Science.gov

Sample records for plane geometry

  1. Structure analysis for plane geometry figures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Tianxiao; Lu, Xiaoqing; Liu, Lu; Li, Keqiang; Tang, Zhi

    2013-12-01

    As there are increasing numbers of digital documents for education purpose, we realize that there is not a retrieval application for mathematic plane geometry images. In this paper, we propose a method for retrieving plane geometry figures (PGFs), which often appear in geometry books and digital documents. First, detecting algorithms are applied to detect common basic geometry shapes from a PGF image. Based on all basic shapes, we analyze the structural relationships between two basic shapes and combine some of them to a compound shape to build the PGF descriptor. Afterwards, we apply matching function to retrieve candidate PGF images with ranking. The great contribution of the paper is that we propose a structure analysis method to better describe the spatial relationships in such image composed of many overlapped shapes. Experimental results demonstrate that our analysis method and shape descriptor can obtain good retrieval results with relatively high effectiveness and efficiency.

  2. A method of plane geometry primitive presentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Anbo; Luo, Haibo; Chang, Zheng; Hui, Bin

    2014-11-01

    Point feature and line feature are basic elements in object feature sets, and they play an important role in object matching and recognition. On one hand, point feature is sensitive to noise; on the other hand, there are usually a huge number of point features in an image, which makes it complex for matching. Line feature includes straight line segment and curve. One difficulty in straight line segment matching is the uncertainty of endpoint location, the other is straight line segment fracture problem or short straight line segments joined to form long straight line segment. While for the curve, in addition to the above problems, there is another difficulty in how to quantitatively describe the shape difference between curves. Due to the problems of point feature and line feature, the robustness and accuracy of target description will be affected; in this case, a method of plane geometry primitive presentation is proposed to describe the significant structure of an object. Firstly, two types of primitives are constructed, they are intersecting line primitive and blob primitive. Secondly, a line segment detector (LSD) is applied to detect line segment, and then intersecting line primitive is extracted. Finally, robustness and accuracy of the plane geometry primitive presentation method is studied. This method has a good ability to obtain structural information of the object, even if there is rotation or scale change of the object in the image. Experimental results verify the robustness and accuracy of this method.

  3. Results from electrostatic calibrations for measuring the Casimir force in the cylinder-plane geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Q.; Dalvit, D. A. R.; Lombardo, F. C.; Mazzitelli, F. D.; Onofrio, R.

    2010-05-15

    We report on measurements performed on an apparatus aimed to study the Casimir force in the cylinder-plane configuration. The electrostatic calibrations evidence anomalous behaviors in the dependence of the electrostatic force and the minimizing potential upon distance. We discuss analogies and differences of these anomalies with respect to those already observed in the sphere-plane configuration. At the smallest explored distances we observe frequency shifts of non-Coulombian nature preventing the measurement of the Casimir force in the same range. We also report on measurements performed in the parallel-plane configuration, showing that the dependence on distance of the minimizing potential, if present at all, is milder than in the sphere-plane or cylinder-plane geometries. General considerations on the interplay between the distance-dependent minimizing potential and the precision of Casimir force measurements in the range relevant to detect the thermal corrections for all geometries are finally reported.

  4. Validating Phasing and Geometry of Large Focal Plane Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Standley, Shaun P.; Gautier, Thomas N.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Rabbette, Maura

    2011-01-01

    The Kepler Mission is designed to survey our region of the Milky Way galaxy to discover hundreds of Earth-sized and smaller planets in or near the habitable zone. The Kepler photometer is an array of 42 CCDs (charge-coupled devices) in the focal plane of a 95-cm Schmidt camera onboard the Kepler spacecraft. Each 50x25-mm CCD has 2,200 x 1,024 pixels. The CCDs accumulate photons and are read out every six seconds to prevent saturation. The data is integrated for 30 minutes, and then the pixel data is transferred to onboard storage. The data is subsequently encoded and transmitted to the ground. During End-to-End Information System (EEIS) testing of the Kepler Mission System (KMS), there was a need to verify that the pixels requested by the science team operationally were correctly collected, encoded, compressed, stored, and transmitted by the FS, and subsequently received, decoded, uncompressed, and displayed by the Ground Segment (GS) without the outputs of any CCD modules being flipped, mirrored, or otherwise corrupted during the extensive FS and GS processing. This would normally be done by projecting an image on the focal plane array (FPA), collecting the data in a flight-like way, and making a comparison between the original data and the data reconstructed by the science data system. Projecting a focused image onto the FPA through the telescope would normally involve using a collimator suspended over the telescope opening. There were several problems with this approach: the collimation equipment is elaborate and expensive; as conceived, it could only illuminate a limited section of the FPA (.25 percent) during a given test; the telescope cover would have to be deployed during testing to allow the image to be projected into the telescope; the equipment was bulky and difficult to situate in temperature-controlled environments; and given all the above, test setup, execution, and repeatability were significant concerns. Instead of using this complicated approach of

  5. Investigating Plane Geometry Problem-Solving Strategies of Prospective Mathematics Teachers in Technology and Paper-and-Pencil Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koyuncu, Ilhan; Akyuz, Didem; Cakiroglu, Erdinc

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate plane geometry problem-solving strategies of prospective mathematics teachers using dynamic geometry software (DGS) and paper-and-pencil (PPB) environments after receiving an instruction with GeoGebra (GGB). Four plane geometry problems were used in a multiple case study design to understand the solution strategies…

  6. Effect of Bubbles on Liquid Nitrogen Breakdown in Plane-Plane Electrode Geometry From 100-250 kPa

    SciTech Connect

    Sauers, Isidor; James, David Randy; Tuncer, Enis; Polyzos, Georgios; Pace, Marshall O

    2011-01-01

    Liquid nitrogen (LN(2)) is used as the cryogen and dielectric for many high temperature superconducting, high voltage applications. When a quench in the superconductor occurs, bubbles are generated which can affect the dielectric breakdown properties of the LN(2). Experiments were performed using plane-plane electrode geometry where bubbles were introduced into the gap through a pinhole in the ground electrode. Bubbles were generated using one or more kapton heaters producing heater powers up to 30 W. Pressure was varied from 100-250 kPa. Breakdown strength was found to be relatively constant up to a given heater power and pressure at which the breakdown strength drops to a low value depending on the pressure. After the drop the breakdown strength continues to drop gradually at higher heater power. This is particularly illustrated at 100 kPa. After the drop in breakdown strength the breakdown is believed to be due to the formation of a vapor bridge. Also the heater power at which the breakdown strength changes from that of LN(2) to that of gaseous nitrogen increases with increasing pressure. The data can provide design constraints for high temperature superconducting fault current limiters (FCLs) so that the formation of a vapor bridge can be suppressed or avoided.

  7. RMT focal plane sensitivity to seismic network geometry and faulting style

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kendra L.; Hayes, Gavin P.; Herrmann, Robert B.; Benz, Harley M.; McNamara, Dan E.; Bergman, Eric

    2016-07-01

    Modern tectonic studies often use regional moment tensors (RMTs) to interpret the seismotectonic framework of an earthquake or earthquake sequence; however, despite extensive use, little existing work addresses RMT parameter uncertainty. Here, we quantify how network geometry and faulting style affect RMT sensitivity. We examine how data-model fits change with fault plane geometry (strike and dip) for varying station configurations. We calculate the relative data fit for incrementally varying geometries about a best-fitting solution, applying our workflow to real and synthetic seismograms for both real and hypothetical station distributions and earthquakes. Initially, we conduct purely observational tests, computing RMTs from synthetic seismograms for hypothetical earthquakes and a series of well-behaved network geometries. We then incorporate real data and station distributions from the International Maule Aftershock Deployment (IMAD), which recorded aftershocks of the 2010 MW 8.8 Maule earthquake, and a set of regional stations capturing the ongoing earthquake sequence in Oklahoma and southern Kansas. We consider RMTs computed under three scenarios: (1) real seismic records selected for high data quality; (2) synthetic seismic records with noise computed for the observed source-station pairings and (3) synthetic seismic records with noise computed for all possible station-source pairings. To assess RMT sensitivity for each test, we observe the `fit falloff', which portrays how relative fit changes when strike or dip varies incrementally; we then derive the ranges of acceptable strikes and dips by identifying the span of solutions with relative fits larger than 90 per cent of the best fit. For the azimuthally incomplete IMAD network, Scenario 3 best constrains fault geometry, with average ranges of 45° and 31° for strike and dip, respectively. In Oklahoma, Scenario 3 best constrains fault dip with an average range of 46°; however, strike is best constrained by

  8. RMT focal plane sensitivity to seismic network geometry and faulting style

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Kendra L.; Hayes, Gavin; Herrmann, Robert B.; Benz, Harley M.; McNamara, Daniel E.; Bergman, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    Modern tectonic studies often use regional moment tensors (RMTs) to interpret the seismotectonic framework of an earthquake or earthquake sequence; however, despite extensive use, little existing work addresses RMT parameter uncertainty. Here, we quantify how network geometry and faulting style affect RMT sensitivity. We examine how data-model fits change with fault plane geometry (strike and dip) for varying station configurations. We calculate the relative data fit for incrementally varying geometries about a best-fitting solution, applying our workflow to real and synthetic seismograms for both real and hypothetical station distributions and earthquakes. Initially, we conduct purely observational tests, computing RMTs from synthetic seismograms for hypothetical earthquakes and a series of well-behaved network geometries. We then incorporate real data and station distributions from the International Maule Aftershock Deployment (IMAD), which recorded aftershocks of the 2010 MW 8.8 Maule earthquake, and a set of regional stations capturing the ongoing earthquake sequence in Oklahoma and southern Kansas. We consider RMTs computed under three scenarios: (1) real seismic records selected for high data quality; (2) synthetic seismic records with noise computed for the observed source-station pairings and (3) synthetic seismic records with noise computed for all possible station-source pairings. To assess RMT sensitivity for each test, we observe the ‘fit falloff’, which portrays how relative fit changes when strike or dip varies incrementally; we then derive the ranges of acceptable strikes and dips by identifying the span of solutions with relative fits larger than 90 per cent of the best fit. For the azimuthally incomplete IMAD network, Scenario 3 best constrains fault geometry, with average ranges of 45° and 31° for strike and dip, respectively. In Oklahoma, Scenario 3 best constrains fault dip with an average range of 46°; however, strike is best constrained

  9. Developing framework to constrain the geometry of the seismic rupture plane on subduction interfaces a priori - A probabilistic approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayes, G.P.; Wald, D.J.

    2009-01-01

    A key step in many earthquake source inversions requires knowledge of the geometry of the fault surface on which the earthquake occurred. Our knowledge of this surface is often uncertain, however, and as a result fault geometry misinterpretation can map into significant error in the final temporal and spatial slip patterns of these inversions. Relying solely on an initial hypocentre and CMT mechanism can be problematic when establishing rupture characteristics needed for rapid tsunami and ground shaking estimates. Here, we attempt to improve the quality of fast finite-fault inversion results by combining several independent and complementary data sets to more accurately constrain the geometry of the seismic rupture plane of subducting slabs. Unlike previous analyses aimed at defining the general form of the plate interface, we require mechanisms and locations of the seismicity considered in our inversions to be consistent with their occurrence on the plate interface, by limiting events to those with well-constrained depths and with CMT solutions indicative of shallow-dip thrust faulting. We construct probability density functions about each location based on formal assumptions of their depth uncertainty and use these constraints to solve for the ‘most-likely’ fault plane. Examples are shown for the trench in the source region of the Mw 8.6 Southern Sumatra earthquake of March 2005, and for the Northern Chile Trench in the source region of the November 2007 Antofagasta earthquake. We also show examples using only the historic catalogues in regions without recent great earthquakes, such as the Japan and Kamchatka Trenches. In most cases, this method produces a fault plane that is more consistent with all of the data available than is the plane implied by the initial hypocentre and CMT mechanism. Using the aggregated data sets, we have developed an algorithm to rapidly determine more accurate initial fault plane geometries for source inversions of future

  10. Digital holography wavefront sensing in the pupil-plane recording geometry for distributed-volume atmospheric aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banet, Matthias T.; Spencer, Mark F.; Raynor, Robert A.; Marker, Dan K.

    2016-09-01

    Digital holography in the pupil-plane recording geometry shows promise as a wavefront sensor for use in adaptive-optics systems. Because current wavefront sensors suffer from decreased performance in the presence of turbulence and thermal blooming, there is a need for a more robust wavefront sensor in such distributed-volume atmospheric conditions. Digital holography fulfills this roll by accurately estimating the wrapped phase of the complex optical field after propagation through the atmosphere to the pupil plane of an optical system. This paper examines wave-optics simulations of spherical-wave propagation through both turbulence and thermal blooming; it also quantifies the performance of digital holography as a wavefront sensor by generating field-estimated Strehl ratios as a function of the number of pixels in the detector array, the Rytov number, and the Fried coherence diameter. Altogether the results indicate that digital holography wavefront sensing in the pupil-plane recording geometry is a valid and accurate method for estimating the wrapped phase of the complex optical field in the presence of distributed-volume atmospheric aberrations.

  11. The influence of out-of-plane geometry on pulsatile flow within a distal end-to-side anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Papaharilaou, Y; Doorly, D J; Sherwin, S J

    2002-09-01

    We present an experimental and computational investigation of time-varying flow in an idealized fully occluded 45 degrees distal end-to-side anastomosis. Two geometric configurations are assessed, one where the centerlines of host and bypass vessels lie within a plane, and one where the bypass vessel is deformed out of the plane of symmetry, respectively, termed planar and non-planar. Flow experiments were conducted by magnetic resonance imaging in rigid wall models and computations were performed using a high order spectral/hp algorithm. Results indicate a significant change in the spatial distribution of wall shear stress and a reduction of the time-averaged peak wall shear stress magnitude by 10% in the non-planar model as compared to the planar configuration. In the planar geometry the stagnation point follows a straight-line path along the host artery bed with a path length of 0.8 diameters. By contrast in the non-planar case the stagnation point oscillates about a center that is located off the symmetry plane intersection with the host artery bed wall, and follows a parabolic path with a 0.7 diameter longitudinal and 0.5 diameter transverse excursion. A definition of the oscillatory shear index (OSI) is introduced that varies between 0 and 0.5 and that accounts for a continuous range of wall shear stress vector angles. In both models, regions of elevated oscillatory shear were spatially associated with regions of separated or oscillating stagnation point flow. The mean oscillatory shear magnitude (considering sites where OSI>0.1) in the non-planar geometry was reduced by 22% as compared to the planar configuration. These changes in the dynamic behavior of the stagnation point and the oscillatory shear distribution introduced by out-of-plane graft curvature may influence the localization of vessel wall sites exposed to physiologically unfavorable flow conditions.

  12. Varying assay geometry to emulate connective tissue planes in an in vitro model of acupuncture needling

    PubMed Central

    Julias, Margaret; Buettner, Helen M.; Shreiber, David I.

    2011-01-01

    During traditional acupuncture, fine needles are inserted subcutaneously and rotated, which causes loose fascial tissue to wind around the needle. This coupling is stronger at acupuncture points, which tend to fall above intermuscular fascial planes, than control points, which lay above skeletal muscle. These different anatomical constraints may affect the mechanical coupling. Fascia at acupuncture points is bounded on two sides by skeletal muscle, but at control points is essentially unbounded. These differences were approximated in simple in vitro models. To emulate the narrower boundary within the intermuscular plane, type 1 collagen was cast in circular gels of different radii. To model the channel-like nature of these planes, collagen was cast in elliptical gels with major and minor axes matching the large and small circular gels, respectively, and in planar gels constrained on two sides. Acupuncture needles were inserted into the gels and rotated via a computer-controlled motor while capturing the evolution of fiber alignment under cross-polarization. Small circular gels aligned faster, but failed earlier than large circular gels. Rotation in elliptical and planar gels generated more alignment-per-revolution than circular gels. Planar gels were particularly resistant to failure. Fiber alignment in circular gels was isotropic, but was stronger in the direction of the minor axis in elliptical and planar gels. In fibroblast-populated gels, cells followed the alignment of the collagen fibers, and also became denser in regions of stronger alignment. These results suggest that the anatomy at acupuncture points provides unique boundaries that accentuate the mechanical response to needle manipulation. PMID:21234998

  13. Formation of miscible fluid microstructures by hydrodynamic focusing in plane geometries.

    PubMed

    Cubaud, Thomas; Mason, Thomas G

    2008-11-01

    We experimentally investigate the flow structures formed when two miscible fluids that have large viscosity contrasts are injected and hydrodynamically focused in plane microchannels. Parallel viscous flows composed of a central stream surrounded by symmetric sheath streams are examined as a function of the flow rates, fluid viscosities, and rates of molecular diffusion. We study miscible interfacial morphologies and show a route for manipulating viscous flow-segregation processes in plane microsystems. The diffusion layer at the boundary of an ensheathed fluid grows as function of the distance downstream and depends on the Péclet number. In particular, we observe diffusion-enhanced viscous ensheathing processes. In the presence of a constriction, we investigate the formation of a lubricated viscous thread in the converging flow and also the buckling morphologies of the thread in the diverging flow. This study, relevant to multifluid flow between a "thick" material and a "thin" solvent, demonstrates the possibility to further control steady and oscillatory miscible fluid microstructures.

  14. Control of fault plane geometry on the formation of a normal fault-related anticline: an experimental approach.

    PubMed

    Long, Wei; Li, Zhongquan; Li, Ying; Chen, Junliang; Li, Hongkui; Wan, Shuangshuang

    2017-12-01

    In one of the largest oil-gas fields in Daqing, China, the anticlines are important structures that hold natural gas. The origin of the symmetric anticlines, which have bends on both the limbs, remains under debate. This is especially true in the case of the anticline in Xujiaweizi (XJWZ), which has recently been the focus of gas exploration. A compressive force introduced by a ramp/flat fault was suggested as its origin of formation; however, this is inconsistent with the reconstruction of the regional stress fields, which show an extensive environment. An alternative explanation suggests a normal fault-related fold under extensive stress. However, this mechanism has difficulty explaining the very localized, rather than wide-spread, development of the anticline along the proposed controlling normal fault. The well-developed bends on both limbs of the anticline are also very different from the typical roll-over anticline. Here, we conduct an experimental study showing that the very localized development of the bent-on-both-limbs anticline is controlled by the geometry of the underlying fault-plane. A ramp/flat fault plane can introduce an anticline with bends on both limbs, while a smooth fault plane will develop a roll-over anticline with a bend on only one limb.

  15. Investigation of flaw geometry and loading effects on plane strain fracture in metallic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, L. R.; Finger, R. W.

    1971-01-01

    The effects on fracture and flaw growth of weld-induced residual stresses, combined bending and tension stresses, and stress fields adjacent to circular holes in 2219-T87 aluminum and 5AI-2.5Sn(ELI) titanium alloys were evaluated. Static fracture tests were conducted in liquid nitrogen; fatigue tests were performed in room air, liquid nitrogen, and liquid hydrogen. Evaluation of results was based on linear elastic fracture mechanics concepts and was directed to improving existing methods of estimating minimum fracture strength and fatigue lives for pressurized structure in spacecraft and booster systems. Effects of specimen design in plane-strain fracture toughness testing were investigated. Four different specimen types were tested in room air, liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen environments using the aluminum and titanium alloys. Interferometry and holograph were used to measure crack-opening displacements in surface-flawed plexiglass test specimens. Comparisons were made between stress intensities calculated using displacement measurements, and approximate analytical solutions.

  16. Dielectric Barrier Discharges in Helium at Atmospheric Pressure: Experiments and Model in the Needle-Plane Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radu, Ion; Bartnikas, Raymond; Wertheimer, Michael

    2002-10-01

    We present an experimental and theoretical modeling study of "dielectric barrier discharges" (DBD) at atmospheric pressure in a needle-plane configuration. Synchronous, Ultra High Speed Imaging (UHSI, using a Princeton Instruments PI-MAX 512RB Digital ICCD Camera System) and real-time dual detection (optical-electrical) diagnostics have been carried out in a flow of He. A phase-resolved synchronizing circuit was used to trigger the ICCD camera's shutter for durations varying from 2 ns up to 100 ms. All diagnostics, including the PI-MAX images, could be precisely synchronized and processed on a PC computer. The high voltage electrode was a steel needle with a sharp point of precisely-machined radius, while a thin (1.6 mm) ceramic (Al2O3) plate with a metallized bottom surface was used as the ground electrode. Three different situations have been studied, namely (i) the bare Al2O3, and with an ultra-thin coatings of (ii) graphite (a semiconductor) or (iii) metal, the latter two at floating potential. The purpose of these experiments was to investigate possible effects of surface charging on the discharge behavior [1]. The axial [y(t)] and radial [x(t)] time evolutions of the discharge have been measured by UHSI, plotted, and found to differ very significantly among cases (i) to (iii). In the needle-plane configuration (like in the plane-plane case), the DBD is characterized by a single pulse per half-period of the applied voltage. A two-dimensional model of the needle-plane discharge, based upon the continuity equations for electrons, ions, excited particles, and the Poisson equation, is developed; it assumes a low degree of ionization, so that the transport coefficients of the gas are uniquely determined by the local electric field [2]. In order to determine the electric field and the electrical potential in the (hyperboloidal) needle-plane geometry, the finite element method is used. We have found excellent agreement between measured and calculated [y(t)] and [x

  17. Design of a 1 DOF MEMS motion stage for a parallel plane geometry rheometer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong-Sik; Dagalakis, Nicholas G.; Ferraris, Chiara; Avramov-Zamurovic, Svetlana

    2016-01-01

    Rotational rheometers are used to measure paste properties, but the test would take too long to be useful for quality control (QC) on the job site. In this paper, a new type of rheometer is proposed based on a one degree of freedom (DOF) micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS)-based motion stage. Preliminary data will be presented to show the capability of the system to measure the viscoelastic properties of a paste. The parallel plate geometry rheometer consists of two plates, which move relative to each other to apply a strain to the material to be tested. From the stress measured and the strain applied, the rheological characteristics of the material can be calculated. The new device consists of an electrothermal actuator and a motion plate. For the rheological measurements, the device is designed to generate the shear stress up to 60 Pa and maintain its stiffness to less than 44 N/m. With these features, the device uses a square plate of 1.5 mm x 1.5 mm to provide enough area for a few micro-liter level volumes. The motion of the square plate is monitored by a capacitive sensor at the end of the oscillating plate which has a resolution of 1.06 μm. When a reference cementitious paste, Standard Reference Material (SRM)-2492, is placed between the oscillating plate of the presented motion stage and a fixed plate, the reduction in the displacement of the oscillating plate is monitored showing that the presented motion stage is reasonably designed to detect the response of the reference cementitious paste. PMID:27088006

  18. Design of a 1 DOF MEMS motion stage for a parallel plane geometry rheometer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Sik; Dagalakis, Nicholas G; Ferraris, Chiara; Avramov-Zamurovic, Svetlana

    2015-12-01

    Rotational rheometers are used to measure paste properties, but the test would take too long to be useful for quality control (QC) on the job site. In this paper, a new type of rheometer is proposed based on a one degree of freedom (DOF) micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS)-based motion stage. Preliminary data will be presented to show the capability of the system to measure the viscoelastic properties of a paste. The parallel plate geometry rheometer consists of two plates, which move relative to each other to apply a strain to the material to be tested. From the stress measured and the strain applied, the rheological characteristics of the material can be calculated. The new device consists of an electrothermal actuator and a motion plate. For the rheological measurements, the device is designed to generate the shear stress up to 60 Pa and maintain its stiffness to less than 44 N/m. With these features, the device uses a square plate of 1.5 mm x 1.5 mm to provide enough area for a few micro-liter level volumes. The motion of the square plate is monitored by a capacitive sensor at the end of the oscillating plate which has a resolution of 1.06 μm. When a reference cementitious paste, Standard Reference Material (SRM)-2492, is placed between the oscillating plate of the presented motion stage and a fixed plate, the reduction in the displacement of the oscillating plate is monitored showing that the presented motion stage is reasonably designed to detect the response of the reference cementitious paste.

  19. Advancing techniques to constrain the geometry of the seismic rupture plane on subduction interfaces a priori: Higher-order functional fits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayes, G.P.; Wald, D.J.; Keranen, K.

    2009-01-01

    Ongoing developments in earthquake source inversions incorporate nonplanar fault geometries as inputs to the inversion process, improving previous approaches that relied solely on planar fault surfaces. This evolution motivates advancing the existing framework for constraining fault geometry, particularly in subduction zones where plate boundary surfaces that host highly hazardous earthquakes are clearly nonplanar. Here, we improve upon the existing framework for the constraint of the seismic rupture plane of subduction interfaces by incorporating active seismic and seafloor sediment thickness data with existing independent data sets and inverting for the most probable nonplanar subduction geometry. Constraining the rupture interface a priori with independent geological and seismological information reduces the uncertainty in the derived earthquake source inversion parameters over models that rely on simpler assumptions, such as the moment tensor inferred fault plane. Examples are shown for a number of wellconstrained global locations. We expand the coverage of previous analyses to a more uniform global data set and show that even in areas of sparse data this approach is able to accurately constrain the approximate subduction geometry, particularly when aided with the addition of data from local active seismic surveys. In addition, we show an example of the integration of many two-dimensional profiles into a threedimensional surface for the Sunda subduction zone and introduce the development of a new global threedimensional subduction interface model: Slab1.0. ?? 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. Study of the in-plane magnetic structure of a layered system using polarized neutron scattering under grazing incidence geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, R.; Bigault, T.; Wildes, A. R.; Dewhurst, C. D.; Soyama, K.; Courtois, P.

    2016-05-01

    The in-plane magnetic structure of a layered system with a polycrystalline grain size less than the ferromagnetic exchange length was investigated using polarized neutron off-specular scattering and grazing incidence small angle scattering measurements to gain insight into the mechanism that controls the magnetic properties which are different from the bulk. These complementary measurements with different length scales and the data analysis based on the distorted wave Born approximation revealed the lateral correlation on a length scale of sub- μm due to the fluctuating orientation of the magnetization in the layer. The obtained in-plane magnetic structure is consistent with the random anisotropy model, i.e. competition between the exchange interactions between neighboring spins and the local magnetocrystalline anisotropy.

  1. Dielectric barrier discharges in helium at atmospheric pressure: experiments and model in the needle-plane geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radu, I.; Bartnikas, R.; Wertheimer, M. R.

    2003-06-01

    We present an experimental and numerical modelling study of dielectric barrier discharges in pure, flowing helium at atmospheric pressure, in a 3.0 mm length needle-plane gap. Ultra-high speed imaging and synchronous, real-time dual detection (optical-electrical) diagnostics have been carried out. The high-voltage electrode was a hyperboloidal steel needle with a sharp point of 40 mum radius, while the grounded electrode was covered with 1.6 mm of Al2O3. The surface of the latter was either bare (case 1) or coated with ~20 nm of semiconducting graphite (case 2) or metallic aluminium (case 3), all at floating potential. Axial [z(t)] and radial [r(t)] time-evolutions (leq2 mus) of discharge propagation across the gap were found to depend very strongly upon surface charging or conduction (cases 1-3). A two-dimensional model of the needle-plane discharge, based on coupled solution of the continuity equations for electrons, ions and excited neutral particles and of Poisson's equation, was found to agree very well with the observed [r,z](t) behaviour.

  2. Differentialless geometry of plane curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latecki, Longin J.; Rosenfeld, Azriel

    1997-10-01

    We introduce a class of planar arcs and curves, called tame arcs, which is general enough to describe the boundaries of planar real objects. A tame arc can have smooth parts as well as sharp corners; thus a polygonal arc is tame. On the other hand, this class of arcs is restrictive enough to rule out pathological arcs which have infinitely many inflections or which turn infinitely often: a tame arc can have only finitely many inflections, and its total absolute turn must be finite. In order to relate boundary properties of discrete objects obtained by segmenting digital images to the corresponding properties of their continuous originals, the theory of tame arcs is based on concepts that can be directly transferred from the continuous to the discrete domain. A tame arc is composed of a finite number of supported arcs. We define supported digital arcs and motivate their definition by the fact that hey can be obtained by digitizing continuous supported arcs. Every digital arc is tame, since it contains a finite number of points, and therefore it can be decomposed into a finite number of supported digital arcs.

  3. Euclidean Geometry via Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filimonov, Rossen; Kreith, Kurt

    1992-01-01

    Describes the Plane Geometry System computer software developed at the Educational Computer Systems laboratory in Sofia, Bulgaria. The system enables students to use the concept of "algorithm" to correspond to the process of "deductive proof" in the development of plane geometry. Provides an example of the software's capability…

  4. A COMPARISON OF LINEAR AND BRANCHING TECHNIQUES OF PROGRAMED INSTRUCTION IN PLANE GEOMETRY. COMPARATIVE STUDIES OF PRINCIPLES FOR PROGRAMING MATHEMATICS IN AUTOMATED INSTRUCTION, TECHNICAL REPORT NO. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BEANE, DONALD G.

    SIXTY-FIVE STUDENTS IN TWO CLASSES IN HIGH SCHOOL GEOMETRY WERE ASSIGNED BY STRATIFIED RANDOM PROCEDURE ON THE BASIS OF THE HENNON-NELSON TEST OF MENTAL ABILITY TO FOUR EXPERIMENTAL GROUPS--TWO USING A LINEAR OR A BRANCHING TYPE PROGRAM EXCLUSIVELY, AND TWO SWITCHING PROGRAM TYPE MIDWAY THROUGH THE EXPERIMENT. A THIRD CLASS, TAUGHT BY THE SAME…

  5. Automatic gonio-spectrophotometer for the absolute measurement of the spectral BRDF at in- and out-of-plane and retroreflection geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabal, A. M.; Ferrero, A.; Campos, J.; Fontecha, J. L.; Pons, A.; Rubiño, A. M.; Corróns, A.

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents the description and the characterization of the gonio-spectrophotometer GEFE (the acronym for 'Gonio-EspectroFotómetro Español'). This device has been designed and built for the low-uncertainty absolute measurement of the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF). It comprises a fixed, collimated and uniform light source, a six-axis robot-arm to rotate the sample and a spectroradiometer that may revolve around the sample to be able to vary the source-to-detector angular separation. This gonio-spectrophotometer makes it possible to perform spectral measurements in the visible range, both inside and outside the incidence plane, as well as measurements in retroreflection conditions. This fully automated system is able to measure autonomously a sample's complete spectral BRDF (comprising around 1000 different angular configurations) in less than 4 h.

  6. The Method of Centroids in Plane Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinker, Aron

    1980-01-01

    Archimedes viewed the method of centroids as a valuable tool for intuitive discoveries. This article presents several uses of this technique and discusses how the method of centroids could be used in secondary schools. (Author/MK)

  7. GEOMETRY, TENTATIVE GUIDES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KLIER, KATHERINE M.

    PRESENTED IS A FUSED COURSE IN PLANE, SOLID, AND COORDINATE GEOMETRY. ELEMENTARY SET THEORY, LOGIC, AND THE PRINCIPLE OF SEPARATION PROVIDE UNIFYING THREADS THROUGHOUT THE TEXT. THE TWO CURRICULUM GUIDES HAVE BEEN PREPARED FOR USE WITH TWO DIFFERENT TEXTS. EITHER CURRICULUM GUIDE MAY BE USED DEPENDING UPON THE CHOICE OF THE TEACHER AND THE NEEDS…

  8. Core Geometry Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirata, Li Ann

    Core Geometry is a course offered in the Option Y sequence of the high school mathematics program described by the Hawaii State Department of Education's guidelines. The emphasis of this course is on the general awareness and use of the relationships among points, lines, and figures in planes and space. This sample course is based on the…

  9. Analogy and Dynamic Geometry System Used to Introduce Three-Dimensional Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mammana, M. F.; Micale, B.; Pennisi, M.

    2012-01-01

    We present a sequence of classroom activities on Euclidean geometry, both plane and space geometry, used to make three dimensional geometry more catchy and simple. The activity consists of a guided research activity that leads the students to discover unexpected properties of two apparently distant geometrical entities, quadrilaterals and…

  10. Digital scanner infrared focal plane technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, M. A.; Malone, N. R.; Harris, M.; Shin, J.; Byers, S.; Price, D.; Vampola, J.

    2011-09-01

    Advancements in finer geometry and technology advancements in circuit design now allow placement of digital architecture on cryogenic focal planes while using less power than heritage analog designs. These advances in technology reduce the size, weight, and power of modern focal planes. In addition, the interface to the focal plane is significantly simplified and is more immune to Electromagnetic Interference (EMI). The cost of the customer's instrument after integration with the digital scanning Focal Plane Array (FPA) has been significantly reduced by placing digital architecture such as Analog to digital convertors and Low Voltage Differential Signaling (LVDS) Inputs and Outputs (I/O) on the Read Out Integrated Circuit (ROIC).

  11. Molecular Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desseyn, H. O.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Compares linear-nonlinear and planar-nonplanar geometry through the valence-shell electron pairs repulsion (V.S.E.P.R.), Mulliken-Walsh, and electrostatic force theories. Indicates that although the V.S.E.P.R. theory has more advantages for elementary courses, an explanation of the best features of the different theories offers students a better…

  12. The Geometry of the Universe: Part 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    Hyperbolic geometry occurs on hyperbolic planes--the most commonly cited one being a saddle shape. In this article, the author explores negative hyperbolic curvature, and provides a detailed description of how she constructed two hyperbolic paraboloids. Hyperbolic geometry occurs on surfaces that have negative curvature. (Contains 11 figures and 4…

  13. Geometry, Student's Text, Part II, Unit 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Frank B.; And Others

    Unit 14 in the SMSG secondary school mathematics series is a student text covering the following topics in geometry: areas of polygonal regions, similarity, circles and spheres, characterization of sets, constructions, areas of circles and sectors, volumes of solids, and plane coordinate geometry. Appendices cover Eratosthenes' measurement of the…

  14. Geometry, Senior High School Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klier, Katherine M., Ed.

    This syllabus presents a fused course in plane, solid, and coordinate geometry for secondary school students. Elementary set theory, logic, and the principles of separation provide unifying threads throughout this approach to geometry. There are actually two curriculum guides included; one for each of two different texts--Henderson, Pingry, and…

  15. Augmented-plane-wave forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soler, José M.; Williams, Arthur R.

    1990-11-01

    Results are presented that demonstrate the effectiveness of a calculational method of electronic-structure theory. The method combines the power (tractable basis-set size) and flexibility (transition and first-row elements) of the augmented-plane-wave method with the computational efficiency of the Car-Parrinello method of molecular dynamics and total-energy minimization. Equilibrium geometry and vibrational frequencies in agreement with experiment are presented for Si, to demonstrate agreement with existing methods and for Cu, N2, and H2O to demonstrate the broader applicability of the approach.

  16. Enrichment Activities for Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usiskin, Zalman

    1983-01-01

    Enrichment activities that teach about geometry as they instruct in geometry are given for some significant topics. The facets of geometry included are tessellations, round robin tournaments, geometric theorems on triangles, and connections between geometry and complex numbers. (MNS)

  17. Out of plane analysis for composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, P. C.; Saff, C. R.; Sanger, Kenneth B.; Mahler, M. A.; Kan, Han Pin; Kautz, Edward F.

    1990-01-01

    Simple two dimensional analysis techniques were developed to aid in the design of strong joints for integrally stiffened/bonded composite structures subjected to out of plane loads. It was found that most out of plane failures were due to induced stresses arising from rapid changes in load path direction or geometry, induced stresses due to changes in geometry caused by buckling, or direct stresses produced by fuel pressure or bearing loads. While the analysis techniques were developed to address a great variety of out of plane loading conditions, they were primarily derived to address the conditions described above. The methods were developed and verified using existing element test data. The methods were demonstrated using the data from a test failure of a high strain wingbox that was designed, built, and tested under a previous program. Subsequently, a set of design guidelines were assembled to assist in the design of safe, strong integral composite structures using the analysis techniques developed.

  18. Plane Transformations in a Complex Setting I: Homotheties-Translations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dana-Picard, T.

    2006-01-01

    A previous note described how complex numbers can be used for elementary analytic geometry in the plane, describing lines, circles and their intersections using complex Cartesian equations. In the present note, a description of elementary plane transformations, namely homotheties and translations, their group structure and their operations on…

  19. Orientifolded locally AdS3 geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loran, F.; Sheikh-Jabbari, M. M.

    2011-01-01

    Continuing the analysis of [Loran F and Sheikh-Jabbari M M 2010 Phys. Lett. B 693 184-7], we classify all locally AdS3 stationary axi-symmetric unorientable solutions to AdS3 Einstein gravity and show that they are obtained by applying certain orientifold projection on AdS3, BTZ or AdS3 self-dual orbifold, respectively, O-AdS3, O-BTZ and O-SDO geometries. Depending on the orientifold fixed surface, the O-surface, which is either a space-like 2D plane or a cylinder, or a light-like 2D plane or a cylinder, one can distinguish four distinct cases. For the space-like orientifold plane or cylinder cases, these geometries solve AdS3 Einstein equations and are hence locally AdS3 everywhere except at the O-surface, where there is a delta-function source. For the light-like cases, the geometry is a solution to Einstein equations even at the O-surface. We discuss the causal structure for static, extremal and general rotating O-BTZ and O-SDO cases as well as the geodesic motion on these geometries. We also discuss orientifolding Poincaré patch AdS3 and AdS2 geometries as a way to geodesic completion of these spaces and comment on the 2D CFT dual to the O-geometries.

  20. Seismological Constraints on Fault Plane Curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, K.

    2015-12-01

    The down-dip geometry of seismically active normal faults is not well known. Many examples of normal faults with down-dip curvature exist, such as listric faults revealed in cross-section or in seismic reflection data, or the exposed domes of core complexes. However, it is not understood: (1) whether curved faults fail in earthquakes, and (2) if those faults have generated earthquakes, is the curvature a primary feature of the rupture or due to later modification of the plane? Even if an event is surface-rupturing, because of the limited depth-extent over which observations can be made, it is difficult to reliably constrain the change in dip with depth (if any) and therefore the fault curvature. Despite the uncertainty in seismogenic normal fault geometries, published slip inversions most commonly use planar fault models. We investigate the seismological constraints on normal fault geometry using a forward-modelling approach and present a seismological technique for determining down-dip geometry. We demonstrate that complexity in the shape of teleseismic body waveforms may be used to investigate the presence of down-dip fault plane curvature. We have applied this method to a catalogue of continental and oceanic normal faulting events. Synthetic models demonstrate that the shapes of SH waveforms at along-strike stations are particularly sensitive to fault plane geometry. It is therefore important to consider the azimuthal station coverage before modelling an event. We find that none of the data require significant down-dip curvature, although the modelling results for some events remain ambiguous. In some cases we can constrain that the down-dip fault geometry is within 20° of planar.

  1. Point-to-plane and plane-to-plane electrostatic charge injection atomization for insulating liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkawi, Ghazi

    An electrostatic charge injection atomizer was fabricated and used to introduce and study the electrostatic charge injection atomization methods for highly viscous vegetable oils and high conductivity low viscosity aviation fuel, JP8. The total, spray and leakage currents and spray breakup characteristics for these liquids were investigated and compared with Diesel fuel data. Jet breakup and spray atomization mechanism showed differences for vegetable oils and lower viscosity hydrocarbon fuels. For vegetable oils, a bending/spinning instability phenomenon was observed similar to the phenomenon found in liquid jets of high viscosity polymer solutions. The spray tip lengths and cone angles were presented qualitatively and quantitatively and correlated with the appropriate empirical formulas. The different stages of the breakup mechanisms for such oils, as a function of specific charges and flow rates, were discussed. In order to make this method of atomization more suitable for practical use in high flow rate applications, a blunt face electrode (plane-to-plane) was used as the charge emitter in place of a single pointed electrode (point-to-plane). This allowed the use of a multi-orifice emitter that maintained a specific charge with the flow rate increase which could not be achieved with the needle electrode. The effect of the nozzle geometry, liquid physical properties and applied bulk flow on the spray charge, total charge, maximum critical spray specific charge and electrical efficiency compared with the needle point-to-plane atomizer results was presented. Our investigation revealed that the electrical efficiency of the atomizer is dominated by the charge forced convection rate rather than charge transport by ion motilities and liquid motion by the electric field. As a result of the electric coulomb forces between the electrified jets, the multi-orifice atomizer provided a unique means of dispersing the fuel in a hollow cone with wide angles making the new

  2. Hyperbolic geometry of cosmological attractors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, John Joseph M.; Kallosh, Renata; Linde, Andrei; Roest, Diederik

    2015-08-01

    Cosmological α attractors give a natural explanation for the spectral index ns of inflation as measured by Planck while predicting a range for the tensor-to-scalar ratio r , consistent with all observations, to be measured more precisely in future B-mode experiments. We highlight the crucial role of the hyperbolic geometry of the Poincaré disk or half plane in the supergravity construction. These geometries are isometric under Möbius transformations, which include the shift symmetry of the inflaton field. We introduce a new Kähler potential frame that explicitly preserves this symmetry, enabling the inflaton to be light. Moreover, we include higher-order curvature deformations, which can stabilize a direction orthogonal to the inflationary trajectory. We illustrate this new framework by stabilizing the single superfield α attractors.

  3. Geometry in Medias Res

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cukier, Mimi; Asdourian, Tony; Thakker, Anand

    2012-01-01

    Geometry provides a natural window into what it is like to do mathematics. In the world of geometry, playful experimentation is often more fruitful than following a procedure, and logic plus a few axioms can open new worlds. Nonetheless, teaching a geometry course in a way that combines both rigor and play can be difficult. Many geometry courses…

  4. Learning Geometry through Dynamic Geometry Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forsythe, Sue

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author investigates effective teaching and learning of geometrical concepts using dynamic geometry software (DGS). Based from her students' reactions to her project, the author found that her students' understanding of the concepts was better than if they had learned geometry through paper-based tasks. However, mixing computer…

  5. Fourier plane imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, Daniel Peralta, Luis Grave de; Alharbi, Nouf; Alhusain, Mdhaoui; Bernussi, Ayrton A.

    2014-09-14

    We show how the image of an unresolved photonic crystal can be reconstructed using a single Fourier plane (FP) image obtained with a second camera that was added to a traditional compound microscope. We discuss how Fourier plane imaging microscopy is an application of a remarkable property of the obtained FP images: they contain more information about the photonic crystals than the images recorded by the camera commonly placed at the real plane of the microscope. We argue that the experimental results support the hypothesis that surface waves, contributing to enhanced resolution abilities, were optically excited in the studied photonic crystals.

  6. Characterization of Finite Ground Coplanar Waveguide with Narrow Ground Planes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.; Tentzeris, Emmanouil M.; Katehi, Linda P. B.

    1997-01-01

    Coplanar waveguide with finite width ground planes is characterized through measurements, conformal mapping, and the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) technique for the purpose of determining the optimum ground plane width. The attenuation and effective permittivity of the lines are related to its geometry. It is found that the characteristics of the Finite Ground Coplanar line (FGC) are not dependent on the ground plane width if it is greater than twice the center conductor width, but less than lambda(sub d)/8. In addition, electromagnetic field plots are presented which show for the first time that electric fields in the plane of the substrate terminate on the outer edge of the ground plane, and that the magnitude of these fields is related to the ground plane width.

  7. Geometry and Erdkinder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Nathaniel J.

    2001-01-01

    Chronicles a teacher's first year teaching geometry at the Hershey Montessori Farm School in Huntsburg, Ohio. Instructional methods relied on Euclid primary readings and combined pure abstract logic with practical applications of geometry on the land. The course included geometry background imparted by Montessori elementary materials as well as…

  8. Axial Plane Optical Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tongcang; Ota, Sadao; Kim, Jeongmin; Wong, Zi Jing; Wang, Yuan; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    We present axial plane optical microscopy (APOM) that can, in contrast to conventional microscopy, directly image a sample's cross-section parallel to the optical axis of an objective lens without scanning. APOM combined with conventional microscopy simultaneously provides two orthogonal images of a 3D sample. More importantly, APOM uses only a single lens near the sample to achieve selective-plane illumination microscopy, as we demonstrated by three-dimensional (3D) imaging of fluorescent pollens and brain slices. This technique allows fast, high-contrast, and convenient 3D imaging of structures that are hundreds of microns beneath the surfaces of large biological tissues. PMID:25434770

  9. SNAP focal plane

    SciTech Connect

    Lampton, Michael L.; Kim, A.; Akerlof, C.W.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Astier, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bebek, C.; Bergstrom, L.; Berkovitz, J.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Carithers Jr., W.C.; Commins, E.D.; Day, C.; Deustua, S.E.; DiGennaro,R.; Ealet, A.; Ellis, R.S.; Eriksson, M.; Fruchter, A.; Genat, J.-F.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.; Harris, S.E.; Harvey, P.R.; Heetderks, H.D.; Holland, S.E.; Huterer, D.; Karcher, A.; Kolbe, W.; Krieger, B.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureux, J.; Levi, M.E.; Levin, D.S.; Linder,E.V.; Loken, S.C.; Malina, R.; Massey, R.; McKay, T.; McKee, S.P.; Miquel, R.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi, H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Perlmutter, S.; Pratt, R.; Prieto, E.; Refregier, A.; Rhodes, J.; Robinson, K.; Roe, N.; Sholl, M.; Schubnell, M.; Smadja, G.; Smoot, G.; Spadafora, A.; Tarle, G.; Tomasch,A.; von der Lippe, H.; Vincent, R.; Walder, J.-P.; Wang, G.

    2002-07-29

    The proposed SuperNova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) mission will have a two-meter class telescope delivering diffraction-limited images to an instrumented 0.7 square-degree field sensitive in the visible and near-infrared wavelength regime. We describe the requirements for the instrument suite and the evolution of the focal plane design to the present concept in which all the instrumentation--visible and near-infrared imagers, spectrograph, and star guiders--share one common focal plane.

  10. Blackfolds, plane waves and minimal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armas, Jay; Blau, Matthias

    2015-07-01

    Minimal surfaces in Euclidean space provide examples of possible non-compact horizon geometries and topologies in asymptotically flat space-time. On the other hand, the existence of limiting surfaces in the space-time provides a simple mechanism for making these configurations compact. Limiting surfaces appear naturally in a given space-time by making minimal surfaces rotate but they are also inherent to plane wave or de Sitter space-times in which case minimal surfaces can be static and compact. We use the blackfold approach in order to scan for possible black hole horizon geometries and topologies in asymptotically flat, plane wave and de Sitter space-times. In the process we uncover several new configurations, such as black helicoids and catenoids, some of which have an asymptotically flat counterpart. In particular, we find that the ultraspinning regime of singly-spinning Myers-Perry black holes, described in terms of the simplest minimal surface (the plane), can be obtained as a limit of a black helicoid, suggesting that these two families of black holes are connected. We also show that minimal surfaces embedded in spheres rather than Euclidean space can be used to construct static compact horizons in asymptotically de Sitter space-times.

  11. Precise measurement of planeness.

    PubMed

    Schulz, G; Schwider, J

    1967-06-01

    Interference methods are reviewed-particularly those developed at the German Academy of Sciences in Berlin-with which the deviations of an optically flat surface from the ideal plane can be measured with a high degree of exactness. One aid to achieve this is the relative methods which measure the differences in planeness between two surfaces. These are then used in the absolute methods which determine the absolute planeness of a surface. This absolute determination can be effected in connection with a liquid surface, or (as done by the authors) only by suitable evaluation of relative measurements between unknown plates in various positional combinations. Experimentally, one uses two- or multiple-beam interference fringes of equal thickness(1) or of equal inclination. The fringes are observed visually, scanned, or photographed, and in part several wavelengths or curves of equal density (Aquidensiten) are employed. The survey also brings the following new methods: a relative method, where, with the aid of fringes of superposition, the fringe separation is subdivided equidistantly thus achieving an increase of measuring precision, and an absolute method which determines the deviations of a surface from ideal planeness along arbitrary central sections, without a liquid surface, from four relative interference photographs.

  12. Plane Jane(s).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenman, Geri

    2001-01-01

    Describes an assignment that was used in an advanced drawing class in which the students created self-portraits, breaking up their images using planes and angles to suggest their bone structure. Explains that the students also had to include three realistic portions in their drawings. (CMK)

  13. Colliding plane waves in F(R)=RN gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahamtan, T.; Halilsoy, M.; Habib Mazharimousavi, S.

    2016-10-01

    We identify a region of a specific F( R)= R N gravity solution without external sources which is isometric to the spacetime of colliding plane waves (CPW). The analogy renders construction and collision of plane waves in F( R)= R N gravity possible. The geometry of the interaction region is equivalent to the Reissner-Nordström (RN) one, however there is no Einstein-Maxwell (EM) source --this is made possible by using the model of RN gravity and the parameter N>1 creates the source. For N=1, we naturally recover the plane waves (and their collision) in Einstein's theory.

  14. Developments in special geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohaupt, Thomas; Vaughan, Owen

    2012-02-01

    We review the special geometry of Script N = 2 supersymmetric vector and hypermultiplets with emphasis on recent developments and applications. A new formulation of the local c-map based on the Hesse potential and special real coordinates is presented. Other recent developments include the Euclidean version of special geometry, and generalizations of special geometry to non-supersymmetric theories. As applications we disucss the proof that the local r-map and c-map preserve geodesic completeness, and the construction of four- and five-dimensional static solutions through dimensional reduction over time. The shared features of the real, complex and quaternionic version of special geometry are stressed throughout.

  15. Parameter Plane Design Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    Th usr a toente aninteer a thca sms b esta 1 Fp-ocsing 2. Enter P1 values, lwgt, ldig - > 9 Table I give us proper values. Table 1. PARAMETER TABLE...necessary and identify by block number) In this thesis a control systems analysis package is developed using parameter plane methods. It is an interactive...designer is able to choose values of the parameters which provide a good compromise between cost and dynamic behavior. 20 Distribution Availability of

  16. Geometry of multihadron production

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1994-10-01

    This summary talk only reviews a small sample of topics featured at this symposium: Introduction; The Geometry and Geography of Phase space; Space-Time Geometry and HBT; Multiplicities, Intermittency, Correlations; Disoriented Chiral Condensate; Deep Inelastic Scattering at HERA; and Other Contributions.

  17. Geometry + Technology = Proof

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyublinskaya, Irina; Funsch, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Several interactive geometry software packages are available today to secondary school teachers. An example is The Geometer's Sketchpad[R] (GSP), also known as Dynamic Geometry[R] software, developed by Key Curriculum Press. This numeric based technology has been widely adopted in the last twenty years, and a vast amount of creativity has been…

  18. The Beauty of Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Barbara H.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes a geometry project that used the beauty of stained-glass-window designs to teach middle school students about geometric figures and concepts. Three honors prealgebra teachers and a middle school mathematics gifted intervention specialist created a geometry project that covered the curriculum and also assessed students'…

  19. Modelling the Landing of a Plane in a Calculus Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morante, Antonio; Vallejo, Jose A.

    2012-01-01

    We exhibit a simple model of a plane landing that involves only basic concepts of differential calculus, so it is suitable for a first-year calculus lab. We use the computer algebra system Maxima and the interactive geometry software GeoGebra to do the computations and graphics. (Contains 5 figures and 1 note.)

  20. Procedures for calculating the nonconvexity measures of a plane set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, P. D.; Uspenskii, A. A.

    2009-03-01

    The geometry of nonconvex sets is analyzed. The measure of nonconvexity of a closed set that has the sense of an angle is considered. Characteristic manifolds of nonconvex sets are constructed. Procedures for calculating the measure of nonconvexity are proposed for a class of plane sets.

  1. Modelling the landing of a plane in a calculus lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morante, Antonio; Vallejo, José A.

    2012-10-01

    We exhibit a simple model of a plane landing that involves only basic concepts of differential calculus, so it is suitable for a first-year calculus lab. We use the computer algebra system Maxima and the interactive geometry software GeoGebra to do the computations and graphics.

  2. Geometry of membrane fission.

    PubMed

    Frolov, Vadim A; Escalada, Artur; Akimov, Sergey A; Shnyrova, Anna V

    2015-01-01

    Cellular membranes define the functional geometry of intracellular space. Formation of new membrane compartments and maintenance of complex organelles require division and disconnection of cellular membranes, a process termed membrane fission. Peripheral membrane proteins generally control membrane remodeling during fission. Local membrane stresses, reflecting molecular geometry of membrane-interacting parts of these proteins, sum up to produce the key membrane geometries of fission: the saddle-shaped neck and hour-glass hemifission intermediate. Here, we review the fundamental principles behind the translation of molecular geometry into membrane shape and topology during fission. We emphasize the central role the membrane insertion of specialized protein domains plays in orchestrating fission in vitro and in cells. We further compare individual to synergistic action of the membrane insertion during fission mediated by individual protein species, proteins complexes or membrane domains. Finally, we describe how local geometry of fission intermediates defines the functional design of the protein complexes catalyzing fission of cellular membranes.

  3. The Aerodynamic Plane Table

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahm, A F

    1924-01-01

    This report gives the description and the use of a specially designed aerodynamic plane table. For the accurate and expeditious geometrical measurement of models in an aerodynamic laboratory, and for miscellaneous truing operations, there is frequent need for a specially equipped plan table. For example, one may have to measure truly to 0.001 inch the offsets of an airfoil at many parts of its surface. Or the offsets of a strut, airship hull, or other carefully formed figure may require exact calipering. Again, a complete airplane model may have to be adjusted for correct incidence at all parts of its surfaces or verified in those parts for conformance to specifications. Such work, if but occasional, may be done on a planing or milling machine; but if frequent, justifies the provision of a special table. For this reason it was found desirable in 1918 to make the table described in this report and to equip it with such gauges and measures as the work should require.

  4. Fourier plane image amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, L.A.; Hermann, M.R.; Dane, C.B.; Tiszauer, D.H.

    1995-12-12

    A solid state laser is frequency tripled to 0.3 {micro}m. A small portion of the laser is split off and generates a Stokes seed in a low power oscillator. The low power output passes through a mask with the appropriate hole pattern. Meanwhile, the bulk of the laser output is focused into a larger stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) amplifier. The low power beam is directed through the same cell in the opposite direction. The majority of the amplification takes place at the focus which is the fourier transform plane of the mask image. The small holes occupy large area at the focus and thus are preferentially amplified. The amplified output is now imaged onto the multichip module where the holes are drilled. Because of the fourier plane amplifier, only about 1/10th the power of a competitive system is needed. This concept allows less expensive masks to be used in the process and requires much less laser power. 1 fig.

  5. Fourier plane image amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Hermann, Mark R.; Dane, C. Brent; Tiszauer, Detlev H.

