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Sample records for plane load-bearing structures

  1. Ceramic Fiber Structures for Cryogenic Load-Bearing Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaskowiak, Martha H.; Eckel, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    This invention is intended for use as a load-bearing device under cryogenic temperatures and/or abrasive conditions (i.e., during missions to the Moon). The innovation consists of small-diameter, ceramic fibers that are woven or braided into devices like ropes, belts, tracks, or cables. The fibers can be formed from a variety of ceramic materials like silicon carbide, carbon, aluminosilicate, or aluminum oxide. The fiber architecture of the weave or braid is determined by both the fiber properties and the mechanical requirements of the application. A variety of weave or braid architectures is possible for this application. Thickness of load-bearing devices can be achieved by using either a 3D woven structure, or a layered, 2D structure. For the prototype device, a belt approximately 0.10 in. (0.25 cm) thick, and 3.0 in. (7.6 cm) wide was formed by layering and stitching a 2D aluminosilicate fiber weave.

  2. Conformal Load-Bearing Antenna Structure for Australian Defence Force Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    while the F/A-18 has over 70. Large antenna structures , such as reflecting dishes or planar arrays, are usually housed in fairings or radomes ...manufacturing issues related to incorporating antenna into glass fibre/ ceramic structural armour [24]. A.2.4 USAF The goals of USAF CLAS programs have been...Conformal Load-Bearing Antenna Structure for Australian Defence Force Aircraft Paul J. Callus Air Vehicles Division Defence Science and

  3. Composite load bearing outer skin for an arctic structure and a method for erecting same

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Birdy, J. N.; Watt, B. J.

    1985-08-27

    The load bearing outer skin contains an inner assembly and an outer assembly. Both the inner and outer assemblies include a skin plate member which is stiffened by stiffeners welded to one side of the skin plate member. The stiffeners are located at spaced intervals from each other and are disposed substantially perpendicular to the skin plate member. The inner and outer assembly are placed substantially parallel to each other to form a composite structure having an internal cavity defined by the inner and outer plates. The stiffeners of the inner assembly and the outer assembly are disposed in the cavity at a spaced relation to each other and extend partly into the cavity. A cementitious material substantially fills the cavity thereby completing the load bearing outer skin structure. The stiffeners may be flat steel plates or may have the profile of structural shapes such as angles or T's among others.

  4. Influence of structural load-bearing scaffolds on mechanical load- and BMP-2-mediated bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Anna M; Mason, Devon E; Lin, Angela S P; Guldberg, Robert E; Boerckel, Joel D

    2016-09-01

    A common design constraint in functional tissue engineering is that scaffolds intended for use in load-bearing sites possess similar mechanical properties to the replaced tissue. Here, we tested the hypothesis that in vivo loading would enhance bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2)-mediated bone regeneration in the presence of a load-bearing PLDL scaffold, whose pores and central core were filled with BMP-2-releasing alginate hydrogel. First, we evaluated the effects of in vivo mechanical loading on bone regeneration in the structural scaffolds. Second, we compared scaffold-mediated bone regeneration, independent of mechanical loading, with alginate hydrogel constructs, without the structural scaffold, that have been shown previously to facilitate in vivo mechanical stimulation of bone formation. Contrary to our hypothesis, mechanical loading had no effect on bone formation, distribution, or biomechanical properties in structural scaffolds. Independent of loading, the structural scaffolds reduced bone formation compared to non-structural alginate, particularly in regions in which the scaffold was concentrated, resulting in impaired functional regeneration. This is attributable to a combination of stress shielding by the scaffold and inhibition of cellular infiltration and tissue ingrowth. Collectively, these data question the necessity of scaffold similarity to mature tissue at the time of implantation and emphasize development of an environment conducive to cellular activation of matrix production and ultimate functional regeneration.

  5. Structure design and manufacturing of layered bioceramic scaffolds for load-bearing bone reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing-Zhou; Hu, Xiao-Zhi; Sultana, Rumana; Edward Day, Robert; Ichim, Paul

    2015-07-08

    Bioceramic scaffolds with desired bone regeneration functions have the potential to become real alternatives to autologous bone grafts for reconstruction of load-bearing and critical-sized segmental bone defects. The aim of this paper was to develop a layered scaffold structure that has the biodegradable function of common monolithic scaffolds and adequate mechanical function for surgical fixing and after surgery support. The exemplary case of this study is assumed to be a large-segment tibia or femur bone repair. The layered scaffold structure consists of a macro porous hydroxyapatite-wollastonite layer and a strong dense zirconia matrix dense layer. The bio-functional scaffold layer with interconnected freeze-dried porous structures shows excellent apatite formation, cell attachment, and cell proliferation capabilities. The mechanical functional layer provides a bending strength matching that of the compact bone.

  6. Network structure of the mussel plaque and its significance for load bearing and adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippidi, Emmanouela; Kim, Juntae; Waite, J. Herbert; Helgeson, Matthew; Valentine, Megan T.

    2015-03-01

    Marine mussels attach to rocks, each other, and a variety of surfaces via a flat, wide plaque that is interpenetrated by the collagen fibers of a thin, long thread that connects the plaque to the mussel body. The unusually strong adhesion of the plaque has long been attributed to the molecular design of its adhesive proteins that can form a variety of strong chemical bonds. However, the molecular energies for de-adhesion are orders of magnitude smaller than the macroscopic energies measured. We propose that the mesoscopic design of the plaque is critical in enhancing load bearing and eventually adhesion. We present new results on the structure of the plaque studied via electron microscopy and neutron scattering that exhibit a plaque geometry reminiscent of structural foams. Our studies reveal a collection of pores with an inner network, further connected with an outer network. The final structure can be described by two length scales. A synthetic soft system is constructed in an effort to mimic the two-lengthscale structure of the natural plaques. The structure of the native and synthetic systems is compared with the ultimate goal of evaluating the importance of the mesoscopic structure to mechanics and adhesion. NSF MRSEC IRG-I.

  7. Active load path adaption in a simple kinematic load-bearing structure due to stiffness change in the structure's supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehb, C. M.; Platz, R.; Melz, T.

    2016-09-01

    Load-bearing structures with kinematic functions enable and disable degrees of freedom and are part of many mechanical engineering applications. The relative movement between a wheel and the body of a car or a landing gear and an aircraft fuselage are examples for load-bearing systems with defined kinematics. In most cases, the load is transmitted through a predetermined load path to the structural support interfaces. However, unexpected load peaks or varying health condition of the system's supports, which means for example varying damping and stiffness characteristics, may require an active adjustment of the load path. However, load paths transmitted through damaged or weakened supports can be the reason for reduced comfort or even failure. In this paper a simplified 2D two mass oscillator with two supports is used to numerically investigate the potential of controlled adaptive auxiliary kinematic guidance elements in a load-bearing structure to adapt the load path depending on the stiffness change, representing damage of the supports. The aim is to provide additional forces in the auxiliary kinematic guidance elements for two reasons. On the one hand, one of the two supports that may become weaker through stiffness change will be relieved from higher loading. On the other hand, tilting due to different compliance in the supports will be minimized. Therefore, shifting load between the supports during operation could be an effective option.

  8. Bioinspired structure of bioceramics for bone regeneration in load-bearing sites.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Faming; Chang, Jiang; Lu, Jianxi; Lin, Kaili; Ning, Congqin

    2007-11-01

    The major problem with the use of porous bioceramics as bone regeneration grafts is their weak mechanical strength, which has not been overcome to date. Here we described a novel way to solve this problem. Beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) bioceramics with a bioinspired structure were designed and prepared with a porous cancellous core (porosity: 70-90%) inside and a dense compact shell (porosity: 5-10%) outside that mimics the characteristics of natural bone. They showed excellent mechanical properties, with a compressive strength of 10-80MPa and an elastic modulus of 180MPa-1.0GPa, which could be tailored by the dense/porous cross-sectional area ratio obeying the rule of exponential growth. The in vitro degradation of the bioinspired bioceramics was faster than that of dense bioceramics but slower than that of porous counterparts. The changes in mechanical properties of the bioinspired ceramics during in vitro degradation were also investigated. A concept of the bioinspired macrostructure design of natural bone was proposed which provided a simple but effective way to increase the mechanical properties of porous bioceramics for load-bearing bone regeneration applications. It should be readily applicable to other porous materials.

  9. Compliant load-bearing skins and structures for morphing aircraft applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olympio, Kingnide Raymond

    Aircraft morphing has the potential to significantly improve the performance of an aircraft over its flight envelope and expand its ight capability to allow it to perform dramatically different missions. The multiple projects carried on in the past three decades have considerably helped improve the designing of actuation systems and the utilization of smart materials for morphing aircraft structures. However, morphing aircraft and especially aircraft undergoing large shape change still face some significant technical issues. Among them, the skin covering the morphing structure must meet challenging requirements that no current conventional material fully satisfy. The design of such skin, which should be able to undergo large deformations and to carry air-loads, has received some attention in the last several years but no satisfactory solution has been found yet. In the current study, the design of compliant cellular structures and flexible skins for morphing aircraft structures is investigated for two different morphing deformations. The first morphing deformation considered corresponds to one-dimensional morphing which is representative of a wing or blade changing its chord or span. The second morphing deformation considered is shear-compression morphing which can be found in some morphing wing undergoing change in area, sweep and chord such as NextGen Aeronautics' morphing wing. Topologies of compliant cellular structures which can be used for these two types of structures are first calculated using a multi-objective approach. These topologies are calculated based on linear kinematics but the effect of geometric nonlinearities is also investigated. Then, ways to provide a smooth surface were investigated by considering a general honeycomb substructure with infill, bonded face-sheet or scales. This allowed justifying an overall skin concept made of a cellular substructure with a bonded face-sheet. Lastly, the design of an improved skin for NextGen Aeronautics

  10. Spider silk as a load bearing biomaterial: tailoring mechanical properties via structural modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Cameron P.; Rosei, Federico; Traversa, Enrico; Licoccia, Silvia

    2011-03-01

    Spider silk shows great potential as a biomaterial: in addition to biocompatibility and biodegradability, its strength and toughness are greater than native biological fibres (e.g. collagen), with toughness exceeding that of synthetic fibres (e.g. nylon). Although the ultimate tensile strength and toughness at failure are unlikely to be limiting factors, its yield strain of 2% is insufficient, particularly for biomedical application because of the inability to mimic the complex ultrastructure of natural tissues with current tissue engineering approaches. To harness the full potential of spider silk as a biomaterial, it is therefore necessary to increase its yield strain. In this paper, we discuss the means by which the mechanical properties of spider silk, particularly the yield strain, can be optimized through structural modifications.

  11. Effects of load-bearing exercise on skeletal structure and mechanics differ between outbred populations of mice.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Ian J; Judex, Stefan; Demes, Brigitte

    2015-03-01

    Effects of load-bearing exercise on skeletal structure and mechanical properties can vary between inbred strains of mice. Here, we examine whether such variation also exists at the population level. An experiment was performed with two outbred mouse stocks that have been reproductively isolated for >120 generations (Hsd:ICR, Crl:CD1). Growing females from each stock were either treated with a treadmill-running regimen for 1 month or served as controls. Limb forces were recorded with a force plate and cage activity monitored to verify that they were similar between stocks. After the experiment, femoral cortical and trabecular bone structure were quantified with micro-CT in the mid-diaphysis and distal metaphysis, respectively, and diaphyseal structural strength was determined with mechanical testing. Among Hsd:ICR mice, running led to significant improvements in diaphyseal bone quantity, structural geometry, and mechanical properties, as well as enhanced trabecular morphology. In contrast, among Crl:CD1 mice, the same running regimen had little effect on cortical and trabecular structure and significantly reduced diaphyseal resistance to fracture. In neither stock was body mass, muscle mass, or cage activity level different between runners and controls. Given that most environmental variables were controlled in this study, the differential effects of exercise on Hsd:ICR and Crl:CD1 bones were likely due to genetic differences between stocks. These results suggest that the benefits of loading for bone may vary between human populations (e.g., ethnic groups), in which case exercise programs and technologies designed to promote bone health with mechanical signals may be more advantageous to certain populations than others.

  12. Novel class of collector in electrospinning device for the fabrication of 3D nanofibrous structure for large defect load-bearing tissue engineering application.

    PubMed

    Hejazi, Fatemeh; Mirzadeh, Hamid; Contessi, Nicola; Tanzi, Maria Cristina; Faré, Silvia

    2017-05-01

    Adequate porosity, appropriate pore size, and 3D-thick shape are crucial parameters in the design of scaffolds, as they should provide the right space for cell adhesion, spreading, migration, and growth. In this work, a novel design for fabricating a 3D nanostructured scaffold by electrospinning was taken into account. Helical spring-shaped collector was purposely designed and used for electrospinning PCL fibers. Improved morphological properties and more uniform diameter distribution of collected nanofibers on the turns of helical spring-shaped collector are confirmed by SEM analysis. SEM images elaboration showed 3D pores with average diameter of 4 and 5.5 micrometer in x-y plane and z-direction, respectively. Prepared 3D scaffold possessed 99.98% porosity which led to the increased water uptake behavior in PBS at 37°C up to 10 days, and higher degradation rate compared to 2D flat structure. Uniaxial compression test on 3D scaffolds revealed an elastic modulus of 7 MPa and a stiffness of 10(2) MPa, together with very low hysteresis area and residual strain. In vitro cytocompatibility test with MG-63 osteoblast-like cells using AlamarBlue(™) colorimetric assay, indicated a continuous increase in cell viability for the 3D structure over the test duration. SEM observation showed enhanced cells spreading and diffusion into the underneath layers for 3D scaffold. Accelerated calcium deposition in 3D substrate was confirmed by EDX analysis. Obtained morphological, physical, and mechanical properties together with in vitro cytocompatibility results, suggest this novel technique as a proper method for the fabrication of 3D nanofibrous scaffolds for the regeneration of critical-size load bearing defects. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 1535-1548, 2017.

  13. Structural finite-element modeling strategies for conformal load-bearing antenna structure (CLAS) (Air Force contract F33615-C-93-3200)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockyer, Allen J.; Alt, Kevin H.; Kudva, Jayanth N.; Kinslow, Robert W.; Goetz, Allan C.

    1997-06-01

    As the Wright Lab Air Force military contrast `Smart Skin Structures Technology Demonstration' (S3TD) Contract No. F33615-C-93-3200 draws toward conclusion, pertinent features of the program finite element modeling are presented. Analysis was performed to predict the structural performance of a complex multilayered composite panel that will be tested structurally (and electrically) for the final program deliverable. Application of finite element modeling to predict component load path and strain distribution in sandwich panel construction has been reported elsewhere in the literature for more standard applications. However, the unauthordox sandwich configuration lay-up posed by the quite revolutionary S3TD CLAS aircraft fuselage panel demonstration article merits further discussion. Difficulties with material selection, the stumbling block for many programs, are further exacerbated by conflicting material properties required to support simultaneous electrical and structural performance roles. The structural analysis challenge derives from S3TD's unique program goal, namely, to investigate load bearing antennas structural configurations, rather than conventional structurally inefficient `bolt in' installations, that have been the modus operandi for tactical aircraft antenna installations to date. Discussed below is a cost saving strategy where use of linear finite element analysis has been employed in the prediction of key structural parameters, and validated with risk reduction sub panel measurements, before proceeding to the final fabrication of a full scale 36 by 36 inch CLAS panel demonstration article.

  14. Design and development of a conformal load-bearing smart skin antenna: overview of the AFRL Smart Skin Structures Technology Demonstration (S3TD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockyer, Allen J.; Alt, Kevin H.; Coughlin, Daniel P.; Durham, Michael D.; Kudva, Jayanth N.; Goetz, Allan C.; Tuss, James

    1999-07-01

    Documented herein is a review of progress for the recently completed 'Smart Skin Structure Technology Demonstration' (S3TD) contract number F33615-93-C-3200 performed by Northrop Grumman Corporation, Hawthorne, California and TRW/ASD, Rancho Bernardo, San Diego, California under the Air Force Research Laboratory, Flight Dynamics Directorate, Structures Division's direction and sponsorship. S3TD was conceived as the first serious attempt, to made a complex antenna become a bone fide aircraft structural panel, without loss of overall structural integrity or electrical performance. The program successfully demonstrated the design, fabrication, and structural validation of a load bearing multifunction antenna component panel subjected to realistic aircraft flight load conditions. The final demonstration article was a structurally effective 36 by 36 inch curved multifunction antenna component panel that withstood running loads of 4,000 pounds per inch, and principal strain levels of 4,700 microstrain. Testing the structural component to ultimate, the panel failed at the predicted limit of 148 kips equating to 150 percent design limit load, after successfully completing one lifetime of fatigue. The load conditions were representative of a mid-fuselage F-18 class fighter component panel installation. The panel was designed not to buckle at ultimate failure, and the dominant failure mode was face sheet pull off, as predicted. Structural test data correlated closely with analysis. Wide band electrical performance for the component antenna panel was validated using anechoic chamber measurements and near field probing techniques, covering avionics communication navigation and identification and electronic warfare functions in the 0.15 to 2.2 GHz frequency regimes.

  15. Carbon-Nanotube-Based Epoxy Matrix Thermal Interface Materials for Thermal Management in Load Bearing Aerospace Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-12

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF...TIMs). When two nominally flat surfaces come together at at a typical material interface, the solid-solid contact area is limited to 1-2% of the...interfaces using diffraction limited infrared microscopy. They reported a thermal interface resistance of the CNT-based interface structure to be much

  16. Load Bearing Innovative Construction from Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalamar, R.; Eliášová, M.

    2015-11-01

    Glass plays an exceptional role in the modern architecture due to the optical properties and transparency. Structural elements from glass like beams, facades and roofs are relatively frequent in common practice [1]. Although glass has significantly higher compressive strength in comparison with tensile strength, load bearing glass elements are relatively rare. This opens up new opportunities for application of glass in such structures as transparent columns loaded by the axial force. This paper summarizes the experimental results of the tests on glass columns loaded by centric pressure, which were performed in the laboratories of the CTU in Prague, Faculty of Civil Engineering. The first set of experiments was composed of three specimens in a reduced scale 1:2 to verify real behaviour of the specimens with enclosed hollow cross-section. The main goal of the experiment was to determine force at the first breakage and consequently the maximal force at the collapse of this element.

  17. Nanogel Aerogel as Load Bearing Insulation for Cryogenic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koravos, J. J.; Miller, T. M.; Fesmire, J. E.; Coffman, B. E.

    2010-04-01

    Load support structures in cryogenic storage, transport and processing systems are large contributors to the total heat leak of the system. Conventional insulation systems require the use of these support members in order to stabilize the process fluid enclosure and prevent degradation of insulation performance due to compression. Removal of these support structures would substantially improve system efficiency. Nanogel aerogel insulation performance is tested at vacuum pressures ranging from high vacuum to atmospheric pressure and under loads from loosely packed to greater than 10,000 Pa. Insulation performance is determined using boil-off calorimetry with liquid nitrogen as the latent heat recipient. Two properties of the aerogel insulation material suit it to act as a load bearing "structure" in a process vessel: (1) Ability to maintain thermal performance under load; (2) Elasticity when subjected to load. Results of testing provide positive preliminary indication that these properties allow Nanogel aerogel to effectively be used as a load bearing insulation in cryogenic systems.

  18. Load Bearing Equipment for Bone and Muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shackelford, Linda; Griffith, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    Resistance exercise on ISS has proven effective in maintaining bone mineral density and muscle mass. Exploration missions require exercise with similar high loads using equipment with less mass and volume and greater safety and reliability than resistance exercise equipment used on ISS (iRED, ARED, FWED). Load Bearing Equipment (LBE) uses each exercising person to create and control the load to the partner.

  19. Failure tolerance of load-bearing hierarchical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachhvah, Ajay Deep; Gupte, Neelima

    2011-03-01

    We investigate the statistics and dynamics of failure in a two-dimensional load-bearing network with branching hierarchical structure, and its variants. The variants strengthen the original lattice by using connectivity strategies which add new sites to the maximal cluster in top-to-bottom or bottom-to-top versions. We study the load-bearing capacity and the failure tolerance of all versions, as well as that of the strongest realization of the original lattice, the V lattice. The average number of failures as a function of the test load shows power-law behavior with power 5/2 for the V lattice, but sigmoidal behavior for all other versions. Thus the V lattice turns out to be the critical case of the load-bearing lattices. The distribution of failures is Gaussian for the original lattice, the V lattice, and the bottom-to-top strategy, but is non-Gaussian for the top-to-bottom one. The bottom-to-top strategy leads to stable and strong lattices, and can resist failure even when tested with weights which greatly exceed the capacity of its backbone. We also examine the behavior of asymmetric lattices and discover that the mean failure rates are minimized if the probability of connection p is symmetric with respect to both neighbors. Our results can be of relevance in the context of realistic networks.

  20. A Broadband High-Gain Bi-Layer Log-Periodic Dipole Array (LPDA) for Ultra High Frequency (UHF) Conformal Load Bearing Antenna Structures (CLAS) Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    AFRL-RQ-WP-TR-2014-0212 University of South Carolina Department of Electrical Engineering Columbia, SC 29208 Structures Technology Branch...S2603-04-C01. Cleared for Public Release - Case Number: . Nicholas Bishop and M. Ali are with the Department of Electrical Engineering, University of...that is stiff and light weight. The sandwich composite panel has a greatly increased strength -to-weight ratio when compared to a similar RF

  1. Morphogenic Peptides in Regeneration of Load Bearing Tissues.

    PubMed

    Moeinzadeh, Seyedsina; Jabbari, Esmaiel

    2015-01-01

    Morphogenic proteins due to their short half-life require high doses of growth factors in regeneration of load bearing tissues which leads to undesirable side effects. These side effects include bone overgrowth, tumor formation and immune reaction. An alternative approach to reduce undesirable side effects of proteins in regenerative medicine is to use morphogenic peptides derived from the active domains of morphogenic proteins or soluble and insoluble components of the extracellular matrix of mineralized load bearing tissues to induce differentiation of progenitor cells, mineralization, maturation and bone formation. In that regard, many peptides with osteogenic activity have been discovered. These include peptides derived from bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs), those based on interaction with integrin and heparin-binding receptors, collagen derived peptides, peptides derived from other soluble ECM proteins such as bone sialoprotein and enamel matrix proteins, and those peptides derived from vasculoinductive and neuro-inductive proteins. Although these peptides show significant osteogenic activity in vitro and increase mineralization and bone formation in animal models, they are not widely used in clinical orthopedic applications as an alternative to morphogenic proteins. This is partly due to the limited availability of data on structure and function of morphogenic peptides in physiological medium, particularly in tissue engineered scaffolds. Due to their amphiphilic nature, peptides spontaneously self-assemble and aggregate into micellar structures in physiological medium. Aggregation alters the sequence of amino acids in morphogenic peptides that interact with cell surface receptors thus affecting osteogenic activity of the peptide. Aggregation and micelle formation can dramatically reduce the active concentration of morphogenic peptides with many-fold increase in peptide concentration in physiological medium. Other factors that affect bioactivity are the non

  2. Fracture behaviors of ceramic tissue scaffolds for load bearing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Entezari, Ali; Roohani-Esfahani, Seyed-Iman; Zhang, Zhongpu; Zreiqat, Hala; Dunstan, Colin R.; Li, Qing

    2016-07-01

    Healing large bone defects, especially in weight-bearing locations, remains a challenge using available synthetic ceramic scaffolds. Manufactured as a scaffold using 3D printing technology, Sr-HT-Gahnite at high porosity (66%) had demonstrated significantly improved compressive strength (53 ± 9 MPa) and toughness. Nevertheless, the main concern of ceramic scaffolds in general remains to be their inherent brittleness and low fracture strength in load bearing applications. Therefore, it is crucial to establish a robust numerical framework for predicting fracture strengths of such scaffolds. Since crack initiation and propagation plays a critical role on the fracture strength of ceramic structures, we employed extended finite element method (XFEM) to predict fracture behaviors of Sr-HT-Gahnite scaffolds. The correlation between experimental and numerical results proved the superiority of XFEM for quantifying fracture strength of scaffolds over conventional FEM. In addition to computer aided design (CAD) based modeling analyses, XFEM was conducted on micro-computed tomography (μCT) based models for fabricated scaffolds, which took into account the geometric variations induced by the fabrication process. Fracture strengths and crack paths predicted by the μCT-based XFEM analyses correlated well with relevant experimental results. The study provided an effective means for the prediction of fracture strength of porous ceramic structures, thereby facilitating design optimization of scaffolds.

  3. Fracture behaviors of ceramic tissue scaffolds for load bearing applications.

    PubMed

    Entezari, Ali; Roohani-Esfahani, Seyed-Iman; Zhang, Zhongpu; Zreiqat, Hala; Dunstan, Colin R; Li, Qing

    2016-07-12

    Healing large bone defects, especially in weight-bearing locations, remains a challenge using available synthetic ceramic scaffolds. Manufactured as a scaffold using 3D printing technology, Sr-HT-Gahnite at high porosity (66%) had demonstrated significantly improved compressive strength (53 ± 9 MPa) and toughness. Nevertheless, the main concern of ceramic scaffolds in general remains to be their inherent brittleness and low fracture strength in load bearing applications. Therefore, it is crucial to establish a robust numerical framework for predicting fracture strengths of such scaffolds. Since crack initiation and propagation plays a critical role on the fracture strength of ceramic structures, we employed extended finite element method (XFEM) to predict fracture behaviors of Sr-HT-Gahnite scaffolds. The correlation between experimental and numerical results proved the superiority of XFEM for quantifying fracture strength of scaffolds over conventional FEM. In addition to computer aided design (CAD) based modeling analyses, XFEM was conducted on micro-computed tomography (μCT) based models for fabricated scaffolds, which took into account the geometric variations induced by the fabrication process. Fracture strengths and crack paths predicted by the μCT-based XFEM analyses correlated well with relevant experimental results. The study provided an effective means for the prediction of fracture strength of porous ceramic structures, thereby facilitating design optimization of scaffolds.

  4. Fracture behaviors of ceramic tissue scaffolds for load bearing applications

    PubMed Central

    Entezari, Ali; Roohani-Esfahani, Seyed-Iman; Zhang, Zhongpu; Zreiqat, Hala; Dunstan, Colin R.; Li, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Healing large bone defects, especially in weight-bearing locations, remains a challenge using available synthetic ceramic scaffolds. Manufactured as a scaffold using 3D printing technology, Sr-HT-Gahnite at high porosity (66%) had demonstrated significantly improved compressive strength (53 ± 9 MPa) and toughness. Nevertheless, the main concern of ceramic scaffolds in general remains to be their inherent brittleness and low fracture strength in load bearing applications. Therefore, it is crucial to establish a robust numerical framework for predicting fracture strengths of such scaffolds. Since crack initiation and propagation plays a critical role on the fracture strength of ceramic structures, we employed extended finite element method (XFEM) to predict fracture behaviors of Sr-HT-Gahnite scaffolds. The correlation between experimental and numerical results proved the superiority of XFEM for quantifying fracture strength of scaffolds over conventional FEM. In addition to computer aided design (CAD) based modeling analyses, XFEM was conducted on micro-computed tomography (μCT) based models for fabricated scaffolds, which took into account the geometric variations induced by the fabrication process. Fracture strengths and crack paths predicted by the μCT-based XFEM analyses correlated well with relevant experimental results. The study provided an effective means for the prediction of fracture strength of porous ceramic structures, thereby facilitating design optimization of scaffolds. PMID:27403936

  5. Design Methods for Load-bearing Elements from Crosslaminated Timber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilguts, A.; Serdjuks, D.; Goremikins, V.

    2015-11-01

    Cross-laminated timber is an environmentally friendly material, which possesses a decreased level of anisotropy in comparison with the solid and glued timber. Cross-laminated timber could be used for load-bearing walls and slabs of multi-storey timber buildings as well as decking structures of pedestrian and road bridges. Design methods of cross-laminated timber elements subjected to bending and compression with bending were considered. The presented methods were experimentally validated and verified by FEM. Two cross-laminated timber slabs were tested at the action of static load. Pine wood was chosen as a board's material. Freely supported beam with the span equal to 1.9 m, which was loaded by the uniformly distributed load, was a design scheme of the considered plates. The width of the plates was equal to 1 m. The considered cross-laminated timber plates were analysed by FEM method. The comparison of stresses acting in the edge fibres of the plate and the maximum vertical displacements shows that both considered methods can be used for engineering calculations. The difference between the results obtained experimentally and analytically is within the limits from 2 to 31%. The difference in results obtained by effective strength and stiffness and transformed sections methods was not significant.

  6. Protein-based materials in load-bearing tissue-engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Sayin, Esen; Baran, Erkan Türker; Hasirci, Vasif

    2014-01-01

    Proteins such as collagen and elastin are robust molecules that constitute nanocomponents in the hierarchically organized ultrastructures of bone and tendon as well as in some of the soft tissues that have load-bearing functions. In the present paper, the macromolecular structure and function of the proteins are reviewed and the potential of mammalian and non-mammalian proteins in the engineering of load-bearing tissue substitutes are discussed. Chimeric proteins have become an important structural biomaterial source and their potential in tissue engineering is highlighted. Processing of proteins challenge investigators and in this review rapid prototyping and microfabrication are proposed as methods for obtaining precisely defined custom-built tissue engineered structures with intrinsic microarchitecture.

  7. 3D Printing and Biofabrication for Load Bearing Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Claire G; Atala, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based direct biofabrication and 3D bioprinting is becoming a dominant technological platform and is suggested as a new paradigm for twenty-first century tissue engineering. These techniques may be our next step in surpassing the hurdles and limitations of conventional scaffold-based tissue engineering, and may offer the industrial potential of tissue engineered products especially for load bearing tissues. Here we present a topically focused review regarding the fundamental concepts, state of the art, and perspectives of this new technology and field of biofabrication and 3D bioprinting, specifically focused on tissue engineering of load bearing tissues such as bone, cartilage, osteochondral and dental tissue engineering.

  8. Thermal coupon testing of Load-Bearing Multilayer Insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, W. L.; Heckle, K. W.; Hurd, J.

    2014-01-01

    Advanced liquid hydrogen storage concepts being considered for long duration space travel incorporate refrigeration systems and cryocoolers to lower the heat load. Using a refrigeration loop to intercept the energy flowing through MLI to a liquid hydrogen tank at a temperature between the environment and the liquid hydrogen can lower the heat load on the propellant system by as much as 50%. However, the refrigeration loop requires structural integration into the MLI. Use of a more traditional concept of MLI underneath this refrigeration loop requires that a structural system be put in place to support the loop. Such structures, even when thermally optimized, present a relatively large parasitic heat load into the tank. Through NASA small business innovation research funding, Quest Thermal Group and Ball Aerospace have been developing a structural MLI based insulation system. These systems are designed with discrete polymeric spacers between reflective layers instead of either dacron or silk netting. The spacers (or posts) have an intrinsic structural capability that is beyond that of just supporting the internal insulation mechanical loads. This new MLI variant called Load Bearing MLI (LB-MLI) has been developed specifically for the application of supporting thermal shields within the insulation system. Test articles (coupons) of the new LB-MLI product were fabricated for thermal performance testing using liquid nitrogen at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and using cryocooler based calorimetry at Florida State University. The test results and analysis are presented. Thermal models developed for correlation with the thermal testing results both at KSC and testing that was performed at Florida State University are also discussed.

  9. Out of plane analysis for composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, P. C.; Saff, C. R.; Sanger, Kenneth B.; Mahler, M. A.; Kan, Han Pin; Kautz, Edward F.

    1990-01-01

    Simple two dimensional analysis techniques were developed to aid in the design of strong joints for integrally stiffened/bonded composite structures subjected to out of plane loads. It was found that most out of plane failures were due to induced stresses arising from rapid changes in load path direction or geometry, induced stresses due to changes in geometry caused by buckling, or direct stresses produced by fuel pressure or bearing loads. While the analysis techniques were developed to address a great variety of out of plane loading conditions, they were primarily derived to address the conditions described above. The methods were developed and verified using existing element test data. The methods were demonstrated using the data from a test failure of a high strain wingbox that was designed, built, and tested under a previous program. Subsequently, a set of design guidelines were assembled to assist in the design of safe, strong integral composite structures using the analysis techniques developed.

  10. Structure analysis for plane geometry figures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Tianxiao; Lu, Xiaoqing; Liu, Lu; Li, Keqiang; Tang, Zhi

    2013-12-01

    As there are increasing numbers of digital documents for education purpose, we realize that there is not a retrieval application for mathematic plane geometry images. In this paper, we propose a method for retrieving plane geometry figures (PGFs), which often appear in geometry books and digital documents. First, detecting algorithms are applied to detect common basic geometry shapes from a PGF image. Based on all basic shapes, we analyze the structural relationships between two basic shapes and combine some of them to a compound shape to build the PGF descriptor. Afterwards, we apply matching function to retrieve candidate PGF images with ranking. The great contribution of the paper is that we propose a structure analysis method to better describe the spatial relationships in such image composed of many overlapped shapes. Experimental results demonstrate that our analysis method and shape descriptor can obtain good retrieval results with relatively high effectiveness and efficiency.

  11. Load Bearing Equipment for Bone and Muscle Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terrier, Douglas; Clayton, Ronald G.; Shackelford, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Axial skeletal loads coupled with muscle torque forces around joints maintain bone. Astronauts working in pairs to exercise can provide high eccentric loads for each other that are most effective. A prototype of load bearing equipment that will allow astronauts to perform exercises using each other for counter force generation in a controlled fashion and provide eccentric overload is proposed. A frame and attachments that can be rapidly assembled for use and easily stored will demonstrate feasibility of a design that can be adapted for ISS testing and Orion use.

  12. Evacuated load-bearing high performance insulation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmley, R. T.; Cunnington, G. R.

    1977-01-01

    A light weight, vacuum jacketed, load bearing cryogenic insulation system was developed and tested on a 1.17-m (46-in.) spherical test tank. The vacuum jacket consists of 0.08 mm (0.003 in.) thick 321 stainless steel formed into a wedge design that allows elastic jacket movements as the tank shrinks (cools) or expands (warms up or is pressurized). Hollow glass spheres, approximately 80 micrometers in diameter with a bulk density of 0.069 g/cc (4.3 lb cubic foot), provide the insulating qualities and one atmosphere load bearing capability required. The design, fabrication, and test effort developed the manufacturing methods and engineering data needed to scale the system to other tank sizes, shapes, and applications. The program demonstrated that thin wall jackets can be formed and welded to maintain the required vacuum level of .013 Pa yet flex elastically for multiple reuses. No significant shifting or breakage of the microspheres occurred after 13 simulated Space Tug flight cycles on the test tank and a hundred 1 atmosphere load cycles in a flat plate calorimeter. The test data were then scaled to the Space Tug LO2 and LH2 tanks, and weight, thermal performance, payload performance, and costs were compared with a helium purged multilayer insulation system.

  13. Human Footprint Variation while Performing Load Bearing Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Wall-Scheffler, Cara M.; Wagnild, Janelle; Wagler, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Human footprint fossils have provided essential evidence about the evolution of human bipedalism as well as the social dynamics of the footprint makers, including estimates of speed, sex and group composition. Generally such estimates are made by comparing footprint evidence with modern controls; however, previous studies have not accounted for the variation in footprint dimensions coming from load bearing activities. It is likely that a portion of the hominins who created these fossil footprints were carrying a significant load, such as offspring or foraging loads, which caused variation in the footprint which could extend to variation in any estimations concerning the footprint’s maker. To identify significant variation in footprints due to load-bearing tasks, we had participants (N = 30, 15 males and 15 females) walk at a series of speeds carrying a 20kg pack on their back, side and front. Paint was applied to the bare feet of each participant to create footprints that were compared in terms of foot length, foot width and foot area. Female foot length and width increased during multiple loaded conditions. An appreciation of footprint variability associated with carrying loads adds an additional layer to our understanding of the behavior and morphology of extinct hominin populations. PMID:25738496

  14. Load-bearing properties of minimal-invasive monolithic lithium disilicate and zirconia occlusal onlays: finite element and theoretical analyses

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li; Guess, Petra C.; Zhang, Yu

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that monolithic lithium disilicate glass-ceramic occlusal onlay can exhibit a load-bearing capacity that approaches monolithic zirconia, due to a smaller elastic modulus mismatch between the lithium disilicate and its supporting tooth structure relative to zirconia. Methods Ceramic occlusal onlays of various thicknesses cemented to either enamel or dentin were considered. Occlusal load was applied through an enamel-like deformable indenter or a control rigid indenter. Flexural tensile stress at the ceramic intaglio (cementation) surface—a cause for bulk fracture of occlusal onlays—was rigorously analyzed using finite element analysis and classical plate-on-foundation theory. Results When bonded to enamel (supported by dentin), the load-bearing capacity of lithium disilicate can approach 75% of that of zirconia, despite the flexural strength of lithium disilicate (400 MPa) being merely 40% of zirconia (1000 MPa). When bonded to dentin (with the enamel completely removed), the load-bearing capacity of lithium disilicate is about 57% of zirconia, still significantly higher than the anticipated value based on its strength. Both ceramics show slightly higher load-bearing capacity when loaded with a deformable indenter (enamel, glass-ceramic, or porcelain) rather than a rigid indenter. Significance When supported by enamel, the load-bearing property of minimally invasive lithium disilicate occlusal onlays (0.6 to 1.4 mm thick) can exceed 70% of that of zircona. Additionally, a relatively weak dependence of fracture load on restoration thickness indicates that a 1.2 mm thin lithium disilicate onlay can be as fracture resistant as its 1.6 mm counterpart. PMID:23683531

  15. Plane mixing layer vortical structure kinematics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leboeuf, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the current project was to experimentally investigate the structure and dynamics of the streamwise vorticity in a plane mixing layer. The first part of this research program was intended to clarify whether the observed decrease in mean streamwise vorticity in the far-field of mixing layers is due primarily to the 'smearing' caused by vortex meander or to diffusion. Two-point velocity correlation measurements have been used to show that there is little spanwise meander of the large-scale streamwise vortical structure. The correlation measurements also indicate a large degree of transverse meander of the streamwise vorticity which is not surprising since the streamwise vorticity exists in the inclined braid region between the spanwise vortex core regions. The streamwise convection of the braid region thereby introduces an apparent transverse meander into measurements using stationary probes. These results corroborated with estimated secondary velocity profiles in which the streamwise vorticity produces a signature which was tracked in time.

  16. Muscle force regulates bone shaping for optimal load-bearing capacity during embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sharir, Amnon; Stern, Tomer; Rot, Chagai; Shahar, Ron; Zelzer, Elazar

    2011-08-01

    The vertebrate skeleton consists of over 200 individual bones, each with its own unique shape, size and function. We study the role of intrauterine muscle-induced mechanical loads in determining the three-dimensional morphology of developing bones. Analysis of the force-generating capacity of intrauterine muscles in mice revealed that developing bones are subjected to significant and progressively increasing mechanical challenges. To evaluate the effect of intrauterine loads on bone morphogenesis and the contribution of the emerging shape to the ability of bones to withstand these loads, we monitored structural and mineral changes during development. Using daily micro-CT scans of appendicular long bones we identify a developmental program, which we term preferential bone growth, that determines the specific circumferential shape of each bone by employing asymmetric mineral deposition and transient cortical thickening. Finite element analysis demonstrates that the resulting bone structure has optimal load-bearing capacity. To test the hypothesis that muscle forces regulate preferential bone growth in utero, we examine this process in a mouse strain (mdg) that lacks muscle contractions. In the absence of mechanical loads, the stereotypical circumferential outline of each bone is lost, leading to the development of mechanically inferior bones. This study identifies muscle force regulation of preferential bone growth as the module that shapes the circumferential outline of bones and, consequently, optimizes their load-bearing capacity during development. Our findings invoke a common mechanism that permits the formation of different circumferential outlines in different bones.

  17. A detailed study of homogeneous agarose/hydroxyapatite nanocomposites for load-bearing bone tissue.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jingxiao; Zhu, Youjia; Tong, Hua; Shen, Xinyu; Chen, Li; Ran, Jiabing

    2016-01-01

    Agarose/hydroxyapatite (agar/HA) nanocomposites for load-bearing bone substitutes were successfully fabricated via a novel in situ precipitation method. Observation via SEM and TEM revealed that the spherical inorganic nanoparticles of approximately 50 nm were well dispersed in the organic matrix, and the crystallographic area combined closely with the amorphous area. The uniform dispersion of HA nanoparticles had prominent effect on improving the mechanical properties of the agar/HA nanocomposites (the highest elastic modulus: 1104.42 MPa; the highest compressive strength: 400.039 MPa), which proved to be potential load-bearing bone substitutes. The thermal stability of agarose and nanocomposites was also studied. The MG63 osteoblast-like cells on the composite disks displayed fusiform and polygonal morphology in the presence of HA, suggesting that the cell maturation was promoted. The results of cell proliferation and cell differentiation indicated that the cells cultured on the agar/HA composite disks significantly increased the alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium deposition. The structural role of agarose in the composite system was investigated to better understand the effect of biopolymer on structure and properties of the composites. The optimal properties were the result of a comprehensive synergy of the components.

  18. Mesenchymal stem cell proliferation and differentiation on load-bearing trabecular Nitinol scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Gotman, Irena; Ben-David, Dror; Unger, Ronald E; Böse, Thomas; Gutmanas, Elazar Y; Kirkpatrick, C James

    2013-09-01

    Bone tissue regeneration in load-bearing regions of the body requires high-strength porous scaffolds capable of supporting angiogenesis and osteogenesis. 70% porous Nitinol (NiTi) scaffolds with a regular 3-D architecture resembling trabecular bone were produced from Ni foams using an original reactive vapor infiltration technique. The "trabecular Nitinol" scaffolds possessed a high compressive strength of 79 MPa and high permeability of 6.9×10(-6) cm2. The scaffolds were further modified to produce a near Ni-free surface layer and evaluated in terms of Ni ion release and human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) proliferation (AlamarBlue), differentiation (alkaline phosphatase activity, ALP) and mineralization (Alizarin Red S staining). Scanning electron microscopy was employed to qualitatively corroborate the results. hMSCs were able to adhere and proliferate on both as-produced and surface-modified trabecular NiTi scaffolds, to acquire an osteoblastic phenotype and produce a mineralized extracellular matrix. Both ALP activity and mineralization were increased on porous scaffolds compared to control polystyrene plates. Experiments in a model coculture system of microvascular endothelial cells and hMSCs demonstrated the formation of prevascular structures in trabecular NiTi scaffolds. These data suggest that load-bearing trabecular Nitinol scaffolds could be effective in regenerating damaged or lost bone tissue.

  19. The influence of operating loads on the state of stress and strain in selected load-bearing elements of a tower-type headgear structure / Wpływ obciążeń eksploatacyjnych na stan naprężenia oraz przemieszczenia wybranych elementów nośnych konstrukcji basztowej wieży szybowych

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolny, Stanisław

    2012-12-01

    The headgear structure allows the conveyance to be moved over the shaft top to the loading (unloading) point, at the same time it keeps in place the rope pulleys while tower-type headgear structures also accommodate the entire winder installations. The headgear is where the final stage of the hoisting installation is located and where the surface transport systems begin. These aspects strongly impact the actual shape of the tower, its height and in some cases determine the design of the entire winding gear. In order that all the headgear functions should be provided, it is required that the ultimate state conditions should be maintained throughout its entire service life. In order to assess the critical service conditions, the computation procedure should be applied based on design loads and fatigue endurance parameters. The computations of characteristic loads acting on the headgear structure use the developed model of the system based on the dynamic analysis carried out for a specific case: a hoisting installation operated in one of the underground collieries in Poland. The maximal and minimal loads acting on a Koepe pulley and those required for the system operation are determined accordingly. The laws of dynamics provide a background for finding the forces and moments of forces acting in the components of the driving system (including the electric motors and pulley blocks) for the specified loading of the Koepe pulley. Underlying the numerical FEM model of the tower-type headgear structure are the technical specifications of the analysed object and FEM calculations followed by endurance analysis to find the state of stress in structural elements of the headgear under the typical service conditions. The results help in assessing how the design of the hoisting installation should impact on safety features of load-bearing elements in the headgear structure.

  20. Novel Concepts for Conformal Load-Bearing Antenna Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    liquid moulding techniques of Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Moulding ( VARTM ) or Resin Transfer Moulding ( RTM ). Latter specimens were prepared using... VARTM ) 4 Resin Transfer Moulding ( RTM ) 5 Meter resin onto dry fibre then stage in an autoclave 7 Mandrel Number 0 As-received 25.4 mm x 12.7 mm...r Spiral slot radius RF Radio Frequency RFID Radio Frequency Identification Rs Surface resistivity RTM Resin Transfer Moulding S11 Reflection S

  1. Three-dimensional printing of porous load-bearing bioceramic scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, Elena; Alharbi, Naif; Bretcanu, Oana A; Marshall, Martyn; Birch, Mark A; McCaskie, Andrew W; Dalgarno, Kenneth W

    2016-12-01

    This article reports on the use of the binder jetting three-dimensional printing process combined with sintering to process bioceramic materials to form micro- and macroporous three-dimensional structures. Three different glass-ceramic formulations, apatite-wollastonite and two silicate-based glasses, have been processed using this route to create porous structures which have Young's modulus equivalent to cortical bone and average bending strengths in the range 24-36 MPa. It is demonstrated that a range of macroporous geometries can be created with accuracies of ±0.25 mm over length scales up to 40 mm. Hot-stage microscopy is a valuable tool in the definition of processing parameters for the sintering step of the process. Overall, it is concluded that binder jetting followed by sintering offers a versatile process for the manufacture of load-bearing bioceramic components for bone replacement applications.

  2. Biomimetic nanocomposites of carboxymethyl cellulose-hydroxyapatite: novel three dimensional load bearing bone grafts.

    PubMed

    Garai, Subhadra; Sinha, Arvind

    2014-03-01

    An innovative biomimetic synthesis of novel three dimensional micro/macro porous carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)-hydroxyapatite (HA) nanocomposites having four systematically different compositions has been established for its possible application as a load bearing synthetic bone graft. Our process, being in situ, involves a simple and cost effective route akin to a matrix mediated biomineralization process. Developed synthesis route not only controls the size of HA particles in the range of 15-50 nm, embedded in CMC matrix, but also assists in the formation of a mechanically strong three dimensional nanocomposite structures due to physical cross linking of HA impregnated CMC matrix. The process does not involve any toxic cross linker and works at near ambient conditions. The nanocomposites are systematically structurally and mechanically characterized using various techniques like scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform IR (FTIR), solid state (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance ((13)C NMR), thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) and Universal mechanical test. It reveals that the ionic/polar or electrostatic interactions are the main driving force for formation of load bearing three dimensional nanocomposites via a process similar to matrix mediated biomineralization. Compressive strength and compressive modulus of nanocomposites, being in the range of 1.74-12 MPa and 157-330 MPa, respectively, meet the desired range of compressive strength for the synthetic grafts used in cancellous bone. An increase in the compressive strength with increase in the porosity has been an interesting observation in the present study. In vitro cytotoxicity of the synthesized nanocomposites has been evaluated using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC) isolated from Wistar rat.

  3. Bending strength of piezoelectric ceramics and single crystals for multifunctional load-bearing applications.

    PubMed

    Anton, Steven R; Erturk, Alper; Inman, Daniel

    2012-06-01

    The topic of multifunctional material systems using active or smart materials has recently gained attention in the research community. Multifunctional piezoelectric systems present the ability to combine multiple functions into a single active piezoelectric element, namely, combining sensing, actuation, or energy conversion ability with load-bearing capacity. Quantification of the bending strength of various piezoelectric materials is, therefore, critical in the development of load-bearing piezoelectric systems. Three-point bend tests are carried out on a variety of piezoelectric ceramics including soft monolithic piezoceramics (PZT-5A and PZT-5H), hard monolithic ceramics (PZT-4 and PZT-8), single-crystal piezoelectrics (PMN-PT and PMN-PZT), and commercially packaged composite devices (which contain active PZT-5A layers). A common 3-point bend test procedure is used throughout the experimental tests. The bending strengths of these materials are found using Euler-Bernoulli beam theory to be 44.9 MPa for PMN-PZT, 60.6 MPa for PMN-PT, 114.8 MPa for PZT- 5H, 123.2 MPa for PZT-4, 127.5 MPa for PZT-8, 140.4 MPa for PZT-5A, and 186.6 MPa for the commercial composite. The high strength of the commercial configuration is a result of the composite structure that allows for shear stresses on the surfaces of the piezoelectric layers, whereas the low strength of the single-crystal materials is due to their unique crystal structure, which allows for rapid propagation of cracks initiating at flaw sites. The experimental bending strength results reported, which are linear estimates without nonlinear ferroelastic considerations, are intended for use in the design of multifunctional piezoelectric systems in which the active device is subjected to bending loads.

  4. Application of a load-bearing passive and active vibration isolation system in hydraulic drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unruh, Oliver; Haase, Thomas; Pohl, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Hydraulic drives are widely used in many engineering applications due to their high power to weight ratio. The high power output of the hydraulic drives produces high static and dynamic reaction forces and moments which must be carried by the mounts and the surrounding structure. A drawback of hydraulic drives based on rotating pistons consists in multi-tonal disturbances which propagate through the mounts and the load bearing structure and produce structure borne sound at the surrounding structures and cavities. One possible approach to overcome this drawback is to use an optimised mounting, which combines vibration isolation in the main disturbance direction with the capability to carry the reaction forces and moments. This paper presents an experimental study, which addresses the vibration isolation performance of an optimised mounting. A dummy hydraulic drive is attached to a generic surrounding structure with optimised mounting and excited by multiple shakers. In order to improve the performance of the passive vibration isolation system, piezoelectric transducers are applied on the mounting and integrated into a feed-forward control loop. It is shown that the optimised mounting of the hydraulic drive decreases the vibration transmission to the surrounding structure by 8 dB. The presented study also reveals that the use of the active control system leads to a further decrease of vibration transmission of up to 14 dB and also allows an improvement of the vibration isolation in an additional degree of freedom and higher harmonic frequencies.

  5. 8. Interior of Building 1015 (land plane hangar), structural detail, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Interior of Building 1015 (land plane hangar), structural detail, looking northeast - Naval Air Station Chase Field, Building 1015, Byrd Street, .82 mile South-southeast of intersection of Texas State Highway 202 & Independence Street, Beeville, Bee County, TX

  6. 7. Interior of Building 1015 (land plane hangar), structural detail, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Interior of Building 1015 (land plane hangar), structural detail, looking northeast - Naval Air Station Chase Field, Building 1015, Byrd Street, .82 mile South-southeast of intersection of Texas State Highway 202 & Independence Street, Beeville, Bee County, TX

  7. Tank Applied Testing of Load-Bearing Multilayer Insulation (LB-MLI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wesley L.; Valenzuela, Juan G.; Feller, Jerr; Plachta, Dave

    2014-01-01

    The development of long duration orbital cryogenic storage systems will require the reduction of heat loads into the storage tank. In the case of liquid hydrogen, complete elimination of the heat load at 20 K is currently impractical due to the limitations in lift available on flight cryocoolers. In order to reduce the heat load, without having to remove heat at 20 K, the concept of Reduced Boil-Off uses cooled shields within the insulation system at approximately 90 K. The development of Load-Bearing Multilayer Insulation (LB-MLI) allowed the 90 K shield with tubing and cryocooler attachments to be suspended within the MLI and still be structurally stable. Coupon testing both thermally and structurally were performed to verify that the LB-MLI should work at the tank applied level. Then tank applied thermal and structural (acoustic) testing was performed to demonstrate the functionality of the LB-MLI as a structural insulation system. The LB-MLI showed no degradation of thermal performance due to the acoustic testing and showed excellent thermal performance when integrated with a 90 K class cryocooler on a liquid hydrogen tank.

  8. Tank Applied Testing of Load-Bearing Multilayer Insulation (LB-MLI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wesley L.; Valenzuela, Juan G.; Feller, Jeffrey R.; Plachta, David W.

    2014-01-01

    The development of long duration orbital cryogenic storage systems will require the reduction of heat loads into the storage tank. In the case of liquid hydrogen, complete elimination of the heat load at 20 K is currently impractical due to the limitations in lift available on flight cryocoolers. In order to reduce the heat load, without having to remove heat at 20 K, the concept of Reduced Boil-Off uses cooled shields within the insulation system at approximately 90 K. The development of Load-Bearing Multilayer Insulation (LB-MLI) allowed the 90 K shield with tubing and cryocooler attachments to be suspended within the MLI and still be structurally stable. Coupon testing, both thermal and structural was performed to verify that the LB-MLI should work at the tank applied level. Then tank applied thermal and structural (acoustic) testing was performed to demonstrate the functionality of the LB-MLI as a structural insulation system. The LB-MLI showed no degradation of thermal performance due to the acoustic testing and showed excellent thermal performance when integrated with a 90 K class cryocooler on a liquid hydrogen tank.

  9. Protein viscosity, mineral fraction and staggered architecture cooperatively enable the fastest stress wave decay in load-bearing biological materials.

    PubMed

    Qwamizadeh, Mahan; Zhang, Zuoqi; Zhou, Kun; Zhang, Yong Wei

    2016-07-01

    One of the key functions of load-bearing biological materials, such as bone, dentin and sea shell, is to protect their inside fragile organs by effectively damping dynamic impact. How those materials achieve this remarkable function remains largely unknown. Using systematic finite element analyses, we study the stress wave propagation and attenuation in cortical bone at the nanoscale as a model material to examine the effects of protein viscosity, mineral fraction and staggered architecture on the elastic wave decay. It is found that the staggered arrangement, protein viscosity and mineral fraction work cooperatively to effectively attenuate the stress wave. For a typical mineral volume fraction and protein viscosity, an optimal staggered nanostructure with specific feature sizes and layouts is able to give rise to the fastest stress wave decay, and the optimal aspect ratio and thickness of mineral platelets are in excellent agreement with experimental measurements. In contrary, as the mineral volume fraction or the protein viscosity goes much higher, the structural arrangement is seen having trivial effect on the stress wave decay, suggesting that the damping properties of the composites go into the structure-insensitive regime from the structure-sensitive regime. These findings not only significantly add to our understanding of the structure-function relationship of load-bearing biological materials, and but also provide useful guidelines for the design of bio-inspired materials with superior resistance to impact loading.

  10. ON THE BIOMECHANICAL FUNCTION OF SCAFFOLDS FOR ENGINEERING LOAD BEARING SOFT TISSUES

    PubMed Central

    Stella, John A.; D’Amore, Antonio; Wagner, William R.; Sacks, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Replacement or regeneration of load bearing soft tissues has long been the impetus for the development bioactive materials. While maturing, current efforts continue to be confounded by our lack of understanding of the intricate multi-scale hierarchical arrangements and interactions typically found in native tissues. The current state of the art in biomaterial processing enables a degree of controllable microstructure that can be used for the development of model systems to deduce fundamental biological implications of matrix morphologies on cell function. Furthermore, the development of computational frameworks which allow for the simulation of experimentally derived observations represents a positive departure from what has mostly been an empirically driven field, enabling a deeper understanding of the highly complex biological mechanisms we wish to ultimately emulate. Ongoing research is actively pursuing new materials and processing methods to control material structure down to the micro-scale to sustain or improve cell viability, guide tissue growth, and provide mechanical integrity all while exhibiting the capacity to degrade in a controlled manner. The purpose of this review is not to focus solely on material processing but to assess the ability of these techniques to produce mechanically sound tissue surrogates, highlight the unique structural characteristics produced in these materials, and discuss how this translates to distinct macroscopic biomechanical behaviors. PMID:20060509

  11. Characterization of load bearing metrological parameters in reptilian exuviae in comparison to precision-finished cylinder liner surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Aal, H. A.; El Mansori, M.

    2014-10-01

    Design of precise functional surfaces is essential for many future applications. In the technological realm, the accumulated experience with construction of such surfaces is not sufficient. Nature provides many examples of dynamic surfaces worthy of study and adoption, at least in concept, within human engineering. This work probes the load-bearing metrological features of the ventral skin in snakes. We examine the structure of two snake species that mainly move by rectilinear locomotion. These are Python regius (Pythonidae) and Bitis gabonica (Vipridae). To this end, we focus on the load-bearing characteristics of the ventral skin surface (i.e., the Sk family of parameters). Therefore, detailed comparison is drawn between the metrological structure of the reptilian surfaces and two sets of technological data. The first set pertains to an actual commercial cylinder liner, whereas the second set is a summary of recommended surface finish metrological values for several commercial cylinder liner manufacturers. The results highlight several similarities between the two types of surfaces. In particular, it is shown that there is a striking correspondence between the sense of texture morphology within both surfaces (although their construction evolved along entirely different paths). It is also shown that reptilian surfaces manifest a high degree of specialization with respect to habitat constraints on wear resistance and adhesive effects. In particular, their surface displays a high degree of pre-conditioning to functional requirements, which eliminates the need for a running-in period.

  12. Load bearing and stiffness tailored NiTi implants produced by additive manufacturing: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmanian, Rasool; Shayesteh Moghaddam, Narges; Haberland, Christoph; Dean, David; Miller, Michael; Elahinia, Mohammad

    2014-03-01

    Common metals for stable long-term implants (e.g. stainless steel, Titanium and Titanium alloys) are much stiffer than spongy cancellous and even stiffer than cortical bone. When bone and implant are loaded this stiffness mismatch results in stress shielding and as a consequence, degradation of surrounding bony structure can lead to disassociation of the implant. Due to its lower stiffness and high reversible deformability, which is associated with the superelastic behavior, NiTi is an attractive biomaterial for load bearing implants. However, the stiffness of austenitic Nitinol is closer to that of bone but still too high. Additive manufacturing provides, in addition to the fabrication of patient specific implants, the ability to solve the stiffness mismatch by adding engineered porosity to the implant. This in turn allows for the design of different stiffness profiles in one implant tailored to the physiological load conditions. This work covers a fundamental approach to bring this vision to reality. At first modeling of the mechanical behavior of different scaffold designs are presented as a proof of concept of stiffness tailoring. Based on these results different Nitinol scaffolds can be produced by additive manufacturing.

  13. Design, fabrication and test of Load Bearing multilayer insulation to support a broad area cooled shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dye, S. A.; Johnson, W. L.; Plachta, D. W.; Mills, G. L.; Buchanan, L.; Kopelove, A. B.

    2014-11-01

    Improvements in cryogenic propellant storage are needed to achieve reduced or Zero Boil Off of cryopropellants, critical for long duration missions. Techniques for reducing heat leak into cryotanks include using passive multi-layer insulation (MLI) and vapor cooled or actively cooled thermal shields. Large scale shields cannot be supported by tank structural supports without heat leak through the supports. Traditional MLI also cannot support shield structural loads, and separate shield support mechanisms add significant heat leak. Quest Thermal Group and Ball Aerospace, with NASA SBIR support, have developed a novel Load Bearing multi-layer insulation (LBMLI) capable of self-supporting thermal shields and providing high thermal performance. We report on the development of LBMLI, including design, modeling and analysis, structural testing via vibe and acoustic loading, calorimeter thermal testing, and Reduced Boil-Off (RBO) testing on NASA large scale cryotanks. LBMLI uses the strength of discrete polymer spacers to control interlayer spacing and support the external load of an actively cooled shield and external MLI. Structural testing at NASA Marshall was performed to beyond maximum launch profiles without failure. LBMLI coupons were thermally tested on calorimeters, with superior performance to traditional MLI on a per layer basis. Thermal and structural tests were performed with LBMLI supporting an actively cooled shield, and comparisons are made to the performance of traditional MLI and thermal shield supports. LBMLI provided a 51% reduction in heat leak per layer over a previously tested traditional MLI with tank standoffs, a 38% reduction in mass, and was advanced to TRL5. Active thermal control using LBMLI and a broad area cooled shield offers significant advantages in total system heat flux, mass and structural robustness for future Reduced Boil-Off and Zero Boil-Off cryogenic missions with durations over a few weeks.

  14. Direct ink writing of highly porous and strong glass scaffolds for load-bearing bone defects repair and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiang; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P

    2011-10-01

    The quest for synthetic materials to repair load-bearing bone lost because of trauma, cancer, or congenital bone defects requires the development of porous, high-performance scaffolds with exceptional mechanical strength. However, the low mechanical strength of porous bioactive ceramic and glass scaffolds, compared with that of human cortical bone, has limited their use for these applications. In the present work bioactive 6P53B glass scaffolds with superior mechanical strength were fabricated using a direct ink writing technique. The rheological properties of Pluronic® F-127 (referred to hereafter simply as F-127) hydrogel-based inks were optimized for the printing of features as fine as 30 μm and of three-dimensional scaffolds. The mechanical strength and in vitro degradation of the scaffolds were assessed in a simulated body fluid (SBF). The sintered glass scaffolds showed a compressive strength (136 ± 22 MPa) comparable with that of human cortical bone (100-150 MPa), while the porosity (60%) was in the range of that of trabecular bone (50-90%). The strength is ~100-times that of polymer scaffolds and 4-5-times that of ceramic and glass scaffolds with comparable porosities. Despite the strength decrease resulting from weight loss during immersion in SBF, the value (77 MPa) is still far above that of trabecular bone after 3 weeks. The ability to create both porous and strong structures opens a new avenue for fabricating scaffolds for load-bearing bone defect repair and regeneration.

  15. Plane and hemispherical potential structures in magnetically expanding plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Kazunori; Igarashi, Yuichi; Fujiwara, Tamiya

    2010-07-26

    Two-dimensional potential structures are measured for different gas pressure in expanding argon plasma using permanent magnets, where the magnetic field is about 100 G in the source and several gauss in the diffusion chamber. The plane potential drop is observed near the source exit for 0.35 mTorr, while the potential structure becomes hemispherical when increasing up to 1 mTorr; the hemispherical structure results in the radial divergence of the ion beam. It is found that the trajectories of the accelerated ions and the electrons overcoming the potential drop are dominated by the potential structure and magnetic-field lines, respectively.

  16. Load-bearing capacity of all-ceramic posterior inlay-retained fixed dental prostheses.

    PubMed

    Puschmann, Djamila; Wolfart, Stefan; Ludwig, Klaus; Kern, Matthias

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the quasi-static load-bearing capacity of all-ceramic resin-bonded three-unit inlay-retained fixed dental prostheses (IRFDPs) made from computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM)-manufactured yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystals (Y-TZP) frameworks with two different connector dimensions, with and without fatigue loading. Twelve IRFDPs each were made with connector dimensions 3 x 3 mm(2) (width x height) (control group) and 3 x 2 mm(2) (test group). Inlay-retained fixed dental prostheses were adhesively cemented on identical metal-models using composite resin cement. Subgroups of six specimens each were fatigued with maximal 1,200,000 loading cycles in a chewing simulator with a weight load of 25 kg and a load frequency of 1.5 Hz. The load-bearing capacity was tested in a universal testing machine for IRFDPs without fatigue loading and for IRFDPs that had not already fractured during fatigue loading. During fatigue testing one IRFDP (17%) of the test group failed. Under both loading conditions, IRFDPs of the control group exhibited statistically significantly higher load-bearing capacities than the test group. Fatigue loading reduced the load-bearing capacity in both groups. Considering the maximum chewing forces in the molar region, it seems possible to use zirconia ceramic as a core material for IRFDPs with a minimum connector dimension of 9 mm(2). A further reduction of the connector dimensions to 6 mm(2) results in a significant reduction of the load-bearing capacity.

  17. Load-Bearing Biomedical Applications of Diamond-Like Carbon Coatings - Current Status

    PubMed Central

    Alakoski, Esa; Tiainen, Veli-Matti; Soininen, Antti; Konttinen, Yrjö T

    2008-01-01

    The current status of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings for biomedical applications is reviewed with emphasis on load-bearing coatings. Although diamond-like carbon coating materials have been studied for decades, no indisputably successful commercial biomedical applications for high load situations exist today. High internal stress, leading to insufficient adhesion of thick coatings, is the evident reason behind this delay of the break-through of DLC coatings for applications. Excellent adhesion of thick DLC coatings is of utmost importance for load-bearing applications. According to this review superior candidate material for articulating implants is thick and adherent DLC on both sliding surfaces. With the filtered pulsed arc discharge method, all the necessary requirements for the deposition of thick and adherent DLC are fulfilled, provided that the substrate material is selected properly. PMID:19478929

  18. (GameChanger) Multifunctional Design of Hybrid Composites of Load Bearing Antennas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    and Hydroethyl Cellulose ", Nov 2009, AICHE Annual Meeting 24. June 2009:Gordon Research Conference, “ Carbon Nanotube Nanostructures E. Jan, N...Volakis, “Polymer- Carbon Nanotube Sheets for Conformal Load Bearing Antennas,” IEEE Trans. Antenn. Propag., vol. 58, no. 7, pp. 2169- 2175, Jul. 2010...Propagation, Toronto, Canada, July, 2010. 7. Y. Bayram, Feng Du, L. Dai, J.L. Volakis, “Surface Conditioned Carbon Nanotube Conductive Sheet for Flexible and

  19. Precast/Prestressed Concrete Experiments Performance on Non-Load Bearing Sandwich Wall Panels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    AFRL-RX-TY-TR-2011-0021 PRECAST /PRESTRESSED CONCRETE EXPERIMENTS PERFORMANCE ON NON-LOAD BEARING SANDWICH WALL PANELS Clay J. Naito...2008 -- 20-NOV-2010 Precast /Prestressed Concrete Experiments Performance on Non-Loadbearing Sandwich Wall Panels FA8903-08-D-8768-0002 99999F GOVT F0...conducted by AFRL and the Portland Cement Association (PCA) on the performance of insulated concrete wall panels. The purpose of the research is to

  20. Surface modification and fatigue behavior of nitinol for load bearing implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Sheldon A.

