process for fabricating planarized thin film metal interconnects for integrated circuit structures, a planarized metal layer is etched back to the underlying dielectric layer by electropolishing, ion milling or other procedure. Electropolishing reduces processing time from hours to minutes and allows batch processing of multiple wafers. The etched back planarized thin film interconnect is flush with the dielectric layer. 12 figures.

  18. Electrochemical planarization

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, Anthony F.; Contolini, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    In a process for fabricating planarized thin film metal interconnects for integrated circuit structures, a planarized metal layer is etched back to the underlying dielectric layer by electropolishing, ion milling or other procedure. Electropolishing reduces processing time from hours to minutes and allows batch processing of multiple wafers. The etched back planarized thin film interconnect is flush with the dielectric layer.

  19. Integrated multilayer microfluidic device with a nanoporous membrane interconnect for online coupling of solid-phase extraction to microchip electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Long, Zhicheng; Shen, Zheng; Wu, Dapeng; Qin, Jianhua; Lin, Bingcheng

    2007-12-01

    An integrated microfluidic device was developed for online coupling of solid-phase extraction to microchip electrophoresis (chip SPE-CE). With a nanoporous membrane sandwiched between two PDMS substrates, SPE preconcentration and electrophoretic separation can be carried out in upper and lower fluidic layers, separately and sequentially. During the SPE process, the thin membrane can act as a fluid isolator to prevent intermixing between two fluidic channels. However, when a pulse voltage is applied, the membrane becomes a gateable interconnect so that a small plug of concentrated analytes can be online injected into the lower channel for subsequent separations. This multilayer design provides a universal solution to online SPE-CE hyphenation. Both electroosmotic flow and hydrodynamic pumps have been adopted for SPE operation. SPE was performed on a 2.5 mm long microcolumn, with two weirs on both sides to retain the C(18)-coated silica beads. Rhodamine 123 and FITC-labelled ephedrine were used to test the operational performance of the hyphenation system. High separation efficiency and thousand-fold signal enhancement were achieved.

  20. Planarization effect evaluation of acid and alkaline slurries in the copper interconnect process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Hu; Yan, Li; Yuling, Liu; Yangang, He

    2015-03-01

    We observed and analyzed the acid and HEBUT alkaline of Cu chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) slurry to evaluate their effects. Material analysis has shown that the planarity surfaces and the removal rate of alkaline slurry are better than the acid slurry during metal CMP processes. The global surface roughness and the small-scale surface roughness by 10 × 10 μm2 of copper film polished by the SVTC slurry are 1.127 nm and 2.49 nm. However, it is found that the surface roughnesses of copper films polished by the HEBUT slurry are 0.728 nm and 0.215 nm. All other things being equal, the remaining step heights of copper films polished by the SVTC slurry and HEBUT slurry are respectively 150 nm and 50 nm. At the end of the polishing process, the dishing heights of the HEBUT slurry and the SVTC slurry are approximately both 30 nm, the erosion heights of the HEBUT slurry and the SVTC slurry are approximately both 20 nm. The surface states of the copper film after CMP are tested, and the AFM results of two samples are obviously seen. The surface polished by SVTC slurry shows many spikes. This indicates that the HEBUT alkaline slurry is promising for inter-level dielectric (ILD) applications in ultra large-scale integrated circuits (ULSI) technology. Project supported by the Special Project Items No. 2 in National Long-Term Technology Development Plan (No. 2009ZX02308), the Doctoral Program Foundation of Xinjiang Normal University Plan (No. XJNUBS1226), the Key Laboratory of Coal Gasification, Ministry of Education, and the Inorganic Chemistry Key Disciplines of Xinjiang Normal University.

  1. Three-dimensional silicone microfluidic interconnection scheme using sacrificial wax filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharmatilleke, Saman; Henderson, H. Thurman; Bhansali, Shekhar; Ahn, Chong H.

    2000-08-01

    A very simple room-temperature procedure is presented herein for formation of true three-dimensionality of microplumbing in plastic (silicone elastomer in this case), by molding the plastic to simply encapsulate a pre-formed network of sacrificial wax threads or other connected wax configurations which are ultimately to become micro channels and cavities in the plastic motherboard. When these wax sacrificial areas are etched away with acetone, precise cavities, channels, and capillaries results with direct arbitrary three- dimensionality for the first time. This method leads also to a simple and effective external interconnect scheme where ordinary fused silica tubes may be press-fitted into the surface opening to withstand high pressure. This method may be extended for connection of multiple levels of silicone motherboards together using small sections of fused silica tubing, with no loss of stacking volume because of the lack of any connector lips or bosses. An array of micro channels having circular cross sections with diameters of 100, 150 and 200 microns were molded on silicone elastomer using wax thread. The wax thread was dissolved in acetone after the silicon elastometer became components (motherboards) while being able to control the channel lengths within the stacks as desired. Mixing chambers were also molded in a single silicone elastomer layer, because true three-dimensionality is trivially possible without the complexity of multi stacked lithography.

  2. Diode laser bonding of planar microfluidic devices, MOEMS, bioMEMS, diagnostic chips, and microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jie-Wei; Zybko, Jerry M.

    2005-01-01

    The assembly of plastic microfluidic devices, MOEMS and microarrays requiring high positioning and welding accuracy in the micrometer range, has been successfully achieved using a new technology based on laser transmission welding combined with a photolithographic mask technique. This paper reviews a laser assembly platform for the joining of microfluidic plastic parts with its main related process characteristics and its potential for low-cost and high volume manufacturing. The system consists of a of diode laser with a mask and an automated alignment function to generate micro welding seams with freely definable geometries. A fully automated mask alignment system with a resolution of < 2 &mum and a precise, noncontact energy input allows a fast welding of micro structured plastic parts with high reproducibility and excellent welding quality.

  3. Fit-to-Flow (F2F) interconnects: universal reversible adhesive-free microfluidic adaptors for lab-on-a-chip systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Arnold; Pan, Tingrui

    2011-02-21

    World-to-chip (macro-to-micro) interface continues to be one of the most complicated, ineffective, and unreliable components in the development of emerging lab-on-a-chip systems involving integrated microfluidic operations. A number of irreversible (e.g., adhesive gluing) and reversible techniques (e.g., press fitting) have attempted to provide dedicated fluidic passage from standard tubing to miniature on-chip devices, none of which completely addresses the above concerns. In this paper, we present standardized adhesive-free microfluidic adaptors, referred to as Fit-to-Flow (F2F) Interconnects, to achieve reliable hermetic seal, high-density tube packing, self-aligned plug-in, reworkable connectivity, straightforward scalability and expandability, and applicability to broad lab-on-a-chip platforms; analogous to the modular plug-and-play USB architecture employed in modern electronics. Specifically, two distinct physical packaging mechanisms are applied, with one utilizing induced tensile stress in elastomeric socket to establish reversible seal and the other using negative pressure to provide on demand vacuum shield, both of which can be adapted to a variety of experimental configurations. The non-leaking performance (up to 336 kPa) along with high tube-packing density (of 1 tube/mm(2)) and accurate self-guided alignment (of 10 μm) have been characterized. In addition, a 3D microfluidic mixer and a 6-level chemical gradient generator paired with the corresponding F2F Interconnects have been devised to illustrate the applicability of the universal fluidic connections to classic lab-on-a-chip operations.

  4. Looking into Living Cell Systems: Planar Waveguide Microfluidic NMR Detector for in Vitro Metabolomics of Tumor Spheroids.

    PubMed

    Kalfe, Ayten; Telfah, Ahmad; Lambert, Jörg; Hergenröder, Roland

    2015-07-21

    The complex cell metabolism and its link to oncogenic signaling pathways have received huge interest within the last few years. But the lack of advanced analytical tools for the investigation of living cell metabolism is still a challenge to be faced. Therefore, we designed and fabricated a novel miniaturized microslot NMR detector with on-board heater integrated with a microfluidic device as NMR sample holder. For the first time, a tumor spheroid of 500 μm diameter and consisting of 9000 cells has been studied noninvasively and online for 24 h. The dynamic processes of production and degradation of 23 intra- and extracellular metabolites were monitored. Remarkably high concentrations of lactate and alanine were observed, being an indicator for a shift from oxidative to glycolytic metabolism. In summary, this methodical development has proven to be a successful analytical tool for the elucidation of cellular functions and their corresponding biochemical pathways. Additionally, the planar geometry of the microslot NMR detector allows the hyphenation with versatile lab-on-a chip (LOC) technology. This opens a new window for metabolomics studies on living cells and can be implemented into new application fields in biotechnology and life sciences.

  5. Oscillatory motion of water droplets in kerosene above co-planar electrodes in microfluidic chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beránek, Pavel; Flittner, Rudolf; Hrobař, Vlastimil; Ethgen, Pauline; Přibyl, Michal

    2014-06-01

    We experimentally observed oscillatory motion of water droplets in microfluidic systems with coplanar microelectrodes under imposed DC electric fields. Two-electrode arrangement with no bipolar electrode and eight-electrode arrangement with six bipolar microelectrodes were investigated. Kerosene was used as the continuous phase. We studied the dependences of the oscillation frequency on the electric field intensity and ionic strength of the water phase. We found that the electric field dependence is strongly nonlinear and discussed possible reasons of this phenomenon, e.g., the droplet deformation at electrode edges that affects the charge transfer between the electrode and droplet or the interplay between the Coulomb force on free charge and the dielectrophoretic force. Our experiments further revealed that the oscillation frequency decreases with growing salt concentration in the two-electrode arrangement, but increases in the eight-electrode arrangement, which was attributed to surface tension related processes and electrochemical processes on the bipolar electrodes. Finally, we analyzed the effects of the electric field on the oscillatory motion by means of a simplified mathematical model. It was shown that the electric force imposed on the droplet charge is the key factor to induce the oscillations and the dielectrophoretic force significantly contributes to the momentum transfer at the electrode edges. For the same electric field strength, the model is able to predict the same oscillation frequency as that observed in the experiments.

  6. Wettability patterning for high-rate, pumpless fluid transport on open, non-planar microfluidic platforms.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Aritra; Ganguly, Ranjan; Schutzius, Thomas M; Megaridis, Constantine M

    2014-05-07

    Surface tension driven transport of liquids on open substrates offers an enabling tool for open micro total analysis systems that are becoming increasingly popular for low-cost biomedical diagnostic devices. The present study uses a facile wettability patterning method to produce open microfluidic tracks that - due to their shape, surface texture and chemistry - are capable of transporting a wide range of liquid volumes (~1-500 μL) on-chip, overcoming viscous and other opposing forces (e.g., gravity) at the pertinent length scales. Small volumes are handled as individual droplets, while larger volumes require repeated droplet transport. The concept is developed and demonstrated with coatings based on TiO2 filler particles, which, when present in adequate (~80 wt.%) quantities within a hydrophobic fluoroacrylic polymer matrix, form composites that are intrinsically superhydrophobic. Such composite coatings become superhydrophilic upon exposure to UV light (390 nm). A commercial laser printer-based photo-masking approach is used on the coating for spatially selective wettability conversion from superhydrophobic to superhydrophilic. Carefully designed wedge-patterned surface tension confined tracks on the open-air devices move liquid on them without power input, even when acting against gravity. Simple designs of wettability patterning are used on versatile substrates (e.g., metals, polymers, paper) to demonstrate complex droplet handling tasks, e.g., merging, splitting and metered dispensing, some of which occur in 3-D geometries. Fluid transport rates of up to 350 μL s(-1) are attained. Applicability of the design on metal substrates allows these devices to be used also for other microscale engineering applications, e.g., water management in fuel cells.

  7. Chemiluminescence detector based on a single planar transparent digital microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiangyu; Zhang, Kaidi; Pan, Jian; Chen, Guoping; Liu, Ai-Qun; Fan, Shih-Kang; Zhou, Jia

    2013-07-21

    We report on a compact and portable prototype of chemiluminescence detector based on a single planar single polar transparent electrowetting-on-dielectrics (EWOD) device. The coupling ground model was proposed to build the EWOD device, which could be driven under a single polar voltage. Such a design not only simplified the chip construction and control circuit, but also had the potential for the ball-like droplet to focus the fluorescence and enhance the detection sensitivity. Simulations and experiments both confirmed that the greater the contact angle, the stronger the detected optical signal, and thus the higher the sensitivity. The sensitivity of the prototype detector to H2O2 was 5.45 mV (mmol L(-1))(-1) and the detection limit was 0.01 mmol L(-1) when the contact angle of the EWOD surface was 120°. To further increase the sensitivity and decrease the detection limit, the contact angle of the EWOD device could be increased and the dark current of the photomultiplier decreased. The prototype shows potential applications as highly sensitive, cost effective and portable immuno-detectors, especially as a blood glucose monitor.

  8. Non-planar interconnects in double-sided flexible Cu-PET substrates using a laser-assisted maskless microdeposition process: 3D finite element modeling and experimental analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabari, Elahe; Tong, Steven; Azhari, Amir; Toyserkani, Ehsan

    2014-03-01

    Non-planar (3D) interconnects have an important role in the electronic packaging industry these days. These unconventional interconnects allow manufacturers to save materials and space while connecting circuit components on flexible and non-planar substrates. Among a variety of flexible boards, double-sided flexible substrates have attracted the electronic industry to effectively and compactly develop miniaturized flexible devices such as sensors-on-chips. This study reports our developmental procedure for the creation of non-planar silver interconnects on the edge of double-sided copper substrates separated by a layer of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) using laser-assisted maskless microdeposition (LAMM). The article consists of the characterization of the LAMM process to effectively deposit Ag nanoparticles for production of conductive interconnects. Several parameters, including the deposition and laser processing parameters, are optimized to achieve interconnects free of pores, cracks and delamination. For investigating the topography and microstructure of interconnects, various analytical tools, such as SEM, XRD, Profilometery, and EDS were used. Furthermore, a 3D finite element numerical model was developed to predict the laser processing of silver nanoparticles on the substrate. The model includes a coupled thermal and structural governing physics to derive the temperature history throughout the simulation as well as strain/displacement within the substrate, which is identified the major source of cark formation in Ag tracks. The SEM micrographs of the laser processed nanoparticles suggest that a minimum of 1.24 W laser power was needed for an effective nanoparticles sintering to obtain conductive 3D interconnects with minimum amount of cracks whereas a 1.7 W laser power caused PET to decompose.

  9. Back-flushing and heart cut capillary gas chromatography using planar microfluidic Deans' switching for the separation of benzene and alkylbenzenes in industrial samples.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Matthew R; Gras, Ronda; Nesterenko, Pavel N; Luong, Jim; Shellie, Robert A

    2015-11-20

    Planar microfluidic devices coupled with modern electronic pressure control have allowed gas chromatography (GC) practitioners to easily manipulate chromatographic systems to achieve heart cut and back-flushing configurations. These planar microfluidic devices have enhanced the connectivity between different components of GC instrumentation and have improved the inertness and minimised system dead volumes compared to classical chromatographic unions and valves. In the present contribution the setup and configuration of two multidimensional GC (MDGC) platforms is described for achieving the separation and quantification of trace level target C6-C8 alkylbenzenes in styrene monomer and Isoparaffin™ solvents, using flame ionisation detection (FID). The performance of these MDGC platforms indicated excellent retention time (0.2% relative standard deviation, RSD) and peak area repeatability (1% RSD) for all analytes of interest. The limit of detection (LOD) was 0.8 mg kg(-1) for benzene in styrene monomer, and 2.4-2.8 mg kg(-1) for C6-C8 alkylbenzenes such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene in Isoparaffin™ solvent.

  10. Fuel cell system with interconnect

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Zhien; Goettler, Richard

    2016-12-20

    The present invention includes an integrated planar, series connected fuel cell system having electrochemical cells electrically connected via interconnects, wherein the anodes of the electrochemical cells are protected against Ni loss and migration via an engineered porous anode barrier layer.

  11. Alignability of Optical Interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beech, Russell Scott

    With the continuing drive towards higher speed, density, and functionality in electronics, electrical interconnects become inadequate. Due to optics' high speed and bandwidth, freedom from capacitive loading effects, and freedom from crosstalk, optical interconnects can meet more stringent interconnect requirements. But, an optical interconnect requires additional components, such as an optical source and detector, lenses, holographic elements, etc. Fabrication and assembly of an optical interconnect requires precise alignment of these components. The successful development and deployment of optical interconnects depend on how easily the interconnect components can be aligned and/or how tolerant the interconnect is to misalignments. In this thesis, a method of quantitatively specifying the relative difficulty of properly aligning an optical interconnect is described. Ways of using this theory of alignment to obtain design and packaging guidelines for optical interconnects are examined. The measure of the ease with which an optical interconnect can be aligned, called the alignability, uses the efficiency of power transfer as a measure of alignment quality. The alignability is related to interconnect package design through the overall cost measure, which depends upon various physical parameters of the interconnect, such as the cost of the components and the time required for fabrication and alignment. Through a mutual dependence on detector size, the relationship between an interconnect's alignability and its bandwidth, signal-to-noise ratio, and bit-error -rate is examined. The results indicate that a range of device sizes exists for which given performance threshold values are satisfied. Next, the alignability of integrated planar-optic backplanes is analyzed in detail. The resulting data show that the alignability can be optimized by varying the substrate thickness or the angle of reflection. By including the effects of crosstalk, in a multi-channel backplane, the

  12. Three-dimensional focusing of particles using negative dielectrophoretic force in a microfluidic chip with insulating microstructures and dual planar microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Jen, Chun-Ping; Weng, Cheng-Hsin; Huang, Ching-Te

    2011-09-01

    The focusing of biological and synthetic particles in microfluidic devices is a prerequisite for the construction of microstructured materials, as well as for medical applications. In the present study, a microdevice that can effectively focus particles in three dimensions using a combination of insulator-based and metal-electrode dielectrophoresis (DEP) has been designed and fabricated. The DEP force is employed to confine the particles using a negative DEP response. Four insulating microstructures, which form an X-pattern in the microchannel, were employed to distort the electric field between the insulators in a conducting solution, thereby generating regions with a high electric-field gradient. Two strips of microelectrodes on the top and bottom surfaces were placed in the middle of the microchannel and connected to an electric pole. Two sets of dual-planar electrodes connected to the opposite pole were placed at the sides of the microchannel at the top and bottom surfaces. The results of a transient simulation of tracks of polystyrene particles, which was performed using the commercial software package CFD-ACE⁺ (ESI Group, France), demonstrate that the three-dimensional focusing of particles was achieved when the applied voltage was larger than 35 V at a frequency of 1 MHz. Furthermore, the focusing performance increased with the increased strength of the applied electric field and decreased inlet flow rate. Experiments on particle focusing, employing polystyrene particles 10 μm in diameter, were conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed design; the results agree with the trend predicted by numerical simulations.

  13. Lab-on-CMOS integration of microfluidics and electrochemical sensors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yue; Mason, Andrew J

    2013-10-07

    This paper introduces a CMOS-microfluidics integration scheme for electrochemical microsystems. A CMOS chip was embedded into a micro-machined silicon carrier. By leveling the CMOS chip and carrier surface to within 100 nm, an expanded obstacle-free surface suitable for photolithography was achieved. Thin film metal planar interconnects were microfabricated to bridge CMOS pads to the perimeter of the carrier, leaving a flat and smooth surface for integrating microfluidic structures. A model device containing SU-8 microfluidic mixers and detection channels crossing over microelectrodes on a CMOS integrated circuit was constructed using the chip-carrier assembly scheme. Functional integrity of microfluidic structures and on-CMOS electrodes was verified by a simultaneous sample dilution and electrochemical detection experiment within multi-channel microfluidics. This lab-on-CMOS integration process is capable of high packing density, is suitable for wafer-level batch production, and opens new opportunities to combine the performance benefits of on-CMOS sensors with lab-on-chip platforms.

  14. Interconnection Guidelines

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Interconnection Guidelines provide general guidance on the steps involved with connecting biogas recovery systems to the utility electrical power grid. Interconnection best practices including time and cost estimates are discussed.

  15. Optical Interconnect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaburro, Zeno

    The progress of silicon electronic industry is based on scaling down the minimum feature size of integrated circuits. Speed, density and costs of devices improve with scaling, but unfortunately the performance of interconnect worsens, both in terms of speed and power consumption. This issue -- the ``interconnect bottleneck'' -- is envisioned as a critical showstopper of electronic industry in the near future. The physical reason behind the interconnect bottleneck is the resistive nature of metals. The introduction of copper in place of aluminum has temporarily improved the interconnect performance, but on the other hand in a few years a more disruptive solution will be required in order to keep the current pace of progress. Optical interconnect is an intriguing alternative to metallic wires, because light can travel in dielectrics, and even in vacuum. At present, optical technology in silicon is not mature for industrial implementation. For this very same reason, however, it is also rich of research opportunities with large potential payoff. The rationale of this chapter has been to trace a snapshot of the current interconnect limitations; to point out the basic differences between the electrical and optical interconnect from different perspectives, ranging from basic physics up to system layouts; and to give a flavor of suggested practical realization of optical solutions. Any of these goals would be too ambitious for a book chapter without a hopefully rich and up-to-date bibliography.

  16. Carbon Nanotube Interconnect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Method and system for fabricating an electrical interconnect capable of supporting very high current densities ( 10(exp 6)-10(exp 10) Amps/sq cm), using an array of one or more carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The CNT array is grown in a selected spaced apart pattern, preferably with multi-wall CNTs, and a selected insulating material, such as SiOw, or SiuNv is deposited using CVD to encapsulate each CNT in the array. An exposed surface of the insulating material is planarized to provide one or more exposed electrical contacts for one or more CNTs.

  17. Liquid metal enabled microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Tang, Shi-Yang; Zhu, Jiu Yang; Schaefer, Samira; Mitchell, Arnan; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh; Dickey, Michael D

    2017-03-14

    Several gallium-based liquid metal alloys are liquid at room temperature. As 'liquid', such alloys have a low viscosity and a high surface tension while as 'metal', they have high thermal and electrical conductivities, similar to mercury. However, unlike mercury, these liquid metal alloys have low toxicity and a negligible vapor pressure, rendering them much safer. In comparison to mercury, the distinguishing feature of these alloys is the rapid formation of a self-limiting atomically thin layer of gallium oxide over their surface when exposed to oxygen. This oxide layer changes many physical and chemical properties of gallium alloys, including their interfacial and rheological properties, which can be employed and modulated for various applications in microfluidics. Injecting liquid metal into microfluidic structures has been extensively used to pattern and encapsulate highly deformable and reconfigurable electronic devices including electrodes, sensors, antennas, and interconnects. Likewise, the unique features of liquid metals have been employed for fabricating miniaturized microfluidic components including pumps, valves, heaters, and electrodes. In this review, we discuss liquid metal enabled microfluidic components, and highlight their desirable attributes including simple fabrication, facile integration, stretchability, reconfigurability, and low power consumption, with promising applications for highly integrated microfluidic systems.

  18. Electrical interconnect

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, John S.; Brandt, Randolph J.; Hebert, Peter; Al Taher, Omar

    2015-10-06

    An interconnect includes a first set of connector pads, a second set of connector pads, and a continuous central portion. A first plurality of legs extends at a first angle from the continuous central portion. Each leg of the first plurality of legs is connected to a connector pad of a first set of connector pads. A second plurality of legs extends at a second angle from the continuous central portion. Each leg of the second plurality of legs is connected to a connector pad of the second set of connector pads. Gaps are defined between legs. The gaps enable movement of the first set of connector pads relative to the second set of connector pads.

  19. Suspended microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Casavant, Benjamin P; Berthier, Erwin; Theberge, Ashleigh B; Berthier, Jean; Montanez-Sauri, Sara I; Bischel, Lauren L; Brakke, Kenneth; Hedman, Curtis J; Bushman, Wade; Keller, Nancy P; Beebe, David J

    2013-06-18

    Although the field of microfluidics has made significant progress in bringing new tools to address biological questions, the accessibility and adoption of microfluidics within the life sciences are still limited. Open microfluidic systems have the potential to lower the barriers to adoption, but the absence of robust design rules has hindered their use. Here, we present an open microfluidic platform, suspended microfluidics, that uses surface tension to fill and maintain a fluid in microscale structures devoid of a ceiling and floor. We developed a simple and ubiquitous model predicting fluid flow in suspended microfluidic systems and show that it encompasses many known capillary phenomena. Suspended microfluidics was used to create arrays of collagen membranes, mico Dots (μDots), in a horizontal plane separating two fluidic chambers, demonstrating a transwell platform able to discern collective or individual cellular invasion. Further, we demonstrated that μDots can also be used as a simple multiplexed 3D cellular growth platform. Using the μDot array, we probed the combined effects of soluble factors and matrix components, finding that laminin mitigates the growth suppression properties of the matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor GM6001. Based on the same fluidic principles, we created a suspended microfluidic metabolite extraction platform using a multilayer biphasic system that leverages the accessibility of open microchannels to retrieve steroids and other metabolites readily from cell culture. Suspended microfluidics brings the high degree of fluidic control and unique functionality of closed microfluidics into the highly accessible and robust platform of open microfluidics.

  20. Suspended microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Casavant, Benjamin P.; Berthier, Erwin; Theberge, Ashleigh B.; Berthier, Jean; Montanez-Sauri, Sara I.; Bischel, Lauren L.; Brakke, Kenneth; Hedman, Curtis J.; Bushman, Wade; Keller, Nancy P.; Beebe, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Although the field of microfluidics has made significant progress in bringing new tools to address biological questions, the accessibility and adoption of microfluidics within the life sciences are still limited. Open microfluidic systems have the potential to lower the barriers to adoption, but the absence of robust design rules has hindered their use. Here, we present an open microfluidic platform, suspended microfluidics, that uses surface tension to fill and maintain a fluid in microscale structures devoid of a ceiling and floor. We developed a simple and ubiquitous model predicting fluid flow in suspended microfluidic systems and show that it encompasses many known capillary phenomena. Suspended microfluidics was used to create arrays of collagen membranes, mico Dots (μDots), in a horizontal plane separating two fluidic chambers, demonstrating a transwell platform able to discern collective or individual cellular invasion. Further, we demonstrated that μDots can also be used as a simple multiplexed 3D cellular growth platform. Using the μDot array, we probed the combined effects of soluble factors and matrix components, finding that laminin mitigates the growth suppression properties of the matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor GM6001. Based on the same fluidic principles, we created a suspended microfluidic metabolite extraction platform using a multilayer biphasic system that leverages the accessibility of open microchannels to retrieve steroids and other metabolites readily from cell culture. Suspended microfluidics brings the high degree of fluidic control and unique functionality of closed microfluidics into the highly accessible and robust platform of open microfluidics. PMID:23729815

  1. Advanced Interconnect Development

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z.G.; Maupin, G.; Simner, S.; Singh, P.; Stevenson, J.; Xia, G.

    2005-01-27

    The objectives of this project are to develop cost-effective, optimized materials for intermediate temperature SOFC interconnect and interconnect/electrode interface applications and identify and understand degradation processes in interconnects and at their interfaces with electrodes.

  2. Interconnection networks

    DOEpatents

    Faber, V.; Moore, J.W.

    1988-06-20

    A network of interconnected processors is formed from a vertex symmetric graph selected from graphs GAMMA/sub d/(k) with degree d, diameter k, and (d + 1)exclamation/ (d /minus/ k + 1)exclamation processors for each d greater than or equal to k and GAMMA/sub d/(k, /minus/1) with degree d /minus/ 1, diameter k + 1, and (d + 1)exclamation/(d /minus/ k + 1)exclamation processors for each d greater than or equal to k greater than or equal to 4. Each processor has an address formed by one of the permutations from a predetermined sequence of letters chosen a selected number of letters at a time, and an extended address formed by appending to the address the remaining ones of the predetermined sequence of letters. A plurality of transmission channels is provided from each of the processors, where each processor has one less channel than the selected number of letters forming the sequence. Where a network GAMMA/sub d/(k, /minus/1) is provided, no processor has a channel connected to form an edge in a direction delta/sub 1/. Each of the channels has an identification number selected from the sequence of letters and connected from a first processor having a first extended address to a second processor having a second address formed from a second extended address defined by moving to the front of the first extended address the letter found in the position within the first extended address defined by the channel identification number. The second address is then formed by selecting the first elements of the second extended address corresponding to the selected number used to form the address permutations. 9 figs.

  3. Interconnected semiconductor devices

    DOEpatents

    Grimmer, Derrick P.; Paulson, Kenneth R.; Gilbert, James R.

    1990-10-23

    Semiconductor layer and conductive layer formed on a flexible substrate, divided into individual devices and interconnected with one another in series by interconnection layers and penetrating terminals.

  4. Microfluidic device for drug delivery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beebe, David J. (Inventor); MacDonald, Michael J. (Inventor); Eddington, David T. (Inventor); Mensing, Glennys A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A microfluidic device is provided for delivering a drug to an individual. The microfluidic device includes a body that defines a reservoir for receiving the drug therein. A valve interconnects the reservoir to an output needle that is insertable into the skin of an individual. A pressure source urges the drug from the reservoir toward the needle. The valve is movable between a closed position preventing the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle and an open position allowing for the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle in response to a predetermined condition in the physiological fluids of the individual.

  5. Advanced Planarization Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basol, Bulent M.

    As the integrated circuit technology nodes reach 45 nm and beyondgrowing requirement for reduced propagation delay dictates inclusion of low-k materials in the interconnect metallization structures. Unfortunately, mechanical properties, such as hardness and Young's modulus of the dielectric materials, deteriorate as their porosity is increased and the k value is reduced to 2.5 and below [1]. Reliability issues such as electromigration, stress migration, and time-dependent dielectric breakdown (TDDB) lifetimes are also becoming more challenging for multi-stack low-k structures. The low-k and ultra low-k materials are prone to delamination [2] and cracking [3] during CMP; risk of damage rising as the polishing pressure and time increases [4]. It has been demonstrated that delamination in low-k stacks was driven by the work done against the friction force during the CMP process [5]. Therefore, it is becoming more and more difficult to polish and planarize topographic copper layers, deposited on low-k dielectric materials, at low stress and high rate while maintaining the mechanical integrity of the overall interconnect structure. Furthermore as feature widths and depths shrink, tolerances for metal loss and line resistance variation over the wafer surface are also reduced. In advanced interconnects, adding sacrificial thickness to the dielectric layer which can then be removed during CMP overpolish step is not a good option to minimize topography because hard cap layers are often used to protect the low-k dielectric materials from the negative effects of CMP [6, 7] and thickness of these layers is kept to a minimum to reduce their contribution to the effective dielectric constant of the stack. Therefore, as technology nodes move beyond 45 nm, planarization steps of the interconnect manufacturing process flow are expected to offer reduced stress, higher planarization efficiency, reduced copper dishing, less dielectric erosion, better global line resistance uniformity

  6. Microfluidic electronics.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shi; Wu, Zhigang

    2012-08-21

    Microfluidics, a field that has been well-established for several decades, has seen extensive applications in the areas of biology, chemistry, and medicine. However, it might be very hard to imagine how such soft microfluidic devices would be used in other areas, such as electronics, in which stiff, solid metals, insulators, and semiconductors have previously dominated. Very recently, things have radically changed. Taking advantage of native properties of microfluidics, advances in microfluidics-based electronics have shown great potential in numerous new appealing applications, e.g. bio-inspired devices, body-worn healthcare and medical sensing systems, and ergonomic units, in which conventional rigid, bulky electronics are facing insurmountable obstacles to fulfil the demand on comfortable user experience. Not only would the birth of microfluidic electronics contribute to both the microfluidics and electronics fields, but it may also shape the future of our daily life. Nevertheless, microfluidic electronics are still at a very early stage, and significant efforts in research and development are needed to advance this emerging field. The intention of this article is to review recent research outcomes in the field of microfluidic electronics, and address current technical challenges and issues. The outlook of future development in microfluidic electronic devices and systems, as well as new fabrication techniques, is also discussed. Moreover, the authors would like to inspire both the microfluidics and electronics communities to further exploit this newly-established field.

  7. Polymer-based platform for microfluidic systems

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William [Livermore, CA; Krulevitch, Peter [Pleasanton, CA; Maghribi, Mariam [Livermore, CA; Hamilton, Julie [Tracy, CA; Rose, Klint [Boston, MA; Wang, Amy W [Oakland, CA

    2009-10-13

    A method of forming a polymer-based microfluidic system platform using network building blocks selected from a set of interconnectable network building blocks, such as wire, pins, blocks, and interconnects. The selected building blocks are interconnectably assembled and fixedly positioned in precise positions in a mold cavity of a mold frame to construct a three-dimensional model construction of a microfluidic flow path network preferably having meso-scale dimensions. A hardenable liquid, such as poly (dimethylsiloxane) is then introduced into the mold cavity and hardened to form a platform structure as well as to mold the microfluidic flow path network having channels, reservoirs and ports. Pre-fabricated elbows, T's and other joints are used to interconnect various building block elements together. After hardening the liquid the building blocks are removed from the platform structure to make available the channels, cavities and ports within the platform structure. Microdevices may be embedded within the cast polymer-based platform, or bonded to the platform structure subsequent to molding, to create an integrated microfluidic system. In this manner, the new microfluidic platform is versatile and capable of quickly generating prototype systems, and could easily be adapted to a manufacturing setting.

  8. Acoustically-driven microfluidic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, A W; Benett, W J; Tarte, L R

    2000-06-23

    We have demonstrated a non-contact method of concentrating and mixing particles in a plastic microfluidic chamber employing acoustic radiation pressure. A flaw cell package has also been designed that integrates liquid sample interconnects, electrical contacts and a removable sample chamber. Experiments were performed on 1, 3, 6, and 10 {micro}m polystyrene beads. Increased antibody binding to a solid-phase substrate was observed in the presence of acoustic mixing due to improve mass transport.

  9. Method for making electro-fluidic connections in microfluidic devices

    DOEpatents

    Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Martinez, David; Manginell, Ronald P.; Heller, Edwin J.; Chanchani, Rajen

    2004-08-10

    A method for forming electro-fluidic interconnections in microfluidic devices comprises forming an electrical connection between matching bond pads on a die containing an active electrical element and a microfluidic substrate and forming a fluidic seal ring that circumscribes the active electrical element and a fluidic feedthrough. Preferably, the electrical connection and the seal ring are formed in a single bonding step. The simple method is particularly useful for chemical microanalytical systems wherein a plurality of microanalytical components, such as a chemical preconcentrator, a gas chromatography column, and a surface acoustic wave detector, are fluidically interconnected on a hybrid microfluidic substrate having electrical connection to external support electronics.

  10. A tunable spherical cap microfluidic electrically small antenna.

    PubMed

    Jobs, Magnus; Hjort, Klas; Rydberg, Anders; Wu, Zhigang

    2013-10-11

    A highly efficient microfluidic 3D electrically small antenna is created using a simple fabrication technique. It is easy to construct simply by pneumatically inflating a planar microfluidic antenna into a spherical cap. It has premium performance around its hemispherical shape, combining a wide working band with high efficiency.

  11. Planar electrochemical device assembly

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2007-06-19

    A pre-fabricated electrochemical device having a dense electrolyte disposed between an anode and a cathode preferably deposited as thin films is bonded to a porous electrically conductive support. A second porous electrically conductive support may be bonded to a counter electrode of the electrochemical device. Multiple electrochemical devices may be bonded in parallel to a single porous support, such as a perforated sheet to provide a planar array. Planar arrays may be arranged in a stacked interconnected array. A method of making a supported electrochemical device is disclosed wherein the method includes a step of bonding a pre-fabricated electrochemical device layer to an existing porous metal or porous metal alloy layer.

  12. Planar electrochemical device assembly

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson; Craig P. , Visco; Steven J. , De Jonghe; Lutgard C.

    2010-11-09

    A pre-fabricated electrochemical device having a dense electrolyte disposed between an anode and a cathode preferably deposited as thin films is bonded to a porous electrically conductive support. A second porous electrically conductive support may be bonded to a counter electrode of the electrochemical device. Multiple electrochemical devices may be bonded in parallel to a single porous support, such as a perforated sheet to provide a planar array. Planar arrays may be arranged in a stacked interconnected array. A method of making a supported electrochemical device is disclosed wherein the method includes a step of bonding a pre-fabricated electrochemical device layer to an existing porous metal or porous metal alloy layer.

  13. High-pressure microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjort, K.

    2015-03-01

    When using appropriate materials and microfabrication techniques, with the small dimensions the mechanical stability of microstructured devices allows for processes at high pressures without loss in safety. The largest area of applications has been demonstrated in green chemistry and bioprocesses, where extraction, synthesis and analyses often excel at high densities and high temperatures. This is accessible through high pressures. Capillary chemistry has been used since long but, just like in low-pressure applications, there are several potential advantages in using microfluidic platforms, e.g., planar isothermal set-ups, large local variations in geometries, dense form factors, small dead volumes and precisely positioned microstructures for control of reactions, catalysis, mixing and separation. Other potential applications are in, e.g., microhydraulics, exploration, gas driven vehicles, and high-pressure science. From a review of the state-of-art and frontiers of high pressure microfluidics, the focus will be on different solutions demonstrated for microfluidic handling at high pressures and challenges that remain.

  14. Next-generation integrated microfluidic circuits.

    PubMed

    Mosadegh, Bobak; Bersano-Begey, Tommaso; Park, Joong Yull; Burns, Mark A; Takayama, Shuichi

    2011-09-07

    This mini-review provides a brief overview of recent devices that use networks of elastomeric valves to minimize or eliminate the need for interconnections between microfluidic chips and external instruction lines that send flow control signals. Conventional microfluidic control mechanisms convey instruction signals in a parallel manner such that the number of instruction lines must increase as the number of independently operated valves increases. The devices described here circumvent this "tyranny of microfluidic interconnects" by the serial encoding of information to enable instruction of an arbitrary number of independent valves with a set number of control lines, or by the microfluidic circuit-embedded encoding of instructions to eliminate control lines altogether. Because the parallel instruction chips are the most historical and straightforward to design, they are still the most commonly used approach today. As requirements for instruction complexity, chip-to-chip communication, and real-time on-chip feedback flow control arise, the next generation of integrated microfluidic circuits will need to incorporate these latest interconnect flow control approaches.

  15. Bio-microfluidics: biomaterials and biomimetic designs.

    PubMed

    Domachuk, Peter; Tsioris, Konstantinos; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G; Kaplan, David L

    2010-01-12

    Bio-microfluidics applies biomaterials and biologically inspired structural designs (biomimetics) to microfluidic devices. Microfluidics, the techniques for constraining fluids on the micrometer and sub-micrometer scale, offer applications ranging from lab-on-a-chip to optofluidics. Despite this wealth of applications, the design of typical microfluidic devices imparts relatively simple, laminar behavior on fluids and is realized using materials and techniques from silicon planar fabrication. On the other hand, highly complex microfluidic behavior is commonplace in nature, where fluids with nonlinear rheology flow through chaotic vasculature composed from a range of biopolymers. In this Review, the current state of bio-microfluidic materials, designs and applications are examined. Biopolymers enable bio-microfluidic devices with versatile functionalization chemistries, flexibility in fabrication, and biocompatibility in vitro and in vivo. Polymeric materials such as alginate, collagen, chitosan, and silk are being explored as bulk and film materials for bio-microfluidics. Hydrogels offer options for mechanically functional devices for microfluidic systems such as self-regulating valves, microlens arrays and drug release systems, vital for integrated bio-microfluidic devices. These devices including growth factor gradients to study cell responses, blood analysis, biomimetic capillary designs, and blood vessel tissue culture systems, as some recent examples of inroads in the field that should lead the way in a new generation of microfluidic devices for bio-related needs and applications. Perhaps one of the most intriguing directions for the future will be fully implantable microfluidic devices that will also integrate with existing vasculature and slowly degrade to fully recapitulate native tissue structure and function, yet serve critical interim functions, such as tissue maintenance, drug release, mechanical support, and cell delivery.

  16. Printed Module Interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Stockert, Talysa R.; Fields, Jeremy D.; Pach, Gregory F.; Mauger, Scott A.; van Hest, Maikel F. A. M.

    2015-06-14

    Monolithic interconnects in photovoltaic modules connect adjacent cells in series, and are typically formed sequentially involving multiple deposition and scribing steps. Interconnect widths of 500 um every 10 mm result in 5% dead area, which does not contribute to power generation in an interconnected solar panel. This work expands on previous work that introduced an alternative interconnection method capable of producing interconnect widths less than 100 um. The interconnect is added to the module in a single step after deposition of the photovoltaic stack, eliminating the need for scribe alignment. This alternative method can be used for all types of thin film photovoltaic modules. Voltage addition with copper-indium-gallium-diselenide (CIGS) solar cells using a 2-scribe printed interconnect approach is demonstrated. Additionally, interconnect widths of 250 um are shown.

  17. Flexible packaging and integration of CMOS IC with elastomeric microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bowei; Dong, Quan; Korman, Can E.; Li, Zhenyu; Zaghloul, Mona E.

    2013-05-01

    We have demonstrated flexible packaging and integration of CMOS IC chips with PDMS microfluidics. Microfluidic channels are used to deliver both liquid samples and liquid metals to the CMOS die. The liquid metals are used to realize electrical interconnects to the CMOS chip. As a demonstration we integrated a CMOS magnetic sensor die and matched PDMS microfluidic channels in a flexible package. The packaged system is fully functional under 3cm bending radius. The flexible integration of CMOS ICs with microfluidics enables previously unavailable flexible CMOS electronic systems with fluidic manipulation capabilities, which hold great potential for wearable health monitoring, point-of-care diagnostics and environmental sensing.

  18. Compact planar microwave blocking filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    U-Yen, Kongpop (Inventor); Wollack, Edward J. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A compact planar microwave blocking filter includes a dielectric substrate and a plurality of filter unit elements disposed on the substrate. The filter unit elements are interconnected in a symmetrical series cascade with filter unit elements being organized in the series based on physical size. In the filter, a first filter unit element of the plurality of filter unit elements includes a low impedance open-ended line configured to reduce the shunt capacitance of the filter.

  19. Fabrication, Metrology, and Transport Characteristics of Single Polymeric Nanopores in Three-Dimensional Hybrid Microfluidic/Nanofluidic Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Travis L.

    2009-01-01

    The incorporation of nanofluidic elements between microfluidic channels to form hybrid microfluidic/nanofluidic architectures allows the extension of microfluidic systems into the third dimension, thus removing the constraints imposed by planarity. Measuring and understanding the behavior of these devices creates new analytical challenges due to…

  20. Fabrication, Metrology, and Transport Characteristics of Single Polymeric Nanopores in Three-Dimensional Hybrid Microfluidic/Nanofluidic Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Travis L.

    2009-01-01

    The incorporation of nanofluidic elements between microfluidic channels to form hybrid microfluidic/nanofluidic architectures allows the extension of microfluidic systems into the third dimension, thus removing the constraints imposed by planarity. Measuring and understanding the behavior of these devices creates new analytical challenges due to…

  1. Planar micromixer

    DOEpatents

    Fiechtner, Gregory J.; Singh, Anup K.; Wiedenman, Boyd J.

    2008-03-18

    The present embodiment describes a laminar-mixing embodiment that utilizes simple, three-dimensional injection. Also described is the use of the embodiment in combination with wide and shallow sections of channel to affect rapid mixing in microanalytical systems. The shallow channel sections are constructed using all planar micromachining techniques, including those based on isotropic etching. The planar construction enables design using minimum dispersion concepts that, in turn, enable simultaneous mixing and injection into subsequent chromatography channels.

  2. Perforation patterned electrical interconnects

    DOEpatents

    Frey, Jonathan

    2014-01-28

    This disclosure describes systems and methods for increasing the usable surface area of electrical contacts within a device, such as a thin film solid state device, through the implementation of electrically conductive interconnects. Embodiments described herein include the use of a plurality of electrically conductive interconnects that penetrate through a top contact layer, through one or more multiple layers, and into a bottom contact layer. The plurality of conductive interconnects may form horizontal and vertical cross-sectional patterns. The use of lasers to form the plurality of electrically conductive interconnects from reflowed layer material further aids in the manufacturing process of a device.

  3. Optical microfluidics

    SciTech Connect

    Kotz, K.T.; Noble, K.A.; Faris, G.W.

    2004-09-27

    We present a method for the control of small droplets based on the thermal Marangoni effect using laser heating. With this approach, droplets covering five orders of magnitude in volume ({approx}1.7 {mu}L to 14 pL), immersed in decanol, were moved on an unmodified polystyrene surface, with speeds of up to 3 mm/s. When two droplets were brought into contact, they spontaneously fused and rapidly mixed in less than 33 ms. This optically addressed microfluidic approach has many advantages for microfluidic transport, including exceptional reconfigurability, low intersample contamination, large volume range, extremely simple substrates, no electrical connections, and ready scaling to large arrays.

  4. Fabrication of plastic microfluidic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Peter M.; Matson, Dean W.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Hammerstrom, D. J.

    1998-09-01

    Plastic components have many advantages, including ease of fabrication, low cost, chemical inertness, lightweight, and disposability. We report on the fabrication of three plastics-based microfluidic components: a motherboard, a dialysis unit, and a metal sensor. Microchannels, headers, and interconnects were produced in thin sheets (>=50 microns) of polyimide, PMMA, polyethylene, and polycarbonate using a direct-write excimer laser micromachining system. Machined sheets were laminated by thermal and adhesive bonding to form leak-tight microfluidic components. The microfluidic motherboard borrowed the `functionality on a chip' concept from the electronics industry and was the heart of a complex microfluidic analytical device. The motherboard platform was designed to be tightly integrated and self-contained (i.e., liquid flows are all confined within machined microchannels), reducing the need for tubing with fluid distribution and connectivity. This concept greatly facilitated system integration and miniaturization. As fabricated, the motherboard consisted of three fluid reservoirs connected to micropumps by microchannels. The fluids could either be pumped independently or mixed in microchannels prior to being directed to exterior analytical components via outlet ports. The microdialysis device was intended to separate electrolytic solutes from low volume samples prior to mass spectrometric analysis. The device consisted of a dialysis membrane laminated between opposed serpentine microchannels containing the sample fluid and a buffer solution. The laminated metal sensor consisted of fluid reservoirs, micro-flow channels, micropumps, mixing channels, reaction channels, and detector circuitry.

  5. Integrated Microfluidic Gas Sensors for Water Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, L.; Sniadecki, N.; DeVoe, D. L.; Beamesderfer, M.; Semancik, S.; DeVoe, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    A silicon-based microhotplate tin oxide (SnO2) gas sensor integrated into a polymer-based microfluidic system for monitoring of contaminants in water systems is presented. This device is designed to sample a water source, control the sample vapor pressure within a microchannel using integrated resistive heaters, and direct the vapor past the integrated gas sensor for analysis. The sensor platform takes advantage of novel technology allowing direct integration of discrete silicon chips into a larger polymer microfluidic substrate, including seamless fluidic and electrical interconnects between the substrate and silicon chip.

  6. Micro-Fluidic Device for Drug Delivery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beebe, David J. (Inventor); MacDonald, Michael J. (Inventor); Eddington, David T. (Inventor); Mensing, Glennys A. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A microfluidic device is provided for delivering a drug to an individual. The microfluidic device includes a body that defines a reservoir for receiving the drug therein. A valve interconnects the reservoir to an output needle that is insertable into the skin of an individual. A pressure source urges the drug from the reservoir toward the needle. The valve is movable between a closed position preventing the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle and an open position allowing for the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle in response to a predetermined condition in the physiological fluids of the individual.

  7. Integrated Microfluidic Gas Sensors for Water Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, L.; Sniadecki, N.; DeVoe, D. L.; Beamesderfer, M.; Semancik, S.; DeVoe, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    A silicon-based microhotplate tin oxide (SnO2) gas sensor integrated into a polymer-based microfluidic system for monitoring of contaminants in water systems is presented. This device is designed to sample a water source, control the sample vapor pressure within a microchannel using integrated resistive heaters, and direct the vapor past the integrated gas sensor for analysis. The sensor platform takes advantage of novel technology allowing direct integration of discrete silicon chips into a larger polymer microfluidic substrate, including seamless fluidic and electrical interconnects between the substrate and silicon chip.

  8. Solar cell array interconnects

    DOEpatents

    Carey, Paul G.; Thompson, Jesse B.; Colella, Nicolas J.; Williams, Kenneth A.

    1995-01-01

    Electrical interconnects for solar cells or other electronic components using a silver-silicone paste or a lead-tin (Pb-Sn) no-clean fluxless solder cream, whereby the high breakage of thin (<6 mil thick) solar cells using conventional solder interconnect is eliminated. The interconnects of this invention employs copper strips which are secured to the solar cells by a silver-silicone conductive paste which can be used at room temperature, or by a Pb-Sn solder cream which eliminates undesired residue on the active surfaces of the solar cells. Electrical testing using the interconnects of this invention has shown that no degradation of the interconnects developed under high current testing, while providing a very low contact resistance value.

  9. Solar cell array interconnects

    DOEpatents

    Carey, P.G.; Thompson, J.B.; Colella, N.J.; Williams, K.A.

    1995-11-14

    Electrical interconnects are disclosed for solar cells or other electronic components using a silver-silicone paste or a lead-tin (Pb-Sn) no-clean fluxless solder cream, whereby the high breakage of thin (<6 mil thick) solar cells using conventional solder interconnect is eliminated. The interconnects of this invention employs copper strips which are secured to the solar cells by a silver-silicone conductive paste which can be used at room temperature, or by a Pb-Sn solder cream which eliminates undesired residue on the active surfaces of the solar cells. Electrical testing using the interconnects of this invention has shown that no degradation of the interconnects developed under high current testing, while providing a very low contact resistance value. 4 figs.