    1995-01-01

    A solid state laser is frequency tripled to 0.3 .mu.m. A small portion of the laser is split off and generates a Stokes seed in a low power oscillator. The low power output passes through a mask with the appropriate hole pattern. Meanwhile, the bulk of the laser output is focused into a larger stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) amplifier. The low power beam is directed through the same cell in the opposite direction. The majority of the amplification takes place at the focus which is the fourier transform plane of the mask image. The small holes occupy large area at the focus and thus are preferentially amplified. The amplified output is now imaged onto the multichip module where the holes are drilled. Because of the fourier plane amplifier, only .about.1/10th the power of a competitive system is needed. This concept allows less expensive masks to be used in the process and requires much less laser power.

  6. Flyby Geometry Optimization Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlgaard, Christopher D.

    2007-01-01

    The Flyby Geometry Optimization Tool is a computer program for computing trajectories and trajectory-altering impulsive maneuvers for spacecraft used in radio relay of scientific data to Earth from an exploratory airplane flying in the atmosphere of Mars.

  7. What Is Geometry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chern, Shiing-Shen

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are the major historical developments of geometry. Euclid, Descartes, Klein's Erlanger Program, Gaus and Riemann, globalization, topology, Elie Cartan, and an application to molecular biology are included as topics. (KR)

  8. Gingerbread-House Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emenaker, Charles E.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a sixth-grade interdisciplinary geometry unit based on Charles Dickens's "A Christmas Carol". Focuses on finding area, volume, and perimeter, and working with estimation, decimals, and fractions in the context of making gingerbread houses. (ASK)

  9. Facilitating Understandings of Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pappas, Christine C.; Bush, Sara

    1989-01-01

    Illustrates some learning encounters for facilitating first graders' understanding of geometry. Describes some of children's approaches using Cuisenaire rods and teacher's intervening. Presents six problems involving various combinations of Cuisenaire rods and cubes. (YP)

  10. Proof in Transformation Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, A. W.

    1971-01-01

    The first of three articles showing how inductively-obtained results in transformation geometry may be organized into a deductive system. This article discusses two approaches to enlargement (dilatation), one using coordinates and the other using synthetic methods. (MM)

  11. Asymmetric magnetic reconnection with out-of-plane shear flows in a two dimensional hybrid model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lin; Wang, Xiao-Gang; Wang, Xian-Qu; Liu, Yue

    2015-05-15

    Effects of out-of-plane shear flows on asymmetric magnetic reconnect are investigated in a two-dimensional (2D) hybrid model with an initial Harris sheet equilibrium. It is found that the out-of-plane flow with an in-plane shear can significantly change the asymmetric reconnection process as well as the related geometry. The magnetic flux, out-of-plane magnetic field, in-plane flow vorticity, plasma density, and the reconnection rate are discussed in detail. The results are in comparison with the cases without the shear flows to further understand the effect.

  12. Common Geometry Module

    SciTech Connect

    Tautges, Timothy J.

    2005-01-01

    The Common Geometry Module (CGM) is a code library which provides geometry functionality used for mesh generation and other applications. This functionality includes that commonly found in solid modeling engines, like geometry creation, query and modification; CGM also includes capabilities not commonly found in solid modeling engines, like geometry decomposition tools and support for shared material interfaces. CGM is built upon the ACIS solid modeling engine, but also includes geometry capability developed beside and on top of ACIS. CGM can be used as-is to provide geometry functionality for codes needing this capability. However, CGM can also be extended using derived classes in C++, allowing the geometric model to serve as the basis for other applications, for example mesh generation. CGM is supported on Sun Solaris, SGI, HP, IBM, DEC, Linux and Windows NT platforms. CGM also indudes support for loading ACIS models on parallel computers, using MPI-based communication. Future plans for CGM are to port it to different solid modeling engines, including Pro/Engineer or SolidWorks. CGM is being released into the public domain under an LGPL license; the ACIS-based engine is available to ACIS licensees on request.

  13. Software Geometry in Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alion, Tyler; Viren, Brett; Junk, Tom

    2015-04-01

    The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) involves many detectors. The experiment's near detector (ND) facility, may ultimately involve several detectors. The far detector (FD) will be significantly larger than any other Liquid Argon (LAr) detector yet constructed; many prototype detectors are being constructed and studied to motivate a plethora of proposed FD designs. Whether it be a constructed prototype or a proposed ND/FD design, every design must be simulated and analyzed. This presents a considerable challenge to LBNE software experts; each detector geometry must be described to the simulation software in an efficient way which allows for multiple authors to easily collaborate. Furthermore, different geometry versions must be tracked throughout their use. We present a framework called General Geometry Description (GGD), written and developed by LBNE software collaborators for managing software to generate geometries. Though GGD is flexible enough to be used by any experiment working with detectors, we present it's first use in generating Geometry Description Markup Language (GDML) files to interface with LArSoft, a framework of detector simulations, event reconstruction, and data analyses written for all LAr technology users at Fermilab. Brett is the other of the framework discussed here, the General Geometry Description (GGD).

  14. NASA Connect: 'Plane Weather'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Excerpt from the NASA Connect show 'Plane Weather' This clip explains what high and low pressure weather systems are, and how they form. Weather affects our daily lives. The elements of weather: rain, wind, fog, ice and snow affect the operation and flight of an airplane. In this program, NASA and FAA researchers will introduce students to math, science, and weather; demonstrate how these elements influence flight; and show how NASA and FAA research is used to limit the effects of these elements on flight. Students will examine: the tools, techniques, and technologies used by engineers and scientists to detect these and other climatological factors affecting aircraft in flight. The lesson and classroom experiment will involve students in the scientific process and emphasizing problem solving, measurement, and reasoning skills.

  15. NASA Connect: 'Plane Weather'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Excerpt from the NASA Connect show 'Plane Weather' This clip explains what high and low pressure weather systems are, and how these affect weather patterns. Weather affects our daily lives. The elements of weather: rain, wind, fog, ice and snow affect the operation and flight of an airplane. In this program, NASA and FAA researchers will introduce students to math, science, and weather; demonstrate how these elements influence flight; and show how NASA and FAA research is used to limit the effects of these elements on flight. Students will examine: the tools, techniques, and technologies used by engineers and scientists to detect these and other climatological factors affecting aircraft in flight. The lesson and classroom experiment will involve students in the scientific process and emphasizing problem solving, measurement, and reasoning skills.

  16. Local geometry of isoscalar surfaces.

    PubMed

    Dopazo, César; Martín, Jesús; Hierro, Juan

    2007-11-01

    An inert dynamically passive scalar in a constant density fluid forced by a statistically homogeneous field of turbulence has been investigated using the results of a 256(3) grid direct numerical simulation. Mixing characteristics are characterized in terms of either principal curvatures or mean and Gauss curvatures. The most probable small-scale scalar geometries are flat and tilelike isosurfaces. Preliminary correlations between flow and scalar small-scale structures associate highly curved saddle points with large-strain regions and elliptic points with vorticity-dominated zones. The concavity of the scalar profiles along the isosurface normal coordinate xn correlates well with negative mean curvatures, Gauss curvatures displaying any sign, which correspond to scalar minima, tiles, or saddle points; on the other hand, convexity along xn is associated with positive mean curvatures, Gauss curvatures ranging from negative to positive signs, featuring maxima, tiles, or saddle points; inflection points along xn correlate well with small values of the mean curvature and zero or negative values of kg, corresponding to plane isosurfaces or saddle points with curvatures of equal and opposite signs. Small values of the scalar gradient are associated with elliptic points, either concave or convex (kg>0) , for both concave and convex scalar profiles along xn. Large values of the scalar gradient (or, equivalently, scalar fluctuation dissipation rates) are generally connected with small values of the Gauss curvature (either flat or moderate-curvature tilelike local geometries), with both concave and convex scalar profiles along xn equally probable. Vortical local flow structures correlate well with small and moderate values of the scalar gradient, while strain-dominated regions are associated with large values.

  17. Integrable Background Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderbank, David M. J.

    2014-03-01

    This work has its origins in an attempt to describe systematically the integrable geometries and gauge theories in dimensions one to four related to twistor theory. In each such dimension, there is a nondegenerate integrable geometric structure, governed by a nonlinear integrable differential equation, and each solution of this equation determines a background geometry on which, for any Lie group G, an integrable gauge theory is defined. In four dimensions, the geometry is selfdual conformal geometry and the gauge theory is selfdual Yang-Mills theory, while the lower-dimensional structures are nondegenerate (i.e., non-null) reductions of this. Any solution of the gauge theory on a k-dimensional geometry, such that the gauge group H acts transitively on an ℓ-manifold, determines a (k+ℓ)-dimensional geometry (k+ℓ≤4) fibering over the k-dimensional geometry with H as a structure group. In the case of an ℓ-dimensional group H acting on itself by the regular representation, all (k+ℓ)-dimensional geometries with symmetry group H are locally obtained in this way. This framework unifies and extends known results about dimensional reductions of selfdual conformal geometry and the selfdual Yang-Mills equation, and provides a rich supply of constructive methods. In one dimension, generalized Nahm equations provide a uniform description of four pole isomonodromic deformation problems, and may be related to the {SU}(∞) Toda and dKP equations via a hodograph transformation. In two dimensions, the {Diff}(S^1) Hitchin equation is shown to be equivalent to the hyperCR Einstein-Weyl equation, while the {SDiff}(Σ^2) Hitchin equation leads to a Euclidean analogue of Plebanski's heavenly equations. In three and four dimensions, the constructions of this paper help to organize the huge range of examples of Einstein-Weyl and selfdual spaces in the literature, as well as providing some new ! ones. The nondegenerate reductions have a long ancestry. More ! recently

  18. Lensless x-ray imaging in reflection geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, S.; Parks, D.H.; Seu, K.A.; Turner, J.J.; Chao, W.; Anderson, E.H.; Cabrini, S.; Kevan, S.D.; Su, R.

    2011-02-03

    Lensless X-ray imaging techniques such as coherent diffraction imaging and ptychography, and Fourier transform holography can provide time-resolved, diffraction-limited images. Nearly all examples of these techniques have focused on transmission geometry, restricting the samples and reciprocal spaces that can be investigated. We report a lensless X-ray technique developed for imaging in Bragg and small-angle scattering geometries, which may also find application in transmission geometries. We demonstrate this by imaging a nanofabricated pseudorandom binary structure in small-angle reflection geometry. The technique can be used with extended objects, places no restriction on sample size, and requires no additional sample masking. The realization of X-ray lensless imaging in reflection geometry opens up the possibility of single-shot imaging of surfaces in thin films, buried interfaces in magnetic multilayers, organic photovoltaic and field-effect transistor devices, or Bragg planes in a single crystal.

  19. Methods of Power Geometry in Asymptotic Analysis of Solutions to Algebraic or Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goryuchkina, Irina

    2010-06-01

    Here we present some basic ideas of the plane Power Geometry to study asymptotic behavior of solutions to differential equations. We consider two examples for demonstration of these methods and two applications the methods.

  20. Origins of cellular geometry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Cells are highly complex and orderly machines, with defined shapes and a startling variety of internal organizations. Complex geometry is a feature of both free-living unicellular organisms and cells inside multicellular animals. Where does the geometry of a cell come from? Many of the same questions that arise in developmental biology can also be asked of cells, but in most cases we do not know the answers. How much of cellular organization is dictated by global cell polarity cues as opposed to local interactions between cellular components? Does cellular structure persist across cell generations? What is the relationship between cell geometry and tissue organization? What ensures that intracellular structures are scaled to the overall size of the cell? Cell biology is only now beginning to come to grips with these questions. PMID:21880160

  1. Geometry and Cloaking Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochiai, T.; Nacher, J. C.

    2011-09-01

    Recently, the application of geometry and conformal mappings to artificial materials (metamaterials) has attracted the attention in various research communities. These materials, characterized by a unique man-made structure, have unusual optical properties, which materials found in nature do not exhibit. By applying the geometry and conformal mappings theory to metamaterial science, it may be possible to realize so-called "Harry Potter cloaking device". Although such a device is still in the science fiction realm, several works have shown that by using such metamaterials it may be possible to control the direction of the electromagnetic field at will. We could then make an object hidden inside of a cloaking device. Here, we will explain how to design invisibility device using differential geometry and conformal mappings.

  2. Students Discovering Spherical Geometry Using Dynamic Geometry Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guven, Bulent; Karatas, Ilhan

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic geometry software (DGS) such as Cabri and Geometers' Sketchpad has been regularly used worldwide for teaching and learning Euclidean geometry for a long time. The DGS with its inductive nature allows students to learn Euclidean geometry via explorations. However, with respect to non-Euclidean geometries, do we need to introduce them to…

  3. Geometry of Miura-folded metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Schenk, Mark; Guest, Simon D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes two folded metamaterials based on the Miura-ori fold pattern. The structural mechanics of these metamaterials are dominated by the kinematics of the folding, which only depends on the geometry and therefore is scale-independent. First, a folded shell structure is introduced, where the fold pattern provides a negative Poisson’s ratio for in-plane deformations and a positive Poisson’s ratio for out-of-plane bending. Second, a cellular metamaterial is described based on a stacking of individual folded layers, where the folding kinematics are compatible between layers. Additional freedom in the design of the metamaterial can be achieved by varying the fold pattern within each layer. PMID:23401549

  4. The Prints: A Picture Book for Pre-Formal Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skoumpourdi, Chrysanthi; Mpakopoulou, Ifigenia

    2011-01-01

    A pre-test questionnaire was conducted in a kindergarten and it showed that, although the children were able to give various examples of objects, from their everyday lives, that are similar to solid shapes, the examples they gave for plane figures were also tangible objects. Since it is suggested that geometry instruction has to begin early,…

  5. Secondary School Advanced Mathematics, Chapter 3, Formal Geometry. Student's Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford Univ., CA. School Mathematics Study Group.

    This text is the second of five in the Secondary School Advanced Mathematics (SSAM) series which was designed to meet the needs of students who have completed the Secondary School Mathematics (SSM) program, and wish to continue their study of mathematics. This volume is devoted to a rigorous development of theorems in plane geometry from 22…

  6. Dewetting processes in a cylindrical geometry.

    PubMed

    Callegari, G; Calvo, A; Hulin, J P

    2005-03-01

    Dewetting of liquid films of water-glycerol solutions of different viscosities has been studied experimentally in PVC cylindrical tubes. In contrast with plane surfaces, the dewetting capillary number Ca(vd) increases with the film thickness ho over a large part of the experimental range and follows a same global trend independent of viscosity as a function of ho. This increase is only partly explained by variations of the capillary driving force predicted in a recent theoretical work for a cylindrical geometry. An additional explanation is suggested, based on different spatial distributions of the viscous dissipation in the dewetting bump in the planar and cylindrical geometries. This mechanism is investigated for films of different thicknesses in a numerical model assuming a polynomial variation of the liquid thickness with distance in the bump region.

  7. Determination of isocentric machine parameters for inclined treatment volumes: a single solution for angled transverse or coronal treatment planes.

    PubMed

    Bradley, F L

    2001-01-01

    The derivation of the trigonometric equations necessary to calculate gantry, floor and collimator settings for a treatment plane at an angle phi to the transverse plane of the patient has been described previously. The derivation of a second set of equations to facilitate treatment in a plane at an angle phi to the coronal plane has also been described previously. This work reinterprets the geometry of inclined volumes and shows that essentially only one set of equations is required to determine the settings for treatment planes at an angle phi to either the transverse or coronal planes of the patient.

  8. Origami, Geometry and Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wares, Arsalan; Elstak, Iwan

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the mathematics that emanates from the construction of an origami box. We first construct a simple origami box from a rectangular sheet and then discuss some of the mathematical questions that arise in the context of geometry and algebra. The activity can be used as a context for illustrating how algebra…

  9. Emergent Hyperbolic Network Geometry.

    PubMed

    Bianconi, Ginestra; Rahmede, Christoph

    2017-02-07

    A large variety of interacting complex systems are characterized by interactions occurring between more than two nodes. These systems are described by simplicial complexes. Simplicial complexes are formed by simplices (nodes, links, triangles, tetrahedra etc.) that have a natural geometric interpretation. As such simplicial complexes are widely used in quantum gravity approaches that involve a discretization of spacetime. Here, by extending our knowledge of growing complex networks to growing simplicial complexes we investigate the nature of the emergent geometry of complex networks and explore whether this geometry is hyperbolic. Specifically we show that an hyperbolic network geometry emerges spontaneously from models of growing simplicial complexes that are purely combinatorial. The statistical and geometrical properties of the growing simplicial complexes strongly depend on their dimensionality and display the major universal properties of real complex networks (scale-free degree distribution, small-world and communities) at the same time. Interestingly, when the network dynamics includes an heterogeneous fitness of the faces, the growing simplicial complex can undergo phase transitions that are reflected by relevant changes in the network geometry.

  10. Sliding vane geometry turbines

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Harold Huimin; Zhang, Jizhong; Hu, Liangjun; Hanna, Dave R

    2014-12-30

    Various systems and methods are described for a variable geometry turbine. In one example, a turbine nozzle comprises a central axis and a nozzle vane. The nozzle vane includes a stationary vane and a sliding vane. The sliding vane is positioned to slide in a direction substantially tangent to an inner circumference of the turbine nozzle and in contact with the stationary vane.

  11. Fractal geometry of music.

    PubMed Central

    Hsü, K J; Hsü, A J

    1990-01-01

    Music critics have compared Bach's music to the precision of mathematics. What "mathematics" and what "precision" are the questions for a curious scientist. The purpose of this short note is to suggest that the mathematics is, at least in part, Mandelbrot's fractal geometry and the precision is the deviation from a log-log linear plot. PMID:11607061

  12. The Helen of Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, John

    2010-01-01

    The cycloid has been called the Helen of Geometry, not only because of its beautiful properties but also because of the quarrels it provoked between famous mathematicians of the 17th century. This article surveys the history of the cycloid and its importance in the development of the calculus.

  13. Emergent Hyperbolic Network Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianconi, Ginestra; Rahmede, Christoph

    2017-02-01

    A large variety of interacting complex systems are characterized by interactions occurring between more than two nodes. These systems are described by simplicial complexes. Simplicial complexes are formed by simplices (nodes, links, triangles, tetrahedra etc.) that have a natural geometric interpretation. As such simplicial complexes are widely used in quantum gravity approaches that involve a discretization of spacetime. Here, by extending our knowledge of growing complex networks to growing simplicial complexes we investigate the nature of the emergent geometry of complex networks and explore whether this geometry is hyperbolic. Specifically we show that an hyperbolic network geometry emerges spontaneously from models of growing simplicial complexes that are purely combinatorial. The statistical and geometrical properties of the growing simplicial complexes strongly depend on their dimensionality and display the major universal properties of real complex networks (scale-free degree distribution, small-world and communities) at the same time. Interestingly, when the network dynamics includes an heterogeneous fitness of the faces, the growing simplicial complex can undergo phase transitions that are reflected by relevant changes in the network geometry.

  14. Emergent Hyperbolic Network Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Bianconi, Ginestra; Rahmede, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    A large variety of interacting complex systems are characterized by interactions occurring between more than two nodes. These systems are described by simplicial complexes. Simplicial complexes are formed by simplices (nodes, links, triangles, tetrahedra etc.) that have a natural geometric interpretation. As such simplicial complexes are widely used in quantum gravity approaches that involve a discretization of spacetime. Here, by extending our knowledge of growing complex networks to growing simplicial complexes we investigate the nature of the emergent geometry of complex networks and explore whether this geometry is hyperbolic. Specifically we show that an hyperbolic network geometry emerges spontaneously from models of growing simplicial complexes that are purely combinatorial. The statistical and geometrical properties of the growing simplicial complexes strongly depend on their dimensionality and display the major universal properties of real complex networks (scale-free degree distribution, small-world and communities) at the same time. Interestingly, when the network dynamics includes an heterogeneous fitness of the faces, the growing simplicial complex can undergo phase transitions that are reflected by relevant changes in the network geometry. PMID:28167818

  15. Gravity is Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKeown, P. K.

    1984-01-01

    Clarifies two concepts of gravity--those of a fictitious force and those of how space and time may have geometry. Reviews the position of Newton's theory of gravity in the context of special relativity and considers why gravity (as distinct from electromagnetics) lends itself to Einstein's revolutionary interpretation. (JN)

  16. Geoff Giles and Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fielker, David

    2007-01-01

    Geoff Giles died suddenly in 2005. He was a highly original thinker in the field of geometry teaching. As early as 1964, when teaching at Strathallen School in Perth, he was writing in "MT27" about constructing tessellations by modifying the sides of triangles and (irregular) quadrilaterals to produce what he called "trisides" and "quadrisides".…

  17. Geometry of spinor regularization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hestenes, D.; Lounesto, P.

    1983-01-01

    The Kustaanheimo theory of spinor regularization is given a new formulation in terms of geometric algebra. The Kustaanheimo-Stiefel matrix and its subsidiary condition are put in a spinor form directly related to the geometry of the orbit in physical space. A physically significant alternative to the KS subsidiary condition is discussed. Derivations are carried out without using coordinates.

  18. Making Solid Geometry Solid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartz, Viggo

    1981-01-01

    Allowing students to use a polystyrene cutter to fashion their own three-dimensional models is suggested as a means of allowing individuals to experience problems and develop ideas related to solid geometry. A list of ideas that can lead to mathematical discovery is provided. (MP)

  19. Listening to Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Brett D.; Barger, Rita

    2009-01-01

    The many connections between music and mathematics are well known. The length of a plucked string determines its tone, the time signature of a piece of music is a ratio, and note durations are measured in fractions. One connection commonly overlooked is that between music and geometry--specifically, geometric transformations, including…

  20. The Geometry of Viruses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Christine L.

    1991-01-01

    Presented is an activity in which students make models of viruses, which allows them to visualize the shape of these microorganisms. Included are some background on viruses, the biology and geometry of viruses, directions for building viruses, a comparison of cells and viruses, and questions for students. (KR)

  1. Geometry and physics

    PubMed Central

    Atiyah, Michael; Dijkgraaf, Robbert; Hitchin, Nigel

    2010-01-01

    We review the remarkably fruitful interactions between mathematics and quantum physics in the past decades, pointing out some general trends and highlighting several examples, such as the counting of curves in algebraic geometry, invariants of knots and four-dimensional topology. PMID:20123740

  2. Advanced geometries and regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, S. S.; Bulanov, S. V.; Turchetti, G.; Limpouch, J.; Klimo, O.; Psikal, J.; Margarone, D.; Korn, G.

    2013-07-26

    We review and discuss different schemes of laser ion acceleration as well as advanced target geometries in connection with the development of the laser-driven proton source for hadron therapy of oncological diseases, which is a part of the ELIMED project.

  3. Geometry of PDE's. IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prástaro, Agostino

    2008-02-01

    Following our previous results on this subject [R.P. Agarwal, A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's. III(I): Webs on PDE's and integral bordism groups. The general theory, Adv. Math. Sci. Appl. 17 (2007) 239-266; R.P. Agarwal, A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's. III(II): Webs on PDE's and integral bordism groups. Applications to Riemannian geometry PDE's, Adv. Math. Sci. Appl. 17 (2007) 267-285; A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's and Mechanics, World Scientific, Singapore, 1996; A. Prástaro, Quantum and integral (co)bordism in partial differential equations, Acta Appl. Math. (5) (3) (1998) 243-302; A. Prástaro, (Co)bordism groups in PDE's, Acta Appl. Math. 59 (2) (1999) 111-201; A. Prástaro, Quantized Partial Differential Equations, World Scientific Publishing Co, Singapore, 2004, 500 pp.; A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's. I: Integral bordism groups in PDE's, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 319 (2006) 547-566; A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's. II: Variational PDE's and integral bordism groups, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 321 (2006) 930-948; A. Prástaro, Th.M. Rassias, Ulam stability in geometry of PDE's, Nonlinear Funct. Anal. Appl. 8 (2) (2003) 259-278; I. Stakgold, Boundary Value Problems of Mathematical Physics, I, The MacMillan Company, New York, 1967; I. Stakgold, Boundary Value Problems of Mathematical Physics, II, Collier-MacMillan, Canada, Ltd, Toronto, Ontario, 1968], integral bordism groups of the Navier-Stokes equation are calculated for smooth, singular and weak solutions, respectively. Then a characterization of global solutions is made on this ground. Enough conditions to assure existence of global smooth solutions are given and related to nullity of integral characteristic numbers of the boundaries. Stability of global solutions are related to some characteristic numbers of the space-like Cauchy dataE Global solutions of variational problems constrained by (NS) are classified by means of suitable integral bordism groups too.

  4. Detecting Translation Errors in CAD Surfaces and Preparing Geometries for Mesh Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Petersson, N Anders; Chand, K K

    2001-08-27

    The authors have developed tools for the efficient preparation of CAD geometries for mesh generation. Geometries are read from IGES files and then maintained in a boundary-representation consisting of a patchwork of trimmed and untrimmed surfaces. Gross errors in the geometry can be identified and removed automatically while a user interface is provided for manipulating the geometry (such as correcting invalid trimming curves or removing unwanted details). Modifying the geometry by adding or deleting surfaces and/or sectioning it by arbitrary planes (e.g. symmetry planes) is also supported. These tools are used for robust and accurate geometry models for initial mesh generation and will be applied to in situ mesh generation requirements of moving and adaptive grid simulations.

  5. Cylindrical geometry hall thruster

    DOEpatents

    Raitses, Yevgeny; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method for thrusting plasma, utilizing a Hall thruster with a cylindrical geometry, wherein ions are accelerated in substantially the axial direction. The apparatus is suitable for operation at low power. It employs small size thruster components, including a ceramic channel, with the center pole piece of the conventional annular design thruster eliminated or greatly reduced. Efficient operation is accomplished through magnetic fields with a substantial radial component. The propellant gas is ionized at an optimal location in the thruster. A further improvement is accomplished by segmented electrodes, which produce localized voltage drops within the thruster at optimally prescribed locations. The apparatus differs from a conventional Hall thruster, which has an annular geometry, not well suited to scaling to small size, because the small size for an annular design has a great deal of surface area relative to the volume.

  6. Geometry of thermodynamic control.

    PubMed

    Zulkowski, Patrick R; Sivak, David A; Crooks, Gavin E; DeWeese, Michael R

    2012-10-01

    A deeper understanding of nonequilibrium phenomena is needed to reveal the principles governing natural and synthetic molecular machines. Recent work has shown that when a thermodynamic system is driven from equilibrium then, in the linear response regime, the space of controllable parameters has a Riemannian geometry induced by a generalized friction tensor. We exploit this geometric insight to construct closed-form expressions for minimal-dissipation protocols for a particle diffusing in a one-dimensional harmonic potential, where the spring constant, inverse temperature, and trap location are adjusted simultaneously. These optimal protocols are geodesics on the Riemannian manifold and reveal that this simple model has a surprisingly rich geometry. We test these optimal protocols via a numerical implementation of the Fokker-Planck equation and demonstrate that the friction tensor arises naturally from a first-order expansion in temporal derivatives of the control parameters, without appealing directly to linear response theory.

  7. Freezing in confined geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokol, P. E.; Ma, W. J.; Herwig, K. W.; Snow, W. M.; Wang, Y.; Koplik, Joel; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    1992-01-01

    Results of detailed structural studies, using elastic neutron scattering, of the freezing of liquid O2 and D2 in porous vycor glass, are presented. The experimental studies have been complemented by computer simulations of the dynamics of freezing of a Lennard-Jones liquid in narrow channels bounded by molecular walls. Results point to a new simple physical interpretation of freezing in confined geometries.

  8. E 8 geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cederwall, Martin; Rosabal, J. A.

    2015-07-01

    We investigate exceptional generalised diffeomorphisms based on E 8(8) in a geometric setting. The transformations include gauge transformations for the dual gravity field. The surprising key result, which allows for a development of a tensor formalism, is that it is possible to define field-dependent transformations containing connection, which are covariant. We solve for the spin connection and construct a curvature tensor. A geometry for the Ehlers symmetry SL( n + 1) is sketched. Some related issues are discussed.

  9. Jets and storm tracks in ?-plane models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambaum, Maarten; Harvey, Ben

    2013-04-01

    We will present new results from linear calculations and non-linear simulations of a two-layer baroclinic ?-plane model. The model consists of two interacting levels with dynamical temperature anomalies (as in the Eady model), but by its nature provides a consistent description of the continuous 3-dimensional velocity field inside the domain. Our set-up has realistic jet-profiles, yet has a very low-dimensional parameter space. The model is shown to exhibit realistic linear baroclinic instability properties. In addition, it is shown that the introduction of a ?-plane term induces a jet and a storm-track that is highly non-linear: it exhibits a realistic spiral jet structure and jet-exit region, as is the case for the observed N. Hemisphere jet on Earth. This seems to imply that the variability of the N. Atlantic jet stream is not the result of complex topographic and orographic boundary conditions in the N. Hemisphere, as recent simulations appear to suggest, but rather the result of the spherical geometry of the Earth, setting the right conditions for relevant non-linear interactions between Rossby waves and the jet.

  10. Poisson-Riemannian geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beggs, Edwin J.; Majid, Shahn

    2017-04-01

    We study noncommutative bundles and Riemannian geometry at the semiclassical level of first order in a deformation parameter λ, using a functorial approach. This leads us to field equations of 'Poisson-Riemannian geometry' between the classical metric, the Poisson bracket and a certain Poisson-compatible connection needed as initial data for the quantisation of the differential structure. We use such data to define a functor Q to O(λ2) from the monoidal category of all classical vector bundles equipped with connections to the monoidal category of bimodules equipped with bimodule connections over the quantised algebra. This is used to 'semiquantise' the wedge product of the exterior algebra and in the Riemannian case, the metric and the Levi-Civita connection in the sense of constructing a noncommutative geometry to O(λ2) . We solve our field equations for the Schwarzschild black-hole metric under the assumption of spherical symmetry and classical dimension, finding a unique solution and the necessity of nonassociativity at order λ2, which is similar to previous results for quantum groups. The paper also includes a nonassociative hyperboloid, nonassociative fuzzy sphere and our previously algebraic bicrossproduct model.

  11. Integral geometry and holography

    DOE PAGES

    Czech, Bartlomiej; Lamprou, Lampros; McCandlish, Samuel; ...

    2015-10-27

    We present a mathematical framework which underlies the connection between information theory and the bulk spacetime in the AdS3/CFT2 correspondence. A key concept is kinematic space: an auxiliary Lorentzian geometry whose metric is defined in terms of conditional mutual informations and which organizes the entanglement pattern of a CFT state. When the field theory has a holographic dual obeying the Ryu-Takayanagi proposal, kinematic space has a direct geometric meaning: it is the space of bulk geodesics studied in integral geometry. Lengths of bulk curves are computed by kinematic volumes, giving a precise entropic interpretation of the length of any bulkmore » curve. We explain how basic geometric concepts -- points, distances and angles -- are reflected in kinematic space, allowing one to reconstruct a large class of spatial bulk geometries from boundary entanglement entropies. In this way, kinematic space translates between information theoretic and geometric descriptions of a CFT state. As an example, we discuss in detail the static slice of AdS3 whose kinematic space is two-dimensional de Sitter space.« less

  12. Emergent Complex Network Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhihao; Menichetti, Giulia; Rahmede, Christoph; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2015-01-01

    Networks are mathematical structures that are universally used to describe a large variety of complex systems such as the brain or the Internet. Characterizing the geometrical properties of these networks has become increasingly relevant for routing problems, inference and data mining. In real growing networks, topological, structural and geometrical properties emerge spontaneously from their dynamical rules. Nevertheless we still miss a model in which networks develop an emergent complex geometry. Here we show that a single two parameter network model, the growing geometrical network, can generate complex network geometries with non-trivial distribution of curvatures, combining exponential growth and small-world properties with finite spectral dimensionality. In one limit, the non-equilibrium dynamical rules of these networks can generate scale-free networks with clustering and communities, in another limit planar random geometries with non-trivial modularity. Finally we find that these properties of the geometrical growing networks are present in a large set of real networks describing biological, social and technological systems. PMID:25985280

  13. Integral geometry and holography

    SciTech Connect

    Czech, Bartlomiej; Lamprou, Lampros; McCandlish, Samuel; Sully, James

    2015-10-27

    We present a mathematical framework which underlies the connection between information theory and the bulk spacetime in the AdS3/CFT2 correspondence. A key concept is kinematic space: an auxiliary Lorentzian geometry whose metric is defined in terms of conditional mutual informations and which organizes the entanglement pattern of a CFT state. When the field theory has a holographic dual obeying the Ryu-Takayanagi proposal, kinematic space has a direct geometric meaning: it is the space of bulk geodesics studied in integral geometry. Lengths of bulk curves are computed by kinematic volumes, giving a precise entropic interpretation of the length of any bulk curve. We explain how basic geometric concepts -- points, distances and angles -- are reflected in kinematic space, allowing one to reconstruct a large class of spatial bulk geometries from boundary entanglement entropies. In this way, kinematic space translates between information theoretic and geometric descriptions of a CFT state. As an example, we discuss in detail the static slice of AdS3 whose kinematic space is two-dimensional de Sitter space.

  14. Noncommutative geometry and arithmetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, P.

    2009-09-01

    We intend to illustrate how the methods of noncommutative geometry are currently used to tackle problems in class field theory. Noncommutative geometry enables one to think geometrically in situations in which the classical notion of space formed of points is no longer adequate, and thus a “noncommutative space” is needed; a full account of this approach is given in [3] by its main contributor, Alain Connes. The class field theory, i.e., number theory within the realm of Galois theory, is undoubtedly one of the main achievements in arithmetics, leading to an important algebraic machinery; for a modern overview, see [23]. The relationship between noncommutative geometry and number theory is one of the many themes treated in [22, 7-9, 11], a small part of which we will try to put in a more down-to-earth perspective, illustrating through an example what should be called an “application of physics to mathematics,” and our only purpose is to introduce nonspecialists to this beautiful area.

  15. Geometry of solar coronal rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, B. P.; Martsenyuk, O. V.; Platov, Yu. V.; Den, O. E.

    2016-02-01

    Coronal helmet streamers are the most prominent large-scale elements of the solar corona observed in white light during total solar eclipses. The base of the streamer is an arcade of loops located above a global polarity inversion line. At an altitude of 1-2 solar radii above the limb, the apices of the arches sharpen, forming cusp structures, above which narrow coronal rays are observed. Lyot coronagraphs, especially those on-board spacecrafts flying beyond the Earth's atmosphere, enable us to observe the corona continuously and at large distances. At distances of several solar radii, the streamers take the form of fairly narrow spokes that diverge radially from the Sun. This radial direction displays a continuous expansion of the corona into the surrounding space, and the formation of the solar wind. However, the solar magnetic field and solar rotation complicate the situation. The rotation curves radial streams into spiral ones, similar to water streams flowing from rotating tubes. The influence of the magnetic field is more complex and multifarious. A thorough study of coronal ray geometries shows that rays are frequently not radial and not straight. Coronal streamers frequently display a curvature whose direction in the meridional plane depends on the phase of the solar cycle. It is evident that this curvature is related to the geometry of the global solar magnetic field, which depends on the cycle phase. Equatorward deviations of coronal streamers at solar minima and poleward deviations at solar maxima can be interpreted as the effects of changes in the general topology of the global solar magnetic field. There are sporadic temporal changes in the coronal rays shape caused by remote coronal mass ejections (CMEs) propagating through the corona. This is also a manifestation of the influence of the magnetic field on plasma flows. The motion of a large-scale flux rope associated with a CME away from the Sun creates changes in the structure of surrounding field

  16. Measuring Space-Time Geometry over the Ages

    SciTech Connect

    Stebbins, Albert; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    Theorists are often told to express things in the 'observational plane'. One can do this for space-time geometry, considering 'visual' observations of matter in our universe by a single observer over time, with no assumptions about isometries, initial conditions, nor any particular relation between matter and geometry, such as Einstein's equations. Using observables as coordinates naturally leads to a parametrization of space-time geometry in terms of other observables, which in turn prescribes an observational program to measure the geometry. Under the assumption of vorticity-free matter flow we describe this observational program, which includes measurements of gravitational lensing, proper motion, and redshift drift. Only 15% of the curvature information can be extracted without long time baseline observations, and this increases to 35% with observations that will take decades. The rest would likely require centuries of observations. The formalism developed is exact, non-perturbative, and more general than the usual cosmological analysis.

  17. Navigating solid medical images by pencils of sectioning planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bookstein, Fred L.; Athey, Brian D.; Green, William D. K.; Wetzel, Arthur W.

    2000-10-01

    Beyond their involvement in ordinary surface rendering, the boundaries of organs in medical images have differential properties that make them quite useful for quantitative understanding. In particular, their geometry affords a framework for navigating the original solid, representing its R3 contents quite flexibility as multiple pseudovolumes R2 x T, where T is ar eal-valued parameter standing for screen time. A navigation is a smoothly parameterized series of image sections characterized by normal direction, centerpoint, scale and orientation. Such filmstrips represent a radical generalization of conventional medical image dynamics. The lances encountered in these navigations can be represented by constructs from classic differential geometry. Sequences of plane sections can be formalized as continuous pencils of planes, sets of cardinality (infinity) 1 that are sometimes explicitly characterized by a real-value parameter and sometimes defined implicitly as the intersection (curve of common elements) of a pair of bundles of (infinity) 2 planes. An example of the first type of navigation is the pencil of planes through the tangent line at one point of a curve; of the second type, the cone of planes through a point tangent to a surface. The further enhancements of centering, orienting, and rescaling in the medical context are intended to leave landmark points or boundary intersections invariant on the screen. Edgewarp, a publicly available software package, allows free play with pencils of planes like these as they section one single enormous medical data resource, the Visible Human data sets from the National Library of Medicine. This paper argues the relative merits of such visualizations over conventional surface-rendered flybys for understanding and communication of associated anatomical knowledge.

  18. Multi-scale modelling of pulsed nanosecond dielectric barrier plasma discharges in plane-to-plane geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaraja, Sharath; Yang, Vigor; Adamovich, Igor

    2013-04-01

    An integrated theoretical and numerical framework is developed to study the dynamics of energy coupling, gas heating and generation of active species by repetitively pulsed nanosecond dielectric barrier discharges (NS DBDs) in air. The work represents one of the first attempts to simulate, in a self-consistent manner, multiple (more than 100) nanosecond pulses. Detailed information is obtained about the electric-field transients during each voltage pulse, and accumulation of plasma generated species and gas heating over ms timescales. The plasma is modelled using a two-temperature, detailed chemistry scheme, with ions and neutral species in thermal equilibrium at the gas temperature, and electrons in thermal nonequilibrium. The analysis is conducted with pressures and pulsing frequency in the range 40-100 Torr and 1-105 Hz, respectively. The input electrical energy is directly proportional to the number density, and remains fairly constant on a per molecule basis from pulse to pulse. Repetitive pulsing results in uniform production of atomic oxygen in the discharge volume via electron-impact dissociation during voltage pulses, and through quenching of excited nitrogen molecules in the afterglow. The ion Joule effect causes rapid gas heating of ˜40 K/pulse in the cathode sheath and generates weak acoustic waves. Conductive heat loss to the walls during the time interval between voltage pulses prevents overheating of the cathode layer and development of ionization instabilities. A uniform ‘hat-shaped’ temperature profile develops in the discharge volume after multiple pulses, due to chemical heat release from quenching of excited species. This finding may explain experimentally observed volumetric ignition (as opposed to hot-spot ignition) in fuel-air mixtures subject to NS DBD.

  19. Diffusion in quantum geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calcagni, Gianluca

    2012-08-01

    The change of the effective dimension of spacetime with the probed scale is a universal phenomenon shared by independent models of quantum gravity. Using tools of probability theory and multifractal geometry, we show how dimensional flow is controlled by a multiscale fractional diffusion equation, and physically interpreted as a composite stochastic process. The simplest example is a fractional telegraph process, describing quantum spacetimes with a spectral dimension equal to 2 in the ultraviolet and monotonically rising to 4 towards the infrared. The general profile of the spectral dimension of the recently introduced multifractional spaces is constructed for the first time.

  20. Geometrie verstehen: statisch - kinematisch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, Ekkehard

    Dem Allgemeinen steht begrifflich das Besondere gegenüber. In diesem Sinne sind allgemeine Überlegungen zum Verstehen von Mathematik zu ergänzen durch Untersuchungen hinsichtlich des Verstehens der einzelnen mathematischen Disziplinen, insbesondere der Geometrie. Hier haben viele Schülerinnen und Schüler Probleme. Diese rühren hauptsächlich daher, dass eine fertige geometrische Konstruktion in ihrer statischen Präsentation auf Papier nicht mehr die einzelnen Konstruktionsschritte erkennen lässt; zum Nachvollzug müssen sie daher ergänzend in einer Konstruktionsbeschreibung festgehalten werden.

  1. National Aerospace Plane (NASP) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Artists concept of the X-30 aerospace plane flying through Earth's atmosphere on its way to low-Earth orbit. the experimental concept is part of the National Aero-Space Plane Program. The X-30 is planned to demonstrate the technology for airbreathing space launch and hypersonic cruise vehicles. Photograph and caption published in Winds of Change, 75th Anniversary NASA publication (page 117), by James Schultz.

  2. Graded geometry and Poisson reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Cattaneo, A. S.; Zambon, M.

    2009-02-02

    The main result extends the Marsden-Ratiu reduction theorem in Poisson geometry, and is proven by means of graded geometry. In this note we provide the background material about graded geometry necessary for the proof. Further, we provide an alternative algebraic proof for the main result.

  3. Computer-Aided Geometry Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoosmith, J. N. (Compiler); Fulton, R. E. (Compiler)

    1984-01-01

    Techniques in computer-aided geometry modeling and their application are addressed. Mathematical modeling, solid geometry models, management of geometric data, development of geometry standards, and interactive and graphic procedures are discussed. The applications include aeronautical and aerospace structures design, fluid flow modeling, and gas turbine design.

  4. Teaching of Geometry in Bulgaria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bankov, Kiril

    2013-01-01

    Geometry plays an important role in the school mathematics curriculum all around the world. Teaching of geometry varies a lot (Hoyls, Foxman, & Kuchemann, 2001). Many countries revise the objectives, the content, and the approaches to the geometry in school. Studies of the processes show that there are not common trends of these changes…

  5. Core geometry in perspective

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Moira R.; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2015-01-01

    Research on animals, infants, children, and adults provides evidence that distinct cognitive systems underlie navigation and object recognition. Here we examine whether and how these systems interact when children interpret 2D edge-based perspectival line drawings of scenes and objects. Such drawings serve as symbols early in development, and they preserve scene and object geometry from canonical points of view. Young children show limits when using geometry both in non-symbolic tasks and in symbolic map tasks that present 3D contexts from unusual, unfamiliar points of view. When presented with the familiar viewpoints in perspectival line drawings, however, do children engage more integrated geometric representations? In three experiments, children successfully interpreted line drawings with respect to their depicted scene or object. Nevertheless, children recruited distinct processes when navigating based on the information in these drawings, and these processes depended on the context in which the drawings were presented. These results suggest that children are flexible but limited in using geometric information to form integrated representations of scenes and objects, even when interpreting spatial symbols that are highly familiar and faithful renditions of the visual world. PMID:25441089

  6. Ionization coefficient approach to modeling breakdown in nonuniform geometries.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Nicolaysen, Scott D.

    2003-11-01

    This report summarizes the work on breakdown modeling in nonuniform geometries by the ionization coefficient approach. Included are: (1) fits to primary and secondary ionization coefficients used in the modeling; (2) analytical test cases for sphere-to-sphere, wire-to-wire, corner, coaxial, and rod-to-plane geometries; a compilation of experimental data with source references; comparisons between code results, test case results, and experimental data. A simple criterion is proposed to differentiate between corona and spark. The effect of a dielectric surface on avalanche growth is examined by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The presence of a clean dry surface does not appear to enhance growth.

  7. Evaluation of a cone beam computed tomography geometry for image guided small animal irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yidong; Armour, Michael; Kang-Hsin Wang, Ken; Gandhi, Nishant; Iordachita, Iulian; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey; Wong, John

    2015-07-01

    The conventional imaging geometry for small animal cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is that a detector panel rotates around the head-to-tail axis of an imaged animal (‘tubular’ geometry). Another unusual but possible imaging geometry is that the detector panel rotates around the anterior-to-posterior axis of the animal (‘pancake’ geometry). The small animal radiation research platform developed at Johns Hopkins University employs the pancake geometry where a prone-positioned animal is rotated horizontally between an x-ray source and detector panel. This study is to assess the CBCT image quality in the pancake geometry and investigate potential methods for improvement. We compared CBCT images acquired in the pancake geometry with those acquired in the tubular geometry when the phantom/animal was placed upright simulating the conventional CBCT geometry. Results showed signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios in the pancake geometry were reduced in comparison to the tubular geometry at the same dose level. But the overall spatial resolution within the transverse plane of the imaged cylinder/animal was better in the pancake geometry. A modest exposure increase to two folds in the pancake geometry can improve image quality to a level close to the tubular geometry. Image quality can also be improved by inclining the animal, which reduces streak artifacts caused by bony structures. The major factor resulting in the inferior image quality in the pancake geometry is the elevated beam attenuation along the long axis of the phantom/animal and consequently increased scatter-to-primary ratio in that orientation. Not withstanding, the image quality in the pancake-geometry CBCT is adequate to support image guided animal positioning, while providing unique advantages of non-coplanar and multiple mice irradiation. This study also provides useful knowledge about the image quality in the two very different imaging geometries, i.e. pancake and tubular geometry

  8. Evaluation of a Cone Beam Computed Tomography Geometry for Image Guided Small Animal Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yidong; Armour, Michael; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Gandhi, Nishant; Iordachita, Iulian; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey; Wong, John

    2015-01-01

    The conventional imaging geometry for small animal cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is that a detector panel rotates around the head-to-tail axis of an imaged animal (“tubular” geometry). Another unusual but possible imaging geometry is that the detector panel rotates around the anterior-to-posterior axis of the animal (“pancake” geometry). The small animal radiation research platform (SARRP) developed at Johns Hopkins University employs the pancake geometry where a prone-positioned animal is rotated horizontally between an x-ray source and detector panel. This study is to assess the CBCT image quality in the pancake geometry and investigate potential methods for improvement. We compared CBCT images acquired in the pancake geometry with those acquired in the tubular geometry when the phantom/animal was placed upright simulating the conventional CBCT geometry. Results showed signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios in the pancake geometry were reduced in comparison to the tubular geometry at the same dose level. But the overall spatial resolution within the transverse plane of the imaged cylinder/animal was better in the pancake geometry. A modest exposure increase to two folds in the pancake geometry can improve image quality to a level close to the tubular geometry. Image quality can also be improved by inclining the animal, which reduces streak artifacts caused by bony structures. The major factor resulting in the inferior image quality in the pancake geometry is the elevated beam attenuation along the long axis of the phantom/animal and consequently increased scatter-to-primary ratio in that orientation. Notwithstanding, the image quality in the pancake-geometry CBCT is adequate to support image guided animal positioning, while providing unique advantages of non-coplanar and multiple mice irradiation. This study also provides useful knowledge about the image quality in the two very different imaging geometries, i.e., pancake and tubular geometry

  9. Evaluation of a cone beam computed tomography geometry for image guided small animal irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yidong; Armour, Michael; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Gandhi, Nishant; Iordachita, Iulian; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey; Wong, John

    2015-07-07

    The conventional imaging geometry for small animal cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is that a detector panel rotates around the head-to-tail axis of an imaged animal ('tubular' geometry). Another unusual but possible imaging geometry is that the detector panel rotates around the anterior-to-posterior axis of the animal ('pancake' geometry). The small animal radiation research platform developed at Johns Hopkins University employs the pancake geometry where a prone-positioned animal is rotated horizontally between an x-ray source and detector panel. This study is to assess the CBCT image quality in the pancake geometry and investigate potential methods for improvement. We compared CBCT images acquired in the pancake geometry with those acquired in the tubular geometry when the phantom/animal was placed upright simulating the conventional CBCT geometry. Results showed signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios in the pancake geometry were reduced in comparison to the tubular geometry at the same dose level. But the overall spatial resolution within the transverse plane of the imaged cylinder/animal was better in the pancake geometry. A modest exposure increase to two folds in the pancake geometry can improve image quality to a level close to the tubular geometry. Image quality can also be improved by inclining the animal, which reduces streak artifacts caused by bony structures. The major factor resulting in the inferior image quality in the pancake geometry is the elevated beam attenuation along the long axis of the phantom/animal and consequently increased scatter-to-primary ratio in that orientation. Not withstanding, the image quality in the pancake-geometry CBCT is adequate to support image guided animal positioning, while providing unique advantages of non-coplanar and multiple mice irradiation. This study also provides useful knowledge about the image quality in the two very different imaging geometries, i.e. pancake and tubular geometry, respectively.

  10. Noncommutative geometry of Zitterbewegung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckstein, Michał; Franco, Nicolas; Miller, Tomasz

    2017-03-01

    Drawing from the advanced mathematics of noncommutative geometry, we model a "classical" Dirac fermion propagating in a curved spacetime. We demonstrate that the inherent causal structure of the model encodes the possibility of Zitterbewegung—the "trembling motion" of the fermion. We recover the well-known frequency of Zitterbewegung as the highest possible speed of change in the fermion's "internal space." Furthermore, we show that the bound does not change in the presence of an external electromagnetic field and derive its explicit analogue when the mass parameter is promoted to a Yukawa field. We explain the universal character of the model and discuss a table-top experiment in the domain of quantum simulation to test its predictions.

  11. Critique of information geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Skilling, John

    2014-12-05

    As applied to probability, information geometry fails because probability distributions do not form a metric space. Probability theory rests on a compelling foundation of elementary symmetries, which also support information (aka minus entropy, Kullback-Leibler) H(p;q) as the unique measure of divergence from source probability distribution q to destination p. Because the only compatible connective H is from≠to asymmetric, H(p;q)≠H(q;p), there can be no compatible geometrical distance (which would necessarily be from=to symmetric). Hence there is no distance relationship compatible with the structure of probability theory. Metrics g and densities sqrt(det(g)) interpreted as prior probabilities follow from the definition of distance, and must fail likewise. Various metrics and corresponding priors have been proposed, Fisher's being the most popular, but all must behave unacceptably. This is illustrated with simple counter-examples.

  12. Magnetism in curved geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streubel, Robert; Fischer, Peter; Kronast, Florian; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Sheka, Denis D.; Gaididei, Yuri; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Makarov, Denys

    2016-09-01

    Extending planar two-dimensional structures into the three-dimensional space has become a general trend in multiple disciplines, including electronics, photonics, plasmonics and magnetics. This approach provides means to modify conventional or to launch novel functionalities by tailoring the geometry of an object, e.g. its local curvature. In a generic electronic system, curvature results in the appearance of scalar and vector geometric potentials inducing anisotropic and chiral effects. In the specific case of magnetism, even in the simplest case of a curved anisotropic Heisenberg magnet, the curvilinear geometry manifests two exchange-driven interactions, namely effective anisotropy and antisymmetric exchange, i.e. Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya-like interaction. As a consequence, a family of novel curvature-driven effects emerges, which includes magnetochiral effects and topologically induced magnetization patterning, resulting in theoretically predicted unlimited domain wall velocities, chirality symmetry breaking and Cherenkov-like effects for magnons. The broad range of altered physical properties makes these curved architectures appealing in view of fundamental research on e.g. skyrmionic systems, magnonic crystals or exotic spin configurations. In addition to these rich physics, the application potential of three-dimensionally shaped objects is currently being explored as magnetic field sensorics for magnetofluidic applications, spin-wave filters, advanced magneto-encephalography devices for diagnosis of epilepsy or for energy-efficient racetrack memory devices. These recent developments ranging from theoretical predictions over fabrication of three-dimensionally curved magnetic thin films, hollow cylinders or wires, to their characterization using integral means as well as the development of advanced tomography approaches are in the focus of this review.

  13. Magnetism in curved geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Streubel, Robert; Fischer, Peter; Kronast, Florian; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Sheka, Denis D.; Gaididei, Yuri; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Makarov, Denys

    2016-08-17

    Extending planar two-dimensional structures into the three-dimensional space has become a general trend in multiple disciplines, including electronics, photonics, plasmonics and magnetics. This approach provides means to modify conventional or to launch novel functionalities by tailoring the geometry of an object, e.g. its local curvature. In a generic electronic system, curvature results in the appearance of scalar and vector geometric potentials inducing anisotropic and chiral effects. In the specific case of magnetism, even in the simplest case of a curved anisotropic Heisenberg magnet, the curvilinear geometry manifests two exchange-driven interactions, namely effective anisotropy and antisymmetric exchange, i.e. Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya-like interaction. As a consequence, a family of novel curvature-driven effects emerges, which includes magnetochiral effects and topologically induced magnetization patterning, resulting in theoretically predicted unlimited domain wall velocities, chirality symmetry breaking and Cherenkov-like effects for magnons. The broad range of altered physical properties makes these curved architectures appealing in view of fundamental research on e.g. skyrmionic systems, magnonic crystals or exotic spin configurations. In addition to these rich physics, the application potential of three-dimensionally shaped objects is currently being explored as magnetic field sensorics for magnetofluidic applications, spin-wave filters, advanced magneto-encephalography devices for diagnosis of epilepsy or for energy-efficient racetrack memory devices. Finally, these recent developments ranging from theoretical predictions over fabrication of three-dimensionally curved magnetic thin films, hollow cylinders or wires, to their characterization using integral means as well as the development of advanced tomography approaches are in the focus of this review.

  14. Magnetism in curved geometries

    DOE PAGES

    Streubel, Robert; Fischer, Peter; Kronast, Florian; ...

    2016-08-17

    Extending planar two-dimensional structures into the three-dimensional space has become a general trend in multiple disciplines, including electronics, photonics, plasmonics and magnetics. This approach provides means to modify conventional or to launch novel functionalities by tailoring the geometry of an object, e.g. its local curvature. In a generic electronic system, curvature results in the appearance of scalar and vector geometric potentials inducing anisotropic and chiral effects. In the specific case of magnetism, even in the simplest case of a curved anisotropic Heisenberg magnet, the curvilinear geometry manifests two exchange-driven interactions, namely effective anisotropy and antisymmetric exchange, i.e. Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya-like interaction. Asmore » a consequence, a family of novel curvature-driven effects emerges, which includes magnetochiral effects and topologically induced magnetization patterning, resulting in theoretically predicted unlimited domain wall velocities, chirality symmetry breaking and Cherenkov-like effects for magnons. The broad range of altered physical properties makes these curved architectures appealing in view of fundamental research on e.g. skyrmionic systems, magnonic crystals or exotic spin configurations. In addition to these rich physics, the application potential of three-dimensionally shaped objects is currently being explored as magnetic field sensorics for magnetofluidic applications, spin-wave filters, advanced magneto-encephalography devices for diagnosis of epilepsy or for energy-efficient racetrack memory devices. Finally, these recent developments ranging from theoretical predictions over fabrication of three-dimensionally curved magnetic thin films, hollow cylinders or wires, to their characterization using integral means as well as the development of advanced tomography approaches are in the focus of this review.« less

  15. The Laplace Planes of Uranus and Pluto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobrovolskis, Anthony R.

    1993-01-01

    Satellite orbits close to an oblate planet precess about its equatorial plane, while distant satellites precess around the plane of the planet's heliocentric orbit. In between, satellites in nearly circular orbits precess about a warped intermediate surface called the Laplace 'plane.' Herein we derive general formulas for locating the Laplace plane. Because Uranus and Pluto have high obliquities, their Laplace planes are severely warped. We present maps of these Laplace planes, of interest in telescopic searches for new satellites. The Laplace plane of the Solar System as a whole is similarly distorted, but comets in the inner Oort cloud precess too slowly to sense the Laplace plane.