    Musculoskeletal disorders are recognized amongst the most significant human health problems that exist today. Even though considerable research and development has gone towards understanding musculoskeletal disorders, there is still lack of bone replacement materials that are appropriate for restoring lost structures and functions, particularly for load-bearing applications. Many materials on the market today, such as titanium and stainless steel, suffer from significantly higher modulus than natural bone and low bioactivity leading to stress shielding and implant loosening over longer time use. Nitinol (NiTi) is an equiatomic intermetallic compound of nickel and titanium whose unique biomechanical and biological properties contributed to its increasing use as a biomaterial. An innovative method for creating dense and porous net shape NiTi alloy parts has been developed to improve biological properties while maintaining comparable or better mechanical properties than commercial materials that are currently in use. Laser engineered net shaping (LENS(TM)) and surface electrochemistry modification was used to create dense/porous samples and micro textured surfaces on NiTi parts, respectively. Porous implants are known to promote cell adhesion and have a low elastic modulus, a combination that can significantly increase the life of an implant. However, porosity can significantly reduce the fatigue life of an implant, and very little work has been reported on the fatigue behavior of bulk porous metals, specifically on porous nitinol alloy. High-cycle rotating bending and compression-compression fatigue behavior of porous NiTi fabricated using LENS(TM) were studied. In cyclic compression loading, plastic strain increased with increasing porosity and it was evident that maximum strain was achieved during the first 50000 cycles and remained constant throughout the remaining loading. No failures were observed due to loading up to 150% of the yield strength. When subjected

  1. Strained layer superlattice focal plane array having a planar structure

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Jin K; Carroll, Malcolm S; Gin, Aaron; Marsh, Phillip F; Young, Erik W; Cich, Michael J

    2012-10-23

    An infrared focal plane array (FPA) is disclosed which utilizes a strained-layer superlattice (SLS) formed of alternating layers of InAs and In.sub.xGa.sub.1-xSb with 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5 epitaxially grown on a GaSb substrate. The FPA avoids the use of a mesa structure to isolate each photodetector element and instead uses impurity-doped regions formed in or about each photodetector for electrical isolation. This results in a substantially-planar structure in which the SLS is unbroken across the entire width of a 2-D array of the photodetector elements which are capped with an epitaxially-grown passivation layer to reduce or eliminate surface recombination. The FPA has applications for use in the wavelength range of 3-25 .mu.m.

  2. Plane shock wave structure in a dilute granular gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, M. H. Lakshminarayana; Alam, Meheboob

    2016-11-01

    We analyse the early time evolution of the Riemann problem of planar shock wave structures for a dilute granular gas by solving Navier-Stokes equations numerically. The one-dimensional reduced Navier-Stokes equations for plane shock wave problem are solved numerically using a relaxation-type numerical scheme. The results on the shock structures in granular gases are presented for different Mach numbers and restitution coefficients. Based on our analysis on early time shock dynamics we conclude that the density and temperature profiles are "asymmetric"; the density maximum and the temperature maximum occur within the shock layer; the absolute magnitudes of longitudinal stress and heat flux which are initially zero at both end states attain maxima in a very short time and thereafter decrease with time.

  3. Mechanical behaviour of Bioactive Glass granules and morselized cancellous bone allograft in load bearing defects.

    PubMed

    Hulsen, D J W; Geurts, J; van Gestel, N A P; van Rietbergen, B; Arts, J J

    2016-05-03

    Bioactive Glass (BAG) granules are osteoconductive and possess unique antibacterial properties for a synthetic biomaterial. To assess the applicability of BAG granules in load-bearing defects, the aim was to compare mechanical behaviour of graft layers consisting of BAG granules and morselized cancellous bone allograft in different volume mixtures under clinically relevant conditions. The graft layers were mechanically tested, using two mechanical testing modalities with simulated physiological loading conditions: highly controllable confined compression tests (CCT) and more clinically realistic in situ compression tests (ISCT) in cadaveric porcine bone defects. Graft layer impaction strain, residual strain, aggregate modulus, and creep strain were determined in CCT. Graft layer porosity was determined using micro computed tomography. The ISCT was used to determine graft layer subsidence in bone environment. ANOVA showed significant differences (p<0.001) between different graft layer compositions. True strains absolutely decreased for increasing BAG content: impaction strain -0.92 (allograft) to -0.39 (BAG), residual strain -0.12 to -0.01, and creep strain -0.09 to 0.00 respectively. Aggregate modulus increased with increasing BAG content from 116 to 653MPa. Porosity ranged from 66% (pure allograft) to 15% (pure BAG). Subsidence was highest for allograft, and remarkably low for a 1:1 BAG-allograft volume mixture. Both BAG granules and allograft morsels as stand-alone materials exhibit suboptimal mechanical behaviour for load-bearing purpose. BAG granules are difficult to handle and less porous, whereas allograft subsides and creeps. A 1:1 volume mixture of BAG and allograft is therefore proposed as the best graft material in load-bearing defects.

  4. Stretchable and transparent electrodes based on in-plane structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kukjoo; Kim, Joohee; Hyun, Byung Gwan; Ji, Sangyoon; Kim, So-Yun; Kim, Sungwon; An, Byeong Wan; Park, Jang-Ung

    2015-08-01

    Stretchable electronics has attracted great interest with compelling potential applications that require reliable operation under mechanical deformation. Achieving stretchability in devices, however, requires a deeper understanding of nanoscale materials and mechanics beyond the success of flexible electronics. In this regard, tremendous research efforts have been dedicated toward developing stretchable electrodes, which are one of the most important building blocks for stretchable electronics. Stretchable transparent thin-film electrodes, which retain their electrical conductivity and optical transparency under mechanical deformation, are particularly important for the favourable application of stretchable devices. This minireview summarizes recent advances in stretchable transparent thin-film electrodes, especially employing strategies based on in-plane structures. Various approaches using metal nanomaterials, carbon nanomaterials, and their hybrids are described in terms of preparation processes and their optoelectronic/mechanical properties. Some challenges and perspectives for further advances in stretchable transparent electrodes are also discussed.

  5. HERSCHEL GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY OF [N ii] FINE STRUCTURE EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, Paul F.; Yıldız, Umut A.; Langer, William D.; Pineda, Jorge L.

    2015-12-01

    We present the first large-scale high angular resolution survey of ionized nitrogen in the Galactic Plane through emission of its two fine structure transitions ([N ii]) at 122 and 205 μm. The observations were largely obtained with the PACS instrument onboard the Herschel Space Observatory. The lines of sight were in the Galactic plane, following those of the Herschel OTKP project GOT C+. Both lines are reliably detected at the 10{sup −8}–10{sup −7} Wm{sup −2} sr{sup −1} level over the range –60° ≤ l ≤ 60°. The rms of the intensity among the 25 PACS spaxels of a given pointing is typically less than one third of the mean intensity, showing that the emission is extended. [N ii] is produced in gas in which hydrogen is ionized, and collisional excitation is by electrons. The ratio of the two fine structure transitions provides a direct measurement of the electron density, yielding n(e) largely in the range 10–50 cm{sup −3} with an average value of 29 cm{sup −3} and N{sup +} column densities 10{sup 16}–10{sup 17} cm{sup −2}. [N ii] emission is highly correlated with that of [C ii], and we calculate that between 1/3 and 1/2 of the [C ii] emission is associated with the ionized gas. The relatively high electron densities indicate that the source of the [N ii] emission is not the warm ionized medium (WIM), which has electron densities more than 100 times smaller. Possible origins of the observed [N ii] include the ionized surfaces of dense atomic and molecular clouds, the extended low-density envelopes of H ii regions, and low-filling factor high-density fluctuations of the WIM.

  6. Herschel Galactic Plane Survey of [NII] Fine Structure Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, Paul F.; Yıldız, Umut A.; Langer, William D.; Pineda, Jorge L.

    2015-12-01

    We present the first large-scale high angular resolution survey of ionized nitrogen in the Galactic Plane through emission of its two fine structure transitions ([N ii]) at 122 and 205 μm. The observations were largely obtained with the PACS instrument onboard the Herschel Space Observatory. The lines of sight were in the Galactic plane, following those of the Herschel OTKP project GOT C+. Both lines are reliably detected at the 10-8-10-7 Wm-2 sr-1 level over the range -60° ≤ l ≤ 60°. The rms of the intensity among the 25 PACS spaxels of a given pointing is typically less than one third of the mean intensity, showing that the emission is extended. [N ii] is produced in gas in which hydrogen is ionized, and collisional excitation is by electrons. The ratio of the two fine structure transitions provides a direct measurement of the electron density, yielding n(e) largely in the range 10-50 cm-3 with an average value of 29 cm-3 and N+ column densities 1016-1017 cm-2. [N ii] emission is highly correlated with that of [C ii], and we calculate that between 1/3 and 1/2 of the [C ii] emission is associated with the ionized gas. The relatively high electron densities indicate that the source of the [N ii] emission is not the warm ionized medium (WIM), which has electron densities more than 100 times smaller. Possible origins of the observed [N ii] include the ionized surfaces of dense atomic and molecular clouds, the extended low-density envelopes of H ii regions, and low-filling factor high-density fluctuations of the WIM.

  7. Silk as a biocohesive sacrificial binder in the fabrication of hydroxyapatite load bearing scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Stephanie L.; Rnjak-Kovacina, Jelena; Schmidt, Daniel; Lo, Tim J.; Kaplan, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Limitations of current clinical methods for bone repair continue to fuel the demand for a high strength, bioactive bone replacement material. Recent attempts to produce porous scaffolds for bone regeneration have been limited by the intrinsic weakness associated with high porosity materials. In this study, ceramic scaffold fabrication techniques for potential use in load-bearing bone repairs have been developed using naturally derived silk from Bombyx mori. Silk was first employed for ceramic grain consolidation during green body formation, and later as a sacrificial polymer to impart porosity during sintering. These techniques allowed preparation of hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffolds that exhibited a wide range of mechanical and porosity profiles, with some displaying unusually high compressive strength up to 152.4 ± 9.1 MPa. Results showed that the scaffolds exhibited a wide range of compressive strengths and moduli (8.7 ± 2.7 MPa to 152.4 ± 9.1 MPa and 0.3 ± 0.1 GPa to 8.6 ± 0.3 GPa) with total porosities of up to 62.9 ± 2.7% depending on the parameters used for fabrication. Moreover, HA-silk scaffolds could be molded into large, complex shapes, and further machined post-sinter to generate specific three-dimensional geometries. Scaffolds supported bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell attachment and proliferation, with no signs of cytotoxicity. Therefore, silk-fabricated HA scaffolds show promise for load bearing bone repair and regeneration needs. PMID:24881027

  8. Stress analysis of the space telescope focal plane structure joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, W. A., Jr.; Shoemaker, W. L.

    1985-01-01

    Two major efforts were begun concerning the Space Telescope focal plane structure joint. The 3-D solid finite element modeling of the bipod flexure plate was carried out. Conceptual models were developed for the load transfer through the three major bolts to the flexure plate. The flexure plate drawings were reconstructed using DADAM for the purpose of developing a file from which the coordinates of any point on the flexure plate could be determined and also to locate the attachment points of the various components which connect with the flexure plate. For modeling convenience the CADAM drawing of the flexure plate has been divided into several regions which will be subdivided into finite elements using MSGMESH, which is a finite element mesh generator available with MSC/NASTRAN. In addition to the CADAM work on the flexure plate, an effort was also begun to develop computer aided drawings of the peripheral beam which will be used to assist in modeling the connection between it and the flexure plate.

  9. Study on Load-Bearing Characteristics of a New Pile Group Foundation for an Offshore Wind Turbine

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Run; Lian, Jijian; Ding, Hongyan

    2014-01-01

    Because offshore wind turbines are high-rise structures, they transfer large horizontal loads and moments to their foundations. One of the keys to designing a foundation is determining the sensitivities and laws affecting its load-bearing capacity. In this study, this procedure was carried out for a new high-rise cap pile group foundation adapted to the loading characteristics of offshore wind turbines. The sensitivities of influential factors affecting the bearing properties were determined using an orthogonal test. Through a combination of numerical simulations and model tests, the effects of the inclination angle, length, diameter, and number of side piles on the vertical bearing capacity, horizontal bearing capacity, and bending bearing capacity were determined. The results indicate that an increase in the inclination angle of the side piles will increase the vertical bearing capacity, horizontal bearing capacity, and bending bearing capacity. An increase in the length of the side piles will increase the vertical bearing capacity and bending bearing capacity. When the length of the side piles is close to the central pile, the increase is more apparent. Finally, increasing the number of piles will increase the horizontal bearing capacity; however, the growth rate is small because of the pile group effect. PMID:25250375

  10. Study on load-bearing characteristics of a new pile group foundation for an offshore wind turbine.

    PubMed

    Lang, Ruiqing; Liu, Run; Lian, Jijian; Ding, Hongyan

    2014-01-01

    Because offshore wind turbines are high-rise structures, they transfer large horizontal loads and moments to their foundations. One of the keys to designing a foundation is determining the sensitivities and laws affecting its load-bearing capacity. In this study, this procedure was carried out for a new high-rise cap pile group foundation adapted to the loading characteristics of offshore wind turbines. The sensitivities of influential factors affecting the bearing properties were determined using an orthogonal test. Through a combination of numerical simulations and model tests, the effects of the inclination angle, length, diameter, and number of side piles on the vertical bearing capacity, horizontal bearing capacity, and bending bearing capacity were determined. The results indicate that an increase in the inclination angle of the side piles will increase the vertical bearing capacity, horizontal bearing capacity, and bending bearing capacity. An increase in the length of the side piles will increase the vertical bearing capacity and bending bearing capacity. When the length of the side piles is close to the central pile, the increase is more apparent. Finally, increasing the number of piles will increase the horizontal bearing capacity; however, the growth rate is small because of the pile group effect.

  11. Growth and Crystal Orientation of ZnTe on m-Plane Sapphire with Nanofaceted Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakasu, Taizo; Sun, Wei-Che; Kobayashi, Masakazu; Asahi, Toshiaki

    2017-04-01

    ZnTe thin films on sapphire substrate with nanofaceted structure have been studied. The nanofaceted structure of the m-plane (10-10) sapphire was obtained by heating the substrate at above 1100°C in air, and the r-plane (10-12) and S-plane (1-101) were confirmed. ZnTe layers were prepared on the nanofaceted m-plane sapphire substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The effect of the nanofaceted structure on the orientation of the thin films was examined based on x-ray diffraction (XRD) pole figures. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was also employed to characterize the interface structures. The ZnTe layer on the nanofaceted m-plane sapphire substrate exhibited (331)-plane orientation, compared with (211)-plane without the nanofaceted structure. After thermal treatment, the m-plane surface vanished and (211) layer could not be formed because of the lack of surface lattice matching. On the other hand, (331)-plane thin film was formed on the nanofaceted m-plane sapphire substrate, since the (111) ZnTe domains were oriented on the S-facet. The orientation of the ZnTe epilayer depended on the atomic ordering on the surface and the influence of the S-plane.

  12. Microfabrication of Cell-Laden Hydrogels for Engineering Mineralized and Load Bearing Tissues.

    PubMed

    Li, Chia-Cheng; Kharaziha, Mahshid; Min, Christine; Maas, Richard; Nikkhah, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Microengineering technologies and advanced biomaterials have extensive applications in the field of regenerative medicine. In this chapter, we review the integration of microfabrication techniques and hydrogel-based biomaterials in the field of dental, bone, and cartilage tissue engineering. We primarily discuss the major features that make hydrogels attractive candidates to mimic extracellular matrix (ECM), and we consider the benefits of three-dimensional (3D) culture systems for tissue engineering applications. We then focus on the fundamental principles of microfabrication techniques including photolithography, soft lithography and bioprinting approaches. Lastly, we summarize recent research on microengineering cell-laden hydrogel constructs for dental, bone and cartilage regeneration, and discuss future applications of microfabrication techniques for load-bearing tissue engineering.

  13. Reinforced Portland cement porous scaffolds for load-bearing bone tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Higuita-Castro, Natalia; Gallego-Perez, Daniel; Pelaez-Vargas, Alejandro; García Quiroz, Felipe; Posada, Olga M; López, Luis E; Sarassa, Carlos A; Agudelo-Florez, Piedad; Monteiro, Fernando J; Litsky, Alan S; Hansford, Derek J

    2012-02-01

    Modified Portland cement porous scaffolds with suitable characteristics for load-bearing bone tissue engineering applications were manufactured by combining the particulate leaching and foaming methods. Non-crosslinked polydimethylsiloxane was evaluated as a potential reinforcing material. The scaffolds presented average porosities between 70 and 80% with mean pore sizes ranging from 300 μm up to 5.0 mm. Non-reinforced scaffolds presented compressive strengths and elastic modulus values of 2.6 and 245 MPa, respectively, whereas reinforced scaffolds exhibited 4.2 and 443 MPa, respectively, an increase of ∼62 and 80%. Portland cement scaffolds supported human osteoblast-like cell adhesion, spreading, and propagation (t = 1-28 days). Cell metabolism and alkaline phosphatase activity were found to be enhanced at longer culture intervals (t ≥ 14 days). These results suggest the possibility of obtaining strong and biocompatible scaffolds for bone repair applications from inexpensive, yet technologically advanced materials such as Portland cement.

  14. Localized and chaotic folding: the role of axial plane structures.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Bruce E; Ord, Alison

    2012-04-28

    Most natural fold systems are not sinusoidal in profile. A widely held view is that such irregularity derives solely from inherited initial geometrical perturbations. Although, undoubtedly, initial perturbations can contribute to irregularity, we explore a different (but complementary) view in which the irregular geometry results from some material or system softening process. This arises because the buckling response of a layer (or layers) embedded in a weaker matrix is controlled in a sensitive manner by the nature of the reaction forces exerted by the deforming matrix on the layer. In many theoretical treatments of the folding problem, this reaction force is assumed to be a linear function of some measure of the deformation or deformation rate. This paper is concerned with the influence of nonlinear reaction forces such as arise from nonlinear elasticity or viscosity. Localized folds arising from nonlinearity form in a fundamentally different way than the Biot wavelength selection process. As a particular example of nonlinear behaviour, we examine the influence of axial plane structures made up of layers of different mineralogy formed by chemical differentiation processes accompanying the deformation; they are referred to as metamorphic layering. The alternating mineralogical composition in the metamorphic layers means that the embedding matrix exerts a reaction force on the folded layers that varies not only with the deflection or the velocity of deflection of the layer, but also in a periodic manner along the length of the folded layers. The influence of this spatially periodic reaction force on the development of localized and chaotic folding is explored numerically.

  15. Three-Dimensional Structure of Plane Mixing Layers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, James Horatio

    Recent studies have shown the existence of an organized and persistent streamwise vortex structure in plane mixing layers, which is believed to take the form of a row of alternating-sign streamwise vortices. So far, this streamwise vortex structure has been studied mostly through flow-visualization at relatively low Reynolds numbers. The main objective of the present work was to obtain quantitative measurements of the streamwise vorticity at Reynolds numbers more comparable to those commonly found in practical applications. In the first experiment, the artificially induced streamwise vortex was observed to decay as approximately 1/X^2 within the mixing layer. The effect of the vortex was to locally distort the mean strain distribution in the mixing layer, thus altering the production of the Reynolds stresses. Peak values of the normal stresses were increased by about 20% over the undisturbed case in the region of the streamwise vortex. In particular a strong, pronounced peak was generated in the secondary shear stress, (overline{u^' w^ '}).. In the second experiment, "naturally-occurring" streamwise vorticity was clearly observed in a two-stream mixing layer. Concentrated streamwise vortices appeared just downstream of the first roll-up of the spanwise vorticity, with an initial circulation which was roughly half that of the spanwise vortex circulation. The streamwise vortices first appeared in "clusters", the positions of which seemed to be related to small disturbances in one of the upstream boundary layers. The clusters quickly reorganized into a single row of alternating-sign vortices under the influence of vortex dynamics and changes in the normal stress anisotropy. The streamwise vortex spacing increased in a stepwise fashion, at least partially through the amalgamation of like-sign vortices. The wavelength of the streamwise vortices increased approximately as the mixing layer vorticity thickness, while their strength decayed as roughly 1/X^ {1.5}. In the

  16. Tailored complex 3D vortex lattice structures by perturbed multiples of three-plane waves.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Jolly; Vyas, Sunil; Senthilkumaran, Paramasivam; Joseph, Joby

    2012-04-20

    As three-plane waves are the minimum number required for the formation of vortex-embedded lattice structures by plane wave interference, we present our experimental investigation on the formation of complex 3D photonic vortex lattice structures by a designed superposition of multiples of phase-engineered three-plane waves. The unfolding of the generated complex photonic lattice structures with higher order helical phase is realized by perturbing the superposition of a relatively phase-encoded, axially equidistant multiple of three noncoplanar plane waves. Through a programmable spatial light modulator assisted single step fabrication approach, the unfolded 3D vortex lattice structures are experimentally realized, well matched to our computer simulations. The formation of higher order intertwined helices embedded in these 3D spiraling vortex lattice structures by the superposition of the multiples of phase-engineered three-plane waves interference is also studied.

  17. Proteins in load-bearing junctions: the histidine-rich metal-binding protein of mussel byssus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hua; Waite, J Herbert

    2006-11-28

    Building complex load-bearing scaffolds depends on effective ways of joining functionally different biomacromolecules. The junction between collagen fibers and foamlike adhesive plaques in mussel byssus is robust despite the strikingly dissimilar connected structures. mcfp-4, the matrix protein from this junction, and its presecreted form from the foot tissue of Mytilus californianus were isolated and characterized. mcfp-4 has a mass of approximately 93 kDa as determined by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Its composition is dominated by histidine (22 mol %), but levels of lysine, arginine, and aspartate are also significant. A small amount of 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-l-alanine (2 mol %) can be detected by amino acid analysis and redox cycling assays. The cDNA-deduced sequence of mcfp-4 reveals multiple variants with highly repetitive internal structures, including approximately 36 tandemly repeated His-rich decapeptides (e.g., HVHTHRVLHK) in the N-terminal half and 16 somewhat more degenerate aspartate-rich undecapeptides (e.g., DDHVNDIAQTA) in the C-terminal half. Incubation of a synthetic peptide based on the His-rich decapeptide with Fe3+, Co2+, Ni2+, Zn2+, and Cu2+ indicates that only Cu is strongly bound. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry of the peptide modified with diethyl pyrocarbonate before and after Cu binding suggests that histidine residues dominate Cu binding. In contrast, the aspartate-rich undecapeptides preferentially bind Ca2+. mcfp-4 is strategically positioned to function as a macromolecular bifunctional linker by using metal ions to couple its own His-rich domains to the His-rich termini of the preCOLs. Ca2+ may mediate coupling of the C-terminus to other calcium-binding plaque proteins.

  18. Thermal and structural analyses of variable thickness plane problems

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhibi; Kuzay, T.M.

    1995-07-01

    Finite difference formulations for variable thickness thermal analysis and variable thickness plane stress analysis are presented. In heat transfer analysis, radiation effects and temperature-dependent thermal conductivity are taken into account. While in thermal stress analysis, the thermal expansion coefficient is considered as temperature dependent. An application of the variable thickness window for synchrotron radiation beamline under very strong X-ray is provided.

  19. Development of composite scaffolds for load-bearing segmental bone defects.

    PubMed

    Pilia, Marcello; Guda, Teja; Appleford, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The need for a suitable tissue-engineered scaffold that can be used to heal load-bearing segmental bone defects (SBDs) is both immediate and increasing. During the past 30 years, various ceramic and polymer scaffolds have been investigated for this application. More recently, while composite scaffolds built using a combination of ceramics and polymeric materials are being investigated in a greater number, very few products have progressed from laboratory benchtop studies to preclinical testing in animals. This review is based on an exhaustive literature search of various composite scaffolds designed to serve as bone regenerative therapies. We analyzed the benefits and drawbacks of different composite scaffold manufacturing techniques, the properties of commonly used ceramics and polymers, and the properties of currently investigated synthetic composite grafts. To follow, a comprehensive review of in vivo models used to test composite scaffolds in SBDs is detailed to serve as a guide to design appropriate translational studies and to identify the challenges that need to be overcome in scaffold design for successful translation. This includes selecting the animal type, determining the anatomical location within the animals, choosing the correct study duration, and finally, an overview of scaffold performance assessment.

  20. An Investigation on Load Bearing Capacities of Cement and Resin Grouted Rock Bolts Installed in Weak Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalyoncu Erguler, Guzide; Abiddin Erguler, Zeynal

    2015-04-01

    Rock bolts have been considered one of indispensable support method to improve load bearing capacity of many underground engineering projects, and thus, various types of them have been developed until now for different purposes. Although mechanically anchored rock bolts can be successfully installed to prevent structurally controlled instabilities in hard rocks, in comparison with cement and resin grouted rock bolts, these types of anchors are not so effective in weak rocks characterized by relatively low mechanical properties. In order to investigate the applicability and to measure relative performance of cement and resin grouted rock bolts into weak and heavily jointed rock mass, a research program mainly consisting of pull-out tests was performed in a metal mine in Turkey. The rock materials excavated in this underground mining were described as basalt, tuff, ore dominated volcanic rocks and dacite. To achieve more representative results for rock materials found in this mining and openings excavated in varied dimensions, the pull-out tests were conducted on rock bolts used in many different locations where more convergences were measured and deformation dependent instability was expected to cause greater engineering problems. It is well known that the capacity of rock bolts depends on the length, diameter and density of the bolt pattern, and so considering the thickness of plastic zone in the studied openings, the length and diameter of rock bolts were taken as 2.4 m. and 25 mm., respectively. The spacing between rows changed between 70 and 180 cm. In this study, totally twenty five pull-out tests were performed to have a general understanding about axial load bearing capacity and support reaction curves of cement and resin grouted rock bolts. When pull load-displacement curves belongs to cement and resin grouted rock bolts were compared with each other, it was determined that cement grouted rock bolts carry more load ranging between 115.6 kN and 127.5 kN with

  1. Grain Boundary Plane Orientation Fundamental Zones and Structure-Property Relationships.

    PubMed

    Homer, Eric R; Patala, Srikanth; Priedeman, Jonathan L

    2015-10-26

    Grain boundary plane orientation is a profoundly important determinant of character in polycrystalline materials that is not well understood. This work demonstrates how boundary plane orientation fundamental zones, which capture the natural crystallographic symmetries of a grain boundary, can be used to establish structure-property relationships. Using the fundamental zone representation, trends in computed energy, excess volume at the grain boundary, and temperature-dependent mobility naturally emerge and show a strong dependence on the boundary plane orientation. Analysis of common misorientation axes even suggests broader trends of grain boundary energy as a function of misorientation angle and plane orientation. Due to the strong structure-property relationships that naturally emerge from this work, boundary plane fundamental zones are expected to simplify analysis of both computational and experimental data. This standardized representation has the potential to significantly accelerate research in the topologically complex and vast five-dimensional phase space of grain boundaries.

  2. Grain Boundary Plane Orientation Fundamental Zones and Structure-Property Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Homer, Eric R.; Patala, Srikanth; Priedeman, Jonathan L.

    2015-01-01

    Grain boundary plane orientation is a profoundly important determinant of character in polycrystalline materials that is not well understood. This work demonstrates how boundary plane orientation fundamental zones, which capture the natural crystallographic symmetries of a grain boundary, can be used to establish structure-property relationships. Using the fundamental zone representation, trends in computed energy, excess volume at the grain boundary, and temperature-dependent mobility naturally emerge and show a strong dependence on the boundary plane orientation. Analysis of common misorientation axes even suggests broader trends of grain boundary energy as a function of misorientation angle and plane orientation. Due to the strong structure-property relationships that naturally emerge from this work, boundary plane fundamental zones are expected to simplify analysis of both computational and experimental data. This standardized representation has the potential to significantly accelerate research in the topologically complex and vast five-dimensional phase space of grain boundaries. PMID:26498715

  3. Grain boundary plane orientation fundamental zones and structure-property relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Homer, Eric R.; Patala, Srikanth; Priedeman, Jonathan L.

    2015-10-26

    Grain boundary plane orientation is a profoundly important determinant of character in polycrystalline materials that is not well understood. This work demonstrates how boundary plane orientation fundamental zones, which capture the natural crystallographic symmetries of a grain boundary, can be used to establish structure-property relationships. Using the fundamental zone representation, trends in computed energy, excess volume at the grain boundary, and temperature-dependent mobility naturally emerge and show a strong dependence on the boundary plane orientation. Analysis of common misorientation axes even suggests broader trends of grain boundary energy as a function of misorientation angle and plane orientation. Due to the strong structure-property relationships that naturally emerge from this work, boundary plane fundamental zones are expected to simplify analysis of both computational and experimental data. This standardized representation has the potential to significantly accelerate research in the topologically complex and vast five-dimensional phase space of grain boundaries.

  4. Grain boundary plane orientation fundamental zones and structure-property relationships

    DOE PAGES

    Homer, Eric R.; Patala, Srikanth; Priedeman, Jonathan L.

    2015-10-26

    Grain boundary plane orientation is a profoundly important determinant of character in polycrystalline materials that is not well understood. This work demonstrates how boundary plane orientation fundamental zones, which capture the natural crystallographic symmetries of a grain boundary, can be used to establish structure-property relationships. Using the fundamental zone representation, trends in computed energy, excess volume at the grain boundary, and temperature-dependent mobility naturally emerge and show a strong dependence on the boundary plane orientation. Analysis of common misorientation axes even suggests broader trends of grain boundary energy as a function of misorientation angle and plane orientation. Due to themore » strong structure-property relationships that naturally emerge from this work, boundary plane fundamental zones are expected to simplify analysis of both computational and experimental data. This standardized representation has the potential to significantly accelerate research in the topologically complex and vast five-dimensional phase space of grain boundaries.« less

  5. An automatic recognition and parameter extraction method for structural planes in borehole image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chuanying; Zou, Xianjian; Han, Zengqiang; Wang, Yiteng; Wang, Jinchao

    2016-12-01

    As a breakthrough in borehole imaging technology, digital panoramic borehole camera technology has been widely employed. The high-resolution panoramic borehole images can accurately reproduce the geometric features of structural planes. However, the detection of these features is usually done manually, which is both time-consuming and introduces human errors. To solve this problem, this paper presents a method for the automatic recognition and parameter extraction of borehole geometric features of camera images. In this method, the image's gray and gradient level, and also their projection on the depth axis are used to identify the locations of structural planes. Afterwards, iterative matching is employed by using a template of sinusoidal function to search for structural planes in the identified image blocks. Finally, optimal sine curves are selected as the feature curves of structural planes, and their related parameters are converted into structural plane parameters required for engineering, such as their positions, dip directions, dip angles and fracture widths. The method can automatically identify all of structural planes throughout the whole borehole camera image in a continuous and rapid manner, and obtain the corresponding structural parameters. It has proven highly reliable, accurate and efficient.

  6. Calcium phosphate-titanium composites for articulating surfaces of load-bearing implants.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Amit; Dittrick, Stanley; Gualtieri, Thomas; Wu, Jeffrey; Bose, Susmita

    2016-04-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP)-titanium (Ti) composites were processed using a commercial laser engineered net shaping (LENS™) machine to increase wear resistance of articulating surfaces of load-bearing implants. Such composites could be used to cover the surface of titanium implants and potentially increase the lifetime of a joint replacement. It was hypothesized that adding calcium phosphate to commercially pure titanium (CP-Ti) and Ti6Al4V alloy via laser processing would decrease the material loss when subjected to wear. This added protection would be due to the in situ formation of a CaP tribofilm. Different amounts of CaP were mixed by weight with pure Ti and Ti6Al4V powders. The mixed powders were then made into cylindrical samples using a commercial LENS™-750 system. Microstructures were observed and it was found the CaP had integrated into the titanium metal matrix. Compression test revealed that CaP significantly increased the 0.2% offset yield strength as well as the ultimate compressive strength of CP-Ti. It was found that the addition of CaP to pure titanium reduced the material loss and increased wear resistance. This was due to the formation of CaP tribofilm on the articulating surface. The in situ formed tribofilm also lowered the coefficient of friction and acted as a solid lubricant between the two interacting metal surfaces. Overall, CaP addition to Ti and its alloy Ti6Al4V show an effective way to minimize wear induced damage due to the formation of in situ tribofilm at the articulating surface, a strategy that can be utilized in various biomedical devices.

  7. Reduction of load-bearing capacity of all-ceramic crowns due to cement aging.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chenglin; Wang, Raorao; Mao, Shuangshuang; Arola, Dwayne; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how water aging of the resin cement influences the stress distribution in all-ceramic crowns and if there is an increase in the propensity for crown failure. The failure of all-ceramic crowns attributed to cement degradation was explored using a combination of experimental and numerical methods. Sectioned all-ceramic crown specimens were fabricated of IPS e.max Ceram/e.max Press (CP) and Vita VM9/Cercon zirconia (VZ), and then stored in either air or distilled water for 30 days. Monotonic contact loads were applied to fracture near the buccal cusp ridge of each sample. Deformation within the crown layers during loading was analyzed by means of Digital Image Correlation (DIC). A 3D finite element model of the restoration including veneer, core, cement and tooth substrate was developed to evaluate the stress distribution in the crowns before and after cement degradation. There was a significant decrease (p<0.001) in the critical fracture load and a change in the fracture mode after cement water absorption in the CP crowns. In contrast, there was no significant influence of cement aging on fracture modes and fracture loads (p>0.05) in the VZ crowns. Finite element analysis showed that regardless of the crown types, the stress distribution is identical by degradation in Young's modulus of the cement. However, core/substrate debonding results in a change of the stress distribution and a significant increase in the magnitude. Water aging causes reduction of stiffness and bonding strength of cement agents. Degradation in bonding strength and stiffness could potentially lead to stress redistribution in the restored crown and reduce the load-bearing capacity of all-ceramic restorations after years of service.

  8. Effect of a novel load-bearing trabecular Nitinol scaffold on rabbit radius bone regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Gotman, Irena Gutmanas, Elazar Y.; Zaretzky, Asaph; Psakhie, Sergey G.

    2015-10-27

    The research aim was to evaluate the bone regeneration capability of novel load-bearing NiTi alloy (Nitinol) scaffolds in a critical-size defect (CSD) model. High strength “trabecular Nitinol” scaffolds were prepared by PIRAC (Powder Immersion Reaction Assisted Coating) annealing of the highly porous Ni foam in Ti powder at 900°C. This was followed by PIRAC nitriding to mitigate the release of potentially toxic Ni ions. Scaffolds phase composition and microstructure were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDS), and their mechanical properties were tested in compression. New Zealand white rabbits received bone defect in right radius and were divided in four groups randomly. In the control group, nothing was placed in the defect. In other groups, NiTi scaffolds were implanted in the defect: (i) as produced, (ii) loaded with bone marrow aspirate (BMA), and (iii) biomimetically CaP-coated. The animals were sacrificed after 12 weeks. The forelimbs with scaffolds were resected, fixed, sectioned and examined in SEM. New bone formation inside the scaffold was studied by EDS analysis and by the processing of backscattered electron images. Bone ingrowth into the scaffold was observed in all implant groups, mostly next to the ulna. New bone formation was strongly enhanced by BMA loading and biomimeatic CaP coating, the bone penetrating as much as 1–1.5 mm into the scaffold. The results of this preliminary study demonstrate that the newly developed high strength trabecular Nitinol scaffolds can be successfully used for bone regeneration in critical size defects.

  9. Effect of a novel load-bearing trabecular Nitinol scaffold on rabbit radius bone regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotman, Irena; Zaretzky, Asaph; Psakhie, Sergey G.; Gutmanas, Elazar Y.

    2015-10-01

    The research aim was to evaluate the bone regeneration capability of novel load-bearing NiTi alloy (Nitinol) scaffolds in a critical-size defect (CSD) model. High strength "trabecular Nitinol" scaffolds were prepared by PIRAC (Powder Immersion Reaction Assisted Coating) annealing of the highly porous Ni foam in Ti powder at 900°C. This was followed by PIRAC nitriding to mitigate the release of potentially toxic Ni ions. Scaffolds phase composition and microstructure were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDS), and their mechanical properties were tested in compression. New Zealand white rabbits received bone defect in right radius and were divided in four groups randomly. In the control group, nothing was placed in the defect. In other groups, NiTi scaffolds were implanted in the defect: (i) as produced, (ii) loaded with bone marrow aspirate (BMA), and (iii) biomimetically CaP-coated. The animals were sacrificed after 12 weeks. The forelimbs with scaffolds were resected, fixed, sectioned and examined in SEM. New bone formation inside the scaffold was studied by EDS analysis and by the processing of backscattered electron images. Bone ingrowth into the scaffold was observed in all implant groups, mostly next to the ulna. New bone formation was strongly enhanced by BMA loading and biomimeatic CaP coating, the bone penetrating as much as 1-1.5 mm into the scaffold. The results of this preliminary study demonstrate that the newly developed high strength trabecular Nitinol scaffolds can be successfully used for bone regeneration in critical size defects.

  10. Load-bearing masonry system adoption and performance: A case study of construction company in a developing country

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramli, Nor Azlinda; Abdullah, Che Sobry; Nawi, Mohd Nasrun Mohd; Bahaudin, Ahmad Yusni

    2016-08-01

    This study addresses the factors that influence the adoption of load-bearing masonry (LBM) system. A case study of the load-bearing masonry (LBM) system adoption is conducted through an interview to explore the situation of the technology adoption in a construction company. The finding indicates the factors influence the adoption of LBM system for the construction company are: organizational resources, usefulness, less maintenance, reduce construction time and cost. From the findings, these factors consistent with previous literature. Furthermore, the performance of the company was measured by looking into the financial and non-financial aspects. The LBM system brings good performance as it increased the profits of the company, a good quality of product and attracts more demand from customers. Thus, these factors should be considered for the other companies that are interested in implementing the LBM system in their projects.

  11. Out-of-plane free vibration analysis of a cable-arch structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, H. J.; Zhao, Y. Y.; Zhu, H. P.

    2013-02-01

    Cable-arch structure has been widely used in many long-span structures such as cable roofs and cable-stayed arch bridges, but its dynamics is still not well understood. In this paper, the out-of-plane dynamic behavior of a cable-arch structure is investigated. The equations governing the out-of-plane free vibration of the structure are derived using d'Alembert's principle. A transfer matrix method is used to solve the governing equations and determine the frequencies of the out-of-plane vibration. The theories are then used to study two specific cases: free vibration of a model cable-arch and simulation of an arch erection process. The effects of some key parameters of cable and arch, such as tension of cable and radius, open-angle and shape of arch, are examined. The results indicate that in-plane and spatial cables can largely improve the out-of-plane dynamic behavior of arch structures, which are further verified by analyzing the out-of-plane buckling of cable-arch structures. The present work should be valuable and significant not only for the fundamental research but also engineering design of roofs and bridges.

  12. A FUNDAMENTAL PLANE OF SPIRAL STRUCTURE IN DISK GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Benjamin L.; Kennefick, Daniel; Kennefick, Julia; Shields, Douglas W.; Flatman, Russell; Hartley, Matthew T.; Berrier, Joel C.; Martinsson, Thomas P. K.; Swaters, Rob A.

    2015-03-20

    Spiral structure is the most distinctive feature of disk galaxies and yet debate persists about which theory of spiral structure is correct. Many versions of the density wave theory demand that the pitch angle be uniquely determined by the distribution of mass in the bulge and disk of the galaxy. We present evidence that the tangent of the pitch angle of logarithmic spiral arms in disk galaxies correlates strongly with the density of neutral atomic hydrogen in the disk and with the central stellar bulge mass of the galaxy. These three quantities, when plotted against each other, form a planar relationship that we argue should be fundamental to our understanding of spiral structure in disk galaxies. We further argue that any successful theory of spiral structure must be able to explain this relationship.

  13. Out-of-plane structural flexibility of phosphorene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gaoxue; Loh, G C; Pandey, Ravindra; Karna, Shashi P

    2016-02-05

    Phosphorene has been rediscovered recently, establishing itself as one of the most promising two-dimensional group-V elemental monolayers with direct band gap, high carrier mobility, and anisotropic electronic properties. In this paper, surface buckling and its effect on its electronic properties are investigated by using molecular dynamics simulations together with density functional theory calculations. We find that phosphorene shows superior structural flexibility along the armchair direction allowing it to have large curvatures. The semiconducting and direct band gap nature are retained with buckling along the armchair direction; the band gap decreases and transforms to an indirect band gap with buckling along the zigzag direction. The structural flexibility and electronic robustness along the armchair direction facilitate the fabrication of devices with complex shapes, such as folded phosphorene and phosphorene nano-scrolls, thereby offering new possibilities for the application of phosphorene in flexible electronics and optoelectronics.

  14. Effect of weave tightness and structure on the in-plane and through-plane air permeability of woven carbon fibers for gas diffusion layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caston, Terry B.; Murphy, Andrew R.; Harris, Tequila A. L.

    In this study, woven gas diffusion layers (GDLs) with varying weave type and tightness are investigated. Plain and twill weave patterns were manufactured in-house. The in-plane and through-plane air permeability of the woven samples were tested, and mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) tests were performed to study the pore structure. It was found that the twill weave has a higher permeability than the plain weave, which is consistent with literature. Like non-woven carbon papers, woven GDLs have higher in-plane permeability than through-plane permeability; however it has been shown that it is possible to manufacture a GDL with higher through-plane permeability than in-plane permeability. It was also concluded that the percentage of macropores in the weave is the driving factor in determining the through-plane air permeability. This work lays the groundwork for future studies to attempt to characterize the relationship between the weave structure and the air permeability in woven GDLs.

  15. Compressive neuropathy of long thoracic nerve and accessory nerve secondary to heavy load bearing. A case report.

    PubMed

    Sahin, F; Yilmaz, F; Esit, N; Aysal, F; Kuran, B

    2007-03-01

    Carrying heavy loads that compress the shoulders is a possible etiological factor for both accessory and long thoracic nerve entrapment. In our patient, shouldering heavy loads damaged both nerves. A 27-year-old right-hand-dominant man was referred because of difficulty in raising his arms after a brief period of painful episodes due to heavy load bearing on both shoulders. Atrophic muscles around the shoulders, depressed and winged scapula were noted. An EMG confirmed entrapment of long thoracic and accessory nerves. An exercise program was instituted; 16 months after initial referral, though winged scapula was still noted, manual muscular strength had returned without functional limitation.

  16. The influence of the atomic structure of basal planes on interplanar distance in pyrolytic carbon materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgardt, N. I.; Prihodko, A. S.; Seibt, M.

    2016-12-01

    The atomic structure of carbon materials is studied using the example of pyrocarbon and boronrich pyrocarbon by means of the method of reconstruction of the wave function in transmission electron microscopy. It is shown that the digital processing of the phase distributions of these functions allows us to find the average distance between the basal planes. Using the method of molecular dynamics for the formation of the test structures and obtaining for them the calculated phase distributions, the effect of depletion of the basal planes of the carbon atoms on the interplanar distance in the pyrocarbon materials is quantified.

  17. Optical polarization characteristics of m-plane GaN/AlGaN quantum well structures grown on m-plane SiC substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seoung-Hwan; Ahn, Doyeol

    2015-12-01

    Optical polarization characteristics of m-plane GaN/AlGaN QW structures grown on m-plane SiC substrate were theoretically investigated using the multiband effective-mass theory. The QW structure grown on SiC substrate shows much larger in-plane optical polarization than that grown on GaN substrate. This is attributed to the fact that the QW structure grown on SiC substrate has larger y‧-polarized optical emission and smaller x‧-polarized optical emission than the QW structure grown on GaN substrate. Also, the magnitude of the optical polarization is found to depend on the carrier density and decrease gradually with increasing carrier density. This can be explained by the fact that, with increasing k∥, the x‧-polarized matrix element increases while the y‧-polarized matrix element rapidly decreases.

  18. Effect of fiber crosslinking on collagen-fiber reinforced collagen-chondroitin-6-sulfate materials for regenerating load-bearing soft tissues.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, J H; Ghose, S; Kew, S J; Moavenian, A; Best, S M; Cameron, R E

    2013-01-01

    Porous collagen-glycosaminoglycan structures are bioactive and exhibit a pore architecture favorable for both cellular infiltration and attachment; however, their inferior mechanical properties limit use, particularly in load-bearing situations. Reinforcement with collagen fibers may be a feasible route for enhancing the mechanical characteristics of these materials, providing potential for composites used for the repair and regeneration of soft tissue such as tendon, ligaments, and cartilage. Therefore, this study investigates the reinforcement of collagen-chondroitin-6-sulfate (C6S) porous structures with bundles of extruded, reconstituted type I collagen fibers. Fiber bundles were produced through extrusion and then, where applicable, crosslinked using a solution of 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide/N-hydroxysuccinimide. Fibers were then submerged in the collagen-C6S matrix slurry before being lyophilized. A second 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide and N-hydroxysuccinimide crosslinking process was then applied to the composite material before a secondary lyophilization cycle. Where bundles had been previously crosslinked, composites withstood a load of approximately 60 N before failure, the reinforcing fibers remained dense and a favorable matrix pore structure resulted, with good interaction between fiber and matrix. Fibers that had not been crosslinked before lyophilization showed significant internal porosity and a channel existed between them and the matrix. Mechanical properties were significantly reduced, but the additional porosity could prove favorable for cell migration and has potential for directing aligned tissue growth.

  19. Evaluation of a hybrid scaffold/cell construct in repair of high-load-bearing osteochondral defects in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Shao, Xin Xin; Hutmacher, Dietmar W; Ho, Saey Tuan; Goh, James C H; Lee, Eng Hin

    2006-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and potential of a hybrid scaffold system in large- and high-load-bearing osteochondral defects repair. The implants were made of medical-grade PCL (mPCL) for the bone compartment whereas fibrin glue was used for the cartilage part. Both matrices were seeded with allogenic bone marrow-derived mesenchymal cells (BMSC) and implanted in the defect (4 mm diameter x 5 mm depth) on medial femoral condyle of adult New Zealand White rabbits. Empty scaffolds were used at the control side. Cell survival was tracked via fluorescent labeling. The regeneration process was evaluated by several techniques at 3 and 6 months post-implantation. Mature trabecular bone regularly formed in the mPCL scaffold at both 3 and 6 months post-operation. Micro-Computed Tomography showed progression of mineralization from the host-tissue interface towards the inner region of the grafts. At 3 months time point, the specimens showed good cartilage repair. In contrast, the majority of 6 months specimens revealed poor remodeling and fissured integration with host cartilage while other samples could maintain good cartilage appearance. In vivo viability of the transplanted cells was demonstrated for the duration of 5 weeks. The results demonstrated that mPCL scaffold is a potential matrix for osteochondral bone regeneration and that fibrin glue does not inherit the physical properties to allow for cartilage regeneration in a large and high-load-bearing defect site.

  20. Influence of cyclic fatigue in water on the load-bearing capacity of dental bridges made of zirconia.

    PubMed

    Kohorst, Philipp; Dittmer, Marc Philipp; Borchers, Lothar; Stiesch-Scholz, Meike

    2008-09-01

    The humid atmosphere and permanent occurrence of chewing forces in the oral environment lead to degradation of ceramics used for prosthetic restorations. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of artificial aging on the load-bearing capacity of four-unit bridges, with both undamaged and predamaged zirconia frameworks. Additionally, different parameters for chewing simulation have been investigated and a finite element analysis was made to predict the location of highest tensile stresses within the bridges. A total of 60 frameworks were milled from presintered zirconia and divided into six homogeneous groups. Prior to veneering, frameworks of two groups were "damaged" by a defined saw cut similar to an accidental flaw generated during shape cutting. After veneering, FPDs were subjected to thermal and mechanical cycling - with the exception of control groups. The load-bearing capacity of tested FPDs was significantly reduced by artificial aging. In comparison to unaged specimens, fracture resistance decreased by about 40%, whereas preliminary damage did not have a significant effect. Increasing number of cycles and increasing upper load limit failed to show any additional effect on fracture force. To predict the progression of degradation under the terms of in vitro simulation for even longer periods, further aging experiments are required.

  1. Development of hydroxyapatite/calcium silicate composites addressed to the design of load-bearing bone scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Sprio, Simone; Tampieri, Anna; Celotti, Giancarlo; Landi, Elena

    2009-04-01

    This work deals with the preparation of bioactive ceramic composites to be employed for the development of load-bearing bone substitutes, made of hydroxyapatite (Ca(10)(PO(4))(6)(OH)(2), HA) and bioactive dicalcium silicate (Ca(2)SiO(4), C(2)S) as a reinforcing phase. The composite materials were prepared by Fast Hot-Pressing (FHP), which allowed the rapid sintering of monolithic ceramics at temperatures up to 1500 degrees C, well above the commonly adopted temperatures for the consolidation of hydroxyapatite (1200-1300 degrees C). The purpose was to achieve the grain coalescence of both HA and the strengthening phase, so that to obtain a homogeneous ceramic material characterized by controlled phase composition and improved mechanical strength; the dwell time was reduced as much as possible to prevent HA decomposition and excessive grain growth. The most remarkable result, in terms of phase composition, was the absence of any secondary phases in the final ceramics other than HA and C(2)S, even after sintering at 1500 degrees C. The flexure strength of the composite materials was found to be much higher than that of HA alone. Further mechanical characterization was also carried out on HA and composites, sintered in different conditions, to evaluate the elastic properties and fracture toughness, and properties close to those of mineral bone were found. These preliminary results confirmed that composites of HA and Ca(2)SiO(4) are promising for the development of bioactive load-bearing ceramic bone substitutes with controlled phase composition.

  2. Performance of bioactive PMMA-based bone cement under load-bearing conditions: an in vivo evaluation and FE simulation.

    PubMed

    Fottner, Andreas; Nies, Berthold; Kitanovic, Denis; Steinbrück, Arnd; Mayer-Wagner, Susanne; Schröder, Christian; Heinemann, Sascha; Pohl, Ulrich; Jansson, Volkmar

    2016-09-01

    In the past, bioactive bone cement was investigated in order to improve the durability of cemented arthroplasties by strengthening the bone-cement interface. As direct bone-cement bonding may theoretically lead to higher stresses within the cement, the question arises, whether polymethylmethacrylate features suitable mechanical properties to withstand altered stress conditions? To answer this question, in vivo experiments and finite element simulations were conducted. Twelve rabbits were divided into two groups examining either bioactive polymethylmethacrylate-based cement with unchanged mechanical properties or commercially available polymethylmethacrylate cement. The cements were tested under load-bearing conditions over a period of 7 months, using a spacer prosthesis cemented into the femur. For the finite element analyses, boundary conditions of the rabbit femur were simulated and analyses were performed with respect to different loading scenarios. Calculations of equivalent stress distributions within the cements were applied, with a completely bonded cement surface for the bioactive cement and with a continuously interfering fibrous tissue layer for the reference cement. The bioactive cement revealed good in vivo bioactivity. In the bioactive cement group two failures (33 %), with complete break-out of the prosthesis occurred, while none in the reference group. Finite element analyses of simulated bioactive cement fixation showed an increase in maximal equivalent stress by 49.2 to 109.4 % compared to the simulation of reference cement. The two failures as well as an increase in calculated equivalent stress highlight the importance of fatigue properties of polymethylmethacrylate in general and especially when developing bioactive cements designated for load-bearing conditions.

  3. Measurements of the streamwise vortical structures in a plane mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, James H.; Mehta, Rabindra D.

    1992-01-01

    The 3D structure of a plane two-stream mixing layer of velocity ratio 0.6 and originating from laminar initial boundary layers was investigated through direct measurements made in a specially constructed mixing-layer wind tunnel. The main objective of the study was to establish quantitatively the presence and the role of the secondary streamwise vortex structure (of the kind that has been shown in past flow visualization investigations to ride among the primary spanwise vortices) in the development of a plane turbulent mixing layer at relatively high Reynolds numbers. Results indicate that the instability leading to the formation of streamwise vortices is initially amplified just downstream of the first spanwise roll-up. The streamwise vortices, which first appear in clusters containing vorticity of both signs, realign further downstream to form counterrotating pairs. Due to the amalgamation of like-sign vortices, the streamwise vortex spacing increases in a stepwise fashion.

  4. Plane of elastic non-resisting tension material under foundation structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baratta, A.; Corbi, I.

    2004-05-01

    In the frame of 2D-static problems one approaches the problem of elastic-NRT (not-resisting tension) semi-plane loaded on its limit line. This problem is intended to model the stress situation induced in the soil by a foundation structure. The solution, in terms of activated stress field, is searched for in the class of stress fields satisfying equilibrium and admissibility conditions, by applying an energy approach. Copyright

  5. Structural Properties of Lanthanide and Actinide Compounds within the Plane Wave Pseudopotential Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickard, Chris J.; Winkler, Björn; Chen, Roger K.; Payne, M. C.; Lee, M. H.; Lin, J. S.; White, J. A.; Milman, V.; Vanderbilt, David

    2000-12-01

    We show that plane wave ultrasoft pseudopotential methods readily extend to the calculation of the structural properties of lanthanide and actinide containing compounds. This is demonstrated through a series of calculations performed on UO, UO2, UO3, U3O8, UC2, α-CeC2, CeB6, CeSe, CeO2, NdB6, TmOI, LaBi, LaTiO3, YbO, and elemental Lu.

  6. Structural properties of lanthanide and actinide compounds within the plane wave pseudopotential approach

    PubMed

    Pickard; Winkler; Chen; Payne; Lee; Lin; White; Milman; Vanderbilt

    2000-12-11

    We show that plane wave ultrasoft pseudopotential methods readily extend to the calculation of the structural properties of lanthanide and actinide containing compounds. This is demonstrated through a series of calculations performed on UO, UO2, UO3, U3O8, UC2, alpha-CeC2, CeB6, CeSe, CeO2, NdB6, TmOI, LaBi, LaTiO3, YbO, and elemental Lu.

  7. Designing stable finite state machine behaviors using phase plane analysis and variable structure control

    SciTech Connect

    Feddema, J.T.; Robinett, R.D.; Driessen, B.J.

    1998-03-10

    This paper discusses how phase plane analysis can be used to describe the overall behavior of single and multiple autonomous robotic vehicles with finite state machine rules. The importance of this result is that one can begin to design provably asymptotically stable group behaviors from a set of simple control laws and appropriate switching points with decentralized variable structure control. The ability to prove asymptotically stable group behavior is especially important for applications such as locating military targets or land mines.

  8. Crystallographic tilt and in-plane anisotropies of an a-plane InGaN/GaN layered structure grown by MOCVD on r-plane sapphire using a ZnO buffer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H. F.; Liu, W.; Guo, S.; Chi, D. Z.

    2016-03-01

    High-resolution x-ray diffraction (HRXRD) was used to investigate the crystallographic tilts and structural anisotropies in epitaxial nonpolar a-plane InGaN/GaN grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition on r-plane sapphire using a ZnO buffer. The substrate had an unintentional miscut of 0.14° towards its [-4 2 2 3] axis. However, HRXRD revealed a tilt of 0.26° (0.20°) between the ZnO (GaN) (11-20) and the Al2O3 (1-102) atomic planes, with the (11-20) axis of ZnO (GaN) tilted towards its c-axis, which has a difference of 163° in azimuth from that of the substrate’s miscut. Excess broadenings in the GaN/ZnO (11-20) rocking curves (RCs) were observed along its c-axis. Specific analyses revealed that partial dislocations and anisotropic in-plane strains, rather than surface-related effects, wafer curvature or stacking faults, are the dominant factors for the structural anisotropy. The orientation of the partial dislocations is most likely affected by the miscut of the substrate, e.g. via tilting of the misfit dislocation gliding planes created during island coalescences. Their Burgers vector components in the growth direction, in turn, gave rise to crystallographic tilts in the same direction as that of the excess RC-broadenings.

  9. A novel dual-frequency loading system for studying mechanobiology of load-bearing tissue.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunqiu; Qiu, Lulu; Gao, Lilan; Guan, Yinjie; Xu, Qiang; Zhang, Xizheng; Chen, Qian

    2016-12-01

    In mechanobiological research, an appropriate loading system is an essential tool to mimic mechanical signals in a native environment. To achieve this goal, we have developed a novel loading system capable of applying dual-frequency loading including both a low-frequency high-amplitude loading and a high-frequency low-amplitude loading, according to the mechanical conditions experienced by bone and articular cartilage tissues. The low-frequency high-amplitude loading embodies the main force from muscular contractions and/or reaction forces while the high-frequency low-amplitude loading represents an assistant force from small muscles, ligaments and/or other tissue in order to maintain body posture during human activities. Therefore, such dual frequency loading system may reflect the natural characteristics of complex mechanical load on bone or articular cartilage than the single frequency loading often applied during current mechanobiological experiments. The dual-frequency loading system is validated by experimental tests using precision miniature plane-mirror interferometers. The dual-frequency loading results in significantly more solute transport in articular cartilage than that of the low-frequency high-amplitude loading regiment alone, as determined by quantitative fluorescence microscopy of tracer distribution in articular cartilage. Thus, the loading system can provide a new method to mimic mechanical environment in bone and cartilage, thereby revealing the in vivo mechanisms of mechanosensation, mechanotransduction and mass-transport, and improving mechanical conditioning of cartilage and/or bone constructs for tissue engineering.

  10. Structural anisotropic properties of a-plane GaN epilayers grown on r-plane sapphire by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Lotsari, A.; Kehagias, Th.; Katsikini, M.; Arvanitidis, J.; Ves, S.; Komninou, Ph.; Dimitrakopulos, G. P.; Tsiakatouras, G.; Tsagaraki, K.; Georgakilas, A.; Christofilos, D.

    2014-06-07

    Heteroepitaxial non-polar III-Nitride layers may exhibit extensive anisotropy in the surface morphology and the epilayer microstructure along distinct in-plane directions. The structural anisotropy, evidenced by the “M”-shape dependence of the (112{sup ¯}0) x-ray rocking curve widths on the beam azimuth angle, was studied by combining transmission electron microscopy observations, Raman spectroscopy, high resolution x-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy in a-plane GaN epilayers grown on r-plane sapphire substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE). The structural anisotropic behavior was attributed quantitatively to the high dislocation densities, particularly the Frank-Shockley partial dislocations that delimit the I{sub 1} intrinsic basal stacking faults, and to the concomitant plastic strain relaxation. On the other hand, isotropic samples exhibited lower dislocation densities and a biaxial residual stress state. For PAMBE growth, the anisotropy was correlated to N-rich (or Ga-poor) conditions on the surface during growth, that result in formation of asymmetric a-plane GaN grains elongated along the c-axis. Such conditions enhance the anisotropy of gallium diffusion on the surface and reduce the GaN nucleation rate.

  11. Anti-plane transverse waves propagation in nanoscale periodic layered piezoelectric structures.

    PubMed

    Chen, A-Li; Yan, Dong-Jia; Wang, Yue-Sheng; Zhang, Chuanzeng

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, anti-plane transverse wave propagation in nanoscale periodic layered piezoelectric structures is studied. The localization factor is introduced to characterize the wave propagation behavior. The transfer matrix method based on the nonlocal piezoelectricity continuum theory is used to calculate the localization factor. Additionally, the stiffness matrix method is applied to compute the wave transmission spectra. A cut-off frequency is found, beyond which the elastic waves cannot propagate through the periodic structure. The size effect or the influence of the ratio of the internal to external characteristic lengths on the cut-off frequency and the wave propagation behavior are investigated and discussed.

  12. Engineering of optical polarization based on electronic band structures of A-plane ZnO layers under biaxial strains

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, Hiroaki Tabata, Hitoshi; Hasuike, Noriyuki; Harima, Hiroshi

    2014-09-21

    In-plane anisotropic strains in A-plane layers on the electronic band structure of ZnO were investigated from the viewpoint of optical polarization anisotropy. Investigations utilizing k·p perturbation theory revealed that energy transitions and associated oscillation strengths were dependent on in-plane strains. The theoretical correlation between optical polarizations and in-plane strains was experimentally demonstrated using A-plane ZnO layers with different in-plane strains. Finally, optical polarization anisotropy and its implications for in-plane optical properties are discussed in relation to the energy shift between two orthogonal directions. Higher polarization rotations were obtained in an A-plane ZnO layer with in-plane biaxially compressive strains as compared to strain-free ZnO. This study provides detailed information concerning the role played by in-plane strains in optically polarized applications based on nonpolar ZnO in the ultra-violet region.

  13. Controlling the Electronic Structures and Properties of in-Plane Transition-Metal Dichalcogenides Quantum Wells

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Dai, Ying; Niu, Chengwang; Huang, Baibiao

    2015-01-01

    In-plane transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) quantum wells have been studied on the basis of first-principles density functional calculations to reveal how to control the electronic structures and the properties. In collection of quantum confinement, strain and intrinsic electric field, TMD quantum wells offer a diverse of exciting new physics. The band gap can be continuously reduced ascribed to the potential drop over the embedded TMD and the strain substantially affects the band gap nature. The true type-II alignment forms due to the coherent lattice and strong interface coupling suggesting the effective separation and collection of excitons. Interestingly, two-dimensional quantum wells of in-plane TMD can enrich the photoluminescence properties of TMD materials. The intrinsic electric polarization enhances the spin-orbital coupling and demonstrates the possibility to achieve topological insulator state and valleytronics in TMD quantum wells. In-plane TMD quantum wells have opened up new possibilities of applications in next-generation devices at nanoscale. PMID:26616013

  14. Domain overlap matrices from plane-wave-based methods of electronic structure calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golub, Pavlo; Baranov, Alexey I.

    2016-10-01

    Plane waves are one of the most popular and efficient basis sets for electronic structure calculations of solids; however, their delocalized nature makes it difficult to employ for them classical orbital-based methods of chemical bonding analysis. The quantum chemical topology approach, introducing chemical concepts via partitioning of real space into chemically meaningful domains, has no difficulties with plane-wave-based basis sets. Many popular tools employed within this approach, for instance delocalization indices, need overlap integrals over these domains—the elements of the so called domain overlap matrices. This article reports an efficient algorithm for evaluation of domain overlap matrix elements for plane-wave-based calculations as well as evaluation of its implementation for one of the most popular projector augmented wave (PAW) methods on the small set of simple and complex solids. The stability of the obtained results with respect to PAW calculation parameters has been investigated, and the comparison of the results with the results from other calculation methods has also been made.

  15. Chiral nematic self-assembly of minimally surface damaged chitin nanofibrils and its load bearing functions.

    PubMed

    Oh, Dongyeop X; Cha, Yun Jeong; Nguyen, Hoang-Linh; Je, Hwa Heon; Jho, Yong Seok; Hwang, Dong Soo; Yoon, Dong Ki

    2016-03-18

    Chitin is one of the most abundant biomaterials in nature, with 10(10) tons produced annually as hierarchically organized nanofibril fillers to reinforce the exoskeletons of arthropods. This green and cheap biomaterial has attracted great attention due to its potential application to reinforce biomedical materials. Despite that, its practical use is limited since the extraction of chitin nanofibrils requires surface modification involving harsh chemical treatments, leading to difficulties in reproducing their natural prototypal hierarchical structure, i.e. chiral nematic phase. Here, we develop a chemical etching-free approach using calcium ions, called "natural way", to disintegrate the chitin nanofibrils while keeping the essential moiety for the self-assembly, ultimately resulting in the reproduction of chitin's natural chiral structure in a polymeric matrix. This chiral chitin nanostructure exceptionally toughens the composite. Our resultant chiral nematic phase of chitin materials can contribute to the understanding and use of the reinforcing strategy in nature.

  16. Chiral nematic self-assembly of minimally surface damaged chitin nanofibrils and its load bearing functions

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Dongyeop X.; Cha, Yun Jeong; Nguyen, Hoang-Linh; Je, Hwa Heon; Jho, Yong Seok; Hwang, Dong Soo; Yoon, Dong Ki

    2016-01-01

    Chitin is one of the most abundant biomaterials in nature, with 1010 tons produced annually as hierarchically organized nanofibril fillers to reinforce the exoskeletons of arthropods. This green and cheap biomaterial has attracted great attention due to its potential application to reinforce biomedical materials. Despite that, its practical use is limited since the extraction of chitin nanofibrils requires surface modification involving harsh chemical treatments, leading to difficulties in reproducing their natural prototypal hierarchical structure, i.e. chiral nematic phase. Here, we develop a chemical etching-free approach using calcium ions, called “natural way”, to disintegrate the chitin nanofibrils while keeping the essential moiety for the self-assembly, ultimately resulting in the reproduction of chitin’s natural chiral structure in a polymeric matrix. This chiral chitin nanostructure exceptionally toughens the composite. Our resultant chiral nematic phase of chitin materials can contribute to the understanding and use of the reinforcing strategy in nature. PMID:26988392

  17. Chiral nematic self-assembly of minimally surface damaged chitin nanofibrils and its load bearing functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Dongyeop X.; Cha, Yun Jeong; Nguyen, Hoang-Linh; Je, Hwa Heon; Jho, Yong Seok; Hwang, Dong Soo; Yoon, Dong Ki

    2016-03-01

    Chitin is one of the most abundant biomaterials in nature, with 1010 tons produced annually as hierarchically organized nanofibril fillers to reinforce the exoskeletons of arthropods. This green and cheap biomaterial has attracted great attention due to its potential application to reinforce biomedical materials. Despite that, its practical use is limited since the extraction of chitin nanofibrils requires surface modification involving harsh chemical treatments, leading to difficulties in reproducing their natural prototypal hierarchical structure, i.e. chiral nematic phase. Here, we develop a chemical etching-free approach using calcium ions, called “natural way”, to disintegrate the chitin nanofibrils while keeping the essential moiety for the self-assembly, ultimately resulting in the reproduction of chitin’s natural chiral structure in a polymeric matrix. This chiral chitin nanostructure exceptionally toughens the composite. Our resultant chiral nematic phase of chitin materials can contribute to the understanding and use of the reinforcing strategy in nature.

  18. Complex band structure under plane-wave nonlocal pseudopotential Hamiltonian of metallic wires and electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Chao

    2009-07-17

    We present a practical approach to calculate the complex band structure of an electrode for quantum transport calculations. This method is designed for plane wave based Hamiltonian with nonlocal pseudopotentials and the auxiliary periodic boundary condition transport calculation approach. Currently there is no direct method to calculate all the evanescent states for a given energy for systems with nonlocal pseudopotentials. On the other hand, in the auxiliary periodic boundary condition transport calculation, there is no need for all the evanescent states at a given energy. The current method fills this niche. The method has been used to study copper and gold nanowires and bulk electrodes.

  19. Three-dimensional vortical structures of transition in plane channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biringen, S.

    1987-01-01

    Three-dimensional visualization of flwo field structures in transitional plane channel flow obtained from a numerical simulation are presented at two Reynolds numbers. It is revealed that at the one-spike stage, independent of Reynolds number, the flow is characterized by a multi-layer vortex system. In the upper layer, total vorticity vector plots indicate a high-shear layer dominated by spanwise vorticity, whereas the middle layer (corresponding approximately to the critical layer) forms a vortex loop (alpha-vortex) consisting of strong streamwise and spanwise vorticity components. At the three-spike stage, the breakdown of the vortical structure proceeds in a manner similar to frontal relaminarization of turbulent spots. This process is accompanied by intense vortex lift-up activity near the wall which seems to originate at the legs of the vortex loop trailing the high-shear layer. Finally, at the five-spike stage, it is shown that high-vorticity regions (vortical structures) develop into horseshow eddies in planes inclined to the main flow direction.