  10. A photonic-microfluidic integrated device for reliable fluorescence detection and counting.

    PubMed

    Watts, Benjamin R; Zhang, Zhiyi; Xu, Chang Qing; Cao, Xudong; Lin, Min

    2012-11-01

    A photonic-microfluidic integrated device is demonstrated with excellent and reliable fluorescence detection performance. CV values of 8% for 2.5-μm beads and 14% for 6-μm beads were achieved through the correct deployment of carefully formed excitation beam shapes via integrated on-chip optics even without the use of 3D hydrodynamic focusing or a high-quality laser source and single mode beam propagation. The devices are fabricated in a monolithic planar fashion using a system of microlenses and waveguides integrated with microfluidic channels on-chip and packaged using a high-quality and low-cost channel sealing and high-performance interconnecting technology developed from our earlier works. Beam geometry in the excitation region is shown to affect the variation of fluorescence intensity from specimens, hence configurations of beam geometry targeted for a specific bead sizes are examined to ensure proper deployment of the lens designs. The formed high-quality optical excitation regions ensure reliable detection even with relaxed hydrodynamic focusing to ensure applicability with multiple specimen sizes. Device performance with each bead size was found to be acceptable for a range of beam geometries with a different ideal configuration for each bead size. These device designs help to form a device that will supplement conventional flow cytometry in point-of-care and remote detection applications by performing specific detections with an inexpensive and replaceable device.

  11. Rapid prototyping of three-dimensional microfluidic mixers in glass by femtosecond laser direct writing.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yang; Song, Jiangxin; Li, En; Luo, Yong; Shen, Yinglong; Chen, Danping; Cheng, Ya; Xu, Zhizhan; Sugioka, Koji; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2012-02-21

    The creation of complex three-dimensional (3D) microfluidic systems has attracted significant attention from both scientific and applied research communities. However, it is still a formidable challenge to build 3D microfluidic structures with arbitrary configurations using conventional planar lithographic fabrication methods. Here, we demonstrate rapid fabrication of high-aspect-ratio microfluidic channels with various 3D configurations in glass substrates by femtosecond laser direct writing. Based on this approach, we demonstrate a 3D passive microfluidic mixer and characterize its functionalities. This technology will enable rapid construction of complex 3D microfluidic devices for a wide array of lab-on-a-chip applications.

  12. Laser-Micromachined and Laminated Microfluidic Components for Miniaturized Thermal, Chemical and Biological Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Peter M. ); Matson, Dean W. ); Bennett, Wendy D. ); Stewart, Donald C. ); Lin, Yuehe )

    1999-01-01

    Microchannel microfluidic components are being developed for heat transfer, chemical reactor, chemical analysis, and biological analytical applications. Specific applications include chemical sensing, DNA replication, blodd analysis, capillary electrophoresis, fuel cell reactors, high temperature chemical reactors, heat pumps, combustors, and fuel processors. Two general types of component architectures have been developed and the fabrication processes defined. All involve a lamination scheme using plastic, ceramic, or metal laminates, as opposed to planar components. The first type is a stacked architecture that utilizes functionality built in each layer, with fluid flow interconnects between layers. Each layer of the laminate has specific microchannel geometry, and performs a specific function (such as mixing, heat exchange, or chemical reaction). Polymeric materials are used primarily. Fabrication processes used are laser micromaching, wet and dry etching, and coating deposition. T he laminates can also be micromolded plastics. The second architecture employs laminates to form internal microchannels and interconnects. Materials include ceramic tapes and high temperature metals. Catalysts can be placed in the microchannels. Fabrication processes used are diffusion bonding, ceramic bonding and firing, photochemical etching, and electrochemical micromaching. Bonding, thus sealing, the laminates is an important issue. Process conditions have been developed to reduce distortion of the laminates and to hermetically seal the components.

  13. Laser-micromachined and laminated microfluidic components for miniaturized thermal, chemical, and biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Peter M.; Matson, Dean W.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Stewart, Donald C.; Lin, Yuehe

    1999-03-01

    Microchannel microfluidic components are being developed for heat transfer, chemical reactor, chemical analysis, and biological analytical applications. Specific applications include chemical sensing, DNA replication, blood analysis, capillary electrophoresis, fuel cell reactors, high temperature chemical reactors, heat pumps, combustors, and fuel processors. Two general types of component architectures have been developed and the fabrication processes defined. All involve a lamination scheme using plastic, ceramic, or metal laminates, as opposed to planar components. The first type is a stacked architecture that utilizes functionality built in each layer, with fluid flow interconnects between layers. Each layer of the laminate has specific microchannel geometry, and performs a specific function. Polymeric materials are used primarily. Fabrication processes used are laser micromachining, wet and dry etching, and coating deposition. the laminates can also be micromolded plastics. The second architecture employs laminates to form internal microchannels and interconnects. Materials include ceramic tapes and high temperature metals. Catalysts can be placed in the microchannels. Fabrication processes used are diffusion bonding, ceramic bonding and firing, photochemical etching, and electrochemical micromachining. Bonding, thus sealing, the laminates is an important issue. Process conditions have been develop to reduce distortion of the laminates and to hermetically seal the components.

  14. Microfluidic Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Zheng, Siyang (Inventor); Lin, Jeffrey Chun-Hui (Inventor); Kasdan, Harvey L. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Described herein are particular embodiments relating to a microfluidic device that may be utilized for cell sensing, counting, and/or sorting. Particular aspects relate to a microfabricated device that is capable of differentiating single cell types from dense cell populations. One particular embodiment relates a device and methods of using the same for sensing, counting, and/or sorting leukocytes from whole, undiluted blood samples.

  15. Microfluidic Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Zheng, Siyang (Inventor); Lin, Jeffrey Chun-Hui (Inventor); Kasdan, Harvey (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Described herein are particular embodiments relating to a microfluidic device that may be utilized for cell sensing, counting, and/or sorting. Particular aspects relate to a microfabricated device that is capable of differentiating single cell types from dense cell populations. One particular embodiment relates a device and methods of using the same for sensing, counting, and/or sorting leukocytes from whole, undiluted blood samples.

  16. Microfluidic Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Zheng, Siyang (Inventor); Lin, Jeffrey Chun-Hui (Inventor); Kasdan, Harvey L. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Described herein are particular embodiments relating to a microfluidic device that may be utilized for cell sensing, counting, and/or sorting. Particular aspects relate to a microfabricated device that is capable of differentiating single cell types from dense cell populations. One particular embodiment relates a device and methods of using the same for sensing, counting, and/or sorting leukocytes from whole, undiluted blood samples.

  17. Microfluidic Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Zheng, Siyang (Inventor); Lin, Jeffrey Chun-Hui (Inventor); Kasdan, Harvey L. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Described herein are particular embodiments relating to a microfluidic device that may be utilized for cell sensing, counting, and/or sorting. Particular aspects relate to a microfabricated device that is capable of differentiating single cell types from dense cell populations. One particular embodiment relates a device and methods of using the same for sensing, counting, and/or sorting leukocytes from whole, undiluted blood samples.

  18. Microfluidic waves

    PubMed Central

    Utz, Marcel; Begley, Matthew R.; Haj-Hariri, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    The propagation of pressure waves in fluidic channels with elastic covers is discussed in view of applications to flow control in microfluidic devices. A theory is presented which describes pressure waves in the fluid that are coupled to bending waves in the elastic cover. At low frequencies, the lateral bending of the cover dominates over longitudinal bending, leading to propagating, non-dispersive longitudinal pressure waves in the channel. The theory addresses effects due to both the finite viscosity and compressibility of the fluid. The coupled waves propagate without dispersion, as long as the wave length is larger than the channel width. It is shown that in channels of typical microfluidic dimensions, wave velocities in the range of a few 10 m s−1 result if the channels are covered by films of a compliant material such as PDMS. The application of this principle to design microfluidic band pass filters based on standing waves is discussed. Characteristic frequencies in the range of a few kHz are readily achieved with quality factors above 30. PMID:21966667

  19. Laser printing of 3D metallic interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beniam, Iyoel; Mathews, Scott A.; Charipar, Nicholas A.; Auyeung, Raymond C. Y.; Piqué, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    The use of laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) techniques for the printing of functional materials has been demonstrated for numerous applications. The printing gives rise to patterns, which can be used to fabricate planar interconnects. More recently, various groups have demonstrated electrical interconnects from laser-printed 3D structures. The laser printing of these interconnects takes place through aggregation of voxels of either molten metal or of pastes containing dispersed metallic particles. However, the generated 3D structures do not posses the same metallic conductivity as a bulk metal interconnect of the same cross-section and length as those formed by wire bonding or tab welding. An alternative is to laser transfer entire 3D structures using a technique known as lase-and-place. Lase-and-place is a LIFT process whereby whole components and parts can be transferred from a donor substrate onto a desired location with one single laser pulse. This paper will describe the use of LIFT to laser print freestanding, solid metal foils or beams precisely over the contact pads of discrete devices to interconnect them into fully functional circuits. Furthermore, this paper will also show how the same laser can be used to bend or fold the bulk metal foils prior to transfer, thus forming compliant 3D structures able to provide strain relief for the circuits under flexing or during motion from thermal mismatch. These interconnect "ridges" can span wide gaps (on the order of a millimeter) and accommodate height differences of tens of microns between adjacent devices. Examples of these laser printed 3D metallic bridges and their role in the development of next generation electronics by additive manufacturing will be presented.

  20. Novel interconnect deposition technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speckman, D. M.; Wendt, J. P.

    1991-12-01

    A new series of experiments was initiated to improve current interconnect deposition technology for integrated circuits. Preliminary aluminum deposition experiments were carried out using trimethylamine(alane) as the precursor, and some mildly reflective, uniform aluminum films were successfully deposited on glass slides, suggesting that chemical vapor deposition (CVD) will be a practicable deposition technique for advanced integrated circuit interconnect films. CVD studies of aluminum and zirconium- and hafnium-diboride thin films are continuing.

  1. LTCC interconnects in microsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusu, Cristina; Persson, Katrin; Ottosson, Britta; Billger, Dag

    2006-06-01

    Different microelectromechanical system (MEMS) packaging strategies towards high packaging density of MEMS devices and lower expenditure exist both in the market and in research. For example, electrical interconnections and low stress wafer level packaging are essential for improving device performance. Hybrid integration of low temperature co-fired ceramics (LTCC) with Si can be a way for an easier packaging system with integrated electrical interconnection, and as well towards lower costs. Our research on LTCC-Si integration is reported in this paper.

  2. Zee electrical interconnect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, Thomas M. (Inventor); Gaddy, Edward M. (Inventor); Herriage, Michael J. (Inventor); Patterson, Robert E. (Inventor); Partin, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An interconnect, having some length, that reliably connects two conductors separated by the length of the interconnect when the connection is made but in which one length if unstressed would change relative to the other in operation. The interconnect comprises a base element an intermediate element and a top element. Each element is rectangular and formed of a conducting material and has opposed ends. The elements are arranged in a generally Z-shape with the base element having one end adapted to be connected to one conductor. The top element has one end adapted to be connected to another conductor and the intermediate element has its ends disposed against the other end of the base and the top element. Brazes mechanically and electrically interconnect the intermediate element to the base and the top elements proximate the corresponding ends of the elements. When the respective ends of the base and the top elements are connected to the conductors, an electrical connection is formed therebetween, and when the conductors are relatively moved or the interconnect elements change length the elements accommodate the changes and the associated compression and tension forces in such a way that the interconnect does not mechanically fatigue.

  3. Fluid delivery manifolds and microfluidic systems

    DOEpatents

    Renzi, Ronald F.; Sommer, Gregory J.; Singh, Anup K.; Hatch, Anson V.; Claudnic, Mark R.; Wang, Ying-Chih; Van de Vreugde, James L.

    2017-02-28

    Embodiments of fluid distribution manifolds, cartridges, and microfluidic systems are described herein. Fluid distribution manifolds may include an insert member and a manifold base and may define a substantially closed channel within the manifold when the insert member is press-fit into the base. Cartridges described herein may allow for simultaneous electrical and fluidic interconnection with an electrical multiplex board and may be held in place using magnetic attraction.

  4. SOFC INTERCONNECT DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Diane M. England

    2004-03-16

    An interconnect for an SOFC stack is used to connect fuel cells into a stack. SOFC stacks are expected to run for 40,000 hours and 10 thermal cycles for the stationary application and 10,000 hours and 7000 thermal cycles for the transportation application. The interconnect of a stack must be economical and robust enough to survive the SOFC stack operation temperature of 750 C and must maintain the electrical connection to the fuel cells throughout the lifetime and under thermal cycling conditions. Ferritic and austenitic stainless steels, and nickel-based superalloys were investigated as possible interconnect materials for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks. The alloys were thermally cycled in air and in a wet nitrogen-argon-hydrogen (N2-Ar-H2-H2O) atmosphere. Thermogravimetry was used to determine the parabolic oxidation rate constants of the alloys in both atmospheres. The area-specific resistance of the oxide scale and metal substrates were measured using a two-probe technique with platinum contacts. The study identifies two new interconnect designs which can be used with both bonded and compressive stack sealing mechanisms. The new interconnect designs offer a solution to chromium vaporization, which can lead to degradation of some (chromium-sensitive) SOFC cathodes.

  5. Optically interconnected phased arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, Kul B.; Kunath, Richard R.

    1988-01-01

    Phased-array antennas are required for many future NASA missions. They will provide agile electronic beam forming for communications and tracking in the range of 1 to 100 GHz. Such phased arrays are expected to use several hundred GaAs monolithic integrated circuits (MMICs) as transmitting and receiving elements. However, the interconnections of these elements by conventional coaxial cables and waveguides add weight, reduce flexibility, and increase electrical interference. Alternative interconnections based on optical fibers, optical processing, and holography are under evaluation as possible solutions. In this paper, the current status of these techniques is described. Since high-frequency optical components such as photodetectors, lasers, and modulators are key elements in these interconnections, their performance and limitations are discussed.

  6. Welded solar cell interconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stofel, E. J.; Browne, E. R.; Meese, R. A.; Vendura, G. J.

    1982-01-01

    The efficiency of the welding of solar-cell interconnects is compared with the efficiency of soldering such interconnects, and the cases in which welding may be superior are examined. Emphasis is placed on ultrasonic welding; attention is given to the solar-cell welding machine, the application of the welding process to different solar-cell configurations, producibility, and long-life performance of welded interconnects. Much of the present work has been directed toward providing increased confidence in the reliability of welding using conditions approximating those that would occur with large-scale array production. It is concluded that there is as yet insufficient data to determine which of three methods (soldering, parallel gap welding, and ultrasonic welding) provides the longest-duration solar panel life.

  7. SOFC INTERCONNECT DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Diane M. England

    2003-06-06

    This report summarizes the interconnect work being performed at Delphi. Materials were chosen for this interconnect project were chosen from ferritic and austenitic stainless steels, and nickel-based superalloys. The alloys are thermally cycled in air and a wet hydrogen atmosphere. The oxide scale adherence, electrical resistance and oxidation resistance are determined after long-term oxidation of each alloy. The oxide scale adherence will be observed using a scanning electron microscope. The electrical resistance of the oxidized alloys will be determined using an electrical resistance measurement apparatus which has been designed and is currently being built. Data from the electrical resistance measurement is expected to be provided in the second quarter.

  8. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF CATHODE-INTERCONNECT INTERFACES IN PLANAR SOFCs

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yanli; Armstrong, Beth L; Trejo, Rosa M; Bai, Jianming; Watkins, Thomas R; Lara-Curzio, Edgar

    2010-01-01

    The residual stresses in manganese cobaltite, i.e., Mn1.5Co1.5O4, coatings applied onto alloys 441 and Crofer 22 APU were determined by X-Ray Diffraction. The residual stresses were found to be tensile at 800 C for both systems. The residual stress for spinel-coated AL441 relaxed with time and reached a value of 0.16 0.02 GPa after 300 minutes. The stress relaxation process was slower for spinel-coated Crofer and reached a value of 0.23 0.01 GPa after 500 minutes. Four-point bend SENB testing technique was used to evaluate the toughness of the interfaces between LSM10, i.e., (La0.9Sr0.1)0.98MnO3+δ, and spinel-coated AL441 and Crofer. Sandwich test specimens were prepared by sintering the LSM10 layer at 900 C for four hours in air or under PO2 cyclic conditions. The strain energy release rate was found to be 1.52 0.11 J/m2 for regular sintering and 1.47 0.15 J/m2 for sintering with cyclic PO2 treatment. This difference was found to be statistically insignificant.

  9. Capillary interconnect device

    SciTech Connect

    Renzi, Ronald F

    2013-11-19

    An interconnecting device for connecting a plurality of first fluid-bearing conduits to a corresponding plurality of second fluid-bearing conduits thereby providing fluid communication between the first fluid-bearing conduits and the second fluid-bearing conduits. The device includes a manifold and one or two ferrule plates that are held by compressive axial forces.

  10. Coplanar interconnection module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steward, R. D.; Windsor, H. F.

    1970-01-01

    Module for interconnecting a semiconductor array to external leads or components incorporates a metal external heat sink for cooling the array. Heat sink, extending down from the molded block that supports the array, is immersed in a liquid nitrogen bath which is designed to maintain the desired array temperature.

  11. Interconnecting with VIPs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Interconnectedness changes lives. It can even save lives. Recently the author got to witness and be part of something in his role as a teacher of primary science that has changed lives: it may even have saved lives. It involved primary science teaching--and the climate. Robert Collins describes how it is all interconnected. The "Toilet…

  12. Open Systems Interconnection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denenberg, Ray

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the need for standards allowing computer-to-computer communication and gives examples of technical issues. The seven-layer framework of the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) Reference Model is explained and illustrated. Sidebars feature public data networks and Recommendation X.25, OSI standards, OSI layer functions, and a glossary.…

  13. CAISSON: Interconnect Network Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springer, Paul L.

    2006-01-01

    Cray response to HPCS initiative. Model future petaflop computer interconnect. Parallel discrete event simulation techniques for large scale network simulation. Built on WarpIV engine. Run on laptop and Altix 3000. Can be sized up to 1000 simulated nodes per host node. Good parallel scaling characteristics. Flexible: multiple injectors, arbitration strategies, queue iterators, network topologies.

  14. Optical Interconnections For WSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, E.; Valette, S.; Gidon, P.

    1989-02-01

    Optical interconnections may be an alternative to metallic lines in very large and fast circuits. In this field, integrated optics could be very attractive because the basic approach is similar to the one of microelectronics. From this point of view, the silicon based integrated optics technology developed at LETI is described and expected performances are analysed.

  15. Interconnecting with VIPs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Interconnectedness changes lives. It can even save lives. Recently the author got to witness and be part of something in his role as a teacher of primary science that has changed lives: it may even have saved lives. It involved primary science teaching--and the climate. Robert Collins describes how it is all interconnected. The "Toilet…

  16. Microfluidic electrochemical reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Nuzzo, Ralph G; Mitrovski, Svetlana M

    2011-03-22

    A microfluidic electrochemical reactor includes an electrode and one or more microfluidic channels on the electrode, where the microfluidic channels are covered with a membrane containing a gas permeable polymer. The distance between the electrode and the membrane is less than 500 micrometers. The microfluidic electrochemical reactor can provide for increased reaction rates in electrochemical reactions using a gaseous reactant, as compared to conventional electrochemical cells. Microfluidic electrochemical reactors can be incorporated into devices for applications such as fuel cells, electrochemical analysis, microfluidic actuation, pH gradient formation.

  17. Thermoosmotic microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingcheng; Ripoll, Marisol

    2016-10-19

    Microchannels with asymmetrically ratcheted walls are here shown to behave as effective and versatile microfluidic pumps if locally heated. When the boundary walls have different temperatures, the confined liquid experiences a temperature gradient along the sawtooth edges, which can induce a thermoosmotic flow. A mesoscale molecular simulation approach is here employed to investigate the flows which are contrasted using an analytical approach. Microchannels can be composed by one or two ratcheted walls which can be straight or cylindrical. Varying the channel geometry can not only change the overall fluid flux, but also vary the flow patters from shear to capillary type, or even to extensional type flows. This scheme does not require multiphase fluids or any movable channel parts, although they are possible to be implemented. The proposed principle is then very versatile to locally manipulate complex fluids, and a promising tool to recover waste heat, to facilitate cooling of microchips, and to manufacture portable lab-on-a-chip devices.

  18. Corrosion Performance of Ferritic Steel for SOFC Interconnect Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Jablonski, P.D.; Alman, D.E.

    2006-11-01

    Ferritic stainless steels have been identified as potential candidates for interconnects in planar-type solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) operating below 800ºC. Crofer 22 APU was selected for this study. It was studied under simulated SOFC-interconnect dual environment conditions with humidified air on one side of the sample and humidified hydrogen on the other side at 750ºC. The surfaces of the oxidized samples were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with microanalytical capabilities. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis was also used in this study.

  19. Fuel cell system with interconnect

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Zhien; Goettler, Richard; Delaforce, Philip Mark

    2016-03-08

    The present invention includes a fuel cell system having an interconnect that reduces or eliminates diffusion (leakage) of fuel and oxidant by providing an increased densification, by forming the interconnect as a ceramic/metal composite.

  20. Photovoltaic sub-cell interconnects

    DOEpatents

    van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria; Swinger Platt, Heather Anne

    2017-05-09

    Photovoltaic sub-cell interconnect systems and methods are provided. In one embodiment, a photovoltaic device comprises a thin film stack of layers deposited upon a substrate, wherein the thin film stack layers are subdivided into a plurality of sub-cells interconnected in series by a plurality of electrical interconnection structures; and wherein the plurality of electrical interconnection structures each comprise no more than two scribes that penetrate into the thin film stack layers.

  1. Polydimethylsiloxane-based conducting composites and their applications in microfluidic chip fabrication

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Xiuqing; Wen, Weijia

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews the design and fabrication of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based conducting composites and their applications in microfluidic chip fabrication. Owing to their good electrical conductivity and rubberlike elastic characteristics, these composites can be used variously in soft-touch electronic packaging, planar and three-dimensional electronic circuits, and in-chip electrodes. Several microfluidic components fabricated with PDMS-based composites have been introduced, including a microfluidic mixer, a microheater, a micropump, a microdroplet controller, as well as an all-in-one microfluidic chip. PMID:19693388

  2. Possibilities and limitations of space-variant holographic optical elements for switching networks and general interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwider, Johannes; Stork, Wilhelm; Streibl, Norbert; Voelkel, Reinhard

    1990-07-01

    Optical interconnects of arbitrary design require space-variant optics. Planar holographic optical elements (HOE) offer a high flexibility and ease of production. HOE work via diffraction causing chromatic aberrations. This problem becomes serious if semiconductor lasers with poor wavelength stability should be used. Estimates for the number of independent space-variant interconnects their spatial tolerances and their wavelength stability will be considered. 1 . INTRODUC liON Optical interconnects enable the transmission of signals with ultra high frequencies with small crosstalk and rather low waste energy per transmission line. Two fields of application for optical wiring concepts can be discerned i. e. fixed pattern chip to chip (or board to board) interconnects and reconfigurable switching networks or bus systems where the interconnect path is selected out of a number of fixed interconnects by means of e. g. so-called exchange bypass modules (EBM)1''2. 2. INTERCONNECT CONCEPTS A general feature of optical interconnects is the fact that the light has to leave the board/chip-plane in order to give room for the interconnect fabric i. e. the light leaves the board-plane perpendicularly The necessary optical means are: collimating or focussing elements deflectors and beamsplitters(fanout). Gratings or more general holograms seem the most promising optical elements. These elements may be planar and can be configurated in an arbitrary manner. HOE3 can be used for the above mentioned purposes . Efficient HOE can be obtained either by using thick

  3. Multiphase flows with digital and traditional microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Michael A.

    Multi-phase fluid systems are an important concept in fluid mechanics, seen every day in how fluids interact with solids, gases, and other fluids in many industrial, medical, agricultural, and other regimes. In this thesis, the development of a two-dimensional digital microfluidic device is presented, followed by the development of a two-phase microfluidic diagnostic tool designed to simulate sandstone geometries in oil reservoirs. In both instances, it is possible to take advantage of the physics involved in multiphase flows to affect positive outcomes in both. In order to make an effective droplet-based digital microfluidic device, one must be able to precisely control a number of key processes including droplet positioning, motion, coalescence, mixing, and sorting. For planar or open microfluidic devices, many of these processes have yet to be demonstrated. A suitable platform for an open system is a superhydrophobic surface, as suface characteristics are critical. Great efforts have been spent over the last decade developing hydrophobic surfaces exhibiting very large contact angles with water, and which allow for high droplet mobility. We demonstrate that sanding Teflon can produce superhydrophobic surfaces with advancing contact angles of up to 151° and contact angle hysteresis of less than 4°. We use these surfaces to characterize droplet coalescence, mixing, motion, deflection, positioning, and sorting. This research culminates with the presentation of two digital microfluidic devices: a droplet reactor/analyzer and a droplet sorter. As global energy usage increases, maximizing oil recovery from known reserves becomes a crucial multiphase challenge in order to meet the rising demand. This thesis presents the development of a microfluidic sandstone platform capable of quickly and inexpensively testing the performance of fluids with different rheological properties on the recovery of oil. Specifically, these microfluidic devices are utilized to examine how

  4. Rapid fabrication of supercapacitor electrodes using bionanoscaffolds in capillary microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, F.; Chu, S.; Gerasopoulos, K.; Culver, J. N.; Ghodssi, R.

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports the utilization of capillary microfluidics to rapidly create nanostructure-patterned electrodes for energy storage applications. Using patterned photoresist as open-channel capillary microfluidics, Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) bio-nanoscaffolds suspended in solution are autonomously delivered onto planar gold electrodes over a 1 cm2 area. The TMVs assemble on the electrode and form a dense bio-nanoscaffold layer due to enhanced evaporation-assisted assembly in the open-channel capillary microfluidic device within an hour. The TMV structures are coated with Ni/NiO through electroless plating and thermal oxidation to form supercapacitor electrodes. The galvanostatic charge/discharge cycle showed a 3.6-fold increase in areal capacitance for the nanostructured electrode compared to planar structures.

  5. Interconnected network of cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini Kamal, Mahdad; Afshari, Hossein; Leblebici, Yusuf; Schmid, Alexandre; Vandergheynst, Pierre

    2013-02-01

    The real-time development of multi-camera systems is a great challenge. Synchronization and large data rates of the cameras adds to the complexity of these systems as well. The complexity of such system also increases as the number of their incorporating cameras increases. The customary approach to implementation of such system is a central type, where all the raw stream from the camera are first stored then processed for their target application. An alternative approach is to embed smart cameras to these systems instead of ordinary cameras with limited or no processing capability. Smart cameras with intra and inter camera processing capability and programmability at the software and hardware level will offer the right platform for distributed and parallel processing for multi- camera systems real-time application development. Inter camera processing requires the interconnection of smart cameras in a network arrangement. A novel hardware emulating platform is introduced for demonstrating the concept of the interconnected network of cameras. A methodology is demonstrated for the interconnection network of camera construction and analysis. A sample application is developed and demonstrated.

  6. Interconnects, Transmitters, and Receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoefflinger, Bernd

    Interconnects on-chip between transistors and between functions like processors and memories, between chips on carriers or in stacks, and the communication with the outside world have become a highly complex performance, reliability, cost, and energy challenge. Twelve layers of metal interconnects, produced by lithography, require, including the contact vias, 24 mask and process cycles on top of the process front-end. The resulting lines are associated with resistance, capacitance and inductance parasitics as well as with ageing due to high current densities. Large savings in wiring lengths are achieved with 3D integration: transistor stacking, chip stacking and TSV's, a direction, which has exploded since 2005 because of many other benefits and, at the same time, with sensitive reliability and cost issues. On top of this or as an alternative, non-contact interconnects are possible with capacitive or inductive coupling. Inductive in particular has proven to be attractive because its transmission range is large enough for communication in chip stacks and yet not too large to cause interference.Optical transmitters based on integrated III-V compound-semiconductor lasers and THz power amplifiers compete with ascending low-cost, parallel-wire transmitters based on BiCMOS technologies. Parallel mm-wave and THz transceiver arrays enable mm-wave radar for traffic safety and THz computed-tomography. In spite of all these technology advances, the power efficiency of data communication will only improve 100× in a decade. New compression and architectural techniques are in high demand.

  7. Robust fluidic connections to freestanding microfluidic hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Baer, Bradly B.; Larsen, Taylor S. H.

    2015-01-01

    Biomimetic scaffolds approaching physiological scale, whose size and large cellular load far exceed the limits of diffusion, require incorporation of a fluidic means to achieve adequate nutrient/metabolite exchange. This need has driven the extension of microfluidic technologies into the area of biomaterials. While construction of perfusable scaffolds is essentially a problem of microfluidic device fabrication, functional implementation of free-standing, thick-tissue constructs depends upon successful integration of external pumping mechanisms through optimized connective assemblies. However, a critical analysis to identify optimal materials/assembly components for hydrogel substrates has received little focus to date. This investigation addresses this issue directly by evaluating the efficacy of a range of adhesive and mechanical fluidic connection methods to gelatin hydrogel constructs based upon both mechanical property analysis and cell compatibility. Results identify a novel bioadhesive, comprised of two enzymatically modified gelatin compounds, for connecting tubing to hydrogel constructs that is both structurally robust and non-cytotoxic. Furthermore, outcomes from this study provide clear evidence that fluidic interconnect success varies with substrate composition (specifically hydrogel versus polydimethylsiloxane), highlighting not only the importance of selecting the appropriately tailored components for fluidic hydrogel systems but also that of encouraging ongoing, targeted exploration of this issue. The optimization of such interconnect systems will ultimately promote exciting scientific and therapeutic developments provided by microfluidic, cell-laden scaffolds. PMID:26045731

  8. Microfab-less Microfluidic Capillary Electrophoresis Devices

    PubMed Central

    Segato, Thiago P.; Bhakta, Samir A.; Gordon, Matthew; Carrilho, Emanuel; Willis, Peter A.; Jiao, Hong; Garcia, Carlos D.

    2013-01-01

    Compared to conventional bench-top instruments, microfluidic devices possess advantageous characteristics including great portability potential, reduced analysis time (minutes), and relatively inexpensive production, putting them on the forefront of modern analytical chemistry. Fabrication of these devices, however, often involves polymeric materials with less-than-ideal surface properties, specific instrumentation, and cumbersome fabrication procedures. In order to overcome such drawbacks, a new hybrid platform is proposed. The platform is centered on the use of 5 interconnecting microfluidic components that serve as the injector or reservoirs. These plastic units are interconnected using standard capillary tubing, enabling in-channel detection by a wide variety of standard techniques, including capacitively-coupled contactless conductivity detection (C4D). Due to the minimum impact on the separation efficiency, the plastic microfluidic components used for the experiments discussed herein were fabricated using an inexpensive engraving tool and standard Plexiglas. The presented approach (named 52-platform) offers a previously unseen versatility: enabling the assembly of the platform within minutes using capillary tubing that differs in length, diameter, or material. The advantages of the proposed design are demonstrated by performing the analysis of inorganic cations by capillary electrophoresis on soil samples from the Atacama Desert. PMID:23585815

  9. Microfab-less Microfluidic Capillary Electrophoresis Devices.

    PubMed

    Segato, Thiago P; Bhakta, Samir A; Gordon, Matthew; Carrilho, Emanuel; Willis, Peter A; Jiao, Hong; Garcia, Carlos D

    2013-04-07

    Compared to conventional bench-top instruments, microfluidic devices possess advantageous characteristics including great portability potential, reduced analysis time (minutes), and relatively inexpensive production, putting them on the forefront of modern analytical chemistry. Fabrication of these devices, however, often involves polymeric materials with less-than-ideal surface properties, specific instrumentation, and cumbersome fabrication procedures. In order to overcome such drawbacks, a new hybrid platform is proposed. The platform is centered on the use of 5 interconnecting microfluidic components that serve as the injector or reservoirs. These plastic units are interconnected using standard capillary tubing, enabling in-channel detection by a wide variety of standard techniques, including capacitively-coupled contactless conductivity detection (C(4)D). Due to the minimum impact on the separation efficiency, the plastic microfluidic components used for the experiments discussed herein were fabricated using an inexpensive engraving tool and standard Plexiglas. The presented approach (named 5(2)-platform) offers a previously unseen versatility: enabling the assembly of the platform within minutes using capillary tubing that differs in length, diameter, or material. The advantages of the proposed design are demonstrated by performing the analysis of inorganic cations by capillary electrophoresis on soil samples from the Atacama Desert.

  10. Microfluidic sieve valves

    DOEpatents

    Quake, Stephen R; Marcus, Joshua S; Hansen, Carl L

    2015-01-13

    Sieve valves for use in microfluidic device are provided. The valves are useful for impeding the flow of particles, such as chromatography beads or cells, in a microfluidic channel while allowing liquid solution to pass through the valve. The valves find particular use in making microfluidic chromatography modules.

  11. Tunable Microfluidic Microlasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    particularly convenient material for microfluidic experiments with LC. Figure 7: A droplet of E7 nematic liquid crystal on a PDMS...AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2011-0039 TUNABLE MICROFLUIDIC MICROLASERS Francesco Simoni Universita Politecnica delle Marche...DATES COVERED (From – To) 15 June 2010 – 15 June 2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE TUNABLE MICROFLUIDIC MICROLASERS 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8655

  12. Open microfluidic gel electrophoresis: Rapid and low cost separation and analysis of DNA at the nanoliter scale.

    PubMed

    Gutzweiler, Ludwig; Gleichmann, Tobias; Tanguy, Laurent; Koltay, Peter; Zengerle, Roland; Riegger, Lutz

    2017-07-01

    Gel electrophoresis is one of the most applied and standardized tools for separation and analysis of macromolecules and their fragments in academic research and in industry. In this work we present a novel approach for conducting on-demand electrophoretic separations of DNA molecules in open microfluidic (OM) systems on planar polymer substrates. The approach combines advantages of slab gel, capillary- and chip-based methods offering low consumable costs (<0.1$) circumventing cost-intensive microfluidic chip fabrication, short process times (5 min per analysis) and high sensitivity (4 ng/μL dsDNA) combined with reasonable resolution (17 bases). The open microfluidic separation system comprises two opposing reservoirs of 2-4 μL in volume, a semi-contact written gel line acting as separation channel interconnecting the reservoirs and sample injected into the line via non-contact droplet dispensing and thus enabling the precise control of the injection plug and sample concentration. Evaporation is prevented by covering aqueous structures with PCR-grade mineral oil while maintaining surface temperature at 15°C. The liquid gel line exhibits a semi-circular cross section of adaptable width (∼200-600 μm) and height (∼30-80 μm) as well as a typical length of 15-55 mm. Layout of such liquid structures is adaptable on-demand not requiring time consuming and repetitive fabrication steps. The approach was successfully demonstrated by the separation of a standard label-free DNA ladder (100-1000 bp) at 100 V/cm via in-line staining and laser induced fluorescent end-point detection using an automated prototype. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Fast process flow, on-wafer interconnection and singulation for MEPV

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N.; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Sanchez, Carlos Anthony

    2017-01-31

    A method including providing a substrate comprising a device layer on which a plurality of device cells are defined; depositing a first dielectric layer on the device layer and metal interconnect such that the deposited interconnect is electrically connected to at least two of the device cells; depositing a second dielectric layer over the interconnect; and exposing at least one contact point on the interconnect through the second dielectric layer. An apparatus including a substrate having defined thereon a device layer including a plurality of device cells; a first dielectric layer disposed directly on the device layer; a plurality of metal interconnects, each of which is electrically connected to at least two of the device cells; and a second dielectric layer disposed over the first dielectric layer and over the interconnects, wherein the second dielectric layer is patterned in a positive or negative planar spring pattern.

  14. SOFC Interconnect and Compressive Seal Development at PNNL

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Y S.; Yang, Z Gary; Singh, Prabhakar; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Xia, Gordon

    2005-11-01

    The development of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology represents an opportunity to achieve significant improvements in energy conversion efficiency and reduction of undesirable emissions. However, many technical challenges still need to be overcome before the utilization of the advantages of SOFC can take place. These challenges include the need for improved interconnects and seals for planar SOFC stacks. In this paper, we briefly summarize recent progress at PNNL in these two research areas.

  15. Microfluidic systems for electrochemical and biological studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ackler, H., LLNL

    1998-05-01

    Microfluidic devices with microelectrodes have the potential to enable studies of phenomena at size scales where behavior may be dominated by different mechanisms than at macroscales. Through our work developing microfluidic devices for dielectrophoretic separation and sensing of cells and particles, we have fabricated devices from which general or more specialized research devices may be derived. Fluid channels from 80 {micro}m wide X 20 {micro}m deep to 1 mm wide to 200 {micro}m deep have been fabricated in glass, with lithographically patterned electrodes from 10 to 80 {micro}m wide on one or both sides on the channels and over topographies tens of microns in heights. the devices are designed to easily interface to electronic and fluidic interconnect packages that permit reuse of devices, rather than one-time use, crude glue-based methods. Such devices may be useful for many applications of interest to the electrochemical and biological community.

  16. Planned development of a 3D computer based on free-space optical interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, John A.; Guarino, David R.

    1994-05-01

    Free-space optical interconnection has the potential to provide upwards of a million data channels between planes of electronic circuits. This may result in the planar board and backplane structures of today giving away to 3-D stacks of wafers or multi-chip modules interconnected via channels running perpendicular to the processor planes, thereby eliminating much of the packaging overhead. Three-dimensional packaging is very appealing for tightly coupled fine-grained parallel computing where the need for massive numbers of interconnections is severely taxing the capabilities of the planar structures. This paper describes a coordinated effort by four research organizations to demonstrate an operational fine-grained parallel computer that achieves global connectivity through the use of free space optical interconnects.

  17. Developments in laser processing for silica-based planar lightwave circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasu, Y.; Abe, M.; Kohtoku, M.

    2006-02-01

    Laser processing offers an attractive way of manufacturing both optical and biomedical devices including microfluidic channels and biochips. Laser processing is also promising for the fabrication and trimming of silica-based planar lightwave circuits (PLCs). PLCs are key functional components for use in optical telecommunication systems since they offer compactness and high functionality in addition to excellent stability. A laser light that strongly interacts with glass, such as ultraviolet (UV) light or femtosecond pulses, can increase the refractive index of glass. This phenomenon can be used to improve the performance of PLCs as well as to enhance their functionality. UV laser trimming is useful in that it can be used to change the refractive index of fabricated waveguides and thus compensate for fabrication errors. Fabrication errors have various detrimental effects on PLC performance including deviation from the designed wavelength, polarization dependence and crosstalk degradation. UV laser trimming can greatly improve PLC performance by compensating for these errors. In addition, laser processing can provide PLCs with new functionalities. For example, a UV laser can be used to produce band-reflection mirrors in external cavity lasers in PLCs. Direct waveguide writing is also an attractive way to enhance circuit layout flexibility. Recently, a femtosecond laser was found to be effective for writing 3-dimensional waveguides, and it can also be used to interconnect waveguides flexibly. This enables us to expand PLC geometry from two to three dimensions. This talk will review trends in laser processing for PLC fabrication and recent R and D topics.

  18. Polymeric optoelectronic interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldada, Louay A.

    2000-04-01

    Electrical interconnects are reaching their fundamental limits and are becoming the speed bottleneck as processor speeds are increasing. A polymer-based interconnect technology was developed for affordable integrated optical circuits that address the optical signal processing needs in the telecom, datacom, and performance computing industries. We engineered organic polymers that can be readily made into single-mode, multimode, and micro-optical waveguide structures of controlled numerical apertures and geometries. These materials are formed from highly-crosslinked acrylate monomers with specific linkages that determine properties such as flexibility, robustness, optical loss, thermal stability, and humidity resistance. These monomers are intermiscible, providing for precise continuous adjustment of the refractive index over a wide range. In polymer form, they exhibit state-of-the-art loss values and exceptional environmental stability, enabling use in a variety of demanding applications. A wide range of rigid and flexible substrates can be used, including glass, quartz, silicon, glass-filled epoxy printed circuit board substrates, and flexible plastic films. The devices we describe include a variety of routing elements that can be sued as part of a massively parallel photonic integrated circuit on the MCM, board, or backplane level.

  19. Discrete elements for 3D microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Krisna C.; Thompson, Bryant; Malmstadt, Noah

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic systems are rapidly becoming commonplace tools for high-precision materials synthesis, biochemical sample preparation, and biophysical analysis. Typically, microfluidic systems are constructed in monolithic form by means of microfabrication and, increasingly, by additive techniques. These methods restrict the design and assembly of truly complex systems by placing unnecessary emphasis on complete functional integration of operational elements in a planar environment. Here, we present a solution based on discrete elements that liberates designers to build large-scale microfluidic systems in three dimensions that are modular, diverse, and predictable by simple network analysis techniques. We develop a sample library of standardized components and connectors manufactured using stereolithography. We predict and validate the flow characteristics of these individual components to design and construct a tunable concentration gradient generator with a scalable number of parallel outputs. We show that these systems are rapidly reconfigurable by constructing three variations of a device for generating monodisperse microdroplets in two distinct size regimes and in a high-throughput mode by simple replacement of emulsifier subcircuits. Finally, we demonstrate the capability for active process monitoring by constructing an optical sensing element for detecting water droplets in a fluorocarbon stream and quantifying their size and frequency. By moving away from large-scale integration toward standardized discrete elements, we demonstrate the potential to reduce the practice of designing and assembling complex 3D microfluidic circuits to a methodology comparable to that found in the electronics industry. PMID:25246553

  20. Discrete elements for 3D microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Krisna C; Thompson, Bryant; Malmstadt, Noah

    2014-10-21

    Microfluidic systems are rapidly becoming commonplace tools for high-precision materials synthesis, biochemical sample preparation, and biophysical analysis. Typically, microfluidic systems are constructed in monolithic form by means of microfabrication and, increasingly, by additive techniques. These methods restrict the design and assembly of truly complex systems by placing unnecessary emphasis on complete functional integration of operational elements in a planar environment. Here, we present a solution based on discrete elements that liberates designers to build large-scale microfluidic systems in three dimensions that are modular, diverse, and predictable by simple network analysis techniques. We develop a sample library of standardized components and connectors manufactured using stereolithography. We predict and validate the flow characteristics of these individual components to design and construct a tunable concentration gradient generator with a scalable number of parallel outputs. We show that these systems are rapidly reconfigurable by constructing three variations of a device for generating monodisperse microdroplets in two distinct size regimes and in a high-throughput mode by simple replacement of emulsifier subcircuits. Finally, we demonstrate the capability for active process monitoring by constructing an optical sensing element for detecting water droplets in a fluorocarbon stream and quantifying their size and frequency. By moving away from large-scale integration toward standardized discrete elements, we demonstrate the potential to reduce the practice of designing and assembling complex 3D microfluidic circuits to a methodology comparable to that found in the electronics industry.

  1. Fuel cell system with interconnect

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Zhien; Goettler, Richard

    2015-09-29

    The present invention includes a fuel cell system having a plurality of adjacent electrochemical cells formed of an anode layer, a cathode layer spaced apart from the anode layer, and an electrolyte layer disposed between the anode layer and the cathode layer. The fuel cell system also includes at least one interconnect, the interconnect being structured to conduct free electrons between adjacent electrochemical cells. Each interconnect includes a primary conductor embedded within the electrolyte layer and structured to conduct the free electrons.

  2. Policy issues in interconnecting networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiner, Barry M.

    1989-01-01

    To support the activities of the Federal Research Coordinating Committee (FRICC) in creating an interconnected set of networks to serve the research community, two workshops were held to address the technical support of policy issues that arise when interconnecting such networks. The workshops addressed the required and feasible technologies and architectures that could be used to satisfy the desired policies for interconnection. The results of the workshop are documented.

  3. Optical interconnection of optical modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schamschula, Marius P.; Caulfield, H. J.; Shamir, Joseph

    1990-12-01

    The most plausible possible uses of nonlinear optics as the bases for interconnections among complex optical modules are evaluated, with a view to such applications as neural networks that entail large numbers of interconnections and numerous stages. Optical interconnection allows such a system to be composed of many modules as well as to incorporate switching- and amplification-function optical nonlinearities. While it is possible to achieve a pixel-by-pixel, diffraction-limited flat-field relay with nonlinearity, where the interconnect allows for cascadability, the wave-particle duality is destroyed between stages.

  4. Epidemics on interconnected networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickison, Mark; Havlin, S.; Stanley, H. E.

    2012-06-01

    Populations are seldom completely isolated from their environment. Individuals in a particular geographic or social region may be considered a distinct network due to strong local ties but will also interact with individuals in other networks. We study the susceptible-infected-recovered process on interconnected network systems and find two distinct regimes. In strongly coupled network systems, epidemics occur simultaneously across the entire system at a critical infection strength βc, below which the disease does not spread. In contrast, in weakly coupled network systems, a mixed phase exists below βc of the coupled network system, where an epidemic occurs in one network but does not spread to the coupled network. We derive an expression for the network and disease parameters that allow this mixed phase and verify it numerically. Public health implications of communities comprising these two classes of network systems are also mentioned.

  5. Integrated Microfluidic Reactors.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Yu; Wang, Yanju; Wang, Shutao; Tseng, Hsian-Rong

    2009-12-01

    Microfluidic reactors exhibit intrinsic advantages of reduced chemical consumption, safety, high surface-area-to-volume ratios, and improved control over mass and heat transfer superior to the macroscopic reaction setting. In contract to a continuous-flow microfluidic system composed of only a microchannel network, an integrated microfluidic system represents a scalable integration of a microchannel network with functional microfluidic modules, thus enabling the execution and automation of complicated chemical reactions in a single device. In this review, we summarize recent progresses on the development of integrated microfluidics-based chemical reactors for (i) parallel screening of in situ click chemistry libraries, (ii) multistep synthesis of radiolabeled imaging probes for positron emission tomography (PET), (iii) sequential preparation of individually addressable conducting polymer nanowire (CPNW), and (iv) solid-phase synthesis of DNA oligonucleotides. These proof-of-principle demonstrations validate the feasibility and set a solid foundation for exploring a broad application of the integrated microfluidic system.

  6. Advanced lift-off planarization process for Josephson integrated circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, I.; Tahara, S.; Wada, Y.

    1988-07-25

    An advanced lift-off planarization process utilizing an undercut technique of a photoresist etching mask has been developed to achieve planarization of thin-sputtered and fine-patterned films that are necessary for high-performance Josephson integrated circuits (IC's). A stack of the same kind of photoresist layers, including the modified layer between them, has been utilized as an etching mask providing fine-patterned film profiles with minimized resist degradation by the top photoresist protection layer. This advanced planarization process brings about smooth surfaces having no residues and no grooves along pattern edges. 30 nm deviation from planarity has been demonstrated on a 200-nm-thick planarized Nb superconducting layer. A four-level interconnection of Josephson IC's was successfully fabricated by this process.

  7. Commercialization of microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Volpatti, Lisa R; Yetisen, Ali K

    2014-07-01

    Microfluidic devices offer automation and high-throughput screening, and operate at low volumes of consumables. Although microfluidics has the potential to reduce turnaround times and costs for analytical devices, particularly in medical, veterinary, and environmental sciences, this enabling technology has had limited diffusion into consumer products. This article analyzes the microfluidics market, identifies issues, and highlights successful commercialization strategies. Addressing niche markets and establishing compatibility with existing workflows will accelerate market penetration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Microfluidics for manipulating cells.

    PubMed

    Mu, Xuan; Zheng, Wenfu; Sun, Jiashu; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Xingyu

    2013-01-14

    Microfluidics, a toolbox comprising methods for precise manipulation of fluids at small length scales (micrometers to millimeters), has become useful for manipulating cells. Its uses range from dynamic management of cellular interactions to high-throughput screening of cells, and to precise analysis of chemical contents in single cells. Microfluidics demonstrates a completely new perspective and an excellent practical way to manipulate cells for solving various needs in biology and medicine. This review introduces and comments on recent achievements and challenges of using microfluidics to manipulate and analyze cells. It is believed that microfluidics will assume an even greater role in the mechanistic understanding of cell biology and, eventually, in clinical applications.

  9. Printed interconnects for photovoltaic modules

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, J. D.; Pach, G.; Horowitz, K. A. W.; Stockert, T. R.; Woodhouse, M.; van Hest, M. F. A. M.

    2017-01-01

    Film-based photovoltaic modules employ monolithic interconnects to minimize resistance loss and enhance module voltage via series connection. Conventional interconnect construction occurs sequentially, with a scribing step following deposition of the bottom electrode, a second scribe after deposition of absorber and intermediate layers, and a third following deposition of the top electrode. This method produces interconnect widths of about 300 um, and the area comprised by interconnects within a module (generally about 3%) does not contribute to power generation. The present work reports on an increasingly popular strategy capable of reducing the interconnect width to less than 100 um: printing interconnects. Cost modeling projects a savings of about $0.02/watt for CdTe module production through the use of printed interconnects, with savings coming from both reduced capital expense and increased module power output. Printed interconnect demonstrations with copper-indium-gallium-diselenide and cadmium-telluride solar cells show successful voltage addition and miniaturization down to 250 um. Material selection guidelines and considerations for commercialization are discussed.

  10. Printed interconnects for photovoltaic modules

    DOE PAGES

    Fields, J. D.; Pach, G.; Horowitz, K. A. W.; ...

    2016-10-21

    Film-based photovoltaic modules employ monolithic interconnects to minimize resistance loss and enhance module voltage via series connection. Conventional interconnect construction occurs sequentially, with a scribing step following deposition of the bottom electrode, a second scribe after deposition of absorber and intermediate layers, and a third following deposition of the top electrode. This method produces interconnect widths of about 300 µm, and the area comprised by interconnects within a module (generally about 3%) does not contribute to power generation. The present work reports on an increasingly popular strategy capable of reducing the interconnect width to less than 100 µm: printing interconnects.more » Cost modeling projects a savings of about $0.02/watt for CdTe module production through the use of printed interconnects, with savings coming from both reduced capital expense and increased module power output. Printed interconnect demonstrations with copper-indium-gallium-diselenide and cadmium-telluride solar cells show successful voltage addition and miniaturization down to 250 µm. As a result, material selection guidelines and considerations for commercialization are discussed.« less

  11. Process for electrically interconnecting electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Carey, Paul G.; Thompson, Jesse B.; Colella, Nicolas J.; Williams, Kenneth A.