  16. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOEpatents

    Marsh, S.P.

    1988-03-08

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 4 figs.

  17. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOEpatents

    Marsh, Stanley P.

    1988-01-01

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive.

  18. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOEpatents

    Marsh, S.P.

    1987-03-12

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Space-Plane Spreadsheet Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackall, Dale

    1993-01-01

    Basic Hypersonic Data and Equations (HYPERDATA) spreadsheet computer program provides data gained from three analyses of performance of space plane. Equations used to perform analyses derived from Newton's second law of physics, derivation included. First analysis is parametric study of some basic factors affecting ability of space plane to reach orbit. Second includes calculation of thickness of spherical fuel tank. Third produces ratio between volume of fuel and total mass for each of various aircraft. HYPERDATA intended for use on Macintosh(R) series computers running Microsoft Excel 3.0.

  20. Stationary equilibrium singularity distributions in the plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, P. K.; Ostrovskyi, V.

    2012-02-01

    We characterize all stationary equilibrium point singularity distributions in the plane of logarithmic type, allowing for real, imaginary or complex singularity strengths. The dynamical system follows from the assumption that each of the N singularities moves according to the flow field generated by all the others at that point. For strength vector \\vec{\\Gamma} \\in {\\Bbb R}^N , the dynamical system is the classical point vortex system obtained from a singular discrete representation of the vorticity field from ideal, incompressible fluid flow. When \\vec{\\Gamma} \\in \\Im , it corresponds to a system of sources and sinks, whereas when \\vec{\\Gamma} \\in {\\Bbb C}^N the system consists of spiral sources and sinks discussed in Kochin et al (1964 Theoretical Hydromechanics 1 (London: Interscience)). We formulate the equilibrium problem as one in linear algebra, A \\vec{\\Gamma} = 0 , A \\in {\\Bbb C}^{N \\times N} , \\vec{\\Gamma} \\in {\\Bbb C}^N , where A is a N × N complex skew-symmetric configuration matrix which encodes the geometry of the system of interacting singularities. For an equilibrium to exist, A must have a kernel and \\vec{\\Gamma} must be an element of the nullspace of A. We prove that when N is odd, A always has a kernel, hence there is a choice of \\vec{\\Gamma} for which the system is a stationary equilibrium. When N is even, there may or may not be a non-trivial nullspace of A, depending on the relative position of the points in the plane. We provide examples of evenly and randomly distributed points on curves such as circles, figure eights, flower-petal configurations and spirals. We then show how to classify the stationary equilibria in terms of the singular spectrum of A.

  1. Fermi liquid viscosity in a finite geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    Forced flow of a Fermi liquid is studied for a cell geometry consisting of two planes with a separation on the order of the mean free path. An approximate transport equation is used to derive an integral equation for the velocity profile, which is solved numerically. Results for the total flux through the cell, which determines the dissipation, are given as a function of the Knudsen number kappa (ratio of cell thickness to mean free path). Effects of specular reflection at the boundaries are considered. It is found that the dissipation has a minimum at kappa of 1/2, and behaves linearly for kappa not less than 3. Implications for present experimentation are discussed.

  2. Interactive design of hypersonic waverider geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Center, K. B.; Sobieczky, H.; Dougherty, F. C.

    1991-01-01

    The paper deals with an inverse design code utilizing the method of oscillating cones; the code integrated into an interactive graphics software package allows manipulation of both the exit-plane shock profile and leading edge of the vehicle. Another interactive feature of the system is the ability to vary freestream conditions and reevaluate the governing conditions. The development of the oscillating cones is shown on five classes each of which is chosen to demonstrate an aspect of improved design flexibility over previous studies. Results are evaluated using a robust flow solver, insuring that the shock shapes specified in the design process are recovered. It is pointed out that the expanded range of waverider geometries that may be generated using the oscillating cones technique may provide insight into visually oriented optimization parameters such as volumetric efficiency and practical planform.

  3. Fermi liquid viscosity in a finite geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    Forced flow of a Fermi liquid is studied for a cell geometry consisting of two planes with a separation on the order of mean free path. An approximate transport equation is used to derive an integral equation for the velocity profile, which is solved numerically. Results for the total flux through the cell, which determines the dissipation, are given as a function of the Knudsen number N (ratio of cell thickness to mean free path). Effects of specular reflection at the boundaries are considered. It is found that the dissipation has a minimum at N approximately equal to 1/2, and behaves linearly for N greater than or equal to 3. Implications for present experimentation are discussed.

  4. Geometry and Mechanics of Thin Growing Bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzulla, Matteo; Smith, Gabriel; Nardinocchi, Paola; Holmes, Douglas

    We investigate how thin sheets of arbitrary shapes morph under the isotropic in-plane expansion of their top surface, which may represent several stimuli such as nonuniform heating, local swelling and differential growth. Inspired by geometry, an analytical model is presented that rationalizes how the shape of the disk influences morphing, from the initial spherical bending to the final isometric limit. We introduce a new measure of slenderness that describes a sheet in terms of both thickness and plate shape. We find that the mean curvature of the isometric state is three fourth's the natural curvature, which we verify by numerics and experiments. We finally investigate the emergence of a preferred direction of bending in the isometric state, guided by numerical analyses. The scalability of our model suggests that it is suitable to describe the morphing of sheets spanning several orders of magnitude. NSF Grant CMMI-1300860.

  5. Generalized Kähler Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gualtieri, Marco

    2014-10-01

    Generalized Kähler geometry is the natural analogue of Kähler geometry, in the context of generalized complex geometry. Just as we may require a complex structure to be compatible with a Riemannian metric in a way which gives rise to a symplectic form, we may require a generalized complex structure to be compatible with a metric so that it defines a second generalized complex structure. We prove that generalized Kähler geometry is equivalent to the bi-Hermitian geometry on the target of a 2-dimensional sigma model with (2, 2) supersymmetry. We also prove the existence of natural holomorphic Courant algebroids for each of the underlying complex structures, and that these split into a sum of transverse holomorphic Dirac structures. Finally, we explore the analogy between pre-quantum line bundles and gerbes in the context of generalized Kähler geometry.

  6. Planetary Image Geometry Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deen, Robert C.; Pariser, Oleg

    2010-01-01

    The Planetary Image Geometry (PIG) library is a multi-mission library used for projecting images (EDRs, or Experiment Data Records) and managing their geometry for in-situ missions. A collection of models describes cameras and their articulation, allowing application programs such as mosaickers, terrain generators, and pointing correction tools to be written in a multi-mission manner, without any knowledge of parameters specific to the supported missions. Camera model objects allow transformation of image coordinates to and from view vectors in XYZ space. Pointing models, specific to each mission, describe how to orient the camera models based on telemetry or other information. Surface models describe the surface in general terms. Coordinate system objects manage the various coordinate systems involved in most missions. File objects manage access to metadata (labels, including telemetry information) in the input EDRs and RDRs (Reduced Data Records). Label models manage metadata information in output files. Site objects keep track of different locations where the spacecraft might be at a given time. Radiometry models allow correction of radiometry for an image. Mission objects contain basic mission parameters. Pointing adjustment ("nav") files allow pointing to be corrected. The object-oriented structure (C++) makes it easy to subclass just the pieces of the library that are truly mission-specific. Typically, this involves just the pointing model and coordinate systems, and parts of the file model. Once the library was developed (initially for Mars Polar Lander, MPL), adding new missions ranged from two days to a few months, resulting in significant cost savings as compared to rewriting all the application programs for each mission. Currently supported missions include Mars Pathfinder (MPF), MPL, Mars Exploration Rover (MER), Phoenix, and Mars Science Lab (MSL). Applications based on this library create the majority of operational image RDRs for those missions. A

  7. Thermodynamics of Asymptotically Conical Geometries.

    PubMed

    Cvetič, Mirjam; Gibbons, Gary W; Saleem, Zain H

    2015-06-12

    We study the thermodynamical properties of a class of asymptotically conical geometries known as "subtracted geometries." We derive the mass and angular momentum from the regulated Komar integral and the Hawking-Horowitz prescription and show that they are equivalent. By deriving the asymptotic charges, we show that the Smarr formula and the first law of thermodynamics hold. We also propose an analog of Christodulou-Ruffini inequality. The analysis can be generalized to other asymptotically conical geometries.

  8. Geometric and morphologic evolution of normal fault planes and traces from 2D to 4D data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchal, Denis; Guiraud, Michel; Rives, Thierry

    2003-01-01

    The detailed 3D geometry of normal fault planes is described and analysed using datasets from outcrop studies (2D), seismic surveys (3D) and analogue models (4D). Different geometric configurations of simple isolated normal faults are studied by reference to processes of normal fault propagation. When a normal fault propagates without interacting with other fault zones, the entire border of the principal plane displays characteristic connected secondary structures. These secondary structures cause bifurcations of the principal fault terminations. The along-strike terminations of the principal plane display typical bifurcation configurations ('ear geometry'). The orientation of the bifurcations depends on the vertical direction of propagation (downwards and/or upwards). The along-dip terminations display en échelon secondary fault planes linked to the principal plane and are described as 'lobate geometry'. A 3D genetic model of isolated normal fault geometry is proposed with a new general terminology for the secondary structures. When two isolated normal faults propagate towards each other and overlap, the two principal planes connect up via a relay fault. The resulting geometry is a longer fault exhibiting a characteristic undulation with two inactive branches.

  9. Investigating Fractal Geometry Using LOGO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, David A.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses dimensionality in Euclidean geometry. Presents methods to produce fractals using LOGO. Uses the idea of self-similarity. Included are program listings and suggested extension activities. (MVL)

  10. Affine Contractions on the Plane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celik, D.; Ozdemir, Y.; Ureyen, M.

    2007-01-01

    Contractions play a considerable role in the theory of fractals. However, it is not easy to find contractions which are not similitudes. In this study, it is shown by counter examples that an affine transformation of the plane carrying a given triangle onto another triangle may not be a contraction even if it contracts edges, heights or medians.…

  11. Geometry of blind thrusts

    SciTech Connect

    Kligfield, R.; Geiser, P.; Geiser, J.

    1985-01-01

    Blind thrusts are structures which at no time in their history broke the erosion surface and along which displacement progressively changes upwards. Faults of the stiff layer along which displacement progressively decreases to zero (tip) are one prominent type of blind thrust structure. Shortening above such tips is accommodated entirely by folding whereas shortening below the tip is partitioned between folding and faulting. For these types of faults it is possible to determine the original length of the stiff layer for balancing purposes. A systematic methodology for line length and area restoration is outlined for determining blind thrust geometry. Application of the methodology is particularly suitable for use with microcomputers. If the folded form of the cover is known along with the position of the fault and its tip, then it is possible to locate hanging and footwall cutoffs. If the fault trajectory, tip, and a single hanging wall footwall cutoff pair are known, then the folded form of the cover layer can be determined. In these constructions it is necessary to specify pin lines for balancing purposes. These pin lines may or may not have a zero displacement gradient, depending upon the amount of simple shear deformation. Examples are given from both Laramide structures of the western USA and the Appalachians.

  12. The relationship between strain geometry and geometrically necessary dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Lars; Wallis, David

    2016-04-01

    single crystals and aggregates of olivine for which the strain geometry is known. Tested geometries include constrictional strain, flattening strain, and plane strain. We use measured lattice curvatures to calculate the densities and spatial distributions of geometrically necessary dislocations. Dislocation densities are calculated for each of the major dislocation types in olivine. These densities are then used to estimate the plastic strain geometry under the assumption that the population of geometrically necessary dislocations accurately represents the relative activity of different dislocations during deformation. Our initial results demonstrate compelling relationships between the imposed strain geometry and the calculated plastic strain geometry. In addition, the calculated plastic strain geometry is linked to the distribution of crystallographic orientations, giving insight into the nature of plastic anisotropy in textured olivine aggregates. We present this technique as a new microstructural tool for assessing the kinematic history of deformed rocks.

  13. Microparticle column geometry in acoustic stationary fields.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Andrew; Insana, Michael F; Allen, John S

    2003-01-01

    Particles suspended in a fluid will experience forces from stationary acoustic fields. The magnitude of the force depends on the time-averaged energy density of the field and the material properties of the particles and fluid. Forces acting on known particles smaller than 20 microm were studied. Within a 500 kHz acoustic beam generated by a plane-piston circular source, observations were made of the geometry of the particle column that is formed. Varying the acoustic energy altered the column width in a manner predicted by equations for the primary acoustic radiation force from scattering of particles in the long-wavelength limit. The minimum pressures required to trap gas, solid, and liquid particles in a water medium at room temperature were also estimated to within 12%. These results highlight the ability of stationary acoustic fields from a plane-piston radiator to impose nano-Newton-scale forces onto fluid particles with properties similar to biological cells, and suggest that it is possible to accurately quantify these forces.

  14. TES Limb-Geometry Observations of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael D.

    2003-01-01

    The Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) on-board Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) has a pointing mirror that allows observations in the plane of the orbit anywhere from directly nadir to far above either the forward or aft limbs for details about the TES instrument). Nadir-geometry observations are defined as those where the field-of-view contains the surface of Mars (even if the actual observation is at a high emission angle far from true nadir). Limb-geometry observations are defined as those where the line-of-sight of the observations does not intersect the surface. At a number of points along the MGS orbit (typically every 10 deg. or 20 deg. of latitude) a limb sequence is taken, which includes a stack of overlapping TES spectra from just below the limb to more than 120 km above the limb. A typical limb sequence has approx. 20 individual spectra, and the projected size of a TES pixel at the limb is 13 km.

  15. Pulsar lensing geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Siqi; Pen, Ue-Li; Macquart, J.-P.; Brisken, Walter; Deller, Adam

    2016-05-01

    We test the inclined sheet pulsar scintillation model (Pen & Levin) against archival very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) data on PSR 0834+06 and show that its scintillation properties can be precisely reproduced by a model in which refraction occurs on two distinct lens planes. These data strongly favour a model in which grazing-incidence refraction instead of diffraction off turbulent structures is the primary source of pulsar scattering. This model can reproduce the parameters of the observed diffractive scintillation with an accuracy at the percent level. Comparison with new VLBI proper motion results in a direct measure of the ionized interstellar medium (ISM) screen transverse velocity. The results are consistent with ISM velocities local to the PSR 0834+06 sight-line (through the Galaxy). The simple 1-D structure of the lenses opens up the possibility of using interstellar lenses as precision probes for pulsar lens mapping, precision transverse motions in the ISM, and new opportunities for removing scattering to improve pulsar timing. We describe the parameters and observables of this double screen system. While relative screen distances can in principle be accurately determined, a global conformal distance degeneracy exists that allows a rescaling of the absolute distance scale. For PSR B0834+06, we present VLBI astrometry results that provide (for the first time) a direct measurement of the distance of the pulsar. For most of the recycled millisecond pulsars that are the targets of precision timing observations, the targets where independent distance measurements are not available. The degeneracy presented in the lens modelling could be broken if the pulsar resides in a binary system.

  16. Cloud geometry effects on atmospheric solar absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Q.; Cribb, M.C.; Barker, H.W.; Krueger, S.K.; Grossman, A.

    2000-04-15

    A 3D broadband solar radiative transfer scheme is formulated by integrating a Monte Carlo photon transport algorithm with the Fu-Liou radiation model. It is applied to fields of tropical mesoscale convective clouds and subtropical marine boundary layer clouds that were generated by a 2D cloud-resolving model. The effects of cloud geometry on the radiative energy budget are examined by comparing the full-resolution Monte Carlo results with those from the independent column approximation (ICA) that applies the plane-parallel radiation model to each column. For the tropical convective cloud system, it is found that cloud geometry effects always enhance atmospheric solar absorption regardless of solar zenith angle. In a large horizontal domain (512 km), differences in domain-averaged atmospheric absorption between the Monte Carlo and the ICA are less than 4 W m{sup {minus}2} in the daytime. However, for a smaller domain (e.g., 75 km) containing a cluster of deep convective towers, domain-averaged absorption can be enhanced by more than 20 W m{sup {minus}2}. For a subtropical marine boundary layer cloud system during the stratus-to-cumulus transition, calculations show that the ICA works very well for domain-averaged fluxes of the stratocumulus cloud fields even for a very small domain (4.8 km). For the trade cumulus cloud field, the effects of cloud sides and horizontal transport of photons become more significant. Calculations have also been made for both cloud systems including black carbon aerosol and a water vapor continuum. It is found that cloud geometry produces no discernible effects on the absorption enhancement due to the black carbon aerosol and water vapor continuum. The current study indicates that the atmospheric absorption enhancement due to cloud-related 3D photon transport is small. This enhancement could not explain the excess absorption suggested by recent studies.

  17. Linguistic geometry for autonomous navigation

    SciTech Connect

    Stilman, B.

    1995-09-01

    To discover the inner properties of human expert heuristics, which were successful in a certain class of complex control systems, we develop a formal theory, the Linguistic Geometry. This paper reports two examples of application of Linguistic Geometry to autonomous navigation of aerospace vehicles that demonstrate dramatic search reduction.

  18. GPS: Geometry, Probability, and Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Mike

    2012-01-01

    It might be said that for most occupations there is now less of a need for mathematics than there was say fifty years ago. But, the author argues, geometry, probability, and statistics constitute essential knowledge for everyone. Maybe not the geometry of Euclid, but certainly geometrical ways of thinking that might enable us to describe the world…

  19. Characteristics of stereo images from detectors in focal plane array.

    PubMed

    Son, Jung-Young; Yeom, Seokwon; Chun, Joo-Hwan; Guschin, Vladmir P; Lee, Dong-Su

    2011-07-01

    The equivalent ray geometry of two horizontally aligned detectors at the focal plane of the main antenna in a millimeter wave imaging system is analyzed to reveal the reason why the images from the detectors are fused as an image with a depth sense. Scanning the main antenna in both horizontal and vertical directions makes each detector perform as a camera, and the two detectors can work like a stereo camera in the millimeter wave range. However, the stereo camera geometry is different from that of the stereo camera used in the visual spectral range because the detectors' viewing directions are diverging to each other and they are a certain distance apart. The depth sense is mainly induced by the distance between detectors. The images obtained from the detectors in the millimeter imaging system are perceived with a good depth sense. The disparities responsible for the depth sense are identified in the images.

  20. Gravitational scattering of zero-rest-mass plane waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Logi, W. K.; Kovacs, S. J., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The Feyman-diagram technique is used to calculate the differential cross sections for the scattering of zero-rest-mass plane waves of spin 0, 1, and 2 by linearized Schwarzschild and Kerr geometries in the long-wavelength weak-field limit. It is found that the polarization of right (or left) circularly polarized electromagnetic waves is unaffected by the scattering process (i.e., helicity is conserved) and that the two helicity (polarization) states of the photon are scattered differently by the Kerr geometry. This coupling between the photon helicity and the angular momentum of the scatterer also leads to a partial polarization of unpolarized incident light. For gravitational waves, on the other hand, there is neither helicity conservation nor helicity-dependent scattering; the angular momentum of the scatterer has no polarizing effect on incident unpolarized gravitational waves.

  1. Plane elastostatic analysis of V-notched plates.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, B.; Mendelson, A.

    1972-01-01

    Solutions are given for several plane elastostatic problems of plates having a V-notch on one edge, and subjected to a variety of boundary conditions. The effect of the magnitude of the V-notch angle and specimen geometry on stress intensity factors KI and KII are obtained for unloaded notch surfaces. There is less than one per cent difference in opening model stress intensity factor in going from a zero degree notch angle to a 30 degree notch angle. Notch opening displacements at the plate edge were measured experimentally, and the results obtained were in excellent agreement with the computed results.

  2. Superfluid Spin Transport Through Easy-Plane Ferromagnetic Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takei, So; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2014-06-01

    Superfluid spin transport—dissipationless transport of spin—is theoretically studied in a ferromagnetic insulator with easy-plane anisotropy. We consider an open geometry where the spin current is injected into the ferromagnet from one side by a metallic reservoir with a nonequilibrium spin accumulation and ejected into another metallic reservoir located downstream. Spin transport is studied using a combination of magnetoelectric circuit theory, Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert phenomenology, and microscopic linear-response theory. We discuss how spin superfluidity can be probed in a magnetically mediated negative electron-drag experiment.

  3. Generation of a crowned pinion tooth surface by a plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, F. L.; Zhang, J.; Handschuh, R. F.

    1988-01-01

    The topology of a crowned spur pinion tooth surface that reduces the level of transmission errors due to misalignment is described. The geometry of the modified pinion tooth surface and of the regular involute gear tooth surface is discussed. The tooth contact analysis between the meshing surfaces is also described. Generating a modified pinion tooth surface by a plane whose motion is controlled by a 5-degree-of-freedom system is investigated. The numerical results included indicate that the transmission error remains low as the gears are misaligned.

  4. Eight plane IPND mechanical testing.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, A.; Guarino, V.; Wood, K.; Nephew, T.; Ayres, D.; Lee, A.; High Energy Physics; FNAL

    2008-03-18

    A mechanical test of an 8 plane IPND mechanical prototype, which was constructed using extrusions from the testing/tryout of the 16 cell prototype extrusion die in Argonne National Laboratory, was conducted. There were 4 vertical and 4 horizontal planes in this 8 plane IPND prototype. Each vertical plane had four 16 cell extrusions, while each horizontal plane had six 16 cell extrusions. Each plane was glued together using the formulation of Devcon adhesive, Devcon 60. The vertical extrusions used in the vertical planes shares the same dimensions as the horizontal extrusions in the horizontal planes with the average web thickness of 2.1 mm and the average wall thickness of 3.1 mm. This mechanical prototype was constructed with end-seals on the both ends of the vertical extrusions. The gaps were filled with epoxy between extrusions and end-seals. The overall dimension of IPND is 154.8 by 103.1 by 21.7 inches with the weight of approximately 1200 kg, as shown in a figure. Two similar mechanical tests of 3 layer and 11 layer prototypes have been done in order to evaluate the strength of the adhesive joint between extrusions in the NOvA detector. The test showed that the IPND prototype was able to sustain under the loading of weight of itself and scintillator. Two FEA models were built to verify the measurement data from the test. The prediction from FEA slice model seems correlated reasonably well to the test result, even under a 'rough' estimated condition for the wall thickness (from an untuned die) and an unknown property of 'garage type' extrusion. A full size of FEA 3-D model also agrees very well with the test data from strain gage readings. It is worthy to point out that the stress distribution of the structure is predominantly determined by the internal pressure, while the buckling stability relies more on the loading weight from the extrusions themselves and scintillate. Results of conducted internal pressure tests, including 3- cell, 11-cell and the IPND

  5. SETI in the Ecliptic Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conn Henry, Richard; Kilston, S.; Shostak, S.

    2008-05-01

    The strong advantages of SETI searches in the ecliptic plane have been pointed out by Kilston, Shostak, and Henry (2008). In our poster we show one possible history of civilizations in the galaxy, from birth, through galactic colonization, up to death - and even beyond. Should this scenario be correct, the pattern suggests that the best hope for success in SETI is exploration of the possibility that there are a few extremely ancient but non-colonizing civilizations; civilizations that, aeons ago, detected the existence of Earth (oxygen, and hence life) and of its Moon (stabilizing Earth's rotation) via observations of transits of the Sun (hence, ecliptic, which is stable over millions of years [Laskar et al. 2004]), and have been beaming voluminous information in our direction ever since, in their faint hope (now realized) that a technological "receiving” species would appear. To maintain such a targeted broadcast would be extremely cheap for an advanced civilization. A search of a swath centered on our ecliptic plane should easily find such civilizations, if they exist. We hope to carry out such a search, using the Allen Telescope Array. http://henry.pha.jhu.edu/poster.SETI.pdf References: Kilston, Steven; Shostak, Seth; & Henry, Richard Conn; "Who's Looking at You, Kid?: SETI Advantages near the Ecliptic Plane," AbSciCon 2008, April 14-17, Santa Clara, CA.; Laskar, J., et al., A&A 428, 261, 2004 This work was supported by Maryland Space Grant Consortium.

  6. Characterization of the centroidal geometry of human ribs.

    PubMed

    Kindig, Matthew W; Kent, Richard W

    2013-11-01

    While a number of studies have quantified overall ribcage morphology (breadth, depth, kyphosis/lordosis) and rib cross-sectional geometry in humans, few studies have characterized the centroidal geometry of individual ribs. In this study, a novel model is introduced to describe the centroidal path of a rib (i.e., the sequence of centroids connecting adjacent cross-sections) in terms of several physically-meaningful and intuitive geometric parameters. Surface reconstructions of rib levels 2-10 from 16 adult male cadavers (aged 31-75 years) were first extracted from CT scans, and the centroidal path was calculated in 3D for each rib using a custom numerical method. The projection of the centroidal path onto the plane of best fit (i.e., the "in-plane" centroidal path) was then modeled using two geometric primitives (a circle and a semiellipse) connected to give C1 continuity. Two additional parameters were used to describe the deviation of the centroidal path from this plane; further, the radius of curvature was calculated at various points along the rib length. This model was fit to each of the 144 extracted ribs, and average trends in rib size and shape with rib level were reported. In general, upper ribs (levels 2-5) had centroidal paths which were closer to circular, while lower ribs (levels 6-10) tended to be more elliptical; further the centroidal curvature at the posterior extremity was less pronounced for lower ribs. Lower ribs also tended to exhibit larger deviations from the best-fit plane. The rib dimensions and trends with subject stature were found to be consistent with findings previously reported in the literature. This model addresses a critical need in the biomechanics literature for the accurate characterization of rib geometry, and can be extended to a larger population as a simple and accurate way to represent the centroidal shape of human ribs.

  7. Chemical etching and organometallic chemical vapor deposition on varied geometries of GaAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Wilt, David M.

    1989-01-01

    Results of micron-spaced geometries produced by wet chemical etching and subsequent OMCVD growth on various GaAs surfaces are presented. The polar lattice increases the complexity of the process. The slow-etch planes defined by anisotropic etching are not always the same as the growth facets produced during MOCVD deposition, especially for deposition on higher-order planes produced by the hex groove etching.

  8. CATIA-GDML geometry builder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belogurov, S.; Berchun, Yu; Chernogorov, A.; Malzacher, P.; Ovcharenko, E.; Semennikov, A.

    2011-12-01

    Due to conceptual difference between geometry descriptions in Computer-Aided Design (CAD) systems and particle transport Monte Carlo (MC) codes direct conversion of detector geometry in either direction is not feasible. An original set of tools has been developed for building a GEANT4/ROOT compatible geometry in the CATIA CAD system and exchanging it with mentioned MC packages using GDML file format. A Special structure of a CATIA product tree, a wide range of primitives, different types of multiple volume instantiation, and supporting macros have been implemented.

  9. An improved combinatorial geometry model for arbitrary geometry in DSMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargaran, H.; Minuchehr, A.; Zolfaghari, A.

    2017-03-01

    This paper focuses on a new direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code based on combinatorial geometry (CG) for simulation of any rarefied gas flow. The developed code, called DgSMC-A, has been supplied with an improved CG modeling able to significantly optimize the particle-tracking process, resulting in a highly reduced runtime compared to the conventional codes. The improved algorithm inserts a grid over the geometry and saves those grid elements containing some part of the geometry border. Since only a small part of a grid is engaged with the geometry border, significant time can be saved using the proposed algorithm. Embedding the modified algorithm in the DgSMC-A resulted in a fast, robust and self-governing code needless to any mesh generator. The code completely handles complex geometries created with first-and second-order surfaces. In addition, we developed a new surface area calculator in the CG methodology for complex geometries based on the Monte Carlo method with acceptable accuracy. Several well-known test cases are examined to indicate the code ability to deal with a wide range of realistic problems. Results are also found to be in good agreement with references and experimental data.

  10. Natural Language as a Tool for Analyzing the Proving Process: The Case of Plane Geometry Proof

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robotti, Elisabetta

    2012-01-01

    In the field of human cognition, language plays a special role that is connected directly to thinking and mental development (e.g., Vygotsky, "1938"). Thanks to "verbal thought", language allows humans to go beyond the limits of immediately perceived information, to form concepts and solve complex problems (Luria, "1975"). So, it appears language…

  11. Emergent geometry from quantized spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Hyun Seok; Sivakumar, M.

    2010-08-15

    We examine the picture of emergent geometry arising from a mass-deformed matrix model. Because of the mass deformation, a vacuum geometry turns out to be a constant curvature spacetime such as d-dimensional sphere and (anti-)de Sitter spaces. We show that the mass-deformed matrix model giving rise to the constant curvature spacetime can be derived from the d-dimensional Snyder algebra. The emergent geometry beautifully confirms all the rationale inferred from the algebraic point of view that the d-dimensional Snyder algebra is equivalent to the Lorentz algebra in (d+1)-dimensional flat spacetime. For example, a vacuum geometry of the mass-deformed matrix model is completely described by a G-invariant metric of coset manifolds G/H defined by the Snyder algebra. We also discuss a nonlinear deformation of the Snyder algebra.

  12. Orbital Space Plane Cost Credibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creech, Steve

    2003-01-01

    NASA's largest new start development program is the Orbital Space Plane (OSP) Program. The program is currently in the formulation stage. One of the critical issues to be resolved, prior to initiating full-scale development, is establishing cost credibility of NASA s budget estimates for development, production, and operations of the OSP. This paper will discuss the processes, tools, and methodologies that NASA, along with its industry partners, are implementing to assure cost credibility for the OSP program. Results of benchmarking of current tools and the development of new cost estimating capabilities and approaches will be discussed.

  13. SNAP Satellite Focal Plane Development

    SciTech Connect

    Bebek, C.; Akerlof, C.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Astier, P.; Baltay, C.; Barrelet, E.; Basa, S.; Bercovitz, J.; Bergstrom, L.; Berstein, G.P.; Bester, M.; Bohlin, R.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Campbell, M.; Carithers, W.; Commins, E.; Day, C.; Deustua, S.; DiGennaro, R.; Ealet, A.; Ellis, R.; Emmett, W.; Eriksson, M.; Fouchez,D.; Fruchter, A.; Genat, J-F.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.; Heetderks, H.; Holland, S.; Huterer, D.; Johnson, W.; Kadel, R.; Karcher,A.; Kim, A.; Kolbe, W.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureaux, J.; Lampton, M.; Lefevre, O.; Levi, M.; Levin, D.; Linder, E.; Loken, S.; Malina, R.; Mazure, A.; McKay, T.; McKee, S.; Miquel, R.; Morgan, N.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Roe, N.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi, H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Perlmutter, S.; Prieto, E.; Rabinowitz,D.; Refregier, A.; Rhodes, J.; Schubnell, M.; Sholl, M.; Smadja, G.; Smith, R.; Smoot, G.; Snyder, J.; Spadafora, A.; Szymkowiak, A.; Tarle,G.; Taylor, K.; Tilquin, A.; Tomasch, A.; Vincent, D.; von der Lippe, H.; Walder, J-P.; Wang, G.

    2003-07-07

    The proposed SuperNova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) mission will have a two-meter class telescope delivering diffraction-limited images to an instrumented 0.7 square degree field in the visible and near-infrared wavelength regime. The requirements for the instrument suite and the present configuration of the focal plane concept are presented. A two year R&D phase, largely supported by the Department of Energy, is just beginning. We describe the development activities that are taking place to advance our preparedness for mission proposal in the areas of detectors and electronics.

  14. The Common Geometry Module (CGM).

    SciTech Connect

    Tautges, Timothy James

    2004-12-01

    The Common Geometry Module (CGM) is a code library which provides geometry functionality used for mesh generation and other applications. This functionality includes that commonly found in solid modeling engines, like geometry creation, query and modification; CGM also includes capabilities not commonly found in solid modeling engines, like geometry decomposition tools and support for shared material interfaces. CGM is built upon the ACIS solid modeling engine, but also includes geometry capability developed beside and on top of ACIS. CGM can be used as-is to provide geometry functionality for codes needing this capability. However, CGM can also be extended using derived classes in C++, allowing the geometric model to serve as the basis for other applications, for example mesh generation. CGM is supported on Sun Solaris, SGI, HP, IBM, DEC, Linux and Windows NT platforms. CGM also includes support for loading ACIS models on parallel computers, using MPI-based communication. Future plans for CGM are to port it to different solid modeling engines, including Pro/Engineer or SolidWorks. CGM is being released into the public domain under an LGPL license; the ACIS-based engine is available to ACIS licensees on request.

  15. The Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glenn, Jason; Aguirre, James; Bally, John; Battersby, Cara; Bradley, Eric Todd; Cyganowski, Claudia; Dowell, Darren; Drosback, Meredith; Dunham, Miranda K.; Evans, Neal J., II; Ginsburg, Adam; Harvey, Paul; Rosolowsky, Erik; Schlingman, Wayne; Shirley, Yancy L.; Stringfellow, Guy S.; Walawender, Josh; Williams, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    The Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) is a 1.1 millimeter continuum survey of the northern Galactic Plane made with Bolocam and the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. The coverage totals 170 square degrees, comprised of a contiguous range from -10.5 deg is less than or equal to 90.5 deg, 0.5 deg is less than or equal to b is less than or equal to 0.5 deg, with extended coverage in b in selected regions, and four targeted regions in the outer Galaxy, including: IC1396, toward the Perseus arm at l is approximately 111 deg, W3/4/5, and Gem OB1. Depths of the maps range from 30 to 60 mJy beam (sup 1). Approximately 8,400 sources were detected and the maps and source catalog have been made publicly available. Millimeter-wave thermal dust emission reveals dense regions within molecular clouds, thus the BGPS serves as a database for studies of the dense interstellar medium and star formation within the Milky Way.

  16. Image plane sweep volume illumination.

    PubMed

    Sundén, Erik; Ynnerman, Anders; Ropinski, Timo

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, many volumetric illumination models have been proposed, which have the potential to simulate advanced lighting effects and thus support improved image comprehension. Although volume ray-casting is widely accepted as the volume rendering technique which achieves the highest image quality, so far no volumetric illumination algorithm has been designed to be directly incorporated into the ray-casting process. In this paper we propose image plane sweep volume illumination (IPSVI), which allows the integration of advanced illumination effects into a GPU-based volume ray-caster by exploiting the plane sweep paradigm. Thus, we are able to reduce the problem complexity and achieve interactive frame rates, while supporting scattering as well as shadowing. Since all illumination computations are performed directly within a single rendering pass, IPSVI does not require any preprocessing nor does it need to store intermediate results within an illumination volume. It therefore has a significantly lower memory footprint than other techniques. This makes IPSVI directly applicable to large data sets. Furthermore, the integration into a GPU-based ray-caster allows for high image quality as well as improved rendering performance by exploiting early ray termination. This paper discusses the theory behind IPSVI, describes its implementation, demonstrates its visual results and provides performance measurements.

  17. Singularities from colliding plane gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tipler, Frank J.

    1980-12-01

    A simple geometrical argument is given which shows that a collision between two plane gravitational waves must result in singularities. The argument suggests that these singularities are a peculiar feature of plane waves, because singularities are also a consequence of a collision between self-gravitating plane waves of other fields with arbitrarily small energy density.

  18. Possible Laminographic and Tomosynthesis Applications for Wolter Microscope Scan Geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Schneberk, D; Jackson, J; Martz, H

    2004-10-05

    The Wolter microscope includes a number of attractive features for x-ray imaging, and possible connections to laminographic and tomosynthesis 3D object recovery algorithms. This type of instrument employs x-ray optics to sift out single energy x-rays from a broader spectral energy source, and direct those x-rays to a ''focus plane'' similar to the operation of a optical microscope (see Figure 1 for schematic of a Wolter instrument). Unlike optical microscopes the 3D object can be thick in the direction of the x-rays and in this case more of the intensity of the image is affected by the out-of-focus planes, since the ray-paths span the entire depth of the object. It is clear that the ''in-focus'' plane of a Wolter contain more 3D information than a simple ''point-projection'' radiograph. However, it is not clear just how the impact of the out-of-focus planes obscures or distorts features of interest for the in-focus planes. Further, it is not clear just how object positioning can be combined with multiple acquisitions to enable recovery of other planes within the object function or the entire object function. Of particular interest here are Wolter microscopes configured for mesoscale objects (mm extent with um features). Laminographic and tomosynthesis scanning methods can be strategic for this type of inspection instrument. First, photon output for inspection purposes can be meager in this type of ''small field of view'' system. With laboratory x-ray sources a single image can require up to 10 minutes to accumulate adequate signal. Techniques that can obtain 3D object information from small numbers of views, rotational or translational, are consequently at a premium. Laminographic and tomosynthesis scanning methods require relatively small numbers of views (2-30). Secondly, the Wolter microscope scan geometry in a single view is a fit with the type of source-detector geometry achieved through source-object-detector re-positioning in laminographic and tomosynthesis

  19. Serious Play with Dynamic Plane Transformations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, James

    2011-01-01

    Transformations are a central organizing idea in geometry. They are included in most geometry curricula and are likely to appear with even greater emphasis in the future, given the central role they play in the "Common Core State Standards" for K-12 mathematics. One of the attractions of geometry is the ability to draw and construct the…

  20. Analysis of out-of-plane thermal microactuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atre, Amarendra

    2006-02-01

    Out-of-plane thermal microactuators find applications in optical switches to motivate micromirrors. Accurate analysis of such actuators is beneficial for improving existing designs and constructing more energy efficient actuators. However, the analysis is complicated by the nonlinear deformation of the thermal actuators along with temperature-dependent properties of polysilicon. This paper describes the development, modeling issues and results of a three-dimensional multiphysics nonlinear finite element model of surface micromachined out-of-plane thermal actuators. The model includes conductive and convective cooling effects and takes into account the effect of variable air gap on the response of the actuator. The model is implemented to investigate the characteristics of two diverse MUMPs fabricated out-of-plane thermal actuators. Reasonable agreement is observed between simulated and measured results for the model that considers the influence of air gap on actuator response. The usefulness of the model is demonstrated by implementing it to observe the effect of actuator geometry variation on steady-state deflection response.

  1. Universal rules for division plane selection in plants.

    PubMed

    Müller, Sabine

    2012-04-01

    Coordinated cell divisions and cell expansion are the key processes that command growth in all organisms. The orientation of cell divisions and the direction of cell expansion are critical for normal development. Symmetric divisions contribute to proliferation and growth, while asymmetric divisions initiate pattern formation and differentiation. In plants these processes are of particular importance since their cells are encased in cellulosic walls that determine their shape and lock their position within tissues and organs. Several recent studies have analyzed the relationship between cell shape and patterns of symmetric cell division in diverse organisms and employed biophysical and mathematical considerations to develop computer simulations that have allowed accurate prediction of cell division patterns. From these studies, a picture emerges that diverse biological systems follow simple universal rules of geometry to select their division planes and that the microtubule cytoskeleton takes a major part in sensing the geometric information and translates this information into a specific division outcome. In plant cells, the division plane is selected before mitosis, and spatial information of the division plane is preserved throughout division by the presence of reference molecules at a distinct region of the plasma membrane, the cortical division zone. The recruitment of these division zone markers occurs multiple times by several mechanisms, suggesting that the cortical division zone is a highly dynamic region.

  2. Functional Aesthetic Occlusal Plane (FAOP)

    PubMed Central

    Câmara, Carlos Alexandre; Martins, Renato Parsekian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: A reasonable exposure of incisors and gingival tissues is generally considered more attractive than excess or lack of exposure. A reasonable gingival exposure is considered to be around 0 to 2 mm when smiling and 2-4 mm exposure of the maxillary incisor edge when the lips are at rest. Objective: The aim of this paper is to present the Functional Aesthetic Occlusal Plane (FAOP), which aims to help in the diagnosis of the relationships established among molars, incisors and the upper lip. Conclusion: FAOP can complement an existing and established orthodontic treatment plan, facilitating the visualization of functional and aesthetic demands by giving a greater focus on the position of incisors in the relationship established among the incisors, molars and the upper lip stomion. PMID:27653271

  3. Thermodynamics of black plane solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Manuel E.; Jardim, Deborah F.; Houndjo, Stéphane J. M.; Myrzakulov, Ratbay

    2013-11-01

    We obtain a new phantom black plane solution in D of the Einstein-Maxwell theory coupled with a cosmological constant. We analyse their basic properties, as well as its causal structure, and obtain the extensive and intensive thermodynamic variables, as well as the specific heat and the first law. Through the specific heat and the so-called geometric methods, we analyse in detail their thermodynamic properties, the extreme and phase transition limits, as well as the local and global stabilities of the system. The normal case is shown with an extreme limit and the phantom one with a phase transition only for null mass, which is physically inaccessible. The systems present local and global stabilities for certain values of the entropy density with respect to the electric charge, for the canonical and grand canonical ensembles.

  4. Smov Baseline Focal Plane Check

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmozzi, Roberto

    1994-01-01

    This test will be executed during the period after the servicing mission and before the extension of the COSTAR assembly. Its purpose is to verify that the FOS, HRS, and FOC focal planes have not been altered by the activities performed by Story and the Astronauts during the servicing mission. A large unknown deviation in aperture position would severly impact subsequent COSTAR alignment activities. If this test reveals a deviation, we may be able to compensate for any offsets prior to the complex and delicate COSTAR alignment calibrations. This enhanced version of the Heptathlon is designed to verify course alignments and measure relative aperture positions to within a few arcsecs. SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS: ***This test uses pre-servicing parameters for HRS, FOS, and FOC and the Cycle 4 parameters for WFPC2.*** ***This test requires special alignment and special guide stars.** ***This test requires special commanding for telemetry setups.**

  5. Snakes Out of the Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, Andrew; Young, Bruce A.; Mahadevan, L.

    2012-02-01

    We develop a new computational model of elastic rods, taking into account shear and full rotational dynamics, as well as friction, adhesion, and collision. This model is used to study the movement of snakes in different environments. By applying different muscular activation patterns to the snake, we observe many different patterns of motion, from planar undulation to sudden strikes. Many of the most interesting behaviors involve the snake rising out of the horizontal plane in the vertical direction. Such behaviors include a sand snake sidewinding over the hot desert sand and a cobra rearing up into a defensive striking position. Experimental videos of live snakes are analyzed and compared with computational results. We identify and explain a new form of movement previously unobserved: ``collateral locomotion.''

  6. Broken chiral symmetry on a null plane

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, Silas R.

    2013-10-15

    On a null-plane (light-front), all effects of spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking are contained in the three Hamiltonians (dynamical Poincaré generators), while the vacuum state is a chiral invariant. This property is used to give a general proof of Goldstone’s theorem on a null-plane. Focusing on null-plane QCD with N degenerate flavors of light quarks, the chiral-symmetry breaking Hamiltonians are obtained, and the role of vacuum condensates is clarified. In particular, the null-plane Gell-Mann–Oakes–Renner formula is derived, and a general prescription is given for mapping all chiral-symmetry breaking QCD condensates to chiral-symmetry conserving null-plane QCD condensates. The utility of the null-plane description lies in the operator algebra that mixes the null-plane Hamiltonians and the chiral symmetry charges. It is demonstrated that in a certain non-trivial limit, the null-plane operator algebra reduces to the symmetry group SU(2N) of the constituent quark model. -- Highlights: •A proof (the first) of Goldstone’s theorem on a null-plane is given. •The puzzle of chiral-symmetry breaking condensates on a null-plane is solved. •The emergence of spin-flavor symmetries in null-plane QCD is demonstrated.

  7. Detection of trans–cis flips and peptide-plane flips in protein structures

    SciTech Connect

    Touw, Wouter G.; Joosten, Robbie P.; Vriend, Gert

    2015-07-28

    A method is presented to detect peptide bonds that need either a trans–cis flip or a peptide-plane flip. A coordinate-based method is presented to detect peptide bonds that need correction either by a peptide-plane flip or by a trans–cis inversion of the peptide bond. When applied to the whole Protein Data Bank, the method predicts 4617 trans–cis flips and many thousands of hitherto unknown peptide-plane flips. A few examples are highlighted for which a correction of the peptide-plane geometry leads to a correction of the understanding of the structure–function relation. All data, including 1088 manually validated cases, are freely available and the method is available from a web server, a web-service interface and through WHAT-CHECK.

  8. Electrodynamics and Spacetime Geometry: Foundations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral, Francisco; Lobo, Francisco S. N.

    2016-11-01

    We explore the intimate connection between spacetime geometry and electrodynamics. This link is already implicit in the constitutive relations between the field strengths and excitations, which are an essential part of the axiomatic structure of electromagnetism, clearly formulated via integration theory and differential forms. We review the foundations of classical electromagnetism based on charge and magnetic flux conservation, the Lorentz force and the constitutive relations. These relations introduce the conformal part of the metric and allow the study of electrodynamics for specific spacetime geometries. At the foundational level, we discuss the possibility of generalizing the vacuum constitutive relations, by relaxing the fixed conditions of homogeneity and isotropy, and by assuming that the symmetry properties of the electro-vacuum follow the spacetime isometries. The implications of this extension are briefly discussed in the context of the intimate connection between electromagnetism and the geometry (and causal structure) of spacetime.

  9. Conventionalism and integrable Weyl geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucheu, M. L.

    2015-03-01

    Since the appearance of Einstein's general relativity, gravitation has been associated to the space-time curvature. This theory introduced a geometrodynamic language which became a convenient tool to predict matter behaviour. However, the properties of space-time itself cannot be measurable by experiments. Taking Poincaré idea that the geometry of space-time is merely a convention, we show that the general theory of relativity can be completely reformulated in a more general setting, a generalization of Riemannian geometry, namely, the Weyl integrable geometry. The choice of this new mathematical language implies, among other things, that the path of particles and light rays should now correspond to Weylian geodesies. Such modification in the dynamic of bodies brings a new perception of physical phenomena that we will explore.

  10. Quantum geometry and gravitational entropy

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Joan; Balasubramanian, Vijay; Czech, Bart Iomiej; Larjo, Klaus; Marolf, Donald; Simon, Joan

    2007-05-29

    Most quantum states have wavefunctions that are widely spread over the accessible Hilbert space and hence do not have a good description in terms of a single classical geometry. In order to understand when geometric descriptions are possible, we exploit the AdS/CFT correspondence in the half-BPS sector of asymptotically AdS_5 x S5 universes. In this sector we devise a"coarse-grained metric operator" whose eigenstates are well described by a single spacetime topology and geometry. We show that such half-BPS universes have a non-vanishing entropy if and only if the metric is singular, and that the entropy arises from coarse-graining the geometry. Finally, we use our entropy formula to find the most entropic spacetimes with fixed asymptotic moments beyond the global charges.

  11. Electrodynamics and Spacetime Geometry: Foundations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral, Francisco; Lobo, Francisco S. N.

    2017-02-01

    We explore the intimate connection between spacetime geometry and electrodynamics. This link is already implicit in the constitutive relations between the field strengths and excitations, which are an essential part of the axiomatic structure of electromagnetism, clearly formulated via integration theory and differential forms. We review the foundations of classical electromagnetism based on charge and magnetic flux conservation, the Lorentz force and the constitutive relations. These relations introduce the conformal part of the metric and allow the study of electrodynamics for specific spacetime geometries. At the foundational level, we discuss the possibility of generalizing the vacuum constitutive relations, by relaxing the fixed conditions of homogeneity and isotropy, and by assuming that the symmetry properties of the electro-vacuum follow the spacetime isometries. The implications of this extension are briefly discussed in the context of the intimate connection between electromagnetism and the geometry (and causal structure) of spacetime.

  12. Pupil geometry and pupil re-imaging in telescope arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Traub, Wesley A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper considers the issues of lateral and longitudinal pupil geometry in ground-based telescope arrays, such as IOTA. In particular, it is considered whether or not pupil re-imaging is required before beam combination. By considering the paths of rays through the system, an expression is derived for the optical path errors in the combined wavefront as a function of array dimensions, telescope magnification factor, viewing angle, and field-of-view. By examining this expression for the two cases of pupil-plane and image-plane combination, operational limits can be found for any array. As a particular example, it is shown that for IOTA no pupil re-imaging optics will be needed.

  13. Fibonacci Numbers and an Area Puzzle: Connecting Geometry and Algebra in the Mathematics Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Mary M.; Panasuk, Regina M.

    1997-01-01

    Presents a mathematical puzzle that asks about "missing" area and leads to an exploration of the Fibonacci sequence as well as genuine inquiry in plane geometry connected to algebra. Discusses the inquiry, the concepts, the solution, and an extension that deepens all students' understanding of the connections between algebra and…

  14. The Impacts of Virtual Manipulatives and Prior Knowledge on Geometry Learning Performance in Junior High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Chun-Yi; Chen, Ming-Jang

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies on the effects of virtual and physical manipulatives have failed to consider the impact of prior knowledge on the efficacy of manipulatives. This study focuses on the learning of plane geometry in junior high schools, including the sum of interior angles in polygons, the sum of exterior angles in polygons, and the properties of…

  15. The Effects of Differentiation of Content in Problem-Solving in Learning Geometry in Secondary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bikic, Naida; Maricic, Sanja M.; Pikula, Milenko

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effects of problem-based learning which was established on differentiation of content at three levels of complexity in the processing of the content of Analytical geometry in the plane. In this context, an experimental research was conducted, on a sample of secondary school students (N = 165) in order to…

  16. Geometry, topology, and string theory

    SciTech Connect

    Varadarajan, Uday

    2003-01-01

    A variety of scenarios are considered which shed light upon the uses and limitations of classical geometric and topological notions in string theory. The primary focus is on situations in which D-brane or string probes of a given classical space-time see the geometry quite differently than one might naively expect. In particular, situations in which extra dimensions, non-commutative geometries as well as other non-local structures emerge are explored in detail. Further, a preliminary exploration of such issues in Lorentzian space-times with non-trivial causal structures within string theory is initiated.

  17. Geometry of generalized depolarizing channels

    SciTech Connect

    Burrell, Christian K.

    2009-10-15

    A generalized depolarizing channel acts on an N-dimensional quantum system to compress the 'Bloch ball' in N{sup 2}-1 directions; it has a corresponding compression vector. We investigate the geometry of these compression vectors and prove a conjecture of Dixit and Sudarshan [Phys. Rev. A 78, 032308 (2008)], namely, that when N=2{sup d} (i.e., the system consists of d qubits), and we work in the Pauli basis then the set of all compression vectors forms a simplex. We extend this result by investigating the geometry in other bases; in particular we find precisely when the set of all compression vectors forms a simplex.

  18. RCS Analysis of Plate Geometries, parts 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Polka, Lesley A.; Polycarpou, Anastasis C.

    1993-01-01

    High-frequency techniques for Radar Cross Section (RCS) prediction of plate geometries and a physical optics/equivalent currents model for the RCS of trihedral corner reflectors are addressed. In part 1, a Uniform Theory of Diffraction (UTD) model for the principal-plane radar cross section (RCS) of a perfectly conducting, rectangular plate coated on one side with an electrically thin, lossy dielectric is presented. In part 2, the scattering in the interior regions of both square and triangular trihedral corner reflectors are examined.

  19. Phases of dipolar bosons in a bilayer geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinti, Fabio; Wang, Daw-Wei; Boninsegni, Massimo

    2017-02-01

    We study, by first-principles computer simulations, the low-temperature phase diagram of bosonic dipolar gases in a bilayer geometry as a function of the two control parameters, i.e., the in-plane density and the interlayer distance. We observe four distinct phases, namely, paired and decoupled superfluids, as well as a crystal of dimers and one consisting of two aligned crystalline layers. A direct quantum phase transition from a dimer crystal to two independent superfluids is observed in a relatively wide range of parameters. No supersolid phase is predicted for this system.

  20. A molecular dynamics study of freezing in a confined geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Wen-Jong; Banavar, Jayanth R.; Koplik, Joel

    1992-01-01

    The dynamics of freezing of a Lennard-Jones liquid in narrow channels bounded by molecular walls is studied by computer simulation. The time development of ordering is quantified and a novel freezing mechanism is observed. The liquid forms layers and subsequent in-plane ordering within a layer is accompanied by a sharpening of the layer in the transverse direction. The effects of channel size, the methods of quench, the liquid-wall interaction and the roughness of walls on the freezing mechanism are elucidated. Comparison with recent experiments on freezing in confined geometries is presented.

  1. Differential geometry of groups in string theory

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidke, W.B. Jr.

    1990-09-01

    Techniques from differential geometry and group theory are applied to two topics from string theory. The first topic studied is quantum groups, with the example of GL (1{vert bar}1). The quantum group GL{sub q}(1{vert bar}1) is introduced, and an exponential description is derived. The algebra and coproduct are determined using the invariant differential calculus method introduced by Woronowicz and generalized by Wess and Zumino. An invariant calculus is also introduced on the quantum superplane, and a representation of the algebra of GL{sub q}(1{vert bar}1) in terms of the super-plane coordinates is constructed. The second topic follows the approach to string theory introduced by Bowick and Rajeev. Here the ghost contribution to the anomaly of the energy-momentum tensor is calculated as the Ricci curvature of the Kaehler quotient space Diff(S{sup 1})/S{sup 1}. We discuss general Kaehler quotient spaces and derive an expression for their Ricci curvatures. Application is made to the string and superstring diffeomorphism groups, considering all possible choices of subgroup. The formalism is extended to associated holomorphic vector bundles, where the Ricci curvature corresponds to the anomaly for different ghost sea levels. 26 refs.

  2. Tilted planes in 3D image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pargas, Roy P.; Staples, Nancy J.; Malloy, Brian F.; Cantrell, Ken; Chhatriwala, Murtuza

    1998-03-01

    Reliable 3D wholebody scanners which output digitized 3D images of a complete human body are now commercially available. This paper describes a software package, called 3DM, being developed by researchers at Clemson University and which manipulates and extracts measurements from such images. The focus of this paper is on tilted planes, a 3DM tool which allows a user to define a plane through a scanned image, tilt it in any direction, and effectively define three disjoint regions on the image: the points on the plane and the points on either side of the plane. With tilted planes, the user can accurately take measurements required in applications such as apparel manufacturing. The user can manually segment the body rather precisely. Tilted planes assist the user in analyzing the form of the body and classifying the body in terms of body shape. Finally, titled planes allow the user to eliminate extraneous and unwanted points often generated by a 3D scanner. This paper describes the user interface for tilted planes, the equations defining the plane as the user moves it through the scanned image, an overview of the algorithms, and the interaction of the tilted plane feature with other tools in 3DM.