  20. Role of isostaticity and load-bearing microstructure in the elasticity of yielded colloidal gels

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Lilian C.; Newman, Richmond S.; Glotzer, Sharon C.; Solomon, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    We report a simple correlation between microstructure and strain-dependent elasticity in colloidal gels by visualizing the evolution of cluster structure in high strain-rate flows. We control the initial gel microstructure by inducing different levels of isotropic depletion attraction between particles suspended in refractive index matched solvents. Contrary to previous ideas from mode coupling and micromechanical treatments, our studies show that bond breakage occurs mainly due to the erosion of rigid clusters that persist far beyond the yield strain. This rigidity contributes to gel elasticity even when the sample is fully fluidized; the origin of the elasticity is the slow Brownian relaxation of rigid, hydrodynamically interacting clusters. We find a power-law scaling of the elastic modulus with the stress-bearing volume fraction that is valid over a range of volume fractions and gelation conditions. These results provide a conceptual framework to quantitatively connect the flow-induced microstructure of soft materials to their nonlinear rheology. PMID:22988067

  1. Nonlocal axial load-bearing capacity of two neighboring perpendicular single-walled carbon nanotubes accounting for shear deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiani, Keivan

    2015-11-01

    This study is devoted to examine load-bearing capacity of a nanosystem composed of two adjacent perpendicular single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) which are embedded in an elastic matrix. Accounting for the nonlocality and the intertube van der Waals forces, the governing equations are established based on the nonlocal Euler-Bernoulli, Timoshenko, and higher-order beam theories. These are sets of coupled integro-ordinary differential equations whose analytical solutions are unavailable. Hence, an efficient meshless methodology is proposed and the discrete governing equations are obtained via Galerkin approach. By solving the resulting set of eigenvalue equations, the axial buckling load of the elastically embedded nanosystem is evaluated. The roles of the radius and slenderness ratio of the constitutive SWCNTs, free distance between two tubes, small-scale parameter, aspect ratio, transverse and rotational stiffness of the surrounding matrix on the axial buckling load of the nanosystem are comprehensively addressed. The obtained results can be regarded as a pivotal step for better understanding the mechanism of elastic buckling of more complex systems such as elastically embedded-orthogonal membranes or even forests of SWCNTs.

  2. Load-bearing evaluation of spinal posterior column by measuring surface strain from lumbar pedicles. An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Sun, Peidong; Zhao, Weidong; Bi, Zhenyu; Wu, Changfu; Ouyang, Jun

    2012-01-01

    An understanding of the load transfer within spinal posterior column of lumbar spine is necessary to determine the influence of mechanical factors on potential mechanisms of the motion-sparing implant such as artificial intervertebral disc and the dynamic spine stabilization systems. In this study, a new method has been developed for evaluating the load bearing of spinal posterior column by the surface strain of spinal pedicle response to the loading of spinal segment. Six cadaveric lumbar spine segments were biomechanically evaluated between levels L1 and L5 in intact condition and the strain gauges were pasted to an inferior surface of L2 pedicles. Multidirectional flexibility testing used the Panjabi testing protocol; pure moments for the intact condition with overall spinal motion and unconstrained intact moments of ±8 Nm were used for flexion-extension and lateral bending testing. High correlation coefficient (0.967-0.998) indicated a good agreement between the load of spinal segment and the surface strain of pedicle in all loading directions. Principal compressive strain could be observed in flexion direction and tensile strain in extension direction, respectively. In conclusion, the new method seems to be effective for evaluating posterior spinal column loads using pedicles' surface strain data collected during biomechanical testing of spine segments.

  3. High load-bearing multi-material-joints of metal sheets and composites by incremental in-situ forming processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidlitz, Holger; Fritzsche, Sebastian; Bambach, Markus; Gerstenberger, Colin

    2016-10-01

    Thermo-mechanically flow-formed joints (FDJ) are an appropriate joining technology to realize high load-bearing multi-material-joints between fiber reinforced thermoplastics and sheet metals, without additional joining components. As in the automotive industry new vehicle and lightweight designs with one-sided accessibility joints are required, the technology which so far requires a two-sided accessibility of the joint, is examined for the ability to be performed with one-sided accessibility. The main part of the paper are therefore experimental studies on the one-sided manufacturing of FDJ-joints without an additional forming tool and their examination with head pull test and tension shear test according to DIN EN ISO 14272 and DIN EN ISO 14273. In this context, a tool and an experimental setup were designed to provide a corresponding joint production of a material combination of continuous glass fiber reinforced polypropylene (Plytron) and an aluminum alloy (EN AW-6082 T6). In the experiment, the novel joints bear maximum forces of 291 N in the head pull test and 708 N in the tension shear test.

  4. Influence of cyclic loading on the fracture toughness and load bearing capacities of all-ceramic crowns

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rao-Rao; Lu, Cheng-Lin; Wang, Gang; Zhang, Dong-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how cyclic loading influenced the fracture toughness of hot-press lithium disilicate and zirconia core materials and whether there was an increase in the propensity for crown failure. Two types of all-ceramic crowns including the IPS e.max Press system (n=24) and the Lava zirconia system (n=24), were selected. Sectioned specimens were subjected to cyclic loading with the maximum magnitude of 200 N (R=0.1) until two million cycles. The material properties including Young's modulus (E) and hardness (H) and the fracture toughness (KIC) of the core materials were evaluated using indentation methods (n=12 each). The load-bearing capacities of the specimens were examined by means of monotonic load to fracture (n=12 each). It was found that the material properties, including E, H and KIC, of the two types of dental ceramics, were reduced. Statistical analysis indicated that there were no significant influences of fatigue loading on material properties E and H for both types of dental ceramics or KIC for zirconia, while for the IPS e.max Press core, KIC, which was parallel to the direction of the lithium disilicate crystals, was significantly reduced (P=0.001). A conclusion was drawn that zirconia possesses high mechanical reliability and sustainable capacity to resist fatigue loading, while fatigue loading remarkably degraded the anisotropic mechanical behaviour of hot-press lithium disilicate ceramics. PMID:24335786

  5. Electronic and crystal structure changes induced by in-plane oxygen vacancies in multiferroic YMnO3

    DOE PAGES

    Cheng, Shaobo; Meng, Qingping; Li, Mengli; ...

    2016-02-08

    Here, the widely spread oxygen vacancies (VO) in multiferroic materials can strongly affect their physical properties. However, their exact influence has rarely been identified in hexagonal manganites. Here, with the combined use of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and first-principles calculations, we have systematically studied the electronic and crystal structure modifications induced by VO located at the same Mn atomic plane (in-plane VO). Our TEM experiments reveal that the easily formed in-plane VO not only influence the electronic structure of YMnO3 but alter the in-plane Wyckoff positions of Mn ions, which may subsequently affect the intraplane and interplane exchange interaction ofmore » Mn ions. The ferroelectricity is also impaired due to the introduction of VO. Further calculations confirm these electronic and structural changes and modifications. Our results indicate that the electronic and crystal structure of YMnO3 can be manipulated by the creation of VO.« less

  6. Anodized titania: Processing and characterization to improve cell-materials interactions for load bearing implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Kakoli

    The objective of this study is to investigate in vitro cell-materials interactions using human osteoblast cells on anodized titanium. Titanium is a bioinert material and, therefore, gets encapsulated after implantation into the living body by a fibrous tissue that isolates them from the surrounding tissues. In this work, bioactive nonporous and nanoporous TiO2 layers were grown on commercially pure titanium substrate by anodization process using different electrolyte solutions namely (1) H3PO 4, (2) HF and (3) H2SO4, (4) aqueous solution of citric acid, sodium fluoride and sulfuric acid. The first three electrolytes produced bioactive TiO2 films with a nonporous structure showing three distinctive surface morphologies. Nanoporous morphology was obtained on Ti-surfaces from the fourth electrolyte at 20V for 4h. Cross-sectional view of the nanoporous surface reveals titania nanotubes of length 600 nm. It was found that increasing anodization time initially increased the height of the nanotubes while maintaining the tubular array structure, but beyond 4h, growth of nanotubes decreased with a collapsed array structure. Human osteoblast (HOB) cell attachment and growth behavior were studied using an osteoprecursor cell line (OPC 1) for 3, 7 and 11 days. Colonization of the cells was noticed with distinctive cell-to-cell attachment on HF anodized surfaces. TiO2 layer grown in H2SO4 electrolyte did not show significant cell growth on the surface, and some cell death was also noticed. Good cellular adherence with extracellular matrix extensions in between the cells was noticed for samples anodized with H3PO 4 electrolyte and nanotube surface. Cell proliferation was excellent on anodized nanotube surfaces. An abundant amount of extracellular matrix (ECM) between the neighboring cells was also noticed on nanotube surfaces with filopodia extensions coming out from cells to grasp the nanoporous surface for anchorage. To better understand and compare cell-materials interactions

  7. Woven silk fabric-reinforced silk nanofibrous scaffolds for regenerating load-bearing soft tissues.

    PubMed

    Han, F; Liu, S; Liu, X; Pei, Y; Bai, S; Zhao, H; Lu, Q; Ma, F; Kaplan, D L; Zhu, H

    2014-02-01

    Although three-dimensional (3-D) porous regenerated silk scaffolds with outstanding biocompatibility, biodegradability and low inflammatory reactions have promising application in different tissue regeneration, the mechanical properties of regenerated scaffolds, especially suture retention strength, must be further improved to satisfy the requirements of clinical applications. This study presents woven silk fabric-reinforced silk nanofibrous scaffolds aimed at dermal tissue engineering. To improve the mechanical properties, silk scaffolds prepared by lyophilization were reinforced with degummed woven silk fabrics. The ultimate tensile strength, elongation at break and suture retention strength of the scaffolds were significantly improved, providing suitable mechanical properties strong enough for clinical applications. The stiffness and degradation behaviors were then further regulated by different after-treatment processes, making the scaffolds more suitable for dermal tissue regeneration. The in vitro cell culture results indicated that these scaffolds maintained their excellent biocompatibility after being reinforced with woven silk fabrics. Without sacrifice of porous structure and biocompatibility, the fabric-reinforced scaffolds with better mechanical properties could facilitate future clinical applications of silk as matrices in skin repair.

  8. Simulated ΛCDM analogues of the thin plane of satellites around the Andromeda galaxy are not kinematically coherent structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, Tobias; Dutton, Aaron A.; Macciò, Andrea V.

    2016-08-01

    A large fraction of the dwarf satellites orbiting the Andromeda galaxy are surprisingly aligned in a thin, extended and apparently kinematically coherent planar structure. Such a structure is not easily found in simulations based on the cold dark matter model (ΛCDM). Using 21 high-resolution cosmological simulations, we analyse the kinematics of planes of satellites similar to the one around Andromeda. We find good agreement when co-rotation is characterized by the line-of-sight velocity. At the same time, when co-rotation is inferred by the angular momenta of the satellites, the planes are in agreement with the plane around our Galaxy. We find such planes to be common in our high-concentration haloes. The number of co-rotating satellites obtained from the sign of the line-of-sight velocity shows large variations depending on the viewing angle and is consistent with that obtained from a sample with random velocities. We find that the clustering of angular momentum vectors of the satellites in the plane is a better measure of the kinematic coherence. Thus we conclude that the line-of-sight velocity is not well suited as a proxy for the kinematical coherence of the plane. Analysis of the kinematics of our planes shows a fraction of ˜30 per cent chance-aligned satellites. Tracking the satellites in the plane back in time reveals that these planes are a transient feature and not kinematically coherent as would appear at first sight. Thus we expect some of the satellites in the plane around Andromeda to have high velocities perpendicular to the plane.

  9. Vortex structure of a plane impinging jet with spanwise periodic forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakakibara, Jun; Anzai, Tomokuni

    1999-11-01

    Vortex structure of a plane impinging jet of water with spanwise periodic forcing has been experimentally measured using PIV. A plane nozzle, having a width of ( B=30 ) mm and aspect ratio of 10, issued water jet vertically and impinged on a plate set at a distance ( H=5.5B ) from the nozzle exit. Sixty rectangular slots (1mm (×) 4mm cross-section) aligned in spanwise direction are installed both side of the nozzle exit with 5mm interval. Each slots are connected via vinyl tubes to four of speaker boxes to add suction/blowing perturbations to the initial shear layer of the jet. The perturbation added by successive 3 slots, 15mm in spanwise length, have a phase lag (α) behind the perturbation by next 3 slots, and repeated in whole row of the slots. This configuration could make spanwise periodic perturbations, which have a wave length (λ=30)mm, to excite the secondary instability of the shear layer. As increasing phase lag (α) the intensity of the vorticity of the streamwise counter-rotating vortices on the stagnation plate was increased, and maximum intensity was achieved at (α=π). Time and spatial evolution of the vortex structures will be shown in the presentation.

  10. Strained-layer superlattice focal plane array having a planar structure

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Jin K.; Carroll, Malcolm S.; Gin, Aaron; Marsh, Phillip F.; Young, Erik W.; Cich, Michael J.

    2010-07-13

    An infrared focal plane array (FPA) is disclosed which utilizes a strained-layer superlattice (SLS) formed of alternating layers of InAs and In.sub.xGa.sub.1-xSb with 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5 epitaxially grown on a GaSb substrate. The FPA avoids the use of a mesa structure to isolate each photodetector element and instead uses impurity-doped regions formed in or about each photodetector for electrical isolation. This results in a substantially-planar structure in which the SLS is unbroken across the entire width of a 2-D array of the photodetector elements which are capped with an epitaxially-grown passivation layer to reduce or eliminate surface recombination. The FPA has applications for use in the wavelength range of 3-25 .mu.m.

  11. Structure and mechanism of turbulence under dynamical restriction in plane Poiseuille flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantinou, Navid; Farrell, Brian; Ioannou, Petros; Jimenez, Javier; Lozano-Duran, Adrian; Nikolaidis, Marios-Andreas

    2016-11-01

    The perspective of Statistical State Dynamics (SSD) is used to investigate plane Poiseuille turbulence at moderately high Reynolds numbers (Reτ 940). Simulations of a quasi-linear restricted nonlinear dynamics (RNL), which is an approximation to the full SSD, provide insight into the mechanism and structure of turbulent flow. RNL dynamics spontaneously limits the support of its turbulence to a small set of streamwise Fourier components giving rise to a natural minimal representation of its turbulence dynamics. Although greatly simplified, this RNL turbulence exhibits natural-looking structures and turbulent statistics. RNL turbulence at the Reynolds numbers studied is dominated by the roll/streak structure in the buffer layer and similar very-large-scale structure (VLSM) in the outer layer. Diagnostics of the structure, spectrum and energetics of RNL and DNS turbulence are used to demonstrate that the roll/streak dynamics supporting the turbulence in the buffer and logarithmic layer is essentially similar in RNL and DNS. This mechanism, which has analytical expression in the SSD, comprises a cooperative interaction between the coherent streamwise mean flow and the incoherent turbulent perturbations.

  12. Turbulent rotating plane Couette flow: Reynolds and rotation number dependency of flow structure and momentum transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, Takuya; Alfredsson, P. Henrik

    2016-07-01

    Plane Couette flow under spanwise, anticyclonic system rotation [rotating plane Couette flow (RPCF)] is studied experimentally using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry for different Reynolds and rotation numbers in the fully turbulent regime. Similar to the laminar regime, the turbulent flow in RPCF is characterized by roll cells, however both instantaneous snapshots of the velocity field and space correlations show that the roll cell structure varies with the rotation number. All three velocity components are measured and both the mean flow and all four nonzero Reynolds stresses are obtained across the central parts of the channel. This also allows us to determine the wall shear stress from the viscous stress and the Reynolds stress in the center of the channel, and for low rotation rates the wall shear stress increases with increasing rotation rate as expected. The results show that zero absolute vorticity is established in the central parts of the channel of turbulent RPCF for high enough rotation rates, but also that the mean velocity profile for certain parameter ranges shows an S shape giving rise to a negative velocity gradient in the center of the channel. We find that from an analysis of the Reynolds stress transport equation using the present data there is a transport of the Reynolds shear stress towards the center of the channel, which may then result in a negative mean velocity gradient there.

  13. Preparation of three-dimensional braided carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK composites for potential load-bearing bone fixations. Part I. Mechanical properties and cytocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Luo, Honglin; Xiong, Guangyao; Yang, Zhiwei; Raman, Sudha R; Li, Qiuping; Ma, Chunying; Li, Deying; Wang, Zheren; Wan, Yizao

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we focused on fabrication and characterization of three-dimensional carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone (C3-D/PEEK) composites for orthopedic applications. We found that pre-heating of 3-D fabrics before hot-pressing could eliminate pores in the composites prepared by 3-D co-braiding and hot-pressing techniques. The manufacturing process and the processing variables were studied and optimum parameters were obtained. Moreover, the carbon fibers were surface treated by the anodic oxidization and its effect on mechanical properties of the composites was determined. Preliminary cell studies with mouse osteoblast cells were also performed to examine the cytocompatibility of the composites. Feasibility of the C3-D/PEEK composites as load-bearing bone fixation materials was evaluated. Results suggest that the C3-D/PEEK composites show good promising as load-bearing bone fixations.

  14. Investigation of flaw geometry and loading effects on plane strain fracture in metallic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, L. R.; Finger, R. W.

    1971-01-01

    The effects on fracture and flaw growth of weld-induced residual stresses, combined bending and tension stresses, and stress fields adjacent to circular holes in 2219-T87 aluminum and 5AI-2.5Sn(ELI) titanium alloys were evaluated. Static fracture tests were conducted in liquid nitrogen; fatigue tests were performed in room air, liquid nitrogen, and liquid hydrogen. Evaluation of results was based on linear elastic fracture mechanics concepts and was directed to improving existing methods of estimating minimum fracture strength and fatigue lives for pressurized structure in spacecraft and booster systems. Effects of specimen design in plane-strain fracture toughness testing were investigated. Four different specimen types were tested in room air, liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen environments using the aluminum and titanium alloys. Interferometry and holograph were used to measure crack-opening displacements in surface-flawed plexiglass test specimens. Comparisons were made between stress intensities calculated using displacement measurements, and approximate analytical solutions.

  15. Use of 3X3 integrated optic polarizer/splitters for a smart aerospace plane structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshamani, Ramani; Alex, T. K.

    1991-10-01

    A fiber-optic/integrated optic optoelectronic neural computer approach to the design of an 'intelligent' aerospace structure is described, and the methodology of the approach is defined. A source consisting of a strained-layer QW laser emitting 100 micro-W at 978 nm and an Er-doped single-mode polarization preserving fiber laser with a gain of 3.9 dB/mW is assumed. The SNR for the aerospace plane is calculated with 49 sensing arms. A 441-path splitter is required; this is designed using an eight-stage multipath coupler based on a 3X3 polarizer/splitter as the basic repeating element. A surface-mounted implementation is suggested, which includes a 448-path switch, an integrated-optic coupler, a detector, an ADC, and a processor.

  16. Inertial effects on thin-film wave structures with imposed surface shear on an inclined plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivapuratharasu, M.; Hibberd, S.; Hubbard, M. E.; Power, H.

    2016-06-01

    This study provides an extended approach to the mathematical simulation of thin-film flow on a flat inclined plane relevant to flows subject to high surface shear. Motivated by modelling thin-film structures within an industrial context, wave structures are investigated for flows with moderate inertial effects and small film depth aspect ratio ε. Approximations are made assuming a Reynolds number, Re ∼ O(ε-1) and depth-averaging used to simplify the governing Navier-Stokes equations. A parallel Stokes flow is expected in the absence of any wave disturbance and a generalisation for the flow is based on a local quadratic profile. This approach provides a more general system which includes inertial effects and is solved numerically. Flow structures are compared with studies for Stokes flow in the limit of negligible inertial effects. Both two-tier and three-tier wave disturbances are used to study film profile evolution. A parametric study is provided for wave disturbances with increasing film Reynolds number. An evaluation of standing wave and transient film profiles is undertaken and identifies new profiles not previously predicted when inertial effects are neglected.

  17. The generalized scattering coefficient method for plane wave scattering in layered structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu; Li, Chao; Wang, Huai-Yu; Zhou, Yun-Song

    2017-02-01

    The generalized scattering coefficient (GSC) method is pedagogically derived and employed to study the scattering of plane waves in homogeneous and inhomogeneous layered structures. The numerical stabilities and accuracies of this method and other commonly used numerical methods are discussed and compared. For homogeneous layered structures, concise scattering formulas with clear physical interpretations and strong numerical stability are obtained by introducing the GSCs. For inhomogeneous layered structures, three numerical methods are employed: the staircase approximation method, the power series expansion method, and the differential equation based on the GSCs. We investigate the accuracies and convergence behaviors of these methods by comparing their predictions to the exact results. The conclusions are as follows. The staircase approximation method has a slow convergence in spite of its simple and intuitive implementation, and a fine stratification within the inhomogeneous layer is required for obtaining accurate results. The expansion method results are sensitive to the expansion order, and the treatment becomes very complicated for relatively complex configurations, which restricts its applicability. By contrast, the GSC-based differential equation possesses a simple implementation while providing fast and accurate results.

  18. Dynamics of a passive micro-vibration isolator based on a pretensioned plane cable net structure and fluid damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yanhao; Lu, Qi; Jing, Bo; Zhang, Zhiyi

    2016-09-01

    This paper addresses dynamic modelling and experiments on a passive vibration isolator for application in the space environment. The isolator is composed of a pretensioned plane cable net structure and a fluid damper in parallel. Firstly, the frequency response function (FRF) of a single cable is analysed according to the string theory, and the FRF synthesis method is adopted to establish a dynamic model of the plane cable net structure. Secondly, the equivalent damping coefficient of the fluid damper is analysed. Thirdly, experiments are carried out to compare the plane cable net structure, the fluid damper and the vibration isolator formed by the net and the damper, respectively. It is shown that the plane cable net structure can achieve substantial vibration attenuation but has a great amplification at its resonance frequency due to the light damping of cables. The damping effect of fluid damper is acceptable without taking the poor carrying capacity into consideration. Compared to the plane cable net structure and the fluid damper, the isolator has an acceptable resonance amplification as well as vibration attenuation.

  19. Load-bearing capacity of screw-retained CAD/CAM-produced titanium implant frameworks (I-Bridge®2) before and after cyclic mechanical loading

    PubMed Central

    DITTMER, Marc Philipp; NENSA, Moritz; STIESCH, Meike; KOHORST, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    Implant-supported screw-retained fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) produced by CAD/ CAM have been introduced in recent years for the rehabilitation of partial or total endentulous jaws. However, there is a lack of data about the long-term mechanical characteristics. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the failure mode and the influence of extended cyclic mechanical loading on the load-bearing capacity of these frameworks. Material and Methods Ten five-unit FDP frameworks simulating a free-end situation in the mandibular jaw were manufactured according to the I-Bridge®2-concept (I-Bridge®2, Biomain AB, Helsingborg, Sweden) and each was screw-retained on three differently angulated Astra Tech implants (30º buccal angulation/0º angulation/30º lingual angulation). One half of the specimens was tested for static load-bearing capacity without any further treatment (control), whereas the other half underwent five million cycles of mechanical loading with 100 N as the upper load limit (test). All specimens were loaded until failure in a universal testing machine with an occlusal force applied at the pontics. Load-displacement curves were recorded and the failure mode was macro- and microscopically analyzed. The statistical analysis was performed using a t-test (p=0.05). Results All the specimens survived cyclic mechanical loading and no obvious failure could be observed. Due to the cyclic mechanical loading, the load-bearing capacity decreased from 8,496 N±196 N (control) to 7,592 N±901 N (test). The cyclic mechanical loading did not significantly influence the load-bearing capacity (p=0.060). The failure mode was almost identical in all specimens: large deformations of the framework at the implant connection area were obvious. Conclusion The load-bearing capacity of the I-Bridge®2 frameworks is much higher than the clinically relevant occlusal forces, even with considerably angulated implants. However, the performance under functional loading in vivo

  20. Electronic levels and electrical response of periodic molecular structures from plane-wave orbital-dependent calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanli; Dabo, Ismaila

    2011-10-01

    Plane-wave electronic-structure predictions based upon orbital-dependent density-functional theory (OD-DFT) approximations, such as hybrid density-functional methods and self-interaction density-functional corrections, are severely affected by computational inaccuracies in evaluating electron interactions in the plane-wave representation. These errors arise from divergence singularities in the plane-wave summation of electrostatic and exchange interaction contributions. Auxiliary-function corrections are reciprocal-space countercharge corrections that cancel plane-wave singularities through the addition of an auxiliary function to the point-charge electrostatic kernel that enters into the expression of interaction terms. At variance with real-space countercharge corrections that are employed in the context of density-functional theory (DFT), reciprocal-space corrections are computationally inexpensive, making them suited to more demanding OD-DFT calculations. Nevertheless, there exists much freedom in the choice of auxiliary functions and various definitions result in different levels of performance in eliminating plane-wave inaccuracies. In this work we derive exact point-charge auxiliary functions for the description of molecular structures of arbitrary translational symmetry, including the yet unaddressed one-dimensional case. In addition, we provide a critical assessment of different reciprocal-space countercharge corrections and demonstrate the improved accuracy of point-charge auxiliary functions in predicting the electronic levels and electrical response of conjugated polymers from plane-wave OD-DFT calculations.

  1. Adhesive strength of bone-implant interfaces and in-vivo degradation of PHB composites for load-bearing applications.

    PubMed

    Meischel, M; Eichler, J; Martinelli, E; Karr, U; Weigel, J; Schmöller, G; Tschegg, E K; Fischerauer, S; Weinberg, A M; Stanzl-Tschegg, S E

    2016-01-01

    Aim of this study was to evaluate the response of bone to novel biodegradable polymeric composite implants in the femora of growing rats. Longitudinal observation of bone reaction at the implant site (BV/TV) as well as resorption of the implanted pins were monitored using in vivo micro-focus computed tomography (µCT). After 12, 24 and 36 weeks femora containing the implants were explanted, scanned with high resolution ex vivo µCT, and the surface roughness of the implants was measured to conclude on the ingrowth capability for bone tissue. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) were used to observe changes on the surface of Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) during degradation and cell ingrowth. Four different composites with zirconium dioxide (ZrO2) and Herafill(®) were compared. After 36 weeks in vivo, none of the implants did show significant degradation. The PHB composite with ZrO2 and a high percentage (30%) of Herafill® as well as the Mg-alloy WZ21 showed the highest values of bone accumulation (increased BV/TV) around the implant. The lowest value was measured in PHB with 3% ZrO2 containing no Herafill®. Roughness measurements as well as EDX and SEM imaging could not reveal any changes on the PHB composites׳ surfaces. Biomechanical parameters, such as the adhesion strength between bone and implant were determined by measuring the shear strength as well as push-out energy of the bone-implant interface. The results showed that improvement of these mechanical properties of the studied PHBs P3Z, P3Z10H and P3Z30H is necessary in order to obtain appropriate load-bearing material. The moduli of elasticity, tensile strength and strain properties of the PHB composites are close to that of bone and thus promising. Compared to clinically used PLGA, PGA and PLA materials, their additional benefit is an unchanged local pH value during degradation, which makes them well tolerated by cells and immune system. They might be used

  2. Prognosis of Long-Term Load-Bearing Capability in Aerospace Structures: Quantification of Microstructurally Short Crack Growth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-31

    grain size distributions in a Ni-based superalloy in three and two dimensions using the Saltykov method .” Scripta Materialia, Acta Materialia Inc., 66...Ni-based superalloy in three and two dimensions using the Saltykov method .” Scripta Materialia, 66(8):554–557. ...follows, and as input for the elastic FFT simulation. The spectral method is an alternative to finite element modeling, used in this instance

  3. Anatomical sector analysis of load-bearing tibial bone structure during 90-day bed rest and 1-year recovery.

    PubMed

    Cervinka, Tomas; Rittweger, Jörn; Hyttinen, Jari; Felsenberg, Dieter; Sievänen, Harri

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the bone response to long bed rest-related immobility and during subsequent recovery differed at anatomically different sectors of tibial epiphysis and diaphysis. For this study, peripheral quantitative tomographic (pQCT) scans obtained from a previous 90-day 'Long Term Bed Rest' intervention were preprocessed with a new method based on statistical approach and re-analysed sector-wise. The pQCT was performed on 25 young healthy males twice before the bed rest, after the bed rest and after 1-year follow-up. All men underwent a strict bed rest intervention, and in addition, seven of them received pamidronate treatment and nine did flywheel exercises as countermeasures against disuse-related bone loss. Clearly, 3-9% sector-specific losses in trabecular density were observed at the tibial epiphysis on average. Similarly, cortical density decreased in a sector-specific way being the largest at the anterior sector of tibial diaphysis. During recovery, the bed rest-induced bone losses were practically restored and no consistent sector-specific modulation was observed in any subgroup. It is concluded that the sector-specific analysis of bone cross-sections has potential to reveal skeletal responses to various interventions that cannot be inferred from the average analysis of the whole bone cross-section. This approach is considered also useful for evaluating the bone responses from the biomechanical point of view.

  4. Turbulent statistics and flow structures in spanwise-rotating turbulent plane Couette flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Jie; Xia, Zhenhua; Cai, Qingdong; Chen, Shiyi

    2016-09-01

    A series of direct numerical simulations of spanwise-rotating turbulent plane Couette flows at a Reynolds number of 1300 with rotation numbers Ro between 0 and 0.9 is carried out to investigate the effects of anticyclonic rotation on turbulent statistics and flow structures. Several typical turbulent statistics are presented, including the mean shear rate at the centerline, the wall-friction Reynolds number, and volume-averaged kinetic energies with respect to the secondary flow field, turbulent field, and total fluctuation field. Our results show that the rotation changes these quantities in different manners. Volume-averaged balance equations for kinetic energy are analyzed and it turns out that the interaction term acts as a kinetic energy bridge that transfers energy from the secondary flow to the turbulent fluctuations. Several typical flow regimes are identified based on the correlation functions across the whole channel and flow visualizations. The two-dimensional roll cells are observed at weak rotation Ro=0.01 , where alternant clustering of vortices appears. Three-dimensional roll cells emerge around Ro≈0.02 , where the clustering of vortices shows the meandering and bifurcating behavior. For moderate rotation 0.07 ≲Ro≲0.36 , well-organized structures are observed, where the herringbonelike vortices are clustered between streaks from the top view of three-dimensional flow visualization and form annuluses. More importantly, the vortices are rather confined to one side of the walls when Ro≤0.02 and are inclined from the bottom to upper walls when Ro≥0.07 .

  5. Electronic and crystal structure changes induced by in-plane oxygen vacancies in multiferroic YMnO3

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Shaobo; Meng, Qingping; Li, Mengli; Duan, Wenhui; Zhao, Y. G.; Sun, X. F.; Zhu, Yimei; Zhu, Jing

    2016-02-08

    Here, the widely spread oxygen vacancies (VO) in multiferroic materials can strongly affect their physical properties. However, their exact influence has rarely been identified in hexagonal manganites. Here, with the combined use of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and first-principles calculations, we have systematically studied the electronic and crystal structure modifications induced by VO located at the same Mn atomic plane (in-plane VO). Our TEM experiments reveal that the easily formed in-plane VO not only influence the electronic structure of YMnO3 but alter the in-plane Wyckoff positions of Mn ions, which may subsequently affect the intraplane and interplane exchange interaction of Mn ions. The ferroelectricity is also impaired due to the introduction of VO. Further calculations confirm these electronic and structural changes and modifications. Our results indicate that the electronic and crystal structure of YMnO3 can be manipulated by the creation of VO.

  6. Detection of trans–cis flips and peptide-plane flips in protein structures

    SciTech Connect

    Touw, Wouter G.; Joosten, Robbie P.; Vriend, Gert

    2015-07-28

    A method is presented to detect peptide bonds that need either a trans–cis flip or a peptide-plane flip. A coordinate-based method is presented to detect peptide bonds that need correction either by a peptide-plane flip or by a trans–cis inversion of the peptide bond. When applied to the whole Protein Data Bank, the method predicts 4617 trans–cis flips and many thousands of hitherto unknown peptide-plane flips. A few examples are highlighted for which a correction of the peptide-plane geometry leads to a correction of the understanding of the structure–function relation. All data, including 1088 manually validated cases, are freely available and the method is available from a web server, a web-service interface and through WHAT-CHECK.

  7. Evaluation of the Load-bearing Capacity of Fractured Incisal Edge of Maxillary Permanent Central Incisors restored with a Glass Fiber-reinforced Nanocomposite: An in vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Srilatha, KT; Nandlal, B; Dhull, Kanika Singh

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the load-bearing capacity of fractured incisal edge of maxillary permanent central incisors restored with a nanocomposite and a glass fiber-reinforced nanocomposite. Materials and methods: Thirty-six extracted sound maxillary central incisors randomly divided in three groups were used for the present study. Group I (control) contained untreated teeth. Samples in experimental groups II and III were prepared by cutting the incisal (one-third) part of the crown horizontally and subjected to enamel preparations and restored with a nanocomposite and a glass fiber-reinforced nanocomposite respectively. All restored teeth were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 24 hours. Fracture resistance was evaluated as peak load at failure (Newton) for samples tested in a cantilever-bending test using Hounsfield universal testing machine. Failure modes were microscopically examined. Results: Highest mean peak failure load (Newton) among experimental groups was observed in glass fiber-reinforced nano composite group (863.50 ± 76.12 N) followed by nanocomposite group (633.67 ± 40.14 N). One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed that the restoration technique significantly affected the load-bearing capacity (p < 0.001). Scheffe’s post-hoc comparison test (subset for α = 0.05) revealed that there was significant difference in the mean peak failure load values of nanocomposite and glass fiber-reinforced nanocomposite groups when considered together (p < 0.001). Experimental groups showed similar types of failure modes with majority occurring ascohesive and mixed type. Fifty-eight percent of the teeth in glass fiber-reinforced nanocomposite group fractured below the cementoenamel junction. Conclusion: By using fiber-reinforced composite substructure under conventional composites in the repair of fractured incisors, the load-bearing capacity of the restored incisal edge could be substantially

  8. Structure and magnetism of bulk Fe and Cr: from plane waves to LCAO methods.

    PubMed

    Soulairol, R; Fu, Chu-Chun; Barreteau, C

    2010-07-28

    Magnetic, structural and energetic properties of bulk Fe and Cr were studied using first-principles calculations within density functional theory (DFT). We aimed to identify the dependence of these properties on key approximations of DFT, namely the exchange-correlation functional, the pseudopotential and the basis set. We found a smaller effect of pseudopotentials (PPs) on Fe than on Cr. For instance, the local magnetism of Cr was shown to be particularly sensitive to the potentials representing the core electrons, i.e. projector augmented wave and Vanderbilt ultrasoft PPs predict similar results, whereas standard norm-conserving PPs tend to overestimate the local magnetic moments of Cr in bcc Cr and in dilute bcc FeCr alloys. This drawback is suggested to be closely correlated to the overestimation of Cr solution energy in the latter system. On the other hand, we point out that DFT methods with very reduced localized basis sets (LCAO: linear combination of atomic orbitals) give satisfactory results compared with more robust plane-wave approaches. A minimal-basis representation of '3d' electrons comes to be sufficient to describe non-trivial magnetic phases including spin spirals in both fcc Fe and bcc Cr, as well as the experimental magnetic ground state of bcc Cr showing a spin density wave (SDW) state. In addition, a magnetic 'spd' tight binding model within the Stoner formalism was proposed and validated for Fe and Cr. The respective Stoner parameters were obtained by fitting to DFT data. This efficient semiempirical approach was shown to be accurate enough for studying various collinear and non-collinear phases of bulk Fe and Cr. It also enabled a detailed investigation of different polarization states of SDW in bcc Cr, where the longitudinal state was suggested to be the ground state, consistent with existing experimental data.

  9. Simultaneous in-plane and out-of-plane displacement measurement based on a dual-camera imaging system and its application to inspection of large-scale space structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ri, Shien; Tsuda, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Takeshi; Umebayashi, Takashi; Sato, Akiyoshi; Sato, Eiichi

    2015-07-01

    Optical methods providing full-field deformation data have potentially enormous interest for mechanical engineers. In this study, an in-plane and out-of-plane displacement measurement method based on a dual-camera imaging system is proposed. The in-plane and out-of-plane displacements are determined simultaneously using two measured in-plane displacement data observed from two digital cameras at different view angles. The fundamental measurement principle and experimental results of accuracy confirmation are presented. In addition, we applied this method to the displacement measurement in a static loading and bending test of a solid rocket motor case (CFRP material; 2.2 m diameter and 2.3 m long) for an up-to-date Epsilon rocket developed by JAXA. The effectiveness and measurement accuracy is confirmed by comparing with conventional displacement sensor. This method could be useful to diagnose the reliability of large-scale space structures in the rocket development.

  10. Octupolar out-of-plane magnetic field structure generation during collisionless magnetic reconnection in a stressed X-point collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Graf von der Pahlen, J.; Tsiklauri, D.

    2014-06-15

    The out-of-plane magnetic field, generated by fast magnetic reconnection, during collisionless, stressed X-point collapse, was studied with a kinetic, 2.5D, fully electromagnetic, relativistic particle-in-cell numerical code, using both closed (flux conserving) and open boundary conditions on a square grid. It was discovered that the well known quadrupolar structure in the out-of-plane magnetic field gains four additional regions of opposite magnetic polarity, emerging near the corners of the simulation box, moving towards the X-point. The emerging, outer, magnetic field structure has opposite polarity to the inner quadrupolar structure, leading to an overall octupolar structure. Using Ampere's law and integrating electron and ion currents, defined at grid cells, over the simulation domain, contributions to the out-of-plane magnetic field from electron and ion currents were determined. The emerging regions of opposite magnetic polarity were shown to be the result of ion currents. Magnetic octupolar structure is found to be a signature of X-point collapse, rather than tearing mode, and factors relating to potential discoveries in experimental scenarios or space-craft observations are discussed.

  11. Line-feature-based calibration method of structured light plane parameters for robot hand-eye system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Yuhan; Jing, Fengshui; Tan, Min

    2013-03-01

    For monocular-structured light vision measurement, it is essential to calibrate the structured light plane parameters in addition to the camera intrinsic parameters. A line-feature-based calibration method of structured light plane parameters for a robot hand-eye system is proposed. Structured light stripes are selected as calibrating primitive elements, and the robot moves from one calibrating position to another with constraint in order that two misaligned stripe lines are generated. The images of stripe lines could then be captured by the camera fixed at the robot's end link. During calibration, the equations of two stripe lines in the camera coordinate system are calculated, and then the structured light plane could be determined. As the robot's motion may affect the effectiveness of calibration, so the robot's motion constraints are analyzed. A calibration experiment and two vision measurement experiments are implemented, and the results reveal that the calibration accuracy can meet the precision requirement of robot thick plate welding. Finally, analysis and discussion are provided to illustrate that the method has a high efficiency fit for industrial in-situ calibration.

  12. Fabrication of interface-modified ramp-edge junction on YBCO ground plane with multilayer structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakana, H.; Adachi, S.; Kamitani, A.; Sugiyama, H.; Sugano, T.; Horibe, M.; Ishimaru, Y.; Tarutani, Y.; Tanabe, K.

    2003-10-01

    We examined the fabrication conditions to obtain high-quality ramp-edge Josephson junctions on a liquid-phase-epitaxy YBa 2Cu 3O y (LPE-YBCO) ground plane, in particular, focusing on the fabrication of a suitable insulating layer on the ground plane and the post-annealing conditions to load oxygen to the ground plane. A (LaAlO 3) 0.3-(SrAl 0.5Ta 0.5O 3) 0.7 (LSAT) insulating film on the ground planes exhibited a conductance ranging from 10 -4 to 10 -8 S after deposition of an upper superconducting film, suggesting existence of some leak paths through the LSAT insulating layer. By introducing approximately 30 nm thick SrTiO 3 (STO) buffer layers on both side of the LSAT insulating layer. We reproducibly obtained a conductance lower than 10 -8 S. The dielectric constant of the STO/LSAT/STO layer was 32, which was slightly larger than that of the single LSAT layer. It was found that a very slow cooling rate of 1.0 °C/h in oxygen was needed to fully oxidize the ground plane through the STO/LSAT/STO insulating layers, while the oxidation time could be effectively reduced by introducing via holes in the insulating layer at an interval of 200 μm. Ramp-edge junctions on LPE-YBCO ground planes with STO/LSAT/STO insulating layers exhibited a 1 σ-spread in Ic of 8% for 100-junction series-arrays and a sheet inductance of 0.7 pH/□ at 4.2 K.

  13. Repair of segmental load-bearing bone defect by autologous mesenchymal stem cells and plasma-derived fibrin impregnated ceramic block results in early recovery of limb function.

    PubMed

    Ng, Min Hwei; Duski, Suryasmi; Tan, Kok Keong; Yusof, Mohd Reusmaazran; Low, Kiat Cheong; Rose, Isa Mohamed; Mohamed, Zahiah; Bin Saim, Aminuddin; Idrus, Ruszymah Bt Hj

    2014-01-01

    Calcium phosphate-based bone substitutes have not been used to repair load-bearing bone defects due to their weak mechanical property. In this study, we reevaluated the functional outcomes of combining ceramic block with osteogenic-induced mesenchymal stem cells and platelet-rich plasma (TEB) to repair critical-sized segmental tibial defect. Comparisons were made with fresh marrow-impregnated ceramic block (MIC) and partially demineralized allogeneic bone block (ALLO). Six New Zealand White female rabbits were used in each study group and three rabbits with no implants were used as negative controls. By Day 90, 4/6 rabbits in TEB group and 2/6 in ALLO and MIC groups resumed normal gait pattern. Union was achieved significantly faster in TEB group with a radiological score of 4.50 ± 0.78 versus ALLO (1.06 ± 0.32), MIC (1.28 ± 0.24), and negative controls (0). Histologically, TEB group scored the highest percentage of new bone (82% ± 5.1%) compared to ALLO (5% ± 2.5%) and MIC (26% ± 5.2%). Biomechanically, TEB-treated tibiae achieved the highest compressive strength (43.50 ± 12.72 MPa) compared to those treated with ALLO (15.15 ± 3.57 MPa) and MIC (23.28 ± 6.14 MPa). In conclusion, TEB can repair critical-sized segmental load-bearing bone defects and restore limb function.

  14. Mobile offshore structure for arctic exploratory drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, D. R.; Orndorff Jr., J. A.; Owen, W. A.

    1985-04-23

    An offshore exploratory drilling floatable structure ballastable to rest on a sea floor but to extend above water level when so supported and adapted to withstand arctic ice loads, comprising a substantially vertical wall capable of withstanding arctic ice loads; a structural load bearing bottom rigidly connected to a lower portion of the wall; and a floatable vertically displaceable load bearing structural deck inside the wall.

  15. Study of the in-plane magnetic structure of a layered system using polarized neutron scattering under grazing incidence geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, R.; Bigault, T.; Wildes, A. R.; Dewhurst, C. D.; Soyama, K.; Courtois, P.

    2016-05-01

    The in-plane magnetic structure of a layered system with a polycrystalline grain size less than the ferromagnetic exchange length was investigated using polarized neutron off-specular scattering and grazing incidence small angle scattering measurements to gain insight into the mechanism that controls the magnetic properties which are different from the bulk. These complementary measurements with different length scales and the data analysis based on the distorted wave Born approximation revealed the lateral correlation on a length scale of sub- μm due to the fluctuating orientation of the magnetization in the layer. The obtained in-plane magnetic structure is consistent with the random anisotropy model, i.e. competition between the exchange interactions between neighboring spins and the local magnetocrystalline anisotropy.

  16. In-Plane Structure of Underpotentially Deposited Copper on Gold (111) Determined by Surface EXAFS (Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-28

    D-Al 263 INN-PLANE STRUCTURE OF UNDERPOTENTIALLY DEPOSITED COPPER /. ON GOLD (Iii) DET (U) PUERTO RICO UNIV RIO PIEDRAS DEPT OF PHVS I CS 0 R...051-0776 TECHNICAL REPORT #33 In-Plane Structure of Underpotentially Deposited Copper on Gold (111) Determined by Surface EXAFS by O.R. Melroy*, M.G...Strueture of Underpotentially Deposited Copper on Gold ( 11) determincd hv Surface EXAFS 0. R. Melroy*, N1. G. Samant, G. L. Borges. and J. G. Gordon

  17. Planes formed with four intron-positions in tertiary structures of retinol binding protein and calpain domain VI.

    PubMed

    Nosaka, Michiko; Hirata, Katsuki; Tsuji, Ryotarou; Sunaba, Syunya

    2014-01-07

    Eukaryotic genes have intervening sequences, introns, in their coding regions. Since introns are spliced out from m-RNA before translation, they are considered to have no effect on the protein structure. Here, we report a novel relationship between introns and the tertiary structures of retinol binding protein and calpain domain VI. We identified "intron-positions" as amino acid residues on which or just after which introns are found in their corresponding nucleotide sequences, and then found that four intron-positions form a plane. We also found that the four intron-positions of retinol-binding protein encloses its ligand retinol. The tertiary structure of calpain domain VI changes after Ca(2+) binding, and the four intron-positions form a plane that includes its ligand calpastatin. To evaluate the statistical significance of the planarity, we calculated the mean distance of each intron-position from the plane defined by the other three intron-positions, and showed that it is significantly smaller than the one calculated for randomly generated locations based on exon size distribution. On the basis of this finding, we discuss the evolution of retinol binding protein and the origin of introns.

  18. Heat transfer and vortical structures of a plane impinging jet excited by spanwise periodic disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, Yoshifumi; Kaneko, Jun-Ichi; Sakakibara, Jun

    2001-11-01

    Wall temperature and vorticity distribution of a stagnation region of a plane impinging jet with spanwise and temporal periodic disturbances has been measured by using thermochromic liquid crystal (TLC) and PIV. The plane jet of water was excited in time and space by adding suction/blowing type disturbances produced by servomotor-driven injectors. Stainless foil heaters with TLC coating glued on a Plexiglass plate was used as a heated impingement wall. The TLC surface was observed by 3 monochrome CCD cameras through RGB filters to acquire color distribution, and the velocity and vorticity field in a center-plane of the jet have been measured by PIV. Strouhal and Reynolds number were set respectively at St=0.45 and Re=2300. Surface temperature distribution showed unsteady streaks in parallel with a wall jet direction. It was evident from the PIV results that these streaks were caused by counter-rotating vortices induced on the wall. The vorticity magnitude and heat transfer rate could be modified by the temporal phase angle between disturbances added in adjacent spanwise locations.

  19. Direct spontaneous growth and interfacial structural properties of inclined GaN nanopillars on r-plane sapphire

    SciTech Connect

    Adikimenakis, A.; Aretouli, K. E.; Tsagaraki, K.; Androulidaki, M.; Georgakilas, A.; Lotsari, A.; Dimitrakopulos, G. P. Kehagias, Th.; Komninou, Ph.

    2015-06-28

    The spontaneous growth of GaN nanopillars (NPs) by direct plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on nitridated r-plane sapphire substrates has been studied. The emanation of metal-polarity NPs from inside an a-plane nonpolar GaN film was found to depend on both the substrate nitridation and the growth conditions. The density of NPs increased with increasing the duration of the nitridation process and the power applied on the radio-frequency plasma source, as well as the III/V flux ratio, while variation of the first two parameters enhanced the roughness of the substrate's surface. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques were employed to reveal the structural characteristics of the NPs and their nucleation mechanism from steps on the sapphire surface and/or interfacial semipolar GaN nanocrystals. Lattice strain measurements showed a possible Al enrichment of the first 5–6 monolayers of the NPs. By combining cross-sectional and plan-view TEM observations, the three-dimensional model of the NPs was constructed. The orientation relationship and interfacial accommodation between the NPs and the nonpolar a-plane GaN film were also elucidated. The NPs exhibited strong and narrow excitonic emission, suggesting an excellent structural quality.

  20. Strain and water effects on the electronic structure and chemical activity of in-plane graphene/silicene heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kistanov, Andrey A.; Cai, Yongqing; Zhang, Yong-Wei; Dmitriev, Sergey V.; Zhou, Kun

    2017-03-01

    By using first-principles calculations, the electronic structure of planar and strained in-plane graphene/silicene heterostructure is studied. The heterostructure is found to be metallic in a strain range from  ‑7% (compression) to  +7% (tension). The effect of compressive/tensile strain on the chemical activity of the in-plane graphene/silicene heterostructure is examined by studying its interaction with the H2O molecule. It shows that compressive/tensile strain is able to increase the binding energy of H2O compared with the adsorption on a planar surface, and the charge transfer between the water molecule and the graphene/silicene sheet can be modulated by strain. Moreover, the presence of the boron-nitride (BN)-substrate significantly influences the chemical activity of the graphene/silicene heterostructure upon its interaction with the H2O molecule and may cause an increase/decrease of the charge transfer between the H2O molecule and the heterostructure. These findings provide insights into the modulation of electronic properties of the in-plane free-standing/substrate-supported graphene/silicene heterostructure, and render possible ways to control its electronic structure, carrier density and redox characteristics, which may be useful for its potential applications in nanoelectronics and gas sensors.

  1. Voltage-Driven In-Plane Magnetization Easy Axis Switching in FeNi/Piezoelectric Actuator Hybrid Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Li; Guo, Xiaobin; Wang, Zhen; Li, Yue; Yao, Yuelin; Zuo, Yalu; Xue, Desheng

    2013-01-01

    FeNi thin films with the in-plane uniaxial anisotropy were fabricated by direct current magnetron sputtering. An FeNi/piezoelectric actuator hybrid structure was used to investigate the voltage-controlled magnetization switching. A theoretical calculation was performed to provide a simplified vision of the magnetoelastic contribution to the magnetic anisotropy. Magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements were performed and the rotation of the magnetization easy axis in the FeNi film upon application of a voltage with or without the application of a magnetic field was demonstrated. A film-thickness dependent in-plane magnetization easy axis rotation angle was observed and explained by the variation of the magnetostriction.

  2. Electronic states in low-dimensional nano-structures: Comparison between the variational and plane wave basis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Min; Wang, Hailong; Gong, Qian; Wang, Shumin

    2017-04-01

    A comparison is made between the plane wave basis and variational method. Within the framework of effective-mass approximation theory, the variational and plane wave basis method are used to calculate ground state energy and ground state binding energy in low-dimensional nano-structures under the external electric field. Comparing calculation results, the donor binding energies of ground state display the consistent trend, both of them are strongly dependent on the quantum size, impurity position and external electric field. However, the impurity ground state energy calculated using variational method may be larger than the real value and it results in the smaller binding energy for variational method. In addition, the binding energy is more sensitive to the external electric field for the variational method, which can be seen more clearly from Stark shift.

  3. Magnonic band structures in two-dimensional bi-component magnonic crystals with in-plane magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, M.; Mamica, S.; Mruczkiewicz, M.; Klos, J. W.; Tacchi, S.; Madami, M.; Gubbiotti, G.; Duerr, G.; Grundler, D.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the magnonic band structure of in-plane magnetized two-dimensional magnonic crystals composed of cobalt dots embedded into a permalloy antidot lattice. Our analysis is based on the results of numerical calculations carried out by the plane wave method. The complex magnonic band structure found in square-lattice magnonic crystals is explained on the basis of the spin wave dispersion relations calculated in the empty lattice model. We show that four principal effects influence the formation of a magnonic band structure in planar two-dimensional bi-component magnonic crystals: a folding effect, Bragg scattering, hybridization between various spin wave modes, and a demagnetizing field. While the first two effects are found for other types of waves in periodic composites, the third one exists in an anisotropic medium and the last one is specific to spin waves propagating in magnonic crystals with magnetization in the film plane. The strong anisotropy in the dispersion relation of spin waves in thin ferromagnetic films results in the crossing and anti-crossing of the fast, Damon-Eshbach-like mode with a number of other spin waves folded to the first Brillouin zone. The demagnetizing field can induce the formation of channels for spin waves which are propagating perpendicular to the external magnetic field direction, but this property exists only in the limiting range of the thicknesses and the lattice constants of the bi-component magnonic crystals. Based on the model analysis we propose a modification of the magnonic crystal structure by changing its thickness, lattice constant and aspect ratio along the direction of the applied magnetic field to significantly modify the magnonic band structure and obtain partial magnonic band gaps.

  4. Splitting of the neutral mechanical plane depends on the length of the multi-layer structure of flexible electronics.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuang; Su, Yewang; Li, Rui

    2016-06-01

    Multi-layer structures with soft (compliant) interlayers have been widely used in flexible electronics and photonics as an effective design for reducing interactions among the hard (stiff) layers and thus avoiding the premature failure of an entire device. The analytic model for bending of such a structure has not been well established due to its complex mechanical behaviour. Here, we present a rational analytic model, without any parameter fitting, to study the bending of a multi-layer structure on a cylinder, which is often regarded as an important approach to mechanical reliability testing of flexible electronics and photonics. For the first time, our model quantitatively reveals that, as the key for accurate strain control, the splitting of the neutral mechanical plane depends not only on the relative thickness of the middle layer, but also on the length-to-thickness ratio of the multi-layer structure. The model accurately captures the key quantities, including the axial strains in the top and bottom layers, the shear strain in the middle layer and the locations of the neutral mechanical planes of the top and bottom layers. The effects of the length of the multi-layer and the thickness of the middle layer are elaborated. This work is very useful for the design of multi-layer structure-based flexible electronics and photonics.

  5. In vivo evaluation of bioactive PMMA-based bone cement with unchanged mechanical properties in a load-bearing model on rabbits.

    PubMed

    Fottner, Andreas; Nies, Berthold; Kitanovic, Denis; Steinbrück, Arnd; Hausdorf, Jörg; Mayer-Wagner, Susanne; Pohl, Ulrich; Jansson, Volkmar

    2015-07-01

    Polymethylmethacrylate-based bone cements are widely used for fixation of joint replacements. To improve the long-term outcome, bioactive bone cements are aspired to advance the bone-cement interface. This study evaluated the in vivo properties of a new polymethylmethacrylate-based bioactive bone cement with addition of amphiphilic phosphorylated 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate. Previous in vitro studies confirmed bioactive properties in cell culture, as well as unchanged mechanical properties are tests according to ISO 5833:2002.Three different variations of the cement (polymethylmethacrylate + phosphorylated 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate, polymethylmethacrylate + phosphorylated 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate + CaCl2 and polymethylmethacrylate + phosphorylated 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate + CaCl2 + Na2CO3) were compared to conventional polymethylmethacrylate cement. To evaluate the properties under load-bearing conditions, a spacer prosthesis was implanted into the femoral diaphysis of 24 rabbits. Additionally, a cement plug was installed into the proximal tibia. After three months, polished sections with Giemsa surface staining were prepared. The bioactivity was determined using the bone affinity index.The sections showed a good osseointegration of the bioactive bone cement without cement cracks under load-bearing conditions. Regarding the bone affinity index, the bioactive bone cement revealed a significantly higher value in the proximal tibia (25.9-37.7%) and around the spacer prosthesis (36.8-58.9%) compared to the conventional polymethylmethacrylate cement (12.8-17.0%).The results confirm the in vivo bioactivity of this bone cement. The absence of cement cracks indicates a sufficient mechanical stability to fix prostheses with this bioactive cement, but for a final assessment long-term tests are necessary.

  6. Repair of Segmental Load-Bearing Bone Defect by Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Plasma-Derived Fibrin Impregnated Ceramic Block Results in Early Recovery of Limb Function

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Min Hwei; Duski, Suryasmi; Tan, Kok Keong; Yusof, Mohd Reusmaazran; Low, Kiat Cheong; Mohamed Rose, Isa; Mohamed, Zahiah; Bin Saim, Aminuddin; Idrus, Ruszymah Bt Hj

    2014-01-01

    Calcium phosphate-based bone substitutes have not been used to repair load-bearing bone defects due to their weak mechanical property. In this study, we reevaluated the functional outcomes of combining ceramic block with osteogenic-induced mesenchymal stem cells and platelet-rich plasma (TEB) to repair critical-sized segmental tibial defect. Comparisons were made with fresh marrow-impregnated ceramic block (MIC) and partially demineralized allogeneic bone block (ALLO). Six New Zealand White female rabbits were used in each study group and three rabbits with no implants were used as negative controls. By Day 90, 4/6 rabbits in TEB group and 2/6 in ALLO and MIC groups resumed normal gait pattern. Union was achieved significantly faster in TEB group with a radiological score of 4.50 ± 0.78 versus ALLO (1.06 ± 0.32), MIC (1.28 ± 0.24), and negative controls (0). Histologically, TEB group scored the highest percentage of new bone (82% ± 5.1%) compared to ALLO (5% ± 2.5%) and MIC (26% ± 5.2%). Biomechanically, TEB-treated tibiae achieved the highest compressive strength (43.50 ± 12.72 MPa) compared to those treated with ALLO (15.15 ± 3.57 MPa) and MIC (23.28 ± 6.14 MPa). In conclusion, TEB can repair critical-sized segmental load-bearing bone defects and restore limb function. PMID:25165699

  7. Iterative diagonalization in augmented plane wave based methods in electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Blaha, P.; Laskowski, R.; Schwarz, K.

    2010-01-20

    Due to the increased computer power and advanced algorithms, quantum mechanical calculations based on Density Functional Theory are more and more widely used to solve real materials science problems. In this context large nonlinear generalized eigenvalue problems must be solved repeatedly to calculate the electronic ground state of a solid or molecule. Due to the nonlinear nature of this problem, an iterative solution of the eigenvalue problem can be more efficient provided it does not disturb the convergence of the self-consistent-field problem. The blocked Davidson method is one of the widely used and efficient schemes for that purpose, but its performance depends critically on the preconditioning, i.e. the procedure to improve the search space for an accurate solution. For more diagonally dominated problems, which appear typically for plane wave based pseudopotential calculations, the inverse of the diagonal of (H - ES) is used. However, for the more efficient 'augmented plane wave + local-orbitals' basis set this preconditioning is not sufficient due to large off-diagonal terms caused by the local orbitals. We propose a new preconditioner based on the inverse of (H - {lambda}S) and demonstrate its efficiency for real applications using both, a sequential and a parallel implementation of this algorithm into our WIEN2k code.

  8. Glide-plane symmetry and superconducting gap structure of iron-based superconductors

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Yan; Berlijn, Tom; Hirschfeld, Peter J.; ...

    2015-03-10

    We consider the effect of glide-plane symmetry of the Fe-pnictogen/chalcogen layer in Fe-based superconductors on pairing in spin fluctuation models. Recent theories propose that so-called η-pairing states with nonzero total momentum can be realized and possess such exotic properties as odd parity spin singlet symmetry and time-reversal symmetry breaking. Here we show that when there is orbital weight at the Fermi level from orbitals with even and odd mirror reflection symmetry in z, η pairing is inevitable; however, we conclude from explicit calculation that the gap function appearing in observable quantities is identical to that found in earlier pseudocrystal momentummore » calculations with 1 Fe per unit cell.« less

  9. Glide-plane symmetry and superconducting gap structure of iron-based superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yan; Berlijn, Tom; Hirschfeld, Peter J.; Scalapino, Douglas J.; Maier, Thomas A.

    2015-03-10

    We consider the effect of glide-plane symmetry of the Fe-pnictogen/chalcogen layer in Fe-based superconductors on pairing in spin fluctuation models. Recent theories propose that so-called η-pairing states with nonzero total momentum can be realized and possess such exotic properties as odd parity spin singlet symmetry and time-reversal symmetry breaking. Here we show that when there is orbital weight at the Fermi level from orbitals with even and odd mirror reflection symmetry in z, η pairing is inevitable; however, we conclude from explicit calculation that the gap function appearing in observable quantities is identical to that found in earlier pseudocrystal momentum calculations with 1 Fe per unit cell.

  10. TIGHT CORRELATIONS BETWEEN MASSIVE GALAXY STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES AND DYNAMICS: THE MASS FUNDAMENTAL PLANE WAS IN PLACE BY z ∼ 2

    SciTech Connect

    Bezanson, Rachel; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Leja, Joel; Van de Sande, Jesse; Franx, Marijn; Kriek, Mariska

    2013-12-20

    The fundamental plane (FP) is an empirical relation between the size, surface brightness, and velocity dispersion of early-type galaxies. This relation has been studied extensively for early-type galaxies in the local universe to constrain galaxy formation mechanisms. The evolution of the zero point of this plane has been extended to high redshifts to study the luminosity evolution of massive galaxies, under the assumption of structural homology. In this work, we assess this assumption by replacing surface brightness with stellar mass density and present the evolution of the ''mass FP'' for massive, quiescent galaxies since z ∼ 2. By accounting for stellar populations, we thereby isolate and trace structural and dynamical evolution. Despite the observed dramatic evolution in the sizes and morphologies of massive galaxies since z ∼ 3, we find that quiescent galaxies lie on the mass FP out to z ∼ 2. In contrast with ∼1.4 dex evolution in the luminosity FP, average residuals from the z ∼ 0 mass FP are less than ∼0.15 dex since z ∼ 2. Assuming the Hyde and Bernardi mass FP slope, we find that this minimal offset scales as (1 + z){sup –0.095} {sup ±} {sup 0.043}. This result lends credence to previous studies that derived luminosity evolution from the FP. Therefore, despite their compact sizes and suggestions that massive galaxies are more disk-like at z ∼ 2, the relationship between their dynamics and structural properties are consistent with local early-type galaxies. Finally, we find no strong evidence for a tilt of the mass FP relative to the virial plane, but emphasize the need for full models including selection biases to fully investigate this issue.

  11. Focal plane array detectors with micro-bolometer structure and its application in IR and THz imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Mou, Wenchao; Gou, Jun; Jiang, Yadong

    2016-10-01

    Focal Plane Array (FPA) detector has characteristics of low cost, operating at room temperature, compatibility with the silicon CMOS technology, and high detecting performance, therefore it becomes a hot spot in infrared (IR) or terahertz (THz) detect field recently. However, the tradition structure of micro-bolometer has the conflict of the pixel size and thermal performance. In order to improve the detecting performance of small pixel size bolometer, high fill factor and low thermal conductance design should be considered. In IR detecting, double layers structure is an efficient method to improve the absorption of micro-bolometer and reduce thermal conductance. The three-dimension model of small size micro-bolometer was built in this article. The thermal and mechanical characters of those models were simulated and optimized, and finally the double layer structure micro-bolometer was fabricated with multifarious semiconductor recipes on the readout integrated chip wafer. For THz detecting, to improve the detecting performance, different dimension THz detectors based on micro-bridge structure were designed and fabricated to get optimizing micro-bolometer parameters from the test results of membrane deformation. A nanostructured titanium thin film absorber is integrated in the micro-bridge structure of the VOx micro-bolometer to enhance the absorption of THz radiation. Continuous-wave THz detection and imaging are demonstrated with a 2.52 THz far infrared CO2 laser and fabricated 320×240 vanadium oxide micro-bolometer focal plane array with optimized cell structure. With this detecting system, THz imaging of metal concealed in wiping cloth and envelope is demonstrated.

  12. Glide plane symmetry and gap structure in the iron-based superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Berlijn, Tom; Hirschfeld, Peter; Scalapino, Douglas; Maier, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    We consider the effect of glide plane symmetry of the Fe-pnictogen/chalcogen layer in Fe-based superconductors for pairing in spin fluctuation models. Recent theories have proposed that so-called η-pairing states with nonzero total momentum can be realized and possess exotic properties such as odd parity spin singlet symmetry and time-reversal symmetry breaking. Here we show that η-pairing is inevitable when there is orbital weight at the Fermi level from orbitals with even and odd mirror reflection symmetry in z; however, by explicit calculation, we conclude that the gap function that appears in observable quantities is identical to that found in earlier, 1 Fe per unit cell pseudo-crystal momentum calculations. P.J.H. and Y.W. were supported by Grant No. DOE DE-FG02-05ER46236 and T.B. was supported as a Wigner Fellow at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A portion of this research was conducted at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, which is sponsored at Oak Ridge National Laboratory by the Scientific User Facilities Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, US Department of Energy.

  13. In-plane structural and electronic anisotropy in de-twinned (Ba1-xKx)Fe2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blomberg, Erick; Tanatar, M. A.; Straszheim, W. E.; Shen, B.; Wen, H. H.; Prozorov, R.

    2012-02-01

    The iron-pnictides undergo a tetragonal to orthorhombic structural transition below a doping - dependent temperature Ts. In the absence of external stress or strain, the orthorhombic phase is divided into four degenerate, equally populated, ``twin'' structural domains, obscuring direct measurement of in-plane anisotropy. This degeneracy may be broken through mild mechanical stress or strain leaving the sample de-twinned. The properties of detwinned (Ba1-xKx)Fe2As2 with x=0.1, 0.18 (hole under-doped) were discussed previously [1]. Here we report polarized-light microscopy and AC transport measurements of strain-detwinned (Ba1-xKx)Fe2As2 with a dopping range from x=0.15 to x=0.35. Our results provide new insight into a region of coexisting magnetic and superconducting order parameters. [4pt] [1] J. J. Ying, et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 107 067001 (2011).

  14. Predicting the Influence of Nano-Scale Material Structure on the In-Plane Buckling of Orthotropic Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas S.; Odegard, Gregory M.; Nemeth, Michael P.; Frankland, Sarah-Jane V.

    2004-01-01

    A multi-scale analysis of the structural stability of a carbon nanotube-polymer composite material is developed. The influence of intrinsic molecular structure, such as nanotube length, volume fraction, orientation and chemical functionalization, is investigated by assessing the relative change in critical, in-plane buckling loads. The analysis method relies on elastic properties predicted using the hierarchical, constitutive equations developed from the equivalent-continuum modeling technique applied to the buckling analysis of an orthotropic plate. The results indicate that for the specific composite materials considered in this study, a composite with randomly orientated carbon nanotubes consistently provides the highest values of critical buckling load and that for low volume fraction composites, the non-functionalized nanotube material provides an increase in critical buckling stability with respect to the functionalized system.

  15. Use of passive scalar tagging for the study of coherent structures in the plane mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaprian, B. R.; Sandham, N. D.; Mungal, M. G.; Reynolds, W. C.

    1988-01-01

    Data obtained from the numerical simulation of a 2-D mixing layer were used to study the feasibility of using the instantaneous concentration of a passive scalar for detecting the typical coherent structures in the flow. The study showed that this technique works quite satisfactorily and yields results similar to those that can be obtained by using the instantaneous vorticity for structure detection. Using the coherent events educed by the scalar conditioning technique, the contribution of the coherent events to the total turbulent momentum and scalar transport was estimated. It is found that the contribution from the typical coherent events is of the same order as that of the time-mean value. However, the individual contributions become very large during the pairing of these structures. The increase is particularly spectacular in the case of the Reynolds shear stress.