    2002-01-01

    Electrical interconnects for solar cells or other electronic components using a silver-silicone paste or a lead-tin (Pb--Sn) no-clean fluxless solder cream, whereby the high breakage of thin (<6 mil thick) solar cells using conventional solder interconnect is eliminated. The interconnects of this invention employs copper strips which are secured to the solar cells by a silver-silicone conductive paste which can be used at room temperature, or by a Pb--Sn solder cream which eliminates undesired residue on the active surfaces of the solar cells. Electrical testing using the interconnects of this invention has shown that no degradation of the interconnects developed under high current testing, while providing a very low contact resistance value.

  12. Interconnection and electromigration scaling theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Donald S.; Meindl, James D.; Saraswat, Krishna

    1986-12-01

    Interconnections will become the limit in performance and reliability at submicron dimensions. Long-distance interconnections are defined by models based on resistivity, and it is found that more than half of the interconnections will become categorized as such at 0.5 micrometers feature sizes. The resistivity of even less resistive materials, therefore, will become important. A model for analyzing the trends of material usage for interconnections and for projecting design rules is presented. Electromigration is the driving force away from the lowest resistivity silicon compatible material, namely aluminum. Replacements such as gold, however, have technological problems and the resistivity of refractory metals will be too high for a large fraction of the interconnections. Layered structures are one possible solution to the problems of electromigration.

  13. Electrochemical Processing Tools for Advanced Copper Interconnects: An Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Madhav

    The change from vacuum-deposited aluminum to electroplated copper in 1997 brought about a paradigm shift in interconnect technology and in chip making [1]. Since then, most of the leading chip manufacturers have converted to electroplated Cu technology for chip interconnects. Cu interconnects are fabricated by dual Damascene process which is referred to a metallization patterning process by which two insulator (dielectric) levels are patterned, filled with copper, and planarized to create a metal layer consisting of vias and lines. The process steps consist of laying a sandwich of two levels of insulator and etch stop layers that are patterned as holes for vias and troughs for lines. They are then filled with a single metallization step. Finally, the excess material is removed, and the wafer is planarized by chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). While finer details of exact sequence of fabrication steps vary, the end result of forming a metal layer remains the same in which vias are formed in the lower layer, and trenches are formed in the upper layer. Electroplating enables deposition of Cu in via holes and overlying trenches in a single step thus eliminating a via/line interface and significantly reducing the cycle time. Due to these reasons and due to relatively less expensive tooling, electroplating is a cost-effective and efficient process for Cu interconnects [2, 3]. Compared with vacuum deposition processes, electroplated Cu provides improved super filling capabilities and abnormal grain growth phenomena. These properties contribute significantly to improved reliability of Cu interconnects. With the proper choice of additives and plating conditions, void-free, seam-free Damascene deposits are obtained which eliminates surface-like fast diffusion paths for Cu electromigration.

  14. SmartBuild-a truly plug-n-play modular microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Po Ki

    2008-08-01

    In this Technical Note, for the first time, a truly "plug-n-play" modular microfluidic system (SmartBuild Plug-n-Play Modular Microfluidic System) is presented for designing and building integrated modular microfluidic systems for biological and chemical applications. The modular microfluidic system can be built by connecting multiple microfluidic components together to form a larger integrated system. The SmartBuild System comprises of a motherboard with interconnect channels/grooves, fitting components, microchannel inserts with different configurations and microchips/modules with different functionalities. Also, heaters, micropumps and valving systems can be designed and used in the system. Examples of an integrated mixing system and reaction systems are presented here to demonstrate the versatility of the SmartBuild System.

  15. Flexible packaging of solid-state integrated circuit chips with elastomeric microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bowei; Dong, Quan; Korman, Can E.; Li, Zhenyu; Zaghloul, Mona E.

    2013-01-01

    A flexible technology is proposed to integrate smart electronics and microfluidics all embedded in an elastomer package. The microfluidic channels are used to deliver both liquid samples and liquid metals to the integrated circuits (ICs). The liquid metals are used to realize electrical interconnects to the IC chip. This avoids the traditional IC packaging challenges, such as wire-bonding and flip-chip bonding, which are not compatible with current microfluidic technologies. As a demonstration we integrated a CMOS magnetic sensor chip and associate microfluidic channels on a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate that allows precise delivery of small liquid samples to the sensor. Furthermore, the packaged system is fully functional under bending curvature radius of one centimetre and uniaxial strain of 15%. The flexible integration of solid-state ICs with microfluidics enables compact flexible electronic and lab-on-a-chip systems, which hold great potential for wearable health monitoring, point-of-care diagnostics and environmental sensing among many other applications.

  16. Flexible packaging of solid-state integrated circuit chips with elastomeric microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bowei; Dong, Quan; Korman, Can E.; Li, Zhenyu; Zaghloul, Mona E.

    2013-01-01

    A flexible technology is proposed to integrate smart electronics and microfluidics all embedded in an elastomer package. The microfluidic channels are used to deliver both liquid samples and liquid metals to the integrated circuits (ICs). The liquid metals are used to realize electrical interconnects to the IC chip. This avoids the traditional IC packaging challenges, such as wire-bonding and flip-chip bonding, which are not compatible with current microfluidic technologies. As a demonstration we integrated a CMOS magnetic sensor chip and associate microfluidic channels on a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate that allows precise delivery of small liquid samples to the sensor. Furthermore, the packaged system is fully functional under bending curvature radius of one centimetre and uniaxial strain of 15%. The flexible integration of solid-state ICs with microfluidics enables compact flexible electronic and lab-on-a-chip systems, which hold great potential for wearable health monitoring, point-of-care diagnostics and environmental sensing among many other applications.

  17. Microfluidics and Coagulation Biology

    PubMed Central

    Colace, Thomas V.; Tormoen, Garth W.

    2014-01-01

    The study of blood ex vivo can occur in closed or open systems, with or without flow. Microfluidic devices facilitate measurements of platelet function, coagulation biology, cellular biorheology, adhesion dynamics, pharmacology, and clinical diagnostics. An experimental session can accommodate 100s to 1000s of unique clotting events. Using microfluidics, thrombotic events can be studied on defined surfaces of biopolymers, matrix proteins, and tissue factor under constant flow rate or constant pressure drop conditions. Distinct shear rates can be created on a device with a single perfusion pump. Microfluidic devices facilitated the determination of intraluminal thrombus permeability and the discovery that platelet contractility can be activated by a sudden decrease in flow. Microfluidics are ideal for multicolor imaging of platelets, fibrin, and phosphatidylserine and provide a human blood analog to the mouse injury models. Overall, microfluidic advances offer many opportunities for research, drug testing under relevant hemodynamic conditions, and clinical diagnostics. PMID:23642241

  18. Interconnecting heterogeneous database management systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gligor, V. D.; Luckenbaugh, G. L.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that there is still a great need for the development of improved communication between remote, heterogeneous database management systems (DBMS). Problems regarding the effective communication between distributed DBMSs are primarily related to significant differences between local data managers, local data models and representations, and local transaction managers. A system of interconnected DBMSs which exhibit such differences is called a network of distributed, heterogeneous DBMSs. In order to achieve effective interconnection of remote, heterogeneous DBMSs, the users must have uniform, integrated access to the different DBMs. The present investigation is mainly concerned with an analysis of the existing approaches to interconnecting heterogeneous DBMSs, taking into account four experimental DBMS projects.

  19. Interconnect resistance of photovoltaic submodules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volltrauer, H.; Eser, E.; Delahoy, A. E.

    1985-01-01

    Small area amorphous silicon solar cells generally have higher efficiencies than large interconnected submodules. Among the reasons for the differences in performance are the lack of large area uniformity, the effect of nonzero tin oxide sheet resistance, and possibly pinholes in the various layers. Another and usually small effect that can contribute to reduced performance of interconnected cells is the resistance of the interconnection i.e., the series resistance introduced by the metal to tin oxide contact through silicon. Proper processing problems to avoid poor contacts are discussed.

  20. Unconventional microfluidics: expanding the discipline.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Ahmad Ahsan; Mao, Xiaole; Stratton, Zackary S; Huang, Tony Jun

    2013-04-21

    Since its inception, the discipline of microfluidics has been harnessed for innovations in the biomedicine/chemistry fields-and to great effect. This success has had the natural side-effect of stereotyping microfluidics as a platform for medical diagnostics and miniaturized lab processes. But microfluidics has more to offer. And very recently, some researchers have successfully applied microfluidics to fields outside its traditional domains. In this Focus article, we highlight notable examples of such "unconventional" microfluidics applications (e.g., robotics, electronics). It is our hope that these early successes in unconventional microfluidics prompt further creativity, and inspire readers to expand the microfluidics discipline.

  1. Unconventional microfluidics: expanding the discipline

    PubMed Central

    Nawaz, Ahmad Ahsan; Mao, Xiaole; Stratton, Zackary S.; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    Since its inception, the discipline of microfluidics has been harnessed for innovations in the biomedicine/chemistry fields—and to great effect. This success has had the natural side-effect of stereotyping microfluidics as a platform for medical diagnostics and miniaturized lab processes. But microfluidics has more to offer. And very recently, some researchers have successfully applied microfluidics to fields outside its traditional domains. In this Focus article, we highlight notable examples of such “unconventional” microfluidics applications (e.g., robotics, electronics). It is our hope that these early successes in unconventional microfluidics prompt further creativity, and inspire readers to expand the microfluidics discipline. PMID:23478651

  2. Survivable planar internetwork (SPIN) for multimedia communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kota, S. L.; Garcia-Luna-Aceves, J. J.

    A survivable planar internetwork (SPIN) architecture to interconnect local area networks (LANs), wide area networks (WANs), and extended-area satellite networks (ESANs) by organizing them into various connectivity planes that extend the range of survivable communications provided by each is proposed. The core of the SPIN architecture is a layer of gateways that interconnect purpose-specific networks or preexisting networks deployed for localized networking support to provide a much wider range of communications. An adaptive SPIN access protocol (ASAP) is proposed to handle both data and stream traffic in the proposed SPIN. According to ASAP, the reservation requests are handled by the terrestrial network and the data transmission will take place via satellite network or the ground segment, depending on the resources available. Other issues, such as routing and congestion control, are discussed.

  3. Renewable Systems Interconnection: Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Kroposki, B.; Margolis, R.; Kuswa, G.; Torres, J.; Bower, W.; Key, T.; Ton, D.

    2008-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy launched the Renewable Systems Interconnection (RSI) study in 2007 to address the challenges to high penetrations of distributed renewable energy technologies. The RSI study consists of 14 additional reports.

  4. Universal Interconnection Technology Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Sheaffer, P.; Lemar, P.; Honton, E. J.; Kime, E.; Friedman, N. R.; Kroposki, B.; Galdo, J.

    2002-10-01

    The Universal Interconnection Technology (UIT) Workshop - sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Distributed Energy and Electric Reliability (DEER) Program, and Distribution and Interconnection R&D - was held July 25-26, 2002, in Chicago, Ill., to: (1) Examine the need for a modular universal interconnection technology; (2) Identify UIT functional and technical requirements; (3) Assess the feasibility of and potential roadblocks to UIT; (4) Create an action plan for UIT development. These proceedings begin with an overview of the workshop. The body of the proceedings provides a series of industry representative-prepared papers on UIT functions and features, present interconnection technology, approaches to modularization and expandability, and technical issues in UIT development as well as detailed summaries of group discussions. Presentations, a list of participants, a copy of the agenda, and contact information are provided in the appendices of this document.

  5. Constant field gradient planar coupled cavity structure

    DOEpatents

    Kang, Y.W.; Kustom, R.L.

    1999-07-27

    A cavity structure is disclosed having at least two opposing planar housing members spaced apart to accommodate the passage of a particle beam through the structure between the members. Each of the housing members have a plurality of serially aligned hollows defined therein, and also passages, formed in the members, which interconnect serially adjacent hollows to provide communication between the hollows. The opposing planar housing members are spaced and aligned such that the hollows in one member cooperate with corresponding hollows in the other member to form a plurality of resonant cavities aligned along the particle beam within the cavity structure. To facilitate the obtaining of a constant field gradient within the cavity structure, the passages are configured so as to be incrementally narrower in the direction of travel of the particle beam. In addition, the spacing distance between the opposing housing members is configured to be incrementally smaller in the direction of travel of the beam. 16 figs.

  6. Constant field gradient planar coupled cavity structure

    DOEpatents

    Kang, Yoon W.; Kustom, Robert L.

    1999-01-01

    A cavity structure having at least two opposing planar housing members spaced apart to accommodate the passage of a particle beam through the structure between the members. Each of the housing members have a plurality of serially aligned hollows defined therein, and also passages, formed in the members, which interconnect serially adjacent hollows to provide communication between the hollows. The opposing planar housing members are spaced and aligned such that the hollows in one member cooperate with corresponding hollows in the other member to form a plurality of resonant cavities aligned along the particle beam within the cavity structure. To facilitate the obtaining of a constant field gradient within the cavity structure, the passages are configured so as to be incrementally narrower in the direction of travel of the particle beam. In addition, the spacing distance between the opposing housing members is configured to be incrementally smaller in the direction of travel of the beam.

  7. Constant field gradient planar cavity structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Yoon W.; Kustom, R.L.

    1997-12-01

    A cavity structure is described having at least two opposing planar housing members spaced apart to accommodate the passage of a particle beam through the structure between the members. Each of the housing members have a plurality of serially aligned hollows defined therein, and also passages, formed in the members, which interconnect serially adjacent hollows to provide communication between the hollows. The opposing planar housing members are spaced and aligned such that the hollows in one member cooperate with corresponding hollows in the other member to form a plurality of resonant cavities aligned along the particle beam within the cavity structure. To facilitate the obtaining of a constant field gradient within the cavity structure, the passages are configured so as to be incrementally narrower in the direction of travel of the particle beam. In addition, the spacing distance between the opposing housing members is configured to be incrementally smaller in the direction of travel of the beam.

  8. Applying microfluidics to electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Eddington, David T

    2007-01-01

    Microfluidics can be integrated with standard electrophysiology techniques to allow new experimental modalities. Specifically, the motivation for the microfluidic brain slice device is discussed including how the device docks to standard perfusion chambers and the technique of passive pumping which is used to deliver boluses of neuromodulators to the brain slice. By simplifying the device design, we are able to achieve a practical solution to the current unmet electrophysiology need of applying multiple neuromodulators across multiple regions of the brain slice. This is achieved by substituting the standard coverglass substrate of the perfusion chamber with a thin microfluidic device bonded to the coverglass substrate. This was then attached to the perfusion chamber and small holes connect the open-well of the perfusion chamber to the microfluidic channels buried within the microfluidic substrate. These microfluidic channels are interfaced with ports drilled into the edge of the perfusion chamber to access and deliver stimulants. This project represents how the field of microfluidics is transitioning away from proof-of concept device demonstrations and into practical solutions for unmet experimental and clinical needs.

  9. Applying Microfluidics to Electrophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Eddington, David T.

    2007-01-01

    Microfluidics can be integrated with standard electrophysiology techniques to allow new experimental modalities. Specifically, the motivation for the microfluidic brain slice device is discussed including how the device docks to standard perfusion chambers and the technique of passive pumping which is used to deliver boluses of neuromodulators to the brain slice. By simplifying the device design, we are able to achieve a practical solution to the current unmet electrophysiology need of applying multiple neuromodulators across multiple regions of the brain slice. This is achieved by substituting the standard coverglass substrate of the perfusion chamber with a thin microfluidic device bonded to the coverglass substrate. This was then attached to the perfusion chamber and small holes connect the open-well of the perfusion chamber to the microfluidic channels buried within the microfluidic substrate. These microfluidic channels are interfaced with ports drilled into the edge of the perfusion chamber to access and deliver stimulants. This project represents how the field of microfluidics is transitioning away from proof-of concept device demonstrations and into practical solutions for unmet experimental and clinical needs. PMID:18989410

  10. Microfluidics and microbial engineering.

    PubMed

    Kou, Songzi; Cheng, Danhui; Sun, Fei; Hsing, I-Ming

    2016-02-07

    The combination of microbial engineering and microfluidics is synergistic in nature. For example, microfluidics is benefiting from the outcome of microbial engineering and many reported point-of-care microfluidic devices employ engineered microbes as functional parts for the microsystems. In addition, microbial engineering is facilitated by various microfluidic techniques, due to their inherent strength in high-throughput screening and miniaturization. In this review article, we firstly examine the applications of engineered microbes for toxicity detection, biosensing, and motion generation in microfluidic platforms. Secondly, we look into how microfluidic technologies facilitate the upstream and downstream processes of microbial engineering, including DNA recombination, transformation, target microbe selection, mutant characterization, and microbial function analysis. Thirdly, we highlight an emerging concept in microbial engineering, namely, microbial consortium engineering, where the behavior of a multicultural microbial community rather than that of a single cell/species is delineated. Integrating the disciplines of microfluidics and microbial engineering opens up many new opportunities, for example in diagnostics, engineering of microbial motors, development of portable devices for genetics, high throughput characterization of genetic mutants, isolation and identification of rare/unculturable microbial species, single-cell analysis with high spatio-temporal resolution, and exploration of natural microbial communities.

  11. A Microfluidic Platform for Interfacial Electrophoretic Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joung, Young Soo; Moran, Jeffrey; Jones, Andrew; Bailey, Eric; Buie, Cullen

    2014-11-01

    Composite membranes of hydrogel and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are fabricated using electrophoretic deposition (EPD) at the interface of two immiscible liquids in microfluidic channels. Microfluidic channels, which have two parallel electrodes at the walls, are used to create electric fields across the interface of oil and water continuously supplied into the channels. Depending on the Reynolds (Re) and Weber (We) numbers of oil and water, we observe different formations of the interface. Once we find the optimal Re and We to create a planar interface in the channel, we apply an electric field across the interface for EPD of CNTs and/or silver (Ag) nanorods dispersed in water. During EPD, particles migrate to the oil/water interface, where cross-linking of polymers is induced to form composite hydrogel membranes. Properties of the composite hydrogel films are controlled by electric fields, CNT concentrations, and both Re and We numbers, allowing for continuous production. This fabrication method is effective to create composite polymer membranes placed in microfluidic devices with tunable electrical, mechanical, and biological properties. Potential applications include fabrication of doped hydrogels for drug delivery, conductive hydrogels for biological sensing, and electron permeable membranes for water splitting and osmotic power generation.

  12. Nanomaterials meet microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Pumera, Martin

    2011-05-28

    Nanomaterials and lab-on-a-chip platforms have undergone enormous development during the past decade. Here, we present an overview of how microfluidics benefited from the use of nanomaterials for the enhanced separation and detection of analytes. We also discuss how nanomaterials benefit from microfluidics in terms of synthesis and in terms of the simulation of environments for nanomotors and nanorobots. In our opinion, the "marriage" of nanomaterials and microfluidics is highly beneficial and is expected to solve vital challenges in related fields. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  13. Planarization techniques for MEMS: enabling new structures and enhancing manufacturability

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.H.

    1996-12-31

    Planarization techniques such as chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) have emerged as enabling technologies for the manufacturing of multi- level metal interconnects used in high-density Integrated Circuits (IC). An overview of general planarization techniques for MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) and, in particular, the extension of CMP from sub-micron IC manufacturing to the fabrication of complex surface-micromachined MEMS will be presented. Planarization technique alleviates processing problems associated with fabrication of multi-level polysilicon structures, eliminates design constraints linked with non-planar topography, and provides an avenue for integrating different process technologies. The CMP process and present examples of the use of CMP in fabricating MEMS devices such as microengines, pressure sensors, and proof masses for accelerometers along with its use for monolithically integrating MEMS devices with microelectronics are presented.

  14. Planarization techniques for MEMS: enabling new structures and enhancing manufacturability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, James H.

    1998-04-01

    Planarization techniques such as chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) have emerged as enabling technologies for the manufacturing of multi-level metal interconnects used in high-density Integrated Circuits (IC). An overview of general planarization techniques for MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) and, in particular, the extension of CMP from sub-micron IC manufacturing to the fabrication of complex surface-micromachined MEMS will be presented. Planarization technique alleviates processing problems associated with fabrication of multi-level polysilicon structures, eliminates design constraints linked with non-planar topography, and provides an avenue for integrating different process technologies. The CMP process and present examples of the use of CMP in fabricating MEMS devices such as microengines, pressure sensors, and proof masses for accelerometers along with its use for monolithically integrating MEMS devices with microelectronics are presented.

  15. Using Adhesive Patterning to Construct 3D Paper Microfluidic Devices.

    PubMed

    Kalish, Brent; Tsutsui, Hideaki

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate the use of patterned aerosol adhesives to construct both planar and nonplanar 3D paper microfluidic devices. By spraying an aerosol adhesive through a metal stencil, the overall amount of adhesive used in assembling paper microfluidic devices can be significantly reduced. We show on a simple 4-layer planar paper microfluidic device that the optimal adhesive application technique and device construction style depends heavily on desired performance characteristics. By moderately increasing the overall area of a device, it is possible to dramatically decrease the wicking time and increase device success rates while also reducing the amount of adhesive required to keep the device together. Such adhesive application also causes the adhesive to form semi-permanent bonds instead of permanent bonds between paper layers, enabling single-use devices to be non-destructively disassembled after use. Nonplanar 3D origami devices also benefit from the semi-permanent bonds during folding, as it reduces the likelihood that unrelated faces may accidently stick together. Like planar devices, nonplanar structures see reduced wicking times with patterned adhesive application vs uniformly applied adhesive.

  16. Misalignment corrections in optical interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Deqiang

    Optical interconnects are considered a promising solution for long distance and high bitrate data transmissions, outperforming electrical interconnects in terms of loss and dispersion. Due to the bandwidth and distance advantage of optical interconnects, longer links have been implemented with optics. Recent studies show that optical interconnects have clear advantages even at very short distances---intra system interconnects. The biggest challenge for such optical interconnects is the alignment tolerance. Many free space optical components require very precise assembly and installation, and therefore the overall cost could be increased. This thesis studied the misalignment tolerance and possible alignment correction solutions for optical interconnects at backplane or board level. First the alignment tolerance for free space couplers was simulated and the result indicated the most critical alignments occur between the VCSEL, waveguide and microlens arrays. An in-situ microlens array fabrication method was designed and experimentally demonstrated, with no observable misalignment with the waveguide array. At the receiver side, conical lens arrays were proposed to replace simple microlens arrays for a larger angular alignment tolerance. Multilayer simulation models in CodeV were built to optimized the refractive index and shape profiles of the conical lens arrays. Conical lenses fabricated with micro injection molding machine and fiber etching were characterized. Active component VCSOA was used to correct misalignment in optical connectors between the board and backplane. The alignment correction capability were characterized for both DC and AC (1GHz) optical signal. The speed and bandwidth of the VCSOA was measured and compared with a same structure VCSEL. Based on the optical inverter being studied in our lab, an all-optical flip-flop was demonstrated using a pair of VCSOAs. This memory cell with random access ability can store one bit optical signal with set or

  17. Smart and functional polymer materials for smart and functional microfluidic instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Bonnie L.

    2014-04-01

    As microfluidic systems evolve from "chip-in-the-lab" to true portable lab-on-a-chip (LoC) or lab-in-a-package (LiP) microinstrumentation, there is a need for increasingly miniaturized sensors, actuators, and integration/interconnect technologies with high levels of functionality and self-direction. Furthermore, as microfluidic instruments are increasingly realized in polymer-based rather than glass- or silicon- based platforms, there is a need to realize these highly functional components in materials that are polymer-compatible. Polymers that are altered to possess basic functionality, and even higher-functioning "smart" polymer materials, may help to realize high-functioning and selfdirecting portable microinstrumentation. Stimuli-responsive hydrogels have been recognized for over a decade as beneficial to the development of smart microfluidics systems and instrumentation. In addition, functional materials such as conductive and magnetic composite polymers are being increasingly employed to push microfluidics systems to greater degrees of functionality, portability, and/or flexibility for wearable/implantable systems. Functional and smart polymer materials can be employed to realize electrodes, electronic routing, heaters, mixers, valves, pumps, sensors, and interconnect structures in polymer-based microfluidic systems. Stimuli for such materials can be located on-chip or in a small package, thus greatly increasing the degree of portability and the potential for mechanical flexibility of such systems. This paper will examine the application of functional polymer materials to the development of high-functioning microfluidics instruments with a goal towards self-direction.

  18. Average interconnection length and interconnection distribution for rectangular arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gura, Carol; Abraham, Jacob A.

    1989-05-01

    It is shown that it is necessary to utilize different partitioning coefficients in interconnection length analyses which are based on Rent's rule, depending on whether one- or two-dimensional placement strategies are used. Beta is the partitioning coefficient in the power-law relationship Alpha Beta which provides a measure of the number of interconnection that cross a boundary which encloses Beta blocks. The partitioning coefficients are Beta = p/2 and Beta = p for two- and one-dimensional arrays, respectively, where p is the experimental coefficient, of the Rent relationship. Based on these separate partitioning coefficients, an average interconnection length prediction is presented for rectangular arrays that out performs existing predictions. Examples are given to support this theory.

  19. Cell manipulation in microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Yun, Hoyoung; Kim, Kisoo; Lee, Won Gu

    2013-06-01

    Recent advances in the lab-on-a-chip field in association with nano/microfluidics have been made for new applications and functionalities to the fields of molecular biology, genetic analysis and proteomics, enabling the expansion of the cell biology field. Specifically, microfluidics has provided promising tools for enhancing cell biological research, since it has the ability to precisely control the cellular environment, to easily mimic heterogeneous cellular environment by multiplexing, and to analyze sub-cellular information by high-contents screening assays at the single-cell level. Various cell manipulation techniques in microfluidics have been developed in accordance with specific objectives and applications. In this review, we examine the latest achievements of cell manipulation techniques in microfluidics by categorizing externally applied forces for manipulation: (i) optical, (ii) magnetic, (iii) electrical, (iv) mechanical and (v) other manipulations. We furthermore focus on history where the manipulation techniques originate and also discuss future perspectives with key examples where available.

  20. Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chung-cheng; Sui, Guodong; Elizarov, Arkadij; Kolb, Hartmuth C; Huang, Jiang; Heath, James R; Phelps, Michael E; Quake, Stephen R; Tseng, Hsian-rong; Wyatt, Paul; Daridon, Antoine

    2012-06-26

    New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

  1. Microfluidic multiplexing in bioanalyses.

    PubMed

    Araz, M Kursad; Tentori, Augusto M; Herr, Amy E

    2013-10-01

    The importance of biological assays spans from clinical diagnostics to environmental monitoring. Simultaneous detection of multiple analytes enhances the efficacy of bioassays by providing more data per assay under standardized conditions. Nevertheless, simultaneous handling and assaying of multiple samples, targets, and experimental conditions can be laborious, reagent consuming, and time intensive. Given these demands, microfluidic platforms have emerged over the past two decades as well-suited approaches for multiplexed assays. Microfluidic design supports integration of assay steps and reproducible sample manipulation across large sets of conditions--all relevant to multiplexed assays. Taken together, reduced reagent consumption, faster assay times, and potential for automation stemming from microfluidic assay design are attractive and needed multiplexed assay performance attributes. This review highlights recent advances in multiplexed bioanalyses benefitting from microfluidic integration.

  2. Microfluidics: reframing biological enquiry.

    PubMed

    Duncombe, Todd A; Tentori, Augusto M; Herr, Amy E

    2015-09-01

    The underlying physical properties of microfluidic tools have led to new biological insights through the development of microsystems that can manipulate, mimic and measure biology at a resolution that has not been possible with macroscale tools. Microsystems readily handle sub-microlitre volumes, precisely route predictable laminar fluid flows and match both perturbations and measurements to the length scales and timescales of biological systems. The advent of fabrication techniques that do not require highly specialized engineering facilities is fuelling the broad dissemination of microfluidic systems and their adaptation to specific biological questions. We describe how our understanding of molecular and cell biology is being and will continue to be advanced by precision microfluidic approaches and posit that microfluidic tools - in conjunction with advanced imaging, bioinformatics and molecular biology approaches - will transform biology into a precision science.

  3. Microfluidics in inorganic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Abou-Hassan, Ali; Sandre, Olivier; Cabuil, Valérie

    2010-08-23

    The application of microfluidics in chemistry has gained significant importance in the recent years. Miniaturized chemistry platforms provide controlled fluid transport, rapid chemical reactions, and cost-saving advantages over conventional reactors. The advantages of microfluidics have been clearly established in the field of analytical and bioanalytical sciences and in the field of organic synthesis. It is less true in the field of inorganic chemistry and materials science; however in inorganic chemistry it has mostly been used for the separation and selective extraction of metal ions. Microfluidics has been used in materials science mainly for the improvement of nanoparticle synthesis, namely metal, metal oxide, and semiconductor nanoparticles. Microfluidic devices can also be used for the formulation of more advanced and sophisticated inorganic materials or hybrids.

  4. Electro-Microfluidic Packaging

    SciTech Connect

    BENAVIDES, GILBERT L.; GALAMBOS, PAUL C.

    2002-06-01

    Electro-microfluidics is experiencing explosive growth in new product developments. There are many commercial applications for electro-microfluidic devices such as chemical sensors, biological sensors, and drop ejectors for both printing and chemical analysis. The number of silicon surface micromachined electro-microfluidic products is likely to increase. Manufacturing efficiency and integration of microfluidics with electronics will become important. Surface micromachined microfluidic devices are manufactured with the same tools as IC's (integrated circuits) and their fabrication can be incorporated into the IC fabrication process. In order to realize applications for devices must be developed. An Electro-Microfluidic Dual In-line Package (EMDIP{trademark}) was developed surface micromachined electro-microfluidic devices, a practical method for getting fluid into these to be a standard solution that allows for both the electrical and the fluidic connections needed to operate a great variety of electro-microfluidic devices. The EMDIP{trademark} includes a fan-out manifold that, on one side, mates directly with the 200 micron diameter Bosch etched holes found on the device, and, on the other side, mates to lager 1 mm diameter holes. To minimize cost the EMDIP{trademark} can be injection molded in a great variety of thermoplastics which also serve to optimize fluid compatibility. The EMDIP{trademark} plugs directly into a fluidic printed wiring board using a standard dual in-line package pattern for the electrical connections and having a grid of multiple 1 mm diameter fluidic connections to mate to the underside of the EMDIP{trademark}.

  5. Flock-based microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Hitzbleck, Martina; Lovchik, Robert D; Delamarche, Emmanuel

    2013-05-21

    Flock-based microfluidics are created by depositing hydrophilic microfibers on an adhesive-coated substrate using an electric field. This enables the fabrication of self-powered microfluidics from one or more different kinds of fibers that form 2D and 3D flowpaths, which can wick 40 microliters of liquid per square centimeter. With this approach, large areas of functional wicking materials can be produced at extremely low cost.

  6. MEMS in microfluidic channels.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, Carol Iris Hill; Okandan, Murat; Michalske, Terry A.; Sounart, Thomas L.; Matzke, Carolyn M.

    2004-03-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) comprise a new class of devices that include various forms of sensors and actuators. Recent studies have shown that microscale cantilever structures are able to detect a wide range of chemicals, biomolecules or even single bacterial cells. In this approach, cantilever deflection replaces optical fluorescence detection thereby eliminating complex chemical tagging steps that are difficult to achieve with chip-based architectures. A key challenge to utilizing this new detection scheme is the incorporation of functionalized MEMS structures within complex microfluidic channel architectures. The ability to accomplish this integration is currently limited by the processing approaches used to seal lids on pre-etched microfluidic channels. This report describes Sandia's first construction of MEMS instrumented microfluidic chips, which were fabricated by combining our leading capabilities in MEMS processing with our low-temperature photolithographic method for fabricating microfluidic channels. We have explored in-situ cantilevers and other similar passive MEMS devices as a new approach to directly sense fluid transport, and have successfully monitored local flow rates and viscosities within microfluidic channels. Actuated MEMS structures have also been incorporated into microfluidic channels, and the electrical requirements for actuation in liquids have been quantified with an elegant theory. Electrostatic actuation in water has been accomplished, and a novel technique for monitoring local electrical conductivities has been invented.

  7. Surface acoustic wave microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiaoyun; Li, Peng; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Stratton, Zackary S.; Nama, Nitesh; Guo, Feng; Slotcavage, Daniel; Mao, Xiaole; Shi, Jinjie; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    The recent introduction of surface acoustic wave (SAW) technology onto lab-on-a-chip platforms has opened a new frontier in microfluidics. The advantages provided by such SAW microfluidics are numerous: simple fabrication, high biocompatibility, fast fluid actuation, versatility, compact and inexpensive devices and accessories, contact-free particle manipulation, and compatibility with other microfluidic components. We believe that these advantages enable SAW microfluidics to play a significant role in a variety of applications in biology, chemistry, engineering, and medicine. In this review article, we discuss the theory underpinning SAWs and their interactions with particles and the contacting fluids in which they are suspended. We then review the SAW-enabled microfluidic devices demonstrated to date, starting with devices that accomplish fluid mixing and transport through the use of travelling SAW; we follow that by reviewing the more recent innovations achieved with standing SAW that enable such actions as particle/cell focusing, sorting, and patterning. Finally, we look forward and appraise where the discipline of SAW microfluidics could go next. PMID:23900527

  8. Surface acoustic wave microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiaoyun; Li, Peng; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Stratton, Zackary S; Nama, Nitesh; Guo, Feng; Slotcavage, Daniel; Mao, Xiaole; Shi, Jinjie; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2013-09-21

    The recent introduction of surface acoustic wave (SAW) technology onto lab-on-a-chip platforms has opened a new frontier in microfluidics. The advantages provided by such SAW microfluidics are numerous: simple fabrication, high biocompatibility, fast fluid actuation, versatility, compact and inexpensive devices and accessories, contact-free particle manipulation, and compatibility with other microfluidic components. We believe that these advantages enable SAW microfluidics to play a significant role in a variety of applications in biology, chemistry, engineering and medicine. In this review article, we discuss the theory underpinning SAWs and their interactions with particles and the contacting fluids in which they are suspended. We then review the SAW-enabled microfluidic devices demonstrated to date, starting with devices that accomplish fluid mixing and transport through the use of travelling SAW; we follow that by reviewing the more recent innovations achieved with standing SAW that enable such actions as particle/cell focusing, sorting and patterning. Finally, we look forward and appraise where the discipline of SAW microfluidics could go next.

  9. Three-dimensional surface microfluidics enabled by spatiotemporal control of elastic fluidic interface.

    PubMed

    Hong, Lingfei; Pan, Tingrui

    2010-12-07

    As an emerging alternative to the conventional counterpart, surface microfluidics incorporates both intrinsic resistive solid-liquid and elastic frictionless gas-liquid interfaces, leading to unique flow-pressure characteristics. Furthermore, the open-surface microfluidic platforms can be fabricated on a monolithic substrate with high wettability contrast by the previously reported one-step lithographic process of a photosensitive superhydrophobic nanocomposite material, which permits flexible fluidic operations and direct surface modifications. In the paper, we first present three-dimensional microfluidic manipulations utilizing the unconventional gas-liquid interfaces of surface microfluidics, outlined by the micropatterned wetting boundaries (also known as the triple lines). In contrast to the primary linear (resistive) nature of the conventional closed-channel microfluidics, the distinct elastic interface of surface microfluidics enables remarkable three-dimensional (deformable) and time-dependent (capacitive) operations of the flow. Specifically, spatiotemporal dependence of microflow patterns on the planar fluidic surfaces has been theoretically analyzed and experimentally characterized. Utilizing the unconventional interface-enabled flow-pressure relationship, novel surface fluidic operations, including microflow regulation and flow-controlled switching, have been demonstrated and fully investigated. Furthermore, three-dimensional surface microfluidic networks together with analog-to-digital stereo-flow activations have been established, in which miniature capillary bridges form fluidic connections between two independent surface microfluidic circuits.

  10. Backplane photonic interconnect modules with optical jumpers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glebov, Alexei L.; Lee, Michael G.; Yokouchi, Kishio

    2005-03-01

    Prototypes of optical interconnect (OI) modules for backplane applications are presented. The transceivers attached to the linecards E/O convert the signals that are passed to and from the backplane by optical jumpers terminated with MTP-type connectors. The connectors plug into adaptors attached to the backplane and the microlens arrays mounted in the adaptors couple the light between the fibers and waveguides. Planar polymer channel waveguides with 30-50 μm cross-sections route the optical signals across the board with propagation losses as low as 0.05 dB/cm @ 850 nm. The 45¦-tapered integrated micromirrors reflect the light in and out of the waveguide plane with the loss of 0.8 dB per mirror. The connector displacement measurements indicate that the adaptor lateral assembly accuracy can be at least +/-10 μm for the excess loss not exceeding 1 dB. Insertion losses of the test modules with integrated waveguides, 45¦ mirrors, and pluggable optical jumper connectors are about 5 dB. Eye diagrams at 10.7 Gb/s have typical width and height of 70 ps and 400 mV, respectively, and jitter of about 20 ps.

  11. Hybrid microfluidic systems: combining a polymer microfluidic toolbox with biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gärtner, Claudia; Kirsch, Stefanie; Anton, Birgit; Becker, Holger

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present polymer based microfluidic chips which contain functional elements (electrodes, biosensors) made out of a different material (metals, silicon, organic semiconductors). These hybrid microfluidic devices allow the integration of additional functionality other than the simple manipulation of liquids in the chip and have been developed as a reaction to the increasing requirement for functional integration in microfluidics.

  12. Design and development of application-specific microfluidic components for flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bai; Castracane, James; Altemus, Bruce; Keijmel, Jeroen; Heuzinkveld, Martijn

    2003-01-01

    There has been a growing interest in the research of microfluidic management systems, e.g., for DNA sequencing devices, biological cell manipulation systems, chemical analysis systems and microdosage systems. microfluidic management is crucial capability in most biomedical nanodevices and micro fuel cells using methanol as fuel. It involves the manipulation of fluids ranging from a scale of nano to millimeters. Basic building components for a microfluidic management system are microvalves and micropump s together with the interconnect fluidic channels . Micropumps can have passive and/or active valve. Because of the increasing functionality in portable electronic devices and systems, the micropumps and mic rovalves should be compact, reliable, long-lifetime and high energy efficient. In this report, the design, fabrication and modeling of a low power, low voltage, leak proof microfluidic management systems will be discussed.

  13. Punch card programmable microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Korir, George; Prakash, Manu

    2015-01-01

    Small volume fluid handling in single and multiphase microfluidics provides a promising strategy for efficient bio-chemical assays, low-cost point-of-care diagnostics and new approaches to scientific discoveries. However multiple barriers exist towards low-cost field deployment of programmable microfluidics. Incorporating multiple pumps, mixers and discrete valve based control of nanoliter fluids and droplets in an integrated, programmable manner without additional required external components has remained elusive. Combining the idea of punch card programming with arbitrary fluid control, here we describe a self-contained, hand-crank powered, multiplex and robust programmable microfluidic platform. A paper tape encodes information as a series of punched holes. A mechanical reader/actuator reads these paper tapes and correspondingly executes operations onto a microfluidic chip coupled to the platform in a plug-and-play fashion. Enabled by the complexity of codes that can be represented by a series of holes in punched paper tapes, we demonstrate independent control of 15 on-chip pumps with enhanced mixing, normally-closed valves and a novel on-demand impact-based droplet generator. We demonstrate robustness of operation by encoding a string of characters representing the word "PUNCHCARD MICROFLUIDICS" using the droplet generator. Multiplexing is demonstrated by implementing an example colorimetric water quality assays for pH, ammonia, nitrite and nitrate content in different water samples. With its portable and robust design, low cost and ease-of-use, we envision punch card programmable microfluidics will bring complex control of microfluidic chips into field-based applications in low-resource settings and in the hands of children around the world.

  14. Local Network Wideband Interconnection Alternatives.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    greater than 1.5 Mbps and two standard televison channels. 1.1 SCOPE Interconnection of local area networks within the continental United States is...may influence : a. Media selection, b. Interface design, c. The use of the 1.5 Mbps data transmission capacity, and d. Adherence to the full-motion video

  15. Optical interconnection techniques for Hypercube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, A. R.; Bergman, L. A.; Wu, W. H.

    1988-01-01

    Direct free-space optical interconnection techniques are described for the Hypercube concurrent processor machine using a holographic optical element. Computational requirements and optical constraints on implementation are briefly summarized with regard to topology, power consumption, and available technologies. A hybrid lens/HOE approach is described that can support an eight-dimensional cube of 256 nodes.

  16. Chemical Mechanical Polishing with Nanocolloidal Ceria Slurry for Low-Damage Planarization of Dielectric Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryuzaki, Daisuke; Hoshi, Yosuke; Machii, Yoichi; Koyama, Naoyuki; Sakurai, Haruaki; Ashizawa, Toranosuke

    2012-03-01

    New chemical mechanical polishing processes using nanocolloidal ceria slurry are proposed for high-precision and low-damage planarization of silicon-dioxide-based dielectric films. In the polishing process of a shallow trench isolation structure, a hard pad and a cationic polymer additive are used in combination with the slurry. The new process is effective in improving the planarity and reducing the microscratch count in comparison with a conventional polishing process with calcined ceria slurry and a standard pad. In the polishing process of an interconnect structure with ultralow-k interlayer dielectrics (ULK-ILDs), the standard pad should be used since the ULK-ILDs are easily damaged. By employing a spin-on-type ULK-ILD having a self-planarizing effect, a high planarity is obtained when using the nanocolloidal ceria slurry with the standard pad. The electrical measurement of the interconnect structure indicates that dielectric damage due to the process is successfully suppressed.

  17. Multi-level interconnects for heterojunction bipolar transistor integrated circuit technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Patrizi, G.A.; Lovejoy, M.L.; Schneider, R.P. Jr.; Hou, H.Q.; Enquist, P.M.

    1995-12-31

    Heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs) are mesa structures which present difficult planarization problems in integrated circuit fabrication. The authors report a multilevel metal interconnect technology using Benzocyclobutene (BCB) to implement high-speed, low-power photoreceivers based on InGaAs/InP HBTs. Processes for patterning and dry etching BCB to achieve smooth via holes with sloped sidewalls are presented. Excellent planarization of 1.9 {micro}m mesa topographies on InGaAs/InP device structures is demonstrated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Additionally, SEM cross sections of both the multi-level metal interconnect via holes and the base emitter via holes required in the HBT IC process are presented. All via holes exhibit sloped sidewalls with slopes of 0.4 {micro}m/{micro}m to 2 {micro}m/{micro}m which are needed to realize a robust interconnect process. Specific contact resistances of the interconnects are found to be less than 6 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} {Omega}cm{sup 2}. Integrated circuits utilizing InGaAs/InP HBTs are fabricated to demonstrate the applicability and compatibility of the multi-level interconnect technology with integrated circuit processing.

  18. Planar gradient metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yadong; Fu, Yangyang; Chen, Huanyang

    2016-12-01

    Metamaterials possess exotic properties that do not exist in nature. Gradient metamaterials, which are characterized by a continuous spatial variation of their properties, provide a promising approach to the development of both bulk and planar optics. In particular, planar gradient metamaterials can be classified into three categories: gradient metasurfaces, gradient index metamaterials and gradient metallic gratings. In this Review, we summarize the progress made in the theoretical modelling of these materials, in their experimental implementation and in the design of functional devices. We discuss the use of planar gradient metamaterials for wave bending and focusing in free space, for supporting surface plasmon polaritons and for the realization of trapped rainbows. We also focus on the implementation of these materials in waveguide systems, which can enable electromagnetic cloaking, Fano resonances, asymmetric transmission and guided mode conversion. Finally, we discuss promising trends, such as the use of dielectric rather than metallic unit elements and the use of planar gradient metamaterials in 3D systems.

  19. A metallic interconnect for a solid oxide fuel cell stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    England, Diane Mildred

    A solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) electrochemically converts the chemical energy of reaction into electrical energy. The commercial success of planar, SOFC stack technology has a number of challenges, one of which is the interconnect that electrically and physically connects the cathode of one cell to the anode of an adjacent cell in the SOFC stack and in addition, separates the anodic and cathodic gases. An SOFC stack operating at intermediate temperatures, between 600°C and 800°C, can utilize a metallic alloy as an interconnect material. Since the interconnect of an SOFC stack must operate in both air and fuel environments, the oxidation kinetics, adherence and electronic resistance of the oxide scales formed on commercial alloys were investigated in air and wet hydrogen under thermal cycling conditions to 800°C. The alloy, Haynes 230, exhibited the slowest oxidation kinetics and the lowest area-specific resistance as a function of oxidation time of all the alloys in air at 800°C. However, the area-specific resistance of the oxide scale formed on Haynes 230 in wet hydrogen was unacceptably high after only 500 hours of oxidation, which was attributed to the high resistivity of Cr2O3 in a reducing atmosphere. A study of the electrical conductivity of the minor phase manganese chromite, MnXCr3-XO4, in the oxide scale of Haynes 230, revealed that a composition closer to Mn2CrO4 had significantly higher electrical conductivity than that closer to MnCr 2O4. Haynes 230 was coated with Mn to form a phase closer to the Mn2CrO4 composition for application on the fuel side of the interconnect. U.S. Patent No. 6,054,231 is pending. Although coating a metallic alloy is inexpensive, the stringent economic requirements of SOFC stack technology required an alloy without coating for production applications. As no commercially available alloy, among the 41 alloys investigated, performed to the specifications required, a new alloy was created and designated DME-A2. The oxide scale

  20. Microfluidic Mixing: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chia-Yen; Chang, Chin-Lung; Wang, Yao-Nan; Fu, Lung-Ming

    2011-01-01

    The aim of microfluidic mixing is to achieve a thorough and rapid mixing of multiple samples in microscale devices. In such devices, sample mixing is essentially achieved by enhancing the diffusion effect between the different species flows. Broadly speaking, microfluidic mixing schemes can be categorized as either “active”, where an external energy force is applied to perturb the sample species, or “passive”, where the contact area and contact time of the species samples are increased through specially-designed microchannel configurations. Many mixers have been proposed to facilitate this task over the past 10 years. Accordingly, this paper commences by providing a high level overview of the field of microfluidic mixing devices before describing some of the more significant proposals for active and passive mixers. PMID:21686184

  1. Microfluidic platforms for mechanobiology

    PubMed Central

    Polacheck, William J.; Li, Ran; Uzel, Sebastien G. M.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanotransduction has been a topic of considerable interest since early studies demonstrated a link between mechanical force and biological response. Until recently, studies of fundamental phenomena were based either on in vivo experiments with limited control or direct access, or on large-scale in vitro studies lacking many of the potentially important physiological factors. With the advent of microfluidics, many of the previous limitations of in vitro testing were eliminated or reduced through greater control or combined functionalities. At the same time, imaging capabilities were tremendously enhanced. In this review, we discuss how microfluidics has transformed the study of mechanotransduction. This is done in the context of the various cell types that exhibit force-induced responses and the new biological insights that have been elucidated. We also discuss new microfluidic studies that could produce even more realistic models of in vivo conditions by combining multiple stimuli or creating a more realistic microenvironment. PMID:23649165

  2. Chromium Vaporization Reduction by Nickel Coatings For SOEC Interconnect Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Michael V. Glazoff; Sergey N. Rashkeev; J. Stephen Herring

    2014-09-01

    The vaporization of Cr-rich volatile species from interconnect materials is a major source of degradation that limits the lifetime of planar solid oxide devices systems with metallic interconnects, including Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells, or SOECs. Some metallic coatings (Ni, Co, and Cu) significantly reduce the Cr release from interconnects and slow down the oxide scale growth on the steel substrate. To shed additional light upon the mechanisms of such protection and find a suitable coating material for ferritic stainless steel materials, we used a combination of first-principles calculations, thermodynamics, and diffusion modeling to investigate which factors determine the quality of the Ni metallic coating at stainless steel interconnector. We found that the Cr migration in Ni coating is determined by a delicate combination of the nickel oxidation, Cr diffusion, and phase transformation processes. Although the formation of Cr2O3 oxide is more exothermic than that of NiO, the kinetic rate of the chromia formation in the coating layer and its surface is significantly reduced by the low mobility of Cr in nickel oxide and in NiCr2O4 spinel. These results are in a good agreement with diffusion modeling for Cr diffusion through Ni coating layer on the ferritic 441 steel substrate.

  3. Learning planar ising models

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Jason K; Chertkov, Michael; Netrapalli, Praneeth

    2010-11-12

    Inference and learning of graphical models are both well-studied problems in statistics and machine learning that have found many applications in science and engineering. However, exact inference is intractable in general graphical models, which suggests the problem of seeking the best approximation to a collection of random variables within some tractable family of graphical models. In this paper, we focus our attention on the class of planar Ising models, for which inference is tractable using techniques of statistical physics [Kac and Ward; Kasteleyn]. Based on these techniques and recent methods for planarity testing and planar embedding [Chrobak and Payne], we propose a simple greedy algorithm for learning the best planar Ising model to approximate an arbitrary collection of binary random variables (possibly from sample data). Given the set of all pairwise correlations among variables, we select a planar graph and optimal planar Ising model defined on this graph to best approximate that set of correlations. We present the results of numerical experiments evaluating the performance of our algorithm.

  4. Learning planar Ising models

    DOE PAGES

    Johnson, Jason K.; Oyen, Diane Adele; Chertkov, Michael; ...