  3. Math 1813 (PIPI): Analytic Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater. Coll. of Engineering.

    This study guide, designed for use at Oklahoma State University, contains lists of activities for students to perform based on the "mastery of learning" concept. The activities include readings, problems, self evaluations, and assessment tasks. The units included are: Lines in a Plane, Conics, Transformations, Polar Coordinates,…

  4. Out-of-plane properties

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, W.C.; Portanova, M.A.

    1995-10-01

    This paper summarizes three areas of research which were performed to characterize out-of-plane properties of composite materials. In the first investigation, a series of tests was run to characterize the through-the-thickness tensile strength for a variety of composites that included 2D braids, 2D and 3D weaves, and prepreg tapes. A new test method based on a curved beam was evaluated. Failures were significantly different between the 2D materials and the 3D weaves. The 2D materials delaminated between layers due to out-of-plane tensile stresses while the 3D weaves failed due to the formation of radial cracks between the surface plies caused by high circumferential stresses along the inner radius. The strength of the 2D textile composites did not increase relative to the tapes. Final failure in the 3D weaves was caused by a circumferential crack similar to the 2D materials and occurred at a lower bending moment than in other materials. The early failures in the 3D weaves were caused by radial crack formation rather than a low through-the-thickness strength. The second investigation focused on the development of a standard impact test method to measure impact damage resistance. The only impact tests that currently exist are compression after impact (CAI) tests which incorporate elements of both damage resistance and damage tolerance. A new impact test method is under development which uses a quasi-static indentation (QSI) test to directly measure damage resistance. Damage resistance is quantified in terms of the contact force to produce a unit of damage where a metric for damage may be area in C-scan, depth of residual dent, penetration, damage growth, etc. A final draft of an impact standard that uses a QSI test method will be presented to the ASTM Impact Task Group on impact. In the third investigation, the impact damage resistance behavior of a variety of textile materials was studied using the QSI test method.

  5. The UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, P. W.; Hoare, M. G.; Longmore, A.; Schröder, A. C.; Davis, C. J.; Adamson, A.; Bandyopadhyay, R. M.; de Grijs, R.; Smith, M.; Gosling, A.; Mitchison, S.; Gáspár, A.; Coe, M.; Tamura, M.; Parker, Q.; Irwin, M.; Hambly, N.; Bryant, J.; Collins, R. S.; Cross, N.; Evans, D. W.; Gonzalez-Solares, E.; Hodgkin, S.; Lewis, J.; Read, M.; Riello, M.; Sutorius, E. T. W.; Lawrence, A.; Drew, J. E.; Dye, S.; Thompson, M. A.

    2008-11-01

    The UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey (GPS) is one of the five near-infrared Public Legacy Surveys that are being undertaken by the UKIDSS consortium, using the Wide Field Camera on the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope. It is surveying 1868 deg2 of the northern and equatorial Galactic plane at Galactic latitudes -5° < b < 5° in the J, H and K filters and a ~200-deg2 area of the Taurus-Auriga-Perseus molecular cloud complex in these three filters and the 2.12 μm (1-0) H2 filter. It will provide data on ~2 × 109 sources. Here we describe the properties of the data set and provide a user's guide for its exploitation. We also present brief Demonstration Science results from DR2 and from the Science Verification programme. These results illustrate how GPS data will frequently be combined with data taken in other wavebands to produce scientific results. The Demonstration Science comprises six studies. (1) A GPS-Spitzer-GLIMPSE cross-match for the star formation region G28.983-0.603 to identify YSOs. This increases the number of YSOs identified by a factor of 10 compared to GLIMPSE alone. (2) A wide-field study of the M17 nebula, in which an extinction map of the field is presented and the effect of source confusion on luminosity functions in different subregions is noted. (3) H2 emission in the ρ Ophiuchi dark cloud. All the molecular jets are traced back to a single active clump containing only a few protostars, which suggests that the duration of strong jet activity and associated rapid accretion in low-mass protostars is brief. (4) X-ray sources in the nuclear bulge. The GPS data distinguishes local main-sequence counterparts with soft X-ray spectra from nuclear bulge giant counterparts with hard X-ray spectra. (5) External galaxies in the zone of avoidance. The galaxies are clearly distinguished from stars in fields at longitudes l > 90°. (6) IPHAS-GPS optical-infrared spectrophotometric typing. The (i' - J) versus (J - H) diagram is used to distinguish A-F type

  6. Out-of-plane properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Wade C.; Portanova, Marc A.

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarizes three areas of research which were performed to characterize out-of-plane properties of composite materials. In the first investigation, a series of tests was run to characterize the through-the-thickness tensile strength for a variety of composites that included 2D braids, 2D and 3D weaves, and prepreg tapes. A new test method based on a curved beam was evaluated. Failures were significantly different between the 2D materials and the 3D weaves. The 2D materials delaminated between layers due to out-of-plane tensile stresses while the 3D weaves failed due to the formation of radial cracks between the surface plies caused by high circumferential stresses along the inner radius. The strength of the 2D textile composites did not increase relative to the tapes. Final failure in the 3D weaves was caused by a circumferential crack similar to the 2D materials and occurred at a lower bending moment than in other materials. The early failures in the 3D weaves were caused by radial crack formation rather than a low through-the-thickness strength. The second investigation focused on the development of a standard impact test method to measure impact damage resistance. The only impact tests that currently exist are compression after impact (CAI) tests which incorporate elements of both damage resistance and damage tolerance. A new impact test method is under development which uses a quasi-static indentation (QSI) test to directly measure damage resistance. Damage resistance is quantified in terms of the contact force to produce a unit of damage where a metric for damage may be area in C-scan, depth of residual dent , penetration, damage growth, etc. A final draft of an impact standard that uses a QSI test method will be presented to the ASTM Impact Task Group on impact. In the third investigation, the impact damage resistance behavior of a variety of textile materials was studied using the QSI test method. In this study, the force where large damage

  7. Approximations useful for the prediction of electrostatic discharges for simple electrode geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmonds, L.

    1986-01-01

    The report provides approximations for estimating the capacitance and the ratio of electric field strength to potential for a certain class of electrode geometries. The geometry consists of an electrode near a grounded plane, with the electrode being a surface of revolution about the perpendicular to the plane. Some examples which show the accuracy of the capacitance estimate and the accuracy of the estimate of electric field over potential can be found in the appendix. When it is possible to estimate the potential of the electrode, knowing the ratio of electric field to potential will help to determine if an electrostatic discharge is likely to occur. Knowing the capacitance will help to determine the strength of the discharge (the energy released by it) if it does occur. A brief discussion of discharge mechanisms is given. The medium between the electrode and the grounded plane may be a neutral gas, a vacuum, or an unchanged homogeneous isotropic dielectric.

  8. Teaching Activity-Based Taxicab Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ada, Tuba

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed on the process of teaching taxicab geometry, a non-Euclidean geometry that is easy to understand and similar to Euclidean geometry with its axiomatic structure. In this regard, several teaching activities were designed such as measuring taxicab distance, defining a taxicab circle, finding a geometric locus in taxicab geometry, and…

  9. Cell division plane orientation based on tensile stress in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Louveaux, Marion; Julien, Jean-Daniel; Mirabet, Vincent; Boudaoud, Arezki; Hamant, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Cell geometry has long been proposed to play a key role in the orientation of symmetric cell division planes. In particular, the recently proposed Besson–Dumais rule generalizes Errera’s rule and predicts that cells divide along one of the local minima of plane area. However, this rule has been tested only on tissues with rather local spherical shape and homogeneous growth. Here, we tested the application of the Besson–Dumais rule to the divisions occurring in the Arabidopsis shoot apex, which contains domains with anisotropic curvature and differential growth. We found that the Besson–Dumais rule works well in the central part of the apex, but fails to account for cell division planes in the saddle-shaped boundary region. Because curvature anisotropy and differential growth prescribe directional tensile stress in that region, we tested the putative contribution of anisotropic stress fields to cell division plane orientation at the shoot apex. To do so, we compared two division rules: geometrical (new plane along the shortest path) and mechanical (new plane along maximal tension). The mechanical division rule reproduced the enrichment of long planes observed in the boundary region. Experimental perturbation of mechanical stress pattern further supported a contribution of anisotropic tensile stress in division plane orientation. Importantly, simulations of tissues growing in an isotropic stress field, and dividing along maximal tension, provided division plane distributions comparable to those obtained with the geometrical rule. We thus propose that division plane orientation by tensile stress offers a general rule for symmetric cell division in plants. PMID:27436908

  10. Gyrokinetic particle simulation of microturbulence for general magnetic geometry and experimental profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Yong; Holod, Ihor; Wang, Zhixuan; Lin, Zhihong; Zhang, Taige

    2015-02-15

    Developments in gyrokinetic particle simulation enable the gyrokinetic toroidal code (GTC) to simulate turbulent transport in tokamaks with realistic equilibrium profiles and plasma geometry, which is a critical step in the code–experiment validation process. These new developments include numerical equilibrium representation using B-splines, a new Poisson solver based on finite difference using field-aligned mesh and magnetic flux coordinates, a new zonal flow solver for general geometry, and improvements on the conventional four-point gyroaverage with nonuniform background marker loading. The gyrokinetic Poisson equation is solved in the perpendicular plane instead of the poloidal plane. Exploiting these new features, GTC is able to simulate a typical DIII-D discharge with experimental magnetic geometry and profiles. The simulated turbulent heat diffusivity and its radial profile show good agreement with other gyrokinetic codes. The newly developed nonuniform loading method provides a modified radial transport profile to that of the conventional uniform loading method.

  11. Exploring Fractal Geometry with Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vacc, Nancy Nesbitt

    1999-01-01

    Heightens the awareness of elementary school teachers, teacher educators, and teacher-education researchers of possible applications of fractal geometry with children and, subsequently, initiates discussion about the appropriateness of including this new mathematics in the elementary curriculum. Presents activities for exploring children's…

  12. General Relativity: Geometry Meets Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomsen, Dietrick E.

    1975-01-01

    Observing the relationship of general relativity and the geometry of space-time, the author questions whether the rest of physics has geometrical explanations. As a partial answer he discusses current research on subatomic particles employing geometric transformations, and cites the existence of geometrical definitions of physical quantities such…

  13. Improving Student Reasoning in Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Bobson; Bukalov, Larisa

    2013-01-01

    In their years of teaching geometry, Wong and Bukalov realized that the greatest challenge has been getting students to improve their reasoning. Many students have difficulty writing formal proofs--a task that requires a good deal of reasoning. Wong and Bukalov reasoned that the solution was to divide the lessons into parallel tasks, allowing…

  14. Generative CAI in Analytical Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uttal, William R.; And Others

    A generative computer-assisted instruction system is being developed to tutor students in analytical geometry. The basis of this development is the thesis that a generative teaching system can be developed by establishing and then stimulating a simplified, explicit model of the human tutor. The goal attempted is that of a computer environment…

  15. Analogical Reasoning in Geometry Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magdas, Ioana

    2015-01-01

    The analogical reasoning isn't used only in mathematics but also in everyday life. In this article we approach the analogical reasoning in Geometry Education. The novelty of this article is a classification of geometrical analogies by reasoning type and their exemplification. Our classification includes: analogies for understanding and setting a…

  16. 3DHZETRN: Inhomogeneous Geometry Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Slaba, Tony C.; Badavi, Francis F.

    2017-01-01

    Historical methods for assessing radiation exposure inside complicated geometries for space applications were limited by computational constraints and lack of knowledge associated with nuclear processes occurring over a broad range of particles and energies. Various methods were developed and utilized to simplify geometric representations and enable coupling with simplified but efficient particle transport codes. Recent transport code development efforts, leading to 3DHZETRN, now enable such approximate methods to be carefully assessed to determine if past exposure analyses and validation efforts based on those approximate methods need to be revisited. In this work, historical methods of representing inhomogeneous spacecraft geometry for radiation protection analysis are first reviewed. Two inhomogeneous geometry cases, previously studied with 3DHZETRN and Monte Carlo codes, are considered with various levels of geometric approximation. Fluence, dose, and dose equivalent values are computed in all cases and compared. It is found that although these historical geometry approximations can induce large errors in neutron fluences up to 100 MeV, errors on dose and dose equivalent are modest (<10%) for the cases studied here.

  17. Teaching Geometry According to Euclid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartshorne, Robin

    2000-01-01

    This essay contains some reflections and questions arising from encounters with the text of Euclid's Elements. The reflections arise out of the teaching of a course in Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry to undergraduates. It is concluded that teachers of such courses should read Euclid and ask questions, then teach a course on Euclid and later…

  18. Math Sense: Algebra and Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howett, Jerry

    This book is designed to help students gain the range of math skills they need to succeed in life, work, and on standardized tests; overcome math anxiety; discover math as interesting and purposeful; and develop good number sense. Topics covered in this book include algebra and geometry. Lessons are organized around four strands: (1) skill lessons…

  19. Galactic plane gamma-radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Ogelman, H. B.; Tumer, T.; Ozel, M. E.

    1979-01-01

    Analysis of the SAS 2 data together with the COS B results shows that the distribution of galactic gamma-radiation has several similarities to that of other large-scale tracers of galactic structure. The radiation is primarily confined to a thin disc which exhibits offsets from b = 0 degrees similar to warping at radio frequencies. The principal distinction of the gamma-radiation is a stronger contrast in intensity between the region from 310 to 45 degrees in longitude and the regions away from the center that can be attributed to a variation in cosmic-ray density as a function of position in Galaxy. The diffuse galactic gamma-ray energy spectrum shows no significant variation in direction, and the spectrum seen along the plane is the same as that for the galactic component of the gamma-radiation at high altitudes. The uniformity of the galactic gamma-ray spectrum, the smooth decrease in intensity as a function of altitude, and the absence of any galactic gamma-ray sources at high altitudes indicate a diffuse origin for bulk of the galactic gamma-radiation rather than a collection of localized sources.

  20. Duel-Plane Optical Disdrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winsky, B. E.; Eichinger, W. E.

    2011-12-01

    Acquiring better drop-size distributions of rainfall will improve our understanding of the spatial and temporal variability of rainfall. In order to fully capture the spatial and temporal variability of rainfall, a robust, calibration free, low-cost instrument that provides an accurate drop-size distribution is required. Therefore, The University of Iowa Lidar Group has developed and built a new duel-plane optical disdrometer that meets these criteria. Two sheets of laser light, vertically spaced by 1 cm are produced by two 670nm laser beams passing through a collecting lens and culminating lens, respectively. The two sheets of laser light then pass through a convex lens located 20 cm from the lasers that focuses the light on a photo detector. A computer reads in and stores the voltages at 10 kHz. The velocity, diameter, shape and drop-size distribution of raindrops are extracted from the voltage measurements. Rainfall data collected in Iowa City, IA tested our disdrometer's robustness and accuracy of providing drop-size distributions. Our distrometer is advantageous because it is simple, low-cost, and requires no calibration.

  1. Radioactivity in the galactic plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walraven, G. D.; Haymes, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    The paper reports the detection of a large concentration of interstellar radioactivity during balloon-altitude measurements of gamma-ray energy spectra in the band between 0.02 and 12.27 MeV from galactic and extragalactic sources. Enhanced counting rates were observed in three directions towards the plane of the Galaxy; a power-law energy spectrum is computed for one of these directions (designated B 10). A large statistical deviation from the power law in a 1.0-FWHM interval centered near 1.16 MeV is discussed, and the existence of a nuclear gamma-ray line at 1.15 MeV in B 10 is postulated. It is suggested that Ca-44, which emits gamma radiation at 1.156 MeV following the decay of radioactive Sc-44, is a likely candidate for this line, noting that Sc-44 arises from Ti-44 according to explosive models of supernova nucleosynthesis. The 1.16-MeV line flux inferred from the present data is shown to equal the predicted flux for a supernova at a distance of approximately 3 kpc and an age not exceeding about 100 years.

  2. On plane submerged laminar jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coenen, Wilfried; Sanchez, Antonio L.

    2016-11-01

    We address the laminar flow generated when a developed stream of liquid of kinematic viscosity ν flowing along channel of width 2 h discharges into an open space bounded by two symmetric plane walls departing from the channel rim with an angle α 1 . Attention is focused on values of the jet volume flux 2 Q such that the associated Reynolds number Re = Qh / ν is of order unity. The formulation requires specification of the boundary conditions far from the channel exit. If the flow is driven by the volume flux, then the far-field solution corresponds to Jeffery-Hamel self-similar flow. However, as noted by Fraenkel (1962), such solutions exist only for α <129o in a limited range of Reynolds numbers 0 <=Re <=Rec (α) (e.g. Rec = 1 . 43 for α = π / 2). It is reasoned that an alternative solution, driven by a fraction of the momentum flux of the feed stream, may also exist for all values of Re and α, including a near-centerline Bickley jet, a surrounding Taylor potential flow driven by the jet entrainment, and a Falkner-Skan near-wall boundary layer. Numerical integrations of the Navier-Stokes equations are used to ascertain the existence of these different solutions.

  3. In-plane and interlaminar Iosipescu shear properties of various graphite fabric/epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Donald F.; Walrath, David E.

    1987-01-01

    The Iosipescu shear test method was used to measure the in-plane and interlaminar shear properties of four T300 graphite fabric/Fiberite 934 epoxy composite materials. Weave geometries tested included an Oxford weave, a 5-harness satin weave, an 8-harness satin weave, and a plain weave with auxiliary warp yarns. Both orthogonal and quasi-isotropic layup laminates were tested. In-plane and interlaminar shear properties were obtained for laminates of all four fabric types. Overall, few differences in shear properties attributable to the fabric weave pattern were observed. However, the auxiliary warp material was significantly weaker and less stiff in interlaminar shear parallel to its fill direction.

  4. Dynamics of Crowd Behaviors: From Complex Plane to Quantum Random Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivancevic, Vladimir G.; Reid, Darryn J.

    2015-11-01

    The following sections are included: * Complex Plane Dynamics of Crowds and Groups * Introduction * Complex-Valued Dynamics of Crowd and Group Behaviors * Kähler Geometry of Crowd and Group Dynamics * Computer Simulations of Crowds and Croups Dynamics * Braids of Agents' Behaviors in the Complex Plane * Hilbert-Space Control of Crowds and Groups Dynamics * Quantum Random Fields: A Unique Framework for Simulation, Optimization, Control and Learning * Introduction * Adaptive Quantum Oscillator * Optimization and Learning on Banach and Hilbert Spaces * Appendix * Complex-Valued Image Processing * Linear Integral Equations * Riemann-Liouville Fractional Calculus * Rigorous Geometric Quantization * Supervised Machine-Learning Methods * First-Order Logic and Quantum Random Fields

  5. RF/Optical Demonstration: Focal Plane Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppe, D. J.; Chung, S.; Kovalik, J.; Gama, E.; Fernandez, M. M.

    2016-11-01

    In this article, we describe the second-generation focal plane optical assembly employed in the RF/optical demonstration at DSS-13. This assembly receives reflected light from the two mirror segments mounted on the RF primary. The focal plane assembly contains a fast steering mirror (FSM) to stabilize the focal plane spot, a pupil camera to aid in aligning the two segments, and several additional cameras for receiving the optical signal prior to as well as after the FSM loop.

  6. Nanostructured carbon films with oriented graphitic planes

    SciTech Connect

    Teo, E. H. T.; Kalish, R.; Kulik, J.; Kauffmann, Y.; Lifshitz, Y.

    2011-03-21

    Nanostructured carbon films with oriented graphitic planes can be deposited by applying energetic carbon bombardment. The present work shows the possibility of structuring graphitic planes perpendicular to the substrate in following two distinct ways: (i) applying sufficiently large carbon energies for deposition at room temperature (E>10 keV), (ii) utilizing much lower energies for deposition at elevated substrate temperatures (T>200 deg. C). High resolution transmission electron microscopy is used to probe the graphitic planes. The alignment achieved at elevated temperatures does not depend on the deposition angle. The data provides insight into the mechanisms leading to the growth of oriented graphitic planes under different conditions.

  7. Adaptive Geometry Shader Tessellation for Massive Geometry Display

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    necessary to prepare complex models for use in analysis and visualization tasks. We investigated several avenues for high-speed visualization and worked to...geometry, visualization 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 22 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE...Introduction and Background 1 2. Approach 2 3. Speed Improvements in the Visual Simulation Laboratory 2 4. Ray Tracing 4 5. Sharing Display Technologies

  8. 3D geometry analysis of the medial meniscus--a statistical shape modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Vrancken, A C T; Crijns, S P M; Ploegmakers, M J M; O'Kane, C; van Tienen, T G; Janssen, D; Buma, P; Verdonschot, N

    2014-10-01

    The geometry-dependent functioning of the meniscus indicates that detailed knowledge on 3D meniscus geometry and its inter-subject variation is essential to design well functioning anatomically shaped meniscus replacements. Therefore, the aim of this study was to quantify 3D meniscus geometry and to determine whether variation in medial meniscus geometry is size- or shape-driven. Also we performed a cluster analysis to identify distinct morphological groups of medial menisci and assessed whether meniscal geometry is gender-dependent. A statistical shape model was created, containing the meniscus geometries of 35 subjects (20 females, 15 males) that were obtained from MR images. A principal component analysis was performed to determine the most important modes of geometry variation and the characteristic changes per principal component were evaluated. Each meniscus from the original dataset was then reconstructed as a linear combination of principal components. This allowed the comparison of male and female menisci, and a cluster analysis to determine distinct morphological meniscus groups. Of the variation in medial meniscus geometry, 53.8% was found to be due to primarily size-related differences and 29.6% due to shape differences. Shape changes were most prominent in the cross-sectional plane, rather than in the transverse plane. Significant differences between male and female menisci were only found for principal component 1, which predominantly reflected size differences. The cluster analysis resulted in four clusters, yet these clusters represented two statistically different meniscal shapes, as differences between cluster 1, 2 and 4 were only present for principal component 1. This study illustrates that differences in meniscal geometry cannot be explained by scaling only, but that different meniscal shapes can be distinguished. Functional analysis, e.g. through finite element modeling, is required to assess whether these distinct shapes actually influence

  9. Gully geometry: what are we measuring?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casalí, Javier; Giménez, Rafael; Ángel Campo, Miguel

    2014-05-01

    Gully erosion has attracted the attention of many scientists during the last decades, and gullies are an important source of sediment within catchments. For succeeding in gully erosion research, gullies must be properly characterized. Characterization includes the determination of gully morphology and volume, being the definition of gully width (W) and depth (D) -and consequently related variables such as the well-known W/D ratio- key issues toward to this goal. However, and surprisingly, universally accepted criteria (rules or guidance) to define gully morphology are lacking. This because the protocol every researcher follows to measure the eroded channel geometry is generally taken for granted and most of the time even no explanation is given about it. For example, when analyzing a gully cross section we usually just identify gully depth with gully maximum depth. But, is this the right protocol? What does this length really represent? What is its meaning? All this uncertainties can lead to non-comparable results and then important inconsistencies. So, to define universal rules of procedure would allow gully scientists "speak the same language" and then deliver truly comparable gully geometry and volume. On the other hand, there are other misunderstandings. For example, very frequently we characterize or depict a whole gully only through some of its cross sections. Again, is this correct? The problem is even more complex when considering that gully geometry may (largely) change along the channel. The main aim of this presentation is to highlight some (unnoticed) common flaws when measuring and describing gully geometry, hoping ultimately to open a debate on that subject. For this last purpose, a conceptual approach to define gully cross section width and other derived variables is firstly proposed. It is based on the subtraction of a highly detailed digital elevation model of a landscape surface containing the studied gully (DEM1) from a detailed spatial

  10. Geometry-invariant resonant cavities

    PubMed Central

    Liberal, I.; Mahmoud, A. M.; Engheta, N.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant cavities are one of the basic building blocks in various disciplines of science and technology, with numerous applications ranging from abstract theoretical modelling to everyday life devices. The eigenfrequencies of conventional cavities are a function of their geometry, and, thus, the size and shape of a resonant cavity is selected to operate at a specific frequency. Here we demonstrate theoretically the existence of geometry-invariant resonant cavities, that is, resonators whose eigenfrequencies are invariant with respect to geometrical deformations of their external boundaries. This effect is obtained by exploiting the unusual properties of zero-index metamaterials, such as epsilon-near-zero media, which enable decoupling of the temporal and spatial field variations in the lossless limit. This new class of resonators may inspire alternative design concepts, and it might lead to the first generation of deformable resonant devices. PMID:27010103

  11. Experimental Probes of Spacetime Geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, JoAnne

    2009-07-10

    A novel approach which exploits the geometry of extra spacetime dimensions has been recently proposed as a means to resolving the hierarchy problem, i.e., the large energy gap that separates the electroweak scale and the scale where gravity becomes strong. I will describe two models of this type: one where the apparent hierarchy is generated by a large volume for the extra dimensions, and a second where the observed hierarchy is created by an exponential warp factor which arises from a non-factorizable geometry. Both scenarios have concrete and distinctive phenomenological tests at the TeV scale. I will describe the classes of low-energy and collider signatures for both models, summarize the present constraints from experiment, and examine the ability of future accelerators to probe their parameter space.

  12. Geometry-invariant resonant cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberal, I.; Mahmoud, A. M.; Engheta, N.

    2016-03-01

    Resonant cavities are one of the basic building blocks in various disciplines of science and technology, with numerous applications ranging from abstract theoretical modelling to everyday life devices. The eigenfrequencies of conventional cavities are a function of their geometry, and, thus, the size and shape of a resonant cavity is selected to operate at a specific frequency. Here we demonstrate theoretically the existence of geometry-invariant resonant cavities, that is, resonators whose eigenfrequencies are invariant with respect to geometrical deformations of their external boundaries. This effect is obtained by exploiting the unusual properties of zero-index metamaterials, such as epsilon-near-zero media, which enable decoupling of the temporal and spatial field variations in the lossless limit. This new class of resonators may inspire alternative design concepts, and it might lead to the first generation of deformable resonant devices.

  13. Information geometry of Boltzmann machines.

    PubMed

    Amari, S; Kurata, K; Nagaoka, H

    1992-01-01

    A Boltzmann machine is a network of stochastic neurons. The set of all the Boltzmann machines with a fixed topology forms a geometric manifold of high dimension, where modifiable synaptic weights of connections play the role of a coordinate system to specify networks. A learning trajectory, for example, is a curve in this manifold. It is important to study the geometry of the neural manifold, rather than the behavior of a single network, in order to know the capabilities and limitations of neural networks of a fixed topology. Using the new theory of information geometry, a natural invariant Riemannian metric and a dual pair of affine connections on the Boltzmann neural network manifold are established. The meaning of geometrical structures is elucidated from the stochastic and the statistical point of view. This leads to a natural modification of the Boltzmann machine learning rule.

  14. Superfluid Spin Transport through Easy-Plane Ferromagnetic Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takei, So; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2014-03-01

    Superfluid spin transport | dissipationless transport of spin | is theoretically studied in a ferromagnetic insulator with easy-plane anisotropy. We consider an open geometry where spin current is injected into the ferromagnet from one side by a metallic reservoir with a nonequilibrium spin accumulation, and ejected into another metallic reservoir located downstream. Spin transport through the device is studied using a combination of magnetoelectric circuit theory, Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert phenomenology, and microscopic linear-response theory. We discuss how spin superfluidity can be probed using a magnetically-mediated electron-drag experiment. This work was supported in part by FAME (an SRC STARnet center sponsored by MARCO and DARPA), the NSF under Grant No. DMR-0840965, and Grant No. 228481 from the Simons Foundation.

  15. Augmented-plane-wave calculations on small molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Serena, P.A.; Baratoff, A. ); Soler, J.M. )

    1993-07-15

    We have performed [ital ab] [ital initio] calculations on a wide range of small molecules, demonstrating the accuracy and flexibility of an alternative method for calculating the electronic structure of molecules, solids, and surfaces. It is based on the local-density approximation (LDA) for exchange and correlation and the nonlinear augmented-plane-wave method. Very accurate atomic forces are obtained directly. This allows for implementation of Car-Parrinello-like techniques to determine simultaneously the self-consistent electron wave functions and the equilibrium atomic positions within an iterative scheme. We find excellent agreement with the best existing LDA-based calculations and remarkable agreement with experiment for the equilibrium geometries, vibrational frequencies, and dipole moments of a wide variety of molecules, including strongly bound homopolar and polar molecules, hydrogen-bound and electron-deficient molecules, and weakly bound alkali and noble-metal dimers, although binding energies are overestimated.

  16. Granular flow down an inclined plane: Bagnold scaling and rheology.

    PubMed

    Silbert, L E; Ertaş, D; Grest, G S; Halsey, T C; Levine, D; Plimpton, S J

    2001-11-01

    We have performed a systematic, large-scale simulation study of granular media in two and three dimensions, investigating the rheology of cohesionless granular particles in inclined plane geometries, i.e., chute flows. We find that over a wide range of parameter space of interaction coefficients and inclination angles, a steady-state flow regime exists in which the energy input from gravity balances that dissipated from friction and inelastic collisions. In this regime, the bulk packing fraction (away from the top free surface and the bottom plate boundary) remains constant as a function of depth z, of the pile. The velocity profile in the direction of flow vx(z) scales with height of the pile H, according to vx(z) proportional to H(alpha), with alpha=1.52+/-0.05. However, the behavior of the normal stresses indicates that existing simple theories of granular flow do not capture all of the features evidenced in the simulations.

  17. Realizing in-plane surface diffraction by x-ray multiple-beam diffraction with large incidence angle

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xian-Rong Gog, Thomas; Assoufid, Lahsen; Peng, Ru-Wen; Siddons, D. P.

    2014-11-03

    Based on rigorous dynamical-theory calculations, we demonstrate the principle of an x-ray multiple-beam diffraction (MBD) scheme that overcomes the long-lasting difficulties of high-resolution in-plane diffraction from crystal surfaces. This scheme only utilizes symmetric reflection geometry with large incident angles but activates the out-of-plane and in-plane diffraction processes simultaneously and separately in the continuous MBD planes. The in-plane diffraction is realized by detoured MBD, where the intermediate diffracted waves propagate parallel to the surface, which corresponds to an absolute Bragg surface diffraction configuration that is extremely sensitive to surface structures. A series of MBD diffraction and imaging techniques may be developed from this principle to study surface/interface (misfit) strains, lateral nanostructures, and phase transitions of a wide range of (pseudo)cubic crystal structures, including ultrathin epitaxial films and multilayers, quantum dots, strain-engineered semiconductor or (multi)ferroic materials, etc.

  18. Application of Hybrid Fillers for Improving the Through-Plane Heat Transport in Graphite Nanoplatelet-Based Thermal Interface Layers

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiaojuan; Itkis, Mikhail E.; Haddon, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    The in-plane alignment of graphite nanoplatelets (GNPs) in thin thermal interface material (TIM) layers suppresses the though-plane heat transport thus limiting the performance of GNPs in the geometry normally required for thermal management applications. Here we report a disruption of the GNP in-plane alignment by addition of spherical microparticles. The degree of GNP alignment was monitored by measurement of the anisotropy of electrical conductivity which is extremely sensitive to the orientation of high aspect ratio filler particles. Scanning Electron Microscopy images of TIM layer cross-sections confirmed the suppression of the in-plane alignment. The hybrid filler formulations reported herein resulted in a synergistic enhancement of the through-plane thermal conductivity of GNP/Al2O3 and GNP/Al filled TIM layers confirming that the control of GNP alignment is an important parameter in the development of highly efficient GNP and graphene-based TIMs. PMID:26279183

  19. Dynamics, Spectral Geometry and Topology

    SciTech Connect

    Burghelea, Dan

    2011-02-10

    The paper is an informal report on joint work with Stefan Haller on Dynamics in relation with Topology and Spectral Geometry. By dynamics one means a smooth vector field on a closed smooth manifold; the elements of dynamics of concern are the rest points, instantons and closed trajectories. One discusses their counting in the case of a generic vector field which has some additional properties satisfied by a still very large class of vector fields.

  20. Core foundations of abstract geometry.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Moira R; Huang, Yi; Spelke, Elizabeth S

    2013-08-27

    Human adults from diverse cultures share intuitions about the points, lines, and figures of Euclidean geometry. Do children develop these intuitions by drawing on phylogenetically ancient and developmentally precocious geometric representations that guide their navigation and their analysis of object shape? In what way might these early-arising representations support later-developing Euclidean intuitions? To approach these questions, we investigated the relations among young children's use of geometry in tasks assessing: navigation; visual form analysis; and the interpretation of symbolic, purely geometric maps. Children's navigation depended on the distance and directional relations of the surface layout and predicted their use of a symbolic map with targets designated by surface distances. In contrast, children's analysis of visual forms depended on the size-invariant shape relations of objects and predicted their use of the same map but with targets designated by corner angles. Even though the two map tasks used identical instructions and map displays, children's performance on these tasks showed no evidence of integrated representations of distance and angle. Instead, young children flexibly recruited geometric representations of either navigable layouts or objects to interpret the same spatial symbols. These findings reveal a link between the early-arising geometric representations that humans share with diverse animals and the flexible geometric intuitions that give rise to human knowledge at its highest reaches. Although young children do not appear to integrate core geometric representations, children's use of the abstract geometry in spatial symbols such as maps may provide the earliest clues to the later construction of Euclidean geometry.

  1. Hyperbolic geometry of complex networks.

    PubMed

    Krioukov, Dmitri; Papadopoulos, Fragkiskos; Kitsak, Maksim; Vahdat, Amin; Boguñá, Marián

    2010-09-01

    We develop a geometric framework to study the structure and function of complex networks. We assume that hyperbolic geometry underlies these networks, and we show that with this assumption, heterogeneous degree distributions and strong clustering in complex networks emerge naturally as simple reflections of the negative curvature and metric property of the underlying hyperbolic geometry. Conversely, we show that if a network has some metric structure, and if the network degree distribution is heterogeneous, then the network has an effective hyperbolic geometry underneath. We then establish a mapping between our geometric framework and statistical mechanics of complex networks. This mapping interprets edges in a network as noninteracting fermions whose energies are hyperbolic distances between nodes, while the auxiliary fields coupled to edges are linear functions of these energies or distances. The geometric network ensemble subsumes the standard configuration model and classical random graphs as two limiting cases with degenerate geometric structures. Finally, we show that targeted transport processes without global topology knowledge, made possible by our geometric framework, are maximally efficient, according to all efficiency measures, in networks with strongest heterogeneity and clustering, and that this efficiency is remarkably robust with respect to even catastrophic disturbances and damages to the network structure.

  2. Slipping and Rolling on an Inclined Plane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aghamohammadi, Cina; Aghamohammadi, Amir

    2011-01-01

    In the first part of the paper, using a direct calculation two-dimensional motion of a particle sliding on an inclined plane is investigated for general values of friction coefficient ([mu]). A parametric equation for the trajectory of the particle is also obtained. In the second part of the paper, the motion of a sphere on the inclined plane is…

  3. Solar Impulse's Solar-Powered Plane

    ScienceCinema

    Moniz, Ernest; Piccard, Bertrand; Reicher, Dan

    2016-07-12

    Solar Impulse lands in Washington, DC at Washington Dulles International Airport as part of its journey across the United States. Secretary Ernest Moniz speaks about how advancements like those at the Department of Energy are leading the way for innovations like the solar-powered plane. Footage of the solar-powered plane courtesy of Solar Impulse.

  4. Solar Impulse's Solar-Powered Plane

    SciTech Connect

    Moniz, Ernest; Piccard, Bertrand; Reicher, Dan

    2013-07-08

    Solar Impulse lands in Washington, DC at Washington Dulles International Airport as part of its journey across the United States. Secretary Ernest Moniz speaks about how advancements like those at the Department of Energy are leading the way for innovations like the solar-powered plane. Footage of the solar-powered plane courtesy of Solar Impulse.

  5. Jet mixing into a heated cross flow in a cylindrical duct: Influence of geometry and flow variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatch, M. S.; Sowa, W. A.; Samuelsen, G. S.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    To examine the mixing characteristics of jets in an axi-symmetric can geometry, temperature measurements were obtained downstream of a row of cold jets injected into a heated cross stream. Parametric, non-reacting experiments were conducted to determine the influence of geometry and flow variations on mixing patterns in a cylindrical configuration. Results show that jet to mainstream momentum flux ratio and orifice geometry significantly impact the mixing characteristics of jets in a can geometry. For a fixed number of orifices, the coupling between momentum flux ratio and injector determines (1) the degree of jet penetration at the injection plane, and (2) the extent of circumferential mixing downstream of the injection plane. The results also show that, at a fixed momentum flux ratio, jet penetration decreases with (1) an increase in slanted slot aspect ratio, and (2) an increase in the angle of the slots with respect to the mainstream direction.

  6. Study the Z-Plane Strip Capacitance

    SciTech Connect

    Parikh, H.; Swain, S.; /SLAC

    2005-12-15

    The BaBaR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center is currently undergoing an upgrade to improve its muon and neutral hadron detection system. The Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) that had been used till now have deteriorated in performance over the past few years and are being replaced by Limited Streamer Tube (LSTs). Each layer of the system consists of a set of up to 10 streamer tube modules which provide one coordinate ({phi} coordinate) and a single ''Z-plane'' which provides the Z coordinate of the hit. The large area Z-planes (up to 12m{sup 2}) are 1mm thick and contain 96 copper strips that detect the induced charge from avalanches created in the streamer tube wires. All the Z-planes needed for the upgrade have already been constructed, but only a third of the planes were installed last summer. After installing the 24 Z-planes last year, it was learned that 0.7% of the strips were dead when put inside the detector. This was mainly due to the delicate solder joint between the read-out cable and the strip, and since it is difficult to access or replace the Z-planes inside the detector, it is very important to perform various tests to make sure that the Z-planes will be efficient and effective in the long term. We measure the capacitance between the copper strips and the ground plane, and compare it to the theoretical value that we expect. Instead of measuring the capacitance channel by channel, which would be a very tedious job, we developed a more effective method of measuring the capacitance. Since all the Z-planes were built at SLAC, we also built a smaller 46 cm by 30 cm Z-plane with 12 strips just to see how they were constructed and to gain a better understanding about the solder joints.

  7. Network geometry with flavor: From complexity to quantum geometry.

    PubMed

    Bianconi, Ginestra; Rahmede, Christoph

    2016-03-01

    Network geometry is attracting increasing attention because it has a wide range of applications, ranging from data mining to routing protocols in the Internet. At the same time advances in the understanding of the geometrical properties of networks are essential for further progress in quantum gravity. In network geometry, simplicial complexes describing the interaction between two or more nodes play a special role. In fact these structures can be used to discretize a geometrical d-dimensional space, and for this reason they have already been widely used in quantum gravity. Here we introduce the network geometry with flavor s=-1,0,1 (NGF) describing simplicial complexes defined in arbitrary dimension d and evolving by a nonequilibrium dynamics. The NGF can generate discrete geometries of different natures, ranging from chains and higher-dimensional manifolds to scale-free networks with small-world properties, scale-free degree distribution, and nontrivial community structure. The NGF admits as limiting cases both the Bianconi-Barabási models for complex networks, the stochastic Apollonian network, and the recently introduced model for complex quantum network manifolds. The thermodynamic properties of NGF reveal that NGF obeys a generalized area law opening a new scenario for formulating its coarse-grained limit. The structure of NGF is strongly dependent on the dimensionality d. In d=1 NGFs grow complex networks for which the preferential attachment mechanism is necessary in order to obtain a scale-free degree distribution. Instead, for NGF with dimension d>1 it is not necessary to have an explicit preferential attachment rule to generate scale-free topologies. We also show that NGF admits a quantum mechanical description in terms of associated quantum network states. Quantum network states evolve by a Markovian dynamics and a quantum network state at time t encodes all possible NGF evolutions up to time t. Interestingly the NGF remains fully classical but its

  8. Network geometry with flavor: From complexity to quantum geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianconi, Ginestra; Rahmede, Christoph

    2016-03-01

    Network geometry is attracting increasing attention because it has a wide range of applications, ranging from data mining to routing protocols in the Internet. At the same time advances in the understanding of the geometrical properties of networks are essential for further progress in quantum gravity. In network geometry, simplicial complexes describing the interaction between two or more nodes play a special role. In fact these structures can be used to discretize a geometrical d -dimensional space, and for this reason they have already been widely used in quantum gravity. Here we introduce the network geometry with flavor s =-1 ,0 ,1 (NGF) describing simplicial complexes defined in arbitrary dimension d and evolving by a nonequilibrium dynamics. The NGF can generate discrete geometries of different natures, ranging from chains and higher-dimensional manifolds to scale-free networks with small-world properties, scale-free degree distribution, and nontrivial community structure. The NGF admits as limiting cases both the Bianconi-Barabási models for complex networks, the stochastic Apollonian network, and the recently introduced model for complex quantum network manifolds. The thermodynamic properties of NGF reveal that NGF obeys a generalized area law opening a new scenario for formulating its coarse-grained limit. The structure of NGF is strongly dependent on the dimensionality d . In d =1 NGFs grow complex networks for which the preferential attachment mechanism is necessary in order to obtain a scale-free degree distribution. Instead, for NGF with dimension d >1 it is not necessary to have an explicit preferential attachment rule to generate scale-free topologies. We also show that NGF admits a quantum mechanical description in terms of associated quantum network states. Quantum network states evolve by a Markovian dynamics and a quantum network state at time t encodes all possible NGF evolutions up to time t . Interestingly the NGF remains fully classical but

  9. Brillouin light scattering in ferromagnetic single layers: hysteresis loop and backward geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djemia, P.; Roussigné, Y.; Chérif, S.-M.; Billet, D.; Stashkevich, A.; Moch, P.

    2006-09-01

    We present a Brillouin light scattering study of a thick ferromagnetic single layer Ni80Fe20 (44 nm) film, using two different geometrical setup: (i) the so-called Damon-Eschbach (DE) geometry where the in-plane wave vector Q// of the studied spin wave is perpendicular to the external magnetic field H and (ii) the backward geometry (BW) where it is parallel to H (Q// and H lie in the film plane). An in-plane uniaxial anisotropy that do not exceed 100 Oe is evidenced through the analysis of the variations of DE mode frequency and of the Stokes/anti-Stokes dissymmetry versus H. The experimental magnetic Brillouin spectra showing the presence of dipolar and exchange standing spin waves are well reproduced for both geometries by our calculations of the scattered intensity using the following magnetic parameters: 4πM = 9400 G; g = 2.13; A = 0.93 10-6 erg.cm-1 for different values of the magnetic field H and of the in-plane wave vector amplitude Q //.

  10. Observation angle and plane characterisation for ISAR imaging of LEO space objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jin; Fu, Tuo; Chen, Defeng; Gao, Meiguo

    2016-07-01

    For inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging of low Earth orbit (LEO) space objects, examining the variations in the image plane of the object over the entire visible arc period allows more direct characterisation of the variations in the object imaging. In this study, the ideal turntable model was extended to determine the observation geometry of near-circular LEO objects. Two approximations were applied to the observation model to calculate the image plane's normal and observation angles for near-circular orbit objects. One approximation treats the orbit of the space object as a standard arc relative to the Earth during the radar observation period, and the other omits the effect of the rotation of the Earth on the observations. First, the closed-form solution of the image plane normal in various attitude-stabilisation approaches was determined based on geometric models. The characteristics of the image plane and the observation angle of the near-circular orbit object were then analysed based on the common constraints of the radar line-of-sight (LOS). Subsequently, the variations in the image plane and the geometric constraints of the ISAR imaging were quantified. Based on the image plane's normal, the rotational angular velocity of the radar LOS was estimated. The cross-range direction of the ISAR image was then calibrated. Three-dimensional imaging was then reconstructed based on dual station interferometry. Finally, simulations were performed to verify the result of the three-dimensional interferometric reconstruction and to calculate the reconstruction's precision errors.

  11. The Effect of Geometry Instruction with Dynamic Geometry Software; GeoGebra on Van Hiele Geometry Understanding Levels of Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutluca, Tamer

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of dynamic geometry software GeoGebra on Van Hiele geometry understanding level of students at 11th grade geometry course. The study was conducted with pre and posttest control group quasi-experimental method. The sample of the study was 42 eleventh grade students studying in the spring term of…

  12. The method of planes pressure tensor for a spherical subvolume

    SciTech Connect

    Heyes, D. M. Smith, E. R. Dini, D. Zaki, T. A.

    2014-02-07

    Various formulas for the local pressure tensor based on a spherical subvolume of radius, R, are considered. An extension of the Method of Planes (MOP) formula of Todd et al. [Phys. Rev. E 52, 1627 (1995)] for a spherical geometry is derived using the recently proposed Control Volume formulation [E. R. Smith, D. M. Heyes, D. Dini, and T. A. Zaki, Phys. Rev. E 85, 056705 (2012)]. The MOP formula for the purely radial component of the pressure tensor is shown to be mathematically identical to the Radial Irving-Kirkwood formula. Novel offdiagonal elements which are important for momentum conservation emerge naturally from this treatment. The local pressure tensor formulas for a plane are shown to be the large radius limits of those for spherical surfaces. The radial-dependence of the pressure tensor computed by Molecular Dynamics simulation is reported for virtual spheres in a model bulk liquid where the sphere is positioned randomly or whose center is also that of a molecule in the liquid. The probability distributions of angles relating to pairs of atoms which cross the surface of the sphere, and the center of the sphere, are presented as a function of R. The variance in the shear stress calculated from the spherical Volume Averaging method is shown to converge slowly to the limiting values with increasing radius, and to be a strong function of the number of molecules in the simulation cell.

  13. Geometric plane shapes for computer-generated holographic engraving codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augier, Ángel G.; Rabal, Héctor; Sánchez, Raúl B.

    2017-04-01

    We report a new theoretical and experimental study on hologravures, as holographic computer-generated laser-engravings. A geometric theory of images based on the general principles of light ray behaviour is shown. The models used are also applicable for similar engravings obtained by any non-laser method, and the solutions allow for the analysis of particular situations, not only in the case of light reflection mode, but also in transmission mode geometry. This approach is a novel perspective allowing the three-dimensional (3D) design of engraved images for specific ends. We prove theoretically that plane curves of very general geometric shapes can be used to encode image information onto a two-dimensional (2D) engraving, showing notable influence on the behaviour of reconstructed images that appears as an exciting investigation topic, extending its applications. Several cases of code using particular curvilinear shapes are experimentally studied. The computer-generated objects are coded by using the chosen curve type, and engraved by a laser on a plane surface of suitable material. All images are recovered optically by adequate illumination. The pseudoscopic or orthoscopic character of these images is considered, and an appropriate interpretation is presented.

  14. Determination of fault planes and dimensions for low-magnitude earthquakes - A case study in eastern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozziconacci, Laetitia; Delouis, Bertrand; Huang, Bor-Shouh

    2017-03-01

    We present a modified version of the FMNEAR method for determining the focal mechanisms and fault plane geometries of small earthquakes. Our improvements allow determination of the fault plane and dimensions using the near-field components of only a few local records. The limiting factor is the number of stations: a minimum of five to six stations is required to discriminate between the fault plane and auxiliary plane. This limitation corresponds to events with magnitudes ML > 3.5 in eastern Taiwan, but strongly depends on station coverage in the study area. Once a fault plane is identified, it is provided along with its source time function and fault slip distribution. The proposed approach is validated by synthetic tests, and applied to real cases from a seismic crisis that occurred in the Longitudinal Valley of eastern Taiwan in April 2006. The fault geometries and faulting types of test events closely match the fault system of the main shock and reveal a minor one inside the faults zone of the Longitudinal Valley. Tested on a larger scale, this approach enables the fault geometries of main and secondary fault systems to be recovered from small earthquakes, allowing subsurface faults to be mapped in detail without waiting for a large, damaging event.

  15. A Whirlwind Tour of Computational Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Ron; Yao, Frances

    1990-01-01

    Described is computational geometry which used concepts and results from classical geometry, topology, combinatorics, as well as standard algorithmic techniques such as sorting and searching, graph manipulations, and linear programing. Also included are special techniques and paradigms. (KR)

  16. Enumerative Algebraic Geometry of Conics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    projective plane CP2 . When we first introduced the parameter space RP5 we noted that its points are in one-to-one correspondence with the equations of...example x2 + y2 + 1 = 0 and x2 + y2 + 3 = 0 both define the empty set. But in CP2 these equations become X 2 + Y 2 + Z2 = 0 and X 2 + Y 2 + 3Z2 = 0 and...they define different complex curves. Points in CP5 are in one-to-one correspondence with conic curves in CP2 . This fact follows from the observation

  17. The fractal geometry of life.

    PubMed

    Losa, Gabriele A

    2009-01-01

    The extension of the concepts of Fractal Geometry (Mandelbrot [1983]) toward the life sciences has led to significant progress in understanding complex functional properties and architectural / morphological / structural features characterising cells and tissues during ontogenesis and both normal and pathological development processes. It has even been argued that fractal geometry could provide a coherent description of the design principles underlying living organisms (Weibel [1991]). Fractals fulfil a certain number of theoretical and methodological criteria including a high level of organization, shape irregularity, functional and morphological self-similarity, scale invariance, iterative pathways and a peculiar non-integer fractal dimension [FD]. Whereas mathematical objects are deterministic invariant or self-similar over an unlimited range of scales, biological components are statistically self-similar only within a fractal domain defined by upper and lower limits, called scaling window, in which the relationship between the scale of observation and the measured size or length of the object can be established (Losa and Nonnenmacher [1996]). Selected examples will contribute to depict complex biological shapes and structures as fractal entities, and also to show why the application of the fractal principle is valuable for measuring dimensional, geometrical and functional parameters of cells, tissues and organs occurring within the vegetal and animal realms. If the criteria for a strict description of natural fractals are met, then it follows that a Fractal Geometry of Life may be envisaged and all natural objects and biological systems exhibiting self-similar patterns and scaling properties may be considered as belonging to the new subdiscipline of "fractalomics".

  18. Cable equation for general geometry.

    PubMed

    López-Sánchez, Erick J; Romero, Juan M

    2017-02-01

    The cable equation describes the voltage in a straight cylindrical cable, and this model has been employed to model electrical potential in dendrites and axons. However, sometimes this equation might give incorrect predictions for some realistic geometries, in particular when the radius of the cable changes significantly. Cables with a nonconstant radius are important for some phenomena, for example, discrete swellings along the axons appear in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimers, Parkinsons, human immunodeficiency virus associated dementia, and multiple sclerosis. In this paper, using the Frenet-Serret frame, we propose a generalized cable equation for a general cable geometry. This generalized equation depends on geometric quantities such as the curvature and torsion of the cable. We show that when the cable has a constant circular cross section, the first fundamental form of the cable can be simplified and the generalized cable equation depends on neither the curvature nor the torsion of the cable. Additionally, we find an exact solution for an ideal cable which has a particular variable circular cross section and zero curvature. For this case we show that when the cross section of the cable increases the voltage decreases. Inspired by this ideal case, we rewrite the generalized cable equation as a diffusion equation with a source term generated by the cable geometry. This source term depends on the cable cross-sectional area and its derivates. In addition, we study different cables with swelling and provide their numerical solutions. The numerical solutions show that when the cross section of the cable has abrupt changes, its voltage is smaller than the voltage in the cylindrical cable. Furthermore, these numerical solutions show that the voltage can be affected by geometrical inhomogeneities on the cable.

  19. Cable equation for general geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Sánchez, Erick J.; Romero, Juan M.

    2017-02-01

    The cable equation describes the voltage in a straight cylindrical cable, and this model has been employed to model electrical potential in dendrites and axons. However, sometimes this equation might give incorrect predictions for some realistic geometries, in particular when the radius of the cable changes significantly. Cables with a nonconstant radius are important for some phenomena, for example, discrete swellings along the axons appear in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimers, Parkinsons, human immunodeficiency virus associated dementia, and multiple sclerosis. In this paper, using the Frenet-Serret frame, we propose a generalized cable equation for a general cable geometry. This generalized equation depends on geometric quantities such as the curvature and torsion of the cable. We show that when the cable has a constant circular cross section, the first fundamental form of the cable can be simplified and the generalized cable equation depends on neither the curvature nor the torsion of the cable. Additionally, we find an exact solution for an ideal cable which has a particular variable circular cross section and zero curvature. For this case we show that when the cross section of the cable increases the voltage decreases. Inspired by this ideal case, we rewrite the generalized cable equation as a diffusion equation with a source term generated by the cable geometry. This source term depends on the cable cross-sectional area and its derivates. In addition, we study different cables with swelling and provide their numerical solutions. The numerical solutions show that when the cross section of the cable has abrupt changes, its voltage is smaller than the voltage in the cylindrical cable. Furthermore, these numerical solutions show that the voltage can be affected by geometrical inhomogeneities on the cable.

  20. The Geometry of Quasar Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Rajib

    2012-10-01

    Quasar outflows are important for understanding the accretion and growth processes of the central black hole, but also potentially play a role in feedback to the galaxy, halting star formation and infall of gas. A big uncertainty lies in the geometry and density of these outflows, especially as a function of ionization and velocity. We aim to tackle this using the archival COS M grating spectra of 266 quasars. We separate the geometry of outflows into two parts: the solid angle subtended around the black hole, and the distance of the outflow from the central engine. Large numbers of quasars with high resolution spectra are required for each aspect of this statistical investigation. First, we will determine which/how many absorption-line systems are intrinsic through both partial covering methods and statistical assessments. Second, we will consider the incidence of intrinsic absorbers as a function of quasar property {e.g., radio-loudness, SED shape, black hole mass, bolometric luminosity}. This will reveal what determines the solid angle. This can only be done at moderate redshifts where quasars with a larger range of properties are observable, and hence requires HST/COS. Third, we will use the wide range of diagnostic lines to constrain the physical conditions of the absorbers. We will target the CIII*1175 complex and apply photoionization models to constrain the densities and ionization parameters. This will provide the largest set yet of intrinsic absorbers with systematic distance constraints. In tandem with the solid angles, this work will inform models regarding the geometry of quasar outflows.

  1. Lower incisor inclination regarding different reference planes.

    PubMed

    Zataráin, Brenda; Avila, Josué; Moyaho, Angeles; Carrasco, Rosendo; Velasco, Carmen

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the degree of lower incisor inclination with respect to different reference planes. It was an observational, analytical, longitudinal, prospective study conducted on 100 lateral cephalograms which were corrected according to the photograph in natural head position in order to draw the true vertical plane (TVP). The incisor mandibular plane angle (IMPA) was compensated to eliminate the variation of the mandibular plane growth type with the formula "FMApx.- 25 (FMA) + IMPApx. = compensated IMPA (IMPACOM)". As the data followed normal distribution determined by the KolmogorovSmirnov test, parametric tests were used for the statistical analysis, Ttest, ANOVA and Pearson coefficient correlation test. Statistical analysis was performed using a statistical significance of p <0.05. There is correlation between TVP and NB line (NB) (0.8614), Frankfort mandibular incisor angle (FMIA) (0.8894), IMPA (0.6351), Apo line (Apo) (0.609), IMPACOM (0.8895) and McHorris angle (MH) (0.7769). ANOVA showed statistically significant differences between the means for the 7 variables with 95% confidence level, P=0.0001. The multiple range test showed no significant difference among means: APoNB (0.88), IMPAMH (0.36), IMPANB (0.65), FMIAIMPACOM (0.01), FMIATVP (0.18), TVPIMPACOM (0.17). There was correlation among all reference planes. There were statistically significant differences among the means of the planes measured, except for IMPACOM, FMIA and TVP. The IMPA differed significantly from the IMPACOM. The compensated IMPA and the FMIA did not differ significantly from the TVP. The true horizontal plane was mismatched with Frankfort plane in 84% of the sample with a range of 19°. The true vertical plane is adequate for measuring lower incisor inclination.