  16. In-plane current induced domain wall nucleation and its stochasticity in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy Hall cross structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethi, P.; Murapaka, C.; Lim, G. J.; Lew, W. S.

    2015-11-01

    Hall cross structures in magnetic nanowires are commonly used for electrical detection of magnetization reversal in which a domain wall (DW) is conventionally nucleated by a local Oersted field. In this letter, we demonstrate DW nucleation in Co/Ni perpendicular magnetic anisotropy nanowire at the magnetic Hall cross junction. The DWs are nucleated by applying an in-plane pulsed current through the nanowire without the need of a local Oersted field. The change in Hall resistance, detected using anomalous Hall effect, is governed by the magnetic volume switched at the Hall junction, which can be tuned by varying the magnitude of the applied current density and pulse width. The nucleated DWs are driven simultaneously under the spin transfer torque effect when the applied current density is above a threshold. The possibility of multiple DW generation and variation in magnetic volume switched makes nucleation process stochastic in nature. The in-plane current induced stochastic nature of DW generation may find applications in random number generation.

  17. In-plane current induced domain wall nucleation and its stochasticity in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy Hall cross structures

    SciTech Connect

    Sethi, P.; Murapaka, C.; Lim, G. J.; Lew, W. S.

    2015-11-09

    Hall cross structures in magnetic nanowires are commonly used for electrical detection of magnetization reversal in which a domain wall (DW) is conventionally nucleated by a local Oersted field. In this letter, we demonstrate DW nucleation in Co/Ni perpendicular magnetic anisotropy nanowire at the magnetic Hall cross junction. The DWs are nucleated by applying an in-plane pulsed current through the nanowire without the need of a local Oersted field. The change in Hall resistance, detected using anomalous Hall effect, is governed by the magnetic volume switched at the Hall junction, which can be tuned by varying the magnitude of the applied current density and pulse width. The nucleated DWs are driven simultaneously under the spin transfer torque effect when the applied current density is above a threshold. The possibility of multiple DW generation and variation in magnetic volume switched makes nucleation process stochastic in nature. The in-plane current induced stochastic nature of DW generation may find applications in random number generation.

  18. Mechanical properties and in vivo performance of load-bearing fiber-reinforced composite intramedullary nails with improved torsional strength.

    PubMed

    Moritz, N; Strandberg, N; Zhao, D S; Mattila, R; Paracchini, L; Vallittu, P K; Aro, H T

    2014-12-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites (FRC) could be feasible materials for fracture fixation devices if the mechanical properties of the composites are congruent with the local structural properties of bone. In a recently developed FRC implant, bisphenol A dimethacrylate (BisGMA) and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) resin was reinforced with unidirectional E-glass fibers. The addition of a braided glass fiber sleeving to the unidirectional fibers increased the torsional strength (99.5MPa) of the FRC implants at the expense of the flexural strength (602.0MPa). The flexural modulus was 15.3GPa. Two types of FRC intramedullary nails were prepared; first type was FRC as such, second type was FRC with a surface layer of bioactive glass (BG) granules. Experimental oblong subtrochanteric defect was created in 14 rabbits. The defect, which reduced the torsional strength of the bones by 66%, was fixed with an FRC intramedullary nail of either type. The contralateral intact femur served as the control. This model simulated surgical stabilization of bone metastasis. After 12 weeks of follow-up, the femurs were harvested and analyzed by torsional testing, micro-CT and hard tissue histology. Healed undisplaced peri-implant fractures were noticed in half of the animals irrespective of the type of FRC implant. Torsional testing showed no significant differences between the implantation groups. The torsional strength of the bones stabilized by either type of FRC implant was 83% of that of the contralateral femurs. In histological analysis, no implant debris and no adverse tissue reactions were observed. While the mechanical properties of the modified FRCs were suboptimal, the FRC intramedullary nails supported the femurs without structural failure, even in the cases of peri-implant fractures.

  19. Influence of fatigue testing and cementation mode on the load-bearing capability of bovine incisors restored with crowns and FRC posts.

    PubMed

    Nothdurft, Frank P; Schmitt, Thomas; Rupf, Stefan; Pospiech, Peter R

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of fatigue and cementation mode on the fracture behaviour of endodontically treated bovine incisors restored with fiber-reinforced-composite (FRC) posts and crowns. Forty-eight endodontically treated incisors were restored with FRC posts, composite build-ups, and cast crowns. In 16 teeth, each of the posts were cemented conventionally with KetacCem (3M Espe) or adhesively with Panavia F (Kuraray) or RelyXUniCem (3M Espe). One-half of the specimens in each group were subjected to thermal cycling with 10,000 cycles at 5-55°C and mechanical aging, loading the specimens in 1,200,000 cycles with 50 N. Fracture resistance was determined by loading the specimens until fracture at an angle of 45°. The loading test showed that cementation mode and fatigue testing had an influence on the load bearing capability. Before fatigue testing no statistically significant differences between the different cementation modes could be detected. After fatigue testing, conventionally cemented FRC posts lead to statistically significant higher fracture loads compared to adhesively luted posts. Most specimens fractured in a favourable way, independent from the type of cementation.

  20. The role of heat treatment on microstructure and mechanical properties of Ti-13Zr-13Nb alloy for biomedical load bearing applications.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, P; Singh, S B; Chakraborty, M

    2011-10-01

    The suitability of heat treated Ti-13Zr-13Nb (TZN) alloy for biomedical load bearing applications has been investigated. Depending upon the heat treatment conditions, the microstructure of TZN alloy mainly consists of α, β or α" martensite phases. In general, for all the deformation and solution treatment temperatures the variation of the hardness and tensile strength with cooling rate is similar. The elastic modulus of TZN alloy decreases with an increase in cooling rate from the solution treatment temperature. Relatively fine α+β microstructure increases the hardness and tensile strength. The presence of martensite and/or retained β in the microstructure decreases the hardness and elastic modulus and increases the ductility substantially whereas higher amount of α phase in the matrix increases the elastic modulus. Decomposition of martensite and retained β into α phase during aging increases the hardness, elastic modulus and tensile strength and decreases the ductility. Among the samples studied, the aged TZN sample, which was deformed and solution treated at 800 °C followed by water quenching, is a promising candidate for the application as implant material.

  1. Silk coating on a bioactive ceramic scaffold for bone regeneration: effective enhancement of mechanical and in vitro osteogenic properties towards load-bearing applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiao Jiao; Roohani-Esfahani, Seyed-Iman; Kim, Kyungsook; Kaplan, David L; Zreiqat, Hala

    2015-07-24

    Bioactive ceramic scaffolds represent competitive choices for clinical bone reconstruction, but their widespread use is restricted by inherent brittleness and weak mechanical performance under load. This study reports the development of strong and tough bioactive scaffolds suitable for use in load-bearing bone reconstruction. A strong and bioactive ceramic scaffold (strontium-hardystonite-gahnite) is combined with single and multiple coating layers of silk fibroin to enhance its toughness, producing composite scaffolds which match the mechanical properties of cancellous bone and show enhanced capacity to promote in vitro osteogenesis. Also reported for the first time is a comparison of the coating effects obtained when a polymeric material is coated on ceramic scaffolds with differing microstructures, namely the strontium-hardystonite-gahnite scaffold with high-density struts as opposed to a conventional ceramic scaffold, such as biphasic calcium phosphate, with low-density struts. The results show that silk coating on a unique ceramic scaffold can lead to simple and effective enhancement of its mechanical and biological properties to suit a wider range of applications in clinical bone reconstruction, and also establish the influence of ceramic microstructure on the effectiveness of silk coating as a method of reinforcement when applied to different types of ceramic bone graft substitutes. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Influence of fatigue testing and cementation mode on the load-bearing capability of bovine incisors restored with crowns and zirconium dioxide posts.

    PubMed

    Nothdurft, F P; Schmitt, T; Motter, P J; Pospiech, P R

    2008-12-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of fatigue and cementation mode on the fracture behavior of endodontically treated bovine incisors restored with zirconium dioxide posts and crowns. Forty-eight endodontically treated bovine primary incisors were restored with zirconium dioxide posts (Cerapost, Brasseler), composite build-ups, and crowns cast from a chromium cobalt alloy. In 16 teeth, each of the posts was cemented conventionally with KetacCem (3M ESPE) or adhesively with Panavia F (Kuraray) or RelyX UniCem (3M ESPE). One-half of the specimens in each group were subjected to thermocycling with 10,000 cycles at 5-55 degrees C and mechanical aging, loading the specimens at an angle of 45 degrees in 1,200,000 cycles with 50 N. Fracture resistance was determined by loading the specimens until fracture at an angle of 45 degrees to the long axis of the teeth. The loading test showed that neither cementation mode nor fatigue testing had an influence on the load bearing capability. Most specimens fractured in a favorable way, independent from the type of cementation.

  3. Enabling technologies research and development structures. [for National Aerospace Plane Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, John G., Jr.; Murrow, Harold N.

    1989-01-01

    The technology-development areas of most critical importance to the definition of the NASP vehicle's airframe and integrated propulsion systems are discussed with a view to the progress made to date and the prospects for the expansion of a definitive NASP design data base on materials, structures, etc. It is necessary to achieve a very low structural-mass fraction, to withstand 6000 F radiation equilibrium fuselage nosecap temperatures, to manage an extensive active cooling network for both airframe and propulsion system capable of dissipating 10,000 BTU/sq ft-sec thermal fluxes, to maintain effective hot-gas sealing, and to manufacture high temperature effectiveness-retaining control surfaces. An account is given of successes thus far achieved.

  4. Resorbable composites with bioresorbable glass fibers for load-bearing applications. In vitro degradation and degradation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lehtonen, Timo J; Tuominen, Jukka U; Hiekkanen, Elina

    2013-01-01

    An in vitro degradation study of three bioresorbable glass fiber-reinforced poly(l-lactide-co-dl-lactide) (PLDLA) composites was carried out in simulated body fluid (SBF), to simulate body conditions, and deionized water, to evaluate the nature of the degradation products. The changes in mechanical and chemical properties were systematically characterized over 52 weeks dissolution time to determine the degradation mechanism and investigate strength retention by the bioresorbable glass fiber-reinforced PLDLA composite. The degradation mechanism was found to be a combination of surface and bulk erosion and does not follow the typical core-accelerated degradation mechanism of poly(α-hydroxyacids). Strength retention by bioresorbable glass fiber-reinforced PLDLA composites can be tailored by changing the oxide composition of the glass fibers, but the structure-property relationship of the glass fibers has to be understood and controlled so that the phenomenon of ion leaching can be utilized to control the degradation rate. Therefore, these high performance composites are likely to open up several new possibilities for utilizing resorbable materials in clinical applications which could not be realized in the past.

  5. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy study of the stretched magnetic-domain structure of Co/Pt multilayers under an in-plane field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handoko, Djati; Quach, Duy-Truong; Lee, Sang-Hyuk; Shim, Je-Ho; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Kyung-Min; Jeong, Jong-Ryul; Kim, Namdong; Shin, Hyun-Joon

    2015-06-01

    We report our investigation on the magnetic-domain structure of a Co/Pt multilayer with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy under a horizontal in-plane field by using a high-resolution scanning transmission X-ray microscope (STXM) developed at Pohang Accelerator Laboratory. The ruggedshaped striped magnetic-domain structure that was initially formed under a field cycle along the out-of-the plane magnetic easy axis was found to be stretched and elongated along the direction of the horizontal in-plane field. As the in-plane field was strengthened, the striped pattern exhibited an anisotropic domain growth with further stretching and aligning, as well as with a modification of the magnetic-domain's width.

  6. Compact Test Structure to Measure All Thermophysical Properties for the In-Plane Figure of Merit ZT of Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, Dominik; Mueller, David; Paul, Oliver

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports a versatile thermophysical test structure to measure all material properties contributing to the in-plane thermoelectric figure of merit ZT=S^2Tκ ^{-1} ρ ^{-1} from a single thin film sample of only about 0.5 mm^2. These properties are the Seebeck coefficient S of the sample against aluminum (Al), its thermal conductivity κ , and its resistivity ρ. The thermal membrane-based test structure is produced using standard thin film deposition and structuring processes followed by silicon micromachining. It can be used to characterize thin films deposited at high temperature, such as doped polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si), as well as films deposited at low temperature, e.g., sputtered metals. We present the measurement of all components of the ZT of low-pressure, chemical vapor-deposited n- and p-doped poly-Si thin films in the temperature range from 300 K to 380 K. Values of 1.46 × 10-2 and 0.95 × 10-2 were found at room temperature (RT) for the ZT of n- and p-doped poly-Si films, respectively. Furthermore, the test structure was used to extract ρ and κ of a sputtered aluminum film in the same temperature range. The respective RT values are 48.7 × 10-9 Ω {m} and 154 W m-1 K-1.

  7. Ab initio electronic structure of quasi-two-dimensional materials: A "native" Gaussian-plane wave approach.

    PubMed

    Trevisanutto, Paolo E; Vignale, Giovanni

    2016-05-28

    Ab initio electronic structure calculations of two-dimensional layered structures are typically performed using codes that were developed for three-dimensional structures, which are periodic in all three directions. The introduction of a periodicity in the third direction (perpendicular to the layer) is completely artificial and may lead in some cases to spurious results and to difficulties in treating the action of external fields. In this paper we develop a new approach, which is "native" to quasi-2D materials, making use of basis function that are periodic in the plane, but atomic-like in the perpendicular direction. We show how some of the basic tools of ab initio electronic structure theory - density functional theory, GW approximation and Bethe-Salpeter equation - are implemented in the new basis. We argue that the new approach will be preferable to the conventional one in treating the peculiarities of layered materials, including the long range of the unscreened Coulomb interaction in insulators, and the effects of strain, corrugations, and external fields.

  8. Magnetization reversal induced by in-plane current in Ta/CoFeB/MgO structures with perpendicular magnetic easy axis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, C.; Yamanouchi, M. Ikeda, S.; Sato, H.; Fukami, S.; Matsukura, F.; Ohno, H.

    2014-05-07

    We investigate in-plane current-induced magnetization reversal under an in-plane magnetic field in Hall bar shaped devices composed of Ta/CoFeB/MgO structures with perpendicular magnetic easy axis. The observed relationship between the directions of current and magnetization switching and Ta thickness dependence of magnetization switching current are accordance with those for magnetization reversal by spin transfer torque originated from the spin Hall effect in the Ta layer.

  9. Electronic structure of hole centers in CuO2 planes of cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskvin, A. S.; Panov, Yu. D.

    2011-03-01

    A theoretical analysis and a large amount of experimental data indicate that the structure of the valence hole states in doped cuprates is more complicated than assumed in the simple Zhang-Rice singlet model. In fact, we are dealing with a competition between a hybrid Cu3d -O2pb1g∝dx2-y2-state and purely oxygen nonbonding states with a2g- and eux ,y∝px ,y-symmetries. Thus, as a cluster analog of a Cu3+ ion, the ground state of a non-Zhang-Rice CuO45- hole center of this sort should be described by complicated A1g1-B2g1,3-Eu1,3 multiplet with a set of charge, orbital, and spin order parameters, some of which are well known (e.g., spin moment or "ferromagnetic" Ising orbital momentum localized on oxygen ions) while others are unconventional or hidden (e.g., "antiferromagnetic" ordering of Ising orbital momenta localized on four oxygen atoms or a combined spin-orbital-quadrupole ordering). The non-Zhang-Rice CuO45- centers are actually singlet-triplet pseudo-Jahn-Teller centers with strong vibron coupling to the lattice. The complicated structure of the ground-state multiplet of the hole centers shows up in many of the unusual properties of doped cuprates, in particular, their pseudo-gap phase.

  10. Structural analysis of the 3C|4H boundaries formed on prismatic planes in 4H-SiC epitaxial films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, T.; Matsuhata, H.; Naijo, T.; Momose, K.; Osawa, H.

    2016-12-01

    The boundaries between 3C and 4H-SiC domains on the prismatic planes of hexagonal lattices formed in a 4H-SiC epitaxial film were investigated using both transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy. These observations determined that the boundaries have a periodic structure, in which each unit cell consists of 12 basal planes of the hexagonal lattice. Six Shockley partial dislocations are situated in each unit cell of the boundary structure. Burgers vectors and core structures of these partial dislocations are discussed.

  11. Mechanics, degradability, bioactivity, in vitro, and in vivo biocompatibility evaluation of poly(amino acid)/hydroxyapatite/calcium sulfate composite for potential load-bearing bone repair.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaoxia; Ren, Haohao; Luo, Xiaoman; Wang, Peng; Lv, Guoyu; Yuan, Huipin; Li, Hong; Yan, Yonggang

    2016-03-01

    A ternary composite of poly(amino acid), hydroxyapatite, and calcium sulfate (PAA/HA/CS) was prepared using in situ melting polycondensation method and evaluated in terms of mechanical strengths, in vitro degradability, bioactivity, as well as in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility. The results showed that the ternary composite exhibited a compressive strength of 147 MPa, a bending strength of 121 MPa, a tensile strength of 122 MPa, and a tensile modulus of 4.6 GPa. After immersion in simulated body fluid, the compressive strength of the composite decreased from 147 to 98 MPa for six weeks and the bending strength decreased from 121 to 75 MPa for eight weeks, and both of them kept stable in the following soaking period. The composite could be slowly degraded with 7.27 wt% loss of initial weight after soaking in phosphate buffered solution for three weeks when started to keep stable weight in the following days. The composite was soaked in simulated body fluid solution and the hydroxyapatite layer, as flower-like granules, formed on the surface of the composite samples, showing good bioactivity. Moreover, it was found that the composite could promote proliferation of MG-63 cells, and the cells with normal phenotype extended and spread well on the composite surface. The implantation of the composite into the ulna of sheep confirmed that the composite was biocompatible and osteoconductive in vivo, and offered the PAA/HA/CS composite promising material for load-bearing bone substitutes for clinical application.

  12. Low elastic modulus Ti-Ta alloys for load-bearing permanent implants: enhancing the biodegradation resistance by electrochemical surface engineering.

    PubMed

    Kesteven, Jazmin; Kannan, M Bobby; Walter, Rhys; Khakbaz, Hadis; Choe, Han-Choel

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the in vitro degradation behaviour of titanium-tantalum (Ti-Ta) alloys (10-30 wt.% Ta) was investigated and compared with conventional implant materials, i.e., commercially pure titanium (Cp-Ti) and titanium-aluminium-vanadium (Ti6Al4V) alloy. Among the three Ti-Ta alloys studied, the Ti20Ta (6.3×10(-4) mm/y) exhibited the lowest degradation rate, followed by Ti30Ta (1.2×10(-3) mm/y) and Ti10Ta (1.4×10(-3) mm/y). All the Ti-Ta alloys exhibited lower degradation rate than that of Cp-Ti (1.8×10(-3) mm/y), which suggests that Ta addition to Ti is beneficial. As compared to Ti6Al4V alloy (8.1×10(-4) mm/y), the degradation rate of Ti20Ta alloy was lower by ~22%. However, the Ti30Ta alloy, which has closer elastic modulus to that of natural bone, showed ~48% higher degradation rate than that of Ti6Al4V alloy. Hence, to improve the degradation performance of Ti30Ta alloy, an intermediate thin porous layer was formed electrochemically on the alloy followed by calcium phosphate (CaP) electrodeposition. The coated Ti30Ta alloy (3.8×10(-3) mm/y) showed ~53% lower degradation rate than that of Ti6Al4V alloy. Thus, the study suggests that CaP coated Ti30Ta alloy can be a viable material for load-bearing permanent implants.

  13. Improved performance of HgCdTe infrared detector focal plane arrays by modulating light field based on photonic crystal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Jian; Hu, Weida Ye, Zhenhua; Li, Zhifeng; Chen, Xiaoshuang Lu, Wei; Liao, Lei

    2014-05-14

    An HgCdTe long-wavelength infrared focal plane array photodetector is proposed by modulating light distributions based on the photonic crystal. It is shown that a promising prospect of improving performance is better light harvest and dark current limitation. To optimize the photon field distributions of the HgCdTe-based photonic crystal structure, a numerical method is built by combining the finite-element modeling and the finite-difference time-domain simulation. The optical and electrical characteristics of designed HgCdTe mid-wavelength and long-wavelength photon-trapping infrared detector focal plane arrays are obtained numerically. The results indicate that the photon crystal structure, which is entirely compatible with the large infrared focal plane arrays, can significantly reduce the dark current without degrading the quantum efficiency compared to the regular mesa or planar structure.

  14. Off-easy-plane antiferromagnetic spin canting in coupled FePt/NiO bilayer structure with perpendicular exchange bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Tenghua; Itokawa, Nobuhide; Wang, Jian; Yu, Youxing; Harumoto, Takashi; Nakamura, Yoshio; Shi, Ji

    2016-08-01

    We report on the investigation of perpendicular exchange bias in FePt (001 ) /NiO (1 ¯1 ¯1 ) orthogonal exchange couple with FePt partially L 10 ordered. From initial magnetization curve measurement and magnetic domain imaging, we find that, for the as-grown bilayer structure, the FePt layer experiences a small-angle magnetization rotation when it is magnetized near to saturation in film normal direction. After field cooling, the bilayer structure shows a significant enhancement of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy, indicating the field mediated coupling between the spins across the FePt/NiO interface. According to Koon's theoretical calculation on the basis of lowest energy ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic coupling configuration for compensated spins at antiferromagnetic side, we consider slightly slanted Ni spins at the interface off the (1 ¯1 ¯1 ) easy plane can stabilize the spin coupling between FePt and NiO and result in the observed exchange bias in this paper. This consideration was further confirmed by stripe domain width calculation.

  15. Effects of embedded SHM sensors on the structural integrity of glass fiber/epoxy laminates under in-plane loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghezzo, Fabrizia; Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    2007-04-01

    This experimental research is focused on examining the effects of stress concentration due to the embedded Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) sensors on the structural integrity of glass fiber/epoxy laminates subjected to in-plane tensile loads. Recent advances of health monitoring technologies have resulted in development of micro-dimensional sensors that can be embedded into composite laminates. Notwithstanding their small sizes, such inclusions may affect the response of the composite. Damage induced by the peak values of stress concentration around the embedded devices is, in fact, one of the main concerns. To assess this and related issues, we have fabricated a series of samples with and without embedded (dummy) sensors and micro-processors in S2 glass fiber/epoxy laminates, and systematically tested the samples while continuously monitoring the response by the acoustic emission technique. In this manner we have sought to address the process of damage initiation and evolution within the material. The results show that acoustic events begin earlier on during the loading process, in specimens with embedded sensors and the source of the damage is located near the sensors. These early events are associated with matrix failure at the sensor-resin interfaces through micrographic observations.

  16. InGaN/GaN quantum well structures with greatly enhanced performance on a-plane GaN grown using self-organized nano-masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, K.; Gong, Y.; Bai, J.; Wang, T.

    2011-10-01

    Great improvement in crystal quality of a-plane (non-polar) GaN has been achieved using a simple but effective overgrowth technique based on self-organized nano-masks. This has been confirmed by a massive reduction in full width at half maximum of x-ray diffraction rocking curves measured along both symmetrical and asymmetrical directions. Taking the advantage of utilising the nano-masks, a quick coalescence with a thickness of less than 1 μm has been obtained, which is much less than that using any conventional overgrowth techniques. The dislocation density has been significantly reduced by more than one order magnitude compared with a standard a-plane GaN layer on sapphire. An InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) structure grown on the high quality a-plane GaN has demonstrated an enhancement with a factor of 7 in optical efficiency, compared with a similar MQW structure grown on a standard c-plane GaN layer. The excitation-power dependent photoluminescence measurements have confirmed that the a-plane InGaN/GaN MQW structure does not suffer from quantum-confined Stark effect any more.

  17. Determination of the effect of initial inner-core structure on tropical cyclone intensification and track on a beta plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guanghua

    2016-08-01

    The sensitivity of TC intensification and track to the initial inner-core structure on a β plane is investigated using a numerical model. The results show that the vortex with large inner-core winds (CVEX-EXP) experiences an earlier intensification than that with small inner-core winds (CCAVE-EXP), but they have nearly the same intensification rate after spin-up. In the early stage, the convective cells associated with surface heat flux are mainly confined within the inner-core region in CVEX-EXP, whereas the vortex in CCAVE-EXP exhibits a considerably asymmetric structure with most of the convective vortices being initiated to the northeast in the outer-core region due to the β effect. The large inner-core inertial stability in CVEX-EXP can prompt a high efficiency in the conversion from convective heating to kinetic energy. In addition, much stronger straining deformation and PBL imbalance in the inner-core region outside the primary eyewall ensue during the initial development stage in CVEX-EXP than in CCAVE-EXP, which is conducive to the rapid axisymmetrization and early intensification in CVEX-EXP. The TC track in CVEX-EXP sustains a northwestward displacement throughout the integration, whereas the TC in CCAVE-EXP undergoes a northeastward recurvature when the asymmetric structure is dominant. Due to the enhanced asymmetric convection to the northeast of the TC center in CCAVE-EXP, a pair of secondary gyres embedded within the large-scale primary β gyres forms, which modulates the ventilation flow and thus steers the TC to move northeastward.

  18. Dual Character of the Electronic Structure of YBa2Cu4O8: The Conduction Bands of CuO2 Planes and CuO Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, T.; Khasanov, R.; Karpinski, J.; Kazakov, S. M.; Zhigadlo, N. D.; Ohta, T.; Fretwell, H. M.; Palczewski, A. D.; Koll, J. D.; Mesot, J.; Rotenberg, E.; Keller, H.; Kaminski, A.

    2007-04-01

    We use microprobe angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (μARPES) to separately investigate the electronic properties of CuO2 planes and CuO chains in the high temperature superconductor, YBa2Cu4O8. For the CuO2 planes, a two-dimensional (2D) electronic structure is observed and, in contrast to Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ, the bilayer splitting is almost isotropic and 50% larger, which strongly suggests that bilayer splitting has no direct effect on the superconducting properties. In addition, the scattering rate for the bonding band is about 1.5 times stronger than the antibonding band and is independent of momentum. For the CuO chains, the electronic structure is quasi-one-dimensional and consists of a conduction and insulating band. Finally, we find that the conduction electrons are well confined within the planes and chains with a nontrivial hybridization.

  19. Liquid crystal-gated-organic field-effect transistors with in-plane drain-source-gate electrode structure.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jooyeok; Nam, Sungho; Jeong, Jaehoon; Lee, Chulyeon; Kim, Hwajeong; Kim, Youngkyoo

    2015-01-14

    We report planar liquid crystal-gated-organic field-effect transistors (LC-g-OFETs) with a simple in-plane drain-source-gate electrode structure, which can be cost-effectively prepared by typical photolithography/etching processes. The LC-g-OFET devices were fabricated by forming the LC layer (4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl, 5CB) on top of the channel layer (poly(3-hexylthiophene), P3HT) that was spin-coated on the patterned indium-tin oxide (ITO)-coated glass substrates. The LC-g-OFET devices showed p-type transistor characteristics, while a current saturation behavior in the output curves was achieved for the 50-150 nm-thick P3HT (channel) layers. A prospective on/off ratio (>1 × 10(3)) was obtained regardless of the P3HT thickness, whereas the resulting hole mobility (0.5-1.1 cm(2)/(V s)) at a linear regime was dependent on the P3HT thickness. The tilted ordering of 5CB at the LC-P3HT interfaces, which is induced by the gate electric field, has been proposed as a core point of working mechanism for the present LC-g-OFETs.

  20. Structure and switching of in-plane ferroelectric nano-domains in strained Pb(x)Sr(1-x)TiO(3) thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matzen, Sylvia; Nesterov, Oleksiy; Rispens, Gijsbert; Heuver, Jeroen; Noheda, Beatriz; Biegalski, Michael; Christen, Hans

    2014-03-01

    Understanding and controlling domain formation in nanoscale ferroelectrics is interesting from a fundamental point of view and of great technological importance. Increasing miniaturization allows creating complex domain structures, offering novel functionalities that could be particularly useful for the development of nanoelectronic devices. While most studies in thin films focus on domain patterns with up/down polarization for ferroelectric memories, domain structures with purely in-plane polarization have not been much investigated. However, such structures are potentially useful in optical devices or to avoid depolarization fields in ultra-thin films, as long as the domains can be addressed and switched. We use a combination of compositional substitutions and epitaxial growth on a substrate in order to tune the domain configuration. The substitution of Pb by Sr in PbxSr1-xTiO3 thin films grown epitaxially on (110)-DyScO3, stabilizes a domain structure with purely in-plane polarization. In this work, we show that it is possible to stabilize and control a complex domain architecture at two different length scales, yielding periodic ferroelectric nano-domains with purely in-plane polarization. Most importantly, these in-plane domains can be switched by a scanning probe.

  1. Trade-offs and difficulties of the vertical photoconductor: a novel device structure suitable for HgCdTe two-dimensional infrared focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhan, R. K.; Dhar, V.; Mittal, Vandana

    1999-10-01

    Recently Siliquini and Faraone [J.F. Siliquini, L. Faraone, Infrared Phys. Technol. 38 (1997) 205] have proposed vertical photoconductive device (PC) based two-dimensional long wavelength infrared region focal plane arrays (LWIR FPAs). In this note, we examine some trade-offs and difficulties of this proposed structure.

  2. Domain structure and in-plane switching in a highly strained Bi0.9Sm0.1FeO3 film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weigang; Ren, Wei; You, Lu; Yang, Yurong; Chen, Zuhuang; Qi, Yajun; Zou, Xi; Wang, Junling; Sritharan, Thirumany; Yang, Ping; Bellaiche, L.; Chen, Lang

    2011-11-01

    We report the domain structure and ferroelectric properties of a 32 nm-thick Bi0.9Sm0.1FeO3 film epitaxially grown on a LaAlO3 (LAO) substrate. This film exhibits a monoclinic Mc phase, with its monoclinic distortion and anisotropy of in-plane (IP) lattice parameters being both smaller than those of pure BiFeO3 (BFO) grown on LaAlO3. Polarization hysteresis loops measured using a quasi-planar capacitor show an in-plane polarization up to 30 μC/cm2. Piezoresponse force microcopy demonstrates that a 180° in-plane polarization switching accompanied by a 90° domain wall rotation takes place after electric poling. First-principles calculations suggest the differences between highly strained Sm-substituted and pure BiFeO3.

  3. Plane wave density functional theory studies of the structural and the electronic properties of amino acids attached to graphene oxide via peptide bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Byeong June; Jeong, Hae Kyung; Lee, ChangWoo

    2015-08-01

    We studied via plane wave pseudopotential total-energy calculations within the local spin density approximation (LSDA) the electronic and the structural properties of amino acids (alanine, glycine, and histidine) attached to graphene oxide (GO) by peptide bonding. The HOMO-LUMO gap, the Hirshfeld charges, and the equilibrium geometrical structures exhibit distinctive variations that depend on the species of the attached amino acid. The GO-amino acid system appears to be a good candidate for a biosensor.

  4. In-plane structural order of domain engineered La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschker, J. E.; Monsen, Å. F.; Nord, M.; Mathieu, R.; Grepstad, J. K.; Holmestad, R.; Wahlström, E.; Tybell, T.

    2013-05-01

    We present a detailed structural study of tensile-strained La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 thin films. We use the substrate miscut to control the number of rhombohedral variants in the films and study the in-plane order and structural distortions. Using high-resolution X-ray diffraction, we demonstrate that step-edge induced lattice modulations occur in 4-variant films, whereas periodic twinning is the dominant in-plane order for 2-variant films. We show that the in-plane twinning angle is almost completely relaxed. However, the relaxation of shear strain by the out-of-plane twinning angle and the monoclinic distortion is only partial. Furthermore, the film thickness dependence of the domain width reveals that domain formation is a universal mechanism for shear strain relaxation. Finally, we show that the structural response to the transition from the paramagnetic to the ferromagnetic phase of La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 at 345 K is smaller in 4-variant films compared to 2-variant films.

  5. Vibration and acoustic properties of honeycomb sandwich structures subject to variable incident plane-wave angle pressure loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jiaxue

    Honeycomb structures are widely used in many areas for their material characteristics such as high strength-to-weight ratio, stiffness-to-weight, sound transmission, and other properties. Honeycomb structures are generally constructed from periodically spaced tessellations of unit cells. It can be shown that the effective stiffness and mass properties of honeycomb are controlled by the local geometry and wall thickness of the particular unit cells used. Of particular interest are regular hexagonal (6-sided) honeycomb unit cell geometries which exhibit positive effective Poisson's ratio, and modified 6-sided auxetic honeycomb unit cells with Poisson's ratio which is effectively negative; a property not found in natural materials. One important honeycomb meta-structure is sandwich composites designed with a honeycomb core bonded between two panel layers. By changing the geometry of the repetitive unit cell, and overall depth and material properties of the honeycomb core, sandwich panels with different vibration and acoustic properties can be designed to shift resonant frequencies and improve intensity and Sound Transmission Loss (STL). In the present work, a honeycomb finite element model based on beam elements is programmed in MATLAB and verified with the commercial finite element software ABAQUS for frequency extraction and direct frequency response analysis. The MATLAB program was used to study the vibration and acoustic properties of different kinds of honeycomb sandwich panels undergoing in-plane loading with different incident pressure wave angles and frequency. Results for the root mean square intensity IRMS based on normal velocity on the transmitted side of the panel measure vibration magnitude are reported for frequencies between 0 and 1000 Hz. The relationship between the sound transmission loss computed with ABAQUS and the inverse of the intensity of surface velocity is established. In the present work it is demonstrated that the general trend between the

  6. Fermions on the low-buckled honey-comb structured lattice plane and classical Casimir-Polder force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Partha

    2016-05-01

    We start with the well-known expression for the vacuum polarization and suitably modify it for 2+1-dimensional spin-orbit coupled (SOC) fermions on the low-buckled honey-comb structured lattice plane described by the low-energy Liu-Yao-Feng-Ezawa (LYFE) model Hamiltonian involving the Dirac matrices in the chiral representation obeying the Clifford algebra. The silicene and germanene fit this description suitably. They have the Dirac cones similar to those of graphene and SOC is much stronger. The system could be normal or ferromagnetic in nature. The silicene turns into the latter type if there is exchange field arising due to the proximity coupling to a ferromagnet (FM) such as depositing Fe atoms to the silicene surface. For the silicene, we find that the many-body effects considerably change the bare Coulomb potential by way of the dependence of the Coulomb propagator on the real-spin, iso-spin and the potential due to an electric field applied perpendicular to the silicene plane. The computation aspect of the Casimir-Polder force (CPF) needs to be investigated in this paper. An important quantity in this process is the dielectric response function (DRF) of the material. The plasmon branch was obtained by finding the zeros of DRF in the long-wavelength limit. This leads to the plasmon frequencies. We find that the collective charge excitations at zero doping, i.e., intrinsic plasmons, in this system, are absent in the Dirac limit. The valley-spin-split intrinsic plasmons, however, come into being in the case of the massive Dirac particles with characteristic frequency close to 10 THz. Our scheme to calculate the Casimir-Polder interaction (CPI) of a micro-particle with a sheet involves replacing the dielectric constant of the sample in the CPI expression obtained on the basis of the Lifshitz theory by the static DRF obtained using the expressions for the polarization function we started with. Though the approach replaces a macroscopic constant by a microscopic

  7. Plane Jane(s).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenman, Geri

    2001-01-01

    Describes an assignment that was used in an advanced drawing class in which the students created self-portraits, breaking up their images using planes and angles to suggest their bone structure. Explains that the students also had to include three realistic portions in their drawings. (CMK)

  8. Enhanced plane wave expansion analysis for the band structure of bulk modes in two-dimensional high-contrast solid-solid phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baboly, Mohammadhosein Ghasemi; Soliman, Yasser; Su, Mehmet F.; Reinke, Charles M.; Leseman, Zayd C.; El-Kady, Ihab

    2014-11-01

    Plane wave expansion analyses that use the inverse rule to obtain the Fourier coefficients of the elastic tensor instead of the more conventional Laurent's rule, exhibit faster convergence rates for solid-solid phononic crystals. In this work, the band structure convergence of calculations using the inverse rule is investigated and applied to the case of high acoustic impedance contrast solid-solid phononic crystals, previously known for convergence difficulties. Results are contrasted to those obtained with the conventional plane wave expansion method. The inverse rule is found to converge at a much rate for all ranges of impedance contrast, and the ratio between the computational times needed to obtain a convergent band structure for a high-contrast solid-solid phononic crystal with the conventional plane wave expansion method using 1369 reciprocal lattice vectors is as large as 6800:1. This ratio decreases for material sets with lower impedance contrast; however, the inverse rule is still faster for a given error threshold for even the lowest impedance contrast phononic crystals reported in the literature. This convergence enhancement is a major factor in reconsidering the plane wave expansion method as an important tool in obtaining propagating elastic modes in phononic crystals.

  9. Axial Plane Optical Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tongcang; Ota, Sadao; Kim, Jeongmin; Wong, Zi Jing; Wang, Yuan; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    We present axial plane optical microscopy (APOM) that can, in contrast to conventional microscopy, directly image a sample's cross-section parallel to the optical axis of an objective lens without scanning. APOM combined with conventional microscopy simultaneously provides two orthogonal images of a 3D sample. More importantly, APOM uses only a single lens near the sample to achieve selective-plane illumination microscopy, as we demonstrated by three-dimensional (3D) imaging of fluorescent pollens and brain slices. This technique allows fast, high-contrast, and convenient 3D imaging of structures that are hundreds of microns beneath the surfaces of large biological tissues. PMID:25434770

  10. System and method of designing a load bearing layer that interfaces to a structural pass-through of an inflatable vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spexarth, Gary R. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method for determining a design of an inflatable module including a rigid member disposed in a restraint layer, wherein the restraint layer includes orthogonal straps, includes modeling a strap adjacent to the rigid member and a strap connected to the rigid member. The adjacent strap and the member strap extend in a first direction. The method further includes selecting a first length of the member strap such that the adjacent strap carries load before the member strap during pressurization of the inflatable module, modeling tensions in the member strap with the first length and the adjacent strap during pressurization of the inflatable model, and outputting the modeled tensions in the member strap with the first length and the adjacent strap. An inflatable module includes a member strap having a length such that an adjacent strap carries load before the member strap during pressurization of the inflatable module.

  11. THE CANADA-FRANCE ECLIPTIC PLANE SURVEY-FULL DATA RELEASE: THE ORBITAL STRUCTURE OF THE KUIPER BELT

    SciTech Connect

    Petit, J.-M.; Rousselot, P.; Mousis, O.; Kavelaars, J. J.; Gladman, B. J.; Jones, R. L.; Van Laerhoven, C.; Parker, J. Wm.; Bieryla, A.; Nicholson, P.; Mars, G.; Marsden, B.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Taylor, M.; Bernabeu, G.; Benavidez, P.; Campo Bagatin, A.

    2011-10-15

    We report the orbital distribution of the trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) discovered during the Canada-France Ecliptic Plane Survey (CFEPS), whose discovery phase ran from early 2003 until early 2007. The follow-up observations started just after the first discoveries and extended until late 2009. We obtained characterized observations of 321 deg{sup 2} of sky to depths in the range g {approx} 23.5-24.4 AB mag. We provide a database of 169 TNOs with high-precision dynamical classification and known discovery efficiency. Using this database, we find that the classical belt is a complex region with sub-structures that go beyond the usual splitting of inner (interior to 3:2 mean-motion resonance [MMR]), main (between 3:2 and 2:1 MMR), and outer (exterior to 2:1 MMR). The main classical belt (a = 40-47 AU) needs to be modeled with at least three components: the 'hot' component with a wide inclination distribution and two 'cold' components (stirred and kernel) with much narrower inclination distributions. The hot component must have a significantly shallower absolute magnitude (H{sub g} ) distribution than the other two components. With 95% confidence, there are 8000{sup +1800}{sub -1600} objects in the main belt with H{sub g} {<=} 8.0, of which 50% are from the hot component, 40% from the stirred component, and 10% from the kernel; the hot component's fraction drops rapidly with increasing H{sub g} . Because of this, the apparent population fractions depend on the depth and ecliptic latitude of a trans-Neptunian survey. The stirred and kernel components are limited to only a portion of the main belt, while we find that the hot component is consistent with a smooth extension throughout the inner, main, and outer regions of the classical belt; in fact, the inner and outer belts are consistent with containing only hot-component objects. The H{sub g} {<=} 8.0 TNO population estimates are 400 for the inner belt and 10,000 for the outer belt to within a factor of two (95

  12. A theoretical study of the local electronic structure of two adjacent CuOplanes in YBa 2Cu 3O 7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suter, H. U.; Stoll, E. P.; Hüsser, P.; Schafroth, S.; Meier, P. F.

    1997-08-01

    To reveal the local electronic structure of the two adjacent CuOplanes in YBa 2Cu 3O 7, ab initio studies on a small cluster (Cu 2Y 4O 8) were performed. Electron correlation was investigated with both density functional theory and Møller-Plesset theory. The ionisation energies, electron affinities adn the singlet-triplet differences are discussed with respect to model Hamiltonians of high-T c compounds.

  13. The Camel Rhinarium: A Study Revealing the Presence of the Nasal Plane in Dromedary Camel (Camelus dromedarius), with Special Reference to Its Epidermal Structure.

    PubMed

    Eshrah, E A

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to prove that the nasal plane (Planum nasale) present in camel (Camelus dromedarius). Furthermore, it was the first description of the gross and primary microscopic anatomy as well as the epidermal ultrastructure of the camel nasal plane. Grossly, the camel rhinarium was formed of the glabrous grayish-black skin that extended to cover the philtrum and the medial nasal angles. It was composed of two perinasal parts and an inter-labial part. A shallow groove was passed across its middle. A dermatoglyphic pattern of epidermal ridges with primary and secondary fissures in between was revealed by scanning electron microscopy. The nasal plane was very small in relation to the camel head size. In general, the morphological appearance of the camel rhinarium was greatly similar to that of the proboscis-bearing mammals. The basic histological structure as well as the epidermal ultrastructure of the camel nasal plane was observed to resemble very closely the common type. Few differences were found, including indistinct or absent hypodermal layer, thinner stratum corneum and some basal cells have unusual sinuous bases.

  14. Continuum dynamics of the formation, migration and dissociation of self-locked dislocation structures on parallel slip planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yichao; Niu, Xiaohua; Xiang, Yang

    2016-11-01

    In continuum models of dislocations, proper formulations of short-range elastic interactions of dislocations are crucial for capturing various types of dislocation patterns formed in crystalline materials. In this article, the continuum dynamics of straight dislocations distributed on two parallel slip planes is modelled through upscaling the underlying discrete dislocation dynamics. Two continuum velocity field quantities are introduced to facilitate the discrete-to-continuum transition. The first one is the local migration velocity of dislocation ensembles which is found fully independent of the short-range dislocation correlations. The second one is the decoupling velocity of dislocation pairs controlled by a threshold stress value, which is proposed to be the effective flow stress for single slip systems. Compared to the almost ubiquitously adopted Taylor relationship, the derived flow stress formula exhibits two features that are more consistent with the underlying discrete dislocation dynamics: (i) the flow stress increases with the in-plane component of the dislocation density only up to a certain value, hence the derived formula admits a minimum inter-dislocation distance within slip planes; (ii) the flow stress smoothly transits to zero when all dislocations become geometrically necessary dislocations. A regime under which inhomogeneities in dislocation density grow is identified, and is further validated through comparison with discrete dislocation dynamical simulation results. Based on the findings in this article and in our previous works, a general strategy for incorporating short-range dislocation correlations into continuum models of dislocations is proposed.

  15. Dual character of the electronic structure in YBa2Cu4O8: conduction bands of CuO2 planes and CuO chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, A.; Kondo, T.; Khasanov, R.; Karpinski, J.; Kazakov, S. M.; Zhigadlo, N. D.; Ohta, T.; Fretwell, H. M.; Palczewski, A. D.; Koll, J. D.; Mesot, J.; Rotenberg, E.; Keller, H.

    2007-03-01

    We use microprobe Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (μARPES) to separately investigate the electronic properties of CuO2 planes and CuO chains in the high temperature superconductor, YBa2Cu4O8. In the CuO2 planes, a two dimensional (2D) electronic structure with nearly momentum independent bilayer splitting is observed. The splitting energy is 150 meV at (π,0), almost 50% larger than in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ and the electron scattering at the Fermi level in the bonding band is about 1.5 times stronger than in the antibonding band. The CuO chains have a quasi one dimensional (1D) electronic structure. We observe two 1D bands separated by ˜ 550meV: a conducting band and an insulating band with an energy gap of ˜240meV. We find that the conduction electrons are well confined within the planes and chains with a non-trivial hybridization.

  16. Magnon-driven longitudinal spin Seebeck effect in F | N and N | F | N structures: Role of asymmetric in-plane magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chotorlishvili, L.; Toklikishvili, Z.; Etesami, S. R.; Dugaev, V. K.; Barnaś, J.; Berakdar, J.

    2015-12-01

    The influence of an asymmetric in-plane magnetic anisotropy Kx ≠Ky on the thermally activated spin current is studied theoretically for two different systems: (i) the F | N system consisting of a ferromagnetic insulator (F) in a direct contact with a nonmagnetic metal (N) and (ii) the sandwich structure N | F | N consisting of a ferromagnetic insulating part sandwiched between two nonmagnetic metals. It is shown that when the difference between the temperatures of the two nonmagnetic metals in a N | F | N structure is not large, the spin pumping currents from the magnetic part to the nonmagnetic ones are equal in amplitude and have opposite directions, so only the spin torque current contributes to the total spin current. The spin current flows then from the nonmagnetic metal with the higher temperature to the nonmagnetic metal having a lower temperature. Its amplitude varies linearly with the difference in temperatures. In addition, we have found that if the magnetic anisotropy is in the layer plane, then the spin current increases with the magnon temperature, while in the case of an out-of-plane magnetic anisotropy the spin current decreases when the magnon temperature enhances. Enlarging the difference between the temperatures of the nonmagnetic metals, the linear response becomes important, as confirmed by analytical expressions inferred from the Fokker-Planck approach and by the results obtained upon a full numerical integration of the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation.

  17. Comparison tests and experimental compliance calibration of the proposed standard round compact plane strain fracture toughness specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, D. M.; Buzzard, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    Standard round specimen fracture test results compared satisfactorily with results from standard rectangular compact specimens machined from the same material. The location of the loading pin holes was found to provide adequate strength in the load bearing region for plane strain fracture toughness testing. Excellent agreement was found between the stress intensity coefficient values obtained from compliance measurements and the analytic solution proposed for inclusion in the standard test method. Load displacement measurements were made using long armed displacement gages and hollow loading cylinders. Gage points registered on the loading hole surfaces through small holes in the walls of the loading cylinders.

  18. Quasiparticle density of states in layered superconductors under a magnetic field parallel to the ab plane: Determination of the gap structure of Sr2 Ru O4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udagawa, Masafumi; Yanase, Youichi; Ogata, Masao

    2004-11-01

    We study the vortex state of a layered superconductor with vertical line nodes on its Fermi surface when a magnetic field is applied in the ab -plane direction. We rotate the magnetic field within the plane, and analyze the change of low-energy excitation spectrum. Our analysis is based on the microscopic Bogoliubov-de Gennes equation and a convenient approximate analytical method invented by Pesch and developed by Dahm Both methods give consistent results. Near the upper critical field Hc2 , we observe a larger zero-energy density of states (ZEDOS) when the magnetic field is applied in the nodal direction, while much below Hc2 , larger ZEDOS is observed under a field in the anti-nodal direction. We give a natural interpretation to this crossover behavior in terms of contributions of quasiparticles propagating parallel and perpendicular to the applied field in the plane. We examine the recent field angle variation experiments of thermal conductivity and specific heat. Comparisons with our results suggest that special care should be taken to derive the position of line nodes from the experimental data. Combining the experimental data of the specific heat and our analyses, we conclude that Sr2RuO4 has a vertical-line-node-like structure in the direction of the a axis and the b axis.

  19. Electronic structure of cerium hydrides: Augmented-plane-wave linear-combination-of-atomic-orbitals energy bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimori, A.; Minami, F.; Tsuda, N.

    1980-10-01

    Electronic energy bands have been calculated for CeH2 and CeH3 using the augmented-plane-wave method and have been fitted by the linear-combination-of-atomic-orbitals interpolation scheme. The partial densities of states and the numbers of electrons on atomic orbitals indicate that hydrogen in CeH2 is almost anionlike. When going from CeH2 to CeH3, shallow bonding levels are found to form between the third hydrogen state and conduction electrons of CeH2, other features of CeH2 being little affected by it. Thus the rare-earth dihydrides are regarded as ionic compounds similar to the saline-element dihydrides except for the presence of d-like conduction electrons.

  20. On the Structure Dependence of CO Oxidation over CeO2 Nanocrystals with Well-Defined Surface Planes

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zili; Li, Meijun; Overbury, Steven {Steve} H

    2012-01-01

    CO oxidation is a model reaction for probing the redox property of ceria-based catalysts. In this study, CO oxidation was investigated over ceria nanocrystals with defined surface planes (nanoshapes) including rods ({110} + {100}), cubes ({100}), and octahedra ({111}). To understand the strong dependence of CO oxidation observed on these different ceria nanoshapes, in situ techniques including infrared and Raman spectroscopy coupled with online mass spectrometer, and temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) were employed to reveal how CO interacts with the different ceria surfaces, while the mobility of ceria lattice oxygen was investigated via oxygen isotopic exchange experiment. CO adsorption at room temperature leads to strongly bonded carbonate species on the more reactive surfaces of rods and cubes but weakly bonded ones on the rather inert octahedra surface. CO-TPR, proceeding via several channels including CO removal of lattice oxygen, surface water-gas shift reaction and CO disproportionation reaction, reveals that the reducibility of these ceria nanoshapes is in line with their CO oxidation activity, i.e., rods > cubes > octahedra. The mobility of lattice oxygen also shows similar dependence. It is suggested that defect sites and coordinatively unsaturated sites on ceria play a direct role in facilitating both CO interaction with ceria surface and the reactivity and mobility of lattice oxygen. The nature and amount of the defect and low coordination sites are intrinsically affected by the surface planes of the ceria nanoshapes. Several reaction pathways for CO oxidation over the ceria nanoshapes are proposed and certain types of carbonates, especially those associated with reduced ceria surface, are considered among the reaction intermediates to form CO2, while the majority of carbonate species observed under CO oxidation condition are believed to be spectators.

  1. Structure and switching of in-plane ferroelectric nano-domains in strained PbxSr1-xTiO3 thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Matzen, Sylivia; Nesterov, Okeksiy; Rispens, Gregory; Heuver, J. A.; Bark, C; Biegalski, Michael D; Christen, Hans M; Noheda, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    Nanoscale ferroelectrics, the active elements of a variety of nanoelectronic devices, develop denser and richer domain structures than the bulk counterparts. With shrinking device sizes understanding and controlling domain formation in nanoferroelectrics is being intensely studied. Here we show that a precise control of the epitaxy and the strain allows stabilizing a hierarchical domain architecture in PbxSr1-xTiO3 thin films, showing periodic, purely in-plane polarized, ferroelectric nano-domains that can be switched by a scanning probe.

  2. Statistics of the fractal structure and phase singularity of a plane light wave propagation in atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Rao, Ruizhong

    2008-01-10

    Numerical experiments are carried out for a plane wave propagating in the atmospheric turbulence for a weak to strong fluctuation condition, i.e., the Rytov index being in a large range of 2x10(-3) to 20. Mainly two categories of propagation events are explored for the same range of Rytov index. In one category the propagation distance and also the Fresnel length are kept fixed with the turbulence strength changing. In the other the turbulence strength is kept fixed with the distance changing. The statistical characteristics of the scintillation index, the maximum and minimum of the intensity, the fractal dimension of the intensity image, and the number density of the phase singularity are analyzed. The behaviors of the fractal dimension and the density of the phase singularity present obvious differences for the two categories of propagation. The fractal dimension depends both on the Rytov index and the Fresnel length. In both weak and strong fluctuation conditions the dimension generally increases with the Rytov index, but is at minimum at the onset region. The phase singularity density is coincident with the theoretical results under a weak fluctuation condition, and has a slowly increasing manner with the Rytov index in the strong fluctuation condition. The dependence on the Fresnel size is confident and there is no saturation for the phase singularity.

  3. Validation of the k-filtering technique for a signal composed of random phase plane waves and non-random coherent structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, O. W.; Li, X.; Jeska, L.

    2014-08-01

    Recent observations of astrophysical magnetic fields have shown the presence of fluctuations being wave-like (propagating in the plasma frame) and those described as being structure-like (advected by the plasma bulk velocity). Typically with single spacecraft missions it is impossible to differentiate between these two fluctuations, due to the inherent spatio-temporal ambiguity associated with a single point measurement. However missions such as Cluster which contain multiple spacecraft have allowed temporal and spatial changes to be resolved, with techniques such as the k-filtering technique. While this technique does not assume Taylor's hypothesis as is necessary with single spacecraft missions, it does require weak stationarity of the time series, and that the fluctuations can be described by a superposition of plane waves with random phase. In this paper we test whether the method can cope with a synthetic signal which is composed of a combination of non-random phase coherent structures with a mean radius d and a mean separation λ, as well as plane waves with random phase.

  4. Validation of the k-filtering technique for a signal composed of random-phase plane waves and non-random coherent structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, O. W.; Li, X.; Jeska, L.

    2014-12-01

    Recent observations of astrophysical magnetic fields have shown the presence of fluctuations being wave-like (propagating in the plasma frame) and those described as being structure-like (advected by the plasma bulk velocity). Typically with single-spacecraft missions it is impossible to differentiate between these two fluctuations, due to the inherent spatio-temporal ambiguity associated with a single point measurement. However missions such as Cluster which contain multiple spacecraft have allowed for temporal and spatial changes to be resolved, using techniques such as k filtering. While this technique does not assume Taylor's hypothesis it requires both weak stationarity of the time series and that the fluctuations can be described by a superposition of plane waves with random phases. In this paper we test whether the method can cope with a synthetic signal which is composed of a combination of non-random-phase coherent structures with a mean radius d and a mean separation λ, as well as plane waves with random phase.

  5. Anisotropic structural and optical properties of semi-polar (11–22) GaN grown on m-plane sapphire using double AlN buffer layers

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guijuan; Wang, Lianshan; Yang, Shaoyan; Li, Huijie; Wei, Hongyuan; Han, Dongyue; Wang, Zhanguo

    2016-01-01

    We report the anisotropic structural and optical properties of semi-polar (11–22) GaN grown on m-plane sapphire using a three-step growth method which consisted of a low temperature AlN buffer layer, followed by a high temperature AlN buffer layer and GaN growth. By introducing double AlN buffer layers, we substantially improve the crystal and optical qualities of semi-polar (11–22) GaN, and significantly reduce the density of stacking faults and dislocations. The high resolution x-ray diffraction measurement revealed that the in-plane anisotropic structural characteristics of GaN layer are azimuthal dependent. Transmission electron microscopy analysis showed that the majority of dislocations in the GaN epitaxial layer grown on m-sapphire are the mixed-type and the orientation of GaN layer was rotated 58.4° against the substrate. The room temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectra showed the PL intensity and wavelength have polarization dependence along parallel and perpendicular to the [1–100] axis (polarization degrees ~ 0.63). The realization of a high polarization semi-polar GaN would be useful to achieve III-nitride based lighting emission device for displays and backlighting. PMID:26861595

  6. THE CANADA-FRANCE ECLIPTIC PLANE SURVEY-L3 DATA RELEASE: THE ORBITAL STRUCTURE OF THE KUIPER BELT

    SciTech Connect

    Kavelaars, J. J.; Jones, R. L.; Murray, I.; Gladman, B. J.; Petit, J.-M.; Van Laerhoven, C.; Parker, Joel Wm.; Bieryla, A.; Nicholson, P.; Margot, J. L.; Rousselot, P.; Mousis, O.; Scholl, H.; Marsden, B.; Benavidez, P.; Campo Bagatin, A.; Doressoundiram, A.; Veillet, C.

    2009-06-15

    We report the orbital distribution of the trans-Neptunian comets discovered during the first discovery year of the Canada-France Ecliptic Plane Survey (CFEPS). CFEPS is a Kuiper Belt object survey based on observations acquired by the Very Wide component of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (LS-VW). The first year's detections consist of 73 Kuiper Belt objects, 55 of which have now been tracked for three years or more, providing precise orbits. Although this sample size is small compared to the world-wide inventory, because we have an absolutely calibrated and extremely well-characterized survey (with known pointing history) we are able to de-bias our observed population and make unbiased statements about the intrinsic orbital distribution of the Kuiper Belt. By applying the (publically available) CFEPS Survey Simulator to models of the true orbital distribution and comparing the resulting simulated detections to the actual detections made by the survey, we are able to rule out several hypothesized Kuiper Belt object orbit distributions. We find that the main classical belt's so-called 'cold' component is confined in semimajor axis (a) and eccentricity (e) compared to the more extended 'hot' component; the cold component is confined to lower e and does not stretch all the way out to the 2:1 resonance but rather depletes quickly beyond a = 45 AU. For the cold main classical belt population we find a robust population estimate of N(H{sub g} < 10) = 50 {+-} 5 x 10{sup 3} and find that the hot component of the main classical belt represents {approx}60% of the total population. The inner classical belt (sunward of the 3:2 mean-motion resonance) has a population of roughly 2000 trans-Neptunian objects with absolute magnitudes H{sub g} < 10, and may not share the inclination distribution of the main classical belt. We also find that the plutino population lacks a cold low-inclination component, and so, the population is somewhat larger than recent estimates

  7. Atomic-scale investigation of structural defects in GaN layer on c-plane sapphire substrate during initial growth stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubara, Tohoru; Sugimoto, Kohei; Okada, Narihito; Tadatomo, Kazuyuki

    2016-04-01

    Structural defects in the initial growth stages of GaN on sapphire, including stacking faults (SFs), threading dislocations (TDs), and mosaic structure containing grain boundaries, are investigated at the atomic scale. Individual grains in the as-deposited low temperature-GaN buffer layer are found to have twists correlated with those of the adjacent grains. These grains have little similarity on the stacking sequences, and the atomic arrangement on each side of the grain boundaries may be rearranged by annealing to achieve higher similarity in the stacking sequence. The TD identified as a-type at the top of the SFs-rich interfacial region is thought to originate from Frank partial dislocations. The Frank partial dislocation produces a distorted wurtzite-type structure. At the intermediate region of the basal-plane stacking fault between Frank and Shockley partial dislocations, the TD relieves the distortion in the wurtzite-type structure. In the TD, the wurtzite structure slips relative to the surrounding wurtzite.

  8. A statistical state dynamics-based study of the structure and mechanism of large-scale motions in plane Poiseuille flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, Brian F.; Ioannou, Petros J.; Jiménez, Javier; Constantinou, Navid C.; Lozano-Durán, Adrián; Nikolaidis, Marios-Andreas

    2016-12-01

    The perspective of statistical state dynamics (SSD) has recently been applied to the study of mechanisms underlying turbulence in various physical systems. An example implementation of SSD is the second order closure referred to as stochastic structural stability theory (S3T), which has provided insight into the dynamics of wall turbulence and specifically the emergence and maintenance of the roll/streak structure. This closure eliminates nonlinear interactions among the perturbations has been removed, restricting nonlinearity in the dynamics to that of the mean equation and the interaction between the mean and perturbation covariance. Here, this quasi-linear restriction of the dynamics is used to study the structure and dynamics of turbulence in plane Poiseuille flow at moderately high Reynolds numbers in a closely related dynamical system, referred to as the restricted nonlinear (RNL) system. RNL simulations reveal that the essential features of wall-turbulence dynamics are retained. Remarkably, the RNL system spontaneously limits the support of its turbulence to a small set of streamwise Fourier components giving rise to a naturally minimal representation of its turbulence dynamics. Although greatly simplified, this RNL turbulence exhibits natural-looking structures and statistics. Surprisingly, even when further truncation of the perturbation support to a single streamwise component is imposed the RNL system continues to produce self-sustaining turbulent structure and dynamics. RNL turbulence at the Reynolds numbers studied is dominated by the roll/streak structure in the buffer layer and similar very-large-scale structure (VLSM) in the outer layer. Diagnostics of the structure, spectrum and energetics of RNL and DNS turbulence are used to demonstrate that the roll/streak dynamics supporting the turbulence in the buffer and logarithmic layer is essentially similar in RNL and DNS.

  9. Out-of-plane (SH) soil-structure interaction: a shear wall with rigid and flexible ring foundation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Thang; Lee, Vincent W.; Luo, Hao

    2016-02-01

    Soil-structure interaction (SSI) of a building and shear wall above a foundation in an elastic half-space has long been an important research subject for earthquake engineers and strong-motion seismologists. Numerous papers have been published since the early 1970s; however, very few of these papers have analytic closed-form solutions available. The soil-structure interaction problem is one of the most classic problems connecting the two disciplines of earthquake engineering and civil engineering. The interaction effect represents the mechanism of energy transfer and dissipation among the elements of the dynamic system, namely the soil subgrade, foundation, and superstructure. This interaction effect is important across many structure, foundation, and subgrade types but is most pronounced when a rigid superstructure is founded on a relatively soft lower foundation and subgrade. This effect may only be ignored when the subgrade is much harder than a flexible superstructure: for instance a flexible moment frame superstructure founded on a thin compacted soil layer on top of very stiff bedrock below. This paper will study the interaction effect of the subgrade and the superstructure. The analytical solution of the interaction of a shear wall, flexible-rigid foundation, and an elastic half-space is derived for incident SH waves with various angles of incidence. It found that the flexible ring (soft layer) cannot be used as an isolation mechanism to decouple a superstructure from its substructure resting on a shaking half-space.

  10. Structural, electronic, and optical properties of m -plane InGaN/GaN quantum wells: Insights from experiment and atomistic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, S.; Tanner, D. P.; O'Reilly, E. P.; Caro, M. A.; Martin, T. L.; Bagot, P. A. J.; Moody, M. P.; Tang, F.; Griffiths, J. T.; Oehler, F.; Kappers, M. J.; Oliver, R. A.; Humphreys, C. J.; Sutherland, D.; Davies, M. J.; Dawson, P.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we present a detailed analysis of the structural, electronic, and optical properties of an m -plane (In,Ga)N/GaN quantum well structure grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy. The sample has been structurally characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and 3D atom probe tomography. The optical properties of the sample have been studied by photoluminescence (PL), time-resolved PL spectroscopy, and polarized PL excitation spectroscopy. The PL spectrum consisted of a very broad PL line with a high degree of optical linear polarization. To understand the optical properties we have performed atomistic tight-binding calculations, and based on our initial atom probe tomography data, the model includes the effects of strain and built-in field variations arising from random alloy fluctuations. Furthermore, we included Coulomb effects in the calculations. Our microscopic theoretical description reveals strong hole wave function localization effects due to random alloy fluctuations, resulting in strong variations in ground state energies and consequently the corresponding transition energies. This is consistent with the experimentally observed broad PL peak. Furthermore, when including Coulomb contributions in the calculations we find strong exciton localization effects which explain the form of the PL decay transients. Additionally, the theoretical results confirm the experimentally observed high degree of optical linear polarization. Overall, the theoretical data are in very good agreement with the experimental findings, highlighting the strong impact of the microscopic alloy structure on the optoelectronic properties of these systems.

  11. Atomic structure characterization of stacking faults on the { 1 1 ¯00 } plane in α-alumina by scanning transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tochigi, Eita; Findlay, Scott D.; Okunishi, Eiji; Mizoguchi, Teruyasu; Nakamura, Atsutomo; Shibata, Naoya; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2016-08-01

    The structure of a b =<1 1 ¯00 > dislocation formed in the { 1 1 ¯00 } /<112 ¯0> 2° low-angle grain boundary of alumina was observed by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). It was found that the <1 1 ¯00 > dislocation dissociate-s into 1/3<1 1 ¯00 > partial-dislocation triplets with two stacking faults on the { 1 1 ¯00 } plane. The atomic structure of the { 1 1 ¯00 } stacking faults was characterized by annular bright field STEM (ABF-STEM). The two stacking faults were found to have a stacking sequence of …ABCCABC… and …ABCBCAB…, wh-ich is consistent with a former report. ABF-STEM image simulation was performed using structure models with the { 1 1 ¯00 } stacking faults optimized by first-principles calculations. The overall features of the experimental and the simulated results agree with each other. However, slight differences in contrast were recognized in the vicinity of the stacking faults, suggesting that there are small differences between the observed structures and the theoretical models.

  12. Study of defect structures in 6H-SiC a/m-plane pseudofiber crystals grown by hot-wall CVD epitaxy

    DOE PAGES

    Goue, Ouloide Y.; Raghothamachar, Balaji; Yang, Yu; ...

    2015-11-25

    Structural perfection of silicon carbide (SiC) single crystals is essential to achieve high-performance power devices. A new bulk growth process for SiC proposed by researchers at NASA Glenn Research Center, called large tapered crystal (LTC) growth, based on axial fiber growth followed by lateral expansion, could produce SiC boules with potentially as few as one threading screw dislocation per wafer. In this study, the lateral expansion aspect of LTC growth is addressed through analysis of lateral growth of 6H-SiC a/m-plane seed crystals by hot-wall chemical vapor deposition. Preliminary synchrotron white-beam x-ray topography (SWBXT) indicates that the as-grown boules match themore » polytype structure of the underlying seed and have a faceted hexagonal morphology with a strain-free surface marked by steps. SWBXT Laue diffraction patterns of transverse and axial slices of the boules reveal streaks suggesting the existence of stacking faults/polytypes, and this is confirmed by micro-Raman spectroscopy. Transmission x-ray topography of both transverse and axial slices reveals inhomogeneous strains at the seed–epilayer interface and linear features propagating from the seed along the growth direction. Micro-Raman mapping of an axial slice reveals that the seed contains high stacking disorder, while contrast extinction analysis (g·b and g·b×l) of the linear features reveals that these are mostly edge-type basal plane dislocations. Further high-resolution transmission electron microscopy investigation of the seed–homoepilayer interface also reveals nanobands of different SiC polytypes. A model for their formation mechanism is proposed. Lastly, the implication of these results for improving the LTC growth process is addressed.« less

  13. Study of defect structures in 6H-SiC a/m-plane pseudofiber crystals grown by hot-wall CVD epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Goue, Ouloide Y.; Raghothamachar, Balaji; Yang, Yu; Guo, Jianqiu; Dudley, Michael; Kisslinger, Kim; Trunek, Andrew J.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Spry, David J.; Woodworth, Andrew A.