    2016-12-01

    Inference and learning of graphical models are both well-studied problems in statistics and machine learning that have found many applications in science and engineering. However, exact inference is intractable in general graphical models, which suggests the problem of seeking the best approximation to a collection of random variables within some tractable family of graphical models. In this paper, we focus on the class of planar Ising models, for which exact inference is tractable using techniques of statistical physics. Based on these techniques and recent methods for planarity testing and planar embedding, we propose a greedy algorithm for learning the bestmore » planar Ising model to approximate an arbitrary collection of binary random variables (possibly from sample data). Given the set of all pairwise correlations among variables, we select a planar graph and optimal planar Ising model defined on this graph to best approximate that set of correlations. Finally, we demonstrate our method in simulations and for two applications: modeling senate voting records and identifying geo-chemical depth trends from Mars rover data.« less

  5. Learning planar Ising models

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Jason K.; Oyen, Diane Adele; Chertkov, Michael; Netrapalli, Praneeth

    2016-12-01

    Inference and learning of graphical models are both well-studied problems in statistics and machine learning that have found many applications in science and engineering. However, exact inference is intractable in general graphical models, which suggests the problem of seeking the best approximation to a collection of random variables within some tractable family of graphical models. In this paper, we focus on the class of planar Ising models, for which exact inference is tractable using techniques of statistical physics. Based on these techniques and recent methods for planarity testing and planar embedding, we propose a greedy algorithm for learning the best planar Ising model to approximate an arbitrary collection of binary random variables (possibly from sample data). Given the set of all pairwise correlations among variables, we select a planar graph and optimal planar Ising model defined on this graph to best approximate that set of correlations. Finally, we demonstrate our method in simulations and for two applications: modeling senate voting records and identifying geo-chemical depth trends from Mars rover data.

  6. Punch Card Programmable Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Korir, George; Prakash, Manu

    2015-01-01

    Small volume fluid handling in single and multiphase microfluidics provides a promising strategy for efficient bio-chemical assays, low-cost point-of-care diagnostics and new approaches to scientific discoveries. However multiple barriers exist towards low-cost field deployment of programmable microfluidics. Incorporating multiple pumps, mixers and discrete valve based control of nanoliter fluids and droplets in an integrated, programmable manner without additional required external components has remained elusive. Combining the idea of punch card programming with arbitrary fluid control, here we describe a self-contained, hand-crank powered, multiplex and robust programmable microfluidic platform. A paper tape encodes information as a series of punched holes. A mechanical reader/actuator reads these paper tapes and correspondingly executes operations onto a microfluidic chip coupled to the platform in a plug-and-play fashion. Enabled by the complexity of codes that can be represented by a series of holes in punched paper tapes, we demonstrate independent control of 15 on-chip pumps with enhanced mixing, normally-closed valves and a novel on-demand impact-based droplet generator. We demonstrate robustness of operation by encoding a string of characters representing the word “PUNCHCARD MICROFLUIDICS” using the droplet generator. Multiplexing is demonstrated by implementing an example colorimetric water quality assays for pH, ammonia, nitrite and nitrate content in different water samples. With its portable and robust design, low cost and ease-of-use, we envision punch card programmable microfluidics will bring complex control of microfluidic chips into field-based applications in low-resource settings and in the hands of children around the world. PMID:25738834

  7. Planar high density sodium battery

    DOEpatents

    Lemmon, John P.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.

    2016-03-01

    A method of making a molten sodium battery is disclosed. A first metallic interconnect frame having a first interconnect vent hole is provided. A second metallic interconnect frame having a second interconnect vent hole is also provided. An electrolyte plate having a cathode vent hole and an anode vent hole is interposed between the metallic interconnect frames. The metallic interconnect frames and the electrolyte plate are sealed thereby forming gaseous communication between an anode chamber through the anode vent hole and gaseous communication between a cathode chamber through the cathode vent hole.

  8. Microfluidic Flame Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mungas, Gregory S. (Inventor); Fisher, David J. (Inventor); Mungas, Christopher (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Propellants flow through specialized mechanical hardware that is designed for effective and safe ignition and sustained combustion of the propellants. By integrating a micro-fluidic porous media element between a propellant feed source and the combustion chamber, an effective and reliable propellant injector head may be implemented that is capable of withstanding transient combustion and detonation waves that commonly occur during an ignition event. The micro-fluidic porous media element is of specified porosity or porosity gradient selected to be appropriate for a given propellant. Additionally the propellant injector head design integrates a spark ignition mechanism that withstands extremely hot running conditions without noticeable spark mechanism degradation.

  9. Microfluidic CARS cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Han-Wei; Bao, Ning; Le, Thuc T.; Lu, Chang; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2009-01-01

    Coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering (CARS) flow cytometry was demonstrated by combining a laser-scanning CARS microscope with a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) based microfluidic device. Line-scanning across the hydrodynamically focused core stream was performed for detection of flowing objects. Parameters were optimized by utilizing polystyrene beads as flowing particles. Population measurements of adipocytes isolated from mouse fat tissues demonstrated the viability of microfluidic CARS cytometry for quantitation of adipocyte size distribution. CARS cytometry could be a new modality for quantitative analysis with vibrational selectivity. PMID:18542688

  10. Experimental Microfluidic System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culbertson, Christopher; Gonda, Steve; Ramsey, John Michael

    2005-01-01

    The ultimate goal of this project is to integrate microfluidic devices with NASA's space bioreactor systems. In such a system, the microfluidic device would provide realtime feedback control of the bioreactor by monitoring pH, glucose, and lactate levels in the cell media; and would provide an analytical capability to the bioreactor in exterrestrial environments for monitoring bioengineered cell products and health changes in cells due to environmental stressors. Such integrated systems could be used as biosentinels both in space and on planet surfaces. The objective is to demonstrate the ability of microfabricated devices to repeatedly and reproducibly perform bead cytometry experiments in micro, lunar, martian, and hypergravity (1.8g).

  11. Immortality of Cu damascene interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hau-Riege, Stefan P.

    2002-04-01

    We have studied short-line effects in fully-integrated Cu damascene interconnects through electromigration experiments on lines of various lengths and embedded in different dielectric materials. We compare these results with results from analogous experiments on subtractively-etched Al-based interconnects. It is known that Al-based interconnects exhibit three different behaviors, depending on the magnitude of the product of current density, j, and line length, L: For small values of (jL), no void nucleation occurs, and the line is immortal. For intermediate values, voids nucleate, but the line does not fail because the current can flow through the higher-resistivity refractory-metal-based shunt layers. Here, the resistance of the line increases but eventually saturates, and the relative resistance increase is proportional to (jL/B), where B is the effective elastic modulus of the metallization system. For large values of (jL/B), voiding leads to an unacceptably high resistance increase, and the line is considered failed. By contrast, we observed only two regimes for Cu-based interconnects: Either the resistance of the line stays constant during the duration of the experiment, and the line is considered immortal, or the line fails due to an abrupt open-circuit failure. The absence of an intermediate regime in which the resistance saturates is due to the absence of a shunt layer that is able to support a large amount of current once voiding occurs. Since voids nucleate much more easily in Cu- than in Al-based interconnects, a small fraction of short Cu lines fails even at low current densities. It is therefore more appropriate to consider the probability of immortality in the case of Cu rather than assuming a sharp boundary between mortality and immortality. The probability of immortality decreases with increasing amount of material depleted from the cathode, which is proportional to (jL2/B) at steady state. By contrast, the immortality of Al-based interconnects is

  12. 47 CFR 64.1401 - Expanded interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... such equipment to connect interconnectors' fiber optic systems or microwave radio transmission... interconnectors' fiber optic systems or microwave radio transmission facilities (where reasonably feasible) with... interconnection of fiber optic facilities, local exchange carriers shall provide: (1) An interconnection point or...

  13. 47 CFR 64.1401 - Expanded interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... such equipment to connect interconnectors' fiber optic systems or microwave radio transmission... interconnectors' fiber optic systems or microwave radio transmission facilities (where reasonably feasible) with... interconnection of fiber optic facilities, local exchange carriers shall provide: (1) An interconnection point or...

  14. 47 CFR 64.1401 - Expanded interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... such equipment to connect interconnectors' fiber optic systems or microwave radio transmission... interconnectors' fiber optic systems or microwave radio transmission facilities (where reasonably feasible) with... interconnection of fiber optic facilities, local exchange carriers shall provide: (1) An interconnection point or...

  15. Process for making a multilayer interconnect system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zachry, Clyde L. (Inventor); Niedzwiecke, Andrew J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A process for making an interconnect system for a multilayer circuit pattern. The interconnect system is formed having minimized through-hole space consumption so as to be suitable for high density, closely meshed circuit patterns.

  16. Sequential assembly of 3D perfusable microfluidic hydrogels.

    PubMed

    He, Jiankang; Zhu, Lin; Liu, Yaxiong; Li, Dichen; Jin, Zhongmin

    2014-11-01

    Bottom-up tissue engineering provides a promising way to recreate complex structural organizations of native organs in artificial constructs by assembling functional repeating modules. However, it is challenging for current bottom-up strategies to simultaneously produce a controllable and immediately perfusable microfluidic network in modularly assembled 3D constructs. Here we presented a bottom-up strategy to produce perfusable microchannels in 3D hydrogels by sequentially assembling microfluidic modules. The effects of agarose-collagen composition on microchannel replication and 3D assembly of hydrogel modules were investigated. The unique property of predefined microchannels in transporting fluids within 3D assemblies was evaluated. Endothelial cells were incorporated into the microfluidic network of 3D hydrogels for dynamic culture in a house-made bioreactor system. The results indicated that the sequential assembly method could produce interconnected 3D predefined microfluidic networks in optimized agarose-collagen hydrogels, which were fully perfusable and successfully functioned as fluid pathways to facilitate the spreading of endothelial cells. We envision that the presented method could be potentially used to engineer 3D vascularized parenchymal constructs by encapsulating primary cells in bulk hydrogels and incorporating endothelial cells in predefined microchannels.

  17. Engineering anastomosis between living capillary networks and endothelial cell-lined microfluidic channels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolin; Phan, Duc T T; Sobrino, Agua; George, Steven C; Hughes, Christopher C W; Lee, Abraham P

    2016-01-21

    This paper reports a method for generating an intact and perfusable microvascular network that connects to microfluidic channels without appreciable leakage. This platform incorporates different stages of vascular development including vasculogenesis, endothelial cell (EC) lining, sprouting angiogenesis, and anastomosis in sequential order. After formation of a capillary network inside the tissue chamber via vasculogenesis, the adjacent microfluidic channels are lined with a monolayer of ECs, which then serve as the high-pressure input ("artery") and low pressure output ("vein") conduits. To promote a tight interconnection between the artery/vein and the capillary network, sprouting angiogenesis is induced, which promotes anastomosis of the vasculature inside the tissue chamber with the EC lining along the microfluidic channels. Flow of fluorescent microparticles confirms the perfusability of the lumenized microvascular network, and minimal leakage of 70 kDa FITC-dextran confirms physiologic tightness of the EC junctions and completeness of the interconnections between artery/vein and the capillary network. This versatile device design and its robust construction methodology establish a physiological transport model of interconnected perfused vessels from artery to vascularized tissue to vein. The system has utility in a wide range of organ-on-a-chip applications as it enables the physiological vascular interconnection of multiple on-chip tissue constructs that can serve as disease models for drug screening.

  18. Modular microfluidics for point-of-care protein purifications

    SciTech Connect

    Millet, L. J.; Lucheon, J. D.; Standaert, R. F.; Retterer, S. T.; Doktycz, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Biochemical separations are the heart of diagnostic assays and purification methods for biologics. On-chip miniaturization and modularization of separation procedures will enable the development of customized, portable devices for personalized health-care diagnostics and point-of-use production of treatments. In this report, we describe the design and fabrication of miniature ion exchange, size exclusion and affinity chromatography modules for on-chip clean-up of recombinantly-produced proteins. Our results demonstrate that these common separations techniques can be implemented in microfluidic modules with performance comparable to conventional approaches. We introduce embedded 3-D microfluidic interconnects for integrating micro-scale separation modules that can be arranged and reconfigured to suit a variety of fluidic operations or biochemical processes. In conclusion, we demonstrate the utility of the modular approach with a platform for the enrichment of enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) from Escherichia coli lysate through integrated affinity and size-exclusion chromatography modules.

  19. Uniform Microparticles with Controllable Highly Interconnected Hierarchical Porous Structures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mao-Jie; Wang, Wei; Yang, Xiu-Lan; Ma, Bing; Liu, Ying-Mei; Xie, Rui; Ju, Xiao-Jie; Liu, Zhuang; Chu, Liang-Yin

    2015-07-01

    A simple and versatile strategy is developed for one-step fabrication of uniform polymeric microparticles with controllable highly interconnected hierarchical porous structures. Monodisperse water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) emulsions, with methyl methacrylate, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate, and glycidyl methacrylate as the monomer-containing oil phase, are generated from microfluidics and used for constructing the microparticles. Due to the partially miscible property of oil/aqueous phases, the monodisperse W/O/W emulsions can deform into desired shapes depending on the packing structure of inner aqueous microdrops, and form aqueous nanodrops in the oil phase. The deformed W/O/W emulsions allow template syntheses of highly interconnected hierarchical porous microparticles with precisely and individually controlled pore size, porosity, functionality, and particle shape. The microparticles elaborately combine the advantages of enhanced mass transfer, large functional surface area, and flexibly tunable functionalities, providing an efficient strategy to physically and chemically achieve enhanced synergetic performances for extensive applications. This is demonstrated by using the microparticles for oil removal for water purification and protein adsorption for bioseparation. The method proposed in this study provides full versatility for fabrication of functional polymeric microparticles with controllable hierarchical porous structures for enhancing and even broadening their applications.

  20. 47 CFR 90.477 - Interconnected systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Interconnected systems. 90.477 Section 90.477... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Transmitter Control Interconnected Systems § 90.477 Interconnected systems. (a... operation. This restriction will not apply to trunked systems or on any channel assigned exclusively to one...

  1. 18 CFR 292.306 - Interconnection costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Interconnection costs... § 292.306 Interconnection costs. (a) Obligation to pay. Each qualifying facility shall be obligated to pay any interconnection costs which the State regulatory authority (with respect to any...

  2. Microfluidic flow of cholesteric liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Wiese, Oliver; Marenduzzo, Davide; Henrich, Oliver

    2016-11-16

    We explore the rheology and flow-induced morphological changes of cholesteric liquid crystal patterns subject to Poiseuille flow within a slab geometry, and under different anchoring conditions at the wall. Our focus is particularly on the behaviour of "Cholesteric Fingers of the first kind" and of Blue Phase II. Depending on the applied pressure gradient, we observe a number of dynamic regimes with different rheological properties. Our results provide the first insight into the flow response of cholesteric phases with fully two- or three-dimensional director field patterns and normal and planar degenerate anchoring conditions as commonly realised in experiments. They are also of high relevance for a fundamental understanding of complex liquid crystals in confinement and an important step towards future microfluidic applications that are based on cholesteric liquid crystals.

  3. A planar dodecasubstituted porphyrin

    SciTech Connect

    Senge, M.O.; Medforth, C.J.; Smith, K.M. ); Sparks, L.D.; Shelnutt, J.A. )

    1993-04-28

    Structural investigations of copper and nickel complexes of dodecasubstituted porphyrins bearing aryl groups at the meso positions and propano rings at the pyrrole [beta] positions reveal considerable differences in their macrocycle conformations. While the nickel complex NiTC5T(3,4,5-OMeP)P was found to exhibit a nonplanar conformation which is considerably more planar than that of other dodecasubstituted porphyrins, the corresponding copper complex CuTC5T(3,4,5-OMeP)P was planar. CuTC5T(3,4,5-OMeP)P thus represents the first example of a completely planar dodecasubstituted porphyrin. The crystal structures of both porphyrins reveal that the C[sub b]-C[sub b]-CH[sub 2] angle is 13[degrees] smaller than in OEP derivatives. This change, which moves the methylene and aryl substituents further apart, effectively removes the steric repulsion responsible for the very nonplanar conformations observed for other dodecasubstituted porphyrins. Molecular mechanics calculations using a porphyrin force field correctly predict a planar macrocycle conformation. The possible reasons for the discrepancy between the observed moderately nonplanar structure and the calculated planar structure for NiTC5T(3,4,5-OMeP)P are discussed. The usefulness of spectroscopic probes (NMR, resonance Raman, electronic absorption) in predicting the planarity of dodecasubstituted porphyrins is also examined. The identification of a planar dodecasubstituted porphyrin further indicates the flexibility of the tetrapyrrole macrocycle and has implications for the study of nonplanarity in synthetic porphyrins and metallotetrapyrrole containing biomolecules. 32 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs.

  4. Coated and uncoated cellophane as materials for microplates and open-channel microfluidics devices.

    PubMed

    Hamedi, Mahiar M; Ünal, Barış; Kerr, Emily; Glavan, Ana C; Fernandez-Abedul, M Teresa; Whitesides, George M

    2016-10-05

    This communication describes the use of uncoated cellophane (regenerated cellulose films) for the fabrication of microplates, and the use of coated cellophane for the fabrication of open-channel microfluidic devices. The microplates based on uncoated cellophane are particularly interesting for applications that require high transparency in the ultraviolet (UV) regime, and offer a low-cost alternative to expensive quartz-well plates. Uncoated cellophane is also resistant to damage by various solvents. The microfluidic devices, based on coated cellophane, can have features with dimensions as small as 500 μm, and complex, non-planar geometries. Electrodes can be printed on the surface of the coated cellophane, and embedded in microfluidic devices, to develop resistive heaters and electroanalytical devices for flow injection analysis, and continuous flow electrochemiluminescence (ECL) applications. These open-channel devices are appropriate for applications where optical transparency (especially in the visible regime), resistance to damage by water, biocompatibility and biodegradability are important. Cellophane microfluidic systems complement existing cellulose-based paper microfluidic systems, and provide an alternative to other materials used in microfluidics, such as synthetic polymers or glass. Cellulose films are plausible materials for uses in integrated microfluidic systems for diagnostics, analyses, cell-culture, and MEMS.

  5. Avioptic plug-in interconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caserta, Anthony L.; Lijoi, Bruno

    1989-05-01

    A secure interconnection is claimed for optical and avioptic cables located in exposed positions, which often occur on aircraft communications circuits, for connecting those cables into equipment such as circuit boards. In this invention the interconnection for optical fiber cables comprises a connector which is engaged in a receptacle in a mother board provided with optical circuitry. The connector comprises a cuplike body or plug containing a metal sleeve which encases the optical fiber cable such that the cable end is exposed. The mating receptacle comprises a cylindrical shell having its lower end embedded in the mother board. A hole in the receptacle shell wall receives the end of an optical fiber on the optical circuitry of the mother board. The end of the sleeve of the connector fits over the end of the receptacle shell protruding from the mother board. Beam deflection means in the receptacle or on the connector directs light between the fiber optic cable and the optical circuit element of the mother board. Electrical coupling can be incorporated into the interconnection such that the termination can accommodate electrical as well as optical functions.

  6. Chemistry in Microfluidic Channels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chia, Matthew C.; Sweeney, Christina M.; Odom, Teri W.

    2011-01-01

    General chemistry introduces principles such as acid-base chemistry, mixing, and precipitation that are usually demonstrated in bulk solutions. In this laboratory experiment, we describe how chemical reactions can be performed in a microfluidic channel to show advanced concepts such as laminar fluid flow and controlled precipitation. Three sets of…

  7. Microfluidic blood filtration device.

    PubMed

    Maltezos, George; Lee, John; Rajagopal, Aditya; Scholten, Kee; Kartalov, Emil; Scherer, Axel

    2011-02-01

    Rapid decentralized biomedical diagnostics have become increasingly necessary in a medical environment of growing costs and mounting demands on healthcare personnel and infrastructure. Such diagnostics require low-cost novel devices that can operate at bedside or in doctor offices using small amounts of sample that can be extracted and processed on the spot. Thus, point-of-care sample preparation is an important component of the necessary diagnostic paradigm shift. We therefore introduce a microfluidic device which produces plasma from whole blood. The device is inexpensive, reliable, easy to fabricate, and requires only 3.5 kPa pressure to operate. The device is fully compatible with microfluidic diagnostic chips. The output 23-gauge microtube of the former can be directly plugged into the input ports of the latter allowing immediate applicability in practice as a sample-prep pre-stage to a variety of emergent microfluidic diagnostic devices. In addition, the shown approach of filter encapsulation in elastomer has principle importance as it is compatible with and applicable to microfluidic sample-prep integration with analytical stages within the same elastomeric chip. This can eventually lead to finger-prick blood tests in point-of-care settings.

  8. Chemistry in Microfluidic Channels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chia, Matthew C.; Sweeney, Christina M.; Odom, Teri W.

    2011-01-01

    General chemistry introduces principles such as acid-base chemistry, mixing, and precipitation that are usually demonstrated in bulk solutions. In this laboratory experiment, we describe how chemical reactions can be performed in a microfluidic channel to show advanced concepts such as laminar fluid flow and controlled precipitation. Three sets of…

  9. Droplet position control in digital microfluidic systems.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Biddut; Najjaran, Homayoun

    2010-02-01

    Research on so called digital microfluidic systems (DMS) capable of manipulating individual microdroplets on a cell-based structure has enormously increased in the past few years, mainly due to the demand of the technology-dependent biomedical applications. Significant research in this area has been related to the simulation and modeling of droplet motion, demonstration of different drop actuation techniques on laboratory-scale prototypes, and droplet routing and scheduling for more efficient assay procedures. This paper introduces the basics of the control analysis and design of a DMS, which is a relatively unexplored area in digital microfluidics. This paper starts with a discussion on a simplified dynamic model of droplet motion in a planar array of cells, and continues with more complicated dynamic models that are necessary to realize the structure of an appropriate closed-loop control system for the DMS. The control analysis and design includes both the transient and steady-state responses of the DMS under external driving forces. The proposed control analysis and design approach is implemented into SIMULINK models to demonstrate the performance of the DMS through simulation using the system parameters previously reported in the literature.

  10. Interconnects for nanoscale MOSFET technology: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhry, Amit

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, a review of Cu/low-k, carbon nanotube (CNT), graphene nanoribbon (GNR) and optical based interconnect technologies has been done. Interconnect models, challenges and solutions have also been discussed. Of all the four technologies, CNT interconnects satisfy most of the challenges and they are most suited for nanometer scale technologies, despite some minor drawbacks. It is concluded that beyond 32 nm technology, a paradigm shift in the interconnect material is required as Cu/low-k interconnects are approaching fundamental limits.

  11. Flexible interconnects for fuel cell stacks

    DOEpatents

    Lenz, David J.; Chung, Brandon W.; Pham, Ai Quoc

    2004-11-09

    An interconnect that facilitates electrical connection and mechanical support with minimal mechanical stress for fuel cell stacks. The interconnects are flexible and provide mechanically robust fuel cell stacks with higher stack performance at lower cost. The flexible interconnects replace the prior rigid rib interconnects with flexible "fingers" or contact pads which will accommodate the imperfect flatness of the ceramic fuel cells. Also, the mechanical stress of stacked fuel cells will be smaller due to the flexibility of the fingers. The interconnects can be one-sided or double-sided.

  12. Magnetic digital microfluidics - a review.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2017-03-14

    A digital microfluidic platform manipulates droplets on an open surface. Magnetic digital microfluidics utilizes magnetic forces for actuation and offers unique advantages compared to other digital microfluidic platforms. First, the magnetic particles used in magnetic digital microfluidics have multiple functions. In addition to serving as actuators, they also provide a functional solid substrate for molecule binding, which enables a wide range of applications in molecular diagnostics and immunodiagnostics. Second, magnetic digital microfluidics can be manually operated in a "power-free" manner, which allows for operation in low-resource environments for point-of-care diagnostics where even batteries are considered a luxury item. This review covers research areas related to magnetic digital microfluidics. This paper first summarizes the current development of magnetic digital microfluidics. Various methods of droplet manipulation using magnetic forces are discussed, ranging from conventional magnetic particle-based actuation to the recent development of ferrofluids and magnetic liquid marbles. This paper also discusses several new approaches that use magnetically controlled flexible substrates for droplet manipulation. In addition, we emphasize applications of magnetic digital microfluidics in biosensing and medical diagnostics, and identify the current limitations of magnetic digital microfluidics. We provide a perspective on possible solutions to close these gaps. Finally, the paper discusses the future improvement of magnetic digital microfluidics to explore potential new research directions.

  13. Oxygen control with microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Martin D; Rexius-Hall, Megan L; Elgass, Laura Jane; Eddington, David T

    2014-11-21

    Cellular function and behavior are affected by the partial pressure of O2, or oxygen tension, in the microenvironment. The level of oxygenation is important, as it is a balance of oxygen availability and oxygen consumption that is necessary to maintain normoxia. Changes in oxygen tension, from above physiological oxygen tension (hyperoxia) to below physiological levels (hypoxia) or even complete absence of oxygen (anoxia), trigger potent biological responses. For instance, hypoxia has been shown to support the maintenance and promote proliferation of regenerative stem and progenitor cells. Paradoxically, hypoxia also contributes to the development of pathological conditions including systemic inflammatory response, tumorigenesis, and cardiovascular disease, such as ischemic heart disease and pulmonary hypertension. Current methods to study cellular behavior in low levels of oxygen tension include hypoxia workstations and hypoxia chambers. These culture systems do not provide oxygen gradients that are found in vivo or precise control at the microscale. Microfluidic platforms have been developed to overcome the inherent limits of these current methods, including lack of spatial control, slow equilibration, and unachievable or difficult coupling to live-cell microscopy. The various applications made possible by microfluidic systems are the topic of this review. In order to understand how the microscale can be leveraged for oxygen control of cells and tissues within microfluidic systems, some background understanding of diffusion, solubility, and transport at the microscale will be presented in addition to a discussion on the methods for measuring the oxygen tension in microfluidic channels. Finally the various methods for oxygen control within microfluidic platforms will be discussed including devices that rely on diffusion from liquid or gas, utilizing on-or-off-chip mixers, leveraging cellular oxygen uptake to deplete the oxygen, relying on chemical reactions in

  14. Silicon-hybrid wafer-scale integration achieved with multilevel aluminum interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Grant L.; Kolesar, Edward S.

    A silicon-hybrid wafer-scale integration (WSI) technique has been developed to interconnect complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) circuits. Electrical performance tests and processing diagnostics reveal that the interconnect design is very promising. The wafer-scale integrated circuit was fabricated by mounting two CMOS integrated circuit dies into etched wells and then planarizing the surface of the silicon wafer substrate. Next the wafer's surface was coated with a photosensitive polyimide and patterned with vias to accommodate the interconnecting conductors. The CMOS dies were two-bit shift registers and were electrically interconnected with aluminum conductors using conventional silicon processing techniques. A diagnostic evaluation was accomplished to determine the electrical continuity of the conductors and via contacts. When compared to a complementary wire-bonded interconnect scheme, the silicon WSI technology was found to be the superior performer at 1-MHz operating frequencies. Discontinuous interconnects were evaluated, and the failures were identified to occur at the severe topographical steps encountered on the substrate wafer's surface.

  15. In-memory interconnect protocol configuration registers

    DOEpatents

    Cheng, Kevin Y.; Roberts, David A.

    2017-09-19

    Systems, apparatuses, and methods for moving the interconnect protocol configuration registers into the main memory space of a node. The region of memory used for storing the interconnect protocol configuration registers may also be made cacheable to reduce the latency of accesses to the interconnect protocol configuration registers. Interconnect protocol configuration registers which are used during a startup routine may be prefetched into the host's cache to make the startup routine more efficient. The interconnect protocol configuration registers for various interconnect protocols may include one or more of device capability tables, memory-side statistics (e.g., to support two-level memory data mapping decisions), advanced memory and interconnect features such as repair resources and routing tables, prefetching hints, error correcting code (ECC) bits, lists of device capabilities, set and store base address, capability, device ID, status, configuration, capabilities, and other settings.

  16. 78 FR 29672 - Small Generator Interconnection Agreements and Procedures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-21

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission 18 CFR Part 35 Small Generator Interconnection Agreements and Procedures... Generator Interconnection Procedures (SGIP) and pro forma Small Generator Interconnection Agreement (SGIA..., 2013, the Commission issued an order in the above- referenced docket. Small Generator Interconnection...

  17. PREFACE: Nano- and microfluidics Nano- and microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Karin

    2011-05-01

    The field of nano- and microfluidics emerged at the end of the 1990s parallel to the demand for smaller and smaller containers and channels for chemical, biochemical and medical applications such as blood and DNS analysis [1], gene sequencing or proteomics [2, 3]. Since then, new journals and conferences have been launched and meanwhile, about two decades later, a variety of microfluidic applications are on the market. Briefly, 'the small flow becomes mainstream' [4]. Nevertheless, research in nano- and microfluidics is more than downsizing the spatial dimensions. For liquids on the nanoscale, surface and interface phenomena grow in importance and may even dominate the behavior in some systems. The studies collected in this special issue all concentrate on these type of systems and were part ot the priority programme SPP1164 'Nano- and Microfluidics' of the German Science Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, DFG). The priority programme was initiated in 2002 by Hendrik Kuhlmann and myself and was launched in 2004. Friction between a moving liquid and a solid wall may, for instance, play an important role so that the usual assumption of a no-slip boundary condition is no longer valid. Likewise, the dynamic deformations of soft objects like polymers, vesicles or capsules in flow arise from the subtle interplay between the (visco-)elasticity of the object and the viscous stresses in the surrounding fluid and, potentially, the presence of structures confining the flow like channels. Consequently, new theories were developed ( see articles in this issue by Münch and Wagner, Falk and Mecke, Bonthuis et al, Finken et al, Almenar and Rauscher, Straube) and experiments were set up to unambiguously demonstrate deviations from bulk, or 'macro', behavior (see articles in this issue by Wolff et al, Vinogradova and Belyaev, Hahn et al, Seemann et al, Grüner and Huber, Müller-Buschbaum et al, Gutsche et al, Braunmüller et al, Laube et al, Brücker, Nottebrock et al

  18. Droplet microfluidics based microseparation systems.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhiliang; Niu, Menglei; Zhang, Bo

    2012-06-01

    Lab on a chip (LOC) technology is a promising miniaturization approach. The feature that it significantly reduced sample consumption makes great sense in analytical and bioanalytical chemistry. Since the start of LOC technology, much attention has been focused on continuous flow microfluidic systems. At the turn of the century, droplet microfluidics, which was also termed segmented flow microfluidics, was introduced. Droplet microfluidics employs two immiscible phases to form discrete droplets, which are ideal vessels with confined volume, restricted dispersion, limited cross-contamination, and high surface area. Due to these unique features, droplet microfluidics proves to be a versatile tool in microscale sample handling. This article reviews the utility of droplet microfluidics in microanalytical systems with an emphasize on separation science, including sample encapsulation at ultra-small volume, compartmentalization of separation bands, isolation of droplet contents, and related detection techniques.

  19. Double interconnection fuel cell array

    DOEpatents

    Draper, Robert; Zymboly, Gregory E.

    1993-01-01

    A fuel cell array (10) is made, containing number of tubular, elongated fuel cells (12) which are placed next to each other in rows (A, B, C, D), where each cell contains inner electrodes (14) and outer electrodes (18 and 18'), with solid electrolyte (16 and 16') between the electrodes, where the electrolyte and outer electrode are discontinuous, having two portions, and providing at least two opposed discontinuities which contain at least two oppositely opposed interconnections (20 and 20') contacting the inner electrode (14), each cell (12) having only three metallic felt electrical connectors (22) which contact surrounding cells, where each row is electrically connected to the other.

  20. Analysis of vertical interconnection measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karner, F. A.

    The paper examines the predominance of the effects that measurement points, geometries, and alignment have on the interpretation of measured values of contact resistance of vertical interconnections in multilayer electronic packages. It is concluded that: (1) four-terminal measurements for contact resistance are misleading; (2) measured values are mostly a function of structural geometry; (3) simulation in two dimensions and subsequent synthesis is a good predictor in three-dimensional simulations; (4) the dual-contact site is a good alignment aid and contact-resistance indicator; and (5) the measured resistance value should only be used as a reference, and not as an indicator of good or bad.

  1. Environmental toxicology: Interconnections between human ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This presentation will discuss what has made a career in environmental toxicology rewarding, environmental and scientific challenges for the 21st century, paradigm shift in regulatory toxicology, adverse outcome framework, interconnections between human health and ecological integrity, SOT-SETAC Pellston Workshop findings, concepts for systems thinking in environmental toxicology The Eminent Toxicologist Lectures are historically relevant, high-quality presentations appropriate for senior undergraduate students, graduate students, or the scientifically oriented general public. This series of lectures is produced by the SOT Undergraduate Subcommittee of the Education Committee in conjunction with the Eminent Toxicologist Working Group.

  2. Environmental toxicology: Interconnections between human ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This presentation will discuss what has made a career in environmental toxicology rewarding, environmental and scientific challenges for the 21st century, paradigm shift in regulatory toxicology, adverse outcome framework, interconnections between human health and ecological integrity, SOT-SETAC Pellston Workshop findings, concepts for systems thinking in environmental toxicology The Eminent Toxicologist Lectures are historically relevant, high-quality presentations appropriate for senior undergraduate students, graduate students, or the scientifically oriented general public. This series of lectures is produced by the SOT Undergraduate Subcommittee of the Education Committee in conjunction with the Eminent Toxicologist Working Group.

  3. Microfluidic Chips for Semen Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Segerink, L.I.; Sprenkels, A.J.; Oosterhuis, G.J.E.; Vermes, I.; van den Berg, A.

    2012-01-01

    The gold standard of semen analysis is still an manual method, which is time-consuming, labour intensive and needs thorough quality control. Microfluidics can also offer advantages for this application. Therefore a first step in the development of a microfluidic chip has been made, which enables the man the semen analysis at home. In this article recent efforts to determine the concentration and motility using a microfluidic chip are summarized. PMID:27683417

  4. Microfluidic device, and related methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Eric W. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method of making a microfluidic device is provided. The method features patterning a permeable wall on a substrate, and surrounding the permeable wall with a solid, non-permeable boundary structure to establish a microfluidic channel having a cross-sectional dimension less than 5,000 microns and a cross-sectional area at least partially filled with the permeable wall so that fluid flowing through the microfluidic channel at least partially passes through the permeable wall.

  5. Reconfigurable Photonic Capsules Containing Cholesteric Liquid Crystals with Planar Alignment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Seok; Kim, Su Kyung; Won, Jong Chan; Kim, Yun Ho; Kim, Shin-Hyun

    2015-12-07

    Cholesteric liquid crystals (CLCs) reflect selected wavelengths of light owing to their periodic helical structures. The encapsulation of CLCs leads to photonic devices that can be easily processed and might be used as stand-alone microsensors. However, when CLCs are enclosed by polymeric membranes, they usually lose their planar alignment, leading to a deterioration of the optical performance. A microfluidics approach was employed to integrate an ultrathin alignment layer into microcapsules to separate the CLC core and the elastomeric solid membrane using triple-emulsion drops as the templates. The thinness of the alignment layer provides high lubrication resistance, preserving the layer integrity during elastic deformation of the membrane. The CLCs in the microcapsules can thus maintain their planar alignment, rendering the shape and optical properties highly reconfigurable. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Complex Planar Splines.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    try todefine a complex planar spline by holomorphic elements like polynomials, then by the well known identity theorem (e.g. Diederich- Remmert [9, p...R. Remmert : Funktionentheorie I, Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York, 1972, 246 p. 10 0. Lehto - K.I. Virtanen: Quasikonforme AbbildunQen, Springer

  7. A new UV-curing elastomeric substrate for rapid prototyping of microfluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvankarian, Jafar; Yeop Majlis, Burhanuddin

    2012-03-01

    Rapid prototyping in the design cycle of new microfluidic devices is very important for shortening time-to-market. Researchers are facing the challenge to explore new and suitable substrates with simple and efficient microfabrication techniques. In this paper, we introduce and characterize a UV-curing elastomeric polyurethane methacrylate (PUMA) for rapid prototyping of microfluidic devices. The swelling and solubility of PUMA in different chemicals is determined. Time-dependent measurements of water contact angle show that the native PUMA is hydrophilic without surface treatment. The current monitoring method is used for measurement of the electroosmotic flow mobility in the microchannels made from PUMA. The optical, physical, thermal and mechanical properties of PUMA are evaluated. The UV-lithography and molding process is used for making micropillars and deep channel microfluidic structures integrated to the supporting base layer. Spin coating is characterized for producing different layer thicknesses of PUMA resin. A device is fabricated and tested for examining the strength of different bonding techniques such as conformal, corona treating and semi-curing of two PUMA layers in microfluidic application and the results show that the bonding strengths are comparable to that of PDMS. We also report fabrication and testing of a three-layer multi inlet/outlet microfluidic device including a very effective fluidic interconnect for application demonstration of PUMA as a promising new substrate. A simple micro-device is developed and employed for observing the pressure deflection of membrane made from PUMA as a very effective elastomeric valve in microfluidic devices.

  8. Microfluidics on compliant substrates: recent developments in foldable and bendable devices and system packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Bonnie L.

    2012-04-01

    Microfluidics is revolutionizing laboratory methods and biomedical devices, offering new capabilities and instrumentation in multiple areas such as DNA analysis, proteomics, enzymatic analysis, single cell analysis, immunology, point-of-care medicine, personalized medicine, drug delivery, and environmental toxin and pathogen detection. For many applications (e.g., wearable and implantable health monitors, drug delivery devices, and prosthetics) mechanically flexible polymer devices and systems that can conform to the body offer benefits that cannot be achieved using systems based on conventional rigid substrate materials. However, difficulties in implementing active devices and reliable packaging technologies have limited the success of flexible microfluidics. Employing highly compliant materials such as PDMS that are typically employed for prototyping, we review mechanically flexible polymer microfluidic technologies based on free-standing polymer substrates and novel electronic and microfluidic interconnection schemes. Central to these new technologies are hybrid microfabrication methods employing novel nanocomposite polymer materials and devices. We review microfabrication methods using these materials, along with demonstrations of example devices and packaging schemes that employ them. We review these recent developments and place them in the context of the fields of flexible microfluidics and conformable systems, and discuss cross-over applications to conventional rigid-substrate microfluidics.

  9. Generation of oxygen gradients in microfluidic devices for cell culture using spatially confined chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yung-Ann; King, Andrew D; Shih, Hsiu-Chen; Peng, Chien-Chung; Wu, Chueh-Yu; Liao, Wei-Hao; Tung, Yi-Chung

    2011-11-07

    This paper reports a microfluidic device capable of generating oxygen gradients for cell culture using spatially confined chemical reactions with minimal chemical consumption. The microfluidic cell culture device is constructed by single-layer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic channels, in which the cells can be easily observed by microscopes. The device can control the oxygen gradients without the utilization of bulky pressurized gas cylinders, direct addition of oxygen scavenging agents, or tedious gas interconnections and sophisticated flow control. In addition, due to the efficient transportation of oxygen within the device using the spatially confined chemical reactions, the microfluidic cell culture device can be directly used in conventional cell incubators without altering their gaseous compositions. The oxygen gradients generated in the device are numerically simulated and experimentally characterized using an oxygen-sensitive fluorescence dye. In this paper, carcinomic human alveolar basal epithelial (A549) cells have been cultured in the microfluidic device with a growth medium and an anti-cancer drug (Tirapazamine, TPZ) under various oxygen gradients. The cell experiment results successfully demonstrate the hyperoxia-induced cell death and hypoxia-induced cytotoxicity of TPZ. In addition, the results confirm the great cell compatibility and stable oxygen gradient generation of the developed device. Consequently, the microfluidic cell culture device developed in this paper is promising to be exploited in biological labs with minimal instrumentation to study cellular responses under various oxygen gradients. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  10. Enhanced surface acoustic wave cell sorting by 3D microfluidic-chip design.

    PubMed

    Ung, W L; Mutafopulos, K; Spink, P; Rambach, R W; Franke, T; Weitz, D A

    2017-10-10

    We demonstrate an acoustic wave driven microfluidic cell sorter that combines advantages of multilayer device fabrication with planar surface acoustic wave excitation. We harness the strong vertical component of the refracted acoustic wave to enhance cell actuation by using an asymmetric flow field to increase cell deflection. Precise control of the 3-dimensional flow is realized by topographical structures implemented on the top of the microchannel. We experimentally quantify the effect of the structure dimensions and acoustic parameter. The design attains cell sorting rates and purities approaching those of state of the art fluorescence-activated cell sorters with all the advantages of microfluidic cell sorting.

  11. Microfluidic binary phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelescu, Dan; Menetrier, Laure; Wong, Joyce; Tabeling, Patrick; Salamitou, Philippe

    2004-03-01

    We present a novel binary phase flow regime where the two phases differ substantially in both their wetting and viscous properties. Optical tracking particles are used in order to investigate the details of such multiphase flow inside capillary channels. We also describe microfluidic filters we have developed, capable of separating the two phases based on capillary pressure. The performance of the filters in separating oil-water emulsions is discussed. Binary phase flow has been previously used in microchannels in applications such as emulsion generation, enhancement of mixing and assembly of custom colloidal paticles. Such microfluidic systems are increasingly used in a number of applications spanning a diverse range of industries, such as biotech, pharmaceuticals and more recently the oil industry.

  12. Microfluidic channel fabrication method

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Don W.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Cardinale, Gregory F.

    2001-01-01

    A new channel structure for microfluidic systems and process for fabricating this structure. In contrast to the conventional practice of fabricating fluid channels as trenches or grooves in a substrate, fluid channels are fabricated as thin walled raised structures on a substrate. Microfluidic devices produced in accordance with the invention are a hybrid assembly generally consisting of three layers: 1) a substrate that can or cannot be an electrical insulator; 2) a middle layer, that is an electrically conducting material and preferably silicon, forms the channel walls whose height defines the channel height, joined to and extending from the substrate; and 3) a top layer, joined to the top of the channels, that forms a cover for the channels. The channels can be defined by photolithographic techniques and are produced by etching away the material around the channel walls.

  13. Microfluidic colloid filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linkhorst, John; Beckmann, Torsten; Go, Dennis; Kuehne, Alexander J. C.; Wessling, Matthias

    2016-03-01

    Filtration of natural and colloidal matter is an essential process in today’s water treatment processes. The colloidal matter is retained with the help of micro- and nanoporous synthetic membranes. Colloids are retained in a “cake layer” - often coined fouling layer. Membrane fouling is the most substantial problem in membrane filtration: colloidal and natural matter build-up leads to an increasing resistance and thus decreasing water transport rate through the membrane. Theoretical models exist to describe macroscopically the hydrodynamic resistance of such transport and rejection phenomena; however, visualization of the various phenomena occurring during colloid retention is extremely demanding. Here we present a microfluidics based methodology to follow filter cake build up as well as transport phenomena occuring inside of the fouling layer. The microfluidic colloidal filtration methodology enables the study of complex colloidal jamming, crystallization and melting processes as well as translocation at the single particle level.

  14. Microfluidic redox battery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Wook; Goulet, Marc-Antoni; Kjeang, Erik

    2013-07-07

    A miniaturized microfluidic battery is proposed, which is the first membraneless redox battery demonstrated to date. This unique concept capitalizes on dual-pass flow-through porous electrodes combined with stratified, co-laminar flow to generate electrical power on-chip. The fluidic design is symmetric to allow for both charging and discharging operations in forward, reverse, and recirculation modes. The proof-of-concept device fabricated using low-cost materials integrated in a microfluidic chip is shown to produce competitive power levels when operated on a vanadium redox electrolyte. A complete charge/discharge cycle is performed to demonstrate its operation as a rechargeable battery, which is an important step towards providing sustainable power to lab-on-a-chip and microelectronic applications.

  15. Microfluidic bubble logic.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Manu; Gershenfeld, Neil

    2007-02-09

    We demonstrate universal computation in an all-fluidic two-phase microfluidic system. Nonlinearity is introduced into an otherwise linear, reversible, low-Reynolds number flow via bubble-to-bubble hydrodynamic interactions. A bubble traveling in a channel represents a bit, providing us with the capability to simultaneously transport materials and perform logical control operations. We demonstrate bubble logic AND/OR/NOT gates, a toggle flip-flop, a ripple counter, timing restoration, a ring oscillator, and an electro-bubble modulator. These show the nonlinearity, gain, bistability, synchronization, cascadability, feedback, and programmability required for scalable universal computation. With increasing complexity in large-scale microfluidic processors, bubble logic provides an on-chip process control mechanism integrating chemistry and computation.

  16. The Microfluidic Jukebox

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Say Hwa; Maes, Florine; Semin, Benoît; Vrignon, Jérémy; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Music is a form of art interweaving people of all walks of life. Through subtle changes in frequencies, a succession of musical notes forms a melody which is capable of mesmerizing the minds of people. With the advances in technology, we are now able to generate music electronically without relying solely on physical instruments. Here, we demonstrate a musical interpretation of droplet-based microfluidics as a form of novel electronic musical instruments. Using the interplay of electric field and hydrodynamics in microfluidic devices, well controlled frequency patterns corresponding to musical tracks are generated in real time. This high-speed modulation of droplet frequency (and therefore of droplet sizes) may also provide solutions that reconciles high-throughput droplet production and the control of individual droplet at production which is needed for many biochemical or material synthesis applications. PMID:24781785

  17. The Microfluidic Jukebox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Say Hwa; Maes, Florine; Semin, Benoît; Vrignon, Jérémy; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2014-04-01

    Music is a form of art interweaving people of all walks of life. Through subtle changes in frequencies, a succession of musical notes forms a melody which is capable of mesmerizing the minds of people. With the advances in technology, we are now able to generate music electronically without relying solely on physical instruments. Here, we demonstrate a musical interpretation of droplet-based microfluidics as a form of novel electronic musical instruments. Using the interplay of electric field and hydrodynamics in microfluidic devices, well controlled frequency patterns corresponding to musical tracks are generated in real time. This high-speed modulation of droplet frequency (and therefore of droplet sizes) may also provide solutions that reconciles high-throughput droplet production and the control of individual droplet at production which is needed for many biochemical or material synthesis applications.

  18. Effect on Two-Step Polishing Process of Electrochemical Mechanical Planarization and Chemical-Mechanical Planarization on Planarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Sukhoon; Joo, Sukbae; Kim, Hyoungjae; Kim, Sungryul; Jeong, Haedo

    2009-06-01

    Chemical-mechanical planarization (CMP) is a technique used for planarizing an overburden film in the fabrication of semiconductor devices by chemical treatment and mechanical abrasion. However, a variety of defects such as dishing of metal interconnects, erosion, delamination, and metal layer peeling are generated by a high down force in CMP. A high down force is required to generate a high material removal rate (MRR), which results in greater defects. To minimize these defects, a new planarization process is used, known as electrochemical mechanical planarization (ECMP), which requires electrochemical and mechanical energies. ECMP first involves using an electrochemical reaction to change the surface on the target material into a passivation film. Then, the passivation film is worn down using a polishing pad or abrasives on the contacted areas of the metal film with the polishing pad under a low down force. The electrochemical energy dissolves the copper solid into copper ions in an aqueous electrolyte on the contacted areas of the metal film and the polishing pad. Therefore, the low-down-force ECMP reduces the defects such as dishing, erosion, delamination and metal layer peeling to a greater degree than a conventional high-down-force CMP. Also, the MRR of the ECMP process is higher than that of the low-down-force CMP process because the MRR of the ECMP process is proportional to current density. However, some residual metal between the dielectric material was generated through the use of a nonconductive polishing pad in the ECMP process. Therefore, the CMP process is required for the final process to remove residual metals. In this research, we investigated a two-step polishing method that consists of ECMP with a nonconductive polishing pad and a conventional CMP process to planarize a micro-patterned wafer for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). First, the ECMP process using a nonconductive polishing pad removed several tens of micrometers (µm) of bulk

  19. Animal microsurgery using microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Stirman, Jeffrey N.; Harker, Bethany; Lu, Hang; Crane, Matthew M.

    2013-01-01

    Small multicellular genetic organisms form a central part of modern biological research. Using these small organisms provides significant advantages in genetic tractability, manipulation, lifespan and cost. Although the small size is generally advantageous, it can make procedures such as surgeries both time consuming and labor intensive. Over the past few years there have been dramatic improvements in microfluidic technologies that enable significant improvements in microsurgery and interrogation of small multicellular model organisms. PMID:24484877

  20. Microfluidic Biochip Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panzarella, Charles

    2004-01-01

    As humans prepare for the exploration of our solar system, there is a growing need for miniaturized medical and environmental diagnostic devices for use on spacecrafts, especially during long-duration space missions where size and power requirements are critical. In recent years, the biochip (or Lab-on-a- Chip) has emerged as a technology that might be able to satisfy this need. In generic terms, a biochip is a miniaturized microfluidic device analogous to the electronic microchip that ushered in the digital age. It consists of tiny microfluidic channels, pumps and valves that transport small amounts of sample fluids to biosensors that can perform a variety of tests on those fluids in near real time. It has the obvious advantages of being small, lightweight, requiring less sample fluids and reagents and being more sensitive and efficient than larger devices currently in use. Some of the desired space-based applications would be to provide smaller, more robust devices for analyzing blood, saliva and urine and for testing water and food supplies for the presence of harmful contaminants and microorganisms. Our group has undertaken the goal of adapting as well as improving upon current biochip technology for use in long-duration microgravity environments. In addition to developing computational models of the microfluidic channels, valves and pumps that form the basis of every biochip, we are also trying to identify potential problems that could arise in reduced gravity and develop solutions to these problems. One such problem is due to the prevalence of bubbly sample fluids in microgravity. A bubble trapped in a microfluidic channel could be detrimental to the operation of a biochip. Therefore, the process of bubble formation in microgravity needs to be studied, and a model of this process has been developed and used to understand how bubbles develop and move through biochip components. It is clear that some type of bubble filter would be necessary in Space, and

  1. AC magnetohydrodynamic microfluidic switch

    SciTech Connect

    Lemoff, A V; Lee, A P

    2000-03-02

    A microfluidic switch has been demonstrated using an AC Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pumping mechanism in which the Lorentz force is used to pump an electrolytic solution. By integrating two AC MHD pumps into different arms of a Y-shaped fluidic circuit, flow can be switched between the two arms. This type of switch can be used to produce complex fluidic routing, which may have multiple applications in {micro}TAS.