  2. Complex geometry and string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, A. Y.; Perelomov, A. M.

    1990-06-01

    The analytic properties of string theory are reviewed. It is demonstrated that the theory of strings is connected with contemporary fields of complex geometry. A massless classical point-like particle which moves in Minkowski space of D dimensions is considered. The formulation used to develop string theory is based on the Polyakov approach. In order to find the quantum scattering amplitude in the Polyakov approach, the functional integral over all Riemannian surfaces is calculated. The simplest case of the amplitude of vacuum-vacuum transitions Z of a closed string is considered. The description of linear bundles in the divisor terms is given.

  3. Worldsheet geometries of ambitwistor string

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmori, Kantaro

    2015-06-01

    Mason and Skinner proposed the ambitwistor string theory which directly reproduces the formulas for the amplitudes of massless particles proposed by Cachazo, He and Yuan. In this paper we discuss geometries of the moduli space of worldsheets associated to the bosonic or the RNS ambitwistor string. Further, we investigate the factorization properties of the amplitudes when an internal momentum is near on-shell in the abstract CFT language. Along the way, we propose the existence of the ambitwistor strings with three or four fermionic worldsheet currents.

  4. Bondi accretion in trumpet geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, August J.; Baumgarte, Thomas W.

    2017-02-01

    The Bondi solution, which describes the radial inflow of a gas onto a non-rotating black hole, provides a powerful test for numerical relativistic codes. However, the Bondi solution is usually derived in Schwarzschild coordinates, which are not well suited for dynamical spacetime evolutions. Instead, many current numerical relativistic codes adopt moving-puncture coordinates, which render black holes in trumpet geometries. Here we transform the Bondi solution into trumpet coordinates, which result in regular expressions for the fluid flow extending into the black-hole interior. We also evolve these solutions numerically and demonstrate their usefulness for testing and calibrating numerical codes.

  5. Quanta of geometry and unification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamseddine, Ali H.

    2016-11-01

    This is a tribute to Abdus Salam’s memory whose insight and creative thinking set for me a role model to follow. In this contribution I show that the simple requirement of volume quantization in spacetime (with Euclidean signature) uniquely determines the geometry to be that of a noncommutative space whose finite part is based on an algebra that leads to Pati-Salam grand unified models. The Standard Model corresponds to a special case where a mathematical constraint (order one condition) is satisfied. This provides evidence that Salam was a visionary who was generations ahead of his time.

  6. Mosaic focal plane for star sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, N. C.

    1981-02-01

    The basic principles of star sensors are reviewed with reference to the advantages of replacing photodiodes, image dissectors, and vidicons with mosaic charge transfer device (CTD) focal planes. The desirable characteristics of CTD focal planes include: high uniformity, high transfer effect, low dark current, low hot and cold spots, low dead space, low angular misalignment, high coplanarity, and high thermal stability. An implementation of a mosaic CTD array star sensor which achieves high angular position accuracy and frequency attitude update is presented. Two focal plane packaging concepts, the planar and vertical board packagings, are examined.

  7. Geometry: Career Related Units. Teacher's Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierro, Mike; And Others

    Using six geometry units as resource units, the document explores 22 math-related careers. The authors intend the document to provide senior high school students with career orientation and exploration experiences while they learn geometry skills. The units are to be considered as a part of a geometry course, not a course by themselves. The six…

  8. Preservice Primary School Teachers' Elementary Geometry Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchis, Iuliana

    2012-01-01

    Geometrical notions and properties occur in real-world problems, thus Geometry has an important place in school Mathematics curricula. Primary school curricula lays the foundation of Geometry knowledge, pupils learn Geometry notions and properties by exploring their environment. Thus it is very important that primary school teachers have a good…

  9. Students' Misconceptions and Errors in Transformation Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ada, Tuba; Kurtulus, Aytac

    2010-01-01

    This study analyses the students' performances in two-dimensional transformation geometry and explores the mistakes made by the students taking the analytic geometry course given by researchers. An examination was given to students of Education Faculties who have taken the analytic geometry course at Eskisehir Osmangazi University in Turkey. The…

  10. Teaching Geometry: An Experiential and Artistic Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogletree, Earl J.

    The view that geometry should be taught at every grade level is promoted. Primary and elementary school children are thought to rarely have any direct experience with geometry, except on an incidental basis. Children are supposed to be able to learn geometry rather easily, so long as the method and content are adapted to their development and…

  11. Geometry in the Early Years: A Commentary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dindyal, Jaguthsing

    2015-01-01

    The primary goal of this paper is to provide a commentary on the teaching and learning of geometry in the early years of schooling with the set of papers in this issue as a guiding factor. It is structured around issues about geometry education of young learners, such as: what should we teach in geometry and why; representation of geometrical…

  12. Engaging All Students with "Impossible Geometry"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiest, Lynda R.; Ayebo, Abraham; Dornoo, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    Geometry is an area in which Australian students performed particularly poorly on the 2007 Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS). One innovative area of recreational geometry that has rich potential to engage and challenge a wide variety of students is "impossible geometry." An impossible geometric object is a…

  13. Fabric geometry distortion during composites processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Julie

    1994-01-01

    Waviness and tow misalignment are often cited as possible causes of data scatter and lower compression stiffness and strength in textile composites. Strength differences of as much as 40 percent have been seen in composites that appear to have the same basic material and structural properties -- i.e., yarn orientation, yarn size, interlacing geometry. Fabric geometry distortion has been suggested as a possible reason for this discrepancy, but little quantitative data or substantial evidence exists. The focus of this research is to contribute to the present understanding of the causes and effects of geometric distortion in textile composites. The initial part of the study was an attempt to gather qualitative information on a variety of textile structures. Existing and new samples confirmed that structures with a significant direction presence would be more susceptible to distortion due to the compaction process. Thus, uniweaves (fiber vol frac: 54-72 percent) biaxial braids (vf: 34-58 percent) demonstrated very little fabric geometry distortion. In stitched panels, only slight buckling of z-direction stitches was observed, primarily near the surface. In contrast, for structures with high compaction ratios -- e.g., large cylindrical yarns (2.5:1) orpowder towpreg (4:1) -- there were visible distortions where previously smooth and periodic undulations were transformed to abrupt changes in direction. A controlled study of the effect of forming pressure on distortion was conducted on type 162 glass plain weave fabrics. Panels (6 x 6 in) were produced via a resin infusion type setup, but with an EPON 815 epoxy resin. Pressures ranging from hand layup to 200 psi were used (vf: 34-54 percent). Photomicrographs indicated that at pressures up to 50 psi, large changes in thickness were due primarily to resin squeeze out. At higher pressures, when intimate contact was made between the layers, there was some tow flattening and in-plane shifting to optimize nesting. However

  14. Digital Tomosynthesis System Geometry Analysis Using Convolution-Based Blur-and-Add (BAA) Model.

    PubMed

    Wu, Meng; Yoon, Sungwon; Solomon, Edward G; Star-Lack, Josh; Pelc, Norbert; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Digital tomosynthesis is a three-dimensional imaging technique with a lower radiation dose than computed tomography (CT). Due to the missing data in tomosynthesis systems, out-of-plane structures in the depth direction cannot be completely removed by the reconstruction algorithms. In this work, we analyzed the impulse responses of common tomosynthesis systems on a plane-to-plane basis and proposed a fast and accurate convolution-based blur-and-add (BAA) model to simulate the backprojected images. In addition, the analysis formalism describing the impulse response of out-of-plane structures can be generalized to both rotating and parallel gantries. We implemented a ray tracing forward projection and backprojection (ray-based model) algorithm and the convolution-based BAA model to simulate the shift-and-add (backproject) tomosynthesis reconstructions. The convolution-based BAA model with proper geometry distortion correction provides reasonably accurate estimates of the tomosynthesis reconstruction. A numerical comparison indicates that the simulated images using the two models differ by less than 6% in terms of the root-mean-squared error. This convolution-based BAA model can be used in efficient system geometry analysis, reconstruction algorithm design, out-of-plane artifacts suppression, and CT-tomosynthesis registration.

  15. Target Detection Using Fractal Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, J. Joseph

    1991-01-01

    The concepts and theory of fractal geometry were applied to the problem of segmenting a 256 x 256 pixel image so that manmade objects could be extracted from natural backgrounds. The two most important measurements necessary to extract these manmade objects were fractal dimension and lacunarity. Provision was made to pass the manmade portion to a lookup table for subsequent identification. A computer program was written to construct cloud backgrounds of fractal dimensions which were allowed to vary between 2.2 and 2.8. Images of three model space targets were combined with these backgrounds to provide a data set for testing the validity of the approach. Once the data set was constructed, computer programs were written to extract estimates of the fractal dimension and lacunarity on 4 x 4 pixel subsets of the image. It was shown that for clouds of fractal dimension 2.7 or less, appropriate thresholding on fractal dimension and lacunarity yielded a 64 x 64 edge-detected image with all or most of the cloud background removed. These images were enhanced by an erosion and dilation to provide the final image passed to the lookup table. While the ultimate goal was to pass the final image to a neural network for identification, this work shows the applicability of fractal geometry to the problems of image segmentation, edge detection and separating a target of interest from a natural background.

  16. Fuzzy Logic for Incidence Geometry.

    PubMed

    Tserkovny, Alex

    The paper presents a mathematical framework for approximate geometric reasoning with extended objects in the context of Geography, in which all entities and their relationships are described by human language. These entities could be labelled by commonly used names of landmarks, water areas, and so forth. Unlike single points that are given in Cartesian coordinates, these geographic entities are extended in space and often loosely defined, but people easily perform spatial reasoning with extended geographic objects "as if they were points." Unfortunately, up to date, geographic information systems (GIS) miss the capability of geometric reasoning with extended objects. The aim of the paper is to present a mathematical apparatus for approximate geometric reasoning with extended objects that is usable in GIS. In the paper we discuss the fuzzy logic (Aliev and Tserkovny, 2011) as a reasoning system for geometry of extended objects, as well as a basis for fuzzification of the axioms of incidence geometry. The same fuzzy logic was used for fuzzification of Euclid's first postulate. Fuzzy equivalence relation "extended lines sameness" is introduced. For its approximation we also utilize a fuzzy conditional inference, which is based on proposed fuzzy "degree of indiscernibility" and "discernibility measure" of extended points.

  17. Quanta of geometry: noncommutative aspects.

    PubMed

    Chamseddine, Ali H; Connes, Alain; Mukhanov, Viatcheslav

    2015-03-06

    In the construction of spectral manifolds in noncommutative geometry, a higher degree Heisenberg commutation relation involving the Dirac operator and the Feynman slash of real scalar fields naturally appears and implies, by equality with the index formula, the quantization of the volume. We first show that this condition implies that the manifold decomposes into disconnected spheres, which will represent quanta of geometry. We then refine the condition by involving the real structure and two types of geometric quanta, and show that connected spin manifolds with large quantized volume are then obtained as solutions. The two algebras M_{2}(H) and M_{4}(C) are obtained, which are the exact constituents of the standard model. Using the two maps from M_{4} to S^{4} the four-manifold is built out of a very large number of the two kinds of spheres of Planckian volume. We give several physical applications of this scheme such as quantization of the cosmological constant, mimetic dark matter, and area quantization of black holes.

  18. Weyl gravity and Cartan geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attard, J.; François, J.; Lazzarini, S.

    2016-04-01

    We point out that the Cartan geometry known as the second-order conformal structure provides a natural differential geometric framework underlying gauge theories of conformal gravity. We are concerned with two theories: the first one is the associated Yang-Mills-like Lagrangian, while the second, inspired by [1], is a slightly more general one that relaxes the conformal Cartan geometry. The corresponding gauge symmetry is treated within the Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin language. We show that the Weyl gauge potential is a spurious degree of freedom, analogous to a Stueckelberg field, that can be eliminated through the dressing field method. We derive sets of field equations for both the studied Lagrangians. For the second one, they constrain the gauge field to be the "normal conformal Cartan connection.''Finally, we provide in a Lagrangian framework a justification of the identification, in dimension 4, of the Bach tensor with the Yang-Mills current of the normal conformal Cartan connection, as proved in [2].

  19. Fuzzy Logic for Incidence Geometry

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a mathematical framework for approximate geometric reasoning with extended objects in the context of Geography, in which all entities and their relationships are described by human language. These entities could be labelled by commonly used names of landmarks, water areas, and so forth. Unlike single points that are given in Cartesian coordinates, these geographic entities are extended in space and often loosely defined, but people easily perform spatial reasoning with extended geographic objects “as if they were points.” Unfortunately, up to date, geographic information systems (GIS) miss the capability of geometric reasoning with extended objects. The aim of the paper is to present a mathematical apparatus for approximate geometric reasoning with extended objects that is usable in GIS. In the paper we discuss the fuzzy logic (Aliev and Tserkovny, 2011) as a reasoning system for geometry of extended objects, as well as a basis for fuzzification of the axioms of incidence geometry. The same fuzzy logic was used for fuzzification of Euclid's first postulate. Fuzzy equivalence relation “extended lines sameness” is introduced. For its approximation we also utilize a fuzzy conditional inference, which is based on proposed fuzzy “degree of indiscernibility” and “discernibility measure” of extended points. PMID:27689133

  20. Research on method of geometry and spectral calibration of pushbroom dispersive hyperspectral imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhiping; Shu, Rong; Wang, Jianyu

    2012-11-01

    Development and application of airborne and aerospace hyperspectral imager press for high precision geometry and spectral calibration of pixels of image cube. The research of geometry and spectral calibration of pushbroom hyperspectral imager, its target is giving the coordinate of angle field of view and center wavelength of each detect unit in focal plane detector of hyperspectral imager, and achieves the high precision, full field of view, full channel geometry and spectral calibration. It is importance for imaging quantitative and deep application of hyperspectal imager. The paper takes the geometry and spectral calibration of pushbroom dispersive hyperspectral imager as case study, and research on the constitution and analysis of imaging mathematical model. Aimed especially at grating-dispersive hyperspectral imaging, the specialty of the imaging mode and dispersive method has been concretely analyzed. Based on the analysis, the theory and feasible method of geometry and spectral calibration of dispersive hyperspectral imager is set up. The key technique has been solved is As follows: 1). the imaging mathematical model and feasible method of geometry and spectral calibration for full pixels of image cube has been set up, the feasibility of the calibration method has been analyzed. 2). the engineering model and method of the geometry and spectral calibration of pushbroom dispersive hyperspectral imager has been set up and the calibration equipment has been constructed, and the calibration precision has been analyzed.

  1. Geometric and analytic problems on bicomplex plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimiev, Stancho; Stoev, Peter; Stoilova, Stanislava

    2015-11-01

    Let us recall that the bicomplex plane is a complex ring of complex dimension 2. It consists of couples of the kind (z, w) = z + jw, where z and w are complex numbers and j is a symbol with the property j2 = -1. We note that the bicomplex plane admits singular points. The set of these singular points coincides with the cross-choped set of complex bisectrices (z, ±z), z is a complex. The main problem in the function theory on the bicomplex plane is to describe the interconnection between the same theory of the cross-choped subset and whole bicomplex plane. The first theory is of one complex variable and the second one is of two complex variables. Another problems are related with the comformal mappings and the movement of a partials of this subset on the whole one. Presented paper is a start studies in this direction.

  2. Causal inheritence in plane wave quotients

    SciTech Connect

    Hubeny, Veronika E.; Rangamani, Mukund; Ross, Simon F.

    2003-11-24

    We investigate the appearance of closed timelike curves in quotients of plane waves along spacelike isometries. First we formulate a necessary and sufficient condition for a quotient of a general spacetime to preserve stable causality. We explicitly show that the plane waves are stably causal; in passing, we observe that some pp-waves are not even distinguishing. We then consider the classification of all quotients of the maximally supersymmetric ten-dimensional plane wave under a spacelike isometry, and show that the quotient will lead to closed timelike curves iff the isometry involves a translation along the u direction. The appearance of these closed timelike curves is thus connected to the special properties of the light cones in plane wave spacetimes. We show that all other quotients preserve stable causality.

  3. High-frequency techniques for RCS prediction of plate geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Polka, Lesley A.

    1992-01-01

    The principal-plane scattering from perfectly conducting and coated strips and rectangular plates is examined. Previous reports have detailed Geometrical Theory of Diffraction/Uniform Theory of Diffraction (GTD/UTD) solutions for these geometries. The GTD/UTD solution for the perfectly conducting plate yields monostatic radar cross section (RCS) results that are nearly identical to measurements and results obtained using the Moment Method (MM) and the Extended Physical Theory of Diffraction (EPTD). This was demonstrated in previous reports. The previous analysis is extended to bistatic cases. GTD/UTD results for the principal-plane scattering from a perfectly conducting, infinite strip are compared to MM and EPTD data. A comprehensive overview of the advantages and disadvantages of the GTD/UTD and of the EPTD and a detailed analysis of the results from both methods are provided. Several previous reports also presented preliminary discussions and results for a GTD/UTD model of the RCS of a coated, rectangular plate. Several approximations for accounting for the finite coating thickness, plane-wave incidence, and far-field observation were discussed. Here, these approximations are replaced by a revised wedge diffraction coefficient that implicitly accounts for a coating on a perfect conductor, plane-wave incidence, and far-field observation. This coefficient is computationally more efficient than the previous diffraction coefficient because the number of Maliuzhinets functions that must be calculated using numerical integration is reduced by a factor of 2. The derivation and the revised coefficient are presented in detail for the hard polarization case. Computations and experimental data are also included. The soft polarization case is currently under investigation.

  4. Attitude analysis in Flatland: The plane truth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuster, Malcolm D.

    1993-01-01

    Many results in attitude analysis are still meaningful when the attitude is restricted to rotations about a single axis. Such a picture corresponds to attitude analysis in the Euclidean plane. The present report formalizes the representation of attitude in the plane and applies it to some well-known problems. In particular, we study the connection of the 'additive' and 'multiplicative' formulations of the differential corrector for the quaternion in its two-dimensional setting.

  5. Some implications of the particle and climb geometry on the climb resistance in nickel-base superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherji, D.; Wahi, R.P.

    1996-04-01

    Various dislocation climb models were developed for modeling the deformation processes in precipitation hardened alloys at elevated temperatures and low applied stresses. These models have been applied to alloy systems containing spherical, cubic and other precipitate shapes. However, in applying these models to alloys containing cubic precipitates, the particle orientation with respect to the slip plane and the slip geometry relevant to the nickel-base superalloys was not considered. In this paper the authors show that by taking into account the realistic climb and glide geometries, the value of the climb resistances considerably differ from those reported earlier on the basis of simplified geometries.

  6. Differential Geometry Based Multiscale Models

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Guo-Wei

    2010-01-01

    Large chemical and biological systems such as fuel cells, ion channels, molecular motors, and viruses are of great importance to the scientific community and public health. Typically, these complex systems in conjunction with their aquatic environment pose a fabulous challenge to theoretical description, simulation, and prediction. In this work, we propose a differential geometry based multiscale paradigm to model complex macromolecular systems, and to put macroscopic and microscopic descriptions on an equal footing. In our approach, the differential geometry theory of surfaces and geometric measure theory are employed as a natural means to couple the macroscopic continuum mechanical description of the aquatic environment with the microscopic discrete atom-istic description of the macromolecule. Multiscale free energy functionals, or multiscale action functionals are constructed as a unified framework to derive the governing equations for the dynamics of different scales and different descriptions. Two types of aqueous macromolecular complexes, ones that are near equilibrium and others that are far from equilibrium, are considered in our formulations. We show that generalized Navier–Stokes equations for the fluid dynamics, generalized Poisson equations or generalized Poisson–Boltzmann equations for electrostatic interactions, and Newton's equation for the molecular dynamics can be derived by the least action principle. These equations are coupled through the continuum-discrete interface whose dynamics is governed by potential driven geometric flows. Comparison is given to classical descriptions of the fluid and electrostatic interactions without geometric flow based micro-macro interfaces. The detailed balance of forces is emphasized in the present work. We further extend the proposed multiscale paradigm to micro-macro analysis of electrohydrodynamics, electrophoresis, fuel cells, and ion channels. We derive generalized Poisson–Nernst–Planck equations that

  7. Differential geometry based multiscale models.

    PubMed

    Wei, Guo-Wei

    2010-08-01

    Large chemical and biological systems such as fuel cells, ion channels, molecular motors, and viruses are of great importance to the scientific community and public health. Typically, these complex systems in conjunction with their aquatic environment pose a fabulous challenge to theoretical description, simulation, and prediction. In this work, we propose a differential geometry based multiscale paradigm to model complex macromolecular systems, and to put macroscopic and microscopic descriptions on an equal footing. In our approach, the differential geometry theory of surfaces and geometric measure theory are employed as a natural means to couple the macroscopic continuum mechanical description of the aquatic environment with the microscopic discrete atomistic description of the macromolecule. Multiscale free energy functionals, or multiscale action functionals are constructed as a unified framework to derive the governing equations for the dynamics of different scales and different descriptions. Two types of aqueous macromolecular complexes, ones that are near equilibrium and others that are far from equilibrium, are considered in our formulations. We show that generalized Navier-Stokes equations for the fluid dynamics, generalized Poisson equations or generalized Poisson-Boltzmann equations for electrostatic interactions, and Newton's equation for the molecular dynamics can be derived by the least action principle. These equations are coupled through the continuum-discrete interface whose dynamics is governed by potential driven geometric flows. Comparison is given to classical descriptions of the fluid and electrostatic interactions without geometric flow based micro-macro interfaces. The detailed balance of forces is emphasized in the present work. We further extend the proposed multiscale paradigm to micro-macro analysis of electrohydrodynamics, electrophoresis, fuel cells, and ion channels. We derive generalized Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations that are

  8. Geometry dependence of stellarator turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mynick, H. E.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Boozer, A. H.

    2009-11-01

    Using the nonlinear gyrokinetic code package GENE/GIST [F. Jenko, W. Dorland, M. Kotschenreuther, and B. N. Rogers, Phys. Plasmas 7, 1904 (2000); P. Xanthopoulos, W. A. Cooper, F. Jenko, Yu. Turkin, A. Runov, and J. Geiger, Phys. Plasmas 16, 082303 (2009)], we study the turbulent transport in a broad family of stellarator designs, to understand the geometry dependence of the microturbulence. By using a set of flux tubes on a given flux surface, we construct a picture of the two-dimensional structure of the microturbulence over that surface and relate this to relevant geometric quantities, such as the curvature, local shear, and effective potential in the Schrödinger-like equation governing linear drift modes.

  9. Geometry of spinning Ellis wormholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, Xiao Yan; Kleihaus, Burkhard; Kunz, Jutta

    2016-11-01

    We give a detailed account of the properties of spinning Ellis wormholes, supported by a phantom field. The general set of solutions depends on three parameters, associated with the size of the throat, the rotation, and the symmetry of the solutions. For symmetric wormholes the global charges possess the same values in both asymptotic regions, while this is no longer the case for nonsymmetric wormholes. We present mass formulas for these wormholes, study their quadrupole moments, and discuss the geometry of their throat and their ergoregion. We demonstrate, that these wormholes possess limiting configurations corresponding to an extremal Kerr black hole. Moreover, we analyze the geodesics of these wormholes, and show that they possess bound orbits.

  10. Geometry of minisuperspace in examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerbrat, Yvan; Kerbrat-Lunc, Hélène; Śniatycki, Jȩdrzej

    1992-04-01

    Minisuperspace, interpreted as the configuration space for homogeneous cosmologies, has a naturally defined pseudo-Riemannian metric (supermetric) such that solutions of the ADM equations correspond to geodesics of the supermetric parametrized by arc-length (supertime). The supermetric is used to analyse the geometry of minisuperspace. In particular, if the supermetric is incomplete, its prolongations relate different components of minisuperspace. For Robertson-Walker universes with a homogeneous scalar field there exists a C1 prolongation of supermetric relating the positive and the negative curvature models. If the potential vanishes, then this prolongation is C∞. There is no prolongation of supermetric through generic boundary points between the Bianchi VIII and Bianchi IX models.

  11. Geometry-induced capillary emptying.

    PubMed

    Rascón, Carlos; Parry, Andrew O; Aarts, Dirk G A L

    2016-10-24

    When a capillary is half-filled with liquid and turned to the horizontal, the liquid may flow out of the capillary or remain in it. For lack of a better criterion, the standard assumption is that the liquid will remain in a capillary of narrow cross-section, and will flow out otherwise. Here, we present a precise mathematical criterion that determines which of the two outcomes occurs for capillaries of arbitrary cross-sectional shape, and show that the standard assumption fails for certain simple geometries, leading to very rich and counterintuitive behavior. This opens the possibility of creating very sensitive microfluidic devices that respond readily to small physical changes, for instance, by triggering the sudden displacement of fluid along a capillary without the need of any external pumping.

  12. Changing the Structure Boundary Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Karasev, Viktor; Dzlieva, Elena; Ivanov, Artyom

    2008-09-07

    Analysis of previously obtained results shows that hexagonal crystal lattice is the dominant type of ordering, in particular, in striated glow discharges. We explore the possibility for changing the dust distribution in horizontal cross sections of relatively highly ordered structures in a glow-discharge. Presuming that boundary geometry can affect dust distribution, we used cylindrical coolers held at 0 deg. C and placed against a striation containing a structure, to change the geometry of its outer boundary. By varying the number of coolers, their positions, and their separations from the tube wall, azimuthally asymmetric thermophoretic forces can be used to form polygonal boundaries and vary the angles between their segments (in a horizontal cross section). The corner in the structure's boundary of 60 deg. stimulates formation of hexagonal cells. The structure between the supported parallel boundaries is also characterized by stable hexagonal ordering. We found that a single linear boundary segment does not give rise to any sizable domain, but generates a lattice extending from the boundary (without edge defects). A square lattice can be formed by setting the angle equal to 90 deg. . However, angles of 45 deg. and 135 deg. turned out easier to form. Square lattice was created by forming a near-135 deg. corner with four coolers. It was noted that no grain ordering is observed in the region adjacent to corners of angles smaller than 30 deg. , which do not promote ordering into cells of any shape. Thus, manipulation of a structure boundary can be used to change dust distribution, create structures free of the ubiquitous edge defects that destroy orientation order, and probably change the crystal lattice type.

  13. Geometry for the Primary Electron Donor and the Bacteriopheophytin Acceptor in Rhodopseudomonas viridis Photosynthetic Reaction Centers

    PubMed Central

    Tiede, D. M.; Choquet, Y.; Breton, J.

    1985-01-01

    The tetrapyrrole electron donors and acceptors (bacteriochlorophyll, BCh; bacteriopheophytin, BPh) within the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center (RC) are arranged with a specific geometry that permits rapid (picosecond time scale) electron tunneling to occur between them. Here we have measured the angle between the molecular planes of the bacteriochlorophyll dimer (primary donor), B2, and the acceptor bacteriopheophytin, H, by analyzing the dichroism of the absorption change associated with H reduction, formed by photoselection with RCs of Rhodopseudomonas viridis. This angle between molecular planes is found to be 60° ± 2. This means that the ultrafast electron tunneling must occur between donors and acceptors that are fixed by the protein to have a noncoplanar alignment. Nearly perpendicular alignments have been determined for other electron tunneling complexes involving RCs. These geometries can be contrasted with models proposed for heme-heme electron transfer complexes, which have emphasized that mutually parallel orientations should permit the most kinetically facile transfers. PMID:19431588

  14. Double plane wave reverse time migration with plane wave Green's function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Z.; Sen, M. K.; Stoffa, P. L.

    2015-12-01

    Reverse time migration (RTM) is effective in obtaining complex subsurface structures from seismic data. By solving the two-way wave equation, RTM can use entire wavefield for imaging. Although powerful computer are becoming available, the conventional pre-stack shot gather RTM is still computationally expensive. Solving forward and backward wavefield propagation for each source location and shot gather is extremely time consuming, especially for large seismic datasets. We present an efficient, accurate and flexible plane wave RTM in the frequency domain where we utilize a compressed plane wave dataset, known as the double plane wave (DPW) dataset. Provided with densely sampled seismic dataset, shot gathers can be decomposed into source and receiver plane wave components with minimal artifacts. The DPW RTM is derived under the Born approximation and utilizes frequency domain plane wave Green's function for imaging. Time dips in the shot profiles can help to estimate the range of plane wave components present in shot gathers. Therefore, a limited number of plane wave Green's functions are needed for imaging. Plane wave Green's functions can be used for imaging both source and receiver plane waves. Source and receiver reciprocity can be used for imaging plane wave components at no cost and save half of the computation time. As a result, the computational burden for migration is substantially reduced. Plane wave components can be migrated independently to recover specific targets with given dips, and ray parameter common image gathers (CIGs) can be generated after migration directly. The ray parameter CIGs can be used to justify the correctness of velocity models. Subsurface anisotropy effects can also be included in our imaging condition, provided with plane wave Green's functions in the anisotropic media.

  15. Biomechanical differences between incline and plane hopping.

    PubMed

    Kannas, Theodoros M; Kellis, Eleftherios; Amiridis, Ioannis G

    2011-12-01

    Kannas, TM, Kellis, E, and Amiridis, IG. Biomechanical differences between incline and plane hopping. J Strength Cond Res 25(12): 3334-3341, 2011-The need for the generation of higher joint power output during performance of dynamic activities led us to investigate the force-length relationship of the plantar flexors during consecutive stretch-shortening cycles of hopping. The hypothesis of this study was that hopping (consecutive jumps with the knee as straight as possible) on an inclined (15°) surface might lead to a better jumping performance compared with hopping on a plane surface (0°). Twelve active men performed 3 sets of 10 consecutive hops on both an incline and plane surface. Ground reaction forces; ankle and knee joint kinematics; electromyographic (EMG) activity from the medial gastrocnemius (MG), soleus (Sol) and tibialis anterior (TA); and architectural data from the MG were recorded. The results showed that participants jumped significantly higher (p < 0.05) when hopping on an inclined surface (30.32 ± 8.18 cm) compared with hopping on a plane surface (27.52 ± 4.97 cm). No differences in temporal characteristics between the 2 types of jumps were observed. Incline hopping induced significantly greater ankle dorsiflexion and knee extension at takeoff compared with plane hopping (p < 0.05). The fascicle length of the MG was greater at initial contact with the ground during incline hopping (p < 0.05). Moreover, the EMG activities of Sol and TA during the propulsion phase were significantly higher during incline compared with that during plane hopping (p < 0.05). It does not seem unreasonable to suggest that, if the aim of hopping plyometrics is to improve plantar flexor explosivity, incline hopping might be a more effective exercise than hopping on a plane surface.

  16. Matematica Para La Escuela Secundaria: Geometria (Parte 1). Traduccion Preliminar de la Edicion Inglesa Revisada. (Mathematics for High School: Geometry, Part 1. Preliminary Translation of the Revised English Edition).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Frank B.; And Others

    This is part one of a two-part SMSG mathematics text for high school students. Topics include plane geometry, real numbers, triangles and angles, congruence, construction, parallel lines, perpendicular lines, and parallelograms. The text is written in Spanish. (RH)

  17. Convection in Slab and Spheroidal Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, David H.; Woodward, Paul R.; Jacobs, Michael L.

    2000-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of compressible turbulent thermally driven convection, in both slab and spheroidal geometries, are reviewed and analyzed in terms of velocity spectra and mixing-length theory. The same ideal gas model is used in both geometries, and resulting flows are compared. The piecewise-parabolic method (PPM), with either thermal conductivity or photospheric boundary conditions, is used to solve the fluid equations of motion. Fluid motions in both geometries exhibit a Kolmogorov-like k(sup -5/3) range in their velocity spectra. The longest wavelength modes are energetically dominant in both geometries, typically leading to one convection cell dominating the flow. In spheroidal geometry, a dipolar flow dominates the largest scale convective motions. Downflows are intensely turbulent and up drafts are relatively laminar in both geometries. In slab geometry, correlations between temperature and velocity fluctuations, which lead to the enthalpy flux, are fairly independent of depth. In spheroidal geometry this same correlation increases linearly with radius over the inner 70 percent by radius, in which the local pressure scale heights are a sizable fraction of the radius. The effects from the impenetrable boundary conditions in the slab geometry models are confused with the effects from non-local convection. In spheroidal geometry nonlocal effects, due to coherent plumes, are seen as far as several pressure scale heights from the lower boundary and are clearly distinguishable from boundary effects.

  18. A spectral dynamic stiffness method for free vibration analysis of plane elastodynamic problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Banerjee, J. R.

    2017-03-01

    A highly efficient and accurate analytical spectral dynamic stiffness (SDS) method for modal analysis of plane elastodynamic problems based on both plane stress and plane strain assumptions is presented in this paper. First, the general solution satisfying the governing differential equation exactly is derived by applying two types of one-dimensional modified Fourier series. Then the SDS matrix for an element is formulated symbolically using the general solution. The SDS matrices are assembled directly in a similar way to that of the finite element method, demonstrating the method's capability to model complex structures. Any arbitrary boundary conditions are represented accurately in the form of the modified Fourier series. The Wittrick-Williams algorithm is then used as the solution technique where the mode count problem (J0) of a fully-clamped element is resolved. The proposed method gives highly accurate solutions with remarkable computational efficiency, covering low, medium and high frequency ranges. The method is applied to both plane stress and plane strain problems with simple as well as complex geometries. All results from the theory in this paper are accurate up to the last figures quoted to serve as benchmarks.

  19. DYNAMIC PLANE-STRAIN SHEAR RUPTURE WITH A SLIP-WEAKENING FRICTION LAW CALCULATED BY A BOUNDARY INTEGRAL METHOD.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    A numerical boundary integral method, relating slip and traction on a plane in an elastic medium by convolution with a discretized Green function, can be linked to a slip-dependent friction law on the fault plane. Such a method is developed here in two-dimensional plane-strain geometry. Spontaneous plane-strain shear ruptures can make a transition from sub-Rayleigh to near-P propagation velocity. Results from the boundary integral method agree with earlier results from a finite difference method on the location of this transition in parameter space. The methods differ in their prediction of rupture velocity following the transition. The trailing edge of the cohesive zone propagates at the P-wave velocity after the transition in the boundary integral calculations. Refs.

  20. INTERIOR OF SECOND FLOOR BRIDGE BETWEEN PLANING MILL AND CAR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR OF SECOND FLOOR BRIDGE BETWEEN PLANING MILL AND CAR MACHINE SHOP, LOOKING SOUTH TOWARD PLANING MILL. - Southern Pacific, Sacramento Shops, Planing Mill, 111 I Street, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  1. Modeling the transmission of beta rays through thin foils in planar geometry.

    PubMed

    Stanga, D; De Felice, P; Keightley, J; Capogni, M; Ionescu, E

    2016-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the modeling of the transmission of beta rays through thin foils in planar geometry based on the plane source concept, using Monte Carlo simulation of electron transport and least squares fitting. Applications of modeling results for calculating the efficiency of large-area beta sources, transmission coefficient of beta rays through thin foils and the beta detection efficiency of large-area detectors used in surface contamination measurements are also presented.

  2. GLAMER - II. Multiple-plane gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkova, Margarita; Metcalf, R. Benton; Giocoli, Carlo

    2014-12-01

    We present an extension to multiple planes of the gravitational lensing code GLAMER. The method entails projecting the mass in the observed light-cone on to a discrete number of lens planes and inverse ray-shooting from the image to the source plane. The mass on each plane can be represented as haloes, simulation particles, a projected mass map extracted form a numerical simulation or any combination of these. The image finding is done in a source-oriented fashion, where only regions of interest are iteratively refined on an initially coarse image plane grid. The calculations are performed in parallel on shared memory machines. The code is able to handle different types of analytic haloes (NFW, NSIE, power law, etc.), haloes extracted from numerical simulations and clusters constructed from semi-analytic models (MOKA). Likewise, there are several different options for modelling the source(s) which can be distributed throughout the light-cone. The distribution of matter in the light-cone can be either taken from a pre-existing N-body numerical simulations, from halo catalogues, or are generated from an analytic mass function. We present several tests of the code and demonstrate some of its applications such as generating mock images of galaxy and galaxy cluster lenses.

  3. Focal Plane Metrology for the LSST Camera

    SciTech Connect

    A Rasmussen, Andrew P.; Hale, Layton; Kim, Peter; Lee, Eric; Perl, Martin; Schindler, Rafe; Takacs, Peter; Thurston, Timothy; /SLAC

    2007-01-10

    Meeting the science goals for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) translates into a demanding set of imaging performance requirements for the optical system over a wide (3.5{sup o}) field of view. In turn, meeting those imaging requirements necessitates maintaining precise control of the focal plane surface (10 {micro}m P-V) over the entire field of view (640 mm diameter) at the operating temperature (T {approx} -100 C) and over the operational elevation angle range. We briefly describe the hierarchical design approach for the LSST Camera focal plane and the baseline design for assembling the flat focal plane at room temperature. Preliminary results of gravity load and thermal distortion calculations are provided, and early metrological verification of candidate materials under cold thermal conditions are presented. A detailed, generalized method for stitching together sparse metrology data originating from differential, non-contact metrological data acquisition spanning multiple (non-continuous) sensor surfaces making up the focal plane, is described and demonstrated. Finally, we describe some in situ alignment verification alternatives, some of which may be integrated into the camera's focal plane.

  4. The effects of spherical geometry on baroclinic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moura, A. D.; Stone, P. H.

    1976-01-01

    A baroclinic stability analysis is performed for a simple family of zonal shear profiles over a sphere, using a two-layer, quasi-geostrophic model. The stability properties and the structure of the most unstable waves are qualitatively similar to those on a beta-plane. However, the spherical geometry plays a major role in locating some of the important features of the most unstable waves. In particular, the locations of the maximum wave amplitude, maximum eddy heat fluxes, and maximum convergence of the eddy angular momentum flux are all well correlated with the location of the maximum excess of the vertical shear over the minimum value necessary for local instability on a sphere. Consequently the eddy momentum flux tends to generate a mid-latitude jet even if there is no preexisting mid-latitude jet in the basic state zonal flow. These findings suggest some of the elements needed for parameterizing the meridional variations of baroclinic eddy fluxes accurately.

  5. Cosmology in One Dimension: Fractal Geometry, Power Spectra and Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Bruce; Rouet, Jean-Louis

    2011-03-01

    Concentrations of matter, such as galaxies and galactic clusters, originated as very small density fluctuations in the early universe. The existence of galaxy clusters and super-clusters suggests that a natural scale for the matter distribution may not exist. A point of controversy is whether the distribution is fractal and, if so,over what range of scales. One-dimensional models demonstrate that the important dynamics for cluster formation occur in the position-velocity plane. Here the development of scaling behavior and multifractal geometry is investigated for a family of one-dimensional models for three different, scale-free, initial conditions. A possible physical mechanism for understanding the self-similar evolution is introduced. It is shown that hierarchical cluster formation depends both on the model and the initial power spectrum. Under special circumstances a simple relation between the power spectrum, correlation function, and correlation dimension in the highly nonlinear regime is confirmed.

  6. Multipole Vortex Blobs (MVB): Symplectic Geometry and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holm, Darryl D.; Jacobs, Henry O.

    2017-03-01

    Vortex blob methods are typically characterized by a regularization length scale, below which the dynamics are trivial for isolated blobs. In this article, we observe that the dynamics need not be trivial if one is willing to consider distributional derivatives of Dirac delta functionals as valid vorticity distributions. More specifically, a new singular vortex theory is presented for regularized Euler fluid equations of ideal incompressible flow in the plane. We determine the conditions under which such regularized Euler fluid equations may admit vorticity singularities which are stronger than delta functions, e.g., derivatives of delta functions. We also describe the symplectic geometry associated with these augmented vortex structures, and we characterize the dynamics as Hamiltonian. Applications to the design of numerical methods similar to vortex blob methods are also discussed. Such findings illuminate the rich dynamics which occur below the regularization length scale and enlighten our perspective on the potential for regularized fluid models to capture multiscale phenomena.

  7. Geometry of G-Structures via the Intrinsic Torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedziałomski, Kamil

    2016-11-01

    We study the geometry of a G-structure P inside the oriented orthonormal frame bundle SO(M) over an oriented Riemannian manifold M. We assume that G is connected and closed, so the quotient SO(n)/G, where n=dim M, is a normal homogeneous space and we equip SO(M) with the natural Riemannian structure induced from the structure on M and the Killing form of SO(n). We show, in particular, that minimality of P is equivalent to harmonicity of an induced section of the homogeneous bundle SO(M)×_{SO(n)}{SO}(n)/G, with a Riemannian metric on M obtained as the pull-back with respect to this section of the Riemannian metric on the considered associated bundle, and to the minimality of the image of this section. We apply obtained results to the case of almost product structures, i.e., structures induced by plane fields.

  8. Riemannian geometry of fluctuation theory: An introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazquez, Luisberis

    2016-05-01

    Fluctuation geometry was recently proposed as a counterpart approach of Riemannian geometry of inference theory (information geometry), which describes the geometric features of the statistical manifold M of random events that are described by a family of continuous distributions dpξ(x|θ). This theory states a connection among geometry notions and statistical properties: separation distance as a measure of relative probabilities, curvature as a measure about the existence of irreducible statistical correlations, among others. In statistical mechanics, fluctuation geometry arises as the mathematical apparatus of a Riemannian extension of Einstein fluctuation theory, which is also closely related to Ruppeiner geometry of thermodynamics. Moreover, the curvature tensor allows to express some asymptotic formulae that account for the system fluctuating behavior beyond the gaussian approximation, while curvature scalar appears as a second-order correction of Legendre transformation between thermodynamic potentials.

  9. Use of CAD Geometry in MDO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh, Jamshid A.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the use of Computer-Aided Design (CAD) geometry in a Multi-Disciplinary Design Optimization (MDO) environment. Two techniques are presented to facilitate the use of CAD geometry by different disciplines, such as Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM). One method is to transfer the load from a CFD grid to a CSM grid. The second method is to update the CAD geometry for CSM deflection.

  10. Serpentine Geometry Plasma Actuators for Flow Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-23

    Serpentine geometry plasma actuators for flow control Mark Riherd and Subrata Roy Citation: J. Appl. Phys. 114, 083303 (2013); doi: 10.1063...DATES COVERED 00-00-2013 to 00-00-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Serpentine geometry plasma actuators for flow control 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Serpentine geometry plasma actuators for flow

  11. The MSX Galactic Plane Survey Submillimeter Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, S.; Carey, S.; Egan, M. P.

    The MidCourse Space eXperiment (MSX) surveyed the Galactic plane within 5° latitude in four mid-infrared spectral bands. A set of full resolution (20'') 1.5^circ×1.5^circ images on 6'' pixel centers has been created in each spectral band by co-adding all the survey data. A lower (1.2') resolution atlas of 10^circ×10^circ images provide large-scale panoramas of the plane. A new class of objects has been identified in the images, infrared dark clouds, which are silhouetted against the mid-infrared background emission from the interstellar medium in the Galactic plane. The IRAS ISSA plates indicate that these clouds are dark out to 100 μm. Submillimeter emission traces the form of the dark cloud and reveals cores indicative of class 0 protostars.

  12. Solid-state curved focal plane arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor); Hoenk, Michael (Inventor); Jones, Todd (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to curved focal plane arrays. More specifically, the present invention relates to a system and method for making solid-state curved focal plane arrays from standard and high-purity devices that may be matched to a given optical system. There are two ways to make a curved focal plane arrays starting with the fully fabricated device. One way, is to thin the device and conform it to a curvature. A second way, is to back-illuminate a thick device without making a thinned membrane. The thick device is a special class of devices; for example devices fabricated with high purity silicon. One surface of the device (the non VLSI fabricated surface, also referred to as the back surface) can be polished to form a curved surface.

  13. Achromatic phase shifting focal plane masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Kevin

    The search for life on other worlds is an exciting scientific endeavor that could change the way we perceive our place in the universe. Thousands of extrasolar planets have been discovered using indirect detection techniques. One of the most promising methods for discovering new exoplanets and searching for life is direct imaging with a coronagraph. Exoplanet coronagraphy of Earth-like planets is a challenging task, but we have developed many of the tools necessary to make it feasible. The Phase-Induced Amplitude Apodization (PIAA) Coronagraph is one of the highest-performing architectures for direct exoplanet imaging. With a complex phase-shifting focal plane mask, the PIAA Complex Mask Coronagraph (PIAACMC) can approach the theoretical performance limit for any direct detection technique. The architecture design is flexible enough to be applied to any arbitrary aperture shape, including segmented and obscured apertures. This is an important feature for compatibility with next-generation ground and space-based telescopes. PIAA and PIAACMC focal plane masks have been demonstrated in monochromatic light. An important next step for high-performance coronagraphy is the development of broadband phase-shifting focal plane masks. In this dissertation, we present an algorithm for designing the PIAA and PIAACMC focal plane masks to operate in broadband. We also demonstrate manufacturing of the focal plane masks, and show laboratory results. We use simulations to show the potential performance of the coronagraph system, and the use of wavefront control to correct for mask manufacturing errors. Given the laboratory results and simulations, we show new areas of exoplanet science that can potentially be explored using coronagraph technology. The main conclusion of this dissertation is that we now have the tools required to design and manufacture PIAA and PIAACMC achromatic focal plane masks. These tools can be applied to current and future telescope systems to enable new

  14. T-branes and geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Lara B.; Heckman, Jonathan J.; Katz, Sheldon

    2014-05-01

    T-branes are a non-abelian generalization of intersecting branes in which the matrix of normal deformations is nilpotent along some subspace. In this paper we study the geometric remnant of this open string data for six-dimensional F-theory vacua. We show that in the dual M-theory / IIA compactification on a smooth Calabi-Yau threefold X smth, the geometric remnant of T-brane data translates to periods of the three-form potential valued in the intermediate Jacobian of X smth. Starting from a smoothing of a singular Calabi-Yau, we show how to track this data in singular limits using the theory of limiting mixed Hodge structures, which in turn directly points to an emergent Hitchin-like system coupled to defects. We argue that the physical data of an F-theory compactification on a singular threefold involves specifying both a geometry as well as the remnant of three-form potential moduli and flux which is localized on the discriminant. We give examples of T-branes in compact F-theory models with heterotic duals, and comment on the extension of our results to four-dimensional vacua.

  15. Latent geometry of bipartite networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitsak, Maksim; Papadopoulos, Fragkiskos; Krioukov, Dmitri

    2017-03-01

    Despite the abundance of bipartite networked systems, their organizing principles are less studied compared to unipartite networks. Bipartite networks are often analyzed after projecting them onto one of the two sets of nodes. As a result of the projection, nodes of the same set are linked together if they have at least one neighbor in common in the bipartite network. Even though these projections allow one to study bipartite networks using tools developed for unipartite networks, one-mode projections lead to significant loss of information and artificial inflation of the projected network with fully connected subgraphs. Here we pursue a different approach for analyzing bipartite systems that is based on the observation that such systems have a latent metric structure: network nodes are points in a latent metric space, while connections are more likely to form between nodes separated by shorter distances. This approach has been developed for unipartite networks, and relatively little is known about its applicability to bipartite systems. Here, we fully analyze a simple latent-geometric model of bipartite networks and show that this model explains the peculiar structural properties of many real bipartite systems, including the distributions of common neighbors and bipartite clustering. We also analyze the geometric information loss in one-mode projections in this model and propose an efficient method to infer the latent pairwise distances between nodes. Uncovering the latent geometry underlying real bipartite networks can find applications in diverse domains, ranging from constructing efficient recommender systems to understanding cell metabolism.

  16. Geometry-induced asymmetric diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Robert S.; Packard, Norman; Schröter, Matthias; Swinney, Harry L.

    2007-01-01

    Past work has shown that ions can pass through a membrane more readily in one direction than the other. We demonstrate here in a model and an experiment that for a mixture of small and large particles such asymmetric diffusion can arise solely from an asymmetry in the geometry of the pores of the membrane. Our deterministic simulation considers a two-dimensional gas of elastic disks of two sizes diffusing through a membrane, and our laboratory experiment examines the diffusion of glass beads of two sizes through a metal membrane. In both experiment and simulation, the membrane is permeable only to the smaller particles, and the asymmetric pores lead to an asymmetry in the diffusion rates of these particles. The presence of even a small percentage of large particles can clog a membrane, preventing passage of the small particles in one direction while permitting free flow of the small particles in the other direction. The purely geometric kinetic constraints may play a role in common biological contexts such as membrane ion channels. PMID:17522257

  17. Contour matching by epipolar geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Mao-Lin; Zhang, Damin; Wei, Sui

    2003-09-01

    Matching features computed in images is an important process in multiview image analysis. When the motion between two images is large, the matching problem becomes very difficult. In this paper, we propose a contour matching algorithm based on geometric constraints. With the assumption that the contours are obtained from images taken from a moving camera with static scenes, we apply the epipolar constraint between two sets of contours and compute the corresponding points on the contours. From the initial epipolar constraints obtained from comer point matching, candidate contours are selected according to the epipolar geometry, the linear relation among tangent vectors of the contour. In order to reduce the possibility of false matches, the curvature of the contour of match points on a contour is also used as a selection method. The initial epipolar constraint is refined from the matched sets of contours. The algorithm can be applied to a pair or two pairs of images. All of the processes are fully automatic and successfully implemented and tested with various synthetic images.

  18. Noncommutative Riemannian geometry on graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majid, Shahn

    2013-07-01

    We show that arising out of noncommutative geometry is a natural family of edge Laplacians on the edges of a graph. The family includes a canonical edge Laplacian associated to the graph, extending the usual graph Laplacian on vertices, and we find its spectrum. We show that for a connected graph its eigenvalues are strictly positive aside from one mandatory zero mode, and include all the vertex degrees. Our edge Laplacian is not the graph Laplacian on the line graph but rather it arises as the noncommutative Laplace-Beltrami operator on differential 1-forms, where we use the language of differential algebras to functorially interpret a graph as providing a 'finite manifold structure' on the set of vertices. We equip any graph with a canonical 'Euclidean metric' and a canonical bimodule connection, and in the case of a Cayley graph we construct a metric compatible connection for the Euclidean metric. We make use of results on bimodule connections on inner calculi on algebras, which we prove, including a general relation between zero curvature and the braid relations.

  19. Eye movements and information geometry.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Reiner

    2016-08-01

    The human visual system uses eye movements to gather visual information. They act as visual scanning processes and can roughly be divided into two different types: small movements around fixation points and larger movements between fixation points. The processes are often modeled as random walks, and recent models based on heavy tail distributions, also known as Levý flights, have been used in these investigations. In contrast to these approaches we do not model the stochastic processes, but we will show that the step lengths of the movements between fixation points follow generalized Pareto distributions (GPDs). We will use general arguments from the theory of extreme value statistics to motivate the usage of the GPD and show empirically that the GPDs provide good fits for measured eye tracking data. In the framework of information geometry the GPDs with a common threshold form a two-dimensional Riemann manifold with the Fisher information matrix as a metric. We compute the Fisher information matrix for the GPDs and introduce a feature vector describing a GPD by its parameters and different geometrical properties of its Fisher information matrix. In our statistical analysis we use eye tracker measurements in a database with 15 observers viewing 1003 images under free-viewing conditions. We use Matlab functions with their standard parameter settings and show that a naive Bayes classifier using the eigenvalues of the Fisher information matrix provides a high classification rate identifying the 15 observers in the database.

  20. Slant plane CSAR processing using Householder transform.

    PubMed

    Burki, Jehanzeb; Barnes, Christopher F

    2008-10-01

    Fourier analysis-based focusing of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data collected during circular flight path is a recent advancement in SAR signal processing. This paper uses the Householder transform to obtain a ground plane circular SAR (CSAR) signal phase history from the slant plane CSAR phase history by inverting the linear shift-varying system model, thereby circumventing the need for explicitly computing a pseudo-inverse. The Householder transform has recently been shown to have improved error bounds and stability as an underdetermined and ill-conditioned system solver, and the Householder transform is computationally efficient.

  1. [Normolipemic plane xanthomas and mycosis fungoides].

    PubMed

    García-Arpa, Mónica; Rodríguez-Vázquez, María; Vera, Elena; Romero, Guillermo; González-García, Jesús; Cortina, Pilar

    2005-06-01

    Diffuse normolipemic plane xanthomas are characterized by the presence of yellowish plaques on the eyelids, neck, upper trunk, buttocks and flexures. Histology shows foamy histiocytes in the dermis. Approximately half of all cases are associated with hematological disorders. On rare occasions, they have been described in the context of cutaneous T-cell lymphomas. We present the case of a female patient with tumor-stage mycosis fungoides who developed normolipemic plane xanthomas coinciding with the appearance of new lymphoma lesions. We review English-language literature regarding the rare association of xanthomas and cutaneous T-cell lymphomas.

  2. Toward loop quantization of plane gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinterleitner, Franz; Major, Seth

    2012-03-01

    The polarized Gowdy model in terms of Ashtekar-Barbero variables is reduced with an additional constraint derived from the Killing equations for plane gravitational waves with parallel rays. The new constraint is formulated in a diffeomorphism invariant manner and, when it is included in the model, the resulting constraint algebra is first class, in contrast to the prior work done in special coordinates. Using an earlier work by Banerjee and Date, the constraints are expressed in terms of classical quantities that have an operator equivalent in loop quantum gravity, making these plane gravitational wave spacetimes accessible to loop quantization techniques.

  3. Orbital plane change maneuver with aerocruise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naidu, D. S.

    1991-01-01

    The synergistic plane change problem connected with orbital transfer employing aeroassist technology, is addressed. The mission involves transfer from high earth orbit to low earth orbit with plane change being performed within the atmosphere. The complete mission consists of a deorbit phase, atmospheric phase, and finally reorbit phase. The atmospheric maneuver is composed of an entry mode, a cruise mode, and finally an exit mode. During the cruise mode, constant altitude and velocity are maintained by means of bank angle control with constant thrust or thrust control with constant bank angle. Comparisons between these two control strategies bring out some interesting features.

  4. Note: A novel integrated microforce measurement system for plane-plane contact research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, W.; Rostoucher, D.; Gauthier, M.