    2015-11-25

    Structural perfection of silicon carbide (SiC) single crystals is essential to achieve high-performance power devices. A new bulk growth process for SiC proposed by researchers at NASA Glenn Research Center, called large tapered crystal (LTC) growth, based on axial fiber growth followed by lateral expansion, could produce SiC boules with potentially as few as one threading screw dislocation per wafer. In this study, the lateral expansion aspect of LTC growth is addressed through analysis of lateral growth of 6H-SiC a/m-plane seed crystals by hot-wall chemical vapor deposition. Preliminary synchrotron white-beam x-ray topography (SWBXT) indicates that the as-grown boules match the polytype structure of the underlying seed and have a faceted hexagonal morphology with a strain-free surface marked by steps. SWBXT Laue diffraction patterns of transverse and axial slices of the boules reveal streaks suggesting the existence of stacking faults/polytypes, and this is confirmed by micro-Raman spectroscopy. Transmission x-ray topography of both transverse and axial slices reveals inhomogeneous strains at the seed–epilayer interface and linear features propagating from the seed along the growth direction. Micro-Raman mapping of an axial slice reveals that the seed contains high stacking disorder, while contrast extinction analysis (g·b and g·b×l) of the linear features reveals that these are mostly edge-type basal plane dislocations. Further high-resolution transmission electron microscopy investigation of the seed–homoepilayer interface also reveals nanobands of different SiC polytypes. A model for their formation mechanism is proposed. Lastly, the implication of these results for improving the LTC growth process is addressed.

  14. Novel slanted incidence air-coupled ultrasound method for delamination assessment in individual bonding planes of structural multi-layered glued timber laminates.

    PubMed

    Sanabria, Sergio J; Furrer, Roman; Neuenschwander, Jürg; Niemz, Peter; Sennhauser, Urs

    2013-09-01

    Non-destructive assessment of delaminations in glued laminated timber structures is required during their full life cycle. A novel air-coupled ultrasound (ACU) method has been developed, which is able to separately detect delaminations in individual bonding planes of arbitrarily high and long laminated stacks and typically 200 mm wide. The 120 kHz ACU transmitter-receiver pair is positioned at two opposite lateral faces of the sample, with a small inclination with respect to the inspected bonding planes, so that an ultrasound beam is excited at a user-defined refraction angle within the sample, interacting with defects in a limited height portion of the stack. The attenuation of the ultrasound beam transmitted across the defect (negative detection) provided better sensitivity to defects than the scattered fields (positive detection), which are masked by spurious fields. Dedicated finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations provided understanding on the wave propagation and defect detectability limits, with respect to the heterogeneous anisotropic material structure introduced by the curvature of the annual rings in individual timber lamellas. A simplified analytical expression was derived to calculate refraction angles in timber in function of insonification angle and ring angle. Experimental results show that the method is able to detect >20% wide defects in both isotropic material and in glulam with straight year rings, and >50% wide and 100mm long defects in commercial glulam beams. The discrimination of defects from background variability is optimized by normalizing the images with respect to reference defect-free sample sections (normalization) or previous measurements (difference imaging), and by combining readings obtained with distinct ultrasound beam refraction angles (spatial diversity). Future work aims at the development of a tomographic defect inspection by combining the described theoretical and experimental methods.

  15. Variational theory of complex rays applied to shell structures: in-plane inertia, quasi-symmetric ray distribution, and orthotropic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattabiani, Alessandro; Barbarulo, Andrea; Riou, Hervé; Ladevèze, Pierre

    2015-12-01

    Recently, interest of aerospace and automotive industries on medium-frequency vibrational behavior of composite shell structures has grown due to their high specific stiffness and fatigue resistance. Conventional methods such as the finite element method and the statistical energy analysis are not suitable for the medium-frequency bandwidth. Conversely, the variational theory of complex rays (VTCR) is taking place as an ad-hoc technique to tackle such frequency band. It is a Trefftz method based on a weak variational formulation. Equilibrium equations are met using exact solutions as shape functions. The variational problem imposes boundary conditions in weak form. The present paper extends VTCR to orthotropic shell structures. Moreover, several new enhancements are introduced. Now, we use a quasi-symmetric ray distribution which can greatly reduce computational costs, and addresses in-plane inertia which was neglected in previous works. Some relevant numerical examples are presented to show the strategy and results are compared with a FEM reference to study performances.

  16. Optimum design of phononic crystal perforated plate structures for widest bandgap of fundamental guided wave modes and maximized in-plane stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedayatrasa, Saeid; Abhary, Kazem; Uddin, Mohammad; Ng, Ching-Tai

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a topology optimization of single material phononic crystal plate (PhP) to be produced by perforation of a uniform background plate. The primary objective of this optimization study is to explore widest exclusive bandgaps of fundamental (first order) symmetric or asymmetric guided wave modes as well as widest complete bandgap of mixed wave modes (symmetric and asymmetric). However, in the case of single material porous phononic crystals the bandgap width essentially depends on the resultant structural integration introduced by achieved unitcell topology. Thinner connections of scattering segments (i.e. lower effective stiffness) generally lead to (i) wider bandgap due to enhanced interfacial reflections, and (ii) lower bandgap frequency range due to lower wave speed. In other words higher relative bandgap width (RBW) is produced by topology with lower effective stiffness. Hence in order to study the bandgap efficiency of PhP unitcell with respect to its structural worthiness, the in-plane stiffness is incorporated in optimization algorithm as an opposing objective to be maximized. Thick and relatively thin Polysilicon PhP unitcells with square symmetry are studied. Non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm NSGA-II is employed for this multi-objective optimization problem and modal band analysis of individual topologies is performed through finite element method. Specialized topology initiation, evaluation and filtering are applied to achieve refined feasible topologies without penalizing the randomness of genetic algorithm (GA) and diversity of search space. Selected Pareto topologies are presented and gradient of RBW and elastic properties in between the two Pareto front extremes are investigated. Chosen intermediate Pareto topology, even not extreme topology with widest bandgap, show superior bandgap efficiency compared with the results reported in other works on widest bandgap topology of asymmetric guided waves, available in the literature

  17. Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity maps and three-dimensional shear velocity structure of the western US from local non-plane surface wave tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, F.F.; Snoke, J. Arthur

    2010-01-01

    We utilize two-and-three-quarter years of vertical-component recordings made by the Transportable Array (TA) component of Earthscope to constrain three-dimensional (3-D) seismic shear wave velocity structure in the upper 200 km of the western United States. Single-taper spectral estimation is used to compile measurements of complex spectral amplitudes from 44 317 seismograms generated by 123 teleseismic events. In the first step employed to determine the Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity structure, we implement a new tomographic method, which is simpler and more robust than scattering-based methods (e.g. multi-plane surface wave tomography). The TA is effectively implemented as a large number of local arrays by defining a horizontal Gaussian smoothing distance that weights observations near a given target point. The complex spectral-amplitude measurements are interpreted with the spherical Helmholtz equation using local observations about a succession of target points, resulting in Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity maps at periods over the range of 18–125 s. The derived maps depend on the form of local fits to the Helmholtz equation, which generally involve the nonplane-wave solutions of Friederich et al. In a second step, the phase-velocity maps are used to derive 3-D shear velocity structure. The 3-D velocity images confirm details witnessed in prior body-wave and surface-wave studies and reveal new structures, including a deep (>100 km deep) high-velocity lineament, of width ∼200 km, stretching from the southern Great Valley to northern Utah that may be a relic of plate subduction or, alternatively, either a remnant of the Mojave Precambrian Province or a mantle downwelling. Mantle seismic velocity is highly correlated with heat flow, Holocene volcanism, elastic plate thickness and seismicity. This suggests that shallow mantle structure provides the heat source for associated magmatism, as well as thinning of the thermal lithosphere, leading to relatively high

  18. TEMP-STRESS---A thermomechanical finite element program for the analysis of plane and axisymmetric reinforced/prestressed concrete structures: User`s manual

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, J. M.; Pfeiffer, P. A.; Marchertas, A. H.

    1989-01-01

    TEMP-STRESS has been developed to improve the understanding of the behavior of concrete subjected to mechanical loadings and high temperatures simulating the effects of coolant spills, molten debris, etc. The capability to model concrete structures subjected to static and dynamic overpressures, such as LWR and LMR containments with complex axisymmetric geometries, can be solved. The computer code is a finite element program which has a weakly coupled thermomechanical formulation. It can handle transient and steady state problems through the use of explicit time integration and dynamic relaxation. There is a plane or axisymmetric continuum element and flexural beam and shell elements for concrete discretization. The continuum element is a four node quadrilateral using numerical integration and elastic hourglass control. Variable material properties as a function of temperature are available. Thermal and/or mechanical loading can be handled. The concrete material model has the following characteristics: (a) elastic-plastic response, (b) variable loading surface capability, (c) cracking normal to maximum principal strain at specified failure surface, (d) post-failure element treatment, and (e) variable temperature dependence. Concrete can be reinforced and/or prestressed. 15 refs., 33 figs., 24 tabs.

  19. High density load bearing insulation peg

    DOEpatents

    Nowobilski, J.J.; Owens, W.J.

    1985-01-29

    A high density peg is disclosed which can support a large load and exhibits excellent thermal resistance produced by a method wherein the peg is made in compliance with specified conditions of time, temperature and pressure. 4 figs.

  20. High density load bearing insulation peg

    DOEpatents

    Nowobilski, Jeffert J.; Owens, William J.

    1985-01-01

    A high density peg which can support a large load and exhibits excellent thermal resistance produced by a method wherein the peg is made in compliance with specified conditions of time, temperature and pressure.

  1. Physiological Determinants of Load Bearing Capacity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    less than a 2 ml increase of oxygen uptake with a 2% increase in grade. Gas volumes were measured by a Collins 120 liter chain-compensated spirometer ...and/or commanders. Participation by the chain of command In the performance trial, while desirable, may not be feasible. Incentives such as weekend

  2. Electronic structure of the ingredient planes of the cuprate superconductor Bi2Sr2CuO6+δ: A comparison study with Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ

    DOE PAGES

    Yan -Feng Lv; Gu, G. D.; Wang, Wen -Lin; ...

    2016-04-15

    By means of low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy, we report on the electronic structures of the BiO and SrO planes of the Bi2Sr2CuO6+δ (Bi-2201) superconductor prepared by argon-ion bombardment and annealing. Depending on post annealing conditions, the BiO planes exhibit either a pseudogap (PG) with sharp coherence peaks and an anomalously large gap magnitude of 49 meV or van Hove singularity (vHS) near the Fermi level, while the SrO is always characteristic of a PG-like feature. This contrasts with the Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (Bi-2212) superconductor where vHS occurs solely on the SrO plane. We disclose the interstitial oxygen dopants (δ in the formulas)more » as a primary cause for the occurrence of vHS, which are located dominantly around the BiO and SrO planes, respectively, in Bi-2201 and Bi-2212. This is supported by the contrasting structural buckling amplitude of the BiO and SrO planes in the two superconductors. Furthermore, our findings provide solid evidence for the irrelevance of PG to the superconductivity in the two superconductors, as well as insights into why Bi-2212 can achieve a higher superconducting transition temperature than Bi-2201, and by implication, the mechanism of cuprate superconductivity.« less

  3. Evidence for a collinear easy-plane magnetic structure of multiferroic EuF e3(BO3) 4 : Spectroscopic and theoretical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, M. N.; Malkin, B. Z.; Boldyrev, K. N.; Stanislavchuk, T. N.; Erofeev, D. A.; Temerov, V. L.; Gudim, I. A.

    2016-11-01

    We performed high-resolution polarized optical transmission spectroscopy and theoretical studies of multiferroic EuF e3(BO3) 4 single crystals in the three phases: paramagnetic R 32 (T >Ts=84 K ) and P 3121 ( Ts>T >TN=34 K ) , and antiferromagnetic (T structure, namely, a collinear arrangement of the iron magnetic moments along the C2 symmetry axis in the a b crystallographic plane of EuF e3(BO3) 4 below TN. Spectral signatures of the phase transitions and the spin-phonon interaction are observed and discussed. Reliable crystal-field and exchange-interaction parameters are obtained and used to model the magnetic susceptibility of the compound. The results of detailed calculations of the electric polarization of EuF e3(BO3) 4 in the R 32 phase are presented, and mechanisms of the magnetoelectric response are discussed. We detect a strong effect of impurities (that enter the crystal from a flux in the course of the crystal growth) on the structural phase-transition temperature and demonstrate a coexistence of both R 32 and P 3121 phases down to the lowest temperatures in a EuF e3(BO3) 4 crystal grown with the B i2M o3O12 based flux, due to inhomogeneous distribution of impurity B i3 + ions. Our study can be considered as a demonstration of the abilities of optical spectroscopy in delivering new information on a magnetic compound, even in the case when other methods fail.

  4. THE BOLOCAM GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY. XII. DISTANCE CATALOG EXPANSION USING KINEMATIC ISOLATION OF DENSE MOLECULAR CLOUD STRUCTURES WITH {sup 13}CO(1-0)

    SciTech Connect

    Ellsworth-Bowers, Timothy P.; Glenn, Jason; Rosolowsky, Erik; Ginsburg, Adam; Evans II, Neal J.; Battersby, Cara; Shirley, Yancy L.; Svoboda, Brian

    2015-01-20

    We present an expanded distance catalog for 1710 molecular cloud structures identified in the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) version 2, representing a nearly threefold increase over the previous BGPS distance catalog. We additionally present a new method for incorporating extant data sets into our Bayesian distance probability density function (DPDF) methodology. To augment the dense-gas tracers (e.g., HCO{sup +}(3-2), NH{sub 3}(1,1)) used to derive line-of-sight velocities for kinematic distances, we utilize the Galactic Ring Survey (GRS) {sup 13}CO(1-0) data to morphologically extract velocities for BGPS sources. The outline of a BGPS source is used to select a region of the GRS {sup 13}CO data, along with a reference region to subtract enveloping diffuse emission, to produce a line profile of {sup 13}CO matched to the BGPS source. For objects with a HCO{sup +}(3-2) velocity, ≈95% of the new {sup 13}CO(1-0) velocities agree with that of the dense gas. A new prior DPDF for kinematic distance ambiguity (KDA) resolution, based on a validated formalism for associating molecular cloud structures with known objects from the literature, is presented. We demonstrate this prior using catalogs of masers with trigonometric parallaxes and H II regions with robust KDA resolutions. The distance catalog presented here contains well-constrained distance estimates for 20% of BGPS V2 sources, with typical distance uncertainties ≲ 0.5 kpc. Approximately 75% of the well-constrained sources lie within 6 kpc of the Sun, concentrated in the Scutum-Centaurus arm. Galactocentric positions of objects additionally trace out portions of the Sagittarius, Perseus, and Outer arms in the first and second Galactic quadrants, and we also find evidence for significant regions of interarm dense gas.

  5. Nanostructured carbon films with oriented graphitic planes

    SciTech Connect

    Teo, E. H. T.; Kalish, R.; Kulik, J.; Kauffmann, Y.; Lifshitz, Y.

    2011-03-21

    Nanostructured carbon films with oriented graphitic planes can be deposited by applying energetic carbon bombardment. The present work shows the possibility of structuring graphitic planes perpendicular to the substrate in following two distinct ways: (i) applying sufficiently large carbon energies for deposition at room temperature (E>10 keV), (ii) utilizing much lower energies for deposition at elevated substrate temperatures (T>200 deg. C). High resolution transmission electron microscopy is used to probe the graphitic planes. The alignment achieved at elevated temperatures does not depend on the deposition angle. The data provides insight into the mechanisms leading to the growth of oriented graphitic planes under different conditions.

  6. Effect of out-of-plane directional intra-layer coupling from graphene monolayer on sp3 type defect with gap-plasmonic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Won-Hwa

    2016-09-01

    The author investigates an intra-layer coupling effect through transverse acoustic (TA) phonon modes along the z-direction at Au nanoparticle (NP)-graphene monolayer (GM)-Au thin film (TF) plasmonic junctions in regard with sp3 type defect effect. The oxidation and resulting disorder of GM with breaking of six-fold symmetry have been explored. Because a Raman-forbidden D peak can be activated due to unwanted single-phonon inter-valley and intra-valley scattering processes, the quantitative estimation of the sp3 type defect is being performed by the intensity ratio between G and D peaks. By exploring the difference of the maximum peak position (TA3-TA1) and the intensity ratio, (TA1/TA3) the author can reveal that a lower z-protruded GM accompanied with weak intra-coupling and a weaker RBLM intensity show relatively high D/G. It means that larger surface area of a GM to be functionalized by oxidization can secure more easily than the higher z-protruded. This investigation presents the importance of controlling the degree of z-protrusion of GM surface in terms of not only the presence of high D/G but also its related and detailed nano-structural surface shape, leading to the enhancement of electrical properties such as a carrier mobility and sheet resistance value. The out-of-plane phonon modes will be considered as a key factor in further exploring nano-physical deformation of 2D materials in sync with its electrical performance.

  7. Fourier plane imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, Daniel Peralta, Luis Grave de; Alharbi, Nouf; Alhusain, Mdhaoui; Bernussi, Ayrton A.

    2014-09-14

    We show how the image of an unresolved photonic crystal can be reconstructed using a single Fourier plane (FP) image obtained with a second camera that was added to a traditional compound microscope. We discuss how Fourier plane imaging microscopy is an application of a remarkable property of the obtained FP images: they contain more information about the photonic crystals than the images recorded by the camera commonly placed at the real plane of the microscope. We argue that the experimental results support the hypothesis that surface waves, contributing to enhanced resolution abilities, were optically excited in the studied photonic crystals.

  8. Structure and Function of the Superior Temporal Plane in Adult Males with Cleft Lip and Palate: Pathologic Enlargement with No Relationship to Childhood Hearing Deficits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shriver, A. S.; Canady, J.; Richman, L.; Andreasen, N. C.; Nopoulos, P.

    2006-01-01

    Background: In a previous study from our lab, adult males with non-syndromic cleft lip and/or palate (NSCLP) were shown to have significantly lower temporal lobe gray matter volume than matched controls. The current study was designed to begin a regional analysis of specific subregions of the temporal lobe. The superior temporal plane (STP) is a…

  9. Building Technology Forecast and Evaluation (BTFE). Volume 2. Evaluation of Two Structural Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-01

    insulative foam ( expanded polystyrene ) strips between each truss. The assembly is held together with 14-gauge wires welded to the trusses on 2-in. centers...structural load bearing qualities expanded polystyrene . No taping and mudding. Ar. ~J~ .wplrtpd( at each irllnfrnPllo Tile I hin- set or float over

  10. Structure and Composition of Air-Plane Soots and Surrogates Analyzed by Raman Spectroscopy and Laser/Ions Desorption Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Ismael; Chazallon, Bertrand; Carpentier, Yvain; Irimiea, Cornelia; Focsa, Cristian; Ouf, François-Xavier; Salm, François; Delhaye, David; Gaffié, Daniel; Yon, Jérôme

    2015-04-01

    Aviation alters the composition of the atmosphere globally and can thus drive climate change and ozone depletion [1]. An aircraft exhaust plume contains species emitted by the engines, species formed in the plume from the emitted species and atmospheric species that become entrained into the plume. The majority of emitted species (gases and soot particles) are produced by the combustion of kerosene with ambient air in the combustion chamber of the engine. Emissions of soot particles by air-planes produce persistent contrails in the upper troposphere in ice-supersaturated air masses that contribute to cloudiness and impact the radiative properties of the atmosphere. These aerosol-cloud interactions represent one of the largest sources of uncertainty in global climate models [2]. Though the formation of atmospheric ice particles has been studied since many years [3], there are still numerous opened questions on nucleation properties of soot particles [4], as the ice nucleation experiments showed a large spread in results depending on the nucleation mode chosen and origin of the soot produced. Most likely one of the reasons behind these discrepancies resides in the different physico-chemical properties (composition, structure) of soot particles produced in different conditions, e.g. with respect to fuel or combustion techniques. In this work, we use Raman microscopy (266, 514 and 785 nm excitation) and ablation techniques (SIMS, Secondary Ions Mass Spectrometry, and Laser Desorption Mass Spectrometry) to characterize soot particles produced from air-plane at different engine regimes simulating a landing and taking-off (LTO) cycle. First, the spectral parameters of the first-order Raman band of various soot samples, collected from three different sources in the frame of the MERMOSE project (http://mermose.onera.fr/): PowerJet SaM-146 turbofan (four engine regimes), CAST generator (propane fuel, four different global equivalence ratios), and Kerosene laboratory flame

  11. Eight plane IPND mechanical testing.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, A.; Guarino, V.; Wood, K.; Nephew, T.; Ayres, D.; Lee, A.; High Energy Physics; FNAL

    2008-03-18

    A mechanical test of an 8 plane IPND mechanical prototype, which was constructed using extrusions from the testing/tryout of the 16 cell prototype extrusion die in Argonne National Laboratory, was conducted. There were 4 vertical and 4 horizontal planes in this 8 plane IPND prototype. Each vertical plane had four 16 cell extrusions, while each horizontal plane had six 16 cell extrusions. Each plane was glued together using the formulation of Devcon adhesive, Devcon 60. The vertical extrusions used in the vertical planes shares the same dimensions as the horizontal extrusions in the horizontal planes with the average web thickness of 2.1 mm and the average wall thickness of 3.1 mm. This mechanical prototype was constructed with end-seals on the both ends of the vertical extrusions. The gaps were filled with epoxy between extrusions and end-seals. The overall dimension of IPND is 154.8 by 103.1 by 21.7 inches with the weight of approximately 1200 kg, as shown in a figure. Two similar mechanical tests of 3 layer and 11 layer prototypes have been done in order to evaluate the strength of the adhesive joint between extrusions in the NOvA detector. The test showed that the IPND prototype was able to sustain under the loading of weight of itself and scintillator. Two FEA models were built to verify the measurement data from the test. The prediction from FEA slice model seems correlated reasonably well to the test result, even under a 'rough' estimated condition for the wall thickness (from an untuned die) and an unknown property of 'garage type' extrusion. A full size of FEA 3-D model also agrees very well with the test data from strain gage readings. It is worthy to point out that the stress distribution of the structure is predominantly determined by the internal pressure, while the buckling stability relies more on the loading weight from the extrusions themselves and scintillate. Results of conducted internal pressure tests, including 3- cell, 11-cell and the IPND

  12. Core structure, dislocation energy and Peierls stress for 1/3?11 0? edge dislocations with (0001) and {1 00} slip planes in α-Zr.

    SciTech Connect

    Voskoboinikov, Roman E; Osetskiy, Yury N; Bacon, David J

    2005-01-01

    Atomic-scale simulations of edge dislocations of the 1/3<11{bar 2}0> (0001) and 1/3<11{bar 2}0> {l_brace}1{bar 1}00{r_brace} slip systems have been carried out using a Finnis-Sinclair-type interatomic potential for {alpha}-zirconium. The distribution of atomic displacements in the dislocation core shows that in this model the edge dislocation in the basal plane dissociates into two Shockley partials whereas the dislocation in the prism plane remains undissociated. The effective core radius and core energy are estimated, and dislocation response to increasing applied shear strain is investigated. The core properties and the critical stress for dislocation glide (Peierls stress) depend sensitively on whether the core extends or not.

  13. SNAP focal plane

    SciTech Connect

    Lampton, Michael L.; Kim, A.; Akerlof, C.W.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Astier, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bebek, C.; Bergstrom, L.; Berkovitz, J.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Carithers Jr., W.C.; Commins, E.D.; Day, C.; Deustua, S.E.; DiGennaro,R.; Ealet, A.; Ellis, R.S.; Eriksson, M.; Fruchter, A.; Genat, J.-F.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.; Harris, S.E.; Harvey, P.R.; Heetderks, H.D.; Holland, S.E.; Huterer, D.; Karcher, A.; Kolbe, W.; Krieger, B.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureux, J.; Levi, M.E.; Levin, D.S.; Linder,E.V.; Loken, S.C.; Malina, R.; Massey, R.; McKay, T.; McKee, S.P.; Miquel, R.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi, H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Perlmutter, S.; Pratt, R.; Prieto, E.; Refregier, A.; Rhodes, J.; Robinson, K.; Roe, N.; Sholl, M.; Schubnell, M.; Smadja, G.; Smoot, G.; Spadafora, A.; Tarle, G.; Tomasch,A.; von der Lippe, H.; Vincent, R.; Walder, J.-P.; Wang, G.

    2002-07-29

    The proposed SuperNova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) mission will have a two-meter class telescope delivering diffraction-limited images to an instrumented 0.7 square-degree field sensitive in the visible and near-infrared wavelength regime. We describe the requirements for the instrument suite and the evolution of the focal plane design to the present concept in which all the instrumentation--visible and near-infrared imagers, spectrograph, and star guiders--share one common focal plane.

  14. Anisotropy in geometrically rough structure of ice prismatic plane interface during growth: Development of a modified six-site model of H2O and a molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Nada, Hiroki

    2016-12-28

    This paper presents a modified version of the six-site model of H2O [H. Nada and J. P. J. M. van der Eerden, J. Chem. Phys. 118, 7401 (2003)]. Although the original six-site model was optimized by assuming the cut-off of the Coulomb interaction at an intermolecular distance of 10 Å, the modified model is optimized by using the Ewald method for estimating the Coulomb interaction. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of an ice-water interface suggest that the melting point of ice at 1 atm in the modified model is approximately 274.5 K, in good agreement with the real melting point of 273.15 K. MD simulations of bulk ice and water suggest that the modified model reproduces not only the structures and density curves of ice and water, but also the diffusion coefficient of water molecules in water near the melting point at 1 atm. Using the modified model, a large-scale MD simulation of the growth at an ice-water interface of the prismatic plane is performed to elucidate the anisotropy in the interface structure during growth. Simulation results indicate that the geometrical roughness of the ice growth front at the interface is greater in the c-axis direction than in the direction normal to the c-axis when it is analyzed along the axes parallel to the prismatic plane. In addition, during the growth at the interface, the transient appearance of specific crystallographic planes, such as a {202¯1} pyramidal plane, occurs preferentially at the ice growth front. The effect of different ensembles with different simulation systems on the anisotropy in the interface structure is also investigated.

  15. Precise measurement of planeness.

    PubMed

    Schulz, G; Schwider, J

    1967-06-01

    Interference methods are reviewed-particularly those developed at the German Academy of Sciences in Berlin-with which the deviations of an optically flat surface from the ideal plane can be measured with a high degree of exactness. One aid to achieve this is the relative methods which measure the differences in planeness between two surfaces. These are then used in the absolute methods which determine the absolute planeness of a surface. This absolute determination can be effected in connection with a liquid surface, or (as done by the authors) only by suitable evaluation of relative measurements between unknown plates in various positional combinations. Experimentally, one uses two- or multiple-beam interference fringes of equal thickness(1) or of equal inclination. The fringes are observed visually, scanned, or photographed, and in part several wavelengths or curves of equal density (Aquidensiten) are employed. The survey also brings the following new methods: a relative method, where, with the aid of fringes of superposition, the fringe separation is subdivided equidistantly thus achieving an increase of measuring precision, and an absolute method which determines the deviations of a surface from ideal planeness along arbitrary central sections, without a liquid surface, from four relative interference photographs.

  16. Effect of CuO2 planes on the structural and superconducting transport properties of [CuTl - 12(n - 1)n;n = 2,3,4] superconductor family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzaffar, M. Usman; Khan, Nawazish A.

    2016-06-01

    Cu0.5Tl0.5Ba2Can-1CunO2n+4-δ (n = 2, 3, 4) superconducting bulk samples have been synthesized by using two-step solid state reaction method. We investigated the effects of CuO2 planes on the structural and superconducting transport properties of [CuTl - 12(n - 1)n; n = 2, 3, 4] superconducting family. These samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorption spectroscopy and DC-resistivity (ρ) measurements. These samples are c-axis length oriented and have shown orthorhombic crystal structure. All the samples have shown metallic variations of resistivity from room temperature down to onset of superconductivity. The zero resistivity critical temperature Tc(R = 0) increases with the increase in superconducting planes and normal state resistivity systematically decreases, which show the density of inadvertent defects decreases in the final compound. The apical oxygen phonon modes are hardened as observed in the FTIR absorption measurements. The intrinsic microscopic superconducting parameters, such as the cross-over temperatures, coherence length along c-axis (ξc(0)) at 0 K, inter-layer coupling (J), inter-grain coupling (α) and fermi velocity (VF), were extracted from the fluctuation-induced conductivity (FIC) analysis. FIC analysis also showed the improvement in superconductivity with the increase in CuO2 planes.

  17. Augmented-plane-wave forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soler, José M.; Williams, Arthur R.

    1990-11-01

    Results are presented that demonstrate the effectiveness of a calculational method of electronic-structure theory. The method combines the power (tractable basis-set size) and flexibility (transition and first-row elements) of the augmented-plane-wave method with the computational efficiency of the Car-Parrinello method of molecular dynamics and total-energy minimization. Equilibrium geometry and vibrational frequencies in agreement with experiment are presented for Si, to demonstrate agreement with existing methods and for Cu, N2, and H2O to demonstrate the broader applicability of the approach.

  18. Influence of edge-grown HVPE GaN on the structural quality of c-plane oriented HVPE-GaN grown on ammonothermal GaN substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domagala, J. Z.; Smalc-Koziorowska, J.; Iwinska, M.; Sochacki, T.; Amilusik, M.; Lucznik, B.; Fijalkowski, M.; Kamler, G.; Grzegory, I.; Kucharski, R.; Zajac, M.; Bockowski, M.

    2016-12-01

    Study on the sources of stress in HVPE-GaN layer crystallized on 1-in. ammonothermally grown GaN seed is presented in this paper. Characterization by means of X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy is performed. HVPE-GaN samples of high quality and those with visible quality deterioration are investigated on c-plane and m-plane cross-sections. Special attention is paid to HVPE material growing in semi-polar and non-polar directions on the edges of the seed and the growing layer. It is shown that this material generates significant stress leading to a structural deterioration of HVPE-GaN growing in the c-direction.

  19. Foam rigidized inflatable structural assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinker, Michael L. (Inventor); Schnell, Andrew R. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An inflatable and rigidizable structure for use as a habitat or a load bearing structure is disclosed. The structure consists of an outer wall and an inner wall defining a containment member and a bladder. The bladder is pressurized to erect the structure from an initially collapsed state. The containment member is subsequently injected with rigidizable fluid through an arrangement of injection ports. Exhaust gases from the curing rigidizable fluid are vented through an arrangement of exhaust ports. The rate of erection can be controlled by frictional engagement with a container or by using a tether. A method for fabricating a tubular structure is disclosed.

  20. Double plane wave reverse time migration with plane wave Green's function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Z.; Sen, M. K.; Stoffa, P. L.

    2015-12-01

    Reverse time migration (RTM) is effective in obtaining complex subsurface structures from seismic data. By solving the two-way wave equation, RTM can use entire wavefield for imaging. Although powerful computer are becoming available, the conventional pre-stack shot gather RTM is still computationally expensive. Solving forward and backward wavefield propagation for each source location and shot gather is extremely time consuming, especially for large seismic datasets. We present an efficient, accurate and flexible plane wave RTM in the frequency domain where we utilize a compressed plane wave dataset, known as the double plane wave (DPW) dataset. Provided with densely sampled seismic dataset, shot gathers can be decomposed into source and receiver plane wave components with minimal artifacts. The DPW RTM is derived under the Born approximation and utilizes frequency domain plane wave Green's function for imaging. Time dips in the shot profiles can help to estimate the range of plane wave components present in shot gathers. Therefore, a limited number of plane wave Green's functions are needed for imaging. Plane wave Green's functions can be used for imaging both source and receiver plane waves. Source and receiver reciprocity can be used for imaging plane wave components at no cost and save half of the computation time. As a result, the computational burden for migration is substantially reduced. Plane wave components can be migrated independently to recover specific targets with given dips, and ray parameter common image gathers (CIGs) can be generated after migration directly. The ray parameter CIGs can be used to justify the correctness of velocity models. Subsurface anisotropy effects can also be included in our imaging condition, provided with plane wave Green's functions in the anisotropic media.

  1. Self-accommodation of B19' martensite in Ti-Ni shape memory alloys - Part II. Characteristic interface structures between habit plane variants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, M.; Okunishi, E.; Nishiura, T.; Kawano, H.; Inamura, T.; S., Ii; Hara, T.

    2012-06-01

    Four characteristic interface microstructures between habit plane variants (HPVs) in the self-accommodation morphologies of B19‧ martensite in Ti-Ni alloys have been investigated by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The straight interface of a ? B19‧ type I twin is present at interface I. The relaxation of the transformation strain at interface II is achieved by a volume reduction of the minor correspondence variants (CVs) in the relevant habit plane variants (HPVs). The relaxation of the transformation strain at interface III is mainly due to the formation of a ? B19‧ type I twin between the two major CVs. Subsequently, local strain around the tips of the minor CVs perpendicular to the interface is released by the formation of micro-twins with the ⟨011⟩B19‧ type II and/or ? B19‧ type I relation. The major and minor CVs in each HPV are alternately connected through fine variants with the ? B19‧ type I twin relation parallel to interface IV. The results are compared with macroscopic observations and the predictions of PTMC analysis.

  2. Parameter Plane Design Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    Th usr a toente aninteer a thca sms b esta 1 Fp-ocsing 2. Enter P1 values, lwgt, ldig - > 9 Table I give us proper values. Table 1. PARAMETER TABLE...necessary and identify by block number) In this thesis a control systems analysis package is developed using parameter plane methods. It is an interactive...designer is able to choose values of the parameters which provide a good compromise between cost and dynamic behavior. 20 Distribution Availability of

  3. Structural Characterization of Lateral-grown 6H-SiC am-plane Seed Crystals by Hot Wall CVD Epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goue, Ouloide Yannick; Raghothamachar, Balaji; Dudley, Michael; Trunek, Andrew J.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Woodworth, Andrew A.; Spry, David J.

    2014-01-01

    The performance of commercially available silicon carbide (SiC) power devices is limited due to inherently high density of screw dislocations (SD), which are necessary for maintaining polytype during boule growth and commercially viable growth rates. The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has recently proposed a new bulk growth process based on axial fiber growth (parallel to the c-axis) followed by lateral expansion (perpendicular to the c-axis) for producing multi-faceted m-plane SiC boules that can potentially produce wafers with as few as one SD per wafer. In order to implement this novel growth technique, the lateral homoepitaxial growth expansion of a SiC fiber without introducing a significant number of additional defects is critical. Lateral expansion is being investigated by hot wall chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) growth of 6H-SiC am-plane seed crystals (0.8mm x 0.5mm x 15mm) designed to replicate axially grown SiC single crystal fibers. The post-growth crystals exhibit hexagonal morphology with approximately 1500 m (1.5 mm) of total lateral expansion. Preliminary analysis by synchrotron white beam x-ray topography (SWBXT) confirms that the growth was homoepitaxial, matching the polytype of the respective underlying region of the seed crystal. Axial and transverse sections from the as grown crystal samples were characterized in detail by a combination of SWBXT, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy to map defect types and distribution. X-ray diffraction analysis indicates the seed crystal contained stacking disorders and this appears to have been reproduced in the lateral growth sections. Analysis of the relative intensity for folded transverse acoustic (FTA) and optical (FTO) modes on the Raman spectra indicate the existence of stacking faults. Further, the density of stacking faults is higher in the seed than in the grown crystal. Bundles of dislocations are observed propagating from the seed in m-axis lateral directions

  4. Full-scale testing and numerical modeling of a multistory masonry structure subjected to internal blast loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapata, Brian Jarvis

    As military and diplomatic representatives of the United States are deployed throughout the world, they must frequently make use of local, existing facilities; it is inevitable that some of these will be load bearing unreinforced masonry (URM) structures. Although generally suitable for conventional design loads, load bearing URM presents a unique hazard, with respect to collapse, when exposed to blast loading. There is therefore a need to study the blast resistance of load bearing URM construction in order to better protect US citizens assigned to dangerous locales. To address this, the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte conducted three blast tests inside a decommissioned, coal-fired, power plant prior to its scheduled demolition. The power plant's walls were constructed of URM and provided an excellent opportunity to study the response of URM walls in-situ. Post-test analytical studies investigated the ability of existing blast load prediction methodologies to model the case of a cylindrical charge with a low height of burst. It was found that even for the relatively simple blast chamber geometries of these tests, simplified analysis methods predicted blast impulses with an average net error of 22%. The study suggested that existing simplified analysis methods would benefit from additional development to better predict blast loads from cylinders detonated near the ground's surface. A hydrocode, CTH, was also used to perform two and three-dimensional simulations of the blast events. In order to use the hydrocode, Jones Wilkins Lee (JWL) equation of state (EOS) coefficients were developed for the experiment's Unimax dynamite charges; a novel energy-scaling technique was developed which permits the derivation of new JWL coefficients from an existing coefficient set. The hydrocode simulations were able to simulate blast impulses with an average absolute error of 34.5%. Moreover, the hydrocode simulations

  5. The Aerodynamic Plane Table

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahm, A F

    1924-01-01

    This report gives the description and the use of a specially designed aerodynamic plane table. For the accurate and expeditious geometrical measurement of models in an aerodynamic laboratory, and for miscellaneous truing operations, there is frequent need for a specially equipped plan table. For example, one may have to measure truly to 0.001 inch the offsets of an airfoil at many parts of its surface. Or the offsets of a strut, airship hull, or other carefully formed figure may require exact calipering. Again, a complete airplane model may have to be adjusted for correct incidence at all parts of its surfaces or verified in those parts for conformance to specifications. Such work, if but occasional, may be done on a planing or milling machine; but if frequent, justifies the provision of a special table. For this reason it was found desirable in 1918 to make the table described in this report and to equip it with such gauges and measures as the work should require.

  6. Fourier plane image amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, L.A.; Hermann, M.R.; Dane, C.B.; Tiszauer, D.H.

    1995-12-12

    A solid state laser is frequency tripled to 0.3 {micro}m. A small portion of the laser is split off and generates a Stokes seed in a low power oscillator. The low power output passes through a mask with the appropriate hole pattern. Meanwhile, the bulk of the laser output is focused into a larger stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) amplifier. The low power beam is directed through the same cell in the opposite direction. The majority of the amplification takes place at the focus which is the fourier transform plane of the mask image. The small holes occupy large area at the focus and thus are preferentially amplified. The amplified output is now imaged onto the multichip module where the holes are drilled. Because of the fourier plane amplifier, only about 1/10th the power of a competitive system is needed. This concept allows less expensive masks to be used in the process and requires much less laser power. 1 fig.

  7. Fourier plane image amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Hermann, Mark R.; Dane, C. Brent; Tiszauer, Detlev H.

    1995-01-01

    A solid state laser is frequency tripled to 0.3 .mu.m. A small portion of the laser is split off and generates a Stokes seed in a low power oscillator. The low power output passes through a mask with the appropriate hole pattern. Meanwhile, the bulk of the laser output is focused into a larger stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) amplifier. The low power beam is directed through the same cell in the opposite direction. The majority of the amplification takes place at the focus which is the fourier transform plane of the mask image. The small holes occupy large area at the focus and thus are preferentially amplified. The amplified output is now imaged onto the multichip module where the holes are drilled. Because of the fourier plane amplifier, only .about.1/10th the power of a competitive system is needed. This concept allows less expensive masks to be used in the process and requires much less laser power.

  8. Frictional contact behaviour of the tyre: the effect of tread slip on the in-plane structural deformation and stress field development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsotras, Achillefs; Mavros, George

    2010-08-01

    The analysis of the in-plane deformation of the tyre in relation to the frictional contact between the road and the tread is a crucial first step in the understanding of its contribution to the longitudinal dynamics of a vehicle. In this work, the physical mechanism of the generation of the two-dimensional contact pressure distribution for a non-rolling tyre is studied. Towards this aim, a physical tyre model is constructed, consisting of an analytical ring under pretension, a non-linear sidewall foundation, and a discretised foundation of viscoelastic elements representing the tread. Tread behaviour is examined first, with focus on the development of shear micro-slip. The tread simulation is enhanced with the combination of radial and tangential tread elements and the benefits of such an approach are identified. Subsequently, the contact of the complete model is examined by implementing an algorithm for transient simulations in the time domain. The effects of the imposed vertical load and sidewall non-linearity on the contact stress and strain fields are identified. The modelling approach is validated by comparison with published experimental results. The physical mechanism that couples the torsional and horizontal/vertical deformations of the carcass with the frictional forces at the tread is identified and discussed in detail. The proposed modelling approach is found appropriate for the description of the development of the two-dimensional contact pressure field as a function of the frictional potential of the contact.

  9. Integrated focal-plane array /IFPA/ approach to large-area infrared focal plane architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    A modular approach to IFPA design is presented which makes it possible to obtain a high-density infrared focal plane amendable to parallel manufacturing techniques as well as to serial plane integration and test. The percent fill factor of the design is dependent on the dimension of the individual detectors; each submodule is manufactured from identical components. The technologies including cables, interconnects, multilayer interconnect structures, and subassembly test requirements, which have direct application to scanning as well as staring integrated focal plane arrays, are discussed.

  10. Transformation from an easy-plane to an easy-axis antiferromagnetic structure in the mixed rare-earth ferroborates Pr x Y1-x Fe3(BO3)4: magnetic properties and crystal field calculations.

    PubMed

    Pankrats, A I; Demidov, A A; Ritter, C; Velikanov, D A; Semenov, S V; Tugarinov, V I; Temerov, V L; Gudim, I A

    2016-10-05

    The magnetic structure of the mixed rare-earth system Pr x Y1-x Fe3(BO3)4 (x  =  0.75, 0.67, 0.55, 0.45, 0.25) was studied via magnetic and resonance measurements. These data evidence the successive spin reorientation from the easy-axis antiferromagnetic structure formed in PrFe3(BO3)4 to the easy-plane one of YFe3(BO3)4 associated with the weakening of the magnetic anisotropy of the Pr subsystem due to its diamagnetic dilution by nonmagnetic Y. This reorientation occurs through the formation of an inclined magnetic structure, as was confirmed by our previous neutron research in the range of x  =  0.67 ÷ 0.45. In the compounds with x  =  0.75 and 0.67 whose magnetic structure is close to the easy-axis one, a two-step spin reorientation takes place in the magnetic field H||c. Such a peculiarity is explained by the formation of an interjacent inclined magnetic structure with magnetic moments of Fe ions located closer to the basal plane than in the initial state, with these intermediate states remaining stable in some ranges of the magnetic field. An approach based on a crystal field model for the Pr(3+) ion and the molecular-field approximation is used to describe the magnetic characteristics of the system Pr x Y1-x Fe3(BO3)4. With the parameters of the d-d and f-d exchange interactions, of the magnetic anisotropy of the iron subsystem and of the crystal field parameters of praseodymium thus determined, it is possible to achieve a good agreement between the experimental and calculated temperature and field dependences of the magnetization curves (up to 90 kOe) and magnetic susceptibilities (2-300 K).

  11. Structures Technology for Future Aerospace Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Venneri, Samuel L.; Paul, Donald B.; Hopkins, Mark A.

    2000-01-01

    An overview of structures technology for future aerospace systems is given. Discussion focuses on developments in component technologies that will improve the vehicle performance, advance the technology exploitation process, and reduce system life-cycle costs. The component technologies described are smart materials and structures, multifunctional materials and structures, affordable composite structures, extreme environment structures, flexible load bearing structures, and computational methods and simulation-based design. The trends in each of the component technologies are discussed and the applicability of these technologies to future aerospace vehicles is described.

  12. Thermodynamics of black plane solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Manuel E.; Jardim, Deborah F.; Houndjo, Stéphane J. M.; Myrzakulov, Ratbay

    2013-11-01

    We obtain a new phantom black plane solution in D of the Einstein-Maxwell theory coupled with a cosmological constant. We analyse their basic properties, as well as its causal structure, and obtain the extensive and intensive thermodynamic variables, as well as the specific heat and the first law. Through the specific heat and the so-called geometric methods, we analyse in detail their thermodynamic properties, the extreme and phase transition limits, as well as the local and global stabilities of the system. The normal case is shown with an extreme limit and the phantom one with a phase transition only for null mass, which is physically inaccessible. The systems present local and global stabilities for certain values of the entropy density with respect to the electric charge, for the canonical and grand canonical ensembles.

  13. NASA Connect: 'Plane Weather'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Excerpt from the NASA Connect show 'Plane Weather' This clip explains what high and low pressure weather systems are, and how they form. Weather affects our daily lives. The elements of weather: rain, wind, fog, ice and snow affect the operation and flight of an airplane. In this program, NASA and FAA researchers will introduce students to math, science, and weather; demonstrate how these elements influence flight; and show how NASA and FAA research is used to limit the effects of these elements on flight. Students will examine: the tools, techniques, and technologies used by engineers and scientists to detect these and other climatological factors affecting aircraft in flight. The lesson and classroom experiment will involve students in the scientific process and emphasizing problem solving, measurement, and reasoning skills.

  14. NASA Connect: 'Plane Weather'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Excerpt from the NASA Connect show 'Plane Weather' This clip explains what high and low pressure weather systems are, and how these affect weather patterns. Weather affects our daily lives. The elements of weather: rain, wind, fog, ice and snow affect the operation and flight of an airplane. In this program, NASA and FAA researchers will introduce students to math, science, and weather; demonstrate how these elements influence flight; and show how NASA and FAA research is used to limit the effects of these elements on flight. Students will examine: the tools, techniques, and technologies used by engineers and scientists to detect these and other climatological factors affecting aircraft in flight. The lesson and classroom experiment will involve students in the scientific process and emphasizing problem solving, measurement, and reasoning skills.

  15. Spin-polarized semiconductors: tuning the electronic structure of graphene by introducing a regular pattern of sp3 carbons on the graphene plane.

    PubMed

    Jing, Long; Huang, Ping; Zhu, Huarui; Gao, Xueyun

    2013-01-28

    First-principles calculations (generalized gradient approximation, density functional therory (DFT) with dispersion corrections, and DFT plus local atomic potential) are carried out on the stability and electronic structures of superlattice configurations of nitrophenyl diazonium functionalized graphene with different coverage. In the calculations, the stabilities of these structures are strengthened significantly since van der Waals interactions between nitrophenyl groups are taken into account. Furthermore, spin-polarized and wider-bandgap electronic structures are obtained when the nitrophenyl groups break the sublattice symmetry of the graphene. The unpaired quasi-localized p electrons are responsible for this itinerant magnetism. The results provide a novel approach to tune graphene's electronic structures as well as to form ferromagnetic semiconductive graphene.

  16. Small angle neutron scattering study to determine the structure of high strength hydrogels.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tominaga, Taiki; Tirumala, Vijay R.; Lin, Eric K.; Wu, Wen-Li; Gong, Jian Ping; Furukawa, Hidemitsu; Osada, Yoshihito

    2006-03-01

    Hydrogels are swollen polymer networks containing more than 90% water. Most hydrogels, however, are mechanically too weak to be used as load bearing devices. Gong et al. have overcome this problem by synthesizing hydrogels with a double network (DN) structure. Modifying the polyelectrolyte network structure by polymerization of high molecular weight uncharged polymer in situ, resulted in orders of magnitude increase in their load bearing ability. Despite 90% water, these tough gels exhibit a fracture stress of 170 kg/cm^2, similar to that of articular cartilage found in the bone-joints of human body. In this work, we determined the structure of DN-gels using small angle neutron scattering. Structural origins for high toughness found in DN-gels were then examined by comparing the structure of DN-gels with that of pure polyelectrolyte network and polyacrylamide solution.

  17. Stabilization of endangered part of structures by building dry brunt brick buttressing, critical case study of plane wall in DKG-North Area, Mohenjo daro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, J. M.; Park, J.

    2013-07-01

    'World Heritage Sites' are places or buildings of outstanding universal value recognized as constituting a world heritage 'for whose protection it is the duty of the international community as a whole to co-operate'. The concept of World Heritage is at the core of the World Heritage Convention, adopted by Heritage List as a means of identifying, protecting, conserving and presenting those parts of the world's natural and cultural heritage that are of sufficient 'outstanding universal value' to be the responsibility of the international community as a whole. By joining the Convention, nation states are pledged to safeguard the WH S by protecting their national heritage. UNESCO in 1972, to which 160 nations have now been adhered. The Convention came into force in 1975 and established a Site in their territory as part of a universally agreed policy for World. Moenjodaro site covering an area of 555 Acres out of which only 10 % of it has been excavated by exposing 50 Kilometer standing walls. The wall of the main street of DK G Area, Mohen jo Daro partially deformed, due to the torque effects this is studied here on a lateral cross wall in the chief house. Furthermore, the resulting behaviour of the bucking wall demonstrates the significant loadbearing capacity of the structure under service conditions and its high sensitivity to imposed changes of the geometry. Although the tensile stresses exceeded the flexural strength at the vertices and the length of the wall, hence both the geometry and condition of this area are critical for the safety of the wall. The results of this study can improve the assessment and thus help in the preservation of many important structures of the metropolitan city. Here the hydrous characteristic of the brick is studied as a general phenomenon, it is observed that the remains of the sites located in Sindh suffered a lot mostly due to age, human neglect variations of atmospheric condition, severe temperature and natural disasters. The main

  18. Visualization of microvascular proliferation as a tumor infiltration structure in rat glioma specimens using the diffraction-enhanced imaging in-plane CT technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Seung-Jun; Sunaguchi, Naoki; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Huo, Qingkai; Ando, Masami; Choi, Gi-Hwan; Kim, Hong-Tae; Kim, Ki-Hong; Jeong, Eun-Ju; Chang, Won-Seok; Kim, Jong-Ki

    2012-03-01

    In order to study potent microenvironments of malignant gliomas with a high- resolution x-ray imaging technique, an injection orthotopic glioma model was made using the Sprague-Dawley rat. Total brain tissue, taken out as an ex vivo model, was examined with diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI) computed tomography (CT) acquired with a 35 keV monochromatic x-ray. In the convolution-reconstructed 2D/3D images with a spatial resolution of 12.5 × 12.5 × 25 µm, distinction among necrosis, typical ring-shaped viable tumors, edemas and healthy tissues was clearly observed near the frontal lobe in front of the rat's caudate nucleus. Multiple microvascular proliferations (MVPs) were observed surrounding peritumoral edemas as a tumor infiltration structure. Typical dimensions of tubular MVPs were 130 (diameter) ×250 (length) µm with a partial sprout structure revealed in the 3D reconstructed image. Hyperplasia of cells around vessel walls was revealed with tumor cell infiltration along the perivascular space in microscopic observations of mild MVP during histological analysis. In conclusion, DEI-CT is capable of imaging potent tumor-infiltrating MVP structures surrounding high-grade gliomas.

  19. Structural, mechanical and electronic properties of in-plane 1T/2H phase interface of MoS{sub 2} heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Xiaoyan; Yang, Guohui; Zhang, Junfeng; Xu, Xiaohong

    2015-09-15

    Two-dimensional (2D) molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) phase hybrid system composed by 2H and 1T phase is a natural metal/semiconductor heterostructures and promised a wide range of potential applications. Here, we report the first principle investigations on the structural, mechanical and electronic properties of hybrid system with armchair (AC) and zigzag (ZZ) interfaces. The ZZ type 1T/2H interface are more energy favorable than AC type interface with 3.39 eV/nm. Similar with that of bulked 1T MoS{sub 2}, the intrinsic strengths of the heterostructures are lower than that of the bulk 2H, especially for that with ZZ interface. Analysis of density of states shows that the electronic properties gradually transmitted from the metallic 1T phase to the semiconducting 2H phase for the structural abrupt interface. The present theoretical results constitute a useful picture for the 2D electronic devices using current MoS{sub 2} 1T/2H heterostructures and provide vital insights into the other 2D hybrid materials.

  20. Plane Smoothers for Multiblock Grids: Computational Aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Llorente, Ignacio M.; Diskin, Boris; Melson, N. Duane

    1999-01-01

    Standard multigrid methods are not well suited for problems with anisotropic discrete operators, which can occur, for example, on grids that are stretched in order to resolve a boundary layer. One of the most efficient approaches to yield robust methods is the combination of standard coarsening with alternating-direction plane relaxation in the three dimensions. However, this approach may be difficult to implement in codes with multiblock structured grids because there may be no natural definition of global lines or planes. This inherent obstacle limits the range of an implicit smoother to only the portion of the computational domain in the current block. This report studies in detail, both numerically and analytically, the behavior of blockwise plane smoothers in order to provide guidance to engineers who use block-structured grids. The results obtained so far show alternating-direction plane smoothers to be very robust, even on multiblock grids. In common computational fluid dynamics multiblock simulations, where the number of subdomains crossed by the line of a strong anisotropy is low (up to four), textbook multigrid convergence rates can be obtained with a small overlap of cells between neighboring blocks.

  1. Plane Transformations in a Complex Setting I: Homotheties-Translations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dana-Picard, T.

    2006-01-01

    A previous note described how complex numbers can be used for elementary analytic geometry in the plane, describing lines, circles and their intersections using complex Cartesian equations. In the present note, a description of elementary plane transformations, namely homotheties and translations, their group structure and their operations on…

  2. SAS-2 gamma-ray results from the galactic plane and their implications for galactic structure and galactic cosmic-ray dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Thompson, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    The final SAS-2 results related to high energy galactic gamma-ray emission show a strong correlation with galactic structural features seen at other wavelenghts, when the known gamma-ray sources are subtracted. Theoretical considerations and analysis of the gamma-ray data suggest that the galactic cosmic rays are dynamically coupled to the interstellar matter through the magnetic fields, and hence the cosmic ray density is enhanced where the matter density is greatest on the scale of the galactic arms. This concept has been explored in a galactic model that assumes: (1) cosmic rays are galactic and not universal; (2)on the scale of the galactic arms, the cosmic ray column (surface) density is proportional to the total interstellar gas column density; (3)the cosmic ray scale height is significantly larger than the scale height to the matter; and (4) ours is a spiral galaxy characterized by an arm to interarm density ratio of over 2:1.

  3. The structural and in-plane dielectric/ferroelectric properties of the epitaxial (Ba, Sr)(Zr, Ti)O{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, N. Y. Wang, Y.; Chan, H. L. W.; Wang, D. Y.; Dai, J. Y.

    2014-06-21

    Epitaxial (Ba{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x})(Zr{sub 0.1}Ti{sub 0.9})O{sub 3} (BSZT, x = 0 – 0.45) thin films were deposited on (LaAlO{sub 3}){sub 0.3}(Sr{sub 2}AlTaO{sub 6}){sub 0.35} (LSAT) substrates by pulsed laser deposition. The experimental results demonstrate that the structural, dielectric, and ferroelectric properties of the BSZT thin films were greatly dependent on the strontium content. The BSZT thin films transformed from tetragonal to cubic phase when x ≥ 0.35 at room temperature. The Curie temperature and room-temperature remnant polarization decrease with increasing strontium concentration. The optimal dielectric properties were found in (Ba{sub 0.55}Sr{sub 0.45})(Zr{sub 0.1}Ti{sub 0.9})O{sub 3} thin films which is in paraelectric state, having tunability of 47% and loss tangent of 0.0338 under an electric field of 20 MV/m at 1 MHz. This suggests that BSZT thin film is a promising candidate for tunable microwave device applications.

  4. Effect of Out-of-Plane Alkyl Group's Position in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell Efficiency: A Structure-Property Relationship Utilizing Indoline-Based Unsymmetrical Squaraine Dyes.

    PubMed

    Alagumalai, Ananthan; M K, Munavvar Fairoos; Vellimalai, Punitharasu; Sil, Manik Chandra; Nithyanandhan, Jayaraj

    2016-12-28

    Squaraine dyes are promising chromophores to harvest visible and near-infrared (NIR) photons. A series of indoline-based unsymmetrical squaraine (SQ) dyes that contain alkyl chains at sp(3) C- and N- atoms of indoline moieties with a carboxylic acid anchoring group were synthesized. The optical and electrochemical properties of the SQ dyes in solution were nearly identical as there was no change in the D-A-D SQ framework; however, remarkable changes with respect to the power conversion efficiencies (PCE) were observed depending upon the position of alkyl groups in the dye. Introduction of alkyl groups to the indoline unit that was away from anchoring unit were helped in more dye loading with controlled organization of dyes on surface, increased charge transfer resistance, long electron lifetime, and hence higher PCE than that of the corresponding isomer in which the alkyl groups funtionalized indoline unit contains the carboxylic acid anchoring group. Careful analysis of incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency (IPCE) profiles indicated the presence of aggregated structure on the TiO2 surface that contributes to the charge injection in the presence of a coadsorbent. A dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) device made out of SQ5 was achieved an efficiency of 9.0%, with an open-circuit potential (Voc) of 660 mV and short-circuit current density (Jsc) of 19.82 mA/cm(2), under simulated AM 1.5G illumination (100 mW/cm(2)). The IPCE profile of SQ5 shows an onset near to 750 nm with a good quantum efficiency (>80%) in the range of 550-700 nm, indicating the importance of self-organization of dyes on the TiO2 surface for an efficient charge injection. This present investigation revealed the importance of position of alkyl groups in the squaraine-based dyes for the better PCE.

  5. Galactic plane gamma-radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Ogelman, H. B.; Tumer, T.; Ozel, M. E.

    1979-01-01

    Analysis of the SAS 2 data together with the COS B results shows that the distribution of galactic gamma-radiation has several similarities to that of other large-scale tracers of galactic structure. The radiation is primarily confined to a thin disc which exhibits offsets from b = 0 degrees similar to warping at radio frequencies. The principal distinction of the gamma-radiation is a stronger contrast in intensity between the region from 310 to 45 degrees in longitude and the regions away from the center that can be attributed to a variation in cosmic-ray density as a function of position in Galaxy. The diffuse galactic gamma-ray energy spectrum shows no significant variation in direction, and the spectrum seen along the plane is the same as that for the galactic component of the gamma-radiation at high altitudes. The uniformity of the galactic gamma-ray spectrum, the smooth decrease in intensity as a function of altitude, and the absence of any galactic gamma-ray sources at high altitudes indicate a diffuse origin for bulk of the galactic gamma-radiation rather than a collection of localized sources.

  6. National Aerospace Plane (NASP) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Artists concept of the X-30 aerospace plane flying through Earth's atmosphere on its way to low-Earth orbit. the experimental concept is part of the National Aero-Space Plane Program. The X-30 is planned to demonstrate the technology for airbreathing space launch and hypersonic cruise vehicles. Photograph and caption published in Winds of Change, 75th Anniversary NASA publication (page 117), by James Schultz.

  7. Dynamically variable negative stiffness structures

    PubMed Central

    Churchill, Christopher B.; Shahan, David W.; Smith, Sloan P.; Keefe, Andrew C.; McKnight, Geoffrey P.

    2016-01-01

    Variable stiffness structures that enable a wide range of efficient load-bearing and dexterous activity are ubiquitous in mammalian musculoskeletal systems but are rare in engineered systems because of their complexity, power, and cost. We present a new negative stiffness–based load-bearing structure with dynamically tunable stiffness. Negative stiffness, traditionally used to achieve novel response from passive structures, is a powerful tool to achieve dynamic stiffness changes when configured with an active component. Using relatively simple hardware and low-power, low-frequency actuation, we show an assembly capable of fast (<10 ms) and useful (>100×) dynamic stiffness control. This approach mitigates limitations of conventional tunable stiffness structures that exhibit either small (<30%) stiffness change, high friction, poor load/torque transmission at low stiffness, or high power active control at the frequencies of interest. We experimentally demonstrate actively tunable vibration isolation and stiffness tuning independent of supported loads, enhancing applications such as humanoid robotic limbs and lightweight adaptive vibration isolators. PMID:26989771

  8. Computational insight into the capacitive performance of graphene edge planes

    DOE PAGES

    Zhan, Cheng; Zhang, Yu; Cummings, Peter T.; ...

    2017-02-01

    Recent experiments have shown that electric double-layer capacitors utilizing electrodes consisting of graphene edge plane exhibit higher capacitance than graphene basal plane. However, theoretical understanding of this capacitance enhancement is still limited. Here we applied a self-consistent joint density functional theory calculation on the electrode/electrolyte interface and found that the capacitance of graphene edge plane depends on the edge type: zigzag edge has higher capacitance than armchair edge due to the difference in their electronic structures. We further examined the quantum, dielectric, and electric double-layer (EDL) contributions to the total capacitance of the edge-plane electrodes. Classical molecular dynamics simulation foundmore » that the edge planes have higher EDL capacitance than the basal plane due to better adsorption of counter-ions and higher solvent accessible surface area. Finally, our work therefore has elucidated the capacitive energy storage in graphene edge planes that take into account both the electrode's electronic structure and the EDL structure.« less

  9. The Laplace Planes of Uranus and Pluto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobrovolskis, Anthony R.

    1993-01-01

    Satellite orbits close to an oblate planet precess about its equatorial plane, while distant satellites precess around the plane of the planet's heliocentric orbit. In between, satellites in nearly circular orbits precess about a warped intermediate surface called the Laplace 'plane.' Herein we derive general formulas for locating the Laplace plane. Because Uranus and Pluto have high obliquities, their Laplace planes are severely warped. We present maps of these Laplace planes, of interest in telescopic searches for new satellites. The Laplace plane of the Solar System as a whole is similarly distorted, but comets in the inner Oort cloud precess too slowly to sense the Laplace plane.

  10. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOEpatents

    Marsh, S.P.

    1988-03-08

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 4 figs.

  11. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOEpatents

    Marsh, Stanley P.

    1988-01-01

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive.

  12. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOEpatents

    Marsh, S.P.

    1987-03-12

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Space-Plane Spreadsheet Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackall, Dale

    1993-01-01

    Basic Hypersonic Data and Equations (HYPERDATA) spreadsheet computer program provides data gained from three analyses of performance of space plane. Equations used to perform analyses derived from Newton's second law of physics, derivation included. First analysis is parametric study of some basic factors affecting ability of space plane to reach orbit. Second includes calculation of thickness of spherical fuel tank. Third produces ratio between volume of fuel and total mass for each of various aircraft. HYPERDATA intended for use on Macintosh(R) series computers running Microsoft Excel 3.0.

  14. Radiation enhanced basal plane dislocation glide in GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakimov, Eugene B.; Vergeles, Pavel S.; Polyakov, Alexander Y.; Lee, In-Hwan; Pearton, Stephen J.

    2016-05-01

    A movement of basal plane segments of dislocations in GaN films grown by epitaxial lateral overgrowth under low energy electron beam irradiation (LEEBI) was studied by the electron beam induced current (EBIC) method. Only a small fraction of the basal plane dislocation segments were susceptible to irradiation and the movement was limited to relatively short distances. The effect is explained by the radiation enhanced dislocation glide (REDG) in the structure with strong pinning. A dislocation velocity under LEEBI with a beam current lower than 1 nA was estimated as about 10 nm/s. The results assuming the REDG for prismatic plane dislocations were presented.

  15. Cleavage plane determination in amphibian eggs.

    PubMed

    Sawai, T; Yomota, A

    1990-01-01

    In the present study using eggs of Cynops pyrrhogaster and Xenopus laevis, we examined (1) structural changes in the cytoplasm before the appearance of the cleavage furrow using a cytochemical method, (2) the time of cleavage plane determination depending on the mitotic apparatus (MA), by changing the shape of the eggs, and (3) the time of arrival of the "cleavage stimulus" at the cortex, by injecting colchicine solution or removing cytoplasm. Results were as follows: (1) In amphibian eggs the diastema was formed after development of the MA, appearing between the two asters after the MA had begun to degenerate. (2) The cleavage plane was preliminarily determined by the MA in the meta- to anaphase of karyokinesis. At this time, however, the egg cortex had not yet received the "cleavage stimulus" indispensable for furrow formation. (3) The egg cortex was really prepared to establish the furrow just after the edge of the diastema arrived at the cortex, when the MA had already degenerated. These results imply that the cleavage plane of the amphibian eggs is determined in two steps: the first, depending on the MA, is the determination of the direction of the growth of the diastema, and the second is the arrival of the "cleavage stimulus" at the cortex in association with the diastema.

  16. Concentric Nested Toroidal Inflatable Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Christopher J.; Raboin, Jasen L.; Spexarth, Gary R.

    2010-01-01

    Assemblies comprising multiple limited- height toroidal inflatable structures nested in a concentric arrangement have been invented to obtain more design flexibility than can be obtained in single taller, wider toroidal inflatable structures (see figure). Originally intended for use as containers for habitats for humans in outer space or on remote planets, these and related prior inflatable structures could also be useful on Earth as lightweight, compactly stowable, portable special-purpose buildings that could be transported to remote locations and there inflated to full size and shape. In the case of a single inflatable toroidal structure, one important source of lack of design flexibility is the fact that an increase in outer diameter (which is sometimes desired) is necessarily accompanied by an increase in height (which is sometimes undesired). Increases in diameter and height can also cause difficulty in utilization of the resulting larger volume, in that it can become necessary to partition the volume by means of walls and floors, and features (e.g., stairs or ladders) must be added to enable vertical movement between floors. Moreover, ascending and descending between floors in a gravitational environment could pose unacceptable difficulty for the inhabitants under some circumstances. Another source of lack of design flexibility in a single toroidal inflatable structure is that for a given inflation pressure, an increase in the outer diameter of the structure necessarily entails an increase in the maximum stress in the structure. Because it is necessary to keep the maximum stress within the load-bearing capability of the structural materials, consistent with other aspects of the design, this may translate to a limit on the outer diameter. In an assembly comprising concentric nested toroidal structures, an increase in outer diameter does not necessarily entail an increase in height or a maximum stress in excess of the load-bearing capability of the structural

  17. Affine Contractions on the Plane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celik, D.; Ozdemir, Y.; Ureyen, M.