  2. Microfluidic serial dilution circuit.

    PubMed

    Paegel, Brian M; Grover, William H; Skelley, Alison M; Mathies, Richard A; Joyce, Gerald F

    2006-11-01

    In vitro evolution of RNA molecules requires a method for executing many consecutive serial dilutions. To solve this problem, a microfluidic circuit has been fabricated in a three-layer glass-PDMS-glass device. The 400-nL serial dilution circuit contains five integrated membrane valves: three two-way valves arranged in a loop to drive cyclic mixing of the diluent and carryover, and two bus valves to control fluidic access to the circuit through input and output channels. By varying the valve placement in the circuit, carryover fractions from 0.04 to 0.2 were obtained. Each dilution process, which is composed of a diluent flush cycle followed by a mixing cycle, is carried out with no pipeting, and a sample volume of 400 nL is sufficient for conducting an arbitrary number of serial dilutions. Mixing is precisely controlled by changing the cyclic pumping rate, with a minimum mixing time of 22 s. This microfluidic circuit is generally applicable for integrating automated serial dilution and sample preparation in almost any microfluidic architecture.

  3. Integrated microfluidic systems.

    PubMed

    Kaneda, Shohei; Fujii, Teruo

    2010-01-01

    Using unique physical phenomena at the microscale, such as laminar flow, mixing by diffusion, relative increase of the efficiency of heat exchange, surface tension and friction due to the increase of surface-to-volume ratio by downscaling, research in the field of microfluidic devices, aims at miniaturization of (bio)chemical apparatus for high-throughput analyses. Microchannel networks as core components of microfluidic devices are fabricated on various materials, such as silicon, glass, polymers, metals, etc., using microfabrication techniques adopted from the semiconductor industry and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology, enabling integration of the components capable of performing various operations in microchannel networks. This chapter describes examples of diverse integrated microfluidic devices that incorporate functional components such as heaters for reaction temperature control, micropumps for liquid transportation, air vent structures for pneumatic manipulation of small volume droplets, optical fibers with aspherical lens structures for fluorescence detection, and electrochemical sensors for monitoring of glucose consumption during cell culture. The focus of this review is these integrated components and systems that realize useful functionalities for biochemical analyses.

  4. Integrated Microfluidic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneda, Shohei; Fujii, Teruo

    Using unique physical phenomena at the microscale, such as laminar flow, mixing by diffusion, relative increase of the efficiency of heat exchange, surface tension and friction due to the increase of surface-to-volume ratio by downscaling, research in the field of microfluidic devices, aims at miniaturization of (bio)chemical apparatus for high-throughput analyses. Microchannel networks as core components of microfluidic devices are fabricated on various materials, such as silicon, glass, polymers, metals, etc., using microfabrication techniques adopted from the semiconductor industry and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology, enabling integration of the components capable of performing various operations in microchannel networks. This chapter describes examples of diverse integrated microfluidic devices that incorporate functional components such as heaters for reaction temperature control, micropumps for liquid transportation, air vent structures for pneumatic manipulation of small volume droplets, optical fibers with aspherical lens structures for fluorescence detection, and electrochemical sensors for monitoring of glucose consumption during cell culture. The focus of this review is these integrated components and systems that realize useful functionalities for biochemical analyses.

  5. Droplet based microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Seemann, Ralf; Brinkmann, Martin; Pfohl, Thomas; Herminghaus, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Droplet based microfluidics is a rapidly growing interdisciplinary field of research combining soft matter physics, biochemistry and microsystems engineering. Its applications range from fast analytical systems or the synthesis of advanced materials to protein crystallization and biological assays for living cells. Precise control of droplet volumes and reliable manipulation of individual droplets such as coalescence, mixing of their contents, and sorting in combination with fast analysis tools allow us to perform chemical reactions inside the droplets under defined conditions. In this paper, we will review available drop generation and manipulation techniques. The main focus of this review is not to be comprehensive and explain all techniques in great detail but to identify and shed light on similarities and underlying physical principles. Since geometry and wetting properties of the microfluidic channels are crucial factors for droplet generation, we also briefly describe typical device fabrication methods in droplet based microfluidics. Examples of applications and reaction schemes which rely on the discussed manipulation techniques are also presented, such as the fabrication of special materials and biophysical experiments.

  6. Enjoyment of Euclidean Planar Triangles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srinivasan, V. K.

    2013-01-01

    This article adopts the following classification for a Euclidean planar [triangle]ABC, purely based on angles alone. A Euclidean planar triangle is said to be acute angled if all the three angles of the Euclidean planar [triangle]ABC are acute angles. It is said to be right angled at a specific vertex, say B, if the angle ?ABC is a right angle…

  7. Interconnect fatigue design for terrestrial photovoltaic modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mon, G. R.; Moore, D. M.; Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The results of comprehensive investigation of interconnect fatigue that has led to the definition of useful reliability-design and life-prediction algorithms are presented. Experimental data indicate that the classical strain-cycle (fatigue) curve for the interconnect material is a good model of mean interconnect fatigue performance, but it fails to account for the broad statistical scatter, which is critical to reliability prediction. To fill this shortcoming the classical fatigue curve is combined with experimental cumulative interconnect failure rate data to yield statistical fatigue curves (having failure probability as a parameter) which enable (1) the prediction of cumulative interconnect failures during the design life of an array field, and (2) the unambiguous--ie., quantitative--interpretation of data from field-service qualification (accelerated thermal cycling) tests. Optimal interconnect cost-reliability design algorithms are derived based on minimizing the cost of energy over the design life of the array field.

  8. Cascade solar cell having conductive interconnects

    DOEpatents

    Borden, Peter G.; Saxena, Ram R.

    1982-10-26

    Direct ohmic contact between the cells in an epitaxially grown cascade solar cell is obtained by means of conductive interconnects formed through grooves etched intermittently in the upper cell. The base of the upper cell is directly connected by the conductive interconnects to the emitter of the bottom cell. The conductive interconnects preferably terminate on a ledge formed in the base of the upper cell.

  9. Colloid aspects of chemical-mechanical planarization.

    PubMed

    Matijević, E; Babu, S V

    2008-04-01

    The essential parts of interconnects for silicon based logic and memory devices consist of metal wiring (e.g. copper), a barrier metal (Ta, TaN), and of insulation (SiO2, low-k polymer). The deposition of the conducting metal cannot be confined to trenches, resulting in additional coverage of Cu and Ta/TaN on the surface of the dielectrics, yielding an electrically conducting continuous but an uneven surface. The surplus metal must be removed until a perfectly flat surface consisting of electrically isolated metal lines is achieved with no imperfections. This task is accomplished by the chemical-mechanical planarization (CMP) process, in which the wafer is polished with a slurry containing abrasives of finely dispersed particles in submicrometer to nanometer size. The slurries also contain dissolved chemicals to modify the surfaces to be planarized. Eventually the final product must be cleared of any adhered particles and debris left after polishing is completed. Obviously the entire process deals with materials and interactions which are the focal subjects of colloid and surface science, such as the natures of abrasive particles and their stability in the slurry, the properties of various surfaces and their modifications, adhesion and detachment of the particles and different methods for the characterization of constituents, as well as elucidation of the relevant interfacial phenomena. This review endeavors to describe the colloid approach to optimize the materials and processes in order to achieve desirable polish rates and final surfaces with no imperfections. Specifically, the effects of the composition, size, shape, and charge of abrasive particles on the polish process and the quality of planarized wafers is described in detail. Furthermore, the interactions of metal surfaces with oxidizing, chelating, and other species which affect the dissolution and surface modification of metal (copper) surfaces are illustrated and related to the planarization process

  10. A microfluidic multiplex proteomic immunoassay device for translational research.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jing; Seegmiller, Jesse; Hanson, Naomi Q; Zaun, Christopher; Li, Danni

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidic technology has the potential to miniaturize and automate complex laboratory procedures. The objective of this study was to assess a microfluidic immunoassay device, Simple Plex, which simultaneously measured IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 in serum samples. This assessment is important to understanding the potentials of this microfluidic device as a valuable tool in translational research efforts. We studied the operational characteristics of Simple Plex, and compared to other immunoassay systems including bead-based (i.e., Bio-Plex(®) from Bio-Rad) and planar micro-spot based (i.e., Multi-Array from Meso Scale Discovery) multiplex assays. We determined imprecisions for each of the Simple Plex assays and evaluated the ability of Simple Plex to detect IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 in serum samples. Simple Plex assays required 25 µL serum, and 1.5 h to run 16 samples per cartridge per instrument. Assay imprecisions, evaluated by measurement of 6 replicates in duplicate from a serum pool using three different cartridges, were less than 10 % for all 4 cytokine protein biomarkers, comparable to the imprecisions of traditional ELISAs. The Simple Plex assays were able to detect 32, 95, 97, and 100 % [i.e., percentages of the results within the respective analytical measurement ranges (AMRs)] of IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10, respectively, in 66 serum samples. Simple Plex is a microfluidic multiplex immunoassay device that offers miniaturized, and automated analysis of protein biomarkers. Microfluidic devices such as Simple Plex represent a promising platform to be used in translational research to measure protein biomarkers in real clinical samples.

  11. Visualizing interconnections among climate risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, K.; Yokohata, T.; Nishina, K.; Takahashi, K.; Emori, S.; Kiguchi, M.; Iseri, Y.; Honda, Y.; Okada, M.; Masaki, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Shigemitsu, M.; Yoshimori, M.; Sueyoshi, T.; Hanasaki, N.; Ito, A.; Sakurai, G.; Iizumi, T.; Nishimori, M.; Lim, W. H.; Miyazaki, C.; Kanae, S.; Oki, T.

    2015-12-01

    It is now widely recognized that climate change is affecting various sectors of the world. Climate change impact on one sector may spread out to other sectors including those seemingly remote, which we call "interconnections of climate risks". While a number of climate risks have been identified in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fifth Assessment Report (AR5), there has been no attempt to explore their interconnections comprehensively. Here we present a first and most exhaustive visualization of climate risks drawn based on a systematic literature survey. Our risk network diagrams depict that changes in the climate system impact natural capitals (terrestrial water, crop, and agricultural land) as well as social infrastructures, influencing the socio-economic system and ultimately our access to food, water, and energy. Our findings suggest the importance of incorporating climate risk interconnections into impact and vulnerability assessments and call into question the widely used damage function approaches, which address a limited number of climate change impacts in isolation. Furthermore, the diagram is useful to educate decision makers, stakeholders, and general public about cascading risks that can be triggered by the climate change. Socio-economic activities today are becoming increasingly more inter-dependent because of the rapid technological progress, urbanization, and the globalization among others. Equally complex is the ecosystem that is susceptible to climate change, which comprises interwoven processes affecting one another. In the context of climate change, a number of climate risks have been identified and classified according to regions and sectors. These reports, however, did not fully address the inter-relations among risks because of the complexity inherent in this issue. Climate risks may ripple through sectors in the present inter-dependent world, posing a challenge ahead of us to maintain the resilience of the system. It is

  12. Monolithical integration of polymer-based microfluidic structures on application-specific integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemnitz, Steffen; Schafer, Heiko; Schumacher, Stephanie; Koziy, Volodymyr; Fischer, Alexander; Meixner, Alfred J.; Ehrhardt, Dietmar; Bohm, Markus

    2003-04-01

    In this paper, a concept for a monolithically integrated chemical lab on microchip is presented. It contains an ASIC (Application Specific Integrated Circuit), an interface to the polymer based microfluidic layer and a Pyrex glass cap. The top metal layer of the ASIC is etched off and replaced by a double layer metallization, more suitable to microfluidic and electrophoresis systems. The metallization consists of an approximately 50 nm gold layer and a 10 nm chromium layer, acting as adhesion promoter. A necessary prerequisite is a planarized ASIC topography. SU-8 is used to serve as microfluidic structure because of its excellent aspect ratio. This polymer layer contains reservoirs, channels, mixers and electrokinetic micro pumps. The typical channel cross section is 10μm"10μm. First experimental results on a microfluidic pump, consisting of pairs of interdigitated electrodes on the bottom of the channel and without any moving parts show a flow of up to 50μm per second for low AC-voltages in the range of 5 V for aqueous fluids. The microfluidic system is irreversibly sealed with a 150μm thick Pyrex glass plate bonded to the SU-8-layer, supported by oxygen plasma. Due to capillary forces and surfaces properties of the walls the system is self-priming. The technologies for the fabrication of the microfluidic system and the preparation of the interface between the lab layer and the ASIC are presented.

  13. Monolithic microfluidic concentrators and mixers

    DOEpatents

    Frechet, Jean M.; Svec, Frantisek; Yu, Cong; Rohr, Thomas

    2005-05-03

    Microfluidic devices comprising porous monolithic polymer for concentration, extraction or mixing of fluids. A method for in situ preparation of monolithic polymers by in situ initiated polymerization of polymer precursors within microchannels of a microfluidic device and their use for solid phase extraction (SPE), preconcentration, concentration and mixing.

  14. Combining microfluidics and electrochemical detection.

    PubMed

    Ferrigno, Rosaria; Pittet, Patrick; Stephan, Khaled; Léca-Bouvier, Béatrice; Galvan, Jean-Marc; Renaud, Louis; Morin, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes two configurations that integrate electrochemical detection into microfluidic devices. The first configuration is a low-cost approach based on the use of PCB technology. This device was applied to electrochemiluminescence detection. The second configuration was used to carry out amperometric quantification of electroactive species using a serial dilution microfluidic system.

  15. Rubrenes: planar and twisted.

    PubMed

    Paraskar, Abhimanyu S; Reddy, A Ravikumar; Patra, Asit; Wijsboom, Yair H; Gidron, Ori; Shimon, Linda J W; Leitus, Gregory; Bendikov, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Surprisingly, despite its very high mobility in a single crystal, rubrene shows very low mobility in vacuum-sublimed or solution-processed organic thin-film transistors. We synthesized several rubrene analogues with electron-withdrawing and electron-donating substituents and found that most of the substituted rubrenes are not planar in the solid state. Moreover, we conclude (based on experimental and calculated data) that even parent rubrene is not planar in solution and in thin films. This discovery explains why high mobility is reported in rubrene single crystals, but rubrene shows very low field-effect mobility in thin films. The substituted rubrenes obtained in this work have significantly better solubility than parent rubrene and some even form films and not crystals after evaporation of the solvent. Thus, substituted rubrenes are promising materials for organic light-emitting diode (OLED) applications.

  16. Dielectric Covered Planar Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Llombart Juan, Nuria (Inventor); Lee, Choonsup (Inventor); Chattopadhyay, Goutam (Inventor); Gill, John J. (Inventor); Skalare, Anders J. (Inventor); Siegel, Peter H. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An antenna element suitable for integrated arrays at terahertz frequencies is disclosed. The antenna element comprises an extended spherical (e.g. hemispherical) semiconductor lens, e.g. silicon, antenna fed by a leaky wave waveguide feed. The extended spherical lens comprises a substantially spherical lens adjacent a substantially planar lens extension. A couple of TE/TM leaky wave modes are excited in a resonant cavity formed between a ground plane and the substantially planar lens extension by a waveguide block coupled to the ground plane. Due to these modes, the primary feed radiates inside the lens with a directive pattern that illuminates a small sector of the lens. The antenna structure is compatible with known semiconductor fabrication technology and enables production of large format imaging arrays.

  17. Design, fabrication and test of a microfluidic nebulizer chip for desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Sen, A K; Darabi, J; Knapp, D R

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents design, microfabrication, and test of a microfluidic nebulizer chip for desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) in proteomic analysis. The microfluidic chip is fabricated using cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) substrates. The fluidic channels are thermally embossed onto a base substrate using a nickel master and then a top substrate is thermally bonded to seal the channels. Carbon ink embossed into the top COC substrate is used to established electrical connection between the external power supply and the liquid in the channel. The microfluidic chip to external capillary connection is fabricated using Nanoport™ interconnection system. Preliminary leakage test was performed to demonstrate the interconnection system is leak-free and pressure test was performed to evaluate the burst pressure. Finally, the nebulizer chip was used to perform DESI-MS for analyzing peptides (BSA and bradykinin) and reserpine on the nanoporous alumina surface. DESI-MS performance of the microfluidic nebulizer chip is compared with that obtained using a conventional DESI nebulizer. PMID:20161284

  18. Planar plasmonic chiral nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zu, Shuai; Bao, Yanjun; Fang, Zheyu

    2016-02-01

    A strong chiral optical response induced at a plasmonic Fano resonance in a planar Au heptamer nanostructure was experimentally and theoretically demonstrated. The scattering spectra show the characteristic narrow-band feature of Fano resonances for both left and right circular polarized lights, with a chiral response reaching 30% at the Fano resonance. Specifically, we systematically investigate the chiral response of planar heptamers with gradually changing the inter-particle rotation angles and separation distance. The chiral spectral characteristics clearly depend on the strength of Fano resonances and the associated near-field optical distributions. Finite element method simulations together with a multipole expansion method demonstrate that the enhanced chirality is caused by the excitation of magnetic quadrupolar and electric toroidal dipolar modes. Our work provides an effective method for the design of 2D nanostructures with a strong chiral response.A strong chiral optical response induced at a plasmonic Fano resonance in a planar Au heptamer nanostructure was experimentally and theoretically demonstrated. The scattering spectra show the characteristic narrow-band feature of Fano resonances for both left and right circular polarized lights, with a chiral response reaching 30% at the Fano resonance. Specifically, we systematically investigate the chiral response of planar heptamers with gradually changing the inter-particle rotation angles and separation distance. The chiral spectral characteristics clearly depend on the strength of Fano resonances and the associated near-field optical distributions. Finite element method simulations together with a multipole expansion method demonstrate that the enhanced chirality is caused by the excitation of magnetic quadrupolar and electric toroidal dipolar modes. Our work provides an effective method for the design of 2D nanostructures with a strong chiral response. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available

  19. Planar triode pulser socket

    DOEpatents

    Booth, Rex

    1994-01-01

    A planar triode is mounted in a PC board orifice by means of a U-shaped capacitor housing and anode contact yoke removably attached to cathode leg extensions passing through and soldered to the cathode side of the PC board by means of a PC cathode pad. A pliant/flexible contact attached to the orifice make triode grid contact with a grid pad on the grid side of the PC board, permitting quick and easy replacement of bad triodes.

  20. Planar triode pulser socket

    DOEpatents

    Booth, R.

    1994-10-25

    A planar triode is mounted in a PC board orifice by means of a U-shaped capacitor housing and anode contact yoke removably attached to cathode leg extensions passing through and soldered to the cathode side of the PC board by means of a PC cathode pad. A pliant/flexible contact attached to the orifice make triode grid contact with a grid pad on the grid side of the PC board, permitting quick and easy replacement of bad triodes. 14 figs.

  1. Planar waveguide optical immunosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choquette, Steven J.; Locascio-Brown, Laurie E.; Durst, Richard A.

    1991-03-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were covalently bonded to the surfaces of planar waveguides to confer immunoreacth''ity. Silver-ion diffused waveguides were used to measure theophylline concentrations in a fluorescence immunoassay and silicon nitride waveguides were used to detect theophylline in an absorbance-based immunoassay. Liposomes were employed in both assays as the optically detectable label in a competitive reaction to monitor antigen-antibody complexation. Regeneration of the active antibody site will be discussed.

  2. Gel integration for microfluidic applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuanqi; Li, Lingjun; Luo, Chunxiong

    2016-05-21

    Molecular diffusive membranes or materials are important for biological applications in microfluidic systems. Hydrogels are typical materials that offer several advantages, such as free diffusion for small molecules, biocompatibility with most cells, temperature sensitivity, relatively low cost, and ease of production. With the development of microfluidic applications, hydrogels can be integrated into microfluidic systems by soft lithography, flow-solid processes or UV cure methods. Due to their special properties, hydrogels are widely used as fluid control modules, biochemical reaction modules or biological application modules in different applications. Although hydrogels have been used in microfluidic systems for more than ten years, many hydrogels' properties and integrated techniques have not been carefully elaborated. Here, we systematically review the physical properties of hydrogels, general methods for gel-microfluidics integration and applications of this field. Advanced topics and the outlook of hydrogel fabrication and applications are also discussed. We hope this review can help researchers choose suitable methods for their applications using hydrogels.

  3. Inexpensive, rapid fabrication of polymer-film microfluidic autoregulatory valve for disposable microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinjie; Zhu, Zhixian; Ni, Zhonghua; Xiang, Nan; Yi, Hong

    2017-06-01

    This work presents the fabrication of a microfluidic autoregulatory valve which is composed of several layers of thin polymer films (i.e., polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyethylene terephthalate (PET) double-sided tape, and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)). Briefly, pulsed UV laser is employed to cut the microstructures of through grooves or holes in the thermoplastic polymer films, and then the polymer-film valves are precisely assembled through laminating the PDMS membranes to the thermoplastic polymer films through the roll-lamination method. The effective bonding between the PVC film and the PDMS membrane is realized using the planar seal method, and the valve is sandwiched and compressed by a home-made housing to achieve the good seal effect. Then, the flow performances of the prototype valve are examined, and constant flow autoregulation is realized under the static or dynamic test pressures. The long-term response of the valve is also studied and minimum flow-rate decrements are found over a long actuation time. The fabrication method proposed in this work is successful for the low-cost and fast prototyping of the polymer-film valve. We believe our method will also be broadly applicable for fabrication of other low-cost and disposable polymer-film microfluidic devices.

  4. Solid oxide fuel cell interconnect design optimization considering the thermal stresses.

    PubMed

    Xu, Min; Li, Tingshuai; Yang, Ming; Andersson, Martin

    The mechanical failure of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) components may cause cracks with consequences such as gas leakage, structure instability and reduction of cell lifetime. A comprehensive 3D model of the thermal stresses of an anode-supported planar SOFC is presented in this work. The main objective of this paper is to get an interconnect optimized design by evaluating the thermal stresses of an anode-supported SOFC for different designs, which would be a new criterion for interconnect design. The model incorporates the momentum, mass, heat, ion and electron transport, as well as steady-state mechanics. Heat from methane steam reforming and water-gas shift reaction were considered in our model. The results examine the relationship between the interconnect structures and thermal stresses in SOFC at certain mechanical properties. A wider interconnect of the anode side lowers the stress obviously. The simulation results also indicate that thermal stress of coflow design is smaller than that of counterflow, corresponding to the temperature distribution. This study shows that it is possible to design interconnects for an optimum thermal stress performance of the cell.

  5. Organic MEMS devices and MWCNT (multi-wall carbon nanotube) interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lempkowski, Robert B.; Qian, Zhengfang

    2010-04-01

    RF system front ends need to be mounted on a circuit board and interconnected to other devices such as antennas and surrounding circuitry functions. Providing suitable RF performing interconnects between or within devices on multi-layer construction has been done typically with doped semiconductors, copper, and occasionally other conductors. This paper discusses the use of organic printed circuit board MEMS switches and varactors, and the use of multi-wall carbon nanotubes as transmission lines and antennas. Carbon nanotube active transistors use single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) with efforts to improve percentages of semiconducting structures. Interconnects are needed not only to connect CNT devices to each other, but to larger structures in order to be able to use subsystems that integrate CNT devices, large scale multifunction ICs, and RF devices used in RF front ends, including antennas. This paper addresses the use of organic substrates as the media for integration of MEMS, interconnects to devices on the substrate, and planar antennas. These methods will be required until complete assembly of all devices and interconnects can be done with processes at the nano-scale level, which is assumed to still need efficient radiative antenna structures at a larger scale for commonly used consumer wireless products.

  6. Direct Writing of Microfluidic Footpaths by Pyro-EHD Printing.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Sara; Nasti, Giuseppe; Todino, Michele; Olivieri, Federico; Vespini, Veronica; Ferraro, Pietro

    2017-05-17

    In this study, we report a direct writing method for the fabrication of microfluidic footpaths by pyro-electrohydrodynamic (EHD) jet printing. Here, we propose the use of a nozzle-free three-dimensional printing technique for the fabrication of printed structures that can be embedded in a variety of soft, transparent, flexible, and biocompatible polymers and thus easily integrated into lab-on-chip devices. We prove the advantage of the high resolution and flexibility of pyro-EHD printing for the realization of microfluidic channels well below the standard limit in dimension of conventional ink-jet printing technique and simply adaptable to the end-user desires in terms of geometry and materials. Starting from the description of the innovative approach proposed for the channel fabrication, we demonstrate the design, fabrication, and proof of a microfluidic matrix of interconnected channels. The method described here could be a breakthrough technology for the fabrication of in situ implantable, stretchable, and biocompatible devices, opening new routes in the field of biomedical engineering and wearable electronics.

  7. Microfluidic and biosensor applications of fluoropolymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, Glen Wallace

    2001-07-01

    Deposition of fluoropolymer films in microfluidic and biosensor applications enables the fabrication and miniaturization of several new integrated sensor devices that could provide a method for measuring oxygen consumption at the cellular level, providing an unique measurement device to be incorporated in cell based sensors. Fluoropolymer films have several properties that make them an excellent candidate for microfluidic and biosensor applications. These films are chemically inert, biocompatible, selectively gas permeable, have a low friction coefficient, are non-polarizable, and are capable of being processed using standard integrated circuit fabrication techniques. This allows for the seamless incorporation of these films into many different sensor applications, ranging from coating fluid interconnect channels to minimize protein absorption, to the realization of different miniaturized sensors which are capable of making point specific measurements. Film deposition is accomplished using an industrial standard plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) chamber, customized with the capability of producing a pulsed plasma. The film deposition process has been characterised in situ using real time power measurement techniques, ultra violet optical emission spectroscopy (OES) measurements, and Langmuir probe measurements. These measurements along with post processing measurements of the films properties utilizing X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements, fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR), ellipsometric measurements, contact angle measurements, and electrical characterization methods have been utilized to optimize the films properties for various applications. This thesis presents the characterization and optimization of the pulsed plasma deposited polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) film process along with the development of a solid state dissolved oxygen sensor using the PTFE film as the oxygen permeable membrane. The plasma deposition

  8. Inertial microfluidic physics.

    PubMed

    Amini, Hamed; Lee, Wonhee; Di Carlo, Dino

    2014-08-07

    Microfluidics has experienced massive growth in the past two decades, and especially with advances in rapid prototyping researchers have explored a multitude of channel structures, fluid and particle mixtures, and integration with electrical and optical systems towards solving problems in healthcare, biological and chemical analysis, materials synthesis, and other emerging areas that can benefit from the scale, automation, or the unique physics of these systems. Inertial microfluidics, which relies on the unconventional use of fluid inertia in microfluidic platforms, is one of the emerging fields that make use of unique physical phenomena that are accessible in microscale patterned channels. Channel shapes that focus, concentrate, order, separate, transfer, and mix particles and fluids have been demonstrated, however physical underpinnings guiding these channel designs have been limited and much of the development has been based on experimentally-derived intuition. Here we aim to provide a deeper understanding of mechanisms and underlying physics in these systems which can lead to more effective and reliable designs with less iteration. To place the inertial effects into context we also discuss related fluid-induced forces present in particulate flows including forces due to non-Newtonian fluids, particle asymmetry, and particle deformability. We then highlight the inverse situation and describe the effect of the suspended particles acting on the fluid in a channel flow. Finally, we discuss the importance of structured channels, i.e. channels with boundary conditions that vary in the streamwise direction, and their potential as a means to achieve unprecedented three-dimensional control over fluid and particles in microchannels. Ultimately, we hope that an improved fundamental and quantitative understanding of inertial fluid dynamic effects can lead to unprecedented capabilities to program fluid and particle flow towards automation of biomedicine, materials

  9. Stretchable multilayer self-aligned interconnects fabricated using excimer laser photoablation and in situ masking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Kevin L.; Jain, Kanti

    2009-02-01

    Stretchable interconnects are essential to large-area flexible circuits and large-area sensor array systems, and they play an important role towards the realization of the realm of systems which include wearable electronics, sensor arrays for structural health monitoring, and sensor skins for tactile feedback. These interconnects must be reliable and robust for viability, and must be flexible, stretchable, and conformable to non-planar surfaces. This research describes the design, modeling, fabrication, and testing of stretchable interconnects on polymer substrates using metal patterns both as functional interconnect layers and as in-situ masks for excimer laser photoablation. Excimer laser photoablation is often used for patterning of polymers and thin-film metals. The fluences for photoablation of polymers are generally much lower than the threshold fluence for removal or damage of high-thermallyconductive metals; thus, metal thin films can be used as in-situ masks for polymers if the proper fluence is used. Selfaligned single-layer and multi-layer interconnects of various designs (rectilinear and 'meandering') have been fabricated, and certain 'meandering' interconnect designs can be stretched up to 50% uniaxially while maintaining good electrical conductivity and structural integrity. These results are compared with Finite Element Analysis (FEA) models and are observed to be in good accordance with them. This fabrication approach eliminates masks and microfabrication processing steps as compared to traditional fabrication approaches; furthermore, this technology is scalable for large-area sensor arrays and electronic circuits, adaptable for a variety of materials and interconnects designs, and compatible with MEMS-based capacitive sensor technology.

  10. 47 CFR 90.477 - Interconnected systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Applicants for new land stations to be interconnected with the public switched telephone network must... switched telephone network only after modifying their license. See § 1.929 of this chapter. In all cases a..., 896-901 MHz, and 935-940 MHz, interconnection with the public switched telephone network is...

  11. High density interconnects for aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menozzi, Gaetan

    1988-08-01

    The technologies of large scale interconnectors were evaluated for chip and wire or leadless ceramic chip carriers. The packaging and interconnecting structures are either ceramic multilayer with multilayer thick film and cofired multilayer ceramic. Test results are given, technology status and next generation interconnects are described, and aerospace applications are presented.

  12. Interconnections in ULSI: Correlation and Crosstalk

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-31

    cide interconnects. Finally. in Section V. we present the 2L conclusions. -_-. - ax, II. THEORY + A"- a- ) A. Coupling Between Optical Interconnects - To... TesIs . Note that the circulating urrent pattems hardly carry any net current in the x.direction. Therefore, the conductance of the stmctue will be very

  13. 14 CFR 23.701 - Flap interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flap interconnection. 23.701 Section 23.701 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS... Systems § 23.701 Flap interconnection. (a) The main wing flaps and related movable surfaces as a...

  14. Government Open Systems Interconnection: Profile in Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Kevin L.

    1990-01-01

    Describes the emergence of Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) as it relates to the U.S. Government Open Systems Interconnection Profile (GOSIP); defines GOSIP; and speculates about its future. Challenges facing GOSIP that are related to test policies and procedures, strategic and tactical planning, additional functionality, and international…

  15. 14 CFR 29.674 - Interconnected controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Interconnected controls. 29.674 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 29.674 Interconnected controls. Each primary flight control system must provide for safe flight and landing and operate...

  16. 14 CFR 27.674 - Interconnected controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Interconnected controls. 27.674 Section 27... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems § 27.674 Interconnected controls. Each primary flight control system must provide for safe flight and landing and operate...

  17. 47 CFR 101.519 - Interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Interconnection. 101.519 Section 101.519 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.519 Interconnection. (a) All...

  18. Durability of Metallic Interconnects and Protective Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhenguo; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2009-12-15

    To build up a useful voltage, a number of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are electrically connected into series in a stack via interconnects, which are placed between adjacent cells. In addition to functioning as a bi-polar electrical connector, the interconnect also acts as a separator plate that separates the fuel at the anode side of one cell from the air at the cathode side on an adjacent cell. During SOFC operation at the high temperatures, the interconnects are thus simultaneously exposed to the oxidizing air at one side and a reducing fuel that can be either hydrogen or hydrocarbon at the other. Besides, they are in contact with adjacent components, such as electrodes or electrical contacts, seals, etc. With steady reduction in SOFC operating temperatures into the low or intermediate range 600-850oC, oxidation resistant alloys are often used to construct interconnects. However, the metallic interconnects may degrade via interactions at their interfaces with surrounding environments or adjacent components, potentially affecting the stability and performance of interconnects and the SOFC stacks. Thus protection layers are applied to metallic interconnects that also intend to mitigate or prevent chromium migration into cells and the cell poisoning. This chapter provides a comprehensive review of materials for metallic interconnects, their degradation and coating protection.

  19. Updating Technical Screens for PV Interconnection: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Coddington, M.; Ellis, A.; Lynn, K.; Razon, A.; Key, T.; Kroposki, B.; Mather, B.; Hill, R.; Nicole, K.; Smith, J.

    2012-08-01

    Solar photovoltaics (PV) is the dominant type of distributed generation (DG) technology interconnected to electric distribution systems in the United States, and deployment of PV systems continues to increase rapidly. Considering the rapid growth and widespread deployment of PV systems in United States electric distribution grids, it is important that interconnection procedures be as streamlined as possible to avoid unnecessary interconnection studies, costs, and delays. Because many PV interconnection applications involve high penetration scenarios, the process needs to allow for a sufficiently rigorous technical evaluation to identify and address possible system impacts. Existing interconnection procedures are designed to balance the need for efficiency and technical rigor for all DG. However, there is an implicit expectation that those procedures will be updated over time in order to remain relevant with respect to evolving standards, technology, and practical experience. Modifications to interconnection screens and procedures must focus on maintaining or improving safety and reliability, as well as accurately allocating costs and improving expediency of the interconnection process. This paper evaluates the origins and usefulness of the capacity penetration screen, offers potential short-term solutions which could effectively allow fast-track interconnection to many PV system applications, and considers longer-term solutions for increasing PV deployment levels in a safe and reliable manner while reducing or eliminating the emphasis on the penetration screen.

  20. Interconnections For Stacked Parallel Computer Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johannesson, Richard T.

    1996-01-01

    Concept for interconnecting modules in parallel computers leads to cheaper, smaller, lighter, lower-power computing systems for aerospace, industrial, business, and consumer applications. Computer modules stacked and interconnected in various configurations. Connections among stacks controlled by switching within gateways and/or by addresses on buses.

  1. 47 CFR 101.519 - Interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Interconnection. 101.519 Section 101.519 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.519 Interconnection. (a) All...

  2. 47 CFR 101.519 - Interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Interconnection. 101.519 Section 101.519 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.519 Interconnection. (a) All...

  3. 47 CFR 101.519 - Interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Interconnection. 101.519 Section 101.519 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.519 Interconnection. (a) All...

  4. 47 CFR 101.519 - Interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Interconnection. 101.519 Section 101.519 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.519 Interconnection. (a) All...

  5. Interconnect fatigue design for terrestrial photovoltaic modules

    SciTech Connect

    Mon, G. R.; Moore, D. M.; Ross, Jr., R. G.

    1982-03-01

    Fatigue of solar cell electrical interconnects due to thermal cycling has historically been a major failure mechanism in photovoltaic arrays; the results of a comprehensive investigation of interconnect fatigue that has led to the definition of useful reliability-design and life-prediction algorithms are presented. Experimental data gathered in this study indicate that the classical strain-cycle (fatigue) curve for the interconnect material is a good model of mean interconnect fatigue performance, but it fails to account for the broad statistical scatter, which is critical to reliability prediction. To fill this shortcoming the classical fatigue curve is combined with experimental cumulative interconnect failure rate data to yield statistical fatigue curves (having failure probability as a parameter) which enable: (1) the prediction of cumulative interconnect failures during the design life of an array field; and (2) the unambiguous - i.e., quantitative - interpretation of data from field-service qualification (accelerated thermal cycling) tests. Optimal interconnect cost-reliability design algorithms are derived based on minimizing the cost of energy over the design life of the array field. This procedure yields not only the minimum break-even cost of delivered energy, but also the required degree of interconnect redundancy and an estimate of array power degradation during the design life of the array field. The usefulness of the design algorithms is demonstrated with realistic examples of design optimization, prediction, and service qualification testing.

  6. A Deterministic Microfluidic Ratchet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loutherback, Kevin; Puchalla, Jason; Austin, Robert; Sturm, James

    2009-03-01

    We present a deterministic microfluidic ratchet where the trajectory of particles in a certain size range is not reversed when the sign of the driving force is reversed. This ratcheting effect is produced by employing triangular rather than the conventionally circular posts in a post array that selectively displaces particles transported through the array. The underlying mechanism of this method is shown to to be an asymmetric fluid velocity distribution through the gap between triangular posts that results in different critical particle sizes depending on the direction of the flow.

  7. Microfluidic Cell Culture Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takayama, Shuichi (Inventor); Cabrera, Lourdes Marcella (Inventor); Heo, Yun Seok (Inventor); Smith, Gary Daniel (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic devices for cell culturing and methods for using the same are disclosed. One device includes a substrate and membrane. The substrate includes a reservoir in fluid communication with a passage. A bio-compatible fluid may be added to the reservoir and passage. The reservoir is configured to receive and retain at least a portion of a cell mass. The membrane acts as a barrier to evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid from the passage. A cover fluid may be added to cover the bio-compatible fluid to prevent evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid.

  8. Motion in microfluidic ratchets.

    PubMed

    Caballero, D; Katuri, J; Samitier, J; Sánchez, S

    2016-11-15

    The ubiquitous random motion of mesoscopic active particles, such as cells, can be "rectified" or directed by embedding the particles in systems containing local and periodic asymmetric cues. Incorporated on lab-on-a-chip devices, these microratchet-like structures can be used to self-propel fluids, transport particles, and direct cell motion in the absence of external power sources. In this Focus article we discuss recent advances in the use of ratchet-like geometries in microfluidics which could open new avenues in biomedicine for applications in diagnosis, cancer biology, and bioengineering.

  9. Microfluidic channels with ultralow-loss waveguide crossings for various chip-integrated photonic sensors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Yan, Hai; Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Subbaraman, Harish; Xu, Xiaochuan; Fan, D L; Wang, Alan X; Chen, Ray T

    2015-04-01

    Traditional silicon waveguides are defined by waveguide trenches on either side of the high-index silicon core that leads to fluid leakage orifices for over-layed microfluidic channels. Closing the orifices needs additional fabrication steps which may include oxide deposition and planarization. We experimentally demonstrated a new type of microfluidic channel design with ultralow-loss waveguide crossings (0.00248 dB per crossings). The waveguide crossings and all other on-chip passive-waveguide components are fabricated in one step with no additional planarization steps which eliminates any orifices and leads to leak-free fluid flow. Such designs are applicable in all optical-waveguide-based sensing applications where the analyte must be flowed over the sensor. The new channel design was demonstrated in a L55 photonic crystal sensor operating between 1540 and 1580 nm.

  10. Planar polarity, tissue polarity and planar morphogenesis in plants.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Moritaka; Kiefer, Christian S; Grebe, Markus

    2012-12-01

    Plant tissues commonly undergo morphogenesis within a single tissue layer or between associated cells of the same tissue type such as vascular cells. Tissue morphogenesis may rely on an underlying tissue polarity marked by coordinated unidirectional asymmetric localisation of molecules to ends of cells. When observed in the plane of the tissue layer this is referred to as planar polarity and planar morphogenesis. However, planar morphogenesis can also involve multidirectional or differential growth of cells relying on cell-cell communication. Here, we review recent progress towards an understanding of hormonal coordination and molecular mechanisms underlying planar and tissue polarity as well as planar morphogenesis. Furthermore, we discuss the role of physical forces in planar morphogenesis and the contribution of tissue polarity to plant organ shape. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Modeling interconnect corners under double patterning misalignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, Daijoon; Shin, Youngsoo

    2016-03-01

    Publisher's Note: This paper, originally published on March 16th, was replaced with a corrected/revised version on March 28th. If you downloaded the original PDF but are unable to access the revision, please contact SPIE Digital Library Customer Service for assistance. Interconnect corners should accurately reflect the effect of misalingment in LELE double patterning process. Misalignment is usually considered separately from interconnect structure variations; this incurs too much pessimism and fails to reflect a large increase in total capacitance for asymmetric interconnect structure. We model interconnect corners by taking account of misalignment in conjunction with interconnect structure variations; we also characterize misalignment effect more accurately by handling metal pitch at both sides of a target metal independently. Identifying metal space at both sides of a target metal.

  12. Integrated microfluidic systems for DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Njoroge, Samuel K; Chen, Hui-Wen; Witek, Małgorzata A; Soper, Steven A

    2011-01-01

    The potential utility of genome-related research in terms of evolving basic discoveries in biology has generated widespread use of DNA diagnostics and DNA forensics and driven the accelerated development of fully integrated microfluidic systems for genome processing. To produce a microsystem with favorable performance characteristics for genetic-based analyses, several key operational elements must be strategically chosen, including device substrate material, temperature control, fluidic control, and reaction product readout. As a matter of definition, a microdevice is a chip that performs a single processing step, for example microchip electrophoresis. Several microdevices can be integrated to a single wafer, or combined on a control board as separate devices to form a microsystem. A microsystem is defined as a chip composed of at least two microdevices. Among the many documented analytical microdevices, those focused on the ability to perform the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) have been reported extensively due to the importance of this processing step in most genetic-based assays. Other microdevices that have been detailed in the literature include those for solid-phase extractions, microchip electrophoresis, and devices composed of DNA microarrays used for interrogating DNA primary structure. Great progress has also been made in the areas of chip fabrication, bonding and sealing to enclose fluidic networks, evaluation of different chip substrate materials, surface chemistries, and the architecture of reaction conduits for basic processing steps such as mixing. Other important elements that have been developed to realize functional systems include miniaturized readout formats comprising optical or electrochemical transduction and interconnect technologies. These discoveries have led to the development of fully autonomous and functional integrated systems for genome processing that can supply "sample in/answer out" capabilities. In this chapter, we focus on

  13. Interfacial tension based on-chip extraction of microparticles confined in microfluidic Stokes flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Haishui; He, Xiaoming

    2014-10-01

    Microfluidics involving two immiscible fluids (oil and water) has been increasingly used to produce hydrogel microparticles with wide applications. However, it is difficult to extract the microparticles out of the microfluidic Stokes flows of oil that have a Reynolds number (the ratio of inertia to viscous force) much less than one, where the dominant viscous force tends to drive the microparticles to move together with the surrounding oil. Here, we present a passive method for extracting hydrogel microparticles in microfluidic Stokes flow from oil into aqueous extracting solution on-chip by utilizing the intrinsic interfacial tension between oil and the microparticles. We further reveal that the thickness of an "extended confining layer" of oil next to the interface between oil and aqueous extracting solution must be smaller than the radius of microparticles for effective extraction. This method uses a simple planar merging microchannel design that can be readily fabricated and further integrated into a fluidic system to extract microparticles for wide applications.

  14. Biofabrication of Tobacco mosaic virus-nanoscaffolded supercapacitors via temporal capillary microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, Faheng; Chu, Sangwook; Gerasopoulos, Konstantinos; Culver, James N.; Ghodssi, Reza

    2017-06-01

    This paper reports the implementation of temporal capillary microfluidic patterns and biological nanoscaffolds in autonomous microfabrication of nanostructured symmetric electrochemical supercapacitors. A photoresist layer was first patterned on the substrate, forming a capillary microfluidics layer with two separated interdigitated microchannels. Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) macromolecules suspended in solution are autonomously delivered into the microfluidics, and form a dense bio-nanoscaffolds layer within an hour. This TMV layer is utilized in the electroless plating and thermal oxidation for creating nanostructured NiO supercapacitor. The galvanostatic charge/discharge cycle showed a 3.6-fold increase in areal capacitance for the nanostructured electrode compared to planar structures. The rapid creation of nanostructure-textured microdevices with only simple photolithography and bionanostructure self-assembly can completely eliminate the needs for sophisticated synthesis or deposition processes. This method will contribute to rapid prototyping of wide range of nano-/micro-devices with enhanced performance.

  15. Reciprocating flow-based centrifugal microfluidics mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noroozi, Zahra; Kido, Horacio; Micic, Miodrag; Pan, Hansheng; Bartolome, Christian; Princevac, Marko; Zoval, Jim; Madou, Marc

    2009-07-01

    Proper mixing of reagents is of paramount importance for an efficient chemical reaction. While on a large scale there are many good solutions for quantitative mixing of reagents, as of today, efficient and inexpensive fluid mixing in the nanoliter and microliter volume range is still a challenge. Complete, i.e., quantitative mixing is of special importance in any small-scale analytical application because the scarcity of analytes and the low volume of the reagents demand efficient utilization of all available reaction components. In this paper we demonstrate the design and fabrication of a novel centrifugal force-based unit for fast mixing of fluids in the nanoliter to microliter volume range. The device consists of a number of chambers (including two loading chambers, one pressure chamber, and one mixing chamber) that are connected through a network of microchannels, and is made by bonding a slab of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to a glass slide. The PDMS slab was cast using a SU-8 master mold fabricated by a two-level photolithography process. This microfluidic mixer exploits centrifugal force and pneumatic pressure to reciprocate the flow of fluid samples in order to minimize the amount of sample and the time of mixing. The process of mixing was monitored by utilizing the planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) technique. A time series of high resolution images of the mixing chamber were analyzed for the spatial distribution of light intensities as the two fluids (suspension of red fluorescent particles and water) mixed. Histograms of the fluorescent emissions within the mixing chamber during different stages of the mixing process were created to quantify the level of mixing of the mixing fluids. The results suggest that quantitative mixing was achieved in less than 3 min. This device can be employed as a stand alone mixing unit or may be integrated into a disk-based microfluidic system where, in addition to mixing, several other sample preparation steps may be

  16. Reciprocating flow-based centrifugal microfluidics mixer.

    PubMed

    Noroozi, Zahra; Kido, Horacio; Micic, Miodrag; Pan, Hansheng; Bartolome, Christian; Princevac, Marko; Zoval, Jim; Madou, Marc

    2009-07-01

    Proper mixing of reagents is of paramount importance for an efficient chemical reaction. While on a large scale there are many good solutions for quantitative mixing of reagents, as of today, efficient and inexpensive fluid mixing in the nanoliter and microliter volume range is still a challenge. Complete, i.e., quantitative mixing is of special importance in any small-scale analytical application because the scarcity of analytes and the low volume of the reagents demand efficient utilization of all available reaction components. In this paper we demonstrate the design and fabrication of a novel centrifugal force-based unit for fast mixing of fluids in the nanoliter to microliter volume range. The device consists of a number of chambers (including two loading chambers, one pressure chamber, and one mixing chamber) that are connected through a network of microchannels, and is made by bonding a slab of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to a glass slide. The PDMS slab was cast using a SU-8 master mold fabricated by a two-level photolithography process. This microfluidic mixer exploits centrifugal force and pneumatic pressure to reciprocate the flow of fluid samples in order to minimize the amount of sample and the time of mixing. The process of mixing was monitored by utilizing the planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) technique. A time series of high resolution images of the mixing chamber were analyzed for the spatial distribution of light intensities as the two fluids (suspension of red fluorescent particles and water) mixed. Histograms of the fluorescent emissions within the mixing chamber during different stages of the mixing process were created to quantify the level of mixing of the mixing fluids. The results suggest that quantitative mixing was achieved in less than 3 min. This device can be employed as a stand alone mixing unit or may be integrated into a disk-based microfluidic system where, in addition to mixing, several other sample preparation steps may be

  17. Microfluidic hydrogel arrays for direct genotyping of clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yun Kyung; Kim, Jungkyu; Mathies, Richard A

    2016-05-15

    A microfluidic hydrogel DNA microarray is developed to overcome the limitations of conventional planar microarrays such as low sensitivity, long overnight hybridization time, lack of a melting verification of proper hybrid, and complicated sample preparation process for genotyping of clinical samples. Unlike our previous prototype hydrogel array which can analyze only single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) targets, the device is the first of its type to allow direct multiplexed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection of human clinical samples comprising double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). This advance is made possible by incorporating a streptavidin (SA) hydrogel capture/purification element in a double T-junction at the start of the linear hydrogel array structure and fabricating ten different probe DNAs-entrapped hydrogels in microfluidic channels. The purified or unpurified polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products labeled with a fluorophore and a biotin are electrophoresed through the SA hydrogel for binding and purification. After electrophoretic washing, the fluorophore-labeled DNA strand is then thermally released for hybridization capture by its complementary probe gel element. We demonstrate the precise and rapid discrimination of the genotypes of five different clinical targets by melting curve analysis based on temperature-gradient electrophoresis within 3h, which is at least 3-fold decrease in incubation time compared to conventional microarrays. In addition, a 1.7 pg (0.024 femtomoles) limit of detection for clinical samples is achieved which is ~100-fold better sensitivity than planar microarrays.

  18. Inertial microfluidics for continuous separation of cells and particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Arpita; Kuntaegowdanahalli, Sathyakumar S.; Papautsky, Ian

    2011-02-01

    In this work we describe the use of inertial microfluidics for continuous multi-particle separation in a simple spiral microchannel. The inertial forces coupled with the rotational Dean drag force in the spiral microchannel geometry cause neutrally-buoyant particles and cells to occupy a single equilibrium position near the inner microchannel wall. This position is strongly dependent on the particle/cell diameter. Based on this concept, a 5-loop Archimedean spiral microchannel chip was used to demonstrate for the first time focusing and separation of four particles simultaneously. The polystyrene particles (7.32 μm, 10 μm, 15 μm, 20 μm in diameter) were selected for this work since they are compatible to the size of blood cells. The device exhibited an average 87% separation efficiency, which is comparable to that of other microfluidic separation systems. The simple planar structure and high sample throughput offered by this passive microfluidic approach makes it attractive for lab-on-a-chip integration in hematology applications.

  19. Microfluidic flow-dependent optical particle trapping and circulation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinton, David; Blakely, Thomas; Gordon, Reuven

    2007-11-01

    Through the planar integration of microfluidics and fiber optics, flow-dependent optical trapping and stable circulation are achieved. Two configurations are demonstrated: Single tapered fiber traps aligned with the up-stream flow direction; and dual fiber cross-flow optical traps with alignment bias relative to the flow direction. In both configurations, particle trapping results from a combination of flow-induced drag force and optical scattering forces. In the tapered fiber traps, the stable particle trapping is achieved through a balance of forward scattering and fluid drag force, with particle position indicating the relative strength each. In the dual fiber traps, two fibers are oriented in the cross-stream direction. Employing a bias in the optical fiber in-plane alignment angle results in a flow dependence for stability and circulation. The result is a microfluidic flow-dependent circulating optical trap which may be employed to indicate flow direction, magnitude, or employed to mix co-laminar streams. A strong dependence on particle size also indicates potential for stream-wise particle sorting by size. Lastly, two extensions of this work are discussed: Microfluidic and optical interactions in multiphase (oil-water-particle) systems; and flow dependencies of optically-trapped linear arrays of particles.