    2010-11-01

    The evaluation of plane-plane contact force has become a big issue in micro-/nano research, for example in microassembly. However with the lack of effective experimental equipments, the research on plane-plane contact has been limited to theoretical formulations or virtual simulation. In this paper, a microforce sensor and precision parallel robot integrated system is proposed for the microforce measurement of plane-plane contact. In the proposed system, the two objects are fixed on the parallel robot end-platform and the microforce sensor probe tip, respectively, and the high precision robot system is employed to provide six degree-of-freedom motions between both objects. So it is convenient for the microforce measurement between the planar objects with different orientations. As a significant application, the proposed system is utilized for measurements of pull-off force between planar objects, in which the validation of the system is demonstrated in practice. The proposed microforce measurement system is generic, which can be extended to a variety of microforce measurements in plane-plane contact.

  5. An analysis of Landsat Thematic Mapper P-Product internal geometry and conformity to earth surface geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, N. A.; Zobrist, A. L.; Walker, R. E.; Gokhman, B.

    1985-01-01

    Performance requirements regarding geometric accuracy have been defined in terms of end product goals, but until recently no precise details have been given concerning the conditions under which that accuracy is to be achieved. In order to achieve higher spatial and spectral resolutions, the Thematic Mapper (TM) sensor was designed to image in both forward and reverse mirror sweeps in two separate focal planes. Both hardware and software have been augmented and changed during the course of the Landsat TM developments to achieve improved geometric accuracy. An investigation has been conducted to determine if the TM meets the National Map Accuracy Standards for geometric accuracy at larger scales. It was found that TM imagery, in terms of geometry, has come close to, and in some cases exceeded, its stringent specifications.

  6. A Superposition Technique for Deriving Photon Scattering Statistics in Plane-Parallel Cloudy Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platnick, S.

    1999-01-01

    Photon transport in a multiple scattering medium is critically dependent on scattering statistics, in particular the average number of scatterings. A superposition technique is derived to accurately determine the average number of scatterings encountered by reflected and transmitted photons within arbitrary layers in plane-parallel, vertically inhomogeneous clouds. As expected, the resulting scattering number profiles are highly dependent on cloud particle absorption and solar/viewing geometry. The technique uses efficient adding and doubling radiative transfer procedures, avoiding traditional time-intensive Monte Carlo methods. Derived superposition formulae are applied to a variety of geometries and cloud models, and selected results are compared with Monte Carlo calculations. Cloud remote sensing techniques that use solar reflectance or transmittance measurements generally assume a homogeneous plane-parallel cloud structure. The scales over which this assumption is relevant, in both the vertical and horizontal, can be obtained from the superposition calculations. Though the emphasis is on photon transport in clouds, the derived technique is applicable to any scattering plane-parallel radiative transfer problem, including arbitrary combinations of cloud, aerosol, and gas layers in the atmosphere.

  7. An improved enhancement layer for octree based point cloud compression with plane projection approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ainala, Khartik; Mekuria, Rufael N.; Khathariya, Birendra; Li, Zhu; Wang, Ye-Kui; Joshi, Rajan

    2016-09-01

    Recent advances in point cloud capture and applications in VR/AR sparked new interests in the point cloud data compression. Point Clouds are often organized and compressed with octree based structures. The octree subdivision sequence is often serialized in a sequence of bytes that are subsequently entropy encoded using range coding, arithmetic coding or other methods. Such octree based algorithms are efficient only up to a certain level of detail as they have an exponential run-time in the number of subdivision levels. In addition, the compression efficiency diminishes when the number of subdivision levels increases. Therefore, in this work we present an alternative enhancement layer to the coarse octree coded point cloud. In this case, the base layer of the point cloud is coded in known octree based fashion, but the higher level of details are coded in a different way in an enhancement layer bit-stream. The enhancement layer coding method takes the distribution of the points into account and projects points to geometric primitives, i.e. planes. It then stores residuals and applies entropy encoding with a learning based technique. The plane projection method is used for both geometry compression and color attribute compression. For color coding the method is used to enable efficient raster scanning of the color attributes on the plane to map them to an image grid. Results show that both improved compression performance and faster run-times are achieved for geometry and color attribute compression in point clouds.

  8. In-plane spin wave modes in permalloy antidot arrays observation and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chengtao; Mankey, Gary

    2005-03-01

    Previously, we have reported demagnetization field induced localized modes[1] in-plane at 35 GHz ferromagnetic resonance, and dipolar-exchange governed lateral standing spin waves out-of-plane at 9.7 GHz in permalloy antidots. Here we present in-plane investigations at 9.7 GHz on various hole arrays (hole diameter 1.5μm; hole lattice 3μm x 3, 4, 5, and 7μm). In addition to the two main localized modes, which arise from regions confined by holes along the long axis and short axis (region A and B, respectively), spin wave manifolds pertinent to each peak are identified. Owing to the confinement imposed by the holes as well as the demagnetization field, region A and B exhibit distinct resonance geometry. For instance, for field along short axis, region A and B are in Damon-Esbach and magnetostatic backward volume mode geometry respectively, with the spin wave vectors determined by hole separations along long and short axis. This is reversed with field along long axis. The dispersion of the observed spin waves is analyzed accordingly. Supported by US DOE FG02-86ER45281 (MU) and NSF DMR-0213985 (UA). ^1Chengtao Yu, Michael J. Pechan, G. J. Mankey, Appl. Phys. Lett. 83, 3948 (2003).

  9. A Mathematical Model of Human Semicircular Canal Geometry: A New Basis for Interpreting Vestibular Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Curthoys, Ian S.; Todd, Michael J.; Magnussen, John S.; Taubman, David S.; Aw, Swee T.; Halmagyi, G. Michael

    2009-01-01

    We report a precise, simple, and accessible method of mathematically measuring and modeling the three-dimensional (3D) geometry of semicircular canals (SCCs) in living humans. Knowledge of this geometry helps understand the development and physiology of SCC stimulation. We developed a framework of robust techniques that automatically and accurately reconstruct SCC geometry from computed tomography (CT) images and are directly validated using micro-CT as ground truth. This framework measures the 3D centroid paths of the bony SCCs allowing direct comparison and analysis between ears within and between subjects. An average set of SCC morphology is calculated from 34 human ears, within which other geometrical attributes such as nonplanarity, radius of curvature, and inter-SCC angle are examined, with a focus on physiological implications. These measurements have also been used to critically evaluate plane fitting techniques that reconcile many of the discrepancies in current SCC plane studies. Finally, we mathematically model SCC geometry using Fourier series equations. This work has the potential to reinterpret physiology and pathophysiology in terms of real individual 3D morphology. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10162-009-0195-6) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:19949828

  10. Wake Geometry Measurements and Analytical Calculations on a Small-Scale Rotor Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghee, Terence A.; Berry, John D.; Zori, Laith A. J.; Elliott, Joe W.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel to quantify the rotor wake behind a scale model helicopter rotor in forward level flight at one thrust level. The rotor system in this test consisted of a four-bladed fully articulated hub with blades of rectangular planform and an NACA 0012 airfoil section. A laser light sheet, seeded with propylene glycol smoke, was used to visualize the vortex geometry in the flow in planes parallel and perpendicular to the free-stream flow. Quantitative measurements of wake geometric proper- ties, such as vortex location, vertical skew angle, and vortex particle void radius, were obtained as well as convective velocities for blade tip vortices. Comparisons were made between experimental data and four computational method predictions of experimental tip vortex locations, vortex vertical skew angles, and wake geometries. The results of these comparisons highlight difficulties of accurate wake geometry predictions.

  11. An interactive user-friendly approach to surface-fitting three-dimensional geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheatwood, F. Mcneil; Dejarnette, Fred R.

    1988-01-01

    A surface-fitting technique has been developed which addresses two problems with existing geometry packages: computer storage requirements and the time required of the user for the initial setup of the geometry model. Coordinates of cross sections are fit using segments of general conic sections. The next step is to blend the cross-sectional curve-fits in the longitudinal direction using general conics to fit specific meridional half-planes. Provisions are made to allow the fitting of fuselages and wings so that entire wing-body combinations may be modeled. This report includes the development of the technique along with a User's Guide for the various menus within the program. Results for the modeling of the Space Shuttle and a proposed Aeroassist Flight Experiment geometry are presented.

  12. Three-dimensional temporally resolved measurements of turbulence-flame interactions using orthogonal-plane cinema-stereoscopic PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, Adam Michael; Driscoll, James F.; Ceccio, Steven L.

    2009-09-01

    A new orthogonal-plane cinema-stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (OPCS-PIV) diagnostic has been used to measure the dynamics of three-dimensional turbulence-flame interactions. The diagnostic employed two orthogonal PIV planes, with one aligned perpendicular and one aligned parallel to the streamwise flow direction. In the plane normal to the flow, temporally resolved slices of the nine-component velocity gradient tensor were determined using Taylor’s hypothesis. Volumetric reconstruction of the 3D turbulence was performed using these slices. The PIV plane parallel to the streamwise flow direction was then used to measure the evolution of the turbulence; the path and strength of 3D turbulent structures as they interacted with the flame were determined from their image in this second plane. Structures of both vorticity and strain-rate magnitude were extracted from the flow. The geometry of these structures agreed well with predictions from direct numerical simulations. The interaction of turbulent structures with the flame also was observed. In three dimensions, these interactions had complex geometries that could not be reflected in either planar measurements or simple flame-vortex configurations.

  13. On the geometry of four-qubit invariants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lévay, Péter

    2006-07-01

    The geometry of four-qubit entanglement is investigated. We replace some of the polynomial invariants for four qubits introduced recently by new ones of direct geometrical meaning. It is shown that these invariants describe four points, six lines and four planes in complex projective space CP3. For the generic entanglement class of stochastic local operations and classical communication they take a very simple form related to the elementary symmetric polynomials in four complex variables. Moreover, suitable powers of their magnitudes are entanglement monotones that fit nicely into the geometric set of n-qubit ones related to Grassmannians of l-planes found recently. We also show that in terms of these invariants the hyperdeterminant of order 24 in the four-qubit amplitudes takes a more instructive form than the previously published expressions available in the literature. Finally, in order to understand two-, three- and four-qubit entanglement in geometric terms we propose a unified setting based on CP3 furnished with a fixed quadric.

  14. Axisymmetric curvature-driven instability in a model divertor geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, W. A.; Ryutov, D. D.

    2013-09-15

    A model problem is presented which qualitatively describes a pressure-driven instability which can occur near the null-point in the divertor region of a tokamak where the poloidal field becomes small. The model problem is described by a horizontal slot with a vertical magnetic field which plays the role of the poloidal field. Line-tying boundary conditions are applied at the planes defining the slot. A toroidal field lying parallel to the planes is assumed to be very strong, thereby constraining the possible structure of the perturbations. Axisymmetric perturbations which leave the toroidal field unperturbed are analyzed. Ideal magnetohydrodynamics is used, and the instability threshold is determined by the energy principle. Because of the boundary conditions, the Euler equation is, in general, non-separable except at marginal stability. This problem may be useful in understanding the source of heat transport into the private flux region in a snowflake divertor which possesses a large region of small poloidal field, and for code benchmarking as it yields simple analytic results in an interesting geometry.

  15. A magnetic method for determining the geometry of hydraulic fractures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byerlee, J.D.; Johnston, M.J.S.

    1976-01-01

    We propose a method that may be used to determine the spatial orientation of the fracture plane developed during hydraulic fracture. In the method, magnetic particles are injected into the crack with the fracturing fluid so as to generate a sheet of magnetized material. Since the magnetization of a body with extreme dimension ratios, such as a crack, exceeds that of an equidimensional body and since this magnetization is sensitive both to orientation and geometry, this could be used to obtain information about the crack. By measuring the vertical and horizontal components of the magnetic field and field gradients at the earth's surface surrounding the injection well with superconducting magnetometers having 10-4 gamma sensitivity and also by measuring field direction within the well itself, it should be possible to calculate the orientation and perhaps infer the approximate geometry of the fracture surface. Experiments on electric field potential operated in conjunction with this experiment could further constrain estimates of shape and orientation. ?? 1976 Birkha??user Verlag.

  16. PREFACE: Water in confined geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovere, Mauro

    2004-11-01

    The study of water confined in complex systems in solid or gel phases and/or in contact with macromolecules is relevant to many important processes ranging from industrial applications such as catalysis and soil chemistry, to biological processes such as protein folding or ionic transport in membranes. Thermodynamics, phase behaviour and the molecular mobility of water have been observed to change upon confinement depending on the properties of the substrate. In particular, polar substrates perturb the hydrogen bond network of water, inducing large changes in the properties upon freezing. Understanding how the connected random hydrogen bond network of bulk water is modified when water is confined in small cavities inside a substrate material is very important for studies of stability and the enzymatic activity of proteins, oil recovery or heterogeneous catalysis, where water-substrate interactions play a fundamental role. The modifications of the short-range order in the liquid depend on the nature of the water-substrate interaction, hydrophilic or hydrophobic, as well as on its spatial range and on the geometry of the substrate. Despite extensive study, both experimentally and by computer simulation, there remain a number of open problems. In the many experimental studies of confined water, those performed on water in Vycor are of particular interest for computer simulation and theoretical studies since Vycor is a porous silica glass characterized by a quite sharp distribution of pore sizes and a strong capability to absorb water. It can be considered as a good candidate for studying the general behaviour of water in hydrophilic nanopores. But there there have been a number of studies of water confined in more complex substrates, where the interpretation of experiments and computer simulation is more difficult, such as in zeolites or in aerogels or in contact with membranes. Of the many problems to consider we can mention the study of supercooled water. It is

  17. Quantum groups: Geometry and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Chong -Sun

    1996-05-13

    The main theme of this thesis is a study of the geometry of quantum groups and quantum spaces, with the hope that they will be useful for the construction of quantum field theory with quantum group symmetry. The main tool used is the Faddeev-Reshetikhin-Takhtajan description of quantum groups. A few content-rich examples of quantum complex spaces with quantum group symmetry are treated in details. In chapter 1, the author reviews some of the basic concepts and notions for Hopf algebras and other background materials. In chapter 2, he studies the vector fields of quantum groups. A compact realization of these vector fields as pseudodifferential operators acting on the linear quantum spaces is given. In chapter 3, he describes the quantum sphere as a complex quantum manifold by means of a quantum stereographic projection. A covariant calculus is introduced. An interesting property of this calculus is the existence of a one-form realization of the exterior differential operator. The concept of a braided comodule is introduced and a braided algebra of quantum spheres is constructed. In chapter 4, the author considers the more general higher dimensional quantum complex projective spaces and the quantum Grassman manifolds. Differential calculus, integration and braiding can be introduced as in the one dimensional case. Finally, in chapter 5, he studies the framework of quantum principal bundle and construct the q-deformed Dirac monopole as a quantum principal bundle with a quantum sphere as the base and a U(1) with non-commutative calculus as the fiber. The first Chern class can be introduced and integrated to give the monopole charge.

  18. Analytical form of current-voltage characteristic of parallel-plane, cylindrical and spherical ionization chambers with homogeneous ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoyanov, D. G.

    2007-11-01

    The elementary processes taking place in the formation of charged particles and their flow in parallel-plane, cylindrical and spherical geometry cases of ionization chamber are considered. On the basis of particles and charges balance a differential equation describing the distribution of current densities in the ionization chamber volume is obtained. As a result of the differential equation solution an analytical form of the current-voltage characteristic of an ionization chamber with homogeneous ionization is obtained. For the parallel-plane case comparision with experimental data is performed.

  19. In plane oscillation of a bifilar pendulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinrichsen, Peter F.

    2016-11-01

    The line tensions, the horizontal and vertical accelerations as well as the period of large angle oscillations parallel to the plane of a bifilar suspension are presented and have been experimentally investigated using strain gauges and a smart phone. This system has a number of advantages over the simple pendulum for studying large angle oscillations, and for measuring the acceleration due to gravity.

  20. MTI Focal Plane Assembly Design and Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, M.; Rienstra, J.L.

    1999-06-17

    The focal plane assembly for the Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) consists of sensor chip assemblies, optical filters, and a vacuum enclosure. Sensor chip assemblies, composed of linear detector arrays and readout integrated circuits, provide spatial resolution in the cross-track direction for the pushbroom imager. Optical filters define 15 spectral bands in a range from 0.45 {micro}m to 10.7 {micro}m. All the detector arrays are mounted on a single focal plane and are designed to operate at 75 K. Three pairs of sensor chip assemblies (SCAs) are required to provide cross-track coverage in all 15 spectral bands. Each pair of SCAs includes detector arrays made from silicon, iridium antimonide, and mercury cadmium telluride. Read out integrated circuits multiplex the signals from the detectors to 18 separate video channels. Optical filter assemblies defining the spectral bands are mounted over the linear detector arrays. Each filter assembly consists of several filter strips bonded together side-by-side. The MTI focal plane assembly has been integrated with the rest of the payload and has undergone detailed testing and calibration. This paper includes representative test data for the various spectral bands and the overall performance of the focal plane assembly.

  1. Plane Smoothers for Multiblock Grids: Computational Aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Llorente, Ignacio M.; Diskin, Boris; Melson, N. Duane

    1999-01-01

    Standard multigrid methods are not well suited for problems with anisotropic discrete operators, which can occur, for example, on grids that are stretched in order to resolve a boundary layer. One of the most efficient approaches to yield robust methods is the combination of standard coarsening with alternating-direction plane relaxation in the three dimensions. However, this approach may be difficult to implement in codes with multiblock structured grids because there may be no natural definition of global lines or planes. This inherent obstacle limits the range of an implicit smoother to only the portion of the computational domain in the current block. This report studies in detail, both numerically and analytically, the behavior of blockwise plane smoothers in order to provide guidance to engineers who use block-structured grids. The results obtained so far show alternating-direction plane smoothers to be very robust, even on multiblock grids. In common computational fluid dynamics multiblock simulations, where the number of subdomains crossed by the line of a strong anisotropy is low (up to four), textbook multigrid convergence rates can be obtained with a small overlap of cells between neighboring blocks.

  2. Deep-Plane Lipoabdominoplasty in East Asians

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jun-Young; Hong, Yoon Gi; Sim, Hyung Bo; Sun, Sang Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to develop a new surgical technique by combining traditional abdominoplasty with liposuction. This combination of operations permits simpler and more accurate management of various abdominal deformities. In lipoabdominoplasty, the combination of techniques is of paramount concern. Herein, we introduce a new combination of liposuction and abdominoplasty using deep-plane flap sliding to maximize the benefits of both techniques. Methods Deep-plane lipoabdominoplasty was performed in 143 patients between January 2007 and May 2014. We applied extensive liposuction on the entire abdomen followed by a sliding flap through the deep plane after repairing the diastasis recti. The abdominal wound closure was completed with repair of Scarpa's fascia. Results The average amount of liposuction aspirate was 1,400 mL (700–3,100 mL), and the size of the average excised skin ellipse was 21.78×12.81 cm (from 15×10 to 25×15 cm). There were no major complications such as deep-vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism. We encountered 22 cases of minor complications: one wound infection, one case of skin necrosis, two cases of undercorrection, nine hypertrophic scars, and nine seromas. These complications were solved by conservative management or simple revision. Conclusions The use of deep-plane lipoabdominoplasty can correct abdominal deformities more effectively and with fewer complications than traditional abdominoplasty. PMID:27462568

  3. Microscale out-of-plane anemometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Chang (Inventor); Chen, Jack (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A microscale out-of-plane thermal sensor. A resistive heater is suspended over a substrate by supports raised with respect to the substrate to provide a clearance underneath the resistive heater for fluid flow. A preferred fabrication process for the thermal sensor uses surface micromachining and a three-dimensional assembly to raise the supports and lift the resistive heater over the substrate.

  4. End Site Control Plane Subsystem (ESCPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Swany, Douglas Martin

    2014-08-12

    This project researched extending the control plane for dynamic networks into end sites like campuses and laboratories. Key aspects of consideration were signaling over local area network technologies, application integration and monitoring. We studied design considerations for such environments and developed and demonstrated a useful proof of concept implementation and documented implementation strategies for heterogeneous networks.

  5. Optical interconnections to focal plane arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Rienstra, J.L.; Hinckley, M.K.

    2000-11-01

    The authors have successfully demonstrated an optical data interconnection from the output of a focal plane array to the downstream data acquisition electronics. The demonstrated approach included a continuous wave laser beam directed at a multiple quantum well reflectance modulator connected to the focal plane array analog output. The output waveform from the optical interconnect was observed on an oscilloscope to be a replica of the input signal. They fed the output of the optical data link to the same data acquisition system used to characterize focal plane array performance. Measurements of the signal to noise ratio at the input and output of the optical interconnection showed that the signal to noise ratio was reduced by a factor of 10 or more. Analysis of the noise and link gain showed that the primary contributors to the additional noise were laser intensity noise and photodetector receiver noise. Subsequent efforts should be able to reduce these noise sources considerably and should result in substantially improved signal to noise performance. They also observed significant photocurrent generation in the reflectance modulator that imposes a current load on the focal plane array output amplifier. This current loading is an issue with the demonstrated approach because it tends to negate the power saving feature of the reflectance modulator interconnection concept.

  6. Dual band QWIP focal plane array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor); Choi, Kwong Kit (Inventor); Bandara, Sumith V. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) that provides two-color image sensing. Two different quantum wells are configured to absorb two different wavelengths. The QWIPs are arrayed in a focal plane array (FPA). The two-color QWIPs are selected for readout by selective electrical contact with the two different QWIPs or by the use of two different wavelength sensitive gratings.

  7. Simple Harmonic Motion in Harmonic Plane Waves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benumof, Reuben

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the distribution of kinetic and potential energy in transverse and longitudinal waves and examines the transmission of power and momentum. This discussion is intended to aid in understanding the simple harmonic motion of a particle involved in the propagation of a harmonic mechanical plane wave. (HM)

  8. A geometric calibration method for inverse geometry computed tomography using P-matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slagowski, Jordan M.; Dunkerley, David A. P.; Hatt, Charles R.; Speidel, Michael A.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate and artifact free reconstruction of tomographic images requires precise knowledge of the imaging system geometry. This work proposes a novel projection matrix (P-matrix) based calibration method to enable C-arm inverse geometry CT (IGCT). The method is evaluated for scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX), a C-arm mounted inverse geometry fluoroscopic technology. A helical configuration of fiducials is imaged at each gantry angle in a rotational acquisition. For each gantry angle, digital tomosynthesis is performed at multiple planes and a composite image analogous to a cone-beam projection is generated from the plane stack. The geometry of the C-arm, source array, and detector array is determined at each angle by constructing a parameterized 3D-to-2D projection matrix that minimizes the sum-of-squared deviations between measured and projected fiducial coordinates. Simulations were used to evaluate calibration performance with translations and rotations of the source and detector. In a geometry with 1 mm translation of the central ray relative to the axis-of-rotation and 1 degree yaw of the detector and source arrays, the maximum error in the recovered translational parameters was 0.4 mm and maximum error in the rotation parameter was 0.02 degrees. The relative rootmean- square error in a reconstruction of a numerical thorax phantom was 0.4% using the calibration method, versus 7.7% without calibration. Changes in source-detector-distance were the most challenging to estimate. Reconstruction of experimental SBDX data using the proposed method eliminated double contour artifacts present in a non-calibrated reconstruction. The proposed IGCT geometric calibration method reduces image artifacts when uncertainties exist in system geometry.

  9. A geometric calibration method for inverse geometry computed tomography using P-matrices.

    PubMed

    Slagowski, Jordan M; Dunkerley, David A P; Hatt, Charles R; Speidel, Michael A

    2016-02-27

    Accurate and artifact free reconstruction of tomographic images requires precise knowledge of the imaging system geometry. This work proposes a novel projection matrix (P-matrix) based calibration method to enable C-arm inverse geometry CT (IGCT). The method is evaluated for scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX), a C-arm mounted inverse geometry fluoroscopic technology. A helical configuration of fiducials is imaged at each gantry angle in a rotational acquisition. For each gantry angle, digital tomosynthesis is performed at multiple planes and a composite image analogous to a cone-beam projection is generated from the plane stack. The geometry of the C-arm, source array, and detector array is determined at each angle by constructing a parameterized 3D-to-2D projection matrix that minimizes the sum-of-squared deviations between measured and projected fiducial coordinates. Simulations were used to evaluate calibration performance with translations and rotations of the source and detector. In a geometry with 1 mm translation of the central ray relative to the axis-of-rotation and 1 degree yaw of the detector and source arrays, the maximum error in the recovered translational parameters was 0.4 mm and maximum error in the rotation parameter was 0.02 degrees. The relative root-mean-square error in a reconstruction of a numerical thorax phantom was 0.4% using the calibration method, versus 7.7% without calibration. Changes in source-detector-distance were the most challenging to estimate. Reconstruction of experimental SBDX data using the proposed method eliminated double contour artifacts present in a non-calibrated reconstruction. The proposed IGCT geometric calibration method reduces image artifacts when uncertainties exist in system geometry.

  10. A geometric calibration method for inverse geometry computed tomography using P-matrices

    PubMed Central

    Slagowski, Jordan M.; Dunkerley, David A. P.; Hatt, Charles R.; Speidel, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and artifact free reconstruction of tomographic images requires precise knowledge of the imaging system geometry. This work proposes a novel projection matrix (P-matrix) based calibration method to enable C-arm inverse geometry CT (IGCT). The method is evaluated for scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX), a C-arm mounted inverse geometry fluoroscopic technology. A helical configuration of fiducials is imaged at each gantry angle in a rotational acquisition. For each gantry angle, digital tomosynthesis is performed at multiple planes and a composite image analogous to a cone-beam projection is generated from the plane stack. The geometry of the C-arm, source array, and detector array is determined at each angle by constructing a parameterized 3D-to-2D projection matrix that minimizes the sum-of-squared deviations between measured and projected fiducial coordinates. Simulations were used to evaluate calibration performance with translations and rotations of the source and detector. In a geometry with 1 mm translation of the central ray relative to the axis-of-rotation and 1 degree yaw of the detector and source arrays, the maximum error in the recovered translational parameters was 0.4 mm and maximum error in the rotation parameter was 0.02 degrees. The relative root-mean-square error in a reconstruction of a numerical thorax phantom was 0.4% using the calibration method, versus 7.7% without calibration. Changes in source-detector-distance were the most challenging to estimate. Reconstruction of experimental SBDX data using the proposed method eliminated double contour artifacts present in a non-calibrated reconstruction. The proposed IGCT geometric calibration method reduces image artifacts when uncertainties exist in system geometry. PMID:27375313

  11. Orientation Maps in V1 and Non-Euclidean Geometry.

    PubMed

    Afgoustidis, Alexandre

    2015-12-01

    In the primary visual cortex, the processing of information uses the distribution of orientations in the visual input: neurons react to some orientations in the stimulus more than to others. In many species, orientation preference is mapped in a remarkable way on the cortical surface, and this organization of the neural population seems to be important for visual processing. Now, existing models for the geometry and development of orientation preference maps in higher mammals make a crucial use of symmetry considerations. In this paper, we consider probabilistic models for V1 maps from the point of view of group theory; we focus on Gaussian random fields with symmetry properties and review the probabilistic arguments that allow one to estimate pinwheel densities and predict the observed value of π. Then, in order to test the relevance of general symmetry arguments and to introduce methods which could be of use in modeling curved regions, we reconsider this model in the light of group representation theory, the canonical mathematics of symmetry. We show that through the Plancherel decomposition of the space of complex-valued maps on the Euclidean plane, each infinite-dimensional irreducible unitary representation of the special Euclidean group yields a unique V1-like map, and we use representation theory as a symmetry-based toolbox to build orientation maps adapted to the most famous non-Euclidean geometries, viz. spherical and hyperbolic geometry. We find that most of the dominant traits of V1 maps are preserved in these; we also study the link between symmetry and the statistics of singularities in orientation maps, and show what the striking quantitative characteristics observed in animals become in our curved models.

  12. A transient, quadratic nodal method for triangular-Z geometry

    SciTech Connect

    DeLorey, T.F.

    1993-06-01

    Many systematically-derived nodal methods have been developed for Cartesian geometry due to the extensive interest in Light Water Reactors. These methods typically model the transverse-integrated flux as either an analytic or low order polynomial function of position within the node. Recently, quadratic nodal methods have been developed for R-Z and hexagonal geometry. A static and transient quadratic nodal method is developed for triangular-Z geometry. This development is particularly challenging because the quadratic expansion in each node must be performed between the node faces and the triangular points. As a consequence, in the 2-D plane, the flux and current at the points of the triangles must be treated. Quadratic nodal equations are solved using a non-linear iteration scheme, which utilizes the corrected, mesh-centered finite difference equations, and forces these equations to match the quadratic equations by computing discontinuity factors during the solution. Transient nodal equations are solved using the improved quasi-static method, which has been shown to be a very efficient solution method for transient problems. Several static problems are used to compare the quadratic nodal method to the Coarse Mesh Finite Difference (CMFD) method. The quadratic method is shown to give more accurate node-averaged fluxes. However, it appears that the method has difficulty predicting node leakages near reactor boundaries and severe material interfaces. The consequence is that the eigenvalue may be poorly predicted for certain reactor configurations. The transient methods are tested using a simple analytic test problem, a heterogeneous heavy water reactor benchmark problem, and three thermal hydraulic test problems. Results indicate that the transient methods have been implemented correctly.

  13. Geometry and earthquake potential of the shoreline fault, central California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hardebeck, Jeanne L.

    2013-01-01

    The Shoreline fault is a vertical strike‐slip fault running along the coastline near San Luis Obispo, California. Much is unknown about the Shoreline fault, including its slip rate and the details of its geometry. Here, I study the geometry of the Shoreline fault at seismogenic depth, as well as the adjacent section of the offshore Hosgri fault, using seismicity relocations and earthquake focal mechanisms. The Optimal Anisotropic Dynamic Clustering (OADC) algorithm (Ouillon et al., 2008) is used to objectively identify the simplest planar fault geometry that fits all of the earthquakes to within their location uncertainty. The OADC results show that the Shoreline fault is a single continuous structure that connects to the Hosgri fault. Discontinuities smaller than about 1 km may be undetected, but would be too small to be barriers to earthquake rupture. The Hosgri fault dips steeply to the east, while the Shoreline fault is essentially vertical, so the Hosgri fault dips towards and under the Shoreline fault as the two faults approach their intersection. The focal mechanisms generally agree with pure right‐lateral strike‐slip on the OADC planes, but suggest a non‐planar Hosgri fault or another structure underlying the northern Shoreline fault. The Shoreline fault most likely transfers strike‐slip motion between the Hosgri fault and other faults of the Pacific–North America plate boundary system to the east. A hypothetical earthquake rupturing the entire known length of the Shoreline fault would have a moment magnitude of 6.4–6.8. A hypothetical earthquake rupturing the Shoreline fault and the section of the Hosgri fault north of the Hosgri–Shoreline junction would have a moment magnitude of 7.2–7.5.

  14. The slab geometry laser. I - Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggleston, J. M.; Kane, T. J.; Kuhn, K.; Byer, R. L.; Unternahrer, J.

    1984-01-01

    Slab geometry solid-state lasers offer significant performance improvements over conventional rod-geometry lasers. A detailed theoretical description of the thermal, stress, and beam-propagation characteristics of a slab laser is presented. The analysis includes consideration of the effects of the zig-zag optical path, which eliminates thermal and stress focusing and reduces residual birefringence.

  15. Reflection: Its Concepts and Applications in Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Man, Yiu Kwong

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the basic concepts of reflection and its related concepts in optics. It aims at providing examples on how to apply the principle of reflection in geometry. Explorations of the concepts involved via dynamic geometry software are also included.

  16. Geometry and Education in the Internet Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kortenkamp, Ulrich H.; Richter-Gebert, Jurgen

    This paper discusses the requirements of Interactive Geometry Systems (IGSs) and how they can be fulfilled, explains how a geometry tool can benefit from the Internet, and presents Cinderella's Cafe. Cinderella's Cafe is a new IGS with a high mathematical background that uses the most general mathematical models whenever possible, is highly…

  17. Visual and Analytic Strategies in Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kospentaris, George; Vosniadou, Stella; Kazic, Smaragda; Thanou, Emilian

    2016-01-01

    We argue that there is an increasing reliance on analytic strategies compared to visuospatial strategies, which is related to geometry expertise and not on individual differences in cognitive style. A Visual/Analytic Strategy Test (VAST) was developed to investigate the use of visuo-spatial and analytic strategies in geometry in 30 mathematics…

  18. Exact geometries from quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremer, Dieter; Kraka, Elfi; He, Yuan

    2001-06-01

    For seventeen molecules, complete basis set (CBS) geometries are obtained for Møller-Plesset perturbation methods at second (MP2), fourth (MP4), and sixth order (MP6) as well as for the Coupled Cluster methods CCD, CCSD, and CCSD( T). The correlation consistent basis sets cc-pVDZ, cc-pVTZ, and cc-pVQZ were systematically applied and calculated geometries extrapolated to the limit of an infinitely large basis set. MP6 equilibrium geometries are more accurate than MP2 or MP4 geometries at the CBS limit and provide AH bond lengths with an accuracy of 0.001 Å. However, AB bonds are always predicted too long because of the lack of sufficient coupling effects between p-electron correlation at MP6. CCSD( T) provides reasonable AB bond lengths although these are in general too short by 0.003 Å. Due to error cancellation very accurate geometries are obtained at the CCSD( T)/cc-pVTZ and CCSD( T)/cc-pVQZ level of theory. With the help of the accurate equilibrium geometries obtained in this work, several experimentally based geometries could be corrected. The effects of HF-optimized basis sets, diffuse functions or the frozen core approximation on geometry optimizations are discussed. It is emphasized that the use of the cc-pVDZ or any other VDZ+P basis set should be avoided in correlation corrected ab initio calculations.

  19. Fractal Geometry in Elementary School Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vacc, Nancy Nesbitt

    1992-01-01

    Reports a case study to evaluate whether basic concepts of fractal geometry are teachable to elementary school children and to determine the effectiveness of having an elementary school student present a lesson to inservice and preservice teachers. Concludes that simple concepts of fractal geometry appear appropriate for the elementary school…

  20. Computing Bisectors in a Dynamic Geometry Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botana, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    In this note, an approach combining dynamic geometry and automated deduction techniques is used to study the bisectors between points and curves. Usual teacher constructions for bisectors are discussed, showing that inherent limitations in dynamic geometry software impede their thorough study. We show that the interactive sketching of bisectors…

  1. An approach for management of geometry data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dube, R. P.; Herron, G. J.; Schweitzer, J. E.; Warkentine, E. R.

    1980-01-01

    The strategies for managing Integrated Programs for Aerospace Design (IPAD) computer-based geometry are described. The computer model of geometry is the basis for communication, manipulation, and analysis of shape information. IPAD's data base system makes this information available to all authorized departments in a company. A discussion of the data structures and algorithms required to support geometry in IPIP (IPAD's data base management system) is presented. Through the use of IPIP's data definition language, the structure of the geometry components is defined. The data manipulation language is the vehicle by which a user defines an instance of the geometry. The manipulation language also allows a user to edit, query, and manage the geometry. The selection of canonical forms is a very important part of the IPAD geometry. IPAD has a canonical form for each entity and provides transformations to alternate forms; in particular, IPAD will provide a transformation to the ANSI standard. The DBMS schemas required to support IPAD geometry are explained.

  2. Reasoning by Contradiction in Dynamic Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baccaglini-Frank, Anna; Antonini, Samuele; Leung, Allen; Mariotti, Maria Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses contributions that dynamic geometry systems (DGSs) may give in reasoning by contradiction in geometry. We present analyses of three excerpts of students' work and use the notion of pseudo object, elaborated from previous research, to show some specificities of DGS in constructing proof by contradiction. In particular, we…

  3. A Multivariate Model of Achievement in Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, MarLynn; Taasoobshirazi, Gita; Carr, Martha

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that several key variables influence student achievement in geometry, but no research has been conducted to determine how these variables interact. A model of achievement in geometry was tested on a sample of 102 high school students. Structural equation modeling was used to test hypothesized relationships among…

  4. Making Euclidean Geometry Compulsory: Are We Prepared?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Putten, Sonja; Howie, Sarah; Stols, Gerrit

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the attitude towards, as well as the level of understanding of Euclidean geometry in pre-service mathematics education (PME) students. In order to do so, a case study was undertaken within which a one group pre-post-test procedure was conducted around a geometry module, and a representative group of students was interviewed…

  5. Teaching Geometry to Visually Impaired Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard, Christine K.; Lamb, John H.

    2012-01-01

    NCTM (2000) described geometry as "a means of describing, analyzing, and understanding the world and seeing beauty in its structures" (p. 309). Dossey et al. (2002) captured the essence of this aspect of visualization by stating that geometry fosters in students an ability to "visualize and mentally manipulate geometric objects." (p. 200).…

  6. Historical Digressions in Greek Geometry Lessons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomaidis, Yannis

    1991-01-01

    Presents an attempt to combine the history of mathematics of ancient Greece with the course on theoretical geometry taught in Greek secondary schools. Three sections present the history of ancient Greek geometry, geometrical constructions using straightedges and compasses, and an application of Ptolemy's theorem in solving ancient astronomy…

  7. Topics in sub-Riemannian geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrachev, A. A.

    2016-12-01

    Sub-Riemannian geometry is the geometry of spaces with non-holonomic constraints. This paper presents an informal survey of some topics in this area, starting with the construction of geodesic curves and ending with a recent definition of curvature. Bibliography: 28 titles.

  8. Improving African American Achievement in Geometry Honors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mims, Adrian B.

    2010-01-01

    This case study evaluated the significance of implementing an enrichment mathematics course during the summer to rising African American ninth graders entitled, "Geometry Honors Preview." In the past, 60 to 70 percent of African American students in this school district had withdrawn from Geometry Honors by the second academic quarter. This study…

  9. Stop Teaching and Let Students Learn Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosse, Michael J.; Adu-Gyamfi, Kwaku

    2011-01-01

    For many high school students as well as preservice teachers, geometry can be difficult to learn without experiences that allow them to build their own understanding. The authors' approach to geometry instruction--with its integration of content, multiple representations, real-world examples, reading and writing, communication and collaboration as…

  10. Out-of-plane magnetized cone-shaped magnetic nanoshells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, D. K.; Günther, S.; Fritzsche, M.; Lenz, K.; Varvaro, G.; Laureti, S.; Makarov, D.; Mücklich, A.; Facsko, S.; Albrecht, M.; Fassbender, J.

    2017-03-01

    The geometry of a magnetic nano-object, namely its shape and dimensions determines the complex electromagnetic responses. Here, we address the geometry-induced changes of the magnetic properties of thin ferromagnetic Co/Pd multilayers with out-of-plane magnetic anisotropy deposited on three-dimensionally curved templates. For this purpose, arrays of self-assembled cone-shaped nano-objects with a chracteristic size of either 30 or 70 nm were created in GaSb(0 0 1) by the ion erosion technique. The templates are designed in the way that the shape of the cone remains the same for all the samples; namely, we keep the opening angle at about 55° by adjusting the ratio between the cone height and its base diameter to be about 1. In this case, we are able to address the impact of the linear dimensions of the object on the magnetic properties and exclude the impact of the shape from the consideration. The deposition of 15 nm thick Co/Pd multilayers on top of the cone templates results in the formation of a close-packed array of 2D magnetic cone-shaped shells. Integral angle-dependent magnetometry measurements demonstrate that the local curvature results in the spread of the easy axes of magnetization following the shape of the nanocones independent of the linear dimensions of the cones. At the same time different local magnetic domain patterns are observed for samples prepared on 30 and 70 nm large cones. When the thickness of the magnetic shell is only half of the linear dimension of a cone, a clear multidomain state is observed. Remarkably, we find that the neighboring magnetic cone-shaped shells are exchange decoupled when the linear dimension of a cone is four times larger compared to the thickness of the magnetic shell. These findings are relevant for the further development of tilted bit patterned magnetic recording media as well as for the emergent field of magnetism in curved geometries.

  11. FINAL REPORT: GEOMETRY AND ELEMENTARY PARTICLE PHYSICS

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, Isadore M.

    2008-03-04

    The effect on mathematics of collaborations between high-energy theoretical physics and modern mathematics has been remarkable. Mirror symmetry has revolutionized enumerative geometry, and Seiberg-Witten invariants have greatly simplified the study of four manifolds. And because of their application to string theory, physicists now need to know cohomology theory, characteristic classes, index theory, K-theory, algebraic geometry, differential geometry, and non-commutative geometry. Much more is coming. We are experiencing a deeper contact between the two sciences, which will stimulate new mathematics essential to the physicists’ quest for the unification of quantum mechanics and relativity. Our grant, supported by the Department of Energy for twelve years, has been instrumental in promoting an effective interaction between geometry and string theory, by supporting the Mathematical Physics seminar, postdoc research, collaborations, graduate students and several research papers.

  12. Determining the Ice-binding Planes of Antifreeze Proteins by Fluorescence-based Ice Plane Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Koli; Garnham, Christopher P.; Nishimiya, Yoshiyuki; Tsuda, Sakae; Braslavsky, Ido; Davies, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are expressed in a variety of cold-hardy organisms to prevent or slow internal ice growth. AFPs bind to specific planes of ice through their ice-binding surfaces. Fluorescence-based ice plane affinity (FIPA) analysis is a modified technique used to determine the ice planes to which the AFPs bind. FIPA is based on the original ice-etching method for determining AFP-bound ice-planes. It produces clearer images in a shortened experimental time. In FIPA analysis, AFPs are fluorescently labeled with a chimeric tag or a covalent dye then slowly incorporated into a macroscopic single ice crystal, which has been preformed into a hemisphere and oriented to determine the a- and c-axes. The AFP-bound ice hemisphere is imaged under UV light to visualize AFP-bound planes using filters to block out nonspecific light. Fluorescent labeling of the AFPs allows real-time monitoring of AFP adsorption into ice. The labels have been found not to influence the planes to which AFPs bind. FIPA analysis also introduces the option to bind more than one differently tagged AFP on the same single ice crystal to help differentiate their binding planes. These applications of FIPA are helping to advance our understanding of how AFPs bind to ice to halt its growth and why many AFP-producing organisms express multiple AFP isoforms. PMID:24457629

  13. Drawing Dynamic Geometry Figures Online with Natural Language for Junior High School Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Wing-Kwong; Yin, Sheng-Kai; Yang, Chang-Zhe

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a tool for drawing dynamic geometric figures by understanding the texts of geometry problems. With the tool, teachers and students can construct dynamic geometric figures on a web page by inputting a geometry problem in natural language. First we need to build the knowledge base for understanding geometry problems. With the…

  14. Geometry-Related Children's Literature Improves the Geometry Achievement and Attitudes of Second-Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAndrew, Erica M.; Morris, Wendy L.; Fennell, Francis

    2017-01-01

    Use of mathematics-related literature can engage students' interest and increase their understanding of mathematical concepts. A quasi-experimental study of two second-grade classrooms assessed whether daily inclusion of geometry-related literature in the classroom improved attitudes toward geometry and achievement in geometry. Consistent with the…

  15. Visuospatial Working Memory in Intuitive Geometry, and in Academic Achievement in Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giofre, David; Mammarella, Irene C.; Ronconi, Lucia; Cornoldi, Cesare

    2013-01-01

    A study was conducted on the involvement of visuospatial working memory (VSWM) in intuitive geometry and in school performance in geometry at secondary school. A total of 166 pupils were administered: (1) six VSWM tasks, comprising simple storage and complex span tasks; and (2) the intuitive geometry task devised by Dehaene, Izard, Pica, and…

  16. Integrated focal-plane array /IFPA/ approach to large-area infrared focal plane architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    A modular approach to IFPA design is presented which makes it possible to obtain a high-density infrared focal plane amendable to parallel manufacturing techniques as well as to serial plane integration and test. The percent fill factor of the design is dependent on the dimension of the individual detectors; each submodule is manufactured from identical components. The technologies including cables, interconnects, multilayer interconnect structures, and subassembly test requirements, which have direct application to scanning as well as staring integrated focal plane arrays, are discussed.

  17. Dissipative N-point-vortex Models in the Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shashikanth, Banavara N.

    2010-02-01

    A method is presented for constructing point vortex models in the plane that dissipate the Hamiltonian function at any prescribed rate and yet conserve the level sets of the invariants of the Hamiltonian model arising from the SE (2) symmetries. The method is purely geometric in that it uses the level sets of the Hamiltonian and the invariants to construct the dissipative field and is based on elementary classical geometry in ℝ3. Extension to higher-dimensional spaces, such as the point vortex phase space, is done using exterior algebra. The method is in fact general enough to apply to any smooth finite-dimensional system with conserved quantities, and, for certain special cases, the dissipative vector field constructed can be associated with an appropriately defined double Nambu-Poisson bracket. The most interesting feature of this method is that it allows for an infinite sequence of such dissipative vector fields to be constructed by repeated application of a symmetric linear operator (matrix) at each point of the intersection of the level sets.

  18. Effects of Geometry on Turbulent Rayleigh-Benard Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hao

    A systematic study of turbulent thermal convection is carried out in horizontal cylindrical cells of different lengths filled with water. The aim of the thesis work is to study the geometry effect on the fluid dynamics of the large-scale circulation (LSC) and the scaling laws in turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection. The results obtained in the horizontal cylinders are compared with those obtained in the upright cylinders. The large-scale flow shows interesting new dynamics in the horizontal cylindrical cells. Four different flow modes are found in the cells with varying aspect ratio Gamma: two-dimensional rotation (2DR), small-Gamma diagonal switching (SDS), large-Gamma diagonal switching (LDS) and periodic reversals (PR). In the 2DR phase (Gamma ≤ 0.16), the flow is quasi-two-dimensional and is confined in the circular plane of the horizontal cylinder. In this phase, a well-defined in-plane oscillation of LSC is observed, resulting from the periodical eruption of thermal plumes from the top and bottom thermal boundary layers. In the SDS phase (0.16 < Gamma < 0.82), the rotation plane of LSC switches periodically between the two diagonals of the cell, spanning across the curved sidewalls. The switching period is found to be equal to the LSC turnover time. In the LDS phase (0.82 ≤ Gamma ≤ 1.69), the periodic switching of the LSC orientation still remains, but the switching is now spanning across the flat end walls of the cell. The switching period has a large jump at the transition aspect ratio Gammac = 0.82 and then exponentially decays with increasing Gamma. For even larger aspect ratios (1.30 ≤ Gamma ≤ 1.69), the bulk fluid as a whole rotates around the central axis of the horizontal cylinder with periodic reversals. The reversal period is found to change linearly with the length of the cell. The scaling laws of turbulent convection are also investigated in the horizontal cylinders. The scaling behavior of the measured Nusselt number (total heat flux

  19. Stokes flow in ellipsoidal geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vafeas, Panayiotis; Dassios, George

    2006-09-01

    Particle-in-cell models for Stokes flow through a relatively homogeneous swarm of particles are of substantial practical interest, because they provide a relatively simple platform for the analytical or semianalytical solution of heat and mass transport problems. Despite the fact that many practical applications involve relatively small particles (inorganic, organic, biological) with axisymmetric shapes, the general consideration consists of rigid particles of arbitrary shape. The present work is concerned with some interesting aspects of the theoretical analysis of creeping flow in ellipsoidal, hence nonaxisymmetric domains. More specifically, the low Reynolds number flow of a swarm of ellipsoidal particles in an otherwise quiescent Newtonian fluid, that move with constant uniform velocity in an arbitrary direction and rotate with an arbitrary constant angular velocity, is analyzed with an ellipsoid-in-cell model. The solid internal ellipsoid represents a particle of the swarm. The external ellipsoid contains the ellipsoidal particle and the amount of fluid required to match the fluid volume fraction of the swarm. The nonslip flow condition on the surface of the solid ellipsoid is supplemented by the boundary conditions on the external ellipsoidal surface which are similar to those of the sphere-in-cell model of Happel (self-sufficient in mechanical energy). This model requires zero normal velocity component and shear stress. The boundary value problem is solved with the aim of the potential representation theory. In particular, the Papkovich-Neuber complete differential representation of Stokes flow, valid for nonaxisymmetric geometries, is considered here, which provides the velocity and total pressure fields in terms of harmonic ellipsoidal eigenfunctions. The flexibility of the particular representation is demonstrated by imposing some conditions, which made the calculations possible. It turns out that the velocity of first degree, which represents the leading

  20. Angular-dependent Raman study of a- and s-plane InN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filintoglou, K.; Katsikini, M.; Arvanitidis, J.; Christofilos, D.; Lotsari, A.; Dimitrakopulos, G. P.; Vouroutzis, N.; Ajagunna, A. O.; Georgakilas, A.; Zoumakis, N.; Kourouklis, G. A.; Ves, S.

    2015-02-01

    Angular-dependent polarized Raman spectroscopy was utilized to study nonpolar a-plane ( 1 1 ¯ 20 ) and semipolar s-plane ( 10 1 ¯ 1 ) InN epilayers. The intensity dependence of the Raman peaks assigned to the vibrational modes A1(TO), E1(TO), and E2 h on the angle ψ that corresponds to rotation around the growth axis, is very well reproduced by using expressions taking into account the corresponding Raman tensors and the experimental geometry, providing thus a reliable technique towards assessing the sample quality. The s- and a-plane InN epilayers grown on nitridated r-plane sapphire (Al2O3) exhibit good crystalline quality as deduced from the excellent fitting of the experimental angle-dependent peak intensities to the theoretical expressions as well as from the small width of the Raman peaks. On the contrary, in the case of the s-plane epilayer grown on non-nitridated r-plane sapphire, fitting of the angular dependence is much worse and can be modeled only by considering the presence of two structural modifications, rotated so as their c-axes are almost perpendicular to each other. Although the presence of the second variant is verified by transmission electron and atomic force microscopies, angular dependent Raman spectroscopy offers a non-destructive and quick way for its quantification. Rapid thermal annealing of this sample did not affect the angular dependence of the peak intensities. The shift of the E1(TO) and E2 h Raman peaks was used for the estimation of the strain state of the samples.

  1. Angular-dependent Raman study of a- and s-plane InN

    SciTech Connect

    Filintoglou, K.; Katsikini, M. Arvanitidis, J.; Lotsari, A.; Dimitrakopulos, G. P.; Vouroutzis, N.; Ves, S.; Christofilos, D.; Kourouklis, G. A.; Ajagunna, A. O.; Georgakilas, A.; Zoumakis, N.

    2015-02-21

    Angular-dependent polarized Raman spectroscopy was utilized to study nonpolar a-plane (11{sup ¯}20) and semipolar s-plane (101{sup ¯}1) InN epilayers. The intensity dependence of the Raman peaks assigned to the vibrational modes A{sub 1}(TO), E{sub 1}(TO), and E{sub 2}{sup h} on the angle ψ that corresponds to rotation around the growth axis, is very well reproduced by using expressions taking into account the corresponding Raman tensors and the experimental geometry, providing thus a reliable technique towards assessing the sample quality. The s- and a-plane InN epilayers grown on nitridated r-plane sapphire (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) exhibit good crystalline quality as deduced from the excellent fitting of the experimental angle-dependent peak intensities to the theoretical expressions as well as from the small width of the Raman peaks. On the contrary, in the case of the s-plane epilayer grown on non-nitridated r-plane sapphire, fitting of the angular dependence is much worse and can be modeled only by considering the presence of two structural modifications, rotated so as their c-axes are almost perpendicular to each other. Although the presence of the second variant is verified by transmission electron and atomic force microscopies, angular dependent Raman spectroscopy offers a non-destructive and quick way for its quantification. Rapid thermal annealing of this sample did not affect the angular dependence of the peak intensities. The shift of the E{sub 1}(TO) and E{sub 2}{sup h} Raman peaks was used for the estimation of the strain state of the samples.

  2. Performance study of the anisotropic flow and reaction plane reconstruction in the CBM experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhaylov, V.; Kugler, A.; Kushpil, V.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Tlustý, P.

    2016-08-01

    The Projectile Spectator Detector (PSD) is a subsystem of the CBM experiment at the future FAIR facility designed to determine centrality and reaction plane orientation in the heavy-ion collisions. It will be done by measurement of the energy distribution of the heavy nucleons and nuclei fragments emitted close to the beam rapidity in forward direction. For the anticipated beam energies of FAIR SIS100 and SIS300 accelerators, different event generators (iQMD, UrQMD, DCM-QGSM, LA-QGSM and HSD) were used for the study of directed and elliptic proton flow in Au+Au collisions. Produced particles were transported with the GEANT4 Monte-Carlo using the CBM detector geometry. Performance of the reaction plane determination is shown for different PSD setups to demonstrate effects of the detector granularity and magnetic field. Simulation results are compared with the FOPI, AGS E877, E895 and STAR experimental data.

  3. Effect of geometric parameters on the in-plane crushing behavior of honeycombs and honeycombs with facesheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atli-Veltin, Bilim

    In aerospace field, use of honeycombs in energy absorbing applications is a very attractive concept since they are relatively low weight structures and their crushing behavior satisfies the requirements of ideal energy absorbing applications. This dissertation is about the utilization of honeycomb crushing in energy absorbing applications and maximizing their specific energy absorption (SEA) capacity by modifying their geometry. In-plane direction crushing of honeycombs is investigated with the help of simulations conducted with ABAQUS. Due to the nonlinearity of the problem an optimization technique could not be implemented; however, the results of the trend studies lead to geometries with improved SEA. This study has two objectives; the first is to obtain modified cell geometry for a hexagonal honeycomb cell in order to provide higher energy absorption for minimum weight relative to the regular hexagonal cell geometry which has 30° cell angle and walls at equal length. The results of the first objective show that by increasing the cell angle, increasing wall thickness and reducing vertical wall length it is possible to increase the SEA 4.8 times; where the honeycomb with modified geometry provided 3.3 kJ/kg SEA and with regular geometry 0.68 kJ/kg SEA. The second objective considers integration of the energy absorbing honeycombs into the helicopter subfloor, possibly as the web section of a keel beam. In-plane direction crushing of a honeycomb core sandwiched between two facesheets is simulated. Effects of core and facesheet geometric parameters on the energy absorption are investigated, and modified geometries are suggested. For the sandwich structure with thin facesheets increasing cell angle, increasing wall thicknesses and decreasing the cell depth increase the SEA. For the ones with thick facesheet reducing vertical wall length, increasing wall thicknesses and reducing the cell depth increase the SEA. The results show that regular honeycomb geometry with

  4. Finite element analysis of head-neck kinematics during motor vehicle accidents: analysis in multiple planes.

    PubMed

    Teo, Ee Chon; Zhang, Qing Hang; Huang, Russel C

    2007-01-01

    In this study, a detailed three-dimensional head-neck (C0-C7) finite element (FE) model developed previously based on the actual geometry of a human cadaver specimen was used. Five simulation analyses were performed to investigate the kinematic responses of the head-neck complex under rear-end, front, side, rear- and front-side impacts. Under rear-end and front impacts, it was predicted that the global and intervertebral rotations of the head-neck in the sagittal plane displayed nearly symmetric curvatures about the frontal plane. The primary sagittal rotational angles of the neck under direct front and rear-end impact conditions were higher than the primary frontal rotational angles under other side impact conditions. The analysis predicted early S-shaped and subsequent C-shaped curvatures of the head-neck complex in the sagittal plane under front and rear-end impact, and in the frontal plane under side impact. The head-neck complex flexed laterally in one direction with peak magnitude of larger than 22 degrees and a duration of about 130 ms before flexing in the opposite direction under both side and rear-side impact, compared to the corresponding values of about 15 degrees and 105 ms under front-side impact. The C0-C7 FE model has reasonably predicted the effects of impact direction in the primary sagittal and frontal segmental motion and curvatures of the head-neck complex under various impact conditions.