    2007-01-01

    Contractions play a considerable role in the theory of fractals. However, it is not easy to find contractions which are not similitudes. In this study, it is shown by counter examples that an affine transformation of the plane carrying a given triangle onto another triangle may not be a contraction even if it contracts edges, heights or medians.…

  18. Testing the two planes of satellites in the Centaurus group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Oliver; Jerjen, Helmut; Pawlowski, Marcel S.; Binggeli, Bruno

    2016-11-01

    Context. The existence of satellite galaxy planes poses a major challenge for the standard picture of structure formation with non-baryonic dark matter. Recently Tully et al. (2015, ApJ, 802, L25) reported the discovery of two almost parallel planes in the nearby Cen A group using mostly high-mass galaxies (MB< -10 mag) in their analysis. Aims: Our team detected a large number of new group member candidates in the Cen A group. This dwarf galaxy sample, combined with other recent results from the literature, enables us to test the galaxy distribution in the direction of the Cen A group and to determine the statistical significance of the geometric alignment. Methods: Taking advantage of the fact that the two galaxy planes lie almost edge-on along the line of sight, the newly found group members can be assigned relative to the two planes. We used various statistical methods to test whether the distribution of galaxies follows a single normal distribution or shows evidence of bimodality as has been reported earlier. Results: We confirm that the data used for the Tully et al. study support the picture of a bimodal structure. When the new galaxy samples are included, however, the gap between the two galaxy planes is closing and the significance level of the bimodality is reduced. Instead, the plane that contains Cen A becomes more prominent. Conclusions: We found evidence that the galaxy system around Cen A is made up of only one plane of satellites. This plane is almost orthogonal to the dust plane of Cen A. Accurate distances to the new dwarf galaxies will be required to measure the precise 3D distribution of the galaxies around Cen A.

  19. Experiments with unilateral bite planes in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Sergl, H G; Farmland, M

    1975-04-01

    1. Insertion of bite planes on the right mandibular lateral teeth of eight young rabbits caused load changes in the masticatory system. Eight other animals served as controls. 2. The induced changes were equilibrated during the nine-week experimental period by adapation processes. At the end of the period all teeth were in occlusion and the glenoid fossa-condylar process distance was equal on both sides. 3. The adaptation was the result of several mechanisms working together. We found changes in the alveolar region and at distant growth structures. Cranial scolioses were observed. 4. Masticatory functional loading is a factor which regulates growth in the region of the facial skeleton.

  20. Braiding patterns on an inclined plane.

    PubMed

    Mertens, Keith; Putkaradze, Vakhtang; Vorobieff, Peter

    2004-07-08

    A jet of fluid flowing down a partially wetting, inclined plane usually meanders but--by maintaining a constant flow rate--meandering can be suppressed, leading to the emergence of a beautiful braided structure. Here we show that this flow pattern can be explained by the interplay between surface tension, which tends to narrow the jet, and fluid inertia, which drives the jet to widen. These observations dispel misconceptions about the relationship between braiding and meandering that have persisted for over 20 years.

  1. Mechanical Impedance of the Non-loaded Lower Leg with Relaxed Muscles in the Transverse Plane

    PubMed Central

    Ficanha, Evandro Maicon; Ribeiro, Guilherme Aramizo; Rastgaar, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the protocols and results of the experiments for the estimation of the mechanical impedance of the humans’ lower leg in the External–Internal direction in the transverse plane under non-load bearing condition and with relaxed muscles. The objectives of the estimation of the lower leg’s mechanical impedance are to facilitate the design of passive and active prostheses with mechanical characteristics similar to the humans’ lower leg, and to define a reference that can be compared to the values from the patients suffering from spasticity. The experiments were performed with 10 unimpaired male subjects using a lower extremity rehabilitation robot (Anklebot, Interactive Motion Technologies, Inc.) capable of applying torque perturbations to the foot. The subjects were in a seated position, and the Anklebot recorded the applied torques and the resulting angular movement of the lower leg. In this configuration, the recorded dynamics are due mainly to the rotations of the ankle’s talocrural and the subtalar joints, and any contribution of the tibiofibular joints and knee joint. The dynamic mechanical impedance of the lower leg was estimated in the frequency domain with an average coherence of 0.92 within the frequency range of 0–30 Hz, showing a linear correlation between the displacement and the torques within this frequency range under the conditions of the experiment. The mean magnitude of the stiffness of the lower leg (the impedance magnitude averaged in the range of 0–1 Hz) was determined as 4.9 ± 0.74 Nm/rad. The direct estimation of the quasi-static stiffness of the lower leg results in the mean value of 5.8 ± 0.81 Nm/rad. An analysis of variance shows that the estimated values for the stiffness from the two experiments are not statistically different. PMID:26697424

  2. Apparatus for integrating a rigid structure into a flexible wall of an inflatable structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Christopher J. (Inventor); Patterson, Ross M. (Inventor); Spexarth, Gary R. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    For an inflatable structure having a flexible outer shell or wall structure having a flexible restraint layer comprising interwoven, load-bearing straps, apparatus for integrating one or more substantially rigid members into the flexible shell. For each rigid member, a corresponding opening is formed through the flexible shell for receiving the rigid member. A plurality of connection devices are mounted on the rigid member for receiving respective ones of the load-bearing straps. In one embodiment, the connection devices comprise inner connecting mechanisms and outer connecting mechanisms, the inner and outer connecting mechanisms being mounted on the substantially rigid structure and spaced along a peripheral edge portion of the structure in an interleafed array in which respective outer connecting mechanisms are interposed between adjacent pairs of inner connecting mechanisms, the outer connecting mechanisms projecting outwardly from the peripheral edge portion of the substantially rigid structure beyond the adjacent inner connecting mechanisms to form a staggered array of connecting mechanisms extending along the panel structure edge portion. In one embodiment, the inner and outer connecting mechanisms form part of an integrated, structure rotatably mounted on the rigid member peripheral edge portion.

  3. Development of Composite Scaffolds for Load Bearing Segmental Bone Defects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    progressed from laboratory benchtop studies to preclinical testing in animals. This review is based on an exhaustive literature search of various...follow, a comprehensive review of in vivo models used to test composite scaffolds in SBDs is detailed to serve as a guide to design appropriate...related to fractures, sport and blast injuries. Diseases include bone cancer (osteosarcoma), tumor resection and reconstruction, osteoporosis

  4. Material Characterization for Composite Materials in Load Bearing Wave Guides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    range for applications in small RPAs. A graphite epoxy stiffening component will be primarily considered. Different nickel , graphene, and carbon...69 4.3.4 Nickel coated CNT composite ............................................................ 71 4.3.5 P100 carbon fiber...69 Error! Bookmark Figure 48. Power coefficient for the Nickel coated CNT composite

  5. SETI in the Ecliptic Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conn Henry, Richard; Kilston, S.; Shostak, S.

    2008-05-01

    The strong advantages of SETI searches in the ecliptic plane have been pointed out by Kilston, Shostak, and Henry (2008). In our poster we show one possible history of civilizations in the galaxy, from birth, through galactic colonization, up to death - and even beyond. Should this scenario be correct, the pattern suggests that the best hope for success in SETI is exploration of the possibility that there are a few extremely ancient but non-colonizing civilizations; civilizations that, aeons ago, detected the existence of Earth (oxygen, and hence life) and of its Moon (stabilizing Earth's rotation) via observations of transits of the Sun (hence, ecliptic, which is stable over millions of years [Laskar et al. 2004]), and have been beaming voluminous information in our direction ever since, in their faint hope (now realized) that a technological "receiving” species would appear. To maintain such a targeted broadcast would be extremely cheap for an advanced civilization. A search of a swath centered on our ecliptic plane should easily find such civilizations, if they exist. We hope to carry out such a search, using the Allen Telescope Array. http://henry.pha.jhu.edu/poster.SETI.pdf References: Kilston, Steven; Shostak, Seth; & Henry, Richard Conn; "Who's Looking at You, Kid?: SETI Advantages near the Ecliptic Plane," AbSciCon 2008, April 14-17, Santa Clara, CA.; Laskar, J., et al., A&A 428, 261, 2004 This work was supported by Maryland Space Grant Consortium.

  6. Epitaxial growth, electrical and optical properties of a-plane InN on r-plane sapphire

    SciTech Connect

    Ajagunna, A. O.; Iliopoulos, E.; Tsiakatouras, G.; Tsagaraki, K.; Androulidaki, M.; Georgakilas, A.

    2010-01-15

    The heteroepitaxy of a-plane (1120) InN films on r-plane (1102) sapphire substrates, by nitrogen radio frequency plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy, has been investigated and compared to that of c-plane (0001) InN. The epitaxial growth of a-plane InN proceeded through the nucleation, growth, and coalescence of three-dimensional islands, resulting in surface roughness that increased monotonically with epilayer thickness. The full width at half maximum of (1120) x-ray diffraction rocking curves decreased significantly with increasing InN thickness, characteristic of structural improvement, and it reached the value of 24 arcmin for a 1 {mu}m thick film. Hall-effect measurements exhibited a similar dependence of electron concentration and mobility on thickness for both the a- and c-plane InN films. The analysis of the Hall-effect measurements, by considering the contribution of two conducting layers, indicates a similar accumulation of low mobility electrons with N{sub s}>10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} at the films' surface/interfacial region for both the a- and c-plane InN films. From optical transmittance measurements, the absorption edge of 0.768 eV was determined for the 1 {mu}m a-plane film, consistent with the expected Burstein-Moss effect. Photoluminescence spectra exhibited a lower energy peak at 0.631 eV, suggesting defect-related transitions.

  7. A method of plane geometry primitive presentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Anbo; Luo, Haibo; Chang, Zheng; Hui, Bin

    2014-11-01

    Point feature and line feature are basic elements in object feature sets, and they play an important role in object matching and recognition. On one hand, point feature is sensitive to noise; on the other hand, there are usually a huge number of point features in an image, which makes it complex for matching. Line feature includes straight line segment and curve. One difficulty in straight line segment matching is the uncertainty of endpoint location, the other is straight line segment fracture problem or short straight line segments joined to form long straight line segment. While for the curve, in addition to the above problems, there is another difficulty in how to quantitatively describe the shape difference between curves. Due to the problems of point feature and line feature, the robustness and accuracy of target description will be affected; in this case, a method of plane geometry primitive presentation is proposed to describe the significant structure of an object. Firstly, two types of primitives are constructed, they are intersecting line primitive and blob primitive. Secondly, a line segment detector (LSD) is applied to detect line segment, and then intersecting line primitive is extracted. Finally, robustness and accuracy of the plane geometry primitive presentation method is studied. This method has a good ability to obtain structural information of the object, even if there is rotation or scale change of the object in the image. Experimental results verify the robustness and accuracy of this method.

  8. Point-to-plane and plane-to-plane electrostatic charge injection atomization for insulating liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkawi, Ghazi

    An electrostatic charge injection atomizer was fabricated and used to introduce and study the electrostatic charge injection atomization methods for highly viscous vegetable oils and high conductivity low viscosity aviation fuel, JP8. The total, spray and leakage currents and spray breakup characteristics for these liquids were investigated and compared with Diesel fuel data. Jet breakup and spray atomization mechanism showed differences for vegetable oils and lower viscosity hydrocarbon fuels. For vegetable oils, a bending/spinning instability phenomenon was observed similar to the phenomenon found in liquid jets of high viscosity polymer solutions. The spray tip lengths and cone angles were presented qualitatively and quantitatively and correlated with the appropriate empirical formulas. The different stages of the breakup mechanisms for such oils, as a function of specific charges and flow rates, were discussed. In order to make this method of atomization more suitable for practical use in high flow rate applications, a blunt face electrode (plane-to-plane) was used as the charge emitter in place of a single pointed electrode (point-to-plane). This allowed the use of a multi-orifice emitter that maintained a specific charge with the flow rate increase which could not be achieved with the needle electrode. The effect of the nozzle geometry, liquid physical properties and applied bulk flow on the spray charge, total charge, maximum critical spray specific charge and electrical efficiency compared with the needle point-to-plane atomizer results was presented. Our investigation revealed that the electrical efficiency of the atomizer is dominated by the charge forced convection rate rather than charge transport by ion motilities and liquid motion by the electric field. As a result of the electric coulomb forces between the electrified jets, the multi-orifice atomizer provided a unique means of dispersing the fuel in a hollow cone with wide angles making the new

  9. Electronic structure of the ingredient planes of the cuprate superconductor Bi2Sr2CuO6+δ: A comparison study with Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ

    SciTech Connect

    Yan -Feng Lv; Gu, G. D.; Wang, Wen -Lin; Ding, Hao; Wang, Yang; Ding, Ying; Zhong, Ruidan; Schneeloch, John; Wang, Lili; He, Ke; Ji, Shuai -Hua; Zhao, Lin; Zhou, Xing -Jiang; Song, Can -Li; Ma, Xu -Cun; Xue, Qi -Kun

    2016-04-15

    By means of low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy, we report on the electronic structures of the BiO and SrO planes of the Bi2Sr2CuO6+δ (Bi-2201) superconductor prepared by argon-ion bombardment and annealing. Depending on post annealing conditions, the BiO planes exhibit either a pseudogap (PG) with sharp coherence peaks and an anomalously large gap magnitude of 49 meV or van Hove singularity (vHS) near the Fermi level, while the SrO is always characteristic of a PG-like feature. This contrasts with the Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (Bi-2212) superconductor where vHS occurs solely on the SrO plane. We disclose the interstitial oxygen dopants (δ in the formulas) as a primary cause for the occurrence of vHS, which are located dominantly around the BiO and SrO planes, respectively, in Bi-2201 and Bi-2212. This is supported by the contrasting structural buckling amplitude of the BiO and SrO planes in the two superconductors. Furthermore, our findings provide solid evidence for the irrelevance of PG to the superconductivity in the two superconductors, as well as insights into why Bi-2212 can achieve a higher superconducting transition temperature than Bi-2201, and by implication, the mechanism of cuprate superconductivity.

  10. Eta Carinae: Orientation of The Orbital Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, T. R.; Nielsen, K. E.; Ivarsson, S.; Corcoran, M. F.; Verner, E.; Hillier, J. D.

    2006-01-01

    Evidence continues to build that Eta Carinae is a massive binary system with a hidden hot companion in a highly elliptical orbit. We present imaging and spectroscopic evidence that provide clues to the orientation of the orbital plane. The circumstellar ejecta, known as the Homunculus and Little Homunculus, are hourglass-shaped structures, one encapsulated within the other, tilted at about 45 degrees from the sky plane. A disk region lies between the bipolar lobes. Based upon their velocities and proper motions, Weigelt blobs B, C and D, very bright emission clumps 0.1 to 0.3" Northwest from Eta Carinae, lie in the disk. UV flux from the hot companion, Eta Car B, photoexcites the Weigelt blobs. Other clumps form a complete chain around the star, but are not significantly photoexcited. The strontium filament, a 'neutral' emission structure, lies in the same general direction as the Weigelt blobs and exhibits peculiar properties indicative that much mid-UV, but no hydrogen-ionizing radiation impinges on this structure. It is shielded by singly-ionized iron. P Cygni absorptions in Fe I I lines, seen directly in line of sight from Eta Carinae, are absent in the stellar light scattered by the Weigelt blobs. Rather than a strong absorption extending to -600 km/s, a low velocity absorption feature extends from -40 to -150 km/s. No absorbing Fe II exists between Eta Carinae and Weigelt D, but the outer reaches of the wind are intercepted in line of sight from Weigelt D to the observer. This indicates that the UV radiation is constrained by the dominating wind of Eta Car A to a small cavity carved out by the weaker wind of Eta Car B. Since the high excitation nebular lines are seen in the Weigelt blobs at most phases, the cavity, and hence the major axis of the highly elliptical orbit, must lie in the general direction of the Weigelt blobs. The evidence is compelling that the orbital major axis of Eta Carinae is projected at -45 degrees position angle on the sky. Moreover

  11. Orbital Space Plane Cost Credibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creech, Steve

    2003-01-01

    NASA's largest new start development program is the Orbital Space Plane (OSP) Program. The program is currently in the formulation stage. One of the critical issues to be resolved, prior to initiating full-scale development, is establishing cost credibility of NASA s budget estimates for development, production, and operations of the OSP. This paper will discuss the processes, tools, and methodologies that NASA, along with its industry partners, are implementing to assure cost credibility for the OSP program. Results of benchmarking of current tools and the development of new cost estimating capabilities and approaches will be discussed.

  12. SNAP Satellite Focal Plane Development

    SciTech Connect

    Bebek, C.; Akerlof, C.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Astier, P.; Baltay, C.; Barrelet, E.; Basa, S.; Bercovitz, J.; Bergstrom, L.; Berstein, G.P.; Bester, M.; Bohlin, R.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Campbell, M.; Carithers, W.; Commins, E.; Day, C.; Deustua, S.; DiGennaro, R.; Ealet, A.; Ellis, R.; Emmett, W.; Eriksson, M.; Fouchez,D.; Fruchter, A.; Genat, J-F.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.; Heetderks, H.; Holland, S.; Huterer, D.; Johnson, W.; Kadel, R.; Karcher,A.; Kim, A.; Kolbe, W.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureaux, J.; Lampton, M.; Lefevre, O.; Levi, M.; Levin, D.; Linder, E.; Loken, S.; Malina, R.; Mazure, A.; McKay, T.; McKee, S.; Miquel, R.; Morgan, N.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Roe, N.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi, H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Perlmutter, S.; Prieto, E.; Rabinowitz,D.; Refregier, A.; Rhodes, J.; Schubnell, M.; Sholl, M.; Smadja, G.; Smith, R.; Smoot, G.; Snyder, J.; Spadafora, A.; Szymkowiak, A.; Tarle,G.; Taylor, K.; Tilquin, A.; Tomasch, A.; Vincent, D.; von der Lippe, H.; Walder, J-P.; Wang, G.

    2003-07-07

    The proposed SuperNova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) mission will have a two-meter class telescope delivering diffraction-limited images to an instrumented 0.7 square degree field in the visible and near-infrared wavelength regime. The requirements for the instrument suite and the present configuration of the focal plane concept are presented. A two year R&D phase, largely supported by the Department of Energy, is just beginning. We describe the development activities that are taking place to advance our preparedness for mission proposal in the areas of detectors and electronics.

  13. Stokes problems for moving half-planes.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Y; Weinbaum, S

    1995-01-01

    New exact solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations are obtained for the unbounded and bounded oscillatory and impulsive tangential edgewise motion of touching half-infinite plates in their own plane. In contrast to Stokes classical solutions for the harmonic and impulsive motion of an infinite plane wall, where the solutions are separable or have a simple similarity form, the present solutions have a two-dimensional structure in the near region of the contact between the half-infinite plates. Nevertheless, it is possible to obtain relatively simple closed-form solutions for the flow field in each case by defining new variables which greatly simplify the r- and theta- dependence of the solutions in the vicinity of the contact region. These solutions for flow in a half-infinite space are then extended to bounded flows in a channel using an image superposition technique. The impulsive motion has application to the motion near geophysical faults, whereas the oscillatory motion has arisen in the design of a novel oscillating half-plate flow chamber for examining the effect of fluid shear stress on cultured cell monolayers.

  14. Jets and storm tracks in ?-plane models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambaum, Maarten; Harvey, Ben

    2013-04-01

    We will present new results from linear calculations and non-linear simulations of a two-layer baroclinic ?-plane model. The model consists of two interacting levels with dynamical temperature anomalies (as in the Eady model), but by its nature provides a consistent description of the continuous 3-dimensional velocity field inside the domain. Our set-up has realistic jet-profiles, yet has a very low-dimensional parameter space. The model is shown to exhibit realistic linear baroclinic instability properties. In addition, it is shown that the introduction of a ?-plane term induces a jet and a storm-track that is highly non-linear: it exhibits a realistic spiral jet structure and jet-exit region, as is the case for the observed N. Hemisphere jet on Earth. This seems to imply that the variability of the N. Atlantic jet stream is not the result of complex topographic and orographic boundary conditions in the N. Hemisphere, as recent simulations appear to suggest, but rather the result of the spherical geometry of the Earth, setting the right conditions for relevant non-linear interactions between Rossby waves and the jet.

  15. The Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glenn, Jason; Aguirre, James; Bally, John; Battersby, Cara; Bradley, Eric Todd; Cyganowski, Claudia; Dowell, Darren; Drosback, Meredith; Dunham, Miranda K.; Evans, Neal J., II; Ginsburg, Adam; Harvey, Paul; Rosolowsky, Erik; Schlingman, Wayne; Shirley, Yancy L.; Stringfellow, Guy S.; Walawender, Josh; Williams, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    The Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) is a 1.1 millimeter continuum survey of the northern Galactic Plane made with Bolocam and the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. The coverage totals 170 square degrees, comprised of a contiguous range from -10.5 deg is less than or equal to 90.5 deg, 0.5 deg is less than or equal to b is less than or equal to 0.5 deg, with extended coverage in b in selected regions, and four targeted regions in the outer Galaxy, including: IC1396, toward the Perseus arm at l is approximately 111 deg, W3/4/5, and Gem OB1. Depths of the maps range from 30 to 60 mJy beam (sup 1). Approximately 8,400 sources were detected and the maps and source catalog have been made publicly available. Millimeter-wave thermal dust emission reveals dense regions within molecular clouds, thus the BGPS serves as a database for studies of the dense interstellar medium and star formation within the Milky Way.

  16. Image plane sweep volume illumination.

    PubMed

    Sundén, Erik; Ynnerman, Anders; Ropinski, Timo

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, many volumetric illumination models have been proposed, which have the potential to simulate advanced lighting effects and thus support improved image comprehension. Although volume ray-casting is widely accepted as the volume rendering technique which achieves the highest image quality, so far no volumetric illumination algorithm has been designed to be directly incorporated into the ray-casting process. In this paper we propose image plane sweep volume illumination (IPSVI), which allows the integration of advanced illumination effects into a GPU-based volume ray-caster by exploiting the plane sweep paradigm. Thus, we are able to reduce the problem complexity and achieve interactive frame rates, while supporting scattering as well as shadowing. Since all illumination computations are performed directly within a single rendering pass, IPSVI does not require any preprocessing nor does it need to store intermediate results within an illumination volume. It therefore has a significantly lower memory footprint than other techniques. This makes IPSVI directly applicable to large data sets. Furthermore, the integration into a GPU-based ray-caster allows for high image quality as well as improved rendering performance by exploiting early ray termination. This paper discusses the theory behind IPSVI, describes its implementation, demonstrates its visual results and provides performance measurements.

  17. Singularities from colliding plane gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tipler, Frank J.

    1980-12-01

    A simple geometrical argument is given which shows that a collision between two plane gravitational waves must result in singularities. The argument suggests that these singularities are a peculiar feature of plane waves, because singularities are also a consequence of a collision between self-gravitating plane waves of other fields with arbitrarily small energy density.

  18. Crisis bifurcations in plane Poiseuille flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zammert, Stefan; Eckhardt, Bruno

    2015-04-01

    Many shear flows follow a route to turbulence that has striking similarities to bifurcation scenarios in low-dimensional dynamical systems. Among the bifurcations that appear, crisis bifurcations are important because they cause global transitions between open and closed attractors, or indicate drastic increases in the range of the state space that is covered by the dynamics. We here study exterior and interior crisis bifurcations in direct numerical simulations of transitional plane Poiseuille flow in a mirror-symmetric subspace. We trace the state space dynamics from the appearance of the first three-dimensional exact coherent structures to the transition from an attractor to a chaotic saddle in an exterior crisis. For intermediate Reynolds numbers, the attractor undergoes several interior crises, in which new states appear and intermittent behavior can be observed. The bifurcations contribute to increasing the complexity of the dynamics and to a more dense coverage of state space.

  19. On turbulent spots in plane Poiseuille flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henningson, Dan S.; Kim, John

    1991-01-01

    Turbulence characteristics inside a turbulent spot in plane Poiseuille flow are investigated by analyzing a database obtained from a direct numerical simulation. The spot is found to consist of two distinct regions - a turbulent area and a wave area. The flow inside the turbulent area has a strong resemblance to that found in the fully developed turbulent channel. Suitably defined mean and r.m.s. fluctuations as well as the internal shear-layer structures are found to be similar to the turbulent counterpart. In the wave area the inflexional mean spanwise profiles cause a rapid growth of oblique waves, which break down to turbulence. The breakdown process of the oblique waves is reminiscent of the secondary instability observed during transition to turbulence in channel and boundary-layer flows. Other detailed characteristics associated with the Poiseuille spot are presented and are compared with experimental results.

  20. Functional Aesthetic Occlusal Plane (FAOP)

    PubMed Central

    Câmara, Carlos Alexandre; Martins, Renato Parsekian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: A reasonable exposure of incisors and gingival tissues is generally considered more attractive than excess or lack of exposure. A reasonable gingival exposure is considered to be around 0 to 2 mm when smiling and 2-4 mm exposure of the maxillary incisor edge when the lips are at rest. Objective: The aim of this paper is to present the Functional Aesthetic Occlusal Plane (FAOP), which aims to help in the diagnosis of the relationships established among molars, incisors and the upper lip. Conclusion: FAOP can complement an existing and established orthodontic treatment plan, facilitating the visualization of functional and aesthetic demands by giving a greater focus on the position of incisors in the relationship established among the incisors, molars and the upper lip stomion. PMID:27653271

  1. Smov Baseline Focal Plane Check

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmozzi, Roberto

    1994-01-01

    This test will be executed during the period after the servicing mission and before the extension of the COSTAR assembly. Its purpose is to verify that the FOS, HRS, and FOC focal planes have not been altered by the activities performed by Story and the Astronauts during the servicing mission. A large unknown deviation in aperture position would severly impact subsequent COSTAR alignment activities. If this test reveals a deviation, we may be able to compensate for any offsets prior to the complex and delicate COSTAR alignment calibrations. This enhanced version of the Heptathlon is designed to verify course alignments and measure relative aperture positions to within a few arcsecs. SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS: ***This test uses pre-servicing parameters for HRS, FOS, and FOC and the Cycle 4 parameters for WFPC2.*** ***This test requires special alignment and special guide stars.** ***This test requires special commanding for telemetry setups.**

  2. Snakes Out of the Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, Andrew; Young, Bruce A.; Mahadevan, L.

    2012-02-01

    We develop a new computational model of elastic rods, taking into account shear and full rotational dynamics, as well as friction, adhesion, and collision. This model is used to study the movement of snakes in different environments. By applying different muscular activation patterns to the snake, we observe many different patterns of motion, from planar undulation to sudden strikes. Many of the most interesting behaviors involve the snake rising out of the horizontal plane in the vertical direction. Such behaviors include a sand snake sidewinding over the hot desert sand and a cobra rearing up into a defensive striking position. Experimental videos of live snakes are analyzed and compared with computational results. We identify and explain a new form of movement previously unobserved: ``collateral locomotion.''

  3. Broken chiral symmetry on a null plane

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, Silas R.

    2013-10-15

    On a null-plane (light-front), all effects of spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking are contained in the three Hamiltonians (dynamical Poincaré generators), while the vacuum state is a chiral invariant. This property is used to give a general proof of Goldstone’s theorem on a null-plane. Focusing on null-plane QCD with N degenerate flavors of light quarks, the chiral-symmetry breaking Hamiltonians are obtained, and the role of vacuum condensates is clarified. In particular, the null-plane Gell-Mann–Oakes–Renner formula is derived, and a general prescription is given for mapping all chiral-symmetry breaking QCD condensates to chiral-symmetry conserving null-plane QCD condensates. The utility of the null-plane description lies in the operator algebra that mixes the null-plane Hamiltonians and the chiral symmetry charges. It is demonstrated that in a certain non-trivial limit, the null-plane operator algebra reduces to the symmetry group SU(2N) of the constituent quark model. -- Highlights: •A proof (the first) of Goldstone’s theorem on a null-plane is given. •The puzzle of chiral-symmetry breaking condensates on a null-plane is solved. •The emergence of spin-flavor symmetries in null-plane QCD is demonstrated.

  4. Empirically Derived Strength of Residential Roof Structures for Solar Installations.

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, Stephen F.; Sanchez, Alfred; Campos, Ivan A.; Gerstle, Walter H.

    2014-12-01

    Engineering certification for the installation of solar photovoltaic (PV) modules on wood roofs is often denied because existing wood roofs do not meet structural design codes. This work is intended to show that many roofs are actually sufficiently strong given the conservatism in codes, documented allowable strengths, roof structure system effects, and beam composite action produced by joist-sheathing interaction. This report provides results from a testing program to provide actual load carrying capacity of residential rooftops. The results reveal that the actual load carrying capacity of structural members and systems tested are significantly stronger than allowable loads provided by the International Residential Code (IRC 2009) and the national structural code found in Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures (ASCE 7-10). Engineering analysis of residential rooftops typically ignores the system affects and beam composite action in determining rooftop stresses given a potential PV installation. This extreme conservatism combined with conservatism in codes and published allowable stress values for roof building materials (NDS 2012) lead to the perception that well built homes may not have adequate load bearing capacity to enable a rooftop PV installation. However, based on the test results presented in this report of residential rooftop structural systems, the actual load bearing capacity is several times higher than published values (NDS 2012).

  5. P-Wave and S-Wave Velocity Structure of Submarine Landslide Associated With Gas Hydrate Layer on Frontal Ridge of Northern Cascadia Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, T.; Lu, H.; Yelisetti, S.; Spence, G.

    2015-12-01

    The submarine landslide associated with gas hydrate is a potential risk for environment and engineering projects, and thus from long time ago it has been a hot topic of hydrate research. The study target is Slipstream submarine landslide, one of the slope failures observed on the frontal ridges of the Northern Cascadia accretionary margin off Vancouver Island. The previous studies indicated a possible connection between this submarine landslide feature and gas hydrate, whose occurrence is indicated by a prominent bottom-simulating reflector (BSR), at a depth of ~265-275 m beneath the seafloor (mbsf). The OBS (Ocean Bottom Seismometer) data collected during SeaJade (Seafloor Earthquake Array - Japan Canada Cascadia Experiment) project were used to derive the subseafloor velocity structure for both P- and S-wave using travel times picked from refraction and reflection events. The P-wave velocity structure above the BSR showed anomalous high velocities of about 2.0 km/s at shallow depths of 100 mbsf, closely matching the estimated depth of the glide plane (100 ± 10 m). Forward modelling of S-waves was carried out using the data from the OBS horizontal components. The S-wave velocities, interpreted in conjunction with the P-wave results, provide the key constraints on the gas hydrate distribution within the pores. The hydrate distribution in the pores is important for determining concentrations, and also for determining the frame strength which is critical for controlling slope stability of steep frontal ridges. The increase in S-wave velocity suggests that the hydrate is distributed as part of the load-bearing matrix to increase the rigidity of the sediment.

  6. Thermoelectric characterization and fabrication of nanostructured p-type Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 and n-type Bi2Te3 thin film thermoelectric energy generator with an in-plane planar structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, No-Won; Park, Tae-Hyun; Ahn, Jay-Young; Kang, So-Hyeon; Lee, Won-Yong; Yoon, Young-Gui; Yoon, Soon-Gil; Lee, Sang-Kwon

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents in-plane bismuth-telluride-based thermoelectric (TE) energy generators fabricated using metal-shadow and radio-frequency sputtering methods at room temperature. The TE energy generators consist of four couples of 300-nm-thick nanostructured Bi2Te3 (n-BT) and Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 (p-BST) thin films used as n-type and p-type materials, respectively, on a Si substrate for the p/n junctions of the TE energy generators. Furthermore, the effect of annealing treatment of both n-BT and p-BST thin films on the electrical and TE properties as well as the TE performance of the TE energy generators is discussed. By varying the temperature between the hot and cold junction legs of the n-BT/p-BST in-plane TE energy generators annealed at 200 °C, the maximum output voltage and power are determined to be ˜3.6 mV and ˜1.1 nW, respectively, at a temperature difference of 50 K. The output powers increased by ˜590% compared to that of the as-grown TE generator at a temperature difference of 90 K. This improvement in the TE performance is attributed to the enhancement of the electrical conductivity after heat treatment. From a numerical simulation conducted using a commercial software (COMSOL), we are confident that it plays a crucial role in determining the dimension (i.e., thickness of each leg) and material properties of both n-BT and p-BST materials of the in-plane TE energy generators.

  7. Plasmonic Airy beam generated by in-plane diffraction.

    PubMed

    Li, L; Li, T; Wang, S M; Zhang, C; Zhu, S N

    2011-09-16

    We report an experimental realization of a plasmonic Airy beam, which is generated thoroughly on a silver surface. With a carefully designed nanoarray structure, such Airy beams come into being from an in-plane propagating surface plasmon polariton wave, exhibiting nonspreading, self-bending, and self-healing properties. Besides, a new phase-tuning method based on nonperfectly matched diffraction processes is proposed to generate and modulate the beam almost at will. This unique plasmonic Airy beam as well as the generation method would significantly promote the evolutions in in-plane surface plasmon polariton manipulations and indicate potential applications in lab-on-chip photonic integrations.

  8. Tilted planes in 3D image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pargas, Roy P.; Staples, Nancy J.; Malloy, Brian F.; Cantrell, Ken; Chhatriwala, Murtuza

    1998-03-01

    Reliable 3D wholebody scanners which output digitized 3D images of a complete human body are now commercially available. This paper describes a software package, called 3DM, being developed by researchers at Clemson University and which manipulates and extracts measurements from such images. The focus of this paper is on tilted planes, a 3DM tool which allows a user to define a plane through a scanned image, tilt it in any direction, and effectively define three disjoint regions on the image: the points on the plane and the points on either side of the plane. With tilted planes, the user can accurately take measurements required in applications such as apparel manufacturing. The user can manually segment the body rather precisely. Tilted planes assist the user in analyzing the form of the body and classifying the body in terms of body shape. Finally, titled planes allow the user to eliminate extraneous and unwanted points often generated by a 3D scanner. This paper describes the user interface for tilted planes, the equations defining the plane as the user moves it through the scanned image, an overview of the algorithms, and the interaction of the tilted plane feature with other tools in 3DM.

  9. Artificial impedance ground planes for low profile antenna applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMichael, Ian T.

    Recent interest in artificial impedance surfaces for low-profile antennas has led to extensive research with the goal of optimizing the ground plane's characteristics for a given antenna configuration and broadening the operational bandwidth, or alternatively creating a multi-band functionality. A method of determining the optimal reflection phase for a low-profile dipole antenna over an electromagnetic band gap (EBG) ground plane has been developed based on image theory and is presented with experimental and numerical validation. A new artificial impedance surface has also been developed, which is composed of an annular slot ring on a thin grounded dielectric. The main difference between the proposed ground plane and a conventional EBG is that the high impedance condition exists only in the vicinity of the slot and is therefore best suited for antennas with a current distribution that has a similar shape as the annular slot ring. It is shown that a loop antenna positioned closely over an annular slot loaded ground plane exhibits approximately the same gain as a loop antenna over a conventional EBG ground plane. The advantage of the new structure is its lack of periodicity, which significantly eases manufacturing. Additionally, it is shown that multiple concentric slot rings can be designed into the ground plane, which excites multiple resonances in low-profile wideband antennas. The result is a multi-band high impedance ground plane constructed using a simple arrangement of annular slots. Finally, a manufacturing technique is presented for the application of arbitrarily configured EBG antennas to handheld dual-sensor landmine detection systems. It is shown that creating an EBG antenna using very thin layers of metal will enable it to be used for ground penetrating radar (GPR) when it is co-located with a low frequency metal detector without compromising the operation of the metal detector. The potential benefit of such an antenna would be a lower profile sensor

  10. Out-of-plane properties

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, W.C.; Portanova, M.A.

    1995-10-01

    This paper summarizes three areas of research which were performed to characterize out-of-plane properties of composite materials. In the first investigation, a series of tests was run to characterize the through-the-thickness tensile strength for a variety of composites that included 2D braids, 2D and 3D weaves, and prepreg tapes. A new test method based on a curved beam was evaluated. Failures were significantly different between the 2D materials and the 3D weaves. The 2D materials delaminated between layers due to out-of-plane tensile stresses while the 3D weaves failed due to the formation of radial cracks between the surface plies caused by high circumferential stresses along the inner radius. The strength of the 2D textile composites did not increase relative to the tapes. Final failure in the 3D weaves was caused by a circumferential crack similar to the 2D materials and occurred at a lower bending moment than in other materials. The early failures in the 3D weaves were caused by radial crack formation rather than a low through-the-thickness strength. The second investigation focused on the development of a standard impact test method to measure impact damage resistance. The only impact tests that currently exist are compression after impact (CAI) tests which incorporate elements of both damage resistance and damage tolerance. A new impact test method is under development which uses a quasi-static indentation (QSI) test to directly measure damage resistance. Damage resistance is quantified in terms of the contact force to produce a unit of damage where a metric for damage may be area in C-scan, depth of residual dent, penetration, damage growth, etc. A final draft of an impact standard that uses a QSI test method will be presented to the ASTM Impact Task Group on impact. In the third investigation, the impact damage resistance behavior of a variety of textile materials was studied using the QSI test method.

  11. The UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, P. W.; Hoare, M. G.; Longmore, A.; Schröder, A. C.; Davis, C. J.; Adamson, A.; Bandyopadhyay, R. M.; de Grijs, R.; Smith, M.; Gosling, A.; Mitchison, S.; Gáspár, A.; Coe, M.; Tamura, M.; Parker, Q.; Irwin, M.; Hambly, N.; Bryant, J.; Collins, R. S.; Cross, N.; Evans, D. W.; Gonzalez-Solares, E.; Hodgkin, S.; Lewis, J.; Read, M.; Riello, M.; Sutorius, E. T. W.; Lawrence, A.; Drew, J. E.; Dye, S.; Thompson, M. A.

    2008-11-01

    The UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey (GPS) is one of the five near-infrared Public Legacy Surveys that are being undertaken by the UKIDSS consortium, using the Wide Field Camera on the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope. It is surveying 1868 deg2 of the northern and equatorial Galactic plane at Galactic latitudes -5° < b < 5° in the J, H and K filters and a ~200-deg2 area of the Taurus-Auriga-Perseus molecular cloud complex in these three filters and the 2.12 μm (1-0) H2 filter. It will provide data on ~2 × 109 sources. Here we describe the properties of the data set and provide a user's guide for its exploitation. We also present brief Demonstration Science results from DR2 and from the Science Verification programme. These results illustrate how GPS data will frequently be combined with data taken in other wavebands to produce scientific results. The Demonstration Science comprises six studies. (1) A GPS-Spitzer-GLIMPSE cross-match for the star formation region G28.983-0.603 to identify YSOs. This increases the number of YSOs identified by a factor of 10 compared to GLIMPSE alone. (2) A wide-field study of the M17 nebula, in which an extinction map of the field is presented and the effect of source confusion on luminosity functions in different subregions is noted. (3) H2 emission in the ρ Ophiuchi dark cloud. All the molecular jets are traced back to a single active clump containing only a few protostars, which suggests that the duration of strong jet activity and associated rapid accretion in low-mass protostars is brief. (4) X-ray sources in the nuclear bulge. The GPS data distinguishes local main-sequence counterparts with soft X-ray spectra from nuclear bulge giant counterparts with hard X-ray spectra. (5) External galaxies in the zone of avoidance. The galaxies are clearly distinguished from stars in fields at longitudes l > 90°. (6) IPHAS-GPS optical-infrared spectrophotometric typing. The (i' - J) versus (J - H) diagram is used to distinguish A-F type

  12. Out-of-plane properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Wade C.; Portanova, Marc A.

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarizes three areas of research which were performed to characterize out-of-plane properties of composite materials. In the first investigation, a series of tests was run to characterize the through-the-thickness tensile strength for a variety of composites that included 2D braids, 2D and 3D weaves, and prepreg tapes. A new test method based on a curved beam was evaluated. Failures were significantly different between the 2D materials and the 3D weaves. The 2D materials delaminated between layers due to out-of-plane tensile stresses while the 3D weaves failed due to the formation of radial cracks between the surface plies caused by high circumferential stresses along the inner radius. The strength of the 2D textile composites did not increase relative to the tapes. Final failure in the 3D weaves was caused by a circumferential crack similar to the 2D materials and occurred at a lower bending moment than in other materials. The early failures in the 3D weaves were caused by radial crack formation rather than a low through-the-thickness strength. The second investigation focused on the development of a standard impact test method to measure impact damage resistance. The only impact tests that currently exist are compression after impact (CAI) tests which incorporate elements of both damage resistance and damage tolerance. A new impact test method is under development which uses a quasi-static indentation (QSI) test to directly measure damage resistance. Damage resistance is quantified in terms of the contact force to produce a unit of damage where a metric for damage may be area in C-scan, depth of residual dent , penetration, damage growth, etc. A final draft of an impact standard that uses a QSI test method will be presented to the ASTM Impact Task Group on impact. In the third investigation, the impact damage resistance behavior of a variety of textile materials was studied using the QSI test method. In this study, the force where large damage

  13. Duel-Plane Optical Disdrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winsky, B. E.; Eichinger, W. E.

    2011-12-01

    Acquiring better drop-size distributions of rainfall will improve our understanding of the spatial and temporal variability of rainfall. In order to fully capture the spatial and temporal variability of rainfall, a robust, calibration free, low-cost instrument that provides an accurate drop-size distribution is required. Therefore, The University of Iowa Lidar Group has developed and built a new duel-plane optical disdrometer that meets these criteria. Two sheets of laser light, vertically spaced by 1 cm are produced by two 670nm laser beams passing through a collecting lens and culminating lens, respectively. The two sheets of laser light then pass through a convex lens located 20 cm from the lasers that focuses the light on a photo detector. A computer reads in and stores the voltages at 10 kHz. The velocity, diameter, shape and drop-size distribution of raindrops are extracted from the voltage measurements. Rainfall data collected in Iowa City, IA tested our disdrometer's robustness and accuracy of providing drop-size distributions. Our distrometer is advantageous because it is simple, low-cost, and requires no calibration.

  14. Radioactivity in the galactic plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walraven, G. D.; Haymes, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    The paper reports the detection of a large concentration of interstellar radioactivity during balloon-altitude measurements of gamma-ray energy spectra in the band between 0.02 and 12.27 MeV from galactic and extragalactic sources. Enhanced counting rates were observed in three directions towards the plane of the Galaxy; a power-law energy spectrum is computed for one of these directions (designated B 10). A large statistical deviation from the power law in a 1.0-FWHM interval centered near 1.16 MeV is discussed, and the existence of a nuclear gamma-ray line at 1.15 MeV in B 10 is postulated. It is suggested that Ca-44, which emits gamma radiation at 1.156 MeV following the decay of radioactive Sc-44, is a likely candidate for this line, noting that Sc-44 arises from Ti-44 according to explosive models of supernova nucleosynthesis. The 1.16-MeV line flux inferred from the present data is shown to equal the predicted flux for a supernova at a distance of approximately 3 kpc and an age not exceeding about 100 years.

  15. On plane submerged laminar jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coenen, Wilfried; Sanchez, Antonio L.

    2016-11-01

    We address the laminar flow generated when a developed stream of liquid of kinematic viscosity ν flowing along channel of width 2 h discharges into an open space bounded by two symmetric plane walls departing from the channel rim with an angle α 1 . Attention is focused on values of the jet volume flux 2 Q such that the associated Reynolds number Re = Qh / ν is of order unity. The formulation requires specification of the boundary conditions far from the channel exit. If the flow is driven by the volume flux, then the far-field solution corresponds to Jeffery-Hamel self-similar flow. However, as noted by Fraenkel (1962), such solutions exist only for α <129o in a limited range of Reynolds numbers 0 <=Re <=Rec (α) (e.g. Rec = 1 . 43 for α = π / 2). It is reasoned that an alternative solution, driven by a fraction of the momentum flux of the feed stream, may also exist for all values of Re and α, including a near-centerline Bickley jet, a surrounding Taylor potential flow driven by the jet entrainment, and a Falkner-Skan near-wall boundary layer. Numerical integrations of the Navier-Stokes equations are used to ascertain the existence of these different solutions.

  16. RF/Optical Demonstration: Focal Plane Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppe, D. J.; Chung, S.; Kovalik, J.; Gama, E.; Fernandez, M. M.

    2016-11-01

    In this article, we describe the second-generation focal plane optical assembly employed in the RF/optical demonstration at DSS-13. This assembly receives reflected light from the two mirror segments mounted on the RF primary. The focal plane assembly contains a fast steering mirror (FSM) to stabilize the focal plane spot, a pupil camera to aid in aligning the two segments, and several additional cameras for receiving the optical signal prior to as well as after the FSM loop.

  17. Digital scanner infrared focal plane technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, M. A.; Malone, N. R.; Harris, M.; Shin, J.; Byers, S.; Price, D.; Vampola, J.

    2011-09-01

    Advancements in finer geometry and technology advancements in circuit design now allow placement of digital architecture on cryogenic focal planes while using less power than heritage analog designs. These advances in technology reduce the size, weight, and power of modern focal planes. In addition, the interface to the focal plane is significantly simplified and is more immune to Electromagnetic Interference (EMI). The cost of the customer's instrument after integration with the digital scanning Focal Plane Array (FPA) has been significantly reduced by placing digital architecture such as Analog to digital convertors and Low Voltage Differential Signaling (LVDS) Inputs and Outputs (I/O) on the Read Out Integrated Circuit (ROIC).

  18. A bio-inspired high-authority actuator for shape morphing structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elzey, Dana M.; Sofla, Aarash Y. N.; Wadley, Haydn N. G.

    2003-08-01

    Lightweight structures capable of changing their shape on demand are of interest for a number of applications, including aerospace, power generation, and undersea vehicles. This paper describes a bio-inspired cellular metal vertebrate structure which relies on shape memory alloy (SMA) faces to achieve fully reversing shape change. The resulting vertebrate actuators can be combined with flexible face sheets to create a load-bearing, shape morphing panel. Performance of the vertebrate actuator in terms of maximum curvature and moment is analyzed and discussed. A recently constructed, prototype shape morphing airfoil is used to illustrate the concept.

  19. Deployable Soft Composite Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Rodrigue, Hugo; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-02-01

    Deployable structure composed of smart materials based actuators can reconcile its inherently conflicting requirements of low mass, good shape adaptability, and high load-bearing capability. This work describes the fabrication of deployable structures using smart soft composite actuators combining a soft matrix with variable stiffness properties and hinge-like movement through a rigid skeleton. The hinge actuator has the advantage of being simple to fabricate, inexpensive, lightweight and simple to actuate. This basic actuator can then be used to form modules capable of different types of deformations, which can then be assembled into deployable structures. The design of deployable structures is based on three principles: design of basic hinge actuators, assembly of modules and assembly of modules into large-scale deployable structures. Various deployable structures such as a segmented triangular mast, a planar structure comprised of single-loop hexagonal modules and a ring structure comprised of single-loop quadrilateral modules were designed and fabricated to verify this approach. Finally, a prototype for a deployable mirror was developed by attaching a foldable reflective membrane to the designed ring structure and its functionality was tested by using it to reflect sunlight onto to a small-scale solar panel.

  20. Deployable Soft Composite Structures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Rodrigue, Hugo; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Deployable structure composed of smart materials based actuators can reconcile its inherently conflicting requirements of low mass, good shape adaptability, and high load-bearing capability. This work describes the fabrication of deployable structures using smart soft composite actuators combining a soft matrix with variable stiffness properties and hinge-like movement through a rigid skeleton. The hinge actuator has the advantage of being simple to fabricate, inexpensive, lightweight and simple to actuate. This basic actuator can then be used to form modules capable of different types of deformations, which can then be assembled into deployable structures. The design of deployable structures is based on three principles: design of basic hinge actuators, assembly of modules and assembly of modules into large-scale deployable structures. Various deployable structures such as a segmented triangular mast, a planar structure comprised of single-loop hexagonal modules and a ring structure comprised of single-loop quadrilateral modules were designed and fabricated to verify this approach. Finally, a prototype for a deployable mirror was developed by attaching a foldable reflective membrane to the designed ring structure and its functionality was tested by using it to reflect sunlight onto to a small-scale solar panel. PMID:26892762

  1. Deployable Soft Composite Structures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Rodrigue, Hugo; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2016-02-19

    Deployable structure composed of smart materials based actuators can reconcile its inherently conflicting requirements of low mass, good shape adaptability, and high load-bearing capability. This work describes the fabrication of deployable structures using smart soft composite actuators combining a soft matrix with variable stiffness properties and hinge-like movement through a rigid skeleton. The hinge actuator has the advantage of being simple to fabricate, inexpensive, lightweight and simple to actuate. This basic actuator can then be used to form modules capable of different types of deformations, which can then be assembled into deployable structures. The design of deployable structures is based on three principles: design of basic hinge actuators, assembly of modules and assembly of modules into large-scale deployable structures. Various deployable structures such as a segmented triangular mast, a planar structure comprised of single-loop hexagonal modules and a ring structure comprised of single-loop quadrilateral modules were designed and fabricated to verify this approach. Finally, a prototype for a deployable mirror was developed by attaching a foldable reflective membrane to the designed ring structure and its functionality was tested by using it to reflect sunlight onto to a small-scale solar panel.

  2. Numerical investigation of lensless zoomable holographic multiple projections to tilted planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Makowski, Michal; Kakue, Takashi; Okada, Naohisa; Endo, Yutaka; Hirayama, Ryuji; Hiyama, Daisuke; Hasegawa, Satoki; Nagahama, Yuki; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2014-12-01

    This paper numerically investigates the feasibility of lensless zoomable holographic multiple projections to tilted planes. We have already developed lensless zoomable holographic single projection using scaled diffraction, which calculates diffraction between parallel planes with different sampling pitches. The structure of this zoomable holographic projection is very simple because it does not need a lens; however, it only projects a single image to a plane parallel to the hologram. The lensless zoomable holographic projection in this paper is capable of projecting multiple images onto tilted planes simultaneously.

  3. National Aerospace Plane Thermal Development. (Latest Citations from the Aerospace Database)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning thermal properties of the National Aerospace Plane (NASP). Analysis of thermal stress, and methods for determining thermal effects on the plane's supersonic structure are discussed. The citations also review temperature extremes that the vehicle is likely to encounter. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  4. National Aerospace Plane Thermal Development. (Latest citations from the Aerospace Database)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning thermal properties of the National Aerospace Plane (NASP). Analysis of thermal stress, and methods for determining thermal effects on the plane's supersonic structure are discussed. The citations also review temperature extremes that the vehicle is likely to encounter.

  5. Slipping and Rolling on an Inclined Plane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aghamohammadi, Cina; Aghamohammadi, Amir

    2011-01-01

    In the first part of the paper, using a direct calculation two-dimensional motion of a particle sliding on an inclined plane is investigated for general values of friction coefficient ([mu]). A parametric equation for the trajectory of the particle is also obtained. In the second part of the paper, the motion of a sphere on the inclined plane is…

  6. Solar Impulse's Solar-Powered Plane

    ScienceCinema

    Moniz, Ernest; Piccard, Bertrand; Reicher, Dan

    2016-07-12

    Solar Impulse lands in Washington, DC at Washington Dulles International Airport as part of its journey across the United States. Secretary Ernest Moniz speaks about how advancements like those at the Department of Energy are leading the way for innovations like the solar-powered plane. Footage of the solar-powered plane courtesy of Solar Impulse.

  7. Solar Impulse's Solar-Powered Plane

    SciTech Connect

    Moniz, Ernest; Piccard, Bertrand; Reicher, Dan

    2013-07-08

    Solar Impulse lands in Washington, DC at Washington Dulles International Airport as part of its journey across the United States. Secretary Ernest Moniz speaks about how advancements like those at the Department of Energy are leading the way for innovations like the solar-powered plane. Footage of the solar-powered plane courtesy of Solar Impulse.

  8. How to embed shrimps in parameter planes of the Lorenz system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rech, Paulo C.

    2017-04-01

    Shrimps are typical periodic islands present in chaotic regions of parameter planes of nonlinear dynamical systems. Such periodic structures have been observed in several different fields including mathematical models simulating lasers, electronic circuits, chemical reactions, neural networks, and biological systems. As far as I know the existence of shrimps in parameter planes of the Lorenz system has never been reported. This paper describes how to display such structures embedded in chaotic regions of parameter planes of the Lorenz system. This is accomplished by considering a shift in the x variable of the \\dot{x} differential equation. Additionally it is shown that these periodic structures may appear organized in period-adding sequences.

  9. Study the Z-Plane Strip Capacitance

    SciTech Connect

    Parikh, H.; Swain, S.; /SLAC

    2005-12-15

    The BaBaR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center is currently undergoing an upgrade to improve its muon and neutral hadron detection system. The Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) that had been used till now have deteriorated in performance over the past few years and are being replaced by Limited Streamer Tube (LSTs). Each layer of the system consists of a set of up to 10 streamer tube modules which provide one coordinate ({phi} coordinate) and a single ''Z-plane'' which provides the Z coordinate of the hit. The large area Z-planes (up to 12m{sup 2}) are 1mm thick and contain 96 copper strips that detect the induced charge from avalanches created in the streamer tube wires. All the Z-planes needed for the upgrade have already been constructed, but only a third of the planes were installed last summer. After installing the 24 Z-planes last year, it was learned that 0.7% of the strips were dead when put inside the detector. This was mainly due to the delicate solder joint between the read-out cable and the strip, and since it is difficult to access or replace the Z-planes inside the detector, it is very important to perform various tests to make sure that the Z-planes will be efficient and effective in the long term. We measure the capacitance between the copper strips and the ground plane, and compare it to the theoretical value that we expect. Instead of measuring the capacitance channel by channel, which would be a very tedious job, we developed a more effective method of measuring the capacitance. Since all the Z-planes were built at SLAC, we also built a smaller 46 cm by 30 cm Z-plane with 12 strips just to see how they were constructed and to gain a better understanding about the solder joints.

  10. In-plane magnetocrystalline anisotropy observed on Fe/Cu(111) nanostructures grown on stepped surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeglin, C.; Stanescu, S.; Deville, J. P.; Ohresser, P.; Brookes, N. B.

    2002-07-01

    Magnetic in-plane and out-of-plane anisotropies measured by angle dependent x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) on fcc Fe nanostructures are discussed and compared with fcc FeNi nanostructures. All studies were performed using XMCD at the Fe L2,3 edges for Fe grown on a Cu(111) vicinal vic surface. The step induced in-plane anisotropy in the step decoration regime is analyzed by measuring the orbital magnetic moment dependence as a function of the in-plane azimuth and out-of-plane incidence angles. In the one-dimensional limit where the out-of-plane magnetic easy axis dominates, Fe/Cu(111) shows a large in-plane orbital magnetic moment anisotropy leading to a magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy of 0.4 meV/atom and an in-plane magnetic easy axis perpendicular to the steps. In the nanometer scale the aspect ratio of the elongated rectangular Fe stripes are found to be responsible for the in-plane and out-of-plane anisotropy. This is coherent with previous findings where the circular shaped fcc Fe0.65Ni0.35 nanostructures do not show any in-plane anisotropy. The three-dimensional nanostructures are characterized by magnetic orbital moments connected with the number of broken bonds in the direction of the quantization axis defined by the direction of the saturation field. The microscopic origin of the in-plane large orbital magnetic moment anisotropy is attributed to the nanometer size of the structures perpendicular to the steps and to the asymmetry of the number of broken bonds in the plane.

  11. Thermomechanical response of metal foam sandwich panels for structural thermal protection systems in hypersonic vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakow, Joseph F.

    Sandwich panels with metal foam cores are proposed for load-bearing structural components in actively cooled thermal protection systems for aerospace vehicles. Prototype acreage metal foam sandwich panels (MFSP's) are constructed and analyzed with the central goal of characterizing the thermomechanical response of the system. MFSP's are subjected to uniform temperature fields and equibiaxial loading in a novel experimental load frame. The load frame exploits the mismatch of coefficients of thermal expansion and allows for thermostructural experimentation without the endemic conflict of thermal and mechanical boundary conditions. Back-to-back strain gages and distributed thermocouples capture the in-plane response of the panels, including buckling and elastic-plastic post-buckling. The out-of-plane response is captured via moire interferometry, which provides a visualization of evolving mode shapes throughout the post-buckling regime. The experimental results agree with an analytical prediction for critical temperatures in sandwich panels based on a Rayleigh-Ritz minimization of the energy functional for a Reissner-Mindlin plate. In addition, a three-dimensional finite element model of the non-linear thermomechanical response of the panel-frame experimental system is developed and the results are shown to agree well with the experimentally identified response of MFSP's. Central to analytical and numerical characterization of MFSP's is an understanding of the response of metal foam under shear loading. The shear response of metal foam is captured experimentally, providing density-dependent relationships for material stiffness, strength, and energy absorption. Speckle photography is employed to identify microstructural size effects in the distribution of strain throughout metal foam under shear loading. In addition, a micromechanical model is established for the density-dependent shear modulus of metal foam, which allows for the coupling of cell-level imperfections

  12. Transition in Plane Channel Flow with Spatially Periodic Perturbations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schatz, Michael Francis

    We studied experimentally the primary and secondary instabilities in a plane channel flow perturbed by a streamwise -periodic array of cylinders. Wall-bounded shear flow in plane channels typically undergoes a direct transition from simple laminar behavior to turbulence with complex spatial and temporal intermittency; such behavior is characteristic of open flows, where fluid can advect through the system. However, the spatially perturbed channel flow displays bifurcations to well-ordered stable states, similar to transition exhibited by closed flows (flows confined in a box). The primary transition is a supercritical Hopf bifurcation arising from convective rather than absolute instability. The critical value of Reynolds number R _1 = 130 for the transition is more than an order of magnitude less than that for the unperturbed flow (R_1 = 5772 from linear stability theory). The stable secondary flow, a two-dimensional travelling-wave, resembles Tollmein-Schlichting waves, the linear modes of plane Poiseuille flow. As in the spatially unperturbed case, intentionally imposed, controlled disturbances are required to reveal transition since the bifurcation arises from convective instability. Numerical simulations are in quantitative agreement with the experimental observations. The secondary flow loses stability at R _2~ 160 to a three-dimensional state with a preferred spanwise periodicity. This tertiary flow demonstrates standing-wave behavior as it evolves along the streamwise direction; equivalent behavior results from differing initial disturbances. The flow structure and the strictly periodic spectra resemble the beginning stages of turbulent breakdown typically displayed by unperturbed plane channel flow; however, we observed no evidence in our experiment that the three-dimensional states continue to evolve toward turbulence. For R _sp {~}{>} 200, power spectra from our experiment have broad subharmonics that are also observed in other wall-bounded shear flows

  13. A Cool Tool for Deicing Planes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Nicknamed the "ice zapper," the Electro Expulsive Separation System (EESS) is an aircraft ice removal system that "pulverizes ice and removes layers of ice as thin as frost or as thick as an inch of glaze," according to the principle inventor of the technology. Patented by NASA's Ames Research Center, the EESS consists of layers of conductors encased in materials that are bonded directly to the airframe structure. When ice accumulates on the aircraft, an electric current is sent through the conductors, causing them to pulse. Even though the conductors move less than a twenty-thousandth of an inch in just a millisecond, the movement is sufficient to pulverize the ice. It is this highly accelerated motion that shatters the ice into particles the size of table salt; too small to be harmful to the aircraft. When compared with other systems in use, such as thermal deicers and pneumatic boots, the ice zapper does very well. Thermal deicers are fairly common, although they use an enormous amount of energy and present the possibility of ice refreezing. Pneumatic boots are not always effective because they require an inflation device that is unable to work until a quarter inch of ice has accumulated. With both systems, the ice that is loosened may still be large enough to cause problems for the plane once dislodged.

  14. Coupled Riccati equations for complex plane constraint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, Kristin M.; Sesak, John R.

    1991-01-01

    A new Linear Quadratic Gaussian design method is presented which provides prescribed imaginary axis pole placement for optimal control and estimation systems. This procedure contributes another degree of design freedom to flexible spacecraft control. Current design methods which interject modal damping into the system tend to have little affect on modal frequencies, i.e., they predictably shift open plant poles horizontally in the complex plane to form the closed loop controller or estimator pole constellation, but make little provision for vertical (imaginary axis) pole shifts. Imaginary axis shifts which reduce the closed loop model frequencies (the bandwidths) are desirable since they reduce the sensitivity of the system to noise disturbances. The new method drives the closed loop modal frequencies to predictable (specified) levels, frequencies as low as zero rad/sec (real axis pole placement) can be achieved. The design procedure works through rotational and translational destabilizations of the plant, and a coupling of two independently solved algebraic Riccati equations through a structured state weighting matrix. Two new concepts, gain transference and Q equivalency, are introduced and their use shown.

  15. Quantum dynamics of a plane pendulum

    SciTech Connect

    Leibscher, Monika; Schmidt, Burkhard

    2009-07-15

    A semianalytical approach to the quantum dynamics of a plane pendulum is developed, based on Mathieu functions which appear as stationary wave functions. The time-dependent Schroedinger equation is solved for pendular analogs of coherent and squeezed states of a harmonic oscillator, induced by instantaneous changes of the periodic potential energy function. Coherent pendular states are discussed between the harmonic limit for small displacements and the inverted pendulum limit, while squeezed pendular states are shown to interpolate between vibrational and free rotational motion. In the latter case, full and fractional revivals as well as spatiotemporal structures in the time evolution of the probability densities (quantum carpets) are quantitatively analyzed. Corresponding expressions for the mean orientation are derived in terms of Mathieu functions in time. For periodic double well potentials, different revival schemes, and different quantum carpets are found for the even and odd initial states forming the ground tunneling doublet. Time evolution of the mean alignment allows the separation of states with different parity. Implications for external (rotational) and internal (torsional) motion of molecules induced by intense laser fields are discussed.

  16. Exotensioned structural members with energy-absorbing effects

    SciTech Connect

    Brockwell, Michael Ian

    2014-01-07

    Structural members having enhanced load bearing capacity per unit mass include a skeleton structure formed from strips of material. Notches may be placed on the strips and a weave of tensile material placed in the notches and woven around the skeleton structure. At least one pair of structural members can be jointed together to provide very strong joints due to a weave patterns of tensile material, such as Kevlar, that distributes stress throughout the structure, preventing stress from concentrating in one area. Methods of manufacturing such structural members include molding material into skeletons of desired cross section using a matrix of molding segments. Total catastrophic failures in composite materials are substantially avoided and the strength to weight ratio of structures can be increased.

  17. Exotensioned structural members with energy-absorbing effects

    DOEpatents

    Brockwell, Michael Ian

    2015-08-11

    Structural members having enhanced load bearing capacity per unit mass include a skeleton structure formed from strips of material. Notches may be placed on the strips and a weave of tensile material placed in the notches and woven around the skeleton structure. At least one pair of structural members can be jointed together to provide very strong joints due to a weave patterns of tensile material, such as Kevlar, that distributes stress throughout the structure, preventing stress from concentrating in one area. Methods of manufacturing such structural members include molding material into skeletons of desired cross section using a matrix of molding segments. Total catastrophic failures in composite materials are substantially avoided and the strength to weight ratio of structures can be increased.

  18. Progress in patch repair of aerospace composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Weiguo; Zhang, Weifang; Tang, Qingyun

    2011-11-01

    With the rapid application of the composite structure in the aerospace industry, more load-bearing structures and components are used with composites instead of conventional engineering materials. However, the composite structures are inevitably suffered damages in the complex environment, the composites structures repair become more important in the airplane maintenance. This paper describes the composites patch repair progress. Firstly, the flaws and damages concerned to composite structures are concluded, and also the repair principles are presented. Secondly, the advantages and disadvantages for different repair methods are analyzed, as well as the different bonded repair and their applicability to different structures is discussed. According the recent research in theory and experiment, the scarf repair effects under different parameters are analyzed. Finally, the failure mechanisms of repair structure are discussed, and some prospects are put forward.

  19. Progress in patch repair of aerospace composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Weiguo; Zhang, Weifang; Tang, Qingyun

    2012-04-01

    With the rapid application of the composite structure in the aerospace industry, more load-bearing structures and components are used with composites instead of conventional engineering materials. However, the composite structures are inevitably suffered damages in the complex environment, the composites structures repair become more important in the airplane maintenance. This paper describes the composites patch repair progress. Firstly, the flaws and damages concerned to composite structures are concluded, and also the repair principles are presented. Secondly, the advantages and disadvantages for different repair methods are analyzed, as well as the different bonded repair and their applicability to different structures is discussed. According the recent research in theory and experiment, the scarf repair effects under different parameters are analyzed. Finally, the failure mechanisms of repair structure are discussed, and some prospects are put forward.

  20. Lower incisor inclination regarding different reference planes.

    PubMed

    Zataráin, Brenda; Avila, Josué; Moyaho, Angeles; Carrasco, Rosendo; Velasco, Carmen

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the degree of lower incisor inclination with respect to different reference planes. It was an observational, analytical, longitudinal, prospective study conducted on 100 lateral cephalograms which were corrected according to the photograph in natural head position in order to draw the true vertical plane (TVP). The incisor mandibular plane angle (IMPA) was compensated to eliminate the variation of the mandibular plane growth type with the formula "FMApx.- 25 (FMA) + IMPApx. = compensated IMPA (IMPACOM)". As the data followed normal distribution determined by the KolmogorovSmirnov test, parametric tests were used for the statistical analysis, Ttest, ANOVA and Pearson coefficient correlation test. Statistical analysis was performed using a statistical significance of p <0.05. There is correlation between TVP and NB line (NB) (0.8614), Frankfort mandibular incisor angle (FMIA) (0.8894), IMPA (0.6351), Apo line (Apo) (0.609), IMPACOM (0.8895) and McHorris angle (MH) (0.7769). ANOVA showed statistically significant differences between the means for the 7 variables with 95% confidence level, P=0.0001. The multiple range test showed no significant difference among means: APoNB (0.88), IMPAMH (0.36), IMPANB (0.65), FMIAIMPACOM (0.01), FMIATVP (0.18), TVPIMPACOM (0.17). There was correlation among all reference planes. There were statistically significant differences among the means of the planes measured, except for IMPACOM, FMIA and TVP. The IMPA differed significantly from the IMPACOM. The compensated IMPA and the FMIA did not differ significantly from the TVP. The true horizontal plane was mismatched with Frankfort plane in 84% of the sample with a range of 19°. The true vertical plane is adequate for measuring lower incisor inclination.

  1. Mosaic focal plane for star sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, N. C.

    1981-02-01

    The basic principles of star sensors are reviewed with reference to the advantages of replacing photodiodes, image dissectors, and vidicons with mosaic charge transfer device (CTD) focal planes. The desirable characteristics of CTD focal planes include: high uniformity, high transfer effect, low dark current, low hot and cold spots, low dead space, low angular misalignment, high coplanarity, and high thermal stability. An implementation of a mosaic CTD array star sensor which achieves high angular position accuracy and frequency attitude update is presented. Two focal plane packaging concepts, the planar and vertical board packagings, are examined.

  2. An assessment of tailoring of lightning protection design requirements for a composite wing structure on a metallic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harwood, T. L.

    1991-01-01

    The Navy A-6E aircraft is presently being modified with a new wing which uses graphite/epoxy structures and substructures around a titanium load-bearing structure. The ability of composites to conduct electricity is less than that of aluminum. This is cause for concern when the wing may be required to conduct large lightning currents. The manufacturer attempted to solve lightning protection issues by performing a risk assessment based on a statistical approach which allows relaxation of the wing lightning protection design levels over certain locations of the composite wing. A sensitivity study is presented designed to define the total risk of relaxation of the design levels.