  20. Electrowetting-based actuation of droplets for integrated microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Pollack, M G; Shenderov, A D; Fair, R B

    2002-05-01

    The serviceability of microfluidics-based instrumentation including 'lab-on-a-chip' systems critically depends on control of fluid motion. We are reporting here an alternative approach to microfluidics based upon the micromanipulation of discrete droplets of aqueous electrolyte by electrowetting. Using a simple open structure, consisting of two sets of opposing planar electrodes fabricated on glass substrates, positional and formational control of microdroplets ranging in size from several nanoliters to several microliters has been demonstrated at voltages between 15-100 V. Since there are no permanent channels or structures between the plates, the system is highly flexible and reconfigurable. Droplet transport is rapid and efficient with average velocities exceeding 10 cm s(-1) having been observed. The dependence of the velocity on voltage is roughly independent of the droplet size within certain limits, thus the smallest droplets studied (approximately 3 nl) could be transported over 1000 times their length per second. Formation, mixing, and splitting of microdroplets was also demonstrated using the same microactuator structures. Thus, electrowetting provides a means to achieve high levels of functional integration and flexibility for microfluidic systems.

  1. Microfluidic partitioning of the extracellular space around single cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Klauke, Norbert; Smith, Godfrey L; Cooper, Jonathan M

    2007-02-01

    This paper describes the partitioning of the extracellular space around an electrically activated single cardiac myocyte, constrained within a microfluidic device. Central to this new method is the production of a hydrophobic gap-structure, which divides the extracellular space into two distinct microfluidic pools. The content of these pools was controlled using a pair of concentric automated pipets (subsequently called "dual superfusion pipet"), each providing the ability to dispense (i.e., the source, inner pipet) and aspirate (the sink, outer pipet) a buffer solution (perfusate) into each of the two pools. For rapid solution switching around the cell, additional dual superfusion pipets were inserted into the microchannel for defined time periods using a piezostepper, enabling us to add a test solution, such as a drug. Three distinct areas of the cell were manipulated, namely, the microfluidic environment, the cellular membrane, and the intracellular space. Planar integrated microelectrodes enabled the electrical stimulation of the cardiomyocyte and the recording of the evoked action potential. The device was mounted on an inverted microscope to allow simultaneous sarcomere length and epifluorescence measurements during evoked electrical activity, including, for example, the response of the stimulated end of the cardiac myocyte in comparison with the untreated cell end.

  2. A microfluidic separation platform using an array of slanted ramps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risbud, Sumedh; Bernate, Jorge; Drazer, German

    2013-03-01

    The separation of the different components of a sample is a crucial step in many micro- and nano-fluidic applications, including the detection of infections, the capture of circulating tumor cells, the isolation of proteins, RNA and DNA, to mention but a few. Vector chromatography, in which different species migrate in different directions in a planar microfluidic device thus achieving spatial as well as temporal resolution, offers the promise of high selectivity along with high throughput. In this work, we present a microfluidic vector chromatography platform consisting of slanted ramps in a microfluidic channel for the separation of suspended particles. We construct these ramps using inclined UV lithography, such that the inclined portion of the ramps is upstream. We show that particles of different size displace laterally to a different extent when driven by a flow field over a slanted ramp. The flow close to the ramp reorients along the ramp, causing the size-dependent deflection of the particles. The cumulative effect of an array of these ramps would cause particles of different size to migrate in different directions, thus allowing their passive and continuous separation.

  3. Microfluidics without microfabrication

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Barry R.; Chen, Jian; Schwartz, Daniel T.

    2003-01-01

    Microfluidic devices create spatially defined, chemically controlled environments at microscopic dimensions. We demonstrate the formation and control of microscopic hydrodynamic and chemical environments by impinging a low-intensity acoustic oscillation on a cylindrical electrode. The interaction of small-amplitude (≤203 μm), low-frequency (≤515 Hz) fluid oscillations with a submillimeter cylinder creates four microscopic eddies that circulate adjacent to the cylinder. This steady flow is known as acoustic streaming. Because the steady circulation in the eddies has closed streamlines, reagent dosed from the electrode can escape the eddies only by slow molecular diffusion. As a result, reagent dosing rates of 10 nmol/s produce eddy concentrations as high as 8 mM, without a correspondingly large rise in bulk solution composition. Imaging Raman spectroscopy is used to visualize the eddy concentration distribution for various acoustic oscillation conditions, and point Raman spectra are used to quantify eddy compositions. These results, and corresponding numerical simulations, show that each eddy acts as a microchemical trap with size determined by acoustic frequency and the concentration tuned via reagent dosing rate and acoustic amplitude. Low-intensity acoustic streaming flows can serve as microfluidic elements without the need for microfabrication. PMID:12671076

  4. Microfluidic Biochip Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panzarella, Charles

    2004-01-01

    As humans prepare for the exploration of our solar system, there is a growing need for miniaturized medical and environmental diagnostic devices for use on spacecrafts, especially during long-duration space missions where size and power requirements are critical. In recent years, the biochip (or Lab-on-a-Chip) has emerged as a technology that might be able to satisfy this need. In generic terms, a biochip is a miniaturized microfluidic device analogous to the electronic microchip that ushered in the digital age. It consists of tiny microfluidic channels, pumps and valves that transport small amounts of sample fluids to biosensors that can perform a variety of tests on those fluids in near real time. It has the obvious advantages of being small, lightweight, requiring less sample fluids and reagents and being more sensitive and efficient than larger devices currently in use. Some of the desired space-based applications would be to provide smaller, more robust devices for analyzing blood, saliva and urine and for testing water and food supplies for the presence of harmful contaminants and microorganisms. Our group has undertaken the goal of adapting as well as improving upon current biochip technology for use in long-duration microgravity environments.

  5. Electro-Microfluidic Packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benavides, G. L.; Galambos, P. C.

    2002-06-01

    There are many examples of electro-microfluidic products that require cost effective packaging solutions. Industry has responded to a demand for products such as drop ejectors, chemical sensors, and biological sensors. Drop ejectors have consumer applications such as ink jet printing and scientific applications such as patterning self-assembled monolayers or ejecting picoliters of expensive analytes/reagents for chemical analysis. Drop ejectors can be used to perform chemical analysis, combinatorial chemistry, drug manufacture, drug discovery, drug delivery, and DNA sequencing. Chemical and biological micro-sensors can sniff the ambient environment for traces of dangerous materials such as explosives, toxins, or pathogens. Other biological sensors can be used to improve world health by providing timely diagnostics and applying corrective measures to the human body. Electro-microfluidic packaging can easily represent over fifty percent of the product cost and, as with Integrated Circuits (IC), the industry should evolve to standard packaging solutions. Standard packaging schemes will minimize cost and bring products to market sooner.

  6. Planar oscillatory stirring apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, Martin F. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Apparatus (11) for applying planar oscillations to a container (13). Pressurized air (99) is supplied to a moveable slide plate (27) which employs arms (19) having an air bearing vent structure (29, 31) which allows the slide plate to float and to translate. The container (13) to be oscillated is secured to the upper surface of the slide plate (27). A motor (39) driven rotating eccentric shaft (59) loosely extends into a center hole bearing (37) of the slide plate (27) to cause the oscillations.

  7. Large data centers interconnect bottlenecks.

    PubMed

    Ghiasi, Ali

    2015-02-09

    Large data centers interconnect bottlenecks are dominated by the switch I/O BW and the front panel BW as a result of pluggable modules. To overcome the front panel BW and the switch ASIC BW limitation one approach is to either move the optics onto the mid-plan or integrate the optics into the switch ASIC. Over the last 4 years, VCSEL based optical engines have been integrated into the packages of large-scale HPC routers, moderate size Ethernet switches, and even FPGA's. Competing solutions based on Silicon Photonics (SiP) have also been proposed for integration into HPC and Ethernet switch packages but with better integration path through the use of TSV (Through Silicon Via) stack dies. Integrating either VCSEL or SiP based optical engines into complex ASIC package that operates at high temperatures, where the required reliability is not trivial, one should ask what is the technical or the economic advantage before embarking on such a complex integration. High density Ethernet switches addressing data centers currently in development are based on 25G NRZ signaling and QSFP28 optical module that can support up to 3.6 Tb of front panel bandwidth.

  8. Forensic drug analysis and microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Al-Hetlani, Entesar

    2013-05-01

    The analysis of drugs of abuse in microfluidic devices has the potential to provide solutions to today's on-site analysis challenges. The use of such devices has not been limited to miniaturising conventional analytical methods used routinely in forensic laboratories; new and interesting approaches have been implemented in microfluidics and benefit from the ability to control minute amounts of liquids in the small channels. The microfluidic platforms developed so far have been used successfully to carry out single or multiple analytical processes and offer a great opportunity for new technologies for on-site drug testing. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Novel planarization and passivation in the integration of III-V semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun-Fei; Hanberg, Peter J.; Demir, Hilmi V.; Sabnis, Vijit A.; Fidaner, Onur; Harris, James S., Jr.; Miller, David A. B.

    2004-06-01

    III-V semiconductor devices typically use structures grown layer-by-layer and require passivation of sidewalls by vertical etching to reduce leakage current. The passivation is conventionally achieved by sealing the sidewalls using polymer and the polymer needs to be planarized by polymer etch-back method to device top for metal interconnection. It is very challenging to achieve perfect planarization needed for sidewalls of all the device layers including the top layer to be completely sealed. We introduce a novel hard-mask-assisted self-aligned planarization process that allows the polymer in 1-3 μm vicinity of the devices to be planarized perfectly to the top of devices. The hard-mask-assisted process also allows self-aligned via formation for metal interconnection to device top of μm size. The hard mask is removed to expose a very clean device top surface for depositing metals for low ohmic contact resistance metal interconnection. The process is robust because it is insensitive to device height difference, spin-on polymer thickness variation, and polymer etch non-uniformity. We have demonstrated high yield fabrication of monolithically integrated optical switch arrays with mesa diodes and waveguide electroabsorption modulators on InP substrate with yield > 90%, high breakdown voltage of > 15 Volts, and low ohmic contact resistance of 10-20 Ω.

  10. Planar Submillimeter-Wave Mixer Technology with Integrated Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Gautam; Mehdi, Imran; Gill, John J.; Lee, Choonsup; lombart, Muria L.; Thomas, Betrand

    2010-01-01

    High-performance mixers at terahertz frequencies require good matching between the coupling circuits such as antennas and local oscillators and the diode embedding impedance. With the availability of amplifiers at submillimeter wavelengths and the need to have multi-pixel imagers and cameras, planar mixer architecture is required to have an integrated system. An integrated mixer with planar antenna provides a compact and optimized design at terahertz frequencies. Moreover, it leads to a planar architecture that enables efficient interconnect with submillimeter-wave amplifiers. In this architecture, a planar slot antenna is designed on a thin gallium arsenide (GaAs) membrane in such a way that the beam on either side of the membrane is symmetric and has good beam profile with high coupling efficiency. A coplanar waveguide (CPW) coupled Schottky diode mixer is designed and integrated with the antenna. In this architecture, the local oscillator (LO) is coupled through one side of the antenna and the RF from the other side, without requiring any beam sp litters or diplexers. The intermediate frequency (IF) comes out on a 50-ohm CPW line at the edge of the mixer chip, which can be wire-bonded to external circuits. This unique terahertz mixer has an integrated single planar antenna for coupling both the radio frequency (RF) input and LO injection without any diplexer or beamsplitters. The design utilizes novel planar slot antenna architecture on a 3- mthick GaAs membrane. This work is required to enable future multi-pixel terahertz receivers for astrophysics missions, and lightweight and compact receivers for planetary missions to the outer planets in our solar system. Also, this technology can be used in tera hertz radar imaging applications as well as for testing of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs).

  11. Microbridge structures for uniform interval control of flowing droplets in microfluidic networks.

    PubMed

    Lee, Do-Hyun; Lee, Wonhye; Um, Eujin; Park, Je-Kyun

    2011-09-01

    Precise temporal control of microfluidic droplets such as synchronization and combinatorial pairing of droplets is required to achieve a variety range of chemical and biochemical reactions inside microfluidic networks. Here, we present a facile and robust microfluidic platform enabling uniform interval control of flowing droplets for the precise temporal synchronization and pairing of picoliter droplets with a reagent. By incorporating microbridge structures interconnecting the droplet-carrying channel and the flow control channel, a fluidic pressure drop was derived between the two fluidic channels via the microbridge structures, reordering flowing droplets with a defined uniform interval. Through the adjustment of the control oil flow rate, the droplet intervals were flexibly and precisely adjustable. With this mechanism of droplet spacing, the gelation of the alginate droplets as well as control of the droplet interval was simultaneously achieved by additional control oil flow including calcified oleic acid. In addition, by parallel linking identical microfluidic modules with distinct sample inlet, controlled synchronization and pairing of two distinct droplets were demonstrated. This method is applicable to facilitate and develop many droplet-based microfluidic applications, including biological assay, combinatorial synthesis, and high-throughput screening.

  12. Ultrafast microfluidics using surface acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James R.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate that surface acoustic waves (SAWs), nanometer amplitude Rayleigh waves driven at megahertz order frequencies propagating on the surface of a piezoelectric substrate, offer a powerful method for driving a host of extremely fast microfluidic actuation and micro∕bioparticle manipulation schemes. We show that sessile drops can be translated rapidly on planar substrates or fluid can be pumped through microchannels at 1–10 cm∕s velocities, which are typically one to two orders quicker than that afforded by current microfluidic technologies. Through symmetry-breaking, azimuthal recirculation can be induced within the drop to drive strong inertial microcentrifugation for micromixing and particle concentration or separation. Similar micromixing strategies can be induced in the same microchannel in which fluid is pumped with the SAW by merely changing the SAW frequency to rapidly switch the uniform through-flow into a chaotic oscillatory flow by exploiting superpositioning of the irradiated sound waves from the sidewalls of the microchannel. If the flow is sufficiently quiescent, the nodes of the transverse standing wave that arises across the microchannel also allow for particle aggregation, and hence, sorting on nodal lines. In addition, the SAW also facilitates other microfluidic capabilities. For example, capillary waves excited at the free surface of a sessile drop by the SAW underneath it can be exploited for micro∕nanoparticle collection and sorting at nodal points or lines at low powers. At higher powers, the large accelerations off the substrate surface as the SAW propagates across drives rapid destabilization of the drop free surface giving rise to inertial liquid jets that persist over 1–2 cm in length or atomization of the entire drop to produce 1–10 μm monodispersed aerosol droplets, which can be exploited for ink-jet printing, mass spectrometry interfacing, or pulmonary drug delivery. The atomization of polymer∕protein solutions

  13. Packaging of silicon sensors for microfluidic bio-analytical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimberger-Friedl, Reinhold; Nellissen, Ton; Weekamp, Wim; van Delft, Jan; Ansems, Will; Prins, Menno; Megens, Mischa; Dittmer, Wendy; de Witz, Christiane; van Iersel, Ben

    2009-01-01

    A new industrial concept is presented for packaging biosensor chips in disposable microfluidic cartridges to enable medical diagnostic applications. The inorganic electronic substrates, such as silicon or glass, are integrated in a polymer package which provides the electrical and fluidic interconnections to the world and provides mechanical strength and protection for out-of-lab use. The demonstrated prototype consists of a molded interconnection device (MID), a silicon-based giant magneto-resistive (GMR) biosensor chip, a flex and a polymer fluidic part with integrated tubing. The various processes are compatible with mass manufacturing and run at a high yield. The devices show a reliable electrical interconnection between the sensor chip and readout electronics during extended wet operation. Sandwich immunoassays were carried out in the cartridges with surface functionalized sensor chips. Biological response curves were determined for different concentrations of parathyroid hormone (PTH) on the packaged biosensor, which demonstrates the functionality and biocompatibility of the devices. The new packaging concept provides a platform for easy further integration of electrical and fluidic functions, as for instance required for integrated molecular diagnostic devices in cost-effective mass manufacturing.

  14. Planar Para Algebras, Reflection Positivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, Arthur; Liu, Zhengwei

    2017-05-01

    We define a planar para algebra, which arises naturally from combining planar algebras with the idea of ZN para symmetry in physics. A subfactor planar para algebra is a Hilbert space representation of planar tangles with parafermionic defects that are invariant under para isotopy. For each ZN, we construct a family of subfactor planar para algebras that play the role of Temperley-Lieb-Jones planar algebras. The first example in this family is the parafermion planar para algebra (PAPPA). Based on this example, we introduce parafermion Pauli matrices, quaternion relations, and braided relations for parafermion algebras, which one can use in the study of quantum information. An important ingredient in planar para algebra theory is the string Fourier transform (SFT), which we use on the matrix algebra generated by the Pauli matrices. Two different reflections play an important role in the theory of planar para algebras. One is the adjoint operator; the other is the modular conjugation in Tomita-Takesaki theory. We use the latter one to define the double algebra and to introduce reflection positivity. We give a new and geometric proof of reflection positivity by relating the two reflections through the string Fourier transform.

  15. EPRI PEAC Corp.: Certification Model Program and Interconnection Agreement Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2003-10-01

    Summarizes the work of EPRI PEAC Corp., under contract to DOE's Distribution and Interconnection R&D, to develop a certification model program and interconnection agreement tools to support the interconnection of distributed energy resources.

  16. Partial Synchronization of Interconnected Boolean Networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongwei; Liang, Jinling; Lu, Jianquan

    2017-01-01

    This paper addresses the partial synchronization problem for the interconnected Boolean networks (BNs) via the semi-tensor product (STP) of matrices. First, based on an algebraic state space representation of BNs, a necessary and sufficient criterion is presented to ensure the partial synchronization of the interconnected BNs. Second, by defining an induced digraph of the partial synchronized states set, an equivalent graphical description for the partial synchronization of the interconnected BNs is established. Consequently, the second partial synchronization criterion is derived in terms of adjacency matrix of the induced digraph. Finally, two examples (including an epigenetic model) are provided to illustrate the efficiency of the obtained results.

  17. Microfluidic technologies for temporal perturbations of chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Irimia, Daniel

    2010-08-15

    Most cells in the body have the ability to change their physical locations during physiologic or pathologic events such as inflammation, wound healing, or cancer. When cell migration is directed toward sources of cue chemicals, the process is known as chemotaxis, and it requires linking the sensing of chemicals through receptors on the surfaces of the cells to the directional activation of the motility apparatus inside the cells. This link is supported by complex intracellular signaling pathways, and although details regarding the nature of the molecules involved in the signal transduction are well established, far less is known about how different signaling molecules and processes are dynamically interconnected and how slower and faster signaling events take place simultaneously inside moving cells. In this context, advances in microfluidic technologies are enabling the emergence of new tools that facilitate the development of experimental protocols in which the cellular microenvironment is precisely controlled in time and space and in which signaling-associated changes inside cells can be quantitatively measured and compared. These tools could enable new insights into the intricacies of the biological systems that participate in chemotaxis processes and could have the potential to accelerate the development of novel therapeutic strategies to control cell motility and enhance our abilities for medical intervention during health and disease.

  18. Microfluidic Technologies for Temporal Perturbations of Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Irimia, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Most cells in the body have the ability to change their physical locations during physiologic or pathologic events such as inflammation, wound healing, or cancer. When cell migration is directed toward sources of cue chemicals, the process is known as chemotaxis, and it requires linking the sensing of chemicals through receptors on the surfaces of the cells to the directional activation of the motility apparatus inside the cells. This link is supported by complex intracellular signaling pathways, and although details regarding the nature of the molecules involved in the signal transduction are well established, far less is known about how different signaling molecules and processes are dynamically interconnected and how slower and faster signaling events take place simultaneously inside moving cells. In this context, advances in microfluidic technologies are enabling the emergence of new tools that facilitate the development of experimental protocols in which the cellular microenvironment is precisely controlled in time and space and in which signaling-associated changes inside cells can be quantitatively measured and compared. These tools could enable new insights into the intricacies of the biological systems that participate in chemotaxis processes and could have the potential to accelerate the development of novel therapeutic strategies to control cell motility and enhance our abilities for medical intervention during health and disease. PMID:20450351

  19. Bioanalysis in structured microfluidic systems.

    PubMed

    Ros, Alexandra; Hellmich, Wibke; Regtmeier, Jan; Duong, Thanh Tu; Anselmetti, Dario

    2006-07-01

    Microfluidic and lab-on-a-chip devices have attracted widespread interest in separation sciences and bioanalysis. Recent designs in microfluidic devices extend common separation concepts by exploiting new phenomena for molecular dynamics on a length scale of 10 mum and below, giving rise to novel manipulation tools and nonintuitive phenomena for microseparations. Here, we focus on three very recent developments for bioseparations based on tailored microfluidic systems: Single cell navigation, trapping and steering with subsequent on-chip lysis, protein separation and LIF detection (Section 3.1), then we report dielectrophoretic trapping and separation of large DNA fragments in structured microfluidic devices (Section 3.2). Finally, a paradoxial migration phenomenon based on thermal fluctuations, periodically arranged microchannels and a biased alternating current electric field is presented in Section 3.3.

  20. Emergence of microfluidic wearable technologies.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Joo Chuan; Kenry; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2016-10-18

    There has been an intense interest in the development of wearable technologies, arising from increasing demands in the areas of fitness and healthcare. While still at an early stage, incorporating microfluidics in wearable technologies has enormous potential, especially in healthcare applications. For example, current microfluidic fabrication techniques can be innovatively modified to fabricate microstructures and incorporate electrically conductive elements on soft, flexible and stretchable materials. In fact, by leverarging on such microfabrication and liquid manipulation techniques, the developed flexible microfluidic wearable technologies have enabled several biosensing applications, including in situ sweat metabolites analysis, vital signs monitoring, and gait analysis. As such, we anticipate further significant breakthroughs and potential uses of wearable microfluidics in active drug delivery patches, soft robotics sensing and control, and even implantable artificial organs in the near future.

  1. Microfluidic technology for molecular diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Tom; Dittrich, Petra S

    2013-01-01

    Molecular diagnostics have helped to improve the lives of millions of patients worldwide by allowing clinicians to diagnose patients earlier as well as providing better ongoing therapies. Point-of-care (POC) testing can bring these laboratory-based techniques to the patient in a home setting or to remote settings in the developing world. However, despite substantial progress in the field, there still remain many challenges. Progress in molecular diagnostics has benefitted greatly from microfluidic technology. This chapter aims to summarise the more recent advances in microfluidic-based molecular diagnostics. Sections include an introduction to microfluidic technology, the challenges of molecular diagnostics, how microfluidic advances are working to solve these issues, some alternative design approaches, and detection within these systems.

  2. Rapid mask prototyping for microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Maisonneuve, B G C; Honegger, T; Cordeiro, J; Lecarme, O; Thiry, T; Fuard, D; Berton, K; Picard, E; Zelsmann, M; Peyrade, D

    2016-03-01

    With the rise of microfluidics for the past decade, there has come an ever more pressing need for a low-cost and rapid prototyping technology, especially for research and education purposes. In this article, we report a rapid prototyping process of chromed masks for various microfluidic applications. The process takes place out of a clean room, uses a commercially available video-projector, and can be completed in less than half an hour. We quantify the ranges of fields of view and of resolutions accessible through this video-projection system and report the fabrication of critical microfluidic components (junctions, straight channels, and curved channels). To exemplify the process, three common devices are produced using this method: a droplet generation device, a gradient generation device, and a neuro-engineering oriented device. The neuro-engineering oriented device is a compartmentalized microfluidic chip, and therefore, required the production and the precise alignment of two different masks.

  3. Optical Backplane Interconnect Technology (OBIT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    We describe and analyze a novel approach to implementing an Optical Backplane Interconnect Technology (OBIT) that is capable of optically connecting any row of a 32x32 backplane array to any row of a second 32x32 array. Each backplane array is formed monolithically on a wafer. The technology is based on the use of Grating Surface Emitting (GSE) waveguides formed on a wafer containing quantum-well and separate confinement waveguide layers. These layers are used for transverse guiding, gain, modulation, detection, and for the formation of wavelength tunable distributed-Bragg reflector lasers. The required surface structures are formed photolithographically. The GSE waveguides act as efficient antennae that radiate light at angles selected by tuning the wavelength of the lasers. The same waveguides may be used as the receiving antennae when the array is used in the receiving mode. Thus, wavelength tuning is used to direct each row of the transmitting array to the desired row of the receiving array. In summary: The optical backplane array will have the following characteristics: Any row of a 32x32 GSE array may be optically connected to any row of a second 32x32 array. Only one switch decision is required to switch 32 parallel connections to any one of 32 positions. Each monolithic array can be used as both transmitter and receiver by switching the bias on the quantum-well switch-detectors. Separate transmitting and receiving structures could be provided for duplex operation. For a bit error rate of 10 sup 9 at 100-MHz data rate, a required laser power of 12 mW is calculated based on an estimated total optical loss of 40 dB.

  4. Towards printable open air microfluidics.

    SciTech Connect

    Collord, Andrew; Cook, Adam W.; Clem, Paul Gilbert; Fenton, Kyle Ross; Apblett, Christopher Alan; Branson, Eric D.

    2010-04-01

    We have demonstrated a novel microfluidic technique for aqueous media, which uses super-hydrophobic materials to create microfluidic channels that are open to the atmosphere. We have demonstrated the ability to perform traditional electrokinetic operations such as ionic separations and electrophoresis using these devices. The rate of evaporation was studied and found to increase with decreasing channel size, which places a limitation on the minimum size of channel that could be used for such a device.

  5. Passive microfluidic array card and reader

    SciTech Connect

    Dugan, Lawrence Christopher; Coleman, Matthew A

    2011-08-09

    A microfluidic array card and reader system for analyzing a sample. The microfluidic array card includes a sample loading section for loading the sample onto the microfluidic array card, a multiplicity of array windows, and a transport section or sections for transporting the sample from the sample loading section to the array windows. The microfluidic array card reader includes a housing, a receiving section for receiving the microfluidic array card, a viewing section, and a light source that directs light to the array window of the microfluidic array card and to the viewing section.

  6. Method for fabricating an interconnected array of semiconductor devices

    DOEpatents

    Grimmer, Derrick P.; Paulson, Kenneth R.; Gilbert, James R.

    1989-10-10

    Semiconductor layer and conductive layer formed on a flexible substrate, divided into individual devices and interconnected with one another in series by interconnection layers and penetrating terminals.

  7. A Programmable MicroFluidic Processor: Integrated and Hybrid Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, K A

    2002-05-10

    The Programmable Fluidic Processor (PFP), a device conceived of by researchers at MD Anderson Cancer Center, is a reconfigurable and programmable bio-chemical analysis system designed for handheld operation in a variety of applications. Unlike most microfluidic systems which utilize channels to control fluids, the PFP device is a droplet-based system. The device is based on dielectrophoresis; a fluid transport phenomenon that utilizes mismatched polarizability between a droplet and its medium to induce droplet mobility. In the device, sample carrying droplets are polarized by an array of electrodes, individually addressable by subsurface microelectronics. My research focused on the development of a polymer-based microfluidic injection system for injecting these droplets onto the electrode array. The first of two device generations fabricated at LLNL was designed using extensive research and modeling performed by MD Anderson and Coventor. Fabricating the first generation required several iterations and design changes in order to generate an acceptable device for testing. Difficulties in planar fabrication of the fluidic system and a narrow channel design necessitated these changes. The second generation device incorporated modifications of the previous generation and improved on deficiencies discovered during experimentation with the initial device. Extensive modeling of the injection channels and fluid storage chamber also aided in redesigning the device's microfluidic system. A micromolding technique with interlocking features enabled precise alignments and dimensional control, critical requirements for device optimization. Fabrication of a final device will be fully integrated with the polymer-based microfluidics bonded directly to the silicon-based microelectronics. The optimized design and process flow developed in the trial generations will readily transfer to this approach.

  8. Inertial focusing in microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Martel, Joseph M; Toner, Mehmet

    2014-07-11

    When Segré and Silberberg in 1961 witnessed particles in a laminar pipe flow congregating at an annulus in the pipe, scientists were perplexed and spent decades learning why such behavior occurred, finally understanding that it was caused by previously unknown forces on particles in an inertial flow. The advent of microfluidics opened a new realm of possibilities for inertial focusing in the processing of biological fluids and cellular suspensions and created a field that is now rapidly expanding. Over the past five years, inertial focusing has enabled high-throughput, simple, and precise manipulation of bodily fluids for a myriad of applications in point-of-care and clinical diagnostics. This review describes the theoretical developments that have made the field of inertial focusing what it is today and presents the key applications that will make inertial focusing a mainstream technology in the future.

  9. Enhanced Microfluidic Electromagnetic Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giovangrandi, Laurent (Inventor); Ricco, Antonio J. (Inventor); Kovacs, Gregory (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Techniques for enhanced microfluidic impedance spectroscopy include causing a core fluid to flow into a channel between two sheath flows of one or more sheath fluids different from the core fluid. Flow in the channel is laminar. A dielectric constant of a fluid constituting either sheath flow is much less than a dielectric constant of the core fluid. Electrical impedance is measured in the channel between at least a first pair of electrodes. In some embodiments, enhanced optical measurements include causing a core fluid to flow into a channel between two sheath flows of one or more sheath fluids different from the core fluid. An optical index of refraction of a fluid constituting either sheath flow is much less than an optical index of refraction of the core fluid. An optical property is measured in the channel.

  10. Inertial Focusing in Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Martel, Joseph M.; Toner, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    When Segré and Silberberg in 1961 witnessed particles in a laminar pipe flow congregating at an annulus in the pipe, scientists were perplexed and spent decades learning why such behavior occurred, finally understanding that it was caused by previously unknown forces on particles in an inertial flow. The advent of microfluidics opened a new realm of possibilities for inertial focusing in the processing of biological fluids and cellular suspensions and created a field that is now rapidly expanding. Over the past five years, inertial focusing has enabled high-throughput, simple, and precise manipulation of bodily fluids for a myriad of applications in point-of-care and clinical diagnostics. This review describes the theoretical developments that have made the field of inertial focusing what it is today and presents the key applications that will make inertial focusing a mainstream technology in the future. PMID:24905880

  11. Microfluidic serial dilution ladder.

    PubMed

    Ahrar, Siavash; Hwang, Michelle; Duncan, Philip N; Hui, Elliot E

    2014-01-07

    Serial dilution is a fundamental procedure that is common to a large number of laboratory protocols. Automation of serial dilution is thus a valuable component for lab-on-a-chip systems. While a handful of different microfluidic strategies for serial dilution have been reported, approaches based on continuous flow mixing inherently consume larger amounts of sample volume and chip real estate. We employ valve-driven circulatory mixing to address these issues and also introduce a novel device structure to store each stage of the dilution process. The dilution strategy is based on sequentially mixing the rungs of a ladder structure. We demonstrate a 7-stage series of 1 : 1 dilutions with R(2) equal to 0.995 in an active device area of 1 cm(2).

  12. Electrodes for microfluidic applications

    DOEpatents

    Crocker, Robert W.; Harnett, Cindy K.; Rognlien, Judith L.

    2006-08-22

    An electrode device for high pressure applications. These electrodes, designed to withstand pressure of greater than 10,000 psi, are adapted for use in microfluidic devices that employ electrokinetic or electrophoretic flow. The electrode is composed, generally, of an outer electrically insulating tubular body having a porous ceramic frit material disposed in one end of the outer body. The pores of the porous ceramic material are filled with an ion conductive polymer resin. A conductive material situated on the upper surface of the porous ceramic frit material and, thus isolated from direct contact with the electrolyte, forms a gas diffusion electrode. A metal current collector, in contact with the gas diffusion electrode, provides connection to a voltage source.

  13. Microfluidic flow spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Vergara, Pamela; Torres Rojas, Aimee M.; Guevara-Pantoja, Pablo E.; Corvera Poiré, Eugenia; Caballero-Robledo, Gabriel A.

    2017-07-01

    We present a microfluidic device which allows one to study the dynamics of oscillatory flows for a frequency range between 1 and 300 Hz. The fluid in the microdevice could be Newtonian, viscoelastic, or even a biofluid, since the device is made of PMMA, which makes it biocompatible and free of elastomeric elements. Coupling a piezoelectric to a micropiston allows one to impose periodic movement to the fluid, with zero mean flow and amplitudes of up to 20~μ m, within the microchannels in which the dynamics is studied. The use of a fast camera coupled to a microscope allows one to study the dynamics of 1~μ m tracer particles and interfaces at an image acquisition rate as fast as 5000 frames per second. The fabrication of the device is easy and cost-effective, since it is based on the use of a micromilling machine. The dynamics of a Newtonian fluid is studied as a proof of principle.

  14. Interplay between materials and microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Xu; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Santiago, Grissel Trujillo-De; Alvarez, Mario Moisés; Ribas, João; Jonas, Steven J.; Weiss, Paul S.; Andrews, Anne M.; Aizenberg, Joanna; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2017-04-01

    Developments in the field of microfluidics have triggered technological revolutions in many disciplines, including chemical synthesis, electronics, diagnostics, single-cell analysis, micro- and nanofabrication, and pharmaceutics. In many of these areas, rapid growth is driven by the increasing synergy between fundamental materials development and new microfluidic capabilities. In this Review, we critically evaluate both how recent advances in materials fabrication have expanded the frontiers of microfluidic platforms and how the improved microfluidic capabilities are, in turn, furthering materials design. We discuss how various inorganic and organic materials enable the fabrication of systems with advanced mechanical, optical, chemical, electrical and biointerfacial properties — in particular, when these materials are combined into new hybrids and modular configurations. The increasing sophistication of microfluidic techniques has also expanded the range of resources available for the fabrication of new materials, including particles and fibres with specific functionalities, 3D (bio)printed composites and organoids. Together, these advances lead to complex, multifunctional systems, which have many interesting potential applications, especially in the biomedical and bioengineering domains. Future exploration of the interactions between materials science and microfluidics will continue to enrich the diversity of applications across engineering as well as the physical and biomedical sciences.

  15. Parallel imaging microfluidic cytometer.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, Daniel J; McKenna, Brian K; Evans, James G; Belkina, Anna C; Denis, Gerald V; Sherr, David H; Cheung, Man Ching

    2011-01-01

    By adding an additional degree of freedom from multichannel flow, the parallel microfluidic cytometer (PMC) combines some of the best features of fluorescence-activated flow cytometry (FCM) and microscope-based high-content screening (HCS). The PMC (i) lends itself to fast processing of large numbers of samples, (ii) adds a 1D imaging capability for intracellular localization assays (HCS), (iii) has a high rare-cell sensitivity, and (iv) has an unusual capability for time-synchronized sampling. An inability to practically handle large sample numbers has restricted applications of conventional flow cytometers and microscopes in combinatorial cell assays, network biology, and drug discovery. The PMC promises to relieve a bottleneck in these previously constrained applications. The PMC may also be a powerful tool for finding rare primary cells in the clinic. The multichannel architecture of current PMC prototypes allows 384 unique samples for a cell-based screen to be read out in ∼6-10 min, about 30 times the speed of most current FCM systems. In 1D intracellular imaging, the PMC can obtain protein localization using HCS marker strategies at many times for the sample throughput of charge-coupled device (CCD)-based microscopes or CCD-based single-channel flow cytometers. The PMC also permits the signal integration time to be varied over a larger range than is practical in conventional flow cytometers. The signal-to-noise advantages are useful, for example, in counting rare positive cells in the most difficult early stages of genome-wide screening. We review the status of parallel microfluidic cytometry and discuss some of the directions the new technology may take.

  16. Digital Microfluidics Sample Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, Michael G.; Srinivasan, Vijay; Eckhardt, Allen; Paik, Philip Y.; Sudarsan, Arjun; Shenderov, Alex; Hua, Zhishan; Pamula, Vamsee K.

    2010-01-01

    Three innovations address the needs of the medical world with regard to microfluidic manipulation and testing of physiological samples in ways that can benefit point-of-care needs for patients such as premature infants, for which drawing of blood for continuous tests can be life-threatening in their own right, and for expedited results. A chip with sample injection elements, reservoirs (and waste), droplet formation structures, fluidic pathways, mixing areas, and optical detection sites, was fabricated to test the various components of the microfluidic platform, both individually and in integrated fashion. The droplet control system permits a user to control droplet microactuator system functions, such as droplet operations and detector operations. Also, the programming system allows a user to develop software routines for controlling droplet microactuator system functions, such as droplet operations and detector operations. A chip is incorporated into the system with a controller, a detector, input and output devices, and software. A novel filler fluid formulation is used for the transport of droplets with high protein concentrations. Novel assemblies for detection of photons from an on-chip droplet are present, as well as novel systems for conducting various assays, such as immunoassays and PCR (polymerase chain reaction). The lab-on-a-chip (a.k.a., lab-on-a-printed-circuit board) processes physiological samples and comprises a system for automated, multi-analyte measurements using sub-microliter samples of human serum. The invention also relates to a diagnostic chip and system including the chip that performs many of the routine operations of a central labbased chemistry analyzer, integrating, for example, colorimetric assays (e.g., for proteins), chemiluminescence/fluorescence assays (e.g., for enzymes, electrolytes, and gases), and/or conductometric assays (e.g., for hematocrit on plasma and whole blood) on a single chip platform.

  17. Digital Microfluidics for Immunoprecipitation.

    PubMed

    Seale, Brendon; Lam, Charis; Rackus, Darius G; Chamberlain, M Dean; Liu, Chang; Wheeler, Aaron R

    2016-10-04

    Immunoprecipitation (IP) is a common method for isolating a targeted protein from a complex sample such as blood, serum, or cell lysate. In particular, IP is often used as the primary means of target purification for the analysis by mass spectrometry of novel biologically derived pharmaceuticals, with particular utility for the identification of molecules bound to a protein target. Unfortunately, IP is a labor-intensive technique, is difficult to perform in parallel, and has limited options for automation. Furthermore, the technique is typically limited to large sample volumes, making the application of IP cleanup to precious samples nearly impossible. In recognition of these challenges, we introduce a method for performing microscale IP using magnetic particles and digital microfluidics (DMF-IP). The new method allows for 80% recovery of model proteins from approximately microliter volumes of serum in a sample-to-answer run time of approximately 25 min. Uniquely, analytes are eluted from these small samples in a format compatible with direct analysis by mass spectrometry. To extend the technique to be useful for large samples, we also developed a macro-to-microscale interface called preconcentration using liquid intake by paper (P-CLIP). This technique allows for efficient analysis of samples >100× larger than are typically processed on microfluidic devices. As described herein, DMF-IP and P-CLIP-DMF-IP are rapid, automated, and multiplexed methods that have the potential to reduce the time and effort required for IP sample preparations with applications in the fields of pharmacy, biomarker discovery, and protein biology.

  18. Epidemics in Interconnected Small-World Networks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Meng; Li, Daqing; Qin, Pengju; Liu, Chaoran; Wang, Huijuan; Wang, Feilong

    2015-01-01

    Networks can be used to describe the interconnections among individuals, which play an important role in the spread of disease. Although the small-world effect has been found to have a significant impact on epidemics in single networks, the small-world effect on epidemics in interconnected networks has rarely been considered. Here, we study the susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) model of epidemic spreading in a system comprising two interconnected small-world networks. We find that the epidemic threshold in such networks decreases when the rewiring probability of the component small-world networks increases. When the infection rate is low, the rewiring probability affects the global steady-state infection density, whereas when the infection rate is high, the infection density is insensitive to the rewiring probability. Moreover, epidemics in interconnected small-world networks are found to spread at different velocities that depend on the rewiring probability. PMID:25799143

  19. Recent Development of SOFC Metallic Interconnect

    SciTech Connect

    Wu JW, Liu XB

    2010-04-01

    Interest in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) stems from their higher e±ciencies and lower levels of emitted pollu- tants, compared to traditional power production methods. Interconnects are a critical part in SOFC stacks, which connect cells in series electrically, and also separate air or oxygen at the cathode side from fuel at the anode side. Therefore, the requirements of interconnects are the most demanding, i:e:, to maintain high elec- trical conductivity, good stability in both reducing and oxidizing atmospheres, and close coe±cient of thermal expansion (CTE) match and good compatibility with other SOFC ceramic components. The paper reviewed the interconnect materials, and coatings for metallic interconnect materials.

  20. INTERCONNECTIONS BETWEEN HUMAN HEALTH AND ECOLOGICAL INTEGRITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interconnections between Human Health and Ecological Integrity emanates from a June 2000 Pellston Workshop in Snowbird, Utah, USA. Jointly sponsored by the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC) and the Society of Toxicology (SOT), the workshop was motivated by...

  1. Implementation of optical interconnections for VLSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Wennie H.; Bergman, Larry A.; Johnston, Alan R.; Guest, Clark C.; Esener, Sadik C.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports on the progress in implementing optical interconnections for VLSI. Four areas are covered: (1) the holographic optical element (HOE), (2) the laser sources, (3) the detectors and associated circuits forming an optically addressed gate, and (4) interconnection experiments in which five gates are actuated from one source. A laser scanner system with a resolution of 12 x 20 microns has been utilized to generate the HOEs. Diffraction efficiency of the HOE and diffracted spot size have been measured. Stock lasers have been modified with a high-frequency package for interconnect experiments, and buried heterostructure fabrication techniques have been pursued. Measurements have been made on the fabricated photodetectors to determine dark current, responsivity, and response time. The optical gates and the overall chip have been driven successfully with an input light beam, as well as with the optical signal interconnected through the one to five holograms.

  2. INTERCONNECTIONS BETWEEN HUMAN HEALTH AND ECOLOGICAL INTEGRITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interconnections between Human Health and Ecological Integrity emanates from a June 2000 Pellston Workshop in Snowbird, Utah, USA. Jointly sponsored by the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC) and the Society of Toxicology (SOT), the workshop was motivated by...

  3. Computational continuum modeling of solder interconnects: Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Burchett, S.N.; Neilsen, M.K.; Frear, D.R.

    1997-04-01

    The most commonly used solder for electrical interconnections in electronic packages is the near eutectic 60Sn-40Fb alloy. This alloy has a number of processing advantages (suitable melting point of 183C and good wetting behavior). However, under conditions of cyclic strain and temperature (thermomechanical fatigue), the microstructure of this alloy undergoes a heterogeneous coarsening and failure process that makes the prediction of solder joint lifetime complex. A viscoplastic, microstructure dependent, constitutive model for solder, which is currently under development, was implemented into a finite element code. With this computational capability, the thermomechanical response of solder interconnects, including microstructural evolution, can be predicted. This capability was applied to predict the thermomechanical response of a mini ball grid array solder interconnect. In this paper, the constitutive model will first be briefly discussed. The results of computational studies to determine the thermomechanical response of a mini ball grid array solder interconnects then will be presented.

  4. Traffic congestion in interconnected complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Fei; Wu, Jiajing; Xia, Yongxiang; Tse, Chi K.

    2014-06-01

    Traffic congestion in isolated complex networks has been investigated extensively over the last decade. Coupled network models have recently been developed to facilitate further understanding of real complex systems. Analysis of traffic congestion in coupled complex networks, however, is still relatively unexplored. In this paper, we try to explore the effect of interconnections on traffic congestion in interconnected Barabási-Albert scale-free networks. We find that assortative coupling can alleviate traffic congestion more readily than disassortative and random coupling when the node processing capacity is allocated based on node usage probability. Furthermore, the optimal coupling probability can be found for assortative coupling. However, three types of coupling preferences achieve similar traffic performance if all nodes share the same processing capacity. We analyze interconnected Internet autonomous-system-level graphs of South Korea and Japan and obtain similar results. Some practical suggestions are presented to optimize such real-world interconnected networks accordingly.

  5. Traffic congestion in interconnected complex networks.

    PubMed

    Tan, Fei; Wu, Jiajing; Xia, Yongxiang; Tse, Chi K

    2014-06-01

    Traffic congestion in isolated complex networks has been investigated extensively over the last decade. Coupled network models have recently been developed to facilitate further understanding of real complex systems. Analysis of traffic congestion in coupled complex networks, however, is still relatively unexplored. In this paper, we try to explore the effect of interconnections on traffic congestion in interconnected Barabási-Albert scale-free networks. We find that assortative coupling can alleviate traffic congestion more readily than disassortative and random coupling when the node processing capacity is allocated based on node usage probability. Furthermore, the optimal coupling probability can be found for assortative coupling. However, three types of coupling preferences achieve similar traffic performance if all nodes share the same processing capacity. We analyze interconnected Internet autonomous-system-level graphs of South Korea and Japan and obtain similar results. Some practical suggestions are presented to optimize such real-world interconnected networks accordingly.

  6. Electrochemical planarization for multilevel metallization

    SciTech Connect

    Contolini, R.J.; Bernhardt, A.F.; Mayer, S.T. )

    1994-09-01

    The authors describe an electrochemical planarization technology involving electroplating followed by electropolishing, resulting in a very flat surface containing embedded conductors. Electrochemical planarization technology has been used to produce silicon substrate multichip modules. Both the electroplating and electropolishing processes have a thickness uniformity of better than [+-] 2% ([+-]3[sigma]) across a 100 mm wafer.

  7. Planar oscillatory stirring apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, M. F.

    1985-08-01

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus for stirring materials using planar orthogonal axes oscillations. The apparatus has a movable slide plate sandwiched between two fixed parallel support plates. Pressurized air is supplied to the movable slide plate which employs a tri-arm air bearing vent structure which allows the slide plate to float and to translate between the parallel support plates. The container having a material to be stirred is secured to the upper surface of the slide plate through an aperture in the upper support plate. A motor driven eccentric shaft loosely extends into a center hole bearing of the slide plate to cause the horizontal oscillations. Novelty lies in the combination of elements which exploits the discovery that low frequency, orthogonal oscillations applied horizontally to a Bridgman crucible provides a very rigorous stirring action, comparable with and more effective by an order of magnitude than the accelerated crucible rotation technique.

  8. Planar elliptic growth

    SciTech Connect

    Mineev, Mark

    2008-01-01

    The planar elliptic extension of the Laplacian growth is, after a proper parametrization, given in a form of a solution to the equation for areapreserving diffeomorphisms. The infinite set of conservation laws associated with such elliptic growth is interpreted in terms of potential theory, and the relations between two major forms of the elliptic growth are analyzed. The constants of integration for closed form solutions are identified as the singularities of the Schwarz function, which are located both inside and outside the moving contour. Well-posedness of the recovery of the elliptic operator governing the process from the continuum of interfaces parametrized by time is addressed and two examples of exact solutions of elliptic growth are presented.

  9. Silicon Hybrid Wafer Scale Integration Interconnect Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    the assessment of the current state -of-the-art in electromagnetic analyses to determine its applicability to NVSI interconnections. Weak links or... states that transmission line effects are clearly exhibited when the physical length of any component of an electrical system (include interconnections...assumedl for coniduc- tois and dielectrics. Furthermore, all geometric distances arc assuimedl to bie uniform. unless otherwise stated . This assertion

  10. Navigability of interconnected networks under random failures

    PubMed Central

    De Domenico, Manlio; Solé-Ribalta, Albert; Gómez, Sergio; Arenas, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Assessing the navigability of interconnected networks (transporting information, people, or goods) under eventual random failures is of utmost importance to design and protect critical infrastructures. Random walks are a good proxy to determine this navigability, specifically the coverage time of random walks, which is a measure of the dynamical functionality of the network. Here, we introduce the theoretical tools required to describe random walks in interconnected networks accounting for structure and dynamics inherent to real systems. We develop an analytical approach for the covering time of random walks in interconnected networks and compare it with extensive Monte Carlo simulations. Generally speaking, interconnected networks are more resilient to random failures than their individual layers per se, and we are able to quantify this effect. As an application––which we illustrate by considering the public transport of London––we show how the efficiency in exploring the multiplex critically depends on layers’ topology, interconnection strengths, and walk strategy. Our findings are corroborated by data-driven simulations, where the empirical distribution of check-ins and checks-out is considered and passengers travel along fastest paths in a network affected by real disruptions. These findings are fundamental for further development of searching and navigability strategies in real interconnected systems. PMID:24912174

  11. Navigability of interconnected networks under random failures.

    PubMed

    De Domenico, Manlio; Solé-Ribalta, Albert; Gómez, Sergio; Arenas, Alex

    2014-06-10

    Assessing the navigability of interconnected networks (transporting information, people, or goods) under eventual random failures is of utmost importance to design and protect critical infrastructures. Random walks are a good proxy to determine this navigability, specifically the coverage time of random walks, which is a measure of the dynamical functionality of the network. Here, we introduce the theoretical tools required to describe random walks in interconnected networks accounting for structure and dynamics inherent to real systems. We develop an analytical approach for the covering time of random walks in interconnected networks and compare it with extensive Monte Carlo simulations. Generally speaking, interconnected networks are more resilient to random failures than their individual layers per se, and we are able to quantify this effect. As an application--which we illustrate by considering the public transport of London--we show how the efficiency in exploring the multiplex critically depends on layers' topology, interconnection strengths, and walk strategy. Our findings are corroborated by data-driven simulations, where the empirical distribution of check-ins and checks-out is considered and passengers travel along fastest paths in a network affected by real disruptions. These findings are fundamental for further development of searching and navigability strategies in real interconnected systems.

  12. Scalable IP switching based on optical interconnect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zhixiang; Cao, Mingcui; Liu, Erwu

    2000-10-01

    IP traffic on the Internet and enterprise networks has been growing exponentially in the last several years, and much attention is being focused on the use of IP multicast for real-time multimedia applications. The current soft and general-purpose CPU-based routers face great stress since they have great latency and low forwarding speeds. Based on the ASICs, layer 2 switching provides high-speed packet forwarding. Integrating high-speed of Layer 2 switching with the flexibility of Layer 3 routing, Layer 3 switching (IP switching) has been put forward in order to avoid the performance bottleneck associated with Layer 3 forwarding. In this paper, we present a prototype system of a scalable IP switching based on scalable ATM switching fabric and optical interconnect. The IP switching system mainly consists of the input/output interface unit, scalable ATM switching fabric and IP control component. Optical interconnects between the input fan-out stage and the interconnect stage, also the interconnect stage and the output concentration stage provide high-speed data paths. And the interconnect stage is composed of 16 X 16 CMOS-SEED ATM switching modules. With 64 ports of OC-12 interface, the maximum throughput of the prototype system is about 20 million packets per second (MPPS) for 256 bytes average packet length, and the packet loss ratio is less than 10e-9. Benefiting from the scalable architecture and the optical interconnect, this IP switching system can easily scale to very large network size.