  5. Influence of meniscus shape in the cross sectional plane on the knee contact mechanics.

    PubMed

    Łuczkiewicz, Piotr; Daszkiewicz, Karol; Witkowski, Wojciech; Chróścielewski, Jacek; Zarzycki, Witold

    2015-06-01

    We present a three dimensional finite element analysis of stress distribution and menisci deformation in the human knee joint. The study is based on the Open Knee model with the geometry of the lateral meniscus which shows some degenerative disorders. The nonlinear analysis of the knee joint under compressive axial load is performed. We present results for intact knee, knee with complete radial posterior meniscus root tear and knee with total meniscectomy of medial or lateral meniscus. We investigate how the meniscus shape in the cross sectional plane influences knee-joint mechanics by comparing the results for flat (degenerated) lateral and normal medial meniscus. Specifically, the deformation of the menisci in the coronal plane and the corresponding stress values in cartilages are studied. By analysing contact resultant force acting on the menisci in axial plane we have shown that restricted extrusion of the torn lateral meniscus can be attributed to small slope of its cross section in the coronal plane. Additionally, the change of the contact area and the resultant force acting on the menisci as the function of compressive load are investigated.

  6. The Glimm scheme for perfect fluids on plane-symmetric Gowdy spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, A. P.; Lefloch, P. G.; Schmidt, B. G.; Stewart, J. M.

    2004-11-01

    We propose a new, augmented formulation of the coupled Euler Einstein equations for perfect fluids on plane-symmetric Gowdy spacetimes. The unknowns of the augmented system are the density and velocity of the fluid and the first- and second-order spacetime derivatives of the metric. We solve the Riemann problem for the augmented system, allowing propagating discontinuities in both the fluid variables and the first- and second-order derivatives of the geometry coefficients. Our main result, based on Glimm's random choice scheme, is the existence of solutions with bounded total variation of the Euler Einstein equations, up to the first time where a blow-up singularity (unbounded first-order derivatives of the geometry coefficients) occurs. We demonstrate the relevance of the augmented system for numerical relativity. We also consider general vacuum spacetimes and solve a Riemann problem, by relying on a theorem by Rendall on the characteristic value problem for the Einstein equations.

  7. Moving KML geometry elements within Google Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Liang-feng; Wang, Xi-feng; Pan, Xin

    2014-11-01

    During the process of modeling and visualizing geospatial information on the Google Earth virtual globe, there is an increasing demand to carry out such operations as moving geospatial objects defined by KML geometry elements horizontally or vertically. Due to the absence of the functionality and user interface for performing the moving transformation, it is either hard or impossible to interactively move multiple geospatial objects only using the existing Google Earth desktop application, especially when the data sets are in large volume. In this paper, we present a general framework and associated implementation methods for moving multiple KML geometry elements within Google Earth. In our proposed framework, we first load KML objects into the Google Earth plug-in, and then extract KML geometry elements from the imported KML objects. Subsequently, we interactively control the movement distance along a specified orientation by employing a custom user interface, calculate the transformed geographic location for each KML geometry element, and adjust geographic coordinates of the points in each KML objects. And finally, transformed KML geometry elements can be displayed in Google Earth for 3D visualization and spatial analysis. A key advantage of the proposed framework is that it provides a simple, uniform and efficient user interface for moving multiple KML geometry elements within Google Earth. More importantly, the proposed framework and associated implementations can be conveniently integrated into other customizable Google Earth applications to support interactively visualizing and analyzing geospatial objects defined by KML geometry elements.

  8. Detection of edges using local geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gualtieri, J. A.; Manohar, M.

    1989-01-01

    Researchers described a new representation, the local geometry, for early visual processing which is motivated by results from biological vision. This representation is richer than is often used in image processing. It extracts more of the local structure available at each pixel in the image by using receptive fields that can be continuously rotated and that go to third order spatial variation. Early visual processing algorithms such as edge detectors and ridge detectors can be written in terms of various local geometries and are computationally tractable. For example, Canny's edge detector has been implemented in terms of a local geometry of order two, and a ridge detector in terms of a local geometry of order three. The edge detector in local geometry was applied to synthetic and real images and it was shown using simple interpolation schemes that sufficient information is available to locate edges with sub-pixel accuracy (to a resolution increase of at least a factor of five). This is reasonable even for noisy images because the local geometry fits a smooth surface - the Taylor series - to the discrete image data. Only local processing was used in the implementation so it can readily be implemented on parallel mesh machines such as the MPP. Researchers expect that other early visual algorithms, such as region growing, inflection point detection, and segmentation can also be implemented in terms of the local geometry and will provide sufficiently rich and robust representations for subsequent visual processing.

  9. The effects of out-of-plane curvature on the growth of epithelia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yevick, Hannah; Duclos, Guillaume; Bonnet, Isabelle; Silberzan, Pascal

    2015-03-01

    Collective cell migration is at play in many well documented in vivo processes for example, wound re-epithelialization, cancer metastasis and dorsal closure. We present a study describing the effect of out of plane curvature on the collective properties of epithelial tissue. Microfabricated environments are used to deconstruct a monolayer's response to geometry. Specifically, fibers with a radius of curvature between 1um-100um are populated with MDCK cells, a model epithelial, kidney-derived, cell line. Migration dynamics as well as cell architecture are quantified and the effects of curvature compared with confinement alone. Large curvatures trigger specific cellular behaviors and organization that may shed light on tubulogenesis.

  10. Large-eddy simulation of flow in a plane, asymmetric diffuser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaltenbach, Hans-Jakob

    1993-01-01

    Recent improvements in subgrid-scale modeling as well as increases in computer power make it feasible to investigate flows using large-eddy simulation (LES) which have been traditionally studied with techniques based on Reynolds averaging. However, LES has not yet been applied to many flows of immediate technical interest. Preliminary results from LES of a plane diffuser flow are described. The long term goal of this work is to investigate flow separation as well as separation control in ducts and ramp-like geometries.

  11. X-ray plane-wave diffraction effects in a crystal with third-order nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balyan, M. K.

    2016-12-01

    The two-wave dynamical diffraction in the Laue geometry has been theoretically considered for a plane X-ray wave in a crystal with a third-order nonlinear response to the external field. An analytical solution to the problem stated is found for certain diffraction conditions. A nonlinear pendulum effect is analyzed. The nonlinear extinction length is found to depend on the incident-wave intensity. A pendulum effect of a new type is revealed: the intensities of the transmitted and diffracted waves periodically depend on the incidentwave intensity at a fixed crystal thickness. The rocking curves and Borrmann nonlinear effect are numerically calculated.

  12. Elasticity of smectic liquid crystals with in-plane orientational order and dispiration asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alageshan, Jaya Kumar; Chakrabarti, Buddhapriya; Hatwalne, Yashodhan

    2017-02-01

    The Nelson-Peliti formulation of the elasticity theory of isolated fluid membranes with orientational order emphasizes the interplay between geometry, topology, and thermal fluctuations. Fluid layers of lamellar liquid crystals such as smectic-C , hexatic smectics, and smectic-C* are endowed with in-plane orientational order. We extend the Nelson-Peliti formulation so as to bring these smectics within its ambit. Using the elasticity theory of smectics-C*, we show that positive and negative dispirations (topological defects in Smectic-C* liquid crystals) with strengths of equal magnitude have disparate energies—a result that is amenable to experimental tests.

  13. The crack problem for a nonhomogeneous plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delale, F.; Erdogan, F.

    1982-01-01

    The plane elasticity problem for a nonhomogeneous medium containing a crack is considered. It is assumed that the Poisson's ratio of the medium is constant and the Young's modulus E varies exponentially with the coordinate parallel to the crack. First the half plane problem is formulated and the solution is given for arbitrary tractions along the boundary. Then the integral equation for the crack problem is derived. It is shown that the integral equation having the derivative of the crack surface displacement as the density function has a simple Cauchy type kernel. Hence, its solution and the stresses around the crack tips have the conventional square root singularity. The solution is given for various loading conditions. The results show that the effect of the Poisson's ratio and consequently that of the thickness constraint on the stress intensity factors are rather negligible.

  14. Split-field pupil plane determination apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Salmon, Joseph T.

    1996-01-01

    A split-field pupil plane determination apparatus (10) having a wedge assembly (16) with a first glass wedge (18) and a second glass wedge (20) positioned to divide a laser beam (12) into a first laser beam half (22) and a second laser beam half (24) which diverge away from the wedge assembly (16). A wire mask (26) is positioned immediately after the wedge assembly (16) in the path of the laser beam halves (22, 24) such that a shadow thereof is cast as a first shadow half (30) and a second shadow half (32) at the input to a relay telescope (14). The relay telescope (14) causes the laser beam halves (22, 24) to converge such that the first shadow half (30) of the wire mask (26) is aligned with the second shadow half (32) at any subsequent pupil plane (34).

  15. Image-plane processing of visual information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huck, F. O.; Fales, C. L.; Park, S. K.; Samms, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    Shannon's theory of information is used to optimize the optical design of sensor-array imaging systems which use neighborhood image-plane signal processing for enhancing edges and compressing dynamic range during image formation. The resultant edge-enhancement, or band-pass-filter, response is found to be very similar to that of human vision. Comparisons of traits in human vision with results from information theory suggest that: (1) Image-plane processing, like preprocessing in human vision, can improve visual information acquisition for pattern recognition when resolving power, sensitivity, and dynamic range are constrained. Improvements include reduced sensitivity to changes in lighter levels, reduced signal dynamic range, reduced data transmission and processing, and reduced aliasing and photosensor noise degradation. (2) Information content can be an appropriate figure of merit for optimizing the optical design of imaging systems when visual information is acquired for pattern recognition. The design trade-offs involve spatial response, sensitivity, and sampling interval.

  16. The iPTF Galactic Plane Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellm, Eric Christopher; Prince, Thomas A.; Miller, Adam; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Kupfer, Thomas; Laher, Russ; Masci, Frank J.; Oded Ofek, Eran; Shupe, David L.; Surace, Jason A.; Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Beginning in 2013, the Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory has conducted a survey of the Northern Galactic Plane. The major science goals of the survey include mapping variable stars throughout the Galaxy; discovering outbursting sources such as Cataclysmic Variables, FU Ori outbursts, and M-dwarf flares; and identifying rare types of compact binaries. Through 2015 the survey has obtained an average of 60 epochs in R-band in the spatial region 0 < l < 150 degrees, |b| < 20 degrees, with greatest coverage in the |b| < 5 degree region.I will describe the performance of the survey and present initial results, with a focus on variability-based identification of X-ray sources. The Zwicky Transient Facility, to begin in 2017, will include an extensive public variability survey of the Galactic Plane.

  17. Cutting Plane Algorithms for Maximum Problems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    Bazaraa and Shetty (1979). For variational inequalities, references on the cutting plane approach are considerably less. Zuhovickii et al. (1969) (see...and can be expressed as a convex combination of a finite number of extreme points [see, e.g., Bazaraa et al., (1990)], For VI problems, both U and X are...unique solution (see, page 234 of Bazaraa and Shetty, 1979)., 32 Figure 4: A ’Strong’ Solution to a Variational Inequality Problem The rate of

  18. High speed multi focal plane optical system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minott, P. O. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An apparatus for eliminating beamsplitter generated optical aberrations in a pupil concentric optical system providing a plurality of spatially separated images on different focal planes or surfaces is presented. The system employs a buried surface beamsplitter having spherically curved entrance and exit faces which are concentric to a system aperture stop with the entrance face being located in the path of a converging light beam directed there from an image forming objective element which is also concentric to the aperture stop.

  19. Equations for the Magnetic Field Produced by One or More Rectangular Loops of Wire in the Same Plane.

    PubMed

    Misakian, M

    2000-01-01

    Beginning with expressions for the vector potential, the equations for calculating the magnetic flux density from up to three rectangular loops of wire in the same plane are derived. The geometry considered is the same as that found in some walk-through metal detectors and electronic article surveillance systems. Equations for more or fewer loops can be determined by inspection. A computer program for performing the magnetic field calculation is provided in an appendix.

  20. Analytical modeling of PWAS in-plane and out-of-plane electromechanical impedance spectroscopy (EMIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamas, Tuncay; Lin, Bin; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2013-04-01

    This paper discusses theoretical analysis of electro-mechanical impedance spectroscopy (EMIS) of piezoelectric wafer active sensor (PWAS). Both free and constrained PWAS EMIS models are developed for in-plane (lengthwise) and outof plane (thickness wise) mode. The paper starts with the general piezoelectric constitutive equations that express the linear relation between stress, strain, electric field and electric displacement. This is followed by the PWAS EMIS models with two assumptions: 1) constant electric displacement in thickness direction (D3) for out-of-plane mode; 2) constant electric field in thickness direction (E3) for in-plane mode. The effects of these assumptions on the free PWAS in-plane and out-of-plane EMIS models are studied and compared. The effects of internal damping of PWAS are considered in the analytical EMIS models. The analytical EMIS models are verified by Coupled Field Finite Element Method (CF-FEM) simulations and by experimental measurements. The extent of the agreement between the analytical and experimental EMIS results is discussed. The paper ends with summary, conclusions, and suggestions for future work.

  1. In-plane and out-of-plane motions of the human tympanic membrane

    PubMed Central

    Khaleghi, Morteza; Cheng, Jeffrey Tao; Furlong, Cosme; Rosowski, John J.

    2016-01-01

    Computer-controlled digital holographic techniques are developed and used to measure shape and four-dimensional nano-scale displacements of the surface of the tympanic membrane (TM) in cadaveric human ears in response to tonal sounds. The combination of these measurements (shape and sound-induced motions) allows the calculation of the out-of-plane (perpendicular to the surface) and in-plane (tangential) motion components at over 1 000 000 points on the TM surface with a high-degree of accuracy and sensitivity. A general conclusion is that the in-plane motion components are 10–20 dB smaller than the out-of-plane motions. These conditions are most often compromised with higher-frequency sound stimuli where the overall displacements are smaller, or the spatial density of holographic fringes is higher, both of which increase the uncertainty of the measurements. The results are consistent with the TM acting as a Kirchhoff–Love's thin shell dominated by out-of-plane motion with little in-plane motion, at least with stimulus frequencies up to 8 kHz. PMID:26827009

  2. On the Road Map of Vogel's Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mkrtchyan, Ruben L.

    2016-01-01

    We define "population" of Vogel's plane as points for which universal character of adjoint representation is regular in the finite plane of its argument. It is shown that they are given exactly by all solutions of seven Diophantine equations of third order on three variables. We find all their solutions: classical series of simple Lie algebras (including an "odd symplectic" one), {D_{2,1,λ}} superalgebra, the line of sl(2) algebras, and a number of isolated solutions, including exceptional simple Lie algebras. One of these Diophantine equations, namely {knm=4k+4n+2m+12,} contains all simple Lie algebras, except so{(2N+1).} Among isolated solutions are, besides exceptional simple Lie algebras, so called {e_{71/2}} algebra and also two other similar unidentified objects with positive dimensions. In addition, there are 47 isolated solutions in "unphysical semiplane" with negative dimensions. Isolated solutions mainly belong to the few lines in Vogel plane, including some rows of Freudenthal magic square. Universal dimension formulae have an integer values on all these solutions at least for first three symmetric powers of adjoint representation.

  3. Simulation Exploration through Immersive Parallel Planes: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Brunhart-Lupo, Nicholas; Bush, Brian W.; Gruchalla, Kenny; Smith, Steve

    2016-03-01

    We present a visualization-driven simulation system that tightly couples systems dynamics simulations with an immersive virtual environment to allow analysts to rapidly develop and test hypotheses in a high-dimensional parameter space. To accomplish this, we generalize the two-dimensional parallel-coordinates statistical graphic as an immersive 'parallel-planes' visualization for multivariate time series emitted by simulations running in parallel with the visualization. In contrast to traditional parallel coordinate's mapping the multivariate dimensions onto coordinate axes represented by a series of parallel lines, we map pairs of the multivariate dimensions onto a series of parallel rectangles. As in the case of parallel coordinates, each individual observation in the dataset is mapped to a polyline whose vertices coincide with its coordinate values. Regions of the rectangles can be 'brushed' to highlight and select observations of interest: a 'slider' control allows the user to filter the observations by their time coordinate. In an immersive virtual environment, users interact with the parallel planes using a joystick that can select regions on the planes, manipulate selection, and filter time. The brushing and selection actions are used to both explore existing data as well as to launch additional simulations corresponding to the visually selected portions of the input parameter space. As soon as the new simulations complete, their resulting observations are displayed in the virtual environment. This tight feedback loop between simulation and immersive analytics accelerates users' realization of insights about the simulation and its output.

  4. Focal plane scanner with reciprocating spatial window

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Chengye (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A focal plane scanner having a front objective lens, a spatial window for selectively passing a portion of the image therethrough, and a CCD array for receiving the passed portion of the image. All embodiments have a common feature whereby the spatial window and CCD array are mounted for simultaneous relative reciprocating movement with respect to the front objective lens, and the spatial window is mounted within the focal plane of the front objective. In a first embodiment, the spatial window is a slit and the CCD array is one-dimensional, and successive rows of the image in the focal plane of the front objective lens are passed to the CCD array by an image relay lens interposed between the slit and the CCD array. In a second embodiment, the spatial window is a slit, the CCD array is two-dimensional, and a prism-grating-prism optical spectrometer is interposed between the slit and the CCD array so as to cause the scanned row to be split into a plurality of spectral separations onto the CCD array. In a third embodiment, the CCD array is two-dimensional and the spatial window is a rectangular linear variable filter (LVF) window, so as to cause the scanned rows impinging on the LVF to be bandpass filtered into spectral components onto the CCD array through an image relay lens interposed between the LVF and the CCD array.

  5. Restoring Aperture Profile At Sample Plane

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J L; Hackel, R P; Lungershausen, A W

    2003-08-03

    Off-line conditioning of full-size optics for the National Ignition Facility required a beam delivery system to allow conditioning lasers to rapidly raster scan samples while achieving several technical goals. The main purpose of the optical system designed was to reconstruct at the sample plane the flat beam profile found at the laser aperture with significant reductions in beam wander to improve scan times. Another design goal was the ability to vary the beam size at the sample to scan at different fluences while utilizing all of the laser power and minimizing processing time. An optical solution was developed using commercial off-the-shelf lenses. The system incorporates a six meter relay telescope and two sets of focusing optics. The spacing of the focusing optics is changed to allow the fluence on the sample to vary from 2 to 14 Joules per square centimeter in discrete steps. More importantly, these optics use the special properties of image relaying to image the aperture plane onto the sample to form a pupil relay with a beam profile corresponding almost exactly to the flat profile found at the aperture. A flat beam profile speeds scanning by providing a uniform intensity across a larger area on the sample. The relayed pupil plane is more stable with regards to jitter and beam wander. Image relaying also reduces other perturbations from diffraction, scatter, and focus conditions. Image relaying, laser conditioning, and the optical system designed to accomplish the stated goals are discussed.

  6. The fundamental plane correlations for globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djorgovski, S.

    1995-01-01

    In the parameter space whose axes include a radius (core, or half-light), a surface brightness (central, or average within the half-light radius), and the central projected velocity dispersion, globular clusters lie on a two-dimensional surface (a plane, if the logarithmic quantities are used). This is analogous to the 'fundamental plane' of elliptical galaxies. The implied bivariate correlations are the best now known for globular clusters. The derived scaling laws for the core properties imply that cluster cores are fully virialized, homologous systems, with a constant (M/L) ratio. The corresponding scaling laws on the half-light scale are differrent, but are nearly identical to those derived from the 'fundamental plane' of ellipticals. This may be due to the range of cluster concentrations, which are correlated with other parameters. A similar explanation for elliptical galaxies may be viable. These correlations provide new empirical constraints for models of globular cluster formation and evolution, and may also be usable as rough distance-indicator relations for globular clusters.

  7. Control of gradual plane change during aerocruise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, J. E., Jr.; Lee, S.; No, T. S.

    Motivated by the continuing interest in orbital maneuvering using aerodynamic forces and the oft overlooked close relationship between performance and stability analyses, we consider the stability and control of small plane change maneuvers during aerocruise. We use a model which consists of linear equations for perturbed motion with respect to a great circle trajectory about a non-rotating earth in terms of variables which allow uncoupling of the longitudinal and lateral dynamics, and partial uncoupling of lateral dynamics. Characteristics of the perturbed motion of a hypersonic flight vehicle with respect to a great circle trajectory are reviewed, including previous results which show that a change in the orientation of the great circle plane results from a general perturbation in initial conditions. This change is analogous to the heading change and lateral displacement which occur when a conventional aircraft's motion is disturbed. A linear quadratic controller for small plane change maneuvers is obtained, and an inverse method for generating controls for a steady-state aerocruise turn is described. An example is presented which shows that the majority of the optimal maneuver is approximated very well by the steady-state turn.

  8. Antenna arrays for producing plane whistler waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenzel, Reiner; Urrutia, J. Manuel

    2014-10-01

    Linear whistler modes with ω ~= 0 . 3ωce <<ωpe are excited in a large laboratory plasma with magnetic loop antennas. A single antenna always produces a spatially bounded wave packet whose propagation cannot be directly compared to plane wave theories. By superimposing the fields from spatially separated antennas, the wavenumber along the antenna array can be nearly eliminated. 2D arrays nearly produce plane waves. The angle θ of wave propagation has been varied by a phase shift along the array. The refractive index surface n (θ) has been measured. The parallel phase and group velocities for Gendrin modes has been demonstrated. The interference between two oblique plane whistlers creates a whistler ``waveguide'' mode, i.e. standing waves for k ⊥B0 and propagation for k | |B0 . It also describes the reflection of oblique whistlers from a sharp discontinuity in the refractive index or conductivity. Radial reflections are also a dominant factor in small plasma columns of helicon devices. These results are of interest to space and laboratory plasmas. Work supported by NSF/DOE.

  9. Hamiltonian maps in the complex plane

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, J.M.; Percival, I.C.

    1981-01-01

    Following Arnol'd's proof of the KAM theorem, an analogy with the vertical pendulum, and some general arguments concerning maps in the complex plane, detailed calculations are presented and illustrated graphically for the standard map at the golden mean frequency. The functional dependence of the coordinate q on the canonical angle variable theta is analytically continued into the complex theta-plane, where natural boundaries are found at constant absolute values of Im theta. The boundaries represent the appearance of chaotic motion in the complex plane. Two independent numerical methods based on Fourier analysis in the angle variable were used, one based on a variation-annihilation method and the other on a double expansion. The results were further checked by direct solution of the complex equations of motion. The numerically simpler, but intrinsically complex, semipendulum and semistandard map are also studied. We conjecture that natural boundaries appear in the analogous analytic continuation of the invariant tori or KAM surfaces of general nonintegrable systems.

  10. Cleavage plane determination in amphibian eggs.

    PubMed

    Sawai, T; Yomota, A

    1990-01-01

    In the present study using eggs of Cynops pyrrhogaster and Xenopus laevis, we examined (1) structural changes in the cytoplasm before the appearance of the cleavage furrow using a cytochemical method, (2) the time of cleavage plane determination depending on the mitotic apparatus (MA), by changing the shape of the eggs, and (3) the time of arrival of the "cleavage stimulus" at the cortex, by injecting colchicine solution or removing cytoplasm. Results were as follows: (1) In amphibian eggs the diastema was formed after development of the MA, appearing between the two asters after the MA had begun to degenerate. (2) The cleavage plane was preliminarily determined by the MA in the meta- to anaphase of karyokinesis. At this time, however, the egg cortex had not yet received the "cleavage stimulus" indispensable for furrow formation. (3) The egg cortex was really prepared to establish the furrow just after the edge of the diastema arrived at the cortex, when the MA had already degenerated. These results imply that the cleavage plane of the amphibian eggs is determined in two steps: the first, depending on the MA, is the determination of the direction of the growth of the diastema, and the second is the arrival of the "cleavage stimulus" at the cortex in association with the diastema.

  11. Geometry of contextuality from Grothendieck's coset space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planat, Michel

    2015-07-01

    The geometry of cosets in the subgroups of the two-generator free group nicely fits, via Grothendieck's dessins d'enfants, the geometry of commutation for quantum observables. In previous work, it was established that dessins stabilize point-line geometries whose incidence structure reflects the commutation of (generalized) Pauli operators. Now we find that the nonexistence of a dessin for which the commutator precisely corresponds to the commutator of quantum observables on all lines of the geometry is a signature of quantum contextuality. This occurs first at index : in Mermin's square and at index in Mermin's pentagram, as expected. Commuting sets of -qubit observables with are found to be contextual as well as most generalized polygons. A geometrical contextuality measure is introduced.

  12. Fractal Geometry in the High School Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp, Dane R.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses classroom activities that involve applications of fractal geometry. Includes an activity sheet that explores Pascal's triangle, Sierpinsky's gasket, and modular arithmetic in two and three dimensions. (Author/MKR)

  13. Designing Phoxonic Metamaterials with Fractal Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Sisi; Koh, Cheong Yang; Kooi, Steve; Thomas, Edwin

    2012-02-01

    Recently, the concepts of fractal geometry have been introduced into electromagnetic and plasmonic metamaterials. With their self-similarity, structures based on fractal geometry should exhibit multi-band character with high Q factors due to the scaling law. However, there exist few studies of phononic metamaterials based on fractal geometry. We use COMSOL to investigate the wave propagation in two dimensional systems possessing fractal geometries. The simulations of these systems, guided by our recently developed general design framework, help to understand the role of design in determining the phononic properties of the structures. Proposed structures are being fabricated via standard lithographic or 3D printing techniques. The wave behavior of the structures can be characterized using Brillouin Light Scattering, Scanning Acoustic Microscope and Near-field Scanning Optical Microscopy. Due to their sparse spatial distribution, fractal phononic structures show potential fir ``smart skin'', where multifunctional components can be fabricated on the same platform.

  14. Geometry independence of three-string vertices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeno, Masahiro

    1989-01-01

    The geometry independence of three-string vertices in both HIKKO's and Witten's string field theories is examined. A careful regularization shows that the anomaly which has been reported by Morris and Mañes vanishes.

  15. Non-Euclidean Geometry and Unreal Numbers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thwaites, G. N.

    1989-01-01

    This article discusses two of the reasons for the decline of formal Euclidean geometry in recent syllabi: (1) Traditional approach; and (2) Inherent difficulties. Suggested are some reasons and examples as to why the decline should be reversed. (YP)

  16. The Oak Leaf: Connecting Geometry and Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Judy

    1999-01-01

    Presents an activity that integrates biology and mathematics. Involves students in actual biological research and uses geometry, statistics, and computers to interpret data about the leaves of a tree. (ASK)

  17. Emergence of wave equations from quantum geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Majid, Shahn

    2012-09-24

    We argue that classical geometry should be viewed as a special limit of noncommutative geometry in which aspects which are inter-constrained decouple and appear arbitrary in the classical limit. In particular, the wave equation is really a partial derivative in a unified extra-dimensional noncommutative geometry and arises out of the greater rigidity of the noncommutative world not visible in the classical limit. We provide an introduction to this 'wave operator' approach to noncommutative geometry as recently used[27] to quantize any static spacetime metric admitting a spatial conformal Killing vector field, and in particular to construct the quantum Schwarzschild black hole. We also give an introduction to our related result that every classical Riemannian manifold is a shadow of a slightly noncommutative one wherein the meaning of the classical Ricci tensor becomes very natural as the square of a generalised braiding.

  18. Geometry of quantum computation with qutrits.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Yu, Zu-Huan; Fei, Shao-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Determining the quantum circuit complexity of a unitary operation is an important problem in quantum computation. By using the mathematical techniques of Riemannian geometry, we investigate the efficient quantum circuits in quantum computation with n qutrits. We show that the optimal quantum circuits are essentially equivalent to the shortest path between two points in a certain curved geometry of SU(3(n)). As an example, three-qutrit systems are investigated in detail.

  19. Geometry, Representation Theory, and the Langlands Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2013-0144 Geometry, Representation Theory , and the Langlands Program Kari Vilonen Northwestern University...16/6/2008-31/09/2012 Geometry, Representation Theory , and the Langlands Program FA9550-08-1-0351 Kari Vilonen Northwestern University Evanston, IL...Schmid and Vilonen have mostly carried out the program of determining the Unitary dual of reductive Lie groups using Hodge theory . Kashiwara and

  20. Phase distribution in complex geometry conduits

    SciTech Connect

    Lahey, R.T. Jr.; Lopez de Bertodano, M.; Jones, O.C. Jr.

    1992-12-31

    Some of the most important and challenging problems in two-phase flow today have to do with the understanding and prediction of multidimensional phenomena, in particular, lateral phase distribution in both simple and complex geometry conduits. A prior review paper summarized the state-of-the-art in the understanding of phase distribution phenomena, and the ability to perform mechanistic multidimensional predictions. The purpose of this paper is to update that review, with particular emphasis on complex geometry conduit predictive capabilities.

  1. Stress anisotropy and stress gradient in magnetron sputtered films with different deposition geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Z.B.; Yalisove, S.M.; Bilello, J.C.

    2006-03-15

    Mo films were deposited via magnetron sputtering with two different deposition geometries: dynamic deposition (moving substrate) and static deposition (fixed substrate). The residual stress and structural morphologies of these films were investigated, with particular focus on in-plane anisotropy of the biaxial stress and stress gradient across the film thickness. The results revealed that the Mo films developed distinct states of residual stress, which depended on both deposition geometry and film thickness. With the dynamic geometry, the Mo films generally exhibited anisotropic stress. Both the degree of anisotropy and the magnitude of stress varied as functions of film thickness. The variation of stress was linked to the evolution of anisotropic microstructures in the films. The Mo films from the static geometry developed isotropic residual stress, which was more compressive and noticeably larger in magnitude than that of the Mo films from the dynamic geometry. Aside from these disparities, the two types of Mo films (i.e., anisotropic and isotropic) exhibited notably similar trends of stress variation with film thickness. Depth profiling indicated the presence of large stress gradients for the Mo films, irrespective of the deposition geometries. This observation seems to be consistent with the premise that Mo films develop a zone T structure, which is inherently inhomogeneous along the film thickness. Moreover, the largest stress gradient for both types of deposition geometries arises at roughly the same film depth ({approx}240 nm from substrate), where the stresses sharply transits from highly compressive to less compressive or even tensile. This appears to correspond to the boundary region that separates two distinct stages of microstructural evolution, a feature unique to zone T-type structure.

  2. Genetic optimisation of a plane array geometry for beamforming. Application to source localisation in a high speed train

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Courtois, Florent; Thomas, Jean-Hugh; Poisson, Franck; Pascal, Jean-Claude

    2016-06-01

    Thanks to its easy implementation and robust performance, beamforming is applied for source localisation in several fields. Its effectiveness depends greatly on the array sensor configuration. This paper introduces a criterion to improve the array beampattern and increase the accuracy of sound source localisation. The beamwidth and the maximum sidelobe level are used to quantify the spatial variation of the beampattern through a new criterion. This criterion is shown to be useful, especially for the localisation of moving sources. A genetic algorithm is proposed for the optimisation of microphone placement. Statistical analysis of the optimised arrays provides original results on the algorithm performance and on the optimal microphone placement. An optimised array is tested to localise the sound sources of a high speed train. The results show an accurate separation.

  3. Numerical solution of the equation of neutrons transport on plane geometry by analytical schemes using acceleration by synthetic diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Vargas, G.

    A computer program has been developed which uses a technique of synthetic acceleration by diffusion by analytical schemes. Both in the diffusion equation as in that of transport, analytical schemes were used which allowed a substantial time saving in the number of iterations required by source iteration method to obtain the K(sub e)ff. The program developed ASD (Synthetic Diffusion Acceleration) by diffusion was written in FORTRAN and can be executed on a personal computer with a hard disc and mathematical O-processor. The program is unlimited as to the number of regions and energy groups. The results obtained by the ASD program for K(sub e)ff is nearly completely concordant with those obtained by utilizing the ANISN-PC code for different analytical type problems in this work. The ASD program allowed obtention of an approximate solution of the neutron transport equation with a relatively low number of internal reiterations with good precision. One of its applications would be in the direct determinations of axial distribution neutronic flow in a fuel assembly as well as in the obtention of the effective multiplication factor.

  4. Fractional Fourier transforms, symmetrical lens systems, and their cardinal planes.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Ignacio; Sánchez-López, María M; Ferreira, Carlos; Mateos, Felipe

    2007-07-01

    We study the relation between optical lens systems that perform a fractional Fourier transform (FRFT) with the geometrical cardinal planes. We demonstrate that lens systems symmetrical with respect to the central plane provide an exact FRFT link between the input and output planes. Moreover, we show that the fractional order of the transform has real values between 0 and 2 when light propagation is produced between principal planes and antiprincipal planes, respectively. Finally, we use this new point of view to design an optical lens system that provides FRFTs with variable fractional order in the range (0,2) without moving the input and output planes.

  5. Optimum geometry selection for sensor fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadar, Ivan

    1998-07-01

    A relative sensors-to-target geometry measure-of-merit (MOM), based on the Geometric Dilution of Precision (GDOP) measure, is developed. The method of maximum likelihood estimation is introduced for the solution of the position location problem. A linearized measurement model-based error sensitivity analysis is used to derive an expression for the GDOP MOM. The GDOP MOM relates the sensor measurement errors to the target position errors as a function of sensors-to-target geometry. In order to illustrate the efficacy of GDOP MOM for fusion systems, GDOP functional relationships are computed for bearing-only measuring sensors-to-target geometries. The minimum GDOP and associated specific target-to-sensors geometries are computed and illustrated for both two and three bearing-only measuring sensors. Two and three-dimensional plots of relative error contours provide a geometric insight to sensor placement as a function of geometry induced error dilution. The results can be used to select preferred target- to-sensor(s) geometries for M sensors in this application. The GDOP MOM is general and is readily extendable to other measurement-based sensors and fusion architectures.

  6. The effect of averaging adjacent planes for artifact reduction in matrix inversion tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, Devon J.; Page McAdams, H.; Dobbins, James T. III

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: Matrix inversion tomosynthesis (MITS) uses linear systems theory and knowledge of the imaging geometry to remove tomographic blur that is present in conventional backprojection tomosynthesis reconstructions, leaving in-plane detail rendered clearly. The use of partial-pixel interpolation during the backprojection process introduces imprecision in the MITS modeling of tomographic blur, and creates low-contrast artifacts in some MITS planes. This paper examines the use of MITS slabs, created by averaging several adjacent MITS planes, as a method for suppressing partial-pixel artifacts. Methods: Human chest tomosynthesis projection data, acquired as part of an IRB-approved pilot study, were used to generate MITS planes, three-plane MITS slabs (MITSa3), five-plane MITS slabs (MITSa5), and seven-plane MITS slabs (MITSa7). These were qualitatively examined for partial-pixel artifacts and the visibility of normal and abnormal anatomy. Additionally, small (5 mm) subtle pulmonary nodules were simulated and digitally superimposed upon human chest tomosynthesis projection images, and their visibility was qualitatively assessed in the different reconstruction techniques. Simulated images of a thin wire were used to generate modulation transfer function (MTF) and slice-sensitivity profile curves for the different MITS and MITS slab techniques, and these were examined for indications of partial-pixel artifacts and frequency response uniformity. Finally, mean-subtracted, exposure-normalized noise power spectra (ENNPS) estimates were computed and compared for MITS and MITS slab reconstructions, generated from 10 sets of tomosynthesis projection data of an acrylic slab. The simulated in-plane MTF response of each technique was also combined with the square root of the ENNPS estimate to yield stochastic signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) information about the different reconstruction techniques. Results: For scan angles of 20 Degree-Sign and 5 mm plane separation, seven MITS

  7. The impact of galaxy geometry and mass evolution on the survival of star clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Madrid, Juan P.; Hurley, Jarrod R.; Martig, Marie

    2014-04-01

    Direct N-body simulations of globular clusters in a realistic Milky-Way-like potential are carried out using the code NBODY6 to determine the impact of the host galaxy disk mass and geometry on the survival of star clusters. A relation between disk mass and star-cluster dissolution timescale is derived. These N-body models show that doubling the mass of the disk from 5 × 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉} to 10 × 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉} halves the dissolution time of a satellite star cluster orbiting the host galaxy at 6 kpc from the galactic center. Different geometries in a disk of identical mass can determine either the survival or dissolution of a star cluster orbiting within the inner 6 kpc of the galactic center. Furthermore, disk geometry has measurable effects on the mass loss of star clusters up to 15 kpc from the galactic center. N-body simulations performed with a fine output time step show that at each disk crossing the outer layers of star clusters experiences an increase in velocity dispersion of ∼5% of the average velocity dispersion in the outer section of star clusters. This leads to an enhancement of mass loss—a clearly discernable effect of disk shocking. By running models with different inclinations, we determine that star clusters with an orbit that is perpendicular to the Galactic plane have larger mass loss rates than do clusters that evolve in the Galactic plane or in an inclined orbit.

  8. Manifestations of non-planar adsorption geometries of lead pyrenocyanine at the liquid-solid interface.

    PubMed

    Mali, Kunal S; Zöphel, Lukas; Ivasenko, Oleksandr; Müllen, Klaus; De Feyter, Steven

    2013-10-01

    In this work, we provide evidence for multiple non-planar adsorption geometries of a novel pyrenocyanine derivative at the liquid-solid interface under ambient conditions. When adsorbed at the organic liquid-solid interface, lead pyrenocyanine forms well-ordered monolayers that exhibit peculiar non-periodic contrast variation. The different contrast of the adsorbed molecules is attributed to dissimilar adsorption geometries which arise from the non-planar conformation of the molecules. The non-planarity of the molecular backbone in turn arises due to a combination of the angularly extended pyrene subunits and the presence of the large lead ion, which is too big to fit inside the central cavity and thus is located out of the aromatic plane. The two possible locations of the lead atom, namely below and above the aromatic plane, could be identified as depression and protrusion in the central cavity, respectively. The manifestation of such multiple adsorption geometries on the structure of the resultant monolayer is discussed in detail. The packing density of these 2D arrays of molecules could be tuned by heating of the sample wherein the molecular packing changes from a low-density, pseudo six-fold symmetric to a high-density, two-fold symmetric arrangement. Finally, a well-ordered two-component system could be constructed by incorporating C60 molecules in the adlayer of lead pyrenocyanine at the liquid-solid interface.

  9. Wafer plane inspection with soft resist thresholding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Carl; Shi, Rui-fang; Wihl, Mark; Xiong, Yalin; Pang, Song

    2008-10-01

    Wafer Plane Inspection (WPI) is an inspection mode on the KLA-Tencor TeraScaTM platform that uses the high signalto- noise ratio images from the high numerical aperture microscope, and then models the entire lithographic process to enable defect detection on the wafer plane[1]. This technology meets the needs of some advanced mask manufacturers to identify the lithographically-significant defects while ignoring the other non-lithographically-significant defects. WPI accomplishes this goal by performing defect detection based on a modeled image of how the mask features would actually print in the photoresist. There are several advantages to this approach: (1) the high fidelity of the images provide a sensitivity advantage over competing approaches; (2) the ability to perform defect detection on the wafer plane allows one to only see those defects that have a printing impact on the wafer; (3) the use of modeling on the lithographic portion of the flow enables unprecedented flexibility to support arbitrary illumination profiles, process-window inspection in unit time, and combination modes to find both printing and non-printing defects. WPI is proving to be a valuable addition to the KLA-Tencor detection algorithm suite. The modeling portion of WPI uses a single resist threshold as the final step in the processing. This has been shown to be adequate on several advanced customer layers, but is not ideal for all layers. Actual resist chemistry has complicated processes including acid and base-diffusion and quench that are not consistently well-modeled with a single resist threshold. We have considered the use of an advanced resist model for WPI, but rejected it because the burdensome requirements for the calibration of the model were not practical for reticle inspection. This paper describes an alternative approach that allows for a "soft" resist threshold to be applied that provides a more robust solution for the most challenging processes. This approach is just

  10. Symmetrically converging plane thermonuclear burn waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charakhch'yan, A. A.; Khishchenko, K. V.

    2013-10-01

    Five variants of a one-dimensional problem on synchronous bilateral action of two identical drivers on opposite surfaces of a plane layer of DT fuel with the normal or five times greater initial density, where the solution includes two thermonuclear burn waves propagating to meet one another at the symmetry plane, are simulated. A laser pulse with total absorption of energy at the critical density (in two variants) and a proton bunch that provides for a nearly isochoric heating (in three variants) are considered as drivers. A wide-range equation of state for the fuel, electron and ion heat conduction, self-radiation of plasma and plasma heating by α-particles are taken into account. In spite of different ways of ignition, various models of α-particle heat, whether the burn wave remains slow or transforms into the detonation wave, and regardless of way of such a transformation, the final value of the burn-up factor depends essentially on the only parameter Hρ0, where H is the half-thickness of the layer and ρ0 is the initial fuel density. This factor is about 0.35 at Hρ0 ≈ 1 g cm-2 and about 0.7 at Hρ0 ≈ 5 g cm-2. The expansion stage of the flow (after reflecting the burn or detonation wave from the symmetry plane) gives the main contribution in forming the final values of the burn-up factor and the gain at Hρ0 ≈ 1 g cm-2 and increases them approximately two times at Hρ0 ≈ 5 g cm-2. In the case of the proton driver, the final value of the gain is about 200 at Hρ0 ≈ 1 g cm-2 and about 2000 at Hρ0 ≈ 5 g cm-2. In the case of the laser driver, the above values are four times less in conformity with the difference between the driver energies.

  11. Eddy genesis and manipulation in plane laminar shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholle, M.; Haas, A.; Aksel, N.; Wilson, M. C. T.; Thompson, H. M.; Gaskell, P. H.

    2009-07-01

    Eddy formation and presence in a plane laminar shear flow configuration consisting of two infinitely long plates orientated parallel to each other is investigated theoretically. The upper plate, which is planar, drives the flow; the lower one has a sinusoidal profile and is fixed. The governing equations are solved via a full finite element formulation for the general case and semianalytically at the Stokes flow limit. The effects of varying geometry (involving changes in the mean plate separation or the amplitude and wavelength of the lower plate) and inertia are explored separately. For Stokes flow and varying geometry, excellent agreement between the two methods of solution is found. Of particular interest with regard to the flow structure is the importance of the clearance that exists between the upper plate and the tops of the corrugations forming the lower one. When the clearance is large, an eddy is only present at sufficiently large amplitudes or small wavelengths. However, as the plate clearance is reduced, a critical value is found, which triggers the formation of an eddy in an otherwise fully attached flow for any finite amplitude and arbitrarily large wavelength. This is a precursor to the primary eddy to be expected in the lid-driven cavity flow, which is formed in the limit of zero clearance between the plates. The influence of the flow driving mechanism is assessed by comparison with corresponding solutions for the case of gravity-driven fluid films flowing over an undulating substrate. When inertia is present, the flow generally becomes asymmetrical. However, it is found that for large mean plate separations the flow local to the lower plate becomes effectively decoupled from the inertia dominated overlying flow if the wavelength of the lower plate is sufficiently small. In such cases the local flow retains its symmetry. A local Reynolds number based on the wavelength is shown to be useful in characterizing these large-gap flows. As the mean plate

  12. An Improvement on SSA Congruence for Geometry and Trigonometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeshurun, Shraga; Kay, David C.

    1983-01-01

    Three ideas are explored: (1) an improvement of the SSA congruence theorem for trigonometry; (2) a discussion of the failure of SSA in spherical geometry; and (3) an extension of SSA to spherical geometry and hyperbolic geometry. (MNS)

  13. Characterization of DECam focal plane detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Diehl, H.Thomas; Angstadt, Robert; Campa, Julia; Cease, Herman; Derylo, Greg; Emes, John H.; Estrada, Juan; Kibik, Donna; Flaugher, Brenna L.; Holland, Steve E.; Jonas, Michelle; /Fermilab /Madrid, CIEMAT /LBL, Berkeley /Argonne /Pennsylvania U.

    2008-06-01

    DECam is a 520 Mpix, 3 square-deg FOV imager being built for the Blanco 4m Telescope at CTIO. This facility instrument will be used for the 'Dark Energy Survey' of the southern galactic cap. DECam has chosen 250 ?m thick CCDs, developed at LBNL, with good QE in the near IR for the focal plane. In this work we present the characterization of these detectors done by the DES team, and compare it to the DECam technical requirements. The results demonstrate that the detectors satisfy the needs for instrument.

  14. Experiments with unilateral bite planes in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Sergl, H G; Farmland, M

    1975-04-01

    1. Insertion of bite planes on the right mandibular lateral teeth of eight young rabbits caused load changes in the masticatory system. Eight other animals served as controls. 2. The induced changes were equilibrated during the nine-week experimental period by adapation processes. At the end of the period all teeth were in occlusion and the glenoid fossa-condylar process distance was equal on both sides. 3. The adaptation was the result of several mechanisms working together. We found changes in the alveolar region and at distant growth structures. Cranial scolioses were observed. 4. Masticatory functional loading is a factor which regulates growth in the region of the facial skeleton.

  15. Coincidence lattices in the hyperbolic plane.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Andrade, M A; Aragón-González, G; Aragón, J L; Gómez-Rodríguez, A

    2011-01-01

    The problem of coincidences of lattices in the space R(p,q), with p + q = 2, is analyzed using Clifford algebra. We show that, as in R(n), any coincidence isometry can be decomposed as a product of at most two reflections by vectors of the lattice. Bases and coincidence indices are constructed explicitly for several interesting lattices. Our procedure is metric-independent and, in particular, the hyperbolic plane is obtained when p = q = 1. Additionally, we provide a proof of the Cartan-Dieudonné theorem for R(p,q), with p + q = 2, that includes an algorithm to decompose an orthogonal transformation into a product of reflections.

  16. Dynamic Shear Band Development in Plane Strain,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    dicular to the initial propagation direction slows (town and further straining occurs inl a hand. The ul1timlate course of events is essentially...pr scribed velocita oal ysiave e n/sec. lie order of ilacint fiie V1 = -3 I/seecorrspon i toean avera elcirt of -300/etersos(i setal *" increase inl ...Spitzig, WV.A., 1980, *Initiation of Localized Shear Bands inl Plane Siraiii..1. .1lcch. Phys. Solids. \\Vol. 28, pp. 113-128. Asaro. R.J., 1983

  17. Black Plane Solutions and Localized Gravitational Energy

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    We explore the issue of gravitational energy localization for static plane-symmetric solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell equations in 3+1 dimensions with asymptotic anti-de Sitter behavior. We apply three different energy-momentum complexes, the Einstein, Landau-Lifshitz, and Møller prescriptions, to the metric representing this category of solutions and determine the energy distribution for each. We find that the three prescriptions offer identical energy distributions, suggesting their utility for this type of model. PMID:27347499

  18. The Simbol-X Focal Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, P.

    2009-05-01

    The Simbol-X focal plane is designed to detect photons focused by the mirror in the 0.5 to 100 keV energy band. Composed of two detectors, it will measure the position, energy, and arrival time of each incoming X-ray. On top of it will be a collimator to shield all photons not coming from the mirror field of view. The whole system is surrounded by an active and passive shielding in order to ensure the required very low background.

  19. Femoral bowing plane adaptation to femoral anteversion

    PubMed Central

    Akman, Alp; Demirkan, Fahir; Sabir, Nuran; Oto, Murat; Yorukoglu, Cagdas; Kiter, Esat

    2017-01-01

    Background: Femoral bowing plane (FBP) is the unattended subject in the literature. More over the femoral shaft with its bowing is neglected in established anteversion determination methods. There is limited information about the relationship between FBP and anteversion. Thus we focused on this subject and hypothesized that there could be an adaptation of FBP to anteversion. Materials and Methods: FBP is determined on three-dimensional solid models derived from the left femoral computerized tomography data of 47 patients which were taken before for another reason and comparatively evaluated with anteversion. There were 20 women and 27 men. The mean age of patients was 56 years (range 21–84 years). Results: The anteversion values were found as the angle between a distal condylar axis (DCA) and femoral neck anteversion axis (FNAA) along an imaginary longitudinal femoral axis (LFA) in the true cranio-caudal view. The FBP was determined as a plane that passes through the centre-points of three pre-determinated sections on the femoral shaft. The angles between DCA, FNAA and FBP were comparatively evaluated. The independent samples t-test was used for statistical analysis. At the end, it was found that FBP lies nearly perpendicular to the anteversion axis for the mean of our sample which is around 89° in females and 93° in males (range 78–102°). On the other hand, FBP does not lie close to the sagittal femoral plane (SFP); instead, there is an average 12.5° external rotation relative to the SFP. FBP is correlated well with anteversion in terms of FBP inclination from SFP and femoral torsion (i.e., angle between FBP and femoral neck anteversion axis (P < 0.001; r = 0.680 and r = −0.682, respectively). Combined correlation is perfect (R2 = 1) as the FBP, SFP, and posterior femoral plane forms a triangle in the cranio-caudal view. Conclusions: We found that FBP adapts to anteversion. As FBP lies close to perpendicularity for the mean, femoral component positioning

  20. Plane Strain Deformation in Generalized Thermoelastic Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Nidhi; Kumar, Rajneesh; Ram, Paras

    2008-08-01

    The present investigation is concerned with plane strain deformation in homogeneous isotropic generalized thermoelastic diffusion subjected to a normal force, thermal source, and chemical potential source. Laplace and Fourier transform techniques are employed to solve the problem. The integral transform have been inverted by using a numerical technique to obtain the displacements, stresses, temperature distribution, and chemical potential distribution. The numerical results of these quantities are illustrated graphically to depict the response of various sources in the theories of thermoelastic diffusion and thermoelasticity for a particular model. Some particular cases have been deduced from the present investigation.

  1. Plane wave reflection at flow intakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, P. O. A. L.

    1987-06-01

    A treatment is presented for prediction of the acoustic field associated with an open duct termination whose inflow is at a mean Mach number, and requires a quantitative description of both the acoustic and flow conditions in the vicinity of the open end. This problem is presently simplified by restricting the acoustic field within the duct to plane wave motion, with component wave amplitudes p(+) and p(-), where p(+) is incident at the termination. A 'vena contracta' develops in the pipe just downstream of the intake, leading to a significant mean pressure loss.

  2. Optimizing snake locomotion on an inclined plane.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolin; Osborne, Matthew T; Alben, Silas

    2014-01-01

    We develop a model to study the locomotion of snakes on inclined planes. We determine numerically which snake motions are optimal for two retrograde traveling-wave body shapes, triangular and sinusoidal waves, across a wide range of frictional parameters and incline angles. In the regime of large transverse friction coefficients, we find power-law scalings for the optimal wave amplitudes and corresponding costs of locomotion. We give an asymptotic analysis to show that the optimal snake motions are traveling waves with amplitudes given by the same scaling laws found in the numerics.

  3. Braiding patterns on an inclined plane.

    PubMed

    Mertens, Keith; Putkaradze, Vakhtang; Vorobieff, Peter

    2004-07-08

    A jet of fluid flowing down a partially wetting, inclined plane usually meanders but--by maintaining a constant flow rate--meandering can be suppressed, leading to the emergence of a beautiful braided structure. Here we show that this flow pattern can be explained by the interplay between surface tension, which tends to narrow the jet, and fluid inertia, which drives the jet to widen. These observations dispel misconceptions about the relationship between braiding and meandering that have persisted for over 20 years.

  4. Fault plane orientations of intermediate-depth and deep-focus earthquakes in the Japan-Kuril-Kamchatka subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Linda M.; Baluyut, Elena C.; Osburg, Timothy; Lisac, Kristen; Kokkinen, Siiri

    2015-12-01

    In the northwestern Pacific, the Pacific plate subducts to the west at the Japan, Kuril, and Kamchatka trenches. Throughout most of the subduction zone, the subducting slab is planar and dipping at an angle of 30°-60°, with the exception of a fold in the southern Kuril segment. To investigate how the slab deforms in response to the applied forces and which mechanism generates the earthquakes, we analyze the rupture properties of 111 large (MW≥5.7) intermediate-depth and deep-focus earthquakes (60-656 km depth) from 1990 to 2014 in the Japan-Kuril-Kamchatka subduction zone. For each earthquake, we use rupture directivity to estimate rupture direction and rupture speed and to distinguish the fault plane from the auxiliary plane of the focal mechanism. Seventy six percent of the earthquakes with sufficient station coverage are well modeled by unilateral rupture propagation. The estimated rupture speeds range from zero to supershear. The estimated rupture directions allow identification of the fault plane as the more horizontal nodal plane for 30 earthquakes, while an additional 11 earthquakes rupture toward the intersection of the nodal planes, so the fault plane cannot be identified. Combining our newly identified fault planes with previously identified fault planes in the region, we observe that in planar slab segments, most earthquakes slip along a dominant fault orientation. For a steeply dipping slab, this orientation is subhorizontal. In more sharply bent slab segments, such as the Kuril fold, deformation is accommodated along more variable fault orientations, including subvertical faults. The correlation of slab geometry with fault orientation suggests that the local stress field controls fault orientations.

  5. Fault Plane Orientations of Intermediate-Depth Earthquakes in South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, L. M.