  3. Pristine Basal- and Edge-Plane-Oriented Molybdenite MoS2 Exhibiting Highly Anisotropic Properties.

    PubMed

    Tan, Shu Min; Ambrosi, Adriano; Sofer, Zdenĕk; Huber, Štěpán; Sedmidubský, David; Pumera, Martin

    2015-05-04

    The layered structure of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2 ) is structurally similar to that of graphite, with individual sheets strongly covalently bonded within but held together through weak van der Waals interactions. This results in two distinct surfaces of MoS2 : basal and edge planes. The edge plane was theoretically predicted to be more electroactive than the basal plane, but evidence from direct experimental comparison is elusive. Herein, the first study comparing the two surfaces of MoS2 by using macroscopic crystals is presented. A careful investigation of the electrochemical properties of macroscopic MoS2 pristine crystals with precise control over the exposure of one plane surface, that is, basal plane or edge plane, was performed. These crystals were characterized thoroughly by AFM, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, voltammetry, digital simulation, and DFT calculations. In the Raman spectra, the basal and edge planes show anisotropy in the preferred excitation of E2g and A1g phonon modes, respectively. The edge plane exhibits a much larger heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant k(0) of 4.96×10(-5) and 1.1×10(-3)  cm s(-1) for [Fe(CN)6 ](3-/4-) and [Ru(NH3 )6 ](3+/2+) redox probes, respectively, compared to the basal plane, which yielded k(0) tending towards zero for [Fe(CN)6 ](3-/4-) and about 9.3×10(-4)  cm s(-1) for [Ru(NH3 )6 ](3+/2+) . The industrially important hydrogen evolution reaction follows the trend observed for [Fe(CN)6 ](3-/4-) in that the basal plane is basically inactive. The experimental comparison of the edge and basal planes of MoS2 crystals is supported by DFT calculations.

  4. Static and dynamic pile testing of reinforced concrete piles with structure integrated fibre optic strain sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilder, Constanze; Kohlhoff, Harald; Hofmann, Detlef; Basedau, Frank; Habel, Wolfgang R.; Baeßler, Matthias; Niederleithinger, Ernst; Georgi, Steven; Herten, Markus

    2013-05-01

    Static and dynamic pile tests are carried out to determine the load bearing capacity and the quality of reinforced concrete piles. As part of a round robin test to evaluate dynamic load tests, structure integrated fibre optic strain sensors were used to receive more detailed information about the strains along the pile length compared to conventional measurements at the pile head. This paper shows the instrumentation of the pile with extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometers sensors and fibre Bragg gratings sensors together with the results of the conducted static load test as well as the dynamic load tests and pile integrity tests.

  5. Geometric and analytic problems on bicomplex plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimiev, Stancho; Stoev, Peter; Stoilova, Stanislava

    2015-11-01

    Let us recall that the bicomplex plane is a complex ring of complex dimension 2. It consists of couples of the kind (z, w) = z + jw, where z and w are complex numbers and j is a symbol with the property j2 = -1. We note that the bicomplex plane admits singular points. The set of these singular points coincides with the cross-choped set of complex bisectrices (z, ±z), z is a complex. The main problem in the function theory on the bicomplex plane is to describe the interconnection between the same theory of the cross-choped subset and whole bicomplex plane. The first theory is of one complex variable and the second one is of two complex variables. Another problems are related with the comformal mappings and the movement of a partials of this subset on the whole one. Presented paper is a start studies in this direction.

  6. Causal inheritence in plane wave quotients

    SciTech Connect

    Hubeny, Veronika E.; Rangamani, Mukund; Ross, Simon F.

    2003-11-24

    We investigate the appearance of closed timelike curves in quotients of plane waves along spacelike isometries. First we formulate a necessary and sufficient condition for a quotient of a general spacetime to preserve stable causality. We explicitly show that the plane waves are stably causal; in passing, we observe that some pp-waves are not even distinguishing. We then consider the classification of all quotients of the maximally supersymmetric ten-dimensional plane wave under a spacelike isometry, and show that the quotient will lead to closed timelike curves iff the isometry involves a translation along the u direction. The appearance of these closed timelike curves is thus connected to the special properties of the light cones in plane wave spacetimes. We show that all other quotients preserve stable causality.

  7. LWIR scene simulator developed for end-to-end performance evaluation of focal planes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Niels A.; Bowser, William M.; Song, Sung H.; Skiff, Laura T.; Powell, William W.; Romero, Charles

    1992-01-01

    The development of a long-wave infrared optical simulator facilitates evaluation of the end-to-end performance of long wavelength infrared (LWIR) focal plane arrays (FPAs) in a system-like environment. This simulator provides selectable structured scene inputs to a focal plane module or array. Background irradiances as low as 10 exp 10 photons/sq cm s are achievable when the simulator is cooled with liquid helium. The optical simulator can generate single or multiple targets of controllable intensities, and uniform or structured background irradiances. The infrared scenes can be viewed in a stationary mode or dynamically scanned across the focal plane.

  8. Attitude analysis in Flatland: The plane truth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuster, Malcolm D.

    1993-01-01

    Many results in attitude analysis are still meaningful when the attitude is restricted to rotations about a single axis. Such a picture corresponds to attitude analysis in the Euclidean plane. The present report formalizes the representation of attitude in the plane and applies it to some well-known problems. In particular, we study the connection of the 'additive' and 'multiplicative' formulations of the differential corrector for the quaternion in its two-dimensional setting.

  9. In-plane information from tapping mode AFM images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, Matthew

    2003-03-01

    Phase contrast in intermittent-contact atomic force microscopy is shown to reveal in-plane structural and mechanical properties of poly(diacetylene) monolayer films. This is surprising because measurements of in-plane properties typically require a contact mode of microscopy. Such measurements are possible because the tilt in the oscillating cantilever provides components of motion not just perpendicular to the surface, but also parallel to the sample surface. Lateral tip displacement is virtually universal in AFM, implying that any oscillating tip-AFM technique is sensitive to in-plane material properties. Although the tilt in the cantilever is small ( 10^o) it produces a component of motion that is 20% of the total tip displacement, and this motion accounts for 5-10% of dissipated energy through the tip-sample interaction[1]. The data is used in conjunction with a numerical model to extract in-plane material parameters. The effect of the cantilever tilt on phase measurements is directly verified through measurements on silicon samples tilted at a variety of angles with respect to the cantilever. The lateral tip displacement we make use of allows measurements of in-plane properties of soft samples such as polymer and biological samples. This work was done in collaboration with M. D'Amato, R.W. Carpick, and M.A. Eriksson, and was supported by the NSF CAREER and MRSEC programs and the Research Corporation. 1. M.S. Marcus, R.W. Carpick, D.Y. Sasaki, M.A. Eriksson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 226103 (2002)

  10. On-chip ADC for infrared focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lei; Chen, Guo-qiang; Wang, Pan; Ding, Rui-jun

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents a low power and small area analog-digital converter (ADC) for infrared focal plane arrays (IRFPA) readout integrated circuit (ROIC). Successive approximation register (SAR) ADC architecture is used in this IRFPA readout integrated circuit. Each column of the IRFPA shares one SAR ADC. The most important part is the three-level DAC. Compared to the previous design, this three-level DAC needs smaller area, has lower power, and more suitable for IRFPA ROIC. In this DAC, its most significant bit (MSB) sub-DAC uses charge scaling, while the least significant bit (LSB) sub-DAC uses voltage scaling. Where the MSB sub-DAC consists of a four-bit charge scaling DAC and a five-bit sub-charge scaling DAC. We need to put a scaling capacitor Cs between these two sub-DACs. Because of the small area, we have more design methods to make the ADC has a symmetrical structure and has higher accuracy. The ADC also needs a high resolution comparator. In this design the comparator uses three-stage operational amplifier structure to have a 77dB differential gain. As the IR focal plane readout circuit signal is stepped DC signal, the circuit design time without adding the sample and hold circuit, so we can use a DC signal instead of infrared focal plane readout circuit output analog signals to be simulated. The simulation result shows that the resolution of the ADC is 12 bit.

  11. Biomechanical differences between incline and plane hopping.

    PubMed

    Kannas, Theodoros M; Kellis, Eleftherios; Amiridis, Ioannis G

    2011-12-01

    Kannas, TM, Kellis, E, and Amiridis, IG. Biomechanical differences between incline and plane hopping. J Strength Cond Res 25(12): 3334-3341, 2011-The need for the generation of higher joint power output during performance of dynamic activities led us to investigate the force-length relationship of the plantar flexors during consecutive stretch-shortening cycles of hopping. The hypothesis of this study was that hopping (consecutive jumps with the knee as straight as possible) on an inclined (15°) surface might lead to a better jumping performance compared with hopping on a plane surface (0°). Twelve active men performed 3 sets of 10 consecutive hops on both an incline and plane surface. Ground reaction forces; ankle and knee joint kinematics; electromyographic (EMG) activity from the medial gastrocnemius (MG), soleus (Sol) and tibialis anterior (TA); and architectural data from the MG were recorded. The results showed that participants jumped significantly higher (p < 0.05) when hopping on an inclined surface (30.32 ± 8.18 cm) compared with hopping on a plane surface (27.52 ± 4.97 cm). No differences in temporal characteristics between the 2 types of jumps were observed. Incline hopping induced significantly greater ankle dorsiflexion and knee extension at takeoff compared with plane hopping (p < 0.05). The fascicle length of the MG was greater at initial contact with the ground during incline hopping (p < 0.05). Moreover, the EMG activities of Sol and TA during the propulsion phase were significantly higher during incline compared with that during plane hopping (p < 0.05). It does not seem unreasonable to suggest that, if the aim of hopping plyometrics is to improve plantar flexor explosivity, incline hopping might be a more effective exercise than hopping on a plane surface.

  12. Saturn Ring Plane Crossing Observations in August and November 1995

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, Philip

    1995-07-01

    The plane of Saturn's rings passes through the earth on 10 August 1995, and through the sun on 17-21 November 1995, providing a rare opportunity to determine the thickness, vertical distortions, and pole orientation of the rings. A similar opportunity will not recur until the year 2038. We will obtain time series of images using the Wide Field Camera and methane filter at each crossing time, in order to measure the radial profile of apparent ring thickness, to determine the moment of the earth's crossing to within a few minutes, and to look for the expected warp in the ring plane due to satellite perturbations. In addition, the Planetary Camera will be used to recover the small satellites Pan and Atlas and thus refine their orbital periods. A series of multi-color WFC observations will be used to probe the structure and particle size distribution within the faint E and G rings.

  13. A doubly-localized solution of plane Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Evan; Gibson, John

    2013-11-01

    We present a new equilibrium solution of plane Couette flow localized in two spatially extended directions. The solution is derived from the EQ7/HVS solution of plane Couette flow discovered independently by Itano and Generalis (PRL 2009) and Gibson et al. (JFM 2009), of which a spanwise localized version has also recently been produced (Gibson, these proceedings). The doubly localized solution displays relatively long length scales in comparison with the spatially periodic and spanwise localized solutions, suggesting the importance of these scales in capturing the spatial complexity of transitional and low-Reynolds number turbulence. The solution is comparable in size and appearance to the doubly-localized, chaotically evolving edge states previously computed in this flow by Duguet et al. (PoF 2009) and Schneider et al. (JFM 2010). Additionally, we address the structure of localized solutions in the ``tails,'' i.e. in the region approaching laminar.

  14. Simultaneous measurements and flow visualization in a plane mixing layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherikar, S. V.; Chevray, R.

    Wind tunnel experiments performed to determine the flow characteristics of a plane mixing layer are described. Two parallel streams of air moving at different velocities were separated by a splitter plate prior to their mixing in the test section. Gaseous NH3 and gaseous HCI were introduced near the splitter plate to produce an ammonium chloride aerosol which made flow visualization possible. Flow visualization records (movies) and velocity measurements, using laser-doppler-velocimeters tracking silicone oil particles in the flow, were made simultaneously and synchronized using a chopped beam of a He-Ne laser which left a signature on the move film and provided a signal for flow rate data acquisition. Analysis of these synchronized data verified the existence of large, essentially two-dimensional coherent structures in the plane mixing layer.

  15. Stability and Load Bearing Capacity of a Bars with Built up Cross Section and Elastic Supports / Badania Stateczności I Nosności Prętów Złożonych Z Podporami Sprężystymi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajewski, Marcin

    2015-03-01

    The present paper is devoted to the numerical analysis and experimental tests of compressed bars with built-up cross section which are commonly used as a top chord of the roof trusses. The significant impact on carrying capacity for that kind of elements in case of out-of-plane buckling is appropriate choice of battens which are used to provide interaction between separate members. Linear buckling analysis results and nonlinear static analysis results, with material and geometrical nonlinearity, are presented for the bar with built-up cross section which was used as the top chord of the truss made in reality. Diagonals and verticals which are supports for the top chord between marginal joints were replaced by the elastic supports. The threshold stiffness (minimum stiffness) for the intermediate elastic supports which ensures maximum buckling load was appointed for the beam and shell model of the structure. The magnitude of limit load depended on length of the battens was calculated for models with initial geometric imperfections. The experimental tests results for the axially compressed bars with builtup cross section and elastic support are presented. Niniejsza praca poświecona jest analizom numerycznym i badaniom doświadczalnym ściskanych prętów złożonych, które są często stosowane, jako pasy górne kratownic dachowych. Istotny wpływ na nośność tego typu elementów, przy założeniu wyboczenia z płaszczyzny układu, ma odpowiedni dobór przewiązek zapewniający współpracę poszczególnych gałęzi. W pracy przedstawiono rezultaty liniowych analiz stateczności oraz fizycznie i geometrycznie nieliniowych analiz statycznych dla pręta złożonego, z którego zbudowany jest pas górny kratownicy wykonanej w rzeczywistości. Słupki i krzyżulce podpierające pas między węzłami skrajnymi zastąpiono podporami sprężystymi. Wyznaczono graniczną (minimalna) sztywność sprężystych podpór pośrednich zapewniającą maksymalną wartość obci

  16. INTERIOR OF SECOND FLOOR BRIDGE BETWEEN PLANING MILL AND CAR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR OF SECOND FLOOR BRIDGE BETWEEN PLANING MILL AND CAR MACHINE SHOP, LOOKING SOUTH TOWARD PLANING MILL. - Southern Pacific, Sacramento Shops, Planing Mill, 111 I Street, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  17. GLAMER - II. Multiple-plane gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkova, Margarita; Metcalf, R. Benton; Giocoli, Carlo

    2014-12-01

    We present an extension to multiple planes of the gravitational lensing code GLAMER. The method entails projecting the mass in the observed light-cone on to a discrete number of lens planes and inverse ray-shooting from the image to the source plane. The mass on each plane can be represented as haloes, simulation particles, a projected mass map extracted form a numerical simulation or any combination of these. The image finding is done in a source-oriented fashion, where only regions of interest are iteratively refined on an initially coarse image plane grid. The calculations are performed in parallel on shared memory machines. The code is able to handle different types of analytic haloes (NFW, NSIE, power law, etc.), haloes extracted from numerical simulations and clusters constructed from semi-analytic models (MOKA). Likewise, there are several different options for modelling the source(s) which can be distributed throughout the light-cone. The distribution of matter in the light-cone can be either taken from a pre-existing N-body numerical simulations, from halo catalogues, or are generated from an analytic mass function. We present several tests of the code and demonstrate some of its applications such as generating mock images of galaxy and galaxy cluster lenses.

  18. Focal Plane Metrology for the LSST Camera

    SciTech Connect

    A Rasmussen, Andrew P.; Hale, Layton; Kim, Peter; Lee, Eric; Perl, Martin; Schindler, Rafe; Takacs, Peter; Thurston, Timothy; /SLAC

    2007-01-10

    Meeting the science goals for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) translates into a demanding set of imaging performance requirements for the optical system over a wide (3.5{sup o}) field of view. In turn, meeting those imaging requirements necessitates maintaining precise control of the focal plane surface (10 {micro}m P-V) over the entire field of view (640 mm diameter) at the operating temperature (T {approx} -100 C) and over the operational elevation angle range. We briefly describe the hierarchical design approach for the LSST Camera focal plane and the baseline design for assembling the flat focal plane at room temperature. Preliminary results of gravity load and thermal distortion calculations are provided, and early metrological verification of candidate materials under cold thermal conditions are presented. A detailed, generalized method for stitching together sparse metrology data originating from differential, non-contact metrological data acquisition spanning multiple (non-continuous) sensor surfaces making up the focal plane, is described and demonstrated. Finally, we describe some in situ alignment verification alternatives, some of which may be integrated into the camera's focal plane.

  19. On the relationship between the dynamic behavior and nanoscale staggered structure of the bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qwamizadeh, Mahan; Zhang, Zuoqi; Zhou, Kun; Zhang, Yong Wei

    2015-05-01

    Bone, a typical load-bearing biological material, composed of ordinary base materials such as organic protein and inorganic mineral arranged in a hierarchical architecture, exhibits extraordinary mechanical properties. Up to now, most of previous studies focused on its mechanical properties under static loading. However, failure of the bone occurs often under dynamic loading. An interesting question is: Are the structural sizes and layouts of the bone related or even adapted to the functionalities demanded by its dynamic performance? In the present work, systematic finite element analysis was performed on the dynamic response of nanoscale bone structures under dynamic loading. It was found that for a fixed mineral volume fraction and unit cell area, there exists a nanoscale staggered structure at some specific feature size and layout which exhibits the fastest attenuation of stress waves. Remarkably, these specific feature sizes and layouts are in excellent agreement with those experimentally observed in the bone at the same scale, indicating that the structural size and layout of the bone at the nanoscale are evolutionarily adapted to its dynamic behavior. The present work points out the importance of dynamic effect on the biological evolution of load-bearing biological materials.

  20. In-plane chiral tunneling and out-of-plane valley-polarized quantum tunneling in twisted graphene trilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Jia-Bin; He, Lin

    2014-08-01

    Here we show that a twisted graphene trilayer made by misoriented stacking of a graphene monolayer on top of a Bernal graphene bilayer can exhibit rich and tailored electronic properties. For the case that the graphene monolayer and bilayer are strongly coupled, both the massless Dirac fermions and massive chiral fermions coexist in the twisted trilayer, leading to unique in-plane chiral tunneling. For a weak coupling between the two graphene systems, the distinct chiralities and pseudospin textures of quasiparticles in monolayer and bilayer enable vertical valley-polarized quantum tunneling between them. Intriguingly, the polarity of the valley polarization can be inverted simply by either controlling the rotational angles between the two systems or tuning the Fermi levels of the two systems. Our result implies that layered van der Waals structures assembled from individual atomic planes can create materials that harbor unusual properties and alternative functionalities depending on the stacking configuration of the crystalline layers.

  1. The MSX Galactic Plane Survey Submillimeter Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, S.; Carey, S.; Egan, M. P.

    The MidCourse Space eXperiment (MSX) surveyed the Galactic plane within 5° latitude in four mid-infrared spectral bands. A set of full resolution (20'') 1.5^circ×1.5^circ images on 6'' pixel centers has been created in each spectral band by co-adding all the survey data. A lower (1.2') resolution atlas of 10^circ×10^circ images provide large-scale panoramas of the plane. A new class of objects has been identified in the images, infrared dark clouds, which are silhouetted against the mid-infrared background emission from the interstellar medium in the Galactic plane. The IRAS ISSA plates indicate that these clouds are dark out to 100 μm. Submillimeter emission traces the form of the dark cloud and reveals cores indicative of class 0 protostars.

  2. Solid-state curved focal plane arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor); Hoenk, Michael (Inventor); Jones, Todd (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to curved focal plane arrays. More specifically, the present invention relates to a system and method for making solid-state curved focal plane arrays from standard and high-purity devices that may be matched to a given optical system. There are two ways to make a curved focal plane arrays starting with the fully fabricated device. One way, is to thin the device and conform it to a curvature. A second way, is to back-illuminate a thick device without making a thinned membrane. The thick device is a special class of devices; for example devices fabricated with high purity silicon. One surface of the device (the non VLSI fabricated surface, also referred to as the back surface) can be polished to form a curved surface.

  3. Achromatic phase shifting focal plane masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Kevin

    The search for life on other worlds is an exciting scientific endeavor that could change the way we perceive our place in the universe. Thousands of extrasolar planets have been discovered using indirect detection techniques. One of the most promising methods for discovering new exoplanets and searching for life is direct imaging with a coronagraph. Exoplanet coronagraphy of Earth-like planets is a challenging task, but we have developed many of the tools necessary to make it feasible. The Phase-Induced Amplitude Apodization (PIAA) Coronagraph is one of the highest-performing architectures for direct exoplanet imaging. With a complex phase-shifting focal plane mask, the PIAA Complex Mask Coronagraph (PIAACMC) can approach the theoretical performance limit for any direct detection technique. The architecture design is flexible enough to be applied to any arbitrary aperture shape, including segmented and obscured apertures. This is an important feature for compatibility with next-generation ground and space-based telescopes. PIAA and PIAACMC focal plane masks have been demonstrated in monochromatic light. An important next step for high-performance coronagraphy is the development of broadband phase-shifting focal plane masks. In this dissertation, we present an algorithm for designing the PIAA and PIAACMC focal plane masks to operate in broadband. We also demonstrate manufacturing of the focal plane masks, and show laboratory results. We use simulations to show the potential performance of the coronagraph system, and the use of wavefront control to correct for mask manufacturing errors. Given the laboratory results and simulations, we show new areas of exoplanet science that can potentially be explored using coronagraph technology. The main conclusion of this dissertation is that we now have the tools required to design and manufacture PIAA and PIAACMC achromatic focal plane masks. These tools can be applied to current and future telescope systems to enable new

  4. NASA R and T aerospace plane vehicles: Progress and plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, S. C.

    1985-01-01

    Progress made in key technologies such as materials, structures, aerothermodynamics, hypersonic aerodynamics, and hypersonic airbreathing propulsion are reported. Advances were made in more generic, areas such as active controls, flight computer hardware and software, and interdisciplinary analytical design methodology. These technology advances coupled with the development of and experiences with the Space Shuttle make feasible aerospace plane-type vehicles that meet the more demanding requirements of various DOD missions and/or an all-weather Shuttle II with reduced launch costs. Technology needs and high payoff technologies, and the technology advancements in propulsion, control-configured-vehicles, aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics, aerothermal loads, and materials and structures were studied. The highest payoff technologies of materials and structures including thermal-structural analysis and high temperature test techniques are emphasized. The high priority technology of propulsion, and plans, of what remains to be done rather than firm program commitments, are briefly discussed.

  5. Slant plane CSAR processing using Householder transform.

    PubMed

    Burki, Jehanzeb; Barnes, Christopher F

    2008-10-01

    Fourier analysis-based focusing of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data collected during circular flight path is a recent advancement in SAR signal processing. This paper uses the Householder transform to obtain a ground plane circular SAR (CSAR) signal phase history from the slant plane CSAR phase history by inverting the linear shift-varying system model, thereby circumventing the need for explicitly computing a pseudo-inverse. The Householder transform has recently been shown to have improved error bounds and stability as an underdetermined and ill-conditioned system solver, and the Householder transform is computationally efficient.

  6. [Normolipemic plane xanthomas and mycosis fungoides].

    PubMed

    García-Arpa, Mónica; Rodríguez-Vázquez, María; Vera, Elena; Romero, Guillermo; González-García, Jesús; Cortina, Pilar

    2005-06-01

    Diffuse normolipemic plane xanthomas are characterized by the presence of yellowish plaques on the eyelids, neck, upper trunk, buttocks and flexures. Histology shows foamy histiocytes in the dermis. Approximately half of all cases are associated with hematological disorders. On rare occasions, they have been described in the context of cutaneous T-cell lymphomas. We present the case of a female patient with tumor-stage mycosis fungoides who developed normolipemic plane xanthomas coinciding with the appearance of new lymphoma lesions. We review English-language literature regarding the rare association of xanthomas and cutaneous T-cell lymphomas.

  7. Toward loop quantization of plane gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinterleitner, Franz; Major, Seth

    2012-03-01

    The polarized Gowdy model in terms of Ashtekar-Barbero variables is reduced with an additional constraint derived from the Killing equations for plane gravitational waves with parallel rays. The new constraint is formulated in a diffeomorphism invariant manner and, when it is included in the model, the resulting constraint algebra is first class, in contrast to the prior work done in special coordinates. Using an earlier work by Banerjee and Date, the constraints are expressed in terms of classical quantities that have an operator equivalent in loop quantum gravity, making these plane gravitational wave spacetimes accessible to loop quantization techniques.

  8. Orbital plane change maneuver with aerocruise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naidu, D. S.

    1991-01-01

    The synergistic plane change problem connected with orbital transfer employing aeroassist technology, is addressed. The mission involves transfer from high earth orbit to low earth orbit with plane change being performed within the atmosphere. The complete mission consists of a deorbit phase, atmospheric phase, and finally reorbit phase. The atmospheric maneuver is composed of an entry mode, a cruise mode, and finally an exit mode. During the cruise mode, constant altitude and velocity are maintained by means of bank angle control with constant thrust or thrust control with constant bank angle. Comparisons between these two control strategies bring out some interesting features.

  9. Note: A novel integrated microforce measurement system for plane-plane contact research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, W.; Rostoucher, D.; Gauthier, M.

    2010-11-01

    The evaluation of plane-plane contact force has become a big issue in micro-/nano research, for example in microassembly. However with the lack of effective experimental equipments, the research on plane-plane contact has been limited to theoretical formulations or virtual simulation. In this paper, a microforce sensor and precision parallel robot integrated system is proposed for the microforce measurement of plane-plane contact. In the proposed system, the two objects are fixed on the parallel robot end-platform and the microforce sensor probe tip, respectively, and the high precision robot system is employed to provide six degree-of-freedom motions between both objects. So it is convenient for the microforce measurement between the planar objects with different orientations. As a significant application, the proposed system is utilized for measurements of pull-off force between planar objects, in which the validation of the system is demonstrated in practice. The proposed microforce measurement system is generic, which can be extended to a variety of microforce measurements in plane-plane contact.

  10. Wind/seismic comparisons for upgrading existing structures

    SciTech Connect

    Giller, R.A. )

    1989-10-01

    This paper depicts the analysis procedures and methods used to evaluate three existing building structures for extreme wind loads. The three structures involved in this evaluation are located at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. This site is characterized by open flat grassland with few surrounding obstructions and has extreme winds in lieu of tornados as a design basis accident condition. This group of buildings represents a variety of construction types, including a concrete stack, a concrete load-bearing wall structure, and a rigid steel-frame building. The three structures included in this group have recently been evaluated for response to the design basis earthquake that included non-linear time history effects. The resulting loads and stresses from the wind analyses were compared to the loads and stresses resulting from seismic analyses. This approach eliminated the need to prepare additional capacity calculations that were already contained in the seismic evaluations. 4 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. How important is the {103} plane of stable Ge2 Sb2 Te5 for phase-change memory?

    PubMed

    Zhang, W; Zheng, W T; Kim, J-G; Cui, X Q; Li, L; Qi, J G; Kim, Y-J; Song, S A

    2015-07-01

    Closely correlating with {200} plane of cubic phase, {103} plane of hexagonal phase of Ge(2)Sb(2)Te(5) plays a crucial role in achieving fast phase change process as well as formation of modulation structures, dislocations and twins in Ge(2)Sb(2)Te(5). The behaviors of {103} plane of hexagonal phase render the phase-change memory process as a nanoscale shape memory.

  12. Out-of-Plane Coordinated Porphyrin Nanotubes with Enhanced Singlet Oxygen Generation Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qiang; Wang, Yao; Xu, Yanshuang; Yan, Yun; Huang, Jianbin

    2016-08-01

    A supramolecular porphyrin nanotube displaying J-aggregation feature was constructed by out-of-plane coordinated bismuth-porphyrin. Significantly, compared to traditional J-aggregated porphyrin suffering from fluorescence and singlet oxygen quenching, the nanotube exhibits excellent bio-imaging ability and enhanced production efficiency of singlet oxygen. The out-of-plane structure of bismuth to porphyrin makes the aggregation an appropriate material for theranostics. Furthermore, it is also a potential radio-therapeutic drug owing to the presence of radio-active bismuth. Thus, the self-assembly of out-of-plane coordinated porphyrin can be a facile approach toward effective therapy of tumors and other diseases.

  13. Mapping optically variable quasars towards the Galactic plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Trincado, J. G.; Verdugo, T.; Reylé, C.; Robin, A. C.; de Diego, J. A.; Motta, V.; Vega, L.; Downes, J. J.; Mateu, C.; Vivas, A. K.; Briceño, C.; Abad, C.; Vieira, K.; Hernández, J.; Nuñez, A.; Gatuzz, E.

    2015-12-01

    We present preliminary results of the CIDA Equatorial Variability Survey (CEVS), looking for quasar (hereafter QSO) candidates near the Galactic plane. The CEVS contains photometric data from extended and adjacent regions of the Milky Way disk (˜ 500 sq. deg.). In this work 2.5 square degrees with moderately high temporal sampling in the CEVS were analyzed. The selection of QSO candidates was based on the study of intrinsic optical photometric variability of 14,719 light curves. We studied samples defined by cuts in the variability index (V_{index}>66.5), periodicity index (Q > 2), and the distribution of these sources in the plane (A_T,γ), using a slight modification of the first-order of the structure function for the temporal sampling of the survey. Finally, 288 sources were selected as QSO candidates. The results shown in this work are a first attempt to develop a robust method to detect QSO towards the Galactic plane in the era of massive surveys such as VISTA and Gaia.

  14. Application of morphological bit planes in retinal blood vessel extraction.

    PubMed

    Fraz, M M; Basit, A; Barman, S A

    2013-04-01

    The appearance of the retinal blood vessels is an important diagnostic indicator of various clinical disorders of the eye and the body. Retinal blood vessels have been shown to provide evidence in terms of change in diameter, branching angles, or tortuosity, as a result of ophthalmic disease. This paper reports the development for an automated method for segmentation of blood vessels in retinal images. A unique combination of methods for retinal blood vessel skeleton detection and multidirectional morphological bit plane slicing is presented to extract the blood vessels from the color retinal images. The skeleton of main vessels is extracted by the application of directional differential operators and then evaluation of combination of derivative signs and average derivative values. Mathematical morphology has been materialized as a proficient technique for quantifying the retinal vasculature in ocular fundus images. A multidirectional top-hat operator with rotating structuring elements is used to emphasize the vessels in a particular direction, and information is extracted using bit plane slicing. An iterative region growing method is applied to integrate the main skeleton and the images resulting from bit plane slicing of vessel direction-dependent morphological filters. The approach is tested on two publicly available databases DRIVE and STARE. Average accuracy achieved by the proposed method is 0.9423 for both the databases with significant values of sensitivity and specificity also; the algorithm outperforms the second human observer in terms of precision of segmented vessel tree.

  15. Structural and functional diversity of desmosomes.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Robert M; Green, Kathleen J

    2013-12-01

    Desmosomes anchor intermediate filaments at sites of cell contact established by the interaction of cadherins extending from opposing cells. The incorporation of cadherins, catenin adaptors, and cytoskeletal elements resembles the closely related adherens junction. However, the recruitment of intermediate filaments distinguishes desmosomes and imparts a unique function. By linking the load-bearing intermediate filaments of neighboring cells, desmosomes create mechanically contiguous cell sheets and, in so doing, confer structural integrity to the tissues they populate. This trait and a well-established role in human disease have long captured the attention of cell biologists, as evidenced by a publication record dating back to the mid-1860s. Likewise, emerging data implicating the desmosome in signaling events pertinent to organismal development, carcinogenesis, and genetic disorders will secure a prominent role for desmosomes in future biological and biomedical investigations.

  16. In plane oscillation of a bifilar pendulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinrichsen, Peter F.

    2016-11-01

    The line tensions, the horizontal and vertical accelerations as well as the period of large angle oscillations parallel to the plane of a bifilar suspension are presented and have been experimentally investigated using strain gauges and a smart phone. This system has a number of advantages over the simple pendulum for studying large angle oscillations, and for measuring the acceleration due to gravity.

  17. MTI Focal Plane Assembly Design and Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, M.; Rienstra, J.L.

    1999-06-17

    The focal plane assembly for the Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) consists of sensor chip assemblies, optical filters, and a vacuum enclosure. Sensor chip assemblies, composed of linear detector arrays and readout integrated circuits, provide spatial resolution in the cross-track direction for the pushbroom imager. Optical filters define 15 spectral bands in a range from 0.45 {micro}m to 10.7 {micro}m. All the detector arrays are mounted on a single focal plane and are designed to operate at 75 K. Three pairs of sensor chip assemblies (SCAs) are required to provide cross-track coverage in all 15 spectral bands. Each pair of SCAs includes detector arrays made from silicon, iridium antimonide, and mercury cadmium telluride. Read out integrated circuits multiplex the signals from the detectors to 18 separate video channels. Optical filter assemblies defining the spectral bands are mounted over the linear detector arrays. Each filter assembly consists of several filter strips bonded together side-by-side. The MTI focal plane assembly has been integrated with the rest of the payload and has undergone detailed testing and calibration. This paper includes representative test data for the various spectral bands and the overall performance of the focal plane assembly.

  18. Deep-Plane Lipoabdominoplasty in East Asians

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jun-Young; Hong, Yoon Gi; Sim, Hyung Bo; Sun, Sang Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to develop a new surgical technique by combining traditional abdominoplasty with liposuction. This combination of operations permits simpler and more accurate management of various abdominal deformities. In lipoabdominoplasty, the combination of techniques is of paramount concern. Herein, we introduce a new combination of liposuction and abdominoplasty using deep-plane flap sliding to maximize the benefits of both techniques. Methods Deep-plane lipoabdominoplasty was performed in 143 patients between January 2007 and May 2014. We applied extensive liposuction on the entire abdomen followed by a sliding flap through the deep plane after repairing the diastasis recti. The abdominal wound closure was completed with repair of Scarpa's fascia. Results The average amount of liposuction aspirate was 1,400 mL (700–3,100 mL), and the size of the average excised skin ellipse was 21.78×12.81 cm (from 15×10 to 25×15 cm). There were no major complications such as deep-vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism. We encountered 22 cases of minor complications: one wound infection, one case of skin necrosis, two cases of undercorrection, nine hypertrophic scars, and nine seromas. These complications were solved by conservative management or simple revision. Conclusions The use of deep-plane lipoabdominoplasty can correct abdominal deformities more effectively and with fewer complications than traditional abdominoplasty. PMID:27462568

  19. Microscale out-of-plane anemometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Chang (Inventor); Chen, Jack (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A microscale out-of-plane thermal sensor. A resistive heater is suspended over a substrate by supports raised with respect to the substrate to provide a clearance underneath the resistive heater for fluid flow. A preferred fabrication process for the thermal sensor uses surface micromachining and a three-dimensional assembly to raise the supports and lift the resistive heater over the substrate.

  20. End Site Control Plane Subsystem (ESCPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Swany, Douglas Martin

    2014-08-12

    This project researched extending the control plane for dynamic networks into end sites like campuses and laboratories. Key aspects of consideration were signaling over local area network technologies, application integration and monitoring. We studied design considerations for such environments and developed and demonstrated a useful proof of concept implementation and documented implementation strategies for heterogeneous networks.

  1. Optical interconnections to focal plane arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Rienstra, J.L.; Hinckley, M.K.

    2000-11-01

    The authors have successfully demonstrated an optical data interconnection from the output of a focal plane array to the downstream data acquisition electronics. The demonstrated approach included a continuous wave laser beam directed at a multiple quantum well reflectance modulator connected to the focal plane array analog output. The output waveform from the optical interconnect was observed on an oscilloscope to be a replica of the input signal. They fed the output of the optical data link to the same data acquisition system used to characterize focal plane array performance. Measurements of the signal to noise ratio at the input and output of the optical interconnection showed that the signal to noise ratio was reduced by a factor of 10 or more. Analysis of the noise and link gain showed that the primary contributors to the additional noise were laser intensity noise and photodetector receiver noise. Subsequent efforts should be able to reduce these noise sources considerably and should result in substantially improved signal to noise performance. They also observed significant photocurrent generation in the reflectance modulator that imposes a current load on the focal plane array output amplifier. This current loading is an issue with the demonstrated approach because it tends to negate the power saving feature of the reflectance modulator interconnection concept.

  2. Dual band QWIP focal plane array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor); Choi, Kwong Kit (Inventor); Bandara, Sumith V. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) that provides two-color image sensing. Two different quantum wells are configured to absorb two different wavelengths. The QWIPs are arrayed in a focal plane array (FPA). The two-color QWIPs are selected for readout by selective electrical contact with the two different QWIPs or by the use of two different wavelength sensitive gratings.

  3. Simple Harmonic Motion in Harmonic Plane Waves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benumof, Reuben

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the distribution of kinetic and potential energy in transverse and longitudinal waves and examines the transmission of power and momentum. This discussion is intended to aid in understanding the simple harmonic motion of a particle involved in the propagation of a harmonic mechanical plane wave. (HM)

  4. Domain faceting in an in-plane magnetic reorientation transition

    SciTech Connect

    Vescovo, E.; Mentes, T.O.; Sadowski, J.T.; Ablett, J.M.; Nino, M.A.; Locatelli, A.

    2010-11-04

    The microscopic structure of the 90{sup o} in-plane magnetic reorientation transition in Fe(110) films is examined using photoemission x-ray microscopy. At the nanoscale, sharp magnetic boundaries are detected. They are indicative of a first-order transition and are consistent with Fe magnetic anisotropy constants. At the micron scale, the magnetic boundary breaks up into triangular patterns whose characteristic angular dependence is revealed by experiments on conical microwedges. This effect, fully accounted by micromagnetic simulations, opens the possibility to control the sharpness of the transition at the microscopic scale.

  5. Vertical-cavity in-plane heterostructures: Physics and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Taghizadeh, Alireza; Mørk, Jesper; Chung, Il-Sug

    2015-11-02

    We show that in-plane (lateral) heterostructures realized in vertical cavities with high contrast grating reflectors can be used to significantly modify the anisotropic dispersion curvature, also interpreted as the photon effective mass. This design freedom enables exotic configurations of heterostructures and many interesting applications. The effects of the anisotropic photon effective mass on the mode confinement, mode spacing, and transverse modes are investigated. As a possible application, the method of boosting the speed of diode lasers by engineering the photon-photon resonance is discussed. Based on this platform, we propose a system of two laterally coupled cavities, which shows the breaking of parity-time symmetry in vertical cavity structures.

  6. The three-dimensional evolution of a plane wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maekawa, H.; Moser, R. D.; Mansour, N. N.

    1993-01-01

    In the past three decades, linear stability analysis has led to a comprehensive understanding of the linear stages of transition in plane wakes. Our understanding of the nonlinear and turbulent stages is less developed. Nonlinear theory developed by Papageorgiou and Smith was used to study the long-wavelength regime in wakes. The nonlinear and turbulent stages were investigated experimentally, and few numerical studies examined the early nonlinear stages of forced wakes. The evolution of three dimensional disturbances in an incompressible wake is investigated using direct numerical simulations. The instantaneous three-dimaensional structures and corresponding statistics are presented.

  7. Determining the Ice-binding Planes of Antifreeze Proteins by Fluorescence-based Ice Plane Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Koli; Garnham, Christopher P.; Nishimiya, Yoshiyuki; Tsuda, Sakae; Braslavsky, Ido; Davies, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are expressed in a variety of cold-hardy organisms to prevent or slow internal ice growth. AFPs bind to specific planes of ice through their ice-binding surfaces. Fluorescence-based ice plane affinity (FIPA) analysis is a modified technique used to determine the ice planes to which the AFPs bind. FIPA is based on the original ice-etching method for determining AFP-bound ice-planes. It produces clearer images in a shortened experimental time. In FIPA analysis, AFPs are fluorescently labeled with a chimeric tag or a covalent dye then slowly incorporated into a macroscopic single ice crystal, which has been preformed into a hemisphere and oriented to determine the a- and c-axes. The AFP-bound ice hemisphere is imaged under UV light to visualize AFP-bound planes using filters to block out nonspecific light. Fluorescent labeling of the AFPs allows real-time monitoring of AFP adsorption into ice. The labels have been found not to influence the planes to which AFPs bind. FIPA analysis also introduces the option to bind more than one differently tagged AFP on the same single ice crystal to help differentiate their binding planes. These applications of FIPA are helping to advance our understanding of how AFPs bind to ice to halt its growth and why many AFP-producing organisms express multiple AFP isoforms. PMID:24457629

  8. Turbulence characteristics inside a turbulent spot in plane Poiseuille flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henningson, Dan S.; Kim, John

    1989-01-01

    Turbulence characteristics inside a turbulent spot in plane Poiseuille flow are investigated by analyzing a database obtained from a direct simulation. The spot area is divided into two distinct regions - a turbulent area and a wave area. It is found that the flow structures inside the turbulent area have strong resemblance to those found in the fully-developed turbulent channel flow. A suitably defined mean and rms fluctuations as well as the internal shear-layer structures are found to be similar to the turbulent counterpart. In the wave area the inflexional mean spanwise profiles cause a rapid growth of oblique waves, which break down to turbulence. The rms fluctuations and Reynolds stress are found to be higher in that area, and the shear-layer structures are similar to those observed in the secondary instability of two-dimensional Tollmien-Schlichting waves.

  9. Self-healing structural composites with electromagnetic functionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaisted, Thomas A.; Vakil Amirkhizi, Alireza; Arbelaez, Diego; Nemat-Nasser, Syrus C.; Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    2003-08-01

    We have incorporated arrays of conductive electromagnetic scattering elements such as straight copper wires and copper coils into fiber-reinforced polymer composites, resulting in materials with required structural and further electromagnetic functionality. The scattering elements provide controlled electromagnetic response for tasks such as filtering and may be used to tune the overall index of refraction of the composite. Integration of these metallic elements into traditional fiber-reinforced polymer composites has introduced other opportunities for multifunctionality in terms of self-healing, thermal transport and perhaps sensing applications. Such functionalities are the result of fiber/wire integration through textile braiding and weaving, combined with a new polymer matrix that has the ability to heal internal cracking through thermo-reversible covalent bonds. Multifunctional composites of this kind enhance the role of structural materials from mere load-bearing systems to lightweight structures of good thermo-mechanical attributes that also have electromagnetic and other functionalities.

  10. Vestibular influences on human postural control in combinations of pitch and roll planes reveal differences in spatiotemporal processing.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, M G; Allum, J H; Honegger, F

    2001-09-01

    The present study examined the influence of bilateral peripheral vestibular loss (BVL) in humans on postural responses to multidirectional surface rotations in the pitch and roll planes. Specifically, we examined the effects of vestibular loss on the directional sensitivity, timing, and amplitude of early stretch, balance correcting, and stabilizing reactions in postural leg and trunk muscles as well as changes in ankle torque and trunk angular velocity following multidirectional rotational perturbations of the support surface. Fourteen normal healthy adults and five BVL patients stood on a dual axis rotating platform which rotated 7.5 degrees at 50 degrees/s through eight different directions of pitch and roll combinations separated by 45 degrees. Directions were randomized within a series of 44 perturbation trials which were presented first with eyes open, followed by a second series of trials with eyes closed. Vestibular loss did not influence the range of activation or direction of maximum sensitivity for balance correcting responses (120-220 ms). Response onsets at approximately 120 ms were normal in tibialis anterior (TA), soleus (SOL), paraspinals (PARAS), or quadriceps muscles. Only SOL muscle activity demonstrated a 38- to 45-ms delay for combinations of forward (toe-down) and roll perturbations in BVL patients. The amplitude of balance correcting responses in leg muscles between 120 and 220 ms was, with one exception, severely reduced in BVL patients for eyes open and eyes closed conditions. SOL responses were decreased bilaterally for toe-up and toe-down perturbations, but more significantly reduced in the downhill (load-bearing) leg for combined roll and pitch perturbations. TA was significantly reduced bilaterally for toe-up perturbations, and in the downhill leg for backward roll perturbations. Forward perturbations, however, elicited significantly larger TA activity in BVL between 120 and 220 ms compared to normals, which would act to further

  11. VAST PLANES OF SATELLITES IN A HIGH-RESOLUTION SIMULATION OF THE LOCAL GROUP: COMPARISON TO ANDROMEDA

    SciTech Connect

    Gillet, N.; Ocvirk, P.; Aubert, D.; Knebe, A.; Yepes, G.; Libeskind, N.; Gottlöber, S.; Hoffman, Y.

    2015-02-10

    We search for vast planes of satellites (VPoS) in a high-resolution simulation of the Local Group performed by the CLUES project, which improves significantly the resolution of previous similar studies. We use a simple method for detecting planar configurations of satellites, and validate it on the known plane of M31. We implement a range of prescriptions for modeling the satellite populations, roughly reproducing the variety of recipes used in the literature, and investigate the occurrence and properties of planar structures in these populations. The structure of the simulated satellite systems is strongly non-random and contains planes of satellites, predominantly co-rotating, with, in some cases, sizes comparable to the plane observed in M31 by Ibata et al. However, the latter is slightly richer in satellites, slightly thinner, and has stronger co-rotation, which makes it stand out as overall more exceptional than the simulated planes, when compared to a random population. Although the simulated planes we find are generally dominated by one real structure forming its backbone, they are also partly fortuitous and are thus not kinematically coherent structures as a whole. Provided that the simulated and observed planes of satellites are indeed of the same nature, our results suggest that the VPoS of M31 is not a coherent disk and that one-third to one-half of its satellites must have large proper motions perpendicular to the plane.

  12. Out-of-plane Block Copolymer Microdomains in High Aspect-Ratio Templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadelrab, Karim; Bai, Wubin; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo; Ross, Caroline

    The use of directed self-assembly DSA of block copolymers BCP proved to be a power approach for nanoscale fabrication. It combines the ability of BCPs to self-assemble into nanoscale features with the use of lithographic tools to create controlled long range order. In addition, BCP with highly incompatible blocks (high Flory-Huggins interaction parameter (χ)) offer improvement in resolution, and line edge fluctuations of the self-assembled patterns. Unfortunately, high- χ BCPs usually exhibit large differences in surface affinity between the two blocks, leading to the formation of a surface layer of the lower surface energy block and favoring in-plane orientation of lamellae or cylindrical microdomains. Here, we explore the conditions under which a high χ BCP creates an out-of-plane lamellar structure using functionalized high aspect ratio trenches with preferential walls. We employ the free energy analysis of self-consistent field theory SCFT to identify whether an in-plane or out-of-plane structure is stable for a particular trench width. In addition, we employ the single mode expansion of Ginzburg-Landau free energy expression in the weak segregation limit to analytically construct a phase diagram of the in-plane and out-of-plane lamellae as a function of aspect ratio and surface attraction strength. It is found that achieving an out of plane lamellar structure necessitates a coupling between aspect ratio and surface functionality. In particular, strong side wall attraction results in out-of-plane lamellae when the trench aspect ratio is greater than unity. The results are validated for a lamellar forming polystyrene-block-polydimethylsiloxane (PS-b-PDMS) within trenches made using interference lithography.

  13. On the stability of satellite planes - I. Effects of mass, velocity, halo shape and alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernando, Nuwanthika; Arias, Veronica; Guglielmo, Magda; Lewis, Geraint F.; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Power, Chris

    2017-02-01

    The recently discovered vast thin plane of dwarf satellites orbiting the Andromeda Galaxy (M31) adds to the mystery of the small-scale distribution of the Local Group's galaxy population. Such well-defined planar structures are apparently rare occurrences in cold dark matter cosmological simulations, and we lack a coherent explanation of their formation and existence. In this paper, we explore the long-term survivability of thin planes of dwarfs in galactic haloes, focusing, in particular, on systems mimicking the observed Andromeda distribution. The key results show that, in general, planes of dwarf galaxies are fragile, sensitive to the shape of the dark matter halo and other perturbing effects. In fact, long-lived planes of satellites only exist in polar orbits in spherical dark matter haloes, presenting a challenge to the observed Andromeda plane that is significantly tilted with respect to the optical disc. Our conclusion is that, in the standard cosmological models, planes of satellites are generally short lived, and hence we must be located at a relatively special time in the evolution of the Andromeda Plane, lucky enough to see its coherent pattern.

  14. Innovative design of composite structures: Design, manufacturing, and testing of plates utilizing curvilinear fiber trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.; Rust, R. J.; Waters, W. A., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    As a means of improving structural design, the concept of fabricating flat plates containing holes by incorporating curvilinear fiber trajectories to transmit loads around the hole is studied. In the present discussion this concept is viewed from a structural level, where access holes, windows, doors, and other openings are of significant size. This is opposed to holes sized for mechanical fasteners. Instead of cutting the important load-bearing fibers at the hole edge, as a conventional straightline design does, the curvilinear design preserves the load-bearing fibers by orienting them in smooth trajectories around the holes, their loading not ending abruptly at the hole edge. Though the concept of curvilinear fiber trajectories has been studied before, attempts to manufacture and test such plates have been limited. This report describes a cooperative effort between Cincinnati Milacron Inc., NASA Langley Research Center, and Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University to design, manufacture, and test plates using the curvilinear fiber trajectory concept. The paper discusses details of the plate design, details of the manufacturing, and a summary of results from testing the plates with inplane compressive buckling loads and tensile loads. Comparisons between the curvilinear and conventional straightline fiber designs based on measurements and observation are made. Failure modes, failure loads, strains, deflections, and other key responses are compared.

  15. The effect of temperature on supported dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers: structure and lubrication performance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Zander, Thomas; Liu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Chao; Raj, Akanksha; Wieland, D C Florian; Garamus, Vasil M; Willumeit-Römer, Regine; Claesson, Per Martin; Dėdinaitė, Andra

    2015-05-01

    Phospholipids fulfill an important role in joint lubrication. They, together with hyaluronan and glycoproteins, are the biolubricants that sustain low friction between cartilage surfaces bathed in synovial fluid. In this work we have investigated how the friction force and load bearing capacity of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) bilayers on silica surfaces are affected by temperature, covering the temperature range 25-52°C. Friction forces have been determined utilizing the AFM colloidal probe technique, which showed that DPPC bilayers are able to provide low friction forces over the whole temperature interval. However, the load bearing capacity is improved at higher temperatures. We interpret this finding as being a consequence of lower rigidity and higher self-healing capacity of the DPPC bilayer in the liquid disordered state compared to the gel state. The corresponding structure of solid supported DPPC bilayers at the silica-liquid interface has been followed using X-ray reflectivity measurements, which suggests that the DPPC bilayer is in the gel phase at 25°C and 39°C and in the liquid disordered state at 55°C. Well-defined bilayer structures were observed for both phases. The deposited DPPC bilayers were also imaged using AFM PeakForce Tapping mode, and these measurements indicated a less homogeneous layer at temperatures below 37°C.

  16. The crack problem for a nonhomogeneous plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delale, F.; Erdogan, F.

    1982-01-01

    The plane elasticity problem for a nonhomogeneous medium containing a crack is considered. It is assumed that the Poisson's ratio of the medium is constant and the Young's modulus E varies exponentially with the coordinate parallel to the crack. First the half plane problem is formulated and the solution is given for arbitrary tractions along the boundary. Then the integral equation for the crack problem is derived. It is shown that the integral equation having the derivative of the crack surface displacement as the density function has a simple Cauchy type kernel. Hence, its solution and the stresses around the crack tips have the conventional square root singularity. The solution is given for various loading conditions. The results show that the effect of the Poisson's ratio and consequently that of the thickness constraint on the stress intensity factors are rather negligible.

  17. Split-field pupil plane determination apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Salmon, Joseph T.

    1996-01-01

    A split-field pupil plane determination apparatus (10) having a wedge assembly (16) with a first glass wedge (18) and a second glass wedge (20) positioned to divide a laser beam (12) into a first laser beam half (22) and a second laser beam half (24) which diverge away from the wedge assembly (16). A wire mask (26) is positioned immediately after the wedge assembly (16) in the path of the laser beam halves (22, 24) such that a shadow thereof is cast as a first shadow half (30) and a second shadow half (32) at the input to a relay telescope (14). The relay telescope (14) causes the laser beam halves (22, 24) to converge such that the first shadow half (30) of the wire mask (26) is aligned with the second shadow half (32) at any subsequent pupil plane (34).

  18. Image-plane processing of visual information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huck, F. O.; Fales, C. L.; Park, S. K.; Samms, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    Shannon's theory of information is used to optimize the optical design of sensor-array imaging systems which use neighborhood image-plane signal processing for enhancing edges and compressing dynamic range during image formation. The resultant edge-enhancement, or band-pass-filter, response is found to be very similar to that of human vision. Comparisons of traits in human vision with results from information theory suggest that: (1) Image-plane processing, like preprocessing in human vision, can improve visual information acquisition for pattern recognition when resolving power, sensitivity, and dynamic range are constrained. Improvements include reduced sensitivity to changes in lighter levels, reduced signal dynamic range, reduced data transmission and processing, and reduced aliasing and photosensor noise degradation. (2) Information content can be an appropriate figure of merit for optimizing the optical design of imaging systems when visual information is acquired for pattern recognition. The design trade-offs involve spatial response, sensitivity, and sampling interval.

  19. The iPTF Galactic Plane Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellm, Eric Christopher; Prince, Thomas A.; Miller, Adam; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Kupfer, Thomas; Laher, Russ; Masci, Frank J.; Oded Ofek, Eran; Shupe, David L.; Surace, Jason A.; Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Beginning in 2013, the Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory has conducted a survey of the Northern Galactic Plane. The major science goals of the survey include mapping variable stars throughout the Galaxy; discovering outbursting sources such as Cataclysmic Variables, FU Ori outbursts, and M-dwarf flares; and identifying rare types of compact binaries. Through 2015 the survey has obtained an average of 60 epochs in R-band in the spatial region 0 < l < 150 degrees, |b| < 20 degrees, with greatest coverage in the |b| < 5 degree region.I will describe the performance of the survey and present initial results, with a focus on variability-based identification of X-ray sources. The Zwicky Transient Facility, to begin in 2017, will include an extensive public variability survey of the Galactic Plane.

  20. Cutting Plane Algorithms for Maximum Problems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    Bazaraa and Shetty (1979). For variational inequalities, references on the cutting plane approach are considerably less. Zuhovickii et al. (1969) (see...and can be expressed as a convex combination of a finite number of extreme points [see, e.g., Bazaraa et al., (1990)], For VI problems, both U and X are...unique solution (see, page 234 of Bazaraa and Shetty, 1979)., 32 Figure 4: A ’Strong’ Solution to a Variational Inequality Problem The rate of

  1. High speed multi focal plane optical system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minott, P. O. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An apparatus for eliminating beamsplitter generated optical aberrations in a pupil concentric optical system providing a plurality of spatially separated images on different focal planes or surfaces is presented. The system employs a buried surface beamsplitter having spherically curved entrance and exit faces which are concentric to a system aperture stop with the entrance face being located in the path of a converging light beam directed there from an image forming objective element which is also concentric to the aperture stop.

  2. Analytical modeling of PWAS in-plane and out-of-plane electromechanical impedance spectroscopy (EMIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamas, Tuncay; Lin, Bin; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2013-04-01

    This paper discusses theoretical analysis of electro-mechanical impedance spectroscopy (EMIS) of piezoelectric wafer active sensor (PWAS). Both free and constrained PWAS EMIS models are developed for in-plane (lengthwise) and outof plane (thickness wise) mode. The paper starts with the general piezoelectric constitutive equations that express the linear relation between stress, strain, electric field and electric displacement. This is followed by the PWAS EMIS models with two assumptions: 1) constant electric displacement in thickness direction (D3) for out-of-plane mode; 2) constant electric field in thickness direction (E3) for in-plane mode. The effects of these assumptions on the free PWAS in-plane and out-of-plane EMIS models are studied and compared. The effects of internal damping of PWAS are considered in the analytical EMIS models. The analytical EMIS models are verified by Coupled Field Finite Element Method (CF-FEM) simulations and by experimental measurements. The extent of the agreement between the analytical and experimental EMIS results is discussed. The paper ends with summary, conclusions, and suggestions for future work.

  3. In-plane and out-of-plane motions of the human tympanic membrane

    PubMed Central

    Khaleghi, Morteza; Cheng, Jeffrey Tao; Furlong, Cosme; Rosowski, John J.

    2016-01-01

    Computer-controlled digital holographic techniques are developed and used to measure shape and four-dimensional nano-scale displacements of the surface of the tympanic membrane (TM) in cadaveric human ears in response to tonal sounds. The combination of these measurements (shape and sound-induced motions) allows the calculation of the out-of-plane (perpendicular to the surface) and in-plane (tangential) motion components at over 1 000 000 points on the TM surface with a high-degree of accuracy and sensitivity. A general conclusion is that the in-plane motion components are 10–20 dB smaller than the out-of-plane motions. These conditions are most often compromised with higher-frequency sound stimuli where the overall displacements are smaller, or the spatial density of holographic fringes is higher, both of which increase the uncertainty of the measurements. The results are consistent with the TM acting as a Kirchhoff–Love's thin shell dominated by out-of-plane motion with little in-plane motion, at least with stimulus frequencies up to 8 kHz. PMID:26827009

  4. On the Road Map of Vogel's Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mkrtchyan, Ruben L.

    2016-01-01

    We define "population" of Vogel's plane as points for which universal character of adjoint representation is regular in the finite plane of its argument. It is shown that they are given exactly by all solutions of seven Diophantine equations of third order on three variables. We find all their solutions: classical series of simple Lie algebras (including an "odd symplectic" one), {D_{2,1,λ}} superalgebra, the line of sl(2) algebras, and a number of isolated solutions, including exceptional simple Lie algebras. One of these Diophantine equations, namely {knm=4k+4n+2m+12,} contains all simple Lie algebras, except so{(2N+1).} Among isolated solutions are, besides exceptional simple Lie algebras, so called {e_{71/2}} algebra and also two other similar unidentified objects with positive dimensions. In addition, there are 47 isolated solutions in "unphysical semiplane" with negative dimensions. Isolated solutions mainly belong to the few lines in Vogel plane, including some rows of Freudenthal magic square. Universal dimension formulae have an integer values on all these solutions at least for first three symmetric powers of adjoint representation.

  5. Simulation Exploration through Immersive Parallel Planes: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Brunhart-Lupo, Nicholas; Bush, Brian W.; Gruchalla, Kenny; Smith, Steve

    2016-03-01

    We present a visualization-driven simulation system that tightly couples systems dynamics simulations with an immersive virtual environment to allow analysts to rapidly develop and test hypotheses in a high-dimensional parameter space. To accomplish this, we generalize the two-dimensional parallel-coordinates statistical graphic as an immersive 'parallel-planes' visualization for multivariate time series emitted by simulations running in parallel with the visualization. In contrast to traditional parallel coordinate's mapping the multivariate dimensions onto coordinate axes represented by a series of parallel lines, we map pairs of the multivariate dimensions onto a series of parallel rectangles. As in the case of parallel coordinates, each individual observation in the dataset is mapped to a polyline whose vertices coincide with its coordinate values. Regions of the rectangles can be 'brushed' to highlight and select observations of interest: a 'slider' control allows the user to filter the observations by their time coordinate. In an immersive virtual environment, users interact with the parallel planes using a joystick that can select regions on the planes, manipulate selection, and filter time. The brushing and selection actions are used to both explore existing data as well as to launch additional simulations corresponding to the visually selected portions of the input parameter space. As soon as the new simulations complete, their resulting observations are displayed in the virtual environment. This tight feedback loop between simulation and immersive analytics accelerates users' realization of insights about the simulation and its output.

  6. Focal plane scanner with reciprocating spatial window

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Chengye (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A focal plane scanner having a front objective lens, a spatial window for selectively passing a portion of the image therethrough, and a CCD array for receiving the passed portion of the image. All embodiments have a common feature whereby the spatial window and CCD array are mounted for simultaneous relative reciprocating movement with respect to the front objective lens, and the spatial window is mounted within the focal plane of the front objective. In a first embodiment, the spatial window is a slit and the CCD array is one-dimensional, and successive rows of the image in the focal plane of the front objective lens are passed to the CCD array by an image relay lens interposed between the slit and the CCD array. In a second embodiment, the spatial window is a slit, the CCD array is two-dimensional, and a prism-grating-prism optical spectrometer is interposed between the slit and the CCD array so as to cause the scanned row to be split into a plurality of spectral separations onto the CCD array. In a third embodiment, the CCD array is two-dimensional and the spatial window is a rectangular linear variable filter (LVF) window, so as to cause the scanned rows impinging on the LVF to be bandpass filtered into spectral components onto the CCD array through an image relay lens interposed between the LVF and the CCD array.

  7. Restoring Aperture Profile At Sample Plane

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J L; Hackel, R P; Lungershausen, A W

    2003-08-03

    Off-line conditioning of full-size optics for the National Ignition Facility required a beam delivery system to allow conditioning lasers to rapidly raster scan samples while achieving several technical goals. The main purpose of the optical system designed was to reconstruct at the sample plane the flat beam profile found at the laser aperture with significant reductions in beam wander to improve scan times. Another design goal was the ability to vary the beam size at the sample to scan at different fluences while utilizing all of the laser power and minimizing processing time. An optical solution was developed using commercial off-the-shelf lenses. The system incorporates a six meter relay telescope and two sets of focusing optics. The spacing of the focusing optics is changed to allow the fluence on the sample to vary from 2 to 14 Joules per square centimeter in discrete steps. More importantly, these optics use the special properties of image relaying to image the aperture plane onto the sample to form a pupil relay with a beam profile corresponding almost exactly to the flat profile found at the aperture. A flat beam profile speeds scanning by providing a uniform intensity across a larger area on the sample. The relayed pupil plane is more stable with regards to jitter and beam wander. Image relaying also reduces other perturbations from diffraction, scatter, and focus conditions. Image relaying, laser conditioning, and the optical system designed to accomplish the stated goals are discussed.

  8. The fundamental plane correlations for globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djorgovski, S.

    1995-01-01

    In the parameter space whose axes include a radius (core, or half-light), a surface brightness (central, or average within the half-light radius), and the central projected velocity dispersion, globular clusters lie on a two-dimensional surface (a plane, if the logarithmic quantities are used). This is analogous to the 'fundamental plane' of elliptical galaxies. The implied bivariate correlations are the best now known for globular clusters. The derived scaling laws for the core properties imply that cluster cores are fully virialized, homologous systems, with a constant (M/L) ratio. The corresponding scaling laws on the half-light scale are differrent, but are nearly identical to those derived from the 'fundamental plane' of ellipticals. This may be due to the range of cluster concentrations, which are correlated with other parameters. A similar explanation for elliptical galaxies may be viable. These correlations provide new empirical constraints for models of globular cluster formation and evolution, and may also be usable as rough distance-indicator relations for globular clusters.

  9. Blackfolds, plane waves and minimal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armas, Jay; Blau, Matthias

    2015-07-01

    Minimal surfaces in Euclidean space provide examples of possible non-compact horizon geometries and topologies in asymptotically flat space-time. On the other hand, the existence of limiting surfaces in the space-time provides a simple mechanism for making these configurations compact. Limiting surfaces appear naturally in a given space-time by making minimal surfaces rotate but they are also inherent to plane wave or de Sitter space-times in which case minimal surfaces can be static and compact. We use the blackfold approach in order to scan for possible black hole horizon geometries and topologies in asymptotically flat, plane wave and de Sitter space-times. In the process we uncover several new configurations, such as black helicoids and catenoids, some of which have an asymptotically flat counterpart. In particular, we find that the ultraspinning regime of singly-spinning Myers-Perry black holes, described in terms of the simplest minimal surface (the plane), can be obtained as a limit of a black helicoid, suggesting that these two families of black holes are connected. We also show that minimal surfaces embedded in spheres rather than Euclidean space can be used to construct static compact horizons in asymptotically de Sitter space-times.

  10. Control of gradual plane change during aerocruise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, J. E., Jr.; Lee, S.; No, T. S.

    Motivated by the continuing interest in orbital maneuvering using aerodynamic forces and the oft overlooked close relationship between performance and stability analyses, we consider the stability and control of small plane change maneuvers during aerocruise. We use a model which consists of linear equations for perturbed motion with respect to a great circle trajectory about a non-rotating earth in terms of variables which allow uncoupling of the longitudinal and lateral dynamics, and partial uncoupling of lateral dynamics. Characteristics of the perturbed motion of a hypersonic flight vehicle with respect to a great circle trajectory are reviewed, including previous results which show that a change in the orientation of the great circle plane results from a general perturbation in initial conditions. This change is analogous to the heading change and lateral displacement which occur when a conventional aircraft's motion is disturbed. A linear quadratic controller for small plane change maneuvers is obtained, and an inverse method for generating controls for a steady-state aerocruise turn is described. An example is presented which shows that the majority of the optimal maneuver is approximated very well by the steady-state turn.

  11. Antenna arrays for producing plane whistler waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenzel, Reiner; Urrutia, J. Manuel

    2014-10-01

    Linear whistler modes with ω ~= 0 . 3ωce <<ωpe are excited in a large laboratory plasma with magnetic loop antennas. A single antenna always produces a spatially bounded wave packet whose propagation cannot be directly compared to plane wave theories. By superimposing the fields from spatially separated antennas, the wavenumber along the antenna array can be nearly eliminated. 2D arrays nearly produce plane waves. The angle θ of wave propagation has been varied by a phase shift along the array. The refractive index surface n (θ) has been measured. The parallel phase and group velocities for Gendrin modes has been demonstrated. The interference between two oblique plane whistlers creates a whistler ``waveguide'' mode, i.e. standing waves for k ⊥B0 and propagation for k | |B0 . It also describes the reflection of oblique whistlers from a sharp discontinuity in the refractive index or conductivity. Radial reflections are also a dominant factor in small plasma columns of helicon devices. These results are of interest to space and laboratory plasmas. Work supported by NSF/DOE.

  12. Hamiltonian maps in the complex plane

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, J.M.; Percival, I.C.

    1981-01-01

    Following Arnol'd's proof of the KAM theorem, an analogy with the vertical pendulum, and some general arguments concerning maps in the complex plane, detailed calculations are presented and illustrated graphically for the standard map at the golden mean frequency. The functional dependence of the coordinate q on the canonical angle variable theta is analytically continued into the complex theta-plane, where natural boundaries are found at constant absolute values of Im theta. The boundaries represent the appearance of chaotic motion in the complex plane. Two independent numerical methods based on Fourier analysis in the angle variable were used, one based on a variation-annihilation method and the other on a double expansion. The results were further checked by direct solution of the complex equations of motion. The numerically simpler, but intrinsically complex, semipendulum and semistandard map are also studied. We conjecture that natural boundaries appear in the analogous analytic continuation of the invariant tori or KAM surfaces of general nonintegrable systems.