  13. Light-Weight, Low Cost, High-Efficiency Solar Cells Space Planar Arrays.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-01-01

    PL-TR-96-1007 PL-TR- 96- 1007 LIGHT-WEIGHT, LOW COST, HIGH-EFFICIENCY SOLAR CELLS FOR SPACE PLANAR ARRAYS Michael L. Timmons Research Triangle...Cost, High-Efficiency Solar Cells F33615-91-C-2155 for Space Planar Arrays 5b. Program Element # 62601F 6. Author(s) 5c. Project # 2864 Michael L...GalnAsP cell is markedly better. 48 Figure 5.1. Schematic cross-section of mechanically stacked tandem solar cell . S is the spacing of the interconnect grid

  14. Mechanical characterization of oxide coating-interconnect interfaces for solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akanda, Sajedur R.; Walter, Mark E.; Kidner, Neil J.; Seabaugh, Matthew M.

    2012-07-01

    This paper reports on the characterization of interfaces between oxide coatings and metallic interconnects that are used in planar solid oxide fuel cells. With the reduction of operating temperatures to 800 °C, it is possible to replace ceramic interconnects with less expensive stainless steels. However, when incorporating chromia-forming metallic interconnects, steps must be taken to inhibit chromium poisoning. One approach to prevent chromium poisoning, is to deposit dense, protective coatings, such as manganese cobalt spinel oxide (MCO). The brittle nature of MCO makes it susceptible to damage under mechanical and thermal stresses during operation. A four point bend experiment is designed to assess the strength and adhesion of reduced and oxidized coatings deposited on SS441 or Crofer interconnects. Resulting tensile cracking patterns on the convex side of bend specimen are used to quantify the interfacial shear strength with a shear lag model. Using energy based fracture mechanics, interfacial fracture energy is calculated from the strain at the onset of coating spallation. Scanning electron microscopy images of the cracked coating surfaces are processed to analyze the failure mechanisms, crack spacing and spalled areas. At 3% strain, the weakest interface is found in the Crofer system with the oxidized coating.

  15. SEMICONDUCTOR TECHNOLOGY Development of spin-on-glass process for triple metal interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Wenbin, Zhao; Guozhang, Wang; Zongguang, Yu

    2010-12-01

    Spin-on-glass (SOG), an interlayer dielectric material applied in liquid form to fill narrow gaps in the sub-dielectric surface and thus conducive to planarization, is an alternative to silicon dioxide (SiO2) deposited using PECVD processes. However, its inability to adhere to metal and problems such as cracking prevent the easy application of SOG technology to provide an interlayer dielectric in multilevel metal interconnect circuits, particularly in university processing labs. This paper will show that a thin layer of CVD SiO2 and a curing temperature below the sintering temperature of the metal interconnect layer will promote adhesion, reduce gaps, and prevent cracking. Electron scanning microscope analysis has been used to demonstrate the success of the improved technique. This optimized process has been used in batches of double-poly, triple-metal CMOS wafer fabrication to date.

  16. Microfluidic assembly of multiscale soft materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Lian; Guenther, Axel

    2010-11-01

    The vast majority of materials found in nature are characterized by length scales that span several orders of magnitude. Material properties such as porosity, permeability and elasticity are therefore locally and directionally tuned to their (biological) function and adapted to local environmental conditions. We use a massively scaled microfluidic approach to synthetically define multiscale complex fluids and soft materials with precisely tunable, non-isentropic bulk properties. Two or more fluids are separately introduced to the device that consists of fifteen vertically bonded and fluidically connected substrate layers, and guided to an exit section that either consists of 23 equidistantly spaced channels or a 23 x 15 channel array. The flow rates through individual channels are computer-controlled. Upon entering a reservoir in a flow-focusing configuration, a spatially organized fluid with characteristic length scales of 250 microns and 10 mm was defined, and retained via a chemical reaction. To illustrate different soft material morphologies in one, two or three directions, we demonstrate the formation of isolated fibers (1D); planar graded and barcoded materials (2D); graded bulk materials and perfusable matrices (3D).

  17. 3D Anastomosed Microvascular Network Model with Living Capillary Networks and Endothelial Cell-Lined Microfluidic Channels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolin; Phan, Duc T T; George, Steven C; Hughes, Christopher C W; Lee, Abraham P

    2017-01-01

    This protocol describes detailed practical procedures for generating 3D intact and perfusable microvascular network that connects to microfluidic channels without appreciable leakage. This advanced 3D microvascular network model incorporates different stages of vascular development including vasculogenesis, endothelial cell (EC) lining, sprouting angiogenesis, and anastomosis in sequential order. The capillary network is first induced via vasculogenesis in a middle tissue chamber and then EC linings along the microfluidic channel on either side serve as artery and vein. The anastomosis is then induced by sprouting angiogenesis to facilitate tight interconnection between the artery/vein and the capillary network. This versatile device design and its robust construction methodology establish a physiological microcirculation transport model of interconnected perfused vessels from artery to vascularized tissue to vein.

  18. Identification of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus using an integrated and modular microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Wen; Wang, Hong; Hupert, Mateusz; Soper, Steven A

    2013-02-21

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major cause of hospital-acquired (HA-MRSA) infection worldwide. As a result, the rapid and specific detection of MRSA is crucial not only for early prevention of disease spread, but also for the effective treatment of these infections. We report here an integrated modular-based microfluidic system for MRSA identification, which can carry out the multi-step assay used for MRSA identification in a single disposable fluidic cartridge. The multi-step assay included PCR amplification of the mecA gene harboring methicillin resistance loci that can provide information on drug susceptibility, ligase detection reaction (LDR) to generate fluorescent ligation products appended with a zip-code complement that directs the ligation product to a particular address on a universal array containing zip-code probes and a universal DNA array, which consisted of a planar waveguide for evanescent excitation. The fluidic cartridge design was based on a modular format, in which certain steps of the molecular processing pipeline were poised on a module made from a thermoplastic. The cartridge was comprised of a module interconnected to a fluidic motherboard configured in a 3-dimensional network; the motherboard was made from polycarbonate, PC, and was used for PCR and LDR, while the module was made from poly(methylmethacrylate), PMMA, and contained an air-embedded waveguide serving as the support for the universal array. Fluid handling, thermal management and optical readout hardware were situated off-chip and configured into a small footprint instrument. In this work, the cartridge was used to carry out a multiplexed PCR/LDR coupled with the universal array allowed for simultaneous detection of five genes that encode for 16S ribosomal RNA (SG16S), protein A (spa), the femA protein of S. epidermidis (femA), the virulence factor of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) and the gene that confers methicillin resistance (mecA). Results

  19. Novel Vertical Interconnects With 180 Degree Phase Shift for Amplifiers, Filters, and Integrated Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goverdhanam, Kavita; Simons, Rainee N.; Katehi, Linda P. B.; Burke, Thomas P. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, novel low loss, wide-band coplanar stripline technology for RF/microwave integrated circuits is demonstrated on high resistivity silicon wafer. In particular, the fabrication process for the deposition of spin-on-glass (SOG) as a dielectric layer, the etching of microvias for the vertical interconnects, the design methodology for the multiport circuits and their measured/simulated characteristics are graphically illustrated. The study shows that circuits with very low loss, large bandwidth and compact size are feasible using this technology. This multilayer planar technology has potential to significantly enhance RF/microwave IC performance when combined with semiconductor devices and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS).

  20. Recent Progress of Microfluidics in Translational Applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zongbin; Han, Xin; Qin, Lidong

    2016-04-20

    Microfluidics, featuring microfabricated structures, is a technology for manipulating fluids at the micrometer scale. The small dimension and flexibility of microfluidic systems are ideal for mimicking molecular and cellular microenvironment, and show great potential in translational research and development. Here, the recent progress of microfluidics in biological and biomedical applications, including molecular analysis, cellular analysis, and chip-based material delivery and biomimetic design is presented. The potential future developments in the translational microfluidics field are also discussed.

  1. Recent Progress of Microfluidics in Translational Applications

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zongbin; Han, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidics, featuring microfabricated structures, is a technology for manipulating fluids at the micrometer scale. The small dimension and flexibility of microfluidic systems are ideal for mimicking molecular and cellular microenvironment, and show great potential in translational research and development. Here, the recent progress of microfluidics in biological and biomedical applications, including molecular analysis, cellular analysis, and chip-based material delivery and biomimetic design is presented. The potential future developments in the translational microfluidics field are also discussed. PMID:27091777

  2. Cut set-based risk and reliability analysis for arbitrarily interconnected networks

    DOEpatents

    Wyss, Gregory D.

    2000-01-01

    Method for computing all-terminal reliability for arbitrarily interconnected networks such as the United States public switched telephone network. The method includes an efficient search algorithm to generate minimal cut sets for nonhierarchical networks directly from the network connectivity diagram. Efficiency of the search algorithm stems in part from its basis on only link failures. The method also includes a novel quantification scheme that likewise reduces computational effort associated with assessing network reliability based on traditional risk importance measures. Vast reductions in computational effort are realized since combinatorial expansion and subsequent Boolean reduction steps are eliminated through analysis of network segmentations using a technique of assuming node failures to occur on only one side of a break in the network, and repeating the technique for all minimal cut sets generated with the search algorithm. The method functions equally well for planar and non-planar networks.

  3. Multiple atomic scale solid surface interconnects for atom circuits and molecule logic gates.

    PubMed

    Joachim, C; Martrou, D; Rezeq, M; Troadec, C; Jie, Deng; Chandrasekhar, N; Gauthier, S

    2010-03-05

    The scientific and technical challenges involved in building the planar electrical connection of an atomic scale circuit to N electrodes (N > 2) are discussed. The practical, laboratory scale approach explored today to assemble a multi-access atomic scale precision interconnection machine is presented. Depending on the surface electronic properties of the targeted substrates, two types of machines are considered: on moderate surface band gap materials, scanning tunneling microscopy can be combined with scanning electron microscopy to provide an efficient navigation system, while on wide surface band gap materials, atomic force microscopy can be used in conjunction with optical microscopy. The size of the planar part of the circuit should be minimized on moderate band gap surfaces to avoid current leakage, while this requirement does not apply to wide band gap surfaces. These constraints impose different methods of connection, which are thoroughly discussed, in particular regarding the recent progress in single atom and molecule manipulations on a surface.

  4. Holographic Elements and Polymer Waveguides for Optical Interconnection and Wavelength Division Demultiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Michael Renxun

    Photo-lime gelatin polymer films and multiplexed holographic gratings are used to demonstrate large channel density fanout and wavelength division multiplexing/demultiplexing (WDM) optical interconnect devices in waveguide and substrate geometries. The polymer films described herein can be fabricated on a variety of substrate surfaces, including semiconductors, conductors, insulators, and ceramics, regardless of the substrate refractive index and loss tangent. By incorporating a local sensitization technique, locally defined multiplexed holograms are recorded in thick and thin polymer films to facilitate multiple beam diffraction and optical interconnection in both three-dimensional (3 -D) substrate and two-dimensional (2-D) planar waveguide geometries. The study of device structure and holographic grating parameters, and their effect on the design and performance of multiplexed holographic interconnect devices, is described. A simplified theoretical formulation for the 3 -D Bragg diffraction by singly exposed, slanted, holographic phase gratings is presented, based on Kogelnik's original theory for grating diffraction. Through an appropriate choice of the Bragg diffraction plane, the vector coupling problem is reduced to a scalar formulation that facilitates device design. The results are shown to compare favorably with experimentally measured quantities under different polarization conditions and incident angle orientations. 3 -D Bragg diffraction by multiplexed planar holographic gratings is then used, in conjunction with substrate wave propagation, to demonstrate a new 1-to-30 fanout substrate optical interconnect device having a single channel diffraction efficiency of ~3% and an overall efficiency of nearly 87%. A similar formulation is applied to the study of 2-D Bragg diffraction by multiplexed holographic gratings in a planar thin film polymer waveguide geometry that incorporates a graded refractive index profile. New high efficiency 4- and 5-channel

  5. Interconnect mechanisms in microelectronic packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roma, Maria Penafrancia C.

    alloy showed differences in adhesion strength and IMC formation. Bond strength by wire pull testing showed the 95Ag alloy with higher values while shear bond testing showed the 88Ag higher bond strength. Use of Cu pillars in flip chips and eutectic bonding in wafer level chip scale packages are direct consequences of diminishing interconnect dimension as a result of the drive for miniaturization. The combination of Cu-Sn interdiffusion, Kirkendall mechanism and heterogeneous vacancy precipitation are the main causes of IMC and void formation in Cu pillar - Sn solder - Cu lead frame sandwich structure. However, adding a Ni barrier agent showed less porous IMC layer as well as void formation as a result of the modified Cu and Sn movement well as the void formation. Direct die to die bonding using Al-Ge eutectic bonds is necessary when 3D integration is needed to reduce the footprint of a package. Hermeticity and adhesion strength are a function of the Al/Ge thickness ratio, bonding pressure, temperature and time. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Focused Ion Beam (FIB) allowed imaging of interfacial microstructures, porosity, grain morphology while Scanning Transmission Electron microscope (STEM) provided diffusion profile and confirmed interdiffusion. Ion polishing technique provided information on porosity and when imaged using backscattered mode, grain structure confirmed mechanical deformation of the bonds. Measurements of the interfacial bond strength are made by wire pull tests and ball shear tests based on existing industry standard tests. However, for the Al-Ge eutectic bonds, no standard strength is available so a test is developed using the stud pull test method using the Dage 4000 Plus to yield consistent results. Adhesion strengths of 30-40 MPa are found for eutectic bonded packages however, as low as 20MPa was measured in low temperature bonded areas.

  6. Development of cofired type planar SOFC

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, Hiroaki; Sakamoto, Sadaaki; Zhou, Hua-Bing

    1996-12-31

    We have developed fabrication process for planar SOFC fabricated with cofired anode/electrolyte/cathode multilayers and interconnects. By cofiring technique for the multilayers, we expect to reduce the thickness of the electrolyte layers, resulting in decrease of innerimpedance, and achieve low production cost. On the other hand, the cofiring technique requires that the sintering temperature, the shrinkage profiles and the thermal expansion characteristics of all component materials should be compatible with the other. It is, therefore, difficult to cofire the multilayers with large area. Using the multilayers with surface area of 150cm{sup 2}, we fabricated the multiple cell stacks. The maximum power of 5x4 multiple cell stack (5 planes of cells in series, 4 cells in parallel in each planes 484cm{sup 2} effective electrode area of each cell planes) was 601W (0.25Wcm{sup -2}, Uf=40%). However, the terminal voltage of the multiple cell stack decreased by the cause of cell cracking, gas leakage and degradation of cofired multilayers. This paper presents the improvements of cofired multilayers, and the performance of multiple cell stacks with the improved multilayers.

  7. Whole-Cell Electrical Activity Under Direct Mechanical Stimulus by AFM Cantilever Using Planar Patch Clamp Chip Approach

    PubMed Central

    Upadhye, Kalpesh V.; Candiello, Joseph E.; Davidson, Lance A.; Lin, Hai

    2011-01-01

    Patch clamp is a powerful tool for studying the properties of ion-channels and cellular membrane. In recent years, planar patch clamp chips have been fabricated from various materials including glass, quartz, silicon, silicon nitride, polydimethyl-siloxane (PDMS), and silicon dioxide. Planar patch clamps have made automation of patch clamp recordings possible. However, most planar patch clamp chips have limitations when used in combination with other techniques. Furthermore, the fabrication methods used are often expensive and require specialized equipments. An improved design as well as fabrication and characterization of a silicon-based planar patch clamp chip are described in this report. Fabrication involves true batch fabrication processes that can be performed in most common microfabrication facilities using well established MEMS techniques. Our planar patch clamp chips can form giga-ohm seals with the cell plasma membrane with success rate comparable to existing patch clamp techniques. The chip permits whole-cell voltage clamp recordings on variety of cell types including Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells and pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells, for times longer than most available patch clamp chips. When combined with a custom microfluidics chamber, we demonstrate that it is possible to perfuse the extra-cellular as well as intra-cellular buffers. The chamber design allows integration of planar patch clamp with atomic force microscope (AFM). Using our planar patch clamp chip and microfluidics chamber, we have recorded whole-cell mechanosensitive (MS) currents produced by directly stimulating human keratinocyte (HaCaT) cells using an AFM cantilever. Our results reveal the spatial distribution of MS ion channels and temporal details of the responses from MS channels. The results show that planar patch clamp chips have great potential for multi-parametric high throughput studies of ion channel proteins. PMID:22174731

  8. Non-planar chemical preconcentrator

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Adkins, Douglas R.; Sokolowski, Sara S.; Lewis, Patrick R.

    2006-10-10

    A non-planar chemical preconcentrator comprises a high-surface area, low mass, three-dimensional, flow-through sorption support structure that can be coated or packed with a sorptive material. The sorptive material can collect and concentrate a chemical analyte from a fluid stream and rapidly release it as a very narrow temporal plug for improved separations in a microanalytical system. The non-planar chemical preconcentrator retains most of the thermal and fabrication benefits of a planar preconcentrator, but has improved ruggedness and uptake, while reducing sorptive coating concerns and extending the range of collectible analytes.

  9. Electrochemical planarization for microelectronic circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Contolini, R.J.; Mayer, S.T.; Bernhardt, A.F.

    1993-03-25

    The need for flatter and smoother surfaces (planarization) in microelectronic circuits increases as the number of metal levels in ultra large scale integrated (ULSI) circuits increases. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the authors have developed an electrochemical planarization process that fills vias and trenches with metal (without voids) and subsequently planarizes the surface. Use is made of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) of SiO{sub 2} for the dielectric layers and electroplated copper for the metalization. This report describes the advantages of this process over existing techniques, possibilities for collaboration, and previous technology transfer.

  10. Contact planarization of ensemble nanowires.

    PubMed

    Chia, A C E; LaPierre, R R

    2011-06-17

    The viability of four organic polymers (S1808, SC200, SU8 and Cyclotene) as filling materials to achieve planarization of ensemble nanowire arrays is reported. Analysis of the porosity, surface roughness and thermal stability of each filling material was performed. Sonication was used as an effective method to remove the tops of the nanowires (NWs) to achieve complete planarization. Ensemble nanowire devices were fully fabricated and I-V measurements confirmed that Cyclotene effectively planarizes the NWs while still serving the role as an insulating layer between the top and bottom contacts. These processes and analysis can be easily implemented into future characterization and fabrication of ensemble NWs for optoelectronic device applications.

  11. Electrochemical planarization for microelectronic circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Contolini, R.J.; Mayer, S.T.; Bernhardt, A.F.

    1993-03-25

    The need for flatter and smoother surfaces (planarization) in microelectronic circuits increases as the number of metal levels in ultra large scale integrated (ULSI) circuits increases. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the authors have developed an electrochemical planarization process that fills vias and trenches with metal (without voids) and subsequently planarizes the surface. Use is made of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) of SiO[sub 2] for the dielectric layers and electroplated copper for the metalization. This report describes the advantages of this process over existing techniques, possibilities for collaboration, and previous technology transfer.

  12. Machine vision for digital microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yong-Jun; Lee, Jeong-Bong

    2010-01-01

    Machine vision is widely used in an industrial environment today. It can perform various tasks, such as inspecting and controlling production processes, that may require humanlike intelligence. The importance of imaging technology for biological research or medical diagnosis is greater than ever. For example, fluorescent reporter imaging enables scientists to study the dynamics of gene networks with high spatial and temporal resolution. Such high-throughput imaging is increasingly demanding the use of machine vision for real-time analysis and control. Digital microfluidics is a relatively new technology with expectations of becoming a true lab-on-a-chip platform. Utilizing digital microfluidics, only small amounts of biological samples are required and the experimental procedures can be automatically controlled. There is a strong need for the development of a digital microfluidics system integrated with machine vision for innovative biological research today. In this paper, we show how machine vision can be applied to digital microfluidics by demonstrating two applications: machine vision-based measurement of the kinetics of biomolecular interactions and machine vision-based droplet motion control. It is expected that digital microfluidics-based machine vision system will add intelligence and automation to high-throughput biological imaging in the future.

  13. Machine vision for digital microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Yong-Jun; Lee, Jeong-Bong

    2010-01-01

    Machine vision is widely used in an industrial environment today. It can perform various tasks, such as inspecting and controlling production processes, that may require humanlike intelligence. The importance of imaging technology for biological research or medical diagnosis is greater than ever. For example, fluorescent reporter imaging enables scientists to study the dynamics of gene networks with high spatial and temporal resolution. Such high-throughput imaging is increasingly demanding the use of machine vision for real-time analysis and control. Digital microfluidics is a relatively new technology with expectations of becoming a true lab-on-a-chip platform. Utilizing digital microfluidics, only small amounts of biological samples are required and the experimental procedures can be automatically controlled. There is a strong need for the development of a digital microfluidics system integrated with machine vision for innovative biological research today. In this paper, we show how machine vision can be applied to digital microfluidics by demonstrating two applications: machine vision-based measurement of the kinetics of biomolecular interactions and machine vision-based droplet motion control. It is expected that digital microfluidics-based machine vision system will add intelligence and automation to high-throughput biological imaging in the future.

  14. Committed regional electrical interconnection projects in the Middle East

    SciTech Connect

    Azzam, M.; Al-Said, A.

    1994-12-01

    Due to the well-known advantages of electrical interconnections and their consequent benefits, Jordan considers the interconnection of its electrical network with the neighboring electrical networks as one of its main corporate strategies. At present the electrical interconnection project of the networks of Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Syria, and Turkey is progressing. To achieve this interconnection project, two feasibility studies were conducted: interconnection of the Egyptian and Jordanian electrical power systems; interconnection of the electrical networks of Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Syria, and Turkey (EIJST interconnection). This presentation reviews these studies and their results.

  15. Single channel layer, single sheath-flow inlet microfluidic flow cytometer with three-dimensional hydrodynamic focusing.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shiang-Chi; Yen, Pei-Wen; Peng, Chien-Chung; Tung, Yi-Chung

    2012-09-07

    Flow cytometry is a technique capable of optically characterizing biological particles in a high-throughput manner. In flow cytometry, three dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic focusing is critical for accurate and consistent measurements. Due to the advantages of microfluidic techniques, a number of microfluidic flow cytometers with 3D hydrodynamic focusing have been developed in recent decades. However, the existing devices consist of multiple layers of microfluidic channels and tedious fluidic interconnections. As a result, these devices often require complicated fabrication and professional operation. Consequently, the development of a robust and reliable microfluidic flow cytometer for practical biological applications is desired. This paper develops a microfluidic device with a single channel layer and single sheath-flow inlet capable of achieving 3D hydrodynamic focusing for flow cytometry. The sheath-flow stream is introduced perpendicular to the microfluidic channel to encircle the sample flow. In this paper, the flow fields are simulated using a computational fluidic dynamic (CFD) software, and the results show that the 3D hydrodynamic focusing can be successfully formed in the designed microfluidic device under proper flow conditions. The developed device is further characterized experimentally. First, confocal microscopy is exploited to investigate the flow fields. The resultant Z-stack confocal images show the cross-sectional view of 3D hydrodynamic with flow conditions that agree with the simulated ones. Furthermore, the flow cytometric detections of fluorescence beads are performed using the developed device with various flow rate combinations. The measurement results demonstrate that the device can achieve great detection performances, which are comparable to the conventional flow cytometer. In addition, the enumeration of fluorescence-labelled cells is also performed to show its practicality for biological applications. Consequently, the microfluidic

  16. Planar bilayer lipid memebranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tien, H. Ti

    The planar bilayer lipid membrane, also known as lipid bilayer membrane, black lipid membrane or simply BLM(s), for short, has been investigated since its inception in 1960, the details of which have been described in a monograph published in 1974. This review is a report on the advances in the BLM research since that time. After a brief introduction, the first five sections consider various aspects of experimental methods, optical properties, thermodynamics of lipid bilayers, permeability, and electrical properties of BLMs. Section 7 deals with the use of BLM as energy transducer, particularly the transduction of light into electrical energy. Section 8, the longest portion of the paper, is devoted to modelling of biomembranes, such as the plasma membrane of cells, the thylakoid membrane of chloroplasts, the cristae membrane of mitochondria, the visual receptor membrane of the eye, and the nerve membrane. The concluding section points out that studies of BLMs facilitate the initial testing of working hypothses and may lead to a better choice of appropriate in vivo and reconstituted membrane experiments.

  17. Microfluidic photonic integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sung Hwan; Godin, Jessica; Chen, Chun Hao; Tsai, Frank S.; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2008-11-01

    We report on the development of an inexpensive, portable lab-on-a-chip flow cytometer system in which microfluidics, photonics, and acoustics are integrated together to work synergistically. The system relies on fluid-filled twodimensional on-chip photonic components such as lenses, apertures, and slab waveguides to allow for illumination laser beam shaping, light scattering and fluorescence signal detection. Both scattered and fluorescent lights are detected by photodetectors after being collected and guided by the on-chip optics components (e.g. lenses and waveguides). The detected light signal is imported and amplified in real time and triggers the piezoelectric actuator so that the targeted samples are directed into desired reservoir for subsequent advanced analysis. The real-time, closed-loop control system is developed with field-programmable-gate-array (FPGA) implementation. The system enables high-throughput (1- 10kHz operation), high reliability and low-powered (<1mW) fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) on a chip. The microfabricated flow cytometer can potentially be used as a portable, inexpensive point-of-care device in resource poor environments.

  18. Mixing in Microfluidic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beskok, A.

    Flow and species transport in micro-scales experience laminar, even Stokes flow conditions. In absence of turbulence, species mixing becomes diffusion dominated, and requires very long mixing length scales (l m ). This creates significant challenges in the design of Lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices, where mixing of macromolecules and biological species with very low mass diffusivities are often desired. The objectives of this chapter are to introduce concepts relevant to mixing enhancement in microfluidic systems, and guide readers in the design of new mixers via numerical simulations. A distinguishing feature is the identification of flow kinematics that enhance mixing, followed with systematic characterization of mixing as a function of the Schmidt number at fixed kinematic conditions. In this chapter, we briefly review the routes to achieve chaotic advection in Stokes flow, and then illustrate the characteri-zation of a continuous flow chaotic stirrer via appropriate numerical tools, including the Poincaré section, finite time Lyapunov exponent, and mixing index.

  19. Vibration Induced Microfluidic Atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Leslie; Qi, Aisha; Friend, James

    2008-11-01

    We demonstrate rapid generation of micron aerosol droplets in a microfluidic device in which a fluid drop is exposed to surface vibration as it sits atop a piezoelectric substrate. Little, however, is understood about the processes by which these droplets form due to the complex hydrodynamic processes that occur across widely varying length and time scales. Through experiments, scaling theory and numerical modelling, we elucidate the interfacial destabilization mechanisms that lead to droplet formation. Droplets form due to the axisymmetric break-up of cylindrical liquid jets ejected as a consequence of interfacial destabilization. Their 10 μm size correlates with the jet radius and the instability wavelength, both determined from a viscous-capillary dominant force balance and confirmed through a numerical solution. With the exception of drops that spread into thin films with thicknesses on the order of the boundary layer dimension, the free surface is always observed to vibrate at the capillary-viscous resonance frequency despite the surface vibration frequency being several orders larger. This is contrary to common assumptions used in deriving subharmonic models resulting in a Mathieu equation, which has commonly led to spurious predictions in the droplet size.

  20. Microfluidic Compartmentalized Directed Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Paegel, Brian M.; Joyce, Gerald F.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Directed evolution studies often make use of water-in-oil compartments, which conventionally are prepared by bulk emulsification, a crude process that generates non-uniform droplets and can damage biochemical reagents. A microfluidic emulsification circuit was devised that generates uniform water-in-oil droplets (21.9 ± 0.8 μm radius) with high throughput (107–108 droplets per hour). The circuit contains a radial array of aqueous flow nozzles that intersect a surrounding oil flow channel. This device was used to evolve RNA enzymes with RNA ligase activity, selecting enzymes that could resist inhibition by neomycin. Each molecule in the population had the opportunity to undergo 108-fold selective amplification within its respective compartment. Then the progeny RNAs were harvested and used to seed new compartments. During five rounds of this procedure, the enzymes acquired mutations that conferred resistance to neomycin and caused some enzymes to become dependent on neomycin for optimal activity. PMID:20659684

  1. Microfluidic stretchable RF electronics.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shi; Wu, Zhigang

    2010-12-07

    Stretchable electronics is a revolutionary technology that will potentially create a world of radically different electronic devices and systems that open up an entirely new spectrum of possibilities. This article proposes a microfluidic based solution for stretchable radio frequency (RF) electronics, using hybrid integration of active circuits assembled on flex foils and liquid alloy passive structures embedded in elastic substrates, e.g. polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). This concept was employed to implement a 900 MHz stretchable RF radiation sensor, consisting of a large area elastic antenna and a cluster of conventional rigid components for RF power detection. The integrated radiation sensor except the power supply was fully embedded in a thin elastomeric substrate. Good electrical performance of the standalone stretchable antenna as well as the RF power detection sub-module was verified by experiments. The sensor successfully detected the RF radiation over 5 m distance in the system demonstration. Experiments on two-dimensional (2D) stretching up to 15%, folding and twisting of the demonstrated sensor were also carried out. Despite the integrated device was severely deformed, no failure in RF radiation sensing was observed in the tests. This technique illuminates a promising route of realizing stretchable and foldable large area integrated RF electronics that are of great interest to a variety of applications like wearable computing, health monitoring, medical diagnostics, and curvilinear electronics.

  2. Microfluidic reflow pumps.

    PubMed

    Haslam, Bryan; Tsai, Long-Fang; Anderson, Ryan R; Kim, Seunghyun; Hu, Weisheng; Nordin, Gregory P

    2015-07-01

    A new microfluidic pump, termed a reflow pump, is designed to operate with a sub-μl sample volume and transport it back and forth between two pneumatically actuated reservoirs through a flow channel typically containing one or more sensor surfaces. The ultimate motivation is to efficiently use the small sample volume in conjunction with convection to maximize analyte flux to the sensor surface(s) in order to minimize sensor response time. In this paper, we focus on the operational properties of the pumps themselves (rather than the sensor surfaces), and demonstrate both two-layer and three-layer polydimethylsiloxane reflow pumps. For the three-layer pump, we examine the effects of reservoir actuation pressure and actuation period, and demonstrate average volumetric flow rates as high as 500 μl/min. We also show that the two-layer design can pump up to 93% of the sample volume during each half period and demonstrate integration of a reflow pump with a single-chip microcantilever array to measure maximum flow rate.

  3. Planarized nanophotonic sensor for real-time fluid sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yazhao; Salemink, H. W. M.

    2017-09-01

    A planarized on-chip nanophotonic sensor based on a photonic crystal cavity is realized in this work. The sensor was embedded in a solid protecting material (flowable oxide) with perfect filled holes: this eliminates problems of fouling in practical applications. The functional area of the sensor is created by carefully removing the protecting material only on the top surface of the cavity. A wavelength shift of 7.5 nm was observed in experiment which is very close to a simulation result of 9.0 nm for sensing water (n=1.33) and crude oil (n=1.45) samples. Swift and accurate sensing was verified by a real-time dynamic measurement with rapidly alternating analytes in a microfluid channel.

  4. Real-time label-free biosensing with integrated planar waveguide ring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohlström, Hans; Gylfason, Kristinn B.; Hill, Daniel

    2010-05-01

    We review the use of planar integrated optical waveguide ring resonators for label free bio-sensing and present recent results from two European biosensor collaborations: SABIO and InTopSens. Planar waveguide ring resonators are attractive for label-free biosensing due to their small footprint, high Q-factors, and compatibility with on-chip optics and microfluidics. This enables integrated sensor arrays for compact labs-on-chip. One application of label-free sensor arrays is for point-of-care medical diagnostics. Bringing such powerful tools to the single medical practitioner is an important step towards personalized medicine, but requires addressing a number of issues: improving limit of detection, managing the influence of temperature, parallelization of the measurement for higher throughput and on-chip referencing, efficient light-coupling strategies to simplify alignment, and packaging of the optical chip and integration with microfluidics. From the SABIO project we report refractive index measurement and label-free biosensing in an 8-channel slotwaveguide ring resonator sensor array, within a compact cartridge with integrated microfluidics. The sensors show a volume sensing detection limit of 5 x 10-6 RIU and a surface sensing detection limit of 0.9 pg/mm2. From the InTopSens project we report early results on silicon-on-insulator racetrack resonators.

  5. Microfluidic tools toward industrial biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Aline F; Pessoa, Amanda C S N; Bastos, Reinaldo G; de la Torre, Lucimara G

    2016-11-01

    Microfluidics is a technology that operates with small amounts of fluids and makes possible the investigation of cells, enzymes, and biomolecules and encapsulation of biocatalysts in a greater variety of conditions than permitted using conventional methods. This review discusses technological possibilities that can be applied in the field of industrial biotechnology, presenting the principal definitions and fundamental aspects of microfluidic parameters to better understand advanced approaches. Specifically, concentration gradient generators, droplet-based microfluidics, and microbioreactors are explored as useful tools that can contribute to industrial biotechnology. These tools present potential applications, inclusive as commercial platforms to optimizing in bioprocesses development as screening cells, encapsulating biocatalysts, and determining critical kinetic parameters. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:1372-1389, 2016. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  6. Imaging Liquids Using Microfluidic Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xiao-Ying; Liu, Bingwen; Yang, Li

    2013-05-10

    Chemistry occurring in the liquid and liquid surface is important in many applications. Chemical imaging of liquids using vacuum based analytical techniques is challenging due to the difficulty in working with liquids with high volatility. Recent development in microfluidics enabled and increased our capabilities to study liquid in situ using surface sensitive techniques such as electron microscopy and spectroscopy. Due to its small size, low cost, and flexibility in design, liquid cells based on microfluidics have been increasingly used in studying and imaging complex phenomena involving liquids. This paper presents a review of microfluidic cells that were developed to adapt to electron microscopes and various spectrometers for in situ chemical analysis and imaging of liquids. The following topics will be covered including cell designs, fabrication techniques, unique technical features for vacuum compatible cells, and imaging with electron microscopy and spectroscopy. Challenges are summarized and recommendations for future development priority are proposed.

  7. Designing Colloidal Molecules with Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Bingqing; Ricouvier, Joshua; Malloggi, Florent

    2016-01-01

    The creation of new colloidal materials involves the design of functional building blocks. Here, a microfluidic method for designing building blocks one by one, at high throughput, with a broad range of shapes is introduced. The method exploits a coupling between hydrodynamic interactions and depletion forces that controls the configurational dynamics of droplet clusters traveling in microfluidic channels. Droplet clusters can be solidified in situ with UV. By varying the flow parameters, clusters are prescribed a given size, geometry, chemical and/or magnetic heterogeneities enabling local bonding. Compact structures (chains, triangles, diamonds, tetrahedrons,...) and noncompact structures, such as crosses and T, difficult to obtain with current techniques are produced. Size dispersions are small (2%) and throughputs are high (30 000 h−1). The work opens a new pathway, based on microfluidics, for designing colloidal building blocks with a potential to enable the creation of new materials. PMID:27840804

  8. Glass Sealing in Planar SOFC Stacks and Chemical Stability of Seal Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z Gary; Xia, Gordon; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Weil, K. Scott; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2005-03-01

    In intermediate temperature planar SOFC stacks, the interconnect, which is typically made from cost-effective oxidation resistant high temperature alloys, is typically sealed to the ceramic PEN (Positive electrode-Electrolyte-Negative electrode) by a sealing glass. To maintain the structural stability and minimize the degradation of stack performance, the sealing glass has to be chemically compatible with the PEN and alloy interconnects. In the present study, the chemical compatibility of a barium-calcium-aluminosilicate (BCAS) based glass-ceramic (specifically developed as a sealant in SOFC stacks) with a number of selected oxidation resistant high temperature alloys, as well as the YSZ electrolyte, was evaluated. This paper reports the results of that study, with a particular focus on Crofer22 APU, a new ferritic stainless steel that was developed specifically for SOFC interconnect applications.

  9. Object Classification via Planar Abstraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oesau, Sven; Lafarge, Florent; Alliez, Pierre

    2016-06-01

    We present a supervised machine learning approach for classification of objects from sampled point data. The main idea consists in first abstracting the input object into planar parts at several scales, then discriminate between the different classes of objects solely through features derived from these planar shapes. Abstracting into planar shapes provides a means to both reduce the computational complexity and improve robustness to defects inherent to the acquisition process. Measuring statistical properties and relationships between planar shapes offers invariance to scale and orientation. A random forest is then used for solving the multiclass classification problem. We demonstrate the potential of our approach on a set of indoor objects from the Princeton shape benchmark and on objects acquired from indoor scenes and compare the performance of our method with other point-based shape descriptors.

  10. Process for forming planarized films

    DOEpatents

    Pang, Stella W.; Horn, Mark W.

    1991-01-01

    A planarization process and apparatus which employs plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) to form plarnarization films of dielectric or conductive carbonaceous material on step-like substrates.

  11. Applications of microfluidics in quantitative biology.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yang; Gao, Meng; Wen, Lingling; He, Caiyun; Chen, Yuan; Liu, Chenli; Fu, Xiongfei; Huang, Shuqiang

    2017-10-04

    Quantitative biology is dedicated to taking advantage of quantitative reasoning and advanced engineering technologies to make biology more predictable. Microfluidics, as an emerging technique, provides new approaches to precisely control fluidic conditions on small scales and collect data in high-throughput and quantitative manners. In this review, we present the relevant applications of microfluidics to quantitative biology based on two major categories (channel-based microfluidics and droplet-based microfluidics), and their typical features. We also envision some other microfluidic techniques that may not be employed in quantitative biology right now, but have great potential in the near future. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Rapid prototyping of glass microfluidic chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotz, Frederik; Plewa, Klaus; Bauer, Werner; Hanemann, Thomas; Waldbaur, Ansgar; Wilhelm, Elisabeth; Neumann, Christiane; Rapp, Bastian E.

    2015-03-01

    In academia the rapid and flexible creation of microfluidic chips is of great importance for microfluidic research. Besides polymers glass is a very important material especially when high chemical and temperature resistance are required. However, glass structuring is a very hazardous process which is not accessible to most members of the microfluidic community. We therefore sought a new method for the rapid and simple creation of transparent microfluidic glass chips by structuring and sintering amorphous silica suspensions. The whole process from a digital mask layout to a microstructured glass sheet can be done within two days. In this paper we show the applicability of this process to fabricate capillary driven microfluidic systems.

  13. Random walk centrality in interconnected multilayer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solé-Ribalta, Albert; De Domenico, Manlio; Gómez, Sergio; Arenas, Alex

    2016-06-01

    Real-world complex systems exhibit multiple levels of relationships. In many cases they require to be modeled as interconnected multilayer networks, characterizing interactions of several types simultaneously. It is of crucial importance in many fields, from economics to biology and from urban planning to social sciences, to identify the most (or the less) influent nodes in a network using centrality measures. However, defining the centrality of actors in interconnected complex networks is not trivial. In this paper, we rely on the tensorial formalism recently proposed to characterize and investigate this kind of complex topologies, and extend two well known random walk centrality measures, the random walk betweenness and closeness centrality, to interconnected multilayer networks. For each of the measures we provide analytical expressions that completely agree with numerically results.

  14. Optical transceivers for interconnections in satellite payloads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karppinen, Mikko; Heikkinen, Veli; Juntunen, Eveliina; Kautio, Kari; Ollila, Jyrki; Sitomaniemi, Aila; Tanskanen, Antti

    2013-02-01

    The increasing data rates and processing on board satellites call for the use of photonic interconnects providing high-bitrate performance as well as valuable savings in mass and volume. Therefore, optical transmitter and receiver technology is developed for aerospace applications. The metal-ceramic-packaging with hermetic fiber pigtails enables robustness for the harsh spacecraft environment, while the 850-nm VCSEL-based transceiver technology meets the high bit-rate and low power requirements. The developed components include 6 Gbps SpaceFibre duplex transceivers for intra-satellite data links and 40 Gbps parallel optical transceivers for board-to-board interconnects. Also, integration concept of interchip optical interconnects for onboard processor ICs is presented.

  15. The motion of interconnected flexible bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, A. S.

    1975-01-01

    The equations of motion for an arbitrarily interconnected collection of substructures are derived. The substructures are elastic bodies which may be idealized as finite element assemblies and are subject to small deformations relative to a nominal state. Interconnections between the elastic substructures permit large relative translations and rotations between substructures, governed by Pfaffian constraints describing the connections. Screw connections (permitting rotation about and translation along a single axis) eliminate constraint forces and incorporate modal coupling. The problem of flexible spacecraft simulation is discussed. Hurty's component mode approach is extended by permitting interconnected elastic substructures large motions relative to each other and relative to inertial space. The hybrid coordinate methods are generalized by permitting all substructures to be flexible (rather than only the terminal members of a topological tree of substructures). The basic relationships of continuum mechanics are developed.

  16. Interconnection Testing of Distributed Resources: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Kroposki, B.; Basso, T.; DeBlasio, R.

    2004-02-01

    With the publication of IEEE 1547-2003(TM) Standard for Interconnecting Distributed Resources With Electric Power Systems, the electric power industry has a need to develop tests and procedures to verify that interconnection equipment meets 1547 technical requirements. A new standard, IEEE P1547.1(TM), is being written to give detailed tests and procedures for confirming that equipment meets the interconnection requirements. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory has been validating test procedures being developed as part of IEEE P1547.1. As work progresses on the validation of those procedures, information and test reports are passed on to the working group of IEEE P1547.1 for future revisions.

  17. Automotion of domain walls for spintronic interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Young, Ian A.

    2014-06-07

    We simulate “automotion,” the transport of a magnetic domain wall under the influence of demagnetization and magnetic anisotropy, in nanoscale spintronic interconnects. In contrast to spin transfer driven magnetic domain wall motion, the proposed interconnects operate without longitudinal charge current transfer, with only a transient current pulse at domain wall creation and have favorable scaling down to the 20 nm dimension. Cases of both in-plane and out-of-plane magnetization are considered. Analytical dependence of the velocity of domain walls on the angle of magnetization are compared with full micromagnetic simulations. Deceleration, attenuation and disappearance, and reflection of domain walls are demonstrated through simulation. Dependences of the magnetization angle on the current pulse parameters are studied. The energy and delay analysis suggests that automotion is an attractive option for spintronic logic interconnects.

  18. Flat panel planar optic display

    SciTech Connect

    Veligdan, J.T.

    1994-11-01

    A prototype 10 inch flat panel Planar Optic Display, (POD), screen has been constructed and tested. This display screen is comprised of hundreds of planar optic class sheets bonded together with a cladding layer between each sheet where each glass sheet represents a vertical line of resolution. The display is 9 inches wide by 5 inches high and approximately 1 inch thick. A 3 milliwatt HeNe laser is used as the illumination source and a vector scanning technique is employed.

  19. A microfluidic device for performing pressure-driven separations.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Debashis; Ramsey, J Michael

    2011-09-21

    Microchannels in microfluidic devices are frequently chemically modified to introduce specific functional elements or operational modalities. In this work, we describe a miniaturized hydraulic pump created by coating selective channels in a glass microfluidic manifold with a polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM) that alters the surface charge of the substrate. Pressure-driven flow is generated due to a mismatch in the electroosmotic flow (EOF) rates induced upon the application of an electric field to a tee channel junction that has one arm coated with a positively charged PEM and the other arm left uncoated in its native state. In this design, the channels that generate the hydraulic pressure are interconnected via the third arm of the tee to a field-free analysis channel for performing pressure-driven separations. We have also shown that modifications in the cross-sectional area of the channels in the pumping unit can enhance the hydrodynamic flow through the separation section of the manifold. The integrated device has been demonstrated by separating Coumarin dyes in the field-free analysis channel using open-channel liquid chromatography under pressure-driven flow conditions. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  20. Laminated plastic microfluidic components for biological and chemical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, P.M.; Matson, D.W.; Bennett, W.D.; Lin, Y.; Hammerstrom, D.J.

    1999-07-01

    Laminated plastic microfluidic components are being developed for biological testing systems and chemical sensors. Applications include a DNA thermal cycler, DNA analytical systems, electrophoretic flow systems, dialysis systems, and metal sensors for ground water. This article describes fabrication processes developed for these plastic microfluidic components, and the fabrication of a chromium metal sensor and a microdialysis device. Most of the components have a stacked architecture. Using this architecture, the fluid flows, or is pumped through, as many as nine laminated functional levels. Functions include pumping, mixing, reaction, detection, reservoirs, separations, and electronics. Polyimide, poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA), and polycarbonate materials with thicknesses between 25 and 125 {mu}m are used to construct the components. This makes the components low cost, inert to many biological fluids and chemicals, and disposable. The components are fabricated by excimer laser micromachining the microchannel patterns and microstructures in the various laminates. In some cases, micropumps are integrated into these components to move the fluids. Vias and interconnects are also cut by the laser and integrated with micropumps. The laminates are sealed and bonded by adhesive and thermal processes and are leak tight. The parts withstand pressures as high as 790 kPa. Typical channel widths are 50 to 100 {mu}m, with aspect ratios near 5. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Vacuum Society.}

  1. Phononic crystal structures for acoustically driven microfluidic manipulations.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Rab; Reboud, Julien; Bourquin, Yannyk; Neale, Steven L; Zhang, Yi; Cooper, Jonathan M

    2011-01-21

    The development of microfluidic systems is often constrained both by difficulties associated with the chip interconnection to other instruments and by limitations imposed by the mechanisms that can enable fluid movement and processing. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices have shown promise in allowing samples to be manipulated, although designing complex fluid operations involves using multiple electrode transducers. We now demonstrate a simple interface between a piezoelectric SAW device and a disposable microfluidic chip, patterned with phononic structures to control the acoustic wave propagation. The surface wave is coupled from the piezoelectric substrate into the disposable chip where it interacts with the phononic lattice. By implementing both a phononic filter and an acoustic waveguide, we illustrate the potential of the technique by demonstrating microcentrifugation for particle and cell concentration in microlitre droplets. We show for the first time that the interaction of the fluid within this metamaterial phononic lattice is dependent upon the frequency of the acoustic wave, providing a route to programme complex fluidic functions into a microchip (in much the same way, by analogy, that a holographic element would change the phase of a light wave in optical tweezers). A practical realisation of this involves the centrifugation of blood on the chip.

  2. Manufacturing of three-dimensionally microstructured nanocomposites through microfluidic infiltration.

    PubMed

    Dermanaki-Farahani, Rouhollah; Lebel, Louis Laberge; Therriault, Daniel

    2014-03-12

    Microstructured composite beams reinforced with complex three-dimensionally (3D) patterned nanocomposite microfilaments are fabricated via nanocomposite infiltration of 3D interconnected microfluidic networks. The manufacturing of the reinforced beams begins with the fabrication of microfluidic networks, which involves layer-by-layer deposition of fugitive ink filaments using a dispensing robot, filling the empty space between filaments using a low viscosity resin, curing the resin and finally removing the ink. Self-supported 3D structures with other geometries and many layers (e.g. a few hundreds layers) could be built using this method. The resulting tubular microfluidic networks are then infiltrated with thermosetting nanocomposite suspensions containing nanofillers (e.g. single-walled carbon nanotubes), and subsequently cured. The infiltration is done by applying a pressure gradient between two ends of the empty network (either by applying a vacuum or vacuum-assisted microinjection). Prior to the infiltration, the nanocomposite suspensions are prepared by dispersing nanofillers into polymer matrices using ultrasonication and three-roll mixing methods. The nanocomposites (i.e. materials infiltrated) are then solidified under UV exposure/heat cure, resulting in a 3D-reinforced composite structure. The technique presented here enables the design of functional nanocomposite macroscopic products for microengineering applications such as actuators and sensors.

  3. Modular microfluidics for point-of-care protein purifications

    DOE PAGES

    Millet, L. J.; Lucheon, J. D.; Standaert, R. F.; ...

    2015-01-01

    Biochemical separations are the heart of diagnostic assays and purification methods for biologics. On-chip miniaturization and modularization of separation procedures will enable the development of customized, portable devices for personalized health-care diagnostics and point-of-use production of treatments. In this report, we describe the design and fabrication of miniature ion exchange, size exclusion and affinity chromatography modules for on-chip clean-up of recombinantly-produced proteins. Our results demonstrate that these common separations techniques can be implemented in microfluidic modules with performance comparable to conventional approaches. We introduce embedded 3-D microfluidic interconnects for integrating micro-scale separation modules that can be arranged and reconfigured tomore » suit a variety of fluidic operations or biochemical processes. In conclusion, we demonstrate the utility of the modular approach with a platform for the enrichment of enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) from Escherichia coli lysate through integrated affinity and size-exclusion chromatography modules.« less

  4. Fluid control in microfluidic devices using a fluid conveyance extension and an absorbent microfluidic flow modulator.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Po Ki

    2013-05-07

    This article presents a simple method for controlling fluid in microfluidic devices without the need for valves or pumps. A fluid conveyance extension is fluidly coupled to the enclosed outlet chamber of a microfluidic device. After a fluid is introduced into the microfluidic device and saturates the fluid conveyance extension, a fluid flow in the microfluidic device is generated by contacting an absorbent microfluidic flow modulator with the fluid conveyance extension to absorb the fluid from the fluid conveyance extension through capillary action. Since the fluid in the microfluidic device is fluidly coupled with the fluid conveyance extension and the fluid conveyance extension is fluidly coupled with the absorbent microfluidic flow modulator, the absorption rate of the absorbent microfluidic flow modulator, which is the rate at which the absorbent microfluidic flow modulator absorbs fluid, matches the fluid flow rate in the microfluidic device. Thus, the fluid flow rate in the microfluidic device is set by the absorption rate of the absorbent microfluidic flow modulator. Sheath flow and fluid switching applications are demonstrated using this simple fluid control method without the need for valves or pumps. Also, the ability to control the fluid flow rate in the microfluidic device is demonstrated using absorbent microfluidic flow modulators with various absorbent characteristics and dimensions.