    2013-12-01

    Extending from Colombia in the north to Chile and Argentina in the south, the South American subduction zone exhibits considerable variation: the subduction angle alternates between flat and steep; the subducting plate has complex structures such as ridges, plateaus, and fracture zones; and late Cenozoic volcanism in the overlying plate has gaps. I investigate the effect of these differences in incoming plate structure and subduction geometry on intermediate-depth earthquakes and use the results to test hypotheses for why intermediate-depth earthquakes occur. For all large (Mw ≥5.7) intermediate-depth earthquakes (60-360 km depth) in South America since 1990, I analyze rupture directivity to try to distinguish which of the two possible fault planes of the focal mechanism slipped in the earthquake. Of the 163 earthquakes that met the selection criteria, half were recorded with a sufficient distribution of stations to determine if there was directivity to the rupture and fault planes were identified for 31 events. Fault plane orientations are spatially coherent. In regions with "normal" subduction angles, such as the Central Volcanic Zone (southern Peru to central Chile), results are consistent with previous studies in Central America and the western Pacific subduction zones: most earthquakes rupture along subhorizontal faults and rupture azimuths are randomly distributed. In the Peruvian Flat Slab, identified fault planes dip eastward. After taking into account the angle of subduction, these faults are perpendicular to the faults that rupture in regions with normal subduction angles. Within sharply curved slab segments, such as the rebending of the plate at the eastern edge of the Peruvian flat slab, both orientations of faults slip. The observed flip in dominant fault plane orientation on either side of sharply curved slab segments suggests that bending and unbending stresses have an important role in controlling fault orientations. Pre-existing weak zones may

  6. Geometry-induced protein pattern formation.

    PubMed

    Thalmeier, Dominik; Halatek, Jacob; Frey, Erwin

    2016-01-19

    Protein patterns are known to adapt to cell shape and serve as spatial templates that choreograph downstream processes like cell polarity or cell division. However, how can pattern-forming proteins sense and respond to the geometry of a cell, and what mechanistic principles underlie pattern formation? Current models invoke mechanisms based on dynamic instabilities arising from nonlinear interactions between proteins but neglect the influence of the spatial geometry itself. Here, we show that patterns can emerge as a direct result of adaptation to cell geometry, in the absence of dynamical instability. We present a generic reaction module that allows protein densities robustly to adapt to the symmetry of the spatial geometry. The key component is an NTPase protein that cycles between nucleotide-dependent membrane-bound and cytosolic states. For elongated cells, we find that the protein dynamics generically leads to a bipolar pattern, which vanishes as the geometry becomes spherically symmetrical. We show that such a reaction module facilitates universal adaptation to cell geometry by sensing the local ratio of membrane area to cytosolic volume. This sensing mechanism is controlled by the membrane affinities of the different states. We apply the theory to explain AtMinD bipolar patterns in [Formula: see text] EcMinDE Escherichia coli. Due to its generic nature, the mechanism could also serve as a hitherto-unrecognized spatial template in many other bacterial systems. Moreover, the robustness of the mechanism enables self-organized optimization of protein patterns by evolutionary processes. Finally, the proposed module can be used to establish geometry-sensitive protein gradients in synthetic biological systems.

  7. PLANING MILL, FIRST FLOOR INTERIOR, LOOKING SOUTH. THE LARGE DEVICE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PLANING MILL, FIRST FLOOR INTERIOR, LOOKING SOUTH. THE LARGE DEVICE IS A WHEEL BORING MACHINE USED DURING THE TIME THIS AREA WAS A WHEEL SHOP. - Southern Pacific, Sacramento Shops, Planing Mill, 111 I Street, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  8. 55. LOOKING EAST FROM HEAD OF PLANE 2 EAST. POWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    55. LOOKING EAST FROM HEAD OF PLANE 2 EAST. POWER HOUSE AND FLUME VISIBLE TO RIGHT, TAILRACE RUNNING THROUGH CENTER OF PHOTOGRAPH. CRADLE TO INCLINED PLANE 3 EAST IS VISIBLE IN BACKGROUND TO LEFT. - Morris Canal, Phillipsburg, Warren County, NJ

  9. 5. VIEW WEST, PERSPECTIVE UP INCLINED PLANE FROM TOP OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW WEST, PERSPECTIVE UP INCLINED PLANE FROM TOP OF ABUTMENT, FILL CONFIGURATION - Laurel Hill Quarry, Incline Plane, Both sides of State Route 56, 2.4 miles East of State Route 711, Seward, Westmoreland County, PA

  10. 2. VIEW SOUTH, PERSPECTIVE OF ABUTMENT AND INCLINED PLANE ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW SOUTH, PERSPECTIVE OF ABUTMENT AND INCLINED PLANE ON WEST SIDE OF PA ROUTE 56 - Laurel Hill Quarry, Incline Plane, Both sides of State Route 56, 2.4 miles East of State Route 711, Seward, Westmoreland County, PA

  11. 3. VIEW NORTHWEST, PERSPECTIVE OF ABUTMENT AND INCLINED PLANE ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW NORTHWEST, PERSPECTIVE OF ABUTMENT AND INCLINED PLANE ON WEST SIDE OF PA ROUTE 56 - Laurel Hill Quarry, Incline Plane, Both sides of State Route 56, 2.4 miles East of State Route 711, Seward, Westmoreland County, PA

  12. 6. VIEW WEST, PERSPECTIVE UP INCLINED PLANE FROM MIDSLOPE VICINITY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW WEST, PERSPECTIVE UP INCLINED PLANE FROM MID-SLOPE VICINITY, CUT CONFIGURATION - Laurel Hill Quarry, Incline Plane, Both sides of State Route 56, 2.4 miles East of State Route 711, Seward, Westmoreland County, PA

  13. Extensive characterization of anisotropic conductors in the Montgomery geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corraze, B.; Ribault, M.

    1994-04-01

    In very anisotropic materials the transport properties of a single crystal may be equivalent to those of a long thin bar. In this geometry we show that an extension of the Montgomery method [1] allows a detailed discussion of the experimental results. It is then possible to establish the correct value of the anisotropy of the resistivity tensor. The method is used to show that in La2CuO{4+0.018}, the conductivity is activated in the Cu-O planes while it results from variable range hopping process perpendicular to the planes as previously established. Dans le cas de matériaux très anisotropes, les propriétés de transport d'un monocristal peuvent être équivalentes à celle d'une longue barre de section quasi carrée. Dans cette géométrie, nous avons analysé en détail les erreurs introduites par l'emploi de la technique de Montgomery [1]. Nous proposons une extension de cette méthode. Dans ces conditions, nous montrons qu'une analyse complète peut aisément permettre de choisir une géométrie de test conduisant à la détermination de l'anisotropie réelle du matériau et de sa variation thermique. La méthode est utilisée pour montrer que, dans le composé La2CuO{4+0.018}, la conductivité est activée dans les plans Cu-O alors que, perpendiculairement aux plans, nous avons montré précédemment qu'elle résulte d'un processus de sauts.

  14. Assessment of approximate computational methods for conical intersections and branching plane vectors in organic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Nikiforov, Alexander; Gamez, Jose A.; Thiel, Walter; Huix-Rotllant, Miquel; Filatov, Michael

    2014-09-28

    Quantum-chemical computational methods are benchmarked for their ability to describe conical intersections in a series of organic molecules and models of biological chromophores. Reference results for the geometries, relative energies, and branching planes of conical intersections are obtained using ab initio multireference configuration interaction with single and double excitations (MRCISD). They are compared with the results from more approximate methods, namely, the state-interaction state-averaged restricted ensemble-referenced Kohn-Sham method, spin-flip time-dependent density functional theory, and a semiempirical MRCISD approach using an orthogonalization-corrected model. It is demonstrated that these approximate methods reproduce the ab initio reference data very well, with root-mean-square deviations in the optimized geometries of the order of 0.1 Å or less and with reasonable agreement in the computed relative energies. A detailed analysis of the branching plane vectors shows that all currently applied methods yield similar nuclear displacements for escaping the strong non-adiabatic coupling region near the conical intersections. Our comparisons support the use of the tested quantum-chemical methods for modeling the photochemistry of large organic and biological systems.

  15. Cosmology in one dimension: fractal geometry, power spectra and correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Bruce N.; Rouet, Jean-Louis

    2010-12-01

    Concentrations of matter, such as galaxies and galactic clusters, originated as very small density fluctuations in the early universe. The existence of galaxy clusters and super-clusters suggests that a natural scale for the matter distribution may not exist. A point of controversy is whether the distribution is fractal and, if so, over what range of scales. One-dimensional models demonstrate that the important dynamics for cluster formation occur in the position-velocity plane. Here the development of scaling behavior and multifractal geometry is investigated for a family of one-dimensional models for three different, scale-free, initial conditions. The methodology employed includes: (1) the derivation of explicit solutions for the gravitational potential and field for a one-dimensional system with periodic boundary conditions (Ewald sums for one dimension); (2) the development of a procedure for obtaining scale-free initial conditions for the growing mode in phase space for an arbitrary power-law index; (3) the evaluation of power spectra, correlation functions, and generalized fractal dimensions at different stages of the system evolution. It is shown that a simple analytic representation of the power spectra captures the main features of the evolution, including the correct time dependence of the crossover from the linear to nonlinear regime and the transition from regular to fractal geometry. A possible physical mechanism for understanding the self-similar evolution is introduced. It is shown that hierarchical cluster formation depends both on the model and on the initial power spectrum. Under special circumstances a simple relation between the power spectrum, correlation function, and correlation dimension in the highly nonlinear regime is confirmed.

  16. The control of limb geometry in cat posture.

    PubMed Central

    Lacquaniti, F; Le Taillanter, M; Lopiano, L; Maioli, C

    1990-01-01

    1. The aim of this study is to address the problem of the controlled variable in quadrupedal stance. In particular, we considered whether the projection of the centre of mass of the body on the support surface or the joint torques or the geometrical configuration of the limbs are primarily controlled. 2. Cats were trained to stand freely on a platform which could be tilted in the sagittal plane by up to +/- 20 deg. The normal and tangential components of the contact forces at each paw were measured by means of load cells. The position of limb joints was recorded by means of the ELITE system. 3. The projection of the centre of body mass on the platform, as well as the orientation and length of limb axes, varied to only a limited extent with tilt angle. In particular, the limb axes were closely lined up with the vertical, as were the vectors of the contact forces at the paws. As a result, the torques at the proximal joints (scapula and hip) were close to zero and the torques at the other joints varied little with table tilt. 4. In order to test the different hypotheses on postural control, an external load (10-20% of the animal weight) was applied to the cat forequarters. The projected centre of mass consistently shifted forwards, contrary to the hypothesis that this parameter is controlled in stance. Instead, the geometry of limb posture remained unmodified after load application, even though the torques at forelimb joints were much greater than in the control. 5. This postural behaviour showed no sign of adaptation over a period of 24 h of continuous load application. 6. It is concluded that limb geometry is primarily controlled in stance. The results are discussed in the context of current notions on hierarchical control and body scheme. PMID:2231397

  17. Seismicity and Geometry Properties of the Hellenic Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadimitriou, E. E.; Karakostas, V. G.; Vallianatos, F.; Makropoulos, C.; Drakatos, G.

    2014-12-01

    Recent seismicity and fault plane solutions of earthquakes that occurred along the Hellenic Arc-Trench system are engaged for approximating the geometry of the subducted oceanic plate. Seismicity and focal mechanisms confirm the gentle subduction (~15o-20o) of the oceanic crust reaching a depth of 20 km at a distance of 100 km from the trench. The slab is then bending at larger angles, and in particular at ~45o up to the depth of 80 km and at ~65o up to the depth of 180 km, when seismicity ceased. This geometry of the slab is shown in a bunch of cross sections normal to the convergence strike, up to ~25o (east Crete Island). To the east the sparse inslab seismicity reveals an almost vertical dipping of the lower part (from 80 km downdip) of the descending slab. The slab interface that accommodates hazardous earthquakes is clearly nonplanar with the main seismic moment release taking place on its up-dip side. The fore-arc, upper plate seismicity, is remarkably low in comparison with both subduction and back arc seismicity, and confined inside a seismogenic layer having a width not exceeding the 20km. Offshore seismicity is spatially variable forming distinctive streaks thus revealing that parts of the oceanic crust are probably slipped aseismically. This observation along with the fact that coupling in the Hellenic arc is only about a tenth of the plate motion, imply the presence of areas of lower and higher coupling across the subduction interface. Areas of high coupling imply areas of the slab interface subjected to high normal forces and correlate with earthquake asperities. Although asperity distributions vary substantially through time, identification of such characteristics in the seismogenesis can have a significant impact in the seismic hazard assessment. This research has been co-funded by the European Union (European Social Fund) and Greek national resources under the framework of the "THALES Program: SEISMO FEAR HELLARC" project.

  18. In-plane and out-of-plane defectivity in thin films of lamellar block copolymers

    DOE PAGES

    Mahadevapuram, Nikhila; Mitra, Indranil; Bozhchenko, Alona; ...

    2015-10-29

    We investigate the ordering of poly(styrene-b-methyl methacrylate) (PS-PMMA) lamellar copolymers (periodicity L0 = 46 nm) confined between a free surface and brushed poly(styrene-r-methyl methacrylate) silicon substrate. The processing temperature was selected to eliminate wetting layers at the top and bottom interfaces, producing approximately neutral boundaries that stabilize perpendicular domain orientations. The PS-PMMA film thickness (t = 0.5L0–2.5L0) and brush grafting density (Σ = 0.2–0.6 nm–2) were systematically varied to examine their impacts on in-plane and out-of-plane ordering. Samples were characterized with a combination of high-resolution microscopy, X-ray reflectivity, and grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering. In-plane order at the top of themore » film (quantified through calculation of orientational correlation lengths) improved with tn, where the exponent n increased from 0.75 to 1 as Σ decreased from 0.6 to 0.2 nm–2. Out-of-plane defects such as tilted domains were detected in all films, and the distribution of domain tilt angles was nearly independent of t and Σ. These studies demonstrate that defectivity in perpendicular lamellar phases is three-dimensional, comprised of in-plane topological defects and out-of-plane domain tilt, with little or no correlation between these two types of disorder. As a result, strong interactions between the block copolymer and underlying substrate may trap both kinds of thermally generated defects.« less

  19. In-plane and out-of-plane defectivity in thin films of lamellar block copolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Mahadevapuram, Nikhila; Mitra, Indranil; Bozhchenko, Alona; Strzalka, Joseph; Stein, Gila E.

    2015-10-29

    We investigate the ordering of poly(styrene-b-methyl methacrylate) (PS-PMMA) lamellar copolymers (periodicity L0 = 46 nm) confined between a free surface and brushed poly(styrene-r-methyl methacrylate) silicon substrate. The processing temperature was selected to eliminate wetting layers at the top and bottom interfaces, producing approximately neutral boundaries that stabilize perpendicular domain orientations. The PS-PMMA film thickness (t = 0.5L0–2.5L0) and brush grafting density (Σ = 0.2–0.6 nm–2) were systematically varied to examine their impacts on in-plane and out-of-plane ordering. Samples were characterized with a combination of high-resolution microscopy, X-ray reflectivity, and grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering. In-plane order at the top of the film (quantified through calculation of orientational correlation lengths) improved with tn, where the exponent n increased from 0.75 to 1 as Σ decreased from 0.6 to 0.2 nm–2. Out-of-plane defects such as tilted domains were detected in all films, and the distribution of domain tilt angles was nearly independent of t and Σ. These studies demonstrate that defectivity in perpendicular lamellar phases is three-dimensional, comprised of in-plane topological defects and out-of-plane domain tilt, with little or no correlation between these two types of disorder. As a result, strong interactions between the block copolymer and underlying substrate may trap both kinds of thermally generated defects.

  20. Phase retrieval in the focal plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaessler, W.; Peter, D.; Storz, C.

    Phase retrieval in the focal plane is a very appealing technique, which would simplify the optomechanics of an Adaptive Optics (AO) system a lot and could gain sensitivity under certain conditions. For conventional AO systems the limiting magnitude of the system does not depend on the diameter of the telescope, since any wave front sensor splits the light into sub-apertures, which are in number related to the telescope diameter. Having this in mind the phase retrieval technique looks promising as it breaks this paradigm in the diffraction limited case and thus yields some gain in limiting magnitude with larger telescope diameter. Until now this path was not followed deeply in astronomical AO systems, as the solution of the inversion is non unique and demands much higher calculation power as in conventional AO. This might change with state of the art computers. We give a short overview of some existing techniques and algorithms of focal plane AO and report results of other groups, which tested them in laboratory and on sky. To solve the drawback of the large computational demands and to increase the sensitivity we propose a bootstrapping process with dynamical binning.

  1. Dense granular flows down an inclined plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ecke, Robert; Borzsonyi, Tamas

    2006-03-01

    Granular flow on a rough inclined plane is an important model system in which to study the basic rules of the dynamics of granular materials. Despite intensive study, many features of such flows are still incompletely understood. For uniformly flowing layers at relatively shallow inclination, we consider experimentally the the basic flow rheology of the granular media and propose new scalings to collapse our data for glass beads and rough sand as a function of inclination angle and particle diameter. At steep inclinations above some angle θs (θs/θr 1.3-1.5, where θr stands for the angle of repose) for flowing grains, numerics and theory predict that the surface roughness is inadequate to dissipate energy gained in the gravitational field, and the flow should continue to accelerate. We report on our experimental results on the properties of granular flows on a steeply inclined plane and define the domains of steady flows. We also discuss the instabilities of such flows leading to spatial patterns.

  2. Trajectory optimization for the National aerospace plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Ping

    1993-01-01

    While continuing the application of the inverse dynamics approach in obtaining the optimal numerical solutions, the research during the past six months has been focused on the formulation and derivation of closed-form solutions for constrained hypersonic flight trajectories. Since it was found in the research of the first year that a dominant portion of the optimal ascent trajectory of the aerospace plane is constrained by dynamic pressure and heating constraints, the application of the analytical solutions significantly enhances the efficiency in trajectory optimization, provides a better insight to understanding of the trajectory and conceivably has great potential in guidance of the vehicle. Work of this period has been reported in four technical papers. Two of the papers were presented in the AIAA Guidance, Navigation, and Control Conference (Hilton Head, SC, August, 1992) and Fourth International Aerospace Planes Conference (Orlando, FL, December, 1992). The other two papers have been accepted for publication by Journal of Guidance, Control, and Dynamics, and will appear in 1993. This report briefly summarizes the work done in the past six months and work currently underway.

  3. Burnett description for plane Poiseuille flow.

    PubMed

    Uribe, F J; Garcia, A L

    1999-10-01

    Two recent works have shown that at small Knudsen number (K) the pressure and temperature profiles in plane Poiseuille flow exhibit a different qualitative behavior from the profiles obtained by the Navier-Stokes equations. Tij and Santos [J. Stat. Phys. 76, 1399 (1994)] used the Bhatnagar-Gross-Kook model to show that the temperature profile is bimodal and the pressure profile is nonconstant. Malek-Mansour, Baras, and Garcia [Physica A 240, 255 (1997)] qualitatively confirmed these predictions in computer experiments using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method (DSMC). In this paper we compare the DSMC measurements of hydrodynamic variables and non-equilibrium fluxes with numerical solutions of the Burnett equations. Given that they are in better agreement with molecular-dynamics simulations [E. Salomons and M. Mareschal, Phys. Rev. Lett. 69, 269 (1992)] of strong shock waves than Navier-Stokes [F. J. Uribe, R. M. Velasco, and L. S. García-Colín, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 2044 (1998)], and that they are second order in Knudsen number suggests that the Burnett equations may provide a better description for large K. We find that for plane Poiseuille flow the Burnett equations do not predict the bimodal temperature profile but do recover many of the other anomalous features (e.g., nonconstant pressure and nonzero parallel heat flux).

  4. Comments on a military transatmospheric aerospace plane

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    The conceptual design of a military transatmospheric aerospace plane candidate involves the selection of the mission(s), operating environment, operational concept, payload definition, specific design choices, and a close look at the technology base. A broad range of missions and concepts were reviewed prior to the selection of the mission and concepts presented in this paper. The mission selected was CONUS based global strike. The flight profile selected was a boost-glide-skip unrefuled global range trajectory. Two concepts were selected. The first was a rocket-powered design and the second was a combined air-breathing and rocket powered design. The rocket-powered configuration is a high lift-to-drag ratio modified lifting body. The rocket engine is an advanced dual fuel linear aero-spike. The air-breathing powered configuration is a modified waverider configuration. The engine for the air-breather is a rocket based combined cycle engine. Performance and technology readiness comparisons are presented for the two concepts. The paper closes with a discussion of lessons learned about military transatmospheric aerospace planes over the past twenty years. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Burnett description for plane Poiseuille flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uribe, F. J.; Garcia, Alejandro L.

    1999-10-01

    Two recent works have shown that at small Knudsen number (K) the pressure and temperature profiles in plane Poiseuille flow exhibit a different qualitative behavior from the profiles obtained by the Navier-Stokes equations. Tij and Santos [J. Stat. Phys. 76, 1399 (1994)] used the Bhatnagar-Gross-Kook model to show that the temperature profile is bimodal and the pressure profile is nonconstant. Malek-Mansour, Baras, and Garcia [Physica A 240, 255 (1997)] qualitatively confirmed these predictions in computer experiments using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method (DSMC). In this paper we compare the DSMC measurements of hydrodynamic variables and non-equilibrium fluxes with numerical solutions of the Burnett equations. Given that they are in better agreement with molecular-dynamics simulations [E. Salomons and M. Mareschal, Phys. Rev. Lett. 69, 269 (1992)] of strong shock waves than Navier-Stokes [F. J. Uribe, R. M. Velasco, and L. S. García-Colín, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 2044 (1998)], and that they are second order in Knudsen number suggests that the Burnett equations may provide a better description for large K. We find that for plane Poiseuille flow the Burnett equations do not predict the bimodal temperature profile but do recover many of the other anomalous features (e.g., nonconstant pressure and nonzero parallel heat flux).

  6. Waveguide Metacouplers for In-Plane Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pors, Anders; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2016-06-01

    The state of polarization (SOP) is an inherent property of the vectorial nature of light and a crucial parameter in a wide range of remote sensing applications. Nevertheless, the SOP is rather cumbersome to probe experimentally, as conventional detectors respond only to the intensity of the light, hence losing the phase information between orthogonal vector components. In this work, we propose a type of polarimeter that is compact and well suited for in-plane optical circuitry while allowing for immediate determination of the SOP through simultaneous retrieval of the associated Stokes parameters. The polarimeter is based on plasmonic phase-gradient birefringent metasurfaces that facilitate normal incident light to launch in-plane photonic-waveguide modes propagating in six predefined directions with the coupling efficiencies providing a direct measure of the incident SOP. The functionality and accuracy of the polarimeter, which essentially is an all-polarization-sensitive waveguide metacoupler, is confirmed through full-wave simulations at the operation wavelength of 1.55 μ m .

  7. Stokes problems for moving half-planes.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Y; Weinbaum, S

    1995-01-01

    New exact solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations are obtained for the unbounded and bounded oscillatory and impulsive tangential edgewise motion of touching half-infinite plates in their own plane. In contrast to Stokes classical solutions for the harmonic and impulsive motion of an infinite plane wall, where the solutions are separable or have a simple similarity form, the present solutions have a two-dimensional structure in the near region of the contact between the half-infinite plates. Nevertheless, it is possible to obtain relatively simple closed-form solutions for the flow field in each case by defining new variables which greatly simplify the r- and theta- dependence of the solutions in the vicinity of the contact region. These solutions for flow in a half-infinite space are then extended to bounded flows in a channel using an image superposition technique. The impulsive motion has application to the motion near geophysical faults, whereas the oscillatory motion has arisen in the design of a novel oscillating half-plate flow chamber for examining the effect of fluid shear stress on cultured cell monolayers.

  8. Object tracking based on bit-planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Na; Zhao, Xiangmo; Liu, Ying; Li, Daxiang; Wu, Shiqian; Zhao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Visual object tracking is one of the most important components in computer vision. The main challenge for robust tracking is to handle illumination change, appearance modification, occlusion, motion blur, and pose variation. But in surveillance videos, factors such as low resolution, high levels of noise, and uneven illumination further increase the difficulty of tracking. To tackle this problem, an object tracking algorithm based on bit-planes is proposed. First, intensity and local binary pattern features represented by bit-planes are used to build two appearance models, respectively. Second, in the neighborhood of the estimated object location, a region that is most similar to the models is detected as the tracked object in the current frame. In the last step, the appearance models are updated with new tracking results in order to deal with environmental and object changes. Experimental results on several challenging video sequences demonstrate the superior performance of our tracker compared with six state-of-the-art tracking algorithms. Additionally, our tracker is more robust to low resolution, uneven illumination, and noisy video sequences.

  9. Extension and contraction of faulted marker planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Marie D.; Delaney, Paul T.

    1985-08-01

    We present graphical and analytical methods to determine the extensional or contractional separation of a faulted planar marker using commonly measured field data: fault attitude, slip direction, and bedding or other marker-plane attitude. This determination is easily accomplished for horizontal markers. Faults with normal components of slip extend the markers and indicate extensional tectonics; those with reverse components are contractional. Although the methods quantify this simple relation for horizontal markers, they are most useful in rocks with planar fabrics of steep dip where marker separation cannot be uniquely determined from map or outcrop patterns alone and where faults with normal components of dip slip can contract markers and those with reverse components can extend them. The methods rely on two parameters: (1) the angle between normals to the marker and fault planes and (2) the angle between the slip direction and intersection of the marker and fault. This second parameter measures the obliquity of slip relative to the directions of maximum extensional or contractional separation of the marker, and for a horizontal marker, it is equivalent to the rake of the slip direction. The graphical method requires stereographic projections routinely used for faulting data; the analytical method is programmable on a calculator. *Present address: Department of Applied Earth Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94035

  10. Beam geometry selection using sequential beam addition

    SciTech Connect

    Popple, Richard A. Brezovich, Ivan A.; Fiveash, John B.

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: The selection of optimal beam geometry has been of interest since the inception of conformal radiotherapy. The authors report on sequential beam addition, a simple beam geometry selection method, for intensity modulated radiation therapy. Methods: The sequential beam addition algorithm (SBA) requires definition of an objective function (score) and a set of candidate beam geometries (pool). In the first iteration, the optimal score is determined for each beam in the pool and the beam with the best score selected. In the next iteration, the optimal score is calculated for each beam remaining in the pool combined with the beam selected in the first iteration, and the best scoring beam is selected. The process is repeated until the desired number of beams is reached. The authors selected three treatment sites, breast, lung, and brain, and determined beam arrangements for up to 11 beams from a pool comprised of 25 equiangular transverse beams. For the brain, arrangements were additionally selected from a pool of 22 noncoplanar beams. Scores were determined for geometries comprised equiangular transverse beams (EQA), as well as two tangential beams for the breast case. Results: In all cases, SBA resulted in scores superior to EQA. The breast case had the strongest dependence on beam geometry, for which only the 7-beam EQA geometry had a score better than the two tangential beams, whereas all SBA geometries with more than two beams were superior. In the lung case, EQA and SBA scores monotonically improved with increasing number of beams; however, SBA required fewer beams to achieve scores equivalent to EQA. For the brain case, SBA with a coplanar pool was equivalent to EQA, while the noncoplanar pool resulted in slightly better scores; however, the dose-volume histograms demonstrated that the differences were not clinically significant. Conclusions: For situations in which beam geometry has a significant effect on the objective function, SBA can identify

  11. 63. CANAL BOAT IN CRADLE AT TOP OF PLANE. TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    63. CANAL BOAT IN CRADLE AT TOP OF PLANE. TO PASS OVER THE SUMMIT (THE HUMP OF LAND AT THE TOP OF PLANE TO HOLD BACK THE WATER AT THAT LEVEL), THE BOATS HAVE SEEN HINGED AND TWO CRADLES ARE USED TO CARRY THE BOAT UP THE PLANE. - Morris Canal, Phillipsburg, Warren County, NJ

  12. 1. LOOKING TOWARD PLANE 9 WEST. BASIN HAS BEEN DRAINED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. LOOKING TOWARD PLANE 9 WEST. BASIN HAS BEEN DRAINED AND SLOPE OF PLANE 9 IS VISIBLE BETWEEN ROW OF TREES IN BACKGROUND. STONEWORK ON LEFT IS ABUTMENT TO BRIDGE THAT CROSSED OVER THE CANAL. - Morris Canal, Inclined Plane 9 West, Port Warren, Warren County, NJ

  13. Localized and chaotic folding: the role of axial plane structures.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Bruce E; Ord, Alison

    2012-04-28

    Most natural fold systems are not sinusoidal in profile. A widely held view is that such irregularity derives solely from inherited initial geometrical perturbations. Although, undoubtedly, initial perturbations can contribute to irregularity, we explore a different (but complementary) view in which the irregular geometry results from some material or system softening process. This arises because the buckling response of a layer (or layers) embedded in a weaker matrix is controlled in a sensitive manner by the nature of the reaction forces exerted by the deforming matrix on the layer. In many theoretical treatments of the folding problem, this reaction force is assumed to be a linear function of some measure of the deformation or deformation rate. This paper is concerned with the influence of nonlinear reaction forces such as arise from nonlinear elasticity or viscosity. Localized folds arising from nonlinearity form in a fundamentally different way than the Biot wavelength selection process. As a particular example of nonlinear behaviour, we examine the influence of axial plane structures made up of layers of different mineralogy formed by chemical differentiation processes accompanying the deformation; they are referred to as metamorphic layering. The alternating mineralogical composition in the metamorphic layers means that the embedding matrix exerts a reaction force on the folded layers that varies not only with the deflection or the velocity of deflection of the layer, but also in a periodic manner along the length of the folded layers. The influence of this spatially periodic reaction force on the development of localized and chaotic folding is explored numerically.

  14. The influence of non-planar geometry on the flow within a distal end-to-side anastomosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwin, S. J.; Doorly, D. J.; Peiro, J.; Caro, C. G.

    1998-11-01

    The pattern of the flow in arteries is strongly influenced by the three-dimensional shape of the geometry. Curvature and torsion of the wall geometry alters the axial velocity distribution, and introduces cross flow velocity components. In this investigation we have considered flow in a model geometry of a fully occluded 45^o distal end-to-side anastomosis. Previous investigations have typically focused on planar end-to-side anastomoses where the bypass and host vessels have a plane of symmetry. We have increased the complexity of the model by considering a non-planar geometry produced by deforming the bypass vessel out of the plane of symmetry. The flows have been numerically and experimentally investigated using a spectral/hp element algorithm and magnetic resonance imaging. The significant effect of the non-planar geometry is to introduce a bulk rotation of the two secondary flow cells present in flow within a planar geometry. A reduction in wall shear stress is observed at the bed of the anastomosis and a larger absolute flux of velocity is seen within the occluded region proximal to the anastomosis. Current investigations have considered the role of pulsatility in the form of a non-reversing sinusoidal oscillation. In this case a separation bubble, not present in the steady case, is seen at the toe of the anastomosis during the systolic part of the cycle. The role of geometry and pulsatility on particle motion has also been addressed with a view to determining the shear exposure on particle within these types of flows.

  15. Phase-field simulations of GaN growth by selective area epitaxy from complex mask geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Aagesen, Larry K.; Thornton, Katsuyo; Coltrin, Michael E.; Han, Jung

    2015-05-21

    Three-dimensional phase-field simulations of GaN growth by selective area epitaxy were performed. The model includes a crystallographic-orientation-dependent deposition rate and arbitrarily complex mask geometries. The orientation-dependent deposition rate can be determined from experimental measurements of the relative growth rates of low-index crystallographic facets. Growth on various complex mask geometries was simulated on both c-plane and a-plane template layers. Agreement was observed between simulations and experiment, including complex phenomena occurring at the intersections between facets. The sources of the discrepancies between simulated and experimental morphologies were also investigated. The model provides a route to optimize masks and processing conditions during materials synthesis for solar cells, light-emitting diodes, and other electronic and opto-electronic applications.

  16. Phase-field simulations of GaN growth by selective area epitaxy on complex mask geometries

    DOE PAGES

    Aagesen, Larry K.; Coltrin, Michael Elliott; Han, Jung; ...

    2015-05-15

    Three-dimensional phase-field simulations of GaN growth by selective area epitaxy were performed. Furthermore, this model includes a crystallographic-orientation-dependent deposition rate and arbitrarily complex mask geometries. The orientation-dependent deposition rate can be determined from experimental measurements of the relative growth rates of low-index crystallographic facets. Growth on various complex mask geometries was simulated on both c-plane and a-plane template layers. Agreement was observed between simulations and experiment, including complex phenomena occurring at the intersections between facets. The sources of the discrepancies between simulated and experimental morphologies were also investigated. We found that the model provides a route to optimize masks andmore » processing conditions during materials synthesis for solar cells, light-emitting diodes, and other electronic and opto-electronic applications.« less

  17. Phase-field simulations of GaN growth by selective area epitaxy on complex mask geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Aagesen, Larry K.; Coltrin, Michael Elliott; Han, Jung; Thornton, Katsuyo

    2015-05-15

    Three-dimensional phase-field simulations of GaN growth by selective area epitaxy were performed. Furthermore, this model includes a crystallographic-orientation-dependent deposition rate and arbitrarily complex mask geometries. The orientation-dependent deposition rate can be determined from experimental measurements of the relative growth rates of low-index crystallographic facets. Growth on various complex mask geometries was simulated on both c-plane and a-plane template layers. Agreement was observed between simulations and experiment, including complex phenomena occurring at the intersections between facets. The sources of the discrepancies between simulated and experimental morphologies were also investigated. We found that the model provides a route to optimize masks and processing conditions during materials synthesis for solar cells, light-emitting diodes, and other electronic and opto-electronic applications.

  18. Packing of charged chains on toroidal geometries?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Zhenwei; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica

    2013-03-01

    We study sequential Langmuir adsorption of a flexible charged polyelectrolyte chain on tori. In the regime of monomer-monomer electrostatic interaction dominating over thermal fluctuations, it becomes a generalized Thomson problem. Various patterns of adsorbed chain are found including double spirals, disclination-like structures, Janus tori and uniform wrappings, arising from the long-range electrostatic interaction and the toroidal geometry. Their broken mirror symmetry and energetics are analyzed. In particular, we find a power law for the electrostatic energy; the dependence of the power on the geometry of tori implies a geometric origin. Furthermore, in the regime of large thermal fluctuation, we systematically study random walks on tori that generate chain configurations; the features associated with the toroidal geometry are discussed. This work was funded by grants from the Office of the Director of Defense Research and Engineering (DDR&E) and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) under Award No. FA9550-10-1-0167.

  19. Gully geometry: what are we measuring?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casalí, J.; Giménez, R.; Campo-Bescós, M. A.

    2015-07-01

    Much of the research on (ephemeral) gully erosion comprises the determination of the geometry of these eroded channels, especially their width and depth. This is not a simple task due to uncertainty generated by the wide range of variability in gully cross section shapes found in the field. However, in the literature, this uncertainty is not recognized so that no criteria for their measurement are indicated. The aim of this work is to make researchers aware of the ambiguity that arises when characterizing the geometry of an ephemeral gully and similar eroded channels. In addition, a measurement protocol is proposed with the ultimate goal of pooling criteria in future works. It is suggested that the geometry of a gully could be characterized through its mean equivalent width and mean equivalent depth, which, together with its length, define an "equivalent prismatic gully" (EPG). The latter would facilitate the comparison between different gullies.

  20. First-order Dyson coordinates and geometry.

    PubMed

    Hermes, Matthew R; Hirata, So

    2013-08-15

    The mathematical constructs of the Dyson coordinates and geometry are introduced. The former are a unitary transformation of the normal coordinates and the anharmonic vibrational counterpart of the Dyson orbitals in electronic structure theory. The first-order Dyson coordinates bring the sums of the harmonic force constants and their first-order diagrammatic perturbation corrections (the first-order Dyson self-energy) to a diagonal form. The first-order Dyson geometry has no counterpart in electronic structure theory. It is the point on the potential energy surface at which the sums of the energy gradients and their first-order diagrammatic perturbation corrections vanish. It agrees with the vibrationally averaged geometry of vibrational self-consistent field (VSCF) theory in the bulk limit. These constructs provide a unified view of the relationship of VSCF and its diagrammatically size-consistent modifications as well as the self-consistent phonon method widely used in solid-state physics.

  1. Interfacial geometry dictates cancer cell tumorigenicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Junmin; Abdeen, Amr A.; Wycislo, Kathryn L.; Fan, Timothy M.; Kilian, Kristopher A.

    2016-08-01

    Within the heterogeneous architecture of tumour tissue there exists an elusive population of stem-like cells that are implicated in both recurrence and metastasis. Here, by using engineered extracellular matrices, we show that geometric features at the perimeter of tumour tissue will prime a population of cells with a stem-cell-like phenotype. These cells show characteristics of cancer stem cells in vitro, as well as enhanced tumorigenicity in murine models of primary tumour growth and pulmonary metastases. We also show that interfacial geometry modulates cell shape, adhesion through integrin α5β1, MAPK and STAT activity, and initiation of pluripotency signalling. Our results for several human cancer cell lines suggest that interfacial geometry triggers a general mechanism for the regulation of cancer-cell state. Similar to how a growing tumour can co-opt normal soluble signalling pathways, our findings demonstrate how cancer can also exploit geometry to orchestrate oncogenesis.

  2. The Magnetic Field Geometry of Cool Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    See, Victor; Jardine, Moira; Vidotto, Aline; Donati, Jean-Francois; Folsom, Colin; Boro Saikia, Sudeshna; Bouvier, Jerome; Fares, Rim; Gregory, Scott; Hussain, Gaitee; Jeffers, Sandra; Marsden, Stephen; Morin, Julien; Moutou, Claire; do Nascimento, Jose-Dias, Jr.; Petit, Pascal; Rosen, Lisa; Waite, Ian

    2016-06-01

    Zeeman-Doppler imaging has been used to map the large-scale surface magnetic fields of cool stars across a wide range of stellar masses and rotation periods. The derived field geometries are surprising, with many stars showing strong azimuthal fields that are not observed on the Sun. In this poster, using 100 magnetic maps of over 50 stars, we present results showing how the magnetic field geometry of cool stars varies as a function of fundamental parameters. The stellar mass, and hence internal structure, critically influences the field geometry, although this is modified by the stellar rotation rate. We discuss the implications of these results for dynamo theory and the nature of stellar magnetic activity.

  3. Geometric Monte Carlo and black Janus geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, Dongsu; Kim, Chanju; Kim, Kyung Kiu; Min, Hyunsoo; Song, Jeong-Pil

    2017-04-01

    We describe an application of the Monte Carlo method to the Janus deformation of the black brane background. We present numerical results for three and five dimensional black Janus geometries with planar and spherical interfaces. In particular, we argue that the 5D geometry with a spherical interface has an application in understanding the finite temperature bag-like QCD model via the AdS/CFT correspondence. The accuracy and convergence of the algorithm are evaluated with respect to the grid spacing. The systematic errors of the method are determined using an exact solution of 3D black Janus. This numerical approach for solving linear problems is unaffected initial guess of a trial solution and can handle an arbitrary geometry under various boundary conditions in the presence of source fields.

  4. Pearson's Functions to Describe FSW Weld Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lacombe, D.; Coupard, D.; Tcherniaeff, S.; Girot, F.; Gutierrez-Orrantia, M. E.

    2011-01-17

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a relatively new joining technique particularly for aluminium alloys that are difficult to fusion weld. In this study, the geometry of the weld has been investigated and modelled using Pearson's functions. It has been demonstrated that the Pearson's parameters (mean, standard deviation, skewness, kurtosis and geometric constant) can be used to characterize the weld geometry and the tensile strength of the weld assembly. Pearson's parameters and process parameters are strongly correlated allowing to define a control process procedure for FSW assemblies which make radiographic or ultrasonic controls unnecessary. Finally, an optimisation using a Generalized Gradient Method allows to determine the geometry of the weld which maximises the assembly tensile strength.

  5. Supersymmetric geometries of IIA supergravity III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gran, Ulf; Papadopoulos, George; von Schultz, Christian

    2016-06-01

    We find that (massive) IIA backgrounds that admit a {G}_2ltimes {mathbb{R}}^8 invariant Killing spinor must exhibit a null Killing vector field which leaves the Killing spinor invariant and that the rotation of the Killing vector field satisfies a certain g2 instanton condition. This result together with those in [4] and [5] complete the classification of geometries of all (massive) IIA backgrounds that preserve one supersymmetry. We also explore the geometry of a class of backgrounds which admit a {G}_2ltimes {mathbb{R}}^8 invariant Killing spinor and where in addition an appropriate 1-form bilinear vanishes. In all cases, we express the fluxes of the theory in terms of the geometry.

  6. Reach-Scale Channel Geometry of a Mountain River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohl, E.; Kuzma, J.; Brown, N.

    2002-12-01

    N. St. Vrain Creek drains 250 km2 of the Colorado Front Range. The basin is underlain by granitic rocks, and the upper half was glaciated. We used 25 study reaches to examine controls on reach-scale channel geometry. Variables measured included channel geometry (width, depth, gradient, bedforms), grain size, and mean velocity. Drainage area at each study reach ranged from 2.2-245 km2, and gradient from 0.013-0.147 m/m. The increase in discharge with drainage area is strongly linear. Channel types included cascade, step-pool, plane-bed and pool-riffle. We examined correlations among (1) the reach-scale response variables bankfull width (w), hydraulic radius (R), mean velocity (v), Darcy-Weisbach ff, bedform wavelength (bw) and amplitude (a), grain size, relative roughness (R/D84) and shear stress (ss), and (2) potential control variables that change progressively downstream (drainage area, discharge) or that are reach-specific (bed gradient). Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that response variables correlate most strongly with local gradient because of the segmented nature of mountain channels. Results from linear regression analyses indicate that most response variables(R/D84, D50, D84, ff, ss) correlate best with gradient, although w, w/d ratio, and bw correlate best with discharge. Multiple regression analyses using Mallow's Cp selection criterion produced similar results in that most response variables correlate strongly with gradient, although the specific variables differ from those selected with linear regressions: w, a, v, ff and ss correlate with gradient, whereas R, bw and v correlate with discharge. These results suggest that the hypothesis is partially supported: channel bed gradient is likely to be a good predictor for many reach-scale response variables along mountain rivers, but discharge is also a good predictor for some response variables. Thus, although subject to strong constraints imposed by changes in gradient and grain size supplied by

  7. Coordinate Geometry. Geometry Module for Use in a Mathematics Laboratory Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brotherton, Sheila; And Others

    This is one of a series of geometry modules developed for use by secondary students in a laboratory setting. This module includes: (1) Pythagorean Theorem (with review of radicals); (2) Basic Coordinate Geometry (distance and midpoint, slope, slope of parallels and perpendiculars, and equation of a line); (3) Selecting Coordinates; (4) Coordinate…

  8. The Effect of Dynamic Geometry Software and Physical Manipulatives on Candidate Teachers' Transformational Geometry Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yilmaz, Gül Kaleli

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of using Dynamic Geometry Software (DGS) Cabri II Plus and physical manipulatives on the transformational geometry achievement of candidate teachers. In this study, the semi-experimental method was used, consisting of two experimental and one control groups. The samples of this study were 117 students. A…

  9. Using Dynamic Geometry Software to Improve Eight Grade Students' Understanding of Transformation Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guven, Bulent

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the effect of dynamic geometry software (DGS) on students' learning of transformation geometry. A pre- and post-test quasi-experimental design was used. Participants in the study were 68 eighth grade students (36 in the experimental group and 32 in the control group). While the experimental group students were studying the…

  10. Aspects of electrostatics in BTZ geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Y.; Hurovich, V.; Santillán, O.; Simeone, C.

    2015-10-01

    In the present paper the electrostatics of charges in nonrotating BTZ black hole and wormhole spacetimes is studied. Our attention is focused on the self-force of a point charge in the geometry, for which a regularization prescription based on the Haddamard Green function is employed. The differences between the self-force in both cases is a theoretical experiment for distinguishing both geometries, which otherwise are locally indistinguishable. This idea was applied before to four and higher-dimensional black holes by the present and other authors. However, the particularities of the BTZ geometry makes the analysis considerable more complicated than those. First, the BTZ spacetimes are not asymptotically flat but instead asymptotically AdS. In addition, the relative distance d (r ,r +1 ) between two particles located at a radius r and r +1 in the geometry tends to zero when r →∞. This behavior, which is radically different in a flat geometry, changes the analysis of the asymptotic conditions for the electrostatic field. The other problem is that there exist several regularization methods other than the one we are employing, and there does not exist a proof in three dimensions that they are equivalent. However, we focus on the Haddamard method and obtain an expression for the hypothetical self-force in series, and the resulting expansion is convergent to the real solution. We suspect that the convergence is not uniform, and furthermore there are no summation formulas at our disposal. It appears, for points that are far away from the black hole the calculation of the Haddamard self-force requires higher-order summation. These subtleties are carefully analyzed in the paper, and it is shown that they lead to severe problems when calculating the Haddamard self-force for asymptotic points in the geometry.

  11. Turbulent Plane Wakes Subjected to Successive Strains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Michael M.

    2003-01-01

    Six direct numerical simulations of turbulent time-evolving strained plane wakes have been examined to investigate the response of a wake to successive irrotational plane strains of opposite sign. The orientation of the applied strain field has been selected so that the flow is the time-developing analogue of a spatially developing wake evolving in the presence of either a favourable or an adverse streamwise pressure gradient. The magnitude of the applied strain rate a is constant in time t until the total strain e(sup at) reaches about four. At this point, a new simulation is begun with the sign of the applied strain being reversed (the original simulation is continued as well). When the total strain is reduced back to its original value of one, yet another simulation is begun with the sign of the strain being reversed again back to its original sign. This process is done for both initially "favourable" and initially "adverse" strains, providing simulations for each of these strain types from three different initial conditions. The evolution of the wake mean velocity deficit and width is found to be very similar for all the adversely strained cases, with both measures rapidly achieving exponential growth at the rate associated with the cross-stream expansive strain e(sup at). In the "favourably" strained cases, the wake widths approach a constant and the velocity deficits ultimately decay rapidly as e(sup -2at). Although all three of these cases do exhibit the same asymptotic exponential behaviour, the time required to achieve this is longer for the cases that have been previously adversely strained (by at approx. equals 1). These simulations confirm the generality of the conclusions drawn in Rogers (2002) regarding the response of plane wakes to strain. The evolution of strained wakes is not consistent with the predictions of classical self-similar analysis; a more general equilibrium similarity solution is required to describe the results. At least for the cases

  12. Eta Carinae: Orientation of The Orbital Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, T. R.; Nielsen, K. E.; Ivarsson, S.; Corcoran, M. F.; Verner, E.; Hillier, J. D.

    2006-01-01

    Evidence continues to build that Eta Carinae is a massive binary system with a hidden hot companion in a highly elliptical orbit. We present imaging and spectroscopic evidence that provide clues to the orientation of the orbital plane. The circumstellar ejecta, known as the Homunculus and Little Homunculus, are hourglass-shaped structures, one encapsulated within the other, tilted at about 45 degrees from the sky plane. A disk region lies between the bipolar lobes. Based upon their velocities and proper motions, Weigelt blobs B, C and D, very bright emission clumps 0.1 to 0.3" Northwest from Eta Carinae, lie in the disk. UV flux from the hot companion, Eta Car B, photoexcites the Weigelt blobs. Other clumps form a complete chain around the star, but are not significantly photoexcited. The strontium filament, a 'neutral' emission structure, lies in the same general direction as the Weigelt blobs and exhibits peculiar properties indicative that much mid-UV, but no hydrogen-ionizing radiation impinges on this structure. It is shielded by singly-ionized iron. P Cygni absorptions in Fe I I lines, seen directly in line of sight from Eta Carinae, are absent in the stellar light scattered by the Weigelt blobs. Rather than a strong absorption extending to -600 km/s, a low velocity absorption feature extends from -40 to -150 km/s. No absorbing Fe II exists between Eta Carinae and Weigelt D, but the outer reaches of the wind are intercepted in line of sight from Weigelt D to the observer. This indicates that the UV radiation is constrained by the dominating wind of Eta Car A to a small cavity carved out by the weaker wind of Eta Car B. Since the high excitation nebular lines are seen in the Weigelt blobs at most phases, the cavity, and hence the major axis of the highly elliptical orbit, must lie in the general direction of the Weigelt blobs. The evidence is compelling that the orbital major axis of Eta Carinae is projected at -45 degrees position angle on the sky. Moreover

  13. Hybrid Image-Plane/Stereo Manipulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgartner, Eric; Robinson, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    Hybrid Image-Plane/Stereo (HIPS) manipulation is a method of processing image data, and of controlling a robotic manipulator arm in response to the data, that enables the manipulator arm to place an end-effector (an instrument or tool) precisely with respect to a target (see figure). Unlike other stereoscopic machine-vision-based methods of controlling robots, this method is robust in the face of calibration errors and changes in calibration during operation. In this method, a stereoscopic pair of cameras on the robot first acquires images of the manipulator at a set of predefined poses. The image data are processed to obtain image-plane coordinates of known visible features of the end-effector. Next, there is computed an initial calibration in the form of a mapping between (1) the image-plane coordinates and (2) the nominal three-dimensional coordinates of the noted end-effector features in a reference frame fixed to the main robot body at the base of the manipulator. The nominal three-dimensional coordinates are obtained by use of the nominal forward kinematics of the manipulator arm that is, calculated by use of the currently measured manipulator joint angles and previously measured lengths of manipulator arm segments under the assumption that the arm segments are rigid, that the arm lengths are constant, and that there is no backlash. It is understood from the outset that these nominal three-dimensional coordinates are likely to contain possibly significant calibration errors, but the effects of the errors are progressively reduced, as described next. As the end-effector is moved toward the target, the calibration is updated repeatedly by use of data from newly acquired images of the end-effector and of the corresponding nominal coordinates in the manipulator reference frame. By use of the updated calibration, the coordinates of the target are computed in manipulator-reference-frame coordinates and then used to the necessary manipulator joint angles to position

  14. Occlusal plane determination using custom made broadrick occlusal plane analyser: a case control study.

    PubMed

    Manvi, Supriya; Miglani, Shaveta; Rajeswari, C L; Srivatsa, G; Arora, Sarvesh

    2012-01-01

    Proper occlusal plane is an essential consideration when multiple long span posterior restorations are designed. The determination of the occlusal plane can have a profound effect on the short and long term success of a restorative case. Purpose of Study. (1) To determine the appropriate occlusal curve for individual patients. (2) To compare the deviation of the clinical occlusal curve with the ideal ones. Materials and Methods. A total of 20 subjects were examined and study models were made of their maxillary and mandibular dentition. Inter-occlusal records were made and the casts were articulated in semiadjustable articulator. An ideal occlusal plane was created. The distance of the farthest cusp tip from the Broadrick curve was measured along the long axis of the tooth for each individual. Paired t-tests were used to compare the findings between subjects and controls. Results. A statistically significant difference P < 0.05 was found in the deviation from the Broadrick curve between patients who have lost posterior teeth and the control group who had a full dentition with no missing teeth. Conclusion. Proper utilization of the broadrick flag on a semi-adjustable articulator will allow for a correct determination of the occlusal plane.

  15. Connes distance function on fuzzy sphere and the connection between geometry and statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, Yendrembam Chaoba; Prajapat, Shivraj; Mukhopadhyay, Aritra K.; Chakraborty, Biswajit; Scholtz, Frederik G.

    2015-04-01

    An algorithm to compute Connes spectral distance, adaptable to the Hilbert-Schmidt operatorial formulation of non-commutative quantum mechanics, was developed earlier by introducing the appropriate spectral triple and used to compute infinitesimal distances in the Moyal plane, revealing a deep connection between geometry and statistics. In this paper, using the same algorithm, the Connes spectral distance has been calculated in the Hilbert-Schmidt operatorial formulation for the fuzzy sphere whose spatial coordinates satisfy the su(2) algebra. This has been computed for both the discrete and the Perelemov's SU(2) coherent state. Here also, we get a connection between geometry and statistics which is shown by computing the infinitesimal distance between mixed states on the quantum Hilbert space of a particular fuzzy sphere, indexed by n ∈ ℤ/2.

  16. Spectral element simulations of laminar and turbulent flows in complex geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karniadakis, George EM

    1989-01-01

    Spectral element methods are high-order weighted residual techniques based on spectral expansions of variables and geometry for the Navier-Stokes (NS) and transport equations. Here, practical aspects of these methods and their efficient implementation are examined, and several examples of flows in truly complex geometries are presented. The spectral element discretization for NS equations is introduced, and the convergence of the method is addressed. An efficient data management scheme is discussed in the context of parallel processing computations. The method is validated by comparing the spectral element solutions with the exact eigensolutions for the Orr-Sommerfeld equations in two and three dimensions. Computer-aided flow visualizations are presented for an impulsive flow past a sharp edge wedge. Three-dimensional states of channel flow disrupted by an array of cylindrical eddy promoters are studied, and the results of a direct simulation of the turbulent flow in a plane channel are presented.

  17. Topological expansion of the Bethe ansatz, and non-commutative algebraic geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eynard, B.; Marchal, O.

    2009-03-01

    In this article, we define a non-commutative deformation of the ``symplectic invariants'' (introduced in [13]) of an algebraic hyperelliptic plane curve. The necessary condition for our definition to make sense is a Bethe ansatz. The commutative limit reduces to the symplectic invariants, i.e. algebraic geometry, and thus we define non-commutative deformations of some algebraic geometry quantities. In particular our non-commutative Bergman kernel satisfies a Rauch variational formula. Those non-commutative invariants are inspired from the large N expansion of formal non-hermitian matrix models. Thus they are expected to be related to the enumeration problem of discrete non-orientable surfaces of arbitrary topologies.

  18. Connes distance function on fuzzy sphere and the connection between geometry and statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Devi, Yendrembam Chaoba Chakraborty, Biswajit; Prajapat, Shivraj; Mukhopadhyay, Aritra K.; Scholtz, Frederik G.

    2015-04-15

    An algorithm to compute Connes spectral distance, adaptable to the Hilbert-Schmidt operatorial formulation of non-commutative quantum mechanics, was developed earlier by introducing the appropriate spectral triple and used to compute infinitesimal distances in the Moyal plane, revealing a deep connection between geometry and statistics. In this paper, using the same algorithm, the Connes spectral distance has been calculated in the Hilbert-Schmidt operatorial formulation for the fuzzy sphere whose spatial coordinates satisfy the su(2) algebra. This has been computed for both the discrete and the Perelemov’s SU(2) coherent state. Here also, we get a connection between geometry and statistics which is shown by computing the infinitesimal distance between mixed states on the quantum Hilbert space of a particular fuzzy sphere, indexed by n ∈ ℤ/2.

  19. Optimal plane changes using third-body forces.

    PubMed

    Villac, B F; Scheeres, D J

    2004-05-01

    The fuel optimality of third-body driven plane changes (i.e., plane changes performed by using third-body forces) over one-impulse transfers is investigated numerically and analytically. In particular, the range of third-body driven plane changes that are realizable is shown to be restricted and one impulse must be used in the uncovered regions. However, when third-body driven plane changes are realizable, it is shown that they are always optimal above a certain critical value (about 40 degrees ) that depends on the initial condition. Contour plots of optimal DeltaV values to perform a desired plane changes are given.

  20. Holographic Geometries for Condensed Matter Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keränen, V.; Thorlacius, L.

    2015-01-01

    Holographic modeling of strongly correlated many-body systems motivates the study of novel spacetime geometries where the scaling behavior of quantum critical systems is encoded into spacetime symmetries. Einstein-Dilaton-Maxwell theory has planar black brane solutions that exhibit Lifshitz scaling and in some cases hyperscaling violation. Entanglement entropy and Wilson loops in the dual field theory are studied by inserting simple geometric probes involving minimal surfaces into the black brane geometry. Coupling to background matter fields leads to interesting low-energy behavior in holographic models, such as U(1) symmetry breaking and emergent Lifshitz scaling.