  13. Studies on an aerial propellant transfer space plane (APTSP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayan, N.; Biju Kumar, K. S.; Gupta, Anish Kumar; Kashyap, Akhilesh Kumar; Venkatraman, Kartik; Mathew, Joseph; Mukunda, H. S.

    2004-04-01

    This paper presents a study of a fully reusable earth-to-orbit launch vehicle concept with horizontal take-off and landing, employing a turbojet engine for low speed, and a rocket for high-speed acceleration and space operations. This concept uses existing technology to the maximum possible extent, thereby reducing development time, cost and effort. It uses the experience in aerial filling of military aircrafts for propellant filling at an altitude of 13 km at a flight speed of M=0.85. Aerial filling of propellant reduces the take-off weight significantly thereby minimizing the structural weight of the vehicle. The vehicle takes off horizontally and uses turbojet engines till the end of the propellant filling operation. The rocket engines provide thrust for the next phase till the injection of a satellite at LEO. A sensitivity analysis of the mission with respect to rocket engine specific impulse and overall vehicle structural factor is also presented in this paper. A conceptual design of space plane with a payload capability of 10 ton to LEO is carried out. The study shows that the realization of an aerial propellant transfer space plane is possible with limited development of new technology thus reducing the demands on the finances required for achieving the objectives.

  14. 26Al Emission Structure Along the Galactic Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purcell, William R.

    1996-01-01

    During the grant period (February 1995 - February 1996), the NU team members worked to analyze the available data. Results of this analysis were presented at the 24(th) international Cosmic Ray Conference held in Rome, Italy, August 28 - September 8, 1995, and at the 1996 meeting of the AAS/High Energy Astrophysics Division held in San Diego, California, April 30 - May 3, 1996. The results were also published in the conference proceedings of the Cosmic Ray Conference. As a result of this work, subsequent proposals have been submitted to continue this effort and to develop enhanced capabilities for OSSE observations of high energy emission.

  15. Dynamics of coherent structures in a plane mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussain, Fazle; Moser, R. D.; Colonius, T.; Moin, P.; Rogers, M. M.

    1988-01-01

    An incompressible, time developing 3-D mixing layer with idealized initial conditions was simulated numerically. Consistent with the suggestions from experimental measurements, the braid region between the dominant spanwise vortices or rolls develops longitudinal vortices or ribs, which are aligned upstream and downstream of a roll and produce spanwise distortion of the rolls. The process by which this distortion occurs is explained by studying a variety of quantities of dynamic importance (e.g., production of enstrophy, vortex stretching). Other quantities of interest (dissipation, helicity density) are also computed and discussed. The currently available simulation only allows the study of the early evolution (before pairing) of the mixing layer. New simulations in progress will relieve this restriction.

  16. A direct in vivo measurement of the three-dimensional orientation of the occlusal plane and of the sagittal discrepancy of the jaws.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, Virgilio F.; Sforza, Chiarella; Serrao, Graziano; Ciusa, Veronica

    2000-02-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to three dimensionally assess craniofacial relationships in vivo. Specifically, by using a non-invasive direct technique, the following measurements were made: 1) natural head position relative to the ground; 2) orientation of the occlusal plane relative to the subject's intrinsic facial planes; and 3) anteroposterior discrepancy of the dental bases, taking into consideration all the facial hard- and soft-tissue structures. Several dental and soft-tissue facial landmarks were directly digitized from 24 adult healthy volunteers with Angle Class I occlusions by means of an electromagnetic three-dimensional computerized digitizer. In natural head position, the three-dimensional orientation of Camper's, occlusal, and mandibular planes were measured along with the anteroposterior maxillo-mandibular discrepancies. In the frontal plane projection, all the measured planes appeared about horizontal. In the lateral plane projection, on average, Camper's plane deviated from the true horizontal by approximately 18 degrees (in a 'head flexed' direction). The occlusal plane deviated from the same horizontal by about 14 degrees, while the mandibular plane had a steeper inclination (about 30 degrees ); both planes were significantly correlated to Camper's plane. The measurements of anteroposterior jaw discrepancy revealed a wide range of sagittal relationships in the analyzed subjects. The method was found to be repeatable and fast. This direct three-dimensional in vivo assessment of the orientation of occlusal plane relative to the other facial planes could allow for a more comprehensive analysis of maxillo-mandibular sagittal discrepancies.

  17. Aerodynamics of flapping insect wing in inclined stroke plane hovering with ground effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowda v, Krishne; Vengadesan, S.

    2014-11-01

    This work presents the time-varying aerodynamic forces and the unsteady flow structures of flapping insect wing in inclined stroke plane hovering with ground effect. Two-dimensional dragonfly model wing is chosen and the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved numerically by using immersed boundary method. The main objective of the present work is to analyze the ground effect on the unsteady forces and vortical structures for the inclined stroke plane motions. We also investigate the influences of kinematics parameters such as Reynolds number (Re), stroke amplitude, wing rotational timing, for various distances between the airfoil and the ground. The effects of aforementioned parameters together with ground effect, on the stroke averaged force coefficients and regimes of force behavior are similar in both normal (horizontal) and inclined stroke plane motions. However, the evolution of the vortex structures which produces the effects are entirely different.

  18. Design and analysis of multifunctional structures for embedded electronics in unmanned aerial vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothari, Rushabh M.

    Multifunctional structures are a new trend in the aerospace industry for the next generation structural design. Many future structures are expected to be something in addition to a load bearing structure. The design and analysis of multifunctional structures combining structural, electrical and thermal functionalities are presented here. The sandwich beam is considered as a starting point for the load bearing structure and then it is modified with a cavity to embed avionics and thermal controls. The embedded avionics inside the load bearing structure would allow weight reduction of the aerospace vehicle due to elimination of separate electronics housing, interconnects, cables etc. The cavity reduces strength of the structure so various reinforcements methods are evaluated. The result of various reinforcements and their effectiveness are presented. The current generation of electronics produce massive amount of heat. In the case of embedded electronics, the excessive heat presents a major challenge to the structural and heat transfer engineers. The embedded nature of electronics prevents the use of the classical heat dissipative methods such as fans and high velocity air flows, etc. The integrated thermal control of the electronics has been designed using passive heat transfer device and highly optimized particulate composite thermal interface material (TIM). The TIMs are used to fill the air gaps and reduce contact resistance between two surfaces, such as electronics and heat dissipators. The efficiency of TIM directly affects the overall heat transfer ability of the integrated thermal control system. The effect of the particles at micron and nano scales are studied for the particulate composite TIM. The thermal boundary resistance study for the particulate composite TIM with nano silica particles is presented in this thesis. The FEA analysis is used to model thermal boundary resistance and compared with the theoretical micromechanics model. The heat pipes are

  19. Optical-based spectral modeling of infrared focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouzali, Salima; Lefebvre, Sidonie; Rommeluère, Sylvain; Ferrec, Yann; Primot, Jérôme

    2016-07-01

    We adopt an optical approach in order to model and predict the spectral signature of an infrared focal plane array. The modeling is based on a multilayer description of the structure and considers a one-dimensional propagation. It provides a better understanding of the physical phenomena occurring within the pixels, which is useful to perform radiometric measurements, as well as to reliably predict the spectral sensitivity of the detector. An exhaustive model is presented, covering the total spectral range of the pixel response. A heuristic model is also described, depicting a complementary approach that separates the different optical phenomena inside the pixel structure. Promising results are presented, validating the models through comparison with experimental results. Finally, advantages and limitations of this approach are discussed.

  20. Realizing in-plane surface diffraction by x-ray multiple-beam diffraction with large incidence angle

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xian-Rong Gog, Thomas; Assoufid, Lahsen; Peng, Ru-Wen; Siddons, D. P.

    2014-11-03

    Based on rigorous dynamical-theory calculations, we demonstrate the principle of an x-ray multiple-beam diffraction (MBD) scheme that overcomes the long-lasting difficulties of high-resolution in-plane diffraction from crystal surfaces. This scheme only utilizes symmetric reflection geometry with large incident angles but activates the out-of-plane and in-plane diffraction processes simultaneously and separately in the continuous MBD planes. The in-plane diffraction is realized by detoured MBD, where the intermediate diffracted waves propagate parallel to the surface, which corresponds to an absolute Bragg surface diffraction configuration that is extremely sensitive to surface structures. A series of MBD diffraction and imaging techniques may be developed from this principle to study surface/interface (misfit) strains, lateral nanostructures, and phase transitions of a wide range of (pseudo)cubic crystal structures, including ultrathin epitaxial films and multilayers, quantum dots, strain-engineered semiconductor or (multi)ferroic materials, etc.

  1. Fractional Fourier transforms, symmetrical lens systems, and their cardinal planes.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Ignacio; Sánchez-López, María M; Ferreira, Carlos; Mateos, Felipe

    2007-07-01

    We study the relation between optical lens systems that perform a fractional Fourier transform (FRFT) with the geometrical cardinal planes. We demonstrate that lens systems symmetrical with respect to the central plane provide an exact FRFT link between the input and output planes. Moreover, we show that the fractional order of the transform has real values between 0 and 2 when light propagation is produced between principal planes and antiprincipal planes, respectively. Finally, we use this new point of view to design an optical lens system that provides FRFTs with variable fractional order in the range (0,2) without moving the input and output planes.

  2. Strength analysis of piezoceramic materials for structural considerations in energy harvesting for UAVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anton, S. R.; Erturk, A.; Inman, D. J.

    2010-04-01

    Vibration energy harvesting has received considerable attention in the research community over the past decade. Typical vibration harvesting systems are designed to be added on to existing host structures and capture ambient vibration energy. An interesting application of vibration energy harvesting exists in unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), where a multifunctional approach, as opposed to the traditional method, is needed due to weight and aerodynamic considerations. The authors propose a multifunctional design for energy harvesting in UAVs where the piezoelectric harvesting device is integrated into the wing of a UAV and provides energy harvesting, energy storage, and load bearing capability. The brittle piezoceramic layer of the harvester is a critical member in load bearing applications; therefore, it is the goal of this research to investigate the bending strength of various common piezoceramic materials. Three-point bend tests are carried out on several piezoelectric ceramics including monolithic piezoceramics PZT-5A and PZT-5H, single crystal piezoelectric PMN-PZT, and commercially packaged QuickPack devices. Bending strength results are reported and can be used as a design tool in the development of piezoelectric vibration energy harvesting systems in which the active device is subjected to bending loads.

  3. Analysis of a Griffith crack at the interface of two piezoelectric materials under anti-plane loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gherrous, M.; Ferdjani, H.

    2016-11-01

    The main objective of this work is the contribution to the study of the piezoelectric structures which contain preexisting defect (crack). For that, we consider a Griffith crack located at the interface of two piezoelectric materials in a semi-infinite plane structure. The structure is subjected to an anti-plane shearing combined with an in-plane electric displacement. Using integral Fourier transforms, the equations of piezoelectricity are converted analytically to a system of singular integral equations. The singular integral equations are further reduced to a system of algebraic equations and solved numerically by using Chebyshev polynomials. The stress intensity factor and the electric displacement intensity factor are calculated and used for the determination of the energy release rate which will be taken as fracture criterion. At the end, numerical results are presented for various parameters of the problem; they are also presented for an infinite plane structure.

  4. Wafer plane inspection with soft resist thresholding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Carl; Shi, Rui-fang; Wihl, Mark; Xiong, Yalin; Pang, Song

    2008-10-01

    Wafer Plane Inspection (WPI) is an inspection mode on the KLA-Tencor TeraScaTM platform that uses the high signalto- noise ratio images from the high numerical aperture microscope, and then models the entire lithographic process to enable defect detection on the wafer plane[1]. This technology meets the needs of some advanced mask manufacturers to identify the lithographically-significant defects while ignoring the other non-lithographically-significant defects. WPI accomplishes this goal by performing defect detection based on a modeled image of how the mask features would actually print in the photoresist. There are several advantages to this approach: (1) the high fidelity of the images provide a sensitivity advantage over competing approaches; (2) the ability to perform defect detection on the wafer plane allows one to only see those defects that have a printing impact on the wafer; (3) the use of modeling on the lithographic portion of the flow enables unprecedented flexibility to support arbitrary illumination profiles, process-window inspection in unit time, and combination modes to find both printing and non-printing defects. WPI is proving to be a valuable addition to the KLA-Tencor detection algorithm suite. The modeling portion of WPI uses a single resist threshold as the final step in the processing. This has been shown to be adequate on several advanced customer layers, but is not ideal for all layers. Actual resist chemistry has complicated processes including acid and base-diffusion and quench that are not consistently well-modeled with a single resist threshold. We have considered the use of an advanced resist model for WPI, but rejected it because the burdensome requirements for the calibration of the model were not practical for reticle inspection. This paper describes an alternative approach that allows for a "soft" resist threshold to be applied that provides a more robust solution for the most challenging processes. This approach is just

  5. Symmetrically converging plane thermonuclear burn waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charakhch'yan, A. A.; Khishchenko, K. V.

    2013-10-01

    Five variants of a one-dimensional problem on synchronous bilateral action of two identical drivers on opposite surfaces of a plane layer of DT fuel with the normal or five times greater initial density, where the solution includes two thermonuclear burn waves propagating to meet one another at the symmetry plane, are simulated. A laser pulse with total absorption of energy at the critical density (in two variants) and a proton bunch that provides for a nearly isochoric heating (in three variants) are considered as drivers. A wide-range equation of state for the fuel, electron and ion heat conduction, self-radiation of plasma and plasma heating by α-particles are taken into account. In spite of different ways of ignition, various models of α-particle heat, whether the burn wave remains slow or transforms into the detonation wave, and regardless of way of such a transformation, the final value of the burn-up factor depends essentially on the only parameter Hρ0, where H is the half-thickness of the layer and ρ0 is the initial fuel density. This factor is about 0.35 at Hρ0 ≈ 1 g cm-2 and about 0.7 at Hρ0 ≈ 5 g cm-2. The expansion stage of the flow (after reflecting the burn or detonation wave from the symmetry plane) gives the main contribution in forming the final values of the burn-up factor and the gain at Hρ0 ≈ 1 g cm-2 and increases them approximately two times at Hρ0 ≈ 5 g cm-2. In the case of the proton driver, the final value of the gain is about 200 at Hρ0 ≈ 1 g cm-2 and about 2000 at Hρ0 ≈ 5 g cm-2. In the case of the laser driver, the above values are four times less in conformity with the difference between the driver energies.

  6. Seismological Constraints on Fault Plane Curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, K.

    2015-12-01

    The down-dip geometry of seismically active normal faults is not well known. Many examples of normal faults with down-dip curvature exist, such as listric faults revealed in cross-section or in seismic reflection data, or the exposed domes of core complexes. However, it is not understood: (1) whether curved faults fail in earthquakes, and (2) if those faults have generated earthquakes, is the curvature a primary feature of the rupture or due to later modification of the plane? Even if an event is surface-rupturing, because of the limited depth-extent over which observations can be made, it is difficult to reliably constrain the change in dip with depth (if any) and therefore the fault curvature. Despite the uncertainty in seismogenic normal fault geometries, published slip inversions most commonly use planar fault models. We investigate the seismological constraints on normal fault geometry using a forward-modelling approach and present a seismological technique for determining down-dip geometry. We demonstrate that complexity in the shape of teleseismic body waveforms may be used to investigate the presence of down-dip fault plane curvature. We have applied this method to a catalogue of continental and oceanic normal faulting events. Synthetic models demonstrate that the shapes of SH waveforms at along-strike stations are particularly sensitive to fault plane geometry. It is therefore important to consider the azimuthal station coverage before modelling an event. We find that none of the data require significant down-dip curvature, although the modelling results for some events remain ambiguous. In some cases we can constrain that the down-dip fault geometry is within 20° of planar.

  7. Preliminary Design and Analysis of an In-plane PRSEUS Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Poplawski, Steven

    2013-01-01

    As part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) program, the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) has been designed, developed and tested. However, PRSEUS development efforts to date have only addressed joints required to transfer bending moments between PRSEUS panels. Development of in-plane joints for the PRSEUS concept is necessary to facilitate in-plane transfer of load from PRSEUS panels to an adjacent structure, such as from a wing panel into a fuselage. This paper presents preliminary design and analysis of an in-plane PRSEUS joint for connecting PRSEUS panels at the termination of the rod-stiffened stringers. Design requirements are provided, the PRSEUS blade joint concept is presented, and preliminary design changes and analyses are carried out to examine the feasibility of the proposed in-plane PRSEUS blade joint. The study conducted herein focuses mainly on the PRSEUS structure on one side of the joint. In particular, the design requirements for the rod shear stress and bolt bearing stress are examined. A PRSEUS blade joint design was developed that demonstrates the feasibility of this in-plane PRSEUS joint concept to terminate the rod-stiffened stringers. The presented design only demonstrates feasibility, therefore, some areas of refinement are presented that would lead to a more optimum and realistic design.

  8. Standard plane localization in ultrasound by radial component model and selective search.

    PubMed

    Ni, Dong; Yang, Xin; Chen, Xin; Chin, Chien-Ting; Chen, Siping; Heng, Pheng Ann; Li, Shengli; Qin, Jing; Wang, Tianfu

    2014-11-01

    Acquisition of the standard plane is crucial for medical ultrasound diagnosis. However, this process requires substantial experience and a thorough knowledge of human anatomy. Therefore it is very challenging for novices and even time consuming for experienced examiners. We proposed a hierarchical, supervised learning framework for automatically detecting the standard plane from consecutive 2-D ultrasound images. We tested this technique by developing a system that localizes the fetal abdominal standard plane from ultrasound video by detecting three key anatomical structures: the stomach bubble, umbilical vein and spine. We first proposed a novel radial component-based model to describe the geometric constraints of these key anatomical structures. We then introduced a novel selective search method which exploits the vessel probability algorithm to produce probable locations for the spine and umbilical vein. Next, using component classifiers trained by random forests, we detected the key anatomical structures at their probable locations within the regions constrained by the radial component-based model. Finally, a second-level classifier combined the results from the component detection to identify an ultrasound image as either a "fetal abdominal standard plane" or a "non- fetal abdominal standard plane." Experimental results on 223 fetal abdomen videos showed that the detection accuracy of our method was as high as 85.6% and significantly outperformed both the full abdomen and the separate anatomy detection methods without geometric constraints. The experimental results demonstrated that our system shows great promise for application to clinical practice.

  9. Characterization of DECam focal plane detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Diehl, H.Thomas; Angstadt, Robert; Campa, Julia; Cease, Herman; Derylo, Greg; Emes, John H.; Estrada, Juan; Kibik, Donna; Flaugher, Brenna L.; Holland, Steve E.; Jonas, Michelle; /Fermilab /Madrid, CIEMAT /LBL, Berkeley /Argonne /Pennsylvania U.

    2008-06-01

    DECam is a 520 Mpix, 3 square-deg FOV imager being built for the Blanco 4m Telescope at CTIO. This facility instrument will be used for the 'Dark Energy Survey' of the southern galactic cap. DECam has chosen 250 ?m thick CCDs, developed at LBNL, with good QE in the near IR for the focal plane. In this work we present the characterization of these detectors done by the DES team, and compare it to the DECam technical requirements. The results demonstrate that the detectors satisfy the needs for instrument.

  10. Coincidence lattices in the hyperbolic plane.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Andrade, M A; Aragón-González, G; Aragón, J L; Gómez-Rodríguez, A

    2011-01-01

    The problem of coincidences of lattices in the space R(p,q), with p + q = 2, is analyzed using Clifford algebra. We show that, as in R(n), any coincidence isometry can be decomposed as a product of at most two reflections by vectors of the lattice. Bases and coincidence indices are constructed explicitly for several interesting lattices. Our procedure is metric-independent and, in particular, the hyperbolic plane is obtained when p = q = 1. Additionally, we provide a proof of the Cartan-Dieudonné theorem for R(p,q), with p + q = 2, that includes an algorithm to decompose an orthogonal transformation into a product of reflections.

  11. Dynamic Shear Band Development in Plane Strain,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    dicular to the initial propagation direction slows (town and further straining occurs inl a hand. The ul1timlate course of events is essentially...pr scribed velocita oal ysiave e n/sec. lie order of ilacint fiie V1 = -3 I/seecorrspon i toean avera elcirt of -300/etersos(i setal *" increase inl ...Spitzig, WV.A., 1980, *Initiation of Localized Shear Bands inl Plane Siraiii..1. .1lcch. Phys. Solids. \\Vol. 28, pp. 113-128. Asaro. R.J., 1983

  12. Black Plane Solutions and Localized Gravitational Energy

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    We explore the issue of gravitational energy localization for static plane-symmetric solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell equations in 3+1 dimensions with asymptotic anti-de Sitter behavior. We apply three different energy-momentum complexes, the Einstein, Landau-Lifshitz, and Møller prescriptions, to the metric representing this category of solutions and determine the energy distribution for each. We find that the three prescriptions offer identical energy distributions, suggesting their utility for this type of model. PMID:27347499

  13. The Simbol-X Focal Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, P.

    2009-05-01

    The Simbol-X focal plane is designed to detect photons focused by the mirror in the 0.5 to 100 keV energy band. Composed of two detectors, it will measure the position, energy, and arrival time of each incoming X-ray. On top of it will be a collimator to shield all photons not coming from the mirror field of view. The whole system is surrounded by an active and passive shielding in order to ensure the required very low background.

  14. Femoral bowing plane adaptation to femoral anteversion

    PubMed Central

    Akman, Alp; Demirkan, Fahir; Sabir, Nuran; Oto, Murat; Yorukoglu, Cagdas; Kiter, Esat

    2017-01-01

    Background: Femoral bowing plane (FBP) is the unattended subject in the literature. More over the femoral shaft with its bowing is neglected in established anteversion determination methods. There is limited information about the relationship between FBP and anteversion. Thus we focused on this subject and hypothesized that there could be an adaptation of FBP to anteversion. Materials and Methods: FBP is determined on three-dimensional solid models derived from the left femoral computerized tomography data of 47 patients which were taken before for another reason and comparatively evaluated with anteversion. There were 20 women and 27 men. The mean age of patients was 56 years (range 21–84 years). Results: The anteversion values were found as the angle between a distal condylar axis (DCA) and femoral neck anteversion axis (FNAA) along an imaginary longitudinal femoral axis (LFA) in the true cranio-caudal view. The FBP was determined as a plane that passes through the centre-points of three pre-determinated sections on the femoral shaft. The angles between DCA, FNAA and FBP were comparatively evaluated. The independent samples t-test was used for statistical analysis. At the end, it was found that FBP lies nearly perpendicular to the anteversion axis for the mean of our sample which is around 89° in females and 93° in males (range 78–102°). On the other hand, FBP does not lie close to the sagittal femoral plane (SFP); instead, there is an average 12.5° external rotation relative to the SFP. FBP is correlated well with anteversion in terms of FBP inclination from SFP and femoral torsion (i.e., angle between FBP and femoral neck anteversion axis (P < 0.001; r = 0.680 and r = −0.682, respectively). Combined correlation is perfect (R2 = 1) as the FBP, SFP, and posterior femoral plane forms a triangle in the cranio-caudal view. Conclusions: We found that FBP adapts to anteversion. As FBP lies close to perpendicularity for the mean, femoral component positioning

  15. Plane Strain Deformation in Generalized Thermoelastic Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Nidhi; Kumar, Rajneesh; Ram, Paras

    2008-08-01

    The present investigation is concerned with plane strain deformation in homogeneous isotropic generalized thermoelastic diffusion subjected to a normal force, thermal source, and chemical potential source. Laplace and Fourier transform techniques are employed to solve the problem. The integral transform have been inverted by using a numerical technique to obtain the displacements, stresses, temperature distribution, and chemical potential distribution. The numerical results of these quantities are illustrated graphically to depict the response of various sources in the theories of thermoelastic diffusion and thermoelasticity for a particular model. Some particular cases have been deduced from the present investigation.

  16. Plane wave reflection at flow intakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, P. O. A. L.

    1987-06-01

    A treatment is presented for prediction of the acoustic field associated with an open duct termination whose inflow is at a mean Mach number, and requires a quantitative description of both the acoustic and flow conditions in the vicinity of the open end. This problem is presently simplified by restricting the acoustic field within the duct to plane wave motion, with component wave amplitudes p(+) and p(-), where p(+) is incident at the termination. A 'vena contracta' develops in the pipe just downstream of the intake, leading to a significant mean pressure loss.

  17. Optimizing snake locomotion on an inclined plane.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolin; Osborne, Matthew T; Alben, Silas

    2014-01-01

    We develop a model to study the locomotion of snakes on inclined planes. We determine numerically which snake motions are optimal for two retrograde traveling-wave body shapes, triangular and sinusoidal waves, across a wide range of frictional parameters and incline angles. In the regime of large transverse friction coefficients, we find power-law scalings for the optimal wave amplitudes and corresponding costs of locomotion. We give an asymptotic analysis to show that the optimal snake motions are traveling waves with amplitudes given by the same scaling laws found in the numerics.

  18. A HIERARCHICAL HIDDEN MARKOV DETERIORATION MODEL FOR PAVEMENT STRUCTURE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Kiyoshi; Kaito, Kiyoyuki; Eguchi, Toshiyuki; Ohi, Akira; Okizuka, Ryosuke

    The deterioration process of pavement is a complex process including the deterioration of road surface and the decrease in load bearing capacity of the entire pavement. The decrease in load bearing capacity influences the deterioration rate of road surface. The soundness of road surface can be observed by a road surface condition investigation. On the other hand, the decrease in load bearing capacity can be partially observed through the FWD testing, etc. In this study, such a deterioration process of road surface is described as a mixed Markov process that depends on the load bearing capacity of pavement. Then, the complex deterioration process, which is composed of the deterioration of road surface and the decrease in load bearing capacity of pavement, is expressed as a hierarchical hidden Markov deterioration model. Through a case study of the application into the expressway, a hierarchical hidden Markov deterioration model is estimated, and its applicability and effectiveness are empirically discussed.

  19. PLANING MILL, FIRST FLOOR INTERIOR, LOOKING SOUTH. THE LARGE DEVICE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PLANING MILL, FIRST FLOOR INTERIOR, LOOKING SOUTH. THE LARGE DEVICE IS A WHEEL BORING MACHINE USED DURING THE TIME THIS AREA WAS A WHEEL SHOP. - Southern Pacific, Sacramento Shops, Planing Mill, 111 I Street, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  20. 55. LOOKING EAST FROM HEAD OF PLANE 2 EAST. POWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    55. LOOKING EAST FROM HEAD OF PLANE 2 EAST. POWER HOUSE AND FLUME VISIBLE TO RIGHT, TAILRACE RUNNING THROUGH CENTER OF PHOTOGRAPH. CRADLE TO INCLINED PLANE 3 EAST IS VISIBLE IN BACKGROUND TO LEFT. - Morris Canal, Phillipsburg, Warren County, NJ

  1. 5. VIEW WEST, PERSPECTIVE UP INCLINED PLANE FROM TOP OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW WEST, PERSPECTIVE UP INCLINED PLANE FROM TOP OF ABUTMENT, FILL CONFIGURATION - Laurel Hill Quarry, Incline Plane, Both sides of State Route 56, 2.4 miles East of State Route 711, Seward, Westmoreland County, PA

  2. 2. VIEW SOUTH, PERSPECTIVE OF ABUTMENT AND INCLINED PLANE ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW SOUTH, PERSPECTIVE OF ABUTMENT AND INCLINED PLANE ON WEST SIDE OF PA ROUTE 56 - Laurel Hill Quarry, Incline Plane, Both sides of State Route 56, 2.4 miles East of State Route 711, Seward, Westmoreland County, PA

  3. 3. VIEW NORTHWEST, PERSPECTIVE OF ABUTMENT AND INCLINED PLANE ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW NORTHWEST, PERSPECTIVE OF ABUTMENT AND INCLINED PLANE ON WEST SIDE OF PA ROUTE 56 - Laurel Hill Quarry, Incline Plane, Both sides of State Route 56, 2.4 miles East of State Route 711, Seward, Westmoreland County, PA

  4. 6. VIEW WEST, PERSPECTIVE UP INCLINED PLANE FROM MIDSLOPE VICINITY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW WEST, PERSPECTIVE UP INCLINED PLANE FROM MID-SLOPE VICINITY, CUT CONFIGURATION - Laurel Hill Quarry, Incline Plane, Both sides of State Route 56, 2.4 miles East of State Route 711, Seward, Westmoreland County, PA

  5. Improving the connection between wood and cement using LBL nanocoating to create a lightweight, eco-friendly structural material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejo, L.; Major, B.; Csoka, L.; Hantos, Z.; Karacsonyi, Zs

    2016-04-01

    Structural elements made out of cement bonded wood may be an excellent alternative to flammable organic bonded composite beams, and CO2 intensive, heavy and nonrenewable reinforced concrete. Unfortunately, preliminary studies showed that a sufficient load-bearing performance is difficult to achieve. Improving the compatibility of cement and wood by LbL nanocoating may be a significant step towards creating viable cement bonded wood load bearing elements. The study involved creating multi layer nanocoating on the surface of poplar veneer using various polyelectrolyte combinations and numbers of treatment cycles, and testing the withdrawal resistance of the samples from a cement matrix. PDDA-PSS treatment was found to form increasingly uniform coating on the surface of wood, while the results were less straightforward for PAH-PSS. Both types and all levels of treatment caused dramatic improvement in load withdrawal resistance. The best result - a more than tenfold improvement - was achieved by at least 10 cycles of PDDA-PSS treatment. PAH-PSS treatment yielded a somewhat more modest improvement, which was already evident after five treatment cycles. The results point to the excellent potential of LbL nanocoating for creating cement bonded structural wood based composite materials.

  6. In-plane vibration analysis of annular plates with arbitrary boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xianjie; Shi, Dongyan; Qin, Zhengrong; Wang, Qingshan

    2014-01-01

    In comparison with the out-of-plane vibrations of annular plates, far less attention has been paid to the in-plane vibrations which may also play a vital important role in affecting the sound radiation from and power flows in a built-up structure. In this investigation, a generalized Fourier series method is proposed for the in-plane vibration analysis of annular plates with arbitrary boundary conditions along each of its edges. Regardless of the boundary conditions, the in-plane displacement fields are invariantly expressed as a new form of trigonometric series expansions with a drastically improved convergence as compared with the conventional Fourier series. All the unknown expansion coefficients are treated as the generalized coordinates and determined using the Rayleigh-Ritz technique. Unlike most of the existing studies, the presented method can be readily and universally applied to a wide spectrum of in-plane vibration problems involving different boundary conditions, varying material, and geometric properties with no need of modifying the basic functions or adapting solution procedures. Several numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness and reliability of the current solution for predicting the in-plane vibration characteristics of annular plates subjected to different boundary conditions.

  7. Vectorial point spread function and optical transfer function in oblique plane imaging.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeongmin; Li, Tongcang; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-05-05

    Oblique plane imaging, using remote focusing with a tilted mirror, enables direct two-dimensional (2D) imaging of any inclined plane of interest in three-dimensional (3D) specimens. It can image real-time dynamics of a living sample that changes rapidly or evolves its structure along arbitrary orientations. It also allows direct observations of any tilted target plane in an object of which orientational information is inaccessible during sample preparation. In this work, we study the optical resolution of this innovative wide-field imaging method. Using the vectorial diffraction theory, we formulate the vectorial point spread function (PSF) of direct oblique plane imaging. The anisotropic lateral resolving power caused by light clipping from the tilted mirror is theoretically analyzed for all oblique angles. We show that the 2D PSF in oblique plane imaging is conceptually different from the inclined 2D slice of the 3D PSF in conventional lateral imaging. Vectorial optical transfer function (OTF) of oblique plane imaging is also calculated by the fast Fourier transform (FFT) method to study effects of oblique angles on frequency responses.

  8. Mid-callosal plane determination using preferred directions from diffusion tensor images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, André L.; Rittner, Letícia; Lotufo, Roberto A.; Appenzeller, Simone

    2015-03-01

    The corpus callosum is the major brain structure responsible for inter{hemispheric communication between neurons. Many studies seek to relate corpus callosum attributes to patient characteristics, cerebral diseases and psychological disorders. Most of those studies rely on 2D analysis of the corpus callosum in the mid-sagittal plane. However, it is common to find conflicting results among studies, once many ignore methodological issues and define the mid-sagittal plane based on precary or invalid criteria with respect to the corpus callosum. In this work we propose a novel method to determine the mid-callosal plane using the corpus callosum internal preferred diffusion directions obtained from diffusion tensor images. This plane is analogous to the mid-sagittal plane, but intended to serve exclusively as the corpus callosum reference. Our method elucidates the great potential the directional information of the corpus callosum fibers have to indicate its own referential. Results from experiments with five image pairs from distinct subjects, obtained under the same conditions, demonstrate the method effectiveness to find the corpus callosum symmetric axis relative to the axial plane.

  9. In-plane DEAP stack actuators for optical MEMS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunne, Jens; Kazan, Samar; Wallrabe, Ulrike

    2011-04-01

    Recently, stacked dielectric polymer actuators have gained a lot of attention as MEMS actuators. In this paper we present a new kind of in-plane stack actuator. In contrast to its multilayer counterparts, it consists of only one active layer with inter-digitated microstructured soft electrodes which allow for a linear, radial or even asymmetric pulling motion in the working plane. The single layer design makes it in principle compatible with standard MEMS processes like deep reactive ion etching as well as silicone casting for optical components. Nevertheless, the wafer level fabrication process does not require any photolithography or clean room processes. The actuator consists of a microstructured layer of carbon black or nanotube filled PDMS which is suspended over a KOH etched trench on a (111) silicon wafer. The conductive PDMS electrodes are structured by laser ablation and subsequently embedded in a dielectric. The use of a (111) silicon wafer enables a mask less definition of the trench as the (111) layer is almost not attacked by the KOH etchant. The trench is defined by laser induced damage of the silicon wafer, so only exposed areas are etched. This allows for a true rapid prototyping of actuators with a fabrication time of less than one day.

  10. Low-order invariant solutions in plane Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Muhammad; Sharma, Ati

    2016-11-01

    Ten new equilibrium solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations in plane Couette flow are presented. The new solutions add to the inventory of known equilibria in plane Couette flow found by Nagata JFM 1990, Gibson JFM 2008, 2009, and Halcrow JFM 2008, who together found 13. These new solutions elucidate the low-dimensional nature of exact coherent structures, which are essential to defining simplified mechanisms that explain the self-sustaining nature of wall-bounded flows. In particular, one of the solutions found has a one-dimensional unstable manifold in the symmetry-invariant subspace and otherwise, like the lower branch equilibrium solution found by Nagata JFM 1990. A new method for generating initial guesses for Newton-Krylov-hookstep (NKH) searches is also presented. This method allows the NKH algorithm to find equilibrium solutions that are derived from previous solutions. Air Force Office of Scientific Research (European Office of Aerospace Research and Development) under award FA9550-14-1-0042.

  11. In-plane and out-of-plane defectivity in thin films of lamellar block copolymers

    DOE PAGES

    Mahadevapuram, Nikhila; Mitra, Indranil; Bozhchenko, Alona; ...

    2015-10-29

    We investigate the ordering of poly(styrene-b-methyl methacrylate) (PS-PMMA) lamellar copolymers (periodicity L0 = 46 nm) confined between a free surface and brushed poly(styrene-r-methyl methacrylate) silicon substrate. The processing temperature was selected to eliminate wetting layers at the top and bottom interfaces, producing approximately neutral boundaries that stabilize perpendicular domain orientations. The PS-PMMA film thickness (t = 0.5L0–2.5L0) and brush grafting density (Σ = 0.2–0.6 nm–2) were systematically varied to examine their impacts on in-plane and out-of-plane ordering. Samples were characterized with a combination of high-resolution microscopy, X-ray reflectivity, and grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering. In-plane order at the top of themore » film (quantified through calculation of orientational correlation lengths) improved with tn, where the exponent n increased from 0.75 to 1 as Σ decreased from 0.6 to 0.2 nm–2. Out-of-plane defects such as tilted domains were detected in all films, and the distribution of domain tilt angles was nearly independent of t and Σ. These studies demonstrate that defectivity in perpendicular lamellar phases is three-dimensional, comprised of in-plane topological defects and out-of-plane domain tilt, with little or no correlation between these two types of disorder. As a result, strong interactions between the block copolymer and underlying substrate may trap both kinds of thermally generated defects.« less

  12. In-plane and out-of-plane defectivity in thin films of lamellar block copolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Mahadevapuram, Nikhila; Mitra, Indranil; Bozhchenko, Alona; Strzalka, Joseph; Stein, Gila E.

    2015-10-29

    We investigate the ordering of poly(styrene-b-methyl methacrylate) (PS-PMMA) lamellar copolymers (periodicity L0 = 46 nm) confined between a free surface and brushed poly(styrene-r-methyl methacrylate) silicon substrate. The processing temperature was selected to eliminate wetting layers at the top and bottom interfaces, producing approximately neutral boundaries that stabilize perpendicular domain orientations. The PS-PMMA film thickness (t = 0.5L0–2.5L0) and brush grafting density (Σ = 0.2–0.6 nm–2) were systematically varied to examine their impacts on in-plane and out-of-plane ordering. Samples were characterized with a combination of high-resolution microscopy, X-ray reflectivity, and grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering. In-plane order at the top of the film (quantified through calculation of orientational correlation lengths) improved with tn, where the exponent n increased from 0.75 to 1 as Σ decreased from 0.6 to 0.2 nm–2. Out-of-plane defects such as tilted domains were detected in all films, and the distribution of domain tilt angles was nearly independent of t and Σ. These studies demonstrate that defectivity in perpendicular lamellar phases is three-dimensional, comprised of in-plane topological defects and out-of-plane domain tilt, with little or no correlation between these two types of disorder. As a result, strong interactions between the block copolymer and underlying substrate may trap both kinds of thermally generated defects.

  13. Phase retrieval in the focal plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaessler, W.; Peter, D.; Storz, C.

    Phase retrieval in the focal plane is a very appealing technique, which would simplify the optomechanics of an Adaptive Optics (AO) system a lot and could gain sensitivity under certain conditions. For conventional AO systems the limiting magnitude of the system does not depend on the diameter of the telescope, since any wave front sensor splits the light into sub-apertures, which are in number related to the telescope diameter. Having this in mind the phase retrieval technique looks promising as it breaks this paradigm in the diffraction limited case and thus yields some gain in limiting magnitude with larger telescope diameter. Until now this path was not followed deeply in astronomical AO systems, as the solution of the inversion is non unique and demands much higher calculation power as in conventional AO. This might change with state of the art computers. We give a short overview of some existing techniques and algorithms of focal plane AO and report results of other groups, which tested them in laboratory and on sky. To solve the drawback of the large computational demands and to increase the sensitivity we propose a bootstrapping process with dynamical binning.

  14. Dense granular flows down an inclined plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ecke, Robert; Borzsonyi, Tamas

    2006-03-01

    Granular flow on a rough inclined plane is an important model system in which to study the basic rules of the dynamics of granular materials. Despite intensive study, many features of such flows are still incompletely understood. For uniformly flowing layers at relatively shallow inclination, we consider experimentally the the basic flow rheology of the granular media and propose new scalings to collapse our data for glass beads and rough sand as a function of inclination angle and particle diameter. At steep inclinations above some angle θs (θs/θr 1.3-1.5, where θr stands for the angle of repose) for flowing grains, numerics and theory predict that the surface roughness is inadequate to dissipate energy gained in the gravitational field, and the flow should continue to accelerate. We report on our experimental results on the properties of granular flows on a steeply inclined plane and define the domains of steady flows. We also discuss the instabilities of such flows leading to spatial patterns.

  15. Trajectory optimization for the National aerospace plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Ping

    1993-01-01

    While continuing the application of the inverse dynamics approach in obtaining the optimal numerical solutions, the research during the past six months has been focused on the formulation and derivation of closed-form solutions for constrained hypersonic flight trajectories. Since it was found in the research of the first year that a dominant portion of the optimal ascent trajectory of the aerospace plane is constrained by dynamic pressure and heating constraints, the application of the analytical solutions significantly enhances the efficiency in trajectory optimization, provides a better insight to understanding of the trajectory and conceivably has great potential in guidance of the vehicle. Work of this period has been reported in four technical papers. Two of the papers were presented in the AIAA Guidance, Navigation, and Control Conference (Hilton Head, SC, August, 1992) and Fourth International Aerospace Planes Conference (Orlando, FL, December, 1992). The other two papers have been accepted for publication by Journal of Guidance, Control, and Dynamics, and will appear in 1993. This report briefly summarizes the work done in the past six months and work currently underway.

  16. Burnett description for plane Poiseuille flow.

    PubMed

    Uribe, F J; Garcia, A L

    1999-10-01

    Two recent works have shown that at small Knudsen number (K) the pressure and temperature profiles in plane Poiseuille flow exhibit a different qualitative behavior from the profiles obtained by the Navier-Stokes equations. Tij and Santos [J. Stat. Phys. 76, 1399 (1994)] used the Bhatnagar-Gross-Kook model to show that the temperature profile is bimodal and the pressure profile is nonconstant. Malek-Mansour, Baras, and Garcia [Physica A 240, 255 (1997)] qualitatively confirmed these predictions in computer experiments using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method (DSMC). In this paper we compare the DSMC measurements of hydrodynamic variables and non-equilibrium fluxes with numerical solutions of the Burnett equations. Given that they are in better agreement with molecular-dynamics simulations [E. Salomons and M. Mareschal, Phys. Rev. Lett. 69, 269 (1992)] of strong shock waves than Navier-Stokes [F. J. Uribe, R. M. Velasco, and L. S. García-Colín, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 2044 (1998)], and that they are second order in Knudsen number suggests that the Burnett equations may provide a better description for large K. We find that for plane Poiseuille flow the Burnett equations do not predict the bimodal temperature profile but do recover many of the other anomalous features (e.g., nonconstant pressure and nonzero parallel heat flux).

  17. Comments on a military transatmospheric aerospace plane

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    The conceptual design of a military transatmospheric aerospace plane candidate involves the selection of the mission(s), operating environment, operational concept, payload definition, specific design choices, and a close look at the technology base. A broad range of missions and concepts were reviewed prior to the selection of the mission and concepts presented in this paper. The mission selected was CONUS based global strike. The flight profile selected was a boost-glide-skip unrefuled global range trajectory. Two concepts were selected. The first was a rocket-powered design and the second was a combined air-breathing and rocket powered design. The rocket-powered configuration is a high lift-to-drag ratio modified lifting body. The rocket engine is an advanced dual fuel linear aero-spike. The air-breathing powered configuration is a modified waverider configuration. The engine for the air-breather is a rocket based combined cycle engine. Performance and technology readiness comparisons are presented for the two concepts. The paper closes with a discussion of lessons learned about military transatmospheric aerospace planes over the past twenty years. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Burnett description for plane Poiseuille flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uribe, F. J.; Garcia, Alejandro L.

    1999-10-01

    Two recent works have shown that at small Knudsen number (K) the pressure and temperature profiles in plane Poiseuille flow exhibit a different qualitative behavior from the profiles obtained by the Navier-Stokes equations. Tij and Santos [J. Stat. Phys. 76, 1399 (1994)] used the Bhatnagar-Gross-Kook model to show that the temperature profile is bimodal and the pressure profile is nonconstant. Malek-Mansour, Baras, and Garcia [Physica A 240, 255 (1997)] qualitatively confirmed these predictions in computer experiments using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method (DSMC). In this paper we compare the DSMC measurements of hydrodynamic variables and non-equilibrium fluxes with numerical solutions of the Burnett equations. Given that they are in better agreement with molecular-dynamics simulations [E. Salomons and M. Mareschal, Phys. Rev. Lett. 69, 269 (1992)] of strong shock waves than Navier-Stokes [F. J. Uribe, R. M. Velasco, and L. S. García-Colín, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 2044 (1998)], and that they are second order in Knudsen number suggests that the Burnett equations may provide a better description for large K. We find that for plane Poiseuille flow the Burnett equations do not predict the bimodal temperature profile but do recover many of the other anomalous features (e.g., nonconstant pressure and nonzero parallel heat flux).

  19. Waveguide Metacouplers for In-Plane Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pors, Anders; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2016-06-01

    The state of polarization (SOP) is an inherent property of the vectorial nature of light and a crucial parameter in a wide range of remote sensing applications. Nevertheless, the SOP is rather cumbersome to probe experimentally, as conventional detectors respond only to the intensity of the light, hence losing the phase information between orthogonal vector components. In this work, we propose a type of polarimeter that is compact and well suited for in-plane optical circuitry while allowing for immediate determination of the SOP through simultaneous retrieval of the associated Stokes parameters. The polarimeter is based on plasmonic phase-gradient birefringent metasurfaces that facilitate normal incident light to launch in-plane photonic-waveguide modes propagating in six predefined directions with the coupling efficiencies providing a direct measure of the incident SOP. The functionality and accuracy of the polarimeter, which essentially is an all-polarization-sensitive waveguide metacoupler, is confirmed through full-wave simulations at the operation wavelength of 1.55 μ m .

  20. Object tracking based on bit-planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Na; Zhao, Xiangmo; Liu, Ying; Li, Daxiang; Wu, Shiqian; Zhao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Visual object tracking is one of the most important components in computer vision. The main challenge for robust tracking is to handle illumination change, appearance modification, occlusion, motion blur, and pose variation. But in surveillance videos, factors such as low resolution, high levels of noise, and uneven illumination further increase the difficulty of tracking. To tackle this problem, an object tracking algorithm based on bit-planes is proposed. First, intensity and local binary pattern features represented by bit-planes are used to build two appearance models, respectively. Second, in the neighborhood of the estimated object location, a region that is most similar to the models is detected as the tracked object in the current frame. In the last step, the appearance models are updated with new tracking results in order to deal with environmental and object changes. Experimental results on several challenging video sequences demonstrate the superior performance of our tracker compared with six state-of-the-art tracking algorithms. Additionally, our tracker is more robust to low resolution, uneven illumination, and noisy video sequences.

  1. Extension and contraction of faulted marker planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Marie D.; Delaney, Paul T.

    1985-08-01

    We present graphical and analytical methods to determine the extensional or contractional separation of a faulted planar marker using commonly measured field data: fault attitude, slip direction, and bedding or other marker-plane attitude. This determination is easily accomplished for horizontal markers. Faults with normal components of slip extend the markers and indicate extensional tectonics; those with reverse components are contractional. Although the methods quantify this simple relation for horizontal markers, they are most useful in rocks with planar fabrics of steep dip where marker separation cannot be uniquely determined from map or outcrop patterns alone and where faults with normal components of dip slip can contract markers and those with reverse components can extend them. The methods rely on two parameters: (1) the angle between normals to the marker and fault planes and (2) the angle between the slip direction and intersection of the marker and fault. This second parameter measures the obliquity of slip relative to the directions of maximum extensional or contractional separation of the marker, and for a horizontal marker, it is equivalent to the rake of the slip direction. The graphical method requires stereographic projections routinely used for faulting data; the analytical method is programmable on a calculator. *Present address: Department of Applied Earth Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94035

  2. 63. CANAL BOAT IN CRADLE AT TOP OF PLANE. TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    63. CANAL BOAT IN CRADLE AT TOP OF PLANE. TO PASS OVER THE SUMMIT (THE HUMP OF LAND AT THE TOP OF PLANE TO HOLD BACK THE WATER AT THAT LEVEL), THE BOATS HAVE SEEN HINGED AND TWO CRADLES ARE USED TO CARRY THE BOAT UP THE PLANE. - Morris Canal, Phillipsburg, Warren County, NJ

  3. 1. LOOKING TOWARD PLANE 9 WEST. BASIN HAS BEEN DRAINED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. LOOKING TOWARD PLANE 9 WEST. BASIN HAS BEEN DRAINED AND SLOPE OF PLANE 9 IS VISIBLE BETWEEN ROW OF TREES IN BACKGROUND. STONEWORK ON LEFT IS ABUTMENT TO BRIDGE THAT CROSSED OVER THE CANAL. - Morris Canal, Inclined Plane 9 West, Port Warren, Warren County, NJ

  4. CaFe2As2 Under In-Plane Uniaxial Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frampton, Miles; Zieve, Rena; Dioguardi, Adam

    2014-03-01

    Many unconventional superconductors have a planar crystal structure, with a resulting two-dimensional character that favors superconductivity. They tend to have anisotropic behavior and can be very sensitive to uniaxial pressure. Since these materials often grow preferentially as platelets perpendicular to the crystalline c axis, applying in-plane pressure is challenging. We present a new setup for studying thin samples under uniaxial pressure and our results on CaFe2As2. CaFe2As2 undergoes a magnetic transition simultaneously with a tetragonal-to-orthorhombic structural transition. In-plane uniaxial pressure detwins the orthorhombic phase and accentuates the difference between the axes. We find a significant change in Ts as well as anisotropy of the in-plane resistivity that increases with pressure.

  5. A Novel MUMPs-compatible single-layer out-of-plane electrothermal actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Weider; Wu, Mingching; Ho, Yi-Ping; Yeh, Mau-Shium; Fang, Weileun

    2002-11-01

    Microactuator is one of the key components for the microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), and it can be categorized as out-of-plane and in-plane according to the motion types. Most of the existing out-of-plane thermal actuators are multi-layer structures. In this paper, a novel electrothermal single-layer out-of-plane actuator is provided and it characteristics and advantages of this device are stated as follows: (1) This actuator is consisted of only a single thin film material, therefore, it can prevent from delaminating after a long-term operation. Besides, owing to its symmetric geometric design, the inner-beams of this structure don"t have any current passed through them and the inner-beams also provide a geometric constraint to allow the two free ends of the structure to bend upwards symmetrically. (2) This device can be operated at a relative low voltage (<5 volt), and deflected upwards about 4 μm in the experiment test. Besides, the fabrication process is very simple and it is MUMPs(Multi-User MEMS Processes)-compatible. Presently, a prototype structure has been successfully fabricated and tested. This structure offers the potential applications in the adaptive optics systems, and Fabry-Perot filters, etc. Besides, it also provides an interface to cooperate with integrated circuits (IC) and various optical elements to construct an embedded-control optical system.

  6. Turbulent Plane Wakes Subjected to Successive Strains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Michael M.

    2003-01-01

    Six direct numerical simulations of turbulent time-evolving strained plane wakes have been examined to investigate the response of a wake to successive irrotational plane strains of opposite sign. The orientation of the applied strain field has been selected so that the flow is the time-developing analogue of a spatially developing wake evolving in the presence of either a favourable or an adverse streamwise pressure gradient. The magnitude of the applied strain rate a is constant in time t until the total strain e(sup at) reaches about four. At this point, a new simulation is begun with the sign of the applied strain being reversed (the original simulation is continued as well). When the total strain is reduced back to its original value of one, yet another simulation is begun with the sign of the strain being reversed again back to its original sign. This process is done for both initially "favourable" and initially "adverse" strains, providing simulations for each of these strain types from three different initial conditions. The evolution of the wake mean velocity deficit and width is found to be very similar for all the adversely strained cases, with both measures rapidly achieving exponential growth at the rate associated with the cross-stream expansive strain e(sup at). In the "favourably" strained cases, the wake widths approach a constant and the velocity deficits ultimately decay rapidly as e(sup -2at). Although all three of these cases do exhibit the same asymptotic exponential behaviour, the time required to achieve this is longer for the cases that have been previously adversely strained (by at approx. equals 1). These simulations confirm the generality of the conclusions drawn in Rogers (2002) regarding the response of plane wakes to strain. The evolution of strained wakes is not consistent with the predictions of classical self-similar analysis; a more general equilibrium similarity solution is required to describe the results. At least for the cases

  7. Hybrid Image-Plane/Stereo Manipulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgartner, Eric; Robinson, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    Hybrid Image-Plane/Stereo (HIPS) manipulation is a method of processing image data, and of controlling a robotic manipulator arm in response to the data, that enables the manipulator arm to place an end-effector (an instrument or tool) precisely with respect to a target (see figure). Unlike other stereoscopic machine-vision-based methods of controlling robots, this method is robust in the face of calibration errors and changes in calibration during operation. In this method, a stereoscopic pair of cameras on the robot first acquires images of the manipulator at a set of predefined poses. The image data are processed to obtain image-plane coordinates of known visible features of the end-effector. Next, there is computed an initial calibration in the form of a mapping between (1) the image-plane coordinates and (2) the nominal three-dimensional coordinates of the noted end-effector features in a reference frame fixed to the main robot body at the base of the manipulator. The nominal three-dimensional coordinates are obtained by use of the nominal forward kinematics of the manipulator arm that is, calculated by use of the currently measured manipulator joint angles and previously measured lengths of manipulator arm segments under the assumption that the arm segments are rigid, that the arm lengths are constant, and that there is no backlash. It is understood from the outset that these nominal three-dimensional coordinates are likely to contain possibly significant calibration errors, but the effects of the errors are progressively reduced, as described next. As the end-effector is moved toward the target, the calibration is updated repeatedly by use of data from newly acquired images of the end-effector and of the corresponding nominal coordinates in the manipulator reference frame. By use of the updated calibration, the coordinates of the target are computed in manipulator-reference-frame coordinates and then used to the necessary manipulator joint angles to position

  8. Out-of-plane Block Copolymer Microdomains in High Aspect-Ratio Templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadelrab, Karim; Bai, Wubin; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo; Ross, Caroline

    Directed self-assembly DSA of block copolymers BCP proved to be a power approach for nanoscale fabrication. In addition, BCP with highly incompatible blocks (high Flory-Huggins interaction parameter (χ)) offer improvement in resolution of the BCP patterns. Unfortunately, high- χ BCPs usually exhibit large differences in surface affinity between the two blocks, forming a surface layer of the lower surface energy block and favoring in-plane orientation of lamellae or cylindrical microdomains. Here, we explore the conditions under which a high χ BCP creates an out-of-plane lamellar structure using high aspect ratio trenches with preferential walls. We employ self-consistent field theory SCFT and single mode expansion of Ginzburg-Landau free energy expression in the weak segregation limit to analytically construct a phase diagram of the in- and out-of-plane lamellae as a function of aspect ratio and surface affinity. It is found that achieving an out of plane lamellar structure necessitates a coupling between aspect ratio and surface functionality. In particular, strong side wall attraction results in out-of-plane lamellae when the trench aspect ratio is greater than unity. The results are validated for a polystyrene-block-polydimethylsiloxane (PS-b-PDMS) system within trenches made using interference lithography.

  9. Occlusal plane determination using custom made broadrick occlusal plane analyser: a case control study.

    PubMed

    Manvi, Supriya; Miglani, Shaveta; Rajeswari, C L; Srivatsa, G; Arora, Sarvesh

    2012-01-01

    Proper occlusal plane is an essential consideration when multiple long span posterior restorations are designed. The determination of the occlusal plane can have a profound effect on the short and long term success of a restorative case. Purpose of Study. (1) To determine the appropriate occlusal curve for individual patients. (2) To compare the deviation of the clinical occlusal curve with the ideal ones. Materials and Methods. A total of 20 subjects were examined and study models were made of their maxillary and mandibular dentition. Inter-occlusal records were made and the casts were articulated in semiadjustable articulator. An ideal occlusal plane was created. The distance of the farthest cusp tip from the Broadrick curve was measured along the long axis of the tooth for each individual. Paired t-tests were used to compare the findings between subjects and controls. Results. A statistically significant difference P < 0.05 was found in the deviation from the Broadrick curve between patients who have lost posterior teeth and the control group who had a full dentition with no missing teeth. Conclusion. Proper utilization of the broadrick flag on a semi-adjustable articulator will allow for a correct determination of the occlusal plane.

  10. Optimal plane changes using third-body forces.

    PubMed

    Villac, B F; Scheeres, D J

    2004-05-01

    The fuel optimality of third-body driven plane changes (i.e., plane changes performed by using third-body forces) over one-impulse transfers is investigated numerically and analytically. In particular, the range of third-body driven plane changes that are realizable is shown to be restricted and one impulse must be used in the uncovered regions. However, when third-body driven plane changes are realizable, it is shown that they are always optimal above a certain critical value (about 40 degrees ) that depends on the initial condition. Contour plots of optimal DeltaV values to perform a desired plane changes are given.

  11. Dissipative dark matter and the Andromeda plane of satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, Lisa; Scholtz, Jakub E-mail: jscholtz@physics.harvard.edu

    2015-09-01

    We show that dissipative dark matter can potentially explain the large observed mass to light ratio of the dwarf satellite galaxies that have been observed in the recently identified planar structure around Andromeda, which are thought to result from tidal forces during a galaxy merger. Whereas dwarf galaxies created from ordinary disks would be dark matter poor, dark matter inside the galactic plane not only provides a source of dark matter, but one that is more readily bound due to the dark matter's lower velocity. This initial N-body study shows that with a thin disk of dark matter inside the baryonic disk, mass-to-light ratios as high as O(90) can be generated when tidal forces pull out patches of sizes similar to the scales of Toomre instabilities of the dark disk. A full simulation will be needed to confirm this result.

  12. Indefinite Plasmonic Beam Engineering by In-plane Holography

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J.; Li, L.; Li, T.; Zhu, S. N.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in controlling the optical phase at the sub-wavelength scale by meta-structures offer unprecedented possibilities in the beam engineering, holograms, and even invisible cloaks. In despite of developments of plasmonic beam engineering for definite beams, here, we proposed a new holographic strategy by in-plane diffraction process to access indefinite plasmonic beams, where a counterintuitive oscillating beam was achieved at a free metal surface that is against the common recognition of light traveling. Beyond the conventional hologram, our approach emphasizes on the phase correlation on the target, and casts an in-depth insight into the beam formation as a kind of long depth-of-field object. Moreover, in contrast to previous plasmonic holography with space light as references, our approach is totally fulfilled in a planar dimension that offers a thoroughly compact manipulation of the plasmonic near-field and suggests new possibilities in nanophotonic designs. PMID:27357133

  13. Integrated focal plane arrays for millimeter-wave astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, James J.; Goldin, Alexey; Hunt, Cynthia; Lange, Andrew E.; Leduc, Henry G.; Day, Peter K.; Vayonakis, Anastasios; Zmuidzinas, Jonas

    2002-02-01

    We are developing focal plane arrays of bolometric detectors for sub-millimeter and millimeter-wave astrophysics. We propose a flexible array architecture using arrays of slot antennae coupled via low-loss superconducting Nb transmission line to microstrip filters and antenna-coupled bolometers. By combining imaging and filtering functions with transmission line, we are able to realize unique structures such as a multi-band polarimeter and a planar, dispersive spectrometer. Micro-strip bolometers have significantly smaller active volume than standard detectors with extended absorbers, and can realize higher sensitivity and speed of response. The integrated array has natural immunity to stray radiation or spectral leaks, and minimizes the suspended mass operating at 0.1-0.3 K. We also discuss future space-borne spectroscopy and polarimetry applications. .

  14. Augmented-plane-wave calculations on small molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Serena, P.A.; Baratoff, A. ); Soler, J.M. )

    1993-07-15

    We have performed [ital ab] [ital initio] calculations on a wide range of small molecules, demonstrating the accuracy and flexibility of an alternative method for calculating the electronic structure of molecules, solids, and surfaces. It is based on the local-density approximation (LDA) for exchange and correlation and the nonlinear augmented-plane-wave method. Very accurate atomic forces are obtained directly. This allows for implementation of Car-Parrinello-like techniques to determine simultaneously the self-consistent electron wave functions and the equilibrium atomic positions within an iterative scheme. We find excellent agreement with the best existing LDA-based calculations and remarkable agreement with experiment for the equilibrium geometries, vibrational frequencies, and dipole moments of a wide variety of molecules, including strongly bound homopolar and polar molecules, hydrogen-bound and electron-deficient molecules, and weakly bound alkali and noble-metal dimers, although binding energies are overestimated.

  15. A Numerical simulation of transition in plane channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goglia, G.; Biringen, S.

    1982-08-01

    A numerical simulation of the final stages of transition to turbulence in plane channel flow at a Reynolds number of 7500 is described. Three dimensional, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are numerically integrated to obtain the time evolution of two and three dimensional finite amplitude disturbances. Computations are performed on the CYBER-203 vector processor for a 32 by 33 by 32 grid. Solutions indicate the existence of structures similar to those observed in the laboratory and which are characteristic of various stages of transition that lead to final breakdown. Details of the resulting flow field after breakdown indicate the evolution of streak-like formations found in turbulent flows. Although the flow field does approach a steady state (turbulent channel flow), implementation of subgrid-scale terms are necessary to obtain proper turbulent statistics.

  16. A Numerical simulation of transition in plane channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goglia, G.; Biringen, S.

    1982-01-01

    A numerical simulation of the final stages of transition to turbulence in plane channel flow at a Reynolds number of 7500 is described. Three dimensional, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are numerically integrated to obtain the time evolution of two and three dimensional finite amplitude disturbances. Computations are performed on the CYBER-203 vector processor for a 32 by 33 by 32 grid. Solutions indicate the existence of structures similar to those observed in the laboratory and which are characteristic of various stages of transition that lead to final breakdown. Details of the resulting flow field after breakdown indicate the evolution of streak-like formations found in turbulent flows. Although the flow field does approach a steady state (turbulent channel flow), implementation of subgrid-scale terms are necessary to obtain proper turbulent statistics.

  17. Advanced Structural and Inflatable Hybrid Spacecraft Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, William C. (Inventor); delaFuente, Horacio M. (Inventor); Edeen, Gregg A. (Inventor); Kennedy, Kriss J. (Inventor); Lester, James D. (Inventor); Gupta, Shalini (Inventor); Hess, Linda F. (Inventor); Lin, Chin H. (Inventor); Malecki, Richard H. (Inventor); Raboin, Jasen L. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An inflatable module comprising a structural core and an inflatable shell, wherein the inflatable shell is sealingly attached to the structural core. In its launch configuration, the wall thickness of the inflatable shell is collapsed by vacuum. Also in this configuration, the inflatable shell is collapsed and efficiently folded around the structural core. Upon deployment, the wall thickness of the inflatable shell is inflated; whereby the inflatable shell itself, is thereby inflated around the structural core, defining therein a large enclosed volume. A plurality of removable shelves are arranged interior to the structural core in the launch configuration. The structural core also includes at least one longeron that, in conjunction with the shelves, primarily constitute the rigid, strong, and lightweight load-bearing structure of the module during launch. The removable shelves are detachable from their arrangement in the launch configuration so that, when the module is in its deployed configuration and launch loads no longer exist, the shelves can be rearranged to provide a module interior arrangement suitable for human habitation and work. In the preferred embodiment, to provide efficiency in structural load paths and attachments, the shape of the inflatable shell is a cylinder with semi-toroidal ends.

  18. Structural integrity analysis of the 224U elevator mothballing

    SciTech Connect

    Boehnke, W.M.

    1994-11-18

    As part of the preparation of Building 224U for turnover to Decontamination and Decommissioning, it is necessary to place the elevator in a mothballed condition so that it can be reactivated for use after 10 to 25 years. This mothballing is going to be accomplished by landing the counterweight on wooden timbers and suspending the elevator cab with wire rope or chain slings. This will take the load off the cables and make it relatively easy to reactive. The objective of this Supporting Document is to verify the structural integrity of all of the load bearing components involved in mothballing the 224U Building elevator. Building 224U is part of the UO{sub 3} Plant where uranyl nitrates from the PUREX Plant was converted to UO{sub 3} powder.

  19. Overview of the DoD's rf multifunction structural aperture (MUSTRAP) program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alt, Kevin H.; Lockyer, Allen J.; Coughlin, Daniel P.; Kudva, Jayanth N.; Tuss, James

    2001-08-01

    The proliferation of antenna systems of state-of-the-art military aircraft has challenged major airframe manufacturers to provide additional outer surface platform space for antenna placement while still maintaining a flightworthy structure. The solution is to design antennas that can sustain severe structural load. The recently completed 'RF Multifunction Structural Aperture (MUSTRAP),' contract number F33615-97-2- 3807 performed by Northrop Grumman Corporation (NGC), El Segundo, California and TRW/ASD, Rancho Bernardo, San Diego, California, together with their DoD customer have met this challenge by conceiving the novel technology of Conformal Load-bearing Antenna Structures (CLAS). Under the Air Force Research Laboratory, Air Vehicles Directorate, Structures Division's leadership and direction, the MUSTRAP team have developed multifunction, broadband, structurally integrated, low cost antennas for communications, navigation, identification (CNI) and electronic warfare (EW) applications in the 0.03 to 2.0 GHz range. Two concepts, a fuselage and a vertical tail installation, were designed, analyzed, fabricated, and tested. The fuselage demonstration article was a load bearing multifunction (UHF/SATCOM) antenna 35 by 37 inch panel subjected to combined axial and shear loading, which replicated realistic flight conditions. Ultimate failure loads imposed on the panel were 1,800 pounds per inch axial loading and 600 pounds per inch shearing loading, after successfully withstanding a single lifetime (6,000 hours) of fatigue. Electrical performance was validated using anechoic chamber measurements. The vertical tail concept was a structural excitation multifunction (VHF/UHF) antenna element that can be tailored to fit in virtually any end cap vertical tail configuration. Designed to endure the severe acoustic environment associated with empennage noise sources, the end cap was successfully flight tested on NASA/Dryden's Systems Research Aircraft (SRA) to validate the

  20. Cable-Stayed Cantilever Structures As An Expat Of Unique Application In The Construction Of A Building Located In Seismic Area - An Author's Project Of Multifunctional Building In Lisbon, Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grębowski, K.; Werdon, M.

    2015-12-01

    The article presents numerical simulations for the modelling of seismic impact on the structure of unique cantilever cablestayed structure with the application of two methods. The Response Spectrum method, in which a spectrum of the structure's responses to an earthquake's impact is generated, and the Accelerogram method, in which we generate dynamic load in the form of a diagram of the connection between acceleration and time for the actual readings during a real earthquake. Both methods have been presented for the El Centro earthquake spectrum. This unique application of a cantilever cablestayed structure in public buildings will allow to assess the safety of this kind of load-bearing system in areas of increased risk of seismic activity. Cantilever cablestayed structures have so far never been designed or analyzed on seismically active areas. Based on numerical simulation we determined the effect of stiffness of load-bearing lines on the increase of stresses and displacements at cable stays joint with the end of the cantilever part of a building.