  5. Discrete Boltzmann equation for microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Li, Baoming; Kwok, Daniel Y

    2003-03-28

    We propose a discrete Boltzmann model for microfluidics based on the Boltzmann equation with external forces using a single relaxation time collision model. Considering the electrostatic interactions in microfluidics systems, we introduce an equilibrium distribution function that differs from the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution by an exponential factor to represent the action of an external force field. A statistical mechanical approach is applied to derive the equivalent external acceleration force exerting on the lattice particles based on a mean-field approximation, resulting from the electro-static potential energy and intermolecular potential energy between fluid-fluid and fluid-substrate interactions.

  6. Microfluidic devices for droplet injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubrecht, Donald; Akartuna, Ilke; Weitz, David

    2012-02-01

    As picoliter-scale reaction vessels, microfluidic water-in-oil emulsions have found application for high-throughput, large-sample number analyses. Often, the biological or chemical system under investigation needs to be encapsulated into droplets to prevent cross contamination prior to the introduction of reaction reagents. Previous techniques of picoinjection or droplet synchronization and merging enable the addition of reagents to individual droplets, but present limitations on what can be added to each droplet. We present microfluidic devices that couple the strengths of picoinjection and droplet merging, allowing us to selectively add precise volume to our droplet reactions.

  7. A microfluidic-based hydrodynamic trap for single particles.

    PubMed

    Johnson-Chavarria, Eric M; Tanyeri, Melikhan; Schroeder, Charles M

    2011-01-21

    The ability to confine and manipulate single particles in free solution is a key enabling technology for fundamental and applied science. Methods for particle trapping based on optical, magnetic, electrokinetic, and acoustic techniques have led to major advancements in physics and biology ranging from the molecular to cellular level. In this article, we introduce a new microfluidic-based technique for particle trapping and manipulation based solely on hydrodynamic fluid flow. Using this method, we demonstrate trapping of micro- and nano-scale particles in aqueous solutions for long time scales. The hydrodynamic trap consists of an integrated microfluidic device with a cross-slot channel geometry where two opposing laminar streams converge, thereby generating a planar extensional flow with a fluid stagnation point (zero-velocity point). In this device, particles are confined at the trap center by active control of the flow field to maintain particle position at the fluid stagnation point. In this manner, particles are effectively trapped in free solution using a feedback control algorithm implemented with a custom-built LabVIEW code. The control algorithm consists of image acquisition for a particle in the microfluidic device, followed by particle tracking, determination of particle centroid position, and active adjustment of fluid flow by regulating the pressure applied to an on-chip pneumatic valve using a pressure regulator. In this way, the on-chip dynamic metering valve functions to regulate the relative flow rates in the outlet channels, thereby enabling fine-scale control of stagnation point position and particle trapping. The microfluidic-based hydrodynamic trap exhibits several advantages as a method for particle trapping. Hydrodynamic trapping is possible for any arbitrary particle without specific requirements on the physical or chemical properties of the trapped object. In addition, hydrodynamic trapping enables confinement of a "single" target object in

  8. A microfluidic cell culture array with various oxygen tensions.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chien-Chung; Liao, Wei-Hao; Chen, Ying-Hua; Wu, Chueh-Yu; Tung, Yi-Chung

    2013-08-21

    Oxygen tension plays an important role in regulating various cellular functions in both normal physiology and disease states. Therefore, drug testing using conventional in vitro cell models under normoxia often possesses limited prediction capability. A traditional method of setting an oxygen tension in a liquid medium is by saturating it with a gas mixture at the desired level of oxygen, which requires bulky gas cylinders, sophisticated control, and tedious interconnections. Moreover, only a single oxygen tension can be tested at the same time. In this paper, we develop a microfluidic cell culture array platform capable of performing cell culture and drug testing under various oxygen tensions simultaneously. The device is fabricated using an elastomeric material, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and the well-developed multi-layer soft lithography (MSL) technique. The prototype device has 4 × 4 wells, arranged in the same dimensions as a conventional 96-well plate, for cell culture. The oxygen tensions are controlled by spatially confined oxygen scavenging chemical reactions underneath the wells using microfluidics. The platform takes advantage of microfluidic phenomena while exhibiting the combinatorial diversities achieved by microarrays. Importantly, the platform is compatible with existing cell incubators and high-throughput instruments (liquid handling systems and plate readers) for cost-effective setup and straightforward operation. Utilizing the developed platform, we successfully perform drug testing using an anti-cancer drug, triapazamine (TPZ), on adenocarcinomic human alveolar basal epithelial cell line (A549) under three oxygen tensions ranging from 1.4% to normoxia. The developed platform is promising to provide a more meaningful in vitro cell model for various biomedical applications while maintaining desired high throughput capabilities.

  9. Graphene Nanoribbons (GNRs) for Future Interconnect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saptono Duryat, Rahmat

    2016-05-01

    Selecting and developing materials for the future devices require a sound understanding of design requirements. Miniaturization of electronic devices, as commonly expressed by Moore Law, has involved the integration level. Increase of the level has caused some consequences in the design and selection of materials for interconnection. The present paper deals with the challenge of materials design and selection beyond the nanoscale limit and the ability of traditional materials to cope with. One of the emerging materials, i.e. Graphene, will be reviewed with particular reference to its characteristics and potentials for future interconnection.

  10. On interconnected systems, passivity and some generalisations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordóñez-Hurtado, Rodrigo H.; Griggs, Wynita M.; Shorten, Robert N.

    2013-12-01

    A sufficient condition for the stability of large-scale interconnections of N linear time-variant systems is presented. Such a condition represents important extensions to passivity criteria and ensures stability by means of the existence of a positive definite (full-block) matrix P which is a common solution to Lyapunov equations involving a diagonal stacking of the N systems and the interconnection structure matrix. An experimental methodology for the verification of the sufficient condition also is proposed, based on evolutionary computation techniques. Applications of the new stability results are provided through illustrative examples, which are developed using particle swarm optimisation and genetic algorithms.

  11. Integrated microfluidic probe station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrault, C. M.; Qasaimeh, M. A.; Brastaviceanu, T.; Anderson, K.; Kabakibo, Y.; Juncker, D.

    2010-11-01

    The microfluidic probe (MFP) consists of a flat, blunt tip with two apertures for the injection and reaspiration of a microjet into a solution—thus hydrodynamically confining the microjet—and is operated atop an inverted microscope that enables live imaging. By scanning across a surface, the microjet can be used for surface processing with the capability of both depositing and removing material; as it operates under immersed conditions, sensitive biological materials and living cells can be processed. During scanning, the MFP is kept immobile and centered over the objective of the inverted microscope, a few micrometers above a substrate that is displaced by moving the microscope stage and that is flushed continuously with the microjet. For consistent and reproducible surface processing, the gap between the MFP and the substrate, the MFP's alignment, the scanning speed, the injection and aspiration flow rates, and the image capture need all to be controlled and synchronized. Here, we present an automated MFP station that integrates all of these functionalities and automates the key operational parameters. A custom software program is used to control an independent motorized Z stage for adjusting the gap, a motorized microscope stage for scanning the substrate, up to 16 syringe pumps for injecting and aspirating fluids, and an inverted fluorescence microscope equipped with a charge-coupled device camera. The parallelism between the MFP and the substrate is adjusted using manual goniometer at the beginning of the experiment. The alignment of the injection and aspiration apertures along the scanning axis is performed using a newly designed MFP screw holder. We illustrate the integrated MFP station by the programmed, automated patterning of fluorescently labeled biotin on a streptavidin-coated surface.

  12. Integrated microfluidic probe station.

    PubMed

    Perrault, C M; Qasaimeh, M A; Brastaviceanu, T; Anderson, K; Kabakibo, Y; Juncker, D

    2010-11-01

    The microfluidic probe (MFP) consists of a flat, blunt tip with two apertures for the injection and reaspiration of a microjet into a solution--thus hydrodynamically confining the microjet--and is operated atop an inverted microscope that enables live imaging. By scanning across a surface, the microjet can be used for surface processing with the capability of both depositing and removing material; as it operates under immersed conditions, sensitive biological materials and living cells can be processed. During scanning, the MFP is kept immobile and centered over the objective of the inverted microscope, a few micrometers above a substrate that is displaced by moving the microscope stage and that is flushed continuously with the microjet. For consistent and reproducible surface processing, the gap between the MFP and the substrate, the MFP's alignment, the scanning speed, the injection and aspiration flow rates, and the image capture need all to be controlled and synchronized. Here, we present an automated MFP station that integrates all of these functionalities and automates the key operational parameters. A custom software program is used to control an independent motorized Z stage for adjusting the gap, a motorized microscope stage for scanning the substrate, up to 16 syringe pumps for injecting and aspirating fluids, and an inverted fluorescence microscope equipped with a charge-coupled device camera. The parallelism between the MFP and the substrate is adjusted using manual goniometer at the beginning of the experiment. The alignment of the injection and aspiration apertures along the scanning axis is performed using a newly designed MFP screw holder. We illustrate the integrated MFP station by the programmed, automated patterning of fluorescently labeled biotin on a streptavidin-coated surface.

  13. A new floating electrode structure for generating homogeneous electrical fields in microfluidic channels.

    PubMed

    Segerink, Loes I; Sprenkels, Ad J; Bomer, Johan G; Vermes, Istvan; van den Berg, Albert

    2011-06-21

    In this article a new parallel electrode structure in a microfluidic channel is described that makes use of a floating electrode to get a homogeneous electrical field. Compared to existing parallel electrode structures, the new structure has an easier production process and there is no need for an electrical connection to both sides of the microfluidic chip. With the new chip design, polystyrene beads suspended in background electrolyte have been detected using electrical impedance measurements. The results of electrical impedance changes caused by beads passing the electrodes are compared with results in a similar planar electrode configuration. It is shown that in the new configuration the coefficient of variation of the impedance changes is lower compared to the planar configuration (0.39 versus 0.56) and less dependent on the position of the beads passage in the channel as a result of the homogeneous electrical field. To our knowledge this is the first time that a floating electrode is used for the realization of a parallel electrode structure. The proposed production method for parallel electrodes in microfluidic channels can easily be applied to other applications.

  14. Multi-layer plastic/glass microfluidic systems containing electrical and mechanical functionality.

    PubMed

    Han, Arum; Wang, Olivia; Graff, Mason; Mohanty, Swomitra K; Edwards, Thayne L; Han, Ki-Ho; Bruno Frazier, A

    2003-08-01

    This paper describes an approach for fabricating multi-layer microfluidic systems from a combination of glass and plastic materials. Methods and characterization results for the microfabrication technologies underlying the process flow are presented. The approach is used to fabricate and characterize multi-layer plastic/glass microfluidic systems containing electrical and mechanical functionality. Hot embossing, heat staking of plastics, injection molding, microstenciling of electrodes, and stereolithography were combined with conventional MEMS fabrication techniques to realize the multi-layer systems. The approach enabled the integration of multiple plastic/glass materials into a single monolithic system, provided a solution for the integration of electrical functionality throughout the system, provided a mechanism for the inclusion of microactuators such as micropumps/valves, and provided an interconnect technology for interfacing fluids and electrical components between the micro system and the macro world.

  15. Ultralow-loss waveguide crossings for the integration of microfluidics and optical waveguide sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zheng; Yan, Hai; Wang, Zongxing; Zou, Yi; Yang, Chun-Ju; Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Subbaraman, Harish; Tang, Naimei; Xu, Xiaochuan; Fan, D. L.; Wang, Alan X.; Chen, Ray T.

    2015-03-01

    Integrating photonic waveguide sensors with microfluidics is promising in achieving high-sensitivity and cost-effective biological and chemical sensing applications. One challenge in the integration is that an air gap would exist between the microfluidic channel and the photonic waveguide when the micro-channel and the waveguide intersect. The air gap creates a path for the fluid to leak out of the micro-channel. Potential solutions, such as oxide deposition followed by surface planarization, would introduce additional fabrication steps and thus are ineffective in cost. Here we propose a reliable and efficient approach for achieving closed microfluidic channels on a waveguide sensing chip. The core of the employed technique is to add waveguide crossings, i.e., perpendicularly intersecting waveguides, to block the etched trenches and prevent the fluid from leaking through the air gap. The waveguide crossings offer a smooth interface for microfluidic channel bonding while bring negligible additional propagation loss (0.024 dB/crossing based on simulation). They are also efficient in fabrication, which are patterned and fabricated in the same step with waveguides. We experimentally integrated microfluidic channels with photonic crystal (PC) microcavity sensor chips on silicon-on-insulator substrate and demonstrated leak-free sensing measurement with waveguide crossings. The microfluidic channel was made from polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and pressure bonded to the silicon chip. The tested flow rates can be varied from 0.2 μL/min to 200 μL/min. Strong resonances from the PC cavity were observed from the transmission spectra. The spectra also show that the waveguide crossings did not induce any significant additional loss or alter the resonances.

  16. 47 CFR 51.305 - Interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... service quality as perceived by end users, and includes, but is not limited to, service quality as... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) INTERCONNECTION... described in § 51.319; (3) That is at a level of quality that is equal to that which the incumbent LEC...

  17. Vector Lyapunov Functions for Stochastic Interconnected Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boussalis, D.

    1985-01-01

    Theoretical paper presents set of sufficient conditions for asymptotic and exponential stability with probability 1 for class of stochastic interconnected systems. Theory applicable to complicated, large-scale mechanical or electrical systems, and, for several design problems, it reduces computational difficulty by relating stability criteria to fundamental structural features of system.

  18. Electromigration of damascene copper of IC interconnect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, William Kevin

    Copper metallization patterned with multi-level damascene process is prone to electromigration failure, which affects the reliability and performance of IC interconnect. In typical products, interconnect that is not already constrained by I·R drop or Joule self-heating operates at 'near threshold' conditions. Measurement of electromigration damage near threshold is very difficult due to slow degradation requiring greatly extended stress times, or high currents that cause thermal anomalies. Software simulations of the electromigration mechanism combined with characterization of temperature profiles allows extracting material parameters and calculation of design rules to ensure reliable interconnect. Test structures capable of demonstrating Blech threshold effects while allowing thermal characterization were designed and processed. Electromigration stress tests at various conditions were performed to extract both shortline (threshold) and long-line (above threshold) performance values. The resistance increase time constant shows immortality below Je·L (product of current density and segment length) of 3200 amp/cm. Statistical analysis of times-to-failure show that long lines last 105 hours at 3.1 mA/mum2 (120°C). While this is more robust than aluminum interconnect, the semiconductor industry will be challenged to improve that performance as future products require.

  19. A continuum model for interconnected lattice trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakrishnan, A. V.

    1992-01-01

    A continuum model for interconnected lattice trusses based on the 1D Timoshenko beam approximation is developed using the NASA-LRC Phase Zero Evolutionary Model. The continuum model dynamics is presented in the canonical wave-equation form in a Hilbert space.

  20. Organization of Systems with Bussed Interconnections

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    arrangement of modules. For general arrangements, arbitration time grows linearly with number of busses, while for linear arrangements, *1.4 .,-B2’ZT TE•.1...for linear arrangements, arbitration time is constant. Keywords: arbitration with busses, binomial arbitration, bussed interconnections, busses...demonstrating the superiority of binomial arbitration for general arrangements of modules under the digital transmission line model. For linear

  1. 14 CFR 27.674 - Interconnected controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interconnected controls. 27.674 Section 27.674 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems §...

  2. 14 CFR 29.674 - Interconnected controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Interconnected controls. 29.674 Section 29.674 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems §...

  3. 14 CFR 27.674 - Interconnected controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Interconnected controls. 27.674 Section 27.674 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems §...

  4. 14 CFR 29.674 - Interconnected controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interconnected controls. 29.674 Section 29.674 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Control Systems §...

  5. 14 CFR 23.701 - Flap interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 23.701 Flap interconnection. (a) The main wing flaps and related movable surfaces as a system... independent of the flap drive system; or by an approved equivalent means; or (2) Be designed so that...

  6. 14 CFR 23.701 - Flap interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 23.701 Flap interconnection. (a) The main wing flaps and related movable surfaces as a system... independent of the flap drive system; or by an approved equivalent means; or (2) Be designed so that...

  7. 14 CFR 23.701 - Flap interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 23.701 Flap interconnection. (a) The main wing flaps and related movable surfaces as a system... independent of the flap drive system; or by an approved equivalent means; or (2) Be designed so that...

  8. 14 CFR 23.701 - Flap interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 23.701 Flap interconnection. (a) The main wing flaps and related movable surfaces as a system... independent of the flap drive system; or by an approved equivalent means; or (2) Be designed so that...

  9. Laser printed interconnects for flexible electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pique, Alberto; Beniam, Iyoel; Mathews, Scott; Charipar, Nicholas

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) can be used to generate microscale 3D structures for interconnect applications non-lithographically. The laser printing of these interconnects takes place through aggregation of voxels of either molten metal or dispersed metallic nanoparticles. However, the resulting 3D structures do not achieve the bulk conductivity of metal interconnects of the same cross-section and length as those formed by wire bonding or tab welding. It is possible, however, to laser transfer entire structures using a LIFT technique known as lase-and-place. Lase-and-place allows whole components and parts to be transferred from a donor substrate onto a desired location with one single laser pulse. This talk will present the use of LIFT to laser print freestanding solid metal interconnects to connect individual devices into functional circuits. Furthermore, the same laser can bend or fold the thin metal foils prior to transfer, thus forming compliant 3D structures able to provide strain relief due to flexing or thermal mismatch. Examples of these laser printed 3D metallic bridges and their role in the development of next generation flexible electronics by additive manufacturing will be presented. This work was funded by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) through the Naval Research Laboratory Basic Research Program.

  10. Computational continuum modeling of solder interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Burchett, S.N.; Neilsen, M.K.; Frear, D.R.; Stephens, J.J.

    1997-03-01

    The most commonly used solder for electrical interconnections in electronic packages is the near eutectic 60Sn-40Pb alloy. This alloy has a number of processing advantages (suitable melting point of 183 C and good wetting behavior). However, under conditions of cyclic strain and temperature (thermomechanical fatigue), the microstructure of this alloy undergoes a heterogeneous coarsening and failure process that makes prediction of solder joint lifetime complex. A viscoplastic, microstructure dependent, constitutive model for solder which is currently in development was implemented into a finite element code. With this computational capability, the thermomechanical response of solder interconnects, including microstructural evolution, can be predicted. This capability was applied to predict the thermomechanical response of various leadless chip carrier solder interconnects to determine the effects of variations in geometry and loading. In this paper, the constitutive model will first be briefly discussed. The results of computational studies to determine the effect of geometry and loading variations on leadless chip carrier solder interconnects then will be presented.

  11. Electric network interconnection of Mashreq Arab Countries

    SciTech Connect

    El-Amin, I.M.; Al-Shehri, A.M.; Opoku, G.; Al-Baiyat, S.A.; Zedan, F.M.

    1994-12-01

    Power system interconnection is a well established practice for a variety of technical and economical reasons. Several interconnected networks exist worldwide for a number of factors. Some of these networks cross international boundaries. This presentation discusses the future developments of the power systems of Mashreq Arab Countries (MAC). MAC consists of Bahrain, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates (UAE), and Yemen. Mac power systems are operated by government or semigovernment bodies. Many of these countries have national or regional electric grids but are generally isolated from each other. With the exception of Saudi Arabia power systems, which employ 60 Hz, all other MAC utilities use 50 Hz frequency. Each country is served by one utility, except Saudi Arabia, which is served by four major utilities and some smaller utilities serving remote towns and small load centers. The major utilities are the Saudi Consolidated electric Company in the Eastern Province (SCECO East), SCECO Center, SCECO West, and SCECO South. These are the ones considered in this study. The energy resources in MAC are varied. Countries such as Egypt, Iraq, and Syria have significant hydro resources.The gulf countries and Iraq have abundant fossil fuel, The variation in energy resources as well as the characteristics of the electric load make it essential to look into interconnections beyond the national boundaries. Most of the existing or planned interconnections involve few power systems. A study involving 12 countries and over 20 utilities with different characteristics represents a very large scale undertaking.

  12. 47 CFR 95.1313 - Interconnection prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... circuits) or as an integral part of an authorized, private, internal system of communication or as an integral part of dispatch point circuits in a multi-use radio station are not considered to be interconnection for purposes of this rule part. ...

  13. Optical interconnections to focal plane arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Rienstra, J.L.; Hinckley, M.K.

    2000-11-01

    The authors have successfully demonstrated an optical data interconnection from the output of a focal plane array to the downstream data acquisition electronics. The demonstrated approach included a continuous wave laser beam directed at a multiple quantum well reflectance modulator connected to the focal plane array analog output. The output waveform from the optical interconnect was observed on an oscilloscope to be a replica of the input signal. They fed the output of the optical data link to the same data acquisition system used to characterize focal plane array performance. Measurements of the signal to noise ratio at the input and output of the optical interconnection showed that the signal to noise ratio was reduced by a factor of 10 or more. Analysis of the noise and link gain showed that the primary contributors to the additional noise were laser intensity noise and photodetector receiver noise. Subsequent efforts should be able to reduce these noise sources considerably and should result in substantially improved signal to noise performance. They also observed significant photocurrent generation in the reflectance modulator that imposes a current load on the focal plane array output amplifier. This current loading is an issue with the demonstrated approach because it tends to negate the power saving feature of the reflectance modulator interconnection concept.

  14. 47 CFR 90.477 - Interconnected systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... where the base station site or sites proposed stations are located 120 km (75 mi.) or more from the... mi.) of the 25 cities, they must obtain the consent of all co-channel licensees located both within 120 km (75 mi.) of the center of the city; and within 120 km (75 mi.) of the interconnected...

  15. 47 CFR 90.477 - Interconnected systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... where the base station site or sites proposed stations are located 120 km (75 mi.) or more from the... mi.) of the 25 cities, they must obtain the consent of all co-channel licensees located both within 120 km (75 mi.) of the center of the city; and within 120 km (75 mi.) of the interconnected...

  16. 47 CFR 90.477 - Interconnected systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... where the base station site or sites proposed stations are located 120 km (75 mi.) or more from the... mi.) of the 25 cities, they must obtain the consent of all co-channel licensees located both within 120 km (75 mi.) of the center of the city; and within 120 km (75 mi.) of the interconnected...

  17. Bioinspired multicompartmental microfibers from microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yao; Zheng, Fuyin; Lu, Jie; Shang, Luoran; Xie, Zhuoying; Zhao, Yuanjin; Chen, Yongping; Gu, Zhongze

    2014-08-13

    Bioinspired multicompartmental microfibers are generated by novel capillary microfluidics. The resultant microfibers possess multicompartment body-and-shell compositions with specifically designed geometries. Potential use of these microfibers for tissue-engineering applications is demonstrated by creating multifunctional fibers with a spatially controlled encapsulation of cells.

  18. Microfluidic-integrated DNA nanobiosensors.

    PubMed

    Ansari, M I Haque; Hassan, Shabir; Qurashi, Ahsanulhaq; Khanday, Firdous Ahmad

    2016-11-15

    Over the last few decades, an increased demand has emerged for integrating biosensors with microfluidic- and nanofluidic-based lab-on-chip (LOC) devices for point-of-care (POC) diagnostics, in the medical industry and environmental monitoring of pathogenic threat agents. Such a merger of microfluidics with biosensing technologies allows for the precise control of volumes, as low as one nanolitre and the integration of various types of bioassays on a single miniaturized platform. This integration offers several favorable advantages, such as low reagent consumption, automation of sample preparation, reduction in processing time, low cost analysis, minimal handling of hazardous materials, high detection accuracy, portability and disposability. This review provides a synopsis of the most recent developments in the microfluidic-integrated biosensing field by delineating the fundamental theory of microfluidics, fabrication techniques and a detailed account of the various transduction methods that are employed. Lastly, the review discusses state-of-the-art DNA biosensors with a focus on optical DNA biosensors.

  19. Chemical and biochemical analysis using microfluidic-localized field platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepaniak, Michael; Abu-Hatab, Nahla; Wellman, Amber; John, Joshy; Connatser, Maggie

    2007-09-01

    Microfluidics offer the advantages of multiplexed analysis on small, inexpensive platforms. We describe herein two distinct optical detection techniques that have the common point of sequestering and measuring analyte signals in highly localized EM fields. The first technique mates a microfluidic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) platform with colloidal-based surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) in order to perform parallel, high throughput vibrational spectroscopy. Spectra are acquired for analytes localized in surface plasmon fields associated with conventional and uniquely synthesized cubic silver colloids. SERS studies such as pH of the colloidal solution, and the type of colloid are used to demonstrate the efficiency and applicability of the method. In addition, a facile passive pumping method is used to deliver Ag colloids and analytes into the channels where all SERS measurements were completed under nondestructive flowing conditions. With this approach, SERS signal reproducibility was found to be better than 7%. A calibration curve for the drug mitoxantrone (resonance enhanced) was generated. The second technique seeks to integrate a passively-pumped, microfluidic, PDMS platform and planar waveguide technology, utilizing magnetic beads as solid supports for fluoro-assays with direct detection of bound analyte within the sample mixture accomplished by selectively driving functionalized beads to a localized evanescent field. Because analyte binding occurs in free solution, the reaction is not diffusion limited and, once magnetically delivered to the evanescent wave, the analyte can be detected with fewer complications arising from non-optically homogeneous, biological matrices. Additionally, the evanescent sensing surface can be easily regenerated by simply removing the bead-retaining magnetic field. Initial testing, optimization and calibration were performed using a model sandwich immunoassay system for the detection of rabbit IgG, with which we demonstrate a

  20. Measuring Cell Viscoelastic Properties Using a Microfluidic Extensional Flow Device.

    PubMed

    Guillou, Lionel; Dahl, Joanna B; Lin, Jung-Ming G; Barakat, AbduI I; Husson, Julien; Muller, Susan J; Kumar, Sanjay

    2016-11-01

    The quantification of cellular mechanical properties is of tremendous interest in biology and medicine. Recent microfluidic technologies that infer cellular mechanical properties based on analysis of cellular deformations during microchannel traversal have dramatically improved throughput over traditional single-cell rheological tools, yet the extraction of material parameters from these measurements remains quite complex due to challenges such as confinement by channel walls and the domination of complex inertial forces. Here, we describe a simple microfluidic platform that uses hydrodynamic forces at low Reynolds number and low confinement to elongate single cells near the stagnation point of a planar extensional flow. In tandem, we present, to our knowledge, a novel analytical framework that enables determination of cellular viscoelastic properties (stiffness and fluidity) from these measurements. We validated our system and analysis by measuring the stiffness of cross-linked dextran microparticles, which yielded reasonable agreement with previously reported values and our micropipette aspiration measurements. We then measured viscoelastic properties of 3T3 fibroblasts and glioblastoma tumor initiating cells. Our system captures the expected changes in elastic modulus induced in 3T3 fibroblasts and tumor initiating cells in response to agents that soften (cytochalasin D) or stiffen (paraformaldehyde) the cytoskeleton. The simplicity of the device coupled with our analytical model allows straightforward measurement of the viscoelastic properties of cells and soft, spherical objects.

  1. Micron-scale tunability in photonic devices using microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monat, Christelle; Domachuk, Peter; Jaouen, Vincent; Grillet, Christian; Littler, Ian; Croning-Golomb, Mark; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Mutzenich, Simon; Mahmud, Tanveer; Rosengarten, Gary; Mitchell, Arnan

    2006-08-01

    Optofluidics offers new functionalities that can be useful for a large range of applications. What microfluidics can bring to microphotonics is the ability to tune and reconfigure ultra-compact optical devices. This flexibility is essentially provided by three characteristics of fluids that are scalable at the micron-scale: fluid mobility, large ranges of index modulation, and adaptable interfaces. Several examples of optofluidic devices are presented to illustrate the achievement of new functionalities onto (semi)planar and compact platforms. First, we report an ultra-compact and tunable interferometer that exploits a sharp and mobile air/water interface. We describe then a novel class of optically controlled switches and routers that rely on the actuation of optically trapped lens microspheres within fluid environment. A tunable optical switch device can alternatively be built from a transversely probed photonic crystal fiber infused with mobile fluids. The last reported optofluidic device relies on strong fluid/ light interaction to produce either a sensitive index sensor or a tunable optical filter. The common feature of these various devices is their significant flexibility. Higher degrees of functionality could be achieved in the future with fully integrated optofluidic platforms that associate complex microfluidic delivery and mixing schemes with microphotonic devices.

  2. Fast prototyping of injection molded polymer microfluidic chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steen Hansen, Thomas; Selmeczi, David; Larsen, Niels B.

    2010-01-01

    We present fast prototyping of injection molding tools by the definition of microfluidic structures in a light-curable epoxy (SU-8) directly on planar nickel mold inserts. Optimized prototype mold structures could withstand injection molding of more than 300 replicas in cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) without any signs of failure or release. The key parameters to avoid mold failure are maximum adhesion strength of the epoxy to the nickel insert and minimum interfacial energy of the epoxy pattern to the molded polymer. Optimal molding of microstructures with vertical sidewalls was found for nickel inserts pre-coated by silicon oxide before applying the structured epoxy, followed by coating of the epoxy by a fluorocarbon layer prior to injection molding. Further improvements in the mold stability were observed after homogeneous coating of the patterned epoxy by a second reflowed layer of epoxy, likely due to the resulting reduction in sidewall steepness. We employed the latter method for injection molding bondable polymer microfluidic chips with integrated conducting polymer electrode arrays that permitted the culture and on-chip analysis of cell spreading by impedance spectroscopy.

  3. A world-to-chip socket for microfluidic prototype development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhen; Maeda, Ryutaro

    2002-11-01

    This paper reports a prototype for a standard connector between a microfluidic chip and the macro world. This prototype is the first to demonstrate a fully functioning socket for a microchip to access the outside world by means of fluids, data and energy supply, as well as providing process visibility. It has 20 channels for the input and output of liquids or gases, as well as compressed air or vacuum lines for pneumatic power lines. It also contains 42 pins for electrical signals and power. All these connections were designed in a planar configuration with linear orthogonal arrays. The vertical space was opened for optical measurement and evaluation. The die (29.1 mm x 27.5 mm x 0.9 mm) can be easily mounted and dismounted from the socket. No adhesives or solders are used at any contact points. The pressure limit for the connection of working fluids was 0.2 MPa and the current limit for the electrical connections was 1 A. This socket supports both serial and parallel processing applications. It exhibits great potential for developing microfluidic system efficiently.

  4. An optical microfluidic platform for spatiotemporal biofilm treatment monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Wook; Mosteller, Matthew P.; Subramanian, Sowmya; Meyer, Mariana T.; Bentley, William E.; Ghodssi, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms constitute in excess of 65% of clinical microbial infections, with the antibiotic treatment of biofilm infections posing a unique challenge due to their high antibiotic tolerance. Recent studies performed in our group have demonstrated that a bioelectric effect featuring low-intensity electric signals combined with antibiotics can significantly improve the efficacy of biofilm treatment. In this work, we demonstrate the bioelectric effect using sub-micron thick planar electrodes in a microfluidic device. This is critical in efforts to develop microsystems for clinical biofilm infection management, including both in vivo and in vitro applications. Adaptation of the method to the microscale, for example, can enable the development of localized biofilm infection treatment using microfabricated medical devices, while augmenting existing capabilities to perform biofilm management beyond the clinical realm. Furthermore, due to scale-down of the system, the voltage requirement for inducing the electric field is reduced further below the media electrolysis threshold. Enhanced biofilm treatment using the bioelectric effect in the developed microfluidic device elicited a 56% greater reduction in viable cell density and 26% further decrease in biomass growth compared to traditional antibiotic therapy. This biofilm treatment efficacy, demonstrated in a micro-scale device and utilizing biocompatible voltage ranges, encourages the use of this method for future clinical biofilm treatment applications.

  5. A lab-on-a-chip system for the development of complex assays using modular microfluidic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlawatsch, Nadine; Klemm, Richard; Carstens, Cornelia; Brandst"tter, Thomas; Becker, Holger; Elbracht, Rudi; Gärtner, Claudia

    2012-03-01

    For complex biological or diagnostic assays, the development of an integrated microfluidic device can be difficult and error-prone. For this reason, a modular approach, using individual microfluidic functional modules for the different process steps, can be advantageous. However often the interconnection of the modules proves to be tedious and the peripheral instrumentation to drive the various modules is cumbersome and of large size. For this reason, we have developed an integrated instrument platform which has generic functionalities such as valves and pumps, heating zones for continuous-flow PCR, moveable magnets for bead-based assays and an optical detection unit build into the instrument. The instrument holds a titerplate-sized carrier in which up to four microscopy-slide sized microfluidic modules can be clipped in. This allows for developing and optimizing individual assay steps without the need to modify the instrument or generate a completely new microfluidic cartridge. As a proof-of-concept, the automated sample processing of liquor or blood culture in microfluidic structures for detection of currently occuring Neisseria meningitidis strains was carried out. This assay involves the extraction of bacterial DNA, the fluorescent labeling, amplification using PCR as well as the hybridization of the DNA molecules in three-dimensional capture sites spotted into a microchannel. To define the assay sensitivity, chip modules were tested with bacteria spiked samples of different origins and results were controlled by conventional techniques. For liquor or blood culture, the presence of 200 bacteria was detected within 1 hour.

  6. Large Scale Interconnections Using Dynamic Gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauliat, Gilles; Roosen, Gerald

    1987-01-01

    Optics is attractive for interconnects because the possibility of crossing without any interaction multiple light beams. A crossbar network can be achieved using holographic elements which permit to connect independently all inputs and all outputs. The incorporation of dynamic holographic materials is enticing as this will render the interconnection changeable. However, it is necessary to find first a passive method permitting to achieve beam deflection and secondly a photosensitive material of high optical quality requiring low power levels to optically induce the refractive index changes. We first describe an optical method allowing to produce very large deflections of light beams thus enabling to randomly address any spot on a plane. Such a technique appears applicable to both interconnections of VLSI chips and random access of optical memories. Our scheme for realizing dynamic optical interconnects is based on Bragg diffraction of the beam to steer by a dynamic phase grating which spacing and orientation are changeable in real time. This is achieved in a passive way by acting on the optical frequency of the control beams used to record the dynamic grating. Deflection angles of 15° have been experimentally demonstrated for a 27 nm shift in the control wavelength. For a larger wavelength scanning (50 nm), 28° deflections are anticipated while maintaining the Bragg condition satisfied. We then discuss some issues related to photosensitive materials able to dynamically record the optically induced refractive index change. The specific example of Bi12 Si 020 or Bi12 Ge 020 photorefractive crystals is presented. Indeed these materials are very attractive as they require low driving energy and exhibit a memory effect. This latter property permits to achieve numerous iterations between computing cells before reconfiguration of the interconnect network.

  7. Towards energy-efficient photonic interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, Yigit; Hardavellas, Nikos

    2015-03-01

    Silicon photonics have emerged as a promising solution to meet the growing demand for high-bandwidth, low-latency, and energy-efficient on-chip and off-chip communication in many-core processors. However, current silicon-photonic interconnect designs for many-core processors waste a significant amount of power because (a) lasers are always on, even during periods of interconnect inactivity, and (b) microring resonators employ heaters which consume a significant amount of power just to overcome thermal variations and maintain communication on the photonic links, especially in a 3D-stacked design. The problem of high laser power consumption is particularly important as lasers typically have very low energy efficiency, and photonic interconnects often remain underutilized both in scientific computing (compute-intensive execution phases underutilize the interconnect), and in server computing (servers in Google-scale datacenters have a typical utilization of less than 30%). We address the high laser power consumption by proposing EcoLaser+, which is a laser control scheme that saves energy by predicting the interconnect activity and opportunistically turning the on-chip laser off when possible, and also by scaling the width of the communication link based on a runtime prediction of the expected message length. Our laser control scheme can save up to 62 - 92% of the laser energy, and improve the energy efficiency of a manycore processor with negligible performance penalty. We address the high trimming (heating) power consumption of the microrings by proposing insulation methods that reduce the impact of localized heating induced by highly-active components on the 3D-stacked logic die.

  8. Probabilistic immortality of Cu damascene interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hau-Riege, Stefan P.

    2002-02-01

    We have studied electromigration short-line effects in Cu damascene interconnects through experiments on lines of various lengths L, stressed at a variety of current densities j, and embedded in different dielectric materials. We observed two modes of resistance evolution: Either the resistance of the lines remains constant for the duration of the test, so that the lines are considered immortal, or the lines fail due to abrupt open-circuit failure. The resistance was not observed to gradually increase and then saturate, as commonly observed in Al-based interconnects, because the barrier is too thin and resistive to serve as a redundant current path should voiding occur. The critical stress for void nucleation was found to be smaller than 41 MPa, since voiding occurred even under the mildest test conditions of j=2 MA/cm2 and L=10.5 μm at 300 °C. A small fraction of short Cu lines failed even at low current densities, which deems necessary a concept of probabilistic immortality rather than deterministic immortality. Experiments and modeling suggest that the probability of immortality is described by (jL2/B), where B is the effective elastic modulus of the metallization scheme. By contrast, the immortality of Al-based interconnects with shunt layers is described by (jL) if no voids nucleate, and (jL/B) if voids do nucleate. Even though the phenomenology of short-line effects differs for Al- and Cu-based interconnects, the immortality of interconnects of either materials system can be explained by the phenomena of nucleation barriers for void formation and void-growth saturation. The differences are due solely to the absence of a shunt layer and the low critical stress for void nucleation in the case of Cu.

  9. Fabrication of circular microfluidic channels by combining mechanical micromilling and soft lithography.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Mary E; Kota, Nithyanand; Kim, YongTae; Wang, Yadong; Stolz, Donna B; LeDuc, Philip R; Ozdoganlar, O Burak

    2011-04-21

    The fabrication of microfluidic channels with complex three-dimensional (3D) geometries presents a major challenge to the field of microfluidics, because conventional lithography methods are mainly limited to rectangular cross-sections. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of mechanical micromachining to fabricate microfluidic channels with complex cross-sectional geometries. Micro-scale milling tools are first used to fabricate semi-circular patterns on planar metallic surfaces to create a master mold. The micromilled pattern is then transferred to polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) through a two-step reverse molding process. Using these semi-circular PDMS channels, circular cross-sectioned microchannels are created by aligning and adhering two channels face-to-face. Straight and serpentine-shaped microchannels were fabricated, and the channel geometry and precision of the metallic master and PDMS molds were assessed through scanning electron microscopy and non-contact profilometry. Channel functionality was tested by perfusion of liquid through the channels. This work demonstrates that micromachining enabled soft lithography is capable of fabricating non-rectangular cross-section channels for microfluidic applications. We believe that this approach will be important for many fields from biomimetics and vascular engineering to microfabrication and microreactor technologies.

  10. Planar photovoltaic solar concentrator module

    DOEpatents

    Chiang, C.J.

    1992-12-01

    A planar photovoltaic concentrator module for producing an electrical signal from incident solar radiation includes an electrically insulating housing having a front wall, an opposing back wall and a hollow interior. A solar cell having electrical terminals is positioned within the interior of the housing. A planar conductor is connected with a terminal of the solar cell of the same polarity. A lens forming the front wall of the housing is operable to direct solar radiation incident to the lens into the interior of the housing. A refractive optical element in contact with the solar cell and facing the lens receives the solar radiation directed into the interior of the housing by the lens and directs the solar radiation to the solar cell to cause the solar cell to generate an electrical signal. An electrically conductive planar member is positioned in the housing to rest on the housing back wall in supporting relation with the solar cell terminal of opposite polarity. The planar member is operable to dissipate heat radiated by the solar cell as the solar cell generates an electrical signal and further forms a solar cell conductor connected with the solar cell terminal to permit the electrical signal generated by the solar cell to be measured between the planar member and the conductor. 5 figs.

  11. Planar photovoltaic solar concentrator module

    DOEpatents

    Chiang, Clement J.

    1992-01-01

    A planar photovoltaic concentrator module for producing an electrical signal from incident solar radiation includes an electrically insulating housing having a front wall, an opposing back wall and a hollow interior. A solar cell having electrical terminals is positioned within the interior of the housing. A planar conductor is connected with a terminal of the solar cell of the same polarity. A lens forming the front wall of the housing is operable to direct solar radiation incident to the lens into the interior of the housing. A refractive optical element in contact with the solar cell and facing the lens receives the solar radiation directed into the interior of the housing by the lens and directs the solar radiation to the solar cell to cause the solar cell to generate an electrical signal. An electrically conductive planar member is positioned in the housing to rest on the housing back wall in supporting relation with the solar cell terminal of opposite polarity. The planar member is operable to dissipate heat radiated by the solar cell as the solar cell generates an electrical signal and further forms a solar cell conductor connected with the solar cell terminal to permit the electrical signal generated by the solar cell to be measured between the planar member and the conductor.

  12. Planar photovoltaic solar concentrator module

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, C.J.

    1992-12-01

    A planar photovoltaic concentrator module for producing an electrical signal from incident solar radiation includes an electrically insulating housing having a front wall, an opposing back wall and a hollow interior. A solar cell having electrical terminals is positioned within the interior of the housing. A planar conductor is connected with a terminal of the solar cell of the same polarity. A lens forming the front wall of the housing is operable to direct solar radiation incident to the lens into the interior of the housing. A refractive optical element in contact with the solar cell and facing the lens receives the solar radiation directed into the interior of the housing by the lens and directs the solar radiation to the solar cell to cause the solar cell to generate an electrical signal. An electrically conductive planar member is positioned in the housing to rest on the housing back wall in supporting relation with the solar cell terminal of opposite polarity. The planar member is operable to dissipate heat radiated by the solar cell as the solar cell generates an electrical signal and further forms a solar cell conductor connected with the solar cell terminal to permit the electrical signal generated by the solar cell to be measured between the planar member and the conductor. 5 figs.

  13. Interconnect assembly for an electronic assembly and assembly method therefor

    DOEpatents

    Gerbsch, Erich William

    2003-06-10

    An interconnect assembly and method for a semiconductor device, in which the interconnect assembly can be used in lieu of wirebond connections to form an electronic assembly. The interconnect assembly includes first and second interconnect members. The first interconnect member has a first surface with a first contact and a second surface with a second contact electrically connected to the first contact, while the second interconnect member has a flexible finger contacting the second contact of the first interconnect member. The first interconnect member is adapted to be aligned and registered with a semiconductor device having a contact on a first surface thereof, so that the first contact of the first interconnect member electrically contacts the contact of the semiconductor device. Consequently, the assembly method does not require any wirebonds, but instead merely entails aligning and registering the first interconnect member with the semiconductor device so that the contacts of the first interconnect member and the semiconductor device make electrically contact, and then contacting the second contact of the first interconnect member with the flexible finger of the second interconnect member.

  14. Oxidation Resistant, Cr Retaining, Electrically Conductive Coatings on Metallic Alloys for SOFC Interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimir Gorokhovsky

    2008-03-31

    This report describes significant results from an on-going, collaborative effort to enable the use of inexpensive metallic alloys as interconnects in planar solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) through the use of advanced coating technologies. Arcomac Surface Engineering, LLC, under the leadership of Dr. Vladimir Gorokhovsky, is investigating filtered-arc and filtered-arc plasma-assisted hybrid coating deposition technologies to promote oxidation resistance, eliminate Cr volatility, and stabilize the electrical conductivity of both standard and specialty steel alloys of interest for SOFC metallic interconnect (IC) applications. Arcomac has successfully developed technologies and processes to deposit coatings with excellent adhesion, which have demonstrated a substantial increase in high temperature oxidation resistance, stabilization of low Area Specific Resistance values and significantly decrease Cr volatility. An extensive matrix of deposition processes, coating compositions and architectures was evaluated. Technical performance of coated and uncoated sample coupons during exposures to SOFC interconnect-relevant conditions is discussed, and promising future directions are considered. Cost analyses have been prepared based on assessment of plasma processing parameters, which demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed surface engineering process for SOFC metallic IC applications.

  15. Mechanical reliability and life prediction of coated metallic interconnects within solid oxide fuel cells

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, Zhijie; Xu, Wei; Stephens, Elizabeth; ...

    2017-07-03

    Metallic cell interconnects (IC) made of ferritic stainless steels, i.e., iron-based alloys, have been increasingly favored in the recent development of planar solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) because of their advantages in excellent imperviousness, low electrical resistance, ease in fabrication, and cost effectiveness. Typical SOFC operating conditions inevitably lead to the formation of oxide scales on the surface of ferritic stainless steel, which could cause delamination, buckling, and spallation resulting from the mismatch of the coefficient of thermal expansion and eventually reduce the lifetime of the interconnect components. Various protective coating techniques have been applied to alleviate these drawbacks. Inmore » the present work, a fracture-mechanics-based quantitative modeling framework has been established to predict the mechanical reliability and lifetime of the spinel-coated, surface-modified specimens under an isothermal cooling cycle. Analytical solutions have been formulated to evaluate the scale/substrate interfacial strength and determine the critical oxide thickness in terms of a variety of design factors, such as coating thickness, material properties, and uncertainties. In conclusion, the findings then are correlated with the experimentally measured oxide scale growth kinetics to quantify the predicted lifetime of the metallic interconnects.« less

  16. Engineering interconnected 3D vascular networks in hydrogels using molded sodium alginate lattice as the sacrificial template.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-Ying; Jin, Zi-He; Gan, Bo-Wen; Lv, Song-Wei; Xie, Min; Huang, Wei-Hua

    2014-08-07

    Engineering 3D perfusable vascular networks in vitro and reproducing the physiological environment of blood vessels is very challenging for tissue engineering and investigation of blood vessel function. Here, we engineer interconnected 3D microfluidic vascular networks in hydrogels using molded sodium alginate lattice as sacrificial templates. The sacrificial templates are rapidly replicated in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic chips via Ca⁺²-crosslinking and then fully encapsulated in hydrogels. Interconnected channels with well controlled size and morphology are obtained by dissolving the monolayer or multilayer templates with EDTA solution. The human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) are cultured on the channel linings and proliferated to form vascular lumens. The strong cell adhesion capability and adaptive response to shear stress demonstrate the excellent cytocompatibility of both the template and template-sacrificing process. Furthermore, the barrier function of the endothelial layer is characterized and the results show that a confluent endothelial monolayer is fully developed. Taken together, we develop a facile and rapid approach to engineer a vascular model that could be potentially used in physiological studies of vascular functions and vascular tissue engineering.

  17. Quasi-3D Modeling and Efficient Simulation of Laminar Flows in Microfluidic Devices.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Zahurul; Tsui, Ying Yin

    2016-10-03

    A quasi-3D model has been developed to simulate the flow in planar microfluidic systems with low Reynolds numbers. The model was developed by decomposing the flow profile along the height of a microfluidic system into a Fourier series. It was validated against the analytical solution for flow in a straight rectangular channel and the full 3D numerical COMSOL Navier-Stokes solver for flow in a T-channel. Comparable accuracy to the full 3D numerical solution was achieved by using only three Fourier terms with a significant decrease in computation time. The quasi-3D model was used to model flows in a micro-flow cytometer chip on a desktop computer and good agreement between the simulation and the experimental results was found.

  18. Microfluidic Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensors: From Principles to Point-of-Care Applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Da-Shin; Fan, Shih-Kang

    2016-07-27

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is a label-free, highly-sensitive, and real-time sensing technique. Conventional SPR sensors, which involve a planar thin gold film, have been widely exploited in biosensing; various miniaturized formats have been devised for portability purposes. Another type of SPR sensor which utilizes localized SPR (LSPR), is based on metal nanostructures with surface plasmon modes at the structural interface. The resonance condition is sensitive to the refractive index change of the local medium. The principles of these two types of SPR sensors are reviewed and their integration with microfluidic platforms is described. Further applications of microfluidic SPR sensors to point-of-care (POC) diagnostics are discussed.

  19. Microfluidic linear hydrogel array for multiplexed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yun Kyung; Kim, Jungkyu; Mathies, Richard A

    2015-03-17

    A PDMS-based microfluidic linear hydrogel array is developed for multiplexed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection. A sequence of three-dimensional (3D) hydrogel plugs containing the desired DNA probes is prepared by UV polymerization within a PDMS microchannel system. The fluorescently labeled target DNA is then electrophoresed through the sequence of hydrogel plugs for hybridization. Continued electrophoresis provides an electrophoretic wash that removes nonspecific binders. The capture gel array is imaged after washing at various temperatures (temperature gradient electrophoresis) to further distinguish perfect matches from mismatches. The ability of this microdevice to perform multiplex SNP genotyping is demonstrated by analyzing a mixture of model E. coli bacterial targets. This microfluidic hydrogel array is ∼1000 times more sensitive than planar microarrays due to the 3D gel capture, the hybridization time is much shorter due to electrophoretic control of the transport properties, and the stringent wash with temperature gradient electrophoresis enables analysis of single nucleotide mismatches with high specificity.

  20. Microfluidic Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensors: From Principles to Point-of-Care Applications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Da-Shin; Fan, Shih-Kang

    2016-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is a label-free, highly-sensitive, and real-time sensing technique. Conventional SPR sensors, which involve a planar thin gold film, have been widely exploited in biosensing; various miniaturized formats have been devised for portability purposes. Another type of SPR sensor which utilizes localized SPR (LSPR), is based on metal nanostructures with surface plasmon modes at the structural interface. The resonance condition is sensitive to the refractive index change of the local medium. The principles of these two types of SPR sensors are reviewed and their integration with microfluidic platforms is described. Further applications of microfluidic SPR sensors to point-of-care (POC) diagnostics are discussed. PMID:27472340